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Full text of "Butler Alumnal Quarterly"

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THE BUTLER 

ALUMNAL 
QUARTERLY 



FOUNDERS' DAY NUMBER 




APRIL, 1928 



INDIANAPOLIS 



Entered as second-class matter March 26, 1912, at the post 
office at Indianapolis, Ind., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS 

Butler Looks Back 

College Men and Popular Leadership 

Founders' Bay Address Dr. David Kinley 

The Year's Work; The Future's Promise 

Address at Founders' Day Banqiaet Dr. Robert J. Aley 

Dilemmas 

Address at Founders' Bay Banquet. .Mrs. Alice Corbin Sies 

Flying the Air Mail Marie George, '24 

Editorial Comment 

What Would the Founders Say? 
University News 

Chicago Alumni Meet 

Opening of the Field House 

The Alumnus and Commencement 

Back from Tibetan Perils 

In the Sport Realm 

Around the Campus 

Personal Mention 

Marriages 

Births 



THE BUTLER ALUMNAL QUARTERLY 
Vol. XVII April, 1928 No. 1 

Katharine Merrill Graydon, '78 Editor 

J, Douglas Perry, '26 Associate Editor 

George Alexander Schumacher, '25 Business Manager 

Published four times a year, in October, January, April, July. Annual sub- 
scription, $2.00; single copies, 50 cents. Checks, drafts, etc., should be 
made payable to The Butler Alumnal Quarterly. 

Published by the Alumni Association of Butler University, Indianapolis. 
Printed by The William Mitchell Printing Company, Greenfield, Indiana. 

BUTLER LOOKS BACK 

THE faces of founders and benefactors of the college have 
looked down for the last time from the walls of the old 
chapel on the ceremonial observance of Founders' Day. 
Shortly before the academic procession began, a warm winter sun 
dispelled the clouds of the morning, and streaming through the 
east windows, threw an aureate splendor over the old canvases 
in keeping with the spirit of tribute engendered by the occasion. 
Members of the faculty, wearing the insignia of scholarly attain- 
ment accorded by their universities, and two hundred seniors, also 
attired in cap and gown, filed down the aisles, and the exercises 
were formally opened with the invocation by the Rev. B. R. John- 
son, pastor of the Downey Avenue Christian Church. 

If a somber note ruled the morning exercises, it was counter- 
balanced by the spirit of festival that dominated the banquet 
scene in the evening. The gowns of the women, the lights, the 
flowers, the music, the snowy tables and gleaming tableware gave 
brilliant aspect to the Riley Room at the Claypool Hotel, which 
was filled almost to capacity by alumni, students, faculty members, 
directors, and friends of the university. 

Although the annual Founders' Day dinner is one of the most 
formal of all college occasions, formality was tempered by the wit 
and drollery of Dr. David Kinley, president of the University of 
Illinois and principal speaker at the morning exercises, and the 

9 



Butler Looks Back 3 

genial humor of Hilton U. Brown, chairman of the board of 
directors of Butler University. The evening, however, was not 
without its solemn moments, as when Mr. Brown recalled to 
memory the pioneers who had come into the mid-western wilder- 
ness to establish a university, and when President Robert J. Aley, 
toastmaster, expressed his faith in the future of that university 
and its ultimate contribution to the life of the state and nation. 
There was almost the warmth of consecration in the singing by 
the banqueters of ' ' Old Butler ' ' and ' ' In the Gallery of Memories. ' ' 

Mrs. Alice Corbin Sies, president of Teachers College of In- 
dianapolis, also was a speaker at the banquet. At the forenoon 
exercises, Lee Burns, member of the board of directors, reviewed 
the history of the university. Among telegrams of greeting re- 
ceived in the course of the banquet session were one from the 
Chicago Alumni Club, one from Maria Leonard, '06, Butler grad- 
uate and now dean of women at the University of Illinois, and one 
from James G. Randall, '03, professor of history at the University 
of Illinois. 

Dr. Kinley 's topic in the morning was ' ' College Men and Popu- 
lar Leadership." In the evening he spoke on general problems 
and tendencies of modern education. 

"One of the most impressive things in the history of the de- 
velopment of life in America," he said in his evening address, **is 
the repeated insistence of every group of pioneers, of every group 
of Americans who established a new frontier, upon the establish- 
ment of schools of some kind, according to their means. 

"They never let the light of learning die, but they sought 
always to make it burn brighter for their sons and daughters than 
for themselves. I do not know of any other nation whose history 
has a record like that. The determination to maintain these in- 
stitutions at all hazards, the determination that the next genera- 
tion shall be better educated from the point of view of public wel- 
fare and public policy, is constantly reiterated and shines out in 
the acts of each successive generation of our American citizens. 

"The founders of Butler were no exception. The directors of 
Butler through the years have been no exception. A few years 
ago there was great agitation in this country because of the sudden 



4 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

increase of the number of students seeking entrance to our colleges 
and universities, and there were direful prophecies of what would 
happen if we allowed so many to enter the sacred precincts. 
There were a few of us, mostly old chaps like Dr. Aley and my- 
self, who took the other view. We felt that the American boy or 
girl who could meet the requirements of entrance was entitled to 
take advantage of these opportunities. That to my mind is the 
only point of view that we can take in attempting to give equal- 
ity of opportunity to all. 

"Some of us said this period of distress would pass, that the 
American people would meet this emergency in their educational 
history as they had met others and that the publicly supported 
institutions would get larger appropriations and the endowed in- 
stitutions would get increased endowments. They will not have it 
said that in their generation they failed to keep alive the lighted 
torch handed on to them by the founders of institutions like this. 
And the result has justified the prophecy. Endowments have 
been increased everywhere. Yale went out after twenty-five 
millions and raised it in six months. Harvard, Cornell, Lehigh 
report that every year the money comes in more readily, testifying 
to the confidence of the people of the country with reference to 
the support of their educational institutions. 

''My interpretation of this present movement is not from the 
pedagogical point of view, but from the point of view of social 
development. This increasing tide of young people seeking edu- 
cation is simply an illustration of the determination of our people 
to set up a minimum standard of education for the common people 
of America. Just as we have set up a minimum wage standard 
for the working man, so we want to set up this minimum standard 
of education, and the rest of us who want to be highly educated 
will have to go beyond that if we maintain the degree of merit 
that has been maintained for the last tliirty or forty years. 

"There is also an increase in the number of graduate students 
seeking a second or third degree. Therefore to my mind the whole 
movement has solidity, and we are likely to continue in the future 
as in the past, putting up fine institutions like Butler all over 
the country, which stand as beacon lights, and keeping these lights 



Butler Looks Back 5 

going for the security and advancement of coming generations, 
giving them the advantage of newer methods of education. 

''There is a good deal of talk about our educational move- 
ments and educational philosophies. I venture to say that there 
is not a single so-called experiment in education going on today 
that is not duplicated, with variations, in the history of education. 
Therefore, I am not seriously disturbed by lugubrious phrases 
about the failure of our education. I can remember — perhaps 
none of you here can — when in New England there was an outcry 
against the establishment of public high schools. And there is 
not an argument used against the endowment of colleges and uni- 
versities today that was not used then. The same thing applies 
with reference to criticism of our curriculum. 

"Someone was telling me the other day of the discovery of 
some tablets in Babylon giving an account of student life, includ- 
ing a criticism of their methods of hazing and other things that 
are criticized in colleges and universities the world over. There- 
fore it seems to me that we must go about our work not discount- 
ing, not deprecating, and certainly not depreciating any ideas 
that are new, but open-minded all the time, humble in the face 
of our past failures, determined to win greater success, and re- 
membering that there is some truth in the statement made long 
ago that 'There is nothing new under the sun.' In other words, 
that we are not to be carried away by the high-falutin' notions of 
people who do not know their history." 

Mr. Brown, addressing his opening remarks to Dr. Kinley, told 
of Ovid Butler's contribution to the cause of education in Indiana 
and related the part he played in writing the charter for and 
establishing Butler University. 

"Curiously enough," he said, "the spirit which he inculcated 
has been handed down not only through the generations to stu- 
dents, but we think we see it in his sons and in his grandchildren. 
You may not be familiar with this, so allow me to introduce this 
subject to you. Scot Butler, a son of Ovid Butler, is still living 
after years of service in the college. He went into the Civil War 
as a boy and fought all through it, and declining a commission, he 
came home, went to Europe and studied in the great universities. 



6 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

His devotion to learning was not disturbed by his devotion to his 
country, but his patriotism continued to burn brightly as did also 
his love of learning. 

"I remember as a boy seeing walking down the aisle at church 
on Sunday morning a rather heavy-set, short man with a beard. 
That occurring Sunday after Sunday, of course we young people 
became more or less acquainted with him. That was Ovid Butler, 
the founder of the college, and the father of the man whom I 
have just mentioned. 

"But he was not alone. He alone could not have done what 
has been done. His was a voice crying in the wilderness, but 
there were many followers and supporters. Friends came along in 
time of need, so that we are able to trace a line of generosity and 
a belief in education which has kept this institution going through 
the years." 

Mr. Brown recalled some of the early benefactions and bene- 
factors, briefly tracing the history of the college through its years 
of service to its present era of development. 

"But this gets to be an old story with us," he said. "Some- 
times I think it is only a dream, so the other day I went out to 
Fairview to see whether it were true, and there is one building 
going up, and here another, and there is the river, and here the 
canal, and here are roadways. It is a dream realized — the thing is 
there before us. Of course all this has required great sums of money 
and the board is not neglecting to take cognizance of the generous 
gifts of men like Arthur Brown, Will Irwin, Mrs. Sweeney, Arthur 
Jordan, and all of those who have thrown in money so magnifi- 
cently. We are realizing that it takes vast sums of money, be- 
cause education, like everything else, is moving along, and we 
want to build out there in a way that becomes not only ourselves, 
but those who founded the college. 

"Ovid Butler was a man of granite. We are building this 
institution of granite; we are building it to stay. There will al- 
ways be men and women to be educated. Why build temporarily ? 
If there is any place where permanent structures are needed it is 
in schools and colleges, not only for the students and devotees of 
tlie arts, but for the inspiration of those who are on the outside, as 



Butler Looks Back 7 

they see what is past and done and take knowledge of the fact 
that here have been lives devoted to the building of school struc- 
tures that will endure forever. We know how effective that is, for 
even the ruins of antiquity tell the story of the civilization of that 
day. 

''Building as we are now, let us all trust that next year when 
we move out there we shall realize how much greater the obliga- 
tion on us is to do the things which education of these modern 
times is calling on us to do. This may be the last time that we 
celebrate this occasion from the old college. If so, it only adds 
another chapter to the historic past, back to which we refer always 
with love and affection ; and if it should not be the last, it cannot 
be long until the last time will come and we are housed out yonder 
at Fairview with all that that means." 

Mr. Burns, whose address in the morning dealt with phases 
of Butler's history, emphasized the importance of the church as a 
factor in education in the early days. 

''Practically every college was founded by the church," he said. 
"Harvard was a church school. It is interesting to read of the 
beginnings of Yale, when a few clergymen met in Stamford and 
each laid on the table a few books he had brought, saying, 'These 
books are for the founding of a college in this colony.' And so 
three-quarters of a century ago the members of the Brotherhood of 
Disciples decided that the greatest gift that they could make to 
humanity would be to found a college where the youth of the 
middle West could have an opportunity for higher education. 

"It was fortunate that the chairman of their committee was a 
man having breadth of vision — Ovid Butler. Mr. Butler had been 
associated with a group of friends of education, such as Caleb 
Mills of Crawfordsville and H. W. Benton of Indianapolis, in 
planning a system of common schools for Indiana, and they 
realized the need for a college where teachers for these schools 
might be given adequate preparation. They realized the need of 
sufficient provision for men who were preparing for the ministry, 
and they realized the need of a higher education for all the youth 
of the community. Mr. Butler wrote the special charter that was 
granted to this college in perpetuity by the State of Indiana, and 
its provisions are broad and liberal. 



8 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

"The first president of the college was John Young. With 
him were associated two able scholars, Samuel K. Hoshour and 
Allen R. Benton, whose names were known throughout the edu- 
cational world at that time. Following in a few years we find 
such men as Scot Butler, Harvey Wiley, David Starr Jordan, 
Byron K. Elliott, O. P. Hay, Demarchus Brown, all of whom 
measured up to the higher standards of education that Mr. Butler 
was so anxious to have promoted. Among the other great 
teachers of those days was Catharine Merrill, who was the second 
woman to hold a place on the faculty of an American college. 
Miss Merrill was a teacher of great wisdom, a teacher of liberal 
ideas. She was the first to introduce in her classroom the lecture 
system, which is now used in every American school, and it is 
interesting to read in the old correspondence between Miss Merrill 
and teachers in eastern schools their interest in this system, which 
next was introduced at Cornell. Following Miss Merrill in the 
chair of English literature came such teachers as Harriet Xoble 
and Katharine Merrill Graydon. You may well say that the 
mantle of this first teacher has fallen on worthy shoulders. 

"Butler College was the first co-educational school of its kind 
in America. In the early days some separate schools were 
founded for women and there were a few seminaries, notably 
Oberlin, that offered separate courses for women, but I believe 
Butler was the first to offer full courses for men and women. 
The authorities in those days seemed to have some difficulty in 
describing the degrees for women. In the early catalogs it was 
announced that those who completed the female college coui'se 
would be given the degree mistress of arts. There was anotlier 
rather curious provision of the catalog which prohibited the 
bringing on the campus by any student of firearms, dirks or 
bowie knives. 

"Tliere were no organized athletics in those days, but base- 
ball was played on the campus from the very first. David Starr 
Jordan was not only a great teacher but a great first baseman, and 
among the otlier players were Demarchus E. Brown and Hilton 
U. Brown, president of the board of directore. 

"The great teachers of the early days produced great students. 



Butler Looks Back 9 

Butler students are scattered tliroughout tlie world. Among them 
are many teachers, leaders in their profession ; justices of the 
Supreme Court; prominent men in the law, in medicine, in 
journalism, ministers of the Gospel and leaders in business. But- 
ler men have served the government of the United States in the 
diplomatic service, in the United States Senate, and in the Cabinet 
of the President, and in our own community men from Butler have 
succeeded in every activity of life. 

"As we read of their accomplishments time and again, we read 
this significant phrase, 'They attended Butler College.' That 
phrase may well become our watchword, and it bears with it both 
opportunity and obligation. May we so use its opportunities, may 
we so realize its obligations that our children and our children's 
children shall say of us as they say of those who have preceded 
us, 'They attended Butler College.' " 



More than one man who has been graduated within the last ten 
years will regret that when the university moves to Fairview the 
old power house will not go also. It was a popular rendezvous with 
male students in years gone by, having as it did all the comforts 
of home and few of the limitations. Its habitues foregathered in 
"Dad" Holmes' "office," settled themselves comfortably in such 
chairs as were available, planted their feet on the table, swapped 
colorful and ribald yarns, and occasionally, it is to be feared, pulfed 
on a surreptitious cigarette. 

But those evil days have passed. Whether it is because present- 
day students are too far gone in the intellectual pursuits, one can- 
not say. At any rate, a few more months and picturesqueness will 
give way to practicality, and the mountains of coal, the stoking, 
the clanking of the boilers, the grime and the soot wnll be displaced 
by clean, oil-burning furnaces that are ' ' fired ' ' by the pressing of 
a button or the turning of a valve. 



10 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

COLLEGE MEN AND POPULAR LEADERSHIP 

Founders' Day Address 
By Dr. David Kinley, President of the University of Illinois 

LET me first of all congratulate you on the significance of 
this day. The observance of a Founders' Day necessarily 
recalls to mind the purposes and principles of the founder 
and the career of the institution. Such an observance is a tribute 
to the far-seeing person who saw a need and supplied it. That the 
need in this case was a real and important one is proven by the 
continued existence and development of the institution. If the 
foundation laid had not been substantial, this university could not 
have endured and grown as it has in the past half century. "It 
fell not, for it was founded upon a rock. ' ' 

On such occasions we stand, as it were, on a hill top and look 
over the educational landscape to verify and perhaps to rectify our 
course. We get inspiration from the farspread hills and valleys. 
We are impressed anew with the need for constant vigilance and 
with the ideal of a better future lying just beyond the veil of mist 
that shrouds the top of the next hill we have to climb. 

Butler University is one of the monuments strewn along the 
path of the pioneers of American life reaching across the continent 
as evidence of their belief in the importance of education. As one 
of your college historians has said : ' ' The pioneer settlers soon 
realized the importance of establishing educational facilities that 
would be accessible to their own people. They knew that successful 
self-government must be intelligent government." Accordingly, 
the leaders of the church which established this institution under- 
took to supply in part that need which they thus felt. To be sure, 
there may have been a bit of denominational competition and pride 
in their minds ! Hanover and Wabash had been founded by the 
Presbyterians, DePauw by the Methodists, and Franklin by the 
Baptists. This pointed a duty to the members of the Christian or 
Disciples Church. The story of the heroic efforts to get sufficient 
means to start and maintain the project, the history of the sacrifices 
made by all concerned, especially by the earlier members of the 



College Men and Popular Leadership 11 

faculty, some of whose great names are preserved not only in your 
memory but in the memory of the educational world, are all well 
known. In the words of one of your graduates, Mr. John H. 
Holliday: "A great thing was being done, the evoking of a great 
and beneficent force that should pervade the life of many genera- 
tions, exert an incalculable influence upon the community and the 
commonwealth and touch distant lands. It was the beginning of 
an institution that would instill high purposes in the hearts and 
minds of men and women and fill them with a courage to live life 
bravely and serviceably. ' ' And now you may proudly say : 
"Wherever one may go there are to be found men from Butler." 
They have played their part with success in every line of private 
and public activity. They have done their part in molding public 
opinion, formulating public policies, establishing standards in 
private business, and, in short, giving character and direction to 
American life. This thought leads immediately to the subject to 
which I invite your attention today: whether, in view of their in- 
creasing number, college and university graduates of the country 
are exerting proportionately as great and good an influence on 
the life of our people as they did two or three generations ago and 
as they must do if our democracy is to produce its best results. 

The subject is more or less intangible. Facts of any kind, 
statistical or other, bearing upon it, are scarce and illusive. We 
believe that men and women who have had the benefit of a college 
course have or are supposed to have an advantage over those who 
have not had such education, not only in our volume of information 
but in ability to think, and that they are under a heavier moral 
obligation to use that ability and information for the public benefit. 
To-day there are thousands of college educated men and women 
where forty years ago there were hundreds. In the past quarter 
of a century, the increase in the number of young men and women 
graduated each year from the colleges and universities has been 
very large. These graduates numbered 15,972 in 1900. They 
aggregated 78,612 in 1924. In other words, the number graduated 
in the latter year was five times that graduated in the former year, 
and the percentage of those graduated in the latter year to the 
whole population was more than three times that of 1900. In 



12 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

1899-1900, when the first volume of "Who's Who in America" 
appeared, it recorded 8,602 names. Of these, about 41 per cent., in 
round numbers, were graduates of colleges and similar institutions. 
In 1922-23, of the 24,278 names listed in the edition of "Who's 
Who," about 60 per cent, were graduates of institutions of college 
grade. The figures do not mean so much as the figures showing 
the increasing number of graduates in recent years. But taken 
together, the figures may justify raising the question: has the 
influence of the college-educated on public opinion and policy in 
our country increased with their increasing number? Or is it a 
fact that our increasing number does not indicate a corresponding 
gain in the leadership that is supposed to come from ability to 
think in the interest of the public on public matters and to win 
our fellow citizens by their confidence in the clarity and logic of 
our thinking and the integrity of our character? 

My thesis is not that fewer college graduates go into public 
life and into those callings like literature, journalism, and the 
ministry, which mold public opinion and frame public policj^; but 
that the callings which offer this opportunity are perhaps at- 
tracting a smaller proportion of the abler college men and women 
than was the case a generation or two ago. By these callings I do 
not mean office-holding positions only, but include all those call- 
ings which set standards of public opinion and policy. I would 
include the professions of literature, journalism, the ministry, and 
law, as well as public office-holding of all degrees and kinds. I 
put the thesis as a question, rather than assert it as a fact. 

As I remarked, the evidence is rather intangible and scanty, but 
there is some. Speaking of the ministry and the teaching pro- 
fession as openings for men of independent means and good educa- 
tion, Chief Justice Taft wrote recently, "During the last two 
generations, the thirst for money and a life of independence has 
deprived these two professions of their share of the ability of 
college graduates." The shortage of good men in the ministry lias 
long been a cause of regret. 

There has been complaint also for several years of the difficulty 
of attracting able men and women into the teaching profession. 
Far be it from me to contribute to tlie beatins: of the drums that 



College Men and Poe'Ular Leadership 13 

attends upon educational discussion in these days, or to say any- 
thing that will indicate a pessimistic view of educational or, indeed, 
of general social conditions. The criticisms of things educational, 
political, social, with which the air is full, are repetitions of similar 
noises heard at recurrent periods in earlier days. What I am 
saying, therefore, is not intended to be of a critical character but 
simply to raise the question of whether the improved conditions 
of today may not be made better tomorrow by the injection of 
more of our abler people into vocations that seem to have become 
more or less neglected. The teaching profession is one of these. 
To be sure, we cannot expect all teachers to be one hundred per 
cent, good any more than business men, or lawyers, or the members 
of any other group. However, if there is one calling in which it 
is more important to have the best men and women than in any 
other, it is the profession of teaching; for in the hands of the 
teachers lie the high duty and privilege of shaping largely the 
standards and ideals of the coming generation. Here, surely, we 
need the best. Yet it is a constant cry that we are not getting 
enough of the best. Probably there is some truth in the statement. 
It is probable that a larger proportion of the present number of 
teachers are college and university graduates than ever was the 
case before. We have so-called higher requirements for teachers' 
certificates. We have developed our science of education, so that 
our teaching methods are supposed to be superior to those of earlier 
days. With these improvements, should we not get better results? 
Should we not get a better product than we used to get? Do we 
find that the high school graduates, and indeed the college grad- 
uates, are any better trained than they used to be? With the 
multiplication of psychological tests, educational methods and de- 
vices, is our teaching any more successful in turning out educated 
men and women? Are we not in danger of magnifying the im- 
portance of organization, method, devices, as compared with per- 
sonality, . bility, and character? 

It is n >t only in the ministry and teaching professions that there 
seems to ))e too small a proportion of the best of our college and 
university educated men and women. It seems to me that the 
literature'' of the day in the main is produced by writers not of 



14 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

the highest talent. Compare the serious literature of the day with 
that of forty or even thirty years ago. Broadly speaking, the 
proportion of books and magazines, and indeed of newspapers, 
which devoted themselves to discussion of matters of moment, ap- 
pears greater then than it is now. Magazines of philosophical dis- 
cussion of important public questions have almost ceased to exist 
among us. Such of them as survive are largely connected with 
educational or scientific institutions and are not read by the general 
public. Our book stalls are loaded with books and magazines whose 
purpose is to be informative, entertaining, or merely to stir emotion 
or arouse a passing interest. Too many of them are made primarily 
to sell rather than to instruct and help. We are too likely to 
regard as the "best" seller the work of which the largest number of 
copies is sold and which brings to its author and publisher the 
largest amount of money, even if its success comes from appeal to 
passion or prejudice. Consider the dirt that is palmed off on us 
as ' ' good literature ' ' ! More serious still, consider our acceptance 
of it, our support of it, our willingness to have it color and taint 
our national character and pervert our greatest ideals and destroy 
our finest standards. We buy it, we read it, and so support those 
who write it. 

But aside from this kind of literature, we encourage the out- 
pour of mere descriptive or informative publications. We fail to 
distinguish between getting information and getting an education. 
We memorize; we do not think. We believe that it is important 
to know much, whether we digest it and think about it or not. I 
remember asking one of the greatest German economists of a 
generation ago whether he had read a certain book. His reply 
was: "No. If I read everything that is written I have no time to 
think and write myself." The point is that reflection on a smaller 
amount of information will do more for us than increasing knowl- 
edge without reflection. In the latter case, "Knowledge "omes but 
wisdom lingers." 

Then consider some of the writers of our literature. There are 
people writing whose flow of language is better than their compre- 
hension, whose literary technique, as they call it, is of more im- 
portance to them than clear thinking, and whose knc vvledge of 



College Men and Popular Leadership 15 

their subject matter might, without harm, be somewhat enlarged. 
I am amused frequently by interviews with young things whose 
ambition is "to write." It is surprising how many aspirants for 
literary fame there are whose only credentials for admission are 
the desire to write and what they call their knowledge of technique. 
It seems that membership, past or present, in the English depart- 
ment of a college is regarded as sufficient preparation for writing 
on subjects of historical, philosophical and social importance. I 
have seen magazine articles and books on subjects concerning which 
the authors showed a profound ignorance and a lack of clearness 
of view, to say nothing of inability to think logically. But the 
authors could ' ' write ' ' ! Their writing was labored expression of 
the commonplace, platitudinous description of the obvious. 

One of the pet ideas of some writers of this class has been to 
decry old standards of ethics, morals, conduct, and to propose, as 
a substitute, some opinion of their own, based on neither experience 
in life, knowledge of history, nor knowledge of human nature. I 
recall a leading article in a leading journal not long ago which 
proposed the idea of beauty as a rule of life rather than the idea 
of right. The young writer had no sufficient experience to justify 
her readers in having confidence in her judgment. She seemed 
ignorant of the fact that the subject was not a new one, that it had 
been discussed by Plato and a line of successors whose knowledge 
of history and human experience was as a mountain to her mole 
hill. Indeed, I doubt if the writer would have recognized her 
subject under the title given to it by other w-riters — a discussion 
of the relation of ethics and aesthetics. Yet, such articles are 
eagerly read and have much influence on public opinion. 

Again, consider the journalism of the day. One must enter with 
fear and trembling upon any discussion that seems at all critical 
of this field ! Is it or is it not a correct view that new^spapers had a 
greater influence in the days of personal journalism, as it was 
called then, than to-day, as leaders of the people, in sober thought 
about important public matters? Their influence on the public 
by furnishing information was never so great. I am speaking of 
their editorial influence. There are great editors in America to- 
day. Their voices, however, speak, in the main, the policy of their 



16 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

organizations. The personal influence of great characters like 
Horace White, Henry Watterson, Charles A. Dana, Joseph Medill, 
Horace Greeley, Henry Raymond, Samuel Bowles, seems to be lack- 
ing in these days. One wonders whether the removal of the 
anonymity that surrounds our great editors would not be a public 
benefit. 

One great group of molders of public opinion has practically 
disappeared. I refer to the platform lecturers of other days. 
Wendell Phillips, Garrison, and others like them have no successors. 
In mentioning these various callings, I use them as typical of 
the callings that have a more direct and important influence on 
shaping public opinion. There is another class that should be 
added. Justice Taft, in the article already referred to, says, ' ' The 
men whose ranks should be filled are the politicians." With this 
we must agree. Justice Taft deprecates the sinister significance 
commonly attached to the term ' ' politician, ' ' and defines the word 
as meaning ' ' one active in politics with a sense of civic responsibil- 
ity, studying public questions with the purpose of doing the best he 
can for the public." He adds, what is true, that "the holding of 
office is not essential to the life of a good politician." Xor is the 
holding of office essential to the influencing of public opinion. 
Justice Taft urges men of independent means to go into polities, 
on the ground that "the men who are not dependent upon their 
salaries for office will introduce into polities men of independence 
who will not be afraid to lose office in fighting for what they 
desire in politics." Such men, the Justice thinks, "will be trained 
to study the wishes of people and their actual condition. They 
will be trained to weigh the justice of their contentions and not 
what are merely selfish outbursts of a class. They will be trained 
not to hesitate to condemn aspirations that have their origin in 
the love of a class and the welfare of a class as distinguished from 
the rest of the community." 

There are great problems before the American people to-day. 
Are the college-educated taking the lead in discussing them — men 
and women whose purpose is to find the solutions best for the 
public interest, or men who are using these problems as footballs of 
partisan politics or for the promotion of special interests? Who 



College Men and Popular Leadership 17 

are discussing what shall finally be the position of our country on 
matters that make for permanent peace? In a society that is be- 
coming increasingly industrial and commercial, how many college- 
educated are discussing with knowledge, intelligence, and disinter- 
estedness the fundamental principles of agricultural readjustment, 
proposed changes in our constitution, or our economic and com- 
mercial relations with other countries of the world? Who are the 
leaders in the solution of these questions? We have recently had 
some splendid illustrations of leadership by men who, as statesmen 
and citizens, have accepted their responsibility. Mr. Roosevelt 
was one. Mr. Dawes and his associates in their solution of the 
German reparations difficulty are others. Doubtless many others 
might be mentioned ; but broadly speaking, are we college-educated 
people taking that position of leadership in the solution of such 
questions, in the molding of public opinion on such matters, as 
people at large are entitled to expect of us? 

But it is pertinent to pause for a moment to ask what is meant 
by leader and leadership. A distinguished business man, president 
of one of our great life insurance companies, has been quoted 
recently as saying that a democracy which follows the "foolish 
philosophy of the Declaration of Independence" cannot long en- 
dure in this age of science and business, and that "to endure, a 
democracy must be ruled by its best. Leadersliip to-day is no 
longer in government. It is in science and business. . . . The 
really great men of America are rarely in politics." 

These remarfe seem to me to show a misconception of what is 
meant by leadership in public life and the qualities necessary for 
that leadership. Modern life, especially in its complex economic 
and material development, necessitates leadership of various kinds 
and it is assuming much to say that the qualities necessary to make 
a great financier, or engineer, or scientist, are the same as those 
necessary to make a great leader of the people. It seems to me 
that the latter kind of leadership requires qualities different in 
many respects from those needed for the former kind of leader- 
ship. It requires one type of man to earrj' through a great 
engineering project when he has authority to require the per- 
formance of their duties by people whose only business is to obey 



18 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

the will of the leading spirit. It requires a different type of man 
to fuse together the conflicting opinions of his fellow citizens and 
to win them to his views. Such a leader must know history and 
government and law. He should know something about interna- 
tional affairs. He should know the ambitions, aspirations, feelings 
of his countrymen. He must have prophetic vision to see where 
these lead and balanced judgment to correlate conflicting views 
and plans. And above all, he must have the human touch that 
wins men's hearts to him and the logical acumen that con\inces 
them. Lincoln was such a leader. So was Roosevelt. 

It is unwise to expect a man to be a sound guide in public 
affairs merely because he is great in some line of private business 
or expert in scientific discovery. ''Nothing is more deceitful," 
Justice Taft remarks, "than the statements that what we need in 
politics is the business man. Politics are a business — at least they 
are a field in which experience tells for usefulness and effective- 
ness — and a man who has devoted his entire life to the successful 
establishment of a business is generally not the man who will be 
useful to the public in the administration of public business. ' ' 

There are men who, given authority over other men and means, 
can do great things. But they could not win the mass of men to 
their views. Such men in public life would probably be Mussolinis, 
rather than Lincolns. 

