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Full text of "The Caldron"



DRO/I 

1914 







IIIIIII!IIIIIIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!IIIIIII!IIII1IIIIIIIIIINI 

THE 

19 14 
CAL- 
DRON 

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iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i i i ii i milium mm i mini 

THE CALDRON 

KflNIIIIIUIltllllltHnilllHIIIIIIIIIIIJIIIIIIIIIIIItllllllllilllUnillllLllllllllJIIIIIIIHlllllMllilllllllllUlllllNUIIitlllHIIIIIIIlllililimUIIIIIUIHHimil 

THE ANNUAL PUBLISHED BY THE 
FIFTIETH GRADUATING CLASS OF THE 
FORT WAYNE HIGH AND MANUAL 
TRAINING SCHOOL IN THE YEAR 
NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FOURTEEN 




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THIS IS PAGE THREE 



THE DEDICATION OF THE FOURTEEN CALDRON 




0URSCH00L 



ITS-PAST* ITS- PRESENT 

AND-ITS-FUTURE 
AND-TO-ALL-THOSE-WHO 
HAVE-MADE-1T-P0SSIBEE 
THIS-FIFT1ETH-AHNIVERSAW 

AHMUAL 
IS-RESFECTFULLY- DEDICATED 
BYTHE-GRADUATfflG-CLASS 

NIMETEEH- FOURTEEN 




WORDS IX EXPLANATION THEREOF. 

This annual is not much different from any Sears- 
Roebuck catalogue that was ever published, nor is it so 
strikingly unlike a Bertillion record. Nevertheless, it 
represents a few mighty good efforts on the part of the 
board of editors to make a best seller out of a few pho- 
tos of many familiar faces, and a few scraps of "The 
Kings' English, — as She is Writ." A few of the bare 
ideas contained herein have been slightly borrowed, and 
highly disguised, merely because their authors knew 
that Adam and Eve were the only two people who can 
lay claim to originality, in the strict sense and meaning 
of the word. 

And in this frame of mind, we submit our finished 
efforts:- -edited considerable, engraved somewhat, 
printed a great deal, and bound up in good paper, much 
as if it were a good book, and knowing in advance that 
you will knock if yon don't like it, and that you will 
keep your mouth shut if yon do. 

So here she is. 



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THIS IS PAGE SIX 



THINGS THAT WE MIGHT HAVE PRINTED 



In this section of the book properly come the editorials. They were suppressed 
on second thought to make room for other matter of a more optomistic nature. — Editor. 



THIS IS PAGE SEVEN 



HOW WE MADE OUR CALDRON 



Thrice three classes hath attempt 'd, 

Alas but one an annual had. 

1914 cries, 'tis time. 

Round about the Caldron go: 

In the vital pages throw. 

Satire's under skully bone 

Days and nights had thirty-one 

Swelter 'd venom sleeping got. 

Boil thou first i' the charmed pot. 

Double, double, toil and trouble, 

Fire burn and Caldron bubble. 

Pictures of the Senior snake 
In the Caldron boil and bake; 
Bits of news and lots of ads. 
Best of jokes and best of fads. 
Senior's fates and Junior's wit, 
Sophomore fame and Preshie's grit, 
For a book of powerful trouble, 
Like a hell, broth, boil and bubble. 
Double, double, toil and trouble; 
Fire burn and Caldron bubble. 



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THIS IS PAGE EIGHT 



I r 1 i 

ClF=ll DRON 



THE FIRST PAGE OF THE ANNUM Page 1 

Where We Went to School Page 2 

The Dedication of the Fourteen Caldron Page 5 

In Explanation of the Fourteen Caldron Page 6 

Not to be Found in the Fourteen Caldron Page 7 

How We Made the Fourteen Caldron Page S 

The Compilers of the Fourteen Caldron Page 10 

BOOK THE FIRST: THE SCHOOL. 

The History of the School; Past, Present and Future Pages 13 to 22 

Words of Tribute Pages 16 and 17 

The Faculty Pages 23 to 28 

BOOK THE SECOND: THE CLASSES. 

With Apologies to Shakespeare Page 30 

Concerning the Freshmen Pages 31 to 34 

Concerning the Sophomores Pages 35 to 45 

Concerning the Juniors Pages 47 to 56 

Concerning the Seniors Pages 57 to 102 

BOOK THE FOURTH: THE ORGANIZATIONS OF THE SCHOOL. 

The Caldron; The State Discussion League; The Social Council; 
The Glee Club; The Math Club; The Sorosis; The Platonians; and 
The Pi Gammas Pages 103 to 120 

BOOK THE FOURTH: THE EVENTS OF THE YEAR. 

Society; The Senior Excursion; Bacalaureate; Commencement; The 
Senior Play; Arbor Day; Oratorical Contest; Quest Club Lectures; 
and the Log-Book of a Senior Pages 123 to 130 

BOOK THE FIFTH : ATHLETICS Pages 137 to 162 

BOOK THE SIXTH: THE ALUMNI OF THE SCHOOL Pages 163 to 192 

BOOK THE SEVENTH: WIT, HUMOR AND POETRY Pages 193 to 202 

AFTER HAVING READ THE BOOK Page 231 

THE LAST PAGE OF THE ANNUAL Page 232 

■mi mum , iiww i i i i urn i i wwiiwiiwi minium mm i i i mini inn u i miimiiiiiiiim 

THIS IS PAGE NINE 





THOME WHO MANFACTURED THE CALDRON. 

PETER EDSON Editor-in-Chief 

MARJORIE MAHURIN Assistant Editor 

LITERATURE 
MARY ZENT GLADYS GLENN 

ATHLETICS 

FRED GERBERDING. Editor 

ALAN TREMPER ROBERT REED 

ILLUSTRATORS 

FRANCIS HABERI.Y HELEN FAIR VI >X KNIGHT 

ROBERT VERNON — 1915 

SOCIETY 
PAULINE SAYLOR [CATHERINE McCURDY 

EXCHANGE 
CLARA BLONDOIT El. MA DIXON 

BULLETIN JOKES 

PAUL WARREN RICHARD HARTZLER 

NEWS REPORTERS 
DOROTHY DETZER WILLIAM EHRMAN 

UNDERGRADUATES 

DOROTHY KNIGHT, WILLARD SHAMBAUGH, HARRY WATERMAN, ALICE RABUS, 

RALPH DUNKELBERG, LOUELLA PAUL, AUGUST DETZER, JUNE HARROD. 

GEORGIANA HUDSON, PAUL BACHELOR, LOWELL MILES 

THE BUSINESS STAFF 

WELKER WENTZ Business Manager 

BOYD LIPSETT Assistant Business Manager 

ARTHUR STEPHENS i , . 

WENDELL ROBERTS ( C.rculation Managers 

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THIS IS PAGE TEX 



THOSE SENIORS WHO WERE ON THE CALDRON STAFF 




LIPSETT BLONDOIT GLENN W. ROBERTS 

WARREN ZENT MAHURIN FAIR HARTZLER 

SAYLOR WENTZ (Business Manager) EDSON (Editor) DIXON 

HEED DETZER TREMPER MeCURDY HABERLY 

KNIGHT EHRJIAX STEPHENS GERBERDINC 

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THIS IS PAGE ELEVEN 



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®hc^chool 



THE STORY OF THE HIGH SCHOOL; 
ITS PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE 

THE PAST OP THE HIGH SCHOOL. 



DOROTHY KNIGHT. If 




T was thirteen minutes of six o'clock, when I ran up the school 
steps, in hopes thai the building was still open so thai I could cet 
some forgotten hooks. Luckily, 1 found the door unlocked, al- 
though, apparently, there was no one about. At any other time I 
should have wondered at this, hut my mind was filled with the 
thoughts of how. when, and where, I was to procure the material 
to write the history of the high school for the Annual. I was just 
entering Room 18, when, suddenly. 1 stopped, frozen with fear, on the thresh- 
old. What — what was that strange apparation peering at me from the top of 
Mr. Ward's desk:' — a gnome-like figure, not more than three feet tall — a very 
goblin, whose long grey whiskers had feathers of dust and soot (dinging to 
them, whose eyes, gleaming like live coals on each side of his long, crooked 
nose, peered al me through grizzled hair. His hands — more like (daws than 
human hands — pulled incessantly at his beard. Do you wonder that I stopped, 
horrified .' 

Just at that moment. I had a happy inspiration. Why, it was easy! — 
without a doubt, this was the "Guardian Goblin" of the high school, and, if 
anyone could tell me the history of P. W. II. S., he surely could. Emboldened 
by this thought. I approached him, bu1 just as I reached the desk, suddenly, 
he became very small, and tried to creep into the ink-well. I was too quick 
for him, however, and he was forced to regain his natural size. Xow, dear 
readers, can you picture it.' Little did you think on that calm evening of 
May nineteenth, when you were sitting down to your supper, at peace with the 
world, that 1 was engaged in a desperate struggle with the Guardian Goblin 
of the high school, endeavoring to extract from him the history of this insti- 
tution ? 

As I grappled with him, I reflected on several things which had heretofore 
been a mystery in the high school; namely — why the clocks stop; who locked 
the doors to Session rooms IS and 20; why the people in Room 1 freeze, while 
those in Room 15 are burning up? To my mind there was but one answer — 
the high school ''Goblin." 



THIS IS PAGE THIRTEEN 



Finally, I forced him to tell me that which he had hidden for so long. He 
began to speak in a voice as squeaky and as creaky as a rusty hinge. I shall 
not attempl to chronicle it exactly as he gave it to me, but using his story as 

a basis. I shall tell it in my own words. 

In 1852, under the school law. the first Board of School Trustees was ap- 
pointed in Fort Wayne and the first public school established. Because of the 
little support given this new institution, there were about ten years following 
its establishment that might be called the "Dark Ages" as far as the progress 
of public education in Fort Wayne was concerned. By the year 1865. things 
were being brought, gradually into better working order, and it was in that 

year, that the first class (four girls) graduated from Fort Wayne High Scl 1. 

When I say "graduate," do you picture, in your mind, the Majestic Theatre, 
from which our 1!>14 Seniors will graduate.' I thought so: but remember, 
please, that this was the year 1865, and this first graduating class did not have 
a handsome building like ours, but a small, frame "affair" located where the 
Jefferson school now stands. 

It was not long before the inadequacy of this building called for a new 
one to accommodate the increasing number of pupils, and in 1868 the new 
building on East Wayne street was dedicated with appropriate ceremonies. 
In the dedicatory hymn, mention is made of the "lofty and spacious halls of 
the new high school" — (to us, "the old high school.") And. indeed, at that 
time the building was so commodious that the first floor was occupied by the 
training school, the third floor was equipped as a gymnasium, while the second 
floor, alone, sufficed for the high school. 




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THIS is PAGE r< lURTEEN 



high school in 

>1" to "Central 

original name. 

The first one 

the following 

, Mr. Leonard 

Mr. Roberl M. 

■ fall of 79 by 



In 1878 certain movements in Legislature, unfriendly t< 
terests, caused the Board to change the name of "High Sch< 
Grammar School." However, this was soon changed hack to its 
During the years 1863 to 1879, the school had eight principals, 
was Mr. ( '. C. Chamberlain — '63 to '65. He was succeeded by 
who held the position only a short time: Mr. Z&cariah Taylor 
Wilcox, Mr. B. T. Smith. Mr. ('. E. Woods. Mr. Robert McNiece, 
Wright, and Mr. Charles K. Latham, who was succeeded in tin 
the man whom we all know. Professor C. T. Lane. 

•Inst as the pupils of our high school were crowded out of their "gym," 
so the pupils of the "old high school" were crowded out of theirs, in a few 
years. The gymnasium was converted into an auditorium and recitation 
rooms for Drawing. The training school was abolished in 1886; and the trans- 
fer of the ninth grade to the high school, made it necessary to convert the third 
floor into a session room with adjacent recitation rooms. Another necessary 
addition to the building was built in 1898. In 1902, the total enrollment was 
four hundred and twenty, and this necessitated the erection of our present 
building. 

This new building was considered one of the finest of its kind in Indiana. 
There was a "gym." and we still have one of the very best equipments for 
Manual Training anil Domestic Science, as well as one of the very best courses, 
in the state. It was probably due to these that a very noticeable increase in 
the enrollment came in 1902. 

We are proud of our Science "Labs," our Drawing course, our session 
rooms, and — "our heating system." However, the school board was not far- 




iiiiiiiniiiiii mini mini i 

THIS IS PAGE FIFTEEN' 



BY THEIR WORKS 




JUST IX N. STUDY 

Superintendent of Public Schools Since 1896 and a Member of the 
State Board of Education. 



Illllllllllllllllllllllll!! il I II i HI :■■ II I : Mi ■ ■ .r : Ml: IIMMII -IM -Ml : ■ ill' : .Ill ,||, hi: imii.'Iii: <I||: i||i: HIM :WI!- i 

THIS IS PAGE SIXTEEN 



YE MAY KNOW THE 




CHESTER T. LANE 
Principal of the High School Since 1879. 



THIS IS PAGE SEVENTEEN 




,_ __ 




sighted enough, even in the erection of this building;. It looked very large to 
them in 11102. hut every one knows that it is entirely too small in 1914. But 
we have one thing to look forward to — our new southside high school — a 
model of its kind, to which we shall send our children or our grand-children. 
We live for it alone! It is to be a school with no recitation rooms on dark 
alleys; it will have a clean, wholesome lunch room; it will have the best 
"gym" and athletic fields in the state; it will have rooms set aside for social 
functions. My, can you not hear that school spirit of your children ringing 
in your ears? 

Xo more knocking, for this is neither the time nor the place. The fiftieth 
class graduating from old Fort Wayne High, is issueing its Annual — the first 
Annual since the publishment of the first monthly Caldron. We have lots of 
things to boast of, our Caldron, for instance, — one of the best school papers 
in the middle-west ; our faculty, too, is one of which we are justly proud; and 
last but not least, our boys and girls. 

Now, when the weird, little man had finished his story, 1 prepared to go: 
then I discovered that my story teller was no longer peaceful, but an enraged 
little beast who had parted with his pet hobby — high school lore. His ugly 
little eyes darted swords of fire at me. ami lie had finished before he sum- 
moned all his strength and darted at me, with his claw-like hands. Death 
gleamed in his eyes, and like that Creek Pyrrhus he cried hoarsely. "Now, 
you have it — the story of the high school, which I have kept so long! Tell it 
to your great, great grandfather, if you like, but not to the readers of the 
Annua 1 . " ' 

1 had barely enough time to dodge him and clutch his "skinny" neck 
with my hands. And now — prepare yourself for a shock — I confess my crime. 
if it was one. and call on you to judge. I swear I did it in self-defense, for as 




THIS IS PAGE EIGHTEEN 








my fingers sank into his parched skin, and as his weazened lace began to turn 

purple, suddenly, he vanished into thin air. Am I his murderer? Is his hi I 

on my head? Perhaps he was immortal and still exists! Would thai I knew! 
Perhaps he is peeping at yon now from behind your session room clock, or, 
what knocked your elbow then, and made that blot on your comp.? 



THE HIGH SCHOOL TODAY 
II. 

By PROFESSOR L. C. WARD. 




li E 11 



[NETY per cent of the students who come to the high school com- 
plete their formal education within its walls. Rather fewer than 
ten per cent cany their studies farther afield into college and uni- 
versity. Most of us at all interested in school statistics know that 
_ _ _ the great majority of hoys and girls hear, in their high school 
Vflfe/ classes, their last word of instruction in the liberal arts and the 
S I' sciences. I believe the recognition of that fact is the guiding 
principle of our faculty today. Most of us are teaching as if our students are 
to go out into the world armed only with what they will here obtain. We are 
trying to combine with as much culture training as may he possible, a practi- 
cal application of our Civics, our English, and our Science to the affairs of ev- 
eryday life. We should he very sorry if our students could not write a more in- 
telligible letter, vote a more decent ballot, live freer from the superstitions of 
error, because of their four years with us. The spirit of the high school today, 
the rock upon which its stability must he founded, is the spirit of service to 
the state. We are bending all our energies, all our little knowdedge. all our 
discipline, wdiolesome if onerous, to the supreme end of making good and use- 
ful citizens of the children who come into our classes. That is probably the 
surest way, certainly the speediest, to repay the Commonwealth for its fos- 





THIS IS [WOK XIXKTKKX 










~34j 



tering support. A citizen with intelligence enough to understand the needs 
of his country, with patriotism enough to desire her to be the best country in 
the world, with will resolute enough to meet her needs, and to help make her 
the best in the world, — that is the sort of citizen we are hoping to develop in 
I his high school, — from our boys and girls. — today. 




1905 
1906 
1907 

1908 
1909 



THE FUTURE OF THE HIGH SCHOOL. 
III. 

By ,T. N. STUDY 
iSupt. of Schools.) 

HEX the present High School building was opened in 1904 it was 
thought that it would provide sufficient accomodations for many 
years. The enrollment of the High School increased from 480 in 
the year ending June, 1904, to 512 in the year ending June, 1905. 
and this increase has been steadfast with but two exceptions, as 
shown by the following table of enrollment: 

512 1910 877 

648 1911 889 

676 1912 S74 

71(1 191:} 950 

795 



The enrollment this year to date is 896. The falling off from 191:? is ow- 
ing to the fact that the establishment of several Commissioned and Certified 




i!iiiiiiiiiiinii inn i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

THIS IS PAGE TWENTY 



, .1 . II I' II.. 



High Schools iii tlic county has diminish 
side the city- -a matter thai in the over- 
in 1913 has been a relief. However this 
in the present 8A Grade, and 190 in the 



•il somewhal the attendance from out- 
srowded condition of the High School 
is hut ;i temporary relief, as with 199 
8B Grade there will be 389 pupils eli- 



gible for High School within the next school year, and counting off 125, 
probably graduating this year, will leave 1,160 who may have to be provided 
for in the next school year. Even counting off withdrawals there is no doubl 

that approximately 1,100 students will be in the High Scl I next year, as 

transfers from outside will offset the withdrawals to a great extent. 

As the building was planned for 800 pupils, it is readily seen that it is now 
crowded and that the prospects are for a still more congested condition next 
year. 

The great increase in High School enrollment was not only the case in 
Fort Wayne, hut was found in all the high schools id' the state and was the 
effect of several causes, among which may he mentioned: 

1. Legislative recognition of the high school as a part of the Common 

.School System, and the requirement that after 1908 all teachers he- 
ginning work in the schools of the state should he graduates of a 
four year high school course of study. 

2. The aroused desire on pari of the people of the state for higher edu- 

cation for their children. 
'3. The better grading of the rural schools and the opportunity offered 

thereby to the students in such schools of entering the high scl Is 

at the end of their elementary course of study. 

The better opportunities offered in the new high school building with its 
enlarged course of study brought larger classes than ever before into the high 
school from the eighth grades of the city and these classes have been increas- 
ingly large each year. In 1913 the congestion reached a maximum and it he- 
came a matter of serious consideration what to do to take care of the students 
seeking admission. 

It is well known that an attempt was made to secure ground for an ad- 
ditional building for high school purposes, adjacent to the present building. 
As a consequence of the failure of this attempt, the Board of Trustees have 
been forced to consider other ways of providing for future high school needs. 

A purchase of a tine lot for high school purposes has been made in the 
south part of the city and in time, no doubt, will lie occupied by a building, 
in which students from that part of the city may he educated. It is too early 
as yet to set forth any definite plan as to what form of secondary education 
this building will seek to provide. 

Approximately one-third of the present high school population is south of 
the Pennsylvania railroad tracks, and while it is certain that the number of 
high school students in that part of the city will increase in number, it is by 
no means certain that the proportion of such students will greatly change, as 
the city is growing in other directions also. Therefore even with an addi- 



THI!- 



PAGE TWKN'TY- 



tional high school upon the south side, it is not probable that any permanent 
diminution of pressure upon the present building will ensue. 

This si ill will leave the future of the high school a problem to be solved. 
II is easier to s;iy what we should have than to say just bow we are to get these 
things. The high school should have a gymnasium built upon modern lines in 
which all the students could have an opportunity to receive careful physical 
training. Rooms should be provided for serving lunches. The rooms now 
used for recitation purposes that require artificial light at all times should be 
given back' to their original uses by adding more recitation rooms. The 
.Manual Training Department — including both the work done by the boys and 
by the girls — should have increased space. These are some of the things — not 
all by any means — that the future of the high school will have in store for 
those who have the good fortune to be students. 

The Fort Wayne High School has had a proud history and it now holds a 
high rank among the high schools of the state and of the nation. I hope that 
it may lose not hint;- of its prestige and that in the future as in the past the 
Alumni of the school may point with pride to their Alma Mater. 

The future of the High School however does not rest iii buildings, in 
equipment, in physical advantages of any kind, but it does rest in the devo- 
tion to duty on part <d' the Faculty and the enthusiasm, the ambition and the 
scholarship of its students. 




'« i mm 'mi ii mil minimi mini iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiini i imiiiiiiiiinii \ mm mini iiniimiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiimini mini uiinniiini mini inn 

THIS IS PAGE TWENTY-TWO 



THE FACULTY 

HEREAS, the school hoard has 
deemed the faculty a necessity to 
the school, and inasmuchas we have 
encountered the faculty several times in 
our high school course, whether we would 
or no, the editors, after much parlay and 
much red tape decided to put their pic- 
tures in the annual, free of charge. If 
the faculty had paid us to insert the pic- 
tures, we would have put them back in 
the section devoted to advertisements; — 
probably with the Pi Gammas. 

Uncle Mac looks better than the rest 
of the gang, merely because F. Schanz 
cut his hair: — (with a paint brush.) 

Miss Kjorstad is the only member who 
is on speaking terms with Cupid at pres- 
ent. She leaves us in June. 



liiirinii !i ' 

THIS IS PAGE TWENTY-THREE 



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PARKER 

TODD 
KOLB 



Mi'.MILLEN 

XEFF 

SMELTZLKY 



MAY 

WILLIAMS 

CUMMINGS 



THIS IS PAGE TWENTY-FOUR 



I'' 



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VORHEES 
GOULD 

HOEBEKE 



WAR] i 
HARRAH 

,MAL< INEY 



:■ I : .-i 

THIS IS PAGE TWENTY-FIVE 



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■ 




WINGERT 
CLARK 

EDSl IN 



WERREMEYER 

STIRWALT 

CURTISS 



I'AXIKI.S 

CRONINGER 

OHAPIN 



I 

THIS IS PAGE TWENTY-SIX 



,,,,,, 




SIHLER 


ROTHERT 


MATE 


STROBEL 


HALL 


NEWMAN 


KJORSTAD 


1 IAVISSON 


UNDERHILL 



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THIS IS PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 




cfc^ 







AGNEW RITTER PURIFIELD 

KNIGHT THOMAS GROSJEAN 



THIS IS PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT 








Book,Tfo?o 





The Cl^cSSE^ 







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THIS IS PAGE TWENTY-NINE 







THE SEVEN AGES OF THE GRADUATE. 



The school's a stage, 

And all the boys and girls are merely players; 

They have their exits and their entrances; 

And during High School one plays many parts. 

His acts being seven ages. First the Freshman, 

An infant, often howling, seldom quiet; 

And then the whining Sophomore, with his books. 

Ami shining morning-face, creeping like the snail, 

Unwillingly to school. The second term 

He is a lover, sighing like a furnace. 

And writing tender ballads to his sweetheart; 

And then the Junior; — soldier, winning honors. 

On the athletic field and in the "gym;" 

The next half-year, the student is the justice, 

Full of advice to give to all beneath him, 

An orator, debator, politician. 

And so plays he his part. The sixth age shifts 

Into the spactacled and bookish Senior; 

The last age ends these strange, eventful scenes, — 

It is the second childhood, or the graduate, 

A stage at once ridiculous and sad, — 

Sans sense, sans wit, sans brains, sans everything. 



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THIS IS PAGE THIRTY 




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S£Ji 



THAT PART OF THE 
BOOK WHICH IS DEVOTED 
TO THE FRESHMEN 



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THIS IS PAGE THIRTY-ONE 




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NINETEEN-SEVENTEEN CLASS 
ORGANIZATION 




MORRIS 
Vice-President 



O'HOUEKE 
Secretary-Treasurer 



CLASS COLORS— ORAXGE AND BLACK. 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

MISS WINGERT MR. CLARK 

SOCIAL COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES 

WAINE SHORT GLADYS HADLEY FRED STOLTE 

CALDRON REPRESENTATIVES 

LOWELL MILES GEORGIANA HUDSON PAUL BACHELOR 



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THIS IS PAGE Tllll:TY-T\YO 



THE FRESHMAN CLASS REVIEW 




By GEORGIANA HUDSON. 

ET the Freshmen open the door!!" Tims it began and thus it 
continues. But what do we care! With two hundred record 
breakers, full of life and energy, opening the door is easy, and 
is just what we mean to do in every direction. We will open 
doors into the realms of school spirit, of social activity, and of 
athletics, as well as the famous one of study. Of course, like 
all record breakers, we were sent, early, into training, — the 
gaieties of social life, for some, were forbidden, for the first week we were 
supplied with cards asking us to pledge ourselves not to join secret societies, 
sororities, or fraternities, while we were training in the F. W. H. S. For some 
this meant much, but for others it was no sacrifice. 

Every successful "bunch" must have its leaders, so with the kind help 
of the dignified and experienced Juniors, we held our first class meeting. As 
a result, Calvin Jackson became our president; William Morris, his chief as- 
sistant; and Carol O'Rourke assumed the great responsibility of guarding our 
funds. 

Lest some might confuse us with those wise Seniors, or possibly the Jun- 
iors, we decided to have some badge that should set us out from the mass. 
With as little delay as possible, we secured our pins, and justly proud is each 
Freshman of his little oval, gold insignia marked "F. W. H. S. — "17." A few 
members were unfortunate in getting mercury near their pins, and as they 
turned green, had to have them replaced ; but, except for these few, they have 
been most satisfactory. To have another mark of distinction, we selected a 
class fob which is bronze, with black plate in the center on which are the let- 
ters "F. W. H. S. 1917" in bronze. 

"All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy;" so to attend to the 
"play," a social committee was organized, consisting of Cladys Hadley, Waine 
Short, Fred Stolte, and the class officers. To make our reputation in social 
life, we began by having a dance at Hanker 's Dancing Academy, February 6, 
1914, to which everyone was kindly invited, provided he paid his quarter. 
The chaperons were Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Lane. Mr. and Mrs. Clark, and Mrs. 
Hudson. The decorations in the hall and the general color scheme were in 
our class colors of black and gold. 

Our time has been very much taken up in getting adjusted to the discipline 
and workings of High School, and we have had little to spare for parties. But 
at the last meeting of the class, we decided to have our last party as Fresh- 
men, in the High School, on Friday, May 22nd. We cordially invited the 
February Freshman to join us in this party, for the "more the merrier." We 
chose as chaperons Mr. and Mrs. Clark, Miss Wingert. and Mrs. Hudson. 

The good time we anticipated was realized and it filled most happily the 
memory box of our Freshman year. 



INIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIRIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllillllllllllilllllllllllllNllllllllllllilllll Ill IIIIIII1IIIHIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIII 

THIS IS PAGE THIRTY-THREE 



ATHLETIC NEWS 

We established ourselves on the athletic field, October 8, 1913, by playing 
football with the Sophomores, at Lawton park. Both teams lacked practice, 
and the Sophomores won. '24 to 0; our lack of experience and practice being a 
great handicap. Anderson, Bradley, and Rabus bore the brunt for the Sopho- 
mores; and Bauerle and Kendricks did fine work for the Freshmen. 

Good practice gave us greater confidence in ourselves; and when we 
played the Juniors at Lawton park, a week later, the final score stood 18 to 6 
in favor of the scorned "Freshies." Hornberger distinguished himself, this 
time, along with Bauerle and Kendricks; while Coil and O'Rourke played the 
lies! for the Juniors. This victory gave us the needed encouragement, and we 
feel that we are coming along, "slow, but sure." 

The captains for the Freshman Relay Teams were chosen, and are ex- 
pected to do fine work on Field Day, May -!'. 11*14. 



IN CONCLUSION 

HUS ends the history of the Freshman class of 1014. And in the fall 
when we enter our second year, we will gladly join in the good-natured 
raillery at the expense of the new class, and will in turn "let the Fresh- 
men open the door." 




i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i i i ■iiiiiiiiiiiiiiui muni i iiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii niiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 

THIS IS PAGE THIRTY-FOUE 



THAT PART OF THE 
BOOK WHICH IS DEVOTED 
TO THE SOPHOMORES 




tmm 



§00 



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THIS IS PAGE THIRTY-FIVE 



FOR never failing and innumerable 
kindnesses, we, the members of the 
class of 191(i desire to express our 
thanks to our ever-thoughtful friend 
and advisor, Miss Parker. 



i" in 1 i mill iiiiii minium miiimiiimiiiimimiiii n i i i i u i i minimum mini u n 

THIS 18 PACK THIKTY-SIX 



NINETEEN-SIXTEEN CLASS 
ORGANIZATION 



EDMONDS DETZER H'ARFEL 

President Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer 

CLASS COLORS— SCARLET AND BLACK. 
FACULTY ADVISORS 

MISS PARKER MR. THOMAS 

SOCIAL COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES 

HELENE STRIEDER HELEN STEVENS LOUELLA PAUL 

CALDRON REPRESENTATIVES 

LOUELLA PAUL JUNE HARROD AUGUST DETZER 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

KINNER BLITZ JUNE HARROD JOHN KOHLER 

KATHERINE METZGER 

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THIS IS PAGE THIRTY-SKYKX 



IMPORTANT PEOPLE IN CLASS OF 1916 



Edmonds. ( President of Sophomore Class and member of the Social Council.) 
If you have ever attended a 1916 elass meeting, you have surely noticed 
the tall, smiling pel-son who presides. A little less than a year ago, very few 
students of Fort Wayne high knew Robert Kelsey Edmonds. Last September, 
however, he suddenly jumped to popularity, and was elected president by a 
handsome majority. His term of office has been marked as a most successful 
year for the 1H16 class, as during the past school year, we have given two 
class parties and one dance, all of which were entirely successful from every 
standpoint. Besides being able to properly regulate elass meetings, "R. Kel- 
sey," as he is familiarly known, is possessed of no little dramatic ability, as 
any one who attended our "hard times"' party will tell you. Much more 
tnighl be said about our president, but. as space is limited, this article must 
be ei t short. However, let us hope that this is not the last class office to be 
held by W. Kelsey Edmonds. 



Detzer. (President of Class in Freshman Year; Class P'ootball Team; Mana- 
ger Freshman Baseball Team: Captain Class Track Team; Caldron Staff: 
Social ( oiincil.) 

From which it will be seen that August Detzer lias been, from the outset 
a prominent figure in the class, and one who has fulfilled his many offices with 
entire satisfaction to his fellow-constituents, and with great credit to himself, 
lie was the pilot of the '16 class in the year, when by a remarkable series of 
"stunts," it put itself on the high school map as the class of original ideas. 

The anomaly of a Freshman dance, evolved under his direction, became a 
dignified success, both socially and financially. This year the good appear- 
ance <d' the Sophomore notes in the Caldron is due largely to him. A youth 
(if noble mien and stature, he fittingly embodies the spirit of the class. His 
motto is always "1916 First!" Comrades and roughnecks of the '16s, fill up 
your bumpers! 1 give you. '-'Our Freshman President." 



Warfel. (Secretary ami Treasurer of (lass; Social Council; Class Mascot; 
.Manager ot Track Team.) 

Harry P. Warfel handles the cash. It is not as easy as it seems to handle 
cdass money. There are a great many tricks to this trade and Harry L. has 
them down to a fine point. Put this is not his only accomplishment, as he is 
a good manager and we expect great things from him in the future. He is 
also a good mascot on account of his canine aspect and there is seldom any 
kind of an athletic contest in which he is not seen. 



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THIS IS PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT 



Helen Stevens. (Social Council.) 

Helen Stevens, one of our three Social Council representatives, was 
elected to tlie position last September, and since then has given the class no 
cause to regret its choice. She always attends the class meetings and gen 
erally has something to say; moreover, she has worked hard for the success 
of all of our class social functions. Besides being a worker, she is very promi- 
nent socially, and few high school affairs are given at which Helen is not 
present. 



Ilelene Strieder. (Social Council.,) 

Helene Strieder, also a member of the Social Council, is one of our most 
diligent workers. She is prominent in social meetings as well as in class 
meetings, and always has something worth while to say. She was one of the 
most energetic workers for all social functions, and to her is due much of the 
credit for the decorations and entertainment of our first class party. Cer- 
tainly the 1916 class will never regret that it elected Helene Strieder to the 
office of Social Council representative. 



Louella Paul. (Social Council and Caldron Staff.) 

Louella Paul was elected to the position of class reporter in September and 
has always turned in sparkling and interesting items. Last February she was 
chosen to fill the position of Social Council representative as the successor of 
Howard Augsperger, who left school. She seldom misses a class meeting, 
and always has something valuable to say. Her part in the Mock Trial was 
literally "a scream" and she is to be congratulated for the excellent manner 
in which she carried it. Certainly the class has no cause to regret her election 
to either of the important positions which she now holds. 



Bradley. (Captain Class Football v.tul Baseball in Freshman year; Captain 
Football and Manager Basket Ball Sophomore year; Varsity Basket Ball 
Team Sophomore year.) 

Ever since his entrance into high school, Ed Bradley has been one of the 
main-stays of the athletics of the '16 class, — and a popular man in athletic 
circles. He has been elected to three captaincies and a managerial berth, and 
has delivered in highly satisfactory style, both as a player and as an official. 

Although his playing was (and still is) all that could be desired. Ed was 
long pursued by that malignant and hateful demon, ineligibility; however, by 
heroic efforts, he finally extricated himself from its clutches, and landed a po- 
sition on the school basket ball team. Bradley is still working to beat the 
demon — a shining example to the youths with athletic aspirations, but with- 
out the faculty of "pulling a 6." Let us all emulate this glorious model. It 
is from such as he that presidents are made. 



THIS IS PAGE THIRTY-NINE 



Herb Myers. (Varsity Basket Ball Team Sophomore year; Captain Class 
Basket Ball and Manager Class Baseball Sophomore year.) 

Herbert Myers was formerly a member of the present Junior class, but 
dropped out for a year, with the result that he is now a full-fledged '16. Myers 
proved a valuable addition to the school athletics, as well as to those of his 
class. On account of his previous record and reputation, he was elected cap- 
tain of the Sophomore basket ball team, which under his guidance won the 
interclass championship. Toward the end of the basket ball season he made 
the school team, playing his first game against Marion, and making the win- 
ning goal on a tap-off in front of the basket. He is sure of a place next year. 
In the spring Myers was elected manager of Ins class baseball team. The 
writer has reason to believe that Herb is considerable noise as a backstop ; but 
this article must go into the editor's hands before the conjecture is verified. 



Ken Sprang. (School Football Team Freshman year; Basket Ball and Base- 
ball both years; all Class Teams both years.) 

When Kenneth Sprang bounded from the Hanna into the high school two 
years ago next fall, oh, what a glorious fall that was for the athletics of the 
class of 1916! For he landed squarely on his feet, and in doing so commun- 
icated to the class an athletic impulse which is still urging it on to great 
achievements. In school athletics also did Sprang come in handily; he made 
football, basket ball, and baseball teams in his first year, and the last two this 
year, since football was practically nil in the school. In addition, he has 
been the star in every '16 class team organized. In short, it may be said of 
Kenneth that, like Mrs. O'Brien nee Donahue, he never Sprang from anything 
in his life — he always springs right at 'em first. 



Blitz. (Committeeman.) 

It has been found necessary to take a fresh pen in order to do justice to 
the glowing character now to be depicted. John Kinner Blitz is a shining 
light in the class of '16 — a lamp to our feet, a torch to lead us on to glory — or 
Mexico. Gifted with unique executive ability, he has done signal service in 
piloting the Sophomores through the perils of class social affairs, the manage- 
ment of which is no snap. No one who saw that remarkable murder trial can 
deny his superiority as an emotional actor; nor can anyone doubt that he 
stands among the best of the school in the grade column. This gifted youth 
is also the unchallenged champion of the Sophomore class, if not of the school, 
in maxillary athletics. With these remarkable qualities, Blitz will surely rise 
to greater heights than any of us: and when he rides by in his carriage, we 
will all tell our offspring to grow up and be great men, like J. K. B. 

THIS IS PAGE FORTY 



I' several Committees; Caldron Staff), 
■•iris of tlie class of 1916 is June Harrod. 



June Harrod. (Chairman i 

One of the besl known girls of the class of 1916 is June Harrod. She is 
always loyally present at class meetings and was a member of the Entertain- 
ment Committee for the famous "hard times party," as well as that for the 
dance, doing excellent work on both. She also acquitted herself with credit 
as one of the Mock Trial cast. 



Katherine Metzger. (Chairman of Committees.) 

Katherine Metzger, too, belongs in the list of well known Sophomores. 
She was a faithful worker on various committees, and is one of the most pop- 
ular girls of the 1916 class, a state of affairs, however, which does not prevent 
her from appearing on the honor roll each month. 



Kohler. (Chairman of Committees.) 

Always prominent in class meetings and affairs, is John Henry Kohler, 
who is always on hand when there is anything to be done, from moving furni- 
ture, to doing miscellaneous telephoning or making contributions to the class 
treasury. In the Mock Trial he was another who surprised every one with 
his ability as an actor. Ordinarily, he hasn't much to say, but what he does 
sav counts. Besides, the 1916 honor roll is never without the name of John 
Kohler. 



Taylor. (Reporter in Freshman year.) 

Houghton W. Taylor, commonly entitled '"Professor," was one of our first 
two Caldron reporters, and in that capactiy he worked well and diligently. 
He has always been prominent in class meetings, and at the "hard times" 
party demonstrated his ability as an actor by the excellent way in which he 
took his jtart in the Mock Trial — a part that called for much originality and 
humor. Besides this, on the 1916 honor roll five or six A's always follow the 
name of Houghton Wells Taylor. 



Winifred Bicknell. (Reporter in Freshman year.) 

Winifred Bicknell, our other Freshman reporter, did remarkably well in 
that position. The class news was always well and accurately reported, and 
the items fraught with hope for the future of the class, as well as praise for its 
achievements of the past. She also has dramatic ability of the emotional va- 
riety, as was shown by the Mock Trial. Moreover, the name of Winifred 
Bicknell always stands with the highest on the honor roll. 



in mil hip mil' i ' ■.■",■■!■ 

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Mr. Knight and Miss Parker. (Our Social Council Representatives.) 

When it came time for the Sophomores to choose their faculty represen- 
tatives for the Social Council, they elected Miss Parker and Mr. Knight, and 
both have worked hard for the class of 1916. Mr. Knight, especially, made a 
splendid master of ceremonies at some of our affairs. Miss Parker has become 
the patron and guardian of the Sophomore class, and to her is due the greater 
part of the credit for all our social functions. She is always ready to help out 
on any matter, and doubtless could tell you more of the heart secrets of the 
Sophomores than you would thinl? possible. The class of 1916 may certainly 
consider as its lucky day, that on which Miss Parker was elected to the Social 
Council. 



FRESHMAN ATHLETICS FOR THE 1916 CLASS. 

The prominence and activity of the '16 class in the line of athletics were 
really phenominal when compared with that of previous Freshman classes. 
We began in "grand style." organizing a basket ball team for both boys and 
girls, with the Jefferson school gym in which to practice. 

Our first basket ball game was played with the powerful 1914 class team. 
Although we were beaten, we are glad to say that our class did better than the 
rest, for the 1913's did not favor the series, and 191") was never even heard 
from. This basket ball team, made up of five noted members of the 1916 
class, with Leslie Carr as captain, played the T. (). P.'s in a close game. In 
the end we were defeated by a score of 39 to 34; but even at that we were 
rather proud, in view of so close a score. 

At the first baseball meeting, eighteen recruits came forward. Ed Bradley 
was appointed captain and August Detzer was manager from the bench, as 
he did not play that year. Harry Warfel, owing to his canine aspect, made 
an excellent mascot, and Houghton Taylor acted as official scorer. 

Early in the season the baseball team played the 1915 class and won by a 
score of 12 to 5. Later on the team played the 1913's; but sad to say, at the 
end, the score stood 7 to 5 in their favor. We again faced the 1914 class in 
baseball and lost. 

In reviewing the situation we have one fact of which we may be proud — 
that during the Freshman year one of our classmates. Kenneth Sprang, made 
the varsity basket ball, baseball and football teams. Along with Sprang was 
Leslie Carr, who also made the varsity football and basket ball teams. On 
the whole, we are enlirelv satisfied with our Freshman record in athletics. 



1916 ATHLETICS IN THE SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

The work of the 1916 class along athletic lines during the past term, made 
good the promise of I he Freshman year, and may be said to have been A num- 
ber one. 



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THIS tS PAGE FORTY-TWO 



At the football meeting Ed Bradley was elected captain, and Etoberl Comp- 
ton manager. Both surpassed the best expectations of the class, and in a 
short time, had formed a snappy, live team. Every player on it should be 
given credit for his fast work. 

Although we met defeat at the hands of the Seniors, we scored a victory 
over both Freshmen and Juniors, thus winning second place. 

In basket ball with Herb Myers as captain and Ed Bradley as manager, 
we pulled down the championship flag. This team was made up, for the most 
part, of varsity men. Sprang, varsity center; Bradley, varsity guard, and 
Myers, forward, constituted the backbone of the team. 

The other two men, Dunkelberg and Gerke, held up their end of the 
game in fine style. 

No other class had a chance against the champions. The Juniors fell be- 
fore them in short order. The Seniors were unable to put a team on the floor, 
and therefore did not dispute the championship. 

At the baseball meeting. Herb Myers was elected manager, and Bob Comp- 
ton captain. Although nothing has happened yet, just wait. By all means, 
watch us shine when that 1914 class graduates. 



SOCIETY. 



The Sophomores as a class always have taken an active part in developing 
the social side of school life. 

They regard themselves as distinguished not only because they were the 
first Freshmen to give a dance, but the very first class, so far as can he dis- 
covered, to give a class party in the high school building. So successful was 
this venture that since their initial attempt all the other classes have followed 
suit. 

These are only two of the numerous delightful social affairs the Sopho- 
mores have given during their high school course. They have always been 
willing, even in the face of discouragement from others, to leave the beaten 
path and try new ways. The success of these attempts has always abundantly 
justified them, and it is their desire and hope when they have completed their 
course, to be recognized as the class which did most to develop tin- truly dem- 
ocratic side of the social affairs of the school. 



CLASS PINS AND CLASS COLORS. 

The much discussed design for the 1916 clas^ pins was at last decided 
upon, to the satisfaction of all. The pins are diamond-shaped with "F. W. H. 
'16" in gold letters on a black background, and in the eyes of the loyal Soph- 
omores, they are the pins. Second only to the pins in this affection are tin- 
scarlet and black colors, which of late have been very much in evidence on 
arm-bands. 



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THIS IS I 'AGE FORTY-THREE 



CLASS HATS. 

Of all the new and remarkable ideas which the Sophomore class has ever 
brought forth, the most conspicuous and brilliant was the class hat. The 
scheme was promulgated and accomplished so quietly that the hats dropped 
like a thunderbolt from the sky one morning last June. 

There were about seventy-five of them, done in class colors, black with 
scarlet band and numerals. So unusual and startling were they that the at- 
tention of the whole school was riveted upon them; and even the daily papers 
took up the subject. 

It was more than the Seniors could stand. What ! To be outdone on the 
very eve of graduation ? Never-r ! Those bats must be squelched. War en- 
sued. Many a Freshman was forcibly relieved of his headgear; but the class 
was all the more determined to vindicate its right to flaunt its colors in the 
presence of all Fort Wayne, including the Seniors of 1913. And it did. The 
hat, in spite of tribulations, nourished like a cactus on the Llano Bstaeado. 

