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Full text of "Caduceus"

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CADUCEUS 
1988 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/caduceus1988unse 



CADUCEUS 1988 



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Loyola 
University 
Medical 
Center 

4^ EMERGENCY 

4^ Hospital 

<r Outpatient Center 

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<- Dental School ' 

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)TRITCH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



Caduceus 1988 is 
Dedicated to 




Father John Tahey, S. J. 




"/ am a Jesuit. Some of you might 
iinow what Jesuits are, others may 
not. The first dictionary definition 
says I'm a member of a religious 
order. The second definition is the 
best: a lying, crafty, untrustworthy 
intriguer . . . So this lying, infa- 
mous, double-talking Jesuit wel- 
comes you. My door will always be 
open. I don t preach and you don 't 
have to be Catholic to speak with 
me. I am here for you. " 

-Father John Fahey, S.J. 
Address to the freshman 
class 



Father John Fahey, S.J. was bom 
and raised in riewarl^, Fiew Jersey. 
He was the oldest child in a family 
of eight, and was a member of his 
family's singing group, "The Four 
Little Faheys ". The group led by 
his father, a honky tonk piano 
player, played with popular acts 
and received first rate reviews in 
Billboard magazine. 

At age 18, Faheyjoined the Society 
of Jesus in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Af- 
ter 13 years of intense academic 
and theological studies. Reverend 
John Fahey, S.J. was ordained. His 
first assignment as a Jesuit priest 
was at the Kings County Medical 
Center in Brooklyn, n.Y. As Chap- 
lain at one of the largest public 
hospitals in the country. Father Fa- 
hey had a difficult task. He quickly 
responded by making many 
friends and loving life in the city. 
Physicians and other hospital 
workers asked him to Baptize their 
babies, some of whom were even- 
tually married by him also. Life 
was wonderful for him and he 
would have been content to re- 



main in new York City for the re- 
mainder of his career. 

However, that was not to be the 
case. He was transferred to Mon- 
roe, ri.Y., a small town many miles 
from the city to run a youth retreat. 
The retreat house served as an 
escape for kids from the city and 
became one of the busiest in the 
country. 

After many years at the retreat. Fa- 
ther Fahey became ill and took a 
leave of absence. He visited the 
Loyola University Rome Center in 
Italy. After befriending a student 
there, he was asked to perform her 
wedding in a Chicago suburb. 
While in Chicago he was sum- 
moned by his friend. Father Hayes, 
to come to Loyola Medical Center 
and become the medical student 
minister and faculty advisor. He 
accepted the position for "one 
year". One year has become sev- 
enteen years. 

His accomplishments during the 
seventeen years are endless. They 



include freshman orientation din- 
ners, annual medical student-fac- 
ulty retreats, St. Luke's day dinner 
dances, creation of Student 
Health, creation of the student 
lounge and the St. Lucia third 
world medicine outreach clerk- 
ship. He is responsible for the 
graduation ceremony which in- 
cludes a mass, brunch, and dinner 
dance. Most of all, Father Fahey is 
known for his caring attitude that 
touched all of us. Father Fahey we 
thank you. 

The senior class dedicates Cadu- 
ceus 1988 to Father John Fahey, 
S.J., who welcomed us as stran- 
gers and brought us together so 
that we gained more than a good 
education; we gained friendships 
we will cherish forever. 



CHICAGO 

CUBS 




The History of Loyola - Stritch 



Loyola University of Clnicago, one 
of 28 Jesuit colleges and universi- 
ties in the United States, was 
founded in 1870. Originally situat- 
ed on the west side of Chicago, the 
university moved to its present lo- 
cation, the Lake Shore Campus, in 
1909. 

Loyola's involvement in medical 
education began early in this cen- 
tury. At that time, medical educa- 
tion in the United States under- 
went a critical investigation by Dr. 
Abraham Flexner under the aus- 
pices of the Carnegie Foundation 
for the Advancement of Teaching. 
There were no uniform require- 
ments for entrance into medical 
school, and the only supervision 
of medical schools was that which 
could be exercised by the various 
state licensing boards. Medical ed- 
ucation was carried on outside the 
educational atmosphere and guid- 
ance of universities. 

The authorities of Loyola Univer- 
sity recognized the value of the 
recommendations of the Flexner 
Report and sensed the need in Chi- 
cago for a strong Catholic medical 
school under university auspices. 
There were at that time several in- 
dependent and unaffiliated medi- 
cal schools in the city. After ex- 
tended consultation and serious 
consideration, it was decided that 
medical education in general, and 
Loyola's aim in particular, could 
best be served by gradual evolu- 
tion through affiliation and ab- 



The Loyola Medical School 
South Wolcott Avenue 



on 



sorption of a few of the leading in- 
dependent medical schools. Thus 
in 1909, the Illinois Medical Col- 
lege was affiliated with Loyola Uni- 
versity, followed in 1910 by the 
Bennett and Reliance Medical Col- 
leges. In 1915 the whole organiza- 
tion passed to the complete con- 
trol of the trustees and became the 
Loyola University School of Medi- 
cine. 

Loyola's medical school found its 
first permanent home in 1917 
when the university purchased the 
building of the Chicago College of 
Medicine and Surgery on South 
Wolcott Avenue, across the street 
from the Cook County Hospital. 
For the next 50 years Loyola medi- 
cal students took their basic sci- 
ence courses at the Wolcott Ave- 
nue facility. Clinical training took 
place at a variety of Chicago hospi- 
tals, including Cook County. The 
Loyola University School of Medi- 
cine was accredited by the Council 
on Medical Education and Hospi- 
tals of the American Medical Asso- 



ciation in 1920 and has been a 
member of the Association of 
American Medical Colleges since 
1921. 

During the 1940's Loyola's efforts 
to improve its medical school fa- 
cilities were limited by a lack of 
funds until Samuel Cardinal 
Stritch lent his name to an annual 
fund raising dinner that has be- 
come the main source of continu- 
ous financial support for the medi- 
cal school. The Cardinal was com- 
mitted to the idea of a Catholic 
medical center to serve the people 
of Chicago, and with his encour- 
agement Loyola began planning 
the construction of a new medical 
school building. So important was 
the Cardinal's contribution to Loy- 
ola, in 1948 the medical school 
was named the Stritch School of 
Medicine in his honor. 

The university considered sites on 
the south side of Chicago and in 
the northern suburb of Skokie be- 
fore deciding to locate the new 











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^ 







medical school adjacent to the 
Mines Veterans Administration 
Hospital in Maywood. The 60 acres 
available provided sufficient land 
not only for a medical school but 
for a complete medical center to 
serve the grov\/ing population in 
the western suburbs of Chicago. 
Construction began in 1965. The 
new medical school was occupied 
in January, 1969, and the univer- 
sity hospital opened its doors on 
May 21, 1969. To honor a gener- 
ous benefactor, the teaching hos- 
pital was named the Foster Q. 
McQaw Hospital of Loyola Univer- 
sity in 1972. The opening of the 
medical center marked a new be- 
ginning for medical education at 
Loyola. Teaching, patient care and 
research would now take place in 
a medical school facility combined 
with a permanent university hospi- 
tal. 




The original planners expected a 
west side medical center to be well 
utilized, but they could not antici- 
pate the rapid increase in the de- 
mand for patient services that took 
place in the years after the Loyola 
University Medical Center opened. 
Within a decade, it was evident the 
facilities would have to be en- 
larged and in the 1980's the uni- 
versity embarked on a program of 
Building construction and remod- 
eling at the Medical Center. In 
1981 the Mulcahy Outpatient Cen- 
ter opened. In 1983 one of the Vet- 
erans Administration buildings ac- 
quired by the Medical Center was 
remodeled to provide office space 
for clinical departments and the 
new Medical Humanities Program. 
In 1986 a nine-story, Russo Surgi- 
cal Pavilion, was added to the hos- 
pital. 




FOSTER G.McGAW 
HOSPITAL 



LOYOLA 
^MIVERSITY 





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14 



Class Of 1988 



It was July of 1984 when we all 
came together for the first time. 
One-hundred and thirty freshman 
medical students all wondering 
why we had to start school in the 
middle of the summer. 

We were a class composed of 65% 
men and 35% women. We came 
from 15 states, 55% from Illinois, 
23% from California, 12% from the 
Hew York-Tristate area and 3% 
from Michigan. Some of us were 
too young to drink, others were re- 
tuming to school after successful 
careers in other fields. However, 
we were to somehow become one, 
one group that would share the 
triumphs and tribulations of medi- 




cal school together. And four 
years later, some of us are gone, 
but the majority of us have made 
it. Graduation day Is here and we 
are ready to tackle the world. We 
will not, however, forget the four 
most memorable years of our 
lives. 








15 





Raymond Baumhart, SJ 
President 



Richard A. Matre, Phd 
Provost 




Anthony Barbato MD 
Dean 



Robert Q. Frazier, MD 
Senior Associate Dean 



18 




Leonard L. Vertuno, MD 
Associate Dean 



Michael L. Rainey, PhD 
Associate Dean of Student Affairs 



Teresa J. Wronski 
Assistant Dean 




Daniel A. Burr, PhD 
Assistant Dean 



James Whitehead, MS 
Dean of Students 



Michael Lambesis, MEd 
Assistant Dean of Students 




John A. Robinson, MD 
Associate Dean-Research 



Linda Qunzburger, PhD 
Associate Dean 



John R. Tobin, MD 
Past Dean 



19 




Department Chairmen k-^ 




Rolf M. Qunnar, MD 
Medicine 



Marion M. Brooks, MD 
Co-Chairman, Medicine 




Qastone Q. Celesia, MD 
rieurology 




Robert Flanigan, MD 
Urology 



T. Hashimoto, MD, PhD 
Microbiology 



Robert A. DeVito, MD 
Psychiatry 



21 






Walter Wood, MD 
Community and Family Medicine 



John M. Isaacs, MD 
Obstetrics and Gynecology 



Rogelio Moncada, MD 
Radiology 




R. Morrison Hurley, MD 
Pediatrics 




Gregory J. Matz, MD 
EriT 



Ciiester J. Herman, MD, PhD 
Pathology 




John Clancy Jr., PhD 
Anatomy 



Robert J. Freeark, MD 

Surgery 



Israel Hanin, PhD 
Pharmacology 



22 





Roque Pifarre, MD 
Thoracic and CV Surgery 



Richard M. Schultz, PhD 
Biochemistry 



David C. Thomasma, PhD 
Medical Humanities 






James E. McDonald, MD 
Ophthalmology 



James P. Filkins, PhD 
Physiology 




Sidney Blair, MD 
Orthopedic Surgery 



James Marks, MD 
Radiotherapy 



Tadi Konda L. K. Rao, MD 
Anesthesiology 



23 




Department Of Obstetrics And Gynecology 




Department Of Pediatrics 



24 




Department Of Medicine 




Department Of Surgery 



25 




Did You Know? 

Class of 1 988 



How many applicants did it take to select the class of 1988? 

5,387 persons applied for the 130 places in the Stritch Class of 1988. This Is 43 applications 
per position. 

564 persons were interviewed for the 130 places. 

This is slightly more than 4 applicants per position. 



514 persons were actually offered a position and 130 matriculated on July 30, 1984. 




'■■^S-?e-i*.s«?';i''» 



Where did we come from? 

130 students came from 14 states: 

71 were residents of Illinois 

32 were residents of California 

10 were residents of New York 

5 were residents of Michigan 

13 were residents of 10 other states 



55% Or 45% were out of state 

25% 
8% 
4% 




What colleges did the Class of 1988 attend? 