It is difficult to decide what are the best causes of the apparent 
decline of leadership of public opinion and affairs by college men. 
Some, however, seem to be clear. One seems to be the diversifica- 
tion of college education. As former Secretary of War Baker 
recently remarked: "In our fathers' day a college education was 
a concrete and definite thing, and college educated men and women 
had not only an equal but the same body of common knowledge. 
In our day electives and specializations have so diversified the 
possibilities of education that men rarely have identical educations 
and, therefore, rarely have any consciousness of academic identity 
in the general mass of educated persons. . . . Our educated and 
cultured people seem voiceless and scattered. They do not have 
the common impulse to make their weight felt at the points of 
social disintegration and danger." 



College Men and Popular Leadership 19 

Two consequences have followed from this diversification. One 
is mentioned by Mr. Baker. The other is that people taking these 
specialized courses of study are not educated in the subjects closest 
to what we call the "general welfare." They have been educated 
to succeed in individual vocations. This difference must not be 
over-emphasized, but there is something in it. As Justice Taft 
remarked in the quotation already made, the methods of business 
are not the methods of public administration and the education 
now regarded as best suited for the former is not perhaps best 
suited for the latter. 

Again, our standard of success in this country has been 
economic. The man who has made the most money has been 
regarded as most successful. It has not been possible, broadly 
speaking, to win in other lines the prestige that success in business 
brings. In other countries, careers are open in such fields as the 
ministry, the army, the public service, which while bringing honor 
to those successful in them, also provide them with reasonable 
subsistence. 

StiU again, until recently our political conditions have been in 
the main rather simple. The past thirty years have brought us 
face to face as a nation with many new~and complex problems. 

Finally, the misapplication of the doctrine which is the essence 
of our democracy, — the doctrine of equality of opportunity — may 
have been a factor in producing the result we are discussing. We 
have interpreted equality too commonly to mean equality of ability, 
knowledge, wisdom, rather than simple equality of opportunity to 
use the talents, however meagre, that we are endowed with. Many 
hold the idea that anybody can do public business, form public 
opinion and decide public issues intelligently. 

Lack of courage may be a partial explanation. It requires 
courage to think. It requires courage to express an opinion formed 
from careful thought. It requires courage to stand up for a 
personal opinion. In matters of public policy, as in most others, 
it is easier to go with the crowd than to stand alone. We have lost 
our courage in a measure by the suppression of our individuality. 
We are victims of mob thought, mob psychology, mob action. We 
have lost too much of our courage to stand alone. 



20 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

As a result of these and other influences, many with capacity 
to lead in public matters have become leaders in various callings 
but are not leading public opinion on matters of public welfare. 
Aside from our activity in our callings, most of us spend our time 
on trivial matters. Our frivolities and our amusements unite us. 
Our intellectual pursuits separate us. 

Not long ago one of our Chicago papers carried an editorial 
on ' ' Education and the Joneses. ' ' The occasion was a social enter- 
tainment. Most of them presumably were college graduates. When 
they assembled some stood up for ten minutes to "reduce." Then 
they discussed the number of shots on the golf course, the kinds of 
automobiles — then cards. Who now, this editorial went on to 
ask, are the Joneses and their friends? "They are the cross-cut 
of our honest, energetic, American citizen. Every one of them is 
a product of higher education. The men all went to college, some 
in the West and some in the East. The women were co-eds or 
graduates of our women's colleges. They spent a good quarter of 
their lives in learning how to live, in acquiring an education and 
absorbing culture. ' ' 

We are not sufficiently interested in matters that do not touch 
our personal interests, especially matters of public concern. In 
1920, of a total voting population of more than 54,000.000, fewer 
than 27,000,000 votes were cast. This less than half. Four years 
later the total vote was about 50 per cent of the possible. College 
educated men, whose education lays on them a larger moral re- 
sponsibility for the discharge of the duties of citizenship, are among 
the shirkers. 

In urging a greater interest on the part of college men and 
women in the molding of public opinion on matters of general 
interest and also a greater participation by them in public affairs, 
I do not advocate the control of public opinion and governmental 
policy by them or any other class. ]\Iy appeal is that they should 
put their talents and education freely at the disposal of the people 
for the people to consider, to follow, to adopt their views and 
plans, provided they can be won over to these. I am not advocat- 
ing the substitution of experts in business or anything else for the 



College Men and Popular Leadership 21 

judgment of the people themselves in matters of public policy and 
government. 

What can arouse us to the duty that I have tried to describe? 
Because of our failure to discharge it we are now confronted with 
the present demand for some kind of aristocracy. We are told that 
only the "fit" should be admitted to college. We are told that 
only the "best" should be allowed to rule. Who are the fit? Who 
are the best? Who can pick them out in advance? It is of the 
very essence of democracy that all shall have an equal opportunity 
to make the best of his talents and to share in the civic life. Many 
fall by the wayside in the competition. Some people call this a 
"waste," which they would avoid or prevent by determining in 
advance who should not be permitted to enter the race. But this 
would be a denial of the right to try, which is the essence of 
equality of opportunity. Who would be the judge? By what 
standards would he judge? 

Professor John Dewey remarks: "The final obstacle in the 
way of any aristocratic rule is that in the absence of any articulate 
voice on the part of the masses, the best do not and cannot remain 
the best, the wise cease to be wise. ... No government by ex- 
perts, in which the masses do not have the chance to inform the 
experts as to their needs, can be anything but an oligarchy managed 
in the interests of the few. The essential need is the improvement 
of the methods and conditions of debate, discussion and persua- 
sion. . . . It is not necessary that the many should have the 
knowledge and skill to carry on the needed investigations ; what is 
required is that they have the ability to judge of the bearing of 
the knowledge supplied by others upon common concerns." 

Here is the opportunity and the need for leaders. College 
educated men and women are called to devote their talents and 
education to the services of the plain people. They are called on to 
win the confidence of the public and to lead it by serving it. To 
be sure, we, the public, have a lesson to learn in this connection. 
That is, that we must be more regardful of our public servants and 
more generous in our treatment of them if we are to secure their 
services. We must make it possible for them to attain at least as 
great a success, as large a prestige in the service of the public as 



22 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

they could, on the whole, obtain in private efforts; and we must 
welcome the help and advice of those, who, while busy with private 
concerns, yet devote themselves whole-heartedly to the promotion of 
the public welfare by urging proper standards, high ideals, and 
straight conduct. We must remove the prejudice which the 
populace has against sound thinking. James Russell Lowell re- 
marked once that "in the opinion of some of our leading politicians 
and of many of our newspapers, men of scholarly minds are ipso 
facto debarred from forming any judgment on public affairs; but 
if they should be so unscrupulous as to do so, that they must at least 
refrain from communicating it to their fellow citizens." 

The lack of public leadership is shown by the present state of 
public mind on some great issues. Commenting on this fact. Presi- 
dent Nicholas Murray Butler recently remarked, "Take as an 
example one great outstanding question of this generation : How 
shall the world act so as to avert the likelihood of a repetition of 
the gigantic military struggle of 1914-18'? . . . To-day, nine 
years after the Armistice which was hailed through the world 
with paeans of joy and hymns of thanksgiving, the cjTiics, the 
masters of sarcasm, and the exponents of those who cannot and 
will not think, are still talking in terms of 1914. . . . They go 
on merrily spending public money for the construction of more 
battleships and swift cruisers and marvelous submarines, and re- 
peating the old saws about security and national defense as if 
these terms now had a meaning at all comparable to that which 
they had in 1914." The lack of sufficient competent leadership 
on such matters is manifest in other countries than our own. 

It is for us who have had the great advantage of education to 
become in a large way the prophets and leaders of the people. 
Do you remember the day in the wanderings of the children of 
Israel when they stood on the banks of the Jordan with the 
Promised Land in sight but feared to cross the swollen river when 
Jehovah commanded them to go forward? Who pointed the way? 
Not the warriors; not the men of wealth. The priests with the 
ark of the covenant of God, the symbol of Israel 's ancient covenant 
with the Almighty and her unrealized hope of the Promised Laud, 
the embodiment of her ideals and her dreams — thev with the ark 



College Men and Popular Leadership 23 

were to go in front. They were the servants and the leaders of the 
people. 

"Take up the ark on your shoulders, Priests of the Holy and True, 
Enter the swelling of Jordan and stand till the tribes go through, 
Stand in the bed of the river where never a foot has trod, 
And win by your patient obedience a path for the people of God. 

What though the Lion of Judah wave o'er the glittering van? 
What though the strength of the serpent coil round the standard 

of Dan? 
Never a Prince nor a Leader can stand in your place to-day, 
Or can reach the strand of the Promised Land, except ye will lead 

the way. 

Not for the mighty ones only scenting the battle afar, 
Reuben and Gad and Mannasseh, harnessed and ready for war, 
But time must be gained, the way maintained, for the weak and the 
young and the slow, — 

And not till the last have safely past — will the priests have leave 
to go." 



Winning generously is as fine a quality as losing cheerfully. 

The day after the basketball victory over Notre Dame, Butler 
students one thousand strong swept through the downtown district 
and swarmed into the Indiana Theater. Charlie Davis, popular 
orchestra leader at the theater, made himself host and master of 
ceremonies. After he had introduced members of the team from 
the stage, his musicians played some Butler songs which brought 
the celebrants to their feet cheering and singing. Then a pause, 
and the orchestra broke into the Notre Dame song. In a flash 
the Butler throng again was on its feet, creating a tumult of ap- 
plause that made its previous effort seem insignificant. The 
demonstration was partly for a fallen foe and partly for Charlie, 
for Notre Dame is Charlie's alma mater. 




24 BuTLEE A1.UMNAL Quarterly 

THE YEAR'S WORK; THE FUTURE'S PROMISE 

Address at Founders' Day Banquet 
By President Robert J. Afey 

NE of the penalties of being in the position of an executive 
in a college is that on occasions of this sort one has to say 
something. It is also a penalty to the audience, but it is 
inescapable so far as I know. I want to say a few words in regard 
to the year that has passed since we met here, and a few words, 
possibly of hope, of the things that are ahead. 

We feel, and I believe properly so, that in the twelve months 
that have gone since last Founders' Day that we have had real 
progress, real growth, real development at Butler. I believe that 
we have had the services of a body of men and women as teachers 
who have given more whole-hearted devotion to their work and 
greater loyal service than we have had in the past, great as the 
past service has been. I am sure that we have had the interest 
of the citizenship of this community and of the state and the 
nation as we have never had it before. I feel beyond any question 
that we have had greater work, more unstinted service on the part 
of our board of directors, not that they would not have given it 
before, but because the conditions of the past year haA^e called for 
it and they have responded to the call in a wonderful way. 

Then I want to say that we have had a body of students who 
have not given us trouble, but have given us courage and hope 
for the future. I have no patience whatever with wild stories of 
"flaming youth," with the notions that are sometimes given forth 
from platform and pulpit and press that the youth of to-day. the 
college youth of to-day, are not what they were in the old days. 
I would be sorry, indeed, to take the cover off the good old days 
and the people who lived in them. I should not like to expose 
those good old days to the splendid youth of to-day. If I should 
attempt it, I am sure I would have many entreaties that it should 
not be done. I feel that the boys and girls in the colleges to-day. 
and I think I can speak for more than Butler, are of as fine stuff, 
have as high ideals, and are as earnest and forward-looking as the 



The Year's Work; The Future's Promise 25 

boys and girls of any age the world ha>s ever known. President 
Kinley just spoke of the history of universities going back thou- 
sands of years, showing that there was criticism of the flaming 
youth of that day. They lived through that criticism, and we 
have lived through criticism and will live through the criticism 
that is being made to-day. I have faith, my friends, in the youth 
of to-day. They are going to respond to the opportunities we give 
them, and they will be the kind of men and women of to-morrow 
that we need to solve to-morrow's problems, and that we need to 
keep the world moving forward. 

It is, as I take it, the province of an institution of learning to 
do a few things better than they can be done by any other institu- 
tion. It is not the place of an institution of learning, not the 
purpose, to replace the legitimate work of other institutions. 
There are a great many fathers and mothers who would like to 
unload upon the grade schools, the high school, the college, their 
problems — ^let somebody else solve them. That is not the purpose 
of an institution of learning. It is not the purpose of an institu- 
tion of learning to take the place of civic righteousness in the 
community. It may contribute its part, but it cannot be the sole 
agent of civic righteousness for the community. It has its work 
to do, and its primary work, as you will agree and as set forth 
in the purpose of such institutions from time immemorial — its 
primary purpose is to expose youth to knowledge, to inspire them 
if possible with a love for laiowledge, to make them seekers after 
truth, to make them, if you please, men and women who will think, 
who will think through problems and act upon judgment that is 
founded upon facts and conditions that warrant decisions made. 

It is not the purpose of the educational institution to teach 
young people what to think, but rather to teach them how to think, 
to give them an attitude of mind that wiU make them approach 
problems of all kinds — social, political, civic relations, moral 
problems, in the attitude of a searcher after truth. That, if I 
understand it, is the purpose of Butler. We are striving to do 
that thing. We succeed, not of course one hundred per cent., but 
we succeed in larger measure than many folk suppose, because as 
you older people know, youth is not opening its mind to every 



26 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

passerby. We do not know what is going on, what changes, what 
developments, what new attitudes are being formed, but after life 
shows that these are being formed within college walls. 

Of course, in the conduct of an institution of learning there 
are a good many extra-curricular activities, and if you read the 
papers and magazines you sometimes mistake, as I think President 
Wilson phrased it at Princeton, the sideshow^s for the big top. 
You get the notion that the extra-curricular activities, athletics 
and social affairs and fraternal organizations, are the things that 
make the university. But as I say a good many times to the stu- 
dents at Butler, we may have a fine football team — the finest; we 
may have a basketball team that can defeat practically all its 
opponents ; we may have a track team that establishes new records ; 
we may have a group of fraternities that have more jewels in their 
buttons than any other group in the world ; we may have a Junior 
Prom and a Sophomore Hop that out-proms and out-hops any- 
thing in the world — we may have all these, and if we fail in the 
main purpose of the institution, the purpose of exposing young 
people to knowledge and giving them an interest in knowledge, 
indeed, if we fail on the academic side, all these other things are 
of no avail, and if we fail on the academic side all these other 
things in a short time will cease. In the long run, men and women 
who send their children and young people to college seek out the 
institution that stands for academic development, culture and 
growth. I hope that in Butler, and in other great educational in- 
stitutions of the country, there may be proper standards kept, and 
that the main purpose for which the institution exists may never 
be forgotten. I trust that at Butler we have contributed some- 
thing to that attitude of mind. 

Now as we look into the future, see the larger facilities that 
we are to have at Butler in the new location, the greater oppor- 
tunities to do with more ease our work in the future, we hope that 
the existing departments may be strengthened, that we may have 
means that will enable us to secure and retain in our faculty the 
very highest grade of men and women. But we realize that if we 
are to serve the community, the state and the nation as we should, 
there are other developments that must come. We believe that an 



The Year's Work; The Future's Promise 27 

institution of learning should contribute very greatly to the better 
business activities of the constituency which it serves, and so we 
hope to see in the not far distant future a college or school of 
business administration developed with a faculty and equipment 
that may make it as good as the best. t 

We are already very much interested in the development of 
training for teachers. We have affiliation with the Teachers 
College of Indianapolis, of which Mrs. Sies is the head, for the 
training of elementary teachers. We are now making an affilia- 
tion with the Claire Ann Shover School, under the direction of 
Mrs. Lieber, and we hope to see Indianapolis the center of train- 
ing for teachers of all sorts, teachers of the highest grade for all 
kinds of public school work. We have an affiliation with two 
prominent and widely-known music schools of this city. We hope 
that is but the beginning of a musical department that shall go on 
increasing in power, for we believe that the educated man of the 
future must have such an understanding of music that will round 
out his full development as a man. 

We have affiliation with the John Herron Art Institute, and 
that, too, we believe, will continue with increasing good result as 
Indianapolis becomes a greater center for the development of 
artists and the training of teachers in art. Investigations are now 
on looking toward the establishment or affiliation of a College 
of Law at Butler. That is a matter I cannot tell you much about, 
but it is one of the dreams of the future. 

In conclusion I want to say that I believe upon the splendid 
foundations of the past, upon the achievements of the men and 
women interested in this institution, upon the work of the present, 
and through the solution of the problems that knock at our door 
to-day, there will come a future that will be greater and better and 
stronger, and that in that future we can contribute more to the 
life of the community, the state and the nation than we have in 
the past. That is the dream that Butler has. We hope you may 
all be interested in helping us to realize that dream. I thank you. 



28 Butler. Alumnal Quaeteely 

DILEMMAS 

Address at Founders' Day Banquet 

By Alice Corbin Sies, 

President of Teaciiers College of Indianapolis 

IN THE Metropolitan Museum of New York City I once saw 
Kodin's statue, "The Thinker." Seated on a rough-hewn 
rock, the Thinker leans heavily forward with the weight of his 
body supported on one knee, the head resting upon a bent arm. 
How simple it seems to think thus, in majestic solitude, serenely 
facing life's issues with elemental, primitive intelligence, in prob- 
ably a rudimentary society. One feels confidence that this primi- 
tive thinker will work his way through successfully to the solution 
of his problems. 

Thinking to-day is not so simple. It is a dilemma. One is 
reminded of the surf bather who in high spirit ventures deeper 
and deeper into the water where larger and increasingly power- 
ful breakers bear down upon him, until at last the overweight of 
the water throws him suddenly backward. There is nothing for 
him to do but strike out with the hands and feet for shore as best 
he can. Life seems to present more situations in which we have 
the dilemma of the bather than that of Rodin's Thinker. 

We talk much about bringing life situations into the school and 
college, seizing upon the dilemmas of society as focal points for 
clarifying our thinking about society. We are attacking this in 
many different ways. Dr. Meiklejohn, once president of Amherst 
College, now dean of the Experimental College of the University 
of Wisconsin, is much in the limelight because of the unique plan 
he is trying to work out there. Dr. Meiklejohn happens to be a 
creative administrator who yet has caught the educational tempo 
of the present generation. He is trying to break away from mass 
education, from regimentation and lock-step, yet at the same 
time he advocates the return to the rather definite curriculum of 
fifty and seventy-five years ago. He returns, however, with a 
fresh point of attack. The Experimental College does not teach 
so much as it exposes youth to knowledge. 



Dilemmas 29 

Twelve students meet with an instructor once a week, who dis- 
cusses with them not so much history, economics and literature, 
but takes up the problems of civilization, taking that civilization to 
pieces, seeing how it worked, what force animated it, finding out 
what suggestions for the future were thrown out. A rotation of 
instructors prevents inbreeding of ideas and keeps the swift cur- 
rents of thought moving. This year the students are delving into 
the Greek civilization ; later they will take a look at the moderns 
with the idea that they will find out in this intimate association with 
great minds something of the main springs of civilization. 

Of course our critics say that this bird's-eye view of the world 
is superficial and that it does not fit youth for the specialization 
of the business and industrial systems which exist to-day. It will 
be interesting to observe the results of putting students independ- 
ently at work and giving them the responsibility for their own 
education. It has been tried other places with varying degrees 
of success. 

Growth in thinking comes from examining foundations of 
thought. One must constantly re-examine facts. The educated 
mind differs from the uneducated both in the insight and the 
technique with which it gathers facts and marshals them into a 
fighting position. The thinkers of to-day are confronted by mil- 
lions of new facts but no gain in the sense of values. Something 
must be done to simplify and interpret the vast fields of knowledge 
which are being opened up so rapidly, knowledge which is over- 
whelming us at every point. That something must be done by the 
thinker himself. 

Glenn Frank of Wisconsin would solve the dilemma b.y throw- 
ing the responsibility for thinking directly on the learner. He 
says, "Let us help students to follow the gleam of an interest, 
show them how to unravel the tangled elements of a situation on 
the assumption that after a while students will come to know a 
good deal about what they are interested in." The college will 
never solve this problem by preparing professional courses of study 
and assigning certain time to them, nor by the "Help Themselves" 
method of the elective system. Youth will sink or swim only by 
his own effort and in direct relation to an intelligent plan to solve 



30 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

his own thinking dilemmas. However, the layman is asking us for 
proofs as to where youth is going to end in the new education. 
If we believe in the field of education, there should be some agree- 
ment of our representative thinkers and philosophers on what con- 
stitutes a well-rounded system of education in a democracy. 

Another dilemma which must be thought out in action is men- 
tioned by Dean Russell of Teachers' College, Columbia University. 
He tells us that for the first time in history we have the spectacle 
of a social democracy attempting to shape the opinions and bias 
the judgment of the new generations. How different this problem 
from that of the Prussian Kultusminster whose loud voice dis- 
tinctly makes itself felt, while in the democracy a thousand school 
boards with as many voices are not so distinctly heard. Public 
opinion back of these school boards represents many minority 
groups; yet any kind of control of education other than by these 
small minority groups is impossible so long as we maintain our 
present ideals of American democracy. 

It is not easy to unify these social groups. That is very clearly 
the dilemma in public education to-day. There is the family 
which has the personal welfare of the child in hand and has its 
own idea of what shall constitute education; there are the social 
groups in which the boys and girls move; and last, there is the 
state which presides over education. Too often the state is un- 
informed regarding the facts, and too often the family's view is 
narrow and prejudiced. That is one dilemma. What are we go- 
ing to do when the family representing the individual, and the 
state representing a political unit of society, do not agree on the 
fundamentals of public education ? Which has the superior right ? 
This question demands clear thinking. It involves a fundamental 
understanding of the real nature of society, of government, and 
of the philosophy of life. 

In this conflict for rights one is reminded of the irate parent 
who sent to a school teacher the following note: 

* ' Dear Madam : Please excuse my Tommy today. He won 't 
come to school because he is acting as time-keeper for his father, 
and it is your fault. You gave him an example, 'If a field is five 



Dilemmas 31 

miles around, how long will it take a man walking three and one- 
half miles per hour to walk two and one-fourth times around it?' 
Tommy ain 't a man so he sent father. They went early this morn- 
ing and father will walk around the field and Tommy will time 
him, but please don't give my boy such an example again, because 
my husband must work every day to support his family." 

Here we have the parents representing one minority group in 
conflict with the teacher representing another minority group. 

Dilemmas! We could go on indefinitely enumerating them. 
Is not education in a sense a victory won over these? So long as 
we can lift the problems of life to higher and more significant 
dilemmas, we are educatable. A recent pessimistic book by Charles 
Rechet, entitled "Powerless Man," says: "Some live wonderful 
lives, but such are not given to all. There is an individual power- 
lessness. We are continually hemmed in. Our efforts do not get 
us far." Is life a dilemma in which man is powerless? Is it not 
rather a grand adventure, a trip on the open road ? The educand 
has business of his own on the open road. He must wander where 
Truth leads the way. He must attain independence of judgment. 
And above all, he must share with Rodin's Thinker a decent 
privacy for contemplation. Giving freedom of thought to others, 
he attains his own freedom — freedom of speech, freedom of 
thought, freedom from meddlesome interference, freedom from the 
crushing weight of authority. Even Rodin's Thinker had that. 



From Interlachen, Florida, comes the welcome information 
that John W. Atherton, financial secretary of the university, is 
gaining steadily in health and expects to return to his office in 
May. Heavy responsibilities placed upon him in connection with 
the expansion program at Fairview resulted in a nervous break- 
down several months ago, compelling him to give up completely 
his work in Indianapolis. He has been spending the winter in 
Florida. 



32 Butler Alumxal Quarterly 

FLYING THE AIR MAIL 

By Marie George, '24'- 

FLYING over Chicago at night 3,000 feet ''toward the stars"; 
banking, climbing, zooming above an ever-changing pattern 
of fields, woods and streams; traveling through sheer space 
at a speed of approximately 130 miles an hour; feeling a pene- 
trating wind with a seeming temperature several degrees below zero 
— these are some of the impressions I carried away from my first 
ride in an airplane when as the first woman passenger ever to make 
the trip, I took off from the Mars Hill airport Thursday morning, 
February 16, in an air mail plane bound for Cincinnati, back to 
Indianapolis, and then to Chicago. When I climbed out of the 
plane at the end of the route Friday morning I had covered more 
than 600 miles in six and one-half hours. 

It is one thing to make up your mind to fly, wallc out on the 
field, jump in a plane and be off. It is quite another thing to wait 
and wait for that plane to come and try to be nonchalant, while 
all around you veteran flyers and mechanics are discussing how 
Bill "cracked up" in Florida, how Smith "jumped just in time," 
and what a narrow escape Jones had when he crashed in a potato 
patch. 

As luck would have it, I waited. The Cincinnati-bound plane 
was behind time. 

"I guess these mail ships are pretty reliable, aren't they?" 
I asked hopefully when Lieutenant Carpenter, of the national 
guard, stationed at Mars Hill, finished telling the sad story of a 
stunt flyer. 

"Yes, they are," piped up Sergeant Johnson. "But a crash is 
a crash and a sack of mail won't save you. Why, I saw " 

"Here, you, lay off that!" To me: "You'll be perfectly all 
right; don't you worry. Miss George." And that was Donald 
McConnell, to whom I pledged everlasting friendship right then. 
Mack is field operator for the Embry-Riddle Company, which runs 



*Miss George, who recounts here for the Quarterly lier experieuces as 
the first womau to fly the air mail route in Indiana, is a reporter for the 
Indianapolis News. 



Flying the Air Mail 33 

the mail line and through whose courtesy I was given the trip, 
along with a second passenger, Paul II. Moore, secretary of the 
aviation committee of the Chamber of Commerce. 

About the middle of the forenoon, the ship, a biplane, sailed 
out of the blue, landed on the field, and taxied to the hangars 
with Okey Bevins at the control stick. Bevins is one of the most 
capable aviators flying the mail. As he brought his plane to a 
stop several mechanics rushed out to supply him with gas and oil, 
replace the incoming mail with that going out, and take care of 
other details. 

With helmets and goggles in place, and wearing extra coats and 
blankets which we had borrowed from good-natured members of the 
national guard (until we reached Cincinnati, where we were to be 
equipped with flying suits), Mr. Moore and I climbed in the open 
cockpit for the first leg of the trip. 

Mack helped us arrange the blankets and then above the noise 
of the whirling propeller yelled his final warning : ' ' Careful, Miss 
George, that cockpit door won't stay shut." 

With an exclamation that we can do without just now, I got a 
firm grip on that door that I didn't relax for the next half hour. 

A wave to the boys and we were off and away. A few minutes 
later and I was living through my first chandelle, which amounts 
to ' ' cocking 'er up on a wing, ' ' in the lingo of the airport, making 
a spiral climb for altitude, and finally straightening out on the 
course, we headed southeast for Cincinnati, about fifty-nine 
minutes or 110 miles away. 

All went well for a while. We were flying about 100 to 150 
feet from the ground, which, at first I was inclined to believe, was 
pure consideration on the part of the pilot for me. Not so, how- 
ever; lower altitude means greater speed as I was informed later. 
Outside diving down within a few feet of a wagon left in a field 
and setting the plane on its tail a time or two in order to get over 
high-tension wires, there really was nothing to get greatly excited 
about. Then all at once we heard the motor slow up just above a 
group of trees. I got ready for a forced landing, in fact, I was 
ready for anything, when by wabbling his plane slightly, the pilot 
signaled for us to look around. He motioned toward a flock of 



34 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

birds which had risen from the trees and except for the slackening 
of our speed would have been struck by the propeller. 

Our attempts at talking reminded me of the conversation be- 
tween the two men on the comedy stage who were slightly deaf. 
After we had sped along several miles, I got especially anxious to 
know at what altitude we were flying. 

"Are we about 500 feet high?" I yelled at Mr. Moore. He 
looked at me, utterly devoid of comprehension. I repeated my 
query, screaming a little louder. Still he could not hear. It was 
most discouraging, but I was determined to know our height. 
Finally he understood me. He glanced over the side and then 
shook his head. 

"No, only about 500 feet," he yelled back at me. Somehow, 
I lost all interest in altitude for the time. 

We breezed merrily along for a while over farmyards, fields 
and woods. Roads stretched out to the horizon like silver ribbons. 
The landscape changed to one of hills and valleys as we crossed 
into Ohio and shifted our course due east to follow the Ohio 
river. We went up several hundred feet to clear the business dis- 
trict of Cincinnati, and within a few minutes Avere circling Lunken 
Field where we landed and taxied to the hangar. 

Shortly after 1 p. m. we were back at the hangars getting ready 
for the return flight to Indianapolis and on to Chicago. Here we 
got heavy sheepskin flying togs that were welcome substitutes for 
the makeshift outfits we had been wearing. 

"I don't know what we are going to do about you," Bevins 
remarked in a rather despairing tone, as he compared my height 
of less than five feet two inches with that of a husky six foot oiie, 
for whom the suit was bought. "We can get you in it. I guess, but 
I'm not sure I can keep you there." 

With his aid, I got into the thing, and watched him helplessly 
as he secured the fastenings. From the waist up, it was fastened 
with a "zipper" arrangement, which in an effort to adjust against 
the cold winds, he pulled up with a jerk that lifted me three inches 
off the floor. Eventually, though, I was all "togged out" in fine 



Flying the Air Mail 35 

style, even to the sheep-skin moccasins, which fit me like week-end 
bags. 

Our pilot for the return was Warren Vine, one of the youngest 
air mail pilots in the world. The going back was far more com- 
fortable, largely due to the fact that we were better dressed for the 
cold. We landed at Mars Hill at the appointed hour, stopping only 
long enough to get oil and gas, before we went on to Chicago. Our 
altitude for most of this flight varied from fifty feet to 1,500 feet, 
while the pilot was continually trying to find favorable winds. 

Gradually it grew darker, and then all of a sudden we caught 
a flash of the revolving beacon light from the municipal airport 
in Chicago, our landing field, about fifteen miles away. 

Pointing the nose of the plane, the pilot started us climbing 
until we had reached an altitude of nearly 3,000 feet. I think look- 
ing down on Chicago, with its network of lighted streets, and with 
lights burning in the houses like tiny balls of gold, is my most 
vivid recollection of the whole flight. In the beauty of the view 
I forgot all about my precious vague wonderings as to just what 
we would do if the motor stopped and we were forced to land 
without being able to find a clearing. 

At this height we seemed to move very slowly, and then as we 
approached the airport, outlined with red lamps bordered with 
yellow, we descended, circled the field and stopped at the hangars. 
Enough for one day. 