And this was not all. Curses no! On the morning before graduation 
three Seniors, parading about the town in their caps and gowns, fell upon and 
captured the hat of an unfortunate Freshie. "Vengeance" vowed that indi- 
vidual. The captured hat was salvaged and a deep plot was hatched. ***** 

On the night of graduation, just as the curtain rose upon the proud and 
smiling Seniors, what should come stealthily down from the gallery but a huge 
orange and purple Junior banner, surmounted by the triumphant Freshman 
hat! The Seniors passed from the high school into the world with the de- 
spised headgear dangling before their eyes. 

This was the final ; when the sixteens, now Sophomores, returned to school 
in the fall, they were allowed to wear their hats in peace. And so ends the 
history of "Those Freshman Hats," now for the first time written down. 



WHAT WE ARE GOING TO DO IN THE FUTURE. 

The future of the 1916 class is indeed bright. Having passed through the 
Freshman and Sophomore years with a record of which we may well be proud, 
we are about to enter upon those upper class years which offer possibilities 
and opportunities unlimited to those keen enough to see and improve them. 

1916 is made up of people well prepared to carry on the business of class 
and school, and who expect to do things. Already plans both novel and prac- 
tical have been formed for the Junior year, and are ready to be submitted to 
the class bright and early next fall. The success we meet with in carrying 
these plans out, and the future of the class, depends entirely on the loyal 
support of its members. But judging from the past, giving support to all 
worthy class undertakings, is second nature to the Sophomores. 

We can depend on the 1916 men to uphold our reputation in athletics, 
several of them having already demonstrated their ability in that line. More- 
over, we have people who will certainly hold their own in all other student ac- 
tivities. Indeed we congratulate ourselves on having among our number some 
of the best, if not the very best, people in the school. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiin 

THIS IS PAGE FORTY-FOUR 



SOPIIOMOREGO. 



(Air: 



'My Country Tis of Thee") 



All you units look at us, 
We kick up all the fuss. 
In the high school. 
Our virtues we parade. 
And we are not afraid 
To break a rule. 

We're grand and good and great 

And do not hesitate. 

To tell you so. 

We know that we alone 

Keep up the moral tone. 

We're not so slow. 

We're modest little flowers. 

We spend our leisure hours, 

Before the glass. 

We run this beastly town 

And heaven and earth kneel down 

To sixteen 's class. 

With scorn our lips are curled, 
We're bored by this dull world 
We 're demons bold ! 
Our mothers shed a tear. 
Our fathers flee in fear 
When we do scold. 

Amen. 



THIS IS PAGE FORTY-FIVE 



THAT PART OF THE 
BOOK DEVOTED TO 
THE JUNIOR CLASS 




::'...-.. 



THIS IP PAGE FORTY-SEVEN 



JUNIOR ORGANIZATION 




CLASS FLOWER— RICHMOND ROSE 



CLASS COLORS— SCARLET AND WHITE 



CLASS YELL 

Ki-yi, Ki-yi. Ki-Elimity-Bim ; 

Come out of the woods, 

Sandpaper your chin. 

We're wild, we're woolly. 

We're rough like a saw. 

Nineteen Fifteen, Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 



CLASS OFFICERS 



STANLEY HUNTING 
President 

MORTON WILLIAMS 
Historian 



PAUL, PARKS 
Vice-President 



MARIAN BASH 

Secretary-Treasurer 



HOWARD STEUP 
Poet 



THIS IS PAGE FORTY-EIGHT 




ii r.vriX' ; 


HASH 


I 'AUKS 


President 


Secretary-Treasurer 


Vice-President 


.SHAMBAUGH 


KNIGHT 


JOHNSON 


Caldron Editor 


Assistant Editor 


Business Manage 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

.MISS KOLB MIC. THOMAS 

SOCIAL COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES 

ADELE WARNER ROBERT HATTERSLY DOROTHY KNIGHT 



" !| i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii!'!' 

THIS IS PAGE FORTY-NINE 



Hoo's Who, In Juniordom 



By SKINNY STEUP. '15. 

The pood staunch ship of our '15, 

Is manned as named below. 

And 'though it oft gets near the rocks, 

It still is on the go. 

Stan Hunting is our president. 
And Parks his running mate , 
While Marion Rash our money tends — 
Such irony of fair ! 

Our days arc blessed with Dorothy Knight, 
Who has served us many a term. 
(Xot behind hard prison bars.) 
But with the "Caldron" firm. 

Duemling, Bash, and Brueckner too. 
They all have earned a name. 
Together with Geller and Diffendorfer. 
They are of great basket ball fain.'. 

Ruck and Seibts and Eugene Reed, 
They all have done brave deeds. 
For they have played the faculty. 
When music had sore needs. 

Taylor and Werkman belong with us too. 
They must have been made to fit. 
They surely are our .Mutt and Jeff, 
Or the long and short of it. 

Johnston and Hall, our comedians bold. 
Who will brave at least one missile 
To go on a stage, and act in a rage, 
While lemons around their heads whistle. 

Williams works cm history. 
And Dunkelburg on jokes; 
And Mohler gathers in the dregs. 
About the high school folks. 



THIS TS PAGE FIFTY 



We miisii'i forgel our Joseph Bell, 

Who always says "By Heck!" 

For he uses the name of a classmate in vain, 

For ( Ilarence is also a Heck. 

Coil and "Biff" ami Roderaeyer 
Have made the baseball team; 
And baseball oughl to flourish now. 
As has ne'er before been seen. 



ippear, 



To those whose names do not 
1 ask you to remember — 
The class of '35 is jusi the best, — 
In June or in September. 



A Short History of the Class of 1 9 I 5 

By MORTON WILLIAMS 
(Class Historian.) 

About the ninth month of the year 1911, a beautiful green cluster of veg- 
etation might have been seen approaching the high school. As it moved nearer 
we saw that it was not a bunch of inert cow feed, but a lively moving aggrega- 
tion of living "Freshies." Other Prieshies — "half white," McMiUen would 
have called them — were at the door to meet them and to see that they found 
Room 1 without chasing up to the third floor for it. They all got inside and. 
after gazing about for an instant inspecting and passing judgment on the 
building, went to Room 1 where Miss Bort (now married) ordered them to 
take seats. 

In a few days they were all comfortably ensconced in the new place and 
accustomed to its usages and manners. Several days afterward the first class 
meeting was called to elect officers. Robert Hall was chosen president; Rob- 
ert Hattersley, vice president: Frederick Thieme, secretary-treasurer; and 
Dorothy Knight, Caldron representative. The following day the members of 
the class sitting in Room '22, no1 having been formally notified of the election, 
circulated a petition for a new election. This was granted after some small 
discussion and in a couple of days the new election was held. The officers 
remained the same with the exception of the president, who was now Jay Fish. 

Fish held his office about three months during which time he did not call 
a (dass meeting or do anything for the good of the class. He left school and 
Hattersley conducted the business for the remainder of the year. During 
our Freshman year we did very little except purchase our class pins and 
choose our colors. Royal purple and old gold were selected. 



nun niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

THIS IS I'AUK KIFTY-OXK 



Another year rolled around and we were Sophomores, swaggering around 
the halls in all the glory that the second year demands. We were all back at 
school — with the exception of the average number of "quitters'' — refreshed 
by our summer vacation. Right after the opening of school we held our sec- 
ond election and our choice was Hattersly. president : Hunting, vice president : 
Marian Bash, secretary-treasurer; and Dorothy Knight, Caldron representa- 
tive. At another meeting we decided to change our class colors because the 
class just ahead of us had selected those colors. Red and white were the col- 
ors agreed upon. 

The class of 15 took no very active part in athletics in its second year but 
it did give a dance at Tanner's on February 14, 1913. We netted but $4.98 
en this dance but everybody present had a good time and for our first attempt 
at money-making it was fairly successful. On May 2 we combined with the 
Freshman class in giving a party and dance at Odd Fellow's hall. We all 
had a good time although we did admit some of the upper classmen. 

Geller and Coil attempted to pilot a class baseball team through the sea- 
son but although we had a pretty strong team, it lost every game it played. 
This was in some measure due to the adversce luck which our team ex- 
perienced. 

After the trials and troubles of our Sophomore year. June came and ad- 
vanced us to Juniors, (no infringement on Dunkelberg's copyrights) and the 
following fall the class began to show some of the class spirit so long looked 
for. A meeting was called in the first week of school and the following of- 
ficers were elected: Stanley Hunting, president; Paul Parks, vice president; 
Marian Bash, secretary-treasurer. The buys interested in football met after- 
ward and Eugene Reed was chosen manager and Walter Geller. captain. The 
team practiced several times at Lawton and Swinney parks, and seemed to 
play a fairly good game in practice. The first game was with the Freshmen, 
but by the will of the gods of football the Juniors came out at the little end 
of an 18 to 6 score. The game with the Sophomores was little better than a 
farce since we played them with only ten men and in the natural course of 
events they beat us 24 to 0. 

Some days later a meeting was held to make arrangements for the Junior 
dance. The date decided upon was November 7. and the place Tanner's hall. 
A large crowd attended the dance and we found that we had made about 
thirty dollars and were very agreeably surprised. This was our first success- 
ful dance. We held our Junior Comp dance at Hanker 's on January 16. 1914, 
and although a large crowd attended, we lost slightly on the affair, owing to 
the large number of Seniors who attended. Everyone present had a good 
time and with the exception of a bit of vandalism, the dance came out all right. 

Our first class party was given at the school on the evening of February 
27. 1914. There whs dancing in Room 15 for those who wished it. the music 
being furnished by Paul Parks and Margery Rohan. A program of vaudeville 
was given in the auditorium, the greatest hit of the evening being the Oxerine 
troupe in their first appearance on the stage. The affair came out all right 
with the exception of the raiding of the poker party in Room 20 by "Sleuth" 



■in- ■ ill .M 1 1: il ill 

"Ill l :-; is PAGE FIFTY-TWO 




f$Mids. 




Ward. Refreshments were served later in the evening and at eleven o'clock 
the party broke up owing to the desire of the .janitors to get home. 

The .second class party was held in the auditorium on April 24. A Long 
programme was given after which the stage was turned into a dancing- floor. 
Refreshments were served later, and the merry gathering broke up at 10:45. 

The class basket ball teams had a little better luck than thai id' the 
either teams. The boys won from the Freshmen but lost to the Sophomores, 
while the girls won every game but one. The .Misses Dueinling, Bash ami 
Breuckner made the girls' school team, and Diffendorfer and Geller the boys' 
team as regulars. Later Diff was elected captain of the varsity for the season 
of 1914-15. k | «,; 

A meeting was held to elect the Caldron staff for the coming year and, 
after a short talk by Edson, the present editor, the following were selected: 

Williard Shambaugh, Editor-in-Chief. 

Dorothy Knight, Assistant Editor. 

Hazen Johnston, Business Manager and Pi Gamma Representative. 

Stanley Hunting, Assistant Business Manager. 

Ralph Dunkelberg, Joke Editor. 

Arthur Mohler, "Dregs'' Editor. 

A. Leslie Jacobs, Exchange Editor. 

Walter Geller, Ahletics. 

The choice was a good one and the members of the staff are going to do 
all in their power to make next year's Caldron the best ever published. 

The 1915 baseball team organized with (idler as manager and "Cow" 
Baker as captain. They played their first game with the Freshmen and by 
a turn of luck were beaten 6 to 2. The Junior class has contributed ('oil. 
Diffendorfer and Rodemeyer to the school team for which the school should 
be duly thankful. 

15 CLASS ATHLETICS. 

Looking back to the days when we were green freshies, the class of 1915 
did not have very much athletic spirit at. the start. We entered school in the 
fall of the year, so football was staring us in the face, lint all in vain, as out- 
class was not represented by a football team that fall, probably because we 
thought the upper classmen would take our initiation out in the game. Win- 
ter came on with its long, dull nights bringing along with it the great game 
of basket ball. At this point the athletic spirit of the class of 1915 sprang up, 
as a basket ball team traveling under the name of F. L. F. or Five Little 
Freshies was organized. In the following spring a baseball team was or- 
ganized under the leadership of J. Rose. On account of disagreement with 
other class managers our team was not represented in the class league, but 
played outside teams, and closed the season with a good record. Our class 
has only one record on the track, that established by ('. Dunkelberg in the 
field meet held in 1912, coming in second on the mile run. 

Our second year in high school was marked by our class having teams iu 






THIS is PAI 



■iiiiiHiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

E FIFTY-THREE 



;ill branches of athletics. Football, basket ball, and baseball were captained 
by W. Geller, but owing' to a lack of material the teams made a poor showing 
during the year. 

The elass of 1915 had tine teams in their third year, making all teams 
work their heads off to beat us. Although victories were not coming our way, 
we had some teams just the same. We made an excellent showing in football, 
basket ball and baseball, playing some very close baseball games in the class 
league. We were represented by a large sipiad of athletes on the track, taking 
a prominent pail in the 1914 field meet. 



ADVERTISING OUR ABILITIES, OUR CHARACTERISTICS, OUR 
DEFICIENCIES AND OUR REQUIREMENTS 



\v m'K» 



WANTED— A bid to the commencement 
dance. Will pay cash if necessary. W. 
Sha mbaugh. 



WANTED — Several new benches for Room 
29. The old ones are worn out and are 
quite inadequate for the bunch of 
rough-necks that inhabits that room. 
Miss Smeltzley. 

WANTED — .Some volunteers to take the 
bench for me when I am absent. E. 
Shulze. 



jme athletic contests. 



WANTED — Some one to pick the eggs 
out of the glue-pot; H. Coil preferred. 

Hue.- Trayton Purfield. 



WANT E D — Some 
otherwise know 

"on the level." 



WANTED- 
Bob how 
Physics. 



to act in vi 



WANTED — Someone to adopt Thoss Dif- 
fendorfer, so that the printer will stop 
mis-spelling his name. 



WANTED — "A bunch of blue ribbon to tie 
up my bonnie brown hair." Paul Parks. 



WANTED — Someone, preferably a blonde, 
to translate our German on Mondays 
anil Thursdays. Helen and Hazel won't 
do it more than three times a week. C. 
Kesler and H. Haller. 

for tango lessons. A. 



WANTED — Dictaphone records, taken 
when Ruth translates Vergil during the 
noon hour. D. Knight. 

WANTED — Some new books. W. Sham- 



WANTED — An absolutely Are- and explo- 
sion-proof chemistry laboratory with no 
teacher. M. B. Williams. 

WANTED — One box of bi-chloride of mer- 
cury tablets for the writer of these ads. 
Apply Caldron staff. 

WANTED — A second hand Maxim silencer 
for Vorhees' chemistry classes so that 
the "please" may be eliminated. 



: " ■"■ '!'" Illllllllllllll 'HI"' "I HIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

THIS IS PAGE KIFTV-FUUR 



WANTED— Information as to the identj 
of the members of the I'i Gamma fra- 
ternity. C. T. Lane and L. C. Ward. 

WANTED — A position us fog-horn on an 
ocean liner, Satisfaction guaranteed. M. 
B. Williams. 



WANTED — A second hand marriag 
cense. S. Hunting. 



LOST 1M) KOI \I> 



LOST, STRAYED OR STOLEN— Happy 
Ross's brain. Return to Caldron office 
and receive the owner's heartfelt 

thanks. 

LOST — The engine out of my machine. In 
returning please do not dent the cylin- 
ders. R. and C. Dunkelberg. 



FOUND — A fine interlineation of Burke 
with the name A. G. Pickard written on 
fly leaf. Owner can have same by call- 
ing at this office and paving for this 
ad. 



FOB s \ia: 



FOR SALE — One perfectly 
ner. Apply "Jiggers." 



rood 1916 ban- 



FOR SALE— One Vergil pony. C. Wild. 



FOR SALE — My position as chief goat for 
Mac. "Happy" Ross. 



FOR SALE — The privilege of taking ray 
girl to the commencement dance. Sen- 
ator J. Bell. 



FOR SALE — Position as session room 
teacher in a beautiful, quiet, clean room 
with many well-behaved scholars in it. 
M. E. Malonev. 



FOR SALE — One slightly used (?) jar of 
complexion cream. Reason for selling 
— I am trying" a new brand to obtain 
quicker results. P. Parks. 



FOB SALE— My Ford for sale cheap, or 
will trade tor a second hand [ngersoll 
watch. R. Dunkelberg. 

FOR KENT 



FOR KENT — During vacation. Two ther- 
mos bottles and leather case for same. 
C. T. Lane. 



FOR KENT — One perfectly good bench, 
reserved for me. I must rent because I 
am leaving the city. R. Dunk. 



POSITIONS WANTED 



POSITION WANTED — As stoker on trans- 
Atlantic liner. Am able-bodied Ameri- 
can. Houghton Taylor. 



POSITION WANTED — As professor of 

phvsics in some secondary school. K. 
Baker. 



POSITION WANTED — As chorus girl with 
some cheap musical comedy. L. Wild- 



MISCELL wkoi s 



I have the rental of seat 135 in Room IS. 
Will be vacant June 19. Apply to J. 
Stemen for particulars. 



In chapel, June 17, I will demonstrate the 
Wilding Electric Hair Curler, free of 
charge. L. Wilding. 



i: \i '•! i<i MK.vr VGENI \ 



Today, we have on our lists a Cook, a 
Taylor, a Werkman, a Baker, a Seller, 
and a Saylor. 



DEEDS OF THE CLASS OF 15 FROM SEPTEMBER, 1914, TO JUNE, 1915. 

By ART MOHLER. 

Iii athletics the class was unusually successful, the boys winning every 
game, and the girls losing but one. We (Ideated the Freshmen, Sophomores, 
and Juniors in football by scores of 113 tc 0, 13 to 7. and 23 to 2. The basket 
ball team with "Hunk" and Thoss as forwards swept everything before it. 
The girls" team defeated all the classes. They won the championship of In- 



fill iiiiiiiiniiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiihiiiiiiiiii mini nn ii i inn i 

THIS IS PAGE FIFTY-FIVE 








diaiia. The baseball season resulted very disastrously for the other class 
teams. 

In an exceedingly jolly party the elass was entertained by Johnson and 
Hall in a brand new Sambo and Rambo act. the actors being unable to appear 
in school for a week afterwards because of injuries received from lemons, aged 
ben fruit, etc. The Oxerine Troupe tried to give a new performance but could 
not get away with it. A. Pickard with a broom gave an excellent demonstra- 
tion of the proper way to dance the tango. 

In order to raise some money, an entertainment was given, modeled on 
i he British Museum, bid containing some natural wonders far more marvelous 
than the features of Unit remarkable collection. Among the exhibits were 
Alice Rabus and E. P. Schulze. "The Thinnest Couple on Earth;" Esther 
Neuter and Ralston Craig. "The Only People Whom No Scales Can Weigh;" 
and Taylor and Werkman, "The Long and the Short of It, or Mutt and Jeff. " 
M. B. Williams, who claimed to have the strongest voice in captivity, succeeded 
in shouting so loudly that forty-seven separate ami distinct echoes were heard. 
Mr. Steup, a contortionist of unusual merit, wrapped his legs around his neck, 
tying them there in a beautiful bow knot. This feat was never before accom- 
plished. Last, but not least, came R. Hall with his imitations of a monkey. 
Bob chattered and made faces in an exceedingly lifelike manner. A sum of 
$743.91 was obtained from this entertainment. 

The 1915 Caldron was the best ever published, every issue containing one 
hundred pages and costing but ten cents. The stories were unsurpassed and 
the jokes were of unbelievable wit. Indeed, the only criticism offered was 
that the faculty laughed so over these jokes that they became grouchy as a 
reaction and flunked every pupil for a week after the Caldron came out. 

The scholarship of this class was unsurpassed by any class which ever 
graduated. Out of a class of 9!). 96 were on the honor list- Two students were 
tied for valedictorian, and a special examination was held to see who would 
receive this honor. As both pupils obtained perfect grades, it was decided to 
give a class recitation instead of the valedictory. The class spoke Burke's 
Speech for Conciliation with America in perfect unison. When they concluded, 
the aduience was sleepingly peacefully. 

The Commencement Dance was a glorious affair, after which the members 
rode to Indianapolis in a special train chartered for the occasion, and enjoyed 
a munificent (?) banquet, which they paid for with the proceeds from the 
Caldron. As a parting gift, the class gave the school $365,942.81, the balance 
in the treasury. With this money a new school building, which the school 
board had long since promised but never started, was erected. 

Note — The author is not responsible for the events chronicled herein. 
Blame the editor of the Junior section. 



i!llllllllll!llilll»lllllll!ll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Ill ill !lll III' Illllllillllinilllllllllllllliilllllilliilllllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllll I';!H Illlllllllil IIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

THIS IS PAGE FIFTY-SIX 



T«J 



"11 



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THAT SECTION OF 
THE BOOK TELLING 
OF THE SENIORS 




mmmm mi hi - i ■ ■ ■■ ■ — —^gf!?HffT55555l 




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DEDICATION 

To a teacher who has been more than a 
teacher to us, to a fellow among the fel- 
lows, to him who has helped us step by 
step over the four year path of High 
School life, to him who encouraged us, 
who sympathized with us in our defeats 
and rejoiced with us in our triumphs, to 
him who has no favorites, who is inter- 
ested in us, every one, to Mr. Ward, 
champion of fair play, these, the Senior 
chronicles are affectionately dedicated by 

THE CLASS OF 19U. 



THIS IS PAGE FIFTY-EIGHT 



Sv 



■li Jpn 







u 



ibidfe 



3 c 



THE SENIOR DIRECTORY 




ROBERTS 
President 



LIPSETT 
Vice-President 



WENTZ (iERBKRDING 

Secretary -Treasurer Sergeant- At- Arm 



MOTTO OF THE CLASS 
"Live to Learn, and Learn to Live. 

CLASS COLORS— BURNT ORANGE AND PURPLE. 



WHAT THE CLASS YELLS 

Kazella, Kazam, Kazinit, 
This is the Class that's in it; 
Roranora, Spearanatus, 
Ziska Boom A-Comutatus ; 
Etlza, Zamma, Zuzu. Zip. 
Nineteen Fourteen — Let 'er Rip. 

THE FACULTY ADVISORS OF THE CLASS 

MISS MAY MR. WARD 

THE SOCIAL COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES OF THE CLASS 

GLADYS GLENN CLEO GOFP MARJORIE MAHURIN 

PAULINE SAYLOR 

IN CHARGE OF THE (LASS'S CALDRON 

PETER EDSON Editor WELKER WENTZ Business Manager 

MARJORIE MAHURIN . .Assistant Editor BOYD LIPSETT Assistant Manager 

111 111 i 111 iiiiiiiiiiiu i iiiiii ii mini i imiiimiiiiimiiimiiimiiimii nun iimi i nmiiii nun 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 

THIS IS PAGE FIFTY-NINE 





By DOROTHY DETZER 
i Historian t" the c 'lass oi 1914.) 

X the morning of September 8, 1911, Room 1, the Freshman as- 
sembly hall, was filled to the doors with excited and expectant 
youngsters. Two weeks later the class was organized and under 

the leadership of Boyd Lipsett as president, a new* class was 
formed. The Freshman year passed uneventfully; merely serv- 
ing as a period of adjustment to work, and as a time in which 
acquaintances were made and friendships formed. 

After the nineteen-fourteens 1 aine Sophomores, good fortune began to smile 

on this deserving class. The particular star of Destiny became visible on the 
horizon after the first foot ball practice, when "Whitey" Gerberding "got into 
the game." 

The Sophomore year came to a brilliant close since it left the nineteen- 
I'mnteens not only rich in the possession of a great athlete, but financially the 
wealthiest class in the history of the school. The accumulation of this wealth 
was due to the clever management and foresight of the Sophomore Dance 
Committee, which had charge of the first social function of the class. 

The glory of winning the baseball championship in the Spring was re- 
ceived by the class with its usual becoming modesty, 

When the nineteen-fourteens became Juniors they gained the reputation 
of being the most alive, the most active, the most independent, the most gay. 
and the most original of any class that had yet enrolled in the annals of the 
school. Just to take the glare from so much brilliancy was also the insistant 
calumny that the nineteen-fourteens carried the banner of stupidity in Physics. 
Let the Physics slander pass. Conspicuous among the elements of success 
were the characteristics of certain well known class leaders: — 



.,, ■. ■ .rri 

THIS IS PAGE SIXTY 



"Whitey" Gerberding, the school hero who helped make high school 
athletics a clean sport and a vital pari of the school life; "Wink" Wentz, who 

held up the financial end of the class : and •"Pete" Edson who. without being 
a class officer was yet its acknowledged head and leader, and whose judgment 
and influence covered such versatile topics as sports, morals, scholarship and 
girls. And at the close of the Junior year he was unanimously elected Editor- 
in-Chief of the Caldron by an enthusiastic class, whose expectations have been 
more than fulfilled. 

When the nineteen-fourteens reached the Senior year they helped inaug- 
urate the Social Council, perhaps the finest feature the high school lias ever 
had. But this innovation would have been short-lived had it not been for the 
rare judgment anil unusual personality of the class president, Glenn Roberts, 
who with Prof. Ward held together the newly organized Social Council. 

The Senior play was a great success financially, artistically, and dramat- 
ically and was considered so even by the modest Seniors themselves, in ath- 
letics they have been unusually prominent — both the hoys" and the girls' 
teams being well represented by 11)14 athletes, and since the honor roll is one 
of the longest in the histroy of the school, the Senior class may well feel proud 
of its scholastic credits. 

And now as the Seniors have matured in mind and have grown both in 
stature anil wisdom they have learned not only certain laws of science and 
certain rules of language, but have had to put in practice that great law of 
give and take which has helped to develop loyalty and class spirit. 



SENIOR BABIES-GUESS WHO 




iiiiiiiiiminmim i i ii i i i i i i n i i i i i i mini i i mini n n i i I 

THIS IS PAGE SIXTY-' iXK 




Seniors to the School 

JESSE PETERS 
(Class Poet.) 

For four long- years, we've walked with thee 
Through sadness and through jollity. 
In snow and sunshine, sleet and showers 
We've been with thee in waking hours. 
Though in a sentimental mood. 
We can't express our gratitude 
For this Libera] education 
With which we are to help the nation. 
Now, dear old school, our paths diverge. 
We hear our school days' funeral dirge. 
Twas yesterday we heard thy bell; — 
Tomorrow we shall hear thy knell. 
Faint and dim thy call doth grow 
The world calls now; and we must go. 
We are loath to leave thy peaceful life, 
To meet the world-old toil and strife 
Which first greets man, when life's begun 
And stays with him 'til the race's run. 
Help us, dear school, to he strong and brave 
When tossed upon life's troubled waves. 
When naught remains hut fear and dread 
Let us think of thee and he comforted. 
Dear old school, our hearts do break, 
Thou'rt swept aside, and in thy wake 
The world doth stare us in the face 
In which we try to win a place. 
Whom, deai- old school, wilt thou commend 
When this battle's at an end .' 
We are scattered at thy very door 
Perhaps some few will meel no more. 
Some in fields of pastoral work. 
Some will go in stores and clerk, 



ili|lll!Ulillllllllllll!llllllllll!IIIIIIIIHIIini!ll!lllll[lllllillllllll!llll!lllll!l!lllllllllllllllllllillllllll! 
THIS IS IWCK SIXTY-TWO 



Some will wear the wedding band, 

Some will live in foreign land, 

Ami some will live upon the seas 

But all shall hold they memories 

Locked in the inmosl chamber of our hearts 

To cherish 'til with life we part. 

Too great for words, our sorrow is to tell 

We can but say farewell, farewell. 



HAVE YOU EVER SEEN THESE FACES 




BEFORE? 




Illll I 'HNIINIIMIII llli IIHII HI! HI! IIMI ill' lu.ih, Illlllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illlllll Illl«llllllllll«llllllllll«llll!lllll!lllllllllll!lllllllllll!lllllllllll!llllllllllll Illlllllllllllllllll Ill 

THIS IS PAGE SIXTY-THREE 



n i mi in; iiiiiiiiiiinitt i ■iiHiiii nun i iimiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i ilium"" i i i i i « i 



HIDDEN SENIORS. 




,■ , .| ,; | 'i.l 

THIS IS PAGE SIXTY-FOUR 



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THIS IS PAGE SIXTY-FIVE 



WILL OF CLASS OF 1914 

Know all Men, That we. class of 1914, P. W. H. S., of the city of Fort 
Wayne, in the county of Allen, in the state of Indiana, still maintaining our 
high record of excellence and our right minds and memories, do make this our 
last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills and bequests made 
by us. To-wit: — 

We give, devise and bequeath, to our devout Juniors, room eighteen, — to- 
gether with intimate friendship with "Louie," sole governor of said room. To 
the Junior boys we give exclusive righl to the machine shop. We also give 
the Juniors intimate friendship with Miss Kolh. and Messers McMillen and 
Werremi'\ er. 

We give, devise and bequeath, to the Sophomore class. Charles Wild's stu- 
diousness to be evenly distributed among the members of said class. 

To the Freshman class we give, devise anil bequeath REAL school spirit, 
spirit not demonstrated by rowdyism on the street and elsewhere, hut by a 
unanimous willingness to work for the benefit of the class and school. 

To the Junior class, we give the chemistry labratory which is to be con- 
verted into and called "Spooner's Corner." After all claims and just debts 
are paid, we give — — dollars (if such sum remains) of our estate for con- 

verting thr hall, between the main hall and the chemistry labratory, into a 
lover's lane. 

PERSONAL BEQUEST— 

We give, devise and bequeath, to Morton Williams. Glenn Roberts's quiet 
disposition and manner of demonstrating school spirit. 

To the president of the Glee Club, we give thr exclusive right and privil- 
ege of strolling down the hall locked arm with his best girl. 

To the girls who are to take pari in the next Senior play, we give the abil- 
ity of Misses Saylor, Blondoit, Detzer and Mahurin. To the boys who are to 
take part in said play, we give the ability of Messrs. Lipsett. Jackson, Warren 
and Stevens. 

To Shambaugh we give Pete Edson 's .-journalistic ability, that the Caldron 
may retain the excellent record that has been made this year. 

To the rest of the staff we give the ability of their predecessors to aid in 
keeping record of said Caldron. 

All the rest and residue of our estate, real, personal or mixed, wheresoever 
it may be found and of whatsoever it may consist, we give and devise unto the 
Sophomore and Freshman classes. Said residue to he equally divided between 
the members of two said classes. 

In Witness Whereof, We. the class of 1914, have hereunto set our hand 
and seal, this nineteenth day of June in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred 
and fourteen. Per JESSE PETERS. 



! " : ' i i i mini in in i urn ii ii n nun i ii i i iiiiiiiiiiiiihiiii 

THIS IS PAGE SIXTY-SIX 





n 



A DIARY 



IDEMUS 
(The Prophet.) 

.Monday. April 13, 1925—1 arrived in New York 
today on board the steamship "Delphi," command- 
ed by ('apt. R. Keim, of the Pool Steamship Line. 
Through the kindness of Customs Inspector Stolte I 
was able to bring in with me several articles which 
! had obtained in my long sojourn in Europe. Among 
these were an original painting by the famous Lon- 
don artist, Helen Fair of the distinguished pianiste 
Margaret Colmey, and some samples of a new min- 
eral which had been discovered by the German 
chemist, R. Reinewald. 

Tuesday, April 14 — I registered in the new Dos- 
well Hotel, which was planned by Architect C. How- 
ard and built by the Mensch-Keil Construction Co. 
To my surprise 1 discovered that the clerk was none 
other than my old friend. W. E. Roberts. As soon 
as 1 entered I was surrounded by a swarm of bell- 
boys, among whom I recognized Paul King. 

At noon I was served with a wonderful meal 
which had been prepared by the world-famed cooks, 
Helen Young and Lucile Ault. Among the wait- 
resses 1 recognized Anna McBratney, Delia Crouse, 
Marie Weinbreunner, and Hattie Greider. 

Tn the evening, as T strolled down Broadway, I 
passed the Tinkham Flower Shop; the Droege Tail- 
oring Establishment: the Kaufman-Laudeman Milli- 
nery Co., and the Graeter Lahmeyer Shoe Store. 

"Wednesday. April 15 — I purchased a ticket this 
morning from Ticket Agent Sheyer, at the Grand 
Central Depot, and left little old New York for Phil- 
adelphia, where I arrived at eleven o'clock. As 1 
walked down the street, 1 was attracted by a huge 
sign, which announced the annual clearance sale of 
the Wild-Salon Clothing Co. 1 entered the store and 
found my old friend "Charlie" doing; a fine busi- 
ness. However, he found time to talk to me, and 
told me about a number of the class. 

Grace Branstrator and Vivian Chapman had 
gone as missionaries to China and were making a 
great number of converts. "Whitie" Gerberding 

■■mi i i mniimiiii: iiiiiiiiiiiiin hi > mini llllllllll i i illinium mi i » i " 

THIS 



ROPHET ARRIVES. 




W. 'R0BER1S. 




Tiilf/fffft 
H. SALON. 




C WILu 



llllllllllillli 

IS I 'AGE SIXTY-SEVEN 




.GERBtRW. 




R, HARTZUR 




V KNIGHT. 



was coaching a University football team; M. Pohl- 
meyer was a great success as a Ford auto salesman ; 
Dick Hartzler was posing as an absolutely painless 
dentist, while Rokie Prill, Pearl Rehorst, and Anna 
Pelzweig were winning votes for women by their 
commanding eloquence. Irene Fair. Gertrude Gross, 
Sabina Waterfield, and Louise Breuer had entered 
the matrimonial field, the latter having married a 
certain New York tailor. 

In the evening I found diversion at the Ehrman 
Moving Picture Theatre, which was featuring a 
scenario written by -Miss Margery Rohan. Jesse 
Peters was taking tickets at the door, and Melba 
Plumadore was playing the piano Among the 
"movie" players I recognized Nora Hunt, Esther 
Kover, Marie Gerke, and Irma Comparet. 

Monday, April 1^0 — T arrived in Baltimore, Md.. 
this morning. Soon after my arrival 1 purchased a 
copy of the Baltimore Gazette, tin editor of which 
was Pete Edson. Von Knight was the cartoonist 
and Katherine McCurdy the society editress, with 
Elma Dixon, Ethel Laurents, and Helen Thompson 
as her assistants. Al Tremper was the sporting edi- 
tor, and Mavis Whyte, Elva Weller, and Blanche 
Bauer were reporters. Among the news items 
which were of interest to me were the following: 

Cincinnati. Ohio — The Zent Publishing Co. an- 
nounces the publication of a new book entitled the 
"Boy Scouts of America." written by James Hard- 
endorf and illustrated by John Slater. 

Foil Wayne, Ind.— P. S. Welly and P>. 0. Virts 
are said to have made a fortune by compiling and 
selling outside reading note books to high school 
students. Their co-workers are the Misses Dorothy 
Sander, Edna Teagarden, and Helen Oren, who have 
always had a liking I'm' this kind of work. 

Santa Fe. New Mexico — Miss Jennie Bowser, 
noted philanthropist, lias founded, a school for the 
education of the ignorant people of New .Mexico. 
Among the teachers are Mabel Bates, Hattie Flaig. 
Alda Sharp, and Irene Jones. 

Peoria. 111. — Mis-; Avis Meiers has been elected 
the first woman mayor id' Peoria. She has chosen 
as city council-women the Misses Beierlein, Eck- 
hardt. Pepper and (irosjeari. 



IlillllllllUll -ill. I I <!!lll!llllllllllillll!lllllllllllll!llllllllllll!llllllllllll MM 

THIS IS PAGE SIXTY-EIGHT 




Wednesday, April 22 — Last aight I witnesse< 
presentation of Beulah Starkel's latest drama, en- 
titled "The Decree of Fate." at the Koehn opera 
House. The Leading memhers of the company were 
the .Misses Saylor, Mahurin, Blondoit, and Detzer, 
and Messrs. Lipsett, Stevens, Jackson, and Warren. 
The company was under the managemenl of W. W. 
Went/, and Francis Haberly was the property man. 

Friday, April 24 — I packed my grip and shook 
the dust of Baltimore from my feet. 

Saturday, April 25 — 1 arrived in Washington 
in the morning'. In the afternoon I attended a ses- 
sion of tlie House of Representatives. A heated de- 
bate was in progress on a bill to increase the wage 
scale for working women. Hildred Van Horn, Pres- 
ident of the American Working Women's Union, 
appeared before the committee to demand the pas- 
sage of the bill. Congressman G. Strathern violently 
opposed the measure, and representatives of the 
Pickard-Strobel Tailoring Establishment of New 
York were lobbying to defeat the bill. 

Monday, April 26 — Secretary of Agriculture 
Wellman yesterday announced that H. Tyger, a 
scientific farmer of Indiana, had succeeded in rais- 
ing a new plant, which he calls the "hash plant." 
produced by grafting seventeen different kinds of 
vegetables. 

Wednesday, April 28 — Senator J. C. White has 
succeeded in having continued the nomination of 
Georgia Bauer as Commissioner of Education. 

Monday, May 5 — Nearing home at last. As I 
passed through the village of Huntertown last night, 
I heard a great commotion outside the train, ami on 
incpiiring the cause, learned that there had been an 
election, and that Walter Z. Rundles had been 
elected mayor over Paul Parker. "Fuzzie" had 
gained a great many votes through the help of his 
wife, formerly Ruth Hieber, and Miss Gladys Pratt, 
who was to be appointed police matron. 

Tuesday. May 6 — Back in old Fort Wayne. I 
was glad to see the old school still in existence, al- 
though there had been a number of changes. On the 
lawn before the school stood a large birch tree, 
which we had planted on Arbor Day years before. 
On inquiring for the principal, I found that he Mas 




SAYLOR, MAHURIN, 
BL0NDO1TX DETZLR. 




W WENTZ 




G5TRATHERN 



THIS IS PAGE SIXTY-NINE 







s -ir-^w 



'n 




H TYGER 




m^ 1 

L WILUAM5. 




H.5T0UDLR 



none other than my old friend "Liz" Roberts, now 
Prof. ( '. G. Roberts, A. B„ Ph. D. "Liz" had given 
up baseball at the urgent request of a certain mem- 
ber of the class whose initials correspond to his first 
two initials. But he and his wife were still great 
fans. 1 found that some of the teachers of my 
school days had departed, giving the younger gen- 
eration a chance. ('. Cutshall, mathematical wiz- 
zard, was holding down the job m room 19, and 
doing traffic duty in the halls between periods. 
Gladys Glenn had succeeded to Mr. McMillen's job, 
while Ruth Logue was keeping order in the Chemis- 
try Labratory, and incidentally teaching a little 
chemistry on the side. Gertrude Zucker was in- 
structor in German, while Lydia Honeck laboriously 
carried the wearied Sophomores through Caesar's 
campaigns in Gaul. Doris Parnin had taken Miss 
Kolb's position, and I was certainly glad to learn 
thai she had eliminated outside readings from the 
worries of the sadly over-worked students. "Liz" 
told me about a great many others in the class. 

La Verne Williams had accumulated a large for- 
tune, but had foolishly spent it all in founding 
asylums for cats and dogs. 

Victor Phares, Carlisle Duell, Arthur Koons 
and Jesse Rose had decided to stick to farming and 
were rapidly reducing the high cost of living. 

Geraldine Bulson and Editha Duemling had fol- 
lowed in the footsteps of their fathers, and had be- 
come famous physicians. 

Elizabeth York bad decided to use her contin- 
uous flow of -words to advantage, and so had taken 
to the lecture platform, while Marian DeVilbiss was 
a teacher of Esperanto. 

Jay Havice had gone out west to become a cow- 
hoy, but had changed his mind and had become pros- 
perous on a chicken farm near Denver. 

Vivien Withers was secretary of the local Y. W. 
('. A., and Gladys Lathouse was chief librarian. 

Helen Trisch had become a noted singer, and 
with Thelma Campbell as her accompanist, was mak- 
ing a tour of the world. 

Herbert Stouder was a famous engineer and 
had completed the work on the Toledo, Fort Wayne 
and Chicago barge canal. 



THIS IS PAGE SEVENTY 



ii ' : ii mi nun iiiiiiin i iiiiiiin mi iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini minium i i n in i i 




T^miP^r-^ 



THE CATALOGUE OF SENIORS 



And now we come to the pictures of the Seniors, all dressed up in their 
Sunday-best, arranged in alphabetical order, surrounded by a very artistic 
panel — at least the art teachers said it was artistic — and looking very much 
like they did when they had their pictures taken over in F. Schantz's 
"Stewchio." They number slightly over ten dozen, and thus compose the 
largest class that lias ever graduated from the school. 

Despite Br'er Carter's statement to the effect that the class is the dummest 
class that ever was, the class managed to dig up a larger percentage of honor 
students than any class since the war times. In addition to this, the class 
has a Liz Roberts, a Wink Wentz and a Whitey Gerberding — which no other 
class was ever able to boast of. 

So look 'em over, and think what you please about their virtues, both 
good and bad, 'cause it's a tough gang and don't care what you sav about it. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllilllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illl MM HI I I Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

THIS IS PAGE SEVENTY-ONE 




Lucile Ault. 

Sweel as the primrose peeps be- 
neath tile thorn. 
Her modest looks some cottage 
might adorn. 



Mable Carrie Bates. 

Mathematics Club. 

So did she travel over Life's com- 
mon way 

That she spread joy and sunshine 
like a day in May. 



Blanche Margaret Bauer. 

Mathematics Club; Commencement 
Dance Committee; Chairman of Flower 
Committee; Class Basket Ball Team. 

As merry as the day is long. 



Georgia Bauer. "Georgie. 

Too wise to err. too good to be un- 
kind. 



miiiiii inn ■ l it miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

THIS IS PAGE SEVENTY-TWO 



)T 



n 



r T*\ 






Martha Marie Beierlein. 

Mathematics Club; Honor Student. 

A quiel maid, — 

Content to Id Life run its diurnal 

course. 



Clara Kanne Blondoit. "Clarie.' 

or "Blondy' 
Senior Play; Caldron Staff; Play Com- 
mittee; Senior Party Committee; Com- 
mittee on Mottoes; Stationery Com- 
mittee; Junior Picnic Committee; 
Class Basket Ball Team. 

A lassie mixed of such fine ele- 
ments. 

That were all virtue and beauty 
dead 

She'd make them newly, being 
what she is. 



Jennie Laurinda Bowser. 

Junior Picnic Committee; Secretary of 
Mathematics Club. 

Here's to the maiden of bashful 
fifteen 

Here's to the widow of fifty 

Here's to the flaunting', extrava- 
gant queen 

And here's to the housewife that's 
thrifty. 

Let the toast pass: 
1 )rink to the lass ; 

I'll warrant she'll prove an excuse 
for a glass. 



Grace Kimmel Branstrator. 

Mathematics Club. 
She prizes not such trifles 
That are precious to the giddy. 




Illlllllllillll!!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllli'!lll !llll!lllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIII!lll!tt!lllll III"IIIIU|II il|l : ,IMHr II Vi II ill !|': i/ili ilNII lil/lli YlnlhllHIIIiillllllll'illlllllll;! 

THIS IS PAGE SEVENTY-THREE 




Louise Henrietta Breuer. 

She liat h a mein to match this; 
Her outward beauty. 



Geraldine Elizabeth Bulson. 

Age cannot wither her, nor custom 
stale her infinite variety. 



Thelma Evora Campbell. 

In truth, together ye do seem 
Like something fashioned in a 
dream. 



Vivien Ceicle Chapman. 

Such a face and such a mein 

To be loved needs only to be seen. 



<>■'■<■"■< ' iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin Minim i ii iiiiiiiiu nun iiiiiniiiiiiiiii i i i i i nun i n i i i 

THIS IS PAGE SEVENTY-FOUR 






Felix George Cohen. 

Being amongst as but so short a 

time, 
We dare nol s;iy tOO much about 

him. 
Yet, — because he is amongst us, 
We cannot help but think. "He is 

all right." 



Irma Comparet. 

She is a form of life and light 
That seen, — becomes a part of 
sight. 



Delia Irma Crouse. 

A fair maid, — fresh glittering with 
graces of both mind and mein. 



Chester Sherman Cutshall. "Chet 
Glee Club; Mathematics Club; Honor 
Student. 