11 University of Notre Dame 
10 Loyola University of Chicago 

9 University of Illinois at Champaign Urbana 

7 University of Illinois at Chicago 

7 University of California at Davis 

7 northwestern 

79 students graduated from 57 other colleges and universities 

26 




continued 



Were most of the students science majors? Of course! But . . . 

54 Biology 

18 Chemistry or Biochemistry 

14 Preprofessional/Premedical 
29 Other science 

115 Total science 

15 rion science majors 



(Ranging from Anthropology to Psychology, 
French to Accounting, 
Mechanical Engineering to Philosophy.) 




How many students had advanced degrees? 14 

2 Ph.D. 

9 M.S. 

2 M.A. 

1 M.A.T. 

However, 23 students also took some coursework at 
community or junior colleges. 




How old were we? 

The average age at matriculation was 23.1. Median age was 22. 
The range was 20 to 37. Four students were 30 + 




Do you have to be the son or daughter of a physician to afford medical school? 

No. Only 18 members of the class (14%) are sons or daughters of physicians. 

But it was expensive. Instate students paid a total of $48 520 

in tuition and required fees 
(excluding parking tickets) 

Out of state students paid a total of $60,020. 

Instate students saw tuition and fees rise from $11,202 first year to 12,614 in the senior 

year. 

An increase of 12.6% over four years. 

(Less than the rise in the cost of living) 

Out of state students experienced an increase in tuition and fees from $13,702 to $16,114 
an increase of 17.6% over four years. 

The average amount borrowed was $44,439 vAth 22 students taking out no loans. 




continued 



27 



How many Dean's Letters were sent out? 

A total of 122 students requested a total of 2213 Dean's Letters to be mailed 
out on or about november 1, 1987 for positions in July 1988. This was an 
average of 18 per senior with a range of 1 to 63. 

Although there are 28 California residents in the Class of 1988, a total of 50 
members of the Class applied to California residency programs. The Califor- 
nia myth continues ... or was it the Chicago winters? 

In contrast, 95 members of the Class applied to LUMC positions. If you elimi- 
nate applicants to military programs (12) and family practice programs (13), 
then virtually all members of the class considered staying at LUMC for resi- 
dency training. 




What were the most popular residency fields sought by members of the Class? 
Internal Medicine-C 24% 



Ob/Qyn-C 
Pediatrics-C 
Family Practice-C 



14% 
12% 
10% 




Stats compiled by Dr. Rainey with assistance of Dr. Burr and Donna Sobie. 



The Class of 1988 would like to thank the members of the 




Medical Student Union 

for their support of Caduceus. 



28 





Rudy Allen 






Virginia Qreaney Allen 



Candice Anderson 



Robert Azevedo 






Stephen Barnes 



Russell Beckley 



Angela Bell 



30 




Christopher Beneduce 







Christine Bennett 



David Bhaskar 



Robert; Brodish 






Brigitta Brott 



Kristin Buehler 



William Cannon 



31 






Kevin Carney 



Christopher Cascino 



Anthony Caterine 





Mark Chelsky 






Gary Chmielewski 



Kelley Coffey 



I^evin Colton 



32 




Leslie Cone 



Joanne Connolly 



Joseph Contino 




David Cziperle 



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Diane Dailey 



Patricia Damper 



Douglas Darlin 



33 






Cheryl Diamond 



David Dungan 



Becky Estill 









Amy Facinelli 



Janis Fee 



Brian Foley 





James Fox 






Stuart Fox 



Kevin Qermlno 



Jeffrey Qirardot 






David Qodbe 



Barry Goldberg 



Karen Hendler-Qoldberg 




Judy Gordon 







John Maydek 



Gerald Hepnar 



Cheryl Hoffrnan 






Thomas Hofstra 



David Howard 



John Hsu 




Milton Hummel 




36 






Warren Jablonsky 



Algimantas Jecius 



Marion Jelcz 






Sharon Junge 



Gregory Kaczmarek 



Vivek Kantayya 





Gwendolyn Kartje-Tillotson 

37 






Peter Kerstan 



Paula Kovarik 



Kevin Kumke 




Michael Leonardi 







Darr Leutz 



Alison Lewis 



Steven Lisco 



38 






Leslie MacDonald 



Wendi Marcus 



Maureen Martin 





Monte Masten 






Suzanne Mattox 



John May 



John Mazzucco 



39 




Kimberly McElroy 







Susan McGregor 



Angela Miller 



Louis Mini 






Bruce Morris 



Thanh-Tarn riguyen 



Jon Piothwang 



40 





Craig Olsen 






Sharon Orfanedes 



Denise Panuccio 



Chinyoung Park 






Stephen Perry 



John Pohl 



Douglas Postels 



41 






Rebecca Preston 



Kyran Quinlan 



Denise Radzialowski 





Daniela Reid 






Randall Reid 



Carl Rossi 



Peter Ruggiero 



42 






Ryushi Saisho 



Russell Sawyer 



Mark Schick 




Steven Schreiter 






Randall Schultz 



Alan Shepard 



Gerald Siege! 



43 






Victor Slana 



Robert Small 



Christopher Smith 




Anne Snider 







Jeffrey Tash 



Scott Tomasil^ 



Eric Trautmann 



44 





Mark Trelka 



Robert Tripp 



Susan Vierczhalek 



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1 

r 1 

i 

j 
i 





Eva Waite 






Mark Wakabayashi 



Philip Waller 



Jill Walsh 



45 






Kurt Warkenthien 



Lesley Wilcoxson 



Curtice Wong 






Peter Wu 



Jeffrey Young 



Late 
Portraits . . . 





46 



Kevin Qregg 



Maryannette Mora 




Timothy Roe 




Professional Photography 
Courtesy of: 



not Pictured: 
Peter OKelly 
Max Mirot 
David Schwartz 
Qreggory Stephens 



William Scurlock 




Wyckoff 
Portraits Inc. 



JAMES TWEEDIE THOMAS WAGONER 

602 W. BURLINGTON • LaGrange. Illinois 60525 • 312/3S't-2880 



HOW WE HAVE CHANGED 



■ ' 


*of students 
on 

7/50/84 


*of married 
students on 
7/30/84 


*marrying 
during Med 
Scliooi 


*of students 
with children 
on 7/30 


*havirig chil- 
dren during 
Med. School 


*of students 
leaving Loyo- 
la 


"of students 
at graduation 


Male 


83 


10 


23 





2 


4 


83 


Female 


47 


7 


13 


4 


4 


5 


42 


Total 


130 


17 


36 


4 


6 


9 


125 



Class Officers 

1987-88 





Dave Dungan 
President 



Mark Wakabayashi 
Vice-President 



Dave Howard 
Treasurer 



Brian Foley 
Secretary 




Denise Panuccio 
Class Representative 



Alison Lewis 
Class Representative 



Yearbook Staff 






Barry Goldberg, Editor-in-Chief 



Mark Wakabayashi 
Asst. Editor 



Dave Qodbe 
Asst. Editor 



Contributors: 



I Chris Bennett, Curtice Wong, 
i Angie Bell 
i Alison Le\Aas 





48 



Janis Fee 
Asst. Editor 



Karen H. Goldberg 
Asst. Editor 





w-siti,«i ^ Iff 

Have a nice day at work, honey. 




f« ^-s. o --^ />, .->s ,■ ■. .- . ... /l^ 




MDL's 



During the first two years of medi- 
eval school, the MDL s setved as 
our home avvay from home for ,% 
many of us._ Initially a place to -1 
meet new friends, it lapidly be- 
came the only place to studj on 
a Satuixlay night when the hbtary 
tlosed. We suffered through 
unending/annoying 'mconse- 
quentiai lectures and discussions 
and made ourselves sick looking 
at histo slides. 















Most of us tried to make our desk 
a personal statement — sporting 
Far Side cartoons (Barnes) pro- 
vocative pictures of women 
(Azevedo), or posters reminding 
us of our true roots in California 
(Wong). Few images will linger 
much longer, but we shall never 
forget the most important func- 
tion of the MDL — It was the 
source of JIERF HOOP 





; must not have been working too hard as many of us still 
d time for tots of intramural sports, from MDL football 
A Softball to the classic nerf fioop Championships, a large 
mt>er of our classmates parUcipated. Some took the 
me& seriously and "prepared for each event. Others tooi< 
iirerent view of preparation. Some of our classmates took 
iney to basKetbaff and spent more time in the gym than 
ywhere else. Stilt the mortality rate was low (as was the 
idy rate, or so it appeared i and we managed to pass our 
sses. 




Classes 



Many of us went to class, many of us did not (the 
record attendance was 11 at a Community Medi- 
cine lecture), but two years transpired with most 
of our fannies parked firmly in those uncomfort- 
able and frequently unstable orange/yellow 
chairs of 2701 and 2706. Everyone seemed to 
have their own seat — that is until a group of 
barbarians chaimapped' Russ Sawyer's seat. 
There was the front row crowd (Leulz, Walsh, 
Azevedo, Sawyer) and the more disruptive back 
row crowd (Jablonski, Jelcz, McGregor, Jecius, 
Lewis, Qulnian, Heydek). We were terrified by 
the quick witted Shea who could call on us by 
name to answer impossible questions (and usu- 
ally be insulted in return). We never got any of 
Coopers "Golda s Hot Dog" questions, we 
laughed at De space of Disse," and watched 
Dr. rilkins explain hormonal pathways all the 
way down to the "goooonaads." The end of 
those first two years signified the end of 18 (or 
more) years of classroom instruction — and our 
medical education had just begun. 

51 




"I want to be a part of it, new York, riew York!" 



One beer, three weenies, five guys, what's missing? 




Where's the beefcake? 



beauty? 
Our Softball team on the bench — again? 




— LOYOLA LMVERSITY STRITCH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



Name 



€lp^ of 1988 Coop^ 

: £rr£ve Sl-'^^/A (\/\cTcS!. ^rf^'?H£r^^-Ar^fi^ IS-J 



No. of paqes: 3 



Date: B/l^/dS O&ss: l\'^<'^ ^^'"^^^ of ]ecture: 24 Instructor- pR. H.l.nA^-^^^ 



The COOP s gave many people a good ex- 
cuse not to go to class — they could always 
get the information from the COOP. Aside 
from the intellectual ramblings in each is- 
sue, there was also many jokes, cartoons 
(mostly the Far Side), stories, party news 
— the more important stuff of day to day 
living. COOPs became a part of our every 
day life our first two years; many found it to 
be indispensible bathroom reading mate- 
rial (if it was not used for other bathroom 
purposes). 

In the two years of published COOP s, the 
system distributed some 500,000 sheets of 
paper, consumed 10,000 dollars, made fun 
of all of our instructors, and took countless 
hours to read. 



Included herein are some comments about 
a typical classmates COOPs that ap- 
peared at one time or another: 

— Perhaps what is so intriguing about his 
work is that it transcends knowledge and 
approaches fact — B. Goldberg. 

— A perfect day is going to the park with 
a bottle of Boones Farm, cheese whiz, and 
Shepard s COOP. — K. Carney 

— Alan Shepard could write about my geni- 
tal system anytime — many women 

— Like a good cigar, Shepard stinks — J. 
Beechert 

— Shepard, represents the archetypical, 
pantheon student. After reading Homer 
and Ulysses, I like to sit down and peruse 
his Biochemistry from his blue period — C. 
Rossi 

— I come in late every morning because I 
read and reread every COOP Shepard has 



done — R. Allen 

The COOP'S were run by a multitude of peo- 
ple: David Qodbe, managing editor; Jill 
Walsh, co-editor first semester; Rob Azev- 
edo. Bill Cannon, Becky Bates-Estille, Steve 
Perry, assistant editors; numerous lecture 
recorders and distributors; and of course, 
the class of 1988. 

