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■^/aRA^v"^ 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 



Joseph Hatton's Novels 



IN HANDSOME CLOTH GILT 



Ssm oaoh 

IN MALE ATTIRE 

THE DAGGER AND THE CR055 

THE VICAR 

THE WHITE KING OF MANOA 

3Sm Sdm OBOh 

WHEN GREEK MEETS GREEK 

THE BANISHMENT OF JESSOP BLYTHE 

28m Sdm oaoh 

UNDER THE GREAT SEAL 
THE PRINCESS MAZAROFF 
BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 
A MODERN ULYSSES 
CLYTIE 

THE TALLANTS OF BARTON 
IN THE LAP OF FORTUNE 
VALLEY OF POPPIES 
NOT IN SOCIETY 
CHRISTOPHER KENRICK 
CRUEL LONDON 
THE QUEEN OF BOHEMIA 
BITTER SWEETS 



LONDON : HUTCHINSON & CO., PATERNOSTER ROW 



B 



Y ORDER OF 
THE CZAR 



A DRAMA IN FIVE ACTS 



BY 

JOSEPH HATTON 



LONDON 
HUTCHINSON AND CO. 

PATERNOSTER ROW 
1904 



H 11 X- 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

Arram^ementa for^l^ prod/uction of 
this play can only be made with 
Miss Elizabeth Marbv/ry^ 20, Queen 
Streety Leicester Square, London, 
W,C, ; Empire Theatre Building, 
New York; and 8^ Rue ffippolyte 
Lebas, Paris^ 



PREFACE 

T"N regard to the prohibition of " By Order 
"^ of the Czar " from circulation in Russia, 
and the seizure of a Swedish edition by the 
Russian police in Finland, I desire to point 
out that, though the ofl&cial formula of " By 
Order of the Czar" covers the tyrannous 
acts of certain of his Imperial Majesty's 
Governors of provinces and prisons, the 
decree of mercy which ends the story is 
the personal act of the Emperor himself. 

Though written for the stage, my present 
object in publishing this dramatisation of 
the story is, as far as possible, to secure 
my property from the piracy and mutilation 
of irresponsible playwrights. In the United 
States publication of a novel confers all 



173521 



6 PREFACE 

stage privileges. My English publisher, en- 
courages me in the belief that there may be 
readers for the story in its present form, as 
at some future day there may be audiences 
for the play. For this optimistic suggestion 
I thank him, and, at the same time, venture 
to hope that the favour shown to the novel 
may be extended to the present publication. 

JOSEPH HATTON. 
Gabbick Club, 

ChrUtnuu, 1903. 



CHARACTERS 



Anna Klosstock 



Olga . 
Andbea Febabi . 



Nathan Elobstook . 
Widow Mobitz . 
Negbutz 

The Babbi Losinski. 

Moses Gbunstein 

The Count Stbavensky 



Genbbal Petbonovitch . 



Paulopp 

Jethbo 

Dick Chetwynd 

Philip Fobstth, R.A. 

Henshaw 

Sam Swynpobd . 

Mbs. Milbanke . 

Dolly . . . . 
Beppo ^ 
Petboski v . 
Ivan j 
Capt. Eazabopp 



Afterwards the Countess Stra- 
vensky. 

Servant to the Countess. 

Known as Ferari the Jew : in 
Act II. disguised as Gold- 
stein the Bfmker, in Act HI. 
known as Col. De Barsac^ 
in Act y. a Russian General. 

Anna's &ther. 

Klosstock's housekeeper. 

Servant to Klosstock, but in 
reality a Russian spy. 

Young learned Jew, betrothed 
to Anna. 

A neighbour of Nathan's. 

A Russian nobleman of Liberal 
sentiments holding official 
rank at Court. 

The newly appointed Governor 
of the province, who hates 
the Jews. 

Servant to Petronovitch. 

An imbecile boy. 

An English war correspondent. 

An English artist of distinction. 

Servant to Forsyth. 

A young English stockbroker. 

A fashionable young English 
widow. 

Her sister. 

Members of the Brotherhood. 
A Russian officer. 



Oppicebs, Sebyants, Villagebs, Soldiebs, Jews, 

Russians, etc. 



SCENERY 
ACT I. — Interior of Nathan K^osstocJi^s House at CzarowM, 

ACT II., Scene I.— Office in the Governor's Palace, 
Scene II. — The Market-place of Ozarovna. 

ACT III. — Philip Forsyth's Studio on the Shrand Canal, 

Venice. 

ACT IV. — A Room in the Fazzio Palace^ Venice, the temporary 

residence of the Countess Stravenshy, 

ACT v., Scene L^The Siberian Frontier. 

Scene II. — Siberian Boundary Post, 

Period.— ^<?w 1881 to 1887. 



Act I 

Scene. — IvUerior of Natha/n, KlosstocJt'g house in the Ohetto 
at Czarovna ; ths general room^ picturesquely and well 
fwrnisJied ; not too ostentatums^ but sufficiently suggestive 
of comfort am.d moderate wealth. Large stove^ chairs^ 
cupboards or caHnets, seats, table with samavor. At the 
bach, large old-fashioned windows, with qiiaint baching 
of Russian street. Entrances L. and K. 

Time. — JEhening, As the act goes on, sun sets and lamps are 
lighted — one swinging ordinary candelabra, centre, one 
or two lamps in sco7ices on each side of room, 

[Nathan Klosstogk is discovered shaking 
hands amd saying ** Good-night " to n&igh- 
hours, who are seen crossing window at 
hack and inaking far&well gestures. At table, 
sewing and looking on, more or less interested, 
his housekeeper, Widow Moritz. On table 
tea-things and so/mavov {Russian urn) ready 
for making tea, 

Klosstogk, 
Good night, dear friends, and God bless you ! 



10 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

NSIOHBOUBS. 

Good night, good Master Klosstock, and Grod bless 
y(m ! 

EXOSSTOCK. 

It has been a very happy day. When the wedding 
takes place, it shall be a festival indeed ! 

\ChjeeTfvl shouts of neighbours as they all JUe 
off and o/re heard talking and laughing 
merrily. 

[Turning to Widow Moritz.] Ah, Mrs. Moritz, 
if my dear wife could have lived to see this day ! 

Widow Moritz. 

Would to God she might have done ! How weU I 
remember her at the festival of Anna's baptism ! 

Klosstock. 

We have both had our sorrows, Mrs. Moritz ; but 
we have much to be thankful for. 

Widow Moritz. 

Yes, indeed, when we think of the svifferings and 
persecutions which fall upon the Lord's chosen people 
in other distant towns and villages of the Czar's 
empire. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR ii 

Klosstock. 

You say truly. We can never be too grateful for 

the blessings we have enjoyed under our most just 

and generous Governor. \Going to unndowJ] Why, 

surely, here is his excellent Grace the Count Stra- 

vensky dismounting from his horse at our humble 

door. 

Enter Amos Negrutz. 

Negrutz. 

His Excellency the Count Stravensky desires to see 
you. Master Klosstock. 

Klosstock. 

[Going to door,] Beg him to enter, Negrutz, beg 
him to enter. 

[Klosstock fussily going to door and bowing. 
Enter the Count Stravensky. 

Stravensky. 

Master Klosstock, I have a serious complaint to 
make against you. 

Klosstock. 
Most gracious Excellency, I crave your pardon. 

Stravensky. 
\GoodrhumouredlyJ\ I met your neighbours in 



12 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

festive attire. They have been witnessing the 
ceremony of your sweet daughter Anna's betrothal 
to the Babbi Losinski. And you did not invite 
me to the ceremony. 

Klosstock. 
Most noble sir, I would not have so far presumed. 

Stravensky. 

Presumed ? You, the chief trader in the province ; 
I, the chief landowner, who have done business 
together and been friends all these years — and I have 
seen Anna grow up from childhood ! Nay, [putting 
his hand familiarly upon Klosstock's shoulder] you 
owe me an apology. 

Klosstock. 

My dear Count — your most gracious Excellency — 
you honour me. I pay the debt with sincere grate- 
fulness ; and my daughter and her betrothed will 
thank you with all their hearts. [Turning to Widow 
MoRiTZ.] Pray call our dear Anna, and say his 
Excellency the Count Stravensky honours us with a 
friendly call. 

[Eodt Widow Moritz, r. 
[Placiifig chair for the Count.] Your visit. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 15 

Excellency, crowns to me and mine the happiness of 
this day. 

Stravenskt. 

[Seating himself.] This young rabbi — ^had he known 
Anna before he came to Ozarovna ? 

Klosstock. 

Oh, yes. He met her on the occasion of his first 
visit to our people. 

Stravensky. 
From Moscow, I think ? 

Klosstock. 
Yes. 

Stravensky. 
Exceptionally placed there, I believe, for a Jew. 

Klosstock. 
Yes, your Excellency. 

Stravensky. 

Honoured, I believe, with a mission last year to 
Paris? 

Klosstock. 

The same, your Excellency. 



#4 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Stravensky. 

A happy man to win so fair a prize as Nathan 
Klosstock's daughter ; well endowed with beauty, 
virtue, and riches. 

Klosstock. 
Your Excellency is most kind to say so. 

Stravensky. 

You have heard no news of moment from the 
Governor ? 

Klosstock. 
None. 

Stravensky. 

I fear we must look for a change^of Imperial policy 
in this happy province of Vilnavitch. \Tum8 and sees 
Anna. Entering r., she has paused in the doorway J\ 

But here is your dstughter. 

[Anna advances, making low curtsey. Count 
Stravensky goes towa/rds her, takes her hand, 
and raises her up. 

My dear child, permit me to offer you my congratu- 
lations and good wishes on this auspicious day. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 15 

Anna. 
I humbly thank your Excellency. 

\JBi(df tv/ming her head, she leads forward 
LosiNSKi. Widow Moritz passes at back 
to her position nea/r table, where she stqnds, 

Stravensky. 

[To LosiNSKi.] Sir, you have won a treasure. 
Your people call her Queen of the Ghetto. She 
would do credit to a still higher title. [To Anna 
and LosiNSKi.] I wish you both happiness and 
good fortune. 

LosiNSKi. 
We thank you, Excellency, with grateful hearts. 

Stravensky. 

[To Klosstock.] There, sir, my mission is ended. 
But I must request the honour of an invitation to 
your next festival. 

[Klosstock bows. Count Stravensky, turning 
a^ain to Losinski and Anna, continvss : 

And let me say with my good-night that if ever you 



i6 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

shoald need a friend, don't forget that your father 
and I have been good neighbours for twenty years. 

\Sluike8 hcmda with Klosstock, hows to 
LosiNSKi and Anna. T^ servant Negrutz, 
who has been standing at the door watch- 
ful all the time, opens door. Exit Count 
Stravensky, courteously and hv/mhly followed 
hy Klosstock. Anna and Losinski go to 
table where Widow Mobitz rnakes tea, 

Anna. 
[To LosiNKi.] And they say we Jewish people are 
a persecuted race. Surely no orthodox Russians could 
be more honoured in such a visit as this. 

LOSINSKI. 

It would hardly be believed, my love, fifty miles 
from Czarovna. Please Gk)d we may take it as a 
revelation. 

Widow Moritz. 

The Stravensky's is the bluest blood in Kussia. It 
is a pity his Excellency does not marry. Come, sit 
down ; Anna knows what a good cup of tea her old 
friend can make. 

[As they siU re-enter Klosstock with Moses 
Grunstein. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 17 

GrUN STEIN. 

\8'pealdin/g as they enter.] My dear old friend, the 
Count does himself honour when he pays respect 
to Nathan Klosstock, whose hand is ever open to 
distress — whether of Bussian moujik or Bussian Jew. 
Seeing him mount his horse, I felt bound to come in 
and say so. 

Anna. 

[To Gbunstein.] And just in time, neighbour 
Grunstein, for tea. 

Klosstock. 

Nay, we must conclude this day with something 
better than tea. [Takes keys from pocket; goes to 
cabinet. Brings out large flask of wi/ne,] 

[Meanwhile Anna a>nd Losinski take tea and 
talk in dv/mh show. 

[Placing wine on table,] Ah, my dear Grunstein, 
a few more such as he and our noble Governor might 
make an earthly paradise for the Jew right through 
the province. [OpcTisflask^ pov/rs out vnne!\ 

Grunstein. 

[Aside to Klosstock.] Did the Count tell you of 
the strange news a traveller from Vilnavitch brings 1 



i8 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Klobstock. 

No, he was about to say something when he was 
interrupted. 

[Gbunstbin takes Mm aside, Anna amd 
LosiNSKi leave table and go to seat l. 
Widow Moritz takes up sewing, Grun- 
STEiN sits, 

[Still stamling,] Strange news indeed, friend 
Grunstein. 'Tis surely some gossip's tale. 

Grunstein. 

Let us hope it is so, and drink to that good hope, 
dear old friend. 

[They drink ami sit down, talking in dwmh 
show, Klosstock turns aside to cabinet, 
brings out pipes and tobacco ; they fU and 
smoke, while conversation goes on between 
Anna and Lostnski on seat, 

LOSINSKI. 

It is accounted a sin among the Christians to love 
even maid or wife beyond the man they have made 
their God ; and I am glad to have been bom a Jew, 
Anna, if it were only to be untrammelled by law, 
human or Divine, in my love for you. 






BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 19 

Anna. 

Do yott not think that Grod's laws are as easy as 
man's are difficult % 

LOSINSKI. 

Yes, Anna, truly I do. Religion lies not in laws 
nor in knowledge, but in a pure and holy life. 

Anna. 

And yet, dear love, I sometimes think you chafe 
here in Czarovna, and long for a wider sphere of 
usefulness. 

LOSINSKI. 

It is not so, Anna. My ambition is satisfied to be 
with* you, whatever my /sphere of work; but some- 
times I wonder if it were not wise to leave this land 
of doubt and fear, and travel farther afield, where our 
people are safe from public persecution and private 
contumely. 

Anna. 

Ah, you envy Andrea Ferari ! You would like to 
go up and down the world as he does, seeing fresh 
peoples, noting the wonders of strange lands. 

LOSINSKI. 

My only desire is to be sure that your future shall 
be as happy as your past ; that neither you nor your 



20 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

father may ever be the victims of some sadden change 
of policy on the part of the Government. For myself, 
my life is nothing to me if it brings no special good 
to you. Martyrdom in such a cause would be happi- 
ness. 

Anna. 

Nay, do not speak of martyrdom ; you make my 
heart stand still ! What martyrdom, dear love, could 
there possibly be for you in my behalf 1 

LOSINSKI. 

Nothing that would be martyrdom. But how do 
we come to be talking in such a melancholy strain ? 
Forgive me, Anna. Ferari comes to your father's 
house presently. I met him an hour ago at the 
barber's. He is particular about his toilette when he 
comes to see the Queen of the Ghetto. 

[Febabi en^^B unobserved. Hearing his name, 
he smiles and pauses, 

Anna. 

He is very welcome. Is he not something like the 
dove returning to the ark with news of the outer 
world 1 There are no books of travel so interesting 
as the travellers themselves. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 21 

Febabi.^ 

[Advcmdng,] For which gracious sentiment I 
return you my hearty thanks. 

Anna. 

Ah, Signor Ferari [rising], « Welcome ! It is true 
we were talking of you. 

LOSINSKI. 

[Rising cmd taking his hand,] Again good-day to 
you. Anna finding me in a doleful mood began to 
talk of you ; I hope you will make us merry. 

Klosstock. 
That must be our duty to Andrea Ferari. [Goes 
up to Ferabi, takes him by the hand,] Welcome, thou 
runagate Ferari; here, there, and everywhere; I 
don't know when most welcome, expected or unex- 
pected ! You have seen our dear Losinski before to- 
day, and yet did not come to assist at our ceremonial 1 

Ferabi. 

My heart was with you ; but I had business of 
grave importance elsewhere. 

Klosstock. 
[Returning to his seat, and taking a/noVier pipe from 



22 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

caMnet.] Come, Ferari, here's your pipe. Pass the 
bottle, Grunstein — [to Fbbabi] and tell us all your 
new& 

[Anna goes up to table with Losinski, seating 
herself near Fbbabi. 

Anna. 

Yes, Signer Italiano, now for your travels. Where 
have you been ? To Venice again since last we saw 
jou? 

Febabi. 
Yes, little sweetheart, to Venice. 

Anna. 

Our dear Losinski has never been to Venice. Tell 
him, Ferari, how from utter darkness our brethren 
have progressed in wealth, in power, and freedom, in 
your City of the Sea. Surely that is an encourage- 
ment for hope even here in Russia. 

Klosstock. 

Would to God that all our neighbours far and near 
\lighting his big German pipe] were as well considered 
and as justly protected in their rights as we of 
Czarovna ! 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 23 

Ferabi. 

Bights ! \in aii/ppressed tone hut fiercely]. What 
rights, my father ? 

Klosstock. 

The right to live without heing heaten — ^the right 
to pray to the God of our fathers — ^the right to huy 
and sell. 

LOSINSKI. 