"So wise so young," they say, 
"Can never live long." 




iiii:;iiiiiiii.iiiiiiiiiiiu niiiiiiiitiiiii.i.i . , niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiinittiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiii! 

THIS IS PAGE SEVENTY-FIVE 





Dorothy D. Detzer. "Detz." 

Class Historian; Caldron Staff; Senior 
Play; Bacalaureate Committee; Com- 
mittee on Mottoes; Stationery Commit- 
tee; Class Basket Ball Team; School 
Basket Ball Team. 

Let every man enjoy his whim, 
What is he to me, or i to him. 



Marian DeVilbiss. 

Mathematics Club. 
<> how this spring' of vivacity re- 

sembleth 
The uncertain glory of an April 

dav. 



Frances Elma Dixon. "Dixie. 

Flower Committee; Caldron Staff. 
Genteel in personage. 
Conduct and equipage. 
Noble by heritage. 
Generous and free. 



Howard Rusher Doswell. 

Mathematics Club. 
I profess not talking; — only this. 
Let each man do his best. 



i ii 11111111111111111 iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini iiiiii iiiiiiii mini n i i mini i i urn 

THIS IS PAGE SEVENTY-SIX 



2_ 




-It 



45f 



7) 



11 



Paul Droege. 



Dreg. 



Secretary and Treasurer of Glee Club; 
Class Baseball Team: Mathematics 
Club; Senior Party Committee; Bowl- 
ing Team. 

I am tlii' "pink" of courtesy. 



William Carlisle Duell. 

Mathematics Club. 
Your face is as a book, where men 
may read strange matters. 



Editha Matilda Duemling. "Edith. 

A sweet, heart-lifting cheerfulness 

seemed ever on her steps to wait. 



Dorthea Eckhardt. 

Mathematics Club; Salutatorian of 
June Section of Class. 

Strong to consume small troubles; 

to commend 
Great thoughts, grave thoughts, 

thoughts lasting to the end. 




illinium iniiiiii niiiiiiiiiiii iiin.i ' I"" iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii 

THIS IS PAGE SEVENTY-SEVEN 





Peter Edson. "Pete. 

Editor-in-Chief of Caldron; Play Com- 
mittee; Publicity Manager of Senior 
Play; Varsity Basket Ball Team: 
Capt. Class Basket Ball Team; Class 
Football Team; Caldron Reporter in 
Junior Year; Junior Dance Committee; 
Stationery Committee; Committee on 
Mottoes; Sophomore Dance Commit- 
tee; Vice President of Class in Fresh- 
man and Sophomore Years; Mathe- 
matics Club. 

"Twill take a mighty man to fill his 
place. 



William Joseph Ehrman. 



"Bill. 



Caldron Staff; Mathematics Club; 

Senior Bowling Team. 
Hi' never yearns for a respite, 
But he'd work right on, and never 
quit. 



Helen Faye Fair. 



Caldron Staff. 
E'en lovely Venus wonl 
ons of thy charm. 



jeal 



Nancy Irene Fair. 

Earth has not anything to show 
more fair. 



IHllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 
THIS IS TAGE SEVENTY-EIGHT 



iwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i ninn i i mini i 



■<i It 




c|% n ^ :: 


it 4, 


k -■ njj 







Hattie Flaig. 

Her looks do argue her 
with modesty. 



>lett 



Fred Edward Gerberding. "Whitie. 

Capt. of Varsity Basket Ball Team; 
Varsity Baseball Team; Capt. of Class 
Football Team; Basket Ball and Base- 
ball Teams; Caldron Staff; Junior Pic- 
nic Committee; Commencement Dance 
Committee; Sergeant-at-Arms of Class; 
Mathematics Club. 

"The Spirit That Built Up Ath- 
letics In the Fort Wayne High 
School." 



Marie Pauline Gerke. 

In simplicity is beauty truly 
found. 



Gladys Glenn. 

Valedictorian of Class; Social Council; 
Play Committee; Caldron Staff; Cal- 
dron Reporter in Junior Year; Flower 
Committee; Stationery Committee; 
Committte on Mottoes. 

Strength and honor are her cloth- 
ing; and she shall rejoice in time 
to come. 
She opened her mouth with wis- 
dom ; and in her tongue is the 
law of kindness. 
"A health to you 
And wealth to you 
And the best that life can give 

to you. 
May Fortune still be kind to you. 
And Happiness be true to you. 
And Life be long and good to 

you. 
Is the toast of all your friends 

to you." 




ii r* iiinwiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiniiiini! mi iiiiiiiii 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllll 

THIS IS PAGE SEVENTY-NINE 




m§B 



~rM» 




Cleo Ora Goff. 

Social Council; Photograph Committee 
Tis beauty truly bent, whose red 

and white 
Nature's own sweet and cunning 

liaml laid on. 



Russel Martin Graeter. "Brownie." 

Mathematics Club. 
A sensible, — well-bred man. 



Hattie Belle Greider. 

A lovlier flower on earth was nevei 
sown. 



Velma Ruth Grosjean. 

Mathematics Club. 
O'er her warm cheek and rising 

bosom, move 
The bloom of young desire and 
purple light of love. 



hi " mi i ii« tin i i allium mm i mm urn mm urn mi i i mi i i i i 

THIS IS PAGE EIGHTY 







Gertrude Irma Gross "Gert. 

Flower Committee; Committee on Mot- 
toes; Class Basket Ball Team; Sta- 
tionery Committee. 

Her Angel 's face. 
As the greal eye of heaven, shined 

bright 
And made ;i sunshine in the shady 

place. 



Francis Stimson Haberly. "Barley. 
Class Football Team; Play Committee; 
Caldron Staff; Property Man of Senior 
Play; Mathematics Club. 

He hath never fed on the dainties 
that are bred in a book ; 

l!ut with his brush, he'll paint his 
way to fame. 



James Riley Hardendorf. "Jim. 

Mathematics Club. 
And then the lover, 
Sighing like a furnace, with a woe- 
ful ballad. 
Made to his mistress's eyebrows. 



Richard Mungen Hartzler. "Dick" 
or "Pinkie." 

Mathematics Club; Caldron Staff; 
Class Football Team; Class Baseball 
Team; Senior Bowling Team. 

A gentleman in every sense of the 
word. 




Illllllillllllllllllllllilll 1:111- l!!i :n ' "l iiimi Ili'illllinilllllllllllllll Illlffllllllll i ' ' ' 'In : IIIIIIIIIH'I Illllllllllll ! 

THIS IS PAGE EIGHTY-ONE 




Jay Frederick Havice. 



' Cabby. ' 



I am not in the roll of common 
men. 



Ruth Pauline Hieber, 

A winsome lass with winning 
ways. 



Lydia Emma Honeck 

Mathematics Club. 
Her air, her manner doth argue 
with ;i woman perfected. 



Claude Strathford Howard. 

Mathematics Club. 
Upon liis brow, so all may under- 
stand 
Nature has written gentleman. 



11 " : : ' ■' " "'■ -=ii--iii ii ■;! 1 1 iir iiini mum illy , vmrr , i man, , .mi.miiiiiimiim muim; 

THIS IS PAGE EIGHTY-TWO 




: ^mm 




Nora Isabelle Hunt. 
Her modesty is a candle to her 

merit. 



Samuel Dillon Jackson. "Sam. 

Senior Play; Commencement Dance 

Committee; Oratorical Contest 

When he speaks, 
The air, a chartered libertine, is 
still. 



Julia Irene Jones. 

Mathematics Club. 
Though seeming lost to sound. 
In memory deal', thou always do 
remain. 



Ruth Mary Kaufman. 

Mathematics Club. 
She was ever known to say 
The proper thing in the proper 
way. 




"'■■■■ i. Hiflllll iuiiii: 



piiii :tiiipiiiipiiiiii 

THIS IS PAGE EIGHTY-THREE 




Luther Frederick Keil. ' ' Keil. 

.Mathematics Club. 
Type of tlic wise who soar, but 
never roam. 



Raymond Daniel Keim. 



"Keim. 



'Varsity Basket Ball Team in Sopho- 
more and Junior Years; Class Basket 
Ball in Junior Year. 

What is impossible can't be, 
And never comes to pass. 



Paul Simpson King. "Cicero. 

1 have neither wit nor words, 
I only speak right on. 



Herbert Von Knight. "Von. 

Caldron Staff. 
Whether the charmer sinner it, or 

saint it, 
If folly grow romantic. 1 must 

paint it. 



Ml Ill Illililll lllllllliitiiillllUilllHI 

THIS IS PAGE EIGHTY-POUR 



■iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi i nnimimmimmmi mill i minium mnnmnmiii i minimi u mini miiimni 



Hilda Catherine Koehn 

In virtues nothing earthly eoul 
surpass her. 



Arthur Karl Koons. "Doc. 

A lad whose life is one perpetual 



Esther Helene Kover. 

As sweet and musical, as bright as 
Apollo's lute. 



John Fred Lahmeyer. "Lahmeyer." 
Mathematics Club. 
He was the noblest Roman of them 
all. 




■■■lilllll I II i I Hi 1 ' Hill i.'> • MHIIIDIIIII 'Illlt 'II ' <«' 1111111111111111111 

THIS IS PAGE EIGHTY-FIVE 







Gladys Evalene Lathouse. 

As young and fair as aught of mor- 
tal birth. 



Faye Leora Laudeman. 

Slight of .stature, of gentle mein, 
A lovlier maid has ne'er been seen. 



Ethel Winona Laurents. "Suff. 

Mathematics Club. 
Her ways are ways of pleasantness 
and all her paths are peace. 



Vera Caroline Lepper. 

Bv mv troth, a maiden fair. 



IHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIBII ■' !ll.:':i':li ' JIIW I 'Mil 1: Hi lil!lll!illll!»llll!H Illffll I!l!lll!llllllllllllllllllll 

THIS IS PAGE EIGHTY-SIX 



Edgar Boyd Lipsett. 



"Lip. 



Class Vice President; Asst. Business 
Manager of Caldron; Social Council; 
Senior Play Committee: Senior Play; 
Engraving Committee; Mathematics 
Club; President of Class in Freshman 
Year; Sophomore Dance Committees; 
Junior Picnic Committee. 

Long shall we seek his likeness 

long in vain. 
Ami turn to all of him which may 

remain. 
Sighing that Nature form'd but 

one such man. 



"Ruth. 
Senior Party 



Mary Ruth Logue. 

Engraving Committee; 

Committee; Mathematics Club. 

Like a thrifty goddess, she deter- 
mines 
Herself the glory of a creditor — 
Both thanks and use. 



Marjorie Alice Mahurin. "Marj. 

Valedictorian of June Section of Class; 
Asst. Editor of Caldron; Social Coun- 
cil; Chairman of Senior Play Commit- 
tee; Senior Play; Junior Dance Com- 
mittee; Junior Picnic Committee; 
Committee on Mottoes; Basket Ball 
Team; Sophomore Dance Committee. 

I will not be slack to play my part 
in Fortune's pageant. 



May. 



Anna Mae McBratney. 

Mathematics Club. 
If all the joys of life should die, 
She'd smile e'er she would heav 
a sigh. 




"' !l '' ! l !'■"■' ' "IM'I ill!! Hlll'il'i:' 



III illlllll, III nINHNIII Kill !ill llll 1 illll hill 
THIS IS PAGE EIGHTY-SEVEN 




Katherine McCurdy. 



"Kat. 



Caldron Staff; Secretary and Treasur 
er of Class in Freshman and Sopho 
more Years; Sophomore Dance Com 
mittee; Junior Dance Committee 
Class Basket Ball Team. 

She is beautiful — and therefore t< 
be woo'd. 



Avis Freeman Meigs. 

A Phantom of delight. 



Oscar Le Roy Mensch "Mensch. 

Mathematics Club; Class Football 
Team. 

A man he seems of cheerful yester- 
days and confident tomorrows. 



Marguerite Marie Myers. 
Officious, innocent, sincere, 
Of every friendless name, the 
friend. 



iliillllllllllllfllll I Ilnlhlllllll IIIHII!llllinill"l!lll Ill II II v II nil; nil '; | | ||| «|| hi ■ Hum; Hlinillllllh! 

THIS IS PAGE EIGHTY-EIGHT 



Helen Ruth Oren. 

Arouse thyself from pensive moo 
Why sittcst thou in quietude .' 



Doris Parnin. 

She's fashioned so slenderly, 
young, Mini so fair. 



Paul Marion Parker. "Parker. 

Mathematics Club. 

Whose armor is his honest thought, 

And simple truth his utmost skill. 



Anna Helen Pelzweig. 

A maiden whose lovely face. 
Is gemmed with mingling sheen of 
fairy trace. 




II C || II I IIIIIIIPV. II II 'ill I I I Illlllllillll IIIIIIUH li 'II' '" ' 'illl'H 'HI 'I''" ' '■ 

THIS IS PAGE EIGHTY-NINE 




Jesse Jerome Peters. 

Class Poet. 

In all thy humors, whether grave 
or mellow, 

Thou'rt such a touchy, testy, pleas- 
ant, fellow. 

Hast so much wit and mirth about 
thee 

There is no living' with thee, or 
without thee. 
("Jesse Peters is a poet 
1 >y his verses you will know it. " ) 



Victor Phares. "Vic' 

Mathematics Club. 
Hnw pool- are they that have not 
patience. 



Melba Manette Plumadore. 

Junior Picnic Committee. 
Her voice was ever- soft, gentle and 

low, — 
An excellent thing in woman. 



Martin William Pohlmeyer. "Moxie. 
Senior Bowling Team. 
Xo sinner, nor no saint, perhaps, 
But — well, the very best of chaps. 



THIS IS PAGE NINETY 



, .. 



James Lloyd Pool. 
His nature is too noble for tli 

world. 



Gladys Louise Pratt. 

There's a language in her eves. 



Rokie Leona Prill. 

Beauty, manners, freedom, power 
Hath Nature given as thy dower. 



Robert A. Reed "Nick. 

Honor Student; Class Prophet; Bac- 
alaureate Committee; 'Varsity Basket 
Ball Team; Capt. Class Baseball 
Team; 'Varsity Baseball Team; Foot- 
ball Team. 

Rieh in saving common-sense 
And as the greatest only are. 
In his simplicity sublime. 




!lll!lllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllllllllllll ' 111 'Illllillllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



THIS IS PAGE XIXETY-OXE 




Pearl Ruth Rehorst. 

Handsome, winsome 
and then some. 



nmesome, — 



Raymond Rheinewald. "Reiny. 

Mathematics Club; Class Football 
Team. 

"I value science; none can prize it 
more. " 



Charles Glenn Roberts. "Liz. 

Senior Class President; Mathematics 
Club; Class Vice President in Junior 
Year; Captain 'Varsity Baseball Team; 
Class Baseball Team; Glee Club; Jun- 
ior Dance Committee; Junior Picnic 
Committee; All Senior Committees; 
Play Committee; Asst. Business Mgr. 
Senior Play. 

His life is gentle, and the elements 
are so mixed in him, that Nature 
might stand up and say, "This is a 
man. " 



Wendell Essig Roberts. "Wen. 

President of Glee Club; Treasurer of 
Mathematics Club; Class Baseball and 
Football Teams. 

Daily lie hath a beauty in his life. 



iiiiiiiiiiililiiii II 11111111111 

THIS IS PAGE NINETY-TWO 




M^m 



Margery Eulalie Rohan. 



' ' Marg. 



Senior Play Committee; Commence- 
ment Dance Committee; Flower Com- 
mittee; Engraving Committee; Senior 
Party Committee. 

A cherry lip, a bonny eye. a pass- 
ing, pleasing tongue. 



Jesse Leonard Rose. 

He shakes his ambrosia] curls, and 

gives the nod, — 
The stamp of fate, the sanction of 
the gods. 



Walter Zell Rundles. "Fuzzy. 

'Varsity and Class Baseball Teams; 

Mathematics Club. 

Warm in the glorious interest he 

pursues, 
And, in one word, a good man and 

a true. 



Nathan Salon. 

Mathematics Club. 
Thou might 'st call him 
A goodly person. 



"Nate. 




i miiiiiiiiiiii mini i i ii iiiiiiiiiini i iiiiiiiiiini i! i i i i i I""" raiiiiiiiinn iiniiiiiiiii nniiiiiiiii 

THIS IS TAGE NINETY-THREE 




Dorthea Saunder. 

There's a holy pleasure in thine 



Mary Pauline Saylor. "Paulie. 

Social Council; Caldron Staff; Senior, 
Junior and Sophomore Dance Commit- 
tees; Commencement Dance Commit- 
tee; Caldron Reporter in Freshman 
and Sophomore Years; Basket Ball 
Team; Senior Play Committee; Senior 
Play; Junior Picnic Committee. 

Her valiant courage and undaunt- 
ed spirit 
Is more than in woman commonly 



Alda Avilla Sharp. 

A maiden never bold. 



Roger Sheyer. "Rawgo. 

His heart's his mouth; 
What his breast forges, that his 
tongue must vent. 



■ 

THIS IS PAGE NINETY-POUR 




'&mms 




John Herbert Slater. 



"Johnny. 



Mathematics Club. 
A plain blunt man that loves his 
friends. 



Beulah May Starkel. 

Ever silent and demure, — content 
to leave her thoughts unspoken. 



Arthur Chapman Stephens. "Art' 

or "Steve.' 
President of Mathematics Club; Cal- 
dron Staff; Vice President of Glee 
Club; Senior Play; Class Baseball 
Team. 

A combination and a form indeed, 
Where every god did seem to set 

his seal. 
To give the world assurance of a 

man. 



William Henry Stolte. "Bill.' 

Mathematics Club; Class Baseball 

Team. 

He spreads his welcome where he 
goes. 




urn minimum miiimiiiimiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiimiii i m iiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiini mini inn miiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

THIS IS PAGE NINETY-FIVE 




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Herbert Albia Stouder "Stouder. 

Who deserves well, needs not an- 
other's praise. 



N. Grant Strathern. "Cockie. 

Class Football Team; Cheer Leader; 
Mathematics Club. 

■ "Let me have audience for a word 

or two !" 



Rosella Alma Strobel. "Lollie. 

Her beauty hangs upon the cheek 
of night as a rich jewel in an 
Ethiope's ear. 



Edna Belle Teagarden. "Betty. 

Commencement Dance Committee. 

When yon dance. I wish yon might 

ever do nothing else but that. 



HIKI" ' :"» I" ' ■!: ! I < ! Ml. ' ■' HI" .I'll. i I Illll HI! I ii.l I l ■ : li I I I :l|l | 

THIS IS PAGE NINETY-SIX 




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Helen Josephine Thompson. 
.Mathematics Club. 

Like a leaflet in ;i breeze, 
Never resting or at ease, 
When e'er she hears the mus 

sound. 
She's ready for another round. 



Ralph Herbert Tinkham. "Tinkham 
Mathematics Club. 
Cutesl li'l' feller, everybody 

knows. 



Allan J. Tremper. "Tremp 

Caldron Staff; Class Baseball Team. 

Kind, like a man was he; Like a 

man, too, would have his way. 



Helen Lorene Trisch. 

Mathematics Club. 
And she that was not only passing 

fair 
But was withal discreet and debon- 
air, 
Resolved the passive doctrine to 
fulfil. 




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THIS IS PAGE NINETY-SEVEN 




Howard Morton Tyger "Tige. 

Mathematics Club; Commencement 
Dance Committee. 

Where is any author in the world 
Teaches such beauty as a woman's 
eve. 



Grace Hildred Van Horn. 

Mathematics Club. 
A face with gladness overspread. 
Soft smiles by human kindness 
bred. 



Ralph Oak Virts. 'Deacon' 

or "Virts.' 
Take him for all in all — he was a 

man 
We shall not see his like again. 



Paul Wilbur Warren, "Warnie. 

Senior Play: Caldron Staff; Engraving 
Committee; All Committees in Junior 
Year; President of Class in Junior 
Year; Mathematics Club. 

And what is knowledge, but a 

gleam 
A little light, a punny spark, 
A phantasy, a ghost, a dream, 
Which only glimmers in the dark. 



I "I! 'I'' 1 !' 11'' I'lllllHI I'IMI' Ill- 



THIS IS PAGE NINETY-EIGHT 




iE*p 



Sabina Waterfield. 

Mathematics Club. 

A Lovely maid thai is eontenl with 

Nature's own sweet ornament. 



Marie Weinbreunner. 

Her aii'. her manners, all who saw 

admired, 
Courteous, though coy, gentle, 

though retired, 

Tlic joy of youth and health her 

eyes display 'd 
And ease of heart her every look 

conveyed. 



31va May Weller. 
She stands high in the hearts of 
those that know her. 



Jacob Walter Lewis Wellman. "Jake. 
'Varsity Basket Ball Team; Class Foot- 
ball Team. 

Hang sorrow! Care will kill a eat, 
And therefore let's be merry. 




1 

THIS IS PAGE N'lXKTY-NINE 




Paul Silas Welty. "Cy. 

Committee on Mottoes; Glee Club. 
A man upright. 
Whose heart is free 
From all dishonest deeds. 



Welker Wallace Wentz. "Wink. 

Honor Student; Secretary and Treas- 
urer of Class in Junior and Senior 
Years; Business Manager of Caldron; 
Play Committee; Business Manager of 
Senior Play; Senior Party Committee; 
Junior Picnic Committee; Junior 
Dance Committee; Engraving Commit- 
tee; Stationery Committee; Committee 
on Mottoes; Social Council; Mathe- 
matics Club. 

An honest man he is, and hates the 
slime that sticks on filthv deeds. 



James Cecilius White 
Prosperity conceals 
ray. 



"Jim. 

his brightest 



Mavis Muriel Whyte. 

Mathematics Club; Bacalaureate Com- 
mittee. 

A beautiful and happy girl, 

With step as light as summer air. 



; ' ' : ■", : i i.i H liiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED 








Charles Wild. "Charlie. 

Honor Student. 
A man who is abstract of all faults 
that most men follow. 



Rose Laverne Williams. 

Mathematics Club. 
The lustre in your eye, and the 
heaven in your cheek pleads 
your fair usage. 



Vivian Hatton Withers. 

Delicate, and faultless as a dream. 



Elizabeth Charlotte York. "Betty. 

Mathematics Club. 
Though wit may flash from fluent 

eyes, 
And mirth distract the breast. 
1 boast not having much of these, 
But at least I do my best. 




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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND ONE 




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Helen Irene Young. 

Mathematics Club. 
Harmony with every grace, 
Plays in the fair proportions of her 

face. 



Mary Elizabeth Zent. 

Honor Student; Caldron Staff; Senior 
Party Committee; Mathematics Club. 
She walks in beauty like the night. 
Of cloudless elimes, and starry 

skies. 

And all that's best of dark and 

bright, 
.Meet in her asped and her eyes. 



Gertrude Marie Zucker. "Gert. 

Honor Student. 
And she more sweet than any bird 

on bough, 
Would oftentimes amongst us bear 

a part. 



Margaret Colmy. 



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Walter Edward Kruse. 
Better late than never — 

Louise Pickard. 

if 



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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AXD TAVO 




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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND THREE 



A SKETCH OF THE CALDRON. 

By BESSIE KEERAN 
(Society Editress of the First Caldron Staff.) 

In the Spring of 1903 — sounds like a war ehronicle, doesn't it.' — a re- 
search department was established by the class of '04. The first work was 
done by a committee of five during the following summer. Although the 
original report of this committee is no Longer extant, the fruits of their 
labors remain to this day. The work of this little group of pioneers is a 
monument to their initiative and energy, if not their genius. 

This committee of five made a survey of the journlistie efforts of high 
schools in Indiana anil neighboring states. In the eousre of the investigation 
an interesting collection of specimens was made, which easily outclassed all 
present-day popular fiction magazines in their general lack of profundity. 

The immediate result of the invesigation was the committee's deduction 
that some kind of a publication was within the scope of a class posssesed of 
all the latent ability believed to exist in the class of '04. This remarkable 
conclusion was followed by immediate action. Plans were made for the pub- 
liction of a school paper to appear each month of the following school year 
and to he in charge of the Senior class. The carefully prepared report was 
submitted to tie- class at the first meeting in the fall. The report embodied 
a slate of suggested staff workers for the projected paper, which slate was 
accepted without any evident dissatisfaction. 1 doubt if a well-oiled machine 
ever "pulled-off" a bolder coup. Every member of the committee had a 
prominent place on the staff, selected according to bis peculiar brand of genius. 
Thus do our future statesmen receive their training in the Kindergarten of 
politics. 

The paper was founded on September the 15th, 1903, and after all the 
troublesome details were neatly arranged, the question of a suitable name 
came up. Anything suggestive of a scrap-heap seemed appropriate. There 
were the "Debris." numerous "Echoes," et cetera. 

A quotation from Macbeth was finallv the source of the now well-known 
title — - 

"Double, double, toil and trouble, 

Fire burn and Caldron bubble." 

It also suggested possibilities for a cover design. No other publication 
at that time had used the name "Caldron," so "The Caldron" it became. 
Its first cover design was a charming blonde witch — the illustrator was partial 
to tie- James Montgomery Flagg type— stirring ;i delectable brew made up of 
tennis rackets, footballs. Aurentz' chocolates, corsage bouquets, sweaters and 
dance programs, all arranged with a delightful disregard for perspective. 
What the design lacked in unity and simplicity, it made up for in variety. 

The first Staff is now scattered all over this broad land. The class 
prophetess in her wildest flights could not have planned more surprisingly 
than Fate has for these people. Of the two illustrators, one is now designer 
for an Art Glass firm in Denver; the other is a capable home-maker in Spring- 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mm iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiii minium i iiiiiiiiiiii minimi imimiimiiiimiii i i i i i i i , ■immimiiimmmiiimimmiiimiii 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FOUR 




field, Illinois. The Exchange editress is a teacher of English in a New York 
City high school, while the Sporting editor is ;i successful New York business 
man. The Business Manager is in the piano business in Chicago while his 
assistant is an electrical engineer in a western state. Of the Associate editors 
one is in the Vocational Guidance Bureau in New York City; another is a 
Paris correspondent for the Boston Transcript and author of a recent hook 
on dramatic criticism, while the other is on the staff of the leading Philan- 
thropic ami Economic publication. One of the society editresses is a teacher 
of mechanical drawing in a high school in Illinois. Of the twelve members 
only two arc left in our midst — one a promising physician and the other a 
humble school teacher. 



From this time the Caldron has grown until it now assumes the propor- 
tions and characteristics so familiar to the student body. This year's staff has 
greatly increased the standard of the paper over that of last year, hut the staff 
still feels sure that if it were possible to do it all over again, a still better job 
would result. The greatest difficulties that the staff encountered were the 
trouble of securing a good yet varied assortment of stories, and the small cir- 
culation, although the circulation this year was larger by half a hundred than 
it has ever been before. 

The future of the Caldron depends entirely upon the policies that the edi- 
tors of the next few years may adopt, but it would nevertheless be safe to say 
that within the next few years the magazine will become a weekly publication 
instead of a monthly magazine. 




THE DISCISSION LEAGUE. 

OR a long while the boosters of the Debating Society struggled with 
the indifference and lack of interest which was manifested by the stu- 
dents of the Fort Wayne High School. They did. after a series of 
meetings, the attendance of which diminished all too rapidly, actually 
organize the coveted society and a program was started. At this time, Pro- 
fessor Lackridge, of Indiana University, visited the school and it was an- 
nounced that he wished to speak to the Senior English students in Room 22. 
Either to escape the oppression of Room 18 or on account of personalty of the 
speaker, there was a grand rush toward the realm of Mr. McMillen. Tin- 
students actully displayed an interest in something else besides basket ball and 
tangoeing, for soon the room was packed, — all eager and really wide awake. 
Mr. Lackridge's talk was about the State High School Discussion League 
of which he is an able champion ; he encouraged the extended entries into the 
contest for, it seemed, he thought that most of his hearers were members of 
the Debating Society. I think three or four there were members. Here was 
an excellent chance for the Debaters to get a good work out and surely the 
state contest should have been enough to arouse the last spark of enthusiasm 
in the theretofore indifferent. When persons were called for for entries, be- 
hold! all bad fled save two. Well, it was enough for a contest but just enough. 



THIS IS I'AGE ONE HUNDRED AND FIVE 




TIIK FKESILMAX COl'XCIL 




JACKSON 
MORRIS 



(i. HADLEY 
W. SHI IRT 



.MISS WINGKRT 
STi )LTE 



MR. CLARK 
O'ROURKE 



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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SIX 



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PERTAINING TO THE SOCIAL COUNCIL. 

By PRI IPBSSI IR 1.. C. WARD 
(President "i the Council. ) 

HE Social Council of the Fori Wayne High and Manual Training School 
is the outcome of a Heeling on the part of many teachers, parents and 
students thai the dances and parties of our young people were failing 
to contribute anything of value to their social development. It seemed 
evident to many of us thai some of our pupils were devoting far too much of 
their time and energy lo their frolics to allow any reserve for school work; 
and on the other hand, that very many students were altogether debarred 
from any social enjoyment whatever. School society had come into the con- 

THE SOPHOMORE COUNCIL 




EDMONDS 

WARFEL 



L. PAUL 
H. STKEIDER 



MISS PARKER 
H. STEVENS 



MR. KNIGHT 

DETZER 






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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SEVEN 



trol of small cliques whose only idea of amusement is the dance; and the 
"High School Set" was fast acquiring an undesirable reputation among our 
livelier citizens. Chaperonage was largely a matter of chance, sometimes a 
mere pretence. On many occasions, indeed, the chaperons did their full duty; 
but far too seldom did such happy conditions prevail. For these reasons, and 
several others, the students of the high school, through their class organiza- 
tions, were invited in .(line. 1913, by Principal C. T. Lane, to join in the forma- 
tion of a Social Council which should act in an advisory capacity in all social 
matters pertaining to the school. The purpose and scope of the Council were 
explained as far as possible to the various classes; and, with scarcely any op- 
position, they acceded to the plan. 

THE JUNIOR COUNCIL 




ADKLK W'AliXKK MARIAN BASH I n iROTHY KNIGHT 

HUNTING PARKS MR. THOMAS HATTERSLEY 

fSec'y of Council) 
[MISS KOLB] 

iiiii i iiti inn inn i jhii mrniiii mti i iim i lumurii iiiuiiin uiimniniiitiuii 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHT 



>? 



5— - n- 




In September, 1913, the actual work of organization was begun. Each 

class selected, in open meeting, two faculty representatives. At the same time 
each class chose three students who with the three class officers form the stu- 
dent delegation in the Council. 

At the first meeting of the year. October 23, 1913, a simple, flexible con- 
stitution was adopted. Mr. Ward was elected president. Mr. Robert Hatters- 
ley, secretary. At this time also was passed a resolution requiring from any 
High School organization planning a social affair, the following information: 
(1) Xante of the organization; (2) time and place of proposed function: (3) 
approximate cost and method of raising funds: (4) names of chaperons who 
will certainly be present. This information is furnished at least a week be- 
fore the party. Even so simple a requirement as this has produced wonder- 
ful results. No affair under the approval of the Council has been without 
chaperons. No lottery or other unlawful device has been used to raise money. 
The check-room "graft" has been abolished: and the cost of entertainments 
has been materially reduced. But however desirable these results may be, the 



THE SENIOR COUNCIL 




l:< IRKRTS 
WENTZ 



M. MAHURIN MISS MAY MR. WARD (Pres.) 

P. SAYLOR G. GLENN MISS GOFF LIPSETT 

(June Section) (Feb. Section) 



THIS IS PAGE ONE HTXDRED .VXD NINE 



members of the Council feel that its most important action of the year was the 
passage of the following resolution : 

"Resolved, That the Social Council disclaims any responsibility for the 
conduct of any high school student or any other person at any dance or party 
not held in the high school building; and also that the Council refuses to ac- 
cept any duties of chaperonagc or police in connection with dances or parties 
outside the building." 

The intention in passing the resolution was to relieve the Council of a 
burden of responsibility intolerable because of a lack of legal authority out- 
side the building. To be sure, conditions will probably retrograde to their 
former status iu the ease of dances held down-town: but if they do. the fault 
will lie. not with the school people, but squarely upon the parents who alone 
can exercise effective authority over their children in the precincts of the 
dance hall. The Council feels that the school can not stand sponsor for the 
dances of today, anil is entirely willing to turn over its responsibility in that 
direction to the parents. From the school standpoint, the resolution is im- 
portant because it must inevitably drive all legitimate social functions of the 
school into the school-building. We have had rive such affairs this year. 
They have been successful, viewed from any side. There has always been a 
sufficient number of alert chaperones, an attendance of sixty to seventy-five 
per cent of the class, and an entertainment, which for educative social value. 
is far above the former danee-puneh-cigarette combination. The Council feels 
that its first year's work has been successful, far beyond what any of us 
thought possible. Best of all, we believe that a school sentimenl lias been 
aroused which will, in the end. make our social pleasure educative and of 
permanent value to school and student. We look forward into the future 
with confidence. We believe that our classes will use the building more and 
more, as the years go on, for the scene of their fun as well as their work; and 
that perhaps in the dim, distant future the school will be able to do a wonder- 
ful office in bringing together sometimes, for mutual, social enjoyment, our 
students and their fathers and mothers. 




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THIS IS PAGE ONE HI'XHREI) AND TEN 




ABOUT THE GLEE CLUB. 

N the fall of 191] Prof. Win. Miles originated the idea of organizing a 
high school glee club. Tt was a husky lot of voices that were exposed 
at the first few practices, hut under Hie constant work and care of 
Prof. Miles these voices began to change and to round into better form. 
Steven Ross was the first president of the organization and it was his constant 
boosting which put our glee club on such a firm foundation. During this first 
year the glee club confined itself to furnishing musical entertainment at 
chapel, and did not appeal' in public at all. 

The following fall the glee club again resumed its practices and was re- 
organized. This time it was Ralph Yirts who was selected as president. The 
club was weakened by the loss of several members of the previous year, but 
it was not long till new members were found to fill these vacancies. 

This year the faithful work of all those concerned helped to produce one 
of the best glee clubs we have ever had. We were handicapped in numbers, 
but by hard work we have managed to have a very successful year. 

Our first concert this year was given at the Jefferson theatre, and the 
packed houses at all three shows proved that our glee club had become a mu- 
sical organization which would be appreciated wherever it might go. Other 
programmes were given at various churches during the season. 

In addition to our glee club we also had a quartet, a trio, and a soloist. 
The quartet gave one concert at the Third Presbyterian church which was 
highly complimented by all who heard it. The quartet consisted of Paul 
Droege, first tenor; Wendell E. Roberts, second tenor: Chester Cutshall, bari- 
tone; and Elmer Parker, bass. The quartet did not confine itself to glee club 
music only, but varied its program to such an extent that they were engaged 
to sing for the church service ;it Grace Chapel on one occasion. 



THIS IS 1 



AGE ONE HUNDRED AND ELEVEN 



The trio consisted of Paul Droege, first tenor; Wendell E. Roberts, second 
tenor: and Jesse Peters, bass. The shining light of the trio was Mr. Peters, 
whose perfect acting of Joe s part in "Poor Old Joe" brought plenty of ap- 
plause from all audiences. 

Our soloist. Mr. I!. Salmon, needs no introduction as he is well known as 
a young singer of unusual merit. Mr. Sarmon sings at the Westminster 
church and only those who have heard him can realize the richness and melo- 
dy of his voice. His comic solo. "I'm Only a Sophomore," brings thunders 
of applause wherever he sings it. 

The glee club is a loyal supporter of everything connected with Fort 
Wayne High School and we earnestly hope that on this fiftieth anniversary of 
our school she may "Live Forever." We also hope that the Victrola, which 
Prof. Miles and the glee club so bravely tried to pay for by giving a concert, 
shall be paid for at the end of the next fifty years. 




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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND TWELVE 



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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTEEN 




REGARDING THE MATH. CLUB. 

HE events of the past school year have surpassed all oilier years. Our 
school has had better "spirit," better athletics, and better organiza- 
tions than ever before. Foremost among the latter is an organization 
which has proved immensely popular among both teachers and pupils. 
which has filled a long felt need, which has placed our school in line with other 
up-to-date schools, and, in short, is one of the best things that ever happened 
in Fort Wayne High School. It is — but you all know what it is — the Math. 
Club, of course. 

It all came about this way. (Now, we do not know how long this bee hail 
been buzzing in the bonnets of our Math, staff, we are only here to praise the 
"bee.") At four P. M„ December fourth, to be explicit, a mass meeting was 
called in Room IS. of all Juniors and Seniors who were interested in forming 
a Mathematics Club. It was rumored about that the sole purpose of this club 
was to establish a social ecpiality between teacher and pupil. 



THE MATH CLUR OFFICERS 




STEVENS MR. H'ERREJIEVER ROBERTS 

(President) (Founder) (Treasurer) 

R. SCHULTHEIS J. BOWSER 

(Vice-President ) (Secretary) 



THIS IS PACK ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTEEN 






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This announcemenl was hailed with delight. Ii was the very thing for 
which our young souls had been craving, and, needless to say. the firsl meet- 
ing was well attended. The officers were chosen and various committees were 
selected: Mr. Edson, president; iMiss Schultheis, vice presidenl ; .Miss Bowser, 

secretary and treasurer. 

At the next meeting Mr. Edson 's resignation was granted and Mr. Stevens 
elected in his place. With the helpful assistance of our Math, teachers and 
these competent people at the wheel, what could fail' 

In accordance with the constitution, a meeting was held every month in 
the school building. These meetings were very well attended, and wen' the 
crowning social events of the school year. They were made interestingly in- 
structive as well, by a number of excellent talks given by the faculty and 
pupils. Not too much credit can be given to Mr. Lipsett's work as chairman 
of tin 1 Entertainment Committee. 

And next year?— but wait and see! DOROTHY KNIGHT. 



in mi in ii i i i i i nun i iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiii i minium i ii minimi m 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTEEN 








REVIEWING THE SOROSIS. 

Miss Todd, Founder. 

Colors: Irish green and white. 
Motto: "To be intensely something." 
Emblem : The oak leaf. 

SOROSIS SONG. 

If any one should ask us, from Fort Wayne or Damascus, 

Why we are wearing colors so glaring, 

We would answer you in tones of pride. 

With faces all serene : 

"We are the Sorosis, we wear the white and green, 

Sorosis we ! jolly girls so keen, 

Sorosis we ! Whose like was never seen. 

We are a jolly crew and we put it up to you. 

Wouldn't you just like to be "A Wearing' of the Green.' 



THE SOROSIS OFFICERS 




MISS EIKENP.ARY MISS McMILLEN MISS PAUL 

(President) (Secretary) (Treasurer) 

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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEEN 



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HE first me 
)f March 
second an< 



THE HISTORY OF THE SOROSIS. 

By MISS ANNA It. TODD. 

ting of Sorosis Literary Society occurred on the afternoon 

1914. It was participated in by about thirty j*irls of the 

third year classes of the high school, who had signed a pe- 

iacl been submitted 



tit ion for the privilege of forming a society, wl 
to the principal, and cordially approved by him. 

An organization was initiated by the election of officers, and the appoint- 
ment of committees on constitution, on name, on colors and motto and emblem, 
on song and yell, on bulletin board, and on record books. The officers elected 
were as follows : 

President — Gladys Eikenbary. 

Vice President — Winifred Bicknell. 

Treasurer — Louella Paid. 

Secretary — ( 'lara McMillen. 

Sergeant -at- Arms — Hilda Herrmann. 

Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms — Florence Piekard. 

Critic — Helen Roebel. 

Cheer Leader — Constance Underbill. 

Pianist— Elizabeth Powell. 

Executive Committee — Constance Underhill, Marian Hash, and Virginia 
Kinniard. 

The work of all of these committees was accomplished in the couse of a 
few meetings with great energy and effectiveness, ami a permanent organiza- 
tion was accomplished. In addition to the business of organization, weekly 
programs have been prepared and given, consisting of music, readings, bio- 
graphical, travel, descriptive sketches and debates. A pantomime dramatiza- 
tion of "The Lady of the Lake*' is planned. 

The spirit oi' the society from the beginning has been earnest and enthusi- 
astic, and the prospects, at the present time, are bright for its permanence. 
The motto of Sorosis, "To be intensely something," expresses the purpose in 
the minds of the girls who constitute its membership. The object is not only 
to cultivate the arts of expression in writing and speaking and in dramatizing 
and in music, but to seek as well a richer mental and emotional life through 
the widening and deepening of interests in things worth while. We desire 
also to secure for ourselves drill and exercise in the practice of parliamentary 
procedure, so essentially a part of a girl's education in our day; and to develop 
ley the committee work, executive ability and powers of the initiative. An- 
other very important object is the enrichment of character that comes from 
the practice of the social graces in the old fashioned arts of hospitality. In 
short, it is our object to secure opportunity for development of such powers 
as we may have, and thus to increase our capacity for usefulness and pleasure 
in the business of living. 

Upon this large program we have made our modest beginning. There is 
a welcome to high school girls who care to join us in the spirit of these ideals. 
We dare to predict that Sorosis shall come to mean "intensely something" in 
the Fort Wayne High School. 



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)NB HUNDRED AND SEVENTEEN 



CONCERNING THE PLATONIANS. 

One of the newest desirable organizations of our High School is the lately 
formed Boys' Literary Society, unappropriately termed the Platonians. On 
March the 5th of this semester, at the suggestion of Miss Todd, a meeting of 
all boys of this school interested in literature was held at which the following 
officers were elected: President, Willard Shambaugh; Vice President, Wayne 
Thieme; Secretary, Win Mossmann; Treasurer, Ralph Dunkelberg; Executive 
Committee, A. Leslie Jacobs. Chairman; Arthur Mohler, Herbert Rust; Mar- 
shal, Ralph Taylor; Second Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms, Artemas Pickard; Re- 
porter, Chelcie Kesler. All these officers have performed their various weighty 
duties to the best of their ability and the highest degree of efficiency'/.'? A 
meeting of this society is held every two weeks, at which a very interesting, 
instructive and entertaining program is rendered by the various members. 
Although some members have striven hard for the success of the society, still 
it sustained a severe set-back on May the 13th in the resignation of Miss Todd 
as Faculty adviser. This step was taken by Miss Todd as the result of the 
questionable conduct of certain unplatonatic members of the society at its var- 
ious meetings. Although the outlook for the Platonians is gloomy at the pres- 
ent writing, still it is hoped that success may be obtained as the result of more 
serious effort on the part of the members, liesides the officers the following 
are members of the society: 

H. A. Thomas, J. Stiefel. E. Clear. L. Popp, M. Williams, P. Kerby, J. Bush, 
K. Rouch, H. Taylor, E. Spiegel, P. Spiegel, H. Waterman, A. Detzer, H. War- 
fel, A. Moellering, W. Geller, J. Blitz, R. Eggeman, L. Schneider, A. Rode- 
meyer, W. Ross. R. Edmonds, S. Hunting, L. Keegan. H. Haller, R. Bitner, H. 
Safford, W. Wentz. Hon. A. P. Phipps. H. T. Purfield. 

THE OFFICERS 




DUNK ELBE KG 



SHAMBAUGH 



MOSSMAN 



i 
THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTEEN 



HISTORY. 

The Pi Gamma is not ;i fraternity. It is merely a league of Junior Bad 
Boys. 

The original chapter of the Noble Order of Pi Gammas was established in 
the Fort Wayne High School on February 30, 1U14. It consists of the cream 
of the F. W. H. S. 

Later A. Detzer tried to start competition, by organizing the Cowls, which 
consists of three members, none of which are any good. Be it understood by all 
concerned that the Pi Gammas have not felt the intended cmpetition in the 

least. 

Feeling the need of somebody to guide them the Pi Gammas elected Mr. 
Lane Ornery President, without his knowledge or consent. The history will 
have to stop now. because there ain't no more, on account of the youngness of 
the club. 



YELL. 

Oxerine, Oxerine, 
Always heard, always seen. 
Pi Gamm, Pi Gamm, 
We don't give a d — n 
Tyranny never. 
Pi Gamma forever, 
Amen. 



MEMBERS. 