And finally, a note about all of the 
members' of the COOPs who had to tran- 
scribe the lecture from the inaudible tape: 
It was finally at this point in the lecture she 
became totally incoherent and un- 
stoppable. I tried, but was unable to deci- 
pher her ramblings. If there are any ques- 
tions, please leave me alone. Don t you 
think I've had enough already!? ' — J. 
Mothwang 




Well. . . Well. . . this survey certainly 
drew some hot stuff I In fact, some was too hot 
to handle . i . or print (Sorry) . We can only 
speculate whether our lab partners came close to 
guessing our wherea'bouts at the eve of the New 
Year. Here goes; 

Brltta Brott "Click" as we affectionately 
know her, was talking with an Insurance salesman 
about liability Insurance, 

Krlsten Buelher was on the beach In her 
Porsche, cooking stir fry and partying with some 
Illegal aliens from Mexico In attempt to mellow 
out from the awesome complexity of the coming new 
year, 

Leslie Cone was "consoling" Cubs' team members 
at Motel 6 in Berwyn. She was later seen atop the 
Sears Tower screamlngi "Cubs In '85!" 

Mark Trelka was moving his oar out of the snow, 
, . without getting Inside It! 

Kurt Warkenthlen occupied himself by sticking 
pins in a Steve Garvey voodoo doll. 

David Cziperle was in a Florldlan bar discuss- 
ing recent Issues of cardiology today with a Cu'ban 
refugee who runs a tuna 'boat fleet , 



l^WXtJE. 



OF 



LOYOLh 

JAM I^S5 



Gary Chmielewskl was either receiving a stimulat- 
ing and sensuous massage from his friend at the shoe 
store or lying drunk with fourteen dental hygiene 
students. 

Bob Brodlsh and Bill Cannon were writing 
apologies to Brltta Brott and Krlsten Buehler for 
being so abusive during anatomy lab, 

Cindy Clanonni was shopping or at a wedding 
reception, 

Kelley Coffey spent the night dancing on stage 
for the male patrons at "Mr, Mike's Magic Touch" In 
Lyons, 

Jeff Glrardot was practicing Larry Holmes 
Impressions. 

Cheryl Hoffman was kissing Kyran (Smooch), 

Tom Hofstra studied Into the New Year, 
After all. It's a nl^it to do something you don't 
o the rest of the year. 



study Break 



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t^ysBLf, Time to 600P 
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Hold It, Nlles. It says here, These little fish have 
taeen known to skeletonize a cow in less than two 
minutes.' Now there's a viv,d thought." 




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St. Luke's Might 



Medicine, like just about everything else, has Its own patron saint — St. Luke. In celebration of th good 
St. Luke, we held an annual dinner and dance, usually at the Carisle. With all due respect to the goot' Saint, 
It must be noted that the day was most notable because it was a school holiday; no lectures, no cuill. Each 
year we would shed our lab jackets, don our very best clothes and hob nob with the faculty. . ^, 



ST. LU 

Monday, October 



435 E^ 

n 

Cocktails: 6:30 p.m 
Dinner: 7:30 p.m. 
Orchestra: 8 - 11:3( 





AY DINNER 

— 6:30 p.m. - 12:00 p.m. 



irlisle 

erfield Road 
, Illinois 




We were entertained by a variety of skits — usu- 
ally another classes! Our sophomore skit was 
most memorable for Stu Fox's shorts — which 
he proudly displayed to students and faculty 
alike. The skit of 1986 was our nemesis. Luckily 
no pictures of this musical fiasco are in exis- 
tence. We redeemed ourselves in our senior 
year when we teamed up with the juniors. Led 
by our handsome yet witty M. C. E.T.,' we ex- 
plained why Bob Brodish wanted to be a sur- 
geon, Darr Leutz an orthopod, and Alison Lewis 
a urologist? 

In addition to tiie experienced acting of our com- 
rades, there was much financial gain to be had 
as well. The door prizes were varied and many 
— from gift certificates at Qoldas to microwave 
ovens. As a class, we fared well for the first two 
years — amassing a great bounty. In our final 
years, we could not even steal a prize (unless 
you counted a free box of crushed cookies). Per- 
haps this was our penalty for our skits. 








Alplfa Omep Alpha ^^ 



r.J^ ^/^l 





Afpha Omega Alpha (AOA) is fhe only national 

medical honorsociety composed of a select group 

f of students, faculty and alumni, nomination to 

: .AOA is based upon outstanding academic 

achievement throughout the four years of medical 

school. The activities of AOA include sponsoring 

student research forums, lectures series, and 

' nominating a worthy faculty member to AOA. This 

year, the award was given to Dr. William Baker>-;;i^ 

Dept. of Surgery. '^' ■: 

The Class of 1988 congratulates this years AOA ' 
electees: Robert Azevedo, Stephen Barnes, Rus- 
sell Beckley, Angela Bell, Robert Brodish, Joseph 
Contino, Diane Dailey, Amy Facinelli, David 
Qodbe, David Howard, Leslie MacDonald, Max Mi- 
rot, Craig Olsen, Douglas Postels, Russell Sav^yer, 
Steven Schreiter, Alan Shepard, Anne Snider, Jef- 
frey Tash, Scott Tomasik, and Jill Walsh. 



i ^< 







!Alpha Sigma Mu 



<^S"^ 



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74 



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Ipha Sigma nu (ASn) is the national honor soci 
ty of the Jesuit colleges and universities of the 
inited States. The society was founded in 1915 to 
onor a select group of students each year on the 
asis of scholarship, loyalty and service 



he Class of 1988 congratulates this years ASM 
lectees: Christopher Beneduce, Joseph Contino, 
lavid Dungan Karen Hendler Goldberg Robert 
ripp Susan Vierczhalek and Eva Waite 









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Medical Student Organization Fund 



















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The Medical Student Organization Fund 
(MSOr) was created to make it possible to sup- 
port approved student organization activities 
in an efficient and equitable manner. The Bud- 
getary Review Committee of the MSOF has 
been established to review past and proposed 
activites and budgets of each participating stu- 
dent organization and make recommenda- 
tions for expenditures. This year, the MSOF 
has helped funding of the Class of 1988 year- 
book. The staff of Caduceus is thankful for the 
support. 



59 



\merican Medical Student Association 



siiiisa 



NiwPliyskian 



The Class of 1988 is well represented in the American Medi- 
cal Student Association, with greater than 50% of the class 
as members. Once again, the Loyola Chapter of AMSA was 
among the elite group of "50 + " chapters in the national 
organization. 

National AMSA has a major task in keeping students in- 
formed of current issues concerning the present and future 
practice of medicine. More importantly, AMSA encourages 
students to become actively involved in shaping the course 
these issues take. 

At the local level, AMSA members continued their participa- 
tion in several traditional projects. Each incoming freshman 
class was treated to a mock anatomy practical.' The sight 
of second year students attempting to locate specific ana- 
tomical structures can only be viewed as entertaining cha- 
os. The used book sale was always a big hit with sellers and 
buyers participating in the ancient ritual of bartering. The 
annual medical instrument coop always brought on an air 
of excitement and apprehension, as students realized phys- 
ical diagnosis is just around the corner. The big question 
was, "flow does the stethoscope work? " One of the most 
popular events was the lunchtime speaker series, where the 
students had a chance to learn about different specialties 
in medicine and general health care issues and concerns. 
AMSA members also participated in the annual Hunger 
Week and organized a medical instrument drive for the un- 
derprivileged nations. 

The national convention was an exhilarating experience; 
students from across the nation got together to share expe- 
riences, learn about current issues, and have an all around 
good time (not to mention a nice trip). Chicago was the site 
of the 1985 convention. In 1986, AMSA members learned 
about issues at the source in Washington, D.C. In 1987, Mew 
Orleans was the site of the convention festivities. It's hard 
to imagine that anyone did not enjoy the experience. 



AMSA would like to thank the AMSA members from the Class of 1988 for their participation, 
which helped to make all of these events successful. AMSA wishes the entire CLASS OF 1988 
great success in their future careers. 



60 



American Medical Women's Association 



AMWA, a national organization for 
women physicians, was formed in 
1915 in riew York City to meet the 
needs of the woman professional, 
from publishing a journal with ar- 
ticles written by women to provid- 
ing a support network for the few 
women in medicine. Today AMWA 
not only serves many of the same 
needs, but also is a politically ac- 
tive force and an advocate of wom- 
en's health issues. 

The Loyola Chapter was founded 
in 1985. Activities sponsored by 
AMWA and its members from the 
Class of 1988 included seminars 
and "Lunch with the Docs, " a se- 
ries of discussions by women 
physicians in different specialties. 
Many members attended the an- 
nual national conventions 
throughout the country. 




AMWA COnQFlATULATES ITS MEMBERS ADD THE CLASS OF 1988 ADD WISHES THEM A 
PROSPEROUS CAREER. 



61 

9 



Phi Chi 




HAPPY RESIDEnCY PHI CHI QP^DUATES — 



STEVE BARMES 
BOB BRODISH 
DAVID QODBE 
WEHDI MARCUS 
CARL ROSSI 



RUSS BECKLEY 
JAFilS D. TEE 
BARRY GOLDBERG 
JOHn nOTHWAriG 
GERRY SIEGAL 



CHRIS BEFiEDUCE 

JIM rox 

STEVE LISCO 
STEVE PERRY 



AND BEST WISHES TO ALL IH THE CLASS OF 

1988 FROM 
PHI CHI MEDICAL FRATERFIITY 





62 



Physicians for Social Responsibility 




The Class of 1988 saw the emergence of PSR/Loyola. Over the past four years, PSR/Loyola has continued to 
challenge, educate and interact with the Medical Center. Functions have included film shows and speakers to 
journal clubs and Grand Rounds. Thanks to all of those who helped to make PSR/Loyola possible. 



RUSS BECKLEY 
KAREri H. QOLDBERQ 
MIKE HUMMEL 
ALISOri LEWIS 
KIM MACELROY 
TOM SAISHO 



KEVin COLTOri 
CHERYL HOFFMAn 
AL JECIUS 
JOHN MAY 
DOUG POSTELS 
ALAM SHEPARD 



BECKY ESTILLE 
TOM HOFSTRA 
SHARON JUriGE 
JOHN MAZZUCO 
KYRAN QUmLAN 
ERIC TRAUTMAN 




A VERY SPECIAL THAflKS TO SUSAM VIERC- 
ZHALEK AMD MAUREEfl MARTIfi FOR KPiOCK- 
inO DOWM THE BARRIERS AMD MAKiriQ WAY 
FOR PSR/LOYOLA. 



• 



I • t • i 




• ! • 1 



Amnesty International 



HELP ,, 



^^ 



%£R L >Nt^^ 



The Loyola chapter of Amnesty In- 
ternational was very active during 
our four years at Loyola. Al sup- 
ported human rights throughout 
the worid. The annual Hunger 
Week helped the needy to obtain 
food through numerous activities 
including Hoops for Hunger and 
the food drive. 

Members from the Class of 1988 
include: 

Kevin Colton 

Kim MacElroy 

Craig Olsen 

Eric Trautmann 

Susan Vierczhalek 




j/et so ^^lal a. fiMiut 



THAnK YOU TO THE CLASS OF 1988 TOR ITS SUPPORT AMD COnORATULATIOnS FOR A 
JOB WELL DOME. 



