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REFERENCE 
COLLECTION 

CLEVELAND 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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USINESS SCRE 

LS, TECHNIQUES AND IDEAS FOR AUDIOVISUAL COMMUNI 



SPECIAL 

1970 FILM FESTIVAL PLANNING GUIDE 

A Complete schedule of 1970 festivals and competitions 




CD 

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JANUARY • 1970 






1969's 

MOST HONORED 

FILMS 



Plus: 

Multi-Screen on 
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Introducing a new way to reach college students 
with your company message. 

It's called College Cinema— the exciting new 
audience program developed by Modern to sup- 
plement our regular films-by-mail service. 

Through College Cinema, you can achieve even 
more effective penetration of the college market 
through its favorite medium— films. 

Here's how it works: Modern sets up free movie 
lounges in the student unions and dormitories of 
selected colleges and universities. We supply the 
projector, projectionist, delivery, and program- 
ming—all free of charge. And we show business 
films several hours every day. 



If you've got a film about your company or your 
product ... a recruitment film ... or one that simply 
entertains, there's no better way to reach this 
sophisticated audience. That's why dozens of alert 
companies are already telling their story to thou- 
sands of students via College Cinema. 

Right now, we're showing company films on 
some 100 college campuses throughout the coun- 
try. By the end of the school year, these films will 
be seen by three million student viewers. And the 
number can only get bigger. 

If you'd like to know how to send your company 
to college, contact Modern. We're very big on 
campus these days. 



MODERN TALKING PICTURE SERVICE, INC. 

1212 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10036 

M.xliTii is Ihe ».irld\ larBfM dislribulor uf sponsored films lo t ommunilt Groups. Schools, lelevision. and 1 healres, serving sponsors Ihroogh 34 L .S. and Canadian film libraries, and through Inforfilm overseas. 



WE'VE ALWAYS BEEN CONCERNED WITH QUALITY IMAGES 

\l- 97488 

The 1970's will bring revolutionary changes to the motion picture laboratory 
business. New techniques. New materials. Improved equipment. But the 
people at Cinema Processors believe that some things will remain the same, 
only more so. In the 'SOs we learned that a client demands quality processing, 
when promised. Licking production problems, meeting near impossible 
schedules — that was our problem. Came the '60s and we discovered that 
clients want to work with people who care. Our people do. They are all 
professionals. They respect the client and they help him. All this has worked 
so well in the past, we plan no changes in the '70s. We respect our customers' 
needs — quality images . . . 



HERE'S OUR NEW ONE! 










CINEMA PROCESSORS, INC. 



211 EAST GRAND AVENUE 
2156 FAULKNER ROAD, N.E. 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60611 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30324 



(31 2) -642-6453 
(404)-633-144P 



S JANUARY, 1970 



0. H. COELLN 

Publisher 

JOHN G.REYNOLDS 

Vice President 



LON B.GREGORY 

Editor 



BRUCE B. HOWAT 
RAY H. SMITH 

Publishing Consultants 



NOREEN OSTLER 

Editorial Assistant 

AUDREY RIDDELL 

Advertising Service Mgr. 




EDITORIAL AND 
ADVERTISING OFFICES 

402 West Liberty Drive 

Wheaton, Illinois 60187 

Phone (312) 653-4040 



REGIONAL OFFICES 



WEST: 

H. L MITCHELL 

Western Manager 

1450 Lorain Rd. 

San Marino, Calif. 91108 

Phone: (213) 283-4394 

463-4891 



EAST: 

ROBERT SEYMOUR, JR. 

Eastern Manager 

250 W. 57th St. 

New York, N.Y. 10019 

Phone: (212) 245-2969 



BUSINESS SCREEN 

JANUARY, 1970 . VOLUME 31 . NUMBER 1 

CT/te ^(aaavtne o^ ^jriut/to tint/ t'lAua/ 
^ooIa and STec/ntt'^ue^ <^ ^^otnnu**ucaiion 

This Month's Features 

1964"s Most Honored Films; Top Award Winners 12 

The 1970 Film Festival Planning Guide 16 

Fifteen Countries Compete in International Film Festival .24 

The Cassette Videoplayer: Promising New A-V Format 27 

Multi-Screen Programs on a Mini Budget 28 

"The Three-Ten from Texas" — History-PR-Inforniation 30 

'is This Trip Necessary?"'— Videotape Cuts Executive Travel 35 



Departments 

Right Off the Newsreel: Late News Reports 6 

The Screen Executive: Personnel Notes 10 

Picture Parade: Previews of New Films 31 

New Products Review: New Tools and Equipment 32 

The National Directory of Audiovisual Dealers 36 

Business Screen Marketplace: Classified Advertising 36 

Reference Shelf: Helpful Books and Literature 36 

Index to Advertisers in this Issue 38 

The Last Word: Observation and Comment 38 



ja A Harcourt, Brace & World Publication 
l^d Harbrace Publications, Inc. 



M9 



BUSINESS SCREEN is published monthly by Harbrace Publications, Inc., 402 West Liberty Drive, Wheaton, 
Illinois 60187, a subsidiary of Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc. Telephone: (312) 653-4040. Subscription 
rates: One year, $5; two years, $8; three years, $'0, in the U.S. and Canada. Other countries: $10 
per year. Single copies: 75* in U.S. and Canada,- all other countries: $2. Controlled circulation postage 
paid at Rochelle, Illinois 61068. Copyright 1970 by Harbrace Publications, Inc. Trodemark registered 
with U.S. Patent Office. Address correspondence concerning circulation only to Harbrace Building, 
Duluth, Minnesota 55802. Address all other correspondence to BUSINESS SCREEN, 402 West Liberty 
Drive, Wheaton, Illinois 60187. POSTMASTER: Please send Form 3579 to BUSINESS SCREEN, Harbrace 
Building, Duluth, Minnesota 55802. 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



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JANUARY, 1970 



The beer pours and Niagara 
stops: ARRIFLEX' 35 shoots 
both ''as usuaF'for HoUand- 
Wepan Productions, Inc. 



In the age of specialization, the commercial film producer may be likened 
to the Renaissance Man— facing new situations and challenges each day. 
So it is wtih Holland-Wegman Productions of Buffalo, New York whose 
credits encompass TV commercials, industrials, documentary features, edu- 
cational films— virtually the full spectrum of in-and-out-of-studio assign- 
ments. Two jobs recently completed by the firm indicate the diverse— and 
often fascinating— nature of the work handled by the commercial film 
producer. 

One included a 60-second commercial for a brewer in West Virginia. Here, 
the job required H-W/ crews to show a foursome relaxing on the patio, chat- 
ting amicably over bottles of beer. Although such a spot might easily have 
been shot on location, H-W felt it best to stay in the studio. Here, sound 
and lighting both are far more malleable in the director's hands— both able 
to make or break the viewer's appetite for the sponsor's beer. 

But on another job, no studio could have housed the subject— Niagara 
Falls. H-W had been in the midst of a film concerned with the geology of 
the world famous waterfall, when a separate government sponsored geologi- 
cal survey ordered the water "turned off" in order to investigate the land 
mass beneath. Writes H-W President, Paul Sciandra: "How lucky could we 
get? Right in the middle of our project, someone decides on this never-to-be 
forgotten and never-to-be duplicated event. At the moment the water 
stopped, revealing to the eyes of mankind the land beneath for the first 
and only time, our Arriflexes were really recording a piece of history. But 
as far as the 35's were concerned, it was just business as usual— in, out 
and around the setting as quickly as feasible, as reliably as always." 

Even when the action can be repeated, such as in the studio, H-W's per- 
sonnel approach each shot as if it were now-or-never. This professionalism 
helps explain the firm's success with such clients as Xerox, Ford Motor, 
Marine Midland and many other national names. It also explains the com- 
pany's selection of Arriflex 352C cameras. Noted for their lightweight and 
compact design, they combine total mobility with the proven reliability of 
their rock-steady film movement. And with its complete accessory system, 
the same Arriflex masters equally the requirements of sound stage or 
river bed. 

But this was the thinking behind the Arriflex's creation: to be as versatile as 
the filmmakers who consistently rely upon it. 




r^ CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



CORPORATION OF AMERICA Woodside, N. Y. 1 13?7 . 




BUSINESS SCREEN 




right off the newsreel 



IIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllllllllllllllllini 



Abel-Black Corporation 
Formed in Canadian Merger 

Two giants in Canada's pho- 
tographic industry have merged 
to form Abel-Black Corporation 
Limited. The firms are Chas. 
Abel Photo Service, a photo pro- 
cessing company, and Eddie 
Black's Limited, Canada's largest 
chain of retail photographic 
equipment stores. 

Headquartered in Toronto, 
Abel-Black will now provide a 
complete range of photographic 
services, including the sale of 
cameras and film, photo acces- 
sories, special optics, audio vis- 
ual equipment, and black and 
white and color processing. 

Eddie Black operations include 
camera, film, and accessory sales, 
from 20 stores through southern 
Ontario, film processing in a 
plant separate from the Abel 
Photo Service labs, and a tre- 
mendously growing audio-visual 
division. 

Chas. Abel Photo Service is 
one of the largest processors in 
Canada, providing photofinish- 



ing service to some 500 drug 
stores and similar retail accounts 
throughout Ontario. 

U. S. Industrial Festival 
Sets March 1 Deadline 

The U. S. Industrial Film Fes- 
tival reports that entries are now 
being accepted for the 3rd an- 
nual event and should reach fes- 
tival headquarters prior to March 
I, 1970. Awards will be present- 
ed on April 30, 1970 in Chica- 
go's Palmer House Hotel. 

"Based on the growth of the 
festival over the past year and 
the responses we are receiving, 
we anticipate doubling the 250 
entries received last year," festi- 
val creator and chairman, J. W. 
Anderson noted. "We are en- 
larging both our board of ad- 
visors and our judging conmiit- 
tees to continue to adequately 
serve entrants. Limiting entries 
to 16mm industrial motion pic- 
tures and 35mni filmstrips as- 
sures the business film producer 
that the focal point will be on 
his production, not overshadowed 



lllltlllllllll 

by features or television commer- 
cials." 

Entry forms and information 
about the festival may be ob- 
tained by writing to the festival's 
new offices in the Film Center 
Building. Suite 216. 161 East 
Grand Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 
60611 U.S.A. Overseas entrants 
may cable FILMFEST, Chicago. 



United Air Lines Opens 
"Mini-Library" in NYC 

United Air Lines is expanding 
its stock footage "mini-library" 
concept to the East Coast, fol- 
lowing the immediate success of 
its first "mini-library" which was 
opened in Chicago in August. 

J. A. Kennedy, director of 
publicity for the airline, said 
United has opened a "mini-li- 
brary" in New York City to pro- 
vide East Coast film producers 
and editors with facilities for 
viewing selected scenes in the air- 
line's film library and for faster 
service in obtaining orders from 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiMiiiiiii 

its film library catalogue. 

Mini-library services may be 
obtained through publicity man- 
ager. United Air Lines, 277 Park 
Ave., New York. 

The mini-library is maintained 
lor the airline by V.P.L Color 
Center, 410 East 62nd St., N.Y. 



Food Production Conferenc 
Seeks Agricultural Films 

International Minerals & 
Chemical Corporation will hold 
Food Production Conferences in 
Manila, Phillippine Islands and 
Santiago, Chili during March of 
1970. These conferences will be 
attended by top management 
people of leading organizations 
engaged in agricultural fertilizer 
and chemical manufacturing and 
sales. Observers represent addi- 
tional local and regional business 
interests related to feeding the 
world. 

One of the major goals of the 

conferences is to display new 

ideas, results of recently initiated 

Continued on page 8 



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Free film provided to producers for authentic airline sequences 




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Call Publicity Department 






Atlanta 523-5517 


Los Angeles 


482-3620 


Chicago 726-5500 


New York 


922-5225 


Denver 398-4535 


Pittsburgh 


471-0700 


Detroit 963-9770 


San Francisco 


397-2620 


Honolulu 547-2727 


Seattle 


682-2121 



737-6830 



Washington, D.C. 

Write for catalog: 

UNITED AIR LINES FILM 

626 Wilshire Boulevard 

Los Angeles, California 90017 



LIBRARY 



•Jet moclrups for interior filming— New York City and Hollywood 



United Air Lines 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




We get positive results 
from negative thinking. 

And we do more than think about your negatives. We plan, organize and 
coordinate our editorial, sound studio and film processing capability far ahead to 
assure you a film full of clarity, detail, true sound, true color, true black and white. 

We'll give you a film to be proud of. In 35mm, 16mm, super 8. In cartridge or on 
reel. In Ecktachrome ECO-2 or ME-4. In negative-positive color or black and white. We'll 
give you optical sound prints. Magnetic sound prints. Reduction or blow-up negatives. 
Magnetic or optical sound transfers. We'll edit, record and re-edit. 'Til it's right. At 
Capital. Wherever we are. 



Capital 

FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 



470 E Street, S,W., Washington, D.C. 20024 

Telephone (202) Dl 7-1717/TELEX 89-2393 

1998 N.E. 150th Street. North Miami, Florida 33161 

Telephone (305) 949-4252/TELEX 51-9453 

Super 8 City, 1905 Fairview Ave., N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002 

Telephone (202) 526-0505 



right off the newsreel 



continued 

programs, and thoughts for the 
future as they relate to agricul- 
ture. Ideas selected for this pur- 
pose are those which can be used 
by developing nations to improve 
their per capita food production 
and consumption. 

BUSINESS SCREEN readers 
who have a film or program 
which should be considered for 
showing at the conferences 
should contact the Administra- 
tive Center. International Min- 
erals & Chemicals Corporation, 
Dept. BSC Skokie. Illinois 
60076. 



UFA Slates 1970 Film 
Scholarship Competition 

Tha University Film Associa- 
tion has announced the begin- 
ning of competition for SEVEN 
SCHOLARSHIPS IN FILM to 
be awarded to students in Amer- 
ican universities and colleges. 

Although film has been one of 
the fastest-growing academic dis- 
ciplines in recent years, the 
amount of financial aid available 
to students has not kept pace. 



Therefore, the University Film 
Association, a professional organ- 
ization of more than six hundred 
individuals, institutions, and com- 
panies has embarked upon a pro- 
gram to increase the number of 
scholarships available to students 
of the art. 

Any graduate or undergradu- 
ate student is eligible to apply 
for these scholarships, which will 
be awarded principally on the 
basis of the student's past work 
in film production, scholarship, 
or criticism. Competition will 
close February 14, 1970. 

Information on the organiza- 
tion's scholarship program can 
be obtained from Professor How- 
ard Suber, Scholarship Chairman, 
University Film Association, in 
care of the UCLA Motion Pic- 
ture Division, Los Angeles 
90024. 

Modern Introduces "The 
Shape of Films to Come" 

The next decade promises to 
be a time of innovation and 
change for the communications 
industry. It is evident that motion 



pictures, along with other visual 
media, will assume an important 
voice in the language of the "70's. 

As a service to New York's 
communications executives. Mod- 
ern Talking Picture Service re- 
cently introduced The Shape of 
Films to Come, a series of pro- 
grams designed to provide an 
opportunity to see examples of 
recent business films. 

About a hundred advertising 
and public relations executives, 
on both client and agency sides, 
attended the first program on De- 
cember 4 at the Johnny Victor 
Theatre. Films shown included 
Why Man Creates, Saul Bass's 
Academy Award winner for 
Kaiser Aluminum; New York 
City, from United Air Lines' cen- 
tennial commemorative. 

Holland-Wegman Now 
Mars; Four Execs Added 

The name of Holland-Wegman 
Productions, inc., producers of 
commercial films, has been 
changed to Mars Productions. 

Simultaneously, four key exec- 
utives were appointed to the man- 
agement staff. Wayne D. Apple- 
ton has become sales manager; 
.lohn W. Cantillon, senior ac- 
count executive; Robert B. 



Rleske, Production manager, and 
Michael A. McNerney, business 
manager and executive assistant 
to the president, Paul Sciandra. 

Nelson Editing Service at 
New Milwaukee Location 

Nelson Editing Service has 
opened a new office at 2909 N. 
Humboldt Blvd., Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

The company provides film 
producers with complete editing 
services, sync and voice over nar- 
ration track cutting, effects edit- 
ing, a-b music cutting and selec- 
tion, a-b original conforming 
and negative cutting, release 
printing, print breakdown, box- 
ing and shipping. 

Association Films, Inc. 
Relocates Canada Office 

Association Films, Inc. has 
moved its Canadian affiliate, As- 
.sociation-Industrial Films to 333 
Adelaide Street West, Toronto 
133, Ontario. 

The new quarters are now in 
line with Association's continuing 
program of expansion. Last 
month new libraries were opened 
in La Grange. Illinois and Dal- 
las. Texas. 



all this man 




at Geo. W. Colburn Laboratory 
to save time, money 
and footage 

^ on your next film! 

Allen Hilliard, our Director of Technical 
Information, is constantly trying to be of 
service to the film maker. 

By planning with Allen ahead of shoot- 
ing, you can save time, money and foot- 
age. In this way, we can also coordinate 
i;*-i**^ our specialized equipment and experi- 
ence with yours to guarantee fine profes- 
sional quality and effectiveness in every 
film you produce. 

There is no obligation. Write, stop in or 
call now (area code 312) 332-6286. 




GEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY, INC. 

164 N. Wacker Drive • Chicago, Illinois 60606 
Telephone (area code 312) 332-6286 

Complete Laboratory Service for 16MM / Editing / Recording / Work Prints / Super 8, 8MM & 16MM Release Printing / Titling / 35MM Slide and Filmstrip Service 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



There's nothing new about 
a quad printer. 



Unless if s one that prints 
•uner 8 film six times f astei 



And only Cine Magnetics film laboratory has it. 

Because right now there is only one Op- 
tronics Mark X Quad Printer to give you better 
print quality. Quicker. 

We've just installed this 16mm to Super 
8mm optical reduction printer in our Mamar- 
oneck laboratory. 

Developed under the direction of John 
Maurer, it operates at 50 feet per minute on 
the 8mm side. Or 200 feet of 8mm reduction 
prints per minute. 

But the Optronics Mark X is just one 
of the dramatic changes at Cine Magnetics. 

There are many others: 

Like a new 16mm Bell & Howell printer, a 
new Filmline black-and-white film processor, 
and a new Hazeltine color analyzer. 



Like new facilities, including clean-room 
finishing rooms for Fairchild, Technicolor, 
Bohn-Benton, Jayark, and other cartridges. 

Like new services, specifically inventory 
maintenance of release prints, drop shipment 
distribution, and 100 percent inspection. 

And most important, like a select group of 
talented people who will give your order the 
personal attention it deserves. 

It adds up to a complete 8mm and 16mm 
center for motion picture duplication and pre- 
print services. 

It adds up to the new Cine Magnetics. 

Call us and we'll be happy to show you 
around. 

We'll be even happier to show you the 
results on your next print order. 



Cine Magneticsjnc. 

520 North Barry Avenue, Mamaroneck, NY. 10543 (914) 698-3434 
New York City Receiving Center: 202 East 44th Street (212) 682-2780 



JANUARY, 1970 




utmnit 

STOCK 

FOOTAGE 

LIBRARY 

Summit Films, award winning 
production company has a large 
stock footage library available 
on summer and winter mountain 
sports, particularly skiing and 
climbing. World coverage. Also 
wildlife film. Contact Natalie 
Maxwell. 



SUMMIT FILMS, INC. 

1801 York Street 

Denver, Colorado 80206 

(303) 399-8040 



SLIDE FILMS ARE 
OUR SPECIALTY 

editing & composites 

signaling 

ALL types of mastering 
(records and tape) 

Processing Pressing 

APPROVED BY 

Audiscan 

DuKane cassettes & records 

La Belle 

Cartridge winding for all slide 
film machines and radio cart- 
ridges 

Tape Duplicating 

Fast, accurate service anywhere 
in the United States. 

(Tapes are on their way back 
to you in two days, records in 
five, after receipt of your tape.) 

VIRCO RECORDING CO. 

P. O. Box 185 

Monterey Parle, California 91754 

(213) 283-1888 




the screen executive 



nil 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Blucher Joins Fairchild As 
Audiovisual Marketing Mgr. 

Stephen Blucher has joined 
Fairchild Industrial Products, a 
division of Fairchild Camera and 
Instrument Corporation, as mar- 
keting manager for audiovisual 
and communications products. 
He will be responsible for mar- 
keting of the entire Fairchild line 
of automatic cartridge loading 
<Smni sound film projectors. 

Lewis Is Appointed VP In 
Major Expansion at VPI 

W. W. "Red" Lewis has been 
appointed vice president for VPI 
Films. Lewis will develop new 
film projects with major indus- 
trial clients, specifically those 
dealing with major contemporary 
issues and those reflecting man- 
agement's feeling of involvement. 

The appointment establishes 
an East Coast base for the firm, 
which was organized primarily to 
produce films dealing with the 
complexities of change. 

Brotman Joins P.T.A. As 
VP, Sales and Marketing 

Charles H. Brotman will insti- 
tute a production liaison service 
to clients for their conventions, 
exhibitions, sales meetings and 
specialized projects in his new 
position as vice president of sales 
and marketing at Presentation 
Technical Aids, Inc. 

Brotman's experience include 
a career in business communica- 
tions, multi-media presentations, 
live theatre and the audiovisual 
field. 



Pioneer Producer Of Calvin 
Productions Dies at Age 85 

Joseph De Frenes, nontheatri- 
cal motion picture producer pio- 
neer, is dead at the age of 85. 

De Frenes founded the firm of 
Bosvvorth, Felton and De Frenes, 
later renamed the DeFrenes 
Company, after he bought out his 
partners. Upon retirement in 
1963, De Frenes sold his compa- 
ny to Calvin Productions of Kan- 



sas City, who named the new 
firm Calvin-DeFrenes Corpora- 
tion, presently called Calvin Pro- 
ductions of Pennsylvania. 




DEFRENES 



ELRICK 



Kirschner Studios Promotes 
EIrick To Vice Presidency 

The appointment of George S. 
EIrick to vice president of Wm. 
N. Kirschner Studios was made 
at that company's annual stock- 
holders' meeting Sunday, Nov. 
23rd. 

The Kirschner organization, 
producers of industrial and edu- 
cational motion pictures, and 
audiovisual sales training aids, 
has offices and facilities in Glen- 
view, Illinois and in Tampa, 
Florida. 



IQ Elects New Officers 
And Board of Governors 

In election results of The In- 
ternational Quorum of Motion 
Pictures. W. B. Legg, Jr., Ex- 
ecutive Producer of Paragon 
Productions, was named presi- 
dent; Hack Swain, of Hack 
Swain Productions, was elected 
vice president; Secretary-Treas- 
urer of 10 is Fred Niles of Fred 
Niles Communications Center. 

The new board of governors 
includes Georges Pessis of Paris, 
Heinrich Fueter of Condor Films 
in Zurich and G. H. W. Groom 
of Films of Africa in Johannes- 
burg, the three officers and three 
past presidents. 



Ralph Lopatin Productions 
Elects Levanios President 

The Philadelphia motion pic- 
ture firm. Ralph Lopatin Pro- 



ductions, has elected Michael 
Levanios, Jr. to succeed Ralph 
Lopatin as the company's presi- 
dent. Lopatin has become chair- 
luan of the board and continues 
as chief executive officer. 

Levanios has been associated 
with Ralph Lopatin Productions 
since 1963, as vice president and 
production manager. 

Around The Industry 

Marvin Fireman has joined 
MPO, New York, as director . . . 
GAF Corporation has named 
Edwin T. Mosher to the post of 
industrial specialist for the com- 
pany's central region . . . Mar- 
shall M. Sluyier has been named 
vice president of Instructional 
Dynamics Inc. . . . Gordon Wil- 
lis has returned to Audio Pro- 
ductions from a leave of ab- 
sence during which he was di- 
rector of photography on three 
major features . . . Estelle Tep- 
per has joined The Fifi Oscard 
Talent Agency and will be work- 
ing on industrials, commercials, 
and theater . . . Eugene S. 
Cooper has been appointed ad- 
vertising manager for the Photo 
lamp Division of Sylvania Elec- 
tric Products, Inc. . . . E. R. 
"Skip" Bulkley has been ap- 
pointed eastern marketing rep- 
resentative of LaBelle Industries, 
Inc. . . . Lori Productions, Inc. 
has added H. Donald Proiity to 
their staff as an executive pro- 
ducer . . . Charles Howard Reed 
has been named director, south- 
western regional sales for the 
CBS Electronic Video Recording 
Division . . . Alex Broda has 
been named to head the Arriflex 
Service Dept. of Alan Gordon 
Enterprises, Inc. . . . Waller 
Charnley has joined Walter J. 
Klein Company, Ltd. as creative 
director . . . and the DuKane 
Corporation has named two new 
district managers. Alan J. Spriet 
will be midwest sales district 
manager, in charge of a nine 
state area; Jack Elliott is now 
sales manager for DuKane's east- 
ern territory, working in New 
York and the New England 
states. 



10 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



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W.C. Fields 
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in tlieir famous 
comedy classic 
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Meet your new 

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Revivals of early movie classics are doing big box office business today. 
In fact, major stars like Mae West and W. C. Fields are actually reaching 
larger audiences now than when their movies first appeared. And along 
with these classic films, guess what else today's audiences are seeing? 
Right. A PR film which has been booked to help reinforce the program. 

Not just any PR film of course. But it is true that huge, measurable audi- 
ences are available to you if your film is right for theatrical distribution. 

A lot of people in PR film distribution are now talking about this new 
medium, and we're delighted to have them join us. We've been talking 
about motion picture theater distribution for years. As part of the 
Universal-MCA family, it wasn't hard for us to spot this trend when it first 
happened, and to take advantage of it for our clients. There are still a few 
tricks up our sleeve that your distribution house probably hasn't caught 
on to yet. 

This is just one more reason to talk with us 
about your PR film distribution. Whether it's 
movie houses only, or a full mi.\ of all of 
today's distribution channels, you'll find it 
really does pay to talk with the man from 
United World. 



^M 



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DISTRIBUTION 
SERVICES 

212-777-6SOO 



An aclivily of Universal Education and Visual Arls. a division of Universal City Studios. Inc. /221 Park Ave. South, New York. NY 10U0.1 • Cable: UNEDVISA.N.V 



JANUARY, 1970 



THE MOST HONORED FILMS OF 1969 



America In Space: The First Decade 

Producer, Sponsor, Distributor: NASA 
Silver Medal — Atlanta International Film 

Festival 
Golden Eagle — CINE 
First Prize — • 6th International Exhibition of 

Scientific Fikns, Buenas Aires 

And Of Course You 

Producer: Murakami — Wolf Films, Inc. 

Sponsor, Distributor: USIA 

Diploma of Participation — Ttli International 
Festival of Science Fiction — Trieste 

Golden Eagle — CINE 

Special Diploma — 5th International Festival 
of Scientific & Technical-Belgrade 

Diploma of Participation, 12th Golden Mer- 
cury, Venice 

Astrocolor 

Producer: Wilding, Inc. 

Sponsor: American Airlines 

Golden Eagle — CINE 

Chris Certificate — Columbus Film Festival 

Silver Osella, Certificate of Participation — 
20th International Exhibition of Documen- 
tary Films, Venice 

Birthright 

Producer: Fred A. Niles ComiriuTu'cations Cen- 
ters, Inc. 

Sponsor: Bible Society 

Bronze Medal — N.Y. Film Festival 

Gold Camera — U.S. Industrial Film Festi- 
val 

Chris Statuette • — Columbus Film Festival 

Bronchospasm 

Producer: Aegis Productions, Inc. 
Sponsor: Warner-Chikott Laboratories 
Distributors: Modern Talking Picture Service 
Golden Eagle — CINE 

Diploma of Honor — 6th International Exhibi- 
tion of Scientific Films, Biieuas Aires 

Combustion Techniques in Liquid Scintillation 
Counting 

Producer, Sponsor: Argonne National Labora- 
tory 

Distributor: Association Films, Inc. 

Golden Eagle — CTNE 

Diploma of Participation — 7 th International 
Festival of Science Fiction — Trieste 

The Discoverers 

Producer: Peckham Productions 
Sponsor, Distributors: Union Carbide Corp. 
Golden Eagle — CINE 

Gold Medal — Atlanta International Festival 

Diploma of Participation — 7th Intemational 

Festival of Science Fiction Films — Trieste 

Experiments In Motion Graphics, Pt. 1; 
Permutations, Pt. 2 

Producer: John H. Whitnet 

Sponsor: IBM Corporation 

Distributor: New York City Museum of Mod- 
ern Art 

Golden Eagle — CINE 

Silver Osella, Certificate of Participation — 

20th International Exhibition of Documentar\ 
Films, Venice 



A Fable 

Producer: Fred A. Niles Communications Cen- 
ters, Inc. 
Sponsor: Mciii ! () ! Coni:a:i\ 
Distributor; Columbia Pictures Corporation 
First Prize — PRSA Film Competition 
Grand Award — N. Y. Film Festival 
Golden Dove — Atlanta International Film 

Festival 
Golden Eagle — CINE 

A Few Notes On Our Food Problem 

Producer: James Blue 

Sponsor, Distributor: USIA 

(ioklen Eagle — CINE 

Best Documentary, Best Color Cinematog- 
raphy — 11th International Film Festival, 
Vancouver 

Diploma of Particijiation, 12th Golden Mer- 
cmy, Venice 

A Gathering of One 

Producer: Henry Strauss Communications, Inc. 
Sponsor, Distributor: IBM World Trade Corp. 
Golden Eagle — CINE 

Chris Certificate — Coluinhns Film Festival 
Special Award — N.Y. Film Festival 

Have A Healthy Baby 

Producer, Sponsor & Distributor: Churchill 

Films 
C;olden Eagle — CINE 
Blue Ribbon — American Film Festival 
Chris Certificate — Columbus Film Festival 

Holy Thursday 
Producer & Distributor: George F. Hood, 

Richard Blakeslee 
(iolden Eagle — CINE 
Silver Medallion — 6th International Amateur 

Film Festival, Kelibia 



Homage To Rodin 
Producer: Herb Golden Productions 
Sponsor: B. G. Cantor Ait Foundation 
Distributor: Herb Golden Productions 
Chris Certificate — Columbus Film Festival 
C;old Medal — N.Y. Film Festival 
Golden Eagle — CINE 

Honolulu 

Producer: Cal Bernstein Prodiutions 
Sponsor; United Air Lines 

Distributor: Modern Talking Picture Service 
Gold Medal Special Jury — Atlanta Interna- 
tional Film Festival 
Gold Camera — U.S. Industrial Film Festival 
Chris Certificate — Columbus Film Festival 
Ciolden Eagle — CINE 

Inlertie 

Producer: Robert Charlton Motion Pictures 

Sponsor & Distributor: Bonneville Power Ad- 
ministration 

Diploma of Participation - — 12th Golden 
Mercury Competition — \'enice 

Golden Eagle — CINE 

Bronze Medal • — N.Y. Film Festival 

Silver Cindy — IFPA 

Bronze Medal — Atlanta Liternational Film 
Festival 



Invitation To Europe 

Producer: Pace Films, Inc. 

Sponsor & Distributor; American Express Co. 

Silver Medal — N.Y. Film Festival 

Silver Medal — Atlanta International Film 
Festival 

Chris Statuette — Columbus Film Festival 

Golden Eagle — CINE 

Diploma of Participation — 12th Golden Mer- 
cury Competition — \ en ce 

Gold Hugo — Chicago International Film 
Festival 



Kevin 

Producer: Malcolm Tarlovsky 

Sponsor: Syracuse Universit>- & Central N.Y. 

Bank Assoc. 
Gold Medal — Atlanta International Film 

Festival 
Gold Camera — U.S. Industrial Film Festival 
Blue Ribbon — American Film Festival 

Leo Beuerman 

Producer: Centron Corporation, Inc. 

Silver Medal — Atlanta International Film 

Festival 
Silver Cindy — IFPA 

Chris Statuette — Columbus Film Festival 
Special Award — N.Y. Film Festival 

Lillehei On Stagnant Shock 

Producer, Sponsor & Distributor: The Upjohn 
Company 

Diploma of Honor — 6th Internationa! Exhibi- 
tion of Scientific Films, Buenas Aires 

Golden Eagle — CINE 

Gold Medal — Atlanta International Film 
Festival 

('liris Statuette — Columbus Film Festi\al 

Once Upon A Time 

Producer: MPO Productions 
Sponsor: United Air Lines 

Golden Eagle — CINE 
Silver Phoenix — Atlanta International Film 

Festival 
Gold Medal — N.Y. Film Festixal 

On Guard 

Producer: Don Hoster 
Spon.sor: District Attorney L.A. 
Bronze Medal — N.Y. Film Festival 
Gold Camera — U.S. Industrial Film Festival 
Bronze Medal — Atlanta International Film 
Festival 

On The Move 

Producer & Sponsor; Lockheed Aircralt Cor- 
poration 

Eastern Airlines Ionosphere — Atlanta Inter- 
national Film Festival 

(^hris Certificate — Columbus Film Festival 

Silver Cindy — IFPA 

Paced To Live 

Producer & Distributor: Empire Photosound, 
Inc. 

Sponsor: Great Northern Railwav 

Golden Eagle — CINE 

Bronze Medal — Atlanta International Film 
Festival 

Award of Merit Certificate — National Safet\' 
Council 



12 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



The Perils of Priscilla 

Pnxliiccr: Diincnsion l-"ilms 

Sponsor: Pasadena Ilimiano Society 

Distiilnitor; C'liurchill Minis 

llronze Medal — N.Y. Film Festival 

Cliris Certificate — Columbus Film Festival 

Cold Medal — Atlanta International I'ilrn 

Festival 
Colden Kaiile — CINE 

Certificate of Participation — 23rd Interna- 
tional Film Festival — Edinburgh 

A Place To CJrovv- 
Producer: Pcckham Productions 
Sponsor: Eastman Kodak 
Distributor: Eastman ('hefnical Productions 
Colden Eagle — CINE 

Silver Medal — Atlanta International Festival 
Silver Medal — N.Y. Film Festival 

Prescription: Roses 
Producer: The John Hopkins Universitv — 

Applied Physics Lab 
Sponsor: Dept. of Health, Education & \Xe\- 

fare 
Distributor: U.S. Public Health Service 
Colden Eagle — CINE 

Chris Certificate — Columbus Film Festival 
C;old Cindy — IFPA 

Project Apollo 

Producer, Sponsor & Distributor: USIA/E. 
Spec Films, Inc. 

Colden Eagle — CINE 

Certificate of Participation — 2nd Interna- 
tional Film Festival, Rio de Janeiro 

(iolden Rocket, Diploma of Merit — 16th In- 
ternational Electronic. Nuclear, Telecom- 
munications Review, Rome 

Clold Medal — 7th International Festival of 
Maritime & Exploration Films, Toulon 

Diploma of Participation — I2th Golden Mer- 
cur\' — \'enice 

Radio Bantu 

Producer: Killarney Film Studios 
Sponsor: South African Information Service 
Distributor: Sterling Movies 
Silver Medal — N.Y. Film Festival 
Gold Camera — U.S. Industrial Film Festival 
Gold Medal — Atlanta International Film 
Festival 

Robert Kennedy Remembered 
Producer: Guggengeim Productions, Inc. 
Producer & Distributor: Guggenheim Produc- 
tions, Inc. 

Sponsor: Robert Kennedy Memorial Founda- 
tion 
Distributor: General Pictures Corporation 
Golden Eagle — CINE 
Blue Ribbon — American Film Festival 
Gold Cindv — IFPA 



Lee 



Second Sight 
Mendelson Film 



Productions, 



Producer: 

Inc. 
Sponsor: The Eye Bank for Sight Restoration 
1 St Prize — N\'CA "Da\- of ^'isuals" 
Bronze Medal — N.Y. Film Festival 
Chris Certificate — Columbus Film Festival 
Gold Cindy — IFPA 

The Significance Of You 

Producer: de Martin — Marona & Assoc. 
Sponsor: Boise Cascade Corporation 
Distributor: Modern Talking Picture Service 
4th Prize — International Industrial Film 

Festival 
Chris Certificate — Columbus Film Festival 
Golden Eagle — CINE 



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JANUARY, 1970 



most honored films 



continued 



Ski The Outer Limits 

Producer: Summit Films, Inc. 
Sponsor: Hart Ski Mfg. Company 
Distributors: Modem Talking Picture Service, 

Associated Films 
Bronze Medal — N.Y. Film Festival 
Blue P.ihhon — .American Film Festival 
Cold Camera — U.S. Industrial Film Festival 
Bronze Medal — Atlanta International Film 

Festival 
Emih' — American Film Festival 
C:olden Eagle — CINE 
Silver Cup — 25th International Competition 

of Sports Motion Pictures, Cortina 
Honorable Mention — Chicago International 

Film Festival 

Sky Capers 

Producer & Distributor: Pyramid Film Pro- 
ducers 

Sponsor: Carl Boenish 

Colden Eagle — CINE 

Diploma of Honor — 25th International Com- 
petition of Sports Motion Pictures, Cortina 

Diploma of Merit — 2nd International Film 
Festival, Rio de Janeiro 

Steps Toward Maturity & Health 

Producer: Walt Disney Educational Materials 
Sponsor: Upjohn Company 



MR. SALES MANAGEMENT 
We'll send you a 

COLOR 
FILMSTRIP 



The filmstrip covers such sales management con 
cerns as: 

. . . the increasing difficulty in achieving greater sales 
. . . the difficulty in motivating today's salesmen to be 

more productive 
... having to hire so many salesmen to find so few 

good ones 
;t will make you aware of the "the greatest need in 



Distributor: Walt Disney Educational Material 

Colden Eagle — CINE 

Chris Statuette — Columbus Film Festival 

Diploma of Honor with Special Mention — 
6th International E.\hibition of Scientific- 
Films, Buenos Aires 

Strange Partners 
Producer and Sponsor: Reela Films 
Distributor: Sterling Movies 
Golden Eagle — CINE 
Diploma of Honor with Special Mention — 

6th International E.xhibition of Scientific 

Films, Buenos Aires 
1st Prize — Hoje de Tilo de Plata — 7th 

International Children's Film Festival, La 

Plata 
Silver Anchor & Diploma — 7th International 

Festival of Maritime & Exploration Films, 

Toulon 

Subject: Packaging 

Producer: Coldsholl & Assoc. 

Sponsor: Owens — Illinois 

Silver Medal — Atlanta International Film 

Festival 
Silver Cindy — IFPA 

Cold Camera — U.S. Industrial Film Festival 
Chris Certificate — Columbus Film Festival 
Bronze Medal — N.Y. Film Festival 

Talking With Dolphins 

Producer: Naval Undersea Warfare Center 
Sponsor: Biosciences Systems Div. Naval 

Underseas R&D Center 
Distributor: Naval Undersea Re.search & De 

velopment 
Academy of Var Prize — 7th International 

Maritime & Exploration, Toulon 
Bronze Medal ■ — Atlanta International Film 

Festival 

Golden Eagle — CINE 

The Thinking???Machines 

Producer & Sponsor: Bell Telephone Labora- 
tories, Inc. 

Distributor: Garden State Novo, Inc. 

Golden Eagle — CINE 

Diploma of Participation — 7th International 
Festival of Science Fiction, Trieste 

Diploma of Participation — 7th Golden Mer- 
cury Competition, Venice 

Tomorrow Is A Day 

roducer: Guggenheim Productions, Inc. 
ponsor & Distributor: Illinois Scsquicenten- 

nial Commission 
olden Eagle — CINE 

old Camera — U.S. Industrial Film Festival 
old Medal — Atlanta International Film 

Festi\al 



Trio For Three Angles 

roducer & Sponsor: Bruce & Katherine 
Comvvell 

'istributor: International Film Bureau 

olden Eagle — CINE 

rogrammed — 5th International Week, Edu- 
cational & Teaching Films, Brussels 

pecial Panel Prize — 4th International Ex- 
hibition of Scientific Films, Buenos Aires 



Vitamins From Food 

Producer: Wexler Film Productions 

Sponsor: Dairy Council of Cahf. 

Distributor; Henk Newenhouse, Inc. 

Diploma of Participation — 12th Golden Mer- 
cury — Venice 

Blue Ribbon — American Film Festival 
Golden Eagle — CINE 

Water 

Producer: Cavalcade Productions Inc. 

Sponsor: Morton Salt Company 

Distributor: Modern Talking Pictures 

f ;olden Eagle — CINE 

Silver Cindy — IFPA 

Bronze Medal — N.Y. Film Festival 

A Way Out Of The Wilderness 

Producer: John Sutherland Productions 
Sponsor: Edward Newman 
Distributor: Div. of Mental Retardation, 

Dept. of HEW 
Golden Eagle — CINE 
Blue Ribbon — American Film Festival 
Chris Certificate — Columbus Film Festival 

What's It Going To Cost You 

Producer: Portafilms 
Sponsor: Consumers Power Company 
Distributor: Portafilms Management Services 
Golden Eagle — CINE 
Bronze Plaque — National Safety Council 
Diploma of Participation — 12th Golden 
Mercury Competition — Venice 

Why Man Creates 

Producer: Saul Bass & Assoc. 

Sponsor: Kaiser Aluminum & Chemicals 

Distributor: Modern Talking Picture Service 

Gold Medal — International Festival, Moscow 

Golden Eagle — CINE 

Blue Ribbon — American Film Festival 

Oscar — Academy of Motion Picture Arts & 
Sciences 

Information Award, Grand Prix & First Award 
— International Industrial Film Festival 

Waterford Glass Award, Statuette of St. Fin- 
barr — 14th International Film Review, 
Cork 

Certificate of Participation — 23rd Interna- 
tional Film Fe.stival, Edinburgh 

Diploma of Merit — International Amateur 
Film Festival, Marburg 

Silver Seal - — 7th International Festival of 
Science Fiction — Trieste 

Gold Medal — 12th Golden Mercury Compe- 
tition, Venice 

Silver Osella, Certificate of Participation — 
Venice Exhibition of Dociimentar\' — 
Venice 

Worth How Many Words 

Producer: Coldsholl & Assoc. 

Sponsor & Distributor: Eastman Kodak Com- 
pany 

Honorable Mention, Silver Medal — 8th In- 
ternatioual Children's Festival, La Plata 

Golden Eagle — CINE 

Gold Cindy — IFPA 

Special Award — N.Y. Film Festival 

Zelenka 

Producer: Group 8 Films 
Sponsor & Distributor: Amrak Nowak Assoc. 
Golden Eagle — CINE 

Certificate of Participation — 2.3rd Interna- 
tional Film Festival, Edinburg 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




ujherever you are 
ujhatever ijou Film 

color 

bq 
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MOTION PICTURE LABORATORIES 
HOLLYWOOD CHICAGO NEW YORK 



JArjUARY, 1970 



15 



1970 FILM FESTIVAL PLANNING GUIDE 

An exclusive revie\A/ of 1970 film festivals and awards competitions. 



THE AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL 

Sponsored by the Educational Film 

Library Association 

New York City May 12-16, 1970 

The 1970 American Film Festival, sponsored 
by the Educational Film Library Association, 
representing school, university and public li- 
braries throughout the U.S., will be held Mav 
12-16, 1970 at the New York Hilton Hotel, 
New York City. 

CATEGORIES: 32 major areas of education 
and information, art and culture, religion and 
ethics, business and industry, and health and 
medicine will be offered for final judging by 
screening groups during the Festival. Elec- 
tions will have been made by pre-screening 
juries for final entries. 

AWARDS: Blue Ribbon (trophy) Awards to 
be presented at banquet, Saturday, May 16, 
1970. FESTIVAL: May Closing date for en- 
tries: January 15, 1970. 

INFORMATION: Educational Film Library 
Association, Inc., 2.50 West 57th Street, New 
York City 10019. 



THE 1970 AMERICAN TV & RADIO 
COMMERCIALS FESTIVAL 

New York City — May 19, 1970 
Other U.S. & Foreign Cities — May-June 

F.LIGIBILITY: Open to commercials broad- 
cast in the U.S. and Canada for first time dur- 
ing 1969 and through January 1970. No limit 
on entries from sponsors, agencies, station or 
production companies. 

ENTRY DEADLINE: February 1, 1970. 

FEES: $50 per entry; $35 to attend the full 
tlay of screenings and the formal award cere- 
monies ill Philharmonic Hall, Lincoln Center. 

CATEGORIES: TV-Forty product classifica- 
tions plus one category for Classics, which 
must have been first telecast more than five 
\cars ago. A special International TV and 
cinema category is open to entries from all 
other countries. Radio entries are grouped by 
size of market reached. 

JUDGING: By ten regional councils of prom- 
inent advertising executives. 



CRITERIA: Outstanding commercials . . . 
based on strength of the sales message, vis- 
ual and aural appeal and the all-over tech- 
nical skill. 

AWARDS: A golden "CLIO" statuette to each 
Best of Product Category and Spec'al Citation 
winner. Certificates to Runners-Up in both 
American and International competitions. In 
1969, there were 2064 TV entries, 968 Radio 
entries and 402 International entries. A total 
of 78 Clio statuettes were presented. 

INFORMATION: 16mm reel of winners is 
available from Wallace A. Ross, Director, 
American TV Commercials Festival, .30 East 
60th Street, New York, N.Y. 10022. Phone: 
(212) 59.3-1900. 



THE NINTH ANNUAL FILM FESTIVAL 

AMERICAN PERSONNEL & GUIDANCE 

ASSOCIATION 

Held in conjunction with the Annual 

APGA Convention at New Orleans, Louisiana 

March 23-25, 1970 

CATEGORIES: Films and filmstrips in the 
following categories will be presented: Inter- 
Personal Relations; Educational and Career 
Planning, Rehabilitation; Counseling; The Pro- 
fess.'on. Principles and Techniques; and Guid- 
ance Films from other countries. 
SELECTION: All films and filmstrips present- 
ed at the Film Festi\al are previewed before 
the final invitation to the producer. Generally 
75 to 100 films are previewed, and 25 to 30 
are chosen. Selection is aimed to provide as 
wide a program as possible. 

AWARD: "Best Film: 1970 APGA Film Fes- 
tival" will be given for the first time this 
year. The winner or winners will be recognized 
by a plaque and receive coverage in the June 
issue of the Cuideposi, APGA's nationally dis- 
tributed newsletter. 

INFORMATION: Further information about 
APGA Film Festivals is available from: APGA 
Convention Film Festival, 1607 New Hamp- 
shire Avenue, N.W., Wasliiiigton, D.C. 20009. 




Georgia 30324 USA Phone: (404) 633-4105. 
Cable: INTERFILM, USA. Telex: 54-2484. 

SUPPORTING GROUPS: "Forward Atlanta" 
(Atlanta Chamber of Commerce); The Atlanta 
Arts Alhance; INTERFILM. 

CATEGORIES: (and entry fees): Feature ftlm 
($200); short subjects ($50); television com- 
mercials ($30 each); experimental films ($25), 
documentary films ($50); student productions, 
no entry fee. 

AWARDS: The Golden Phoenix (best of Festi- 
val); The Silver Phoenix (best film in each 
category); The Golden Dove (best film dealing 
with world peace; Gold, Silver and Bronze 
Medals for best films in each division as: in- 
dustrial; educational; sales training; econom- 
ics; television; safety; public relations; sports; 
underwater; peace, etc. 

OTHER AWARDS: The Eastern Ionosphere 
Award (best film dealing with flight); The 
Regencv Hvatt Award (best film bv a southern 
U.S. film ' producer); INTERFILM Award 
(cash grant to best student film; and The 
"Forward Atlanta" Award (best film by an 
-Atlanta producer). 

SHOWING SITES: Preliminary screenings; 
Regency Hyatt House; Arts Alliance Film 
Center; feature and short subjects (35mm) 
winners: Roxy Theater, June 13-21, 1970. 




THE THIRD ANNUAL ATLANTA 
INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 

Atlanta, Ga. June 13-21, 1970 

MANAGEMENT: J. Hunter Todd, Executive 
Producer; David O'Keefe, Associate Director. 
Vhiiling address: Drawer 1325SK, Atlanta, 



THE 6TH CHICAGO 
INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 

Chicago — November 7-21, 1970 

CATEGORIES: Industrial film competition 
plus seven other categories including enter- 
tainment, e,xperimental, etc. 

ELIGIBILITY: 35mm, 16mm and videotape 
mav be entered in the industrial competition. 
Films produced in 1969 or 1970 are eligible. 
Each entry should be accompanied by a state- 
ment of purpose and specification of the par- 
ticular audience for which the film was in- 
tended. Entry fee is $35. 

A\\'ARDS: Awards are made for commercially 
produced and in-plant produced films in the 
areas of sales, marketing, public relations, 
training and recruiting. A total of six Gold 
and Silver Hugo Awards are made in addi- 
tion to the issuance of certificates of partici- 
pation for all films accepted in the competi- 
tion. 

SPECIAL FILMS: Industrial film entries 
w iiich, because of budget, size, multiplicity 
of images or screens, are termed "special" and 
treated in a separate category. 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



SCREENING: StTcfiiiiius are free and open 
to tlie pul)lie. This inelndes u screening at the 
lesti\al tlieater as well as aiklitional industrial 
liliii prolyl. uns at a separate location. 

INFOKMATION: Address all inqmries to 
Michael J. Kut/a. Diiector, 6th (Chicago In- 
ternational I-'ilin Festixai, 235 W. Engenie St. 
I' -2. Cliuauo, Illinois fi()614. 




CINE 
COUNCIL OF INTERNATIONAL 
NONTHEATRICAL EVENTS, INC. 

1101 Sixteenth Street, N.W , Washington, D.C. 20036 

Area Code 202, 265-1136 265-6889 

Manoging Director, Anita Price 

OFFICERS: 1969-70: President, Reid H. Ray; 
First Vice President, Peter Cott; Vice Presi- 
dent—Finance, Charles Dana Bennett; Infor- 
mation, Willis H. Pratt, Jr.; Festivals, Dr. Anna 
L. Hyer; Selections, Rev. David O. Poinde.vter; 
Vice Prcsidents-at-larfie, Charles A. Beniant, 
Ott ("oellii, Ralph P. Creer, Emily S. Jones; 
Seerelani, O. S. Knudsen; Treasurer, Alfred 
E. Bnicn; Coordinating Director, Dr. Harold 
E. Wigren; Mana^^ing Director, Anita S. Price; 
Past President, Alden H. Li\ingston. 

ADVISORY COUNCIL: Jay Carmody, Dr. 
William G. Carr, Judith Crist, Louis J. Hazam 

HONORARY LIFE BOARD MEMBERS: 

E>re Branch, Dr. CaroKn Cuss, Ralph Hoy, 
Rev. Michael Mullen, Frank S. Rollins, Brig. 
Gen. Webb, (ret.). 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: 1970: Irwin H. 
Braun, J. Carter Browii, Ott CoeUn, Peter 
Cott, Ralph P. Creer, James H. Culver, James 
G. Damon, O. S. Knudsen, Rev. David O. 
Poindexter. Reid H. Rav, Dr. Don G. Wil- 
liams. 1971: J. Walter Evans, Dr. Malcolm S. 
Ferguson, John Flor\, Dr. Anna L. Hyer, Dr. 
John B. Kuiper, Carl H. Lenz, Alden H. Liv- 
ingston. Darvl I. Miller, Peter J. Moonev, 
\Villis H. Pratt, Jr., Ira E. Thatcher. 1972: 
Charles A. Bemant, Charles Dana Bennett, 
Alfred E. Bruch, Henry Herx, Thomas W. 
Hope, Emilv S. Jones, Stanlev Mcintosh, J. 
Edward Oglesby, David Z. Shefrin, Dr. Rob- 
ert \\'. Wagner, Dr. Harold E. Wigren. 

ENTRY DEADLINE: January 15 of each 
year. 

PURPOSE: CINE is a voluntary, non-profit 
organization established to coordinate the se- 
lection of U.S. non-theatrical, short subject, 
and television documentary motion pictures 
(including government films) for submission 
to overseas film festivals. CINE is supported 
b\- interested patrons (associate, professional 
and sustaining). 




THE 18TH ANNUAL COLUMBUS 
FILM FESTIVAL AND AWARDS 

Sponsored by the Film Council 

of Greater Columbus in association 

with the Columbus Area Chamber of 

Commerce 

Producers Showcase Screening at Hotel South- 
ern. October 21-22, 1970. Chris Awards Ban- 
(|uet: Thursday, October 22 at 7 p.m., Hotel 
Southern ballroom. 

ENTRIES: Film producers and sponsors are 
invited to enter motion pictures produced in 
1968, 1969 and 1970 pro\ ided the\- lune not 
been previously submitted to an\- Columbus 
Film Festival. Entries (in the categories enum- 
erated below) must be accompanied by 4 .\ 6 
cards (for preview committees) noting type of 
audience intended. 

Films are judged by professionals in the 
various fields. Entry fee for all films up to 
1600 feet, $30.00; 'over 1600 feet to 2400 
feet, .$35.00. (Exception: $10.00 for all 
Student Experimental film entries in Graph- 
ic Arts categor\). Entries will be accepted 
beginning February 1, and closing date 
is July 31, 1970 at 5 p.m. E.S.T. Each print 
should be made available for judging for at 
least one month or longer. If less time is avail- 
able, the categor>- chairman should be so in- 
formed. This year no film will be accepted 
after the closing date for entries, August 1. 

CATEGORIES & CHAIRMEN: Business & 
Industr)' (job training; sales promotion; indus- 
trial relations; public relations; Nils Lindquist, 
chairman, Lindy Productions, Inc., 4784 North 
High St., Columbus, Ohio 43214. Information 
and Education (classroom instructional films; 
specialized instructional, general information); 
Wm. Schmitt, chairman. Center of Science & 
Industry, 280 E. Broad Street, Columbus, 
Ohio, 43215; Co-Chaimian, (Social Studies). 
Glenn S. Bittner, 803 Dimson Drive East, 
Health & Mental Health (health & hygiene; 
mental health; general medicine; professional 
medicine; dental), Florence L. Fogle, Assoc. 
Professor of Health Education, Ohio State 
University, 321 W. 17th St., Columbus, Ohio 
43210; Travel V.S. & Foreign. Daniel F. 
Prugh, Film Council of Greater Columbus. 
280 East Broad St.. Columbus, Ohio 4.3215. 
Religious Films, Miss Delores Sherwood, Augs- 
burg Publishing House, Audio Visual Dept.. 
57 E. Main St., Columbus, Ohio 43215; 
Graphic and Theater .Arts; Darrcl McDouglc. 
Chairman, S. N. Hallock, Co-chairman, Center 
of Science & Industry, 280 E. Broad St., Co- 
lumbus, Oluo 4321.5; New Student Experi- 
mental Film categorv under Graphic Arts: SIO 
entry fee for all lengths of film including both 
8min, Super 8 and 16mm. 

AWARDS: This is the 12th year of the Chris 
Statuette .■\ wards, presented to the outstanding 
films in each category. Films receiving the 



C;hris Statuette must be voted "best in photog- 
raph\-, stor\- value, and technical aspects of 
production." Chris Certificate .-Awards are 
given to motion pictures considered "finalists" 
but not receiving tiie statuette award. 

FOR ENTRY BLANKS: Write to Miss Mary 
Rnpe, Film C:ouncil of Greater Columbus, 
Kresge Bldg., 83 S. High St., Room 408, 
Columbus, Ohio 43215. Phone: (614) 228- 
8840. Phone calls after 4 p.m. may be left 
with automatic message center. 

.Ml lilins iire to be shipped to John Neff, Co- 
lumbus I'ilm Festival Receiving Center, 3820 
Simlr\ 11(1., f:oliunbus. Ohio 4.3026. 

FARM FILM FOUNDATION PROFESSIONAL 
IMPROVEMENT AWARDS 

.WN'ARDS: The 16th annual presentation of 
our inscribed certificate and a check for 
.$.500.00 nia\- be awarded to an active member 
of the American Association of Agricultiual 
College editors if, in the opimon of the of- 
ficers of the Farm Film Foimdation there are 
sufficient applications for the award to war- 
lant its continuance in 1970. If such an Award 
is made, the winner will be selected b\- a com- 
imttee ot three judges as having made through 
w(irk in motion picture production the most 
otitstanding contribution to the advancement 
of agriculture, home econonucs, rural-urban 
relations, and the public interest during the 
past_two years. Honorable Mention Awards 
of .S50.00 each ma\ ;ilso be given at the discre- 
tion of the judges. 

PRESENTATION: The Awards, if given, will 
be presented at a dinner co-sponsored by the 
Farm Foundation and the Foundation for 
American Agriculture at the annual meeting of 
the American .Association of Agricultural Col- 
lege Editors scheduled for July 13, 1970 at 
Cornell Uni\ersity, Ithaca, N.Y. 

ELEGIBILITY: Any active member of A.\A- 
CE engaged in some phase of motion picture 
production is eligible to appK' for the Award. 

ENTRIES: All entries and inquiries should be 
sent to Edith T. Bennett, Farm Film Founda- 
tion, 1425 H. Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 
20005. Closing date for entries is May 1, 1970. 




ANNUAL INFORMATION FILM 
PRODUCERS OF AMERICA AWARDS 

Sponsored by the Information Film Producers ot America, 

Inc. "Cindy" Awards Presented at Annual Meeting of 

IFPA, The Newporter Inn, Newport Beach Colifornlo 

November 5, 6, 7, 1970 

ANNUAL AWARDS CO.VIPETITION in rec- 
ognition of outstanding information films. The 
purpose of the IFPA awards is to stimulate 
constant improvement in the quahty of in- 
formational, pubhc relations and educational 
films, and their effective utilization by indu- 
tr\', business, education and government. 

Continued on page 2- 



JANUARY, 1970 




VILIS LAPENIEKS 

AT WORK 





20 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



Shooting an hour-long CBS TV Special on the 
Tijuana Brass, Vilis Lapenieks decided 
to get a close shot from inside the bull ring 
at a rodeo. They said: ''Bulls never touch 
that steel barrel." But this one did. So Vilis got 
a great shot of 16,000 spectators upside 
down, until the battery cord came unplugged. 
Vilis had a broken arm and he hopes the 



bull had a headache. But the camera was O.K. 



They used it the next day. An Eclair NPR. 





For an NPR brochure, write 
Eclair Corporation at 7262 
Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles 
Calif. 90046: or at 18 West 
56th Street, New Yorl< 10019. 

CAMERA MAKERS SINCE 1909 

JANUARY, 1970 21 



festival planning guide . 

continued 



CATEGORIES: Public Information. Techni- 
cal Information, Promotion, Industrial Rela- 
tions, Education and Enrichment. 



ENTRY INFORMATION: Any film com- 
pleted for release during the period August 
I, 1969 through August 1, 1970. More than 
one film may be submitted by the same mem- 
ber or organization. Entiy deadline is August 
1, 1970. Entry fee per film is $25 for mem- 
bers, $40. tor non-members. For additional in- 
formation, write Film Competitions Chairman, 
Information Film Producers of America, Inc., 
P.O. Bo.x 1470, Holhwood, California 90028. 



THE 17TH INTERNATIONAL ADVERTISING 
FILM FESTIVAL 

Venice — June 15-20, 1970 

Sponsored by the Screen Advertising 

World Association Ltd. 

MANAGEMENT: The Executive Council of 
S.A.W.A. is fully responsible for aU policy 
matters in relation to the Organization of the 
Festival. All inquiries should be made to the 
Festival Director: Mr. S. I. Dalgleish Office. 
International Advertising Film Festival, 35 
PiccadilK', LONDON \VR' 9PB England. 
Phone 7,34-7621. 

ENTRY DATES: Books of Entry Forms and 
Delegate Registration Forms will be issued 
from the Head Office during Februarv. 
CATEGORIES: Films will be judged by prod- 
uct categories. There will be 17 individual 
categoi ies in each of the two groups — Cinema 
and Television and details of each categorx 
are included in the film entry books togethei 
with the regulations governing the entry of 
films. 

JURY: The international jury is drawn from 
creative miheux from countries where TV is 
a prime media. 




THE 11TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL 
BROADCASTING AWARDS 

Sponsored by the Hollywood 
Radio and Television Society 

ELIGIBILITY: Open to radio and television 
commercials broadcast during 1970 in any na- 
tion in the \\orld. 



CATEGORIES: Twelve television and eight 
radio commercial categories. In addition, spe- 



cial sweepstakes awards for both television 
and radio at annual presentation dinner. 

JUDGING: Fortv creative screening panels 
meeting in several countries make initial judg- 
ing. Final judging panel consisting of 23 
judges representing advertising companies, ad- 
\ertising agencies, production companies and 
broadcasters. 

CRITERIA: Excellence in broadcast and tele- 
vision commercial presentation including audio 
and visual quality, sales message impact, and 
overall technical skill and technique. 

AWARDS: Special trophy presentations to 
winners in 12 television and 8 radio cate- 
gories. IBA a\\ards to approximately 250 final- 
ists in judging. And, a special "Man of the 
Year" award presented annually to the person 
judged the outstanding man of the year in 
international communications. 

INFORMATION: Additional information, 
entry forms and data on past winners may be 
obtained from the Holly\\ood Radio and Tele- 
vision Society, International Broadcasting 
Awards, 1717 N. Highland Avenue, Hollv- 
wood, California 90028. Phone: (213) 465- 
1183. 




13TH INTERNATIONAL FILM & TV 
FESTIVAL OF NEW YORK 

Combined with The 1st International 
Film-Fair of New York 

PURPOSE: To honor those individuals and 
companies who contribute to the greatness of 
the industry with their outstanding creations. 
A coincidental seminar held during the festival 
provides a showcase for new developments 
and a forum for the sharing of new ideas and 
techniques. 

CATEGORIES: Inclusive, encompassing all 
phases of film production from Filmstrips, in- 
dustrial films, television and cinema commer- 
cials to filmed introductions, titles as well as 
public service television programs, featurettes 
and multi-media presentations. 

ENTRY INFORMATION: Any production 
completed after September, 1969 is eligible 
for entry. There is no limit to the number of 
films, programs or commercials which may be 
submitted. 

ENTRY DEADLINE: September 1, 1970. 

INFORMATION: Complete data and entry in- 
formation is available from Herbert Rosen, 
festival chairman. Industrial Exhibitions, 121 
W. 45th St., New York, N.Y. 10036. 



THE lUH INTERNATIONAL 
INDUSTRIAL FILM FESTIVAL 

Sponsored by 
The Confederation of European 
Industrial Federations (CEIF) 

The industrial federations of West Europe, 
send their best industrial motion pictures, 
chosen in national competition, to a different 
Eiuopean capital each >ear for the world's 
most formidable industrial film competition. 
Entries from other lands, including the United 
States, must be submitted through similar na- 
tional industrial federations, upon formal in- 
vitation to compete from CEIF. 

Seven Official Categories of Festival 

Category A: Films about subjects of gen- 
eral industrial or scientific interest (economic, 
social or technical) or films contributing to the 
prestige of a sponsor, intended primarily for 
general audiences. 

Category B: Films, other than sales films, 
about specific industrial products, materials 
or projects, intended primarih' for general au- 
diences. 

Categorj' C: Films, other than sales films, 
about specific industrial products, materials or 
projects intended primarily for special audi- 
ences. 

Category D: Films about specific products 
or services, with a direct sales purpose, in- 
tended either for general audiences or dealers 
(excluding films for showing in paid time in 
cinemas or on television). 

Category G: Films on accident prevention, 
and research (excluding film used as a research 
tool) intended primarily for special audiences, 
including educational establishments. 

Category F: Training films (for example, 
films on management measures for increasing 
efficiency, producti\'ity, automation, human 
relations, vocational guidance) intended pri- 
marily for special audiences. 

Category G: Films on accdident prevention, 
occupational diseases, rehabilitation, health, 
education and other aspects of social security. 

ENTRIES: An official invitation to participate 
must be extended to the National Association 
of Manufactmers, as the U.S. host group; a 
sub-committee appointed by the N 'A/M has 
worked in cooperation with the U.S. Council 
on International Nontheatrical Events (CINE) 
to select official U.S. entries, if invited. The 
11th annual event is tentatively scheduled to 
be held in Rome, Italy in October, 1970; 
in Barcelona the following year. 



THE 27TH ANNUAL NATIONAL 
SAFETY FILM CONTEST 

Sponsored by the Notional Committee 
on Films for Safety 

ELIGIBLE FILMS; All motion pictures pro- 
duced or released during 1969 whose primary 
olijectives are safety or which have import- 
ant accident prevention sequences. Contest 
entrv deadline will be February 16, 1970. 

CATEGORIES: Motion pictures, (16mm) in 
each of five fields: 1. Occupational. 2. Home. 
3. Traffic and transportation. 4. Recreational 
and Sports. 5. General. Judged separately are 
television and tlieatric.al subjects, TV shorts 
and spots. 

AWARDS: Bronze Plaques will be awarded to 
top winners in each of the various areas of 
safet>'. Award of Merit Certificates will be 
given to other films for special reasons of sub- 
ject treatment, production excellence and/or 
unusual contribution to safety. At the discre- 
tion of the judges, awards may be given sepa- 
rately for "instruction-teaching," documen- 
tary," and for "inspirational" purpose films. 



22 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




industrial festival 
orchestrated color 
llieir achievements. 



offering winners fully 
leader film hiphliRhtinR 



S. 



One (it the placjue winning films ma\' be de- 
signed "Safety film of the Year" and receive 
appropriate recognition. 

PRESENTATIONS: Films winning the Bronze 
Plaque will he shown in October during the 
National Safety Congress and Exposition in 
Chicago, Illinois. Plaques will be presented at 
that time to representatives of sponsors of 
the.se films by the Committee's chairman. 
Award of Merit winners will receive their 
awards after the final judging which is in 
.April. All winners will be notified immediateh 
after the judging. 

INFORMATION ON AWARDS PROGRAMS: 

Write to Wm. E. Wendland, Secretary, Na- 
tional Committee on Films for Safety, 425 N. 
Mich-'gan Ave., 5th Floor, Chicago, Illinois, 
60611. 



SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL 
FILM FESTIVAL 

Son Francisco — October, 1970 

CATEGORIES: Within "Films for Communi- 
cation" section include Educational (classroom 
& training); Enlightenment (information & en- 
richment); Documentation (essays & factual); 
and Persuasion (promotion & influence). 

ENTRY DEADLINE: (and fees): Official en- 
try deadline to be annoimced. 

AWARDS: Golden Gate (placque) 1st; Silver 
placque-2nd; Bronze placque-3rd; plus "Best 
of Category" placque and "Honorable Men- 
tion" awards in each category. 

INFORMATION: For entry data and other 
information, write San Francisco International 
Film Festival, 425 California, San Francisco. 
Calif. 94104. 



U. S. INDUSTRIAL 
FILM FESTIVAL 

Chkogo — April 30, 1970 at 
Palmer House Hotel. 

Pvecognizing that the attainment of awards is a 
valuable measure of success and such achieve- 
ments provide producers, sponsors and dis- 
tributors with an ideal basis for publicity, sales 
promotion and advertising programs, the U. S. 
Industrial Film Festival was created in 1967 
specifically to serve those interested in the 
industrial film medium. The festival initiated 
the concept of separating entries by t>pe of 
producer (see "Organization") and is the only 



PURPOSE AND OBJECTINES: The U 

Industrial Film I'>sti\al and its objecti\es; 

• to highl'ght the Industrial Film and its 
effectiveness as a modern communica- 
tions mediimi. 

• to provide producers, sponsors and dis- 
tributors with an opportunity to show- 
case their productiims. 

• to enable the industrv to maintain an 
ever increasing standard of production ex- 
cellence through competitive competition. 

ORGANIZATION: Entries are .separated by 
t\pe of production into foiu' distinct groups: 

• Commercial Productions 

• (ioNcrnmcnt Productions 

• In-PJant Productions 

• l'ni\crsity Productions 

liiiscd on its type of production, each entry 
is judged within its own group with films pro- 
duced under comparable circumstances. Each 
gi-oup contains 15 identical categories of sub- 
ject matter into which a film is entered. Judg- 
ing of filmstrips is likewise separated from mo- 
tion pictures but utilizes the same groups and 
categories. 

JUDGING: Films are rated on a point basis 
considering factors such as effectiveness of 
film, audience motivation, clarity, photog- 
raphy and sound. Black and white films are 
welcomed and judging forms are so con- 
structed that these films are not penalized 
when compared with color productions. 




RECOGNITION: Every film entered in the 
festival receives a "Certificate of Entry" 
acknowledging its receipt. 

The festival provides one first place "Gold 
Comera" award for each category of subject 
matter within each group for both motion pic- 
tures and filmstrips. Presentation of the award 
is not mandatory, for it is earned strictly on 
the basis of merit. Those films not receiving a 
first place award but judged to be of festival 
qualit\' are presented with a "Certificate ol 
Creative Excellence." 

Three special "Gold Camera" Awards are 
presented each year. They are the Business 
Screen Magazine Award to the outstanding 
Advertising-Sales Promotion film, the Back 
Stage Piililication .Award to the outstanding 
Public Relations film and the Chairman's Spe- 
cial Award for Outstanding Creativity. 

ENTRY DEADLINE: March 1, 1970. 

INFORM.\TION: For complete details and 
entry information, wTite J. W. Anderson, festi- 
val chairman, U. S. Industrial Film Festival, 
161 East Grand .Vvenue, Chicago, Illinois 
60611. USA Cable: FILMFEST 



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JANUARY, 1970 



23 




Delegates are welcomed to opening session at the festival. Host at West Berlin, Dr. Hugo Ritter 
(inset) chats with Will Riesenberg president of the international jury. 

15 Countries Compete in 
International Festival 



'T^Hn Significant Role of the industrial 
-*- film in the social and economic com- 
munications' process were cited in the key- 
note address which opened the 10th Inter- 
national Industrial Film Festival on Tuesday 
morning, November 1 1 in the Congress 
Hall of West Berlin. Fritz Berg, distin- 
guished president of the Bundesverbandes 
der Deutschen Industrie (West Germany's 
manufacturer associations), noted the wide 
and resultful use of the film medium by 
companies throughout Europe. 

At the Festival's concluding Gala Awards 
Dinner ceremonies at the Berlin Hilton on 
Saturday evening, November 15, Dr. Wolf- 
gang Eichler, managing director of the Fed- 
eral Union of German Employers' Associa- 
tions, prefaced Grand Prix awards with these 
comments: 

"121 films from 15 countries were dis- 
played on the screens of the Congress Hall 
this week. Judging from the films I have 
seen here, strong creative impulses have 
come to the industrial film, thus confirm- 
ing tlie close relation of industry and cul- 
ture." 

It is this kind of high-level management 
Darticipation which has made this event 
the premier world competition for factual 
films in the 10 years since its inaugural at 







Fritz Berg, president of the Bundesverbandes 
derDeutschen Industrie, at opening session. 



Rouen, France in 1959. The presence at 
West Berlin this year of the first sizeable 
U.S. delegation, including nine corporate 
communications' executives, added further 
lustre to this year's Festival. The Confedera- 
tion of European Industrial Federations is 
the sponsoring organization. Counterpart or- 
ganizations in the Federal Republic of Ger- 
many were 1969 hosts as the Festival re- 
turned to West Berlin for the second time. 
24 prize trophies awarded in the seven 
well-defined competitive categories were 



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supplemented by two Grand Prix, the an- 
nual Inforfilm plaque and a special West 
German "Landesfiimdienste" award. 

The 26 members of the International 
Jury, headed by their president, Will Riesen- 
berg of the Bundesvereinigung der Deut- 
schen Arbeitgeberverbande, voted top cate- 
gory honors to entries from Great Britain j 
(three "firsts" in categories D, E and F); ! 
West German titles won first prizes in cate- i 
gories A and B; a Swiss film was first in i 
category G and the United States received I 
the first prize trophy in category C. The : 
first four categories A-B-C-D embrace gen- ■ 
eral audience subjects and the latter three 
;over "special interest" films for internal 
training, employee indoctrination, safety, 
ate, generally of lower budget cost. 

Jury ballots gave the Festival's coveted 
Grand Prix awards to the U.S. first prize 
winner: Why Man Creates, sponsored by 
Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp. and 
produced by Saul Bass & Associates. This 
film was the overwhelming favorite of both 
the juries and the delegates at West Berlin. 
The Festival's second Grand Prix, from 
among the E-F-G categories, went to an- 
other outstanding audience winner. The Be- 
haviour Game, sponsored by Barclays 
Bank Limited and produced by Lion Pace- 
setter Productions Ltd., both of London. 

Wliy Man Creates added to its laurels 
when it received the annual Inforfilm plaque, 
presented by this international distribution 
organization as symbolic of "its great po- 
tential worldwide audience interest." Infor- 
film secretary-general Jan Botermans, of 
Brussels, presented the plaque to O. H. 
Coelln, head of the U.S. delegation. 

Adding to first place and Grand Prix 
iionors, films from Britain also tallied three 
second-place trophies and one fourth award 
to merit top honors at West Berlin. German 
entries matched that country's two first 
prizes with three "seconds" and a third 
prize. Britain and Italy were the only two 
countries to submit the full total of 15 
entries; the German entry list totaled 14. 

Small in geographical size, but strong at 
Berlin, Switzerland carried home four prizes 
out of its 1 1 entries, winning a first place, 
two "thirds" and a fourth. Films from Italy 
were also multiple award winners with one 
third and a fourth prize. 

The United States submitted only 1 1 
films this year (two of which were "late" 
entries) but its delegation went home well- 
Members of the U.S. delegation included 
(I. to r.): Jack Gabrielson, McDonnell-Douglas 
Corp.; Harold Daffer, Honeywell, Inc.; 
Wm. Walton, IBM Corp.; Michael Ritt, Jr., 
Combined Insurance Co.; Johna Pepper, 
Ford Motor Co.; Robert Unrath, Port of New York 
Authority; Robert 0. Beatty, Boise Cascade 
Corp.; Ott Coelln, head of U.S. delegation; 
Bruce Thomas, Modern Talking Picture Service; 
and E. B. (JacI ) Hal, Eastman Kodak Co. 



pleased as the first prize. Grand Prix and 
Inforfilni honors given Why Man CieaU'\ 
were supplemented by the seeond prize 
awarded Operutor in category F and by the 
fourth prize trophy given The Sianijicance 
of You in the highly-competitive category 
C. Operator was sponsored by American 
Telephone & Telegraph Co. and produced 
by the Festival's sole woman producer, Nell 
Cox. The Signijicance of You. sponsored by 
Uoise Cascade Ci'rporation. was produced 
by dcMartin. .Marona & .Associates. 

Denmark, with a third prize for Water 
to the Islands (category B) and France, 
with another "third"' for .\ature Morte (cat- 
egory C) were the only other countries to 
share prize honors at Berlin. 

It is useful to note the criteria which 
guided members of the Jury: (1) is the 
specific objective of tlie film acliieved? 
(2) is the fihn likely to communicate at 
the level of the specified audience? (3) 
judge technical ami artistic qualities of the 
film, consider visual quality, sound and 
tempo. 

Other active participants at Berlin in- 
cluded Japan (12 entries); France (13 ti- 
tles); the Netherlands (8 titles) and Swe- 
den (7 titles). Denmark submitted five 
films; Spain, four; Finland, two; Austria, 
two; and Belgium and Portugal had a single 
entry apiece. Among these 47 films, repre- 
senting 10 countries, there were only two 
third prizes shared by Denmark and France, 
emphasizing the awards' dominance at West 
Berlin of the five big winners: Britain, Ger- 
many. Italy, Switzerland, and the U.S.A. 

Worthy of special note was the high de- 
gree of screening excellence achieved by 
projectionists in the two theaters of the Con- 
gress Hall at West Berlin. At some previous 
CEIF-sponsored Festivals, there was a con- 
siderable difference in screen quality be- 
tween 16mm and 35mm prints. .Although 
the vast majority of entries at Berlin, es- 
pecially subjects from European lands, were 
35mm color prints (84 of 121 entries), 
there were 38 entries on 16mm print stock 
and every one of these was shown with ex- 
ceptional clarity and brilliance. Four Fes- 
tival winners were on 16mm, including two 
of the three U.S. award-winners. 

Underscoring the dominance of color in 
today's industrial motion pictures there was 




One of the worlds i;rejt iiiLtt'ng places, //est Berlin's Congress Hall was the festival site. 



only one black & white entry among the 
1 2 1 films competing in Berlin, riie French 
entry, Ecrire Pour Etru Lu, produced for 
office training by Les Analyses Cinema- 
tographiques of Paris (a previous Festival 
winner), really didn't need color for its 
purpose but suffered audience and jury 
displeasure from an ill-fated attempt to 
hand-insert German subtitles in addition to 
its English subtitles and an original French 
sound track. It was all very confusing. 

Honors for the Festival's funniest film 
(though it might not have been intended 
that way) easily went to a Swiss entry, Tres 
Cliairs et Tendres which opened the Festi- 
val screenings in category A. Turning to 
""pure" fantasy for its delineation of mech- 
anized poultry production, this abysmally 
long film (55 minutes) dismayed early Fes- 
tival viewers with sequences best summar- 
ized from these program notes: 

"A parrot is teaching the hens to speak. 
Tliey catch on without difficulty because 
modern poidtry breeding gives them con- 
tact and initiative which they didn't have 
in grandfather's lienhouse . . ." 

Of more serious import is our sobering 
analysis of the many aspects of modern in- 
dustry represented on the screens in West 
Berlin. Major representation of such basic 
industries as automotive manufacture; atom- 
ic power, air transport, oil, chemical and 
pharmaceutical products, banking, ship- 
building, steel-making, heavy machinery and 
construction projects gave delegates real in- 



sight into competitive aspects among the 15 
countries. 

Agricultural interests varied from flower 
production, tobacco culture and processing 
and wine-making. Denmark and Italy were 
especially active in this subject area. Prod- 
uct presentations, with selling overtones 
through manufacturing demonstrations, 
showed brick making (Holland); concrete 
and cement (France, Spain); candles (Swe- 
den) matches (Sweden); chinaware (Ja- 
pan); salt (Netherlands) and textiles 
(U.S.A.). 

The currently important subject of ocean 
freight containerization was covered in two 
competing and similar films from Japan 
with such major firms as Mitsui and NYK 
showing these activities. The Japanese en- 
tries in '69 included a new car presentation 
( Colt ) ; two important overseas construction 
project reports (Mitsui, on an Australian 
coal field project and Kajima-Tasei with a 
report on a big dam project in Malaysia); 
Hitachi showed a film on weather forecast- 
ing and a "product" film on stereo sound 
equipment. Japan's entry in aircraft build- 
ing was featured in a Shin Meiwa film on 
its Stol Flying Boat PX-S. The Swiss air- 
craft maker, Pilatus, also showed perform- 
ance characteristics of its Pilatus Porter. 

Overall, however, the 12 Japanese en- 
tries this year were not of the high quality 
and with the usual design qualities of past 
successes. Some distraction involving film 




Exchanging world film views at Charlottenburg Castle reception (I to r): B. Pictured at Berlin Senate reception (I. to r.): U.S. delegate Richard Roxas, 

Dugdale, Shell-Mex & BP Ltd., British delegate; Inga Millar, of Norway's Meetings & Presentations mgr., Westinghouse Electric Corp. and Mrs. Roxas; 

Produktivet Institut; U.S. delegate Ott Coelln; and Godfrey Jennison, Films Mrs. Jack Gabrielson; British delegate G. C. Hargrove, British-American To- 

Officer, Shell Mex & BP Ltd., another member of the British delegation. bacco Co. and U.S. delegate Jack Gabrielson, McDonnell-Douglas Corporation. 



JANUARY, 1970 



25 




■>^fy^ mk 



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projection), 16 & 35MM 
double system sound 
interlock projectors, 
overhead projectors, strip 
film sound projectors, 
background slide 
projectors and projection 
accessory equipment. 

Everything is available 
for rent, long-term lease, 
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running on schedule we 
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For further information 
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international festival 

continued 



assignments for the 1970 Expo at Osaka is 
suspected. 

The air transport industry was represent- 
ed by two excellent entries by KLM Royal 
Dutch, two films from Swissair (one prize 
winner) and an Air France internal training 
film entry. 

Italy's 15 entries were easily dominated 
by five films sponsored and produced by 
Olivetti (all on computers and related of- 
fice products) by four Fiat pictures (two 
prize winners among them) and two films 
sponsored by Montecatini Edison. The 
Montecatini film. Biton Lavoro Slid (Good 
Work South) was a most informative re- 
port on that company's success in creating 
new work opportunities in Italy's hard- 
pressed Southern regions. 

Mining safety was the concern of two 
films, from France {Tir de Mines) and 
England (Hands, Knees & Boomps-ci- 
Daisy), both from coal industry sources. 
The English entry, a brief cartoon spon- 
sored by the National Coal Board, was the 
second prize winner in films cf that special 
category (G). 

But the banking business also held sur- 
prises for Festival juries and audiences. 
Barclays Bank Limited first lead Britain in- 
to the winner's circle with a richly-deserved 
second prize in category A for the Larkins- 
produced title, The Curious History of 
Money. This animated display of the tal- 
ents of writer-producer Beryl Stevens was 
soon followed by the Grand Prix and first 
prize also given to Barclays for The Be- 
haviour Game, a very amusing and effec- 
tive film on courteous behaviour. 

The Midland Bank entry. Farmers Three 
(category C), merited honors for its warm, 
honest picturization of typical land-owners 
helped by that bank. And a remarkable 
French film, sponsored by the Banques 
Populaires, Paris, was easily the Festival's 
most complex production, involving very 
well done historical sequences, excellent 
casting and sync sound dialogue. Cinema & 
Publicite deserve special credit for this ma- 
jor production effort in a traditional studio 
format seldom seen in these shoot-and-run 
days of the cinema verite. 

Electric utility and pipeline construction 
reports-on-film, some superb delineation by 
European and Japanese steel makers (not- 
ably Italsider and the Japan Steel Works) 
and the prize-winning aluminum alloys film 
(Profiles) produced by Ronald Riley & 
Associates for High Duty Alloys Ltd. of 
Britain round out this "general" background 
of what the festival films were all about. 

There was very little doubt that this 
year's Jury selections were truly representa- 
tive of the Festival's best. A switch of a 
few Jury votes here and there might have 
altered a second, third or fourth place but 
few at West Berlin will forget the resound- 



ing applause earned by The Unknown Con- 
tinent. Leonaris Films' superb and detailed 
exposition of biochemistry and biophysical 
discoveries (the category A winner) or the 
instant but lasting popularity of Wliy Man 
Creates, which earned a triple-crown for 
the U.S.A. 

As for the rest of Festival week at Ber- 
lin: the reception given by the Berlin Senate 
at Charlottenburg Castle; the "Evening in 
Berlin" party hosted by Arnold & Richter 
and leading West German film laboratories; 
and the special ballet performance at the 
Berlin Opera House were typical of the ex- 
ceptional hospitality accorded the several 
hundred international delegates and jury 
members by our hosts in West Berlin. 

We have already described the superb 
meeting hall arrangements of the Congress 
Hall (Camera Eye: September, 1969); 
you'll meet members of the U.S. Delegation 
in pictures on these pages. The 1970 Festi- 
val is presently slated for Italy with the site 
still to be named by next year's hosts: the 
Italian Confederation of Industry. • 




Jury president Will Riesenberg presents first 
prize trophy for "Why Man Creates to U.S. 
delegate Michael Ritt of Combined Insurance Co. 



John Chlttock (left), Financial Times' corre- 
spondent visits with U.S. delegate Johna Pepper 
and Norman Vigars, films officer for Ford Ltd. 




BUSINESS SCREEN 



ANEW VIDEOTAPE system 
with ci^nsidcrablc signifi- 
cance to the sponsored film in- 
dustry was unveiled in New York 
in November by Sony Corpora- 
tion of America. A cassette 
videoplayer system, utilizing 
regular home TV color or b/vv 
sets, or large-screen projection 
TV. as recjuired. a Sony Color 
\ ideoplayer. and a VideiKassette 
tape which can be loaded and un- 
loaded as easily as an audio tape 
cassette, comprise the basis for 
the system. Each Videocassette 
can provide a program up to 90 
minutes. In addition, a simple 
adaptor to the Color Videoplayer 
will permit color or b/w TV pro- 
grams to be recorded from the 
air, or, cassettes to be duplicated 
from one cassette to another. 

The Sony Color Videoplayer 
can be connected to any standard 
color TV set, without any modi- 
fications to the set, to immediate- 
ly reproduce a color picture on 
the screen, with sound. Addi- 
tionally, because it is fully com- 
patible, it may be used with a 
b,'w TV set. 

As seen in the New York 
demonstration, the quality of the 
picture on 12-inch Sony and 23- 
inch Zenith receivers placed 
about the Cotillion Room of the 
Pierre Hotel was very, very good 
— superior, it seemed to some 
viewers, than color tape repro- 
duction on any helical scan sys- 
tem yet seen. 

In order to create a Video- 
cassette library with a wide vari- 
ety of programs for the Color 
Videoplayer. Sony intends to 
make its recording facilities 
available to the motion picture 
and TV industries, music re- 
cording companies, publishers, 
educational institutions and 
sports promoters to transfer their 
programs to Videocassettes. Sony 
believes its Color Videoplayer 
will create, for these industries, 
new ways of selling programs to 
the public. 

The company expects that the 
ultimate price of its Videoplayer 
will be as low as $350 in the 
United States. 

Because the Color Videoplay- 
er utilizes a magnetic tape re- 
cording system, a program on a 
Videocassette can be erased eas- 
ily and as frequently as on audio 
tape. The reuse of the Videocas- 
sette will reflect substantial sav- 
ings, the company said. Sony 
also pointed out that the original 
cost of the Videocassette will be 
amortized in direct proportion to 
the number of programs record- 



ed on the tape. After a customer 
has played back the Videocas- 
sette program, the cassette can 
he returned to the program's sup- 
jilicr for re-recording another 
program on the same Videocas- 
sette. 

The price of a non-recorded, 
re-usable Videocassette for a 90- 
minute program is expected to 
be $20 in the United States. 

Since a Videocassette has two 
sound tracks, a program can 
have stereophonic sound when 
the sound is played back through 
a stereo amplifier and separate 
speakers are used as well as the 
TV set for video. 

By attaching a simple adaptor, 
ultimately about $100 in the 
United States, to the Color 
Videoplayer, TV programs from 
the air can be recorded in color 
or b/w on the Videocassette in 
the home. 

Horizontal resolution of the 
Sony Videoplayer is 250 lines in 
color, 300 monochrome. Width 
of the tape is approximately % 
inch. 

Sony disclosed that it has been 
working with Philips, of Eind- 
hoven, the Netherlands, in the 
development of video recording 
technology to meet worldwide 
standards. Sony, Philips, and 
other companies, such as Grun- 
dig GmbH of West Germany 
hope to accomplish this world- 
wide aim with the Sony system. 
But it is likely that other manu- 
facturers will soon introduce 
other systems for worldwide con- 
sideration before universal stand- 
ards are finally achieved. 

Akio Morita, executive vice 
president, and co-founder, of 
Sony, said that the company's 
Color Videoplayer, together with 
an extensive Videocassette li- 
brary will at first be on the mar- 
ket in Japan in late 1970. 

Industrial film sponsors, cur- 
rently intrigued with the possibil- 
ities of the CBS-EVR system in- 
troduced early last year, have 
now another possible program 
distribution medium to consider. 
If 90 minutes of good quality 
color picture can be placed in a 
reusable casette about the size of 
a pocket book for $20 for 90 
minutes (and probably consider- 
ably lower for shorter pro- 
grams), perhaps the day may 
loom when industrial sponsors 
will be loaning their programs to 
a great new mass of TV video- 
player owner who will be able to 
borrow free programs from dis- 
tributor exchanges located in 
hundreds of cities across the 
country. • 



The 

Cassette 

Videoplayer 



Surprisingly good quality TV pictures have been 
shown in Sony's newly introduced 
cassette videoplayer system. 



Close-up shows videocassette which 
carries a program of up to 90 min- 
utes being loaded. 




Pre-recorded program is reproduced with the Sony Color Videoplayer on 
a 19-inch color TV screen. 




JANUARY, 1970 



27 




Multi-image sequence starts with close-up of a 
face . . . 





^ 


^^^^^^^k* 









then in a series of flashes, the rest of the face 
is filled . . . 



^niiii? 




THftr 



then, a segment of the face is shown with three 
shots of 3 girl laughing. 




Multi-Scree' 



■Kiir 11 III 11- : 




■ 


•■^^^^l&»i 




■"nI^ 


-. ^^^'Jirii iiiii, ml 


1 






Things can grow on the screen. Panoramic view of 
construction site (left) starts with just one screen filled 
and grows (top to bottom) until the entire picture 
tills 12 screens. 



You can relate a whole object (the car) to one of its parts (the wheel) 
in a dramatic fashion. 




28 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



vrOU CAN PRODUCH a multi-screen a/v 
-'- show as dazzling as anything you've 
seen at Expo . . . with the same money 
you'd spend on a standard single frame 
slide show. And with no more equipment 
or technical know-how than you need foi 
ordinary slides. 

The technicjue that makes it possible was 
developed by the audiovisual production 
groups of Lawrence Wolf (Canada) Ltd., a 
Toronto-based marketing communications 
organization, and its U. S. affiliate, Law- 
rence Wolf Inc., in Buffalo. 

The secret is in the slide itself. A special 



or four screens with a picture of men talk- 
ing, then a picture of the thing they're talk- 
ing about could fade in on the screen be- 
tween them. You can also vary the size of 
images — a picture of a man might fill 
three screens; a picture of his son, one. 

You can bleed a single image across all 
the screens, to suggest size; or repeat it in 
smaller form on each of 1 2 screens, to give 
it emphasis. 

Ytni can even make things grow on the 
screen, either by progressively revealing 
parts of a whole; or by changing the actual 
imaee. 



rograms on A Mini-Budget 



process enables Wolf to modify standard 
35mm. slides so that each slide can carry up 
to six images of varying sizes and shapes, 
each of which can be projected on a separate 
screen. 

With two ordinary slide projectors, then, 
you can create up to 12 images simultane- 
ously. And with two Kodak Ektagraphics 
and a standard Kodak dissolve unit, you can 
produce animated images. 

Wolf's own house presentation is a show- 
case for the new technique — a technique 
which can turn ordinary sales meetings into 
pint-sized Expos, and which is already be- 
ing used by such clients in the United States 
and Canada as Eastman Kodak, Westing- 
house, and Pharmacraft. 

The big advantage of the technique is its 
flexibility — both in ease of operation, and 
in the number of different ways it enables 
you to achieve dramatic effects. 

One way is to vary the number and com- 
binations of images you project. In the Wolf 
show, one segment shows a close-up of an 
eye, nose and mouth, with the rest of the 
face not shown. Then, in a series of quick 
flashes, the rest of the face is added. Then 
part of the face is shown in combination 
with three separate shots of a girl laughing, 
as though the face were watching the girl. 

This technique is good for showing rela- 
tionships or contrasts, or for dramatically 
emphasizing a point. You could fill three 



For instance, the large panoramic view 
of a construction site. The full shot occu- 
pies all 12 screens. But only one corner of 
the shot is shown first. Then more screens 
are filled in stages. Finally, the whole image 
is revealed. The order in which you fill the 
screens is completely variable, so the image 
can grow in any number of ways or geo- 
metric patterns. 

You can also have the image grow by 
changing it. A tree might start as a seedling 
in one screen, and grow vertically to fill 
successively more screens until it is a fully 
grown giant in the forest. 

Another dramatic technique is to add 
more images. Start with a single shot of a 
man's face, filling one screen. Then add 
faces of other people in other screens until 
your original image is now just a face in 
the crowd. 

And all this, remember, with two ordinary 
slide projectors. 

The very shape of each image is infin- 
itely variable: in addition to any geometric 
shape, special or irregular shapes are also 
possible by using special masks on the 
slides. 

By adding a specially-designed dissolve 
unit, the slide show almost becomes a movie. 

You can achieve extii^mley rapid motion 
effects by flashing a series of very similar 
images in rapid succession, with slight vari- 
ations in each shot. For example, a traffic 



light can turn from red to amber to greeu; 
a ferris wheel turn around; and a word 
light up. 

You can also incorporate a live speaker 
into the slide program. In the Wolf show, 
a live speaker suddenly appears in a spot- 
light, holding an aerosol can with the firm's 
■W" symbof emblazoned on it. He presses 
the button — and the same aerosol can pops 
onto the screen, beside him. 

Unlike movies, you can juxtapose still 
images to show relationships, make com- 
parisons and contrasts. You can also in- 
finitely vary the sizes and shapes of your 
images and of your screens. 

You get a time flexibility that would be 
impossible with movies. Since the operation 
of the technique is so simple, the operator 
has complete control over the duration of 
each image. A wide range of complicated 
effects can be achieved without the need for 
split-second synchronization of film and live 
speaker, or without the need for a complex, 
computer-controlled tape and highly trained 
technician. 

The technique requires a minimum 
amount of equipment. Most visual effects 
described can be created with two ordinary 
Kodak Ektagraphic 900 projectors, and an 
ordinary Kodak dissolve unit. 

An entire show can be packaged in reg- 
ular Kodak Carousel slide trays. It requires 
no technical expertise to run the show and 
the necessary equipment can be set up in 
a matter of minutes. 

The show can adapt itself to any sized 
facility, turning a meeting room, auditorium 
or exhibition booth into a small-scale Expo. 

Local and regional sales meetings can be 
as visually impressive as the national sales 
meeting . . . and the regional sales manager 
can run the whole show himself in a hotel 

The technique can even be used for a 
sales presentation. Since the show is low- 
cost and extremely portable, a salesman can 
literally carry it with him into a client's 
office. 

All this can be done on a budget that's 
frequently comparable to the cost of a tra- 
ditional single-screen slide show. 

All it takes for a multi-screen mini-spec- 
tacular is a couple of slide projectors, a 
modest budget, an electrical outlet and an 
audience. 

Then, just plug it in and turn them on. c 




A live speaker can step into 

the spotlight to demonstrate a certain 

product or emphasize a point. 



JANUARY, 1970 



29 



to and from any medium 



8mm Super 8 

16mm 

• Quality 

• Fasf Service 



Magno Sound 

723 Seventh Avenue 

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212-CI7-2630 



"The Three-Ten from Texas" 
History-PR-Information 



piPELINE BUILDING, conservation and 
-*- a lesson in little-known history of the 
Southwest are the ingredients successfully 
combined in the sharp new film, The Three- 
Ten from Texas. This film is a refreshing 
approach to a subject that can all-too-easily 
be boring. 

More like an exciting chapter from 
"Death Valley Days" than a pipeline film. 
The Three-Ten from Texas offers some lit- 
tle known history of the Southwest while 
following the construction trail of a massive 
pipeline being installed through beautiful, 
sometimes foreboding terrain by El Paso 
Natural Gas Co. 

Masterfully narrated by the craggy voice 
of Victor Jory and interspersed with Rem- 
ington-like paintings by Reynold Brown, the 
film changes neatly from Brown's scenes of 
the Old West to the present world of hardy 
men fighting choking dust and the desert 
to install a pipeline across parts of four 
southwestern states. 

Producer Jack Williamson, of Jack Wil- 
liamson Motion Picture Productions, under- 
staled. "We had some difficulties." 

"The pipeline was well underway," said 
Williamson, "before the film got a go-ahead, 
so without waiting for the niceties of a 
script, we had to plunge headlong into this 
700-mile-long construction project before 
they (construction crews) got it into the 
ground and covered up. Consequently, we 
shot 14,000 feet of film to get our ISVz 
minutes, retracing the route later to tie in 
our historical yarns." 

Williamson said, "The initial concept of 
the film was sold with a storyboard presen- 
tation, Reynold Brown's sketches put on 
slides, aided by a I/4" mag voice track with 
head-and-tail music and one or two sound 
effects. 

"In our initial consideration of the script, 
we recognized immediately that our prob- 
lem would not be finding enough trail stories 
along the route, but a matter of selection. 
We all agreed that we didn't want Billy the 
Kid, Wyatt Earp and Geronimo; we want- 
ted the people nobody had ever heard of 
— "nobodies' like harmonica-playing Dew- 
ey, who rides into the prologue and then 
out again. The only song he knew was 



'Where's My Sister Annie?'; it got written 
into the script that way — and there wasn't 
any such song. So we wrote it. Sammy Kahn 
can relax." 

Producer Williamson has cleverly cap- 
tured the challenge, the drama and the ex- 
hilaration of pipeline building, while tell- 
ing how it is done without lengthy mono- 
logues on the mechanical technicalities. 

Perhaps most important, the viewer 
leaves knowing a little more about the 
history of the area, feeling that the color- 
ful natural beauty of the area has been 
preserved and aware that some companies 
(El Paso Natural Gas in this case) are pro- 
viding important modern conveniences with- 
out polluting or impairing the natural en- 
vironment. 




Producer Jack Williamson (right) directs photog- 
raphy for Cameraman Don Flocker and Assistant 
Cory Williamson. 




Bending a natural gas pipe is tiicky business — 
too much and it won't work — too litt e and it 
won't lay right. 



Through the hills, valleys and desert, "The Three-Ten from Texas," follows a rolling, twisting route. 



30 





picture parade 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllirillllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIII 



Filmstrips Teach 
Human Relations Skills 

rrainiiig and niotuuting per- 
sonnel in today's competitive 
market is a never-ending proeess. 
Film A Month is a new, contin- 
uing series concept which can be 
of help to harried personnel and 
training directors who happen to 
be involved in the human rela- 
tions aspects of training. 

The Becittitiides, a series of 
monthly filmstrips, covers such 
subjects as self-esteem awareness, 
enthusiasm, integrity, sincerity, 
dependability, loyalty, courtesy, 
discipline, cooperation, appear- 
ance and ambition. The series is 
based on the belief that if em- 
ployees haven't the basic human 
relations skills to support their 
efforts, they will never be as suc- 
cessful — as profitable — for 
you, or for themselves, as they 
could and should be. 

For more information, write 
Film A Month, Suite 716, 505 
N. Ervav Bids.. Dallas, Texas 
75201. 



"Land Of the Sea"— A 
Theatrical Industrial 

Alcoa Aluminum's theatrical 
"feature", Laud of the Sea. is 
currently making the rounds of 
theatres around the country, be- 
ing booked in as a free "feature" 
to theatres who want to run it as 
a supplement to their main pro- 
gram. 

Produced by Jerry Fairbanks 
Productions and distributed by 
Modern Talking Picture Service, 
the film is a feature-length look 
at modern oceanography, explor- 
ing and explaining mysteries of 
the deep. 

It presents an all around look 
at life and the land beneath the 
seas. Included are scenes of 
aquanauts living undersea, the 
dramatic moment when an atom- 
ic submarine breaks through the 
polar icecap. 

The dramatic tenseness of the 
recovery of a lost H-bomb is 
revealed as the search is made — 
and successfully concluded. 

Narrated by Lt. Commander 



.Ion Lindbergh, USNR, Land of 

:he Sea probes the last frontier 
on earth. 

More significantly, the film 
represents an emerging potential 
for a developing type of spon- 
sored film - — those specifically 
prepared for theatrical release 
and distribution. 



Red Cross Film Teaches 
Teachers Water Safety 

A crew of three film makers, 
all in their early twenties, are do- 
ing their best to make the tradi- 
tional programs of the American 
Red Cross meaningful in today's 
world. 

Their most recent effort is a 
film called Aquatic School. This 




Potential Red Cross water safety in- 
structors observe a demonstration of 
the tired swimmer carry. 



14'/2 minute color film shows 
what goes on where water safety 
is taught to those who will be 
teaching others when they return 
to their own communities. The 
film can be obtained from your 
local Red Cross chapter. 



Film Clarifies Court Rule 
On Religion in Schools 

Kevitone for Education — Re- 
ligion and tlje Public .Schools, a 
half-hour. color documentary 
film, was produced for the Edu- 
cational Communication Associ- 
ation by Intcrfilm Cinema East 
for the purpose of clarifying the 
United States Supreme Court de- 
cisions regarding religion in the 
public schools. The constant 
growth of available technical 



knowledge, rapidly growing and 
more complicated history, tran- 
sient quality of many of our com- 
mimitics. and ease of travel and 
communication are all factors 
necessitating a far different edu- 
cation for today's children than 
that needed by the students of 
only a generation ago. But. the 
film contends, the essential hu- 
man questions remain the same 
. . . questions of identity and 
morality and human relation- 
ships. 

Ten articulate spokesmen, 
leaders in education and religion, 
present their points of view in 
the film. They expose the curric- 
ulum possibilities still legal under 
the Court rulings, and point out 
methods and examples now in 
practice to make this subject an 
integral part of public school life. 

The film stresses that it is de- 
sirable and, indeed, necessary 
for our schools to teach about 
religion. Throughout the ages, 
religion has played an important 
role in this history, literature and 
art of the world. To ignore this 
role is to withhold a large seg- 
ment of the student's education 
and understanding. The key word 
in such studies is objectivity. The 
aim must be to educate — not 
indoctrinate; to encourage un- 
derstanding — not commitment. 
Keystone for Education pro- 
vides an authoritative spring- 
board for community information 
and action. It is being distributed 
bv Sterling Movies. 



Important Breakthrough in 
Computer Applications 

An important breakthrough in 
computer applications is de- 
scribed in Masterminding the 
Computer, sponsored by Haskins 
& Sells for students of accounting 
and other management sciences. 
The 14-minute film shows how 
the Auditape System saves time 
and money by printing out exact- 
ly what is needed. 

The film is available to col- 
leges and Universities from As- 
sociation Films. 



CREATE THE 
Right MOOD 
EVERY TIME 

with the 



< \ 



n 



MAJOR' 

i PRODUCTION 
iMUSIC 

(LIBRARY 

= "MAJOR" offers you a full 

= 65 hours of background 

E production music for titles, 

= bridges, background — for 

= scoring, editing, recording and 

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I • FEATURE PRODUCTIONS 

= • DOCUMENTARIES 

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i • ANIMATION 

I • INDUSTRIAL FILMS 

E • SALES PRESENTATIONS 
\ • COMMERCIALS 

\ • EDUCATIONAL 

i "MAJOR" specializes in sound 
: — you get exceptional technical 
\ know-how and beautifully- 
: recorded original music on 
: LP records or V4-lnch Tape, 
: or on 16 or 35mm Mag. 
: Tape ready for a mix. 

• IMPORTANT: "Ma'ior" owns in own 
: copyrights on all production mood 
; music in its library. World rights 
: available to you on a completely 
'■ sound legal basis. Re-recording rights 
available on a "per selection" or "un- 
limited use" flat fee arrangement. 



; WRITE FOR 135-PAGE CATALOGUE TO 

I THOMAS J. VALENTINO 

ilNCORPORATED 

I Esfob/ished ?932 

; 150 W. 46 St. New York 10036 
: or phone (212) 246-4675 

i Also available: Detailed Catalogue 
i of our complete LP library of 
: 471 Sound Effects. 



JAMUARY, 1970 



31 




new products review 



miiiiMiiiiiiiiiMiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii nil I I iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii I iiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiniii 



Optical Improvement Lens 
For Carousel Projectors 

The Coil (Condenser Optical 
Improvement Lens) lens system 
will provide 40% greater illumi- 
nation with a normal DEK 500 




Coil replaces original condenser lens 
set for greater brilliance. 

watt, 1 20 volt lamp in any stan- 
dard carousel projector. Improve- 
ment of the light factor results 



VANDERLEELIE FILM SYSTEMS 
PROUDLY OFFERS YOU 



SOUND FOR 
YOUR BOLEX! 




An Inexpensive, high-quality lightweight 
sound-on-film module. newly-improved, 
converts your 16mm Bolex to a single- 
system magnetic sound camera. Its excel- 
lent performance matches or exceeds 
professional standards. 



The Boly-Sound transistorized amplifier 
Is designed especially for use with this 
module. 



Boly-Drive replaces the spring-wind 
mechanism, assures constant speed — 24 
f.p.s. ±1% — and permits installation and 
use of 200' or 400' magazines. 



Now — Your Bolex becomes more versa- 
tile, more effective, more productive 
than ever. For detailed information write 
to: 



VANDERLEELIE FILM SYSTEMS 

P.O. Boi 8092 

Universal Cify, California 91604 

213/876-0237 



from a coating process of both 
front and rear condenser lenses, 
coupled with a reformulation of 
the heat reducer thus eliminating 
the need for heavy duty blowers 
or increased power supply. 

For full details, write Record- 
ed Sales Visual Presentations, 
Inc., Dept. BSC, 1815 A'. Mer- 
idian Street, Indianapolis, Indi- 
ana 46202. 



Complete Line of Film 
Rollers from Treise 

A complete line of film rollers 
for lab processors features ball- 
bearing design insuring minimum 
film pull and smooth processor 
performance. All rollers are pre- 
cision molded of durable plastic, 
including the core itself. The 
lands in the rollers are angled 
so that only the outside edges of 
the film touch and the image 
never comes in contact with the 
roller. 




Treise film rollers are available in 
many sizes and types. 

In addition to the standard 
rollers are other models for use 
with unperforated or multiperfor- 
ated film or any type of film on 
tendency drive processors. For 
complete information, write 
Treise Engineering, Inc.. Dept. 
BSC. 1941 First Street. San 
Fernando. Calif. 91340. 



Sound Projector Serves 
All 8mm Formats 

The Bauer T22, a single-sys- 
tem projector, offers sound pro- 
jection and semi-automatic 
threading of all three 8mm for- 
mats and is completely self-con- 



tained. The projector is supplied 
with a highly corrected Vario 
Kliptagon f/1.4 zoom lens rang- 
ing from 18 to 30mm. A 12-volt, 
100-watt quartz iodine projection 
lamp provides brilliance and con- 
stant illumination over a 50-hour 




This Bauer sound projector com- 
bines simplicity of operation with 
many advanced features. 

life. Continuously variable speeds 
range from 18 to 24 fps, forward 
or reverse, with or without light. 
Two inputs are provided, one 
for microphone, the other for an 
additional sound source. Mixing 
is automatic, as is sound-on- 
sound recording. For full infor- 
mation, write Allied Impe.x Cor- 
poration, Dept. BSC, 168 Glen 
Cove Road, Carle Place, N.Y. 



Mitee Grip Earns 
Title "The Gripper" 

The Mitee Grip supports many 
types of lighting instruments and 
accessories as well as cameras. It 
grips any surface securely, is 




easy to adjust and incorporates 
quick locking devices. The unit 
features a unique 4-way bracket 
consisting of three male studs for 
the mounting of light fixtures and 
a V4 "-20 threaded male stud for 
camera mounting. 

For complete descriptive data, 
write Berkey-ColorTran. Inc.. 
Dept. B5C.' 1015 Chestnut 
St.. Burlmnk. California 91502. 



Hervic Distributes 
Unomat Strobe Line 

Hervic Corporation is United 
States distributor for the Unomat 
line of strobes. At present three 
electronic flash models are of- 
fered. The model 3000 operates 
on penlite batteries and models 
6000 and 1000 are equipped 
with built-in rechargeable nickel 





The Mitee Grip weighs only one 
pound. 



Three electronic models of Unomat 
strobes are available. 



cadmium batteries and built-in ' 
chargers. All Unomat strobes can 
operate directly on AC mains 
and are equipped with "hot- 
shoe" contacts. 

For more information, write 
Cinema Beaulieu. Dept. BSC, 
14225 Ventura Blvd.. Sherman 
Oal<s. California 91403. 



Kodak Has Super 8 
System Available 

Eastman Kodak has an- 
nounced the immediate avail- 
ability of a professional super 8 
cartridge projection system. De- 
signed to use the Kodak Projec- 
tion Cartridge, the system pro- 
vides a completely enclosed film 
path, from supply reel through 
take-up reel. In use, the cart- 
ridge is snapped into position on 
the Kodak Ektagraphic 120 pro- 
jector and the thread button is 



32 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



pressed. The movie begins im- 
metiiately as a reliable projector 
mechanism transports the lihii on 
a stress-free path. 

Automatic rewind returns the 
fihn to the cartridge where it can 
be screened again. Additional 
controls allow the viewer to stop 
the film, review selected portions 
or automatically return the film 
to the cartridge at any time. The 
projector weighs less than 15 
pounds. For more information, 
write Eastmun Kodak Company. 
Depl. BSC. 343 State St.. Roch- 
ester. N.Y. 14650. 



Filmline Introduces 
Film Processor 

The DC-240 1 6mm color posi- 
ti\e film processor is a profes- 
sional caliber machine built by 
Filmline Corporation and de- 
signed to meet the industry's ex- 
acting requirements for speed, 
quality and trouble-free opera- 
tion. 

The DC-240 processes color 
positive emulsions at 240 FPM. 




dak Carousel or Ektagraphic 
slide projector changes the pro- 
jector into a sound-slide projec- 
tor. 

The Kalovox is self-contained. 
To record a message, press the 
■record" button. If the first try 
is less than the best, push the 
"repeat"" button and try again. 



The DC-240 film processor was de- 
signed for use by major film labs. 

It is constructed of heavy gauge, 
type 316 stainless steel, and is 
equipped with demand friction 
drive. For additional information 
and details, write Filiuline Cor- 
poration, Dept. BSC, Miljord, 
Connecticut. 



Kalart Provides 
Sound/Slide System 

The Kalovox TM sound slide 
system combines any convention- 
al 2 x 2 slide with a reel-to-reel 
sound tape. The tape capacity al- 
lows up to one minute of record- 
ing time per cassette. Mounting 
the Kalovox in place of the con- 
ventional trav on either the Ko- 




The Kalovox provides sound slide 
synchronization in a self-contained 
unit. 

The "cue"" button is pushed when 
the message has been completed. 
This records an inaudible im- 
pulse that will make the Kalovox 
automatically advance to the next 
slide cassette. For more informa- 
tion, write The Kalart Company, 
lite. Dept. BSC. Plaiinille. 
Conn. 06062. 



Light Table Available in 
Floor or Table Top Models 

The Lucent View Light Table 
is available in either floor or 
table top models. The use of 
washable plastic has made pos- 
sible the reasonable cost, and 
the table is rugged enough for 
darkroom use and still attrac- 
tive enough to serve as an in- 
spection table in office or lab- 
oratory. 

For more information, write 
Buckingham Graphic. Inc.. Dept. 
BSC 834 Custer, Evanston, III. 
60202. 



lion projection, as \».e!l as still 
picture and frame-by-frame 
viewing. Write I'ancolor, Inc., 
Dept. BSC. 345 Bark Ave., New 
York. N.Y. 10022 for more in- 
formation. 



High Speed Film for Use 
Under Low Illumination 

Gafpan High Speed Reversal 
Film Type 2962 has a daylight 
exposure index of 500 that can 
be safely pushed to ASA 1000 
with special processing. Its high 
speed makes the film especially 
suitable for filming indoor sports 
events and outdoor events under 
artificial lighting. 

More information is available 
from GAF Corporation. Dept. 
BSC. 140 West 5\st Street, New 
York, N.Y. 10020 

Many Sizes of 
Splicing Tape Available 

Magnetic splicing tape with di- 
mensions of .140" + 0-.005. on 
a 1" diameter core, up to linear 
lengths of at least 160' and also 
diniensions of .140" - 0-.005. 
on a 3" diameter core, up to 
linear lengths of at least 550' is 
Contiimed on page 34 



TV Film Chain Projector 
Needs No Modification 

A capstan drive and rotating 
prism assembly make possible a 
motion picture camera which 
does not have to be modified for 
television film chain systems. 
Bright, clear, steady pictures are 
assured when picked up by a 
T'V camera for closed-circuit or 
off-the-air TV viewing. The pro- 
jector offers the convenience of 
drop-in magazine loading with a 
two-hour capacity of sound films 
in color or black and white and 
push-button access to any of up 
to six subjects in a single maga- 
zine. 

Other features provide remote 
controls for reverse and slow mo- 



Manager 
- II 



Software program 

(electronic video recording) 

electronic Video Recording (EVR). 
■he exciting new system of audio- 
\u«l ccrT^mun;cotlon. has opened 
• ne door to a "BILLION DOLLAR 
NEW INDUSTRY". 
The Software Manager required to 
support this new business Is a key 
figure In our EVR operation. He is 
responsible for . . . DEVELOPMENT 

ACQUISITION ... and 
MERCHANDISING of software 
programs. He must be thoroughly 
familiar wi^h techniques of the 
industry in these major functions. He 
should be sales and financially 
oriented with strong distribution 
and marketing background in the 
software business. Preferably 
audio-visual films, tapes, etc. Ex- 
cellent contacts In the film 
and software industries are vital. 
MOTOROLA has been awarded the 
EXCLUSIVE rights to make and 
market EVR PLAYERS in the USA 
and Canada ... (by CBS Laborator- 
ies, inventor of this new system). 
In terms of interesting wort, 
continuing opportunitv for future 
advancement and personal economic 
rewards, this position should have a 
strong appeal to the No. 2 man 
with a software or audio-visual 
company. 

(^MOTOROLA® 

4545 W. Augusta Blvd. Chicago. III. 60651 

An Eaual Opportunitv Emplover 



musif ex inc 

45 w. 45 St., n. y. c. 



MUSIC & FX EDITING 



^^pTj/l 



. INDUSTRIALS 

. P.R. FILMS 

. DOCUMENTARIES 

. RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT 

. TRADE SHOWS 

. TV & RADIO SPOTS 

. FEATURE FILMS, ETC., 

. ETC., ETC., ETC., ETC., ETC. 

WE HAVE SCORED OVER 
6000 PRODUCTIONS 



TRY US- 



BOB VELAZCO 



ci 6-4061 



JANUARY, 1970 



33 



new products . . . 



continued 



now available. Zipper Industries 
is able to produce any core diam- 
eter size between 1" and 3" to 
meet specific requirements and 
has developed equipment to slit 
pressure sensitive tapes to widths 




This splicing tape meets specific di- 
mension requirements. 

narrow as 1/32" with very high 
tolerance. 

The splicing tape can be used 




Quality-BJIt 

Film Shipping Cases 

• Best quality domestic fibre 

• Heavy steel corners for 
added protection 

• Durable 1" web straps 

• Large address card holder 
with positive retainer spring 

• Sizes from 400' to 2000' 

OTHER "QUALITY-BILT" ITEMS: 

Salon Print Shipping Cases 

Sound Slidefilm Shipping Cases 
(for Transcriptions & Filmstrips) 

FUmstrip Shipping Cases (hold up 
to 6 strips plus scripts) 

K^'rite direct to 
maniijactnrer lor catalog 

WM. SCHllESSLER 

Div. ol Liidu'ig Industries 

361 W. Superior St., Chicago 10, III. 

Phone: 312-SU 7-6869 



on any magnetic tape. For infor- 
mation, write Zipper Industries, 
Inc.. Depl. BSC, 207 W. Central 
Ave.. Muywood, New Jersey 
OlbOl. 



Noreico Introduces 
The Synchroplayer 

The Synchroplayer, an AC-op- 
erated cassette slide/filmstrip 
synchronizer, is designed for 
flush mount installation in table, 
bench or wall, or can be carried 
in a custom case. It can also be 
used as a component in multi- 
media systems. 

The Synchroplayer provides 
complete separation between nar- 




The Synchroplayer can be used as 
a portable unit or flush mounted. 



ration tracks and projector cue 
tracks, thus preventing signal 
bleed and crosstalk. For details, 
write North American Fliilips 
Corporation, Dept. BSC, 100 
Ea.st 42nd Street. New York, 
N.Y. 10017. 