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Sow du you know 



Our pictures are mi the next page — Have a look. 



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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETEEN 



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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY 



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BOOK IV 



EVENTS 




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Early in October some of our faculty, with Mr. Lane as sponsor, took it 
upon themselves to inaugurate a Social Council in the Fort Wayne High School. 

A meeting was held October 2:id. at which Mr. Ward was unanimously 
elected president. Mr. Ward suggested a few suitable rules for guidance, 
and after some discussion, the articles of the constitution were formulated, 
and resolutions were passed concerning the social functions of the year. The 
first meeting of the Social Council proved to be one of interest and enthusiasm 
on the part of both students and faculty. 

It has proven that earnest work, good judgment and right spirit on the 



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part of the Council has inaugurated a new era in the standards of manners, 
and social usages in school affairs. 

Since then, all the parties and good times have been under the direction 
of this Council and these have undoubtedly been a success. 

The Juniors were the first to profit by (he help of the Council, in giving 
a dance the latter part of October at Hanker 's Academy. The grand march 
at 8:30, found half of the high school pupils there, ready for the fun that the 
evening afforded. The hall was beautifully and seasonably decorated. Danc- 
ing and games which w ere played by those who did not dance, were the chief 
features of the evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ritter, Mr. and Mrs. Ward. Mi', and Mrs. Hunting, Mr. and 
Mrs. Parks, and Mr. and Mrs. Rohan were the chaperons of the occasion. 

# # # 

The Sophomore party, the first of its kind given in the Fort Wayne High 
School, was one of the greatest successes imaginable, surpassing the highest 
expectations of every one. When the guests had assembled, Mr. Knight an- 
nounced thi' programme. Dancing, music and progressive games were the 
order of the evening. Later Miss Beebe"s room was thrown open and found 
to be transformed into a dining room by means of tables decorated with ferns, 
chrysanthemums and sparkling candles in crystal holders. Here refresh- 
ments were served amid much laughter and chat. Altogether, the party was 
a most delightful affair and the Sophomores feel that they have proved that an 
entertainment in which every member of the class shares, is the kind they 
want in the future. 

The chaperons were Prof, and Mrs. C. T. Lane. Mr. and .Mrs. W. W. 
Knight, Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Blitz. Mrs. Edson, Miss Parker and Mr. H. A. 

Thomas. 

* * # 

Sad to relate the next social affair, which was attempted by the Seniors, 
was not approved b\ the Council. But a few of the reckless, with more cour- 
age than sense, sallied forth on the evening of the intended party and had 
what they styled "the best time of their lives." This is commonly referrered 
to as the "Curb Stone Party."* 

The authorized party was finally realized a few weeks later. December 
22d. One hundred and three members of the class were able to attend and 
to enjoy the fun of the evening. Welker Wentz acted as master of cere- 
monies, and a large share of the success of the party was due to him. Danc- 
ing, including circle two-steps and barn-dances, alternated with games of 
Three-Deep and Drop-the-Handkerchief formed the body of the programme. 
During the course of the evening the Colonial quartet sang several popular 
songs. Ice cream and fancy cakes were served and small 14 pennants M'ere 
given to each member of the class. Class President Roberts made a short 
speech for which he was heartily applauded. The affair was cheperoned by 
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Ritter, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Rohan, and Mr. and Miss Thomas. 



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The 1913 Alumni gave an informal dance al the Odd Fellows' Hall on the 
evening of December 30th, about seventy members of the class being presenl 
to enjoy the festivities. An interesting feature of the evening was the giving 
of the yells of the different colleges which the members of the class are at- 
tending. Purdue had the Largesl contingent, Illinois same second, and Michi- 
gan third. Mr. and .Mrs. .1. J. Bitter acted as chaperons to the parly. Walter 
Carter, president of the Alumni, made the statemenl that a similar affair would 
be given next year if enough of the Alumni could lie brought together. 

*= * # 

Mr. Raymond Rheinewald made one of the dreary February evenings live- 
ly by honoring the Seniors and officers of the Junior class at a dance at Unity 
Hall, ('lass Veils, refreshments and the usual good time were participated in. 

# * # 

The Freshman, feeling that they must net he left out of the social whirl 
altogether, celebrated their one year's existance on February 6th. by plung- 
ing into all the activity and excitement id' a dance at Hanker's Hall. They 
had announced that the old two-step and waltz would he in vogue once more, 
but their older brothers and sisters decided that they were not going to be 
told what they could or could not do at a Freshman dance, so the Tango, Fish- 
walk, Castle-walk. Hesitation, Argentine. Broken-hip and Maxixe proved as 
popular as ever. Even the chaperons felt it in the air. so the little Freshmen 
felt pleased and perhaps a trifle guilty that their first attempt had gone off so 
brilliantly. 

# # # 

The "hard times" party as the Sophomores deemed to call it. came off on 
the evening of February 21st. These Sophomores, always trying to do some- 
thing original, decided to entertain themselves that evening by a "tragedy" 
enacted on the stage of the auditorium. "Old Faithful" rose a little jerky on 
a scene of intense emotion. Two men locked in deadly combat. "Rang! 
went the gun and the villian did run. for he had shot the hero in the fore- 
head." The second act was laid in the court-room. At once one recognized 
it as the trial in procedure. The moans of the bereaved were so pronounced 
and the glances of the fair widow aroused such sympathy from the jurymen, 
that a verdict of "guilty" was soon pronounced. So endeth the tragedy but 
not the party. It continued until the janitors said it was time to go home. 

# # # 

The Juniors came in on another party a week after the Sophomore 
"stunt." February 27th. and was an exception to the rule. An interesting 
programme was given in the auditorium, featured by Waterman, Dunkelberg 
and Riker, who proved themselves quite equal to the occasion of standing up 
before their critics and performing. Hazen Johnston gave a very excellent 
demonstration of how not to make a speech which was greatly appreciated, 
hut the kindness and good nature of the class prevented him from being 
mobbed. The rest of the evening was spent most enjoyably in games, danc- 
ing and feasting. 

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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND TW.EXTY-FIVE 



As March was a cold and dreary month and in April every one was 
stricken with poverty, parties were not much in evidence, but May brought 
another round of gaieties. On the evening of the 15th the Seniors celebrated 
their last party in the high school. Several members of the class rendered a 
very pleasing, and highly educative little vaudeville in the auditorium, which 
was followed by dancing on the stage, and a series of kid games in one of the 
"Roman Rooms." to-wit ; — room 2. A light lunch was then served in Miss 
Harrah's room. Everyone had a perfectly grand time from start to finish, 
even the janitors and the poor unfortunates who had to make speeches. Pat- 
ron Ward prophesied magnanimous matrimonial activities for a majority of 
the class, and Miss Detzer showed that she had a hat. The chaperons in evi- 
dence throughout the evening were, Miss May. Miss Williams, and Mr. Ward. 

On Friday evening. May 22, the Freshmen had a little party which they 
held in the High School. 

According to the account of the children who attended this "most won- 
derful entertainment," the evening was enjoyed by playing games. The nnst 
spectacular was a "Pie Contest" which was won by Raymond Stub. Evi- 
dently this young lad has a monstrous appetite for the object of the contest 
was to see which one could consume the most pie. After this interesting little 
episode, the children played "Wink" and maybe, for all we know, they had 
a little game of "Post-office" on the side. Refreshments which were served 
in the hall on a long table, consisted of ice cream and eake. 

The nurses, who were Miss Wingert and Mr. and ill's. Clark, felt that the 
children would be tired the next day, after their strenuous evening, so they 
sent them home at eleven o'clock. 




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i i "■-.:! " ..!■" ! ■' '■!"■■! 



Sf 





Since the Annual goes to press before the Senior excursion and the Com- 
mencement Dance, the task of "writing them up" lias been Left to you. It 
might have been perfectly safe to say that these two events were the same that 
they were last yar, only better, hut this would he too commonplace. There- 
fore the task of writing these two social events has been left to our readers, 
ami the space below has been left blank for you to fill in. Pencils for this task 
may be purchased from any of the book stores advertising in the rear section 
of this Annual. 

It woidd be a safe bet to say that this is the only page in the Annual that 
will satisfy all of our readers. 



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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN 



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THIS IS PACK ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT 



V 




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THE SENIOR PLAY. 

The expectations of the most optimistic of people could uo1 have come up 
to the real success of "A Rose o' Plymouth-town," iliis year's Senior play. 
Surmounting ;ill sorts of difficulties, mosl of which came ^^- i 1 1 ■ i 1 1 the few days 
immediately preceding the presentation of the play, the management and casl 

cannot be given too much credit for their work. When il urtain wenl up 

for the first performance, the scenery had jusi been finished, and two stage 
hands were standing back of that staunch cabin, holding their breaths for fear 
that it should tumble. Prom the time when Miriam ran down the sleep stairs 
(Manual Training Dept. Pat. Appld. for), through the duell, and on to the last 
resounding echo of the heroine's kiss "to the better man." the audience was 
held in a semi-continuous state of rapture and awe, mixed with a greal deal of 
real appreciation. 

In sharing ou1 the honors. Coach Shank, Committee Chairman Marjorie 
Mahurin, the business managers, and the east all come in for their just dues, 
but certainly everyone realizes that without the help of Mr. Griswold of the 
Sentinel, who was so kind as to work late two nights, crayoning the scenery. 
the whole play would not have been produced on schedule lime, and I he repu- 
tation of the class would have been lost. 




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THIS IS TAGE ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY -NINE 



ARBOR DAY CELEBRATION. 

April 17th of this year marked the first celebration of Arbor Day in the 
High School. School was dismissed for the occasion at the end of the second 
period in the afternoon, and after a short musical program, Dr. Herman Bab- 
son, professor of German in the University of Purdue, delivered a very inter- 
esting address on the German forestry system, comparing it with the wasteful 
methods of the Americans, and illustrating his points with a large and varied 
collection of beautiful lantern slides of the world-famous Black Forest of 
Germany. The speaker was introduced by our own Prof. Voorhees, who 
managed to slip a few very apt little boyhood recollections into his speech. 

Following the program in the auditorium, we all assembled on the "North 
Campus," where City Forester Getz planted a lurch sapling, presented to the 
school by the Women's Reading Club. 

As the Annual goes to press, the sapling seems to be in a very good state 
of health, and is prospering very well on such cultured soil. 

The Sentinel photographer happened to be on the scene at the time of 
action, and through his courtesy, we are able to commemorate the day with a 
picture. 




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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY 



I' II 



THE ORATORICAL CONTEST. 

David Erwin and Samuel Jackson could have been found working away 
even a month before the contest, for they were well matched and there was 
much work to be done Of course their grades suffered a Little bit, but what 
mattered it for were they not both going to win both the school and the dis- 
trict contests and would they not both face the best high school orators of the 
state at Bloomington ? Possibly, had not the sad fact revealed itself that there 
were not enough "decisions" to go around. One had to win and the other to 
loose. 

The day of April '21st arrived and morning chapel filled the auditorium 
with a throng to witness the clash of oratory. It was soon over — "Dave" 
had won. The afternoon.. too, approached but there were two hoys absent: 
of course they had to celebrate — that was American. Dave and Sam spent 

OUR ORATORS 




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tidi^ 




(he afternoon together, one the happiest student of the F. YV. II. S. ready to 
make his school the state winner, while the other — he had come closer to beat- 
ing him than had any other student, he was a good looser; ready to back up 
the winner with "teeth and toe-nail." 



THE DISTRICT CONTEST. 

Though we all felt proud of Dave when he delivered his masterful oration 
in the Auditorium, we nevertheless had our feeling of pride increased when 
he came home from Columbia City with the laurels on his forehead, and a 
broad smile on his face, stamped as the best High School orator in the con- 
gressional district. 

Dave's only opponent was a Columbia City youth, and even his speech, 
though it showed careful preparation, was far below par in comparison with 
thai of our David. The judges were Prof. L. M. Sniff, Tri-State College; Prof. 
A. L. 1'urey, North Manchester, ami Prof. Homer Dutter, of Plymouth. Their 
unanimous decision in Dave's favor was entirely in accord with the opinion of 
the audience, although they were naturally in favor of their home-town repre- 
sentative. 



THE STATE CONTEST 

About the State contest, held at Bloomington under the auspices of 
Indiana University on June third, we haven't very much to boast of, to our 
greal surprise and sorrow. Wabash walked off with first place, Danville took 
second, while Kokomo was awarded third honors. 

Even if we didn't take high honors in the state contest we are never- 
theless just as proud of Dave and his work, and are sure that at the least 
he made the other twelve contestants hustle for their places. Since it is all 
over and done with, our thanks are naturally due to Mr. Erwin for putting 
us on tin' map, and letting people know that Fort Wayne High School still 
has a few live members in the making. 



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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-TWO 



THE QUEST C 



BCTURERS. 



One i)!' the brighl features of the ehapel exercises which were frequently 
held during the pasl year was the presence al these meetings of some of Fori 
Wayne's most prominent citizens, members of the Quest Club. These men 
came before the students as practical business men, to speak along practical 
lines, and their speeches were interesting as well as instructive. Coming as 
they did from men who had foughl their way up in life, round after found, 
these talks were certainly appreciated, especially by the Seniors, most of 
whom are soon to step into the world themselves to seek success. The speak- 
ers were C. R. Lane, of the Fori Wayne Trade Mark Title Co.; E. II. Puckett, 
of the Fort Wayne Oil Supply Coy C. M. Niezer, attorney-at-law ; and W. E. 
Dowdj of the City and Suburban Reality Co. 

Mr. Lane spoke on the subject "Stamping- it Down." He dwelt chiefly 
on the necessity of thoroughness in business methods, and for that matter, in 
every other line of endeavor. He pointed out how the formation of habits of 
thoroughness in school work would affect the after life of the student. 

Mr. E. H. Puckett was enthusiasticlly received by the students and his 
speech was just the kind that makes a deep impression on the hearers. He 
set forth the rules which should govern the conduct of a man who wishes to 
be a success in life, in whatever endeavor he may choose. The things he 
wished to impress upon the minds of the students were: care of health; 
character; personality; memory; initiative; confidence; perseverence ; will: 
concentration: influence; tact; and enthusiasm. 

Mr. C. M. Niezer was the next speaker and he spoke on the occasion of 
the joint celebration of the birthdays of Washington and Lincoln. He gave 
incidents in the lives of these great men tending to inspire somewhat the 
youths of today, with their better opportunities for education and training. 
.Mr. Niezer is a man of eloquence, and his talk was greatly enjoyed. 

Mr. W. E. Dowd, the last speaker of the Quest Club, spoke along the same 
lines as Mr. Puckett. adding several id' his own rules id' self-government, and 
emphasizing those already presented. 

Every speaker on the program was well received by the students, and 
every speech was appreciated. A vote of thanks from the whole school is due 
the club and the speakers for their earnest and successful effort to be of help 
to the student bodv. 



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THIS IS PAGE ONE Hl'XHHED AND THIRTY-THREE 



IN THE LOG-BOOK 



Being the diary of a 1914 Senior on his trip "Around the year" in the 
Port Wayne High School Limited. 

Sept. 8-13. — Again we have stalled to conquer ignorance; some of us for 
the last time and many for the first time. How blissful the ignorance of that 
first time seems, when we look back with our "finished touch" and educated 
ideas. 

Sept. 9-13. — This day can never be forgotten. It was today that Dish- 
washer Thomas made his first appearance in coach IS. Xo wonder he had a 
dark sunburn ( ?) directly behind his ears. 

Sept. 10-13. — We are not carrying as many passengers this year, but still 
the train is too crowded for comfort. Let us live in patience. The officiels 
have already plans to run a second section over on the south side. 

Sept. 13, '13 — Time passes so slow on this train that we must use calendars 
instead of clocks. The time pieces are taking their annual vacation. 

Sept. 19-13. — Pullman Maid Parker has been traveling for several years — 
I can't give the exact number — and she doesn't know the regulations yet. 
Lower berth passengers are required to use the center stairs, when going down 
— except the "Freshies," who don't know any better. Maid Parker only made 
a mistake. 

Oct. 16. — We have now organized an athletic association. Let us get out 
and win some games. 

Oct. 17 — The "Freshies" beat the "Juniors"; the "Sophs" beat the 
"Freshies"; the Seniors beat the "Sophs" in inter-class football. Who are 
the champions? 

Nov. 6 — The special's paper, known as the Caldron, has succeeded so far 
in giving "gospel measure" for fifteen cents, but most everybody lacks the 
fifteen cents. There is always room for improvement. 

Nov. 7 — We will have the honor of celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of 
the F. W. H. S. limited and we are going to celebrate it with an annual Caldron, 
something bigger than other classes thought they could handle. 

Nov. 14- — A few extra passengers from Decatur took in the sights on our 
limited. 

Nov. 23 — A fire gong has been installed near the baggage car to amuse the 
"Freshies." 

Nov. 26 — Our special made its first stop today. We will have a short lay- 
over. 

Nov. 28 — One performance of the best of all Senior plays has been given 
and the final performance takes place tonight. 

Dec. 3 — Nothing of importance happened this month for it is too near 
Christinas. Nevertheless a "Bench Convention" took place on coach 18. Ty- 
ger. White and P. Warren were the delegates. 



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Dec 12—11 might be said thai our firsl baskel ball game of the season 
resulted sorrowfully for us, hut we die hard. 

Dee. 1 M — Again we went down to defeat, bu1 the girls broughl home a vic- 
tory and displayed their ability in the game of baskel ball. 

Jan. 4, li»14 -The Math. Cluh has been organized and has been a great 
success. 

Jan. 14 — M. Kolb closely pursued Streathern and Wentz today, when they 
tied from coach 18 before it was time for them to go. 

Jan. 27 — By the number of magazines on our special, we know that a lay- 
over is shortly expected. 

dan. 28 — The entrance to coach 18 became so clogged that it was neces- 
sary to call Brakeman Grosjean to clear the heap of "everything" away. 

Jan. 29 — A short lay-over of one day in order to get a good start on the 
second lap of our journey. 

Jan. 30 — Here's one I almost forgot. We won our first basket ball game 
from Huntington. 

Feb. 2 — The second half of our journey started today. 

Feb. 7 — Pullman coach No. 29 lacked a brakeman on account of the ab- 
sence of E. Stirwalt. 

Feb. 11 — Brakeman Clark absent today, but Porter Xeff, although a 
small personage, is big enough to take the place of two. A sort of promotion 
from porter to brakeman. 

Feb. 13 — An interesting talk was given by Mr. Puckett in the assembly 
coach. 

Friday, 13 — Unlucky Friday didn't hurt the girl's chances to win. An- 
other victory. 

Feb. 20 — In order to save the musical entertainer that we have on this 
train, in other words the Vietrola, a grand opera was given, which resulted in 
a grand failure. 

Feb. 20 — Again our basket ball athletes won a game. 1 can only speak 
of our victories now. for there are no losses. 

March 4 — A tire drill on board a train. Who ever heard of such thing? 
Well, this is only the second time that it has ever been heard of. 

March 13 — Again a victory. This time we trimmed Auburn, — twice. 
(Girls once and boys once.) 

March 20 — Some more victories. Both teams trimmed Auburn. The 
limited side-tracked ami an assortment of passengers, tilling two coaches, went 
to Auburn to witness the final games of the season. 

March 25 — Train robbers! F. W. H. S. Limited held up and baggage car 
entered. Robbers carry off loot amounting to $66. Seems funny they didn't 
carry away some of the valuable text books. 

March 31 — Some sweet (?) smelling essence perfumed the atmosphere. 
Conductor Ward said he had a clew. As for that we all had a clew. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 
this is page: one hundred and thirty-fivh 




m& 




April— "Well, hard times made us cheapen the quality of the Caldron. It 
might have been democratic times, also. 

April 1 — In due respect for the trainmaster's convention, our train was 
delayed for a couple days. 

April 24 — Erwin, by defeating Jackson, is the undisputed orator, repre- 
senting our special in the state oratorical contest. 

April 29 — Coach 20 was locked today. Too had Warren isn't here, so the 
blame can be properly placed. 

May — The Junior number. Rather a "live one" to be called the funeral 
number. 

May 22 — Seniors held a party on hoard. Less school and more parties 
would he more becoming anyway. 

May -!.' — To find the athletes and those in the bud, a field day event was 
pulled oft' today. 

June 4 — Dave Erwin crawled in a very small hole. 
June 1- — The Seniors are away on their annual outing today. 
June H — A positive fact. Every Senior attended church. Just a chance 
to reform, before it is too late. 

June IS — Commencement exercises. 0, what joy for some of us. 

June l!l — More joy. The commencement dance and then 'twill all be o'er. 

June 22 — Out on the sea of life. Good-bye, Fort Wavne High. 




! 
THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SIX 



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lllllllllllllllillilll llllllllllllllllillllilllllllllllllllllUIIIINIIIIIIUillr 

THIS IS PACE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SEVEN 



FOUR YEARS OF IT 

(Being a short resume of athletics in the high school since the class of nineteen 
fourteen entered the school.) 

THLETICS, that is successful and well organized athletics in this 
school of ours, are not as old as the class of nineteen fourteen, which 
is to say that athletics in the high school are not four years old. True 
enough that before 1910 the school had been represented by several 
teams, but they were always ineligible, and what was worse, they were nearly 
always defeated. 

Taking into consideration that athletics in the school were not encour- 
aged by the faculty as a whole, and that the fraternities, each one of which had 
its own team, were then in full sway, these facts are not so astonishing as they 
migh be under ordinary conditions. 

And therefore, since the athletics of the school grew up with the nineteen 
fourteen class, a review covering the last four years is hardly out of place in 
this, the annual of the nineteen fourteen class. 

THE FIRST ELIGIBLE TEAM TO REPRESENT THE SCHOOL 

In the spring of 1911 a track team was organized, the first to represent 
the F. W. H. S. for a number of years. The men did not have the facilities 
for thorough training, and only one meet was engaged in, that with Bluffton 
on May 13. The team made a very creditable showing, although it was de- 
feated 52 to 38. Fort Wayne was very strong in the runs, while Bluffton' ex- 
celled in the field events. Verne Scott was captain of the team and much of 
its success was due to him. He won sixteen points for Fort Wayne, equaling 
the state record of 23 seconds in the 220 yard dash. Those who won points 
for Fort Wayne in the meet were Scott, Barth, Houck, Ross, Kettler, Ashley, 
and Learmouth. 

( INE EGG IX THE NEST. 

In addition to this track team, the class of 1913 had organized a class 
baseball team, and with Ren Vernon and big Barry as battery, the team cleaned 
up a greater part of the shop league, and several other teams, somewhat larger 
than itself. 

THE FIRST FOOTBALL 

The season of 1911 opened with but two class teams on the field. These 
teams represented the '13 and '14 classes. The 1913 team defeated the 1914 
team in two closely contested games, the superior weight of the upper class 
being used with telling force against the light line of the 1914 team. Since 
the 1913 team was victorious in both games, and since no other teams were on 
the field they were declared class champions of 1911. 

Late in October it was decided to drop the class teams and organize a 
school team. "Whitie" Gerberding, '14, was elected captain. Work was im- 
mediately begun and the team closed the season with five wins and not a loss. 



THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-EIGHT 



Line-up for season of 1 !>1 1 : 

L. E Gerberding, ('apt. 14 

L.T Karr, •1:5 

L. G Wefel, 14 

C 

L. II. II Vernon, '13 

K. B Herrman, '13 



R.Q 

R.T 

R.E 

.... Baker, '14 

R. H. B 





. .. Frank, 13 
. . . . Bauer, 13 
Reed, 13 

. . . Erwin, '14 

Fergueson, 13 



Though the first team was made up of only two or three eligible men, and 
though no out-of-town games were scheduled, one fact was clearly demon- 
strated; — the school certainly had the material for a first class squad that 
could be worked into a fast and smooth team. It only remained, and sad to 
relate, it still remains to make the squad eligible. 

The crowds that witnessed the games were by no means representative 
of the spirit the school might show, nevertheless the team and its games served 
the purpose well, and helped to fan the flame into a rather warm little blaze 
that was soon to heat the student body up to the point where it could support 
an eligible basket ball team; — the first in the history of the school. 
\ 

"STONY" STONCIFEE 1)11) IT. 

The first call for basket ball was made early in October by ('apt. Paul 
Stoncifer, 'VI, and Coach Roy Cummings. Capt. Stoncifer was the only high 
class basket ball player in the school and he had an uphill fight from start to 
finish. The team went through a disastrous season playing but five games 
and losing all. The association came out well ahead financially, and the team 
got a great deal of experience, some of which helped make the team of the 
following season a success. Capt. Stoncifer graduated in 12 and in the fall 
entered Purdue University where he has made good in athletics. 

The 1911-12 line-up: 



Stoncifer, Capt., 'V2 
Gerberding, '14 



Karr, 15 
Ross, 13 



.G. 
.G. 



Keim, '14 C. 

Edson, '14, and Brooks, 13, were the extra men carried throughout the 
season. 

BASEBALL AND THE PURDUE TOURNAMENT 

Early in the season it was decided not to put a Varsity baseball team on 
the field, but news of the baseball tournament at Purdue upset this decision and 
Prof. Ritter started to build a championship team from nothing. This was 
two weeks before the tournament, but Mr. Ritter rolled up his sleeves and, by 
working like a mule every night he succeeded in rounding into shape what he 
considered only a fair team. Just before leaving for the tournament, Paul 
Stoncifer was elected captain, a position which he filled admirably. 



THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-NINE 








The morning of the opening day, Fort Wayne was pitted against Rens- 
selaer. After getting a good start we had tilings all our own way. ami won, 
12 to 3. Reed, Stoncifer and Roberts worked for Fort Wayne. 

In the second game, Frankfort H. S. was drawn as our opponent, and in 
what was probably the most interesting game of the whole tournament, we 
defeated them 4 to 0. The game was played in but fifty-five minutes, being 
the shortest game of baseball ever played by a high school nine. The Frank- 
t'orl pitcher held us down to two hits, one by Gerberding and the other by 

Roberts, while K 1 was credited with eleven strike-outs, and was hit seven 

times. 

The third game, which was our last, was played aginst the strong South 
Bend nine, and we were defeated 16 to 2 in a seven inning game. Reed was 
our only pitcher, and had been used for every game, and it was this weakness 
on the pitching end of the line-up that lost us the championship. 

Nevertheless, our team had won third place in the tournament, and this 
was a wonderful record, considering that the team had been organized but 
three weeks, and that it was the first eligible baseball team that had repre- 
sented the school for many years. 



Catcher — Glenn Roberts, '14. 
Pitchers— Reed, '1:1; Rundles, 
1st Base — Dinger, '13. 
2nd Base — Gerberding. '14. 



3rd Base — Kronmiller, '13. 
'14. s. s. — Stoncifer, ('apt., '12. 

Outfielders — Koenig, '13: Ross, '13: 
Iba. '12; Ilillegas, '14. 



FOOTBALL IX '12;— STILL [NELIGIBLB 

This season brought out the best team that hail represented the high 
school for many years. The old men were Ross, Frank, Karr, Reed, Bauer, 
Herrmann, Gerberding, Erwin and Edson. Koenig, Sprang, Deady, Barber and 
McFadden were the new men. Of the new men Koenig, Sprang, and McFad- 
den landed regular positions. 

The best games played were with the Colonials and the first game with 
the C.r. II. S. F. W. H. S. defeated the Colonials to the tune of 12 to (5. This 
game was anybody's game until the last few minutes, as both teams were tear- 
ing (iff spectacular gains at regular intervals. Shortly before the game ended 
F. W. H. S. won the contest by pushing across the last score. 

The first game with C. C. II. S. the F. W. H. S. team won by the score of 
18 to 6. Edson stalled the game at quarter, Gerberding being laid up by in- 
juries. Edson ran his team in superb fashion, sending across the first touch- 
down in less than five minutes. Gerberding took the field in the third quarter 
and succeeded in pushing across a marker but he retired in favor of Edson in 
the last quarter. 

The final game of the season was with C. C. II. S., who went down under 
an unmerciful slaughter, the score standing 35 to 0. The game was called 
at the end of the third quarter by agreement. The ('. 0. H. S. line could not 
stand the plunging of our powerful backs, Herrman, Ross and Erwin, and 



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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY 




BJ& 



great ii"a ins were made by ploughing through holes made by Koenig and Karr 
at tackles. Gerberding, however, was the big aoise, and his spectacular ami 
brainy headwork at quarter was the big reason for the one-sided score. 

The mosi important game played bj our football team in 1912 was the 
Topeka game. Our team was outweighed at least twenty pounds to a man 
and lost 30 to 5 as a result. Their weighl was used to advantage againsl our 
line as the field was wet and soggy and a stiff wind with a little snow and rain 
swept over the field. The condition of the field made fast play impossible. 
Topeka made all of their points on touchdowns while the High School team 
scored on a drop kick and a safety. In the second quarter F. W. H. 8. scored 
from the Held on a drop kick by Gerberding From the 25-yard line after a 
series of rushes and plays had carried the ball down the field. The other two 
points were scored on a touchback after Matter's long punt rolled across the 
goal line. 

"Red" Koenig led the line in attack, bri 
time and again and breaking up plays before 
berding had to retire at the end of the first 
shoulder and arm. 

The Topeka team had been playing the best teams in the noil hern part 
of the state and its home goal line had not been scored over until the P. W. 
II. S. team came to town. This speaks for itself concerning the strength of our 
team. 

Line-up for season : 



laking through the Topeka line 
they were fairly started. Ger- 
half because of injuries to his 



L.B Reed. 13; Barber, 13 

L. T Karr. '13 

L. G McFadden, 13 

(' Sprang, '16; Deady, 13 

L.H.B Erwin, 14 

F.B 



R. G Frank. 13 

R. T Koenig, '13 

R, E Bauer, '14 

Q. B. ..Gerberding, 14; Edson, 14 

R.H.B Ross, 13 

Herrman, ('apt., '13 



BASKET BALL, 1912-13. 



cessful ever experienced in the F. 
sight were won and but four were 



The season of 12-13 was the most s 
\V. II. S. Out of the twelve games playe< 
lost. 

We had some of the strongest teams in the state on our schedule. Those 
on our schedule were Decatur, Bluffton, Huntington, Hartford City, Ander- 
son. Auburn. Pennville, Albion anil Warsaw. Decatur, Anderson and Hart- 
ford City succeeded in defeating our team and those games came early in tin 1 
season. Coach Thomas cannot be given too much credit for the showing made 
by the team as he had his work cut out for him at the beginning of the season, 
lie certainly rose to the occasion and put out an excellent team. 

Ross, our steady old guard, graduated in February, '13, and his position 
was filled by Brooks, '13, who looked after the position as diligently as did 
his predecessor. Koenig, '13, at the other guard made a name for himself in 



; .. i 'i ■■ i ■■ ' ; 



THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED A.\'l> FORTY-ONE 



the F. W. H. S. by his superb play throughout the season. Sprang, '16, put 
up a great game at center and was a bear at floor work. Edson's shooting at 
forward held up the team in many close places and had a lot to do with 
"bringing home the bacon" on many occasions. Capt. Gerberding, '14, at 
the other forward put up a steady game and got his share of the points during 
the season. 

Nick Reed was the first aid to the injured man but he was not called upon 
to do much work. 

During the entire season we scored 346 points, to our opponents 289. Of 
these, Gerberding scored 198, Edson 68, Sprang 48, Koenig 26, Ross 4, and 
Brooks 2. 

1913 BASE BALL. 

The 1913 baseball season was one of the most successful seasons ever ex- 
perienced by the F. W. H. S. The team won 4 out of 6 games. We had two 
games each with Bluffton. Hicksville and Auburn, and succeeded in defeating 
both Bluffton and Hicksville two games. Auburn, however, took our meas- 
ure by taking both contests, one at Auburn and the other at Fort Wayne. 

The scores for the season were: 



Bluffton at Bluffton 7 F. W. H. S. 

Bluffton at Fort Wayne F. W. H. S. 

Auburn at Auburn 4 F. W. H. S. 

Auburn at Fort Wavne 6 F. W. H. S. 

Hicksville at Hicksville 2 F. W. H. S. 

Hicksville at Fort Wayne 7 F. W. H. S. 

Total Opponents 26 F. W. II. S. 



.21 

. 8 
. 3 
. 3 
.11 
.11 



Our famous wrecking crew was responsible for the majority of the runs 
and when they all went without a hit it meant an off day or some excellent 
pitching on the part of the opposition. 

Line-up for the season: Kronmiller, 3b: Dinger, If: Koenig, rf; Roberts, 
c; Gerberding, 2b; W. Reed, p; R. Reed, ss ; Rundles, ef; Sprang, lb; Diffen- 
dorfer, pitcher, and Kendricks, outfielder, were the extra men carried, hut 
they broke into very few games as the regulars were going at a great clip. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-TWO 




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THE INTER CLASS FOOTBALL SEASON. 

The season of 1913 opened with class teams on the field. The games were 
all played at Lawton park ami were usually well attended. The games, as a 
rule, lasted only three quarters as it became dark too early to permit a lull 
Same to be played. 

The first game was between the Sophomores and the Freshmen. The '16 
team took the lead and defeated the '17 team to the tune of 24 to 0. 

The second game of the series was played by the Juniors and Freshmen. 
The Juniors went down under a storm of line plunges anil end runs. The 
final score was 30 to 6. Bauerle, Kendricks and Hornberger bore the brunt 
of the battle for the Freshmen, while O'Rourke and Geller led for the Juniors. 

The third game was between the Seniors and Sophomores. It was the 
hitter part of the first quarter before the Seniors scored the first touchdown. 
In the second quarter the Sophomores scored their only touchdown. The 
score at the end of the game was 30 to 6. Compton scored the Sophomores' 
only touchdown by intercepting a forward pass in midtield and chasing across 
the goal line after a hard run. The Seniors' touchdowns were made by Erwin, 
Baker, Gerberding (3). 

The Seniors were then declared inter-class champions, and a meeting was 
held on October 20th to discuss the prospects of a school team, either eligible 
or ineligible. 

The class series was dropped and a meeting was held to organize a varsity 
team. "Whitie" Gerberding, '14. was elected captain and "Pete" Edson. '14, 
was made manager. The squad contained about thirty-five men and the pros- 
pects of a good team were very bright, but, after three weeks hard practice, 
a notice came from Mr. Lane saying that we must drop the team or be dis- 
missed from the I. H. S. A. A. This notice was backed by a letter from the 
state secretary and we decided to give up football and turn our attention 
entirely to basket ball. 

The captains of the class teams were: 

1914— David Erwin. 

1915— Walter Geller. 

1916— Edgar Bradley. 

1917 — Howard Bauerle. 



THIS IS PAGE ON EHUNDRED AND FORTY-FOUR 




BASKET BALL, 13-14— AN OFF YEAR FOR F. W. H. S. 

This season opened with the brightest prospects that ever confronted the 
F. W. H. S., but before the opening games a few of the men, depended upon 
to hold down important positions, were declared ineligible and the result was 
that the team was switched time and again in an endeavor to make a winning 
combination but to no avail as the remaining men were not quite up to the 
standard. As high as five different combinations were tried but none of them 
worked. 

Our schedule contained the strongest teams of our section of the state and 
it took good teams to beat them. Decatur, Hartford City. Bluffton, Hunting- 
ton. Marion and Auburn were on the regular schedule. 



iiiBiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 

THIS IS PAGE ONE-HUNDRED 



AND FORTY-FIVE 



The first game of the season was played at borne with Hartford City as 
the attraction. This game was a thriller, the lead switching from one team 
to the other and the final score in doubt until the last minute when Brown, of 
Hartford City, toppled the leather through the net for the winning point mak- 
ing the score 22 to 21 with Hartford City on the 22 end. 

Decatur came next and took the game home by the score of 43 to 20. The 
game was fast from start to finish but the Yancil-Falk combination was a little 
too much for our guards to break up and the result can be seen by the score. 
This win made the fifth straight one for Decatur over Fort Wayne, a fact that 
Decatur boasts of every chance she gets and a fact that she can well be proud 
of. The sporting editor of the Decatur "Ravelings" described the game 
thusly: 

It was the nineteenth of December, 

The date you can remember, 
To Fort "Wayne, we went, 
Without a blame cent. 

With Fort Wayne High to contender, 

Rut before we were sent, 
They canned Bremerkamp, 

Which caused us to think of surrender. 

For never before had we lost on their floor 
(And of course this fact they remember, i 

But our team work so great 
Hade "Whitie's" head ache. 

And for winning from them we must render 

To captain Shorty our thanks 
For his few little pranks. 

At Library Hall that December. 

Our schedule next called for Bluffton. After it was all over, we found 
that we had lost our third straight game by the score of 37 to 23. The game 
was played at the James H. Smart gymnasium and was rather rough at times 
but the officials were on the job and many fouls was the result. 

A week later Bluffton repeated the trick defeating our team 47 to 20 
Gerberding did the scoring this game, making the entire 20 points for Fort 
Wayne. Our team was unlucky in its shooting and could not locate the net- 
ting. 

On January 23 we proceeded to Marion and again were defeated 48 to 28. 
The first half ended with Marion on the 33 end of a 33 to 8 score. Fort Wayne 
got a running start in the second half and outplayed Marion, scoring 20 to 
their 15 points but the spurt was not great enough to overcome the great lead. 

Huntington came to Fort Wayne for the next game and our team suc- 
ceeded in breaking the hoodoo by taking the game. 39 to 29. One of our nu- 



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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SIX 







merous switches seemed to get results in this game. Gerberding went to guard 
and Diffendorfer was scut to forward. 

After breaking the hoodoo we went to Hartford City determined to gel 

hack a win for that 22 to -1 defeal early in the season hut there was "nothin' 
stirrin' " as we met defeat. 38 to 20. The score at the end of the first half was 
22 to 5, favoring Hartford City. In the second half Gerberding switched back 
to forward and we played Hartford f'itv on better terms, scoring 15 points to 
their 16. 

Marion came next. Flushed with the victory some time earlier, they ex- 
pected to repeat hut were mistaken as they returned home with the short end 
of a 25 to 24 score. The game was a thriller anil kept the crowd wondering 
which team would eventually come out the winner. 

In this game. Myers and Bradley made their initial performances on the 
home floor. It was Myers's basket in the last minute that saved the day. The 
team work was also greatly improved. 

At Huntington the following week our sadly crippled team met defeat, 
:i7 to 24. Sprang was out witli a bad ankle and Gerberding could just hobble 
having bad ankles and knees. Myers at center gave a fine account of himself 
and all things considered the team made an excellent showing. 

In the final game at home Fort Wayne atoned for some of its defeats by 
winning from Auburn, 47 to 19. Gerberding finished his high school basket 
ball in great shape, scoring 11 times from the field and 3 from the foul line. 
Sprang came in second with fl to his credit. 

The final game of the season was played at Auburn, our boys winning 22 
to 18. Gerberding and Diffendorfer were ruled out before this game and the 
result was that the team had a hard fight. The Auburn quintet was in the lead 
at the end of the first half but a strong finish by the F. W. H. S. pulled the 
game out of the fire and our basket ball season was closed in a very successful 
manner, namely, a victory. 

The season was a success financially. The treasury contained $150 at the 
close of the season or just four times the amount with which the season was 
started. Much of this was >\\\r to the untiring efforts of Mr. Ritter and Glenn 
Roberts who had charge of the financial affairs of the team. 

Thoss Diffendorfer was elected captain of next season's team and lie 
should have the pleasure of leading his team through a successful season as 
he has tried and experienced men to work with. In addition to the captain, 
Geller, Sprang, Myers and Bradley return for play next year, and barring 
ineligibility, it should be a great year for basket ball. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ill ill mum 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SEVEN 




S^idlS 




THE SUMMARY. 

Our opponents scored 54 more points than we did this season as can be 
seen bv the record : 



F. W. H. S. at Fort Wayne 21 

F. W. H. S. at Fort Wavne 28 

F. W. H. S. at Fort Wavne 24 

F. W. H. S. at Bluffton 20 

F. W. H. S. at Marion 28 

F. W. H. S. at Fort Wayne 39 Huntington 

F. W. H. S. at Hartford City 20 

F. W. H. S. at Fort Wayne 25 

F. W. H. S. at Huntington 24 

F. W. H. S. at Fort Wavne 47 

F. W. U.S. al Auburn 22 



Hartford City 22 

Decatur 43 

Bluffton 37 

Bluffton 47 

Marion 40 

29 

Hartford City 38 

Marion 24 

Huntington 37 

Auburn 19 

Auburn 18 



Total— F. W. H. S. 



.298 



Opponents 354 



The individual scores for Fort Wayne were: 

Field Goals Foul Goals Points 

Gerberding 51 52 154 

Edson 12 . . 24 

Sprang 39 5 83 

Myers 7 3 17 

Geller 

Bradley . . " 

Diff endorf er 9 2 20 

Wellrnan 

Reed 

Total points 298 



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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-EIGHT 




COACH HARRY" 
THOMAS 

Prof. Harry A. Thomas came to the Fort 
Wayne High School in 1911. Besides be- 
ing efficient in the manual training de- 
partment he has shown his ability in 
coaching the basket ball teams. Being 
a graduate of Purdue University and a 
member of a Y. M. C. A., his knowledge 
of the game is complete. During the sea- 
son of 1912 and '13 he turned out the best 
basket ball team that has ever represent- 
ed the high school. This year's team did 
not come up to his expectations because 
he was handicapped by the ineligibility 
of some of the best performers. The 
student body wishes to extend its heart- 
iest thanks for his conscientious work of 
the past, and hopes he will be able to boss 
our teams in the future. 



"WHITIE" 

"Whitie," as he is commonly known, 
did not enter this high school until the 
end of his Freshman year and this, prob- 
ably is the only reason why he did not 
make the basket ball team that year. He 
has been a star forward the last three 
years and captain the last two years. He 
was feared by all the teams in this part 
of the state both for his speed and ac- 
curacy on shots at all angles and dis- 
tances from the basket. He is considered 
one of the best all-around athletes that 
the Fort Wayne High School has ever 
had and when he graduates this year, 
will leave the impression behind him of 
one who, by his faithful and untiring ef- 
forts, has given this high school its much 
needed foot-hold on athletics. 



II 'III '"I 'III :il|l. Ill,': lil.MM' Up:. Ill III :<lM Ml 'I!' MM |li i:' ill ' ||! ' HM^ II! 'Ill':- : .llh ' ,111 III .: ' ,ll! .: : .^ ,:<r..ill .rillN fhlll 

THIS IS PACK 'INK HUNDRED AND FORTY-NINE 




STRIXG" 



"PETE" 



"Ken" is only a Sophomore, but he has 
beer .1 member of the basket ball team 
both his years in high school. As cen- 
ters had always been a scarcity until his 
arrival at school he had little difficulty 
in making- the team in his first year. He 
has been one of the main factors in both 
the floor work and scoring-. He has sel- 
dom missed either practice or a game 
and is counted on by everybody to do big- 
things the next two years. He is loyal 
and game and often played when injured 
sufficiently to be on crutches, simply be- 
cause we had nobody else to fill in his 
important position. 



"HERB" 

Herbert Meyers, '16, joined the squad 
in February and immediately made his 
presence felt. He was not able to make 
the team before this time because he had 
just come from another school in Sep- 
tember and his credits would not permit 
him playing on the team. His presence at 
forward after February put more "pep" 
in the play of the team, and his shooting- 
was also a great factor. He is only a 
Sophomore and. under the eye of Coach 
Thomas, should develop into pretty much 
el' a wonder before he leaves school. 



"""I i ii imiiiii iiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiinii minimi i i i i, 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTT 



Although not so brilliant a player as 
some of the others on the team, "Pete" 
has always been a consistant conscien- 
tious worker. He has been a member of 
the basket ball team for three years and 
a regular forward during the last two 
years. During this entire time he seldom 
missed a practice and was always the 
first to offer encouragement to the play- 
ers after a defeat, and praise after a vic- 
tory. He was never seen or known to 
use rough tactics either in or out of the 
game nor to act ungentlemanly toward 
the visiting players. If everybody would 
have worked as hard as "Pete," it would 
be safe to say that our percentage of vic- 
totries would be considerably larger than 
they were last year. He graduates this 
year. 