Yes, we are well off at Czarovna ; hut that should 
not make us content when our brethren in the East 
and West are ground under the heel, heaten in the 
streets, cast into prison, crucified ! Even here in 
the South, Czarovna is one of the few exceptions, where 
we may do more than herd together like animals con- 
tent to feed on the husks their masters fling to them. 
It was so once in Venice, where to-day our brethren 
hold up their heads in the blessed sun, and walk with 
the Christian merchants, their equals in respect and 
in power. 

Ferabi. 

Not quite that ; but of a sufficient freedom of action 
and life ; it is only in London where it may be said 
the Jew is equal to the Christian. And if it were 
not that some of our brethren, steeped in the pre- 
judices and vices that have been engendered of a 



24 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

thousand years of persecution, trespass upon the 
English liberal and humane sentiment by evil deeds 
that we as a community would be the first ourselves 
to punish, London would come to forget entirely that 
a man were Jew or Gentile, except, if he were a Jew, 
to glorify him all the more for his good works. 

Klosstock. 
If thou wert not a Jew, and true as the ring of 
thine own gold, Andrea Ferari, thy words would be 
thine own condemnation ; but, friend of many 
countries, do thou tell our daughter Anna of that 
City of the Sea, which is like the dream of a poet 
rather than a sober incident from the book of real 
experience ; and whither our dear son, the rabbi, doth 
propose to travel with our loving daughter Anna — 
mayhap accompanied by their father — what sayest 
thou, Anna ? 

Anna. 
It is too much happiness to think upon. 

Klosstock. 
\Addre8sing Negrutz, who has entered quietly,^ 
You may go to bed, Amos Negrutz ; we shall need 
your service no more to-night. 

[LosiNSKi and Ferari have eyed him tmth 
suspicion. Negrutz hows and exits. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 25 

LOSINSKI. 

\R%smg!\ Forgive me. \Goe8 to door whence Amos 
Nbgrutz has disappea/red ; lifts heavy curtain, and 
stands for a moment in listening attitude.] I will ex- 
plain later. 

[Klosstock holes inquiringly at Anna, whose 
hand, seeking his, he raises . to his lips. She 
lays her head upon his shoulder. 

[Eetv/ming and resu/mvng seat.] I do hot like the 
man Amos Negrutz. 

Febari. 
Nor do I. 

Klosstock. 

Nay, what has the poor fellow done 1 — [To Losinski.] 
You thought him a good man, and useful, my son, 
until now. 

Losinski. 

I did. It is only to-day that I doubt him — only 
to-night that I fear him. 

Klosstock. 
Fear him ! Do I hear aright ? 

Febari. 
Where did he come from ? 



26 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Klosstook. 
From Elizabethgrad. 

Fbrabi. 
Becommended by one worthy of trust ? 

Klosstook. 
Yes, truly, the merchant Chane. 

Eerari. 

[Signijficantly,] I thought so. Do you know the 
merchant Chane ? 

Klosstock. 

Not to speak with him ; but I know him by repute 
as one whose word is his bond, and who has large 
possessions. 

Ferabi. 

Ha ! [Eisea and paces the room for a moment^ then 
pcmses near the door, as if he listened for footsteps,"} 

Gbunstein. 
Do you know him ? 

Febabi. 
Ida 

LOSINSEI. 

I fear a cloud is gathering about us, but one which 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 27 

may break far away if we are careful. I have kept 
watch over my words this evening that your servant 
might not hear of the warnings which have reached 
me within the last few hours from a trusted friend in 
St. Petersburg. 

Grunstein. 
Is it touching the new Governor ? 

LOSINSEI. 

It is. 

Grunstbin. 

\Noddmg to Klosstock.] I told you the news was 
bad. 

Ferari. 

Alas ! I can endorse it ; and I, too, have observed 
a reticent demeanour for the reason that this Amos 
is not what he represents himself to be. 

LOSINSKI. 

Forewarned is forearmed. The new Governor is on 
his way to Czarovna ; it may be possible to propitiate 
him ; I know that it is possible for him to reduce our 
lives to the miserable level of those of our brethren at 
Kiev. That we are an exception is due to excep- 
tional causes. The hand of persecution lies heavy on 
our brethren all round about us. 



28 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Klosstooe. 

Our brethren are themselves much to blame^ 
They make hard bargains; they thrive on the 
Christian need ; they do no acts of charity outside 
the pale of settlement ; they forget that God made us 
all. 

Ferari. 

They remember that the Christian has ground 
them beneath his heel ; they remember that from 
age to age in all countries they have been harried 
by Christian fire and sword ; and that even in these 
days of so-called charity, and education, and 
especially in this land of the Czar, they are the 
victims of harsh laws, aliens alike from freedom and 
justice, and compelled to kiss the rod that strikes 
them. No, my father, blame them not that they take 
their revenge. 

Klosstock. 

But I do blame them, my son ; and I present to 
them and to you the example of Czarovna as proof 
of the good that comes of toleration. 

Ferabi. 

Toleration ! The merchant Chane is a tolerant 
man. Hush ! We alarm our good young hostess. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 29 

LOSINSKI. 

I have spoken something of this to Anna akeady, 
and we are accustomed to discuss many things out- 
side the ordinary lines of education. 

Klosstogk. 

Anna, it were well thou went to rest. Ferari is 
over-anxious about this new Grovemor. He will 
alarm thee, and even our dear Losinski is inclined 
to exaggerate the possibilities of the change of 
governorship. Parting with a kind and benevolent 
man, we should rejoice in his promotion. 

Ferari. 
If it is promotion. 

Klosstock. 

Be sure it is, dear friend. Let us not alarm 
ourselves unduly. 

Grunstein. 
And, above all, 'twere an ill turn to alarm our 
Anna on a night like this. Czarovna has many 
blessings. 

Klosstock. 

\To Anna.] Thou art my blessing, Anna ! \Em- 
hrcLces her,'] And it grows late. Good-night ! 



30 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Anna. 
\To aa:\ Good-night ! 

[LosiNSEi accompanies her to door s., where 
Widow Moritz has appeared ready to re- 
ceive her. On her exit, Losinsei advances to 
table, 

Losinsei. 

And I too will say good-night, dear friends ; and 
God he with you! If there is such danger abroad 
as that which Andrea Ferari fears, it is well that I 
go amongst our people and warn them. Good-night. 

[Badt Losinsei. Ferari foUows him to door, 
draws portiere over it, then retwms, and 
addresses Grunstein and Klosstoce : 

Ferari. 

Listen, both of you. The butchers are abroad. 
The red fury of barbarism is once more marching 
through the land. The flame has broken out at 
Elizabethgrad. The Jews, being forewarned of 
trouble, applied to the authorities for protection. 
Placards were issued informing the Orthodox Kussians 
that the property of the Jews had been given over to 
them, and that they might take it. The Govern- 
ment did not deny the outrageous notification. The 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 31 

Orthodox rose. The military presented themselves at 
the scene of the miassacre, but only to encourage the 
cruel excesses. 

Klosstock. 
Didst thou say massacre % 

Ferabi. 

I said massacre. But it was worse than massacre, 
my father; twenty-five good women, our dear 
sisters, were violated and died. 

Grunstein. 
Holy Father ! 

Ferabi. 

At the, home of one, Mordecai Wienarski, the 
mob, disappointed of plunder, caught up his child 
and hurled it through the window. The infant fell 
dead at the feet of a company of Cossacks ; but they 
moved neither to take it up nor to arrest the murderers. 
Two thousand of our brethren are houseless ; thirty 
and more have gone to their long rest, many are 
grievously wounded, and the community has been 
plundered of property to the value of forty thousand 
English pounds. 

EiiOSSTOCK. 

Thou strikest me dumb, Ferari ! 



32 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Ferabi. 

To-morrow, perhaps to-night, your new Grovemor 
will arrive at the palace. I passed him on the way ; 
he is travelling incognito. By this time General 
Poltava, your late Grovemor, is under arrest. I almost 
hate myself for being the bearer of such ill tidings; 
it is the bolt from the blue. I found you steeped 
in the happiness of virtue, good-feeling, and sweet 
content : I am a moral earthquake to your household 
bliss. But it is in one's happiest hours that Fate 
strikes us down. 

Grunstein. 
Who is this new Governor % 

Ferasi. 

General Fetronovitch, a man of a cruel disposition, 
who hates our chosen people and aids and abets their 
persecution. \Twrning to Klosstock.] Nay, dear 
host, my good friend, be not impatient with 
me. I know what I say, know more than I dare 
tell you, more than some might say I ought, more, 
I hope, than is good for such as Petronovitch. 

Klosstock. 
I have never asked thee, Ferari, whence thou 
comest, or whither thou goest ; but I trust to thy 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 33 

love and discretion not to compromise this household 
with anything that can be called political. 

Ferari. 

Your trust is well placed ; I am here for the last 
time. Czarovna will see me no more, nor, indeed, will 
Russia, after I leave her accursed soil on this last 
journey. 

Klosstock. 

If you are compromised in the eyes of the 
Grovernment, Andrea Ferari, it is hardly kind to have 
made this your chief house of call in Southern 
Kussia. 

Ferari. 

I had no reason to believe that I was suspected 
until I left St. Petersburg this time, intending 
to go to Paris; but a sudden knowledge of the 
change of Government here, and the departure 
of a certain man from the capital for Elizabeth- 
grad and Czarovna, forced me, as I said before, 
out of the love I bear this household, to make my 
way hither. 

\Noi8e without, 

[Hand on his knife.] What is that ? 

3 



34 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Grunstein. 
Some late carrier from the country. 

Klosstock. 
You seem much disturbed. 

Ferari. 

I had a bad dream last night. I thought I was 
sitting here among you and that suddenly there 
started up, from behind the stove, a man, who said, 
" Andrea Ferari, thou art my prisoner ! " The noise 
from without struck me curiously as if it were the 
prologue to my captivity. 

Klosstock. 
Hast thou been drinking, Andrea ? 

Ferari. 

No, I am in my soberest senses; a little over- 
anxious for thy welfare perhaps ; for this Grovernor — 
General Petronovitch — is a sensualist and a tyrant ; 
he is believed to have instigated the rising against 
our chosen people at Elizabeth grad, and your friend 
Poltava's witlidrawal from the province is not pro- 
motion, it is disgrace ! 

Klosstock and Grunstein. 
\Togetktr:\ God forbid!, 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 35 

Ferari. 

\Add/re8sing Klosstock.] Moreover, thy new ser- 
vant, Amos Negrutz, is a Government spy. 

[Negrutz at this moment emerges from a dark 
comer behind the stove, covering Ferari 
with the shining barrel of a revolver, and a 
loud knocking is heard at the front ^of the 
house, 

Negrutz. 

[Advan/dng towards Ferari.] And he arrests thee, 
Andrea Ferari, as a traitor ! — [Half turning far a 
m^oment towards Klosstock.] Do thou open thy 
door to the police ? 

[A trumpet call is heard without, Ferari, 
who has drawn his knife, stands for a 
moment as if stupefyed. As Negrutz twms 
to Klosstock, Ferari leaps upon him, seizes 
him, by the throat, stabs and flings him upon 
the floor. Then leaping over his body as 
troops break in from both doors, Ferari looks 
round for a moment, lifts latch of window, 
and dashes through, taking with him, part 
of leaded panics with a crash, and disappears. 
Rifle shots heard. 



36 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Enter Soldiers, Governor's escort. After them, with 
Officers, the new Governor, General Petrono- 

VITCH. 

Petronovitch. 
Which of you is Nathan Klosstock ? 

Klosstock. 

I am he ! And you, sir, who thus disturb the peace 
of this household ? 

Petronovitch. 

I am the Governor of the province. You and your 
fellow conspirators are my prisoners. 

Anna. 

\Entering hurriedly from R.] Prisoners ! [Rvshes 
to father y who folds her in his arms,] 

[Guards stand round Klosstock, Grunstein, 
and the rest. Enter Officer l. 

Petronovitch. 
\Tuming to Officer.] Well ? 

Officer. 
The traitor Ferari has escaped us ! 

Petronovitch. 
And our agent ? 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR yj 

Second Officer. 

\F(n'nJbing to body ©/"Negrutz, which is now being 
removed by Soldiers.] Murdered ! 

Petronovitch. 

\Turning to Klosstock.] So you are the vile 
reptiles that have found favour with my predecessor ! 
Like Grovemor, like subject ! 

Klosstock. 
We are no reptiles, may it please your Excellency. 

Petronovitch. 
Dog of a Jew ! how comes it, then, that my Im- 
perial Master's mandate is treated with contempt, his 
enemy permitted to escape, and his trusted agent 
murdered by thy friend and guest ? Vile traitor ! 

Klosstock. 
I am 'no traitor to his Imperial Majesty, but an 
humble loving subject. 

Petronovitch. 

Loving subject ? I spit upon thee, thou cursed 
Jew ! [Takes cigarette from silver case and smokes,] 

Klosstock. 
Sir, you do me wrong, and I pray your Excellency 



38 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

respect my daughter, who has been trained to 
pray for his Imperial Majesty and to honour her 
father. 

Petronovitch. 

Has she so, indeed ? \Turning his eyes upon her.] 
She does not honour thee in her handsome face, nor 
in her graceful figure. Stand forth, girl, thou needst 
not fear. Where is the man to whom thou art be- 
trothed, as they tell me thou art 1 

Anna. 

At home, no doubt, your Excellency. 

Enter Officer. 

Officer. 
The Eabbi Losinski is without, your Excellency. 

Petronovitch. 
Where was he taken ? 

Officer. 

At the synagogue, denouncing your Excellency to 
his fellow Jews and flock. 

Petronovitch. 
Bring him before us, and your witnesses. He shall 



BV ORDER OF THE CZAR 39 

have justice. Here on the scene of hostilities we 
will hold our court. \Tdke8 Klosstock's chair by 
table.] 

[Guards fcyrce Klosstock, Grunstein, Widow 
MoRiTZ, and Anna boick. 

Unless these cursed Jews give up the murderer 
Ferari, they shall suffer for it. He cannot have left 
Czarovna ; he is in hiding. I will flay them alive, 
every man and woman of them, but I will have the 
conspirator they are concealing. \Tuming towards 
group of prisoners,] As for you, Nathan Klosstock, 
and you 

Officer. 

[Looking also towards them.] Moses Grunstein, your 
Excellency, Nathan Klosstock's most intimate friend, 
and Martha Moritz, widow, housekeeper to the afore- 
said Klosstock. 

Petronovitch. 

You are committed to the prison of Vilnavitch. 
Your guilt is without question — you, Nathan Kloss- 
tock, are taken red-handed, harbouring a conspirator 
against his Imperial Majesty, and accessory to the 
murder of his trusted agent, Amos Negrutz. 



40 BV ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Oh, my father ! 

Petronovitch. 
[N'ow turning to Officer.] Where is this rabbi, 
this Marcus Losinski ? 

[Officer thrusts him forward into centre of 
stage. 

[To Losinski.] Where have you hidden Andrea 
Ferari ? 

Losinski. 
I knew not that he was in hiding. 

Petronovitch. 
You lie, Jew ! 

Losinski. 
I knew not that he had any cause for hiding. 

Petronovitch. 
You lie, Jew ! How were you engaged but now, 
at the moment of your arrest ? 

Losinski. 

I was acquainting my humble flock with the 
sudden and unexpected change in the Government of 
this province. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 41 

Petronovitch. 

You lie, Jew ! You were denouncing the faithful 
eervant of his Imperial Majesty, you were foment- 
ing rebellion. 

LOSINSKI. 

Arraign me before the judges in open court, and let 
me know the charges you bring against me, and I 
shall know how to defend myself. 

Petronovitch. 

I do arraign you now, before this Court-Martial, 
this Council of War. Do you deny the truth of what 
I allege? You shall see that I am just if I am 
severe, as it behoves justice to be in these days of 
conspiracy and rebellion. Stand forth, you Judas, 
there ! 

[Officer thrusts forward Jethro, a half-de- 
demented^ imbecile wretch. 

You heard this man — ^this Rabbi Losinski — warn his 
flock against me, the Governor, appointed by our 
Holy Father the Czar ? 

Jethro. 
I did. 



42 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Petronovitch. 

He said they might neither expect justice nor 
charity from me ? 

Jethro. 

Yes. 

Petronovitch. 

You hear, Jew ! You shall see how just I am^ 
how generous are my brother councillors. What do* 
you say to this evidence ? 

LosiNs^i. 

May I ask your witness a question ? — \Tumi71g to- 
witness,^ Did I advise anything but gentle submission 
to the new Governor and *caref ul observance of the 
law? 

Jethro. 

No — God, forgive me ! [Covers face with hia 
hcmds.] 

Petronovitch. 

Stand up, Judas ! That meant, " Be careful how you 
rebel, but rebel ; not in open day, but the Governor 
Petronovitch is unworthy of his position, he is 
a tyrant; his Imperial Majesty has sent amongst 
you an unjust and cruel officer ; rebel against him. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 45 

but have a care — do it secretly." That is what you 
mean, eh, wretch ? 