Printer Designed For 
Filmstrip Industry 

The Peterson Film Strip Print- 
er was designed especially for the 
slide and film strip industry. 
35mm motion pictures may also 
be printed, it is designed around 
the Peterson additive system and 
utilizes three manual light valves. 
Both the negative loop and the 
rawstock are vacuum cleaned. 
For more information, write 
Peter.son Enterprises, Inc.. 1840 
Pickwick Ave.. Glenview, Illinois 
60025. 



Controller For Multi-Image 
Slide Presentations 

The Media Master 300 is an 
easily programmed electronic 
control unit which simplifies the 
preparation of three-projector 
slide presentations. It makes pos- 
sible lap dissolves, fades, and 



simulated animation while a self- 
contained tape recorder adds 
audio narratives and effects. 

Programming and control 
equipment are contained in a 
carrying case and the entire unit 




Programming the Media Master 300 
is as simple as pushing buttons. 

weighs only 25 pounds. For more 
information, write Systems Tech- 
nology Corporation, Depl. BSC. 
55\2 Over Street. Dallas. Texas 



Unilux Introduces the 
System 700 

The System 700, large area 
strobe lighting unit, is for syn- 
chronous use with all motion pic- 
ture cameras and video systems. 
It stops action and produces 
sharp images on film and video 
tape, regardless of the speed of 
motion of the subject. The Sys- 
tem 700 radiates almost no heat 
onto the subject. 

The 700 flashes up to 250 
flashes per second (15,000 




This Unilux strobe makes possible 
new effects and added realism. 



flashes per minute), with each 
flash lasting for approximately 
50 microseconds. For further in- 
formation, contact Uunilu.x, Inc., 
48-20 70th Street. Woodside. 
N.Y. 11377 

Vidicue 5000 Provides 
Videotape Editing, Control 

The Vidicue 5000 line of flex- 
ible, automatic videotape editing 
and control systems has been de- 
signed to meet the needs of both 



the broadcaster and the produc- 
tion facility. The minimum basic 
unit includes the Vidicue 5100 
time code generator and the 
5200 control unit. A single gen- 
erator supplies an amplitude 
modulated code. 

This code is recorded on the 
cue track or one audio channel 
while recording or previewing the 




The Vidicue 5000 serves both broad- 
caster and producer. 

tape. Time in hours, minutes and 
seconds is displayed as a digital 
readout. For more information, 
write Datatron. Inc., Dept. BSC, 
1562 Reynolds Avenue, Santa 
Ana. Cali'f. 92705. 



Sound-Filmstrip Projector 
Fits Under Airplane Seat 

The Mastermatic projector, 
which employs a single cartridge 
for both filmstrip and audio tape, 
can be used for front or rear 
projection. The projector turns 
off automatically after comple- 
tion of the presentation, or can 
be set for continuous automatic 
replay or frame-by-frame manual 
control. Conversion to front pro- 
jection requires only plugging in 
a replacement lens. 

If the audio program requires 




This projector, with its 7x10 inch 
built-in screen, weighs only 18 
pounds. 

change, the modular sub-car- 
tridge housing the tape can be 
replaced instantly. More informa- 
tion is available from Elco Cor- 
poration, Optisonics Division. 
Dept. BSC, Montgonieryville, Pa. 
18936. 



34 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



"Is This Trip Necessary?" 
Humble Cuts Executive Travel 



;:OME EXECUTIVES al llunihk- Oil 



s 



Rcfiniiii; Co. in Houstim iiaxi.' experi- 
mented with giving up interemiipany eon- 
ference trips for watching television. 

The reason is the use of videotape re- 
cording used with the telephone for inter- 
company conferences. An example: 

A group of men sits around a conference 
table in New York City watching two TV 
screens. When the pictures fade, the group 
begins conferring with four men from Mum- 
ble's supply department and Humble Pipe 
Line Co. whom they had just been watch- 
ing on TV. These men are in Housion. 
Texas. 

They are the first in Humble to use the 
VTR/telephone system introduced by the 
company by the Telecommunications func- 
tion of Humble's General Services Dept. 

The men in Houston were to make twci 
presentations to a special advisory commit- 
tee of Humble's parent company. Standard 
Oil of New Jersey in New York. 

Rather than travel to New York, the men 
spent an hour and 15 minutes recording the 
two presentations on videotape at Humble 
headquarters. This included making the 
tapes (one was 18 minutes, the other 7) 
and then reviewing them. 

The tapes were sent to New York for 
playback. The men making the presenta- 
tion along with some of their associates, 
assembled in a Houston conference room. 
Committee members convened in a con- 
ference room at Rockefeller Plaza in New 
York. The two groups were placed in di- 
rect and continuous communications through 

a telephone conference call a company 

tieline hookup which uses table top speak- 
ers and microphones to relay conversations. 

After watching the tapes, Jersey execu- 
tives asked questions and discussed the pro- 
posed projects with the men in Houston. 
The conference lasted less than an hour, 
and both parties were enthusiastic about the 
effectiveness of the videotape/conference 
call system. 

Humble is finding many new ways to use 
its videotape recording equipment in train- 




ing, communications and public relations. 
The company encourages videotape record- 
ing use by all of its companies and divisions. 

The man responsible for involving Hum- 
ble with \ideotapc recording is E. P. Fitz- 
gerald. Humble's corporate network coor- 
dinator. Fitzgerald says that one of his rc- 
>ponsihilitics is to generate new ideas and 
applications for using videotape equipment 
within the corporate family. An example of 
this is in Humble's Exploration School in 
Houston. Recorders are used to record class- 
es in ESSO Production Research Company's 
Geophysical Exploration Schools. Geophys- 
ical exploration is the scientific search for 
ore deposits on the Earth's crusts and the 
mapping of rock structures that may contain 
oil or natural gas, 

"Students can get the expertise of EPRC's 
Houston lecturers and eliminate travelling 
and housing expenses," Fitgerald said. 
"EPRC's students are professional people 
working in a scientific field getting a re- 
fresher course and learning new techniques. 
EPRC's operations require a state-of-the-art 
type knowledge of all forms of oil produc- 
tion, exploration and all other fields in- 
volved in the petroleum industry. Previous- 
ly, these professionals have been brought to 
Houston from all over the world to be up- 
dated and learn new techniques. Now we 
have the capability to record this informa- 
tion on videotape and send the tapes to 
them." 



a color novie 
from a lilm strip? 



* 

Z003VXg| 



1^^' 



art, Silm clips 
€f products 
sYiitiii'oiiiKCil 
to voice, iiiiisitv 
soiiiiil effects 




Classes on geophysical exploration being con- 
ducted and simultaneously recorded for view- 
ing by Humbe employees around the world. 
them." 



The p^. system that shows pictures. 



Bauer's P6 automatic is a compact 
16mm auto-threading sound pro 
jector, of course. You can see 
that. 

What you can't see is its 
remarkable 15-watt transis- 
torized amplifier. But you can 
hear its effect. Clearly, cleanly, 
and (with optional 20W speak- 
er) in most large size auditori- 
ums, whether you use films with 
optical or magnetic tracks. Be- 
cause this rugged, handsome 
projector takes either and trans- 
forms them into high-fidelity 
sound. 

The P6 automatic also has 
magnetic recording capability (in- 
cluding sound on sound, so you 
can add your own comments over 
music you record on the track); 
mike, record player and tape 
recorder inputs: built-in 3W 
speaker; and separate volume, " 
bass and treble controls. 

Of course, this "p. a. system" is also a 
brilliant projector, with optional 4000' 
capacity and 2-speed film drive, forward 
or reverse. Bauer also makes the P6 
automatic with a Ivlarc-300* metal-arc 
lamp that puts out more than tour times 
the light of conventional projector lamps. 
That you must see to believe. 




See your dealer or write to: Allied Impex Corp., 
»...,„.. 168 Glen Cove Rd.. Carle Place, L.I.. 
[°]|[§| N.Y. 11514. Chicago; Dallas and Glen- 
[p»oto,m: dale, Calif. 

Bauer P6 

automatic-M151 

16mm portable sound projector 



BAUER® ROBERT BOSCH ElEKTRONIK AND PMOTOKINO GMBH 't. M. GENERAL ELECTRIC 



JANUARY, 1970 



35 



NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF AUDIO-VISUAL DEALERS 



EASTERN STATES 

• MAINE • 
Headlight Film Service, 111 Oceao 
St., So. Portland, Me. 

• MARYLAND • 

Stark-Films, Inc. (Since 1920) 
537 N. Howard St., Baltimore 
Md. 21201. Phone: 305/539-3391 
• WASHINGTON • 

"The" Film Center, 915 12th St. 
NW, Washington, D. C. 20005 
(202) 393-1205 

• NEW YORK • 

Bnchan Pictures, 122 W. Chippewa 

St., Buffalo 2, N.Y. 
Cine Communicators, 777 Thlid 

Avenue, New York, New York 

10017, (212) 682-2780 
The Jam Handy Organization, 1775 

Broadway, New York 10019. 

Phone 212/JUdson 2-4060. 
Projection Systems, Incorporated, 

202 East 44th Street, New York, 

New York 10036 (212) MU 2- 

0995 

Training Films, Inc., 33 Laurel St., 

Butler, N.J. 07405 
Visual sciences, 599BS Suffem, N.Y. 

10901 

• PENNSYLVANIA • 
Appel Visual Service, Inc., 12 

Eighth St., Pittsburgh 15222. 
Audio Visuals Center, 14 Wood St., 

Pittsburgh 15222, Sales, Rentals, 

& Repairs. 
Oscar H. HIrf, Inc., 41 N. 11th St. 

Philadelphia, 19107. Phone: 215/ 

923-0650. 

J. P. LiUey & Son, Inc., Box 3035. 

2009 N. Third St., Harrisburg 
17105, (717) 238-8123. 
L. C. Vath Audio Visuals, 449 N. 

Hermitage Rd., Sharpsville, 16150. 
342-5204. 



SOUTHERN STATES 

• FLORIDA • 

Jack Freeman's, 2802 S. MacDill 
Ave., Tampa (813) 839-5374. 

• GEORGIA • 

Colomal Films, 752 Spring St. N.W. 
404/875-8823, Atlanta 30308. 

• LOUISIANA • 

Delta Visual Service, Inc., 715 Girod 
St., New Orleans 70130. Phone: 
504/525-9061. 



MIDWESTERN STATES 

• ILLINOIS • 
fhc Jam Handy Organization. 230 

North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 
60601. State 2 6757. 



Midwest Visual Equipment Co., Inc. 

6500 N. Hamlin, Chicago 60645. 
Phone: (312) IR 8-9820. and 
Two equipment rental locations: 
571 W. Randolph — AN 3-5076. 
G'Hareland: 6600 Mannheim Rd. 
at G'Hare Inn— Phone 296-1037. 

• MICHIGAN • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 2821 
E. Grand Blvd., Detroit 48211. 
Phone: 313/TR 5-2450. 

• MISSOURI • 
Cor-rell Communications Co., 5316 
Pershing, St. Louis 63112. Equip- 
ment rental (314) FO 7-1111. 

Swank Motion Pictures, Inc., 201 S. 

Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
63103. (314) JE 1-5100. 

• OHIO • 

Academy Film Service, Inc., 2110 
Payne Ave., Cleveland 441 14. 

Sunray Films, Inc., 2005 Chester 
Ave., Cleveland 44114. 

Twyman Films, Inc., 329 Salem 
Ave., Dayton 45401. 

M. H. Martin Company, 1118 Lin- 
coln Way E., Massillon. 



WESTERN STATES 

• CALIFORNIA • 
Coast Visual Education Co., 5610 
Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 
90028.466-1651 

The Jam Handy Organization, 305 

Taft Building, 1680 N. Vine St., 
Hollywood 90028. HG 3-2321. 

Photo & Sound Company, 870 Mon- 
terey Pass Road, Monterey Park, 
91754. Phone: (213) 264-6850. . 

Raike Company, Inc. A-V Center, 

641 North Highland Ave., Los 
Angeles 36. (213) 933-7111 

SAN FRANCISCG AREA 
Photo & Sound Company, 116 Na- 

toma St., San Francisco 94105. 
Phone: 415/GArfield 1-0410. 

• COLORADO • 
Cromars' Audio-Visual Center, 1200 
Stout St., Denver 80204. 



• NEW MEXICO • 
University Book Store Allied Supply 
Company, 2122 Central'East, Al- 
buquerque 87106. 

• OREGON • 
Moore's Audio Visual Center, Inc. 

234 S.E. 12th Ave., Portland 
97214. Phone: 503/233-5«21. 

• UTAH • 
Deseret Book Company, 33 East 
South Temple St.. Salt Lake, 10. 



BUSINESS SCREEN 
MARKETPLACE 



POSITION WANTED 

Experienced TV commercial and 
industrial film salesman wants 
to represent top New York or 
Hollywood producer in Chicago- 
Midwest area. Will set up office 
if wanted. Excellent track rec- 
ord.. Good agency and indus- 
trial contacts. Would expect 
drawing account set-up against 
sales commissions. Write: 

Box 666 

BUSINESS SCREEN 

402 West Liberty Drive 

Wheaton, Illinois 60187 




Shelf 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



iiiiiiiiii 



IIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItlllllllllllllllllllll 



Books from Oympic Films 

Books on educational techno- 
logy make up a special section of 
the newly published 4th edition 
of "A Selected and Annotated 
Bibliography on Audiovisual 
Utilization" For a free copy, 
send a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope to Olympic Film Ser- 
vice. Dept. BSC, 161 West 22nd 
Street, New York, N.Y. 10011. 

Title Services Data 

An attractive folder which pic- 
tures some of the steps used in 
title-preparation and quotes 
prices for hand-set and photo- 
lettered title production pro- 
cesses, silk screen, and the pro- 
duction of slides for television, 
advertising and sales presenta- 
tions — plus imprinting service 
for brochures, envelope staffers 
and catalogs — is available from 
rille House, Dept BSC. 723 
Seward St., Hollywood, Calif. 
90038. 

Help in Planning Storage 

The "Storage and Work Area 
Equipment Catalog, Volume 3, 
No. 1" was planned for execu- 



tives responsible for storage plan- 
ning in warehousing, manufac- 
turing, stock room or production 
areas. Especially helpful for the 
photography field, the manual is 
crammed full of ideas on how to 
layout new storage areas. 

The booklet is free to those in 
the photography field. Just write 
on your business letterhead to 
Bernard Franklin Company, 
Dept. BSC, 4424 Paul Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19124. Others 
may obtain a copy for $1.50. 



DeWolfe Music List 

The DeWolfe Music Library, 
Inc. has published a 500 page 
classified music catalog for mo- 
tion picture, slidefilm, and video- 
tape producers who want to 
create their own music scores. 
The music is available on V4" 
tape and LP disks. 

Of special interest is a large 
variety of modem sounding re- 
cordings for industrial and docu- 
mentary films, and TV/Radio 
commercials. For your copy write 
The DeWolfe Music Library, 
Inc.. Dept. BSC, 25 West 45th 
Street, New York, N.Y. 10036. 



36 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



Elements of Film 

A new book. Elements of Film, by Lee 
R. Bobker, president of Vision Associates, 
New York, is designed to appeal to both 
the serious student of film wiio vvisiies to 
pursue a career in filmmaking and to the 
general reader who wishes to learn more 
about this most dynamic of art forms. 

The structure of the book reflects the 
filmmaking process itself. Early chapters 
follow the order in which a film is made: 
script, image (camera, lighting, composi- 
tion), sound and editing, with special at- 
tention to the roles of scriptwriters, camera- 
men, film editors, actors and directors and 
their relationships to one another. Empha- 
sis throughout is on the interconnection be- 
tween the techniques of filmmaking (the 
how to do it) and their creative application 
(the why to do it). 

A separate chapter is included on the 
work of 13 major directors of theatrical film 
(Bergman, Kurosawa, Antonioni, etc.) — 
the complete filmmakers — who have 
shaped every element of their films from 
acting techniques and optical effects to the 
final editing. 

While Mr. Bobker goes to great lengths 
to explore the philosophies and working 
methods of these directors, he does not, 
surprisingly enough from one of the out- 
standing modern directors of the documen- 
tary and public information film, have much 
to say about his own methods and tech- 
niques, or those of his contemporaries in 
this important division of the cinema art. 

Elements of Film, 303 pages, is published 
by Harcourt, Brace & World. ($4.95). 



Books on Cinema 

Indiana University Press has available 
several books on the cinema which will be 
of interest to movie makers. "Literature 
and Film" by Robert Richardson, Chairman 
of the Department of English at the Univer- 
sity of Denver, begins with the simple but 
possibly crucial observation that, in general, 
literature and film are storytelling arts, and 
that, therefore, they are not the entirely dif- 
ferent, antithetical disciplines that they are 
widely held to be. He shows the relationship 
of the two. pointing our differences as well 



as similarities, and ilenioiistialing how each 
form and its associated criticism is able to 
iilumiiuite and enliven the other. 

■■'1 he Inlernational liliii industry" by 
Thomas H. Cniback, Researcii Assistant 
Professor in the Institute of Communica- 
tions Research and Assistant Professor in 
the College o\' Conununicalions at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, documents a study show- 
ing that fihn making in America and West- 
ern Euro|ie is rapidly moving toward inter- 
national coproduction. The massive increase 
of American investment in European film 
companies and the continuing search for 
wider and more lucrative markets are creat- 
ing a dehumanized, slick style of film that 
eliminates domestic cultural characteristics 
and blurs the expression of individual na- 
tional perceptions. Mr. Guback also dis- 
cusses postwar quota and tariff restrictions 
established to protect European film indus- 
tries, the use of the boycott to force a 
foreign market for American films, the in- 
creasing acceptance of European films in 
the United States, our government's backing 
of the industry, and its use of film for 
propaganda purposes. 

"Film Makers on Film Making" was 
edited with an introduction by Harry M. 
Geduld, Associate Professor of English and 
Comparative Literature at Indiana Univer- 
sity. In this book, thirty distinguished film 
makers, ranging chronologically from Louis 
Lumiere to Kenneth Anger, present their 
views of the art and craft of the film. 

Information on any of these books is 
available from the Indiana University Press, 
Depi. BSC. \Oili &. Morton St., Blooming- 
ton, Indiana 47401. 



Sound Services Rate Card 

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broadcast, audio/visual and advertising. 

The rate card may be obtained by writing 
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JANUARY, 1970 



37 



Eclair Corporation of America 20-21 Recorded Publications 37 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Allied Impex Corporation 35 

Animated Productions 35 

Arriflex Corp. of America 4-5 

Better Selling Bureau 14 

Byron Motion Pictures 3 

Camera Mart, Inc., The 26 

Capital Film Laboratories, Inc 7 

Cine Magnetics, Inc 9 

Cinema Processors, Inc 1 

Colburn, George W., Laboratory, Inc. .. 8 

Comprehensive Service Corp 37 

Corelli-Jacobs Film Music, Inc 37 

DeLuxe General 15 



Handy Organization, The Jam 

Fourth Cover 

Hollywood Valley Film Labs 37 

Houston Photo Products 13 

Magno Sound 30 

Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc. 

Second Cover 

Motorola 33 

Musifex, Inc 33 



North Shore Film Labs 23 

Plastic Reel Corp Third Cover 



Schuessler, William 
Summit Films 



.34 
.10 



Title House 37 

United Air Lines 6 

United World Films 11 

U.S. Industrial Film Festival i7-18 



Valentino, Thomas J., Inc 31 

Vanderleelie Film Systems 32 

Virco Recording 10 




IIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii 



A Wrong Impression About 
NAC Smm Films 

An item in our "Industry 
News" column in November car- 
ried information about the U.S. 
Government's new National Au- 
diovisual Center that gave some 
of our readers the wrong impres- 
sion. 

The misimpression was created 
by reference to Technicolor 
Corp. as the "sole" supplier of 
optical sound film cartridses for 
the NAC. 

The issue was further confused 
by reference to 5,000 titles in the 
NAC catalog when there is ac- 
tually less than that number. 

Insofar as we have been able 
to determine. Technicolor is the 
only major cartridge film sup- 
plier to package optical sound 
film, thus Technicolor and their 
lab licensees are likely the only 
optical sound film suppliers, 
though they have no official con- 
tract with the N.AC. 

Our disservice in coverage was 
a failure to comment on the many 
suppliers of magnetic sound film 
cartridges for the NAC. 

To set and keep the record 
straight, we checked with Jim 
Gibson, director of the National 
Audiovisual Center, who told us: 

"Our new film sales catalog 
contains approximately 3,500 ti- 



tles of U.S. Government films 
and filmstrips. Price tags carry 
only 16mni prices. However, all 
motion pictures listed, are also 
available in standard Smm and 
Super 8. 

"NAC will provide purchasers 
of standard Smm prints with 
magnetic sound or silent track 
as ordered. It will also supply 
purchasers of Super S prints with 
mai>netic sound, optical sound, 
or silent track as ordered. Both 
standard Smm and Super 8 prints 
can be ordered delivered on reel 
or loaded in any make cartridge 
desired, as appropriate." 

Gibson added that a free copy 
of the catalog is available by 
writing National Audiovisual 
Center, General Services Admin- 
istration, Washington, D.C. 
20408. 



VTR Consulting Firm 
Opens in Boston 

Formation of Video/One, Inc. 
as a VTR (video tape record- 
ing) consulting and production 
company especially qualified to 
serve the marketing, sales train- 
ing, sales promotion and related 
communication needs of busi- 
ness and industry, has been an- 
nounced by John S. Spofford, 
founder and president. 



Equipped to produce color as 
well as black and white video 
tapes and in possession of the 
latest type of helical scan re- 
cording equipment, Video/One 
is located at 52 Chestnut Street 
in the Beacon Hill section of Bos- 
ton, Mass. 



Forum III — New Editing 
Approach in New York 

Forum III Films, Inc., a new 
editing house "geared to the 
needs of the film world of the 
70's," has opened at 120 West 
44th Street, New York City. 
Forum III Films was organized 
by Hy Goldman, Sam Ornstein 
and Cal Schultz, all veteran edi- 
tors. 

The company hopes to carve 
out new ground for itself in the 
complex mix of film production. 
Although the basic aim of Forum 
III will be to serve advertising 
agency clients, the company ex- 
pects to take over the editing 
and completion functions for film 
production companies as well. 



Science Management Corp. 
Acquires Motion Associates 

Science Management, an in- 
ternational management consult- 
ing firm, has acquired Motion 
Associates East, Incorporated, 
and affiliated companies, whose 
primary business is film produc- 
tion. 

Terms of the acquisition, not 
previously announced, provide 
for both an immediate payout of 
Science Management shares and 
an additional payout to be earned 
by Motion Associates. 

Motion Associates, founded 
in 1967, is a producer of tele- 
vision commercials for major ad- 
vertisers and is engaged in other 



phases of film production, edit- 
ing, marketing and distribution. 

Monitor Film Distrbu^ors 
Formed in Philadelphia 

Walter M. Erickson, vice pres- 
ident of Radio & Television at 
Gray & Rogers, Inc., Philadel- 
phia, has left the agency to form 
Monitor Film Distributors with 
James A. Love. Love is also head 
of James A. Love Productions, 
New York, producers of televi- 
sion commercials and industrial 
films. 

Monitor Film Distributors is 
headquartered at 1411 Walnut 
Street, Philadelphia and will spe- 
cialize in the Sales, Service, and 
Rental of Audio-Visual Equip- 
ment in addition to the distribu- 
tion of non-theatrical films for 
business and industry. 



Technology Inc. to Acquire 
Houston Fearless Corp. 

Technology Incorporated, Day- 
ton, Ohio, has reached an agree- 
ment with the Houston Fearless 
Corporation to acquire substan- 
tially all of the assets of their 
Westwood Division, Los Angeles, 
California. The amount of the 
aareement was pegged to be in 
excess of $3,000,000.00. Tech- 
nology will operate the business 
through a wholly-owned subsidi- 
ary. 

The sale, which has been ap- 
proved by the boards of direc- 
tors of both corporations, is sub- 
ject to approval by Houston 
Fearless shareholders. Mrs. 
James E. Remmer, vice president 
of Houston Fearless and general 
manager of the Westwood divi- 
sion, will become president and 
general manager of Technology's 
new subsidiary. 

PoitU & Period 



38 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



The whole Postal 
Department loves us 




The mail carriers love Plastic Reel Corpora- 
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They're lighter and easier to handle be- 
cause they're made of Plio-Magic. The miracle 
plastic. Exclusive to Plastic Reel. 

Plio-Magic weighs 60% less than conven- 
tional materials. Which means 60% less 
shipping costs to you. And less money in the 
Postal Department's pocket. 

But they keep right on loving us. Because 
they save on labor and paper work. Our light- 
weight reels and cases are super strong. 
Never chip. Or peel. So the guys at the desks 



in the back room have it easy. They never 
have to fill out long, time consuming claim 
forms against damages. 

Now you see why even the big boys at the 
top of the department, (the ones you thought 
nobody could reach), love us. Because han- 
dling Plio-Magic raises the morale of the 
whole department. 

(We even got a letter from them. Thanking 
us for making all their jobs easier.) 

Plio-Magic. A boon to everyone who handles 
film. 

And Plastic Reel makes everything for 
your audio and visual needs with Plio-Magic. 



In practically every size and color. 

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Training Services 
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Goup Meeting Implementation 
Motion Picture Plans 

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Storyboards 
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Filmstrips, Slides and 

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BUSINESS SCREEN 

rOOLS, TECHNIQUES AND IDEAS FOR AUDIOVISUAL COMMUNICATIONS 

S A HARCOURT, BRACE & WORLD PUBLICATION FEBRUARY • 1970 



A-Vs AT XEROX 




Plus ... BUYING BUSINESS FILMS 




Meet the stars of some 
really great films. 



Every story gets more attention and carries more 
impact when it's on film. 

That's why so many Business and Trade Asso- 
ciations are getting their message across through 
motion pictures. 

The American Dairy Association, for example. 
The Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association. 
The Washington Apple Commission. And dozens 
like them are currently using films to create a 
better understanding of their industries, and to 
promote consumer goodwill. 

But, even the most effective film can't do its job 
without effective distribution. That's where we at 



Modern come in. The world's largest distributorof 
sponsored films. Modern can take your message 
into schools, club meetings, resorts, airports, busi- 
ness and community groups. It distributes to. tele- 
vision and motion picture theaters. 

Whether your particular "star" is an apple or 
a locomotive, your films can tell your story in a 
way no other medium can. And whether your 
audience is regional or nation-wide, Modern's 
merchandising and distributing facihties will give 
you maximum exposure. 

Tell your story on film. Modern will take it 
anywhere you want it to go. 



MODERN TALKING PICTURE SERVICE, INC. 

1212 Avenue of the Americas, New York,N.Y. 10036 



.... a significant way to stimulate the under- 
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is to successfully communicate with the 
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LON B.GREGORY 

Editor 



BRUCE B. HOWAT 
RAY H. SMITH 

Publishing Consultants 



NOREEN OSTLER 

Editorial Assistant 

AUDREY RIDDELL 

Advertising Service Mgr. 



EDITORIAL AND 
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402 West Liberty Drive 

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Phone (312) 653-4040 



REGIONAL OFFICES 



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463-4891 




FEBRUARY, 1970 • VOLUME 31 • NUMBER 2 

This Month's Features 

The Negro in America: A worthwhile filmed look 20 

If You Can't Sell It, Sit on It By Dan Hess & Cyrus Epstein 23 

Working Audiovisuals at Xerox Corporation By William Szabo 28 

Buying Business Films: The Basics of Successful Sponsorship 32 

Giant Copystand Provides Vital Maps 36 

IFPA Journal: Current Events and Activities 38 

Supplement to 20th Production Review Listings 46 

Departments 

Right Off the Newsreel: Late News Reports 4 

The Audiovisual Calendar: Upcoming Events 10 

The Screen Executive: Personnel Notes 12 

The Camera Eye: Commentary By O. H. Cuelln 16 

Picture Parade: Previews of New Films 42 

New Products Review: New Tools and Equipment 44 

Industry News: Along the film/tape production line 48 

Reference Shelf: Helpful Books and Literature 49 

The National Directory of Audiovisual Dealers 50 

Business Screen Marketplace: Classified Advertising 50 

Index to Advertisers in this Issue 52 

The Last Word: Observation and Comment 52 



A HARCOURT, BRACE & WORLD PUBLICATION 

Harbrace Publications, Inc. 



fiBP 



BUSINESS SCREEN is published monthly by Harbrace Publications, Inc., 402 West Liberty Drive, Wheoton, 
Illinois 60187, a subsidiary of Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc. Telephone: (312) 653-4040. Subscription 
rates: One year, $5; two years, $8; three years, $'0, in the U.S. and Canoda. Other countries: $10 
per year. Single copies: VSt in U.S. and Canada; all other countries: $2. Controlled circulation postage 
paid at Rochelle, Illinois 61068. Copyright 1970 by Harbrace Publications, Inc. Trademark registered 
with U.S. Patent Office. Address correspondence concerning circulation only to Harbrace Building, 
Duluth, Minnesota 55802. Address all other correspondence to BUSINESS SCREEN, 402 West Liberty 
Drive, Wheaton, Illinois 60187. POSTMASTER: Please send Form 3579 !o BUSINESS SCREEN, Harbrace 
Building, Duluth, Minnesota 55802. 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




a pat on the back for 

"Byron on Film" 



1 Ded 



eittoe 



r 1969 




vjash^*^^ ^ {or ^" 

^/ecent". .,. for a Pto^ course^ 



c^fef _...n and c°-f„, to "V so ^^^ 



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^-pfcfea^ ^-en^ -yl- ^^^ "^-^^^^ ' , Bvron 

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%\\^^^^ ^'^ , .e nave ^een 

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— -'^ HMbe 



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ron 



MOTION PICTURES 



65 K Street, Northeast, Woshington, D.C. 20002 • 202/783-2700 
World's Most Sophisticated Film Laboratory 



FEBRUARY, 1970 




right off the newsreel 



MiiMNriiiiuiiMinniiiiiiiiiiiiMniiiiiiiniHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiMriiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiMUMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMMiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiMiiiMiiiiiiiii.iiiiiMMMii^ 



CINE Extends Entry 
Deadline to Feb. 15 

The Council on International 
Nontheatrical Events (CINE) 
has extended its 1970 deadline 
to February 15 to accommodate 
films released after January 1. 

Applications for all films will 
be accepted up to February 15, 
according to Mrs. Anita S. Price, 
managing director of CINE. 

Byron Adds Extensive 
Facilities to Lab 

As part of an extensive ex- 
pansion program, Byron Motion 
pictures, the Washington-based 
film-processing firm, now has the 
added capacity of producing mag- 
netic Super 8mm color prints by 
reduction from standard 16mm 
color inter-negative and 16mm 
magnetic sound film. 

Byron has also added all of 
the 35mm color services includ- 



ing film strip and slide produc- 
tion. 

In addition, the lab has in- 
stalled America's finest video 
tape transfer equipment, includ- 
ing the most complete Ampex 
VR 2000 2" recorder, Ampex 
VR 7800-16 1" helical tape re- 
corder and the Palmer 16mm 
color kine recorder. With this 
equipment, video tapes can be 
dubbed or transferred to film. 

Byron Motion Pictures has 
also purchased additional land 
adjacent to its present plant for 
building a complete video tape 
facility. Production facilities for 
both motion picture and video 
tape will be featured, as well as 
several sound stages and one 
large Hollywood-type sound 
stage. When completed, these ex- 
tensive facilities will be rented 
to producers for making tape or 
film programs at the Byron Mo- 
tion Pictures location. 

A price list, including all the 



features stated here, is now avail- 
able on request from Byron Mo- 
tion Pictures, 65 K Street. North- 
east, Washington, D.C. 20002. 

New Address for Chicago 
Int'l Flm Festival 

The Chicago International 
Film Festival has moved to new 
offices at 12 E. Grand Ave., Chi- 
cago. 111. 60611. 

Festival Director Michael Kut- 
za reports that all inquiries and 
festival entries should be directed 
to the new address. 

TravelCinema Extended to 
Television Commercials 

Association films is offering 
TV advertisers additional mile- 
age from their existing commer- 
cials through use of its Travel- 
Cinema service in airports. The 
service normally provides airline 
passengers with free motion pic- 
ture entertainment and has be- 



come a popular medium for 
sponsored films. 

According to Robert Finehout, 
vice-president of marketing for 
Association Films, television 
commercials can be shown as 
part of the regular TravelCinema 
programming. "It is not neces- 
sary to produce special spots for 
TravelCinema," Finehout stated. 
"The large screen and bright 
image, actually enhance the im- 
pression. It's an effective way to 
extend the audience 'reach' of 
spot advertising." 

"The TravelCinema medium 
should be of special interest to 
auto manufacturers, credit card 
companies, breweries, airlines, 
bottlers, brokerage firms, local 
telephone companies and car 
rental services, to name a few," 
he said. 

As an additional free service, 

TravelCinema offers advertisers 

rack space for brochures and 

Continued on page 8 



"JET STOCK 'ROOTAGE 

*JET/ PISTON/ HISTORICAL AIRCRAFT 
35 MM/16 MM COLOR and BLACK 86 WHITE 
Free film provided to producers for authentic airline sequences 




UNITED AIR LINES 
Call Publicity Department 

Atlanta 523-5517 

Chicago 726-5500 

Denver 398-4535 

Detroit 963-9770 

Honolulu 547-2727 



Los Angeles 482-3620 

New York 922-5225 

Pittsburgh 471-0700 

San Francisco 397-2620 

Seattle 682-2121 



Washington, D.C. 737-6830 

Write for catalog: 

UNITED AIR LINES FILM LIBRARY 

626 Wilshire Boulevard 

Los .\ngeles, California 90017 



•Jet mockups for interior filming — New York City and Hollywood 



United A ir Lines 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




This 4- inch attache case 
opens to a movie theater. 




This elegant attache case is the most compact projector 
in the world. The Bohn Benton Institor is the first truly port- 
able, rear screen, Super 8 sound movie projector. It's auto- 
matic. It's set up and running in less than 20 seconds. And, 
it's cartridge loaded to eliminate film threading. Films can 
be changed in 2 seconds. 

It's also a front screen projector. On the spot, you can con- 
vert to project an auditorium-size, 6 foot wide picture. Zoom 
lens and external speakers are available for group viewing. 
The Bohn Benton Institor lets your films sell for you every 
day; on every call, in every office. This is the projector sales- 
men will carry because it looks good, it's small, and it's light. 
The newest recruit can give a professional presentation on 



every can. He can take your plant, 
your products and your services to the desk 
of every prospect. It's easy to give an Institor to 
every salesman because its price is as extraordinary as its 
size — $300, far less than the cost of other first-quality rear 
screen projectors without Institor's advantages. 
For more information, or an Institor demonstration, write 
Bohn Benton Inc, Dept. A, 110 Roosevelt Avenue, Ivlmeola. 
New York 1 1 501 ; or call (51 6) 747-8585. 

<^ Bohn Benton 



FEBRUARY. 1970 



"^m 



ARRIFLEX 16BLs 

play the numbers 
for Las Vegas spectacular : 

2 months, 25,000 miles, 70,000 feet! 



Mutual of Omaha wanted to put on an employee convention that would be remem- 
bered—and Chapman/Spittler, Inc. of Omaha, in producing the film program for 
"Jetogether '69", found themselves tackling an assignment they would never forget. 

The show was to present, to a total audience of 3300 people, interviews with the 
insurance company's most successful salesman— each interview being linked to- 
gether by a "jet plane" ride from one salesman's home town to the next. This 
meant, of course, that Chapman/Spittler had to do the actual traveling. 

And what an itinerary! In less than two months, the 3-man production crew had to 
set-up and film in no less than 24 cities across the U.S. and in Puerto Rico. They 
covered 25,000 miles— more than the equivalent of going around-the-world- 
filming in almost every setting imaginable; at airports, at Notre Dame Stadium, at 
the Indianapolis 500, in a locker room; high atop mountains, way out on beaches, in 
and on automobiles, aboard boats, golf carts, and even walking along hand-held. 

Under so many circumstances, in so many places on such a tight schedule, camera 
reliability was essential. Arriflexes were chosen. 

Loaded into Chapman/Spittler's own aircraft, 16S and 16BL Arriflexes became part 
of an overall film unit uniquely designed for filmmaking on a continental scale. With 
so much travel in so short a time, the crew could rarely stop to screen rushes, to 
reassure themselves that the rigors of travel at this high-pitched pace, and the 
many changes of climate, had not affected camera operation. 

The proof of the pudding came with the two performances put on by Mutual of 
Omaha in Caesar's Palace. Interspersed with 35mm slides, the Arriflex-shot footage 
had to fill nine 10x14 ft. screens— as much a challenge to resolution, sharpness and 
registration as ever there was. As reported in the July '69 Business Screen, the 
show was an outstanding success. 

Gambling may be commonplace in Las Vegas, but Chapman/Spittler, like every 
production company, cannot gamble with their assignments. It was with this under- 
standing that each of the Arriflex models was engineered. From the sensible, 
versatile design that adapts an Arriflex to every kind of project, to the sturdy, en- 
during construction that keeps it going in the face of constant use and abuse, 
Arriflex has continually proved how well it can stack the odds in its users' favor. 




r% CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



CORPORATION OF AMERICA Woodside. N. Y. 11377 



% 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



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Company owned aircraft is basic to Chapman/Spittler's successful, wide ranging operation. 



FEBRUARY, 1970 






WE WRITE WE SHOOT 




Tired of the run around? The buck stops at FISCHER 

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Carol Stream, Illinois 60178 
Phone 312/665-4242 

LONDON; 295 Northholt Road 

South Harrow Middx,. England 
Std 01/422-722 



right off the newsreel . . 



continued 

other point-of-display material. 
Display racks are located adja- 
cent to TravelCinema installa- 
tions. 

A booklet, "The Go Medium 
for Americans on the Go!" is 
available at no charge from 
TravelCinema Division, Associa- 
tion Films, 600 Madison Ave- 
nue, N.Y. 10022. 



Monitor Editorial Services 
Begins New York Work 

Monitor Editorial Services, has 
been formed to meet the demand 
for experienced and recognized 
creative film editors, to work in 
close association with advertis- 
ing agency producers and inde- 
pendent film producers. 

Julian Bergman, well known 
in the industry for his editorial 
achievements in film and video- 
tape, will supervise and direct 
Monitor Editorial Services. 

The print procurement facili- 
ties of Monitor Film Distributors 
can also be utilized to meet 
broadcast dates. Both Monitor 
companies are located at 151 
East 50th Street, New York 
10022. 



Mark Anderson Films 
Opens in Champaign, III. 

A new motion picture produc- 
tion firm, Mark Anderson Films, 
has opened offices and studio 
facilities in The Manor Building 
at 311 West University Avenue 
in Champaign, Illinois. 

Owner-producer is Mark A. 
Anderson, 29, formerly a part- 
ner in Gliessman Studio of 
Champaign. 

Mark Anderson Films will 
produce educational, agricultural, 
industrial and business films, ani- 
mation, television commercials, 
and mixed-media presentations. 
The firm will provide any or all 
phases of film production from 
creative planning and scriptwrit- 
ing through filming and final 
production. 



ACL Seeks Freeze on 
Government Lab Additions 

The Association of Cinema 
Laboratories has requested Presi- 
dent Nixon to impose an imme- 
diate freeze on all equipment ac- 
quisition and personnel additions 



for governmental motion picture 
laboratories. 

In addition to the equipment 
purchase and personnel addi- 
purchasc and personnel addi- 
tions freeze. ACL also requested 
"an orderly transfer of govern- 
mental motion picture laboratory 
facilities back to existing com- 
mercial laboratories." 

Referring to the President's 
"diligently seeking means of re- 
ducing government expenses," 
ACL called attention to the gov- 
ernment investment of "about 
$100,000,000 in motion picture 
laboratories facilities to supply 
laboratory services to various 
governmental agencies." 

The letter adds that "Annual 
governmental equipment pur- 
chases and salaries represent an- 
other increasingly high figure in 
the millions of dollars." 

"Our Association can show" 
the letter asserts, "that private 
industry has adequate facilities to 
provide these same services. We 
can also show that where they 
exist, film laboratory contracts 
between industry and govern- 
ment are below the internal costs 
of government operated labora- 
tories." 

According to ACL "adequate 
commercial facilities are avail- 
able at realistic prices "which 
can now accomplish economi- 
cally the needs of the agencies 
of government." 



Jack Pill and Associates 

Jack Pill has changed his com- 
pany name from Jack Pill's 
Camera Equipment to Jack Pill 
and Associates. Pill stated the 
name change was in keeping 
with the reorganization of his 
company as the result of the re- 
cent additions of Ed Engel 
former director of sales at F & B/ 
Ceco and Roy R. Low former 
vice president, marketing of Alan 
Gordon Enterprises Inc. 

Engel and Low along with 
Frank Kelly who has been sales 
manager for Jack Pill's Camera 
Equipment for the past 2Vi years 
and Bob Lovelace, manager of 
the rental department have been 
named associates. Jack Pill and 
Associates have introduced a 
number of new products and 
have embarked on a program of 
further product and market de- 
velopment. • 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



today's films on 

yesterday's 

reels? 





Or in yesterday's cans? 

There are a few people who still use metal reels and cans. And 
they have their reasons. Like tradition. Nostalgia. "It's the kind we've 
always used." 

But when you consider that Plio-Magic plastic reels, cans and 
cases offer far greater protection, and are far cheaper to ship, the old 
reasons just don't have a convincing ring any more. 

Plio-Magic reels, cans and cases are far more resilient than metal. 
They withstand impact. Don't bend. Don't dent. 

Even more importantly, Plio-Magic reels, cases and cans weigh a 
lot less than their metal counterparts. As a result, you save at the Post 
Office. Up to 65% in mailing costs. And out cases hold our reels 
securely. With four positive locks. Snug against a bed of packing foam. 

It all means that your films will be stored and shipped with the 
same loving care that went into making them. 

We make a complete line of plastic accessories for the film indus- 
try. Write for our catalog. Plastic Reel Corporation of America, 640 So. 
Commercial Avenue, Carlstadt, r^^^YI STT^arrvrTiBY^^Mr^^ ^ 
New Jersey 07072. [ ^^JjLk^= *|J ^/J.rvkS31^y 

Someday, you^ll wind up with plastic. 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



NO SURPRISES. 

That is what to expect from CFI. 

From original photography to release 
prints, skilled CFI technicians accu- 
rately and precisely interpret the 
creative objectives of the cinema- 
tographer. Exacting CFI laboratory 
control and advanced processing 
methods insure maximum definition 
and correct tone reproduction. 
Consistently. 

So, what the cinematographer sees 
on tube or screen is what he expects 
to see. No surprises. 

What more can a truly professional 
processor promise? 




THE A-V 
CALENDAR 



MARCH 



Florida Motion Picture and Television 
Producers Association, Industry Recog- 
nition Banquet, March 2, Plaza Hotel, 
Miami Beach. 



American Society for Training and Devel- 
opment, Sales Training Institute, March 
9-13, Holiday Inn, Chicago. 



APRIL 

Fifth Midwest Regional Meeting of the 
Biological Photographic Association, 

April 24-26, Knickerbocker Hotel. Chi- 
cago. 



Society of Motion Picture and Television 
Engineers, 107th Technical Conference 
and Equipment E.xhibit, April 26-May 1, 
Drake Hotel, Chicago. 



Department of Audiovisual Instruction, Na- 
tional Convention and Exhibit, April 27- 
May 1, Sheraton Cadillac Hotel, Detroit. 



U. S. Industrial Film Festival, Awards Pre- 
sentation, April 30, Palmer House Hotel, 
Chicago. 



MAY 



Film Seminar of the Northwest, May S-9, 
Seattle, Washington. 



American Society for Training and Devel- 
opment, National Conference, May 10- 
15, Anaheim Convention Center, Ana- 
heim, Calf. 



American Film Festival, Blue Ribbon 
Awards and film screenings, May 12-16, 
New York. 



Illuminating Engineering Society, 6th The- 
atre, Television and Film Lighting Sym- 
posium, May 24-26, Hollywood-Roose- 
velt Hotel, Hollywood. 



JULY 

National Audio-Visual Association Annual 
Convention, July 18-21, Sheraton-Park 
Hotel, Washington, D.C. 



10 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



'♦' 



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^'^\^n ^ 



m -. 



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i 



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There are so many portable proiectors on 
the market, the claims can sometimes be con- 
fusing. One has its own screen. Another throws 
a large wall picture. One has a repeating car- 
tridge. Another operates reel to reel. One folds 
to compact carrying size. Another is a real 
knee-knocker. 

But whatever your reason for wanting a 
projector, you should want one that is versa- 
tile enough to do anything and everything it's 
possible for a repeater projector to do. And do 
it well. 

You should want the MPO Videotronic 
Super 8, 

This machine is perhaps the finest port- 
able repeater projector ever made. It weighs 
in at a mere 18 lbs. It's cartridge loaded, so 
there's no film threading or rewinding ever. 

The MPO Super 8 comes with its own 



•J|[t 




The MPO 



built-in screen for easy desk top viewing. Draw 
a larger audience, and the Super 8 converts to 
big wall picture projection instantly. And be- 
cause your message may take longer than the 
average 10 or 15 minute film, the MPO has a 
reel-to-reel accessory that will show up to 50 
minutes of footage. And it's the only auto- 
matic projector that can do it. 

We're so sure that our projector can out- 
do any other, that we're anxious to show you 
both, side by side, for a personal inspection. 
Simply tell us which of our competitors you'd 
like to compare to the MPO, We'll arrange to 
show you theirs and ours, so you can test and 
judge for yourself. 

Unusual offer, we know. 

It's not something anyone would do. Just 
the people who have the one that's got every- 
thing. 



Videotronic Super 8 

MPO Videotronic Projector Corp,. 461 Park Ave, So,. New York/ (212) 867-8200 
528 No. Michigan Ave,, Chicago/{312) 527-3680 5400 Cahuenga Boulevard No.. North Hollywood/(213) 985-7310 









^jOUR BUSINESS IS VISUAL.' 



Look to Visualscope for your next production 



VISUALSCOPE 

INCORPORATED 

103 PARK AVENUE • N E W YOR K, N. Y. 1001 7 . MU 3-3513 




the screen 
executive 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIlllllllllllllllMllltllllillllll 



Marcos is Vice President, 
Marketing at Jayark 

Jayark Instruments Corp. has 
named Edward J. Marcos vice 
president educational marlceting. 

A former sales representative 
for Harcourt, Brace & World, 
Inc., Marcos is responsible for 
the development of marketing 
plans for the educational divi- 
sion, and will implement sales 
programs for all Jayark Educa- 
tional Programs. 



Three Promotions Made At 
Calvin Productions, Inc. 

Peter V. DeMitri has been ap- 
pointed president of Calvin Pro- 
ductions of Pennsylvania. East- 
ern subsidiary of Calvin Commu- 
nications, Inc. DeMitri had been 
executive producer at the pro- 
duction division in Kansas City 
and served previously in a wide 
variety of a capacities including 
director, cinematographer, editor 
and services manager. 

Also promoted at Calvin/ 
Pennsylvania was Russell K. 
Spear, to vice president for sales 
and marketing, and Robert M. 
Carroll was elevated to control- 
ler, having served the Philadel- 
phia firm previously as office 
manager. 

All appointments were effec- 
tive November 21, 1969. 



GAF Elects Williams 
Exec Vice President 

Edward J. Williams has been 
elected executive vice president 
and member of the board of di- 
rectors of GAF Corporation. 

Williams will be responsible 
for corporate administrative ser- 
vices at GAF. 



Stover Joins Superscope's 
Record Tape Products 

Richard L. Stover has been 
named director of Business and 
Administration-Recorded Taped 
Products for Superscope, Inc.'s 
tape and tape duplicating divi- 



sions. 

Stover will be responsible for 
coordinating and directing the 
business activities of the two new 
divisions. 



Shanks to Bell & Howell 
Marketing Director Post 

Lloyd L. Shanks has been ap- 
pointed director of marketing for 
Bell & Howell's professional 
equipment division. 

Shanks, who has sixteen years 
of experience in sales, marketing 
and general administration, will 
be responsible for all marketing 
functions. He will be headquar- 
tered in the Chicago office. 




SHANKS 



CHRISTIE 



Christie Electric Corp. 
Names Christie President 

The Board of Directors of 
Christie Electric Corporation has 
appointed Tom E. Christie presi- 
dent and chief executive officer 
of the company. Christie was 
previously executive vice presi- 
dent and general manager. 

S. L. Christie will continue 
as chairman of the board. 



International Video Corp. 
Adds Three to Mktg. Staff 

Carl H. Rosekrans has been 
named southern regional man- 
ager of International Video and 
will be headquartered at IVC's 
Atlanta office. 

Herbert J. Van Driel has been 
appointed midwest regional man- 
ager and will work from IVC's 
Desplaines, Illinois office. 

.'Mso promoted at JVC was 
Continued on page 14 



12 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



Ify 



bind for lab 



ou re in a oind ror lab service^ 
Reela can bail you out. 



When deadlines loom large, and you 

keep running into one delay after 

another, call Reela. Nobody offers 

faster service. And nobody will 

give you better quality v^ork. 

Reela's speed and high quality 

come about because of three things: 

1. Competent, dedicated people. 

2. Jet transportation, and an outfit 

that knows how to exploit it. 

3. Sophisticated new equipment. 

How many release prints do you need 
— 20? 100? Reela can make them. 



Perfect. Sharp. Color-balanced. 
Back in your hands (or drop-shipped 
if you want) before you know it. 

Why settle for less than the best ? 
Call Reela now. 

REELA OFFERS: 

Complete editorial services • complete 

producer's services — animation 

— titling — sound • complete 8, 1 6, 

and 35mm laboratory services. 

including black and white or color 

dailies for Florida filming 

• Super 8 printing and cartridging. 







R\St^ 



\t<C. 



'"^' Han-- 



^«A^a'^ ' w,^Vian- ^^ .^W 



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fov 



<;er 



Vj\\ar[>^ 



-'\> 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



13 



CREATE THE 
Right MOOD 
EVERY TIME 

with the 

MAJOR" 

PRODUCTION 

MUSIC 
LIBRARY 

I "MAJOR" offers you a full 

I 70 hours of background 

: production music for titles, 

j bridges, background — for 

I scoring, editing, recording and 

i dubbing music for your: 

I • FEATURE PRODUCTIONS 

I • DOCUMENTARIES 

; • TV FILMS 

j • SLIDE FILMS 

I • ANIMATION 

I 9 INDUSTRIAL FILMS 

I • SALES PRESENTATIONS 
i • COMMERCIALS 

: • EDUCATIONAL 

: "MAJOR" specializes in sound 
: — you get exceptional technical 
: know-how and beautifully- 
: recorded original music on 
: LP records or Vi-lnch Tape, 
I or on 16 or 35mm Mag. 
: Tape ready for a mix. 

E IMPORTANT: "Major" owns ils own 

1 copyrights on all production mood 

2 music in its library. World rights 
~ available to you on a completely 
E sound legal basis. Re-recording rights 
; available on a "per selection" or "un- 
— limited use" flat fee arrangement. 



WRITE FOR 135-PAGE CATALOGUE TO 

I THOMAS J. VALENTINO 

ilNCORPORATED 

I Established 7932 

; 150W. 46 St. New York 10036 
i or phone (212) 246-4675 

[ Also available: Detailed Catalogue 
; of our complete LP library of 
• 471 Sound Effects. 



screen executive . , 

continued 

Less Knight, who is now district 
sales manager, industrial and ed- 
ucational products. Knight's 
headquarters will be in Los 
Angeles. 



Kirt Films International 
Names Mansfield Co-Head 

Robert B. Mansfield has been 
appointed second in command of 
all projects for Kirt Films. 

Mansfield, who comes to Kirt 
Films from WABC-TV, will act 
as producer, director, writer and 
sales manager. 



Solomon Is Director of 
Finance at Superscope 

Alan B. Solomon has been ap- 
pointed director of finance of 
Superscope, Inc. Solomon will di- 
rect Superscope's financial and 
corporate activities. 

Prior to joining Superscope, 
Solomon served as treasurer of 
United Recording Corporation 
and its affiliates from 1965 to 
the present. 



Sahlein Is Senior VP at 
Alan Gordon Enterprises 

Don Sahlein has been named 
senior vice president of Alan 
Gordon Enterprises, Inc.. Cali- 
fornia. 

Prior to entering the photo- 
graphic field, Sahlein was a pub- 
licist with Glenn Rose & Asso- 
ciates. 



Visionetics Names Richard 
Vice President, Marketing 

Frederick D. Richard has been 
appointed vice president, mar- 
keting for Visionetics, Inc. 

Richard will have overall re- 
sponsibility for new product de- 
velopment and for expanding the 
Visionetics line of educational 
and commercial products. In 
addition, Richard will help di- 
rect the company's entry into 
new markets. 



Robson Is General Manager, 
Marketing, Eastman Kodak 

Wylie S. Robson, whose career 
spans 31 years with Eastman 
Kodak Company, has been 
named general manager of mar- 
keting and a member of the Op- 
erations Committee. 



Robson will assume responsi- 
bility for the marketing of all 
varieties of Kodak photographic 
products in seven regions, 
stretching from New York to 
Honolulu. 



Loucks To Head Sales Div. 
At Alan Gordon Enterprises 

Grant Loucks, senior vice 
president in charge of rentals for 
Alan Gordon Enterprises, Inc., 
has been named to head the 
company's motion picture equip- 
ment sales division, which is now 
headquartered in Hollywood, 
Calif. 

Loucks will continue to head 
up the AGE Inc. rental division, 
also located in Hollywood. 



Todd Delegate To 
General Assembly 

The Atlantic Treaty Associa- 
tion and the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization have ap- 
pointed J. Hunter Todd a dele- 
gate to the 15th General Assem- 
bly. A special international group 
of 55 young men from the 
NATO countries were selected 
for this honor. 



Salzburg Appointed VP at 
Niles Communications, N.Y. 

Fred A. Niles Communica- 
tions Centers, Inc., New York, 
has appointed Joseph S. Salz- 
burg vice president-sales. 

Salzburg, a 30-year veteran of 
the motion picture industry, join- 
ed Niles as an account supervisor 
in 1966. 



Pollan Is Director of I E&T's 
Research and Development 

David Pollan has been named 
director of research and develop- 
ment for International Education 
& Training, Inc. The appoint- 
ment is part of a "major expan- 
sion of the company's product 
research and development activ- 
ities." 



Take Ten Names Leonard 
Vice President 

Take Ten, Incorporated, Chi- 
cago based producer of motion 
pictures, slide films, radio-TV 
commercials, industrial shows 
and communication materials has 



appointed Frank B. Leonard vice 
president, administration and fi- 
nance. 

Prior to joining Take Ten, 
Leonard served as director of the 
W. E. Long Advertising Agency 
and as vice president of the W. E. 
Long Independent Bakers Co- 
operative. 



Around The Industry 

Among promotions in the 
West Coast staff of DeLuxe Gen- 
eral are Stanley F. Judell to vice 
president, business affairs and 
Ray Gaul to superintendent of 
both West Coast laboratories . . . 
Robert J. Belton has joined the 
Creative Film Group of Denver, 
Colorado as manager of produc- 
tion and cinematography . . . 
Sony Corporation of America 
has appointed Leroy Wright dis- 
trict manager, video products, for 
Alabama, Mississippi and eastern 
Tennessee ... Tel Ra Productions 
Inc, has added John Heidenreich 
to its staff as producer/director 
. . . Two men named to key sales 
division positions at Lyon Metal 
Products, Inc. of Aurora, Illi- 
nois are T. L. Davis, who was 
made manager of the office fur- 
niture department, and Wayne S. 
Buchanan who is now sales man- 
ager, northeast region . . . Philip 
J. Wingate has been named gen- 
eral manager of the Du Pont 
Company's photo products de- 
partment . . . Alan Fishburn, 
owner of Alan M. Fishburn Pro- 
ductions, has been elected presi- 
dent of Chicago Unlimited, Inc. 
for the year 1970 .. . Three re- 
cent promotions at the Ampex 
Corporation include William G. 
Shute, who has been named man- 
ager of the Chicago branch in its 
educational and industrial prod- 
ucts division, John G. Campbell, 
who is the new northeast area 
sales manager in the same di- 
vision, and Bruce F. Bond, who 
has been appointed national sales 
manager, also in the educational 
and industrial products division 
. . . Imagination, Inc., San Fran- 
cisco, has also made recent staff 
promotions; Chris Ford has been 
made production manager, while 
Gerry Slick and Danny Benson 
have been named to the Board 
of Directors . . . Jeanne Lindsay 
has been promoted to vice presi- 
dent of Ken Snyder Enterprises 
. . . D. M. Rockwell has joined 
Filmfair Communications as vice 
president and director of eduac- 
tional services, 
tional services. • 



U 



BUSINESS SCREEN 






^. 



Great ^ 

Great t 

Great C. ^ . t/ .^ 

Great tJ ' u i^ 



Great 1^ -s a-- U A* 

Tivt^stf ¥ IT AP 

urx cdiii ii. ij A.X- 

Great things are aeveioping a IT ART 
Great things are developing a J ART 
Great things are developing a. ^U ART 
Great things are developing at DU ART 
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Great things are developing at DU ART 
Great things are developing at DU ART 
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Great things are developing at DU ART 
Great things are developing at DU ART 
Great things are developing at DU ART 
Great things are developing at DU ART 




DU ART FILM LABS 

DU ART BLDG., 245 WEST 55 STREET 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 10019 (212) PL 7-4580 

FEBRUARY, 1976 15 



COMPLETE 
16mm LABORATORY 

SERVICES 

7255 ECO AND EF, MS PROCESSING 

EASTMAN COLOR INTERNEG POSITIVE 

COLOR ADDITIVE PRINTING 

IN CHICAGO . . . 



NORTH SHORE 



NORTH SHORE MOTION PICTURE 
LAB., INC. 

12 East Grand Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60611 
Phone (312) 321-9348 

IN NEW YORK . . . 



CINELAB 
CINELAB, CORP. 

421 West 54th Street 

New York, New York 10019 

Phone (212) 7651670 

WRITE FOR 
BROCHURE 





CINELAB 


CORP. ; 




421 W. 54th St. ! 


; New York, N. 


Y. 


10019 : 


1 Please send 


me informatior 


on 




! a CINELAB SERVICES 






; D NORTH 


SHORE SERVICES 




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By 0. H. Coelln 
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiKiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiin 



Lessons for Factual Filmmakers in 
Changing World of Hollywood Studios 

Dormant Stages and red-inked ledgers 
highlight the current news from Hollywood's 
once-great major entertainment film com- 
panies. "Who Killed Hollywood?" asks the 
banner line over a national newspaper ser- 
ies on that phase of film business. 

Business conglomerate firms are deeply 
involved: Warner Bros. -Seven Arts Ltd. is 
part of the New York-based Kinney Nation- 
al Service; Paramount answers to Gulf & 
Western headquarters, also in Manhattan; 
United Artists is owned by Transamerica 
Corp., a San Francisco conglomerate; and 
Universal Pictures is part of MCA, Inc. 

In this changing world of the glamour film 
the "star" system has given way to a new 
generation of youthful, unpredictable film 
makers. Appealing to the under-30 audi- 
ence, they're ringing the cash registers with 
films like Goodbye, Columbus; Easy Rider, 
Midnight Cowboy. Columbia Pictures ap- 
pears to be the sole remaining independent 
film maker (with Disney) to have scored 
financial success and Easy Rider's half-mil- 
lion budget, matched with early grosses of 
over $6 million have helped build on the 
success of Funny Girl and Oliver for a 
strong rebound on the "plus" side for 1969. 

Both George Seaton and Alfred Hitch- 
cock, top directors with many "hits" to their 
credit have some useful comment to offer. 
Staff writer Leonard Weiner, who authored 
the recent business series, gleaned some 
valuable notes in his visit with Seaton: 

"I met a kid of 14 the other day who has 
made 32 films. Some 5 minutes, some 10. 
Unfortunately, amateurism in some of their 
minds has become professionalism. They 
see somebody else's bad film and they praise 
it because it looks so much like what they 
are turning out." 

And listen to Hitchcock, whose thinking 
can well apply to the making of good factual, 
business-sponsored films. Complaining that 
the new movie makers (speaking of "adult" 
producers) don't have their theory mastered 
before they rush out into the streets with 
their handheld cameras. 

"These creators do not know the roots of 
the business. Therefore you get a lot of pic- 
tures, very successful, but made by accident. 
And mostly what you do see is photographs 
of people talking. That's not cinema. That's 
not the creation of pure film, putting it to- 



getlier to make ideas. And that's the basis 
of our business." 

Think about it. And apply his logic to 
your own product. 



When Equipment Dictates Content, 
Could Be "Garbage In, Garbage Out" 

And while we're on the subject of quality, 
in both format and content two fleeting 
thoughts also bear on today's tendency to 
think of lightweight convenient portable pro- 
jection equipment (whether in Super-8 film 
or portable videotape reproducers) as the 
BIG answer to the medium's needs in the 
70's. 

The adage "garbage in garbage out", 
must apply. Unless the ideas, the techniques 
and the content material written for the 
screen or TV are very, very good before 
they're shown, results won't be worthy of 
showing. Why produce with Super-8 cam- 
eras? Why try to impress thousands of 
salesmen who hold vital keys to dwindling , 
corporate profits with dull-as-dishwater 
"talk" from management on badly-lighted 
little screens? 

Make no mistake about it. It's easier to- 
day to get to the people you must reach: 
on retail counters, in garages, dealer sales- 
rooms, exhibit displays, etc. But the product 
shown to these specific viewers must moti- 
vate them to act favorably. Otherwise write 
off the cost of the entire effort as a waste of 
time. 



A Salute to the People 

Following our last month's salute to the 
"most honored films of 1969, we would 
add a note of honor to those who direct the 
affairs of groups serving A-V progress. Dec- 
ades of service to business and education, 
to hundreds of specializing audiovisual 
equipment dealers and their companies, mer- 
it a "First A-V Citizen" salute to Don 
White, executive director of the National 
Audio-Visual Association, shared by his 
hard-working staff at Fairfax, Va. And we 
accord that honor to Reid Ray, former 
SMPTE president who now heads the Coun- 
cil on International Nontheatrical Events, 
clearing house for U.S. films which repre- 
sent this nation at overseas festivals. 

Veteran Calvin Communications' execu- 
Continiied on page 1 8 



16 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



m .m 






"MOST OF US 
I LOVE OUR 
COUNTRY... 

I 
and we recognize that as individuals we 

can become successful in this country. But 

there's no way we can become successes 

if our brothers become dope addicts.' 



^m'-' 



^■W^ 



^^ 



^^m 



M 



This statement was }ust one of the many 
provocative expressions of campus attitudes 
in "THE DAY BEFORE TOMORROVJ," VPI's 
production for NEWSWEEK fJtagazine . . . 
winner of the 1969 Public Relations Society 
of America Film Festival. 

OTHER VPI PRODUCTIONS INCLUDE: 

"THE SOUNDS OF LEARNING" 

A film for the 3M COMPANY prepared for 
educators and teachers in training. 

"SUNDAY FATHER" 

A theatrical short subject starring 
Dustin Hoffman 

, "A TIME TO PLAY" 

A film for the POLAROID CORPORATION, the 
^ official multi-screened presentation 
of the U.S. Government at Expo '67. 

"THE RICHARD NIXON 1968 PRESIDENTIAL 



^i^% 



\ CAMPAIGN FILMS" 

The production and distribution of the 
fc major television effort of the Republican Party. 

"21st CENTURY COMMERCIALS" 

A series of films describing the research 
V and development efforts of the UNION 
, . CARBIDE CORPORATION. 

"CBS REPORTS COMMERCIALS" 

A series of films for the IBfJI CORPORATION, 
depicting the role of the computer in space, 
health, education, business and industry. 



We would welcome the opportunity to discuss 

your communication needs in public relations, 

industrial relations, marketing, advertising, 

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camera eye . . . 

coniinued 

live Bill Hedden, who now presides over 
the Association of Cinema Laboratories, has 
given countless hours to the affairs of 
SMPTE and helped inform the many thou- 
sands who attend his company's annual 
Workshops. Byron Roudabush is remem- 
bered for his pioneer role in ACL activi- 
ties, his years of aid to the SMPTE. 

DuPont's Deane White, current SMPTE 
president, is helping guide that key group 
into the 70's and a leader of the "new gen- 
eration" who really shares his know-how 
and enthusiasm throughout the Midwest is 
Chicago's Jack Behrend. Salute Kodak's 
Tom Hope for tireless efforts in giving the 
a-v industry its broadest statistical base 
through those annual SMPTE Surveys! 

Health and medicine are vital fields of 
national concern. The men to remember 
certainly include Dr. James Lieberman, di- 
rector of the U.S. Public Health Service's 
National Medical Audiovisual Center in At- 
lanta. 

Ralph Creer's years of service in medical 
motion pictures in the American Medical 
Association are all too well known; this 
year he also heads the Audiovisual Confer- 
ence of Medical and Allied Sciences. Our 
awareness of the relation of air and water 
pollution to the nation's health rates a spe- 
cial salute to the man who has specialized 
in making countless motion pictures on those 
subjects: Stuart Finley, of Falls Church, Va. 
The growth of such national distribution 
companies as Modern, Association Films, 
Sterling and United World, plus their ines- 
timable value in delivering our sight/sound 
media to audiences, is a salute of itself to 
the men who guide these organizations: 
Modern's Carl Lenz; Association's Bob 
Mitchell and Bob Finehout; Sterling's Roger 
Cahaney and United's John Desmond. World 
audience horizons have been extended by 
Inforfilm, headed by Jan Botermans, its 
chief in Brussels. Let us not forget workl- 
minded Albert Amateau, whose West Coast 
Foreign Language Service Co. is responsi- 
ble for multi-lingual translation of so many 
international factual motion pictures. 

In that area of important overseas film 
use, credit Bruce Herschensohn, direc- 
tor of Motion Picture & Television Service 
for our U. S. Information Agency with up- 
holding the highest standards of excellence 
in USIA films; Wilbert Pearson, Chief, Int'l 
Communications Media Staff at USIA is 
the man we all depend on to clear impor- 
tant films for overseas use. 

And where would we be without contin- 
uing equipment design progress, plus to- 
day's great audiovisual facilities within edu- 
cation and business? Representative of those 
who have strived to give us new, flexible 
types of projectors is producer-counsellor- 
inspiration-giver Charles "Cap" Palmer. 
Leading the audiovisual facility designers 
and architect-consultants is Manhattan's Hu- 
bert Wilke, often cited in these pages. • 



18 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



Now the trumpet summons us again — not as a call 

to bear arms, though arms we need — not as a call to battle, 

though embattled we are — but a call to bear the burden 

of a long twilight struggle . . . against the common enemies 

of man: tryanny, poverty, disease and war itself. 

Will you join in that historic effort? 

My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America 

will do for you, but what together we can do for 

the freedom of man. 

John F. Kennedy 

President of the United States 

1960-1963 



Vision Associates, Inc., 680 Fifth Avenue, New York City 




FEBRUARY, 1970 !9 



The 

Negro in 

America 



A new series of films from the 

New York Times' Arno Press traces the 

history of the black man in America 

and adds an important new 

perspective to American history. 



The Negro as a slave is illustrated with drawings 
and reproductions of auction posters like this. 



RAFFLE 



iiinfl Gi,jBiH: 

ifi be Raffled for 

t.. ll. a'-rftnl Cllk U«> dmtx U lAto ■((•l> 

IMK M JJIiyJUI,EtC|L_ 

■ ITH IF ia*. Alli'ir' I'Vjv HlllRli 1 *■> BF HKI 
I , n. I.M lk~> •< I"* » .•■■■« A ■ <o I r 

J<^SEPH JENNINGS. 



TV t*a> vol h> ~a«Mri H (-BtbKfa •r4rru4 kt Uv lav^^ »(_^hn pr^-nl F>'> ■««» 
vfll W*U>«4 u, I — i^ M iw lUA. BiiTH < r til». Alli'ir' H^jw HIIIP.H < *» bf hffn 
AT HT rtniSP. Ko Tn (.«_«> Hl. w.^ < «• i»m lk-> •< I"* » ••■■■« A ■ <o I r M 



rpHE NEW YORK TIMES and 

A its book publishing subsidi- 
ary, Arno Press, have introduced 
a new series of films on black 
Americans for use in schools — 
from upper elementary classes 
through college level. 

The Times and Arno Press are 
particularly well qualified to 
sponsor the series. Arno's 110- 
volume collection. The American 
Negro, His History and Litera- 
ture, documenting the accom- 
plishments of black people in 
America, has filled a great need 
in a field which has recently 
drawn a great deal of shoddy, 
hastily put-together works. The 
collection has had very good 
comments from the Saturday Re- 
view as well as from a number 
of leading educational journals 
for its scholarly excellence. 

The Times believes that the 
series of films will be a natural 
and important adjunct to The 
American Negro volumes, partic- 
ularly in reaching the visually 
oriented new generation. 

Serving as an overview film 
for this series on the role of the 
Nesro in American history is 
Slavery and Slave Resistance 
which seeks to break down 
stereotypes and documents how 
the black man resisted his servi- 
tude both actively and passively. 



"Rewarding" experience 

In recent tests before audi- 
ences of 7th and 10th grade stu- 
dents in New York City and 
nearby suburbs the film gener- 
ated a remarkable response from 
both white and black students 
and teachers who found the ex- 
perience "rewarding," "star- 
tling," "instructive," and "adds 
a new perspective to American 
history." 

The film shows how the black 
man of the early 17th century in 
America fell victim to labor 
shortage. His earlier rights — to 
work his way out of bondage, 
buy land, testify in court, and 
vote — were squashed in a fren- 
zied rush for "black gold." Sud- 
denly he was a commodity to be 
bought and sold at auctions, 
willed to relatives, rented out, 
lost at cards and won in raffles. 
For slaves, learning was made 
a crime, while teaching the black 
man was in some states punish- 
able by death. 

Following the American and 
French revolutions, the slave's 
lot seemed destined for improve- 
ment. Men began to speak out 



for civil rights — foremost among 
them the Quakers. Then two 
events jolted black hopes. Eli 
Whitney's new cotton gin low- 
ered cotton prices and world de- 
mand soared. And, Jefferson pur- 
chased the Louisiana Territory, 
sending cotton growers stream- 
ing across the Mississippi. The 
price of slaves rocketed to as 
high as $2000 each, and Ameri- 
ca's slave population quadrupled 
to four million. 



Myths explained 

Slave masters sought to justify 
forced labor by creating myths 
of the "natural docility" of the 
slave and that bondage was his 
"natural condition." Actually, as 
the film points out, slaves re- 
sisted again and again at the risk 
of their lives. They plotted and 
staged rebellions. They ruined 
crops, wrecked tools, set fires. 
Many fled to the woods, to the 
cities, to the North — to free- 
dom. 

Some of these runaway slaves 
became famous. Phyllis Wheat- 
ley, kidnapped from Africa at 
nine, wrote the second volume of 
poetry published by a woman in 
America. William Wells Brown 
became America's first Negro 
novelist and playwright. Fred- 
erick Douglass became a leading 
anti-slavery orator and editor. 
Achievements of these and other 
black Americans helped close the 
chapter on slavery in America. 



Complete lesson plan 

Slavery and Slave Resistance, 
which won a gold medal at the 
recent International Film Festi- 
val at New York, was produced 
for The New York Times/Arno 
Press by Dynamic Films, Inc. 
Nathan Zucker was executive 
producer; Maurice Rapf, direc- 
tor; and William A. Katz, con- 
sultant on American Negro his- 
story to the New York State Edu- 
cation Department, served as ed- 
ucational consultant. On screen 
narration is delivered by an im- 
pressive young black actor, 
Cleavon Little. 

Slavery and Slave Resistance, 
26 minutes, in color and sound 
is available from the New York 
Times/Arno Press, 229 West 
43rd Street, New York 10036, 
for $325. A comprehensive 
teacher's manual with a step-by- 
step lesson plan accompanies 
each print. • 



20 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



There's nothing new about 
a quad printer. 



Unless if s one that prints 
Super 8 f ihn six times faster. 



And only Cine Magnetics film laboratory has it. 

Because right now there is only one Op- 
tronics Mark X Quad Printer to give you better 
print quality. Quicker. 

We've just installed this 16mm to Super 
8mm optical reduction printer in our Mamar- 
oneck laboratory. 

Developed under the direction of John 
Maurer, it operates at 50 feet per minute on 
the 8mm side. Or 200 feet of 8mm reduction 
prints per minute. 

But the Optronics Mark X is just one 
of the dramatic changes at Cine Magnetics. 

There are many others : 

Like a new 16mm Bell & Howell printer, a 
new Filmline black-and-white film processor, 
and a new Hazeltine color analyzer. 



Like new facilities, including clean-room 
finishing rooms for Fairchild, Technicolor, 
Bohn-Benton, Jayark, and other cartridges. 

Like new services, specifically inventory 
maintenance of release prints, drop shipment 
distribution, and 100 percent inspection. 

And most important, like a select group of 
talented people who will give your order the 
personal attention it deserves. 

It adds up to a complete 8mm and 16mm 
center for motion picture duplication and pre- 
print services. 

It adds up to the new Cine Magnetics. 

Call us and we'll be happy to show you 
around. 

We'll be even happier to show you the 
results on your ne.xt print order. 



Cine Magnetics Jnc. 

520 North Barry Avenue, Mamaroncck, N.Y. 10543 (914) 698-3434 
New York City Receiving Center: 202 East 44th Street ( 212) 682-2780 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



2\ 




one or all of these provable advantages can make 
this your most effective and reliable microphone! 



UNIDIRECTIONAL 

DYNAMIC 

MICROPHONE 




1. ^VIDER FRONT ^VORKING ANGLE 

The SM53 allows greater freedom of performer movement — tonal quality is un- 
affected by movement tfiroughiout the broad effective pickup area. Eliminates 
"ho/es" and "tiot spots" when using multiple microphones. These valuable attri- 
butes stem from a broad, true cardioid frontal pattern at all frequencies, in all 
planes — freeing the user from the restrictions of overly tight angular sensitivity. 



2. MORE EFFECTIVE REJECTION OF UN>VANTED SOUNDS 

The SM53 prevents sound coloration due to off-axis reflections or reverberation — and, 
in addition, unwanted sounds (even air conditioner rumble) are effectively controlled. 
These properties are achieved through the polar pattern which is singularly uniform 
with frequency (even at the extreme low end) and is symmetrical about its axis. 



3. MECHANICAL NOISE ISOLATION 

Built-in effective shock mount significantly reduces the objectionable stand, cable, 
and handling noises associated with many unidirectional microphones. The SM53 
can be used in many applications where conventional units have proved marginal 
or unusable. 



4. EXTRAORDINARY RUGGEDNESS 

You can even drop the SIVI53 directly on its nose without damaging the microphone 
element — and it will maintain its excellent performance characteristics. 



5. SUPERIOR HUM REJECTION 

Built-in hum-rejection system reduces magnetic hum susceptibility by as much as 
20 db compared to other units! Makes it far more usable in distant pickup applications 
and in areas with extremely high magnetic fields. 



6. LESS SUSCEPTIBILITY TO "POP" 

Integral "pop" filter minimizes explosive breath noise without external screening. 
Works well where other microphones are marginal or unusable. 



7. MINIMIZED PROXIMITY EFFECT 

Uniform tonal quality is maintained (without objectionable low-end build-up) regard- 
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a. FIELD SERVICEABILITY 

Element (cartridge), connector, front screen, roll-off switch can all be replaced In 
minutes. ' 



SHURE BROTHERS INC., 222 Hartrey Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 60204 

© 1969 SHURE BROTHERS INC. 



22 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



IF YOU CANT SELL IT, 

SIT ON IT 



A MAN HAS A COLD. It's tax time. A design for a 
house is needed. Your tooth hurts. A group of men 
are to start a corporation. A major corporation wants a 
film made. 

Each of these situations requires the talents, services, help, 
advice and time of a professional. In each case a great deal 
is at stake. You'll try to find the best professional you can. 
You'll expect to pay the professional you choose for the 
service he renders, won't you? And well too! 

Now, there are free clinics — both medical and dental. 
The legal aid society provides lawyers to all without a fee. 
The IRS will help you with your taxes free. And there are 
many architectural students who will willingly design houses 
for the experience — with no fee attached. 

And for film? 

That's what this article is all about. I've been meaning 
to write it for five years, ever since I wrote my first specu- 
lative treatment. 

Let's start at the point where a company wants to make 
a film. It needs a producer. What are the alternatives open 
to the sponsor.' 

It can select a producer, tell him what the budget is, ask 
him if he wants to do the picture, work out a contract and 
let him begin work on research and treatment. 

It can talk to several producers and ask one or all of 
them to submit speculative treatments and competitive bids 
for the film. 

It can review producers who have worked for the com- 
pany and screen the work of new producers. Based on this 
and interviews with the filmmakers, a creative fee for re- 
search and treatment is awarded to one filmmaker. 

At this point we should define what we mean by specu- 
lative treatment and what we mean by creative fee. A specu- 
lative or spec treatment is when a producer submits ideas, 
a story line, a full treatment including synopsis, dialog indi- 
cations, locations, character definition, and theme WITH- 
OUT COMPENSATION from the sponsoring company. 

When a company awards a creative fee it says to a film- 
maker: We want you to make a film for us. We have re- 
viewed your work and background along with others and 
feel that you are the filmmaker we want. We will pay you 
fairly to research, plan and write a treatment for us prior 
to a finished shooting script. We will expect a budget rec- 
ommendation along with the treatment. 

What are the advantages and disadvantages of the various 
options to producers and sponsors? It's a question that 
should be asked by many people in business films, asked 
and thought about in a very serious manner. 

Are there advantages to speculative treatments? 

For the sponsor, and more particularly for the man direct- 
ly responsible for films at the company, spec treatments 
give the opportunity of looking at a lot of ideas prior to 

Continued on next pat^e 



By DAN HESS and CYRUS EPSTEIN 
Dan Hess Productions 



Spec treatments vs. creative fees . . . "You 
wou/d not consult a doctor and tell him you'll 
pay him only if his treatment works" . . . 
veteran film producer Dan Hess says he 
has done his last spec treatment and tells why. 



Hess Epstein 



/ 




FEBRUARY, 1970 



23 



If you can't sell it . . . 

continued 

any commitment. It lets him see treatments 
and direction free. It enables him to get his 
bosses approval before any money is spent 
by submitting several of his spec treatments 
for approval. It helps him to crystalize his 
own ideas. It makes him appear to some 
people in his company as though he's sav- 
ing the company money. It even, in some 
cases, justifys his job. 

Does the spec treatment method of so- 
liciting film contracts offer anything to the 
producer? 

Well perhaps to young filmmakers an- 
xious to break into the business film world. 
Occasionally, after many false starts, you 
may win a contract on a spec treatment. 
But. better to make a personal statement 
film of your own. It can be low budget, it 
can be on any subject. Make it well. Con- 
ceive it, direct it, shoot it, cut it as though 
your life depended on it, because it might. 
And when its finished show it at film fes- 
tivals and show it to business people. Soon- 
er or later someone will give you a chance. 

What about film houses who need to 
keep several sound stages, a coterie of direc- 
tors, a few crews and eleven movieolas busy. 
Well, spec treatments may serve the purpose 
of keeping their plant in production, but one 
wonders if the money, time and effort that 
goes into spec work might not be spent on 
productions already in the house. 

But for the creative filmmaker with firm 
ethics and a strong portfolio of films spec- 
ulative treatments have little appeal. John 
Pcckham. Peckham Productions, an excel- 
lent filmmaker of 20 years standing, said 
although he's done spec work in the past, 
he has not done any in the last two years 
and will not do any in the future. He feels 
that "spec work is the biggest injustice in 
the business world" and that clients have 
more respect for his company because he 
turns down requests for spec treatments. 

Requests for spec treatments take differ- 
ent forms. How many times we've heard the 
words, "Now we're not looking for some- 
thing for nothing." "We don't want you to 
do a script or anything like that . . . we'd 
just like some of your ideas." Sometimes 
its put differently: "Maybe you'd like to 
give it some thought. Then we can talk if 
you wish." Or: "Since you've never done 
anything in our field we'd like to see how 
you'd approach it." 

In other words: open a can of peas, if 
I like the taste I'll buy the can; give one 
scoop of ice cream before we buy'the gal- 
lon; please fill this one tooth and if "the 
tooth doesn't hurt next week, of course, I'll 
pay you. 

How can good ideas be given away? 
They can't be and nobody does. What the 
client gets are quick ideas or old ideas. 
When the client gets these ideas they must 
be gone over first with the producer who 
is submitting them, then with other asso- 



ciates at the sponsoring company. This 
process is repeated over and over with each 
producer who has been asked to submit 
speculative treatments, or proposals as they 
are sometimes called. 

Speculative treatments cost business a 
great amount of money. Various personnel 
at the client waste hundreds of hours in this 
type of useless work. We know of one situ- 
ation where this has been going on for eight 
months. The company has talked to 15 or 
20 producers and still have not found an 
idea that appeals to them. One producer we 
know admitted to submitting five different 
scripts on this particular project. Hundreds 
of producer and sponsor man hours use- 
lessly expended; thousands of dollars thrown 
out the window. 

If this client had the courage at the be- 
ginning to assign the job to one filmmaker 
he had faith in, even two if he wanted to 
have a comparison, open up the doors for 
him to get into the problem, he probably 
would have a finished film by now, would 
have beat out a competitor doing a similar 
public service film, and saved his company 
thousands of dollars. 

The situation is somewhat similar in ad- 
vertising. But twenty years ago Doyle, Dane 
Bernbach began creating a kind of brilliant 
advertising that has changed the nature of 
that business. 

When Bill Bernbach, the creative genius 
at Doyle Dane, is asked for a presentation 
by a potential client he shows work the 
agency has done, gives client references and 
says whether or not his agency would like 
the business. He knows that you can't give 
away good ideas, that good ideas cost mon- 
ey. He also knows that in our world only 
those things that are paid for have value, 
are appreciated. 

Bernbach's influence has permeated a 
whole generation of advertising talent, so 
that today none of the creative agencies 
will give speculative presentations. Jerry 
Delia Famina, president of his own agency 
that has grown to twenty mill-on in three 
years, says: "We don't do any spec presenta- 
tions — no matter what the size of the 
account. If we give our work away why 
should anyone want to pay. We have clients 
who are paying for our times, why take 
away from them. We had a chance to pitch 
for the TWA business last year — you re- 
member a dozen agencies, one million in 
spec work. What if I went to TWA and sug- 
gested they fly me free to the coast, and 'if 
I liked their service and flight arrangements 
I might book my return and other business 
with them. But if I wasn't satisfied I could 
shake hands and we'd still be friends." 

The point is that creative energy is a com- 
modity, that the creators of ideas should 
have the same attitude towards their out- 
put that other professionals have. 

Speculative treatments are bad business 
— bad business for sponsors and producers 



as well. They're bad business for several 
reasons. First of all, its not the way the 
best films are made. Secondly, its the most 
expensive way of making films we know. 
Third, its damaging to the prestige and self 
respect of both parties. 

One of the most promising young film- 
makers in New York several years ago de- 
cided that the way to build a business was 
to do spec treatments. He's developed a 
business making several films a year, a good 
sales manager who sells on spec, and he 
makes a lot of money, but he hasn't made 
a great film in five years. 

Some companies are well aware of this. 
Donald Ackerson, Union Carbide Corpora- 
tion, said he doesn't like to have anyone 
do speculative work for him. Mr. Ackerson 
doesn't want to feel under an obligation to 
the producer who is willing to do specula- 
tive work on a project. 

Carbide, Mr. Ackerson says, will pay for 
initial treatment or research that is neces- 
sary to get a new project underway. While 
this work is going on he works very closely 
with the filmmaker to insure that the work 
does not get off the track. This is neces- 
sary, he said, because Carbide is a com- 
plex structure and people from the outside 
will need a guide. His knowledge of the 
company is useful in setting the research 
and creative fee appropriate for each proj- 
ect. He said there is no rule of thumb that 
can be applied for creative fees and research 
assignments. 

Now what happens if a filmmaker goes 
the spec treatment route? 

Sometimes, if his file system is extensive 
he'll dig into drawer 6B and pull out a spec 
treatment done for another company in the 
same field and rejected 1 6 months ago. He'll 
turn the old treatment over to his secretary, 
dust it, and give it over to a new production 
assistant who does a little writing. 

The treatment will get a new typing job, 
have one new shot put in, three scenes de- 
leted, the music indicated will be changed 
from an upbeat progressive jazz theme to 
a rock score and three extras of other than 
white races put in a crowd scene. 

Along with the treatment they must sub- 
mit a bid to the prospective client. A year 
and a half ago when they had bid the treat- 
ment they bid $38,500, when the budget 
had been set at $40,000. Now with the bud- 
get specified at around $50,000, they won- 
dered how much the market would take 
and what bid would be best. 

Another producer may spend a half day 
coming up with a spec idea that can be 
quickly molded into a treatment. He then 
roughs out a bid and submits. 

What kind of bids can be formulated in 
this manner? Obviously, not accurate ones. 
How could they be when there is nothing 
specific to base a bid on? The producer 
has the choice when making bids this way 
of either lying to himself or lying to his 
prospective client. 

Either way production values suffer and 
the film suffers. 

While beginning to research and script 



24 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



he finds the whole approach he has taken 
is not the best possible one. It's too late to 
change so he must continue to develop ihe 
ideas as fornuilated in that hastily written 
spec treatment. 

As he begins drafting his shooting script 
he finds that to make a certain sequence 
will require an extra 2 days of filming and 
to adequately cover he should have a second 
camera as well. Budget prohibits. So in- 
stead of shoining it the right wa\. modifica- 
tions are made. Five times in the cinirse of 
scripting similar problems come up. 

By the time the shooting script is finished 
a weak idea has been severely weakened 
bv writing to budget. When the picture is 
finished its another run of the mill indus- 
trial with canned 1961 music, stem to stern 
narration, and safe visual images shot in 
minimum time either in broad daylight or 
with flat studio lighting, and action that 
moves stilted in preblocked patterns from 
one place, carefully to the next. 

What then is the wa\ to go? 

Don't do spec treatments. Don't help 
bastardize a good business. Don't submit 
to the pressure when they say "'Well if \ou'll 
give us a few ideas". 

What else have you got but ideas. If you 
give them away what have you got to sell'? 
Airlines don't give away flights. Computers 
don't give away time. Banks don't give away 
money. .A&P doesn't give away food. 

And you shouldn't give away ideas. I say 
this both from an ethical point of view and 
from a pragmatic point of view. It stands 
to reason. You can't give away your best 
ideas because you don't have the time to 
develop them. So you give away old ideas 
or second rate ideas that come quickly. .And 
you make movies based on these ideas. 

The American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company, one of the country's biggest busi- 
ness film sponsors, and a tough client to 
make films for. knows this and accepts no 
speculative work. They screen the work of 
many filmmakers. When a project conies 
up they choose the filmmaker they feel can 
best do the job. They give him either a basic 
treatment fee or a creative fee to carry him 
all the way through script. They have a sug- 
gested budget. 

At the end of the first stage a rough bud- 
get is worked out. When script is finished 
a tight exact budget must be submitted. A 
better more honest way of working would 
be hard to find. 

Johna Pepper, head of motion picture 
production for the Ford Motor Company, 
works in a similar way. No speculative 
work. He begins with assigning a problem 
with a fee attached. Then goes into script 
and then production. Paying fairly, and de- 
manding top work, all the way. 

As Bob Dylan said a few years ago: "The 
times they are a changin" and "you'd bet- 
ter take note or you'll sink like a stone, 
for the times they are a changin". And they 
sure are. Business wants and must have bet- 
ter more exciting films. Films with greater 
reality, more intrinsic drama. Films that 
communicate more vividlv to the various 



audiences we address. The old tableau film 
is gone. The pontificating narrator from his 
i\ory tower will talk down no more. 

How will we fintl the way to create new 
dimensions in film lor our clients? By bas- 
ing the time to think. By exploring our 
thoughts and those of others. By research- 
ing and reading. By screening lots of films, 
by having the time to outline, write and 
develop ideas. By interviewing. By talking. 
By thinking. 

And how will we be compensated for 
this? Business and filmmaker should agree 
at the start of a project. We've a basic for- 
nuila. 

II the client has an idea or firm budget 
committed for the project take ten percent 
of that for your creative fee. Sometimes a 
problem can be looked at and judged ac- 
cordingly. It's going to be a film on a new 
computer system, to be shot in 16, with a 
month of research and writing involved in 
treatment development, the film will be for 
innlant showing and sales use. about \2-\5 
mmutes. It's obviously not a $100,000 
project, nor is it a $20,000 project. Should 
be in the S40-50.000 range. 

Take ten percent of the $40,000 as cre- 
ative fee. 

I've never seen a case when management 
and producer agreed on the basic principle 
of a creative fee where the numbers could 
not be easilv worked out. 



a film. Where will the spark come from? 
What piece of material, what fact will pro- 
vide the basis for your treatment? 

Digging, trying various approaches, talk- 
ing to a multitude of people is what makes 
a film great, great from the point of view 
ol the job it can do for its sponsors. 

Often there are simple ways to shoot a 
film that only become apparent after you've 
gained a thorough knowledge of the subject. 
You might, for examjile. find one location 
where three different things can be shown. 
You'd work out ways to shoot there, sav- 
ing time and money and travel to addi- 
tional locations. Only with adequate re- 
search can this be ascertained. 

That money is eventually saved by pay- 
ing creative fees is evident to all who have 
worked this way. One very dramatic exam- 
ple of this comes to mind. A company want- 
ed to do one film on two new. but very 
different tires. The filmmaker, working on 
a creative fee. suggested in early talks that 
the two tires were so different that they 
would not be compatible in the same film. 
He suggested making one film on each tire, 
each film to tell a different story and in a 
different st\le. In final testing, after both 
films had been shot, one tire was withdrawn 
from the market. The decision to make two 
films saved the client $3.'^.000 and enabled 
him to release one film. 

Filmmakers should be treated in the same 



"Filmmakers should be treated in the same way as other 
professionals. Their creative work is a professional service 
and they should be compensated accordingly." 



The advantages of working this way are 
many. First of all. it allows a relationship, 
an understanding to grow between film- 
maker and the people at the sponsor com- 
pany. It allows that feeling of trust and 
good will to flow from which so much fol- 
lows. It gives the men on both sides the 
freedom to explore, and exploration is the 
basis of all good work. 

Ideas have a way of building and as a 
working relationship develops in a project 
ideas will grow. One thing will trigger an- 
other and yet another. A depth of purpose 
and a new appreciation of people, problems 
and materials grows in a way that is impos- 
sible on the tentative, tenuous basis of a 
spec treatment. 

Planning, too. can be carried on in a 
much more serious manner. For example, 
in trying to figure out the best approach 
to take for a sales film you may wish to 
understand the thinking from the top down 
and the bottom up. We have gotten to talk 
to nresidents of companies in the course of 
working out a creative assignment. In one 
case the whole approach to a film came 
from a point of view developed at such a 
meeting. You never know when this will 
happen. 

John Wanamaker once said "".'iO percent 
of all my advertising money is wasted — 
but I never know which 50 percent." I 
find the same thing true with research on 



wa\ as other professionals. Their creative 
work is a professional service and they 
should be compensated accordingly. 

No company would engage an attorney 
and ask him to submit advice on a legal mat- 
ter and say that pa\ment would be con- 
tingent on the use of that advice. Nor 
would you consult a doctor and then tell 
him you'll pay him if his treatment cures. 

But such are the ground rules that often 
prevail in the sponsored film arena. There 
are companies who misuse their buying 
power in the creative market, who tap the 
creative intelligence of filmmakers with no 
compensation. 

If you can't sell it. sit on it. Chippie Hill, 
one of the great blues singers, sang this ad- 
vice to the ladies of ill repute in New Or- 
leans. And like Chippie Hill. I'm offering 
the same advice to filmmakers. 

I've done my last spec treatment — it 
was fourteen pages long, took 103 hours of 
research, thinking and writing. It's a good 
treatment, but my last spec treatment. From 
now one, if I can't sell it, I'll sit on it. 

If other filmmakers would join John 
Peckham and myself in this resolve we'll 
have a craft worth pursuing and developing. 
.And if sponsors would respect creative ef- 
fort and time of filmmakers as they do their 
lawyers and accountants we'll have an hon- 
est, respectable business that we can all be 
proud to be in. • 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



25 



THE KODAK 

BKI-TIME 

PRODUCER'S 

KIT. 




Here's a tidy little 
super 8 package 
that offers you a lot 
of big advantages in 
your movie-making 
and movie-showing 
operations. It starts 
with a brand-new 
color film in super 8 
cartridges. That's 
high speed Kodak Ektachrome EF Film SO- 105. 
This long-awaited film will come in handy for a lot 

of your available-light 
assembly-line shooting, 
including close-ups. 
Naturally, you'll 
want to put this great 
new film in the 
most flexible super 8 
camera, and that's 
the Kodak 
Instamatic" M9 
Movie Camera. 
Take your pick 
of four shooting 
'speeds; put the five- 
to-one zoom lens to work; use the single-frame capa- 
bility; count on the CdS exposure system. It's handy 
and really compact. 

And speaking of single-frame capability, here's 
the end result, the Kodak Ektagiaphic MFS-8 Pro- 
jector. This amazing new machine lets you combine 
the still-frame advantages of filmstrips with the mo- 
tion advantages of movies. It's all done automati- 
cally with special cues on the film, which you can 
put there yourself, to stop the projector on any 




desired frame. So now, titles and other stiil pictures 
need only one frame while things that move, move! 
You control 
everything, from 
a remote console. 
It's fantastic. 
Fantastic is 
also the word for 
the Kodak Ektalite 
Projection Screen. 






It's brought movie projecting out of the dark ages. 

With this screen you can project your images in 

broad daylight, with more 
brightness and clarity 
than you ever had in the 
dark. 





See your dealer who 
handles Kodak audiovis- 
ual equipment or contact 
one of the offices listed be- 
low and get your Big-Time Producer's Kit. It's the 
most versatile movie-making package you can buy. 
And, who knows— it might even get your name on 
the door. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

Atlanta: 404 35 1-65 10 • Chicago: 3 12 654-0200 
Dallas: 214 351-3221 • Hollywood: 213/464-6131 
New York: 212/262-7100 
San Francisco: 415/776-6055 



lS®dteIls 




Working Audiovisual 



Careful planning and design 

of the audiovisual facilities 

at Xerox Corporation's 

new headquarters in 

Rochester has provided the 

company a daily working 

tool and flexibility 

for additional A-V expansion 

and sophistication 

as needed. 



Using the remote control consoiette from chairside 

IS C. D. "Pete" Peterson, manager, audiovisual 

and photography at Xerox. 




By WILLIAM SZABO 

President 

Will Szabo Associates Ltd. 



TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS for the de- 
sign of audiovisual communications fa- 
cilities have become well established in the 
past five years as designers have obtained 
more experience. Innovation in the form of 
increasingly complex systems, multiplicity 
of equipment and increasing cost have 
characterized contemporary design some- 
times with questionable utility. 

■"Facilities planning for audiovisual com- 
munications should begin with an analysis 
of the client's communication needs and 
end with the specification of hardware, not 
the other way around"" says Will Szabo 
president of Will Szabo .Associates Ltd. "A 
system which is solely equipment oriented 
and does not take into account the client"s 
ability to produce the software for the sys- 
tem is very likely to fall short of it's poten- 
tial as a communications tool and worse, 
for those organizations which are beginning 
to use AV in the display of business in- 
formations or, in their training programs, 
unneeded complexity can give rise to frus- 
tration and eventual disappointment. For 
this reason we try to keep the first genera- 
tion AV facility as simple as possible while 
making provision for future sophistication 
as the operational requirements grow."" 

""The audiovisual facilities we designed 
for the Xerox Corporation's headquarters, 
Xerox Square. Rochester. New York re- 
flects this philosophy even though the 
clients" in-house capabilities for producing 
motion pictures, slides and video tapes is 
considerable. 

■"Stimulated, as we were, by the high 
level of professionalism in the client"s es- 
tablishment we were able to achieve some 
elegant solutions, which in addition to serv- 
ing the client gave us a sense of pride in 
accomplishment. 

""However, no designs can be any better 
than the people who manufacture and in- 
stall the equipment so that as much care 
should go into the selection of audiovisual 
contractors as is put into the design of the 
facility. In turn, we recognized the signifi- 
cant contribution each of the contractors 
made toward the success of this project."' 

Audio\isual facilities at Xerox Square in- 
clude: 

• Slide presentation with random ac- 
cess, 16 mm motion pictures, sound 
reproduction, conference recording 
and speech reinforcement for the 
Board Room. 

• 1 6 motion picture and slide pres- 
entation, sound reproduction and 
conference recording for the execu- 
tive conference rooms. 

• Sound reproduction and speech re- 



?a 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



t Xerox 



inforcenient for a 750 seat audi- 
torium. 

• 16nim motion picture and slide pres- 
entation for a 730 scat auditorium. 

M Xero.x the conventional seating around 
a board table is supplemented by a flexible 
arrangement of seating which includes 
castered "work tables" and swivel chairs as 
well as a setee and lounge chairs for guests. 
Along one rosewood veneered wall decora- 
tive wood strips conceal stainless steel pins 
which support charts while the front of the 
room provides rear projection screen, chalk 
board, tack board, pull-down front projec- 
tion screen: all handsomely concealed be- 
hind floor to ceiling rosewood doors. 

Current programs for the display of man- 
agement information employ 2x2 slides side- 
by-side with control of the display from 
either the projection room or the board 
room. To accommodate the flexible seating 
arrangement the remote control consolette 
was mounted on a stand whose height can 
be adjusted to the various chair heights and 
for use beside a lectern. 

Although the presentations in the Xerox 
board room require sequential operation of 
each of two slide projectors random access 
to anv of the slides was desirable. A unique 
circuit was designed employing two Kodak 
RA950 random access slide projectors which 
permits sequential operation of the two pro- 
jectors and random access to either from a 
single RA950 controller. 

The sequencer also serves as a memory 
so that depressing the SEQ button after 
random retreival restores the projectors to 
the proper slide in the sequential program. 
In the RA mode a Hold button retains the 
retreived information while the controller 
is used to address the companion slide pro- 
jector. The system is also compatible with 
punch tape control of the two projectors. 
For future training applications the same 
system will be controllable from dual fre- 
quency pulses on cassette wound tapes. 

Although conference recording was not 
required in the board room microphone 
receptacles are provided in the baseboard 
for those occasions when recording a special 
presentation may be desirable. Four track 
V4" reel-to-reel magnetic tape is available 
for recording and stereo playback as well 
as control of slides from taped programs. 

The board room is also provided with a 
16mm motion picture projector and pro- 
vision for single-image-with-dissolve slide 
projection using either the RA950's or two 
Kodak Ektagraphic projectors is also avail- 
able. Speech reinforcement was not nor- 
mally indicated in the board room because 
of the acoustical environment achieved 
architecturally. A novel solution affords 
support for the occasional feeble voiced per- 
son. Employing a screw-in type tranducer 
located in the wood facia surrounding the 
lighting cove sufficient sound enersv is 





Peterson shows ho;< control con- 
sole In projection room Is used 
with script for programmed pre- 
sentation. 



This is a general view of the 
board room. Remote control con- 
solette may be used at chairslde, 
table or lectern height. 





One of two executive conference rooms. Mo- 
torized screen Is controlled from consolette 
or projection room. 



Uncluttered work space is achieved 
mounting control boxes under shelves. 



by 



This view of 750 seat auditorium shows flying 
screen In lowered position. 



Projection equipment Is fixed In place along 
the rear wall of projection room on heavy 
guage steel shelving. 





FEBRUARY, 1970 



29 




William "Will" Szabo is a registered profes- 
sional engineer with degrees in Economics 
and Communications from City College of 
New York. Since 1965, he has been president 
of this firm and president of Theater Tcc^;- 
nology in Quebec. He is a member of the 
Audio Engineering Society, Instituts of Elec- 
trical and Electronic Engineers, SMPTE, 
DAVI, Tau Beta Pi and Eta Kappa Nu. 




Slide projectors have 450 watt Xenon 
lamps with indexing mounts for 
quick conversion to single-image — 
with dissolve or side-by-side formats 



Close-up of audio equipment shows 
tape control relay, audio control box 
and mike junction box mounted on wall 
with speech reenforcement amplifier 
and tape recorder below. 



Remote control and audio control boxes 
are clearly labeled for this self-service 
A-V center. 




Small size of control consolette per- 
mits it to be used anywhere. Lectern 
contains Teleprompter reading unit. 






added to the room from a lavalier micro- 
phone for the faintest speech to be heard 
distinctly. 

Executive Conference Rooms 

Simphcity of operation and uncluttered 
design of control equipment was the pri- 
mary requirement for two conference rooms 
employing a centrally located projection 

room. 

Although the audiovisual section, under 
the direction of C. D. Peterson, is ready to 
furnish the services of a technician when- 
ever required, experience showed many of 
the personnel using these conference rooms 
often preferred to operate the equipment 
themselves. Thus for this location the con- 
trol equipment was mounted under the 
shelves where it was readily accessible and 
the receptacles and switches were clearly 
marked. The result: an efficient self-service 
AV center. The remote control consolette 
was designed to be small enough to be 
placed on a lectern and conveniently por- 
table for table or chair side use. It also in- 
cludes a built-in intercom station. Because 
the simple design also proved economical 
the projection room is equipped with du- 
plicate controls and each conference room 
has its own remote control consolette. Note 
that for increased flexibility at chairside or 
close to the scene a Kodak handpiece may 
be plugged into the consolette to control a 
slide presentation. The conference rooms 
facilities provide for two 2x2 slide projec- 
tors either side-by-side or single image with 
dissolver, 16 mm motion picture, and 4 
track ''4 " tape for recording, playback and 
control of slides. 

Auditorium Sound and Projection 

The Xerox Corporation is not only an 
essential part of Rochester's economy it 
plays a leading role in the community cul- 
tural programs as well. Thus the Xerox 
Auditorium serves the corporation's needs 
for large assemblies (750 seats) and pro- 
vides Rochester with an ideal space for 
meetings of many kinds. The stage is 
equipped with four light bars, a 16 foot fly- 
ing motion picture screen and seven micro- 
phone receptacles. A lighting console affords 
control over 52 lighting circuits and the 
stereo sound system accepts up to ten input 
channels. 

To eliminate the unnatural sound which 
is often encountered in auditorium sound 
systems which are used both for speech re- 
inforcement and sound reproduction an un- 
usual loudspeaker system was conceived by 
C. Robert Fine, president of Fine Record- 
ing Studios. An array of 76 eight inch loud- 
speakers built up from nineteen 4-speaker 
units was installed at the junction of the 
ceiling and front wall of the theater. Auto- 
matic switching of the sound system outputs 
provides monaural or three-channel stereo 
with the center channel derived. The results 
are a naturalness of sound for both speech 
reinforcement and sound reproduction. Mo- 
tion pictures are projected from professional 
16mm equipment using a 1600 watt Xenon 



30 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



light smircc and two 2x2 slide projectors arc 
iiivewisc Xenon illuminated. 1 he slide pro- 
jectors are also equipped with nieehanieal 
dissoivers. 

A departure from the more eon\enlional 
design of audio consoles was necessitated 
by the requirement that one person operate 
the lighting console, tiie audio console and 
the projection equipment. Since the loca- 
tion of the lighting console was set the audio 
and projection controls were integrated with 
the lighting console by designing the audio 
console to fit on the wall above and the 
projection contrails on the wall at the side 
of the lighting console. The audio rack was 
hung on the nearest available wall space 
and the power and tape record-playback 
functions made remotely controllable. 

Analysis of the requirements revealed 
that some rehearsals and some presenta- 
tions would be made without a technician 
in the projection room so that some stage 
lighting and audio capability was provided 
backstage. A key switch on a five channel 
mixer remotely turns on the audio rack and 
bypasses the booth sound console, so that 
control of speech reinforcement or sound 
reproduction, using auxiliary reproducing 
equipment, can be done from the stage. A 
remote control consolette similar to those 
in the 1 .'^th floor conference rooms provides 
xrontrol over all projection functions from 
a lectern, table top or from backstage. 

Peterson says "At Xerox we now have a 
well integrated system for audiovisual pres- 
entation which satisfies all our current needs 
and some we will work up to as we develop 
still greater skills. We had conduit for CCTV 
installed when the building was erected so 
we will have no difficulty adding to our 
capability in that area when we move to the 
next generation of AV facilities. ■ 



Owners Representatives 

Paul Van Wert, AlA, Director of Fa- 
cilities Planning, Xerox Corp. 
C. D. "Pete" Peterson, Manager Audio- 
visual and photography 

Special Consultant 
C. Robert Fine, President, Fine Record- 
ing Inc., New York, N.Y. 

Audiovisual Engineer and 
Project Coordinator 

Will Szabo, President, Will Szabo As- 
sociates Ltd. New Rochelle, N.Y. 

Contractors 
Auditorium Sound System: Rochester 
Radio Supply Co. Inc., Rochester, N.Y. 
Auditorium Loudspeaker Array: Temple 
Loudspeaker Corp., Bronx, N.Y. 
Auditorium Projection: Atlantic Films 
Ltd., Montreal, Canada 
Auditorium Stage Lighting, Curtains 
and Flying Screen: Hoffand & Compa- 
ny, Rochester, N.Y. 

13th Floor Conference Rooms: Tel-Com 
Television Company Inc., Rochester, 
N.Y. 

29th Floor Strategy Room (Board 
Room): Tel-Com Television Company 
Inc. Rochester, N.Y. 





* r 


"* ' M 


• ■■'^ 


«g) ® 









Sequencer circuit in consolette permits 
random access slide projectors to be used 
sequentially and has a "memory" to restore 
sequential program after random retrieval. 



Portable control consolette incorporates 
intercom. Kodak handpiece plugs into 
panel for added flexibility. 



This view of projection booth shows loca- 
tion of various projectors, lighting console, 
aulio console and the cue speaker and 
audio rack. 




FEBRUARY, 1970 



31 



BUYING 

BUSINESS 

FILMS 



Though there is no standard or "pat" way to buy or contract 

for a sponsored film, here are some fundamentals that 

can help guide the first time or occasional sponsor. 



MOVIES MOVE PEOPLE. Eastman Ko- 
dak's clever slogan is almost universal- 
ly accepted and agreed upon as very true. 
But, for the new or infrequent sponsor, get- 
ting that finished movie is often a fearsome, 
frustrating experience . . . somewhat akin 
to taking your home TV set to a repairman 
you have not dealt with before. 

The experience need not be that bad. 
Careful planning and selection of kev ele- 
ments can result in an excellent finished film 
that does its job . . . even within a limited 
budget. However, there are some basic 
guidelines and procedures that should be 
kept in mind. 

Objectives & Audience 

The first step in making any business 
film is establishing the objectives of the film 
as firmly as possible. Even though there may 
be some changes in objectives as work pro- 
gresses, there is no substitute for establish- 
ing some hard and fast objectives within the 
sponsoring organization. It is hardly reason- 
able to blame a producer later for a poor 
script when the sponsor's very basic thinking 
has not been done. 

Oviously, if the film is being made to 
solve a particular problem or situation, es- 
tablishing objectives becomes a little easier 
than for a more complex undertaking. 

Perhaps most important is to limit the 
objectives of any film. Too many goals in 
one film often results in no solid achieve- 
ment. Later, some of the objectives may be 
dropped, redefined or others added, but 
some ground rules have to be laid at the out- 
set. Later, after a producer has been se- 
lected, he can offer professional experience 
on the wisdom of the objectives from the 
standpoint of subject matter, treatment and 
methods of distribution. 

Hand-in-hand with establishing a film's 
objectives is carefully defining the audi- 



ence(s) and the distribution methods to be 
employed in reaching them. And, please, 
"general public" is so vague and overused 
that it is almost trite today. Be specific about 
the intended audience. If vou consider TV 
distribution at the outset, be sure the planned 
film allows for the necessary releases and 
clearances. 

Motion pictures cost money. It is better 
not to make a motion picture than make a 
bad one. The amount of the budget should 
be determined by the importance of the 
problem it solves or messase it convevs. It is 
better to plan on spending more than you 
anticipate because making a motion picture 
invariably costs a lot more than most people 
think. 

Of primary importance in determining the 
budget is the consideration of the number of 
final release prints needed, and the method 
of distribution . . . and (often overlooked) 
the costs of supplemental promotional or 
educational retention materials used in con- 
junction with the film. 

A good producer can help analyze and 
budget for these costs, and offer useful guid- 
ance from past experience. Ouite often these 
costs run as much or more than actual pro- 
duction cost. 

Generally speaking, a producer offers to 
make the film within a given range, the exact 
costs being determined at the time of the 
script approval. 

The actual costs of a complete sponsored 
film can run from as little as $15,000 to 
$20,000 to upwards of $250,000.00. 

Selecting A Producer 

Selecting a producer is perhaps the key 
step in making a corporate film. The method 
(competitive bidding vs. creative fee) is 
covered in another article in this issue. But 
here are some important guidelines useful 
in either method. 



First off, contact five or six (or more, if 
you have the desire and time) producers 
that you have heard of or read about and 
you feel could do a good job for you. At 
this point, it isn't too important that you 
know them personally . . . you can even se- 
lect names from directories. Give them some 
idea (it should he rough at this point) of the 
type of film you are planning and the sub- 
ject matter and the intended purpose. 
Those who are interested will tell you. Now, 
ask them to send you two or more of their 
recent complete films along with the objec- 
tives and audiences of each (along with the 
budget if you like). 

Screen each film in its entirety at your lei- 
sure, carefully checking such things as: 

1. Does the film achieve its stated goals 
and objectives? 

2. Is it appropriate for the audience des- 
cribed (as best you know it)? 

3. Is the film tastefully done and tech- 
nically well put together? 

4. Is there evidence of creativity, either 
in content, concept or use of the medi- 
um? Is there an attempt to add interest 
or impact to the subject? 

5. Did you find the film interesting or in- 
formative? This is a good yardstick be- 
cause a truly good film on any subject 
should hold the attention and interest 
of anyone watching it. 

Now, check the references and credentials 
of each producer you still believe could do 
your job. Watch for such things as recent 
successful work. If you know of a company 
he has done recent work for, check with 
them. 

Incidentally, do not let the mere size of 
a production firm be too much of an influ- 
ence on your thinking. The truly outstanding 
industrial films each year are just as often 
made by a very small production company. 
It is far more important that you be con- 
vinced of the producer's talents and capa- 
bilities than impressed with the size of his 
staff or studio. 

These preliminary measures are more im- 
portant for your own self-assurance and 
confidence in the producer than as a real 
check on his integrity. Most all film pro- 
ducers are honest and more interested in 
doing a good job than making a fortune on 
your one film. Remember, his image and 
reputation ride along on the same screen 
with the film he does for your company. 

Now, you're ready to talk to the producers 
who have survived your preliminary studies. 
Discuss the proposed project with each one 
as deeply as he wants to go during the first 
meeting. Try to determine his grasp of the 
subject, his interest and his ideas about it, 
though at this point they should be sketchier 
than'yours. Bear in mind the subject matter 
is new to him and he really shouldn't be up 
on all of the inside "common knowledge" 
of your company. However, he should show 
signs of having given a little thought and re- 
search to the matter by this point. 

In making the final choice, the standard 
Continued on page 34 



32 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




Revivals of early movie classics are doing big box office business today. 
In fact, major stars like Mae West and W. C. Fields are actually reaching 
larger audiences now than when their movies first appeared. And along 
with these classic films, guess what else today's audiences are seeing? 
Right. A PR film which has been booked to help reinforce the program.. 

Not just any PR film of course. But it is true that huge, measurable audi- 
ences are available to you if your film is right for theatrical distribution. 

A lot of people in PR film distribution are now talking about this new 

medium, and we're delighted to have them join us. We've been talking 

about motion picture theater distribution for years. As part of the 

Universal-MCA family, it wasn't hard for us to spot this trend when it first 

happened, and to take advantage of it for our clients. There are still a few 

tricks up our sleeve that your distribution house probably hasn't caught 

on to yet. 

This is just one more reason to talk with us 

about your PR film distribution. Whether it's 

movie houses only, or a full mix of all of 

today's distribution channels, you'll find it 

really does pay to talk with the man from 

United World. 



3l*lil 



DISTRIBUTION 
SERVICES 

212-777-6600 



An activity of Universal Education and Visual Arts, a division of Universal City Studios, Inc./221 Park Ave. South, New York. NY. 1000.1 • Cable: UNEDVISA.N.Y. 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



33 



buying business films 



continued 



items should also be checked as a matter of 
business routine. That is. you should look for 
these general standards in a producer: 

1. Business integrity. 

2. Experience in making sponsored films. 

3. Financial stability. 

4. Length of time in business. 

And, always remember, the producer you 
choose must be a man you trust and feel 
confident will work well with others in your 
company involved in the project. He should 
show an avid interest and enthusiasm for 
the subject. 

Contracts & Scripts 

Film production contracts vary consider- 
ably. However, the producer-sponsor agree- 
ment should be as tightly written and specific 
as possible to avoid later misunderstandings. 

Key elements that should be clearly agreed 
upon and spelled out include: 

1. Script procurement. Most producers 
prefer to contract for the complete job which 
includes script and production. Larger pro- 
ducers will have staff writers or prefer to do 
it themselves. Others will utilize free-lance 
professional script writers. Generally speak- 
ing, the producer is usually better qualified 
to make the writer selection because of his 
past experience and knowledge. 

The actual cost of a script can vary con- 
siderably. It may run from 7% to 30% of 
total production costs or even higher if the 
budget is small or extensive travel or re- 
search is needed. 

2. Ownership rights to the outline and 
script or both should be dearly defined 
early. 

3. Completion date Filmmaking has a 
very bad habit of taking longer than antici- 
pated. A mutually agreeable completion 
date should be spelled out firmly in the 
contract. 

4. The costs of the production. An ob- 
vious must, but do not overlook explicit 
agreement on the method and timing of 
payment. 

In essence, the contract should be written 
just as specifically as possible and neither 
party should sign a contract without fully 
understanding the meaning, intent and in- 
terpretation of each part of it. There is no 
such thing as a "standard" motion picture 
contract. Each one is separate and distinct 
as it should be. 

In preparing the script, the writer should 
be given as great access as possible to the 
sponsor's operations, facilities and proce- 
dures so that he may arrive at the best pos- 
sible script. 

The sponsor should be ready to provide 
security clearances where needed, along with 
access to research material, pertinent person- 
nel, and all other related data necessary to 
preparing a knowledgable script. A technical 



advisor may be appointed to review any 
technical data in the script. The producer 
and writer are bound to hold all information 
in confidence. 

After research, study and planning the 
basic film concept is presented by the pro- 
ducer in the form of an outline or synopsis. 
Though there is a great temptation to the 
opposite, it is important to leave the story 
line, photo planning and the like to the pro- 
ducer. 