American Medical Association 



AMA, IMS, and CMS serve Stritch 
students by providing services, 
journals and publications, and 
representation in Illinois and 
Washington, D.C. 

The Chicago Medical Society pro- 
vides dinner meetings and lec- 
tures at Loyola where student 
members are able to mix and min- 
gle with attendings. Monthly meet- 
ings of the CMS Student Branch 
are attended by Stritch students. 




The Illinois State Medical Society 
was responsible for malpractice 
reform and took a strong stand 
against medical schools' owner- 
ship of tobacco stock. At the 
monthly IMS Medical Student Sec- 
tion meetings, issues concerning 
Loyola students are brought into 
the forefront and addressed. 







The American Medical Association 
fought hard in Washington to pre- 
vent the Guaranteed Student Loan 
Fund from being cut. Because of 
the input from the AMA-Student 
Section, the QSL fund was actually 
increased allowing us to receive 
more in QSL loans. 



THE AMA OFFERS ITS BEST WISHES FOR THE FUTURE TO THE CLASS OF 1988 



64 



Kristen Beuhler 



CflLlfORNIA 




TRUE CHARACTER IS REVEALED 

WHEN YOU COME 

FACE TO FACE WITH ADVERSITY. 



ohn Hsu 



Good family 
Good food & 
Gambling. 



That's life. 
John 




iussell Beckley 



Congratulations Everyone! 
And best of luck in the future. 

Sincerely, 



fiu.^-^^fJJ 




Alan Shepard 




i 



Congratulations to the Class of 1988, and I hope everyone 
does well in their career. Medical school has been fun (most 
of the time) because we have such a great class! Remember, 
I am going into neurology, and if you need a consultor or an 
EEQ analyzed, look up Al's Heuro World \n the phone book, and 
give me a call. Good luck to everyone and keep in touch. 





"If your brains aren't becoming to you, 
should be coming to me. ' 



they 



Alan Shepard 



Kelly Coffey 



Congratulations to everyone and thank you to many of you that have become such special friends to me! I have two 
things I would like to share with you that have really meant something to me throughout these four years of medi- 
cal school. The first is a quote I try to remember with each patient I deal with: 

'If you treat an individual as he is he will stay as he is; but if you treat him as, if he were what he ought to be, 
and could be, he will become what he ought to be and could be." 

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe 

The second is a passage of scripture that has challenged me and given me a new perspective in my attempts to 
help patients: 

"Let us give thanks to the God . . . from whom all help comes! He helps us in all our troubles, so that we are 
able to help others who have all kinds of troubles, using the same help that we ourselves have received from 
God." 

II Corinthians 1:3,4 

These thoughts continue to strengthen me when I need it and reset my focus when my outlook becomes skewed. I 
hope you find them to be meaningful and refreshing also. I wish the best to each of you in your fields of choice. 

68 Kelley/toff 



:3hris Bennett 

The sea does not reward those who are too anx- 
5US, too greedy or too impatient. To dig for trea- 
ures shows not only impatience and greed, but 
ick of faith. Patience, patience, patience is what the 
ea teaches. Patience and faith." 

lift from tfie Sea 

nne Morrow Lindbergh 




ouis Mini 








Ryushi T. Saisho 



Thanks to everyone in Chi- 
cago and Los Angeles for 
all your support these past 
four years. And remember 
to . . . just call me Tom. 




Shar Junge 



70 










f^i V/El^H BEST V^Jl5HeS TO EMeR«10NE fti. H^^PPY, (JseFUL- RmXfES. 'THOir OF SOO N*r /<sj TH 15 
/»HD HWLTHe WoRLpV Yf/S.' Go To IT,' T'U. M|S5 Vou /^Ll --^5fy/^K_ toN&e 



Vivek S. Kantayya 



"numberless are the worlds wonders, but none — none more wondrous than the body of man.' 

Sophocles 

"Man cannot afford to be a naturalist, to look at Mature directly, but only with the side of his eye. We must look through and beyond her." 

Henry David Thoreau 

Earth's crammed with heaven. 
And every common bush afire with Ciod; 
But only he who sees takes ofT his shoes. 
The rest sit round it and pluck blackberries. 

[Elizabeth Barrett Browning 

"Vou can shut tlim up for a fool, you can spit at Him and kill Him as a demon; or you can fall at His feet and call Him Lord and Ood. But 
let us not come up with any patronizing nonsense about His being a great human teacher. He has not left that open to us. He did not intend 
to. " 

C.5. Lewis 

As some of you know I plan to return to India to work in a mission hospital. If in the future any of you would 
like to spend a few weeks contributing your talents in such a setting, please write to the following address: 

Vivek S. Kantayya 
131 Kingswood Court 
naperville, IL 60565 



Thanh-Tarn Nguyen 




My beloved family 



71 



Jill Walsh 
Leslie MacDonald 
Robert Azevedo 
Suzanne Mattox 



Good friends, good times, 
good memories. " 




Leslie Cone 



What Leslie Would Have Rather Done; 

1. Sit In the Left Field Bleachers. 

2. Enjoy My Beautiful City 
(and Send Californlans Home 




Randy (and Kathy) Schultz 





It is an absolute perfection ... to know how . 
to get the very most out of one's individuality. 

Michel de Montaigne 



/ 




Britta C. Brott 



"... it has become clear that Christian leadership is accomplished only through service. 
This service requires the willingness to enter into a situation, with all the human vulnera- 
bilities a man has to share with his fellow man. This is a painful and self-denying experi- 
ence which can indeed lead man out of his prison of confusion and fear. Indeed, the par- 
adox of Christian leadership is that the way out is the way in, that only by entering into 
communion with human suffering can relief be found." 



The Wounded healer 
Henri J.M.Houwen 








■■^ 




r 







Darr Leutz 




Leslie T. Wilcoxson 



Finish every day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders 
and absurdities no doubt crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new 
day; begin it well and serenely and with too high a spirit to be cumbered with your old 
nonsense. This day is all that is good and fair. It is too dear, with its hopes and invita- 
tions, to waste a moment on the yesterdays. 

Ralph Waldo Emerson 



^gclQ Miller 



Take Time 

Take time to think . . . 

It is the source of power. 

Take time to play . . . 

it is the source of perpetual youth. 

Take time to be friendly . , . 

It is the road to happiness. 

Take time to laugh . . . 

It is the music of the soul. 





Take time to give . . . 
It is too short of a day to 

be selfish. 
Take time to love and be 

loved . . . 
It is a God-given privilege. 



77 



Jon nothwang 



imf- r-\ ^'.i^gFTZiM 




Steven J. Lisco 




Chris 
Beneduce 







i 





Happy r^ew Year 1988! 



Chinatown 



Anthony J. 
Caterine 




ood Luck Everyone! 
ay you find happiness 
nd whatever else you 
ere looking for! 




Wife and Fieo - "babe" Colleen 



Tony 




The children: 
Yuri - the chicken 
Ivan - the cowboy. 





At least Dan's med school career was a Busting success! 




And Dean Rainey tries to tell you people don't 
change. 








now let s see . . . the nipple is T4 and the umbilicus is - uh 



So you can show your grandchildren and complain how cold It was! 



Judy Gordon 




80 



Congratulations and best wishes for a happy and successful future 
to ail my classmates! 




Easy to iook smug when its not your wedding 




Maureen Martin 



You Pulled Me Through! 



David Ravi Bliaskar 




"numberless are the worlds wonders but none -none 
more wondrous than the body of man. 

-Sophocles. 



Thank you Mom and Dad for your love, sacrafice, and 
support; this degree is as much yours as it is mine. 



Kevin Qermino 

Congratulations Class of '88 
You're a great class and I am grateful for the times we 
shared. 1 wish all of you continued success. 

Thanks to the faculty and staff of LUMC. Special thanks 
to Maria, Peege, Sue, and KLC (alias "Punker") 
God Bless and 
Keep smiling. 
Germ 



82 



^evin C. Camey 



Victory awaits those who 

have everything in order, people call this 

luck. 
Defeat awaits those who 
fail to make the necessary precautions, 
this is known as bad luck. 

Roald Amundsen 




lark Schick 



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Robert Brodish 




Denise Radzialowski 



"Of those to whom much is given much is required. " 

— John F. Kennedy 

"A ship in the harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are 
built for. " 

— Anonymous 



"Sometimes give your services for nothing, calling to mind a previoi 
benefaction or present satisfaction. And if there be an opportunity i 
serving one who is a stranger in financial straits, give full assistance I 
such . For where there is love of man, there is also love of art. For sort 
patients, though conscious that their condition is perilous, recover the 
health simply through their contentment with the goodness of the phys 
cian. And it is well to superintend the sick to make them well, to cai 
for the healthy to keep them well, also to care for one's own self, so < 
to observe what is seemly. " 

— Hippocrates 



"It Is characteristic of wisdom not to do desperate things.' 

— Henry David Thoreau 



Selected Average Caloric Expenditures 

Related to the Routine Pursuit and Maintenance 

of Personal Chocolate Resources 

Activity Calokic Exprnditure 

Carrying seven pounds of chocolate 

from store to residence 359 

Hiding all chocolate before answering 

door when company drops by 

unexpectedly 744 

Swimming to Switzerland 497,562 (approx.) 



"It is kindness to refuse immediately what you intend to deny 

— Publius Syrus 

"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable fi-o 
magic. " 

— Arthur C. Clarke 



"Courage is grace under pressure. 



"it ain't bragging if you really done it.' 



Ernest Hemingway 



-Dizzy Dean 



)oug Postels 



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Brian P. Foley 




Stephen M. Barnes 



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^evin Kumke 



We know very little, and yet it is astonishing that we know so much, and still more astonishing 
that so little knowledge can give us so much power. 

B. Russell 

Education alone can conduct us to that enjoyment which is, at once, best in quality and infi- 
nite in quantity. 

H. Mann 

Give me the serenity to accept what cannot be changed, give me the courage to change what 
can be changed, and the wisdom to know one from the other. 

R. rieibuhr 



incTrautmann 





Qerry Sieaal 




Joseph P. Contino 



iorrowed from Ziggy; 

As you go thru the great shower bath of life 

)n the soap. " 

rom Lawrence J. Peter; 
You can always tell a real 
riend: when you've made a fool 
»f yourself he doesn't feel 
ou've done a permanent job. " 
"TMAFIKS K ' 

Good Luck 
J.F.C. 



try not to slip 





Sruce Morris 




10 rules for getting along 
with other people 

Dear Readers; I am happy to repeat this column at the reque-^ 
ot readers from Phoenix, Montgomery, New Orleans, Springfield ajid 
Nassau. 
m It ComnuDdinenu of How to Ott Aloni with PeopJ* 

I 1. Ke«p ikld chiUiu on your tongue; alwayi say less thin you 
: ihlnlt Cultlvu* 1 low, pmmiulve voice. How you say It often ccjnts 
! more than what you say. 

• Z MtJu promlMt sptrln|ly and ke«p them faithfully, do nutter 
what It conj. 

3. Never let an opportunity put to ny a kind 
^d encouraging word to or about somebody. 
Praise good wortt, regardless of who did It. If 
critlclim li ne*ded, criticize helpfully, never 
spitefully. 

4. B< Interested In others: their punulti, their 
work, their homes and families. Make merry with 
those who rejoice; with those who weep, 
mourn. Let everyone yon meet, however humble, 
feel that you regard him as t person of 

IiDportuce, * 

!. Be theerfnl. Don't burden or depress those srouwJ you by 

dwvUiflg on your minor aches and pains and small dlsippoiirtmentj. 