At 7 :17 a. m., Friday, Mr. Moore, the pilot and I were in fly- 
ing attire again ready for the trip from Chicago back to Indian- 
apolis. It is the rule of the Cincinnati-bound plane to await the 
arrival of the transcontinental ship from the west coast. However, 
a message was received that that plane was down somewhere in 
Wyoming, and that we should go ahead. Not exactly cheering in- 
formation, I thought. 

I felt like an experienced flyer when once more we climbed 
into the plane, and pointed toward the Hoosier capital. Within 
an hour and forty-five minutes we were back circling the field at 
Mars Hill. 

"Well, that's that," remarked Paul Shideler, photographer of 
The News, a few moments later as he snapped the camera that 



36 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

caught me in my ample flying suit. "It will make a most amus- 
ing story for the younger generation fifty years from now. You 
better get out of those togs as quickly as you can. The city editor 
wants us to get a story on a murder over here on the south side." 
Such is the life of a newspaper reporter in which an airplane 
ride from Chicago is ail in the day's work. 



One of the most ambitious journalistic projects ever undertaken 
at the university was the 24-page special edition of the Butler 
Collegian issued in connection with the holding of the first state 
high school basketball tournament at the new field house March 
16 and 17. The paper, which consisted of three eight-page sections, 
contained, besides news and feature articles, reviews of the work 
done in various departments of the university and resumee of lead- 
ing campus activities. Several thousand copies were distributed 
among tourney visitors. 



Alumni of even recent years probably do not realize the growth 
that has developed in Greek letter colonies on the campus. Butler 
now has twenty-one fraternities and sororities, eighteen of which 
are nationally affiliated. In addition to these social groups, there 
are eleven honorary organizations, six of w^hich are chapters of 
national organizations. Indications are that when the Greek build- 
ing programs are carried to completion at Fairview, Fraternity 
Row will be one of the most populous of north side areas. 



Of the one thousand six hundred students enrolled in Butler 
University, two-thirds are residents of Indianapolis and 521 make 
their homes elsewhere, according to the statistics recently compiled. 
In 1925 about eight per cent, of the student body were Indianapolis 
residents. Of the 521 living outside of the city. 446 live in Indiana, 
seventy-one in other states of the union, and four in foroien 
countries. 



THE BUTLER ALUMNAL QUARTERLY 
Vol. XVII April, 1928 No. 1 

Officers of the Alumni Association — ^President, John F. Mitchell, Jr., '06; 
First Vice-President, John I. Kautz, '17; Second Vice-President, Harold 
B. Tharp, '11; Secretary, Katharine M. Graydon, '78; Treasurer, George 
A. Schumacher, '25. 

Published by The Butler University Alumni Association. 

Printed by The William Mitchell Printing Company, Greenfield, Indiana. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

WHAT WOULD THE FOUNDERS SAY? 

The annual passing of Founders' Day always brings to mind 
the speculative thought, which perhaps is as idle as it is old : What 
would the fathers of such an institution as this say if they could 
return, and after surveying the changes wrought by the years, 
speak their own thoughts? 

After becoming oriented to the exactions and conditions of 
this new day, would they see eye to eye with our modern educational 
theorists? Would they look with approval on the broad sweep of 
progress, or would they feel that it has carried us too far from 
the old moorings ? Would they find youth better or worse in body, 
mind, and morals? Would they think the teachers of youth the 
equal of those of other days when the university was young 1 

One can not know, of course, but one who has some knowledge 
of the character, the aspirations, the ideals of those pioneering 
souls, may perhaps hazard an opinion. 

When Northwestern Christian University came into being, it 
was established for the avowed purpose of training young people 
for the learned professions. The term "learned professions" 
usually included teaching, the ministry, and the law. That North- 
western Christian University fulfilled that purpose in notable 

37 



38 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

fashion is attested by the work of scores of young men and women 
who left her halls to enter pulpits and school rooms in all parts 
of the middle West and to show others the way toward the goals 
of a spiritual or an intellectual life. 

As the years grew into decades and generations, and life be- 
came more complex, other callings began to lay claim, and with 
good reason, to the term ' ' learned. ' ' To-day there has been evolved 
in the fierce heat of competition, a situation in which such pro- 
longed periods and high standards of preliminary training are 
demanded as prerequisites to success, that almost any calling of 
consequence may properly call itself a "learned profession." 

To-day the successful farmer is a scientist who is an expert in 
plant chemistry and soils. The successful journalist is not a 
scavenger of news who makes shift in a precarious way by pound- 
ing out garbled mixtures of truth and falsehood. His is the trained 
intelligence through which the masses receive the knowledge and 
proper interpretation of significant events. Business is no longer 
a matter of simple barter. Even in its most elemental phases, it 
is an intricate problem in economies. The high calling of home- 
making has become for girls a science that points a need to careful 
training in the domestic arts. 

Butler University is still training young people for the "learned 
professions." She has not deviated by so much as a fractional 
part of a compass point from the course charted for her by her 
founders. The fundamental purposes of education have not 
changed. They simply have broadened as the field of need has 
broadened, and those men of far-seeing vision who set forth those 
purposes in the establishment of a college would be the first to 
commend the extension of the institution's sphere of influence. 

As to whether the founders of the college would find encourage- 
ment in the attributes of modern youth, there is even less doubt. 
They loved youth, did those men of revered memory. They proved 
that when they established this university in sacrifice and toil. If 
they loved youth, they understood it, surely. And those who under- 
stand the youth of to-day, know that never within memory has the 
character of youth given such wholesome promise for the future. 
If frankness is a sin, if honesty is a vice, if looking at the facts of 



What Would the Founders Say? 39 

life without either the blush of false modesty or the blanch of fear 
is a crime, then write down modern j^outh in the book of infamy. 
But if these qualities be not vicious, there is no cause for perturba- 
tion. 

The question of the comparative caliber of the faculty of these 
and other days will never be settled here or elsewhere to the 
satisfaction of all. If Ovid Butler and his colleagues were to 
survey the educational world to-day, they certainly would find 
more Doctors-of-this and Masters-of-that than ever were known to 
them. Whether this means anything is matter for debate. In 
certain circles, there is a growing feeling that it does not, that one 
cannot measure intelligence, scholarship, character, and ability as 
one would measure gasoline, potatoes, coal, or other staples. But 
for those who set store by these necessary standards, university 
faculties are undeniably richer in academic degrees than they were 
in the earlier days of educational effort. 

Older alumni will not hesitate to say that there are no teachers 
in the universities to-day who can match, either in mental or 
spiritual equipment, the professors of their student days. Let no 
one challenge that sentiment. It is too beautiful an expression of 
appreciation of the often unrequited services of those pioneers in 
education. Besides, it is true insofar as it concerns the person who 
utters it. No teacher of to-day can hope to equal the memory of 
those long gone as it is treasured in the hearts of loyal students. 
Time has a kindly way of effacing minor faults. Retrospect re- 
casts familiar figures in heroic molds. 

That is as it should be. Many of those old instructors were 
great. Their works prove it. They met the difficult needs of their 
time. No one could ask more. 

The present faculty'- of Butler University is doing the same 
thing. It is confronting the problems of to-day, problems far 
different from those that faced its predecessors, and it is meeting 
them with a courage, a wisdom, and a patience that commands ad- 
miration. The question of which group is the abler is unanswer- 
able, and moreover, irrelevant. The one has fulfilled, the other is 
fulfilling the purpose for which the college was established. To 
know that is enough. 



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I UNIVERSITY NEWS I 



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CHICAGO ALUMNI MEET 

While other alumni were participating in the general Founders' 
Day observance in Indianapolis, the Butler Alumni Association of 
Chicago in its annual meeting held in conjunction with the 
Hoosier Salon was having exercises of its own. 

The group received a telegram of greeting from Miss Katharine 
Merrill Graydon, alumni secretary, and wired its congratulations 
to Alma Mater on the occasion of Founders' Day. 

Following the luncheon, Mrs. Ada Schulz and ]Murray Wiekard, 
Indiana artists, spoke. Mr. Wiekard later conducted the group 
on a tour of the galleries. 

Dr. Garrison, also a luncheon speaker, emphasized the need 
for alumni to keep in close contact with the program and ideals 
of Butler, asserting that each member must assume responsibiiity 
for the closer relationship. lie reminded the group that college 
loyalty must not exhaust itself in reminiscence but must look for- 
ward to the new Butler with its new tasks. 

Among the other speakers were Frank F. llummel, president ; 
Clifford Browder, and Henry Bruuer. 

The report of the nominating committee, presenting the names 
of the following persons for office, was accepted : Frank F. Hum- 
mel, president ; Lorene W. Ingalls, vice-president ; ^largaret Lahr 
McKoberts, secretary -treasurer ; Cornelia T. ]\Iorris(,in. correspond- 
ing secretary. 

40 



The Alumnus and Com :\j en cement 41 

OPENING OF THE FIELD HOUSE 

At 6 :30 o'clock on the evening of March 7, the doors of the new 
Butler field house swung open to the public for the first time. 
The crowd which streamed in from that time until shortly after 
the opening of the Butler-Notre Dame game at 8 o'clock marvelled 
at the vastness of the structure and the completeness of the 
equipment. 

Arthur V. Brown, member of the board of directors, Avas the 
principal speaker at the exercises held in connection with the field 
house opening. Besides the Indianapolis basketball enthusiasts and 
a delegation from South Bend, a number of out-state visitors were 
present. The athletic department of the university was host to all 
rnembers of the faculty and their families. 

Prior to the Butler-Notre Dame game, the freshmen played a 
team composed of alumni. 



THE ALUMNUS AND COMMENCEMENT 

Although the breath of spring is still fitful and sometimes 
frosty, alumni not only in Indiana but in more remote parts of 
the country are looking to June when they are planning to return 
for the festivities and reunions of commencement week. The pro- 
gram begins Friday evening, June 15, with the annual Phi Kappa 
Phi banquet, and ends Monday, June 18, with the awarding of 
the degrees under the shade of campus elms and maples. 

Many classes will have reunions, but the spotlight of special 
attention will be focused on four, '78, '03, '18, '23. These are the 
celebrating classes. Only one person will be present to represent 
the class of '78 on its fiftieth anniversary. This is Miss Katharine 
Merrill Graydon, alumni secretary and sole survivor of her class. 
The class of '03 will meet for its twenty-fifth anniversary ; '18 for 
its tenth anniversary ; and '23 for its fifth anniversary. 

The reunions will be held on Class Day, Saturday, June 16. 
The baccalaureate sermon will be preached Sunday. Although 
programs for the four days have not been completed in all their 
details, class secretaries are being urged to remind their classmates 
of the date for the annual trek back to Alma Mater. 



42 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

BACK FROM TIBETAN PERILS 

Roderick A. MacLeod, '14, and family have recently returned 
to Indianapolis from Tibet after a perilous journey. Their experi- 
ences along the upper reaches of the Yangtze Eiver were told as 
follows in the Indianapolis Star : 

For ten years they were stationed at Batun, on the upper 
Yangtze river, a town of 4,000, where the work of running a church 
and Sunday school, orphanage, hospital and school was supported 
by the Seventh Christian Church of Indianapolis. When the 
trouble in China reached the point where it was no longer safe for 
missionaries to remain anywhere within Chinese territory, they 
were advised by the consul to leave and June 27 their party set out 
for the nearest railway point — Myitkyina, 1,000 miles or more 
away. 

In the party were Mr. and Mrs. MacLeod, their two little sons, 
Duncan, 7 years old, and Shelton, 5 years old, and their 9-year-old 
daughter Lora; Mr. and Mrs. Marion Duncan — also missionaries — 
and their two children; a crowd of porters and an armed escort 
provided by the Chinese government. But, Mrs. MacLeod said, it 
was all too evident that the escort was "in cahoots" with bandits, 
for they were only a few days out from Batun when they were set 
upon by mountain robbers. Their armed escort disappeared and 
their porters ran off — though they returned some time later when 
the danger was over. 

"They took everything we had," said Mr. MacLeod. "Every- 
thing but the clothes on our backs — the.y took all our horses, all 
our supplies, all our records — the journal I'd kept for ten years — 
all the work I'd done for the Royal Geographical Society — all our 
photographic films — the Duncans lost 1,200 films — even ]\Irs. ]\lac- 
Leod's wedding ring. We finally reached a Catholic mission, where 
we were given a new set of supplies and porters to replace those 
the bandits had taken. Have you ever seen a Wild West show? 
That is what the raid of the bandits was like — circling about us on 
their horses while they shot." 

Any one who objects to tlie hardships of a journey of two or 
three days on the train should hear the story of the journey of the 



Back from Tibetan Perils 43 

party of missionaries from Batun to Myitkyina — unable to follow 
the regular routes because of the bandits, depending solely on their 
guides — seventy days of actual travel, marked by endless delays 
and necessary resting periods. Their route took them across the 
eastern end of the Himalayas, across deep rivers, where the only 
way to cross was by way of rope bridges. No wheeled vehicles 
could make the trip; the travelers rode horseback or walked; Mr. 
MacLeod walked all the way ; the children were carried on the backs 
of the grown persons; part of the time the women traveled in a 
primitive species of sedan chair, but for twelve days they, too, 
walked. 

They penetrated into the unexplored and unmapped territory 
of northwestern Yunnan, and over into upper Burma, and traveled 
through the jungles, and sometimes at the houses where they stayed 
tigers had just paid visits or paid a visit immediately after they 
arrived, and carried off live stock. 

"We went," said MacLeod, "where none but a fool or a mis- 
sionary would go." 

Mr. MacLeod drew a vivid picture of Tibet; he said he had 
never been to Lhassa, the forbidden city, for the simple reason 
that he felt he had no business in Lhassa — and he believes that the 
reason so many persons are determined to go there is for no other 
reason than that it is forbidden. 

"Tibet is all mountains, rushing rivers in the valleys and high 
grazing plains, ' ' he said. ' ' Flowers ! Anyone who loves flowers 
should see those of Tibet — more than three thousand species of 
rhododendrons alone, and you can trace the advance of the seasons 
by the rising tide of the color of the rhododendrons along the sides 
of the mountains. 

"The people are fighters and farmers, and one of their great 
sources of income is hunting the musk deer — a little deer about 
the size of a goat — which has a pouch containing- the musk which 
is so valuable in making of perfumes. The missionaries have their 
houses and gardens — yes, and plenty of yaks, too. Nobody in Tibet 
could very well get along without the faithful yak. We ride the 
yak, we eat the yak, we pack our baggage on the yak, we milk the 
yak and we make clothing out of his fur. 



44 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

"I can't say that the lamas — Lamaism is a degenerate form of 
Buddhism — ever bothered us particularly; perhaps we hadn't 
been there long enough to be taken seriously — the mission was only 
founded in 1909 and the permanent building work begun a few 
years later. But don't get the idea that Lamaism and lamas are 
like they are in Kipling's 'Kim' — that is sheer poetry. 

"What the lamas seemed to resent the most was the hospital, 
because we treated every one who came — asking pay from those 
who could afford it, and giving free treatment to those who could 
not ; this cut into the priests ' revenue, for exorcising the devils of 
illness is one of their leading industries ; there are millions of these 
devils, and they have innumerable contraptions for driving them 
out." 



IN THE SPORT REALM 

One of the most successful basketball seasons known at Butler 
has been completed. Coach Paul D. Hinkle, who has directed the 
destinies of the Blue and White netmen for the past three seasons, 
victoriously led his men through one of the hardest schedules, 
which carried the Bulldogs to several of the leading schools and 
universities of the Middle West. Wisconsin, Purdue and Chicago 
were included in the Big Ten teams met by the Butler netters, 
while Notre Dame furnished the opposition for two games, the 
latter being played as a part of the opening exercises at the 
new Butler field house at Fairview. 

Despite the fact that Western Conference teams, Xotre Dame 
and all of the stronger teams in Indiana were on the schedule, 
Hinkle 's team finished the season with a record of having lost 
only three of the scheduled twenty-two games. These defeats were 
suffered at the hands of Wisconsin, Purdue and Xotre Dame. 

A record, which was not surpassed by any team within the 
state, was established by the Butler men when twelve straight 
victories were recorded. Tliis victory-blazing streak was temporar- 
ily halted by the 32 to 24 defeat suffered at tlie liands of the 
Notre Dame outfit on the South Bend floor. The Bulldogs, how- 
ever, came back to Indianapolis, and on the following week-end 



In the Sport Realm 45 

defeated their ancient rivals from Franklin and started their last 
lap of the season, winning the remaining five contests, in which 
were included besides the Baptists, Wabash, Marquette, De Pauw 
and Notre Dame, 

Starting the season, Coach Hinkle had practically the same 
team that laid claim to the state basketball title for 1926-27. Cap^ 
tain Robert Wakefield, versatile Bulldog forward, was the only 
loss to the Blue squad when Hinkle soimded the call for net 
material in November. Supplementing this wealth of veteran 
material were four sophomore players who came to Hinkle highly 
recommended by Robert Nipper, freshman coach. These men who 
made their first try at varsity competition were : Allen of New 
Castle, M. Christopher, brother of Clarence Christopher, star 
varsity floor guard, Hildebrand of Southport, and Eaton of Ben 
Davis. 

From the start of the schedule, which found the Blue netters 
downing Danville Normal, 49-22, the combination of Captain 
Archie Chadd, Dana Chandler, Harold Holz, C. Christopher and 
William Bugg, carried the brunt of the opposition. The varsity 
quintet varied slightly, however, in various games, Maurice Hosier 
replacing Bugg at back guard, Frank White replacing Chadd, and 
Oral Hildebrand being used in place of Holz. 

Chandler led the individual scoring of the Butler team to the 
end of the season, after getting off to a slow start. The sophomore 
Hildebrand led the men in scoring for the first few games, but 
was replaced as Chandler began his season's barrage of baskets. 

Prospects for a state championship squad to perform in the 
new field house next year are encouraging. Captain Chadd, 
Clarence Christopher and Holz are the only men who will be lost 
to the team by graduation. Freshman material during this year 
is not exceptional, although Coach Nipper has several men who 
have shown possibilities of standing the intense strain of the 
varsity pace. E. Gerald Bowman, '29. 



46 Butler Alumnal Quarteri>y 

AROUND THE CAMPUS 

Dramatic Activities To Fore 

Dramatics has been vying with ever-present athletic activities 
for the campus limelight since the beginning of the present semes- 
ter. "The New Poor," a three-act play by Cosmo Hamilton, was 
presented in March by Thespis, Butler dramatic society. Two per- 
formances of the play, which was coached by Mrs. Eugene Fife of 
the public speaking department, were given. 

Thespis will represent the university in the National Dramatic 
Contest to be held at Northwestern University April 19, 20 
and 21. The contest is an annual tournament for dramatic groups 
in colleges and universities. "Dust of the Road," a one-act play 
by Kenneth Fawyer Goodman, will be the Thespis presentation. 

The first all-school musical revue, "Fairview Follies," made 
its debut late in March at the Murat Theater under the auspices 
of the Men's Union. The musical scores were synchronized "with 
the acting to provide an effect that was harmonic and colorful. 
The libretto and music were written by Henry Hebert, student 
director of the Butler band, and John Heiney, ex- '23, author of 
"The Butler War Song." 



Journalists to "Cover" Europe 

A European tour under the direction of the Butler Univel'sity 
School of Journalism, with university credit for work done en 
tour, has been announced for this summer. A course in European 
journalism and a course in feature writing, each of which will give 
the student two hours of credit, will be offered. The group, sail- 
ing from Quebec July 11, will travel through England, Belgium, 
Holland, Germany, France, Italy, and Switzerland. Lectures will 
be given on shipboard, and visits will be made to newspaper plants 
in England and on the continent. The tour is expected to attract 
students and teachers throughout the middle West. 

Courses in journalism also will be offered for the first time 
this year at the regular university summer session. 



Around the Campus 47 

Touring Bandsmen Please Public 
Performance of the university band, under the direction of 
J. B. Vandaworker, on its recent tour through north central 
Indiana, was the source of favorable newspaper comment in those 
towns where the band played. The two-day tour included stops 
at Carmel, Westfield, Arcadia, Kokomo, Elwood, and Cicero. The 
band was composed of fifty pieces. Miss Kathryn Bowlby, '27, 
contralto, sang two groups of solos at the Kokomo concert. 



Win Forensic Laurels 
Although strong debate teams have been the rule at Butler 
for several years, the squad this year has made an unusual record. 
It has won thus far, nine straight victories, defeating some of the 
strongest teams in Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan. The subject de- 
bated was, "Resolved, That the United States Should Not Protect 
Foreign Investments. ' ' 



Miss Butler Speaks In Boston 

Miss Evelyn Butler, dean of women, was one of the principal 
speakers on the program of the National Council of Administrative 
Women in Education, which met in Boston February 27, 28, 29 
and March 1. Miss Butler, who was the only woman from the 
middle West to have a place on the program, is treasurer of the 
national organization. 



Senior Scholars Honored 
Twelve ranking seniors have been elected to membership in 
Phi Kappa Phi, national honorary scholastic fraternity. The 
twelve, in the order of their scholastic standing, are Jane Ogborn, 
Adelai C. Moore, Elizabeth Ann Miller, Margaret Woessner, Mary 
E. Boyd, Virginia Small, Mrs. Grace E. Meyer, Margaret Elrod, 
Mary L. McCormick, Irene Bowers, Virginia Barnes, and Elsie 
Underwood. 



Radio Links Alumni, College 
Alumni throughout the middle West have formed the habit of 
tuning in on WFBM, radio broadcasting station of the Indian- 



48 Butler Alumnal Quaeterly 

apolis Power and Light Company, every Fridaj' night between 9 
and 10 o'clock for the Butler radio hour. The programs, arranged 
by the Butler Radio Bureau, which was organized early in the 
year, are composed entirely of university talent. Stanley Cain, 
'24, instructor in botany, is faculty sponsor. 



Mary Garden Singa for Sorority 
One of the most ambitious enterprises undertaken by a campus 
organization in recent months was carried through successfully 
early in the year by the Delta Gamma Sorority, sponsor for the 
appearance in Indianapolis of Mary Garden, prima donna soprano 
of the Chicago Civic Opera Company. The chapter held a formal 
reception at the Marott Hotel for Miss Garden at the conclusion 
of her concert at the Murat Theater. 



New Collegian Supervisor 
Robert T. Harrison, '27, returned to the university as instructor 
in journalism at the beginning of the second semester. The prin- 
cipal duty of Mr. Harrison, who has done practical work on papers 
in Muncie and Shelbj^ville, will be the supervision of student work 
on the Collegian. Joe Helms, '28, was appointed editor of the 
Collegian for the second semester. Helms was editor of the 1927 
prize-winning Drift. 



Butler Orator Ranks Fourth 
Speaking on the subject, "Our Old Man of the Sea," a dis- 
cussion of fi'ee trade and protective tariff, John Love, Butler 
representative, won fourth place in the state oratorical contest held 
at Purdue University. Wabash took first honors in the contest. 



Scientists Honor Friesner 
Dr. Ray C. Friesner, professor of botany, was elected secre- 
tary of the Indiana Academy of Science at its forty-third annual 
meeting at Notre Dame University. 



Around the Campus 49 

"Potsy" Is Impressario 
An innovation in the way of entertainment between halves of 
basketball games on the home floor this year is the brain child of 
George "Potsy" Clark, director of athletics. Wrestling matches, 
boxing bouts, group singing and other forms of diversion have 
helped while away the tedium of waiting for "the next act." 



$5,000 Is Keating Gift 
A gift of $5,000, with which a chair of political science prob- 
ably will be endowed, was left to Butler University by the will of 
Joseph B. Kealing, '79, Republican national committeeman from 
Indiana, who died several months ago. Mr. Kealing previously had 
expressed the wish that any gift which he might leave to the uni- 
versity might be used to endow such a chair. 



Must Work Harder for Degrees 
Academic standards in the university have been raised through 
the revised system of grading which has been adopted by the 
faculty and which went into effect at the beginning of the second 
semester. Formerly, a student might be graduated by making a 
general average for the four years of "C minus." Now an aver- 
age of "C" will be necessaray for graduation. The new system 
abolishes computation by percentages, the grades now being inter- 
preted solely in terms of credit points. 



University "400" Not So Proud 
The first semester took heavy toll in student failures, accord- 
ing to figures in the registrar's office, where the work of almost 
400 students was classified as "unsatisfactory." This included 
failures, conditions, and incompletes. 



New Boulevard for New Campus 

Plans and specifications for a new boulevard to link Fairview 
with the city have been prepared in the office of the park board. 
The thoroughfare, to be constructed at an estimated cost of 

,000, will connect Thirty-eighth Street with the new campus. 



50 Butler Alumnal, Quarterly 

Student Directory Appears 
The Butler Handbook and Directory, published under the aus- 
pices of the Y. W. C. A., appeared at the beginning of the second 
semester. It contains the names, addresses and telephone numbers 
of students and faculty members and includes a brief history of 
student organizations and a review of campus activities. 



Mrs. Richardson's Mother Dies 
Dr. W, L. Richardson, professor of education, was called to 
Toronto in January by the death of his wife's mother, Mrs. Frances 
Emily Cooper. 



Kappa Chapter Fifty Years Old 
Mu chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma celebrated its fiftieth 
anniversary in January with a formal dinner at the Woman's 
Department Club. Irma Ulrich, '26, was toastmistress. 



Gift In Memory of Son 

A gift of $2,000, the interest on which is to be used as a loan 
to aid students in the English and Economies departments, has 
been received by the university from Mr. and Mrs. John S. Wright. 
The fund has been created in memory of their son, John Xewcomb 
Wright, former student at Butler, who was graduated in June 
from the Indiana Law School. He died in August. 



PERSONAL MENTION 

Mrs. Frela Jones SmuUins, '22, is living in Chicago. 

Miss Leefe Worth, '27, is teaching in Portland, Indiana. 

Miss Dorothy R. Griswold, '19, is living in Pittsburgh. Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Miss Helen C. Moffett, '25, teaches in tlie Bluff ton High School. 

Henry T. Mann, '90, has changed his residence to Gainesville, 
Florida. 

Miss Mary Lou Wright, '27, is laboratory technician at tlie 
Home Lawn Sanitarium of Martinsville, Indiana. 



Personal Mention 51 

0. R. Mcolgin, ex- '20, lives in Montieello, Indiana, where he 
has charge of the Church of the Disciples. 

Miss Mary Ann Huggins, '28, has gone to the University of 
Illinois to be assistant in Dean Thompson's office, while working 
for her master's degree. 

Mr. and Mrs. Prentice D. Edwards (Katharine Gawne, '13) 
and daughter Jane are living in Muncie, Indiana, where Mr. 
Edwards is connected with the Eastern Normal School. 

Rex D. Hopper, '22, writes from Paraguay that he is making 
preliminary arrangements for working for his doctorate in the 
University of Chicago. 

Mrs. Cornelia Thornton Morrison, '14, was elected correspond- 
ing secretary of the Butler Alumni Club of Chicago at the annual 
luncheon of the Butler Alumni Club of Chicago held February 11. 

Miss Genefrede Harris, '20, regional superintendent of young 
people, was on the program of the midwinter retreat of the Indiana 
Christian Ministerial Association held in Indianapolis. 

Joy Julian Bailey, A. B. '26, A. M. '27, has received appoint- 
ment as assistant in the department of history in the University 
of Pennsylvania. While teaching Mr. Bailey will have opportunity 
to work for his doctorate. 

George W. Huggins, student of the old university, and Mrs. 
Huggins celebrated in Indianapolis on January 22 their golden 
wedding anniversary. The Huggins family has been loyal to 
Butler College. Besides Mr. Huggins, his children, Mrs. Edna 
Huggins Hieke, '07, Miss Edith L. Huggins, Dr. Ben H. Huggins, 
Emmett S. Huggins, '02, and his granddaughter, Miss Mary Ann 
Huggins, '28, have attended the university. 

Horace M. Russell, '05, of Amarillo, Texas, passed through 
Indianapolis in January en route to Baltimore, Maryland, in com- 
pany with his daughter, age nine. It was a disappointment to his 
friends that Mr, Russell could not linger longer. The loyalty of 
this member of the class of 1905, expressed in many grateful ways, 
has not been surpassed by any alumnus of Butler University, and 
the Quarterly desires to express its appreciation and to wish for 
him all the good that can come. 

Mrs. J. A. Sims (Miss Mary E. Laughlin) of Elkhart, Indiana, 



.J 2 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

accompanied by lier two sons, Thomas A. of Indianapolis, and 
Ernest of Elkhart, attended the Founders' Day dinner. Mrs. 
Sims was a sister of Miss Jennie Laughlin of the class of 1870, who 
was among the first missionaries sent out by the Christian Women's 
Board of Missions, and she was closely associated through the 
years with Mrs. Alice E. Snider, '66, Mrs. Mary Stewart Cochnower, 
Mrs. Eachel Quick Buttz, Mrs. MoUie Carr Cole, and others of 
that time. It was very pleasant to have Mrs. Sims present at our 
annual celebration and to feel again her loyalty to the university. 

Miss Genevieve Downs, '19, sends from Whittier, California, to 
Miss Cotton the following letter: "I am working on under the 
California State Psychologist and Superintendent Scudder. It 
is an untried field, and I am finding it highly adventurous. It is 
the problem of what can be done for the prevention of juvenile 
crime through the drama. Boys here with criminal tendencies and 
possessing records of theft, murder, immorality, etc., we put in 
plays and try to find some expression for that sense of adventure 
gone astray. When I can't find the right kind of play on the 
market, I write one for the situation. Wish you could have seen 
the Christmas pageant ( ' ' His Birthday ' ' I called it ) and the eight 
hundred people sitting there so breathlessly still at the sincerity 
and solemnity of the boys. We are rehearsing Drinkwater's 
"Abraham Lincoln" now. Every morning I go down into the 
field and pick out my thirty boys while the sky is still pink, about 
ten minutes of seven, and it is a real delight to hear them read 
those lovely lines of Drinkwater. 

"The four years at the Belmont School for Boys I enjoyed 
tremendously, especially the faculty which included many pro- 
fessors from Stanford. Last year five of us organized a new Com- 
munity Playhouse at Palo Alto giving eight plays for adults and 
four plays for children. The boys at Belmont were sons of the 
excessively wealthy and of the royal families of ^Mexico and Hawaii. 
Here at Whittier I am seeing the other side of the picture for 
seventy per cent, of these are from broken homes. It is hard to 
say which type is more absorbing." 



Marriages 53 

MARRIAGES 

Braunlin-Cantwell — Dr. Robert Braunlin and Miss Louise 
Cantwell, ex- '26, were married in Indianapolis on December 7. 
They are at home in Huntington, Indiana. 

RoBiNSON-ZoERCHER — The marriage of Mr. Arthur Raymond 
Robinson, Jr., and Miss Martha M. Zoereher, '27, both of Indian- 
apolis, was announced in December. 