DIFF" 



(CAPTAIN ELECT) 
Thoss Diffendorfer, '15, captain elect for 
next season, made an impression on the 
coach at the first workout, and he has 
been on the varsity ever since. He is a 
Junior, but did not report for basket ball 
before this season. His brilliant playing 
at guard kept our opponents' scores down 
considerably and he worked the floor in 
faultless fashion. "Zanesville Diff" should 
have a great season next year and we 
cannot see how any team will be able to 
make him taste defeat. Here's to you 
"Diff." we wish you the best of luck. 




tp£oA 



& 




"ED' 



'HUNK' 



Edgar Bradley. '16, also joined the 
squad in February, as his credits were 
not up to the standard before that time. 
His position is at guard and he is some 
guard. If you are doubtful about this, 
ask someone who has played against him. 
Another year's experience and he will 
stand a good chance of landing an all- 
state position. 



"JAKE" 



"Jake" came here from Indianapolis in 
his Junior year and played so well on the 
class team that he was given a tryout on 
the school team last fall and made good 
at guard. He did not play many games, 
but those in which he participated he was 
conspicuous by his clever guarding. He 
is sturdily built and fast for his weight 
and the forward who was guarded by 
"Jake" had his hands full to get a basket. 
Because he lived in one of the nearby 
towns and was unable to remain after 
school for practice. "Jake" had to leave 
the team, much to the regret of all who 
ever saw him play. He graduates this 
year. 



Walter Geller, '15. made his first ap- 
pearance in basket ball this winter and 
made the other guards hustle to hold 
their positions. His regular place is at 
guard, but his good shooting made him 
a valuable man to carry as a sub because 
he could fill in at forward. Next year 
we will surely hear great things of 
"Hunk" and we believe he will be at for- 
ward. 



"NICK" 



Robt. Reed. '14, has been giving the 
school his best for three seasons, and 
still has not been a regular on the varsity. 
Heeds position is at forward. He won 
his letters this season and even though 
lie hadn't won them he should receive 
them because he has shown more school 
spirit than any other man in any branch 
of athletics. Nick is also some sport dope- 
ster and basket ball scribe. In the sport 
columns of the Caldron he prophesied that 
Wingate would again cop the champion- 
ship, and sure enough, Wingate did. 



THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-ONE 




"With the exception of the first game played, victory greeted the Girls' 
basket ball team in every game this season. Even with players determined and 
enthusiastic, good fortune could not have been so gracious to the girls had it 
not. been for the exceptional and scientific coaching of Miss Wingert and Miss 
Williams. They gave their time and their skill, their encouragement and 
their sympathy to the team. The girls take pleasure in recording this small 
recognition of their debt of gratitude to their coaches. 



Illllll .1 1 1 IllllllllUlllllillllllllllllllllllllllttlll 

'['HIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-TWO 




4C 



I 



FACULTY-STUDENT. 

The Faculty downed the Students in an interesting game of baskel ball 
early in the Spring. The final score was 20 to 14. ('lark, Croninger and 
Thomas were the big guns Cor the Faculty, showing both speed (forward and 
reverse) and judgmenl for a bunch of has-beens, while Keil and Dunkelburg 
put up Ihe best brand of ball for the studenl body. 

THE [NTER-CLASS SERIES. 

In the 1913-1914 basket ball season, the class of 1916 walked away with 
the championship among the inter-class teams. Fhe Seniors, champions of 
the year before, did not put a team on the floor the whole season, and the other 
three classes were left to fight it out. The Sophomores -von three games from 
the Juniors, 22-1X; 28-18; and 24-17. and also won their games from the Fresh- 
men. The Sophomores had three Varsity men on their team; Sprang, center; 
Myers, forward, and Bradley, guard. The play of these three had much to 
do with the winning of the championship for the 1916's. Dunkelberg and 
Gerke, the other members id' the team, also played good ball, and held their 
own with the opposing forwards. The Line-up id' the team throughout the 
season was: Sprang and Myers, forwards; Bradley, center; Dunkelberg and 
Gerke, guards. 

BOWLING 

In the first contest of the season the Seniors defeated the Faculty by 176 
pins. The Seniors rolled a "2,21:! score to the 2,037 by the Faculty. Next 
came the Seniors ami the Sophomores. This time the Seniors boosted their 
total to 2.4S1 while the best the Sophomores could do was 2.174. In the last 
contest the Sophomores defeated the Faculty 2,166 to 1,991. 



mini i niiinniinuinn nun 1 1 1 1 l mi 

THIS IS PAGE OXE HUNDRE] 



AND FIFTY-THREE 



BASE- 




-^^r=_,Jb4i fMWM5 fli»«y i 



I I : 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-FOUR 




LA 



PORT WAYNE HIGH OPENS WITH A WIN AT HICKSVILLE 

Hicksville, Ohio, .May 2- -In the opening hall game of the 1914 season the 

Foil Wayne High defeated tin- local High by the score of 11 to 8. Diffendor- 

fer was on the mound Eor Fori Wayne and Killion for the locals. Except for 

the first inning in which Fort Wayne bunched hits and scored live runs, the 

g« went off as if it were midseason. Gerberding's three-base hit and Reed's 

timely tWO-bagger had a good deal to do with the final score. Hicksville will 
gel another chance at Fort Wayne on .May l!:!. at Fort Wayne. The box-score: 



Pla 



I'MRT WAYNE. 



Kendricks, If. . . . 

Rodemeyer, cf 4 

Gerberding, ss 4 

Roberts, e 5 

Coil, rf 4 

Reed, 2l> 3 

Rundles, 3b 5 

Sprang, lb 5 

Diff. p 5 



AB. I; II Pi 



1 in ii 1 



Players. 

Treat, 2b. . . , . .5 

Kenning ss 4 

Rose, rf 4 

Hadsell. If 4 

1 took, c 5 

V. Killion, lb 4 

Batchelor, cf 5 

James, 3b 3 

L. Killion, p 4 



1 u 11 11 



4 1 11 11 2 7 
Port Wayne 



38 



KENDAL VILLE-FORT WAYX B 

Fort Wayne High scored her second victory of the season on May 16, 
when the local ball tossers journeyed to Kendallville and defeated the team at 
that place in a great ten-inning game by a score of 4 to 3. Roberts's hit in 
the tenth scored Gerberding from second with the winning run. It was a 
pretty struggle all the way. with honors about even. Diffendorfer and Nelson 
both pitched pretty good ball, although both were touched up for eleven hits. 

Fort Wayne scored in the first inning when Kendricks walked, stole sec- 
ond, and came across on Rodemeyer 's hit. Fort Wayne scored again in the 
third on Kendricks' hit. a sacrifice, and an infield out. Kendallville made one 
in the third and two in the sixth on a combination of four errors, a base on 
balls, and a hit. Reed tied the score in the sixth when he hit to center, stole 
second, and scored on Rundles 's safe drive. In the tenth Gerberding reached 
first on a bad throw, stole second, and scored on Roberts's hit, making it 4 to 3, 
in favor of Fort Wayne. Kendallville made a game effort to tie it up iu their 
half, but fell short. Traxler. the first man up, drove a long one to center 
which was easily good for two bases, but a fast relay cut him off at third when 
he attempted to reach that base. The next two were easy, and Port Wayne 
had her second straight win. The line-ups and box score: 



Ft 
Kendricks, If. . 


1RT 


WAYNE 
AB. 


R. 




1 



1 


u 



H. 

1 
1 

1 
2 

1 
1 


PO. 

4 

1 
6 

1 

4 
11 



A. 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


s 


E. 




1 
1 



1 
1 




Seibert, ss. 
Husselman, 
Adams, lb. 
Traxler. 3b. 
Keen, 2b. 
Fraze, cf 
Bennet, cf. 
Nelson, p. , 
France, rf. 


KENDAI.LYIDL 
AB. 

4 

If 5 

5 

5 


,E 

R. 
1 



1 
1 



u 




H. 

1 
1 

4 
3 

1 

1 


PO. 
3 
5 
7 
3 
3 
3 

1 

3 


A. 
1 


1 
4 

u 
1 





E. 


Rodemeyer, cf 




3 





Gerberding. ss. 




5 

5 

5 


u 


Coil, rf 

Reed, 2b 




3 









4 

4 

4 
















Diffendorfer. p. 










40 4 11 29 15 



41 3 11 30 



■llllllllllllllllllll'.v ■IUIIIIUHIIIIIIII 



iiuiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiil; niiiniiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiii!!' ' ,;M' ' mi,i 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-FIVE 



FORT WAYNE VS. HICKSVILLE. 

Ou Saturday afternoon, May 23d, the Hicksville High School baseball 
team motored to this city to play a return game and met defeat by a score of 
11 to 10 in ten innings. As the local Central League club was at home, we 
were unable to secure their grounds as is the custom. Instead, we secured 
permission to use the Concordia College grounds where a lively battle was 
witnessed by an enthusiastic crowd. 

Strictly speaking, it was not what might be termed a high class exhibi- 
tion but it served to keep up the excitement to the highest tension during the 
entire contest, with the final outcome always in doubt. The game was replete 
with rank errors on both sides and was accompanied by heavy hitting. Horn- 
berger. who started in the box for the locals was hit hard and Coach Ritter 
was compelled to yank him in the second inning after the Ohioans had scored 
three runs off him on four hits and three passes. Diffendorfer was called in 
to pitch with the bases full and but one out. Before he could stop them, the 
slugging rustics had compiled a total for the inning of five runs on six hits, 
three passes and one error. 

"Diff" managed to hold the visitors after this and kept the hits scat- 
tered, but his wabbly support got him into frequent holes. 

A lad named Killon started the slab duty for Hicksville and managed to 
last until the middle of the seventh inning when Rose was sent in. He stopped 
the local rally temporarily but Fort Wayne found him in the tenth inning for 
the winning run, on three clean hits. 

Diffendorfer and Gerberding had big days with the stick for the locals 
and Helming and Hadsell for Hicksville. Rundles blew but one chance in ten 
in the field. 

At one time, in the early part of the game, the score was 6 to 2 against 
the locals but by perseverence and gameness they won out. 

The score : 



HICK 

Hadsell. If 


SVI LI.K 

AB. R. 

6 2 

4 1 

4 

5 1 

5 2 

5 

4 1 


H. 
3 
3 
1 

1 
3 
3 


1 


15 


A. 

3 
1 
4 


1 
2 



11 
1 

2 


PO. 
1 
4 
1 
1 
13 
1 
6 
1 



28 

5 



E. 
U 
3 
1 
1 


1 




6 
3 
1 




4 


2 


5 




FORT 

Hornberger. p.-cf. 
Gerberding, ss. 


WAYNE 
AB. 

5 

5 

5 


R. 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 



11 


H. 



1 

1 

3 
1 

12 


A. 

1 
3 
4 
1 
3 
3 

1 



18 


PO. 
1 



10 

1 

1 

10 



30 


E. 

1 



V. Killion, lb. 
Batohelor, ef 


Coil, rf 

Reed. 2b 

Rundles. 3b 

Sprang lb 

Diffendorfer cf.-p. 


4 

4 

5 

5 




James. 3b 

1.. Killion. p 

Total 


5 1 

2 2 

2 

42 10 

Hicks. 
Ft. W 





Total 

6 7 8 9 10 — R 
2 2 — 10 
6 1—11 


43 


6 



■i" ■■ mi inn il MUM iiiiiiiiiiiiiini 

THIS IS ['ACE ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-SIX 



PORT WAYNE-KENDALLVILLB. 

On Saturday afternoon, June 6th, Fori Wayne High School closed its 
baseball scries of the year by a close victory over the fasl team of Kendall- 
ville high school. The final score was 9 to 8 and it is safe to say that 
every one present enjoyed the game as much as if it had been 1 to 0. 

The local team got away to a flying start and piled up a total of !l to 
the visitors 3 runs, before the game was half over. At this period the Fori 
Wayne rooters had visions of an easy victory hut the Kendallville lads never 
lost heart for a minute and to the surprise of all came back an inning or so 
later scoring 5 runs. This rally was due to some timely hitting and some 
hideous errors by the Fort Wayne infield. Pitcher Hornherger of the locals 
settled down after this scare and kepi the visitors' hits scattered during the 
remainder of the game. 

A husky by the name of Nelson worked in the box for the visitors. 
In the early part of the game lie was hindered by some wobbly support but as 
the support tightened up a little he improved and toward the cud of the 
game had the local batters almost breaking their backs trying to connect 
with his underhand ball. 

Traxler led the visitors in hitting and Hornherger, the locals, with two 
doubles and a single; Gerberding of the locals also featured with a home-run 
to center field. 

Considering that the game was played at the local Central League Ball 
park and that the weather was ideal for baseball, the attendance was not 
what it should have been from a school of our size. 



FORT WAYNE 

AB. R. H. PO. 

Kendricks, If 4 1 1 2 

Rodemeyer, cf 4 1 1 

Gerberding, ss 5 3 1 

Roberts, c 3 2 1 12 

Hornberger, p 4 2 3 1 

Reed, 2b 4 1 

Rundles, 3b 4 1 

Sprang lb 4 1 9 

Buck, rf 4 n 1 1 

36 9 9 27 
Bv Innigs — 
Fort Wayne 
Kendallville 



KENDALLVILLE 

E. AB. R. H. PO. A. E. 

Seibert, ss 4 3 2 2 1 1 

Orstadt, cf 5 1 1 1 1 

2 Adams, lb 4 2 9 

Traxler, 3b 4 1 1 3 u n 

1 Keen. 2b 4 1 2 2 

3 Fraze. rf 5 2 n H 

2 Nelson, p 5 n n u 5 o 

Husselman. If 4 h ii 1 h h 

ii Kaiser, c 4 1 1 7 

S 36 S 7 24 S 4 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R. H. E. 

3 110 3 1 n t) 9 9 S 
1001105008 7 4 



IIINIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinillllllllllVT! I INilllllllllllllllllllll 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED 



■niiDiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii 

AND FIFTY-SEVEN 




'ik 

1 * 

■ 1 




'HORXRERGER 

This is Hornie's first year as a Varsity 
man, as he is a Freshman. Carl is the 
only portsider on the high school team. 
His main position is in the pitcher's box 
although he is no slouch in the outfield. 
He can be depended upon to get his share 
of the hits during a game and this is an- 
other point in his favor. Carl did not 
get much of a chance to show his real 
worth this season but he will make a 
strong bid for first honors in the follow- 
ing years of his high school life. 



MISTER RITTER 

Mr. J. J. Ritter, a graduate of Purdue 
('04), has charge of our baseball teams. 
In 1912, with two weeks' notice, he took 
a bunch of raw recruits, put some base- 
ball into their craniums. went to the 
tournament at Purdue University and cap- 
tured third place among twentv-five 
teams. South Bend and M. T. H S. of 
Indianapolis alone finished ahead of us in 
the order named. Last year Mr. Ritter 
put out a team far above the average and 
first or second place in a state tourna- 
ment (which wasn't) would have been 
within our reach. As you can see Mr. 
Ritter has put conscientious work on the 
teams and he has certainly gotten the 
best results possible. We all thank Mr. 
Ritter for the time and trouble he has 
taken with us and it certainly will be 
to our benefit if he sees fit to continue 
working with our teams. 



LIZ 

"Robbie," captain for the past two sea- 
sons, was the mainstav of the team. He 
played his first game for the F. W. H. S. 
at the I. H. S. A. A. baseball tournament 
at Purdue in 1912. Since that game he 
has been holding down the catching job 
of our baseball teams in faultless "style. 
His hitting has been the feature of every 
game in which he has played and the 
clean-up position was the correct place 
for him to bat. Nothing was to big for 
"Robbie" to tackle; — he would risk break- 
ing a leg to win a game. "Robbie" is 
a Senior and goes out in June. The man 
who attempts to fill his place will have 
an enormous job as he will have to sat- 
isfy a crowd which has been entertained 
by the best catcher in the I. H. S. A. A. 
"Robbie" will enter Purdue University 
next fall and we will hear of him receiv- 
ing "ii the Varsity in a short time. 

DIFF 

Here is "Zanesville Diff" again. Besides 
being a star guard he was the mainstay 
of the baseball team this year in the 
capacity of pitcher. This was his second 
year on the team but his first as a regu- 
lar. He has the weight and arm to send 
the ball across the plate with enough 
speed to make it look like a pea. Diff 
is a Junior and has one more year to 
work for Fort Wayne High. 



IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllll!^ 
THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-EIGHT 




NICK 



STRING 



Here's Nick again. His job was at 
second and his play and pep kept things 
humming on the diamond this season. 
He found his batting eye early this spring 
and lined them out to all corners of the 
lot against any kind of pitching. Nick is 
a Senior and will graduate in June, leav- 
ing a hole that will be hard to fill. 



WHITEHEAD 

Our old friend. "Whitie," once more. 
"Whitie" is at home, as usual, at short- 
stop, and scoops them up from all angles 
at that station. He is a veteran, having 
been on the team which won third place 
in the state tournament at Purdue two 
years ago. Besides being a good infield- 
er. "Whitie" can certainly hit the ball 
and is a dangerous man on the bases be- 
cause of his speed. He would have been 
on the team four years had he been here 
in his Freshman year. "Whitie" takes to 
athletics like a fish tn water and is a 
star in every branch. He is a Senior and 
will be lost by graduation but we shall 
certainly' hear from him soon again as he 
enters Purdue University next fall. 



Again Kenny appears before us. This 
time in the role of a first sacker. This 
is "Ken's" second season on the Varsity 
and it certainly has been a successful one. 
both at bat and in the field. His hitting 
and fielding have improved fifty per cent 
over last year. Ken certainly will be a 
star if he continues to improve in the 
next two years as he has in the last two. 



FUZZY 



'Fuzzy 



ne of our veterans, having 
the team which went to Purdue 
two years ago. This year was his first 
on the infield but he performed wonder- 
fully. He usually managed to get his 
share of the hits and stolen bases. Since 
he is a Senior we shall lose him by grad- 
uation and his place will be a hard one 

tn till. 



THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-NINE 










KENDRICKS 



This is Harry's first season as a regu- 
lar. Last season he was on the Varsity 
squad but did not break into many games. 
This season his fielding was superb and, 
batting in the lead-off position, he hit like 
a house afire. Harry has two more sea- 
sons with the F. W. H. S. being a member 
of the February, 1917. class. 



'BUCK-' 



This is Buck's first year on the Varsity 
squad and. although he did not break into 
the regular line-up, he has the marks of 
a good ball player. Buck has one more 
year in high school and should make a 
regular position next season. We are 
looking for good work from you next year 
so "get busy Buck, old horse." 



COIL 



Coil is another new man on the Varsity 
He was kept back last year on account of 
his ineligibility. He is a hard hitter 
and a sure outfielder. Like Piff. Coil is 
a Junior and he too can work hard one 
more year to bring laurels to good old 
Fort Wayne High. 



RODEMEYER 



Art is a Junior but a new man on the 
Varsity baseball team. He made the 
team by his constant hard work and 
heavy hitting. Art has had little exper- 
ience in baseball but is eager to learn 
and is ii hard worker, a combination 
which will bring any man success. Art 
plays the outfield. 



mm i i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin mm mini i iiiiiiiiniii i i u i mum ■■■■iiiiiiiiiiiiimiinm 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY 




ciipj 



fxJT 



Lk 



TIIH [NTBK CLASS TRACK MEET. 

The third inter class track inert, held ;it Centlivre Pari on May 29 in con- 
junction with the annual public school field day resulted in ;i sweeping victory 

by the Sophomores over all the other ehisses. Tin' 'Hi class ean easily at 
tribute their victory to their careful training and regular practices which none 
of the other classes took the time to bother with. The respective scores of the 
four classes were Sophomores 41; Seniors 18: Freshmen 11 : Juniors 4. 

The heavy part of the Sophomores' score was made by Dunkelberg, Brad- 
ley and Raker. These three lads managed to nose out either a first or a sec- 
ond in nearly every event. 

Baker led all the contestants in individual honors, scoring 1 1 ' •_. points all 
told. Keim, '14. was second with !l points to his credit. Dunkelberg and 
Bradley tied for third place with 8 points apiece. Bonahoom was the star of 
the Freshman squad, pulling a first in the shot put, and a third in the discus 
throw. The Juniors' four points came on two seconds in the relay races. 

The results for the various events were as follows: 

Running Broad Jump — Robert Vernon, first; Charles Dunkelberg, second: 
Kenton Baker and Tom Outland were tied for third place. Distance. 18 feet 
and 2 inches. 

Shot-put — Isaac Bonahoom. first; Adolph Jensen, second, Edgar Bradley, 
third. Distance, 32 feet. ' • 

One-half-mile Run — Edgar Bradley, first; Kenneth Robinson, second: Tom 
Outland, third. Time. 2 minutes and 25 seconds. 

Running High Jump — Vernon, Dunkelberg and White tied for first place. 
Height, 5 feet. 

Discus Throw — Kenton Baker, first; Edgar Bradley, second: Isaac Bona- 
hoom, third. Distance. 85 feet 8 inches. 

Relay Race. High School Girls — Sophomores, first; Juniors, second; Pn 
men, third. Time, 35 4-5 seconds. 

100-yard Dash. Freshmen and Sophomores — Kenton Baker, first ; Leonard 
Blue, second; Kenneth Sprang, third. Time. II 1 - seconds. 

100-yard Dash, Juniors and Seniors- Raymond Keim, first ; Robert Ver- 
non, second; William Ehrman, third. Time, 11 seconds. 

Finals for 100-yard Dash, all classes — Raymond Keim, first: 
second; Leonard Blue, third. Time, 10 4-5 seconds. 

Pole Vault — Raymond Keim, first; Charles Dunkelberg, second 
Height. 8 feet. 

220-yard Dash. All Classes— Kenton Baker, first ; Leonard Blue 
second; Robert Vernon, third. Time. 25 4-5 seconds. 

One-mile Run — Charles Dunkelberg, first; Edward Bradley 
second; Kenneth Robinson, third. Time. 5 minutes. 55 seconds. 

Relay Race — 400-yards, All Class Teams — Freshmen, first 
Juniors, second; Sophomores, third. Xo Senior team entered 
Time, 50 4-5 seconds. 

iii i i ii i i iii ii i i i n it i i i i i mm ii imm Mi imm I I i i i 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-ONE 



3h- 



K en ton Baker 
jond : no third. 




THE FIVE COACHES 




Mr. L. C. Ward, our P. G. professor, is an ardent admirer of football; but 
lie never had had a chance to put out an eligible team representing our high 
school. He has had great success in handling football teams as can be seen 
by his record at Huntington in past years and his handling of our independent 
city team, the Friars, last season. From an ordinary bunch of players he in- 
variably moulds a good team and generally develops a star or two. We hope 
F. W. H. S. will get enough school spirit to put out an eligible team and have 
Mr. Ward demonstrate his abilities. 

The other coaches "got theirs" in other sections of the book. Therefore 
their well known virtues are not printed here. 



THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-TWO 




iii"nii! .iii' mil' mr mii'iniii mi' i i i iiii':in iiiMii'.iii" iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i .iir iii" mi iii' i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin in linn iiiniiiuiiii 

THIS IS TAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-THREE 



ALUMNI 




OR forty-nine years the Port Wayne High School has graduated 
and sent out into the world girls and boys who have entered all 
the varied walks of life. They have been boys and girls educated 
to the best ability of the Fort Wayne High School and, for the 
most part, they have lived up to the standard of their former 
ylJPyi teachings. Many have represented our High School in the most 
rominent Universities and Colleges in the country and have even 
ranked among the best of those who seek a higher education. Many others 
have entered schools of Medicine and Law while still others have proven un- 
usually successful in lines of business or literature, in matters of higher edu- 
cation or have made themselves well known in the furtherance of charitable 
or social movements. 

Not only need we feel a trifle proud of the splendid reputation our Alumni 
have made for our High School but we can also truthfully say that they have 
spread its good name far and wide, and have carried the results of its teach- 
ings into almost all parts of the world, north, east, south and west. It is in- 
deed a credit to anyone to be able to say he is a member of the Alumni of the 
Fort Wayne High School who are scattered here. |here and everywhere and 
who can boast of one of the best High School educations procurable. Follow- 
ing is a list of the forty-nine years of graduates from the Fort Wayne Higli 
School : 

CLASS OF 1865. 

Emma L. Baldwin Teacher. Deceased " 

Margaret S. Cochrane 36 years principal of the Wash- 
ington School City. 

Marian E. Humphrey Mrs. Brenton. Teacher City, 

Abbie J. Sharp Mrs. Frank Morton San Francisco. Cal. 

CLASS OF 1866. 

Georgia A. Hadley Mrs. Edward Brackett Kansas City, Mo. 

Mary E. Hadley Mrs. H. E. Smith Denver, Col. 

Eliza Harter, Valedictorian .. .Mrs. Lemual Hartman. Deceased 

Sarah Kearns Artist. Deceased Coffeeville, Kan. 

Isabel Nash Deceased Lincoln, 111. 

Sophia Taylor Mrs. Hulse City. 

Alice Wells, Salutatorian Music teacher Toledo, Ohio. 

CLASS OF 1S67. 

Abba M. Knapp, Salutatorian . . . Deceased 

Mary E. Morgen. Valedictorian. Mrs. Burrows Los Angeles, Cal. 

Alida Morss Mrs d'Isay City. 

Hiram Myers Supt. ot Schools Cape Cod. Mass. 

Ferry A. Randall Attorney. Pres. of Erie and 

Mich. Waterway Association. .City. 

Samuel F. Swayne Lawyer. Deceased Albuquerque. X. M 

CLASS OF 1868. 

William P. Cooper With New York Life In. Co. . . . ( !ity. 

O. Edward Fleming. Salutatorian ( 'ity. 

Jeremiah Hillegass Former Allen County Supt. . . .Huntertown. 

Harvey C. Lowrie Civil Engineer. Deceased Denver, Col. 

Adelia Lynn Mrs. S. C. Lombard City. 



™ Il"» ! IIIIIIIHIIIISI IHIIIII I I I I HI I ■nillllin SIIKII ! lllfflllMIIII 

THIS is PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FOUR 




» %s 



Marj E. Stevens Teacher Chicago, 111. 

.Mary A. Yandolah Mrs. G. W. Wilbur. Deceased .. Maysville, hid. 

Melville B. Mahurin Real Estate Columbus, Ohio. 

Sarah H. Wilson '.' Mrs. Edgar. Deceased City. 

Samuel I... Morris, Valedictorian. Attorney City. 

CLASS OP 1869. 

George B. Bowen Plumber. Deceased 

Bertha Becker Mrs. Herman Elson Far Rockaway, Long I. 

Mary A. Davis Mrs. Mayhew San Francisco, Cal. 

Emma C. Eckles Rockville, Ind. 

Carrie Graff Mrs. Frank Wise. Deceased . . . 

Frank Hamilton Former Principal of Hoagland 

School Atlantic City. 

Malvina R. Mahurin Mrs. W. H. McQuiston. De- 
ceased Auburn, Ind. 

Gertrude R. McDonald, Saluta- 
torian Mrs. James Ramsey Cleveland, Ohio. 

Jennie Snively Deceased 

Jennie Y. Walker, Valedctorian. Mrs. C. Gates. Deceased Toledo, Ohio. 

CLASS OF 1870. 

Etta B. Abbott Deceased 

Ada L. Benham Mrs. Read 

William Bowen, Jr Deceased 

Edwin C. Crawford, Valedictor- 
ian Attorney Chicago, 111. 

Ella Embry Mrs. James Wilding City. 

John H. Gay 

Mary Green Mrs. James Smith City. 

Sarah J. Hillegass Mrs. John Stahl Denver, Col. 

Joseph J. Jenkinson Attorney. Deceased 

Mary E. Jones Teacher of Latin. Deceased . . .Chicago, 111. 

Mary B. Kearns Deceased 

Emma J. Rupert Mrs. Wallace Dawson Los Angeles, Cal. 

Lizzie C. Williard Mrs. Drake City. 

Charles S. Wise, Salutatorian . . Deceased Chicago, 111. 

CLASS OF 1871. 

M. Alice Hill Teacher Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mary A. Humphrey Teacher. Deceased City. 

Sophia Keil City. 

Margaret McPhail, Yaledictor- Principal of Bloomingdale 
ian School City. 

Samuel E. Morss Distinguished Editor. Consul to 

Paris. Deceased Indianapolis, Ind. 

Florence A. Pequa Mrs. King 

Carrie Salomon, Salutatorian. ...Mrs. John Ross Leavenworth, Kan. 

Caroline W. Straughan Retired Principal of the New- 
berry High School, Chicago. .City. 
CLASS OF 1872. 

Charles S. Bash S. Bash & Co City. 

Julia M. Bryant Proprietress of a Delicatessen 

Store Detroit, Mich. 

Mary E. Jefferds Mrs. Dr. Greenawalt City. 

Fannie H. Probasco Mrs. Charles Bryant Washington, D. C. 

Mary E. Rowan, Valedictorian. . VIrs. James B. Harper City. 

Ella F. Shaeffer Deceased 

Emma L. Stockbridge Mrs. Thomas Edison. Deceased. City. 

Agnes Tower Deceased 



I - ..-. I ii'.,i !■■:., 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



Helen E. Brenton 

Annie B. Davis 

Augustus J. Detzer 

N. Virginia Embry 

Minnie Graff 

Margaret J. Hewes, Salutator 

ian 

Fannie Hoffman 

Susan Harvey 

William H. Housh, Valedictor 

ian 

George W. Hursh 

M. Ida Mahurin 

L. Anna Orff 

Ada Adelaide Orff 



M. Florence Pierce 
Howell C. Rockhill 
Spencer R. Smith . 
Lillie A. Wilding . 



Mary E. Christie 

Frank H. French, Salutatorian. 



Ellen McKeag . . . 
Edith Harrison . . 
Nathan A. Wilson 



Agnes Cannan, Salutatorian . . 

Mabel E. Hill 

Flora A. Markey, Valedictorian 

Martin C. Neuberger 

M. Alice Sink 

Edward Bowen 

Nora J. Bash 

Harry A. Anderson 

Ida D. Beals 

Emma Graff 

Marion M. Imrie 

Agnes D. Jefferds 

Harriet M. Leonard 

M. Belle McDonald 



CLASS OF 1873. 

Teacher City. 

Mrs. Chas. W. Bixby Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Drug Salesman City. 

Mrs. A. Warriner. Deceased . .City. 

Mrs. Louis Feder. Deceased ..Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mrs. John Piper. Deceased . . . .Ctty. 

Mrs. E. T. Williams City. 

Mrs. Squires Emporia, Kan. 

Principal of a High School ...Los Angeles, Cal. 

Principal of a School. Deceased West. 

Deceased 

Mrs. C. A. Stanton Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Frank McKinnie. De- 
ceased Pittsburg, Pa. 

Mrs. A. S. Coverdale City. 

Mgr. Ft. Wayne Rolling Mills.. City. 

Principal of a Public School. . Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. Dr. Porter City. 

CLASS OF 1874. 

Teacher City. 

Colonel U. S. A. Commander 

Fort Shaffer Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Teacher City. 

Mrs. D. Worthington. Deceased. 

Merchant. Deceased Cleveland, Ohio. 

CLASS OF 1875. 

Deceased 

Mrs. Harry Clayton. Teacher. .City. 

Mrs. Jesse Kunse. Deceased . .Wabash, Ind. 

Lawyer. Deceased Chicago, III. 

Mrs. Jehial Fox City. 

Lawyer. Deceased Mandan, Iowa. 

Mrs. Joseph Hughes City. 

With Standard Oil Co Cleveland, Ohio. 

Mrs. Bush California. 

Mrs. Adolph Loveman Nashville, Tenn. 



Sarah Carll 

Wm. A. Diffenderfer 

Ernest F. Frietzsche 

William A. Hodgden 

Charles W. Howey 

Peter E. Pickard, Valedictorian 

Ida M. Hawkins 

Claude B. Miller 

Annie O. Bourie 

Caroline E. Conklin 

Ella H. Green 

Anna B. Miller 

Lillie C. Nill 



Mrs. Clinton Walton 

Mrs. W. W. Wright 

Mrs. Dr. Holliday 

CLASS OF 1876. 

Deceased 

With Mossman & Yarnelle 

Doctor 

Merchant 

Deceased 

Merchant of House Furnishings 

Mrs. Harry Keegan 

Deceased 



Chicago, 111. 

Ft. Dodge, Iowa. 

Cleveland, Ohio. 



Mrs. J. Marsh 

Mrs. Charles Huestis 
Mrs. Stephen Morris 
Teacher. Deceased . 



City. 

Indanapolis, Ind. 
Wichita, Kan. 

City. 
. Shawnee, Okla. 

.Washington, D. C. 
.Toledo, Ohio. 
Portland, Ore. 
.City. 
.City. 



'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii n iniiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiini iiiniiiiiiiii minimi mini i i i i miiiiiiiiiiiimiiini mi i iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



Julia E. Orff Deceased City. 

Mary E. Wise, Salutatorian ....Mrs. Frank Miller. Deceased .. 

Martha Withers Mrs. Hahn. Deceased 

Martha Woolsey Mrs. Frank Poole City. 

Howard McCullough Physician. Deceased 

CLASS OF 1877. 

George W. Henderson, Valedic- 
torian Deceased 

Charles McQuiston Capt. in U. S. A. Deceased . . . .Philippines. 

Frank S. Thanhauser Thanhauser Film Corporation . .New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Ellen M. Babcock Mrs. Lapp City. 

Zilla M. Burkholder Deceased Kansas. 

Agnes Newell Mrs. E. France City. 

Margaret A. Wade Teacher. Deceased City. 

Addie M. Ashley Mrs. Charles Stockbridge City. 

Agnes J. Cochrane, Salutatorian. With firm of Schrader & Wil- 
son City. 

Catherine Freeman Mrs. Harvey McCracken Louisville, Ky. 

Mary E. Freeman Louisville, Ky. 

Mary Gorham Mrs. W. E. Beaty City. 

Jessie L. Humphrey Teacher. Deceased City. 

Lizzie Mellinger West. 

Esther Myerson Mrs. Getz. Ins. Business St. Louis. Mo. 

Mary E. Potter Mrs. Cook. Deceased 

CLASS OF 1878. 

Elizabeth G. Graham, Valedic- 
torian Pittsburg, Pa. 

Sarah L. Hedges Mrs. Miller City. 

Edgar D. Rogers Cleveland, Ohio. 

Samuel Stophlet With a Railroad Kansas City, Kan. 

James W. Cartwright Physician Payne, Ohio. 

Matilda Henderson Mrs. Matilda Wheelock Los Angeles, Cal. 

Augusta G. Reitze, Salutatorian. Deceased City. 

Georgiana Saunders Mrs. McCullough. Deceased ...City. 

Flora E. Orr Mrs. Charles Bash City. 

James E. Scott Michigan. 

Jessie M. Withers Paris. 

Martha E. Wohlfort Principal of the Franklin School. City. 

CLASS OF 1879. 

Julius Samuel Lauferty Private Sec. to Post Master. .. .New York, N. Y. 

John Morris Breen & Morris, Attorneys . . . .City. 

Charles F. Mirdlinger, Valedic- 
torian Theatrical Mgr. and Playwright. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Edward Adolphus Rosenthal ..Attorney. Deceased Chicago, 111. 

Frank Benjamin Walker Minister Iowa. 

Addie Helene Williams Teacher City. 

Winfield Scott Bash Commission Merchant City. 

Lafayette Seavey Berry Fur Business Chicago, III. 

Mary Emma Dick Teacher City. 

Harry Campbell Eckles With Bell Telephone Co City. 

Ann Eliza Garvin Missionary Japan. 

Elizabeth Marshall Hoffman. 
Salutatorian Mrs. Charles Worden City. 

Mary Emma Larrabee Mrs. B. Lyman. Deceased . . . .New York, N. Y. 

Hiram A. Philley With Penn. Co City. 

Charles Howard Worden Pres. of the First Nat. Bank. . . .City. 

Francis Leila Conklin Teacher City. 

ilHIIBIIIIIfflllllllllilllllllH 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HCNDRED AND SIXTY-SEVEN 







i^lte^SfiS 




Alice Liba Coombs Architect San Diego, Cal. 

Isabella Lucretia Dyer Mrs. Myers Seattle, Wash. 

Lucy Candace Gould Mrs. Thomas Pickard La Grange. 111. 

George William Wilson City. 

CLASS OP 1880. 

Clara Delwert Douglas Principal of a High School ....Detroit, Mich. 

Martha Duncan Irwin, Valedic- 
torian Mrs. Pattison New York, N. Y. 

Rhoda Amelia Webb, Salutator- 
ian Mrs. Owen Heaton. Deceased . . City. 

Nancy Katherine Barnett Mrs. W. B. Beamer Los Angeles, Cal. 

Elizabeth Collins Teacher St. Paul, Minn. 

Amelia Belle Davis Mrs. Winbaugh Denver, Col. 

Cora Alice Diggins Mrs. M. S. Mahurin City. 

Lee Ella Dodez Mrs. John J. Muir. Deceased. .City. 

Edith Ellen Fronefield City. 

Chauncey Samuel Hart Deceased 

Minnie Frank Hormsher Teacher Denver, Col. 

Carrie Ardelia Johnson Mrs. MacCormac. Deceased. . ..New York. 

Adella Yalette Ross Mrs. Wolcott Rome City, Ind. 

Lulu Jennie Wiley Mrs. Andrew Wallace. Deceased Chicago, 111. 

Georgianna Boyd Mrs. W. E. Lipsett City. 

Edith Hannah Brackenridge . . . Mrs. Carey New York, N. Y. 

Addie Jacobson Mrs. Max Fisher City. 

Isabella Black Newell Mrs. Gillett. Deceased 

CLASS OF 1881. 

Lilian Delma French, Salutator- 

ian Mrs. Lillian Stouder. Teacher. City. 

Katherine Hamilton City. 

Emma Louise Hamilton. Vale- 
dictorian With Russell Bible House ....Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mary Josephine Hartman Mrs. Capt. Leonard Detroit, Mich. 

Martha Birdora Holman Mrs. E. L. White. Teacher ....Atlantic City. 

Samuel Henry King Presbyterian Minister. Former 

Missionary in Alaska Harrington, Wash. 

Frank Bursley Taylor Geologist City. 

Laura Goshorn Mrs. A. J. Detzer City. 

Alice Mary Habecker Principal Hanna School City. 

Marion Clare Roberts Mrs. Lincoln Orland. Ind. 

Harriett Melissie Wells With Jones' Photo Supply Co. . .City. 

Kate Carlisle Orr Mrs. A. L. Johns City. 

Gracie Edith Sidle Mrs. W. D. Miner City. 

CLASS OF 1882. 
Edith Maud Brewster, Saluta- 

torian Mrs. John McKean City. 

Alice Beatrice Chaplin Mrs. R. A. Curtis Fountain City, Ind. 

Edith May Cothrell Mrs. C. J. Lose City. 

Mai-ilia Ann Craig Mrs. W. O. Scott Butler, Ohio. 

Gustave G. Detzer Real Estate Business Hollywood. Cal. 

Anna Binsley Dick Nurse Boston, Mass. 

Arthur Nathaniel Fitzsimmons.Real Estate Business. Deceased. Chicago, 111. 

Elmer Leonard Attorney City. 

Wilmer Leonard Attorney. Deceased City. 

Mary Elizabeth McClure Mrs. John Abercrombie City. 

Minnie Alice Sidle Mrs. C. W. Weaver City. 

May Alice Tarman Mrs. Baxter City. 

■■iiiiiiiiiiiiii mm limn i i i mini mini inn mm i i i i imiiiimiimiiimim i i mm i i i miiimiiimiiiiiiiiii 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-EIGHT 







Lettie Ann VanAlstine. Valedic- 
torian Mrs. Dr. W. W. Harnett. De- 
ceased City. 

Jennie May Abel Mrs. D. H. Caldwell City. 

Clarence White Cromwell Lumber Business Montgomery, Ala. 

Henry Grant Stouder R. R. Engineer Kansas City, Kan. 

CLASS OF 1883. 

Jacob Warren Houder, Saluta- 

torian Attorney Iowa. 

Agnes Derkhiem Irwin, Vale- 
dictorian Deceased 

Addie Louise Bleekman Mrs. N. Guildlin City. 

Virginia Adaline Clay Mrs. Wolf Chicago. 111. 

Ludmilla Duschner Michigan. 

Louise Rauh Mrs. Herman Reichert Ann Arbor, Mich, 

Nellie Taylor Mrs. J. M. Stouder City. 

Anna Maria Trenam Teacher City. 

Elizabeth Olive Cutshall Mrs. Todd City. 

Permil'a Frances Hamil Mrs. George Carl] Kansas City, Kan. 

Minnie Belle Kemp Mrs. Sam Hanna City. 

Emma Frances Kinnaird Mrs. Frank Olds Los Angeles, Cal. 

Kittie Jane Lehr Mrs. Herbert Tigar New York, N. Y. 

John Webster McKenzie Lumber Business Los Angeles, Cal. 

Minnie Ella Newell Mrs. Charles Cross. Deceased. New York, N. Y. 

Carrie Belle Schrader Mrs. Gesaman Louisville, Ky. 

CLASS OF 1884. 

William Dunham Kyle Kyle Music Store City. 

Abram Lincoln Rogers Traveling Salesman. Deceased. 

John Craig Abel With Bowser Oil Tank Co Sault Ste. Marie. Mich. 

Lillie Bowen Mrs. J. B. Wagner City. 

Prudence Lucretia Bowman ...Mrs. H. W. Clark Farrport, Iowa. 

John Tecumseh Dougall Newspaper Portland, Ore. 

Harriet Jones Mrs. McKracken Dalas, Texas. 

Maggie Louise Goshorn With Home Telephone Co City. 

Matilda Elizabeth Knight Mrs. Norton. Deceased 

George Edwin Randall With Randall Motor Co City. 

John Ebenezer Bleekman Vice Pres. Union Depot and Ter- 
minal Co Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Edith Elizabeth Ersig Mrs. Harry Williamson. Teach- 
er City. 

Carrie Fisher Mrs. Louis Stiefel. Deceased. .City. 

Herman Friberger. Salutatorian. Wholesale Shoe Business City. 

Carrie Frances Guild. Valedic- 
torian Mrs. Dave Creiehton Cleveland, Ohio. 

Ada Lenora Gumpper Mrs. Harry Keplinger. De- 
ceased City. 

Ada Alice Neireiter Mrs. W'illiam Myers Chicago, 111. 

Hattie Rosenthal Mrs. Benjamin Brunswick . . . .Chicago. 111. 

Katie Agnes Ross Mrs. Frank C. Tolan City. 

Lucy Caroline Smith Teacher. Deceased 

CLASS OF 18S5. 

Nicholas Alexander Robertson . Attorney Salt Lake City. Utah. 

Lillie Belle Beaber Principal of a Girls' Presbyter- 
ian School Tabriz, Persia. 

Luella Catherine Boles Mrs. Charles Tanier. Deceased. Statesbora, Ga. 

:illllllllllllll!llllllll!llllllll!lllll!llllllllll!lllllffl 

THIS IS PAGE ONE Ht'XDRED AND SIXTY-NINE 



Georgia Leora Dennison, Salu- 
tatorian 

Emma Prances Gaskins Mrs. Clarence Cook City. 

Fred Orvis Stringer In the Post Office Indianapolis, Ind. 

Emma Mayhew Cottingham, 

Valedictorian Mrs. S. B. Quayle Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Clara Elizabeth Geake City. 

Grace Greenwood Hayden Mrs. A. L. Randall City. 

Abbie Choate Keegan City. 

CLASS OP 1886. 

Adah Taylor Bittinger Teacher. Deceased 

Gertrude Rawling Burdick 

Kate Chapin Mrs. Arthur Smith City. 

Addie Prances Davis Mrs. Prank E. Stone. Deceased. City. 

Edith Carrie Eberly Deceased 

John Andrew Garvey Newspaper Man. Deceased . . . 

John Washington Hall With Electric Works City. 

