(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Calendar of the papers of Benjamin Franklin in the library of the American Philosophical Society"

Illiiil 

iii'iii 



{jl,jj,,l!llin.Ii 



l!ltl>!l<li'l< 



[I'tlinil!'!!''!'"'!! 



iljj tiiiiiililliliini 



-Mlilr, 






iltl 



iiljiiiii 



1 tlii'< 

iillll 

lllllliiitiiii 



i 



i^m 



iiiiiiiiiiiiii II I 



litfijl jlMiiiJiiK 



,,,!llii|(!|IU ,li,, .,.:„,, ,;.,, ; 

|l llMlilll(llinliiii;ii!r..,!i.uii;.;ia>i 

jl nil IIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIII/llllllil!: 
It' I.I 'I !l llllllllMlllllllfli 



!• 



nil 



iiiil' 



itiijiiiiiiiiiiiifiitiifHiii 

I jllllllillHMflllHHIl 



llllitlllll lltlliflllllllll 



<{ llillllllllllllllllli 



IIIIIHHIIHHIIIi 
MIlllMlllllllllfi 



11 j f I! illi/MIMIIIIIIIIItlil 

t j { jl llllllfblllllllllDlli 

>j Hiilj iiOlililiHtlll IHIIII 

)! i|llll|l||)fllllllltlll>; 




BOOK 973 3. Ft cr,r-lPTV * 

AMERICAN PMIIOSOPHICAI SOC.FTV » 
MERICAN PHIIOSOPMICAI. ^lOLir.',;,, 



3 T153 OOQSiaS? 3 



This book may be kept 

FOURTEEN DAYS 

the t ^r- "f^"^'"^ ^^^'^^ "''' ^' ^h-g^d for each day 
the book is kept over time. ^ 




FRANKLIN 

BI-CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 

PHILADELPHIA 

1906 




Weldowood Cameo Medallion of 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN 

presented to 

The: American Philosophtcal Society 

by sir george howard darwin, k.cb 

APRIL 18 1906 



CALENDAR 






OF THE 



PAPERS OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN 



IN THE LIBRARY OF THE 



AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY 



EDITED BY 



L MINIS HAYS 



VOL. I 




printed for 

The American Philosophical Society 

Philadelphia 

1908 



\pA^h 



Copyright, 190S, by 

The American Philosophical Society 

Held at Philadelphia 

For Promoting Useful Knowledge 

under the title of 

The Record of the Celebration of the 
Two Hundredth Anniversary of 
THE Birth of Benjamin Franklin 



Press op 

The new Era printins Company 

Lancaster. Pa. 



CONTENTS 

Vol. I 



Photogravure of the Wedgwood Cameo Medallion 
OF Benjamin Franklin 

Presented to The American Philosophical Society 

BY Sir George Howard Darwin, K.C.B. 

April i8, 1906. 

Frontispiece 

Preface 



Table of Abbreviations 

xi 

Chronology of Benjamin Franklin 

xiii 

Corrigenda 

xvii 

Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

1 730-1 778 

Pages 1-573 



PREFACE. 

Dr. Franklin seems to have contracted, early in life, the habit of 
preserving his correspondence, drafts of letters, and memoranda of all 
kinds, and the mass vi^hich he accumulated during his long and active 
career was very large. In his last Will, dated July 17th, 1788, he 
bequeathed his manuscripts and papers to his grandson, William Temple 
Franklin, who used them in the preparation of " The Life and Writ- 
ings " of his grandfather. These manuscripts and papers William 
Temple Franklin stored at Champlost, the country seat near Philadel- 
phia, of his friend George Fox. A portion of them he subsequently took 
to Europe for use in the completion of this work which he published in 
six volumes in London in 181 7-18 18. 

William Temple Franklin died in Paris on May 25th, 1823, and 
by his Will gave the papers and manuscripts which he had inherited 
from his grandfather to George Fox, and upon the death of the latter, 
his children, Charles P. Fox and IVIary Fox, in July, 1840, deposited 
the collection with The American Philosophical Society, and later, on 
September 17th of the same year, formally gave them to this Society. 

In the transfer there was overlooked a small portion of the Franklin 
papers which had become mixed with the Fox family papers also 
stored in the loft of the stable at Champlost. About twenty-two years 
later, when this loft was being cleaned out and the papers therein were 
being carted off to the paper mill, a small lot of them, most of which had 
originally belonged to the Franklin collection, was rescued from destruc- 
tion by Mrs. Holbrook, a friend and at the time house-guest of Miss 
Fox, to whom they were then given. In 1903 these were purchased 
from her descendants by friends of the University of Pennsylvania, 
and presented to its Library. 

Before making the gift to the American Philosophical Society, up- 
wards of one hundred letters, for the most part to Dr. Franklin from 
members of his family, were separated from the collection and pre- 
sented by Charles P. Fox to Dr. Franklin Bache, a great-grandson 
of Dr. Franklin, and are now in possession of his son. Dr. Thomas 
Hewson Bache. Most of these were printed by William Duane in 
an octavo volume of one hundred and ninety-five pages, published in 
New York in 1859, by C. Benjamin Richardson. 

vii 



viii Preface. 

The papers taken abroad by William Temple Franklin have a less 
clear historj'. For some years they were in the possession of a tailor 
in St. James's Street, London, over whose shop he had lodgings, and 
in the year 1 840 were found by a gentleman who had been a fellow- 
lodger there with him, " roughly bundled-up " on the top shelf of a 
closet in an upper room which William Temple Franklin had occupied. 
This gentleman, an officer under the British Government, kept these 
manuscripts for ten or eleven years, according to Henry Stevens, and 
from time to time offered them in bulk to the British Museum, Lord 
Palmerston, and to the successive American Ministers at the Court of 
St. James, from 1840-1851. In the latter year they were offered to 
Hon. Abbott Lawrence, at that time American Minister in London, 
who, having no authority to purchase them for his Government, re- 
ferred the owner to Henry Stevens as a likely buyer, and he, three days 
later, purchased the entire collection. 

Mr. Stevens repaired and arranged the papers, and added to them 
a number of Dr. Franklin's printed works and imprints, and finally 
in 1882 the entire collection was purchased from him by the Govern- 
ment of the United States, at the instigation of the then Secretary 
of State, the Honorable James G. Blaine, and was deposited in the 
Library of the Department of State. Later, under the Executive Order 
of March 9th, 1903, all the manuscripts and papers in this collection, 
with the exception of the diplomatic records, were transferred to the 
Library of Congress. A Calendar of the Stevens collection was pre- 
pared under the direction of Mr. Worthington C. Ford, Chief of the 
Division of Manuscripts, and was published in 1905 by the Library 
of Congress. 

So far as is known, these four collections constitute the whole of the 
remaining papers of Dr. Franklin, although others may be in existence, 
for before Philadelphia was occupied by the British in 1777, a large chest 
filled with his most valuable early papers, including the drafts of his 
letters for twenty years, covering the whole period of his residence in Eng- 
land, was sent for safe keeping to Joseph Galloway's home at Trevose, 
near Bristol, Pennsylvania. During the military operations around 
Philadelphia, the British visited Mr. Galloway's house, broke open this 
chest and rifled its contents. After the evacuation of this part of the 
country by the British forces, Richard Bache, Dr. Franklin's son- 
in-law, hearing of the condition of these papers, went to Trevose and 
collected the scattered, mud-bespattered, and much injured remnants 
of the contents of the chest, and removed them to Philadelphia. It seems 



Preface. ix 

most likely that all of the papers that were then lost were ruthlessly 
destroyed, for if any of them were still in existence they would probably 
have come to light before this time. 

The collection, as it now stands, is divided up approximately as follows: 

The American Philosophical Society. .. 13,800 pieces (78 per cent.) 
The Stevens Collection in the Library 

of Congress 2,938 pieces ( 16.6 per cent.) 

The University of Pennsylvania 840 pieces ( 4.8 per cent.) 

Dr. T. Hewson Bache 100 pieces ( .6 per cent.) 

Total 16,678 pieces ( 100 per cent.) 

This completes the history, so far as is known, of the papers pre- 
served by Dr. Franklin, and with the publication of the present Calendar 
all of them are made readily available to the student of American history. 

In preparing this Calendar the Editor has adhered to the spelUng 
of proper names as given in the original manuscripts and has, when it 
seemed desirable, endeavored to supply omissions in the letters so as 
to promote the clear understanding of the text, all such additions have 
been enclosed within [ ], while in the Index he has sought to give 
such information as would enable the reader to identify the authors 
of the letters and the persons mentioned therein. Letters which have 
been published in full elsewhere, have been scantily calendared in these 
volumes, and a footnote reference given to the publication in which they 
appear in extenso. 

The very full Index, which accompanies these volumes, it is hoped 
will render their contents readily available for reference. 

The Editor takes pleasure in acknowledging his indebtedness for 
valuable assistance received from many sources in the preparation of 
this Calendar, and especially to Mrs. Lightner Witmer for the admirable 
manner in which she had calendared a very considerable portion of the 
correspondence, and to Miss Rebecca Edmiston Kirkpatrick for the 
conscientious and painstaking labor with which she has assisted in the 
passage of the work through the press, and in the preparation of the Index. 

I. M. H. 

Philadelphia, 
September, 1908. 



TABLE OF ABBREVIATIONS. 

A. = Autograph. 

D. = Document. 
Diss. = Dissertation. 
Dr. = Draft. 

E. = Endorsement. 

F. R. S. = Fellow of the Royal Society, of London. 
L, = Letter. 

M. A. P. S. = Member of the American Philosophical Society. 

M. C. C. = Member of the Continental Congress. 

Mem. = Memorandum. 

Ms. = Manuscript. 

N. = Note. 

P. = Person. 

p. = Page. 

S. = Signed. 

[ ] = Addition by the Editor. 

[?] = Doubtful reading or information. 



XI 



CHRONOLOGY OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 

1706. Born at Boston, January 17 (old style, January 6). 

1 71 8. Apprenticed, as a printer, to his brother James. 

1723. Migrated to Philadelphia in October. 

1724. Arrived in England on December 24, to get a printer's outfit. 
1726. Left England, on July 23, to return to America, and arrived 

at Philadelphia, October 11. 

1728. Formed a partnership in the printing business with Hugh 

Meredith. 

1729. Purchased the "Pennsylvania Gazette." 

1730. Appointed Public Printer by the Pennsylvania Assembly. 
Married Deborah Reed, in September. 

1 73 1. Founded the Library Company of Philadelphia. 

1732. Began the publication of Poor Richard's Almanac. 

Elected Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Free Masons. 

1736. Chosen Clerk of the Pennsylvania Assembly. 
Organized the first fire company in Philadelphia. 

1737. Appointed Postmaster at Philadelphia. 

1 741. Established a printing office in New York, in partnership with 

James Parker. 

1742. Invented the Franklin Open Stove. 

1743. Founded the American Philosophical Society and served as its 

Secretary. 
1745. Began his experiments in electricity. 

1747. Propounded his theory of electricity. 

1748. Chosen a member of the City Council of Philadelphia. 

1749. Retired from active business as a printer. 
Established the identity of lightning and electricity. 
Published his " Proposals relating to the education of youth in 

Pensilvania " which led to the formation of the University 
of Pennsylvania. 

xiii 



xiv Chronology of Benjamin Franklin 

1750. Elected to the Assembly of Pennsylvania and reelected annuall5 

for 14 years. 
Appointed a Commissioner to make a treaty with the Indians. 

1 75 1. His "Experiments and Observations on Electricity" was pub- 

lished in London. 
Promoted the founding of the Pennsylvania Hospital. 

1752. Aided in establishing the first company in America, for insuring 

houses against loss by fire. 
A French translation of his " Experiments and Observations on 

Electricity " was published at Paris. 
Made his kite experiments in June and discharged electricity 

from the clouds. 

1753. Appointed Deputy Postmaster-General for the Colonies. 
Recommended that lightning rods be placed on buildings to pre- 
vent their being struck by lightning. 

The Royal Society awarded him the Copley Gold Medal, and 
Louis XVI directed his thanks to be sent to him for his 
useful discoveries in electricity. 

Harvard and Yale Colleges conferred on him the degree of 
Master of Arts. 

1754. Represented the Province of Pennsylvania at the Albany Con- 

gress held to devise means for the common defense. 

1755. Sent by the Pennsylvania Assembly to confer with General 

Braddock for the defense of the Pennsylvania frontier against 
the French and Indians. 
By request of the Governor took charge of the defense of the 
frontier. 

1756. Elected Fellow of the Royal Society, April 29, 

1757. Sent to England by the Assembly of Pennsylvania as their Agent 

to urge their rights. Sailed on June 5, with his son. 

1758. A German translation of his "Experiments on Electricity" 

was published at Leipzig. 

1759. The University of St. Andrew^s conferred upon him the degree 

of Doctor of Laws. 



Chronology of Benjamin Franklin xv 

1 76 1. Visited Belgium and Holland. 

1762. The University of Oxford conferred upon him the degree of 

D. C. L. on April 30. 
Returned to America and arrived at Philadelphia, November I. 

1763. Made a tour of the Northern Colonies inspecting and regulat- 

ing the post offices. 

1764. Elected Speaker of the Assembly of Pennsylvania, in May. 
Again sent to England as the Agent of the Province of Penn- 
sylvania. Left Philadelphia, November 7. 

1765. Opposed the passage of the Stamp Act. 

1766. Examined in the House of Commons relative to the repeal of 

the Stamp Act — February. 
Went to Germany June 15, returned August 13. 

1767. Visited Paris August 28, returned October 8. 

1768. Appointed Agent in England of the Colony of Georgia, April i. 

1769. Elected President of the American Philosophical Society. 
Visited Paris July 14, returned August 24. 

Appointed Agent in England for the Colony of New Jersey, 
November 8. 

1770. Appointed Agent in England for the Colony of Massachusetts. 

1 771. IVIade a tour of Scotland and Ireland. 

1772. Elected one of the eight foreign members of the Royal Academy 

of Sciences, of Paris. 

1773. A French translation of his " Experiments in Electricity " edited 

by Dubourg, in 2 vols., 4 to., was published at Paris. 

1774. Examined before the Privy Council on the petition of the 

Massachusetts Assembly for the removal of Gov. Hutchinson. 
Dismissed by the British Ministry from the Office of Deputy 

Postmaster-General in North America. 
Presented to the King the petition of the First Continental 

Congress. 

1775. Returned to America, leaving London March 20 and arriving 

at Philadelphia, May 5. 
Elected Delegate to the Continental Congress, on May 6. 



xvi Chronology of Benjamin Franklin 

Elected Chairman of the Committee of Safety of Pennsylvania. 

Proposed in the Continental Congress " Articles of Confedera- 
tion and Perpetual Union." 

Appointed Postmaster-General of the United Colonies. 
1776. Signed the Declaration of Independence. 

July 16, elected President of the Convention to frame a Con- 
stitution for the State of Pennsylvania. 

Appointed one of the Commissioners to the Court of France. 

Sailed in October and arrived in France December 4. 

1778. Negotiated a Treaty of Amity and Commerce and also a Treaty 

of Alliance with France, February 6. 
Appointed Minister Plenipotentiary to the Court of France, 
September 14. 

1779. An edition of his "Works," edited by Vaughan, was published 

in London. 

1780. A German translation of his "Works" was published at 

Dresden in 3 vols., 8 vo. 

1 78 1. Appointed one of the Commissioners to negotiate a Treaty of 

Peace with Great Britain. 

1782. Negotiated a Preliminary Treaty of Peace with Great Britain, 

November 30. 

1783. Concluded, April 3, a Treaty of Amity and Commerce with the 

King of Sweden. 
Negotiated the Definitive Treaty of Peace with Great Britain, 

September 3. 
An Italian translation of his works was published at Padua. 
1785. Negotiated a Treaty of Amity and Commerce with the King 
of Prussia. 
After having taken farewell leave of the King of France, left 

Paris, July 12, and arrived at Philadelphia, September 14. 
Elected President of the State of Pennsylvania, October 26. 
1787. Chosen a Delegate to the Convention to frame the Constitu- 
tion of the United States. 
1790. Died at Philadelphia on April 17. 



CORRIGENDA. 



Page 3 line ii for " 




' 19 ' 


' 15 ' 






' 23 ' 


' 36 ' 






' 39 ' 


' 27 ' 






' 39 ' 


' 31 ' 






' 41 ' 


' I ' 






' 47 ' 


' 18 ' 






' 57 ' 


' 26 ' 






' 71 ' 


' 31 ' 






' 97 ' 


' 15 ' 






' 143 ' 


' 22 ' 






' 144 ' 


' 29 ' 






' 166 ' 


' 8 ' 






' 182 ' 


' II ' 






' 187 ' 


' 27 ' 






' 240 ' 


' 27 ' 






' 275 ' 


' 29 ' 






' 275 ' 


' 34 ' 






' 278 ' 


' 3 ' 






' 281 ' 


' 15 ' 






' 283 ' 


' I ' 






' 307 ' 


' 15 ' 






' 307 ' 


' 16 ' 






' 310 ' 


' 28 ' 






' 325 ' 


' 13 ' 






' 339 ' 


' 23 ' 






' 352 ' 


' 8 ' 






' 364 ' 


' 6 ' 






' 365 ' 


' 29 ' 






' 393 ' 


' 23 ' 






' 393 ' 


' 30 ' 






' 407 ' 


' 27 ' 






' 421 ' 


' II ' 






' 424 ' 


' 14 ' 





Dawse " read 

Musschenbrock " 

William " 

Truslen " 

Somonozow " 

Jos[eph] " 

Royle " 

Reed " 

Mr. Millar" 

Shippon " 

Roclcford " 

Bendict " 

W[illiam] " 

J. M. Lawrence " 

Potiens " 

Dannemours " 

Lelyveed " 

Tollins " 

Folique " 

Kerquelin " 

Rudolph " 

B." 

R. B." 

d'Atterns " 

la Cepede " 

LXII " 

De Germat " 

Sapicha " 

Mostouski " 

Elaud " 

Toustain " 

Maziere " 
Marine " 
Roderigue " 

xvii 



' Dowse " 

' Musschenbroek " 

' Alexander " 

' Trusler " 

' Lomonozow" 

'Jo[hn]" 

' Royal " 

' Read " 

' [Andrew] Millar " 

' Shippen " 

' Rochford " 

' Benedict " 

' F." 

' Jno. Lawrence " 

' Poteins " 

' D'Anmours " 

' Lehsveld " 

' ToUius " 

' FoHgne " 

' Kerguelen " 

' Rodolph " 

'B[ache]" 

'R[ichard] B[ache]" 

' d'Atterns " 

' Lacepede " 

'XLII" 

'De Gimat" 

' Sapieha " 

' Mostowski " 

' Claud " 

' Toustain-Riche- 

bourg " 
' Meziere " 
'M[ilitai]r[e]" 
' Roderique " 



XVlll 







Corrigenda. 




443 line lo 


for " Donap " read 


" Donop " 


483 ' 


' 10 


" "Thiaud" 


" Thiard " 


501 ' 


' 18 


" "Kerguelin" 


" Kerguelen " 


503 ' 


' 13 


" " Joseph Wharton " " 


"Joseph Wharton, 
[Jr.] " 


506 ' 


' 16 


" "Winbert" 


" Wuibert " 


510 ' 


' 17 


" "Jacob Henemer" " 


"Abbe Jacob Hemmer" 


519 ' 


' 6 


" "[Chevalier]" 


" [Agathon Guine- 
ment] " 


520 ' 


' II 


" "Rion" 


" Riou " 


535 ' 


' 15 


" "Walshe" 


" Walsh " 


545 ' 


' 2 


" " de Weiss " 


"Weiss de" 


552 ' 


' 30 


" " Villeboisnes " 


"de La Villesboisnet " 


553 ' 


' 6 


(< <( (( 


a (I 


569 ' 


' 13 


" " [John Reinhold] " " 


(( M 




569 ' 


' 14 


" "Dr. Forster" 


" Dr. [John Reinhold] 
Forster " 


569 ' 


' 17 


" "Rioux" 


" Riou " 


570 ' 


' 7 


" "[1778]" 


" [1782] " 



CALENDAR 

OF THE 

PAPERS OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN 

IN THE LIBRARY OF THE 

American Philosophical Society 



LETTERS TO BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 

From Hugh Meredith. 1730. July 14. 

Dissolution of partnership. All printing material in the office and 
debts owing to the partners to be the property of Benjamin Franklin. 
D. S. I p. LII, 14. 

FrojH Joseph Morgan. 1735. July 7. Maidenhead. 

Concerning the printing of a new edition of " The Temporal Interest 
of North America." ^ Writes out two paragraphs to be added to the 
manuscript. Amount of money he has paid him. A. L. S. I p. I, I. 

' See Hildeburn's Issues of the Penna. Press, No. 496. 

From James Franklin. 1740. November 5. Philadelphia. 

Indenture as apprentice to Benjamin Franklin, printer. D. S. I p. 

LXVI, 5. 
From Constant Reader, A. B. \^Circa 1740.] 

Requests him to insert the accompanying note in his next paper. The 
note is a letter to a friend, giving some distinguishing characteristics of a 
certain species of Gospel-preachers, who would have brought more 
credit to themselves and good to their fellow-men if they had con- 
tinued in a secular employment. L. 3 p. XLIV, 94. 

From G[ilbert] Tennent. 1741. September 22. 

Acknowledging his kindness in sending him certain dissenting re- 
marks on his Sermon on Justifications, likewise in sending the " Quer- 
2 — I 



2 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

ists," ^ lately printed by Franklin; intends to write an answer to the 
former, which will deal with the principal matters in the " Querists." 
Had the pleasure of discoursing with Franklin's brother in his pass 
through his place. Trusts that notwithstanding Mr. Franklin's gifts 
of Nature, he may be kept humble and be enabled to improve his uncom- 
mon genius for God's glory, his own and others' benefits. A. L. S. i p. 
^ See Hildeburn's Issues of the Penna. Press, No. 647. I, 2, 

From Jacob Spicer. 1742. September 20. Cape May. 

Asking him to insert the enclosed advertisement ; will pay also for his 
subscription to Mr. Franklin's Gazette. A. L. S. i p. I, 3. 

From W[illia]m Dames. 1746. March 16. 

Asking that all his letters may be forwarded to him. A. L. S. i p. 

1,4. 
From P[eter] CoUinson. 1747. June i. London. 
Books sent by Elias Bland. A. L. S. i p. LXIX, 49. 

Fro?n [Rev.] G[eorge] W[hitefield]. 1747. June 23. 

Thanks him for the preamble to the subscription which has for its 
purpose the raising of funds for the support of the orphan house in which 
he is personally interested. [Mutilated.] A. L S. 4 p. XLIV, i. 

From James Turner. 1747. July 6. Boston. 

Sends a seal ordered for Mr. Read ; apologizes for having kept him 
waiting so long but has been involved in large, unprofitable silver-smith's 
work. Regrets the price he mentioned for the seal, the work being far 
more than he expected; however, will stand strictly to his bargain, and 
trusts to his generosity to pay the extra amount. Would be glad of an 
opportunity to do any engraving. A. L. S. i p. I, 5* 

From G. Row — . 1747. July 21. North East. 

Requests Dr. Franklin to forward to him any letters which he may 
have or which may arrive for him from Virginia in his care. A. L. 
I p. XLIV, 2. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 3 

From Jonas Green. 1747. July 25. Annapolis. 

Concerning two packets sent him from the Barbadoes by Mr. James 
Bingham. Increase in his salary and also in his work. Begs Mr. 
Franklin to send him a parcel of paper and some other small articles by 
Mr. Daniel Rawlings. The Virginian's speech caused a deal of laugh- 
ter; well-approved of by some in that colony; has not heard how the 
Baronet himself liked it. Weather very hot; has been troubled with 
fever. Sends their hearty respects to Mrs. Franklin and Miss Sally. 
Rejoiced to see that his brave countrymen are to be rewarded for their 
expense in taking Cape Breton. A. L. S. i p. I, 6. 

From Joseph Dawse. 1747. July 27. Boston. 

Writes on behalf of Mrs. Steel, to acknowledge the many kind acts 
of friendship she hath received from Mr. Franklin, also to solicit the 
cause of his displeasure with her since her departure from Philadelphia. 
Mrs. Steel's great esteem for him. Requests him to ?ell her horse and 
chair and to let him know the sum of her indebtedness. A. L. S. i p. 

1,7. 
From Dan[iel] Cheston. 1747. August 2. Chester, [Md.]. 

Acknowledging his favor of the 23d ult. ; applied to Mr. Edward 
Scott for the money; will do everything in his power to get it as soon as 
possible and send it up. A, L. S. i p. I, 8. 

From Mary Franklin. 1747. August 21. Newport. 

The loss of Capt. Grubb's vessel with a great deal of his cargo. 
Acknowledging a book sent her some time before, called Pamely 
[Pamela]. Her daughter, Sarah, has two sons; has taken the elder to 
keep for a time, both parents being weakly and poor. Heard Mr. 
Whitfield preach. A. L. S. i p. I, 9. 

From James Parker. 1747. September 7. New York. 

Knows of no one who has any Spanish paper to sell cheap. The En- 
graver he applied to about the plate, is an idle, lazy fellow, always mak- 
ing excuses; despairs of ever getting him to do it. His Long-Primer 
almost worn out ; asks his advice about sending home for a new one. 
Received the Pocket Companion ; is the Young Man's Companion almost 
done? His son is recovered but his wife is poorly. A. L. S. i p. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d s., XVI, 189. -^J ^^- 



4 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

i^rom James Parker. 1747. September 21. New York. 

Concerning a debt of Mr. Franklin's he is to pay to Mr. De Lancey; 
Sympathizes with him over his frequent losses. Mr. H. deprived of his 
position as Councillor, and out of the Governor's favor. Certain ma- 
terials and their prices. The new type he has used in ' The History of 
the Rebellion.' Various articles he wishes sent to him. Thanks God 
the sickness has greatly abated. A. L. S. i p. I, ii. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d s., XVI, 190. 

From Dan[iel] Cheston. 1747. September 28. Chester, [Md.]. 

Concerning the order drawn in favor of Mr. Edward Scott; has been 
unable to procure anything but promises. Suggests that Mr. Franklin 
should write a threatening line or two, which he will take care to de- 
liver and enforce. A. L. S. i p. I, 12. 

i^row Cadwallader Golden. 1747. September 28. New York. 

Acknowledging favor of the 29th ult. Is particularly desirous of 
seeing "The Indian History"; gave Mr. CoUinson certain papers on 
that subject with no thoughts of their being published ; the publisher, Mr. 
Osborne, desires some work; recommended Mr. Franklin to him for 
trade in that line. Delivered Mr. Franklin's piece on Electricity to 
Mr. Darling. Asks his aid in the matter of a servant-man, who ran 
away from him the previous summer; either agree for his time or send 
him back. Desires news of Mr. Ermet. A. L. S. i p. I, 13. 

From William Strahan. 1748. September 2. London. 

Power of attorney to Benjamin Franklin to collect money from 
James Read. D. S. i p. LII, 22. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1750. February 5. London. 

Sends him all the electrical books and papers he can find. His curious 
pieces relating to electricity and thunder have been read before the 
[Royal] Society. Is making a collection of his articles and letters on 
electricity to put into the hands of the printer to communicate to the 
public. Account of an earthquake felt on the 8th inst. A. L. S. 4 p. 

LXIX, 50. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1750. March 27. London. 
Death of the Prince of Wales. A. L. S. 3 p. LXIX, 51. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 5 

From Peter Kalm. 1750. September 2. Albany. 

Containing a detailed description of Niagara Falls, his journey there, 
his reception by Commandant Beaujeu and his French officers; if he 
finds this letter worthy of being printed in his newspaper, prays him to 
turn it into better English. A. L. S. 5 p. I, 14. 

From . [^Circa 175 1.] 

An account of the courtship and marriage of Mr. Hubbard in 
his eighty-first year (our Speaker's^ father). L. 3 p. XLIV, 91. 

^Thomas Hubbard, Speaker of the Massachusetts House, 1750-1758. 

From John Perkins. 1752. February 17. Boston. 

Acknowledging his bill, also the pamphlets sent the summer before. 
Pleased with Dr. Hamilton's generous defence of good Dr. Thompson. 
Begged Mr. Franklin's " Plain Truth " of Mrs. Mecom, as he had 
never seen it. Mr. Kinnersley well-received ; through him, has seen 
some of Mr. Franklin's entertaining experiments. His opinion of this 
new found element [electricity]. Thinks Mr. Franklin's Rationale 
on Clouds and Rain, and also on the Aurora Borealis, appears ex- 
tremely probable. Would transmit his own observations on the ' Ful- 
men ' if he has the leisure to look at them. Has had a cold winter. 
Boston threatened with epidemic of small-pox; Some persons trying 
tar-water as a preventive; would gladly try anj'thing Mr. Franklin 
may have heard of, but differs from his brethren in the affair of diet. 
Wishes him all the happiness in his son that his genius and accomplish- 
ments seem to promise. A. L. S. 2 p. I, iS* 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, ii8, Note). 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1752. June 3. London. 

Acknowledges receipt of letters. New colonial maps being made. 
Sends books on electricity. A. L. S, 4 p. LXIX, 52. 

Frojn P[eter] Collinson. 1752. July 7. London. 

Publication of book on Franklin's electrical experiments. Purity of 
style of Bolingbroke's letters. Pleased with the Dissertation on the 
Increase of Mankind. Account of books purchased. A. L. S. 3 p. 

LXIX, 53. 



6 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From John Perkins. 1752. August 3. Boston. 

Inquires the number that died of inoculation in Philadelphia. Pro- 
portion of deaths much fewer than in 1730; thinks this due to the 
purging method designed to prevent the secondary fever. Decrease in 
inhabitants. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 16. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 118). 

From [Peter Collinson]. 1752. August 12. 

Hints on the incorporation of the Germans in Pennsylvania vi^ith the 
English and to check the increase of their power. Diss. Ms. 2 p. 

LXIX, 54. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1752. August 12. 

Has given Mr. Franklin's account of the Germans to Mr. Pelham and 
Lord Halifax, with his own seven suggestions on the incorporation of 
the Germans with the English, and Parliament will take some measures 
to remedy the situation. French expedition to the Ohio. Mr. [Wil- 
liam] Smith a very ingenious man; pity that he is not more solid and 
less flighty. Disappointed at the bad luck that attended the transit of 
Mercury. Franklin's zeal to promote that observation is not enough to 
be commended. Has not yet heard any account of it from any of the 
colonies. A. L. S. 2 p. LXIX, 65. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1752. September 27. 

Cannot understand the miscarriage of his letters. Is glad the new 
seminary of learning is so promising. All Europe is in agitation veri- 
fying electrical experiments on points. All commend the thought of 
the inventor. A. L. S. 3 p. LXIX, 55. 

From John Perkins. 1752. October 16. Boston. 

Acknowledging his favor of Sept. — , containing certain observa- 
tions. Delivered his papers on the weather to his brother [John] Frank- 
lin; sorry for his bad state of health. Takes exception to his article on 
the Water-Spout; hopes to hear from him on the subject. A. L. S. 2 p. 

I 17. 

Printed, for the most part, in Works (Sparks, VI, 136). ' '* 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 7 

From John Perkins. [1752. October 20. Boston.] 

Relative to water spouts and his reasons for believing that they de- 
scend rather than ascend. Extract from a voyage which seems to have 
been made by a Mohammedan in 851, relative to water spouts in the 
Indian ocean. A. L. 13 p. XLIX, 4. 

Printed, in small part, in Works (Sparks, VI, 139). 

From John Perkins. 1752. October 23. Boston. 

Enclosing all he has to say on the matter; his motives for expressing 
these opinions; has not been able to differ with Mr. Franklin in any 
other of his suppositions, even in this is open to conviction. Announces 
death of Dr. W. Douglas of an apoplectic fit; left large estate and one 
child whom he acknowledged as his son but never adopted ; no will has 
been found. A. L. S. i p. I, 18. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 138). 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1753. January 14. London. 

Disheartened at the loss of Captain Davis. The Proprietor has given 
him assurance that he will support a rectorship. A. L. S. i p. 

LXIX, 63. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1753. January 27. London. 

Dress goods sent to Mrs. Franklin; electrical books to him. His 
laudable public spirit. Increased hopes of a discovery of the Northwest 
Passage. A. L. S. 3 P- LXIX, 58. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1753. March 21. London. 

Sends books by this ship and the next. Duke of Richmond inquired 
very particularly about the Proprietor. Richard's son. A. L. S. i p. 

LXIX, 59. 

From James Mitchell. 1753. May 19. York. 
Acknowledging his favor of 28th ult. The order on him in favor of 
Mrs. Benger for $100 shall be punctually paid when presented. By 
next post will send an acct. of the stoves paid and those on hand. Asks 
him to forward the enclosed to his son-in-law, if he has arrived at 
New York. A. L. S. i p. I, 20. 



8 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

i^roOT Samuel Holland. 1753. June 14. Lancaster, Pa, 
Bond for £100. D. S. 2 p. LXVI, 6. 

i^'rom Samuel Holland. 1753. June 14. Lancaster, Pa. 

Agreement between Samuel Holland and Benjamin Franklin, printers, 
as to rent for printing press. D. S. i p. LXVI, 7. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1753. July 3. London. 

Acknowledges receipt of letters. Orders eight boxes of seeds from 
J[ohn] Bartram. A. L. S. 2 p. LXIX, 60. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1753. July 20. London. 

Glad to hear of the success of Mr. Peters's sermon. The Proprietor's 
bounty to the Academy. Account of Abbe Nollet's attempt at Paris to 
declare that Franklin's electrical discoveries could not be verified, and 
the frustration of the attempt by a nobleman. A. L. S. 3 p. LXIX, 61. 

From Harvard College. 1753. July 25. Cambridge. 
Diploma of Master of Arts. D. S. i p. Portfolio. 

i^rom P[eter] Collinson. 1753. September 15. London. 

Has recommended Mr. [William] Smith to Mr. Penn, who he hopes 
will endow a professorship in the Academy. A. L. S. 2 p. LXIX, 62. 

From [Cadwallader Colden]. [1753. November 19.] 
In reference to water spouts. XLIX, 5. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 177). 

From John Franklin. 1753. November 26. Boston. 

Furnace stands well ; the glassmen fully employed in making window- 
glass and bottles, expects the former will be thought good enough to 
glaze the church. Reasons for the small profits incident to the position 
of General Postmaster; dishonesty of post-riders. Brother Peter in 
town and talks of writing to Franklin. Progress of the buildings; a 
tenant has bespoke one of them. A. L. S. i p. I, 22. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 9 

From John Perkins. [Circa 1753.] Boston. 

Sends an inclosure relative to a new thought in natural philosophy. 
A. L. S. I p. XLII, 10. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1754. January 26. London. 

The Proprietor is ardent in promoting schools for teaching the Ger- 
mans and solicitous about the prosperity of the Academy. A gold medal 
to be presented to Mr. Franklin by the Royal Society for his electrical 
discoveries. The aggressions of the French. Hearty wishes that Rev- 
erend [William] Smith may have a safe return passage. A. L. S. 4 p. 

LXIX, 56. 

From Cadwallader Golden. 1754. February 13. Coldengham. 

Acknowledging his favors of Dec. 6th and Jan. ist. The value he 
places on Mr. Franklin's approbation and esteem. His political opinions; 
his admiration for the English Constitution ; thinks America in greater 
danger from Popular Licentiousness than from any abuse in their govern- 
ors, though some of them have been bad enough. Lord Halifax's ap- 
proval of his conduct. Exceedingly pleased with Franklin's observations 
on " The Increase of Mankind " ; the last paragraph being the only one 
liable to exception, thinks it a pity it should end the discourse. Has been 
revising his own Principles in order to challenge all opposition. His 
son David pleased with Mr. Franklin's notice of his performance. 
Sends Pike's book by his son, Alexander. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 23. 

From Will[iam] Smith. [1754. February. London,] 

Sent a long letter to Mr. Penn containing the scheme for Franklin's 
Academy and the arguments for it. Mr. Penn has come into every part 
of it and will give a yearly sum for some time, and when he comes to 
Pennsylvania intends to give a manor to the Academy for certain pur- 
poses. The Proprietor had a design in view of his own, of which he 
intended to be the founder, but after argument, agreed to ingraft his 
scheme upon Franklin's in the two foundations proposed, provided Mr. 
Smith would be the person to execute them. To this he agreed, trusting 
that it would be welcome to the trustees. Sees a great deal of Mr. Penn, 
who consults him on every point that relates to literature in his country. 
His letter laid before the Society entrusted with the moneys for the 
Germans, and they are satisfied that the education of youth ought to be 
their more immediate object. The management of this important trust 



lo Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

should devolve upon men of the first rank of Pennsylvania and not upon 
clergy who depend on Dutch synods. Hopes to see all such dependence 
shaken off once they can supply the Germans with ministers from the 
Academy. Outline of the scheme which he has laid before the Society. 
Smelled out and broke the neck of Mr. Tennent's scheme, which was 
for the benefit of the Jersey College, by monopolizing the education of 
German clergy. His proposition of a German professor of divinity at 
the Academy to prevent this scheme of drawing the Pennsylvania Ger- 
mans to the Jersey College. The Proprietor has agreed to give ten or 
twelve acres of land to every schoolmaster. Has drawn out a short 
memorial of the case of the Germans without any reasonings or education, 
which is to be distributed and collections solicited in both houses of 
Parliament. He doubts not the contributions will amount to a great 
sum, his Majesty having given £i,ooo and the Princess Dowager £ioo. 
The Archbishop has greatly encouraged him. Col. Martin, of Antigua, 
if Mr. Smith returns, will send his youngest son to the Academy, and Mr. 
Penn talks of sending out a nephew. He -(Smith) will return with a 
formed scheme and an appointment of trustees. A. L. S. 4 p. XLII, 43. 

From P[eter] CoUinson. 1754. March 7. London. 

Miscarriage of letters sent by Captain Mitchell. Increased interest 
of the Proprietor in the Academy. The gold medal from the Royal 
Society is being sent by [William] Smith. Disturbances in the As- 
semblies of Virginia and New York. Prof. [Peter] Kalm is publishing 
his American travels in Swedish. Further electrical experiments. A. 
L. S. 4 P- LXIX, 57. 

From Richard Jackson. 1754. March 17. Inner Temple. 

Has ventured to commit to paper certain thoughts on the subject of 
a Medium of Commerce including a plan of a provincial bank; ex- 
plains his views. Favorable impression, his friend, Mr. Smith, created 
at Cambridge. Concerning the new model of the Administration, made 
necessary by Mr. Pelham's death, though the Lord Chancellor, the 
Duke of Newcastle and most of the old friends of Sir Robert Walpole, 
hold together, yet they find it difficult to satisfy Mr. Fox, Secretary at 
War; Mr. Fox's powerful connections, said to extend even among the 
Royal Family; his refusing the office of Secretary of State; discovered 
it would curtail his powers in the House of Commons ; rumor that he is 
to quit everything; Public Service cannot but suffer by this dissension. 
A. L. S. 4 p. (See page 12, LII, 23.) I, 24. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin ii 

From James Logan. [Circa 1754?] March 30. London. 

Quoting a paragraph from his brother's letter, concerning the 

strange attitude of their Governor in not taking certain measures 

to make peace with the Indians, in accordance with his instructions. 

A. L. S. I p. XL, 180. 

From [Thomas-Frangois] Dalibard. 1754. March 31. Paris. 

Franklin's name justly reverenced in France by all, except a small 
number of electricians, like I'Abbe NoUet, who are jealous of his dis- 
coveries. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) I, 25. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 193). 

i^row Pet [er] Timothy. 1754. June 14. Charles Town. 
Acknowledging favor of Apr. 28th by Capt. Robeson which caused 
him great concern though its severity was probably merited ; explains 
why he did not send the money. Sends $65 by Rudeman Robeson ; thinks 
that will about balance his account. Can send no paper as yet. For 4 
months has been the sole occupant of his printing-office, except a negro 
boy; discharged his villainous apprentice, who might have been of vast 
service to him had he not been addicted to drink, play and scandalous 
company. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 26. 

From William Daniell. 1754. June 25. Kingston. 

Desirous of dealing with him for paper; asks for certain samples and 
prices. A. L. S. i p. I, 27. 

From William Daniell. 1754. June 29. Kingston. 
Since his last, has received Mr. Franklin's letter, telling him the 
paper has not arrived ; will give more particular directions to the captain 
that carries them. A. L. S. i p. I, 28. 

From John Franklin. 1754. September 2. Boston. 

Expected to hear complaints from Philadelphia of hot weather. Con- 
cerning Blanchard's Remedy for the Stone; thinks it might be service- 
able in his disorder; means he has taken to procure some. Messages 
his wife sends. The enclosed is to be forwarded to Mr. Beacham's son, 
who is sick. A. L. S. i p. I, 21. 

From William Daniell. 1754. November 16. Kingston. 
Acknowledging the receipt of 10 reams of paper, and asking for 
fifty more, as he is really much in want. A. L. S. i p. I, 30. 



12 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Richard Jackson. 1754. 

Observations upon a medium of commerce. (See I, 24.) 11 p. 

LII, 23. 
/'rom Peter Kemble. [C/Vca 1754?] New York. 
A request to forward an inclosure. A. N. S. i p. XLII, 9. 

From . \Circa 1754.] 

Schemes for uniting the strength of the Colonies; puts Mr, Da- 
venant's, published in 1698, ahead of all others; emphasizes its good 
points. A. L. 4 p. (Final part missing.) LVIII, 115. 

i^row Pet [er] Timothy. 1755. June 8. Charles Town. 

Acknowledging receipt of paper. Begs again for statement of his 
account. If his study of the Electrical Arcana, and public affairs leave 
him any leisure, begs for a line or two. Wretched management of In- 
dian affairs by the Governor of South Carolina; effect on his press. 
Announces birth of 6th child and only son. A. L. S. i p. I, 33. 

From Rich[ar]d Brooke. 1755. June 27. Maryland. 

Thanking him for his hospitality during his visit to Philadelphia 
last year. A detailed account of the effects produced on Mrs. Addison's 
house in his neighborhood by a stroke of lightning at the end of last 
May. The noise awakened Mrs. Addison who observed two balls of 
fire in her room, about the size of a pigeon's egg, which soon went out 
and left for a considerable time afterward a strong sulphurous smell in 
the room. Asks numerous questions suggested by this incident. A. L. 
S. 4 p. I, 34. 

From W[illia]ni Franklin. 1755. June 28. Philadelphia. 

Nothing worth communicating since the week before, except a paper 
published by Chattin, which has made a great stir; conjectures as to its 
author; if certain rumors are true, there is no occasion for sending him 
the enclosed copy. As requested, has shipped the paper to Jamaica. 
Holland hopes to finish the whole of the Almanack by the middle of 
August; has sent him vermilion and paper. Trusts his father may have 
no cause to regret leaving him the arrangement of the Post-office. 
Asks to have his name entered as subscriber for the second volume of 
Prince's Chronology. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 35. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 13 

Fro w William Daniell. 1755. July 4. Kingston. 

Asking to know how much paper he has received and what his in- 
debtedness amounts to. Encloses some newspapers. A. L. S. i p. I, 36. 



From Dan[iel] Claus. 1755. September 11. Lake George. 

Containing a detailed and graphic account of the expedition against 
Crown Point, led by Gen. Johnson [afterwards Sir William Johnson, 
Baronet], ending in the defeat of the French. Number of dead and 
wounded ; Gen. Johnson wounded in the thigh ; Baron de Dieskau 
brought in wounded ; details a conversation he had with him ; declared 
600 Indians and 200 white had defeated Gen. Braddock. Hopes to go 
forw^ard with utmost despatch. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 37. 

From William Shipley. 1755. September 13. London. 

Read with great pleasure Mr. Franklin's Plan for promoting Useful 
Knowledge among the British plantations in America. Introduces him- 
self as Secretary of the Premium Society in London ; invites Mr. Frank- 
lin to become one of their Correspondent Members ; explains the purpose 
of the Society; fine results expected from this organization; encloses list 
of members (4 p.). A. L. S. 3 p. I, 38. 

jpro/?/ William Shirley. 1755. September 17. Oswego. 

Acknowledging favors of the 1st and 4th inst. Concerning the pay- 
ment due Franklin for engaging the wagons and horses for the use of 
the late Gen. Braddock's army; importance of that service; has written 
Gov. Morris to appoint three good men to liquidate and adjust those 
accounts. Greatly pressed for time ; expects to move in a few days for 
Niagara. A. L. S. i p. I, 39. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 94). 

From E. Hubbart. 1755. December i. Boston. 

Containing expressions of great affection and regard; likens him to one 
of the noble Romans; begs him to refrain from such an excess of good- 
ness, otherwise he will occupy Heaven alone. Her father suffering 
much, though patiently, from his disorder; disappointed in the bill he 
hoped to send. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 40. 



14 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From . \_Circa 1755?] 

In reference to a train of milk-white spots observed in the skies. 
L. 3 p. XLIX, 6. 

From Lieutenant-Governor Robert Hunter Morris. 

1756. January 5. Reading. 

Commission of Benjamin Franklin, giving him military authority 
over the county of Northampton. D. S, i p. LII, 25. 

From Thomas Lloyd. 

1756. January 31. Fort Allen at Gnadenhutten. 

Giving an account of a portion of their campaign ; describes in detail 
the difficult journey from Bethlehem to Gnadenhutten [Ohio] ; safe 
arrival there ; engaged in building a fort ; scenes of horror and destruc- 
tion where lately flourished a peaceful village. Mr. Wm. Franklin's 
justice, humanity and patience in dealing with the people. Defeat of a 
party who left Bethlehem on the same day they did. Hopes to come up 
with the enemy and convince them that Pennsylvania can defend their 
frontiers ; for himself is determined to scalp all he lays his hands on, with 
unremitting rage. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 41. 

From E. Hubbart. 1756. February 16. Boston. 

Enclosing catalogue of her Papa's library; the books will not be sold 
until Mr. Franklin decides whether he wants any or all of them. He 
will see by the copy of her Papa's will that she has received five vol- 
umes; her father offered her the whole collection, but she refused, 
thinking that the estate could not afford such a legacy. Remits him 
$239 in prize-tickets to be credited to her account. Also sends two 
specimens of sand thrown up by the late earth-quake. A. L. S. 2 p. 

I, 42. 

By Lieutenant-Governor Robert Hunter Morris. 

1756. February 24. Philadelphia. 

Commission of Benjamin Franklin as colonel of the regiment of the 
city of Philadelphia. A. E. that on February 28, 1756, Benjamin Frank- 
lin took the prescribed oath before Richard Peters, Secretary. D. S. 
2 p. LII, 25^. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 15 

From The College of William and Mary in Virginia. 1756. April 2. 
Diploma of master of arts. D. S. i p. Portfolio. 

By The Mayor of Norfolk, Virginia. 1756. April 10. 

Certificate that on that day the freedom of the Borough of Norfolk 
was conferred on Benjamin Franklin. D. S. Rich[ar]d Kelsick, 
Mayor, i p. LII, 27. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1756. April 25. London. 

Electrical papers at last came to hand and are now on press under the 
inspection and direction of Dr. Fothergill, for they thought it a great 
pity that the public should be deprived of the benefit of so many curious 
experiments. The papers communicated to the [Royal] Society, which 
was greatly pleased with them. Abbe Nollet has traveled to Turin, 
Venice and Bologna to see certain experiments verified, but the ingenious 
men of those cities had been too premature in publishing for facts ex- 
periments that could not be depended on to succeed, to his no small dis- 
appointment. Is obliged to him for the Constitutions. Have had the 
warmest winter and spring that ever was known. It may have fur- 
nished materials for earthquakes of February and March. Speculations 
thereon. A. L. S. 4 p. LXIX, 64. 

From C[atherine] Ray. [Circa 1756?] June 28. Block Island. 

Expressions of affection ; sends him sugar-plums sweetened in the way 
he used to like. A. L. S. i p. XL, 54. 

From R[obert] Charles. 1756. August 12. London. 

Acknowledging Mr. Franklin's letter of 4th ult. ; will endeavor to 
make the best use of the seasonable intelligence therein contained. 
Proofs of zeal given by the Assembly of Pennsylvania; injustice of cer- 
tain imputations. Asks for a statement of certain accounts in Pennsyl- 
vania since the commencement of the present troubles, that the colony 
may receive proper consideration when the matter comes before Parlia- 
ment. Gov. Morris has at last communicated his instructions; cannot 
say what will be thought of the claim; hopes the Assembly will not be 
divested of a privilege. Sorry for the unhappy state of affairs in Europe ; 
greatly concerned at news of the military reinforcements sent from 
France into North America. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 43. 



i6 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From William Shipley. 1756. September i. London. 

His election as corresponding member of the Society for the Encour- 
agement of Arts. Their desire to make Great Britain and her colonies 
mutually serviceable. The advantage to the mother countr}'^ of giving 
premiums in America. Thanks him for his generous present of 20 
guineas. A, L. S. 2 p. I, 44. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 124, Note). 

From Richard Peters. 1756, December 24. 

(Memorandum.) Col. Bouquet waited on the Governor in the 
presence of the Mayor and demanded that certain supplies and good 
quarters be provided for the remainder of the iioo men and 51 officers 
before Jan. ist. A. L. S. i p. (Attested copy.) I, 46. 

From L. S. Ourry. 1756. December 26. Philadelphia. 

After visiting the quarters of the First Battalion of the Royal Ameri- 
can Regiment, reports lack of bedding and covering; no quarters fit for 
officers nor any provided for recruits. A. L. S. i p. I, 47. 

From Benjamin Mecom. 1756. December 27. Philadelphia, 
Bond for £50. D. S. i p. LXVI, 9. 

From [Joseph Galloway? Circa 1756.] 

Difficulty in inducing the Governor to grant commissions to certain 
men in Philadelphia chosen to act as militarj'^ officers in their respective 
wards; the Governor hanged in effigy. L. 3 p. (Several pages miss- 
ing.) LVIII, 117. 

Frotn John Waring. 1757. January 24. London. 

Announcing the death of a worthy clergyman, Mr. Henry Wheatley, 
whose executor he is; in his will, appointed Mr. Franklin trustee for his 
heirs; if, however, these legatees be dead the money is to revert to the 
residuary legatee. Is a member of an association for the conversion of 
the negroes on the plantations to Christianity; asks his advice and 
assistance in this matter. (Parts missing.) A. L. S. 3 p. I, 48. 

From The General Assembly of Pennsylvania. 1757. March 31. 

Instructions to Benjamin Franklin, as one of the Commissioners for 

the Province in England. (Incomplete.) D. i p. LVIII, i. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 17 

FroTu Jacob Duche, Jr. 1757. May 6. Philadelphia. 

Begs him to take charge of the enclosed letters which are directed to 
gentlemen with whom he [Franklin] is personally acquainted; wishes 
him the highest success in his laudable undertakings. A. L. S. i p. 

I, 49. 

From . 1757. May lO. Philadelphia. 

Desires this letter containing a minute account of a new clock he has 
invented laid before the Royal Society of London. A. L. 2 p. (Final 
part missing.) LVIII, 99 

From Isaac Norris. 1757. October 17. Philadelphia. 

Pleased to hear of his safe arrival, by a letter from Exeter. Con- 
cerning Indian affairs; proprietary purchases; conduct of certain gentle- 
men at the last Treaty of Easton; Geo. Croghan their tool; minutes 
tampered with; thinks the deed of 171 8 was suppressed during the 
conferences. Indians exasperated ; Delawares acting openly against 
the Mohawks and those they apprehend to be their oppressors in Penn- 
sylvania. Sales of land made by John Penn about the year 1734; dis- 
pute over titles. Late elections. New Castle Convention likely to meet 
during the year. The House dissatisfied with Richard Partridge [Agent 
at Court for New Jersey]. No word from Gen. Stanwix since his 
election. A. L. S. 6 p. I, 50* 

From . [1757.] 

Acknowledging Franklin's excellent Observations on the Increase of 
Mankind. Some observations on the influence manners have always 
had on the numbers of a people and their political prosperity. L. 2 p. 
(Final part missing.) LVIII, 98. 

From W[illia]m Hunter. [Circa 1757?] Wednesday. 

Desiring drafts for three or four hundred pounds on Franklin's 
banker. His sister wants one of twenty pounds for marketing. A. 
L. S. I p. XL, 2. 

From "William Dunlap. 1 757-1 764. 
Post-office accounts. Mem. 7 p. LXVII, 1 05-1 08. 



i8 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

/"row Alexander Gordon. 1758. March 15. Portsmouth. 

Left London on the 5th inst., was taken ill of a fever on the road and 
has been ill ever since; his pitiable condition without money or friends; 
must go to jail unless he can pay the physician, apothecary and landlord; 
aware that Mr. Franklin was once well acquainted with his father; 
begs for a small sum, for which he will give his bill upon his father. 
Was clerk on the ship " Vulture "; if he recovers hopes to get another 
berth. A. L. S. i p. I, 51. 

From Richard Jackson. 1758. April 24. 

Opinion as to alteration of the charter of the Province of Pennsylvania 
and the power of the Crown, in connection therewith, in case of sur- 
render of the powers of government by the Proprietary. A. D. S. 8 p. 

LXXVI, I. 

i^rom [Joseph Galloway]. 1758. June 16. Philadelphia. 

Trade restrictions. Pitt's appointment is disheartening to the Pro- 
prietary party. Military affairs. L. S. 2 p. (Incomplete.) LVIII, 31. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1758. September 3. Tunbridge Wells. 

Acknowledging favor of 30th ult. In a fortnight will set out with 
Mr. Jackson on their Norfolk tour. Thanks him for his care in supply- 
ing him with money as well as for other proofs of paternal affection. 
Mr. Hunter's fondness for Tunbridge Wells increases with the growth 
of his acquaintance. His father's letter with the agreeable news of the 
King of Prussia's having defeated the Russians was very acceptable; 
contained some particulars not yet known. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 51 /4« 

Fro?7i David Golden. 1758. Oct. 26. Coldengham. 

Sends by his cousin, Alexander Golden, a copy of a paper, written by 
himself, explaining the phenomena of electricity; prevented from send- 
ing it before; had Mr. Franklin not been absent from America, these 
papers would have been much more correct; unwilling to have it ap- 
pear in print without his approbation ; begs him to make any corrections 
he may think fit. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 52. 

From Allen and Joseph England. {Circa 1758?] 

Asking what steps are necessary to revoke the power of attorney 
for the management of their estate in the County of Newcastle, 
granted to Israel Pemberton. L. in 3d P. 3 p. LXIX, 94. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 19 

From Rebecca Haydock. [Circa 1758?] 20th inst. Philadelphia. 

Concerning a piece of silk which must be manufactured to match 
her pattern. A. L. S. i p. XL, i. 

From [Sir] John Pringle. [Circa 1758?] 

Asks Dr. Franklin's assistance in treating a lady patient with elec- 
tricity. A. L. S. 2 p. LXVIII, 72. 

Frofii The University of St. Andrews. 

1759. February 12. St. Andrews. 
Doctor of Laws Diploma ; also contemporary copy with translation of 
same. D. S. i p. Portfolio. 

From B[enjaniin] Wilson. 1759. April 8. [London.] 

Concerning an experiment of Mr. Colden's in electricity; reasons for 
not thinking it either surprising or curious. Will satisfy him of the 
fact by an experiment or two when next they meet. A. L. S. i p. I, 53. 

From P. V. Musschenbrock. 1759. April 15. Leyden. 

Concerning various writers on electricity than which none excel Frank- 
lin in the explanation of certain m3^steries; urges him to fresh experi- 
ments. The writer's interest in life is to promote physical and natural 
science ; thinks they might gain mutual advantage from a correspondence. 
A. L. S. 2 p. [In Latin.] I, 54. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 186, Note). 

From J. Sargent. [1759.] June 19. 
Will be glad to see Franklin at his place at all times. Bewails the 
capture of Quebec. A. L. S. i p. XLI, 106. 

Fro?n Isaac Norris. 1759. July 31. Fairhill [near Philadelphia]. 

On the 14th ult. received an order from the Commissioners for 
some public money to discharge agents' salaries, also a supply for Frank- 
lin. Encloses copies of five important papers, the first four concerning 
the Remitting Act, and the fifth, a speech of Gov. Denny's concerning 
the act for recording warrants and surveys ; hopes Mr. Franklin will use 
his best endeavors to get them confirmed in England, the influence this 
may have in settling their differences with the Proprietaries. Assures 



20 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

him that no person whatever had or could take a copy of a paragraph 
in a former letter of his relating to the Proprietaries. A. L. S. 4 p. 
[Copy.] I, 55. 

From Isaac Norris. 1759. August 11. Fairhill. 

Acknowledging letter of June 9th. Uncertain when this letter will 
leave, so wishes merely to acknowledge his kindness in looking after his 
money. Successful expeditions everywhere against the French ; Niagara, 
Ticonderoga and Crown Point being reduced, thinks the same results 
may be expected at Quebec; the French intimidated by such rapid con- 
quests. Sends affectionate remembrances to Billy. A. L. S. i p. I, 57. 

From Isaac Norris. 1759. August 22. [Fairhill.] 

Enclosing Nos. i, 2 and 3. No. i, copy of I, 55, with additional post- 
script, dated Aug. 5th, announcing the reduction of Niagara and Ti- 
conderoga; forces bombarding Quebec. No. 2, copy of letter I, 57. 
No. 3, dated Aug. 22, 1759. Sent these letters before but the ship 
sprung a leak and returned to port, will forward them by Capt. Hamet, 
who is to sail the next day. Thanks him for the care he has taken on 
his account in money matters; the situation of the public money. [In- 
complete.] 4 p. [Copy.] I, 56. 

From The City of Edinburgh. 1759. September 5. Edinburgh. 

Certificate of admission as Burges and Gild brother of Edinburgh. 
D. S. I p. Portfolio. 

From The University of St. Andrews. 1759. October 2. 
Certificate of admission. D. S. i p. Portfolio. 

From W[illia]m Callender. [1759-60?] 

Quotations from the letters of Benjamin Franklin, Isaac Norris and 
William Callender concerning the state of affairs in the province of 
Pennsylvania; dispute over the passage of a bill to insure a state militia; 
bill for conciliating the Indians and holding them to the English inter- 
ests; antagonistic attitude of the Governor. Dr. of L. 3 p. (First 
part missing.) LVIII, lOO. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 21 

From John Waring. 1760. January 4. London. 

Informing him that the Associates of the late Dr. Bray have unani- 
mously elected him a member of their Society; they have resolved upon 
opening three schools for negroes with all convenient speed ; requests 
his attendance at a meeting to be held at Mr. Bird's on the 17th. A. 
L. S. I p. I, 58. 

From Isaac Norris. 1760. September 26. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging various letters received in June and July. Concern- 
ing a bill sent up to the Governor, to enable the agents to receive monies, 
which have been or may be allotted to this Province upon the Parlia- 
mentary grants. Stormy state of affairs; everything in the present 
crisis depends on Franklin; if only the principal Acts be confirmed, their 
future controversies with the Proprietaries will be made more easy. 
Encloses copy of the aforementioned bill with the Governor's amend- 
ment. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 59. 

Printed, in part, in Works (Sparks, VII, 204). 

Fro W2 William Thomson. 1760. November 18. Worcester. 

Pleasure Mr. Franklin's short stay in Worcester afforded him. 
Thanks him for the entertainment he is confident he owes to him, after 
reading " The Interest of Great Britain with respect to her Colonies " ; 
hopes it will be taken to heart by those who are intrusted with the 
property, liberty and life of a people. A. L. S. i p. I, 60. 

From Thomas Taunton. [C/Vca 1760. London.] 

Account of his health during the past winter. A. L. S. i p. 

XLII, 38. 

i^roOT Thomas Taunton. [Czrcfl 1760. London.] 
Appeal for assistance. A. L. S. i p. XLII, 12. LXIX, 89. 

From Tho[mas] Taunton. [Circa 1760.] December 29. [London.] 
Thanks for favors received. A. L. S. i p. XLII, 40. 

From Henry Potts. 1761. May 6. Gen'l Post Office [London]. 

Read the letter left by him to Lord Bessborough, who ordered him to 
acquaint Mr. Franklin that he desired Mackrath might be removed 
directly and the person recommended by Gov. Littleton appointed post- 
master at Charlestown. A. L. S. i p. I, 61. 



22 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Sir John Eardley?] Wilmot. 

1 76 1. May 8. Grey's Inn [London], 

Informed by Mr. Penn that the £100,000 Act passed by Mr. Hamil- 
ton, has been transmitted to Franklin under seal, with the intention, 
he presumes, of presenting it to the Council ; begs for a quarter of an 
hour's conversation with him before that Act is presented ; has something 
material to say to him. A. L. S. i p. I, 62. 

Frojii Isaac Norris. 1761. August 19. Fairhill. 

Acknowledging favors of May 9th and June 13th; well pleased with 
additional purchase of stock on account of the Province. The Parlia- 
mentary grant for 1759 apportioned by the Lords of the Treasury; 
presumes the House will impower some persons to receive it; hopes it 
will be appropriated to the lessening of the taxes and sinking the Bills 
of Credit. Hopes the address of the Assembly sent over at the accession 
of his present Majesty may have escaped the enemy. Concerning a 
letter of credit to Col. Lloyd. Bills of exchange sent by him. A. L. 
S. 2 p. I, 63. 

From Thomas Ronayne. 1761. August 26. Corke. 

Communicates a few experiments and observations on electricity and 
desires to have Franklin's opinion of them. Certain queries concerning 
thunder [answered in red ink on opposite page of manuscript by Dr. 
Franklin]. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 64. 

Frow Isaac Norris. 1761. September 30. Fairhill. 

Acknowledging favor of July loth, which was read in the House; 
members all satisfied with the succinct account therein contained of the 
situation of the public money under Franklin's care; House decided to 
draw bills of exchange on him for the net proceeds of the First Parlia- 
mentary Grant; appointment of certain persons to receive these and 
other monies. Three bills of exchange sent. Certain discoveries con- 
cerning practical surveying. — Oct. 19th. His letter of Sept. 30th missed 
the packet. Since then received Franklin's favor of Aug. 7th. Concern- 
ing the settlement of certain accounts. Reasons for Assembly's decision 
to draw bills of exchange for the First Parliamentary Grant. Robert 
Charles's refusal of the agency of Pennsylvania ; matters connected with 
this. Some investments he would like Franklin to make for him. A. 
L. S. (Duplicate.) 4 p. I, 65. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 23 

From P[eter] Collinson. [1761.] October 17. Mill Hill. 
Expresses pleasure on Mr. Franklin's safe arrival [from the Conti- 
nent] in the happy land of liberty, and hopes to see him soon. There is 
a new large coach on springs that comes every day from the Bull Inn in 
Holborn. A. L. S. i p. LXIX, 66. 

From The Society for the Encouragement of Arts, etc. 1761 and 1762. 
Notice of meetings of committees. Printed N. S. i p. 

LXVIII, 14 to 16. 

From [Thomas-Frangois] Dalibard. 1762. February. Paris. 

Acknowledging favor of Dec. 9, 1761, by Dr. Shippen. Their cor- 
respondence interrupted for many years by the war; delayed answering 
his letter in hopes of hearing some new discovery in electricity that he 
might impart; since the last edition of Dr. Franklin's works, has given 
up all electrical experiments ; gives four reasons why ; M. Le Roy of the 
Royal Academy of Sciences has long upheld Franklin's theory of elec- 
tricity against M. I'Abbe Nollet. Defense of the latter's theory by M. 
Dutour. Recalls the letters printed in 1753 by I'Abbe Nollet in oppo- 
sition to Franklin's. Delighted with Dr. Shippen ; politeness he has 
shown him. M. de Buffon begs him to ask Mr. Collinson to send him 
seeds of trees in Pennsylvania for the Jardin des Plantes ; suggests apply^ 
ing to John Bartram. [Here MS. is badly mutilated.] Begs him 
not to leave Europe without a visit to Paris; offers to get him pass- 
ports. A. L. S. 4 p. I, 66. 

From R. Hippisley. 1762. April 19. 
Begs Franklin, as an encourager of the arts and sciences, to sub- 
scribe to his work, entitled " An Analysis of Oratory." A. L. S. i p. 

1,67. 
From David Hume. 1762. May 10. Edinburgh. 

Acknowledging Mr. Franklin's goodness in sending him an exact 
description of the method of preserving houses from thunder; communi- 
cated it to their Philosophical Society; ]VIr. Russel read a paper on it; 
repeats two suggestions he made. Sent his letter to Lord Mareschal ; his 
Lordship busy settling the controversy about the eternity of hell-torments 
which has upset the little kingdom of Neuf-Chatel. Synod of divines 
making themselves ridiculous. Franklin the first great man of letters 
sent them by America, loth to let him go. Sir William Dick desires 
his compliments sent. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 68. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 243; Bigelow, III, 189; Smyth, IV, 153). 



24 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Sargent, Aufrere & Co. 1762. August 12. London. 
Sends him two gold medals to be applied, as a mark of their good 
wishes, to Franklin's College. Enclose letter of credit. L. S. i p. 

1,69. 

From Lady Dick. [1762?] October 12. Prestonfield [England]. 

Sends an empty purse. Expresses hopes for a good journey and happy 
return to his family. N. in 3d P. i p. XLII, 31. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1762. October 21. London. 

Impatiently awaiting news of Franklin's safe arrival ; his friends 
regret his absence but hope to enjoy his correspondence and share in his 
discoveries. Mr. Fox extremely obliged to Dr. Franklin for his letter; 
this draws a similar request from Mr. Hamilton. Congratulates him on 
his son's promotion ; thinks he has a sensible and agreeable wife. Ac- 
count of certain monies enclosed. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 70. 