Jethro. 
Oh, yes, your Excellency ! God forgive me ! 

Petronovitch. 

You, Losinski, are a cut-throat Jew — a rebel, a 
traitor to the State, and for this I will make an 
example of you. You are condemned to receive fifty 
blows of the knout in the public place of execution. 

Anna. 

\Wiih a loud cry of] Mercy ! mercy ! [staggers 
toioards Petronovitch andfaUs,] 

END OF ACT T. 



Act II 

Scene i. — T?ie office of General PetronovUch at the Palace 

of the Government, 

[Petronovitch discovered at table with vnne 
and cigarettes and papers. Enter Pauloff, 
a military s&i^ant 

Pauloff. 

The Jew merchant's daughter. I told her you 
could not give audience to any one. 

Petronovitch. 
You are a fool ! 

Pauloff. 

Yes, Excellency : I said I would inquire if you had 
leisure. 

Petronovitch. 
Admit her ; see that we are not disturbed. 

[Exit Pauloff, 
[Smiles and drains tumbler to the dregs,] By the 

45 



46 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

mass, a pleasant encounter; I would not have 
wished for a more agreeable visit. She comes to 
beg for her lover. Pauloff ! \Rings hdl hy the side 
of ciga/r-box.^ Pauloff! 

Ervter Pauloff. 
Listen. 

Pauloff. 
Yes, Excellency. 

Petronovitch. 
If I call you and give you an order to postpone the 
punishment of the man Losinski, in presence of this 
Jew girl, you will not deliver it. Do you under- 
stand ? — written or verbal, do you understand ? 

Pauloff. 
Yes, Excellency. She is here. 

Petronovitch. 

Let her come in. Guard the door without ; admit 

no one. 

[Pauloff hows and exits. 

* Anna enters and kneels. 

No, no ; you may not kneel to me. 

Anna. 
Mercy for the rabbi ! Save my father ! It can be 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 47 

no joy to you to bring such terrible suffering upon us 
— it can do no good to our great Emperor ; better it 
•would be to take our money, our jewels, our property : 
that will buy your soldiers' clothes, feed your poor, 
make your .ladies happy ; take it — give us our lives 
.and liberty — we ask no more. 

Petronovitch. 

My dear young lady, do not distress yourself. I am 
not the tyrant your Losinski would make out ; but I 
•owe a duty to my Imperial master. I do not want 
your money, nor does my Government ; we only desire 
peace and order. We are pained to find such reput- 
able persons as your father harbouring a conspirator 
who, on being arrested, cuts the throat of our Imperial 
master's officer, and escapes by the connivance of 
your father, the master of the house. And when we 
are in our most generous mood of narrowing justice 
down to the criminal only, and considering the previous 
^ood conduct of his associates, the rabbi, a learned 
and scholarly man, incites his flock against us the 
Oovernor, denouncing us as the corrupt and cruel 
Agent of a corrupt and unjust Government. 

Anna. 
If he did so, he knew not what he said, your 



48 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Excellency ! Oh, forgive him ! His Greatness the 
Czar has no truer subject — mercy ! oh, be merciful ! 

Petronovitch. 
Be seated, child, and let us talk the matter over. 

Anna. 

Do not ask me to sit ; when I flew here for succour 
they were dragging the rabbi through the streets I 
know not whither, and they said he was condemned to- 
a punishment worse than death. Great God ! while I 
stand here he may be suffering. Oh, sir, spare him I 
Hark ! I hear his voice ; he calls me — he is dying ! 

Petronovitch. 

This is madness \ listen, my poor girl. I wiiU, spare- 
him. There — he is saved ! 

Anna. 

Heaven bless you ! \Ki88e8 Ma hand,] God will 
bless you. But how is he to know you will spare him ?' 
How will they know he is to be saved ? 

Petronovitoh. 

If you will promise to be quiet and remain here,, 
and let me know your wishes and not distress your- 
self, you shall hear the order given for the postpone- 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 49 

ment of his punishment, and you shall yourself bear 
away with you the order for his release. 

Anna. 
Bless you ! [Staggers to a aeat^ 

Petronovitch. 
[Ringing his beU,^ Pauloff ! 

Pauloff enters. 

Bring me pen and ink. 

[Pauloff goes to cabinet, brings writing 

materials, Petronovitch rvrites upon a 

sheet of paper, folds it, and hands to 
Pauloff. 

An order for the postponement of the punishment of 
the Rabbi Losinski ; send a messenger to the Com- 
mander of the prison forthwith. 

[Anna covers her face vnth her hands, and 
weeps tears of joy. 

Will you read the order, madame ? [Showing it to 
her,] 

Anna. 
No, no; I trust you. 

Petronovitch. 
And the messenger will inform the Commander 



50 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

that the order for Losmski's release shall follow — you 
understand ? 

Paulofp. 

Yes, your Excellency. 

\Exit Pauloff. 
[Petronovitch foUowSy and quietly raising 
portiere, belts the door. Then approojches 
Anna, amd lays hand upon her shoulder, 

Petronovitch. 

There, we are not so black as we are painted, are 
we? 

Anna. 
You are very merciful. 

[Petronovitch tahes seat by her side, 

Petronovitch. 

A^d what is to be my reward for all this, and the 
much more that I am to do for you 1 

Anna. 

Eternal thanks and prayers, and the blessed con- 
sciousness of a great act of charity. 

Petronovitch. 
Just so ! And so you are to marry the rabbi ? 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 51 

Anna. 

Yes. \P&rmitti7ig his nea/r approach withcmt a move- 
ment one way or the other, vnUing to submit to soms 
amount ofinsuUfor the sake of the Toan she loves^ 

Peteonovitch. 
He is to be envied. [Stealing his a/rm round her,] 

Anna. 

Your Excellency is pleased to be merry after your 
act of mercy. 

Petronovitch. 
I am pleased with you, and I hope you are not dis- 
pleased with me ? 

Anna. 

You are very good ; I owe you a deep debt o£ 
gratitude. 

Petronovitch. 
[Taki7ig her hand,] It is easily paid. 

Anna. 

It can never be sufficiently acknowledged. [Moving 
a little way from him.] My father and my future 
husband will never cease to bless you. 



52 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Petronovitch. 

I prefer to be in your thoughts — ^and in your arms. 
\Ki88e8 her, roughly, brtUaUy.] 

[Anna struggUa ; frees herself from hie grasp. 

You propose too much honour for a poor Jewess. 
Pray now, sir, permit me to withdraw. 

Petronovitch. 

You are worthy of an emperor — no Christian is 
more beautiful. 

Anna. 

But your Excellency knows that I am to be married 
to one of my own people. You may not marry a 
Jewess, be she ever so wealthy. 

Petronovitch. 

Oh, yes, I may. We are not so particular when 
beauty is in the case — such beauty as yours. 

[Anna retreats before Mm, HefoUows her,] 
I frighten you. Nay, let us talk about that re- 
lease : I have only to write it. [She stands stiU ; he 
approaches her, and she permits him to take her hand,] 

Anna. 
Now, let me go, dear sir, and I will come again to- 
morrow. 



BY ORDER OF The CZAR 53 

Petronovitch. 

You make me jealous of the very man I am about 
to release. \Fut8 his arm about her waist once more,] 

Anna. 
Let me see him free, and I will come to you the 
next moment. 

Petronovitch. 

No, my darling, I cannot spare you. 

[Takes her roughly in Ms a/rms. The next 
moment she is free, a knife which she had 
concealed in h&r d/ress in her hand, her 
attitude defiant am,d violent,, 

Anna. 

Let me go, or call in your servants to carry me 
out dead! 

[For a second Petronovitch is checked. But 
he is not daunted either by the knife or by 
Anna's threats, though he pretends to be, 

Petronovitch, 

Forgive me. I thought that you Jewish girls were 
kind and generous. I had no idea you carried for 
lovers such formidable greetings as poignards. We 
are to know more of each other before we are friends ? 



54 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Well, so be it. Forgive me, and I forgive you. Put 
up your knife, and keep your promise, for I am now 
going to put your word to the test — the moment you 
see him free, you will come to me ? 

Anna. 
[Off her guards and replacing her knife in her bosom , 
as Petronovitch takes up his pen to vyrite the order 
for LosiNSKi's release.^ I said so. 

Petronovitch. 

I give you my word I will not molest you. Be 
seated. I only now desire to have your rabbi re- 
leased that I may see how you ladies of the chosen 
people keep your word. 

[Entirely accepting this view of the case as the 
denouement of her visit, Anna sits down and 
calmly awaits the order for her hver^s release, 
Petronovitch, having written it, offers it 
to her, and then as she holds out her hand for 
it, flings his arms around her^ snatches the 
knife from her bosom, and drags her into an 
adjoining room, her cry for help being hea/rd 
above the crash of the heavy door as it closes 
behind them. 

End of Scene. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 55 

Scene II. — The Marhet-place of Czarovna. On Bacholoth, 
churchy scattered hotises, and distant hills, L.u.c, plat- 
form and whipping block built with practical gallery 
leading mto second floor of prison L. ; seats fm' spectators 
and officials. On stage proper ^ B. houses : L. chief 
entrance to prison* 8ce7ie opens vMh crowd tJtat iii- 
creases as act goes on. Entrances B., L. 

MOUJIK. 

It was high time the Jew dogs should suffer. 

Woman. 
Nay, the Klosstocks have been good friends to us. 

MouJiK. 

Eriends ! No right to be friends. Their money is 
ours, and their goods, so reads the Imperial ukase. 
We have allowed them to be our equals, when they 
should have been our slaves, as they will henceforth. 

Woman. 
They have been good neighbours. 

MoUJIK. 

No right to be neighbours. 

A Jew. 
Thank you for that good word. \To Moujik.] I 
saved your child's life. *Do not turn from us in our 
misery. 



56 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

MOUJIK. 

The avengers and dispossessors are coming hither 
from Elizabethgrad, bringing the ukase ; it is the law 
that you be expelled the province. Here is one of 
them. 

Emifft Dick Chetwynd. 

Chbtwtnd. 
No, friend, I am only a visitor. 

MoujiK. 
A visitor ? 

Chetwynd. 
From England. 

MoUJIK. 

Never heard of it. What part of Kussia ? 

Chetwynd. 
No part of Bussia. — [^sicfe.] Thank God ! 

MoujiK. 

\Fu8hvng aside Jew and Woman.] Here, make way 
for the Great Czar's troops. 

[A JUe of Soldiers enter and take v/p positions 
L., near prison and below platform. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 57 

Chetwynd. 
\To MouJiK.] Why so rough, friend ? 

MOUJIK. 

Why not ? 

Chetwynd. 

No matter. — [-isicfe.] If I had you in England^ 
I'd show you. 

Woman. 

\To Jew.] You have staunch friends among us. 
Orthodox Russians ; but too few, alas ! 

Eerari. 

\Bi8gu%8ed as old man.] Before this unhappy day^ 
is over many a Jew woman will need succour. Help 
them, even as the Klosstocks have helped you. 

Woman. 
I will, I will. 

Chetwynd. 

[To Ferari.] I beg your pardon, what is going on 
here? 

Ferari. 

An English tourist, if he values his life, had better 
look on and not ask questions. 



58 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Chetwynd. 

It is my business to ask questions. Do you belong 
to this place ? 

Ferari. 
No, I am a traveller, as you are. 

Chetwynd. 
Travelled far ? 

Ferari. 
From St. Petersburg ; and you ? 

Chetwynd. 
From Elizabethgrad. 

Ferari. 
Indeed 1 Friend or foe ? 

Chetwynd. 
I am a journalist, from London. 

Ferari. 

Great Jehovah ! what a people it is ! You will be 
killed. 

Chetwynd. 
I think not. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 59 

Ferari. 
JFor the Jew or the Russian ? 

Chetwynd. 
The impartial historian of both. 

Eebari. 

And have you told the story of the violence and 
bloodshed of Tereda, Cherson, and ? 

Chetwynd. 

Not got off my dispatches yet — hope to. You are 
one of the chosen— can you help me % 

Eerari. 
How ? Speak quickly. 

Chetwynd. 

The story's no good in my pocket. I want to wire 
it to London. 

Ferari. 
Ko operator dare send the truth. 

Chetwynd. 
A messenger, then, across the frontier to Germany. 



6o BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Ferari. 

Seek me later, at Moses Grunstein's, but speak no 
more now-^we are watched. 

EnU/r Petronovitch r., vnth Guard, Crowd in- 
creases, Gua/rd pushes people back — way made 
f(yr Petronovitch. Enter hastily Count Stra- 

VENSKY. 

Stravensky. 

[To Petronovitch.] Your Excellency, pardon 
me, I have known these people for many years ; they 
are loyal and honest men and women. 

Petronovitch. 
No doubt — the loyalty that cloaks treason. 

Stravensky. 

No, upon my soul, Russia has no better subjects 
than the Klosstocks. 

Petronovitch. 
And their vile rabbi, eh ? 

Stravensky. 
I dare offer bonds for his good behaviour. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 6i 

Pktronovitch. 

And forge bonds for yourself, Sir Count. Have a 
care ! 

Stravensky. 

You will excuse my persistency when you know 
all. 

Petronovitch. 
Your appeal comes too late. 

Stravensky. 
It is never too late for a merciful action. 

Petronovitch. 

Justice is mercy, and the safety of the province 
demands justice. 

Stravensky. 

Who threatens the province ? The Jews of the 
•Ghetto ? Don't forget that I speak with authority 
no less than your own. 

Petronovitch. 

At St. Petersburg perhaps, Sir Count. It is a long 
way to St. Petersburg, and this is Czarovna, in the 
province of Vilnavitch, and I am its Governor. Stand 
aside, Sir Count— this is no time for controversy. 



62 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR . 

Stravensky. 

Controversy! The Jew is the Czar's subject, he 
has his lawful rights, he has 



Pbteonovitch. 

[Interrupting.^ No rights ; he encumbers the earthy 
he eats the bread of the Christian, he is an alien, a 
traitor. 

Stravensky. 

You speak in anger, Greneral. 

Petronovitch. 
I am responsible for my words and my actions to- 
his Imperial Majesty. I know my duty ; I will teach 
you yours. Begone to your chateau, and remain there 
under pain of arrest until this revolt against my 
Imperial master is crushed. Begone, sir ! [Motions 
Guard to advance,] 

[Petronovitch and Gua/i^d enter prison beneath 
platform, 

Stravensky. 

[Going.] You shall live to regret this day. General 
Petronovitch. 

Ferari. 

Beware, Count Stravensky ; even you may become^ 
suspect. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 63 

Stravensky. 
Who are you ? 

Ferari. 
\In low voice.] Yesterday, Ferari the Jew. 

Stravensky. 
[Suppressing astonishment] * And to-day ? 

Ferari. 

Goldstein the banker, with a message to his friend 
Count Stravensky. 

Stravensky. 
You are a man of courage. 

Ferari. 

Kay, but of great resource. I am staying with 
Moses Grunstein. 

Stravensky. 

Come to me at night — I may need your counsel ; 
to-morrow I shall start for St. Petersburg. Do you 
know anything of the girl Anna ? She is missing 
since yesterday. 

Ferari. 

She went to petition the Governor for her lover's 
life, it is said. 



64 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Stravensky. 
The wolf and the lamb. 

Ferari. 
I lent her a knife. 

Officer. 

\Fr(yra the prison, comes up to them.] Count 
Stravensky, I am ordered to escort you to your 
chateau. 

[Stravensky bows and exits with Officer. 

Chetwynd. 

\To Ferari.] Seems to be trouble among the 
authorities — ^what is it ? 

Ferari. 
I asked you not to address me again. 

Chetwynd. 
Everybody else I speak to is a fool or worse. 

Ferari. 
I am but a fool myself, sir, but not fool enough to 
be seen talking to a foreign newspaper man, and an 
Englishman, at such a time as this. [Moves away,] 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 65 

Chetwynd. 

I have met people who would think it an honour 
to be seen talking to Dick Chetwynd. 

\Mur7rvwr8 and cries off, 

[Looks offJ] Things look ugly. A repetition of the 
Potalva massacre before the night's over. Dick, my 
friend, you must be wary. Seek him at Moses Grun- 
stein's ; where the devil is Moses Grunstein's ? 

[Drwnfis heat, crowd increases. Enter from 
prison on gallery, Governor's escort. Officers 
and Petronovitch take up their positions, 
LosiNSKi brought out, stripped to waist and 
in fetters. Executioner with knout following^ 
Crowd murmurs ; cries and shouts off, 

Ent&r Anna, distratcghty dishevelled; pauses^ 

looks round. 

Anna. 

Oh, my brothers, are ye men, to stand by and see 
your rabbi murdered? Great Jehovah curge this 
cruel host of the fiendish Czar ! 

Ferari. 
Peace, daughter, for heaven's sake ! 



i66 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Anna. 

\Witlwui, heeding him,'] There he stands ! [Point- 
ing to Pbtronovitch.] The false Governor, the 
traitor, the liar, the Christian Tarquin ! 