Bergen-McRoberts — Mr. Harold W. Bergen and Miss Margaret 
McRoberts, ex- '21, were married on December 25, in Indianapolis. 
They are at home in Franklin, Indiana. 

Moore-Crew — Mr. Kenneth William Moore and Miss Mary 
Elizabeth Crew, '24, were married on December 30, in Dayton, 
Ohio. They are at home in Moorhead, Minnesota. 

Stout-Stephenson — Mr. Karl Edgar Stout and Miss Dorothy 
A. Stephenson, '26, were married in December in Indianapolis 
where they are at home. 

Redding-Bloor — Mr. Herbert E. Redding, '09, and Miss 
Margaret Bloor, '19, were married on January 4 in Indianapolis 
where they are at home. 

Matthews-Lennox — Mr. Joseph Casle Matthews and Miss 
Katharine Lennox, '25, were married on January 4 in Indianapolis 
where they are at home. 

Mannon-Brown — Mr. Floyd Ralph Mannon and Miss Jessica 
Merrill Brown, '24, were married on January 7 in Indianapolis 
where they are at home. 

Konold-Brown — Mr. David William Konold, '26, and Miss 
Julia Atherton Brown, '26, were married on January 7 in Indian- 
apolis. They are at home in Omaha, Nebriaska. 

Armer-Graham — Mr. Robert M. Armer and Miss Margaret 
Graham, ex- '28, were married on January 7 in Indianapolis where 
they are at home. 

Courtney-Higgins — Mr. James Clifford Courtney, '26, and 
Miss Marguerite Higgins were married on February 20 in Indian- 
apolis where they are at home. 



54 



Butler Alumnal Quarterly 



BoYLE-ToRR — Mr. Vilas J. Boyle and Miss Eleanor Torr, '27, 
were married on February 21 in Indianapolis where they are at 
home. 



BIRTHS 

Bryant — To Mr. and Mrs. George R. Bryant (Edith Fitz- 
gerald, '24) in Chicago on February 14, a daughter — Carol. 

Felt — To Mr. and Mrs. Truman T. Felt (Frances Brubeck, 
'23), in Florida on January 29, a daughter — Frances Elizabeth. 

Hodges — To Mr. Dale Hodges, '23, and Mrs. Hodges (Helen 
Belle McLean, '22) in Indianapolis on February 23, a daughter — 
Jane Ann. 

Moore — To Mr. and Mrs. Neal Moore in Indianapolis on Janu- 
ary 31, a daughter — Barbara Ann. 

Murray — To Mr. James Lee Murray, '09, and Mrs. Murray in 
Indianapolis on January 2, a daughter— Sue Isabel. 

I 

I Are You Going to Europe? 

I Why Not Join Your University's Party 

I Butler Alumni, Students, Friends 

I The S. S. "Empress of France" will sail from Quebec 

I July 11 and return August 25. The itinerary, which 

I includes seven foreign countries, has been selected with 

I an eye to both economy and comprehensiveness. Ship- 

I board courses giving college credit will be offered for 

s those who wish to combine study and travel. 

i FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. ADDRESS 

! Butler University Sciiool of Journalism 



'ifp- 



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ig28 

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ALUMNI! Live again your unJergraJ Jays. ALUMNI! 

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1928 DRIFT 

$3'^'' CASH 

Fill out and mail to tKe 1(528 Drift, Butler University, Indianapolis 

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Jveserve C^opies ol tne 

1928 BUTLER DRIFT 



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BUTLER UNIVERSITY 

FOUNDED 1852 

A well equipped institution, with a faculty of over seventy- 
five members, offering courses of instruction leading to 

degrees in 



English 

Modem Languages 

Greek 

Latin 

Biblical History 

Political Science 

Education 



Chemistry 

Physics 

Botany 

Zoology 

Astronomy 

Mathematics 

Dramatic Art 

and other subjects 



Business Administra- 
tion 
History 
Philosophy 
Home Economics 
Physical Education 
Journalism 
Public Speaking 



For catalog or other information address 
The Secretary, BUTLER UNIVERSITY, Indianapolis 



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■1-'^ 1Q' 



ALUMNAL 
QUARTERLY 



Commencement Announcement Number 




JUNE, 1928 



INDIANAPOLIS 



Entered as second-class matter March 26, 1912, at the post 
office at Indianapolis, Ind., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



"^ 



"The call is, then, Come hack! Call 
issued to scattered host, to children that 
have gone their several ways, to com- 
rades unforgetting, unforgot. Come 
hack in memory and in such messages as 
wanderer sends home."— Scot Battler, 
in first issue of Alumnal Quarterly, 
April, 1912. 



— 1— 



COMMENCEMENT WEEK 



Friday Evening, June 15 
Phi Kappa Phi Dinner 

* * # * 

Saturday Forenoon, June 16 

Class Day Exercises 

Class Reunions 

* # * * 

Saturday Afternoon 
Class Reunions 

* # * * 

Saturday Evening 

Alumni Supper 

Annual Business Meeting 

Alumni Chapel Program 

* * * * 

Sunday Afternoon, June 17 
Baccalaureate Sermon 

* * * * 

Monday Forenoon, June 18 
73rd Annual Commencement 



THE BUTLER ALUMNAL QUARTERLY 
Vol. XVII June, 1928 No. 2 

Katharine Merrill Graydon, '78 Editor 

J. Douglas Perry, '26 Associate Editor 

George Alexander Schumacher, '25 Business Manager 

Published four times a year, in October, January, April, July. Annual sub- 
scription, $2.00; single copies, 50 cents. Checks, drafts, etc., should be 
made payable to The Butler Alumnal Quarterly. 

Published by the Alumni Association of Butler University, Indianapolis. 
Printed by The William Mitchell Printing Company, Greenfield, Indiana. 



THE OLD NEST 

AN EDITORIAL 

ONE of the strongest impulses among living things is the 
homing instinct, that sense of yearning that guides the 
flight of a bird to its old nest, directs the wandering of a beast to 
its old lair, and turns the footsteps of a man to the roof-tree of 
his youth. 

In the lower forms of creation, this manifestation is interest- 
ing; in man, it is inspiring. It has a spiritual significance that 
involves the highest attributes of character. The lamp of a man's 
soul has indeed burned low when it does not glow in response to 
a suggestion of those places and things that were shelter and 
nurture to him in days gone by. 

Next to the hearthstone as an anchorage for the affections is 
one's college. It has cast the light of its influence over the fairest 
years of life, years when every day was a long day and a sunny 
one. Friendships that have endured through the years were 
formed there. Ideals that have directed the course of individual 
destiny had their birth there. Memories that engraved themselves 
indelibly on the tablets of human sentiment trace back to the 
same source. 

—3— 



That men desire to refresh those memories, to renew those 
friendships, and to kindle again those ideals is a heartening refuta- 
tion to the charge that the world has groA\'n crass and has become 
lost to all the finer sensibilities. It denies in loudest tone the 
assertion of materialists that buildings are only piles of brick and 
mortar, and a campus but a plot of ground. 

They will come back — those students of other days. As surely 
as the skies grow blue with June, they will come, back to the old 
haunts, back to the old nest. They may have to lay aside many a 
personal claim, they may have to travel many a dusty mile, but 
they will come. It is the homing instinct. 

There may be other places as fair as Irvington in June, but 
they do not readily come to mind. Its ciuiet is as the peace of a 
secluded haven. Already the air is laden with the perfume of bud 
and bloom, and is as soft as the touch of a maiden 's caress. Leaves 
as yet unscorched by summer sun reach almost from curb to curb 
across the winding streets. The ivy on the old buildings is green, 
and the light breezes whisper of summer in the campus elms and 
maples. 

The old nest is ready for those who are coming home. 



The old bell, which for twenty-five years has rested in silence 
in the cupola of the Administration Building, spoke again the 
other day. A solitary stroke of the clapper against its cracked side 
sent a feeble clang floating out over the campus that caused a 
generation of students that knew not even of the bell's existence 
to gaze wonderingly at the tower. 

The sound was occasioned by the efforts of workmen who were 
removing it preparatory to taking it to Fairview where, newly 
welded, it will hang in the western tower of the Arthur Jordan 
Memorial Building, its solemn, mellow tone to become once more a 
part of campus life. 

Nearly seventy-five years ago, the bell rang to call students to 
their classes at Northwestern Christian University. "When the in- 
stitution moved to Irvington, came, too, the bell to serve a similar 
purpose. Then there was the day it broke from its hanging and 
crashed through the ceiling. Since then, cracked, dust-covered, 
and almost forgotten, it has been a mute sentinel to the passing 
of the years. 

—4— 



COME HOME 

A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE 

UNIVERSITY 

To the Butler Alumni : 

It is the earnest wish of all of us connected with Butler that 
the alumni attend commencement exercises. You should be here 
to take part in the alumni program on Saturday, June 16. We 
certainly hope you may be present at the Baccalaureate sermon on 
Sunday, June 17. You will enjoy the final exercises on Monday, 
June 18. It will be a pleasure to you, we know, to see the con- 
ferring of degrees on the largest class in the history of Butler. 

Butler is about to move to the new campus at Fairview. Here 
amid beautiful surroundings and with better equipment than ever 
before, the institution should attract the favorable attention of 
the people of the city, the state, and the nation. You know the 
fine character of work for which the institution has always been 
noted. With a larger faculty, with better facilities, with an in- 
creased student body, greater things and higher standards ought 
to result at Fairview. 

Come to commencement. Counsel with each other as to the 
best things that can be done for your Alma Mater. Give us the 
benefit of your experience and the aid of your counsel. We need it. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Robert J. Aley, 

President. 



ALMA MATER'S CALL 

A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE ALUMXI 

ASSOCIATION 

Dear Friend : — 

We are making a supreme effort to induce all of the alumni, 
former students and friends, to return for the annual meeting of 
the Alumni Association Saturday, June 16th. 

The executive committee has recently voted to admit to mem- 
bership in the Butler University Alumni Association all former 
students, whether they were graduated or not. Therefore, if you 
have been enrolled on the college books, you are now a part of our 
great family. 

Everyone will be back this year and after the supper on the 
campus we shall repair to the chapel, where the last chapel service 
will be held. The old college in Irvington then passes into history. 
Loyalty is an admirable characteristic and I am sure you will make 
a supreme effort to come home. I shall be waiting for you at the 
gate. 

Sincerely, 
John F. Mitchell, Jr.. 

President Alumni Association. 



— G- 



THE COMMENCEMENT PROSPECTUS 

FROM the first moment of the Phi Kappa Phi dinner Friday 
evening until the last diploma is awarded on the morning of 
Commencement Day, graduates and former students from the city, 
the state, and many points more distant will live over in retrospect 
their college days and experience the delight of old acquaintance- 
ship renewed. They will stroll again old campus paths and loiter 
in familiar halls. They will look once more upon spots that will 
start a flood of memories. Throughout the class reunions, the 
alumni supper, the last chapel service, which will be held after the 
supper to commemorate the removal from the old campus, the 
baccalaureate service, and the commencement program Monday 
morning, reminiscence will reign. 

The Phi Kappa Phi dinner, which has become one of the annual 
features of Commencement Week, brings back each year an increas- 
ing number of the honor society's alumni. The Butler chapter 
initiated thirty new members on Honor Day, May 11, and is one 
of the foremost agencies of the University for the recognition of 
academic work of merit. 

Graduating seniors are making arrangements for Class Day 
exercises, to be held in the Chapel Saturday morning, and they 
have invited the attendance of all graduates and former students. 
Saturday forenoon and afternoon also will be given over to class 
reunions. The classes of 1878, 1903, 1918, and 1923 will be this 
year the honored classes by reason of the celebration respectively 
of their fiftieth, twenty-fifth, tenth, and fifth anniversaries. Of 
the class of '78, only one member. Miss Katharine Merrill Graydon, 
alumni secretary, is known to be living. The class of '18, graduat- 
ing in the midst of the World War, was negligible in number of 
graduates, as practically every man had answered the call of the 
colors before Commencement Day arrived, but an effort is being 
made to bring the boys back to participate in reunion in the name 
of the class that would have been theirs but for the urgency of 
their country's need. A number of other classes will hold informal 

—7— , 



reunions at points on and adjacent to the campus, some of these 
taking the form of luncheons and breakfasts. 

On the green in the shadow of the Administration Building, the 
alumni supper will be spread. Graduates and former students, 
alone or with their families, will begin to gather there about 5 
o'clock Saturday evening, with fellowship and informality the 
keynotes of the occasion. Immediately after the supper, the group 
will convene for a few moments in business session to elect new 
officers and to hear the reports of old. This completed, the 
assemblage will adjourn to participate in the last gathering of 
alumni in the old chapel. 

This will be the high point of interest of the day. The walls 
that have looked down on a thousand chapels will look down again 
and for the last time and will see the students of ten, twenty, 
twenty-five years ago — a little older surely, a little gray perhaps, 
but still the boys and girls of yesterday. The details of the pro- 
gram, which are being worked out in a manner most suitable to the 
spirit of the occasion, will soon be ready for announcement. 

The baccalaureate sermon in the Chapel at -1 o'clock Sunday 
afternoon will be preached by the Rev. Will Sweeney, pastor of 
the Christian Church of Johnson City, Tennessee, and next morn- 
ing at 10 'clock the activities will reach their climax with the 73rd 
Commencement exercise. Dr. E. C. Elliott, president of Purdue 
University, will speak, after wdiich diplomas will be awarded to 
the largest class ever graduated by Butler University. Present 
plans call for the holding of the commencement exercises at Fair- 
view, and thus the four-day program, part on the old campus, part 
on the new, will be symbolic of the University's transition from 
past to future. 



—8- 



A GREATER ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

ONE of the most important steps made in years for increasing 
the effectiveness of the Butler Alumni Association was taken 
recently by the executive committee when it voted to admit to mem- 
bership all former students of the University, regardless of whether 
they had been graduated. The action was taken under Article III, 
Section I, of the constitution of the Butler Alumni Association 
empowering the executive committee to elect to membership former 
students and members of the faculty not graduates of Butler 
University. 

The result is that all persons who have at any time attended 
the University may now enjoy all the rights and privileges of 
graduates in alumni affairs. Officers of the association now are 
engaged in notifying non-graduates of their admission to the 
association. Owing to the difficulty of compiling a complete list 
of former students who were not graduated, the association is re- 
questing that such persons write in to inform the officers of their 
whereabouts and of the time that they attended Butler, in order 
that their names may be placed on the mailing list. 

The action is in accord with that taken by alumni associations 
of other leading universities where graduates and non-graduates 
work shoulder to shoulder for the welfare of Alma Mater. Many 
men and women most loyal to Butler's interests are included in 
that great group which once attended but never was graduated 
from the institution. Their inclusion in the Butler Alumni Asso- 
ciation is regarded as merited recognition for them and as a bene- 
ficial step for the University. 



—9— 



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OFFICERS 

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DIRECTORS 



JOHN J. APPEL 

Gregory and Appel 

A. A. BARNES 

President Udell Works 

HENRY W. BENNETT 

President State Life Insurance Co. 

ARTHUR V. BROWN 
President 

WM. T. CANNON 

President Railroadmen's Bldg. 
and Sav. Assn. 

E. H. DARRACH 

President Inter-State Car Co. 
THOMAS C. DAY 

of T. C. Day & Co., Mortgage 

Loans 
BERKLEY W. DUCK 

President The Spann Co. 

G. A. EFROYMSON 

President H. P. Wasscn & Co. 

HENRY EITEL 

Vice-President Indiana National 
Bank 



EDGAR H. EVANS 

President Acme-Evans Co. 

HENRY H. HORNBROOK 

Attorney at Law 
WILL G. IRWIN 

President Irwin's Bank. Col- 
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EDWARD L. McKEE 

Treasurer McKee Realty Co. 
WALTER C. MARMON 

Chairman of the Board 

Indianapolis Power and Light Co. 
NORMAN A. PERRY 

President Indianapolis Power 

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President Belt Railroad and 

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PETER C. REILLY 

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FRANK D. STALNAKER 

President Indiana National Bank 
SAMUEL B. SUTPHIN 

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ig28 

Tfrift 



ALUMNIl Live again your unJergraJ Jays. ALUMNI! 

Views ol rSew^ C_.ampus at Jcairview — 
Jjutler Jjeauties ano many new fea- 
tures in college annuals w^ill appear in tne 

1928 DRIFT 

$3 ^0 CASH 

Fill out and mail to tKe 1928 Drift, Butler University, Indianapolis 

No 192_ 

ixeserve v-opies ol tiie 

1928 BUTLER DRIFT 



[Tlie Bigger and Better Drilt will be Oome- I 
tiling you cannot allord to miss. J 

Copy Delivered $ Jraia 



BUTLER UNIVERSITY 

FOUNDED 1852 

A well equipped institution, with a faculty of over seventy- 
five members, offering courses of instruction leading to 

degrees in 



English 

Modern Languages 

Greek 

Latin 

Biblical History 

Political Science 

Education 



Chemistry 

Physics 

Botany 

Zoology 

Astronomy 

Mathematics 

Dramatic Art 

and other subjects 



Business Administra- 
tion 
History 
Philosophy 
Home Economics 
Physical Education 
Journalism 
Public Speaking 



For catalog or other information address 
The Secretary, BUTLER UNIVERSITY, Indianapolis 

After College— What? 

Are yon "training" financially for AFTER yonr graduation? Tour 
ambitions, your hopes will be more quickly realized if you have something 
with which to fight. 

Table shows rapid growth of monthly savings with 6% dividends 
compounded semi-annually. 



Monthly 
Savings 



1 Year 



2 Years 3 Years 4 Tears 



5 Tears 10 Tears 



$ 1.00 


$ 12.39 


$ 25.54 


$ 39.48 


$ 54.28 


$ 69.98 


§ 164.04 


5.00 


61.97 


127.71 


197.45 


271.44 


349.93 


820.22 


10.00 


123.93 


255.41 


394.89 


542.87 


699.86 


1640.43 


15.00 


185.90 


383.12 


593.34 


814.31 


1049.80 


2460.65 


25.00 


309.82 


638.52 


987.24 


1357.19 


1749.67 


4101.08 


100.00 


1239.31 


2554.10 


3948.96 


5428.76 


6998.69 


16404.33 



Chart Copyrighted by Bankers Thrift Corp., Chicago. 



We 
Have 

Paid 



6% 



Dividends 
for 

37 Years 



Resources 

$13,500,000.00 



Fletcher Ave. Savings & Loan Association 



10 East Market Street 



In the Heart of the Business District 



"Uh 



Indianapolis News 



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The Home Paper of the 
Middle West 



Holds the Circulation Record in 

the Three-Cent Evening 

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All the News of Butler and other 
Indiana Colleges 



For Sale Everywhere 



"The Mitchell's have been printing Establistieci 1859 

over fifty years" 



Wm. Mitchell Printing Co. 

Edition Printers and Binders 
GEEENEIELD, INDIANA 



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Printers Since 1859 

TO 

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Butler College 

Butler University 

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The plant complete — book making in its 

entirety — editorial, composition, plates, 

printing, binding. 



V 



1^ w»3 



THE BUTLER 

ALUMNAL 
QUARTERLY 



.^^ 



• \TJr' > 







OCTOBER, 1928 



INDIANAPOLIS 



Entered as second-class matter March 26, 1912, at the post 
office at Indianapolis, Ind., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



DEDICATION 

When that first solemn benediction fell 

Across those voiceless, half completed ivalls, 

Awaking there the first soft echoing calls 

Of that long train of voices soon to well 

Forth everlastingly — new Pasts to tell — 

To gather as each single footstep falls 

Into a tremulous Soiil of granite walls — 

Those ivords seemed then to cast a solemn spell! 

Faint sighs told that that rehorn Spirit breathed — 

Whereat from its new haunt through Fairview's trees 

There rose a thousand birds — wing'd memories 

That traced along the ever darkening sky 

To Irvington, and fleeing out of sight 

Were enveloped in the dark caress of Night. 

— Lucile Turner, '29. 



CONTENTS 

Dedication, a poem Lucile Turner, '29 

Introducing New Butler 

Charles T. Whitsett Hilton U. Brown, '80 

Two Sonnets Sarah T. Sisson, '23 

When Friendship Bridged the Sea May Kolmer Schaefer, '24 
Thomas E. Hibben, Artist and Man Paul V. Brown, '24 

Educating the Alumni 

Editorial Comment 

Who Built New Butler? 
Alma Mater Still 
Welcome Home 

University News 

Around the Campus 

Personal Mention 

Marriages 

Births 

Deaths 



127 






^ButlBPUnlYerslty^ 



THE BUTLER ALUMNAL QUARTERLY 
Vol. XVII October, 1928 No. 3 

Katharine Merrill Graydon, '78 Editor 

J. Douglas Perry, '26 Associate Editor 

George Alexander Schumacher, '25 Business Manager 

Published four times a year, in October, January, April, July. Annual sub- 
scription, $2.00; single copies, 50 cents. Checks, drafts, etc., should be 
made payable to The Butler Alumnal Quarterly. 

Published by the Alumni Association of Butler University, Indianapolis. 
Printed by The William Mitchell Printing Company, Greenfield, Indiana. 

INTRODUCING NEW BUTLER 



Although hundreds of alumni live in Indianapolis, or in towns 
so near at hand that they already have had, or soon will have, the 
opportunity of seeing the new campus, hundreds of others live at 
such distances that they can not hope to see immediately the new 
home of their university. Pictures are a poor substitute, and the 
best descriptions are inadequate. The article below, therefore, is 
intended only to give far-flung alumni an idea of what they will 
see when they do return, as return they must. 



YOU see it perhaps to best advantage as you swing from 
Hampton Drive into the boulevard skirting the east side of 
the campus — a panoramic view of a long, low-lying struc- 
ture of rose-gray granite set against a background of green foliage 
now touched by autumnal gold and brown. You are looking across 
the "back yard" of the Arthur Jordan Memorial Building, but 
that is of no moment. Its beauty knows no "back" or "front." 
Viewed from whatever angle, it gives the same sense of satisfac- 
tion to aesthetic craving. 

Viewed from this vantage point, the unit's E-shaped structure 
is revealed, with the flanking wings that will help form, with the 
completion of the men's and women's dormitories, the central 

129 



130 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

quadrangle of the University. The towers, rising in stepped for- 
mation, give the final touch of classic dignity to the whole. They 
lift themselves loftily above the main entrances which must be 
seen from another angle. 

Drive three blocks north along the boulevard and turn west into 
Forty-sixth Street for closer inspection. Forty-sixth Street is the 
main approach into the campus. As you make the turn, glance 
to the right and you will see three blocks away, the fieldhouse, 
largest of its kind in America, its roof describing a great arc 
against the sky. The stadium cannot be seen from here, for it is 
set into a hill that overlooks a pleasant valley northeast of the 
fieldhouse. However, it is v/orth seeing. Although half com- 
pleted, it will accommodate w^itli ease the population of a town the 
size of Anderson, Indiana. With the completion of the Bowl, the 
population of any city in Indiana, with the exception of Indian- 
apolis, Evansville, and Fort Wayne, may be placed in the con- 
crete tiers, and there will be room to spare. 

You are now in front of the Jordan Building. Just across 
from it is a wooded parkland with landscaped gardens, a sun dial, 
and well-kept lawns. Opposite the west end of the building is a 
knoll that will be dominated in the near future by the College of 
Religion Building, which will include, architects have promised, 
a chapel that is to be the finest of its kind. 

Face to face with the Jordan Building, you are struck with 
awe by its massiveness. There is nothing petty about this struc- 
ture. There was no meanness of spirit in the men who conceived 
it. Those walls are three feet thick. The reinforced concrete 
foundation is from twelve to twenty-two feet deep and is capable 
of supporting a twenty-story building. Examine that ruddy, gray 
stone closely, for you will not see much of it in this part of the 
country. It was shipped from quarries near Salisbury, Xorth 
Carolina, and is known among builders as "the granite eternal." 
The surmounting field of Indiana limestone gives a weathered 
touch that emphasizes the Gothic dignity of the whole. 

You have noticed how deep-set are the windows, and how the 
towers sit back to form high receding alcoves above the entrances. 



Introducing New Butler 131 

In the tower above the center of the building, hangs the bell that 
summoned students to classes at Northwestern Christian University 
and later graced the belfry of the College in Irvington. Now walk 
down the flagstone pavement to the east entrance. You feel you 
are entering a medieval castle as you pass under the Gothic arch, 
but inside, the gleaming white walls and terrazzo floors strike a 
more modern note. The corridors are wide, the ceilings are high, 
and the stairways are broad. That woodwork that catches your 
eye about the stairway leading to the tower is of hand-carved oak, 
and some of the pieces weigh as much as half a ton. 

Step into one of the class rooms. They all are as light as many 
windows can make them. Incidentally, the windows are of steel 
and bronze, and the glass is leaded. Bronze fixtures predominate 
throughout the building unit. The ordinary class room has thirty- 
five stationary chairs equipped with a desk-arm at the right for 
books. The instructor's desk is walnut with double sets of drawers. 

One of the most beautiful rooms in the building is the science 
lecture hall. It will seat two hundred and forty students, the 
chairs being arranged in ascending tiers. The rostrum is built 
into the front wall, giving the effect of a small stage. There are 
several other lecture halls built to accommodate from one hun- 
dred and fifty to two hundred students. Directly beneath the 
science lecture hall, in the basement, is the journalism laboratory. 
It is equipped with thirty-five typewriters, a linotype machine, 
type cases, two United Press printers, and other paraphernalia of 
the newspaper shop. The museum is in the east wing basement, as 
is a lounge room for men. The west wing basement is devoted 
largely to library stack-room purposes, the library reading room 
being immediately above it on the first floor. The College of Re- 
ligion also occupies a considerable part of the west wing. The 
center section of the building houses the science laboratories. A 
feature of the science equipment is the botanical conservatory, 
consisting of a herbarium and greenhouse, built from the third 
floor with southern exposure. The administrative offices of the 
University are on the first floor in the east wing. Each academic 
department has its offices adjacent to the class rooms which it 



132 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

uses. There are fifty-four class rooms in the unit, in addition to 
laboratories and offices. 

As you survey your university on the opening of its seventy- 
fourth year, do not feel that you are acting strangely in giving 
breath to those exclamations of astonishment and admiration. 
There is probably nothing you can say in its praise that has not 
been the common expression of the hosts of visitors who have 
come to look on it in the last two months. There seems to be 
about it that universality of appeal that leaves no room for a dis- 
senting voice. A group of architects brought from the East to 
inspect it asserted that as a type of college edifice, the Arthur 
Jordan Memorial Building is unexcelled by anything in America. 
A member of the faculty who has travelled the world around, 
taught in the Orient, and visited the greatest universities in 
Europe, said that in his opinion this structure surpasses anything 
of its kind in the world. 

What more may one say? To many alumni this day has 
seemed a long time dawning, but now that it is here, one only mar- 
vels that a project of such magnitude should have taken form in 
so short a period. However, it is not yet complete. Tomorrow, 
other buildings no less handsome will be seen rising from the sur- 
rounding groves, but the glory that attaches itself to first things 
can never quite be theirs. Arthur Jordan Memorial Building is 
the first unit of Greater Butler. As such, it is destined to be the 
object of special veneration of Butler alumni for years 
unnumbered. 



Our lives go on and close like a day — morning, noon, night. 
Yet how full of pure happiness these life-days may be, and how 
worthy of the God who plans them and suns them. 

— John Muir. 



What the Alumni Association does in no small measure de- 
pends upon Alumni Dues. 



CHARLES T. WHITSETT* 

By Hilton U. Brown, '80 

MY friends, you know that we seek to make this service as 
simple as Mr. Whitsett would have had it. I want to try 
to be with you as if I had called on him and we were all 
discussing topics that relate to life. In fact, the things that I say 
are things I should much prefer to say to him. He was a very 
modest man about his own attainments, and he tried to prevent his 
friends from expressing the maximum of their affection and re- 
gard for him. He always under-rated himself. 

The common virtues of our American life, it seems to me, are 
translated in his career. He was industrious from his very youth 
and the rewards that he sought were those of the industrious boy 
and the man attentive to the duties incidental to citizenship. He 
grew up knowing how to M^ork and he gave heed to the admonitions 
of his parents and all those w^hom he respected, who presumed to 
lay before him life lessons. And these sank into his life so that 
he acted them out in what he did. He was a most ingenious 
worker. In his business, he advanced it further than any man of 
his time that I know anything about. 

He contrived many w^ays of promoting the business of his life 
and a friend said that he might have patented and copyrighted 
things that he had discovered, but he preferred to give them to 
humanity. In other words, his life was one of unselfish devotion 
to his business, to his friends, to his city and to the community in 
which he lived. He didn't reserve anything for himself that he 
did not wish his friends also to enjoy. 

This, in one sense, should not be an occasion for mourning. I 
think he would not have it so and besides we know the threat that 
he might be taken away at any time that hung over him in the last 
quarter of a century. Periodically he suffered from the illness 
which finally carried him suddenly away, and no one would wish 
a friend to suffer. 



*Address by Mr. Brown at the funeral of Charles T. Whitsett, friend 
of the University, held in Indianapolis, August 23. 

133 



134 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

I have known him in many relations of life. I cannot, of course, 
presume to speak to those who were closer to him by the ties of 
blood and to those who knew him even longer and better. He lived 
in this community for more than fifty years and that is a long 
stretch. He came in contact with many men and many things in 
that time. And he came through it all with the respect and affec- 
tion of acquaintances and friends. 

You remember what a cheerful and cheering person he was. If 
you pried into his affairs a little, he would not unnecessarily speak 
of the danger in which he lived, the danger that life's cord would 
be snapped any moment. That hanging over some people would 
be oppressive, but not so with him. He was as cheerful as the 
young and as wise as the aged. He took life as it came, and as he 
passed along in his daily walk, he tried to leave somebody happier, 
more contented, and more ambitious. 

He could point to many things that had been done in his life- 
time, and he admired them and used them as lessons for those 
whose life was yet ahead. And what a great thing that is — to be 
content with what has been achieved, and yet not be blind to the 
opportunities ahead ! 

You know he was stimulating. He was ambitious, not for him- 
self, nor for any selfish purpose, but he was ambitious to see the 
causes in which he was interested promoted. It was this that led 
him to become such a benefactor of Butler College. He began 
years ago to see how he could advance the interests of that insti- 
tution then starving in its endowment, unable to make any ad- 
vances, unable to do the great work which an educational institu- 
tion in the capital city should do. He set about resolutely and 
prayerfully to help where he could, and besides the monetary con- 
tributions which he made, I wish in behalf of the College to testify 
to the tremendous uplift that came from his helpful life. To one 
plodding along and wrestling with the problem, it is encouraging 
to hear someone come along by .your side, shoulder to shoulder, 
saying: "Have faith, take courage." He had courage and he 
had that sort of helpful faith that promoted a cause that sadly 
needed it. So you don't Avonder that we at Butlor Collesre revere 



Charles T. Whitsett 135 

his name and his word. And it was so in everything in which he 
was interested. He had faith in his country and he gloried in its 
achievements because it brought opportunities and liberty to men. 