When there is a need for a more firm out- 
line, a film "treatment" is completed by the 
producer, and should provide a good, non- 
technical idea of what the film will look like. 

From here on (before if possible) it be- 
comes apparent that the project will move 
far more swiftly if the sponsor representa- 
tive(s) have the necessary authority to make 
decisions. Waiting for approval from 
"above" on small points can be costly from 
here on. 

Once mutual agreement has been reached 
on the oudine or treatment, a shooting script 
is evolved. Storyboards are often used by 
producers to convey the proper understand- 
ing of the final script. The liaison represen- 
tative should help in interpreting the script 
to those in authority. Final changes should 
be made now. 

The final approved script should represent 
what the sponsor expects in pictures and 
sound in the finished film. Minor changes 
are unavoidable, but should be kept to a 
minimum. From here on they become costly. 

Once a shooting script has been accepted, 
a partial payment is usually made by the 
sponsor when the script and production are 
part of one contract. 

The actual contract should be checked by 
a legal advisor to be sure that everything 
expected is adequately covered. As noted 
earlier, contracts vary considerably and can 
be very loose, or very explicitly written, A 
more explicit contract is advisable in that it 
allows less room for misunderstandings and 
misinterpretations. 

Other items that can be covered in the 
contract include; 

1. Schedule of progress payments. 

2. Liaison arrangements, i.e., having a 
sponsor representative on the set or on 
location ready to make decisions at all 
times. 

3. Arrangements for technical or policy 
advice. 

4. Provision for photographic use of 
company products or facilities, and/or 
employees. 

5. Arrangements for photography on the 
sponsor's premises. 

6. A definitive understanding of produc- 
tion responsibilities. 

Other items that can be covered in the 
contract include agreement on disposition of 
preprint material and "out-take" material. 



Generally speaking, it is wiser to let the pro- 
ducer handle laboratory arrangements. 

Copyrighting and ownership rights should 
also be carefully covered in the contract. 
Normally, the sponsor takes title to all ma- 
terial and the film is copyrighted in his 
name. If the film is copyrighted in the pro- 
ducer's name, the sponsor should have the 
right of subsequent transfer of ownership. 

Approval Screenings 

As filming progresses, the sponsor may 
wish to review each days shooting to check 
various technical aspects of the film, al- 
though it is increasingly more common and 
expeditious to review progress showings at 
predetermined intervals. These are usually 
(1) rough cut, (2) interlock, and (3) final 
showings. 

As few people as possible should screen 
the rough cut stage because the film at this 
point is just that, very rough. At the inter- 
lock point, several members of the sponsor- 
ing organization may want to take a look 
at the film. 

By having these designated screenings, 
considerable expense can often be avoided 
when a change or correction is necessary. 

Incidentally, a sponsor should be pre- 
pared to pay for any changes, corrections or 
additions that are requested that were not 
previously specified; or to cover costs attrib- 
utable to errors or delays for which he alone 
was responsible. 

The final showing or "answer print" is the 
last place to check the total quality of the 
production. Once accepted, the producer 
should be paid as specified in the contract. 

Prints & Distribution 

Release prints may be secured in several 
ways. The sponsor may contract to buy 
prints through the producer, usually involv- 
ing a mark-up over the laboratory price, but 
this procedure makes the producer respon- 
sible for print quality and inspection. 

Prints may also be ordered direcdy from 
the lab, but the sponsor then assumes inspec- 
tion responsibility, as well as the job of 
supplying reels, cans and shipping contain- 
ers. 

If the project has been properly planned 
and budgeted, distribution at this point is 
just a matter of getting prints ready along 
with whatever supplemental or promotional 
material is required. 

The negative of the finished film should 
be insured by the sponsor and /or a dupli- 
cating master print safely stored. 

Now the film is ready to move people. 
Buying a sponsored film is just as simple as 
following the basic procedures outlined here. 
Each step can be handled several different 
ways. Those presented here are the most 
common, but not necessarily the best for 
every production or producer-sponsor rela- 
tionship. 

It is far more important that the producer 
and sponsor establish a solid relationship 
and complete understanding and agreement 
on each facet at the outset, than to rigidly 
adhere to some "standard" that may not be 
the best for the situation. • 



34 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



sure, there's more than 
one way to Hght a set... 




but why not select the best way? For many 

years, Charles Ross, Inc. has proved to be the best way for scores 
of motion picture producers who insist on the finest lighting equip- 
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INC 333 WEST 52nd STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y. 10019, Area 212, Circle 6-5470 







FEBRUARY, 1970 



35 



Giant Copystand Provides Vital IVIaps 



By HAROLD E. WiNEY 
Development Planning & 
Fund-Raising Consultant 



To take advantage of low cost color 

separations, a giant copystand was 

constructed to provide the necessary 

color transparencies from large maps. 



Roy Grandey (left), receives map in 
tube from Harold Winey. 





Giant copystand is checked by Harold Winey (left) and Roy Grandey as 
George Bokland (on stand, adjusts camera. 



W/"HEN THE Salvation Army 
" began making long-range 
community plans for the next 20 
years, it didn't know what it was 
getting into. 

Its needs were obvious. Long 
associated with the inner-city 
where many of the problems are, 
it was losing its buildings by 
condemnation for redevelopment, 
urban renewal and freeways. It 
was also witnessing an increas- 
ingly affluent society and the 
ever-present danger of duplica- 
tion of its traditional services by 
governmental and other agencies. 

Its Advisory Boards and 
Long-Range Planning Commit- 
tees were helpful with needed 
community decisions, city and re- 
gional planning departments, 
welfare councils and united 
funds, all gave encouragement to 
The Salvation Army's long-range 
planning efforts and generally 
provided helpful reports and data 
as well. 

Technical help was available 
at all phases of making commu- 
nitv studies. Printed interim and 
final reports were prepared 
showing the data, population and 
service projections for the future, 
but the maps were inadequate. 

Then came the breakthrough 
in the preparation of color sepa- 
rations and the establishment of 
color scanning centers where pre- 
viously costly separations could 
now be obtained for less than 
$100 for a 10" X 12" final size, 
from original color transparen- 
cies. Color key proofs were avail- 
able for the same size at $14. 

How could this process now 
be applied to the reproduction of 
the detailed 5-foot by eight-foot 
mosaics of U. S. Geological Sur- 
vey maps, with as many as six 
mylar overlays in color needing 
to be photographed as one com- 
posite map? 

Roy Grandey, of Roy Grandey 
Productions, producer of many 
national and regional motion 
pictures and filmstrips for The 
Salvat'on Army, agreed to help 
find a wav of making this new 



process applicable to the new 
color separation technique. 

The result was that Roy built 
an open-sided, seven-foot by ten- 
foot adjustable flatbed copystand 
(ten feet tall) in the Grandey 
studios in nearby Burlingame. 

The stand is equipped with in- 
dustrial casters, a winch for rais- 
ng and lowering copy, camera 
stanchion and aperture on top of 
the stand, and a clamp for rigid 
attachment for photography. The 
rtand and the attachment area 
around it were painted flat black 
and lights were placed alongside 
at an angle of 45 degrees to pre- 
vent reflection and flare on the 
mylar overlays. This permits the 
basic map and detailed overlays 
to be photographed in their 
natural flat position. 

The serendipity of this seem- 
ingly simple adaptation to a new 
process makes possible the prep- 
aration and distribution of in- 
terim reports to all who may be 
interested in the demographic 
data shown on the maps or in 
the recommendations which are 
under consideration. A 17" by 
22" map in full color can now 
be produced on one side of the 
interim report, with supporting 
and identifying information and 
recommendations in summary 
form in four SVi" by 11" panels 
on the opposite side, all folded to 
a letter-size or number 10 en- 
velope size for mailing. 

Extra copies of the interim re- 
port can be placed inside of the 
final report, when issued, and 
35mm or larger slides can be 
prepared from the 4 by 5 Ekto- 
chrome transparencies for show- 
ing to large groups. 

In community planning, we 
frequently ask the question, "how 
do you unscramble an egg," 
meaning: what do you do when 
there are so many alternatives 
before you that action is stymied. 
The answer? Feed it back to the 
hen, who is an egg expert. The 
moral is clear: when you have 
an audio-visual problem, feed it 
back to the audio-visual expert — 
and expect some serendipity too. 



36 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




Introducing 

Ihe Fairchild 

Seventy-21 poD-up 

portable MoviePak-load'ng' 

Super 8 Sound proiecior, with self-contained 

rear-screen Folds tn hall and lits under 

airplane seats ~ 

Weighs only 1 7 pounds. 



Write to us for any information you need on 

the potential of 8mm sound movies Or to 

set up a demonstration We II have 

someone from our nationwide dealer service 

show you all you need to become a star. 

The Fairchild Experience has the answers. 



Iniroducmg 

the Fairchild 

Seventy-31 mini-console 

[we also make a maxi, the Seventy-4 1 ) 

For permanent display in limited space On 

the job training right on the job 

Convert videotape to Super 8 film 

and save money on playback too. 



Fairchild Camera & Instrument Corporation, Iridustrial Products Division, 221 Fairchild Avenue, Plainview, NY 1 1803; (516) WE 8-9600 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



37 




THE CAMERA MART 
Audio-Visual Line can put 

your ideas on the right 
track with a complete 
selection of specialized 
equipment including 
opaque projectors (for 
the projection of non- 
transparent material), 
stop motion analyst 
projectors, 16MM Xenon 
projectors (for brightest 
and long distance 
projection), 16 & 35MM 
double system sound 
interlock projectors, 
overhead projectors, strip 
film sound projectors, 
background slide 
projectors and projection 
accessory equipment. 

Everything is available 
for rent, long-term lease, 
or sale. And to keep you 
running on schedule we 
can also provide 
completely packaged 
programs. 

For further information 
and/or reservations call 
or write Mr. Bob Roizman 
(212) 757-6977. 




I F PA JOURNAL 



INFORMATION FILM PRODUCERS OF AMERICA, INC. 



P.O. Box 1470, Hollywood, California 90028 



New Officers Installed, Board 
Holds First, Full Meeting 

At the 1970 national board of directors 
meeting and installation January 8-9, new 
President Robert Montague set the theme 
for the meeting and his policy for the year: 
"in all matters, we must be as unemotional 
as practical and to the point. Leave out 
conjecture — be objective. Be patient and 
hear out the other. Listen well! Maintain 
attitudes of open mindedness and vision. 
Remember why we are here — not for per- 
sonal gain, but to build and keep IFPA 
united in purpose." Then Montague read 
from the selected portions of the Bylaws, 
Rules and Regulations pertaining to the 
duties of the President. He asked for an in- 
terpretation which would give him power 
to appoint committee chairmen to imple- 
ment many new and some of the regular 
services to members. He called for accept- 
ance of the basic 1970 annual calendar of 
events which included — Quarterly Na- 
tional Board Meetings in four different cit- 
ies, the 11th Annual Conference; symposia 
in the East, South, and Northwest. Confer- 
ence co-sponsorship with several other so- 
cieties was also listed. National goals for 
1970 were established: ( 1) Ease of opera- 
tion and administration, efficient but not 
short sighted (2) Double the membership 
and the number of Chapters. ( 3 ) Triple the 
membership services. 

A discussion of "Job Descriptions" fol- 
lowed and each new officer stated his per- 
sonal job related goals: 

Michael Rye-Executive Vice President: 



"I feci the key to the Executive Vice-Presi- 
dent's job is remaining in continuing and 
close contact with the President by phone, 
by letter and by special meetings in order 
to thoroughly familiarize himself with 
the President's scope of duties, in addition, 
with the President's intent and direction of 
thinking in all areas. Next the Executive 
Vice-President should function as a source 
of ideas for the advancement and develop- 
ment of IFPA's goals as of course all Board 
Members will to a certain extent". 

Jack Meakin-Financial Vice President 
and Treasurer: "There has to be one mas- 
ter control for complete membership data 
for all chapters. I think the National Finan- 
cial VP should keep this data up to date 
and at a finger-tip control. My goal will be 
limited to three very basic and important 
operations: (1) Simplify the whole financial 
structure for ease of operation, dues col- 
lections; and realistic indication of financial 
status. In this area I plan to set up a sim- 
plified bookkeeping system". (2) Drastical- 
ly reduce expenses and balance the budget. 
(3) Develop additional sources of income". 

Cliarles (Cfnick) MacC rone-Editorial 
\'ice President: "I consider the bi-monthly 
publication of the IFPA Newsletter to be 
the single most important item during my 
term of office. It will be my goal to publish 
six issues of the Newsletter on a profit mak- 
ing basis. The content of the Newsletter will 
be altered considerably from that of the 
past, to include more information of IFPA 

Continued on page 40 




TheCamera Martmc. 



456 W. SSth St.. (Bet. 9th < tOth AveS.) 
New York. N. Y. ?00I9 Phone: (212) 757-6977 



Board of Directors, Officers for 1970: Front row, L to R — Michael Rye, exec vice presicJent; Ray Hol- 
lingsworth, membership and chapter vice president West; Jack Meakin, financial vice president; 
Dan McGovern, public relations vice president. Back Row: Chuck MacCrone, editorial vice presi- 
dent, Mitch Rose, past president. Bob Montague, national president, and Jackie Stillwell, re- 
cording secretary. Membership & Chapters VP-East, Art Rescher, was missing at time of photo. 



38 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




We get positive results 
from negative thinking. 

And we do more than think about your negatives. We plan, organize and 
coordinate our editorial, sound studio and film processing capability far ahead to 
assure you a film full of clarity, detail, true sound, true color, true black and white. 

We'll give you a film to be proud of. In 35mm, 16mm, super 8. In cartridge or on 
reel. In Ecktachrome ECO-2 or ME-4. In negative-positive color or black and white. We'll 
give you optical sound prints. Magnetic sound prints. Reduction or blow-up negatives. 
Magnetic or optical sound transfers. We'll edit, record and re-edit. 'Til it's right. At 
Capital. Wherever we are. 



Capital 

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TITLE DESIGN ILLUSTRATION 

COLOR CORRECTION HAND LETTERING 

BACKGROUND ART PHOTO LETTERING 

RETOUCHING HOT PRESS TITLES 

SLIDES FOR TV SILK SCREEN 

723 SEWARD ST. 469-1663 
HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 90038 



IFPA Journal 



confinued 




First, quarterly, all day, shirt sleeve, work session of National Board was held at the Town & Coun- 
try Hotel Esquire Room, chaired by Bob Montague and attended by all the National Board Officers. 



people and lor IFPA people. 1 will support 
public relations vice president with material 
pertinent to the activities of IFPA. Develop 
plans, perhaps rekindle the old ones, for 
the production of a co-operatively made 
IFPA story, would be an effective sales tool 
for members in their campaigns for addi- 
tional film business. Assist the public rela- 
tions vice-president in creating a public 
awareness of IFPA, through the use of the 
above mentioned film and other selected 
member made films". 

Daniel A . McGovern — Public Relations 
Vice-President: "As PR-VP my first task 
will be to concentrate on IFPA activities for 
the IFPA Journal in BUSINESS SCREEN 
magazine. Secondly I hall concern myself 
with stories and news items of IFPA for 
other trade magazines, and finally the home- 
own release of news items of IFPA activi- 
ties; members, local media and trade pa- 
pers." 

Artluir Reseller — Mcmhcrsliip and Clian- 
ters Vice President. East: "My goal is to 
promote the following objectives: 
( 1 ) Establish new chapters in the east. 

(2) Recruit new members within the pres- 
ent chapters. 

( 3 ) Keep in close contact with the Vice 
President of Chapters and Membership- 
West for an exchange of recruitment 
plans and interests. 

( 4 ) Promote talks and presentations be- 
tween eastern chapters". 

Ray Hollingsworth — Membership and 
Cluipiers Vice President-West: "Work close- 





Cost Cutting Comments 

Many producers have asked us how they can cut costs. 
We have put all our suggestions into one helpful booklet, 
"Colburn Comments On Industrial Film Cost Reduction." 
This useful information will help you anticipate and avoid 
the many mistakes that lead to costly problems. 

Send for your free copy now. 



GEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY, INC. 

164 N. Wacker Drive • Chicago, III. 60606 
Telephone (area code 312) 332-6286 




Boh Montague (I) new IFPA Prexy, accepts certi- 
ficate of appreciation along with best wishes for 
a good year, from Mitch Rose, past president. 



ly with the Chapter officers in areas of 
membership and programs, not only by 
communication, but in person. Travel 
throughout the west, both north, south and 
central to assist in new chapter formations." 

Mitchell Rose — Immediate Past Presi- 
dent: "Traditionally the Past President pre- 
sides over the Nominating Committee for 
the next term. This I will do, plus be avail- 
able for council and whatever I can do to 
support the present board". 

Jackie Slilwell will continue this year to 
be the Recording Secretary of the National 
Board, assemble and send out agenda min- 
utes, and meeting notices. She also will 
serve as advisor to Marilynn Leben who is 
our office manager. Her hours are 12:30 
p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Fri- 
day — she's also the very pleasant voice 
of IFPA. 



New Appointment Ratified 

Filling the vacancy recently created by 
the resignation of William Nash, Daniel A. 
McGovern, a runner up in the recent elec- 
tions, has accepted the offer to be our new 
Vice President, Public Relations. He was 
installed in .lanuary, and this IFPA Jour- 
nal reflects his first official and primary 
responsibility. • 



40 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




Why the NPR's magazine change takes 
only five seconds. 



Snap off the old magazine, check the 
aperture, snap on the new magazine. That's 
all. No threading; no loop to form; no blimp 
to climb in and out of. You don't need to 
touch the film at all. The film is threaded 
and the loop is formed inside the magazine 
when you load it, before shooting starts. The 
spring-loaded rear film pressure plate is on 
the magazine; the film channel and aperture 
are on the camera body. When you snap off 
the magazine, the aperture, registration pin 
and claw are right before your eyes, visible 
and accessible for fast inspection. Loading 
the 400 foot magazine is fast and easy, too; 
and most of it, including forming the loop, 
can be done in daylight. 



With unscripted action that won't 
wait, you can leave the tape recorder run- 
ning when you run out of film, and cover the 
lost five seconds with a cutaway, later. The 
NPR's built-in clapper will automatically re- 
establish sync. Or with Crystal Control, you 
can tap the microphone to tail slate the 
scene. In the studio with a script, the five- 
second magazine change can prevent 
everyone on set from going off to make a 
phone call when the magazine runs out of 
film. With the NPR it's just a new take. 
Immediately. 



For an NPR brochure, 
write to Eclair at 
7262 Melrose Avenue 
L.A., Calif. 90046 




FEBRUARY, 1970 



41 




picture parade 



iriniiiiinMiiiiiiiMniiiiiniiMiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifuii^^ 



The Whole Family Enjoys 
This Growing Sport 

A rapidly increasing sound in 
sport is booming out all over in 
America. It's the sound of clay 
targets breaking as each year 
thousands of new shooters join 
the millions already calling for 
claybirds. 

In recognition of growing ac- 
ceptance of the shotgun sports 
the Winchester-Western Division 
of Olin Corporation has produc- 
ed a 10-minute, 16mm color mo- 
tion picture entitled The Call of 
the Claybird. filmed at locations 
throughout the U.S. by Francis 




Quality-Bllt 

Film Shipping Cases 

• Best quality domestic fibre 

• Heavy steel corners for 
adcJed protection 

• Durable 1" web straps 

• Large address card holder 
with positive retainer spring 

• Sizes from 400' to 2000' 

OTHER "QUALITV-BILT" ITEMS: 

Salon Print Shipping Cases 

Sound Slidefilm Shipping Cases 
(for Transcriptions & Filmstrips) 

Filmstrip Shipping Cases (hold up 
to 6 strips plus scripts) 

Write direct to 
maniilaclurer lor catalog 

m. SCHUESSLER 

Div. of Liidwig Industries 

361 W. Superior St., Chicago 10, III. 
Phone: 312-SU 7-6869 



Carter Wood Productions of Ne .v 
Canaan, Conn. 

The Call of the Claybird of- 
fers proof that this shooting sport 
means recreation anywhere, 
everywhere, by anyone. The film 
shows over ten variations of clay- 
bird shooting, ranging from the 
use of a handtrap at a relaxed 
family outing to the highly com- 
petitive Grand American that an- 
nually draws over 3,000 shoot- 
ers to the tournament. 

The stars of Winchester's fast- 
paced film are youngsters, par- 
ents and grandparents who share 
a common interest in wanting to 
join a sport that guarantees fun 
for all. Age is no barrier, and it 
doesn't take muscle to be among 
those heeding The Call of the 
Claybird. 

Prints may be obtained free 
of charge from Modem Talking 
Picture Service, Inc. 



Businessman Hunts for 
Perfect Secretary 

Help Wanted: Secretary is a 
tongue-in-cheek commentary on 
the requisites of a good secretary. 
A businessman has lost, through 
marriage, the "perfect" secretary 
he inherited from his predecessor. 
Traumatic experiences with her 
three far-less-than perfect suc- 
cessors lead him to the psy- 
chiatrist's couch where he emo- 




A series of negative examples shows 
how to be a good secretary. 

tionally relates his problems. Hu- 
mor is laced with one strong 
point — that being a good secre- 
tary requires more than basic sec- 
retary skills. 

The film stresses that a "secre- 
tarial state of mind" is a re- 
quisite for the outstanding secre- 



tary who possesses initiative, 
loyalty, common sense and busi- 
ness sense, appearance and tact. 
Further information can be ob- 
tained from General Electric Ed- 
ucational Films, 60 Washing- 
ton Ave., Schnectady, N.Y. 
12305. 



McCall's Uses Film to 
Reach Travel Advertisers 

McCall's Magazine is using an 
attractive new film, Portrait, A 
Lady in Motion, made in the Fo- 
tomation process, to interest trav- 
el advertisers. 

The film points out that in to- 
day's travel market women play 
a crucial role in the family's 
holiday planning. 53 per cent of 
all passports are now issued to 
women. 85 per cent of all travel 
agent's business comes from 
women. More than half of all 
travelers are women. And where 
to reach the woman traveler? 
McCall's, of course. 

Portrait: A Lady in Motion, 
13 minutes, color, was produced 
by Animated Productions, New 
York. Hundreds of stills from 
many kinds of art — travel fold- 
ers, pages from McCall's, etc. — 
were combined vnth live action 
using exciting new computer an- 
imation techniques. One split 
screen shot has a zoom on one 
side and a pan on the other, all 
photographed on one negative. 
This sort of treatment provides 
not only an effective use of other- 
wise static materials but a con- 
siderable saving over other sys- 
tems of achieving the same re- 
sults. 



"The Name of the Game is 
. . . Basketball" 

Fourteen of the country's most 
famous basketball pros star in 
The Name of the Game Is . . . 
Basketball, a public service film 
just released by the Prudential 
Life Insurance Company to pro- 
mote physical fitness. The 28- 
minute color film was produced 
in cooperation with the National 
Basketball Association and the 



President's Council on Physical 
Fitness. 

The top players, representing 
1 3 teams of the NBA, display the 




Elvin Hayes of the San Diego Rock- 
ets and Wes Unseld of the Balti- 
more Bullets leap high at a tap-off. 

skills that earned stardom for 
them, as well as demonstrate the 
exercises they use to sharpen 
those skills. Game action is also 
featured. 

The film is available for free 
loan from local Prudential agents. 



Canada Explored From 
Vancouver to Montreal 

The Canadian National Rail- 
way is offering organizations in 
the United States five films that 
show various scenic attractions 
and vacation areas in Canada. 
The 16mm color films, available 
through Association Films on a 
free-loan basis, are: 

Alaska — Cruise Style, a thou- 
sand-mile, eight-day scenic cruise 
from Vancouver, with its British 
ambiance, to Skagway and gold- 
rush country. 14 mins. 

Columbia Icefields/ Maligne, a 
film that takes the viewer back 
to the Ice Age with fantastic 
green crystal ice caves to the 
Jewel-like blueness of Maligne 
Lake. 13 mins. 

Jasper Holiday, a visit to 
world-famous Jasper Park Lodge 
from which visitors explore, via 
snowmobile, cable car and horse- 
back, towering mountains, tu- 
multuous falls and a chasm 



42 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



carved out of solid rock. 14 mins. 

Traveliving, a relaxed, trans- 
continental tour across Canada 
on a luxury train, with all tlie 
comforts of a first class hotel 
from which one looks out on an 
ever-changing panorama of spec- 
tacular scenery. 28 mins. 

"Montreal — Ville Marie", a 
journey to a cosmopolitan cen- 
ter that captures the gallic flavor 
of Paris and its recently restored 
French habitant environs. 16Vi 
mins. 



Designing Buildings to 
Meet A-V Needs 

A lb-minute, color, sound 
filmstrip, designed to assist in 
the planning of business and ed- 
ucational facilities which are 
adapted to modern audio-visual 
communications capabiUties, has 
been produced by the Industry 
and Business Council of the Na- 
tional Audio- Visual Association. 

Space is Not Enough: Plan- 
ning Facilities for Media com- 
bines a series of dramatic photo- 
graphs and simple diagrams with 
a deft narrative to underscore 
the fact that architectural design 
of educational and meeting facili- 
ties should support the effective 
and efficient use of audio-visual 
media. 

The filmstrip is meant for 
architects, school planning coun- 
selors, businessmen, churchmen 
and anyone else responsible for 
planning educational space or 
meeting facilities in office build- 
ings, industrial plants, hotels, 
churches and other structures 
where A-V media may be used. 
For further information write 
NAVA, 3 1 50 Spring Street, Fair- 
fax. Virginia 22030. 



Film Explores Road to 
Self-Development 

Motivation, self-appraisal, and 
goal setting are just a few of the 
issues examined in depth by Get- 
ting Ahead — The Road to Self- 
Development. Made in coopera- 
ation with well-known business 
and industrial organizations, it 
features interviews with their em- 
ployees, from secretaries to top 
executives. As they reveal their 
personal struggles for self-im- 
provement, these people discuss 
the essential elements of growth 
and development which are 
equally applicable to any kind of 
endeavor. The concepts empha- 
sized are pertinent to every level 



of industry — from unskilled 
minority-group members to those 
\\ ho have remained on lower pro- 
motional levels, as well as peo- 
ple on their way up in manage- 
ment. 

The film examines the impor- 
tance of goals and planning, ways 
of evaluating one's strengths and 
weaknesses, the continuation of 
education and development 
through activities both on and 
off the job, coping with failures 
and mistakes and many other ba- 
sic issues. 

For further information write 
Rountable Films, Inc., 321 S. 
Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, 
Calif. 90212. 

Young Campers Featured 
In Two New Visual Aids 

A II Out For Troop Campiiif;. 
a 14 minute color motion picture, 
and Let's Go Troop Camping, a 
65 frame color filmstrip, were 
produced for the Girl Scouts of 
America by Cinemakers, Inc. 
Both programs are aimed at stim- 
ulating interest in and support for 
out-of-doors and away-from- 
home activity for girls of all ages 
and all racial and economic back- 
grounds. 

The motion picture, photo- 
graphed on location in two Na- 




Teen-age girls rappel down a moun- 
tain side in a scene from "All Out 
For Troop Camping". 

tional Parks in the Great 
Smokies, on the southernmost 
coast of Florida, and in the roll- 
ing hills near Buffalo, N.Y., 
shows actual Girl Scouts from 
nine to seventeen enjoying a wide 
variety of activities. 

The filmstrip, also using actual 
Scouts, was created to stimulate 
the interest of inexperienced 
campers in outdoor adventure. 

For information write Cine- 
makers, Inc.. 162 West 56th 
Street, New York, N.Y. 10019. 



TWICE 

THE 

LIGHT 




THE A.V.E. 
"1200" CAROUSEL 
SLIDE PROJECTOR 

FOR BIG SCREEN PRESENTATIONS 

SMALL . . . COMPACT . . . POWERFUL 

TWICE THE LIGHT OF ORDINARY PROJECTORS 

USES 1200 WATT BULB AND GLASS MOUNTED SLIDES. 



FEATURES 
® Remote focus 

• Forward & Reverse 

• Side door lamp access 



^ 



YOUR BEST VALUE 

Price $390. 
with zoom lens 
and carrying case 



OVER 1000 UNITS SOLD 

(We must be doing something right.) 
Call . . . Write ... or come on up! 

A. V. E. CORPORATION 

250 West 54th Street • New York, N.Y. 10019 
Cable: "AVEMANSA" (212) PL 7-0552 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



43 




new products review 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIirillllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIMIIIIIMMIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIMIIIIMMIMIIIIinMIIIIMIMIilHIMinnillMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIimillllUIIIM^ 



Bell & Howell Introduces 
Compact Slide Storage 

A new concept for the showing 
and storing of 2" x 2" color slides 
has been introduced by Bell & 
Howell. Key to the innovation is 
the use of Slide Cubes instead of 
trays. Each Slide Cube holds up 
to 40 slides and is so compact 
that 16 cubes containing 640 
slides can be stored in the area 
taken up by one 80-slide round 
tray. 

Slides are gravity fed from the 
Cube to a circular handling sys- 
tem which takes each individual 
slide past a preview/edit station. 




The Slide Cube projector lens can 
be elevated a full 20 degrees. 

then moves it on to the projection 
station, and on back to a slide 
collection chamber. The user re- 
turns the slides to the empty Cube 
by lifting the lever in the slide- 
collection chamber. 

The projector allows preview- 
ing of slides and incorporates a 
scan/search feature. Models are 
available in prices ranging from 
$112.50 to $184.50. For more 
information write Bell & Howell, 
Photo Products Group. Dept. 
BSC. 7100 N. McCormick Road, 
Chicago. III. 60645. 



Super 8 Film Allows 
Use of Available Light 

Newsfilm Laboratory's Super 
8 Kodak Ektachrome EF hi- 
speed ASA- 125 film permits in- 
door-outdoor color Super 8 shots 
under available light. An im- 
portant breakthrough for ama- 
teurs and professionals alike, this 
is the same kind of film used by 
TV news and sports cameramen 



for fast-action color photography 
under less than perfect studio 
conditions. 

For more information, write 
Newsfilm Laboratory, Inc., Dept. 
BSC, 516 A'. Larchmont Blvd.. 
Hollywood, Calif. 90004. 



3M Introduces Line 
of Wollensak Recorders 

A system of rugged Wollensak 
cassette recorders offers a wide 
selection of audio-visual perform- 
ance capabilities ranging from 
playback only to slide-narration 
synchronization. The basic unit 
of the system is the Wollensak 
Model 2520 AV cassette recorder 
which was designed for heavy- 
duty, reliable performance in the 
classroom or media and training 
center. 

The series consists of play- 
back-only and record-playback 
decks or portables, and three spe- 
cialized performance models: au- 



_,.<vWBfl»"'i^.„ 




This slide synchronization model is 
one of Wollensak's new cassette 
recorders. 

dio active, remote controlled 
with three types of control ac- 
cessories, and slide synchroniza- 
tion. All models incorporate the 
same basic mechanism, which in- 
cludes a full-size heavy-duty fly- 
wheel, a large-diameter capstan, 
and long-life AC motor. 

Identical controls on all mod- 
els are easy to operate and are 
safety interlocked to prevent ac- 
cidental damage to controls or 
tapes. Basic performance specifi- 



cations are also identical. They 
include a frequency response of 
50 to 8,000 Hz, wow of flut- 
ter of less than 0.25 percent, sig- 
nal to noise ratio of more than 
46 db, and a 10-watt (EIA) 
amplifier. For more information 
write Public Relations Depart- 
ment, 3M Company, Dept. BSC 
3M Center, St. Paul, Minn. 
55101. 



Lamphouse Converts 
Mazda Projectors to Xenon 

The Kneisley Electric Com- 
pany has designed portable 
equipment to convert Mazda 16 
millimeter film projectors and 
Kodak Carousel slide projectors 
to Xenon. These conversions pro- 
vide 4 to 6 times the light of 
1,000 watts of Mazda. 

The L- 100-2 Lamphouse is 
designed around General Elec- 
tric's 500 watt ellipsoidal, hori- 
zontally mounted. Xenon lamp 
having a dichroic coated reflec- 
tor. The lamp is ozone free, cool 
operating with a low explosion 
hazard. The lamphouse is equip- 
ped with a 20 K.V. igniter, an 
elapsed time meter, D.C. Am- 
meter, and is fan cooled. An in- 
terlocking switch on the lamp- 
house precludes operation when 
the door is open. 

The companion R2 180-1 Sele- 
nium Power Supply is fan 
cooled, has a high reactance 
transformer, two filter chokes, 
and a cascaded filter network. A 



\' 




rotary tap switch provides volt- 
age and current adjustment. For 
more details, write The Kneisley 
Electric Company, Dept. BSC, 
2501-9 LaGrange St., Toledo, 
Ohio 43608. 



Nagra IV Recorders 
Offer New Features 

Several models, each designed 
to serve a specific need, make up 
the Nagra IV line of synchronous 
sound recorders. The Nagra IV 
line succeeds the Nagra III and 
models range from single speed 





;ooo;i7 



Lamphouse modifies projectors, at 
low cost, without destroying original 
Mazda optics or circuitry. 



i^agra IV motion picture recorders 
succeed the Nagra III line. 

non-synchronous units to the de- 
luxe three speed synchronous 
unit. 

The line offers the features 
of the Nagra 111 and incorpo- 
rates 47 new features, among 
them, two microphone inputs 
and automatic overload protec- 
tion. The units are fully tran- 
sistorized, of plug-in modular 
construction and are operated by 
self-contained battery power con- 
sisting of 12 flashlight D cells. 

For a brochure, write Nagra 
Magnetic Recorders, Inc., Dept. 
BSC, 1147 N. Vine St., Holly- 
wood, Calif. 90038. 



Record Color or B/W 
On V2 Inch Tape 

The Panasonic compact V2 
inch color VTR permits record- 
ing in black and white or color. 
This innovation allows for the 
simplification of color recording 
while measurably diminishing the 
weight and size of VTR equip- 
ment. 

A newly developed automatic 
phase control circuit in the com- 



44 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



pact color VTR assures higher 
stability of color image by com- 
pensating automatically for de- 
viations in phase and in frequen- 




The Panasonic VTR makes it possi- 
ble to record color on V2" tape. 

cy of color signal. The compact 
color VTR will be marketed in 
1970. More information is avail- 
able from Matsushita Electric 
Corp. of America. Dept BSC, 
Pan-Am Building. 200 Park Ave- 
nue, New York, N.Y. 10017. 



Computerized Animation 
Shown Around Country 

A new form of computerized 
animation being demonstrated 
around the country offers pro- 
ducers and sponsors of industrial 
films a unique method of ani- 



mating titles and other effects 
quickly and inexpensively. Be- 
sides having cost advantages, the 
new system is capable of pro- 
ducing animation impossible with 
any other method. 

Two systems are demonstrated 
by Computer Image Corp., of 
Denver, which has developed 
them over the past ten years. 
One, called Animac, generates 
its own images on a TV monitor 
to be photographed by film or 
tape cameras. The other, Scani- 
matc, a smaller, simplified ver- 
sion of Animac, requires original 
artwork as a take-off point, but 
then goes on to explode, plasti- 
cize, grow, shrink, revolve, twist, 
squeeze, undulate and pull the 
image into something never seen 
on the screen before. The origi- 
nal drawing, emblem or print 
goes through a startling progres- 
sion of combinations, juxtaposi- 
tions and transformations all 
produced by the computer oper- 
ator tweeking his knobs in real 
time. With the more complex 
Animac system Computer Image 
hopes to be able to do a full 
length color cartoon motion pic- 
ture in traditional "Snow White" 
style within two years. 

According to Bruce L. Birch- 



ard, president of Computer 
Image, animation costs can now 
be cut to approximately half that 
of conventional systems within 
the limits of the computerized 
system's capabilities. He gives a 
reference point of $2500 per 
minute with Scanimate and 
$3500 per minute with Animac. 
Output can be in color or b/w, 
and on either film or videotape. 
"Right now we are producing 
television commercials, industrial 
films, logotypes, movie and pro- 
gram titles in our Denver facili- 
ty," explained Birchard. "Soon 
we will be able to provide our 
unique service in key cities, in- 
cluding New York and Los 
Angeles. And by spring, we will 
have manufactured enough Scani- 
mate units that we will be able 
to begin leasing and franchising 
them to interested organizations." 

Shure Microphones For 
Equalized Sound Systems 

The ES-50 and ES-51 micro- 
phones were designed with uni- 
form feedback thresholds for use 
in acoustically equalized sound 
systems. They have undergone 
tests which showed that in the 
110 Hz. to 5,000 Hz. ranee. 



feedback will occur at the same 
amplifier gain level for every 
half-octave step. In the critical 
feedback area above 5,000 Hz., 
the response of both microphones 
has been smoothly tailored with- 
out peaks to increase feedback 
rejection. 

The Model ES-50 is hand- 
held low impedance unit with a 
stand adapter and is shock- 




The E$-50 hand-held microphone 
with stand adaptor. 

mounted for quiet operation. The 
Model ES-5 1 is a stand-mounted, 
dual low impedance unit with 
microphone body and cartridge 
separately shock-mounted for iso- 
lation from mechanical vibration 
noises. For more information 
write. Share Brothers. Inc., Dept. 
BSC. 222 Hartrev Ave., Evans- 
ton. III. 60202. 




Or a bigger sales presentation, weld- 
ing demonstration, or econometrics 
graph, for that matter. 

Presenting exactly the same audio- 
visual woodchuck to different audi- 
ences doesn't always make sense. That's 
why we buili two-way versatility— audio 
and visual— into our Mastermatic 35 mm 
sound-filmstrip projector. 

First, Mastermatic gives you a choice 
of woodchucks, dependent on the 
size of your audience You can have 
built-in rear screen projection for indi- 
vidual or small-group presentations. 
or reposition the projector and switch 
lenses for conventional front screen 
projection for larger groups. 

Second, it's just as easy to change 
the audio portion of your presentation 
for specific audience ine unipak 
needs. Our patented canr.dge 
UNIPAK cartridge houses 
both the 35 mm fllmstrip and ^ ,-,, 
the separate magnetic sound 
tape in one compact unit; re 
place the tape sub-cartridge, and 



(For 300 people, you need 
a bigger woodchuck.) 



you can alter 
the language, 
educational 
level, or the 
entire empha- 
sis of your 
audio-visual 
presentation 
at will. 

With the 
Mastermatic projector, there's no elab- 
orate set-up. no loss of synchroniza- 
tion (even if you interrupt the show), 
and no rewinding of film 
or tape. You can set it 
for continuous run and 
automatic shut-off, or for 
manual operation; 15 or 
30 minute program capa- 
bility, up to 210 
frames 

Not everyone 
V responds to 
he same wood- 
chuck It de- 





look at It. And hear it. Make sure your 
presentation has the versatility of a 
Mastermatic projector. 



ELCO Corporation. Dept. B.S. 
'Montgome'yville. Pa. 18936 (215)368-0111 



ELCO Optisonics Division 

Z; Send me your illustrated brochure. 
Q Call me to arrange a demonstration. 




Company- 
Title 



pends on how you | ^"'^ siaie- zip_ 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



45 



Listing supplement to the 



20th Production Review 

Additional producer listings submitted since production of the December edition. 



NEW YORK 

CINEMA 65, INC. 

209 E. 56th St., New York 10022 

Phone: (212) 758-2510 

Date of incorporation: 1966 

Al Pearson, President 

Sheldon S. Diamond, Secretary/Treasurer 
Services: Production of 16 & 35 mm motion 
pictures, TV spots, educational and training 
films (live and animated), filmstrips, slides, 
multi-media presentations and related graphic 
materials. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

FiLMSTBip; Sights, Sounds & Scents of Mon- 
santo (Monsanto Company); Commercials: 
(3) CustomPAK Commercials (animated) 
(Aetna Life); Multimedia: Trevira Fashion 
Show (Beaumont-Bennett); Hadassah Annual 
Convention Treasurer's Report (Hadassah); 
Slide Shcw: The Essential Ingredient (Schering 
Pharmaceutical). 

' CINEMAKERS, INC. 

162 West 56th Street, New York, N.Y. 10019 

Phone: (212)765-1168 

Date of Incorporated: 1965 

Ed Schulz, Producer/Director 

William Doherty, Producer /Cinematographer 

Carol Hale, Producer/Writer 
Services: Producers of motion pictures, TV 
commercials, filmstrips, slide shows; special edit- 
ing services, print ordering and distribution on 
request. Facilities: Screening, editing, confer- 
ence rooms, creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictikes; .Vow for Tommorow, All 
Out for Troop Camping, A Visit with Lady 
Baden-PoweU (Girl Scouts of the U.S.A.); 
three fibns on the Humanities in production 
for McGraw-Hill Text Films. TV Commercials: 
Planned Parenthood (Community Service So- 
city); Slidefelms: The Age of Discovery, A 
View of Review, All Out for Troop Camping 
(Girl Scouts of the U.S.A.); Vista-Sell: Two 
sound-picture exhibit presentation, for American 
Girl Magazine. 

MOTION ASSOCfATES EAST, INC. 

525 Madison A\enuc, New York, N.Y. 10022 

Phone: (212) 752-7400 

Peter Griffith. President 

Paul Minor, Executive Vice President 

Paul Rosen, Vice President, Sales 

Cliff Bole, Vice President, California 

Kirk Beauregard, Vice President, Chicago 
Services: Films; Audio/Visual; Educational; 
Indu.strial. Facilitios: Stages in Chicago; Affili- 
ates in Tokyo and London. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
MoTiox Pictures: 50 Motion Pictures for vari- 
ous agencies. 



tive production offices, screening editing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Films: The Today Sound of Steel, Paper "Mak- 
ing It" Today (IBM); Bacardi Party (Bacardi 
Corporation); Tlie Student Audience (Ameri- 
c;m Shakespeare Festival Theatre); Simmo7}s 
Second Century (Young & Rubicam and Sim- 
mons Corporation); Twin Buttes, Anaconda 
(Hewitt-Robins Division of Litton Industries); 
410, Burning Bar (Mosler); Innovations in 
Swcdrn (Westinghouse International — Sys- 
tems Division). Filmstbips: Safe Loading and 
Unloading Procedures (Texaco); Sales Meet- 
ing and Multimedia: Raytheon (PHP); Col- 
lateral: National Newark & Essex Bank: Re- 
cruitment Brochure, TV Commercials: Prti- 
dcntial (Reach McClinton); Air Conditioner 
(Westinghouse International); Virginia Dare 
(Helfgott & Partners); Sucrets (Needhani, 
Harper & Steers); Ginger Ale (Pure Spring); 
Kava Coffee (Ross Roy). 

TELETRONICS INTERNATIONAL, INC. 

220 E. 51st Street, New York, N.Y. 10022 

Phone: (212) PL 8-1750 

George K. Gould, President 

Dave Byrnes, Alfred Markim, John Meikle- 
john, Lou Selener, Vice Presidents 

Henry Monasch, Scheduling Manager 

Jerry Cantwell, Post-production Sales 
Services: Custom Video tape facihties and 
services. New Hand-held, portable tape equip- 
ment. Specializing in location production in 
U.S..\. and abroad. Advanced editing and film 
transfer services. Commercials, programs, indus- 
trials. 



SKYLINE FILMS, INC. 

501 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017 

Phone: (212) 986-1737 

Date of Organization: 1963 

Joseph F. McDonough, President 

David Saperstein, Vice-President 
Services: Writing and producing motion pic- 
tures for business, industry, television, educa- 
tion, television commercials, multimedia, col- 
lateral material, shdefilms. Facilities: Execu- 



SOUTH 



PRICE-WEBER ASSOCIATES, INC. 

P.O. Box 21393, Louisville, Ky. 40221 

Phone: (502) 459-9960 

E. A. "jack" Price, President 

John T. Weber, Executive Vice President 

George Weinmann, Director of Photography 

Elise Meyer, Creative Director 
Services: Complete production of motion pic- 
tures, stiipfilms, TV commercials, slide presen- 
tation and sales meetings. FACiLrnES: Shoot- 
ing stage, screening and editing rooms, plus 
distribution facility. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The 903, Trial By Speed, 
300,000 Mile Tcardoum, Cummi/is Means Pow- 
er (Cummins Engine Company); Countdown 
On Competition, Lexan, Smells, The Inside 
Stoiy. Comfomatic, Fire Brigade, A Tale of Two 
Ovens, Sizzle! (General Electric Company); At 
Your Service, Over-Engineering for your Safe- 
ty, The Race to Excel, (Mercedes-Benz of 
North America); Slidefilms: The Dirty Dish 
Stoiy, Vcrsatronic Range (General Electric Com- 
pany); TV Commercials: Range, Room Air 
Cond'tioner and Home Laundry Departments 
of Cneral Electric (General Electric); Renault, 
Inc. (Gilbert Advertising); Sales Meetings: 
Renault National Dealer Meeting. 

JOHN HUTCHINSON FILM PRODUCTIONS 
P.O. Box 29431, New Orleans, Louisiana 

70129 
Phone: (504) 241-3803 
|ohn Hutchinson, Producer 
jean Hutchinson, Office Manager 
Services: 16nini motion pictures; 35mm slide 



films and filmstiips; for business, industry, doc- 
umentaries, sales, training, education, TV com- 
mercials. Scripting, editing, sound recording, 
storyboards, titHng. Location photography, sync 
sound, in-house editing. 



MIDWEST 

COMMUNICO 

11735 Administration Drive, St. Louis, Mo. 
63141 

Phone: (314) 532-5100 , 

Date of Organization: April 1, 1969 ] 

B. E. Senseman, President 

D. D. Christensen, Vice President, Sales Mgr. 

R. W. Pasek, Vice President, Motion Pictures 

]. B. Wills, Vice President, Sales & Business 
Meetings 

]. J. Camie, Educational Motion Pictures 

[. b. Eubanks, Art Director 
Services;. CoifTmercial, industrial educational 
training motion pictures, sales and business 
meeting planning and production, slides, strip 
film and original art. Facilities: Three stages, 
one insert stage, lab facilities, 60 foot Umbo 
cyclorama, 16mm and 35mm editing facilities, 
complete .sound and dubbing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictltees: Mission: Possible, "Tender 
Viltlcs" Cat Food, (Ralston-Purina); Stan Mu- 
sial: The Man (KSD-TV, St. Louis); Guess 
Who's Coming to Dinner (Velsicol Corp.); 
Multi-Medl\: Cash In On The Seventies 
(Standard Oil of Calif.). 

HAROLD DASH ASSOCIATES, INC. 

333 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, III. 
60601 

Phone: (312) 782-3722 

Harold Dash, President 

Douglas Sylvan, Executive Vice President/ 
Executive Producer 

Frank Warrington, Vice President, Sales 

Dr. William Lundin, Consulting Industrial 
Psychologist 

Henry Behrens, Manager - Production 
Services: Producers and Communication Con- 
sultants for Marketing: Total Communications 
Consultants for Marketing Programs; complete 
writing, creative planning and photography for 
16mm and 35min motion pichires; total crea- 
tive planning, design and visuahzation of Live 
Business Trade Theatre, Sales & Distributor 
Meetings; Training Programs: Manpower de- 
\'elopment programs; workshops and seminars; 
Public Employee Relations Programs; Computer- 
ized Communications; Sound Slide Films; Arts 
and Graphics; Related Materials; Staff to totally 
coordinate, create, administer and follow up. 
RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion I'ictuhes: Profits for You, ^eiv Di- 
mensions (Rowe International); Time For Ac- 
tion (Illinois Catholic Conference) (Motiva- 
tional & Educational MP); Multimedia: New 
Dimensions 1970 (Rowe International); Slide- 
film: In '-nri tonal Benefits (Marsh-McLen- 
nan); SaL's Tuning (Boise-Cascade) (Re- 
search & Planning); Broch^ire: International 
Benefits. 

MOTION ASSOCIATES 

919 North Michigan .\venuc, Chicago, 

lUinois 60611 
Phone: (312) 787-3323 
Kirk Beauregard, Vice President 

(See complete listing under New York) 



PRODUCTION THIRTEEN 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 49501 
Phone: (616) 4.59-3533, ext. 63 
Date of Organization: January, 1967 
John L. Bailey, Production Supervisor-Sales 



46 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



William I'riiis. Editorial Supervisor 

WViiiei- Sclnu"i(l('r, Director, Cinematograplty 

SiLab 
yanics Finney, Art Director 
Services: IGmm color films for industry, docu- 
mentary, and TV foniinercials; color slides; 
16nim color processing (ME-4); 16mm color 
printing; creative cditini^ for picture and sound; 
confomiing original to workprint; layout, art 
services. F.\t:iLiTiES: Arrifle.x; 2 Auricon SOF 
for single or double system sound; Bolex; Color 
Tran lights: MaguaSync; Ampex; mixing con- 
sole; Double 16 Siemens interlock projector; 
Bell & Howell .Model J printer with fader modi- 
fication; Houston Fearless ME04 ME-4 color 
processor. 
RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion PicTiiuis: I'laite That Refused to Die, 
Calder-A Man and His Art (Union Bank); 
That Soap Covipamj in Ada (Amway Corpora- 
tion); Bninsuirh Tear Cas (Studio Fixe .\dv); 
Coinwunily at the Crossroads (WZZM-TV); Of 
Eagles and Explorers (Grand Valle\' Boy Scout 
Council); TV Commeiu;i.\ls: Hallmark Chili 
& Beans, Meijcr Stores (Johns Dean Adv.); 
Spartan Stores (Norman, Na\an, Moore & 
Baird Adv.). 



Phoiic: (213) 278-4161 
Cliff Bole, Vice President 

(See complete listing under New York) 



WEST 



JENKYNS, SHEAN & ELLIOTT INC. 

871S Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 
90069 

Phone: (213) OL 5-9340 

Date of Organization & Incorporation: 1962 

Chris Jenk\ns, President 

Richard Elliott, Secretary-Treasurer 

[ack L. Silver, Vice President 

George Woolery, Public Relations 

Barbara Baldwin, Production Supervisor 

Dorothx Invin, Casting Director 
Services : Creating and producing TV Com- 
mercials; educational and institutional films; 
motion pictures; and television shows, in 35mm 
or 16mni film or tape. F-\ciLmES: Complete 
production offices, editorial and screening fa- 
cilities, animation and graphic department and 
small insert stage. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: 1969-70 Promotion Managers 
Film (ABC-TV Network); Las Posadas (J.S.E. 
Inc.;) TV Program Titles: NCAA Sports 
(ABC-TV Network); 3-M Company Specials 
(B.B.D. & O. Minneapolis); Super-Saturday 
(ABC-TV Network); TV Program Promos: 
Big News (KNXT-TV, B.B.D. & O., Los Ange- 
les); Feliz Navidad (KMEX-TV, Spanish In- 
ternational Netxvork); ABC-TV Network Pro- 
motion Department, (promo films for follow- 
ing T\' shows): Judd For The Defense, The 
Dick Cavctt Show, Music Scene, Super Satur- 
day, Love, American Style, Jimmy Durante 
and the Lennon Sisters, NCAA Football. The 
Pat Paulsen Show. TV Commerci.\ls: Thomas 
Organ (Sachs, FirJey & Kaye, Inc.); Ralphs 
Turkeys (Ayer/Jorgensen/MacDonald); Rich- 
field Oil Company Credit Card (Axer/Jorgen- 
senMacDonald); Rose Hills Memorial Park 
(Bob Leeper & Associates); Robinson's Fashion 
Valley (Margo Kramer); Lainie Kazan/Sahara 
Hotel (Geyer/'Oswald Inc.); Kellogg' s Pop 
Tarts (Leo Burnett Co., Chicago); Six "Brain 
Drain" spots. (Mattell Tovs — Carson /Roberts 
Inc.); -Hot Wheels" (Mattell Toys Carson/ 
Roberts Inc.); So. California First National Bank 
(Chapman/Michetti) ; Simple Simon — John- 
stons Pies (Eisaman, Johns & Laws); A & W 
Root Beer (Eisaman, Johns & Laws); Ha- 
waiian First National Bank (Milici Advertising). 

MOTION ASSOCIATES WEST, INC. 
9120 Sunset Boulevard, Los .\ngeles, Calif. 
90069 



CANADA 

WESTMINSTER FILMS LIMITED 

259 Gfrriud Street Last, loronlo 225, 
Ontario 

Phone: (416) 929-3166 

D.itc ol Incorponilion: August 30, 161 

Don IlaJdanc, President & Executive Director 

Miss Lee (iordon, Vice President & Executive 

Producer 
Margaret Beadle, Production Co-ordinator 
Keith Harley, Art & Animation Director 
S\cnd Blangsted, Director Research & Sales 
Promotion 
Services: Motion picture and multi-screen slide 
productions, color & B&W, 36-16-8mm, for in- 
dustr\', education, sports, travel, promotion, 
public relations and television. Research, writ- 
ing, photography, editing, art work, and all 
other facilities for complete production, includ- 
ing tulK e(|uipped iinimation studio. 
RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: You Take the Credit and 
Your Money Matters (Canadian Consumer Loan 
Associat'on & Federated Council of Finance 
Companies); Public Service TV Spots (N.S. Fish 
Packers' Association & Canadian Mental Health 
Association); To Market (Abitibi Paper Co. 
Ltd.); In These Times (Ontario Secondary 
School Trustees' Association); One Tuesday 
(The Hospital for Sick Children); The Flower 
(Canadian Cancer Society') — Currently in pro- 
duction: Animated TV' Commercials (Noranda 
Mines); Study of Educational Facilities (Merto 
Toronto School Board); Films for Ontario Hy- 
dro; Canadian Pulp and Paper Association; 
Texas Gulf Sulphur Company and Foreign Lan- 
guage V'ersions of both recent and current films. 

WESTMINSTER FILMS LIMITED 

1414 Crescent Street, Montreal 25, Quebec 

Phone: (514) 849-3006 

Stuart Richardson, Vice President 

(See complete listing under Toronto, Canada) 



ENGLAND 



CINEMA ASSIGNMENTS, INC. 

S75B Fuliiaui Road. London S W 6, England 

Phone: (01) 731-1278 Cable: Cinesign London 
S\\ 6 Telex: 27806 Cinesign 

Lewis \\ . Bnslmell, President 

Stuart A. Day, Vice President 
Services: A European motion picture produc- 
tion service offering a direct concourse between 
American production interests, and European fa- 
cilities and locations. Concepts, designs, and il- 
lustrated scripts for theatrical properties, exposi- 
tion and festival documentaries, 'corporate iden- 
tity' industrials, and other special productions. 
Cinematography b\- assignment for all media, 
incl. television, educational, scientific, and com- 
mercial. Facilities: Low rate studio space, 
and a complete network of trade contracts and 
communications throughout the European in- 
dustry. 

HALAS & BATCHELOR ANIMATION LTD. 

.'} 7 Kcan Street, London \\ C; 2, England 

Phone: 01-240 3143 Cable: Habafilm London 
WC2 

Date of Organization: 1941 

Associate: D L Taffner Ltd. 39 West 55th 
Street, New York, N.Y. 10019. Phone: 
Plaza 755-6357 Don Taffner, Chief Execu- 
tive 



James R. Nurse, Chief Executive 

|. A. Jelly, Chainnan 

E. A. Levine, Deputy Chairman 

|. P. Graham, D. Karr, Directors 

Joan Halas, loy Batchelor, Creative Director.! 

Maurice Pooley, Studio Manager 

Alan Burke, Head of Education 

lack King, Head of Commercials 

Harold Whitaker, Head of Animation 

Ken Lees, Head of Cameras 
Services: Staff of .50 for animated and special 
effect film productions, for advertising, enter- 
tairunent, public relations, educational and tele- 
vision films. FAc:iLnTES: Studios for celluloid 
and special effects animation, also for .3-dimen- 
sional puppet/model animation and table top 
pliotograpln. Six animation cameras including 
two Oxberrys, one with aerial image facilities. 
Editorial and projection equipment for 35mm 
and Ifiniin. and sound recording facilities. 
RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
MorioN PuiiHE.s: Children and Cars (British 
Petroleum Company); Sputum (Boehringer In- 
gelheim Ltd.); What is a Computer (Argo Rec- 
ord Company); The Five (British Medical As- 
sociation); a series of films on Meteorology 
(Longman Group Ltd. and University of 
Southampton), Linca Programming and Top- 
ology (H&B Mathematics series. TV and Cine- 
ma Commercials: for Castrol, Coca-Cola and 
Flora (American, English and German agen- 
cies), a series for Caltex gasoline (Benton & 
Bowels). 

KINOCRAT FILMS LIMITED 

85 Cromwell Road. London S.\\'. 7 
Phone: 01-370-2242 

Date of Organization: 1937 
Gerald Cookson, Managing Director 
Brian D. Gibson, Technical Director 
Ron Hyde, Manager 
Services: Production of 16mm and 35mm tech- 
nical, industrial, sales, TV and all other films for 
specialized purposes. Audio-visual division cov- 
ers filmstrip and sound slide production; closed- 
circuit TV; Script to screen production serv- 
ice; service facilities and studio for outside 
production units. Facilities: Sound stge; 16mm 
and 35mm editing; sound recording; dubbing; 
titling; scripting; animation; location services; 
permanent technical crews and staff. 
RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Design For Success (Dun- 
lop Tyre Company); The 1,000 Series (Masson 
Scott Engineering); Turning Totcards Tomor- 
row (Stone Manganese Marine); Schroder Sells 
Safety {.\. Schrader's Son); The Burning Ques- 
tion (Mather & Piatt Ltd.); Plus TV fillers for 
Government; newsreels for West Africa, etc. 

LION PACESETTER PRODUCTIONS LTD. 

Sheppcrton Studios, Shepperton, Middlesex 
Phone: Chertsey 2611 

London Office: Broadwick House, Broadwick 
Street. London W.l. Phone: GERard 8676 
Date of Incorpartion: 1961 
U.S. Representatives: Lion Pacesetter Pro- 
ductions Ltd. John W. Conlin, Suite 709, 
667 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y. 
N.Y. 10021. Phone: (421 3371/2. Cable: 
Lionfilm via R.C.A. 
.\drian Worker, Clmirman 
Ronald Spencer, Managing Director 
John Boulting, Director 
Robert .'\ngell, Producer 
Erica Masters, Production Manager 
Services: Specialized film production division 
of British Lion Group; Producers of feature, 
documentaries, sponsored and advertising films, 
T.V. and cinema commercials. F-'VCrLXTiES: All 
the facilities of Shepperton Studios: 40 cutting 
rooms, 13 sound stages, scoring theatre, post 
s\nch theatre, 3 viewing theatres, 2 dubbing 
theatres. 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



47 




industry news 



j,„„i,„„„„„ , mil I miiiiiiiiiimiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i imiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiimiiiniiimiiiumiHimimB 



Visual Electronics Adds 
Raytheon Learning Systems 

Visual Electronics Corporation 
has completed the acquisition of 
the Raytheon Learning Systems 
Company. The transaction avails 
Visual Electronics Corporation 
of 5.5 million dollars additional 
working capital and increases the 
company's net worth by 2.5 mil- 
lion dollars. 

The company has been named 
Visual Educom Company and 
will function as a subsidiary un- 
der the management of Kenneth 
Anderson, president. The com- 
pany is based in Michigan City, 
Indiana and manufactures lan- 
guage and learning laboratories, 
broadcast, CATV and closed cir- 
cuit television systems, student 
response systems and driver ed- 
ucation systems. The full prod- 
uct line will be marketed through 
existing distributor organizations. 



Harvest Films in Larger 
New York City Offices 

Harvest Films, Inc. has moved 
to new and larger offices at 309 
Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 
10016. 

The new space is a reflection 
of Harvest Films' growth and di- 
versity in film production, ac- 
cording to Leo Trachtenberg, 
president and executive producer, 
who says, "Our new quarters 
and additional equipment will en- 
able us to enhance our services 
to our many clients in business, 
government, and social services. 
We extend a cordial invitation to 
visitors and friends to stop in 
and see us at our new quarters." 



Kerr, Data Charts Forms 
Slidegraphics in NY 

Maximilian Kerr Assoc. Inc. 
and Data Charts Inc., associated 
suppliers for several years, have 
consolidated to form Slide- 
graphics Inc. 

The merger will make avail- 
able a complete preparation and 
slide photography service for 



slide presentations. The firm's 
services will include design con- 
cept, art, charting, type compo- 
sition and studio and location 
photography. The firm will again 
offer straight shooting services 
and custom quality slide dupli- 
cation. 

The new executive lineup for 
Slidegrapics Inc. is Saul Shuster, 
president, Maximilian Kerr, vice 
president and creative director, 
Ed Rivera, vice president and 
general manager and Rita Kerr, 
vice president and creative co- 
ordinator. The firm's studios are 
located at 331 Park Avenue 
South, New York, N.Y. 10010. 



Streeterville Sound Stud'os 
Are Opened in Chicago 

A new recording facility, 
Streeterville Sound Studios, Inc. 
at 161 E. Grand Avenue in Chi- 
cago, is nearing final completion 
stages. Occupying the entire 
fourth floor of this "film center" 
structure, the Streeterville opera- 
tion was designed especially to 
serve producers and sponsors of 
films and commercials. 

Featuring a 16-track mixing 
console (with 20 inputs), the 
new facility already has one large 
(full orchestra size) studio, 
flanked by control booths and 
a smaller "special" recording 
room; there are also additional 



studios, dressing rooms and a 
projection room. 

James Dolan is president of 
Streeterville; Marty Rubenstein 
is v.p. and music director and 
Preston Wakeland is studio man- 
ager. Janie Frew is in charge of 
booking arrangements. 



U.S. Industrial Festival 
Names Board of Advisors 

In preparation for its third an- 
nual awards competition, the 
U. S. Industrial Film Festival 
has named it's 1970 board of ad- 
visors according to chairman, 
J. W. Anderson. "Our board was 
carefully selected to give us a 
cross section of individuals with 
knowledge and experience in the 
industrial film field, and through 
their guidance, this will be our 
largest and most successful 
event," Anderson stated. 

New board members include 
G. Roger Cahaney, president. 
Sterling Movies, Inc.; Robert M. 
Finehout, vice president. Associ- 
ation Films Incorporated; Jack 
Lusk and Ed Swanson, Modern 
Talking Picture Service, Inc.; 
Scott Craig, National Broadcast- 
ing Company; R. Peter Rigg, 
Combined Insurance Company 
of America and Richard C. 
Fovkes, Bell & Howell Compa- 
ny. Strengthening the govern- 
ment, university and in-plant 




Streeterville Sound Studios, Chicago's newest recording facility features 
this mixing console with 20 inputs; high, medium and low frequency 
equalization; echo send and cue on each input. For film music and voice 
recording, the audio installation was designed by Behrend's, Inc., engi- 
neered to speciications by S;u:iio Manager Preston Wakeland. 



photography areas are Carl 
Degen, National Park Service; 
Hazen J. Schumacher, Jr., Uni- 
versity of Michigan and Harry E. 
Fancy, Arthur Andersen & Com- 
pany. 

Advisors continuing from pre- 
vious appointments are Peter D. 
Crane, WED Enterprises, Inc.; 
Ira Eaker and Allen Zwerdling, 
Back Stage Publications; Marv 
Gold, Film Design; Lon B. 
Gregory, BUSINESS SCREEN 
MAGAZINE; John P. Grember, 
United Air Lines; Frank J. Hav- 
licek, Motorola, Inc.; Gordon 
Hempel, Sterling Movies, Inc.; 
W. Ray Hyde, Barton Distrilling 
Company; Robert B. Konikow, 
Abelson-Frankel, Inc. and W. R. 
Terrell, Empire Photosound, Inc. 



Color Center Renamed 
VPI Color Center 

VPl Color Center is the new 
name for The Color Center, Inc., 
according to Sheldon Satin, presi- 
dent of VPI, a division of Elec- ( 
trographic Corporation. Previ- ' 
ously, The Color Center had been 
a separate subsidiary of Electro- j 
graphic Corporation. The consol- j 
idation lines up all of the VPI j 
equipment and services under one 
roof on one floor, supervised by 
one group of technical specialists 
and one customer service depart- 
ment. 

Bringing the Color Center un- 
der the VPI "umbrella" is part 
of the company's overall restruc- 
turing in which six separate com- 
mercials post-production services 
in three cities were consolidated 
a few months ago. forming VPI 
Services. Both VPI Color Center, 
which serves the industrial/edu- 
cational markets and VPI Serv- 
ices, meeting all needs of the TV 
commercials industry, are locat- 
ed in the same building at 410 
East 62nd Street. 

Bernie Barnett continues as 
president of VPI Color Center 
and is responsible for all mar- 
keting and sales activities for the 
company. • 



43 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




reference 
shelf 



, Ill) I IIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII MM M MHMMMMIIMIMMM 



Facts About Filmstrips 

A 42-pagi.- booklet troin Iraiik Holmes 
Laboratories contains fresh ideas and val- 
uable tips on making a filmstrip. The book- 
let includes information on how to make 
filmstrips, how much they cost, when they 
should be used, what production methods 
are best for various programs, data about 
laboratory procedures, etc. It also offers 
the recommendations of outstanding experts 
and summarizes the results of recent train- 
ing studies. 

Included are helpful inserts, such as spe- 
cial fold-out pages with standard specifica- 
tions, filmstrip sequence chart, transparency 
cropping guide, artwork field chart, and a 
bibliography. A limited supply of this book- 
let is available free of charge. Just write on 
your company letterhead to Frank Holmes 
Laboratories, Inc.. Dept. BSC. 1947 First 
St., San Fernando. Ca///. 91340. 



Audiovisuals Available from Kodak 

Nineteen new programs have been added 
to the audiovisual catalog "Your Programs 
from Kodak, 1969-70" bringing to 78 the 
number of 16 mm films, slidetape programs 
and individual print sets currently available 
without charge for group showings. Instruc- 
tions on how to borrow, present and return 
the films are included in the catalog, along 
with descriptions of each of the films. 

Free copies are available from Dept. 841, 
Eastman Kodak Companv. 343 State St., 
Rochester. \.Y. 14650. 



Federal Government Films For Sale 

More than 3. DUO Federal Government 
motion pictures and filmstrips, including 
films of the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo 
missions, are offered for sale in the first 
catalog issued by the National Audiovisual 
Center. The films are listed under subject 
headings ranging from "Addiction" to 
"Wood Preservation". 

Inquiries should be directed to: Jim Gib- 
son, Director. National Audiovisual Cen- 
ter. National Archives and Records Serv- 
ice. Dept. BSC. Washington, DC. 20408. 



Film Loop Directories Available 

.-\ new edition of Technicolor's Sound 
Film Loop Source Directory, listing some 
1300 super 8 optical sound film titles avail- 
able from 67 different film producers, has 



just been published by its Commercial and 
Educational Division. 

The films, ranging up to 29 minutes in 
length, are all packaged in instant-loading 
cartridges for use in Technicolor movie pro- 
jectors. This directory and one listing silent 
film loop sources (over 6600 titles; are 
available from Technicolor, Inc., Commer- 
cial and luliicationul Division, Dept. BSC. 
1300 Fra»ley Drive, Costa Mesa, Cali- 
fornia. 



Student Film Library 

To help meet the current, national inter- 
est in student films. Northwestern Univer- 
sity has established a library of 24 of their 
most noteworthy films from the last ten 
years. For a folder describin the collection, 
write Northwestern University Film Library, 
Dept. BSC, 828 Custer Avenue, Evanston. 
Illinois 60202. 

Continued on page 50 



Ij: lUXOR Mobile 
Carousel Slide Center 



■"^ 




Projector base, slide troy filing and storage 
and a lectern — all in one self-contained 
mobile unit ! 

Roll it to your projection area, set-up your 
projector, select the slide tray and you ore 
ready to show slides. The lectern is ideal for 
script or lesson plan and has two shelves for 
additional troys or molerials. And. you con 
protect your projector and slides under lock 
and key. 

Other LUXOR modular Slide Libraries avail- 
able for rotary-type slide trays plus the No. 
88SV which files up to 3,200 2 x 2's in in- 
dexed, plastic see -through folios with an 
ot-hond LUXOR PreViewer. 
Ask your dealer or write for FREE 32-page cata- 
log describing the most complete, comprehensive 
equipment and materials for organizing, filing 
and storoge of Audio Visual and tnstructionol 
Materiols. 



, LUXOR Jick C. Coffey Co., Inc. 

Audio Visual 104 Lake View Avenue 

Materials Libraries Waukegan, III. 60085 



solve your 8mm 
sound problems 
in eight easy pages 



.••s» 



<s^ 






^^^ 



■^^ Things are looking up 
for you, the 8mm film-maker. 
Glen Glenn Sound places at your 
disposal the same know-how, the same 
qualitative techniques they utilize when producing sound for 
major motion picture and TV films, and they do it at competitive 
prices. It's all spelled out in this 1970 Manual which covers every- 
thing from service to rate schedules, from in-lab time to sync 
information. 



Write for it. Read it. Then 
order from Glen Glenn. 
You'll find your 8mm 
sound problems are over. 



WMLEM m/m 



Dept. 2B 

6624 Romaine Street 

Hollywood, Calif. 90038 • (213) 469-7221 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



49 



NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF AUDIO-VISUAL DEALERS 



EASTERN STATES 



• MAINE • 

Headlight Film Service, 104 Ocean 

St., So. Portland. 799-6100 

• WASHINGTON • 

"The" Film Center, 915 12th St. 
NW, Washington, D. C. 20005 
(202) 393-1205 

• NEW YORK • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 1775 
Broadway, New York 10019. 
Phone 2i2/JUdson 2-4060 

Projection Systems, Incorporated, 

202 East 44th Street, New York, 
10036 (212) MU 2-0995 

Visual sciences, Suffern, N.Y. 
10901 

• PENNSYLVANIA • 

J. P. Lilley & Son, Inc., Box 3035, 
2009 N. Third St., Harrisburg 
17105, (717) 238-8123 

Oscar H. Hirt, Inc., 41 N. 11th St. 
Philadelphia, 19107. Phone: 
215/923-0650 

Audio Visuals Center, 14 Wood St., 
Pittsburgh 15222, Sales, Rentals, 
& Repairs. 471-3313 

L. C. Vath Audio Visuals, 449 N. 

Hermitage Rd., Sharp.sville, 
16150. .342-5204. 

• VIRGINIA • 

Stanley Projection Co., 1808 Rap- 
ides, Alexandria 71301. 318-443- 
0464 



SOUTHERN STATES 



• FLORIDA • 

Jack Freeman's, 2802 S. MacDill 
Ave., Tampa (813) 839-5374 



• GEORGIA • 

Colonial Films, 752 Spring St. 
N.W. 404/875-8823, Atlanta 
30308 



MIDWESTERN STATES 

. ILLINOIS • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 230 

North Michigan Avenue, Chica- 
go 60601. State 2-6757 



• MICHIGAN • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 2821 
E. Grand Blvd., Detroit 48211. 
Phone: 313/TR 5-2450 



• MISSOURI • 

Cor-rell Communications Co., 5316 
Pershing, St. Louis 63112. 
Equipment rental (314) 
FO 7-1111 

• OHIO • 

Suinay Films, Inc.. 2005 Chester 
Ave., Cleveland 44114 

Twyman Films, Inc., 329 Salem 
Ave., Dayton 45401 

M. H. Martin Company, 1118 Lin- 
coln Way E., Massillon. 

Cousino Visual Education, 1945 
Franklin Ave., Toledo 43601. 
(419) 246-3691. 



WESTERN STATES 



• CALIFORNIA • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 305 

Taft Building, 1680 N. Vine St., 
Hollywood 90028. HO 3-2321 

Photo & Somid Company, 870 

Monterev Pass Road, Monterey 
Park, 91754. Phone: (213) 264- 
6850. 

Ralke Company, Inc. A-V Center, 

641 North Highland Ave., Los 
Angeles 36. (213) 933-7111 



• SAN FRANCISCO AREA • 

Photo & Sound Company, 116 Na- 

toma St., San Francisco 94105. 
Phone: 41.5/GArfield 1-0410. 

• COLORADO • 

Cromars* Audio-Visual Center, 

1200 Stout St., Denver 80204. 
Colorado Visual Aids, 955 Ban- 
nock, Denver 80204, 303/255- 
5408 

• NEW MEXICO • 

University Book Store Allied Sup- 
ply Company, 2122 Central East, 
Albuquerque 87106. 

• OREGON • 

Moore's Audio Visual Center, Inc., 

234 S.E. 12th Ave., Portland 
97214. Phone: 503/23.3-5621. 

• UTAH • 

Deseret Book Company, 44 East 
South Temple St., Salt Lake, 10. 

• WASHINGTON • 

Photo & Sound Company, 1205 
North 45th St., Seattle 98103. 
206/ME 2-8461 




Position Wanted 



Want filmwriting or related job. 
BA, 26, experienced in news- 
paper, magazine writing and 
pliotography. Now employed 
corporate PR and advertising, 
prefer Chicago area. 
Box 68 
BUSINESS SCREEN 
402 West Liberty Drive 
Wheaton, Illinois 60187 



reference shelf . . . 

continued 

Handbook for Film Editors 

The film editor working on 
present day films is faced with 
a huge and complicated jig-saw 
puzzle. Not only must he select 
and smoothly assemble many 
himdreds of pieces of film into 
a story sequence, but he must 
also pass the accompanying 
sound track through several 
stages of preparation. 

"The Technique of the Film 
Cutting Room" is concerned with 
the physical side of editing. It 
describes in detail the functions 
of the editor and his assistants 
in relation to each stage in the 
production of a film. 

The author. Ernest Walter, is 
an editor of vast experience. For 
25 years he has worked for lead- 
ing studios in the United States 
and Europe. This 282 page, 
hard-cover book is priced at 
$1 1.50. The publisher is Hastings 
House. Inc.. Depl. BSC. 10 Ea.'H 
40/// Street. New York 10016. 



Catalog For Educators 

A catalog of building level in- 
structional materials includes de- 
scriptions and curriculum and 
grade level guidelines for 8mm 
loops, filmstrips, transparencies, 
records and multi-media kits. 

Educators may obtain the 
catalog by writing Modern 
Learning Aids. Dept. BSC. 1212 
Avenue of the Americas, New 
York. N.Y. 10036. 

LaBelle Catalog Sheet 

LaBelle Industries has a 2- 
page catalog sheet of its complete 
line of audiovisual equipment. It 
departmentalizes the equipment 



into three general categories 
35 mm filmstrip and synchro 
nized sound, 16 mm filmstrij 
and synchronized sound anc 
sight/sound sync equipment fo 
adding sound and automatic 
frame changes to any existing re 
mote controlled filmstrip or slide 
projector. 

Copies are available from La- 
Belle Industries, Inc.. Dept. BSC 
510 S. Worthington St., Ocono 
nwwoc. Wisconsin 53066. 



Aluminum Film Catalog 

A list of over 50 films on tin 
manufacture and use of alumi 
num has been compiled by tht 
Aluminum Association. The film: 
are available on a free loan oi 
rental basis and cover such topics' 
as how aluminum is made, alu- 
minum finishes, heat treatment 
welding and joining, and alumi- 
num in architecture, on the farm 
in boats and in the home. 

The list may be obtained h] 
writing the Aluminum Associa 
tion. Dept. BSC, 750 Third Ave. 
New York 10017. 



Robins Industries Catalog 

Robins Industries' 40-page 
illustrated catalog #6912 pro- 
vides a complete guide to cas- 
sette, cartridge and reel-to-ree 
tape and audio accessories. A 
front page index and parallel 
presentation make it easy to fine 
any of the hundreds of products 

Distributors may request theii 
free copy by writing Robins In- 
dustries. Dept. BSC. 15-58 127^A 
5/., College Point (Llusliing) 
N.Y. 11356. 



50 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



a GO or Dovio 
from s des & tne? 



* 

zooivts 

art, film dips 

SYH^hi'oiiizeil 
fo voice, music, 
soiiiiil effects 



RRg 



FOR BUSINESS & INDUSTRY 

EVERYTHING 
IN SOUND 
RECORDING 

If it's sound recording. RPL does 
it! On tape, in reels, cartridges or 
cassettes. On film. On records. 
Duplicates from one to many tfiou 
sands. Original narration, music 
and sound effects. Under your 
personal directions, or by mail, 
witfi RPL AudioProgram Plans. It's 
tfie easy, low-cost way to put the 
audio in your audiovisuals! 

RECORDED PUBLICATIONS LABORATORIES 

1565 Pierce Ave., Camden, N.J. 08105 

Tel.: (215) 922-8558 Phila. 

• (609) 963-3000 Camden 





Advances in Make-Up 

" ITic 1 i-chiiiijiit; ol lilm and Television 
Maive-Up" is a handbook for tiic make-up 
artist. Recent advances in compatible sys- 
tems — requiring make-up to be photo- 
graphed in color and black-and-white si- 
iiuiltaneously — have made necessar\ 
changes in make-up artistry. 

The author, Vincent J-R Kehoe, has been 
make-up artist for over 3000 films, tele- 
vision shows and stage productions. In this 
hook, he shares his knowledge and experi- 
ence. He gives trade names, numbers and 
sources of materials, and illustrates tech- 
niques with photographs, drawings and 
charts. Copies are .Slf-i.-SO. Write Hastings 
House. Inc.. Dept. BSC. 10 luisr AOrli Streei. 
\Vu York. N.Y. 10016. 



Jack Pill Catalog 

Jack Pill and .Associates have announced 
completion of their new Professional Mo- 
tion Picture Catalog and Handbook. This 
pocket sized catalog not only lists rental 
rates for 16mm and 35mm Cameras and 
accessories. Fditing Equipment, Lighting 
Equipment. Sound Equipment and Projec- 
tion Equipment but contains over 16 pages 
oi charts and tables of important produc- 
tion information. The catalog is available 
at no charge by writing or calling Jack Pill 
and .Associates. Dept. BSC. ]]35 North 
His;hland .4 venue. HoUvwood, California 
90038. 



TV Equipment Catalog 

.A 36 page catalog covering all Neumade 
products used in the television field is avail- 
able. Listed are film handling and editing 
e 'uipment. projector tables, and storage fa- 
cilities for films, filmstrips, slides, disc rec- 
ords, audio tape, video tape, etc. For your 
free copy, write Neumade Products Corp.. 
Dept. BSC. 720 White Plains Road. .Scars- 
dale. NY. 10.S83, 



SMPTE Projection Manual 

.\ projection manual covering all aspects 
of motion-picture projection and theater 
presentation has been edited and coordinated 
by Don V. Kloepfel of DeLu,\e General 
Laboratories, Inc, for the Society of Motion 
Picture and Television Engineers, The 190 
page book includes 130 illustrations and is 
priced at .$7.50, 

The book treats in detail the projector, 
sound systems, and projection rooms: it de- 
scribes theater operation and maintenance 
in the clearest possible terms. The index 
makes it suitable for a handy reference when 
trouble crops up and minor repairs or ad- 
justments need to be made. For your copy, 
or for more information, write The Society 
of Motion Picture and Television Engineers 
Dept. BSC 9 East 41 5? Street. New York. 
N. Y. 10017. 




MR. SALES MANAGEMENT 
We'll send you a 

COLOR 

FILMSTRIP 

FREE 

It will tell you, in just 12 minutes, the many subtle 

changes that have taken place in: 

. . . the selling profession 

. . . the buyers and their buying habits 

. . . the salesmen and selling methods 

. . . the selling attitudes and techniques 

And . , . suggests a new, fresh and unique solution 
for stimulating sales. Ideal for sales management 
meetings. Don't miss seeing it. 

There is no obligation. Just tell us when you prefer 
to see this revealing color filmstrip. 

NO NEED FOR DELAY -SEND COUPON TODAY 

BETTER SELLING BUREAU Dept. X20 

1150 W, Olive Ave., Burbank, CA. 91506 

I would like to see the filmstrip you offer, without 

obligation, the week of . 

Name ^ Titti 



Company 



Address 

Citv 



State 



Zip 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



51 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Animated Productions 51 

Arriflex Corporation 6-7 

A.V.E. Corporation 43 

Berkey Colortran, Inc Third Cover 

Better Selling Bureau 51 

Bohn, Benton, Inc 5 

Byron Motion Pictures 3 

Camera Mart, Inc., The 38 

Capital Film Laboratories, Inc 39 

Cine Magnetics, Inc 21 

Coffey, Jack C. Co., Inc 49 

Colburn, George W., Laboratory, Inc. . . .40 

Comprehensive Service Corp 51 

Consolidated Film industries 10 

Corelli-Jacobs Film Music, Inc 40 

DuArt Labs 15 



Eastman Kodak Company 26-27 

Eclair Corporation of America 41 

EIco Corporation 45 

Fairchild Camera & Instrument Corp. . .37 
Fischer/Cygnet 8 

Glenn Glenn Sound 49 

Handy Organization, The Jam 

Fourth Cover 

Hollywood Valley Film Labs 40 

Inter Com 40 

LaBelle Industries 18 

Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc. 

Second Cover 

MPO Videotronics Corporation 11 



North Shore Film Laboratory 16 

Plastic Reel Corporation of America . . 9 
Plaza Productions 1 

Recorded Publications Laboratory 51 

Reela Films, Inc 13 

Ross, Charles, Inc 35 

Schuessler, William 44 

Shure Brothers, Inc 22 

Title House 40 

United Air Lines 4 

United World Films 33 

Valentino, Thomas J., Inc 14 

Vision Associates 19 

Visualscope, Inc 12 

VPI Films 17 




iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!in:i!ii!i 



Kodak Fair History in 
Expo '70 Pavilion 

Eastman Kodak Company's 
"Golden Picture Pavilion" at 
Expo '70 in Osaka, Japan, is the 
culmination of two years of hard 
work and planning by Kodak 
people in Japan and the United 
States and nearly a century of 
participation by Kodak in world's 
fairs and expositions. 

The first Kodak pavilion to be 
built at a world's fair was in 
1893 at the Columbian Exposi- 
tion in Chicago, 111. Unlike the 
Expo '70 Pavilion, it consisted 
only of a small darkroom where 
the art of photography was dem- 
onstrated to all who stopped by. 

Since 1893, Kodak has partici- 
pated in every major world's fair 
and exposition held — a total of 
15. A special exhibit in the 
"Golden Picture Pavilion" will 
feature each of the past pavilions 
to show one way in which Kodak 
is keeping people informed of the 
rapid progress in the science and 
the art of photography. 

Located near the main en- 
trance, the Kodak Pavilion is de- 



signed to serve as a place for 
visitors, the main tower of the 
pavilion is circled by a ramp 
which spirals up the building. 
The tower is constructed of two- 
way glass which will reflect the 
scene by day and allow visitors 
to see inside the building at night. 
Co-sponsored by Nagase & 
Co., distributor for most of 
Kodak's photographic products 
in Japan, the architectural and 
design concept of the pavilion 
was by Franz Johann Schwenk, 
Kodak design architect. The co- 
architect and constructor is Toda 
Construction Company, Ltd. of 
Tokyo. Exhibits are designed by 
DeMartin-Marona Associates of 
New York City. 

Increase Post-Production 
Service at Reeves/Actron 

Reeves/ Actron. the helical 
scan video services company, has 
strengthened and rc-organized its 
post-production operations to 
parallel the Reeves Production 
Services broadcast operations. 

The company has added two 
new Ampex V'R 7800 videotape 



recorders, bringing the total num- 
ber of recorders on their premises 
to 35. These machines are the 
latest design and make electronic 
editing more reliable than ever. 

Simultaneously, Reeves/Actron 
annoLMiced the availability of 
their non-broadcast video studios 
as "below-the-line" facilities to 
any producer. 

More than ever, emphasis is 
now placed on transfer and du- 
plication services, videotape edit- 
ing, and other post-production 
services. Reeves/Actron recently 
installed an advanced kinescope 
recording system expressly de- 
signed for helical scan videotape- 
to-film transfers. Film-to-tape 
transfers are being made through 
the use of a new IVC color film 
chain, offering quality helical 
scan tapes in all formats in both 
color and black and white. Two 
electronic editing rooms are now 
in operation to permit clients to 
edit undisturbed. 

Reeves/Actron maintains 
equipment of various manufac- 
turers, including Sony, IVS, Shi- 
baden, Panasonic, Craig and Am- 
pex. This variety enables helical 
scan duplication on almost any 
format. 

The company's two studios are 
now available as rental facilities 
for independent producers. These 
non-broadcast studios have cam- 
eras, VTR's, lights, switchers, 
and other necessary equipment 
on a daily rental basis. Video 
engineers are available, but 
clients are required to provide 
their own producer, cameramen, 
lighting director, and stage hands. 



Reeves/Actron can assist in lo- 
cating crews for producers who 
have no staff of their own. Rental 
equipment is also available for 
location shooting. 

Heading up the re-organized 
company is E. Grey Hodges, 
most recently senior vice presi- 
dent-marketing for Reeves Pro- 
duction Services. Reeves/Ac- 
tron's expanded post-production 
services will allow the company 
to more effectively service its 
clients throughout the United 
States and Canada. 



UN's 25th Year— 

A Time for Filmmakers 

In this 25th year of the United 
Nations, we look forward to a 
much greater role of that world 
body in contributing to greater 
international social-economic-po- 
litical understanding. 

The UN is considering turning 
to the world's most competent 
film-makers with an appeal for 
pictures that will help publics in 
all member countries. Pictures 
like those from such enlightened 
sponsors as Shell International 
extending ideas on economic and 
social themes. 

In Chicago this month, the lo- 
cal UN Association is joining 
with the Chicago Film Council 
for an evening of films promoting 
international understanding. 

We hope the UN evokes a re- 
sponse which brings new depths 
to world understanding through 
good new films. 

point & period 



52 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



studio in a Case 

by Colortran 

'Quartz" lights in 
compact kits for 
your lighting needs. 
Stands, power 
distribution and 
accessories included. 
Tested and proved in 
fast-moving location 
setups around the 
world. Dependability, 
portability and 
performance guaranteed. 
Write for detailed 
literature. 

Berkey-Colortran, Inc. 
1015 Chestnut Street 
Burbank, Calif. 91502 
(213) 843-1200 




To Get 



Visual Impact 



in your Presentati 




Comprehensive Consultation Services on; 



Group Meeting Services 
Sales Meetings 
Stockholders Meetings 
Seminars 

Convention Assistance 
Visualized Talks 
Speech Coaching 
Picturizations 
Meeting Guides 
Projection Equipment 
Meeting P.ickages 
Portable Stagettes 
Field Surveys 
Field Services 
Closed-Circuit TV 



Training Services 
Quality Control 

Programs 
Foreman Training 
Supervisory Training 
Management 

Development 
Vocational Training 
Sales Training 
Distributor Training 
Retail Training 
Training Devices 
Training Manuals 
Quiz Materials 
Utilization Assistance 
Closed-Circuit TV 
Stimulation Programs 



Group Meeting Implementation 
Motion Picture Plans 

and Specifications 
Storyboards 
Animated Cartoons 
Filmstrips, Slides and 

Slidefilms 
Tape Recordings 
Disc Recordings 
Transparencies 
Pictorial Booklets 
Turnover and Flip Charts 
Programmed Projection 
Film Distribution 

Theatrical 

Non-theatrical 
Closed-Circuit TV 



Project Supervision, with Total Responsibility for Security, 
as in National Defense Projects 

7^ JAM HANDY (^.ya<u^^:£^^^^ 



is set up to help you! 



NEW YORK 

212 -JU 2-4060 



DETROIT 

313 -TR 5-2450 



CHICAGO 

312 -ST 2-6757 



ATLANTA 

404 - 688-7499 



HOLLYWOOD 

213 -463-2321 



USINESS 



A HARCCIURT, BRACt li W(j>< 






MARCH • 1970 



CINEMA VERIT 



Is it suitable to 
business films? 



■■"yrtarx^n^ya^' ■#%'#! iW- . jfxr • s"} f ''■ .J ~.kLM2 



GREATER SALESPOWER 



Portable presentations relieve 
sales personnel shortages 



mrwi^^'yww'm _<■ M.-^'i 



M»"'Jf k'*"l 



MULTI-MEDIA MEETING 



» 




I s *f 



ixciting audiences to action 



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ARMOUR HOT DOGS 1970 KIDS SHOW '^B 


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NETWORK T.V. 


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Funny people, vacationers. 
They travel hundreds of miles 
to resortsThen fish all day. Go 
boating. Play tennis. Water ski. 
Golf. Or sightsee. 



Then at night, what do they 
liketodo? 

Watch films about traveLOr 
fishing. Boating. Tennis. Water 
skiing. Golf. Sightseeing. 



If it's your company's film they watch— or if 
you'd like it to be — maybe you should know 
more about these people. 

We can tell you. 

We just completed a detailed research study 
of the resort audiences who view these films. 
And it proves that if you have a film— or plan 
to make one— on sports, recreation, travel, or 
other interesting subjects, you won't find a 
more receptive audience anywhere. 

Knowing these people is our business. Every 



year Modern's unique Resort Cinema opera- 
tion distributes sponsored films to more than 
1 200 resorts from coast to coast. Hotels, mo- 
tels and camps that play host to over 6 million 
film-viewing vacationers every summer. 

Knowing them could be your business, too. 
That's why we'd like to send you a free copy 
of our informative resort cinema audience 
survey. We'll also show you how these active, 
high-income family groups can be watching 
your sponsored film this coming summer. 



MODERN TALKING PICTURE SERVICE, INC. 

1212 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10036 




. T. si^. '•^'J7:>^-ia»'" 



We get positive results 
from negative thinking. 

And we do more than think about your negatives. We plan, organize and 
coordinate our editorial, sound studio and film processing capability far ahead to 
assure you a film full of clarity, detail, true sound, true color, true black and white. 

We'll give you a film to be proud of. In 35mm, 16mm, super 8. In cartridge or on 
reel. In Ecktachrome ECO-2 or ME-4. In negative-positive color or black and white. We'll 
give you optical sound prints. Magnetic sound prints. Reduction or blow-up negatives. 
Magnetic or optical sound transfers. We'll edit, record and re-edit. 'Til it's right. At 
Capital. Wherever we are. 



Capital 

FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 



470 E Street, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024 

Telephone (202) Dl 7-1717/TELEX 89-2393 

1998 N.E. 150lh Street, North Miami, Florida 33161 

Telephone (305) 949-4252/TELEX 51-9453 

Super 8 City, 1905 Fairview Ave., N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002 

Telephone (202) 526-0505 



0. H. COELLN 

Founder and 
Consultant 

ROBERT SEYMOUR, JR. 

Publisher 

JOHN G.REYNOLDS 

Vice President 

LON B.GREGORY 

Editor & 
Assistant Publisher 

BRUCE B. HOWAT 
RAY H. SMITH 

Publishing Consultants 

NOREEN OSTLER 

Editorial Assistant 

AUDREY RIDDELL 

Advertising Service Mgr. 



EDITORIAL AND 
ADVERTISING OFFICES 

402 West Liberty Drive 

Wheaton, Illinois 60187 

Phone (312) 653-4040 



REGIONAL OFFICES 



EAST: 

ROBERT SEYMOUR, JR. 

757 Third Avenue 
New York, N.Y. 10017 
Phone: (212) 572-4800 

MIDWEST: 

MONAHAN/HUGHES 
& ASSOCIATES 

540 Frontage Road 

Northfield, 111.60093 

Phone: (312) 446-8484 

WEST: 

H. L. MITCHELL 

Western Manager 

1450 Lorain Rd. 

San Marino, Calif. 91108 

Phone: (213) 283-4394 

463-4891 




BUSINESS SCREEN 

MARCH, 1970 • VOLUME 31 • NUMBER 3 

^/i^ tAta^et^'fi^ o^Kfiiui/io and TaMms/ 
&oo/<i and ^ec/t*ti^€4e^ c^ '^^o^nmttnica/tan 

This Month's Features 

Book-TV-Filni Projects Gaining Success 18 

Cinema Verite: A Place in Business Films? S_v Dan Hess 21 

Multi-Media Sales Shows: Armour Excites with Awards 25 

Relief for Salespower Shortages By Leon S. Bolin 28 

IFPA Journal: Recent Events and Activities 32 

Hot Sales Tool for Cool Homes: A-V's Do the Selling 40 

Departments 

Right Off the Newsreel; Late News Reports 6 

The Screen Executive: Personnel Notes 10 

The Audiovisual Calendar: Upcoming Events 14 

The Camera Eye: Commentary By O. H. Coelln 16 

Picture Parade: Previews of New Films 34 

New Products Review: New Tools and Equipment 36 

Industry News: Along the Film/Tape Production Line 39 

Reference Shelf: Helpful Books and Literature 41 

The National Directory of Audiovisual Dealers 42 

Business Screen Marketplace: Classified Advertising 42 

Index to Advertisers in this Issue 44 

The Last Word: Observation and Comment 44 



MP 



A HARCOURT, BRACE & WORLD PUBLICATION 

Harbrace Publications, Inc. 



BUSINESS SCREEN is published monthly by Harbrace Publications, Inc., 402 West Liberty Drive, Wheaton, 
Illinois 60187, a subsidiary of Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc. Telephone: (312) 653-4040. Subscription 
rates: One year, $5; two years, $8; three years, $'0, in the U.S. and Canada. Other countries: $10 
per year. Single copies: 75i in U.S. and Conado; all other countries: $2. Controlled circulation postage 
paid at Rochelle, Illinois 61068. Copyright 1970 by Harbrace Publications, Inc. Trademark registered 
with U.S. Patent Office. Address correspondence concerning circulation only to Harbrace Building, 
Duluth, Minnesota 55802. Address all other correspondence to BUSINESS SCREEN, 402 West Liberty 
Drive, Wheaton, Illinois 60187. POSTMASTER: Please send Form 3579 to BUSINESS SCREEN, Harbrace 
Building, Duluth, Minnesota 55802. 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



If it doesn't 
say byron, it isn't 

"color- correct" 




rode mark. Registered. 
ith people who want 
prints. In fact, we're 
expanding again to keep up with the demand — 
and adding the world's newest super 8 mm 
color facilities to our existing 16 mm and 
35 mm color facilities. 



byron 



MOTION PICTURES 



65 .K Street, Northeost, Woshington, D.C. 20002 • 202 /783-2700 

World's most sophisticafed Film Laboratory 



MARCH, 1970 



fixed focal length lenses 

for the ARRIFLEX 16BL 

permit unparalleled visual creativity, capability and contn 



The silent 16BL's versatility in the studio and on 
location is partly a matter ot its basic design, 
partly its extensive system ot accessories ... and 
to complete the picture, its large complement 
of prime lenses. Fast apertures, extreme w/ide- 
angles, telephotos, macro lenses with 1:1 focus- 
ing capability — they're all part of the BL's 
armament for demanding shooting conditions, or 
for creative visual effects. 

These superb lenses come from the finest manu- 
facturers in the world— but as part of the Arriflex 
system, they include something special: the Arri- 
flex lens mount. Strong, quick-acting and precise, 
this one mount is standardized across the entire 
Arriflex line— the same lenses you use on the 
16BL are interchangeable with the other Arriflex 
16's. And the Zeiss Distagons of focal lengths 
from 16mm up, as well as the longer Planars, all 



cover the 35mm full fiield of .980" x .735"— you 
can mount them on the 35mm Arriflex as well! 
Thus, standardized Arriflex mounts combine op- 
timum quality with minimum investment. 

On the 16BL, the accessory Universal Lens Hous- 
ing provides the multiple advantages of extended 
follow-focus handles, filter holder, and general 
lens protection. Balance is excellent with these 
lightweight lenses, enhancing the camera's oper- 
ation in hand-held and shoulder-rested use. 

The 16BL is available with a wide selection of 5x 
and lOx zooms as standard equipment— but when 
shooting requirements specify additional optical 
capabilities, the range of prime lenses teams with 
the camera's well-known reliability to provide the 
world's most efficient filmmaking system. Write 
for the full listing of lenses. 



choose from a comprehensive rangi 




BUSINESS SCREEN 




of the world's finest prime lenses! 




ARRTFLEX 

r^ CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



MARCH, 1970 




right off the newsreel 



II I Illllllllllll I Mlllllllllllllillllll Illlllllllll I Illlllllllll Ill IllllllllllltllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllliUlllllllillllllilll 



Cement Industry Group 
Expands A-V Services 

The Portland Cement Associa- 
tion, the research and market de- 
velopment arm of the cement in- 
dustry of the United States and 
Canada, has announced reorgan- 
ization of its audio-visual com- 
munications services. 

"The realignment of staff re- 
sponsibilities, use of "creative 
teams" on field assignments, and 
streamlining of photo and slide 
retrieval systems will enable 
PCA to expand its audio-visual 
services to the cement industry 
and its contract work for other 
organizations," said James H. 
Hurley, director of marketing 
communications. 

The Association now has 110 
sound-color motion pictures 
available for rental or purchase 
and a library of 250,000 black- 
and-white photos, 30,000 color 



transparencies, and a half million 
feet of motion picture footage on 
concrete construction and appli- 
cations, he said. 

Hurley said that creation of a 
new Audio-Visual Communica- 
tions Section, combining still and 
motion picture capabilities, will 
allow PCA to expand its produc- 
tion of movies, filmstrips, slide 
programs, multi-media presenta- 
tions and radio and video tapes. 
Arthur P. Mandler, formerly a 
motion picture producer for the 
Association, has been named 
manacer of the new section. 



USIA's Herschensohn 
Wins Flemming Award 

Bruce Herschensohn, director 
of motion picture and television 
service of the U.S. Information 
Agency, has been named a win- 



ner of the twenty-second annual 
Arthur S. Flemming Awards. 

The awards are presented each 
year to the ten outstanding young 
men in the federal government. 

In nominating him, USIA di- 
rector Frank Shakespeare said, 
"Herschensohn has made a vital 
contribution to the Agency by 
his creative spirit, imagination 
and vigor. He is truly an out- 
standing talent who, in my judg- 
ment, has benefitted this country 
greatly by his work." 



Snyder Enterprises Forms 
BrownBell Communications 

Brown/Bell Communications, 
Inc., a Hollywood-based film 
production firm which will be 
staffed primarily by members of 
minority races, has been formed 
by Ken Snyder Enterprises. 



Herb Brown and Theron 
"Skip" Bell will serve as princi- 
pals of the organization which 
will produce commercials, indus- 
trial and educational films whose 
targets are the major ethnic 
groups in the country. 



Experimental System 
Developed by Ampex 

An experimental system that 
for the first time permits high- 
speed, economical duplication of 
broadcast color videotape record- 
ings has been developed by Am- 
pex Corporation. 

Charles P. Ginsburg, Ampex 
vice president disclosed the Am- 
pex technical advances January 
31 at a meeting of the Society of 
Motion Picture and Television 
Engineers in Atlanta. 

Ginsburg noted that the sys- 
Coniiniiccl on page 8 



<j/ET STOCK "ROOTAGE 



*JET/ PISTON/ HISTORICAL AIRCRAFT 
35 MM/16 MM COLOR and BLACK & WHITE 
Free film provided to producers for authentic airline sequences 




UNITED AIR LINES 
Call Publicity Department 

Atlanta 523-5517 

Chicago 726-5500 

Denver 398-4535 

Detroit 963-9770 

llonohilu 547-2727 



Los Angeles 482-3620 

New York 922-5225 

Pittsburgh 471-0700 

San Francisco 397-2620 

Seattle 682-2121 



Wasliington, D.C. 

Write for catalog: 

UNITED AIR LINES FILM 

626 Wilshire Boulevard 

Los Angeles, California 90017 



37-6830 



LIBRARY 



United Air Lines 



•Jet mockups for interior filminR— New York City and Hollvwcio,! 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



J 



<*'5 



1 



"MOST OF US i 
LOVE OUR 
COUNTRY... ^9^- 



and we recognize that as individuals we 
can become successful in this country. But 
there's no way we can become successes 
if our brothers become dope addicts.' 



sS"- 



*»:::' 




^^^^ 



^, ^ 



m^ 1*^ 



This statement was }ust one of the many 
provocative expressions of campus attitudes 
In "THE DAY BEFORE TOl^ORROW," VPI's 
production for NEWSWEEK Magazine . . . 
winner of the 1969 Public Relations Society 
of America Film Festival. 

OTHER VPI PRODUCTIONS INCLUDE: 

"THE SOUNDS OF LEARNING" 

A film for the 3M COMPANY prepared for 
educators and teachers in training. 

"SUNDAY FATHER" 

A theatrical short subject starring 
Dustin Hoffman 

, "A TIME TO PLAY" 

A film for the POLAROID CORPORATION, the 
ijs official multi-screened presentation 
of the U.S. Government at Expo '67. 

"THE RICHARD NIXON 1968 PRESIDENTIAL 
CAMPAIGN FILMS" 

The production and distribution of the 
major television effort of the Republican Party. 

"21st CENTURY COMMERCIALS" 

A series of films describing the research 
and development efforts of the UNION 
CARBIDE CORPORATION. 

"CBS REPORTS COMMERCIALS" 

A series of films for the IBM CORPORATION, 
depicting the role of the computer In space, 
health, education, business and industry. 



We would welcome the opportunity to discuss 

your communication needs in public relations, 

industrial relations, marketing, advertising, 

sales, and training, etc.. and to show you 

samples of our work. Please contact: 

Mr. William Lewis Mr. Robert Drucker 

VPI FILMS, VPI FILMS, 

7B East 56 Street, 1515 North Western Ave., 

New York, New York Hollywood, California 

Telephone (212) 838-3900 Telephone (213) 466-8697 



^"mi 



,^^^- 



FILMS 



'%i 






right off the newsreel . . . 

continued 



tem adds the benefit of economic 
program distribution — presently 
associated with film only — to 
the inherent advantages of elec- 
tronic recording, which include 
immediate replay, reuseability 
and electronic editing. 

"Tests with the Ampex system 
demonstrate the feasibility of our 
approach and we expect to intro- 
duce duplication products to the 
market with the next year," Gins- 
burg said. 



W.R. Grace & Co. Acquires 
Rocket Pictures, BSB 

Rocket Pictures, Inc., of Bur- 
bank, California, has merged with 
W. R. Grace & Co. 

Dick Westen, founder and 
president, and John Russo, exec- 
utive VP, will continue in their 
present capacities. 

The company creates and pro- 
duces audio-visual business edu- 
cation programs in sales and 
management motivation — dis- 
tributed by its subsidiary, Better 
Selling Bureau. 

Better Selling Bureau also cre- 
ates Recruitinii, Sales Traininc. 



Sales Promotion and Public Re- 
lations programs on special as- 
signment. 



East lAVA Group Sees 
New A-V Devices 

The Industrial Audio Visual 
Association Eastern Region's 
monthly meeting in January at 
the Esso Auditorium in New 
York featured a multi-media 
demonstration and seminar put 
on by Presentation Technical 
Aids, Inc., of New York. 

Among the new products and 
systems shown by the PTA group 
under chairman Charles H. Brot- 
man were the PTA Programmer, 
a moderately priced punch tape 
system directed by pulsed sound 
tape; the PTA Highlight Slide 
Projector Adapter, a low cost 
high intensity light source for Ko- 
dak Carousel slide projectors; the 
PTA Peacock, a continuous loop 
cartridge using ordinary 16mm 
film without special treatment; a 
Double System JAN, for post- 
production sound and picture 
editing; and three JAN's with in- 
terlock, three projectors inter- 



locked to run in frame to frame 
synchronization. 

Surrounding the Esso audi- 
torium for the meeting, which 
was arranged by lAVA Eastern 
Region Director, John P. Tier- 
ney, of Jersey Standard, was 
PTA's Crystal Vision Stretch 
Screen, which is said to provide 
no less than "a cocoon of myriad 
audio-visual stimuli." 

Cooperating with PTA in the 
presentation was the Lurana 
Group, New York, who produced 
many of the AV materials shown. 



KR Graphics Acquires 
Maxe Howe Productions 

Maxc Howe Productions, pro- 
ducers of more than 50 business 
and industrial movies and 156 
travel films in 25 years of ser- 
vice, has been acquired by KR 
Graphics, Inc. 

KR Graphics is the publica- 
tions and public relations division 
of King Resources Company, and 
is located in Denver Colo. 



Calvin Communications 
Buys Pershing Building 

Calvin Communications, Inc. 
has purchased the Pershing 
Building at 215 West Pershing 



Road, Kansas City, Mo. for an 
undisclosed amount. 

Calvin plans to make the 
building corporate headquarters 
for its wide-spread organization, 
now operating in Kansas City, 
Mo.; Independence, Mo.; Phil- 
adelphia; and Louisville, Ky. 

The Pershing Building is well 
known for its roof-top weather 
beacon, a Kansas City landmark. 
Calvin plans to continue its op- 
eration. 



TeleGeneral Acquires 
Gotham Recording 

TeleGeneral Corporation has 
completed a previously an- 
nounced acquisition of 90 per 
cent of Gotham Recording Cor- 
poration's outstanding stock. 

TeleGeneral, engaged in the 
field of audiovisual publishing, 
has elected Herbert M. Moss, 
president of Gotham Recording, 
a director of TeleGeneral. 



National Color Labs 
Opens Canadian Branch 

National Color Laboratories, 
Inc., has established a Canadian 
subsidiary. National Color Lab- 
oratories, Ltd., in Toronto. 

The Toronto subsidiary will be 
headed by Felix Wieczorck. • 



Sound-O-Matic * 

makes your 
slide projector talk. 

Gives you^ 
time to ponder 
what it says. 



Lets you 
ask questions. 
And answer questions 

Automatically. 



Our new Sound-O-Matic programmer-recorder gives the power of speech to 
just about any automatic, remotely-controlled slide projector. 

Now, with the optional new response feature, you can pre-set program 
pauses to allow audience discussion or question and answer sessions. 
Afterwards, you just press a remote-control button to get the projector 
talking again. 

You can teach even more effectively with another optional fea- 
ture, the Elco-Optisonics responder^ It makes your projec- 
. tor await a student's answer to multiple-choice ques- 
tions on the screen. The student records his answer 
on a computer-compatible card with a simple hand 
control that simultaneously restarts the presentation. 
The Sound-O-Matic is also available in a playback- 
only version, for use with cassettes pre-recorded on the 
und-0-Matic programmer-recorder. With or without the 
response option. 
Send the coupon for details, or ask for a live demonstration 
that speaks for itself. 



^-^^ 




*Sound-0-Matlc: Trademark. ELCO Corporation 



Name_ 



Company^ 
Title 



Slreel- 
City 



ELCO Optisonics 

' Monlgomeryville, Pa 18936 
(215) 368-0111 



BS 



ELCO Corporation 

□ Send me your illustrated brochure 

□ Call me to arrange a demonstration 
n I'm mteresled in standard unit 

□ I'm interested m ■response" option 



. Zip_ 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




How do you want your 8MM ? 
Super or standard ? Color or 
black and white? Optical or 
contact printed ? Silent or sound ? 
Magnetic or optical track? 
Do you need complete lab 
work or just loading ? 
How about titles ? Music? 
Optical effects? 

Reela can do it. 

Our recently completed 
facilities are the most 
sophisticated in the world . . . 
in layout, in equipment, in 
techniques. To top it off, 
all 8MM loading is done under 
"clean room" conditions. 



Send your first order now. 
Or if you want further 
information, write for our new 
price list to Dept. 007 
Reela Film Laboratories, 
65 N.W. Third Street, 
Miami, Florida 33128. 



FILM 
LABORATORIES.INC. 



A Division of Wometco Enterpfises, Inc. 

Phone (305) 377-2611 

New York |2I2) 279-8555 

cr call Reela In Miami collect. 



MARCH, 1970 




the screen executive 



IIIIIIIIIMIIilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



GAF (Canada) Ltd. Elects 
Wells Director/President 

Edward A, Wells has been 
elected director and president of 
GAF (Canada) Ltd., a subsidi- 
ary of GAF Corporation. 

Wells, who will operate from 
the company's headquarters in 
Cooksville, Ontario, will be gen- 
eral manager of all operations of 
GAF (Canada) Ltd., including 
the manufacturing and market- 
ing of all GAF products handled 
by the Canadian company. 



Computer Image Elects 
Two Vice Presidents 

Richard D. Rush has been 
elected vice president of finance 
of Computer Image Corporation, 
Denver. Rush has been serving 
as secretary-controller of Com- 
puter Image for the past year. 

Also promoted at Computer 



image was Jack D. Hublou, who 
is now vice president for corpo- 
rate development. 

Hublou comes to Computer 
Image from the brokerage firm 
of Reynolds & Co. He will be 
headquartered at the Beverly 
Hills offices. 





RUSH 



HUBLOU 



Cummings Promoted by 
Modern Learning Aids 

Gordon P. Cummings has been 
named national sales manager 
for Modern Learning Aids, in- 



ternational distributor of educa- 
tional audiovisual materials. 

Cummings will be responsible 
for MLA's sales personnel, re- 
search, development and com- 
munication of sales information 
and sales promotion activities. 

Frank Wolf has been named 
manager, Ridgefield, New Jersey 
film exchange. Wolf, who joined 
Association in 1968, will over- 
see the operations of Associa- 
tion's largest film library. 

Boyd V. Hart has been ap- 
pointed Association Instructional 
Materials midwest regional sales 
manager and will concentrate his 
A. 1. M. efforts on the sale of 
film material. 



Former Graflex Mgr. Takes 
Commerce Dept. Post 

W. Whitman Bears, formerly 
manager of market planning and 



development for Graflex, Inc.. 
Rochester, N.Y., has been ap- 
pointed industry specialist for 
photographic products in the 
scientific and business equipment 
division. Business Defense Ser- 
vices Administration. U.S. Dept. 
of Commerce. Washington D.C. 
Bears will serve as major con- 
tact between the government and 
the photographic and A-V equip- 
ment and materials industries. 



American Red Cross Names 
Manno TV-Radio-Film Chief 

George Manno. active in the 
commercial and educational tele- 
vision field since 1948, has been 
named television-radio-film chief 
in the American Red Cross of- 
fice of public relations. 

Manno will direct the produc- 
tion of films, recordings, and 
Continued on page 1 2 



"Quality. . .Service.. .Dependability" 

. . . everybody's promise to the film mal(er! 




These are all empty words indeed, with- 
out the know-how and the personal at- 
tention of experienced people to back 
them up. 

Charles Young, our Laboratory Sched- 
uling Director, helps us put life and 
meaning into the words "Colburn Qual- 
ity," "Colburn Service," "Colburn De- 
pendability." Charlie and his co-workers 
have that priceless experience and the 
equipment to help you achieve a finer 
finished film on your next production. 




GEO. ^. COLBURN LABORATORY, INC. 

164 N. Wacker Drive • Chicago. Illinois 60606 
Telephone (area code 312) 332-6286 



Complete Laboratory Service lor 16MM ' Editing / Recording ,' Work Prints / 
Super 8, 8MM S 16MM Rele.i^e Printing ■' Titling ' 35MM Slide and Filmstrip Service 



10 



BUSINESS SCREEN I 



/f(/0C0/6m Sii/fi(/-Ofi'fi'h kfymyk&f^s! 




"CINEVOICf n" IB mm Optical Sound-OnFIlm Camera. 

■* 100 ft. film capacity for 2H minutes of 
recordmg; 6-Volt DC Convertor or 115-Volt AC 
operation. -»c$1180.00(and up). 



"AURICON PR0-600"16mra Optical SoundOnFilm Camera. "SUPfR 1200" 16 mm Optical SoundOn-Film Camera, 

V 600 ft. film capacity for I6V2 minutes of * 1200 ft. film capacity for 33 minutes of 

recording. * $1820.00 (and up) with 30 day recording. * $6425,00 (and up) complete for 

money-back guarantee. "High-Fidelity" Talking Pictures. 





"PRO-600 SPECIAL" ISmm UEht-Weigtit Camera. 

■*■ 400 ft. film capacity for 11 minutes of 
recording. -»f $1620.00 (and up). 




PORTABLE POWER SUPPLY UNIT— Model PS-21... Silent 
in operation, furnishes 115-Volt AC power to drive 
"Single System" or "Double System" Auricon 
Equipment from 12 Volt Storage Battery, for 
remote "location" filming, -f. $337.00 

Strictly for Profit 

CHOOSE AURICON 

If it's profit you're after in the production of 
16 mm Sound-On Film Talking Pictures, Auricon 
Cameras provide ideal working tools for shooting 
profitable Television Newsreels, film commercials, 
inserts, and local candid-camera programming. 
Now you can get Lip-Synchronized Optical or 
Magnetic Sound WITH your picture using Auricon 
16 mm Sound-On-Film Cameras. Precision designed 
and built to "take it." 

Strictly for Profit — Choose Auricon! 



FIIHHGNETIC — Finger points to Magnetic prestripe 
on unexposed film for recording lip-synchronized 
magnetic sound with your picture. Can be used 
with all Auricon Cameras. ■.- $1325.00 land up). 




TRIPOD — r,»odel5 FT-10 and FT-10S12... 
Pan-Tilt Head Professional Tripod for 
velvet-smooth action. Perfectly counter-balanced 
to prevent Camera "dumping."-* $406.25 (and up). 



esiO R-omain© Street, Hollywood 3S, CaliC 



ITOl.l,ywood S-OS31 



■♦r Auricon Equipment is sold with a 30 day Money Back Guarantee. You must be satisfied 






Write for your? 
free copy of 
this 74-page 
Auricon Catalog 



iij.Miii-j.ij.^ii-xj,u-i^=i.j,i-i.a^j,ni-i«iaiiiiJAiiJjjj^LU,i 




A^ARCH, 1970 



11 



INTRODUCING . . . SENSATIONAL 

A. V. E. 

"CANARY" 



SIMPLE in operation. 
RADICAL in design. 




MORE 

BUILT-IN 

FEATURES 

THAN ANY OTHER 

16mm PROJECTOR 

AVAILABLE 

TODAY 



Virtually foolproof operation • Modular heavy-duty construc- 
tion • Contemporary design • Needle sharp picture • Rock 
steady projection • Superb optical or magnetic sound • Built- 
in concert oval speaker • External full range speaker • Husky 
trouble-free mechanism • Unique automatic loopsetter • 
New long wearing film guides • Encased lubricated claw 
assembly • One knob motor control • Forward and reverse 
• Slow speed projection • Microfocusing • Positive picture 
framing • Replaceable aperture plate • Operates on 50 
or 60 cycles • Speedy film rewinding • Absolutely no spring 
belts • Hi Lumen light output • High speed bulb ejector • 
50mm Canon lens • Accessories include remote control, mag- 
netic record amplifier, flip-away Cinemascope bracket. 



Also available as a heavy duty continuous 
loop projector for repetitive programming. 

Call . . . Write ... or come on up! 

A. V. E. CORPORATION 



250 West 54th Street 
Cable: "AVEMANSA" 



New York, N.Y. 10019 
(212) PL 7-0552 



screen executive . . . 

continued 



other radio and television mate- 
rials for national outlets and ma- 
terials for use by local Red Cross 
chapters on local television and 
radio stations. 

Snider Named President of 
Mitchell Camera Corp. 

After serving as executive vice 
president for one year. Glen R. 
Snider has been elected president 
of Mitchell Camera Corporation. 

The new president was former- 
ly a senior program manager, 
manufacturing manager and 
deputy manager of the electronic 
division of Otis Elevator Com- 
pany, as well as program man- 
ager, manager of field services 
and chief reliability engineer with 
the Stratos Div. of Fairchild 
Hiller Corp. Snider also served 
variously as principal engineer 
and laboratory coordinator at 
Fairch'ld Hiller. 

Snider will reside in Glendale, 
Calif. 