\J&W8 gather about her. The moujiks get to- 
gether in company. A soldier attempts to 
approach Anna. A scuffle ; he is forced back. 
Fighting begins here and there. 

Men of the Ghetto ! look to your wives and 
daughters. You knew me a pure, good woman ; your 
vile Governor Petronovitch has put upon me an ever- 
lasting curse ! I am no longer fit to die by the side 
of my betrothed. Avenge me for the love of your 
women and babes ! 

Jetheo (the imbecile), 

Down with the false Governor Petronovitch ! 

[Fighting increases. Troops begin to take part. 
Executioner flings Losinsei down upon whip- 
ping bench, where two Guards strap him to 
bench, head ami heels, Anna is the centre of 
flighting group. 
Oh, rabbi, father, forgive me ! I betrayed you. 

[Fight begins to be general, Chetwynd seen 
defending himsdf 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 67 

Ferari. 

[Wielding a long knife.] Fight for your lives ! 

[Saves Jethro, who is, however, struck doum by 
soldier, who is instantly stahhed hy Ferari. 

Anna. 

God is with us ! He will send down His fires upon 
them ! [She is seized by soldier with whom she 
struggles — Ferari stabs him. 

Chetwynd. 

If they'd only fought like this at Potalva ! But, 
after all, poor devils, what is the good ? 

[-4 5. Chetwynd speaks, Petronovitch andGuard 
leave scaffold and overcome the twrmdt, and 
drag Anna upon the scaffold. She is handed 
to EocecutioTver. Petronovitch gives an 
order in pantomime. Eocecutioner lays hands 
upon her. She stands forward with dignity, 

END OF ACT II. 



Act III 

Scene. — Philip ForsytJCs studio in Venice, Open balcony 
tmndows with backcloth of canal or Venetian palaces or 
bridge — characteristic bit of Venice, Entrances e. and L. 
In B. XJ. E. portiere and suggestion of alcove or store-room. 
Easy chair or two, old Venetian seat, two or three easels 
with pirctures upon them — several canvases about ; one or 
two rugs here and there ; table ; small sideboard on which 
there a/re cigars, tmne, etc. 

Enter Henshaw, who is Philip's servant and occoMon- 
alVy his models shovmig in Dick Chetwynd and 
Colonel Maurice de Barsac, the Private Secre- 
tary and man of business of the Countess 
Stravensky, hut who is Ferari, his second alias, 

Chetwynd. 
Master out, Henshaw ? 

Henshaw. 

Yes, siBT If you called I was to make you free of 

the studio. What can I offer you, sir ? 

69 



70 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Chetwynd. 
\To Ferari.] What can Mr, Henshaw offer us, 
Colonel ? 

Eerari. 

A glass of Capri^with a cigarette is- quite Venetian ; 
is it not so, monsieur % 

Chetwynd. 
If Mr. Henshaw has a little ice, eh, Henshaw ? 

Henshaw. 

Oh, yes, Mr. Chetwynd, plenty ! \0'pefa8 refrigerator 
and takes out ice in a howl amd places it on sideboard 
and proceeds to open wine ; as he does so Ferari 
offers cigarette-case to Dick and they Ught up,^ 

Chetwynd. 

[As HEHiBH. AW is pouring out unne.] Your master 
still looking for his model ? 

Henshaw. 
Yes, sir ; more persevering than ever. 

Chetwynd. 
And more despairing ? 

Henshaw. > 

Well, sir, I think he is ; I dessay he might have 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 71 

done just as well in Shoreditch as in the Ghetto here, 
though I allow it's more picturesque in Venice. 

Chetwynd. 
That's very good of you, Henshaw. 

Henshaw. 

But I like London for all that, and, as for models, 
why, there ain't no kind of nationality you need sigh 
for and not get in Soho. 

Chetwynd. 
You sit for the master now and then, Henshaw ? 

Henshaw. 

Why, yes, sir, I sat for " The Exile of Erin '* in his 
last Academy picture, leastwise for the clothes, when 
the original Irishman was took up suspicious in 
connection with the blowing up of the West End 
Club. 

Ferari. 

It is not, then, Paris or St. Petersburg alone that 
blow up, as you say? You, too, have your social 
eruptions. 

Chetwynd. 
Oh, yes ; then, you see, we are such a down-trodden 
people in London ; can't do anything we want to ; won't 



72 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

let us drive a railway through Westminster Abbey, 
nor hold public meetings in St. Paul's. 

Ferari. 

It is not easy, monsieur, to tell when you are in 
earnest, or what you call in fun. 

Ohetwynd. 

Earnestness is an old fogey nowadays in England, 
Colonel de Barsac ; we have to disguise him in a mask 
and call him cynicism. 

Ferari. 
Ah, I do not understand you. 

Ohetwynd. 

You compliment me. The less a man is understood 
the more important he becomes. 

Ferari. 

Is it that you think we all wear our little masks, 
monsieur ? 

Ohetwynd. 
With a difference. \Cro88e8 to Henshaw.] 

Ferari. 

[To himself,] Some faces cannot be disguised. 
[^/owc2.] Your mask becomes you, M. Ohetwynd. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 73 

Chetwynd. 
And yours ? 

Ferari. 

I nevaire wear him, monsieur; I am the simple 
secretary of the illustrious Countess Stravensky. 

Henshaw. 
Is there anything else I can do for you ? 

Chetwynd. 

No, thank you, Henshaw ; we will try and amuse 
ourselves until the master comes. 

[Exit Henshaw. 

My friend Philip is the youngest English Academi- 
cian ; he will interest you. 

Ferari. 
Are we in earnest now ? 

Chetwynd. 

Tremendously. His election was a surprise, not 
on account of his talent, but the Royal Academy is 
a conservative institution, and Forsyth is everything 
that is the opposite. He was born in Bussia ; his 
father was a railway contractor. All the boy's 
earliest recollections are Russian, and, between 
ourselves, he has a desperately bad opinion of the 



74 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Great White Czar, of whose Court your Countess 
Stravensky is such a loyely example. What a 
beautiful woman she is ! 

Ferari. 

And good as she is beautiful ! I have reason to- 
say so, for I have the honour to be her secretary, 
steward, and man of business, ever since the death 
of the Count, her husband ; but do not think she i& 
orthodox of the orthodox ; Imperialist, yes ; but 
with a full appreciation of your English Constitution, 

Chetwynd. 

The Count Stravensky ! A remarkable death-bed^ 
was it not ? Now I remember ; he married his wife 
a few hours before he died, eh % Some Russian girl 
who bad been educated in Paris % She was an orphan, 
the friend of the daughter of a Russian general who- 
lost his life in the Caucasus ; is it hot so % 

Ferari. 
It was a romantic marriage. 

Chetwynd. 

Very rich, was he not % Had realised his estatesi 
in Russia before settling in France % 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 75 

Ferari. 

Most of them. It was said he had a mission to 
promote a French alliance with Kussia. 

Chetwynd. 

His estates were in the province of Yilnavitch, not 
far from Czarovna 1 

Ferari. 
I believe so. 

Chetwynd. 

Forsyth will want to paint her. Hasn't seen her, 
I suppose, yet. He is wild just now on some Russian 
subject. I have not seen him for a year ; met him 
yesterday. Stopped me and flung his unfinished 
picture at me as if we had only parted an hour before. 
" The very man I wanted to see," he said. " You 
were in Southern Russia during .the risings against 
the Jews ? " " Yes," I said. " I want to talk to you 
about Russia and the exile system and a lot of things. 
Come and see me; I am living in Yenice for the 
present : worried about a model that eludes me like a 
will-o' the- wisp." " May I bring a friend 1 " I asked. 
" Certainly, anybody ; good-bye for the present ! 
Yery glsui to see you again, old fellow ! " And away 
he went in search of his model. 



76 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Ferari. 
And you were in Bussia during the Jewish disturb- 
ances five years ago ? 

Chetwynd. 
Yes; happened to be in St. Petersburg on a 
mission for The Times ; got a military tip that some- 
thing was going on in the South, and was in time 
for the trouble in Elizabethgrad and the province of 
Yilnavitch. 

Ferari. 
The trouble culminated in Czarovna, did it not ? 

Chetwynd. 
I believe so. 

Ferari. 
Were you at Czarovna ? 

Chetwynd. 

Yes ; and you are the second Russian who has 
asked me the same questicm to-day. 

Ferari. 
Frenchman, but nHmporte. And the other ? 

Chetwynd. 
The famous Petronovitch, whom your Government 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 77 

has sent over with his lovely Princess to do honour 
to the King and make, if possible, a diplomatic check- 
mate to Germany. 

Ferari. 
Did he remind you of the affair at Czarovna ? 

Chetwynd. 

No; he received me so graciously, and was so 
unaffected and pleasant, that I ventured to remind 
him of our previous meeting, when I needed all my 
credentials, I think, to save my back. 

Ferari. 
Your back ? 

Chetwynd. 

Well, you see, he had a fancy for the whipping- 
block and the knout, and was inclined to resent my 
professional appearance on the scene. 

Ferari. 

The Russians don't like what you call the bull's-eye 
of the Press to be turned upon their great acts of 
justice, Mr. Chetwynd. 

Chetwynd. 
Justice ! 



78 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Eerari. 
Ah, I see you think that is a word they don't 
understand in Russia. 

Chetwynd. 

Not with this General Petronovitch as its inter- 
preter. Yet what a power he is ! He is fortunate in 
his marriage ; his trip to England, France, and Italy 
may be said to be his honeymoon, eh ? 

Ferari. 

So I am told. She is a beautiful woman, his wife, 
the Princess Ipponovna. But the match was more 
political than one of affection ; Bussian beauties are 
willing to sacrifice themselves for their country. 

Chetwynd. 
I thought she did not look happy. 

Enter h/wniedly Philip Forsyth. 

Philip. 

Ah, there you are ! How good of you to come so 
soon ! 

Chetwynd. 

\Shaki71g hands wa/rrrdy.^ Permit me, Philip, to 
present to you Colonel Maurice de Barsac. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 79 

Philip. 
I am glad to see you, sir. Any friend of Chet- 
^wynd's is a friend of mine. 

Ferari. 
Thank you, Mr. Forsyth. 

Philip. 

So Henshaw has made you welcome ! Well, I don't 
mind if I join you ; it is very hot to-day, and the 
•Ohetto is not too salubrious. 

Chetwynd. 
You are looking for your model among the Jews ? 

Philip. 

Yes ; among a race so persecuted I ought to find 
my ideal, but I don't. [i>ri7iA».] You are not a 
Russian, I hope ? 

Ferari. 

I have the honour to act as private secretary to 
the Countess Stravensky, who belongs to the Russian 
nobility. 

Philip. 
Then you believe in the severe virtues of the 



So BY ORDER OP THE CZAR 

fortre»( of Peter and Paul, and in administrative exile,, 
and the rest ? 

Fesasi. 
I am a Frenchman, and believe in liberty and the 
rights of man; bat, as the secretary of a great 
Ruflsian countess, I may not speak against Peter or 
Paul. 

Chetwynd. 

But you may show us your Russian picture all the- 
same. 

Philip. 

Your friend may regard it as disrespectful to his- 
Government. 

Febaki. 
My Government is France. 

Chetwynd. 
Not yet marching with Russia across the German^ 
frontier, so go ahead, dear friend. 

Febabi. 

I shall feel it an honour to achieve your confidence^ 
as M. Chetwynd desires. 

Philip. 
Very well ; I am most anxious to have Chetwynd's. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 8i 

opinion; he does not know how I have missed his 
encouragement and advice all this time, [^oes to 
door and ca^.] Henshaw ! 

ETdeir Henshaw. 

\Qive8 him heyJ\ Bring me the easel in from the 
alcove. 

[Henshaw wheels in large easel, unlocks lower 
part, which is padlocked, assists Philip to 
place it for the guests, then withdraws. 
May I act as showman? I will tell you what I 
want to paint, not what I have done. It is a group 
of prisoners on the march, attended by Cossacks of 
the Don and Tartar guards. The wiry steeds of 
the Cossacks and their tall lances break up the 
monotonous line of the travellers afoot, emphasising 
the crouching despondency of some and the defiant 
carriage of others among the forlorn crowd. In the 
foreground a prisoner has fallen by the way. He is 
young, and has collapsed from bodily fatigue. The 
one woman of the group, in the act of stooping to 
assist him, is thrust back with the butt of a trooper's 
rifle. She turns towards the soldier a mingled look 
of appeal and hatred. It is a beautiful face, stamped 
with a suffering that has no resignation in it. The 
eyes are sunken but full of fire. The low, well-knit 

6 



82 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

forehead is wrinkled with pain. The mouth is pursed 
into an expression of angry revolt. If ever the time 
for vengeance came, you should feel that this woman 
would not abhor the assassin's knife or the d3niamiter's 
shell ; and as to the captive whose physical strength 
is not equal to the spirit of the martyr, I trust 
you may be finding yourselves hoping that he will 
speedily be released from the living death to which 
his companions are journeying. 

Ferari. 
It is a fine picture ! 

Philip. 

No, sir ; a fine failure ; but I hope to get it right. 
You see, I thought it rather good until a week 
ago. At the Opera I saw a face I shall never 
forget. It was partially hidden by the box curtains 
that draped it, the neck being in shadow, the 
remainder of the figure hidden, a woman with the 
suffering of a century in her eyes — suffering and 
consuming passion, the pallid face of a prison, the 
tenderness of an angel warped into the lofty scorn 
of a Marie Antoinette with the murderous fire of a 
Charlotte Corday, an indescribable ?reature — the very 
woman I want for my model Do you know the story 
of Madame Lapukin ? It was in 1760; she was 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 83 

publicly flogged by order of the Empress, her tongue 
torn out, then cured of her wounds and sent to 
Siberia, beautiful through all. When I saw the 
woman at the Opera I seemed to see Madame Lapukin. 
I have since come to the conclusion that I was 
dreaming. I went round to the box — I knew the 
people ; they said no other lady had been in their 
box ; it seemed to me as if she had left some other 
part of the house to get a secret view of the Petrono- 
viteh box. Perhaps she hated the Princess ; a rival, 
who knows ? But I wish I had not seen her, or that 
I might see her again — she has spoiled my picture. 

Ferari. 

A very romantic story, and, despite your modesty^ 
sir, I must say a very noble and beautiful work. 

Chetwynd. 
No doubt about it ! 

Ferari. 

\Looking at his watch, and then looking out from 
windovj,'] The Countess Stravensky's gondola is 
coming round the#anal by the bridge. She is at 
leisure, I know. May I bring her to see your picture, 
Mr. Forsyth ? 



84 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Philip. 

If she will not order my arrest for painting such a 
subject. 

Ferari. 
Art is above politics. Have I your- permission ? 

Philip. 
I shall feel honoured, sir. 

Ferari. 

I shall bring her. — [^sicfe.] He shall find his 
model ; and the brotherhood a new disciple. 

\Exit Ferari. 

Chetwynd. 

This woman whom you cannot find has hit you 
hard. 

Philip. 

Dick, I sometimes feel that she is my fate, and that 
I am painting some coming incident in my own life. 

Chetwynd. 
And the Norcotts, Phil ; are we engaged ? 

Philip. % 

I have a rival, a young stockbroker, one Sam 
Swynford. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 85 

Chetwynd. 

A stockbroker ! Does Cupid wing his darts with 
scrip of Afrikanders, or incandescent gas % 

Philip. 

With all the feathers with which finance can wing 
the golden darts of Threadneedle Street. A good 
sort of fellow — rich, young, and a patron of the arts. 

Chetwynd. 
But 

Philip. 

Yes ; there it is ! Mrs. Milbanke, her widowed 
sister whom you admire, declares that Jenny loves 
me to distraction ; but I fancy the idea of the match 
is rather hers than Jenny's ; Mrs. Milbanke has a 
soul for art I do believe. Jenny thinks she has, and 
wants to please her sister. Swynford has the fasci- 
nation of wealth and leisure, and says he's a slave to 
beauty, more particularly to the beauties of Milbanke 
Lodge. Why, that is Mrs. Milbanke's voice. 

Chetwynd. 
Are they in Venice, then ? 

Philip. 
Oh, yes ; for the/efes. 



86 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Entei* Henshaw. 

Henshaw. 
Mrs. Milbanke. 

Enter Mrs. Milbanke, 'pretty^ weU-d/reased widow in 
half -mourning. She pauses coquettishly at door, 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
Anything dreadful going on ? 

Philip. 
Not at present. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
No model behind the screen ? 

« 

Philip. 

Not yet. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
Then we may come in ? 

Philip. 

Oh, yes ! 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
Dolly is with me. 

Philip. 
[Going to her.] My dear Mrs. Milbanke, come in ! 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 87 

Mrs. Milbaxee. 

[Entering.^ Dolly stayed to speak to the porter's 
wife. I thought I would reconnoitre ; you know what 
a shock we had when you were painting, " Venus 
Rising from the Sea," or something of the kind. 

Philip. 
Very sorry, but it was not my fault, you know. 

Mrs. Milbaxee. 