He had faith in his church, and he advanced its cause whenever 
he could; and as a citizen, wherever he was able, he promoted the 
movements that were engaging the attention of his fellows. What 
more can we expect of a man than that he be a participant in the 
activities of his day, promoting them from a Christian's point of 
view, and that he enjoin all of those around him not to neglect 
the opportunities which this still young country affords. 

He lived through a great period. Think what he saw. Much 
older than seventy years, he lived through the greatest period of 
his country's history as well as that of the educational institutions 
and all the organizations that have become now so outstanding in 
civilized life. 

Mr. Atherton told me that not long ago, a few days perhaps, 
he had gone with him through the new college building which he 
helped to construct and which he had watched with such intensity, 
and reviewed the beautiful exterior and surroundings of the 
buildings and thought of not so much what they are now, but the 
promise of what they are to be. He went through the building, 
examined it from cellar to top, wearying his strength but never 
willing to give up until he had seen it all, and w^hen he had come 
through he said : " I have seen it all ; I am ready to go now. ' ' It 
was the fulfillment of a dream. 

So that the death of a man who has lived thus and is ready 
and satisfied doesn't bring hopeless grief from us, but gives a sort 
of exhilaration. So live that when the summons comes, we may 
be as he was, content to go. Satisfied with what he had done? 
No, not entirely, but content that he had done all he could. That 
was much. So our good old friend knows. We don't know but 
what he hears us. There are a great many things we don't know 
yet. We certainly know many more things than we did when very 
young, and we don't know yet whether he hears, but if he does, 
he knows the affection and regard that we all have for him, and so 
in this state we part from him, feeling that it is good to have 



136 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

known him. He was a man of a good heart. He was a man who 
loved his fellows, a man who left a part of his life in the lives of 
others. So he goes on. We bid him an affectionate farewell, not 
doubting that he goes on and on and on. 



TWO SONNETS 
By Sarah T. Sisson, '23 

Poetic moments are divinely rare. 

As jewell'd tiara on a queenly head, 

They flash with thousand feelings blended there 

Into one blazing thought by passion fed. 

Prometheus' gift to helpless men of earth 

Can bring no brighter spark of hope than these, 

Which urge men on to nobler deeds of worth. 

Give promise of a dawn of love and ease. 

So precious, priceless gems through ages long. 

No gold can buy their beauty's perfectness; 

Nor skylark, though he break in heavenly song, 

Quite match the radiance of their gloriousness. 

You call it greed, that hoards in velvet case. 

Until One comes with sympathetic face? 



A butterfly, hatched from its wrappings brown, 

With feeble flutter flies from patch to patch 

Of dandelion, dressed in yellow gown, 

With mushroom speed, the maiden sun to match. 

A blue- jay, scolding, high in yonder tree, 

With saucy tilt of head and beady stare, 

Defies the sky to be as blue as he. 

Although no truant clouds across it fare. 

The old brown world has taken on new life. 

With colors painted every dingy spot. 

When Spring takes all of nature home to wife, 

A Paradise of beauty — my back lot. 

Yet there's no color left in life for me; 

No red, nor scarlet for my soul to see. 



WHEN FRIENDSHIP BRIDGED THE SEA 

By May Kolmer Schaefer, '24 

ONE of the finest tributes ever paid to a college student was 
that paid to Mr. Maximo Pena when he was sent to his 
home, eight thousand miles away in the Philippine Islands, 
it being learned that he was slowly dying of an incurable malady. 
This was accomplished through the beneficence of a group of 
friends to whom he had become much endeared. 

Mr. Peiia came to the United States four years ago to seek a 
higher education. During this time he made an enviable record as 
a student in Butler University and he was elected to Phi Kappa 
Phi with more than the ninety per cent, average required for the 
election of graduate students. He received his bachelor of arts 
degree and had almost completed the work towards his master of 
arts and his bachelor of law degrees when disease, sarcoma of the 
bone, took possession of him. 

Mr. Peiia had the happy faculty of making and holding friends 
in a generous measure. His friends delighted in his successes and 
helped to provide for his needs, and when .he was stricken with 
this deadly disease, they gave their sympathy and service in trying 
to relieve his distress. They proved to be lovers of their fellowmen 
as well as followers of the Great Teacher who said, "Come, ye 
blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from 
the foundation of the world ; for I was hungry, and ye gave me to 
eat ; I was thirsty, and ye gave me to drink ; I was a stranger, and 
ye took me in ; I was sick, and ye visited me. Inasmuch as ye did 
it unto one of these, my brethren, ye did it unto me." 

In 1921, Mr. P. R. Hightower, now a professor in the depart- 
ment of education at Butler, w^as principal of the Vigan Ilocos Sur 
Division High School, where he met Mr. Pena. Mr. Peiia served 
as teacher, property man, and chief assistant to Mr. Hightower. 
Before going to the high school to serve in this capacity, he was 
a grade school teacher, then a high school teacher, and later, he was 
academic supervisor of the grade schools. 

While Avorking under Mr. Hightower, he at once showed that 
earnestness of purpose, capacity for hard work, and exceptional 

137 



138 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

ability which characterized his entire career. In addition to his 
school duties, he did correspondence work with the Hamilton Law 
School in Chicago, and in the spring of 1924 he came to the United 
States for the purpose of satisfying the residence requirement for 
the law degree. Upon his arrival in Chicago, he found that the 
law school had been merged with another institution. He was 
then at a loss to know how to proceed in obtaining a higher educa- 
tion. He desired advanced training so that he could be a teacher 
by profession, and at the same time, he desired to use his legal 
knowledge to protect his people against the land grafters who have 
caused much hardship among the natives. 

Mr. Hightower returned to America several months before Mr. 
Peiia came. Mr. Pena had learned from an Australian missionary 
serving under the American Board of the Disciples of Christ, that 
his former chief was connected with Butler College. "While in 
Chicago, Mr. Pena saw a Butler University baseball advertisement, 
and he immediately wrote for a catalog in the hope of locating his 
friend. He was anxious to learn whether Butler College and 
Butler University were the same. Shortly afterwards, Professor 
Hightower received a letter from him in which he inquired if 
Mr. Hightower could find a way for him to work his way through 
the University. 

The first year at Butler he worked in the cafeteria for part of 
his food ; for the other meals, he was a guest at the Hightower home. 
A room was provided for him in an Irvington home in return for 
his service of firing the furnace. In the following June the High- 
towers occupied more spacious quarters, and there Mr. Pena joined 
them to remain until his illness caused him to be taken to the 
hospital. The Hightower residence was home to him. and ]\Ir. 
and Mrs. Hightower from the beginning joined him in his purpose 
in an effective and stimulating way, making possible by their 
sympathetic co-operation the great amount of work he was able to 
accomplish. 

Mr. Pena was in this country four years. At the end of the 
first semester of 1926-27, he finished the requirements for the 
bachelor of arts degree and he immediately began work on a 
master's degree in education. By the end of the following summer 



When Friendship Bridged the Sea 139 

session, he had twenty-seven hours toward this degree, the thesis 
being the only thing remaining to be completed. In the fall of 
1927, he entered the Indiana Law School as a senior and would have 
received the bachelor of law degree in June had his health per- 
mitted. Dean Rohbach found his law correspondence work suf- 
ficient for this advanced standing. In the law school, as in Butler, 
he proved to be an excellent student and he soon won his way into 
the hearts of the students and the faculty by his personality, his 
courteous and genial manners, his enthusiasm in his work, and his 
earnest desire to prepare himself so that he could help bear the 
burdens of his countrymen. 

In December, 1926, he had the first indication of his illness. 
Medical attention was given him but to no avail. It is said that 
the malady is so insidious in its nature that in the early stages it 
is extremely difficult to diagnose. He continued in his work in 
spite of his ill health and he went to school when he could hardly 
ascend the street car steps. This continued effort seems but 
another proof of his amazing earnestness and willingness to serve. 

In February, 1927, his condition was such that he was com- 
pelled to go to the Indianapolis City Hospital where every effort 
was made to treat his disease and to relieve his pain. When his 
many friends learned that there was no hope for his recovery, they 
were anxious to satisfy his desire to go home to his mother. The 
fund which was started became sufficient to send him home under 
the care of Dr. Paul Iske, a former Butler student and City 
Hospital interne. Patient and doctor left Indianapolis June 17 
and sailed from Vancouver, Canada, June 21, arriving in Manila 
July 13. Mr. Pena was bedfast throughout the entire journey. 
The officials of the railway and steamship entered into the spirit 
of the mission, and every effort was made to keep the patient com- 
fortable. 

There were times out at sea when it was feared that Mr. Pena 
would not complete the voyage. The day before they reached the 
Philippines he was delirious much of the time. Upon arrival, it 
seemed advisable to have him rest in a Manilan hospital under the 
care of the American Red Cross before continuing his journey to 
his home in Vigan, Iloeos Sur. The Red Cross responded promptly 



140 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

to his need and helped to place him in a hospital, and members of 
the Red Cross staff took personal charge of his case. 

On the tenth day after his arrival in Manila, he wrote the fol- 
lowing letter to Mr. and Mrs. Hightower : " I thank God I am now 
in the Philippines. I do not know when I shall be able to be taken 
to Vigan. I suffer much pain on account of the heat. 

"I thank you all very much. Please let others know this heart- 
felt gratitude. ' ' 

I know that this message from him assures his friends of the 
worth of their efforts. 

A letter from his sister, dated August 2, states that he arrived 
home and that his family is now satisfied. Concerning his coming 
home, she says : " . . . and we like it very much too, so that we 
will be the ones to look after him. There are many folks of his, 
and he can just do what he Avants to command us. We are his 
nurses. ' ' 

It is given to but few young men to count so many friends as 
does Mr. Pena — his fellow students at Butler and at the law school, 
members of the faculties of both colleges, and hospital attaches. 
All who came in contact with him hold him in affectionate and 
highest esteem. His illness causes the Philippines to lose an 
earnest teacher, the community in Avhich he lives, a splendid 
citizen and leader, and those who knew him personally, a friend. 



Dr. Irvin T. Schultz of the department of education and Dr. 
John S. Harrison of the department of English were among mem- 
bers of the faculty who addressed section meetings of the Indiana 
State Teachers' Association, October 18, 19 and 20. Dr. Harrison 
addressed the classical section on "Classical Backgrounds in 
English Literature," and Dr. Schultz opened the discussion ses- 
sion of the psychology and education section. Dr. W. L. Richard- 
son, head of the department of education, was president of the lat- 
ter section. 



THOMAS E. HIBBEN, ARTIST AND MAX 

By Paul V. Brown, '24 

IT may be of interest to those who look upon the new structure 
of Butler University to know somewhat of the man who has 
built himself into the stone. Doubtless, future generations 
who pass through Jordan Hall and the other buildings-to-be, will 
come unconsciously to know this man with a deeper understanding 
than is now possible for us whose vision may be dimmed by affec- 
tion for the individual. Certainly they will know that he whose 
genius conceived these buildings was fundamentally honest, was 
a searcher after truth. Living in the presence of his w^ork they 
will understand, too, the positiveness of his character, the masculine 
virility which boasts of strength gently tempered with the artistic. 
They will find in his Avork no strict adherence to tradition, no 
clinging for support to accepted usage of the past. 

Thomas Hibben's life from his tenth year has been directly 
and indirectly influenced by the College whose buildings he was 
later destined to design. Born into an old widely known family, 
he inherited from both parents an artistic sense. The pencil 
drawings and etchings of his father gained wdde recognition. The 
beautiful home was a center for men of art and letters. 

Tom attended the Irvington public school, played football with 
the ' ' Irvington gang ' ' on the Butler campus where his only distinc- 
tion was a dirty white sweater and perhaps a more vigorous en- 
thusiasm. Later he entered Manual Training High School, and 
afterwards the Butler preparatory school, where a zest for knowl- 
edge began to point to his destiny. Two years of undergraduate 
work spent in Princeton University were interrupted by the death 
of his father. He did not return to complete his academic course, 
but followed for a while in the footsteps of his father in mercantile 
business. This career failing to attract him, he joined the Indiana 
militia on the Mexican border. 

At the entrance of the United States in the World War, Tom 
went to France as an artillery officer and is remembered for 
his rapid calculation of firing problems. After a short training 
period, he was commissioned in the United States Infantry and 

141 



142 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

then transferred to the Army Air Corps, first as observer and 
then as a pilot. He was one of the very few to obtain both brevets. 
In all branches of the service in which he participated he was 
recognized for his thorough knowledge of all subjects having to 
do with his work and for his efficiency. He experienced many 
difficult and hazardous assignments as pilot and observer, and 
had numerous harrowing escapes. While in this service, he pre- 
pared a series of pamphlets on various aspects of aerial observa- 
tion which became text books on the subject. 

After the armistice he was permitted to enter a vocational 
school at Paris. This was the beginning of his life's ambition. 
He began the study of architecture. His furlough soon ended, 
however, and he was returned to the United States to take up the 
duties of operations officer in charge of the aviation patrol on 
the Mexican border. 

In the late summer of 1919 he resigned his commission in the 
army and entered the University of Pennsylvania to continue his 
studies in architecture. He worked with such energy that he com- 
pleted the course in a year less than the specified time in spite 
of the fact that he was instructor in engineering at the same time. 

On returning to Indianapolis he worked, first, with Herbert 
Foltz and, later, with Eobert Frost Daggett. In 1923, in prepara- 
tion for the new Butler he visited many universities, going as far 
as the Pacific coast in this study. The following year he went 
abroad for the same purpose, spending a considerable period in 
study at Oxford. 

Upon his return, he was associated with ]\Ir. Daggett in de- 
signing the Chamber of Commerce building. During the follow- 
ing winter he again went to New Mexico and the west coast, 
this trip being followed by a decision to establish his office in 
New York, where he continued to completion his work on the 
Jordan Building. 

His other recent work includes tlie AVilliam Spencer Boyd 
Memorial Chapel at Asheville, North Carolina, and the Indiana 
Lincoln Memorial. Early in 1928 he wrote "Analysis of Design," 
an article presenting a new method of architectural design which 
has aroused much comment. He is now working on other Butler 



Thomas E. Hibben, Artist and Man 143 

groups and a number of other projects of international importance, 
the nature of which has not been publicly announced. He is the 
architect for the new Phi Delta Theta house which will be situated 
at the south entrance to the Butler campus. 

His work in designing the proposed Indiana Lincoln Memorial, 
in particular, has received national recognition. When the plans 
for this memorial were first made public, the New York Evening 
"World, among other things, said editorially: 

"The architect, Thomas Hibben, who has done some brilliant 
work, has sought in the memorial building to give expression to 
the simplicity of the man, his democracy, his distinctive Ameri- 
canism ; and thus, the Greek temple idea has been rejected. There 
is something of the originality of Lincoln himself in the conception, 
with everything of his strength, his simplicity, his splendor of soul 
and beauty of character. It is a fine thing to have a Lincoln 
memorial that the plain people, whom Lincoln symbolized and 
loved, can feel and understand; a fine thing that an Indiana 
architect has planned it ; an appropriate thing that it should be 
built on the site of his boyhood home ; and a commendable thing 
that the Hoosiers have at length awakened to a realization of both 
their opportunity and their obligation." 

Equally complimentary editorials were published in practically 
every state in the Union. Even the Academy of Science of Paris 
took notice of the architectural design and said in effect that it 
was the first typically American architectural expression. The 
Associated Press had this to say, in part : 

"Mr. Thomas Hibben is, at present, among the leading men of 
his line in New York City, but until a few years ago, practiced his 
chosen profession in Indianapolis, the city of his birth and early 
manhood. His outstanding achievements in this state, up until 
the present time, have been the buildings which constituted Butler 
University and the Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce, in which 
project he sustained a relation of associated architect. ... Of all 
memorials to Abraham Lincoln in the United States at the present 
time, this is the only one conceived in the spirit of rugged Ameri- 
canism. Mr. Hibben has made no attempt to work in a classic 
idiom which is common throughout the country, but has developed 
a type of expression in line and mass, simple, rugged, characteristic 



144 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

and seeming to grow in the very soil as did the Abraham Lincoln 
the memorial honors. Indiana is most fortunate in having a native 
son to design a memorial honoring the great martyred President." 

While architecture is Mr. Hibben's vocation, it is not the only 
art at which he excels. Some idea of the tremendous energy of the 
man can be gained when it is recounted that while he is in the 
midst of some of his greatest accomplishments in his chosen field, 
he is creating the ingenious memorial windows for the Kiley 
Hospital ; he is making an exhaustive study of symbolism ; he is 
preparing a number of important articles for magazines; he is 
completing a number of etchings and lithographs which are be- 
coming more and more highly jDrized in art circles, and he is trying 
his hand in the art of modeling and sculpture. 

All these things, he is doing at lightning-like speed and yet 
with the thoroughness seldom lavished on any particular line of 
activity. 

His work on the Riley windows is particularly worthy of 
mention in any article attempting to reveal Tom Hibben, the man. 
These are a series of scenes that delight children and grown-ups 
alike. They are in brilliant primitive colors and the figures 
depicted are amusing and delightful. A study of them shows how 
intimately Mr. Hibben's heart is in tune with that of the child 
and how infinitely sympathetic he is to the child's appreciation of 
fantasy and make-believe. 

Tom is constantly at work and his terrific energy is never 
wasted. He drives forward to a definite objective. It is amazing 
to know the extent of his other interests. He is a student of 
literature and the drama. He is ever well-posted on domestic and 
foreign politics and he is an active observer in the realm of the 
scientists. 

Tom is an intense antagonist in game or sport and thoroughly 
enjoys to win. He is patient and considerate in the presence of 
sincerity, but intolerant of hypocrisy. 

But all these things do not tell what a thoroughly delightful 
and lovable companion he is, nor what his friendship can mean. 



EDUCATING THE ALUMNI 



At the meeting of the American Alumni Council held last May 
in Minneapolis, a topic of vital interest was the above. Following 
is a summarized version of a longer article on this very important 
subject, the original having been written by Daniel L. Grant, for- 
merly alumni secretary of the University of North Carolina and 
now director of an investigation of educational relations between 
colleges and alumni. 



N^OW that we are coming more and more to admit that edu- 
cation must continue throughout life, the colleges and uni- 
versities must do more in the direction of continuing the 
education of their alumni, so we are reminded by Daniel L. Grant, 
director of an investigation of educational relations between col- 
leges and alumni. He recalls that many other relationships between 
the colleges and their alumni have become well known, such as 
the social, the political, the financial, and the athletic ; but that the 
educational relation has been neglected. The old slogan was, he 
says, "What can we do for Alma Mater," but now the movement 
is rather in the direction of alma mater doing something for the 
alumni. 

Much of the confusion in the present college course is due to 
the effort to crowd too much into the four years, thinks Mr. Grant. 
Why not let some of it run over into the alumni year! 

The results of Mr. Grant's survey shows that there are about 
fifty colleges and universities now in the country which have rec- 
ognized that there is a real educational obligation which they have 
to their alumni, and are setting out to meet this need. The first 
in the field was Amherst (1923). Michigan and her "Alumni 
University" idea is one of the latest, and certainly the most dis- 
cussed of any such movement. 

What are the educational demands with which these fifty col- 
leges are trying to supply their alumni, and how is the work being 
done ? 

Perhaps the first is professional guidance and education. Next 

145 



146 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

is cultural education. The third is education to deal intelligently 
with the large issues of common concern. 

These three kinds of alumni education are being carried on by 
means of reading courses, reading lists, and a readers' adviser 
service, supplemented by books from the college library wherever 
the alumnus is out of reach of any adequate local library. Smith 
College, for instance, has organized more than twenty different 
reading courses, and for each of the past four years has matricu- 
lated from about sixteen to twenty per cent, of its total alumnae in 
some of these courses. 

There is, however, one significant limitation, Mr. Grant points 
out, a limitation which "grows out of the narrow institutional out- 
look of organized alumni work in the past. This, in turn, is prob- 
ably very largely a product of intercollegiate athletic competition 
which has given us an institutional complex." He believes that 
an alumnus of a college in Maine who lives in California will get 
educational benefit more easily from the California colleges, "re- 
gardless of how superior alma mater may have seemed to all other 
educational institutions in the country. In this continuing-educa- 
tion-for-the-educated we have a work which is going to cut across 
institutional lines rather liberally." 



As one college president has expressed it: "It is particularly 
true of a real college, that its capital lies even more in the genuine 
trust and loyalty of its alumni than in stocks and bonds. And no 
man will genuinely love and trust an institution to which he gives 
no thought or care. I prize for the college even more than the 
regular money gifts, the steady interest out of which such a gift 
springs, and which it will continuously increase." 



THE BUTLER ALUMNAL QUARTERLY 
Vol. XVII October, 1928 No. 3 

Officers of the Alumni Association — President, Jolin F. Mitchell, Jr., '06; 
First Vice-President, Dr. D. W. Layman, '93 ; Second Vice-President, 
Mrs. Urith Daily Gill, '17; Secretary, Katharine M. Graydon, '78; 
Treasurer, George A. Schumacher, '25. 

Published by The Butler University Alumni Association. 
Printed by The William Mitchell Printing Company, Greenfield, Indiana. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

WHO BUILT NEW BUTLER? 

''Wlio built new Butler?" 

Tom Hibben built it. Long before a stone was laid, this young 
man, himself a student of the University not so many years ago, 
saw in the mind's eye of his architectural genius the long rose- 
gray sweep of edifice with its stately towers, its flanking wings, its 
arched entrances. He saw its wide hallways, its many-windowed 
class rooms, its great laboratories, its beamed and paneled wood- 
work, and as he saw, the builders wrought. 

''Who built new Butler?" 

Arthur Jordan built it. To make real the architect's dream, 
he gave a million dollars, and his gift transformed a fine-spun 
vision into steel and granite. Man of many enterprises, he was not 
too busy to see here an opportunity to serve his state and com- 
munity in a manner unforgettable, and having seen, he acted with 
a directness and a thoroughness characteristic of one who is ac- 
customed to the handling of affairs of magnitude with quickness 
and dispatch, 

''Who built new Butler?" 

Hilton Brown built it. No man has had a greater personal con- 
cern in it than he. Nothing, unless it be his family and his church, 
has taken precedence over it in his thought. Since long before 

147 



148 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

construction began he has been parent to its progress. Then, he 
studied it, talked it, planned it. Later, when graj' stone walls be- 
gan to creep over steel framework, he could be seen almost any 
Sunday and on many another afternoon climbing over perilously 
high girders and parapets, seeing his dream come true. No detail 
ever has been too trivial to demand his attention. 

"Who built new Butler?" 

John Atherton built it. With evangelical fervor, he carried 
the gospel of educational needs to merchants, manufacturers, 
churchmen, and professional men, and made them converts to his 
cause. He sold to the state at large the idea of a great university 
in its capital city. He recruited for this university a constituency 
of friends, imposing not only in numbers but in the distinction of 
its individuals. 

"Who built new Butler?" 

Dr. Henry Jameson built it. He built it by virtue of the fact 
that the ground upon which it stands might never have become the 
property of the University except by his efforts. The acquisition 
of more than two hundred acres of watered, wooded campus land, 
unexcelled in charm by that of any educational institution in 
America — that is his contribution. He may not see the new build- 
ings rise upon it, but behind them stands the spirit of his disinter- 
ested service. 

"Who built new Butler?" 

Friends of the University built it, and among the foremost 
names are those of Mrs. A. M. Robertson and Mrs. Elizabeth C. 
Marmon. They were friends in need and friends in deed. When 
money was an object, they supplied money, and their sincere in- 
terest in the aspirations of a greater university has been a prime 
factor in speeding its progress. 

"Who built new Butler?" 

Its board of directors built it. Will Irwin, Mrs. Z. T. Sweeney, 
Arthur Brown, and the others who have been no less indefatigable 
in their labors or liberal in their gifts, have constituted as faithful 
a crew as ever guided the destinies of an educational institution. 
There is scarcely need to comment on their work. The campus, the 



tiUtlBrl 




riiA Mater Still 149 

buildings, the hundreds of students being fitted for citizenship — 
these are the realities that speak a more eloquent tribute than 
could be put in the finest phrase. 



ALMA MATER STILL 



One of the problems incident to the transplanting of any uni- 
versity is that of carrying over the interests and affections of the 
whole alumni body from the old campus to the new. Whether 
we would have it so or not, the loyalties of old graduates largely 
cluster about physical objects — a vine-covered building, the room 
used by a beloved teacher, a well-worn door sill, a familiar campus 
path. This is not unnatural, but it is unfortunate in that these 
are things that can not be taken into the new surroundings. As a 
result, an alumnus sometimes feels as little inclined to accept the 
new institution as alma mater, as an old hen is disposed to accept 
a brood of goslings in lieu of her own chicks. 

This situation may be expected to manifest itself at Butler now 
in one way or another. The home-coming alumnus is likely to feel 
a little strange. Instead of the small block of land sandwiched 
between the railroad tracks, acres of rolling woodland will con- 
front him. In the place of the red brick buildings beaten upon by 
a half century of winter wind and summer sun, granite structures 
of beauty and dignity will greet his eye. The rambling old gym- 
nasium, relic of World War days, has been replaced by the largest 
and most completely equipped athletic fieldhouse in the state. The 
wooden bleachers that annually were drawn up four-square on 
Irwin Field for the football season have given way to a great con- 
crete bowl built into one of the hills. The names Downey Avenue, 
Hawthorne Lane, and Ritter Avenue are no longer heard; instead, 
it is Hampton Drive, Sunset Avenue, and Blue Ridge Road. Lit- 
tle wonder if an alumnus looks about him with some dismay and 
asks himself: ''Can this be my old school?" 

Let there be no doubt as to the answer. It is and it will ever 
be. Its physical aspects are altered, but the ideals upon which it 
was founded and the purposes for which it always has existed are 



150 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

in no wise changed. These things are real. They constitute the 
heart and the soul of the University. 

A son may return home to find his parents altered by the 
years, but that does not alter his affections. The tall, sinewj' 
young man may not resemble the chubby boy of twenty years ago, 
but his mother knows they are the same. Change is the concomi- 
tant of life. Accept it as such. 



WELCOME HOME 



The Quarterly greets Miss Corinne Welling, associate pro- 
fessor in the department of English, upon her return after an 
absence of two years spent in Hawaii and California. She has 
been greatly missed. The integrity of her scholarship, the perme- 
ating influence of her gracious presence, her loyalty to the College, 
her Alma Mater, spending itself untiringly, make her beloved by 
the students and esteemed by the faculty. 



I'd like to sail the billowy sea 

In a fairy craft for you and me, 
And zephyrs skim with the feathered oar. 

As we're wafted on to farther shore 
We'd strew earth's cares 'mongst the angry waves 

And bury them deep in wat'ry graves. 

— F. F. Hummell, '93. 



UNIVERSITY NEWS 



. AROUND THE CAMPUS 

Increased Registration 

Official registration figures for the fall semester indicate that 
1,764 students have matriculated in the liberal arts college. This 
is a considerable increase over the enrollment of last year. Regis- 
tration took place September 18 and 19, and when the doors opened 
at 8 'clock on these mornings, students were lined up for a distance 
of half a city block, waiting to matriculate. Although the throngs 
were handled expeditiously by Miss Sarah E, Cotton, registrar, and 
her assistants, the halls were crowded with students selecting their 
courses until 5 :30 p. m. In several cases, the early filling of 
sections to the maximum seating capacity of class rooms, necessi- 
tated the scheduling of new sections. 

The College of Religion reported an enrollment of more than 
one hundred, an increase of approximately 33 per cent. 



New Names on Faculty Roll 
The faculty roster of the University contains a number of new 
names. Included among them are those of Dr. A. C. Garnett, pro- 
fessor of apologetics, College of Religion; Dr. S. F. Moncada, asso- 
ciate professor of romance languages; Wallace Perkins, assistant 
professor in the same department; Miss Rosamund Burgi, in- 
structor in the classical language department; Herbert E. Rahe, 
instructor of public speaking; Dr. Talbert P. Reavis, head of the 
sociology department; George W. Harris, instructor in journalism; 
Forrest E. Keller, instructor in economics; Dr. W. N. Clute, cura- 
tor of the herbarium ; Herbert Webster, instructor in English ; Miss 
Kathryn Jamison Journey, instructor in home economics; Paul 
Edgar Alyea, instructor in economics, Dr. Karl S. Means, associate 
professor of chemistry, and Archie Chadd, assistant coach of fresh- 
man sports. 

151 



152 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

Dr. Garnett came to Butler from the University of Adelaide, 
South Australia. He holds the degrees of B. A., M. A., and Litt. 

D. from the University of Melbourne, and has spent a year in 
research work in the University of London. For two years he held 
the pastorate of the Grote Street Church of Christ in Adelaide. 

Dr. S. F. Moncada has been in this country about six years and 
will take the place of Dr. Joseph G. Fucilla. Dr. Fucilla is teach- 
ing at Northwestern University. Dr. Moncada received his doctor 's 
degree at the University of Genoa, Italy. He obtained his master's 
degree from Columbia University. He comes to Butler from 
Denison University, where he was in charge of the Spanish depart- 
ment. He will teach Italian and Spanish here. Assistant Professor 
Perkins will take Prof. Clyde E. Aldrich's place, while Prof. 
Aldrich is studying at Grenoble, France. Assistant Professor Per- 
kins received his A. B. from Harvard and his master's degree from 
Lehigh L'^niversity. He was an instructor in the University of 
New Hampshire and did graduate work in Harvard last year. 
Mary McCormick of the 1928 graduating class was appointed 
graduate assistant in French this year. 

j\Ir. Harris received his A. B. from the University of Wisconsin, 
and Mr. Keller is a graduate of Knox College. He has studied at 
the University of Chicago for the last year and a half. 

Dr. Reavis received his Ph. D. from Indiana University. He 
was an instructor in the romance language department in 1927 and 
in the College of Religion last year. He will succeed Dr. Howard 

E. Jensen as head of the sociology department. 

Miss Journey, a graduate of Stephens College, junior college 
for women at Columbia, Missouri, holds the degrees of B. S. from 
the University of IMissouri, and M. A. from the University of 
Chicago. Her experience includes several years as principal and 
teacher in Missouri high schools. 

Mr. Alyea holds the B. A. and M. A. degrees from the University 
of Illinois. He was an instructor last year in the University of 
Pittsburgh. Mr. Webster is a graduate of Lawrence College, 
Appleton, Wisconsin, and received his master's degree from the 
University of Virginia. 