From Fitzgerald and Dr. [Charles] Morton. 

{Circa 1762. London.] 

Will call on Dr. Franklin, Friday evening, with two ladies. L. in 
3d Rip. XLIII, 175. 

From Isaac Garrigues. [1762? London.] 

Asks for particulars concerning the late Mr. [James] Ralph. A. L. 
S. I p. XLII, 15. 

From John Mills. 1763. March 2. London. 

Begging his acceptance of the first volume of his " Husbandry." A. 
L. S. 1 p. I, 71. 

From J[ohn] Whitehurst. 1763. March 18. Derby. 

Congratulates him on the appointment of his son to the Governorship 
of New Jersey. The bearer, Mr. Tunicliff, is a neighbor of his and a 
farmer; he desires to purchase two or three thousand acres in America 
and bring over his family; hopes Mr. Franklin will give him any as- 
sistance or advice in his power. Parliament in possession of Mr. Harri- 
son's improvement for measuring equal time at sea ; thinks he will re- 
ceive a handsome reward ; the King has ordered this improvement to be 
made known to all his foreign ministers. The King's policy all for the 
general good and benefit of his subjects. Concerning a " General Theory 
of the Earth," which he will send him. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 72. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 25 

'From R[ichard] Jackson. 1763. April 4. 

Glad to hear of his safe arrival. Has been chosen to Parliament for 
Weymouth. Expects to complete his work during the summer. The 
Speaker frequently inquires after Franklin. Can get no satisfactory in- 
formation about Mr. Barker or his family; if the heir was in the East 
India service, can easily procure intelligence of him. Not surpriseed 
at the joy universally expressed on Mr. Franklin's arrival in Philadel- 
phia. His letter, containing an account of Maderia, most welcome, he 
being one of the committee to inquire into its state. Concerning the Act 
of Assembly received from Mr. Moore. — Question of certain monies 
allowed Pennsylvania by the Treasury for her defence in 1760 and 1761. 
A. L. S. 4 p. I, 73. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 249). 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1763. April 6. London. 

Expressing his own and his family's great satisfaction at the news 
of Franklin's safe arrival. A. L. S. i p. I, 74. 

From [Sir John Pringle]. [1763. May ? London.] 

Reasons why Franklin should return to England. Put into Lord 
Bute's hands Franklin's proposals as to the preservation of gun-powder, 
as well as the best means for securing the health of the garrison at 
Senegal. Shells for Lady Bute. Meetings at his house Sunday even- 
ings. Will send Franklin's account of the paper currency to Lord Shel- 
burne. Dr. Watson's cure of tetanus by electricity. A. L. 2 p. (Muti- 
lated.) LVIII, 49. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1763. June 8. London. 

Sends box by Capt. Friend in the Carolina; in it are books and cata- 
logues for The Library Co., some for J. Bartram and the History of 
Florida for Franklin. He and Franklin both fortunate in their family 
connections. Encloses receipt for box of books and one for box of seeds. 
P. S. From a New York newspaper, sees a new colony called New 
Wales is to be settled on the Ohio; asks him to forward any work relat- 
ing to this expedition. A. L. S. 5 p. I, 75. 

i^rom Anthony Armbruster. 1763. June 13. Philadelphia. 

Urged by the greatest necessity, or else would not trouble him. 
Begs Mr. Franklin to send orders to procure him that sum he gave him 



26 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

hopes of, before commencing his journey; his distress very great and if 
Mr. F. does not rescue him, he will be a great sufferer in his business. 
A. L. S. I p. I, 75^. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1763. June 28. London. 

Acknowledging letter, with inclosure to be forwarded to Mr. Hamil- 
ton. Mentions box of books again, its contents, etc. Mr. Edwards has 
published 7th volume of ' Birds and Animals, etc' ; if The Library Co. 
want to complete their set, let them send in time. A. L. S. I p. I, 76. 

From [Alexander Small]. 1763. July 5. London. 

Sending him six pounds of burnet seed and explaining its manifold 
advantages. Promises him the seeds of an uncommonly good cabbage, 
which grows in Anjou. Description of the new hemp machine. A. L. 
4 p. (Final part missing.) LVIII, 50. 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1763. August 23. London. 

Entertainment given to Pennsylvania's new Governor [John Penn] ; 
to judge by appearance, he lacks striking abilities, he'll be the easier 
governed by his uncle; Proprietor Thomas was there and anxious 
to know if Mr. Franklin was coming over to solicit a revival of Dr. 
Coxe's grant for lands on the Mississippi. Loss of Lord Egremont, hopes 
they may be as happy in the new appointment. Concerned at the new 
rupture with the Indians, reasons for it. Mr. Canton thinks he is for- 
gotten. Mr. Clark, chaplain to the Earl of Bristol, has published a 
modern history of Spain. Their friend Hamilton sends thanks for in- 
structions and hopes Franklin will be tempted over soon. A. L. S. 4 p. 

I, 77. 

From Sam[ue]l Engs. 1763. September 3. Norfolk, Va. 

Recalls meeting Mr. Franklin at the house of his worthy partner, Mr. 
Collins, of Rhode Island. Lately arrived from England, but finds 
climate of Virginia so disagreeable, has decided to go to Philadelphia. 
Compliments Franklin on his discoveries, experiments and signal ser- 
vices. Having occasion for a trifle of cash, took the liberty to draw on 
Mr. Franklin for a small amount for travelling expenses to Philadelphia; 
will remit the money as soon as he arrives in that city. A. L. S. 2 p. 

1,78. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 27 

From P[eter] Collinson. 1763. September 9. London. 

Acknowledging his letters from Boston. The enclosed were drawn 
up at the breaking out of the Cherokee War; a few hints drawn from 
them might have prevented these cruel recent depredations. News just 
arrived of their defeat, much concern felt. A. L. S. i p. I, 79* 

From James Bowdoin. 1763. September 20. Roxbury. 

Thanking him for his communication of the 19th inst. Quotes a 
request [in Latin] by Father Beccaria. Congratulates him upon the 
honors conferred on him. A. L. S. i p. I, 80. 

From G[riffith] Jones. 1763. October 6. London. 

Though Mr. Cumming's letter will inform him of the motive, which 
induced the friends of the bearer to send him to Philadelphia, yet, as 
the father of the boy, desired to state his reasons for the step. The 
lad has been carefully brought up ; has been an apprentice for two years, 
but had too much liberty to go out after the business of the day was over; 
afraid of his being led into irregularities and extravagances, so, by Mr. 
Cumming's advice, decided to send him abroad; hopes Mr. Franklin 
will be so good as to accept him for the remainder of his time; sets forth 
his attainments; asks that he may be kept closely at work. A. L. S. 
I p. I, 81. 

From Thomas Gumming. 1763. October 7. London. 

Sends this letter by Capt. Stout. Already greatly in Mr. Franklin's 
debt, but intends to contract a fresh one; Mr. Griffith Jones, a printer 
in Fleet St., has already written about this matter [I, 81]; ad- 
vised him to send his son abroad; thought first naturally of Franklin; 
why he thinks it wiser for him to pay for the boy's passage; hopes the 
lad will be under the supervision of David Hall; trusts he will make 
a man like his father. Lord Shelburne's interest in Franklin; on his 
being appointed Lord of Trade, desired any information Franklin could 
impart, relative to the public good of his Province ; since then a turbulent 
routish faction occasioned his resignation; he is still the King's favorite 
and must always have interest everywhere; advises Franklin to write to 
him and to ignore his resignation. Messages to his wife, son and daugh- 
ter, — is the last-named married? A. L. S. 4 p. I, 81^. 



28 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From J. Sargent. 1763. November 8. London. 

Has not had a line from him since his letter of Aug. 8th. His son 
brought home ill from Eton, but all that is happily over. Lord Eg- 
mont's preferment and Lord Hyde's appointment in his place ; will carry 
out his wishes with the latter if possible. Party feeling running high. 
The Ministry sure to carry their point in Parliament regarding Wilkes ; 
the result in Westminster Hall less certain. Concerning money matters. 
His interest in Franklin's son, now Governor of New Jersey. Messages 
from various friends. A. L. S. 4 p. I, 82. 

From R[ichar]d Jackson. 1763. November 12. London. 

Greatly concerned to hear of Franklin's misfortune but hopes by this 
time the cure is perfectly effected. Concerning some business connected 
with a grant which he is negotiating for Dr. Franklin with the Messrs. 
Coxe; search for original draught. Parliament meets on Tuesday, Mr. 
Wilkes' business will come up then ; House of Commons will probably 
express resentment at the use he has made of their privilege ; session likely 
to be one of great heat and animosity; fears something relative to 
America will be done, very much against his opinion. Question of duty 
on molasses; will oppose all inland duties laid by Parliament on the 
colonies. Province of Pennsylvania excluded from all share of the 
money granted by Parliament for the service of 1761; fears this is not 
the only ill office the General has done the Province. Mr. Penn on his 
(Jackson's) side in this matter. A. L. S. 7 p. I, 83. 

From James Parker. 1763. November 15. 

Bond for £178 i8s. given to Benjamin Franklin. Endorsement by the 
latter. D. S. 2 p. LXVI, 10. 

From Henton Brown. 1763. November 26. London. 

Acknowledging the receipt of several letters and transmitting a state- 
ment of their account with Mr. Franklin. Asks him to recommend them 
to Richard Jackson, Esq., as bankers for the Province of Pennsylvania 
to which he is agent. Various failures; fall of stocks. Unsettled state of 
the Ministry. Question relative to Wilkes; majority in the House; 
duel fought between him and Sam Martin, late of the Treasury; 
Wilkes wounded in the body, but not fatally ; the paper is voted to be 
burnt by the hands of the common hangman ; and 'tis thought the author 
will be expelled. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 84. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 29 

From R[ichar]d Jackson. 1763. December 27. London. 

Has had only one letter from him in a great while ; hopes he is ef- 
fectually cured ; with such news, could make one thousand people 
happy. Lord Hyde to take Lord Egmont's place, Lord Halifax has 
now the administration of American affairs; this mutability no proof 
of an unstable Ministry. Has a good deal of access to Mr. Grenville, 
who is at the head of it. American affairs in a critical situation. Thinks 
Maj. Barker at Manila is the gentleman sought after by Franklin; ex- 
pects him in England in February or March. Difficulty of the work con- 
nected with Messrs. Coxe's application ; various other claims to the land. 
His opinion that themother country is mistress of the trade of its colonies, 
that she may prohibit foreign trade and may therefore tax ; dreads internal 
taxes. Messages to Mr. Galloway. Mr. Allen's stand on behalf of the 
Province. Discusses Indian war. Agrees with Franklin about a plethora 
of money. People's estimate of Col. Bouquet. Encloses list of Acts 
sent him by the Agent for the Proprietors. Dr. Pringle's reasons 
for declining any concern in their scheme. A. L. S. 8 p. I, 85. 

From Richard Jackson. [Circa 1763.] 

Mr. Coxe's claim; project for a settlement on the Mississippi. Paper 
currency. (Fragment.) 2 p. LVIII, 114. 

jproOT Caty Greene. [1764?] January 13. Warwick. 

Misfortunes of Dr. Franklin's sister. Family affairs. A. L. S. 
I p. XLII, 16. 

From R[ichar]d Jackson. 1764. January 26. Inner Temple. 

Has written him by every packet. Maj. Barker's arrival in England, 
his intention to sail for America in April, then to take possession of and 
cultivate his estate ; has recommended him to certain friends in America. 
Several American questions coming before Parliament ; constantly occu- 
pied combating dangerous errors in American politics; results not com- 
mensurate with his efforts. Has long since given up hope of preventing 
some Parliamentary tax on North America for the maintenance of troops 
kept there ; his aversion to internal taxes. Customs and prohibitions in 
trade date from the Long Parliament; wishes this to be the rule of 
England's conduct on this occasion. A bill in embryo for restraining 
the paper currency of North America within certain limits; will un- 
doubtedly be carried. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 86. 



30 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From G. Price. 1764. March 7. Fort Prince George. 
Thanking him for the flattering letter he wrote on his behalf to 
Messrs. Timothy and Limprie. Describes the situation of Fort Prince 
George and its means of defense; it has been besieged more than once 
and almost starved into surrender before succor arrived. Number of 
Indians in the vicinity; two thousand warriors in the Cherokee Nation 
who desire peace; also anxious to aid in any movement against the 
Creeks, who number three or four thousand fighting men. A report that 
the Creeks have refused to give up the late murderers as demanded by the 
Governor; more mischief expected from that quarter. A. L. S. 4 p. 

I, 87. 

From Thomas Moffat. 1764. May 12. Newport, R. I 

Acknowledging favor of 9th ult. Highest degree of heat and cold 
at Newport, curious about the same in Philadelphia. Causes which pro- 
duce yellow or bilious fever. His views as to their College. Agitated 
by imperfect rumors from Esgland about their Charter. A. L. S. 

2 p. I, 88. 

From Jno. Canton. 1764. June 29. London. 

Acknowledging favor of March 14th. Mr. Kinnersley's first experi- 
ment in electricity truly a beautiful one ; what it proves ; his second 
experiment an extraordinary one ; has endeavored in vain to make it in 
England. Mr. Bowdoin's telescope in Mr. Nairne's hands, who is 
making a pedestal for it. Describes certain experiments he has made, 
showing the difference in the compressibility of water, in winter and 
summer. Other members of the Club send their compliments. A. L. S. 

3 p. 1,89. 

Printed in Worlcs (Sparks, VI, 256). 

From John Mills. 1764. July 12. London. 

Acknowledging his favor of March 10 by Mr. Shadwell. Thanks 
him for presenting to Col. Elliot the first volume of his ' Husbandry ' ; 
requests his acceptance of the rest of that work as a mark of esteem for 
the memory of his father. Dr. Elliot. Delay in getting the remaining 
volumes. Sends the fourth volume to Franklin. Greatly obliged for 
list of American book sellers; will make use of it when his fifth and last 
volume is completed. Various American seeds he is sending to the So- 
ciety of Agriculture, Arts and Sciences at Rennes. A. L. S. i p. I, 90. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 31 

From . 1764. August 8. Philadelphia. 

Interested in reading Dr. Pringle's account of the meteor; efforts he 
has made to obtain an accurate account of the one which appeared in 
Philadelphia on the 20th of July, 1764. L. I p. (Mutilated.) 

LVIII, loi. 
From T. Becket. 1764. August 10. London. 
Acknowledging favor of June 1 7th ; confesses that Franklin's resent- 
ment against him is just; reasons for his delay in sending certain prom- 
ised articles; assures him it will not happen again. Sends him two 
packets of reviews, magazines and four pamphlets. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 91. 

i^rom [Col.] Henry Bouquet. 1764. August 10. Carlisle. 
Desertion has reduced his two battalions to about 750 men ; cannot 
spare so many from his small force ; is therefore obliged to apply to the 
Governor and Commissioners for money to recruit the number lost ; 
begs him to use all his influence with the Board to obtain this favor 
speedily. Situation quiet, neither disturbed by their active enemy, nor 
assisted by their indolent frontier friends. A. L. S. 2 p. (In dupli- 
cate.) I, 92 and 93. 

From Henry Bouquet. 1764. August 22. Fort Loudoun. 
Expressing his gratitude to Franklin and his sincere affection for him. 
Sorry to hear his sentiments concerning the government have raised him 
up enemies; wishes the unhappy disputes in the province might be 
amicably adjusted. Points out certain errors in the Government. Min- 
istry appear averse to Proprietary' governments. Board of Trade has 
just overset the fine superstructure raised by Lord Egmont, upon the 
expectation of a grant for the Island of St. John ; sends his plan which 
is much approved of in England. Perused with pleasure the papers, Mr. 
Franklin sent him; wishes the plan of a military frontier could be put 
in execution. Expects no disturbance until the Ohio is crossed. A. 
L. S. 3 P- I, 94. 

From Henry Bouquet. 1764. August 22. Fort Loudoun. 
Acknowledging favor of i6th inst. with the welcome account that his 
request to the Governor had been granted; grateful for Franklin's 
warm support. Recapitulates various times when Franklin has promoted 
the service, rendering timely aid to Gen. Shirley, Gen. Braddock, Lord 
Loudoun and finally to himself in the execution of the present Act. A. 
L. S. 3 p. (In duplicate.) I, 95 and 93. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 262). 



32 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From H[enry] B[ouquet]. 1764. August 27. Fort Loudoun. 

Has the mortification to inform him privately that Bradstreet has 
granted peace at Presqu' Isle to the Delaware and Shavvanese, without 
visiting on the least satisfaction for their murders and insults; intends 
taking no notice of this, but will proceed to the Ohio prepared to treat 
as enemies every villain of those nations, unless contrary orders come 
from the General. A. L. S. i p. I, 96. 

From Thomas Moffat. 1764. September 24. Newport, R. I. 

Thanks him for sending Dr. Heberden's method of inoculating the 
small-pox, which bears every mark of judgment, candor and benevolence; 
attention shown to this treatise in New England. At the anniversary 
meeting of their University, mentions various elections made, to show 
the progress of learning. A. L. S. i p. I, 97. 

From The House of Representatives of the Assembly of 
Pennsylvania. 1764. October 26. 

Appointment of Benjamin Franklin as agent to Great Britain to assist 
Rich[ar]d Jackson. D. S. Cha[rle]s Moore, Clerk, i p. LII, 46. 

From James Parker. 1764. October 27. Woodbridge [N. J.]. 

Acknowledging favors of 20th and 25th inst. Concerning certain 
debts he owes to Mr. Strahan and Mr. Franklin; discusses ways and 
means of paying them off. Business of the post-office. Will send him 
the law relating to the division line, but doubts if it contains the infor- 
mation he wants. Discusses the Virginia affair; whether to go there 
himself, in case of Mr. Royle's death, in order to secure the printing 
business to Mr. Hunter's son; reasons for and against Mr. Holt's going; 
for himself is resigned either to stay or go, according to Mr. Franklin's 
desire. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 98. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Series, XVI, p. 192. 

From Lewis Jones. 1764. October 30. Woodbridge [N. J.]. 

Hears from Mr. Parker that he is going to England; begs him to 
deliver the enclosed letter to his father or Mr. Cummings; has several 
times written to his family, but never received any answer. A. L. S. 
I p. I, 99- 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 33 

From John Smith. 1764. November 2. Burlington. 

Expressing pleasure at his appointment as agent of the Province; 
no one better qualified for the position. Wishes him success and a safe 
return. A. L. S. i p. I, 104. 

From Baynton & Wharton. 1764. November 3. Philadelphia. 

Describing two tracts of land; one on the east side of Lake Cham- 
plain, the other on the north side of the Bay of Chaleur ; advises a speedy 
petition to their Lordships for the land, as everything is being taken up. 
A. L. S. 3 p. I, 105. 

From Edm[und] Quincy, Jr. 1764. November 5. Boston. 

His wife's death together with several avocations has prevented his 
writing for some time past. Published in Edes & Gills paper last post- 
day a letter from his brother Huske to the Committee of Merchants; 
a reference in this paper was supposed by some to point to Franklin, as- 
sures him that it referred to a person residing in London whose treatise 
on the subject he hopes to send him. A. L. S. 2 p. I, io6. 

From Samuel Eckerling. 1764. November 5. Philadelphia. 

His brethren, Israel and Gabriel Eckerling, were taken by the French 
and Indians from the Allegheny Mountains in August, 1757, and some 
time after sent to Rochelle in France where he is informed they died in 
the hospital. Asking Franklin to inquire whether this information be 
true and to let him know. A. L. S. i p. I, 107. 

From Thomas Wharton. 1764. Nov. 13-20. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favor of 9th inst. Concerning Franklin's " Remarks 
on the Protest";^ W[illiam] A[llen]'s attitude in the matter. De- 
termined to have the ' Remarks ' translated into Dutch. Information 
received from Col. Bouquet, concerning a request for peace from the 
Shawanese and Delaware Indians. A. L. i p. I, 100. 

^ [Remarks on a late protest against the appointment of Mr. Franklin an agent 
for this province. Philadelphia, printed by B. Franklin and D. Hall. 1764.] 

From Mar [tin] Howard, Jr. 1764. November 16. Newport, R. I. 

Hearing of his speedy departure for London, embraces this opportunity 
to write him by a steamer bound thither. Flatters himself that Frank- 
lin's zeal will not be exclusively devoted to the correction of abuses in 

2—3 



34 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

his own Province. Rhode Island but a burlesque on order and govern- 
ment, and not likely to improve unless the Constitution is altered ; a 
petition to the King now in the hands of Jos. Harrison who sailed 
three weeks back; thinks it may be in Franklin's power to facilitate this 
matter. Has lost a valuable and affectionate wife. A. L. S. 2 p. 

I, io8. 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Sr.] 1764. November 17. Boston. 

Introducing Mr. Charles Russel, son of the Hon. James Russel of 
Charlestown. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, i. 

From R[icliar]d Jackson. 1764. November 18. [London.] 

Mischief and danger to America and Pennsylvania likely to ensue 
from the disturbances and dispute in the latter Province. His high 
opinion of Mr. Allen's honesty and good sense; this and other reasons 
induced him to open his mind to him more freely than he should, on 
the subjects of Pennsylvania's privileges, the Proprietary Government, 
the power of the Crown, etc.; had no idea that Mr. Allen would make 
these sentiments public; intended chiefly for Franklin's ear. Has just 
heard of the event of the election; not sorry for Franklin, but only for 
the Province; looks upon all hopes of reconciliation as vanished. Mes- 
sages to the Governor of New Jersey. A. L. S. 4 p. I, loi. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 272). 

/'row Joseph Galloway. 1764. November 23. Philadelphia. 

Wrote him from New Castle the substance of the Address of the 
Low^er Counties' Assembly, in which they inform the Crown that, 
although they are governed under the same charter as the people of 
Pennsylvania, their laws are different; proves this to be wrong, as 
well as certain other acts of theirs. Proprietary party still industriously 
endeavoring to prevent their design to change the government; petitions 
to this effect, from the Corporation of the City and also from the Presby- 
terians, to go over with Mr. Hamilton. Debility of the Proprietary 
Government; instances the case of a Dutchman appointed sheriff at Lan- 
caster and the refusal of the Irish Presbyterians to serve under him, end- 
ing with his forced flight to save his life; no measures taken to bring the 
offenders to justice. Hostile attitude of the Governor towards all, 
supporting the measures in favor of the Crown. [Conclusion missing.] 
A. L. 4 p. I, 102. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 276). 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 35 

From James Parker. 1764. November 23. Woodbridge. 

Details of a business transaction with Dunlap. Left Philadelphia 
before the arrival of his letter from the Capes, supposes by this time 
he is well on his voyage. On returning home, sent off his son to bring 
back Lady Jane; Mrs. Franklin had some thoughts of coming, but de- 
cided not to. His debt to Mr. Strahan. A. L. S. i p. I, 103. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, 195. 

From [Samuel Wharton]. 1764. November 23. Philadelphia. 

Provincial politics in Pennsylvania in regard to the relations of the 
Proprietary and the Royal parties. The re-emitting act. Military 
affairs. A. L. 8 p. (Incomplete.) LVIII, 32. 

From [Thomas] Osborne. 1764. November. Gray's Inn, [London], 

Has taken the liberty to send him the 15th volume of Modern History 
with some of his catalogues, which he does not doubt Dr. Franklin will 
distribute to the best advantage. Would give him infinite pleasure if a 
certain intricate account were settled. A. L. i p. I, 109. 

From Alex[ande]r Small. 1764. December i. London. 

Concerning the best means of pickling sturgeon. The best machine 
for uprooting trees; Franklin's idea of pulling them down by a force 
applied to a straight rope appealed strongly to the writer's namesake, the 
Virginia professor. Must have seen by the newspapers the death of Mr. 
Bliss, the Greenwich observer; Mr. Mitchell has unsuccessfully offered 
himself as a candidate; thinks the Torj^ interest will get it for an 
Oxonian who never made an observation. Rival geniuses apt to be highly 
jealous of one another; cites the case between Cumming, the watch- 
maker, and Mr. Harrison. The affair of the £5000 which was to have 
been given to Mr. Harrison; the law says that he is entitled to £20,000 
for his discovery. England's relation to America; Franklin's friends hope 
he will put on paper his thoughts on this subject. A. L. S. 4 p. I, iio. 

From Tho[mas] Wharton. 1764. December 4. Philadelphia. 

James Hamilton and his nephew sailed on the 28th with Capt. Friend. 
Letter received from Col. Bouquet announcing a peace with the Shaw- 
anese and Delawares; terms of surrender. Rumors that an answer to 
Franklin's ' Remarks on a Protest ' will shortly be published ; satisfied 
that J. D. [John Dickinson?] has been applied to for his name, but 



36 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

his warmest friends strenuously oppose his placing it there ; mentions the 
chief points they intend to answer. Names of men left out of the Com- 
mission and one or two put in. After careful reflection, thinks nothing 
can contribute to their freedom so much as a Legislative Council; rea- 
sons for this. Has just seen Col. Bouquet's letter to Gov. Penn, dated 
at the Forks of Muskingham, Nov. 15, 1764; quotes from it the condi- 
tions of peace, the attitude of the Indians, etc. A. L. S. 3 p. I, iii. 

Printed, in part, in Works (Sparks, VII, 281, Note). 

From Cha[rles] Thomson. 1764. December 18. Philadelphia. 

Urgent business called him away and so prevented him from waiting 
on Franklin at Chester; hopes ere now he is safe in London. The 
first day of his journey traveled about thirty-two miles up the Lancaster 
Road and passed nineteen taverns; thinks to this fact is due the wide- 
spread debaucherjf and useless dissipation of time and money; cites the 
story of Cyrus and the Lydians to prove this; much better if the Gov- 
ernor could have a handsome fixed annual salary, instead of perquisites 
arising from tavern licenses. Wm. Moore put at the head of the Com- 
mission in Chester Co. ; other changes made show the effect of party 
spirit. Reason to fear that the Indian war is not at an end ; six Shaw- 
anese hostages have made their escape; trouble expected. Before Mr. 
Hamilton sailed, heard rumors that the Presbyterians had signed a pe- 
tition to the Proprietaries requesting their influence to prevent a change 
of Government. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 112. 

From Sani[uel] Wharton. 1764. December 19. 

Account of the escape from Pittsburg of the Shawanese hostages; this 
tribe independent owing to being supplied by French traders with 
clothing and ammunition ; no permanent peace possible until that coun- 
try is taken and an English garrison established at the Illinois ; one, 
Owens, was sent by Col. Bouquet to invite the hostages to return ; an 
altercation ensued and Owens shot one of them dead on the spot. Dela- 
wares and MIngos desirous of having the peace confirmed. First di- 
vision of the Pennsylvania forces to be disbanded, the other on its way 
to Carlisle. Faction at present in high spirits, declares openly that there 
is not the least fear of a change of Government; his father praying for 
that change, which only can restore peace to the distracted province. 
A. L. S. 7 p. LVIII, 33 and I, 113. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 37 

Frojn [Samuel Wharton]. 1764. December 19. Philadelphia. 

Reply of the Protestors in the Assembly to Dr. Franklin's Remarks. 
Relation of the Chief Justice [William Allen] and Mr. [John] Dick- 
inson to the Protestors. LVIII, 33. 

From David Hall. 1764. December 20. Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Franklin, Sally and his son all well. Sends him that day's 
paper in which there is an article on Franklin's behalf by John Hughes, 
desiring the author or authors of an " Answer " to Franklin's " Re- 
marks " to publish his or their names. Gives him a full account of the 
escape of the six Shawanese hostages and the reasons for it. A very bad 
gang about town, who every night rob houses or attack people, so 
expects another hanging bout soon; road also infested by highwaymen. 
A. L. S. 2 p. I, 114- 

From John Ross, 1764. December 20. Philadelphia. 

The most important matter since Franklin's departure has been the 
issuing new Commissions of Peace for this county and the counties of 
Chester and Bucks; various appointments made; names of men omitted. 
Opinions concerning change of Government; thinks the majority of 
people desire " their dear Sovereign " to rule over them if their present 
liberties granted by Charter are preserved. Persuaded that Franklin 
together with Mr. Jackson, will do everj'thing to promote the happi- 
ness, prosperity and peace of the colonies in general, and this province 
in particular. L. S. i p. I, 115. 

From [Springett] Penn. 1764. December 22. Dublin. 

Congratulates Dr. Franklin on his safe arrival in London ; asks him 
to consult with Mr. Life in regard to putting in his claim in case his 
Majesty takes the government of Pennsylvania on himself; wants to be 
informed whether the intail at Pennsbury is barred. L. i p. XLIV, 3. 

From Marg[aret] Stevenson. {^Circa 1764? London,] 

Asks Dr. Franklin to bring his family to England. Has had poor 
health. Her lodgers. Thanks for cranberries sent. A. L. S. 4 p. 

XLII, 21. 



38 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Bernard Ogden. 

1765. January 9. Sunderland in the County of Durham. 

Asking for information concerning the daughter of one Thos. Cookson, 
deceased, who married one Galloway. There are two daughters of Mr. 
Cookson's only sister, who have been offered a sum of money for their 
right to their uncle's effects; would greatly appreciate any advice as to 
the steps the heirs must take to come at the true value of the effects. 
A. L. S. I p. I, 116. 

From Jos[eph] Galloway. 1765. January 13. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favors of Sept. 26th and Nov. 9th. Confident that 
everything has been done to obtain the desirable object, — a Royal Gov- 
ernment; hopes the presentation of the petitions will bring forth the 
desired issue. Thanking him for the notice taken of the piece signed 
Americanus; has nearly finished a pamphlet on the same subject entitled 
" Political Reflections on the dispute between Great Britain and her 
Colonies respecting her right of imposing taxes on them without their 
assent " ; if Franklin's son approves, will publish it ; something needed 
to allay the violent temper of the Americans ; difficulty of getting it 
published ; printers take everything inflammable but nothing cool and 
rational. Concerning a petition to the Commons for the repeal of the 
law prohibiting paper money from being lawful tender in the colonies ; 
reasons why Parliament would do well to grant it. Impatiently await- 
ing the resolution of Parliament respecting the Stamp Act; mischief 
caused by the delay. Thinks there is a wide-spread intention to throw 
off all connection with the mother country; is confident this will meet 
with little sympathy in Pennsylvania. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 116^. 

From James Parker. 1765. January 14. Woodbridge [N. J.]. 

Details of a business transaction with Dunlap and McNott. Mr. 
Foxcroft will not be up from Virginia until the beginning of February. 
Severity of the weather; anxious to hear of his safe arrival. Sends the 
last four Philadelphia newspapers. A. L. S. i p. I, 117. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Series, XVI, p. 196. 

From James Parker. 1765. January 22. Woodbridge [N. J.]. 

Concerning his two former letters dated Nov. 23d and Jan. 14th; 
repeats some of the news contained in them. Matter of Dunlap 's deed. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 39 

Heavy fall of snow ; enough sheep killed by it to put an end to the talk 
of woollen manufactures. Benny Mecom's accounts still unpaid. Hopes 
Franklin will pay his (Parker's) debt to Mr. Strahan. A. L. S. 2 p. 

I, ii8. 

From Jos[eph] Galloway. 1765. January 23. Philadelphia. 

Enclosing a copy of a letter or mandate sent down by the Governor 
to the Provincial Commissioners of Appeal, concerning the assessment 
of the people's lands and those belonging to the Proprietors, the latter 
to be taxed at a much lower rate; asks if the Governor thinks he has the 
power of the Pope. The majority in the Assembly continue firm in their 
resolve to get rid of the Proprietary Government, the minority make 
no attempt to oppose it. Mr. Croghan, attended by an army officer and 
one hundred of the troops from Fort Pitt, is about to set off for the 
Illinois country to take possession on behalf of the Crown. Franklin's 
family well. A. L. S. 3 p. I, ii9- 

From Tho[nia]s Franklin. 1765. January 28. Lutterworth. 

Heard that Franklin was at Lutterworth not long before and had 
inquired after him. Informed that he is now in London ; begs for a 
line or two as he is anxious to come to London to see him. Sends him a 
hare. His wife joins him in sending love. A. L. S. i p. I, 120. 

Fro?7i Isaac All. 1765. February 5. Edinburgh. 

Heard only the day before of his arrival in London, owing to the 
irregularity of the newspapers. Hopes his aunt and his cousin Sally are 
in good health. Is now loading his ship for London, where he hopes 
to have the pleasure of seeing his kinsman personally. A. L. S. 2 p. 

I, 121. 
Fro 7« Jno. Truslen. 1765. February 6. London. 

Enclosing a plan of the Literary Society and requesting the honor of 
Franklin's name as a subscribing member. Engraved L. S. i p. I, 122. 

From Ezra Stiles. 1765. February 20. Newport. 

Enclosing a letter to the Sieur Somonozow at Petersburg which 
Franklin is to read and suppress if he likes. Curious to have an ac- 
count of the discoveries of the polar voyage. His endeavors to obtain 
thermometrical observations from each one of the sixteen Continental 



40 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

provinces; fears it will be a failure owing to lack of thermometers. A 
detailed account of certain experiments, after M. Braunius, in the 
congelation of mercury. The winter one of intense cold. Hopes he 
will not forget to recommend that ingenious gentleman, IVIr. Professor 
Winthrop, to the honors of the Royal Society. A. L. S. 4 p. I, 124. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 260). 

From Peter Franklin. 1765. February 21. Philadelphia. 

Hopes to hear from him by the January packet. The winter so far 
has been terribly cold. Mr. Foxcroft's visit to Philadelphia postponed 
until May. Have decided not to let Ephe Brown leave, but if Frank- 
lin consents, he would like to hire the office now in Mr. Parker's 
hands. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 125. 

From Rich[ar]d Stockton. 1765. February 23. New York. 

Concerning certain letters and packets directed to Franklin, and by 
whose hands they have been forwarded. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 123. 

From Jos[eph] Galloway. 1765. February 27. Philadelphia. 

Enclosing extract of a letter from Thomas Penn to his nephew; the 
account therein contained of the petitions for a change of Government 
from Proprietary to Royal has struck their friends with the utmost con- 
sternation ; if it be true, the King has refused to listen to their com- 
plaints against Proprietary' oppression and injustice; this letter is in- 
dustriously circulated all over the Province by the Proprietaries and their 
friends; has quoted many extracts from Franklin's letter respecting the 
petitions, to counteract the effect of this and to allay the despair of 
their party; the Assembly anxious to know the result of the petitions; 
results to be expected, if it is true they were rejected without a hearing. 
A. L. S. 3 p. I, 126. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 284; Bigelow, III, 372; Smyth, IV, 364). 

From Isaac All. 1765. March 12. [Edijnburgh. 

Acknowledging favor of 3d inst. Has just undergone an operation 
for the cure of a fistula; expects to leave for London in about three 
weeks; when they meet will give him an account of his sojourn in 
Honduras. Desires some information about lightning rods, as a friend 
of his wishes to erect one on his country house. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 127. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 41 

From Jos[eph] Hope. 1765. March 15. Edinburgh. 

Acknowledging favor of 25th ult. as well as the box of seeds; makes 
suggestions as to collecting and packing them ; will write to Air. Col- 
linson soon to thank and pay him for the seeds, also to ]\Ir. Bartram, 
who, if he wishes, can supply them yearly with seeds. Announcing the 
birth of a daughter to Sir Alexander and Lady Dick. A. L. S. 3 p. 

I, 128. 

From C[adwalader] Evans. 1765. March 15. Philadelphia. 

How they celebrated the good news of Franklin's safe arrival in Lon- 
don the 13th of Dec; Dr. Thos. Bond's tedious indisposition has 
occasioned the sole care of the hospital to fall on him. Account of 
certain scurrilous attacks on them by their enemies, which they met and 
routed with the same weapons. Inhabitants of Cumberland County 
guilty of an act of rebellion ten days previous; a full account of the 
whole affair will be transmitted to him. Rumors from Third Street, that 
the Proprietor had yielded to the importunity of the Pomfret family to 
sell the Government to the Crown for a peerage; not anxious about the 
means, if the end is obtained. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 129. 

Printed, in part, in Works (Sparks, VII, 283, Note). 

From James Parker. 1765. March 22. Woodbridge. 

No word from Franklin ; has written him several times since his 
departure. Work he did in Philadelphia on the accounts. Samuel 
Smith of Burlington has been composing a historj^ of New Jersey; has 
planned to go there and print it for him; intends sending Ben ]\Iecom's 
printing materials there ; will pay Franklin for them if he wishes it. In- 
tends leaving the printing office and little post office at Woodbridge to 
his son. Hopes he will be able to pay off his debts before his death. 
Has had a smart attack of gout. Excessively cold winter ; great poverty 
throughout the country. Question of his losing the comptroller's office, 
unless he moves to New York; reasons why he cannot live there; hopes 
the place of comptroller will not be taken from him ; if it is, he is un- 
willing to keep the post office at Woodbridge, as it does not pay him. 
A. L. S. 4 p. I, 130. 

From Tho[mas] Wharton. 1765. March 25. Philadelphia. 
Concerning the act of rebellion by the inhabitants of Cumberland 
County in destroying certain goods designed for the treaty at Pittsburg; 



42 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

attempts made by those concerned to palliate this atrocious act; im- 
possible to hold a treaty with the Indians without giving them the 
articles they stand in need of; disagreeable consequences likely to en- 
sue. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 131. 

From Geo[rge] Mercer. 1765. April 4. London . 

Asking Franklin to appoint an hour in which to talk over certain 
queries sent him from the Stamp Office, which he is incapable of 
answering. L. S. i p. I, 132. 

From [Capt.] Nath[anie]l Falconer. 
1765. April 5. Savanna-la-Mar, Jamaica. 

Announcing that he has sent him a turtle and two pairs of Spanish 
birds. A. L. S. i p. I, 133. 

From D[eborah] Franklin. [1765.] April 7 and 12. Philadelphia. 

Is glad to hear of his safe arrival in London. Family affairs. A. L. 
S. 4 p. XLII, 42. 

Printed in Works (Bigelow, III, 374). 

From E[phraini] Brown. 1765. April 12. Philadelphia. 

Congratulating him on his safe arrival in England. Going on well 
with the post office. A. L, S. i p. I, 134. 

Fro7n Trevor Newland. 1765. April 17. Holt. 

Reasons why he was prevented waiting on him for the memorandum 
relative to Lecock; is only distant five or six miles from there and will 
gladly make any inquiry Franklin may direct. Dr. Clark and Mr. 
Clutterbuck have letters from a person in Philadelphia inquiring for 
one Carinton ; does not know if this is the person Franklin wants 
to inquire about. A. L. S. i p. I, 135- 

From John Whitehurst. 1765. April 23. Derby. 

Expressing pleasure at his safe arrival in England and acknowledging 
his courtesy to Mr. Tunicliff. The bearer, Mr. Paschall, is going to 
reside at Halifax, Nova Scotia, and desires to know how to get some 
cash remitted thither. Has just heard alarming news of a Governor 
being lost, supposed to be Franklin's son ; will be unhappy until he hears 
a better account. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 136. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 43 

i^roOT James Parker, 1765. April 25. Burlington. 

Repeats various remarks made in his letter of March 22, 1765, con- 
cerning his business in Burlington and his fear of losing the office of 
Comptroller. To please the Governor, Mr. Foxcroft and he decided to 
attempt to have the post go through Burlington. Effect of the cruel 
stamp duty on his business; thinks the people's lot in America only a 
trifle better than that of the French peasants. The past winter the 
hardest since 1740. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 137. 

From Tho[mas] Wharton. 1765. April 27. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging his letter of the 13th inst., with the pamphlet wrote 
in vindication of the measures pursued by P[it]t; the Colonies load 
of debt to England ; the heavy duties, etc. The men who destroyed the 
goods at Pittsburgh have been acquitted by the grand jury of Cum- 
berland Co. ; unless the King interferes, nothing can be done. It is 
said that W[illiam] A [lien] has a letter from the Proprietor, declaring 
his intention to hold the Government and quoting the King as his 
authority; does not believe this, but it has added new spirits to their 
party. The affair of spiking the guns ; accusations against various 
parties ; the one man apprehended is probably innocent. Aversion shown 
by most people to having representatives in Parliament; reasons for it. 
Case of a small compact settlement about 30 miles from Pittsburg on 
land not yet purchased from the Indians; unless these persons are re- 
moved, it may cause another Indian war. A, L. S. 4 p. I, 138. 

From Isaac All. 1765. April 30. [Edin] burgh. 

An accident to his ship has delayed his departure ; consults him again 
about a lightning rod for a friend's house. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 139. 

From Jno. Lloyd. 1765. May 2. Wilmington, N. C. 

The Assembly of that colony having voted £100 towards the estab- 
lishment of a post through the Province, he wrote Franklin's colleague, 
Mr. Foxcroft of Virginia, to that effect. If Franklin thinks proper to 
comply with the request of the Province, offers his services to conduct 
the affair. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 140. 

Frorn Mar [tin] Howard, Jr. 1765. May 14. Newport, R. I. 

Wrote Franklin some time before concerning a petition possessed by 
Jos. Harrison, signed by a few who wish for a Royal Government. Dr. 



44 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Moffat sent Franklin a pamphlet entitled, " A letter from Halifax " ; this 
has involved him (Howard) in a paper war, in which he has taken the 
side of the Mother Countrj^, against her ungrateful sons, and published 
"A defence of the Halifax letter." Being now made not a little obnox- 
ious, would like Franklin to use his influence to procure him the office 
of Receiver of the Stamp Duties. Mr. Ward elected Governor of the 
Colony by a great majority. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 127. 

From Isaac Norris. 1765. May 18. Fairhill. 

Acknowledging his favor of Feb. i8th, with a pamphlet vindicating 
the power of Parliament to make general colony laws. Concerning 
some business with C. & O. Hanbury. Sends by the hand of Wm. 
Dickinson, Baskerville's two volumes of Milton's works to be neatly 
bound; as he has a very good edition of Milton's works printed in 
1720, will chiefly value Baskerville's edition for its elegance and neat- 
ness. His health still delicate. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 141. 

From John Ross. 1765. May 20. Philadelphia. 

Presumes by this time, Franklin can pretty nearly judge what is to be 
the issue of their application to His Majesty for protection; at present 
they have only the form without the power of Government. Acquittal 
of those persons who destroyed the goods at Pittsburg; since then an- 
other extraordinary affair has happened, even His Majesty's troops 
have been attacked and fired upon, as he will perceive from the en- 
closed account; in short, if His Majesty will not accept and take care of 
this flourishing Province, it is hard to tell where these lawless mobs will 
end. A. L. S. i p. I, 142. 

From Hugh Roberts. 1765. May 20. Philadelphia. 

Franklin's family well, although not quite settled in their new house. 
Goes to Chester the next day to accompany his friend Samuel Neave, 
who sails thence to England; praises this friend in the highest terms; 
hopes he and Franklin will meet. Franklin's and the Government's 
enemies are foiled, nay, drubbed with weapons. Visits sometimes the 
worthy remains of the Junto, but the political, polemical divisions have 
contributed to lessen that harmony, formerly enjoyed there. Con- 
cerning a pamphlet called an " Address " wherein is portrayed in 
striking colors, a quondam friend of theirs. Hopes Franklin will ever 
stand above the reach of malice and calumny. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 143. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 45 

From [Samuel Wharton]. 1765. May 27. Philadelphia. 

Expresses thanks for attention to his personal affairs. Need of a 
firmer government in Pennsylvania. Account of the destruction of sup- 
plies en route to the frontier troops. A. L. 4 p. (Conclusion missing.) 

LVIII, 34. 

Fro w James Parker. 1765. May 29. Burlington. 

Complains of not having a single line from Franklin ; at a loss what 
to do in the Dunlap affair or in anything; Mr. Foxcroft momentarily 
expected in Philadelphia. A. L. S. i p. I, 144. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, p. 197. 

From Baynton, Wharton and Morgan. 
1765. May 30. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favor of March 9th ; will certainly transmit the note 
for a thousand pounds by the June packet ; reasons why they had not 
sent it earlier. Expressing sincere appreciation of the proofs of friend- 
ship shown them by Franklin. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 145. 

From James Parker. 1765. June 14. Philadelphia. 

Enclosing a general statement of accounts, and acknowledging a short 
letter from Franklin by Capt. Robinson. Discusses some money mat- 
ters in which he seems to have expected a more generous treatment at 
Franklin's hands. The use he made of B. Mecom's printing materials 
he is willing to pay for ; IVIecom's effects remain in store house in New 
York, awaiting Franklin's orders. His health failing but endeavors to 
be resigned, knowing that it cannot be long before he goes hence. A. L. 
S. I p. I, 146. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, p. 197. 

jprom Jos [eph] Galloway. 1765. June 18. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging his letter by Capt. Robinson ; the case of the Duke of 
Athol a curious one; still more curious are Mr. Pownall's reasons for 
refusing the Government, though they do credit to that gentleman. 
Sends the enclosed Resolves of the Lower House of Assembly of Vir- 
ginia, on the Stamp Act and the right of the British Legislature in 
forming that law; after they were passed, the Governor procured the 
original minutes, tore them up and instantly dissolved the Assembly. 



46 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

The hopes of a change contained in Franklin's last letter give great joy. 
Thanks him for his efforts to set aside the intended application for the 
Delaware Islands. A. L. S. 4 p. I, 147. 

Printed, in part, in Works (Sparks, VII, 298). 

FroT7i Tho[mas] Wharton. 1765. June 24, Philadelphia. 
Dissatisfaction in Pennsylvania respecting the Stamp Act. A Con- 
gress at New York proposed. Virginia resolutions. A. L. S. 2 p. 
Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 297). I> 148' 

Fro7« Jos [eph] Galloway. 1765. June 28. Philadelphia. 

Introducing Mr. John Williams, a gentleman lately come over on 
business of the Treasurj', by order of the Ministry. A. L. S. I p. 

I, 149. 

From [Sir] Alexander Dick. 1765. July 5. Prestonfield. 

Acknowledging favor of 2d ult. ; expressing the obligation he and his 
friend, Mr. Swinton, are under to Franklin for certain information. 
His willingness to serve Franklin's young friend, [Samuel] Bard; can 
obtain board for him with that excellent gentleman, Mr. Blacklock, the 
blind poet; advantages incident to such a position. Inoculated his son 
and three little daughters for small-pox, from which they emerged very 
happily. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 150. 

From [Capt.] Nath[aniel] Falconer. 1765. July 14. Off Dover. 

Concerning several packets which he is to deliver with his own hand 
to Franklin as soon as his ship gets up to London. A. L. S. i p. I, IS^' 

From Tho[mas] Wharton. 1765. July 16. Philadelphia. 

The Resolves of the House of Virginia, enclosed in his letter of the 
15th June, were not the ones entered into by them; encloses a copy of 
the right ones which are much more consistent with their duty to the 
Crown. Cumberland County inhabitants determined to hinder any 
supply going out to Pittsburg, and thereby bring on another Indian war; 
cites instance of their burning the goods belonging to one Joseph Spear. 
Especially impatient to hear from Franklin, as their election draws near. 
Governor Franklin and his spouse with Joseph Galloway, gone to 
Shrewsbury. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 152. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 47 

From Alex[aiide]r Lunech. 1765. July 31. Philadelphia. 

Gilbert Elliot, Esq., is his friend; and his cousin, Lord Pitfour, one 

of the Senators of the College of Justice at Edinburgh, has promised his 

interest to any gentleman who will point out to him anything whereby 

he can serve him (Lunech) ; would beg this favor of Franklin. A. L. 

S. 2 p. I, 153- 

From James Parker. 1765. August i. 

Bond for £65 I2s. given to Benjamin Franklin. Notes and receipt 

by Deborah Franklin and B. Franklin. D. S. 3 p. LXVI, ii. 

From James Parker. 1765. August 8. New York. 
Acknowledging commission as Land-Waiter at New York; thank- 
ing Franklin for this favor. Difficulties in moving to New York before 
May. Engaged in printing the votes of the New Jersey Assembly, 
also a History of New Jersey, by Samuel Smith, of Burlington. Would 
prefer to continue in the service of the post-office ; asks if Franklin 
could transfer the office of Land-Waiter to his son, who has greatly 
reformed. Their old friend, Hugh Hughes, ruined. Arrival of Mr. 
Ro3de from Virginia. No hopes of B. Mecom's succeeding in New 
Haven. A. L. S. 4 p. II, 188. 

From Thom[a]s Penington & Son. 1765. August 10. Bristol. 

His favor of 3d inst., concerning one Mrs. Bigelow; her penniless 

position. A. L. S. i p. I, 154. 

Fro7n Jere[miah] Miller. 1765. August 13. New London. 
Concerning the office of Comptroller, which Col. Dyer wishes to trans- 
fer to the writer's son, John Still Miller; asks Franklin to mention his 
or his family's name to ]VIr. Grenville. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 155. 

From Tho[mas] Wharton. 1765. August 14. Philadelphia. 
Conduct of the frontier inhabitants who have just murdered an Indian 
lad; Delawares assert that unless they receive satisfaction, and a stop 
is put to other abuses, they will declare war. Account received from 
Geo. Croghan, who is pursuing his passage down the Ohio ; was set upon 
by Indians belonging to Pontiac; lost three of the Shawanese chiefs; 
he and his nephew were slightly wounded ; finding out who they were, 
the Indians promised not to molest them further. A charge against 
Franklin, read for some Sundays past in several Dutch churches, that 
he had expressed publicly his enmity to the Dutch and obtained addi- 
tional taxes on Dutch paper, etc. Death of William Plumstead ; nature 



48 Letters to Benjamin Fil^nklin 

of the disease; question of who will succeed him in the office of Probate 
for Wills. An advertisement, published by John Dickinson, inform- 
ing the electors of this county of his determination to decline the ser- 
vice. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 156. 

From John Balfour. 1765. September 2. Edinburgh. 

Acknowledging favor of 9th ult. giving an account of Mr. Mecom's 
affairs ; thinks that young gentleman is much to be pitied ; considers that 
Franklin has acted generously in suffering Mr. Mecom's effects to be 
equally divided amongs his creditors. Asks him to recommend an honest 
attorney in New York, as one James Parker owes him a good deal of 
money. Mr. Robert Alexander stands as candidate for the borough of 
Anstrather in the place of Sir Harry Erskine. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 157. 

From James Parker. 1765. September 22. Burlington. 

Acknowledging favor of July 6th; will send him tables of rates of 
postage as soon as he can print them. Mr. Hall's accounts. Concern- 
ing the possibility of procuring that place in the custom house for 
his son, who has mended his ways. Saw Mr. Hughes in Philadelphia, 
who is poorly. Will doubtless hear from many quarters of the com- 
motions related to the Stamp Act; thinks one-half the Americans will 
die rather than yield. A. L. S. I p. I, 158. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Series, XV^I, p. 199. 

From Mary Hopkinson. 1765. October i. 

Expressing her Intense gratitude to Franklin after his kindness in 
tracing out her family; of all her husband's old friends, but one gentle- 
man besides himself has been good enough to extend their regard to his 
wife and children ; sends him an order on Messrs. Barclay & Sons for the 
expense he has been at in this affair. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 160. 

From Tho[mas] Wharton. 1765. October 5. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favor of 13th July. Result of the elections; got in 
every man they proposed: I. Norrls, J. Fox, J. Galloway, J. Rich- 
ardson, R. Evans, T. Livezey, M. Hillegas and Henrj' Pawling; thus It 
has fared throughout the Province, except in Berks, where they lost 
their worthy friend John Ross. Arrival of the vessel with the stamped 
paper created much confusion and disorder; inhabitants gathered at the 
State House by beat of drum; their object, the destruction of J. Hughes 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 49 

or the surrender of his office; it ended in his promising to resign. J. 
Dickinson, G. Bryan, and J. Morton now in New York in consulta- 
tion with the Committees from the other Colonies relative to the Stamp 
Act. A. L. S. I p. I, 161. 

From [Dr.] John Morgan. 1765. October 10. Philadelphia. 

Expressing the warmest gratitude to Franklin, not only for the 
kindnesses he has shown to him but also to his relations and friends; 
thanking him for advancing the fees necessary to admit him to the 
fellowship of the Royal Society. His appointment as professor of medi- 
cine in the College. Announces his marriage on the 5th ult. to Miss 
Molly Hopkinson. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 162. 

From James Parker. 1765. October 10. Woodbridge. 

Difficult job he has had printing a table of rates for the post-office; 
has had neither time for Mr. Hall's accounts nor for Samuel Smith's 
History. His intention of going to New York in the Spring. Black 
cloud hanging over America; people are running mad and declare it is 
as good to die by the sword as by famine. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 163. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, p. 200. 

From [Samuel Wharton]. 1765. October 13. Philadelphia. 

Events in Philadelphia upon arrival of the news of the change of 
Ministry. Jubilant attitude of the Proprietary party and renewed at- 
tacks upon Dr. Franklin. A. L. 2 p. (Conclusion missing.) 

LVIII, 35. 

From John Whitehurst. 1765. October 20. Derby. 

Since Mr. Ludlam's report of Mr. Harrison's time keeper has been 
made public has formed a plan for rendering such a machine of general 
use; explains the means by which he hopes to accomplish it. A. L. S. 

2 p. I, 164. 

Fro /« Hannah Walker. 1765. October 26. Westbury. 

Confessing some offence [not mentioned] on her own and her hus- 
band's part against Franklin, and begging most humbly for forgiveness; 
tells a pitiful tale of hard work, ill health and povertv. A. L. S. 2 p. 

I, 165. 

2—4 



50 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

i^ro7/i James Parker. 1765. November 6. Burlington. 

Acknowledging favor of Sept. 17th. Dreadful commotions in this 
country. His visit to New York postponed. Desires to know what 
disposition he is to make of the printing materials, when he leaves Bur- 
lington. Has gout in his right hand, so must be brief. A. L. S. i p. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Sen, XVI, p. 202. ^> ^""* 

From Tho[mas] Wharton. 1765. November 7. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favor of igth August. Meetings like the one rela- 
tive to the Stamp Act, held in New York, may in future be of great 
service to America. Refers him to his letter of the 5th ult. to see the 
result of the elections. In the new election for the city held to deter- 
mine whether J. Pemberton or G. Bryan was elected, the former was 
chosen by a large majority; reasons for this. An association formed and 
articles signed by a great number of merchants, declaring they will 
not import from Britain any goods or merchandise until the Stamp Act 
is repealed ; thinks this method far more eligible than the imprudent 
and unwarrantable steps taken by several Colonies. Account of the 
populace in New York having assembled to the number of thousands, 
burnt the Governor's coach and obliged him to give up the Stamp 
papers, which they are determined to send back to London ; seeing the 
multitude resolved, G. Gage advised the delivery; they also destroyed 
all the furniture belonging to Major James, who had said he would 
enforce obedience to the Act. Hourly expect some person to call on B. 
Chew ; will then know what part he will act ; he is considered as Pro- 
bate of Wills, King's Attorney and Recorder of Philadelphia. A. L. S. 
3 p. I, 167. 

Frof/i William Franklin. 1765. November 13. Burlington. 

Hard pressed for time owing to a vessel's sailing early the next morn- 
ing; is obliged to write to the Lords of Trade to acquaint them with the 
situation as regards the Stamp Act; has found it difficult to steer safely 
between the people in America and the Ministry in England; none of 
the Governors have received the least directions with regard to their 
conduct at this critical time. Congratulates himself that the Proprie- 
tary party published those lies against him, thereby giving him an op- 
portunity, by a seasonable answer, to remove the prejudices of the people; 
stands well with them now; their resentment directed against the Speaker; 
gives reasons for this. At the last meeting of the Council, Mr. David 
Ogden moved that he (the Governor) should call the Assembly with- 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 51 

out any application on the part of the members; means he took to avoid 
this; thinks Gov. Bernard and Gov. Colden, by unnecessary officious- 
ness, have made matters much worse; considers any man who sets him- 
self up as an advocate of the Stamp Act in the Colonies, is guilty of a 
mere piece of quixotism; discusses the feasibility of ignoring the Stamp 
Act. [Conclusion of the letter is missing.] A. L. 4 p. I, 168. 

From Edw[ar]d Penington. 1765. November 14. Philadelphia. 

Four years ago, his correspondence with Springett Penn began, con- 
cerning his affairs in America; faithfulness with which he has attended 
to his concerns; hears from a gentleman of undoubted credit, that the 
Proprietor has been treating with his nephew for the purchase of Penns- 
bury Manor; thinks this unfair; not only would he (Penington) lose his 
commission, but is sure Mr. Penn will not get the worth of his lands. 
Has reason to believe that Thos. Penn has prejudiced his kinsman 
against him; asks Franklin to rectify this. Need of surveying the land 
accurately before selling; mean artifices practised to cheat the elder 
branch of the Penn family. A. L. S. 3 p. I, 169. 

From John Balfour. 1765. November 21. Edinburgh. 

Concerning the debt due him and Mr. Hamilton by James Parker; 
would like it paid without the trouble of prosecuting; asks Franklin's 
good offices in this matter. A. L. S. I p. I, 171. 

From Jos[eph] Galloway to Messrs. Jackson & Franklin, London. 

1765. November 29. Philadelphia. 

Transmitting a memorial from the merchants of Philadelphia to the 
merchants and manufacturers of Great Britain. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 172. 
Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 302). 

From Baynton, Wharton & Morgan. 
1765. December 6. Philadelphia. 

Concerning a tax on a cargo of rum sent by them to Quebec; if 
judgment is passed against their agent there, who has declined to pay it, 
will appeal it to the King in Council; considers the action of Mr. Mur- 
ray, Governor of Quebec, in taxing spirituous liquors, a high encroach- 
ment on their rights as Englishmen. Case of Mr. Cunningham, an 
attorney at Quebec, who was suspended by the Governor without any 
stated cause; the real reason was his opposition to the Governor on this 
same question ; asks Franklin to give him an audience on this subject, 
when he arrives in England. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 173' 



52 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From T. Goolding. 1765. December 7. Brewer Street [London], 

Concerning some damask curtains for the Governor [Franklin] and 
his lady. A. L. S. i p. I, 174. 

From Fra[nci]s Hopkinson. 1765. December 13. Philadelphia. 

Esteem themselves very happy in having a friend like Franklin, who 
will represent their characters in a favorable light, to their relation, the 
Bishop. Franklin's advice to send Mr. Burrows a present of sturgeon 
or apples with their letter of thanks, came too late, the letter having 
gone; however, will ship them at once. Concerning Miss Sally's 
harpsichord whose machinery is so complex that no one could keep it in 
order but the man who made it; as Miss Sally plays so well, suggests 
the advisability of buying her a new one. Has finished the translation 
of the Psalms of David to the great satisfaction of the Dutch congrega- 
tion at New York. A. L. S. 4 p. I, 175. 

From James Parker. 1765. December 20. Burlington. 

Acknowledging favor of the middle of September, with invoice of 
goods sent to Mr. Hughes of New York; disposition to be made of 
them. Has had a prolonged and severe attack of the gout ; his son also 
has been very ill, at death's door, but is a little better; all this has 
delayed his accounts with Mr. Hall, also his departure for New York. 
B. Mecom's affairs. A. L. S. 2 p. I, 176. 

From Tho[nias] Wharton. 1765. December 30. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favor of Sept. 26. Overjoyed that the Petitions are 
presented and that there is a good chance of their success, notwith- 
standing the contradictory assertions of the Proprietary party. Stamped 
paper not allowed to land, some of it sent on board Captain Hawker. 
No business done in the courts, nor is the Port of New York opened. 
A. L. S. I p. I, 177. 

From Peter Franklin. [1765?] 

Request to send money by the first opportunity and to ask for a letter 
for him at the post office. A. L. i p. (Incomplete.) LVIII, 81. 

From Jos[epli] Galloway. [1765.] 
Democratic notions in America may lead to the independence of the 
Colonies from England. Distress on account of the Stamp Act. An ad- 
dress of the merchants of Pennsylvania to the merchants of London. 
Proceedings of the Stamp Act Congress. A. L. S. 4 p. (First part 
missing.) LVIII, 36, a, b. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 53 

From Jos[eph] Galloway. [1765.] 

Success of the Royal party against the Protestors in the autumn elec- 
tion. Resignation of Mr. [John] Hughes as stamp distributor. Stag- 
nation of business on account of the Stamp Act. A. L. S. 2 p. (First 
part missing.) LVIII, 36, C. 

From [Richard] Jackson. [1765?] 

Opinion as to the power of Parliament over the Colonies. 3 p. 

LVI(i), 5. 
From Sam[ue]l Salt. [1765.] 

The death of his wife, Dr. Franklin's relation. Shall be proud to 
see him at Bermingham. A. L. S. i p. XLII, 39. 

From Huni[plirey] Senhouse. 1765. January 25. Carlisle. 

Afflicted with a gradually increasing deafness; desires Franklin's 
opinion as to the possible benefit to be derived from electricity. A. L. S. 
2 p. (Mutilated.) LVIII, 51. 

From [Thomas] Whately. [1765.] Parliament St. [London.] 

Asking Franklin to call upon him at the Treasurj^ the following 
morning. L. in 3d P. i p. XL, 81. 

From . [Circa 1765?] 

A few hints relative to a general theory or natural history of the 
earth, principally calculated to prove that fossil shells were originally 
the offspring of the sea. L. (Incomplete.) 4 p. XLIX, 48. 

From . [Circa 1765.] 

Wretched condition of affairs in America; debts and heavy taxes; 
trouble with the Indians; heavy duties on all goods, especially wines; 
proofs of their being no longer freeman. L. 2 p. (Fragment.) 

LVIII, 118. 

From James Parker. 1766. January 4 and 11. Burlington. 

Accounts connected with the post-office. Concerning the disposal 
of the goods sent by Franklin to J. Hughes; that gentleman unable 
to take them ; has not surrendered his estate, but keeps a school and 
avoids the sheriff; he has offered to give up everything, but his 
creditors wish him sent to jail. B. IVIecom's accounts and debts. De- 
tailed reasons for thinking £150 of the money Mr. Holt is sued for in 
New Haven belongs to him. A. L. S. 6 p. II, i. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, 202. 



54 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Ben[jamin] Kent. 1766. January' 19. Boston. 

Still challenges the honor of being Franklin's friend. Describes the 

late discovery by an Indian of a small wilderness root, which, taken 

steeped in Madeira, has not failed to carry off any fit of the gout in a 

few hours' time. A, L. S. I p. II, 2. 

From Jno. Beveridge. 1766. January 20. Philadelphia. 

Sends three copies of ' Familiar Epistles,' ^ which he has printed, two 
for Dr. Pringle and one for Franklin; asks his good offices in procuring 
orders from his friends or the book sellers. A. L, S. 2 p. II, 3. 

^ See Hildeburn's Issues of the Penn. Press, No. 2107. 

FroM Jos [eph] Chew. 1766. January 24. New London. 

Increased confusion of the times; Mr. IngersoU so far intimidated 
as to give up his letters public and private. Although he [Mr. Chew] 
" disapproved in the most modest manner of the Stamp Act," is looked 
upon with disfavor by the advocates of extreme methods. In New 
York the stamp papers were burned. Read a letter from Mr. Conway, 
Secretary of State to the Governor of Rhode Island, couched in the 
strongest terms, demanding the people's submission to all acts of the 
English Legislature and calling upon Gen. Gage and Lord Colville, in 
case force is needed, to maintain order and good government ; trembles 
for the consequences. Finds himself in hard straits for money; would 
be much indebted to Franklin if he could procure him a place in any 
department in a Colony north of Carolina. A. L. S. 4 p. II, 4. 

From W[illiam] Dunlap. 1766. February i. Falmouth. 

An account of his affairs in Barbadoes; desires to live there but has 
not sufficient income ; heard of a vacancy there for the office of Searcher 
of His Majesty's Customs for the port of Bridgetown; begs Franklin's 
interest on his behalf in this important matter; encloses an application 
to the Secretary of the Treasury on the same subject. Has a very ad- 
vantageous offer for the disposition of his interest in Philadelphia, which, 
if closed with, would enable him in time to pay off his debts. A. L. S. 
2 p. II, 5- 

From Geo[rge] Read. 1766. February 7. 

Advising the sale of a piece of land, belonging to Mrs. Franklin, 
lying about 20 miles from him; reasons against renting it. A. L. S. 
I p. II, 6. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 55 

Froj7i Tho[mas] Crowley. 1766. February 8. London. 

Denying the authorship of a paragraph in the Gazetteer of Feb. ist, 
that the taxes in America do not amount to more than eight pence per 
head, whereas in England, to pay the interest only of money spent in 
Great Britain to defend America, they amount to twelve shillings. 
Strongly advocates conciliatory measures. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 7. 

From Springett Penn. 1766. February 12. Dublin. 

A long time ago desired him to ask Mr. Life for enough of his mother's 
money to purchase a lottery ticket. IVIr. Jackson gives him no hopes of 
succeeding in his claim to the Government. A. L. S. I p. II, 8. 

From Amelia Evans. [1766. February] ? 

Is about to sail for America. Asks for a loan of money. A. L. S. 
3 p. XLII, 22. 

From Phil[ip] Syng. 1766. March i. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging the present of Dr. Lewis's new work, wherein the man- 
agement of gold and silver is so well treated. The Junto fainted in the 
heat of the preceding summer and has not yet revived ; Franklin's pres- 
ence needed to reanimate it. A. L. S. i p. II, 9. 

From Tho[mas] Wharton. 1766. March 2. Philadelphia. 

Proprietary party say openly that there will be no change of Gov- 
ernment; all he and his friends can urge are Franklin's integrity, ca- 
pacity, and his assurance that the petitions are not rejected. Certain 
men on the Court side only lie in wait to augment the least omission on 
Franklin's part; the December packet having brought two letters from 
Franklin to Joseph Galloway and none to the Committee of Cor- 
respondence, they declare it contrary- to his instructions and are en- 
deavoring to prejudice members of the Assembly against him. Parson 
Millenburg denies that the letter mentioned before was read in the 
Dutch church. James Tilghman's appointment to the land office in 
place of William Peters, gives general satisfaction. Informed that the 
Courts are to be opened that week. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 10. 