SNIDER 



SALZBURG 



Salzburg to Head United 
Productions Division 

Milton J. Salzburg, for the past 
three years general sales manager 
ol Fleetwood Films, Inc., has 
been appointed president of a 
newly formed non-theatrical di- 
vision of United Productions of 
America, and vice president and 
member of the board of direc- 
tors of UPA's parent company. 
Defense Electronic Industries. 

Movielab-Hollywood Names 
Crane Production Manager 

Michael O. Crane, who had 
served with the Pathe Laboratory 
on the West Coast for 19 years, 
has been named production man- 
ager at Movielab-Hollywood, 
Inc. 

Crane is a member of the Soci- 
ety of Motion Picture and Tele- 
vision Engineers. 



Around-the Industry 

Three senior program admin- 
istrators have been appointed by 
the special products division of 
Bausch & Lomb: George J. 
Jayues. George R. McGee, and 
Jerry T. Jakubczak . . . Vincent 
P. Keenan has been named vice 
president of Lenco Photo Prod- 
ucts, Inc., a subsidiary of GAF 
Corporation . . . Corser Enter- 
prises has appointed E. W. "Bo" 
Bowinglon executive director, re- 
search and development. Inter- 
national Educational Projects . . . 
Two promotions made at Audio 
Devices include Leslie W. Gor- 
don to vice president finance/ 
controller and Edward S. Selig to 
manager, video products . . . 
Robert B. Pell has been named 
sales representative for Reela 
Film Labs . . . Paid R. Riitan is 
vice president and general man- 
ager of the Movielab-Hollywood 
plant . . . John G. Hance. Sr. has 
joined Tech Films Corporation as 
director of film processing ser- 
vices . . . Sony Corp. of Amer- 
ica has named John McDonnell 
advertising and sales promotion 
manager, video products . . . 
Jack Hastings has joined The 
Haboush Co. as executive pro- 
ducer/director . . . Leonard F. 
Coleman is regional sales man- 
ager of Eastman Kodak Com- 
pany's southwestern region . . . 
Siizy Sweetser has joined The 
Film Works as assistant to ex- 
ecutive producer David Groot . . . 
Richard Lebre will serve as sales 
manager of Movielab-Hollywood, 
Inc. . . . Austin Green has been 
elected vice president of Cine- 
sound, Inc. . . . Dr. Hans Chr. 
Wohlrah has been appointed 
technical director, sales . . . Fred 
A. Niles Communications Cen- 
ters, Inc. has appointed Donald 
Higgins creative director . . . 
Oinducer's Service Corn, has 
named B. G. Tubbs manufactur- 
ing manager . . . John Daley has 
joined Superscope, Inc. as gener- 
al manager of its recording divi- 
sion . . . Time-Life Films has ap- 
pointed Alfred J. Gillespie pro- 
mation director . . . Mars Pro- 
ductions has added Graham Har- 
ris as account executive . . . and 
Susan Gale has been named vice 
president of Corser Enterprises, 
Inc. 



12 



BUSINESS SCREEN] 



film clip: 



^ 1 could your organization use m.^ ^^^ 

For what purpose coui , j P^ _ disploY? 

j-or w ' ^ ^n<;trat ons n exnibits 

Q sales de..o s a U ^^^,^.^^ ^^^^^^^, 

° '' '°TeTed cat.on ^ soles .eetmgs 

°Crcraocu.entaf,on 



Do you have spec n flU--^^ «. edUmg 



uo y^" ' 

Q 5cript^'''*"^9 

n narration 

a sound record,ng 

May we show you --^ 
r. credenV.als^Po;;'*;^'^^ ^^.^^^, 



■an answBi ■• ^ 

-^" ,„„ation & »-^l-g 

n Wming & editing 

° t-shde progra--g 

□ sample reel? 




bS»^^^'''* 



liNois 61820 -12171 556-0545 




FILMS 



MARK ANDERSON FILMS is on Illinois film-maker, making movies for business 
communications, television commercials, mixed-media presentations and ani- 
mated films. This communications problem-solving unit can provide you with any 
or all phases of film production — from creative planning and scriptwriting 
through filming and final showing, Mark Anderson Films has recently produced 
March of the IHini — Centennial Year, The Cutting Edge and The Living Arts 
(about the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts) for the University of Illinois 
Alumni Association, Not by Chance for Olivet Nazarene College, 7he 7ryco 
Floater for Tryco Manufacturing Company, Breakthrough — ■ Crazing Straight 
Legumes and A New Day in Baby Pig Management for the A. E. Stoley Manu- 
facturing Company (Lumpp & Fillman, Inc.), How Good Are Your Schools? TV 
spots for the Champaign Education Association, Eisnerland spots for Eisner 
Grocery Company (Lumpp & Fillman, Inc.), and TVCs for Production Credit As- 
sociation and Missouri Farm Bureau (Hall, Haerr, Peterson & Harney, Inc.). What 
we put on film demonstrates. And motivates. So if you think you should be in 
movies, clip the coupon above and mail. For even faster processing, telephone 
today. MARK ANDERSON FILMS in The Manor at 31 1 West University Avenue, 
Champaign, Illinois 61820 and at (217) 356-0345. What we've done for others, 
we can do for you. 



AAARCH, 1970 



y, ' Tape Synchronous Sound Recorder 



9 




— SEND FOR FREE BROCHURE — 



Distribution — Service — Sales 

NAGRA MAGNETIC RECORDERS INC. 

19 West 44th Street, New York, N.Y. 10036 

Southern Caliioinia — Service — Sa/es 

RYDER MAGNETIC SALES CORP. 

1147 NO, VINE STREET 
HOLLYWOOD. CALIF 90038 

Excluiive Distributor m Canada 

BRAUN ELECTRIC CANADA, LTD. 

3269 AMERICAN DRIVE 
MALTON ONTARIO CANADA 



THE A-V 
CALENDAR 



APRIL 

Fifth Midwest Regional Meeting of the 
Biological Photographic Association, 

April 24-26, Knickerbocker Hotel, Chi- 
cago. 



Society of Motion Picture and Television 
Engineers, 107th Technical Conference 
and Equipment Exhibit, April 26-May 1, 
Drake Hotel, Chicago. 



Department of Audiovisual Instruction, Na- 
tional Convention and Exhibit, April 27- 
May 1, Sheraton Cadillac Hotel, Detroit. 



If. S. Industrial Film Festival, Awards Pre- 
sentation, April 30, Palmer House Hotel, 
C'hicago. 



MAY 

Film Seminar of the Northwest, May 8-9, 
.Seattle, Washington. 



American Society for Training and Devel- 
opment, National Conference, May 10- 
15, Anaheim Convention Center, Ana- 
heim, Calif. 



American Film Festival, Blue Ribbon 
Awards and film screenings. May 12-16, 
New York. 



Illuminating Engineering Society, 6th The- 
atre, Television and Film Lighting Sym- 
posium, M,ay 24-26, Hollywood-Roose- 
velt Hotel, Hollywood. 



JULY 



National Audio-Visual Association Aimual 
Convention, July 18-21, Sheraton-Park 
Hotel, Washington, D.C. 



AUGUST 

International Convention of the Photo- 
graphic Society of America, August 18- 
22, Biltniore Hotel, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 



Animation Workshop, August 24-Sept. 4, 
Ohio State University campus, sponsored 
by the University Film Association and 
Ohio State University. 



SURPLUS STOCK 



NOW IN PROGRESS 



CLEARANCE SALE 

SOS has moved to New Jersey. In the course of moving, we have uncovered tons of stock wed like to 
clear out at any cost; not only old and obsolete items, but lots of new and good equipment. Included are 



Cameras 
Zoom Lenses 
Misc. Lenses 
Motors 



Accessories 
Tripods & Dollies 
Mike Booms 
Projectors 



Recorders Tons of Used Lighting and Grip 

Screens Equipment, Lab and Theatre 

Moviolas Items and all sorts of other 

Synchronizers motion picture supplies 



Plus a Complete Collection of Antique Movie Cameras 
EVERYTHING PRICED BELOW COST/ PRICED PENNIES ON THE DOLLAR! 



Rules of the Sale; Cash and Carry — Bring 
a check (Charges Honored Only on fy^aster 
Charge Cards). Bring Your Wagon, Load 
It Up. First Gome — First Served. 



For Further Information Gall Wally Bobbins, 
Hy Roth or Marty Conklin in New York at 
(212) JU 6-1420, or in New Jersey at (201) 
393-5250. 



SALE HOURS: MONDAYFRIDAY,8:30A.M.T05:30P.M. 




SOS PHOTO-CINEOPTICS, INC 

A DIVISION OF F&B/CECO INDUSTRIES, INC. 



DEPT. 

40 Kero Road, Carlstadt, New Jersey 07072 • (201)939-5250 

BRANCHES: 

7051 Santa Monica Boulevard, Hollywood, California 90038 • (213) 469-3601 

51 East Tenth Avenue, Hialeah, Florida 33010 • (305) 888-4604 



14 



BUSINESS SCREE^ 








ujherever you a 
LUhatever gou Film 




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MOTION PICTURE LABORATORIES 




1546 North Argyle Avenue, Hollywood, Calif. 90028. 462-6171 (AC 213) • 1418 North Western Avenue, Hollywood, Calif. 90027, 466-8631 (AC 213) 
1000 Nicholas Blvd., Chicago, Illinois 60007, 569-2250 (AC 312) • 850 Tenth Avenue, New York, New York 10019, 247-3220 (AC 212) 



CARTRIDGE 
LOADING 



Duplication and Impulsing Services for 



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PROGRAM SERVICES 

division of 

PROGRAMMING TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 

215 West Chicago Ave., Chicago 60510 

312-337-3430 




MR. SALES MANAGEMENT 
We'll send you a 

COLOR 

FILMSTRIP 

FREE 

It will tell you, in just 12 minutes, the many subtle 

changes that have taken place in: 

. . . the selling profession 

. . . the buyers and their buying habits 

. . . the salesmen and selling methods 

... the selling attitudes and techniques 

And ... suggests a new, fresh and unique solution 
for stimulating sales. Ideal for sales management 
meetings. Don't miss seeing it. 

There is no obligation. Just tell us when you prefer 
to see this revealing color filmstrip. 

NO NEED FOR DELAY -SEND COUPON TODAY 

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1150 W. Olive Ave., Burbank, CA. 91506 

I would like to see the filmstrip you offer, without 
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Company 



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State 



Zip 




the 
camera eye 

By 0. H. Coelln 
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Certification of Their Professional 
Status Due Industrial A-V Specialists 

T^i\E Years Ago, we proposed to the 
*- membership of the Industrial Audio-Vis- 
ual Association, professional society of man- 
agers of corporate audiovisual programs in 
the United States and Canada, that consid- 
eration be given and criteria established for 
"the certification of professional status" for 
such specialists in industry. 

Precedent already exists in the certifica- 
tion of men and women with related respon- 
sibilities among the members of the Biologi- 
cal Photographers Association, .-^nd further 
impetus is now at hand as the Department 
of Audiovisual Instruction of the National 
Education Association considers similar 
"Guildelines for Certification of A-V Spe- 
cialists" as developed by an Ad Hoc Com- 
mittee headed by W. R. Fulton. 

The professional audiovisual specialists 
within industry eligible for such recognition 
by their professional society will undoubted- 
ly give further thought to this suggestion at 
their annual spring meeting in Minneapolis 
this April. We offer some of the criteria they 
must consider for certification to be mean- 
ingful : 

1. Years of experience in the administra- 
tion of integrated audiovisual communica- 
tion: production of materials, utilization, 
distribution and budget management. 

2. Recognition of the a-v professional's 
status within the corporate management or- 
ganization table: i.e. "manager, audio-visual 
department" or "supervisor, motion picture 
production and distribution" or "manager, 
film & electronics communications depart- 
ment" to name some existing corporate 
titles. 

3. Study in an institution of higher learn- 
ing or specializing school of cinema arts, 
communication or apprenticeship for a given 
number of years before assuming full cor- 
porate responsibility. 

It is not enough that lAVA simply ap- 
point another committee to study "profes- 
sional a-v certification" along the endless 
corridors of time. It is very important that a 
high priority be given this subject with a 
time-limit imposed on the Study Group 
which President Bill Walton may wish to 
appoint. 

And here is why both corporate employ- 
ers and their professional a-v communica- 
tions specialists ought to move toward cer- 
tification: 

1. The need to develop men with these 



special abilities is growing; calls for eligible, 
trained, experienced men and women for 
such jobs simply cannot be filled from pres- 
ent reservoirs. 

2. Direction of skills involved will be laid 
down which can serve as guidelines for fu- 
ture employment, for the guidance of cor- 
porate personnel executives seeking such 
specialists. 

3. The professional a-v specialist attains 
stature through such earned recognition by 
his peers. lAVA, for example, has more 
than two decades of responsible service to 
its credit. It has no commercial or supplier 
membership but is solely composed of men 
with clear-cut corporate responsibilities for 
a-v communication. 

So, make a beginning. And let us begin 
by expressing appreciation to Bill Fulton, 
DAVI and his Ad Hoc Committee for some 
extremely useful "Guidelines" which are in 
a recent mailing sent all lAVA members. 

And for those other professional a-v 
specialists employed within the Federal 
Government, trade associations, etc. we sug- 
gest that equal consideration be given your 
certification potential. Copies of the recent 
DAVI "Guidelines for Certification of A-V 
Specialists" are available at fifty cents the 
copy. Address requests for that paper to the 
National Education Association, 1201 Six- 
teenth Street, N.W., Washington. D.C. 
20036. Order by Stock Number: 071-02326. 



Broader U.N. Film Utilization Can 
Help Meet Crisis in Understanding 

i^NE Organization, worldwide in scope 
^-^ and membership, holds the greatest 
potential power on earth to bring real un- 
derstanding among millions of people. In 
this 25th Anniversary Year of the United 
Nations, with whom we have recently coun- 
seled on its informational film planning, 
there is hope that this world body will soon 
utilize the latent power of sight/ sound to 
bring interpretive versions of our common 
problems to the publics of all member na- 
tions. 

Consider first that a UN-sponsored film, 
carrying the emblem of that world body, can 
secure national television and theatrical ex- 
posure in most of the world's most-popu- 
lated countries. Governments which close 
their networks to other film fare can and 
will accept UN material. 

But, more important, consider some of 



a 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



the common problems shared b\ all coun- 
tries throughout the world: 

1. Peace building through economic and 
social development. 

2. Exploration of human rights. 

3. Peaceful use of outer space and the 
sea bed and the development of these tre- 
mendous resources. 

4. International cooperation in science 
and technology. 

5. Aid to under-de\ eloped lands, both 
agricultural and economic, industrial. 

The point is that films on many of these 
subjects need a central body for recognition 
and dissemination. Existing films, such as 
those sponsored by Shell International, 
shi>uld move up to world body cataloging 
and re-distribution. 

We discussed some of the UN's potential 
while heading the U.S. delegation to the 
lOth International Industrial Film Festival 
at West Berlin last November. We found 
great enthusiasm for ideas like this: 

1. Sponsorship of a worldwide competi- 
tion by the United Nations for films from all 
member countries on basic UN themes, as 
above. 

2. Contribution of such films by either 
governments (member countries) or by pro- 
gressive, world-minded corporate entities 
who would meet basic UN criteria for non- 
commercial. non-political content. These 
are very important criteria. 

3. Awarding of this year's 25th Anniver- 
sary medallions to films which serve the 
UN objectives of "greater world understand- 
ing on common problems of mankind" re- 
gardless of their source. 

Tremendous creative and physical pro- 
duction resources exist throughout Europe, 
the U.S., Canada, and around the Pacific. 
To spur producers and potential sponsors 
to realize that the TIME IS LATE to meet 
this challenge of better understanding and 
the need to develop solutions, the UN should 
take up the challenge. 

And, if you're involved in any kind of 
film festival, anywhere in the world, create 
one special subject area for "films on our 
common world problems: pollution, popu- 
lation, economic development, etc." and 
solicit entries of that kind. Join the world 
community with the tool you understand 
best. We've already had a quick response 
from the Chicago International Film Festi- 
val where films of that kind will be given 
special recognition. Even "spots" of a min- 
ute or two in length can help get the message 
through. 

But, in the final analysis, the problem is 
worldwide. It's important that films express- 
ing solutions from the U.S. be seen by peo- 
ples abroad; even more important that films 
from our neighbors across the oceans be 
shown to the people of the U.S. 

Then, with language barriers easily sur- 
mounted, we'll begin to use the God-given 
power of communication which might yet 
spare mankind from his ancient habit of 
self-destruction. — OHC 



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MARCH, 1970 



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Combination PR Projects Gaining Success 

A combination book-TV-film program for Campbell Soup 
Company is creating a good deal of interest and 
favorable publicity. 



TWO NOVEL public rela- 
tions projects, combined so 
that one enhances the other, 
are now being undertaicen by 
('ainpbell Soup Company, Grecil 
Ki'stctiiniiits Cookbook, U.S.A., 
a travel cookbook published 
ihrough the cooperative ef- 
loit of Campbell and some of 
America's leading restauranteurs, 
is being extensively promoted by 
iiavel and food writer, Stephanie 
Stefanssen in appearances on 
radio and television at 15 major 
cities. At the same time, the 
Company's award-winning new 
fihn, Follow the Fun has been 
booked on the same days by 
Modern Talking Picture Service 
into leading theatre chains at 
cities in which Miss Stefanssen 
is appearing. The resulting cross 
plugs have succeeded in gen- 
erating a great deal of favorable 
publicity and good will for the 
conipany. 

Although the method of ar- 
laiiging the promotion is impres- 
sive, not a little of the success 
of the book-TV-film venture 
may be ascribed to the attrac- 
tiveness of all the components. 
Follow the Fun. produced by 
Show Associates. New York, 
\isits eight interesting American 
restaurants, and features excep- 
tional food photography by Stan 
l.oPresto and original music by 
a folk-rock group in the "now" 
genre. The book is a handsome 
volume with 40 pages of fine 
color photography and 280 re- 
cipes featuring adaptations of 
notable dishes using Campbell's 
soups, tomato juice and V-8 sub- 
stituting for the intricate sauces 
of the great restaurant chefs. 
Stephanie Stefanssen is a renown- 
ed cook and writer and a most at- 
tractive television personality in 
her own right. 

Follow the Fun is the third 
Campbell film that Miss Stefans- 
sen has planned and supervised. 
One was C the Sliinini> C. a film 
also produced by Show Assoc- 
iates, composed of five 4'/2- 
minute segments each on the 
ethnic origins of American food. 
Maximum use for the film was 
obtained by combining all seg- 
ments into a film for school use. 
individual segments for free pub- 
lic service TV programs, and two 
segments were put together for 



a successful theatrical short dis- 
tributed by Warner Brothers. 

Stephanie Stefanssen is pro- 
moting Campbell's soups in her 
capacity as the company's public 
relations account group super- 
visor at Batten, Barton, Durs- 
tine & Osborn, Inc., New York. 
While an associate editor of the 
San Francisco Chronicle's Sunday 
magazine. Bonanza, and as owner 
of her own P.R. agency, Miss 
Stefanssen developed the idea 
that films and books were not 
being tapped by the food industry 
to full potential. For Campbell's 
she is having the opportunity to 
prove that both books and films 
can individually be successful 
merchandisers of food — and the 
combination of the two even 
more successful. 

Follow the Fun. the newest 
Campbell film, was assigned for 
production to Show Associates 
because Stan LoPresto, the 
photographic director of the com- 
pany, had great ideas about how 
to photograph food and scenics, 
and Rodney Chalk, producer, 
seemed to have the facility of 
accepting some of Miss Stefans- 
sen's wild ideas for the film 
without actually saying she was 
mad. "Rodney and Stan stormed 
a lot," Miss Stefanssen now says, 
"but they really accepted the 
challenge to their ingenuity and 



did a magnificent job." 

The resulting film is fresh 
and new-a Gold Medal award 
winner at New York's recent 
International TV and Film Fes- 
tival. 

Made with the "new" photo- 
graphy and scored with the 
"now" sounds. Follow the Fun 
is part of Campbell precept that 
while it will not desert its loyal 
old customers, the new markets . 
must lie with the younger gen- ■ 
crations — in fact, the film means 
to indoctrinate them with the 
values of Campbells even before 
they have a kitchen of their own 
to cook in. 

Stan LoPresto (under the 
Film Team banner) was again , 
retained for "Great Restau- 
rants Cookbook. U. S. A." to ^ 
achieve unusual photographic ; 
concepts. For one thing. Miss 
Stefanssen decided that she ; 
wanted the food photography |. 
done not in the easier controlled '■ 
kitchen, but outside — on a beach, 
a rocky fore-land, etc., with no 
backdrops. 

Following Miss Stefanssen's ' 
17-city tour. Modern Talking 
Picture Service will go on to dis- ] 
tribute the film in further theat- 
rical bookings throughout the 
country, as well as to school , 
and group audiences for several ; 
years to come. • [ 




Stephanie Stefanssen on location with home economist during filming 
sequence. 



13 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




This 4-inch attache case 
opens to a movie theater. 




This elegant attache case is the most compact projector 
in the world. The Bohn Benton Institor is the first truly port- 
able, rear screen, Super 8 sound movie projector. It's auto- 
matic. It's set up and running in less than 20 seconds. And. 
it's cartridge loaded to eliminate film threading. Films can 
be changed in 2 seconds. 

It's also a front screen projector. On the spot, you can con- 
vert to project an auditorium-size. 6 foot wide picture. Zoom 
lens and external speakers are available for group viewing. 
The Bohn Benton Institor lets your films sell for you every 
day; on every call, in every office. This is the projector sales- 
men will carry because it looks good, it's small, and it's light. 
The newest recruit can give a professional presentation on 



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your products and your services to the desk 
of every prospect. It's easy to give an Institor to 
every salesman because its price is as extraordinary as Its 
size — $300, far less than the cost of other first-quality rear 
screen projectors without Institor's advantages. 
For more information, or an institor demonstration, write 
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New York 1 1 501 ; or call (51 6) 747-8585. 

^^ Bohn Benton 



MARCH, 1970 



19 



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Richard Burton 
and Genevieve 
Bujold in 
Universai's 
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Thousand Days." 

(Winner of the 
Hollywood Foreign 
Press Assn. Award 
as "Best Picture 
of the Year.") 



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Major "blockbusters," such as Universai's Anne of tlic Thousand Days, 
are drawing long lines of customers to the nation's movie theaters these 
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are likely to see a 10 to 15-minute PR film that's been selected to help 
round out the one-feature program. Not just any film, of course. But if 
the film is right and has broad appeal, this form of distribution can 
deliver large and measurable bonus audiences for you. 

Theatrical distribution may sound new to you or your present distribu- 
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for our clients for years. That's not so surprising, since we're part of 
the MCA-Universal family, and who knows more about the entertain- 
ment business? 

Why not have us in to help review your present PR film distribution 
program? Let us show you how we can deliver as many people as one 
of the biggest national weekly magazines — and at a lower cost per 
thousand! 



Whether it's theatrical distribution alone — 
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20 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



(^INtMA VERITH, Cinema, 1 ictKli \o\ 
■-'movie. Vcritc. Ircncli Im liuili I Ik- 
movie of triitli. 

Cinema \erite: the liulliful cinema, the 
movie that shows it as it happens. Cinema 
Verite the godlike spirit behind a wave of 
French filmmakers. Cinema Verite the toy 
and password of a generation of yi>imu film- 
makers. 

More and more people are talking about 
Cinema Verite. Cinema N'erite techniques 
have been used in feature films, documen- 
tary films, educational films, and some busi- 
ness films. 

What can Cinema Verite bring to spon- 
sored films today'.' In fact, what is the place 
of Cinema Verite in business films today 
and in the future'.' 

A simple answer to this question is im- 
possible. First: what is Cinema Verite'.' 
Cinema Verite is uncontrolled cinema. Cin- 
ema that is not directed. The filmmaker 
shoots life as it happens. Shooting people 
in real situations, he trys to capture the emi'- 
tional truth of a moment without imposin'i 
his will on it. You could say it is the ulti- 
mate in documentary films, allowing real 
life situations to play undisturbed while re- 
cording them on film. 

For the Cinema Verite filmmaker, the 
truth of his work is in the slice of life he 
chooses to capture on film. The seeds of 
this movement appeared in the early 20th 
century when the Russian filmmaker Vertov 
saw the necessity of filming life as it hap- 
pens, of filming people with their masks 
off. He wanted to break out of theater cin- 
ema and enter the arena of life. This was 
his way of presenting the truth. 

It was not until after the Second World 
War, that the current interest in what we 
now call Cinema Verite was born. In com- 
bat reporting, newsreel cameramen and 
army cinematographers shot films in the 
midst of intense action. When these men 
came back to civilian life they began to use 
new techniaues to get closer to the story 
they were covering. By the mid-fifties tech- 
nological advances came alons that gave 
these pioneers the equipment they needed. 
They now had light, portable cameras that 
could easily sync with liiiht, portable, bat- 
tery operated tape recorders. 

Finally, in 1961, the movement was 
named by Jean La Rouch, a French film- 
maker who invented the term Cinema Verite. 
The term caucht on and was subsequently 
applied to anv documentary film where the 
filmmaker uses the camera's powers as a re- 
cordine instrument to uet drama and vitality 
through direct perception of life. In con- 
trast to the "old line documentaries'" where 
a great part of the action was carefullv 
staeed by a director, the Cinema Verite film- 
maker records on film and tape what is 
actuallv happening. 

Its leaders — men like Leacock. Penny- 
baker, Drew, the Mavsels and Bill Jersey — 
have produced an outstandinn collection of 
films of this .eenre: Films for theatrical re- 
lease, such as "Don't Look Back," a Cin- 
ema Verite portrait of folk rock singer Bob 



CINEMA VERITE 

A place in 
business films? 



"Yes," says filmmaker Dan Hess, but adds that 
it should be considered as only another tool for the 
filmmaker, not as a universally applicable 
style or format. 



By DAN HESS 

Dan Hess Productions 
New York City 



Dylan by Leacock and Pennybaker, and 
""Salesman" a film by the Maysels in which 
they followed an itinerant Bible salesman 
through his life; films for T.V., church, and 
club release, such as "A Time For Burning" 
and "Acts" by Bill Jersey, made for Lu- 
theran Film Associates — both films of 
power and honesty, a credit to the courage 
of filmmaker and sponsor. 

In direct cinema as in Cinema Verite the 
role of the cameraman is to observe. The 
skill is in being open to what is happening, 
being perceptive and aware. Although a 
filnmiaker may have an idea of what he 
wants, he has to be open enough to see what 
is really happening. 

But what can Cinema Verite mean to the 
makers and sponsors of business films? Can 
an understanding and an experimentation 
with Cinema Verite help us communicate 
better with our audience? Can it help us to 
solve problems, sell products, train men. 
communicate ideas, spread a corporate 
philosophy, help us enrich our world? 

Until very recently, business cinema, like 
theatrical cinema has been totally controlled. 
By controlled, we mean that every step, 
every gesture, every word, every scene in 
the film was written, desianed and directed. 
People spoke in stilted stereotvned phrase^, 
narrators talked pedantically from some far 



off pedestal. Many business films are still 
made this way. 

Are there alternatives to this \9?>5 way 
of making films? 

Yes, and Cinema Verite is one of them. 
In Cinema Verite the filmmaker studies and 
understands the subject he is to film, l.e ap- 
proaches each problem assuming he does 
not know the answer. He may have an idea 
of what he wants to get on film, but he is 
also aware that he may not find "truth" as 
he thought it existed. 

Let's say a company wanted to film its 
employment office and methods of hiring. 
Perhaps it was in management's mind to 
show via film that its hiring methods were 
fair to all. They agree to shoot Cinema 
Verite. 

As the film is being shot the filmmaker 
begins to see something different. Subtle 
attitudes, traps, ingrained suspicions and 
prejudices besiin to make themselves known. 
The film is finished. It is a powerful piece 
showing real people manifesting in trying 
situations. But something quite different 
than what was intended is revealed on film. 
As was said, in Cinema Verite this can 
happen. 

A real problem is unearthed. The cxpo- 

Continiicd on pai;e 24 





M^^^^^Hf * Q^H 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

Daniel Hess, who spoke out 'ast month in favor of crea- 
tive fees for film producers, m^kes films for his own com- 
pany, Dan Hess Productions in New York City. His studio 
has made films and served as a consultant to such cornor- 
atlons as American Oil, Eastman Kodak, AT&T, RCA, IBM 
Shell Oil and BOAC. A recently completed educational fi'm 
"Dialog with Life" sponsored bv New York University is a 
prime example of how a good film with a direct appeal to 
teenage audiences can combine a cinema verite attitude 
with stylized staging. Prior to starting his own company. 
Hess headed his own advertising and promotion agency. His 
background as a newspaper and magazine reporter, feature 
writer and photographer covers both the U.S. and Asia. 

-Photo by Carol Saperstein 



MARCH, 1970 



21 



Mountain climbing crew 
with Eclair NPR sets 
new sync sound altitude 
record: 21,000 feet. 



For an hour-long Special 
on NBC Television, cinematogra- 
pher Michael Wadley and pro- 
ducer Leslie Buckland walked 
300 miles with a seven-man 
expedition, to film them climbing 
one of the highest mountains in 
Afghanistan. 

To get there, they crossed 
deserts below sea level, where 
the temperatures went up to 120 
degrees and the sand blew 
everywhere. And they climbed 
to 21,000 feet, where it was 10 
degrees below zero at night, with 
snow flurries. 

Nobody had ever shot sync 
sound at this altitude, or under 
these murderous conditions. 
From 15,000 feet to the top, they 
had to carry everything they 



needed on their backs. One 
camera only. 

The U.S. Mount Everest 
team had told Mr. Wadley that 
no camera would survive it. But 
he ran 48,000 feet of film through 
his, shooting this expedition. And 
he has been using it every day 
since he got back to New York, 
several months ago. 

The same camera body, 
the same motor, the same maga- 
zines that he used in the desert 
and at the peak. No problems. 
Mr. Wadley's camera is an NPR. 



For an NPR brochure, write Eclair Corp., 
7262 Melrose, Los Angeles, Calif. 90046. 

eclair 



22 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



(undman Charles Groesbeek and cameraman-director Michael Wadley photographed at the summit. 




MARCH, 1970 



23 



cinema verite . . . 

continued 

sure of this problem to the world, the ad- 
mission of its existence would imply a sin- 
cere desire of management to change a situa- 
tion, to improve conditions. Perhaps this 
film can even accomplish more than the 
film statement that was originally intended. 

This point is often neglected or thought 
about in the opposite way. Formerly a com- 
pany would hide its problems from the com- 
munity. Perhaps the airing of problems, the 
evidence of honest concern, will help in 
the solving of the problem and will make a 
company more human, will make people 
more ready to listen and cooperate. 

But will management have the courage 
to show the truth? Will the film get expo- 
sure? What if it does? 

Obviously, these are questions that must 
be considered prior to filming. 

It is realistic to say that this kind of reality 
is too strong for many business films. The 
pure Cinema Verite film is on the opposite 
side of the circle from the fully controlled, 
totally scripted industrial film. Perhaps a 
way somewhere in the middle is possible. 
Let's call it "Cinema Verite Attitude." 

What do we mean by Cinema Verite Atti- 
tude? Simply put it means, for me, captur- 
ing on film realism of action, thought and 
emotion as close as possible to the way it 
actually happened, happens, or will happen. 
It means putting truth in front of the camera, 
rather than finding my trutii in the camera 
as I shoot. 

How is this achieved? In pure Cinema 
Verite filming the filmmaker waits for things 
to happen. Waits for accidents. Waits for 
character definition and revelation to ap- 
pear. Then he trys to capture it on film. 

In Cinema Verite Attitude, believability 
can be achieved in different ways. After 
studying and understanding that which we 
want to represent on the screen we can insti- 
gate real people in a real situation. We can 
force a confrontation. 

Or we can put actors in a real situation, 
give them an understanding of what is 
wanted and let them improvise — care in 
casting has previously been taken to assure 
us that we have actors who can improvise. 

Ot it can be scripted and acted. A real 
situation is studied in detail. Dress, language, 
interrelationships of people, and attitudes are 
carefully noted. The sequence is shot, if 
possible, in the location where the action 
is supposed to take place. Evervthinu in- 
volved is made as believable as possible, a 
fine test of directorial and actin'j sensitivity 
and talent. 

In shooting a film for the Shell Oil Com- 
pany we were fierce in our determination to 
make everything surroundinc the Shell deal- 
er, our central character, believable. 

The film opens in early morning as the 
dealer arrives at the service station. We 
show a close up of him yawning in front of 
the station after having parked his jeep, 
we followed him inside and watched him as 



he busied himself with the chores of the day. 
The camera was close, intimate with him. 
As the day moved on, his hands got dirty, 
smudges appeared on his uniform. His sta- 
tion was clean, but not so spotless that it 
looked polished, unrealistic. 

We spent days prior to shooting, at sta- 
tions observing faces, movements, attitudes 
and details, even pumping gas. The greatest 
compliment paid the film was when a pro- 
fessional service station manager asked us 
if the dealer was an actor or a real dealer. 
In this case he happened to be an actor, 
but this brings up another major point: cast- 
ing. When you wish to make things as be- 
lievable as possible, casting is most im- 
portant. 

The question often comes up: Shall we 
use real people or shall we use professional 
actors? The simple answer is. whichever 
will give the most believable result in the 
finished film on the screen. In choosing a 
salesman in one film we looked at 20-25 
actors and found none that we could hon- 
estly cast in the roll and ended up with a 
real live salesman from the company. 

In training films especially, one has to 
consider the importance of having men and 
women in a film to whom the audience can 
relate. The sponsor and filmmaker have to 
ask themselves questions about how they can 
best reach their audience: Will the audience 
accept a wooden actor, mouthing plastic 
lines in a tin attitude? Will they believe a 
film that is meant to motivate them when 
the situations and people in the film are not 
believeable to them? Will they accept a train- 
ing attitude in a film when the people that 
are supposedly the experts are obviously 
moving like mechanical puppets? Will they 
accept a sales training film that shows a man 
overcoming all obstacles or will they be 
more willing to accent as truth a more vul- 
nerable man like themselves. To show on 
film for business audiences some of the real 
conflicts that exist in every man, both in 
his life and on the job can help make a film 
your audience will believe. 

Once a filmmaker has believable char- 
acters, he has to be willing to experiment 
with situations. To use his knowledge and 
his imagination to find those that will best 
work to communicate information and feel- 
ines in a believable way. 

In a nurse recruiting film that we recently 
finished, we were shooting a Cinema Verite 
scene of a group of student nurses in a labor 
room with an expectant mother. I remem- 
bered that when mv wife was in the labor 
room a nurse had s'wen her a stethoscope to 
li'-ten to the baby's breathing, and I su'j- 
gested that to the nurse in charge. When the 
exnectant mother smiles with the stetho- 
scope in hand, after having heard her babv. 
there is no doubt of the emotional quality 
of the scene. The woman's real feelings 
about having her baby became evident when, 
\ia the stethoscope, a communication was 



established with her soon to be born child. 
By finding and introducing elements such as 
this into a scene, depth and "verite" feeling 
can be achieved in a simple way that ob- 
viates the need for much explanation and 
narration. 

But in trying for the Cinema Verite Atti- 
tude you must also be prepared for situa- 
tions that do not work. In one film we took 
an actor playing a working man into a dress 
shop where he waited while his actress wife 
tried on clothes. We had hoped that this 
scene would add another dimension to his 
character and make him a more believable 
character. We spent three hours in that store 
trying to let the scene play easily with a 
verite look. But it never did. The relation- 
ship between the two was awkward, unbe- 
lieveable and ended up unusable. 

Why? Difficult to answer honestly, but 
perhaps the answer lay in our having an idea 
of what we wanted to show that had no real 
relationship with the people involved. The 
man. for example, had never gone shopping 
with his wife before. 

In a sales motivation film a conference 
is held where the customer in an obviously 
annoyed moment tells the sales team that 
they have all the information and cards but 
the computer isn't working right to let them 
get the information off the cards. The mo- 
ment had an authentic ring to it. but, un- 
fortunately, the tension never built ud to the 
point where it should have turned into a 
positive moment. 

Bill Jersey suggests as a key. the respect 
for the individual. You can suggest th'ngs to 
people but not force or insist. You can 
juxtapose elements by putting people in con- 
frontation with each other, or by putting 
them in different situations or even by sue- 
cesting things in conversation. Jersey calls 
it the participation of the filmmaker but 
never manipulation simply because the ma- 
nipulation doesn't work. 

In all aspects of filmmakine. judgment 
and devotion to craft are essential, but this 
is especially true in Cinema Verite. In 
adapting the Cinema Verite attitude toward 
a film, a thousand and one decisions will 
govern whether or not the film is successful, 
believable. From the initial research 
through the location scouting and casting, 
each element has a multitude of factors that 
will give your film communication the abso- 
lute ring of believability or the question 
mark of studied falsehood. 

Business film audiences are readv for bet- 
ter, more honest films. Everyday we are 
exposed to highly sophisticated motion pic- 
tures, on television, in clubs, in churches, 
and especially in the movie theater. These 
movies are usine the mo^t hiahlv developed 
stylized forms of filming, commun'catine to 
audiences in an effective, if sometimes bru- 
tal, manner. Business film, if it wants to be 
successful, must approach its audience in 
a creative way. 

Filmmakers and sponsors must be willin<i 
to experiment with new techniques. Cinema 
Verite is one valid, imaginative technique 
which can be effectively used in business 
film. • 



24 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



EXCiriNCi A SALESMAN to .ictiiMi 
thioui;h an interest in what iiis eoni- 
[ian\ is doint; is an aeeoniplishnient second 
only, perhaps to aetuaiiy impressing a cyni- 
cal okl newspaper city editor. Each year. 
American business spends tremendous 
amounts of money on sales meetings, pro- 
motional material and other ammunition ee- 
signed primarily to enthuse and excite sales- 
men. 

A sales manager's toughest assignment is 
generating a constant outpouring of meet- 
ings and material that will lift and mo\e a 
salesman, and give h ni a product and cor- 
porate pride that he can iiopefiilly con\ey to 
a company's customers. 

Multi-media audio\isual presentations ai 
sales meetings in recent years, have pro- 
vided a big assist to this effort. As the rela- 
tive cost (if equipment and materials has de- 
creased, portability increased, and the reli- 
ability and versatility of equipment im- 
proved, multi-media meetings have gained 
ever greater popularity for sales presenta- 
tions because of their ability to generate ex- 
citement. 

Typical of the ever-growing use of multi- 
media presentations for sales meetings is 
"The .Academy of Marketing Arts & Sci- 
ences Presentation of the 1970 Academy 
.Awards" show last fall by Armour Meat 
Products Division of Armour Foods to ex- 
cite its salesmen and managers and explain 
the company's upcoming advertising plans 
and promotions. 

Ihe emphasis of the day and a half meet- 
Coiuiniii'il on pa^e 26 



EXCITING AUDIENCES 
WITH MULTI-MEDIA 



Typical of recent success with multi-media 
programs at national sales meetings is 
Armour Company's Meat Products Division 
"Academy of Marketing Arts & Sciences 
Presentation of the 1970 Academy Awards." 




Armour sales audience prepares to see "The Academy of Marketing Arts & Sciences Presentation of the 1970 Academy Awards, 



MARCH, 1970 



25 





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*BMOUR MOT DU'-.S l^.-r' •-.It'". ■■*"-■*• 




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All three screens in use at once with a live speaker at podium (right). 



"Cliffie" Awards were present- 
ed in the fashion and best 
tradition of the similar Acade- 
my "Oscars." 




Workmen put final 
touches on cen- 
ter walk-through 
screen before a 
program. 





Entire show was 

packed and trucked 
from one city to 
another in one 
small moving van. 



ing held at five regional locations for Ar- 
mour's managers and salesmen was excite- 
ment through a fast-paced presentation of 
1970 marketing plans and goals. Armour 
wanted the salesmen interested and en- 
thused about the idea that there is a tre- 
mendous amount of backup support pro- 
vided sales efforts by the marketing pro- 
grams presented. 

The Academy Awards theme was jointly 
conceived by Armour's marketing and 
audio-visual departments. The entire pre- 
sentation was prepared and presented by the 
A-V department staff headed by Marshall 
Wayne, with assists from Armour's ad agen- 
cy, Young & Rubicam. The only other out- 
side help was in the physical set design and 
the construction of the three scenes. 

The stage was especially designed to look 
like the one at Grouman's Chinese Theatre 
during Academy Award presentations. Ar- 
mour's awards were Oscar-like statuettes 
called ■•Cliffies" after Dr. Clifford B. Cox, 
group vice president for Armour Foods. The 
stage included wide steps with a modern 
podium at each side. At the rear were three 
6x9 foot screens. The center screen was a 
walk-through screen used for live speakers 
entry and staging of certain parts of the 
program. 

The whole program during the first day 
was styled in the format of an actual awards 
ceremony, with appropriate music, planned 
suspense, and formally presented Sales and 
Management "awards". 

According to Wayne, "There was some- 
thing on the screen at almost all times during 
the first day from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m." In all, 
more than 1200 slides and two hours of fin- 
ished 16mm film were used during the pro- 
gram. 

The stage itself was mounted on risers 
with elegant steps running the full 60 fool 
width of the stage. With modern stylized 
podiums at each side ft)r speakers and 
awards presentations, the setting strongly 
resembled an official "Oscar" presentation 
stags. The screens were centered at the 
rear of the stage and the entire stage was 
approximately IZ'/i feet high from the 
bottom of the steps to the top of the 
screens. 

Wayne added that since the show was 
only being presented five times, they chose 
to use manual projection relying on a 
script book and cue sheets. A projectionist 
was in the projection booth at all times, 
along with one other person, usually Wayne, 
more or less stage managing the presenta- 
t.on, keeping check on the sound and serv- 
ing as a back-up man when needed. 

A 6 x 7 foot projection booth at the rear 



26 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



of the room about d? feet trom the stage 
housed the projection and sound equipment 
used during the show. The equipment in- 
volved mcluded 3 Kodak Ektagrapiiic Car- 
ousel slide projectors; 1 Kodak Pageant 
16mm projector; a sound system including 
two auditorium speakers, and two tape re- 
corder players for background music during 
breaks and lunch. Music was also used 
through the system before and after the 
show . 

Equipment inside the projection booth 
was mounted on two levels. The three Car- 
ousels operated by a 3-button remote con- 
trol panel were on the lower level. The 
16mm motion picture projector was mount- 
ed on a shelf above the slide projectors. 

Timed almost to the second, the program 
only ran late once in the five performances. 

The 16mm projector was cued with lit- 
tle yellow dots on the film. Two seconds of 
black leader was used between each film 
segment to allow the sound head to get up 
to speed. 

In addition, since the show was not auto- 
matically programmed, Wayne and his staff 
designed a special 4-channel intercom system 
which permitted instant communication at 
all times between backstage, the lighting 
man. the projection booth and the audience 
area. 

The entire show, including a supply of 
handout material left at each location was 
packaged and trucked from one site to an- 
other in a small moving van. In a two-month 
period, the show played to audiences in 
Chicago, San Francisco, Houston, Atlanta 
and Boston. 

By using the truck to transport the show 
from one city to another, Wayne said they 
saved a lot of secondary packing and pack- 
aging and were able to carry all of the col- 
lateral material used during the meetings 
along in the truck. In essence, because they 
used their own sound system, the entire pro- 
gram was self-sufficient and complete with 
all of the physical equipment and supplies 
being in the truck. 

.Much of the material shot for the pro- 
gram has found residual and spin-off use 
since the completion of the show tour, ac- 
cording to Wayne. He said that some of the 
film prepared for the program has been 
useable on a local and regional basis and 
two segments of the show have since been 
converted for regular sales use. 

There is no doubt at Armour that the 
program was a total success! First quarter 
profits an dsales in the Meat Products Div- 
ision hit an all time high. Armour manage- 
ment is convinced that the Academy Awards 
presentation played a key role in producing 
these results. • 



Final touches are added to 

draped projection booth just prior 

to a program. 




Basic structure and 

set-up of projection 

booth is seen 

prior to draping. 




Marshall Wayne (right) checks show progress from projec- 
tion booth during a program. 




MARCH, 1970 



27 



THE FUSION of a new automation-age 
role for sales manpower with a dynamic 
use of increasingly sophisticated auido-visual 
systems may well spark one of the "VO's 
more significant shifts in marketing tech- 
niques. 

Building up the pressure for a new ap- 
proach to selling is the convergence of a 
number of socio-economic "intolerables." 
One is the escalating cost of field sales cost, 
up 100% from 1955 to 1965. while during 
the same period the Consumer Price Index 
increased only 18%. By 1975, the increase 
in selling costs will be even more dispro- 
portionate. 

Another is the resistance, even aversion. 
to selling careers among college graduates, 
a fallout from the affluent society's educa- 
tional explosion with which management 
has yet to some to terms. Part of a wide- 
spread alienation from establishment val- 
ues, the disaffection hits hardest among the 
"least preferred"" occupations — such as sell- 
ing. 

A third is the techological gap between 
the structuring of field sales calls, little 
changed in technique and approach since 
pre-World War II days, and that of the an- 
alytical and promotional ends of the market- 
ing operation, where computers target in 
on consumer trends, simulate customer re- 
sponse to products which have yet to be 
developed and in other ways extend man- 
agement's capability to realize a profit. In 
this ambience of instant data and computer- 
to-computer communications, the sales role, 
as traditionally conceived, is becoming an 
expensive anachronism. 

Building new selling methods won"t be 
easy. It will mean discarding many of the 
old sales management shibboleths and learn- 
ing to play the recruiting game with a new 
set of rules. Down will come the "college 
graduates only" requirement and up will go 
the welcome sign to candidates with high 
school certification only. 

Tapping a new source of manpower, sales 
executives will need to design new selling 
programs to persuade the prospect and to 
get the order. 

Cartridged film and sound messages 
covering a company's total line of products 
and services will function as the selling 
tools of the new sales technicians. Screened 
from a portable projector that carries and 
looks like an attache case, each film will 
deliver an expertly prepared, use-tested pre- 
sentation. 

The sales technicians will introduce and 
select the appropriate film, process paper- 
work and otherwise implement the order, 
performing much the same role as a sales 
clerk in the major appliance department 
of a retailer. 

The successful development of sales tech- 
nicians in a new job classification will de- 
pend on the willingness of management to 
critically reexamine the educational package 
it has bought so unquestioningly and at 
such high prices for the past decade. In 
what has been called "the learning society," 
the suggestion that any segment of the 



Relief for 

Salespower 

Shortages 



By LEON BOHN 

President 
Bohn Benton, Inc. 



business community should abandon its 
courtship of college graduates and set its 
sights instead on high school graduates may 
seem heretical. But consider the manpower 
situation as it looms on the horizon of the 
'70's. 

According to the Sales Manpower 
Foundation, to recruit and train a single 
salesman in 1965 cost $14,000-$8,877 
plus salary. That year the 100,000 U. S. 
manufacturing firms employing over 20 
people spent $1 billion for recruiting and 
another $600 million in salaries to replace 
75,000 dropouts and add 42,000 men for 
new products and territories. Projecting 
these figures onto today's rising cost spiral 
will give some idea of what business will 
pay for a field sales call by 1975. 

Obviously all company activities are hit 
by rising costs, but the plant reduces pro- 
duction costs with automated machines, the 
accounting department installs computer- 
ized billing, and communications at all levels 
are streamlined with data phones, fascimile 
transmission, remote dicating systems and 
closed-circuit television. Only in sales do 
obsolete attitudes and techniques continue. 

Thus in 1966, 300 of the 489 members 



of Sales Munageinent's "Panel of Sales 
and Marketing Executives" said they re- 
quired sales ajjplicants to present a college 
background. And the U.S. Department of 
Labor's Occupational Outlook, 1968-69, 
predicts that during the '70's there will be 
a big demand for manufacturers' salesmen- 
"college graduates preferred."' 

Neither of the sources states where the 
college graduates for sales careers are to 
be found. Both provide evidence of man- 
agement's reluctance to engage the realities 
of the manpower crisis. So with the re- 
gularity of a ritual, the recruiters prepare 
their trek to the nation's campuses, each 
time loading their baggage with bigger and 
more expensive inducements, and each 
time returning with diminishing "sales 
material." 

Not only is this competitive bidding for 
sales personnel self-defeating, but it fails to 
attack the problem at its source. For the 
major reason for the high cost of sales to- 
day must be attributed to basic changes in 
the environment and in the opportunities 
available to college graduates. 

In the '30's and '40's, less than 5% of 
American youth attended college and even 
fewer took degrees. An additional 15 to 
20% of the college age group had the in- 
tellectual qualifications but lacked the funds 
to continue their studies. 

A large percentage of this group entering 
the labor market at 18 turned to sales as an 
open avenue of advancement. Intelligent 
and able, they acquired technical and 
specialized skills on the job. Working to 
get ahead, they could afford to give little 
thought to the prestige and status their jobs 
conferred. 

Today, about 70% of high school grad- 
uates go on to college. By the middle of 
the next decade, it will be about 80%. The 
projected figure for degree enrollment in the 
nation's college and universities for 1976- 
77 is 9.4 million. 

Unlike their counterparts of the '30"s and 
■40"s, today's college graduates have over 
21,000 occupations to choose from. Pro- 
ducts of an affluent society, taking the 
satisfaction of basic needs for granted, they 
view status, prestige, "making a social con- 
tribution," as more important than finan- 
cial rewards in determining the choice of a 
career. 

According to a 1969 Gallup Pole, they're 

a "new breed," and they don't go along 

Continued on page 30 



The increasing shortage and rising costs of trained 
salesmen in all marketing endeavors may be relieved 
during the 70's by greater use of more sophisticated 
portable sound film systems attractively 
and lightly packaged. 



28 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



There's nothing new ahout 
a quad printer. 



Unless if s one that prints 
Super 8 film six times faster. 



And only Cine Magnetics film laboratory has it. 

Because right now there is only one Op- 
tronics Mark X Quad Printer to give you better 
print quality. Quicker. 

We've just installed this 16mm to Super 
8mm optical reduction printer in our Mamar- 
oneck laboratory. 

Developed under the direction of John 
Maurer, it operates at 50 feet per minute on 
the 8mm side. Or 200 feet of 8mm reduction 
prints per minute. 

But the Optronics Mark X is just one 
of the dramatic changes at Cine Magnetics. 

There are many others: 

Like a new 16mm Bell & Howell printer, a 
new Filmline black-and-white film processor, 
and a new Hazeltine color analyzer. 



Like new facilities, including clean-room 
finishing rooms for Fairchild, Technicolor, 
Bohn-Benton, Jayark, and other cartridges. 

Like new services, specifically inventory 
maintenance of release prints, drop shipment 
distribution, and 100 percent inspection. 

And most important, like a select group of 
talented people who will give your order the 
personal attention it deserves. 

It adds up to a complete 8mm and 16mm 
center for motion picture duplication and pre- 
print services. 

It adds up to the new Cine Magnetics. 

Call us and we'll be happy to show you 
around. 

We'll be even happier to show you the 
results on your next print order. 



Cine Magnetics, Inc. 

520 North Barr\' Avenue, Mamaroneck, NY. 10543 ( 914 ) 698-3434 
New York City Receiving Center: 202 East 44th Street ( 212 ) 682-2780 



MARCH, 1970 



29 




#v^# 



THE CAMERA MART 
Audio-Visual Line can put 

your ideas on the right 
track with a complete 
selection of specialized 
equipment including 
opaque projectors (for 
the projection of non- 
transparent material), 
stop motion analyst 
projectors, 16MM Xenon 
projectors (for brightest 
and long distance 
projection), 16 & 35MM 
double system sound 
interlock projectors, 
overhead projectors, strip 
film sound projectors, 
background slide 
projectors and projection 
accessory equipment. 

Everything is available 
for rent, long-term lease, 
or sale. And to keep you 
running on schedule we 
can also provide 
completely packaged 
programs. 

For further information 
and/or reservations call 
or write Mr. Bob Roizman 
(212) 757-6977. 




TheCamera Martmc. 

•«56 w. 55m St.. (Bet. 9th i lOlh Aves.) 
New York. N.Y. 10019 Phone: C2I2) 757-6977 



relief for salespower . . . 

confinued 

with the "hard work mystique." For them, 
"the traditional goals of earning a great 
deal of money and making one's way in 
the world have lost their charm. An ex- 
traordinarily high proportion of students to- 
day want to go into the 'helping" profes- 
sions, notably teaching." 

There should be nothing startling to sales 
management about this attitude. The 
National Opinion Research Center at the 
University of Chicago, in a 1963 survey 
listing occupations in order of importance, 
starting with a Supreme Court Justice at 
top and a shoe shine boy at the bottom, 
found selling occupations fell well below 
the average-between tenant farmers and 
plumbers. Then in 1966, a Louis Harris 
poll for Newsweek reported that 88^f of 
college seniors wanted to stay away from 
business altogether. Now, on the eve of the 
■70's, the easy availability of non-selling 
jobs attracts and absorbs the enthusiasm 
and talent which previously were channeled 
into sales. 

Management's awareness of the yearn- 
ing for status and its effect on sales re- 
cruiting is evident in the continuing effort 
to upgrade the public image of high-income, 
low-prestige jobs (salesmen become account 
executives) and in the cries of outrage pro- 
voked among sales executives by films like 
■Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman and the 
1969 Salesman by the Maysles Brothers, 
one of the "in" films among college audi- 
ences this year. 

Yet these are but minor tactics and skir- 
mishes in a war that has not so much been 
lost as become irrelevant. If sales execu- 
tives want to develop recruiting policies 
and selling techniques that reduce the ruin- 
ous cost of selling, they must realistically 
face the changes now occuring in our soc- 
iety. 

They will need to recognize that the 
campus no longer serves as the major source 
of sales recruits; that college men want 
higher status appointments and obtain them 
easily; and that traditional recruiting leads 
only to diminished profit and managerial 
frustration. 

This experience need not be traumatic. 
Both the manpower and the technology for 
a new approach are at hand. Indeed, the 
candidate with high school certification only 
may well prove to be the individual best 
equipped for automation-age selling. He is 
often the product of a blue-collar home, 
he strives, as part of his upward mobility, 
to attain the very jobs the college graduate 
disdains. 

Robert M. Hutchins has observed that 
"if an employer has a choice between a 
man who has had a lot of schooling and 
one who has had little, he is likely to choose 
the one who has had a lot, not because 
the better educated man is better qualified, 
but because this is an easy way to sort out 
applicants." The italics are added but the 



point is an important one: discarding pre- 
selection by educational standards may be 
an inconvenience that can reveal new 
sources of manpower which do not consider 
selling a lessening of prestige, and which 
hold out to management the promise of 
lower recruiting and training costs, realistic ' 
compensation and, yes, even more effective 
sales presentations. 

Film provides the means and the medium 
to automate selling. It can employ tech- 
niques unavailable to even the most skilled 
salesman, to make comprehensive, authori- 
tative presentations of maximum impact. 

In the '70's, audiovisuals will not be used 
so much as an "assist technique but as the 
primary and dynamic medium for com- 
municating with buyers at all levels and 
for most products and services. U 

That's because andiovisuals speak their " 
language. The evidence for this orientation 
is everywhere. Audiovisuals have become 
standard classroom tools at all age levels. By 
the time the average high school student 
graduates, he has spent less than 11,000 
hours in the classroom-and more than 15, 
000 hours watching television. A recent 
Roper study of 10-year trends in television 
reports that it's the most believable medium, 
up from 4Kf most believable in 1967 and 
leading newspaper in believability by two 
to one. 

College students, according to Dr. Robert 
Coles, a resident psychologist at Harvard. 
"are very visual indeed. I can flash a photo 
and it gets right to them." In over 100 col- 
leges, film-making courses are built into the 
curriculum — and in additional hundreds of 
high schools and colleges non-credit film 
making programs are thriving. 

Thus the widespread application of audio- 
visual technology to field sales calls in the 
■70's will merely be the extension of the 
decade's "common language" to new situa- 
tions, where sales technicians play a new 
but vital role. 

But is sales management ready to extend 
the languaee. meet the challenge of new 
situations? It is estimated that today 1/5 of 
1% — fewer than 5.000 of the 4 million 
LI. S. firms-use audiovisual selling, and then 
more as an adjunct to established routines 
than as a basic selling approach. 

These innovators tend to be among the 
nation's top firms. Thus du Pont has 
equipped its entire Automotive Products 
Division with portable attache-sized cart- 
ridge loaded projectors. Roche Laboratories, 
a division of Hoffman La Roche, is in 
process of equipping a 700-man sales force 
with a similar projector. Westinehouse, 
Saunders Associates and American Fiber- 
class are others who find film presentations 
effective. 

Tn every sector of the economy, the 
fhrust for new and better uses of human re- 
sources is breaking down the old patterns of 
thoueht and action and opening new parts 
for development. 9 



30 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



if you don't know what s happening in 
consumer education,you maybe 
missing out on some 

sponsored film business! 



in the nation s scnu_^ 




■■^■m^ 



what is 1 




Get the facts now in our new free brochure, "Consumer Education in the Nation's 
Schools"— a survey of 5,000 high school teachers who tell what industry can do to help in the 
teaching of consumerism— the fastest growing area of education in our school systems. 



I — 



"New Directions 
New Dimensions 
in Communications" 



Associat:ian Films, Inc. 

600 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10022 
Please send "Consumer Education" brochure to: 

N.imp . 

Title 



Street. 

City 

Stale_ 



_Zip Code_ 



Associat:ion Films, Inc. 

600 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10022 



MARCH, 1970 



31 



I F PA JOURNAL 



INFORMATION FILM PRODUCERS OF AMERICA, INC. 



P.O. Box 1470, Hollywood, California 90028 



Another National Officer Due 

The re-creation of the National office of 
Vice President Conferences and Symposia 
was called for by IFPA Board of Direc- 
tors. The 1970"s will start a decade of re- 
gional activities bringing programs, work- 
shops, and seminars to members at large 
and to chapters farthest from the National 
Headquarters. 

The appointment has not been made yet, 
but announcement will be made soon. Any 
volunteers? Job promises long hours, no 
pay, and many headaches. 



Sustainers Grow Too! 

Expanding the sustainer membership in 
IFPA is an activity that never ends, and 



since New Years we have gained four new 
members. Two from San Diego are Browns 
Motion Picture Laboratory now establishing 
a facility in Hawaii, and Nelson Photo Sup- 
plies, the city's largest wholesaler of photo 
supplies and film to industry. Bob Vogel, 
one of Hollywood's finest animators, spe- 
cialists in aerospace, oceanographic and 
technical subjects is the third and from 
Denver, Colorado, the Computer Image 
Corporation, Dick Birchard, President, who 
with the other new members were present 
at the Installation Dinner to receive their 
membership plaques and certificates from 
the new President, Bob Montague. A fifth 
sustainer. Jack Pill & Associates, with sales 
manager Roy Low, also received his 
plaque and certificate. 



^y.$tpm 




DuKane Recorder/ Pulser and 
Duplicator lets you produce 
tapes with automatic signals 



AUDIO-VISUAL DIVISION 
Oept. BS-30 — St. Charles, III. 60174 








Committee Formation Started 

As of this writing, six of more than twen- 
ty position nominees have accepted the re- 
sponsibility of Chairman to organize the 
following activities — Past President Mitch 
Rose will draw up an "Operating Proce- 
dures" handbook for Chapter operations, 
Jerry Oliver will handle the film competition 
awards. Jack Smith will head Selection 
Board of the E. C. Keefer Scholarship Fund 
Jon Stokes will arrange seminars East, Phil 
Neuhauser will communicate with Television 
tape production people and Cinema stu- 
dents in the West, and Bill Blume will con- 
tinue to serve as Special Projects Chairman. 
His current project is EXPO 70 an IFPA 
Charter tour to Japan, this summer. 



Gillmores Film 
Hawaiian Documentary 

Mr. and Mrs. Larry Gillmore of Redon- 
do Beach, Calif, recently returned from two 
weeks on Molokai, 'The Friendly Isle," 
Hawaii. They filmed under their banner, 
Carm-Lar Productions, a 28 minute 16mm 
color/ sound documentary motion picture; 
slated for TV release. (3200 feet of film 
was shot) 

Fifth in size of the Hawaiian group, 
Molokai is 37 miles long by some 10 miles 
wide. It lies 25 miles east of Oahu and is 
but seven miles from Maui. 

Producer Larry Gillmore, also camera- 
man/director, accompanied by his wife. 
Carmen, rented a Bell Jet Ranger helicopter 
and chased wild goats and axis deer in an 
excitin gaerial filming sequence. 

They also filmed unexplored areas, his- 
toric sites and Molokai's north shore and 
it's magnificent and inaccessible coast line 
with 2,000 foot sheer cliffs, water falls, and 
deep green valleys. 

Flying into this historic peninsula; Kalau- 
papa settlement, by chartered aircraft, the 
Gillmores filmed the scenes of Father 
Damiens' labors, "Martyr of Molokai," 
where he worked nearly a century ago help- 
ing the patients of Hansens' disease. (Lep- 
rosy) 

Gillmore is associated with TRW Systems 
Group in Redondo Beach, in the Motion 
Picture Dept., as a film maker. 




The Gillmores on location in Hawaii during film- 
ing of their documentary on the islands. 



32 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



OVER 130 
ILLUSTRATIONS 




CLOTH EDITION BOUND FLEXIBLE COVER 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

1. The Cameraman's Duties and Responsibilities 

• The Director ot Photography • The Camera Operator • The 
Assistant Cameraman 

2. Camera-Film Identification 

• Film Type Identification • Perforations and Pitch • Windings 

• Spool & Core Types • Ordering Raw Stock • Shipping Proce- 
dures 

3. Loading Room Procedures 

• Testing The Loading Room • Preparation of Materials • Load 
ing • Magazine ID • Unloading • Exposed Film • On Location 

• Changing Bag • Hand Tests 

4. Slates 

• Sync Slate • Insert Slate • Slating Procedures 

5. Camera Reports 

• Clipboard-Type • Magazine-Type • Caption Sheet-Type • Dis- 
position of Reports 

6. On The lob Procedures 

• Prior to Shooting • During Shooting • End of Shooting Day 

• Tools 

7. Introduction to Equipment 

• Reflex Viewing Systems • Offset Viewlinder Systems • Mattes 

• Motors • Barneys • Blimps • Magazines • Nomenclature 

8. Tripods 

• Types • Basic Parts • Setting Tripod For Shooting • Moving 
The Tripod • Care & Maintenance • Accessories 

9. Tripod Heads & Accessories 

• Types • Mitchell Friction • O'Connor fluid • Worral Geared 

• The Riser • The Tilt Plate 

10. Arrlflex Cameras And Accessories 

• 35 lie Camera • 35mm Magazines • 35mm Model 400 Blimp 

• IbS Camera • 16S Magazine • IBM Camera • IBM Magazine • 
IBBL Camera • IBBL Magazine • IBmm Blimps • lBmm-1200 ft 
Magazine • Periscope Finder Attachment • Flat Base • llOV AC 
Sync Motor On Plate • Threading Details On All 

11 Auricon Cameras 

• IBmm Pro-BOO Camera • Pro 600 Magazines (BOO-lt, & 400-ft 1 

• 16mm Super 1200 Camera • 1200-ft, Magazine • Threading 
Details 

12. Beckman & Whitley CM16 Camera 

• 16mm CM16 Camera • CM16 Magazines (400-lt. & 1200-ft) • 
Threading Details 

13. Eclair Cameras 

• 35mm Standard CM3 Camera • 16 35 CM3 Camera • 35mni 
CM3 Magazine • IBmm CM3 Magazine • 35mm Magazine for 
Aquallex • 35mm CM3 Blimp • NPR IB Camera • NPR IB Maga 
zine • Threading Details On All 

14. Kodak Reflex Camera 

• 16mm Kodak Reflex Special Camera • Kodak Reflex Special 
Magazine • Threading Details 

IS Maurer Camera 

• 16mm Maurer 150 Camera • Maurer 150 Magazines (-lOO-ft, & 
120011 ) • Threading Details 

16. Mitchell Cameras 

• 35mm Standard High Speed Camera • 35mm NC Camera • 
35mm BNC Camera • 35mm S35R Mark II Camera • 35mm Maga- 
zines • S35R Blimp • 16mm Pro & HS Cameras • 16mm Pro 
Blimp • 16mm Reflex R16 (SS & DS) Cameras • Accessories 
(35mm & 16mml • Threading Details On All 

17. Lenses 

• Lens Cases • Care of, on Turret • Cleaning • Aperture • Focus 

• Wide Angle • Telephoto • Zoom Lenses • Alignment (35mm & 
16mm) • Zoom Lens Accessories 



PROFESSIONAL 

16/35 mm 

CAMERAMAN'S 
HANDBOOK 

by Verne Carlson 
LIMITED FIRST PRINTING! 

A practical guide for every individual 
now working-or planning to work 
-ANYWHERE in the film industry 

The author, Verne Carlson, is a free-lance Director of Photog- 
raphy of Documentaries, TV Commercials, and Feature Films. 
He is also a consultant to a medical research institute, lectures 
to film groups, and conducts camera courses for professionals. 
He is a member of the: lATSE (Cameramen), SMPTE, SPIE, and 
SPSE. His wife Sylvia collaborated with him in the writing of 
this outstanding book. 

This definitive work is a result of 21 years of experience in the 
film industry. Covers everything for the Studio Cameraman and 
Assistant. Also for Inplant, Newsreel, Documentarist, and the 
Experimental Film Maimer. Profusely illustrated with actual pho- 
tographs—not diagrams— and liberally supplied with data 
tables and charts. This unique handbook also provides guide- 
lines, tips, warnings, and "tricks of the trade". The book draws 
upon firsthand knowedge as well as the experiences of other 
talented professionals. The result is the finest guide book of 
its type ever published for the professional as well as the 
aspiring cameraman. In connection with all specific Cameras, 
Magazines, Lenses, and Accessories . . . every phase of 
installation, operation, and usage is fully covered. 

MAIL COUPON TODAY! 

I 1 

BUSINESS SCREEN 

402 W. Liberty Drive 
Wheaton, III. 60187 



Please send me "Professional 16/ 35mm Cameraman's Handbook" 
(^ $15.00 postpaid in U.S.A. and Canada. Add $1.00 for shipping and 
handling overseas (except A.P.O./F.P.O.). III. residents add sales fax. 

Enclosed is check tor $ . 



Name 


please print) 




Address 


City 


State 

Scheduled For Apri 


I97U ihipment. 


Zip 



MARCH, 1970 



33 




picture parade 

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iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Bridge of Understanding 
Between Sets of Values 

In the Company of Men, pre- 
sented by Newsweek magazine, 
examines the conflicting attitudes 
between so-called hard-core un- 
employed and company foremen. 
Using the techniques of sensitiv- 
ity training and role-playing, the 
movie candidly explores the 
breakdown — and the reconstruc- 
tion — of communication between 
men who have been labeled "un- 
employable" and men who are di- 
rectly responsible for hiring, 
training and supervising new em- 
ployees. 

William Greaves Productions 
used no professional actors and 
no prepared script in making the 
film. Rather, the emphasis is on 
spontaneous, blunt, and often 
emotional encounters between 



SLIDE FILMS ARE 
OUR SPECIALTY 

editing & composites 
signaling 

ALL types of mastering 
(records and tape) 

Processing Pressing 

APPROVED BY 

Audiscan 

DuKane cassettes & records 

La Belle 

Cartridge winding for all slide 
film machines and radio cart- 
ridges 

""■ape Duplicating 

Fast, accurate service anywhere 
in the United States. 

(Tapes are on their way back 
to you in two days, records in 
five, after receipt of your tape.) 

VIRCO RECORDING CO. 

P. O. Box 185 

Monterey Parit, California 91754 

(213) 283-1888 



two very different sets of values. 
Filming took place in a large au- 
tomobile factory in the South. 
For information on rental or pur- 
chase, write either Newsweek 
Magazine, 444 Madison Avenue, 
New York 10022 or William 
Greaves Productions, Inc., 254 
West 54th Street, New York 
10019. 



World Problems Examined 
By UN Association 

The United Nations Associa- 
tion of the United States of 
America has released a film con- 
cerned with the problems of al- 
leviating poverty, hunger and dis- 
ease in the under-developed 
world through UN programs. It 
answers some of the sharp adult 
questions as to "Why the UN?", 
nnd challenges young people 
through showing a positive ap- 
proach to some of the world's 
'■^''ial imbalances. 

Development Is ... is avail- 
able as a film strip in color of 
100 frames with a synchronized 
record and as an 80 slide in color 
kit with script, discussion guide 
and bibliography. Write the UN 
Association at 833 United Na- 
tions Plaza, New York, New 
York 10017. 



Williamsburg Opens A 
Doorway to the Past 

Colonial Williamsburg's new- 
est film shows how artifacts re- 
moved from old trash pits, 
foundations and wells enable his- 
torians to picture the society that 
used these artifacts. 

Doorway to the Past was film- 
ed in three sections. The first es- 
tablishes Thomas Jefferson's con- 
tribution to archaeological rea- 
soning. The second pictures sev- 
eral different archaeological loca- 
tions and the laboratory processes 
necessary to protect and analyze 
the artifacts found on a typical 
colonial site. 

The third section recreates a 
lively colonial tavern scene to 
demonstrate how various recov- 



ered artifacts might have oeen 
used, broken and discarded in 
the 18th century. The film is 
available through the Film Dis- 
tribution Section of Colonial Wil- 
liamsbura. 



We Used To Call It 
Printing 

The concept that graphic com- 
munication is the art of commu- 
nicating in a visable graphic form 
which can be retreived at any 
time with the use of light and the 
observer's vision is ably con- 
veyed by Peckham Production's 
Graphic Communications, We 
Used to Call it Printing. The film 
was intended by it's sponsor, E.I. 
DuPont de Nemours &. Company, 
to make a meaningful contribu- 
tion to the printing industry and 
cooperates with the Graphic Arts 
Technical Foundation's recruit- 
ment and education program. 

Brilliant color and an exciting 
sound track make the film as en- 
joyable as it is educational. It is 
being distributed by Association 
Films. 



Excitement Of New Class 
Shown in Racing Film 

An II -minute documentary, 
celebrating the excitement of 
open-wheel race cars. Formula 
Ford, was filmed on location at 
Michigan International Speed- 
way prior to and during the 
Sports Car Club of America na- 
tional championship event in 
September. 1969. The film in- 
cludes dizzying scenes from cam- 
eras mounted on a race car trav- 
eling at speeds in excess of 100 
miles per hour, aerial views, 
long-lens photography, slow mo- 
tion and "strobe" editing. 

The new racing class is based 
on an international formula 
specifying single-seat, open-cock- 
pit and open-wheel cars powered 
by a standard 1600-cc Ford Cor- 
tina engine. The film is available 
from the Ford Film Library, The 
American Road, Dearborn, 
Michigan 48121. 



Navy Explores 
Polar Regions 

A 29 minute film explaining 
scientific exploration of the for- 
bidding polar regions, Ocean- 
ographer in the Polar Regions, is 
available from Public Affairs Of- 
fices of the Navy. 

Featured are great cliffs of 
glittering ice towering hundreds 
of feet above the frigid seas, 
glacial rivers whose masses of ice 
creep across the land, howling 
gales whose bitter winds drop 
temperatures to record depths, 
and marine life, seals, killer 
whales, plankton, that thrive in 
the environment. 



Furling Headsaii Shown 
To Sailing Enthusiasts 

Nautical Development Com- 
pany, Inc. has chosen a 15 min- 
ute film to introduce their recent- 
ly developed Rodluff Furling 
Headstay. The film compares the 
conventional method of hanking 
a headsaii to the headstay with 
the new method of rolling the 
headsaii around a rod headstay 
and unfurling it according to 
your sailing needs. 

Up Front With N.D.C. will be 
shown at boat shows and yacht 
club screenings, and is available 
from Nautical Development 
Company, Inc., 8 South Street, 
Port Washington, N.Y. 



Film Shows Swimming as a 
Sport for Everyone 

The National Swimming Pool 
Institute has sponsored a 13' 2 
minute color motion picture fea- 
turing swimming everywhere and 
for everyone. The film includes 
beautiful underwater photogra- 
phy demonstrating the art and 
grace of this sport. Aimed at the 
whole family, the picture shows 
how the body can adapt to swim- 
ming as easily as to any other 
physical activity, promoting good 
health, fitness and self discipline. 

Prints of A Pool's Paradise 
may be obtained from Associa- 
tions Films, Inc. 



34 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



r 



3 



•J 



.t»T 



i 






B^* 
e- 



I. 






r- 



Keep up with the latest developments 
in A-V equipment by means of the 
illustrated national reference book: 

THE NEW, COMPLETE 

Audio-Visual 
Equipment Directory 

for 1970 



The one truly authoritative guide to r.urreni 

models of audio-visual equipment: 

• Lists over 2300 items . . . more than 1400 

pictures ... 60 categories of equipment 

. . . 500 8"-xll" pages 

• Provides complete speciKcations on each 

model — price, model number, capacity, 

weight, available accessories, and 

important technical details. 

• Includes information which has been 

supplied by nearly 600 companies 

and which has been checked and 

re-checked for accuracy. 



w- 



^ 



,- \. 



^ 






* Contains uniform listings for easy 
comparison of various equipment items. 

• Lists hundreds of accessory items. 

with their sources. 

• Includes charts for projection lamps, 

screen sizes, running times, and 
other useful items. 

* Lists manufacturers and audio-visual 

dealers, with complete addresses. 

* Saves time and trouble ... a convenient, 

single source of information. 



C-^ 



\ 



% 




ORDER 
TODAY! 



Published by the national 

trade association of the 

audio-visual industry. 



MAT lO"* 
AUDIO 

vrsuAi 







Please enter our order for copies of 

mi 1970 Al DIO-MSIAL I.Ql I!»\U:M DIKIX IOU^ 



$8.50 per copy 



D $7.50 per copy if payment 
accompanies the order 



$7.00 per copy in lots of 10 or more copies 
if payment accompanies the order 



Payment enclosed 



Send invoice 



\.i 



Organization 
Street Address 
City. State & Zip. . 

imporlont Price 10 non-mcmbt^r compamn engaged in ihc audio 
1 .iu»1 inriiKirv >\ vit 00 prr rnpv Wnlf for membprihip informnlton 



Mail ihis form will) 
your I heck or 
iniinf'y (irdpr to 
National Audio-Visual 
Association, Inc., 
3150 Spring St.. 
Fairfax. Va 22030 



MARCH, 1970 



35 




new products review 



IIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinillllilllllllllllllllllllllMllllllllilllllllllllllllllMIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



Tailor-Made Presentations 
Inexpensive, Versatile 

The Visualine Communication 
System, a versatile and inexpen- 
sive system of personalized cus- 
tomized visual presentation ma- 
terials stresses maximum flexibil- 
ity of materials and media to 
meet a broad range of potential 



% 




"^ 



A viewer and filmstrip fit in folder 
for easy mailing. 

uses. The system includes a fold- 
ing viewer and 13 picture film- 
strip which fit into a #10 enve- 
lope for mailing, and two dimen- 
sional and stereo slides with 



^ 'ifP 



Viewers (stereo, left and two-dimen- 
sional, right) provide effective pre- 
sentations of visual materials. 

viewers, presentation boxes and 
mailers. 

For a sample of the compact 
viewer and a filmstrip entitled 
Man on the Moon, plus de- 
tailed information, write to Vis- 
ual Data Corporation. Dept. 
BSC, 3 Edison Avenue. Chester- 
field, Missouri 63017. 



Services Offered to 
Producers 

Program Services is offering 
cartridge leasing as a practical 
service to your customers. You 
can lease an all-inclusive Audi- 
scan or Courier 16mm package 
to your customer at prices which 



include cartridge warrantee for 
the length of the lease, all dupli- 
cation of tape and film, cartridge 
loading, checkout, packaging and 
shipping. 

Program Services is exclusive- 
ly a producer's service and spe- 
cializes in continuous loop sound 
slidefilm tape duplication and 
loading, as well as offering peri- 
pheral services and custom engi- 
neering. Further information is 
available from Program Services, 
Dept. BSC, 215 West Chicago 
Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60610. 



Studio Projection System 
Economical Enough for ETV 

A low-cost slide projection 
system, designed to project large 
background images behind tele- 
vision newscasters, sports an- 
nouncers, etc., works equally well 
in black and white and color 
studios. 

The system is offered as a 
package by Spindler & Sauppe, 
Inc.. Dept. BSC. 1329 Grarui 
Central Avenue, Glendale, Cali- 
fornia 91201. 



Film Footage Counter 
From Audio Designs 

The ADM 163 Film Footage 
Counter uses integrated circuits 
and is capable of forward and 
reverse counting. State of the art 
circuit design gives high noise 
immunity, insuring accuracy and 




Readouts are in large, easy to read 
numerals of the rear projection type. 

repeatability. It can count both 
16mm and 35mm film footage 
and will adapt to either a 1200 
RPM or 1800 RPM selsyn. Used 
with an interface accessory it is 
possible to preset the counter 
to a desired footage and receive 



a command signal when this op- 
eration is complete. 

A model featuring four-digit 
readout is also available. Write 
Audio Designs and Manufactur- 
ing, Inc., Dept BSC. 15645 Stur- 
geon, Roseville {Detroit), Michi- 
gan 48066. 



Sound-Slide System 
For Automatic Projectors 

The Cinemasound model 
1050, a compact solid state cas- 
sette tape recorder, synchronizes 
sound and slides for immediate 
playback. The unit plugs into a 
Kodak Carousel. Sawyer, or al- 
most any other automatic pro- 
jector. An inaudible pulse sig- 
nals advance of slides. A power- 



date as many as 10 separate light- 
ing units and is available with 
50I3, 750 and 1000 watt lamps 




This compact sound synchronization 
unit weighs only 6 lbs. 

ful 12 Watt PMP amplifier pro- 
vides room filling sound through 
a built-in speaker. 

Controls for record, playback, 
fast forward, rewind; jacks for 
microphone, auxiliary input, ex- 
ternal speaker, earphone; a V-U 
meter and remote pause control 
are located on top of the unit. 
For more information write 
Creatron Service, Inc., Dept. 
BSC, 32 Cherry Lane, Floral 
Park, L. I.. N.Y. 1 1001. 



Clipstrip Permits 
Variety of Set-Ups 

Bardwell & McAlister's Clip- 
strip is designed especially for 
shooting in confined areas and 
solves many lighting problems. 
It can be hung from walls, sus- 
pended from ceilings or mounted 
between two rolling baby keg 
stands. The clipstrip permits rap- 
id set-ups, cutting installation 
time and cost. 

Each Clipstrip can accommo- 




The Clipstrip kit is totally and easi- 
ly portable. 

and a complete line of accesso- 
ries. For further information, 
write Bardwell & Mc A lister. Inc., 
Dept. BSC 895. 6757 Santa 
Monica Blvd., Hollywood, Cali- 
fornia 90038. 



Opaque Projector Projects 
Black/White or Color 

The Astrascope 3000/2 opaque 
projector will project to life-size 
from only 8 feet Kodacolor 
prints, Polaroid prints, proofs, 
diagrams, drawings, blueprints. 




The Astrascope 3000/2 projects to 
life-size from only 8 feet. 

paintings, coins, stamps, etc. 

For more information, write 
Luminos Photo Corp., Dept. 
BSC, 25 Wolffe St., Yonkers, 
N.Y. 10705. 



Magazine Camera For 
Industrial, Military Use 

Magcam, a medium high- 
speed 16nim camera with select- 
able frame rates from eight to 
200 frames per second, is de- 
signed for film magazine inter- 



36 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



change within five seconds. It 
features niaxinuini steadiness 
through the use of stationary reg- 
istration pins, plus edge guiding 
at the aperture. 

A two-hiaded adjustable shut- 
ter provides an exposure range 
from I/I6 second at low speeds, 
to 1/10,000 second at maximum 
frame rate. Camera weight, with- 
out lens and film, is under eight 
pounds. For more information 
write Red Lake Laboratories. 
Dept. BSC. 2971 Corviii Drive. 
Santa Clara. Calif. 95051. 



Videotape Coordinator 
For Industrial Use 

The l)oll\-l.ite, designed pri- 
marily for industrial and educa- 
tional applications, coordinates 
all pieces of VTR equipment in 
a single, compact unit. It pro- 
vides black and white and color 
lighting through a boom on 
which arc mounted five 3200 
Kelvin Quartz lights and also pro- 



pictures on a 196 square inch 
projection surface. 

For further inli>rniation, write 




The Dolly-Lite folds neatly for stor- 
age. 

vides for the mounting of ETV 
and CCT\' cameras, separate 5" 
monitor, videotape recorder and 
accessory equipment. A micro- 
phone attachment is on the light 
boom. 

One operator controls every- 
thing. For more information 
write Dolly-Lite Systems. Divi- 
sion of Super Mold Corp.. Dept. 
BSC. 213 S. Kelly. Lodi. Cali- 
fornia 95240. 



Radiant Rear-Screen Unit 
For Carousel Projectors 

Carl Vision, a table-top, rear- 
screen projection unit, designed 
for use with all Kodak Carousel 
projectors, requires a minimum 
of preparation and limited space. 
The unit produces bright, clear 




Cari Vision is a compact and easy to 
use rear-screen slide projection unit. 

Radiant Corporation. Dept. BSC. 
8220 .\ortli Austin Avenue. .Mor- 
ton drove, Illinois 60053. 



Low-Cost 1-Inch Format 
VTR Available From Sony 

The Sony EV-300 videotape 
recorder features two-channel 
audio and slow motion and stop 
action in the playback mode. The 
playback picture is continuously 
variable from still frame to less 
than one-fifth of normal speed. 
Audio can be dubbed on channel 
2 without disturbing previously 
recorded video. It has full solid- 
state modular construction and 
is solenoid-operated by pushbut- 
ton controls. 

Utilizing one-inch tape, the 
EV-300 conforms to standard 
EIA TV signal requirements and 
will record and play back in 
monochrome any composite TV 
signal with 60 fields per second, 
including random interlace sig- 
nals. Tapes are interchangeable 




The EV-300 IS housed in a wood cab- 
inet with a plastic dust cover. 

between all EV series Videocor- 
ders. 

Specifications are available by 
writing Video Products. Sony 
Corporation of America. Dept. 
BSC. 47-47 Van Dam St.. Long 
Island City, N.Y. 11101, 

Continued on next page 



'70 HIGH LIGHT 
2x2 SLIDE PROJECTOR 

TRIPLES THE LIGHT OUTPUT OF A "STANDARD" KODAK 
CAROUSEL SLIDE PROJECTOR 

uy»«M«~Mtn^^^ Retains all features of original Kodak 

slide projector. 

No change to automatic focus, dis- 
solve, remote control and programmer 
inputs. 

Simple to operate. 
Double fan cooling system. 
Inexpensive replacement lamp. 
Easy portability— weight, 25 lbs. 
Self contained grey carrying case. 
Ideally suited for audio visual application in: 
BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS • TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT 
EDUCATION • MULTI-MEDIA PRESENTATIONS 




135) 



'70 High Light Pro|ector complete with 

Kodak Model 800 slide projector, slide 

troy, 3" or 5" lens & remote cord 

$675.00 

F.O.B. New York City 

Prices of other models available 

upon request. 

Dealership inquiries invited 

Quantity discounts available 

High Light Division of 




PRESENTATION TECHNICAL AIDS 



630 Ninth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10036 



212-245-2577-1380 



THERE'S NOTHING FINER THAN 

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CONTAINERS 




FOR YOUR 

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FILMSTRIPS 



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• Hinged lid. 

• Unbreakable Polyethylene. 

• IVIoisture-proof, dust-proof 

• Fit standard storage 
Containers. 

• Available with plain or 
custom printed labels. 



2 Sizes . . . 

No. 1: 11/2x11/2" In red, yellow, blue, 
green, orange, magenta, 
white, black and natural. 

No. 2: li/2"x2" In red, blue, green 
and natural. 



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MARCH, 1970 



37 



new products . . . 

continued 

Five Lighting Systems 
Meet TV Needs 

Berkey-Colortran. Inc. has in- 
troduced studio and remote light- 
ing systems incorporating light- 
ing, distribution and control 
equipment primarily designed for 
the television market. From the 
"Porta Studio" system providing 
for a simple and flexible remote/ 
studio lighting application, to the 
"2400" designed to achieve so- 
phisticated broadcast production 
objectives, there are a total of 
five systems to meet both the 
critical and creative needs of the 
TV lighting director. 

The "300" system meets the 
unique requirements of the small 
cable television studio, and the 
"600" is designed for small edu- 
cational or professional color/ 



directions, 4 separate precision 
heads including the bias head 
which records an extra octave in 
the high frequency spectrum, 
magnetic brakes with proper ten- 




Quality-BJIt 

Film Shipping Cases 

• Best quality domestic fibre 

• Heavy steel corners for 
added protection 

• Durable 1" web straps 

• Large address card holder 
with positive retainer spring 

• Sizes from 400' to 2000' 

OTHER "QUALITY-BILT" ITEMS: 

Salon Print Shipping Cases 

Sound Slidefilm Shipping Cases 
(for Transcriptions & Filmstrips) 

Filmstrip Shipping Cases (hold up 
to 6 strips plus scripts) 

Write direct to 
manufacturer for catalog 

SCHIESSIER CASE CO. 

Div. of Luduiig Industries 

2020 W. St. Paul Ave. 

Chicago, III. 60647 

Phone: 312-227-0027 



monochrome productions. The 
"1200" system provides for max- 
imum lighting flexibility for a 
medium size production facility. 

Descriptive literature is avail- 
able by writing to Berkey-Color- 
Tran, Inc., Dept. BSC, 1010 
Chestnut Street. Burhank, Calif. 
91502. 

For information, write Com- 
puter Image Corp.. Dept. BSC. 
2162 5. Jason St.. Denver, Colo- 
rado 80223. 

Addition to Technicolor 
Supers Projector Line 

A desk-top, portable movie 
viewer with triple versatility has 
been added to the Technicolor 
line of super 8 optical sound 




The Model 1300 super 8 viewer and 
projector is compact enough to be 
carried like an attache case. 

movie projectors. A daylight 
bright picture on the built-in 7" 
by 91/2" rear projection screen 
eliminates the need to dim lights 
during business presentations or 
when used in the classroom. 

The viewer can be converted 
to a front throw projector for 
auditorium sized groups and ex- 
ternal speakers or an in-house 
public address system may be 
connected. For individual view- 
ing or training sessions, the view- 
er can be connected to earphones. 

More information on the mod- 
el 1 300 cartridge loading projec- 
tor is available from Technicolor. 
Inc., Commercial and Education 
Division. Dept. BSC. 1300 Fraw- 
lex Drive. Costa Mesa. Calif. 
92627. 

Roberts Offers 
Professional Tape Deck 

The Model 50.'iXD stereo tape 
deck accepts a lO'/i" reel. It 
features automatic reverse capa- 
bilities which provide 25 hours 
of broadcast-quality sound m two 




This stereo tape deck bring the le- 
cording studio into the home with 
a full complement of professional 
features 

sion control to avoid tape break- 
age, and 3-speed capstan for se- 
lection of 7Vi, 3% and 1% ips 
via 3-speed electrically switched 
motor. 

For other features and speci- 
fications, write Califone/ Roberts, 
Dept. BSC, 5922 Bowcroft St.. 
Los Angeles. Calif. 90016. 

Da-Lite Introduces 
Silver-Lite Screen 

The Silver-Lite tripod model 
screen incorporates automatic 
six-second push-button opening 
with the Color Magic surface 
which provides unsurpassed color 
or black and white reproduction 
in partly lightened as well as 
darkened rooms. Vertical ribs, 
specifically designed and spaced, 
control horizontal light reflection 
at the widest angles. 

The optically correct surface 
eliminates glare, hot spots, eye 
fatigue and strain. For additional 
information write Da-Lite Screen 
Company. Inc., Dent. BSC. War- 
saw. Indiana 46580. 

Economical Color Film 
For Overhead Projectors 

3M Company is producin ^ 
color transparency films for 
overhead projectors that cost n 1 
more than black-and-white. Th'^ 
line of 2 1 films includes color 
background with black images, 
color images on clear back- 
grounds and color images on 
opaque backgrounds. 

Also, there is a non-imaging 
color adhesive film the user can 
stick-at-a-touch to add more 
color to selected portions of a 
basic transparency. For further 
information write 3M Company 
Public Relations, Dept. BSC. 135 
West 50th Street. New York 
10020. 



Super Wide Angle Lens 
Introduced by Century 

Century Precision Cine/Optics 
has announced the availability of 
a 6.5mm f/1.8 lens for 16mm 
motion picture cameras. The lens 
covers an angle of 90 degrees, 
four times greater than the nor- 
mal lens. Covering an entire 
room is possible without moving 
the camera. 

Made with fine grade optical 
glass for sharp resolution, full 
color correction and brilliant 
saturation, the lens covers a full 
16mm frame without vignetting. 




This super wide-angle le s is avail- 
able in 16mm "C", or Bolex RX fixed 
focus mounts. 

Objects two feet to infinity re- 
main in focus with a moderate 
8% edge distortion. For more in- 
formation and specifications, 
write Century Precision Cine/ 
Optics, Dept. BSC. 10661 Bur- 
bank Blvd., North Hollywood, 
California 91601. 

Satellite Has Available 
Magnetic Sound Reader 

Satellite Film Service is manu- 
facturing and selling a transis- 
torized 1 6mm magnetic sound 
reader. It features instant warm- 




up. one enclosure for sound head, 
amplifier and speaker and easy 
mounting to the base of most 
16mm viewers. 

Further information may be 
obtained from Satellite Film Ser- 
vice, Dept. BSC. P.O. Bo.x 6476, 
San Jose. California 95150. 



38 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




industry news 



iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiii 



Sony Offers Europe/U.S. 
Videotape Conversion 

The Sony Video Tape Produc- 
tion Center in Yonkers. N.Y. is 
now equipped to transfer video 
tape recordings from a Sony mas- 
ter tape made in the U.S. (ElA 
Standard) to a tape that can be 
played back in Europe (CCIR 
Standard) and vice versa, accord- 
ing to a spokesman for Sony 
Corporation of America. 

This conversion capabiHty 
makes possible an international 
exchange of Sony video tapes and 
should be advantageous to U.S. 
organizations that use video tape 
recordings to exchange informa- 
tion with their European branch- 
es. 

Further information may be 
obtained from The Sony Video 
Tape Production Center, 165 
Tuckahoe Road, Yonkers, N.Y. 
10710. 



Louis de Rochemont, 
Zavala-Riss Join 

Producer-director Louis de 
Rochemont, has formed a new 
production company in 50-50 
partnership with Zavala-Riss 
Productions, Inc. 

The new company, to be 
known as Louis de Rochemont 
International Film Makers, Inc. 
will produce and distribute fea- 
ture motion pictures and educa- 
tional films. 

Under the banner of the new- 
ly chartered company, Louis de 
Rochemont plans a return to 
making updated versions of the 
kind of real-life spy stories that 
first brought him worldwide ac- 
claim. 



Bruder Forms Editorial 
Service: Film Binders 

Bill Bruder. supervising editor 
at VPl Services, will form his 
own editorial service and call it 
Film Binders, Inc. F.B.I, will 
headquarter at 30 East 40th 
Street in New York City. 

With VPI Services almost five 



years, Bruder has built a film 
reputation of considerable stature 
ill the industrv. 



Hollywood Film Co. 
Handles Fuji Products 

Fuji Photo Film U.S.A., Inc. 
has appointed Hollywood Film 
Co. as their West Coast repre- 
sentative for the sale of Fuji's 
motion picture products. 

In announcing the appoint- 
ment, Elias J. Drcxier, National 
Sales Manager of Fuji, stated, 
"Hollywood Film's recent expan- 
sion of their warehousing capaci- 
ty parallels the increased U.S. 
demands for Fuji's motion pic- 
ture products. With these larger 
facilities, we are able to more ef- 
ficiently fulfill the industry needs 
on the West Coast. All inquiries 
from the area should be directed 
to Harry Teiteibaum, Presi- 
dent of Hollywood Film Co., 956 
N. Seward St., Hollywood, 
Calif., 90028." 



Production '70 Roadshow 
Begun March 4 in NY 

Production "70, a workshop in 
television techniques, will be 
shown at Reeves Lincoln Square 
Television Studios on March 4th. 
This one-day presentation marks 
the kick-off showing on videotape 
prior to a national roadshow. The 
original two-day workshop was 
held at Reeves in October. 

The roadshow version of Pro- 
duction '70 has been edited to 
seven and a half hours. Designed 
for advertising agency producers 
and commercial film makers, and 
anyone connected with the tele- 
vision industry, the workshop in- 
cludes demonstrations of some of 
the latest techniques in television 
production of commercials and 
programs. 

Among the subjects covered 
are lighting, set design, cost con- 
trol, videotape editing, and color. 
Participating speakers include 
Imero Fiorentino, president of 



Fiorentino Associates; Carlton 
Winckler of CBS; Hal Stone, 
president of Centrex Productions; 
Curtis Davis of NET; Paul 
Barnes of the Carol Burnett 
Show; Nat Eisenberg, president 
of NBE Productions; and Fred 
Barzyk of WGBH-TV, Boston. 

Those interested in attending 
the New York screening, or a re- 
gional roadshow, are invited to 
write to Richard Christian, Direc- 
tor of Workshops, Reeves Pro- 
duction Services, 101 West 67th 
Street, New York, N.Y. 10023, 
for further information. Cost is 
$30 per person plus an optional 
*5 for lunch. 



Wyman to Head ANSI PH7 
Committee on AV Standards 

Dr. Raymond Wynian, direc- 
tor of the Audiovisual Center at 
the University of Massachusetts, 
has been named chairman of 
American National Standards In- 
stitute (ANSI) PH7 Committee 
on Photographic Audiovisual 
Standards. 

Committee PH7 is concerned 
with the development of stan- 
dards for photographic systems, 
materials, apparatus, nomencla- 
ture, and test methods pertaining 
to the audiovisual art. 



Jacques Brothers Open 
Double Image, Inc. 

Bob and Don Jacques have 
formed Double Image, Inc., a 
new editing and post production 
service company, located at 21 
West 46th Street, New York. 
Each of the twin brothers has ex- 
tensive experience in editing all 
types of films, 

Don Jacques commented that 
"since we have a closeness in 
talent that is interchangeable, we 
are joining forces to provide a 
strong editorial service of the 
highest quality and efficiency. 
One of the first jobs in the shop 
is a series of films for the new 
Pan American World Airways 
747 jet (through Sidney J. Stiber 
Productions, Inc.)." • 



I CREATE THE 
I Right MOOD 
I EVERY TIME 

i with the 

I MAJOR" 

I PRODUCTION 

iMUSIC 
[LIBRARY 

= "MAJOR" offers you a full 

= 70 hours of background 

= production music for titles, 

i bridges, background— for 

i scoring, editing, recording and 

= dubbing music for your: 

I • FEATURE PRODUCTIONS 

I • DOCUMENTARIES 

I • TV FILMS 

I • SLIDE FILMS 

I • ANIMATION 

I • INDUSTRIAL FILMS 

I • SALES PRESENTATIONS 
= • COMMERCIALS 

I • EDUCATIONAL 

= "MAJOR" specializes in sound 
E — you get exceptional technical 
= know-how and beautlfully- 
E recorded original music on 
E LP records or V4-lnch Tape, 
E or on 16 or 35mm Mag. 
E Tape ready for a mix. 

E IMPORTANT: "Major" owns in own 

— copyrights on all production mood 
E music in its library. World rights 
~ available to you on a completely 

— sound legal bosis. Re-recording rights 
~ available on a "per selection" or "un- 
Z limited use" flat fee arrangement. 



WRITE FOR 135-PAGE CATALOGUE TO 

I THOMAS J. VALENTINO 

ilNCORPORATED 

lEsfablished 7932 

I 150 W. 46 St. New York 10036 
: or phone (212) 246-4675 

: Also available: Detailed Catalogue 
: of our complete LP library of 
■ 471 Sound Effects. 



AAARCH, 1970 



39 



Hot Sales Tool for Cool Homes 



JNTERNATIONAL HEATER 

Company, Utica, New York 
produces a line of high quality 
central residential air condition- 
ing systems called the Greenbrier. 
The units are sold by salaried 
International salesmen to whole- 
sale distributors who, in turn, 
sell to independent instaUing 
dealers (contractors). The Mar- 
keting Department searched for 
an answer to the complicated 
problem of influencing every link 
of the entire chain of distribu- 
tion down to the actual sale and 
installation in the home. 

The LaBelle Courier® was 
harnessed to the problem of help- 
ing their independent self-em- 
ployed installing dealers improve 
their sales. Making the task more 
difficult, the equipment involved 
was of a deluxe nature, being 
more costly than other more 
widely recognized national brand 
names. It was also a line that was 
being introduced new for the 
first cooling year, without the 
benefit of even one trial season's 
use to bolster its acceptance. 

A program was developed and 



called "Greenbrier Show'n Sell 
. . . your extra salesman." The 
program has 134 color pictures, 
plus professional narration, to 
show and tell the complete cool- 
ing story and spell out the exclu- 
sive International features. It was 
designed primarily to be shown 
to homeowners right in their liv- 
ing room so it had to be able to 
be carried like a brief case, set 
down, plugged in and let it sell 
without messing around with pro- 
jection equipment, complicated 
time-wasting setups, and annoy- 
ances. The Courier was the an- 
swer. It was welcomed into the 
prospect's home . . . and this is 
where most central cooling sales 
are made. The show ran for 17 
minutes and included light music 
and sound effects in key spots. 
Exclusive features were dramati- 
cally presented by color photo- 
graphs, diagrams, cartoons, and 
cut-away photos. 

Installing/Dealer sales results 
in instances where the machine 
was used were great. They claim 
the presentation helped them ( 1 ) 
close sales they would have ordi- 




Homeowners watch International's sales story on the Courier. Some- 
times the salesman makes a quick estimate while the machine dees 
the selling. 



narily lost to more widely adver- 
tised equipment names; (2) close 
sales in less time because of the 
concise, yet superior, audio/vis- 
ual presentations; (3) hold onto 
sales, with the customer willing 
to wait for an International 
Greenbrier unit for weeks at a 
time when unfortunate delays in 
vendors' delivery of components 
caused backups in the produc- 
tion of sold orders. 

The Courier has had a vital 



role in helping effect the most 
outstanding year of sales Inter- 
national Heater Company has 
ever enjoyed. 

Due to the past season's sue-, 
cess. International is preparingi 
two more product shows to be, 
used in the 1970 season. One; 
features residential total interior 
comfort, utilizing gas-fired heat-j 
ing equipment, and the other is 
a similar approach but stresses! 
the benefits of the oil-fired type. 



THIS PROJECTOR WORKS BEST 
WHEN THE CONDITIONS AREN'T 



Any good 16inin projector performs 
well under ideal viewing conditions. 

But you usually don't have 
(or don't want) perfect darkness. 
Perfect quiet. Or perfect anything 
else. 

That's when you need the per- 
fect projector for imperfect con- 
ditions. 

It's called the Bauer P6 Auto- 
matic 300 portable 16mni sound 
projector. 

"What makes it better? For one 
thing, the Bauer P6 has a special 
new high-intensity lamp. It's the 
MARC 300* metal arc that pro- 
duces nearly four times more light 
than conventional tungsten lamps. 

More light means a more 
brilliant picture. More vivid color. 
Clear, sharp images even in full 
room light (one of those imperfect 
conditions we talked about earlier: 
now you can leave the lights or 
shades up so the audience can take 
notes) . 

Now about sound. The Bauer 
P6 has a 15-watt solid-state ampli- 
fier. Maybe that doesn't mean 
much to you. It would, though, if 



you could hear it in a large, crowded 
hall. It sounds like real high fidel- 
ity. (That's why we say our Bauer 
P6 is like having a PA system 
that shows pictures.) 

The Bauer P6 has a lot of 
other features, too: automatic 
threading, blower motor for 
lamp cooling and an auto- 
matic fail-safe circuit that 
stops the projector if your 
film breaks during a per- 
formance. It's also quiet. 

Maybe you think that a 
projector that does so much 
should cost a lot. 

It doesn't. And this may be thr 
most attractive feature of all. 

For a colorful new booklet on 
Bauer 16mm projection equipment 
write to Dept. BS. 



BAUER P6 



ALLIED (MPE)l CORP DIVISION OF Alt PHOTO INC 
168GLENC0VE ROAD CARLE PLACE NV 11S14. 
•Robert Bosch Pholohmo GUBH 



•G E TRADEMARK. 




40 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



M 




reference shelf 



IIMIIIIIMinilMIMIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinilllinilMMMinillllllllMMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIinillMIIIMMIIIMIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIiaillUIIIIIIH 



8mm Sound Service 

A iK-w booklet Irom GIcti (ilcnii SouikI 
will giw \ou quick, concise information on 
8nim antl Super S film sound track record- 
ing. Glen Cilenn. with over 30 years exper- 
ience in ser\ing major feature film and 
television producers, is now ready to serv- 
ice all facets of your Smm film program. 

For a copy of the booklet, write GU'ii 
Glenn Sound. Dept. BSC. 6624 Ronuiine 
Street. Holhwood. Cci. 90038. 



Filming for Color TV 

I he creation of successful color TV films 
j is the subject of the latest special issue of 
' the Bolex Reporter, entitled ""Filming for 
i Television." 

Color laboratory work, film production 
' techniques, processing, editing, sound ap- 
plication and filming equipment, as well as 
I in-depth coverage of motion picture cam- 
; era use by television stations around the 
' world, are covered. For your copy, write 



Paillarcl Incorporated. Dept. BSC. 1900 
Lower Road, Linden, New Jersey 07036. 



List of Service Prices 

Fast and easy reference to prices of mo- 
tion picture, filmstrip, slides, and still lab 
services is available in a price list from Bc- 
bell & Bebell Color Laboratories. The list 
was published in conjunctiim with the labs 
move to its new facility in the heart of New 
York's motion picture district. 

For your copy, write Bebell & Bebell 
Color Laboratories, Inc., Dept. BSC. 416 
West 45tli Street. New York 10036. 



NAVA Equipment Directory 

NAVA has published its ""1970 Audio- 
Visual Equipment Directory" containing 
photographs, specifications and prices of 
more than 1,400 current models of equip- 
ment. Included are motion picture, filmstrip, 
slide, opaque, overhead and special purpose 



projection equipment; audio tape and cas- 
sette recorders; record players; video tape 
recorders; CCTV cameras and receivers; 
learning laboratories; multi-media systems; 
projection stands; screens; storage cabinets; 
and all other types of audio-visual equip- 
Price of the 1970 A-V Equipment Direc- 
tory to audio-visual users not commercially 
engaged in the A-V industry is .$8.50 per 
copy, or $7.50 when payment accompanies 
the order. Write the National Audio-Visual 
Association. Inc., Dept. BSC, 3150 Spring 
Street, Fairjux, Virginia 22030. 



Why Theater Distribution? 

The advantages of theatrical distribution 
of sponsored motion pictures are discussed 
in the brochure, ""Your Ticket to the Na- 
tion's Theaters." The brochure gives a pro- 
file of today's audience, explains why a 
theatrical presentation enhances the impact 
of a sponsored film and offers guidelines as 
Continued on next page 




MARCH, 1970 



41 



NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF AUDIO-VISUAL DEALERS 



EASTERN STATES 



• MAINE • 

Headlight Film Service, 104 Ocean 

St., So. Portland. 799-6100 

• WASHINGTON • 

"The" Film Center, 915 12th St. 
NW, Washington, D. C. 20005 
(202) 393-1205 

• NEW YORK • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 1775 
Broadway, New York 10019. 
Phone 212/JUdson 2-4060 

Projection Systems, Incorporated, 

202 East 44th Street, New York, 
10036 (212) Mil 2-0995 

Visual sciences, Suffern, N.Y. 
10901 

• PENNSYLVANIA • 

F. P. Lilley & Son, Inc., Box 3035, 
2009 N. Third St., Harrisburg 
17105, (717) 238-8123 

Oscar H. Hirt, Inc., 41 N. 11th St. 
Philadelphia, 19107. Phone: 
215/923-0650 

Audio Visuals Center, 14 Wood St., 
Pittsburgh 15222, Sales, Rentals, 
& Repairs. 471-3313 

L. C. Vath Audio Visuals, 449 N. 
Hermitage Rd., Sluirpsville, 
16150. .342-5204. 

• VIRGINIA . 

Stanley Projection Co., 1808 Rap- 
ides, Alexandria 71301. 318-443- 
0464 



SOUTHERN STATES 



• FLORIDA . 

Jack Freeman's, 2802 S. MacDill 
Ave., Tampa (813) 839-5374 



• GEORGIA • 

Colonial Films, 752 Spring St. 
N.W. 404/875-8823, Atlanta 
30308 



MIDWESTERN STATES 



• ILLINOIS • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 230 

North Michigan Avenue, Chica- 
go 60601. State 2-6757 



• MICHIGAN • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 2821 
E. Grand Blvd., Detroit 48211. 
Phone: 313/TR 5-2450 



42 



• MISSOURI • 

Cor-rell Communications Co., 5316 
Pershing, St. Louis 63112. 
Equipment rental (314) 
FO 7-1111 

• OHIO • 

Sunray Films, Inc., 2005 Chester 
Ave., Cleveland 44114 

Twyman Films, Inc., 329 Salem 
Ave., Dayton 45401 

M. H. Martin Company, 1118 Lin- 
coln Way E., Massillon. 

Cousino Visual Education, 1945 
Franklin Ave., Toledo 43601. 
(419) 246-3691. 



WESTERN STATES 



• CALIFORNIA • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 305 

Taft Building, 1680 N. Vine St., 
Hollywood 90028. HO 3-2321 

Photo & Sound Company, 870 

Monterey Pass Road, Monterey 
Park, 91754. Phone: (213) 264- 
6850. 

Kalke Company, Inc. A-V Center, 

641 North Highland Ave., Los 
Angeles 36. (213) 933-7111 



• SAN FRANCISCO AREA • 

Photo & Sound Company, 116 Na- 
toma St., San Fr,anci,sco 94105. 
Phone: 415/GArfield 1-0410. 



• COLORADO • 

Cromars' Audio-Visual Center, 

1200 Stout St., Denver 80204. 
Colorado Visual Aids, 955 Ban- 
nock, Denver 80204, 303/255- 
5408 

• NEW MEXICO • 

University Book Store Allied Sup- 
ply Company, 2122 Central East, 
Albuquerque 87106. 

• OREGON • 

Moore's Audio Visual Center, Inc., 

234 S.E. 12th Ave., Portland 
97214. Phone: 503/233-5621. 

• UTAH • 

Deseret Book Company, 44 East 
South Temple St., Salt Lake, 10. 

• WASHINGTON • 

Photo & Sound Company, 1205 
North 45th St., Seattle 98103. 
206/ME 2-8461 



reference shelf . . . 



confinuecf 



to content, length and acceptabil- 
ity of sponsor identification. 

Hollywood's virtual abandon- 
ment of the short subject is cited 
as only one of the reasons for the 
increasing popularity of spon- 
sored shorts in theaters. For your 
copy write Association Films, 
Dept. BSC. AF/35 Division. 600 
Madison Ave., New Yorli 10022. 



Ampex Data Sheet 

The VS600, a solid state video 
switcher system used in television 
production and control facilities 
for broadcasting and program re- 
cording, is described in a data 
sheet, along with specifications 
and a diagram of the control 
panel. 

Requests for the data sheet 
should be directed to Ainpe.x 
Corporation, Dept. BSC, M.S. 
7-13, 401 Broadway, Redwood 
Ci/y. California 94063. 



Microphone Catalog 

Shurc Brothers has available 
a comprehensive catalog describ- 
ing their line of microphones, 
microphone mixers and related 
products for public address and 
tape recording applications. In- 
cluded in the catalog are illus- 
trations and technical specifica- 
tions, along with an extensive 



guide to microphone types anc 
microphone selection. 

For a free copy, write Shun 
Brothers, Dept. BSC, Til Hart- 
rev Avenue, Evanston, Illinoii i 
60204. 



RCA Learning Lab Systems 

A booklet, packed with fact; 
and figures for those considering 
the purchase of Learning Lab 
systems is available from RCA, 
The booklet shows all the latest 
RCA equipment from consoles 
to headsets and lessons sources! 
Capabilities are explained andj 
uses illustrated. 

Copies are available from 
RCA Professional Electronic 
Systems, Building 15-5, Dept. 
BSC, Camden, New Jersey 
08102. 



Educational Film List 

The ACI Films 1970 cataloj 
lists and describes 126 films, 1^ 
of them 1969 releases. Amonj 
the new films are series on ar 
media for the lower grades, the 
history of rockets and space ex- 
ploration, German language, anc 
reading readiness. 

Copies of the catalogue, de- 
scribing films in 15 subject areas 
are available from ACI Films 
Inc., Dept. BSC, 35 We.^t 45// 
St.. New York. N.Y. 10036. 



BUSINESS SCREEN 
MARKETPLACE 



16MM PROJECTOR 
SPECIAL 

B&H Mdl. D4 sound projector 
w/fiberglass cose, speaker, 5 
watt amp. Designed for single 
or dual changeover projection. 
Provision for external 20 watt 
amp. and 2 speakers. Fast re- 
wind. Quality 2-in. fl.6 lens. 
Limited quantity available. Val- 
ued at $900. SALE PRICE $375. 

Alan Gordon Enterprises 

5362 N. Cohuenga Blvd. 

North Hollywood, Ca. 91601 



MANAGEMENT 
OPPORTUNITY 

Small fully equipped 16mm mo- 
tion picture studio, prestige Bev- 
erly Hills location , needs Man- 
ager with technical knowledge 
and enthusiasm. Unique oppor- 
tunity to grow with the business. 
Please reply with resume to 

Box 69 

BUSINESS SCREEN 

402 West Liberty Drive 

Wheaton, Illinois 60187 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




II 



INTER COM 

worldwide! Desires contact with Cinema- 
tographers ONLY. Write 130 7th Street, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 15222 or telephone (412) 471-2780 



i 



SUPER-8 * 8-n .r 16a.n, 

m TH^e DUPLICATES 



^^Finest-Quality Kodachrome 

COLOR or BLACK & WHITE 

PROFESSIONALS: W« are Specialisti In . . . 8mm 

to 14mm Blow-Ups. ■* 35mm or 16mm to Bmm or 

Sup«r-« Reductions * A & B Roll PrinHng. * 8mm 

a Itmm Eastman Interneqs. ■# 8mm & 14mm Eastman 

Color Release Prints. * B i W Reversal Dupes. * 

Dup Neqs. * B i W Positive Release Prints. * Single 

Bmm Printing. * Soundstriping, Splicing, Be. 

t/> FAST SERVICE on Moil-Orders. 

<^ Finest QUALITY Work. 

t^ Guaranteed SATISFACTION! 

Send for our latest PROFESSIONAL Price-Llsf. 
Write Dept. S 



•WtxUtftwwi yfi,my FILM LABS. 

2704 W. OLIVE Ave., BURBANK, CALIF. 91505 



FOR BUSINESS & INDUSTRY 

EVERYTHING 
IN SOUND 

RECORDING 

If it's sound recording, RPL does 
it! On tape, in reels, cartridges or 
cassettes. On film On records. 
Duplicates from one to many thou- 
sands. Original narration, music 
and sound effects. Under your 
personal directions, or by mail, 
witfi RPL AudioProgram Plans. It's 
the easy, low-cost way to put the 
audio in your audiovisuals! 

RECORDED PUBLICATIONS LABORATORIES 

1565 Pierce Ave., Camden, N.J. 08105 

Tel.: (215) 922-8558 Phila. 

• '6091 963 3000 Camden 




Rental Catalog Available 

A catalog of equipment available for rcnl- 
;il contains descriptions and illustrations of 
most photographic equipment a professional 
would need to supplement his own equip- 
ment. Alst) included is a section of special 
eltects equipment and supplies, including 
such exotic items as cobweb spinners, fog- 
makers (with fog juice, of course!) and 
breakaway bottles. 

The catalog is a\ailable free to profes- 
sionals. Write Standard Photo Supply Com- 
pany. Dept. BSC. 43 East Chicago Avenue, 
C'hiiai'o. Illinois 6061 1. 



Titlefile System 

\ isuul I:leclrt)nics Corporation announces 
the availability of a new 8-page brochure 
covering their recently introduced Titlefile 
System. The brochure describes the applica- 
tions and versatility of the new TV titling 
system. The Titlefile System stores up to 
30.000 characters of pre-programmed in- 
formation which is rapidly accessible for T\' 
presentation. The system is available at a 
fraction of the cost of previous titling sys- 
tems. Write Visual Electronics Corporation. 
Dept. BSC. 356 W. 40th St.. New York. 
i\'.Y. 10018. 



Construction Safety Films 

Association Instructional Materials has 
released a supplement covering its library 
of films on safety in the construction indus- 
try. The films cover every aspect of safety 
in this industry, including one for teachers to 
train children to recognize dangers on con- 
struction sites. 

For your copy of the list, write Associ- 
ation Instructional Materials. Dept. BSC. 
600 Madison Ave.. New York 10022. 



Underwater Housing 

A booklet on the subject of underwater 
camera housings, build-it-yourself style, sim- 
plifies construction with a complete line of 
parts and materials available by mail. This 
manual makes it relatively easy to build an 
attractive and functional underwater case 
for your present still or movie camera. 

The booklet is available for $1.9.^ from 
Hydrotech, Dept. BSC, P.O. Box 14444, 
Long Beach. California. 



Acme Offers Newsletter 

.Acme Film & Videotape Laboratories has 
begun the publication of a monthly maga- 
zine, "Monitor," with film and tape news for 
engineers, producers, agencies, stations and 
educators. 

To be placed on their mailing list, and 
also to receive Acme's 28 page catalog, 
write Acme Film & Videotape Laboratories, 
1161 North Highland Ave.. Hollywood, 
California 90038. 




a color DOTie 
complete in 1 week? 



mmmam 

art, Silfn clips ^ 
&product§ 
SYiicliroiiiKcil 
to voice, iiiiisic, 
SMiiiiil effects 




MARCH, 1970 



43 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Allied Impex Corp 40-41 

Amphoto 33 

Mark Anderson Films 13 

Animated Productions 43 

Arriflex Corp. of America 4-5 

Association Films, Inc 31 

AVE Corporation 12 

Bach Auricon, Inc 11 

Better Selling Bureau 16 

Berkey Technical (Oxberry) 18 

Bohn Benton, Inc 19 

Byron Motion Pictures 3 

Camera Mart, Inc., The 30 

Capital Film Laboratories, Inc 1 

Cine Magnetics, Inc 29 

Colburn, George W. Laboratories, Inc. .10 



Comprehensive Service Corp 43 

De Luxe General 15 

De Wolfe Music Library, Inc 43 

Du Kane Corp 32 

Eclair Corp. of America 22-23 

EIco Optisonics 8 

Handy Organization, The Jam 

Fourth Cover 

Hollywood Valley Film Labs 43 

Inter Com 43 

La Belle Industries 17 

Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc. 
Second Cover 

Nagra Magnetic Recorders, Inc 14 



National Audio-Visual Association, 
Inc 35 

Plastic Reel Corp Third Cover 

Program Services 16 

Presentation Technical Aids, Inc 37 

Recorded Publications 43 

Reela Films, Inc 9 

Richard Manufacturing Co 37 

Schuessier Case Company 38 

SOS Photo-Cine-Optics, Inc 14 

United Air Lines 6 

United World Films 20 

Valentino, Thomas J., Inc 39 

Virco Recording Company 34 

VPI Films 7 



the 

last word 




By LON B. GREGORY 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIII 



Not Here Yet 

It seemed appropriate as we 
were putting this issue together 
that we should have one story 
somewhat projecting the role of 
A-V's in selling (page 28) in the 
future . . . and an article in the 
same issue (page 40) relating 
the successful use of a portable 
sales presentation. 