Celia Louise Hotter City. 

Grace Jackson, Salutatorian. .. Latin teacher Hyde Park Sch. ..Chicago, 111. 

Bertrand Paul Mossman, Vale- 
dictorian Mossman & Yarnelle City. 

Margaret Sinclair Mrs. Charles Cherry City. 

Alice Violet Taylor Mrs. W. H. Caps Kansas City, Mo. 

Edith May Boseker Mrs. G. L. Hackius City. 

Anna Elizabeth Farnen Mrs. L. Voelker City. 

Alice Lucia Hamil Mrs. E. B. Johns Washington, D. C. 

Lizzie Nonnamaker Mrs. Israel Scranton Toledo, Ohio. 

Jennie Young Deceased 

CLASS OP 18S7. 

Albert Jabriskie Foster Deceased 

Robert Strowan Robertson . . . .Lumberman Paducah, Ky. 

Grace Margaret Waldo Mrs. Stephen Jessup Petoskey, Mich. 

Harry Oliver Wise, Valedictor- 
ian Prof, in High School San Diego, Cal. 

William Primrose Bidwell ....With Electric Works City. 

Daniel Edwin Bricker Deceased 

Mary Carll Teacher. Deceased City. 

Willie Oliver Cromwell, Saluta- 
torian Lumber Business Montgomery, Ala. 

Sadie Foster Teacher City. 

Ada Matilda Heller Mrs. Charles J. Bulger, First 

National Bank City. 

Mary Josephine Leonard Stenographer Chicago, 111. 

Eda Lilian Maier Mrs. F. D. Capen Bloomington, 111. 

Elizabeth B. Mitchell Mrs. Houlihan. Deceased 

Louise Robertson Mrs. W. H. Shambaugh City. 

Harry Wilson Stirk Clerk in John Bass' Office City. 

Matilda Agnes Vibery Mrs. W. Lonergan. Deceased. .City. 

Henrietta May Winbaugh Mrs. Dr. H. W. Pierce City. 

Edward Frederick Biddle With Y. M. C. A DeMoines, Iowa. 

Lida Elizabeth Boseker Mrs. Wheeler Muncie, Ind. 

Anna Phoebe Brewer Mrs. Gailey City. 

Mary Martha Brokaw Mrs. Christopher Heit City. 

Josephine Carter 

Martha Marcella Clark Teacher City. 

Emma Henrietta Ersig Mrs. W. F. Snyder City! 

Kittie Cawline Fowler 

mi" i ■Mil i i mini Illlllll iiiiiiiimiiii i I i i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii! ii i i mini i hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY 



Egbert Curtice Olds .... 
Maggie Houstoun Powers 
Kittie Marie Remmert . 
George Herbert Rowe . . 



Rachel Cassandra Boles 

Miriam Cohen 

Florence Barrett 

Katherine Harriet Blynn, Vale 

dictorian 

Ella Linda Esmond 

Joseph Freiburger 



Annette Augusta Gaskins 

Marianna Jane Geake 

Annie Grace Habecker. Saluta 

torian 

Mary Elizabeth Hoffman 

Robert Garnet Nonnamaker . . . 

Maurice Rosenthal 

Francis Everett Sweet 

Mary Evelyn Taylor 

Victoria Carter 

Cecelia Foley 

Ada May Griffith 

Clara Fleming Humphrey 

Susan Lucretia Thompson 



Electrical Expert City. 

Mrs. Joseph Flowers Joliet, 111. 

Mrs. A. P. Waibel San Diego, Cal. 

Utilities Development Co Chicago. 111. 

Formerly Prof, of Electricity of 

Leland Standford University, 

Califirnia. 
CLASS OF 1888. 

Mrs. Frank Safford City. 

Mrs. Pinkous Oak Park, 111. 

Mrs. G. T. Ladd Pittsburg, Pa. 

Teacher Walla Walla, Wash. 

Mrs. W. F. Demy Omaha, Neb. 

Wholesale Leather and Shoe 

Business City. 

Teacher City. 

Teacher City. 



Daisy Stallard Carver 

Margaret Rice Carver, Valedic- 
torian 

Lillian Fisk 

Lillian Maud Graham 

Anna Albertie Homsher 

Hugh Glenn Keegan 

Minnie Belle Keel 

Mary Battey Lincoln, Salutator 
ian 

Hattie Rosenthal 

Sarah Catherine Schaaf 

Coraell Doughty 

John King Ferguson 

Florence May Fulton 

Edwin William Knox 

Estella Miner 

Charles Morgan Olds 

Mabel Robertson 

Stella Steirheim 

Estella Catherine Stringer 

Effie Belle Rickey 



Fanny Taylor Hartman 
Artena Mary Chapin . . . 
Jennie Carson Crighton 



Mrs. George Taylor Clinton, 111. 

Mrs. W. F. Kanning City. 

Hartford City, Ind. 

Surgeon City. 

Presto Light Co Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mrs. H. J. Doswell City. 

Teacher Denver, Col. 

Principal of the Minor School. .City. 

Teacher City. 

Mrs. Charles Guild Burlington, Iowa. 

Mrs. Webster Chicago, 111. 

CLASS OF 1889. 
Mrs. George Lahr Indianapolis, Ind. 

Missionary India. 

Mrs. Charles L. Reese Ellensbury, Wash. 

Mrs. John Evans City. 

Mrs. J. L. Shook Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Attorney City. 

Mrs. Dan Bash Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mrs. C. MacMillen Schnectady, N. Y. 

Mrs. Louis Frankel Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. F. H. Hilgeman City. 

Mrs. Hollenstein. Deceased . . . 

Lumber Business Paducah, Ky. 



Kokomo, Ind. 

Photographer City. 

Deceased 

Mrs. E. S. Lloyd Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. O. E. Mohler City. 

Librarian City. 

Deceased 

CLASS OF 1890. 
Entomologist, State Museum ...Albany, N. Y. 

Librarian Redlands, Cal. 

Mrs. F. L. Sessions Cleveland, Ohio. 



THIS IS PAGE 



lllllllllllllllllllll 

NE HUNDRED 



AND SEVENTY-ONE 



Martha Jane French Mrs. Jackson 

Grace Curtis Glenn Missionary to China. Now Mrs, 

Fox 

Elizabeth Cushing Lincoln Mrs. Charles Eveleth 

Agnes Anderson Seabreaze Mrs. Clayton Giles 

Lelia Hester Saybold 

Helen Frances Stringer Mrs. A. A. Purman 

Sadie Louise Sturgis Librarian 

Christina Bastues 

Mary Biddle, Salutatorian 

Adele Edna Bourie Mrs. Charles Betts 

Etta Lulu Boylan Deceased 

Katherine Alice Ersig Teacher 

Adah Louise Gray Mrs. Artemas Pickard 

Clara Greer Mrs. Bell 

Rose Esther Kohn Mrs. Joseph Baum 

Constance Lumbard. Valedictor- 
ian Mrs. Robert Carnahan. De 

ceased 

Georgiana Lumbard Mrs. E. H. Olds 

Nellie May McKay Mrs. Malcolm McKay. Teacher. 

Nellie Isabelle Newell Mrs. Henry Lefferts 

Jessie Robison Mrs. James Wells. Deceased . . 

Mary Isabella Smith Mrs. Mandaville Chambers ... 

Sarah Eugenie Smith Deceased 

Carrie Alice Snively Ass't Director of Phy. Culture. . 

Winifred Sophia Spalding Stenographer 

Jessie May Sweet Mrs. McPhetridge 

Alice Christine Ward 



City. 



Chicago, 111. 
Schnectady, N. Y. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
City. 

Battle Ground, Ind. 
Sypney, Ohio. 

City. 
City. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
City. 



City. 
City. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 

City. 

City. 

City. 

City. 

City. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

City. 



Helen Eliza Dryer 

Samuel Cochrane Moffat 

Eva Louise Beebe 

Leota May Connett 

Belle Geake 

Frank Lyne Markey 

Leona Bean McQuiston 

Leora Miner 

Anna Margaret Robertson 

Lorena Stahl 

Bertha Stahl 

I Iruzilla Weidner ' 

Fannie Ruth Conover, Saluta 

torian 

Harvey Edsall Crane 



Edith Rosalie Cutshall 

Minnie Ella Ferguson 

Frank Wesley Gavin 

Maude Frances Hendricks 

Edith Hols worth 

Gertrude Davis Mayhew, Vale 

dictorian 

Emma Marian McElfatrick 

Eugene Henry Olds 

Daisy Studor 



CLASS OF 1891. 

Mrs. Albert Woodard Youngstown, Ohio. 

On the Denver Post Denver, Col. 

Mrs. Fred Nickols Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. C. W. White Liberal, Kan. 

Mrs. Tom Snook City. 

Markey Green House City. 

Dressmaker Los Angeles, Cal. 

Teacher City. 

Mrs. W. N. Whitely Springfield, Ohio. 

Mrs. John Ferguson Paducah, Ky. 

Mrs. H. O. Drayton Denver, Col. 

Mrs. E. E. Jackson Union City, Ind. 



Mrs. A. D. Luley Boston, Mass. 

Production Mgr. Electric Light 

Works City. 

Mrs. M. G. Beaver City. 

Mrs. Robert Robertson Paducah, Ky. 

Physician. Deceased 

Mrs. A. Fuller. Deceased Chicago, 111. 

Teacher City. 

Stenographer San Francisco. Cal. 

Mrs. Williams Chicago, 111. 

Olds Coal Co City. 

Mrs. Delbert Davis Schenectady, N. Y. 



r ll 

THIS IS I 'AGE ''XL-: Hl'XDRED AND SEVEXTY-TWO 



CLASS OF 1892. 

Grace Carver Mrs. George Ransome Oklahoma. 

Taber Hamilton Master Mechanic of Cumber- 
land Valley R. R Chambersburg, Pa. 

Anna Maud Lipes Mrs. Peter Shaden 

Helen Pettit Spencer Mrs. Mathers Smally Syracuse, N. V. 

Daisy Keturah Beaber Mrs. John Mulford Boston, Mass. 

Frank Morris Biddle Physician Battle Ground, Ind. 

Etta Campbell Brooks Mrs. Willard Smith City. 

Cora Alice Conover Mrs. Charles Rabus City. 

Harriet Brinsley Dyche Originator of the Fire-Fly 

Dance Chicago, 111. 

Emma Sophia Gutermuth Mrs. Edward White Detroit. Mich. 

Louise Cecelia Heller Mrs. Ed. Lindman City. 

Laura Douglas Muirhead Principal of the McCulloch Sc.City. 

Minnie Louise Ortman Mrs. Charles King City. 

Grace Olive Phillabaum Mrs. Norman Covvden Jackson, Mich. 

Katherine Charlotte Beebe Mrs. W. W. Rockhill City. 

Caroline Biddle Teacher City. 

Howard W. ("'lark. Valedictorian. Government Fisheries Dept. . . . 

Lola Ella Conover Mrs. Ed. Heywood Detroit, Midi. 

Walter Edwin Cook General Agent City. 

John William Dalman Master Mechanic — American 

Steel Co Chicago, 111. 

Emma Marie Hebert Mrs. Aaron Farasinski Gary, Ind. 

Charles King Office of Bass Foundry City. 

Fannie Kohn. Salutatorian . . . .Mrs. L. A. Heilbroner City. 

Frederick Nash Kollock, Jr. ...Pacific Rep. Westenhouse El?c 

trie Co Portland, Ore. 

Sophia Celia Nix Booker City. 

Minnie Bertha Seibt Mrs. Lampert Portland, Ore. 

Detlef Ferdinand Urbahns ....With Hamilton Bank City. 

CLASS OF 1893. 

Euretta Colman Banister Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Elgie Magellan Keyser 

Elmer Bromfield Lane With Remington Typewriter Co. London, England. 

Josephine Teen Page Mrs. Wright. Magazine Writer. San Diego. Cal, 

Cornelia Anne Wilding, Valedic- 
torian Mrs. W. E. Hodgman Coldwater. Mich, 

Millie Blanche Blynn Mrs. E. E. Ruby Walla Walla. Wash. 

Fnnces Mary Lowry Mrs. Harry Wise Riverside, Cal. 

Nellie Louise Markey Mrs. Erwin Evans City. 

Julia Rumsey Germany. 

Gertrude Elmira Clark, Saluta- 
torian Married Indianapolis, Ind. 

William Wilbert Cook Mail Clerk. Deceased 

Harry Lansdowne Lumberman Everett, Wash. 

Annie Louise Miller Teacher City. 

Edgar Martin Myers Farmer Wallen. Ind. 

Catherine Laura Pence Mrs. Arlie Paschall Mentone. Ind. 

Mary Elizabeth Shoaff Mrs. Mitchell St. Louis, Mo. 

Lida A'ire Spalding Mrs. Clark Gilford City. 

Charles Kenny Stringer Auditor for Clark Estate New York, N. V. 

CLASS OF 1894. 

Georgia Wallace Devlin Mrs. C. O. Miller City. 

I'liiiiiiiiiraiiiiiiiraiiiiiii'Hiiirainiih^^ 

THIS IS PAGE ONE Hl'NPRKIi ,\.\'I> SEVENTY-THREE 



Katherine Margaret Scherer, 

Salutatorian Wife of Prof. W. Palmer of Pur- 
due University Lafayette, Ind. 

Minnie Idella Aker Mrs. McMaken City. 

Maud Biegler Teacher. Deceased City. 

Laura Grace Bradley Mrs. J. E. Moring City. 

Anna Conover Mrs. Shilliam Areola, Ind. 

Mary Louise Fisk In Business Seattle, Wash. 

Sara Helen Griffiths Librarian Des Moines, Iowa. 

Lewis Oliver Hartman Methodist Minister 

Ethel Kathrina Jenness Mrs. Charles Kendrick Gary, Ind. 

Clara Margaret Joost Mrs. Yarlotte Logansport, Ind. 

Margaret Frances Muirhead . . .Mrs. W. E. Johnson Seattle, Wash. 

John Clifford Wallace Physician City. 

Anna Zucker. Valedictorian . . . .Mrs. Fuerbringer St. Louis. Mo. 

Grace Conover Mrs. West St. Louis, Mo. 

Alice Cordelia Crane Mrs. Frank Bond City. 

Edward King Physician Gary, Ind. 

Elmer Francis Knepper Farmer 

Carrie May Koons Mrs. R. M. Snider South Bend, Ind. 

Bessie Ellen McCracken Teacher City. 

Jennie Grace Pelkey Mrs. Strain. Deceased Louisville, Ky. 

Emma Louise Ranke Bookkeeper City. 

Clara May Webb Stenographer City. 

Clara Minnie Wilson Mrs. W. Shepard Jackson, Mich. 

CLASS OF 1895. 
Edith Maria Eldridge, Valedic- 
torian Teacher Indianapolis, Ind. 

Annie Bowden Kensill Mrs. Mattoon Chicago, 111. 

Ralph Chester Lane Ind. Rep. Scott, Torsman Pub- 
lishing Co Indianapolis, Ind. 

Dora Barbara Miller Mrs. J. A. Coy Buffalo, N. Y. 

Charles Luther Olds, Jr Master of Boys' Prep. School. . .Newport, R. I. 

Percy Olds Sales Mgr. Mill Supply Co Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mabel Tinkham Librarian Gary, Ind. 

Mary Esther Walton Mrs Wilkinson Youngstown, Ohio. 

Annie Young Baillie Mrs. Geo. Gillian City. 

Joseph Aldrich Bursley Mechanical Instructor Michigan 

University. Now Student of 

Efficiency Philadelphia. Pa. 

Ralph Emerson Chapin Traveling Salesman St. Louis, Mo. 

Grace Litton Harding Mrs. E. M. Hulse City. 

Janet Agnes Humphrey Teacher Toledo, Ohio. 

Bertha Elizabeth Jackson Mrs. C. W. Lang City. 

Anna Vera Morgan Mrs. Richard Crosby City. 

George Louis Seabold Traveling Salesman Detroit, Mich. 

Frederick Barnett Shoaff, Sal- 
utatorian Attorney City. 

John Jacob Stahl Master Mechanic City. 

John Harrison Sweer Dentist California. 

Nellie May Bolman Mrs. Hughes City. 

Olive May Brooks Mrs. J. P. Martin City. 

Laura Carll Mrs. Noble Graham Illinois. 

Ralph Westfall Dick With Rastetter & Son City. 

Charlotte Catherine Grimes ....Mrs. Percy Bedson. Deceased. 

James Montgomery Hamilton . . Architect Cleveland, Ohio. 

Jane Anna Harper Teacher City. 

iwii'i^fiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiraiiiiPiiiiiiiiiiiiBii iiiiiuiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i minium i iimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiimiiimimiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiiiii i iiiiiiimmmiiimmmiiii 

THTS IS IWCE ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-FOUR 






Ethelyn Blanche Kyle 

Rose Orr 

Bessie Grace Rich 

Frederick Williams Stoler 

Dora Dewella Stover 

Gertrude Estella Weaver . 

Nellie Fortuna You 

Fannie Lowe Zook 



Frank Edwin Davis 

Thomas Johnson Davis . . 

Clair Pearl Foster 

Arthur Anthony Greenick 
Winifred Evelyn Hartman 

Lillias Marion Hays 

Mary Janet Kern 



Lucile Ann Porter 

Harry Lingo Stonecifer 

Rebecca Cornelia Swayne 

Lillie Belle Wilding 

Aurillia Ann Aker 

Maud Alice Gaskins 

Augusta Anna Haberkorn 

Emma Mary Haberkorn 

Donald John Hayden 

Agnes Emily Lansdown 

Georgene Markey 

Frederick Calvin McCracken . . . 

Carrie Isabel Akers 

Hugh Brenton Hatch, Salutator 

ian 

Mabel Althea Hatch 

Grace Agnes Hauck 

Elizabeth Janet Hebert 

Beatrice Kell 

Ada Mary McCormick 

Mary Maude VanTilburg 

Albert Lewis Waters 

Jennie Gibson You 

Henry Shaubert Banks, Yaledic 

torian 



Mrs. O. R. Kelsey City. 

Mrs. Walter Wesley Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Gorden Los Angeles, Cal. 

Farmer 

Mrs. Bert Miller City. 

Mrs. Jacoby Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. Cannon Los Angeles, Cal. 

Deceased 

CLASS OF 1896. 

First Lieut, in U. S. Army Ft. Sheridan, 111. 

With a College California. 

Mrs. F. G. Rahe City. 

Draftsman Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Hormel City. 

Mrs. Chauncey Krotz Toledo. Ohio. 

Mrs. John Chenoweth, wife of 

Chaplain in U. S. A 

Mrs. Dr. B. P. Weaver City. 

Railroad man City. 

Deceased 

Mrs. C. R. Wilson City. 

Mrs. J. C. Kain Buffalo, N. Y. 

Teacher City. 

Teacher City. 

Teacher City. 

Automobile Business Indianapolis. Ind. 

Bookkeeper North Yekimo, Wash. 

City. 

Lumber Dealer Paducah, Ky. 

Former Teacher City. 

Owner of a Grape Fruit Farm. . .Sutherland, Fla. 

Teacher City. 

Milliner City. 

Teacher City. 

Domestic Science Student New York, N. Y. 

Librarian City. 

Milliner City. 

Teacher Wallen, Ind. 

Married Tonapah, Nevada. 



Deceased 



CLASS OF 1897. 

Charles Douglass Barrett Ass't Engineer Motive Power 

Penn. R. R Williamsport, Pa. 

Guy Reed Bell Real Estate City. 

Hugh Worthington Croxton ...Real Estate Chicago. 111. 

Mary Margaret Hanna City. 

Lee Foster Hartman Harper Bros New York, N. Y. 

Marian Johnson Hartman Deceased 

Gertrude Ethel Morris Mrs. Percy Olds Minneapolis, Minn. 

Maude Franklin Sperry Mrs. Paul Turner New York, N. Y. 

James Parke Swayne Farming Manatoba, Canada. 

Grace Tinkham Substitute Teacher City. 

Edward Ralph Yarnelle V. Pres. and Sales Mgr. Ameri- 
can Horse Shoe Co Phillipsburg, N. J. 



I' 
THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-FIVE 








Oscar Russel Brokaw 

Anna Mary Clark 

Nellie Clark 

Walter Henshaw Crim 

Rosa Mary Gardner 

Emma Marie Sauer 

Myrtle Pearl Haines, Salutator 

ian 

Carrie Alva Hauck 

Charles Lansdowne 

Elizabeth Martha Lapp 

Emilie Jane Reese 

Mabel Gertrude Crosby 

Clyde Floyd Driesback 

Phoebe Ellison 

Clarence Elmer Fryer 

Augusta Amelia Hormel 

Bertha Sarah Huestis 

Herbert Wilson Lang 

Thomas Holmes McCormick, 

Valedictorian 



Ethel Pearson 

Nancy Elnora Scott 

Lucretia Powell Seybold 



Cornelius Marcellus Smith 
George Perry McDonald . . 



Julia Christine Lund 

Maude Walker McBride 

Charles Darwin Porter 

Asahel Jay Reed 

Margaret Hamilton Wagenhals. 

Lora Bell Walter 

Gladys Higgins Williams 

Minnie May Arnold, Salutator 

ian 

Philip Everette Bursley 

Wilbur Garfield Carpenter 

Florence Bessie Fitch 

Edwin Briant Fox 

Anna Cordelia Jones 

Adah Anne Keim 

Dorris August Muirhead 

George Henry Pressler 

Lillian Esther Read 

Helen Mae Reitze 

.Mary Bell Seaton 

Leah Olivia Tennant 

Marian Agnes Webb .... 

Katherine Evans 

Gertrude Fissel 

Albert Randolph Parker 



Cooperage City. 

Owner of Poultry Farm Near City. 

Mrs. Hayes Glass City. 

Lumber Business Salem. Ind. 

Colored. Deceased 

Teacher City. 

Teacher. Deceased 

Mrs. E. V. Emerick City. 

With H. L. Leson Advertisers. .Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. O. C. Myers. Deceased . . 

Teacher in Lutheran School ..Cleveland, Ohio. 

Teacher City. 

Commercial Travel?r City. 

Mrs. Warren DuPre Smith Manila, Philippines. 

Deceased 

Mrs. T. J. Kucker City. 

Teacher Seattle, Wash. 

Ft. Wayne Iron Store Co City. 

Prof. of Math. Commercial 

High School New York, N. Y. 

Mrs. Frank Miller City. 

High School Teacher Chambersburgh, Pa. 

Student at Dr. White's Training 

School New York, N. Y. 

Managing Salesman American 

Locomotive Co New York. N. Y. 

Structural Engineer Chicago, 111. 

CLASS OF 189S. 
Mrs. Elmer Hudson. Deceased. 
Teacher Central High School. . .Detroit, Mich. 
Mech. Engineer. Penu. R. R. ...Altoona. Pa. 

Lawyer Kansas City, Kan. 

Manuscript and Proof Reader, 
with Street & Smith, Pubs. . . New York, N. Y. 

Teacher City. 

Teacher City. 



Mrs. A. Powell 

Prof, at Michigan University .. 

Lawyer 

Mrs. Fred Kell 

With Peter Voght Mfg. Co 

Mrs. Fred Sutton 

Mrs. Ed. Albrecht. Deceased . . 
With White Pass & Yukon R. R 

Linotype Operator 

Mrs. Charles Printz 

Mrs. Benj. F. Heaton 

Teacher 

Mrs. W. E. Stout 

Children's Librarian 

Mrs. Robert Gillis 

Teacher 

Supt. of Schools 



Menossen, Pa. 

Ann Arbor. Mich. 

City. 

Huntertown, Ind. 

Buffalo. N. Y. 

Cashmere, Wash. 

Wooster. Ohio. 

Seattle, Wash. 

City. 

Chicago, 

City. 

City. 

Chicago, 

City. 

Hammond, 

City. 

Monroeville. Ind. 



111. 



111. 



Ind. 



' !! I! 
THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-SIX 



Elsie May Sheridan 

Anna Bailey Sinclair 

Louise Margaret Wolf, Valedic- 
torian 



Mabel Alice Durnell 
Lilian Eliel Lauferty 

Agnes Murdock 

Mary Emma Steelier 
Nannie Ann Williams . . . 
Mary Elizabeth Anderson 
Benjamin Rector Bell . . . 
Douglas Burns Douglass . 

Mary Elinor Hauck 

Leora May Kanaga 

Anna Charlotte Matsch . 
Lilian Mary Orthman 

Bertha May Phelps 

Margaret Louise Raser . . 
Sidney Lee Schwartz 
Augusta Feme Sewell . . . 
Maud May Sponhauer . . . 
Charles Bertrand Taylor 

Nina Valley Astry 

Nina Ernestine Graham . 
Walter Wells Griffiths . . . 



Mrs. 1. G. Stafford Loveland, Cal. 

Teacher City. 

German Teacher City. 

CLASS OF 1899. 

Mrs. Mabel Bradley Detroit, Mich. 

Magazine Writer Brookline, Mass. 

High School Teacher Portland. Ore. 

City. 

Mrs. Ralph Pidgeon Los Angeles, Cal. 



John Hill Johnson 

Ida Sarah Koons, Salutatorian. . 

Glo. Delia Millier 

Henry Edwin Orr 

Martha Julia Sauer. Valedictor 

ian 

May Julia Warner 

Bertha Christine Wiebke 

Murray Allen Dalman, Saluta 
torian 

Martha Hazel Staub 

Katherine Hamilton Wagenhals 
Valedictorian 

Edith Mae Zook 

Carina Carpenter Binning 

Walter Aldrich Barrett 

Charles Griffin Beall 

Grace Pickard Benoy 

Morning Ethel Blystone 

Mary Elizabeth Brimmer 

Harry Clark 

Penelope May Clements 

Harry Henry Hilgeman 

Walter Abbott Jones 

Bessie Lucile Jones 

Milton Guy Longacre 

Agnes Frances Miller 

Ralph V. Murray 

Myra Pellens 



. Real Estate City. 

. Lawyer City. 

. Mrs. J. Imberry Seattle, Wash. 

. Stenographer City. 

. Mrs. David McComb City. 

. Teacher City. 

. Mrs. Howard Monroe City. 

.Mrs. Edward D. Moore St. Louis, Mo. 

. Pres. Wholesale Paper Co. ... Chicago, 111. 

. Mrs. John Ladig City. 

. Mining Engineer Santa Cruz, Cal. 

.Mrs. William Brown. Deceased. 

. Bookkeeper City. 

.Mechanical Engineer Ft. Wayne 

Electric Works City. 

.Clerk American Ex. Co Indianapolis, Ind. 

. Teacher City. 

. Mrs. E. J. Rieke City. 

Physicians' Insurance Sherman, Texas. 

Mrs. Ernest Zucker Lockport, 111. 

Mrs. Peter Goda City. 

Mrs. Bruce Havens Harrisburg, Pa. 

CLASS OF 1900. 

Principal High School Greencastle, hid. 

College Teacher Marion. Ind. 



Artist City. 

Mrs. F. A. Taylor Cumberland, Md. 

Mrs. W'm. Warrington City. 

Traveling Salesman Bass Co. ..City. 

Physician City. 

Teacher City. 

Stenographer City. 

Teacher City. 

With Penn. R. R. Co Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mrs. Peter Epple City. 

Prosecuting Attorney City. 

Roundhouse Foreman P. R. R. .Rochester, Pa. 

Mrs. Charles Thayer Charlotte. N. C. 

Civil Engineer Cleveland, Ohio. 

Stenographer Detroit, Mich. 

Physician Zanesville, Ind. 

Domestic Science Teacher ....Tennessee. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiniiNiiiiiiiiiiHiiiii ii liimiiiiiiii i i iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i i i i i i i i i mini mini m 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SEYEXTY-SEVEN 



Ill 



Ethel Babe Savior Mrs. William Ferguson Des Moin 

Mark Franklin Shoemaker ....Accountant Ft. W. Iron Store.. City. 

Blanche Tinkham Kindergartener Chicago, 

Nellie Louise Von Volkenburg. . Mrs. Maurice Browne. Proprie 
tress and Actress "Little 
Theatre" Chicago, 111. 

Carl Herbert Upmeyer Chicago Tribune Chicago, 111. 

Hazel Harper Whitaker Chicago Tribune Chicago, III. 

Myrtle Sleeper Wilding Mrs. Charles G. Beall City. 

George Frederick Dick Physician and Medical Writer. . Chicago, 111. 

Lola May Eckles Teacher City. 

Frederick Theodore Huston . . . Ass't Master Mechanic P. R. R. .Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Albert John Krueper Supt. Money Order Dept. P. O.. .City. 

Blanche Liggett Teacher Kansas City, Mo. 

Orpha Robinson Mrs. Bert Woods Gill, Col. 

Clara Lee Shepard Postmistress Gary, Ind. 



CLASS OF 1901. 



Clara Phelps Porter 

Almana Beebe, Valedictorian... 

Franklin J. Brown 

Georgia Lura Fee 

John Henry Gaetge 

George Washington Hand 

Ella Gustine McCullough 

Dudley Ellis Murray 

Jessie Lloyd Parker 

Hazel Blanche Pearse 

Howard Harvey Pierce 

Hugh Monroe Smaltz 

Mary Wilder Stockbridge 

Charles Gregg Alderman 

Elmira Jessica Baldwin, Saluta 

torian 

Eva Leah Buck 

Ada Reifel Burdett 

Susie Lurah Geake 

Guy Walter Hamilton 

Ada Louise Higgins 

Oliver Paul Hopkins 

Bessie Mildred Myers 

Guy Addison Smith 

Mabelle Catherine Tennant .... 
Eleanor Jean Benoy 



Louise Bond 

Frederick William Burger 

Thomas Buckman Coppock 
Laurinda May DeVilbiss . . . 

Alice May Fitch 

Frederick Simminger 

Henry Clark Wehnert 



Erma Dochterman 

Elizabeth Morris Evans 



Mrs. Wm. Page Yarnelle City. 

Latin Teacher, High School ... City. 

Real Estate City. 

Mrs. S. Rohrer Los Vegas, N. M. 

Electrical Engineer Chicago, 111. 

Farmer 

Artist Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Physician Huntertown, Ind. 

English Teacher. High School. City. 

Deceased City. 

Ticket Office Penn. R. R City. 

Mgr. Boss Glove and Mitten Co. Marion, Ind. 

Mrs. R. O. Grosjean City. 

Physician. Deceased 

Mrs. Erickson Southern Indiana. 

Deceased 

Substitute Teacher City. 

Mrs. S. P. Hirsch City. 

Locomotive Insp., Penn. R. R.. City. 

Mrs. Edwin Allfree Chicago, 111. 

Editor Bureau of Foreign and 

Domestic Commerce Washington, D. C. 

Teacher Country. 

Physician Kansas City. Kan. 

Mrs. Ray Adams New York, N. Y. 

Wife of Sr. Lieut. lames Wil- 
son, U. S. N 

Mrs. Littleton Tough City. 

Mechanical Engineer Wayne 
Auto Co City. 

Lumber Business City. 

Domestic Science Teacher City. 

Mrs. Geo. Overmeyer Tacoma, Wash. 

Packard Piano Co City. 

( 'ivil Engineer St. Louis, Mo. 

CLASS OF 1902. 

Teacher City. 

Mrs. John Hoffman City. 



IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-EI' HIT 



Alice Harrison Foster, Saluta- 
torian Mrs. Fred 11. McCullough City. 

Arthur Wayne Perry Attorney City. 

.Marion Baker Mrs. O. Rheinhardt City. 

Elizabeth Connor City. 

Georgia Louise Davis Mrs. Will Tompson City. 

Anna Biddle Mrs. Warren Shearer Washington, D. C. 

Mae Marguerite Eiter Mrs. P. Barr Bluffton, Ind. 

Edith Josephine Foster Studying Music in Germany.... 

Roy Oscar Grosjean Manual Training Teacher in the 

High School City. 

Zona Hopkins City. 

Agnes Thompson Littlejohn . . . Mrs. Bright City. 

Pearl Edna Bond Mrs. Wallace City. 

Robert Maximilian Fuestel ....Chief Engineer of Public Util 

ities for State of Illinois ....Springfield. 111. 

Robert Newell Kinnaird Supt. of City Water Works . . . . Des Moines, Iowa. 

Bernadette Monahan Teacher City. 

Maud Murray Mrs. Arthur Twining City. 

Clara Eaton Owen Mrs. C. W. Stoup Midland, Pa. 

Alathea Stockbridge Teacher City. 

Herbert Hamilton Wagenhals ..Sanitary Engineer for City of .. .Cleveland, Ohio. 

William Page Yarnelle Mossman & Yarnelle City. 

Mera Helen Fox Teacher City. 

Albert Herman Schaaf, Valedic- 
torian Real Estate City. 

Jessie Loretta Tuckey Mrs. Whittern Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Georgia Mae Warner Mrs. J. P. Goda City. 

Martha Grace Smith Librarian Chicago. 111. 

Royden P. Tigar With a Railroad Chicago, 111. 

George Theodore Thorward .... With Telephone Co South Bend. Ind. 

Arthur Glenn Sawyer Commercial Traveler 

William C. Schaden Saloon Business City. 

Arthur Chester Twining Chief Clerk to Train Master, 

Penn. R. R City. 

Favor Bowen Vreeland Mrs. Schiefer Los Angeles, Cal. 

Emma Clara Warner Teacher City. 

CLASS OF 1903. 

Mabel Martha Coverdale Mrs. B. Coppock City. 

Charles Clyde Peltz Traveling Salesman City. 

Samuel Edgar Fleming Minister Colorado. 

Joseph Douglass Gage Bookkeeper City. 

Clara Catherine Schmidt Teacher City. 

Dwight Hale Ashley Farmer 

Jessamine Bailey. Salutatorian . Mrs. R. D. Mock Oak Park, 111. 

Elinor Bond Mrs. Edmund H. Miller City. 

Mary Jeanette Brown Mrs. Robert Kell Huntertown, Ind. 

Harry William Ginty Attorney Chicago, III. 

Desdemona Phoebe Hale Teacher City. 

Mabel Dell Hall Mrs. Harry Gill City. 

Stella Louise Helmer Mrs. Roger Frisby Chicago. III. 

Lillian Julia Joost Mrs. A. Hang Rockford, 111. 

Edna Anna Kern Stenographer City. 

Carrie Elsie Shoup Zanesville, Ind. 

Willard Milfred Thomas Citizens' Trust Co City. 

Elizabeth Hughes Williams . . . .Mrs. L. Elliott Syracuse, N. Y. 

Francis Hoffman Williams ....With Daily News City. 

iiiiqiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy 

THIS IS TAGE ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-NINE 





Hilda Lane 

Edward French Lukens . . 
Cora Elizabeth McAfee . . 
Grace Vivian McAllister . . 
Harry Benton McCorraick 



.Mrs. J. H. Breidenstein 

. Attorney 

.Mrs. Clayton Johnson . 



. City. 

.New York, N. 

.City. 



Ruth Read Randall 

Emma Scheumann 

Helen Burd Staub 

Maud Irene Whieleather 

Frederick Wm. Fremont Zent. . 
Gearry Lloyd Knight, Valedic 

torian 

Florida Jeanette Banning 

Frank Edward Bonn 

Grace Aurelia Fitch 

Francesca Marie Green 

Dorothy Alice Kell 

Albert Lansdown 

Gertrude Amanda Zook 

Mildred Muirhead 

Mary Katherine Muller 

Blanche Gertrude Rauch 

Homer Burlington Shoup 

Adele Pauline Sauer 

George Leon Sharp 

Edith Elfrieda Vogley 



Gertrude Eliza Buzzard, Vale 

dictorian 

Edward Clarence Olds 

Leora Electa Fink 

Maud May Gaskill 

Howard Hurford VanSweringen 

Grace C. Irwin 

Bessie Hazen Keeran 

Jessie Terza Parry 

Louise Pellens 



Former Missionary in China. 
Now with Church of Christ. . 

Teacher 

jerman Teacher 

Mrs. Hugh Dare 

Mrs. Harper 

Insurance Business 



Merchant 

Mrs. Charles Hart. Teacher 
Mgr. of Home Telephone Co. 

Mrs. Geo. DeBuchanne 

Mrs. A. W. Ford 

Mrs. Rundel. Teacher 

With Eckart Packing Co. . . . 
Teacher 



Teacher 

Mrs. Jessie Rayl 

Physician 

Teacher 

Clerk at Bass Foundry 
Mrs. W. C. England . . . 



.New York, N. Y. 
. City. 
. City. 

.Marion. Ind. 
.Cleveland, Ohio. 
. Denver, Col. 

.Zanesville. Ohio. 

• City. 
.City. 

.Bonne Terre, Mo. 

. Watertown, N. Y. 

.Philippines. 

. City. 

. City. 

.Suokane, Wash. 

.City. 

.City. 

.Grand Junction, Col. 

.City. 

• City. 
.Toledo, Ohio. 



Blanche Blackburn 

herald William Bohn 
Julia Florence Davis 
Edwin Bowser DeVilbiss 



Charles Chester Durnell 

Esther Gertrude Griffiths 

Mabel Ethel Bechtol 

Miles Fuller Porter, Jr., Saluta 

torian 

Francis Bonner Sale 

Frank M. Schaden 

James Ewing Smith 

Meldon Swift 

Minnie Ethel Valentine 

Nina Ethel Welch 



CLASS OF 1904. 

Teacher in a High School New York, N. Y. 

With W. W. Halsey & Co New York, N. Y, 

Teacher City. 

With a Piano Co Chicago. 111. 

Teacher City. 

Teacher City. 

Teacher City. 

Teacher of Mechanical Draw- 
ing in High School Rockford, 111. 

Teacher. Deceased 

Mgr. of a Fruit Ranch Hermiston. Ore. 

Teacher Tacoma, Wash. 

Electric Engineer with Penn. 
Co City. 

R. R. Engineer, Penn. R. R City. 

Mrs. R. M. Feustel Springfield. 111. 

Teacher City. 

Physician City. 

Mining Engineer Montana. 

Deceased 

With Steel Mills Gary. Ind. 

With International Harvester 

Co 

Mrs. Wilkinson City. 

Mrs. M. W. Bartmers Pittsburg, Pa. 



THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY 



Charlotte Magdalene llaberkorn. Designer for the Murtrle Art 

Glass Co Denver, Col. 

Gertrude May Melsheimer ....Mrs. Robt. Shuman City. 

Charles Rastetter Real Estate Business City. 

Margaret Anna Swayne Teacher Ubuquerque, N. M. 

Florence Edith Warner Stenographer City. 

CLASS OP 1905. 

l.ois Edith Field Mrs. Chatworthy Red lands, Cal. 

Emma Emilie Kiefer. Valedic- 
torian German Teacher City. 

Amy Rowena Baldwin Mrs. M. Constantine New Jersey. 

Roscoe Larcome Heaton With Bowser Oil Tank Co City. 

Margaret Marion Johnson Mrs. Winthrope Lane New York, N. Y. 

Agnes McKay Mrs. Edwin DeVilbiss City. 

Stephen Morris, Jr 

Edith Belle Buskirk Mrs. George Seabold City. 

Harold Alexander Baxter Metallurgist, Midvale Steel 

Works Germantown, Pa. 

Harry August Beerman Assistant Supt., Rolling Mills.. City. 

Lillian Katherine Poster Teacher City. 

Alice Mary Garrity Teacher City. 

Charles Emerson Pask Advertising Dept. Daily News.. City. 

Donna Marie Saylor Mrs. Mariott Price City. 

Clara Mae Scott Mrs. John Barnes Ashton, Mich. 

Maurice Seelberg The Seelberg Store City. 

Winthrop David Lane On the Editorial Staff, Survey.. New York, N. Y. 

Florian Dwight Myers Selling Rauch & Lang Electric 

Cars Nashville, Tenn. 

Harry C. Schlatter Chemist, Aluminum Plate Co. . .Niagara Palls, N. Y. 

Wilbur Ferdinand Sheridan ....Commission Business Missoula, Mont. 

William Henry Tschannen Attorney City. 

Juanita Jetter Heyman Teacher City. 

Bessie Ethel Jackson Teacher City. 

Grace Minnie McMillen Teacher City. 

Mary Ann Mertz, Salutatorian . . Formerly Stenographer City. 

Corrinne Helen Strass Teacher, Piano City. 

Mary Mabel Vogely Librarian City. 

Marie Louise Zuecker German Teacher City. 

The First Clrsj to Graudate grom the Barr Street High School. 
CLASS OF 1906. 

Ruth Elizabeth Beers Mrs. Wm. McKay City. 

Helen Rowan Harper. Valedic- 
torian City. 

Harris Vincent Hartman, Salu- 
tatorian Architect New York City, N. Y. 

Whiting Alden Forester, with Canadian Pa. Ry. Calgary, Alberta, Can. 

Ralph Thomas Ashley Insurance South. 

Ruth Bailey Mrs. Everett Sherwood Oak Park. 111. 

Agnes Marjorie Beaber Mrs. E. E. Fisher St. Louis, Mo. 

William Edward Butt Teacher of Economies, Ken- 
tucky State University Kentucky. 

Myrtle Helen Carter City. 

Brown Cooper Agent N. Y. Life Insurance Co . . City. 

Charles Perry Cooper Traveling Salesman City. 

Herbert Pierce Coverdale With Coppock Lumber Co Indianapolis, Ind. 

Anna Rhea Fleming Domestic Science Teacher, Mad- 
ison University Wisconsin. 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Illllllllllllllllll!llllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllll!l!llllllllllllllll!llllll!lll«lllllllllllllllllllllllllll»iy 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND EI 



Esther Merica Fleming Law Librarian City. 

Anna Marie Heyman Teacher City. 

Lucile Penn House Kindergarten Teacher City. 

Pearl Karn Mrs. Finkenburg Baltimore, Md. 

Martha Christine Kettler Mrs. C. D. Campbelle Kobe, Japan. 

Otto Edward Fuelber Attorney City. 

Theresa May Lancaster Insurance City. 

Celia Foley Studying Design in Art In Chicago, 111. 

Anna M. Gallmeier Mrs. E. Luecke Cornelius, Ore. 

Mabel Kathaleen Holland Teacher City. 

Leonard Stowe House Mt'gs. Agent City. 

Angus Cameron McCoy Public Accountant City. 

Edmund Creighton Hamilton. .. Interior Decorator, Colby & Son. Chicago, 111. 

Rachel Ruth Ridenour Mrs. Carl Tumbleson City. 

Clara Jeannette Thieme Mrs. T. S. Cook Whiting, Ind. 

Millie Thompson Teacher City. 

Carl Clarence Kiess Prof, of Astronomy at State 

University Missouri. 

Harry Carl M'lvor Purchasing Agt. for Purdue Uni- 
versity Lafayette, Ind 

Laurel Mariotte Mrs. Leonard House City. 

Hiram Kelly Moderwell Paris Correspondent for the 

Boston Transcript. Published 

a book on "Dramatic Criticism Paris, France. 

Jeannette Morris Mrs. Lyle Tucker City. 

Jessie Hill Orr Mrs. Herbert Wagenhalls Cleveland, Ohio. 

James Pomeroy Porter With Fox-Shryock Auto. Co. ...City. 

Harry Reithmiller Grocery City. 

Grayston Holm Ruhl Farmer City. 

Mabel Margarete Sites City. 

Edith A. Swank Student at Champaigne Illinois. 

Alice Jane Walter Nurse Chicago, 111. 

Grace Porter Wilding Mrs. B. B. Hodgman East Orange, N. J. 

Vera LePerle Williamson Teacher City. 

Alice Worden Mrs. Gex Condit Gary, Ind. 

Willard Ashley Stockbridge .... Motive Power Dept. Penn. Ry. . City. 

Rhoda Ninde Swayne Mrs. J. Gentry Albuquerque, N. M. 

Robert John Martz Chemist, Electric Works City. 

Ina May Maxwell Teacher City. 

Julia Edith Monahan City. 

Gertrude Warner Stenographer City. 

Ignota Belle White City. 

Millie Dorothy Winkelmeyer . . . Teacher — Deceased City. 

David McKay Elec. Dept. Illinois Steel Wks. .Chicago. 111. 