From Amelia Evans. 1766. March 6. Portsmouth. 

Apologizing for not waiting on him before she left town ; expects to 
sail on the Aeolus; Sir William Erskine among the passengers, who is 



56 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

" going to visit the remains of ancient magnificence in the African 
World." Telling him where to send for a copper plate of Pennsylvania, 
New Jersey, etc., belonging to her father; thinks he might find it of 
use some day. A. L. S. 2 p. II, ii. 

From Joseph Priestley. 1766. March 25. Warrington. 

Describing certain experiments in electricity; progress he is making in 
his treatise on electricity; wishes Franklin would procure for him the 
Histoire d'Electricite he mentions, and certain other books; has decided 
to relate Mr. Wilson's experiments just as he published them with very 
few remarks. (Lower part of sheet missing. ) A. L. 3 p. II, 12. 

i^row Tho [mas] Hutchinson. 1766. March 26. Boston. 

His son bound for London ; expected to have gone himself, but his 
friends dissuaded him ; hopes his son will obtain for him some relief 
under his great sufferings ; asks Franklin to caution the young man 
against the snares and temptations of London. A. L. S. i p. II, 13. 

From James Parker. 1766. March 27. Woodbridge. 

His son convalescent ; is preparing for New York with all possible 
expedition. Can get no settlement nor any money from Holt. Dispo- 
sition made of Franklin's box of books. Has not received a penny from 
Benny Mecom nor any reply to his letters. A. L. S. 2 p. II, I4' 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Sen, XVI, 207. 

From J [oseph] Priestley. 1766. April 13. Warrington. 

Acknowledging favor of lOth inst., also the parcels of books, from 
the perusal of which he expects to make valuable additions to his His- 
tory; this work will come into Franklin's hands in an imperfect condi- 
tion ; hopes he will correct any errors in the French words, etc. Would 
be glad of Franklin's opinion on his experiments with vanes; has been 
wholly employed lately constructing an electrical machine upon a new 
and improved plan. Mr. Boulanger's remarks on experiments with 
condensed air. Sends various messages to Mr. Canton. Hopes he can 
procure him Beccaria's work; sorry that Wilkes' piece is not complete. 
A. L. S. 3 P- H, 15. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 57 

From Tho[mas] "Wharton. 1766. April 26. Philadelphia. 

Many contradictory reports circulated until the true account arrived 
of the Stamp Act being repealed ; hopes peace will be restored. Com- 
pares number of Presbyterian meeting-houses in America with number 
of churches belonging to the Church of England ; ten times as many 
of the former; disapproves of this. All trade at a standstill; neither can 
they pay their debts unless Great Britain allows general free trade. In 
order to relieve their distress, nearly two hundred poor women employed 
in spinning flax in the factory. Announces the birth of a son, whom 
they have taken the liberty to name Franklin Wharton ; hopes this proof 
of their regard will not be disagreeable to him. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 16. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1766. April 30. Philadelphia. 
Acknowledging favor of Feb. 25th; fears his letter of the 1 6th was 
lost at sea; begs for a copy, if he has it. Keen satisfaction afforded 
Franklin's friends by the accounts of his examination at the bar of the 
House of Commons; prominent part played by him in the repeal of the 
Stamp Act ; every merchant writes home as if he alone had accomplished 
the affair. Sensible letter from the Committee of Merchants in Lon- 
don, but all such advice is frustrated by the people's indiscretion. Is not 
surprised at Franklin's disapproval of his speech against the Proprietary 
officers, in answer to the Lodge paper; at such a distance, does not think 
a right judgment can be formed; all his friends think he acted rightly; 
Gov. Hutchinson thought the attacks on him beneath notice; the conse- 
quence was his house and effects were destroyed and his life endangered. 
Encloses two applications for favors from the Ministry: one from Col, 
Croghan, the other from Mr, Geo. Reed. Account of a company formed 
by himself and others to purchase from the French certain lands at the 
Illinois, Does not want the Chronicle stopped, Betsy sends a cordial 
thanks for the notice taken of her nephew. A, L, S. 4 p. II, 17. 

From James Parker. 1766, May 6, New York, 

Has arrived in New York and accepted the place of Land Waiter ; his 
state of health improved but precarious. Reasons against printing a 
newspaper himself; his rival in the business would be Mr. Holt who 
owes him a great sum of money and will probably pay it in time if not 
interfered with; Holt is aided and abetted by the Sons of Liberty, who 
carry all before them; everyone afraid to speak against them. Must 
take the box of goods himself, and will allow Franklin interest from the 



58 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

present day. Benny Mecom promises everything but does not pay a 
farthing. Acknowledging his favor of Feb. 26, just received. A. L. S. 
2 p. II, 18. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, 209. 

By The Assembly of Pennsylvania. 1766. May 7. 

That the Agents of the Province be directed to address their business 
letter to the Committee of Correspondence. D. attested by Cha[rle]s 
Moore, Clerk, i p. LIT, 56. 

From Tho [mas] Wharton. 1766. May 9. Philadelphia. 

Receipt of the news of the repeal of the Stamp Act. Eminent ser- 
vices of Dr. Franklin acknowledged. Pennsylvania Hospital. A. L. S. 
2 p. II, 20. 

Printed, with the exception of two unimportant paragraphs, in Works (Sparks, 
VII, 313). 

From Isaac Hunt. 1766. May 21. Philadelphia. 

Concerning a contest for the best essay, written on " The reciprocal 
advantages of a perpetual union between Great Britain and her Col- 
onies"; the reward, a medal, was won by Dr. Morgan; the writer 
was a contestant and considers himself unfairly used by the Trustees of 
the College; sends both papers to Franklin for judgment; by advice of 
his friends will publish his essay with a dedication to Franklin, whom 
he trusts will forgive so great a freedom. On applying for his Master's 
Degree, an honor he was entitled to, his printer, a poor ignorant man, 
was summoned and examined as to political pamphlets he (Hunt) had 
written ; later his application was refused, without hearing what he had 
to say; his ambition greatly checked by this cruel behavior. Praises 
Franklin's great work in connection with the repeal of the Stamp Act. 
A. L. S. 2 p. II, 21. 

From Tho[mas] Wharton. 1766. May 22. Philadelphia. 

Joyous and satisfactorj^ news of the repeal of the Stamp Act; uni- 
versal pleasure it diffused. Illumination took place on the evening of 
the 20th; on the 21st a handsome dinner was provided at the Stadt 
House and concluded with much decency. There it was agreed that all 
who (from a patriotic spirit) had procured suits of home-made cloth 
should give them to the poor, and on the King's birth day appear in new 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 59 

suits of broadcloth made in England. The intention on the part of a 
few to introduce in the Address to the King, Lords and Commons some 
remarks against the Proprietary Government. A plan conceived by 
himself and four others to purchase a chain of lots belonging to Sprin- 
gett Penn, which lie between id Street and the river Schuylkill; asks 
Franklin to find out Mr. Penn's price for these and also for Pennsbor- 
ough Manor. Mentions names of those elected as managers for the work 
house, which is to be erected. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 19. 

From Jos [eph] Galloway. 1766. May 23. Philadelphia. 
Proceedings in Philadelphia on the repeal of the Stamp Act. The 
part acted by Franklin in procuring the repeal highly commended. A. 
L. S. 2 p. II, 22. 

Printed, with the exception of the concluding six lines, in Works (Sparks, 
VII, 317). 

From Jos[eph] Galloway. 1766. June 7. Philadelphia. 

Transmitting a letter from the Committee of Correspondence, en- 
closing an Address from the Assembly to His Majesty; their objections 
to the Proprietaries not due to personal resentment, but to the unhappi- 
ness and injury their government has caused. Great opposition shown 
to a resolve giving His Majesty assurances of granting aids for the de- 
fence of the colonies; reasons for and against; finally passed. Describes 
the Governor's conduct during the late trouble ; evident from Secretary 
Conway's letter to the Governor, approving of his conduct, " that his 
honor deceived Mr. Conway by a eulogium on himself which he did not 
deserve." Malevolence of the Chief Justice against Franklin, as shown 
by his public accusation in the House that Franklin was the greatest 
enemy to the repeal of the Stamp Act. Assembly's grateful sense of the 
firmness and integrity with which Franklin has served his country. 
Various considerations which point to the policy and wisdom of chang- 
ing the Government from Proprietary to Royal. The Assembly, not 
suspecting that the petitions are rejected and being in debt, are anxious 
to push them to a conclusion. A. L. S. 4 p. II, 23. 

From James Parker. 1766. June 11. New York. 

Acknowledging favor of Apr. 6. Unjust treatment he has suf- 
fered at Mr. Holt's hands; recounts in detail every transaction he has 
had with Mr. Holt since their first meeting, at present it stands thus: 



6o Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

if Holt will settle his debt to him within three months, well and good; 
if not, he will arrest him and start to print a rival newspaper. Com- 
plains of the amount he earns as Land-Waiter, of the misfortunes he has 
had to struggle against, of Mr. Colden, his assistants in the post-office, 
and of many other things. Bulk of people still dispute authority from 
home; notwithstanding the late Act of Parliament directing every Cap- 
tain of a vessel to carry all letters to the post-office, the moment a ship 
comes in, the letters are seized by force and carried to the coffee-house 
where they are cried out and delivered. A. L. S. 8 p. II, 24. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, p. 212. 

Frojn The [mas] Wharton. 1766. June 12. Philadelphia. 

Sentiments of Dr. Franklin's friends in Pennsylvania respecting his 
manner of executing his agency in England. Great honor due Dr. 
Fothergill for his piece written on the Stamp Act. A. L. S. i p. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 318). -^^J 25. 

Frotn Jos[eph] Galloway. 1766. June 16. Philadelphia. 

Fine qualities of those worthy men now at the head of public affairs. 
Great relief caused by Franklin's letter to the Committee of Corre- 
spondence, announcing that the petitions will be proceeded on. Infamous 
and groundless charge preferred against Franklin by the Chief Justice. 
Regulations in American commerce. Currency. Proprietors deter- 
mined to give their friends twelve months' notice before surrendering the 
government. A. L. S. 3 p. II, 26. 

Printed, in part, in Works (Sparks, VII, 321). 

From John Read. 1766. June 17. Philadelphia. 

Enclosing a copy of a letter to reinstate him in the King's service; 
chance of his being appointed Commissary of the Southwest or Pennsyl- 
vania district. Mr. Allen's assertion in the House that Franklin was 
the great cause of bringing on the Stamp Act. Dr. Smith's remarks 
relative to an American Bishopric resented by the Presbyterian clergy. 
A. L. S. I p. II, 27. 

From G[eorge] Wythe. 1766. June 23. [Virginia.] 

Begging Franklin to recommend his promotion in the House of 
Burgesses ; promises to be an exception to a quotation from Tacitus re- 
garding ingratitude. (Partially mutilated.) A. L. S. i p. II, 28. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 6i 

From Hannah Walker. 1766. June 28. Westbury. 

Thanking him for his goodness in freeing her letters; wishes them 

sent to Boston. Her son happily situated with a good master and a 

good trade; excellent accounts of him. [Note from Thos. Walker on 

back of MSS. to the same effect.] A. L. S. 2 p. II, 29. 

From James Parker. 1766. July i. New York. 

The Assembly of New Jersey broken up; Gov. Franklin and Miss 
Sally at Newark. Commotion excited by the Stamp Act not yet sub- 
sided. Complains of a complication of sickness, infirmities and wrongs; 
no money from B. Mecom ; no business in his shop ; expense of living 
in New York ; inadequate pay he receives as Land-Waiter. Reasons for 
business being so excessively dull throughout the colonies. A. L. S. 3 p. 

II, 30. 
From Sarah Broughton. 1766. July i. Philadelphia. 

Concerning a feather bed which she sold to Mrs. Franklin, and which 
that lady refused to pay for; appeals to Franklin for justice. A. L. S. 

2 p. II, 31. 

From W[illiam] F[ranklin]. 1766. July 10. 

Indian murders. Resolutions of Parliament relative to commerce. 
Assembly troubles in Virginia and Massachusetts. His victory over the 
New Jersey Assembly. A. L. S. 2 p. XLII, 2. 

From James Parker. 1766. July 15. New York. 

Acknowledging favor of IVIay 9th; delays printing a newspaper in 
hopes of getting a settlement with Holt. Reasons for the dull and 
gloomy outlook in New York, and the high prices for everj^thing. Mr. 
Hall's accounts. Electrical machine not yet delivered. Goes over 
again all his crosses and hardships; would be glad of a better allowance 
in the post-office. His tj'pes all worn out; asks Franklin to aid him 
in getting some new ones. Thinks Mr. Colden rather too much of a 
gentleman for the due execution of the post-office duties. His son 
stronger. A. L. S. 4 p. II, 32. 

From James Balfour. 1766. Aug. i. Virginia, Little England. 

Acknowledging Franklin's kindness to him while in London; em- 
braces every opportunity to set forth publicly Franklin's eminent ser- 
vices to America ; his great qualities certain to confound his enemies. 
A. L. S. 2 p. II, 33- 



62 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From E[phraiin] Brown. 1766. August 25. Philadelphia. 

Having previously announced the death of Franklin's worthy brother 
[Peter], must now inform him of the death of his widow; nothing to 
hinder him now from embracing Franklin's generous offer to put him 
into a printing office in London. Is going to resign the post-office to Mr. 
Thos. Foxcroft; intends working with Mr. Hall until he hears from 
Franklin. Mrs. Franklin having left no will, her promise to leave him 
the little she possesed is of no value. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 34. 

Frotn James Parker. 1766, August 27. New York. 

His son's sickness and his own ill health. Holt's promise to pay him 
on the first of next month not to be depended on. Every farthing of his 
allowance goes in the necessaries of life; wishes his salary as Comp- 
troller could be made more nearly adequate to his services. Very little 
stationery sold in his shop; too much competition. Benny Mecom gen- 
erous in promises but never in payments. A. L. S. 3 p. II, 35. 

From Sam[uel] Wharton. 1766. August 30. Philadelphia. 

Introducing Dr. Jonathan Potts, son of Franklin's friend, John 
Potts, Esq., who goes to Europe to continue his studies in medicine. 
A. L. S. I p. II, 36. 

From Anth[ony] Tissington. 1766. August 30. Alfreton. 

Trusts Franklin's German town was pleasing to himself and useful 
to Sir J. Pringle. Account of his wife's recent illness. Hopes he has 
received his paper on Mineral Customs. Desires a visit from Franklin. 
A. L. S. 2 p. II, 37. 

From Jos[epli] Galloway. [1766. August. Philadelphia.] 
Introducing Jonathan Potts. A. L. S. i p. XLII, 5. 

From W[illia]m Sturgeon. 1766. September i. Philadelphia. 

His health so poor that he has been obliged to retire into the country. 
The mission of Burlington being left vacant by the death of Mr. 
Campbell, asks Franklin to intercede with the Society on his behalf 
A. L. S. I p. II, 38. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 63 

Fro w James Parker. 1766. September 11, New York. 

Thinks Holt a villain; is now applying to a lawyer to sue him. 
Both his boys sick. Times unfavorable for printing a newspaper. Hot 
summer; sickness prevalent. Engaged in printing an almanac. Com- 
plains of his salary as Land-Waiter; no chance of promotion. Expense 
of living in New York; doctor's bills, etc. Temper of Benny Mecom and 
Mr. Holt as compared with his own. Reported death of his nephew at 
Cape Fear. Inconsistency in being afflicted with gout and poverty. 
Troubles of his friend, Hughes. A. L. S. 4 p. II, 39. 

From A[nii] Penn. 1766. September 16. Dublin. 

Writes instead of her son, Springett, who has been very ill, but is 
now recuperating in the country. Hopes Franklin has recovered from 
his late fatigue and indisposition. A. L. S. i p. II, 41. 

f row Hannah Walker. 1766. September 17. Westbury. 
Acknowledging favor of 13th [name of month torn out]. Sorry to 
hear of his loss; promises to be frugal and industrious. Intense gratitude 
for past and present favors. Begging his acceptance of some small offer- 
ings for himself and Mrs. Stevenson. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 40. 

From J[oseph] Priestley. 1766. September 21. Warrington. 

Relating to a History of Electricity, which he is writing. Curious 

experiments with an electrified chain. A. L. S. 3 p. II, 42. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 273). 

From Benj[ami]n Kent. [1766. Circa September. Boston.] 
A new cure for the gout. Would like to see Dr. Franklin commis- 
sioned as Governor of Massachusetts Bay. A. L. S. 2 p. XLII, 13. 

From Tlio[mas] Franklin. 1766. October 11. Lutterworth. 
Expressing deep appreciation of Franklin's kindness to himself and 
daughter; overjo5'ed to hear of the latter's convalescence; thanks Mrs. 
Stevenson for her extraordinary goodness to her. A. L. S. i p. II, 43. 

From James Parker. 1766. October 11. New York. 
No settlement with Holt. Obstacles in the way of publishing a news- 
paper. Had the wettest summer ever remembered ; universal sickness 
and distress, especially in his own family; his expenses more than his 
income. Asks once more if his allowance in the post-office cannot be 
enlarged a little. " A little more struggling through life will probably 
carry him out of it." A, L. S. 4 p. II, 44. 



64 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Frofu Jonathan Potts. 1766. October 22. Liverpool, 

Letters Franklin will receive introducing the writer and his friend, 
Mr. Benjamin Rush ; requesting him to write to any gentlemen in 
Edinburgh in their favor. A. L. S. i p. II, 45. 

From Tho[nias] Ronayne. 1766. October 22. Cork [Ireland]. 

Acknowledging favor of April 20th, with his book on Whirlwinds, 
Waterspouts, etc. Describes various electrical experiments. A. L. S. 

3 P- II, 46. 

FroTii Benjamin Rush. 1766. October 22. Liverpool. 

Has procured some letters of introduction from Franklin's friends in 
Pennsylvania, whose import, he hopes, will gain Franklin's favor for 
him ; begs him to write to such of his friends in Edinburgh on behalf 
of his friend Mr. Potts and himself as will be most useful to them in the 
prosecution of their studies. Franklin's merit and learning held by 
him in high esteem. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 47. 

From James Parker. 1766. October 25. New York. 

No prospect of bringing Holt to a settlement ; has therefore started 
a newspaper; small number of subscribers. Continual sickness and dis- 
tress in his family. Expense of living. Question of having his salary 
increased. His accounts with Holt and B. Mecom. Electrical ma- 
chine in his store-house; Mr. Hughes will not take it until he can pay 
for it. Lewis Jones has left his service to become a flogger and drummer 
in the armj^ A. L. S. 3 p. II, 48. 

From Jos[eph] Galloway. 1766, October 28, Philadelphia. 

News of a change of Ministry received with real concern; fears that 
it will prevent a change of Government ; asks Franklin's opinion. Chief 
Justice declared publicly in the House that Secretary Conway had 
rebuked Franklin when he applied for a hearing on the petitions, and 
assured him that they were laid aside by His Majesty never to be re- 
sumed ; does not believe this but would like the power to deny it. Un- 
easy about their poor friend H., who, owing to his having written many 
indiscreet things, is much disliked by both parties; wishes means could 
be found to raise him above the malice of his unrelenting enemies. The 
last election a complete victory; new mode of electing approved by 
both parties; prevents perjury and fraud. Joseph Wharton sends kindly 
remembrances, A. L. S. 4 p. II, 49. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 65 

From [Sir] Alexander Dick. 1766. October 28. Prestonfield. 

Acknowledging his favor of nth inst. Expressing gratitude on behalf 
of his friend Mr. Swinton for Franklin's great kindness to him. Lord 
Karnes's admiration for Franklin ; great accession to his estate by the 
death of Lady Karnes. A. L. S. i p. II, 50. 

From F. W. de Monchy. 1766. November 4. Rotterdam. 

Acknowledging his favor of the 23d ult. Questions concerning a 
fire-engine. Compliments to Sir John Pringle. A. L. S. i p. II, 51. 

From Tho[mas] Wharton. 1766. November 11. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging his favor of the 13th Sept. Will give him particular 
pleasure to receive the "Police of Amsterdam"; orderly government 
of that city. Good results expected from the erection of the work-house. 
Glad of Franklin's approval of the Illinois scheme. Will receive from 
Galloway the Resolves of the Assembly and their instructions relative 
to the change of Government. Informed that Sir William Johnson 
has had a treaty with Pontiac and a great number of southern Indians 
at Oswego, and has settled matters to their satisfaction. A. L. S. 2 p. 

II, 52. 

From James Parker. 1766. November 11. New York. 

Acknowledging favor of Sept. 1st. Nothing has prospered with him. 
Continual sickness in his family. No news of his son since he went to 
sea in a small schooner ten weeks earlier bound for North Carolina. 
Poor success he has met with in printing his almanac and his newspaper. 
Lewis Jones has repented and returned to him. H. Hughes is a Son 
of Liberty and is greatly displeased with his brother and Franklin, whom 
he will believe favors the Stamp Act. Holt grown popular by his ap- 
pearance against the Act. A. L. S. 3 p. II, 53. 

From "W[illia]in Franklin. [1766?] November 13. 

The office of agent for the province of New Jersey. Appointment of 
Mr. Wilmot under a misapprehension; his intended removal. God- 
dard's printing business in Philadelphia in opposition to Hall. Hall 
unfriendly to Franklin. Goddard to publish a newspaper. Has rented 
Franklin's press and the Market street house to him. 4 p. XLII, 3. 

2—5 



66 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Frotn Beiij[aini]n Gale. 1766. November 15. Killingworth. 

Describes the case of a patient of his, who is a sufferer from dropsy; 
saw in a magazine an account of the effects of the meadow saffron by 
Dr. [Wm.] Stark; would like Franklin to ask Dr. Pringle's opinion of 
this drug, and if it has been successfully tried, to send him a sufficient quan- 
tity. Begs Franklin to correct a misstatement concerning his experi- 
ments in inoculation, made by Dr. Huxham in the Gentlemen's Maga- 
zine for August. A. L. S. 4 p. II, 54. 

i^rom James Parker. 1766. November 15. New York. 

Enclosing two or three of his newspapers; small number of sub- 
scribers. Heard from his son, whom he had given up for lost; was de- 
tained by violent gales. Sickness in his family still continues. A. L. S. 
I p. II, 55- 

From T[homas] Pownall. 1766. November 20. Westrop. 
Scarcely forgiven by Lady Fawkener for not bringing him down to 
this place. Has promised her that he will come at Christmas. A. L. S. 
I p. LXIX, 83. 

FroT7i Jonathan Potts. 1766. December 10. Edinburgh. 

Fears that he did not receive a former application for letters to 
friends of his in Edinburgh in favor of Mr. Benjamin Rush and 
himself; since their arrival, finding that such letters would be of infinite 
service, he takes the liberty to repeat the request. A. L. S. i p. II, 56. 

From Rich[ar]d Price. 1766. December 15. Newington Green. 

Received the enclosed letter from Dr. Priestley concerning a list of 

books on electricity, which he is in a hurry for. Regrets not meeting 

Franklin at St. Paul's Coffee-house. A. L. S. i p. II, 57* 

jprom James Parker. 1766. December 15. New York. 

Thanking Franklin for the extra allowance of £20 per annum. Con- 
tinues to print a newspaper without the least appearance of success; 
compares his failures with Holt's successes; has had a warrant out for 
his arrest for three months but he keeps close and cannot be taken ; 
Mecom's and Holt's debts to him. His son returned, having spent all 
his money, and in debt for his passage home. His type all worn out; 
asks Franklin for new ones. A. L. S. 4 p. II, 58. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 67 

From John Tunnicliff. 

1766. December 21. Langley Lodge, near Derby. 

Describing the kind of plantation he would like; if Franklin knows 

of such a one in Pennsylvania or New Jersey would be glad to hear of 

it. Begging his acceptance of a woodcock and a partridge. A. L. S. 

I p. II, 59- 

i^rom James Parker. 1766. December 22. New York. 

Acknowledging favor of October nth. Thinks Col. Hunter ought 
to see that justice is done in his affair with Mr. Holt. Objects to 
Franklin's remark that his "voluminous complaints hurt" him; never 
had that intention ; accustomed long since to poverty and distress. Will 
not avail himself of Franklin's kind permission to let him leave New 
York; thinks it his duty to continue printing his newspaper. His grati- 
tude to Franklin. His increasing years and failing strength. Repeats 
contents of preceding letter, H, 58. A. L. S. 3 p . II, 60. 

From The Committee of American Merchants. 

[1766?] Monday 29. [London.] 
Requesting Franklin to attend their meeting at Kings Arms, Cornhill. 
L. in 3d P. I p. XLIII, 159. 

FroTii The Associates of Dr. Bray. 1766. 
Notice of meeting. Printed N. i p. LXVIII, 17. 

From Jno. Canton. {Circa 1766.] 

Desiring to know whether Franklin, in writing to Dr. Priestley, 
mentioned a book which he desires for Mr. Cavendish. L. in 3d P. 
I p. XL, 215. 

From [John] Huske. [1766?] 

Thinks the use of the account of the exports and imports may be of 
greatest service to the northern colonies. The members for Scotland 
who are directors of the Bank, India and Hudson's Bay Companies, and 
the Irish and West Indian members may be convinced that if they do not 
assist in extinguishing the flames in their neighbor's house, their own 
may be next to burn. L. i p. XLIV, no. 

From [John] Huske. [1766?] 

In reference to statistics of imports from the West Indies to the ports 
of Great Britain and their application in favor of the northern colonies. 
A. L. S. 3 p. XLIV, 278. 



68 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Frojn [John] H[uske. 1766?] Tuesday evening. 

Begs him to omit the postscript to the papers he has previously sent 
him, should he care to bring them before the public eye, as the mention 
would do great injury to private property. A. L. S. i p. XLIV, 90. 

From [Thomas] Osborne. \_Circa 1766.] 

Relative to a request to be made to Dr. [John] Fothergill. A. N. 
in 3d P. I p. XLII, 14. 

From Sir John Pringle. {Circa 1766?] 

Introducing Dr. [Wm.] Stark who has made some curious experi- 
ments on living on bread and water, and wants to make a pair of scales 
for weighing himself in the prosecution of these experiments. A. L. in 
3d P. I p. LXVIII, 72a. 

From Miss Rich, Joseph Sherwood, W. Small, [William] Strahan, 
Dr. [Peter] Templeman and [Samuel] Wharton. 

1766-1767. 

Requests for engagements, letters of introduction, advice, etc. 

LXVIII, 73-79. 

From The Royal Society. 1 766-1 768. 
Notices of meetings of the Council. N. S. i p. LXVIII, 3-1 1. 

From Jos[eph] Galloway. 1767. January 4. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favor of Nov. 8th. Plentifully bespattered by the 
malice of their enemies ; the effect of this abuse to raise them in the esti- 
mation of many people. If anything of importance should arise in the 
present sitting of Assembly will communicate it. A. L. S. I p. II, 61. 

Frow F. W. de Monchy. 1767. Januarj^ 9. Rotterdam. 

Concerning the making of an ice boat for Franklin; its cost. Com- 
parative cost of coal consumed per day by the fire engines in New 
York. Begs him while in London to speak to Mr. Benjamin Martin 
about two microscopes which he paid him for but never received. A. 
L. S. 2 p. II, 62. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 69 

From Tlio[mas] Wharton. 1767. January 14. Philadelphia. 

Hopes within the coming year to congratulate him on a change in 
Government from Proprietary to Royal. Assembly now sitting; pe- 
titions from the whole province praying that an act may pass to oblige 
the judges of the Supreme Court to ride the circuit and not force the 
country to attend in Philadelphia. Acknowledging favor of Nov. 8th. 
Safe arrival of George Croghan from the Illinois; has settled every- 
thing with the Indians to his entire satisfaction ; Baynton, Wharton and 
Morgan will have a profitable trade there this winter. Actions of the 
Assembly of Maryland. (Lower third of sheet lost.) A. L. S. 3 p. 

II, 63. 
From James Parker. 1767. January 16. New York. 

Has received no word from Franklin by the packet; sorry he is so 
displeasing to him. Asks him to thank the gentleman to whom he owes 
his place in the Custom-House. Thinks of having his son come and work 
with him. Begs for stationery and two fonts of new letter. A. L. S. 

1 p. II, 64. 

From Anth[ony] Tissington. 1767. January 20. Alfreton. 

Snow has rendered roads impassible. Hopes to pay Franklin a visit 
in a few days. Death of Mr. Gell, their attorney. A. L. S. I p. 

II, 65. 
From Tho[nias] Wharton. 1767. February 7. Philadelphia. 

Hourly expecting the December packet with news relative to the 
affairs of the Province. Court party's expressions concerning a change 
of Government. The sober and religious inhabitants of the city have 
requested the House to offer to the Governor a bill for the putting a 
stop to the exhibition of plays in the Province ; thinks the Governor will 
be puzzled how to act, as he constantly attends the plays and has had the 
players to dine or sup with him. Various acts passed by the Assembly ; 
the Act for obliging the judges to ride the circuits. Failure of W[illiam] 
A[llen] to give the usual trouble to the House. Committee formed to 
consider the means of paying off the public debt. William Goddard's 
paper established ; has 700 subscribers ; sends him two numbers. A. L. S. 

2 p. II, 66. 

From James Parker. 1767. February 13. 

Office of Hartford rider revived. Landing of vessel from Holland 
with no news of Miller's arrival. Other ships sailing to and from 
London. A. L. S. i p. II, 67. 



yo Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From James Parker. 1767, February 23. New York. 

Concerning the kind of type he needs. His dunning of B. Mecom 

has occasioned that gentleman's resignation from the post-office. His 

newspaper progresses slowly. Has a slight attack of gout. A. L. S. 

I p. II, 68. 

From Thomas Pownall. 1767. March 4. 

Asks for information as to Mr. Dimsdale, who died in Pennsylvania in 
1764 or 1765. A. L. in 3d P. i p. LXIX, 84. 

From R A . 1767. March 8. London. 

Sends a locked portfolio containing his papers; shall send for them 
again betwixt 12 and I in order to convey them to one other friend who 
keeps himself disengaged through the day in order to give them serious 
perusal. A. L. S. i p. LXIX, 86. 

From T. M. Luther. 1767. March 15. Frankfort. 

Acknowledging favor of September 9th, 1766, as well as various 
purchases he made for him ; thanking him for his trouble. Begs to know 
date of Franklin's departure for America; puts in his hands certain 
affairs of his there. Sends his compliments to Mr. John Pringle. 

March i6th. — Asking Franklin to procure him a microscope; de- 
scribes the kind he wants; refers him to Messrs. Jas. Des Cotes and Co. 
for whatever sum he expends. His services always at Franklin's dis- 
posal. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 11,70. 

From Tho[ma]s Franklin. 1767. March 16. Lutterworth. 

Begs his acceptance of ten pounds of butter, two chickens and a sago 
cheese. A. L. S. i p. II, 69. 

From Pomeroys and Hodgkin. 1767. March 18. London. 

Enclose two sermons of the Reverend Mr. [Samuel] Cooper's, from 
Nicholas Boylston, to be forwarded to Glasgow in order to get the de- 
gree of doctor of divinity for him. A. L. S. i p. LXIX, 80. 

From H|enry] Potts. 
1767. April 2. General Post-Office. [London.] 

Sends Franklin's commission, signed by his Majesty's Postmaster 
General. A. L. S. i p. LXIX, 81. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 71 

From Edw[ar]d Penington. 1767. April 5. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favor of December 13 enclosing a copy of Springett 
Penn's will. Has received the power of attorney to sell the lands, for 
which he thanks Franklin. Encloses letter to Ann Penn, whose estate 
he will endeavor to dispose of on the best terms. A. L. S. i p. II, 71. 

From James Parker. 1767. April 5. New York. 

Acknowledging favor of Jan. 10. Has appointed Mr. Luke Bab- 
cock in place of B. Mecom in the post-office. Desires some English 
papers. Has had a writ out for Holt above six months, with no result. 
Cannot trust his son alone in Woodbridge ; expects him in New York 
in May. Concerning a request from Mr. Foxcroft to send Franklin 
a bill for £300. Wisdom of keeping certain unpaid letters separate in 
the post-office accounts. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 72. 

From David Barclay & Sons. 1767. April 21. London. 

Relative to a letter from Charles Read and an affair with M. Morgan. 
L. in 3d P. I p. LXIX, 47. 

From James Parker. 1767. April 29. New York. 

Enclosing the first of a bill for £300 he got from Mr. Colden. The 
affair with Holt; he still escapes arrest; is evidently waiting for his 
[Parker's] death to trump up what account he pleases. Bemoans his 
son's folly; has no hopes that he will ever see his erroneous ways. A. L. 

s. I p. 11,73. 

From James Parker. 1767. May 2. New York. 

Enclosing the second bill for £300. Concerning the best means of 

getting his pay for his year's work in the Custom-House. Thinks Holt 

a downright villain ; the accounts he exhibited to the auditors at New 

Haven a proof of this. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 74« 

From The Duke of Marlborough, et al.. Stewards. 
1767. May 5 and 7. 
Choir tickets. Printed card, i p. LXVIII, 23-24. 

From Mr. Millar. [1767?] May 11. 

Sends packet to Joseph Galloway and hopes to meet Mr. Hume and 
Dr. Franklin at Mr. Strahan's this day. A. L. in 3d P. i p. 

LXIX, 77. 



72 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From W[illiam] Shippen, Jr. 

1767. May 14 and November 15. Philadelphia. 
Relative to two children joined firmly together at the breast-bone. 
Sends a wax model and an account of the dissection for the Royal So- 
ciety. A. L. S. 3 and 2 p. LXIX, 87, 88. 

From James Parker. 1767. May 15. 

Bond for <£i6o los. to Benjamin Franklin. Partial receipts by De- 
borah Franklin. D. S. 2 p. LXVI, 12. 

From F. W. de Monchy. 1767. May 15. Rotterdam. 

Thanking him for the accurate information concerning the fire-engine 
and also for the microscope. Sends two drawings of an ice-boat; would 
have finished his part of the work sooner had he not been prevented by 
the death of his mother. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 75. 

Frotn Rich[ar]d Price. 1767. May 15. 

Inviting Franklin to dine with him at St. Paul's Coffee-house in com- 
pany with several gentlemen. A. L. S. i p. II, 75^4. 

i^row W[illia]m Franklin. 1767. May 16. Burlington. 

Asking Franklin's advice and influence in the case of one Mr. Francis, 
who is deeply involved in the failure of Mr. Hagen, and who embarks 
the following day for London. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 76. 

From Anth[ony] Tissington. 1767. May 17. Alfreton. 

Desires to hear of Franklin's health, his movements and his time of 
stay in England. Enclosing copies of two estimates of fire-engines as 
erected in Derbyshire. Looks forward to pursuing his favorite studies 
in peace and quiet, after their mineral liberties are preserved in en- 
tirety, A. L. S. I p. II, 77. 

/^ro/« James Parker. 1767. May 23. New York. 

Acknowledging favor of Feb. 28 and one per packet of March. 
Enclosing the first of a bill of £200 got of Mr. Hubbart. Repeats 
several items mentioned in letter II, 74. Holt still at liberty; hopes 
nothing from him. His own strength failing him. A. L. S. 2 p. 

II, 78. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 73 

From Jos[eph] Galloway. 1767. May 26. Philadelphia. 
Enclosing a bill of exchange for £250 sterling, in part payment of his 
two years' salary, amounting on the whole to £1000; will remit the 
residue by the first opportunity. A. L. S. i p. (In duplicate.) 

II, 79 and 80. 

From F[rancis] Hopkinson. 1767. May 31. Hartlebury Castle. 
Describing his pleasant stay at Hartlebury Castle, as well as his 
movements after he left London. Looking forward to embarking for 
' dear Philadelphia ' the latter end of July. Compliments to Franklin, 
Mrs. Stevenson and Miss Franklin. A. L. S. 3 p. II, 81. 

From Messrs. James Des Cotes & Co. 1767. June 2. 
Requesting to know the sum of Mr. Luther's indebtedness to Frank- 
lin, also how long he proposes to stay in London, and whether he has 
procured the spy-glass for Mr. Luther. A. L. i p. II, 82. 

From James Parker. 1767. June 12. New York. 
Introducing to Franklin, the bearer, Dr. Nicholas Falck, an inhabitant 
of New York, who has made same remarkable discoveries in mathe- 
matics and other sciences. A. L. S. I p. II, 83. 

From James Parker. 1767. June 13. New York. 

Concerning the books that Franklin sent over; never received as 
much money for them as he has paid out ; Holt responsible for the profits 
from those sold, but declines to come to an account; ' books an excessive 
dull article in trade.' A. L. S. i p. II, 84. 

From James Parker. 1767. June 13. New York. 

Mr. Foxcroft back from Virginia. Business in books and stationery 
dull; mentions various firms who are doing almost nothing. Complains 
of not hearing from Franklin and of not receiving any newspapers. B. 
Mecom still at New Haven, but can get nothing from him. His own 
health excellent. A. L. S. i p. II, 85. 

From James Payne. 1767. June 25. Brackley. 

Concerning the purchase of a house at Wappenham by Mrs. Steven- 
son ; desires her instructions in the matter. A. L. S. I p. II, 86. 



74 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From James Parker. 1767. August 8. New York, 
Mr. Chew's claim against Franklin for a rider he hired to Hartford 
in 1755 and 1756. Illness of his son, A letter from London to him 
got lost through " the vile practice of calling off letters at the coffee- 
house," A, L, S. 2 p, II, 87. 

From W[illiani] F[ranklm]. 1767. August 22, Burlington, 
Interested in perusing the few pages he received of Franklin's journal ; 
promises to keep it an inviolable secret; Mr, G,'s^ opinion that if the 
people did but know one half of Franklin's work in their behalf, they 
would go near to deifj- him. Question of paper currency; doubtful 
whether they will get permission to make any this year. Inadequate 
salaries of officers; from all his fees of office, has never made more than 
£300 per annum. Discusses the advisability of making the Governors 
independent of the Assemblies. Approves of the Governor's right to 
grant Crown lands with advice of Council, but deprecates sharing that 
power with the Assemblies, Collection of quit rents. Wishes the reso- 
lution Franklin drew up for Governor Pownall could have appeared on 
the minutes of the House of Commons; it must have opened their 
eyes to the impropriety of taxing the Colonies without giving them repre- 
sentation ; thinks everything has been done to prejudice the people in 
America against this plan, especially by the Presbyterians; these latter 
in favor of an American Parliament, in order to advance their own 
interests. A, L, S, 5 p, II, 88. 

^ [Joseph Galloway.] 

From James Parker. 1767. August 24, New York, 
Acknowledging favors of April 14, May 23 and June 12, and con- 
gratulating him on the renewal of his commission. In receipt of the 
Chronicles. Makes but slow advance with his newspaper, but con- 
tinues to swim against the tide. Illness in his family. Will send power 
of attorney by next packet. Summoned by Mr, Ingersoll to come up 
and give evidence the beginning of October, Holt keeps close or else 
their sheriff is dishonest. A, L, S, i p, II, 89. 

F;&w James Parker. 1767, August 27, New York, 
Sends the day's paper which contains nothing of importance ; one of 
his best apprentices sick. A. L. S. i p. II) Qi* 

From Will[iam] Strahan. [1767.] August 27, 
Encloses a receipt for books. Reminds Franklin of his engagement to 
dine with him. A, L, S, i p, XLIII, 229. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 75 

From James Parker. 1767. September i. New York. 

An attack of gout prevented his executing a power of attorney. 
Thinks Mr. Chew has failed ; his claim on Franklin for a sum expended 
in hiring riders; neither he nor Mr. Foxcroft know anything about 
this. A. L. S. I p. II, 92. 

From John Michell. 1767. September 6. Newark. 

Just returned to Newark from a visit to Thornhill, where he ex- 
pects to remove in three weeks; describes the house there. Concerning 
a kind of candle-stick desired by Mrs. Stevenson, which he thinks he 
can procure for her. Sees by the papers that Sir John Pringle has gone 
to France; hopes it is for his pleasure and not for his health. A. L. S. 
3 p. II, 93. 

From Thomas Wharton. 1767. September 21. Philadelphia. 

Concerning the affairs of Baynton, Wharton & Morgan; the state- 
ment they made to their creditors. Election close at hand ; no change 
in their ticket expected, except perphas one owing to the illness of 
John Potts. Mentions some changes in office. Some reason to believe 
that W[illiam] A[llen] will lose his election in Cumberland County. 
A. L. S. 2 p. II, 94. 

/'/■ow John Frederick Hartmann. 1767. October. 

Often recalls the first time he met and spoke with Franklin; sorry 
he was unable to show him some of his experiments in electricity. 
Prince Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt, hearing of Franklin's proposed visit 
to Germany, was extremely anxious to see and speak with him ; with this 
purpose in view, sent a friend to Gottingen to greet Franklin, but un- 
fortunately arrived too late; the Prince anxious to have lightning rods 
placed on his houses; desires Franklin to describe accurately the method 
used in America, thereby gaining for himself honors and profit in Ger- 
many. Contemplates writing a history of electricity, in which work he 
wishes to print certain experiments and inventions of Franklin's; aware 
of the audacity of this request. A. L. S. 4 p. [In Latin.] II, 95. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 326, Note). 

From James Parker. 1767. October i. New York. 

Reason for not sending the power. Set out for New Haven the fol- 
lowing morning to give his evidence. Times are dull, but " will not 
cease to struggle until he either gains the port or sinks forever." A. 
L. S. I p. II, 96. 



76 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Geo[rge] Croghan. 1767. October 2. Lancaster. 

Acknowledging favor of April 18. Has spent three months with Sir 
William Johnson, where they had several conferences with the Six 
Nations; these express great uneasiness that the boundary between this 
hunting country and the middle British colonies was not confirmed ; 
since the agreement made two years before with Sir William Johnson 
the English have made more encroachments on their country than ever 
before, and have killed several of their warriors. In consequence, a 
great meeting of the Indians is to be held in the Shawanese country, and 
he, Croghan, leaves at once for Fort Pitt to divert, if possible, this 
Council. The result likely to be war, unless the boundary is confirmed. 
Sir William Johnson has written of it to His Majesty. L. S. 4 p. 

II, 97. 

From Jos[eph] Galloway. 1767. October 9. Philadelphia. 

Election over; all the old members returned as representatives in 
Assembly; in place of the few who resigned, warm supporters of a 
change of Government have come in; thinks Franklin will soon receive 
further instructions from the new House respecting that important 
measure. Concerning the several bills which he has remitted Franklin 
in payment of his salary. Has seen the Act of Parliament laying certain 
duties on paper, etc., imported into America, and appropriating these 
duties to the payment of Governors' and judges' salaries; thinks this 
measure may assist the desired change; his opinion of it. If the Gov- 
ernor and judges are to be independent of the people, as they are, it is 
best they should also be independent of the Proprietors. A. L. S. 

3 p. n, 98. 

From T[homas] Pownall. 1767. October 12. Westhorp. 

Is revising his " Administration of the Colonies." A. L. S. i p. 

LXIX, 85. 
From James Parker. 1767. October 16. 

Appointing Benjamin Franklin his attorney to receive from the Re- 
ceiver-General of his Majesty's Customs, his salary as Land-Waiter. 

n, 99/2. 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Sr.] 1767. October 19. Boston. 

Acknowledging Franklin's letter and the kind condolences contained 

therein on his late losses by fire. Death of Mrs. Mecom's daughter, 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 77 

Polly. Death of his own youngest daughter, Sally, about the same 
time. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 2. 

From James Parker. 1767. October 24. New York. 

Has sent power of attorney [i p.] by Capt. Miller. Account of visit 
to New Haven, and the evidence he gave before the auditors; he and 
Mr. Ingersoll both thought the auditors inclined to favor Holt; that 
gentleman to stay some weeks at New Haven ; desired Mr. Ingersoll to 
attach his house there. Rumor in tow^n that Weyman w^on't print any 
more newspapers ; his own progress slow. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 99. 

From W[illia]in Franklin. 1767. November 3. Burlington. 

Begs leave to recommend the bearer, Daniel Coxe, of Trenton, to 
Franklin's civilities and good offices. A. L. S. i p. II, lOO. 

From Tho[mas] Collinson. 1767. November 12. London. 

Returns letter. Inquires concerning the house at Philadelphia. A 
L. S. I p. LXIX, 67. 

From Tho[nias] Wharton. 1767. November 17. Philadelphia. 

W[illiam] A [lien] received a letter from T[homas] P[enn], no 
doubt intended, had it arriv-ed in time, to have facilitated Franklin's 
rejection as an agent ; mentions various remarks in it. Sends him a sup- 
plement of Goddard's paper that he may see the steps the people in 
Boston Government are taking; fears consequences if England should 
act with her usual spirit; his opinion as to what w^ould advance the 
interest of both countries. Stamp Act has raised a great spirit, especially 
to the eastward. At present, about 150 sail in port, but business very 
dull, and must grow worse. Asking Franklin's assistance in purchasing 
the rights from William Royden's heirs, of certain lands in the Province, 
for the heirs of Jonah Smith. Recommends to Franklin the bearer of 
this letter, Enoch Story, as an honest, worthy man. A. L. S. 3 p. 

II, lOI. 

From Tho[mas] Wharton. 1767. November 18. Philadelphia. 

Enclosing letter from Thomas Livezey ; has delivered for him to Capt. 
Falkner twelve bottles of wine. A. L. S. i p. II, 102. 



78 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Tho[ma]s Livezey. 
1767. November 18. Roxbury Township, Philadelphia Co. 

Informing him that he has sent him by Captain Falkner twelve bottles 
of wine made from wild grapes on his own place ; hopes it may warm the 
hearts of all who taste it with a love for America. Despairs of a change 
of Government until after the death of Thomas Penn ; wishes he could 
be prevailed on to die for the good of the people, and thus make his 
name as immortal as Samson's death did his. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 103. 

Printed in Works (Smyth, V, 103). 

From C[adwalader] Evans. 1767. November 20. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favor of August 5th and also Dr. Baker's ingenious 
investigation of the cause of Devonshire colic; he deserves the thanks of 
that county in particular and of all the world where wine and cider are 
drank; compares their own tendency to colic with that of other nations. 
Sends him a catalogue of the medical books in their library; thanks 
Franklin for the interest he has taken in the scheme. Account of the 
annual election; none now so hardy as to speak against Franklin. 
Question of the colonies manufacturing articles to rival other nations 
rather than Great Britain. A. L. S. 4 p. II, 104. 

i^row James Parker. 1767. November 24. New York. 

The affair at New Haven terminated by Holt having to pay Mr. 
Ingersoll £48, which he has since done. If he can but hold out a year 
or two, expects to bring his newspaper through successfully; at present 
it's a hard struggle. Price of writing-paper higher, owing to the new 
duty, also his labors in the custom-house Increased. Weyman continues 
in public service; his paper, a jumble of lies and truth, expressed in the 
vilest language. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 105. 

i^roOT James Parker. 1767. December 24. New York. 

Issue of trial of Post-Office vs. Holt. Has suffered lately with a 
fever and gout, but is now better. Concerning the payment of his 
salary in the Custom-House. The Thursday's post by way of Hartford 
to Boston is to be stopped ; a rider from Hartford to New London will 
answer all purposes. Intends altering his paper to Monday; every day 
sees a slight increase. The new duties make a great noise on the conti- 
nent, but not so much at home ; the poor people complain much, and yet 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 79 

there is much luxury. Benny Mecom's failure to get along; expects 
nothing from that quarter. Assembly sitting, but ignorant what they are 
doing; Wej'man still prints for them; thinks him an object of pity and 
contempt. A. L. S. 3 p. II, 106. 

Fro //z Tho[ ma] s Gumming. [1767?] December 30. [London.] 
Introducing a gentleman who wishes to become librarian of the Royal 
Society. A. L. in 3d P. i p. LXIX, 69. 

From Mr. Chambers. \_Circa 1767? London.] 
Disappointed at not meeting Franklin at the Philadelphia Coffee 
House. Requests him to send letters for him, by bearer, as he is going 
to set out for Portsmouth next morning. L. in 3d P. i p. 

XLIII, 157. 

From William Franklin. [1767. Burlington?] 
Mr. B[ache] informs him that he has [given] you an exact account 
of his misfortunes ; bills have come back protested, but his brother is 
bound with him for their payment. His brother becomes his surety un- 
til he can contrive to pay them. Mr. R s says that Mr. B. had often 

attempted to deceive him about his circumstances, and he was convinced, 
before this unlucky affair happened, that Mr. B. was not worth any- 
thing at all if his debts were paid; he is a mere fortune hunter. If Sally 
marries him they will both be entirely dependent on Dr. Franklin for 
subsistence. Asks him to burn this letter. L. 2 p. XLIV, 108. 

From Garth. [Circa 1767.] London. 

Announcing Mr. Grenville's consent to give audience to the depu- 
tation. L. in 3d P. I p. XL, 35. 

From Garth. [Circa 1767?] London. 

Relative to despatches to be sent to the South Carolina Asssembly. 
A. L. in 3d P. I p. XLII, 30. 

From Lord Morton [James Douglas]. [Circa 1767?] 

Relative to chimneys and lightning conductors to be placed on his 
house. 3. N. in 3d P. Each i p. LXVIII, 69-71. 

From The Royal Society. 1767 and 1768. 

Notices of meetings of the Committee on Papers. N. S. I p. 

LXVIII, 12-13. 



8o Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Frojii William Strahan. [1767? London.] 
Asks permission to see him that evening. A. L. i p. XLIV, 281. 

From Will[iam] Strahan. [1767? London.] 

Reminds him of his appointment for the following day. A. L. S. 
I p. XLIV, 282. 

From Ben[jami]n Vaughan. [1767-68?] 

Comparison between boiling and evaporation. Sends Dr. Priestley's 
History of Electricity. A. L. S. 2 p. (First part missing.) LVIII, 53. 

From Eleanor Morris. 1768. January 18. Westbury. 

Wishing him many happy returns of his birthday (Jan. 17th), which 
she and the children celebrated by having a plum-pudding for dinner, and 
drinking his health in tea. Her own health good though the weather is 
very severe; Henry goes every day to school. Asks him to pardon her 
writing as she may never live to see another of his birth-days. A. L. S. 
I p. II, 107. 

From James Parker. 1768. January 21. New York. 

Altered the day of his paper to Monday. The Hartford rider sup- 
pressed. Question of his pay in the Custom-House. Weyman has dropped 
his paper and has resigned his government work in favor of Hugh Gaine, 
who allows him one year's salary; his (Parker's) name was mentioned 
by some of the members, but it was objected that he was a Custom-House 
officer. Holt still avoids arrest. No hope of getting a copper of rent 
from Benny Mecom. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 108. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1768. January 22. Burlington. 

Has only time to acknowledge his favors of Oct. 9th and Nov. 13th. 
Doubts whether it will be good policy to drop the superintendencies, at 
least until the new colonies are got into some forwardness. A. L. S. 
I p. II, 109. 

From Martha Johnson. 1768. January 26. Letchlade. 

Just arrived at Letchlade with her brother-in-law ; expects to get into 
her shop in a week or so. Her son Sammy very ill. Begs Franklin's 
acceptance of a cheese. A. L. S. i p. II, no. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 8i 

From James Parker. 1768. January 30. New York. 

Holt denies that he ever sent to Mr. Strahan for any books; begs 
Franklin to ask Mr. Strahan if he ever received any orders for books 
in Holt's handwriting. A. L. S. i p. 

A. E. by Franklin. Asking Mr. Strahan to peruse this and enable 
him to send a proper answer. II, ill. 

From Tho[mas] Wharton. 1768. Februarj^ 9. Philadelphia. 

The horrid murders committed by Frederick Stump ; account of his 
capture. The House improves every opportunity to urge the Governor 
to do his duty by bringing those wretches to the just test of the law. 
Prevalence of a disposition in the inhabitants of Cumberland Co. to sup- 
port all persons who kill Indians; while this lawless disposition con- 
tinues, there is little hope of peace with the natives. Patterson's life in 
danger. A proposition that the Assembly shall give about £3000 to the 
northern tribes and the western Indians for the wiping away the blood 
of their warriors and relatives spilt at a time of peace. Their party 
stronger in the House than ever before ; great hopes of a change of Gov- 
ernment. A. L. S. 3 p. II, 112. 

Frow Martha Johnson. 1768. February 15. Letchlade. 
Hopes Nancy behaves herself; trusts Franklin will chide her if she 
doesn't. Begs him to think of poor Sammy and get him provided for if 
possible. A. L. S. i p. II, 114. 

From Henry Home [Lord Karnes]. 1768. February. 18. Edinburgh. 
Has bought a house in Edinburgh; most complete in every respect, 
except that one of the chimnej^s smokes; applies to Franklin for a 
remedy; has been thinking lately of adopting his Philadelphia grate, as it 
promises to save coal. Will give him great joy to entertain Franklin. 
L. S. I p. II, 113. 

Printed in Works (Smyth, V, 106). 

From James Parker. 1768. February 25. New York. 

Acknowledging favors of Dec. 2d and 12th. A detailed account of 
the New Haven affair and the stoppage of the Hartford rider; this 
latter action has caused a general outcry against him ; gives Franklin a 
true statement of the case. Concerning his responsibility for the books he 
had of Hamilton and Balfour. Longs to bring Holt to a settlement 
before he dies. Struggles hard but cannot support himself in this very 
dear town. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 115. 

2—6 



U03a. 



82 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From J[oseph] Galloway. 1768. March 10. Philadelphia. 
State of affairs in Pennsylvania. A. L. S. 3 p. II, 116. 

Printed, for the most part, in Works (Sparks, VII, 387) ; (Bigelovv, IV, 126). 

From J[ospeh] Priestley. 1768. March 20. Leeds. 

Begging him to transmit the two enclosed copies of a paper to Dr. 
Kippis and Mr. Price. Preparing for the second edition of his History 
of Electricity; difficulties in the way; at present reading the History of 
Electricity, written by A. Grelett of Dantzig. A. L. S. i p. II, 117. 

From Fra[nci]s Hopkinson. 1768. March 28. Philadelphia. 

Thanking Franklin for his advice and encouragement, which induced 
him to accept his cousin, Mr. Warren's, of¥er; the unusual success he 
has met with alread}^ Sent Mr. Waring a full account of the negro 
school in Philadelphia. Hopes he will see the Lord Bishop in Lon- 
don. A. L. S. 3 p. II, 118. 

Fro w William Saunders, £>/ a/. [1768. March-May. London.] 

Solicitations for his vote at an election for physician to the London 
Hospital, 1768. Printed. N. S. i p. LXVIII, 18-21. 

From Henry Walker. 1768. April i. Westbury. 

Presenting his and his family's humble duties to Franklin ; his mother 
hopes that Franklin's name will be perpetuated by the Boston branch of 
the family. A. L. S. i p. II, 119. 

From Charles Lee. 1768. April 7. Barton. 

In case Mr. Durden should write him concerning the Springsborough 
estate, begs Franklin to forward the letter to him at Sir Charles Bun- 
bury's and to forgive the liberty of the request. A. L. S. i p. II, 120. 

From The Province of Georgia. 1768. April 11. 

Ordinance appointing Benjamin Franklin its Agent in Great Britain. 
Attested copy, 2 p. LXXVI, 8. 

Fro w James Parker. 1768. April 18. New York. 

Issue of suit against Holt at New Haven. Revival of the Hartford 
rider. Details of the way Holt undermined a venture of his in the 
newspaper line. His dealings with B. Mecom. The coldest, backward- 
est spring ever known. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 121. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 83 

i^row James Parker. 1768. April 25. New York. 

Has not had a line from Franklin since December. Wishing him a 
safe and speedy return home. A. L. S. i p. II, 122. 

Fro 7« The Royal Society. 1768. April. London. 

Notice of a Council meeting on April 28, 1768. Engraved N. S. 
J. Robertson, Ch[airman]. i p. II, \22Y2. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1768. May 8. Paris. 

Acknowledging treatise on the small-pox by Mr. Dimsdale ; discusses 
new method of treating this disease. Pays Franklin many compliments 
on the style of his writings in the periodicals; anxious to have these 
translated together with Franklin's examination, to be published in the 
" Ephemerides du Citoyen." Has announced the rough draft of this 
translation in the honorable assemblies at the house of the Marquis de 
Mirabaud. Sends explanation of his Chronological Chart, which Frank- 
lin was good enough to ask for. Acknowledges the Biographical Chart 
of Mr. Priestley. Thanks him for the strange nuts, — walnuts and 
hickories. Wants to know if the liberty of the press in London or 
Philadelphia would permit of his printing an article on Deism, and if 
so, would Franklin take charge of it? A. L. S. 4 p. [In French.] 

II, 123. 

From [Pierre Samuel] Du Pont [de Nemours]. 
1768. May 10. Paris. 

Heard from Dr. Quesnay, when it was too late, of Franklin's visit to 
Paris; regret at not having seen him; has long known him as the savant, 
the mathematician and the philosopher; has taken the liberty of trans- 
lating some of his papers on the affairs of the Colonies, in which he is 
revealed as the citizen-philosopher, occupied for the good of his brothers 
and the interest of humanity. Sends him two books: one a collection of 
Dr. Quesnay's writings, the other his own treatise, " La Physiocratie," 
a resume of Dr. Quesnay's principles. Introducing the bearer, Mr. 
Reboul, Secretary of the Economical Society. A. L. S. 4 p. [In 
French.] II, 124. 

Printed in Works (Smyth, V, 153). 



84 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Martha Johnson. 1768. May 10. Letchlade. 

Sorry to hear that Franklin is about to leave England; cannot leave 
her shop to bid him good-b}'e. Begs that with so much influence at his 
command he will do something for Sammy, as she cannot afford to ap- 
prentice him. Hopes Nancy behaves herself and makes progress in her 
French; would be obliged if Franklin would always address her in 
that tongue. A. L. S. i p. II, 125. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1768. May 10. Perth Amboy. 

Acknowledging favors of Jan. 9, 29, Feb. 13 and March 13. M[au- 
rice] Morgan not yet arrived. Concerning Franklin's lands in Nova 
Scotia and his scheme of returning home via Halifax. Goddard has not yet 
published Franklin's paper on Smuggling in the Chronicle, but has 
printed the one relative to disputes in America^ ; both much admired, 
the latter far more than the Farmer's Letters. Concerning the experi- 
ment of setting water on fire. Reported by Mr. Foxcroft that Frank- 
lin was to be appointed one of the Under Secretaries of State to Lord 
Hillsborough; doubts the truth of this, but it is much wished for. As- 
sures his father that in spite of great provocation, his one endeavor has 
been to avoid family quarrels. Question of paper currency. Evil con- 
sequences of the Ministr}' abandoning the posts in the back country, and 
leaving them to the colonies to garrison. Glad that the boundary is at 
last to be completed. Sent an exact account of the manufactories car- 
ried on in his province to Lord Shelburne; therefore cannot understand 
Mr. Grenville's complaints. Proves by statistics that there is not wool 
enough in the colonies to make each person a pair of garters. Act of 
Assembly for supplying the King's forces. Agreeable dinner he had with 
Mr. Bayard, meeting there Gen. Gage and Sir Henry Moore. Has 
just seen that Franklin has been chosen agent for Georgia; anxious to 
know if he will accept it. A. L. S. 6 p. II, 126. 

^ See Ford's Bibliography of Benjamin Franklin, p. 135, No. 302. 

From Mar [tin] Howard, Jr. 1768. May 14. Newport, R. L 

Wrote to him some time past and mentioned the petition signed by 
a few here for a Royal Government. The pamphlet entitled "A Letter 
from Halifax " has involved him in a paper war and he has taken the 
side of the Mother Country against her ungrateful sons. Has lately 
published "A Defence of the Halifax Letter." His attitude has ren- 
dered him not a little obnoxious. Asks his influence to have him appointed 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 85 

Receiver of Stamp Duties. Party is high in Philadelphia and every 
measure of decency is renounced by the antagonists there. Mr. 
[Samuel] Ward elected Governor of Rhode Island. A. L. S. 2 p. 

II, 127. 

i^row James Parker. 1768. May 14. New York. 

His son about to embark for London; durst not recommend him to 
Franklin's regard ; ignorant if he will even wait on him. Nothing 
pleasing to write about. A. L. S. i p. II, 128. 

From James Parker. 1768. May 15. New York. 

Sends this with his unhappy son ; leaves to Franklin's discretion 
how far he may be an object of his regard; nothing else to say in his 
favor. A. L. S. i p. II, 129. 

From William Saunders. 1768. May 20. London. 

Notice of the day of the election for a physician to the London Hos- 
pital. Printed N. i p. LXVIII, 22. 

From [Thomas Frangois] Dalibard. 1768. June 14. Paris. 

Acknowledging his favors of March last. Prevented by various in- 
cidents from reading Dr. Priestley's History of Electricity. Death of 
M. Camus of the Academy. Begs to know when Franklin intends pay- 
ing Paris a visit; Dr. and Mrs. Dubourg and Mesdemoiselles Basseporte 
and Biheron are greatly desirous of seeing him before his return to 
America. New arrangements of the museums in the Jardin du Roi. 
A. L. S. 4 p. [In French.] II, 130. 

Printed in part in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 15. 

From Hannah Walker. 1768. June 16. Westbury, 

Thanking Franklin for his favor to her son Henry. Has been in 
great trouble owing to her son Johnny's eyes ; after being prevented some 
time by her husband, finally took him to Banbury to consult a famous 
gentlewoman there, who takes nothing for her services, but she said it was 
too late to do anything. Damage done by the late heavy rains to their 
present abode; hopes that Franklin and Mrs. Stevenson will not disap- 
point them about providing them with a better dwelling; mentions one in 
the middle of the town, in every way suitable. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 131. 



86 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From . 1768. June 16. Versailles. 

Giving an account of two incidents which recently happened in which 
the young Dauphin displayed good qualities and a high sense of justice. 
Thinks the young Prince gives promise of being a wise and just King. 
L. 2 p. (In French.) (Copy by Franklin.) L(i)> 29. 

F;o/« James Parker. 1768. June 17. New York. 

Acknowledging favor of April 16, with Mr. Strahan's memorandum 
about Holt; unfortunate that he (Parker) has to pay for books which he 
never received. His son probably arrived in England; wishes he had 
sown his wild oats while single ; hopes he will be preserved from utter 
ruin. A. L. S. i p. II, 132. 

Fro /« James Parker. 1768. June 29. New York. 

Hears Franklin is about to embark for home; wishes him a good 
passage. Durst not ask any favors for his son, but trusts to Franklin's 
kindness. A. L. S. i p. II, 133. 

From Sam[uel] F. Parker. 1768. July i. Deptford. 

Being engaged at Deptford, has been hindered from delivering his 
letter, which he now sends. A. L. S. i p. II, 134. 

From Capt. Nath[anie]l Falconer. 1768. July 3. Off Dover. 

Announcing his landing, after a passage of five weeks and three days. 
Franklin's family all well when he left home; will wait on Franklin 
with his letters as soon as he gets to London. A. L. S. i p. II, 135. 

/"ro/rt James Parker. 1768. July 12. New York. 

Sends this line on the chance of Franklin not having yet left England. 
Continues to rub along in the old way, but thinks he is almost at the 
end of his journey. A. L. S. i p. II, 136. 

From George III. 1768. July 20. New York. 

Commission for deciding the boundary line between New York and 
New Jersey. 1 sheet, parchment. 

E. Notice that the first meeting will be held on July i8th, 1769. 2 p. 
Parchment. LXXVI, 7. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 87 

From John Alleyne. [1768. August 13.] Fachiney, 

Returns thanks for congratulations upon his marriage and for his 
advice. A. L. S. i p. XLII, 23. 

In answer to Dr. Franklin's letter of Aug. 9, 1768, printed in Works (Sparks, 
VII, 413; Bigelow, IV, 196). 

From John Swinton, Jr. 1768. August 29. Edinburgh. 

Begging him to transmit the enclosed letter to Governor Franklin 
w^ho was good enough to advance for him four guineas, for which he 
herewith sends Dr. Franklin an order. A. L. S. i p. II, 137. 

From James Parker. 1768. September i. New York. 

Acknowledging favor of April 20. Concerning the unhappy afifair 
of the books sent him by Franklin ; how much money he has already lost 
through that transaction ; cheated by both his kinsman and Holt, to whom 
at difiEerent times the books were confided ; has collected all that are left ; 
will do what he can to repair Franklin's loss. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 138. 

From Pet[er] Timothy. 1768. September 3. Charleston, S. C. 

The bearer is the young man Franklin desired him to inquire about; 
sketches his history. Mr. Spencer happily settled, owing to Franklin's 
recommendation. He (Timothy) is the most unpopular man in the 
Province, since taking a place in the post-office at the time of the Stamp 
Act. Flourishing condition of South Carolina; many improvements in 
Charleston. Lawyers, doctors and planters grow rich, merchants do 
not so well. Great confusion however prevails ; people in the back 
settlements, calling themselves regulators, are in arms and acknowledge 
no authority ; they owe their origin to " Grenville's hellish idea of a 
Stamp Act." A. L. S. 4 p. II, 139. 

Frow James Parker. 1768. September 10. New York. 

Has not had a line from Franklin for many months ; has heard nothing 
from his unhappy son, whether he be dead or alive; some mention of him 
by Franklin would have been appreciated. A. L. S. i p. II, 140. 

From James Parker. 1768. September 25. New York. 