Reflecting on this growing use 
of audiovisuals in selling, we 
couldn't help but wonder what 
the salesman of 1980 will be. 

Despite the present availabil- 
ity of very lightweight portable 
film and slidefilm projectors with 
folding rear screens and the 
like that work very well, we 
really believe the audiovisual 
sales tool of 1980 will be in wide- 
spread use, but be drastically dif- 
ferent from anything we now 
know or envision. 

1980's A-V sales tool must 
and will be much, much smaller 
and lighter. It will probably be 



some sort of sound on film (or 
tape ) device that packs a tremen- 
dous amount of information in 
about the space of a present-day 
pocket transistor radio. Quite 
possibly it will project its mes- 
sage (without wires) through the 
TV receiver in the client's home 
or office. (Small TV receivers 
will be everywhere by then). 

In addition to a variety of tai- 
lored sales messages, the device 
will also have the capability of 
fast data retrieval for quick re- 
view of segments of the informa- 
tion or emphasis on a specific 
point. 

So armed, the 1980 salesman 
may well be a gray-flanneled "or- 
der-taker" really famiUar only 
with the operation of the "sales- 
man" in his breast pocket or 
neatly tucked away in the corner 
of his briefcase out of the way of 
the leave-behind literature, in- 
struction manuals and order 
forms also in his case. 

It's something to think about. 



An Important Addition 

Compiling any kind of data 
is at best a worrisome under- 
taking. Because we rely on sev- 
eral different sources for data 
in our annual "Most Honored 
Films" list, oversights and errors 
of omission can creep in, even 
though we take great pride in the 
fact that it remains the most ac- 
curate guide to the top award- 
winning sponsored films. 

Gordon/ Glyn Productions' 
film. Please. Hurry! for New 
York Telephone Company is 
one that should have been in- 
cluded in our January listing. It 
won a Chris Statuette at the Co- 
lumbus Film Festival last year, 
but was not listed in the official 
program of the festival because 
of a printing error. In addition, 
the film was the winner of a 
Gold Hugo at the Chicago Inter- 
national Film Festival; a silver 
medal at the Atlanta Internation- 
al Film Festival; and a bronze 
medal at the New York Film and 
TV Festival. 

Image Dynamics Opens in 
Chicago to Image Concept 

Image Dynamics, boasting a 
"versatile studio-office-produc- 
tion" facility at 206 N. Cass 
Ave., Westmont in suburban 
Chicago, has opened offering 
every facet of communication ac- 
tivity to clients. 

The base of the operation is 
Image Dynamics Institute, an 
educational business trust, which 
studies specific communications 



problems for special methods of 
solution. 

After evaluation and deter- 
mination of the best media, the 
production facility provides the 
finished product in the medium 
selected. Present plans are to con- 
centrate on videotape produc- 
tions though Image Dynamics 
can provide still or motion pic- 
ture production. The company of- 
fers complete packages from cre- 
ation through packaging and dis- 
tribution. 

Heading the new company are 
John G. Geier. Ph.D., as presi- 
dent, and Russell C. "Whitney, 
Jr., vice president of operations, 

Swanson Productions Inc. 
Expands in Milwaukee 

The accelerated tempo of its 
international film business has led 
to the expansion of Swanson 
Productions, Inc. 

Ronald G. Johnson has been 
named vice president and direc- 
tor of production services at 
Swanson Productions, whose 
headquarters are at 625 N. Mil- 
waukee St., Milwaukee, Wiscon- 
sin. 

National Color Labs More 
Than Doubles Plant Size 

National Color Laboratories 
recently broke ground for a new 
two-story, 21,000 square foot 
addition to its current facilities at 
306 West First St., Roselle, New 
Jersey. 



44 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



today's films on 

yesterdar's 

reels? 



Or in yesterday's cans? 

There are a tew people who still use metal reels and cans. And 
they have their reasons. Like tradition. Nostalgia. "It's the kind we've 
always used." 

But when you consider that Plio-Magic plastic reels, cans and 
cases offer far greater protection, and are far cheaper to ship, the old 
reasons just don't have a convincing ring any more. 

Plio-Magic reels, cans and cases are far more resilient than metal. 
They withstand impact. Don't bend. Don't dent. 

Even more importantly, Plio-Magic reels, cases and cans weigh a 
lot less than their metal counterparts. As a result, you save at the Post 
Office. Up to 65% in mailing costs. And out cases hold our reels 
securely. With four positive locks. Snug against a bed of packing foam. 

It all means that your films will be stored and shipped with the 
same loving care that went into making them. 

We make a complete line of plastic accessories for the film indus- 
try Write for our catalog. Plastic Reel Corporation of America, 640 So. 

SwTrsev ^^' ''"''''' r pxLa^- r p^x^J^a^ ' 

Someday, you^ll wind up with plastic. 



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Field Services 
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Training Services 
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Programs 
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TOOLS, TECHNIQUES AND IDEAS FOR AUDIOVISUAL COMMUNICATIONS 



A HARCOURT. BRACE & WORLD PUBLICATION 



APRIL . 1970 



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When Beatrice Foods 
puts recipes on film 



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Home Ec students eat it up. 



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More and more, these days. Miss Teen-Age 
America is becoming interested in Mexican and 
Chinese cooking. She wants to eat more of it— 
and she wants to prepare it herself! 

One big reason for this development is Beatrice 
Foods. 

In classrooms across the country, Beatrice has 
been introducing millions of students to the pleas- 
ures of foreign cuisine through a series of tempting 
tilms. Expert chefs show them how to prepare 
dozens of exotic specialties. And these films whet 
lots of young appetites for the Gebhardt Mexican 
Foods and LaChoy Chinese cookery packaged 
by Beatrice. 

Millions of women are enjoying these films, too. 



On television. And at hundreds of resorts. In addi- 
tion, they're watching other entertaining and in- 
formative Beatrice films about its Jolly Rancher 
candies and Burny Bros, baked goods. 

These audiences— the older women and the on- 
coming generation— represent giant marketing 
opportunities for food processors. Both groups 
influence what goes on the table right now— and 
the youngsters will be clearing supermarket shelves 
of their favorite products for years to come. 

To reach this big, big market, Beatrice works 
with a big, big distributor of sponsored films. The 
biggest, in fact: Modern. 

If this gives you .some food for thought, give 
us a call. 



MODERN TALKING PICTURE SERVICE, INC. 

1212 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10036 

\> ant more inrorniatiun about Beatrice Foods' films? Or about lio» sponsored film protu'ams can benefit >our company? Write to Modern. 



< 




today's films on 
Yesterdar's 



m:- 






■cr,' 



reels? 



<<: 



^fl:; 



Or in yesterday's cans? 

There are a tew people who still use metal reels and cans. And 
they have their reasons. Like tradition. Nostalgia. "It's the kind we've 
always used." 

But when you consider that Plio-Magic plastic reels, cans and 
cases offer far greater protection, and are far cheaper to ship, the old 
reasons just don't have a convincing ring any more. 

Plio-Magic reels, cans and cases are far more resilient than metal. 
They withstand impact. Don't bend. Don't dent. 

Even more importantly, Plio-Magic reels, cases and cans weigh a 
lot less than their metal counterparts. As a result, you sa\e at the Post 
Office. Up to 65% in mailing costs. And out cases hold our reels 
securely. With tour positive locks. Snug against a bed of packing foam. 

It all means that your films will be stored and shipped v\ith the 
same loving care that went into making them. 

We make a complete line of plastic accessories for the film indus- 
tr>' Write for our catalog. Plastic Reel Corporation of America, 640 So. 

Someday, you^ll wind up with plastic. 



APRIL, 1970 



0. H. COELLN 

Founder and 
Consultant 



ROBERT SEYMOUR, JR. 

Publisher 

JOHN G. REYNOLDS 

Vice President 

LON B.GREGORY 

Editor & 
Assistant Publisher 

BRUCE B. HOWAT 
RAY H. SMITH 

Publishing Consultants 

NOREEN OSTLER 

Editorial Assistant 

AUDREY RIDDELL 

Advertising Service Mgr. 



EDITORIAL AND 
ADVERTISING OFFICES 

402 West Liberty Drive 

Wheaton, Illinois 60187 

Phone (312) 653-4040 



REGIONAL OFFICES 



EAST: 

ROBERT SEYMOUR, JR. 

757 Third Avenue 
New York, N.Y. 10017 
Phone: (212) 572-4853 

MIDWEST: 

MONAHAN/HUGHES 
& ASSOCIATES 

540 Frontage Road 

Northfield, 111.60093 

Phone: (312) 446-8484 

WEST: 

H. L. MITCHELL 

Western Manager 

1450 Lorain Rd. 

San Marino, Calif. 91108 

Phone: (il3) 2834394 

463-4891 




APRIL, 1970 • VOLUME 31 • NUMBER 4 
^oo^ and 0ec/t*ti^i4«^ c^ *i&o*ntnutticaii<*n 



This Month's Features 

IFPA Journal: Current Events and Activities 24 

Videotape: Where It's Been, Where It's Going 29 

Videotape Service Centers: A Burgeoning Business 31 

Filming for Feeling in Red Cross Filmmaking 32 

Lumber Dealers Find Success in Visual Selling Centers 34 

Chicago SMPTE Conference to Follow Successful '69 Format 36 



Departments 

Right Off the Newsreel: Late News Reports 6 

The Screen Executive: Personnel Notes 12 

The Audiovisual Calendar: Upcoming Events 16 

The Camera Eye: Commentary By O. H. Coelln 18 

Picture Parade: Previews of New Films 38 

New Products Review: New Tools and Equipment 40 

Industry News: Along the Film/Tape Production Line 45 

The National Directory of Audiovisual Dealers 46 

Business Screen Marketplace: Classified Advertising 46 

Reference Shelf: Helpful Books and Literature 47 

Index to Advertisers in This Issue 48 

The Last Word: Observation and Comment 48 



ABP 



A HARCOURT, BRACE & WORLD PUBLICATION 

Harbrace Publications, Inc. 



BUSINESS SCREEN is published monthly by Harbrace Publications, Inc., 402 West Uberty Drive, Wheoton, 
Illinois 60187, a subsidiary of Harcourt, Brace i World, Inc. Telephone: (312) 653-4040. Subscription 
rotes: One year, $5; two years, $8; three years, $'0, in the U.S. and Canada. Other countries: $10 
per year. Single copies: 75t in U.S. and Canada; all other countries: $2. Controlled circulation postage 
paid at Rochelle, Illinois 61068. Copyright 1970 by Harbrace Publications, Inc. Trademark registered 
with U.S. Patent Office. Address correspondence concerning circulation only to Harbrace Building, 
Duluth, Minnesota 55802. Address all other correspondence to BUSINESS SCREEN, 402 West Liberty 
Drive, Wheaton, Illinois 60187. POSTA«<ASTER: Please send Form 3579 to BUSINESS SCREEN, Harbrace 
Building, Duluth, Minnesota 55802. 



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APRIL, 1970 




BUSINESS SCREEN 




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right off the newsreel 



iiiiiiiiiiiiMMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiinMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniniiu 



NAVA Sets Media '70 
As Convention Theme 

p. Ray Swank, President of 
the National Audio-Visual Asso- 
ciation, and of Swank Motion 
Pictures, Inc., St. Louis. Missouri 
announced that "Media '70: Ed- 
ucation Through Communica- 
tion." will be the theme of the 
31st Annual National Audio- Vis- 
ual Convention and Exhibit. The 
Convention will be held at the 
Sheraton-Park Hotel, Washing- 
ton, DC. July 18-21. 1970. 

"This theme was selected be- 
cause it highlights the importance 
we believe will be attached to the 
continued growth and develop- 
ment of educational media and 
technology throughout the dec- 
ade," said Alan P. Twyman. gen- 
eral convention chairman. Twy- 
man is also First Vice-President 
and president-elect of the asso- 



ciation, and vice president of 
Twyman Films, Inc., Dayton, 
Ohio. 

The Convention and Exhibit is 
regularly attended by 1500 A-V 
dealers and dealer personnel, as 
well as A-V industry suppliers. 
The event is also expected to at- 
tract several thousand audio-vis- 
ual users from education, busi- 
ness, industry, medicine, govern- 
ment, civic groups and the religi- 
ous field to attend special meet- 
ings and for a first-hand look at 
"what's new" in modern commu- 
nications technology. 

Pre-registration fee for the 
NAVA Convention and Exhibit 
is $12.50. Special fees are appli- 
cable for those registering for the 
special meetings mentioned 
above. For further information 
about the Convention or the spe- 
cial meetings, and for hotel reser- 



vation and convention registra- 
tion forms, write to: NAVA 
Convention Registrations. Na- 
tional Audio-Visual Association, 
Inc.. 3150 Spring Street. Fairfax. 
Virginia 22030. 



Modern to Distribute 
Vacation Sample Bags 

Modern Marketing Programs 
has announced plans to distribute 
Vacation Sample Bags this sum- 
mer at leading family resorts 
from coast to coast. 

The sample bags will be given 
to each family as it checks in by 
the resort owner or manager. 
Contact with the resorts will be 
handled by 40 regional repre- 
sentatives who have been calling 
on resorts in connection with a 
summer film program operated 



by Modern Talking Picture Serv- 
ice, Inc. 

Samples of non-competing toi- 
let items, pain relievers, etc., will 
be well received by these families. 
Certain printed sales promotion 
material, such as credit card ap- 
plications and premium offers, 
can be included in the pack. Pub- 
lic relations literature dealing 
with such subjects as driving, 
swimming and boating safety will 
make excellent and valuable ad- 
ditions to the pack. 



Large New Student Film 
Festival Plans Announced 

Plans for the largest student 

film festival in history, with the 

new sponsorship of a major 

American business organization. 

Continued on page 8 




A sound-filmstrip projector 
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There are times when an audio-visual 
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be seen but not heard. 

That's why we've designed a new 
response option for the Mastermatic® 35 
mm sound-lilmstrip protector. It lets you 
pre-set program pauses for audience 
participation or question and answer ses- 
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The Mastermatic gives 
you a choice of screen 
sizes suited to the size of 
your audience: built-in 100 
sq in. rear-screen protec- 
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lenses for conventional 
large-screen projection for 
bigger audiences. 

And with our patented 
v,^ UNIPAK cartridge, 
you tailor the talk to 
your audience 
switch sound 
cartridges to alter 
the language. 



change the educational level, or first-name 
your audience. 

You can teach or tram even more ef- 
fectively with the optional Elco-Optisonics 
responder. Its control allows the student 
to record his answer on a computer-com- 
patible card and simultaneously restart 
the presentation. 

Send the coupon for details or a 
chance to cross-examine the Mastermatic 
projector. 






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Because you're proud of your work, give it the 
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We spent 
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Our engineers literally lived inside 
this system, checking out optics, 
sound fidelity, frequency response, 
light efficiency and every shaft, 
roller, plate, sprocket, mask, collar 
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engineers, this 35mm sound 
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It, built to deliver everything you 
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right off the newsreel 

continued 



the Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co. of 
Milwaukee, were announced re- 
cently. 

Schlitz is sponsoring the com- 
petition in co-operation with the 
American Fihn Institute and the 
National Student Association. 
The contest is aimed at stimulat- 
ing the creative talent of young 
filmmakers on the college cam- 
puses of the country where inter- 
est in film is mounting. 

World premiere screenings of 
prize winning films, to be held in 
New York and Los Angeles in 
September, will highlight the fes- 
tival. 

Robert A. Uihicin, Jr., board 
chairman and president of 
Schlitz, said the brewery would 
provide five cash prizes of $2,- 
5()() each. 20 prizes of $500 each, 
and two Fellowships worth $30,- 
000 each. 

Rules, regulations and entry 
forms will be sent to college film 
schools and student film makers 
in early March. Deadline for en- 
tries is May I . All entries must 
be Iftmni or 35mm with optical 
sound. 



Industrial Photo Congress 
Again at Photokina 

Continuing a series of photo 
application meetings during Pho- 
tokina 70, (Oct. 3-11), the "3rd 
International Congress on Pho- 
tography and Cinematography in 
Industry and Technology" will 
be held (Oct. 6-8) in Cologne. 

Survey lectures on various 
fields of photographic applica- 
tion will be supplemented by 
symposia and discussions on 
these subjects. 

Details of the Congress are 
available from the Congress Sec- 
retariat at DGPh, Neumarkt 49, 
D-5000, Cologne, Germany. 



RHR Filmedia Formed to 
Distribute Theatre Shorts 

Richard H. Rogers, audiovis- 
ual and film distribution execu- 
tive, has formed a new company 
in New York, RHR Filmedia, 
Inc., to distribute short subjects 
to theatres. The firm will dis- 
tribute short films made avail- 
able by industry, trade associa- 
tions, state and foreign govern- 



ments and other similar souites. 

Prior to forming RHR Fil- 
media, Inc., Rogers was presi- 
dent of Sterling General Pictures, 
a subsidiary of Sterling Commu- 
nications. Before that he was 
vice-president at Modern Talk- 
ing Picture Service where he had 
served as an account executive 
and eastern sales manager since 
1957 prior to assuming respon- 
sibility for that company's thea- 
tre division in 1965. 

Before 1957, he was employed 
by Shell Oil Company as audio- 
visual representative of the Pub- 
lic Relations Department. His 
background also includes pro- 
gramming and sales experience 
in radio and television at Robert 
Monroe Productions and Ziv 
Television Programs. 

Rogers pointed out figures 
showing that more than 5000 
theatres in the U.S. now use free 
shorts and the reasons are quite 
apparent. Hollywood is not turn- 
ing out any short subjects in 
quantity and with the death of 
the newsrecls recently, the main 
source of supply of shorts to 
round out a theatre program has 
been industry-presented films. 
These shorts have filled the gap. 

RHR Filmedia has 32 film 
exchanges to serve theatres 
throughout the U.S. 

In addition to the distribution 
of shorts, the company will be 
acting as audio-visual consultant 
for many companies and trade 
associations. 



TV, Film Production 
Center Begun in Houston 

Plans for establishing a mil- 
lion-dollar-plus television, radio, 
and film production center in 
Houston were announced last 
month by Tom Thuman, broad- 
casting executive and president 
of the new company. The Pro- 
duction Center, Inc. 

Founders of the corporation 
and directors are Thuman, pres- 
ident; Gerald Oates. vice presi- 
dent-production; William Hynes. 
vice president-finance; Robert A. 
Shepherd, Jr., general counsel. 
Leo Womack, treasurer; and H. 
Dale Henderson, public relations 
consultant. M. H. Straight, Hous- 
ton corporate advertising execu- 
Conli lined on page 1 



I- 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




This 4-inch attache case 
opens to a movie theater. 




This elegant attache case is the most compact projector 
in the world. The Bohn Benton Institor is the first truly port- 
able, rear screen, Super 8 sound movie projector. It's auto- 
matic. It's set up and running in less than 20 seconds. And, 
it's cartridge loaded to eliminate film threading. Films can 
be changed in 2 seconds. 

It's also a front screen projector. On the spot, you can con- 
vert to project an auditorium-size, 6 foot wide picture. Zoom 
lens and external speakers are available for group viewing. 
The Bohn Benton Institor lets your films sell for you every 
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The newest recruit can give a professional presentation on 



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of every prospect. It's easy to give an Institor to 
every salesman because its price is as extraordinary as its 
size — S300, far less than the cost of other first-quality rear 
screen projectors without Institor's advantages. 
For more Information, or an Institor demonstration, write 
Bohn Benton Inc, Dept. A, 110 Roosevelt Avenue, IVIineola, 
New York 11501; or call (516) 747-8585. 

^^> Bohn Benton 



APRIL, 1970 



right off the newsreel . . . 

continued 



tive, has been elected a director. 
PCI will start construction of 
a major studio facility with all 
new TV and recording equip- 
ment. Pending completion of the 
building and installation of some 
$600,000 worth of equipment. 
PCI will engage in the produc- 
tion of films for industry, educa- 
tion, training, and television com- 
mercials. 



AIA Festival Slated in 
Montreal, June 15 

The Association of Industrial 
Advertisers reports that its 4th 
annual Industrial Film Festival 
will be held in Montreal, Canada, 
from June 14 to 17. 

A showcase for North Ameri- 
can film productions produced 
for industry and business, the 
Festival is accepting submissions 
until April 15th, 1970. Awards 
will be presented to winning en- 
tries on June 15th at the A.l.A. 
48th Annual Conference in Mon- 
treal. To be eligible, films must 
have been produced after Janu- 
ary 1, 1969. 

This is the first time the Festi- 



val has been held in Canada. 
Montreal is one of the largest 
film production centers in North 
America due mainly to the high 
volume of French language films 
produced there. 

Entry forms may be obtained 
by writing to A. G. Temple, Pres- 
ident, Industrial Advertising 
Agency Ltd.. 1500 Stanley 
Street, Montreal, Canada, or to 
AIA at 41 E. 42 Street. New 
York City. N. Y. 10017. 



Conservation Film Wins 
Special Florida Award 

Alligator!!, which tells the 
story of the danger of extinction 
now faced by the famed Florida 
reptile, was presented with a 
Golden Sun Special Award by 
the Florida Council of 100 at an 
awards dinner sponsored by the 
Florida Motion Picture and Tele- 
vision Producers Association. 

The conservation film was pro- 
duced for the Central and South- 
ern Florida Flood Control Dis- 
trict by Goodway Films of Fort 
Lauderdale. 



Title House Acquires 
Richard Label Printing 

Hollywood's Title House has 
acquired the label printing and 
die-cutting business of Richard 
Manufacturing Co. 

Title House will now provide 
the labels for Richard's Poly- 
Con filmstrip containers, as well 
as printed labels for tape cas- 
settes that accompany filmstrips. 

Under the new arrangement, 
Richard will continue to apply 
the printed labels on their cus- 
tomers' Poly-Cons, though Title 
House will do the printing and 
cutting. 

Because of the close working 
arrangement, customers may 
place orders for the containers 
and labels with either of the 
firms. Brunson Motley, president 
of Richard Manufacturing, said 
that no procedural change in 
service is expected and that the 
firms will continue to supply 
printing of as few as 100 labels 
in one week or less. 



Southern Film Labs in 
New Atlanta Quarters 

Southern Film Lab, Inc., 
Atlanta, Georgia, has moved 
to facilities at 2381 John Glenn 
Drive, Suite 105, Chamblee, 
Georgia. 

New services there consist of 



color inter negatives, positive pro- 
cessing and printing. The staff 
has also been increased to meet 
Southern's growing demands for 
quality and service. 



VPI Announces Advances 
In Filmstrip Services 

What is reported to be the only 
filmstrip service in the east utiliz- 
ing a control system of electronic 
timing for filmstrip negatives has 
been announced by VPI Color 
Center, New York. 

Bernie Barnett, president of 
the industrial film post produc- 
tion house, also announced other 
innovations which mark advances 
in original master negative pho- 
tography, answer prints and .e- 
lease print services. 



F&B Ceco Opens Branch in 
Washington, D.C. 

F&B Ceco Industries opened a 
Washington, D.C. branch last 
month at 2215 M St., N.W., to 
lease and service the entire range 
of professional motion picture 
equipment. 

The new branch is headed by 
John Bennewitz, regional direc- 
tor of marketing. • 



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Denver 398-4535 


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Detroit 963-9770 


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10 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




Tracy Ward filmed it that way 

... a motion picture in. which the intangible world 
of anesthesiology is made dramatically real for the lay public 

and the medical profession. Ask to see this film. 



^i 



A group of creative film-makers who 
give any film compelling force 



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Nathan is Time-Life Films 
Dir. of Sales & Marketing 

Wynn Nathan, formerly vice 
president of Metromedia Pro- 
gram Sales, has been named di- 
rector of sales and marketing for 
Time-Life films. 

Nathan heads all film sales to 
network, educational and cable 
television markets, syndication 
and international markets. 



P 

NATHAN 




HAVLICEK 



Havlicek Named Manager 
Of New Division of Motorola 

Frank J. Havlicek. formerly 
senior vice president and region- 
al manager of Sterling Movies. 
Inc., has been appointed man- 
ager of program material for Ed- 
ucation and Training Products, a 
newly created unit of Motorola 
Systems Inc., Chicago. 

Havlicek joined Motorola to 
manage its film acquisition and 
distribution in the electronic vid- 
eo recording (EVR) format. 

Berkey-ColorTran Names 
Rimmer Sales Manager 

Marion Rimmer has been 
named national sales manager for 
the California based division of 
Berkey-ColorTran, which mar- 
kets a complete line of profes- 
sional lighting equipment for mo- 
tion picture, television and still 
photographic industries. 

Rimmer will be responsible for 
sales/marketing, making his 
headquarters in Burbank, Calif. 

Two Promotions Made at 
North Shore Lab, Inc. 

North Shore Motion Picture 
Lab, a subsidiary of Cinelab 
Corp.. New York, has named 



Noel Pruess president. The for- 
mer vice president of the cor- 
poration, Pruess will act as chief 
executive officer. 

Also promoted at North Shore 
Lab was Paul R. Markun to vice 
president, responsible for all in- 
ternal lab operations. 



Ware Joins Superscope as 
General Sales Manager 

Richard O. Ware has joined 
Superscope. Inc. as general man- 
ager of its recorded tape divi- 
sion. 

Ware will be in charge of sales 
and new business contacts with 
major record companies who are 
potential customers for Super- 
scope's custom tape duplicating 
service. 



Burns to Head New VTR 
Expansion at F & B/Ceco 

F & B/Ceco, Inc., New York 
City, has opened a full scale 
VTR department which encom- 
passes products of major VTR 
manufacturers, rentals, sales, 
equipment service and plans for 
a VTR studio. 

The new department is headed 
by Edward Burns, who has spe- 
cialized in all aspects of the au- 
diovisual field since 1952. Burns 
designed and installed one of the 
first optical/magnetic 35mm pro- 
jectors, edited 16mm and 35mm 
films and sound tracks, photo- 
graphed mini-movies and pro- 
duced all types of audiovisuals 
from TV commercials to docu- 
mentaries. 



Satin to Head VPI Div. of 
Electrographic Corporation 

Sheldon Satin has been elected 
chief executive officer of the 
VPI Division of Electrographic 
Corp. (American Stock Ex- 
change). 

Satin replaces George Tomp- 



kins, who will continue his af- 
filiation with Electrographic as a 
consultant with specific assign- 
ments in the A-V area of opera- 
tion. 



General Cassette Corp. 
Names Johnson President 

Bill L. Johnson has been ap- 
pointed president of the newly 
formed custom duplicator. Gen- 
eral Cassette Corporation, lo- 
cated in Phoenix. Arizona. 

Johnson spent eleven years of 
service with Ampex Corporation 
prior to this appointment. 

Graflex Names Gallagher 
VP and General Manager 

Robert A. Gallagher has been 
named vice president and gen- 
eral manager of Graflex Division 
of The Singer Company. 

Gallagher comes to Graflex 
from Corporate Headquarters at 
S'nger where he has been vice 
president of planning and admin- 
istration for the Education and 
Training Products Group. 



Bishop Named to Succeed 
Rothenberger at Kodak 

Martin J. Rothenberger. man- 
ager of Eastman Kodak's Holly- 
wood processing laboratory, has 
retired after 47 years of service. 

R. W. Bishop has been named 
to replace Rothenberger in the 
managers' position. 

Bishop has been with Kodak 
since 1946. 



Universal Education Names 
Wulf General Sales Manager 

Universal Education and Vis- 
ual Arts recently promoted Phil- 
lip Wulf to company general 
sales manager. Wulf had former- 
ly served as marketing director of 
educational sales. 

Wulf will be responsible for 
the continued growth and profit- 



able sales performance of the 
company's 16mm non-theatrical 
film division. 



Zworykin Award Goes to 
Coleman of Ampex Corp. 

Charles H. Coleman, senior 
staff engineer for the video en- 
gineering department of Ampex 
Corporation video products divi- 
sion, has been named to receive 
the 1970 Vladimir K. Zwarykin 
Television Prize Award for his 
technical achievements in the 
field of broadcast videotape re- 
cording. 

The Zworykin award is pre- 
sented annually by the Institute 
of Electrical and Electronics En- 
gineers (IEEE). 



I 





COLEMAN 



BENNEWIT2 



Bennewitz to Represent 
F & B/Ceco in Washington 

F & B/Ceco Industries, Inc. 
has opened a branch office in 
Washington, D.C., under the di- 
rection of John Bennewitz, re- 
gional director of marketing. 

The opening of the Washing- 
ton office under Bennewitz' di- 
rection, is another step in F & B 
Ceco's program to bring local 
service to important clients. The 
office, located at 2215 M Street, 
N.W., Washington. D.C. 20037 
will sell, lease and service the 
entire range of professional mo- 
tion picture equipment. 



U.S. Air Force Names Nash 
Information Staff Officer 

William J. Nash, former head 
of the Presentation Div., Naval 
Ship Missile Systems Engineering 
Station at Port Hueneme. has 
been selected by headquarters, 



12 



BUSINESS SCREEN' 



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APRIL, 1970 



13 







^ at DU ARl 
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DU ART FILM LABS 

DU ART BLDG., 245 WEST 55 STREET 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 10019 (212) PL 7-4580 

74 BUSINESS SCREEN 



screen executive . . . 

(ontinued 



Western Air Force Reserve Re- 
gion as information staff officer, 
Nash is a member of the 
American Association of Univer- 
sity Professors, American News- 
paper Guild. Society of Techni- 
cal Writers and Publishers, Pro- 
fessional Photographers of Amer- 
ica. Greater l.os Angeles Press 
Club, the San Francisco Press 
Club, and is a former vice presi- 
dent of the Information Film 
Producers of America. 



Novo Names Two Execs to 
Education-Communications 

Ira S. Stevens has been named 
vice president of the education/ 
communications group of Novo 
Corporation. Stevens, also presi- 
dent of Bonded Services, a Novo 
Subsidiary, will direct Novo's 
"expanding effort in the educa- 
tion/communications field." 

At the same time, Frederick 
L. Hyman was appointed vice 
president of marketing for the 
education communications group. 
Hyman is president of Americom, 
another subsidiary. 



Association Films, Inc. 
Names Four in Changes 

Jean C. Marotta has been 
named controller at Association 
Films, Inc. Miss Marotta's re- 
sponsibilities will include super- 
vising all financial functions of 
the company. 

E. H. Johnson has been ap- 
pointed operations manager at 
Association Instructional Mate- 
rials division. Johnson has been 
with the company since 1955. 



Four Execs Promoted at 
Teletronics Int'l Inc. 

Charles Manno. former vice 
president and general manager at 
VPI. has been named vice presi- 
dent of Teletronics International 
Inc. 

Alfred Markim has been elect- 
ed executive vice president of 
Teletronics. Markim was former- 
ly president and general manager 
of Recording Studios, Inc.. and 
vice president of the Landau- 
Unger Company. 

Also appointed at Teletronics 
was Gerry Cantwell, now post 
production sales manager. Cant- 



well will manage the sales of 
the entire range of post pro- 
duction services. 

Elected to the office of trea- 
surer at Teletronics is William 
Follett. 



Around the Industry 

Recent promotions at Ampex 
Corporation include: John T. 
CiilUin to product news manager 
in the public relations depart- 
ment; Edward G. Dietrich, na- 
tional accounts and programs 
manager for the educational and 
industrial products division . . . 
Robert L. Acton has been ap- 
pointed field manager, photo- 
graphic products, of the New 
York City area of Graflex Divi- 
sion of Singer Corp. . . . Hanna- 
Barbera Productions has named 
Ray Thurshy production man- 
aszer of the industrial, commer- 
cial, and educational film divi- 
sions . . . Communico has ap- 
pointed John F. Schultz account 
executive . . . Donald G. Schu- 
macher has joined Modem Talk- 
ing Picture Service. Inc. as ac- 
count executive in the company's 
Chicago office . . . Evan Medow 
has been added to the staff of 
FilmFair as general counsel . . . 
Paul Pruess is the new director 
of development for Seattle's King 
Screen Productions and Tom 
Kirkman has joined the same 
firm as production manager . . . 
National Color Labs has named 
three executives to promotions: 
Hugh W. Tribhle is vice presi- 
dent marketing; C. J. Schuster is 
vice president, production; and 
Leonard Slopick is assistant 
treasurer . . . John O'Leary has 
joined Reeves Production Serv- 
ices as a sales executive . . . Au- 
dio Devices, Inc. has named 
John M. Ricci group product 
manager . . . Frank J. Kearney 
has joined Prism Enterprises as 
head of national sales . . . The 
Walter G. O'Connor Company 
has added McMillan Johnson to 
their staff of motion picture and 
live industrial show division . . . 
Edward Reihle is account execu- 
tive at Goessl & Associates . . . 
Universal Training Systems Co. 
has appointed Marvin Farwell 
director of marketing . . . and 
Omega Productions has added 
Jon Stoll to its staff as sound 
director. 



■# 



m 



' *;.-- 



SOMETHING WONDERFUL 

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WITH DYNAMIC DISSOLVE 

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never before available for slide presentations. This new 
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projectors, is so revolutionary you will have to see it to 
appreciate it. And now you can: Write today for complete 
information and the name of the Dynamic Dissolve dealer 
scheduling demonstrations in your area. 



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APRIL, 1970 



15 



SCALPEL! 

SUTURE! 

SCOTCH TAPE! 

SENSITOMETRY! 

CHEMICAL CONTROL! 

COLOR RENDITION! 




AT CFI, WE TREAT FILMSTRIPS LIKE MAJOR SURGERY. Any good surgeon 
demands the best back-up staff he can get and the vast facilities of the 
modern hospital complex. At CFI, we do for filmstrips what the hospital staff 
and equipment do for the surgeon. Our labs are staffed by trained techni- 
cians backed up by the most precise laboratory equipment. Sensiton^etric 
control insures proper color correction and exposure balance; Chemical 
control gives consistent color balance and density; Accurate color rendition 
and minimum contrast gain is assured by special lighting equipment. At 
CFI, our experts take the worry out of the operation. Delivery problems? In 
our business, one week is normal for a complete filmstrip, but on tighter 
deadlines, we'll work with you to meet your schedule. Emergency? Like 
need a special piece of artwork? Our art department will design and com- 
plete original frames with just the right touch. Or we'll photograph your flat 
art up to 24" x 32" (32 field). Worried about getting the message across? 
We set type on cells for superimposure or give you special handlettering. 
3-dimensional packages? We can shoot them against a colorful background 
right into your filmstrip. Different size transparencies? We shoot directly 
from 35mm through 8x 10 with no intermediate reduction step to cause 
loss of detail or color. And at CFI, no matter how delicate the problem, our 
unique continuous-loop printing equipment assures you absolutely uniform 
filmstrip prints from scratch-free negatives. Our experts are ready to solve 
your problems right now in our labs. Hopeless case? Call Lou Livingston at 
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THE A-V 
CALENDAR 



APRIL 

Fifth Midwest Regional Meeting of the 
Biological Photographic Association, 
April 24-26, Knickerbocker Hotel, Chi- 
cago. 

Society of Motion Picture and Television 
Engineers, 1 07th Technical Conference 
and Equipment E.xhibit, April 26-May 1, 
Drake Hotel, Chicago. 

Department of Audiovisual Instruction, Na- 
tional Convention and Exhibit, April 27- 
.\Iay 1, Sheraton Cadillac Hotel, Detroit. 



U. S. Industrial Film Festival, Awards Pre- 
sentation, April 30, Palmer House Hotel, 
Chicago. 



MAY 

Film Seminar of the Northwest, May 8-9. 
Seattle, Washington. 

American Society for Training and Devel- 
opment, National Conference, May 10- 
15, Anaheim Convention Center, Ana- 
heim, Calif. 

.American Film Festival, Blue Ribbon 
Awards and film screenings. May 12-16, 
New York. 



Illuminating Engineering Society, 6th The 

atre. Television and Film Lighting Sym 
posium. May 24-26, Holly wood-Roosi 
velt Hotel, Hollywood. 



JUNE 

AI.\ Industrial Film Fcsti\al, June 14-1' 
Montreal, C^anada. 



JULY 

National Audio-Visual Association Annual 
Convention, July 18-21, Sheraton-Park 
Hotel, ^^'ashington, D.C. 



AUGUST 

International Convention of tlie Photo- 
graphic Society of America, August 18- 
22, Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 



Animation Workshop, August 24-Sept. 4, 
Ohio State Universitx- campus, sponsored 
b\' the University Film Association and 
Ohio State Universitv. 



16 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



^<ji}iitfyv 




COMMUNICATORS 
OF IDEAS 




'm 




iLi;--?"'';-: 



^■'■vli'jLgl^j,, 



EMOTIONAL INVOLVEMENT 



IS CENTRAL TO FULL COMMUNICATION 



The communicator commands an infinite 
variety of techniques which allow him ^ 
to enter the privacy of the mind through 
an interplay of emotions. 



31 WEST 53RD STREET- NEW YORK. N.Y. 10019 
PLAZA 7-0651 



Communicating ideas on film and a fuU range of programmed audio-visual media 



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THE INNOVATORS IN 
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So high in intensity it does 
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better and easier than ever 
before. Want to know 
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12164 Sherman Way 

North Hollywood, California 91605 

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315 W, 43rd St., New York. N Y, 10036 
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/fi-^i 




the 
camera eye 

By 0. H. Coelln 

I Illlllllllllll Mill Illlllllll I Illlllllillllllllllllllllilllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



The "Vision" and the "Practical" As 
They Affect the Filmmaker's Economy 

IN THIS TIME when we have been liber- 
ated from everyday "crises"' of publica- 
tion detail, the "Eye" finds it refreshing and 
rewarding to behold our communications' 
world with a somewhat wider field of vision, 
yet brought into fairly sharp focus by our 
sense of practicality. The "vision" of one 
idea brought a first sizeable delegation of 
U.S. industrial a-v executives to Europe last 
fall; the "practical" came through sharing 
with their corporate managements the seri- 
ousness with which other leading industrial 
nations regard the industrial film and in 
these delegates achieving better understand- 
ing of the Europe in which U.S. business is 
so vitally concerned. 

The "vision" of the United Nations" need 
for greater involvement in sight/ sound me- 
dia that will help keep the publics of all 
member countries aware and informed grows 
more practical as the UN now begins to 
take up the challenge following our recent 
consultations. The "practical" will happen 
when the increased flow of film between 
these lands brings new inter-world under- 
standing essential to real peace. 

But the over-riding sense of the practical 
and our more frequent travels across these 
United States returns us to one pervading, 
persistent and recurring challenge: 

"What can our creative and production 
leaders, i.e. writers, directors, film producers 
of the United States do to improve their ec- 
onomic well-beini; now and in the months 
to come?" 

For it is the creative and technical re- 
sources of these professionals in a-v commu- 
nication, as individuals and as companies, 
large and small, which are responsilile for 
the hulk of informational and industrial mo- 
tion pictures requirint; the t^realest number 
of 35, 16 aiul Hmm prints currently sho»iiii> 
across the land. 

Yet their "group"" efforts are negligible, 
most often defensive as producers react to 
escalating union rates. What really are some 
of the other "common concerns" through 
which ori^anized effort would encourage in- 
creasing sponsorship of worthwhile films'' 
What we"re talking about is our production 
industry's need for a program of R&D, re- 
search and development, followed by an ac- 
tive nationwide program of public relations. 
\\ hat we"re talking about is group-sell of the 



medium as well as group consideration of 
stupid deterrents to real economic progress. 

Consider the enormous build-up of chan- 
nels of sight/ sound distribution: commercial 
television, resurgent cinema theater con- 
struction, new programming needs of cable 
t.v., educational t.v. and the tremendous re- 
source of group-owned 16mm sound pro- 
jectors. Super-8 sound adds still another 
dimension. Satellites, both for overseas and 
oncoming for domestic a-v transmission, 
facilitate broader viewing as they emphasize 
the urgency of interest-holding content. 

Match these phy.tical resources to the na- 
tion's social and economic problems, ask 
how many viewing hours are helping us to 
motivate young people to career opportuni- 
ties, answering their questions about conser- 
vation, pollution, population growth, ad in- 
finitum. 

Consider some other influence groups 
which represent enormous a-v buyer poten- 
tial, such as: 

Corporate management consultants are 
influencing client decisions on the high-level 
base required for communications" budget- 
ing. How many films are key men at Booz- 
Allen & Hamilton, McKinsey & Company, 
Arthur D. Little or Rand Corporation seeing 
these days? What are we doing to .show 
tliem examples of the best product? Listen 
to Philip W. Shay, executive director of that 
group's Association of Consulting Manage- 
ment Engineers: 

"/ think the direction of future i^rowth 
will be away from basic industries that proc- 
ess primary products toward the services sec- 
tor and especially the section concentrated 
on education, government, and non-profit 
institutions, as well as major social and ur- 
ban problems and emerging industries, in 

the no's." 

Somebody out there is talking our lan- 
guage even if we, as an industry of commu- 
nicators, aren't communicating our interest 
and our latent abilities to help translate ele- 
ments of the future outlook. 

How many account executives in leading 
financial public relations firms have seen 
the best of factual films in recent months? 

Oh, you'll run into a man from Hill & 
Knowlton at a preview for one of their cli- 
ent's pictures, now and then. 

But what are we doing to share and show- 
case ideas-on-film, wherever created, to 
other executives at H&K and the hundred or 
Continued on page 20 



18 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



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APRIL, 1970 



19 



Da-Lite® Electrolef picked to screen TV spots! 




projection 
screens 




When Reacti-McClinton expanded and 
remodeled their conference room, 
the Chicago advertising agency in- 
cluded Da-Lite's 50" x 50" Automatic 
Electrolet for the finest, remote- 
control viewing of TV commercials. 
Da-Llte offers a full line of four 
electrically operated screens, all de- 
signed for easy installation, con- 
cealed or flush-mounted on ceilings 



or walls. Sizes from 50" through 20' 
square available. 

Write Dept. B.S. for full informa- 
tion and the name of a Da-Lite Audio- 
Visual specialist near you. 

Da-Llte Screen Co., Inc. • Warsaw, Indiana 46580 



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camera eye 



H. WILSON CORPORATION • 555 West Taft Drive 

SOUTH HOLLAND, ILLINOIS 60473 



continued 



more other p.r. firms who need to counsel 
clients to think and act on sight/ sound? 

Producer cooperation could lay the 
groundwork for activities no single com- 
pany can undertake. It could survey the ne- 
glected areas of equipment standards; festi- 
val participation, news and feature prepara- 
tion on industrywide subjects. Its reputation 
for statistical dependability would be en- 
hanced by building on the groundwork for 
audiovisual survey done by Eastman Ko- 
dak's market analyst; Tom Hope. 

So this idea persists as another '■moun- 
tain" to climb for us and for the industry. 
Traveling out Southwest, East and through 
the Midwest, we've been encouraged by pro- 
ducer interest. From somewhere, somehow, 
these sparks may yet ignite the flame of 
real inter-action. 



A-V Equipment: Deductible, Useful 

A current Polaroid ad reminds us of an 
important truism about acquiring sight/ 
sound equipment. Titled "if you use it for 
business, it's a business expense" the ad re- 
fers to the deductibility of projector, cam- 
era and other gear under IRS regulations. 

And you can help your community, your 
lodge, your club, your PTA, and your busi- 
ness by sharing that equipment in a time 
when improving communications among all 
kinds of groups, both young and old, is im- 
portant. Thousands of available film titles 
await that kind of sharing. 



Secular Tribute to "Why Man 
Creates" in Kaiser Comments 

There's been a lot of comment about 
Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corpora- 
tion's Why Man Creoles. We liked the com- 
ments in Spectrum, a religious journal 
which calls this 25-minute, widely-honored 
film "an imaginative and delightful offer- 
ing." 

When the editors asked Kaiser why they 
undertook sponsorship of a film that seemed 
to have no immediate relation to any of 
their large and diversified business/indus- 
trial interests, company representatives re- 
plied that they were interested in stimulat- 
ing creativity in an age of ever-quickening 
change and said, 

"If the film motivates anybody to take 
a creative approach in seeking answers to 
new problems, then Kaiser Aluminum feels 
its efforts in making the film have been 
rewarded." 

And Spectrum concludes "the reward 

Kaiser Aluminum is seeking is an intanaible 

one but if the numbers of people who have 

loved it since it first came out are anv in- 

CofUiniied on page 22 



20 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




The moment we cease to hold each other, 



the moment we break faith with one another, 



the sea engulfs us and the light goes out. 



James Baldwin 



Vision Associates, Inc., 680 Fiftli Avenue, New York City 




APRIL, 1970 



21 



camera eye 




for 

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continued 



dication, we cannot but wonder if they have 
not succeeded. 

We'll trade that comment for any one 
of those trophies. 



Multi-Screen Film of Japanese Life 
Saves Day at Country's Expo Pavilion 

The somehow inadequate Japanese Pa- 
vilion at Canada's great "Expo" in Mon- 
treal wasn't helped by the absence of the 
truly fine films producers in that land are so 
capable of making. 

And first reports on Japan's Expo 70 at 
Osaka indicate that country's own pavilion. 
the largest on the grounds, is disappointing 
visitors v\ith its gimmickry, flashing lights 
and over-loudspeakers. This time, however, 
its a very good multi-screen motion picture 
that is saving the day as visitors see the 
ii'ol Japan at the very end of their pavilion 
loLirs. 

Correspondent Mark Gayn of the Daily 
News Foreign Service describes this film: 
"Shown on eight huge and linked screens at 
once, it has what the rest of the Japanese 
exhibit lacks — a sense of humor and com- 
passion — the woman wiping a tear at her 
son's graduation from a primary school, a 
child weeping when her home is swept away 
in a landslide, workers welding a tanker, 
sightseers by the thousands, and. always 
present in Japanese life. Mount Fuji, majes- 
tic and terrifying." 

While we're awaiting Jim Damon's on- 
the-scene report following the Expo 70 pre- 
miere of IBM World Trade's fascinating 
film (produced by the Hubley's), there will 
be an abundance of other reports from other 
correspondents in Japan, due for these 
pages in months-to-conie. 



Illinois Bell's Five Million Viewers 

The annual report of the Illinois Bell 
Telephone Company, circa 1970, has a 
good page devoted to "'VVe grow through 
involvement" ( see previous paragraph ) . 
After mentioning Illinois Bell's sponsor- 
ship of a useful new television series that 
is helping the large Chicago area Spanish- 
speaking community, page 1 2 also discloses 
that Illinois Bell provided educational films 
and talk-demonstrations viewed by more 
iluiii five inillion persons last year. 

The corporate annual report is a good 
place to share background on the company's 
film program, especially if the kinds of films 
arc out there doing a job to improve cus- 
tomer relations, advancing education through 
useful information and the like. — OHC 



WORLD 



ItlilSI' 



^i' 



UREAND 



Wm 



Vi" Tape Synchronous Sound Recorder 



9 




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serves your salesmen's best interests 
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22 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



Dean Martin 
Jacqueline Bisset 
Lloyd Nolan 
Maureen Stapleton 
Dana Wynter 
Barry Nelson 
George Seaton 
Ross Hunter 
Barbara Hale 
George Kennedy 
Helen Hayes 
Van Heflin 
Jean Seberg 
Burt Lancaster 

Starring in 
Universal's 
"AIRPORT" 



Meet your new 

PR film 
distribution team. 



Your team now includes the all-star cast of Universal's major new release. 
"Airport," based on 1969"s best-seller novel of the year. Often accom- 
panied by a suitable PR film to help round out the bill, "Airport" has 
already been booked into the leading first-run houses in the country, 
where it will draw big. big crowds in market after market. 

And that's our point; theatrical distribution is generating huge and meas- 
urable audiences for PR films — whether the main feature is a revival of a 
W. C. Fields classic ... a musical spectacular such as Sweet Charity ... as 
contemporary as Elvis Presley's Change of Habit . . .or a historical "block- 
buster" such as Anne oj the Thousand Days. 

Today, theatrical distribution can put your PR message before more 
people at lower costs than some of the biggest national magazines! .And 
we'd be delighted to prove that statement to you. Just ask us. 

In fact, ask us about all of today's PR film distribution channels. As part 
of the MCA-Universal family, we're con- 
stantly involved with most of the entertain- 
ment media, which means we're in a great 
position to custom-tailor just the right dis- 
tribution plan for your film. Call us. You'll 
find it really does pay to talk with the man 
from United World. 



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SERVICES 

212-777-6600 



An aclivily of Universal EJuoalion and Visual Arts, a division of Universal City Studios. Inc. / ;: 1 Park Ave. South. Vew ^ ork. N.V. 1000? • Cable: UNEDVIS.A. N > 



APRIL, 1970 



23 



as film 

gets 

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bigger 



We've added 8mm services 
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which we're best known. 
Now we're ready for any little 
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super 8 

standard 

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color 

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titles 

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All of it. Right down 
the line. In one line. 
Under one roof. 
Call Bernle Barnett 
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410 East 62nd Street, 
New York, N.Y. 10021 



I F PA JOURNAL 



INFORMATION FILM PRODUCERS OF AMERICA, INC. 



P.O. Box 1470, Hollywood, California 90028 



What Is IFPA? 

Editor's Note: hi response to a iniinbcr 
of inquiries about IFPA ami its activities, 
we are piiblishin'j the following statement 
of purpose and explanation of organization 
goals. 

IFPA — The Information Film Pro- 
ducers of America. Inc.. is a non-profit 
corporation. It is the society of non-the- 
atrical film makers who seek through pro- 
fessional growth, educational programs, and 
free exchange of ideas, better and more 
effective communication skills. Aside from 
being a set of initials IFPA is the connect- 
ing link between the creative and the tech- 
nical men and women of the A-V industry 
— the only link. It is the very core of the 
industrial apple-born of mutual need, nur- 
tured by the swelling river of progress, and 
headed toward a goal of infinity. 

IFPA is and should be everybody active- 
ly engaged in the growing field of audio- 
visual communication. IFPA people are: 
creative people, management people, tech- 
nical people, people who work in Govern- 
ment industry, education, technical, promo- 
tional and enrichment fields — anywhere 
that audio-visuals are concerned with dis- 
seminating information to the public, as 
well as to the fields of research. 

We promote recognition, unity and 
status for our profession, and provide op- 
portunity for fellowship between our peo- 
ple of like interests. 

We recognize and make awards to mem- 
bers and non-members, alike, for outstand- 
ing films produced and contributions to the 
state of the art. 

We provide a forum for universal, na- 
tional and local issues and our responsibil- 
ity to report honesdy and objectivciv to 
the nation and to the world. 

We recognize our responsibility to the 
future of our profession and provide schol- 
arships and apprenticeship to deserving ex- 
perimentors and students of the filmic arts. 

OUR PEOPLE PRODUCE: Technical 
films, educational films — teaching and train- 
ing TV commercials and programs (Travel- 
sports-documentaries) industrial films — 
public and industrial relations commercial 
products marketing and sales proposals and 
reports — documentary "tell it like it is 
or was'", medical films, scientific studies 
and data acquisition and recovery, plus 
photo-optical instrumentation and engineers. 



and football coaching films, military and 
governmental training films, special film 
projects, motivational, moral and public in- 
formation, religious and inspirational films 
etc. 

Films that: inform, motivate, inspire, 
teach, sell, document and report — this is 
IFPA"s people. 

WHY IFPA? IFPA exists because we, 
the people of the audio-visual industry, need 
such an organization to help us keep in 
touc^h with one another and the ever chang- 
ing state of the art. Our internal publica- 
tion, THE NEWSLETTER — our official 
publication, BUSINESS SCREEN, our year- 
ly conferences, our annual international 
film competition, our monthly chapter 
meetings in Los Angeles. San Diego, San 
Francisco. Seattle, Washington. D.C., Chi- 
cago, San Bernardino and Dallas, our year- 
ly symposiums — all these items assist on 
the task of making IFPA members the best 
informed people in the A-V industry. 

IFPA was formed in 1957. Its annual 
conference, at which awards are presented 
(The CINDY) to honor creativity and 
technical excellence of non-theatrical films, 
is held annually in the fall. In 1968 we had 
approximately 250 members — today we 
have over 600. In 1968 we had three chap- 
ters — today we have eight and another 
four in various stages of formation. Our 
goal for the new year is 1000 members and 
15 chapters. 

Yon may be an active member if you 
are professionally engaged in any branch 
of audio-visual communications. 



Midwest Chapter Chartered 

In a unique use of its own medium, the 
Midwest Chapter of the Information Film 
Producers of America (IFPA) was char- 
tered at a meeting at the Chicago Press Club 
February 25. 

National President, Robert Montague 
presented the charter via a film he made for 
the occasion when it was learned he could 
not attend the chartering ceremonies in per- 
son. On hand to physically present the char- 
ter to Chapter Chairman Al LeVine of 
Sportlite Films was Art Rescher, Eastern 
membership vice president. 

On hand at the charter meeting were 
Continued on page 26 



24 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



It's the Canon Scoopic 16. It's also the end of a 
load o( moviemaking grief. Here's why. 

World's first #1: It's the first 16mm movie camera 
with a built-in zoom lens (5.85:1 zoom ratio). 

World's first #2: It's the first 16mm movie camera 
with a fully automatic exposure system, plus 
manual override. 

Shoot everything, goof nothing. You'll get close-ups, 
medium and long shots, zooms, telephotos, wide 
angles, indoors or out— with no muddled exposures. 
Because your exposure's right automatically. 

You don't miss great moments while fiddling with 
the camera. No switching lenses. No rotating 
turrets. No special lenses to lug around. One hand 



holds the Scoopic 16 easily. Your other hand's 
free to focus and zoom, simply by turning 
the master lens. 

Handiest hand camera yet. With its no-slip handgrip 
and handstrap, the Scoopic 16 is braced and 
balanced to give you jitter-free shots. Automatic 
loading. 16, 24, 32 or 48 fps. Runs on a recharge- 
able inner battery (8 rolls per charge). Forget 
about battery packs. 

Only $1250 buys the Scoopic 16, 13-76mm F1.6 
zoom lens, 12V battery, recharger, lens hood, lens 
cap, 3 filters and metal case. No extra charges. 

If you prefer to shoot what you like— and like what 
you shoot— mail the coupon for more facts. 



The one-hand movie oamera with two 
world's firsts. 




Mail to: Canon USA, Inc.. Dept. BU-1 64-10 Queens 
Blvd., Woodside, N.Y. 11377. 

Send me all the facts about the one-hand Canon 
Scoopic 16mm movie camera. No obligation. 



Title or Occupation 

Company 

Address 

City State. 



.Zip. 



Canon 

SCOOPIC 16 



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APRIL, 1970 



25 



Camera Mart 
Introduces the 
portable phone booth. 

Now, the man on the go can 
have instant communication 
with virtually any telephone in 
the country with the Melabs 
phone — a portable electronic 
telephone built into a hand- 
some leather case. It goes any- 
where you go and at the 
touch of a button you can place 
or receive calls anywhere . . . 
in a taxi, in an elevator, or even 
on a park bench. 

Features: Solid-State • 11 
Channels • Rechargeable 
Battery • Lightweight 

For Rent, Long-Term Lease or Sale. 

y\ TheCamera Martmc. 

^1 j 456 W. 55th St.. (Bet. 9th A lOth Aves.} New York. N. Y. 10019 
■■° / Phone: (212) 757-6977 






Snap-in Cassette 

sound and DuKane's Super 

MicromatJc works automatically 



IFPA Journal . 

continued 



imo 




AUDIO-VISUAL DIVISION 
Dept. BS-40 — St. Charles, III. 60174 



VvWV 


1 



Celebrating the official charter are (left to right): 
Al LeVine. chapter chairman; Lon B. Gregory, 
publicity chairman; Court and Chilton, secretary 
treasurer; John Lord, sustaining member; and 
Art Rescher, Eastern membership vies president. 



members Courtland Chilton, Jeanette Marsh. 
Lon B. Gregory. Jack Lusk. John Lord and 
Al LeVine. New members present included 
Murray Pattinson. Chris Iseiey. Bob Hicks. 
Cary Brown and Ron Ascher. 

The formation of the Midwest Chapter 
promises to be a dvnamic new addition to 
IFPA. 

Officers in the Midwest Chapter include: 
.•\1 LeVine, chapter chairman; Courtland 
Chilton, secretary/ treasurer; John Daven- 
port, program chairman; and Lon B. Greg- 
ory, publicity chairman. 



IFPA President, Robert Montague 
Shows "Dynamic" Background 

As if the name of the company he works 
for had an effect on his activities, new 
IFPA President Robert Montague assumed 
his new post in the same fashion as he ful- 
filled every previous IFPA post he held . . . 
as well as his responsibilities for his employ- 
er. General DynaDucs. Convair Division. 

Montague, who is chief of motion pictures 
and television for GD"s Convair division, 
also boasts another credential equally hard 
to find ... he is a native Californian. 

His election marked the first time in a 
12-year history that IFPA has elected a 
national president from outside the Holly- 
wood area. 

As vice president-membership last year, 
he introduced many innovations to the or- 
ganization such as a mobile display, stream- 
lined application forms, an identification 
banner and chapter programming on a na- 
tional level. 

.A filmmaker since 1939. ""Monty" was a 
WW II newsreel cameraman, and has been 
a commercial film producer. His group at 
Convair produces films for the General 
Dynamics corporate office and serves as a 
support group for other divisions. 



26 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



If youVe in a bind for lab service^ 
Reela can bail you out. 



When deadlines loom large, and you 

keep running into one delay after 

another, call Reela. Nobody offers 

faster service. And nobody will 

give you better quality work. 

Reela's speed and high quality 

come about because of three things: 

1 . Competent, dedicated people. 

2. Jet transportation, and an outfit 

that knows how to exploit it. 

3. Sophisticated new equipment. 

How many release prints do you need 
—20 ? 1 00 ? Reela can make them. 



Perfect. Sharp. Color-balanced. 
Back in your hands (or drop-shipped 
if you want) before you know it. 

Why settle for less than the best ? 
Call Reela now. 

REELA OFFERS: 

Complete editorial services • complete 

producer's services — animation 

— titling — sound • complete 8, 1 6, 

and 35mm laboratory services, 

including black and white or color 

dailies for Florida filming 

• Super 8 printing and cartridging. 







Ree\a 



\0 



N\\a"^* 



APRIL, 1970 



27 



There's nothing new about 

a fihn lab. 



Nothing fancy. 

Nothing spectacular. 

Nothing dramatic. 

Nothing glamorous. 



It's just the place with the respon- 
sibility of printing and processing every- 
thing you've struggled to capture on film. 

You want perfect prints. UsualK in 
quantit\ . Always on a rigid schedule. 

And no lab understands this better 
than Cine .Magnetics. 

It's v\'h\ v\'e've invested so heavily 
in modern equipment, like our new high- 
speed Optronics Mark X Quad Printer 
and our new Filmline black-and-white 
processor. 

It's wh\ we've created new facilities 
and enlarged old ones. 



And it's why we've accepted only 
the most experienced people. 

Today, we have a complete 8mm, 
Super 8mm and i6mm center for motion 
picture duplication and preprint services. 

(The man to call: Ed Schuller, 
General Manager. He'll be glad to discuss 
your print needs, arrange a tour of the lab, 
or send one of our salesmen to see you.) 

We print. We process. We load car- 
tridges; Kodak, Technicolor, Fairchild, 
Ja\ ark, Bohn-Benton and others. 

Not terribly e.xciting. 

But incredibly professional. 



Cine Magnetics Film Laboratory 

A DIVISION OF CINE MAGNETICS, INC. 

520 North Barry Avenje.Mamaroneck, NY 10543(914)698-3434 
New York Receiving Center: 202 East 44th St, (2 1 2) 682-2780 



28 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



ALMOST SINCR THE INVENTION of 
videotape in 1956, there have been an- 
nual predictions that "next year" would see 
the flooding of the home market with in- 
expensive, practical videotape recording 
systems. "Someday," said every major video- 
tape prognosticator at one time or another, 
videotape rcct>rilcrs and players on the home 
scene would open new programming hori- 
zons and c|uickly replace home movies. Al- 
most always, the "someday" was used 
around the term "next year." 

Those harbingers of the "someday" and 
"next year" have yet to see their predictions 
come true. It will not be this year, but 1471 
could well be the "year of the successful ad- 
\ent of home \idcotape usage." 



What is it? 

\ideotape recording is the newest and 
most sophisticated type of magnetic record- 
ing, and a natural outgrowth of the mag- 
netic audio recording that has been around 
for years. Simply stated, it is the recording 
of television images on magnetic tape. 

To capture high fidelity light images re- 
quires higher frequencies than sound or data 
recording. For example, high fidelity sound 
is recorded at no more than 15,000 hz 
(cycles per second). The most sophisticated 
instrumentation recorders in use today reach 
about 2.000.000 hz. To record high quality 
television pictures requires frequencies of 
5.000.000 hz. 

Since frequency response in a magnetic 
recorder rises as the speed of the tape pass- 
ing the head increases, early attempts to 
create a videotape recorder used tape speeds 
of 100 inches per second or more. This re- 
sulted in unstable pictures and a small 
amount of program on a reel of tape. 

Ampex Corporation introduced the first 
practical videotape recorder in 1956. The 
\R-1000 employed four recording heads on 
a metal disk that moved across the tape as 
the tape passed at a speed of 30 inches per 
second. With both heads and the tape mov- 
ing, the relative tape-head speed was in- 
creased to 500 inches per second making 
possible high quality TV recording. 



Impact 

The impact of videotape recording on the 
broadcast TV industry was immediate and 
spectacular. Suddenly, programs could be 
broadcast in one time zone, recorded in an- 
other and replayed at the same relative hour 
with quality undistinguishable from the live 
broadcast. Stations throughout the world are 
now equipped for recording and playback. 
.And, the majority of TV programming now 
originates on videotape. 

A variation of the video recorder, em- 
ploying metal discs instead of tape, makes 
possible the popular and familiar "instant 
replay" feature in sports and other live tele- 
casts. 

Undoubtedly, the invention of the video- 
Continueci on next page 



A Business Screen special report 



VIDEOTAPE - 
The View from 70 



1970 will not be the anticipated "next year" for the total 
videotape market. But with the arrival this year of several 
low cost cassette-type models, 1971 could well be the greatest 
year yet in the short history of videotape. 



Videotape recording and closed circuit TV installation range from the very small to sophisticated 
facilities like the AT&T A-V Center production and control studios shown here. 




APRIL, 1970 



29 



videotape in the 70s 



continued 



tape recorder is one of the most significant 
technological developcments of the period 
since World War II. 



Cutting cost and size 

In the years following its development. 
modern technology produced less expensive 
TV cameras, receivers and videotape re- 
corders. 

In the '60s, business, industry, govern- 
ment and to a degree, education were quick 
to grasp and employ this new medium. Now 
information, training and educational pro- 
grams could be recorded on videotape and 
used anywhere. 

Small videotape recorders have emerged 
as important adjuncts to closed circuit tele- 
vision in education, industry, medicine, gov- 
ernment and many specialized fields for 
training and communications. 

In the late 1960s, literally hundreds of 
companies began installing closed circuit 
and videotape recording systems. Japanese 
and American manufacturers began making 
and selling ever smaller, less expensive TV 
production and recording equipment. Sony, 
Panasonic, Shibaden, RCA, IVC, Concord 
and others represent strong competition in 
the videotape equipment market, although 
Ampex remains the acknowledged leader, in 
terms of existing equipment in use. 

Quite naturally, the introduction of color 
to the business, industry, government mar- 
kets followed, just slightly behind color use 
in the broadcast industry. 

Still other innovative applications opened 
new markets for the equipment in the fields 
of data communications and education. 



Widespread use 

Price, size and reliability have hampered 
the growth and development of the medium, 
although the latter two items are currently 
within practical and acceptable standards. 

The American business community dis- 
covered in videotape a major new communi- 
cations tool. Since the introduction of the 
first low cost, portable videotape recorders 
designed exclusively for closed circuit TV 
use, American business has been heavily 
utilizing the new medium. 

It is estimated that there are presently 
more than 50,000 closed circuit videotape 
recorders in use in the United States, with 



ever growing use in Japan, Europe and 
other parts of the world. 

Corporations like AT&T, National Cash 
Register, Equitable Insurance, Republic 
Steel, Humble Oil and many others have 
been leaders in the field and quick to apply 
the new technology. 

Presently available recorders range in 
price from under $1,000 to more than $21,- 
000 for a color unit with sophisticated edit- 
ing capability. 

Variety of applications 

Since 1963, when the smaller recorders 
for closed circuit TV use were introduced 
utilizing a helical recording technique, the 
application of videotape mushrooms. With 
the helical (as opposed to transverse) tech- 
nique, one or two record/ playback heads 
are mounted on a moving drum and record 
across the moving tape in a diagonal curve 
known as a helix. The rotary recording head 
(transverse) is still the standard in broad- 
cast TV. 

As the smaller units and tapes became 
more widespread, and uses become more di- 
verse, manufacturers broadened their prod- 
uct lines to fit a variety of budgets and spec- 
ialized applications. 

The dramatic part of the videotape re- 
cording story is in the variety of its applica- 
tions. Videotape recording has captured for 
instant replay the faraway stars, peered be- 
neath the seas and revealed the inner human 
body for the enlightenment of scientists. It 
has helped increase factory productivity and 
contributed to quality control. It has given 
new hope -to remedial students and enriched 
the lives of the gifted. It daily assists those 
involved in law enforcement, selling, teach- 
ing, training and communicating. 

Here are just a few of the many interest- 
ing ways in which videotape recording is be- 
ing used today: 

The May Company. Los Angeles. Califor- 
nia, uses videotape recording to demonstrate 
the' latest women's wear, furniture, appli- 
ances and other products to their sales peo- 
ple at 16 southern California stores. The 
tapes enable company buyers to reach the 
entire sales force in a single presentation in- 
stead of repeating the information at each 
of the stores. 

The Cohtmbia Gas System Service Corp., 
Columbus, Ohio, is training 800 customer 



servicemen per year using videotape record- 
ing to keep their employees informed on new 
home appliance changes. 

The Biidd Company. Philadelphia, a ma- 
jor supplier of industrial automotive parts, 
has reduced the training time of its 16,000 
labor and management personnel through 
videotaped programs. The courses, previous- 
ly presented 25 times each, are taped once 
and replayed as often as it necessary, reduc- 
ing speaker time and increasing uniformity. 

Humble Oil and Refining Company ex- 
ecutives in Houston have eliminated some 
business trips with transcontinental meetings 
via videotape recorders and the telephone. 
Executives in Houston tape their report and 
send it to New York where other company 
executives view the tape. The two groups 
discuss the report via a telephone confer- 
ence call — resulting in significant savings 
in travel costs. 

Republic Steel Corp.. Cleveland, Ohio, 
has prepared 41 half-hour videotaped pro- 
grams on economics, government and man- 
agement development as an educational pub- 
lic service for use by chambers of commerce, 
schools and professional societies. 

These and countless other examples of 
successful use led Willis H. Pratt, Jr., film 
and CCTV director for AT&T, to comment 
that "videotaping and the use of closed- 
circuit television is one of the most signifi- 
cant breakthroughs in internal communica- 
tions that we have experienced in many 
years." 

"For the audiovisual specialist," Pratt 
says, "videotape holds forth all kinds of 
challenge for the future. It is one of the 
most exciting eras we have ever had." 

1971 — Tiie awaited "next year" 

With such impressive headway and suc- 
cess in four short years, it is no wonder ev- 
eryone looks forward to "next year" as 
holding significant promise for the home 
market. Obviously, such breakthroughs will 
similarly have a profound effect on the ex- 
pansion on usage in the business, education, 
government fields. 

Already, significant advances have been 
made toward compatibility, and the intro- 
duction of the RCA, Sony and Panasonic 
drop-in loading units offer even more pro- 
mise. 

The Sony and RCA systems also break 
the price barrier that has obstructed video- 
tape for so long. RCA hopes to sell its play- 
back-only system for $400 next year. Sony 
has announced its color player for about 
$350, adding a record capability for another 
$100. Sony's factory-made recordings will 
probably be slightly higher than RCA's in- 
tended $10 for a half-hour color recording. 

It seems only a matter of a relatively short 
time before greater compatibility is available 
and the expansion of recording time limits 
to past the present maxmum of 90 minutes. 

We see 1971 as the year of the success 
of the home videotape player-recorders. Aft- 
er that, one can only guess as to how rapid- 
ly such things as economical editing, fancy 
fades, supers, and split-screen are added. • 



30 



BUSINESS SCREEN : 



Videotape Service Centers 



'T'HE VIDEOTAPE production and post- 
-^ production facilities of Rombcx Pro- 
ductions Corporation, first organized in 
August 1^69. tia\e gone into full-scale op- 
eration at the company's nev\ly ciniipleted 
offices and facilities in the Du Art Building, 
245 West 55th St.. N.Y.C. 

Designed to be a complete production 
and service organization for the rapidly ex- 
panding 1" and ' i" videotape field. Rombex 
offers post-production services in tape to 
film, film to tape, duplication and editing 
as well as video and audio production serv- 
ices in studios or on location. 

Chief officers of Rombex are: Richard 
S. Marcus. President. John Anthony. Vice- 
President, and Philip Mancino. Chief En- 
gineer. Richard Marcus and John Anthony 
have served as production engineers at the 
British Broadcasting Corporation's studios 
in London and were founders of the Reeves/ 
Actron Corporation in New York before 
forming Rombcx. which is a subsidiary of 
Du Art Film Laboratories. 

The capabilities of the new Rombex fa- 
cilities include kinescope transfers of all 
popular formats of 1" and Vi" video tape 
(e.g., .Ampcx, Sony, I\'C. Shibaden. etc.) 
to 16mm film, negative or positive, with 
either single or double system sound, optical 
or magnetic. Rombex engineers have de- 
signed image enhancement and gamma cor- 
rection circuits which provide improved 
sharpness, stability and gradation for opti- 
mum quality in the kinescope. 

Rombex's close association with Du Art 
provides fast and efficient film laboratory 
services. Du Art's extensive sound record- 
ing department provides full-scale sound 
transfer facilities. Other services of the 
company include the transfer of 16mm film 
to all popular formats of 1" and V2" VTRs. 

Tape duplication is offered within the 
same formal and from one format to an- 
other. 



A specially designed editing console pro- 
vides facilities for the creative editing of all 
popular 1" and 'A" video tape formats. 

.'X Rombcx mobile \ideo tape recording 
unit employing four Norelco plumbicon 
b&w cameras, zoom lenses, a broadcast ver- 
tical interval switcher and I" VTR's re- 
cently covered a four-day conference work- 
shop on "Explorations in the Management 
of Technology." for the Innovation Group 
at the Harrison House Conference Center in 
Glen Cove, N.Y. AU the units in the mobile 
equipment are completely two-man portable 
and can be unloaded from a station wagon 
and operationally set up in less than one 
hour. The unit provides six preview moni- 
tors, special effects capabilities, a complete- 
ly equipped director's console and switching 
unit and a multiple channel audio console. 

The use of the plumbicon camera al- 
lows video tape recording to be carried out 
under normal lighting conditions. The total 
unit power requirements are less than 1 5 
amps which is less than the power needed to 
operate one electric toaster. Hence, it is 
possible to tape in normal office and factory 
locations. 

The use of a television recording tech- 
nique allows for fast and efficient production 
for industry training and education. The 
use of "in house" kinescope facilities and 
Du Art 16mm to 8mm transfers allows 
complete flexibility for distribution. 

Irwin Young, president of Du Art, has 
long felt that no service organization in the 
audiovisual field should restrict itself to a 
single medium. He believes that film and 
tape and perhaps other visual image trans- 
mission systems yet to come will co-exist 
for many years. At the same time, he has 
been expanding the film laboratory services 
of Du Art, he has also invested over $500,- 
000. in the parallel Rombex operation. He 
sees the companies as a "happy marriage" 
of the visual arts complementing each other. 




Looking over the Ron'.: 
president, and Irwin Young, 
about an hour. 



Jeotape recording unit are Richard S. Marcus (left), Rombex 
president of Du Art Film Labs. Inc. Mobile unit can be set up in 



On 

The 

Rise 



Rombex Productions Corporation 
is a prime example of the 
growing number of videotape 
production and service centers 
springing up around the country to 
offer users an extensive variety of 
specialized, quality services. 




Kinescopes of all V2 and 1-inch videotape for- 
mats can be transferred here to 16mm film, 
negative or positive, single or double system, 
optical or magnetic sound. 

Editing facilities include a specially designed 
editing console for editing in all popular V2 and 
1-inch formats. 




Filming for Feeling 
in Red Cross Films 



Mobility is the key to the success of the Red Cross film 

production unit now in its sixth year. Current films indicate that 

the transition to an in-house production department was a 

good move for the Red Cross which must strive for a certain 

consistent human feeling in its films. 



Filming a Red Cross panel discussion are 

A! Rettig, audio, and Michael 

Gowell, cameraman. 




A WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR on 

■^^ a dock in mid-Massachusetts ... a 
wounded Gl in an Army hospital ... a Ca- 
jun woman watching her hurricane-devas- 
tated home being rebuilt in Louisiana . . . 
a young hospital volunteer in Charleston . . . 
a fire chief in Dallas. These were a few of 
the recent shooting situations covered by 
the American Red Cross film unit. To docu- 
ment the work and impact of the Red Cross, 
members of the unit travelled over 20,000 
miles and exposed tens of thousands of feet 
of film and tape during the last year. 

The Red Cross originally had outside 
contractors produce all its film. Five years 
ago, a self-sufficient internal production 
unit was started, under the direction of Norm 
Ross. The unit he built has evolved into a 
versatile crew that has been using a direct 
cinema, documentary approach. 

Such a unit has to be flexible, mobile and 
sensitive in order to work well documenting 
a variety of situations and events. The crew 
of four is young, eager and creative. Alan 
Rettig and Michael Gowell handle direct 
production functions. Jeff Rosenberg is re- 
sponsible for writing, promotion and pro- 
duction coordination. Jane Milton writes, 
serves as the unit's liaison with the eight 
Red Cross services, and acts as production 
assistant when the crew is on location. 

Most of the unit's work is in short infor- 
mation films, but some time is spent in re- 
lated areas. Each year eight TV spots in 
three lengths are produced for local station 
distribution. Radio spots are also produced 
each year for network and local use. 

The Red Cross is an organization of, by, 
and for people. For this reason, the stress 
in the major film productions has concen- 
trated on letting both Red Cross people and 
those served by Red Cross speak for them- 
selves, in cinema vcrite fashion. In the unit's 
most recent production. Aquatic School. 
students and instructors talk about their wa- 
ter safety and first aid activities at the Han- 
son. Massachusetts school. The tone of the 
film is personal, so much so that the viewer 
leaves feeling as if he just had a private talk 
with the people at the school. 

The unit's current production, now in the 
editing stage, is a documentation of Red 
Cross recovery and rehabilitation efforts in 
the wake of Hurricane Camille. The crew 
shot for almost three weeks along the storm- 
stricken Gulf Coast, striving to depict the 
human, personal aspects of what it means 
to lose everything in a hurricane. 

To shoot without detailed scripts in such 
a wide variety of locations demands extreme 
portability. An Arri BL with a shoulder pod, 
a Nagra and a shotgun mike usually fill the 
bill. An arsenal of hand cameras, two light- 
weight Lowell-Quartz kits, plus extra mikes 
and sun guns round out the location equip- 
ment. 

Since the direct documentary approach 
used by the unit precludes the use of detailed 
scripts, the films are actually shaped in the 
editing rooms of the Red Cross' Washington 
studio. 

Original film is processed immediately 



32 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



upiin roturnins: trom Ideation. After the 
original is returned, useless takes are dis- 
carded and printing rolls are made up. When 
the workprint is reeeived, the niateliing sync 
tracks are transferred from the Nagra to 
I6mni magnetic film on a Magnasync re- 
corder utilizing a Jensen synchronizer. Sound 
and picture are synced up, and the first stage 
of editing begins — complete familiarization 
with all the material. The entire workprint 
is screened at least three times, until the ed- 
itors know each sequence well enough to 
quote the dialogue. L'nusable material is 
discarded, and related sequences are 
screened together. 

At this stage the editors have a good idea 
of what the thrust of the film should he, 
permitting the material itself to dictate the 
form and sequences of the film. Narration is 
held to an absi>lute minimum, and the edi- 
tors often write it as they cut, using it mainly 
for transitions and introductions. The re- 
cently completed Aqiialic Sdiool has a run- 
ning time of 14' i minutes, but uses only 
35 seconds of narration. 

Editing proceeds with trimming, addition 
of cut-ins and cut-aways, and juxtaposition 
of sequences to insure nia.\imum communi- 
cation in the shortest possible time. 

The physical editing is accomplished on 
a bench with two sets of rewinds, two view- 
ers, and multiple gang synchronizers with 
magnetic sound reading heads. Sync tracks 
■ are edited simultaneously with picture in 
preparation for the mix. 

After editing is complete, final narration 
is recorded and laid in. The film is then 
ready for mixing. 

The unit's studio is capable of a two chan- 
nel sync mix to picture. A third Vi " tape 
channel is available for non-sync presence 
and music tracks. In order to utilize both 
magnetic film channels for playback of sync 
tracks, productions are usually mixed to the 
Nagra at 15 ips, using a line-generated neo- 
pilot reference pulse. 

When the mix is completed, the good take 
is retransferred back to magnetic film and 
interlocked w ith the cut workprint for check- 



ing. But the laboratory uses the (iriginal '4" 
mix as the final magnetic generation, re- 
solving the tape directly to the optical film 
recortler. When mixes require three or more 
sync charuiels the job is done at the labora- 
tory's mixing facility. 

The final step before printing, of course, 
is matching the original. .Al and Mike usu- 
alK flip a coin :uul the loser iloes the con- 
forming. 

The confornied original picture rolls and 
mixed track are then delivered to the lab 
with complete instructions. A sound color 
reversal composite is struck and checked for 
timing, effects and proper original cutting. 
Ihcn a cok)r internegative and positive 
answer print are made. When the positive 
answer print has been approved, the produc- 
tion is authorized for release. 

About a hundred prints of any given film 
will be struck for use by the four Red Cross 
loan libraries across the country, and addi- 
tional prints are available to individual Red 
Cross chapters at print cost. No effort is 
made to amortize production costs in the 
final print cost. The combination of good 
quality and low cost makes the films popu- 
lar with chapters. Air Evac. a 1969 film 
about Red Cross service to returning wdund- 
ed servicemen, has had a run of alnn)st 500 
prints to date. 

Several months ago. Norm Ross left the 
section. The unit's new chief. George Man- 
no. has a heavy background in educational 
and commercial television production, and 
will expand its base of operations to include 
more complex and diversified productions, 
utilizing videotape and electronic video re- 
cording as well as 16mm film, and letting 
each individual theme dictate the final meth- 
od and means to be used in achieving a 
quality master. 

The film unit feels a deep commitment to 
the humanitarian ideals of the Red Cross, 
and is uniquely situated to communicate the 
reality of Red Cross work. They anticipate 
an expanded production schedule matching 
the increasing programs and services of the 
Red Cross. • 




Red Cross film crew on location at Red Cross 
relief center includes Michael Gowell, Al Rettig, 
and Jane Milton. 




V t ^m^j^j^ 



A! Rettig checks out the three-channel mixing 
console in the Red Cross film studio. 




Red Cross film crew interviews Cajun woman of Gulf Coast in wake of 
Hurricane Camille for Red Cross film coverage. 



Capturing feelings of volunteers helping to rebuild area damaged by Hur- 
ricane Camille, Michael Gowell and Jeffrey Rosenberg film a sequence. 



APRIL, 1970 



Lumber Dealers Find 

Success in 



Visual Selling Centers 



Through a series of "do it 

yourself" home remodeling 

films, lumber dealers are 

turning "lookers" into 

satisfied customers. 



Sequences from the 

"how-to-do-it" film 
on instalMng floor tile. 




SPONSORSHIP OF Consumer- 
Oriented film presenta- 
tions by national or regional trade 
groups had a beginning in the 
farm machine industry. Through 
the advent of Super-8 lightweight, 
rear-screen sound projectors, 
such groups can now attain as- 
sured success, at lower-dealer- 
unit-cost, than has been possi- 
ble in earlier years. 

An example of real progress 
in this field of association-spon- 
sorship for dealer-oriented con- 
sumer salesroom showings is the 
recently announced "Dealers' 
Customer Visual Information 
Program" of the National Lum- 
ber & Building Material Dealers 
Association. Created by Jim 
Stewart and his staffers at 
Stewart Advertising, Inc., Car- 
negie, Pennsylvania, here is why 
this program is especially note- 
worthy ; 

1 . The Dealer V-I Program is 
a complete package, including a 
Super-8 repeater projector, thor- 
oughly pre-tested for nationwide 
offering; plus five already-com- 



pleted 10-minute color motion 
pictures on popular do-it-yourself 
projects; plus a quantity of cus- 
tomer "take-home" literature for 
each film subject; plus a supply 
of promotional envelope stuffers 
describing the Dealer Visual In- 
formation Center (note the show- 
case concept here); plus dealer 
display room posters announcing 
the Center; plus a 16-page Vis- 
ual Selling Center Guide Book 
which gives the subscribing deal- 
ers important sales promotion 
and merchandising ideas; and. fi- 
nally, a monthly Visual Informa- 
tion Program newsletter which 
the participating dealer can use 
for his prospect mailing list. 

Now that's a package! And it 
is really inexpensive with the to- 
tal package priced in the range 
of $650, including the selected 
MPO Repeater Projector, the 
five films and the printed mate- 
rials. 

We saw the films in February 
at a Chicago building materials 
show. They're very professional 
in style and content, covering 




Potential customers watch one of the film series on a cartridge loaded 
projector in participating dealer's showroom before buying materials 
and equipment for home improvement project. 



such title subjects as Prefinished 
Panel Sheets, Floor Tile, Ceiling 
Tile, Roofing Shingles, and Ex- 
terior Painting. Straight, how-to- 
really-do-it-right stuff, with no 
fancy music, wipes, dissolves or 
gimcracks which aren't needed. 
Just the facts, maam, so you or 
Dad can feel that tackling that 
extra room, refinishing an old 
room or improving your living 
place is both possible and prob- 
able. 

Sit and watch the film of your 
choice after slipping its handy 
cartridge into the MPO Repeat- 
er .. . you'll be as fascinated as 
we were! Easy to load, bright and 
clear to the eye on the screen. 

How did Jim Stewart go about 
selecting that particular machine? 
Well, he says that very extensive 
tests were conducted on all equip- 
ment submitted for procurement. 
And the MPO job just always 
worked best, was least trouble- 
some and came with top guaran- 
tees of fast replacement in case 
of breakdown in the field. 

That's what the buyer said. 

But, behind the scenes, this 
program makes a great deal of 
good economic "survival" sense 
to participating dealers. For one 
thing, there's an obvious slow- 
down in new house construction 
while today's high mortgage in- 
terest rates prevail. 

Dealers need to promote and 
sell this do-it-yourself-market. 
But to "do it" successfully, they 
need to spur potential home 
workers to accept the minimum 
requirements of skill, the ease of 
use and the beauty of today's 
home rebuilding and improve- 
ment materials. 

And they needed what this 
program has given: complete 
promotional guidance to develop 
salesroom audiences. 

As Jim Stewart puts it "in- 
creased sales of accessory and 
related items derived from his 
Visual Selling Center, plus sav- 
ings in valuable man-hours by 
not having to verbally explain 
"how-to-do-it" will help amor- 
tize a dealer's initial program in- 
vestment in a very short time." 

Manufacturers of building ma- 
terials can obtain an eight-page 
brochure describing this Visual 
Information Program by contact- 
ing the National Lumber & 
Building Material Dealers Asso- 
ciation, 302 Ring Building, 
Washington, D. C. 20036 or 
drop a note to enterprising Jim 
Stewart at Stewart Advertising, 
Inc., P.O. Box 102, Carnegie, 
Pa. 15106. • 



34 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




Kodak 



caiirid 



or thai 



II 



to show 



Snap 



Kodak's done it for you— snap-on movies with ttie new 
cartridge loading Kodak Ektagraphic 120 Movie Projector. 
Just snap on the new Kodak super 8 cartridge, and the 
show's on. 

With the Ektagraphic 1 20 Proiector, there's now a 
low cost, portable, easyto use display system that makes it 
a snap for anyone to show films. Mean anything to you 
and your business? Like the fact that now your films are 
more usable by more people m more places? And the fact 
that now's the time to consider reducing more of your 16mm 
films to super 8 for even wider distribution? Think about it. 

The Ektagraphic 120 Projector is rugged -completely 
dependable. You can instantly repeat any part of the film 



by just pressing a button. You can also project any frame as' 
a still picture. At the end. the film automatically rewinds back 
into the cart ridge — ready to show again, right from the start. 

And the unique new Kodak cartridge? It's also a snap to 
load or unload with standard super 8 reels in 50- or lOOfoot 
lengths. Just snap it open. Drop in the film reel Snap the 
cartridge closed, and its ready for showing. To edit or dean 
the film, simply snap open the cartridge. 

A Kodak Audiovisual Dealer will be glad to shov -"^ 
you how the new Kodak Ektagraphic 1 20 Movie 
Projector can become a convenience tool m '^Kodak 
your film operation. See him. or contact 
the nearest office listed below. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY Atlanta 404 3515510 Ctucago 312 654-0200 

Dallas: 214/351 3221 Hollywood 213 4646131 New York 212 2627100 San Francisco 415 776 6055 



to and from any medium 



8mm Super 8 

16mm 

• Quality 

• Fast Service 



Magno Sound 
723 Seventh Avenue 
18 West 45th Street 

1501 Broadway 
New York 



212-CI7-2630 



Chicago SMPTE Conference to 
Follow Successful '69 Format 



The 107th Technical Conference and 
Equipment Exhibit of the Society of Mo- 
tion Picture and Television Engineers to 
be held April 26-May 1 at Chicago's Drake 
Hotel will reportedly follow the successful 
program format of last year's conference in 
Los Angeles. 

Technical papers to be presented at the 
conference on laboratory practices and tele- 
vision include: 

""Standardization in the Video-Tape 
Recorder Industry," by R. N. Hurst, Com- 
mercial Electronic Systems Div., RCA 
Corp.. Camden. N.J. A reevaluation of 
video tape recorder standards will be given 
with a new look at how the continuing use 
of standards benefits the industry. 

"'Compact Optical System for Field/Line 
Sequential Color Videotelephone Camera," 
by R. L. Eilenberger, F. W. Kammerer and 
J. F. Muller, Bell Telephone Laboratories, 
Inc.. Holmdel, N.J. A very compact op- 
tical system has been designed to imple- 
ment a field/line color camera for video- 
phone use which uses a spectral separation 
prism and dichroic reflectors. Conversion to 
an electrical signal is via a pickup tube 
provided with a new form of composite 
fiber-optics/clear-glass faceplate. 

"An Improved Servo System for Ouad- 
ruplex Video-Tape Recorders," by Harold 
V. Clark, Ampex Corp., Redwood City, 
Ca. The system is examined theoretically 
with the practical results of an experimental 
system presented showmE; their significance 
to future designs of video tape recorders. 

"Automatic Color Phase Control Sys- 
tem." by Y. Itoh and Y. Inoue. Tokyo 
Broadcasting Svstem Inc.; K. Saitoh, and 
N. Ideshito, Nippon Flectric Co.. Ltd., 
Tokvo. The intention of this svstem is to 
maintain automaticallv color nualitv by use 
of a variable-nhase voltaae sh'fter installed 
in the video transmission route. 

"A Solid-State Machine Control Assign- 
ment System," by R. J. Smith. Commercial 
Electronic Systems Div.. RCA Corp., Cam- 



den, N.J. A new control console is de- 
scribed which allows operation of any ma- 
ch.ne in the TV station from a number of 
operating positions throughout the station. 

"A Method for Reporting Exposure on 
Color Negatives," by Dr. Frank P. 
Brackett and Fred H. Detmers, Technicolor 
Inc., Hollywood, A system for reporting 
exposure in terms of numbers on an arbi- 
trary scale will be described. Means for 
keeping the scale constant in the face of 
varying conditions will develop into a new: 
language of communication between labora- 
tories, cinematographers and photographic 
effects technicians. 

"System Sharpness Calibration of Com- 
mercial Super 8 Prints," by John C. Norris, 
Photographic Technology Div., Eastman 
Kodak Co., Rochester. The production of 
commercial prints in the super 8 format 
can be accomplished via several printing 
systems. The sharpest prints can be pro- 
duced by reduction printing from 35mm 
negatives. However when speed and 
economy are necessary a 1 6mm reversal 
orisinal/l 6mm internegative/optical reduc- 
tion system will prove to be the most prac- 
tical. I 

"Film Dynamics of A Rolling-Loop Film '' 
Transport System," by William C. Shaw, 
Multiscreen Corp., Gait, Ontario, Canada. 
Work on the commercial development of a 
70mm motion-picture projector has resulted ' 
in the design of an appropriate film guide 
and the use of air jets to assist in forming 
and picking up film loops before and after 
passing the projection lamp. A description ■ 
is given of the behavior of the film as the 
rolling loop forms, grows and moves to- 
ward the projection eate. 

In addition to the regular conference 
program a symposium on Production, Con- 
trol and Use of Color Television Film to be 
held April 30 and May 1 will feature a 
number of tutorial papers and discussions 
covering the entire area of films relating to , 
television. 




Let's cut out the problems. 

Editing, one of the most essential and creative steps 
in producing a film, is the subject of a booklet 
we have produced. It contains valuable information 
about the equipment, the procedures, and the 
language of editing. 

Send today for your FREE "Colburn Comments on Editing." 



GEO.W. COLBURN LABORATORY, INC. 

164 N.Wacker Drive • Chicago, III. 60606 
Telephone (area code 312) 332-6286 




36 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




borrowing 
the Bolex 



Running at 64-frames per second, the Bolex 
would have been perfect for that slow- 
motion study of that high-speed machine. 

With a 400-foot magazine and constant 
speed motor, the Bolex could have given 
you 12-mmutes of shooting capacity for 
that film about the assembly line. 

You could easily have attached the Bolex 
to the microscope for that sequence in the 
research film. 

\nd the Bolex. with its wide range of lenses 
and easy one-man operation would have 
been the perfect choice for that worldwide 
public relations film. It could have handled 
the arctic and tropic sequences without 
getting frostbite or sunstroke. And done 
the sync sound portions, as well. 

But you won't be able to borrow the Bolex 
this time. It's being used to do a time- 



lapse study of the construction Of the new 

plant. And it's going to be tied up for 

awhile. 

Maybe what you need is another Bolex. 

A Bolex makes as good a second camera 
as It does a first. Because with Bolex you 
can get exactly what you want in a camera. 
You never have to buy more capacity than 
you need. 

You might start off with a compact 1 00-foot 
Bolex and later extend your system to in- 
clude a 400' magazine with motor drive for 
sync sound shooting. 

If one of our zoom lenses (with or without 
automatic exposure control) will do the 
|ob. fine. If not. Bolex also offers extreme 
wide angle lenses. Telephoto lenses. 
Ivlacro lenses that focus as close as 1". 
Lenses as fast as f/1.1. with pre-set di- 



aphragm. Whatever you want. And never 
more than you want. 

Whatever Bolex you choose, you'll have 
a camera capable of turning out films of 
professional quality— rock steady and 
sharp. A camera wfiose built-in features 
can produce fades, lap dissolves, double 
exposures and many other sophisticated 
effects. 

Below are suggested Bolex combinations 
for various uses. 

For a free 32-page catalog, Industrial Bul- 
letin and list of Bolex dealers near you, 
write to address below: 



Paillard incorporated. 

1900 Lower Road, Linden, N J. 07036, 

Other products: Hasselblad cameras and accessories. 

Hermes typewriters and ligunng machines. 




^iSifl 



Borei H-16 Rex-S Camera. 

Vano-Switar Zoom Lens 
with fully aotomaiic 
Ififough-Ihe-Iens exposure conuol. 
JOO' Film Magazine with Take Up 
Motor MST Constani Speed Motor 
with sync generator lor 
synchronous sound recording. 




Bolet H.16 R«i-5. 

26mm Mac'O-S'Aiiar t.'M lens 

400" Film Magarine with Take-yp 

Moioi variaDte Speed Motor. 



r 



Bolex H-16 Rex-5. 

' jmm MacfO-Swilar 

■ -; Lens Underwaler 

Housing with 

I pa-allax-co'tecled viewflnder 

and eKiernal Itim wind. 




Bolei H-16 Rex-S. ■ 

vanobwitar Zoom Lens 

with tully automatic 

through-trie-lens exposure 

conifol 400' Film Magazine 

With Take Up Motor MST 

Constant Speed Motor with sync 

generator. Blimp (or silence. 



APRIL, 1970 




picture parade 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mill Ill iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii I I 



Careers in Paper Industry 
Explored In Film 

What's So Special About Pa- 
per? is a career guidance film 
from the American Paper Insti- 
tute. Narrated by Chet Huntley, 
the film covers a wide range of 
job opportunities in the paper 
field and also illustrates the in- 
dustry's socially responsible role 
in water conservation, forest 
management and the training of 
the unemployed and unskilled. 
In addition, the film demon- 
strates a variety of unusual and 
exotic uses of paper and shows 
product development and the 
scope of the ever-growing useful- 
ness of paper. 

Teenage attitudes and opinions 
are revealed by students, filmed 
at their own high schools, who 
ask questions about the paper 
industry in terms of their values. 
Huntley and a variety of spokes- 
men present realistic answers. 
The film is available from Mod- 
ern Talkine Picture Service, Inc. 



Motion Picture As Timely 
As Today's Headlines 

Can We Wave The Flag Too 
Much?, a 5-minute, 16mm color 
film is a moving tribute to all 
that is great in American history 
and depicts the many reasons for 
a resurgence of loyalty and faith 
in the United States. 

It is a hymn of praise for all 
that the flag represents: Jeffer- 
son, Washington, Franklin, Lin- 
coln, Gettysburg, Valley Forge, 
Normandy, Wake Island, Korea 
. . . and now the moon. 

The film is for sale and may be 
obtained by writing to Associa- 
tion Instructional Materials, 600 
Madison Avenue, New York 
10022. 



"A Nice Kid Like You" 
Bridges Generation Gap 

Drugs, sex, parents and the 
problems of America as seen by 
college students today are dis- 
cussed frankly and forthrightly in 
interviews and "rap sessions" in 



a 16mm film, A Nice Kid Like 
Y'ou. now available for sale, 
rental and preview from the Uni- 
versity of California Extension 
Media Center, Berkeley. 

Designed to provoke construc- 
tive conversations across the gen- 
eration gap, the 38-minute black 
and white film provides an hon- 
est, open encounter in which stu- 
dents strongly criticize hippies 
and the drug scene as well as the 
"establishment." 

A Nice Kid Like You was pro- 
duced by Gene Lichtenstein of 
the Education Research Center at 
MIT, with the guidance of the 
Committee on the College Stu- 
dent of the Group for the Ad- 
vancement of Psychiatry. 



Fishing Aids in Veteran's 
Rehabilitation 

The story of the rehabilitation 
of a wounded Vietnam War vet- 
eran combines with the spectacu- 
lar scenery and sparkling streams 
of Alaska in a new motion pic- 
ture. Entitled The Open Road, it 
is a 27 '/2 -minute, 1 6mm color 
and sound film. 

The story concerns a serious- 
ly wounded soldier whose civilian 
life activities included a love for 
fishing. Fearing that he may nev- 
er enjoy the sport again, he is 
despondent about his lot and out- 
look for the future. 

The film shows in compact 
segments the rehabilitation work 
done in a military hospital. The 
therapeutic value of fishing with 
the aid of new ideas in fishing 
equipment, is shown in a major 
portion of the film which takes 
the G.I. and the viewing audience 
to the splendid and unspoiled 
hunting and fishing grounds of 
Alaska. 

The film is exciting as well as 
instructive. It is available for 
free showings by sporting goods 
dealers, youth and servicemen's 
organizations, sportsmen's clubs 
and other groups interested in 
rehabilitation and outdoor sports. 
Prints can be reserved by writ- 
ing to Woodstream Corporation, 
Lititz, Pa. 17543. 



Summit Releases More 
Exciting Ski Films 

Summit Films has recently re- 
leased three new ski films. The 
Moebius Flip is a fantasy movie 
about a group of skiers who find 
that the world has flip-flopped 
onto the other side of reality. 
They perform a variety of dare- 
devil stunts in an attempt to re- 
turn to reality, including the sen- 
sational "Moebius Flip" by Her- 
mann Gollner. The 28 minute, 
full-color film includes some 
stunning visual effects and pio- 
neering film techniques. It is be- 
ing distributed by Association 
Films and Modern Talking Pic- 
ture Service. 

Ski Racer is a highly personal 
and mood-provoking treatment 
of the excitement, anxiety and 
thrills of competition skiing. This 
36-minute color film features a 
closing sequence of free pleasure 
skiing by super-star, Jean Claude 
Killy. Skileidoscope (28 min- 
utes) presents a warm and often 
humorous treatment of skiing 
pleasure at Vail, the famous Col- 
orado resort. 

Ski Racer and Skileidoscope 
are available from Modern Talk- 
ing Pictures. 

Canning Industry Model 
For Economics Film 

Everyone plays the game. It 
puts food on the table, clothes 
on your back, transports goods, 
and is involved with every as- 
pect of buying, selling, and using 
things. 

Sandler Institutional Films, in 
cooperation with the National 
Canners Association, has pro- 
duced a ten-minute film, titled 
Economics depicting how the 
concerns and resources of a com- 
munity are administered. 

When a youngster buys a 
product he is, in effect, demand- 
ing that industry put up risk 
dollars to deliver the goods when 
and where he wants them. The 
canning industry is the industrial 
model upon which the film is 
based. 

Someone has to pay the farm- 
er to plant the seed to get the 



raw material to the cannery and 
out to the retailer. The central 
portion of the film is designed 
to bring all aspects of the na- 
tional economy into focus. From 
the coal mines of West Virginia 
to the steel mills of California; 
from the forests of Oregon to 
paper factories. 

For more information write 
Sandler Institutional Films, 1001 
N. Poinsettia Place, Hollywood. 
Calif. 90046. 



Film Examines Importance 
Of Personal Space 

An experiment exploring the 
phenomenon of personal space 
and the responses of middle- 
class Americans when someone 
encroaches on this space by ap- 
proaching them too closely is re- 
corded and analyzed in Invisi- 
ble Walts, a 16mm film now 
available for purchase, rental and 
preview from the University of 
California Extension Media Cen- 
ter, Berkeley. 

The 12-minute black and white 
film documents the reactions of 
unsuspecting subjects when their 
personal space is violated by 
trained experimenters who are 
ostensibly conducting a consumer 
survey. The subjects' varied phys- 
ical responses, which reveal their 
feeling of discomfort, are demon- 
strated and analyzed, and are 
seen to follow several patterns; 
the patterns are shown to be 
learned, rather than innate, and 
to be culturally derived. The film 
also shows how children learn 
these response patterns, and it 
offers some observations on how 
growing population pressures 
may affect Americans' sense of 
personal space. 



Ducks Unlimited Assures 
Unlimited Supply of Ducks 

Instant marsh? Just add water. 
The way Bing Crosby explains it 
in The Wetlanders. it's as natu- 
ral as rain rolling off a duck's 
back. 

Crosby is at his casual best in 
this documentary, produced by 



38 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



Crawley Films, which explains 
the vital conservation work of 
Ducks Unlimited. The face of 
the land is changed so that the 
autumn flyways are filled. Breed- 
ing ground construction begins 
after planning and discussions 
with landowners. The earth-mciv- 
ing equipment of Ducks Unlim- 
ited then pours in to rehabili- 
tate the wetlands of Canada's 
prairie provinces. As winter's 
snowfall melts into diverted 
drainage systems, the plans (and 
the ducks) get off the ground. 

The next stage of marshland 
management is left to the drakes. 
Soon eggs begin to hatch and the 
surface is rippled by thousands of 
newly-arrived webbed feet. 
11 For information on how to ob- 
' tain the film, write Ducks, Un- 
limited. P. O. Box 66300, Chi- 
ll caao. Illinois. 
Il 



"Vacation— Southern Style" 
Shows Old and New South 

I'acaiion — Souihern Style, a 
color film showing the tourist at- 
tractions, historic landmarks and 
resort areas of Georgia, Alabama 
and Mississippi, is now available 
to community organizations and 
travel groups through Associa- 
tion Films. 

Presented by Humble Oil and 
Refining Company, the 28-min- 
ute motion picture contrasts the 
traditional South with its ante- 
bellum heritage to the new South 
where growth and progress are 
the hallmarks. The film covers 
natural and historical landmarks, 
plantations and resort and rec- 
reational areas. 



Australian Legends 
On 16mm Film 

Two unusual Australian leg- 
ends are presented in films pro- 
duced by Concept Films Interna- 
tional and distributed through As- 
sociation Instructional Materials. 
Slory of the Souihern Cro.ss tells 
an aboriginal legend of the crea- 
tion of the constellation. 

A Time of Giving tells the 
ston,' of St. Nicholas of Myra. the 
original Santa Claus. 



Secrets, Mystery of Ocean 
Revealed in Film Series 

A series of 22 minute films, 
available in 16mm and Super 8 
sound, record the first year of 
Jacques Cousteau's anticipated 



five-year voyage exploring the 
world's oceans. This modern day 
Captain Nemo has made count- 
less expeditions charting life in 
the hidden crevices across the 
ocean floor. 

For a description of the films, 
write Doubledav Multimedia, 277 
Park Ave., New York, New York 
10017. 



CBS 21st Century Series 
Available on 16mm Film 

McGraw-Hill Films has an- 
nounced the release of the entire 
1969 CBS news series, the 21.v/ 
Century Series. Narrated by Wal- 
ter Cronkite, the series is suitable 
for junior high through adult age 
groups and covers ideas, inven- 
tions and discoveries of today 
that will shape the world of to- 
morrow. 

The films are relevant to 
courses in science, art, current 
events, education and contem- 
porary social problems, and are 
excellent for use by community 
groups and adult discussion 
groups. 

For a descriptive list, includ- 
ing purchase or rental informa- 
tion, write McGraw-Hill Films, 
Dept. DF, 330 West 42nd Street, 
New York 10036. 



Safety Film Has New Slant 
For Junior High Schools 

Today's child, brought up in 
a highly electrified world, takes 
safe, convenient electric power 
for granted — almost as much 
as the air he breathes. But the 
hazards of electricity in unusual 
circumstances — a wire felled 
by a storm, for example — may 
be outside his experience. A new- 
film strip, for school use, seeks 
to alert and safeguard him. 

Called Current Fads and 
written primarily for junior high 
school level, the production takes 
a novel approach to explaining 
shock hazard. "Don't make your- 
self a pathway to the ground, is 
the theme. The 16 minute, 90- 
frame sound filmstrip, done in 
full color, first explains the basic 
electrical circuit in unusual dia- 
gram form, emphasizing the com- 
mon use of grounding. Then it 
shows how defective wiring and 
appliances make one a pathway 
to the ground completing the cir- 
cuit — the wrong way. 

Inquiries should be directed to 
the producer. Admaster, Inc.. 
425 Park Ave.. S., New York 
10016. 




I WE PRINT & PROCESS WE DISTRIBUTE' 



1 




MHRCi 



. . all under one roof, including producer services, 

new color processing, scene to scene color and 

exposure controlled printing, quadrank superS 

recording, cartridge loading and packaging, film 

library distribution and maintenance service, 

audio visual systems. 
If you're tired of running around start where the 

buck stops ... at 



©FISCHER 
rtCYGNET 



CHICAGO: 399 Gundersen Drive 

Carol Stream. Illinois 60178 
Phone 312/665-4242 



LONDON: 295 Northholt Road 

South Harrow Middx., England 
Std 01/422-722 



APRIL, 1970 



39 




new products review 



„„„„„„iii,ii I I I nil iiiiiiiiiii mil mill mmmmmimimimmimm ii mimmiimimmimmimm 



Carousel Slide Projector 
Serves Still Another Use 

Yet another use has been 
found for the ubiquitous Carou- 
sel slide projector. This reliable 
tool, found on almost every 
audio-visual equipment shelf, is 
now the initial activating force 
of a mixed media programmer 
that is so simple to set up that 
even the neophyte can prepare, 
edit and deliver a sophisticated 
multi-media presentation with 
the precision of an audio-visual 
"pro." 

The Visual Environments 
MP-25 Programmer accurately 
controls on and off functions for 
as many as 50 Kodak Carousel 
slide projectors in dissolve as 
well as motion picture projectors, 
tape recorders, house lights or 
any other electrically operated 
gizmos. And the unique thing 
about it is its ability to use an 
unmodified Carousel to deliver 
cues to the control console. To 




Simplicity and reliability are key 

factors in this programming system. 

convert the Carousel into a cue 
transport mechanism all that is 
required is to replace the pro- 
jector's lens with the optical 
reader part of the MP-25 's sys- 
tem. Tt slips in as easily as the 
lens. 

In place of slides in the Carou- 
sel circular trays, 2"x2" slide- 
like cue cards are placed. Each 
card has 25 numbered and par- 
tially perforated holes. To activ- 
ate a particular projector you 
simply punch out its designated 
number on the cue card with the 
tip of a pencil. By punching sev- 
eral holes in a card any number 
of projectors can be brought in- 
to action simultaneously. With 
50 projectors and dissolve units, 
50 changes may thus be made at 
once. 

The big advantage of the sys- 



tem is its simplicity and reliabil- 
ity. Cards are easily punched and 
changes may be made in a few 
seconds by re-punching a new 
card and throwing the old one 
away rather than by re-punching 
or mending a paper tape or re- 
beeping a magnetic tape. An- 
other advantage is that the pres- 
entation may be reviewed slide 
by slide in reverse for checking, 
without going back to the begin- 
ning and starting over. 

On the MP-25"s control con- 
sole are 25 lighted buttons which 
tell the contents of each cue card 
as the program progresses. For 
flexibility, any individual pro- 
jector may be advanced or re- 
versed independent of its pro- 
grammed cues. 

Inquiries on the new lVlP-25 
Programmer should be directed 
to Visual Environments, Inc., 
Dept. BSC. 225 luist 45th Street, 
New York. N.Y. 10017 



High Speed Super 8 Printer 
From Optronics 

The Optronics Mark X high 
speed Super 8 quad printer is 
specifically designed for color re- 
lease prints. It operates from 
16mm color inter-ncgatives for 
continuous flow optical reduction 
printing of four rows of images 
on 35mm film perforated in the 
•"5 rank" pattern. Using Type 
7380 raw stock, the printer 
achieves production rates of 200 




3000 foot film capacity, forward 
and reverse operation, constant 
tension takeups, custom designed 
p u p i l-splitting "apochromatic" 
lens system, oil-drip lubrication 
and ultra-precise ball bearing 
drive system. For more informa- 
tion, write Optronics Techno- 
logv. Inc., Dept. BSC. 118 West 
29th St.. New York 10001. 



Camera Stand Fills 
Special Requirements 

Merv's Polytechnic Camera 
Stand is a low cost, multi-func- 
tion device designed for the spe- 
cial requirements of the in-house 
photo group, motion picture pro- 
ducers, independent photograph- 
ers and artists. The geometrically 
rigid stand operates from a sit- 
ting position with camera reflex 



easily fitting into a standard pro- 
jector carrying case. 

A large 8 x 9" format for a 
square or vertical picture can be 




The Mark X promises long life and 
low maintenance. 

to 400 feet per minute, depend- 
ing on the lamp source option. 
The Mark X is equipped with 



Merv's Camera Stand is available 
with several fast-attach accessories. 

viewer at eye-level and controls 
grouped for operation-by-feel. 

Also available is an animation 
easel for art production for mo- 
lion pictures and slidefilms, 
slides, tv commercials, etc. For 
information write Mervin J . Up- 
degrafj, Dept. BSC. 17040 Ot.se- 
go St.. Encino. Calif. 91316. 

Rear Projection Screen 
Lightweight, Compact 

A rear projection screen, de- 
signed for any sound/slide pro- 
jection system, is excellent for 
desk top presentation, individual 
t aining or slide editing. Built of 
plastic with a high quality mir- 
ror, it measures II" by IIV2" 
and collapses to a V2" thickness, 



■^ .. 1 




1 

■ 




8 




*F 


ii 


» 



A rear projection screen for use with 
any sound/slide projection system, 
accommodated. The unit weighs 
2 pounds. Write Vi.'i-U-Line Sys- ' 
terns. Inc.. Dept. BSC, 5319 . 
Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, \ 
California 90027. 



Tape Interchange Possible 
Between Countries 

Two videotape recorders per- 
mitting tape interchange between 
countries using difterent record- 
ing and playback standards are 
offered by International Video 
Corp. The IVC-8II will repro- 
duce 60 Hz, 525-line recordings 
while operating on a 50 Hz line. 
Also, it records and reproduces 
50 Hz 625-line tapes compatible 
with all VTR's using the IVC 
format and intended for use on 
50 Hz power. The two operating 
standards are switch selectable at 
the control panel. 

The IVC-810 performs the op- 
posite function. For full informa- 
tion write International Video 
Corp.. Dept. BSC. 675 Alainan- 
or Ave.. Sunnyvale. California 
94086. 



Eumig Announces Three 
Zoom Reflex Movie Cameras 

Eumig, Inc. has announced 
three new zoom reflex movie 
cameras. The super 8 Viennette 
3 is fully automatic and has a 
zoom range from 9 to 27mm. 
The Viennette 5, also automatic. 
Continued on page 42 



40 



BUSINESS SCREENi^ 



EUROPEAN CURRENCY REVALUATIONS 
HAVE CHANGED SOME CAMERA PRICES 

So which is the least 

expensive, totally 

professional camera: 

the Arrif lex 16S/B? 
No. The Eclair CM3 . 

What's more, the CMS lets you 
change magazines in five seconds, 
plus... shoot 16 and 35mm with the 
same camera! 




The Franc has been devalued; the Deutsche 
Mark has gone up. As a result, most French prod- 
ucts, including Eclair cameras, have become less 
expensive on the U.S. market, while most German 
products have gone up in price. 

With two 400 foot magazines, three lenses 
and constant-speed motor with sync-pulse gener- 
ator, the CMS now costs about $200.00 less than 
the Arri S/B GS similarly equipped. Not much less, 
certainly. But with all its features, you would expect 
the CM3 to cost a lot more. The Arri S, of course, 
is the least expensive Arriflex. It's the one with a 
body designed for 100 foot loads, to which you can 
attach a 400 foot magazine. 

The CMS is the Eclair camera that won 
an Academy Award for its design. In addition to 
its five-second clip-on magazine change and its 
unique capacity for shooting both 16mm and S5mm 
with the same camera body, same motor and same 
lenses, (different magazines), the CMS gives you 



extremely bright and accurate reflex viewing, 
(simpler optics, groundglass at the film aperture), 
a viewfinder and eyepiece that each rotate through 
360°, (any angle, either eye), three heavy duty bay- 
onet lens mounts, (for critical seating of wide-angle 
and zoom lenses), plus a variable shutter, matte 
box and sound blimp. 

You can also adapt the CMS to shoot S5mm 
Techniscope in seconds, at no cost; and the CMS 
accepts Panavision lenses. Most features are being 
shot wide screen, most commercials in standard 
35mm, most industrials and documentaries in 
16mm. The CMS is the only camera that will shoot 
all three formats. What's your next job going to be? 
And the one after that? 



For a CM3 brochure, 
write to Eclair Corp. 
317262 Melrose Ave., 
Los Angeles 90046. 




APRIL, 1970 



41 



new products . . . 

continued 



has a Eumig 14 element Vario 
Viennar f/1.8, 8-40inni zoom 
lens. 

The Macro Viennette 8 adds 
an f/1.8, 7-56mm Macro Vien- 




One of Eumig's reflex movie cameras 
is the Viennette 8. 

nar zoom lens which focuses from 
infinity to 0, utilizing the full 
zoom range. For more informa- 
tion and specifications write 
Eiimii; { U.S.A.) Inc.. Depl. BSC. 
101 We.<it 3I.S7 Street. New York. 
New York 10001. 



*^ >^ 



A complete line of squeeges for lab 
processors, mcluding Ott, box, vac- 
uum, knife and wiper squeeges, as 
well as a pre-dryer, is available from 
Treise Engineering, Inc., Dept. BSC, 
1941 First Street, San Fernando, 
California 91340. 



MTI Introduces 

Low Light Level Camera 

The MTI isocon camera is de- 
signed for use in applications 
where light levels are extremely 
low. A significant increase in sen- 
sitivity may be realized in static 
applications permitting integra- 
tion of charge buildup. It is de- 




Isocon camera produces useable pic- 
tures at 10 to -6fc ptiotocathode il- 
lumination. 

signed to utilize the operating 
advantages of the isocon tube 
which over-comes the limitations 



inherent in low light level image 
orthicons. 

The long-life burn resistant, 
electron conducting glass target 
isocon tube is available in a var- 
iety of photocathode surfaces 
with different spectral responses 
and a fiber-optic face plate for 
coupling to image intensifiers for 
extremely low light level pick- 
ups. MTl's cameras use the Eng- 
lish Electric Valve isocon tube, 
distributed by Visual Electronics 
Corp. For specifications write 
Mary la n d Telecommuuications 
I tic. Dept. BSC. Coikeysville, 
Marvland 2 1 030. 



Lightweight Battery Pack 
Offers Longer Life 

Dynasciences' portable battery 
pack, weighing only 3'/i pounds, 
will drive up to six 400-foot 
16mm film magazines before 
needing recharging. The unit fea- 
tures circuitry that prevents over- 
charging or damage to the cam- 
era motor should the charger line 
cord be left plugged in while the 
camera is connected to the pack. 
There is also a built-in under- 
voltage circuit that prolongs bat- 
tery life by preventing battery 
discharge below recommended 
limits. 

The y-volt batteries arc re- 
charged in approximately 12 




Life expectancy of this battery pack 
is two or three years. 

hours by connecting the integra- 
ted AC line cord to a 110 volt, 
60 Hz outlet. More information 
is available from Scientific Sys- 
t e m s Division, Dynasciences 
Corp.. Dept. BSC. Town.sliip 
Line Road, Blue Belt. Pa. 19422. 



Crossfield Designed Deck 
From Tandberg 

The 6000X stereo tape deck 
is a 3 speed, solid state, 57 tran- 



sistor instrument making possi- 
ble professional quality record- 
ings even at slower speeds. 

The compact deck offers 4 pre- 
cision-gapped, mumetal screened 
heads with bias design. It is avail- 
able in quarter-track and half- 
track models, may be used with 
low noise, high output tape and 
operates in vertical or horizontal 



own narration. 