CLASS OF 1907. 

Clara Buck Teacher City. 

Oscar Bitler Experiment Station, Purdue 

University Lafayette, Ind. 

Paul Baade 2nd Lieut. U. S. A 

Emma Matsch Teacher City. 

Carl L. Schroeder Daily News City. 

Veta Sterling Affleck Teacher City. 

Dorothy Alden, Valedictorian .. .Private Sec'y Peninsular Bank. . Detroit, Mich. 

Bernice Gertrude Baldwin Married California. 

Harry Joseph Krueper Civil Engineer, Penn. Co City. 

Sadie Ann Leach Stenographer City. 

■■ » i mii mm mm milium i i i i i mini i i i i i niiiiiiiiiiiiiini i nimnnm mm 

THIS IS PACK ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-TWO 




— 



fMek 



Irene Bond Malloy Milliner City. 

David Reuben Benninghoff .... Physician City. 

Howard Larimer Colmey Merchant City. 

Louis Frederick Crosby Attorney City. 

Mary Caroline Doty Mrs. Whiting Alden Glengary, Can. 

Edna D. Eby On a Land Claim Dakota. 

Mabel Deane Erwin Teacher Jefferson Villi-, [ml. 

Florence May Foster. Salutator- 

ian Mrs. Harvey Hall City. 

Benita Alice Fox Bookkeeper City. 

Otto Gumpper Southern Railway Birmingham, Ala. 

Walter Hitzeman With Electrical Co City. 

Adolph Karl Hofer Surveyor City. 

Mabel Margaret Hull Mrs. Alexander Baxter Germantown, Pa. 

Lesta Ellen Denis Clerk City. 

Ella Geake Geake Kindergarten City. 

Nellie Blanche Havens Teacher Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rhena Hazel Miller Teacher City. 

Mary Edith Denis Mrs. Smitley City. 

Thomas James Kelly .Engineer Gas Company City. 

John Roddick McKay Civil Engineer Traction Co City. 

Louise Naylor Nurse, St. Luke's Hospital ....San Francisco, Cal. 

Esther Pearl Nelson Teacher City. 

May Ransom Randall Mrs. Austin Melcher Detroit, Mich 

Amy Belle Rothschild Mrs. Elmer Rauh Columbus, Ohio. 

Cammie Nadine Shonts 

Venette Marie Sites Teacher of Mathematics, High 

School Bay City, Mich. 

Abbie Pearl Smith Mrs. Schookman Urbana. Ind. 

Steece Sponhauer Ft. Wayne Electric Works .... City. 

Elsie Leota Tapp Mrs. John Straw-bridge City. 

Emerson C. Woolf Methodist Minister Berlin Center, Ohio. 

Emma May Shoup Student of Domestic Science, 

Purdue Lafayette, Ind. 

Mabel Irene Sledd City. 

John Albert Wass Bowser Oil Tank Co Canada. 

Ethel Barbara Scully Student of Physical Culture ...Milwaukee. Wis. 

Moses Zweig Translator for Sears & Roebuck. Chicago, III. 

William McKay G. E. Bursley & Co City. 

CLASS OF 1908. 

Mabel Cooper Bookkeeper City. 

Marie Christine Ehle Teacher City. 

Eben Elwood Lane Real Estate Business Phoenix, Ariz. 

Maurice Rosenthal Lohman .... Michigan University 

Carrie Blanche Swank Teacher Thelma, Texas. 

Budd Eakin VanSweringen ....Automobile Salesman Phoenix, Ariz. 

Edith Johanna Steelier Teacher City. 

Helen Margaret Blackburn . . . .Teacher City. 

Clare Ellen wood Teacher of County School City. 

Verma Cornelia Hinton City. 

Harvey Pratt Ingham Insurance Business City. 

Bertha Valerie Leach Teacher, High School Leo. Ind. 

Viola Edna Warner Stenographer City 

Carolyn Elizabeth Weller City. 

Edna Belle Beaver Mrs. Leander Stratton Gary, Ind. 

Anna Myrtle Glass Mrs. Lloyd Hulbert Colton, Cal. 

Frieda Caroline Kampe Teacher City. 

giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i hi huh in iiiiiniiiiii huh Miiiiiimmiiimiimiiimiiiiiiiimiimiiiminmiiimiiiimmiiimiiiiiiiii imiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiii 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTV-THREE 



Pansy Marie Knoll Teacher Los Angeles, Cal. 

Robert Porter Lane Teacher of English in Michigan 

University Michigan. 

Herbert Henry Meyer Tri-State Loan & Trust Co ... City. 

Lois Estelle Puddy Teacher City. 

Lela Florence Rich Latin Teacher in High School. . Columbia City, Ind. 

Laura Elizabeth Ross Teacher City. 

Dora Lydia Ruf Mrs. Wade Miller Fostoria, Ohio. 

Frieda Zulia Scheiman City. 

Clara Jane Sheridan Teacher New Haven, Ind. 

Bartlett Ward Shryock Shryock Motor Co City. 

David Studabaker Vesey Attorney City. 

{Catherine Eileen Bauer Mrs. Huress City. 

Lulu Bechtol Bookkeeper City. 

Clara Lenor Bendure Mrs. W. T. Pfeiffer Sandusky, Ohio. 

Lillian May Bitler City. 

Irene Comparet Teacher City. 

Josephine Livicia Eckles Mrs. H. D. Tumbleson City. 

Florence Heit Teacher in High School . . . . New Haven, Ind. 

Florence Aurora Klinkenberg City. 

Fern Dinsmore Kyle China Painter and Teacher .... City. 

Elsie May Mehl Mrs. Frank Wallace Portland, Ore. 

Flossie Viola Regenauer Deceased 

Helen Elizabeth Weaver Teacher City. 

Magdelena Verena Welty Art Institute Chicago. 111. 

Olga Katherine Weseman Mrs. Phillip Fiess Rockham. So. Dakota. 

Mildred Hamilton Wagenhals . . University of Wisconsin Madison, Wis. 

George William Fishering Insurance Business City. 

Zama Victoria Harris City. 

Edward Elmer Springer Grocery Business City. 

Marshall Wines Worden Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. 

Nelson Craig Dairy Business City. 

CLASS OF 1909. 

Edna Marie DeVilbiss Mrs. Elmer Springer City. 

Lillie Kammeyer Mrs. Clarence Quick Highmore, S. D. 

Bertha Lawrence Mrs. Otis Knowlton Huntertown, Ind. 

Irma Shordon Student of Liberal Arts at Indi- 
ana University Bloomington. Ind. 

Raymond William Ashley Purdue University Lafayette. 

Ralph Lenig De Pauw University Greencastle, Ind. 

Annie Laurie Graham Student of Journalism City. 

Charlotte Schick Mrs. Magna Certia City. 

Ralph Thieme Salesman Knitting Mills City. 

Katherine Lenora Hartle Teacher City. 

Delia Josephine McMaken Teacher City. 

Anna Elizabeth Birth Mrs. Henry Meyer City. 

Adeline Charlotte Becker Teacher City. 

Ruth Bicknell Smith College City. 

Helen Jane Colerick Society Editress, Daily News City. 

Bessie Beatrice DeVilbiss Teacher City. 

Bertha Rose Israel Stenographer Reading, Pa. 

Marguerite Ingham Milton College Wisconisin. 

Ethel Mariotte City. 

David Sidney Oakes Civil Engineer, Wabash R. R. . . Peru, Ind. 

Helena Puckett Stenographer City. 

Paula Catherine Reese Mrs. W. Edwards Chicago, 111. 

Gwendolyn Cole Saylor Mrs. Abbott Carter City. 



II' IIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I' II Illlllllllll Illl 

THIS IS PACK ONE Hl'XDRED AND EIGHTY-FOUR 





, f- 


I H v" -■ 



Clara Lydia Schaaf, Valedictor 
Ian 



John Francis Schwieters . . 

Charlotte Berry Sites 

Howard Clifton Smith 

Dorothy Ida Underhill 

Belle Black Wilson 

.Miriam Alice Pearl Young 
Helen Margaret Anstrup . . 
James Ewing Bond 



Herman and Latin Teacher 

High School 

Law Senior, Harvard 

Michigan University 

Indiana University 

Ass't Art Instructor High Sch. 
Mrs. Ray Howden 



. I, os Vatos, Cal. 
. Boston. Mass. 
. Michigan. 

■ City. 

Belfast, N. v. 
. Muncie, lnd. 
City. 



Fred Arthur Compton 



Robert Felix Schanz 

Catherine Irene Beman 
Katherine Marie Kerby 

Royal Perry Scully 

Edith Dora Squires 

Esther Beamer 

Bertha Magdalene Buck 

Mabel Ellenwood 

Esther Ruth Erickson 

Edith Caroline Heit 

Irma Ruth Henderson 

Laura Marie Houck 

Reba Marshall Jackson 
Marguerite Payne Langford 
Zella Marguerite Maxwell . 
Luretta May Rhodes 



.Clerk, Wabash R. R 

.Michigan University. Athlete 
World's record, 220 yd. dash — 
20-5 (semi-official) Michigan. 

.Architectural Engineer, Michi 
gan LTniversity 

. Michigan University 

.Teacher 



. On a Peach Ranch 

.Teacher 

.Stenographer 

. Stenographer 



. Kindergarten Teacher 
.Domestic Science Student 



, Mrs. Herbert Ehrman 



Gladys Otie Ringwalt 

Lola Dot Rohrbaugh 

Alice Catherine Stouder 

Erna Hulda Tapp 

Francis Caroline Willey, Sala- 

tatorian 

Josephine Marguerite Ashley . . 

Harry Charles Krimmel 

Samuel Arthur Swayne 

Raymond Calvin Close 

Robert Francis Henry Hohman. 

Albert Henry Koons 

Frank Raymond McMaken 

Ralph Frederick Markey 

George Henry Stouder 



Ruth Agnes Caldwell . . 

Alice L. Fisher 

Gertrude Iba 

Helen Frances Morris . 

Lydia Irene Nold 

Preston Everit Ake 
Corinne Louise Baade . 
Esther Luella Baldwin . 
Royall Henry Bandalier 



Mrs. Arthur 

Ass't Domestic Science Teache, 

High School 

Mrs. Myron Crawford 

Stenographer 

Teacher 



City. 

City. 

Washington. 

«'ity. 

Denver, Col. 

City. 

City. 

City. 

Jacksonville, II 

City. 

City. 

City. 

City. 

City. 

City. 
City. 
City. 
City. 
City 



Mrs. Ford Beebe Los Angeles, Cal. 

Bookkeeper City. 

With Mossman & Yarnelle ....City. 

Medical Student. DePauw Indiana. 

Purdue University Lafayette. Ind. 

Carnegie Institute Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Baggageman, Penn. R. R City. 

Signal Dept. Penn. Co City. 

Drafting Dept. Penn. Co City. 

Chemist. Electric Works City. 

CLASS OF 1910. 
Piano Accompanist, City Schs..City. 

Stenographer City. 

City. 

Mrs. Bernard Jones Richmond, Va. 

Taking Voice Culture Richmond Hill., I 

Salesman City. 

Teacher City. 

Stenographer Los Angeles, Cal. 

Medical Student Indiana Uni. ..Indiana. 





THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIVE 




m 



r^:. 



^ 



Nora Ethel Barbour Kindergarten Teacher City. 

Carrie Justine Berhman County Teacher Indiana. 

Nell Grace Bleekman Mrs. H. B. Hull Brookville, Ohio. 

Gertrude Louise Bohne Teacher City. 

Jay Murray Brown Deputy County Auditor City. 

Harry Baldwin Calpha Laurel, Ind. 

Eva Iona Connett County Teacher 

Agnes Cecelia Beatrice Diebold.Mrs. Wheelock Near City. 

Helen Doswell City. 

John Hyndman Craig Post Office City. 

Louis Heber Dunton Law Student, Michigan Uni. ...Michigan. 

Albert Christian Jacob Elett Clerk, Knitting Mills -.City. 

Walter Jenkinson Fishering ...Traveling Salesman City. 

Solly Katzenberg Frankenstein. Law Senior, Northwestern Uni. .Chicago, 111. 

Olive Gaunt Smith College Massachusetts. 

Cecelia Goldberger Mrs. Ed Bolson Braddock, Pa. 

Alfred Waldemar Gross With McCray Refrigerator Co. .. Keudallville, Ind. 

Amelia Metha Hofer Mrs. J. Brown City. 

Elsie Hyacinth Hoopingarner. . .County Teacher 

Gwladys Hughes Designer Domestic Science Dept. 

Pratt Institute New York City, X Y. 

George Joseph Jordan Purdue Lafayette, Ind. 

Alma Irene Kariger County Teacher 

Helen Anna Lane Miami University Oxford, Ohio. 

Clarence Francis Lomont Purdue Lafayette, Ind. 

Leah Helen Marth Stenographer City. 

Nellie Gertrude Maxwell Bookkeeper City. 

Dudley Stockton McClure Michigan University Michigan. 

James Marshall McKay Wabash College Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Jane Ellenor McKay County Teacher 

Evelyn Louise Meyer Student at Art Institute Chicago, 111. 

Lola Curtis Miller Teacher City. 

William McKee Moffat LaFayette College Easton, Pa. 

Albert Byran Muller City. 

Edward George Nagel County Teacher 

Cecelia Grace Parker Mrs. S. Surfus Huntertown, Ind. 

Irma Lucile Poole Kindergarter Teacher City. 

Elizabeth Lane Porter, Valedic- 
torian City. 

Charles Edgar Pratt Farming Near City. 

Mary Aylene Randall Librarian City. 

Georgia Irene Saylor Art Teacher Miami University. . 

Alma Belle Sharp Assistant Librarian City. 

Margaret Miller Shulze Assistant Librarian City. 

Desdelora Stevens Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Margery Study City. 

Ethel May Tompkins City. 

Larene Isabel Travers Teacher City. 

Byron Burns Turflinger Farming 

Margaret Turner Underhill .... Miami University Ohio. 

Annette Elizabeth Vonderau . . .Typewriter City. 

Trafford MacCrea Wilson Schrader & Wilson City. 

Georgia Mildred Wirth, Saluta- 

torian Clerk City. 

Roscoe Herald Zook Student of Architecture, Armour 

Institute Chicago, III. 

IIHIIIMIIIIUniillliniltHlinUlllllUlllinilllUninillllllllltllilllliHIIIItllllHIIII Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll! III! Illllllllllllll!lllllllll»!ll!!llllllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllll| I I1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-SIX 



CLASS OF 1911. 

Ethel Laura Allegeier County Teacher City. 

Helen May Caldwell Kindergarten Student, Pratt In- 
stitute New York City. N. V. 

(irace Ella Christensen Teacher City. 

Edward Frederick Chas. Eicks . Bookkeeper City. 

Victor Ward Fitch Clerk, Penn. Co ('it v. 

Florenz Frederick Gumper Civil Engineer Student, Purdue . Lafayette, I n<l. 

Miles Clifford Hoopingarner . . . Grocery City. 

Arthur Paul Irmscher Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. 

Esther Marguerite Jacobs Teacher City. 

Homer Andrew Mertz Bookkeeper City. 

Donald Hunter O'Rourke Student of Medicine, Michigan 

University Michigan. 

Edward Henry Wm. Schlegel. .. Medical Student, .Michigan Uni- 
versity Michigan. 

Jacob Howard Wilkins Meat Market City. 

Verl Arthur Wise Butler College Indianapolis, Ind 

Alice Estella Albro Teacher New Haven, Ind. 

Kenneth David Ashley County Teacher City. 

Elmer J. Bandelier Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. 

Marguerite Elizabeth Bicknell. .Smith College Massachusetts. 

Elmer Henry William Braun...Beer Inspector, Berghoff Brew- 
ery City. 

Amy May Brown County Teacher City. 

Stephen Emmett Burns Notre Dame South Bend, Ind. 

Norma Katherine Byrer Clerical Work City. 

Helen Clark Teacher City. 

Anna Belle Cook County Teacher City. 

Altha May Doswell Domestic Science Student Angola, Ind. 

Elmer Elzer Eggeman Student of Elec. Engineering 

Purdue Lafayette, Ind. 

Eva Grace Feltz Domestic Science Student Angola, Ind. 

Esther Helen Freeze Kindergarten Student Ypsilanti, Mich. 

Mergel Addison Giles Candy Business City. 

Elmer Schomp Goheen County Teacher City. 

Raymond Leonard Goheen .... Bookkeeper City. 

Myrtle Martina Graeter Mathematics Teacher — H. S. . . .New Haven, Ind. 

Clara Bell Gross Mrs. C. F. Wertz Logansport, Ind. 

Mabel Grubb City. 

Theodore Elmer Haberkorn ....Student of Elec. Engineering. 

Purdue Lafayette. Ind. 

Odber Raymond Hartt Law Student Valparaiso, Ind. 

Eugene Harrison Hattersley ..Studying Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, Purdue Lafayette, nld. 

John Foster Houck County Teacher City. 

Lucy Agnes Jacquay. Salutator- 

ian County Teacher City. 

Donald Hatch Jones Student of Chemical Engineer- 
ing, Purdue Lafayette, Ind. 

Elsie Louise Josse Teacher City. 

Alfred William Kettler Michigan University Michigan. 

Emma Caroline Krimmel City. 

Esther Lahmeyer City. 

G. Lakey Teacher City. 

Garnette Marie Lenhart County Teacher City. 

Madge Magee City. 

iiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!ttiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!!!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiii i MiimtittniiiintiiiMiiitflinmiirmiiimiiiHiiifmnwiitmiiiii«UHHHiniuiJiiHJHH«HHiiHeiittH mini i niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-SEVEN 



Marjorie Esther Pickard, 

dictorian 

Phylis Hayden Randall . . 
Clarence Dalman Rich . . 



Lorene Hazel Rosseau 

Ida May Rush 

Gladys Aromilla Schust 

Clarence Verne Scott 

Ina Estella Shordon 

Rachel L. Sirit 

Albert Nelson Smith 

Andrew McCampbell Snodgrass, 

George Brooks Somers 

Jullia Anna Sweer 

Martha Tolan 

Ruth Harriet Tracy 

John Burton Walters 

Oscar Walter Wehnert 

Dorothy Esther White 

Helen Marie Wllkie 

Harrison Winters 

Charles James Worden 



.Michigan University 

.Kindergarten, Private School.. 
.Studying Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, Michigan University . . . 



Madison University 

Teacher 

County Teacher 

Indiana University 

Teacher 

Farming 

Electric Works 

Fruit Ranch 

Clerking 

Domestic Student, Pratt Insti. 

Teacher 

County Teacher 

Purdue 

Smith College 

Mrs. Melvin Fretz 

Draftsman 

Sherman-White Cold Storage. 

CLASS OF 1912. 



Michigan. 
Baltimore, Md. 

Michigan. 
City. 

Wisconsin. 
City. 



. City. 

. City. 

. Oregon. 

.City. 

.New York City, N. Y. 

.City. 

. Lafayette, Ind. 
. Massachusetts. 
. Angola. Ind. 
.City. 
. City. 



Burton Quincy Adams County Teacher 

Robert Kenneth Archiborld ...Chauffeur, Maysville Line City. 

Bertha Katherine Axt Normal School City. 

Arthur J. Baldwin Manufacturing Extracts & Per- 
fumes City. 

Otis Everett Bennett Electric Works City. 

Mamie Hesler Byers City. 

Katherine Emily Cook City. 

Hazel Ruth Gessner County Teacher 

Jessie Helen Gillespie Teacher Buffalo, Okla. 

Oscar Frederick Hambrock . . . .Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. 

Wayne Allen Harrod Mining Engineering, Colorado 

School of Mines Denver, Col. 

Chloe Juanita Havens Normal School City. 

Beulah Lawrence McCrea Music Teacher City. 

James Maier Meriwether Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. 

Hazel Fanetta Spore Clerical Work City. 

Richard Charles Stolte Draftsman City. 

Fred Irving Wagner Adams Express Co City. 

Delight Genevieve Anderton .... Normal School City. 

Leota Flora Anspach Wesleyan University Delaware, Ohio. 

Ruth Baldwin Mrs. James Arthur Marion, Ind. 

Inez Edna Bandelier County Teacher City. 

Joe Allen Barber Gas Co City. 

James Madison Barrett, Jr., Val- 
edictorian Mchigan University Michigan. 

William Jacob Barth, Jr Bookkeeper City. 

Melvin Montgomery Beaver .... Michigan University Michigan. 

Gladys Ethlyn Becker Normal School City. 

Richard Stephen Bohn Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. 

William Ranke Bohne Michigan University Michigan. 



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THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-EIGHT 



Irene Valette Webster Boshler. 

Janet Catherine Bower 

Kenneth Murray Brown 

Florence Grace Buskirk 

Howard Knight Carter 

Avis Merial Clark 

Carleton Vaughan Corey 

Addie Viola Coverdale 

Zoa Celeste Davis 

Paul C. Eninger 

Vivian Rosalie Erickson 

Margaret Monta Essig 

Agnes Lorena Fortriede 

Laura Irene Gilbert 

Thomas Earl Griffith 

Ruth Jeanette Gumpper 

Zelpha Marie Hand 

Arnold Hitzeman 

Esther Amanda Hofer 

Anna Elizabeth Hutchinson 

Frances Marian Ingham 

Gladys Lucile Johns 

Edith Louise Keeran 

Marion Kiess 

Ruth Marie Koover 

Robert Angell Learmouth. Jr... 
Marion Josephine Leonard, Sal 

utatorian 

Hollis Lyon Logue 

Clarice Irene Marlatt 

Benjamin Rush- McClure 

Kendall YVinfield Pfeiffer 

Helen Marie Pucket 

Maurice Ruby 

Doris Jeanette Shirey 

Guinevere Delilah Stamets 

Carrie Stiet'el 

Mathilde Elizabeth Stolte 

Benjamin Paul Stonecifer 

Florence Alberta Stump 

Leon Charles Swager 

Ray Francis Tarmon 

Vesta Ornette Thompson 

Bertha Tower 

Josephine Esther Travers 

Catherine Vesey 

Roy Greer Welch 

Viola Ruth Welty 

Chester Hamlin Werkman 

Alfred Clemenz Wermuth 

Robert Ersig Williamson 

Raymond Arthur Wo'ford 



Teacher in the Ural and Dumb 

School Indianapolis, lnd. 

Nromal School City. 

Ft. Wayne Printing Co City. 

County Teacher City. 

Purdue University Lafayette, lnd. 

Purdue University Lafayette, lnd. 

County Teacher City. 

County Teacher 

Packard Piano Co City. 

Studying Kindergarten Grand Rapids. Mich. 

Teacher Huntertown, lnd. 

At Normal School City. 

At a College Albany, N. Y. 

With a Contsruction Co Texas. 

City. 

County Teacher 

Draftsman, Penn. Co City. 

Clerical Work City. 

City. 

Milton College Wisconsin. 

Pratt Institute New York, N. Y. 

Normal School City. 

Indiana University Bloomington, lnd. 

City. 

Clerical Work City. 

Michigan University Ann Arbor, Mich. 

With Ft. Wayne Daily News.. City. 

Mrs. John Syock City. 

Purdue University Lafayette, lnd. 

Real Estate City. 

Student of Physical Culture ...Indianapolis. lnd. 

Purdue University Lafayette, lnd. 

Western College Oxford, Ohio. 

Stenographer City. 

City. 

Normal School City. 

Purdue University Lafayette, lnd. 

Normal School City. 

Purdue University Lafayette, lnd. 

Draftsman City. 

Normal School City. 

Normal School City. 

Normal School City. 

Wesleyan University Oxford, Ohio. 

Boilermaker City. 

Bluffton College Bluffton, Ohio. 

With Penn. Co City. 

Armour Institute Chicago, 111. 

Michigan University Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Clerk, Penn. Co City. 



CLASS OF 1913. 

Grace Lavina Aurand City. 

Walter Cleo Birkhold Business College City. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mill ii"!' 1 ■" '— "iiiiiiii'rm'iiiin'iiiiiiii iiiiimnniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii imii i mini i i i iniiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiin 

THrs IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-NINE 




PW^ 1 - . 




IT 



Lyman Henry Blakesley Duke's Clothing Store City. 

Mabelle Mae Bracey County Teacher City. 

Leroy Bradley University of Illinois Champaigne, 111. 

Helen Marie Erwin Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. 

Vera Virginia Ferneau Normal School City. 

Loraine Clara Gross Normal School City. 

George Rudolph Herrman Michigan University Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Lucile Alberta H in ton City. 

Paul William Iba Grocery Store City. 

Irene Elizabeth Lepper, Saluta- 

torian Normal School City. 

Etta Hermine Linden County Teacher New Haven, Ind. 

Frank Roddick McKay Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. 

Elsie Marie Paul University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Stephen Abbott Ross With Journal-Gazette City. 

Bessie Rowe Normal School City. 

Joseph Salan Columbia University New York, N. V. 

Zillah Marguerite Stewart Normal School City. 

Ross Herman Tapp Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. 

Leah DeFrance Underwood City. 

Arthur Philip Warriner Michigan University Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Bertha Iona Adams County Teacher 

Gladys Minette Allen Business College City. 

Irene Rose Apfelbaum Laselle Seminary Auburndale, Mass. 

Robert Wayne Barber Business College City. 

Evelyn Marie Barbier City. 

Edna Mae Beckett Teacher at Leo City. 

Irene Ann Beugnot County Teacher 

Louis Jerome Bobilya University of Illinois Champaigne, 111. 

Roy Charles Bromelmeier Electric Works City. 

Dallas Leon Brooks Traction Company City. 

Ethel Ashley Brown Miami University Oxford, Ohio. 

Helen Lenore Byrer Western College Oxford, Ohio. 

Victor Vincent Carmicliael ....Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. 

Walter McKinley Carter Illinois University Champaigne, 111. 

Cecil Clarice Connett County Teacher 

Joseph Hyndman Craig Post Grad. Course at High Sch. .City. 

Kenneth Stewart Creighton .... Electric Works City. 

George Dawkins Farming New Haven, Ind. 

Earl Eugene Debolt Huntertown, Ind. 

Earl Monroe Dinger Traction Company City. 

Anna Juanita Doughman Normal School City. 

Ellen Margaret Doyle Normal School City. 

Edward Charles Dubois Electric Works City. 

Helen Alma Ehle Normal School City. 

John Lesly Emenhiser County Teacher Woodburn, Ind. 

Luella Marie Feiertag Normal School City. 

Joseph Henry Field Chicago University Chicago, 111 

Helen Alda Figel DePauw University Greencastle, Ind. 

Eugene Marz Frank Frank Dry Goods Co City. 

Ernest Frederick Fruechte Sentinel Reporter City. 

Lillian Ruth Fry City. 

Roy Gessner Farming Near City. 

Donald Chauncey Gilbert Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio. 

Adeline Goldberger City. 

Marie Marguerite Ann Gross City. 

'WIBIIIl'lliliaill'lll'llflllllPllillllillllllllillFilWllllllllillHlllillllllllll Illlllllllllllllllllll!lll!l!llll»lllll|l||!llll»lllllllll»lll!llllllll^ 

THIS is PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY 



Harold George Gusching Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. 

Lawrence Bennett Hallenstein .. Furniture Store Milwaukee, Wis. 

Byrd Henry Harrod Illinois University Champaigne, Hi 

Beatrice Bernice Herron Indiana University Bloomington, Ind. 

Goodsell Warren Herron Indiana University Bloomington, Ind. 

Katherine Marie Jackson city. 

Mabel Esther Jefferies Cashier at Welker's Dry Goods 

Store City. 

Miriam Grace Kimble Normal School City. 

Herbert Henry Koenig Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. 

Louis August Krummel Business College City. 

Walter John Kronmiller Business College City. 

Marie Emily Landenberger .... Fairmount Seminary Washington, D. C. 

Win. Marquis Large Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. 

Carl Wm. Lauman Electric Works City. 

Myrtle Elsie Lerch City. 

Jessie Luella Lloyd Normal School City. 

Vera Caroline Mackwitz Normal School Milwaukee. Wis. 

Agnes Irene Mahurin Milwaukee Downer College . . . .City. 

Lillian Viola Matott Business College City. 

Hon McBride Post Grad. at High School City. 

Otis Allen McFadden Farming Near City. 

Goldie Marie McKeeman Clerking City. 

Lula B. McNamara City. 

Esther Gladys Miller Kindergarten Course, Teachers' 

College Indianapolis, Ind. 

Myrl Milton Miller Michigan University Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Ruth Miller City. 

Mary Isabella Monroe Normal School City. 

Agnes Eulalia Nail Teacher Maples, Ind. 

Vera Amelia Palmer South Side Librarian City. 

George Manford Parker Farming Huntertown, Ind. 

Maurice Joshua Payton Electric Works City. 

Alice Marjorie Peebles 

Flora Adella Peters County Teacher City. 

Agnes Emily Philley Post Grad. Course in High Sch. .City. 

Esther Viola Phipps Normal School City. 

Harry Keene Polhamus Ft. Wayne Oil & Supply Co. At- 
tends Interna. Night Sch City. 

Esther Elizabeth Pool Stout Institute Minomonie. Wis. 

Alma Henrietta Poole Teacher in Indian Schools ....Las Vegas, N. M. 

Franklin Peleg Randall Michigan University Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Virginia Randall City. 

Wade Reed Electric Works City. 

Ada Dephene Roebuck City. 

Clarence Lester Rosselot Farming Near City. 

Blanda Jenny Schmidt City. 

Ralph Fulkerson Shoaff Electric Works City. 

Ann Ward Shryock City. 

Sarah Sirit Business College City. 

Lillian Lorange Sites City. 

Faye Elizabeth Squires Mrs. Otis Parkison City. 

Julius Herman Staak Inspector of Electrical Self- 
Starters, Wagner Elec. Pit... St. Louis, Mo. 

Venita Ann Stamets With Bowser Oil Tank Co City. 

Russell Stout Stephens With Brooks' Construction Co. City. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ nmniyiiiiniiumiuiiminiinHiHfliyiHffliiimnimuiHiiiDimniiHiniiMiiiHiiiHiuiiuiiimiHiiiiiHiuiiiiiM 

THIS IS r.VC.E ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-ONE 




*3 




Susanne Anne Stolte Normal School City. 

Margaret Irene Strebig Knitting Mills City. 

Alexander McJunkin Tower . . .Illinois University Champaigne, 111. 

Hildegarde Hamilton Wagelhals, 

Valedictorian Smith College Massachusetts. 

Ruth Peace Warner Stenographer City. 

Thor Frederick Webber With City Surveyor City. 

Esther Catherine Weiler Heidelberg University Tiffin. Ohio. 

Esther Alfretta Werling Business College City. 

Wayne Valorus Whicker Deceased 

Estella Marie Wilkens Pittsburg. Kan. 

Ralph Henry Work Business College City. 

Helen Marie Young Clerk City. 

Beulah Irene Youse City. 



"""Willi" I .hi iiiiuiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiuiiiu mil iiih i 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-TWO 



BOOK VII 
WIT Jt LITERATURE 

HUMOR .wW^k POETRY 




[F SOMEONE WERE TO STICK UNCLE MAC'S HEAD IN A VISE 
IT MIGHT LOOK SOMETHING LIKE THIS 



iiiiiini i mum ii, ii. !. i ii mini nun mini mini u mm i m i i nun i mm nun mini i mm 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-THREE 








THE BENCH. 

By WILHELMINA MORRISS 

For fifty years the Bench has stood 
A monarch crowned with power, 
Holding in its relentless grasp 
A victim every hour. 

The matinee girl and baseball fan. 
Who write their own excuses, — 
Are taught upon the Bench to put 
Their skill to better uses. 

Through office, session room and hall 
It holds its dusty sway, 
Forcing reluctanl feet to tread 
The straight and narrow way. 



THOUGHTS ON OUTSIDE READINGS. 

(JESSE PETERS) 
(Class Poet.) 

Oh you. worse than hateful things. 
'Tis students' minds you vex. 
While your praise the teacher sings. — 
(They say to thoroughly learn your text) 
We must have outside readings. 

There's just one thing that I can't see 
How they can call that courtesy. — 
(If that's what they're supposed to teach,) 
To find some author out of reach, 
And say I ha1 he 's authority. 



WITH APOLOGIES TO THE AUTHOK OP "LITTLE JOHNNY JINGLE.' 

K. E. B.. '15. 

A Senior (Cockie Strathern) on last Commencement Day. 
Danced so many tangoes and fancy steps, they sax- 
Next morn when he retired, (that is. he went to bed,) 
He dreamed 1 hat he was tired, and yelled. "] hold her head." 
For Cockie had the night-mare: (he had it had they say.) 
For he swore that he wouldn't dance again, — 
'Till next Commencement Day. 



> i! nun am iiiihiiiiiiiiiii minium iiiiniiinn inniiininii mini in i 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-POUR 



THE SOCIAL COUNCIL. 

By W1I.11K1..M l.\.\ Mill; KISS 

The Social Council was formed thai ii mighl rule, 
The manners and morals of Fori Wayne High School. 

* * # 

When sluill the Social Council have its way! 

When thf Sinu-lc Session is in full sway, 

And we have chapel every day, 

When the tango is out of style, 

And the fish-walk is in exile. 

When some of the teachers have ;i second growth of hair, 

And the ventilating system is in good repair. 

When the last installment on the Victrola is paid, 

And the cornerstone for a new High School is laid. 



Then shall the Social C 
Bui we'll be men and 



mcil 1 
imen, 



■ its w 
•repit, 



d gray. 



SOCIAL COUNCIL. 

JESSE PETERS 
(Class Poet.) 

0, counsel that's austere and grave, 
Prom wraek and ruin yon can save 

The young- and giddy student. 
Now due to our prosperity. 
We have, so-called society. 
Alas, no more like waves we dance 
The "Bunny-hug" and '"Tango" prance, 

You thought it was not prudent. 

You add to vice (advice) and give to us 
The sum and tell us that we must 

Accept it and say nothing. 
Now since the time when you firsl lent 
Your wisdom and your good intent 
Our manly hearts, within us swell 
With love for thee, where it doth dwell, 

Your praise we'll ever sing. 



FLZZY'S ABILITY. 

M. Z.. '14. 

F\izz could write and tell his ma 
How in High School he had fun. 
Bui could never tell his pa 
Where the went all the mun. 



i i mini i i in i in H inn i mm mm iiiimi iiiiumiii mn 

THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-FIVE 








NEPF SUD OE NUFF SED? 

Ami it came to pass that in the tliiHy-tifty year of the reign of Chester 
the Good, there came unto a place called High and Manual Training School 
in the City of Fort Wayne a dwarf. This dwarf had beard much about the 
Fort Wayne High School. He was come from a small town on the southern 
part of the state which was called Rochester. 

And when he had visited the Lord High Scribe of the place, whose name, 
because of his sweetness of temper is enrolled amongst those of the saints, he 
departed thence from his presence with great joy. — for he had become a teach- 
er of the Fort Wayne High and Manual Training School. 

The newcomer was received by the tribe of the Faculties and in Septem- 
ber was taken into the tribe. 

Now it came to pass that in the first week when he had come into that 
place he tread upon air. His feel were encased in rubber shoes. 

And in the third month when he had come into the place, many of the 
tribe were gathered in a certain building where there was great rejoicing. 
The dwarf had become a great bowler. 

It came to pass that in the spring of the same year that there was a con- 
test oi- oratory between two of the Seniorites, David and Samuel. The dwarf 
was the chairman. 

In the seventh month of his dwelling in that place he attended a Sopho- 
more hall. Greal was his feasting and dancing and all agreed that their en- 
joyment had been great. 

(Here endeth the reading of the first book of the History of the Dwarf of 
the fort Wayne High and Manual Training School.) 

M. Z.. '14. 



SONNET TO PAUL W. WARREN. 

JESSE PETERS 
(Class Poet. > 

This man was wronged, in days of yore 

When he was hut a Sophomore. 

Once caught in a delicate situation, — 

Unable to make an explanation. — 

'Twas then that he was cruelly wronged 

(Or such has afterwards been his song) 

Just for this lack of explanation 

He established a living- reputation. 

Alas for Paul, 'tis very sad 

This "rep" of his was very had. 

To be consistent is his rule 

Whether in or out of school 

The way Paul seeks his compensation 

Is living up to his reputation. 



....:■! i;: :: 11..11 

THIS is PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-SIX 



CHAPEL. 

By \YIUIKI..\ll.V\ MORRISS. 

( Ihapel 's a benefactor 
Thai we gladly praise, 
Km breaking the monotony 
Of the school's dull days.' 

Our orators are of the best 
They are both witty and wise 

Ami the Quest Club s] dies 

We cannot criticize. 

11' you searched the wide world over 
At last you would have to cry, 
"There are no such elocutionists 
Outside the Fort Wayne High." 

Bui when we show appreciation 
They say we "re wild and rough 
And when we start to clap our hands 
Tliev crv "Now that's enough." 



THE FISH-WALK 

Now the fishwalk is the rage 
And take it, kid, from me — 

That all who in this dance engage 
Are a pleasing sight to see. 

To the tune of "Too Much Mustard" 

Or any other rag 
They dance from noon till midnight 

And then spirits never lag. 

The Soeial Council gang, they say. 

Is hard against it set 
But if once they heard the music gay 

'Twould bring 'em round, you bet. 



So all you slal ely people 

Join the crowd and have son 
For soon that deadly fishwalk 
Will bv everyone be done. 



fun 



THIS IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-SEVEN 








CHARLIE WILD'S THOUGHTS TOWARD THE FORT WAYNE 
HIGH SCHOOL. 

M. Z., '14. 

My heart leaps when I behold 
The Fort Wayne High in view: 
So was it when I first began 
So 'tis now I'm a Senior man 
So he it when I shall grow old 

Or let me die ! 
The High is father of the Good, 
And I could wish my years to be 
Going on and on in the Fort Wayne High. 



HOW CAN IT WAS" ' 

.1 KSSE PETERS 
I Class Poet.) 

In Latin, so his classmates say, 

He cried because he got hut A. 

His hair is black, his fare is round. 

His feet set firmly on the ground. 

His gentle heart is satisfied 

When Pauline Savior's by his side. 

To study Latin, so they say 

But Pauline always has her way. 

And there they sit, — why have you smiled 

I bet you've guessed it's Charlie Wild. 



Wh 



ODE TO THE TWO TEACHERS 
Would Xot Have Their Pictures Taken For the 



Annual 



Woman! Woman I Woman! 

Why even in our school, 

We have a couple ladies 

Who 're exceptions to the rule. 

When ALL the school had promised 

To make this Annual a success, 

They wouldn't get their pictures ta'en 

Though poor Pete did his best. 

Now these handsome ladies 

Both stand high in our esteem. 

One serves us with the "suffrage sauc 

While tlie other pours the cream. 



IMI'lHIHIIIIII.llllillNII II. lllllMII'IMIIill IMIMI'lll 'III IMINrilH 

Tills IS PAGE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-EIGHT 



Oh ( 

your swei 
ly up-to- 
Though s 
exertions 
with awe 
hook!" 



THE GLEE CLUB. 

By WIUIKI.MIXA MORRISS. 

Hee < lull bow we love thee, your music's mil of sight, the tones of 
■t voices till us with delight. Your selections are ;ill 0. K. and strict- 
date, Johnny Smoker and the rest arc simply something great, 
ome have better voices, of thai we have no doubt, to you for your 
we give our thanks devout. Caruso or Professor .Miles on whom 
we look, might think your music not so fine ami cry "Oh get the 



PLEASE DROP ANOTHER PINK. 

K. E. B., '15. 

Though rows of seats divide us. 
And your face I can scarcely see, 
Just take a wad of paper, 
And throw a note to me. 

Though a bench now stands between us, 
Because of the first one you wrote, 
.lust keep your cheerful expression, 
And send me another note. 



'TIS STRANGE ABOUT OUB EELEN. 

M. Z., '14. 

Ye gods, 'tis strange, 
I say 'tis strange 
How her hair curls. 
On bright .sunny days 
A halo of curls. 
( In warm rainy days 
Her halo unfurls. 
Ye gods, 'tis strange. 
All yes, 'tis strange. 

SNORE OX 

This Single Session business which has passed around the High 

Apparently has disappeared, we hear the pupils sigh 

But one day to our great surprise, to chapel we were sent 

The minds of all straight way, were on the speaker bent. 

All hearts were tilled with joy. to learn from Mr. Lane 

That, our efforts for a "half-day sess" hail not been in vain 

And as our shouts did rend the air 

A pity it does seem, that before you all I must declare 

It was just a dandy dream. 0. II. 'Pi. 



iiiuiiiiiiiinii!, i i I iiiiiim 



THIS IS PACE ONE HIW'llREIi AND N1NET V-N'TXE 



THINGS WE COULDN'T FIND OUT. 

1. Do Freshmen all go to chapel because some one said "Let all green things 

of the earth praise the Lord?" 

2. Why Doc Koons diiln t reach the pinnacle of fame? 

3. If Maloney has a pony .' 

4. Why II. Thompson doesn't give lessons in hairdressing ? 

5. How many "daily yaller" shirts has Louis Ward or has he Only One? 
(>. If .Miss Sihler gets her fashions from Vogue .' 

7. Why Hardendorf doesn't gel a home in Lakeside;' 

8. How Clark combs his front hair? 

!). If "Whitie" has only one "Sunset necktie?" 

(a) If he has more why doesn't he vary the monotony.' 
lit. How Strobe! measures his hair? 

11. (a) Who AI Tremper is going to take to the Commencement dance? 
i hi Who is going to take Cleo G. to the dance? 

12. Why Neff i|iiit wearing tennis shoes.' 

13. (a) How Mae. curls his hair? 

(Ii) Does Parker use the same method.' 

14. Why J. Ritter and Liz Roberts don't take off their collars in sweltering 

weather .' 

15. Is Charley Wild able to crack a joke.' 

16. (a i What the engineer eats for dinner? 
(hi Is it the same as Gould eats.' 

17. How often Lip shaves? 

IS. Is Wendell H. really in love and if so with whom? 

111. Where Mary (). K. got hold of her method of teaching and how long ago 
she had it patented? 

20. (a) How M. Mahurin managed to finish in four years? 

(b) Why Jimmie White wasn't valedictorian? 

21. If Haberly's ambition in life is to be property man at the Empress? 

22. (a) When is Fuzz going to Hicksville? 
(b) Is he going to take the same girl .' 

23. Where Harry Thomas learned how to wash dishes? 

24. Can Xeff bowl or is it only imagination.' Is this imagination equal to 

Wordsworth 's ? 

25. When will M. Zent become a princess.' 

26. How long, Lord, How long will Werry's love last for H. Savior? 

27. Does Peroxide l!l le Wellman pay for part of the gasoline for Seidel's 

Ford ? 

28. Did any one ever hear Dick, our warbler, grunt ' 

29. Who ever heard of Pauline dying from dancing? 

30. Does V. Grosjean think of men in general or of a particular man.' 

31. When were the janitors appointed as special policemen for the halls.' 

32. Did Miss Curtiss tell her Freshmen that in one millimetre of Johnny cake 

there are (i20.N42.< 100,00(1.000 bacteria after the butter? 



'.. ■. ... 

THIS IS PAGE TWO Hl'NDRED 



jY '( 


u TH^S 




Cj%^- : y'<' 7 . 






Ba **JH 



SIC SEMPER TYRANNIS. 
I Thus always In tyranl s. 

\.\ \\ I l.ll ELM l.\ A MORRISS 

Scene: The Golden Gates. 
Time: The future. 
St. Peter:— 

•"Look my comrade angel, and 
Tell me whal you see." 
Angel:— 

" A haughtj dame approaches, 
As it appears to me." 

Dinar : — 

" ( )h joy ! to see before me 

The Gold celestial arch, 

Through which I shall now prepare 

Triumphantly to march." 
St. Peter: — 

"None enters here without mine own consent." 
Dame : — 

"Delay me sir. or you shall bitterly repent." 
St. Peter:— 

"Before you dare to enter in 

Behild the Golden Portals,— 

Three questions you must answer me 

As must all other mortals. " 
Dame : — 

"Indeed? Rut I should worry. 