Remember, everyone la cirrylng some kind of a load. 
6. Keep an open mind. Dlicuss but don't argue. It it a mark of • 
;5iipertor mind to be able to disagree without being dliagreeable. 
t 7. Let your virtues, If you have any, speak for themselves. Refuje 
:to lilk of »DOth«r'l vices. Discourage gossip. It is • waste of 
;vilu«ble time and can be extremely destructive. 
- 8. Be cireful of another's feelings. Wit and humor at the other 
-person's expense are rarely worth It and miy hurt when least 
•expected. 

: 9. Pay no attention to Ill-natured remirks about you. Remember, 
-the person who carried the message may not be the most accurate 
^reporter In the world. Simply live so that nobody will believe them. 
7 Disordered nerves and bad digestion are a common cause of back- 
;nmng. 

10. Don't be too anxloua about the credit due you. Do your best 
,.ind Ni patient Forget about yourself and let others "remember. " 

Success Is much sweeter that way. 39 



^^m 



Kurt Warkenthein 

nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. 
Talent will not: nothing is more common than unsuc- 
cessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded ge- 
nius is almost a proverb. Education alone will not; the 
world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and De- 
termination are omnipotent. 




David Dungan 

Comer of the Sky 

Everything has its season 

Everything has its time 

Show me a reason and ril show you a rhyme. 

Cats fit on the windowsill 

Children fit in the snow 

Why do I feel I don t fit in anywhere I go? 

Rivers belong where they can ramble 
Eagles belong where they can fly 
I've got to be where my spirit can run free 
Got to find my corner of the sky. 

Everyman has his daydreams 

Everyman has his goals 

People like the way dreams have of sticking to 

the soul. 

Thunderclouds have their lightning 

Nightingales have their song 

And don't you see I want my life to be 

something more than long? 

So many men seem destined 

To settle for something small 

But 1 won t rest until 1 know I have it all. 

So don't ask where I'm going 

But listen when I'm gone 

And far away you'll hear me singing softly 

to the dawn 




At a sports medicine "conference " in Aspen 




What a swing . . . look out Kaz 



Almost as good as St. Lucia 



Kyran Quinlan 





Stuart Fox 




Mark Wakabayashi 





My Family and Friends 



Cheryl Hoflfman 




92 





[ ^Y^Ct\C^C> J\ Kiri^VQ.r^n ^° "^y family and friends who helped create the good times that 
<^€Al 1V_11V^V^ 1 \l l\JL\^l Ov-/l 1 made the bad times bearable ... I love you" 

Dr. Suess 




In special memory of the late Mayor Harold Washington and others before him who have dedicated their lives to making 
"The Dream" a reality . . . Sweet Dreams 



Oavid Schwartz 



V *»>►■•» "^T^i" 




Celebrating my accep- 
tance into Loyola 



My two loves: Quacamole and Indiana University 
Basketball. The night of the 1987 nCAA Cham- 
pionship. 



Post-Call. So what's Tan- 
la's excuse? 



93 



Greg Kaczmarek 

To My Classmates, 

My thanks for making the last four years so enjoyable and unfor- 
getable. Ill watch with great anticipation to see what the future 
holds for this group. So many interesting and intelligent people 
with a genuine concern for their fellow man, should have no diffi- 
culty finding happiness and success in the years to come. 

To My future Wife, Family, and Special Friends, 
To all of you, thanks for keeping me from getting too one dimen- 
sional during the last 4 years. 

To Mom and Dad, thanks for your support and understanding. 
To Jackie & Steve and Eileen & Tom, thanks for being such won- 
derful couples and friends. 
To Sharon, a life-time of thanks. 

Best Wishes, 
Greg f^aczmarek 





Wendy Tillotson 





94 



Iva Wai 




le family with our newest member 



Jackson and me by the Niagara 
Fails; cat absolutely hated al 
that water 



f^KllQ T^ F^^ Congratulations to the Class of 1988. Special 
* thanl^s to Martin, my family, and you, my friends 

here in Chicago for making these four years en- | 
joyable as well as worthwhile. 

Best Wishes to All, 




Michael R. Leonard! 



I'MMOTSlCK.' / TOKG'Ot 

WILL \T HURT? IT WONT 
-y AH'-WMMi 



r 




Ki 



WHM'S 

VJILLIT 
HURT? 



ITS ^ CATTLE 

FftOD \THyRl5 

^ LITTLE LESS 

TUm A 




ITS A n 

STrT]C)S^'.OPE 

IT YiC^VT 
HURTATAU-, 




Um-£ KIDS t^Ai£ NO 
SEHSt OF WMCR. 




Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has rea 
ched in life as by the obstacles he has overcome while trying to succeed 

Booker T. Washingtoi 

Knowledge is proud that it knows so much; 
Wisdom is humble that it knows no more. 

William Cowpe 
The highest reward for a man's toil is not what he gets for it but what hi 
becomes by it. 

John Ruskinj 

To my family, friends, and all those who have supported me 

THAriK YOU! 



Real joy comes not from ease or riches or from the praise of men, but from doing 
something worthwhile. 

William T. Qrenfall 



Sue McGregor 







ft w(id tki b^o^V/y^. 



c- Picnm 





teve Slana 





With Kevin Carney in St. Lucia 



rried Jaci^ie on June 15, 1985 




th date Greg Kaczmarek 




Fishing with Tom 
and Eileen Meuman 



eff Tash 



Ma Tuan-lin, Elhnographie des peuples etrangers a la Chine, 
trans. Marquis d'Hervey de Saint-Denys, II: Meridlonaux (Ge- 
neva, 1883), pp. 228-35. E. H. Parker, Burma, wilh Special 
Reference to Her Relations with China (Rangoon, 1893), p. 12. 
C. H. Luce, "The Ancient Pyu," pp. 250-52. 



The wall of the capital, measuring 160 // 
in length, is made of green glazed brick and Is protected by a moat 
lined with bricks; It is pierced by twelve gates and armed with 
towers at the corners. Its population includes several tens of 
thousands of families. The houses are roofed with lead and tin 
shingles. There are more than a hundred Buddhist monasteries, 
decorated with gold, silver, and many colors of paint and hung 
with embroidered cloth. In the palace of the king there are two 
bells, one gold and the other silver, that are struck in a certain 
way if the kingdom is threatened by invasion; the sounds the 
bells make are interpreted as presaging good luck or bad. Near 
the palace there Is a statue of a large white elephant 100 feet 
high. In front of which all those who have grievances kneel, re- 
flecting Inwardly about the justice or injustice of their own causes. 
In case of public misfortunes, the king himself bows down before 
the elephant, burning Incense and blaming himself for the offenses 
he has committed. The women pile their hair on top of their 
head, forming a large knot that they decorate with tin flowers, 
pearls, and various stones. They all carry fans, and those of the 
upper class suspend five or six of them from their girdles. Young 
boys and girls have their heads completely shaved at seven years 
of age and are then placed in the temples and convents. They live 
there until their twentieth year, studying the religion of the 
Buddha, and then they re-enter the world. Their clothes consist 
only of a white cotton robe and a girdle whose red color imitates 
the shade of the clouds that surround the rising sun. They spurn 
the use of silk because it is fiecessary to take life in order to 
procure silk. The inhabitants of the country profess a love of life 
and a horror of killing. Neither shackles, manacles, nor any in- 
struments of torture are used on accused persons, who are simply 
tied up. Those who are found guilty receive lashes of bamboo on 
the back: five blows for grave offenses, three for those less serious. 



Denise Panuccio And Peter Ruggiero 





98 



^aren And Barry Goldberg 







|Q^^B^7 ^^^^^^^1 




b^ ^^ J^M 






f 


^^^^^^^^^1 

^^^^^^^^H 




THE NEW yOWK TIMES 



Miss Handler to Marry 

Announcement has been made by 
Dr. and Mrs. Leo Hendler of Spring 
Valley, N.Y., of the engagement of 
their daughter, Karen Lynn Hendler, 
to Barry Edward Goldberg, a son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Goldberg of 
Brooklyn. Miss Hendler and her 
flanc^ expect to receive M. D. de- 
grees from the Strltch School of Medi- 
cine at Loyola University in Chicago 
next year. The future bride graduated 
cum laude from the Wharton School 
of the University of Pennsylvania. 
Mr. Goldberg is a graduate of New 
York University. An August wedding 
Is planned. 




On 4/4/85 we thought maybe. 
On 12/25/86 we were certain, 
On 8/30/87 we exchanged vows. 

With the love and support of our fam- 
ilies and friends, we have made all 
our dreams come true. 

Karen and Barry 




Rudy J. Allen 



^ «'' 



y^^ 



"N 




4 



I'd like to thank: 

My Mom, Dad, Mary and riana - for all their love 

My Aunt Evelyn - for her encouragement and prayers 

My friends - for always being there 

Loyola - for my education, good friends, and enabling me to meet my wife 

My Doll - for all her love, for making me happy, and for being my wife. 5/22/86; 12/31/86; 5/21/88 



VirginiaT.Qreaney 

To my Mom - thank you for going through 
medical school with me and for all of your 
love and support. I could not have done it 
without you. 

To my friends - thank you for all of the good 
times we've shared. 

To Loyola - thank you for my medical educa- 
tion and for enabling me to become a physi- 
cian. 

To my Rudy - although we found each other 
in an unlikely place, I would have loved you 
no matter where we met. 

Mere's to May 21, 1988 and to a lifetime of 
happiness together. 

' g n y 

And to my Father - (6/22/19 - 2/26/79), „ 1 
whose loving memory remains my insplra- jg 
tion and who is always in my heart. 




David Howard 




Family 



Friends 



Future 



)usan Vierczhalek 




Randy Reid 




Daniela Reid 




Carl J. Rossi, Jr. 



■*? a57v-^i 




rar better to dare mighty things, than to take rank with those poor 
jirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, for they live in that 
'ay twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat." 

heodore Roosevelt, Custer Battlefield national Monument, 1908 




Douglas Darlin 









9 mm ^^f - •,'''14 
'-.'llf.'IKII ■ - ■''^<r ' -V^y 




103 



Becky Preston 




With thanks to Bill 

Who provided all kinds of support 
To Andy and Ellen 

Who gave up a share of time and attention 
And to our families 

For their loving encouragement 



Alison Lewis 

A special drug for those who wish to abuse themselves: 
BOHICA'5) (LUMC) 

Description: A 4 year imprisonment at The IMecca during which students 
are intermittently force fed and later squashed to expel partially 
digested fragments of useless information. 

Indications and Usage: Used to treat incurable desire to save the world, 
attain high social status or own a Porsche. 

Actions: Converts B.S. to M.D., causing severe financial debt. 

Adverse Reactions: CMS - causes neurosis, paranoia, anxiety, and in- 
somnia every 4-5 nights. Ql - increases sphincter tone. 

Precautions: May have a tendency to deplete social skills and inflate the 
ego. Do not use if patient enjoys weekends, sleep, recreational read- 
ing or especially sunshine. 

Dosage: 10 months times 2 years, then continuously thereafter for life. 




Special thanks to my financial Aid D 
partment. 



104 





Fellow Classmates, 

Meet your future Opthalmologist, General 
Surgeon, and Radiologist. 

I'm going to miss you all. Good Luck in 
your future endeavors. 

P.S. I want you all to meet the future 
Mrs. J. Y. 




Monte W. Hasten 



To gather knowledge and to find out new knowledge is the 
noblest occupation of the physician. To apply that knowledge 
. . . with sympathy born of understanding, to the relief of human 
suffering, is his loveliest occupation. 