Sends Franklin news of his son and daughter. Complains of the 
Nation being in debt, yet five or six commissioners are sent to Boston with 



88 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

a salary of £3000 sterling per annum ; thinks this absurd, as they do 
nothing but ape their superiors in a haughty bearing. A. L. S. 3 p. 

II, 141. 

From James Parker. 1768. October 17. New York. 

Hardly able to hold a pen, owing to gout in his right hand. Acknowl- 
edging his favor of Aug. 9, giving an account of his (Parker's) son's 
base behavior in attempting to get money of Mrs. Cummings; his 
wife died on the 7th inst., leaving a girl of three years old ; hopes he may 
be spared until she arrives above the reach of want of a little education. 
A. L. S. I p. II, 142. 

From J[oseph] Galloway. 1768. October 17. Philadelphia. 

Affairs of Pennsylvania. Two regiments arrived in Boston. Gov- 
ernor Franklin attending an Indian treaty at Fort Stanwix. The re- 
tirement of Mr. Hughes to the country, disgusted with his friends and 
all the world. A. L. S. 4 p. II, 143. 

Printed, for the most part, in Works (Sparks, VII, 416); (Bigelow, IV, 210). 

From James Parker. 1768. October 24. New York. 

Distressed at his son's meanness and viciousness; hopes Franklin will 
admonish him; distressed enough in other quarters; bad attack of gout; 
no settlement with Holt, but thinks he wearies of his confinement. A. 
L. S. I p. II, 144. 

Froj7i Anth[oiiy] Todd. 1768. October 31. Gen. Post Office. 

As Lord Le Despencer cannot get at his oats in time for Franklin to 
send them to America, herewith sends his last year's produce, having 
added a little more Swiss barley. A. L. S. i p. II, 145. 

From J[oseph] Priestley. 1768. November i. Leeds. 

Introducing the bearer, Mr. Lee of Lincoln's Inn, who is very de- 
sirous of making his acquaintance ; if Franklin will give him the plates 
of his last work he will deliver them safely. Concerning a certain experi- 
ment in electricity which he describes, and on which he desires Frank- 
lin's opinion. Proposes to make a few experiments to refute what M. 
I'Epinasse has advanced in the last volume of ' Transactions,' concern- 
ing loss of force occasioned by interruptions in the electric circuit; ex- 
pects to draw up another paper of original experiments for the Royal 
Society. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 146. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 89 

From John Bartram. 1768. November 5. [Philadelphia.] 
Peter Collinson having died, applies to Franklin as the most inti- 
mate and capable friend he has left, to take charge of a box, which he is 
sending to the King, at His Majesty's request, containing some roots 
of arums. Expects daily to hear from some one of his correspondents 
how his affairs stand, through whom, now, the King's bounty will come 
to him, whether he must send annually more plants to the King, and how 
to address them. Franklin's picture still hangs by his bed to remind 
him of their friendship. A. L. S. i p. II, 147. 

From The Library Company of Philadelphia. 1768. November 5. 
Enclosing two bills of exchange, respectively £50 and £100, for 
account of the Philadelphia Library Company ; the directors desire Frank- 
lin to deduct the amount kindly advanced by him to the company, and 
to lay out the remainder in books agreeable to the enclosed list. Asks for 
his opinion on an expensive work entitled British Zoology, published 
lately under the inspection of the Cymmrodorion Society. A. L. S. 
Cha[rles] Thomson and Thomas Mifflin. 2 p. (Copy.) II, 148. 

From Rich[ard] Bache. 1768. November 6. Philadelphia. 

Received from Mr. Bayard of New York two exemplifications of 
His Majesty's commission, appointing Franklin with Mr. Allen and sev- 
eral others, commissioners to settle the line between New York and 
New Jersey; the meeting will be held in July next; hopes Franklin will 
be there. Expects to make another trip to Jamaica this winter; would 
be happy to be honored with a line from Franklin while there. A. 
L. S. 2 p. II, 149. 

From The Merchants of Philadelphia. 
1768. November 10. Philadelphia. 

Have forwarded a copy of the memorial to the Merchants and Manu- 
facturers of Great Britain. Earnestly request his aid to obtain the 
repeal of the Revenue Acts. A. L. S. John Reynell et al. i p. 

LII, 60. 
i^roOT James Parker. 1768. November 22. New York. 

Arrival of the Inspector-general of the Customs from Boston ; question 
of his salary in the custom-house, by whom it will be paid, if at all; 
what per cent, he must lose, and in his opinion the general mismanage- 
ment of the entire matter. Enclosing a line for Mr. Strahan, on behalf 
of his poor son. Not much hope of ease or prosperity until he rests in 
the grave. A. L. S. 3 p. II, 150. 



90 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From J[oseph] Priestley. 1768. November 28. Leeds. 

According to his promise sends Franklin the other paper containing 
an account of experiments, which he desires him to lay before the Royal 
Society. Has materials for another short paper of miscellaneous experi- 
ments, but thinks it better to wait until he has completed his study con- 
cerning magnetism. Hopes American affairs have assumed a better 
aspect. A. L. S. i p. II, 151- 

From [Thomas Wharton] ? 1768. December 2. Philadelphia. 
An account of Sir William Johnson's conference and treaty with the 
Six Nations. (Incomplete.) L. 4 p. XLIX, 77. 

From Samuel Fayerweather. 1768. December 5. Cambridge, N. E. 

Pays Franklin many florid compliments on his greatness and learn- 
ing. Asks his influence in procuring the title of LL.D. at one of the 
universities of Great Britain for his friend, Mr. Winthrop, professor 
of mathematics at Cambridge, N. E. ; the inestimable advantage this 
will prove to Mr, Winthrop. His own sphere a small one; takes charge 
of a small flock in the sacerdotal way; for divertisement, enjoys a chase 
of beagle hunting. Gives Franklin news of his old friend, Harry 
Babcock. A. L. S. 3 p. II, 152. 

From James Parker. 1768. December 12. New York. 

Times dull and melancholy. Concerning the disposition of books 
sent him formerly by Hamilton and Balfour of Scotland. Not able to 
bring Holt to an account; thinks he is using his wife's money to live. 
Enclosing a letter for his son. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 205. 

From William Robertson. 1768. December 12. Edinburgh College. 

Acknowledging his favor of the 26th ult. recommending Mr. Rogers 
of New York to a degree in divinity ; his absolute confidence in Frank- 
lin's opinion, confirmed, however, in this case by other testimony; accord- 
ingly, the degree is conferred upon Mr. Rogers and his diploma will be 
sent by the first opportunity. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 153. 

From N[oble] W[imberly] Jones. 
1768. December 24. Savannah, Ga. 

With an address from the Assembly of Georgia to The King. A. L. 
S. 2 p. • II, 154- 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 425). 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 91 

From N[oble] ■W[imberly] Jones. 1768. December 24. Savannah. 

Relative to the Assembly's petition to the King, of the same date.. 
A. L. S. 2 p. LII, 76. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 425). 

From The Selectmen of Boston. [1768?] 

Protesting against the treatment accorded Boston by interested and 
designing men; affirming their loyalty to Britain and asking Franklin's 
attention to their interests in England. A. L. S. Joshua Henshaw, 
Joseph Jackson, John Ruddock, John Hancock, Samuel Pemberton and 
Henderson Inches. 2 p. (First part missing.) LVIII, 83. 

FroTH George Croghan. [1768.] 

Sir William Johnson to have a conference early that spring with the 
Six Nations; he himself expecting orders to go to Fort Pitt and call all 
the western nations together; necessity of hindering the meeting of the 
western and northern Indians. L. S. 2 p. (First part missing.) 

LVIII, 82. 
From W[illiam] Dunlap. [1768?] 

Relative to disorders in his post-office accounts. Denies insinuations 
and appellations bestowed on him. A. L. S. 2 p. XLII, 28. 

From W[illiam] Dunlap to [Benjamin] Franklin and 
[John] Foxcroft. [1768?] 

Is willing to make over all his property to them (about £600) in 
satisfaction for a debt. A. L. S. i p. XLII, 27. 

From W[illiam] F[ranklin]. [1768?] 

Wishes some more pictures of Dr. Franklin. Family news. If 
Temple comes home he might assume his proper name and what expla- 
nation should be given. Assistance given to Ben and John Mecom. A. 
L. S. 2 p. (Incomplete.) LVIII, 46. 

From Mrs. [Elizabeth] Montagu. {Circa 1768.] 

Gets nourishment from Franklin's writings as well as from his 
bread ; desires the recipe for the latter. The condition of her poor 
neighbors in Berkshire tempts her to lead a colony of them to Penn- 
sylvania. A. L. in 3d P. I p. XLI, 55. 



92 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Mrs. [Elizabeth] Montagu. {Circa 1768.] London. 

Begging Franklin to dine with her to meet the artist, Mr. Bolton. 
L. in 3d P. I p. XL, 182. 

Front S[amue]l Wharton. [1768?] 

Attitude of the Proprietors. Peace conference held by Mr. Croghan 
at Fort Pitt; convinced that he will safely reach the Illinois and con- 
ciliate the minds of the Indians there. A. L. S. i p. (First part 
missing.) LVIII, 88. 

From James Parker. 1769. January 4. Woodbridge. 

Still in Woodbridge, about the Jersey laws. Sent bill of exchange 
for £200 for Franklin to New York. Expects to return to New York 
in two weeks ; has resigned his office in the custom-house. Never remem- 
bers to have seen Franklin's ' Examination ' in a Quebec paper. A. 
L. S. I p. II, 155. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1769. January 31. Burlington. 

Sees a number of pieces in the Chronicle, which he is sure are from 
Franklin's pen, especially two signed ' A Briton,' and one signed F. B., 
concerning the trade between England and the colonies; this latter 
Bradford has printed in his last Journal, also a letter from London 
wherein Franklin is said to have spoken in a large company against the 
right of Parliament to tax the colonies; thinks Bradford printed this to 
incense Parliament against Franklin. Enclosing copy of the lost Chron- 
icle, containing two pieces signed Amor Patriae, said to be by one 
Crawley in London, also Lord Hillsborough's letter to himself and his 
answer unsealed. Same spirit still prevails in the colonies as before the 
sending of troops to Boston ; nothing will make them acknowledge the 
right of Parliament to tax them. Notwithstanding Mr. Foxcroft's 
assertion, denies having said to anyone that Franklin continued in 
England this winter " at the solicitation of Lord Gower." Begs Frank- 
lin to send him Gov. Pownall's History of his Administration of the 
colonies and any other new publications. Mentions one or two petty 
instances of Lord Hillsborough's want of politeness to himself. Mr. 
Hughes retired to his farm where he writes letters of advice to the 
Ministry. A. L. S. 4 p. II, 156. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 93 

Fro?n Tho[ma]s Gordon. 1769. February 5. Philadelphia. 

Begging Franklin to recommend his son-in-law, Henry Benbridge, 
to such of his acquaintance as may employ him ; he has been several years 
in Italy studying printing and is now going to London for business. 
A. L. S. I p. II, 157. 

From James Parker. 1769. February 17. New York. 

Concerning some bills of exchange. Asks Franklin to send some horns 
for the riders, who have lost and broken nearly all of theirs. Has a bad 
fit of the gout. New York a very dear place to live in. Weyman is 
dead; a young Scotchman has got his tools and in the spring will pub- 
lish a newspaper. A. L. S. i p. II, 158. 

FroTu Moses Franks. 1769. Februarj^ 20. London. 

Requesting Franklin to deliver to i\Ir. Dagge the account and papers 
relative to the sufferers by Indian depredations in 1754. A. L. S. i p. 

II, 159- 

From John Foxcroft. 1769. February 21. Williamsburg. 

On hearing that their Lordships had granted him leave of absence for 
a few months, set out at once for the Colony in order to put the riders on 
a good footing during his absence; this he has done and thereby saved 
£100 to the revenue. Looks forward to visiting his native country and 
seeing his aged parent after a lapse of sixteen years. Uneasy at Mr. 
Todd's letter of Nov. 2d; fears he has incurred the displeasure of their 
honorable masters by not allowing the packet to sail before the ap- 
pointed day; hopes Franklin will be able to prevent any disagreeable 
consequences. A. L. S. 4 p. II, 160. 

Frorti J[oseph] Priestley. 1769. February 24. Leeds. 

Has decided to confine himself to the inscription ; therefore asks Frank- 
lin to throw the dedication he sent him into the fire. A. L. S. I p. 

II, 161. 

From Kath[arine] French. [1769?] Februarj^ 26. 

Sending her book to Franklin, together with Dr. Grey Sharpe's 
letter on the subject. A, L. S. 2 p. XLI, 197. 



94 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Pere Joseph Etienne] Bertier. 1769. February 27. Paris. 

Thanking Franklin for directing Captain Houry to him, and thereby 
giving him an occasion of expressing for Franklin his attachment and 
esteem. France, Franklin's country as much as England; avows him- 
self with pride a ' Frankliniste.' A. L. S. i p. (In French.) II, 162. 

From James Parker. 1769. March i. New York. 

By Mrs. Franklin's desire, now sends him two small kegs of nuts. 
Has had a bad attack of gout. Concerning some bills of exchange he is 
sending Franklin. A. L. S. i p. II, 163. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1769. March 2. Burlington. 

Reasons for thinking Franklin's letters have been intercepted. Boston 
people continue their attacks on Governor B[ernard] and the Commis- 
sioners, and have lately begun in the Journal of Occurrences to attack 
the military. A piece, signed Francis Lynn, supposed to be by Franklin, 
and much admired, has appeared in answer to Crawley's letter. Inter- 
ested in a History of Electricity he saw at a friend's house, by Dr. 
Priestley; who is the author? Anxious to see the new edition advertised 
of Franklin's experiments; wonderful that he can find time for those 
studies. Employed reading books of husbandrj^ as he expects soon to 
move to his farm ; desires some books on that subject, as well as certain 
others. Concerning a new plough lately invented for cutting trenches 
and making drains; urges its introduction into America. Best means of 
rooting up trees. Wants a good hand-mill. Young Dunlap has pub- 
lished an edition of the " Sermons to Asses " and to give them a sale has 
had the impudence to attribute them to Franklin. A. L. S. 4 p. 

II, 164. 

From James Parker. 1769. March 4. New York. 

Nuts he sent him. Bills of exchange. Will be thankful if he doesn't 
lose his place, by reason of his wicked gout. A. L. S, i p. II, 166. 

From James Parker. 1769. ]\Iarch 20. New York. 

Enclosing a bill of exchange for £55 ; explains what he wants done 
with it. A. L. S. I p. II, 167. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 95 

From James Parker. 1769. March 29. New York. 

Acknowledging favors of Dec. 22d and Jan. 4th; arrival of his son, 
who knew not of his wife's death until he came within the Hook; ac- 
count of his son's many back-slidings ; at present he has gone to Wood- 
bridge and married again a young woman of good character, who, with 
her sister, has a plantation w^orth £700, which will enable him to spend 
his days in idleness and dissipation. Account of his brother's death, 
leaving a wife and eight children to his care; has placed them in his 
house at Woodbridge. Times are very distressing ; everything very dear 
and his own ill health a drawback. The scheme to publish a New York 
Chronicle as large as Goddard's. Describes in detail all his dealings 
with Benny Mecom; Mrs. Franklin blames him (Parker) ; appeals to 
Franklin to decide the matter. Concerning certain bills of exchange. 
His affairs with Holt. Won't resign from the custom-house in spite of 
his unpopularity. A. L. S. 4 p. II, 168. 

From John Bartram. 1769. April 10. [Philadelphia.] 

Acknowledging favor of January 9, and thanking him for his kind- 
ness in taking care of the King's box. Has heard from Michael CoUin- 
son, his old friend's son and from Dr. Fothergill ; but still at a loss to 
know whether he must send any more plants or seeds to His ]\Iajesty 
and whether he is pleased to continue his bounty. Sent over his journal 
containing observations on the soils, rivers and natural vegetable pro- 
ductions in the Carolinas, Georgia and Florida, with which his friend 
Peter Collinson expressed much satisfaction. Mentions the appearance 
of the Borealis. Much moved by Franklin's kind letter. A. L. S. i p. 

11, 169. 
From James Parker. 1769. April 14. Philadelphia. 

Sends him the second bill of exchange. Still in poor health. A. 
L. S. I p. II, 170. 

From M[ichae]l Hillegas. 1769. April 15. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favor of January 5, and thanking him for having the 
glasses made for his ' Armonica.' Nova Scotia adventurers expecting 
Franklin's answer to their letter. A. L. S. i p. II, 171. 

From T[homas] Coombe. 1769. April 17. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favor of January 5, and expressing the keenest appre- 
ciation of Franklin's kindness to his son, and his good opinion of him. 
A. L. S. 2 p. II, 172. 



96 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Fro w The Merchants of Philadelphia. 1769. April 18. Philadelphia. 

Relative to the revenue policy of Great Britain. A. L. S. Jere[mi]ah 
Warder et al. 2 p. LII, 66. 

From James Parker. 1769. May 12. New York. 

Hopes by this time Mr. Foxcroft has arrived safely. Concerning 
bills for various amounts of money. Necessity for new portmanteaus 
to carry the mails, which he took the liberty of ordering in one or two 
instances. A. L. S. i p. II, 173, 

From James Parker. 1769. May 22. New York. 

Franklin has never told him whether he has received any pay from 
the custom-house; if he has, begs him to pay out of it his two years' 
subscription to the Chronicle. Concerning a box of books which has 
never been opened for five years ; desires an order from Franklin to that 
effect, that they may be cleaned and the saleable ones gotten rid of. Will 
write again by Mr. Robertson, who is preparing to go to England. 
A. L. S. I p. II, I73>4. 

Fro 7« Amelia Evans. 1769. May 23. Tunis. 

Acknowledging his two obliging favors by Mr. Stuart, who arrived 
a few weeks before; satisfaction experienced by Mr. and Mrs. Traill at 
supplying a fatherless, friendless young man with the long lost blessings 
of parental care. Her own early inclinations toward frivolity; checked 
however by calamities of the heaviest kind. Congratulating him on the 
marriage of his daughter. A. L. S. 2 p. II, I74« 

From Hannah "Walker. 1769. May 24. Westbury. 

Apologizing for the shortness of her husband's letter to Mrs. Steven- 
son; lack of time the cause; they agree to Mrs. Stevenson's proposals 
in everything; her kindness in offering to go as far as £150, they are 
ready to meet the remaining expense and pay her six pounds a year. 
All her family well. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 175. 

Fro/// James Parker. 1769. May 30. New York. 

Has decided, with Franklin's permission, to resign from the custom- 
house; the duties too arduous for a man of his age, and the salary in- 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 97 

adequate in such a dear place as New York. Post-office affairs; ques- 
tion of appointing him traveling surveyor. Offers to measure the roads, 
if it is thought expedient to have it done. Never expects to do much with 
his printing; mentions many rival papers; of advertisements, which are 
the life of a paper, he only gets a few. A. L. S. 3 p. II, 176. 

i^row James Parker. 1769. May 31. New York. 

Concerning bills of exchange sent to Franklin. Has got almost all 
the locks and keys on the several mails ; many of the riders don't like it. 
Mr. Luke Babcock, Post-Master at New Haven, wishes to resign in 
favor of Mr. Christopher Kilby; desires Franklin's opinion. Question 
of appointing Mr. Robinson assistant in the post-office. His printing 
materials at Woodbridge are being used by his son; he seems to have 
reformed a little; his health injured by his folly. Hard times in 
general. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 177. 

From John Shippon. 1769. June 3. Southwark. 

After perusing the enclosed letters from his father, hopes Franklin 
will assist him to return to America, to accomplish his scheme of read- 
ing lectures on natural history. A. L. S. I p. II, 178. 

From [Dr.] Th[omas] Bond. 1769. June 7. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favor of March 9, concerning some business trans- 
action between Mr. Cowell and Bond & Byrn. Mrs. Franklin was 
affected with a partial palsy in the tongue and a sudden loss of memorj^; 
better now, but constitution seems impaired. American Philosophical 
Society again united and with the aid of Franklin's presence, might make 
a figure. The telescope he procured was used in the late observa- 
tions of Venus's transit; hopes to transmit these in a fortnight. Hos- 
pital and School of Physic flourishing; manufactures of necessity take 
place more and more; Maryland and Virginia examples of industry 
and patriotic spirits. L. S. 2 p. • II, 179. 

From C [adwalader] Evans. 1769. June 11. Philadelphia. 

Enclosing some remarks made by O. Biddle and Joel Bailey at Cape 
Henlopen on the late transit of Venus. Has not attended the meetings 
of the Philosophical Society since the two were joined and Franklin was 
elected President; thinks the eagerness the professors of the College 
showed for the union was to avail themselves of the labors of others 
2—7 



98 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

and filch reputation from their knowledge; what confirmed him in 
this opinion. Gives data concerning parts taken in observing transit. 
A year previous sent Franklin, at the request of Wm. Henry of Lancas- 
ter, a draft of a register he had invented to regulate the heat in fire- 
works. Mr. Galloway's health. Capt. Dowell's widow, daughter of 
Franklin's old friend, Oswald Peel, sails for London. Recommends 
temperance, amid luxuries, to Mr. Wharton. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 180. 

From Anth[ony] Tissington. 1769. June 13. Alfreton. 

For three weeks after leaving London lay ill of its smoke. En- 
closing letter from Richard Parkin, the young gentleman who dined 
with Franklin; directs him where to send his answer. His wife much 
stronger. Glad to learn American affairs are to be settled to Frank- 
lin's liking. A. L. S. i p. II, 181. 

From James Parker. 1769. June 18. New York. 

Mr. Chew's insolvency ; his omission to pay the rider £33 98s., due him ; 
cannot let the poor rider suffer. Concerning his purpose to resign from 
the custom-house, but will continue till he hears from Franklin; thinks 
the position would be an excellent one for Mr. Robinson. A. L. S. 2 p. 

II, 182. 
Fro OT James Parker. 1769. June 28. New York. 
Enclosing two bills of exchange. A. L. S. i p. II, 183. 

From James Elphinston. 1769. July 4. 

Receipted bill for the board and education of Master William 
Temple [Franklin] for a half year. D. S. i p. LII, 67. 

From C [adwalader] Evans. 1769. July 15. Philadelphia. 

Sent him Owen Biddle's and Joel Bailey's observations of the Transit 
of Venus, at Cape Henlopen. Choice of Franklin as president of the 
Philosophical Society. Recommends the culture of silk in America; how 
to defray the expense of a trial. A. L. S. i p. II, 184. 

From Hannah Walker. 1769. July 17. Westbury. 

Has been ill for six weeks with an intermittent fever; begs Franklin's 
forgiveness, with tears, for having offended him ; prays daily for his 
good health and well-being. A. L. S. i p. II, 136^. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 99 

From Smith, Wright & Gray. 1769. July 27. [London.] 

Sends him forty guineas to his debit in account.^ Shall pay for the 
corn mill for his son, also buy two lottery tickets and advise ye num- 
bers to Jonathan Williams at Boston, as ordered. Franklin so well 
known in Paris, a letter of credit may be needless, but his drafts will be 
honored with the utmost punctuality. Wishing him an agreeable tour. 
A. L. S. I p. II, 185. 

' See Hale's Franklin in France, Part I, p. 17. 

i^ro 7/2 James Parker. 1769. July 22. New York. 

Concerning bills of exchange. Has had Mr. Scott's book of Upper 
Marlborough returned to him by Mr. McGruder who is afraid nothing 
will be got of him, though there is a considerable balance due. Fears 
nothing ever will be got in Mr. Huske's affair. The same case is Mr. 
Walker's of Hartford, who is still in jail. Also despaired of Mr. Chase 
of Providence' arrears as he is next to a bankrupt. All other affairs 
in the [Post] Office seem to go on pretty well. Still determined 
to resign from the Custom-House. A. L. S. i p. II, 186. 

i^rom Sutaine de Bourez (?). 1769. July 28. Champagne. 

Concerning the papers of his nephew, du Coudray, who was drowned 
in the Delaware. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) II, 187. 

From William Hunter (to be opened by Miss Franklin,) Philadelphia. 
1769. August 4. Williamsburg, Va. 

Wishes two Dilworth's School Master's Assistant sent him. A. L. S. 
I p. XLVIII, 109. 

From James Parker. 1769. August 12. New York. 
Bills of exchange he has sent Franklin. Question of the right of Lord 
Botetourt of Virginia to frank his letters. Never expects to get anything 
out of Holt. A. L. S. I p. II, 189. 

From Jos[eph] Galloway. 1769. August 12. Philadelphia. 

Recommending the bearer, Mr. James Adair, to Franklin's notice 
and encouragement; his design is to publish a History of the American 



loo Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Indians; this, he thinks, he can execute better in England; well assured 
of his capacity. A. L. S. i p. II, 190. 

From James Parker. 1769. August 14. New York. 
Enclosing the second bill for £200 sterling. A. L. S. i p. II, 191. 

From John Alleyne. 1769. September 5. 

Asks Franklin's advice on behalf of a reverend friend who has 
the chance of accepting a living in the Island of St. John ; high charac- 
ter of this friend. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 192. 

From James Parker. 1769. September 12. New York. 

Death of the Governor, Sir Henry Moore, of a bloody flux; expected 
that old Mr. Golden, though weakly and infirm, will administer the 
government again; wishes Franklin had the inclination and interest to 
procure it for himself. A. L. S. i p. II, 193. 

From E[phraim] Brown. 1769. September 15. Oxford. 

Acknowledging his favor of the 13th inst., and accepting his loan of 
three guineas, which must go towards the doctor's bill ; his apothe- 
cary's bill unpaid. His wretched state of health; advisability of going to 
a hospital in London. A. L. S. i p. II, 194. 

From James Parker. 1769. October 5. New York. 

Has been laid up with an excruciating fit of the gout. Mr. Babcock 
has left the New Haven Post-office; has sent a commission to Mr. Kelby, 
in his stead, who has qualified ; has hinted to Mr. Golden, who is a 
good deal in arrear again, that as bills are low now, it would be agreeable 
to send, but he has not regarded it. Anxious to hear from Franklin, 
that he may resign his position in the custom-house in Mr. Robinson's 
favor. Sends book of accounts, also bill of exchange. A. L. S. i p. 

II, 195. 

From James Parker. 1769. October 6. New York. 

Scarce able to creep about; has not touched B. Mecom's books as 
yet. Enclosing two bills from Mr. Hubbart. A. L. S. i p. II, 196. 

From [Sir] Grey Cooper. 1769. October 13. Kew Gape. 
Will come to town on Monday next and will take him back, if 
he is disengaged. A. L. S. i p. LXIX, 68. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin ioi 

From Tho[mas] Clifford. 1769, October 21. Philadelphia. 

Introducing Thomas Clifford, Jr. ; desires Franklin's friendly notice 
of him. A. L. S. i p. II, 198. 

From Henry Elwes. 1769. October 22. Plymouth. 

Has letters for Dr. Franklin which are to be delivered in person. 
A. L. S. I p. LXIX, 70. 

Fro w Committee of the Town of Boston. 1769. October 23. Boston. 

Transmitting a correspondence with Gov. Bernard, Gen. Gage and 
Com. Hood. L. S. Thomas Cushing et al. 2 p. (Copy.) 11,198^. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 459). 

From Anth[ony] Tissington. 1769. October 27. Hercules Pillars. 
Arrived safely. Hopes to see Dr. Franklin soon. A. L. S. i p. 

LXIX, 71. 

From James Parker. 1769. October 30. New York. 

Still weak from his last severe fit of the gout; scarce able to write. 
In daily expectation of letters from Franklin. A. L. S. i p. II, 199. 

From William Strahan. 1769. November 22. London. 

Informs him that his Majesty's servants have in contemplation, first, 
to relieve the Colonies from the taxes complained of; and secondly, to 
preserve the honor, dignity and supremacy of the British legislature over 
all his Majesty's dominions. Begs him to answer his queries respecting 
American affairs. L. S. 2 p. (Copy in French.) XLV, 36a. 

Printed in Works (Smyth, V, 236). 

From M[ichae]l Hillegas. 1769. November 25. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging Franklin's kind letter of July 13th to the Nova Scotia 
adventurers. Asks Franklin's opinion about roofing houses with copper 
instead of shingles, and about how much it would cost. Reminds him 
of his old troublesome commission, to wit, the glasses for his Ar- 
monica. A. L. S. 2 p. II, 200. 



I02 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From C[adwala'der] Evans. 1769. November 27. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favors of September 8th and 9th, together with four 
French memoirs on the Education of Silk Worms and the Culture of 
Mulberry Trees. Has not attended a meeting of the Philosophical 
Society for ten months; did not wish to be a solemn witness of trans- 
actions inconsistent with his judgment. States in detail why the other 
observations of the transit of Venus were not sent to Franklin. Charac- 
terizes certain members of the Society as liars and filchers of reputation. 
Saw Charles Read's wife in Burlington just before she died; Gov. 
Franklin and his wife in good health and much beloved and esteemed. 
A. L. S. 3 p. II, 201. 

From John Bartram. 1769. November 29. [Philadelphia.] 

Acknowledging his favor of July 9th. Sent his journal of North 
and South Carolina, Georgia and Florida to Peter Collinson, who ap- 
proved it; is willing for Franklin to print it with certain corrections. 
Thinks of giving Dr. Fothergill's nephew orders to dispose of his seeds 
and receive and remit money, in place of his dear friend Peter Collin- 
son. Asks for the seeds of a certain rhubarb mentioned by Franklin. 
A. L. S. I p. II, 202. 

From Seth Paddack. 1769. November 29. London. 

Has a quintal of codfish from Tim[othy] Folger, of Nantucket, for 
Mr. Franklin. A. L. S. i p. LXIX, 79. 

From James Parker. 1769. November 30. Woodbridge. 

Acknowledging his favor of Sept. 9. Still unable to work owing to 
the gout. Will write in a day or two and resign office in the customs. 
Mr. Colden's delay in sending certain bills to Franklin. A. L. S. i p. 

II, 203. 
From Committee of the New Jersey Assembly. 
1769. December 7. Burlington. 

Relative to his work as the Agent of the Province. A. L. S. Cort- 
[lan]d Skinner et al. 4 p. LII, 68. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 460). 

From Jer[emiah] Miller. 1769. December 11. New London. 

Thanking Franklin on his son's behalf, who has taken Mr. Chew's 
place in the post-office; asks that certain expenses incidental to the 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 103 

office maj^ be allowed him by the Comptroller. Has sent two pamphlets 
to Dr. Johnson on the Susquehanna disputes; encloses a petition printed 
in type made in ' this colony.' No American insensible to Franklin's 
assiduity and important serv^ices in this critical era. A. L. S. 2 p. 

II, 204. 

Frojn [Joseph Chew]. 1769. December 12. New London. 

Concerning a dispute between [James] Parker and himself relative to 
the post-office accounts. A. L. 2 p. (Final part missing.) LVIII, 104. 

Fro /« James Parker. 1769. December 16. New York. 

Concerning a bill of £200 sterling, which he will send by Capt. Davis 
in eight or ten days' time. Feels a little stronger. A. L. S. i p. 

II, 206. 

From Rich[ar]d Stockton. 1769. December 22. Princeton. 

Congratulating him on his late appointment as agent to the Province 
of New Jersey. Begs his particular attention to an Act of Assembly, 
entitled " A Supplementary Act to an Act entitled an Act appointing 
Commissioners for finally settling and determining the several rights, titles 
and claims to the common lands of the township of Bergen and for 
making partition thereof in just and equitable proportion among those 
who shall be adjudged by the said Commissioners to be entitled to the 
same "; strong opposition to this act by William Bayard; asks Franklin 
to take the bill under his especial protection, and pledges the proprietors 
of Secaucus to compensate Franklin for any expense which may attend 
his opposing Mr. Bayard. A. L. S. 6 p. II, 207. 

From James Parker. 1769. December 23. Woodbridge. 

Reasons why bill of exchange promised in his last was not sent. For- 
warded him a power to recover any of his wages in the customs that may 
be due; has written resigning his office. Has recovered his strength a 
little. A. L. S. I p. II, 208. 

From Alex [andejr Colden. 1769. December 23. 

Concerning certain bills which were promised to be made out and 
signed. A. L. S. i p. XLI, 41. 



104 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From James Parker. 1769. December 26. Woodbridge. 

Enclosing the bill for £200 sterling just received from Mr. Colden. 
A. L. S. I p. II, 209. 

From Committee of Merchants of the Town of Boston. 
1769. December 29. Boston. 

Concerning an agreement entered into by the merchants and traders 
of Boston not to import any goods from Great Britain until all the 
revenue acts should be totally repealed ; reasons why the merchants at 
New York, Philadelphia and other colonies could not concur with them 
in this; realizing the importance of all the traders acting upon the same 
plan, they have agreed to conform to the agreement entered into at 
New York and Philadelphia. Endorsing some observations of the mer- 
chants on the Acts of the 4th and 6th George the Third, and also on the 
conduct of the custom-house officers. L. S. 2 p. II, 210, 

From W[illiam] Masters. [Circa 1769.] 

Requests that Dr. Franklin would assist an English soldier to ob- 
tain his discharge, A. L. S. I p. XLII, 29. 

From Gov[erno]r [Thomas] Pownall. [Circa 1769.] 

Introducing Mr. Wilson who desires Franklin's advice as to the state 
of his lands. A. L. in 3d P. i p. XLI, 170. 

From Alex[ande]r Small. [1769?] Paris. 

Inquires if Captain Nairn gave him a paper on ventilation. A, L. 
S. I p. XLII, 70. 

By Peter Henry Tesdorpf. 1769. Lubeck. 

Translation of German verses in praise of Franklin for his invention 
of lightning conductors. Mem. i p. LI, 91. 

From John Ewing. 1770. January 4. Philadelphia. 

Ordered by the Philosophical Society to draw out an account of their 
observations of the Transits of Venus and Mercury and transmit it 
to Franklin as their President, through whose hands it may be com- 
municated to the learned societies of Europe. Asks Franklin to use his 
influence to have a fixed observatory established in Philadelphia. A. 
L. S. 2 p. Ill, I. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 326). 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 105 

From T[homas] Viny. 1770. January 13. Tenterden. 

Pays Franklin many compliments. Has sold that part of his estate 
he mentioned to Franklin. [MS. mutilated.] Account of ' a tender 
scene,' which so sensibly affected him that he doubts he has ' philosophy 
enough to encounter so passionate a farewell ' ; nothing short of stub- 
born persecution can steel his fortitude. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 2. 

From Dr. [John] Blair. [Circa 1770.] January 13. 

Acquaints him that Lady Irwin and one or two ladies with her, pro- 
pose visiting him [in Craven street] ; if agreeable, Mr. George Lewis 
Scott and Mr. Strahan will be of the party. A. L. in 3d P. i p. 

XLIV, 208. 

From John Whitehurst. 1770. January 18. Derby. 

Asking Franklin's favor on behalf of a young artist, named Powell, 
who is desirous of studying art under Mr. West. Concerned at 
Franklin's intention of leaving London in the spring ; expects to wait 
on him 'ere that time. Hopes he received a ham by the Derby stage. 
Desires his sentiments on what will be done about the duties imposed 
on North America. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 3. 

From James Parker. 1770. February 2. New York. 

Concerning certain bills of exchange he has sent Franklin. Has 
resigned his place in the Custom-house. B. Mecom's effects to be sold 
at auction. The New York Chronicle flourished a while, but was soon 
dropped. Hopes by degrees to work out of debt, if he shall retain his 
place in the Post-OflSce. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 4. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, 220. 

From Jos[eph] Smith. 1770. February 6. Burlington [N. J.]. 

Enclosing printed copies of Acts passed at last session of Assembly ; one 
among them is the Act for striking £ioo,CXXD in bills of credit; wishes 
the King's assent may be obtained to it before the breaking up of 
Parliament. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 5- 

From Sam[uel] Potts. [Circa 1770?] February 15. London. 

Have no North American boat on this side consequently no mail was 
made up last Saturday night for New York. The general post-office does 
not supply horns; they are purchased by the post boys. A. L. S. I p. 

LXIX, 82. 



io6 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From James Parker. 1770. February 20. New York. 

Referring to matters in his letter of the 2d inst. Has resigned the 
Custom-House business and received his pay. Absurd manner in which 
the money is paid. Concerning the sale of B. Mecom's books. His 
health still poor. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 6. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, 222. 

From The Assembly of Georgia. 
1770. February 21. Savannah. 

Is directed by the Assembly to ask its Agent to purchase a mace for the 
use of the House, and two gowns suitable for the Speaker and the 
Clerk. A. L. S. Noble Wimberly Jones, Speaker. 2 p. LIT, 80. 

From Daniel Roberdeau. 1770. February 27. Philadelphia. 

Concerning the sale of his estate in St. Christopher's; if Franklin 
will take charge of it, he will save him a trip to England ; does not sell 
from necessity, but partly to remove the temptation of slave-holding 
from his children. Commits himself and his affairs to Franklin's pru- 
dent and careful management. A. L. S. 3 p. Ill, 7. 

From The Province of Georgia. 1770. February 27. 

Ordinance appointing Benjamin Franklin its Agent in Great Britain. 
Attested copy, 3 p. LXXVI, 9. 

From Dr. [John] Blair. [Circa 1770.] February 28. 

Desires to know if Friday will be equally agreeable to him, being 
more convenient for the Bishop of Peterboro and the ladies; the party 
will not exceed nine. A. L. in 3d P. i p. XLIV, 209. 

From James Parker. 1770. March 8. New York. 

Sends certain bills of exchange, one an account of B. Mecom's 
books sold at auction. Mr. Hughes has applied to him for the elec- 
trical machine Franklin sent, designed for him. A. L. S. I p. Ill, 8. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, 223. 

From John Perkins. 1770. March 12. Boston. 

Enclosing some papers of his; one, a small tract on Epidemic Colds. 
Something unnatural in philosophic speculations at a time when the 
nation is involved in such disorder and confusion. Gratitude for Frank- 
lin's past favors to him. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 9. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 107 

From John Perkins. 1770. March 12. Boston. 

Concerning a notion he has that pit-coal is a vegetable production; 
these thoughts occasioned by accounts the Irish give of using peat as 
fuel; anxious to visit the coal mines. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, lO. 

From R[odolph] E[ric] Raspe. 1770. March 17. Cassel. 

Recommending Mr. Lichtenberg, Professor of Mathematics in the 
University of Giessen, who is very desirous of his acquaintance. Re- 
ceived the compliments Franklin was kind enough to send him by Mr. 
Merk. Hopes the new edition of his Electrical Letters will soon be 
finished. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 11. 

Fro7n The Freeholders and Inhabitants of Boston. 
1770. March 22. Boston. 

Resolution that the news of the recent massacre by the soldiery in 
Boston be sent to Benjamin Franklin. D. S. William Cooper, Town 
Clerk. I p. LIII, I. 

From A Committee of the New Jersey Assembly. 
1770. March 27. Burlington. 

Ask Dr. Franklin to do all in his power to overcome opposition to a 
bill just passed, entitled " An act to provide a more effectual remedy 
against excessive costs in the recovery of debts." Wish to hear the 
latest resolutions of Parliament in regard to the laying of duties. A. L. 
S. Hend[ric]k Fisher et al. i p. LIII, 2. 

From [Jean Baptiste LeRoy. 1770.] April 22. Paris. 

Plans for seeing Franklin in England before the end of the year. Has 
sent him his brother's [Pierre LeRoy] work on the determination of 
longitude at sea. Promises to send him Abbe Galiani's work, Sur les 
Commerces des Bles. Project to raise a statue to Voltaire before his 
death. Recommending his brother, the physician [Charles LeRoy], 
to Franklin and Mr. Pringle. A. L. 4 p. (In French.) XLII, 179. 

From James Parker. 1770. April 23. New York. 

Concerning certain bills of exchange. Prospect of a settlement be- 
tween himself and Holt. Wrote to Quebec for the papers containing 
Franklin's examination ; herewith sends them. Account of the trial 



io8 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

of one, Lewis Jones, for counterfeiting bills; he was assigned to him 
by Franklin and after serving his time left ; for his father's sake, gave all 
the testimony he could in his favor; his final acquittal. A, L. S. 2 p. 

Ill, 12. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, 224. 

From F[rancis] Hopkinson. 1770. April 23. Philadelphia. 

Lord North's favor instrumental in obtaining something for his 
benefit; has written to the Bishop of Worcester on the subject. Has 
thought if Beckford should complete what he has been so long about, — 
and really die, he might, with the influence of his friends, gain the 
office of Collectorship of Philadelphia. Asks Franklin's interest and 
attention in this matter. Contemplates a trip to England. A. L. S. 
2 p. Ill, 13. 

From James Parker, 1770. April 25. New York. 

Enclosing bill of exchange. Lewis Jones has just been to thank 
him for the help he gave him in his trial ; entreated him not to write 
the news to his father; promised amendment; has Franklin's name 
to thank for the Judge's favorable verdict. A. L. S. I p. Ill, 14. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, 226. 

From The D[eputy] Postmaster General. 
1770. April 26. General Post-Office, North America. 

A circular letter enclosing the rates of postage. Printed. L. i p. 

LVIII, 54. 
From Robert Rogers. 1770. May 4. 

Encloses an estimate and account of the peltry and fur trade of the 
district of Michilimakinac. The estimate gives the probable cost of 
carrying on the trade with the outposts as £60,898. If the trade be 
confined to the one post at Michilimakinac the cost would be much 
smaller but the Spaniards would work up the outposts. Greatly favors 
extension of the trade and recommends a plan of civil government for 
the district. 27 p. A. L. S. i p. LIII, 4. 

By The Commons House of Assembly, Georgia. 1770. May 10. 

Instructions to their Agent in Great Britain. Attested copy. 2 p. 

LII, 78. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 109 

From The Province of Georgia. 1770. May 10. 

Ordinance re-appointing Benjamin Franklin its Agent in Great 
Britain. Attested copy, 3 p. LXXVI, 10. 

From James Parker. 1770. May 10. New York. 

Concerning certain bills of exchange. Wishes he could get into some 
warmer climate in his old age. Contributed as much as he could 
towards getting Lewis Jones a passage to South Carolina. Sale of B. 
Mecom's books amounted to £175. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 15. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Sen, XVT, 226. 

From The Committee of the Assembly of Georgia. 
1770. May II. Savannah. 

Notification of re-appointment as Agent in England for the Province. 
L. S. James Habersham et al. i p. (Original and copy.) 

LII, 78^ and 83. 

From The Committee of the Assembly of Georgia. 
1770. May 23. Savannah. 

Explanation of the instructions of the Assembly to its Agent in Great 
Britain. A. L. S. James Habersham et al. 4 p. LII, 79. 

From Hum[phr]y Marshall. 1770. May 28. Chester Co., Pa. 

Question of whether the merchants will hold out in their resolve to 
import nothing from England. Spirit of industry among the people of 
Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia; great noise about the manu- 
facture of silk. Thanking Franklin for sending him a small reflecting 
telescope. Hopes if England does take off the duties the American peo- 
ple will not forget the cause of their past resentment, but will manu- 
facture those articles necessary for their own consumption. Prophesies 
bloodshed. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 16. 

From John Ewing. 1770. June 14. Philadelphia. 

Concerning the observations of the Transit of Venus. Question of 
erecting an observatory in Philadelphia. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 17. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 330). 



no Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From J[oseph] Galloway. 1770. June 21. Philadelphia. 

American paper money. Mr. Jackson's appointment as Counsel to 
the Board of Trade. A. L. S. 3 P- HI, 18. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 481). 

From Lieut.-Gov. Francklin. 1770, June 22. London. 

Sends a book which Mr. Frances, the Minister of France, sent to his 
lodgings; believes the book was designed by M. Le Roy for Dr. 
Franklin. A. L. i p. Ill, 19. 

From Samuel F. Parker. 1770. July 7. New York. 

Announcing the death of his father in Burlington, from a nervous 
fever; supposes Mr. Foxcroft has the immediate care of the affairs he 
left concerning the Post-Office. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 20. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, 228. 

i^rom W[illiam] Masters. 1770. July 17. Philadelphia. 

Writes to remind Franklin of his promise to endeavor to procure the 
discharge of Thomas Truck, a soldier, and thus complete the earthly 
happiness of a poor but honest family. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 21, 

From Abel James. 1770. July 19. London. 

Concerning a trunk of clothes left to him by Peter Razor, deceased; 
asks Franklin to lay the enclosed paper before James West, Esq., that 
he may give the necessary orders. L, S. Ill, 22. 

From D. Blunt. [i77o(?).] July 26. Bromley. 

Relative to Mrs. Hewson. (Probably refers to her marriage.) A. 
L. S. 4 p. XLII, 24. 

From Mary Parker. 1770. August 12. New York. 

Giving an account of her husband's death. Tells all she knows 
concerning the Post-Office affairs. Afraid Mr. Parker has not left the 
family very well provided for. A. L. S. I p. Ill, 23. 

From John Bard. 1770. August 18. [New York?]. 

Recommending his son, Samuel, as a successor to the late Mr. 
Parker in the office he held in the Post-Office. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 24. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin hi 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Sr.]. 1770. August 27. Boston. 

His son Josiah to go to London under his brother's care; his desire 
to study music under ]VIr. Stanlej'. Business very poor, owing to the 
unfortunate difference between Great Britain and her colonies. Gov- 
ernor wanted for Massachusetts; general desire for Franklin. A, L. S. 
2 p. XXXVII, 3. 

From Fra[nci]s Panton. [1770. August.] ? 

The will of James Parker. Mrs. Parker wishes Dr. Franklin to be 
paid as soon as possible. A. L. S. 2 p. XLII, 105. 

From Robert Alexander. 1770. September 3 [Scotland]. 

Concerning a harpsichord for 33 guineas, which he desires Franklin 
to send him. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 25. 

From John Borthwick. 1770. September 8. New York. 

Visited Burlington, where he found Franklin's family in good health. 
Asks Franklin to procure some office for him. Concerning a manu- 
script entitled " An examination into the value of Canada and Guade- 
loupe, with an impartial account of the latter in answer to a late 
pamphlet, entitled ' The interest of Great Britain considered in regard 
to her Colonies.' " said to be written by one Mr. Kennedy, alias Scott. 
The old Duke of Wharton has a duplicate of the plan of Philadelphia, 
the same the writer gave Franklin. A. L. S. 3 p. Ill, 26. 

From Thomas Fitzmaurice. 1770. September 10. Isle of Wight. 

Promised Dr. Hawkesworth that he w^ould acquaint Franklin how 
eagerly they looked for him; expected him the previous day with Sir 
Charles Knowles, who purposes to make a very curious experiment of 
the force and direction of the winds upon one of the high neighboring 
downs. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 27. 

From J[oseph] Galloway. 1770. September 27. Philadelphia. 

Speculations about the coming election ; his own fate uncertain ; has 
always received a great deal of abuse and calumny instead of grateful 
returns for the most faithful services. Hears from many that Gen. 
G[a]ge has sent to the Ministr}^ a copy of Franklin's letter to Ch. 
T[homso]n; cautions him against writing of private matters to that 
man; thinks him void of principle and virtue. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 28. 



112 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Tho[ma]s Gilpin. 1770. September 28. Philadelphia. 

Transient thoughts on the subject of the duties imposed by England 
on the Colonies. A. L. S. 3 p. Ill, 29. 

From Mary Parker. 1770. October 6. New York. 

Concerning the Comptroller's books in Mr. Foxcroft's possession. 
Promises to send a general account of the Post-Office affairs. A. L. S. 
I p. Ill, 30. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, 228. 

From N[oble] W[iinberly] Jones. 1770. October 9. 

Acknowledges receipt of mace and gowns ordered last February 21st, 
and encloses bills of exchange in part payment. Also acknowledges 
receipt of pamphlets and speeches. Assurances of the Assembly's esteem. 
A. L. S. 3 P- LII, 81. 

From Thomas Fitzmaurice. 1770. October 12. Isle of Wight. 

Expressing his own and Dr. Hawkesworth's disappointment at not 
seeing Franklin. Concerning Sir Charles Knowles' experiment to 
ascertain the force and direction of the wind; plans to bring him and 
Franklin together. " Aspersions thrown upon the Doctor's Maggy." 
Warlike preparations growing fainter. A. L. S. 4 p. Ill, 31. 

From Tho[mas] Foxcroft. 1770. November 10. Philadelphia. 

Has just received the enclosed bill of exchange from the Quebec office. 
A. L. S. I p. HI, 32. 

From Jona[than] Williams [Sr.]. 1770. November 16. Boston. 

Congratulating their cousin Nancy on her marriage to Capt. Clark. 
A. L. S. I p. XXXVII, 4. 

From J[oseph] Priestley. 1770. November 21. Leeds. 

Rectifies a mistake in the catalogue of books wanted; very anxious 
to get De la Hire's " Dififerents Accidents de la Vue " and Du Hamel's 
"History of the French Academy"; must purchase the Petersburg 
Memoirs, though they will cost above £20; has not yet received Boyle's 
Works; studying up the subject of light and color. A. L. S. 2 p. 

Ill, S3. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 113 

From John Bartram. 1770. November 24. [Philadelphia.] 

Acknowledging the pamphlet and picture of his dear Peter Collinson, 
which he has added to those of Linnaeus, Franklin and Edwards; de- 
sires to add a picture of Dr. Fothergill to the collection. Can hear 
nothing of the continuation of the King's bounty; William Young 
blusters stoutly of his being the botanist to their Majesties, the King 
and Queen of England. Sends a box of seeds. Begs Franklin to 
" squeeze out a few lines " as often as convenient. A. L. S. i p. 

HI, 34. 

From [Barbeu Dubourg]. 1770. November 25. Paris. 

Has received copies of the English translation of his little " Code." 
The translation might well pass for the original, it is so well done. The 
work did not cause much sensation in Paris, but it was very well re- 
ceived in London, and a second edition is about to be published there. 
Has made many changes and additions since the first edition, which he 
hopes his translator will render into English. Requests Franklin to 
send a copy of the second edition in English to Miss Pitt, sister of the 
Earl of Chatham, to whom he is indebted for many kindnesses. In- 
tends to publish also soon a " Digest of Humanity " or a commentary on 
the " Code," under the assumed name of M. Tone, of Philadelphia. 
Thanks Franklin for his kind reception of his friend, M. Frey, when 
the latter was in London. A. L. 4 p. (In French.) XLIV, 4. 

From [Thomas] Life. 1770, November 30. [London.] 

Acquaints Franklin that the Georgia Acts are referred to Mr. Jack- 
son; wishes to have an attendance on Mr. Jackson before he makes 
his report. A. L. in 3d P. Ill, 35. 

From Tho[ina]s Life. 1770. November to 1771. February. 

Account for legal services to Dr. Franklin as Agent for the Colonies. 
Mem. S. 2 p. LXIX, 108. 

From Jos[eph] Smith. 1770. December 8. Burlington. 

Has received his favors of March 19, April lo and 12, and June 1 1, 
and communicated them to the Committee of Correspondence, who laid 
them before the House of Assembly, where they gave general satisfac- 
tion. The House determined not to allow Sherwood the balance he 



114 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

mentions to be due him. The Committee anxious to know whether two 
Acts, mentioned in his letter of April 12, gained the Royal assent. 
Thanks him for Gov. Pownall's speech. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 36. 

From Benj[amin] Gale. 1770. December 10. Killingworth. 

Mentioning a gold medal granted him by the Society of Arts for an 
improvement on the drill-plow; expresses his grateful acknowledg- 
ments to the Society for the honor they have conferred upon him. Ig- 
norant who is Dr. Templeman's successor in the Society; sent specimen 
of white iron ore at the same time with his model of the drill-plow. 
Interest taken in the culture of mulberry trees ; makes suggestions which 
he thinks would aid this work. A. L. S. 4 p. Ill, 37* 

From N[oble] W[imberly] Jones. 1770. December 13. Savannah. 

Encloses second set of bills of exchange in payment for mace and 
gowns. The Assembly holds in highest approbation the conduct of 
its Agent, and is about to pass an ordinance of reappointment. A. L. S. 
I p. LII, 82. 

From N[oble] W[imberly] Jones. 1770. December 13. Savannah. 

Asking his assistance for Mr. Cornelius Winter, who intends taking 
holy orders. A. L. S. 2 p. LII, 82, a. 

From Tho[nia]s Crowley. 1770. December 17. [London,] 

Concerning a pamphlet by J. Otis which contains sentiments exactly 
similar to his own ; thinks it deserves another edition ; in that case, prom- 
ises to take a dozen or two copies ; concerned at the thought that a man 
of such just sentiments should have met with so much oppression. A. 
L. S. I p. Ill, 38. 

From Anth[ony] Tissington. 1770. December 29. Alfreton. 

His movements since July; hopes soon to return to his more pleasing 
studies. Glad to see by the papers that the affairs in America do well, 
and that Franklin settles with the Ministry, not with the Parliament. 
Illness of his wife. Has gathered some materials for a philosophical 
paper. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 39- 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 115 

From Count Carburi. {Circa 1770?] 

The Duke of Marlborough would be delighted to have Dr. Franklin 
at Marlborough House and see him make the experiments in electricity. 
Asks him if he can come and if he needs to see, beforehand, the electric 
machine which would be used. N. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) 

XLII, II. 

From Sain[ue]l Claphamson. [Circa 1770? London.] 

Cabinet maker. Asking for the discharge of his bill delivered some 
time before. A. L. S. i p. XL, 214. 

From [William Franklin. 1770?] 

Relative to New Jersey politics and trouble with the Assembly. 
Threat to destroy the iron works in New Jersey as contrary to law. 
The Americans ought at least, before they attempt to evade this law, use 
all their endeavors to obtain a repeal ; for the interest of both countries, 
that all partial Acts of that nature were abolished. His salary and 
expenses. A. L. S. 3 p. (Incomplete.) LVIII, 44 and 80. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. [Circa 1770?] June. Perth Amboy. 
Encloses a bill of exchange. A. L. S. i p. XLII, ^Yz. 

From Mrs. [Katharine] French. [Circa 1770.] 

Called at Dr. Franklin's house to invite him to dinner, to meet 
Mrs. Payne and to play a game of chess. L, in 3d P. i p. 

XLIII, 171. 

From Dr. [Thomas] Percival. [Circa 1770.] King St. [London?] 

Will call on Franklin in half an hour; desires his company at 
supper that evening. L. in 3d P. i p. XL, 144. 

From Sir John Pringle. [Circa 1770?] Wednesday morning. 

Wishes to know at what hour Dr. Franklin can meet him at Mr. 
Hewson's. L, in 3d P. i p. XLIII, 220. 



ii6 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From . [Circa 1770.] 

Sends money to pay expenses of bringing certain books to his country. 
Asks for data of the lives of the most eminent members of the Royal 
Society. L. 2 p. L(ii)» 26. 



From Jno. Hawkesworth. 1771. January 5. Bromley, Kent. 

Mr. Ackland is a candidate for the afternoon preachership at the 
Foundling Hospital; recommends him to Franklin's assistance. A. 

L. s. I p. in, 40. 

From John Foxcroft. 1771. January 14. Philadelphia. 

Introducing his brother, whom he hopes Franklin will take cordially 
by the hand; his brother's business in London; shares with Franklin 
his fondness for chess. Quite happy at hearing that there is a favorable 
disposition in England towards the Colonies. Trade beginning to look 
up; an Act to encourage and extend the trade of America would be an 
act of grace indeed, worthy of the British Senate, and productive of 
great results at the time. Concerning certain accusations made against 
him; their probable source; account of a conversation with Mr. Black- 
burn in which the latter abused Franklin; some warmth occasioned by 
the writer's calling himself an American; stated his belief that a good 
American and a good Englishman were synonymous terms. A. L. S. 
4 p. III» 41- 

From Jona[than] Williams [Sr.]. 1771. January 19. Boston. 

Happy to learn of his son's and brother's safe arrival. Will send to 
Mr. Pease for the bond and shall recover the money. Shall take pleasure 
to encourage his benevolent scheme. Answered his letters in regard 
to the lottery; decided to risk the two tickets and gave his account 
current credit for the balance as he directed in the past. Has not yet 
been able to let his house. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 5. 

From [Thomas] Life. 1771. January 24. London. 

Has arranged for a conference of Dr. Franklin, Mr. Jackson and Mr. 
Life, for the 30th inst. in reference to the Georgia Acts. Would like 
a previous meeting with Dr. Franklin. L. in 3d P. i p. LII, 84. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 117 

From The Library Company of Philadelphia. 
1 77 1. January 25. Philadelphia. 

Appointed by the Directors of The Library Co. to acknowledge Frank- 
lin's favor of July 7, 1769; prevented from answering it sooner by the 
confusion arising from the union of the several libraries. They concur 
with Franklin in his opinion of the propriety of having, in some of 
their public libraries, all the transactions of every philosophical society 
in Europe; before deciding, they desire to know the price of each set and 
also of the French Encyclopaedia. Sends catalogue of books wanted. 
L. S. M[ichael] Hillegas, Nicholas Wain and R. Strettell Jones, i p. 

Ill, 42. 

From Humphry Marshall. 1771. January 27. West Bradford. 

By all accounts the colonies have gone into the importation of goods 
more largely than ever; instances of great spirit, however, remaining 
among the farmers. Manufacture of china; of double flint glass; of silk, 
which, mixed with worsted, forms a material of which they make clothes. 
Has sent him some observations on the spots appearing on the sun's 
disk; asks him to show them to his old friend, John Fothergill, and after 
a perusal, to present them to the Roj^al Society, in his (Marshall's) 
name. Offers to furnish seeds, 3^oung plants, etc., to any gentlemen in 
England who may desire them, at lower prices than common ; has done 
this work for his cousin, John Bartram, for many years. A. L. S. 2 p. 

HI, 43. 
From Will[iam] Knox. 1771. January 29. London. 

Encloses plan and papers in reference to the lands claimed by W[il- 
lia]m Batner's representative. A. L. S. i p. LII, 86. 

From W[illiam] Henly. 1771. January 29. [London]. 

Thanks Franklin for the improvement of his electrometers; if he 
has been able to produce any experiment in electricity upon which 
Franklin can bestow the epithet ' curious,' his highest ambition and 
vanity in that science is fully satisfied. Drawings and description of 
an experiment. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 44. 

From Isaac Gamgius. 1771. January 31. London. 

Left Capt. Dalrymple's ship because his station was not a suitable 
one; hoped Franklin could have gotten a berth for him in another 
ship. A. L. S. I p. Ill, 45. 



ii8 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Theodorus Swaine Drage. 1771. March 2. Salisbury, N. C. 

A long account of the religious, social and political conditions ex- 
isting in his present parish. A. L. S. 11 p. (Pages missing.) 

LVIII, 55. 

From N[oble] W[imberly] Jones. 1771. March 4. Savannah. 

Informing Franklin of how their [Georgia] Asssembly was dissolved by 
order of the Governor; same fate attended them in December, 1768. 
Cause for it: their having committed the Deputy Secretary, Mr. Moodie, 
for refusing to give evidence to the House in the case of the Deputy Sur- 
veyor-General for taking double fees in his office; this the Governor said 
the Assembly had no right to do. Trusts he has received the bills of ex- 
change. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 46. 

From N[oble] W[iniberly] Jones. 1771. March 7. Savannah. 

Sends the last two Gazettes, as they mention the matters respecting 
the dissolution of the Assembly referred to in his letter of the 4th inst. 
A. L. S. I p. Ill, 47. 

From Rob [er]t Craf ton. 1771. March 11. London. 

Concerning an agreement to dine every Thursday at the Dog Tavern 
on Garlick Hill; reproaches Franklin with being there only once; ex- 
pects to take the chair next Thursday and commands him, under pain of 
his greatest displeasure, to appear in person and bring with him several 
young sucking Americans, who probably attend Franklin's levees. A. 
L. S. I p. Ill, 48. 

From [Charles-Guillaume-Frederic] Dumas. 
1 771. March 22. The Hague. 

Engaged in tutoring two young Dutch noblemen ; the rest of his time 
employed in translating Anderson's Historical and Chronological De- 
duction of the Origin of Commerce. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

LVIII, 56. 

From [William Franklin]. 1771. March 30. Burlington. 

Enclosed a letter to L. H. Heard from Mr. W. Logan that Dr. 
Franklin was well the first of January. L. i p. XLIV, 5. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 119 

From Alex[ander] Wilson. 1771, April 14. College, Glasgow. 

Concerning some fonts of printing types; the price and quality; these 
terms proving agreeable, will be much obliged for orders. A. L. S. 
2 p. Ill, 49. 

From Jos[eph] Galloway. 1771. April 23. Philadelphia. 

Recommending Mr. Nicholas Biddle to Franklin's advice and as- 
sistance; the merchant service has hitherto claimed his attention but his 
ambition incites him to some more honorable pursuit; either the navy, 
or, should peace continue, a berth in the East India Co. A. L. S. 2 p. 

Ill, 50. 

From Eliza [be] th Empson. 1771. April 23. Poole. 

Returning thanks for the money Franklin was kind enough to allow 
her ; afraid that he is displeased with the freedom she has taken ; her 
miserable situation without friends or money; disappointed that he is 
unable to do anything for Mr. Empson. A. L. S. i p. [Mutilated.] 

Ill, 51. 

From [Thomas] Life. 1771. April 26. London. 

Expressing regret that owing to business of very great consequence 
he has not been able to wait on Franklin about the Georgia affair; 
makes an appointment for Monday. L. in 3d P. Ill, 52. 

Frojn J. G. Lottilby. 1771. April 27. Dublin. 

Question of printing-presses, forms, types, etc. An invention he has 
made which will alarm the whole fraternity of printers. A. L. S. i p. 

HI, 53. 

From John Bartram. 1771. April 29. [Philadelphia.] 

Not a line from any of his correspondents concerning the matter of 
the King's bounty; William Young styles himself their Majesties' botan- 
ist. His daughter, Elizabeth, has saved several thousand silk worms 
which she expects will hatch in a few days. His sight failing him; has 
handed all his business over to his son, John, except part of his garden. 
A. L. S. I p. Ill, 54. 



I20 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Sain[uel] Rhoads. 1771. May 3. Philadelphia. 

Limestone. — Trade of Baltimore. — Project of a canal from the Sus- 
quehanna to the Schuylkill. — Pennsylvania Hospital. A. L. S. 2 p. 

HI, 55. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, 518). 

From William Smith. 1771. May 3. Philadelphia. 

Agreeable to the directions of the Philosophical Society, has sent 
Franklin, as their President, eleven copies of the first volume of the So- 
ciety's Transactions, which he is requested to deliver to the persons men- 
tioned in the letter ; will send more copies later ; would like the Astrono- 
mer Royal to have his as soon as possible. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 56. 

From C[adwalader] Evans. 1771. May 4. Philadelphia. 

His account of Mr. Walpole's valuation of the samples of silk sent, 
gave them spirits; account of the condition in which the eggs arrived 
from Spain ; advises a different manner of transportation ; the experiment 
in America takes beyond their most sanguine expectations. Transac- 
tions of the [American Philosophical] Society sent by Dr. Smith. De- 
parture of Gov. Penn for England immediately on hearing of his father's 
death ; his brother, Dick Penn, who is to take his place, said to be 
illiterate, arbitrary and vindictive. Apologizes for not writing to [Sam- 
uel] Wharton, whose father has been ill all winter ' with a slow fever, 
an inveterate cough and a pertinacious refusal of all medicines'; saw a 
good deal of Wharton's friend, David Darrach. Sends Franklin a 
snuff-box made out of the root of laurel. A. L. S. 3 p. Ill, 57. 

From. A. Clarke. 1771. May 5. Barbadoes. 

Acquainting him with their arrival on December 9; very kindly re- 
ceived by Capt. Clarke's mother and relations ; Capt. Clarke in Grenada ; 
his family one of the first on the island ; his brother very rich and a great 
traveller and keeps open house. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 58. 

From [Thomas] Pownall. 1771. May 7. Whitehall. 

Asking Franklin if he can inform him who will take out the warrant 
appointing [Daniel] Coxe one of the Council of New Jersey. L. in 3d 
P. I p. Ill, 60. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 121 

From Tho[mas] Percival. 1771. May 16. Manchester. 

Enclosing an attempt of his to account for the different quantities of 
rain which fall at different heights. Hope of seeing and interviewing 
Franklin at Manchester. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 61. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1771. May 27. Paris. 

Has not heard from Franklin for several months. Nine numbers 
of the " Citizen's Ephemerides " have appeared within the last five 
months. Sends them to Franklin and also to Mr. Rush. His " Manual 
of Humanity " is finally being printed at Bouillon. His work on the 
" Peerage of France " has been delayed and altered by the Censor. 
Although the present Government is bad enough, fears a change to 
worse. Thinks the judges and magistrates have too much power and 
are more arbitrary than a despot. A. L. 4 p. (In French.) XLIV, 6. 

By William Franklin. 1771. May. 

Remarks on Benjamin Franklin's account against William Franklin, 
dated London, April 20, 1771. A. Mem. 3 p. LXVII, 24. 

By J[onatlian] Williams, [Jr.]. 1771. June i. London. 

Joint expense account of Dr. Franklin, Mr. Canton, Dr. Ingen 
Housz and J. Williams, [Jr.]. Mem. i p. LXVII, 26. 

From The Managers of the Pennsylvania Hospital to Dr. John 

Fothergill, Benjamin Franklin and David Barclay. 

1 77 1. June 3. Philadelphia. 

Send them duplicates of the law and letters of attorney empowering 
them to receive on their account the money arising from the unclaimed 
shares of the Pennsylvania Land Company, also informs them that the 
necessities of their institution are very urgent. Ask to be informed of 
the receipt of money that they may embrace the very first opportunity of 
selling the bills of exchange which will relieve their pressing necessities. 
L. S. John Reynell, Sam[ue]l Rhoads, Jam[e]s Pemberton. 2 p. 

XLVII, 53. 