Dr. Means is an alumnus of Butler of the Class of 1914 and was 



Around the Campus 153 

a member of the Butler faculty from 1919 to 1921. He holds the 
M. A. degree from Indiana University and the Ph. D. degree from 
the University of Chicago. He taught last year at Milligan Col- 
lege, Milligan, Tennessee. 

Mr. Chadd, who was graduated from Butler in June, will be 
remembered by alumni as captain of last year's champion basket- 
ball team. 

Dr. Irvin T. Schultz has returned from two years of graduate 
work at the University of Pennsylvania where he received his 
doctor's degree in June. 

The Rev. Thomas W. Grafton, former pastor of the Third 
Christian Church, has been chosen chaplain for Butler University. 



Team in Midst of Stiff Schedule 

Falling heir to the promising talent of last year's freshman 
team, and with a pleasing number of varsity men back in uniform, 
Coach Potsy Clark began fall gridiron practice with a formida- 
ble array of material. Thirty-five or forty men appeared for 
tutelage under Potsy and his assistant coaches, Hyde, Hinkle, 
Nipper and Chadd. Early season injuries, however, to "Nish" 
Dienhart, of Lafayette, varsitj" guard, and John Cavosie, of Iron- 
wood, Mich., the sensation of last year's freshman team, were costly. 

Special cars filled with rooters accompanied the team when 
it went to Evanston to meet Northwestern University October 6. 
Besides student fans, the University board of trustees and the 
Butler Men's Club were aboard the excursion train. The first 
home game was with Franklin College on the following Saturday, 
and the Homecoming Day contest was scheduled in the Butler bowl 
for October 20, with Danville Normal as the opposition. 

The schedule for the remainder of the season follows : 

October 27, Washington University, Butler stadimn, Indian- 
apolis Day. 

November 3, Indiana State Normal School (Muncie), Butler 
stadium. Boy Scout Day. 

November 10, University of Illinois, Butler stadium, dedication 
of the Bowl. 



154 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

November 17, Earlham College, Butler stadium, Dad's Day. 

November 24, Open. 

November 29, Tufts College, Butler stadium, Thanksgiving Day, 

Fraternities in New Homes 

Eighteen sororities and fraternities have rented or purchased 
temporary houses near the campus for this year. Those renting 
are : Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Delta Tau Delta, Tau 
Kappa Tau, Chi Rho Zeta, Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, Pi Beta Phi, Delta Delta Delta, Alpha Delta Theta, Delta 
Zeta, Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Delta Pi, Delta Gamma and Alpha 
Omicron Pi. Zeta Tau Alpha and Kappa Delta Rho have bought 
their houses. Lambda Chi Alpha plans to have its new house com- 
pleted by October 1. 

Seven Greek organizations have expressed intentions of building 
homes on the campus within one year. They are Phi Delta Theta, 
Chi Rho Zeta, Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Delta 
Delta Delta, Alpha Chi Omega and Delta Gamma. 

Sigma Nu, Zeta Tau Alpha, Delta Zeta and Alpha Delta Theta 
plan to build homes within the next two or three years. The other 
organizations have not announced their plans as yet. 

A directory of fraternity and sorority houses is as follows : 

Kappa Alpha Theta— 3632 North Illinois Street. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma — 4546 North Pennsylvania Street ; "Wa. 
1661. 

Pi Beta Phi— 706 West Forty-third Street. 

Delta Delta Delta— 325 West Forty-fourth Street; Hu. 7252. 

Zeta Tau Alpha— 329 Hampton Drive ; Hu. 6852. 

Alpha Delta Theta— 4615 Sunset Boulevard; Wa. 3356. 

Delta Zeta — 4617 Sunset Boulevard ; Hu. 7555. 

Alpha Chi Omega— 201 Blue Ridge Road ; Hu. 7212. 

Alpha Delta Pi— 4403 North Capitol Avenue ; Hu. 6809. 

Delta Gamma — 216 East Forty-ninth Street. 

Alpha Omicron Pi — 611 Berkeley Road ; Hu. 7557. 

Chi Theta Chi— 205 East Thirty-third Street ; Wa. 1772. 

Delta Tau Delta— 4950 Graeeland; Hu. 2921. 

Lambda Chi Alpha — 4751 Sunset Boulevard. 



Around the Campus 155 

Sigma Chi — 714 Berkley Road. 

Sigma Nu — 4635 North Capitol Avenue. 

Chi Rho Zeta— 4610 North Illinois Street. 

Tail Kappa Tail — 507 Buckingham Drive. 

Kappa Delta Rho — Forty-sixth Street and Rookwood Avenue. 



A 32-Page Collegian 

One of the largest college newspapers ever published made its 
appearance with the first edition of the Collegian which was dis- 
tributed on the campus and throughout north Indianapolis at the 
opening of the semester. This, a special edition in celebration of 
the opening of the Arthur Jordan Memorial Building, contained 
thirty-two pages. One page of pictures pertaining to the opening 
was included. The Collegian has now installed the complete wire 
service of the United Press, and the size of the page has been in- 
creased from six to seven coliims. It also is being issued five days 
a week now instead of four. 



Gearhart Publicity Director 
Don H. Gearhart, president of the class of 1928, has been ap- 
pointed publicity director of the University, having taken up the 
duties of that office at the beginning of the present semester. He 
is supplying newspapers in all parts of the country with accounts 
of campus happenings, and has inaugurated also a pictorial news 
service. 



Cafeteria in Operation 
A University cafeteria is now in operation in temporary quar- 
ters that have been built in the rear of the Jordan Building. The 
structure is a gray frame building, 50x100 feet, and will accom- 
modate between three and four hundred students. 



First Chapel Service in Fieldhouse 
The first day of instruction in the Jordan Building was marked 
by an all-school chapel service held in the fieldhouse. Dr. Aley, 
who presided, presented Arthur Jordan, donor of $1,000,000 for 



156 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

building purposes; Hilton U. Brown, president of the board of 
directors, and the Rev. T. W. Grafton, newly appointed chaplain 
of the University. 



Writes Best College Short Story 
George C. Lloyd, sophomore, was awarded the Maxwell Aley 
first prize of $75 for the best short story written by a college stu- 
dent in Indianapolis, at the annual Culver literary field day 
exercises held at Culver, Indiana, August 4. "Coquette at 
Kearney's" is the title of Lloyd's manuscript. He wrote the story 
while a freshman last year. 



PERSONAL MENTION 

The Rev. and Mrs. Stanley Sellick, '16, of Stratford, Connect- 
icut, spent August in Irvington. 

Miss Emily Helming, '99, is spending the current year at Yale 
University. 

Joy J. Bailey, '26, is teaching history and English in the 
Veedersburg, Indiana, high school. 

Mrs. James H. Butler (Edith Gwartney, '19) is president of 
the Irvington Union of Clubs. 

George A. Schumacher, '25, has returned from a summer in 
Europe delighted with all experiences. 

The Quarterly acknowledges receipt from J. Challen Smith, 
'88, of the Sawtelle Evening Trihunc of California, containing an 
illustrated notice of our new college buildings. Thank you, 
Mr. Smith. 

Dr. J. T. Carey McCallum, '16, has been appointed University 
physician. 

Mrs. Lorene Whitham Ingalls, '26, of Oak Park, Illinois, and 
Mrs. Gwendolen Dorey Spaid, '26, of South Bend, Indiana, sur- 
veyed the new home in September. 

Dr. Karl Means, '14, has been appointed associate professor in 
the department of chemistry. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford H. Browder, '12, have purchased a new 
home in Evanston, Illinois, at 2315 Bryant Avenue. 



Personal Mention 157 

The Kev. Roderick A. Macleod, '14, and Mrs. Macleod have 
gone to Washington, where they are in charge of the Indian Mis- 
sion at White Swan. 

The Rev. Clarence L. Reidenbach, '12, of Kansas City has ac- 
cepted a call from the Second Congregational Church of Mount 
Holyoke, Massachusetts, and will take up his new work in 
December. 

John B. Mason, '26, has left for Germany, where he will work 
on a thesis, "Danzig, a Free City on the Baltic." The thesis is 
being prepared for a Ph. D. degree in international law at the 
University of Wisconsin. 

Miss Jane Ogborn, '28, is acting as executive secretary of the 
Little Theatre of Indianapolis. Miss Ogborn was active in dramatic 
work while in college and took part in several Stuart Walker plays 
during the past summer. 

The Rev. Harry Letts, '15, and Mrs. Letts (Ethel Bennett, 
'13) have removed to Sheridan, Indiana. This new location allows 
Mr. Letts to work for the present year in the College of Religion. 

Mrs. Arley McNeeley (Mary M. Coate, '26) has registered for 
graduate work in the department of English. 

Mrs. Frederick Pohl (Josephine PoUitt, '17) is living in 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Miss Narcie PoUitt, '15, is teaching in the Arsenal 
Technical High School of Indianapolis. Both spent the summer 
with their mother in Bay View, Michigan. 

Charles Edward Prichard, '12, recently received a master's 
degree in the Graduate School of Arts and Literature at the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. The subject of his thesis was "Court Decisions 
of the State of California Relative to Public Schools. ' ' 

Miss Gretchen Scotten, '08, was hostess to the Butler Alumnae 
Literary Club, of which she is president, at its opening meeting in 
September. Miss Ruth Carter, '15, furnished the program, review- 
ing James Baikie's "The Glamour of Near East Excavations." 

Edward G. McGavran, '23, was graduated from the Harvard 
Medical School in July and is now interne in the Rochester, New 
York, Hospital. The Journal of the American Medical Association 



158 Butler Alumnal, Quarterly 

has printed a report of Dr. McGavran upon Diphyllohothrium 
Latum in Massachusetts. 

Miss Ida B. Wilhite in August completed at Columbia Uni- 
versity her work for the master's degree in the department of 
home economics education. 

Mrs. T. C. Howe, '89, and sons, Thomas C, Jr., and Addison, 
have returned from a summer in Europe. The boys have gone 
back to Harvard for graduate work, while their sister, Charlotte, 
is spending the year, also in graduate work, at Radcliffe College. 

Howard H. Burkher, '24, after several years of teaching in 
Alaska has returned to the College for graduate work in the de- 
partment of education. 

Miss Charlotte Howe has been appointed mistress of Whitman 
Hall, Radcliffe College. 

The Katharine Merrill Graydon Club held its President's Day 
Luncheon on October 2 at the home of Miss Graydon. A study of 
Indiana constitutes the year's program. Mrs. Elbert Glass, '15, is 
president ; Miss Lola Conner, '17, chairman of program committee ; 
Mrs. Joseph Ostrander, '16, chairman of the social committee. 

Miss Mary J. Brown, '19, spent the summer at the Rocky 
Mountain Biological Station in central Colorado, where she con- 
ducted for a time Dr. Weese's classes in ecology, and then was 
assistant to the head of the department as she continued her re- 
search work. Miss Brown writes that she often thinks of the In- 
dianapolis friends as her best, and the Butler memories as her 
happiest. She was connected last year with the University of 
Oklahoma. 

Miss Edith Eichoff, '16, who has been associate director of the 
social service department of the Presbyterian Hospital in New 
York for the last two years, has come to Indianapolis to take a 
position as assistant professor of medical work in Indiana Uni- 
versity, succeeding Miss Grace Ferguson. Miss Eichoff became a 
worker in the United States public health service in 1919, and 
from 1921 to 1925 she was clinic executive in the Cornell Uni- 
versity clinic in New York. Besides her Butler work, Miss Eichoff 
studied in Columbia University, the Simmons College School of 



Marriages 159 

Social Work, the New York School of Social Work and the new 
School for Social Research in New York. 

Russell C. Putnam, '19, son of Dean and Mrs. J. W. Putnam, 
received the degree of E. E. during the summer from the Uni- 
versity of Colorado. He received the degree of bachelor of science 
in electrical engineering from there in 1923. The subject in which 
he did research and on which his thesis was written for his E. E. 
degree, "The Photometry of Asymmetric Lighting Units," is one 
that has attracted wide-spread attention among men in his field. 
Mr. Putnam was in the employ of the General Electric Company, 
Schenectady, New York, for two years, and has also conducted 
surveys and research for the National Lamp Works, subsidiary of 
General Electric, at Nela Park, Ohio. He is at present member of 
the electrical engineering faculty at the Case School of Applied 
Science, Cleveland. 

Professor Thomas M. Iden, '83, of Ann Arbor, Michigan, and 
his sister, Mrs. Frank Lacey (Lona L. Iden, '93) were guests in 
August of F. R. Kautz, '87. 



MARRIAGES 



Hopper-Ball — Mr. Frank M. Hopper, '27, and Miss Gertrude 
Ball, '28, were married on July 12 in Indianapolis. They are liv- 
ing in Chicago. 

Brown-James — Mr. Wendell J. Brown, '23, and Miss Margaret 
James were married in Irvington by the Rev. Frederick Harvey 
Jacobs, '16, of Huntington, West Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Brown 
are at home in Chicago. 

Collier-Blakely — Mr. Harrison C. Collier, '28, and Miss Leone 
Blakely, were married on July 21 in Irvington where they are 
making their home. 

Graham-Foxworthy — Mr. W. Brewer Graham, '26, and Miss 
Virginia Rose Foxworthy, '27, were married in Indianapolis on 
July 21. They are at home in South Bend, Indiana. 

Barclay-Miller— Mr. Harold Barclay, '25, and Miss Leota 
Miller, '25, were married in Indianapolis where they are at home. 



160 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

Hitchcock-Hawekotte — Mr. Gareth Hitchcock, '28, and ]\Iiss 
Jane Hawekotte, '28, were married on August 5 in Indianapolis. 

Churchman-Mueller — Mr. Frank L. Churchman and Miss 
Eleanor Bos Mueller, '25, were married on August 9 in Indian- 
apolis. 

Heavin-McCormick — Mr. Albert W. Heavin and ^Miss Ruth 
Elizabeth McCormick, '23, were married on August 22 in Indian- 
apolis. Mr. and Mrs. Heavin are at home in Bainbridge, Indiana. 

Federman-Wishard — Mr. Richard Louis Federman and Miss 
Mary Alice Wishard, '28, were married in Irvington on September 
12. They are at home in Indianapolis. 

Seashore-Payne — Mr. Carl Gustav Seashore and ^liss Helen 
Claire Payne, '26, were married in Irvington on September 12. 
They are at home in Sioux City, Iowa. 

Ahrbecker-Peters — Mr. Frederick "W. Ahrbecker and Miss 
Frances M. Peters, '28, were married on August 29 in Indian- 
apolis where they are making their home. 

Keilman-Dyer — IMr. Edward Joseph Keilman and Miss Kath- 
leen Allison Dyer, '26, were married on September 21 at Dyer, 
Indiana, where they are making their home. 

Love-Headrick — Mr. John Love, '28, and Miss Catharine 
Headrick, '27, were married in the early summer. 



BIRTHS 

Pearson — To Dr. Nathan E. Pearson, of the department of 
zoology, and Mrs. Pearson, on September 4, in Indianapolis, a 
daughter, Anita Patricia. 



DEATHS 

Byers — On July 30 Thomas J. Byers, '69, passed away at his 
home in Florida at the age of eighty-two years. 

Mr. Byers in his youth met with an accident which paralyzed 
the whole of one side of his body, but in spite of this handicap he 
made good in the world and was a man among men. For a time 
he taught, but later became a seed merchant in Franklin, Indiana, 



Deaths 161 

where he built up a good business and made warm friends and 
won the respect and confidence of all. 

For the past few years he had been in poor health, spending 
much of his time in Florida. Mr. Byers was a loyal friend of 
Butler College. He knew it in the days of small beginnings and 
rejoiced in the promise of the greater Butler that is to be. 

William Mullendore, '88. 



Byram — The death of Perry M. Byram makes vacant a place 
in the ranks of the Butler Alumni that under the best gifts of 
fortune will be hard to fill. His measure was the full stature of a 
college man in culture and character. His regard for his Alma 
Mater, her faculty and ideals, was of the noblest sort. 

He was born at Paragon, Indiana, November 2, 1864, and died 
at the Mayo Hospital at Rochester, Minnesota, August 20, 1928. 
After completing the course in the schools of Paragon, he entered 
the State Normal at Terre Haute, taught in the schools of his home 
county, and later in life was an outstanding teacher in the high 
schools of Martinsville, and also of Haughville. 

Upon graduation from Butler in 1899, he was granted a schol- 
arship from Chicago University, where he spent a year in graduate 
work. His major student interests were along the lines of philos- 
ophy, history and the languages. He was eternally helping some 
forlorn and struggling soul in German, and took up Spanish for his 
own delight just a few years ago. The greater portion of his 
working period was spent, however, in the service of the Federal 
government in the Land Office at Camden, Arkansas, and at 
Little Rock. 

While at Butler Mr. Byram maintained a fair interest in all 
phases of college life, yet his personal bent was for those things 
that go to make the service of higher institutions of learning in- 
dispensable to the life of a great and free nation. He was unmar- 
ried and the spirit of devotion to his mother and sister with whom 
he lived, was in keeping with the high motives that dominated his 
fine personality. The quest for the best and the passing on of the 



162 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

good things of life to others was to him second nature. He was a 
rare chum, a loyal friend, a generous and dependable co-worker 
and a torch bearer of true American citizenship amid the befud- 
dling gloom that now hovers over the land. He stood the gaff of 
the routine of the commonplace, of bodily ills and the hard knocks 
of a workaday life, yet he never filled a situation that was not the 
better for his having lived. To those who knew him best his pass- 
ing is a near-tragedy, but the pattern of his splendid life will ever 
remain an inspiration and a sacred memory. 

Delmar T. Powers. 



Steiner — In the death of Mrs. Agnes Wallace Steiner, former 
student of the Northwestern Christian University, another link 
has been severed connecting the University with its earliest 
students. 

Mrs. Steiner was the daughter of Governor David Wallace and 
Mrs. Zerelda Sanders Wallace, and sister of General Lew Wallace. 
She was a beautiful woman and one of those aristocrats who char- 
acterized early Indianapolis. 



Washburn — Anson Phelps Washburn, '98, died on July 7 in 
Charlevoix, Michigan, at the age of fifty-two years. Mention was 
made in the July Quarterly of his long illness. No friend can 
regret that his suffering has ended. He was a good man, a valued 
citizen, a loyal alumnus. He will be missed. 



Butler alumni of the eighties will recall that in those days the 
business section of Irvington consisted of a post office, Avhich held 
forth in the Panhandle depot, a grocery and a drug store. Crum- 
rine's drug store was the rendezvous for students where tlieir wants 
were supplied with everything from candy to college textbooks. 
They will also remember the genial proprietor. Dr. Crumrine, who 
was both physician and druggist. Dr. Crumrine died recently in 
Chicago. The funeral was held at Shirley Brothers Chapel in 
Irvington, and the burial was in IMemorial Park Cemetery. 

B. F. D. 



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Butler Moves North! 

During the coming year, the transition from college to university is to 
be made. Alumni — You who are proud of the progress Butler has made — 
See the record of this transition in the 

1929 

T>RIFT 

($3.30 the copy) 

The 1929 Drift, combining retrospection with prophecy, will commem- 
orate the Butler of the past and foresee the Butler of the future. 

The section devoted to old Irvington will arouse fond memories 

Views of the new buildings and Campus at Fairview will cause a thrill of 
pride. 

The Number of Copies is Limited — 
Order Yours Today! 

1929 DRIFT, BUTLER UNIVERSITY, 
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA. 

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BUTLER UNIVERSITY 

FOUNDED 1852 

A well equipped institution, with a faculty of over seventy- 
five members, offering courses of instruction leading to 

degrees in 



English 

Modem Languages 

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Education 



Chemistry 

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For catalog or other information address 
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After College— What? 

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Table shows rapid growth of monthly savings with 6% dividends 
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2 Years 3 Years 



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$ 25.54 


$ 39.48 


$ 54.28 


$ 69.98 


$ 164.04 


5.00 


61.97 


127.71 


197.45 


271.44 


349.93 


820.22 


10.00 


123.93 


255.41 


394.89 


542.87 


699.86 


1640.43 


15.00 


185.90 


383.12 


592.34 


814.31 


1049.80 


2460.65 


25.00 


309.82 


638.52 


987.24 


1357.19 


1749.67 


4101.08 


100.00 


1239.31 


2554.10 


3948.96 


5428.76 


6998.69 


16404.33 



Chart Copyrighted by Bankers Thrift Corp., Chicago. 



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THE BUTLER 

ALUMNAL 
QUARTERLY 



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JANUARY, 1929 



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office at Indianapolis, Ind., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS 

The American : Poet Alice Bidwell Wesenberg 

Student Life at the University of Grenoble A. T. DeGroot, '26 

Crinoline Days Kathryn Fall Tressel, '30 

For the Campus Beautiful Willard N. Clute 

Another Landmark Gone Vida Tibbott Cottman, '90 

A Memory K. M. G. 

Editorial Comment 

E 204 

The College Commuiiity 
University News 

Around the Campus 

Along the Sidelines 

Publications 

Personal Mention 

Marriages 

Births 

Deaths 



163 



^4^ BR /\R^ 



THE BUTLER ALUMNAL QUARTERLY 
Vol. XVII January, 1929 No. 4 

Katharine Merrill Graydon, '78 Editor 

J. Douglas Perry, '26 Associate Editor 

George Alexander Schumacher, '25 Business Manager 

Published four times a year, in October, January, April, July. Annual sub- 
scription, $2.00; single copies, 50 cents. Checks, drafts, etc., should be 
made payable to The Butler Alumnal Quarterly. 

Published by the Alumni Association of Butler University, Indianapolis. 
Printed by The William Mitchell Printing Company, Greenfield, Indiana. 

THE AMERICAN: POET* 

By Alice Bidwell Wesenberg, Associate Professor of English 

I want to know a butcher paints, 

A baker rhymes for his pursuit 
Candlestick-maker much acquaints 

His soul with song. 

— Browning. 

THE census of 1930 will not be complete unless it reports the 
number of poets, verse-makers, and rhymers in every com- 
munity of the United States. Indeed, if it gives these 
figures no others will be necessary ; the c«nsus will be taken. So it 
seems, at least, to one who tries to keep on neighborly terms with 
verse-writing in her own communitj^. We are all writing it. What 
price Poetry? What is the explanation? 

This question may seem the starting-point for a consideration 
of the matter, but on second thought the query as to what it all 
means must lead back through ' ' How did it happen ? ' ' and ' ' What 
is it ? " Why is this an age when all who possibly can — and several 
who c anno t — are writing poetry? There are statements enough 
every week of the lack of genuine inspiration in our American 



*Reprinted from the English Journal. 

165 



166 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

poetry, of the fact that we have so much not bad and fairly good 
verse in all our publications that we are grown unsensitive, 
habituated to anything clear and pleasant, or pleased with every- 
thing unusual and shocking. True as this is, alarming as it may be, 
this view of the situation is not the most important one. I wish to 
go back of it to the reasons for our almost overwhelming provincial 
interest in, and the production of, verse in America. 

Two things must have happened to effect the changed status of 
versifying — a changed attitude both toward poetry and the poetic 
faculty. Of poetry we think now as not more special than prose ; 
the poetic faculty we consider universal. How did the change 
occur? Several possible influences come at once to the inquiring 
mind, all of them starting from the same source : familiarity. We 
are all on intimate terms with poetry; it has lost its glamor. We 
meet poets on the street; we read poetry in our daily papers; we 
use it in our advertising. And yet it has enough fascination left 
so that we are all courting the muse, careless of her reputation. 
That we all know her well enough to pay court is interesting. 

This acquaintance is partly the result of the education in 
rhythm which every American home has received from the presence 
of music machines. In the days when the piano was in the best 
parlor, practiced behind closed doors, and displayed by Susie at 
the end of a two-year musical education under the faded woman 
or the blustering, irregular man who stood for music in the com- 
munity — in those days the word ''syncopation" had as erudite a 
sound for everyone as ''solipism" will always have for many. The 
rest of Susie's family may or may not have heard, and probably 
did not feel any response to the stimulus of her rhythms — if, in- 
deed, she ever succeeded in catching any. But now, when few 
homes are without a Victrola, a piano player, or a radio, and when 
many homes have all three — now the sense of rhythm so strong in 
the Spanish muleteer, the negro stevedore, the Italian boatman 
(because of their heavily accented employments) is transferred to 
the ears of the American business man, the American housewife. 
She washes dishes to the "Volga Boat Song" and he pays his biUs 
to a Turkish March, or *'The Swamp Blues." Rhythm, always 
inherent in the life-blood, universal pulse of existence, is now heard 



The American Poet 167 

and felt. It makes us step and think and speak in time and tune. 
No wonder, then, that poetry is no longer a thing to be amazed at ; 
we know what rhythm is and how to tune in. 

Again, book learning is as common as bread. The American 
people have read, studied, and practiced poetry in the classroom. 
Not the college graduates only; the kindergartners who think — or 
whose parents think — they lisp in numbers are very scantily 
represented by the Hilda Conklings and Nathalia Cranes. Hardly 
a teacher in the elementary schools who is not proud of the results 
of her efforts to teach "creative writing." Whole anthologies, 
magazines, and individual volumes publish the output of secondary- 
school training in the use of verse forms. As for the colleges, the 
history of poetry, the technique of poetry, the theory of poetry, the 
psychology — and perhaps even the chemistry of genius — are sub- 
jects of the curriculum. Books on the writing of verse are written 
for ages ranging from that of nursery-rhyme readers to that of 
psycho-analytic scholars. No one need be ignorant of the way to 
make verse; hardly anyone is. Nor is there need of ignorance re- 
garding the poets and poetry of any period, especially of our own 
day. Anthologies and critical comment are ground out by each 
publisher each year. 

This list of available reading matter would partly account for 
the familiarity of a large part of the world with poetic forms when 
one remembers in addition how full the college halls are today, and 
how numerous. It must soon be exceptional to find young people 
who have never been to college — as it has been to find those who 
have no smattering of secondary education. The number of those 
who knew Plato's ideas on poetic inspiration twenty years ago is 
multiplied by thousands today. There have never been so many 
people laying claim to higher education and showing some slight 
acquaintance at least with the subject matter of advanced study. 
It is not a chosen few, but a multitude of readers today who have 
been exposed to Spenser, Herrick, Keats, and Emily Dickinson, 
for example. 

But a sense of rhythm and a knowledge of poetry gained from 
books are not enough to account for the amount of poetry written 
in every corner of every state in the Union. If to know it were to 



168 BuTLEE Alumnal Quarterly 

write it, our investigation would be complete ; but it is the general — 
universal — desire for self-expression, a direct result of all our 
modern thinking, that is the fertile soil for all these seeds. In this, 
roots are easily struck; from it both flowers and weeds shoot to 
blossom in profusion. The young people now leaving the colleges 
have been encouraged since kindergarten days in creating ; nothing 
at the family dinner table has been so interesting as the child's 
untrammeled talk. Repression has been taboo, expression canon- 
ized. Arrived at a crisis from which life-colors are seen in new 
combinations, the young person is moved at once to express — and 
does so — emotions and experiences new to him. Having read some- 
where that the secret of the poet is to see the beautiful in the com- 
monplace and to make that beauty live, the older person, pent up 
through the most emotional years, now expresses the romantic 
tendencies of that time in less climactic verse. The I and the 
exclamation mark are as evident in self -expressive modern verse 
when the letter is lower case and all punctuation is omitted as when 
these typographic signs of soul outpouring are used. Old and 
young, we have no reticence. Feeling knows no limits ; expression 
of it is as common as walking. Blame Rousseau for it, or praise 
him; but remember he is largely responsible for the present flood 
of poetry in America. 

And so poetry is written in Walla Walla, Washington; in 
Kokomo, Indiana ; in Miami, Florida ; it is written on State Street, 
Railroad Street, and Front Street. And what becomes of it ? It is 
read to little groups of aspirants who cheer each other on \)\ 
sympathetic approval and mild suggestion. Sometimes the poetry 
club or circle prints privately a volume of the verse of its members 
to be sold to patient friends and presented to the state library. 
Some of it is bait, and very good bait, for rejection slips. ]More 
than one provincial American has laughed courageously by showing 
a careful collection of the clammy printed slips that mean bitter 
chill to the hearts of poets and nothing to the editors. Much of 
the poetry, of course, sees print in the ordinary mediums. Economic 
laws are not often broken in the arts; the public demand and the 
artist's supply are, except in the case of an amazing genius, directly 
related. There are readers of verse almost to match the writers, 



The American Poet 169 

and therefore there are publishers of it. In many communities 
columns of the daily papers are devoted on certain days of the 
week to the work of "Our Own Poets." Sometimes the column 
head is more poetic and more reminiscent of an eloquent speech 
made in Athens than the poems in the column warrant. In a 
recent magazine of advice and encouragement to writers — and 
there are many of these — were listed 102 journals publishing poetry. 
The article emphasized the "extensive market for verse in Amer- 
ica." Many of the readers of these 102 channels of expression are 
undoubtedly the poets themselves, but not all of them. Those whose 
longings are too vague, whose sense of form is too feeble, but whose 
sensitiveness to beauty is acute, find satisfaction in reading the 
poetry of their compeers, in vicarious emotional katharsis. 

One of the most astonishing facts in all this case concerning 
American poetry is that in money it does not pay. Few magazines 
pay well for verse ; many do not pay at all ; and some pay spas- 
modically. Several fairly generous prizes are offered each year, 
but for these hundreds of poems are submitted. It does not pay, 
and yet the American people believe in it. A pleasant reply, I sub- 
mit, to criticism of American materialism. When one considers 
that not only are poets not paid for their verses, but that in order 
to keep the channels open they largely support by subscriptions and 
gifts the poetry magazines, one realizes to what extent poetry is 
either a fever in the blood or a very religion. 

It is hardly a religion, however; for while payment in money is 
little expected, ambition for fame is a keen stimulus. Poetry is not 
being written in America all for love of beauty. Nor are its pub- 
lishers all performing an act of self-sacrifice. For them the desire 
on the part of the many verse makers that their names may be 
known, their work read, may be a source of actual profit. Reputa- 
tion as an author, and especially the name of poet, is enthusiasti- 
cally and industriously sought by our legion of writers. Interesting, 
certainly, that the attitude to authorship in the days of popular 
ballads — when all were anonymous contributors to the nation's 
poetry — is reversed in this later day of popular verse. No "com- 
mon authorship" today in the songs of the American people. We 
all write, but as individuals and with the definite hope that our 



170 Butler Alumnal Quabteelt 

names will be included in the already corpulent anthologies of 
modern American poetry. 