-Edward Archibald 
Best wishes to my fellow colleagues in the Class of 1988 for future 
success. Dedicated with love and thanks to Dad, Mom, Steph, 
Jeff, Mary, Alison, and Tom Kaltsulas, Sr. 

Monte W. Masten 




Gary Chmielewski 




Before we go . . . 

Some words to live by . . . 

Always sit between the chicks. 

Hang out with guys that are tougher than 

you are, 

and have plenty of fun in the sun. 
Hang on to what's important gang. Take 
Care. 



Kevin F. Colton 




A short prayer of thanks for the miracles 

of the past 4 years: Acceptance to Loyola, the 

Air Force Scholarship, Our Marriage, Our First baby. 
Our friends, and the chance to serve. Thank you 
Jesus. 

Kevin & Laurie 












1^ 


a 


P 




^•k 


SAT 


-»-^ «•(>«/- 


1 SUN 



:mb£R: 

IF You DON'T 
LIKE ^^ J 

IT ^-^ ^( 



Mike Hummel 



WW 




■as, 



Son of The Fly' 





Developing other skills just in case this medical 
thing doesn't pan out. 



So what's the big deal with Chernobyl? 



now what's this about a great white? 



Peter Kerstan 




Russell Sawyer 

Wishing ail the best for the Class of 1988 during residency and in 
their chosen speciality!!! 

Fondly, 
Russ & Marina Sawyer 




Scott 
romasik 




"?ete^oaSelly 




Warren Jablonsky 

The following quotes were taken from Aequanimitas a book of ad- 
dresses to medical students, nurses and practitioners of medicine by 
Sir William Osier M.D., approximately 1906. 

To each one of you the practice of medicine will be very 
much as you make it — to one a worry, a care, a perpetual 
annoyance; to another, a daily joy and a life of as much 
happiness and usefulness as can well fall to the lot of man. 
In the student spirit you caa best fulfil the high missioa of 
our uoble calling — in his hunility, conscious of weakness, 
while seeking strength; in his confidence, knowing the 
power, while recognizing the limitations of his art; in his 
■pride in the glorious heritage from which the greatest gifts 
to man have been derived; and in his sure and certain hope 
that the future holds for us richer blessings than the 
past. 

There are men and classes of men that stand above the common herd: 
he soldier, the sailor, and the shepherd not infrequently ; the artist rarely; 
arelier st U, the clergyman; the physician almost as a rule. He is the 
lower (such as it is) of our civilization; and when that stage of man is done 
vith, and only to be marvelled at in history, he will be thought to have 
hared as little as any in the defects of tlie period, and most notably 
xhibited the virtues cf the race. Generosity he has, such as is possible 
o those who practise an art, Dever to those who drive a trade; discretion, 
psted by a hundred secrets; tact, tried in a thousand embarrassments; 
nd what are more important, Heraclean cheerfulness and courage, 
lo that he brings air and cheer into the sick room, and often enough, 
hough not so often as he wishes, brings healing. 

Robert Locis Stevenson, Preface to Underwoods. 



Best Wishes and continued success to my fellow 
classmates, in both your professional and private 
lives. 

Warren Jablonsky 



These (years of vague, restless speculation) had now lasted long enough, 
and it was time for the MeisieTJahre of quiet, methodical research to 
succeed if science was to acquire steady and sedentary habits instead of 
losing itself in a maze of phantasies, revolving in idle circles. It is the 
undying glory of the medical school of Cos that it introduced this inno- 
vation in the domain of its art, and thus exercised the most beneficial 
influence on the whole intellectual life of mankind. "Fiction to the right! 
Reality to the left!" was the battle-cry of tliis school in the war they were 
the first to wage agr.inst the excesses and defects of the nature-philosophy. 
Nor could it have found any more suitable ch.'impions, for the serious and 
noble calling of the physician, which brings him every day and every hour 
in close communion with nature, in the exercise of which mistakes in theory 
engender the most fatal practical consequences, has served in all ages as a 
nursery of the most genuine and incorruptible sense of truth. The best 
phyiicians must be the best observers, but the man who sees keenly, who 
hears clearly, and whose senses, powerful at the start, are sharpened and 
refined by constant exercise, will only in exceptional instances be a 
visionary or a dreamer. 

GoMPERz, Greek Thinkers, vol i. 



3ill Cannon 





My godson (& nephew) Danny, in my lap My family. Evidence that mutations are genetic. 



All the Qeeks in my wedding 





^^ 




y niece and nephews to date. Biped mutations 
TO scream. 



My first dog, Stinko. My next dog will be named Zork. The church was kind enough to provide safety 
1 want to teach her to chew with her mouth closed, tips for the honeymoon. Meres Joleen practlc- 
Should be worth a spot on Letterman. ing. 



\my Facinelli Stone 










Peter Wu 




Senior Class Special Edition 



LOYOLA TRIBUME 



Inside 

Four Years In Review 
Fun Facts 



"This is a parody, it is not meant or intended to be a 
representation of an actual Chicago Tribune. 



■ledical Student Stays 
^wake 100 Straight Hours 




still can't find The Hat "! 



Day 1000 In Captivity 

Chairnappers Demand End to Qunnerism 




riew Life-Like 
Teaching Mannequins 



Student Hears Loan 
Total - Stunned Silly! 





Freshman 



Year 




Anatomy Biochemistry Histology Fleuroscience Physiolog 




ci^ojm<^\^ i\ 




TOP: We learned how to study by osmosis fresh- 
man year and coffee became a member of the ba- 
sic food groups. 

ABOVE: Coops were a way of life for two years as 
were the coop comics . 



114 



It was a difficult beginning, not 
only was it our first day of Medi- 
cal School, but it also was July, 
the middle of a hot summer. 
Somehow it just didn't seem 
right starting school so soon. 
Most of us had worked all our 
livesjust for that moment, yet we 
were apprehensive of what was 
to come. Would we be able to 
handle the rigors of Medical 
School? Could we compete with 
all those super bright people in 
our class? 

We began with orientation. The 
most memorable moment had 
to be Carl sitting in the first row 
with his Teddy Bear. There were 
some surprised looks from the 
administration that day. We 
heard one phrase over and over, 
"Welcome to Loyola " and we 
also heard what was to come. 
Graduation seemed so far away 
that day, because it was. 

An hour after the beginning of 
first day of classes we were in 
anatomy lab. Most of us were so 
shell-shocked we did not realize 
what we were actually doing! 

The work load as heavy. Anato- 
my, Histology, Biochemistry and 
we quickly fell behind. The extra 



hours in the lab and the Coops 
gave us an opportunity to catch up 
which we never did. We learned 
the definition of Gunner', though 
we all possessed some of those in- 
stincts. The most harrowing expe- 
rience probably was the first set of 
exams. Once we got past them we 
knew that although there was alot 
of hard work ahead, we would 
somehow get through. 

That year we focused on our differ- 
ences. We joked about each 
others accents and styles of dress. 
There were the standard California 
and new York jokes but there was 
also the first Chicago winter for 
many of us. Although we were a di- 
verse group, we began to coalesce 
into a class that would spend 4 dif- 
ficult years together. While there 
was lots of work, there was also 
some time for fun. There was MDL 
sports, the All-School Picnic, St. 
Lukes day, parties and other 
events. 

The balance of freshman year was 
devoted to neuroscience. Physiol- 
ogy, Humanities and more. Any- 
thing seemed tolerable aft:er that 
year but then there was second 
year. 




Sophomore 



Year 



Microbiology Pathology Organ Systems Physical Diagnosis 



When we returned for second year 
we knew we were older and wiser, 
so we thought. Unfortunately, 
third semester greeted us with 
Pharmacology, Microbiology and 
Pathology. How could anyone 
memorize every drug and its side 
effects, the genetics of every virus 
and all the pathologic processes 
affecting the kidney? Freshman 
year seemed like cake during that 
semester. If you had been having 
doubts before, now you were really 
questioning your ability. The late 
nights of studying in the library 
and MDLs paid off. 

We looked for ways to relax and 
PIG' basketball became a popular 
sport as there was no time to play 
real basketball, except for a few 
who always managed to find time 
for sports. 

Fourth semester was exciting, for 
it was the first time we could see 
a light at the end of the tunnel. 
There was Organ Systems and 
Venn Diagrams, and there was P- 
Daug' and Qynne models and 
there was the fifty pound white 
coat. All that we had learned was 
beginning to coalesce. We were 
real thankful because we spent a 



year and a half wondering why we 
needed to know what happened to 
every glucose molecule we con- 
sumed. 

That first day we put on our white 
coats was exciting. Some of us 
were so excited that we wore our 
coats everywhere we went! Look- 
ing back it was silly, but we were 
"doctors' now and we liked it. It 
was difficult to find a willing patient 
those days and we used any sub- 
stitute we could find; our wives, 
husbands, girl/boy friends, cats, 
dogs, etc. Picking clerkship tracts 
seemed like the most important 
decision and it caused much dis- 
tress especially for those who were 
unlucky enough to select lower 
numbers. Fourth semester was 
also Behavioral Science and Com- 
munity Medicine classes which a 
majority of us chose not to partici- 
pate in. That year ended with 
Boards Part 1. We were exhausted, 
but what was to follow would make 
the past two years feel like gram- 
mar school. 




TOP: It was difficult finding willing patients during 

Physical Diagnosis. 

ABOVE: Many of us practically mo\ed into our 

MDLs. 



115 



Junior 



Year 




Pediatrics Medicine OB/Gyn Surgery Psychiatry 




TOP: Junior year was an exhausting experience 
and sleep was valued highly. 
ABOVE: Being on the floors however, enabled us 
to meet Loyola's sexy' nurses. 



Third year marked the beginning 
of clerkships. Jockeying for 
clerkships at the best hospitals' 
was the thing to do, although it 
seemed like the same people al- 
ways got their top choice while 
others wound up at their least de- 
sired hospital. We learned a new 
term that year, Scut-Monkey,' with 
all those sleepless nights on call, 
starting countless l.V.s and draw- 
ing countless tubes of blood. We 
were the brunt of many wise- 
cracks and pimp questions that 
made us feel lower than the vir- 
uses that we learned about sopho- 
more year. Pio matter how hard we 
worked it still beat those countless 
hours memorizing minutia. And if 
nothing else we built our muscles 
holding retractors in surgery for 
hours at a time. We were happy 
though, as we were finally partici- 
pating as a member of the health 
care team' and were learning pa- 
tient management skills. 



During Pediatrics, OB/Qyn, Psychia- 
try we wondered which would be the 
one for us. Most of us changed 
monthly, as the decision seemed to 
depend what clerkship we were do- 
ing at the time. Our sights turned to- 
ward the future, during the latter 
part of junior year. We all pondered 
the question where we wanted to do 
our residencies not to mention in 
which field. We arranged all our se- 
nior year electives so we would have 
ample time to interview. We worried, 
"Would we get that coveted top resi- 
dency' position? " Our worries were 
only compounded when the FilRMP 
changed all the traditional dates for 
applications and the match. 



116 




Senior 



Year 



>ub-Internship neurology Interview St. Lucia Natch Da> 



Senior year was unquestionably 
the best of the four years. Much of 
the year was spent filling out resi- 
dency applications, requesting let- 
ters of recommendation and inter- 
viewing. The atmosphere became 
relaxed and we no longer focused 
on our differences but compared 
our similarities. We were now pros 
at jump-starting frozen cars and 
became tolerant of the Cardinal, 
Cub and Met fans in our class. 
While our white coats became 
lighter our worries became heavi- 
er as Match Day approached. 
There were, of course, a couple of 
hurdles, namely Medicine Sub-In- 
ternship, neurology and the 
Boards Part II. While extremely 
confident in our abilities we were 
frequently brought back to earth 
when we were called at 4 a.m. for 
an order only to be instructed that 
a senior would need to co-sign. But 
even that was not enough to upset 
us because the end was in sight. 