Slide advance signals are im- 




Tandberg's 600DX tape deck has a 
walnut cabinet. 

position. More information is 
available from TaiuU^erg ol 
Atnerica. Inc.. Dept. BSC. P.O. 
Box 171, Pelhain. New York 
10803. 



File and Store 
8mm Film Cartridges 

Filing and storage libraries for 
Kodak Super 8 film cartridges 
are available in one or two draw- 




These libraries are constructed of 
steel with double side walls for 
greatest strength. 

er models. These libraries are 
modular and lock-stack with 
other Luxor audiovisual mater- 
ials libraries. 

Cartridges are filed in four 
indexed compartments with mov- 
able bookend dividers which 
keep the cartidges to the front for 
easy title selection. Write Jack 
C. Coffey Co.. Inc., Dept. BSC. 
104 Lake View Avenue, Waii- 
kegan. III. 6008.S. 



Economic Synchronization 
For Tape/Slide Program 

Edmund's Tape-Slide Synchro- 
nizer provides any photographer, 
amateur or professional, with an 
inexpensive tool to synchronize a 
tape-slide program. Record on- 
the-spot sound or music to go 
along with your slides and your 




Edmunds synchronizer measures on- 
ly 4" X 3" X IV2". 

pressed on the tape by simply 
pushing a button. For more in- 
formation, write Edmund Scien- 
tific Company. Dept. BSC, 555 
Edscorp Buildint;. Barrington. 
N.J. 08007. 



Lighter Head for 
Heavy Cameras 

O'Connor Engineering Labor- 
atories has developed the Model 
100-C fluid head for motion pic- 




The Model 100-C is significantly 
lighter than the 100 which it re- 
places. 

ture and TV cameras weighing 
up to 100 pounds. The new head 
weighs only 16 pounds and fea- 
tures a camera tie-down "cinch 
lever" for faster mounting and re- 
leasing with no loss in stability. 

With an operating range of 
to 120 F, the new head is suit- 
able for rugged field operation, 
protected by special seal rings 
from water, dust and sand. Fur- 
ther information may be obtained 
from O'Connor Engineering Lab- 
oratories. Dept. BSC. 3490 E. 
Foothill Boulevard, Pasadena. 
Co///. 91107. 



CCTV Camera Mount for 
Wall, Ceiling, Floor 

A wall mount, engineered to 
securely support and aim CCTV 




i 



Installation and removal of the 
camera from this mount is simple 
and fast — even in hard-to-reach 
locations. 



42 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



cameras, has a fully adjustable 
pan head with 3-way controls. 
Panning handle locks horizontal 
and vertical action; a front tilt 
knob also permits side tilt a full 
90 degrees right or left for more 
precise aiming. 

All parts are precision ma- 
chined of aluminum. Standard tu- 
bular arm puts camera about 1 1 
inches from wall. Models also 
available for fUx>r. table or ceil- 
ing installations. For further in- 
formation write Welt/ Sale-Lock. 
Inc.. Dept. BSC. 2400 West ^th 
Lane. Hiuleah. Florida 33010. 



Inexpensive, Lightweight 
TV Support Equipment 

Innovative Television Equip- 
ment's D3 Dolly is a rugged 
lightweight unit with a load ca- 
pacity of 300 lbs. Each dolly leg 
has a 4" diameter caster with 
brake. Each caster can be set for 
free swivelling or can be indexed 
for tracking by adjusting spring 
loaded pins. 

Another piece of lightweight 
TV support equipment is the ITE 



% 



ff 
1 



*L 



Lightweight but rugged dolly for 
television use. 

TIO Elevator Tripod with a load 
capacity of 165 lbs. Large dia- 
meter legs and center column are 
retained in position by positive 
locking devices and center spider 
stay rods. Locking grooves are 
provided for attachment to the 
dolly. Further information is 
available from Innovative Tele- 
vision Equipment. Dept. BSC. 
11661 San Vicente Blvd.. Los 
Angeles. California 90049. 



Timelapse Analysis System 
Features Economy 

A Timelapse Super-8 Analysis 
System for medical documenta- 
tion, time study in training and 
education, surveillance, ware- 
house inventory control, etc. can 
compress up to one day's events 
into '/z hour viewing time. The 
complete system includes self- 
powered camera with 5 to 1 
zoom lens, reflex viewing and 
automatic exposure control, a 



choice of speeds, a remotely con- 
trolled flickerless automatic 
threading projector with single 
frame viewing plus speeds of Vi. 




This Super 8 system records up to 

8 hours on 2 conventional film 

cassettes. 

1, 2, 3, 6, 18 or 54 frames per 

second both forward and reverse, 

plus accessories. 

For literature write Instrumen- 
tation Marketing Corp., Dept. 
BSC. 820 S. Mariposa St.. Bur- 
hank. California 91506. 



Instructional Videotapes 
With Ampex Tape Purchase 

A series of four 25-minute in- 
structional videotapes on closed 
circuit television techniques is 
available to purchasers of Am- 
pex Series 161 or 163 closed 
circuit video tape. 

For details on quantity re- 
quired to obtain the programs, 
see your Ampex dealer. 



Manual Projector Offers 
Several Desirable Features 

lAV's Royal M projector is 
basically the same projector as 
the ST and offers the same fea- 
tures and advantages, but is a 
manual projector and, therefore, 
considerably lower in price. 

In addition to its initial eco- 




The Royal M 16mm projectors fea- 
ture economy in purchase and up- 
keep. 

nomy, the M offers lower main- 
tenance costs. It features half the 
Continued on next page 




'70 HIGH LIGHT 
2x2 SLIDE PROJECTOR 

TRIPLES THE LIGHT OUTPUT OF A "STANDARD" KODAK 
CAROUSEL SLIDE PROJECTOR 

Retains all features of original Kodak 
slide projector. 

No chfionge to automatic focus, dis- 
solve, remote control and programmer 
inputs. 

Simple to operate. 
Double fan cooling system. 
Inexpensive replacement lamp. 
Easy portability— weight, 25 lbs. 
Self contained grey carrying case. 

Ideally suited for audio visual application in: 

BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS • TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT 

EDUCATION • MULTI-MEDIA PRESENTATIONS 




I3S) 



70 High Light Projector complete with 

Kodak Model 800 slide projector, slide 

troy, 3" or 5" lens & remote cord 

$675.00 

F.O.B. New York City 

Prices of other models available 

upon request. 

Dealership inquiries Invited 

Quantify discounts available 

High Light Division of 




PRESENTATION TECHNICAL AIDS. INC. 



630 Ninth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10036 



212-245-2577-1380 



APRIL, 1970 



43 



new products . . . 

continued 



moving parts tound in most pro- 
jectors and all parts which might 
require replacssment are easily 
accessible without major disas- 
sembling. The M is convertible 
from classroom to auditorium 
brightness. Several models are 
available. 

For more information write 
International Audio Visual, Inc.. 
Dept. BSC. 1 19 Blanclwni Street. 
Seattle, Wa.'ihington 98121. 



System Uses Both Sides 
Of Cassette Cartridge 

Teaching Dynamics model ID 
201 cassette sound projection sys- 
tem uses both sides of a stan- 
dard cassette cartridge giving up 
to two hours of programming 
from a sinsile cassette unit. It 




Quality-Bilt 

Film Shipping Cases 

• Best quality domestic fibre 

• Heavy steel corners for 
added protection 

• Durable 1" web straps 

• Large address card holder 
with positive retainer spring 

• Sizes from 400' to 2000' 
OTHER "QUALITY-UILT" ITEMS: 

Salon Print Shipping Cases 

Sound Slidefilm Shipping Cases 
(for Transcriptions & Filmstrips) 

Filmstrip Shipping Cases (hold up 
to 6 strips plus scripts ) 

Write direcl In 
matitdlacltirer lor cululog 

SCHUESSIER CASE CO. 

Div of Ludwig Industries 

2020 W. St. Paul Ave. 

Chicago, III. 60647 

Phone: 312-227-0027 



automatically programs any slide 
or film strip projector with re- 
mote capability. 

For additional information 




The programmer records its own 
sound and programming cues and 
playback is automatic. 

write Teaching Dynamics, Dept. 
BSC. Main and Cotton Streets. 
Philadelphia. P e n n s y I w a n i a 
19127. 



Birns & Sawyer Introduces 
Improved Gaffer Grip 

A Gaffer Grip with 5/8" stud 
to accept most professional lights, 
comes with rubber teeth and is 
designed as a heavy-duty acces- 
sory to clamp on chairs, pipes, 
doors, beams, or anything firm 
enough to use as a solid support. 

More information on the Gaf- 
fer Grip is available from Birns 
& Sawyer. Inc.. Dept. BSC. 1026 
N. Higliland Avenue, Los Ange- 
les. California 90038. 



Projector Designed for 
Time Motion Study 

The Model AAP-301 industri- 
al time motion study projector is 
designed for use in establishing 
performance rates, proving fair- 
ness in production requirements, 




^:o 



miproving uniform quality, elimi- 
nating wasteful rehandlings, 
training employees, etc. 

The unit has specially de- 
signed solid state circuit control 
that gives positive speeds from 
900-1500 frames per minute in 
increments of 50 and 100. with 
settings of 960 and 1440 for si- 
lent and sound film. Also in- 
cluded with this unit is a five dig- 
it, resettable frame counter for 
registering precise frame rates. 
For brochure #170, write La- 
javette Instrument Company, 
Dept. BSC. P. O. Box 1279, La- 
fayette. Indiana. 



Versatile Slimline II 
Produces Even Light 

The Slimline II high-intensity, 
continuous duty light source pro- 
duces an even pattern of light 
over a wide area. The rugged 
housing allows convection cool- 
ing, reducing heat-load and in- 
creasing unit life. Each of the 
four leaf style barndoors has its 
own spring-loaded hinge and can 




The Lafayette Analyzer is especially 
designed for industrial time/motion 
study. 



The Slimline II is available with a 
wide variety of accessories. 

be adjusted individually for posi- 
tive lighting control and sharp 
edge cut-off. 

Because of its small size and 
portability, the Slimline II is also 
ideal for field use. When the 
barndoors are closed several of 
the units can be packed together 
into small units of space. Models 
without barndoors are also avail- 
able. Write Bardwell & McAllis- 
ter. Inc.. Dept. BSC 895, 12164 
Sherman Way. North Hollywood. 
Calij. 91605.' 



Mor-Lite for Projection 
Without Darkening Room 

Mor-Lite, a 1000 watt lamp 
system using the autofocus Car- 



ousel type slide projector, is com- 
patible with all Carousel lenses 
and may be used with super 
slides. Lamp brilliance is variable 
from "off to "high". The addi- 
tional light is particularly desir- 
able in conference rooms where 
dimming of lights often impedes 




Mor-Lite provides far more light than 
the standard 500 watt machine lamp. 

good rapport between partici- 
pants. 

To assure proper cooling, the 
fan continues to run after the 
projector has been turned off and 
shuts off automatically when the 
projector has cooled. Further in- 
formation may be obtained by 
writing Fortune Audiovisual. 
Dept.^ BSC. 30-24 Broadway. 
Fair Lawn. New Jersey 07410. 



Packaged Sound System 
From Shure Brothers 

The Shure VA302 Vocal Mas- 
ter is a package sound system 
capable of meeting exacting pro- 
fessional requirements as either 
a portable or permanently in- 
stalled system. Features include 
a true V.U. meter (with two-po- 
sition meter sensitivity switch) 
that gives positive reference to 
actual output; low impedance 
Cannon connector microphone 
inputs; and a microphone level 




This sound system consists of con- 
trol console-amplifier and two speak- 
er columns 

output with impedance selector 
switch. 

For further information write 
Share Brothers. Inc.. Dept. BSC. 
222 Hartrev Ave.. Evanston. III. 
60204. 



44 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




industry news 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinilllllllllilMIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIMII 



Japan Wins Top IBA 
Television Award 

Japan won the tclcvisinn grand 

i sweepstakes in the lOtli annual 

International Broadcasting 

Awards with a commercial for 

i the Fuji Film Company produced 

bv the Tokyo Publicity Center. 

It was the first sweepstakes 
\ictory for a commercial pro- 
duced outside the United States 
in the history of the event. 

Radio sweepstakes honors 
were wi)n by a Colorado com- 
I mercial titled Fiif flier, (correct) 
which was produced for the Pla- 
teau Natural Gas Co. and the 
Broyles. Allebaugh & Davis ad- 
vertising agency of Denver by 
Don Spencer Productions, also of 
Denver. 

The two commercials thus 
emerged as the "world's best" se- 
lected from 3505 entries from 45 
nations in this year's competition 
sponsored by the Hollywood Ra- 
dio and Television Society. 

The Japanese commercial had 
been selected as the trophy win- 
ner in a special category for non- 
English language commercials 
en route to the sweepstakes hon- 
or. The Colorado commercial 
was the trophy winner in the 
radio numerous category. 

In all. trophy winners in 12 
television and eight radio cate- 
gories were announced and tro- 
phies presented by Hollywood 
celebrities at a gala dinner at- 
tended by 1000 advertising and 
broadcasting executives in the 
Century Plaza Hotel March 10. 

Carol Burnett, star of her own 
CBS Television show, was hon- 
ored at the dinner as "Woman 
of the Year" in broadcasting. A 
special award also was made to 
Brig. Gen. David Sarnoff, retired 
chairman of the board of the Ra- 
dio Corporation of America, as 
"Man of the Century in Com- 
munications." 

Russell C. Stoneham. director 
of program development for 
M-G-M Television, was IBA 
general chairman. 

TV winners included: 
Category 1. Truck Swcnc (or 



APRIL, 1970 



Mcicccles-lkMi/.. .XgciitN : Ogiivy & 
Mathoi'. Prodnccr: l''iliii\\ a\ s ol 
( 'aliloniia. 

C'ategory 2: Caiiclicl Kids lor 
llalliiiark Cards. .•Vj;eiKy; Foote, 
Cone & Hcldint;. Producer: \. Lee 
Lac\ . 

Category .3. Eskimo for Heecli- 
Xiit, Inc. Agency: Young 6; Rul)i- 
c.iin. Producer: Horn Criner Pro- 
ductions. 

Categor) 4. FjiuitalAc Savings 
Builds for Equitable Savings & 
Loan. Agenc>': Chiat Day. Pro- 
fhicer: Klein Barzman Hecht. 

Category 5. 'Sew Technique for 
Coca-Cola Export Co. Agenc> : 
Hansen-Ruhersohm-McCann-Erick- 
son. Producer: Supreme Films 
( Sydne>', Australia). 

CategorN' 6. Bronco for Gale\ 6; 
Lord. Agency: Do\le Dane Bern- 
bach. Producer: .'MtonMelsky Pro- 
tluctions. 

Categor) S. Pass-lnj for Schen- 
ley Industries. Agency: Gilbert 
.\dvertising. Producer: Tele\ideo 
Productions. 

Category 9. Lovers lor Pacific 
Northwest Bell. Agenc\ : .\IcCann- 
Erickson. Producer: N. Lee Lacey 

Categorx' 10: Funeral for New 
York Urban Coalition. Agency: 
Young & Ruhicam. Producer: 
Horn Criner Productions. 

Categor\- 11. Newshunter for 
W'ABC-TV. Agency: The Lambert 
Agency. Producer: Audio Produc- 
tions. 

Category- liZ: Great Sil-ln. Every 
Aiig/c, Dry Society for Proctor fv- 
Gamble. Agenc\ : Benton & Bowles. 
Producer: Harold Becker Produc- 
tions. 



Mel Richman Acquires 
Glenn Bernard Productions 

Mel Richman, Inc., has ac- 
quired the complete facilities and 
services of Glenn Bernard Film 
Productions, based in Philadel- 
phia and New York. 

Bernard, a 20-year veteran of 
TV and film production, will 
function as director and execu- 
tive producer of all A-V require- 
ments for Richman. according 
to Thomas Paul, executive vice 
president. 

Mel Richman Inc. creative 
marketins services in Bala Cvn- 



wyd. Pa., offers total creative 
services to clients including such 
things as package design, direct 
mail, A-V production, product 
introduction, merchandising and 
media services. 



Tom Hope to Publish 
Annual A-V Market Report 

"Market Review; Nt)ntheatri- 
cal Film and Audio-Visual," 
which has been printed in the 
Joiinud of the SMPTE (Society 
of Motion Picture and Television 
Engineers) since its inception in 
1959. will now be published per- 
sonally by its long-time author. 
Tom Hope 

Hope is leaving the Eastman 
Kodak Company to devote full 
time to audiovisual communica- 
t'on market reports and consult- 
ing work. 

He anticipates releasing lour 
market reviews by mid-summer: 
a general-type report such as that 
desired by security analysts; one 
on the education, religious and 
related markets; another on the 
business, industrial and govern- 
ment markets; and a compre- 
hensive survey of the entire field 
including product studies and 
other data designed for manage- 
ment use. 

Additional reoorts are in the 
planning stage for later release. 

The reports will be issued by 
the new firm, H(^i>e Reports, at 
58 Carverdale Drive. Rochester, 
New York 1 46 1 8. 



Screenways Slates Series 
On Children in U.S. 

C'liiUlreii. Anieriea, a six part 
documentary series has been 
scheduled for production b\ 
Screenways, New York. Planned 
as a dramatic journal of the cur- 
rent life of American children 
from birth to teens, the films will 
be made with the cooperation of 
HEW's Office of Child Devel- 
opment. The series will include 
Continued on ne.xi !>ai;e 



f CREATE THE 
I Right MOOD 
I EVERY TIME 

I with the 

I MAJOR" 

PRODUCTION 

MUSIC 
LIBRARY 

"MAJOR" offers you a full 
I 70 hours of background 
I production music for titles, 
! bridges, background— for 
; scoring, editing, recording and 
; dubbing music for your: 
: • FEATURE PRODUCTIONS 

; • DOCUMENTARIES 

i • TV FILMS 

: • SLIDE FILMS 

I • ANIMATION 

I • INDUSTRIAL FILMS 

: • SALES PRESENTATIONS 
I • COMMERCIALS 

: • EDUCATIONAL 

: "MAJOR" specializes in sound 
: — you get exceptional technical 
: know-how and beautifully- 
: recorded original music on 
: LP records or lA-lnch Tape, 
: or on 16 or 35mm Mag. 
E Tape ready for a mix. 

; IMPORTANT; "Major" owns i>i own 
E copyrights on all production mood 
: music in its library. World rights 
E available to you on a completely 
E sound legal basis. Re-recording rights 
E available on a "per selection" or "un- 
E limited use" flat fee arrangement. 



= WRITE FOR 135-PAGE CATAIOGUE TO 

i THOMAS J. VALENTINO 

EiNCORPORATED 

= Esfab/is/ied 1932 

= 150 W. 46 St. New York 10036 
I or phone (212) 246-4675 

= Also available: Detailed Catalogue 
H of our complete LP library of 
= 47] Sound Effects. 



45 



NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF AUDIO-VISUAL DEALERS 



EASTERN STATES 



. MAINE • 

Headlight Film Service, 104 Ocean 
St., So. Portland. 799-6100 

• WASfflNGTON • 

"The" Film Center, 915 12th St. 
NW, Washington, D. C. 20005 
(202) 393-1205 

• NEW YORK • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 1775 
Broadway, New York 10019. 
Phone 212/JUdson 2-4060 

Projection Systems, Incorporated, 

202 East 44th Street, New York, 
10036 (212) MU 2-0995 

Visual sciences, Suffern, N.Y. 
10901 

• PENNSYLVANIA • 

I. P. Lilley & Son, Inc., Box 3035, 
2009 N. Third St., Harrisburg 
17105, (717) 238-8123 

Oscar H. Hirt, Inc., 41 N. 11th St. 
Philadelphia, 19107. Phone: 
215/923-0650 

Audio Visuals Center, 14 Wood St., 
Pittsburgh 15222, Sales, Rentals, 
& Repairs. 471-3313 

L. C. Vath Audio Visuals, 449 N. 
Hermitage Rd., Sharpsville, 
16150. 342-5204. 

• VIRGINIA • 

Stanley Projection Co., 1808 Rap- 
ides, Alexandria 71301. 318-443- 
0464 



SOUTHERN STATES 



• FLORIDA . 

Jack Freeman's, 2802 S. MacDill 
Ave., Tampa (813) 839-5374 



• GEORGIA • 

Colonial Films, 752 Spring St. 
N.W. 404/875-8823, Atlanta 
30308 



MIDWESTERN STATES 



• ILLINOIS • 
The Jam Handy Organization, 230 

North Michigan Avenue, Chica- 
go 60601. State 2-6757 



• MICHIGAN • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 2821 
E. Grand Blvd., Detroit 48211. 
Phone: 313/TR 5-2450 



• MISSOURI • 

Cor-rell Communications Co., 5316 
Pershing, St. Louis 63112. 
Equipment rental (314) 
FO 7-1111 

Swank Motion Pictures, Inc., 201 S. 

Jefferson Ave., St. Louis 63166. 
(314) 534-6300. 

• OHIO • 

Academy Film Service, Inc., 2110 
Payne Ave., Cleveland 44114. 

Sunray Films, Inc., 2005 Chester 
Ave., Cleveland 44114 

Twyman Films, Inc., 329 Salem 
Ave., Dayton 45401 

M. H. Martin Company, 1118 Lin- 
coln Way E., Massillon. 

Cousino Visual Education, 1945 
Franklin Ave., Toledo 43601. 
(419) 246-3691. 



WESTERN STATES 



• CALIFORNIA • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 305 

Taft Building, 1680 N. Vine St., 
Hollywood 90028. HO 3-2321 

Photo & Sound Company, 870 

Monterev Pass Road, Monterey 
Park, 91754. Phone: (213) 264- 
6850. 

Ralke Company, Inc. A-V Center, 

641 North Highland Ave., Los 
Angeles 36. (213) 933-7111 

• SAN FRANCISCO AREA • 

Photo & Sound Company, 116 Na- 

toma St., San Francisco 94105. 
Phone: 415/GArfield 1-0410. 

• COLORADO • 

Cromars' Audio-Visual Center, 

1200 Stout St., Denver 80204. 
Colorado Visual Aids, 955 Ban- 
nock, Denver 80204, 303/255- 
5408 

• NEW MEXICO • 

University Book Store Allied Sup- 
ply Company, 2122 Central East, 
Albuquerque 87106. 

• OREGON • 

Moore's Audio Visual Center, Inc., 

234 S.E. 12th Ave., Portland 
97214. Phone: 503/233-5621. 

• UTAH • 

Deseret Book Company, 44 East 
South Temple St., Salt Lake, 10. 

• W^ASHINGTON • 

Photo & Sound Company, 1205 
North 45th St., Seattle 98103. 
206/ME 2-8461 



industry news 



continued 



examination of the long-range 
impact of the first five years, the 
homeless runaways, institution- 
alized children, the poor and the 
hungry, and drug users and delin- 
quents. 

Supers Productions 
Shoots Original in 8 

Dudley Hosea and Fred Wal- 
terreit have opened Super 8mm 
Productions in Anaheim, Califor- 
nia, to serve budget-restricted 
film clients by filming entirely in 
the Super 8 format. 

One of their first completed 
projects is a sales promotion film 
shot at the Anaheim Convention 
Center during the Motorcycle and 
Accessory trade show and cur- 
rently being shown to dealers 
throughout the West. 

LaBelle Expanding its 
Plant Facilities 

In a move aimed at meeting 
a growing demand for its Prod- 
ucts, LaBelle Industries in Ocon- 
omowoc, Wisconsin has ex- 
panded in manufacturing, engi- 
neering and research facilities. 

The new addition to the plant 
provides an extra 8500 square 
feet to the electronic assembly 
department, and 3000 square 
feet to the general offices and 
engineering/research facilities. 

Coffin/Christensen Add 
Partner in Seattle 

Coffin/Christensen P r o d u c- 
tions, 619 East Pine Street, Seat- 
tle, Washington, has taken on a 
new partner and changed its 



name to Coffin, Christensen, 
Todd. Inc. 

With the change in name and 
in personnel, the firm is broaden- 
ing its horizons, expanding its 
views of life and offering wider 
communications services to its 
clients. 

The new partner, K. P. Todd, 
Jr.. was formerly public lelations 
manager for Pacific Northwest 
Bell in Seattle. 



Swartwouts Open New 
Arizona Film Center 

Scottsdale, Arizona's first mo- 
tion picture studio complex was 
opened recently when the new 
Arizona Film Center Building 
was occupied by four separate 
organizations specializing in serv- 
ices relating to the production of 
theatrical and sponsored films. 

The largest occupant and own- 
er of the building is Swartwout 
Film Productions. 

Closely associated with the 
company is Bruce Henry, veteran 
free-lance writer-producer, who 
acted as creative consultant to 
the Swartwouts. Henry retired to 
Scottsdale a few years ago, but 
became interested in the new 
company and has written and 
been active in its productions 
ever since. 

Other occupants of the center 
are the Bobby Ball talent agency, 
the leading supplier of talent in 
Arizona; Gerald "Dink" Read, 
cinematographer; and Sherman 
Goodrich's "Artimation" unit 
which produces motion picture 
animation. 




LAB TECHNICIANS 

Major Chicago lob has positions 
open for experienced motion 
picture printer operator and 
16mm color timers. Top pay for 
experienced people. Send re- 
sume tO: 

Box 71 

BUSINESS SCREEN 

402 West Liberty Drive 

Wheaton, Illinois 60187 



FREE LANCE WRITERS 

with experience on films involv- 
ing environmental problems pre- 
ferred, thougfi not necessary. 
State background and avail- 
ability. Good rates. 

Box 70 

BUSINESS SCREEN 

402 West Liberty Drive 

Wheaton, Illinois 60187 



46 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



Kinescopes 

from 

Helical 

Videotapes 

Almost any format tape. 
Custom Quality. 16mm, 
8mm, Super 8. Cartridges. 



(^ 



Reeves Actron 

565 FKtti Avenue. New York. N. Y. 10017 
(212) 687-6586 



9* SUPER-8 ^ Smmorll 

0] TKaace DUPLICATES 



Finest-Quality Kodaclirome 
COLOR or BLACK & WHITE 

PROFESSIONALS: Wa are Specialists in . . . 8mm 
to l*mm Blow-Ups. * 35mm or 14mm to 8mm or 
Sup«r-8 Reductions -^ A & B Roll Printing. * 8mm 
a l*mm Eastman Internets. * 8mm t Itmm Eastman 
Color Release Prints. * B 4 W Reversal Dupes. • 
Dup Negs. •*■ B & W Positive Release Prints. •* Single 
8mm Printing. * Soundstripinq, Splicing, Etc. 

t^ FAST SERVICE on Mail-Orders. 

t^ Finest QUALITY Work. 

i^ Guaranteed SATISFACTION! 

if it -k 

Send for our latest PROFESSIONAL Price-LIsf. 

Write Dept. S 



f¥<xUtfW<KyeC VAtlEY f\lfA LABS. 

2704 W. OLIVE Ave., BURBANKy CALIF. 91505 



[title] 

TITLE DESIGN 
COLOR CORRECTION 
BACKGROUND ART 
RETOUCHING 
SLIDES FOR TV 

723 SEWARD ST 469-1663 
HOLLYWOOD. CALIFORNIA 90038 



HOUSE 



ILLUSTRATION 
HAND LETTERING 
PHOTO LETTERING 
HOT PRESS TITLES 
SILK SCREEN 





reference shelf 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Surveillance/Time Lapse Camera 

A brochure describing the Newman 
"Newmark" surveillance/time lapse se- 
quence camera is available. The camera fea- 
tures 107 degree undistorted field of view 
on a P/2" X 5" negative format and is de- 
signed for use in banks, military, industrial 
and retail establishments, for mob activity 
documentation, on-site or in-plant elliciency 
studies, etc. 

For a copy of the brochure, write New- 
man Company. Photographic Division, Dept. 
BSC. 36-770 Cathedral Canyon Drive, 
Cathedral City, Calif. 92234. 



RCA Brochure and Catalog Data 

A 12-page brochure and series of cata- 
log sheets detail the complete complement 
of color television equipment offered by 
RCA's Professional Electronic Systems De- 
partment. The brochure provides an over- 
view of color cameras, color film systems 
and video tape recorders. Several typical 
TV systems for instructional and training 
applications are depicted. 

For copies, write RCA Professional Elec- 
tronic Systems, Dept. BSC, Building 15-5, 
Camden. New Jersey 08102. Request form 
3J5558. 



Television in Training Booklet 

"Straight Talk About Television and 
Training" is a booklet addressed to training 
directors and provides useful general infor- 
mation on the role of TV in training. 

Write for copies of Training — Form 
3J5561, to RCA Professional Electronic 
Systems. Dept. BSC, Building 15-5, Cam- 
den. New Jersey 0H\Q2. 



Ampex Fact Sheet 

A specification sheet describing the Am- 
pex BC-210M monochrome broadcast tele- 
vision camera is available. The BC-2I0M. 
designed for studio and remote use, is a 
monochrome version of the Ampex BC-2I0 
color television camera. The BC-210M is 
designed to be easily converted to BC-210 
performance level, a capability which allows 
users to avoid new camera expenses in- 
curred when making the transition from 
monochrome to color television. Request 
Bulletin V262 from Mail Stop 7-13, Dept. 
BSC Ampex Corporation. 401 Broadway. 
Redwood City, California. 94063. 




a color Dovie 
iroD a film strip? 



art, linn clips I 
&products 
SYiieliroiiiKcil 
t» voice, iiiiisie, 
soiiiiil effeefssi 

ON8MH&16HH 



For private 

nformat 



ing, 
ion, 



detaile 
and FOTOMATION film 
producer's timetable, 
,call A! Stahl(212) 265-2942, 



animated 

PRODUCTIONS. IMC. 

I600 Broadway Vvw York IOOI9 



APRIL, 1970 



47 



We have a 

New LAB Price 

List for you, 

mot/on pictures 

filmstrips 

slides 



Write, phone 

bebell 



416 West 45 St. 
New York 10036 

(2/2)245-8900 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Animated Productions 47 

Arriflex Corp 4-5 

Audio Productions 11 

Bardwell & McAlister 18 

Bebell & Bebell Color Labs, Inc 48 

Berkey ColorTran Third Cover 

Better Selling Bureau 22 

Bohn Benton, Inc 9 

Byron Motion Pictures 3 

Camera Mart, Inc., The 26 

Canan USA, Inc 25 

Cine Magnetics, Inc 28 

Cine 60 19 

Colburn, George W., Laboratory, Inc. ..36 

Comprehensive Service Corp 47 

Consolidated Film Industries 16 

Da-Lite Screen Company, Inc 20 

De Wolfe Music Library, Inc 47 

Du Art Film Labs 19 

Du Kane Corp 26 

Eastman Kodak Company 35 

Eclair Corporation of America 41 

EIco Optisonics 6 

Fischer/Cygnet 39 

iHandy Organization, The Jam 

Fourth Cover 

Hazeltine Corp 7 



Hollywood Valley Film Labs 47 

Magno Sound 36 

Modern Talking Picture Service, 

Inc Second Cover 

Musifex, Inc 43 

Nagra Magnetic Recorders, Inc 22 

Paillard, Inc 37 

Plastic Reel Corp. of America i 

Presentation Technical Aids, Inc 43 

Rapid Film Technique 22 

Reela Films, Inc 27 

Reeves Actron 47 

Ross, Charles, Inc 13 

Schuessler Case Co., The 44 

SOS Photo-Cine-Optics, Inc 8 

Spindler & Sauppe, Inc 15 

Strauss, Henry & Co., Inc 17 

Title House 47 

United Air Lines 10 

United World Films 23 

Valentino, Thomas J., Inc 45 

Vision Associates 21 

VPI Coior Center 24 



Wilson, H., Corp. 



.20 



the 

last word 







By ION B. GREGORY 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



Here's How to Start Your 
Own Videotape Facility 

TT IS RELATIVELY EASY to 

•■- get started making your own 
videotape programs. Minimum 
equipment needed to produce a 
videotape is a camera for con- 
verting visual images into electri- 
cal signals, a tripod for securing 
the camera, a microphone for 
picking up sound, a videotape 
recorder for recording the sig- 
nals, a reel of magnetic tape for 
providing the recording surface, 
and a television set for viewing 
the picture. 

Cables for connecting the cam- 
era, recorder and TV set, as well 
as for power, are provided with 
the equipment. 

A simple, professional closed 



circuit videotape recording sys- 
tem may be obtained for approx- 
imately $2,000 to $2,500. And, 
most manufacturers today pro- 
vide operating instructions at 
your location, offer complex 
training courses and seminars, 
and provide innumerable books, 
pamphlets and directions for 
producing successful program- 
ming. 

Today's business, regardless of 
size, is missing a good bet if it 
is not at least considering poten- 
tial applications of videotape re- 
cording within the next 18 
months. 

Indications of the very rapid 
rise of VTR usage is everywhere. 
Most closed circuit videotape re- 
corders purchased today are for 



the purpose of producing and 
playing original videotapes. And, 
even though the business and in- 
dustry market accounts for about 
30 per cent of VTR equipment in 
use (education is first — 55%), 
it is expanding more rapidly than 
any other market. 



A Growing Market Despite 
Lack of Standards 

Despite criticism from users, 
producers and others, the Super 
8 format continues to grow at a 
rapid pace. Most authorities now 
feel that the Super 8 format will 
simply co-exist with the standard 
16mm format. 

This thinking was reflected 
earlier this year at an SMPTE 
meeting by Douglas S. Fletcher, 
general manager of Technicolor's 
Commercial and Educational 
Division. 

"We now have Super 8 film 
standards for picture-to-sound 
separation from SMPTE." But, 
Fletcher noted that of seven Su- 
per 8 magnetic sound projector 
manufacturers, four have not 
conformed to the standards. A 
more heartening indication is that 
the three optical sound projector 



manufacturers have adopted a 
standard. 

The question of optical vs 
magnetic is still not settled, and 
there are no present indications 
that it will be in the near future. 
The preferred format — contin- 
uous loop or reel-to-reel — will 
be settled in the marketplace ac- 
cording to Fletcher. 

It would seem to us that the 
sooner a firm standard is estab- 
lished, the better the entire mar- 
ket would be. Right now, it is the 
user who suffers, being uncertain 
of which direction to go, and then 
not always have exactly the soft- 
ware he wants universally avail- 
able. 



Congratulations 

1970 marks the 25th anniver- 
sary of Jack Lieb Productions in 
Chicago. Our congratulations 
are extended to Jack Lieb, who 
founded the company which to 
date has produced more than 500 
films and 1 ,000 television com- 
mercials. 

This year also marks the 2 1st 
anniversary of the Film Produc- 
ers Association of New York. 

pbiht & period 



48 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



The difference is. 




Gelatran is not like any other color media.! Daylight and incandescent conversion 

The difference is the unique deep dye i colors available in sheets and rolls. 

process v»/hich chemically links the ^, i„.„ ^„^« on" ,.,iho 

^ J Arc correction colors come 30 wide. 

color t-h-r-u-o-u-t the Mylar^*' (not just 
washed on the surface). 




Deep dyed Gelatran is: 

— Heat resistant 

— Doesn't dry out — Won't tear 

— Moisture proof 

— Resists fading for longerlife 




Tear-off box for easy handling 
and storage. 



# 



Write for detailed literature and 

sample swatchbook. 

Quality -Service -Innovation Befkey-Colortran, InC. 

1015 Chestnut Street, Burbank, Calif. 91502 (213) 843-1200 



^ijsssas 



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flNCST COLOR MEDIA FOR INDOOR/ OUTDOOR MOTION PICTURt TELEVISION. 
THEATRE, AND STILL PHOTOORAPHIC LIQMTINS APPLICATIONS. 



BerkeylA 

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To Get 



Visual Impact 

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in your Presentati<|jns 




Comprehensive Consultation Services on: 



Group Meeting Services 
Sales Meetings 
Stoclcholders Meetings 
Seminars 

Convention Assistance 
Visualized Talks 
Speech Coaching 
Picturizations 
Meeting Guides 
Projection Equipment 
Meeting Packages 
Portable Stagettes 
Field Surveys 
Field Services 
Closed-Circuit TV 



Training Services 
Quality Control 

Programs 
Foreman Training 
Supervisory Training 
Management 

Development 
Vocational Training 
Sales Training 
Distributor Training 
Retail Training 
Training Devices 
Training Manuals 
Quiz Materials 
Utilization Assistance 
Closed-Circuit TV 
Stimulation Programs 



Group Meeting Implementation 
Motion Picture Plans 

and Specifications 
Storyboards 
Animated Cartoons 
Filmstrips, Slides and 

Slidefilms 
Tape Recordings 
Disc Recordings 
Transparencies 
Pictorial Booklets 
Turnover and Flip Charts 
Programmed Projection 
Film Distribution 

Theatrical 

Non-theatrical 
Closed-Circuit TV 



Project Supervision, with Total Responsibility for Security, 
as in National Defense Projects 

7^ ZPlVI handy (^^a^t^aZ!^^ 



is set up to help you! 



NEW YORK 

212- JU 2-4060 



DETROIT 

313 -TR 5-2450 



CHICAGO 

312 -ST 2-6757 



ATLANTA 

404 - 688-7499 



HOLLYWOOD 

213-463-2321 



OLS, TECHNIQUES AND IDEAS FOR AUDIOVISUAL COMMUI 




AUDIOVISUALS 



W 



TRAINING 



""' "■■■ it 


1 

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4 




Plus . . 



^ ( 



I 



PR FILMS- 
Coming or Coin 



What can executives do 
until their plane takes off? 




m:- 






* 









They can follow the jet stream of thou- 
sands of other executives — and wing 
over to Modern's Skyport Cinemas — 
the free airport movie lounges that 
offer travelers a varied program of in- 
teresting business shorts. 

Films about science. Industry. 
Sports. Travel. And social documen- 
taries. All produced by progressive, 
PR-minded companies like Anheuser- 
Busch, Bethlehem Steel, Buick, and Eli 
Lilly. And by almost a hundred other sponsors who 
use this unique opportunity to both entertain and 
inform hard-to-reach executives. 

If you have a film you'd like to get off the ground, 




Modern's Skyport Cinemas can give you the boost 
you need. They're a powerful way to tell your story 
to a fast-moving and highly influential market — the 
top-flight executives. 



Skyport Cinemas are located at airports in Atlanta, Minneapolis -St. Paul, New York, Kansas City, 
Denver, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Detroit, Pittsburgh, Seattle, Honolulu. 

SKYPORT CINEMA 

A Division of Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc., 1212 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10036 Tel. 765-3100 



lU 




How do you want your 8MM ? 
Super or standard ? Color or 
black and white? Optical or 
contact printed ? Silent or sound ? 
Magnetic or optical track? 
Do you need complete lab 
work or just loading ? 
How about titles? Music? 
Optical effects ? 

Reela can do it. 

Our recently completed 
facilities are the most 
sophisticated in the world . . . 
in layout, in equipment, in 
techniques. To top it off, 
all 8MM loading is done under 
"clean room" conditions. ^ 



Send your first order now. 
Or if you want further 
information, write for our new 
price list to Dept. 007 
Reela Film Laboratories, 
65 N.W. Third Street, 
Miami, Florida 33128. 



FILM 
LABORATORIES.INC. 



A Dmision o( Womeico Enteipfises, Inc. 

Phone (305) 377-2611 

New York (212) 279-8555 

or call Reela in Miami collect. 



MAY, 1970 



0. H. COEU.N 

Founder and 
Consultant 




BUSINESS SCREEN 

MAY, 1970 • VOLUME 31 • NUMBER 5 



ROBERT SEYMOUR, JR. 

Publisher 

LON B.GREGORY 

Editor & 
Assistant Publisher 

NOREEN OSTLER 

Editorial Assistant 

AUDREY RIDDELL 

Advertising Service Mgr. 



EDITORIAL AND 
ADVERTISING OFFICES 

402 West Liberty Drive 

Wheaton, Illinois 60187 

Phone (312) 653-4040 



REGIONAL OFFICES 



EAST: 

ROBERT SEYMOUR, JR. 

757 Third Avenue 
New York, N.Y. 10017 
Phone: (212) 572-4853 

MIDWEST: 

MONAHAN/HUGHES 
& ASSOCIATES 

540 Frontage Road 

Northfield, 111.60093 

Phone: (312) 446-8484 

WEST: 

H. L. MITCHELL 

Western Manager 

1450 Lorain Rd. 

San Marino, Calif. 91108 

Phone: (213) 283-4394 

463-4891 



This Month's Features 

Growth of Audiovisuals in Training: Source Guide 21 

Executives Learn as Their Time Permits 22 

Realism Key to Firefighter Training 23 

Versaltile Projectors Add Meaning to Self-Learning 27 

Multi-Media for Multi-Sites: "Will Travel" Programs 28 

Foreign Policy for the Citizen: Film Review 30 

The Quiet Voice of Creativity: Producer Profile 31 

PR Films — Coming or Going? by Shirley Smith 34 

IFPA Journal: Current Events and Activities 37 



Departments 

Right Off the Newsreel: Late News Reports 6 

The Screen Executive: Personnel Notes 10 

The Audiovisual Calendar: Upcoming Events 14 

The Camera Eye: Commentary by O. H. Coelln 16 

New Products Review: New Tools and Equipment 39 

Industry News: Along the Film/ Tape Production Line 44 

The National Directory of Audiovisual Dealers 46 

Business Screen Marketplace: Classified Advertising 46 

Reference Shelf: Helpful Books and Literature 46 

Index to Advertisers in This Issue 48 

The Last Word: Observation and Comment 48 



ABP 



A HARCOURT, BRACE & WORLD PUBLICATION 

Harbrace Publications, Inc. 



BUSINESS SCREEN is published monthly by Harbrace Publications, Inc., 402 Weit Liberty Drive, Wheaton, 
Illinois 60187, a subsidiary of Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc. Telephone: (312) 653-4040. Subscription 
rates: One year, $5; two years, $8; three years, $'0, in the U.S. and Canada. Other countries: $10 
per year. Single copies: 75t in U.S. and Canada; oil other countries: $2. Controlled circulation postage 
paid at Rochelle, Illinois 61068. Copyright 1970 by Harbrace Publications, Inc. Trodemark registered 
with U.S. Patent Office. Address correspondence concerning circulation only to Harbrace Building, 
Duluth, Minnesota 55802. Address all other correspondence to BUSINESS SCREEN, 402 West liberty 
Drive, Wheaton, Illinois 60187. POSTMASTER: Please send Form 3579 to BUSINESS SCREEN, Harbrace 
Building, Duluth, Minnesota 55802. 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




e leaaer 



HEAD 



D 




UNIVERSAL 
LEADER 

SMPTE 
UNIVEKSAL 
LEADER 



SMPTE 
UNIVERSilL 
LEADER 



byron 



MOTION PICTURES 



65 K Street, Northeost, Woshington, D.C. 20002 • 202/783-2700 

World's Most Sophisticated Film Laboratory 



AAAY, 1970 



ARRIFLEX 35 'does its thing' 

for improvised Atianta Festival 

award-iflfinner/'RECESS" 



Suddenly spontaneity is the thing — in the life style of youth, in the 
films they make, demand to see. Filling the demand comes "Recess". 
Looks like it worked. Not altogether complementary to its subject- 
American values and living patterns— its thematic and technical 
candor helped it take the Golden Phoenix, top award in the 1969 
Atlanta International Film Festival, 

Minimal sets and costumes, improvised action, free wheeling cam- 
era techniques, symbolism, metaphores both visual and literary— 
"Recess" might once have been pigeonholed as 'Underground'. 
But its thematic outlook has emerged into the mainstream, in this 
case backed by a crew of impeccable professionalism. Producer, 
William E. Barnes spent seven years as story editor for Otto Prem- 
inger; DP George Silano has such TV features as "Hunger in 
America" and "N.Y.P.D." behind him; and Director, Rule Royce 
Johnson zeroes in on his film's techniques during years of directing 
for the stage, including the original production of "Recess" at the 
esteemed Off-Broadway theatre, Cafe La Mama. 

The difficulty with the improvisational shooting technique used in 
"Recess" is the relative chaos it requires— when spontaneity is the 
spicing you want, overpreparation will likely dull the flavor. "The 
actors would get deeply into their parts", said Mr. Silano, "impro- 
vising some of the most intense performances I'd ever seen. So you 
look at the footage counter and— you're running out of film Spend 
more than a few seconds reloading and the actor looks like a de- 
flated automobile tire. You've got to be shooting again almost in- 
stantly, while that pressure's still in him. If he takes it from the top 
again, he'll improvise a whole new movie. And that, more than any- 
thing else, is how the Arri 'made' this film. No other 35 would have 
let me work fast enough. It was the magazines, the viewfinder, its 
hand-holdability— the whole thing's |ust geared for speed, for the 
unexpected," 

"Recess" represents the latest approach to filmic expression, but 
the groundwork that led to its style laid by the Arriflex, Cinema 
Verite and similar styles were first practiced with the Arriflex— the 
only 35 small enough, fast enough to be used for the high-pitched, 
intense, deeply-involved camerawork now part of the grammar of 
contemporary films. But film is the most dynamic art, and yet 
newer styles will surely evolve. If the past is a valid teacher, it is 
certain that the Arriflex, now entering its fourth decade as the most 
versatile filming tool, will continue as the malleable, obedient instru- 
ment used by the next generation of innovators. 



JIRRIFIEX 

. r^ CORPORATION Of AMERICA 



Woodside, N.Y. 11377 • Burbank, Calif. 91502 . 




Camera Operator Michael Livesey 



Director of Photography George Silano 



Director RuEe Royce Johnson 



MAY, 1970 




right off the newsreel 



iiiii iiiniiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Knox Lenticular Screens 
Selected for 747 Jets 

The lenticular screen pattern 
developed by Knox Manufactur- 
ing Company of Wood Dale, 
Illinois has been selected for use 
by Inflight Motion Pictures on 
the new Boeing 747 Super Jets. 

This screen pattern features 
an optically perfected vertical/ 
horizontal silver lenticular sur- 
face to give maximum projection 
brilliance with a minimum of 
fade-off on side viewing angles. 
It is especially desirable in par- 
tially lighted areas, such as the 
interior cabin of the new Super 
Jets. 

Inflight Motion Pictures will 
use the Knox screen pattern on 
eight major airlines utilizing the 
Inflight system in their new Boe- 
ing 747 Super Jets. These air- 



lines include TWA, Northwest, 
Air France. Alitalia, BOAC, 
Iberia, Japan Air Lines, and 
Lufthansa. 



F&B Ceco Opens New 
Hollywood Editing Center 

One of the most complete edit- 
ing centers in the nation has 
been opened at 1041 N. High- 
land in Hollywood by F&B Ceco. 

The ground floor of the two- 
story building houses a large and 
varied stock of editing and VTR 
equipment. According to the 
company, the new facility marks 
the first time editors can find 
everything they need under one 
roof. 

On the upper floor of the cen- 
ter there are 25 cutting rooms 



where a producer can actually 
select the kind of equipment he 
prefers: Moviola, Prevost, Steen- 
beck. Keller CTM or any other 
table available. 

Twelve production offices, 
available furnished or unfur- 
nished, are equipped with ad- 
joining doors so any multiple of 
rooms may be used. A projec- 
tion room with facilities for in- 
terlock screenings is also avail- 
able to occupants. 



Cornell Plans Unique 
Summer Film Session 

An opportunity to make a film 
with a famous independent film 
maker will be the feature of a 
Film Production Studio which is 
a part of a broad Summer Ses- 



sion program to be held at Cor- 
nell University, Ithaca, New 
York. July 2 to August 14. 

Students will have the oppor- 
tunity of learning and taking part 
at all phases of producing a fea- 
ture length film: camera work, 
recording, lighting, acting, edit- 
ing and other studio activities. 
Company members will have 
access to a sound stage, record- 
ing studios, editing facilities and 
a wide variety of photographic 
equipment. 

In addition to students, the 
company will consist of the film 
maker, who will direct the entire 
film; a master cinematographer; 
and two production technicians. 
The total program will be super- 
vised by Professor Gordon Beck, 
director of the Cornell Univer- 
Continued on page 8 



Anybody need footage 

of an airplane? 






• Stock footage of jets, piston and histori- 
cal aircraft in 35 and 16MM Color or Black 
and White available free to producers for 
authentic airline sequences. 

• 16MM Mini-libraries available in Chicago 
and New York, with immediate service on 
color print and masters. 

• Jet mockups for interior filming available 
in New York and Hollywood. 

CALL UNITED AIR LINES 
PUBLICITY DEPARTMENT 

Atlanta . 523-5517 

Chicago 726-5500 

Denver 398-4535 

Detroit 963-9770 

Honolulu 547-2727 

Los Angeles 482-3620 

New York 922-5225 

Pittsburgh 391-9777 

San Francisco 397-2620 

Seattle 682-2121 

Washington, D.C 737-6830 

Write for catalog: 

United Air Lines Film Library 

626 Wilshire Boulevard 

Los Angeles, California 90017 



United Air Lines. 




BUSINESS screen; 

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MOTION PICTURE LABORATORIES 
HOLLYWOOD :: CHICAGO NEW YORK 



MAY, 1970 



right off the newsreel 



continued 



sity Cinema. Company members 
will be enrolled in Theatre Arts 
370 for six hours of undergrad- 
uate or graduate level credit. 
Meetings will be held daily and 
production sessions will be as- 
signed throughout the day and 
evening. 

The film will be conceived 
and scripted by the director and 
will be free of any constraints 
of commercial enterprises. It will 
be shot on the Cornell campus 
and the surrounding Ithaca area 
during the period July 2 to Au- 
gust 14. A work print "in prog- 
ress" wiU be screened publicly 
at the end of the session. Shoot- 
ing will be both synch and non- 
synch and will be in student 
hands. Public release of the film 
is expected. 

Further information and a 
copy of the Announcement of 
the Summer Session, 1970, 
which includes an application for 
admission, may be obtained from 
Professor Gordon Beck, B-20 
Ives Hall, Cornell University, 
Ithaca, New York 14850. 



Bardwell&McAlisterto 
Larger Hollywood Facility 

Bardwell & McAJister Inc., 
manufacturers of Fresnel and 
Quartz lighting equipment, has 
moved to a new and larger fa- 
cility at 12164 Sherman Way in 
North Hollywood, California. 

The new facility consists of 
1 3,800 square feet and houses 
both a complete showroom and 
a substantially enlarged plant. 
The increased manufacturing ca- 
pability will reportedly permit 
Bardwell & McAlister to speed 
up service to customers. 



Technology, Inc. Acquires 
Houston Fearless' Westwood 

Technology Incorporated has 
concluded an agreement to ac- 
quire the Westwood Division of 
Houston Fearless Corporation, 
Los Angeles, Technology's pres- 
ident, Maurice F. Krug said. The 
agreement — originally an- 
nounced in November 1969 was 



approved by the Houston Fear- 
less shareholders last month. 

Technology will rename West- 
wood the Cintel Corporation and 
operate it as a wholly-owned 
subsidiary. Cintel's officers are: 
Krug, board chairman; James E. 
Remmer, president and general 
manager; Fred Kobayashi, con- 
troller; George F. Hall, assistant 
controller; and James J. Mulli- 
gan, secretary. 



Hollywood Valley Labs 
Merged into Dymat Corp. 

Dr. Richard J. Goldberg and 
Kenneth C. Cleveland. Jr. recent- 
ly announced the formation of 
Dymat International Corpora- 
tion, with offices located at 14241 
Ventura Boulevard, Sherman 
Oaks, California. Dymat is en- 
gaged in the technology of cre- 
ating and reproducing images for 
the national and international 
photographic industry as well as 
for the pubUc. The principal in- 
vestors in Dymat are Sam Wyly 
and Charles J. Wyly, Jr., of Dal- 
las, Texas. 

Concurrently it was announced 
that Hollywood Valley Film 
Laboratories, Inc. of Burbank, 



California was merged into Dy- 
mat. 

Both Goldberg and Cleveland 
were previously vice presidents 
of Houston Fearless Corporation. 

Vernon G. Frith, who pre- 
viously owned Hollywood Val- 
ley Film Labs, will continue as 
its president. In addition, Frith 
was elected a vice president and 
board member of Dymat. 

Film Analyzer, Dynalens 
Win Academy Awards 

Academy Awards for techni- 
cal achievement were presented 
last month to Hazeltine Corpor- 
ation for its color film analyzer 
and to Dynaciences Corpora- 
tion for the Dynalens, introduced 
to professional cinematographers 
in 1968 by Alan Gordon Enter- 
prises. 

Dynalens is an electro-optical 
image stabilizing lens system. It 
eliminates camera vibrations 
through a system of electro- 
gyros. 

The Hazeltine Color Film An- 
alyzer makes it possible for lab- 
oratories to achieve optimum 
scene-to-scene color correction 
and balance before the film is 
committed to printing, thus elim- 
inating trial and error prints. • 



Sound-O-Matic * 

makes your 
slide projector talk. 

Gives you 
time to ponder ^ 
what it says. ^ 



Lets you 
ask questions. 
And answer questions 

Automatically. 



Our new Sound-O-Matic programmer-recorder gives the power of speech to 
|ust about any automatic, remotely-controlled slide projector. 

Now, with the optional new response feature, you can pre-set program 
pauses to allow audience discussion or question and answer sessions. 
Afterwards, you just press a remote-control button to get the projector 
talking again. 

You can teach even more effectively with another optional fea- 
ture, the Elco-Optisonics responder. It makes your projec- 
. tor await a student's answer to multiple-choice ques- 
tions on the screen. The student records his answer 
on a computer-compatible card with a simple hand 
control that simultaneously restarts the presentation. 
The Sound-O-Matic is also available in a playback- 
only version, for use with cassettes pre-recorded on the 
Sound-O-Matic programmer-recorder. With or without the 
response option. 
Send the coupon for details, or ask for a live demonstration 
that speaks for itself. 



^-<N 




'Sound-O-Matic; Trademark, ELCO Corporation 



"^ ^mlTfl^ / ^WTITTTRn^^^ 



ELCO Optisonics 

li/lontgomervviHe. Pa 18936 
(215) 368-0111 



BS 



ELCO Corporation 

n Send me your illustrated brochure 

□ Call me to arrange a demonstration 

□ I'm interested in standard unit 

n I'm Interested in "response" option 



Company. 



Title, 



Street. 
Cily 



Zip_ 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



i>.v-. ■, 



Elvis Presley, 
in a scene from 
Universalis 
"Change of Habit," 
also starring 
Mary Tyler Moore, 
Barbara McNair, 
and Jane EUiot. 



4mm.^ 



Meet your new ' 

PR film aoJ 
distribution team. 



^e^i 






DISTRIBUTION 
SERVICES 

212-777-6600 



1-"/^ ]-^- 



if 7H ■ 



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Now films on contemporary subjects— like "CHANGE OF HABIT," 
starring Elvis Presley— are what today's movie business is all about. The 
big audiences these films are attracting seem to set new box office records 
with every new film. 

In addition to the main feature, today's growing movie theater audiences 
are also viewing a PR film that's been booked to help round out the pro- 
gram. Not just any PR film, of course. But it is true that theatrical distri- 
bution can deliver huge, and measurable audiences for you if your film is 
right. 

A lot of people in PR film distribution are now looking into this new 
medium, and we're delighted to have them join us. We've been talking 
about motion picture distribution for years. As part of the MCA-Univer- 
sal family, we were alerted to this trend when it was first new, and were 
able to take advantage of it for our clients. And we're still 'way out in 
front when it comes to getting the most efficiency from movie theater 
distribution. 

That's just one reason more and more com- 
panies are changing their habit, and coming 
to us for total distribution programming for 
their PR films. Whether it's movie houses 
only, or a complete mix of all of today's dis- 
tribution channels, you'll find it pays to ask 
the man from United World. 

An activity of Universal Education and Visual Arts, a division of Universal City Studios. Inc./22l Park Ave. South. New York. NY 10003 • Cable: UNEDVISA.N.Y. 



' AAAY, 1970 




^\\"'«^ 




^//JllWS^ 




OUR BUSINESS IS VISUAL.' 



Look to Visualscope for your next production 



VISUALSCOPE 

INCORPORATED 

103 PARK AVENUE • N EW YOR K, N. Y. 10017 . MU 3-3513 




the 

screen 

executive 



iriiiiii mil iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mil mm 



Three Appointments at 
H. Wilson Corporation 

A number of changes have 
been made at H. Wilson Corpo- 
ration, South Holland, Illinois. 

Doris De Bias, formally office 
manager, has been appointed di- 
rector of customer relations. Miss 
De Bias has been with Wilson 
nine years and has had responsi- 
bility in all areas of the business. 

Henry Camphausen has been 
appointed controller of the H. 
Wilson Corp. In addition to du- 
ties as controller, Camphausen 
will be responsible for purchas- 
ing, traffic, warehouse operations 
and inventory control. 

Myril D. Lattz has been 
named manager, advertising and 
sales promotion. Lattz has had 
six years experience in this field. 



Motorola Appoints Miller 
Head of EVR Engineering 

Albert W. (Bud) Massman 
has been named director of Elec- 
tronic Video Recording (EVR) 
engineering for Motorola. Inc., 
Chicago. 

Massman, who was instrumen- 
tal in the development of the 
color EVR player, is a veteran 
of more than 20 years with Mo- 
torola. During this time, he has 
worked on the development of 
both black and white and color 
television. He holds numerous 
patents in the television field. 



Audio Graphic Films Names 
Kent VP of Marketing 

George Kent, Los Angeles 
Chapter IFPA membership 
chairman, was recently appointed 
vice president, director of mar- 
keting. Audio Graphic Films. 

Kent will be responsible for all 
domestic and foreign sales of 
audiovisual communication prod- 
ucts and services at Audio 
Graphic Films. 

Prior to this appointment, Kent 
was manager of customer serv- 



ices at Fairchild Camera and In- 
strument Corporation. 



Rasch Heads Northeast 
Sales for Fairchild 

Ed Rasch has been named re- 
gional manager for Fairchild In- 
dustrial Products, a division of 
Fairchild Camera and Instrument 
Corporation. 

Rasch will be responsible for 
the sale of Fairchild's new line 
of 8mm sound cartridge projec- 
tors for the industrial and educa- 
tion markets in the Northeast 
United States. 



Miller Heads Sylvania 
Photolamp Operations 

Charles H. Miller has been 
appointed operations manager of 
the Photolamp Division of Syl- 
vania Electric Products Inc. 

Miller is responsible for manu- 
facturing operations at photo- 
lamp plants in Montoursville, Pa., 
Winchester, Ky., and Dyersburg, 
Tenn. He will make his headquar- 
ters in Montoursville. 



VPI Services Appoints 
Robinson General Mgr. 

Mel Robinson has been ap- 
al manager of VPI Services, New 
pointed vice president and gener- 
York City. 

Formerly director of opera- 
tions for VPI Services, Robinson 
joined the company shortly after 
its inception seven years ago, and I 
has worked in and supervised the 
various service departments. 



1 



Three Changes in Kodak's 
MP & Ed. Markets Division 

Kenneth M. Mason will take 
over the position of regional sales 
manager. Pacific Southern region, 
replacing Walter L. Farley, 
whose retirement is effective Au- 
gust 1, 1970. 

John H. Maynard has been ap- 
pointed regional sales manager. 
Continued on page 1 2 



10 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



^ 



today's films on 

lfesierdair's~ 



reels? 








Or in yesterday's cans? 

There are a few people who still use metal reels and cans. And 
they have their reasons. Like tradition. Nostalgia. "It's the kind we've 
always used." 

But when you consider that Plio-Magic plastic reels, cans and 
cases offer far greater protection, and are far cheaper to ship, the old 
reasons just don't have a convincing ring any more. 

Plio-Magic reels, cans and cases are far more resilient than metal. 
They withstand impact. Don't bend. Don't dent. 

Even more importantly, Plio-Magic reels, cases and cans weigh a 
lot less than their metal counterparts. As a result, you save at the Post 
Office. Up to 65% in mailing costs. And our cases hold our reels 
securely. With four positive locks. Snug against a bed of packing foam. 

It all means that your films will be stored and shipped with the 
same loving care that went into making them. 

We make a complete line of plastic accessories for the film indus- 
try Write for our catalog. Plastic Reel Corporation of America, 640 So. 

Someday, you'll wrind up with plastic. 



1 1 MAY, 1970 
II 



n 



the screen executive . . . 

continued 



New York City region. Maynard 
joined Kodak in 1936 in the cine 
processing lab in Hollywood, 
Calif. He most recently was sales 
manager in the Midwestern re- 
gion. 



NUCA Appoints Ground 
Executive Secretary 

Robert Ground has been ap- 
pointed executive secretary of the 
National University Cinema As- 
sociation. 

Ground, an award winning 
member of the D.G.A.. is holder 
of a Ph.D. in English Literature. 
His doctoral studies placed 
special emphasis on dramatic and 
filmic literature. He has more 
than 20 years of experience in 
motion pictures and is an accom- 
plished cinematographer. In addi- 
tion to his duties guiding the ac- 
tivities of NUC.^, current plans 
call for Ground to write and di- 
rect several features this year. 



Fairchild Camera Elects 
Longo a Vice President 

Dr. Thomas A. Longo has 
been elected a vice president of 
Fairchild Camera and Instru- 
ment Corporation. 

Dr. Longo recently joined the 
Semiconductor Division of Fair- 
child as group director of opera- 
tions and continues in that post. 

Dr. Longo is responsible for 
MSI. Hybrid and other complex 
digital product operations in the 
Mountain View and Shiprock, 
New Mexico production facili- 
ties. 



Movielab, Inc. Appoints 
Kaplan Corporate Counsel 

David M. Kaplan has been 
named corporate counsel of Mo- 
vielab, Inc. 

Kaplan comes to Movielab 
with a broad legal background in 
corporate and labor law. He was 
formerly corporate general coun- 
sel and secretary for Shahmoon 
Industries. Inc. 



Doyle & Hershfield Form 
Audio Information Corp. 

John F. Doyle and Herbert B. 
Hershfield have announced the 
formation of a new company. 
Audio Information Corporation, 
to be headquartered at 2040 
North Towne Avenue, Pomona. 
California. 

Sales communication will be 
the company's initial activity. 
Customized information will be 
prepared by Audio Information 
to bridge the communications 
gap that exists between compa- 
nies and their field sales forces. 
Audio Information primarily will 
be a service organization provid- 
ing programming innovations 
that will utilize the latest audio 
communications techniques and 
the versatility and convenience 
of the cassette medium. 



Around the Industry 

Among appointments at the 
special products divisions of 
Bausch & Lomb are Peter H. 
Backer to senior program admin- 
istrator and George M. Tomczyk 
to program administrator . . . 
Derek Skiidder is promoted to 
production service manager at 
Rank Film Laboratories . . . Mar- 
tin R. Lieherman has joined Vic- 



tor Video, Inc., as executive vice 
president in charge of creative 
and production activities . . . 
Patrick J. Ford will handle sales 
for Plastic Reel Corp. of America 
in his recent appointment as sales 
representative . . . George D. 
Black, Jr. has been named man- 
ager, personnel for Commercial 
Electronic Systems, a major oper- 
ating unit of RCA . . . Virgil L. 
Lowe is a northeast region sales 
engineer for the Ampex Corp. 
video products division . . . Ed- 
ward C. Gannon has joined Reel- 
pro Division of Mutschmann 
Films as producer/director . . . 
International Video Corp. has 
named Robert E. Riddle man- 
ager, marketing administration 
. . . Donald P. Cochrane has 
joined Calvin Productions of 
Pennsylvania as writer/director 
. . . and Joseph S. Cuchiara has 
joined DeLuxe General Inc. and 
will be in charge of technical op- 
erations in DeLuxe General's in- 
dustrial and educational division's 
8mm department . . . J. M. 
(Bette) Brown has joined Pan- 
orama Film Productions as news- 
woman . . . Plastic Reel Corp. 
of America has appointed An- 
thoity E. Schicchi sales repre- 
sentative for the Mid-Atlantic 
states. 




Audio Visual Libraries choose LUXOR Equipment 

because it is the most complete line to 

satisfy the smallest and largest libraries 



There are three sizes and many types of 
LUXOR Modular Libraries 



LUXOR Landmark Series is tlie 
smallest, only 1 'A " wide, spe- 
cially designed for the individual 
classroom, or the just-beginning 
audio visual materials library. 

LUXOR Leader Libraries, 1 9 'A " 
wide, most popular in schools 
across the nation! Satisfies the 
needs of AV Centers, IMC's, Audio 
Visual Departments and Libraries. 

LUXOR Unlimited Libraries (ex- 
tra wide-39"), for large materials 
capacity. This series, styled to com- 
plement modern decors, available 
in lively, contemporary colors. 



All three Series, 1 7 'A " deep, 

feature the original LUXOR Mod- 
ular Design. They all lock-stack on 
LUXOR units of same width to 
permit systematic, orderly growth 
of your Library. 

Look to LUXOR also for such 
essential Audio Visual Equipment 
as: Mobile Projector and TV Re- 
ceiver Stands; VTR Consoles; Mo- 
bile Cabinet/Stands; Classroom 
TV Mounts; AV Record Systems; 
Overhead Transparency-making 
Materials and Equipment; 16mm 
Film Cleaner; and forms, materials 
and booking aids. 



. . . mailed on request, provides full information on other matctiing and lock-stack- 
ing LUXOR Audio Visual Materials Libraries ... for filmstrips, sound filmstrips, 
disc records, audio tapes, tape cassettes, OH transparencies, slides. 8mm and I 
16mm films, 8mm film cartridges, study prints, video tapes and microfilms. Also| 
multi-height projector stands and mobile VTR consoles. 



SEE YOUR AUDIO VISUAL DEALER, 
SCHOOL EQUIPMENT DISTRIBUTOR 
OR LIBRARY SUPPLIER. 



LUXOR Audio Visual 
Materials Libraries 

Jack C- Cofley Co . Inc. 
104 Lake View Ave. 
Waukegan. Illinois 60085 






12 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




Your proaiicer. 




From 55<a day. 



This is the Videotronic Package Plan. It lets you get 
your sales films produced, installs them in portable pro- 
jectors, and lets you pay for them as you use them. 

Here's how the plan works: You arrange for production 
of a five minute color and sound movie film on your product 
by the film producer of your choice. MPO will arrange the 
financing according to usual credit requirements. When the 
film is complete, we'll make the necessary Super 8 color and 
sound prints, and ship to your salesmen. You pay for the 
film, the prints and the projectors at a low monthly rate 
over a 36 month period. At the end, you own the film, prints 
and projectors. 

The beauty of the plan is that you pay for it as you sell 
with it— which usually means getting sales increases from 
35% to 50%— without making an immediate cash outlay. 

Now's the time to equip your sales force for selling in 
the competitive 70's. And this is the plan by which to do it. 
The Videotronic Package Plan- try it on for size. 

If you wish to equip 25 salesmen with films and pro- 
jectors, over a period of 36 months, the cost averages 
$22,21 per man, per month. Then you own film, prints, 
and projectors. 



If you wish to equip 50 salesmen, the cost averages 

$18.25 per man. per month for 36 months. 

For 75 salesmen, the approximate cost is only $16.41 

—55c a day!— per man. 

Lower rates for larger quantities. 

Individualized plans can be arranged. 

(This same plan is available for training and all other types of sponsored 
motion pictures) 



MPO Videotronic Projector Corp. 

A Division of Optico, Inc. 

461 Park Avenue South, New York. New York 10016 

I'm interested in the MPO package plan. Please contact 
me with further information. 



Name. 



Company. 
Address_ 



My local producer is_ 



Your PROGRAM IN A 

COMMPAK CARTRIDGE 

INSTANTLY 

INTERCHANGEABLE 

IN ALL LA BELLE 

"16" SERIES UNITS 





LA BELLE 
COURIER® 16 



APortable audio/visual unit uti- 
lizing ttie LaBelle COMMPAK 
cartridge. Attractive appearance, 
easy-to-carry, with built-in dura- 
bility and dependability. Take 
this "attache case" unit where 
it's needed . . . gets showing fast 
for personalized communica- 
tions . . . selling, training, or 
educating. 





LA BELLE 
SENTINEL 16 

^Larger screen, self-contained. 
Keeps your dramatized story 
working automatically in dis- 
plays, at point-of-purchase, or 
where there are people. Edu- 
cates, communicates, demon- 
strates. COMMPAK cartridges in- 
stantly interchangeable. 




LA BELLE 
TUTOR 16 

^Large screen projected im- 
age. Ideal for directors, sales 
conferences, clubs, trainees, or 
other groups of people. Pro- 
grams in COMMPAK cartridges 
instantly interchangeable. 

(Available soon) 



14 



La Belle 
eomntpah 
3-way cartridge 




continuous loo] 
synchronized 
sight and sound 




This small compact 16mm filmstrip cartridge 
presents up to 250 visuals plus 20 minutes audio 
tape. Fast sequence scenes approach animation, 
suggesting motion. Slips in for instant program 
changes. No adjustments — permanently synchro- 
nized. No turning over ... no rewinding. Instantly 
interchangeable In any of the LaBelle "16" series', 
three A/V units to suit every audience condition. 



Arrange for dramatic convincing demonstration. 
LaBelle Industries, 502 S. Worthlngton St., 
Oconomowoc, Wisconsin 53066. 
Telephone: 414/567-5527, 



LA BELLE 




lndust;ries 




THE A-V 
CALENDAR 



MAY 

Film Seminar of the Northwest, May 8-9, 
Seattle, Washington. 

.\nierican Society tor Training and Devel- 
opment, National Conference, May 10- 
15, Anaheim Convention Center, Ana- 
heim, Calif. 



American Film Festival, Blue Ribbon 
Awards and film screenings. May 12-16, 
New York. 



Illuminating Engineering Society, 6th The- 
atre, Television and Film Lighting Sym- 
posium, May 24-26, Hollywood-Rooic- 
velt Hotel, Hollywood. 



JUNE 

AI.'\ Industrial Film Festival, June 14-17, 
Mcjntreal, Canada. 



Hemisfilm '70 film festival, June 18-22, 
San Antonio Convention Center, San An- 
tonio, Texas. 



Atlanta International Film Festival, June 

22-27, Atlanta, Georgia. 



JULY 

NAVA Institute for Audiovisual Selling, 
July 12-16, Indiana University. Spon- 
sored by the National Audio- Visual Asso- 
ciation. 



i 



National Audio-Visual Association Aimual 
Convention, July 18-21, Sheraton-Park 
Hotel, Washington, D.C. 



AUGUST 

9th International Congress on High-Speed 
Photography, August 2-7, Denver Hilton 
Hotel, Denver. Colorado. 



n 



American Management Association Annual I 
Conference & Exposition on Education ( 
and Training, August 3-7, New York i 
Hilton, New York. 



i 



International Convention of the Photo- i 
graphic Society of America, August 18- 
22, Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 



Animation Workshop, August 24-Sept. 4, 
Ohio State University campus, sponsored 
by the University Film Association and 
Ohio State University. 



BUSINESS SCREEN ( 



il 



There's nothing new about 

a fihn lab. 



Nothing fancy. 

Nothing spectacular. 

Nothing dramatic. 

Nothing glamorous. 



It's just the place with the respon- 
sibihtv of printing and processing every- 
thing you've struggled to capture on film. 

You want perfect prints. UsualK in 
quantity. Always on a rigid schedule. 

And no lab understands this better 
than Cine .Magnetics. 

It's \\ h\ we've invested so heavih 
in modern equipment, like our new high- 
speed Optronics Mark X Qiiad Printer 
and our new P'ilmline black-and-white 
processor. 

It's why we've created new facilities 
and enlarged old ones. 



And it's w h\ we've accepted only 
the most experienced people. 

Today, we have a complete 8mm, 
Super 8mm and i6mm center for motion 
picture duplication and preprint services. 

(The man to call: Ed Schuller, 
General Manager. He'll be glad to discuss 
your print needs, arrange a tour of the lab, 
or send one of our salesmen to see you.) 

We print. We process. Wc load car- 
tridges; Kodak, Technicolor, Fairchild, 
jayark, Bohn-Benton and others. 

Not terribly exciting. 

But incredibly professional. 



Cine Magnetics Film Laboratory 

A DIVISION OF CINE MAGNETICS, INC. 

520 North Barry Avenue, Mamaroneck, N.Y. 10543 (914) 698-3434 
New York Receiving Center: 202 East 44th St. (212) 682-2780 



MAY, 1970 



15 





the camera eye 



By 0. H. Coelln 
iiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii I iiiiiiiiiiiii 



No Harm to Aim for Greatness 
Just Don't Overlook Results 

What Kind of Film really counts? When 
the miracles of art and science come to- 
gether to provide a total viewer experience, 
achieved with all the mastery which modern 
technology has made possible in cameras 
and film stock, the sponsor may have 
achieved a very valuable tool. Yet, all too 
often in our reviewing rooms, business and 
industrial films fall short of their potential. 

Perhaps the target is limited — no more 
than a "report-on-film" of a new process, 
a new machine or a new corporate situation 
is wanted. Or a major goal is set but the 
people assigned to reach it are limited in ex- 
perience or equipment. And, again, all too 
many films seem to become mere outlines 
of the total subject, lacking in depth, fail- 
ing to stir real viewer interest or to ac- 
complish complete understanding. 

We mused on this premise of promise 
vs. fulfillment through long evenings of so- 



ber evaluation at our "Shangri-La" in South 
Central Missouri where the Lost River 
Ranch, its cattle operations, apple/ peach 
orchards and new vineyards require a lot 
of agricultural implements and we could 
benefit from the inspiration and guidance 
of good informative farm-ranch-oriented 
films. Take one recent example; a film on 
a tractor which we decided to show our 
people for their better understanding of the 
machine's work potentials and operating 
parts. 

But what the sponsor sent us turned out 
to be the usual product introduction sales 
film intended to spur dealer interest in the 
machine when it was premiered. Lots of 
good sales points and excellent graphics, but 
little depth for actual users of the machine. 
Where are the kinds of films which agricul- 
tural implement dealers might stock, most 
efficiently and economically, on Super-8 
cartridges? These would help meet today's 
real crisis in service, help hired hands to 





Snap-in Cassette 

sound and DuKane's Super 

Micromatic works automatically 



AUDIO-VISUAL DIVISION 
Dept. BS-50 - St. Charles, III. 60174 








understand how to maintain and repair a 
very expensive, really sizeable diesel tractor, 
for example. 

There's a cue in that simple example: this 
film was intended for an entirely different 
purpose. Perhaps it was enough to highlight 
the new sales points which made this ma- 
chine better than competitor's current mod- 
els. Yet how many producers and sponsors 
try to "make do" with the "all-purpose" 
picture? There's an inherent weakness in 
trying to satisfy several unrelated objec- 
tives with one film. 

Another experience, repeated on the fre- 
quent occasions when we have met with 
film festival juries in preliminary judging of 
entries, has been even more disillusioning. 
After seeing the first dozen titles, the pile 
of complete "rejects" grows and the con- 
clusion is inescapable on these. The hopeful 
entrants have completely misjudged the 
basic goals of the festival. This has been 
especially true in judging basic entries for 
international film events (CINE). You 
soon ask yourself "what utter use would be 
served by sending this film to any event 
abroad?" The title in question is completely 
dependent on the sound track to get any 
meaning whatsoever of the visual content. 
Or the visual content, poorly supported by 
vague voice-over track, is confusing or dis- 
concerting. And again you ask, "why do 
these people waste their entry fees, their 
time and the jury's by even submitting this 
picture?" 

So the occasional great factual film (and 
they are unfortunately all too few in num- 
bers) only proves to be the exception that 
makes the rule. You sense within the first 
moments of screening that the creators have 
understood and they are bringing under- 
standing to you and to myriads of other 
viewers. They have been honest in their ap- 
proach to concept, true to their goal of 
completeness of detail — and successful in 
applying the best techniques with camera, 
sound, lighting and film stock. 

And we reflect that those who achieve 
top festival honors have earned these; that 
they justify the medium and its potential. 
They move hearts and minds. 

Along about this time, we're aware that 
men in top management, from vice-presi- 
dents in charge of results to controllers of 
budget money, are fidgeting in their chairs 
during this kind of esoteric reverie. So be 
prepared to talk their language: the factual 
Continued on page 1 8 



16 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




2000 YEARS AGO 

In the Roman market place, a customer re- 
jected the merchant's ordinary goods and asked 
for something better. —And 2000 years from 
now. a customer will go to the market place 
and make the same decision. As long as a 
choice exists, the discriminating will want some- 
thing above the average. We pride ourselves 
that this is the reason so many of the finest firms 
come to Frank Holmes Laboratories for the pro- 
cessing of fiinistrips and color slide duplicates. 

j^^JB "" V/ri'e for our ite'A' Cufaliy 

*| ■ FRANK HOLMES 

f% LABORATORIES, INC. 

1947 First St. • San Fernando, Calif. • EMpire 5-4501 



MAY, 1970 



17 




BIG MESSAGE ... SMALL BUDGET? 

WHY NOT A FILMSTRIP? There's no faster, more economical, or dra- 
matic way to get your message across. Complicated story? A colorful 
filmstrip c?n say it for you more clearly. Rest/ess client? Let him relax 
while you project your best image. A lot of territory to cover? Filmstrips 
love to travel. Budget problems are gone! Filmstrips are comparatively 
economical to produce . . . and can be made to meet impossible dead- 
lines. Re/ease prints? One or ten thousand are unbelievably inexpen- 
sive. Contact us immediately. We can recommend filmstrip producers 
on whom you can rely. 

Here at CFI your filmstrip producer is backed by a processing laboratory 
whose professional procedures and facilities produce the finest and t/ie 
most consistent results possible. 




CONSOLIDATED FILM INDUSTRIES 

959 SEWARD STREET, HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 90038 / HO 2-0881 • HO 9-1441 



camera eye . . . 

continued 

film as the lowest-cost-view-minute medium 
(and that includes print media); the action- 
getting effectiveness of a well-made picture, 
the tony life of a really good corporate im- 
age or p.r. film. 



Notes from Our Ozark Mountain Diary 

The afternoon when this column was 
drafted was an eventful one. We write in 
our spacious (very old in terms of the 
American scene) ranch house at Koshko- 
nong where we headquarter the 1800-acre 
Lost River spread. We are surrounded by 
our library of audiovisual books, some dat- 
ing back to the last century. These volumes 
cover the technique of sight/ sound over the 
past 60 years and more. 

The decision to build a new life in this 
Ozark mountain country will interest our 
many friends throughout the U.S. and 
abroad. For one thing, the land itself here 
is challenging but had defied earlier efforts 
to break away from long-established agri- 
cultural traditions. It was cattle and hog 
country. But we also acquired some 30 acres 
of orchards, largely of peaches with some 
excellent apples. 

Yesterday we completed the planting of 
nearly 19 miles of wine grapes. That is 
something new for this state, for this region. 
It began, our venture into wine grape cul- 
ture, with last year's first seven acres of Ca- 
tawbas, the basic grape used in American 
champagne wines. Within the last week, des- 
pite some seven inches of intermittent but 
heavy rains, we supervised the planting of 
more than 30 additional acres of Catawbas, 
Niagaras and 11 varieties of French hybrid 
and other interesting wine grapes in a special 
experimental plot. 

And last evening, with the new vineyard 
making Missouri history as the largest plant- 
ing of wine grapes in this new rival of Cali- 
fornia, New York and Ohio, we looked at 
a loan print of California's Womterfiil 
World of Wine. Look alive, California, you 
have a new competitor in America's mid- 
west! 

After 30 years and more of active labor 
on BUSINESS SCREEN, what a pleasure 
it is to find the echo of our thoughts in 
Boris Pasternak's "Dr. Zhivago" when the 
subject of that masterful novel muses: 

"What happiness, to work from dawtn to 
dusk for your family and for yourself, to 
build a roof over their heads, to till the soil 
to feed them, to create your own world, like 
Robinson Crusoe, in imitation of the Crea- 
tor of the Universe and, as your own mother 
did, to give birth to yourself, time and 
again." 

The distant blue hills surround us, the 
mockingbird calls from a nearby bramble 
and the young grape vines thrust toward 
the sky. What more can one ask in this 
world? 



18 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




THE ABOVE PICTURE COULDN'T GET INTO ANY THEATRE IN THIS COUNTRY 
EXCEPT BY PAYING APPROXIMATELY $2.00 AT THE BOX OFFICE. 



^f/^e are sho\\in<> it for a few reasons. First of all, 
for the few of you who don't know him (very 
few we hope) it's our president, Dick Rogers. 

Secondly, if we can show this picture, none of you 
have to be shy about showing yours .... and for 
approximately $8.00 more than he pays for a seat at 
his fa\orite theatre, we might be able to get your 
picture into the movies (that's if it is suitable for 
motion picture theatre presentation and the running 
time is up to about 15 minutes). Other rates upon 
request. 

We'll do all we can to make it easy and the place 
to start is to let us see your film, whatever its present 
length. By merely some good editing to shorten it 
where necessary, some new narration if necessary 
and a blow up to 35mm your present film might be 
ready to go to the movies. We'll point all these pos- 
sibilities out for you to discuss with your producer. 

We specialize in theatre distribution through a 
network of what we believe to be the 32 finest 
theatre branch offices in this country. As a result we 
can deliver national, regional or even local distribu- 
tion for you. 

We are priced below virtually every other major 
sponsored theatre film distributor because our the- 
atre operation doesn't have several hundred other 
employees \\ ho are not involved in theatre distribu- 
tion e\en though our theatre operation is as big as 
any other. 



Our report is the most thorough and most in- 
formatixe with at least three or four items of in- 
formation provided on our monthly reports beyond 
what is considered to be "standard" information. 

Oh yes, the $10.00 per booking (up to the first 
nine days at the theatre) also includes individual 
promotion of your film, publicity, preview ship- 
ments, inspection and maintenance of prints, ship- 
ments to and from the theatres, advance notices, 
monthly reports including the actual report cards 
and lots of plain old fashioned service to our cus- 
tomers. 

So whether you are a small client with a tiny 
budget, a big client with a small budget or whatever, 
we'll get you the best audience for your money. If 
you want to put up to 200 prints into our very 
capable hands for theatre distribution, we'll make 
them all work and deliver an audience averaging 
2500 viewers nationally per booking from among 
the more than 5100 theatres that will use good spon- 
sored shorts. 

Write, wire or call us collect for more information 
or better, send us a 16mm print. We'll screen it 
pronto at no cost or obligation to you and tell you 
how you can get on the big screen (or advise you 
that it doesn't belong there, should that be the case). 

We'll suggest how you can get ready through your 
own producer. 





RHR FIIMEDIA, INC., SUITE 1806, 1270 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10020 
212 541-9692 Richard H. Rogers, President 



MAY, 1970 




This 4- inch attache case 
opens to a movie theater. 




This elegant attache case is the most compact projector 
in the world. The Bohn Benton Institor is the first truly port- 
able, rear screen, Super 8 sound movie projector. It's auto- 
matic. It's set up and running in less than 20 seconds. And, 
it's cartridge loaded to eliminate film threading. Films can 
be changed in 2 seconds. 

It's also a front screen projector. On the spot, you can con- 
vert to project an auditorium-size, 6 foot wide picture. Zoom 
lens and external speakers are available for group viewing. 
The Bohn Benton Institor lets your films sell for you every 
day; on every call, in every office. This is the projector sales- 
men will carry because it looks good, it's small, and it's light. 
The newest recruit can give a professional presentation on 



every call. He can take your plant, 
your products and your services to the desk 
of every prospect. It's easy to give an Institor to 
every salesman because its price is as extraordinary as its 
size — $300, far less than the cost of other first-quality rear 
screen projectors without Instltor's advantages. 
For more information, or an Institor demonstration, write 
Bohn Benton Inc, Dept. A, 110 Roosevelt Avenue, Mineola, 
New York 1 1501 ; or call (516) 747-8585, 



# 



Bohn Benton 



20 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



A BUSINESS SCREEN special report 



AUDIOVISUALS IN TRAINING 



nPHE LAST HALF of the 1960s witnessed 
-■■ the greatest surge in the use of audio- 
visuals for business and industrial training 
ever. The increase in A-V usage between 
1966 and 1968 will probably never be 
equalled, but the growth continues. 

Today, there are more films, slides, film- 
strips and videotape training programs in 
use than ever before. 

The sudden increase of audiovisuals for 
strictly business and industry employee 
training at all levels came as the result of 
several developments during the past dec- 
ade. Despite tremendous improvements in 
software in the actual programs that were 
available and that could be made, it was 
the development of new, less expensive, 
easy-to-use hardware that spurred the in- 
crease in the usage of audio-visuals in 
training. 

With the advent of the Super 8 format, 
improved less expensive videotape equip- 
ment, cartridge projectors, better rear 
screens, synchronized tape systems for use 
with slides, more compact sound filmstrip 
projectors and many other devices, came 
the means of economically delivering spec- 
ialized audiovisual training programs and 
materials to employees at all levels. More 
importantly, effedive audiovisual training 
programs could be delivered on an individu- 
al basis. Compact, rugged, easy-to-operate 
projectors could be used at any time by the 
individual to be trained. He could learn at 
his own pace whenever he had time. 

It was during this time that single con- 
cept films, conceived earlier, became a 
reality. And, we have not reached the ulti- 
mate yet in this area. 

The advent of all this hardware also 
spurred tremendous improvements in ready- 
to-use audiovisual programs and custom- 
made programs. As corporate and govern- 
ment training departments became aware of 
the success, effectiveness and economy of 
audiovisual training, more and better films 
and A-V training programs were being de- 
veloped by specialists in this area. 

On the following pages are several 
specific examples of the use of audiovisual 
training materials at all levels. Companies 
not presently using one or more of the pleth- 
ora of audiovisual training systems and pro- 
grams available should be considering it. 
There arc literally hundreds of ready-made 
films, filmstrips and slide programs avail- 



The last half of the 1960s saw perhaps the greatest In- 
crease in the use of audiovisuals in business, industry and 
government training that we will ever know. As the growth 
continues, both equipment technology and the software 
programming becomes more sophisticated and available. 



able for employee training at all levels. Ev- 
erything from sales training, executive de- 
cision-making, motivational and personal 
relationships to appearance, diplomacy and 
safety is available. In addition, any busi- 
ness or industry can now afford to make 
their own tailor-made training programs on 
any subject, no matter how detailed. In fact, 
most companies cannot afford not to con- 
sider the audiovisual training medium. 

The articles on the following pages are 
examples of what is being done in the area 
of employee training by many companies. 



In response to a number of inquiries on 
the subject and as a guide to those wishing 
to take advantage of ready-to-use audiovis- 
ual training programs, the companies listed 
on this page specialize in providing excel- 
lent training programs on various subjects. 

In addition to those listed here, certain 
sales, management, motivational and other 
training films are available from the various 
national film distribution firms such as 
Modern Talking Picture Service, Associa- 
tion-Sterling Films, and United World 
Films. 



A-V TRAINING SOURCES 



Better Selling Bureau, 1150 W. Olive Ave., 
Burbank, Calif. 91506. Specialists in 
business and sales films. Programs cus- 
tom made for individual clients. 

BNA Films, 5615 Fi.shers Lane, Rockville, 
Maryland 20852. Wide variety of busi- 
ness, management and motivational 
training films. 

Close/Plenum Productions. 2020 S'aii Car- 
los Blvd., Fort Myers Beach, Fla. 33931. 
Wide selection of management, sales 
and employe training audiovisuals. Films, 
filmstrips, slides, etc. 

Dartnell Corporation, 4660 Ravenswood 
Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60640. Specialists 
in sales management and sales training 
films and programs. 

Edutronics Systems IntcriKitional, 3345 
Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1007, Los Angeles, 
California 90005. Specialists in audio- 
\isual training and education programs 
in computer and information sciences. 

International Film Bureau, 332 S. Michi- 
gan A\'e., Chicago, 111. 60604. ImIhis for 



business education, distributive educa- 
tion, dress and vocational counselling. 

The Jam Handy Organization, 2821 E. 
Grand Blvd.. Detroit, .Michigan 48211. 
Ready-to-use and custom made film, 
filmstrip and slide programs for all train- 
ing needs. 

Journal Films, 909 W. Diverse) Parkwa\', 
Chicago. Illinois 60614. \'ariet\' ot films, 
filmstrips for specialized business indus- 
trial training. 

Roundtable Films, 321 S. Bevcrlv Drive, 
Beverly Hills, California 90212. Spe- 
cialists in management and executive 
training films and programs. 

Urhiversal Education and N'isual Arts, 221 
Park Avenue South, New York, N.Y. 
10003. Distributors of comprehensive 
sales training film series. 

Universal Training Systems, 7101 N. Cicero, 
Lincolnwood, III. 60646. Suppliers of 
custom-made training materials and dis- 
tributors of selected prepared training 
materials and equipment. 



MAY, 1970 



21 



Executives Learn As 



Their Time Permits 



Using Panacolor projectors containing the entire BNA 
Films' "Effective Executive" series, Government Employees 
Insurance Company managers learn at their own desks 
as their schedule permits. 



THE BUSY EXECUTIVE, beset by 
countless crises clamoring for his time. 
Top priority for everything. And toward the 
bottom of the hst, seldom getting any closer 
to the top, is the frustrated training director 
attempting to bring together a group of ex- 
ecutives for a management training seminar. 

"A training film? At a time like this'?"" is 
the familiar refrain. 

"At your own time, in your own office," 
was the surprising reply of Nancy Dickey, 
training coordinator for the Government 
Employees Insurance Co., (GEICO), 
Washington, D.C., the sixth largest stock 
auto insurer in the U.S. Her trump card 
was the new Panacolor motion picture pro- 
jector. 

GEICO"s middle and top management 
were recently able to view the Peter F. 
Drucker full color film series produced by 
BNA Films on The Effective Executive. In- 
stead of being called away from their desks 
to attend a viewing in an auditorium, they 
saw the five-part series in their offices, at 
their convenience. 



"So far we"ve reached 40 of the 110 ex- 
ecutives here from manager up,"" explained 
Nancy Dickey. "For seven weeks the Pana- 
color projector was in use every day. As 
word of its presence got around, others 
called asking to be fit into the schedule. We 
expect to reach most of those 110 execu- 
tives.'" 

To evaluate the projection system and the 
film content, a form was left with each ex- 
ecutive who used it. The evaluation form 
asked several specific questions about both 
the machine and the film. Each executive re- 
turned a completed form with 100 percent 
saying they were interested in seeing more 
films in this format. 

Ted Culp, assistant vice president of the 
Claims Department said: 

"There are usually four or five films each 
year that I'd like to see but can't because of 
more important commitments. Chances are 
unlikely that I'd be able to get away right 
now to see the Drucker series. But I was 
able to see it right in my office." 

"I wouldn't want to take the time and ef- 




GEICO executives loading cartridge containing the five films in the BNA "Effective Executive" 
series into the Panacolor projector. Remote control on desk top permits instant random access 
control of the program. 



fort to see a training film," pointed out 
Stacy Williams, assistant vice president and 
claims counsel. "But I did get to see one of 
the Drucker films on the Panacolor machine. 
And I got as much out of it as I would have 
in an auditorium." 

"Flexibility is the chief advantage here," 
explained Gerry 0"Neal, director of mar- 
keting. "I was able to look at the presenta- 
tion off and on all day between various 
meetings." 

There were a lot of interruptions," said 
Donn Knight, director of staff services, "but 
the important point is that I saw the Druck- 
er films and was still on hand to take care 
of all those interrupting matters. I saw all 
five films. Normally, I wouldn't have had 
time." 

Minding the store while watching a train- 
ing film sums up the reaction of GEICO 
executives to the projector. Nancy Dickey 
achieved a breakthrough among the hard- 
est group to reach, top management, with 
the machine that looks like a television set, 
works like a cassette tape recorder and fea- 
tures unique control capabilities. 

The Panacolor projector has as its heart 
"prism optics," an advanced motion picture 
shutter system developed by Panacolor's Dr. 
Leon Wells and engineers at Zeiss Ikon, 
West Germany. They designed a unique 
"prism core" assembly by bonding 12 sym- 
metrical lens elements to an optical prism. 
A continuous capstan-driven film trans- 
port mechanism similar to those employed 
in tape recorders gives the projector the 
quietness of the tape recorder, plus the con- 
trol abilities of reverse, frame-by-frame 
movement, and stop on frame. 

Film for the projector is contained in a 
hand-size magazine that holds the equiva- 
lent of one full-length sound motion picture 
of up to two hours duration, or six different 
films, each up to 20 minutes long. 

The film format consists of 12 rows of 
pictures and 12 tracks of optical sound re- 
produced on 70nim film. Printing economy 
is the principle advantage to this format, 
and the resulting film size takes up less stor- 
age space and is more rugged than 16mm 
film. 

"We gave each executive a short demon- 
stration on how to operate the machine," 
Nancy Dickey said. "Then we left them 
alone to use the machine at their own con- 
venience throughout the day." 

The push button controls allowed users 
to stop the film at any time for interrup- 
tions, or study a particular frame. They re- 
versed to go over a point, proceeded frame- 
by-frame, or in slow motion. 

"We were able to stop the machine at any 
time and discuss the presentation from the 
standpoint of applications within our depart- 
ment," said Ross Pierce, GEICO's assistant 
vice president of operations who called an 
associate in to view the Drucker series. 

"The executives felt it was a very relaxed 
way of viewing a training film," Nancy 
Dickey pointed out. "But most important, it 
made it possible to present some ideas like 
Drucker's to people who just didn't have 
time for classroom presentation." • 



22 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



UNUSUAL REALISM is created through 
the use of a combination of autiiovis- 
ual elements to train today's modern U.S. 
Forest Service firefighters. Nearly real com- 
munications situations are created in the 
training centers. 

"Fire in medium pine timber, quite a 
few dinvn logs on fire, must be an acre or 

more, burning hot, some crowning "" 

the excited voice crackling over the radio 
is that of a U.S. Forest Service trail crew 
foreman who has just arrived at a lightning- 
started fire at the 7.000-foot line in the 
sicep-walled, desolate Ponderosa National 
Forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. 

Although the voice on the radio suggests 
the tempo that will build as war is de- 
clared on the fire, this fire will not burn 
a single bush or tree, deface a forest, fell 
a fleeing fawn, or threaten a home. 

The fire appears on a projection screen 
upon which five different projectors are 
casting their images to create a scene of 
unusual realism. The fire simulator, in- 
stalled at the U.S. Forest Service fire train- 
ing center at Marana. Arizona, is used to 
train fire bosses, the "generals" who must 
assess a fire situation and deploy men, air- 
craft, bulldozers, vehicles and materials. 



Realism 
Key to 
Firefighter 
Training 



Specially constructed room 

In the specially constructed bell-shaped 
room near Tucson, the fire boss plays his 
role and his actions bring prompt and some- 
times embarrassingly dramatic results. 

If, for example, he directs the pilot of a 
firefighting tanker plane to make his drop 
of chemicals at the head of the fire the 
colorful fire scene on the screen will dimin- 
ish in intensity at the head of the fire but 
the flanks will crown and spot as they com- 
pete for attention. 

In the advanced fire management course 
the training follows a branching sequence. 
The action can follow to some degree a 
course of events that would be a fair re- 
sponse to commands given by the fire boss 
in training. 

There are at the present time more than 
a dozen fire simulators throughout the 
United States, used by various federal and 
state forestry agencies for intensive, profes- 
sional fire training. The fire simulator at 
Marana' is unique, however, in' that it has 
an additional instructional system, the Ray- 
theon EDEX student response system, which 
increases the number of active trainees from 
the usual four or five to forty. 

By using the student response system and a 
special program prepared with the help of 
Raytheon Learning Systems Company, the 
"observers" become active, participating 
trainees. 

Using selector buttons at their seats these 
additional trainees answer multiple choice 
questions at key points in the exercise and 
their responses may be used by the "umpire" 
in directing the activities. 

Although every fire represents a loss in 
Contimied on pai^e 26 



Through a combination of audiovisual elements and a 
student response system, the U.S. Forest Service provides 
fast, accurate forest firefighting training in an atmosphere 
of dynamic realism. 



Five projectors create realistic picture of 

"fire" as fire bosses (right) direct their forces 

by radio. The picture on the screen 

responds to the various actions taken by 

the foresters in training. 




MAY, 1970 



23 



In eight months, Baldwin Baker 

exposed a million and a quarter 

feet of 16mm film for ABC TV. 



Baldwin ai( 



That's 7000 feet a day, five 

days a week. All on location, 

sync sound, with one camera. 



In 



Mr. Baker needed a camera that 

was quick to operate and, above 

all, reliable. He used an NPR. 



Baldwin Baker writes: 
"E\/erybody's Talking is an 
ABC Television show that 
really eats up film. In the first 
eight months of shooting, we 
regularly exposed between 
fifteen and twenty 400 foot 
rolls a day. In 35mm, that 
would be over 20,000 feet a 
day. All lip sync, of course, 
and all on location — very 
often three or more separate 
locations on the same day." 



"Short film clips from our 
filmed footage of people 
talking about an unidentified 
subject were screened in the 
studio for a live panel, who 
had to guess what the people 
were talking about. Because 
we could nevertell howlong it 
would take the panel to guess 
the subject and because the 
people doing the talking were 
mostly non-professionals, we 
had to shoot literally miles of 



film to get good tantalizinc 
quotes and to make sure 
there would be enough foot- 
age to keep running clips un- 
til a panelist finally guessec 
right. We used so much film 
in fact, that more than once 
Eastman's Hollywood store 
ran completely out of 16mrr 
black-and-white rawstock!" 
"With travel between loca- 
tions and ashooting schedule 
like that, you can imagine 



24 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



le man in the photograph, is a member of the lATSE Hollywood local 659; and that's his NPR. 




■bw much time thers was to 
S'are for setting up or for me- 
cianical problems. Without 
te NPR's instant magazine 
ciange, I don't think we could 
h;ve gotten that much foot- 
ae in the can. Overall, it's a 
fst camera to work with, of 
ourse. But our NPR had to 
b; completely reliable too; 
ad it certainly was. We got 
anillion and a quarter feet of 
rck-steady images." 



As well as five-second 
magazine changes, the NPR 
gives you precise reflex 
viewing, balanced shoulder- 
resting, registration-pin 
movement, a constant-speed 
motor with sync-pulse gener- 
ator and automatic clapper, a 
rotating two-lens turret, and, 
of course, it gives you blimp- 
free silence. May we send you 
a free copy of our sixteen 
page NPR brochure? 



You can get it, free of course, from 
Eclair at 7262 Melrose Avenue, Los 
Angeles, California: (213) 933 7182. 
Or from our office at 18 West 56th 
St., New York City; (213) 247 0350 




Camera makers since 1909 



MAY, 1970 



25 



training firefighters 



eonfinued 




Opinions are asked in the form of multiple 
choice questions projected on the wall. Trainees 
answer by pressing appropriate button on stu- 
dent response system which records their an- 
swers and provides feedbacl< to exercise director. 



timber, watershed, scenic value, or wildlife 
the course for "generals" is aimed particu- 
larly at controlling those catastrophic fires 
that burn 1,000 or more acres. Of the 
12,000 forest fires annually in the United 
States less than 50 cause 80 per cent of 
the total loss. 

Fires of this magnitude challenge the fire 
boss' organizational ability as well as his 
hard-won fire line experience. 

The Raytheon-aided program helps the 
foresters to deal efficiently with uncertain- 
ties, evaluate risks, prepare for contingen- 
cies and cope with the varied risks of nor- 
mal and unusual fire behavior. 

Each trainee has an opportunity to size- 
up the fire, order and deploy the various 
resources, plan and execute strategy, and 
direct his forces — even to the extent of 
planning what and where they will eat and 
sleep and how they will be replaced by fresh 
crews. 

Dynamic realism 

An essential ingredient in the program is 
its dynamic quality. The trainee must con- 
stantly make new decisions based on the 
effects of his earlier decisions. Like the 
proverbial painter who paints himself into 
a corner, the trainee at the simulator might 
even "bum" himself out of his command 
post. 

As part of the realistic details associ- 
ated with an actual first magnitude fire 
the fire boss receives radio reports that 



Trainee group of firefighters is briefed on operation of the EDEX response system before a fire- 
fighting drill. They will watch a fire develop on a simulator and listen as the fire bosses deploy 
forces to fight it. 




some of his equipment is being held up by 
sightseers blocking the highway. And just 
as he is expecting a call from a key unit 
on the fire line he gets one instead from a i 
"newspaper reporter" requesting an in-depth ' 
interview on the progress of the campaign. 

At another point in the program, a group 
of residents near the edge of the fire calls 
to ask if homes in the area should be evac- 
uated. ! 

To insure that he really feels the im- 
mensity of the organization and command 
role, the pilots of the several types of air- 
craft at his disposal pose typical logistics 
problems as they report their fuel remain- 
ing and the time required to return to their 
bases. 

In the darkened room with their atten- 
tion focused on the animated color scene 
shown on the screen, the trainees become 
swept up in the realism of the scene. Vet- 
eran foresters who learned their firefight- 
ing in the searing, crackling heat of the 
fire line often find themselves so engrossed 
by the realism of the simulated fire and the 
"radio" reports that they may look up at 
the ceiling of the darkened room as the 
sound of an approaching plane is heard 
over the loud speaker system and the pilot 
"radios" that he's approaching the scene 
and will fly in low over the command post 
to survey the fire line. 

Simulated fire 

To create the simulated fire on the screen 
the foresters have experimented with vari- 
ous combinations of devices. One early de- 
vice was a board with holes in it through 
which smoke was puffed on cue. The pres- 
ent simulator has five mirror-bounce projec- 
tors to superimpose the flame and smoke 
over a forest scene. 

A synthesis of actual systems and situa- 
tions, the simulator and the multi-media 
student response system form a bridge be- 
tween the classroom and actual fire man- 
agement. But the foresters have wisely in- 
sured that it is more than a game. Each 
exercise is carefully planned and objectives 
are specified and discussed in advance with 
the participants. At the conclusion of each 
exercise a debriefing session is held — 
whether the conclusion is "fire out" or 
"fire out of control" — to analyze each de- 
cision and its alternatives. The instructor 
team brings out ways to improve perform- 
ance on the fire line. 

U.S. Forest Service officials cite the im- 
pact that both modern firefighting equip- 
ment and training techniques are having on 
controlling fire losses. Typically, in the 
South, during the early Forties the average 
fire burned 165 acres. By 1966 the average 
loss had been reduced to 30 acres. It is 
hoped that the combination of fire simula- 
tion and the new training techniques will 
be able to insure that more trained men 
will be at the scene of every future fire and 
that sound decisions in the initial attack will 
continue to minimize the ravages of fire in 
our woodlands. • 



26 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




Here a worker studies the assembly of the Audi- 
scan cartridge assembly. 



Versatile Projectors 

Add Meaning to 

Self Training 



The Audiscan continuous loop projector with synchronized 
sound is one of several compact audiovisual systems in 
training use which permit individual control and 
study pacing. 




The projectors also work well in communicating 
corporate messages to employees during breaks. 




Restaurant employees at King's Food Host USA 
learn methods and procedures at their own 
pace as they have time. 



/^NE OF TODAY'S newer audiovisual 
^-^ training tools being used with outstand- 
ing success in business and government 
training programs is the Audiscan audicv 
visual self-instruction system. 

The Audiscan system revolves around a 
single, sealed 5" x 5" I'/a" cartridge which 
snaps into a portable projector. The car- 
tridge can be programmed with up to 225 
16mm visuals, and 25 minutes of sound, 
perfectly synchronized and sealed into the 
cartridge. Stop-start-hold capabilities per- 
mit near animation-like sequences. Controls 
providing for automatic or manual, or com- 
bination operation are built-in to suit the 
program needs. 

Since Audiscan is a self-training tool, the 
need for instructor and supervision time is 
reduced substantially. There is no pressure 
on student or instructor, and no chance of 
important information being left out. 

Audiscan adapts nicely to single concept 
"Program Teaching," because instructions 
can be broken down to suit any level of 
learning. Complicated subjects can be sim- 
plified and graphically emphasized. The 
learning time required is determined by the 
trainee, who manually restarts the lesson 
whenever he is satisfied with his understand- 
ing of the subject covered. 

The combination of words and pictures, 
plus the presentation techniques available 
with Audiscan programming capabilities re- 
sults in superior training. Uniformity of 
training is an added advantage. Pictures 
show the trainees exactly what the subject 
should look like at each point in the les- 
son, while the voice tells him exactly what 
to do. Consequently, trainees learn the most 
efficient way to do the job and they all 
learn it alike. 

Ryder Systems, for example, found that 




Warehouse employees study 
inventory control and 
handling instruction with 
the use of the Audiscan 
projector. 



maintenance employees not only learned 
faster, but easier and with better retention 
and understanding, than from printed man- 
uals. 

ITT Cannon Electric, division of IT & T 
Corporation, experienced savings of 50% 
in time, and costs, in training microelectron- 
ics assembly-line workers. Employees were 
also better trained, and able to assume full 
job responsibility as soon as assigned to 
work stations. 

Boeing and Sikorsky were early users, 
with aircraft maintenance training programs. 
Owens-Illinois Glass Company trains over- 
seas in the operation of their equipment, 
while Chase Manhattan Bank trains tellers 
with Audiscan. 

It has proven particularly appropriate 
for franchisors. Krystal Company, a drive- 
in restaurant chain, and Bavarian Alpine 
Inns depend on the system for operations 
training courses. King's Food Host includes 
waitress training, and food handling instruc- 
tions. International House of Pies programs 
its accounting procedures for Audiscan. Wil- 
cox & Gibb, manufacturers of industrial 
sewing machines, train employees in assem- 
bly and installation with Audiscan. National 
Tool & Die Precision Machine Association 
has a series of filmstrips for training of 
apprentices, technical personnel, and jour- 
neymen review. 

The Army Air Force selected Audiscan 
for its Serendipity Program. The U.S. Army 
Signal Corps teaches its Project "Covet" 
(common basic electronics) with Audiscan 
systems. And it is being used in classified 
training courses by the U.S. Navy in Bangor, 
Washington, and New London, Connecticut, 
plus a joint venture program with the U.S. 
Marine Corps. 

Firms of all sizes are utilizing Audiscan 
and similar systems more and more for em- 
ployee training and indoctrination, at all 
levels from routine semi-skilled jobs to ex- 
ecutive communications. They are uniquely 
effective for technical and production-line 
training. 

With training of both the jobless and the 
employed becoming critical facets of our 
economic structure, cartridged self con- 
tained sound projection systems are provid- 
ing a simple, proven method of effectively 
training employees with minimum supervi- 
sion at low cost. • 



27 



wmm 





The quadrangle of floating screen blocks as they appeared during a program break. The blocks were mounted on a turntable in the stage floor and re- 
volved for various portions of the program. 



MULTI-MEDIA FOR MULTI-SITES 



when an elaborate audiovisual show 

has to travel to many locations and 

play under varying conditions, 

resulting adaptions often destroy 

much of the program's effectiveness. 

Here's how John Deere Company, 

through careful planning, presented 

a highly effective product 

introduction multi-media show that 

also fits the "will travel" category 



rpo RECEIVE FULL value from an aud- 
■*■ iovisual investment, a company will of- 
ten seek wide exposure for its film, stripfilm, 
or multi-media story. The multi-media or 
multi-screen program, as a result of this 
need to reach more people, is usually 
booked for showings in many locations un 
der widely varying circumstances . . . audi- 
ences may range in size from 75 to 750, 
and room sizes will vary accordingly. This, 
in turn, will often require an adaptation of 
the original show to suit the new show situ- 
ations, and changes become necessary which 
may prove fatal to the effectiveness of the 
original program. 

Deere & Company, manufacturers of 
farm machinery — tractors, combines, and 
auxiliary machines — last fall launched a ma- 
jor product introduction to its 700 branch 
executives and some 1000 dealerships. They 
asked Ken Saco Associates, New York show 
producers, to prepare an audiovisual pra- 
gram that would fill the typical sales meet- 
ing and new product introduction needs — to 
generate enthusiasm and to tell the nuts- 
and-bolts story as well. 

Two initial kick-off shows were to be giv- 
en in the Deere Administrative Center in 
Moline, Illinois. A few days later the pro- 
gram would travel into the field to be given 
by the Deere branch sales managers to their 
John Deere dealerships. All programs, hov;- 
cver, were expected to be given equal treat- 
ment, regardless of the different in-field 
conditions under which they would be given. 

The Deere Administrative Center, a mod- 
ern six-story structure of exposed steel gir- 
ders and glass, is one of the late Eero Saar- 
inen"s most brilliant pieces of architecture 
and the Quad Cities' popular points of in- 



terest. It contains corporate executive offices 
and a unique 350 seat semi-circular audi- 
torium with several striking features: A re- 
volving 32-foot wide turntable is built into 
the stage floor, capable of carrying many 
tons of weight. The entire rear wall of the 
stage, over 16 feet high, is covered with 
steel curtains which may be raised to re- 
veal a glass wall and large courtyard be- 
yond. When the steel curtains are down a 
15x28 foot movie screen may be lowered 
into position for projection. Lighting, pro- 
jection and sound installations are very 
complete. 

The problem was to design a program 
that would make use of this auditorium's 
potential, yet have a show that could travel 
without extensive adaptations. 

Good lead time 

The show's lead time of six months was 
a healthy one. Time was required for prop- 
er photographic coverage of the prototype 
combines, self-propelled farm machines ca- 
pable of threshing and harvesting wheat, 
maize, corn and other crops. These proto- 
type machines were in short supply and 
were in demand for advertising photos and 
filming, all of which had to be fitted around 
another need — a cross-country testing 
schedule calling for workouts of new- 
against-old machines in many different crop 
areas at the best possible harvest times. 

A timetable was prepared, allowing for 
script and shooting storyboards to enable 
photographers to complete their work be- 
fore the combines were moved out for field 
testing. When it was completed, the six- 
month lead time did not seem quite as long 
as it did at the outset — the planning time for 
presenting a visual format and script treat- 



28 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



nient had hecn condensed into a six week 
period. 

"Stonehen^e West" takes shape 

The auditorium was covered photograph- 
ically hy the producer, and blueprints were 
obtained lor the structure itsell'. When the 
research team finished they had more than 
enough background information and statis- 
tics. D'fferent a\enues of visual approach 
were explored. 

Initial idea drawings indicated some ex- 
citing directions and the new concepts were 
followed thru into dummy stage form. The 
resulting idea immediately caught the imag- 
ination of the creative team. 

A group of free-standing, apparently 
"floating in space" blocks were designed 
which would stand on the stage turntable. 
It was found that a variety of shapes could 
be presented to the audience depending 
upon how the turntable moved during the 
show. The final concept presented to the 
Deere people took this shape: 

"In the Moline Auditorium the screens 
will be a series of free-floating screen blocks, 
positioned on the stage turntable in a tri- 
angular arrangement. At transitional points 
in the program the turntable will rotate to 
present the audience with a different config- 
uration of screen blocks. Through selective 
masking of 35nim slides, and positioning of 
projection equipment, images will fit into 
each of the three screen configurations with- 
out changing position of the projectors. In 
the branch field shows, on the road, a single 
two-to-one ratio screen will accommodate 
all three formats, without any change in the 
original show." 

This meant that the in-field shows could 
be picked up as-is from the original. It was 
recommended that the original take advan- 
tage of the projection balcony, and use nine 
slide and two 1 6mm projectors for a smooth- 
er series of visual effects, with additional 
music and light effects during the screen 
changes. 

The in-field shows could be projected 
with as few as three slide projectors, and a 
single 16mm film projector, or they could 
be almost as elaborate as the original show 
if the staging conditions and audience size 
warranted it. 

Scripts were planned to make full use of 
the "floating block" screens whenever pos- 
sible and appropriate. Deere's story was a 
straightforward one — and the staging avoid- 
ed any look of "gimmicry" by its highly 
functional use. When screen changes were 
made, they underscored actual program con- 
tent changes. 

Company spokesmen were at lecterns 
during portions of the program, at other 
times the films and slides were mixed to a 
pre-recorded track — all portions of the pro- 
gram were tightly staged and visualized. 

The entire program ran three hours, in- 
cluding a mid program break for a view of 
the new combines in the courtyard during 
a coffee serving. Deere's board chairman, 
William Hewitt, attended the first show. 
Impressed by the visual format, and sensing 
a resemblance to England's grouping of an- 



cient astronomic stone shapes, he quipped 
to Curtis Lowey, Ken Saco Associates' part- 
ner, "I've decided to dub this. Stonchenue 
West!" 

The branch shows 

I raveling "kit" versions of the show 
were prepared, and were ready for delivery 
at the same time as the original show. They 
were duplicates of the first show, and con- 
tained detailed scripts with complete cuing 
and tray-change instructions. In addition, 
custom-built triple pri)jector control boxes 
were provided to simplify the advancing of 
projectors on script cues. 

Response from the field, traditionally 
quiet when it comes to coping with multi- 
media show productions, was excellent. 
Every branch manager had seen the Moline 
show, and at that time had an opportunity 
to become familiar with the projection tech- 
nique. Classes were given, informally, for 
those wishing to rehearse the kit setup. 

Multi-media shows certainly need to reach 
adequately large audiences . . . and today 
the show techniques and projection equip- 
ment are available to do this efficiently. 

Company sales executives are becoming 
more interested in these mixed media shows 
that have an excitement about them that the 
single-screen programs lack — and this gen- 
eration of excitement is what most of these 
sales meetings are all about. • 




Each of the vertical screens measured 11 x SVi 
feet. After each program section, the turntable 
revolved for a 20-second quarter turn in sync 
with music and light effects. 




The projection equipment was 

arranged in this fashion in the 
second balcony. Stage 
Manager Skip Rognlien 
reviews cue script prior to 
performance. 



Top edges of floating screen 

blocks were lit with red from 

above to intensify dimensional 

effect. 




MAY, 1970 



29 



Foreign Policy for the Citizen 



Offering no solutions, the Henry Strauss film, "From Where I Sit," 

provides a much needed insight into U.S. foreign policy. It 

examines the complex decision-making process and relates the 

situation in understandable personal terms. 




The film begins with a fade-in on a 
chair (top), but as the camera cir- 
cles the chair, it ceases to be a 
chair, evolving into an abstract 3 



THE FADE-IN OPENS with 
a straight-lined, easily recog- 
nizable chair. Slowly — but pur- 
posively — the camera begins 
moving around the chair. And 
soon, the chair becomes less like 
a chair '■ — eventually an abstract 
three-dimensional design of re- 
volving rods. 

"When is a chair not a chair?" 
the narrator asks. 

This intriguing opening sets 
the mood and stage for From 
Where I Sii, a 27-minute, 16mm 
black-and-white documentary 
about the complexity of foreign 
policy issues and the diverse fac- 



dimensional design of revolving rods tors which must be defined and 
(bottom), making the point that a evaluated before the State De- 
situation must be approached from ^^jment makes a decision. The 
every conceivable angle. J:, , . , .u ttc 

film was produced tor the U.b. 

government by Henry Strauss 
Communications of New York, a 
division of Novo Corp. 

"This production has none of 
the characteristics of a dramatic 
film," Henry Strauss, the pro- 
ducer, says. "There is no point 
of view. It arrives at no conclu- 
sion. There is no beginning, mid- 
dle or end. We're dealing with 
an abstract concept, a total prob- 
lem." 