From The Bataafsch Genootschap der Proefondervinderlijke 

Wijsbergeerte. 1771. June 11. Rotterdam. 
Certificate of Corresponding Membership. D. S. i p. Portfolio. 



122 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Step [he] n Crane. 1771. June 22. Elizabethtown. 

Late debate between the Governor and Assembly of New Jersey 
relative to the granting supplies for His Majesty's troops ; reluctance on 
the part of the House to enter into a measure likely to pain the Gov- 
ernor; forced to it, however, by the inability of the inhabitants at this 
time to pay any additional taxes; hopes, if His Majesty insists on this 
tax, he will permit a bill for striking a paper currency; begs Franklin's 
services in obtaining this bill, which will give general satisfaction. A. 
L. S. 2 p. [In duplicate.] Ill, 63 and 64. 



From [Thomas Gushing]. 1771. June 29. Massachusetts. 

His favor of February 5th was laid before the House; right of Parlia- 
ment to tax the Colonies ; danger of Britain's forcing a free people, by 
oppressive measures, into a state of desperation; Massachusetts will 
never submit to the authority of an absolute government. A. L. 2 p. 
(Final part missing.) LVIII, 57. 



From Alex[ande]r Golden. 1771. July 2. New York. 

Has taken such steps as will put the accounts in a proper state before 
Mr. Foxcroft returns. Concerning an advertisement about Elizabeth 
Holland, and why he failed to insert it. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 66. 

From [Dr.] Th[onias] Bond. 1771. July 6. Philadelphia. 

Introducing Mr. Daniel Kheun, brother of Dr. Kheun; he goes to 
Sweden to study divinity, preparatory to taking charge of some Swedish 
congregation. His son Richard's progress in the study of physic and 
surgery; takes his examinations next year, and will then finish his 
studies in Europe; discusses the respective merits of the medical schools 
in Edinburgh, Paris, London, Leyden and Vienna; would like Sir John 
Pringle's advice on this matter. Thanking Franklin for a new pic- 
ture, a striking likeness of himself, presented to him by good Mrs. 
Franklin. On June 28 had a commencement in the College; the farce 
prettily played. Certain medical dissertations. A correspondence with 
the learned societies of Europe would prove an advantage to the [Ameri- 
can] Philosophical Society. A. L. S. 3 p. Ill, 67. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 123 

/'row N[oble] W[imberly] Jones. 1771. July 8. Savannah. 

Amazed that the objection to Mr, Winter's ordination was his regard 
for or connection with Mr. Whitefield. Concerning what Franklin 
mentions from Mr. Manduit relative to the dissenters. The Governor's 
reasons for dissolving the first Assembly; personal enmity against him- 
self. Franklin's solicitations on behalf of the Negro law will be grate- 
fully acknowledged by every well-wisher to the Province. Hopes all 
difficulties will be overcome respecting Sir William Baker's claim; 
warns him not to count on the Governor's assistance. Wishes Franklin 
had written to the Committee of Correspondence relative to public 
matters. As they were not dissolved with the House as Franklin im- 
agined, his letters containing some matters of a private nature, he did 
not choose to send to them, and some of the Committee being those that 
assisted the Governor in using him (Jones) ill, he could not well 
in person communicate them ; however he will contrive some method 
to acquaint them with what thev have a right to know. A. L. S. 
4 p. ' III, 68. 

From J[ohn] J[oachiin] Zubly. 1771. July 9. Savannah. 

Finds that Mr. Jasper Maudult has applied for Franklin's kind 
assistance to remove some grievances imposed on protestant dissenters; 
dispute between himself and the rector; encloses copy of letter published 
on that occasion ; question of sexton's fees. Bill sent by the upper house 
to the lower, in which a rate is fixed on all dissenters to be paid to the 
rector, though his attendance is not required nor any duty performed; 
this received not a vote in the lower house. Refusal of upper house to 
hear a second reading of a bill passed in the lower to lay out a burying 
ground for protestant dissenters; expects a like bill in favor of the 
Jews will meet with the same fate. Unlucky in being a dissenter in 
political as well as religious matters. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 69. 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Sr.]. 1771. July 12. Boston. 

Arrival in town of Mr. Foxcroft and his lady. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 6. 

From John Whitehurst. 1771. July 25. London. 

Hopes Franklin will be pleased with the two clocks he sent; had not 
time to engrave the plates. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 7^' 



124 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From John Whitehurst. 1771. August i. Derby. 

Sends the bill for the clocks; the other one Franklin was kind enough 
to order will soon be completed; alteration he deemed necessary to 
make in Mr. Ferguson's plan. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 7i54» 

From W[illiani] Franklin. 1771. August 3. Burlington. 

Just returned from Philadelphia where he has been for some days 
with Betsy in order to see her brother Downes, his wife and daughter, 
who arrived there from Barbadoes; he is in bad health, so took him 
home with them to escape the heat of Philadelphia. Sally's [Mrs. 
Bache] determination to accompany her husband to England in the 
fall; thinks the expense of such a trip will not suit Mr. Bache's present 
circumstances nor consistent with justice to his creditors; if she does 
go, wishes his mother might have some clever body to take care of her; 
her memory has failed much ; daily becomes more unfit to be left alone. 
A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 72. 

From Jona[tlian] Williams [Sr.]. 1771. August 5. Boston. 

Settlement of accounts. News of the family. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 7. 

Fro7n Alex[ande]r Golden. 1771. August 6. New York. 

Has lost Mr. Jesser's letter. Enclosing the second set of those bills, 
sent by Mr. Foxcroft by the last packet; Mr. Foxcroft and Lady both 
well. Gov. Tryon has arrived and taken the administration of the 
government; his amiable disposition promises good things; Lord Dun- 
more has sent his seals and baggage to Virginia, but is at present on a 
tour to Lake Champlain. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 73. 

From J[onatlian Shipley, Bishop of] St. Asaph. 

[177 1.] August 13. Twyford. 

Desiring Franklin to deliver his letters to Primate and Mrs. Jackson ; 
his loss keenly felt at Twyford. Concerning the probable behavior of 
his younger daughter, Franklin's fellow-traveler. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XL, 122. 

From Jona[than] Williams [Sr.]. 1771. September 19. Boston. 

His belief that Hall will pay the money. Franklin's kindness to his 
sons; glad Josiah is remaining in London; safe arrival of Jonathan, 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 125 

who is just entering into business in Boston. Question of an indorse- 
ment on Franklin's bond, received by John Cooke. A. L. S. 3 p. 

XXXVII, 8. 

From John Holt. 1771. October 2. New York. 

A true account of an unhappy difference between his neighbor, Mr. 
Hugh Hughes and his brother John ; the cause was the espousal of the 
Stamp Act by by Mr. John Hughes; his haughty and imperious charac- 
ter. Unhappy situation of Mr. Hugh Hughes' affairs; by being security 
he became insolvent ; for years made himself a voluntary prisoner in his 
own house to avoid arrest; supported a numerous family by teaching 
school ; his health impaired ; anxious to get some other occupation ; offers 
of assistance from his brother, such as no man of spirit could accept. 

A. L. s. 3 p. in, 74. 

From T[homas] Gushing. 1771. October 2. Boston. 

William Storey will deliver to Franklin the votes of the last sessions 
of the General Court. Account of a difficulty Mr. Storey is In; took 
Mr. Wheelwright's note of hand at the direction of the Surveyor- 
General; Mr. Wheelwright's subsequent failure; Mr. Storey goes to 
England to apply for relief to the Commissioners there. A. L. S. 3 p. 

HI. 75. 

From Jona[than] Williams [Sr.]. 1771. October 3. Boston. 
Concerning certain bills of exchange. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 9. 

From Ann Clay. 1771. October 4. Newcastle. 

Recommending her son to Franklin. Has been a widow four years; 
is neither rich nor poor; has eleven children, which she regards as an 
addition to her happiness. If necessary, begs him to advance 200 guineas 
to her son, for the payment of which she will be his security. A. L. S. 
I p. Ill, 745^. 

From [William Henly]. 1771. October 7. 

Electrical experiment from which he infers the necessity of making 
the conductors erected to secure buildings from damage of lightning, 
both of the best materials and of a very sufficient substance. L. i p. 

XLIX, 60. 



126 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Pet[er] Timothy. 1771. October 20. Charleston. 

Concerning a bill finally passed in the Assembly on the question of 
carrying the £1500 into the estimate under the expedient of including 
the same in the treasurer's accounts ; opposition to it finally overcome ; 
if the Governor gives his consent, public credit may be restored and 
universal harmony revived. Mr. Hughes' wretched state of health; 
fears the w^orst. Rice and indigo crop. Dr. Haly having surrendered 
himself, the trial is to take place; his numerous and powerful friends; 
supposes the verdict will be manslaughter; he was compelled to fight, 
contrary to his inclinations. A. L. S. 3 p. Ill, 76. 

From John Foxcroft. 1771. November 5. Philadelphia. 

Hopes Franklin has returned safely and in good health from his 
trip to Ireland. Expects the two casks of flour. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 77. 

From John Balfour. 1771. November 5. Edinburgh. 

Asking Franklin to transact a debt due him by the late Mr. Parker; 
is willing to compromise the matter on easy terms, as he thinks Parker 
an honest man; leaves the entire affair to Franklin and will abide by 
his decision. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 78. 

From Penuel Bowen. 1771. November 6. Boston. 

Expressing the most fervent gratitude to and admiration for Frank- 
lin ; thanking him for the picture of himself lately received through the 
hands of Mr. Samuel Franklin. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 79. 

From Edw[ar]d Penington, et al., to Drs. Franklin and Forthergill. 

1 77 1. November 8. Philadelphia. 

The subscribers, Managers of the Contributions for promoting 
the Culture of Silk in Pennsylvania, having 155 pounds of raw silk 
ready for exportation, have decided to commit this first adventure to 
Franklin's care and disposal. Hopes of this industry becoming an ob- 
ject of general attention in Pennsylvania, and in time a considerable 
remittance to the Mother Country; mentions the number of pounds to 
go to the Queen, to Lady Juliana Penn, to the relict of Archibald Penn, 
and to the lady of the Hon. John Penn. L. S. i p. Ill, 80. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 127 

From Samuel Noble. 1771. November 11. Philadelphia. 

Franklin being his neighbor in his infancy and a fellow-citizen, he 
makes free to write him and present him with a pair of soles made of 
leather of his own tanning; gives history of aforesaid leather from the 
time it was part of a steer on Carpenter Island. Trade improving. 
A. L. S. I p. Ill, 81. 

From Isaac Hunt. 1771. November 12. Philadelphia. 

Acquainting him with the death of the Attorney General of the Ber- 
mudas, and soliciting Franklin's offices to procure him that place ; makes 
this application from absolute necessity. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 82. 

From Joseph [Stiles]. 1771. November 13. Philadelphia. 

On behalf of a committee of tradesmen, acknowledges Franklin's 
favors of July 29th and August 28th, 1770. Convinced that the 
pamphlet sent them will be of infinite service to the American colonies. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (Mutilated.) LVIII, 58. 

From [Jean Baptiste] LeRoy. [1771.] November 27. Brest. 

Presumption and ignorance of two pseudo-scientists who have written 
against lightning rods. Account of his placing the first lightning rod 
on a French vessel; desires Franklin's observations on the method em- 
ployed. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XLII, 183. 

By The House and Council of New Jersey. 
1771. December 11 and 20. Burlington, N. J. 

Resolutions appointing Dr. Benjamin Franklin Agent of the Colony in 
Great Britain. D. S. Cha[rle]s Pettit, D[eputy] Cl[er]k of the 
Council. 2 p. LIII, 8. 

From Jona[than] Williams [Sr.]. 1771. December 13. Boston. 

Probabilities of Mr. Hall finally paying Franklin the money. In- 
troducing Mr. John Milliquet, who married Mr. Cushing's niece. 
Fears Josiah's infirmity will render him too troublesome. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 10. 

From Jona [than] Williams [Jr.]. 1771. December 13 ( ?). Boston. 
Introducing Mr. John Milliquet. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, il. 



128 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Cort[lan]d Skinner, Aaron Learning, Abr[aha]m Hewlings 
and Joseph Smith. 1771. December 21. Burlington. 

The House of Assembly's opinion not to push the farther considera- 
tion of the Septennial Act until a favorable opportunity arises; confi- 
dence placed in Franklin. Concerning a law for the recovery of small 
debts; hopes Mr. Jackson may be induced to give it a favorable report. 
The law to enable persons not naturalized to hold lands; similar to one 
in New York to which the Royal assent has been given; reasons why 
it is a just law; hopes Franklin will endeavor to enforce its applica- 
tion by every means in his power. Differences between the House and 
Government touching the subsistence of the troops have been happily 
settled. Expressing the thanks of the House. L. S. 3 p. Ill, 83. 

Statement of William Franklin in account with Benjamin Franklin. 

1771. 
A. Mem. S. 2 p. LXVII, 25. 

From W[illiam] Henly. [Circa 1771.] 
Accounts of electrical experiments. A. L. S. 8 p. XLII, 32-37. 

From [William Henly. Circa 1771.] 

Effect of a thunder storm upon the electric rod. Mem. i p. 

XLIX, 75. 
From William Henly. [Circa 1771.] 

Description and use of a new prime conductor for experiments in elec- 
tricity. With drawing. A. Mem. 3 p. LVIII, 29. 

From R[ichar]d Jackson. [Circa 1771.] Thursday. London. 

Read d'Anquetil's voyage attentively; remarks the author's evident 
carelessness, ignorance, and his palpable malignity against the whole 
English nation. Will dine with Franklin at the Mitre. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XL, 190. 

From R[ichar]d Jackson. [1771.] Saturday night. London? 

Query as to when it will suit Franklin to go with him to Ireland. 
Wishes to see him before he leaves London. A. L. S. i p. XL, 191. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 129 

From Daniel Roberdeau to Beiij[ami]n Franklin, John Fothergill 
and Charles Pearce. [Circa 1771. Philadelphia.] 

Authorising the reduction in the selling-price of his property in the 
West Indies. A. L. S. i p. XLII, 17. 

From [Benjamin Rush. Circa 1771.] 

Discusses the origin of catarrh. A. L. 4 p. (Incomplete.) 

LVIII, 62. 

From . l^Circa 177 1.] 

Instructions in regard to obtaining copy of patent for Secretary 
of New Jersey, granted to Christopher Coates and to Maurice Morgan. 
D. 2 p. LVI(i), 4. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1772. January 6. Burlington. 

Has carried two points in the late sessions of the Assembly, with 
which he expects the Ministry to be not a little pleased; one is the 
supply for the troops; the other, the leaving out those words in the 
Support Bill which the Board of Trade looked upon as meant to es- 
tablish the Assembly's claim of the sole right of appointing an agent. 
Messrs. Galloway and Foxcroft have written fully with respect to the 
grants made by the Government of Virginia of lands which will fall in 
the new colony ; question of Lord Botetourt's right or authority to grant 
lands on the other side of the Allegheny Mountains. A. L. S. 2 p. 

Ill, 84. 

From Anth[ony] Tissington. 1772. January 15. Alfreton. 

Hopes Franklin is back again in London after a summer of rambling 
in which he has been so unfortunate as to miss seeing him twice. Sends 
him a turkey. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 85. 

From Hannah Walker. 1772. January 15. Westbury. 

Wishing him many happy returns of his birthday; all her family 
join in begging Franklin's acceptance of their humble duties, with 
prayers for his long life. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 86. 

jprom [Capt.] W[illia]m Outram. 1772. January 17. London. 

Commissioned by Rev. Mr. Dunlap to purchase for his son, Ben- 
jamin, organist of his father's church in Virginia, a good armonica; 
asks where such may be had. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 87. 

2—9 



130 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Sargent, Chambers & Co. 1772. January 25. [London.] 

Agreeable to Franklin's instructions, have drawn out his account, 
which amounts to £149 i6s. id.; beg that Franklin may signify his 
pleasure about its disposal. L. in 3d P. i p. Ill, 88. 

From [Jonathan Shipley,] Bishop of St. Asaph. 

\^Circa 1772.] Januar}' 25. 
Inviting him to dinner. N. in 3d P. i p. XLIII, 230(1). 

From N[oble] W[imberly] Jones. 1772. February 2. Savannah. 

Greatly concerned at not hearing from Franklin for so long ; affairs 
in the same state as when he last wrote ; no House of Representatives ; 
at a loss to conceive what their arbitrary rulers mean by it, unless to 
terrify weak-minded people into their measures; the coming election 
will disclose a part of their motives ; would be glad to hear from Frank- 
lin, if anything occurs concerning the Province. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 89. 

From W[illia]ni Franklin. 1772. February 28. Burlington. 

Acknowledging Franklin's letter of April 20th, containing his Lon- 
don account against the estate of Mr. Parker with the request to assist 
in securing the debts; enclosing a copy of Mr. Parker's account against 
Franklin, also a memorandum to enable Franklin to state his account 
properly against Mr. Parker's estate; the sooner this is done the better; 
Mrs. Parker very infirm; leaves everything to Jenny, who is about to 
marry a j^oung fellow not of age, an apprentice to a lawyer. A. L. S. 
I p. Ill, 90. 

From [Jonathan Shipley,] Bishop of St. Asaph and Mrs. Shipley. 

[1772. February.] 

Inviting him to dinner on Sunday. N. in 3d P. i p. 

XLIII, 230, (3). 

From [Jean-Baptiste] Le Roy. [1772?] March 5. Paris. 

Reproaching Franklin with his year's silence. Recommending the 
bearer, M. de Bassue, to Franklin's kind notice. Arctic exploration 
planned for May; desires any advice Franklin can give their new 
argonauts. Messrs. Banks's and Solander's proposed antarctic trip ; his 
admiration for scientific explorers. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

XLII, 162. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 131 

From [John] Huske. 1772. March 10. Paris. 

The bearer's plan and views will be fully disclosed by the enclosed 
letter; this, pruned and dressed by Franklin's pen, together with his 
accompanying Mr. O'Gormand to Lord Clare's, must produce a favor- 
able reception ; if the plan is relished by the Ministry so far as to give 
this gentleman encouragement to go to America, begs Franklin to give 
him advice, and letters to his friends in the different provinces; knows 
he will give every assistance in his power to such a laudable under- 
taking. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 91. 

From Noble W[imberly] Jones. 1772. March 18. Savannah. 

Introducing to Franklin's kindness Mr. William Stephen, an attor- 
ney-at-law. Elections going forward, but results doubtful. A. L. S. 
I p. Ill, 92. 

From Jona[than] Williams [Jr.], 1772. April 10. Boston. 

Acknowledging the receipt of the gum; will inform Franklin of his 
success in making the rubbers. Business poor, owing to the hard winter. 
Message to Josiah to hasten his home-coming. A. L. S. 3 p. 

XXXVII, 12. 

From [Alexander Small]. 1772. April 13. New York. 

Full account of storms, electrical disturbances and other incidents of 
his voyage from Jamaica to New York. A. L. 4 p. (Final part 
missing.) LVIII, 59. 

From J[olin] Michell. 1772. April 13. 

Returning his book together with Mr. Winthrop's letter. Will not 
have the pleasure of seeing him until the next winter unless Franklin 
honors Yorkshire with his presence. A. L. S. I p. Ill, 93. 

From The Library Company of Philadelphia. 

1772. April 27. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging Franklin's favor of April 16, 1771 ; concerning cer- 
tain accounts between the Library and Franklin. In receipt of his 
favor of June 5, enclosing invoice of books which arrived in good order. 
The Directors agree with him that £300 is too much to lay out for the 
transactions of the European societies, but they desire the new improved 
edition of the French Encyclopaedia. Enclosing catalogues of books 
wanted. L. S. Matth[ew] Clarkson, Fra[nci]s Hopkinson and R. 
Strettell Jones. 2 p. Ill, 94. 



132 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Anthony Benezet. 1772. April 27. Philadelphia. 

Looking forward to holding converse with Franklin in the winter 
evenings on past dangers and better future prospects. Concerning the 
grievous iniquities practiced towards the negroes; asks him to consider 
whether he may not be able to do something effectual towards the re- 
moval of that terrible evil ; at the same time that he sent the tracts on 
the slave trade to Franklin, sent them to the most weighty of their 
friends in London ; desired them to consider whether it might not be 
their duty to lay the iniquity and dreadful consequence of the slave trade 
before the Parliament. Realizes the opposition they are likely to en- 
counter from those " who sell their country and their God for gold " ; 
pleads the cause however with great eloquence and fervor; number of 
slaves in English colonies; many opposed to it in New England, and 
also in Virginia, who will add their weight to any reform. A. L. S. 
2 p. Ill, 95. 

From . 1772. May i. Philadelphia. 

Remarks and suggestions relative to the settlement and government 
of the new grant. L. 4 p. LVIII, 37. 

From William Smith. 1772. May 16. Philadelphia. 

On receipt of Franklin's obliging letter was preparing to embark for 
Carolina where he was lucky enough to get 1000 guineas for their 
College, which is in high repute. Enclosing sheet missing in Dr. Fother- 
gill's book. Sends also a box containing copies of the [Philosophical 
Society's] Transactions for those societies whose names he gives; any 
more copies can be had by applying to Dilly, the bookseller; only forty 
copies left for the use of the Society; £200 in debt; reason for having 
the title-page of the Transactions in English instead of Latin ; the 
Society in receipt of a letter from Mr. White, treasurer of the Found- 
ling Hospital; great work he is carrying on entitled Musasum Britan- 
nicum; he desires some knowledge as to American animals; asks Frank- 
lin to give him the enclosed. A. L. S. 3 p. Ill, 96. 

From Tho[ma]s Foxcroft. 1772. May 16. Philadelphia. 

Enclosing bill of lading for two barrels of flour; his brother-in-law in 
Virginia; all Franklin's family well. Had the misfortune to break his 
arm six days previous. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 97« 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 133 

From John Whitehurst. 1772. May 21. Derby. 

Describing the mechanism of a clock which he has made especially 
for Franklin. A. L. S. 3 p. Ill, 98. 

From The Library Company of Philadelphia. 

1792. May 28. Philadelphia. 

Enclosing a draft of £125 to pay for the books ordered for the Library 
Co. by Sparks. L. S. Sam[uel] Rhoads, Josiah Hewes and R. Strettell 
Jones. I p. Ill, 99. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1772. May 29. Boston. 

Arrival of his brother Josiah ; state of his health most alarming. 
Promising to sell Dr. Priestley's works, on their arrival and give the 
money to Mrs. Mecom. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 13. 

From S[amuel] Rhoads. 1772. May 30. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging papers and pamphlets on canals sent by Franklin. 
Project of a canal between the Susquehanna and the Schuylkill. A. L. 
S. I p. Ill, 100. 

Printed, in part, in Works (Sparks, VII, 519, Note). 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1772. May 31. Paris. 

Not like certain bad Catholics who having failed one year to make 
their Easter duties, dare not return to confess; much concerned at the 
past two years' dreary silence. Acknowledging his kindness to Mile. 
Biheron as well as himself. Concerning the progress made in the 
translation of Franklin's works. Considerably increased his little 
'Bible of Humanity' (Petit Code de I'Humanite), but they refuse 
him the approbation necessary for printing it; restrictions on the press; 
they are afraid even of the shadow of evil. Any volumes of " The 
Ephemerides of a Citizen " that Franklin may lack, is prepared to send 
him. A. L. S. 3 p. [In French.] Ill, loi. 

From . 1772. May. 

Statement of Benjamin Franklin's proportion of expenses and charges 
incurred from June, 1769, to May, 1772, on the application to the 
Crown for a grant of lands on the River Ohio in North America. 2 p. 

LXVII, 31. 



134 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From W[illia]ni Franklin. 1772. June 12. Burlington. 

Concerning a grant of lands in Pennsylvania to Major Robert 
Thompson; in the enclosed letter Mr. Galloway has written out what 
he knew of the affair; possible that Major Thompson may have dis- 
posed of his rights; thinks if there is any heir living, he ought to put in 
his claim at once. Map of the original purchasers. A. L. S. 2 p. 

Ill, 102. 

From W. Brownrigg. 1772. June 12. Armathwaite. 

Has just received a letter from Sir John Pringle, in which he speaks 
of paying him a visit and of the possibility of Franklin's accompanying 
him; will esteem himself highly obliged by the favor of Franklin's com- 
pany, and therefore adds his solicitations to those of his good friend 
Pringle. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 103. 

From J[oseph] Priestley. 1772. June 13. Leeds. 

Thanking him for the paper entitled ' The Native of New England ' ;^ 
much struck with it, before he knew " Poor Richard " was the author. 
Experiments on air. A. L. S. 4 p. Ill, 103^. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VII, p. 344). 

^Probably alluding to a piece entitled 'Toleration in Old England and New 
England.' 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr. 1772. June 13. Boston. 

Introducing Mr. Adam Winthrop, son of Dr. Winthrop of Cam- 
bridge. Mr. Bancroft's stay in Boston too short to enjoy much of his 
society. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 14. 

From [Baron] Francis Maseres. 1772. June 17. Inner Temple. 

Comments on a Parliamentary Act for relief of the poor. Sends him 
a copy of a draught of an Act of Parliament for settling the laws of 
Quebec, which he has prepared merely of his own accord in order to 
expedite the settlement of that province, where everj^thing seems to be 
in suspense. Discusses question of the Dutch scheme. Something like 
the alms-house in England. A. L. S. 7 p. Ill, 104. 

Frojii John Walsh. 1772. June 21. Paris. 

Has procured two copies of Gennete's book for Franklin; various 
civilities shown him by M. Le Roy, M. Trudaine and others; has 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 135 

attended two meetings of the Academy of Sciences, where he had a 
polite and obliging reception. Has made no secret of his intention to 
prosecute experiments on the torpedo [a species of ray-fish] ; they are 
found in great numbers at La Rochelle; just starting for that place. 
Low ebb of electricity at Paris ; account of an electrical experiment made 
by the Due de Chaulnes. A. L. S. 4 p. (In duplicate.) 

Ill, 105 and 106. 

From [Earl of] Stirling, [William Alexander]. 
1772. June 30. New York. 

After his arrival in America, bought a great quantity of land, with 
a view to disposing of it again to his advantage; sudden change that 
took place rendered lands almost unsaleable; to extricate himself from 
debt, has devised a scheme to sell some of the land by way of a lottery, 
which has met with considerable success in most of the Colonies ; asks 
Franklin to give it his countenance among his friends in England. 
A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 107. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1772. June 30. Burlington. 

Various accounts between himself and his father. A. L. S. 2 p. 

Ill, 108. 

From Jona[tlian] Williams, Jr. 1772. June — . Boston. 

Concerning his account with Mr. Warren. His father has received 
Hall's bond and desires a power of attorney. A. L. S. 3 p. 

XXXVII, 15. 

From J[oseph] Priestley. 1772. July i. Leeds. 

Curious experiments on air, and discoveries of various properties. 
A. L. S. 3 p. Ill, 65. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 346). 

From John Walsh. 1772. July 12. La Rochelle. 

Experiments for ascertaining the electrical properties of the torpedo. 
A. L. S. 5 p. (In duplicate.) Ill, 109 and no. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 348). 



136 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

i^rom J [ohn] Robertson. 1772. July 14. London. 

Notice to attend the Royal Society's Committee meeting, to consider 
the request made by the Board of Ordnance for directions how to apply 
electrical conductors to the powder magazine at Erith. A. L. S. I p. 

Ill, III. 

From E[rasmus] Darwin. 1772. July 18. Lichfield, 

Account of an experiment he tried of filling a bladder with unmixed 
air from the muddy bottom of the creek, then pricking the bladder with 
a pin and applying a candle to it; showed no tendency to catch fire. 
Would be glad of any observations of Franklin's on the alphabet. Is 
there any truth in the report that somebody has attempted to make a 
speaking machine? A. L. S. 4 p. Ill, 112. 

From Dr. [Richard] Watson. 1772. July 31. Lincoln's Inn Fields 

[London]. 

Concerning an expedition to Purfleet ; hopes Franklin will call to 
arrange a time before the summer is too far advanced ; whenever the 
meeting is fixed their President is willing to be of the party. L. in 3d 
P. I p. Ill, 113. 

Froin Pat [rick] Wilson. 1772. August 3. [London.] 

On the point of leaving for Glasgow; will take care to deliver the 
volume of the American [Philosophical Society's] Transactions to the 
questor of their library. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 114. 

From John Whitehurst. 1772. August 4. Derby. 

Has that day delivered Franklin's clock to Mr. Clark; gives him 
certain directions as to unpacking it. A. L. S. I p. Ill, 115. 

From Jean Baptiste Toderini. 1772. August 15. Forli. 

Giving an account of a work, published by him, entitled " Filosofia 
Frankliniana." A. L. S. i p. (In French.) Ill, 116. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 351). 

i^row Will [iam] Strahan. 1772. August 21. New Street [London]. 

Asking Franklin to remind Mr. Galloway of the money due him for 
types and newspapers sent to Mr. Goddard ; hard that he should suffer 
for the madness and ingratitude of Goddard, when he only obeyed Mr. 
Galloway's order. A. L. S. i p. Ill, II7. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 137 

From Pet[er] Timothy. 1772. August 24. Charles Town. 

Has not heard a word from Franklin, in answer to his letters for 
over a year; enough to discourage further correspondence; is ready for 
any employment in His Majesty's service. Recommends Capt. Elias 
Vanderhorst to Franklin's friendship. A. L. S. 3 p. Ill, 118. 

From John Walsh. 1772. August 27. Paris. 

Congratulating Franklin on his being elected by the French Academy 
of Sciences to be one of its eight foreign members. Concerning his ex- 
periments with the torpedo. A. L. S. 8 p. Ill, 119. 

From Jona [than] Williams [Sr.]. 1772. August — . 

Franklin's kindness to his son, whose loss they feel deeply. Execu- 
tion obtained against Hall. Messages to the family. [Badly mutilated.] 
A. L. S. I p. XXXVII, 16. 

From [Capt.] Nath[aniel] Falconer. 1772. September 2. Downes. 

Asking Franklin to call on Mr. Samuel Wharton w^hen the grant 
is made for his right to 40,000 acres, and if more money is necessary, to 
kindly advance it for him. A. L, S. i p. Ill, 120. 

From [Mile.] Biheron. 1772. September 10. Paris. 

Seizes the occasion of Mr. Walsh's departure to send Franklin a speech 
in their " Cour des Aides " by their celebrated M. Malherbe. High 
consideration in which Mr. Walsh is held. Begs Mrs. Stevenson to 
hand a little package of powder to a poor linen draper who has had 
trouble with his eyes. A. L. S. 2 p. In French. Ill, 121. 

From Rich[ard] Price. 1772. September 30. Newington Green. 

Enclosing Dr. Priestley's letter; at a loss whether to be glad or sorry 
at his rejection of Lord Shelburne's proposal. Thanking Franklin for 
mentioning him to Sir John Pringle; afraid they will both be disap- 
pointed in him; hours at which he preaches. A. L. S. 3 p. Ill, 122. 

From Count of Belgioiso. \^Circa 1772.] September 30. London. 

Desiring to know where the person lives who makes the glasses for 
the Armonica. L. in 3d P. i p. XLI, 136. 

Obliged to defer giving him a particular answer, as the French Am- 
bassador does not return from Scotland till November. L. in 3d P. 
I p. XLI, 114. 



138 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Joseph Smith. 1772. October i. Burlington. 

Present Assembly met the previous month at Amboy; understands 
they have continued Franklin as Agent; has received for his use £275, 
being two years and nine months salary as agent. A. L. S. i p. 

Ill, 123. 

From Jesser. 1772. October 7. College Hill. 

Governors of the London Hospital will be much obliged to Dr. Frank- 
lin if he will write to Mr. Golden and Mr. Dixon what he thinks to be 
necessary on the state of the case which Mr. Jesser left for him. L. 
in 3d P. I p. Ill, 124. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1772. October 9. Paris. 

Returned from the country, to find the manuscript of the translation 
of Franklin's works by M. Lesqui, awaiting him ; will not quit the 
work now until he has finished it. Difficulties in the way of publishing 
his " Petit Code de I'Humanite " ; if the same obstacles exist in England 
will have it printed secretly at Caen. Has sent him the new volume 
of the " Ephemerides du Citoyen." Mile. Biheron is occupied with 
Mrs. Stevenson's commission. A. L. S. 3 p. In French. Ill, 125. 

From Abbe Morellet. [1772.] October 9. Whycomb. 

Acknowledging the letters sent him for Birmingham; expects to go to 
Oxford first; will make every efifort to meet Franklin in Birmingham. 
Message to Dr. Pringle. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XL, 90. 

From Jos[eph] Galloway. 1772. October 12. Philadelphia. 

Encloses bills of credit for £500, last year's salarj^ as Agent for the 
Province. Is again elected to the Assembly. Recent changes in political 
conditions. A. L. S. 3 p. (Mutilated.) LVIII, 38. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1772. October 13. Philadelphia. 

Failed to receive his favor of August 3d ; suspects the same person who 
broke open his letters to his father has kept this one ; question of who it 
can be; reasons against suspecting Lord Hillsborough; thinks it may be 
Wharton. Question of the Virginia grants. Has just heard that Gov. 
Spry of Barbadoes is dead, and that Capt. Williams, the engineer, has 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 139 

just taken his passage for England in hopes of being appointed Captain 
of Needham's Fort. Wishes he could be appointed Governor in Spry's 
place; is now the oldest governor in America; knows he stands no 
chance of promotion or increase of salary, while Lord H. is at the head 
of the American Department and while he is so displeased with Frank- 
lin. Desires his father to send him a handsome tea-urn ; cannot afford 
a silver one. Has dined with Gov. Penn, with whom he has become 
very sociable. A. L. S. 4 p. Ill, 126. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1772. October 13, Boston. 

Death of his brother. Henry's unfaithfulness; thought best not to 
bind him as apprentice until he heard from Franklin. Fears he intends 
to break through his intention of visiting Boston every ten years. A. 
L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 17. 

Fro?n [James] Hutton. 1772. October 23. 

Concerning a great work [Monde Primitif] by a friend of his [An- 
toine Court de Gebelin] ; longs to see it finished ; Franklin and Dr. 
Moreton the first in England to give him encouragement; he is charmed 
to hear that an Englishman, Mr. Bryant, is prosecuting the same work 
in England. Bishop of Vilna has left for Poland by way of Vienna, 
his great family estates being in that part which voracious Austria has 
seized. Marquis de Pezay just returned from his tour; Lord Lyttleton, 
whom he visited twice, was much pleased with him. A, L. S. 4 p. 

Ill, 127. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1772. October 28. Paris. 

Hard at work revising the translation of Franklin's works ; difficulties 
he encounters; asks the meaning of "orreries," "surf," "spray," 
" jostled." Various questions relating to his experiments. Advisa- 
bility of sending him some sheets of the translation before proceeding 
further; concerning some new engravings for the work. Mile. Biheron's 
intention to go to London about the end of November; her health not 
good and fears her expenses will be heavy; begs Franklin to let him 
know if this voyage promises as little success as the last; if so, he will 
insist on her remaining in France for the sake of her health. A. L. S. 
4 p. (In French.) Ill, 128. 



140 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1772. October 29. Burlington. 

Acknowledging letters of various dates from August 3d to September 
3d. Concerning the Virginia grants; begs his father to pay no heed to 
what Mr. Wharton may say, but to give it his particular attention ; 
should the extent of country claimed by Virginia as its boundary be 
confirmed, the small tract remaining for the Proprietors of the new 
colony, will not be worth the purchase money; encloses letters respect- 
ing Mr. Penn's western boundary, which if true, will be most advan- 
tageous to the Proprietors of the new colony. A. L. S. 3 p. Ill, 129. 

From [Baron] F. de Westerholt. 1772. November 12. Hacforth. 

In the second volume of the " Ephemerides du Citoyen " read Frank- 
lin's plan for benefiting distant unprovided countries, and was filled 
with admiration of such universal benevolence ; though he has not 
the advantage of being an Englishman, hopes he may have the honor 
of contributing to such a laudable design the sum of four Holland 
ducats; is but a poor gentleman, burdened with a large family of chil- 
dren, but trusts Franklin will not scorn his small contribution. A. L. 
S. 2 p. (In French.) Ill, 130. 

From [Capt.] Nath[aniel] Falconer. 

1772. November 15. Philadelphia. 

Has sent him one barrel of Newtown pippins, one cask of shell-bark 
hickory nuts and two kegs of bread. Has concluded to stay at home 
this year, so must forego the pleasure of keeping Christmas with Frank- 
lin. Concerning a grant of land which he asked Franklin to see Mr. 
Wharton about. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 131. 

From Abel James and Benj[ami]n Morgan. 
1772. November 17. Philadelphia. 

The newly elected Managers of the Filature have requested them (the 
undersigned) to forward Capt. button's bill of loading for two trunks of 
silk, the produce of this year, with a certificate from their Custom-house 
to recover bounty; also, to beg Franklin's acceptance of four pounds of 
the silk sent. L. S. i p. Ill, 132. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 141 

FrojTi Joseph and William Danton, Aaron Lopez, Sani[uel] Fowler. 
1772. November 18. Newport. 

Recommending Capt. Richard Grinnell, of Newport, as qualified to 
command any vessel in the merchant service. A. L. S. i p. LVIII, 60. 

From [Barbeu Dubourg]. 1772. November 28. Paris. 

Is about half finished with his translation of Franklin's works in 
quarto. Is very anxious to receive some copies of the second edition of 
his little Code printed in London. In order to avoid paying excessive 
charges for postage, gives Franklin directions how to send the packages. 
Tells how he translated one passage in Franklin's works about silk 
worms. Sends his magic square of ii,ooo numbers. Has verified 
Franklin's magic square of i6 and found but two mistakes in it. A. L. 
4 p. (Mutilated.) (In French.) XLIV, 7. 

From [William] Henly. 1772. November 28. 

Description and use of a new conductor for experiments in electricity 
contrived by Mr. Henly and executed by Mr. Edward Nairne. A. L. 
in 3d P. 3 p. XLIX, 24. 

From Sir John Pringle. [1772.] ? December 6. 

Inviting him to dine, to meet Mile. Biheron and Dr. Ingen Housz, 
before his departure. L. i p. XLIII, 221. 

Fro7n H[annah] Walker. 1772. December 22. Westbury. 

Thanking him for his present. Sorry to hear of Mr. William's death; 
and the consequent removal of her son ; begs Franklin to direct her 
letters [under his frank] to him, as he may now have nothing with 
which to pay for them. A. L. S. i p. Ill, I33« 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1772. December 26. Boston. 

Settlement of his accounts for the year very satisfactory; can pay 
all his debts and have clear profits left. His affairs with Mr. Warren. 
A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 18. 



142 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

By J C . [Circa 1 772.] 

Reasons for establishing a colony at the Illinois. (Incomplete.) D. 
4 p. LVIII, 4. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. [Circa 1772.] 

Question of colds and their causes. Effect of white walls in the 
cultivation of fruit. Acknowledging his letter of December 30th con- 
taining an explanation of the word chain. M. Dalibard's electrical 
experiments. Anxiety felt on account of Mile. Biheron's state of health. 
A. L. S. 4 p. (In French. Mutilated.) LVIII, 65. 

From Dr. [John] Fothergill. [Circa 1772? London.] 
Political and moral reflections. L. 8 p. LVI(i), 12. 

From J[olin] C[oakIey] Lettsom. [Circa 1772.] Tuesday. London. 

Begging Franklin's acceptance of a French hare. L. in 3d P. i p. 

XL, 125. 
From [Baron Francis] Maseres. [1772.] 

Sending him two more copies of the collection of Quebec instruments, 
and the draft of a toleration act ; desires one set sent to Governor Frank- 
lin, of New Jersey, and the other to Mr. Galloway, of Philadelphia. 
Begs for another copy of his tract called Squire Richard. L. in 3d P. 
I p. XLI, 65. 

From Major [Robert] Rogers. 

[Circa 1772?] Thursday evening. [London.] 

Informing Dr. Franklin that his petition for a tour through the 
North American continent comes on before the Committee of Council 
on Tuesday. L. in 3d P. i p. XLIII, 222. 

From [Thomas] Ronayne. [1772.] Friday. 

At Mr. Henly's instance, writes for his paper on the effects of light- 
ning on the Tabernacle^ in order to render it more correct for publica- 
tion. L. in 3d P. I p. XL, 59. 

'Philosophical Transactions, LXII, 131. 

From [Jonathan Shipley] Bishop of St. Asaph. [Circa 1772.] 
Inviting him to dinner. N. in 3d P. i p. XLIII, 230(2). 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 143 

From [Chevalier] O'Gorman. 1773. January 4. Paris. 

Asks pardon for his delay in acknowledging Franklin's many civilities 
to him while in London. Has been busy preparing his eldest son to be 
a page to the King, and nursing the other two boys through the small- 
pox. Has had a good vintage this season, and has marked a hogs- 
head of his best burgundy to be sent to Franklin. Their friend jVIr. 
Huske expects soon to return to London. Asks Franklin to write and 
' hint to him with caution ' their friends' thoughts upon a certain sub- 
ject they have talked of. A. L. S. 3 p. Ill, I34- 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1773. January 5. Burlington. 

Acknowledging his letters by the October and November packets; 
the former came opened ; suspects now that the villainy is on this side 
the water; suggests a different seal and handwriting. Glad to find that 
Lord D[artmouth?] has spoken so favorably of him; has written to 
him concerning an increase in the salary of Mr. Skinner, the Attorney 
General, and took that occasion to say a word in his own behalf ; asks his 
father's influence in this matter. Encloses a copy of a letter from Lord 
Stirling a propos of the Virginia grants. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 135. 

From The Trustees of the Burlington Free School. 
1773' January 5. Burlington. 

His assistance asked in presenting a petition to the King. The appli- 
cation of Lord Rockford for a grant of the islands in the Delaware, 
although thrown aside, makes the petition necessary at the present time. 
The income from the rents of the island supports from 25 to 30 poor 
children in the Free School. Hope that this income will not have to be 
used in obtaining a confirmation of the title. Suggest that an instruction 
to the Governor to grant a patent would incur the least expense. Have 
no private interests to promote. A. L. S. John Hoskins et al. 2 p. 

LIII, 9. 

From Alex[ande]r Golden. 

1773- January 7. Gen [era] 1 Post-Office [New York]. 

Enclosing certain bills of exchange; will send by next packet the 
printed papers, containing the advertisement about Mrs. Elizabeth 
Holland, and his proceedings thereon. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 136. 



144 Letters to Benjamin F'ranklin 

From N[oble] W[imberly] Jones. 1773. January 13. Savannah. 

Has not yet seen Mr. Bryan, but when he does, will take care that 
Franklin's and Mr. Ellis' request is fulfilled. The present Assembly 
has elected him Speaker, a proceeding which gave him real pleasure, but 
must have galled certain arbitrary men; determined, however, owing to 
private business, to decline accepting it. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 137. 

jProOT Rich [ar]d Bache. 1773. January 20. Philadelphia. 

Met several gentlemen while in Jamaica who had a smattering of 
electricity and were great admirers of Franklin's publications on that 
and other philosophical subjects; never heard any report there of a 
building with two conductors being struck by lightning; will ask his 
friend Mr, Grant of Kingston to make inquiries. Fears he will have to 
sue Sheets' estate for the amount of Franklin's note. Concerning the 
expiration of the insurance on Franklin's two houses in Market Street. 
Mr. Hall's death much lamented. Hopes to hear soon of the com- 
pletion of the Ohio grant. A. L. S. 4 p. Ill, 138. 

From Jenny Bedford. 1773. February 2. Woodbrldge [N. J.]. 

Concerning her father's (James Parker's) affairs; his estate only en- 
cumbered with those bonds to Mr. Franklin, which they wish could be 
discharged, as the interest is daily accumulating. Writes on her 
mother's behalf, who is old and afflicted and would willingly live in 
peace. Consults him about other accounts left by her father. A. L. 

S. 2 p. Ill, 139. 

Printed in Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Ser., XVI, p. 228. 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Sr.]. 1773. February 15. Boston. 

Concerning the proposal made by Hale's friend for the payment of 
the debt. Disposition of certain moneys desired by Mrs. Mecom. A. 
L. S. I p. XXXVII, 19. 

From [Horace-Bendict] De Saussure. 1773. February 23. Naples. 

Conductors of lightning. Project of the Royal Society to ascertain 
the attraction of mountains. Volcanic eruptions. Experiments on the 
torpedo. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) Ill, 140. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 371). 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 145 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1773. February 24. Paris. 

Work of printing the translation goes steadily on; asks some questions 
concerning experiments in electricity; desires to know what Franklin 
considers the simplest and best among the different electrical machines. 
Concerning the best manner of forwarding to him one or more sheets 
at a time of Franklin's new edition, as well as the pamphlet of M. Du- 
pont, who sends him a thousand compliments, as does the Marquis de 
Mirabeau and M. Dalibard. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) Ill, 141. 

From [Prof. John Winthrop]. 
1773. March 4. Cambridge, New England. 

Returns thanks for Dr. Priestley's article on the impregnation of 
water with fixed air; very important discovery. Dr. Priestley's excel- 
lent character. Memorandum relating to lightning bells with report 
of observations of their behavior during thunder storms. Account of 
the damage done in a cornfield by lightning during a thunder storm on 
July 2, 1768. Requests Dr. Franklin to ascertain all the circumstances 
relative to the security of persons in an open field during a thunder 
storm. Thanks the Rev. Dr. Price for sending him papers on aberra- 
tion, and sees clearly the source of the fallacy. A. L. 4 p. XLIV, 8. 

Printed, for the most part, in Works (Sparks, VI, 375). 

From Samuel Cooper. 1773. March 15. Boston. 

Lord Dartmouth. Measures adopted by the towns in Massachusetts. 
Conduct of the Governor. Administration in England universally dis- 
approved. A. L. S. 4 p. Ill, 142. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VIII, 36). 

Fro?n [Anthony] Todd. 
1773. April 6. Gen [era] 1 Post-Office [London]. 

Understands that Franklin has received his accounts by that day's 
mail ; would be glad if the Accountant-General could have them to ex- 
amine. L. in 3d P. I p. Ill, 143. 

From D[eborah] Franklin. 1773. April 6. [Philadelphia.] 
Acknowledging his favor of January 6th. Intended to say something 
abo.ut Benjamin Franklin Bache, but Billy told her he had written to 
Franklin about him ; all their children in town. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 144. 
2 — 10 



146 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1773. April 11. Paris. 

Concerning the Leyden experiment. Has a specimen of the Phyto- 
lacca ; believes it to be poke-weed ; there are at least three kinds ; which 
is the best? He and a friend have agreed to translate the Transactions 
of the American Philosophical Society. Thanks Franklin warmly for 
all his kindness in having his " Petit Code " printed ; expresses satisfac- 
tion with the result. Could not Franklin bring Mile. Biheron back 
with him? Sends kindest remembrances to Mrs. Hewson. A. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) Ill, 146. 

From ■W[illiani] Henly. 1773. April 18. [London.] 

Relative to the new prime conductor (see page 128, LVHI, 29). 
Also to proceedings at a meeting of the Royal Society. (Incomplete.) 
A. L. S. 2 p. LVIII, 30. 

From [Jean Baptiste] LeRoy. 1773. April 19. 

Thanks for having been elected a member of the American Philo- 
sophical Society. Appreciates the honor. Discusses at length electricity 
and Franklin's work on the subject. His idea about lightning rods and 
how they should be made. His brother [Pierre] has been awarded a 
prize by the Academy for his calculation of longitude. A. L. 4 p. 
(In French.) XLIV, 102. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr. 1773. April 20. Boston. 

News of Franklin's family in Philadelphia. Concerning his own and 
his father's business; hears that the East India Co. are to be allowed 
to send two ships directly to America; obliged if Franklin would recom- 
mend them to his father and himself. A. L. S. 3 p. XXXVII, 20. 

From Jona[thaii] Williams, Jr. 1773. April 22. Boston. 

Enclosing a letter from Henry [Walker?]. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 21. 

From James Hunter. 1773. April 24. Philadelphia. 

According to instructions, drew upon him for the sum mentioned ; 
disposition he has made of the bill. In his low sphere of life has not the 
power to make Franklin any restitution, but wishes him all happiness. 
A. L. S. I p. Ill, I47» 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 147 

From Daniel Wister. 1773. April 30. Philadelphia. 

Having incurred debts in his business amounting to £30,000, has been 
a prisoner in his own house for nearly three years; impossible in his 
present situation to make any attempts toward paying the debts; begs 
Franklin to intercede for him with his creditors in London, a list of 
whom he encloses; wants them to give him a letter of license for a 
certain number of years that he may have a chance to pay every man 
his due. A. L. S. 4 p. Ill, 148. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1773. April 30. Philadelphia. 

Surprised to find nothing in his favor of March 15th about the Ohio 
grant, as the Whartons are quite elated with the glad tidings they have 
received from Mr. S[amuel] Wharton. Absurd behavior of old 
Wharton in sending one of his sons to ask him to sell his share of the 
lands on the Ohio. Extraordinary conduct of Lord Dunmore in 
granting land on the Kanawa, after what he told Lord Stirling. Has 
small hopes of Dr. [Cadwalader] Evans' recovery. Thought he had 
satisfied Haynes of there being no such estate as the one he came in 
search of. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 149. 

i^roOT Benjamin Rush. 1773. May i. Philadelphia. 

Dr. Priestley's experiment with fixed air; his observations thereon. 
Sending Franklin a pamphlet of his against the importation of negro 
slaves into Pennsylvania. Desires to see Franklin's treatise on colds; 
Dr. Cullen's observations on catarrhs and colds. Marriage of Rev. Mr. 
Coombe. A. L. S. 3 p. LVIII, 61. 

From D. Blunt. [1773?] May i. London. 

Begging him to dine that day at Sir Charles Blunt's to meet Dr. 
Hawkesworth. A. L. S. 2 p. XLI, 125. 

From Geo[rge] Morgan. 1773. May 4. Philadelphia. 

Asking Franklin to converse with Mr. Wharton on the subject of the 
enclosed letter, and serve Mr. Baynton's family therein. A. L. S. I p. 

Ill, 150. 

Fro/7z Jona [than] Williams, Jr. 1773. May 6. Boston. 

Has received a letter from Mrs. Walker expressing great uneasiness 
as to the welfare of her son ; has endeavored to remove it by the enclosed 
answer. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 22. 



148 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Jenny Mecom. 1773. May 9, Boston. 

Expressing great affection for Franklin, and the keenest gratitude for 
his generous present to her; the ardent wish of her life to be a credit to 
her Uncle. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 151. 

Fro7n [Capt.] Nath[aniel] Falconer. 1773. May 13. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging his favor of February 4th. Concerning a certain claim 
to which he has sold his right; if Franklin has paid any money prior to 
the receipt of this, they are to repay it before the deed is made out. 
A. L. S. I p. Ill, 152. 

From Rebecca Gar rigues. 1773. May 20. Philadelphia. 

Offering thanks for the silk which came safely to hand. A. L. S. 
I p. Ill, 153. 

From D. Blunt. [1773?] May 23. London. 

Desiring permission to have the piano forte, lent him by Franklin, 
removed to Streadham, where he spends more time and sees more com- 
pany. A. L. S. 2 p. XLI, 126. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1773. May (?). Burlington. 

Relative to [Josiah Franklin] Davenport and his desire to do some- 
thing to aid him. A. L. S. 2 p. XLII, i. 

From Alex[ande]r Golden. 1773. June 2. New York. 

Wrote Franklin the 5th ult. and sent him the Office accounts and sun- 
dr>^ bills of exchange; encloses a second set. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 154. 

From Edward Rowe Mores. 1773. June 7. Leyton, Essex. 

Mrs. James is so teasing that he is obliged to apply to Franklin for 
relief. Concerning the business of the foundry; his plan to induce Her 
Majesty of Russia to purchase the foundry; wishes this design kept 
secret; Mrs. James angry at his reticence; begs Franklin to assure Mrs. 
James that he knows the design and approves of it. A. L. S. i p. 

Ill, 155. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 149 

From [Samuel Cooper]. 1773. June 14. Boston. 

Concerning the letters from Governor Hutchinson and the proceed- 
ings thereon in the House. A. L. 2 p. (Closing lines missing.) 

LVIII, 63. 
Printed in Works (Sparks, VIII, 49; Blgelow, V, 148; Smyth, VI, 57). 

From [Thomas Gushing]. 

1773- June 16. Province of Massachusetts Bay. 

Containing the Resolves of the House of Representatives relative to 
the Hutchinson letters. A. L. 4 p. (Incomplete.) LVIII, 64. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, IV, 426). 

From [Mile.] Biheron. 1773. June 26. Paris. 

Delivered to M. Dubourg the papers concerning the translations of 
Franklin's works. Various messages from Franklin's French friends, and 
to her English friends. Account of her journey to Paris. M. Dalibard 
enchanted with the acquisition which Franklin sent him. Recommends 
to Mr. Hewson's kindness a young surgeon, who goes to London to 
study. Warns Franklin against Mile. Guion de St. Marie; she is little 
known in Paris and is said to have deceived " le pere Bertier." A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) Ill, 156. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr. 1773. June 28. Boston. 

Franklin's letter delivered to the Speaker. Encloses Gazette with 
the Resolves and Proceedings of their Council relative to the Governor's 
conduct. Commissions Franklin to get him a hand-organ like the one 
he had made for Mrs. Foxcroft. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 23. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr. 1773. June 29. Boston. 

Concerning his account with Mr. Warren. Books desired by his 
father. Obliged to Franklin for delivering his letter to Mrs. Barwell; 
messages to her and other friends. A. L. S. 3 p. XXXVII, 24. 

From John [Jean-Baptiste] LeRoy. [1773. June ?] 

Will carry out Franklin's wishes as regards the transaction. Ques- 
tion of the mortality in certain hospitals owing to impure air. A. L. S. 
I p. XLII, 175. 



150 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Alex[ande]r Colden. 1773. July 7. New York. 

Enclosing several bills of exchange. His father [Cadwallader Gol- 
den] in a surprising state of health and glow of spirits. A. L. S. 2 p. 

Ill, 157. 

From [Louis Jean Marie] Daubenton, Jr. 1773. July 20. [Paris?] 

Is requested by the Comte de Buffon to add to the colored engravings 
in the box this little memoir on the manner of preserving birds and 
other objects in natural history; and to beg him to send the natural pro- 
ductions of Pennsylvania for the Cabinet of the King, especially birds, as 
the Comte de Buffon is completing his work on ornithology. A. L. in 
3d P. I p. (In French.) Ill, 158. 

From W[illia]in Franklin. 1773. July 29. New York. 

Surprised that when he wrote the grant was not completed ; hears that 
as soon as the grant has passed the seals Wharton would receive enough 
money for land in the new colony to discharge all the demands of 
Baynton and Wharton's creditors. Gov. Hutchinson made very un- 
happy by the publication of his letters to Whately; believed by some 
that Franklin sent these letters, by others Mr. Temple; the Governor 
says the party against him are much elated by receiving some letters 
from Franklin wherein he goes so far as to advise them to insist on their 
independence. On his way to Albany with Mrs. Franklin, who wanted 
a jaunt on account of her health. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 159. 

From J. Cuthbert. 1773. July 30. Newcastle-on-Tyne. 

A long time since he saw Franklin at the Royal Society and received 
his commission in regard to the furniture of their colliery; found one, 
Mr. Bielby, an ingenious drawing-master, who undertook it; gave the 
finished drawings to Lady Bewick, who promised to send them to 
Franklin. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 160. 

From [Louis Jean Marie] Daubenton, Jr. [1773. July.] 

Sending Dr. Franklin the new colored engravings of birds to com- 
plete his collection. N. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) LXX, 79. 

From C. Jackson. 1773. August 4. 

Inviting him to Hampstead to breakfast and dinner. A. L. S. i p. 

Ill, 161. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 151 

From L. Fevre. 1773. August 4. London. 

Sent him two parcels containing the Acts relating to America, and 
five letters or parcels. Concerning a receipt for £800, paid to Frank- 
lin's account. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 162. 

From L. Fevre. 1773. August 5. London. 

Mr. Hay desires to know if there is any addition to the Psalms, as 
they have only six pages more to finish the work. Prof. Allamand de- 
sires him to tell Franklin that he is to be three weeks in town, and that 
Count Bentick has arrived. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 163. 

From M[arqu]is de Condorcet. [Circa 1773.] August 20. 

Acknowledging, on behalf of the Academy, Franklin's handsome 
gift; will give it a prominent place in their librarJ^ A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) XLII, 132. 

From John Baskerville. 1773. August 24. Birmingham. 

Engaged in enlarging his foundry in order to sell types abroad, but 
first to their own Colonies; begs Franklin's good offices in sending them 
to any printing-houses in North America which he may approve of. 
A. L. S. I p. Ill, 164. 

From Clia[rle]s Wilcox. 1773. September 13. Bristol. 

Has been applied to by the heirs of Colonel William Cole who had 
an estate in Maryland and Philadelphia, to recover the same for them; 
asks Franklin if he knew any such person; he died thirteen years before 
at Cole Creek, in Maryland. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 165. 

From Seth Paddack. 1773. September 21. 

Very well received by their kinsman and family. Advice he gave to 
a number of gentlemen farmers who intend to settle in America. Asks 
Franklin to endorse the enclosed letter to Mr. Benjamin Stead, asking 
his assistance for a ship in the Carolina trade, A. L. S. i p. Ill, 166. 

From J[oseph] Priestley. 1773. September 26. Calne. 

New experiments on air. Report that Franklin intends leaving Eng- 
land. A. L. S. 4 p. Ill, 167. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 404). 



152 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From J[oseph] Priestley. 1773. October 14. Calne. 

Experiments on alkaline air. Possibility of Franklin's visiting him. 
A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 168. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 409). 

From Jona[than] Williams [Sr.]. 1773. October 17. Boston. 

Safe arrival of Mrs. Mecom's goods. Prize of twent)^ pounds drawn 
by one of his lottery tickets. Death of his brother's son. Thanking him 
for his offer to serve him and his son in the commission way. A. L. S. 
I p. XXXVII, 25. 

From Jos [eph] Galloway. 1773. October 21. Trevose, Bucks [Pa.]. 

Recommending to Franklin's notice and advice Mr. John Coxe, who 
goes to England to finish his study of the law at one of the Temples. 
A. L. S. I p. Ill, 169. 

From [Baron] F[rancis] Maseres. 

1773- October 26. Inner Temple [London]. 

Having occasion, in his " French Memoire," to quote from the 
Abbe Raynal's account of the European colonies, he sent him a copy. 
Hears from the Abbe in reply, that a new and accurate edition of his 
works is now being printed, and asking him for an exact account of the 
population, shipping, agriculture, etc., relating to the British colonies in 
North America ; cannot give this information but begs leave to refer him 
to Franklin. A. L. S. I p. Ill, 170. 

From R[ober]t Hare. 1773. October 28. Philadelphia. 

Thanks for the recommendations he favored him with ; they have 
been of inestimable value to him in Philadelphia. A. L. S. i p. 

Ill, 171. 

From D[eborah] Franklin. 1773. October 29. [Philadelphia.] 

Accounts of their fine grandchildren. Bad luck with the squirrels. 
A. L. S. I p. Ill, 172. 

Printed in Bigelow's Life of Franklin, 3d Ed., II, tSjd. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 153 

From S[arah] Bache. 1773. October 30. [Philadelphia.] 

Account of her two fine boys. Reasons why she is no longer house- 
keeper. Dining-room wants new paper. Squirrel sent in Mungo's 
place. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 173. 

Printed in Bigelow's Life of Franklin, 3d Ed., II, 167^. 

From Cha[rle]s Wilcox. 1773. November 8. Bristol. 

The Concord, Capt. Valans, will sail for Philadelphia about January 
I2th; any letters will be duly taken care of. A. L. S. i p. II, 174. 

From Grey Elliott. 1773. November 8. Hammersmith. 

Encloses a statement of the produce of the Province of Georgia and 
gives explanation of the varying amounts of different commodities ex- 
ported in each year. States the affair of the Barony. Offers of com- 
position by the claimants to the holders of land. A. L. S. 6 p. Ill, 175. 

From D[eborali] Franklin. 1773. November 16. [Philadelphia?] 

Such a task to write a line! Movements of various members of the 
family. Sends two barrels of apples; will send Indian meal and buck- 
wheat flour by the next opportunity. A. L. S. i p. Ill, 176. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1773. November 25. Paris. 

Acknowledging the packet Franklin was kind enough to send him, 
containing the Philosophical Transactions of Philadelphia, the life of 
M. Collinson, and the two latest publications by Franklin ; read them 
all with great pleasure. M. Collinson's reflections on country-life. 
Cultivation of the Corona solis. Asks Franklin's opinion on the sub- 
ject of a machine for raising chickens from eggs without the aid of 
hens. Criticisms on Franklin's works. Change of address but not of 
residence. Number of people and learned societies to whom he sent 
copies of Franklin's works. Will send the dozen portraits with the six 
copies Franklin asked for. A paper read by M. Le Roy, at the re- 
opening of the Academy of Sciences, on Electricity. Dined with the 
Marquis de Courtanvaux ; he has a magnificent electrical machine. 
Hopes that the extract from the old Almanac of Pennsylvania will not 
only be applauded but will bear fruit. Mile. Biheron, Mile. Basseporte, 
and his wife all invalids. A. L. S. 6 p. (In French.) Ill, 177. 



154 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From R[icliard] Bache. 1773. November 30. [Philadelphia.] 

Sends the enclosed paper, that Franklin may see the disposition of the 
good people in Philadelphia respecting the tea that is hourly expected ; 
the paper designed more as a scare-crow than anything else. A. L. S. 
I p. Ill, 178. 

From [Capt.] Nath[aniel] Falconer. 
1773. December 2. [Dover,] 

His safe arrival at Dover; left all Franklin's family well. A. L. S. 
I p. Ill, 179. 

From Caspere, I'aine. 1773. December 6. Calais. 

Sends him a case of books, mark MF Libri which he received by way 
of Paris from M. Pancoucke. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) Ill, 180. 

From [Henry?] Ellis. 1773. December 8. Gray's Inn [London]. 

Has seen Dr. Fothergill, who is very urgent to have Franklin's 
thoughts on the subject of coffee; what advantages it will be to the 
Government to encourage the growth of coffee by lowering the duties. 
Begs Franklin to return the French book on coffee, which he lent him. 
L. in 3d P. I p. Ill, 181. 

From J[onatlian Shipley, Bishop of] St. Asaph. 

[Circa 1773.] December 10. Twyford. 

Begging him to spend Christmas with them; directions for his 
journey. A. L. S. 2 p. XL, 121. 

/^/ow J [onathan] Williams, Jr. 1773. December 11, Boston. 

Enclosing a letter for the Rev. Dr. Mather. Acknowledging the re- 
ceipt of the organ. Unable to remit money to Mr. Warren ; bills of 
exchange too scarce and dear. A. L, S. i p. XXXVII, 26. 

From Sani[ue]l Franklin. 1773. December 17, Boston. 

Acknowledging his kind letter with book of advice enclosed. Account 
of the throwing overboard of the tea, A. L. S. i p. Ill, 182. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 155 

From [Henry?] Ellis. 1773. December 25. Gray's Inn [London]. 

Begs for the return of the French book on jMoca coffee. Dr. Fother- 
gill being very anxious that the remarks upon coffee should speedily go 
to press; hopes Franklin will remember his kind promise of assisting 
therein. L. in 3d P. i p. Ill, 183. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1773. December 29. Paris. 
M. le Prince de Conti anxious to see the description and the diagram 
of Franklin's chimney, which he promised to send. A prize to be offered 
for the best paper on the means of protecting houses and individuals 
from thunderbolts. Experiments of one Comus, a juggler, much in 
vogue on the Boulevards. Translation of Franklin's works much read 
by men of taste and discernment, but, lacking the favor of the libraries, 
they are not yet known to the public; has already received more com- 
pliments on his preface than on all his other works; of such value is it 
to soar in the shadow of Franklin's wings. A. L. S. 4 p. ( In French. ) 

III, 184. 
From D. Blunt. [1773?] 

Expects to call the following week. A. L. S. 2 p. XLII, 25. 

From D. Blunt. [1773?] 
Expressions of pleasure in the friendship of Dr. Franklin. A. L. S. 
2 p. XLII, 26. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. [1773?] 

Tells of the arrival of an abbe from Perpignan who is reported to 
have cured six paralytics by means of electricity. Is treating three 
patients in Paris. The Faculty of Medicine has appointed a committee 
to observe his methods. Describes his treatment. Encloses a note from 
a friend asking for information about America and an incident con- 
nected with Newton. Has not yet received the package sent by Mr. 
Rush. Sends compliments to Mr. Pringle. Regrets he cannot go to 
England ; would like to have met Mr. Maty, of whom Franklin speaks. 
A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XLII, 6. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. [1773?] 

Alludes to Mile. Biheron and his wife, who esteem Franklin very 
highly. If his wife's health were good, she could be easily induced to go 
to London to see Franklin and Mrs. Pringle. Hopes Franklin's stay in 
England will be prolonged and that he will cross the channel to France 
once more. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XLII, 7. 



156 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. [1773?] 

Wants Mile. Biheron to purchase, while in London, a dozen or 
more bottles of peppermint water and to send them to him by public 
conveyance. Asks that the bottles be wrapped up in pages of Franklin's 
writings or in leaves of his (Dubourg's) little Code. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) XLII, 8. 

From The Translator [ Lesqui]. 1773. Paris. 

Being engaged in translation and compiling Franklin's works, has 
learned much about electricity. Many accidents by lightning have hap- 
pened recently which could have been avoided by proper precautions. 
Has given much time and thought to the subject of how to avoid being 
struck by lightning under certain circumstances. Has designed a para- 
tonnerre, resembling in shape a parasol, to be used while out of doors 
during a thunderstorm. A. Dr. of L. 4 p. (In French.) XLIV, 9. 