[Looking back,] Oh, here she is ! Come along ; 
there is nothing dreadful going on [sees Chetwyxd] 
— except Mr. Chetwynd. Why, Mr. Chetwynd, how 
do you do ? I have not seen you for years ! 

Chetwyxd. 

Months ; flattering, that to you they should seem 
years. 

Enter Dolly. She is received by Philip. 

Dolly. 

Jenny, you should not leave me in that way. 
There was a crowd to see some famous Russian 
countess alight from her gondola, and the porter's 
wife went off into hysterics of admiration. Oh, 
Philip, how do you do ? 



88 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Philip. 
I am very well, Dolly ; and you ? 

Dolly. 

I hate crowds that stare after a pretty woman. 
Must make her feel awfully vain ! 

Philip. 

You are not awfully vain, Dolly, and I have seen 
crowds stare at you. 

Dolly. 

You said they were only looking at my hat. Is 
this your new picture that bothers you so ? I thought 
it was to be a secret until it was finished. 

Philip. 
I fear it never will be finished, Dolly. 

Chetwynd. 
Oh, yes, it will ! Everything is finished at last. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 

\Who has been looking at picttM*e.] It is one of Mr. 
Forsyth's dreams of liberty, I suppose. 

Chetwynd. 
Rather a gloomy dream of liberty ! 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 89 

Dolly. 
Philip does have disagreeable dreams. 

Chetwynd. 

Not always ; you are looking charming this morn- 
ing. 

Dolly. 

But I am not one of his dreams. I am a very 
serious reality, am I not, Mr. Philip Forsyth, R. A. ? 

Philip. 
Not very serious, Dolly. 

Dolly. 

Now he is going to scold me for being frivolous^ 
Mr. Chetwynd shall protect me. 

Chetwynd. 
I shall be delighted. 

Mrs. Milbaxee. 

Oh, don't you trouble, Mr: Chetwynd ; Sam Swyn- 
ford will be here presently — he is Dolly's champion^ 
unattached. 

Chetwynd. 
Indeed, I thought he was very much attached. 



90 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
To me, yes, he is, and I am proud of him. 

Einier Henshaw vMh tea on tray, and bread a/nd butter. 

Oh, here you are ! I ventured, my dear Philip, 
to ask for some tea ; Henshaw is always so obliging. 

Philip. 
I hope so. 

[Henshaw places tea on table. 

And the cigarettes, Henshaw. 

[Henshaw places cigarette-box and elega/ni smaU 
lighted lamp on table, 

Mrs. Milbanke. 

Nothing so chic as afternoon tea in a bachelor's 
studio. And cigarettes ! Unforbidden fruit in Para- 
dise ! Shall I play the hostess ? 

Philip. 

I feared you were going to say the Eve. [AS^ee* Dolly 
looking at pictu/re, and goes to her.] 

Ohetwynd. 

Would o\ir first mother have touched that tree if it 
hfidn't been forbidden, I wonder ? 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 91 

Mrs. Milbanee. 

Why, of course not. Life is a continual scramble 
after the forbidden. [Pouring tea.] Do you take 
sugar ? Of course you do. [Puts in sugar,] 

Chetwynd. 

And yet a man might dare to dream of afternoon 
tea every day, with Mrs. Milbanke asking him if he'll 
take sugar. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 

If the dream came true, she would no longer be 
Mrs. Milbanke. 

Chetwynd. 
I suppose not ; that's the pity of it. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
You prefer the forbidden Paradise ? 

Chetwynd. 

No ; it would worry me to think of the inevitable 
angel with the two-edged sword. I would prefer a 
pleasant, well-secured freehold. And you ? 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
And me ! WeU, I must say you have a very sudden 
and original way of 



92 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Chetwynd. 

Pardon me, you anticipate ; I was only asking your 
opinion. 

Mrs. Milbaxke. 

Indeed ! It sounded serious ; but there, it is all the 
same. I should have reserved my defence, as the 
well-advised prisoner says. Won't you smoke ? 

Chetwynd. 

\Tdking cigarette, Mrs. Milbanke holding lamip while 
he lights it,] And you? Another question, you 
perceive. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 

' Still letting I dare not wait upon I would. No, 
thank you. When it was taboo I used to take a 
cigarette and hate it ; now that it is anybody's habit 
it is no longer mine. 

[They go aside, continuing conversation sotto 
voce, and stroUing to outlook upon ca/nal, 

Dolly. 

[Looking at picture, and speaking to Philip.] You 
don't think I appreciate your work, Philip? I am 
sure I try to do so. 

Philip. 

I am sure you do, dear. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 93 

Dolly. 

\Lo6king critically at pictv/re,^ Bather a 
mannish woman, isn't she ? 

Philip. 
Do you think so ? 

Dolly. 

The kind of woman that drives a motor and defies 
the police ! 

Philip. 
That was not quite my idea. 

Dolly. 

[Intent on picture, and not attending to Philip's last 
remark J\ Has to look like that because she's tragic, 
I suppose ? Jenny says you think her lovely. I like 
the young fellow best ; but oh, how ill he is ! If he 
were quite well, he would look something like you, 
Phil. [She steps aside to look into the pictv/re more 
^arefuUyi] 

Philip. 

[Aside, with a sigh,^ Sometimes I think it is I 
indeed — the whole thing a terrible forecast ! Does 
Fate beckon me, or is there a warning finger in this 
«dream of captivity ? 



94 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Dolly. 
\Lo6k%ng up.] What did you say, Philip ? 

Philip. 
The picture makes you sad ? 

Dolly. 

No ; but I feel very, very sorry for the prisoner who^ 
is sick; and the woman wants to help him, doesn't 
she ? I like her for that. Oh, I think it is a great 
work, Philip ! Mr. Chetwynd thinks so. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 

[Who has overheard last remark while making tea^ 
and dismissing Henshaw and handing cup to Dick.] 
Then it must be good if Mr. Chetwynd thinks so and 
is willing to put his words into print. 

Chetwynd. 

What I think and what I print are quite different- 
things, eh, Mrs. Milbanke? How well you know 
me ! What a pleasant thing it is to have a character 
that every one can read like a book — to wear one's 
heart on one's sleeve, as Shakespeare says. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
For daws to peck at. Then I'm a daw, Mr. Chet-^ 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 95 

wynd ! Thank you ! You thought I did not know 
my Shakespeare. Dolly, I think we will go now I 
have made a point — scored off Mr. Chetwynd. 

Chetwynd. 
Therefore stay and give him his revenge. 

Dolly. 

Jenny will not do that. Whenever she wins she 
leaves \ except once — it was at Monte Carlo, where 
we met Mr. Swynford last year, you know, Philip. 
Sam said when you lose leave off, when you win go 
on, and Jenny won — oh, I don't know how much. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 

[Fatronisingly.] You forget, Dolly dear, Mr. 
Forsyth has never been to Monte Carlo. 

Chetwynd. 

Really ! I wonder what a man can possibly find 
to talk about who has not been to Monte Carlo. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
Mr. Chetwynd, you have suddenly become disagree- 
able ; what is the matter ? I thought your Venetian 
letter in Monday's Times was very good ; didn't your 
chief care for it ? 



96 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Chbtwynd. 

I don't care for his opinion as long as I can please 
jou. 

Enter Henshaw. 

Henshaw. 
[Announces,] Mr. Sam Swynford. 

Enter Swynford. 

Philip. 

How do you do, Mr. Swynford ? [Shakes hands^] 
We were just speaking of you. 

Sam. 
Honoured, I'm sure ! 

Mrs. Milbanke. 

Mr. Swynford can tell you all about Monte Carlo. 
He knows how to break the bank. 

Sam. 

Knows how, but hates to worry the croupiers. 
Mr. Chetwynd, I declare ! Come to do the Jetes ? 

Chetwynd. 

Yes, Mr. Swynford. [To Mrs. Milbanke.] You 
see, Mr. Swynford also knows my little game, as he 
would call it. 



BY ORDER' OF THE CZAR ^ 97 

Sam. 

Should think I do ; believe IVe read every line you 
have written for years. 

Chetwynd. 
And yet I don*t write about the money market. 
You are too polite, Mr. Swynford. 

Sam. 

Not a bit of it ; I like your style. It's got what 
the critics call distinction. As for the money market, 
any fool can write about that, and a good many fools 
do. 

Chetwynd. 
And how are things, Mr. Swynford ? 

Sam. 

Lovely, Mr. Chetwynd. Bought largely for a 
falling market, sold well for the rise. I'm what 
you newspaper men call an optimist — believe in the 
British flag and all that ; things have gone up to the 
very figure I hoped they'd touch. 

Chetwynd. 
Then youVe made more money in a week than I 
shall earn in the next five years during which you 
will be reading me. 

7 



98 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Sam. 

Don't know your rates, Mr. Chetwynd, but I can 
put you on to a good thing if you like. 

Chetwynd. 

My dear friend, don't ; the last good thing nearly 
ruined me. 

Sam. 

Oh, I would take care of you ! \Aside to Dolly, 
who has come nea/r him dwring the conversation,^ 
Dolly, IVe bought that pearl necklace — got it in my 
pocket — ^told you I'd buy it if Union Pacifies and 
Egyptians went up. 

Dolly. 
Oh, you shouldn't, Sam ! 

Sam. 
And I want you to come and look at a diamond 
there is just oflp the square by that little street past 
St. Mark's. 

Dolly. 

You are too kind, Sam ; I really cannot accept it. 
Did you say you had the pearls in your pocket ? 

Sam. 
Yes ; \taking them out furtively] there they are ! 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 99 

They've got a sheen, Dolly, that's as lovely— if I 
dare say so — as your eyes. 

Dolly. 

I must not listen to you, Sam — certainly not here, 
under Mr. Forsyth's very roof. 

Sam. 

Oh, he's got a world of things to make his life 
happy ; I have only you. 

Dolly. 

Sam, how dare you! You haven't got me; if 
Jenny hears you say those things she will have a fit ! 

Sam. 

\Aside?^ Then she's likely to have several fits 
before the day's over ! I am on the war-path. 

Dolly. 

Sam, what do you mean ? Go away ! Don't you 
see that Philip is watching us ? 

Sam. 

No ; better occupied, listening to Chetwynd's com- 
pliments — fine scheme of colour, artistic reticence, 

masterly treatment 

[Mrs. Milbanke JoiW Dolly and Sam; they 
talk in dumb show. 



' - ^ J ' ' > ' 



loo BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Chbtwynd. 

[To Philip.] There is an incident much later than 
Madame Lapukin, Philip. A young girl was flogged at 
Czarovna by order of this very Petronovitch. She 
was betrothed to the rabbi, a young fellow of great 
learning from Moscow. They beat him to death in 
her presence and then, stripped to the waist, they gave 
her twenty blows of the knout. She bore it without 
a cry ; I saw her carried dying to the hospital. She 
was said to be beautiful, but I only saw her a wild, 
frantic creature, haranguing the mob ; her father 
was the richest Jew in the town ; they called her 
"Queen of the Ghetto"; her name was Anna 
Klosstock. 

Enter Henshaw. 

Henshaw. 

The Countess Stravensky and Colonel Maurice de 
Barsac. 

Philip. 

[^wc?e.] The woman of my dreams — the face at 
the Opera ! 

Ferari. 
Thi^ is Mr. Philip Forsyth. 



JBY ORDER OF THE CZAR loi 

Anna. 

It is a pleasure to make your acquaintance. 

Philip, 

[Fery wAwh ahaiyrhed^ Thank you ! \Lo6king 
round — stiU beuoildered.] May I present to you Mrs. 
Milbanke ? 

[Mrs. Milbanke hows. 
Miss Norcott. 

Dolly. 

[Boioing,] I saw you landing from your gondola, 
Countess ! What a crowd there was ! 

Anna. 
Yes : all Venice is out of doors to-dav. 

Philip. 

[SwYNFORD having pressed forward by Dolly's side,] 
Mr. Samuel Swynford. 

[SwYNPORD bows. 
And Mr. Eichard Chetwynd, of London. 

Anna. 
How do you do, sir ? We have met before. 

Chetwynd. 
In Paris, I think. 



102 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Anna. 
At the Russian Embassy. 

Chbtwynd. 
Yes ! — [-4«wfo.] By Jupiter, she is like the picture ! 

Mrs. Milbanke. 

\To Philip.] Why don't you introduce us to the 
Colonel % 

Philip. 

Colonel Maurice de Barsac, Mrs. Milbanke. 

[Fbrari h0V)8, 
Miss Norcott. 

[Dolly haws, 
Mr. Samuel Swynford. 

[Sam horuoB. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
Are you making a long stay in Venice, Colonel ? 

Febari. 

No, madame; unfortunately. 

\T'hAy go aside cmd talk, 

Anna. 

[To Philip.] This is the picture which has so 
much aroused the feelings of the Colonel ? - 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 103 

Philip. 
He was anxious you should see it. 

[Anna looks steadfastly at the picture, 

Dolly. 
\To Ferari.] Oh, I love Venice ; it is so chic ! 

Ferari. 
Do you go to the Countess's ball on Monday 1 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
The Countess Stravensky ? 

Ferari. 

Yes ; she receives the Princess Ipponova and her 
husband the Russian Ambassador, (general Petrono- 
vitch, 

« 

Dolly. 

We have only just had the honour to meet the 
Countess, as you know, and, therefore, are not invited. 

Ferari. 

Believe me, the Countess will feel greatly the 
honour to have you come. 

[They talk in dwmh show. 






104 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Anna. 

And [looking round at Chbtwynd cmd Philip] 
Ck>lonel de Barsac had the audacity to say this 
woman is like me — 

[Phil and Chetwynd look surprised. 
when I am angry. 

[Chetwynd smUes. 

Philip. 
As if you could be angry ! 

Anna. 

Oh, T can ! But what else do you think my daring 
secretary said ? That I ought to come to your assist- 
ance. 

Philip. 
My assistance ? 

Anna. 

The face of the- woman is only sketched in ? 

Philip. 

That is all ; I rubbed out the original and painted 
this from memory. 

Anna. 

After thinking you had seen something like it at 
the Opera? 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 105 

Philip. 
Yes. 

Anna. 

And you have been searching for your imaginary 
model ever since ? 

Philip. 
Yes. 

Anna. 

And what do you think of Colonel de Barsac's 
audacity when he says that I ought to compassionate 
your despair and sit to you — for that face ? 

Philip. 

Countess ! 

Chetwynd. 
The Colonel is a man of great discernment. 

Anna. 

Do you think so % 

Chetwynd. 
I do, indeed. 

Anna. 
Then you think this is something like me % 



io6 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Chetwynd. 
I thought so the moment you entered the room. 

Anna. 

And do you think I could put so much despair and 
sorrow into my face % 

Chetwynd. 

I should be grieved to think that you might- 
ever have cause to do so. 

Anna. 
But you, Mr. Forsyth, you do not speak ? 

Philip. 

I am too overjoyed to think that the Colonel has. 
made it possible for me to beg that you will give me 
a sitting. At least there is one side of that woman's 
character in your face. 

Anna. 
Yes? 

Philip. 
The womanly, the true, the pure, the angelic ! 

Anna. 
Ah ! when you do find your tongue, Mr. Forsyth, 
you know how to flatter ! But you forget that your 



By ORDER OF THE CZAR 107 

picture is hardly one that should appeal to me — 
politically, at least ; though, as the Colonel says, art 
is above politics, and one may sympathise with 
suffering whether it is deserved or not. Mr. Forsyth, 
if you think I can assist your great work, command 
me. 

[Ferari goes over to Anna, Dick, cmd Philip. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 

[To Dolly.] I think Forsyth has gone quite mad 
over this woman ; depend upon it, this is not their 
first meeting. Did you see that look he gave her ? 
[To Sam.] Sam, take Dolly home ! [Aside to Sam.] 
And I will now back your suit. 

Sam. 
Oh, my dear Mrs. Milbanke ! 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
I will make Chetwynd bring me. [Goes to PraLiF 
and the rest,] Good-bye, Mr. Forsyth ! 

[Bows to Anna, who smiles graciously and hows 
in return, 
Mr. Chetwynd, I will thank you to give me your 
arm. 

Chetwynd. 
With pleasure ! 



io8 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Mrs. Milbanee. 
Take me home. 

Chbtwynd. 

Certainly. \Bow8 to Countess.] G<XKi-moming, 
Countess. 

Anna. 
Good-day, sir. 

Dolly. 
Good-bye, Philip. 

PraLip. 
Oh, good-bye. Miss Norcott. 

Sam. 

[-isic^e.] That's all right ! Miss Norcott^ not 
Dolly. 

Dolly. 
I wish you good-day. Countess Stravensky. 

Anna. 

Good-day, my dear ! \Pui8 (mt her hand — Dolly 
shakes it.^ 

[Sam how8 in a general way to company. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 109 

Dolly. 
I declare I think she is charming. 

Anna. 

\To Philip.] A very sweet girl Miss Norcott ; quite 
an English type : and what complexions your English 
girls have ! * 

Philip. 
Yes. 

Anna. 

And when shall this sitting take place ? 