Match Day came and though a few 
of us were mildly disappointed. 



most of us were extremely happy. 
We partied all day at a pub called 
Doc Ryans' and all night on Rush 
Street. After four years, four long 
years, we had reached our goals. 
Graduation day was only a few 
months away but the rest of our 
lives were here. 

It was a sad time too. We knew that 
many of the close relationships 
that blossomed during Medical 
School were soon to be broken. 
We tried to put that out of our 
minds while we celebrated four 
years of accomplishments. 

Graduation day approached as we 
finalized our plans for the future. 
A long four years had passed. The 
future, that only seemed like a far 
away dream, was now. And so we 
leave Loyola-Stritch School of 
Medicine in body, however we will 
never forget the most memorable 
years of our lives. 




TOP: Senior year allowed time for the finer things 
of life, wine, women and good music. 
ABOVE; St. Lucia was a chance to make a differ- 
ence and get a great sun tan at the same time. 



117 



Fun Facts 

Based on a Class of 1988 Survey 



Most Typical: 



new Yorker 



Califomian 



Curtice Wong 



Chicagoan 




Leslie Cone 



Favorite 
Mnemonics . . . 



1) Ten Zebras Bought My Car 
(Branches of Facial Fierve) 

2) Some Lovers Try Positions 
They Can't Handle 
(Carpal Bones) 

3) Sue Ann Loves "Frolicking " 
On Peru's Main Streets 
(Branches of External Carotid Artery) 

Most Likely . . . 

to be found in gym: 
Gary Chmielewski 

to be found in library: 
Jeff Tash 

at a new restaurant: 
John Hsu 



Hospitals witii Best Food: 




RESURRECT 



#l-Resurrection 




#2-St. Francis 



NOTE: Loyola was not men- 
tioned once! 



*3-Alexian Brothers 



118 



continued 




Most Memorable Hines Elevator Stories: 

"The day I took the elevator to the 14th floor at the same time Carl Rossi was 
walking up the 14 flights. Me beat the elevator and wasn't even out of breath! " 

"Dropping 12 floors and having the elevator doors open to a cinderblock wall." 

"Trapped - going up to 15 then down to the basement, then again and again." 

Stopping on every floor from the basement to 15 but the door never opened!" 

"The Vet who wheeled himself, at the last minute, into the elevator, but, unfor- 
tunately his Foley collection bag was left outside the door-as the elevator rose 
we can only imagine what happened on the other side . . . Ouch!" 



Did You Know? 

as a class we . . . 

ripped a total of 375 pockets on our 

white coats. 

gained a total of 750 pounds. 

visited Qoldas 1200 times. 

received 250 parking tickets at school. 



Most Ridiculous Call While on Call: 

"Glucose is 120; do you want to give some insulin to bring it to 100?" 

"The 2AI^ call to tell me that I had a 4AIM PTT to draw." 

"A call at 3AIM because a patient was acting strange - 1 was doing my Psychi 
atry rotation." 



"Fieurology call - short call was more like playing hide and go seek with 
my resident — I always won!" 



Most Embarrassing Moment on the 
Eloors: 

"I was running to an imminent delivery during Ob/Qyn and tripped over a wheelchair falling 
flat on my face." 

"Asking a patient how he was feeling while on attending rounds, only to later realize he had 
passed away. " 

"On my first day on a new surgery service, I was driving to the hospital and cut off a jerk in 
a Bronco who cut me off on the Kennedy Expressway. When I got to the hospital that morning 
he tumed out to be my chief resident. Fortunately, we became good friends." 

"Spraying blood all over my senior surgical residents white coat, not to mention all over the 
patient, myself and the ceiling." 



Most Interesting Question 
Asked In Class: 

Any question asked by Tony Caterine - especially 
to Dr. Thomas concerning crucifixion." 



By the Year 2000 . . . 

The class believes there will be a vaccine for AIDS approved for general 
use. 

The malpractice problem will get better. 

The cost of the 1st year of medical school at Stritch will be $25,000- 
30,000. 

75 first year students will matriculate at Stritch. 

Major problems facing physicians: HMO's and government regulations. 



Favorite . . . 



names paged in the library: 

Dr. Pepper, Al Dosterone, Dr. Bill Roth, Dr. Ann Qioplasia, 
Dr. Sue Damonas 

Hilighter color: Yellow 



119 



Match Day 



ALLEh, Rudy 
AMDERSOM, Candice 
AZEVEDO, Robert 
BARNES, Stephen 
BECKLEY, Russel 
BELL, Angela 
BEriEDUCE, Chris 
BEMNETT, Chris 
BHASKAR, David 
BRODISh, Robert 
BROTT, Brigitta 
BUEMLER, Kristin 
CAMriOn, William 
CARMEY, Kevin 
CASCinO, Chris 

CATERIHE, Anthony 
CMELSKY, Mark 

CHMIELEWSKI, Gary 
COEFEY, Kelley 
COLTOn, Kevin 
COME, Leslie 
COrihOLLY, Joanne 
COMTinO, Joseph 
CZIPERLE, DAVID 
DAILEY, Diane 
DAMPER, Patricia 
DARLIh, Douglas 
DIAMOND, Cheryl 

DUNCAN, David 
ESTILL, Becky B. 
EACINELLI. Amy 

FEE, Janis 
FOLEY, Brian 
FOX, James 



FOX, Stuart 



U. Chicago Med. Ctr, 
St. Joseph Hospital 
U. California Davis 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
Harbor-UCLA Med. Ctr. 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
Maine Medical Center 
Columbus Hospital 
U. Cincinnati Hosp. 
Beth Israel Hosp.-Bost. 
Maricopa Med. Ctr. 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
U. IL. Hospital 
Rush-Pres.-St. Lukes 

U. Fl. Med. Ctr.-Shands 
Temple University Hosp. 

WSU/Detroit Med. Ctr. 
Loma Linda U. Med. Ctr. 
VA Med. Ctr-Martinez 
Madigan/Seattle 
Evanston Hosp.-NW Univ. 
U. Cal. Davis 
Med. Coll. of Wisconsin 
U. Cal. Davis 
Rush-Pres.-St. Lukes 
Kaiser Perm. Med. Ctr. 
U. Chicago Med Ctr. 

Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 

Lutheran Qen Hosp 

LA County-use Med. Ctr. 

U. Chicago Med. Ctr. 
St, Francis-Evanston 
MacNeal Hospital 
U Michigan Hosps.-Ann 

Arb, 
Naval Hospital, Oakland 



IL PEDIATRICS-C , 

IL OB/QYN-C ^ 

CA OB/QYN-C 
IL GENERAL SURQERY-C 
CA INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 
IL GENERAL SURGERY-P 
IL INTERNAL MEDICINE-P 
ME PEDIATRICS-C 
IL OB/GYN-C 

OH GENERAL SURGERY-C 
MA INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 
AZ GENERAL SURGERY-C 
IL MEDICINE/PEDIATRICS-C 
IL INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 
IL GENERAL SURGERY-P 

NEUR05URQEKY-C 
FL PSYCHIATRY-C 
PA GENERAL SURGERY-P 

UROLOGY-C 
Ml GENERAL SURQERY-C 
CA PSYCHIATRY-C 
CA INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 
WA PEDIATRICS-C 
IL INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 
CA GENERAL SURGERY-C 
Wl GENERAL SURGERY-C 
CA INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 
IL INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 
CA UROLOGY-C 
IL DIAGNOSTIC 

RADIOLOGY-C 
IL MEDICINE/PEDIATRICS-C 
IL PSYCHIATRY-C 
CA EMERGENCY 

MEDICINE-C 
IL OB/GYN-C 
IL OB/GYN-C 
IL TRANSITIONAL-P 
Ml ANESTME5IOLOGY-C 

CA OB/GYN-C 



GERMINO, Kevin 
QIRARDOT, Jeffrey 

GODBE, David 
GOLDBERG, Barry 
GORDON, Judy 
GREANEY, Virginia 
GREGG, Kevin 
HAYDEK, John 
HENDLER, Karen 

HEPNAR, Gerald 
HOFFMAN, Cheryl 
HOWARD, David 
HSU, John 
HUMMEL, Milton 

JABLONSKY, Warren 
JECIUS, Algimantas 
JELCZ, Marion 
JUNQE, Sharon 

KACZMAREK, Gregory 
KANTAYYA, Vivek 
KARTJE-TILLOTSON, G, 



KERSTAN, Peter 
KOVARIK, Paula 
KUMKE, Kevin 
LEONARDI, Michael 
LEUTZ, Darr 
LEWIS, Alison 
LISCO, Steven 

MACDONALD, Leslie 
MARCUS, Wendi 
MARTIN, Maureen 
MASTEN, MONTE 
MATTOX, J. Suzanne 
MAY, John 

MAZZUCCO, John 
MCELROY, Kimberly 
MCGREGOR, Susan 
MILLER, Angela 



Med. Coll. of Wisconsin 
WSU/Detroit Med. Ctr. 

U. California-Irvine 
Long Island Jewish 
Hinsdale Hospital 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
VA Med. Ctr.-Sepulveda 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
NY Med. Coll. -West Co. 
Long Island Jewish 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
U. IL Hosp. 

Tripler Army Medical Ctr. 
Loma Linda U. Med. Ctr. 
Cook County Hosp. 

Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
Mt. Carmel Mercy 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
Mem. Hosp. of 

Carbondale 
Evanston Hosp.-NW Univ. 
Cook County Hospital 
W. Suburban Hosp. /Med, 

Ctr 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
Resurrection Hospital 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
Brook Army Hospital 
Wilford Hall Med. Ctr. 
SIU Sch. of Med. & Affl. 
San Joaquin Gen. Hosp. 
U. Michigan Hosps-Ann 

Arb 
U. of Minnesota Hospitals 
Lutheran Qen. Hosp. 
Strong Memorial Hosp. 
Barnes Hosp. 
Rush-Pres-St. Lukes 
AMSA 

Waterbury Hosp. 
George Washington U. 
Med. Coll. of Wisconsin 
U. IL. Hospital 



Wl PEDIATRICS-C 
Ml DIAGNOSTIC 

RADIOLOQY-C 
CA GENERAL SURGERY-C 
NY PEDIATRICS-C 
IL FAMILY PRACTICE-C 
IL INTERNAL MEDICINE-P 
CA PSYCHIATRY-C 
IL INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 
NY INTERNAL MEDICINE-P 
NY OFHTHALMOLOGY-C 
IL INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 
IL INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 
HI TRANSITIONAL-F 
CA UROLOGY-C 
IL DIAGNOSTIC 

RADIOLOQY-C 
IL ORTHOFAEDICS-C 
Ml GENERAL SURQERY-C 
IL OB/GYN-C 
IL FAMILY PRACTICE-C 

IL INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 
IL FAMILY PRACTICE-C 
IL TRANSITIONAL-P 

IL NEUROLOGY-C 

IL FAMILY PRACTICE-C 

IL PATHOLOGY-C 

TX INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 

TX OB/GYN-C 

IL ORTHOPAEDICS-C 

CA FAMILY PRACTICE-C 

Ml INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 

MN OB/GYN-C 

IL INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 

NY PEDIATRICS-C 

MO OB/GYN-C 

IL INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 
INT. HEALTH FELLOW- 
SHIP 