From The Translator [ Lesqui]. 1773. Paris. 

Letter written from the foregoing rough draft. A. L. 4 p. (In 
French.) XLIV, 10. 

From [ Lesqui. 1773?] 

On the selection of a glass bottle, or jar, for the Leyden experiment. 
Explains why all kinds of glass do not possess the same properties, but 
differ greatly. Some kinds of glass are good conductors of electricity, 
whilst others are non-conducting. How glass can rarely be manufac- 
tured evenly and of uniform thickness, due to the uneven action of 
the heat in furnace. A. L. 4 p. (In French.) XLIX, 52. 

From I. Smith, Jr. [Circa 1773. London.] 

Asks for advice and directions concerning a trip to France. A. L. 
S. 2 p. XLII, 20. 

From [Anthony] Todd. [1773? London.] 

Thanks for certain paragraphs furnished him. A. N. in 3d P. i p. 

XLII, 19. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 157 

From Rich[ar]d Bache. 1774. January i. Philadelphia, 

Will show the Alcocks every friendly civility in his povv^er. Much 
gratified that the 'Edict' was of Franklin's writing; charged likewise 
with being the author of " The Method to make a Little State of a 
Great One"; Gen. Lee the only man who differs from this opinion. 
Concerning the accounts which Mr. Thomas Foxcroft transmitted to 
Franklin, Sent Mrs. Barry's letter to Mr. Cox. Can get no tidings 
of the Dutchman for whom Franklin forwarded a letter. A, L, S, 3 p, 

IV, I. 

From S[arah] Bache. 1774, January 2, Philadelphia, 

Praises her lovely boys; sure Franklin will see them with pleasure. 
The word ' positively ' in his letter in connection with his coming home, 
gave them all spirits, A. L. S. i p. IV, 2. 

Frojn W[illia]m Ansell. 1774. January 5. Snetterton, Norfolk, 

Has taken the liberty of sending him a turkey; wishes to trouble him 
with one hour of his company before he sails for America, A, L, S, 
I p. IV, 3. 

Fro?n W[illia]m Franklin. 1774, January 5, Burlington, 

Has sent him two half-barrels of pork and a keg of dried apples; one 
of the barrels is for Mr, Sargent, with thanks for his present of wine; 
the keg of apples is for Sir John Pringle, for whose opinion on his case 
he is greatly obliged. A, L, S, i p, IV, 4. 

From E. Henckell. \_Circa 1774,] January 5, Hampton [England], 

Desires to send thanks for compliance with a former request. Good 
wishes for the New Year, A, L, S, i p. XLII, 18. 

From Eras[nius] Darwin. 1774. January 24. Lichfield. 

Transmitting a medico-philosophical paper to be communicated to 
The Royal Society. Has another very curious paper containing experi- 
ments on the colors seen in the closed eye after having gazed some time 
on luminous objects, which he will also send, if it is likely to be accept- 
able to that Society. Hopes he shall sometime again have the pleasure 
of seeing him in Staffordshire. A. L. S. i p. IV, 5. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VT, 410). 



158 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Frotn Jona[than] Williams, Jr. 1774. January 24. Boston. 

His debt to Mr. Warren; hopes to pay the balance in full in the 
spring. Some business which will shortly bring him to England. A 
business scheme which he and Mr. Joseph Russell wish to put into 
execution; if Franklin approves, desires his kind interest with certain 
manufacturers. A. L. 6 p. XXXVII, 27. 



From John Whitehurst. 1774. January 30. Derby. 

Miss Moresby, the young lady whom Mr. West is so obliging as to 
take under his tuition, is rendered extremely happy by Franklin's inter- 
cessions; she takes pleasure in nothing but drawing, therefore hopes she 
will prove worthy of notice and encouragement. A. L. S. I p. IV, 6. 



From Josh[ua] Babcock. 1774. February 15. Westerly [Mass.]. 

Concerning the fate in Boston of the India Company's 342 chests 
of tea; many towns in the Colonies entering into agreements and form- 
ing resolutions to quit all dutied tea. Question of appointing an agent 
for their little colony [Rhode Island] ; inconsiderable salary; if, however, 
Franklin would forget his real dignity and be so unconscious of his 
intrinsic worth as to deign to write Governor Wanton, feels sure he 
would be solicited to accept the agency. He is often toasted in Connecti- 
cut. Tells him of a noted subterraneous prison (once a mine) in Lims- 
bury, appropriated for the confinement of felons; calls it a hell. A. 
L. S. 3 p. IV, 8. 

From [Dean] J[osiali] Tucker. 1774. February 21. [London.] 

Partially retracting certain charges against Franklin relating to his 
conduct about the Stamp Act. A. L. S. i p. IV, 7. 

Printed in Bigelow's Life of Franklin, I, 461. 

From [Dean] J[osiah] Tucker. 
1774. February 24. Gloucester [England], 

Concerning the authority on which he based his charges against 
Franklin. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 9. 

Printed in Bigelow's Life of Franklin, I, 462. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 159 

From David Finney. 1774. February 27. Newcastle. 

Necessity of prosecuting an appeal to the King and Council respecting 
some lands in Kent County, Delaware ; puts it under Franklin's manage- 
ment. Favorable opinion of his appeal expressed by John Dickinson and 
other eminent lawj'ers; offer of a considerable sum on the part of his 
opponents to check the prosecution. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 10. 

From The Assembly of Georgia. 1774. March 13. Savannah. 

Communicates the high opinion which the members of the Assembly 
of Georgia entertain for their agent in London. A. L. S. Will[ia]m 
Young, Speaker, i p. LII, 87. 

From T[homas] Viny. 1774. March 29. Tenterden. 

Acquainting him with his resignation of his Agency for the colonies. 
In case he has to find shelter for himself and his two boys, desires to 
know if there is any choice among the colonies; is there any study or 
particular branch of science he would recommend? Can he depend on 
the authority of Gov. Hutchinson's and Lieut.-Gov. Oliver's letters, etc., 
printed in Boston? A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 11. 

From Tuthill Hubbart. 1774. March 31. Boston. 

Forwarded him the appeal on Huske's afifair with the Post-Office, but 
has not had the pleasure of a line for a long time. Unhappy disputes 
now subsisting; fears the consequences; thinks Franklin's last letter to 
the Speaker bears a melancholy aspect. Concerning the attack made on 
the Post-Office, originating probably with Mr. Goddard. Rumors that 
Franklin is threatened with being displaced from office. A. L. S. 3 p. 

IV, 12. 

Frotn Rich[ard] Nicholls Golden. 1774. April 6. New York. 

Acknowledging favor of January 5th and promising to prepare the 
accounts. Enclosing bill of exchange. A. L. S. i p. IV, 13. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1774. April 16. Paris. 

Recommending M. Macquart. Encloses a copy of six verses, composed 
by the Abbe des Prades, underneath Franklin's portrait. Bill passed 
against Boston ; Lord North a man of brains but of little sense ; Eng- 
land's erroneous attitude. Experiment of drowning flies in Madeira in 



i6o Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

America, and resuscitating them in London; could this be done with 
bees? ]VI. Delor not at all surprised at Mr. Walsh's experiments with 
barometers, they are known to all natural philosophers; when are his 
experiments on the torpedo to appear? A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

IV, 14. 

From [Earl of] Buchan. 1774. April 22. Kirkhill, West Lothian. 

Recommending an honest farmer's son, who intends going to America 
to teach, if he can get a situation in one of the North American semi- 
naries. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 15. 

From [Lord] Le Despencer. 

1774. May 3. Hanover Square [London]. 
Sending Franklin an extract from Mr. Jackson's bill for the vase 
stove. A. L. S. I p. IV, 16. 

From W[illiam] F[ranklin]. 1774. May 3. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging his favor of i8th ult. Betsy and he on a visit to their 
mother. Franklin's growing popularity. The people propose burning 
a certain unpopular counsellor in effigy. Attitude of Franklin's friends 
in Boston in encouraging Mr. Goddard with the new Post-Office. Lord 
D[artmouth]'s sentiments respecting his conduct have made him easy as 
to his office. A. L. S. i p. IV, 17. 

From Richard Bache. 1774. May 5. Philadelphia. 

His bill on Ropes came to hand. Will pay proper respect to Frank- 
lin's recommendation of Brown and Adams; Mr. Adams has got em- 
ployment, but wishes a farm. Received sixteen boxes of type. En- 
closes epitaphs of Gov. H[utchinso]n and Mr. S 11 r W n; 

both burned in effigy. A. L. S. 2 p. Ill, 59. 

From Jos[eph] Smith. 1774. May 13. Burlington. 

Enclosing him the second bill of exchange. Recommending Mr. 
Dilluyn of Burlington to his kind notice. A. L. S. i p. IV, 18. 

From Hump[hr]y Marshall. 1774. May 14. West Bradford, Pa. 

Sorrj^ to hear how matters are misrepresented at home concerning 
the poor Americans and also for the abuse Franklin has received in his 
faithful services to his King and country. If England sends over an 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin i6i 

army, believes force will be met by force. Wishes their good sovereign, 
King George, would take the advice of such counsellors as Lord 
Chatham. In all ages the consequence of oppression has been revolution. 
Let the Parliament only take ye duty off tea and not use any coercive 
measures to obtain satisfaction for the loss of it, and never turn their 
thoughts on taxing us in future. When the Crown wants assistance 
from her Colonies let her call upon them to raise men and money in 
their own way for the King's use, which he has no doubt will be cheer- 
fully done as heretofore, and then harmony between the mother and 
her children will subsist. His observations of the spots on the sun. 
The money bill. A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 19. 

From R[ichard] Jackson. 1774. May 31. 

Opinion on the case of the lands in America bequeathed by Robert 
French, late of Newcastle, on the Delaware. D. 5 p. LXXVI, 14. 

From Harvard College. 1774. May 31. [Cambridge.] 

On behalf of the Corporation of Harvard College, expresses a vote 
of thanks to Franklin for presenting their library with a French trans- 
lation of his philosophical works in 2 vols, quarto. A. L. S. Nath- 
[aniejl Appleton. i p. (Attested copy.) IV, 20. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VI, 408, Note). 

From Tho[mas] Percival. 1774. June 21. Manchester. 

Acknowledging a packet of papers on American affairs, which he 
presumes came from Franklin ; has distributed the pamphlets amongst 
persons of the first consequence and they cannot fail to make some use- 
ful impressions. Principles of despotism in the governors and of passive 
obedience in the people advance in the most alarming progression. En- 
closes a paper of his on the number of people in Manchester, which is 
an extract of a long memoir he intends sending to Dr. Price, for the 
Royal Society. A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 21. 

From Gros. 1774. June 21. London. 

Just arrived at London; desires to wait on Franklin and inform him 
why his brother cannot profit by Franklin's advice. Anxious to settle 
in South Carolina and become a vine-grower. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) IV, 91. 



i62 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From . 1774. July 5. London. 

Was very desirous to see Franklin's [grand] son, the latter was, how- 
ever, detained in Paris until the summer. Treats of current political 
events in Canada; intrigues and false promises of the British Govern- 
ment. The latter now wants to use the Canadians against the people 
of the United States. A. L. 4 p. (In French.) XLIV, 11. 

From James Parker. 1774. July 5. Perth Amboy. 

Concerning the confirmation of the Act of New York confirming the 
division line; presumes Franklin's letter enclosing this Act has mis- 
carried; should be glad of a duplicate. A. L. S. i p. IV, 22. 

i^row Jona [than] Williams, Jr. 1774. July 18. Manchester, [Eng.]. 

His success so far in a business way. Asks for a letter of introduction 
to Leeds. General attitude towards America; all wish for an amicable 
settlement. XXXVII, 28. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1774. July 20. Lancaster. 

Informing him of the favorable reception he met with in Lancaster. 
Successful business arrangements he made in Liverpool. Has been very 
economical. His intention to go to Glasgow and Edinburgh. All this 
pleasure he has experienced is due to his alliance with Franklin. A. 
L. S. 2 p. IV, 23. 

i^rom Charles Joseph Campi. 1774. July 24. Milan. 

Sending some selections from Franklin's works which he has trans- 
lated into Italian; hears a new edition of Franklin's works is about to 
appear at Cambridge; begs to know if it contains writings not found in 
the preceding edition, as he burns with desire to translate into Italian 
other philosophical tit-bits. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) IV, 24. 

From A Committee of the Assembly of New Jersey. 

1774. July 26. Burlington. 

Appointed by the Assembly to secure the latest news which may in 
any way affect the liberties or privileges of America. Ask Dr. Frank- 
lin's help. Have the highest esteem of his integrity and abilities. L. S. 
Sam[ue]l Tucker et al. 2 p. 

Also a letter asking assistance in obtaining the Roj'al assent to recent 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 163 

Acts of the Assembly, especially an Act to institute a suit against the 
late Treasurer, a subject which had raised hard feelings between the 
Governor and many of his real friends. Hear with concern of Dr. 
Franklin's difficulties, and would be glad to contribute to their allevia- 
tion. I p. L. S. Sam[ue]l Tucker, et al. LIII, 15, 16. 

From J[onatlian] Williams, Jr. 1774. July 27. Glasgow. 

Advantage derived from his travels. Account of his business in Glas- 
gow. Messages to friends and relations in London. A. L. S. 3 p. 

XXXVII, 29. 

From Tho[ma]s Potts. 1774. August i. Pottsgrove [Pa.]. 

Feels that the old friendship between himself and Franklin still con- 
tinues. Conversation he had with their friend, good Mr. Philip Syng. 
Gives Mr. Joseph Brewer the best of characters and begs Franklin to 
endorse this opinion, should inquiry be made of him. A. L. S. 2 p. 

IV, 25. 
From Tho[mas] Foulger. 1774. August i. London. 

So unfortunate as to come to town in Franklin's absence; hopes he 
will give the bearer his opinion on certain questions. A. L. S. i p. 

IV, 26. 
From [Jean-Hyacinthe de] Magelhaens [Magellan]. 
1774. August 2. Paris. 

Recommending a son of Mr. Ludwig, scholar and physician at Leip- 
sic; he travels to improve his mind and expects to pass some time in 
London. Intends returning to England toward the end of the month. 
Messages from Franklin's many friends in Paris. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) IV, 27. 

i^rom J [onathan] Williams, Jr. 1774. August 10. Edinburgh. 

Account of the hospitable reception given Mr. Boyd and himself by 
Lord Erroll. Expects to dine that day with Mr. Alexander. Reasons 
for prolonging his absence. XXXVII, 30. 

From Sam[ue]l Cooper. 1774. September 9. Boston. 

Popular excitement in Massachusetts. Action of Gen. Gage. Mili- 
tary force. Wild rumors and much apprehension. Refers him to the 
bearer, Josiah Quincy, Jr., for further particulars. A. L. S. 4 p. 

IV, 28. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VIII, 132; the postscript omitted). 



164 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From de la Riviere. 1774. September 21. Paris. 

A proposition to import from America a very large quantity of flour, 
and to load the returning vessels with wine, made on his own place; 
discusses the details of this speculation ; prevented from going to Lon- 
don by ill health ; question of the person through whom the arrange- 
ments shall be made. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) IV, 29. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1774. September 22. Paris, 

Acknowledging his favor of August loth. Prospect of his going to 
London or of Franklin's coming to Paris. Franklin's departure at this 
crisis for America, will give umbrage to the British Government; begs 
him to come to France, which place has never been more tranquil. Con- 
fidence of the King and the people in M. Turgot, the new Comptroller- 
General ; liberty of commerce ; liberty of the press almost re-established ; 
religion an exception to this rule. Concerning a series of papers he pro- 
poses to publish entitled " Le Correspondant de Philadelphie "; relies 
principally on Franklin to forward and enliven it. A. L. S. 4 p. 
(In French.) IV, 30. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1774. October 10. Paris. 

Will be delighted to receive Franklin's nephew [Jonathan Williams, 
Jr.] and overjoyed to accompany him on his return to England. His 
paper on the stilling of waves by means of oil has been translated; re- 
fers him to the use made of vinegar in Pliny. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) IV, 31. 

From [Mile.] Biheron. 1774. October 10. Paris. 

Her poor health the sole cause of her delay in answering his letter. 
Takes a vivid interest in the present affairs of America. Sends messages 
to Mrs. Stevenson and other friends in England. Expresses her own 
and Mile. Basseporte's thanks for the beautiful gift delivered to them by 
M. Dubourg. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IV, 32. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1774. October 28. London. 

Important news from America; resolutions passed in Milton by the 
delegates from the County of Suffolk refusing to obey the late Acts of 
Parliament or to have any connection with Great Britain whatsoever 
until the Acts be repealed, and recommending the mustering and train- 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 165 

ing of militia; these Resolves approved and adopted by the Continental 
Congress. Entertainment given by the City of Philadelphia to the 
Congress and other gentlemen ; Franklin one of the spirited toasts. The 
Court at Springfield obliged to sign a declaration not to act under the 
present form of government. Town of Marblehead to muster militia 
four times a week. A. L. S. 4 p. XXXVII, 31. 

Front J. Warner Phipps. 

1774. October 28. Doctor's Commons [London]. 

Inviting Franklin to dine with a society of gentlemen, friends to the 
cause of liberty, who for many years past have been wont to dine at the 
Paul's Head Tavern on November 4th, in commemoration of King 
William's landing and of the glorious revolution that ensued thereon. 
A. L. S. I p. IV, 33. 

FroT7i J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1774. October 29. [London?] 

Experiments showing the amount of air obtained from a piece of ice. 
Is rising into fame among the Grub Street votaries of the muses; his 
song dubbed a grand federal edifice; sends Franklin several copies. 

XXXVII, 32. 

From Jane Mecom. 1774. November 3. Boston. 

Cannot understand why he has received no letters from Boston. 
Thanking him for the pamphlets; thinks it no profanity to compare 
Franklin to the " blessed Savior." Is as happy as the present state of 
affairs will permit, owing to Franklin's bounty. The unity of the 
colonies and the remarkable fruitfulness of the season seem like miracles 
wrought in their favor. Boston full of profligate soldiers; account of 
their shocking behavior. Thinks the Congress address to the people of 
England is a " grand performance," and does them honor. Mentions 
a " horrid lie " told and published about Franklin's son ; had soon the 
pleasure of- hearing it contradicted. A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 34. 

From [David Hartley.] 1774. November 29. 

The intended speech for the opening of the first session of Parliament 
wherein the advisability of reducing the American colonies to uncon- 
ditional submission is discussed. A. L. 3 p. XLIV, 12. 



i66 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From M[arqu]is de Condorcet. [1774.] December 2. Paris. 

Mentioning five questions which he wishes laid before the American 
Philosophical Society; begs Franklin to send him their replies. A. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) XLII, 130. 

From J[ohn] Almon. 1774. December 6. [London.] 

Would be glad if Franklin would point out any errors in the pamphlet 
he sends ; probable that it will be re-printed. A. L. S. i p. IV, 35. 

From W[illia]m Van Lehsveld. 1774. December 9. Leyden. 

Read with particular pleasure a French translation of Franklin's letter to 
Mr. Brownrigg, upon the property of oil in stilling the waves; desires to 
make a Dutch translation of this paper, which, however, is not sold in 
Leyden or Amsterdam; Prof. Allamand promises to lend him a copy. 
Discusses this experiment with the oil; what nations have used it. 
March 11, 1775. Informing Franklin that the above is a copy of a 
letter he once wrote him and to which he received no response. Sends 
him six copies of the above-mentioned translation. A. L. S. 4 p. 

IV, 36. 

From Cha[rle]s Wilcox. 1774. December 17. Bristol [England]. 

Communicated the contents of Franklin's favor to Capt. Spain of the 
Chalkley; repeats what the Captain said concerning his terms. A. L. S. 
2 p. IV, 37. 

From C. G. F. Dumas. [1774?] 

Giving two renderings in Latin, by a young poet, of an English 
quatrain inserted in the London Evening Post, a propos of Franklin's 
treatment in the Privy Council in January', 1774. Mem. i p. (In 
French.) XXXIX, 230. 

From Dr. [John] Fothergill. [Circa 1774. London.] 

Desiring Franklin's company that evening about five o'clock. A. L. 
in 3d P. I p. XLI, 152. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. [1774?] 

Relative to the proposed [First Continental] Congress, and the ac- 
tions of Massachusetts. A. L. S. 2 p. (First part missing.) 

LVIII, 45. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 167 

From Dr. [William] Hunter. \_Circa 1774.] London. 

Has some preparations to give away; if they would be acceptable, 
appoints an hour for him to call. L. in 3d P. i p. XL, 6. 

From [Granville Sharp. 1774?] 

Extract from a letter to Mr. Pecuezet, dated January 7, 1774, con- 
cerning the gradual enfranchisement of slaves already in the colonies. 
A. L. 2 p. (Final part missing.) LVIII, 66. 

From [Samuel] Wharton. \_Circa 1774.] 

Requests him to explain to Governor Pownall, Abraham Mitchel's 
base conduct. A. L. in 3d P. i p. LXIX, 90. 

From S[amuel] Wharton. {Circa 1774.] 

Sends letters for him which he found at the New York Coffee House. 
A. L. S. I p. LXIX, 91. 

From J. Friis. 1775. January 2. Philadelphia. 

Returning his letter which he was so kind as to let him read. Invokes 
a blessing on him and the whole Congress. A. L. S. I p. IV, 39. 

From [Jean-Baptiste] Le Roy. 1775. January 3. [Paris.] 

Does not doubt that the Parliament will come around to Franklin's 
views and will finally appreciate the part he has played in reconciling 
England to her colonies. Heard with pleasure that Franklin had been 
again nominated Agent of Pennsylvania ; interest he takes in the struggles 
of the worthy Americans for their liberty. M. de Malherbes at present 
the idol of Paris and of the nation ; his election to the French Academy. 
Messages to Dr. Pringle, and to Mr. Walsh, to whom he returns 
thanks for his present. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) IV, 39^. 

From Dr. [Thomas] Percival. 1775. January 10. Manchester. 

Sends him the enclosed extract from Bede's ecclesiastical History. 
The experiment of stilling waves with oil tried at Manchester with 
success. L. in 3d P. i p. IV, 40. 



1 68 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Rich[ar]d Bache. 1775. January 31. Philadelphia. 

Acknowledging favor of November 17th. Civilities he has shown to 
Franklin's friends, Messrs. Foulger and Rant, with their families, who 
arrived in good health on the 27th inst. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 41. 

From [Capt.] Nath[aniel] Falconer. 
1775. February 20. Portsmouth. 

Detained by contrary winds. Directs him where to send any letters 
to go by him. Should any new pamphlets come out before the " Lovely 
Lass " sails for Philadelphia, would be greatly obliged for them. A. 
L. S. I p. IV, 42. 

From Thomas Gushing. 1775. February 20. Boston. 

Acknowledging his favor of November 12th. In receipt of the King's 
speech and the answer of both Houses; these have made no alteration in 
the sentiments of the people; the Association of the Continental Con- 
gress sacredly adhered to through all the Colonies. Assembly of New 
York has agreed to petition the King, address the House of Lords and 
remonstrate to the House of Commons relative to the American griev- 
ances. Enclosing a small pamphlet entitled " Calculations on American 
Population," which may convince the English people what an amazing 
source of commerce they will deprive themselves of if, by any intem- 
perate and rash measures, the connection between Great Britain and 
America should be dissolved. A. L. S. i p. IV, 43. 

From John Kent. 1775. February 22. [London.] 

Presenting him with a work, " De la Felicite [Publique]," by Cheva- 
lier de Chastellu[x], who, having joined the multitude in applauding 
Franklin, would like him to read his sentiments. A. L. S. i p. 

IV, 42K2. 

From Thomas Pain[e]. 1775. March 4. Philadelphia. 

Account of his wretched trip across the ocean ; six weeks on shore be- 
fore he was well enough to wait on Mr. Bache. Observations induced 
by a perusal of Dr. Priestley's late experiment on air. Franklin's coun- 
tenance has obtained him many friends and much reputation ; has been 
applied to by several gentlemen to instruct their sons on very advan- 
tageous terms. His connection with a magazine published by Robert 
Aitken. A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 44. 

Printed, in part, in Bigelow's Life of Franiilin, II, 248, Note. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 169 

From The Library Company of Philadelphia. 

1775. March 4. Philadelphia. 

Directed to acknowledge his favor of April 7th and July 25th with the 
books sent for the use of the [Library] Company; the directors were 
preparing an order for books, but from the present unhappy state of pub- 
lic affairs, it must be postponed. A. L. S. i p. Andrew Robeson, 
Secretary, i p. IV, 45. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1775. March 19. Paris. 

Delighted with Franklin's nephew, Mr. Williams; he is very popular 
with both men and women; hopes to keep him with them a long time. 
Spurred M. Stanley on to speak to M. Le Roy about the affair of the 
clock. Concerning the taxation of the colonies. His letters, signed 
" Un Tremblant," though approved by the Royal Censor, were abso- 
lutely suppressed by " Le Garde des Sceaux." Condoles with Franklin 
on the death of his wife. Honors bestowed on Dr. Pringle and Mr. 
Walsh. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) IV, 45^. 

From J[ames] Kinsey. 1775. March 26. Burlington. 

Transmitting the votes and laws of the last session of the Assembly, 
and a duplicate of the petition to the King. Hopes Mr. Wilmot will 
exonorate the Colony from all blame and will speedily receive his money. 
Hopes Franklin will acquaint the Committee of Correspondence should 
there be any opposition against the law for instituting a suit against the 
late Eastern Treasurer. A. L. S. i p. IV, 46. 

From William Lee. 1775. April 3. London. 

Enclosing Mr. Oliver's letter respecting a hundred pounds which the 
Constitutional Society had orded to be given for the relief of the poor 
sufferers in Boston. Presumes he is fully informed of all public trans- 
actions in England. A. L. S. i p. IV, 47. 

From John Foxcroft. 1775. April 4. New York. 

Thanking him for promising to become his security should the need 
arise. So far the Post-Office seems to escape the political storm. W^hat 
has become of the Ohio scheme? Virginians settling that country very 
fast since the peace which Lord Dunmore concluded with the Indians. 
A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 48. 



lyo Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Alexander] Dalrymple. 1775. April 17. Soho Square [London]. 

Mr. William Whitehurst finding his health much impaired has been 
induced to make a voyage to America; if he can find suitable employ- 
ment, he will remain at Philadelphia; believes Franklin is not unac- 
quainted with his works as a writing-engraver, and hopes he will give 
him his advice and countenance. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 49. 

From S[amuel] Wharton. 1775. April 17. Portsmouth [Eng.]. 

Informs Franklin, at Lord Camden's request, that the Chancellor's 
decision in his case was entirely political; his lordship will move for a 
total repeal of the Quebec Act ; Lord Chatham will probably second the 
motion ; in the House of Commons, Sir George Saville moves to amend 
this shameful Act. Really grieved at the publication of Mr. Galloway's 
extraordinary pamphlets; points out the indiscretion of these papers. 
Major Trent carries out with him the Restraining Act for Pennsylvania, 
New Jersey, etc. ; efforts made not to have New York inserted therein. 
The Generals Burgoyne, Howe and Clinton waiting only for a favor- 
able wind to sail for Boston; spies are to be sent to each province; 
Major Skeene goes for that or some other servile and dishonorable pur- 
pose. Advises the inviolable maintenance of the non-exportation and 
non-importation plans; the magnitude of these measures will force their 
own \\ay. A. L. S. 4 p. IV, 50. 

Printed in Penna. Magazine of Hist, and Biog., XXVII, 151. 

From D. Blunt. 1775. April 17. [London.] 

Assuring Franklin of his profound regard. Called on Mrs. Steven- 
son ; thinks she would be inconsolable without the animating hope of 
spending the remainder of her days with Franklin. News of the Hewson 
family. Just going to Bath ; will not remain long at Kensington as he 
dislikes the situation there. A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 51. 

From [Mrs.] Marg[are]t Stevenson. 1775. April 24. 

Hoping he has arrived safely in America. News of Franklin's friends 
in London. Will rejoice at the happy day when Franklin returns. Has 
taken two Americans as lodgers. Has sent all his letters and papers. 
A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 52. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 171 

From Colonel Chevalier de Champigny. 1775. May 18. Amsterdam. 

Sent him the first two volumes of his Histoty of England, also the 
first two volumes of his History of Denmark, but has received no 
acknowledgment and especially no money; reminds Franklin of his 
promise to subscribe to them, A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 53. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1775. May 20. London. 

Received from the Duchesse de Villeroy the plan of Franklin's har- 
monica improved. Reflections on the failure of the New York and 
Quebec petitions as well as those from Congress ; thinks this must surely 
cure the New York dissension, if any remains. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XXXVII, 33. 

From Richard Oliver. 1775. May 31. London. 

Concerning the payment of £100 from the Constitutional Society into 
the hands of Franklin's bankers, towards relieving the distressed inhabi- 
tants of Boston. Recent accounts from America tell of an unprovoked 
attack by the detachment of regular troops at Boston on the provincials, 
which reflects as little honor on the British military as their politics do 
on the British legislature. Hopes with the aid of Franklin's wisdom the 
Americans will maintain the rights of free though loyal subjects. A. L. 
S. 2 p. IV, 54. 

Printed in Penna. Magazine of Hist, and Biog., XXVII, 153. 

From [Mrs.] Mary Hewson. 
1775' June 10. Craven Street [London]. 

Sending Franklin all the domestic news. Is as much as ever an 
American at heart. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 55. 

From Sain[uel] Vaughan. 1775. June 24. Montego Bay, Jamaica. 

Congratulations on his safe arrival in America; wishing the Colonies 
success equal to the justice and importance of their cause. His inten- 
tion was to make a tour of North America with his son, but now that 
the sword has been drawn, thinks it more prudent to wait until the 
spring when he may throw his small mite with more advantage into the 
public weal. Asks Franklin's favor in procuring settlements for his 
sons, who will not disgrace even his recommendations. A. L. S. 3 p. 

IV, 56. 



172 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From C[harles] G[uillaunie] F[rederic] Dumas. 
1775- June 30. The Hague. 

Acknowledging the receipt of English edition of Franklin's works, 
as well as the American Gazettes. Reflections caused hy the declara- 
tion of war. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 2. 

From A[rthur] L[ee]. 1775. July 6. [London.] 

The two defeats near Boston seem to have made little impression on 
the Ministry. Information to be drawn from the single word rebels used 
in the Gazette. Lord Germain is the dictator in all military opera- 
tions. A report that Sir John Murray's regiment of Highlanders 
are to be sent over; believes the Scotch will fight with more rancor 
and less bravery than the English. Dissatisfaction of the public. Asks 
him to obtain a list of numerous petitions which have been presented 
in vain ; may need it in the future. Concerning the heat and cold of 
mineral bodies. A. L. S. 4 p. IV, 57. 

Printed in Penna. Magazine of Hist, and Biog., XXVII, 154. 

From [Barbeu Dubcurg]. 1775. July 13. Paris. 

Intended to send a letter by Messrs. Magellan and Priestley when they 
were leaving for London, but waited for a relative of M. LeRoy's 
to bring the 8 louis which he owed Franklin. Comments on his experi- 
ment of pouring oil on the waves at sea. Many people here interested in 
it, especially sea-faring men. Has recently received two letters from 
Dr. Rush. Is going to publish a periodical in the form of letters sup- 
posed to be written by a Quaker called Samuel Tone, from London, in 
which he will treat freely of all kinds of subjects. Has applied for 
permission to have these letters printed. The Royal Censor who ex- 
amined the work was not severe on it. A. L. 4 p. (In French.) 

XLIV, 13. 

From Jonathan Williams, Jr. 1775. July 19. London. 

Account of his interview with Lord Dartmouth respecting the petition 
presented to the King from the Assembly of New Jersey. A. Dr. of 
L. 3 p. XXXVII, 35. 

The same. A. L. 2 p. (Final part missing.) LVIII, 67. 

From S[amuel] Smith. 1775. July 29. Cecil Street [London]. 
Glad to hear of Franklin's safe arrival. A. L. S. i p. IV, 58. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 173 

i^romG.B. [David Hartley]. 1775. Julysi. Golden Square [London] . 

Both countries at the mercy of the Ministry for all their information; 
they permit none but the most violent libels to be sent over to America. 
Stories of atrocious cruelties, practiced by the rebels, appear in the 
Gazette; begs him, however, to believe that the general disposition of the 
English people towards the Americans is favorable; still a chance of 
reconcilement; incredible that those of the same blood should be alien- 
ated. Entreats him to furnish his friends in England with all possible 
materials to do justice to their cause. A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 59. 

Printed in Penna. Magazine of Hist, and Biog., XXVII, 156. 

From Edw[ar]d Bancroft. 1775. August 7. [London.] 

Concerning the title of the Indian tribes to the property and jurisdic- 
tion of their territories; sending a pamphlet on that subject by Mr. 
Wharton and himself. Probability of the British inciting the Indians 
to butcher the inhabitants. Thinks the affection of the Indians might 
be unalterably secured if Congress should publicly assert and maintain 
the right of the natives to sell and convey their lands to the highest 
bidder; pernicious views of Government as manifested in the Quebec 
Act. Five regiments, containing in all 1,500 men, are soon to proceed 
from Ireland to America; hopes a future change of Ministry will bring 
about a reconciliation. A. L. S. 7 p. IV, 60. 

Printed in Penna. Magazine of Hist, and Biog., XXVII, 158. 

From Benj[amin] Gale. 1775. August 7. Killingworth. 

Concerning a marvelous invention by a Yale student of a boat which 
can stay under water and contains a machine so contrived that on 
striking another vessel it grapples to the keel and, at a given time, 
explodes. Recommends certain gentlemen for positions in the Post- 
Office. A. L. S. 4 p. IV, 61. 

From Geo[rge] Morgan to W[illiam] F[ranklin] for B[enjaniin] 
F[ranklm]. 1775. August 8. Philadelphia. 

Concerning the Indian grant of land to the sufferers in 1763; would 
be glad of Franklin's sentiments on the propriety of a sale under the 



174 Letters to Benjamin Fil'\nklin 

Government of Virginia; would like to undertake the sale himself; 
value of the lands. Has the honor of accompanying Dr. Franklin to 
Pittsburg the following week and will then have further information 
to impart. L. 3 p. (Copy by W[ilHam] T[emple] F[ranklin].) 

IV, 62. 

From Henry Tucker. 1775. August 12. Bermuda. 

Thanking Franklin on behalf of himself and also of their four deputies 
for presenting their Address to Congress; hopes they w^ill obtain their 
reasonable request. Will endeavor to secure for America whatever 
powder comes to Bermuda. Reasons for the law passed in Bermuda to 
prohibit the exportation of provisions. Greatly shocked on hearing of 
the terrible carnage in the late battle ; hopes some expedient will be found 
to prevent further bloodshed. A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 63. 

From M[artin] Howard, [Jr.]. 1775. August 12. Newbern. 

Concerning a debt of his to Franklin which, owing to bad times, he 
is unable to pay. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 64. 

From Tho[ma]s Bromfield. 1775. August 12. London. 

The Ministry still seem determined to pursue rigorous measures; 
more troops and men-of-war are going over; believes it to be im- 
practicable to force these measures by the sword ; results to be expected 
from the stoppage in the trade to America. Since the battle of June 7th 
their reproach of cowardice, however, is wiped off. Death of their 
friend, [Josiah] Quincy [Jr.]. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 65. 

Printed in Penna. Magazine of Hist, and Biog., XXVII, 162. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1775. August 14. Perth Amboy. 

Enclosing a copy of Mr. George Morgan's letter on the subject of the 
Indian grant of land (see IV, 62) with his answer thereto; would be 
glad of Franklin's opinion respecting the contents. Read Messrs. Wal- 
pole and Sargent's letter to Franklin ; thinks it impossible to keep such 
transactions as secret as they deem necessary. Discusses business of 
Major Trent and Mr. Tilghman. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 66. 

Printed in Penna. Magazine of Hist, and Biog., XXVII, 163. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 175 

From Will [iam] Strahan. 1775. September 6. London. 
Takes exception to Franklin's remark, — " all tends to a separation." 
Represents the evil consequences to America of a break with England ; 
enumerates the many past privileges enjoyed by the Colonies; terrible 
evils of war; hopes on the reassembling of Parliament something may 
be found to stop the progress of such an unnatural and destructive quar- 
rel. In the Declaration of Congress he sees " that foreign assistance, if 
necessary, is undoubtedly attainable"; supposes this is merely a threat; 
evils of foreign interference. Probable suffering in store for America. 
Comments on the last petition of Congress to Great Britain. Prophesies 
future trouble from the arming of the provincials. A. L. S. 4 p. 

IV, 67. 

Printed in Penna. Magazine of Hist, and Biog., XXVII, 165. 

From W[illia]m Franklin. 1775. September 6. Perth Amboy. 

Enclosing a copy of the exposition of the Resolution of the House of 
Commons and also the minutes of the two last sessions of the New 
Jersey Assembly, containing his remarks on the present unnatural dis- 
pute between Great Britain and her colonies. A. L. S. I p. IV, 68. 

From John Foxcroft. 1775. September 15. New York. 
Received a most friendly and polite letter from their mutual friend. 
Lord Le Despencer, who approves of every step he (Foxcroft) has taken 
in these troublesome times. Hears that some people have had the 
curiosity to pry into his correspondence with Franklin. Encloses His 
Majesty's answer to the City Address. A. L. S. i p. IV, 69. 

From The Committee of Safety of Pennsylvania. 
[1775. October 21. Philadelphia.] 
Meeting of the Committee of Safety and of the Committee of As- 
sembly, also of the Board at which the appointment of a commodore will 
be considered. A. L. S. W[illia]m Govett, Secretary, i p. 

XLIII, 190. 

From Horatio Gates. 1775. November 7. Head Q'rs. 
Giving accounts of the capture of several vessels with cargoes of wine, 
dry goods, rum, sugar and fruit respectively; evident that "wine and 
punch will not be wanting to the Sons of Liberty." Asks how the pulse 
of the politicians is beating. Cannot write for interruptions ; no peace 
possible for him until he gives the ambassador from Marblehead two 
barrels of powder for the defense of that port. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 70. 



176 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From W[illia]ni Greene. 1775. November 13. Westerly [R. I.]. 
Acknowledging Franklin's favor from New Haven, At a loss to 
express his gratitude to Franklin for taking his little son under his 
care; consults him as to the best means of making him a useful member 
of society. A. L. S. i p. IV, 71. 

From Caty Greene. 1775. November 13. Westerly [R. I.]. 

Cannot express how pleased she is to have her boy with Franklin ; 
hopes he may deserve such goodness. A. L. S. i p. IV, 71^. 

From Marg[are]t Stevenson. 

1775. November 16. Northumberland Court. 

Expressing the deepest devotion to Franklin and mentioning all the 
friends who come to her house to talk of him and lament his absence. 
Mr. Strahan sorry to differ from Franklin, but it is a matter of principle. 
Does not know if he will ever get this letter; expects it will be opened, 
but is sure they will be puzzled to decipher it. A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 72. 

From Horatio Gates. 1775. December 5. Headquarters. 

News received of the capture of Quebec by their troops, assisted by 
6000 Canadians. Burgoyne sails for London that very day; thinks if 
there is an honest mob left in London he and Gage cannot ride the 
streets in safety. Franklin will hear in Congress of their success at 
sea. Insists upon the condemnation of the Glasgow ship ; every tittle of 
clothing on board needed for the soldiers. Trouble in retaining the Con- 
necticut troops. Anxiously awaiting the results of the committee sent to 
Montreal ; wishes Franklin could have been one of them. Splendid 
conduct of Gen. Montgomery and Col. Arnold. A play-house estab- 
lished in Boston, which opened with a tragedy; very possible it may 
conclude with one. A. L. S. 4 p. IV, 73. 

From Horatio Gates. 1775. December 7. Headquarters. 

Enclosing a copy of General Lee's letter lately sent to Gen. Burgoyne, 
if Franklin approves it may be published in the newspapers. Longs to 
send him his and Lee's opinions of the military measures to be pur- 
sued in Canada. Deprecates so much wrangling about forms of gov- 
ernment; let them first establish their freedom; let them not tarnish the 
glorious and successful Continental arms by timid conduct; Franklin 
does not need these arguments; they are for certain others. A. L. S. 
2 p. IV, 74. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 177 

From Charles Lee. 1775. December 10. Camp. 
Concerning the publishing of his letter to Gen. Burgoyne. A good 
deal surprised and a little shocked at the proceedings of the Assembly; 
considers the " injunction of these gentlemen to their delegates to dissent 
from any resolve leading to independence ill-timed, impertinent and 
impolitic " ; bad results to be expected from such a declaration. Wishes 
Franklin would send some man who has the reputation of being a soldier 
to Virginia, which is the weak point; explains the prejudice of the com- 
mon people against any man who has not seen service; cites anecdote to 
prove their blind faith in the latter. Enlistments go on swimmingly; 
let them but get powder and Boston shall be theirs. A. L. S. 4 p. 

IV, 75. 

Printed in Journal of Military Service Institution, July, 1903, p. 72. 

From Mary Hewson. 1775. December 12. Kensington. 
Her mother [Mrs. Stevenson] not very well; describes the various 
attractions of her children; her son William struggling with the diffi- 
culties of orthography, which she begs Franklin as the future sovereign 
and law-giver in the empire of America to render less difficult. Rails 
against the present fashion of small waists; longs to be in America 
where she may appear without distortion ; comments on the extravagant 
manner of dressing the hair. Concerning a number of sheep and hogs 
which are to be sent to Boston to feed — the fishes, she hopes. Lady 
Blunt has a son. A. L. S. 4 p. IV, 76. 

From Catharine Mead. 1775. December 16. Sun(s)bury [Penna.]. 
Is the daughter of John Croker and was once at Franklin's house 
when she was little; is at least a head taller since the receipt of Frank- 
lin's letter. A. L. S. i p. IV, 76^. 

From . 1775. December 23. London. 

Introducing Mr. Wrixon, a gentleman of character and connections 
in Ireland, to Franklin's friendship, civility and protection; as his late 
publications will show, he has not been an indifferent spectator of the 
present unhappy dispute. Dares not say a word on public affairs; he 
will hear all about them from the bearer. L. i p. IV, 77. 

From [Edward Bancroft], 1775. December 23. London. 
Recomends Mr. Wrixon, a young man possessing valuable military 
2 — 12 



178 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

knowledge to Dr. Franklin's friendly acquaintance and assistance. 
Wishes to refrain from discussing politics through the mail. Lord 
Howe anxious to restore peace with America; has gone to the country 
to see whether the Ministers can gratify his demands respecting the 
marines and extend his powers. A. L. 3 p. (Signature torn out.) 

XLIV, 14. 
From Israel Gilpin. 1775. December 29. Wilmington. 

Informed by his kinsman, George Gilpin, that several of the manu- 
facturers are likely to suffer from want of coal ; mentions various places 
where he thinks coal could be found. A. L. S. i p. IV, 78. 

From [Thomas Gushing. 1775?] 

The exportation of gun powder or any sort of arms or ammunition 
prohibited by order of the King. The Colonies apprehend that this fore- 
bodes the most vigorous exertion of martial force and are adopting the 
most effective measures to defend themselves. Military stores in Rhode 
Island and New Hampshire removed to places of safety. L. i p. 
(First part missing.) LVIII, 107. 

From Gharles Lee. [1775?] 

Suggestions as to the best measures to be taken to prepare for war with 
Great Britain. A. L. S. 3 p. XLII, 45. 

In Gommittee of the Pennsylvania Assembly. 1776. February 24. 

Appointing a deputation to request Dr. Franklin to take his seat in 
the House, if consistent with his other duties. If not, that he would 
be pleased to resign that another Burgess may be elected. D. S. 
J[onathan] B. Smith, Secretary, i p. LIU, 20. 

From J[oseph] Priestley. 1776. February 13. London. 

Dr. Price's pamphlet. Conduct of the Ministry. Philosophical ex- 
periments. Fixed air. A. L. S. 4 p. IV, 79. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VIII, 171), also in Penna. Magazine of Hist, and 
Biog., XXVII, 169. 

From [Gapt.] William Goforth. 

1776. February 22. Three Rivers [Canada]. 

Poverty and distress of the people in that province; afraid to join 
with either side; his opinion as to the best measures to be adopted. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 179 

Anxious as commander of Three Rivers to know what forces are com- 
ing to his assistance ; neglect of the Northern Department. A. L. S. 3 p. 

IV, 80. 

Printed in Journal of Military Service Institution, July, 1903, p. 74. 

Fro //z Horatio Gates. 1776. February 23. Headquarters. 

Introducing Baron de Woedtke; his tyrannical treatment by the 
King of Prussia; hopes America may continue to embrace with her 
wonted cordiality every oppressed subject from every quarter of the 
globe. Convinced that the enemy intend to commence their operations 
from New York. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 81. 

From G. B. [David Hartley], 1776. February 24. London. 

Urging measures of reconciliation between Great Britain and the 
Colonies. A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 82. 

Printed in Penna. Magazine of Hist, and Biog., XXVII, 171. 

From Jona [than] Williams [Sr.]. 1776. March i. Worcester. 

Agreeable to Franklin's desire, encloses his account. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 37. 

From Sam[ue]l Cooper. [1776. March 17. Boston.] 

British have left Boston in disgrace before the Colonial forces. Most 
of them just sailed this morning; where to is a secret. Our bombard- 
ment was unexpected, and the occupation of Dorchester Hill completed 
their consternation. Boston stands, but is much plundered. His own 
house looted. " Common Sense " is eagerly read and greatly admired. 
Colonies cannot be subdued by force. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 82^. 

From Dr. [Benjamin] Rush. [1776. March 20? Philadelphia.] 

Mentioning the hour when the members of the Canadian Committee 
will wait on him. A. L. in 3d P. I p. XL, 52. 

From David Barclay. 1776. March 31. London. 

Persuaded that it will not be for want of inclination in Lord Howe 
should the olive branch not rise superior to the din of war. A. L. S. 

2 p. IV, 83. 

Printed in Penna. Magazine of Hist, and Biog., XXVII, 175. 



i8o Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Eben Hazard. 1776. May 3. New York. 

The " Roebuck," of 44 guns, on shore on the east bank of the Brandy- 
wine; eight row galleys, the Province ship and "Reprisal" have gone 
down to take her. A. L. S. i p. IV, 84. 

From Rich[ard] Bache. 1776. May 7. Philadelphia. 

Consternation caused by the firing of the alarm guns, on account of 
three men-of-war which were descried coming up the bay. The " Roe- 
buck " got off without sustaining any damages. Franklin will see by the 
papers what a formidable armament to expect; 45,000 commissioners 
at least, of various nations, commanded by Lord Howe. A. L. S. i p. 

IV, 86. 

FroTti R[ichard] Bache. 1776. May 14. Philadelphia. 

The action between their armed boats and His Majesty's ship, the 
"Roebuck," of 44 guns, and "Liverpool," of 28 guns, off Wilmington; 
the latter got a severe drubbing. A, L. S. i p. IV, 87. 

From [Gen. George Washington]. 1776. May 20. New York. 

Transmits enclosed letter, the others he received with this he for- 
warded to Congress. On the 17th received news of our troops being 
obliged to raise the siege of Quebec, with the loss of their cannon, a 
number of small arms, provisions, etc. Had hoped that the troops 
would maintain their position and, on the arrival of the two bri- 
gades detached from hence, consisting of ten regiments, our block- 
ade, bravely kept up for a long time by a handful of men, would 
terminate in the reduction of Quebec and our consequent possession of 
the important country to which it belongs. Regrets its effect on his mis- 
sion in that country. A. L. S. 3 p. [S. torn out.] IV, 88. 

Fro?n Eben Hazard. [1776. May.] 

Will watch the sloops from Albany and forward the Doctor's bed- 
ding as soon as it comes to hand. A. L. in 3d P. i p. XLIV, 234. 

From W[illia]m Prichard. 1776. June 10. Philadelphia. 
Has applied to several printers for work, but in vain. Begs Frank- 
lin to allow him the use of his types and press for a short time, as he 
is offered the printing of several small things; promises to return them 
whenever required and to pay for their use. A. L. S. i p. IV, 89. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin i8i 

From Lois Killceys. 1776. June 10. 
Reminding him of their ancient friendship. Recommends [name 
illegible] to Franklin's notice. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 90. 

From Chevalier de Kermorvan. [1776.] June 27. Philadelphia. 

Sending Franklin the three volumes entrusted to his care by M. 
[Barbeu] Dubourg, and a present of books from himself. Gave Frank- 
lin's letter to Mr. Rush. Outside of the Members of Congress, wishes 
to keep his communications secret. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XL, 200. 
From Tli[omas] J[efferson]. [1776. June] ? 

Encloses a paper which, with some small alterations, has been approved 
by the Committee; asks him to peruse it and suggest such alterations as 
his more enlarged view of the subject will dictate. The paper has been 
returned to him to change a particular sentiment or two. He proposes 
to lay it again before the Committee [to draft a Declaration of Inde- 
pendence?] . A. N. in 3d P. I p. XLII, 73. 

From Tho[nia]s Hartley to Benjamin Franklin and the other 
Delegates of the Province of Pennsylvania in Congress. 
1776. July 3. Crown Point. 

Detailing the losses of the sixth battalion of Pennsylvania in the 
engagement near Three Rivers. Account of a small party of officers 
•and men being surprised while fishing, by the Indians; two of the 
party murdered and inhumanly scalped, the rest, with two exceptions, 
made prisoners. Begs them to think of some plan whereby these men 
may be exchanged. It is the wish of the army that Gen. Thompson 
should be restored to them immediately. A. L. S. i p. IV, 92. 

From [Frederick William, Baron de] Woedtke. 

1776. July 3. Crown Point. 

Account of his march to Sorel. Council of war with Generals Arnold 
and Thompson ; opposition on his part to their plan of quitting Sorel ; 
prevented Col. de Haas from pitching two of their cannon into the 
water in his desire to precipitate their march. Council of War called 
at St. John, where it was decided to cross Lake Champlain. Arrival 
at Crown Point ; neglect of hospitals ; bad food. Has many enemies, — 
all Tories. Anxious to do honor to Franklin's recommendation, but 
fears they will not be able to hold Crown Point. A. L. S. 8 p. 
(In French.) IV, 93. 



i82 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Frederick William, Baron de] Woedtke. 

1776- July 4. Crown Point. 

Their difficult situation; need of experienced soldiers. Criticizes 
Generals Arnold and Sullivan; considers the latter ignorant of his pro- 
fession. Does all in his power for the well-being of his troops. Heard 
at Chambly that the English had offered 500 guineas for his capture ; 
naturally much flattered. Begs him to give the position of aide-de-camp 
general to an experienced man; recommends Col. St. Clair(?). The 
four vessels of war on the lake in very bad condition. A. L. S. 3 p. 
(In French.) IV, 94. 

From J. M. Lawrence and William Smith. 
1776. July 19. Burlington. 

Informing him that Mrs. Mecom's husband is at times very dan- 
gerous, being often deprived of his reason ; asks Franklin's help in 
placing him in the hospital at Philadelphia, or in confining him in some 
other way. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 95. 

From William Alexander. 1776. July 20. Dijon. 

Introducing M. de Converez, a great traveler who has seen and 
knows a country at present the object of so much attention in Europe; 
asks Franklin's assistance in procuring for M. de Converez a proper 
settlement. A. L. S. i p. IV, 96. 

From Ch[e]v[alier] de Kermorvan. 1776. July 26. 

Works hard to render himself worthy of Franklin's recommendation 
and esteem. Advice he gave Gen. Mercer about the necessity of guard- 
ing the Jersey coast. Concerning a plan for defending the coast of 
America which he has submitted to Mr. Hancock. Account of small 
engagements between their batteries and the enemy's boats ; fine be- 
havior of the soldiers. Begs Franklin to plead with Congress for slow- 
ness in counsel and swiftness in action. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

IV, 97. 

From Ant[hon]y Wayne. 1776. July 31. Ticonderoga. 

So far removed from the seat of government that very little intelli- 
gence reaches them. Informed that Lord Howe has joined the General 
before New York ; expresses certain fears for the brave and generous 
sons of America. In high expectation of shortly seeing Burgoyne; he 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 183 

will find an enemy small in number yet brave by nature and longing to 
revenge the unfortunate affair at Three Rivers. Account of the troops 
under Col. St. Clair and himself. Strength of their naval force as com- 
pared with the enemy. His soldiers destitute of almost every necessary — 
shoes, stockings, shirts and soap — essential articles in an army; pleads 
for some method of sending on these things. A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 98. 

Printed in Journal of Military Service Institution, July, 1903, p. 76. 

From Le President de Goll. 1776. August 3. Montbeillard. 

Asking Franklin to interest himself in Geo. Leopold Besson, bourgeois 
of Montbeilard, originally of Switzerland; his honesty and his mis- 
fortunes. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IV, 99. 

From Ray Greene. 1776. August 4. Warwick [R. I.]. 

Acknowledging the many obligations he is under to Franklin; had a 
pleasant journey home; his relations and friends thought him much al- 
tered; concluded from their smiles that it was for the better. [En- 
closure to Grandma Mecom.] Expressing a high sense of her goodness 
to him; out of his power to return it; hopes she will be pleased with 
Cousin Jenny's match, which they tell him is to be one, as he comes 
pretty often. A. L. S. 3 p. IV, lOO. 

From 'W[illiam] Dunlap. 1776. August 10. King and Queen. 

Has just received a distressing letter from his son Ben informing 
him that the unknown benefactor who has contributed to his education 
so far, can do so no longer and that he must shift for himself; asks 
Franklin to take the poor boy under his patronage and so encourage 
his ardent thirst for knowledge and save him from the plough or spade. 
Gives an account of the other members of his family. A. L. S. i p. 

IV, loi. 

From Mehetable Newland. 

1776. August 12. Stafford, Monmouth Co. [N. J.]. 

Asking whether he has heard anything of Mr. Newland since he 
embarked from New York for Quebec; from the dififerent reports of the 
success of their troops at that place is under the greatest uneasiness for 
his welfare. A. L. S. i p. IV, 102. 



184 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From W[illiam] T[emple] Franklin. 

1776. August 17. Philadelphia. 

Arrived in Philadelphia after spending a night at Mr. and Mrs. 
Duffield's and waiting on Mr. Galloway. Mrs. Bache's son William 
very well. According to his Aunt Mecom's request, waited on Mrs. 
Van Vordice. Mrs. Turner and her husband in London, the latter to 
have a commission in the Guards. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 103. 

From G[eorge] Washington. 1776. August 18. New York. 

Encloses a letter from Lord Howe, sent out by a flag the day before; 
with it comes a letter for Lieut. Barrington, who, if not among those 
who broke parole and went off to Canada, is in York, Pennsylvania. 
A. L. S. I p. IV, 104. 

From J. K. Read. 1776. August 18. Williamsburg. 

Though belonging to branch of the family so far removed from 
Franklin, has always retained an affection for him and would like much 
to hear sometimes from him. Recommending Col. Read, who com- 
mands the 1st regiment on its march to New York, and also Dr. 
Skinner, a gentleman eminent in his profession. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 105. 

From George Ross. 1776. August 18. New York. 

The Phoenix and Rose have just passed " our " batteries, without 
much damage; the visit they had from the fire-ships made them sick 
of their station and they have joined the fleet at the Narrows; every 
countenance cheerful and if the enemy dares attack they will undoubt- 
edly procure themselves a severe drubbing. A. L. S. i p. IV, 106. 

From Pliarne. 1776. August 22. Elizabethtown. 

Being so near the scene of action has visited the various works raised 
for the defense of liberty; at Amboy saw the militia in the greatest dis- 
order, though commanded by good men ; at New York found the forti- 
fications excellent, but not enough men for their defense; however, 
expects their ardor will make up for all deficiencies. Rumors of an 
attack which so far has not materialized; trusts it will be soon. A. L. 
S. 4 p. (In French.) IV, 107. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 185 

From De Watteville de Belp. 1776. August 25. Berne, Switzerland. 

Acknowledging favor of nth inst., containing the petition of poor 
George Leopold Besson ; is commissioned to send the two enclosed new 
louis d'or, but to say that this Besson is not a subject of their Canton. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IV, 108. 

Fro?n Marg[are]t Stevenson. 
1776. September 3. Northumberland Court. 

Acknowledging favor of March 29th ; finds few opportunities to send 
him letters. Has his sword and all other things which shall be care- 
fully preserved. Account of a little jaunt to Cambridge with some 
friends. A. L. S. i p. IV, 109. 

From Mary Hewson. 1776. September 3. London. 

Concerning the settlement of her money matters. Has just arrived 
in London with her three children to visit her mother [Mrs. Stevenson]. 
Hopes this horrid war may be ended soon so that they can come to 
America. Account of her son William proposing a toast to Dr. Frank- 
lin. Glad that Temple has received the surname of Franklin ; always 
knew he had some right to it. A. L. S. 4 p. IV, no. 

Frotn Jonathan Williams, Jr. 1776. September 3. London. 

Unable to marry from lack of means. Mr. A[lexander]'s offer; his 
hopes for the future. Indignant at being called a Tory. Agent ap- 
pointed by New Jersey. A. L. 2 p. XXXVII, 38. 

From Mary Hewson. 1776. September 8. Kensington. 

Giving an account of the doings of his various friends in London. 
A. L. S. 4 p. IV, III. 

From Eliza [beth] Partridge. 1776. September 17. Boston. 

Ill health and want of spirit the reason for her long silence. Begs 
his kind assistance for Messrs. Austen and Barrett; they go on busi- 
ness about a quantity of goods taken from her and others by Gen. Howe 
when he left Boston, and afterwards captured by a United States vessel. 
Trusts heaven may smile upon his endeavors to save his country from 
ruin. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 112. 



i86 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Fro7n Sam[uel] Cooper. 1776. September 17. Boston. 

Expressing pleasure at Franklin's being appointed by Congress to 
confer with Gen. Howe; not sorry the enemy appears so eager for ne- 
gotiating; suspects France has made some motion that alarms Britain; 
doubts not that Franklin will show the world that America has nego- 
tiators as well as soldiers. Many captures made of British ships richly 
laden. Regrets that the American fleet is not in a state of greater 
forwardness. A. L. S. i p. IV, 113. 

From W. Barker. 1776. September 18. Rotterdam. 

Recommending as an officer of trust, Mr. Charles Frederick Be- 
daulx, a Swiss gentleman, who was lieutenant of grenadiers in the ser- 
vice of England ; anxious now to use his sword in the cause of liberty. 
The writer does not expect Franklin to recollect his name, but he had 
the honor to dine with him and Sir John Pringle at the house of Mr. 
Davidson, whose partner he is. Has employed his pen in the cause of 
civil liberty and against the violent measures of the Ministry, but these 
and other greater efforts were in vain. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 114. 

From Jonathan Williams, Jr. 1776. September 19. London. 

News of Franklin's friends; the good Bishop [of St. Asaph] and his 
family gone to Wales. Mr. A[lexander] with his lovely daughters are 
in France. Business promises well. Concerning an edition of Frank- 
lin's political works to be published by the son of Franklin's philosophic 
friend at Wanstead. A. L. 3 p. XXXVII, 39. 

From W[illiam] T[emple] Franklin. 
1776. September 21. Perth Amboy. 

Sorry to find that his intended visit to his father in prison does not 
meet with Franklin's approbation; his mother knows not what to do 
without his father's advice and assistance; assures Franklin of his entire 
ignorance of public affairs, in case he imagines he would give his father 
improper information. Thinks his mother will keep him with her, un- 
less she can hear from her husband concerning her removal. A. L. S. 
2 p. IV, 115. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 187 

By The Continental Congress. 1776. September 24. 

Instructions to Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane, and Arthur Lee, 
Commissioners to France. D. S. John Hancock, Presid[en]t. 6 p. 

LXXV, 2. 

Printed in Journals of the Continental Congress, Washington, 1906, V, 813. 

By The Continental Congress. [1776.] Sept[embe]r 26 and 28. 

Selection of the Commissioners to the Court of France and their in- 
structions. D. S. Cha[rle]s Thomson, Sec[retar]y. i p. (With 
copy.) LXXV, 8 and 9. 

Printed in Journals of the Continental Congress, Washington, 1906, V, 827, 833. 

By The Continental Congress. 1776. September 30. 

Commission of Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane, and Arthur Lee, 
as Commisssioners to France. D. S. i p. (Copy in duplicate.) 

LXXV, I and 10. 

Printed in Journals of the Continental Congress, Washington, 1906, V, 833. 

By The Continental Congress. 1776. September 30. Philadelphia. 

Commission of Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane and Thomas Jefferson 
as Commissioners to France. D. i p. (Last lines missing.) 

LXXVI, 16. 

Printed in Journals of the Continental Congress, Washington, 1906, V, 833. 

From M. Fadeville to The Continental Congress. 
1776. October 7. Bordeaux. 

Congress by its course in defending liberty and property in America 
has made its cause the cause of mankind. Regrets that he cannot give 
his services in the field, but sends a present of four dozen woolen socks 
for the army, and will do this every year as proof of his sincerity. 

(Endorsement by L. V. Potiens that he has received and will deliver 
the stockings as directed.) A. L. S. 2 p. IV, iisYz' 



i88 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Pollard. 1776. October 11. Montreal. 

Everyone, priests and lordlfngs, prostrating themselves before the 
idol of tyranny; the few honest men who sigh for the return of the 
troops are persecuted. The printer, M. Mesplet, the workmen and 
himself were dragged to prison and kept there 26 days without a trial. 
If Franklin thinks his sorrows worthy the attention of Congress, begs 
that it may be directed towards his friend, M. Mesplet. Obliged to 
quit America for London ; leaves a translation of ' Common Sense ' 
in the hands of M. Mesplet, and a letter on the affairs of the time; 
like the Jews who concealed their children from Herod, these must be 
hidden from the tyrant. Would willingly pour out blood as well as 
ink for the success of the child of virtue and liberty. Posterity will 
place Franklin's name with Pompey, Brutus and Cato. A. L. S. 3 p. 
(In French.) IV, 116. 

From John Fraser. 1776. October 15. Reading [Pa.]. 

Unfortunately received his second leave for Canada when he could 
make no use of it, owing to indisposition; as soon as his health permits 
will journey to Philadelphia and thank Franklin in person. A. L. S. 
2 p. IV, 117. 

From The [Continental] Congress to The American Commissioners. 

1776. October 16. 

Additional instructions relative to treating with ambassadors of 
foreign states at the Court of Versailles. D. S. John Hancock, Presi- 
dent. 2 p. LIII, 22. 

Printed in Journals of the Continental Congress, 1906, VI, 884. 

By The Continental Congress. 1776. October 22. 

Instructions to the Commissioners to the Court of France to procure 
eight line of battleships, manned and fitted for service. D. S. John 
Hancock, Presid[en]t. I p. LXXV, 11. 

Duplicate of above. D. S. Cha[rle]s Thomson, Sec[retar]y, John 
Hancock, Presid[en]t. i p. LXXV, 12. 

Printed in Journals of the Continental Congress, Washington, 1906, VI, 895. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 189 

From The Continental Congress, Committee on Secret Corre- 
spondence to The American Commissioners. 

1776. October 24. Philadelphia. 

The ship of war, called the Reprisal, has been allotted to carry Dr. 
Franklin to the port of Nantes; the Reprisal is then destined to proceed 
against their enemies, and send any prizes captured to the ports of 
France; therefore asks Commissioners to make immediate application to 
the Court of France to grant the protection of their ports to American 
men-of-war and their prizes; if this application is crowned with suc- 
cess, he must then obtain leave to make sale of certain parts of those 
prizes; directions in case these requests are granted, also in case they 
are not. Recommends Captain Wickes of the Reprisal as a worthy 
man ; he will treat prisoners with humanity and do honor to his ap- 
pointment. A. L. S. Rob[er]t Morris, Richard Henry Lee, Jno. 
Witherspoon, Will. Hooper. 4 p. IV, 118. 

From J. Ingen Housz. 1776. November 15. Vienna. 

Shocked that America has become the seat of horror and bloodshed, 
a country destined for the abode of tranquility and the asylum for the 
persecuted. Finds himself often obliged to defend Franklin before per- 
sons who ascribe to him, in a great measure, this unhappy contest. Begs 
Franklin to let him hear some news of him. Dr. Priestley's second vol- 
ume on air is full of new matter and opens a large field to philosophers. 
Describes in detail the new electrical machine by one Volta, over which 
there is much discussion. Announces his marriage to a Dutch lady only 
five years younger than himself. Hopes Franklin may be the means 
of bringing to an end this bloody contest. A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 119. 

From Jean Francois Ubetius. 1776. December 10. Turin. 

Almost seven years since he had the pleasure of meeting Franklin in 
London at the Cafe Smyrna; Recommending a young man of Milan, 
who is inflamed with zeal for the cause of liberty; any attention shown 
him will oblige the Rev. Pere Beccaria. Would like much to see 
Franklin again and to pass the rest of his days in America, but the sea- 
trip is extremely disagreeable to him. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

IV, 120. 



190 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Abbe Desprades. [1776?] December 10. Paris. 

Requesting a letter of recommendation for a young surgeon who is 
going to offer his services to the allied armies in the United States. A. 
L. I p. (In French.) LX, 100. 

From Mottin de la Balme. 1776. December 14. Bordeaux. 

Was just about to send him two letters of recommendation co 
Philadelphia when he was informed of Franklin's arrival at Nantes; 
sends them now and begs him to repair the loss by substituting some 
other protector. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) IV, 121. 

From C[harles Frederic] Bedaulx. 
1776. December 16. Havre-de-Grace. 