Speak quickly, please, 

For I am in a hurry." 
St. Peter:— 

""Where did you live before your transmigration? 

And kindly state in lucid terms, 

Your former occupation. 

What did you do upon the earth 

To earn your own salvation.'" 
Dame: — . 

"My residence was in Fori Wayne. 

My fellow tyrant, — Mr. Lane. 

I ruled with hand and rod of might 

And taught the children all I 'was right 

For I was a teacher in his school 

And made them follow all Ids rules." 
St. Peter:— 

"Ah! a teacher in that High Srhool" 

(This in accents calm and cool.) 



mum mini mini iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini minim iiimiiimiiiii urn mini miiiinimniiiini mini iiiiiniii hum iinniniiinnmniinimiiimiimnminmnininiinii 

THIS IS PAGE TWO HUNDRED AND ONE 



"Against your name are many marks 

For temper quick and words sarcastic 

For giving lessons far too long for 

Even minds elestic 

For bench - — •" 

Dame:— 

"Surely little things like thai 

Should not be valued so. — 
St. Peter:— 

"Peace, woman, for all these crimes 

You must go clown below." 
Angel : — 

"St. Peter the carriage waits near the gate. 

Shall I escort m' lady down to meet her fate?" 
St. Peter:— 

"Yes go! I've examined Fort Wayne teachers 

And have found with one accord 

All failed to meet requirements 

Excepting Louie Ward." 

(Curtain.) 



MORAL 
My story is over, my tale is done, 
Hut (his is the moral of the yarn I've spun, 
To gain St. Peter's favor and with your loving 
Take some timely lessons from the teacher of I' 



pupils be, 

G. 



THE 

BAR(R) 

STREET 

ENTRANCE 



V"L 



THIS IS PAGE TWO HUNDRED AXD TWO 



WE OFFER SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR SCHOLARS 
"Personality in the PHOTOGRAPH" 

Successor tO 

% (Oq&J^ MINER STUDIO 

121 W. Wayne St. Phone 885 



'•;**.♦•>•,••:••.• vvv 



LAKESIDE PHARMACY 

SPIEGEL BROS., Props. 

Phone 1675 



•!• & ELZIE D. REDDING •'• 

t ••* GROCERIES, MEATS AND NOTIONS Y 

X X X 

& .'. Phone 2427 A 

* ♦ 1102 Rivermet Avenue •> 



White Duck Trousers— $1.00. 

PATTERSON-FLETCHER CO. 




White Silk Hose — 25c and 50c. 
PATTERS* >N-FLETCHER CO. 

•*♦ »j« **• ij* •*»•*■* •j**j* »^**j* •i**»* *«* *»* ♦*• *j* **» *i* »^» •** *** *** **♦*«■* 't* *■** *♦**»* *♦• 

X 
Boys, don't envy a well hatted man. Buy a •'• 

"Tod Hat" and be envied. Every shape, style and *}* 

weight. One quality, "always the best." & 

One Price — Two Dollars 

Where the styles come from. ♦ 

I 

I 

t 



TWO $ TOD 

1009 Calhoun St. 



m f 



$2 

At the sign 

of the two 

dollars. 



Caps, 50c 
and 
$1.00 



HELFRICK'S 



I 
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% 
i 



% Tailored Clothes Possess Individuality. It's Their Fit That Makes a Hit. * 



$15 to $40 



| THE TOGGERY SHOP 



t 
1216 Calhoun St. t 






* 


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lis. Pistols 


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nls. Dice 
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********* —>♦**♦♦*♦♦♦♦ 

We Have It or Will Get It 

The Cut Rate Novelty Store 

I 

1112 Calhoun Street Fort Wayne, Ind. | 

| m S5SJ? Always Something New | 

X Auto Supplies .5. 

T V 

X Watch Repairing Jewelry Repairing •!• X % 

.*. Engraving .;• a CLARENCE «.. GARTON .*. 

•> VKKK'S WATCH REPAIR SHOP * V * 

♦ A, S. XEFF. Trop. % T GROCERIES * 

••* Workmanship th<- best — Prices the X X X 

T I. (.west. X X COOKED AND SMOKED MEATS .t. 

X All Work Guarant 1 for Due Year. .♦. a X 

X I ■ - Calhoun St. — Opposite the <|> •> Phone I7«« 1043 St. Joe Blvd. •!< 

►•♦ Cathedra] •> •$* •!• 

White Planned Trousers; plain white The liar! Shaffner & .Marx Suits for 

and stripes — Price $o.00. young men have the style anil snap 

PATTERSON-FLETCHER Co. you won't find in others. ' 

PATTERSON-FLETCHEE Co. 
Teacher (seeing a swelling in Hartz- 



ler's lower left Maxillary': "Quid est Don -I. Eayden (translating Virgil): 

hoe .'" "Let the fates (leeree the time." 

Pinkie: "Hoe est quid." Prof. Lane: "The time will he 4 p. 

in. You may make up your Virgil 
Straw Hats and Panamas — Hundreds then.*' 
of them to select from : 



Straws $1.00 to $ 5.00 Visit the Patterson-Fletcher Co. hal 

Panamas 3.00 to 10.00 department to gel the latest things in 

PATTERSON-FLETCHER CO. headwear. 



vv vv *•****♦. 



D. FRANKLIN AULT 

Casualty Insurance and Surety Bonds 

Rooms 10:; and 104 Schmitz Bide. 






PHOTOGRAPHS THAT LIVE FOR ALL TIME 
* 

••• Not only are the prints themselves endurable and permanent, hut Parroi Pho- 

* tographs have that natural likeness about them that they look like life itself Cor 
•> all times. 

X PARROTT STUDIO AND ART STORE 227 East Berry Street 



O STUDY without learning, to read 
without retaining, to earn without 

| saving, will never land any one on top. 

*!* 

| Not what you get but what you keep is what counts 



.-. 



£ He who can earn is good, but he who can earn 1 
% and save a p~ 

I sight better 



and save a part of what he earns is a mighty 



1 



J~[T Start a savings account with us at 4 per cent interest and 4" 

^]] see how big, a bank account will make you feel. It beats 

dances, joy rides and cigarettes by forty miles. $ 

German- American Trust Co. I 

L**** ............................................................ ..... . . * 

I Colonial Theatre ! 

* % 

I The ! 

t 7. 

I House ! 

i I 

of Quality j 



I 

$ H. C. Heisler, Manager 






1 




TO THE STUDENTS I 



OF THE FORT WAYNE 
HIGH SCHOOL 



your education will be a Fortune to you. X 

it will help you to win a fortune, n mak is •;• 

you a nobler man and woman. •$• 

i. myself have never had the opportunity % 

nl receiving a good education. My business i 

is selling von Life Insurance thai will pro 1* 

* 

tect your Father for what it cost him to .♦. 

give you your education, and at the same ♦ 

time start a savings account for yourself Y 

when you are twenty years older. 4. 

Let me explain a Lincoln Life Policy to you. It will surely interest you. y 

Respectfully yours. % 

W. C. BISHOP, General Agent £ 

Lincoln National Life Insurance Co. T 

X 

Phones: — Office, 400 and 420: Residence, 6739 Fort Wayne, Ind. J. 



Soil Shirts with colhir to match 
$1.00 and $1.50. 

PATTERSON-FLETCHER CO. 



Wilson Bros. Athletic Union Suits — 
80 cents. 

PATTERS* >N-PLET( 'II BE ( !( >. 



Pinkie II.: "A fellow told me I 
looked like you. " 

Parks: "'Where is he? I'd like to 
punch him." 

Pinkie II.: "He is dead. I killed 
him. " 

For your lull dress wearing apparel 
i ome here our stock is complete. 
PATTERSON-FLETCHER CO. 



Near Commencement. 
Senior: "Give me five dollars." 

Father: "What.'" 

Senior: "Give me ten dollars?" 

Father : "I heard you I he Brs1 
t illie. " 

Wash Fore-In-Hand Ties Hundred, 
of patterns H" ' 2 c to 50c. 

PATTERSON-FLETCHER CO. 






i 

i 



SUMMIT CITY RESTAURANT 



The Place to Eat 



I 



:». open Day and Night 



108 West Wayne St. % 



i— —■ 




Personality in a piano — the indi- 
vidualizing quality that makes 
the instrument something more 
than a mere mechanism — is some- 
thing you will not find unless it 
has been put into the piano by 
the maker. No maker can put 
it there except by sincerity and 
earnestness in the making. That 
explains the Packard — its per- 
sonal qualities are the result of 

faithfulness to the artistic ideal that has im- 
pelled its makers from the beginning. 

PACKARD PIANOS Sc 
INTERPRETING PIANOS 

made by 

The Pac kar d C ompany 

of Fort Wayne and 

sold by 



PACKARD MUSIC HOUSE. 
930 Calhoun Street Fort Wayne, Indiana 







BE SURE AND ASK FOR 

THE D. M. SEARS 
COMPANY'S 

iiiuiiiHiiiiuinifliiuniixmuuiimiiujnDWHEiTiiiMiiiuniiMiii^iiiLuitriniiiiiiirtintMniriniriiiiiniiiniiirfiiirFnir 

SWEET PICKLES 
OLIVES, CATSUP 
CHILI-SAUCE 
INDIA RELISH 
CHOW CHOW AND 
CHOICEVINEGARS 






Prom the Annual of '96: "Wanted M. O.K.: "MissL — 1, have you done 

— Someone to donate a few thousand your outside reading"" 

dollars to build and equip a High Senior: " No, ma 'am ; it 's too cold. " 

School Gymnasium." * * * 

Suggestion for a Senior Class play — 

Prof . Lane (to a new Junior, who has "A Kiss in Dark." Eeasy to present 

made some remark about the sides of and always takes. 

a circle): "How many sides has a 

circle. "* The He Junior: "What will we do 
New .Junior: "Two." if the chaperons won't allow us to tan- 
Prof. Lane (sarcastically): "Name go?" 

them." The She Junior: "Easy, we'll just 

Xew Junior: "Inside and outside." grin and IlKAR it." 



• •»**♦• v v v ••• ****** "I* v v *•* *»* ••**»*••• v *•* *!* *•* *** v v •••*«*••• •»■ 

:• 

Phones 160 and 555 

TROY LAUNDRY CO. 

308-314 Pearl Street 
Established 1870 



Phones 6003 and 234 

Troy-American Dry Cleaning Co. 

18P2 Calhoun St. 
French Process — 

— Superior Service 



Double Service from Same Deliver;/ Wagons 

Call Either and Your Wants Will be 

Promptly Taken Care of. 









{ ■iti j .i { .i tn; ». |n; ' < i C ii i"> 't "i" t ";"i"l"t"t"t , ' I ,, >' t" > "4 '<'<* 1 



1 
i 


| 

1 


I CBc (Empress 


* 

A 
A 
T 


! FEATURE 


| 

1: 


| PHOTO 




| PLAYS 

4. iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii 
| DURING THE 
l SUMMER ONLY 

1 


* 
1 

J: 

1 


I 

1 

I XVze Coolest 
I ,Spo/ m Town 
I 

i 


5: 
* 
J: 

% 

i 
* 



10c=ALL SEATS=10c 



*i*-^*«l«-*j* ♦x*«i**j**j* *x**j*-»v**i-» «v*-^» ♦♦•^*$**x**$»*j«-*j* •♦r^i**i**i» *x* **- *t**i* *** *♦* *** *** *c*™ , $* *j**j* ♦••♦j* **■***•* *v^*»* * 



I** 



;♦ .;. •;• .;. .♦, .;. .♦• .:..;..;. •; 



:* * •:-;. # •:• * •> * .;. * .> * .> * 



I FIRESTONE TIRES, RIMS AND AUTO ACCESSORIES 
* 2 

4- FORT WAYNE VULCANIZING WORKS $ 

% 224 West Main Street Phones : Home 2412 ; Bell, 45. % 

% R. M. KAOUGH, Prop. | 

C*^**I**t**I**$*****$********J* *J**t* *£• *t* *t* ♦!♦ »t**t* *i* <• "l* *J* •!* *t- ♦;♦ <»*;♦ »t* *;• *;* ♦;••> ♦;• <• <♦ ►;■» ♦;• *;* •;* -;* *;* *;- •;* -;* -;• -;* <• > -> »>•;♦ •!•%••;•♦> •:*%•*•;••:«{• 

*> -j^t* •$••> •?•*> *>*t* •$• *t* •?*♦> *5**t* »!*•> »5» *i* •$• *t* <■*♦!♦ »J**t*-t**t* <* *•* *j* <♦ •5**> *;- *> -t- •> *i* •> <* <♦ »> *> -:* »;- *:- <• -:* •> -:- •;• »> •;- *x-»c* <- **• »i- *;- -:- <• -;- 

| F. E. ASHBAUGH, Conductor 

| THE ANTHONY ORCHESTRA 

£ The Best Orchestra in Northern Indiana. 

913 Webster St. Phone 2639. 



! 



•S*^**^^-*-^-*!*-^* *»*-*t* *** *I**Z**$* *C*-*1* *i»*t- *t**i* *I*»t* »I**2* *I**t» *t* -J* -»t* *•* *v* *i* *t* *X* *I* , *i* *Z* *t* *I**t* *♦• *t* »I* *I* •*•»!• •*» <- *!♦ *t* *!• »t- *J* -t- ****2- •!* <- *t- »i- •!* »J- *Z- 









I The Photo Studio of F. Schanz 
% 

for High=Class Portraits 






Special Rates to Students 



■ •!* *»• •!* *** 'I- v •'.• ''.* •'.• v '•■ v *** ''.' ''•' 'I* ''•' *•* '•' *•* ••* • 



REMEMBER YOUR FRIENDS % 
And when doing so think of THE CRAFT SHOP, 

3 Arcade, West Berry Street <£ 

TELEPHONE 2145 i 

Everything in way of Gifts, 4» 

Post Cards, Souvenirs, Dinner Favors, % 

Pennants, Pillow Tops, Pictures, Etc. J. 

THE HIGHEST QUALITY— THE LOWEST PRICE. % 

Fort Wayne's Largest Optical House £ 





Lyric Theatre Building 
1012 Calhoun Street 



I Meigs Fits U Eyeglasses, Certainly Do! j 



No Charge for Examination 



V t • * juj *^ • * *♦,.♦*♦% I %^%AAA*%A»%*2U%»*^%*W»^*^«<~*»*>»i»<**C^ 



, •****• *£♦♦** ***•*♦ •*"**** *** **• ****** ****** ****** ** 




F you want Classy Photo- 
graphs of your Class go to 
a Classy Photographer--- 

that's PERRY 






Hanker School for Dancing and Aesthetic Culture 

MISS MURIEL LAEIMORE, Instructor 

SOCIAL DANCING EVERY TUESDAY EVENING 

HALL RENTED FOR PRIVATE PARTIES 

PHONE 3213 

R L. LIGGETT. 
220 West Berry Street. A. H. MOHR, Manager. 



RAH! RAH! RAH! 

Stoj) at the 

..Stag Cigar Stand... 

116 W. Main Street 

For Your 

CIGARS, CIGARETTES, TOBACCOS 

and CANDIES 

Forest J. Hiser. Proprietor. 



',* *** •** *I* **• *»* **♦ *!*•!• •!• •" 



••:••:••:••:••:•■:••:••:-•:••:.•:.•:••:•">.:.*.:..!..:.+.:.+.:.+ 



I International Business College ! 



"Greatest in the Central States" 
FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

Prepares for — 

Bookkeeping 
Accountant 
Office Manager 
Credit Man 
Bank Cashier 
Etc., Etc. 

"THE MONEY MAKING EDUCATION 




Catalogue Showing Terms, Rate of Tuition, Room, Etc., Free 
Write for it. Enter any time. 



STENOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT £ 

Prepares for — X 

Stenographer % 

Expert Correspondent .|. 

Office Manager | 

Private Secretary % 

Civil Service % 

Court Reporting £. 

Newspaper Reporting £ 

Etc., Etc. * 



..j~vv.*. .!..;..:..:..j-;.v>-:~>* 



RURODE'S 



The Store for All the People 



Expressing at all times the best and most 
wholesome style tendencies. Giving at all 
times the greatest possible value for the dollar. 
Insisting ever, on QUALITY. Guarantee- 
ing absolute satisfaction under all conditions. 
These are the qualities that have made this 
store GREAT. They are the qualities that 
will KEEP it great. 



MAKE IT YOUR STORE 



|> $ 4. fr <i$<i < »»<■♦$<■ 3" l' fr , t' $ l fr< "H 






The Ideal Motorcycle and Supply Co. 

ANNOUNCES FOR 1914 

The Famous 
INDIA X MO TOHC YC 'LE 

From One to Three Years Ahead in Equipment as Usual 
The Best Line of Bicycles known in the States 

THE RAMBLER & IDEAL BICYCLES 

AND 

The Best Line of Bicycle Tires 
Which are The Red X, I. V., Non-Skid and the Best-Ever 

Guaranteed Tires. 

The Most Complete Line of Motorcycle and Bicycle Accessories in City 

Pay Us a Visit as We Appreciate Your Patronage 

THE IDEAL MOTORCYCLE <$ SUPPLY CO. 

PHONE 1979 

124 East Columbia Street. FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 







S. F. BOWSER, Inc. 

Engineers <§ Manufactures of 
Oil Handling Devices 



Home Plant and General 

Offices : 
Box 2177, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Sales Offices in all Centers 

Representatives Everywhere. 

ESTABLISHED 1885 



Gasolene! Gasolene! 

First you buy a little tank, 

Then you turn a little crank; 

Gasolene! Gasolene! 

Bowser! Bowser! 

Sic em, Towser! 

Gasolene! 










Tanner Dancing Academy 

SOCIAL DANCES THURSDAY AND SATURDAY EVENINGS. 

MATINEE DANCE 

EVERY TUESDAY AND THURSDAY AFTERNOONS. 



Furnas Ice Cream 



Banquets and Class Parties our specialty. 









I (L 'A. &mt 



High - C/c i ss Priu d ng 



Engraved Wedding Invitations, 'Visiting Cards, Etc. 



820 Calhoun St. 



<§• Telephone 1954 

Mae: "Is thai your father's signa NEW NECKWEAR 

ture?" Crepe Silks in Persian patterns ... 50c 

The Skipper: "Yes, as near as I Wide End Bows 50c 

could make it.'" Wash Pour-In-Hand 25c 

PATTERSON-FLETCHER CO. 
Wash Pore-In-Hand Tics -hundreds 
of patterns— 12%c to 50c. 

PATTERSl >N-FLET< II ER ( '< >. 





Mulqueen Dancing School 
"Minuet Hall" 

Social Nights: Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays 

Beginners Mondays 

The "Leading" and "Swellest" place for Society and 

Club Dances. Private Lessons. Phone 68. 



Girls'. Bui) Where Your Friends Buy, at 



(^JieSeelr era Store, 



126 E.BERWT ST. C^KSSTO " * ^^S 



k 







Straws, Panamas, Silks ! 

* 

All the new ideas in Summer Headwear f 
at the Original * 

Y 

$1.00 HAT STORE 

109 West Washington Street % 



^♦J»*I**I* •$• ••* <**C* *>*I* »I**J* *X**I* •£* •!♦ *J**t* ♦5**J» ***♦!• ^**t* ***♦♦♦ ***•!* ♦♦♦♦I* *♦*-*!• *I**I* *■♦* ♦!♦ *X**I* ***♦!♦ *+*♦!♦ *i**t* •■♦♦♦J* *!• *5* 



Always the Best SJiotc 

G— BIG KEITH & ORPHEUM ACTS— 6 

New Show Every Sunday and Thursday 

LADIES' SOUVENIR MATINEE EVERY 
MONDAY AND THURSDAY 

Week Day Matinees 10 & 15 cents 

Evening and Sunday Matinee 10, 15 and 25 cents 
There is No Place Like Home Except the Temple 






X 



I Who is the most popular girl in your class? 

t To Find Out, We Are Going in Give 
f 

A Solid Gold Ring free 

% To the Girl in Each Class Receiving the Musi Votes 
% 

I Get in line and vote for your favorite 



(iiid a! the same lime enjoy the pleasure of wearing f 

me of the Handsome New School Rings. 



WL 



X 

t 

♦ 

£ We have designed a special Ring fur the Fori Wayne * 

£ High School. The price is so reasonable; ring so <>'ooil * 

X looking and so well made that every student in school 

X will want one. * 

X • X 

% To introduce them we are going to sell them at the very '£ 

% reasonable price of $1.00 each for the Sterling Silver i 

* and $3.00 each for the gold. | 
Each Silver King entitles the purchaser to one vote and 
and each gold ring to three votes for the most popular 

$ girl in either class. 'f 

% The girl in each class receiving the most votes will be J; 

% given a gold ring free. J; 

v Order Your Rings of: y 

| GEORGE JACKSON In the Freshman Class | 

$ ROBERT EDMONDS tn the Sophomore Class t 

Z PAUL PARKS In the Junior I llass 

£ PAUL W. WARREN In the Senior Class 

Y Contest Closes June 15 

| C. B. DYER, Jeweler 

f 234 Massachusetts Avenue. INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA : 

I 1 



* •:• 
I * 

I WOLF & DESSAUER I 

♦ % 

"The slore that's just a little ahead of the resV' I 

I ! 

♦.. * 

Manhattan Shirts— $1.50 to $4.00. Son: "Father what do jail birds 

PATTERSOX-FLETCHER CO. come from?" 

Pa : "They are a species brought up 
Teacher: "Give a sentence with by bats, larks, chickens and swallows." 
rigadoor in it." — Cincinnati Enquirer. 

Stude : "Rigadoor may be found in — ■ 

the dictionary." G. R.: "Cleo, isn't it a shame this is 

the last evening I can be with you un- 
The Senior Boy: "I had my picture til tomorrow night?" 
taken today." ■ — 



The Junior Girl: "Who on earth Patterson-Fletcher Co. 's Caps are the 

would steal a tiling like that.'" latest patterns— $1.00 and $1.50. 

♦ * * « • . . 4. * • • • • • • * * * • •*• • 

% X 

I I 

The Jefferson Theatre 

t % 

The House Where You Find J 

Worth While Features 

t i 

Subjects Selected From The World's Greatest Producers •;• 

% . . % 

•> Visualizations of Famous Literary 

Works and Dramas predominate in 

♦ the Jefferson Programs jr 

I Continuous Entertainments from I P. M. to 10.45 P. M. 

'& No interruption during the supper hour f, 

t i 

i | 



I | 

| Quayle 

! 

1 S<t*el Engravers 

X •■"hi < 

Manufacturing Jewelrymen 

X American Universities 



.j, ALBANY 

•> 19 CHAPEL STREET 

£ CHICAGO NEW YORK 

^ 640 W RANDOLPH STREET 25 w 42ND STREET 



i 



•^^•^5**$* , *Z*^**X**t**w**'*'* *Z* ****** *$*♦♦* *v* ■*!• *5* *I* ••i" *♦* »J**** **•♦!* "I* •£* ****t* , *5*'***' *♦*♦!♦ *!*♦*■• *t* ♦!♦ -I**I* *"t**i» -I* *Z* *•• *t* *t* *•* **" *•* *I*^I* *♦• *t* ****** *♦■ *!♦ •I**** -I**** •5» 

* t 

•:• 
Renting of Caps and Gowns to Graduating Classes a Specialty. % 



I E. R. MOORE COMPANY 

X Makers of 

College Caps, Gowns 
and Hoods 

% Originators of Moore's Official High School Cap and Gown. 



* 4016 BROADWAY, CHICAGO Distributors to the Class of 1914. S 

t J. 

* J. 



i I 

X i 



X 




$ 

! 
Loose Leaf Ledgers | 



207 Ea& Berry Street 



Seclional Posl Binders I 

x Ledger Leaves and I 

I Indexes i 

x I 

^ We have a Catalog for you. $ 

I M for it. I 



I I 

£ Singmaster Printing Company * 

* Gooc/ Printing £ 



S X 



»' ! ■■ > ■ >'> ■ ! ■ ■ > ■ !"» ' ! ' ■ > ♦ » ♦■ > <n> i >$ .» ft i t ii{»»fr. | .$, | .ifr, | i •:••:••:•••••:•••••••••••••.•..•..•..•..•..•..•..•..•..■..•.• •. 

i i * "'""• 

I | FRANK CIGAR STORE I 

% | CI GARS, TOBACCOS and PIPE S | 

I S Newspapers, Magazines, Candies t 

t i. 1 

* S IM 3067 

'X ':* ••• 

.j. £ I'i IR BOX < '■' M »l>s I 

♦ 1* 1034 Calhoun St. I 




I A Tight Pinch | I 

t *:' *• 

% is unknown in "Walk-Over" Shoes % % 

■|> fitted the "Walk-Over" way •:• ••• 

X % X 

I Walk-Over Boot Shop | t 

% — 812 Calhoun Street— * £ 

Lillian W.— "Why is a 'Pod $2.00 
Straw Hat like a kiss over the phone?" 
John R.— "It is not felt." 



The Shoe Store in the Air * 

PHONE 2049 J 

Simon's Sample Shoe Shop J 

I. ADIICS' AM) MEN'S $3 50 TO $5.00 * 

SHOE VALUES FOR $2.50 AM) $2.95 ♦ 

Fifth Floor. Shoaff Bldg. * 

Rooms 505-8. •> 



Silk Shirts $150 In $5.00. 

PATTERSON-FLETCHER I '< >. 



Wear "Lion Brand." Collars. 

PATTERSON-FLETCHER CO. 



He: "Nice little game, football. 
She (ardenl suffragette): "Yes, in- 
deed. Very ladylike." 









SCROGGY'S 

PINGREE MA DE FOOTW K. 1 1! 

-for- 

31 EX J XI) WOMEN 

814 Calhoun Street 

i •**»*• •*+**+ ****** •*•*** ♦*• *** ****** ♦J**** ****** ****** *** '** ****** ****** ****** ****** *** *** *** *** ****** **** 



♦> KLOTHES 
f KRITICALLY 
% KLEANED 



REGIS 



PHONES: 
Office, 2198: Works, 859. 



FRENCH 



DRY CLEANING AND DYEING COMPANY 

EXPERT CLEANING, PRESSING AND REPAIRING 

Office — 1205 Calhoun St., Fort Wayne, Ind. 

GET OUR PRICES BY PHONE 



GAIETY THEATRE 
HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS' MEETING PLACE 

ORIGINAL MIRROR SCREEN' Perfecl Projection 

Clean, Comfortable, Steam Heated, Perfectly Ventilated 
\ Pictures Refined, Educating, Moral and Amusing 



* * ♦ 

X T , . ,, % 
|j We Launder Collars "Right" 

% % 

I Banner Laundering Co. i 

i f 

Cold Starching of Shirts Preserves the v 

f ? 

" LINEN & COLOR " % 

I | 

i "? 

Y "THE LIVE CLOTHES STORE" V 

X X 

I r . '•• 

Home of Kuppenheimer Clothes 

% A 

PIT FORM CLOTHES FOR YOUNG MEN •:• 

X r . * 

4- Smartest Furnishings for Young Fellows •:• 

Barker-Rose Company 

x x 

Y 714 CALHOUN STREET X 



•:* ' * * " * ***•:• 

y Artists' Supplies Home Phone 1165 4 

1 W. C. BAADE & CO. 

! . i 

X School Book Depository X 

% 926 Calhoun Street Fort Wayne, Indiana X 

* • • • • M .%.• M .: ' .•„• .••••• A • .'... .• • • • •..• .• .• .%.' AJ .%.• *4 &* .♦..• .'. <• «M •-• *4 ............. t 

•>^>^«>.> A ^>* A $.>«fr.>.M»<">'fr A '8> A 'S"><t~>'£ A <' a * aaaaa <">*^ aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa .;. aa 

♦ PHONE 1657 '•* ? *$* 

t C. W. SANDER ♦ t Hand-a-Cura x 

A DOCKS AND STATIONERY t ¥ «ill positively heal .'happed hnnds in one $ 

.*. Pictures and Picture Framing .-• •"• n 'Sht. li'.v ii. .«, 

% Window Shades a Specialty V * D. & N. Pharmacy * : * 

4» Subscriptions on Magazines ••• .'. .,.,", ' _ _ . », ♦!• 

X i tj Jt7 . -m • c . .*. A '' m > '' ( »t Itatp Drug Store at tin- ... 

y 133 W est Main Street £ V Transfer Corner * 

.J. On? Block West of Courthouse .'. A J, 



^♦♦w*****^*^*****^*********** a * aaaaa * aaa -:~> aa <«x« aaaaaaaaaaaa 

* Phone 1538 T •*• ' ' Promise to Save You $5 to $10.00" « 

J. C. HUTZELL I * *~- 3 * M * °*^ c,otft ** 

4> Druggist Y 

X I ? 

I 1402 West Main Street, Fort Wayne I | 10 " p^*™ Slt ? 






♦^•♦♦^•^•♦♦^•♦♦•^•♦♦♦♦♦^•♦♦♦^•*<..j<.-:":.<.<..:..:..:..:..:..:..:..:..;..:..;.. : .. ; .. ; .^.. : .^.., 



*•:•*•:•+•:••;••:•* 



Young /Hen's 



WEARING APPAREL BEARING THE GOLDEN LABEL 

is the best guarantee of style and quality. 

GOLDENS NOVELTY SHOP 



■ %• •»• %• *** ••♦*•*•!••**•!• *i" ••* ••••!• • 



Headquarters for 

Stationery. 

Calendars, 

Gift Books 

and other 

Holiday 

Novelties 



A LERD I NC -T TTEN B ACH fO 



A AN0 I i 
LEATHER 
SHOP 



827 CALHOUN ST. 



Fort Wayne's 

Leading 

Leather Goods 

Shop — 

The Home 

of the 

"Indestructo." 



| QUALITY AND SERVICE 

X 

Silk Hats— 50c an.l $1.00. Teacher: "Whal other evenl do v. 

PATTERSON-FLETCHER CO. think of when you hear 711 :" 

lie: ■'('raps." 
Fresh: "Gee, your shoe squeaks!" 
Senior: "Yep; there's plenty of mu- 
sic in my sole." 



Initial Belts— 50c ami 75c. 

PATTERSON-FLETCHER C 



WWVTV 



You Furnish the Girl- 
Weil Furnish the House 

129 East Berry Street and 726-728 Clinton Street 
Almost Opposite the Postoffice. 

Your Credit is Good 



h$*****$mJ*»>*2. $ «j*<**>*>*t**5 M J' M '******I**J** 



•>♦ *!• •!* •♦•*> •!• 'J* *l* •> •> • 



i Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
! % SCHOOL of \\ 
| '$&, ENGINEERING 

A CIVIL MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL and CHEMICAL 

.'. ENGINEERING, and GENERAL SCIENCE 

':* Send for a Catalogue. TROY, Nil" 



FortM^yne 
Engraving 0?> 

- MAKERJ 9F - 
HALFTONES and 
ZINC ETCHINGS 
FGRALLKINPS 
6F HIGH CLASS 
-PRINTING. 

TORT WAYNE INIX 



Wilson Bros. Athletic Union Suits — 
•rice— 80e to $4.00. 

PATTERSON-FLETI II HR ( II >. 







XJ 



i@U-YS WONT SUp^^T 

fl ^ PAT D.I 8 QT "*t 



"Won't Slip" Tires, Like Cut, Used or, 
Maimsoim, Fowler & Record 
BICYCLES $22.50 TO $35.00 

"WON'T SLIP" Tires, regular $5, at $3.7:- 
: Peerless" Thorn Proof Red Tires, $3.50 
"Thorn Proof" Heav Tread roadster $2.50 
Morgan & Wright double tube tires $3.00 
Road Tires, not guaranteed $1 .50 

Last Year's High Grade tires, to close $2.00 
Inner Tubes, 75c, $1, $1.25, G. & J. $1.50 
Bring Baby Cab Wheels for new tires. Come to 
the Big Store for your Bicycle Tires and Repairs. 

BROSIUS & BROSIUS, "c^umb^st? 

We sell Ranees and Base Burners. Open even- 
ings April 1 to July 1. Good second-hand bicycles 
SS.OO o J15.00 



Walking Slicks are in vogue — we 
have them— 50c to $5.00. 

PATTERS! )N-FLET< 'HER ( !< I. 



X H. S. PANELS 

X 50 Cents Per Dozen 

>!■ WITH FOUR DIFFERENT POSES 

jr* Made only at 

\ THE NEW YORK STUDIO 

X 1122 Calhoun Street 

* OPPOSITE THE CATHEDRAL 



When You Think of Flowers 
Think of 

DOSWELL'S 
"QUALITY FLOWERS" 

ALL THAT THE NAME IMPLIES 

238 W. Main Street 
Telephone 1183 






MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT 



A. C. AURENTZ 



FINE CONFECTIONS 



826 CALHOUN STREET '. 



-PHONE 768- 



LARGEST ASSORTMENT— LOWEST PRICES 

KEIL $ KEIL 

WALL PAPER, INTERIOR DECORATING AND PAINTING 



PICTURES AND PICTURE FRAMING 
MOULDINGS AND CURTAINS 



926 Calhoun Street 



FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 






We Furnish the Home on Easy Payments Without 
Adding- to the Price 





HOUSE. FURNISHING CO. 



lta AND 114> EAST> OOI^LJIVIBI/V BT1 

JStor« only OIVR SQUARE north and a 
| ^JF£W FJ&CT tutfromtlu TRANSFER CORNER 



www 



RUN IN WHEN YOU RUN OUT OF 
HATS OK MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

We are Thoroughly Prepared to Take Care of Your Wants 

F. H. BOHNE & BRO. 

Hatters and Furnishers 
824 AND 1412 CALHOUN STREET 



Pure Silk Hose in black and colors 
— 25 cents. 

PATTERSOX-FLETt 'II KH ( '( >. 



i mm 


to 


Ins 


lillL 


happi 

s oil 


II 1 

lis 



" I met a deaf ami dunil 
who had every joint in 
broken." 
"Horrible! How did it 
An eye is the smallest part of a head "He used to crack joke: 

that can exist in a monocle. gers." 

I HIGH SCHOOL PINS AND RINGS 

*| Sterling Silver Pins 50 Cents 

$ Sterling Silver Rings $1.00 and $1.50 

Solid Gold Rings $3.50 and $5.00 

I TRENKLEY & KOERBER, jewelers 



I;i\ 



STANDISH4W&> 




COLLAR 2for25« 

Cluett Peabody if Cq.Inc. Makers 






| | Society Brand 

I I Clothes 

A A 

♦ * The best made for young men. 

I l The Shields Clothing Co. 

% % The Young Men's Store. 



EDMUNDS 

Everything Electric 



1019 Calhoun St. 



Telephone '2(32 



*£ Flowers for the sweet girl graduate at 



Bradley Flower Shop 

Exclusive, original and artistic styles in corsage bouquets and baskets. 
828 Calhoun Street Telephone 1229 






The Greek 



Chocolates are superior to all others 



PURITY AND QUALITY 

All the Latest and Fancy Drinks at our Sanitary Fountain 

The Largest and Most Sanitary Confectionery in the State 

Corner Calhoun and Jefferson Streets 

TELEPHONE 588. FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 



•}• Repairing and Special Work 

X To Order 

£ Fort Wayne Trunk & Leather Co. 

924 CALHOUN STREET 
PHONE 2960 
Y Fort Wayne, Indiana 



Phone 3129 
WIEGMAN & GIRARDOT 

SPORTING GOODS CO. 

622 Clinton Street 

FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 



♦ SHARP & WEIHE 

£ "YOUR DRUGGISTS" 
4* SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

Y AURENTZ CHOCOLATES AND 

.'. CHOICE CANDIES 

* —Phone 47— 

Y, Corner Lafayette and Lewis Streets 



Lyric Theater Hnlldi 



Phono 3208. 



I The Gift Shop 



Maude E. Gardne 



1016 Calhoun St. 






Fort Wayne Eledric Works 

OF 

General Electric Company 

"WOOD" SYSTEMS 



Manufacturers of 

Complete Equipments for Power and 

Lighting Plants. 

Alternators, Generators, Meters, Trans- 
formers, Motors, Switchboards, Com- 



♦ pensarcs, etc. 

I 



* 



> MANICURING Leaders in Up-To-Date and Artistic Hair Goods CHIROPODY \ 

l 



Toilet Articles 
Perfumes, Powde 

Pace I've: 



StauTttbrrka 



Telephone 1281 1 004 Calhoun * 



Exclusive Novelties 
for the 

Holidays 



•!• HAIR DRESSING FACIAL MASSAGE 

.;. * 



WHERE PRICE AND QUALITY ALWAYS MEET. 

BESSE JEWELRY CO. 

910 Calhoun St. Phone 1956. 



! App's Shoes I \ 

% —ARE— 

I Good Shoes 



ITHV I) POT 1 II) I \' r 



$ uutju/n uuuinLiiniu $ 



.«. J. C. HINTON. Prop. 

| | Lunches to Order at All Hours ♦ 



1516 Calhoun St. 
FORT WAYNE. INDIANA 



$ ♦ t 

t<"I'^<'V<'C"t'0't , C"t'0< , ^ , t"t"t'^'T T ifr | T"'fr'H^"t"K' » <»| « 0»I , C" t' ' t"& l t ' ^ l t l O * g *g*v»O Tg» » » »»< 







I Kodaks and Films | 
JONES 



112 West Wayne St. X 

Fort Wayne, Ind. $ 

Developing and Finishing. X 

X 







iEtss (Stan Imtrk 



txrluatur iHillittrry 

216 Berry Street, We^t 
Foit Wayne, Ind. 



Special values in Hart Sella ffner & 
.Marx $25.00 Suits — Styles for young 
men. 

PATTERSON-FLETCHER CO. 



"Who was the greatest financier?" 
"Noah. He floated a stock company 

while all his contemporaries were in 

involuntary liquidation. " 




THIS IS NO DREAM 

FLYING MERKLE.R-S&DeLUXE MOTORCYCLES 

Have given better results and more satisfaction for more years than any 
other motorcycle. For a vacation tour nothing equals an Indian. R-S or 
DeLuxe. Ask the man who rides one. Better quality for 
your money. Greater power for its size. 

INDIANA BICYCLE & SUPPLY CO. 

Everything for the Motorcycle and Bicycle Rider 
Yes, we do Repairing 
916 Harrison Street 



',* ****** ****** *** *** ****** ****** ****** ****** ****** *5* 



Rabus, Che tailor 



H6 Berry St. Ulcst 






I JACOBS' 

1 MUSIC HOUSE i 

| 10:21-1023 Calhoun Street % 

% Home Phone 621 Fort Wayne, Ind. % 

C " l" > » »<"t " >' K"t"? '>»' t l » < " > » » l l"> '>»»H'»» 
1* . ••* 

% Bicycles and Supplies. % 

| Skates Sharpened. Baby £ 

% Buggies Retired. % 

E. J. WILKINSON. I 

% 617 Clinton St. $ 

•> ^ * 

♦ THE BEST PLACE ? 

% to Buy J 

|. STATIONERY .*. 

J Special prices to students for en- '}, 

•> graved work and calling cards. 

| 



Kratzsch & Schroeder 

618 Calhoun St. 
The Best $20 Suit. 
The Best $3 Hat. 
The Best $1 Shirt. 
The Best in Everything Else. 

1 •••* •!♦•»• .J.*!* •> *> •> •;• •♦• •:• •> •** •!• •!* •;• * 6 * v • •!* • ♦ * •:• •; 



•*• »"« •*• »*• •*• •*• •*• •*• •*• •** •"• »*• •*• .*• •*• »% •*• ••• ••• A ••• .% ••» »*. •% .'. .*« .•. .•• .*. 

•J- " II Clrary & Builcy uy so—Thry wjl '" .;. 

V "Quality and Service" 

$ Cleary & Bailey, Prompt Printers % 

Z 1028 Calhoun SttMl. Tclephonr 1782 % 

FORT WAYNE. INDIANA * 



LEHMAN BOOK & NEWS CO., 
128 E. Berry St. 



t Weinand's Lunch I 

NOON and 
1 EVENING 

LUNCH 
I 711 COURT STREET. 

% 1421 S. CALHOUN STREET 



I5C 






I Hot Drinks i 

X AND DAINTY LUNCHES 

I Meyer BrotKers Co. 

y 

% At Our Calhoun and Wayne Street Store 

i t 

Before Buying Visit the Big | 
Store, With Big Stock, 

With Little Prices. 

I 
Indiana Furniture Company | 

121-123 East Main St. 





; ; — j^ 




THE GAY LUSSAC 

i In Two Reels) 
CAST : 

Alkali Bill — A base villian. 

Sal Ammoniac — A peroxide Blonde. 

Aluminum Caesium Rubidium — A handsome hero; in fact, the cream 
of tartar. 

Metals. N T on-Metal, Acids. liases and other Reagents. 
FIRST REACT 
(Litimus station of the II (1 line, running from H 2 0.) 

Alkali Bill and other Hydroxides are anilening against the oxide of the 
station. (Business of watching sulphite in the middle of the corode). Train 
whistles in dimorphous distance — 

Bill — "Here she comes, boys, an' oxylate as I thot. (Reduces contents 
of flash as carbides up). 

Sal Ammoniac precipitates and gazes about as if looking for some one. 

Bill (supersaturated) — "0, beautiful sylvite. wishest thou a bromate? 
If so. soda 1. 

Sal (caustically) — "SR!" Slags him in the flux. 

Bill— "Ha! Ha! But this is not the end!" 

Sal (oxide i — "0, horrors! What ultamarine purpose can there be in 
this phosphindish laughter?" (She effloresces). 

CURTAIN 
SECOND REACT 
i Scene laid at Wheatstone 's Bridge) 

Bill, behind bush, watches Sal chloride up the rhodium. 

Bill — "Aha! You have benzene at home for the last time." 

Sal — "Ohm. It's nitrite for you to address me!" 

Bill ( metallurgingly ) — "0, joule of my life, electrolyte of my kinetic en- 
ergy, let us he joined in antimony! Without you to aluminate my life all will 
be dark as Bone Black and 1 will dye." 

Sal (with a corrosive sublimation) — "Carmium! Rather would I commit 
silicide than marry U!" 

Bill — "It was for this that Iodide and you shall 
bridge.) "Hang there over the babbitting 
to the bottomless depths." 

Sal — "Morphine art thou than Satan." 

Bill— "Ba!" (Methylates orange.) 

(Enter Aluminum Caesium Rubidium.) 

Al (drawing his 15 calorie gun from its calorimeter) — "Uiffu.se the lady!" 

Bill (intimately grinding his teeth) — "Na! Xa!" 

Al (caustic sodily)— "OBA, or I'll saphire!" 

Bill (snapping digits) — "Flux, also Proterozoic cytology!" 

Al (etching to get at him) — "Dibasic molecule! I'll kiln you!" 

Bill (quick-limes on his horse) — " Chiliconcorne ! " 

Al (halogenously) — "How different you are from all these other silicates." 

(They earburete.) Curtain. 

— From the Sun Dial, Columbus, Ohio. 

101 



(Ties her over the 
>rook till von dissociate and zink 



illlillililiillliillllllillllllllllllllll 

THIS IS TAGE TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY 







^ 



AFTERTHOUGHT. 

There won't be any more Caldron tin's year. When 
the editors reached this page they decided to stop and [el 
it go at that, hoping for the best, yet fearing the worst. 

We have tried to make this Annual fairly readable, 
not only to the present students, but also to those of the 
fifty years that have gone before. I P we have fallen short 
of our aim, we are indeed sorry, and regret very much 
that we will be unable to refund your money. 

We haven't any doubts that you could have done a 
much better job, if you had had it to do for yourselves. 
Nevertheless, the fact remains that you didn't, and there- 
fore you'll have to grit your teeth and swallow the con- 
tents much like the Freshman takes his castor oil. 

And with these few words we must hid you a fond 
farewell, hoping that fifty years hence some member of 
our class may be able to find his annual and have a few- 
good laughs over the days when he was a kid in high 
school under the reiffn of "Chct the Good." 




THIS IS PAGE TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY-ONE 




IT'S ALL OVER!