Ferari. 

Now ; a gracious action is a doubled courtesy when 
it is done quickly. 

Anna. 

Have I sufficient leisure ? 

Ferari. 
The only time at your disposal this week. 

Anna. 
Then be it so, Mr. Forsyth. 



no BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Philip. 

Oh, thank you ; you are too good ! Excuse me one 
moment. I will give my man some necessary instruc- 
tions. 

\EQdU 

Ferari. 
He is ours ! 

Anna. 

I will not have it so. 

Ferari. 

What, in these few minutes has he stirred your 
heart for the first time since Losinski ? 

ft 

Anna. 

He has the same far-seeing eyes, the same enthu- 
siasm of youth, the same 

Ferari. 

^Interrwpting^ The same hatred of the Russian, 
the same desire to emancipate our fallen race ! 

Anna. 

I pity him ; don't tempt his generous nature ; it 
would defeat him in his first action ; there is only one 
man in all the world who has your resource — ^your 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR in 

Ferari. 

Devotion to the cause and good fortune to have so 
able, so lovely, so true a lieutenant. Ask my life, 
Anna, it is yours; ask me to neglect the smallest 
opportunity for the cause and I am adamant; Forsyth 
is the man of men I want. It is as if the great 
Jehovah had directed our steps hither to find him ; 
he will cover our advance on St. Petersburg. I remind 
you of your oath, and when this sitting is over I have 
news for you — news of your father. 

Anna. 

\EagQrly^ The news we hoped for ? 

Ferari. 

All that we have hoped for is coming to pass ; but 
Losinski is still unavenged. 

Entex Philip with easely speaking to Henshaw. 

Philip. 
I am not to be disturbed under any circumstances. 

Ferari. 

Au revoir, Mr. Forsyth; I leave you with your 
model. 

[Eadt. 



112 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Philip. 

Will you kindly take this seat, Countess 1 — [iim(2e.} 
How my heart beats ! 

\He pl(Me8 chair for her on platform ; she lay» 
OfSide pelisse and hat. Philip arranges easef 
with blank canvas, 

Anna. 

[Seats herself^ Mr. Forsyth, I knew the prototype 
of your martyr. She was of the unhappy race of 
Israel, and they called her Queen of the Ghetto in 
the Russian village where she lived in innocence and 
peace. On the day of her betrothal she fell a victim 
to the lust and tyranny of the Russian Governor, saw 
her lover beaten to death, and was herself flogged in 
the public square, her father dragged to prison broken- 
hearted. [Rises,'\ Paint your picture, but give it a. 
companion — the gallows and the whipping-block, with 
a woman under the knout by the side of her dead 
lover ; the scene the market-place of her native 
village ; her crime that she had dared to denounce the 
Russian Governor who had ruined her life, murdered 
her betrothed, and condemned her father to Siberia I 
Let the gay world see what it is to be a Jew in Russia ; 
hang up the truth on the walls of your great 
Academy, and I, the most wretched, the most 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 113 

miserable of her sex, will be the model for your virgin 
martyr ! \Leamj8 against chair struggling with her 
emotion,^ 

Philip. 
My God, how you must have suffered ! 

Anna. 

[With passion and dignity,] And I will also stand 
for yoiu' spirit of Vengeance ! 



END OF ACT III. 



Act IV 

• 

Scene. — A room in the Fazzlo Palace, Venice, wTiere the 
Countess is residing. Handsomely but simply furnished ; 
frescoed work, hold historic scenes. Luxurious seat or 
divan, rugs on floor, a rich cabinet ; some palms. The 
gateway in c. open>s on stairway down to exit on canal. 
Entrances L. u. C. and R. 

[Countess, Dolly, Mrs. Milbanke, Philip, 
and Chetwynd discovered. The guests are 
bidding Countess good-night. The men are 
in evening dress. Tvjo liveried attendants 
stand on each side of entrance. The moon is. 
shining. A company of minstrels are singing/ 
" FunicidiJ* 

Swynford. 

Quite cockney guests, Countess ; the first to come, 
the last to go. 

Dolly. 
Sam! 

"S 



116 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

SWYNFORD. 

A most deUghtful evening, Countess; we hardly 
know how to thank you. 

Countess. 
The pleasure has been mine. 

Dolly. 

And what a lovely night ! And how beautifully 
they sing in that galagenti — as full of joy as a 
skylark on a spring morning. 

Countess. 

I don't know your skylark, my dear. Music is 
sad or joyful as the heart makes it. Everything is 
beautiful in Venice. 

Philip. 

\Who M stomding apart, watching Countess, and 
speaking aside to himadfi] And you above all ! The 
music makes my heart ache. 

[A soloist is singing verse of " Ftmiculi,** 
followed by chonbs, 

SwYNFORD. 

It is lovely ; the boat is by the palace steps. [Takes 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 117 

Dolly's arm in his, and draws her to the open gate- 
way.] 

[Mrs. Milbanke and Chetwynd are talking 
together on seat, leaving centre of stage 
to Philip and Countess. Philip moves 
towards her. 

Countess. 

[To Philip.] Your pretty countrywoman thinks 
the minstrels' song joyous ; and so it is to hearts that 
beat responsively. 

With laugh, and dance, and song, the day soon passes, 

^Full soon is gone. 

And so you have given her up ? 

Philip. 

Mr. Swynford was always her favourite — and as 
for me 

Countess, 

Hush ! You are not to tell me any more until to- 
morrow. Listen to the song : 

Hark ! The soft guitar I 
Funiculi I Funicula I 

Philip. 
You affect a joy you do not feel. 



ii8 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Countess. 
No, dear heart, I am madly happy to-night. 
There is a joy that stings ; one waits for it yeare and 
years ; and it may be hate, not love. 

« 

Philip. 

You do not give me your confidence, and you will 
not accept mine. 

Countess. 
I said to-morrow ; let the world stand still betwixt 
you and me till to-morrow. 

Philip. 
It is a lifetime until then. 

Countess. 
For your sake would to Grod it were ! 

Philip. 

Why do you say that? My sake counts nothing 
outside your life and happiness. 

Countess. 
You are v^ry rash. 

Philip. 
Is it rash to love you ? Is it rash to hope ? 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 119 

Countess. 
There is hope in the song ; let it be your lullaby 
until to-morrow. Hush ! your friends wish to say 
good-night. 

Philip. . 
And I am dying to say good-morrow. 

[Chetwynd arid Mrs. Milbanee have risen; 
Chetwynd takes up light cloak and places it 
round her shoulders, 

Chetwynd. 
No, it is not cold; but the cloak becomes you. 
And here are our gondoliers. I hear them at the 
quay. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
What a beautiful moon ! 

Chetwynd. 
Nowhere so beautiful as at Venice — and I have 
seen her soft sweet majesty in almost every land and 
on almost every sea. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
What a traveller you have been ! 

Chetwynd. 
But there is another moon I know nothing of, Mrs. 



120 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Milbanke — Jenny — I must call you Jenny, if you 
snub me for it. 

Mrs. Milbanke. 

If I had ever snubbed you in earnest you wouldn't 
dare to call me Jenny now, nor should I call you 
Dick. 

Chetwynd. 

My darling ! That other moon is not made of 
green cheese; it is called the honeymoon — where 
shall we spend it ? 

Mrs. Milbanke. 
This is my first visit to Venice. 

Chetwynd. 

Then we'll celebrate our happiness on a second trip, 
eh ? May I say owr happiness ? 

Mrs. Milbanke. 

Is that your subtle way of asking if I love you 
Is anybody looking ? 

Chetwynd. 
No ; they are all engaged, like ourselves. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR I2I 

Mrs. Milbanke. 

Kiss me, Dick. 

[Chetwynd embraces her^ 

SWYNFORD. 

Here's our gondola. Come, Dolly ! 

Dolly. 
Grood-night again, dear Countess. 

Countess. 

[Tw^nirvg to her.] Good-night, sweetheart. Think 
of me in your happiest remembrances of Venice. 

Dolly. 

Indeed I will ; I have no happier remembrances. 
Good-night. 

[Countess kisses her, 
[Eocit, dmjon steps, Dolly arid Swynford. 

Chetwynd. 

[Coming forward with Mrs. Milbanke.] And here^ 
is our fairy boat, with a fairy lamp in the prow 
\loohing down on ca/nal from gates] in honour of it& 
goddess. [To Countess.] Good-night, most kind 
hostess. 



122 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Countess. 
Good-night, most gallant guest. \He kisses her 

Mrs. Milbanke. 

Grood-night, Countess. I hope you will honour my 
poor receptions when you come to town. 

Countess. 
[Shaking hcmds,] Thank you very much. 

Chetwynd. 
You came with us, Philip. 

Philip. 
Two's company. I will follow you. 

Countess. 

No, indeed you will not, Monsieur Misanthrope. 
You will go with your friends. — [-isicfe.] Go, if you 
love me! Come to me to-morrow, early. [Philip 
bends over her hamd, kisses i<.] Good-night, then. 

[Eodt, all but Countess. 
[To Servants.] See to the fastenings of the lower 
gates. 

[Servants make silent gestures of assent, and 
exit after the guests. 
\Looking off, as music of " Funicidi," wMch had 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 123 

-died away^ is now heard again J\ A fitting song for 
such a night ! 

With laugh, and dance, and song, the day soon passes, 

Full soon is gone. 
For mirth was made for joyous lads and lasses 

To call their own. 
Listen ! Hark ! The soft guitar I 

Funiculi I Funicula I 

\Going towards exit L.] Poor Philip ! To-morrow 
he shall know all. How he will hate me ! [At 
door of exit.] To-night retribution, justice ! To- 
morrow ! Ah, God ! There is no to-morrow for 
Anna Klosstock. 

[Exit. 
[The music of " Funiculi " chorus swells out 
ai}d ceases. 

Enter r., hy arch-like doorway, Petroski and Beppo, 
gondoliers. They close gate on Countess, and 
cover with shutters, which they fasten with bar. 

Petroski. 

[Goes to doors R. and l., opens and closes cautiously, 
looks round room,.] It is time Signor Ferari arrived. 

Beppo. 
[Looks at watch.] Not quite. [/S'lte.] 



124 ^y ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Petroski. 

\Sit8 cross-legged on chair opposite Beppo.] You 
like to be back again in Venice ? 

Beppo. 
It is the only city, and I was bom here. 

Petkoski. 

One more excursion to St Petersburg and your 
service will be finished ; then you can come home 
for good. 

Beppo. 
If I am not here for good already. 

Petroski. 

You don't think the business of to-night will be 
successful ? 

Beppo. 
I doubt ! 

Petroski. 

After the business of to-night, all Europe will 
acknowledge the power of the Brotherhood ; it only 
needs the victory to follow in St. Petersburg to 
make a breach in the walls of Tyranny big enough 
for the army of Freedom to march through. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 125 

Beppo. 
And be captured to a man. 

Petroski. 
Ah, you don't know the resources of our Countess. 

Beppo. 

Speak lower ! I worship our leader, that is why I 
fear. 

Petroski. 

I worship our great cause only, and that is why I 
neither doubt nor fear. 

Enter YEKABifrom R. He is dressed as in First Act, 
representing his own person, Ferari the Jew. 

Ferari. 

[Addressing Beppo.] General Petronovitch awaits 
you by the Church of Saint Maria Formosa ; raise 
your right hand as you approach ; he will acknow- 
ledge the signal by descending the steps ; it is the 
wish of the Countess that he should come here 
incognito : he will wear a grey cloak over an undress 
uniform. Biing him to the private landing by the 



126 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

western corridor [Potn^iw^] — the way you came^ 
Use your own gondola, Beppo, not the Countess's. 

[Beppo and Petroski how and retire r. 
Ferari doaea the door after them and d/rame 
portiere over it, Ferari then rings gong on 
table twice. 

Enter Olga Marasoff, middte-aged woman, severe in 

dress and mamver. 

Where is Ivan ? 

Olga. 
My husband is on guard at the water-gate. 

Ferari. 
The gate is locked ? 

Olga. 
As you ordered, since seven. 

Ferari. 
Ivan stands within imseen ? 

Olga. 

Yes. 

Ferari. 
Have you heard of your sister lately ? 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 127 

Olga. 

They have starved her to death in the prison of 
St. Paul. 

Ferari. 

She is dead ? 

Olga. 
Yes. 

Ferari. 
You lost your father in the massacre of Czarovna % 

Olga. 
You know it. 

Ferari. 

Olga Marasoff, within an hour you will be avenged; 
before the year is out, Ivan shall help to dictate 
terms of peace to the Czar himself, in his own 
palace — or 

Olga. • \ 

I know the rest ; what would you now ? 

Ferari. 

Tell the Countess I am here, and keep the outer 
corridor barred until she returns to her chamber to 
dress, 

\Exit Olga, 



128 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR. 

It is good to probe the old wounds when vengeance 
is afoot. You were right, dear dead Count Stravensky, 
when you told the butcher of Czarovna he would live 
to regret. Stravensky was a good judge of women, 
when he selected Anna to be his instrument. What 
a history ! From the scaffold, mutilated, dying, to 
the wedding at that bedside in Paris, and the dying 
words, ** Under the shelter of my name, use my wealth 
in the cause of the Brotherhood and the Grod of Mercy 
and Justice, and the angel of patriotism be with 
you.'' 

Enter Anna in rich tea-gown. 

Countess. 

Talking to yourself, Andrea Ferari, for lack of 
company, eh? 

Ferari. 
I had the company of many thoughts. 

Countess. 
Yes ? You sent for me. 

Ferari. 

Only to say that the great General Petronovitch, 
Ambassador to Italy, is on his way to n^eet the 
Countess Stravensky. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 129 

Countess. 
She is prepared to receive him. 

Ferari. 
She remembers how he received her % How after 
beating to death her betrothed, he handed her over to 
the executioner ? 

Countess. 

I am not likely to forget ; I remembered it at the 
Queen's ball last night. When he pressed my hand 
in the dance, I gave him the assignation he sought 
for. 

Ferari. 

He is true to his first love, though he has long 
since forgotten Anna Klosstock. 

Countess. 
In Heaven's name do not degrade the sweet word 
** love " with the awful memories you seem anxious to 
recall. 

Ferari. 

I desire to recall all that is bitter in your memory, 
Anna — your love, your betrothal, your exiled father, 
your degradation ; in spite of which I could stoop and 
kiss the hem of your garment ; to me you are an 

9 



130 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

angel, and if I were not old enough to be your father, 
or if I had been made for what women call love, I 
would have sought from you the diviner right of 
authority over you than that which belongs to me as 
commander of the Brotherhood. 

Countess. 

My dear friend, let us leave sentiment for a more 
fitting time : our hands are joined in work that must 
ever divide our hearts. What time is it ? 

Ferari. 

A few minutes to the time when your guest should 
arrive. 

Countess. 
Leave me, Ferari ; have no fear that I will not play 
my part in the act of justice to which we are called. 

Ferari. 

My post is here [pointing to door]. The signal 
is with me. 

[Eodt L. 

Countess. 

Now, all ye ministers of hell, that lent your aid to 
the butcher of Czarovna, aid me now. Help me with 
your devilish arts, make me cruel as the knout, let 



BV ORDER OF THE CZAR 131 

my words bite into his soul ; and, O dread Fate, that 
gives him to my power, let me pronounce his doom 
and fear not. \8he reclines upon an ample handsome 
divan. Fans herself with large featlwr fan, ] 

Enter L. Beppo and Petroski. They stand one each 
side of the door^ and how as Petronovitch, 
wrapped in grey cloak, enters. Then they both 
retire, closing door, Anna rises from, cov>ch. 

Draw the portiere, dear General. 

[Petronovitch draws portiere, and Anna goes 
up to door R., and draws portiere over that. 
I desire to maintain your incognito. General. 

Petronovitch. 

My most kind and sweet Countess, you are discre- 
tion itself, and your gondoliers might be trained agents 
of the Russian police ; I have not even heard the 
sound of their voices. 

Countess. 

Nay, rather say I am very weak, General, but even 
woman's strength is weakness. 

Petronovitch. 
Her strength lies in her generosity. [Eaises her 
hand to his lips.^ 



132 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Countess. 
And man's strength ? 

Petronovitch. 
Is in his appreciation. \LayB aside his cloak and 
sword.^ 

Countess. 
You have made these affairs of the heart a study ? 

Petronovitch. 
What else in life is worth serious attention ? 

Countess. 

Oh, there are other matters of moment ; you must 
have felt them in the exercise of your noble profession 
many a time. 

Petronovitch. 

Never as keenly as the natural interest a man 
feels in a beautiful woman, especially when she grants 
him the delicious privilege you have granted me. 
[He sits by her side, and steals arm about her, which 
she gently resists,^ 

Countess. 

But you are a great general, sir ; you must in your 
time have taken part in many heroic scenes ; your 



BV ORDER OF THE CZAR 133 

victory over the Kurds, for instance, was magnifi- 
cent. 

Petronovitch. 
I prefer my victory of to-night. 

Countess. 

Your triumphant march through Central Asia is 
historic. 