In the film, Strauss dramatizes 





Fisherman aboard a U.S. fishing vessel looks vyith dismay at Russian 
trawler in background scooping up thousands of fish off the California 
coast. 



the varied problems of State De- 
partment policymakers for the 
responsible citizen. The film, 
through carefully structured se- 
quences, use of cinema verite and 
pointed narration, demonstrates 
decision-making alternatives — 
not totally acceptable — and 
each involving conflicts in this 
country and elsewhere. 

"This type of film is provoca- 
tive," Strauss said. "It's a mat- 
ter of picking up the emotional 
overtones. You have to build 
keys as you go along. 

"The script changes as you 
move through your research and 
filming. What someone says 'off- 
the-cuff may affect your next se- 
quence — especially if it chal- 
lenges and stimulates. It's a mat- 
ter of being flexible and patient." 

In focusing on the decision- 
making process, the film makes 
this point: the responsible citizen 
applies the same process — anal- 
ysis and determination of broad 
national interests in shaping his 
own opinions on foreign policy 
issues as does the State Depart- 
ment. In the film, no decisions 
are made; it gives the viewer the 
tools with which to draw his own 
conclusions, pinpointing the dif- 
ficulties facing the State Depart- 
ment. 

"There is no hero, no villain, 
no conclusion or philosophical 
viewpoint," Strauss said. "It is 
difficult to demonstrate success- 
fully the synthesis of shaping 
viewpoints. We must show right 
and wrong, black and white, then 
reverse — and you must take 
into consideration your own feel- 
ings in evaluating the problem. 

"We tried to build a dramatic, 
structural and social viewpoint 
and show black and white do not 
exist in this area — and that gov- 
ernment has to bring together 
conflicting viewpoints." 

This is done in two principal 
sequences. The first deals with 
a pointedly uncomplicated ques- 
tion concerning the United States 
when California fishermen are 
arrested by Ecuadorean, Peru- 
vian and Chilean patrols while 



trawling up to 200 miles off 
South America's west coast. 

In the first, the U.S. tuna fleet 
wants Washington to stop what 
they feel is "piracy" on the high 
seas. "In this case fishing is an 
extremely dramatic problem," 
Strauss said. "We are attempting 
to affect and influence people — 
to give insight — and I think 
the sequence makes the point 
very well." 

In the second sequence, deal- 
ing with the U.S. and trade with 
Eastern European countries, the 
camera sweeps down on a Brook- 
lyn dock where the same diversity 
of views and factors are captured 
via cinema verite. 

Trade means more jobs, some 
say, but others contend Ameri- 
can workers would be subject to 
unfair competition; an American 
manufacturer sees export oppor- 
tunities, but others feel trading 
with the Communist block would 
encourage aggression and betrav 
our fighting men. Others feel 
trade will lead to better under- 
standing and improve peace pros- 
pects. 

The film provides the viewer 
with behind-the-scene activities 
at the State Department, focusing 
on one ranking official who faces 
a continuing range of decision- 
making alternatives. 

At the Arms Control and Dis- 
armament Agency, whose direc- 
tor reports directly to the Secre- 
tary of State, officers are seeking 
a solution to a basic conflict of 
national viewpoints: the deeply 
rooted Soviet rejection of any 
arms control proposal which 
would require inspection of So- 
viet territory by non-Soviet per- 
sonnel, as opposed to the Ameri- 
can rejection of any arms control 
agreement which cannot be po- 
liced. 

In the State Department Of- 
fice: What should be the U.S. 
attitude toward a foreign regime 
which takes and retains power 
undemocratically but which may 
be the only immediate alternative 
to chaotic violence? 

Another office, another topic: 
U.S. aid to a country with severe 
food and population problems. 
Can large-scale aid be justified 
to the American taxpayer if the 
country being helped is not tak- 
ing effective steps to increase i*s 
food production and limit its 
population increase? 

The film concludes by reflect- 
ing on some critical decisions of 
the State Department in recent 
years under four different presi- 
dents — and then surveying the 
problems ahead. • 



30 



B'JSINESS SCREEN 



U'T'HE QUIET voice of creativity" is 
-*- perhaps the best way to describe 
Mort Golclshi>ll of Cu>ldsholl & Associates, 
today considered one of the nation's lead- 
ing sponsored fihii producers. 

He is considered by many tlic imques- 
tiiined mar.ter of creati\it\ in two fields; de- 
sign and sponsored fihiis. although he re- 
fuses to recognizx a distinction between the 
two in his thinking. His approach to all of 
his undertakings is that of an artist. Even 
thought the business world generally sees 
graphic or print design and filmmaking as 
two separate fields, Mort insists, "There is 
no difference between a designer and a 
filmmaker." 

An artist and art enthusiast most of his 
life. Goldsholl studied at Chicago's School 
of Design with Moholy-Nagy, and combines 
beauty and practicality in his work. If there 
is a key to his success, it perhaps lies in 
this feeling that there "is no conflict be- 
tween fine art and applied art" and his ap- 
plication of this principle to everything that 
he does. 

One cannot describe the films of Gold- 
sholl & Associates without also quickly call- 
ing attention to the other half of a very 
creative and harmon-ous team, Mrs. Morton 
Goldsholl. "Millie" to most who know her. 
An equally adept artist and filmmaker. Mil- 
lie is perhaps the more outspoken, quickly 
interpreting, explaining or discussing some- 
thing in great detail, somewhat in contrast 
to Mort's more quiet, thoughtful pattern. 
Outwardly, the two are almost a study of 
contrasts. Millie is vivacious, almost bub- 
bling and seems to be a whirlwind of per- 
petual activity, constant interest and curi- 
osity. Mort is generally quieter, more 
thouchtful. but every bit as curious, inter- 
ested and dedicated to what he is doing. 
And, no less active. They share several 
common interests, hobbies and outlooks, 
differing perhaps only in the way they ex- 
press them. 

They work in a rather simple looking 
building in Northfield, Illinois, a far North- 
ern Chicago suburb, amidst a row of other 
small office buildings. It is near their sub- 
urban home, something they both prefer 
and relish to commuting to the distant 
downtown Chicago loop. 

And. even though they are widely known 
for their film work, their studios more great- 
ly resemble the art department of a busy 
ad agency than a highly creative film pro- 
duction facility. This appearance is attrib- 
utable to the fact that as Mort puts it, "I 
can spend only about 30% of my time on 
our great love . . . films, but fortunately 
Millie can spend full time." 

Like many of the country's most talented 
producers, Mort and Millie can be selective 
about the films they do. They always have 
more opportunities than they can accom- 
modate. Neither of them will accept a film 
assignment that they don't believe in. 

Mort believes a filmmaker "should con- 
sider it a privilege to take on the challenge 
of making a film." "A filmmaker has the 
responsibility of doint; the film to the best 
Continued on next page 



MAY, 1970 



A BUSINESS SCREEN producer profile 



THE QUIET VOICE OF 
CREATIVITY 



Sharing a great love of filmmaking, relentless 
curiosity, and a dedication to artistic creativity, Mort 
and Millie Goldsholl of Chicago's Goldsholl & 
Associates deliver an eloquent artistry in all of their 
films. 







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voice of creativity . . . 

continued 

of his creative ability, to properly convey the 
idea and subject matter, and fight for the 
right to use film as art." 

The Goldsholls wili do nothing "hokey," 
and cringe when they see samples of bad 
filmmaking. They believe art can be effec- 
tively applied to the production of any film. 

If films are their great love, then fishing 
and/or trains are second, and both of these 
interests have played parts in their film- 
making. The first film they made, called 
Nii^ht Driving was filmed on the way home 
from a fishing trip. Millie shot the film 
of passing lights at night from the car as 
Mort was driving. She used the camera lens 
to create distortions for effect in the film. 

Their first sponsored film was Texoprint, 
produced for Kimberly-Clark Corporation. 

Their great love of trains (almost a ro- 
mantic nostalgia) undoubtedly was a fac- 
tor in the acclaim of ImaHimition 10, their 
tremendously successful film of two years 
ago. Up until the demise of most regular 
passenger runs, Mort and Millie traveled 
almost exclusively by train, preferring it to 
automobiles or airplanes. 

Their first film studio was actually in 
their home, even though Mort had a de- 
sign studio in downtown Chicago since the 
early 1940's. Neither of them really knew 
anything about filmmaking, both having 
been art and design students. Their first 
animation stand was fashioned by Mort 
from a drill press. Millie counted the frames 
of film to add sound, knowing only that 
there were 24 frames per second. 

Today, in their 12th year of making films, 
they employ 20 people, six of whom ar-e 
regularly involved in filmmaking. Mort and 
Millie believe in maintaining as much as 
possible the same staff because they feel a 
total crew can work better together this 
way and produce better results. 

"The crew members, having worked to- 
gether, gain a mutual knowledge of each 
other and what is desired in the particular 
approach to "a film," says Millie. 

In the wake of recently completed an- 
nual reports for Borg-Warner Corporation, 
Kimberly-Clark and Owens-Illinois, Mort 
is currently working on Momentum, a film 
for Westinghouse. Millie has just completed 
a film for Eastman Kodak, Out of Sight. 
The film looks at everyday life through the 
eves of an 1 1 -year-old boy where ordinary 
things become unordinary through an ex- 
tension of his vision. An example, as the 
boy looks at a cow, it becomes a milk pro- 
ducing machine through animation. 

In their spare time, the Goldsholls are 
active in the Film Forum, a North Shore 
film society in its 18th year. Presently num- 
bering about 80 members, meeting each 
month in a member's home, the group at 
one time numbered about 500. 

Mort and Millie's strongest feelines are 



expressed on the subjects of creativity and 
filmmaking ethics. 

"For best results," says Millie, "a film- 
maker should be paid a creative fee. And, a 
filmmaker should never bid until he has 
thoroughly researched the subject, applied 
his maximum creativity and envisioned the 
total concept of the film to be made. To 
do this properly, the filmmaker should ex- 
pect to be compensated. 

"A major problem of most filmmakers is 
conveying the sense of the film or subject 
to non-film oriented people. By taking that 
extra creative step and applying the added 
dimension, any film can be made interest- 
ing to nearly any audience. There can be 
something for everyone in any film." 

Sharing the growing belief that many 
young people are turned off on "words," 
Mort and Millie utilize this idea that vis- 
uals convey the message in their films. 

They select and make films that chal- 
lenge their creativity. They want to make 
those films where they can apply creative 
concepts. Millie believes that "all art is 
one," that all art is related. 

On the subject of sponsors and film buy- 
ers, Millie says, "Too many people, includ- 
ing sponsors, have a backward notion about 
what film is and what it can do. A creative 
artistic film can convey a corporate mes- 
sage far better than a direct hard sell ap- 
proach." 

Of film festivals and awards, Mort says, 
"The first award you receive is nice, but 
the most important award is the medal you 
give yourself." He believes this is a rare 
event for a professional filmmaker, because 
there always seems room to improve. 

Mort and Millie each research and write 
their own scripts. They are quick to add 
that they "write film, not words." Mort's 
approach to a film is to think a film as- 
signment over in his mind for days, some- 
times longer. He mulls the film over until 
all facets are clear in his mind. He claims 
that all of the essential details are relative- 
ly sharp in his mind before he prepares the 
script or begins shooting. He says this has 
proven to be his most successful approach 
to a film or design project. 

Preferring a reputation as creative film- 
makers, neither Mort nor Millie are con- 
sidered specialists in any general subject 
area. In one year's time, they have pro- 
duced films ranging from educational un- 
dertakings to very technical product films. 
In one year, their sponsors range from Field 
Enterprises and the Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare to Sears, Roebuck 
and Co. and Owens-Illinois. 

Their dedication and talent are reflected 
on the screen in every film they produce. 
And, despite a tremendous popularity and 
acclaim, they remain the "quiet voice of 
creativity" in industrial filmmakins. • 



32 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




OUR NEW ECO 
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It's finally here — new Kodak Ektachrome 
Commercial Film 7252 — the long-awaited 
camera-film improvement in the ECO system 
that turns into sharper prints — especially in 
super 8. 

Give it a try. You'll see the sharpness and 
the excellent color rendition in your 16mm 
prints right away. And you'll really see the dif- 
ference in super 8 prints. 

But sharpness isn't the whole story. 7252 
also has a wide exposure latitude. Which means 
you've got more control when faced with a 
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permit you to shoot at the normal ASA 25 rating, 
push it up a stop to 50. It can then be forced 
processed and you've got it! 

Last but not least, 7252 is probably going to 
mean greater efficiency in the lab. That's be- 
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which is more compatible with the popular 
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All in all, new Ektachrome Commercial Film 
7252 is the film to turn to when you want to 
turn out sharper prints. Check with one of the 
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The production of corporate public relations films is 
at an all time high and growing, according to Mr. Smith, 
who cites a "glaring lack of selling effort on the part of 
business film producers" as perhaps one of the reasons 
there are not even more being made. 



PR FILMS- 
COMING OR GOING? 



EASTMAN KODAK Company recently 
made a film titled, Movies Move People and 
certainly no one, especially competent and 
knowledgeable public relations people, will 
quarrel with the well-known fact set forth 
in this brief but meaningful title. It has been 
true since the silent film days and the 
earliest sound films such as Al Jolson's 
"The Jazz Singer" and Cecil B. DeMille's 
great spectacular. The King of Kings which 
the author saw at its premiere showing in 
Grauman's Chinese Theatre, May 1, 1927. 

But it was not until television brought 
movies into the living room that the full 
impact of films really made itself felt. TV 
has changed the living habits of the average 
American family to a degree few realize. 
Because of this and other revolutionary de- 
velopments already in the prototype stage 
future generations will be much better in- 
formed and more sophisticated. In fact, as 
one political analyst put it when remarking 
about the huge amount spent on TV in the 
last election, "the first voters this time grew 
up on their bellies in front of a television 
set. They've been brainwashed with audio 
visuals and that's the way its going to be 
from now on." 

Kodak's promotional brochure on 
"Movies Move People" says it is fairly com- 
mon knowledge that film can store events 
for the future, make it possible to project 
information again and again without any 
change in meaning, allows the salesman sell- 
ing turbines or bridge beams to demonstrate 
them without carting them along with him, 
offers a convenience to the executive too 
busy to address his far-flung operations in 
person, can deliver the world, and now even 
the moon, or any part thereof, to any single 
location. Film can be used to demonstrate, 
display and teach in color, black-and-white, 
with sound or without, in wide screen, split 



By SHIRLEY SMITH 

Vice President 

Assistant to Executive 

Association-Sterling Films 



or un-split screen, through animation, 
dramatization, or documentation and in 70, 
35, 16 or super 8 mm. Film can be seen in 
the home, office, store, assembly line, 
school, exhibit, and in the church, theatre, 
on television. In point of fact, it can be 
seen everywhere. All of these are salable 
facts, and while they are important and 
"old hat" to film professionals, they are not 
always the most compelling reasons for 
those who want to communicate effectively 
in the most forceful manner through film. 

Film, by its very nature, provides the 
user the incomparable opportunity to be un- 
usually persuasive. It is the one and only 
medium through which it becomes possible 
to reach a target audience by way of all of 
its emotions at once. Shock, tears, laughter, 
concern and apprehension, uncertainty, re- 
lief — all can carry a message, and all are 
reproducible on film. Film turns an idea, a 
concept, fact or what-have-you, into a very 
personal — and often memorable — experi- 
ence. This alone sets it aside as a uniquely 
potent tool of effective communications. 

Hugh Marlowe, who narrates Eastman's 
film about film, establishes this concept in 
his introduction. He states that film can "in- 
tercept the senses, lull and electrify them: 
that it has the power to embed an idea or 
change one: provoke shouts or a memory" 
— all through the evocation of desire, re- 
gret, joy or revulsion. Entirely unlike other 
media, film can communicate on many 
levels simultaneously. It can channel in- 
formation through receptive climates gen- 
erated by dramatization or comedy, by the 
subtleties of plotting, stylization and tim- 
ing; by the techniques of animation, special 
effects and documentation. It grabs the 
viewer, shakes him out of his apathy and 
alerts him to feel a connection and involve- 
ment with the material being shown on the 



screen. There is a sharp difference between 
this approach and the miasma of words so 
often encountered in other methods of com- 
munication. Film can be most emphatically 
believable and this is vital because credibil- 
ity is the potent essential in the solicitation 
of understanding. Film, as Mr. Marlowe 
concludes in his introduction to Movies 
Move People, is "a substance on which to 
reason directly — with sound or fury, or 
silence. It is a method to make thoughts 
understood." 

Those in the production and distribution 
of business films will all lay claim to know- 
ing what Mr. Marlowe, and the Eastman 
film, so effectively set forth, but many of 
them feel, and so express themselves, that 
"public relations people do not understand 
what a potent tool film is and are not tak- 
ing anywhere near full advantage of its 
potential to help them do a better job of 
communicating." However, the record does 
not support this contention. 

A recent survey conducted for the Society 
of Motion Picture and Television Engineers 
by Thomas Hpoe, also of Eastman Kodak, 
shows that the non-theatrical motion pic- 
ture and audio visual business is now more 
than a billion-dollar industry. The latest 
available figures (for 1967) show a total of 
12,750 non-theatrical films made that year 
— 7,500 of which were produced by and for 
business and industrial firms. Business and 
industry spent $241,000,000 on films dur- 
ing the year with costs per film ranging from 
less than $10,000 to $500,000 spent on a 
40-minute corporate film by a major com- 
pany. A sizeable percentage of the income 
of business film producers and no less than 
75% of the income of distributors of such 
films comes from public relations budgets. 
The important influence of public rela- 
tions thinking and practice in business film 
production is clearly demonstrated in the 
low key commercialism of the average cor- 
porate film today as compared with the 
trend only a few years ago when the firm's 
logo and president's name (and often, pic- 
ture) had to appear every few hundred feet 
to gain official approval. Business films are 
now so tastefully done as to commercialism 
that they are finding fertile exposure pos- 
sibilities both on television and in the na- 
tion's theaters. Kaiser Aluminum's Why 
Man Creates won an Academy Award last 
year as the best short subject. It is a magni- 
ficent film, produced by Saul Bass, and is 
not about aluminum, industry, the Kaiser 
family or the company's record of progress. 
It was the original "brain child" of Robert 
Sandberg, the company's vice president of 
public relations and advertising, and was 
inspired by the themes of three issues of 
the famous Kaiser Magazine. 

At the first film festival ever held by the 
Public Relations Society, during its annual 
conference last November in Los Angeles, 
Mobil Oil Corporation's unique film A 
Fable, starring Marcel Marceau, famous 
French mime, won the grand award. With- 
out a spoken word and with background 
Continued on page 36 



34 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



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Public relations films 

continued 



music by the London Royal Orchestra, this 
beautiful movie, filmed just outside a 14th 
century village near Rome, gently and subtly 
gets across its message of the importance 
of better world understanding and closer 
relationship. Because it has no spoken word 
the film is being shown throughout the 
world transcending language barriers to win 
wide acclaim, acceptance and understand- 
ing. Companies with foreign interests and 
operations can learn much from this ex- 
ample of the versatility of film for universal 
communicating. In this connection, Edward 
J. (Ned) Gerrity, Jr., senior vice president 
and director of corporate relations and ad- 
vertising for International Telephone and 
Telegraph Corporation (ITT), has some in- 
teresting observations in his statement in 
Denny Griswold's Public Relations News 
of December 29, 1969. He says in part, 
"Today, American business is being mea- 
sured more and more frequently not by the 
yardstick of profit or size of assets, but by 
the yardstick of service to the nation. Every 
company is now expected to give something 
back to society in proportion to its cor- 
porate size and its influence over the lives 
of its employees and the people in the com- 
munities where it does business. There are 
urgent problems in our country today that 
can be solved only by government and busi- 
ness working together. The problems of 
pollution, transportation, training of hard- 
core unemployed, housing, minority entre- 
preneurship are a few that government can 
never solve alone. . . ." 

"But", continues Gerrity, "domestic prob- 
lems are not all that will preoccupy public 
relations people. The great changes that 
have occurred in business during the past 
decade indicate that companies are going to 
become even more diversified and more 
international. No longer will a strictly Amer- 
ican or even a Western viewpoint enable 
an enlightened businessman to deal with the 
world around him. The prediction has been 
made that international businessmen will be 
the real diplomats of the future. If this is so, 
and everything seems to be leading to it, 
good corporate public relations will need to 
communicate more and more not with seg- 
ments of people but with the public at large 
— the world. . . ." Gerrity's very astute ob- 
servations make real sense and may very 
well point to an ever-widening usage of 
films by business and industry to accomplish 
the goals he has set forth for the public re- 
lations executive of the future. 

In the same issue of the Public Relations 
News is an item on the rapid growth of 
television — not just as a source of entertain- 
ment — but as a news source. Ten years ago 
Roper Research Associates, in answer to 
"where do you usually get most of your 
news about what's going on in the world to- 
day," were told that 37% depended on 
newspapers, 33% on television and 22% 



on radio. In their latest survey TV jumped 
to 40% while newspapers dropped to 33% 
and radio to 17%. This is yet another piece 
of evidence as to what's happening in this 
"sight and sound revolution." 

Reverend John Culkin of Fordham Uni- 
versity made a survey revealing that by the 
time the average student graduates from 
high school today he or she will have 
watched more than 15,000 hours of tele- 
vision, seen more than 500 films and yet 
will have been in school only 10,800 hours. 
So there's no question but what the "mix" 
in communications media, from henceforth, 
will have to be much heavier in audio vis- 
uals and there's plenty of evidence on all 
sides that thinking public relations people 
realize this full well and are "getting with it" 
at a rapid pace. Sure, most top public rela- 
tions people were print-oriented but yet, in 
the main, they are making effective and in- 
creasing use of films. The reason why more 
of them are not doing so may well be be- 
cause they have not been told or sold the 
many reasons why they should be making 
and using films. And this brings us to what 
we consider a glaring lack of selling effort 
on the part of business film producers espe- 
cially in the public relations area where, as 
we mentioned earlier, most of the money 
for business films comes from. 

So perhaps instead of lamenting the fact 
that more public relations people should 
make more business films the nation's major 
producers of such films should take ad- 
vantage of the situation existent and con- 
centrate on giving public relations people 
more information and help in deciding how 
to make a proper film. 

Of real significance to the film industry 
are the films made recently by prestigious 
publications to tell the public their story 
and to help solve some of the country's ma- 
jor problems. The New York Daily News 
made a film The Trip Bacic, a starkly-true 
story of a woman who was "hooked" on 
drugs for 23 years, and prints have been 
purchased by police departments, commu- 
nity organizations, companies, schools, etc., 
all over the country. Newsweek's Tlie Day 
Before Tomorrow, depicting the true situa- 
tion on our college campuses today, won a 
top award at PRSA's film festival. Reader's 
Digest has just completed From Sea To 
Shining Sea. a fine film recording the frank 
opinions of Americans across the country 
on the many problems facing our nation to- 
day. The New York Times made a good 
film New Yoric City-Tlie Most, sure to help 
repair some of the bad public relations suf- 
fered by the city with all the riots, racial 
disturbances, and other unfortunate hap- 
penings. And when film's principal competi- 
tors in the media field start using films to 
sell their wares that should be the clincher 
to prove Eastman Kodak's contention that 
Movies Move People. • 



36 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



I F PA JOURNAL 



INFORMATION FILM PRODUCERS OF AMERICA, INC. 



P.O. Box 1470, Hollywood, California 90028 



Code of Ethics Coming 

We have come of age during the decade 
of space. Not only IFPA members but all 
non-theatrical filmmakers. Member or not, 
vou are a part of a new profession. Not 
just photographers. Not just writers, direc- 
tors, editors, planners, executors, salesmen, 
or electricians. But part of an industry that 
can mo\e people, move groups, yes. even 
move the world to act and react. This is 
a responsibility that can stagger the im- 
magination. Can you imagine irresponsi- 
bility in the legal or medical profession? 
Dishonesty in architecture or engineering? 
Catastrophy! Recognition has come slow in 
our profession. A few years ago, it was 
considered a luxury — frosting on the cake 
— a dispensable commodity. Today, this 
next decade, is our day. The Communica- 
tion Revolution is here. The Information 
Explosion has happened. We must mature 
and accept our destiny and heritage. We. 
too. must recognize our responsibility, and 
to this end. IFPA has risen to the occasion 
and has prepared, not only for our mem- 
bers, but for all non-theatrical filmmak- 
ers to embrace and subscribe to: a "Code 
of Ethics. ■■ Publication of this code will be 
made nationally in July of 1970 and copies 
suitable for framing made available there- 
after. 

In this day of moral and ethical issues, 
it is commendable that this organization 
spearhead this Code of responsible activity. 

Student Programs Bloom 

Guidance, instruction, and creative pro- 
grams are growing in several IFPA Chap- 
ters throughout the Nation. We strongly 
feel the responsibility to bring youth and 
new ideas of communication into our pow- 
erful medium. Learning to make effective 
and moving pictures is an art. Some of it 
comes naturally and can be nurtured. Some 
of it is skill that must be developed and 
honed to a fine edge. To this end, several 
chapters have started programs for high 
school-age students that are directed to en- 
courage further involvement in the informa- 
tion arts. 

This will be the subject of several arti- 
cles in the future. The reason for this arti- 
cle is the announcement of the national 
subscription drive for a substantial scholar- 
ship grant to be awarded a deserving high 
school senior for use in obtainine a univer- 



sity cinema degree. Goal for the E. C. 
Reefer Scholarship Award this year is 
$2..'^()0.0(). A campaign will start in June 
and will be spearheaded by Chairman Jack 
Smith. If you feel a responsibility to youth 
in our profession — if you recognize that 
the future is in the hands of the next gen- 
eration, if you want future filmmakers to 
be a reflection of guided and professional 
training — not underground, irresponsible 
frustrated filmmakers who are not accepted 
through closed doors and minds — llien 
without further solicitation, send your share 
of the future in dollars to E. C. Keefer 
Scholarship Fund. IFPA, P. O. Box 1470. 
Hollywood. Calif. 90028. It's very worthy. 

Call for "Cindy" Film Awards 

Awards Chairman Jerry Oliver has an- 
nounced the dates and schedules for the 
12th Annual Cindy Film Award Competi- 
tion. Committee chairmen and category 
assignments have been designated and soon 
details will be available for one of the most 
honored and original non-theatrical film rec- 
ognition competitions in America. Awards 
will be made on Saturday. November 7th at 
the National Conference to be held this 
year at the fabulous, refurbished Dell Webbs 
Newporter Inn, in Newport Beach. Cali- 
fornia. No better facilities exist in South- 
ern California and the affair will be staged 
with exceptional finesse and saviorfare. 

Recognizing the advance of electronics in 
our industry, a new category has been add- 
ed this vear — "Information & Communi- 
cation by Videotape." 

The traditional "Jay Gordon Award", and 
The "E. C. Keefer Award" will be present- 
ed to an individual and a group respective- 
Iv for accomplishment and professionalism 
in the motion picture industry. 

Practice What We Preach 

Eastman states that "Movies Move Peo- 
ple" and you can believe it! We believe it 
in TFPA and we're doing just that! Both 
Chicago and the Dallas-Ft. Worth Chapters 
were installed officially via a filmed "greet- 
ing" from the President, who then read the 
installation letter, welcomed the group, and 
urged all to become involved with the chap- 
ter activity and growth. 

In addition, the First Quarterly IFPA 

Status Report was put on film, as well as 

Continued on next page 



Stop 
borrowing 
the Bolex 




Bill H-1< R«a-5 Camara. 

afio-Swilar Zoom Lens 
*viih fuitv automatic 
ii-.TOKgn-ine-ldi etposure coni'ol 
400' Film Magazine with Take Up 
Motof MST Constant Speed Motor 
with sync generator for 
synchronous 50yf*d recording 



Boles H-1G ReK-5. 

lOmm Macro-Switar 
I 6 Lens Underwaief 

Housing With 
railai-coftected viei*1in<Ier 
and eaternal Itlm wind. 




Bo1«K H-16 R*>-S. 

Semm Macfo-Swiia' t/M Jens. 

400" Film Magazine with Take-Up 

Motor Variable Speed Motor 



Today's the day you wanted to use the Bolex. 
"Sorry. The Bolex is being used to make a 
time lapse study and is going to be lied up 
for awhile. ■■ 

You'll have to hold off on that public rela- 
tions film. And that microscope sequence for 
the research film will have to wait. And all 
those other film projects will have to be 
re-scheduled. 

Maybe what your company needs are a few 
more Bolexes. 

Then the Bolex would be at your disposal, 
instead of the other way around. 
For a free 32-page catalog. Industrial Bul- 
letin and list of Bolex dealers near you. write 
to address below. 

Paillard Incorporated, 

1900 Lower Road. Linden. N.J. 07036. 

Other products: Hasseiblad cameras and accessories, 

Hermes typewriters and figuring machines. 



PC 648 

This ad prepared by deGarmo, McCaffery Inc. 



A\AY, 1970 



37 



\ '- 



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Cine 60 Snaplok lets you mount 
your camera in one second! 

^ With any fripod, body-brace 
or camera stand. 

^ Broad, rectangular base firmly 
supports large cameras. 

'A' Safety button prevents accidental 
release of camera. 

-^ Permits precise positioning of 
camera for optimum balance. 

•^ Precision-machined solid aluminum 
for light weight, uncompromised 
strength. 

^ Professional convenience — no more 
fussing with mounting screws. 

V/RITE FOR COMPLETE DETAILS 



CINE 60, Inc. 
630 Ninth Ave. 

New York. N.Y. 10034 (212) 596-8782 




CARTRIDGE 
LOADING 



Duplication and Impulsing Services for 



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f ^\ "A comprehensive 

^(^ '*v--^Producer's Service for 
\ ^^continuous loop sound 

j^^C*^ slidefilm programs." 



PROGRAM SERVICES 

division of 

PROGRAMMING TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 

215 West Chicago Ave., Chicago 60610 

312-337-3430 



IFPA journal 



confinued 



the printed page, for simultaneous presenta- 
tion at the April and early May meetings 
across the country. Reaction, so far, has 
reinforced the conviction that any and all 
medium must be employed to better trans- 
mit information and improve communica- 
tion between the local chapter and the Na- 
tional Office. 



8th IFPA Chapter Installed 

Last month we reported on the granting 
of a charter to the group of Chicago film- 
makers now called the "midwest Chapter." 
Again, we offer our congratulations and 
compliments to this aggressive group for 
their achievements in so short a time: as- 
sistance on the "code of ethics" plan, proj- 
ect for a promotion film, acquisition of the 
North Shore Film Laboratory in addition to 
the Dukane Corporation as sustaining mem- 
bers, and program plans which include a 
full social as well as instructive and educa- 
tional programs. Such enthusiasm deserves 
recognition and the National Board wants 
to assist and support this new chapter in 
the Great Lakes area. 



9th Chapter Installed 

We now have the pleasure of announcing 
the granting of a charter and installation 
on April 1 6th of the Da!las-Ft. Worth Chap- 
ter of IFPA. President Bob Montague on 
two separate visits met with both area pro- 
ducers, and introduced the "professional- 
ism" concept. 

Through free exchange of ideas, mutual 
respect, local recognition, and being the best 
informed filmmakers in the world, IFPA 
members can truly be called "professionals" 
and like lawyers, physicians, architects, and 
engineers, can associate on a high level of 
intellectual and technical exchange of ex- 
perience and accomplishment. 

This Southwestern group started with 
sixteen charter members, an additional fif- 
teen prospects the first 30 days and an esti- 
mated 75 to 100 potential members during 
this year. 



Our Man Bruce Herschensohn 

IFPA member Bruce Herscensohn, who 
recently received a Flemming Award 
(Manli. Business Screen), is the guy who, 
as director of Motion Pictures and TV for 
the USIA, is assigned the rcsponsibihty of 
communicating with an audience of mil- 
lions, in more than 1 10 countries and trans- 
lates his productions into more than five 
languages. 

Yes! our man "Bruce" is quite a guy, 
with quite a responsibility. His interest lies 
in communicating with audiences abroad, 
with a different dimension added by cul- 
tural variety implied by those members and 



by a wide variety of social and political cli- 
mates abroad, as well as some prejudices. 
Let's replay a few well chosen and timely 
remarks selected from his speech of 20 No- 
vember 1969 to the National Academy of 
Television, Arts and Science. 
QUOTES 

"The question often comes to us . . . 
"What good results from the productions 
of the United States Information Agency?" 
With the wealth of information about the 
United States coming from countless sources 
and going all over the world, isn't the USIA 
television and motion picture product really 
just a pebble in the avalanche of material? 
And the answer is . . . yes . . . that is all 
it is. It would be sheer imagination to say 
that it's much more than that. Well, then, 
the question is ... is it worthwhile? 

"Or should we just throw the whole 
thing away? I would say, if it wasn't for 
one basic fact, the Agency should get out 
of the television and film business. But that 
basic fact overrides any other considera- 
tion. The fact is that this country is still 
misunderstood internationally. 

"The truth is that all of those lenses, 
view finders, turrets, cranks, and buttons 
have been made to preserve the visible on 
film and tape. But that assumes the visual 
is the truth. Often it isn't. Most often what 
is visible is only a reaction to the invisible. 

"What is so important that's invisible? 

"Peace is invisible, freedom is invisible, 
faith is invisible, restraint, potential, and 
even the motivation behind political deci- 
sions is largely invisible. 

"It is not visually interesting to watch a 
free border — to watch cars going across an 
unmarked line. That's hardly an interest- 
ing view for the television screen. But a 
wall? That's interesting. 

Peace is visually pretty dull stuff. 

"Perhaps recognizing the limitations of 
the visual and the craving of the invisible 
to be seen, is the way television can be the 
true mirror of man. To ignore these limita- 
tions and this craving any longer may be 
catastrophic." 



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2704 W. OLIVE Ave., BURBANK^ CALIF. 91505 



38 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




new products review 



II 11 iiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii Ill inn inniniiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Chromabeam Converts 
Videotape to Color Film 

3M's Cliromabcam system al- 
lows economical conversion from 
video taped program material on- 
to color 16mni motion picture 
film without loss of color quality 
and registration. This film can 
be projected on any standard 
16mni projector and broadcast 
film chain equipment. The sys- 




The Chromabeam electron beam re- 
corder (left) and printer. 



tern consistently provides a low- 
noise picture with reproduction 



comparable to the taped or live 
original and allows the television 
producer the advantage of doing 
the iiriginal on video tape and 
then producing film copies for 
mass distribution. 

The Chromabeam system is 
composed of an electron beam 
television recorder, specifically 
designed for the system, and a 
newly developed color printer. 
For more information, contact 
3M Company. Depi. BSC, 3M 
Center, St. Paul. Minnesota 
55\0\. 



CR 100 Chemistry Cuts 
Color Processing Time 

CR 100 Cine Color Reversal 
Chemistry, a chemistry which re- 
portedly cuts motion picture 
color processing time in half, has 
been developed by The FR Cor- 



poration in cooperation with the 
Westwood Division of Houston 
Fearless C"orporation. CinTel's 
Minicolor and Colormaster Mo- 
lion Picture Film Processors, for 
which the CR 100 was primarily 
designed, have been developed 
to operate at approximately dou- 
ble normal speed and allow dry- 
to-dry film in approximately one 
half the conventional time re- 
quired. 

The speed of the process will 
enable television stations to ex- 
tend deadline times for newsfilm. 
For further information, write 
The FR Corporation. Dept. BSC. 
95 I Brook A venue. Bronx. S'ew 
York 10451. 



Precision Punching for 
Art and Overlays 

An art-registration punch, now 
available to artists, photogra- 
phers and film producers for 



preparation of art for anima- 
tion, tv commercials, slides, slide- 
films and titles, works with speed, 
accuracy and stability. The de- 
sign features foolproof lifetime 
alignment of hardened tool-steel 
dies, minimal movement and 
fewer and simpler parts. 

Other aids include a multipur- 
pose camera stand, artist work- 




Animation punch features compact- 
ness, ruggedness, precision and ease 
of operation. 

boards and camera-field charts 

in both 12" and 16" professional 

Continued on next page 



A man with plans for you. 

One of your first steps in film making should be to contact 
"your man at Colburn," Clyde Ruppert, 
who is our Director of Producers Services. 

As coordinator of the creative phases of our 
laboratory work, editing . . . narration . . . music ... art 
and titling, Clyde will assist you in 
achieving your desired results. 

Pre-planning with Colburn is 

a valuable tool for you, 

which will save time and money _ 

in both shooting and lab work. 

It's one of the steps 

beyond the technical, 

the chemical and the careful, 

that has built our quality 

reputation with producers 

large and small. 





GEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY, INC. 

164 N. Wacker Drive • Chicago, Illinois 60606 
, Telephone (area code 312) 332-6286 

Complete Laboratory Service for 16MM / Editing / Recording / Work Prints / Super 8, 8I«IVI & 16MIVI Release Printing / Titling / 35MM Slide and Filmstrip Service 



AAAY, 1970 



39 



new products . . . 

continued 



field formats to assure proper 
visuals design and production in- 
plant at comparable savings. For 
information, write Merv's Ani- 
mation Aids, Dept. BSC, 17040 
Otsego, Encino, California 
91316. 



16mm Projection for 
Large Auditoriums 

The Cine-X16, Model 1600 
and 2500, compact and efficient 
16mm xenon projector lamp- 
houses, make possible 16mm 
presentations at light levels pre- 
viously obtainable only with 35- 
mm projectors. The high screen 
brightness of these lamphouses is 



take-up tension on any size reel, 
a smoother and faster rewind 
system, greater motor torque, 
and many inner refinements that 
add to better overall projector 
reliability and long life. 

Two versions of the "Super" 
1600 are available, one with 
sound speed only, and one with 
sound/silent speeds for those 
users who still have the old silent 
16mm films or may have pro- 
duced their own films without 
sound. 

The "Super" 1600 still retains 
the automatic "Safe-Threader" as 
an optional accessory, a simple 
manual threading path, large 
sprockets to protect the film, ease 
of operation with all controls 
centrally located, and flip-up reel 



arms that can be positioned with 
one hand. 

Additional information is avail- 
able from local RCA distributors 
or by writing to RCA Audio-Vis- 
ual Products, Dept. BSC, Build- 
ing 15-5, Camden, New Jersey 
08102. 



EIco Programmer-Recorder 
For Sound/Slide System 

Converting a standard remote- 
control slide projector into an 
automatic sound/slide audiovis- 
ual system, the new Mastermatic 
111 programmer-recorder is 
equipped with a response feature 
that allows the viewer to restart 
the presentation at his conve- 
nience after programmed inter- 
missions. The cassette-loaded 
unit, which offers 60 minutes of 
high-quality synchronized sound, 
is ideal for training applications 
where test-taking is involved. 



Because the unit is equipped 
for audio recording and cassette 
programming as well as for slide 
projector control and audio play- 




The Cine-X16 has advanced safety 
features and interlocks which pro- 
tect both operator and equipment. 

the result of a complex aspheric 
reflector which collects 85% of 
the light emitted from the xenon 
source and directs it to the film- 
gate without corrective lens. 

The xenon lamp affords ozone 
free operation and has an aver- 
age lamp life of 2000 hours. For 
more information write Optical 
Radiation Corp., Dept. BSC. 
2626 S. Peck Road, Monrovia, 
California 91016. 



"Super" 1600 Projector 
Availamie from RCA 

An advanced designed 16nun 
projector, the "Super" 1600, is 
now available from RCA Audio- 
Visual Products. 

It features a completely new 
sound system consisting of a 
transistorized 15 watt RMS (30 
watt peak power) amplifier, a 
wide range 4" x 8" internal 
speaker, and an improved exciter 
lamp of the BAK type with twice 
the output of the usual BTD 
type. In combination with a high- 
efficiency optical system, the "Su- 
per" 1600 assures high quality, 
undistorted sound, and brilliant 
pictures on the screen. 

Other major advances include _ 
an improved fluid clutch for even ^ 



Put a 
professional 

/^i. in your 
f^A projection room 

The new Noreico FP-IBmm projector 

brings big theatre performance to any 
auditorium because it's built to the same 
rugged standards of performance 
demanded by professional motion 
picture theatres. Provides a brighter, 
clearer, steadier screen image. 

Lots of other features, too: 

• Packs a 2'/2 hour film on one reel 

• Available with 9 different Noreico 
lenses including new zoom lens 

• Uses Xenon or carbon arc light sources 
— or can be purchased with 500 W. 
ozone-free Xenon lamp house 

• Optical or magnetic sound 

• Runs forward and reverse 

• Adapts to automatic operation and 
remote conltrol 




/Vore/co' 



MOTION PICTURE 
EQUIPMENT 



OUTSTANDING VALUE! Send coupon lor prices and literature. 



Portable self-contained 
Model El 5100 

for outdoor siiowings, 
exhibits, social halls, 
etc. Uses incandescent 
light source. 



North American Philips Corporalion 

Motion Picture Equipment Division 

One Philips Parkway, Montvale. New Jersey 07645 

(201) 391-1000 

Please send facts and prices on the new Noreico 16mm Pro- 
lessional Projeclors. 

D FP-16 with column-pedestal D EL-5100 Portable model 



Name/Title_ 



School/Company_ 




City_ 



.Stale- 



-Zip- 



Mastermatic III programs and re- 
cords. 



back, no other equipment is 
needed to prepare A-V presen- 
tations. Projector slide advances 
and response pauses are pro- 
grammed into the casette by the 
user in the form of inaudible 
pulses, so that sound and slides 
always remain synchronized. The 
easy-to-use programming con- 
trols are mounted on a separate 
control panel to eliminate the 
possibility of inadvertent pro- 
gramming changes during normal 
operation. 

For more information, write 
Elco Optisonics, Montgomery- 
ville. Pa. I 8936. 



Squeegee System for 
Printing Machines 

The CE-AVS-351 air/vacuum 
squeegee system is furnished 
complete with inlet and outlet fil- 
ters and solid state speed con- 
trol. Power requirements are 3 
amps, 1 1 5 volts, 60 cycle and 




Air/Vacuum squeegee system func- 
tions equally well for all film for- 
mats. 

the system is suited for optical 
printers of all makes and for 
retrofitting of most contact print- 
ers. 

For more information, write 
Carter Equipment Company. 
Inc., Dept. BSC. 232 S. Glasgow 
Ave., Inglewood, California 
90301. 



40 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



SBR-Drive for Uniform 
Processor Tension 

A line of SBR-Orivc Proces- 
sors has been announced by 
Treise Engineering for use of 
commercial laboratories, as well 
as for industrial, military, govern- 
ment and microfilm processing 
requirements. The processors fea- 
ture a type of demand-drive that 
permits laboratories to change 
film sizes and still maintain uni- 
form tension and constant speed. 

The heart of the SBR-Drive is 
a film roller with a flexible 
heavy-duty ."^-leaf spring insert. 



(((((€- 




SBR-Drive processors are available 
to accommodate any film size. 

The spring bearing rollers are 
mounted on a stationary shaft 
at the top of each rack and are 
free to rotate. An overdrive shaft 
is mounted directly underneath. 
As the film tension increases or 
decreases, the SBR contacts or 
pulls away from the drive shaft. 
The slightest change in film ten- 
sion creates a response and thus 
maintains equilibrium. 

Also available is a modifica- 
tion program whereby existing 
processors can be modernized 
with SBR-Drive. For full details, 
write Treise Engineering. Inc., 
Dept. BSC, 1941 First Street. 
San Fernando. Calif. 91340. 

Production Planner 
Organizes AV Paper Work 

The A/V Production Planner 
is a quality vinyl binder with 100 
storyboard pages and indexed di- 
viders which allow better organ- 
ization of scripts, storyboards. 
shot lists, correspondence, model 
releases and the countless detail 




Production coordination and cost 
records can be conveniently kept in 
one binder. 

sheets and memos that make up 
the average A/V program. 



Ihc Planner features the 3- 
frame storyboard, specifically de- 
signed for plamring triple-header 
productions but equally useful 
for standard layouts. For more 
information, write A/V Produc- 
tion Planner, Dept. BSC, Box 
100. Sclienecladv, N.Y. 12304. 



Da-Lite Screens Offer 
Increased Brilliance 

Da-Lite's Challenger, a glass 
beaded tripod slide and movie 
projection screen, and its coun- 
terpart, the silver lenticular Won- 
der-Lite, now feature Color Ma- 
gic surfaces. This surface is spe- 
cially treated and color processed 
for brilliant, life-like color. 

Both screens are available in 
a variety of sizes and with sev- 
eral features. More information 
may be obtained from Da-Lite 
Screen Company, Inc., Dept. 
BSC, Warsaw, Indiana 46580. 



Cartridge System for 
Sales and Recruiting 

The Audiscan 16mm sound 
filmstrip systems utilize synchro- 
nized film and tape in 5" x 5" x 
IVi" sealed cartridges which 
snap into portable electronically 
operated rear screen projectors. 




The Audiscan cartridge holds 225 
visuals and 25 minutes of sound. 



Stop-start-hold capabilities per- 
mit maximum latitude in pro- 
gramming, making it effective for 
self-instruction in assembly line 
operations and complex work 
procedures and efficient at any 
level of learning. The system is 
effective for sales and recruiting. 
For more information, contact 
Audiscan, Inc., Dept. BSC, 1414 
130r/i Avenue N.E., Bellevue. 
Washington 98004. 



Color TV Zoom Lens 
Available from Tele-Cine 

The Schneider-System is a 

11.2 to 1, f/2.1 lens designed 

for use on broadcast color cam- 

Continued on next page 



CONTINUOUS 
DEPENDABILITY 




THE A.V.E. JbopSA 

A CONTINUOUS 16mm 

optical/magnetic sound projector 



No rewinding or rethreading after each show. Rely on the 
dependable A.V.E. "Looper" for your repetitive programming. 
Its unique film looping device accepts up to 1200 feet black 
and white film or 1 100 feet color film. 



The A.V.E. "Looper" features adjustable motorized loop feed 
for minimal film wear, quality sound, heavy duty mechanism 
and simple maintenance. (Also, the A.V.E. "Looper" can 
easily be converted for standard 16mm projection use.) 



EXCELLENT FOR BOTH FRONT & REAR PROJECTION 



Call . . . Write ... or come see us! 



A. V. E. CORPORATION 



250 West 54th Street 
Cable: "AVEMANSA" 



New York, N.Y. 10019 
(212) PL 7-0552 



MAY, 1970 



41 



CREATE THE 
Right MOOD 
EVERY TIME 

with the 



= '1 



n 



MAJOR 

IPRODUCTION 

[music 

[LIBRARY 

|"MAJOR" offers you a full 
=70 hours of background 
Hproduction music for titles, 
Ebridges, background — for 
Escoring, editing, recording and 
=dubbing music for your: 
!• FEATURE PRODUCTIONS 

!• DOCUMENTARIES 

!• TV FILMS 

!• SLIDE FILMS 

!• ANIMATION 

!• INDUSTRIAL FILMS 

!• SALES PRESENTATIONS 
i« COMMERCIALS 

!• EDUCATIONAL 

= "IVIAJOR" specializes in sound 
= — you get exceptional technical 
=know-how and beautifully- 
Erecorded original music on 
ELP records or V4-lnch Tape, 
Eor on 16 or 35mm Mag. 
ETape ready for a mix. 

"IMPORTANT: "Major" owns it» own 
^copyrights on off production mood 
Xniusic in its library. World rights 
"available to you on a completely 
*sound legal bosis. Re-recording rights 
"available on a "per selection" or "un- 
=limited use" flat fee orrongement. 



— WRITE FOR 135-PAGE CATALOGUE TO 

ItHOMAS J. VALENTINO 

EiNCORPORATED 
|£stob;;s/>ed 7932 

|l50 W. 46 St. New York 10036 
=or phone (212) 246-4675 



:Also available: Detailed Catalogue 
'Oi our complete LP library of 
:47] Sound Effects. 



new products . . . 

continued 



eras. It features complete mount- 
ing interchangeability between 
different models and manufactur- 
ers cameras. Servo can be add- 
ed to the basic manual lens at 
any time by the simple addition 
of the plug-in Servomodule. The 
zoom range will focus down to 
28 inches without adaptors. Full 
screen close-ups are possible on 
subject sizes as small as 0.3" x 
0.4". Operational back focus 
control and instant change range 
extenders and a four speed man- 
ual zoom control are also avail- 
able. 

For information, write Tele- 
Cine, Inc.. Dept. BSC. 303 W. 
42nd St.. New York, N.Y. 
10036. 



Bardwell & McAlister Has 
Line of Grip Equipment 

A complete line of grip equip- 
ment and lightweight outdoor 
aluminum reflectors, providing 
total serviceability in TV, mo- 
tion-picture and still-photograph- 
ic uses, is available from Bard- 
well & McAlister. Among the 
products are medium and fold- 




Dots and targets for providing con- 
trol of light and eliminating hot 
spots in studio or location applica- 
tions, are part of a complete line of 
grip equipment. 

ing century stands for studio and 
location use, scrims, flags and 
cutters, baby and junior trom- 



bones, gobo heads with exten- 
sion arms, dots and targets, ap- 
ple boxes and lightweight reflec- 
tors. 

For further information, write 
Bardwell & McAlister. Inc.. 
Dept. BSC, 12164 Sherman 
Way, North Hollywood, Califor- 
nia 91605. 



Do-lt-Yourself Programming 
For Sound Slide/Filmstrip 

The Synchromatic AV2000C 
is an automatic, self-contained, 
cassette recorder and synchro- 
nized projector for 35 mm slides 
and filmstrips. It is contained in 
an attache case with its own 
built-in supersize daylight rear 
projection screen. 

The built-in cassette recording 
and playback unit advances slides 




This projector synchronizes sound 
with 35mm slides or double frame 
horizontal filmstrips. 

automatically. A two-track sys- 
tem allows inaudible signals to 
be erased and changed, without 
affecting the recorded portion of 
the prf)gram. Up to two hours of 
programming is permitted. For 
more information, write T. M. 
Visual Industries, Inc., Dept. 
BSC. 25 West 45th St.. New 
York. N.Y. 10036. 



THE FASTEST GROWING FILM PRODUCTION 
HOUSE IN SOUTHWEST IS LOOKING FOR: 

CINEMATOGRAPHER... Creative cinematographer with proven competence 
in 16 MM and 35 MM color. Must have a flair for the unusual and ex- 
perience in handling large projects. Send demo. Salary open. 

PRODUCER-DIRECTOR . . . Proved competence in all areas - films . . . live 
shows... multi-image presentations. Excellent opportunity to grow with 
an aggressive, young organization with total production capability. 

FILM EDITOR... Imaginative editor who has the "with it" touch for industrial 
film production. Must have at least three years experience. Send demo. 
Salary open. 




Bill Stokes Associates 

5527 Dyer> Dallas, Texas 75206<214 - 363-0161 



Spindler & Sauppe Offers 
Multi-Media Programmer 

The Media Mix Programmer, 
a highly compact, 27-channel, 
punched tape multi-media con- 
trol, includes its own built-in 
1,000 Hz. Synchronizer. The 
solid state unit is designed to con- 
trol three complete S&S Dynam- 
ic Dissolve Systems, plus nine 




The Media Mix Programmer weighs 
only ten pounds and is little larger 
than a cigar box. 

pieces of auxiliary equipment, 
such as other A-V equipment, 
lights, curtains and powered dis- 
plays. 

Standard eight-hole computer 
tape is used in the unit. Each 
dissolve system can be pro- 
grammed for either momentary 
pulses or on-off sequences. 

Local and remote manual con- 
trols are available for "live" pre- 
sentation of programmed materi- 
als, and the built-in synchronizer 
makes possible completely auto- 
mated programs. More informa- 
tion may be obtained from 5/;//;- 
dlcr & Sauppe. Inc., Dept. BSC, 
1329 Grand Central Ave.. Glen- 
dale, Ca. 9120 \. 



Accessory for Sentinal 
Adds to Usefulness 

Synchro-Lock automatic re- 
synchronization is an important 
optional feature for the LaBelle 
Sentinel 35. The accessory is es- 
pecially desirable for installations 
where the unit operates unattend- 




Synchro-Lock provides automatic re- 
synchronization for the Sentinal 35. 

ed, at the command of a prospec- 
tive customer, or is in continu- 
ous operation — such as in dis- 
plays, shows and lobbies. 

If, for any reason, the audio 
and visual sequences get out of 
synchronization, the Synchro- 
Lock takes over and reestablishes 



42 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



synchronization for the next re- 
play. For more information on 
the Sentinel 35 and the Synchro- 
Lock, write l.ttlU'lle huliistries. 
Inc., Dept. BSC. 510 S. Wor- 
thinglon St.. Ocoiumun\(H\ Wis- 
coimt] 53066. 



Two Dual 8 Projectors 
Introduced by Eumig 

Twi) econoniicali\ priced dual 
S projectors have been intro- 



I \\v 




Popularily priced dual 8 sound pro- 
jector from Eumig. 



duced by Eumig. The Marlv-501 
conies with Eupronet f/1.6, 15- 
27mm zoom lens or Eupronet 
f/'1.6, 18mm lens. 

The Mark-S-712 D incorpor- 
ates sound at a practical price. 
Kor more information and speci- 
fications write lutmit; (U.S.A.) 
Inc.. Dept. BSC. 101 We.U 31.v/ 
Street. New York, New York 
1 000 1 . 



Tool Removes Emulsion 
For Proper Splicing 

Sure-Flash, a tool originally 
designed to remove oxide from 
flashguns, has been found to be 
an inexpensive answer to a com- 
mon splicing problem for profes- 
sional projectionists. This tool re- 
moves all emulsion and provides 
a great rough surface. The result 
is a splice comparable to those 
made at film exchanges with ex- 
pensive heat equipment. 

For more information write 
The Eraser Company, Inc., Dept. 
BSC. P.O. Box 1342. Syracuse. 
New York 13201. 



Dawe Cinestrobe Available 
In the United States 

The Dawe Cinestrobe provides 
powerful short-duration light in 



synchronization with the shutter 
of the professional motion pic- 
ture or television camera. It is 
the first lightweight, portable 
strobe light designed exclusively 




LA BELLE COURIER 
PROJECTORS 

Used but in 
excellent condition 

New Price $3 5 0. 
Our Price $15 0. 

(MINIMUM ORDER OF 12) 



Pictured is console and mobile cab- 
inet for Cinestrobe. 

for cine use that provides suffi- 
cient light for motion picture 
making. 

Up to ten strobe lamps and 
two viewing lamps can be con- 
nected. Write Alan Gordon En- 
terprises, Dept. BSC. 5362 N. 
Cahiienga Blvd., North Holly- 
wood, California 91601. • 




Send Inquiry to 

"COURIER" 
P.O. BOX 939 
CRESTLINE, CALIFORNIA 
92325 



Any good 16nim projector performs 
well under ideal viewing conditions. But 
you usually don't have (or don't want) 
perfect darkness or perfect quiet. 

That's why you need the perfect 
projector for imperfect conditions. It's 
called the Bauer P6 automatic 300 
16mm portable sound projector. 

What makes it better? For one thing, 
the Bauer P6 has a special new high- 



intensity lamp. It's the GE MARC 300 
metal arc that produces nearly four 
times more light than conventional 
tungsten lamps. More light means a 
more brilliant picture. More vivid color. 
Clear images even in full room light. 
The Bauer P6 has a 15-watt solid- 
state amplifier, for real high-fidelity 
sound. And a lot of other features, too: 
automatic threading, optional 4,000-foot 



capacity and "change-over" control, 
and automatic fail-safe circuit to stop 
the projector if your film breaks. 

Maybe you think that a projector 
that does so much should cost a lot. It 
doesn't. And this may be the most 
attractive feature of all. Write for 
informa- 
tion to 
Dept. BS5 



BAUER P6 



THIS PROJECTOR WORKS BEST WHEN THE CONDITIONS ARENT. 




16eCLENC0VE«D.CARLEPLACE,N V 11S14 , IN CANADA KINCSWAY FILM EQUiPMCNT LTD ■RoDerl Botch Photd.no GMBH 



MAY, 1970 




industry news 



iiiiiii 



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Technicolor Acquires 
Byron Labs in Washington 

Technicolor, Inc., has ac- 
quired Byron Motion Pictures, 
Inc., in Washington, D.C., for an 
undisclosed amount of Techni- 
color common stock. About a 
year ago. Technicolor had pur- 
chased the Mecca film process- 
ing facilities in New York from 
Byron Roudabush, president of 
Byron Motion Pictures. 

Byron's Washington facility, 
specializing in 16mm film pro- 




Quality-Bilt 

Film Shipping Cases 

• Best quality domestic fibre 

• Heavy steel corners for 
added protection 

• Durable 1" web straps 

• Large address card holder 
with positive retainer spring 

• Sizes from 400' to 2000' 

OTHER "QUALITY-BILT" ITEMS: 

Salon Print Shipping Cases 

Sound Slidefilm Shipping Cases 
(for Transcriptions & Filmstrips) 

Filmstrip Shipping Cases (hold up 
to 6 strips plus scripts) 

Write direct to 
manufacturer for catalog 

SCHIESSIER CASE CO. 

Div. of Ludtvig Iriduilries 

2020 W. St. Paul Ave. 

Chicago, III. 60647 

Phone: 312-227-0027 



cessing will continue to provide 
lab services for industrial, educa- 
tional and government customers. 
It will be expanded to include 
Super 8 processing services for 
the Technicolor TK sound and 
silent film cassette film players 
for Eastern customers. 

Roudabush was named presi- 
dent of the new Washington Di- 
vision and will become a direc- 
tor and senior vice president of 
Technicolor. 



NAVA Sales institute Is 
"Best Ever" Say Planners 

The 22nd annual National In- 
stitute for Audio-Visual Selling 
scheduled July 12-16 at Indiana 
University, is reported to be the 
"biggest and best ever" by Kevin 
O'Sullivan, NAVA director of 
training. 

The meeting planners have 
gathered a dynamic and knowl- 
edgeable team of instructors to 
make the 22nd Institute the most 
searching "in depth" effort ever 
made, according to NAVA Insti- 
tute program planners. 

Additional information on the 
Institute is available from 
NAVA, 3150 Sprino St., Fair- 
fax, Va. 22030. 



Modern Talking Pictures 
Aids Environment Crusade 

"Focus on Environment" is 
the theme of a commendable 
special film distribution program 
begim just over a month ago by 
Modem Talking Picture Service. 

In a special effort to get films 
dealing with environment, pollu- 
tion and the like heavily used 
throughout the month of April, 
particularly April 22 "Earth 
Day", Modern promoted its li- 
brary of films dealing with ecol- 
ogy through a special brochure 
called "Focus on Environment." 

In addition to special mailing 
to various user groups. Modem 




As part of its commendable pro- 
gram of special emphasis on en- 
vironmental films, Modern Talking 
Picture Service last month was pass- 
ing out "Man's Impact on the En- 
vironment" buttons in connection 
with the showing of the film by the 
same name at the DAVI convention. 
Here, Carl Lenz (left), Modern presi- 
dent, gives a button to Walter G. Cox, 
president of KDI Corporation, Mod- 
ern's parent company. 



followed with a concerted effort 
of telephone calls to TV stations 
encouraging environmental pro- 
gramming in connection with the 
national crusade and attention in 
April. 

Because of the extraordinary 
effort. Modern was commended 
by the Department of Interior's 
Bureau of Outdoor Recreation. 

At the DAVI convention in 
Detroit April 27-May 1, Modern 
called additional attention to the 
national environmental crisis and 
its program with the continuous 
showing of the film, Man's Im- 
pact on the Environment. 



Fairchild Industrial to 
New Plant Site 

Fairchild Industrial Products, 
a division of Fairchild Camera 
and Instrument Corporation, has 
moved from Plainview to Com- 
mack, New York. 

The newly constmcted one 
level building at 75 Mall Drive 
will serve as division headquar- 
ters and will house all East Coast 
management, engineering and 



manufacturing personnel. West 
Coast manufacturing facilities in 
Los Angeles will continue in op- 
eration. 

In making the announcement, 
R. G. Hennessey, corporate vice 
president and group general man- 
ager, stated that this move coin- 
cides with initial shipments of 
Fairchild's seventy (70) series 
projectors. The seventy series 
projector equipment provides a 
self contained rear screen and 
represents a decade of leader- 
ship in the 8mm sound field. 



Bureau of Mines Reports 
Heavy '69 Film Usage 

Informational films on min- 
eral resources and mineral con- 
servation, produced by the Bu- 
reau of Mines in cooperation 
with American industry, were 
shown more times during 1969 
than ever before, the Depart- 
ment of the Interior said today. 

Films circulated by the Bu- 
reau cover 47 different mineral 
and natural resource subjects, 
and nearly all of them are fund- 
ed by industrial sponsors. The 
motion pictures are made avail- 
able on free, short-term loan to 
secondary schools, colleges, civic 
and business clubs, professional 
groups, and similar organizations. 
In 1969 these films were 
screened a total of 245,529 
times — an increase of more 
than 8,000 over the previous 
year, and of more than 3,000 
over 1958, the previous record 
year. 

Attendance at 1969 showings 
totaled more than 10.2 million, 
not a new record but a gain of 
more than 200,000 over 1968. 
Moreover, the Department said, 
for the first time in the history 
of the Bureau's film program the 
ten most popular films were each 
shown more than 10,000 times. 

Copper, the Oldest Modern 
Metal, was shown the most (15,- 
212), followed by Steelmaking 



44 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



Today (14.363); Arizona and 
lis Natural Resources (13.556); 
Helium (12,126); The Magic of 
Sulphur (12,049); California 
and Its Natural Resources ( 1 2,- 
009); Aluininuin: Metal of 
Many Faces (11,702); Petrified 
River — Story of Uranium (11,- 
615); Waslii Hilton and Its Nat- 
ural Resources (11,579); and 
A laska and Its Natural Resources 
(10,756). 

Generally, the Bureau's films 
cover either specific mineral re- 
sources, resource and environ- 
mental problems, or the re- 
sources of individual States. 
1 hey explore the important rela- 
tionships between conservation 
practices, resource development, 
social and economic progress, 
and environmental quality. 

Two new films were released 
during the year: Tennessee atul 
Its Natural Resources and First 
Aid Now. Currently in produc- 
tion or soon to be released are 
Bureau films on the natural re- 
sources of Oregon and of Penn- 
sylvania; the recycling of mineral 
values from wastes; the metal, 
molybdenum; refractories; and 
the challenge of low-grade ores. 
All of the Bureau's films are in 
16-mm. sound and color, and 
run about 27 minutes. 

Among firms and organiza- 
tions that have sponsored recent 
Bureau films are: Inland Steel 
Co., Atlantic Richfield Corp., 
Phelps Dodge Corp.. American 
Zinc Institute. Lead Industries 
Association. American Smelting 
and Refining Co.. Anaconda Co.. 
Aluminum Company of America, 
Northern Natural Gas Co.. 
Phillips Petroleum Co.. National 
Helium Corp.. Hecla Mining Co.. 
the State of Tennessee. Johnson 
& Johnson. Texas Gulf Sulphur 
Co., and Johns Manville Corp. 
Complete information about 
the Bureau's film program, in- 
cluding a catalog with a list of 
distribution centers, can be ob- 
tained by writing to Motion 
Pictures, Bureau of Mines, 4800 
Forbes Avenue, Pittsbureh, Pa. 
15213. 



Jane Davenport Reopens 
Chicago Writing Shop 

Jane Ware Davenport & Asso- 
ciates has reopened an enlarged 
film and tape writing shop at 609 
Ivy Court, Kenilworth, Illinois. 
For the past 18 months. Mrs. 
Davenport has served as project 
development manager for a Chi- 
cago film producer. Prior to that, 
she worked as a freelance writer 



and film consultant. 

Mrs. Davenport's extensive ex- 
perience with business and edu- 
cational films includes work at 
\\ ilding and Niles studios in Chi- 
cago, the American Association 
oi Film Producers and Business 
Screen Magazine. She also head- 
ed the Suburban Fine Arts Cen- 
ter and originated the unique art- 
architccture-nature show. The 
.\n^ and Rivcrwoods. 

In addition to scripts and re- 
lated material for business and 
educational films and videotape, 
the firm offers consultancy serv- 
ices in the use and programming 
of these media to solve communi- 
cations problems. 



Lippman New President at 
Design Effects in N.Y. 

Design Effects. Inc.. an optical 
effects company specializing in 
TV commercials, industrial films 
and motion picture trailer effects 
v.ill be under the leadership of 
Larry Lippman, former owner 
and founder of L & L Animation. 

Lippman was most recently 
vice president of sales at Berkey 
Pathe. He is a master cameraman 
with extensive animation and op- 
tical effects experience. 

Key technicians will join him 
at Design Effects, located at 410 
East 54th Street, Ne wYork City. 

Noting that he has the most 
sophisticated optical equipment 
manufactured by the Oxberry 
Corp., including the only #1700 
Oxberry Optical Printer with 
Beam Splitter in the United 
States, Lippman stresses the 
"quality control" factor at De- 
sign Effects. "We are not a nuts 
and bolts factory" he says, "we 
will do quality work, on time, at 
competitive prices." 



Ken Saco Moves 

Ken Saco Associates, New- 
York audiovisual producers and 
corporate designers, have moved 
to new quarters on the 21st floor 
at 150 E. 58th St.. in New York 
City. 

The move represents an ex- 
pansion of the company, dou- 
bling their space. Saco will re- 
portedly now offer clients a more 
expanded service in the design 
and audiovisual field. 



by The American Film Institute 
at its Center for Advanced Film 
Studies in Greystone, Beverly 
Hills, California this July. The 
seminar's aims are to provide 
film teachers with an opportunity 
tL. deepen their knowledge of cin- 
ema and television and to ex- 
plore the methods and goals of 
film education. 

The theme for this seminar, 
which runs from July 6 through 
July 31, is "Images of America" 
— an examination of the films 
of American directors, alongside 
those of European directors who 
emigrated to America. 

The other principal work of 
the seminar will he the study of 
various approaches to film teach- 
ing. 



Commercials with Computer 
Animation Aired in April 

April saw the first extensive 
use of computer animation in TV 
commercials. 

A sports program broadcast on 
New York's WOR-TV April 6 
used five computer animated 60- 
second commercials for Lehigh 
Valley Industries, sponsors of the 
special about the New York 
Mets. The commercials were pro- 
duced in conjunction with Com- 



puter Image Corp. in Denver. 

Norelco claims to hold the 
distinction of sponsoring the first 
3-dimensional commercial com- 
pletely progranuned by compu- 
ter. The commercial, featuring a 
computer animated man using 
the Norelco shaver was aired on 
the CBS Friday Night Movie 
April 17. In producing the 30- 
second conuuercial. William Fet- 
ter used the animated data he 
created through arrangements 
with Computer Graphics. 



Hunt Chemical Plans 
100% Stock Split 

A two-for-one stock split, sub- 
ject to authorization of required 
additional shares at a May 12 
meeting, is planned by Philip A. 
Hunt Chemical Corp. 

The share distribution, in the 
form of a 100 per cent dividend, 
will be paid May 15 to share- 
holders of record May I, 1970. 
Dr. Jerome Coles. Hunt presi- 
dent, noted that payment of the 
slock dividend will enable Hunt 
to meet the stock distribution re- 
quirements for listing on the New 
York Stock Exchange and that 
he expects the listing to occur 
shortly after the stock distribu- 
tion. 




API Sets Summer Film 
Seminar July 6-31 

A four-week Summer Seminar. 
"Teaching the Film," will be held 



ci 6-4061 




MAY, 1970 



45 



NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF AUDIO-VISUAL DEALERS 



EASTERN STATES 



. NEW ENGLAND • 

Headlight Fi'in Service, 104 Ocean 
St., So. Portland, Maine 799- 
6100 

UNICOM - Division of United 
Camera, Inc. Providence, R.I.; 
North Haven, Conn. (401) 467- 
47.50 or (203) 2.39-5.300 

• WASHINGTON • 

"The" Film Center, 915 12th St. 
NW, Washington, D. C. 20005 
(202) 393-1205 

• NEW YORK • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 1775 
Broadway, Nevi' York 10019. 
Phone 212/JUdson 2-4060 

Projection Systems, Incorporated, 

202 East 44th Street, New York, 
10036 (212) MU 2-0995 

Visual sciences, Suffern, N.Y. 
10901 

• PENNSYLVANIA • 

f. P. Lilley & Son, Inc., Box 3035, 

2009 N. Third St., Harrisburg 
17105, (717) 238-8123 

Oscar H. Hirt, Inc., 41 N. 11th St. 
Philadelphia, 19107. Phone: 
215/923-0650 

Audio Visuals Center, 14 Wood St., 
Pittsburgh 15222, Sales, Rentals, 
& Repairs. 471-3313 

L. C. Vath Audio Visuals, 449 N. 

Hermitage Rd,, Sharpsville, 
16150. 342-5204. 

• VIRGINIA • 

Stanley Projection Co., 1808 Rap- 
ides, Alexandria 71301. 318-443- 
0464 



SOUTHERN STATES 

• FLORIDA . 

Jack Freeman's, 2802 S. MacDill 
Ave., Tampa (813) 8.39-5374 

• GEORGIA • 

Colonial Films, 752 Spring St. 
N.W. 404/875-8823, Atlanta 
30308 



MIDWESTERN STATES 

• ILLINOIS • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 230 

North Michigan Avenue, Chica- 
go 60601. State 2-6757 

• MICHIGAN • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 2821 
E. Grand Blvd., Detroit 48211. 
Phone: 313/TR 5-2450 



46 



• MISSOURI . 

Cor-rell Communications Co., 5316 
Pershing, St. Louis 63112. 
Equipment rental (314) 
FO 7-1111 

Swank Motion Pictures, Inc., 201 S. 
Jefferson Ave., St. Loui.s 63166. 
(314) 534-6300. 

• OHIO • 

Academy Film Service, Inc., 2110 
Payne Ave., Cleveland 44114. 

Sunray Films, Inc., 2005 Chester 
Ave., Cleveland 44114 

Twyman Films, Inc., 329 Salem 
Ave., Dayton 45401 

M. H. Martin Company, 1118 Lin- 
coln Way E., Massillon. 

Cousino Visual Education, 1945 
Franklin Ave., Toledo 43601. 
(419) 246-3691. 



WESTERN STATES 



• CALIFORNIA • 

The Jam Handy Organization, 305 

Taft Building, 1680 N. Vine St., 
Hollywood 90028. HO 3-2321 

Photo & Sound Company, 870 

Monterey Pass Road, Monterey 
Park, 91754. Phone: (213) 264- 
6850. 

RaUce Company, Inc. A-V Center, 

641 North Highland Ave., Los 
Angeles 36. (213) 933-7111 

• SAN FRANCISCO AREA • 

Photo & Sound Company, 116 Na- 
toma St., San Francisco 94105. 
Phone: 415/GArfield 1-0410. 

• COLORADO • 

Cromars' Audio-Visual Center, 

1200 Stout St., Denver 80204. 
Colorado Visual Aids, 955 Ban- 
nock. Denver 80204, 303/255- 
5408 

• NEW MEXICO • 

University Book Store Allied Sup- 
ply Company, 2122 Central East, 
Albuquerque 87106. 

• OREGON • 

Moore's Audio Visual Center, Inc., 
234 S.E. 12th Ave., Portland 
97214. Phone: 503/233-5621. 

• UTAH • 

Deseret Book Company, 44 East 

South Temple St., Salt Lake, 10. 

• WASHINGTON • 

Photo & Sound Company, 1205 
North 45th St., Seattle 98103. 
206/ME 2-8461 




reference 
shelf 

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Directors Guild Directory 

Current members of the Direc- 
tors Guild of America are listed 
alphabetically with addresses, 
agents where applicable, and 
their credits, in a 350-page di- 
rectory available at $5.00 a copy 
from the organization's national 
headquarters: Directors Guild of 
America. Inc., Dept. BSC, 7950 
Sunset Boulevard, Hollvwood, 
Calif. 90046. 



Photo Products Described 

The GAP professional photo 
products catalog lists and de- 
scribes the wide range of GAP 
photo products, including color 
and black and white motion pic- 
ture, still, aerial, instrumentation 
and recording and duplication 
film. It also details photofinish- 
ing supplies, photographic pa- 
pers, paper chemicals, film 
chemicals and specialty photo- 
graphic chemicals. 

The catalog may be obtained 
from the Industrial Photo Divi- 
sion of GAF Corporation. Dept. 
BSC, 140 West 52nd Street. New 
York, N.Y. 10020. 



Theatrical Directory/West 

Los Angeles, San Francisco, 
Las Vegas and Hawaii sources 
for the entertainment industry 
and related fields are covered in 
the newly-issued 1970 West 
Coast Theatrical Directory. The 
6x9", 300-page soft-cover direc- 
tory, with Jeremy Tarcher as 
publisher and editor-in-chief, 
lists artists' representatives; 
broadcasting, radio-tv and asso- 
ciated services; live show produc- 
tion; motion picture and tv pro- 
duction and distribution; motion 
picture, tv and theatrical equip- 
ment, facilities and services; mu- 
sic, recording, tape and associ- 
ated services; photography, 
graphic arts and related services; 
public relations, advertising and 
associated media and services; 
publishing; theatrical instruction 
and workshops; unions, guilds 
and trade associations; and such 
local facilities as airlines, hotels 
and restaurants. 

Copies are available at $6.95 
each (plus 350 sales tax in Cali- 
fornia) from Tarcher /Gousha 
Guides. Dept. BSC, 9110 Sun- 
set Blvd.. Los Angeles, Calif. 
90069. 



MARKETPLACE 



A/V 
EQUIPMENT SALESMAN 

Hardworking, aggressive man 
for rapidly expanding division. 
Must have experience in field. 
Knowledge of 35mm cine equip- 
ment desirable. Top salary, ben- 
efits and excellent opportunity 
for advancement. 

Don Sahlein 

Gordon Enterprises 

5362 Cahuenga Blvd. 

North Hollywood, Calif. 91601 



WANTED 
Young Man Going Places 

Sales opportunity with future un- 
limited in small but established 
independent film production and 
distribution company. Growth 
program under way but needs 
aggressive and imaginative out- 
side representative to continue 
impetus. Record of sales per- 
formance in communications or 
service industry essential. Write: 

Box 5-1 

Business Screen 

757 Third Avenue 

New York, N.Y. 10017 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



a color DOTio 
from slides & type? 



ZOO ivi:s 

art, Siim clips 
& products 
SYiicliroiiizeil 
to viiicc, iiiiisic, 
soiiiiil effects i 




Kinescopes 

from 

Helical 

Videotapes 

Almost any format tape. 
Custom Quality. 16mm, 
8mm, Super 8. Cartridges. 



(S> 



Reeves Actron 

565 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10017 
(212) 687-6586 




Help in Handling Audiovisuals 

Anyone who has to present inforniatiim 
to groups can do a better job of it with the 
liclp of tlie newly-puhiished hook. "Audio- 
\isual .'Xids anti Tcclinii|iics in Managerial 
and Supervisory Training." This compre- 
hensive book tells how to select, prepare 
and use AV materials such as slides, dis- 
plays, films, tapes, programmed instruction 
and closed circuit television and videotape. 

This up-to-date bcxik. written by R. P. 
Rigg. is fully illustrated with photographs 
and diagrams and provides help for train- 
ing directors and executives. Included are 
a glossary of audiovisual terms, a film eval- 
uation questionnaire, a list of sources of in- 
formation on audiovisual training, a session 
check list for meeting planners and recom- 
mendations about suppliers. 

This 1970 publication sells for $13.75 
and is being exclusively distributed in the 
LInited States by Olympic Film Service, 
Dept. BSC. 161 West 22nd Street. New 
York 1 00 I 1 . 



Project: Filmstrip Kit 

"How To Make Your Own Filmstrip On 
A Pinch-Penny Budget" is written for edu- 
cators, businessmen and sales executives to 
aid them in being their own producers of 
audio-visual aids at an exceedingly low cost. 
The professional filmstrip producers of 
Project: Filmstrip will also provide the post 
production services of assembling, editing, 
sound and laboratory supervision. 

The kit includes instructions with de- 
tailed examples of script and storyboards 
and professional tools; storyboard form 
pads and cards, script forms, sequence 
sheets, acetate cropping guide and filed 
chart. Project: Filmstrip will also provide 
professional consultation and complete pro- 
duction facilities if needed. 

The cost of the kit is $7.50. Order from 
Project: Filmstrip. Dept. BSC. 24038 Mari- 
ano St.. IVoociland Hills, Calif. 91364. 



Services List From Calvin 

Calvin Productions of Kentucky's slide 
presentation brochure details services which 
include scripting, photographing, processing, 
slide mounting, narration, music and sound 
recording, editing, and equipping facilities 
for slide presentations. 

The brochure also explains Calvin's pack- 
aged finishing and programming services for 
both slide and film strip presentations. For 
vour copy, write Calvin Productions-Ken- 
'tiickv. Dept. BSC. P. O. Box 20126. Louis- 
ville^ Kentucky 40299. 



A new 

visiting-card 

for your 

germany-contact 




Trend-Film Hamburg 

Industrial- and documentationfilms 
tv- and advertising-spots 



burg 22/Germany, Hamburger Str. 171. Tel. (0411) 2913 06 




«« 



Motivate Your Salesmen 
with 

PRIDE IN PRICE 



» 



...one of six critical subjects explored 
in a 14meeting SALES MOTIVATION 
program with 7 color sound film- 
strips . . . 

"CREATIVE 
SELLING" 

This unique Sales Motivation Program 
will cause your salesmen to produce 
the results you want — to meet the 
continuing demand for more sales 
and more profits. 

YOU BE THE JUDGE 

Send for details and "Preview Offer" 

BETTER SELLING BUREAU Dept X50 
1150 W. Olive Ave., Burbank, Calif. 91506 

Please tell me how I may evaluate this new 
Sales Motivation Program. 

Name Title 

Company 

Address 



City 



State 



Zip 



MAY, 1970 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Allied Impex Corporation 43 

Animated Productions 47 

Arriflex Corporation of America 4-5 

A.V.E. Corporation 41 

Bardwell & McAlister 32 

Berkey Colortran Third Cover 

Better Selling Bureau 47 

Bohn Benton, inc 20 

Byron Motion Pictures 3 

Cine 60 38 

Cine Magnetics, Inc 15 

Coffey Company, Inc., Jack C 12 

Colburn Laboratory Inc., George W. . . .39 

Comprehensive Service Corp 47 

Consolidated Film Industries 18 

Courier 43 

DeLuxe General 7 

DeWolfe Music Library, Inc 47 

DuKane Corporation 16 



Eastman Kodak Company 33 

Eclair Corporation of America 24-25 

Elco Corporation 8 



Fairchild Camera & Instrument Corp. . .35 



Handy Organization, Inc., The Jam 

Fourth Cover 

Holmes Laboratories, Inc., Frank 17 

Hollywood Valley Film Labs 38 



La Belle Industries 14 



Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc. 

Second Cover 

MPO Videotronics Corporation 13 

Musifex, Inc 45 



North American Philips Corporation ..40 



Paillard, Inc 37 

Plastic Reel Corp. of America 11 

Polacoat, Inc 36 

Program Services 38 

Reela Films, Inc 1 

Reeves Actron 47 

RHR Filmedia, Inc 19 

Schuessler Case Company 44 

Stokes Associates, Bill 42 

Trend Film Hamburg 47 

United Air Lines 6 

United World Films 9 

Valentino, Thomas J., Inc 42 

Visualscope, Inc 10 



»i 



the 

last word 




By LON B. GREGORY 



lllllllllllllllllinilllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIII 



More A-Vs in Training 

'yHOUGH WE DONT believe 
■*• the use of audiovisuals in 
corporate and government em- 
ployee training and education 
will ever again show the jump it 
reflected in the late 1960s (see 
page 2 1 ) . we are well aware that 
the surface of this whole area 
has barely been scratched. 

Indications of the potential 
and the need for ever more and 
better employee education are 
everywhere. And, at the present 
time, the need and desire for 
these improvement programs is 
expanding faster than current 
steps to meet the demand. 

For example, there are more 
adult Americans (your em- 
ployees, Mr. Businessman) tak- 
ing formal education courses 
than the total enrollment of stu- 
dents in all schools, colleges, and 
universities in the U.S. And, most 



of them are taking courses for 
the express purpose of prepar- 
ing themselves for a better posi- 
tion where they're working . . . 
or for another company. 

Carefully planned audiovisual 
programs and courses on the 
same subjects these people are 
going outside to get can be pre- 
pared and tailored to the indiv- 
idual needs of any company. 
Already, many forward thinking 
organizations offer their em- 
ployees self and job improvement 
courses on company time. 

Economical, portable sound 
film and filmstrip projectors car- 
ry this idea a step further. The 
progressive company of the '70s 
will offer employees a variety of 
self and job improvement courses 
on compact cartridge loaded pro- 
jectors and various other learn- 
ing units. Employees will be able 
to borrow the necessary programs 



and equipment from a corporate 
"library" or training center and 
use it at home instead of attend- 
ing a nearby school. 

Such programs utilizing a clos- 
er alliance between corporate 
audiovisual and training direc- 
tors will result in better educated 
employees of longer tenure and 
provide greater economies in 
employee education and training. 



A Question of Age 

Sir: We notice with specious 
amusement your congratulations 
to two organizations for their 
21st and 25th anniversaries in 
your April column. 

When it comes to old age — 
but not senility — I'd like to 
point out that Wilding was or- 
ganized in 1914, Jam Handy in 

1917 and Worcester Film in 
1918. We were incorporated in 

1918 and believe that we are the 
oldest movie producers in the 
country under the same name. . . 

Carleton E. Bearse 
General Manager 
Worcester Film Corp. 
Worcester, Mass. 
► We were not suggesting that 
Jack Lieb Productions ap- 
proached being the oldest film 
company in business, merely 
commending them on their 25th 
anniversary , a relatively rare 
event among film producers. 



Incidentally, noticeably absent 
from your list of film production 
company "pioneers" is Jamieson 
Film Co., Dallas, Texas, or- 
ganized in 1916.' 

Now that we've opened the 
question, we'll imdoubtedly hear 
from other long-established firms. 
We're waiting. — Editor 



Worth Seeing in New York 

The new Eastman Kodak Gal- 
lery and Photo Information Cen- 
ter at 1133 Avenue of the 
Americas in New York is an ex- 
hibit well worth stopping by to 
see. 

Opened April 15, the open- 
ing show features a collection of 
more than 70 exciting photo- 
graphs of New York City, all 
dedicated at the opening as a 
gift to the people of New York. 

The theme of the Motion Pic- 
ture & Education Markets Divi- 
sion display is "Movies Move 
People" and features movies, 
slide shows and an array of prod- 
ucts. Within a large, self-con- 
tained projection unit, visitors 
are able to watch three presenta- 
tions — a continuous showing 
of parts of two movies, a slide 
quiz on pictures of famous scenes 
and works of art, and a slide 
story of how to make a slide talk. 

It's open from 10 a.m. to 5:30 
p.m. daily except Sunday. 

point & period 



48 



BUSINESS SCREEN 






sthesuflbut 

easier to control! 



The MAXI-BRUTE 9 weighs 
a portable 75 pounds, draws 75 amps 
at 120 volts — A.C. or D.C. 

Set up, focus, and turn on 10 Maxi's 
in a Brute Arc setup time. 

Equip it with dichroic lamps 
and beat a Brute Arc. 

It won't flicker and foul up your shot. 

Eight lamp types in nine combinations 
for tough lighting problems 






compare 


MAXI-BRUTE 9 

with lamps, 

stand & cable 


Brute Arc with 

grid, pedestal 

& cable 


weight 


118 lbs. 


420 lbs. 


cu. ft. 


9.4 


38.1 


power 


75 amps 
120 volts 
AC or DC 


225 amps 
115 volts 
D. C. only 



Colortran 



^^\/|\/| LI Cll I Quality, Service, Innovation 

Berkey Colortran • 1015 Chestnut St., Burbank, Ca. 91502 
Telephone (213) 843-1200, Cable: ColorTran, Telex: 67-7252 



Berkey'lA 

Photo Inc Lm 



To 

Transmit Ideas 



Without Losses 




Comprehensive Consultation Services on: 



Group Meeting Services 
Sales Meetings 
Stockholders Meetings 
Seminars 

Convention Assistance 
Visualized Talks 
Speech Coaching 
Picturizations 
Meeting Guides 
Projection Equipment 
Meeting Packages 
Portable Stagettes 
Field Surveys 
Field Services 
Closed-Circuit TV 



Training Services 


Group Meeting Implementation 


Quality Control 


Motion Picture Plans 


Programs 


and Specifications 


Foreman Training 


Storyboards 


Supervisory Training 


Animated Cartoons 


Management 


Filmstrips, Slides and 


Development 


Slidefilms 


Vocational Training 


Tape Recordings 


Sales Training 


Disc Recordings 


Distributor Training 


Transparencies 


Retail Training 


Pictorial Booklets 


Training Devices 


Turnover and Flip Charts 


Training Manuals 


Programmed Projection 


Quiz Materials 


Film Distribution 


Utilization Assistance 


Theatrical 


Closed-Circuit TV 


Non-theatrical 


Stimulation Programs 


Closed-Circuit TV 



Project Supervision, with Total Responsibility for Security, 
as in National Defense Projects 

7^ JAyi HANDY (^^z^a^^zZc^rc^ 
is set up to help you! 



NEW/ YORK 

212 -JU 2-4060 



DETROIT 

313 -TR 5-2450 



CHICAGO 

312 -ST 2-6757 



ATLANTA 

404 - 688-7499 



HOLLYWOOD 

213-463-2321 



f 



BUSINESS SCREEN 

TOOLS, TECHNIQUES AND IDEAS FOR AUDIOVISUAL COMMUNICATIONS 



B A HARCOURT, BRACE & WORLD PUBLICATION 



JUNE • 197G 



■Tr-^L^ 



1970 

Audiovisual 
Equipment 

Buyer's Guide 



Ht^ 



4^# 




"The decade of the 70s promises 
fo fulfill the vision of the 
pioneers of the cinematic process.' 



^ 
■3^'-^ 



if<-:- 



-^i^/ 



■'***ftri&fi'-Ji>KriTF- , 



Special: NAVA Preview 
& Exhibit Guide 



^ ^ 
^ ^ 

N 



eouCATioivj 

THROUQH 
COMMUMtCATlON 

3Ut f'ia-.crii Audio-VisusI 
Conveniion and Exhibit 
Shcralo^-Parn Hotel 
Wasf^inoior, C. 



No westerns. No mysteries. No epics. 



PX^ -./ii-ZMl' 



4r- 



SOff^KT! ,,,.,„ 



i^^^^^S 



liV,j'^ 



DANGER 
POISON 



^ 






.Ox 



^ >l> 



But our film program gets the highest 
^ rating in television. 



■■■%':v?''i'.lgy*^--"' 



Not from Nielsen or Arbitron. But from the hun- 
dreds of companies and television stations all over 
the country who enjoy the benefits of our spon- 
sored film distribution program. 

Last year, 289 companies who wanted to reach 
millions of viewers turned their films over to Mod- 
ern TV. And we booked them to 788 television 
stations in the U.S.* that broadcast informative 
free films to supplement their regular commercial 
programming. 

Result: at year's end, our clients' films had been 
seen on television 54,732 times. 

To attract such tremendous viewer interest, 
these stations need a broad range of subjects — 
sports, travel, science, home economics, and agri- 
culture, to name just a few. They also need films 
in a variety of lengths — everything from a one- 



minute shortie to a half-hour series — to fill open- 
ings in their program schedules. 

And they know that Modern TV's incompar- 
able service more than meets their needs. 

Modern offers them the largest and best selec- 
tion of sponsored films available. 

We maintain a network of six U.S. TV libraries 
in major cities to provide fast, personalized service. 

Because the needs of stations vary widely, a full- 
time Modern staff of regional field representatives 
calls on them regularly to ask about special free 
film requirements. 

And to stimulate film usage all year long. 
Modern sends out a steady stream of catalogs, bro- 
chures, film lists, and special mailers. 

Does all this sound like your kind of program? 
Give us a call. We'll put your favorite film on TV. 



•Canadian dislribiUion also available. 



MODERN TALKING PICTURK SERVICE, INC. 

1212 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10036 

Modern is the world's largest distributor of sponsored films lo Community Groups, Schools, Television, and Theaters, serving sponsors through U.S. and Canadian film libraries. 



If youVe in a bind for lab service^ 
Reela can bail you out. 



When deadlines loom large, and you 

keep running into one delay after 

another, call Reela. Nobody offers 

faster service. And nobody will 

give you better quality work. 

Reela's speed and high quality 

come about because of three things: 

1. Competent, dedicated people. 

2. Jet transportation, and an outfit 

that knows how to exploit it. 

3. Sophisticated new equipment. 

How many release prints do you need 
—20 ? 1 00 ? Reela can make them. 



Perfect. Sharp. Color-balanced. 
Back in your hands (or drop-shipped 
if you want) before you know it. 

Why settle for less than the best? 
Call Reela now. 

REELA OFFERS: 

Complete editorial services • complete 

producer's services — animation 

— titling — sound • complete 8, 1 6, 

and 35mm laboratory services, 

including black and white or color 

dailies for Florida filming 

• Super 8 printing and cartridging. 




N^0^\^^ 



,\H<^- 



\HC- 



..6555 






JUNE, 1970 



0. H. COELLN 

Founder and 
Consultant 

ROBERT SEYMOUR, JR. 

Publisher 

LON B.GREGORY 

Editor & 
Assistant Publisher 

NOREEN OSTLER 

Editorial Assistant 

AUDREY RIDOELL 

Advertising Service Mgr. 




EDITORIAL AND 
ADVERTISING OFFICES 

402 West Liberty Drive 

Wheaton, Illinois 60187 

Phone (312) 653-4040 



REGIONAL OFFICES 

EAST: 

ROBERT SEYMOUR, JR. 

757 Third Avenue 
New York, N.Y. 10017 
Phone: (212) 572-4853 

MIDWEST: 

LON B. GREGORY 

402 West Liberty Drive 

Wheaton, llinois 60187 

Phone: (312) 653-4040 

WEST: 

H. L. MITCHELL 

Western Manager 

1450 Lorain Rd. 

San Marino, Calif. 91108 

Phone: (213) 283-4394 

463-4891 



JUNE, 1970 • VOLUME 31 • NUMBER 6 

This Month's Features 

Audiovisuals of the 1 970s By Everett Hall 27 

Sell Your Product with Super 8 By Sam Gale 29 

National Audiovisual Center: One Stop Service for Government A-V 30 

Don't Overlook Slidefilms By Spencer Bostwick 32 

The Future of Slidefilms By Robert L. Shoemaker 33 

Black A-V Power in the Caribbean By Boh Seymour 38 

IFPA Journal: "Cindy Competition Opens 41 

U.S. Industrial Film Festival Awards 49 "Gold Cameras" 43 

Northwest Teleproductions Opens Videotape Facility 45 

Preliminary Program to NAVA's 31st Annual Convention 51 

Guide & Floor Plan to 1970 NAVA Exhibits 52 

1970 Audiovisual Equipment Buyer's Guide: NAVA Preview 54 

Index to Audiovisual Equipment Manufacturers 66 

Departments 

The Screen Executive: Personnel Notes 6 

Right Off the Newsreel: Late New Reports 8 

The Camera Eye: Commentary By O. H. Coelln 20 

The Audiovisual Calendar: Upcoming Events 24 

Picture Parade: Previews of New Films 47 

Industry News: Along the Film /Tape Production Line 49 

The National Directory of Audiovisual Dealers 68 

Business Screen Marketplace: Classified Advertising 68 

Reference Shelf: Helpful Books and Literature 68 

Index to Advertisers in this Issue 70 

The Last Word: Observation and Comment 70 



MP 



A HARCOURT, BRACE & WORLD PUBLICATION 

Harbrace Publications, Inc. 



BUSINESS SCREEN is published monthly by Harbrace Publications, Inc., 402 West Liberty Drive, Wheaton, 
Illinois 60187, o subsidiory of Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc. Telephone; (312) 653-4040. Subscription 
rates: One year, $5,- two years, $8; three years, $'0, in the U.S. and Canada. Other countries: $1Q 
per year. Single copies: 75i in U.S. and Canada,- all other countries: $2. Controlled circulation postage 
paid at Rochelle, Illinois 61068. Copyright 1970 by Harbrace Publications, Inc. Trodemark registered 
with U.S. Patent Office. Address correspondence concerning circulation only to Harbrace Building, 
Duluth, Minnesota 55802. Address all other correspondence to BUSINESS SCREEN, 402 West Uberty 
Drive, Wheaton, Illinois 60187. POSTMASTER: Please send Form 3579 to BUSINESS SCREEN, Harbrace 
Building, Duluth, Minnesota 55802. 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



If your lob isn't 
changing for the better 



why not change to 




Our new building doubled our capacity. A 
year later we've doubled it again. We've 
also adding the world's newest super 8mm 
color facilities, and video tape to film trans- 
fers to our existing 16mm and 35mm Color 
Correct facilities. Constant change keeps us 
constantly better. 



byron 



MOTION PICTURES 



Subsidiary of iffl^ Technicolor, Inc. 



65 K Street, Northeast, Washington, D.C. 20002 • 202/783-2700 
World's most sophisticated Film Laboratory 



JUNE, 1970 



IF YOU'RE THINKING 

OF BUYING A REPEATER 

MOVIE PROJECTOR, 



COMPARE ALL 3. 

Of all the companies that manufac- The plain facts are right there for you 
ture cartridge-load repeater projectors, to analyze, investigate and judge. Corn- 
there are 3 leading machines.And of these pare each projector against the competi- 
3, you want the one that's best for you. tion. Then make up your own mind. 



But with conflicting claims from all . 

directions, it's hard to determine whether | 

Brand M has a wider screen than Brand F. I 
Whether Brand B has 2-way viewing ver 



I 



FACT SHEET ON THE 3 



x-rj- rrii 4. 4- ' ^ 1 u u tr ' MPO Videotronic Projector Corp. 

satihty. That one cartridge only holds 5 | Division of Optico, inc. 

minutes of film, another takes 15 minutes. I 461 Park Avenue south New York, N.Y. 10016 

But we've made it easy for you to get ■ ° ^'/" \"t^f ,f d,^" receiving your comparative 

.7 ^ o ■ chart of the 3 leading portable projectors. 

the facts. I Mailittome. 

We have compiled a chart dealing J n I would also like to see a slde-by-slde demon- 

With the most important aspects of port- | st ation of these leading projectors. Call me 

able projectors-picture quality, sound f i- I 

delity, dependability, ease of use, screen | Name 

size, capacity, film print life, and versa- | company 

tility. In this chart we compare our prod- I 

uct, the MPO Videotronic Super 8 projec- [ 

tor, with its 2 leading competitors. ■ ^^^' 



Address, 



JUNE, 1970 



Servfce 




^t(eat 



In the last year, Capital Film has increased its staff in the cus- 
tomer service department by 50% . 

These men and women work for YOU. 

They follow your job completely to final delivery. 

You always have someone to TALK to . . . that understands your 
needs. It's a CAPITAL idea! 

We have a growing file of testimonials on our service which 
we'd be happy to share. 



in the Nation's CAPITAL 
35mm, 16mm and super 8 Ecktachrome 
ECO-2 or ME-4 negative-positive 
color printing and processing 
sound studios and editorial facilities 



CAPITAL of Washington 

470 E Street, S.W. 
Washington, DC, 20024 
(202) 347-1717 



Super 8 cartridge and cassette loading 


Supers City, Inc. 


and repair 


1905 Fairview Avenue, N.E. 




Washington, D.C. 20002 




(202) 526-0505 



CAPITAL of Miami 

1998 N.E. 150th Street 
N. Miami, Florida 33161 
(305) 949-4252 



in the Sun and Fun . . . CAPITAL 
16mm and 35mm "overnight service" 
color dailies and release printing. 
Ecktachrome ECO-2 or ME-4 
printing and processing. 

.Corporate Headquarters: 470 E Street, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024 

FILM LABORATORIES, INCORPORATED 




the 

screen 

executive 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIililllllilllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllilllillllllllilllllllllillllll 



Howell Retires from Navy 
After 25 Years of Service 

Lieutenant Commander Sims 
Howell will retire from the Navy 
on July 1st after nearly 24 years 
of service in Navy photographic 
assignments. 

Howell is best known for his 
five tours of duty in the motion 
picture department at the Naval 
Photographic Center, but he has 
also served on the Navy's first 
guided missile ship, on the staff 
of the Commander of the U.S. 
Sixth Fleet, and as officer-in- 
charge of the Fleet Air Photo- 
graphic Lab in Atsugi, Japan. 



Kutza Chosen to Produce 
"Spoleto Cinema" in Rome 

Michael J. Kutza, Jr., Chi- 
cago International Film Festi- 
val founder and director, has 
been invited by directors Lu- 
chino Visconti, Federico Fellini 
and Franco Zeffirelli to produce 
their "Spoleto Cinema" in Spo- 
leto, Italy June 20 through 24. 

A series of pre-screening is 
presently being set up in Chicago 
for film makers who are inter- 
ested in having their work shown 
in Spoleto. Film makers can send 
their 16mm optical sound or 
35mm optical sound film prints 
to: Chicago International Film 
Festival Headquarters, 12 East 
Grand Avenue, Chicago, 111. 
60611. 



Pfizer Forms New Unit; 
Appoints Shea Director 

Pfizer Pharmaceuticals has es- 
tablished a new medical com- 
munications and education unit 
to coordinate medical communi- 
cations activities for both its 
Pfizer Laboratories and J. B. 
Roerig Divisions and to develop 
new areas of communications 
technology. 

Thomas Shea, formerly group 
product manager in the J. B. 
Roerig Division, has been ap- 
pointed director of medical com- 
munications and education. 

The newly organized unit will 
be responsible for medical sym- 



posia, learning systems, scientific 
exhibits, speakers programs, pro- 
fessional publications and for the 
development of new non-tradi- I 
tional medical communications 
areas. 



Several Changes Made at 
Eastman Kodak Company 

William S. Vaughn has retired 
as chairman of the board of di- 
rectors of Eastman Kodak Com- 
pany and as chairman and mem- 
ber of the executive committee. 
He continues as director. 

Dr. Louis K. Eilers, president, 
was elected chairman of the 
board of directors and continues 
his responsibilities as chief ex- 
ecutive officer and chairman of 
the operations committee. 

Gerald B. Zornow, executive 
vice president, was elected pres- 
ident of the company and chair- 
man of the executive committee. 

Time-Life Films Appoints 
Morris Program Director 

Time-Life Films, a division of 
Time Incorporated, has named 
Edward L. Morris program di- 
rector, responsible for all as- 
pects of production and selec- 
tion of programs to be marketed 
by the division. 

For the past six years, Mor- 
ris has been programming direc- 
tor of the Chicago Educational 
Television Association — 
WTTW Channel 11 and 
WXXW Channel 20, where he 
was responsible for many new 
programs and program series. 



Scott to Head West Coast 
Facilities at Metro/Kalvar 

Kenneth W. Scott has been 
named vice president, operations 
and development of Metro Kal- 
var. Inc. 

Formerly director of opera- 
tions and development, Scott will 
oversee Metro Kalvar's West 
Coast facilities in Los Angeles, 
including R&D, engineering, 
sales and a new expanded pro- 
duction and laboratory services 
department. • 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



lb shoot this man and his family 

for NBC, Gerry Feil and his 

crew walked for six weeks through 

the jungles of New Guinea. 

Temperatures as high as 110. Annual 

rainfall 200 inches. EF film. 

Humidity had made the EF emulsion 

so sticky that Cinelab had to 

unwind the film rolls by hand. But 

Mr. Feil exposed 50,000 feet 

of film without losing a single frame. 

His camera was an Eclair NPR. 




Six weeks into New Guineas un- 
mapped rain forest, Cameraman-Director 
Gerry Feil and his crew found what they were 
looking for: a village whose inhabitants had 
never seen a white man and whose style of 
living was unaltered since the Stone Age. 
Nobody knew how the villagers would react; 
but it was obvious that, whatever they did, 
they would do it only once. No retakes. No 
waiting for jams or threading film. 

The footage was for a 60 minute 
NBC TV Special called "Patrol Into The Un- 
known." produced by Capital Cities Broad- 
casting: and this unrepeatable moment was 
to be the climax of the film. Amazingly, the 
villagers appeared neither terrified nor hos- 
tile as the film crew walked toward them, 
shooting sync sound as they approached. 
Later, it became apparent that the villagers 
were reassured by the presence in the film 
crew of a woman — Mrs. Feil. 

They weren't afraid; but they cer- 
tainly were curious. Never having seen a 
camera before, they were quite unselfcon- 
scious about being filmed by the silent- 
running NPR. But later in the day, when 
Mr. Feil tried to get some candid non-sync 
footage with his backup camera, its whirring 
motor instantly caused everyone to freeze 
and stare at the lens. 

Since it was impractical to carry 
more than one filmstock, Mr. Feil decided to 
use high-speed EF film throughout, relying 
on the NPR's variable shutter to cut down 
exposure where the light was bright. EF 
emulsion is relatively thick, and it tends to 
swell and soften in hot weather: but Mr. Feil 
had used it for the ABC TV Special on Africa 
with no problems, despite the equatorial 
heat encountered there. 

Mr. Feil reports that the NPR's un- 
obtrusiveness, together with its five-second 
magazine change, made it the only camera 
usable at the village, for both sync sound 
and wild footage. "If the NPR had not sur- 
vived its battering en route, or if the fan- 
tastic heat and humidity had made the EF 
emulsion jam the NPR, it would have been 
a disaster," says Mr. Feil. But nothing went 
wrong. Back in New York, Cinelab had to 
load the exposed film by hand into the proc- 
essing machines. But the footage was per- 
fectly OK — and fascinating; and historic. 

For an NPR brochure, write to Eclair Corporation at 
7262 Melrose Avenue. Los Angeles. Calif. 90046. 
Phone: (213) 933 7182. Eclair's New York Service 
Center is at 73 S. Central Avenue. Valley Stream. N.Y. 
11580. Phone: (516) 561-6405. Eclair International: 
Paris 2e. France. 




JUNE, 1970 




right off the newsreel 



I IIIIMIIII Illllllllllllll I Illllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllll 



AFI-Kent School Offer 
Summer Film Institute 

The American Film Institute 
and Kent School will offer a two- 
week Film Institute this summer 
expressly designed for educators 
on all grade levels who are begin- 
ning their work in film study. 

The Institute will be held 
August 12-26 at Kent School in 
Kent, Connecticut (85 miles 
north of New York City). It will 
be limited to 60 participants who 
will study under professional 
filmmakers, critics and educators. 
Activities will include lecture/ 
discussions, screenings, seminars 
and filmmaking workshops. 

The cost of the two-week Insti- 
tute is $250, which includes reg- 
istration fee, laboratory expenses 
and room and board. Facilities 
include two auditoriums equipped 
for 35mm projection, seven 



rooms for 16mm projection and 
extensive audio-visual equipment. 
Applications must be submit- 
ted by June 30, 1970, to Kent/ 
AFI Summer Film Institute, The 
American Film Institute, 1815 H 
Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 
20006. 



New York Film Festival 
Sets Oct. 27-30 Dates 

The International Film & TV 
Festival of New York will be 
held October 27-30 at New 
York's Americana Hotel. 

In announcing the dates for 
the 13th year for the festival, 
Herb Rosen, chairman, said ad- 
ditional details and entry forms 
may be obtained from the festival 
office, 121 W. 45th St., New 
York, N.Y. 10036. 



BNA Films Opens 
Los Angeles Office 

BNA Films, national distribu- 
tor of management and motiva- 
tional films has opened a Los 
Angeles office at 3460 Wilshire 
Blvd., Suite 804. 

Charles A. Krueger, Jr., rep- 
resents BNA at the new branch. 
All of the BNA films are avail- 
able for preview at the new of- 
fice. An advance reservation is 
required to use the screening fa- 
cility. 

Jacksonville Pursues 
Film Center Comeback 

Jacksonville, Florida has taken 
a major step toward re-estab- 
lishing itself as a national pro- 
duction center for motion pic- 
ture and TV film companies. 
After four months of organiza- 



tional work, the Jacksonville 
Area Chamber of Commerce has 
announced the formation of the 
Motion Picture and Television 
Council of Jacksonville. 

■■Jacksonville was the birth- 
place of the American film in- 
dustry," said Chamber president 
Gert Schmidt. "The first full- 
length feature film was made 
here, and at one time scores of 
production companies had head- 
quarters and studio facilities lo- 
cated here. 

"We mean to attract this busi- 
ness back to Jacksonville, and 
the fact that the Motion Picture 
and Television Council has been 
formed already has resulted in 
some major filming on location 
in Jacksonville." 

The Committee of 100, the 

industrial development arm of 

Continued on page 10 



Anybody need footage 

of an airplane? 






• Stock footage of jets, piston and histori- 
cal aircraft in 35 and 16MM Color or Black 
and White available free to producers for 
authentic airline sequences. 

• 16MM Mini-libraries available in Chicago 
and New York, with immediate service on 
color print and masters. 

• Jet mockups for interior filming available 
in New York and Hollywood. 

CALL UNITED AIR LINES 
PUBLICITY DEPARTMENT. 

Atlanta 523-5517 

Chicago 726-5500 

Denver 398-4535 

Detroit 963-9770 

Honolulu 547-2727 

Los Angeles 482-3620 

New York 922-5225 

Pittsburgh 391-9777 

San Francisco 397-2620 

Seattle 682-2121 

Washington, D.C 737-6830 

Write for catalog: 

United Air Lines Film Library 

626 Wilshire Boulevard 

Los Angeles, California 90017 



United Air Lines. 




BUSINESS SCREEN 




''Through thoughtleiis destruction 
we Americans are losing our 

historic buildings and ivith them 
a portion of our heritage and 
of our historical identity. As a 
restdt, visual pollution assails 
our cities and tou')is . . . one day 
we shall find ourselves in an 
ciirironnioit stra)\gea]\d unfriendly . . ." 

The National Trust for 
Historic Preservation 



_0 



Cin©m3K6rS i?' proud to have been commissioned to create the 
film/sound climax to the Centennial Exhibition. THE RISE OF AN AMERI- 
CAN ARCHITECTURE, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fifth Avenue at 82nd 
Street, New York City. Cosponsored by The National Trust for Historic 
Preservation and the New York Chapter. American Institute of Architects; 
on 'view through October 4, 1970, 



cinemaKers inc i62 wesT 56 sxreei new vorK. n y 10019 



•^ iiM 4 



JUNE, 1970 




MVRCi 

... all under one roof, including producer services, 

new color processing, scene to scene color and 

exposure controlled printing, quodrank super 8 

recording, cartridge loading and packaging, film 

library distribution and maintenance service, 

audio visual systems. 
If you're tired of running around start where the 

buck stops ... at 

©FISCHER 
^CYGNET 



right off the newsreel . . . 



CHICAGO: 399 Gundersen Drive 

Carol Stream. Illinois 60178 
Phone 312/665-4242 



LONDON: 295 Northholt Road 

South Harrow Middx., England 
Std 01/422-722 



the Chamber, sees the impact 
of increased film and television 
production as a significant eco- 
nomic factor. The Committee 
has formed a task force within 
its ranks to promote its develop- 
ment in cooperation with the 
film-TV council. Heading the 
task force is Ted Johnson, presi- 
dent of Jacksonville-based Man- 
or Dinner Theatres Corporation 
of America. 

One of the first objectives of 
the Motion Picture and Tele- 
vision Council is to compile and 
publish an inventory of motion 
picture and TV facilities current- 
ly in Jacksonville, including crea- 
tive and technical personnel in 
the field. A detailed directory 
will be distributed nationally in 
a bid to attract increased film 
production in the community. 



Modern-Mass Media Opens 
East Film, A-V Service 

Modern Talking Picture Ser- 
vice, Inc., has licensed Modern- 
Mass Media, Inc., to assume the 
operations of its Summit, New 
Jersey, film library starting July 
1, according to Carl H. Lenz, 
president of Modern Talking Pic- 
ture Service. 

Modern-Mass 
Media is a new 
company formed 
by Ralph J. Del 
Coro, who is 
currently vice 
president of 
Modern Talking 
Picture Service. 
He is president 
of the new firm, in which Mod- 
ern Talking Picture Service holds 
a minority interest. 

As a licensee of Modern Talk- 
ing Picture Service, Modern-Mass 
Media will distribute business 
sponsored free-loan films to 
schools and community groups 
in the New York-New Jersey 
area, to television stations 
throughout the Northeast and to 
summer resorts in Maryland, 
New York, New Jersey and east- 
ern Pennsylvania. 

Del Coro indicates the new 
company will be engaged in a 
general audio-visual business, 
which is expected to include the 
newer, more sophisticated elec- 
tronic audio-visual equipment 
and systems as well as conven- 




DEL CORO 



tional projection equipment, edu- 
cational films, feature films, film- 
strips and other audio-visual aids. 
Headquarters of Modern-Mass 
Media will be at 315 Springfield 
Avenue, Summit, N. J. 



Km&fiJm The Oa^m /^J^^^l 




A special membership award in rec- 
ognition of "promoting the business 
of photography to higher levels of 
accomplishment for a period of more 
than 25 years" was presented to the 
Da-Lite Screen Co. Receiving the 
award is George H. Lenke, Jr. (left), 
president, from Wiliam Ivay, director 
of Canadian Affairs for the Master 
Photo Dealers & Finishers Associa- 
tion. 



Nicholson-Muir Plans 
A-V Research Center 

On June 1, 1970, ground will 
be broken for a new audio-visual 
research center in Mamaroneck, 
New York by Nicholson-Muir 
Productions. Nicholson and Muir 
have been producing shows for 
television since 1947, and are 
best known for "The Newlywed 
Game," "Pay Cards," and "How- 
dy Doody." 

The studios are designed for 
the production of training pro- 
grams for business and industry. 
Nicholson-Muir will also use the 
studios for the production of spe- 
cial interest programming for 
cable television, and for pilots of 
commercial television programs. 

In addition to producing in its 
studios, Nicholson-Muir will have 
a "mini-van" for location shoot- 
ing at plants, on-site construction 
projects, in offices, or at confer- 
ences. 

Patterned along the lines of 
broadcast television studios, but 
designed to meet the needs of the 
closed circuit television user, the 
building has two studios, all the 
necessary allied facilities for the 
Continued on page 1 2 



10 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



m mm mmmmm 




LllAJUIUJUUijrMjD 



JiLd 



Fifty years is a long time to enjoy the reputation of being a prime source for supplying 
the very finest in lighting equipment. We take this opportunity to thank our many 
customer-friends in the motion picture and television industries for making the last five 
decades possible. 

The oldest firm of its kind in the East, Charles Ross has been fulfilling the lighting 
requirements of thousands of the country's foremost producers. And the list keeps 
growing. We must be doing something bright. 




THE EAST'S ONLY SPECIALIST - LIGHTING, GRIP EQUIPMENT. PROPS, GENERATORS 

RENTALS / SALES / SERVICE ^fcT)) Sole distributor of Mole-Richarclson Company Products in Greater New York 



»)-■ 




INC 333 WEST 52nd STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y. 10019, Area 212, Circle 6-5470 



JUNE, 1970 



n 



right off the newsreel 



preparation and execution of 
program production, executive 
and general offices, plus an 
apartment (to accommodate out- 
of-town celebrities and special 
guests). 

The studios are being outfitted 
with the very latest electronic 
equipment, all of which meets 
broadcast standards. This in- 
cludes five color Plumbicon cam- 
eras, two 16mm film chains, 
numerous slide projectors, micro- 
phones and lights; videotape re- 
corders for recording, transfer- 
ring and editing. Since the final 
recorded product will be made 
available to individuals with a 
variety of helical scan (closed 
circuit) systems, an in-house 
duplicating center will enable 
NMP to supply recordings for all 
major brands of recorders. 

The new facilities will employ 
a corporate staff of ten, and a 
basic technical crew. Production 
personnel will be added accord- 
ing to the requirements of each 
job. 

At the present, Nicholson- 
Muir maintains offices and their 
studios in Larchmont, New York. 



Bebell&Bebell Now at 
Full Production 

Bebell & Bebell Color Labora- 
tories" new motion picture in- 
stallation at 416 W. 45th St., 
New York, is now in full produc- 
tion after nearly a year of engi- 
neering, planning and actual con- 
struction. 

Release print and dailies pro- 
duction on Eastman Color Posi- 
tive and Internegative developing 
machine has greatly increased in 
both 16mm and 35mm. Bebell 
is now also developing the new 
Ektachrome Commercial 7252 
film. 

BebelTs Hazeltine Color Ana- 
lyzer timing department has new 
facilities for "over-the-shoulder" 
consulting time by customers. 



Don Glasell Launches 
Chicago A-V Training Firm 

Training Concepts & Com- 
munications, Inc., has been 
opened at 221 N. LaSalle, Suite 
1038 in Chicago by Don Glasell, 
area audiovisual specialist at one 
time with Montgomery Ward. 



According to Glasell, the new 
company is an agency type con- 
sultant-producer of training and 
communication films, audio cas- 
settes and videotape programs. 
The small broadly experienced 
staff will be particularly con- 
cerned with audience receptivity, 
individuality, identity and rein- 
forcement of human values, as 
well as achieving low cost effec- 
tive results. 

Of special importance, Glasell 
notes, is that the company's ser- 
vice supplements, but does not 
replace the work of the client's 
own organization or its other 
advisors. 



Memorex Plans Economical 
Videotape Duplication 

Memorex Corporation has an- 
nounced a breakthrough in color 
TV recordings for broadcast, 
educational and ultimate home 
use — a new low-cost high-speed 
process for the mass duplication 
of video tapes. 

The Memorex duplication pro- 
cess is made possible by the 
unique qualities of a new chromi- 
um dioxide magnetic tape which 
Memorex will produce and mar- 
ket beginning this summer. 

Memorex President Lawrence 



L. Spitters revealed that the 
duplicating equipment now oper- 
ating in the company's labora- 
tories simultaneously turns out 
multiple duplicates at high speed 
for an effective production rate 
10 to 15 times faster than pres- 
ent processes. Existing video tape 
dupHcating processes must utilize 
a separate expensive video tape 
recorder which takes one hour 
to duplicate a one-hour program, 
whereas the new Memorex pro- 
cess takes only minutes. The 
Memorex process requires no 
electronic circuitry to transfer 
between the master and an unlim- 
ited number of copies. 

"The physical properties of 
chromium dioxide also produce 
copies which have twice the mag- 
netic energy or 'brilliance' of 
conventional original video 
tapes," Spitters said. 

The greater video information 
storage capacity of chromium di- 
oxide will open the way to the 
development of a new generation 
of video equipment operating at 
speeds down to one-half those of 
present recorders. This means 
twice the programming per reel 
or a significant cost reduction 
per program for the user. This 
sharply reduced media cost 
coupled with the economies of 
Continued on page 14 




Now* 

A sound-filmstrip projector 
that gives you time to answer 
the questions it aslcs. 

Automatically. 




There are times when an audio-visual 
sales presentalion. or an economics lec- 
ture, or a welding demonstration should 
be seen but not heard. 

That's why we've designed a new 
response option for the Mastermatic® 35 
mm sound-filmstrip pro)ector. It lets you 
pre-set program pauses for audience 
participation or question and answer ses- 
sions. Then press a remote control button 
to restart the projector. 