Takes the liberty of sending the enclosed letter, which was given 
him by Mr. Barker at Rotterdam, three months before. Embarked at 
that time for America, but having been taken by the English, found an 
opportunity to return to France. Is about to set out again to use his 
sword in the cause of liberty against oppression. A. L. S. i p. IV, 123. 

From C[harles Frederic] Bedaulx. 1776. December 16. Paris. 

Devoted to the cause of America but wishes to do more than make 
useless avowals. Hesitated at first to go to America, fearing to be 
taken for one of the numerous adventurers; after his first attempt, has 
still enough money left to cross the ocean, but desires Franklin's advice 
as to ways and means; anxious to arrive before the opening of the 
next campaign in order to take part in the operations. A. L. S. 3 p. 
(In French.) IV, 122. 

From Phil[ip] Thicknesse. 1776. December 16. Calais. 

Being an indirect sufferer in the cause of American liberty, ventures 
to write to Franklin. His misfortunes due to his having spoken and 
sometimes written his honest sentiments relative to Franklin's public 
ones. By the defeat of Lord Camden in the House of Lords he lost 
£10,000, as Franklin will see by the enclosed papers. Is now pub- 
lishing by subscription " A Journey Through France," and entreats the 
honor of his name as well as those of the Continental Congress as sub- 
scribers. His motives not mercenary; they spring from a desire to have 
those names associated with his for future generations to see. A. L. S. 
I p. IV, 124. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 191 

From Jane Mecom. 

1776. December 16. Goshen, Chester Co., Pa. 

Distressed at his leaving the country. Retired for safety to the above 

place on hearing that the enemy were advancing towards them. Return 

of her son-in-law, Collas, who has obtained command of a Continental 

ship and expects to go to France. A. L. S. i p. IV, 125. 

From J. Gruel. 1776. December 16. Nantes. 

Enclosing a letter from Mr. Roslin, Farmer General, in charge of all 
the details which concern the affairs of America. Asks Franklin's in- 
fluence with Mr, Roslin in the matter of reducing the tax on spermaceti 
oil from Rhode Island. Account of the arrival in port and the unload- 
ing of the Success; dispositions to be made of the cargo. Arrival of the 
Reprisal ; account of the sale of her cargo. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

IV, 126. 
From C[harles] G[uillauine] F[rederic] Dumas. 
1776. December 17. Leyden. 

Overjoyed at his arrival in Paris. The minimum expenses of a young 
man studying law at Leyden would be fifty guineas per annum. A. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 3. 

Frofn C[harles] G[uillauine] F[rederic] Dumas. 
1776. December 17. Leyden. 

Sketches the great work ahead of Franklin; certain that it will be 
consummated with honor; when it is completed will expect a long visit 
from both him and Mr. Deane. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XXXIX, 4. 

Fro7ti J. Gruel. 1776. December 18. Nantes. 

Announcing the arrival of the ship Concord, Capt. Harris. Recom- 
mending M. de Basmurieu, brother of his nephew to Franklin's kind 
attention. Just informed of the arrival of the Mary Elizabeth, Capt. 
Young. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) IV, 127. 

From Berard, Freres & Co. 1776. December 20. L'Orient. 

Making proposals for the purchase of a parcel of tobacco, which they 
hear he has the disposal of; can offer him the best of terms and will 
engage to take any quantity he may import in the future. Have it in 



192 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

their power to ship any article the Colonies may be in want of. Would 
like to have a conversation with Franklin in order to make certain 
proposals not to be trusted on paper. A. L. S. 4 p. IV, 128. 

From Montaudouin. 1776. December 21. Nantes. 

Disappointed at being deprived of the pleasure of Franklin's com- 
pany at dinner. Will write recommending Franklin to M. Beudet, who 
has been a long time employed in Ministerial affairs and may be of use 
to him. Also has a cousin in Paris, Madame Duboccage, who would 
be delighted to welcome him. Encloses a poem which expresses but 
feebly the sentiment Franklin inspires. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

IV, 129. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Secret Corre- 
spondence to The American Commissioners. 
1776. December 21. Baltimore. 

Present state of affairs in America. No accommodation with Great 
Britain will be made except upon the recognition of the complete inde- 
pendence of America. A. L. S. Benj[amin] Harrison et al. 6 p. 

LIII, 24. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres. Wharton, II, 226. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Secret Corre- 
spondence to The American Commissioners. 
1776. December 21. Baltimore. 

Copy of preceding, with an added note by Rob[er]t Morris, dated 
Philadelphia, February 26, 1777, saying that he had just written Mr. 
Bingham a full state of intelligence up to the present time; desiring him 
to transmit a copy to the Commissioners. L. S. 7 p. LIII, 25. 

From J. Gruel. 1776. December 21. Nantes. 

Encloses bill of lading of the ship Mary Elizabeth. Arrival that 
morning of the Fanny, Captain Sir William Jokely; account of her 
cargo. News of the capture by the American privateers of 1 1 transports 
destined for the army of General Howe. Capt. Wickes dined with 
them the previous evening; expects to depart immediately. All Frank- 
lin's orders carried out. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) IV, 130. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 193 

From William Alexander. 1776. December 22. Dijon. 

Greatly surprised on hearing of Franklin's arrival, although he will 
not believe the motives assigned for that journey, such as safety, etc. 
Invites him to visit them, just himself and his two young girls; offers 
him various inducements; at liberty to remain incognito if he so desires. 
Offers his services to Franklin, who may command him in anything but 
high treason. A. L. S. 4 p. IV, 131. 

By The Continental Congress. 1776. December 23. 

Resolution authorizing the American Commissioners to borrow 
£2,000,000, at 6 per cent, interest, to be repaid if possible in the products 
of North America, i p. (Copy.) LIII, 26. 

By The Continental Congress. 1776. December 23. 

Instructions to the Commissioners at the Court of France to borrow 
money. D. S. John Hancock, Cha[rle]s Thomson, Sec[retar]y. i p. 

LXXV, 17. 

Printed in Journals of the Continental Congress, Washington, 1906, VI, 1037. 

By The Continental Congress. 1776. December 23. 

Instructions to the Commissioners at the Court of France. D. S. 

Char[le]s Thomson, Sec[retar]y, John Hancock, Presid[en]t. I p. 

(In duplicate.) LXXV, 14 and 15. 

Printed in Journals of the Continental Congress, Washington, 1906, VI, 1035. 

From J. Gruel. 1776. December 24. Nantes. 
Hopes Franklin arrived in Paris without accident. Concerning the 
sale of certain prizes. Disposition made of the thirty-six quarts of 
Indigo. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IV, 132. 

From S[ilas] Deane. 1776. December 24. Paris. 
Sends to his care a letter for Comte de Vergennes. A. L. S. I p. 

IV, 133. 

From W[illiam] T[emple] Franklin. 
1776. December 24. Versailles. 

Mr. Gerard not being in town, waited upon Count de Vergennes and 

delivered him the letters, which he put in his pocket and desired him to 

call for his answer the next morning at 9 ; therefore purposes to stay in 

town all night. A. L. S. i p. IV, 134. 

2—13 



194 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From N[athan] Rumsey. 1776. December 24. Nantes. 

Acknowledging his favor of the 15th inst., the contents of which 
shall be fully and punctually observed. Trouble between Mr. Delamain 
and Capt. Wickes concerning a prize which the former says is French 
property; hopes Franklin's presence at Court will soon decide such afl[airs 
in their favor. A. L. S. 2 p. IV, 135. 

Fro7n Capt. James Pratchell. 1776. December 24. 

Report concerning the bark La Vigne, hailing from Hull, England, 
meeting with the 'Anglo-American ' armed vessel, Reprisal, Capt. Lam- 
bert Wickes, from Philadelphia, and of the vessel and cargo being seized 
and brought into Quiberon, France, as a prize. Had loaded a cargo of 
brandy and wine at Rochefort and was bound for Hull. Saw Mr. 
Franklin on board the Reprisal. His cargo sold at Quiberon to private 
parties and does not know what was done with his vessel. D. 2 p. 
(In French.) LIII, 27. 

From . 1776. December 25. 

A person living in the country who has a favor to ask of Dr. Franklin 
inquires what time he can be seen. N. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) 

LXXI, 107. 

From Ralph Izard. 1776. December 27. London. 

Heartily congratulating him on his arrival in Europe. The bearer, 
a son of Mr. Henry Laurens of South Carolina^ is warmly attached to 
the cause of his country and is desirous of being presented to Franklin. 
A. L. I p. IV, 136. 

From J. Gruel. 1776. December 28. Nantes. 

His bankers in Paris anxious to present their respects to Franklin. 
Concerning the capture of the ship La Vigne, by the Reprisal ; her 
cargo. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) IV, 137. 

From J. Gruel. 1776. December 28. Nantes. 

Recommending Messieurs Tourbon «& Bauer, his bankers in Paris, 
to Franklin's kindness. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) IV, 138. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 195 

From Francis Mackay. 1776. December 28. Paris. 

Would be glad to have the pleasure of meeting Dr. Franklin or Mr. 
Deane, incognito; asks him to name the place and hour that he may 
acquaint him with things not proper to commit to paper. A. L. S. 
I P- IV, 139. 

Fro r« Chevalier Hamilton. 1776. December 28. Paris. 

Sends his compliments to Dr. Franklin on his safe arrival in Paris. 
Would have w^aited on him personally but has been very ill. Inquires 
how the former Miss Grahme and her husband, of Philadelphia, are 
doing. N. in 3d P. 2 p. LXX, 113. 

Fro?n [Pere Joseph Etienne] Bertier. 
1776. December 29. Paris. 

Regrets that a cold prevents him from marking in person his respect 
and attachment for Franklin. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) IV, 140. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Secret Corre- 
spondence to The American Commissioners. 
1776. December 30. Baltimore. 

Gen. Washington's success at Trenton. Propositions to be made to 
France. A. L. S. Benj [amin] Harrison et al. 3 p. LIII, 28. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres. Wharton, II, 240. 

By The Continental Congress. 1776. December 30. 

Informing the Commissioners at the Court of France of the send- 
ing of Commissioners to the Courts of Vienna and the Grand Duke of 
Tuscany, and to solicit the interference of the Emperor and the Duke 
of Tuscany to prevent Great Britain from sending foreign troops to 
this country. D. S, John Hancock, Presid[en]t, Cha[rle]s Thomson, 
Sec[retar]y. i p. LXXV, 20. 

Printed in Journals of the Continental Congress, Washington, 1906, VI, 1057. 

Fro7n Nathan Rumsey. 1776. December 31. Nantes. 

Arrival of a brigantine loaded with tobacco from Georgetown in 
Maryland; on her came one Mr. Robert Maise, of Philadelphia, who 
sups with him that evening; he brings news of Major Rogers' defeat in 



196 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Connecticut; the royalists have retired into New York to winter 
quarters ; no word from the Lakes since the defeat at Crown Point. Ar- 
rival of certain vessels; would be glad of Mr. Morris' presence; M. 
Gruel speaks no English and the writer has no directions or power to 
act. A. L. S. 3 p. IV, 141. 

From J. Mosueron. 1776. December 31. Nantes. 

Asks Franklin's advice concerning a plan for fitting out a French ship 
to trade with America; his doubts as to the ultimate success of such an 
expedition ; if Franklin approves would like some information about the 
ports of America and the nature of the cargo required ; advantage to 
him to have some letters of introduction in Franklin's hand. Impresses 
on him the necessity for secrecy. Less self-interest than a desire to be 
useful to brave men, which animates him in this affair. A. L. S. 4 p. 
(In French.) IV, 142. 

From [Louis Le Begue Duportail] to The American Commissioners. 

[1776. December.] 

Offers his services to the United States. L. in 3d P. i p. (In 
French.) LXII, 95a. 

From [Louis Le Begue Duportail.] [1776. December.] 

He adds certain conditions to those of yesterday. Begs that great 
precaution be taken in seeking his recommendations. Were it known 
that he was going to America, the Minister would not let him leave 
France. A. L. 3 p. (In French.) LXII, 95b. 

Frojn Cha[rle]s Biddle. [1776. Philadelphia.] 

Asks that Dr. Franklin recommend him for a position on the new 
Navy Board. A. L. S. i p. XLII, 95. 

From Le Ray de Chaumont. [1776?] 

Has seen, with Franklin's grandson, a boarding house which may 
suit. A French gentleman who commanded a troop of volunteers in 
Poland offers to go to America with his troop and fight for the Colonies. 
Strongly recommends him and his troopers. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) XLIV, 275. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 197 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg /o The American Commissioners. [1776?] 

Offers to furnish a certain quantity of guns or woolen clothing in 
exchange for Maryland or Virginia tobacco. Mem. i p. (In 
French.) LVI, 62. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. [1776?] 

With reference to negotiations with the Farmers-General about a 
contract for supplying them with tobacco from Virginia. Mem. 3 p. 
(In French.) LVI, 21. 

From W. Fergusson. [1776?] Paris. 

Congratulates Franklin on his arrival in Paris; desires to pay his 
respects and make a few domestic inquiries. L. in 3d P. i p. 

XLI, 195. 
From Gadolle. [1776?] 

'Sending him a prospectus of his school. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

XL, 32. 
From Gadolle. [1776?] Bel-air. 

Offers to take Franklin's two grandsons into his school. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) XL, 25. 

From Field Marshal Comte de Vienne. [1776.] 

Asking for a letter of introduction to General Washington for his 
son the Marquis de Vienne who has served for 20 years as officer in a 
regiment of dragoons. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) XLIV, 285. 

From . [1776?] 

Informs him of the great pleasure with which their Friendly Society 
heard his letter to him. Mr. Raspe, whom Franklin saw in Germany, 
joined the Society. Major Dawson, another member, is made Lieu- 
tenant Governor of the Isle of Man ; rejoiced that the Major will not 
be called upon to fight the Americans. They consider all absent mem- 
bers as still belonging to their little club and cherish affection for them. 
Was exceedingly affected by the letter Congress sent to the people of 
England. L. 3 p. (Torn.) XLIV, 95. 

From E. Thornton. 1777. January i. Paris. 

Enclosing a letter to Franklin and requesting an acknowledgment of 
same. A. L. S. i p. V, i. 



198 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

By The Continental Congress. 1777. January 2. Baltimore. 

Commission of Benjamin Franklin as Commissioner to the Court of 
Spain. D. S. John Hancock, with seal, i p. LXXV, 5. 

From [Louis LeBegue] Dup [or] t[ai]l. 1777. January2. Versailles. 

Requesting Franklin to send him a reply with reference to his 
proposition relating to a corps of troops. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

LXXI, 20. 

From Major [Henry Emanuel] Lutterloh. 1777. January 3. Paris. 

Giving particulars about himself and his previous services. Secrecy 
of his mission to Paris. His offer to raise troops in Germany or 
Northern Europe. L. S. 3 p. LX, 51. 

From J. Ingen Housz. 1777. January 4. Vienna. 

Surprised to hear of Franklin's arrival in Paris; hopes his coming has 
for its object a happy reunion between the mother country and her 
colonies. If he had known earlier of Franklin's arrival would have ac- 
companied his Imperial master to France; Franklin will probably see 
and talk with him in the disguise of a private man. Proposes various 
schemes to enable him to come to Paris, one of them, the desire on the 
part of some family of distinction there to have him inoculate their 
children. A. L. S. V, 2. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. January 4. Nantes. 

Acknowledging his favor of 26th December ; will immediately proceed 
to Port I'Orient and execute that business ; will come to Paris on his re- 
turn, if Franklin thinks it absolutely necessary. L. S. V, 3. 

From [Conrad Alexandre] Gerard [de Rayneval] to The Deputies 

[American Commissioners]. 1777. January 6. Versailles. 

Desires them to postpone the communication of the memorial con- 
taining particular requests. Will advise them when it can be oppor- 
tunely presented ; might confine themselves for the present to the 
memorial explaining the state of affairs in America. L. i p. (In 
French.) XLVII, 70. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 199 

Fro7n Jer[emiali] Ferry. 1777. January 7. [Paris.] 

His principal business in Paris is to get a more satisfactory account of 
his countrymen in America than he has been able to do in England, for 
which purpose he will wait on Franklin. A. L. S. I p. V, 4. 

From Jer[emiah] Ferry. 1777. January 8. [Paris.] 

Asks for half an hour's private conversation with Franklin previous 
to his departure for London; will also be glad of Mr. Deane's acquaint- 
ance. A. L. S. I p. V, 5. 

From Major [H. E.] Lutterloh. 1777. January 8. Paris. 

With reference to his proposal to raise a corps of troops in Germany 
for service in the United States. L. in 3d P. i p. LX, 50. 

From [Major] H. E. Lutterloh to The American Commissioners. 

1777- January 8. Paris. 

Plans and conditions under which he will enter the American Army. 
A. L. S. 2 p. LXII, 74. 

From [Thomas Francois] Dalibard. 1777. January 8. 

Introducing M. de Roussille who wishes to confer with Dr. Franklin 
about some expeditions he proposes to make in North America. N. in 
3d P. I p. (In French.) LXX, 76. 

From The Farmers-General. 1777. January 9. Paris. 

Memorandum with reference to shipments of tobacco to be made 
to the Farmers-General by Messrs. Franklin, Deane and Lee for ac- 
count of Congress. Questions and replies as to terms, manner of ship- 
ment and delivery, payment, etc. Mem. 4 p. (In French.) LIII, 29. 

Fro7n W[illiam] T[emple] Franklin. 1777. January 9. Passy. 

News received from IVIr. Montaudouin of the arrival of a Scotchman 
at Nantes who says that Gen. Howe had embarked ten thousand men to 
attack Philadelphia ; Montaudouin also mentioned an unexpected meeting 
he had wnth Du Coudray, who sailed from Havre December 14. A. 
L. S. 2 p. V, 6. 



200 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From The Continental Congress, Secret Committee to The American 
Commissioners. 1777. January 9. Baltimore. 

Minute account of Gen. Washington's movements against the enemy 
at Trenton and Princeton, and the numbers captured and slain ; this 
information gathered from a gentleman who was in the action ; supposes 
the General has been too busy to write and waits the final issue. L. S. 
Benj. Harrison, Richard Henry Lee. 2 p. V, 7. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 97. 

From Le Ray de Chaumont. 1777. January 9. 

Can procure 200,000 pounds of East India salt-petre at 60 livres the 
hundredweight; asks for a prompt decision. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) V, 8. 

From Nathan Rumsey. 1777. January 10. Nantes. 

Jealousy between the Admiralty officers of Vannes and M. Guerin of 
Auray about the latter's having ventured on such a purchase without 
their consent, and they seem determined to give as much trouble as pos- 
sible; hopes Franklin can prevail with the marine officers to order those 
officers of Vannes to desist troubling M. Guerin as if these matters are 
carried too far they may injure the sales of our prizes hereafter. A. L. 
S. 2 p. V, 9. 

From Gloro. 1777. January 10. L'Orient, 

Asks if Franklin knows anything of one Benjamin Salter; tells of a 
transaction he had with him at the Ascension Isles; he sold him goods 
and received in payment two bills of exchange ; one of them drawn on 
William Carothorne in London, who is a prisoner for debt in the 
King's Exchange prison and will say nothing to it. His desperate finan- 
cial difficulties. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) V, lO. 

From de Vallenais. 1777. January 10. Paris. 

M. de Chaumont's ship, in which he was to embark, has lately set 
sail. Several others ready to set sail in two or three weeks. Asks for 
a letter to Mr. Grouet so that he may treat with him for their passage 
on them to America ; will take a relation along with him ; their 
intention not only to get in the American service, but to settle for life 
in that free country. A. L. S. 3 p. V, ii. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 201 

From Larab[er]t Wickes. 1777. January 11. Nantes. 

Has no opinion of the 60-gun ship; thinks the frigates better for 
his purpose. Recommends the St. John. Can get other ships but fears 
they are too ancient. A. L. S. 3 p. V, 13. 

From Juliana Ritchie. 1777. January 12. Cambray. 

Warns Franklin that he is surrounded by spies who watch his every 
movement; motive for this espionage. She resides at present at Cam- 
bray, taking charge of five young ladies of fortune. Her great friend- 
ship for Franklin. A. L. S. 3 p. V, 13^. 

From Blondel. 1777. January 13. 

His sympathy with the Bostonians in their revolt against tyranny. 
Served for eight years in the King's guard, but after their disbandment 
has been unable to find a military opening. Asks Franklin to obtain 
for him a position in the American army suitable to an officer of his 
experience. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 14. 

From Michael Kovats. 1777. January 13. Bordeaux. 

Details experience as private and officer in Hungary, and states that 
he is sailing from Bordeaux [for America]. Asks assistance for him- 
self and friends. A. L. S. 4 p. (In Latin.) LXX, 88. 

Frofn The Continental Congress, Committee of Secret 

Correspondence, to The American Commissioners. 

1777- January 14. Philadelphia. 

Transmit resolves of Congress of the 19th and 29th of November, 
last, relative to the purchase of supplies in France. L. S. Rob[er]t 
Morris, Chairman. 2 p. LIII, 31. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, 11, 246. 

From The Continental Congress, Secret Committee to The American 
Commissioners. 1777. January 14. Philadelphia. 

Enclosing two resolves of Congress concerning the purchase of brass 
cannon, arms and equipage. Disposition of the Court of France as re- 
gards their views. A. L. S. Rob[er]t Morris, Chairman. 3 p. V, 15. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 246. 



202 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Nathan Rumsey. 1777. January 14. Nantes. 

Has put the papers respecting the prizes in Mr, Morris's hands. 
Concerning Capt. Cod's offer to purchase his vessel of Capt. Wickes. 
A. L. S. 2 p. V, 16. 

From Meschinet De Richemond fils. 
1777- January 14. La Rochelle. 

Begging Franklin to send some American traders to La Rochelle; its 
fine haven and its excellent market ; their brandy almost as good as 
that of Cognac. L. S. 2 p. V, 17. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. January 14. Nantes. 

His arrival in Nantes; has seen M. Montaudouin and Mr. Schweig- 
hauser; will collect the best information on every subject affecting 
American interests; will send a proper report later. Capt. Wickes 
waiting to know if prizes are admissible into French ports. A. L. S. 

XXXVII, 40. 

From Fadeville. 1777. January 14. Bordeaux. 

Sends a letter written by a late major of a regiment of Hussars with 
the King of Prussia; he sails for America on the Catharine of Dart- 
mouth ; if some Prussian officers he expects fail to arrive before he sails, 
desires to know what steps he must take to enable them to follow. 
A. L. S. 2 p. V, 18. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes to The American Commissioners. 
1777- January 14. Nantes. 

Concerning Captain Nicholson; advisability of having his assistance 
in Paris; his qualifications as a commander of a ship of war. A. L. S. 
4 p. V, 19. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 112. 

From Guerin. 1777. January 15. Paris. 

Concerning the affair of his brother and the Admiralty officers. [See 
V, 9.] A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 20. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 203 

From Ternant. 1777. January 15. Bordeaux. 

Just arrived in Bordeaux after a dangerous illness; his hasty depart- 
ure renders doubtful the receipt of the letters Franklin promised him; 
has left directions for forwarding them. The new Spanish Minister, 
Count Florida Blanca, will undoubtedly serve his cause with unremit- 
ting ardor. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 21. 

From [Louis Le Begue Duportail], 1777. January 16. Versailles. 

He asks to know, as soon as possible, the result of his application. 
A. L. I p. (In French.) LXII, 96. 

From Chevalier D'Anmours. 1777. January 17. Bordeaux. 

Received from Madame la Marquise de Saineville a letter written 
by Franklin in his favor to Mr. Morris in Philadelphia; sentiments of 
gratitude and veneration towards Franklin. A. L. S. I p. V, 22. 

f 
From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777' January 17. Nantes. 

Description of the ship Mercury; her cargo, time of sailing, etc. 
A. L. S. 4 p. XXXVII, 41. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. January 18. Nantes. 

Enclosing a letter which he leaves to Franklin's judgment whether to 
send or not. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 42. 

From Comte Macdonald. 1777. January 18. Pau. 

Wishes to know what encouragement he can give to capable officers 
who offer their services to the United Provinces; his character well- 
known; originally from Scotland, now settled in France. Criticises 
the American tactics so far; has a plan of operation for America. 
A. L. S. 2 p. V, 23. 

His services and his plan of discipline for training soldiers, if his ser- 
vices are accepted by Congress. Mem. 3 p. LXII, 76. 

From Recholier Freres. 1777. January 18. Bordeaux. 

Forwarding a letter from M. Ternant who left Bordeaux on the 
15th; will forward him any letters from Franklin with great care. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) V, 24, 



204 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Henry Echlin. 
1777- January 18. Prison of the Abbaie St. Germain. 

Not personally known to Franklin, but ventures to address him, not 
as a countryman but as a fellow creature reduced by a captivity of 
nearly three years, by illness and every sort of evil, to the last degree of 
unhappiness. Was once a lover of liberty and an enemy to oppression. 
The bearer will receive Franklin's commands. A. L. S. i p. V, 25. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. January 18. Nantes. 

Enclosing a letter and an inventory of the frigate Count de Maure- 
pas; concerning the fitting out of the ship; recommends Mr. Gourlade 
for this service. A. L. S, 2 p. V, 26. 

From [Louis Le Begue Duportail]. 1777. January 19. Paris. 

Because he does not know sufficient English to read it when written, 
he is not sure that he has understood the answer sent to him at Ver- 
sailles. As his friend, who understands English, is away, he writes that 
he thinks his request to enter the American service has been refused. 
If this is correct no answer is necessary; but, if he has misunderstood, 
he asks the answer to be written in Latin or French. Requests that 
all letters and writings from him be destroyed. A. L. 2 p. (In 
French.) LXII, 97. 

From [Louis Le Begue Duportail] to The American Commissioners. 
1777' January 21. Paris. 

He is very sorry to have understood exactly the opposite to what was 
written. He will leave that evening for Versailles to learn the 
Minister's intention. He will write also to ' our gentlemen ' to know 
their decision, then he will give their names. A. L. i p. (In French.) 

LXII, 98. 

From [Major] H. E. Lutterloh to The American Commissioners. 
1777' January 21. Paris. 

He proposes another plan for recruiting; if it is not approved of, 
he goes to Nantes as agreed upon. A. L. S. i p. LXII, 75. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 205 

Fro7n C[harles] G[uillaume] F[rederic] Dumas to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. January 21. Leiden. 

Business relative to his position as American agent; quotes certain 
correspondence he has had with a great commercial house. A. L. 
S. 5 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 5. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1777. January 21. Paris. 

Concerning the affair of supplying tobacco to the Farmers-General; 
formation for this purpose of a society, the result of which he hopes 
will be a market for commodities and merchandise, to the mutual ad- 
vantage of two nations, and also to the individual members. A. L. 3 p. 
(In French.) V, 27. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 

1777- January 21. Nantes. 

Finished the examination of the Mercury's cargo ; other matters still 
to be attended to. Arrival of the Chevalier Duplessis; will do all he 
can to assist him. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 43. 

From Montaudouin. 1777. January 21. Nantes. 

Recommending to Franklin's notice M. de L'Ehombe, member of the 
Superior Council of Port au Prince; his keen desire to meet Franklin. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) V, 28. 

From Du Buat. 1777. January 21. Ploermel. 

Desire of Chevalier de Louvigny and Chevalier le Fer to enter 
into the service of America. Wishes to know what treatment they would 
have if they entered the army, one as colonel, the other as captain of 
infantry or cavalry, and what advance money they would receive at the 
moment of departure. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 29. 

From Will[iam] Strahan. 1777. January 23. London. 

Asking about Franklin's welfare. Sees Sir John Pringle often; he is 

quite well, barring insomnia. Hopes that peace, unity and happiness 

.may be soon restored. Hears Franklin saw his colleague, Mr. Charles 

Fox, frequently; he will find him one of the cleverest fellows of his 

years he ever knew. A. L. S. i p. V, 30. 



2o6 Letters TO Benjamin Franklin 

From Paulze. 1777. January 23. Paris. 

Sees no difficulty in the matter of Mr. Franklin's taking an interest 
in the Society for furnishing tobacco to the Farmers-General. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) V, 31. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777- January 23. Nantes. 

Date of the Mercury's sailing; unless he receives further commands, 
will then set off for Paris. Trusts the Amphitrite got off from L'Orient. 
A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 44. 

Frojn [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1777. January 23. 

Requesting Messrs. Franklin, Deane and Lee to give an interview 

to M. Ba}'ard, on important business. A. N. in 3d P. i p. (In 

French.) LXX, 85. 

From Jo. Pfeffinger et al. 1777. January 24. Strassburg. 

Attesting the wholesomeness of a beverage similar to beer, manufac- 
tured by Anton Holper and Frantz Xaverius Deck, in Landsor, upper 
Alsace. D. S. i p. LIX, 33. 

From [Captain] Garanger. 1777. January 24. Havre. 

Has a letter of recommendation to Franklin from M. Brisson ; his 
twenty-one years' service in the artillery; his desire to enter the service 
of America; his friends obtained for him from the King the rank of 
captain of artillery and for his brother that of lieutenant ; only expected 
to wait at Havre six days, and it is now six weeks ; their money exhausted, 
having received no advance on their appointments; asks Franklin's as- 
sistance. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) V, 32. 

From [Louis Le Begue Duportail] to The American Commissioners. 

1777- January 25. Paris. 

The Court permits him to carry out his plan. Because of this 
voyage and to recompense him for a great work for the corps, just 
terminated, he is given the title of Lieutenant Colonel of the Royal 
Engineer Corps. His first condition for entering the American ser- 
vice was that he should have a rank higher than he held in France at . 
the moment of leaving. He makes the same request for his com- 
panions, M, de Laumoy and M. de Gouvion. He urges great caution 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 207 

in making inquiries about these two. If these conditions are accepted 
he will come immediately to make the final arrangements. A. L. 
2 p. (In French.) LXII, 99. 

From [Comte de] Sarsfield. 1777. January 25. 

Will always remember his meeting with Franklin in London some 
years ago ; expects to be in Paris in a few weeks and will wait upon him ; 
in the meantime recommends to Franklin's notice his brother, who is, 
also, his best friend. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 33. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. January 25. Nantes. 

Treated like the nephew of a prince ; hears that the ladies of Nantes 
are making an addition to their heads in imitation of Franklin's hair 
cap, which they intend to call " a la Franklin." A. L. S. 2 p. 

XXXVII, 45. 

From J[onatlian] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 
1777' January 25. Nantes. 

Departure of the Amphitrite. Letters received from M. Du Cou- 
dray, who has sent him seven officers and their baggage for the Mercury ; 
number of officers he has been forced to refuse ; encloses protest made by 
M. Du Coudray against the Captain of the Amphitrite. Difficulty of 
procuring charts of the American coast. A. L. S. 4 p. XXXVII, 46. 

From Jeanne Franklin. 1777. January 26. Saint Mai. 

Concerning the relationship of herself and her son to Franklin; en- 
treats his aid in their present distress and indigency. A. L. S. 2 p. 

V, 34. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 145. 

From [Louis Le Begue Duportail]. 1777. January 26. Paris. 

He leaves for his home to arrange for his departure in a fortnight; 
has received the permits from the King for himself and his companions. 
A. L. I p. (In French.) LXII, 100. 

FrojTi Paulze. 1777. January 27. Paris. 

Notifying him that the King's Library \v\\\ be open for his visit on 
January 30th, and that the librarians will be prepared to receive him. 
A. N. in 3d P. I p. (In French.) LXXI, 63. 



2o8 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones. 1777. January 27. Nantes. 

Arrived from Paris in 56 hours; will give his best protection and safe 
conduct to the squadron now nearly ready to sail, until they are at some 
distance from the coast of Europe; this will afford him an opportunity 
to prove the sailing capacity of the Ranger, whereof he is in great sus- 
pense. Expediency of ordering prizes containing clothing^ warlike or 
naval stores to America instead of to the European ports. A. L. S. 3 p. 

V, 35. 

From Benj[aini]n Vaughan. 1777. January 27. Essex. 

Has decided to cancel the whole impression of Franklin's political 
works and wait for the additional pieces; has not yet received his re- 
marks upon paper currency; advisability of having the American edition 
of Mr. Galloway's speech accompany the dialogue on slavery. All 
letters to and probably from England are opened. Expects Dr. Price's 
pamphlet out soon. A. L. S. 3 p. V, 36. 

From Briaut de Peinquelein. 1777. January 27. Quimperle. 

Desires to serve in the American army; wishes to know what treat- 
ment he may expect from Congress; has served for six years as captain 
of Infantry. Does not wish to be confounded with those adventurers 
animated merely by sordid interest. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 37. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to Messrs. Franklin and Deane. 

1777' January 27. Paimboeuf. 

Eleven officers claiming the right to take passage on the Mercury; 
cannot take but four; M. Du Coudray the most insistent; refusal of M. 
Peltier to take him ; claims of the Chevalier de [la] Barre ; finds his 
situation very disagreeable. A. L. S. 4 p. XXXVII, 48. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. January 27. Paimboeuf. 

Uneasy lest his adhering strictly to orders and refusing the officers 
will be misinterpreted. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 47. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. January 27. Nantes. 

Proposes to send the Chevalier Mauduit Duplessis in the Mercury. 
Explains his reasons for speaking ill of Mr. P[eltier]. A. L. S. I p. 

XXXVII, 49. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 209 

From Prince Dmitri de Galitzin. 1777. Januar>' 28. La Hague. 

One of Franklin's most sincere admirers; his love of science his ex- 
cuse for writing to him. Lays before him certain conclusions he has 
formed on the subject of electricity; begs to hear frankly whether he 
approves or disapproves of his ideas. His residence always at the Hague 
where he is the ambassador of the Empress of Russia. A. L. S. 7 p. 
(In French.) V, 38. 

From Montaudouin. 1777. January 28. Nantes. 

Concerning the purchase and equipment of a ship bound for America. 
Surprised at seeing M. Du Coudray whom he imagined had sailed in 
the Amphitrite; causes of his return; hopes Franklin will see him at 
once; lack of circumspection on the part of the agent at Port Louis. 
A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) V, 39. 

From Buisson de Basseville. 1777. January 28. Quimperle. 

Desirous of having a post in the service of America; was detained a 
prisoner for four years in England in the last war and has thereby 
acquired the English tongue. A. L. S. i p. V, 40. 

From Henry Echlin. 
1777- January 28. Prison of the Abbaye St. Germain. 

According to Franklin's instruction, the bearer will wait to receive his 
orders. Begs him to return the list with whatever he is pleased to join 
to it. A. L. S. I p. V, 41. 

From Arthur Lee. 1777. January 29. Bordeaux. 

A letter received from London which says that ships are actually sent 
for the 10,000 Germans; that the English hope for great advantages 
from dissensions in Pennsylvania and that Burgoyne's destination is 
changed from Virginia to Boston. Cornwallis's defeat in New Jersey 
generally credited. Question of lightening the duties on exports and 
imports to and from the United States. A ship lying at Nantes is costing 
the Congress $100 freight per month; recommended her immediate 
sale, which Mr. Morris ought to have seen to long before. Mr. Myrcle's 
reputed character very bad. Repeated accusations made by the English 
that the Americans have wantonly hung some Hessian prisoners; thinks 
2—14 



2IO Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Congress should publish an authentic contradiction, that such an in- 
famous imputation shall not go down to posterity. Badness of the 
roads; does not expect to reach his destination till March. A. L. S. 
4 P- V, 42. 

From J. Ingen Housz. 1777. January 29. Vienna. 

Entrusted by the Emperor with the erection of conductors upon the 
gunpowder magazines and some other buildings ; Venice has applied to 
the Emperor for aid in a like matter, and he has been asked to under- 
take the work. Thinks Father Beccaria is against the use of con- 
ductors; would like to prove him wrong. Will journey to Ratisbon 
about the 12th of April to inoculate the two sons of the reigning Prince 
of Tour and Taxis, after which would be glad to take a trip to Paris 
and enjoy Franklin's society. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 43. 

From W[illiam] Dodd. 1777. January 29. 

Requesting Franklin to convey the enclosed letter to a worthy young 
woman in America. Concerning the present struggle; chances of recon- 
ciliation. A. L. S. I p. V, 44. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VIII, 199). 

From J. Gruel. 1777. January 30. Nantes. 

Discusses various business matters. Franklin's nephew, Mr. W^il- 
Hams, gave him a little book containing the Articles of Confederation 
of the thirteen United States of America; read it with great satisfaction. 
Exchange of civilities. Invitation to visit them at Barberie. A. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) V, 45. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1777. February i. Paris. 

MM. Dubourg, Debout & Co. announce their intention of furnishing 
the Farmers-General with tobacco in exchange for various articles 
wanted, and implore the favor of Messrs. Franklin, Deane and Lee and 
the protection of Congress to facilitate their venture. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) V, 46. 

From Thomas Walpole. 1777. February i. London. 

Concerning the Erie enterprise. Franklin's testimony of Lord 
Chatham's conduct. States the position of the friends of America in 
England ; their attitude towards the Declaration of Independence. A. 
L. S. 4 P- V, 47. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 94. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 211 

From Ruthefaud. 1777. February i. Bordeaux. 

Saw in the public papers that Franklin had given a remedy for dropsy 
to the physicians of Paris ; as the papers merely mention the use of 
" tobacco ashes," begs to know the quantity and how to use it; it would 
be a service rendered to humanity. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) V, 48. 

From [Louis Le Begue] Duportail. 1777. February i. Pithiviers. 

Asks for a private interview for M. de Laumoy. They will be ready 
to embark about the 15th of the month from whichever port is considered 
best; will be in Paris on Wednesday. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

LXII, loi. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Secret 

Correspondence, to The American Commissioners. 

1777. February 2. Baltimore. 

Severe conditions in America. Vigilance of the British cruisers. 
New supplies needed. L. S. Benj[amin] Harrison et al. 3 p. 

LIII, 32. 
Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 258. 

From Richard Peters. 1777. February 3. Baltimore. 

Leaves the enclosed open and begs Franklin if he can to kindly assist 
him on the subject. Thinks an inquiry would disclose what part of 
England Mr. Penn is in. A. L. S. i p. V, 50. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777. February 4. Nantes. 

Concerning his attempts to procure a vessel to be used as a packet 
boat. The Mercury despatched on the 30th ult. A. L. S. 3 p. 

XXXVII, 50. 

By The Continental Congress. 1777. February 5. 

Directing the American Commissioners to procure clothing and other 
military supplies. D. S. i p. (Copy.) LXXV, 21. 

Printed in part in Journals of the Continental Congress, Phila. [1778], III, 51. 



212 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From de Bruni. 1777. February 6. Paris. 

Enclosing a note touching M. de Chaumont's military experience. 
Expressing a desire to go to America with a friend and serve in the 
army with a higher rank than that held by him in France. If he no 
longer desires officers, how about citizens? His friend and himself 
are no adventurers, but men of fortune and family. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) V, 51. 

From Girardot. 1777. February 6. 

A friend of his in Holland anxious to know if Mr. Adams of Phila- 
delphia was originally from the Hague. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) 

V, 52. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. February 6. Nantes. 

Description of a ship which would answer for a packet boat. Awaits 
with impatience instructions as to his future movements; possible dan- 
ger in his returning to England. Anxious to serve his country. A. L. 
S. 3 p. XXXVII, 51. 

From Mrs. Emma Thompson. [1777.] February 6. St. Omer. 

Gossip about old friends in England. Life in St. Omer. Hopes to 
have a visit from him. A. L. S. 2 p. XLII, 49. 

Dr. Franklin's answer is printed in Works (Bigelow, VI, 66; Smyth, VII, 23). 

From [Louis Le Begue] Duportail. 1777. February 7. Paris. 
Asks for an interview. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) LXII, 102. 

i^roOT [Louis Le Begue] Duportail. 1777. Februarys. Paris. 

Decides to leave for Nantes unless Franklin wishes otherwise; asks 
for certain necessary instruments ; requests an interview to sign the 
papers. If the papers are made out before hand, a place should be left 
beside the real names to put the assumed names. M. du Corps is not 
to know of their departure. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 103. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. February 8. Nantes. 

Concerning a possible business connection with Mr. Schweighauser ; 
advantages of an intimate acquaintance in so agreeable a family; likes 
Nantes very much. Endeavoring to procure lodgings for Mr. Lee. 
A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 52. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 213 

From Thomas Walpole. 1777. February 10. London. 

Mr. Wharton is unable, in the present unhappy state of affairs in 
America, to be of any use in the further application to Government for 
lands on the Ohio river ; therefore he has closed his account ; concerning 
Franklin's part in this. L. S. I p. V, 53. 

From M[ary] Stewart. 1777. February 10. Calais. 

Begging Franklin to lend her fifty pounds, which she promises faith- 
fully to pay on her arrival in Paris; disappointed of money due her in 
England. A. L. S. i p. V, 54. 

From Georgiana Shipley. 1777. February 11. London. 

Writes without her father's knowledge, he deeming it imprudent in 
the present state of affairs. Franklin's many friends in England. Ad- 
vises him to read Smith's Wealth of Nations and Gibbon's History of 
the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire. Franklin's likeness to Socrates. 
Description of a new electrical machine invented in Italy. A. L. 4 p. 

V, 55. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 91. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1777. February 12. Nantes. 

Reasons which determined M. Peltier to purchase The Count de 
Vergennes; expects to despatch her in three weeks. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XXXVII, 53. 

From Elizabeth Wright. 1777. February 13, London. 

A minute account of the case of [Ebenezer Smith] Piatt, now a 
prisoner in Newgate on a charge of high treason committed in America. 
Through Franklin's influence hopes his friends may be made acquainted 
with his situation and thereby take some steps towards his acquittal; 
severities of his imprisonment. Mr. Piatt's uncle one of the members 
of Congress. A. L. S. 7 p. V, 56. 

From Louis Simon. 1777. February 14. Marseilles. 

Is about to fit out and command a new ship bound for the West In- 
dies for purposes of trade; desirous of placing an electrical conductor on 
his ship, but was informed that the method had not yet been adapted 
to the navy; begs Franklin to instruct him in such an important part of 
his discoveries. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 57. 



214 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Arthur Lee. 1777. February 14. Nantes. 

Informed of the agreement between Mr. Morris and the Farmers- 
General ; • the price good but the uncertainty of arrivals will continue 
the same difficulties as regards funds. Du Coudray said to have sailed 
for St. Domingo, A. L. S. i p. V, 58. 

From Marquis d'Osmond. 1777. February 14. 

Has called at the Hotel d'Hambourg many times, but has never been 
fortunate enough to see Mr. Franklin or Mr. Deane. Begs him to 
mention an hour when he will be visible. L. in 3d P. i p. (In 
French.) V, 59. 

From C W K and J H . 1777- February 14. 

The bearer, I. Patten, was taken prisoner on board the Washington 
and carried into Pounchmouth from whence he escaped ; is a man of 
valor and sent to Dr. Franklin to ascertain the true state of affairs 
and it is desired that he return as soon as possible. They assure Dr. 
Franklin that he has a great many friends in England. A. L. i p. 

XLIV, 15. 

From Boux. 1777. February 14. Paris. 

Concerning the Marquis de Bouille, who, on account of his attach- 
ment to him, has determined to go into the service of America and trans- 
port all his family thither; his honorable record in the King's service for 
42 years ; the only condition he makes is that he shall enter the American 
army with a higher rank than he now holds. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 60. 

From Boileau. 1777. February 14. Paris. 

An order to give the bearer certain military belongings of M. Boileau. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) V, 61. 

From Lainb[er]t Wickes to The American Commissioners. 
1777. February 14. Port Lewis. 

Account of his cruise ; prizes taken ; men wounded ; concerning ex- 
change of prisoners. List of vessels and cargoes taken. A. L. S. 3 p. 

V, 62. 
Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 114. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 215 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.], 1777. February 16. Nantes. 

Leaves it to Franklin's judgment whether to send the enclosed to Mr. 
Blunt or not. Desires his assistance as to the best way to answer Mr. 
Alexander's letter. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 54. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 
1777. February i6. Nantes. 

Prize taken by an American frigate, supposed to be commanded by 
Capt. Wickes. Concerning the cargo of The Count de Vergennes. 
Report of the Americans having gained a great advantage over the 
English. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 55- 

From [Lieut.-Col. de] Girard. 1777. February 17. Philippeville. 

Begging for news of Mr. Penn and asking for directions that he may 
forward a letter to him. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) V, 63. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes to The American Commissioners. 
1777. February 19. L'Orient. 

Safe arrival of all his prizes; necessity for repairing his ship. Dis- 
honorable conduct of the captains of the different prizes. Mr. Perrit's 
ill-will towards him (Wickes). His wounded officers doing well. 
A. L. S. 4 P- V, 64. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. February 19. Nantes. 

Desires to know his future movements; takes it for granted that he is 
not to return to England. Has given up all hope of marrying Miss 
A[lexander] on account of the war; thinks Miss S [chweighauser] 
worthy of pursuit, A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 56. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1777. February 19. Nantes. 

The fitting out of The Count de Vergennes. Prizes taken by Capt. 
Wickes; his heroic behavior. Afraid the arms are not worth having. 
A. L. S. 3 p. XXXVII, 57. 

i^roOT J [onathan] Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. February 20. Nantes. 

Concerning the disposition of prize ships and their cargoes. English 
spies everywhere around. Desires to know the truth of the report of the 
American successes in New Jersey. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 58. 



2i6 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From J. J. Garnauld. 1777. February 21. Paris. 

Offers of service from the house of M. Meschinet de Richmond et 
fils at La Rochelle. They have written to the houses in Philadelphia 
whose addresses Franklin gave them; anxious to enter into business 
relations with America, whose cause they deem just. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) V, 65. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes to The American Commissioners. 
1777. February 21. L'Orient. 

Summoned to appear before the Intendant in regard to the destina- 
tion of the prisoners on board his ship. It was finally agreed to wait 
till Sunday for Franklin's answer, and then deliver the prisoners to 
Captain Newman. In receipt of a notice from the Admiralty office to 
depart the port in 24 hours with all his prizes; this does not tally at all 
with Franklin's instructions. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 66. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1777. February 22. Nantes. 

Report of English men-of-war cruizing oflF Brest ; has informed Capt. 
Wickes. News of their successes in New Jersey confirmed ; eighteen 
hundred Hessians surprised and taken at Trenton ; nine hundred said to 
have been killed in the action. News of the Spanish fleet. A. L. S. 
2 p. XXXVII, 59. 

From Nathan Rumsey. 1777. February 22. Nantes. 

Enclosing an agreeable piece of news. Concerning the prizes taken 
by Captain Wickes. Captain Pratchell has obtained a summons against 
himself and Mr. Penet to appear at the first audience and state the 
reasons for detaining his property. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 67. 

From The Farmers-General to [The American Commissioners]. 
1777. February 23. 

Cannot accept proposition made to send vessels with supplies for 
Congress and bring back the tobacco in their own vessels. Hold to 
the offer previously made by the Plenipotentiaries of Congress to deliver 
the tobacco in France at a fixed price. The Farmers-General would 
advance 2,000,000 (francs or livres) as payment to enable Congress to 
carry out the contract. L. i p. (In French.) LIII, 34. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 217 

From Du Breuil fils. 1777. February 24. Calais. 

Having become useless to his Government by the reform of the 
provincial regiments, is very desirous of taking service in America; de- 
sires to know the necessary means to effect this end. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) V, 68. 

From Guirant. 1777. February 25. Bordeaux. 

A vessel containing three casks of vinegar belonging to him was taken 
by an American corsair and conducted to the port of L'Orient, where it is 
held as a prize; being a Frenchman, believes he has the right to reclaim 
his goods and applies to Franklin to this end. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) V, 69. 

From J[ohn] Bradford. 1777. February 25. Boston. 

Concerning the purchase of a set of ballast for the schooner. Goods 
sent to France. Agreeable news of Franklin's arrival at the Court of 
France diffused a joy throughout the continent. Ever since December 
25th they have been gaining advantages over the enemy, who are in a 
miserable plight. Gen. Howe has irrevocably stained and blasted his 
character by cruelly treating his prisoners; the Americans too generous 
to retaliate. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 70. 

Fro?7i A[melia] Barry. 1777. February 25. Tunis. 

Greatest affection for Franklin. Her pleasure at hearing of his 
arrival in France. Mr. Barry and herself are considering the advisa- 
bility of putting their little daughter Amelia in a French convent for a 
few years; chance of seeing him then; news of her other children. A. 
L. S. 4 P- V, 74. 

From St. Jean [Charles Guillaume Frederic Dumas] to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. February 25. 

Urges certain precautions in orer that his correspondence with them 
may remain a secret; advises that the Congress send cargoes of tobacco 
and rice to Rotterdam. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 6. 

From Arthur Lee. 1777. February 26. Victoria. 

Concerning the Committee's [of Correspondence] letter to him of 
October 23d; asks if there is any particular plan relative to Spain. 
A. L. S. I p. V, 71. 

Printed in R. H. Lee's Life of Arthur Lee, I, 74, also in Diplom. Corres., 
Wharton, II, 275. 



2i8 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Lainb[er]t Wickes. 1777. February 26. L'Orlent. 

Concerning the extraordinary orders from the Intendant of the port 
demanding him to leave in 24 hours; ship in sad need of repairs. Ex- 
pects to run into Nantes and enter a protest. Congratulates him on the 
victory at Trenton. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 72. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 115. 

From Samuel Cooper. 1777. February 27. Boston. 

Happy change in the face of affairs since the 26th of December last. 
Washington's important services. New levies received. Enemy in sad 
straits. Attitude of France. A. L. 2 p. V, 73. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 104. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 
1777. February 27. Nantes. 

In order that they may judge of the quality of the arms, sends a 
sample of each. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 60. 

From J[onatlian] Williams, Jr. 1777. February 27. Nantes. 

Glad that Franklin approves his desire to settle in France ; proposal of 
a partnership for him by M. Montaudouin. Introducing their country- 
man, Mr. Jones, who is going to Amsterdam and will take charge of 
any letters or papers. English frigates cruising off the coast. A. L. S. 
3 p. XXXVII, 61. 

From The Council of Massachusetts Bay to The American Commis- 
sioners. 1777. February 27. Boston. 

Despatch of certain letters. Spirited attitude of Congress. Account of 
Washington's movements at Trenton and Princeton. Need of assis- 
tance from France. Ticonderoga to be strengthened. Position of 
enemy in Canada. Importance of sending on the fire-arms. A. L. S. 
James Bowdoin, President. 3 p. V, 75. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, loo. 

From [Prof.] John Winthrop. 1777. February 28. Cambridge. 

Great results hoped for from Franklin's abilities and influence at the 
Court of France; attitude of that nation at the present crisis. A. L. S. 
2 p. V, 76. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, io6. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 219 

From Gourlade. 1777. February 28. L'Orient. 

Gave the letter from Franklin to Lambert Wickes and encloses his 
answer. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) V, 77. 

From Thomas Gushing. 1777. February 28. Boston, 

Congratulating him on his safe arrival in France, and wishing him 
success in his negotiations. Need of assistance from France, especially 
if Great Britain sends any considerable reinforcement to Gen. Howe. 
Any news from Franklin's part of the world very acceptable. A. L. S. 
I p. V, 78. 

From Thomas Gushing. 1777. February 28. Boston. 

Copy of preceding with additional intelligence that the bearer, his 
son, is employed by the Council of Massachusetts to deliver certain 
letters to Franklin. Recommends him to Franklin's care and patronage 
and offers him his services in any employment for the public weal, also 
recommends his nephew, Mr. Henry Newsman, who goes to France in 
the same vessel. L. S. 3 p. V, 79. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. February 28. L'Orient. 

Finally obtained the consent of the Intendant to remain in the above- 
mentioned port until his ship is repaired. Difficulties he has experi- 
enced ; thinks it best for Franklin to order him home as soon as possible. 
All the prizes are gone. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 80. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Gommissioners. 

1777. February 28. Nantes. 
Four of the prizes sold by Mr. Morris. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 62. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. March i. Nantes. 

Determined to remain in Nantes; partnerships offered him by M. 
Montaudouin and M. Schweighauser. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 63. 

From Bergere. 1777. March i. Coligny. 

Great desire on the part of three of his sons to enter the service of 
America; applies to Franklin to know if it is true that they will enter 
the American army with a rank higher than they hold at present. The 
nobility of Champagne, to which he has the honor to belong, is not rich 
and therefore he can only pay for his sons' equipment and the cost of 
the voyage. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 81. 



220 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From W[illiam] Alexander. 1777. March i. Dijon. 

Arrived safely at Dijon and made the girls happy with the prospect 
of a visit from Franklin. Suggests to Franklin's grandson that a little 
absence is a good thing in courtship. Concerning a business matter 
with Dubourg. Begs Franklin not to leave his papers lying about so 
loosely; warns him that he is surrounded by spies. Understands that 
he has been put in the English papers for his visit to Franklin. Will send 
him M. de Morveaux's book in which the iron and steel is treated. A. 
L. S. 3 p. ^ V, 82. 

From Coder. 1777. March 2. 

Suggesting various plans in which he may be useful to America. Con- 
cerning a tax for the clothing and equipment of the troops and the 
manufacture of raw material. Character of M. de Cairol; cause of his 
bankruptcy. Project for establishing a depot at St. Domingo. Would 
not hesitate to leave his mother and his native land to encounter the 
ferocity of the English if Franklin judges his services would be useful 
to America. L. 3 p. (In French.) V, 83. 

From Buisson de Basseville. 1777. March 3. Quimperle. 

Concerning a vessel at L'Orient taken by the Americans and fit to be 
armed as a privateer; anxious to have the command of it. If this is 
agreeable to Franklin he must obtain leave of absence for him and 
a power to engage Frenchmen to go with him. A. L. S. i p. V, 84. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. March 3. L'Orient. 
His ship ready for necessary repairs. A. L. S. I p. V, 85. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 116. 
From [Mrs.] Patience Wright. 1777. March 4. [London.] 
Concerning the imprisonment of young Mr. Piatt in Newgate for 
rebellion committed in Savannah, Ga., in 1775 [see V, 56, written by 
her daughter, Elizabeth Wright]. Her vanity prompts her to believe 
that she can entertain Franklin if permitted to write to him. Lord 
Dunmore has just been trying to convince her of the wickedness of the 
American rebellion and the impudence of Capt. Wickes in capturing 
the King's ship and selling it at public auction in France. A. L. S. 2 p. 

V, 86. 

Frotn J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. March 4. Nantes. 
His business plans; friendship of Mr. Schweighauser and his family. 
A. L. S. 3 p. XXXVII, 64. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 221 

Fro?n Jn. P. Grandam. 1777. March 4. Bordeaux. 

A friend of his, aged thirty-two, of good German family, desires to 
quit France on account of an unfortunate affair and embrace the cause 
of the Americans. Wishes to know what advantages he can hope for 
in that country either in the military or civil service. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) V, 87. 

From Anna Maria Clifton. 1777. March 4. Philadelphia. 

Congratulating him on his safe arrival in France; would be glad 
to be with him in Europe away from the dreadful, terrifying conse- 
quence of war. A. L. S. i p. V, 88. 

From Edward Bancroft. 1777. March 4. 

Has paid Mr. Hood the twelve guineas; will send Mr. Deane a con- 
tinuation of his set of monthly reviews ; in the last number Franklin will 
find some further remarks on the Dean of Gloucester's misconduct 
towards him. Enclosing two letters from Thomas Walpole. Certain 
people jealous of his being the channel through which Franklin for- 
wards certain letters. Government despatches arrived the night before, 
but nothing is given out. A. L. 2 p. V, 89. 

From Arthur Lee. 1777. March 5. Burgos. 

Has been desired to stop at Burgos, which is half-way to Madrid, 
in order to negotiate with more secrecy; timidity evinced greater than in 
France. Asks Franklin's opinion about the wisdom of insisting on push- 
ing on to Madrid. A. L. i p. V, 90. 

From Thomas Walpole. 1777. March 5. London. 

Cause of delay in sending the enclosed letter; has at last closed his 
accounts with his associates in the Ohio purchase. Encloses Franklin's 
account. The best friends of England only meet to lament its mis- 
guidance. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 91. 

From de St. Georges. 1777. March 5. Carhaix. 

Stating what his services have been in the French army for twenty- 
five years; if these services are agreeable to Franklin, begs him to 
procure him a place in the American cavalry. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) V, 92. 



222 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From L[ambert] W[ickes]. 1777. March 5. L'Orient. 

Reasons against cruising in the Sound for the Baltic ships; prefers 
to cruise on the coast of Guinea ; difficulties in the way concerning the 
purchase of the Maurepas. Plan of stationing a swift cutter at Dunkirk ; 
recommends Capt. Hinson for that service. Captain Nicholson deserv- 
ing of confidence. Officers on parole. A. L. 3 p. V, 93. 

From Nathan Rumsey. 1777. March 6. Nantes. 

Obliged to him for the agreeable news contained in his favor of the 
2d inst. Concerning the disposal of the prizes. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 94. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr. 1777. March 6. Nantes. 

Arrival of Major Lutterloh ; his expectation of a free passage ; desires 
advice on this point. Assistance rendered the Messrs. Duportail, etc., 
who sail next daJ^ Begs to know what officers are to go on The Count 
de Vergennes. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 65. 

From Charles Frederic Bedaulx. 1777. March 6. Paris. 

Expects to set out for America on the 8th inst. by order of Mr. Deane. 
Begs Franklin to recommend him to some of his friends in America; 
with such an aid cannot fail to be emplo5'ed with distinction in the ser- 
vice of a country for which he is ready to give up blood and life; his 
fear of being confounded with officers who have been forced to leave 
their country. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 95. 

From Rob[er]t Morris to The American Commissioners. 
1777. March 7. Philadelphia. 

Congress has adjourned from Baltimore to Philadelphia; judges the 
time improper, as Gen. Howe is forming another expedition against 
Philadelphia. Militia lacks clothing; hopes they will negotiate the loan 
and send out the articles wanted ; the produce of America, if it could 
only be exported freely, would soon discharge the debt. A. L. S. 2 p. 

V, 96. 

From W[illiam] Alexander. 1777. March 7. Dijon. 

Concerning the contract between M. Dubourg and the Farmers 
General. The risk of the voyage to and from America. Recommends 
Franklin's friend from South Carolina to Messrs. John Black & Co., 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 223 

Bordeaux. Increase in the circulation of bank paper. The opinion of 
the Privy Councillor of the Empress of Russia that England will not 
get a man from that Empire; recruiting goes on heavily in Germany. 
Sends first volume of M. de Morveaux's Elements of Chemistr>'. A. 
L. S. 3 p. V, 97. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. March 7. L'Orient. 

Would be glad of a line from Franklin concerning his further desti- 
nation ; all ready to heave down and only waiting for good weather. If 
Capt. Nicholson can be spared, the sooner he comes the better. Informed 
that the Admiralty of Vannes will clear all their prizes out under the 
French colors. L. S. i p. V, 98. 

Frotn Elie de Beaumont. 1777. !March 8. Paris. 

Introducing his friend M. de Villiers, one of the most honored mem- 
bers of the " Societe d'Emulation," who does not think it possible to 
put his talents to a more noble or patriotic use than in making a bust of 
Franklin. Begs him to accord his friend this favor, and for himself de- 
sires Franklin's portrait to hang in his library among the friends of 
their country and humanity. A. L. S. I p. (In French.) V, 99. 

Frotn Nathan Rumsey. 1777. March 8. Nantes. 

Just received confirmation of the affair at Trenton and the particulars 
of Gen. Lee's being taken, as he will find by the enclosed Gazettes. 
Numbers of killed and wounded and prisoners. Movements of Con- 
gress. Gen. Lee's capture has greatly enraged the populace; Gen. 
Washington informed the enemy that if Gen. Lee was sent to England 
he would hereafter give no quarter. Order of Congress for 100 bat- 
talions to be enlisted for three years. A. L. S. 3 p. V, lOO. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1777. March 8. Nantes. 

Concerning the purchase of M. Montieu's muskets. Sale of Capt. 
Soakly's brig recommended by ]\Ir. Schweighauser. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 66. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. March 8. Nantes. 

Eagerness of many persons to fit out privateers; if Franklin can give 
cruising commissions, could soon have several at sea; if it is necessary to 



2 24 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

have an American present in anj' such enterprise, offers his services. 
News from America ; capture of Gen. Lee true ; details of their successes 
in New Jersey. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 67. 

From Elie de Beaumont. 1777. March 9. Paris. 

Introducing M. de Champigny, an officer of distinction and nephew 
of a man held in high esteem in years past, who wishes to lay before 
Franklin certain views which may be useful. A. L. S. I p. (In 
French.) V, lOl. 

From E[lizabeth] W [right]. 1777. March 10. 

Concerning the case of young Mr. Piatt; his efforts to obtain a trial; 
Lord Mansfield's opinion that if he should petition the King and take 
the oath of allegiance he would be set at liberty; the petition has been 
written and signed ; her fear that they might have urged the young 
man to do wrong; wishes there had been time to consult Franklin. 
A. L. S. 2 p. V, 102. 

From Ebenezer Smith Piatt. 1777. March 10. Newgate. [London.] 

Stating certain details which were not thought proper to be inserted in 
his case. Ineffectual efforts to obtain a trial; chances for and against 
his being set free. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 103. 

From Tho[ma]s Morris to The American Commissioners. 
1777. March 11. Nantes. 

Informing him of the safe arrival of the ship Jenifer in 35 days 
from Baltimore with despatches for him, which the bearer, Capt. Ham- 
mond, will deliver. A. L. S. i p. V, 104. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. March 11. Nantes. 

Account of the business he proposes to enter into with Mr. Schweig- 
hauser; begs Franklin to write a line to him relative to the proposed 
connection; flatters himself that the want of a proper establishment is 
the sole objection to a still closer union. XXXVII, 68. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 225 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1777. March 11. Nantes. 

Business connected with loading The Count de Vergennes. Ar- 
rival of a little schooner express from Congress; the Captain and Mr. 
Rumsey gone to Paris. Rumor that General Washington has cut off 
the English retreat in New Jersey. A. L, S. i p. XXXVII, 69. 

From St. Jean [Charles Guillaume Frederic Dumas] to The Ameri- 
can Commissioners. 1777. March 11. 

Congratulating them on the American success in New Jersey; 
troubled at the capture of the brave General Lee. Memoir presented 
to the King by the English Ambassador, demanding the punishment of 
the Governor of St. Eustache for favoring the Americans, and order- 
ing that the sale of arms to them shall cease. Recommends the send- 
ing of American news to the French Gazette of Leiden. A. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 7. 

From P. Penet. 1777. March 11. Nantes. 

The bearer, Mr. Rumsey, accompanies Capt. Hammond to Paris with 
letters from the Secret Committee at Philadelphia. All the transactions 
confided to him have been carried out with the greatest exactitude. Mr. 
Thomas Morris busy from morning to night. The sale of prizes at 
L'Orient conducted with prudence and discretion. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) V, 105. 

From Arthur Lee to Franklin and Deane. 
1777. March 12. Victoria. 

Greatly elated over the joyful intelligence enclosed ; the militia so 
exasperated by the past cruelty of the enemy that they fought with ir- 
resisitible fury; afraid Gen. Lee is a prisoner; loss sustained by the 
enemy; upwards of a thousand of the prisoners in New York have died 
of famine and cruel treatment ; destruction by these " Saracen invaders " 
of the philosophical apparatus at Princeton. Awaiting the arrival of 
Count de Grimaldi with news from the Court. Means he has taken to 
publish an account of the late intelligence in various countries, especially 
among the German troops. Considers Holland has broken her strict 
neutrality by agreeing to let the mercenaries, notoriously hired to 
desolate the States of America, have a passage. If Mr. Deane should 
go to Amsterdam, advises him to be on his guard against Mr. Paul 
Wentworth. A, L. S. 3 p. V, 106. 

2-15 



2 26 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1777. March 12. 

Begging him to send by bearer the original treaty between the 
Farmers-General and himself, which he forgot, and which he has actual 
need of. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) V, 107. 

From [William] Wilkinson. 1777. March 12. Paris. 

Informing Dr. Franklin that he knows a gentleman going to London 
who may be depended on to carry any letters there carefully; if Dr. 
Franklin will state when the letters will be ready, he will call for them 
himself. L. in 3d P. i p. V, 108. 

From Baud. 1777. March 13. Paris. 

A person, concerning whom M. le due de la Rochefoucauld could 
furnish information, desired him to make certain propositions to Frank- 
lin which he believes would cause him pleasure ; requests the honor of an 
interview. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) V, 109. 

From Lanib[er]t Wickes. 1777. March 13. L'Orient. 

Extraordinary orders he has just received from the Commissary of 
the above port to get his ship cleaned, put everything on board and leave 
immediately and not to enter any French port again. Wishes to know 
the meaning of this order and how he is to proceed. A. L. S. i p. 

V, no. 

From Alex[ande]r Small. 1777. March 15. St. Philips, Minorca. 

Thinks Britain is hurting herself by an enormous increase of her debt, 
but considers the war a just scourge on America for her excessive luxury 
and dissipation, which will be checked now before too late. Paper he has 
written and sent to Sir J. Pringle on the ventilation of hospitals; will 
send Franklin a copy and begs him to put the finishing touches to it. 
A. L. S. 2 p. V, III. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. March 15. L'Orient. 

Concerning the proceedings against him of Mr. Gonnett, Commissary 
of the Port; desires Franklin's instructions; his anxiety to leave a place 
where he has received such treatment; no conduct on his part has 
merited such behavior. L. S. 2 p. V, 112. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 119. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 227 

Frot?i The Farmers-General to [The American Commissioners]. 