Petronovitch. 

My meeting with the Countess Stravensky at 
Venice will be longer remembered. 

Countess. 

Tell me, Greneral, what was your first great achieve- 
ment in the service of our good father the Czar % 

Petronovitch. 

Great achievements, my dear Countess, become 
small when the victor talks of them. \Hi8 arm now 
around her,] 

Countess. 

But a woman loves to hear her hero recount his 
victories. Don't you remember that it was with the 
eloquent tongue of the soldier that Othello won 
Desdemona : and it was here, on one of these balconies, 



134 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

that the Moorish commander came and held friendly 
and romantic converse with the maiden and her 
father ? 

Petronovitch. 

And it was here, also, I presume, where she 
fell a victim to the black man's jealousy. If I had 
been Othello — for your sake I would even have been 
black — and you had been Desdemona, I should have 
understood you better, should have loved and trusted 
you. I would never have been jealous; I would 
never have killed you, except with kindness ; and then 
we would have crossed the dark river together ! 

Countess. 

My dear General, \turning her eyes fuU upon hirn] 
if all this be true, you are indeed in love. 

Petronovitch. 
I am, indeed, most truly, most devotedly. 

Countess. 

[Her head upon his shoulder, "^ He didn't like the 
parting with his daughter, that old Venetian. I had 
a father once — have now, somewhere in the world ; 
and I would give my life to embrace him once again ! 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 135 

Petronovitch. 
You are in a very reflective mood. 

Countess. 

Yes, the mood comes with thinking of your victories 
and the shadows that follow their sunshine. You 
triumphed once, did you not, most completely and 
with great honour in suppressing the rising against 
the Jews, in the province of Vilnavitch ? Ah, that 
was kind of you, to protect with your strong Russian 
hand those poor Hebrew people ! You know, of 
course, that I am a Jewess ? 

Petronovitch. 

No other race could give to the world so beautiful 
a creature. 

Countess. 

It is the nature of love to flatter, and you do not 
care to talk of your generous deeds. Our Russian 
fellow sulDJects had a fit of madness, had they not, in 
those days against my people? At a place called 
Czarovna, if I remember the name rightly, they had 
made for themselves, as far as possible in Russia, 
what may be called a paradise. It was as if their 
Father Abraham had brought them at last to some- 
thing like a land flowing with milk and honey. 



136 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Petronovitch. 

Yes, I believe so. [Ahsorhed in his admiration of 
the Countess, whom he presses closer to his side,^ 

Countess. 

You helped the poor people, and put down the 
insurrection — is it not so ? 

Petronovitch. 

Well, not quite that, I fear. I was the Czar's 
officer ; I tried to do my duty. 

Countess. 
Yes, you would, dear Greneral, and in so doing show 
your appreciation of the fine character and domestic 
instincts of the Czarovna Jew — I am sure you did. 
It was like you, like E.ussia, like our Holy Father the 
Czar ! Do you remember the name of Klosstock ? 
My dear dead Count Stravensky mentioned him to 
me as a very worthy man : I think he had some 
business dealings with him. 

Petronovitch. 
No, I don't remember \a little out of patience with 
the direction in which the Covi^tess forces the conversa- 
tion^ — it is so long ago, and so many events have 
happened since. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 137 

Countess. 

You do not care to talk of these things ; I am very 
sorry. [aS'^ draws herself from him^ and no longer 
responds to his embraces,^ 

Petronovitch. 

My dear Countess, I care to talk of anything that 
may interest you. Believe me, I have no other desire 
than to be your slave. 

Countess. 

There was a young woman in Czarovna — I think it 
must be talking of Desdemona and her father that 
has made me recall some strange circumstances which 
came to the knowledge of my dear dead husband, 
Count Stravensky — they called her "Queen of the 
Ghetto," do you remember ? 

Petronovitch. 

Yes, I think I do ; but, as I said before, it is so long 
ago, and so many things have happened in the time 
that has passed between then and now. 

Countess. 
Oh, no, it is not so long ago, my dear Greneral — ^not 



138 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

to her, at least, nor to her father, nor to the rabbi to 
whom she was betrothed ! To her \ri8ing and put- 
ting aside his ai*m\ it is as yesterday. To her the 
agony is as keen this moment as it was then. \She 
faces him calmly^ hut with flashing eyes as he rises to 
his feet ; her hand is busy toith a diamond huckle at 
her throat.^ Do you remember how you kept your 
promise to that woman ? Do you remember the base 
proposals she resented ? Do you remember how you 
undertook to release her lover? Do you remember 
how you outraged your promised protection — how you 
slew her lover, and left the cruel marks of your 
savage nature upon her, body and soul ? You do — I 
see you do ! 

[Petronovitch turns pale as she speaks, steps 
hack from her as if to receive the spring of 
some wild animal. Unclasping the diamond 
huckle, she flings aside her robe and discloses 
the peasa7it costume of Czarov7m, and stands 
before him his victim, Anna Klosstock. 

Ferari comes from L., and takes up Petronovitch's 
siooi'd and belt; Petroski and Beppo yrom R., 
in quiet, orderly fashion, Beppo and Petroski 
are both armed. They take up positions as 
guards. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 139 

Countess. 

You are the prisoner of the Brotherhood. My 
mission is not one of revenge, but justice. You pro- 
nounced the judgment upon the Babbi Losinski ; you 
pronounced the judgment upon Nathan Klosstock, my 
dear father ; first ruining your victim beyond repair, 
you pronounced the judgment upon Anna Klosstock. 
You thought her dead. She lives to pronounce the 
judgment upon you, not in her own name, but in the 
name of Liberty. It is death ! 

Petronovitch. 
Give me my sword and the rights of a soldier. 

Ferari. 

You shall be honourably dispatched, but surely 
your hour has come. 

Petronovitch. 
What would you do ? 

Ferari. 

E-emove you hence to the place of execution, and 
after your death, make your body free of the Adriatic 
— a merciful ending compared with the knout and a 



140 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

grave of quick-lime to which you condemned the 
Babbi Losinski. 

[Pbtronovitch moves as if to resist or raise an 
ala/rm ; upon which Bkppo and Peteoski 
cover him with revolvers. 

Resist until we give you the right to fight for your 
life, and you die where you stand. Call for assistance 
and your voice will be heard no more beyond these 
walls than the cries of your victims of Czarovna were 
heard against the beat of your merciless drums. 

Petronovitch. 
Russia will know how to avenge me. 

Countess. 

Russia has a long and cruel arm, but the victory is 
not always to the sti*ong. 

Petronovitch. 

[Viciously,] Yet I recall a lover's victory which 
Anna Klosstock still remembers. [Scoffingh/.] 'Twas 
A bridal your Losinski never dreamt of. 

[Anna covers her face with her hands, 

Ferari. 
[Who stands with hai\d on his knife as Anna 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 141 

covers her face, now draws it and, falls upon Petrono- 
viTCH.] Ruffian, die with that foul taunt upon 
your lips ! \_Stahs him.] 

[Petronovitch falls into the wrms of Beppo 
and Pbtroski, who fling him dead upon the 
floor. 

END OF ACT IV 



During part of closing scene distant music of 
" Funiculi '* heard. 



Act V. 

.Scene I; — The Siberian Frontier. On cloth, in distance, the 
Frontier Pillar, which is a ijr eminent feature of next 
scene. In wing, easily moved (drawn off for change) 
tail of tara7itas — a Russian carriage — and close by (jalso 
placed to be easily drawn off) a wood fire in brazier, with 
samavor (iirn and tea-kettle) steamiiig. 

Eerari as Russian General, undress uniforrfi, with 
large cloak. He is sitting on log, smoking and 
drinking tea. By his side Russian courier, his 
servant OssiP. 

Ferari. 
Well, Ossip, who is the fellow ? t 

OssiP. 

It is the Englishman we passed on the road, Ex- 
•cellency. 

Ferari. 

I thought so. The fellow whose carriage broke 
•down ? 

143 



144 BV ORDER OF THE CZAR 

OssiP. 
Yes, Excellency. 

Ferabi. 
Is he coming this way % 

Ossip. 
Yes, Excellency. 

Ferari. 

Thought he'd be too impatient to wait until they 
patched up the broken wheel. Go, Ossip, and find 
out what section of the exile gang is expected first at 
the frontier. 

Ossip. 
Yes, Excellency. 

\EQdi Ossip. 

Ferari. 

M. Chetwynd won't know me, of course. Hardly 
know myself sometimes. 

Enttr Dick Chetwynd. 

Good-day to you, sir. 

Chetwynd. 
And to you. Colonel. By the way, are you the 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 145 

polite gentleman who saw my wretched carriage break 
down, and would not come to my assistance ? 

Ferari. 

I pride myself on my politeness, sir ; but I am not 
a colonel, M. Chetwynd. 

Chetwynd. 

Is it because you know me, Lieutenant, that you 
lay aside the politeness upon which you pride your- 
self, and treat me with incivility ? 

Ferari. 

There was a freight bivouac close by and another 
disabled carriage besides your own, and it might not 
have been well for any one to have witnessed our 
meeting. Even a Russian general must be circum- 
spect, if he would retain the confidence of his Imperial 
Majesty. You had an old man with you ? 

Chetwynd. 

Picked him up an hour or two ago ; he has gone 
forward on foot. 

Ferari. 
His destination % 

Chetwynd. 

The Frontier Pillar. 

10 



146 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Ferari. 
You are alone ? 

Chetwynd. 
Yes. Any other questions ? 

Ferari. 

One other. \Iii8mgI\ Don't you know me? 
[Flinging doak aside.] 

Chetwynd. 
By Jove, yes ! De Barsac ! 

Ferari. 

[Bows,] At your service, monsieur. I followed 
you from St. Petersburg to Moscow, from Moscow to 
Nijni Novgorod, thence down the Volga, then by 
the Ural Mountains railway, and hither by waggon. 
What a journey ! [aS'i^s.] 

Chetwynd. 
And your object ? 

Ferari. 
Similar to your own. 

Chetwynd. 
I am here to rescue Philip Forsyth, who is en route 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 147 

for the salt-mines of Siberia. You remember the 
young artist % 

Ferari. 

Perfectly. My mission is to — \hA8itaU8\ — have a 
cup of tea ? 

Chetwynd. 
Thank you. 

Ferari. 
^Offering silver case,] Cigarette ? 

Chetwynd. 
Thank you. [Takes cigarette.] 

Ferari. 

[Pouring out tea,] Your genuine Muscovite is not 
content with a slice of lemon in his tea — \jpours from 
fla^sk] — he takes a little brandy. 

Chetwynd. 

[Taking tea from Ferari.] Your genuine Mus- 
covite is wise ; his tea is better than his vodka. 

Ferari. 

If it is not an impertinence, may I ask if Madame 
Milbanke is still the channing widow ] 



148 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Chetwynd. 

Madame Milbanke is still charming, though she is 
no longer a widow. I shall do myself the pleasure 
of sa3dng that you inquired after her. She came 
with me to St. Petersburg. 

Ferari. 
And M. Swynford and Mademoiselle Dolly ? 

Chetwynd. 

They travelled with us ; almost a honeymoon trip, 
I may say. 

Ferari. 
That is good ; I congratulate you, monsieur. 

Chetwynd. 
And the General de 

Ferari. 
Barsac, monsieur. 

Chetwynd. 

Is the General still anything more to the Countess 
Stravensky than simply her Secretary ? 

Ferari. 
J^othing more. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 149 

Chetwynd. 
And her ladyship ? 

Ferari. 
Is travelling under another name. 

Chetwynd. 
And who is the new lord and master ? 

Ferari. 
You don't understand, then, who Anna Klosstock isl 

Chetwynd. 

Only that she was one of the prisoners taken with 
my misguided friend, Philip Forsyth. 

Ferari. 

You gave me in Venice your word of honour to 
respect my confidence. 

Chetwynd. 

Do you remind me of it to question my good 
faith ? 

Ferari. 
No ; to tax it further. 



ISO BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Chetwynd. 
Your trust is sacred. 

Ferari. 

When the Countess Stravensky left Venice, it was 
to carry out a great enterprise in St. Petersburg, 
an operation [lowers voice] that might have trans- 
formed Kussia and been a blessing to every Jew in 
Christendom. 

Chetwynd. 
[Looking round,] Then she was not Orthodox 1 

Ferari. 

Don't fear ; my man, Ossip, is on guard, and not 
a soul hereabout undei-stands English, even if they 
could overhear us. Madame was not all you thought 
her — nor T, monsieur. Well, the enterprise failed; 
the police were ahead of us. The Countess Stravensky 
entered Russia with her faithful steward and 
secretary — myself ; but for the operation in question 
she resumed the garb of her youth, and the name 
of her whom you saw flogged at Czarovna, Anna 
Klosstock. 

Chetwynd. 

By God ! Is that so? Then Anna Klosstock is 
the Countess Stravensky ? 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 151 

Ferari. 
To you and me, but Anna Klosstock only to the 
Russian police. It was a wilful, womanish thing to 
lay aside her rank and title and risk all as Klosstock's 
daughter ; but she was never the same clear-headed 
business-like woman after she met your friend, Philip 
Forsyth. She was arrested, with Forsyth, Petroski, 
Beppo, and six others — a terrible blow to the 
Brotherhood. Detailed for other work, I remained 
at my hotel as Colonel Maurice de Barsac, the secre- 
tary and man of business of the Countess, supposed 
to be travelling in Europe. I was legally endowed 
with all her powers and authority. As her sole 
representative, and with ample means, I won my 
way to favour — became an honorary officer of the 
Guard. Where I could not coax assistance, I 
bought it, and have wielded the Stravensky power 
ostensibly for the Countess, but in truth for Anna 
Klosstock and for her father. It has been a delicate 
and difficult business, but the Stravensky wealth is 
great. It was not my cue to say a word for the 
young enthusiast, Forsyth, having learnt that power- 
ful English influence was being exercised in his 
favour. After to-day, I shall begin to work for 
Beppo, and Petroski, and the rest — one by one I shall 
win them back, if not to duty, at least to home and 



152 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

family ; they have served their term to patriotism. 
Happily, the police had no idea of the importance of 
the conspiracy ; but they knew enough to give ample 
excuse for adding to the exiled population of Siberia. 

Chetwyxd. 
And who are you, then, after all ? Was De Barsac 
a disguise? 

Ferari. 

\B.ising^ and imitating old man,] Do you remember 
old Grunstein the banker ? That was a disguise. 

Chetwynd. 
The old Jew who got off my dispatches to London ? 

Ferari. 
The same. 

Chetwynd. 

By Jupiter, you deserve your successes, whatever 
they are ! 

Ferari. 

It was the same old Jew who the next day got the 
right to visit the hospital whither they had carried 
Anna Klosstock, all but dead of the knout ; the same 
old Jew who, six months later, had her officiaUy killed 
and officially buried —skill, audacity, and roubles will 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR I5S 

do anything in Russia. I carried off the prisoner 
under another name, and delivered her to the charge 
of the Count Stravensky in Paris. Time, good doctors, 
kindness, and a superb physique did the rest. Twa 
years ago, on his death-bed, the Count married Anna 
Klosstock, endowing her with his enormous wealth 
and his patriotic mission. 

Chetwynd. 
And the young woman whom I saw flogged at 
Czarovna ? 

Ferari. 

Was the Countess who sat to your friend, the 
young artist in Venice. 

Chetwynd. 

Great heavens ! Then the cruel Governor Petrono- 
vitch ? 

Ferari. 

Was executed at Venice, by a commander of the 
Brotherhood known as Ferari the Jew ! The 
Brotherhood has its reverses, but it has its triumphs 
also. Let me not boast, however, in presence of that 
silent landmark [pointing to piUar] consecrated to 
blighted hopes and broken hearts. No other bound- 
ary post in all the world's history has witnessed so- 



154 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

much human suflFering. Since the century began 
more than half a million exiles have said good-bye to 
their native land in presence of the Pillar of Tears. 

\Fea8a7\Jt8^ me7i and women, cross stage at hack, 
some with baskets. 

Chetwynd. 
And the people now passing ? 

Ferari. 

They are peasants and others, who have walked or 
ridden miles to cheer their good-byes with gifts, and 
food, and kindly words. 

Enter Klosstock, his heard lohite, gaberdine dress. 

Chetwynd. 

Ah, my friend, you have come ! \To Ferari.] This 
is the fellow-traveller you spoke of; joined us an 
hour or two ago. 

Ferari. 
[-isicfe.] Klosstock ! Sooner than I hoped. 

[Continuing.^ He has been liberated, and comes 
to find his daughter ; an example of Russian 
clemency. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 155 

Ferari. 
Olemency ! Yes. 

Klosstock. 

I am content, if only once more I can hold her 
iaand in mine. 

Ferari. 

\Tdkinghim aside, while Chetwynd sits and smokes.^ 
Old man, do you remember one Ferari — Andrea 
Ferari. 

Klosstock. 
God forgive him — yes ! 

Ferari. 
Do you forgive him ? 

Klosstock. 
With all that is left of my broken heart. 

Ferari. 