The Mastermatic gives 
you a choice of screen F 
sizes suited to the size of 
your audience: built-in 100 
sq. in. rear-screen projec- 
tion for small groups, switch 
lenses for conventional 
large-screen projection for 
bigger audiences. 

And with our patented 
UN IRAK cartridge 
you tailor the talk to 
your audience 
switch sound 
cartridges to alter 



^!lljj^'~^/ .^HMjii^ 



change the educational level, or first-name 
your audience. 

You can teach or train even more ef- 
fectively with the optional Elco-Optisonics 
responder. Its control allows the student 
to record his answer on a computer-com- 
patible card and simultaneously restart 
the presentation. 

Send the coupon for details or a 
chance to cross-examine the Mastermatic 
projector 

7.1 



ELCO OPTISONICS 

Ivlcntgomeryville. Pa. 18936 
(215) 368-0111 



ELCO Corporation 

I n Send me your illustrated brochure 
□ Call me to arrange a demonstration 
n I'm interested in standard unit 

I □ I'm interested in "response" option 



Company. 
Title 



the language. I ' 



12 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




"Some men see things as they are and say why. 
I dream things that never were and say, why not." 
ROBERT FRANCIS KENNEDY 

November 20, 1925-June 6, 1968 



Vision Associates, Inc., 680 Fifth Avenue, NewYorl( City 




JUNE, 1970 



13 



SLIDE FILMS ARE 
OUR SPECIALTY 

editing & composites 
signaling 

ALL types of mastering 
(records and tape) 

Processing Pressing 

APPROVED BY 

Audiscan 

DuKane cassettes & records 

La Belle 

Cartridge winding for all slide 
film machines and radio cart- 
ridges 

Tape Duplicating 

Fast, accurate service anywhere 
in the United States. 

(Tapes are on their way back 
to you in two days, records in 
five, after receipt of your tape.) 

VIRCO RECORDING CO. 

P. O. Box 185 

Monterey Parli, California 91754 

(213) 283-1888 



right off the newsreel . . . 

continued 



the Memorex duplication process 
should set magnetic tape as the 
standard mass visual medium. 

"Looking to the future, we feel 
that thermally duplicated chrom- 
ium dioxide tapes will offer a 
higher quality color video pack- 
age for the mass education and 
consumer markets," Spitters pre- 
dicted. "Like conventional mag- 
netic tape, the recording can be 
erased and reused indefinitely." 

Memorex gave the following 
reasons for the superiority of 
chromium dioxide as a recording 
medium: One, the material in- 
herently retains a greater mag- 
netic force than conventional 
oxides, known in the industry as 
residual magnetic flux density or 
retentivity. Two, the microscopic 
particles which hold the mag- 
netic charge have a uniform 
needle shape, called acicularity, 
which can be more efficiently 
aligned and packed with uniform 
density. Third is the thermal 
characteristics which allow mass 
duplication by the Memorex 
process. 



Ingenuics Contracts for 
3-D System Distribution 

Ingenuics. Inc., of Gaithers- 
burg, Maryland and FCS Com- 
munications Corp., of Rockville, 
Maryland have signed an agree- 
ment whereby FCS Communica- 
tions becomes the exclusive na- 
tional representative for market- 
ing the 1 6mm InVision System 
manufactured by Ingenuics. 

The InVision System permits 
any ordinary inovie to be pro- 
jected for 3-D viewing by large 
or small audiences and sells for 
just under $2,000. The agree- 
ment calls for the sale of at least 
900 Systems through 1975. 



CBS-EVR Opens Sales 
Subsidiary in Canada 

CBS Electronic Video Record- 
ing Limited has established EVR 
sales offices in Montreal, accord- 
ing to Robert E. Brockway, pres- 
ident. CBS Electronic Video Re- 
cording Division. 

Brockway said, "So much in- 



terest in EVR has been generated 
in Canadian industry and educa- 
tion circles that we have found 
it mandatory to locate in Cana- 
da." 

Director of Sales, Canada, is 
Arthur J. Sebesta. He has held 
this post nearly a year, based in 
New York, and has now taken 
up residence in Montreal. 

EVR's Canadian offices are 
located at the Banque Cana- 
dienne Nationale Building, Suite 
1822, 500 Place d'Armes (Mon- 
treal 126, Quebec). 



Wynne Award Films Begins 
Production in Dallas 

David Wynne, president of 
Dallas audio-visual company 
Wynne Enterprises, Inc., has an- 
nounced his company's expan- 
sion into motion picture produc- 
tion with the formation of Wynne 
Award Films. 

Heading up the new division 
are film and videotape veterans 
Bob Curran, Ken Marthey, and 
Yves Vezina. Together, these 
men bring to the Dallas market 
more than 40 years experience 
in film and videotape production. 




2 



11% ONE 



OCTOBER 27—30, 1970 
NEW YORK CITY 




Now in its 13th year, this leading FESTIVAL is the only one that 
encompasses all phases of film production: 



Filmstrips 

Industrial & Educational Films 
TV & Cinema Commercials 
Filmed Introductions 
Lead-in Titles 



Public Service TV Programs 
Multi-Media Productions 
Promotional Films 
Featurettes 
Newsfilms 



A Grand Award is given to the most outstanding entry in each 
section, and Gold, Silver and Bronze medals in each category 
under each section, as well as Special Achievement Awards are 
presented. 



For the first time, an international EXPOSITION & FAIR will be 
held in New York City which includes: 

• A buyer's and seller's market for Film and TV productions. 

• An exhibition of current equipment, techniques and services, 

with special emphasis on the latest achievements in Video- 
tape and Computerized Film Productions. 

• An extensive lecture program, workshop sessions, seminars, as 

well as continuous screenings of outstanding Film & TV 
productions. 



For further information, detailed program, exhibition space, seminar sessions, or visits to studios and laboratories, etc. 

write to: 

INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITIONS, INC., 121 West 45th Street, New York, N. Y. 10036 



14 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




This 4-iiich attache case 
opens to a movie theater. 




This elegant attache case is the most compact projector 
in the world. The Bohn Benton Institor is the first truly port- 
able, rear screen, Super 8 sound movie projector. It's auto- 
matic. It's set up and running in less than 20 seconds. And, 
it's cartridge loaded to eliminate film threading. Films can 
be changed in 2 seconds. 

It's also a front screen projector. On the spot, you can con- 
vert to project an auditorium-size, 6 foot wide picture. Zoom 
lens and external speakers are available for group viewing. 
The Bohn Benton Institor lets your films sell for you every 
day; on every call, in every office. This is the projector sales- 
men will carry because it looks good, it's small, and it's light. 
The newest recruit can give a professional presentation on 



every call. He can take your plant, 
your products and your services to the desk 
of every prospect. It's easy to give an Institor to 
every salesman because its price is as extraordinary as its 
size — $300, far less than the cost of other first-quality rear 
screen projectors without Institor's advantages. 
For more information, or an Institor demonstration, write 
Bohn Benton Inc, Dept. A, 110 Roosevelt Avenue, Mineola, 
New York 11501; or call (516) 747-8585. 

^^ Bohn Benton 



JUNE, 1970 



15 



People like to watch television. And 
closed-circuit television systems of 
various kinds have been used for 
years to train, to sell, to communicate. 

Butthetelevision systems avail- 
able have been too cumbersome, 
too complicated and too costly. 

Until now. Now there's a system 
for displaying audiovisual materials 



more economically and more 
conveniently than by either optical 
projection or videotape techniques. 

And they can be shown in nor- 
mal room light. 

The system. . .CBS Electronic 
Video Recording. 

The EVR System stores up to 
fifty minutes of monochrome 



pictures with sound, or 25 minutes 
of color pictures with sound, in a 
7-inch circular EVR Cartridge. 

The cartridge is placed on the 
EVR Player, where it threads itself 
automatically at the touch of a 
button. 

The EVR Player connects di- 
rectly to the antenna terminals of 



\bur salesmen miaht bring 

in extra business if they spent 

more time watching TV 




any standard television receiver. . . 
one or as many as you require. 

The EVR .System is fully de- 
scribed in an illustrated brochure 
that shows how your audiovisual 
materials can be converted to the 
EVR format for more convenient, 
flexible and economical display. 

To obtain a copy, fill out and 



mail the attached postpaid reply 
card. Or write on your company 
letterhead to Electronic Video 
Recording, a Division of Columbia 
Broadcasting System, Inc., 51 West 
52 Street, New York, N.Y. 10019. 



CHS 

KLKCTKOMC 

VIDKORKCORDING 

The economical way to distribute 

audiovisual materials for playback 

on any TV receiver. 




li 



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new 



Clipstrip' 
Speedlighting 

needs no floor space, 
mounts so fast 
you cut time and 
labor to 50%. 

It's another 
advance from 

B&M 



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LIGHTING EQUIPMENT 




Here's a quartz lighting 
system you can attach to 
walls, doors, ceilings, mount 
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fined areas. Get full details 
on Clipstrip kits and acces- 
sories. Write Dept. BS6-0 

* Patent 3.437,802 



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Our In-Depth Analysis of the 
176 Films for Overseas Festivals 

'T'lii Picture of the U.S.- 1970, as it 
-"- will be seen by those who attend over 
100 overseas film festivals this year, makes 
a fascinating mosaic of this country's re- 
cent factual, sponsored, government, medi- 
cal and industrial motion picture output. 

The 1 76 films selected by over 300 jur- 
ors representing The Council on Interna- 
tional Nonthcatrical Events (CINE) in- 
clude 19 "amateur" films. The other 157 
festival candidates, comprising this coun- 
try's "Olympic Team" which will compete 
for global festival honors this year, include 
66 motion pictures sponsored by U.S. bus- 
iness and industrial firms or trade groups. 
26 of these titles are specific industrial, 
sales promotion or safety subjects; nine ti- 
tles promote travel; three are on sports, 
two are agricultural; 10 titles are for pro- 
fessional medical audiences, three were 
sponsored for public health education; and 
1 3 television documentaries, principally for 
network telecasts, were also sponsored by 
U.S. companies. 

The Federal Government accounted tor 
20 of this year's CINE selections with the 
U.S. Information Agency represented by 
six titles. The Federal Aviation Agency, 
NASA, and the U.S. Atomic Energy Com- 
mission, with two titles each, accounted for 
another six of the Federal-sponsored en- 
tries. Other U.S. government selections rep- 
resented the Departments of Health, Edu- 
cation & Welfare; the Office of Economic 
Opportunity; The National Institutes of 
Health; the National Park Service (U.S. 
Dept. of the Interior) and the U.S. Navy. 

All of these 157 films of professional 
standard will receive ClNE's "Golden 
Eagle" award, symbolic of their overseas 
selection and of their "intrinsic cinematic 
excellence." Amateur film entries, ranging 
from advanced adult to youth-produced 
origination, are given the CINE "Eagle." 

Analysing the remaining 1970 selections, 
we note that 3 1 titles are for classroom and 
other educational purposes; the arts are 
represented by two films. Science subjects 
(non-sponsored) account for four titles; 
religion-oriented content was represented 
by 10 pictures and a social-documentary 
was a single entry. Eleven of this year's 
selections were in the "experimental" cate- 



gory and three others were "entertainment" 
short subjects. 

Was their any kind of pattern in the 
factual business-industrial subject area this 
year? Advanced technology, represented by 
such titles as £55, // ConUln'r Be Done and 
Light, all sponsored by American Telephone 
& Telegraph Co., and Micro, sponsored by 
the Western Electric Co. appeared to serve 
that area. As did Ore to Core — ami Be- 
yond, sponsored by United Nuclear Corpo- 
ration, and Freedom to Explore, offered by 
the Alabama Space & Rocket Center at 
Huntsville. 

Public health concerns were illuminated 
by Please Hurry, a New York Telephone- 
sponsored title; Driving and Drugs, spon- 
sored by General Motors; Second Sight. 
sponsored by The Eye Bank for Sight Res- 
toration; and What Will Poor Robin Do 
Then? underwritten by Merck. Sharp & 
Dohme. 

Corporate imagery brought CINE Re- 
f lections of a Company, sponsored by Crown 
Zellerbach; and The Lively World of Great 
Nortliern (Great Northern Railway). Fi- 
nancial market operations were clarified by 
Market in Motion sponsored by The New 
York Stock Exchange. A lively interpreta- 
tion of the distaff side of marketing is shown 
in Woman Is. sponsored by American Stan- 
dard. The American Sheep Producers Coun- 
cil with Build the Land and the National 
Broiler Council film Chicken. American 
Style represented a diminished sponsored- 
agricultural category. 

The air transport industry was again well- 
represented, especially with sponsored trav- 
el films, where Pan American World Air- 
ways had Grand Tour, TWA sponsored East 
Africa: and United Air Lines took viewers 
to Los Angeles. Other noteworthy travel- 
film sponsors included Continental Oil with 
Four Seasoiis of Yellowstone; Kiekhaefer- 
Mercury. with Inland Sea Odyssey; and 
Eastman Kodak, Brand New Day (San 
Francisco-oriented) . 

A major technological achievement, the 
voyage of the 5.5. Manhattan, dealing with 
the Arctic route to Alaska's new oil discov- 
eries, was contributed by the Humble Oil 
& Refining Co. 

There were other outstanding selections 

from U.S. business and industry sources. 

Continued on page 22 



20 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



There's nothing new about 

a fihn lab. 



Nothing &ncy. 

Nothing spectacular. 

Nothing dramatic. 

Nothing glamorous. 



It's just the place with the respon- 
sibiHtv of printing and processing every- 
thing vou've struggled to capture on film. 

You want perfect prints. Usually in 
quantity. Always on a rigid schedule. 

And no lab understands this better 
than Cine .Magnetics. 

It's why we've invested so heavily 
in modern equipment, like our new high- 
speed Optronics .Mark X Qiiad Printer 
and our new Filmline black-and-white 
processor. 

It's wh\- we've created new facilities 
and enlarged old ones. 



And it's why we've accepted only 
the most experienced people. 

Today, we have a complete 8mm, 
Super 8mm and i6mm center for motion 
picture duplication and preprint services. 

(The man to call: Ed Schuller, 
General Manager. He'll be glad to discuss 
your print needs, arrange a tour of the lab, 
or send one of our salesmen to see you.) 

We print. We process. We load car- 
tridges; Kodak, Technicolor, Fairchild, 
Jayark, Bohn-Benton and others. 

Not terribly e.xciting. 

But incredibly professional. 



Cine Magnetics Film Laboratory 

A DIVISION OF CINE MAGNETICS, INC. 

520 North Barry Avenue, Mamaroneck, M Y 1054 3 i9 14) 698-3434 
New York Receiving Center 202 East 44tri St, (2 1 2) 682-2780 



JUNE, 1970 



21 



How can a 



Just bring your undeveloped 
original for processing and dailies 
to DU ART. At the same time bring 
your tapes, and our Sound 
Department will transfer your sound 
dailies to 16mm or 35mm magnetic 
free -you pay only for the mag stock. 

Your work print and transferred mag 
track will be ready the next day. 



For further information on 'how' 
call Paul Jaeger, PL 7-4580 

All Processing of Original, Prints and Sound by 



T 



camera eye 



DU ART BLDG.. 245 W. 55 ST., N.Y., N.Y. 10019 



continued 



IBM World Trade Corporation is siiowing 
Of Men and Demons at that company's 
Expo 70 exhibit in Osaka, Japan. The film 
should be a widely-distributed festival en- 
try in other parts of the globe. 

Sales promotion, marketing and graphic 
arts-related subjects from U.S. firms in- 
clude Subject: Packaging, sponsored by the 
Forest Products Division of Owens-Illinois; 
We Used to Call It Printing, sponsored by 
E. I. duPont de Nemours; See Where Fash- 
ion is Going, from Celanese Fibers Market- 
ing; and Simmons Mattress, a Simmons 
Company entry. In this area. Threshold of 
Tomorrow, sponsored by the Masonite Cor- 
poration, presages a too-long deferred build- 
ing boom. 

For troubled times 

Of special import in these troubled times 
is the Washington Metropolitan Police De- 
partment's sponsorship of Some to Demon- 
strate — Some to Destroy. Other current 
American public concerns are reflected in 
a number of 1970 CINE selections treating 
social problems and in those dealing with 
efforts to preserve man's environment and 
the balance of nature. Nine of the "Golden 
Eagle" award-winners fell into each of 
these latter two categories. 

Because these overseas festival entries 
are selected through an exhaustive series of 
nationwide regional and national screenings 
(with more than 300 jurors participating) 
they deserve careful, thoughtful analysis. 
Juror representation always includes special- 
ists in subject-matter fields as well as nation- 
ally-known film executives and critics. 

The "Golden Eagle" and "CINE Eagle" 
citations will be presented to producers and 
sponsors of these films at CINE's Awards 
Ceremony and Exhibition of Films of Merit 
to be held November 12-13 in Washington, 
D.C. And on that occasion, international 
trophies will also be presented by ambassa- 
dors and other diplomats representing lands 
where the festivals were held. 

A final note: a sizeable group of network 
television documentaries was represented in 
this year's selections. Sponsors of these in- 
clude Armstrong Cork, the American Gas 
Association; General Electric, 3M Com- 
pany and North American Rockwell. Spon- 
sors of professional medical films worth not- 
ing include Eli Lilly & Co.; Ortho Pharma- 
ceutical Corp.; Hoffman-LaRoche (RE- 
COM ) ; Eaton Laboratories and the Upjohn 
Company. — OHC 



NEW IS BEING DIFFERENT 



A.V.E. CANARY 16MM MAGNETIC 
OPTICAL SOUND PROJECTOR 




A 16mm incandescent projector with needle 
sharp picture and superb optical or mag- 
netic sound. Featuring automatic loop set- 
ter, forward, reverse, slow speed, stop 
frame, remote control. 



A.V.E. 1200 
CAROUSEL SLIDE PROJECTOR 




Double the light output of the ordinary 
ektagraphic slide projector for big screen 
presentations. 



A.V.E. X-300 16MM MAGNETIC 
OPTICAL XENON SOUND PROJECTOR 




A high intensity small package for big 
screens and large audiences. Fully portable. 



A.V.E. X-500 
CAROUSEL XENON SLIDE PROJECTOR 




A high intensity "souped up" slide projec- 
tor for screen sizes up to 40 feet with bril- 
liant color rendition. 



A.V.E. POWERHOUSE 
WIDESCREEN FILMSTRIP PROJECTOR 




Super wide horizontal frame format with 
high speed advance and variable pano- 
ramic craw'.. Also adaptable for xenon light 
source. 



A.V.E. "LOOPER" 

CONTINUOUS 16MM SOUND 

PROJECTOR 




Excel'ent front and rear projection for 
repetitive programming with minimal film 
wear. Features dependable film looping 
device, variab'e loop feed and quality 
sound. 



A.V.E. Corporation specializes in being different and offers a unique line of audiovisual equipment and accessories 
including programmers, special lenses and dissolve and fade devices for purchase and rental. Literature and prices 
on request. 

COMPLETE LINE OF 35MM PROJECTORS AND AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT ALSO AVAILABLE 



AVE. CORPORATION 

250 WEST 54th STREET . NEW YORK, N. Y. 10019 • (212) 757-0552 . Cable Address "AVEMANSA" 



JUNE, 1970 



23 



LA BELLE 

Audience-Rated 
A/V EQUIPMENT 

•35 MM FILMSTRIP 

with interchangeable programs: 




LOOK INTO 



LA BELLE COURIERS I 

Completely portable— rechargeable 
battery — instant play. 




LA BELLE SENTINEL 35 

Semi-portable. TV-like, self-con- 
tained for small groups or in carrels, 

•16 MM FILMSTRIP 

Featuring 3-WAY COMMPAK Car- 
tridge interchangeable in "16" 
series: 



ip.r 



h"**!! 



Continuous loop visuals with con- 
tinuous loop sound permanently 
synchronized; slip in and show. 




LA BELLE COURIER* 16 

Portable — take to audience. AC 
operation — COMMPAK Cartridge. 




LA BELLE SENTINEL 16 

Semi-portable — self-contained: 
place where needed. COMMPAK 
Cartridge. 




LA BELLE TUTOR 16 

Projected image for groups. COMM- 
PAK Cartridge. Available soon. 

•sight/sound sync 

Adds sound and activates visuals 
for remote control filmstrip or slide 
projectors: 









LA BELLE PLA-MATIC 83 

Compact — ideal for built-in appli- 
cations. Continuous loop tape 
sound. 

BULLETINS AVAILABLE ON ABOVE 
LA BELLE A/V EQUIPMENT 



LA BELLE 



audio/visual equipment 



• •• 



the right answer to your problem 



In communications, audio/visual is the current 
magic word ... be it a sales story, assembly 

instruction, employee indoctrination, employee 
training, worker guidance, public Information, 

or the new dimension In education. 

Just having pictures and sound Is not enough . . . 
there must be a dramatic, convincing presentation . . . 

and that presentation needs proper "audience- 
rated" dependable equipment. 

LaBelle offers a reputable line of reliable 
audio/visual equipment. Descriptive literature is free. 

Contact V. M. Ivie, Manager, Audio/Visual Sales, 
LaBelle Industries, Inc., 502 S. Worthlngton St., 
Oconomowoc, Wisconsin 53066. 




LA BELLE Indust: 



n 



If it's LaBelle, you can be sure! 



THE A-V 
CALENDAR 



JUNE 

AIA Industrial Film Festival, June 14-17, 
Montreal, Canada. 

Hemisfilm 70 film festival, June 18-22, 
San Antonio Convention Center, San An- 
tonio, Texas. 

Atlanta International Film Festival, June 
22-27, Atlanta, Georgia. 



JULY 

NAVA Institute for Audiovisual Selling, 
July 12-16, Indiana University. Spon- 
sored by the National Audio-Visual Asso- 
ciation. 

National Audio-Visual Association Annual 
Convention, July 18-21, Sheraton-Park 
Hotel, Washington, D.C. 



AUGUST 

9th International Congress on High-Speed 
Photography, August 2-7, Denver Hilton 
Hotel, Denver, Colorado. 

American Management Association Annual 
Conference & Exposition on Education 
and Training, August 3-7, New York 
Hilton, New York. 

International Convention of the Photo- 
graphic Society of America, August 18- 
22, Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 



Animation Workshop, August 24-Sept. 4, 
Ohio State University campus, sponsored 
by the University Film Association and 
Ohio State University. 



OCTOBER 

13th International FQm & TV Festival of 
New York. October 27-30, Americana 
Hotel, New York City. 



NOVEMBER 

nth Aimual Information Film Producers 
of America (IFPA) Conference, Novem- 
ber 4-7, Ne\\T3orter Inn, Newport Beach, 
California. 



1970 CINE Awards Ceremony and Ex- 
hibition of Films of Merit, November 
12-13, Washington, D.C. Presented by 
the Council on International Nonthe- 
atrical Events. 



24 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



f 










"Cheshire Puss," said Alice, 
'would you tell me please, which 
way I ought to go from here?" 



"That depends a good deal on where you 
want to get to" said the Cat. 

"I don't much care where—" said Alice. 

"Then it doesn't matter which way you 
go;' said the Cat. 

If you don't care about the quality of 
your filmstrips or color slide duplicates, it 
doesn't matter where you go. Any labora- 
tory will do. But, if you care enough to get 
the very best, come to Frank Holmes Lab- 
oratories. Here you will find an outstand- 
ing enthusiasm for perfection in every 
department. Letters from customers a 
over the world praise the zealous care we 
give each job, no matter how large or how 
small. Try us on your next job 
. . . and find out for yourself! 

Write for our new Catalog 



FRANK HOLMES LABORATORIES, inc. 

1947 FIRST STREET • SAN FERNANDO, CALIFORNIA ■ PHONE: (213) 365-4501 




JUNE, 1970 



25 



M.T. E. Recording & 
Projection Equipment 

■ System Engineering 

■ Automated technique 

■ Reversible sync-interlock operation 

For your sound studio, screening 
room, preview room and 
conference room. 




MAGNA-TECH ELECTRONIC 

630 Ninth Avenue / New York, N.Y. 10036 



, INC. 



26 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



AUDIOVISUALS OF THE 1970s 



NEW EQUIPMENT, with greater ease 
of use and improved reliability, chal- 
lenges the industrial audio visual user to 
develop (create) better software in the 
effort to communicate via the projected 
image and the recorded voice. 

The decade of the 70's promises to ful- 
fill the vision of the pioneers of the cine- 
matic process, that the dramatic impact of 
the projected image, with its great memory 
retention facility, will come into daily usage 
by salesmen, trainers and educators. The 
people who will take the time to program 
a film showing are already audio visual 
users. The expansion of the industry must 
come from the layman who can't be bother- 
ed with set up time but who wants instant 
projection as a supplement to his capability. 

Nor is the universal machine that ac- 
cepts any format and comes with a simple 
on/off switch just around the corner. What, 
then, can be expected of the new equip- 
ment? 

1. Elimination of threading. 

2. Projection under existing room con- 
ditions. 

3. Increased reliability. 

4. More presentations, longer materials 
life. 

5. Greater portability. 

6. Adaptability to various audience 
sizes. 

No one piece of equipment is accom- 
pUshing these criteria, so let's take each 
format and analyze the newest items. Su- 
per 8mm and videotape indicate the great- 
est portion of the audio visual industry's ex- 
pansion and the greatest emphasis is on de- 
velopments in this area. 

To check on the acceptance of Super 
8 as compared to the older Regular 
8mm, we interviewed Allan Armour, the 
human encyclopedia of 8mm, at Projec- 
tion Systems, Inc. in New York. 

According to Armour all new 8mm pro- 
jectors being sold are Super 8. The thou- 
sands of Regular 8 projectors in the field 
are still very much in use and laboratory 
facilities are available nationally in both 
sound and silent Regular 8mm. Projection 
Systems still maintains a rental inventory 
of 375 Fairchild AV-400's which were man- 
ufactured in Regular 8mm. These projec- 
tors are still in constant demand as well 
as the hundreds of Super 8 units in the 
company's inventory. 

Super 8 

The continuous loop self-threading cart- 
ridge has been in field use for years with 
great success by some users and disastrous 
results by others. The more successful ones 
have analyzed the limitations of the format 
they have selected and produced program 



By EVERETT HALL 

Looking info /he decade ahead, Everett Hall 
analyzes what is available and what we may expect 
of presentation equipment in the near future. 



material which minimizes those limitations. 
Planning for a percentage of mechanical 
breakdowns is also necessary with schedul- 
ing of extra units to be used for substitution. 
Field personnel must be oriented to the 
failure possibility and the procedures to 
follow for replacement or repair. 

New projector models being placed on 
the market now are tackling the shortcom- 
ings of the old equipment. Bohn Benton, 
Fairchild, MPO and Technicolor — all 
have easy to carry, collapsible rear screens, 
front screen conversion capability, and 
driven turntables in the cartridge to elimi- 
nate film jamming. The higher light output 
of the quartz projection lamp and improved 
optics, substantially increases screen illumi- 
nation. All of these projectors produce a 
picture instantly on their built-in screen or 
a very acceptable wall projected picture by 
a simple mirror or lens change. Where the 
audience capability formerly was up to per- 
haps 20 people, the new machines can be 
used for 75 or more. 

As to sound track format, both magnetic 
and optical continue to be utilized. It is 
doubtful that any cartridge loading system 
will be created to utilize both types of track 
on the same projector. Both magnetic and 
optical sound produce entirely acceptable 
audio and laboratories now have duplica- 
tion techniques to produce either in any 
quantity. A prospective user should select 
a system for desirable projector features 
other than the type of sound track. Stand- 
ardization of the magnetic picture-to-sound 
relationship of Super 8 to the proposed 
18 frame sound advance is progressing, al- 
though different users are stimulating a 
greater variety of cartridges and projector 
models. 

Industry is showing a very definite pref- 
erence for the continuous loop in contrast 
to the educator who has continued to ask 
for the "return to a point and repeat" opera- 
tion. For this demand Kodak devised the 
Projection Cartridge. This "clamshell" type 
plastic case fits over a conventional 8mm 
reel and permits completely automatic film 
handling. The user is literally unable to 
touch the film. The cartridge cannot be re- 
moved from the projector until the film has 
re-wound completely. If the film is pro- 
jected to the end. the high speed re-wind is 
automatic. However, the user may push a 
switch and activate the re-wind function at 



any point during the showing. Cartridges 
will be available in 50', 100' and 400' sizes. 
Kodak has licensed numerous manufac- 
turers to use this cartridge system. 

The Fairchild-Eumig team, has already 
demonstrated a sound projector incorporat- 
ing this cartridge, with a memory to return 
to a point, then re-project that portion of 
the film. 

The audiovisual equipment used in sales 
and promotion will become less and less 
similar to that used in teaching, and as each 
expands there will be less compromising of 
the message to meet the limitation of the 
equipment. 

Much work is going on at the equipment 
design level to create projectors that will 
accept various types of cartridges. The edu- 
cator insists this is desperately needed but 
the un-answered question is, will the in- 
creased cost these accessories will add to 
the projectors be acceptable to the buyer? 

New 8mm equipment of the 70's includes 
the Rheem, a truly portable (l'/2 lbs), 
battery powered sound unit that is really 
a viewer rather than a projector. It has a 
continuous loop cartridge and variable 
speed. Also new. is the A. B. Dick projec- 
tor, a very compact unit with a rear screen, 
approximately 4"x5" and its own type cart- 
ridge. 

Closed Circuit TV 

CCTV is growing so fast, with such dif- 
ferent requirements, many A/V depart- 
ments wish video tape wasn't considered 
audiovisual. The most positive thought of 
the 70's is the standardization of Vi" video 
tape so that a tape recorded on one brand 
of equipment can be played on any other 
transport. The Japanese government is tak- 
ing the lead in promoting this standard, 
since much of the '^ " tape equipment is 
manufactured in Japan. Concurrently, how- 
ever, comes the announcement of still an- 
other tape width, % " from Sony, to be en- 
cased in a cassette for the same automatic 
operation as film cartridges. The Video- 
cassette will transmit color or black and 
white. Since this is a part of a complete sys- 
tems approach, Sony has addressed itself 
to the entire system: tape duplication with 
established pricing, cartridge loading and 
distribution techniques. The Sony cassette 
player has been demonstrated and is ex- 
Continued on next page 



JUNE, 1970 



27 



audiovisuals of the 70's 

continued 

pected on the market in 1971. This is an- 
other advance for the user who hasn't the 
time to become a technician before using 
a/v as a supplement in his own business. 
Ease of operation, along with the in- 
stantaneous playback features of video tape 
recording, allows utilization in areas not 
even considered for film systems. 

16mm 

Major improvements in 16mm projec- 
tion equipment and for that matter, the en- 
tire 16mm system are hard to find. Here is 
a well standardized format, mediocre in 
many ways, in which little research and 
development is taking place. Perhaps this 
is the curse of standardization, perhaps it 
is not the ideal film size of the future. Even 
if it is not, be assured that any 16mm pro- 
jector purchased in 1970 will still be pro- 
jecting 16mm film in 1975 and probably 
will be projecting 16mm film in 1980. After 
all, most 16mm projectors purchased in 
1950 are still in use today. Most of the 
manufacturers offer models with automatic 
threading and with the high light output of 
GE's Marc 300 lamp. 

Slides 

One of the most successful audio visual 
products ever built is the Carousel slide pro- 
jector and it continues to receive internal 
improvement and new accessories annually. 
The newest accessories are the filmstrip 
adaptor and a variety of extremely wide 
angle lenses; especially useful in display 
work. Dozens of smaller manufacturers of- 
fer specialized accessories for the Carousel. 

Bell & Howell has announced a unique 




ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

Known to many as "Mr. 8mm," Everett Hall 
has spent the past ten years pioneering and 
improving the 8mm format for industrial and 
educational use. Prior work included film 
production and distribution. Today he com- 
bines his varied experience as a consultant 
on audiovisuals and filmmaking. 



new slide storage device called "Cubitray." 
This very compact tray allows the projec- 
tionist to view the following slide to be 
projected. 

Two sound-on-slide systems have been 
announced, Kalart's Kalavox is a tiny tape 
cartridge mounted above each slide and 
permits up to 30 seconds of sound with 
each slide. 3M's Wollensak unit has the 
sound encircling the picture on a special 
mount. 

Filmstrip 

The greatest advance in filmstrip equip- 
ment is in combining of sound and picture. 
Most manufacturers have replaced the turn- 
table with the cassette player. The cues 
to advance the pictures are inaudible. 

The 16mm filmstrip allows the combin- 
ing of film and tape into a single compact 
cartridge. Both are conformed into con- 
tinuous loops and once syncronized, repeat 
continuously in sync. LaBelle and Audiscan 
make 16 mm filmstrip projectors and both 
use Vi" tape. 

The latest in sound filmstrip equipment 
has been announced by RCS and is sched- 
uled for mass production in 1971 using 
Super 8mm film and cassette-width tape in 
a tiny continuous loop cartridge. More 
than 600 frames of picture and 20 minutes 
of sound can be incorporated in one cart- 
ridge. 

Audio Tape 

Phillips is the hero in audio tape. Their 
most certainly profitable approach of al- 
lowing all competitors to use the cassette 
format has created a most desirable stand- 
ardization worldwide. Many modifications 
and accessories are now appearing for more 
versatile utilization. Cueing other equip- 
ment, such as projectors especially, is very 
popular. Pulsing generators built into por- 
table recorders for instant cueing are avail- 
able from Coxco, Elco and others. Since 
the cassette was designed for stereo use, 
one track is used for audio while the other 
carries the pulse cues. There are almost as 
many brands of cassette recorders and play- 
ers as there are portable radios and they 
range in price from $15 upward. The con- 
tinuous loop 1/4" tape cartridge is still avail- 
able for programs where rewinding is not 
desirable. 

Other New Items 

There is a compact overhead projector by 
Buhl which projects a 3"x4" transparency. 
This allows lantern slide type projection by 
a lecturer from the front of the room. 

Kodak's high reflectance EktaUte screen 
finds many uses for projecting in rooms 
which are impossible to darken. Sizes larger 
than the present 40"x40" as well as smaller 
ones are expected soon. 

Operating equipment by remote control is 
increasing. Graflex's Media III, a multi- 
media projector stand, comes with built in 



16mm film, slide and filmstrip projectors 
and any unit can be opertated and focused 
from a remote module. DuKane, Motiva 
and Spindler & Sauppe offer automatic 
electronic programmed operation of multi- 
ple projectors simultaneously, permitting 
dramatic multi-media presentations. 

By the mid-1970's, we will see random 
access selection of programs with all of to- 
day's cartridge loading equipment. Some 
systems will use dual transports, operating 
alternately with theatre type switch over. 
Long films can be played continuously with 
the film separated into 20 minute cartridge 
segments. The film "juke box" will become 
a practical reality for both entertainment 
and industry. 

Electronic Video Recording 

EVR, as CBS has trademarked it's new 
system, is again the marriage of advantages 
of two systems. The distribution is by fifm, 
in this case a black and white film even if the 
picture is color, with the picture shown on 
any television set, or for that matter up to 
40 monitors at once from one player. The 
player or film transport is a flying-spot 
scanner and also has a self-threading cart- 
ridge. CBS, in conjunction with Motorola 
is accepting responsibility for the entire sys- 
tem. They have built a special laboratory 
for the duplication of EVR prints. The price 
list has been published for black and white, 
which indicates that a subject of 10 minutes 
when ordered in quantities of 50 prints, 
will cost $10.60 per print complete with 
cartridge. Larger quantities cost correspond- 
ingly less. For instance, 1,000 prints of the 
same subject cost only $6.00 each. 

New Horizons in A/V 

All of the new cartridge load systems, 
Kodak's Projection Cartridge, Sonv's Video 
Cassette, and CBS' EVR a's well as RCA's 
electronic Video System utilizing hologramy, 
all hope to find a mass market in home con- 
sumption. If any or all of these systems are 
successful in this market, and there is every 
indication they all should have at least mod- 
erate success; then the creator of software, 
the film producer and the video producer 
will have demands for product far exceeding 
anything the industry has ever known. The 
one program, on one piece of film that today 
is broadcast to hundreds of thousands of 
homes, becomes thousands of programs on 
tens of thousands of pieces of film or tape 
or "Saran Wrap" as the system may require 
to satisfy individual needs or desires of the 
viewing audience. The entertainment giants 
of Hollywood will find they are competing 
for time on the same screen with subjects 
such as improving vocational skills, teach- 
ing a five year-old to read, learning a for- 
eign language and improving a golf swing. 

All in all, it looks like a great decade for 
audiovisuals — though it may show a slow 
start, waiting for the new equipment to be 
tested, proven and placed in volume field 
use. Cries for standardization will continue, 
and there will be some response but new 
equipment will continue to be devised to ful- 
fill special audio visual needs. • 



28 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



•TASTMAN KODAK COMPANY ha> 

■*-^ produced a pronunionul piece called 
'"Movies Move People." The basic thesis is 
true, for the expert use of a motion picture 
in any two-way coniniunication situation en- 
hances the chance of the message being re- 
ceived as sent. 

In addition, the utilization of the new 
super 8 medium in the presentation of sales 
messages and other important corporate 
communications can measurably contribute 
to your goals of increased profitability. 

Like many other corporate executives, 
you are periodically faced with the decision 
of how much of your sales dollar is going 
to be spent on promotion of your product. 
Historically, the budget has been broken 
down into direct sales and advertising (PR. 
sales promotion, corporate communica- 
tions'). Too often, however, the wall built un 
between direct sales and advertising expendi- 
tures negate real corporate intercommunica- 
tion relating to how dollars spent for one 
can truly benefit the other. 

The increasing inundation of our senses 
with messages from all sources has dulled 
our capability of keeping attuned to what 
is being said. We are suffering a form of 
communication pollution. 

The decision maker in the "go" or "no- 
go" buying situation is also proliferating in 
life. Quite simply, it is harder to ascertain 
just who is responsible for purchasing vour 
product . . . and in a direct sales situation, 
this state of affairs can be disastrous. 

These three basic trends call for a new- 
approach to corporate selling. With that 
goal in mind . . . that is. to use advertising 
dollars to promote direct sales . . . make 
your message stand out in the crowd . . . 
and reach the proper people . . . the use of 
the super 8 medium becomes increasingly 
more attractive. 

But how do you use it? Let's look at 
several examples. 

Company A is a motorcycle firm sell- 
ing motorcycles in the United States. With 
two-wheeled vehicle transportation on the 
increase, their challenge is to capture a 
larger share of the cxnandine two-wheeled 
vehicle market. Specific problem: How to 
reinforce the brand name in the minds of 
potential buyers (youth) and promote point 
of purchase involvement. 

The decision is made to make a 1 6mm 
motorcycle safety film and reduce it to super 
8 for rear-screen super 8 projection devices. 
The 16mm film is distributed to school sys- 
tems and clubs via existing sponsored dis- 
tribution methods and the super 8 projec- 
tors and films are placed at the point of 
purchase. 

Company A gains recognition by its ap- 
pearance in driver training classes and helps 
close the sale by reinforcement at point of 
purchase. Tt also contributes valuable in- 
formation to the driving public via the 
safety format. 

By judicious reworking of direct sales and 
advertising expenditures, the monies for the 
film production and distribution are made 
available. No longer are they just pouring 



SELL YOUR 
PRODUCT 
WITH SUPER 8 



By SAM GALE 

President 

Corser Enterprises 



Super 8 presentations of your corporate (ilm can be an 
important extension of your sales message . . . reaching an 
interested buying audience. Don't overlook Super 8 
for achieving economical added mileage out of existing 
films in a larger format. 



money down the same promotional pipeline. 
They're now using a portion of their dol- 
lars to make their message stand out in 
front of the person who is interested in buy- 
ing. The public relations value of the safety 
format is harder to measure, but we must 
assume it has a psychological value: buy 
safety. 

Company B is a ski manufacturing firm 
selling skis world-wide. Skiing is growing 
dramatically as an "in" sport; their chal- 
lenge is to garner a larger share of the spe- 
cialty ski market. Specific problem: Utilize 
their skis during the instruction phase of 
learning to ski . , , prior to purchase. It is 
fair to assume that a good percentage of 
buyers will purchase their brand of skis 
after learning to ski with them. 

The decision is made to make a 16mni 
film designed to sell Company B"s method 
of learning to ski (without effort) to resort 
ski schools and ski shops. 

The film is reduced to super 8 and load- 
ed into a simple-to-operate cassette load 
projector. Company B sales executives then 
present their method to ski school opera- 
tors, pointing out the increased attendance 
benefits in direct sales confrontation. 

The same film is made available to ski 
shops on rear screen super 8 projectors 
where it entices the beginner to use this 
method. Supplementary material is given to 
the potential buyer indicating where he 



can obtain this type of instruction. 

Once again, the message is presented with 
reality at the point where the buyer must 
make a decision! 

Super 8 has advanced to the state where 
you now can make and/or convert your 
film messages to reliable, easy-to-make 
super 8 projection devices, Eastman, Fair- 
child, Technicolor, Bohn-Benton, Jayark, 
MPO-Videotronics , , , all sell "designed 
for the seventies" projection equipment. Al- 
most all of your major lab facilities are 
geared to print your film on this exciting 
new format. Film production companies are 
learning more about the production of rele- 
vant, short sales messages. 

Motion picture utilization in the sale of 
your product need not be an added expense 
to your overall budget. If properly produced 
and distributed, a motion picture can ac- 
tually produce visible sales results; it can, 
in effect, pay for itself. 

Your decision at this particular time in 
your corporate life should be: 

1 , What do we want to say? 

2, Who do we want to say it to? 

3, How can we place our message in 
front of the buyer with maximum im- 
pact? 

If you conscientiously answer these ques- 
tions, super 8 will be part of your answer. 
Use it , , . and profit from the experience. • 



JUNE, 1970 



29 



By JIM GIBSON 



NAC— One Stop Service 
For Government A-Vs 



Properly used and adm'mistered, the National Audiovisual 

Center could become the long needed central source of 

information and distribution of all government 

audiovisuals. It's off to a good start. 



pROBABLY THE MOST significant de- 
■'- velopment in the area of Federal Gov- 
ernment audiovisual service in recent years 
is the establishment of the National Audio- 
visual Center. NAC, to use its acronym, is 
a part of the National Archives and Records 
Service, the Government agency known well 
for its preservation of historical Govern- 
ment records. 

NAC is an audiovisual first. It is new. 
There has never been anything like it before 
in Government. It is a central information 
point or clearinghouse for all audiovisual 
materials produced by or for the Federal 
Government. It is also a central sales and 
distribution point for those materials which 
Federal agencies deposit with the Center. 
It serves the Government and the public 
on matters relating to motion pictures, film- 
strips, slide sets, audio tapes, video tapes, 
and special audiovisual packets. It is almost 
a one-stop Government audiovisual service 
center. 

The National Audiovisual Center was 
authorized by the Bureau of the Budget on 
October 30, 1968. It became fully opera- 
tive July 1, 1969. The Director, with a small 
staff dedicated to giving technical assistance 
to Federal agencies in the production, pro- 
cessing, and distribution of audiovisual ma- 
terials, is located in the National Archives 
building on Pennsylvania Avenue in down- 
town Washington, D.C. NAC's information, 
sales, and distribution staffs are housed in 
the sprawling Washington National Records 
Center building a few miles away in Suit- 




Jim Gibson, director of the National Audiovisual 
Center. 



land, Md. Here, in an eye-popping struc- 
ture designed to hold four million cubic feet 
of paper records, a few thousand cubic feet 
have been earmarked for the storage and 
servicing of audiovisual materials. 

All Federal agencies are required to fur- 
nish the National Audiovisual Center with 
information on audiovisual materials which 
they produce. This information is necessary 
for NAC to serve as a central information 
point or clearinghouse. Collecting and filing 
this information for immediate retrieval is 
no small task. More than one hundred dif- 
ferent Departments, agencies, offices, and 
activities of the Federal Government pro- 
duce films and other audiovisual materials. 
According to a survey made by the Na- 
tional Archives and Records Service in 1967 
Federal agencies produced that year ap- 
proximately 7,500 motion pictures, 100 
filmstrips, 75,000 sound recordings, 5,000 
video tapes, 4,500 slide sets, and more than 
a million still photographs. 

No wonder a majority of the representa- 
tives of 32 major Government Departments 
and Independent Agencies attending an 
early meeting of the Federal Interagency 
Media Committee admitted they didn't 
know what audiovisual materials the other 
was producing. A subsequent recommenda- 
tion of that Committee resulted in the U.S. 
Office of Education conducting a study to 
determine the feasibility of establishing in 
Government a central audiovisual informa- 
tion clearinghouse. Further studies by the 
National Archives and Records Service and 
the Bureau of the Budget indicated the need 
for a central sales point and other central- 
ized audiovisual support services. Most Fed- 
eral agencies use the sales point and a few 
are taking advantage of the centralized free 
loan and rental distribution point. Today 
NAC's central information point for Gov- 
ernment produced audiovisual materials has 
collected catalogs and lists from all Federal 
agencies. Its staff is developing a special 
reporting form. When it has been com- 
pleted all agencies will be asked to com- 
plete the form as new audiovisual materials 
are developed and approved for release. 
NAC is also collecting catalogs and lists of 
films, filmstrips, and film loops from all 
known non-government sources. For it soon 
learned that searchers are primarily inter- 
ested in the subject matter and content. 
Normally, "who produced it" is of less sig- 



nificance. All activity is geared toward 
achieving in the not too distant future a 
completely automated data bank or central 
file. 

To avoid duplication of information re- 
search NAC. when possible, asks the in- 
quirer to furnish NAC a listing of the ma- 
terials he has already collected on the 
subject. The resulting cooperation enables 
NAC not only to perform its mission but 
further enlarge its growing bank of subject 
information. All inquirers names are placed 
on NAC's mailing list to receive pertinent 
information as it becomes available. 

On July I, 1969, the National Audio- 
visual Center became the central sales point 
for most audiovisual materials produced by 
Federal Government agencies. For 28 years 
a series of contractors had sold U.S. Gov- 
ernment films to the public. Originally 
awarded by the U.S. Office of Education 
in 1941 to sell prints of Government pro- 
duced films and filmstrips for training in- 
dustrial war workers, the contract was termi- 
nated June 30, 1969. Over the years, at one 
time or other, most Government agencies 
used the contract to make prints of their 
films and filmstrips readily available. With 
the change of contractors in recent years, 
too much time elapsed before the new con- 
tractor could meet requests. More agencies 
refused to use the contract and would-be 
purchasers became discouraged with delays 
encountered. Most agencies expressed the 
desire for a central sales point in Govern- 
ment. 

Today, NAC receives approximately 600 
inquiries a week regarding the purchase of 
Government audiovisual materials, primari- 
ly films and filmstrips! These inquiries are 
made up of preview requests (to view the 
film prior to puhchase), requests for quo- 
tation of prices, requests to determine avail- 
ability of specific films and actual orders. 
Inquiries regarding sales have been received 
for every state and as many foreign coun- 
tries. Both inquiries and sales have shown 
a marked increase with publication in No- 
vember 1969 of NAC's first sales catalog 
of approximately 3,500 U.S. Government 
films and filmstrips. The prices of all mo- 
tion pictures listed in the catalog are for the 
16mm size. However, NAC offers these 
films in other formats as well. For example, 
all films listed (if appropriate) are offered 
for sale in 8mm, EVR (electronic video 
recording) when available, and video tape. 
Most purchasers order 16mm prints, but 
NAC anticipates an ever increasing flow of 
orders for 8mm. Copies of the catalog are 
available on request from the National 
Audiovisual Center (GSA), Washington, 
D.C. 20409. 

Most U.S. Government agencies use 
NAC as the sales outlet for prints of films 
approved for public sale. Major users of 
this service are: the Agency for Interna- 
tional Development; the Department of De- 
fense, including the U.S. Air Force, the 
U.S. Army, the U.S. Navy and the U.S. 
Marine Corps; the Department of Health, 
Education, and Welfare, including the So- 
cial and Rehabilitation Service, the Social 



30 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



Security A(Jministratii>n. the L'.S. Office of 
Education, and the L'.S. Public Health Serv- 
ice: the Department of Housini; and Urban 
Development; the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration; the U.S. Atomic 
Energy Commission; the U.S. Information 
Agency; the I'.S. Office of Economic Op- 
portunity; the I'.S, Post Office Department; 
the U.S. Department of State; the Depart- 
ment of Transportation, including the Fed- 
eral Aviation Administration, the. Federal 
Highway .Administration, and the U.S. 
Coast Guard; and the Veterans Adminis- 
tration. NAC also sells foreign language 
tapes and texts for the Foreign Service In- 
stitute of the Department of State. 

During its first year of operation NAC 
anticipates that schools, colleges, industry, 
other groups and individuals will purchase 
appro.ximately 10,000 16mm prints. 2,000 
8mm prints, hundreds of filmstrips and 
slide sets, some video tapes, and a few hun- 
dred foreign language tape sets. A good 
start has been made. Sales are running 
higher than anticipated. The most popular 
sale item has been NASA's moon walk 
film Eagle Has Landed: the Flight of Apollo 
II. More than 1,500 prints of this historic 
film have been purchased by individuals and 
institutions around the world from the Na- 
tional Audiovisual Center. 

Free loan film distribution is a third 
audiovisual support service offered by NAC 
to Federal agencies and the public. This 
service is "free" to the borrower but the 
sponsoring Federal agency pays NAC's 
costs. Comparable commercial service is 
known as "sponsored film distribution." 

Most Federal agencies that produce mo- 
tion pictures use an "in house" type of film 
distribution system. A few of these systems 
are very good, others are "so-so." A grow- 
ing number of agencies are using commer- 
cial distribution companies. NAC encour- 
ages the use of an efficient, professional 
system. 

NAC is now handling films on free loan 
for three units of the Department of Health, 
Education, and Welfare: Social and Re- 
habilitation Service, the National Institute 
of Dental Health, and the National Institute 
of Mental Health. Three other agencies 
using this service are the Agency for Inter- 
national Development, the Department of 
Labor's Job Corps, and the General Serv- 
ices Administration. An interesting develop- 
ment in this area is the establishment of a 
Narcotics and Drug Abuse Film Library 
by the National Institute of Mental Health. 
NAC is operating this library of popular 
films for NIMH. 

In addition to providing a central infor- 
mation and sales point and offering a cen- 
tra! free loan and rental audiovisual distri- 
bution service, the National Audiovisual 
Center also provides, to Federal agencies, 
if requested, a type of audiovisual techni- 
cal assistance. This service is designed to 
help those agencies that need advice and 
assistance relating to the production, pro- 
cessing, and distribution of audiovisual ma- 
terials. Many Federal agencies and offices 
do not have professional audiovisual staff 



members. Nor do they have contracting offi- 
cers familiar in detail with prt)ducing, pro- 
cessing, and distributing motion pictures and 
other audiovisual materials. NAC's techni- 
cal assistance staff is available to assist them 
if they want such help. In addition the staff 
is now endeavoring to develop basic order- 
ing agreements for motion picture produc- 
tion services, motion picture laboratory 
services and motion picture distribution 
services. When completed by GSA these 
agreements will be available for use by all 
Federal agencies on a voluntary basis. Other 
such agreements may be developed in other 
audiovisual areas if desired by enough agen- 
cies. Commercial producers, laboratories, 
and distributors appear to desire and wel- 
come this type of service. It should result 
in more and better audiovisual materials 
being produced and distributed for the Fed- 
eral Government. 

Do these four services make the National 
Audiovisual Center a one-stop Government 
audiovisual service center? Not quite. What 
about stock frontage? In the near future 
NAC plans to have the beginnings of a 
central motion picture stock footage de- 
pository for all non-military Federal agen- 
cies. If a modern information storage and 
retrieval system is installed and if this sys- 
tem can be made compatible with the 
one(s) used by Army, Navy, and Air Force 
Film Depositories so that a stock searcher 
can search and retrieve information on all 
Government stock footage at either in- 
stallation, then NAC will have a one-stop 
Government audiovisual service center. 

Considering these services and the archi- 
val audiovisual holdings of the National 
Archives, the audiovisual inventory of the 
National Archives and Records Service 
should be almost as old as the art of film 
making and almost as up-to-date as the 
latest Government film release. The objec- 
tive of the National Audiovisual Center is 
to serve Federal Government agencies and 
the public and to achieve more efficient and 
wider use of Government audiovisual ma- 
terials. It should prove to be a valuable 
resource center. • 




Les Greenberg and Bill Taylor of the information 
branch review NAC plans. 




In the print inspection section, Ralph Collett, 
chief of the NAC sales branch checks a print 
with Elizabeth West. 



NAC film shipping department has been busier 
and grown faster than anticipated. 




JUNE, 1970 



31 



DON'T OVERLOOK SLIDEFILMS 



Properly prepared slidefilms can be every bit as dramatic 
and effective as a motion picture in specific situations. 
Many "new" techniques are old stuff, enjoying a renais- 
sance, not a birth . . . and they are economical. Spencer 
Bostwick provides some helpful pointers on the production 
of a successful slidefilm. 



By SPENCER BOSTWICK 

Planfilm, Inc. 



W/^E ALL AGREE that tremendous 
" changes have taken place in motion 
picture techniques in recent years. The im- 
pact of these changes on the business mo- 
tion picture was discussed in the February 
issue of Business Screen. 

I would like to point out what the effects 
have been on business slide films. Recent 
developments in cinematography have in no 
way threatened the existence of the slide 
film. The two good reasons for making a 
slide film instead of a movie — limited 
budget and limited projection facilities — 
are still with us. and always will be. 

But the slide film has not remained un- 
changed. Many of the ideas and techniques 
that characterize the contemporary motion 
picture can be used in the making of the 
slide film. Actually, of course, many of 
these "new" techniques are old stuff, enjoy- 
ing a renaissance, not a birth. 

Here are some of the things we do in mo- 
tion pictures that we can also do in slide 
films: 

The fluid camera. With today's light- 
weight, hand-held motion picture camera, 
the photographer can seek out interesting 
subject matter, rather than waiting, frozen 
to a tripod, for the action to come to him. 
The slide film photographer, with his 35mm 
SLR's can do the same thing. 

The frame shot uses out-of-focus fore- 
ground shapes and patterns to frame the 



ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

Spencer Bostwick, owner of Planfilm, Inc. 
and Spencer Bostwick's Photography is a 
professional audiovisual writer and planner, 
noting that he is not a producer. His back- 
ground includes advertising agency writing 
and visual planning for the U.S. Navy and 
Oeveste Granducci. He believes that slide 
films could be "far better than they are," 
and adds, ". . . they just don't get the artis- 
tic attention motion pictures do. A condi- 
tion that should be amended!" 



action — obviously as possible in the slide 
film as in the movie. This includes exotic 
shots, such as the action being shown in 
the rear view mirror of a car, reflected in 
the lens of dark glasses, and so forth. Imag- 
ination is as fruitful behind a Nikon as an 
Arri. 

The extreme close-up adds interest to 
both movie and slide film. A recent the- 
atrical short, "Rodeo," built great suspense 
and gave a fresh look to an old subject by 
telling its story almost exclusively in CUs — 
CU of bloodshot eye of enraged steer hero 
is about to ride; CU of steer's snout, drool- 
ing and menacing; CU of hero painstakingly 
adjusting the rope that will hold him to 
the animal; CU of hand, trembling ever so 
lightly, as glove is pulled on, etc. 

The interesting camera angle is another 
result of the camera becoming free of the 
tripod. We can show the subject as it's seen 
by the eye of the worm, or the eye of the 
helicopter pilot. No reason to use tired 
camera angles. 

The compression effect from the use of 
long focal-length lenses adds impact to 
movie and slide film alike. Multiple images 
are in vogue, and are obtained in slide film 
photography as in motion pictures: by 
double exposure or masking in the camera, 
or later, optically. 

To me, lighting is the secret of exciting 
photography of any kind. The fast new 
emulsions — particularly color — make 
available light shooting so practical, lights 
are almost a thing of the past. There is no 
question in my mind that nature, in its own 
way, develops far more compelling lighting 
situations than the typically bland, asceptic 
effects usually associated with planned, arti- 
ficial studio lighting. It means throwing 
away the book, because the book says to 
avoid the back lighting, edge lighting, and 
high-contrast hghting that abounds so dra- 
matically in nature. 

I believe that night scenes are a much- 
neglected source of interesting photographic 
effects, available, of course, whether you're 
making a movie or a slide film. Why should 
everything be shot in daylight? A recent 
script-photography assignment for HUD 
called for a shot of people getting off a 



bus. Sounds easy, but every shot was strict- 
ly blah — until we took it at night. That 
gave it some whammy. Moral: don't be 
afraid of the dark! 

In addition to night scenes, the aware 
photographer has come to realize the drama 
in bad weather. We have bad weather, so 
why always wait for a sunny day to shoot? 
A recent film, written by a friend of mine, 
begins with a compelling scene of men rac- 
ing on foot in a fog. I thought it was great. 
He explained that his script didn't call for 
fog — it was just there the morning of the 
shooting, and so they shot it. It makes a 
whizzaroo out of an otherwise so-so open- 
ing. 

The portable tape recorder has, of course, 
given sound the spontaneity to match the 
fluidity of contemporary photography. You 
can make sound pickups anywhere, and if 
there's realistic background noise, so much 
the better. The only reservation about the 
use of sound in slide films that we hold 
with is the caveat against trying to use "lip 
sync" dialogue against a still picture of the 
speaker. In such spots, we use a picture 
that doesn't feature the speaker's mouth, 
or cut away from him entirely. Most slide 
films don't come close to using spontaneous 
sound and sound effects to their full po- 
tential. 

But a picture may not need any sound 
at all — if it's a real story-telling slide. The 
rapid, short cuts used so much in contem- 
porary movie work have a direct counter- 
part in slide films: five, six, or seven slides 
in quick succession without narration. 

In motion pictures, we're currently seeing 
considerable use of the freeze frame, and 
slowed-down action, as in the final scenes in 
Elvira Madigan, Butch Cassidy, Bonnie and 
Clyde. These techniques are effective and, 
although they deal with motion, they have 
their counterparts in the slide film. To see 
this, one must understand that pace in a 
film is a relative matter. Thus, a five-sec- 
ond cut in a movie (or a slide held for five 
seconds) is "fast" if the previous cuts or 
slides were seen for, say, twenty seconds. If 
they endured for three seconds, the five- 
second cut is. relatively, "slow." This means 
that the pacing in a slide film can be every 
bit as interesting as in a movie. 

The variety of pacing that's possible in 
a slide film is another factor, I think, that 
is badly neglected. A quick glance at your 
slide film script will tell you if it has inter- 
esting pacing. If the amount of narration 
per slide varies noticeably, and some slides 
have no narration at all, you've got rhythm. 
If each slide has a neat block of narration 
the same length as every other slide, watch 
out — you may be handling a bomb! • 



32 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



iiOOUND SLIDEFILM is finished! Its 

^ through! The joint meeting of the 
military and industry just decreed that there 
would be no more sound slidet'ihii," 

This is the first thought that flashed into 
my head when Lon Gregory asked me to 
get together this paper on the future of 
sound filmstrip (sound slidefilm). 

Startling! It certainly shook me! When 
Ott Coelln told me this, he was reporting 
the conclusions of a joint Washington meet- 
ing of the top audio-visual authorities of the 
military and industry. In 1947. when he 
said it, they were practically the only users 
of sound slidefilm, and sound slidefilm was 
my only source of bread and butter. 

That was 1947. Now, as every good hind- 
sighter knows, there are hundreds of times 
more sound filmstrip projectors and thou- 
sands more titles. And, since Howard Tur- 
ner's standards committee switched the 
name to 'Sound Filmstrip" only us old hands 
refer to the medium as "Sound Slidefilm" 
like some old timey pilot referring to "The 
Aid Corps." 

So what is the future of sound filmstrip? 

I PREDICT: As a Libra probing the 
precession of the equinoxes, I see Battery 
Liberating Portability. I see Signal Control 
in conjunction with Programming. I see end- 
less Loop maledicting Rewind. I see Auto- 
Pause prcdicatin'j Response. I see Synch- 
Lock in juxtaposition with Cart-Lock. Self 
Training and Automated Selling are in the 
House of Cartridge Load. All Siens are in 
phase foreshowing Expansion. Still Pictures 
and Recorded Sound is in the ascendant. 
This is the beginning of the Age of Sound 
Filmstrip .... 

OK. you skeptics. Back on the ground! 
From the Celestial to the Mundane. They 
is them as says you can tell the future by 
the past. Maybe they got something. Let's 
take a look. 

The inventor of animated cartoons. John 
Brav, invented the filmstrip in 1922 while 
riding on the 2()th Century Limited. He 
made a primitive projector to show it. At 
about the same time Bert Kleerup developed 
the definitive form of the filmstrip projector. 
There has been little fundamental change 
in it since. In 1933 William Wood of De- 
troit was aranted a patent for a device which 
combined this filmstrip projector with a ra- 
dio transcriotion player in a sinsle box for 
giving an illustrated lecture with recorded 
sound. Thus was the birth of sound slide- 
film. 

In 1947 the market was industrial and 
military. Further markets were needed if 
the medium was going to survive. Between 
then and now two large markets have been 
opened. 

The first was the religious market. In 
August of 1947 the leaders of religious au- 
dio-visual saw their first sound slidefilm 
and sound slidefilm projector at the Inter- 
national Workshop for Religious Education 
at Green Lake. Wisconsin. The only films 
available to show the reverends were indus- 
trial or military. The excitement about it 
was noteworthy for its absence. The users 



By ROBERT L. SHOEMAKER 



Avaco, Inc. 



THE FILMSTRIP FUTURE 



of church audio-visual and the religious film 
producers of the time saw no future in it. 

One man recognized the value and took 
action. The Rev. Alex Ferguson produced 
and brought to the 194,S convocation the 
first religious sound slidefilm. (Always 
thereinafter called sound filmstrip in the re- 
ligious field.) A film on Stewardship in the 
Church entitled Two Dollars. Simple black 
and white cartoon type drawings, narration 
without flourishes but entirely effective. 

The major meeting of the Audio-Visual 
Leaders in Education is the annual conven- 
tion of the Department of Audio-Visual In- 
struction of the National Education Asso- 
ciation. At the DAVI Convention in 1955 
one exhibitor presented The Studeni Par- 
ticipation Film. This was a series of 90 
sound slidcfilms aimed directly for class- 
rot)ni use. Some were color, some black and 
white. 

By contrast, at the recent DAVI in De- 
troit there were 40 exhibitors offering sound 
filmstrips. They were featuring, in many 
cases, discussional or participational tech- 
niques, enhanced in some cases, by pro- 
gram hold and answer selection devices. 
There were thousands of titles listed in the 
catalogues. 

Riizht after World War II. Jack Mullin 
invented the 30/50 automatic film advance 
for sound slidefilm. By 1949 it was com- 
peting with four other automatic systems. 
The need to eliminate the bell advance for 
the benefit of the operator and the viewer 
was well recognized. He licensed the largest 
company in the field and by 1949 it was 
on the market. It won over the other sys- 
tems because of its greater ease of opera- 
tion and higher dependability. 

In 1962 Leo Coulson and his associates 
invented the battery operated self contained 
desk top unit with permanently placed rca ■ 
screen. This took two more problems out 
of the user's hands. Providing he was goin-i 
to use the same film over again, he had 
nothing to do but turn on the projector. 
Nothing else at all. It started automatically, 
kept the picture and sound synchronized 
automatically, shut off automatically at the 
end of the program and was ready to do the 
same thing again immediately any time later. 
For the first time in the history of the sound 
filmstrip. the pictures and sound could do 
the whole job. 

A variation that the use of tape has made 
possible is automatic program hold — an 
automatic pause during the show of a sin- 
gle frame of the filmstrip. The sound stops 
and the picture remains on the screen un- 
til a response is made by the viewer. This 
greatly enhances the value of the sound 



filmstrip vshcn used in education, in train- 
ing or for directing assembly in manufac- 
turing. 

These six improvements: automatic syn- 
chronization, microgroove record, looped 
tape and film, automatic stop, self contained 
rear screen, battery operation have together 
benefitted the user and spread the use of 
sound filmstrip far beyond the boundaries 
possible without them. 

And that brings us to now. Right now 
the industry is in the final stages of the 
perfection of the combined filmstrip 'tape 
cartrid'.'c. Using it, all you need to do to 
change programs is take one cartridge out 
of the projector, put in a different one. and 
push a button. It's that simple. 

There are four makes of these FS/Tape 
cartridges now extant. They all have the 
advantage of easy load. But they differ from 
each other. And only one of them fits in 
more than one make projector. 

This is incompatibility. How will it be 
resolved? At least three times before we've 
gone through this problem. Each time 
everybody said there ought to be agree- 
ment between the parties. 

How are these things solved? Meetings 
help — but not much. 

The answer comes out of need and use- 
fulness. The technical method which comes 
to prevail has afforded the most conve- 
nience for the widest spectrum of users and 
the widest range of usable equipment. 

With this in mind, let's consider the four 
FS/Tape cartridges. Not from the technical 
standpoint but from the view of the user. 

Cartridge A is the size of a bound book. 
Its film is the present standard filmstrip 
wound in a spiral and spliced end to end. 
The tape is standard i/4 inch lubricated 
cartridge tape as used in 8 track uatomotive 
cartridges. The projector in which it is used 
has a 12 inch, fold out rear screen and, 
with change of lens, will project on a front 
screen. This is the only projector in which 
the cartridge will fit. It is on the market 
and in use and available from one manu- 
facturer. 

Cartridge B is about the size of most 
paperbacks. Its film is 16mni, the format 
similar to industrial motion picture release 
print. For new production this is not prob- 
lem. Present standard filmstrips must be 
reduced to be used in it. The tape is the 
same standard '4 inch lubricated cartridge 
tape as used in Cartridge A. Cartridge B 
also fits in only one projector. This unit is 
a small portable desk-top projector with 
small rear screen. It can be ordered with 
Continued on next page 



JUNE, 1970 



33 



filmstrip future 



continued 



a selection of optional controls for vary- 
ing functions. It is on the market, in use, 
and available from one manufacturer. 

Cartridge C is also about the size of a 
paperback. It's film is the SMPTE format 
of 16mm motion picture release print. The 
tape is standard '4 inch lubricated cartridge 
tape. It fits seven different projectors made 
by three manufacturers. One is a small 
portable desk-top projector with small rear 
screen. The second is a large table top or 
counter top educational, training or display 
projector with 12 inch wide screen. The 
third is a front projector with which the 
picture can be thrown on a front sur- 
face screen for larger groups or, in 
darkened rooms, for audiences up to 
100 or more. The fourth is a self contained 
language teaching laboratory with voice re- 
cording and playback for the learner. The 
fifth is a programmed learning unit with 
response on five pushbuttons and scoring 
facility. The sixth is a customer operated 
display unit that locks the cartridge in until 
the end of the program and automatically 
resynchs the program should it get out of 
synch. The seventh is a portable desk-top 
recruiting device with special response fa- 
cilities and fast forward. Five of these 
projectors are in use and on the market. 
One is promised for production release 
about September 1, 1970. One is a produc- 
tion prototype and only available yet on 
special order. They are obtainable from 
three different manufacturers. 

Curtridge D is about the size of a ciga- 
rette package. Its film is 8mm, the same 
format as Super 8 motion pictures. New 
film production affords no problem. Present 



standard filmstrip would have to be reduced. 
The tape is the narrower width used in 
cassettes. This cartridge fits into a portable 
desk-top projector with small rear screen. 
With the adjustment of a mirror and re- 
focusing of the lens it will project on a 
front screen for groups of people. It is not 
in use or on the market but is promised to 
be available shortly by its manufacturer. 

The 1970 NAVA Audio- Visual Equip- 
ment Directory lists 38 different models of 
sound filmstrip projector. In April at the 
Illinois Audio-Visual Association conven- 
tion in Chicago and at the DAVI conven- 
tion in Detroit a number of additional sound 
filmstrip devices were shown. Undoubtedly 
there will be some more at the NAVA con- 
vention in July. 

They vary in price from $94.50 to 
$400.00, in sophistication from a record 
turntable and filmstrip projector in a box 
to teaching machines. In operation they run 
from the complexity of the record and bell 
to the convenience of battery power and 
the simplicity of the automatic filmstrip/ 
tape cartridge load. See chart Page 34. 

How do you find your way through this 
forest of equipment? 

For use now, the answer is to define your 
purpose in using sound filmstrip and then 
choose from this wealth of possibilities the 
unit or units which best fit that purpose. 
Sound Slide is effective as long as there is 
a legible picture and intelligible sound coin- 
ciding with it. The viewer is not concerned 
with how the message gets to him. It can 
be put before him with a dime store record 
player and your camera store's lowest priced 



slide projector. As long as all goes well, 
the message will be the media. But "YIPE!" 
— the first slide dropped, the first cue 
missed — Shambles! 

At the other end of the scale you or the 
viewer just pushes a button — everything 
is automatic from then on. A little more 
expensive. Yes. But what is it worth to be 
secure in the knowledge that the message 
will arrive whole? Between these two ex- 
tremes are various types of operation with 
various requirements for manipulating the 
record or tape or record or filmstrip, each 
decreasing the cost but adding to the hazard 
of derailed communication. 

For the future planner? Here, Sir, just 
for you is my foggy crystal ball. The very 
same priceless orb that told me in 1946 
to abandon Cape Canaveral because it was 
going back to sandbar and sawgrass. 

Yet, despite this disclaimer, it is possi- 
ble to see a little of the form of the future 
as the clouds of the present are shaped by 
the winds of the past. The systems which 
now predominate have come there through 
the persistence and ingenuity of some in- 
dividuals and some companies in recogniz- 
ing the needs of the users and the audiences 
of sound filmstrip. 

If the experience of the past holds good, 
there are a number of clues. What people 
and what companies are thinking of the 
customer? Who is making it easiest for the 
viewer to see and hear and the user to 
operate with the greatest security under the 
widest range of circumstances? 

Study the chart. Then, with the principles 
just stated, watch carefully the developments 
of the next few months. I think it will come 
clear the direction that sound filmstrip is 
going and be evident that it is on the verge 
of its greatest usefulness to everybody con- 
cerned. 

Ad Astra per Aspera. 



SOUND FILMSTRIP EQUIPMENT AVAILABLE 
June 1970 







Operation 


Power 




Program Hold 


Response 


Resynch 


VISUAL AND SOUND LOADED SEPARATELY 

Visual Sound 


Manual 


Automatic 


Battery 


Rear 
Screen 


Manual 
or remote 


Automatic 


Audio Push 
Active Button 


Automatic 


35mm FS (Roll) 


Record (Disc) 




9 


1 


8 


3 








35mm FS (Roll) 


Tape Cartridge 
(Endless Tape Loop) 




2 






2 








35mm FS (Roll) 


Tape Cassette 
(Reel to Reel Tape) 


2 


2 














35mm FS Magazine 
(Endless Film Loop) 


Tape Cassette 
(Reel to Reel Tape) 




1 


1 


1 


1 








35mm FS Magazine 
(Endless Film Loop) 


Tape Cartridge 
(Endless Tape Loop) 




4 


1 


4 


4 


3 







VISUAL AND SOUND ON FILMSTRIP 

35mm FS (Double Frame) 

VISUAL AND SOUND CARTRIDGE 

(Filmstrip and Tape both endless 
combined in one cartridge for 
single loading into projector) 

35mm Filmstrip with Tape Sound 

16mm Filmstrip mVn Tape Sound 

8mm Filmstrip with Tape Sound 



1 


1 


7 


8 


1 


1 



The figures in this chart are the number of different units available and listed In each category at the time of this writing. Certain peripheral features 
known or promised but not listed in the sources are not included. 



34 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



OVER 130 
ILLUSTRATIONS 




CLOTH EDITION BOUND FLEXIBLE COVER 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

1. The Cameraman's Duties and Responsibilities 

• The Director of Ptiotography • The Camera Operator • The 
Assistant Cameraman 

2. Camera-Film Identification 

• Film Type Identification • Perforations and Pitch • Windings 

• Spool & Core Types • Ordering Raw Stock • Shipping Proce- 
dures 

3. loading Room Procedures 

• Testing The Loading Room • Preparation of Materials • Load- 
ing • IVIagazine ID • Unloading • Exposed Film • On Location 

• Changing Bag • Hand Tests 

4. Slates 

• Sync Slate • Insert Slate • Slating Procedures 

5. Camera Reports 

• Clipboard-Type • Magazine-Type • Caption Sheet-Type • Dis- 
position of Reports 

6. On-The-Job Procedures 

• Prior to Shooting • During Shooting • End of Shooting Day 

• Tools 

7. Introduction to Equipment 

• Reflex Viewing Systems • Offset Viewfinder Systems • Ivlattes 

• Motors • Barneys • Blimps • Magazines • Nomenclature 

8. Tripods 

• Types • Basic Parts • Setting Tripod For Shooting • Moving 
The Tripod • Care & Maintenance • Accessories 

9. Tripod Heads & Accessories 

• Types • Mitchell Friction • O'Connor Fluid • Worral Geared 

• The Riser • The Tilt Plate 

10. Arriflei Cameras And Accessories 

• 35 lie Camera • 35mm Magazines • 35mm Model 400 Blimp 

• IbS Camera • 16S Magazine • 16M Camera • IBM Magazine • 
16BL Camera • 16BL Magazine • 16mm Blimps • 16mm-1200 ft. 
Magazine • Periscope Finder Attachment • Flat Base • llOV AC 
Sync Motor On Plate • Threading Details On All 

11. Auricon Cameras 

• 16mm Pro-600 Camera • Pro 600 Magazines (600 ft & 400-lt ) 

• 16mm Super 1200 Camera • 1200-ft. Magazine • Threading 
Details 

12. Beckman & Whitley CM16 Camera 

• 16mm CMI6 Camera • CM16 Magazines (400-ft- & 1200-ft.) • 
Threading Details 

13. Eclair Cameras 

• 35mm Standard CM3 Camera • 16 35 CM3 Camera • 35mm 
CM3 Magazine • 16mm CM3 Magazine • 35mm Magazine for 
Aquaflex • 35mm CM3 Blimp • NPR 16 Camera • NPR 16 Maga- 
zine • Threading Details On All 

14. Kodak Reflex Camera 

• 16mm Kodak Reflex Special Camera • Kodak Reflex Special 
Magazine • Threading Details 

15. Maurer Camera 

• 16mm Maurer 150 Camera • Maurer 150 Magazines (400-ft. & 
1200-ft ) • Threading Details 

16. Mitchell Cameras 

• 35mm Standard High Speed Camera • 35mm NC Camera • 
35mm BNC Camera • 35mm S35R Mark II Camera • 35mm Maga- 
zines • S35R Blimp • 16mm Pro & HS Cameras • 16mm Pro 
Blimp • 16mm Reflex R16 (SS & DS) Cameras • Accessories 
(35mm & 16mml • Threading Details On All 

17. Lenses 

• Lens Cases • Care of. on Turret • Cleaning • Aperture • Focus 

• Wide-Angle • Telephoto • Zoom Lenses • Alignment (35mm & 
I6mm) • Zoom Lens Accessories 



PROFESSIONAL 

16/ 35 mm 

CAMERAMAN'S 
HANDBOOK 

by Verne Carlson 
LIMITED FIRST PRINTING! 

A practical guide for every individual 
now working-or planning to work 
-ANYWHERE in the film industry 

The author, Verne Carlson, is a free-lance Director of Photog- 
raphy of Documentaries, TV Coinmercials, and Feature Films. 
He is also a consultant to a medical research institute, lectures 
to film groups, and conducts camera courses for professionals. 
He is a member of the: lATSE (Cameramen), SMPTE, SPIE, and 
SPSE. His wife Sylvia collaborated with him in the writing of 
this outstanding book. 

This definitive work is a result of 21 years of experience in the 
film industry. Covers everything for the Studio Cameraman and 
Assistant. Also for In-piant, Newsreel, Documentarist, and the 
Experimental Film Maker. Profusely illustrated with actual pho- 
tographs—not diagrams— and liberally supplied with data 
tables and charts. This unique handbook also provides guide- 
lines, tips, warnings, and "tricks of the trade". The book draws 
upon firsthand knowedge as well as the experiences of other 
talented professionals. The result is the finest guide book of 
its type ever published for the professional as well as the 
aspiring cameraman. In connection with all specific Cameras, 
Magazines, Lenses, and Accessories . . . every phase of 
installation, operation, and usage is fully covered. 

MAIL COUPON TODAY! 

I 1 

BUSINESS SCREEN 
402 V/. Liberty Drive 
VVheafon, III. 60187 

Please send me "Professional 16/35mm Cameraman's Handbook" 
(i: $15.00 postpaid in U.S.A. and Canada. Add $1.00 for shipping and 
handling overseas (except A.P.O./F.P.C). ill. residents add sales tax. 

Enclosed is check for $ . 



Name 


(please print) 




Address 


City 


State 




Zip 



JUNE, 1970 



35 



ARRIFLE> 




36 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



> 16's precise pin-registration'''*assures 

PRINTING ACCURACY 




Arriflex 16mm film transports provide the critical registration es- 
sential for the most sophisticated opticals . . . and each camera comes 
to you with the proof! 

Thetest film that accompanies each new 16mm Arriflex shows why these cameras 
are so successful in shooting master footage for optical effects. Multiple-image, 
split-screen, 16 to 35 blow-ups and other complex effects are as important in 
16mm production today as in larger-format production— and absolute registra- 
tion of the camera original is a pre-requisite if opticals of superb quality are to 
be made later in the laboratory. That such techniques can be produced without 
compromise in 16mm will be proven when you project the Arriflex test film. 

The test film was made in two exposures, with the test grid offset before the 
second pass. Had registration been anything less than perfect, you'd see it 
immediately on the screen as movement of the grid lines in relation to one 
another. But there is no such movement— you see the illusion of a single ex- 
posure—because of the unfailmg constancy of each frame's registration. 

The reason for such consistently steady footage is not only because of a true 
registration pin film movement but also due to the design and construction of 
the mechanism as a whole. It features many unique concepts for absolute film 
stability, followed through with the most durable materials. Its quiet, vibration- 
less precision prevails at all running speeds, forward and reverse, over millions 
of feet of film. Its ability to withstand shock and environmental extremes has 
been proven countless times over, since its introduction nearly twenty years ago. 

Picture quality is the essence of any film, of course; whether or not a production 
involves opticals, registration and sharpness are among the elements producers 
and cameramen stake their reputations on. This offers one explanation why there 
are more Arriflexes in use throughout the world than any other professional 
camera. For the complete story, write for brochures. 



♦ the source of arriflex's 
optical printing accuracy 

Pin movement locks each frame into position for 
exposure; long film channel with spring-loaded 
side pressure rail produces absolute lateral sta- 
bility. Solid cast, hardened double cam mecfia- 
nism resists wear, sustains vertical registration 
accuracy over millions of feet of film. Rear pres- 
sure plate {removed in this illustration to show 
registration pin) is an integral part of the move- 
ment assuring longitudinal stability (no film 
breathing). 




ARRIFLEX leS/B 



ARRIFLEX 16M/B 



ARRIFLEX 16BL 



P.O. Box 1050. Vy'oodside, N.Y. 11377 • ION Chestnut St., Burbank, Calif. 91502 •■ CQRPORAIION Of AMERICA 



r^ CQRPORAIION Of AMERICA . 



JUNE, 1970 



Black Audiovisual Power 

In The Caribbean 



BY BOB SEYMOUR 

Publisher 




i 



Guyana Prime Minister Forbes Burn- 
ham . . . elected througli the povver 
of audiovisuals. Map below shows 
location of Guvana on north-east 
face of South America. 



BY MID-SUMMER of 1968, Guyana, a 
small country on the north-east face of 
South America, but which considers itself 
a part of the Caribbean area, had experi- 
enced four years of self government along 
with enough racial and political strife to 
threaten the very existence of the new na- 
tion. 

Faced with an election coming up in 
March, 1969, the government in power, 
mostly composed of members of the Peo- 
ple's National Congress political party, and 
headed by Prime Minister Forbes Burnham, 
sought ways to carry its story to the 
Guyanese people using the most effective 
political techniques possible. 

The election was of particular importance 
to Guyana for it faced the moderate Burn- 
ham against his chief rival. Dr. Cheddi B. 
Jagan, former dentist, and head of the op- 
posing Marxist People's Progressive Party. 
Many observers felt that if Jagan's elec- 
tion seemed imminent Guyana might be 
subject to intervention from outside her 
borders by Latin nations intent on prevent- 
ing the spread of Communism on the South 
American continent. 

Burnham recognized that audio-visual 
media had been outstandingly successful 
in North American elections, and sought 
ways to use similar techniques in his own 
campaign. After consulting experts in the 
United States, Burnham's party engaged 
Gerald Auerbach, head of The Communica- 
tions Group, New York (now a division 
of DFl Communications, Inc.) and pro- 
ducer of several remarkably successful po- 
litical campaign films in the United States, 
to come to Guyana as a consultant 

On arrival, Auerbach soon found that 




he would be faced with a much different 
situation in Guyana from the American 
political hustings for several important rea- 
sons. The foremost was that Auerbach had 
never worked in a political atmosphere 
such as to be encountered in Guyana, re- 
plete with opposition newspaper headlines 
charging C.I. A. involvement (untrue), un- 
limited public funds being poured into a 
private political campaign (untrue), and 
the hostility of key Government workers 
who were active members of the opposition 
party. Add to this, the fact that the country 
had no television whatsoever. After nine 
days of consultation with PNP party chiefs 
and consideration of all the limiting factors 
to communication involved — (even radio 
was a difficult media to use politically for 
most Guyanese preferred listening to sta- 
tions in next-door Surinam ) — Auerbach 
recommended the establishment of a full- 
blown film production unit to prepare pro- 
government films, plus a small fleet of mo- 
bile motion picture projection trucks which 
could travel throughout the country finding 
audiences at every crossroad and stream 
confluence. This system, when adopted, 
provided the means of reaching more Guy- 
anese and involving them politically than 
had ever been possible before. 

In the next six months, COMGRO pro- 
duction people designed facilities exactly 
tailored to the rugged and humid Guyanese 
field conditions and trained a staff of 21 
Guyanese personnel to be film technicians. 
Another Auerbach innovation was the de- 
velopment of an on-the-spot television "net- 
work" through the use of videotape. Every 
Forbes Burnham speech was recorded on 
Ampex one-inch videotape and immediately 
taken to nearby villages for showing to audi- 
ences via video monitors set up in Land 
Rover generator-equipped trucks. Thus, 
Burnham was speaking almost "live" in 
three or four locations each night. In fact, 
the novelty and appeal of TV was so great 
that often the audiences at the Videotapes 
speeches exceeded Burnham's live appear- 
ances. 

Since there is no film laboratory in Guy- 
ana, Auerbach arranged for his own com- 
pany in New York to handle most post- 
photography aspects of the Burnham cam- 
paign films by overnight airmail from 
Georgetown to New York. Later, more 
extensive facilities were built, including re- 
frigerated vaults, sound recording studios, 
cutting and projection rooms. 

By election time, the COMGRO-trained 
Guyanese film unit had produced 13 docu- 
mentary films on such subjects as defense, 
security, food production, housing, roads, 
and Moslem and Hindu cultural affairs 
(Burnham's largely African-ancestry PNP 
party members vitally needed support from 
the more numerous East Indian population 
to swing the election). Two more films were 
produced on "how to vote." 

Equipment chosen by Auerbach for the 
Guyanese production unit consisted basic- 
ally of 35mm Arriflexes, 16mm Arriflex 
BL's, Nagra recorders, Magnasync transfer 
Continued on next page 



38 



BUSINESS SCREEN 







to show 




Snap 



Kodak's done it for you— snap-on movies with the new by just pressing a butt 

cartridge-loading Kodak Ektagraphic 120 Movie Projector. a still picture. At the ei 

Just snap on the new Kodak super 8 cartridge, and the intothe cartridge-re; 
show's on. And the unique ne\ 

With the Ektagraphic 120 Projector, there's now a load or unload with stj 

low-cost, portable, easy-to-use display system that makes it lengths. Just snap it o 

a snap for anyone to show films. Mean anything to you cartridge closed, and 

and your business? Like the fact that now your films are the film, simply snap ( 
more usable by more people in more places? And the fact A Kodak Audiovisu 

that now's the time to consider reducing more of your 16mm you how the new Koda 

films to super 8 for even wider distribution? Think about it. Projector can become 

The Ektagraph/c 120 Projector is rugged -completely your film operation. S 

dependable. You can instantly repeat any part of the film the nearest office liste 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY Atlanta: 404/351-6510 Chicago: 312/654-0200 

Dallas: 214/351-3221 Hollywood: 213/464-6131 New York: 212/262-7100 San Francisco: 415/776-6055 



^yi.-:\ 



by just pressing a button. You can also project any f^mne 

a still picture. At the end, the film automatically rewinds back 

intothe cartridge— ready to show again, right from the start. 

And the unique new Kodak cartridge? It's also a snap to 
load or unload with standard super 8 reels in 50- or 100-foot 
lengths. Just snap it open. Drop in the film reel. Snap the 
cartridge closed, and it's ready for showing. To edit or clean ' 
the film, simply snap open the cartridge. 

A Kodak Audiovisual Dealer will be glad to show^^ 
you how the new Kodak Ektagraphic 1 20 Movie "^^ 
Projector can become a convenience tool in . 
your film operation. See him, or contact _^^^ 
the nearest office listed below. .^ 



Vonipaet 




CREATE! DIRECT! PRODUCE! YOUR OWN AUDIO/VISUAL PRESENTATIONS 



Just: SELECT any number of 35mm slides 
RECORD (in-machine) up to one full hour 
of audio material (narration, music, 
sound effects, interviews, etc.) 
PROGRAM the magnetic tape (in-machine) 
You place an inaudible electronic "pulse" 
on the tape which will automatically syn- 
chronize your slides and sound track 
PLAYBACK the fully synchronized program 
That's it! Simply — Automatically — Profes- 
sionally— NARRATOR 850 



FEATURES 

Compact Cassette Operation 
Built In Public Address System 
Solid State Circuitry 
8 Watts of Audio 
Total Remote Control 

for additional information, price list 
& dealership list, write to: 



Montage /Productions, Inc., 49 West 27tli St., New York, N.Y. 1[ 




black A-V power . . . 

continued 

equipment, Moviola viewers and a line of 
editing and handling equipment complete 
down to gloves and red pencils. 

At election time in December, 1968, 
Burnham's PNP Party had succeeded in 
convincing most of the nation that it was 
best equipped to handle the difficult future 
problems of the government. PNP candi- 
dates were elected by a good majority and 
have provided a successful and moderate 
leadership in the past year. 

The Guyanese film unit which Gerald 
Auerbach and his COMGRO team helped 
to establish, and which played such an im- 
portant part in the election campaign, has 
since gone on to produce other educational 
and documentary films, and a new labora- 
tory is being planned. The aim of the film 
program will be to establish new educa- 
tional techniques attuned to Guyanese con- 
ditions and to no longer rely on British 
colonial techniques not now considered in- 
digenous to the Guyanese culture and way 
of life. For hundreds of years Guyanese had 
been told what to do and how to do it. Now, 
through audio-visual education, the nation's 
schools will try going it their own way. 

Jerry Auerbach considers his experience 
in Guyana to be the most exciting thing he 
has ever done in a not uneventful career. 
He has since returned several times to con- 
sult with Guyanese film production people 
and reports that much progress is being 
made in providing the country with a first- 
class facility. • 



/^ 



CAMERA STOCKS 



16mm EKTA Color 7242. 7241, 7255 0525 

16mm B S W 7220. 7222, 7231 025 

16mm Color Negative 7254 06 

35mm Color Negalive 5251 10 

35mm B & W 5220. 5222, 5231 035 

LABORATORY STOCKS 

7387, 7253. 7385. 7234, ale. 

MAGNETIC SOUND STOCK 

35 and 16mm New and Reclaimed 

FILM & EDITORIAL LEADER 

Black Opaque 35mm 18 50 

Black Opaque 16mm 16 50 

Clear Leader 16mm 4.50 

Also; Painted, Personalized 
Printed & Lightstruck. 

i>»liifii4» I'iliii 4'x«*liaii|U(o 

11555 VENTURA BLVD. 

STUDIO CITY, CALIF. 91604 

\^ (213) 985-3303 ^ 



[title] 

TITLE DESIGN 
COLOR CORRECTION 
BACKGROUND ART 
RETOUCHING 
SLIDES FOR TV 

723 SEWARD ST 469-1663 
HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 90038 



HOUSE 



ILLUSTRATION 
HAND LETTERING 
PHOTO LETTERING 
HOT PRESS TITLES 
SILK SCREEN 



40 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



I F PA JOURNAL 



INFORMATION FILM PRODUCERS OF AMERICA, INC. 



P.O. Box 1470, Hollywood, California 90028 



"Cindy" Entry Rules 

1. All entries submitted must have been 
completed or declassified for general re- 
lease within the period August 1, 1969 
through July 31, 1970. 

2. All entries submitted (except Category 
zrS — Video Tape) must be 16mm prints 
with optical sound tracks. 

3. There is no limit to the number of en- 
tries which can be submitted by an organ- 
ization or individual. 

4. Films and video tapes may be entered 
by members and non-members of IFPA. 

5. Entry fees are; IFPA Members — 
$25.00 per film; Non-Members — $40.00 
per film. 

6. All fees shall be submitted by check 
and made pavable to: INFORMATION 
FILM PRODUCERS OF AMERICA, 
INC. 

7. .Ml entry forms and fees should be sub- 
mitted immediately, but in no case post- 
marked later than August 1, 1970. Films 
may accompany entry forms and fees, or 
may be sent subsequent to entry. But in no 
case will films be accepted later than Au- 
gust 15, 1970. 

8. No refunds will be made after August 

I, 1970. 

9. Ship films in reusable cartons with a 
return address label enclosed. Insure your 
films. All films will be returned Insured 
Parcel Post, unless you specify otherwise. 

10. IFPA has set up 3 groups with 9 
categories in each group to provide the most 
equitable basis for judging. Producers in 
each group will be competing only with 
films produced under comparable circum- 
stances. 

II. Select one Group and one Category 
within that Group. 

Group A. 

Institiitioiially Produced: produced by the 
internal film unit of a business firm, uni- 
versity, etc. 

Group B. 

Commercially Produced: sponsored by a 
business firm, university or government 
agency. 

Group C. 

Government Produced: produced by the 
film unit of a local, state or federal govern- 
ment agency. 



Category 1. — Public Relations: a film 
designed to inform a general, broadbased 
audience, such as an "institutional film." 

Category 2. — Training: a film designed 
to instruct a specialized audience, in specific 
procedures for operating or maintaining a 
particular system or equipment. The '"how- 
to-do-it" film. 

Category 3. — Employee Relations 
(Group A only) or Indoctrination & Orien- 
tation (Groups B & C only): a film de- 
signed to motivate or inform an in-house 
audience. The "why-to-do-it" film. 

Category 4. — Teclinical: a specialized 
film, such as a technical report, designed for 
a selected audience. 

Category 5. — Sales & Advertising: a film 
designed to increase business and profits 
(Groups A & B only) or to enlist the aid 
of the public in supporting a government 
project (Group C & Government sponsored 
Group B). 

Category 6. — Enrichment: a film de- 
signed to present one or more aspects of 
cultural endeavors or achievements, such 
as art. music, philosophy, religion and sim- 
ilar subjects. 

Category 1. — Academic Instruction: a 
film designed to educate rather than train. 
The entry may be intended for an informal 
as well as a formal environment. 

Category 8. — Video Tape for Informa- 
tion: any non-entertainment video tape 
whose intended purpose is information or 
communication. 

Category 9. — Special: Those films whose 
subject matter or intended audience cannot 
possibly fit into the other seven categories. 

12. In addition to evaluating the techni- 
cal excellence and creative aspects of each 
film, major emphasis is placed on the 
achievement of a film's stated objectives for 
its intended audience. Therefore, great care 
should be taken to enter a film in the most 
appropriate category possible. 

13. If. based on the information provided 
in the entry form, any film appears to be 
entered in the wrong group or category, it 
may, at the discretion of the competition 
committee or its chairman, be placed in the 
group or category deemed most appropriate. 

Continued on next page 







THE CAMERA MART 
Audio-Visual Line can put 

your ideas on the right 
track with a complete 
selection of specialized 
equipment including 
opaque projectors (for 
the projection of non- 
transparent material), 
stop motion analyst 
projectors, 16MM Xenon 
projectors (for brightest 
and long distance 
projection), 16 & 35MM 
double system sound 
interlock projectors, 
overhead projectors, strip 
film sound projectors, 
background slide 
projectors and projection 
accessory equipment. 

Everything is available 
for rent, long-term lease, 
or sale. And to keep you 
running on schedule we 
can also provide 
completely packaged 
programs. 

For further information 
and/or reservations call 
or write Mr. Bob Roizman 
(212) 757-6977. 




TheCamera Martmc. 

456 W 55lh St . (Bet. 9th S lOth »ves ) 
New York. N Y 10019 Phone: (212) 757-6977 



.lUNE, 1970 



41 



IFPA "Cindy" Entry Form and Shipping Instructions 



Entry forms, fees and films for 
each separate entry should be sub- 
mitted directly to the jury which 
will be judging the group and cate- 
gory in which the entry is being 
made. See preceding page for entry 
requirements and categories. 



Group A— Category 3 
Group A — Category 4 
Group B— Category 2 
Group C— Category 9 

TO: 

IFPA "Cindy" Competition 

c/o Bill Morrison 

F-M Motion Picture Services 

733 North Highland 

Los Angeles, Calif. 90038 



Group A— Category 5 

Group A— Category 7 

Group C— Category 1 

Group C— Category 7 

TO: 

IFPA "Cindy" Competition 

c/o Stan Ahlborn 

Cling Peach Advisory Board 

#1 California Street 

San Francisco, Calif. 94111 



Group A— Category 8 
Group B— Category 8 
Group B— Category 9 
Group C— Category 6 
Group C— Category 8 

TO: 

IFPA "Cindy" Comeptition 
c/o Stan Follls 
4055 Bern ice Drive 
San Diego, Calif. 92107 



OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM 

INFORMATION FILM PRODUCERS OF AMERICA, INC. 
1970 FILM COMPETITION 



FILM TITLE: 



RUNNING TIME: 



COLOR 



BLACK WHITE 



VIDEO 



DATE COMPLETED OR RELEASED: 
ORGANIZATION SUBMITTING FILM: 

ADDRESS: 



(See Contest Rules for Group and Category Description) 

ENTER GROUP 

ENTER CATEGORY 



STATEMENT OF FILM OBJECTIVES 



INTENDED AUDIENCE: 



FILM CREDITS: 
certificates) 

Producer: 

Writer: 

Director: 

Cameraman: 

Editor: 



(Spell names accurately and list them as they should appear on 



Art Director: 

Technical Advisor: 

Narrator: 

Sound: 

Music: 

Other: 



ENTRY FEE: IFPA-Members ^25. 00 NON-Members g40. 00 

Submit fee by check, payable to: Information Film Producers of America 

PERSON RESPONSIBLE - For Film Entry and Information 

NAME: ADDRESS 

PHONE: 



SUBMIT 16mm PRINTS ONLY. OPTICAL SOUND TRACKS ONLY ACCEPTED. 
(Except Category 8 - Video Tape) 



INSURE ALL FILMS. 



ENTRIES MUST BE POSTMARKED 
NO LATER THAN August 1, 1970. 



Group B— Category 1 
'i Group B— Category 5 

TO: 

IFPA "Cindy" Competition 

c/o Ray Usery 

P.O. Box 4356 

Norton A.F. Base, Calif. 92409 

Group A— Category 2 
Group A— Category 9 
Group B— Category 7 

TO: 

IFPA "Cindy" Competition 
c/o Bob Scott 
Aerospace Corporation 
Suite 1300 

1717 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20006 



Group B- 
Group C- 



-Category 3 
-Category 4 



TO: 

IFPA Cindy" Competition 
c/o Bob Berman 
Magna Film Productions 
49 Berkeley Street 
Boston, Mass. 02116 

Group A— Category 6 
Group B— Category 4 
Group C— Category 2 

TO: 

IFPA Cindy" Competition 
c/o Dick Cameron 
222 Minor North 
Seattle, Wash. 98109 

Group B— Category 6 
Group C— Category 3 

TO: 

IFPA "Cindy" Competition 
c/o Nancy Lasch 
Modern Teleservice 
201 Erie 
Chicago, III. 60611 

Group A— Category 1 
Group C— Category 5 

TO: 

IFPA "Cindy" Competition 
c/o R, Shields Mitchell 
4111 Shorecrest Drive 
Dallas, Texas 75209 



42 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



U.S. Industrial Film Festival 

Names 49 "Gold Camera" Winners 



O P A t E ACHIEXEMRNTS, 

^ pollulion and cnvirDnmcnt 
and man's cftiuts to find world 
peace were highlighted among 
the winning entries honored at 
the third annual U.S. Industrial 
I-Hm Festival's "Gold Camera" 
awards presentation ceremonies 
at Chicaco's Palmer House April 
30. 

Four hundred films from 15 
countries competed for the 49 
first place awards given in vari- 
ous categories. Iceland, South 
Africa. England. France, Canada 
and the U.S. were countries with 
films receiving top honors. 

Receiving heavy participation 
were the categories dealing with 
training, education, advertising, 
sales promotion and public rela- 
tions. Many entries in the latter 
category reflected the present 
concern of mankind with his 
ecology as conservation and pol- 
lution control were most promi- 
nent subject areas. 

Master of ceremonies for the 
event was G. Roger Cahaney, 
executive vice president of Asso- 
ciation-Sterling Films. Festival 
Chairman J. W. Anderson re- 
ported this year's entries at near- 
ly double last year. 

More than 300 persons were 
on hand for the awards presenta- 
tion and screening of winning 
films. In addition, many members 
of the Chicago Film Council at- 
tended the ceremonies as their 
April meeting. 

National Educational Televi- 
sion will run winning films each 
Monday evening in a 13-week 



series in Chicago and the entire 
collection of winning films will 
begin a nationwide tour of film 
clubs, public relations organiza- 
tions and advertising and sales 
groups. Informatit>n on the avail- 
ability of the film program may 
be obtained from the U.S. Indus- 
trial Film Festival, 161 E. Grand 
Ave.. Chicago, 111. 60611. 

In addition to the winning 
films in each category listed be- 
low, special awards were pre- 
sented to: John J. Hennessy Mo- 
tion Pictures for the Crown Zel- 
lerbach film Number One Bush 
by Backstage Magazine for "out- 
standing creativity in a public re- 
lations film"; Canawest Produc- 
tions for the Red Cedar Shingle 
and Handsplit Shake Bureau's 
Home Sweet Cedar by Business 
Screen Magazine for "Outstand- 
ing creativity in an advertising 
and sales promotion film"; and 
Magic Light produced by UFA- 
Werbefilm GMBH (Dusseldorf, 
West Germany) for Agfa- 
Gevaert received the Chairman's 
Special Award. 

The 1970 "Gold Camera" 
award winning films included: 
Commercially Produced 

Advertising-Sales Promotion 

Home Sweet Cedar, produced 
h\- Canawest Film Productions for 
the Red Cedar Shingle and Hand- 
split Shake Bureau. 

Art, Culture 

Tlie Eye of Picasso produced bv 
Cythere Films for Bell & Howell. 
Documentary 

A tie between Ski Racer by Sum- 
mit Films for The Lange Co. and 
Dubai b\' Spectator Films for Du- 



bai PetrolcMini (KiiKland). 
Fund liaising 

Second Sifiht by Lee Mendel- 
son Film Productions for the Eye 
Bank for Sight Restoration. Film- 
strip Winner: Boy Burning Biifihl 
for the Boy Scouts of America. 

Industrial, Technical Processes 

Mirro !)>■ OwcT] Miupliy Produc- 
lioiis lor Western I'llcclric Co. 
Medicine, Health 

X-Ray, Ultra.sotind & Thermog- 
raphy in Diagnosis by Norman P. 
Schenker for The Upjohn Co. and 
What C.oes Up by Penshurst Enter- 
prises for the American Heart As- 
sociation. 

Public Relations 

Nutnber One Bush by John J. 
Hennessy Motion Pictures for 
Crown Zellerbach and Water by 
Cavalcade Productions for Morton 
Salt Co. 

Recreation, Sports, Hobbies, 
Travel 

A tie between City for All Sea- 
sons by Edgar Anstey for British 
Travel Authorit\- and The Moehius 
Flip by Summit Films for TWA, 
White Stag, Hart Ski Co. and Ski 
Magazine. 

Religion, Ethics 

One in the Sjnrit by .Mirabello 
Enterprises for Refonned Church 
in America. 

Safety, Welfare 

A tie between Please Hurry! by 
Gordon Glyn Productions for New 
York Telephone Co. and Kutluan- 
ong-A Place of Hearing b\ the In- 
formation Service of South Africa. 
Sales 

It's About Time by Norman B. 

Hathaway Associates for Tridon 

Ltd. (Canada). Filmstrip winner: 

How to Succeed in Business with 

Continued on next page 




Ctiatting during a break in the presentation ceremonies are (I. to r.): L.E.S. 
de Villiers, Information Service of South Africa; J. W. Anderson, festival 
chairman; Carl Degan, U.S. National Park Service; G. Roger Cahaney, As- 
sociation-Sterling Films; and Andre Joubart, South African Tourist Corp. 



Receiving the Busmc^i Screen 
award for outstanding creativity in 
an advertising and sales promotion 
film is Jack Gettles (right) of Cana- 
v/est Productions, Vancouver, B.C. 
Canada. 



i CREATE THE 
t Right MOOD 
I EVERY TIME 

I with the 

I MAJOR" 

{production 

Imusic 
ilibrary 

E'MAJOR" offers you a full 
=70 hours of background 
=production music for titles, 
Ebridges, background— for 
Escoring, editing, recording and 
Edubbing music for your: 
= • FEATURE PRODUCTIONS 

= • DOCUMENTARIES 

E* TV FILMS 

= • SLIDE FILMS 

= • ANIMATION 

!• INDUSTRIAL FILMS 

!• SALES PRESENTATIONS 
= • COMMERCIALS 

= • EDUCATIONAL 

="MAJOR" specializes in sound 
i— you get exceptional technical 
zknow-howand beautifully- 
= recorded original music on 
ELP records or V4-lnch Tape, 
=oron 16 or 35mm Mag. 
ilape ready for a mix. 

:IMPORTANT: "Major" owns in owi. 
^copyrights on all production moocJ 
:music in its library. World righll 
^available to you on a completely 
-sound legal basis. Re-recording rights 
lavailable on a "per selection" or "un- 
-limited use" flat fee arrangement. 



= WRITE FOR 135-PAGE CATALOGUE TO 

ItHOMAS J. VALENTINO 

= INCORPORATED 
=Established 1932 

= 150 W. 46 St. New York 10036 
ior phone (212) 246-4675 






=Also available: Detailed Catalogue 
=of our complete LP library of 
=47] Sound Effects. 



JUNE, 1970 



THERE'S NOTHING FINER THAN 

POLY-CONS 



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• Fit standard storage 
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• Available with plain or 
custom printed labels. 

3 Sizes . . . 

No. 2: lV2"x2" In red, yellow, blue, green 
pink, black and natural. 

No. 1: lV2"xlV2" In red, yellow, blue 
green, orange, magenta, white, tur- 
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ural. 

Mini: %"xlV2" In red, yellow, blue, 
green, white and natural. 




FLIP OPEN 
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RICHARD MANUFACTURING CO 



5914 NOBLE AVE 



VAN N U Y S 



'70 HIGH LIGHT 
2x2 SLIDE PROJECTOR 

TRIPLES THE LIGHT OUTPUT OF A "STANDARD" KODAK 
CAROUSEL SLIDE PROJECTOR 

Retains all features of original Kodak 
slide projector. 

No change to automatic focus, dis- 
solve, remote control and programmer 
inputs. 

Simple to operate. 
Double fan cooling system. 
Inexoensive replacement lamp. 
Easy portability— weight, 25 lbs. 
Self contained grey carrying case. 

Ideally suited for audio visual application in: 

BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS • TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT 

EDUCATION • MULTI-MEDIA PRESENTATIONS 




133 



'70 High Light Projector complete with 

Kodak Model 800 slide projector, slide 

troy, 3" or 5" lens & remote cord 

Dealership inquiries invited 
Professional discounts available 



High Light Division of 




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630 Ninth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10036 



212-245-2577-1380 



U.S. Industrial festival 



continued 



Tilt 6i Telescope & Tilt-Away bv 
AMPM Inc. and Bradford LaRiv- 
iere for Saginaw Steering Gear Di- 
vision of General Motors. 
Sciences, Research 

People Saver by David Bransby 
for Eaton, Yale & Towne. 
Training, Education 

A tie between Operator by Nell 
Cox for AT&T and Outward Bound 
by Summit Films for Outward 
Bound. Inc. Fiknstrip winner: In- 
stant Cash b\- Lizardi & W'itte for 
Bank of America. 

World Peace. Understanding, 
Brotherhood 

A tie between A Fable by Fred 
A. Niles Communications Centers 
for Mobil Oil Corp. and Leo Beu- 
erman by and for Centron Corp. 
Fihnstrip winner: Schools Around 
the World by Alfred S. \'edro for 
Field Educational Publications. 
Miscellaneous 

We Used to Call It Printing by 
Peckham Productions for E.I. du 
Pont de Nemoin-s & Co. 

In-Plant Produced 

.\dvertising. Sales Promotion 
The Pontiac Look by General 
Motors Corp. 

Documentar>' 
In Search of A Critical Moment 
b\' Argonne National Laboratory. 
Industrial & Technical Processes 
The New Era by the Boeing Co. 

Public Relations 
Iniaka b\' Sikorsk\- Aircraft. 

Sciences, Research 
Combustion Techniques and 
Liquid Scintillation Counters by 
Argonne National Laboratory'. 
Training, Education 
The Subordination of Teaching 
to Learning by Celanese Corp. 
Miscellaneous 
The Company tlicy Keep by 
General Dynamics Corp. 

Government Produced 

.\rt. Culture 

Environmental Awareness by 



National Park Service. 

Documentary 
Prospect of Iceland h\ Henry 
Sandoz for Ministry of Foreign Af- 
fairs ( Iceland ) . 
Industrial & Technical Processes 
Forts Canada b\' Barrie Howells 
for National Harbours Board (Can- 
ada). 

Medicine, Health 
Protection Against Radioactivity 
in Uranium Mines for Bureau of 
Mines. U.S. Dept. of the Interior. 
Public Relations 
What Makes A Man by George 
Pratt for Aerospace Audio-Visual 
Service. 

Recreation, Sports, Hobbies, 
Travel 
The Peace Game by John De- 
SiKa for South African Tourist 
Coiporation. 

Safety, Welfare 
FroHi the Ground Up by Federal 
Aviation Administration. 

Sciences, Research 
Eagle Has Landed-Apollo 11 by 
National ."Aeronautical and Space 
Administration. 

Training, Education 
Rock Climbii^g, Part II by C. F. 
Parris for Roval Marines (Eng- 
land). 

World Peace, Understanding, 

Brotherhood 
Who Speaks for Man by Arthur 
Zegart for National Educational 
Television. 

Miscellaneous 
Kites to Capsules by Federal 
Aviation Administration. 

University Produced 

Recreation, Sports, Hobbies, 
Travel 

This Land Is by Frank R. Paine 
for Southern Illinois University. 
Safety, Welfare 
A Safer World on Wheels b)' 
University of Michigan. 

Sciences, Research 
The Unknown Continent by 
Leonaris-Film for Med. Phanu 
Studiengesellschaf t ( Germany ) . 




Part of the more than 300 persons m attendance for the 3rd annual U.S. 
Industrial Film Festival awards presentation. 



44 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



First for Midwest 

Northwest Teleproductions Opens 

Complete Videotape Facility 

Empire Phofosound's subsidiary, Northwest Teleproductions 
has opened one of the most complete videotape production 
facilities in the nation. The Minneapolis firm also boasts 
an elaborate mobile production facility. 



A niulti-niillion dullar resource in the 
color television field was revealed last 
month by Northwest Teleproductions, with 
the formal opening in Minneapolis of "one 
of the largest and most completely stalled 
and equipped independent facilities in the 
U.S." 

The new production complex, headed by 
Robert C. Mitchell, has been created to act 
as a major, new single-source supplier of 
VTR commercial, program, and presenta- 



tion material for all phases of the connnu- 
nieations field. 

Ihe new tape center will work closely 
with its parent company. Empire Photo- 
sound, enabling Northwest to offer com- 
plete graphic flexibility, covering any kind 
of communications assignment. The crea- 
tive talent pool resulting will "match any 
now available in the wurld." 

"While we've literally spared no expense 
Continued on next page 



Switching console in the mobile unit handles 18 camera inputs for improved remote capability. 




as film 



r 
L 



A S T I C A N 

SLIDE FRAMES 




Twenty Slides at a Glance 

Flexible yet durable . . . for 35mm 
slides (2" X 2") 

I Provides orderly filing of slides from which 
special presentations may be selected. 

H Rugged, heavy-duty frames measure 9'/2 * 
II V4 and are designed to fit rings of stan- 
dard binders. They may also be fifed in let- 
ter-slie file drawers. 

B Holds slides snugly, scratch-free, yet slides 
slip in and out easily. Eliminates bending of 
slides. 

H Horizontally or vertically mounted slides may 
be viewed with equal ease. 

Packaged 12 in a box — Six dozen in a carton 

■ PLASTICAN CORPORATION 

Box 157, Butler, N.J. 




bigger 



We've added 8mm services 
to the 16mm and 35mm for 
which we're best known. 
Now we're ready for any little 
thing you come up with. 
Or down to. 

super 8 

standard 

optical printing 

magnetic printing 

contact printing 

reduction printing 

color 

b&w 

titles 

opticals 

cartridge loading 

shipping 

storage 

distribution 



All of it. Right down 
the line. In one line. 
Under one roof. 
Call Bernie Barnett 
(212) 838-3900 



mm 

CENTER 



410 East 62nd Street, 
NewYork,N.Y. 10021 



JUNE, 1970 



4." 



How to 

go on location 

without leaving 

the studio. 



Get the new FPC 101 front 
projection system. 

This moving background 
35mm projector is for rent or 
sale. It minimizes the need for 
costly location shooting, in- 
cludes a full professional crew, 
and goes anywhere. 

Hollywood: Wm. Hansard 
(213)780-2156. 

New York: Fred Wells (212) 
986-8980. 




FRONT PROJECTION COMPANY 

0647 M.iii!i).i Avi-nuf. \'.in \'u\s. 0!itorni,^^140T 

A SHERMAN FAIRCHILD ENTERPRISE 



Motivate Your Salesmen 
with 

'*THE ATTITUDE THAT 

CREATES BUSINESS" 

This persuasive color filmstrip will 
cause your salesmen to serve your 
customers' best interests. 
This attitude creates more benefits 
for more customers — and thereby 
creates more sales. As a result, it 
serves your salesmen's best interests 
and yours. That's Creative Selling! 
"The Attitude That Creates Business" 
is one of seven color sound filmstrips 
from the 14-meeting Sales Motivation 
Program . . . 

^'CREATIVE SELLING" 

Judge For Yourself. Send for details 
and "Preview Offer" 

BETTER SELLING BUREAU Dept. X-60 

1150 W. Olive Ave., Burbank, Calif. 91506 
Please tell me how I may evaluate this new 
Sales Motivation Program. 



Name 



Title 



Company 



Address 



videotape facility 



cont/nued 



City 



State 



Zip 



in equipping our operation technically, our 
key product is people," Mitchell added. 
"We now have a complete talent group cov- 
ering casting, production, directing, set de- 
sign, camera, audio, make-up, lighting, vi- 
deo engineering and tape editing. North- 
west Tele is more than a studio — it's a 
production center." 

Important operating adjunct to the 20,- 
000 sq. ft. building housing the new com- 
plex in suburban Edina is a sparking, new 
40' mobile unit recently completed for orig- 
inating and taping capability for sports 
events, conventions, stockholder and sales 
meetings and on-location commercial tele- 
vision production. 

The mobile unit can handle 18 camera 
inputs, tape on three machines, and origin- 
ate four separate programs simultaneously. 
Four separate, sound/environment-condi- 
tioned sections in the unit will handle tap- 
ing, shading, audio and switcher operations, 
duplicating the operating ease of the main 
studio. 

Northwest's main studio occupies a 3,600 
sq. ft. area with a clear ceiling height of 
twenty feet, and features a 75' seamless 
wraparound "cyclorama" as a permanent 
backdrop that blends imperceptibly with the 
matching vinyl floor. Telecine facilities in- 
clude 16mm/ 35mm magnetic film for inter- 
lock as well as 35 and 16mm film and 
slides. Philips-Noreico Plumbicon cameras 
are used in both the main studio and the 
mobile unit. 

Northwest Teleproductions is a wholly 
owned subsidiary of Empire Photosound, 
Inc., parent of the Em Com Communica- 
tion Group Companies headquartered in 
Minneapolis. Em Com provides industrial 
film, multi-media, and audio-visual systems 
and services throughout the world. Em 
Com, headed by William S. Yale, has otfices 
in New York, London, Buenos Aires and 
Tokyo. 




The three-camera shader board wiili tno of 
image enhancers occupies one of the four sep- 
arate sound-conditioned sections of the mobile 
unit. 




The large audio panel in the mobile unit can 
handle 24 inputs and four outputs of audio 
material simultaneously. 




Some Sound Slidefilm Advice 

Here's a free booklet, tfiat gives not only sound advice, 
but visual advice for slidefilm producers. 
It is filled with helpful information for easier, 
more economical preparation of your filmstrips. 

Send today for "Colburn Comments on Sound Slidefilms." 



GEO. W. COLBURN LABORATORY, INC. 

164 N. Wacker Drive • Chicago, III. 60606 
Telephone (area code 312) 332-6286 




46 



BUSINESS SCREEN 




picture parade 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



Centennial Film Shows 
100 Years of History 

A lO-minutc film that whirls 
through 100 years of American 
history in razzle-dazzle, multi- 
image style is helping the West- 
ern Electric Company observe its 
centennial. 100 Years combines 
ncwsrecl clips and old photos and 
art to portray the big moments 
in American history and the 
changing fabric of American life 
from 1869 to 1969. Sports stars 
and entertainers contribute to the 
rapid successions of sights and 
sounds, as do political leaders 
and public heroes like the astro- 
nauts of Apollo 11. 

The development of modern 
communications — Western 
Electric's own field, though its 
name is not mentioned except in 
the credits — helps pace the 
chronicle, and one of the climac- 



tic moments is President Nixon's 
call to the moon. 

The film was produced by 
Hearst Metrotone News and is 
being distributed by Modern 
Talkiniz Picture Service. 



Time-Saving Preview For 
Busy Sales Executives 

Sales managers, training man- 
agers, and other sales-oriented 
executives can now preview the 
popular 200 On Alfred sales 
training program in a time-saving 
preview plan consisting of a sin- 
gle 20-minute film with sound 
track on either record or cas- 
sette. Based on six color film- 
strips and six records or cassette 
tapes, plus literature, 200 On 
Alfred gives salesmen the help 
thev need in both elementary sell- 



ing techniques and more a