And so we understand some of the reasons why the poetry 
renaissance in America has widened from the professional center 
to a genuinely amateur circumference. What it is worth today, 
this mass of poetry, what its effect will be on American life and 
its reaction in future literature, how much of it is a forced growth, 
how much is native and real — these are questions hard to answer 
and better left to days when the perspective of distance makes the 
outlines seem less distorted. Two or three signs may well be noted, 
however, in our garden of American poetry by the careful gardener 
on the watch for blights. If it be true that the subject matter of 
great poetry has always been the normal and the universal, what 
of our search for the strange, for the local, for the racial, for the 
defiantly ugly, in much of our poetry? If it be true that a nice 
relation between form and content must be preserved in the arts, 
what of the slovenly formlessness, what of the affectedly grotesque, 
in our present treatment? If above all else, poetry should be 
sincere, what of the sentimental rhyming syndicated the country 
over, which publishers and even booksellers call poetry? I know 
well which I dislike more ; but it is hard to say how much I dislike 
both urgent feeling smartly displayed and trite insincerities prettily 
expressed. The reader may be in the same predicament if left to 
consider such passages as these two : 

I have seen her a stealthily frail 

flower walking with its fellows in the death 

of light, against whose enormous curve of flesh 

exactly cubes of tiny fragrance try; 

i have watched certain petals rapidly wish 

in the corners of her youth; whom, fiercely shy 

and gently brutal, the prettiest wrath 

of blossoms dishevelling made a pale 

fracas upon the accurate moon .... 

Across the important gardens her body 

will come toAvard me with its liurting sexual smell 

of lilies .... beyond night's silken immense swoon 

the moon is like a floating silver hell 

a song of adolescent ivory. 

— E. E. Cummings, XLI Poems. 



The American Poet 171 

Night 

Oh, the night is a lover with jewels to spare 

And the maiden he woos will have star-gems to wear ; 

He will sift down the gold of his moon on her tresses, 

And release gentle winds to carry caresses : 

But his heart is a vagrant, sweet maiden ; beware. 

But lest you forget that strong and lovely plants are growing in 
our garden, I quote again, this time from Edna St. Vincent Milay : 

Euclid alone has looked on Beauty bare 

Let all who prate of Beauty hold their peace, 

And lay them prone upon the earth and cease 

To ponder on themselves, the while they stare 

At nothing, intricately drawn nowhere 

In shapes of shifting lineage; let geese 

Gabble and hiss, but heroes seek release 

Prom dusty bondage into luminous air. 

blinding hour, O holy terrible day, 

When first the shaft into his vision shone 

Of light anatomized ! Euclid alone 

Has looked on Beauty bare. Fortunate they 

Who, though once only and then but far away, 

Have heard her massive sandal set on stone. 

May no blight destroy our forest trees ! 

If the songs of a nation written by an idealist voicing the best 
his people can hope are an important influence, what must be the 
influence of the songs of a nation written by thousands of highly 
emotional, partially educated, ambitious versifiers? Is it good or 
bad that poetry in America sounds like all the robins and black- 
birds — and a thrush or two — in the tops of all the trees in town on 
a spring evening ? 



■r^'x^ 



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172 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

STUDENT LIFE AT THE UNIVERSITY 
OF GRENOBLE* 

By A. T. DeGroot, '26. 

IT IS difficult for the American collegian to conceive of a 
university except in terms of a campus, athletic teams, frater- 
nity rushing, and ever recurring class tests. The lack of these 
items, so important as they are in the United States, is perhaps the 
most striking feature of one's introduction to the academic life at 
Grenoble. Their absence, however, is at first unnoticed as one 
tries to resolve into understanding his bewilderment at the varied 
medley of jargons which is everywhere at hand. It is a highly 
colorful group which assembles for the vacation courses at this 
centuries-old institution. The crowds which issue from the stained 
stone building constitute a conflux of most of the world's national 
and racial streams. More than forty distinct national groups are 
represented, and in a majority of recent years the United States 
has had in attendance by far the largest delegation. Here a young 
German with shaved head may be heard conversing in fluent 
French with a swarthy Polish girl, while a bare kneed son of the 
Balkans, repairing his trusty bicycle nearby, mutters in what is, 
fortunately, an unintelligible dialect. What wonder that the new 
etudiant, having perhaps only a smattering of theoretical French, 
is a bit distressed as he meanders about the halls, deciphering the 
posted instructions ! 

The University of Grenoble was founded, as a very modest in- 
stitution, in the year 1339. Like most Middle Age schools, it had a 
distinctly ecclesiastical atmosphere for centuries. Since the Great 
War, however, it has shared in the almost universal expansion of 
colleges and universities. The average semester enrollment, during 
recent years, for the three constituent faculties (Science, Law. and 
Letters) has been in the vicinity of 8,000 students, approximately 
one third of whom were cfudiants ci rangers, or other than French 
nationals. This rather unusual emphasis upon courses for for- 
eigners is a development of the present decade. In the faculty of 



^'^Mr. and Mrs. DeGroot (Miss Beulali Richey, '29,) were students last 
summer at the University of Grenoble. 



Student Life at the University of Grenoble 173 

Letters alone, for example, there were 1,403 foreign students en- 
rolled for the summer of 1927, forty-two nationalities being repre- 
sented. The year before there were 1,782 foreigners in these 
summer courses, but this figure was abnormal, due to the extremely 
low exchange value of the franc, which made living and school ex- 
penses in France almost a matter of mere pocket change. It is 
interesting to note the statistics of American students in attendance 
at Grenoble during the last five years. The table reads as follows : 

1923—165 
1924—163 
1925—270 
1926—263 
1927—235 

The franc, at the present writing, is worth a bit less than 
4 cents, which makes living expenses very reasonable. One may 
board at the Students Co-operative Restaurant for $12 a month 
(sans 1 'ordinaire petit dejuner — -cafe au lait et petit pain beurre), 
and furnished rooms may be had at an equally fair price. There 
are varying rates in the pensions, or boarding houses, ranging from 
75 cents a day, up. Our own room and board, in a very clean and 
congenial pension, cost $1 a day each, including room service and 
wine with meals — for those who have a taste for it. Other expenses 
may be estimated in approximately the same ratio to American 
prices. Developing and printing of films, a much used convenience 
of the gaping and snapping traveller, is at about half price — which, 
indeed, may be said to be true of anything requiring human labor. 
For 12 cents one may enjoy a dish of ice cream and two delicious 
pieces of pastry such as only the French pdtissieres appear to be 
able to make. Very nominal fees are charged for bus excursions to 
the many points of interest near Grenoble. For example, an all- 
day trip in a modern sightseeing car over the route of Les Grands 
Ooulets, thrilling with its vistas of peaks, fields high in the moun- 
tains, guarded valleys stretching far below, and the marvel of the 
road itself, carved in the face of sheer cliffs, may be had for the 
unheard of price of $1.20! Every week-end witnesses student 



174 BuTLEB Alumnal Quabteely 

expeditions into the Alps, to Italy, the many ancient chateaux, and 
to other places in this historic region. 

The student body of the University of Grenoble is made up of 
persons with at least as many different reasons for their being 
present as there are nationalities represented. This is especially 
true during the summer session, when all Europe, indeed, the 
whole world, appears to be visiting. It is impossible to divine 
motives simply by a casual observation of the matriculate. One is 
inclined to wonder what may be the objective of this Dane, or that 
Turk, or Hindu, or Pole, or Chinese. Some have confessed that 
they believe the prestige of having studied abroad will be worth 
dollars to them at the hands of a school board, whether or not they 
bettered their knowledge of their subject. Some aspire to the 
noble aim of ''getting credits" for a degree. Others there are 
who are endeavoring to brush up their almost forgotten knowledge 
of the French language in preparation for graduate degree ex- 
aminations. Many teachers are studying in order to increase the 
efficiency of their work. One girl had traveled 4,000 miles and 
engaged in learning the language in order to satisfy her desire to 
study the works of the French philosophers, without a teaching 
position or any other monetary remuneration in view, or even 
desired, to reward her efforts. Still others are here out of a love 
for the language and literature of the nation which has produced 
and fostered this school. Scratch the veneer of non-acquaintance, 
exchange some words of friendship, claim the camaraderie of les 
etudiants, and there is no foretelling what motives one may find 
underlying the presence of his fellow students. 

Tuition for the regular school year, per semester, ranges from 
$4 to $12, according to the instruction desired. For foreign stu- 
dents in the summer courses, however, there is a charge of from 
$14 to $16 a month. This fee permits the matriculate to attend as 
many hours of lectures as he chooses, and provides especially for 
sixteen hours a week of instruction in small classes, which is very 
close to tutoring. In our own case, for example, there were five 
persons in one class (two Poles, a Turk, and ourselves), and eight 
in the other (two Hindoos, two Poles, a Spaniard and three 
Americans). 



Student Life at the University of Grenoble 175 

During the regular academic terms, professors lecture three 
hours, or at the most, five hours a week. Those who teach in the 
summer schools, in some cases, double this quota, while instructors 
teach fifteen hours or more, and may do private tutoring in ad- 
dition. 

Perhaps the most interesting feature of the American student's 
contact with a French university is the equipment which he uses. 
We presume that a few years of sitting on such hard wooden 
benches, most of them without backs, are intended to constitute 
preparation for the rigors of cavalry life, since military training 
is compulsory for all male citizens in France. Of the eight large 
buildings which comprise the university group the more modern 
structures (fifty years old or more) house the faculties of science 
and law and the school of medicine. For language and literature, 
however, it appears to be the philosophy of the bewhiskered gentle- 
men who determine such matters that a very definite atmosphere 
is essential to the proper pursuit of these studies. How marvelously 
have they wrought in providing this imponderable quality! For 
example, the Vieux Temple, the building in which we had our 
classes, is two centuries old, and it is not the genius of continental 
architecture to obscure or minimize the evidences of the years. Its 
stone steps are worn deep from the tread of an unnumbered host of 
students, young and old, who have there made search after the 
elusive elements of wisdom. The board floors have been worn to 
the appearance of a topographical map until they have attained 
a rather uncertain character, providing just the proper measure of 
chance concerning one's safe journey over them which is in keep- 
ing with the hazards of negotiating the rivulet-infested streets 
outside the walls. Doubtless an American fraternity initiating 
committee would require its unenviable pledges to number the less 
worn, and therefore protruding, knots which profusely dot the 
floors. 

Credit should be given to the Comite de Patronage des MudianU 
Strangers pres I'Universite de Grenoble for the excellent services 
which it renders to visiting students. Not only does it assist in 
locating the strangers in congenial places of residence, and furnish 
them with much needed information concerning the routine of 



176 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

university work, but also it provides a measure of social life which, 
by some, is enjoyed very much. As it happened, however, the 
summer of 1928 was the hottest and dryest which the Isere region 
had experienced in many years, and few of the matriculates chose 
to attend the dances (on a somewhat rough stone floor) which 
were arranged by this Coniite. 

Much as one may desire to conclude his portrayal in such a way 
as to leave the reader with a fragrant conception (if such an ex- 
pression may be used) of this Middle Age university brought 
almost up to date, he would not be true to the actual situation with- 
out remarking upon the avenue of approach to the Vieux Temple. 
The entrance to the building itself is situated in a blind alley which 
is often much the worse for the odors and heaps of refuse which 
distinguish it. For the distance of at least half a mile along the 
only street which leads directly to this alley is an open air market. 
Doubtless one may purchase here, at a most reasonable figure, 
wholesome viands to grace the family board, but this is small 
recompense for the odors of age-old cheeses through which one 
must grope his way while searching out the less obnoxious produce. 
We developed an unbounded respect for the capricious French goat, 
based upon the strength of the fragrance which exuded from the 
cheese made from its milk. Each new trip through this area 
revealed added wonders. After passing the public fountain in 
which the fishmongers clean their wares, we were accustomed to 
come upon what we had definitely decided was a butcher's meat 
block. This we later found to be an ancient cheese of heroic propor- 
tions, for several layers of extraneous matter had been removed 
from its surface (probably with a chisel and mallet) and a generous 
slice had been extracted. Such markets may be quite attractive to 
one who has become hardened to them, but they are torture to a 
classical Grecian nose accustomed to a thoroughly respectable 
middle-class environment. We dubbed the street Aroma Avenue 
and engaged in expeditions of exploration for a new route to the 
University. 




FRANK C. CASSEL, '67 BARBARA BLOUxXT CASSEL, 'GS 



Crinoline Days _,^ 177 

CRINOLINE DAYS 

By Kathryn Fall Tressel, '30. 

REMINISCENCES of pioneer days in Indiana and a romance 
which began in Northwestern Christian University, now 
Butler, are being recalled by Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Cassel of 
Kossville, Ind., who celebrated recently their fifty-ninth wedding 
anniversary. 

Sitting by a smoldering fire in an old-fashioned room, with de- 
lightful old furniture, lots of books and every expression of quiet 
scholarly tastes, Mr. and Mrs. Cassel turn back to the campus life 
of sixty-five years ago to evoke glimpses of old days — crinoline 
days — memories glowing pale like the petal of a rose. 

Mrs. Cassel, nee Barbara Blount, was born in Tipton county in 
1847, and enrolled as a student at Northwestern Christian in 1863. 
Her personality today is endowed with the same elusive charm 
which made her the most popular coed on the old campus. Her 
father was Dr. Silas Blount who, in addition to the practice of 
medicine, owned a general store and ran the postoffiee. 

''There were ten children in my family," Mrs. Cassel said in 
recalling early days, "and eight of us were students in the College 
at Indianapolis. Very few girls attended college or even high 
school in those days ; but my father was years ahead of his time in 
his ideas. He believed that girls should have the same opportu- 
nities as boys. More members of the Blount family have graduated 
from the College than any other family. When my sister and I 
enrolled at Butler we had to take preparatory work since there 
were no separate high schools then. I received my degree in four 
years." 

As a student Mrs. Cassel showed unusual aptitude in Latin and 
was known as the champion speller of the College. 

"But one had to be a good speller those days. It was a matter 
of great pride." Mrs. Cassel continued. "Social life? Yes, our 
social calendar was well filled. There were no sororities then, 
but we had societies and clubs. I was a member of a literary 



178 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

organization known as the Sigournean Society. We published a 
paper which was pretty much like your Collegian. There was 
always plenty of work to be done for our paper, but we were all 
willing to do it. Of course, we didn 't dance or play cards then but 
there were sleighing parties, taffy pulls, spelling bees and house 
parties where charades was the most popular game. Dramatics 
took up much of our spare time and it was the ambition of every 
coed to play the heroine in at least one presentation. Then there 
was skating and what fun it was to glide over the ice in the moon- 
light." 

Mr. Cassel, with a twinkling eye and a sense of humor no less 
keen for his eighty -six years, was born in Benton County in 1842. 
He enrolled as a student in the College in 1860. It was while he 
was a freshman that he met Mrs. Cassel's brother, Jacob Blount. 
They were members of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. 

"It was lonely those first few days after I enrolled," confesses 
Mr. Cassel. '*It was the kind of lonesomeness that drives so many 
freshmen home. But it wasn't long before I met Jacob Blount 
and we became inseparable friends. Of course Mrs. Cassel wasn't 
there then but I used to help Jake buy gifts for her and his other 
little sister. When I was a sophomore war was declared and I 
left school to do my part." 

Mr. Cassel served in Company H, 116th Indiana regiment, and 
fought in Tennessee under Colonel Ambrose Burnside. 

''During the Civil war nothing was done to keep the soldiers 
supplied with food, ' ' relates Mr. Cassel. ' ' The people at home were 
well taken care of but we actually suffered from hunger. I can 
remember when for weeks all we had was two ears of corn a day 
for our rations. We used to roast, boil or eat it raw right off of the 
cob. What rejoicing there was when we invaded and took over a 
little town in Tennessee where there was a flour mill. Needless to 
say there were some millers in our company and they groimd our 
corn for us. I found an old colored woman who made mine into 
bread, and kind soul that she was, she gave me some butter for it. 
Those colored folk down there were fine to us. Once when bread 
and butter got monotonous as a steady diet I decided to hunt an 
onion. The first person I met who looked as though she might 



Crinoline Days 179 

help me was a little darky. 'No, suh, ah ain't got eny, but ah '11 ask 
Missey for you all,' she answered. 'Missey, ' agreed that she would 
donate an onion and watched that little tyke from the window 
while she handed it to me. But no sooner had she left the window 
than my little friend ran up to me and gave me five or six other 
onions which she had hidden on her person." 

In Virginia, Company H made a surprise attack on the Con- 
federates and captured a little town where there was a printing 
shop. 

"Those boys had a paper all ready to go to press but had to 
leave it. We took it over, filled it with Union news and printed it. ' ' 

When the war was over Mr. Cassel returned to Northwestern 
Christian and resumed his friendship with Jacob Blount. In the 
meantime Barbara Blount had enrolled as a student, and it wasn't 
long before the returned soldier met her. In 1869, after both had 
finished college, they were married. Six children were born to 
them, four of whom are living. 

In recalling his first experience as a teacher, Mr, Cassel relates 
a story of the eagerness of the country youth of the day for educa- 
tion. 

''When I first graduated from Northwestern Christian I de- 
cided to stay on the farm with the folks for a while before ventur- 
ing out to make my own way, ' ' Mr. Cassel said, ' ' but a number of 
the boys in our neighborhood came to me and asked if I wouldn't 
hold school in the little red brick church. They were boys who had 
little or no chance to attend school and were eager to have at least 
a passing knowledge of reading, writing, and arithmetic. They 
agreed to pay me what they could, keep the church building warm, 
and do good work as pupils, so I agreed to take them and thus I 
launched on a teaching career which I continued for a number of 
years. But I never had a school which gave me more joy than 
those boys who worked so hard for their education." His voice 
expressed a fullness of pity and understanding. 

"We have some real good pictures of the old class," Mrs. Cassel 
offered generously and brought out an old red album which she 
explained had been given to Mr. Cassel by the boys of the red brick 



180 BuTLEE Alumnal Quarterly 

school house. It was decorated with a bronze figure of General 
John A. Logan. 

The fire sputtered and grew low — the room silent. Out of the 
dusk of nearly seventy years ago, from the yellowing pages of an 
old album, fading photographs testified to the beloved life of the 
old campus. We drifted along hand in hand with coeds in muslin 
frocks, dainty ruffled skirts and poke bonnets — with coeds be- 
trothed, pledged and promised, picking wild flowers, speaking 
soft and sacred words and talking to the moon of the tell-tale things 
of young love. Thus Butler of today met Butler of yesterday and 
looked ahead as well as back with these old graduates who dreamed 
among the things they loved. 

''And what," we asked, "what message shall we take back to 
new Butler?" 

"Why tell them," they answered simply, "just tell them to 
live and be good." 



One of the recent developments in "educational" films is the 
movie that attempts to depict college life. Such pictures are usually 
highly entertaining, but so are the Arabian Nights. Those who 
know colleges best usually smile at the over-wrought situations. 
Going to college these days is a serious business rather than an 
adventure in high romance. One of the most recent national re- 
leases dealing with a college theme was filmed on the Princeton 
campus. Many Princeton alumni took exception to the picture, 
some on the ground that it did not truly reflect Princeton life, 
others with the contention that it was questionable ethically to per- 
mit the University's name to be used in connection with com- 
mercialized amusement. One alumnus caustically wrote : "If we 
are going in for such things, why not start nation-wide advertising 
campaigns with svich slogans as 'Princeton, the Friendly Uni- 
versity,' 'You don't know what education is until you've been to 
Princeton.' " 



For The Campus Beautiful 181 



FOR THE CAMPUS BEAUTIFUL 

By Willard N. Clute, Director of the Botanical Garden. 

TO ONE accustomed to consider the possibilities of beauty in 
the landscape, the new campus of Butler University presents 
an attractive prospect. It seems a piece of special good 
fortune that the University finds itself located in an area of forest- 
clad hills and valleys interspersed with level stretches that few 
institutions of the kind can hope to approximate even after years 
of careful planting and the expenditure of much time, labor, and 
money. 

To bring out all the beauty of which the scene is capable, how- 
ever, will require much careful work. Adequate paths and drives 
must be located with reference to the general contour of the 
surface, vistas into the forest and to distant points must be de- 
veloped, and many plants added for decorative effect. The 
possibilities for planting are almost limitless. The flowering dog- 
wood, the wild crab, the redbud, wild plum, the hawthorns, and at 
least half a dozen magnolias will grow as thriftily on these hillsides 
as their congeners do in that apotheosis of beauty. Brown County. 
In time we may have our own flowery woodlands quite equalling 
the famous cherry blossom avenues of Japan. 

The shrubby vegetation that in bygone days must have formed 
interesting groups in the shelter of the trees, has long since 
vanished, but all this beauty may be brought back again by the 
cunning of the landscape architect. It is not to be assumed that 
planting means simply setting out a variety of shrubs in hit-or-miss 
fashion. The ground must be studied for the vistas that may be 
obtained, and the shrubs set at just the right points to catch the 
eye of the saunterer along the paths in early spring and summer. 
One visions the masses of color from clumps of blooming lilacs^ 
golden-bells, rose acacias, snowdrop-trees, syringas, and a hundred 
others that may be used to brighten the landscape. Again in 
autumn and winter, numerous species with brilliant leaves or 
bright bark patterns may be used to light up the otherwise somber 
wood. 



182 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

It is the hope of the botanical department of the University 
that ultimately the trees not at present represented on the campus 
may be set in the places of various dead or decrepit specimens until 
we have an arboretum or tree garden containing all the woody 
plants that will survive in our climate. Such specimens, it may be 
said, do not cost any more than the commoner things so often used 
for decorative effect. 

The botanical department is also basing the hope for an 
adequate botanical garden on the collection of some 2,500 plants 
already set on that part of the campus occupied by a pony track in 
former days. A botanical garden is not to be confused with the 
ordinary flower-garden, though it naturally contains a multitude 
of attractive flowers. It is a garden for the scientist in which 
grow the plants that even he examines with interest and attention. 

Such a garden would provide the fresh material needed in the 
study of botanj^ and serve as an outdoor laboratory in which 
classes, which would otherwise have to mull over dried and pickled 
specimens, may study living plants at first hand. Here, also, 
would be carried on experiments in hybridizing and plant breeding 
and the production of new varieties. Eventually the garden may 
come to have its own collections of the more attractive cultivated 
plants, such as irises, peonies, tulips, roses and the like. And last 
but by no means least, the garden should serve as a source of supply 
for decorative plants used elsewhere. 

This is the limit to which the ordinary botanical garden aspires, 
but if one cares to go further, there are rock and water gardens, 
desert and bog gardens and various other phases of gardening in 
which are cultivated a host of interesting plants that will not thrive 
in the ordinary garden — pitcher-plants, cacti, water-lilies, heaths, 
orchids, puccoons, sedums, and the like. 

Like various other enterprises, the botanical garden finds its 
activities hampered for lack of funds. In two months the 2,500 
plants it now contains were set out and a very large number of 
bulbs and seeds planted. It is now offered some additional thou- 
sands of interesting plants but needs funds to transport and plant 
them. Unfortunately all decorative planting requires time to come 
to perfection. It cannot be completed in a single year but the 



Another Landmark Gone 183 

plants must be allowed time to grow and some of them certainly 
take their time about it. Thus an early start is desired in order 
to make an immediate improvement in the grounds. Little by 
little, however, interesting plants are being accumulated and with 
no untoward reverses, the campus is destined to grow in beauty for 
many years to come. 



A canal which freezes as tight as a drum-head, and high hills 
that slope away invitingly would suggest the campus as a fit 
rendezvous for winter sports, but as yet these natural advantages 
have not been utilized. There was talk of the desirability of a 
toboggan slide, but no organized effort was made to obtain one. It 
will be some little time before students adjust themselves, look 
around, and realize the possibilities of new surroundings. Some 
fine winter, perhaps next year, maybe the year after, someone will 
sharpen his ice skates and try out the canal, and someone else will 
think of pouring water on one of those winding down-hill roads, and 
skating and sledding will become fair rivals of the dance as a form 
of winter amusement. A generation ago, the canal from Broad 
Ripple to Fairview was an accepted highway for skaters. 



Sentiment travels a rough road in this practical and business- 
like age. The old bell whose history runs back to the days of 
Northwestern Christian University, the bell which was patched and 
polished and trucked out from Irvington for the announced purpose 
of summoning laggard students to class, now hangs high in its 
tower as mute as ''the harp that hangs in Tara's halls." It was 
found that electric gongs judiciously placed throughout the build- 
ing did the work more effectively, more easily, more economically. 
They ring as a part of the electric clock system and require the at- 
tention of no one. The old bell demanded the time of one man for 
ten minutes out of each hour. Hereafter, it will be rung only on 
state occasions, authorities say. 



184 Butler Alumnal Quabterlt 

ANOTHER LANDMARK GONE 

By Vida Tibbot Cottman, '90. 

A LITTLE squat gray building fifty-five years old has dis- 
appeared from Irvington. It was not beautiful nor has it 
meant much to students or citizens for more than twenty- 
five years, but those who were here in the '80 's and '90 's will recall 
the Irvington railroad station and postoffiee with affection and 
interest. As I drove by its site a few weeks ago and saw the work- 
men pulling it down, my mind flew to those early days when it 
meant much to us all. It was the first building I saw in Irvington, 
when about 8 o'clock one August evening in 1875, I was awakened 
from sleep and alighted with the rest of my family to begin a 
sojourn of what is now fifty-three years in the classic suburb. To 
tell the truth, I can 't remember the station of that date, but I know 
that is the spot in Irvington where the Tibbott family landed when 
they came here for the express purpose of sending through college 
all their numerous girls and boys. 

The station was well patronized then for the Pennsylvania rail- 
road ran frequent accommodation trains for the benefit partic- 
ularly of those who lived here but who had business in Indianapolis. 
The street cars, drawn by a pair of diminutive mules, took an hour 
to make the trip and the train but fifteen minutes; so many men 
left home on a morning train and returned at 4 :20 in the evening. 
That was the train that interested the children most. The school 
house was then located at University Avenue and the circle on 
South Audubon, and school was dismissed at four. We always 
waited for this train, for besides bringing fathers, brothers, or 
shopping mothers, it brought the afternoon paper. There were no 
carriers in that day; so we each carried our own paper. If we 
weren't at the station, the paper was put in our letter box in the 
postoffiee, which occupied the east half of the building. On the 
west side was a waiting room which we children thronged on cold 
days warming our fingers and toes by the big cannon stove. In 
fine weather we stood around on the platform. One of our sports 
was to place pins on the rails for the on-coming train to smash. 



A Memory 185 

Morning, noon and night there were mails and the postmaster 
carried the heavy bag out to hang on an iron crane at the end 
of the station platform, whence it was snatched as the mail train 
roared by. The little boys always ran to see who could be first to 
pick up the big canvas bag of mail that had been flung from the 
open door of the mail car. Then came the wait while the post- 
master distributed the boxes, letters, post-cards, and papers. How 
we watched our glass fronted boxes ! 

"There's a letter in my box," one child would say. 

'*Huh, there's two and a paper in mine," a little friend might 
boast. 

The evening mail was the one we all loved to go for. The 
station was the community center. There we met the neighbors 
and friends from across town and perchance walked home in the 
friendly dusk with a sweetheart. When I saw the wreckers at 
work, my mind remembered that jammed little room with its good- 
natured crowd of old and young, laughing, joking, teasing, dis- 
cussing; and I heard again that once familiar click, click as the 
deft postmaster threw the mail into our various boxes. 

It was a great place for students to congregate. Letters and 
packages from home! How much they meant to boys and girls 
here working to get an education and enjoying themselves too, but 
lonely often and longing for the understanding father, mother, 
brothers, and sisters. Many a heart-ache did that little old build- 
ing see cured when the mail came in. 

I suppose there is not a student of the '80 's and '90 's who will 
not remember George Russell, who was postmaster, ticket agent 
and express man in those days. I've often thought how kind and 
patient he was with the children who rushed in there many times 
a day to ask : * ' Is there any mail for us ? " And he knew them all. 
I never heard him ask a child his name. 

When in the course of progress, free delivery of mail was 
established in Irvington, there was genuine regret on the part of 
many of the young people, for we had enjoyed our jaunts to the 
postoffice and our contacts there. Gradually the little gray build- 
ing has fallen into disuse. One by one it has been stripped of its 
once numerous functions. The postoffice went, the railroad ceased 



186 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

its accommodation trains, the express and telegraph companies 
withdrew their offices, and for several years the door has been 
locked and the once busy center has been deserted. Now it is gone 
utterly — not a brick is left. It lives in the memory of a few. The 
Irvington Union of Clubs is asking the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company to plant flowers and beautify the site this spring. 



One of the problems which the student council, now in process 
of formation at Butler, will probably consider, is that of the ad- 
visability of instituting the honor system. Just at present, the 
honor system seems to be very much on trial. Perhaps it always 
has been. At any rate, Yale and Amherst abolished it last year, 
Rutgers dropped it in 1925, and Western Reserve gave it up in 
1926. After all, maybe old ways are best. Every alumnus recalls 
with some trepidation still the professor whose piercing glance and 
whose measured tread as he walked about the room during the 
examination hour constituted the best incentive to strict honesty. 



Alumni will be interested to know that such student "hang- 
outs" of former days as the "Canteen," the "Jim-Lou," the 
"Kennel," "Daphne's," "Johnson's," and many others of years 
more remote, have been succeeded on the Fairview campus bj^ the 
"Campus Club." This is the University cafeteria situated south of 
Arthur Jordan Memorial Hall. The proprietors have sought to 
encourage student congregating by putting up on the walls all the 
fraternity and sorority emblems, and providing a piano, magazines, 
and chairs for lounging. Several of the campus organizations use 
the place for evening meetings. 



A Memory 187 

A MEMORY 

THE announcement through the press of the death in Decem- 
ber of Miss Alice M. Longfellow at her home — that historic 
house in which she was born more than three-fourths of a 
century ago and had always called home — brought to mind a 
portrait long cherished. 

There had gone from the Hoosier capital to the Harvard Annex, 
since long known as Radcliffe College, a graduate of Butler College 
to pursue her most loved study, the Greek language and literature. 
It was to her a great event to matriculate under Mr. Arthur Gil- 
man, whose little history of English literature she had studied in 
the old University and which had awakened in her a recognition of 
literary beauty; to settle her tuition with Miss Longfellow as 
treasurer in the Craigie House on Brattle Street ; to attend the Plato 
class of Professor Goodwin, and to read Sophocles under Mr. Louis 
Dyer, since long resident of Oxford University, who impressed 
her with his rare power of making learning beautiful. It was, to 
repeat, a great experience and with it all she never forgot nor 
ceased to be grateful for the preparation Butler had given her. 