CT GENERAL SURGERY-C 

DC INTERNAL MEDICINE-C 

Wl PEDIATRICS-C 

IL PEDIATRICS-C 






STATS 

Received 1st choice 57% 

Received 2nd choice 23% 

Received 3rd choice 4% 

4th or greater 14% 

Location 

Midwest 55% 

West Coast 25% 

East Coast 12% 

South 6% 

22 States plus D.C. and Africa 




Mini, Louis 
MIROT, Max 



MORRIS, Bruce 



hQUYEh. Thanh-Tarn 

riORA, Maryannette 
riOTHWAnQ, Jon 

O KELLY, Peter 
OLSEPt, Craig 
ORFAhEDES, Sharon 
PAnuCCIO, Denise 

PARK, Chinyoung 
PERRY, Stephen 
POHL. John 
POSTELS, Douglas 
PRESTO n, Rebecca 
QUiriLAPI, Kyran 
RADZIALOWSKI, 

Denise 
REID, Randall 
ROE, Timothy 
ROSSI, Carl 
RUQQIERO, Peter 
SAISHO, Ryushi 
SAWYER, Russell 
SCHICK, Mark 

5CHREITER, Steven 
SCHULTZ, Randall 



SCHWARTZ, David 
SCURLOCK, William 

SHEFARD, Allan 

SIEQEL, Gerald 

SLAflA, Victor 

SMALL, Roger 
SMITH, Chris 
SMIDER, Anne 
TASH, Jeffrey 

TOMASIK, Scott 
TRAUTMAPfh, Eric 
TRELKA, Mark 
TRIPP, Robert 
VIERCZHALEK, Susan 
VOQELQESAhQ, Daniela 
WAITE, Eva 
WAKABAYASHI, Mark 
WALLER, Philip 
WALSH, Jill 
WARKEhTHIEn, Kurt 
WILCOXSOn, Lesley 
WOMQ, Curtice 

WU, Peter 
YOUnO, Jeffrey 

U. EL Med. Ctr.-Shands 
Medical University SC 



Baystate Med. Ctr., 

Inc 
U. Califomia-lrvine 

Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
LA County-USC Med. Ctr. 

Harbor-UCLA Med. Ctr. 
U. California-Irvine 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr, 
UMDHJ-Robert W. 

Johnson 
Michael Reese Hosp 
Valley Med. Ctr. -Fresno 
Wilford Hall Med. Ctr. 
Wilford Hall Med. Ctr. 
Resurrection Hospital 
U. Chicago Med. Ctr. 
Hennepin Co. Med. 

Ctr. 
Cook County Hospital 
VAMC W. LA. Wadsworth 
Loma Linda U. Med. Ctr. 
Walter Reed, Wash. D.C. 
San Pedro Peninsula 
U. California Davis 
McQaw Med. Ctr.-MW 

Univ. 
riorth Carolina Baptist 
St. Joseph Hosp. 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
Kern Medical Ctr. 
U California Davis 



Louis A. Weiss Mem. 
northwestern McQaw 
Stonybrook Teaching 

Hosp. 
St. Joseph Hospital 
Loyola/Hines VA 
rfaval Hospital, Oakland 
Med. Coll. of Wisconsin 
St. Erancis-Evanston 
U. Hawaii Integ. Med. 

Res. 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
U. IL-Rockford-EPC 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
Thomas Jefferson Univ. 
St. Christophers Hosp. 
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr. 
U. Chicago Med. Ctr. 
U. Hawaii Integ. Ob/Qyn 
Lutheran General Hosp. 
U. California Davis 
Resurrection Hospital 
U. IL Hospital 
Harbor-UCLA Med. Ctr. 

St. Joseph Hosp. 

Med. Coll. of Wisconsin 

EL PSYCHIATRY-C 
SC DlAQnOSTlC 
RADIOLOGY-C 
MA OB/QYPI-C 



CA MEDICIME/PEDIATRICS- 

C 
IL IMTERMAL MEDICIHE-C 
CA TRAHSITIOMAL-P 

AMESTHESIOLOGY-C 
CA GEhERAL SURGERY-P 
CA IhTERMAL MEDICIhE-C 
IL PEDIATRICS-C 
hj IMTERHAL MEDICIPfE-C 

IL IPtTERnAL MEDICinE-C 

CA inTERMAL MEDICinE-C 

TX inTERHAL MEDICIHE-P 

TX PEDIATRICS-C 

IL FAMILY FRACTICE-C 

IL PEDIATRICS-C 

Mh irfTERHAL 

MEDICiriE-C 
IL OB/GYM-C 

CA iriTERhAL MEDICinE-P 
CA inTERMAL MEDICIHE-P 
MD inTERPtAL MEDICIHE-C 
CA FAMILY PRACTICE-C 
CA QEHERAL 5URGERY-C 
IL ORTHOPAEDICS-C 

nc Internal Medicine-C 
IL IPiTERHAL MEDICIP(E-F 
IL GEHERAL SURQERY-P 
CA inTERhAL MEDICinE-F 
CA AriESTHESlOLOQY-C 



IL inTERhAL MEDICIME-P 
IL hEUROLOQY-C 
riY OB/QYh-C 

IL iriTERMAL MEDICIME-P 

IL OFMTHALMOLOGY-C 

CA OB GYn-C 

Wl FEDIATRICS-C 

IL OB, GYh-C 

HI IPtTERMAL MEDlCinE-C 

IL IMTERMAL MEDICirfE-C 

IL FAMILY PRACTICE-C 

IL IhTERMAL MEDlCinE-C 

FA GEriERAL SURGERY-C 

FA FEDIATRICS-C 

IL FSYCHIATRY-C 

IL MEDICiriE FEDIATRICS-C 

HI OB GYPI-C 

IL inTERPtAL MEDICIPiE-C 

CA PEDlATRICS-C 

IL FAMILY FRACTICE-C 

IL GEHERAL SURGERY-C 

CA EMERGENCY MEDICIME- 

C 
IL FAMILY PRACTICE-C 
Ul IhTERPIAL MEDICIME-F 

OPHTMALMOLOQY-C 



121 




Congratulations and Best Wishes 

to tlie Class of 1988 from the 

Administration, Faculty and 

Alumni Relations Department of 

Loyola University of Chicago 

Stritch School of Medicine 



122 



The Loyola-Stritch Class of 1988 
wishes to thank the following People 
and Departments for their financial 
support of the Caduceus 1988. 

Official Sponsors: 

Dr. Barbato, Dean 

Dr. Fraizer, Assoc. Dean, Academic Affairs 

Dr. Rainey, Assoc. Dean, Student Affairs 

Dr. Vertuno, Assoc. Dean, Professional Affairs 

Dr. Robinson, Assoc. Dean, Research 

Dr. Burr, Asst. Dean Admissions 

Ms. Wronski, Asst. Dean, Student & Academic Affairs 

Mr. Whitehead, Dean of Students 

Mr. Lambesis, Asst. Dean of Students 

Dr. Clancy, Chairman, Dept. of Anatomy 

Dr. Rao, Chairman, Dept. of Anesthesiology 

Dr. Qunnar, Chairman Dept. of Medicine 

Dr. Celesia, Chairman, Dept. of neurology 

Dr. flenkin. Chief, Division of nuclear Medicine 

Dr. Isaacs, Chairman, Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Dr. McDonald, Chairman, Dept. of Ophthalmology 

Dr. Matz, Chairman, Dept. of Otolaryngology 

Dr. Herman, Chairman, Dept. of Pathology 

Dr. Hurley, Chairman, Dept. of Pediatrics 

Dr. Hanin, Chairman, Dept. of Pharmacology 

Dr. Filkins, Chairman, Dept. of Physiology 

Dr. deVito, Chairman, Dept. of Psychiatry 

Dr. Marks, Chairman, Dept. of Radiotherapy 

Dr. Freeark, Chairman, Dept. of Surgery 

Dr. Pifarre, Chairman, Dept. of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 

Dr. Flanigan, Chairman, Dept. of Urology 



(Sponsors as of 3/14/88} 



The 1988 edition of Caduceus is one of the most successful 
Stritch yearbooks. Accomplishments include greatest num- 
ber of student contributors, largest student sales and the big- 
gest color section. The distribution of the yearbook marks the 
end of a long haul which began over one year ago with the 
decision to take on the task of editing this book. The success 
of this book is due to the dedication of my outstanding editori- 
al staff and the help of the Administration and faculty. I want 
to take this opportunity to thank the following individuals: 
David Godbe for his outstanding work on the Introductory 
and Activities sections and work throughout the book and for 
being a great friend. 

Janis Fee for her superb job with the Senior Casuals section 
and for the experience she brought to this project. 
Mark Wakabayashi for an admirable job on the faculty section 
and for being our political liaison. 

David Dungan for helping secure the funds needed to pro- 
duce this book and helping it become a model for future year- 
book staffs to follow. 

Asst. Dean Michael Lambesis for his dedication, hard work 
and support as Faculty Advisor for Caduceus 1988, and for 
handling the daily responsibilities of fund collections, disper- 
sals, contract negotiations and proof reviews. 
Dean Michael Rainey, Phd., for being the force behind the 
newly instituted funding for this, and subsequent yearbooks, 
for his valuable suggestions for features in the book and for 
his overall support. 

Dean Anthony Barbate, M.D., for his generous financial sup- 
port. 

Asst. Dean Terry Wronski, for her advice and help in prepar- 
ing this volume of Caduceus. 

-The Class of 1988 for their enthusiasm and contributions 
that made this book representative of the entire class. 
Linda Schemer and Lisa Harrison, secretaries of the Dean of 
Students office, for their help 
-Robert Vic of Medical Photography 
-Sue Wisthoff of Wycoff Portraits 

-All those who made financial contributions, making it possi- 
ble for us to pay our bills. 

-Last, but not least, my wife and classmate Karen who not only 
did a great job with her contributions to the book but who 
stood by me for the entire year of production, for always being 
at my side during the all night deadline sessions and for listen- 
ing to all my complaints throughout the project. 

In summary, I hope you have enjoyed this book and wish you 
all well in your future careers and endeavors. To quote Sir 
Winston Churchill "This is not the end. This is not even the 
beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the begin- 
ning." Thanks. 



I 



Fhoto Credits: 

-Chicago photos (Introductory sec- 
tion) by Barry Goldberg 
-Loyola Photos (introductory sec- 
tion) by Barry Qolberg and David 
Qodbe 

-Faculty & Administration Portraits 
by Robert Vic, Medical Photography 
-Senior Portraits by Wycoff Studios 
-E;nd Sheet Photo: Courtesy of 
Alumni Relations 

-Remaining Photos by Stritch Class 
of 1988 




-S^^S.Mr^^^ 



Copy Credits: 

-Father Fahey story based on an ar- 
ticle which appeared in Loyola 
World. July 16, 1987. 

-History of Stritch story excerpted 
from Stritch School of Medicine Cat- 
alog 1987-89 



124 



Loyola University of Chicago Stritch School of Medicine admits students without regard to their race, color, sex, or national or ethnic origin to all the 
rights, privileges, programs, and other activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school Loyola University does not discriminate 
on the basis of race, color, sex, or national or ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan pro- 
grams, and athletic and other school-administered programs QualiHed persons are not subject to discrimination on the basis of handicap. 

Due to rigid time requirements, this yearbook must be printed before the final lists of degree candidates can be determined. The exclusion of the name 
of a student is not to be taken as indication of his official status as a non-graduate nor is the inclusion of the name of a student to be taken as certification 
of his ofTicial status as a graduate. 



mWALSWORTH 
PUBLISHING 
COMPANY 

MARCELINE MISSOURI t 8 A 



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