He has devoted every moment of his life, since you 
were parted, to Anna's service. 

Klosstock. 
God bless him ! 



156 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Ferari. 
God has been good to him. 

Klosstock. 
Praise His holy Name ! 

Ferari. 

Do you know what happened after your arrest at 
Czarovna ? 

Klosstock. 
No. 

Ferari. 
[Aside,] Thank God for that ! 

Klosstock. 
Only that I never saw her again, — neither her, nor 
the rabbi, nor Moses Grunstein, nor any friend or 
neighbour. 

Ferari. 
You have forgotten me ? 

Klosstock. 

I have forgotten everything, but the face of my 
dear Anna. 

Ferari. 
[In whisper.] I am Ferari ! 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 157 

Klosstock. 
\Looh8 at Aim.] Fou ? 

[Distant chant heard — a wild kind of vocal 
march. Ferari and Klosstock listen; 
Chetwynd Joiris them. 

t[Eaising his haTids.] Moses and the Prophets! It 
is the Song of the Children of Israel ! 

Ferari. 

[Removin/g his cap.^ The cry of the captives to the 
Lord of Hosts ! 

Enter Ossip. 

Ossip. 

[Addressing Ferari.] Excellency, it is the Jewish 
contingent from Moscow. 

Ferari. 

Forward, then, to meet them. [To Klosstock.] 
Thy daughter Anna is with them. 

Klosstock. 

[With much emotion,^ Sustain me, O Lord, in my 
joy, as Thou hast preserved me in mine adversity ! 

[Exit. 

End of Scene. 



158 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Scene II. — The Siberian Boundary Post, On haokcloth forett 
treesj hroion leaves of late autumn^ tome trees nearly hare. 
Sunset. Waggons at hack and in wings^ ahout tohich are- 
a number of men and women singing an old Israelitish 
hymn. 

Woman. 

Good-bye, father, mother ! Oh, good-bye ! [Kisaea- 
Post, aiid falls by its aide.] 

A Man. 

Farewell, friends, home, life ! Farewell ! 

[Other groups comhig on loith food a/nd gifts,. 
Xear a waggon at bach, fire amd urns; 
peasants making tea ; prisoners receiving it jT 
most of them hampered in their movements- 
by chahis. Cossack and other giuj/rds on 
duty. A pathetic scene, but made picturesquCy 
and tvith touches of cheerfvJ/ness in it. Aha- ■ 
S7iatclies of singing offaiid on. 

In foreground^ group of men, Beppo and Petkoski 
promi^ient. Some reclining ; Beppo a/ic? Petbosei 
on logs or baggage. Beppo and one or two othera^ 
smoking. 

Beppo. 
Happiness and misery's only a question of degree ;, 



£y ORDER OF THE CZAR 159 

it's heaven after hell to be allowed a good rest and a 
drink, and to have a talk. 

Petroski. 

Yes, and a smoke ; they sweeten the Boundary 
Pillar to that extent, anyhow. He's a good deal of a 
brute, this commander Karazoflf; but rations with 
wine and tobacco's a luxury that makes up for a few 
prods by the way. 

[Man s&i^es refreshments; peasants^ too^ a/re 
going among prisoners, watchfully surveyed 
by Cossa^ck and other guards, 

Beppo. 

[Drinking.] Your health, dear Countess ; it's your 
sweet influence that gives us this, I'll be sworn. 

Petroski. 
A wonderful woman ! God bless her ! 

Beppo. 

[In lower voice.] Just like a woman to put on her 
maiden dress and assume her maiden name when the 
hour for vengeance had come. 

' Petroski. 

And like our shrewd Ferari to use the other in 
her behalf and ours. 



i6o BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Beppo. 

A mistake, for all that. Sometbiog to do with 
sentinieiit ; sentiment's no good in our work ; better 
if she'd never met the Englishman ; good fellow, 
plucky too, but no good to its. 

Petroski. 
As it turned out. Whei-e is he, by the way % 

Philip. 

[Coming on sloivly towards tlvem.^ You are looking 
for some one ? 

Petroski. 

Oh, there you are ; we'd lost .you. Come and 
drink. 

Philip. 
No, thank you. Has any one seen her yet ? 

Beppo. 

Anna Kloastock? No; but the women have not 
all arrived yet. [CJuint Jieard off,'] Poor souls, they 
sing! 

Philip. 
So did the martyrs at the stake. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR i6l 

Beppo. 
How do you know that 4-Tina is to be among them ? 

Philip. 
I don't know ; but I hope — T hope. 

Petroski. 

Hope's a good prop until it drops yoy, and then it's 
the very devil. 

\Thi8 group is suffici&nUy down the stage to 
allow for Anna Klosstock's entrance. 

Enter Anna Klosstock. 

Philip. 

Anna ! \Seizes both her hands, and kisses them 
passionately J\ 

Anna. 

Philip ! 

Philip. 
Fate is kind once more. 

Anna. 

Is it kind to bring us together again, when we had 
parted, as it seemed, for ever ? 

11 



i62 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Philip. 
Did you think we had parted for ever 1 



Anna. 



Yes. 



Philip. 



Did you hope so 1 



Anna. 



I think I did. 



Philip. 



My God ! It was only the hope of our meeting 
again that kept me from madness, from despair, 
from death ! Anna, \ld8Be8 heir hand] fate may only 
give us a few passing moments at this resting-place, 
but there is time. You said I should change. If I 
have, adversity only makes me love you more. It is 
ages since they parted us. 

Anna. 

God help you, and forgive me ! I have been your 
bitterest enemy ; but oh ! I did not mean to be — I 
did not mean it ! Yet you owe all your miseries 
to me. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 163 

Philip. 

And all my happiness. Before I knew you on that 
blessed day in Venice, my heart had sought you and 
was darkened with your shadow, to be lifted into sun- 
shine by your presence. Anna, my love, my friend — 
prison, chains, deserts, hunger, nothing hurts, so that 
you reward me with your love. They shall not part 
us again ; husbands and wives go into exile together 
in Siberia, do they not ? There is a priest at Tobolsk ; 
we stop there. Only say you love me ! 

Anna. 

You break my heart ! Oh, I would love you, if I 
dared ! Grod help me, I do love you, and have from 
the first day we met. Oh, Philip ! 

Philip. 

Bless you, Anna. Sweetheart, you make this 
desert a garden, these fetters chains of flowers ! 
\Stagger8 ; she partly supports him.^ 

Anna. 

Calm yourself, dear friend ; you are overwrought 
with hunger and fatigue. 



i64 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Philip. 

[Recovering himself,] No, I am strong. Say you 
will be my wife, say they shall not part us again ? 

Anna. 

You show me a heaven I may not enter. If you 
only knew of all the time before we met, when I was 
a girl ! 

Philip. 

I know it, all, everything. Petroski has told me ; 
but T only know you as the beautiful vision of my 
dreams — the brave, good, loving woman, the self- 
sacrificing patriot, the friend of the poor, whose 
martyrdom as Anna Klosstock makes no barrier to a 
love like mine. 

Anna. 

And you are content to take me as I am, an out- 
cast, a convict, — a criminal, perhaps ? 

Philip. 
Anna, I love you ! 

Anna. 

Philip ! [Lays her head i(pon his shoulder,] 

[Giiards begin to circulate among the prisoners. 
Preparations for moving on.] 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 165 

Enter^ frmi hack of Pillar, Captain Karazoff, 

attended by a Guard. 

Captain. 
[To Guard.] Give the order to form ranks. 

Guard. 
Prisoners ! Attention ! Form ranks. 

[Btiatle of forming ranks. 

Philip. 
[Staggers ; Anna lays hamd on his arm,^ I feel 
faint, Anna. 

[Anna beckons Beppo. Beppo presses cup to 
Forsyth's lips. Philip drinks; looks up, 
revived. 

Guard thrusts Anna and Philip ba>ck into ranks 

with butt-end of rifle. 

Guard. 

Now then ; no tricks. Form ranks ! [Passes on to 
ether groups.^ 

Anna. 
[To Captain Karazoff, who is lighting dgo/rette,] 
Mercy, Excellency ! He is faint and weary. 



■ • 



i66 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

CAFrAIN. 

Idleness, insubordination ! I know the symptomfi. 
[Takes hold of Philip.] Here, you; wake up! 
There's no carriage for such as you. Stand up ! 

Anna. 

[Captain Karazoff looses his hold on Philip, who 
staggers and slips down hy Anna's side and sitSj 
covers face laith hands; Anna, rising to her fuU 
^leight, addresses Karazoff.] I am a miserable 
woman; but I would rather march to exile and 
to death, with such companions as these, than be 
forced to claim kinship with such as you ! No 
wonder the world curses the Great White Czar, when 
his word is the knout and his officers devils ! 

Captain. 
Peace, woman ; or I'll have you flogged. 

Anna. 

[Shrinking with fear,] Nay, forgive me. I know 
not what I say. Yet, surely, you have a mother or 
a sister ; a wife, perhaps. For their sakes, for the 
sake of the Christ you worship, have mercy ! 

Enter, hv/rriedly, Dick Chetwynd. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 167 

Chetwynd. 

\In loud voiceJ] Is this Captain Karazoff's com- 
mand? 

[Captain Karazoff twma towa/rds Chetwynd, 
and exa/mines him scornfully, Anna ata/rls 
at sight of Chetwynd, and stoops over 
Forsyth. 

Anna. 
Courage, dear friend ; relief is at hand ; courage ! 

Philip. 
[Looking up.'\ Heaven is going to be good to us ? 

Anna. 
Yes, yes ! 

Chetwynd. 

[In a loud voice.] Captain Karazoff ! 

Captain. 

[Angrily.] I am Captain Karazoff. Who are you ? 
And what is your business with me ? 



i68 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Chetwynd. 

You have a prisoner, one Philip Forsyth, an 
Englishman. 

Captain. 
Well, sir, what of it 1 

[Chetwynd sees Philip, arid Anna faoM 
group, which is on lines of picture in 
Act II. 

Chetwynd. 
My God ! The picture he painted at Venice ! 

Enter Febari, Klosstock, and Ossip; while Chet- 
wynd stands gazing at group, Klosstock stands 
where Anna cannot see him. 

It was an inspiration of Fate. Yes, it is Philip, by 
heavens ! [Rushes to him ; sees Anna.] And th e 
[Anna stops him by a sign^ 

Anna. 
I am Anna Klosstock. 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 169 

Chetwynd. 

\To Philip.] Philip, my dear boy ! my dear 
Philip ! 

Philip. 

Dick ! \Thjey embrace.] 

[Captain Karazopp beckons Guard, and in 
dumb show points to Chetwynd and gives 
an order. Guard drags Chetwynd to 
Captain Karazofp's feet 

Captain. 
Curse your audacity ! 

Chetwynd. 

[Struggling to his feet^ and flinging Guard aside.] 
And curse yours, sir ; and damn you, into the bar- 
gain ! By God, sir, if you don't apologise, I'll have 
your epaulettes torn off. 

Ferari. 

[Stepping between the Captain and Chetwynd.] 
Gentlemen, gentlemen ! Sir, [to Cafiain Karazopp] 
this gentleman is the bearer of a dispatch from the 
Minister of War at St. Petersburg. 



I70 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Ohetwynd. 

And a cypher from his Imperial Majesty the 
Czar. 

Captain. 
\Boxoing stibserviently,] Pardon, sir. 

Chetwynd. 

Sorry it should require the authority of St. Peters- 
hurg to make a Russian officer ohserve the ordinary 
rules of humanity. 

Captain. 
I don't require a lesson in humanity from you, sir. 

Chetwynd. 

But, by Jupiter, I will give you one. Meanwhile, 
read that. 

Captain. 

[Takes dispatch, and reads.] " The unconditional 
release of Philip Forsyth." Very well, sir. 

[Anna takes Foesyth's hand. 

Chetwynd. 
Is that in order ? 



BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 171 

Captain. 

Quite ; and I beg to offer you my bumble apologies. 
I was irritated at the moment ; my command is a 

diflScult one. 

Chetwynd. 

It would be easier, believe me, if you made it easier 
for the poor devils you hold in custody. But it is 
enough ; you insult me ; you apologise ; I accept your 
apology ; and now for the release of my prisoner. 

[Captain Karazoff gives silent orders to 
Guard / a Smith comes forward^ and tkey 
begin to hammer the shackles from Forsyth's 
legs, 

Ferari. 

And I have the honour to request your attention 
to this little document, M. le Capitaine. 

Captain. 

[Takiiig document, and reading,^ The Czar is 
merciful. 

Chetwynd. 

It is the noblest privilege of power. \To Forsyth] 
Philip, my dear lad, you are free ! 



172 BY ORDER OF THE CZAR 

Ferari. 

Anna Klosstock, I bring your pardon also ; and 
with it a friend to share your joys of freedom. By 
Oi-der of the Czar ! [Bringa forward Klosstock.] 

Anna. 

\With (jreat emxition and wonder,] My father ! 
[ASiiiks into his arms.] 

CURTAIN. 



Printed and bourui by Iliizdl, Watson Jb Vinei/f Ld., London and Ayle^ury, 



TWENTY-FIFTH EDITION. 

Crown Svoy Cloth Gilt, 2S. 6d, Paper Covers, 6d. 

"By Order of the Czar." 

The Tragic Story of Anna Klosstock, 
Queen of the Qhetto. 

By JOSEPH HATTON. 

The Late Mr. L. J. Jennings, M.P., in the New 
York Herald, said : — " The entire story has been worked 
out with the greatest care, and its development shows not 
only practised literary skill, but great knowledge of the 
world. It may, in some degree, do for Russian despotism 
what * Uncle Tom's Cabin ' did for slavery." 

Mr. Gladstone wrote :— " That he hopes the book 
may have a good influence on the policy of Russia to- 
wards the Jews." 

The " Scottish Leader " says :— " Told with the 
vivid dramatic force characteristic of the writer in his 
best moods. Some of the chapters contain passages of 
remarkable power. The scene in which Anna Klosstock 
falls a victim to the brutality and deceit of the Russian 
official will compare not unfavourably with Scott's 
famous encounter between Rebecca and Bois Guilbert ; 
while Andrea Ferari's conflict with the howling anti- 
Jewish mob, with its graphic touches of realism, the quick 
intensity with which incident succeeds incident, and the 
thrilling description of the Italian's magnificent sword- 
play, is worthy to rank among the best fighting scenes 
in fiction." 



" By Order of the Czar " 

fCoatiauedJ. 

Mrs. G. a. Sala, in T/te Gentlewoman^ said : — " I 
could write pages about this most entrancing of 
novels, and the magnificent play it would make. By 
Order of the Czar as a play would take London by 
storm, as it has taken the reading public by storm. 
All the Russian plays we have seen on the London 
stage would fade into insignificance by the side of 
such a drama as By Order of the Czar would make. 
Never has a novel been more successful or more 
widely read and re-read." 



*«* The publishers of the Swedish Edition 
(Fahlerans & Co., Stockholm) call at- 
tention to the unanimous commenda- 
tions of the Swedish Press, including 
the following:— 

" Of all the pictures of life in the great Eastern Empire 
of Europe which have appeared of recent years, not one, 
probably, can bear comparison with Joseph Hatton's 
novel in its startling vigour of delineation." — Smaalands 
Post. "It is certain that we have here no average 
commercial novel, but a literary work of enduring worth." 
— GothenburiT Post, " Animated throughout by a glowing 
enthusiasm for the oppressed Russian people." — Gothen- 
burg Aftenblad. " The book produces a profound effect 
precisely by reason of the epic calm with which the 
author describes even the many horrors of Russian 
despotism." — Helsingborgs Dagblad. 



LONDON : HUTCHINSON & CO., PATERNOSTER ROW. 



JOSEPH HATTON'S NOVELS 



In handsome clotb gilt, 3s. 6d, 
THE BANISHMENT OF JESSOP BLYTHE 

"A fine, eflfective story, highly coloured, brilliantly lit, with interest 
steadily sustained, with touches of pathos." — Saturday Rtvinu, 

"Carries the reader by storm."— /.iV^rary World. 

" Very powerful ... we have rarely read a story so full of human 
intGTesV—SheJffield Daily Telegraph. 



In clotb gilt, 6s. each 
THE VICAR 

" Thoroughly interesting." — Academy. 

•' It glows with life. The spirit of to-day is in it, the men and 
women of to-day are the actors in it. The vicar himself is very 
cleverly drawn ; he claims the reader's kindly feeling on his first 
introduction, and holds it to the end. The heroine, Susannah, is 
charming. There is plenty of comedy as well as drama in the book, 
and very good comedy it is." — World. 

THE DAGGER AND THE CROSS 

THIRD EDITION 

" Powerful, intensely interesting. "^Pa// Mall Gazette. 

" The narrative is powerfully written, and the events are thoroughly 
realistic." — Scotsman. 

"Mr. Hatton has in his time done much good work aa^a novelist, 
but never anything better than 'The Dagger and the Cross.'" — Daily 
Telegraph. 



London : HUTCHINSON & CO., Paternoster Row.