It took some time to realize that Cambridge people were not 
very different from her Indianapolis friends. This she observed 
in the guests of a tea given at Fay House by Mrs. Louis Agassiz. 
The great hostess with all her simplicity and kindliness and sincer- 
ity was a queen in her bearing. And here the timid guest looked 
upon Miss Longfellow as the ideal of a poet's daughter, the very 
definition of cultured womanhood. Here, too, was Colonel Higgin- 
son who delighted the Hoosier by calling her attention to a small 
picture on the wall painted by Dorothea Brooke — the real 
"Dorothea Brooke" of George Eliot. President and Mrs. Eliot, 
Doctor and Mrs. Goodwin, and others of note were very interesting 
for this hero-worshiper to look upon, but perhaps none has re- 
mained more pleasantly in memory than the gracious Miss Long- 
fellow so deeply interested in gaining for young women some of 
Harvard's wealth. How she would have enjoyed the approaching 
occasion of the semi-centennial celebration of the opening of Rad- 
cliffe College which she did much to bring about. — K. M. G. 



THE BUTLER ALUMNAL QUARTERLY 
Vol. XVII January, 1929 No. 4 

Officers of the Alumni Association — President, John F. Mitchell, Jr., '06; 
First Vice-President, Dr. D. W. Layman, '93; Second Vice-President, 
Mrs. Urith Daily Gill, '17; Secretary, Katharine M. Graydon, '78; 
Treasurer, George A. Schumacher, '25; Directors, J. Douglas Perry, '26; 
Herbert E. Eedding. 

Published by The Butler University Alumni Association. 
Printed by The William Mitchell Printing Company, Greenfield, Indiana. 

EDITORIAL COMMENT 
E 204 

This cryptic caption is not the number of a business man 's letter 
file, nor an automobile license number, nor the designation of a 
new type of submarine, nor the call letters of a wireless station, 
nor the password into secret conclaves. It is more significant than 
any of these. Write it down in memory. Forget your own street 
address, or your wife 's first name, or the birth date of your young- 
est child, but forget not E 204. 

E 204 is destined to become a symbol of hospitality to every 
alumnus of Butler. It is to be the link binding the former student 
to his Alma Mater. It will be, it is already, home and headquarters 
to the old grad visiting the campus. E 204 is the alumi office of 
the University. 

The designation E 204 is in itself prosaic. The number has 
about it no intrinsic quality of sound or form that charms the 
senses. Speak it aloud and it falls from the tongue no more 
trippingly than many another number. It has neither rhyme nor 
rhythm. It is devoid even of the mystical quality that would be 
given it by the inclusion of the digit '*7." It means simply East 
wing, second floor, fourth room. It is purely a utilitarian device 
for distinguishing one room from a great many others. 

Nevertheless, despite its plain externals, there are bound up 
with it poetic potentialities. There are few things in this world 
that are not prosaic when stripped of their associations. If De- 

189 



0<^ 



190 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

cember 25 could be detached from the thought of Yuletide, it 
would have no more significance than any other calendar date. 
Gettysburg was only the plain and unpromising name of a sleepy 
Pennsylvania town until it became synonymous with the beginning 
of the end of the Rebellion. 

So with E 204. To alumni, it will not be just a room in a 
building of many rooms. It will have an individuality which can 
not be duplicated. Vision it as it will greet alumni for whose use 
it has been set aside. You can not miss it if you are looking for 
it, for it faces the head of the broad stairway that leads to the 
second floor in the East wing of the Arthur Jordan Memorial Hall. 
Step inside and let it work its spell on you. 

This is a workshop. Alumni business, and that has become a 
business of sizable proportions in recent years, is transacted here, 
but this place has not the stiff and forbidding appearance that 
business so often thinks is demanded in the name of efficiency. 
Comfortable rockers invite the visitor to sink down and relax in 
this atmosphere of quiet. There are pictures on the walls and 
cozy corners lined with book shelves. It is a room that would 
delight the heart of a student. The desks, chairs, and tables, of 
rich walnut but simple in design, are in keeping with the spirit of 
quiet elegance. The rays of the morning sun, softened by the 
draperies, stream in through the windows of leaded glass. Out- 
side is the broad, green sweep of Jordan Field, used during the fall 
as the football practice gridiron. The view commands the main 
approaches to the campus, including in its survey Forty-sixth 
Street, Sunset Avenue, and Buckingham Drive. 

Many students of other years have already dropped into E 204 
to spend a half -hour or more reminiscing over the ' ' old days ' ' and 
expressing felicity for the new. And strange as it may seem, the 
alumni executives, busy as they are, are never too busy for a chat 
with the boys and girls of yesteryear. 

E 204, just a number, plain and unadorned, but as the years 
roll by and it becomes encrusted with the associations that cluster 
about pleasant places, it will take unto itself a beauty now not 
understood. E 204 will be a name with which to stir emotions, a 
thing with which to conjure poetry. 



The College Community 191 

THE COLLEGE COMMUNITY 

That only the young can adapt themselves readily to new situa- 
tions has been proved a fallacy. Butler University, honored in her 
age and for fifty years a part of Irvington, moved from one side of 
the city to another. Four months later finds her firmly fixed in her 
new community and dominating its life as serenely and completely 
as though she had grown to maturity there. The old oak that can 
endure uprooting and transplanting without even a drooping of 
its leaves testifies to its own virility. 

One of the factors in making the change an easy one was that 
when Butler moved north she found herself still among friends. 
Of the students that she had sent out into the world in recent 
years, those who had remained in Indianapolis to establish homes 
had for the most part gone out on the north side to live as a result 
of the rapid development of that part of the city as a residential 
section. Consequently, it was almost like coming home to the chil- 
dren. Hundreds of loyal young alumni and many older ones, too, 
all of whom are familiar with university life and sympathetic with 
its ideals, have become neighbors to their Alma Mater. 

Along the pleasant boulevards near the campus, members of the 
faculty have bought and built new homes. Houses for two of the 
fraternities are nearing completion. Many of the other Greek 
letter organizations are not much further behind with their build- 
ing plans. Butler is ready to announce to the world that she is 
now ' ' at home. ' ' 



192 Butler Alumnal Quaeteely 



UNIVERSITY NEWS 



AROUND THE CAMPUS 

Coed Caroling 

Strains of "Holy Night" and "We Three Kings of Orient Are" 
pervaded the halls of Arthur Jordan Memorial Building on the 
last day of school before Christmas vacation, as Y. W. C. A. carolers 
strolled through the building during the 11 o'clock class hour 
singing Yule songs. The organization expects to make the caroling 
an annual custom. 



"Follies" Tryouts Start 

Tryouts and rehearsals are now under way for the second 
annual production of the "Fairview Follies" under the direction 
of the Men's Union. Present plans call for the presentation at the 
B. F. Keith Theater in March. 



Plan Student Council 
Long agitation for a system of student government has resulted 
in definite steps being taken in that direction with the submission, 
by the committee authorized by President Robert J. Aley, of a 
working plan for such a council. The student committee, assisted 
by Professors R. W. Keahey and Walter L. Slifer of the history 
department, drew up a constitution for a self-governing body in the 
University after a prolonged study of the work of such groups in 
other universities. 



Sponsor Matrix Table 
Butler chapter of Theta Sigma Phi, women's honorary journal- 
istic fraternity, was sponsor for the first Matrix Table banquet to 
be given under University auspices. Approximately 175 women 
were guests, including Indianapolis alumnae and newspaper women 



Around the Campus 193 

and representatives of the DePauw and Indiana University chap- 
ters of the fraternity. Mrs. Beulah Brown Fletcher and Miss Mary 
B. Orvis, widely known for their newspaper and short-story work, 
were the principal speakers. 



Botany Professors Honored 

Dr. Ray C. Friesner, head of the botany department, was re- 
elected secretary of the Indiana Academy of Science at its annual 
meeting in Bloomington, and Stanley A. Cain, assistant professor 
of botany and Butler alumnus, was one of five scientists elected to 
the academy as a fellow. 



students Edit Plainfield Paper 
Six students of the journalism department took complete charge 
of the publication of the Plainfield Messenger, Plainfield, (Ind.) 
weekly newspaper, for the issue of December 20. Their work in- 
cluded selling the advertising, writing and editing the news, and 
making up the paper. They are members of George W. Harris' 
class in community weekly circulation. 



Denny Library Gift To College 
The Butler University library has received one thousand 
volumes, many of them highly valuable, as the gift of Mrs. Austin 
J. Denny in memory of her husband, Austin J. Denny, a graduate 
of Northwestern Christian University in 1862. Mr. Denny, born 
in Indianapolis the son of pioneer parents, was for more than half 
a century one of the most highly respected citizens of the com- 
munity. At the time of his death in 1922, he was one of the oldest 
active lawyers in the city. His library included more than two 
hundred biographies in addition to histories, essays, and the best 
of fiction. 



Debaters To Go East 
The varsity debating team will invade the East during the 
spring vacation, meeting such strong teams as those from Rutgers, 
George Washington, and Syracuse Universities. Negotiations are 



194 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

also under way for debates with Amherst College and New York 
University. 



To Give One-Act Plays 

Presentation in January of three one-act plays has been an- 
nounced by Thespis, campus dramatic organization. The plays 
are ' ' Poor Aubrey, ' ' by George Kelly, a comedy of modern Ameri- 
can life; "The Locked Chest," by John Masefield; and "What 
Men Live By, ' ' an allegorical play written by Virginia Church and 
founded on a story by Leo Tolstoi, 



Old Campus As Park Urged 

One of the most recent suggestions for disposing of the old 
campus in Irvington is that of selling the tract to the city to be 
used as a community park and recreation center. The Irvington 
Union of Clubs is making a concerted effort to bring the matter 
to the favorable attention of city officials. 



Host To College Journalists 
The annual convention of the Indiana Intercollegiate Press 
Association was held on the campus January 11 and 12. The 
Butler chapter of Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalistic 
fraternity, had charge of the arrangements which included the 
annual association dinner. The association represents fifteen In- 
diana colleges publishing weekly or daily newspapers. 



Luncheon Club Visits Campus 

The Indianapolis Optimists' Club was the guest of the Univer- 
sity at the campus cafeteria for one of its weekly luncheons. Pro- 
fessor R. W. Keahey of the history department and Ralph Hitch, 
'27, graduate manager of athletics, welcomed the Optimists on 
behalf of the University. 



Glee Club At Indiana Theater 
The Girls' Glee Club, numbering sixty voices, filled a week's 
engagement at the Indiana Theater. Their appearance was in eon- 



'Sit 



Hi 



Around the Campus- ' 195 

nection with a special program arranged by the theater for Thanks- 
giving Week. 



Miss Hester Resigns 
Miss Eleanor Hester, secretary to President Robert J. Aley, re- 
signed December 1 to accept a secretarial position with the Disciples 
of Christ Pension Fund in its offices in the Chamber of Com- 
merce Building. Miss Hester was known to hundreds of alumni 
through her work as employment secretary and as sponsor of 
student organizations. She had held her position in the President's 
office since 1916, 



student IVIagazine Appears 
The first issue of the Tower, new student literary magazine, suc- 
ceeding the Cocoon, received wide-spread favorable comment from 
both faculty and student body. The contents included essays, book- 
reviews, poetry, and short-stories. 



Paper Follows Students Home 

Christmas vacation did not entirely shut off publication of the 
Butler Collegian, campus daily, this year. The paper was pub- 
lished every day as usual for the first week after the students were 
dismissed and was mailed to their homes. 



Band Sports New Capes 
Subscriptions from students, alumni, faculty, and friends of the 
University were the means of providing new capes for the sixty-five 
members of the band. White belts with silver buckles were added 
to complete the natty appearance of the bandsmen. 



Frat Houses Near Completion 
Construction is progressing rapidly on the new home of the Phi 
Delta Theta fraternity, first organization to start building on 
Fraternity Row. The new home of the Lambda Chi Alpha fra- 
ternity on Sunset Avenue is almost ready for occupancy. The 
Phi Delt house, on the comer of Conser Boulevard and Hampton 



196 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

Drive, will be a three-story structure and will cost approximately 
$60,000. The basement will contain a dining room, storage room 
and kitchen. Two large living rooms, an office, matron's room, 
and guests' room with adjoining baths will comprise the first floor. 
There will be ten double bedrooms on the second floor and four on 
the third floor. 



Students Get Handbooks 
The University handbook and student directory appeared after 
the Christmas vacation. The book, prepared and published by the 
department of journalism, was given without charge to all students 
of the university. 



ALONG THE SIDELINES 

Butler established an enviable record in football for the year. 
Although the Bulldogs did not emerge victorious in all of their 
contests, they gained glory in defeat. 

To start the season they played Northwestern, one of the 
strongest teams in the Big Ten. The Bulldogs held the Wildcats 
during the first half, but weakened in the second under the drives 
of Captain Holmer, Wildcat backfield ace. The 14 to score teUs 
the story of a gamely fighting crew that refused to give up until 
the final whistle. The Franklin Baptists came to the Butler bowl 
for the first home game of the year and the Bulldogs showed a 
powerful offensive that Franklin found it impossible to stop. 
Butler held the long end of a 55 to score. Against Danville 
Normal, the next foe, Butler again had a scoring bee and the 
Danville boys went home with the zero end of a 40 to score. 

Washington University came out of the west to provide an 
interesting afternoon for the boys but fell before the drives of 
Curly Hinchman by a 13-7 count. This was one of the best games 
that Hinchman played during this year. 

On a field that was just as suitable for a boat race as a football 
game, the Bulldogs pushed over a 12-6 victory over the Muncie 
Cardinals. The Muncie team packed plenty of beef and was able 
to hold its feet better than the Butler men. 



Along The SroELiNES 197 

The big game of the season was with Illinois. The Sucker 
eleven had a great team this year and it was no disgrace that the 
Bulldogs fell before the Western Conference champions by a 14 
to count. Earlham surprised everybody by holding the Clarkmen 
scoreless the first half. The second half, however, was an entirely 
different story, and Butler ran up 24 points to Earlham 's nothing 
before calling it an afternoon. 

The Tufts game, played Thanksgiving, showed the Bulldogs in 
the best form of the year. The whole team functioned as a well 
oiled machine and Tufts was helpless before the onslaught. The 
26-3 score does not show the superiority of the Bulldogs. 

Butler scored 170 points to its opponents 44 for the season and 
finished as high scorer in the state. Curly Hinchman, all-state 
fullback, was high individual scorer in the state with 67 points to 
his credit. He crossed the line for eleven touchdowns and made 
one point after touchdown. 

With the fading out of football, basketball assumed the throne. 
Once again Butler is represented by a strong team. Coach Hinkle 
has eight veterans on the squad of eleven men and around them 
he has built a strong offensive team. The Bulldogs defeated the 
highly touted Pittsburgh Panthers by a 35 to 33 count. Other 
teams played to date are Purdue, North Carolina, Missouri, Chi- 
cago,' and Franklin. The remainder of the schedule follows : 

Evansville, here — Jan. 18. 
DePauw, here — Jan. 25. 
Indiana Central, here — Feb. 1. 
Evansville, there — Feb. 2. 
Wabash, there — Feb. 8. 
Franklin, there — Feb. 11. 
Notre Dame, here — Feb. 15. 
DePauw, there— Feb. 22. 
Illinois, there — March 1. 
Wabash, here — March 6. 
Notre Dame, there — March 9. 

Bill Brennan, '31. 



198 Butler Alumnal Quabteely 

PUBLICATIONS 

C. G. Vernier, '03, professor of law at Stanford University, is 
the author, in collaboration with Philip Selig, Jr., San Francisco 
attorney, of an article in the Southern California Law Review on 
''The Reversal of Criminal Cases in the Supreme Court of Cali- 
fornia." A reprint of the article has just been received by the 
alumni office. 

Prof. Vernier has made an exhaustive study of criminal ap- 
peals taken from 1850 to 1926 with a view to determining what, 
if any, changes in practice or statute reforms are desirable. A 
voluminous mass of data is presented in scholarly fashion, and the 
deductions made are clearly and logically drawn. 



PERSONAL MENTION 

Miss Edna N., '09 and Miss Edith I. Cooper, '16, are living in 
Long Beach, California. 

Henry M. Goett, '24, has been appointed secretary to Mayor 
L. Ert Slack. 

Dr. Paul A. Draper, '21 is spending the winter months in the 
South. 

Miss Mildred Campbell, '28, is teaching botany in the Short- 
ridge High School. 

Miss Thelma King, '28, has charge of the English and music 
departments of the schools of Tyner, Indiana. 

Miss Alice Young, '26, sends a pleasant message from Tucson, 
Ariz., where she is spending the year and enjoying her surround- 
ings. 

Mrs. Edna M. Christian, '28, is giving at Indiana University a 
course in ''Art Appreciation." 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Koehler, (Gladys Wamsley, '20,) of South 
Bend spent Thanksgiving in Indianapolis and attended the Butler- 
Tufts game. 

Mrs. David O. Thomas, of Minneapolis, after spending several 
months in Indianapolis, has gone to Florida for the winter. 



Personal Mention 199 

Chester H. Forsyth, '06, professor of mathematics in Dartmouth 
College, stopped in Indianapolis in October, having been called 
West by the death of his mother. 

Mrs. W. L. Richardson has spent the autumn in Victoria, B. C. 
Dr. Richardson went out for his Christmas holidays and they both 
returned for the new year. 

Mrs. Ruth Habbe Nethereut, '17, is living in Wauwatosa, Wis., 
and has recently taken possession of a new residence built by Mr. 
Nethereut for her and the three children. 

Miss Maria Daugherty, '22, of the Family Welfare Society, was 
called to Florida to join in the relief work under direction of the 
National Red Cross following the storm in October. 

Frederick E. Schortemeier, '12, retired on December 1 from the 
office of secretary of state. He has returned to his profession of 
law. 

Miss Levara Millikan, '26, has returned to Indiana after two 
years spent at Boston University where she received her mas- 
ter's degree in 1927, and her M. R. E. degree in 1928. 

Lyman Hoover, '22, and Mrs. Hoover, while waiting for condi- 
tions to improve in China, are located in Denver. Mr. Hoover is 
one of the student secretaries of the Y. M. C. A. for the Rocky 
Mountain field. 

Rev. E. S. Conner, '87, met in November with a painful auto- 
mobile accident as he was crossing Julian Avenue in the dusk. Sev- 
eral ribs were broken, and severe bruises received. He was taken 
to the Methodist Hospital for care, but is now again in his own 
home. 

Joe Dienhart, '28, has been appointed head basketball coach of 
the Cathedral High School of Indianapolis. He is a former Notre 
Dame and Butler football star, having played a year with the Irish 
and with the Bulldogs in his senior year. 

George A. Schumacher, '25, announced on December 12 the 
numbers and read the musical appreciation for the formal concert 
of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. The concert was given in 
the ball-room of the Gibson Hotel and was broadcast over WLW. 



200 Butler Alumnai^ Quarterly 

At the meeting of the executive committee of the Alumni Associ- 
ation held on November 28 in the office of Dr. D. W. Layman, '93, 
Herbert E. Redding was elected director of the Association for the 
ensuing year. Mr. Redding is in the real estate business with 
offices at 211 East Ohio Street, Indianapolis. 



MARRIAGES 

IsKE-ScHAEFER — Dr. Paul G. Iske, special student, and Miss 
May K. Schaefer, '24, were married on December 25 in Indianapo- 
lis, where they will make their home. 

DeGroot-Richey— Mr. Alfred T. DeGroot, '26. of the College 
of Religion, and Miss Beulah Richey, '29, were married on June 
19 in Lebanon. They are at home in Indianapolis. 

Davis-Martindale — Mr. Edward Davis and Miss Grace Martin- 
dale, '27, were married in Rochester, Indiana, on September 1. 
They are at home in Indianapolis, 

Ransburg-McGuire — Mr. Ralph Herbert Ransburg, '22, and 
Miss Caroline Conant McGuire were married on October 10 in 
Indianapolis where they are making their home. 

Walker-Roller — Mr. George W. Walker, '27, and Miss Irma 
Roller, '28, were married on October 20 in Irvington. They are at 
home in Evansville, Indiana. 

NusBAUM-JoHNS — Mr. Frank Baker Nusbaum and Miss Mil- 
dred Lucile Johns, '26, were married on October 21 in Indianapolis 
where they are at home. 

Schetter-Thomas— Mr. Robert C. Schetter and Miss Dorothy 
Lou Thomas, '27, were married on October 26 in Indianapolis 
where they are at home. 

Koehne-Medlam — Mr. Frank Koehne and ]\Iiss Llildred Med- 
1am, '25, were married on October 22 in Indianapolis where they 
are at home. 

Collins-Reynolds — Mr. John B. Collins and ]\Iiss Dorothy E. 
Reynolds, ex- '26, were married on November 29 in Indianapolis 
where they are at home. 



Deaths 201 

ScHULLER-BuRGAN — Mr. Frederick Carl Schuller and Miss 
Katherine Lacey Burgan, '26, were married on December 22 in 
Indianapolis. They are at home in Akron, Ohio. 

Barlow-Coryell — Mr. Howard Walter Barlow of Cleveland 
and Miss Eleanor Marian Coryell, '25, were married in Indianapolis 
in December. They will live in Baltimore. 

York- Wagoner — The marriage of Mr. Joseph W. York, '28, and 
Miss Mary Wagoner, '28, took place in Indianapolis in December. 
They are at home in Anderson. 

Shultz-Treat — Drj, Irvin Tabor Shultz of the department of 
education, Butler University, and Miss Alice Marsh Treat were 
married on December 25 in Akron, Ohio. They are at home in 
Indianapolis. 

Sweet-Jaquith — Dr. Austin D. Sweet and Miss Mildred Ja- 
quith, '23, were married in Indianapolis on December 29. They 
are at home in Martinsville, Indiana. 



BIRTHS 

Browder — To Mr. Clifford Harrison Browder, '12, and Mrs. 
Browder (Mable Felt, '15) on October 22 in Chicago, a son — Clif- 
ford Harrison, Jr. 

White — To Mr. Volney Malott White, former student, and Mrs. 
White, on November 3, in Indianapolis, a daughter — Georgia Reay. 



DEATHS 

Collins — Miss Gladys Ruth Collins, '26, was recently killed in 
an automobile accident on the National Road near Knightstown. 

It was an evening of November. School was closed. The time 
of home-going had come. She stepped out into the dusk with no 
intimation of the great adventure which lay so near. Suddenly, as 
in the twinkling of an eye, she had passed from the world she loved 
into the Unknown. The beautiful purposeful life had come to an 
untimely end. 

Gladys Ruth Collins was an obedient, kind, affectionate daugh- 
ter, the only child in a home whose idol she was. Every advantage 



202 Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

possible was given to her that she might attain a well-rounded 
womanhood. She came to Butler College where she was recognized 
for her industry and friendliness and genuineness, graduating with 
the class of 1926. She chose, as have innumerable young women, 
the well-beaten path which leads through service onward and up- 
ward. 

The hundreds of friends attending her funeral bore testimonial 
to the life that, though brief, had been a blessing wherever spent, 
and though we sadly mourn her taking away, yet, in the words of 
Edgar Guest, 

We would not grieve too much, the promise tells 
That rest is hers who sleeps so sweetly there : 
Beyond the dull slow tolling of the bells 
Which marks her passing, life is free from care. 

You would not mourn if one you love should rise 
To wear the royal purple and the crown, 
Should gain the glory of the great and wise 
And put the tools of humble service down. 

So when death comes though hard it seems to bear. 
And long the years with all their loneliness, 
The loved one has been called away from care 
To high promotion, rest and happiness. 

She has been called from pain and hurt and strife, 
From all the ills which fall to flesh and clay 
She has been raised into an ampler life, 
Nor should we mourn too much who here must stay. 

—Mrs. T. H. Kuhn. 



Keen AN — Miss Katherine F. Keenan after a long illness died at 
the age of twenty-one years at her home in Irvington on October 15. 
She had been a student in the College one year and was a pledge 
of the Alpha Chi Omega sorority. She was a gentle soul, full of 
life, and one for whom life held much in store, it seemed. But her 
plans and the plans of those who loved her were not to be realized. 



Deaths 203 

RoTHERMEL — Word bas been received of the death of Sterling 
G. Rotbermel, '14, on September 22 in India. His labors had been 
heavy and he fell a ready victim to pneumonia. The news is a 
shock to his friends. 

To Mrs. Rothermel and the two children, Charles and Jean, 
the Quarterly sends its sympathy in their sorrow. 



Wallace — Lewis Wallace, '77, died in Indianapolis on October 
15 and was buried in Crown Hill cemetery on the 19th. 

Mr. Wallace was a native of Indianapolis and spent his life in 
this city. He was a graduate of Butler University with the class of 
1877, after which he studied law and practiced the profession until 
the end of life. He was the grandson of Ovid Butler and of David 
Wallace, an early governor of Indiana ; the son of William Wallace 
and a nephew and namesake of General Lew Wallace. 

Mr. Wallace is survived by one daughter and one son. 



Wright — Miss Fern Wright, '18, died on December 9 at her 
home in Irvington and was buried on the 11th in Columbus, Indiana. 

The friends of Fern were shocked by news of her sudden death 
and will cherish many memories of their pleasant association with 
her. Thej' respected and they loved her for faithfulness to her 
home responsibilities, her unselfishness and her silence in living 
up to her ideals. 



Irvington State Bank 

Capital, $50,000.00 
REAL ESTATE, RENTALS AND ALL CLASSES OP INSURANCE 

A general banking business transacted. Banking hours 8 a. m. to 

4 p. m. Every courtesy consistent with good banking 

will be extended. Your deposits are solicited. 

The shareholders live in Irvington and Warren Township 

DIRECTORS 

S. J. C»rf C. E. Kellr U. C. AmbrMe 

William Gale 

OFFICERS 

C. E. Kelly, Presi<lent S. J. Cacr, Vice-Preiident 

Thomas MoffeCt, Caihiet 

5501 EAST WASHINGTON STREET 



5PINK ARM5 HOTEL 

INDIANAPOLIS' NEWEST AND FINEST 
HOTEL— ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 

Transient Rates — $2.50 Per Day and Up 
410 North Meridian— MAin 5803 

We are devoting our greatest efforts toward mak- 
ing the Spink Arms the rendezvous for all special lunch- 
eon and dinner parties, club and fraternal dances, in fact, 
the sort of hostelry where personal service rules 
throughout. 

FURNISHED AND UNFURNISHED KITCHENETTE 
APARTMENTS 

W. A. HOLT, Manager 



Butler Moves North! 

During the coming year, the transition from college to university is to 
be made. Alumni — You who are proud of the progress Butler has made — 
See the record of this transition in the 

1929 

T>RIFT 

($3.50 the copy) 

The 1929 Drift, combining retrospection with prophecy, will commem- 
orate the Butler of the past and foresee the Butler of the future. 

The section devoted to old Irvlngton will arouse fond memories 

Views of the new buildings and Campus at Fairview will cause a thrill of 
pride. 

The Number of Copies is Limited — 
Order Yours Today! 

1929 DRIFT, BUTLER UNIVERSITY, 
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA. 

Reserve for me copies of the 1929 Drift, for which I 

enclose $ 

Address 



"Uhi 



Indianapolis News 



THE GREAT HOOSIER DAILY" 



The Home Paper of the 
Middle West 



Holds the Circulation Record in 

the Three-Cent Evening 

Field in America 



All the News of Butler and other 
Indiana Colleges 



For Sale Everywhere 



BUTLER UNIVERSITY 

FOUNDED 1852 

A well equipped institution, with a faculty of over seventy- 
five members, offering courses of instruction leading to 

degrees in 



English 

Modern Languages 

Greek 

Latin 

Biblical History 

Political Science 

Education 



Chemistry 
Physics 
Botany 
Zoology 
Astronomy 
Mathematics 
Dramatic Art 
and other subjects 



Business Administra- 
tion 
History 
Philosophy 
Home Economics 
Physical Education 
Journalism 
Public Speaking 



For catalog or other information address 
The Secretary, BUTLER UNIVERSITY, Indianapolis 

After College— What? 

Are yon "training" financially for AFTER your graduation? Your 
ambitions, your hopes will be more quicltly realized if you have something 
with which to fight. 

Table shows rapid growth of monthly savings \t-ith 6% dividends 
compounded semi-annually. 



Monthly 
Savings 



1 Tear 



2 Years 



.3 Years 



4 Years 



5 Years 10 Years 



$ 1.00 


$ 12.39 


$ 25.54 


$ 39.48 


$ 54.28 


$ 69.98 


$ 164.04 


5.00 


61.97 


127.71 


197.45 


271.44 


349.93 


820.22 


10.00 


123.93 


255.41 


894.89 


542.87 


699.86 


1640.43 


15.00 


185.90 


383.12 


592.34 


814.31 


1049.80 


2460.65 


25.00 


309.82 


638.52 


987.24 


1357.19 


1749.67 


4101.08 


100.00 


1239.31 


2554.10 


3948.96 


5428.76 


6998.69 


16404.33 



Chart Copyrighted by Bankers Thrift Corp., Chicago. 



We 

Have 

Paid 



6% 



Dividends Resources 

38?Jars $15,000,000.00 



Fletcher Ave. Savings & Loan Association 



10 East Market Street 



In the Heart of the Business District 



MANAGEMENT 

The Basis of Confidence 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHt 



The Union Trust Company, therefore, is proud to list 
its officers — not merely names, but men who are actively 
guiding this bank. These men, distinguished in their 
several professions, have faithfully served this bank for 
many years. Their past stewardship has won the public 
confidence. 

OFFICERS 

ARTHUR v. BROWN President 

JOHN E. REED Vice-President 

MERLIN M. DUNBAR Vice-President and Tax Officer 

HARRY F. McNUTT Treasurer 

ALFRED F. GAUDING Secretary 

CORNELIUS O. ALIG Assistant Treasurer 

ALAN A. RITCHIE Assistant Secretary 

J. FLOYD KING Assistant Treasurer 

RICHARD A. KURTZ Assistant Secretary 

EVERETT E. LETT Assistant Secretary 

ARTHUR V. BROWN, JR Assistant Secretary 

GEORGE A. BUSKIRK Trust Officer 

CHARLES N. FULTZ Trust Officer 

CHARLES T. BLIZZARD Auditor 

IIIIIIIIIIHIIIMIIIIMIIIIIII 



Ittwn ©rust Olompang 

of SnbtanapnltB 

120 East Market Street 
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



Pennant 
Snowdrift 

And Other 

.Fancy Table Syrups 

Made by 

Union Starch Refining Co. 



EDINBURG 
INDIANA 



Butler Cohege people, who appreciate 
good things of every kind, shoiild ask at 
their grocer s for these stiperior products 



'The Mitchell's have been printing EstabUslled 1859 

over fifty years" 



Wm. Mitchell Printing Co. 

Edition Printers and Binders 
GREENFIELD, INDIANA 



Printers Since 1859 

TO 

Northwestern Christian University 

Butler College 

Butler University 

> ( 



The plant complete — book making in its 

entirety — editorial, composition, plates, 

printing, binding.