1777. March 15, 

Are now ready to make and sign the contract with the Commissioners 
from Congress on the basis of the latter's offer to deliver to the Farmers- 
General, in France, 4,000 bales of tobacco at a net price of 8 francs per 
pound. The Farmers-General will advance 2,000,000 francs as pay- 
ment. Cite the articles of agreement. L. 3 p. (In French.) 

LIII, 36. 
Fro?n Paulze. 1777. March 15. Paris. 

Sending Franklin a draft of the contract proposed by M. Grand. 
If Franklin and his colleague approve the provisions thereof, they are 
requested to notify M. Paulze. A. L. in 3d P. (In French.) 

XLV, 113b. 
From Arthur Lee. 1777. March 16. Vittoria. 

In receipt of an answer through the Duke of Grimaldi ; the reasons 
for wishing him not to come to Madrid are insuperable ; amount of aid 
Spain is willing to render the Colonies. Arranging with the house of 
Gardoqui for three vessels of supplies to be despatched as soon as pos- 
sible. Reports of Gen. Washington's offer to exchange three Hessian 
officers for Gen. Lee; Gen. Howe's refusal; disgust among the Hessian 
officers. The Duke of Grimaldi's opinion relative to the Americans' 
right to demand vessels betrayed to England, and to Holland's right 
to give the German mercenaries a passage through their countrj^ A. 
L. S. 2 p. V, 113. 

Fro?n [Baron] La Neuville. 1777. March 16. Paris. 

Emboldened by a desire of glory and a wish to be serviceable to a 
nation fighting for her liberty, he and his brother have decided to go to 
Boston and offer their services. His rank as major, his youth, good-will, 
health and enthusiasm, all the recommendations he has; if he cannot 
get the rank of colonel he will take the field as a volunteer. A. L. S. 
2 p. V, 114. 

Fro7n Gastebois. 1777. March 17. Lauzun. 

In receipt of a letter from the Due de Duras, who informs him that 
he asked Franklin for two companies for his (Gastebois') two sons, 
and that Franklin inquired if they spoke English; at this precise mo- 
ment they do not, but promises that they shall speak it in three months, 
if that is the only obstacle; his sons worthy of Franklin's protection. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 115. 



228 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Debusson de Saxey. 1777. March 18. Saint Quentin. 

Congratulating himself on the happiness of meeting Franklin during 
his last stay in Paris; reminds him of his promise to give them orders 
when he receives his commissions from America. The pleasure he de- 
rives from Franklin's success and prosperity. L. S. i p. V, 116. 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 
1777. March 18. Nantes. 
Shipping news. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 70. 

From Tho[ma]s Morris. 1777. March 19, Nantes. 

Presumes by this time Franklin has received the sundry despatches 
from America by Captain Hammond ; will be greatly obliged for any 
intelligence Franklin may think proper to communicate. Arrival of the 
ship Versailles, 40 days from Boston, which brought the enclosed letter; 
very important that it be safely delivered as directed. Report of Gen. 
Howe having sent a flag of truce to General Washington, requesting a 
cessation of arms for a few days. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 117. 

From William Gordon. 1777. March 21. J[amaica] P[lain, Mass.]. 

Troubles him with a packet for their friend, Dr. Price; asks him 
to peruse the letters and papers before forwarding; wished to put both 
parties out of conceit with Mr. Hutchinson, a man whose only sup- 
porters should be " two upright posts with one across it." Continental 
lottery likely to succeed. Ten thousand would probably go off in 
Massachusetts very soon. A. L. S. i p. V, iiB. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1777. March 21. Paris. 

Begs him to accord an audience to the Baron de Fray whose demands 
are very reasonable and his offers of service very important. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) V, 119. 

From Baudin. 1777. March 21. St. Martin, Isle de Re. 

Writes to offer his services in the above-mentioned isle, which by its 
position is suitable for a market of commodities. The excellent quality 
of the brandy made in the island. Begs Franklin for some orders ; asks 
only the ordinary commission. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) V, 120. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 229 

From Messrs. de Germany and Girardot. 1777. March 24. 

Request Dr. Franklin to send them his reply to a letter from Stras- 
bourg which they received for him. N, in 3d P. i p. (In French.) 

LXX, 102. 

From Rob[er]t Morris to The American Commissioners. 
1777. March 25. Philadelphia. 

Commanded by Congress to transmit copies of their resolve of the 13th 
inst. to their ministers and agents abroad ; many gentlemen in the service 
of America useless, owing to ignorance of the language ; thinks this the 
best means to save others the charge and trouble of the voyage as well as 
the mortification of being disappointed. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 122. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. March 25. Nantes. 

Extremely uneasy at not hearing from him relative to Mr. Schweig- 
hauser's proposals; afraid his silence will create an unfavorable impres- 
sian. Beset with politicians who are forever asking for news. Arrival 
of an order from the English Ambassador which would have obliged 
Major Lutterloh's return to his regiment had he not already embarked. 
A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 73. 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 
1777. March 25. Nantes. 

Arrival of supplies for The Comte de Vergennes ; officers applying for 
passage; desires instructions as to answering them. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XXXVII, 74. 

From Due de la Rochefoucauld. 1777. March 26. Paris. 

Begs Franklin to cast his eyes over the translation of the Constitution 
of Delaware and send it to him at Rouen, with the corrections, so that it 
may be published on his return ; if he has a copy of the Constitution of 
Maryland begs him to send it also ; he will translate that as well as the 
Constitution of Virginia. Inquires if he has heard whether the different 
Colonies have accepted the Act of Confederation just as it is or with 
changes. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 123. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. March 27. Nantes. 

Concerning a plan proposed to him by M. Dubourg; referred him to 
Franklin; would first wish to know Franklin's opinion of Mr. Schweig- 
hauser's proposals. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 75. 



230 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777. March 27. Nantes. 

Concerning the increase in the cargo of The Comte de Vergennes. 
A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 76. 

From Rob[er]t Morris to The American Commissioners. 
1777. March 28. Philadelphia. 

Gen. Howe's army in the Jerseys inactive and greatly distressed for 
want of forage and fresh provisions; thinks they will not be content 
with their situation much longer; desertions frequent. The summing 
up of what General Washington has done with an army half the size 
of the enemy's and consisting chiefly of raw militia. The bad results 
attending short enlistments; Congress busy reforming their systems re- 
specting the army; this being done, has great hopes for the summer, es- 
pecially if Franklin effects a European war to employ the British navy. 
Possibility of Gen. Howe attacking Philadelphia ; if he does get it, 
prophesies that it will prove his ruin. L. 4 p. (Copy.) V, 124. 

From Col. Tissot Grenus. 1777. March 28. Geneva. 

Expressing his sincere appreciation of the conversation he had with 
Franklin; if Franklin's sons should visit the country where he is at 
present, he would like to show his appreciation of their relationship to 
such a great man. A. L. S. i p. (In French. ) V, 125. 

From de Jousserant. 1777. March 28. Route de Bordeaux. 

Offering his services to the colonies; his experience as assistant major 
of grenadiers. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) V, 126. 

From Will[iam] Alexander. 1777. March 29. Dijon. 

A story is current that the British ministry have applied to France 
to have Mr. Deane delivered up, on the pretext that he was concerned 
in the burning of Portsmouth ; proves, by quoting a precedent, that they 
do not need to comply with this request. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 127. 

i^row J [onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. March 29. Nantes. 

Application for a passage to America by Capt. Paddack who will also 
serve as a pilot. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 77. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 231 

Fro?n Jona [than] Williams, Sr. 1777. March 29. Boston. 

All well and in good spirits in spite of the war. His son John anxious 
to go to France and see his brother, who might help him to some em- 
ploy. A. L. S. I p. XXXVII, 78. 

From [Mrs.] Patience Wright. 1777. March 29. London. 

Mr. Piatt's marriage to her daughter and their return to America 
have already been laid before Franklin. A dream she had several years 
ago about Dr. Franklin, which so far is only half fulfilled, but she 
believes it will be completed. Intends coming to France to make a bust 
of Franklin in wax; also one of the Queen, and any others he may ap- 
prove of. A. L. S. 3 P- V, 128. 

From S[ilas] Deane. 1777. March 30. 

Enclosing a letter from Mr. Williams which appears to have been 
opened. Reminds him of the letter and deposition for Lord Stormont 
and the memorial for the Portugal Ambassador. A, L. S. I p. V, 129. 

From Samuel Cooper. 1777. March 30. Boston. 

Anxious to hear from Franklin. Welcome arrival of arms, powder, 
woolens, etc., from France. Burning of some stores left at Peekskill 
by the enemy. Account of skirmish not far from Amboy, the enemy re- 
treating with a loss of 500 killed, wounded and taken. Gen. Washing- 
ton thinks it probable that Philadelphia will be attacked and a consider- 
able part of the army in Canada will come down the St. Lawrence river 
to join him. Expects Washington will soon be able to take the field with 
an adequate force. Price of everything greatly advanced. Lottery tickets 
have a surprisingly rapid sale. Cruelties perpetrated by the enemy have 
increased the numbers and zeal on their side. France cannot long 
avoid a war with Britain ; she never had a fairer opportunity for taking 
a decisive part. Sends this by Mr. Cushing, a young man much es- 
teemed at home, who goes to France on business. A. L, 4 p. V, 130. 

From Reinier Arrenberg. 1777. March 31. Rotterdam. 

In his quality of 2d Secretary of the Physical Society at Rotterdam he 
has long wanted to send Franklin the two volumes of the "Actes de la So- 
ciete." In his character of journalist is anxious to know some one who can 
give him some news of America. Holland's interest in and sympathy 



232 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

with America renders it necessary to procure real American news ; willing 
to pay such a person well. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 131. 

Frojti The Council of Massachusetts Bay to The American Com- 
missioners. 1777. March 31, Boston. 

Copy of letter V, 75. They have employed Mr. Thos. Gushing, Jr., 
to carry three letters to him from the Secret Committee and to await 
his orders. L. S. James Bowdoin, President. 3 p. V, 132. 

From [William] Wilkinson. [Circa 1777. March. Paris.'] 

Requests Dr. Franklin to send him the letter for Nantes, as he is 
about to leave Paris for that place. N. in 3d P. i p. LXXI, 95b. 

From P. Penet & Co. 1777. April i. Nantes. 

Announcing the arrival of two ships; will forward any letters there 
may be for him. Mr. Williams still at Nantes; according to instruc- 
tions, continues to pay him all the money that he asks for. His interest 
and zeal in the service. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) V, 133. 

From J. Ingen Housz. 1777. April 2. Vienna. 

Franklin's letters delayed. Sets out for Ratisbon on April 12 and 
will remain there with the Prince of Taxis during May and a part of 
June; his plan to go from there to Holland, England and France, if his 
Royal mistress permits; his desire to see Franklin; the Emperor's de- 
parture for Paris is a convincing proof of a peaceful disposition among 
the European powers. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 134. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777. April 2. Nantes. 

Arrival from Boston of Capt. Adams who has set off with his packets 
for Paris. Has begun the inventory. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 79. 

From La Barberie. 1777. April 2. Paris. 

Reminds Franklin of his promise to give his son some letters of recom- 
mendation should he enter the service of the Colonies ; the young man 
expects to leave with M. de Galvan, and he would count it a real 
kindness if Franklin would procure for him the acquaintance of his 
friends. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 135. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 233 

From [Aime Ambroise Joseph] Feutry. 1777, April 5. 

Will call on Franklin the next day; outlines of a letter which he 
begs Franklin to write to Madame Hubert in his ( Feutry 's) favor, 
containing a request for an interview with M. Necker, A. L. 2 p. 
(In French.) V, 137. 

From P. P. Burdett. 1777. April 5. Rastatt. 

Wrote Franklin on his arrival in France at the particular request of 
their Highnesses-, the Prince and Princess of Baden; imagines the letter 
never reached him. Is himself a strong well-wisher for the American 
cause; has inspired a certain officer in the service of his Serene Highness 
with a strong desire of embarking on the American side; his friend's 
fitness for the work; recommends him to Franklin, Would be un- 
willing to have all the subject of this letter known to his Prince. A. L. 
S. 3 p. V, 138. 

From Montee. 1777. April 5. 

Request for his son to enter the American army. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) LXII, 84. 

From [Aime Ambroise Joseph] Feutry. 1777. April 7. Paris. 

Sending him a copy of various memoirs relating to instruments of 
war. His pleasure in knowing a great man like the Marquis de 
Puysegur, Lieutenant-General ; the Count d'Heronville honors him like- 
wise with his kind interest. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) V, 139. 

From W[illiam] Alexander. 1777. April 7. Dijon, 

The bearer of this is M, de Montarche, formerly Intendant of St, 
Domingo, Encloses his answer to M. Dubourg with his contract; if 
he goes into the aflFair, mentions the terms he would be willing to accept 
and his reasons for it. Story of a new treaty being arranged between 
France and Britain. Discusses the absurd habit of the commanders of 
fleets engaging in the center of their squadron, where they can neither 
see nor know what passes at any distance. " American plan of de- 
bauching seamen to carry in ships " explained in Lloyd's book. Has 
seen his correspondence with Lord Howe in the English papers and 
likes it much. Compares loss by sickness and desertion in ancient and 
modern warfare. His views on the opening campaign in America. A, 
L S, 8 p. V, 140. 



234 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Boux. 1777. April 7. 

Concerning the building of certain ships; advantages of the port of 
L'Orient. Strict espionage maintained on every side by the Marshal's 
Court. A. L. S, 3 p, (In French.) V, 141. 

From [Aime Ambroise Joseph] Feutry. 1777. April 8. Paris. 

Sending Franklin a dozen of his new fables which appeared with 
twenty others in the second volume of his " d'Opuscules poetiques et 
philologiques." Considers the day he met Franklin the happiest of his 
life. A. L, S. I p. (In French.) V, 142. 

From C. Rybot. 1777. April 8. Paris. 

Did not imagine Franklin would have hesitated to pay him the 
trifling sum he disbursed for Mr. Wood; is aware he has no immediate 
claim upon him, but as a man of known integrity did not think Frank- 
lin would let him (Rybot) be a sufferer by an act from which he reaped 
the benefit. A. L. S. i p. V, 143. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. April 8. Nantes. 

Any business thrown in the way of Williams & Co. will be carefully 
executed. With regard to the alderman, perhaps that might be made 
agreeable on all sides by his joining them in the business of Franklin's 
contracts, especially as he hears Mr. Morris is engaged with Mr. Gruel 
and M. Penet. Concerning a passage for M. de Chantay. The Public 
Advertiser and the London Evening Post ordered regularly sent to 
Congress; the former strictly for the Government; the latter strongly 
against it. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 80. 

From Countess de Marancourt. 1777. April 8. Paris. 

Requesting him to appoint a time when she and her brother-in-law, 
Chevalier de Marancourt, can see him about an important matter. N. 
in 3d P. I p. (In French.) LXXI, 5. 

From Suard. 1777. April 9. Paris. 

Sending a letter received from M. Arrenberg of Rotterdam. N. in 
3d P. I p. (In French.) LXXI, 69. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 235 

From L'Abbe Georgel. 1777. April 9. Paris. 

Introduces himself as a member of the household of Prince Louis de 
Rohan, and ex-minister to the Court of Vienna. Begs Franklin's good 
offices on behalf of a young man of noble family and fine education who 
desires to enter the American army. A. L. in 3d P. (In French.) 

V, 144. 
Fro7n Butor. 1777. April 9. Saint-Savin. 

Recommending a distinguished officer for service in America; wishes 
to know what rank Congress will allow him. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) V, 145. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. April 12. Nantes. 

Suggestions as to shipping goods to America. A. L. S. 3 p. 

XXXVII, 81. 

From John Whitehurst. 1777. April 12. Derby. 

Miss Moresby, for whom Franklin so kindly applied to Mr. West, 
is now at a loss for an introduction; would esteem it a singular favor 
if Franklin would do her that friendly office. A. L. S. i p. V, 146. 

From de la Maucherie. 1777. April 12. 

Desires the honor of his presence after the meeting of the Academy; 
awaits this favor as the Israelites awaited the manna from heaven. 
A. L. in 3d P. (In French.) V, 147. 

From de Gailhard. 1777. April 13. Pamiers. 

His son forced by reduction of pay to quit the French army; applies 
to Franklin to get him a position in the American army; hopes much 
from Franklin's kindness and magnanimity. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

V, 148. 

From [Antoine] Court de Gebelin. 1777. April 14. Paris. 

Takes the liberty to recommend M. Guez, of Lausanne, son of a 
famous surgeon ; would introduce him himself, but he is engaged in 
preparing his fifth volume of the " Monde Primitif," so his brother-in- 
law will replace him ; also recommends M. Pierre Dutilh, of Bordeaux, 
who would be extremely flattered to be honored with commissions. 
Sends him the fourth volume of the " Monde Primitif," for which he 
was kind enough to subscribe. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) V, 149. 



236 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Paul Veron. 1777. April 14. Paris. 

Concerning an important letter which Monsieur Mouge, of Beaune, 
requested him to put into Franklin's own hand, but that is impossible 
as he is ignorant of his address; will send it to Monsieur Grand, 
whom he hears knows Franklin, with a request to deliver it to him. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 150. 

From [Comtesse] D. B. [de] Conway. 1777. April 14. Ville d'Avray. 

Is just learning to read and write in English ; begs him to mention 
when she can pay her respects to him; is the wife of [Gen.] Thomas 
Conway who departed in the Amphitrite to aid his brother Americans. 
A. L. S. I p. V, 151. 

From Nathan Rumsey. 1777. April 15. Nantes. 

Arrival of the dispatches by Mr. Cunningham. Has his faults and 
perhaps they are conspicuous; doubts not but his enemies have made 
a handle of them to rob him of Franklin's esteem; still desirous to 
serve his native land ; hopes his general behavior will be such as to merit 
again Franklin's approbation, A. L. S. 2 p. V, 153. 

From Lanib[er]t Wickes. 1777. April 15. Nantes. 

Arrived at Nantes; found the cutter a fine stout vessel; what guns 
she will be mounted with; has engaged already nine Americans for sea- 
men, hopes in seven days she will be ready to launch; will then return 
to L'Orient ; thinks it would strengthen their little squadron if Captain 
Johnston of the Lexington could join them; recommends the giving 
of the King's pass to all persons who come from Paris with despatches, 
in order to avoid delays ; would not be at Nantes yet had they not forced 
the post-boys to proceed by threats and beatings. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 154. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. April 15. Nantes. 

Begging his opinion on the enclosed articles drawn up by Mr. Schweig- 
hauser. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 82. 

From [Comte de Sarsfield]. 1777. April 15. [Paris.] 

Sending two gazettes and requesting him to return them when he 
sends for the others. A. L. 2 p. (In French.) LXXI, 99a. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 237 

From Baptestin. 1777. April 16. 

Requests an interview about a project for advancing the knowledge 
of sciences and arts in the United States. A. L, S. i p. (In French.) 

LX, 95. 
Fro7n Franquelin. 1777. April 16. Paris. 

Requesting to see Franklin that he may learn if they are descendants 
of the same family. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 155. 

Translation in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 146. 

From Louis Givanetti Pellion. 1777. April 16. Turin. 

No infidelity to his own King (of Servia) is the cause of his desire 
to serve the American cause, but a hope that by experience and travel 
he will be more worthy of his Sovereign. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

V, 156. 

From [Jean-Baptiste] Le Roy. [1777?] April 16. Paris. 

Asking positions in the American army for two excellent officers 
(Messrs. de Gueyssac) ; their reasons for quitting France well known. 
Quotation from Sir John Pringle's letter. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

XLII, 155. 

From [Aime Ambroise Joseph] Feutry. 1777. April 17. 

Had the pleasure of sending him some memoirs the day before ; when 
his other works, which number seven to eight volumes, are ready will 
have the honor of sending them to him. A. L. i p. (In French.) 

V, 157. 

From Chevalier de Basserode. 1777. April 17. Tonnay-Charente. 

His desire to enter the American army; begs Franklin to obtain per- 
mission from the King for him to leave the country for several years and 
also to pay his pension to his wife during his absence; if his services are 
accepted, wishes to know what treatment he may expect ; thinks his 
past services entitle him to demand the rank of Lieutenant-colonel. A. 
L. S. I p. (In French.) V, 158. 

From de Brahm. 1777. April 20. Coblenz. 

His son, once an officer in the services of the Elector of Treves, is 
now a captain of artillery in the American army ; his leave of absence 
was only for two years, and he has written to the Elector for an ex- 



238 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

tension, which is here enclosed with letters from his family, which he 
begs Franklin to forward with all speed. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

V, 159. 

FroTu [Aime Ambroise Joseph] Feutry. 1777. April 20. Paris. 

Had the honor of sending Franklin a part of his feeble productions, 
and in return receives Franklin's scientific works, an advantageous ex- 
change for him. Awaits from Flanders his " Choix d'Histoires 
Morales " and his " Memoires de la Cour d'Auguste," to lay at Frank- 
lin's feet. A. L. S. I p. (In French.) V, 160. 

From De Bragelonne de filley, de la Barre. 

1777. April 21. Bordeaux. 

Invention he has made of a new gun-carriage ; encloses a memoir with a 
full description of it; has other propositions to make more advantageous 
to America. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 161. 

From Benj[ami]n Sowden. 1777. April 21. Rotterdam. 

Is minister of the English Presbyterian church at Rotterdam; knows 
many of Franklin's friends there. Writes this to ask permission to send 
his letters to the Rev. Mr. Gordon of Jamaica Plain, directed to 
Franklin's care ; will leave them open in case he may want to read them. 
Offers to forward any letters for Franklin to friends in England by a 
safe and secret conveyance. A. L. S. 3 p. V, 162. 

Froin De Bragelonne de filley, de la Barre. 

[1777. April 22.] Bordeaux. 

Advantages of a new gun-carriage proposed to Franklin for use 
in the war with England. Mem. 3 p. (In French.) LXI, 100. 

From J[onatlian] Williams, Jr. 1777. April 22. Nantes. 

Concerning a passage for Mr. Hood; desires to know if he is to 
assist him with cash. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 83. 

From Jos[epli] Cauffman. 1777. April 23. Vienna. 

Was born in Philadelphia and sent abroad to study, particularly 
medicine at the University of Vienna; his desire to serve his country; 
sends the enclosed attestations to prove his proficiency in anatomy and 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 239 

surgery; if Franklin thinks he could be of use in the army as a surgeon, 
is ready to return to his native land at once; remittances from his father 
delayed by the war; desires to know what he can do. Many Austrian 
officers desirous of entering the army, providing they could get some 
intelligence of the treatment they would receive. A. L. S. 4 p. V, 163. 

From [Rodolph] Valltravers. 1777. April 25. Passy. 

Called to inform him what steps he has taken since their last inter- 
view. Goes to Versailles for a day or two on business; his ladies leave 
Paris the next week on account of Mrs. Valltravers' health. A. L. S. 

1 p. V, 164. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. April 25. L'Orient. 

Captain Johnston's arrival at Nantes; order from the Commissary 
for him to quit L'Orient in twenty-four hours; will meet Johnston at 
St. Auzeau ; three British ships of war cruising in the bay. Arrival 
of prize sloop loaded with fruit and wine taken by Capt. Thompson of 
the brig Rising States from Boston. A. L. S. 2 p. V, 165. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 120. 

From Saint Martin. 1777. April 26. Bordeaux. 

A long account concerning four bills of exchange drawn on Mr. 
Thomas Morris, one of the Commissioners of Congress, which he re- 
fuses to pay; begs Franklin to use his influence in the matter. A. L. S. 
4 p. (In French.) V, 166. 

From [Aime Ambroise Joseph] Feutry. 1777. April 26. Paris. 

Asking Franklin to accept the accompanying work; will certainly 

appear on Sunday in answer to his gracious invitation. A. L. in 3d P. 

(In French.) V, 167. 

From Lieutenant-Colonel Duparquet. 

1777. April 26. St. Esprit, Languedoc. 

Request to enter American army, if given a suitable rank. A. L. S. 

2 p. (In French.) LXII, 36. 

From Bachelier. 1777. April 27. 

M. Parens expects them at Sevres for dinner on Monday, April 28; 
begs him to inform M. Le Ray de Chaumont of this. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) V, 168. 



240 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Eyraut. 1777. April 27. Nantes. 

Begging Franklin to procure him a place on some battle-ship; knows 
America, having made frequent voyages there; will not tire Franklin 
with details ; IVIonsieur Flamenque will explain in a few words what 
sort of a man he is. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 169. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. April 27. L'Orient. 

Mutiny among his people; will desert unless paid immediately on 
their arrival at Nantes. Ordered by Mr. Gonnett to leave L'Orient. 
Recommends Mr. Gourlade to Franklin's particular notice; his con- 
fidence in his integrity. A. L. S. 3 p. V, 170. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 121. 

By [Aime Ambroise Joseph] Feutry. 1777. April 27. Passy. 

Verses, in praise of Franklin, to be put underneath his portrait. A. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) LI, 24. 

From J[onathan] "Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. April 28. Nantes. 

Returned the articles to Mr. Schweighauser for the additions sug- 
gested; wishes Franklin to send them to Mr. Alexander, in whose sa- 
gacity he has the greatest confidence. A. L.' S. i p. XXXVII, 84. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 

1777. April 28. Nantes. 

Sailing of the Therese. Prizes captured by a privateer from Boston 
commanded by Capt. Thompson. Recommends renewing the lease of 
the magazine and outhouses. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 85. 

From Jarente de Sainneville. 

1777. April 30. Chateau de Vincennes. 

Asks his protection for an officer who wishes to enter the American 
service, also for news of his relative. Chevalier Dannemours, who had 
letters to Philadelphia. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) LXII, 117a. 

Fro7n Daniel Roberdeau. 1777. May i. Philadelphia. 

Being one of the Committee for Foreign Applications, paid immediate 
attention to Franklin's recommendation of Chevalier de Mauduit du 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 241 

Plessis, and through the favor of Congress, procured him a commission 
as captain of artillery, and on his arrival he was forw^arded at once to 
General Washington. Death of his dear Mrs. Roberdeau has been 
such a source of affliction that he will not attempt to send any news. 
A. L. S. I p. VI, I. 

Fro?7i G. B. [David Hartley]. 1777. May 2. London. 

Impossibility of reconciliation between Great Britain and America 
on the terms proposed; possibility of establishing peace; the admission of 
American independence an absolutely necessary preliminary. A. L. S. 
2 p. VI, 2. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 148. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. May 2. Philadelphia. 

Necessity of interesting the French in the American trade. Falsehoods 
of the English press. Present favorable condition in America. A. L. 
S. Benj[amin] Harrison, Rob[er]t Morris, Tho[ma]s Hayward, 
James Lovell. 4 p. (In duplicate. In the second copy the signature 
of Jo[h]n Witherspoon is added.) LIII, 38. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 313. 

From Goueslard de Champigny. 1777. May 3. Paris. 

Concerning his proposal to bring over skilled workmen and establish 
a foundry for making fire-arms and cannon. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) LX, 98. 

From ■W[illia]m Carmichael. 1777. May 3. Nantes. 

Cannot go with Mr. Lee or any individual to Berlin without being 
jointly employed by the representatives of America; his sole view in 
wishing his appointment as secretarj^ is that he may feel himself a 
servant of the public and not of any individual; offers to bear the ex- 
pense himself. A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 3. 

From Tho[ma]s Morris. 1777. May 3. Nantes. 

Arrival of Capt. John Robarts, of the schooner Mary ,from Charles- 
town; William Machmaster, one of the sailors, detained a prisoner in 
Nantes, charged with having drowned one John Hoggins belonging to 
the same vessel; they were both drunk at the time. A. L. S. 2 p. 

VI, 4. 
2 — 16 



242 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From J. de Sparre. 1777. May 3. Strasbourg. 

Has written Franklin and Mr. Deane several letters; thinks his offers 
merit a reply. A. L. S. i p. ( In French. ) VI, 5, 

From Mme. [Ferdinand] Grand to The American Commissioners. 

[1777?] May 5. 

Asking them to name a day on which they will do her the honor of 
dining at her house. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) XLIII, 181. 

From [Lieut.] Ziegler. 1777. May 6. Grave. 

Account of a visit he made to America in 1772, with recommendations 
to Col. Henry Laurens; his desire to serve America; the conditions on 
which he is willing to enter the army. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

VI, 6. 
From Ch. de Brus. 1777. May 6. Bordeaux. 

His great desire to go to New England ; begs Franklin for a letter 
of recommendation to that country; prefers to go with a captain of a 
privateer now at Bordeaux, which will most likely be attacked, than 
with his brother. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 7. 

From P. Penet to The American Commissioners. 
1777. May 6. Nantes. 

Mr. Thomas Morris has communicated to him their letter; they 
must be misinformed concerning him and his associates; knows he has 
many enemies in Paris as well as Nantes; begs to be informed who they 
are that he may justify himself. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 8. 

From Ebenezer S[mith] Piatt. 
1777. May 6. Newgate Prison [London]. 

Is a prisoner in Newgate, not knowing when he will obtain his liberty; 
begs Franklin to forward the enclosed letter to his partner in Savannah, 
Ga., asking for a small remittance ; requests Franklin to receive it, as it 
will probably come in the shape of rice or tobacco, and send the proceeds 
thereof to Mrs. Patience Wright in London. A. L. S. i p. VI, 9. 

From [Mrs.] Patience Wright. 1777. May 7. London. 

Begs him to aid Mr. Piatt, who still lies in irons in Newgate. 
A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 10. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 243 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. May 7. Nantes. 

Concerning the plan proposed by M. Dubourg and Mr. Alexander; 
if it is made reasonable would willingly take a part in it. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 86. 

i^ro;w J [onathan] Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. May 7. Nantes. 

Desiring a letter of introduction for M. Tardiveau, who proposes to 
settle in Philadelphia; his connection in business with M. Tarvouillet. 
A. L. S. I p. XXXVII, 87. 

From Montaudouin. 1777. May 7. Nantes. 

Has read with great pleasure Franklin's response to Lord Howe in 
the "Gazette de Lej'de"; the Admiral soundly beaten. Exorbitant 
prices asked by captains of vessels to transport persons to America; 
compliments Franklin on his nephew. Has an invitation from M. de 
Chaumont to pay him a visit at Passy. The bearer of this is M. Tardi- 
veau, who desires to establish himself in Philadelphia; would be obliged 
if Franklin would give him a word of recommendation, merely attesting 
his honesty. A. L. S. 3 p. VI, 11, 

From Pierres. 1777. May 7. Saint Malo. 

Concerning a debt due him by Captain Cornelius Haight, who gave 
him a draft for the amount on Messrs. David Strahan & Co. of London ; 
has received so far only a small percentage of the amount; encloses a 
copy of the bond; begs Franklin's assistance. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) VI, 12. 

From W[illiam] Alexander. 1777. May 9. Dijon. 

Introducing le Comte de Fontelle; trusts that the nature of his 
business will prove sufficiently agreeable to excuse the trouble he is 
giving him. A. L. S. i p. VI, 13. 

FroTTi Abbe Tardieu. 1777. May 9. Nyons. 

Begging him to forward the enclosed letter to Gen. Washington. 
A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) VI, 13^. 



244 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. May 9. Philadelphia. 

A fast sailing frigate to be purchased in Europe and assigned for 
command to the bearer of this message, Captain John Paul Jones. L. S. 
Robert Morris et al. 3 p. (Copy.) LIII, 40. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 317. 
Frojn Lt.-Colonel Duparquet. 1777. May 10. St. Esprit. 

Request to enter American army, A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 37. 
From Paulze. 1777. May 10. Bercy. 

Encloses a copy of a letter which he received, signed by Mr. Lee; 
refrains from answering it until Franklin verifies the signature; sent a 
copy of it to Comte de Vergennes, and begged him to take such pre- 
cautions as the circumstance appeared to warrant. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) VI, 14. 

From Goueslard de Champigny. 1777. May 13. Coutances. 

Had to leave Paris hurriedly on urgent private business. Requests 
Franklin to communicate with him through M. Dudouit. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) LX, 99. 

From Pliarne. 1777. May 13. Charlestown, S. C. 

Heard with pleasure of his arrival in France, as did all the true lovers 
of America. Arrival of vessels from France with dry goods and ammuni- 
tion raised the spirits of the people and encouraged recruiting for the 
army. Many men enlisting with Washington ; was at his headquarters 
in March, then he was not strong, but upon the way home he met several 
thousand men going to the camp from Virginia, Maryland and North 
Carolina. No important motion in the army of Howe, but six or 
seven men-of-war with some transports were in Delaware Bay on 
April 16. In Philadelphia they were much disposed to defend the city. 
Begs Franklin to continue his friendship for their house; uncertain 
value of money makes speculation in trade dangerous. A. L. S. 3 p. 

VI, 15. 

From O'Meara. 1777. May 14. St. Martin, He de Re. 

His great desire to serve the American cause ; if Franklin is pleased to 
give him any encouragement he will throw up his commission in France 
and set out immediately for the Congress. A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 16. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 245 

From Abbe Tardieu. 1777. May 15. Near Montelimar. 

The circumstances which led up to his composing a sonnet in behalf 
of the Americans. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 17. 

From Lt.-Colonel Duparquet. 1777. May 15. St. Esprit. 

A note enclosing some " Military Reflections" (LXII, 38). A. L. S. 

1 p. (In French.) LXII, 39. 

From Lt.-Colonel Duparquet. [1777. May 15. St. Esprit.] 

How the Americans should conduct the war against England. Mem. 

2 p. (In French.) LXII, 38. 

From Chevalier Perford [Duportail]. 
1777. May 15. Au Cap, St. Dominique. 

The same thing happened here as at Nantes, not able to find a vessel 
to take them to their destination. Mr. Carabas has fitted out a small 
vessel loaded with such commodities as will not render them liable to 
arrest. Obliged to leave one of the party who is ill with a disease of 
the country. When he recovers Mr. Carabas promises to see that he 
has the means of rejoining them. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

LXII, 94. 

From Roger Rossard des Naudins. 1777. May 16. Chateaudun. 

His son, Rossard de Villie, has entered the service of New England ; 
they know neither his whereabouts nor what he is doing and are much 
worried ; encloses a letter which he begs Franklin to get to him if pos- * 
sible. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 18. 

From C. J. Van Mulbraght. 1777. May 16. Ruremonde. 

Begs Franklin to establish him in the service of America as a cadet. 
A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 19. 

From Chevalier de Savari Demronti (?). 1777. May 17. Thouars. 

Willing to enter the American army as a volunteer. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VI, 20. 

From S[ilas] Deane. 1777. May 18. Paris. 
Enclosing letters to Franklin. A. L. S. i p. VI, 21. 



246 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

i^rom John Prichard. 1777. May 21. 

Begs Franklin to buy his discharge from the Minister at Paris for 
about eight guineas, so that he may serve the American cause either by 
sea or land ; his father owns a farm near Boston ; knows the American 
coast well. A. L. S. 3 p. VI, 22. 

From Wilhelm Bayle. [1777?] May 21. Jena, 
Offers to enter American army. A. L. S. 4 p. LIX, ii. 

From Bachelier. 1777. May 22. Paris. 

M. de Laffaye desires to present him with his memoir on the man- 
ner in which the Romans built and their habit of employing lime to 
make mortar as hard as stone. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 23. 

From Bourdin. 1777. May 22. Paris. 

Writes on behalf of a friend, who desires to get his son in the 
American Army and who is willing to equip him and send him to 
whatever port Franklin may name. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

VI, 24 and 43. 

From Lt.-Colonel Duparquet. 1777. May 22. St. Esprit. 

Fearing that his former letters have not reached Franklin, he makes 
another request to enter the American army. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) LXII, 40. 

From de Preville. 1777. May 23. Auch in Gascony. 

Offering him the services of two French gentlemen for the new 
republic ; their military services ; all they ask is the commission of cap- 
tain of dragoons, and a leave of three years with the assurance of having 
their old position on their return to France; neither misconduct nor 
debts causes them to take this step ; all they ask is to have the expenses 
of their voyage defrayed. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) V, 121. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas]. 1777. May 23. Leyden. 

Acknowledging the extract, which shall be published ; will also print 
an article on the kindness of the Americans to their Hessian prisoners 
as contrasted with the behavior of the Royalists. Advisability of receiv- 
ing the Journal of Congress regularly. Suggestions for an American 
currency. Begging him to visit them. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

XXXIX, 9. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 247 

Frorn Montant. 1777. May 23. He de Noirmoutier. 

Offers his services as surgeon ; if he can be useful, is ready to leave at 
once for Bordeaux or whatever port Franklin may indicate; will accom- 
pany M. Tardeville who leaves for Paris to join Franklin. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) VI, 25. 

From L. Bicker (Secretary de la Societe de la Philosophic Experi- 
mentale a Rotterdam). 1777. May 23. Rotterdam. 

The bearer, his brother-in-law, Mr. Caarten, is going to France and 
Italy; he desires to pay his respects to Franklin and to present him with 
the first two volumes of their " Collections Academiques." A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) VI, 26. 

From E. de Baussay. 1777. May 23. La Haie. 

A native of Amsterdam ; has been thirty-four years in the service of 
La Cour de Treves, and has a perfect knowledge of the government of 
Holland ; aware of everything which has passed between Franklin and 
the Ambassador of Holland. A visit from Franklin or Mr. Deane 
would be greeted with enthusiasm, but does not think it would result in 
any real advantages, the Ambassador of England's influence being too 
strong. Suggests the advisability of Franklin having a secret agent in 
Holland; offers his services. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 2654. 

From W[illiam] Alexander. 1777. May 24. Dijon. 

Not surprised that M. Dubourg thought his terms too high ; doubts 
not that he will get many cheaper undertakers. Sees his old friend Lee 
has been made Minister at Madrid; thinks he has much the air and 
manners of a Spaniard, when he is not angry; does Franklin know of his 
friend, the Comte de Rostaing, an officer of artillery? He claims to 
know a method of destroying ships in any river or roadstead, where there 
is no tide nor current. A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 27. 

From Ledoigt. 1777. May 24. Louviers. 

Hears that America is in need of carpenters, especially for the con- 
struction of mills; offers his services. A, L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VI, 28. 



248 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Reinier Arrenberg. 1777. May 24. Rotterdam. 

As he prints a Dutch newspaper, has copied and sent to the " Gazet- 
teer Frangais de Leide " an account of the cruel treatment of the 
Americans by the English ; begs to be informed of any important news 
from America. A. L. S. 3 p. VI, 29. 

From De Bragelonne de filley, de la Barre. 
1777. May 24. Bordeaux. 

Offering a new invention for use in war. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) LXI, 103. 

From De Bragelonne de filley, de la Barre. 
[1777. May 24.] Bordeaux. 

Advantages of a new gun-carriage proposed to Franklin for use 
in the war with England. Mem. 3 p. (In French.) LXI, lOO. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1777. May 25. Paris. 

Begs an audience for Mr. Coder, who has several models of costumes, 
ets., which merit special attention. A. L. in 3d P. (In French.) 

VI, 30. 

From Comte de Sarsfield. 1777. May 26. Paris. 

As he has received no answer from Franklin to his last note, is still 
in suspense about the books he may wish to have ; Mr. Oudin will send 
them to Mr. Deane's upon receiving any note from Franklin written 
in French. A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 31. 

From N[oble] W[imberly] Jones. 1777. May 26. Savannah. 

Many difficulties experienced by the State of Georgia, owing to their 
situation and their being destitute of shipping and seamen ; have been 
unable to procure certain articles essentially requisite for their defense ; 
writes by order of the Honorable House of General Assembly, who have 
deputed Captain de la Plaigne as their agent, to proceed to France 
and to procure such articles as are specified in their instructions to him. 
Important services rendered by Captain de la Plaigne to the American 
cause ; recommends him to Franklin's particular notice. L. S. 2 p. VI, 32. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 249 

From [Jean-Baptiste] LeRoy. [Circa 1777.] May 26. Paris. 

Wishing to borrow a letter from M. Burck [Burke?] to the Sheriff 
of Bristol, urging the necessity of making peace with the American 
Colonies. A. L. in 3d P. i p. XLII, 153. 

From Coder. 1777. May 27. Paris. 

Sends him the rest of the models, which M. Dubourg had -intended to 
bring the day before ; grievous state of Madame Dubourg's health ; will 
call upon him to ascertain his decision. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

VI, 33. 

From Will[iain] Strahan. 1777. May 27. London. 

News of Franklin's friends in London; Small's opinion that his stay 
in Paris is to pave the way to a reconciliation ; his great desire for 
peace on reasonable terms. A. L. S. i p. VI, 34. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1777. May 27. Paris. 

Can do nothing at present for Franklin but pray ; his wife is feebler 
than the day before and it is impossible for him to leave her; recom- 
mends a conference between Franklin, Deane and Bayard; believes that 
the affair can be turned to the satisfaction of all. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) VI, 34^- 

From James Shanly. 1777. May 28. Paris. 

Left Ireland about six weeks before to wait on Franklin and offer 
his services to the American cause ; many staunch friends of that cause 
in Ireland, but they dare not declare themselves openly ; would have 
brought large packets for Franklin from home had it not been dangerous 
to carry them. Understands that officers are needed ; his own experience 
in disciplining troops ; should Franklin give him an encouraging answer, 
there are many people waiting only for that to follow him. A. L. S. 
2 p. VI, 35. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. May 30. Philadelphia. 

Loan to be raised in France. France, Spain, and America, together, 
could expel the British fleet from the western seas. A. L. S. Benj- 
[amin] Harrison et al. 3 p. (In duplicate.) LIII, 43. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 327. 



250 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 
1777. May 31. Nantes. 

Hindrances in the way of loading the Mere Bobie. Report that Ham- 
mond is taken. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 88. 

From [James] Shanly. [1777. May.] 

Called on Dr. Franklin at Passy this Thursday morning; will call 
again to-morrow. N. in 3d P. I p. LXXI, 65, a. 

From Coder. 1777. June i. Paris. 

Advised by M. Dubourg to send him the blue coat exactly like the 
model he showed him. Describes the rest of the uniform. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) VI, 36. 

From Chevalier de Richoufftz. 1777. June i. Douay. 

Without occupation or fortune; begs Franklin to take pity on him 
and agree to his proposition to cross to Boston with the rank of captain 
and a salary of 2,400 livres in addition to the cost of his voyage. A. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 37 and 38. 

From Brusle. 1777. June i. Paris. 

Writes on behalf of a young man of good family, aged twenty-one, 
who desires to follow the profession of arms; heard that Franklin has 
procured for many soldiers the means of passing to America; begs that 
he may receive a like favor. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 39. 

From Burette. 1777. June i. Madrid. 

The success of the Americans proves the justice of their cause; his 
desire to enter their army with the same rank he held in France; asks 
what are the necessary steps to be taken. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

VI, 40. 
From P. P. Burdett. 1777. June i. Carlsruhe. 

The bearer is Baron Steuben, a gentleman of family, merit, and great 
experience, well known to some of the first personages in Europe; he 
comes all the way from Germany to make the acquaintance of Dr. 
Franklin. Apologizes for having troubled him of late with so many 
letters, but his communications of too great importance to trust to the 
common post. A. L. S. 3 p. VI, 41. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 251 

From Cosson de la Sudire. 

1777- June i. Chateau de la Sudire en Perigord. 

Desires to enter the American army; his rank as captain. A. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) VI, 42. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones to The American Commissioners. 
1777- June 3. Portsmouth, N. H. 

Has received orders from the Secret Committee of Congress to pro- 
ceed in the French ship Amphitrite to Charlestown, S. C, and thence 
to Paris, put a letter in Franklin's hands, and take command of a " fine 
frigate " ; refusal of the commander of the Amphitrite, M. Fautrel, to 
permit him to accompany him in any other capacity than as a passenger ; 
Col. Langdon's proposal that he should proceed to France in a new 
Continental ship of war which he is now fitting out; probability of this 
proposition being adopted. Ardently desires to be again in active ser- 
vice; though personally unknown to Franklin, the prospect of being 
shortly under his direction affords him a singular pleasure. L. S. 3 p. 

VI, 45. 

From Coder. 1777. June 3. Paris. 

Arranging for an interview. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 46. 

From Ruault. 1777. June 3. Paris. 

Sends six copies of Franklin's works translated. N. in 3d P. I p. 
(In French.) LXXI, 51. 

From de Lauron. 1777. June 3. Paris. 

Requests to be made a Colonel of infantry, in the American army. 
A. L. S. in 3d P. 2 p. (In French.) LXII, 67. 

From de Lauron. 1777. June 3. Paris. 

In every effort to enter the American service he has failed. As a 
last resource he calls on Franklin but could not see him, so is now 
compelled to send him this letter requesting to be made a Colonel in the 
American army. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) LXII, 68. 

From Recules de Basmarin et Raimbaux. 1777. June 4. Paris. 

The bearer is M. Vanhamme ; possesses many secrets which might 
prove useful to America, among them an easy and inexpensive manner 



252 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

of making salt-petre; wants to obtain a passage gratis and to carry 
certain letters of recommendation. Arrangements being made by them 
for two vessels to sail once a month for America ; will take anyone 
Franklin recommends without any expense, if he so wishes. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) VI, 47. 

From Josiah Smith. 1777. June 4. London. 

Born in Massachusetts, educated at Cambridge and studied physic 
and surgery until January, 1777, when he took ship for Bordeaux; gives 
an account of their capture by the English and their confinement in 
Plymouth ; after two months obtained his freedom ; treatment of the 
ship's company who, though they swore they were subjects of the United 
States, were forced into the service of the King. Two hundred Ameri- 
cans prisoners at Plymouth and as many more at Portsmouth ; is 
coming to France to report their miserable condition to Franklin ; his 
destitute state; begs Franklin to procure him a place as surgeon on some 
vessel; a friend of his, Capt. Brown, lately commander of a privateer, 
has just escaped and also would be glad of assistance. A. L. S. 2 p. 

VI, 48. 

From M[ichae]l Hillegas to The American Commissioners. 

1777- June 5. Baltimore. 

Supposes they are already acquainted with Congress haying established 
a Continental Loan Office, taking money on interest ; they will see by the 
late papers that far from being crushed, afFairs look better than could 
have been expected. A. L. S. i p. VI, 49. 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 

1777- June 5. Nantes. 

Books on Cavalry to go by the Massachusetts ; Count Pulaski and his 
two companions to embark on this ship ; money advanced for their pas- 
sage. Terms on which he can procure suits of clothing, shoes, saddles 
and holsters. A. L. S. 3 p. XXXVII, 89. 

From John Porter. 1777. June 6. St. Malo. 

Account of his capture, imprisonment at Plymouth and escape; is in a 
strange country and destitute of every necessary of life ; desperate cir- 
cumstances of his poor countrymen who are treated like felons in the 
prisons of Plymouth; English worse than the Turks; promised to tell 
Franklin of Capt. John Adams's capture. A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 50. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 253 

From Caleb Lownes (son of John Lownes). 1777. June 6. London. 

Giving an account of his time since he left Philadelphia till his arrival 
in London ; the cause of his leaving America and his reasons for tarry- 
ing in England ; wishes to know whether by staying he will hazard 
either his father's or his own reputation. A. L. S. 4 p. VI, 51. 

From J[oiiathan] Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. June 7. Nantes. 

Concerning his proposed partnership with Mr. Schweighauser ; 
strongly attached to this gentleman's family; stands extremely well with 
the second daughter; believes his present lack of means the only bar to 
a union. Account of his connection with a poor girl in England by 
whom he had a son ; intends providing for the boy and later taking him 
altogether. A. L. S. 4 P- XXXVII, 90. 

From Massequan. 1777. June 7. Nice. 

Read in the London Evening Post that Franklin had already accorded 
letters of marque to thirty vessels of France in charge of American 
captains; a proposal he made to one Francis Fowler, a Scotchman, to 
take command of a vessel belonging to him, and to cruise against the 
" Tamisiens " [English ?] in the Mediterranean. Requests Franklin 
to give a commission to this new patriot, whose honesty, courage and 
knowledge of the sea he can guarantee. A, L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

VI, 52. 

From B[enjamin] S[owden]. 1777. June 7. Rotterdam. 

Extracts from Mr. Gordon's letter to Dr. Price, published by Mr. 
Arrenberg in his Courant; subsequently copied in most of the other 
Courants of Holland. Concerning a French piece entitled " Avis aux 
Hessois " which has had a great vogue. Sir Joseph Yorke's bullying 
memorial to the States has given great offence in Holland; generally 
believed to have been composed bv the King himself. A. L. S. 2 p. 

VI, 53. 

From Francis Fowler. 1777. June 7. Nice. 

Is a subject of Great Britain, born in Aberdeen, and has served in 
different ships of his Majesty; describes the ship he has under his 
command, and asks Franklin for a commission, so that, unlocked for, he 
may cruise in the Mediterranean and fall upon the avowed enemies of 
the Royal Congress of America.^ A. L. S. 3 p. VI, 54. 

^ See VI, 52. 



254 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From de Cardone. 1777. June 8. Paris. 

Sending a memoir, intended for Congress, on the advantages to 
America of having large flour mills and building up an extensive export 
trade in that and similar articles. L. S. and Mem. 4 p. (In French.) 

LX, 121. 
From S[ilas] Deane. 1777. June 8. Paris. 

Expects M. Coder, who has proposed to furnish the clothes the fol- 
lowing morning; asks Franklin to breakfast with him then. The let- 
ter to Mr. Jay is a summary of what they last wrote, but w^ritten in 
secret ink and to all appearance about unimportant matters. A. L. S. 

I p. VI, 55. 

From [Antoine Laurent] Lavoisier. 1777. June 8. Paris. 

They are going to repeat several of Dr. Priestley's principal experi- 
ments on different kinds of air; if these will interest Franklin, will be 
honored with his presence. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 55/^* 

From Matthew Mease. 1777. June 9. Paris. 

Writes on behalf of some gentlemen who are desirous of Franklin's 
advice, to ask if he will grant them an interview. A. L. S. I p. VI, 56. 

From Jona[thaii] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777- June 10. Nantes. 

Capture of Adams verified by Captain Porter who has just arrived; 
assistance given this captain ; his intention to go out on some armed ves- 
sel and revenge his losses; thinks Wickes or Johnson would find him a 
valuable acquisition. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 91. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777- June 10. Nantes. 

Asking their interest on behalf of a poor American sailor who has been 
falsely accused of murder; gives the affair in detail. A. L. S. 3 p. 

XXXVII, 92. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1777. June 10. Paris. 

If he likes the model that M. Coder showed him, advises him to 
decide on it at once, as in a few days prices will go up. Concerning the 
muskets which he spoke to him about before. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) VI, 57- 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 255 

From Cavalier. 1777. June 11. Lyons. 

His admiration for the Americans; wishes to fly to their defense. A. 
L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 58. 

/^roOT Baron de Thuillieres. 1777. June 11. Paris. 

Requests Franklin to appoint a time when he can receive Mme. 
Denneville and Vicomtesse de Choiseul, from Martinique, who wish to 
see him. Asks about a balsam remedy ofEered to him. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) LXXI, 71. 

Frofn De Bretigney. 1777. June 12. Paris. 

Asking for a letter of introduction to Franklin's nephew [Jonathan 
Williams, Jr.], for three officers, leaving for America, via Nantes. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) LXII, 11. 

FroTJi Pet[e]r Timothy. 1777. June 12. 

Congratulates him on the honors conferred by " The Thirteen 
United Free and Independent States." His many positions on com- 
mittees and congresses and his active interest in public affairs left him 
no time for private correspondence. Wishes some instruction on a 
plan of education for his son, Benjamin Franklin, aged six. A. L. S. 
4 p. VI, 59- 

From Coder. 1777. June 12. Paris. 

Concerning the models in cloth ; will not rest until he is en route for 
America; hopes to merit the praise of Congress and the confidence and 
esteem of the generals and the friendship of the Americans. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) VI, 60. 

From W[illiam] L[ee]. 1777. June 13. Paris. 

Informing Franklin that Mr. Deane and himself will do themselves 
the honor of breakfasting with him on Sunday at 9 o'clock. A. L. S. 
I p. VI, 61. 

From Cot d'Ordan. 1777. June 13. Lille. 

Wishes to devote himself to the cause of America; has been employed 
in the Commissary Department and would like a similar position, if 
possible, in America; ready to serve such a cause with either pen or 
sword ; if he receives a favorable reply will set out at once for Paris. 
A. L. S. 8 p. (In French.) VI, 62. 



256 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Jean- Jacques] Caffieri. 1777. June 13. Paris. 

Wishes to know various details concerning Gen. Montgomery, the 
dates of his birth and death, his most famous actions and how and where 
he was killed in the attack on Quebec. Intends making a model of the 
monument for the next salon, and wishes to give a description of the 
tomb and of the person for whom it was made. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) ' VI, 63. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. June 13. Philadelphia. 

General Washington's successes in New Jersey. Everything still quiet 
in the Northern Department. Favorable aspect of affairs. A. L. S. 
Benj [amin] Harrison et al. 2 p. (In duplicate. ) LIII, 44, 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 336. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777- June 14. Nantes. 

Arrival of the Anonyme ; poor opinion of her ability either to fight or 
run away; officers claiming passage on her; question of her destination. 
Reported blowing up of Mr. Chaumont's ship Captain Rotch at the 
entrance of the Delaware. Ships at present for sale. A. L. S. 3 p. 

XXXVII, 93. 

From Ph. F. Thierin, 1777. June 14. Paris. 

Had the honor to give Franklin a letter from one of his friends of 
St. Malo ; reminds Franklin of his promise to answer it. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) VI, 64. 

From Lieut.-Col. de Girard. 1777. June 15. Paris. 

Desires an interview with Franklin; has received a letter from 
Cherbourg with information of the capture of an English vessel. A. L. 
S. I p. (In French.) VI, 65. 

From Courreget, fils. 1777. June 15. Bayonne. 

Writes on behalf of a young Frenchman, aged twenty-five years, who 
wishes to enter that glorious company and perish, if need be, with 
Franklin's brave compatriots. A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 67. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 257 

From Coder. 1777. June 16. Paris. 

M. Dalibard seeks an interview concerning the muskets ; expects to be 
at Passy hiraself at 8 o'clock the next morning. Madame Dubourg's 
dangerous condition. Copy of four lines, written by M. Dubourg at 
the foot of Franklin's picture. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 68. 

From D. Laville. 1777. June 16. 

A letter of recommendation for one Bumel. A. L. S. i p. (In 
Latin.) LXX, 128a. 

From The Royal Society of Medicine of Paris. 
1777, June 17. Paris. 

Certificate of membership. Portfolio. 

From Chevalier de Basserode. 1777. June 17. Tonnay-Charente. 

Fears that his letter of April never reached Franklin ; sends copy of it. 
(See V, 158.) A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 69. 

From Jona[tlian] Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. June 17. Nantes. 

Introducing Mr. Frerot, a cannon-founder of Nantes, who hopes 
to obtain permission of the Ministry to make what quantity of cannon 
he pleases; advantages of obtaining them at the place of shipping. 
A. L. S. I p. XXXVII, 94. 

From De Bretigney. 1777. June 18. Paris. 

Asking permission to call to present his officers, to say good-by, and 
to get letters of introduction for himself and officers to Congress. A. L 
S. I p. (In French.) LXII, 12. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. June 18. Philadelphia. 

Skirmishes in the Northern Department. Military afiEairs in New 
Jersey. A. L. S. Benj[amin] Harrison et al. 4 p. (In duplicate.) 

LIII, 45. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 344. 

From Archibald Douglas. 1777. June 18. Cherbourg. 

Is now lying in Cherbourg with the same prize that Capt. John 
Burnell informed Franklin of; does not know what to do with her 
2 — 17 



258 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

owing to the loss of their captain and the impossibilitj^ of selling her ; 
two King's cutters cruising off the harbor on purpose to take them 
should they venture out; wishes to know how he shall act. A. L. S. 

1 p. VI, 70. 

From R. Haines. 1777. June 18. Paris. 

Assured by his sister (Sarah Evans) that Franklin will not be 
offended at his writing to him. Concerning the sale of some land in the 
northern part of the province of New York belonging to a Mr. Lydius, 
who thought Franklin might know of a purchaser. A. L. S. i p. 

VI, 66. 

From [John] Paradise. 1777. June 18. Homburg Vor-der-Hohe. 

Is secretary of the Patriotic Society of Homburg; desires to add 
Franklin's name and those of some of his brave and learned compatriots 
to the membership. Concerning the memoirs that the society proposes 
to publish. In Germany there are certain writers in the employ of 
Lord North to abuse the Americans, French and Spanish. A. L. S. 

2 p. (In French.) VI, 71. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 

1777- June 19. Nantes. 

Can obtain an old French frigate, which could be fitted for a privateer, 
and enough Americans to man her, in case they care to encourage an 
operation of a warlike nature. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 95. 

From Edward Bridgen. 1777. June 19. Antwerp. 

Sends him a letter from Dr. Price ; gives his address in case Franklin 
wishes to send back an answer. Places the Bishop's sermon, printed in 
the enclosed newspaper, at Franklin's service. A. L. S. i p. VI, 72. 

From Coder. 1777. June 19. Paris. 

Concerning the models he sent to Mr. Deane which have been 
appropriated by the " regisseurs " ; begs him to write a line to Mr. Deane 
in order that he may recover his models. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VI, 73. 

From Abbe d'Antrecourt. 1777. June 20. Paris. 

His brother desires to enter the American army; his brother's knowl- 
edge of mathematics and war. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 74. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 259 

From De Bretigney. 1777. June 21. Paris. 

Sends him a letter from M. de Beaumarchais ; begs him to give the 
bearer the letters he promised. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 75. 

From G. B. de Krohne. 1777. June 23. Hamburg. 

Is minister plenipotentiary of the Duke of Saxe-Hildburghausen ; has 
the requisite talent to serve America, being equipped with a full knowl- 
edge of business and politics ; admirable position of Hamburg as a center 
of news and commerce; all he asks as a reward besides the payment of 
his expenses, is a promise from the Congress to declare him their min- 
ister as soon as the Colonies obtain their independence. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VI, 76. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.], 1777. June 23. Nantes. 

Enclosing an extract from a letter of W. Alexander [2 p.] relative 
to the proposed partnership with Mr. Schweighauser. Has assumed 
certain powers on account of his situation as Franklin's agent and at the 
request of Mr. Ross; on Mr. Lee's arrival will resign this power to 
him. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 96. 

Fro w John [Jean-Baptiste] LeRoy. [Circa 1777.] June 23. Paris. 

Accepting his kind invitation for dinner; in doubt whether Mme. 
LeRoy is included. Complete letter-foundry for sale, if Franklin wishes 
to purchase. A. L. S. 2 p. XLII, 157. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. June 24. Nantes. 

His feelings for Mr. Schweighauser's second daughter; if he stays in 
Nantes must either hazard a refusal or not see her any more. A. L. 
S. 3 p. XXXVII, 97. 

Fro7n Comte de Tressan. 1777. June 24. Paris. 

Writes on behalf of his eldest son, who desires to enter the service of 
America; enumerates his son's claims to consideration and position; 
refers him to his old friends, Messrs. Elie de Beaumont and de St. 
Lambert. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) VI, 76^. 



26o Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1777. June 25. Paris. 

The condition of Mme. Dubourg does not permit him to leave her a 
moment. In spite of the rise in prices the uniforms will be well made of 
the best cloth ; the gaiters and cartridge boxes will be satisfactory ; is not 
yet content with the hats or helmets. Concerning the question of 
muskets. A. L. S. 3 p. ( In French. ) VI, 77. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1777. June 25. Paris. 

Sends him a letter so carefully sealed, that he cannot tear the first 
envelope without destroying the second ; does not know Mr. Thom- 
son's address; begs Franklin to forward it to him. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VI, 78. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777, June 26. Philadelphia. 

Retreat of General Howe's forces from Somerset Court House to 
Amboy. A. L. S. Benj[amin] Harrison et al. 2 p. (In duplicate.) 

LIII, 46. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 349. 

FrojTi Elie de Beaumont. 1777. June 26. Paris. 

The accompanying letter is from the Comte de Tressan, Lieutenant- 
General of the armies of the King, who desires to give his services to the 
American cause ; his rank, his services and his talents ; begs him to write 
to Congress on the subject. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 79. 

From [Col.] Tissot Grenus. 1777. June 26. Geneva. 

Circumstances prevent his return to Paris; the bearer will make 
Franklin a proposition concerning two small works which he desires to 
give to the printers. A. L. S. I p. (In French.) VI, 80. 

From de Weyss. 1777. June 27. Lionville. 

Reminds Franklin of a visit he paid him in March to offer his ser- 
vices to the American cause; left his address, but has heard nothing. 
Resemblance between Switzerland and America. Five or six officers 
anxious to go over with him. His experience and skill. Discusses the 
advisability of negotiating a loan with his country. Desires to hear 
what Congress is willing to do for him. A. L. S. 7 p. VI, 81. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 261 

From Duplessis. 1777. June 27. Hennebont. 

Concerning the copy of a letter in the Leyden Gazette purporting to 
be from " Le Sieur Mauduit Duplessis " to his brother at I'Orient. 
Assures him that the letter is a fraud, and that the person who wrote it 
evidently does not know " le Sieur Mauduit Duplessis," whose corre- 
spondents are not in the habit of publishing his letters. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) VI, 82. 

From W[illiam] Lee. 1777, June 27. Frankfort. 

Denying the report that a contract had been made with a French firm 
for arms and ammunition, on account of the State of Virginia, and again 
requests him to endeavor to procure the same from the French Ministry. 
A. L. S. 3 p. LXI, 29. 

Fro?n J. Ingen Housz. 1777. June 28. Tissingen. 

Still on the estate of the Prince de la Tour et Tassis, whose two sons 
he has successfully inoculated. His intention to go to Amsterdam, 
thence to London and finally to Paris, once more to enjoy Franklin's 
society. His opinion of the present war; his hopes of an ultimate 
reunion of the two countries. Franklin's greatness as a philosopher; 
hears that the Emperor called upon him. Gives him directions for the 
safe conduct of any letters he may wish delivered in England. A. L. 
S. 3 p. VI, 83. 

From Gautier fils. 1777. June 28. Au Cap [Haytien?]. 

The drafts of M. Ceronio have been accepted and paid. Capture of 
the ship " Le Meulan," commanded by Captain L'Aguehay ; Franklin's 
packet discovered by the Royalists, one of the French sailors having been 
bribed to reveal its whereabouts; the captain and the two engineers sent 
to London.' Six frigates needed along the coast to aid the Americans. 
A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) VI, 85. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777' June 28. Nantes. 

Happy return of the Mercury. Safe arrival of the Amphitrite at 
Portsmouth, and also of M. Du Coudray. News from America; people 
full of ardor and high expectations; the prospects of the English ex- 
tremely wretched. M. de Bretigny and his corps to take passage on the 
Anonyme. Desires their opinion concerning his plan for a privateer. 
A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 98. 



262 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Lainb[er]t Wickes. 1777. June 28. St, Malo. 

Announcing his safe arrival in company with Captain Nicholson; 
details of their late cruise; account of being pursued by a man-of-war. 
Advice concerning Capt. Nicholson's ship. Praises Capt. Johnston. 
A. L. S. 3 p. VI, 86. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 123. 

From Comte de . 1777. [June ?] 

Offers to raise and furnish, to the United States, a corps of from 
2,000 to 10,000 trained troops, fully armed and equipped. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) LX, 48. 

From Comte de . 1777. June 29. Spa. 

On the same subject as the preceding letter. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) LX, 49. 

From [Jean Jacques] Caffieri. 1777. June 30. [Paris.] 

Desires a sketch of General Montgomery. A. N. in 3d P. i p. 

LXX, 41, a. 

From [Jean Baptiste] LeRoy. [1777? June.] 

Sends a letter from M. Caffieri. Franklin's gift received with 
gratitude at the Academy. Dr. Home, a young Scotch physician who 
is about to start for Vienna, will gladly take Franklin's letter for Dr. 
Ingen Housz. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XLIV, 160. 

From . [1777. June. Paris.] 

Rank, age, titles and description of the nine officers that went to 
America with M. de Bretigney in June, 1777. Mem. 2 p. (In 
French.) LXII, 14. 

From Berthon [de Maissonneuve]. 1777. July i. Brussels. 

Requesting him to forward a letter to Mr. [Stephen] Sayre. A. 
L. S. I p. (In French.) LXX, 26. 

From Mehl. 1777. July I. Schorndorff, Wiirtemberg. 

His love for America. Was going thither in 1754, but vessel was 

wrecked. Is desirous of establishing a tobacco agency at his place. 

Mentions Christopher Lochner, of Philadelphia, as reference. A. L. 

S. 3 p. LIX, 38. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 263 

From Comte O'Donnell. 1777. July i. Lemberg. 

Desires to enter the service of the Colonies; his military experience, 
first in Austria, now in Poland, where he possesses the rank of lieutenant- 
colonel. His knowledge of the English language. If Franklin looks 
with favor on his plan, begs to know the conditions he may expect. 
A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 87. 

From S[ilas] Deane. 1777. July 2. Paris, 

Captain Wickes's safe arrival. Word of the day in London is that 
Howe is not ordered to attack Philadelphia, but to join Generals Carle- 
ton and Burgoyne; " taut mieux pour nous." A. L. S. i p. VI, 88. 

From Chevalier D'Archambault. 1777. July 2, Chartres. 

Hears that Franklin has accorded to many officers a position in the 
American army suitable to their services and rank in France; begs for 
the like favor; his military experience; can furnish the best of references. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 89. 

FroTti Henri van Laaschet. 1777. July 2. Crefeld. 

His three brothers and one sister are settled in Pennsylvania; not 
being able to send his letters to them as usual via England, begs Frank- 
lin to forward the enclosed. A. L. S, 3 p, (In French.) VI, 90. 

From Comtesse de Caire. 1777. July 2. Versailles. 

Asking for an interview on behalf of the Canadian widow of a 
French Officer who desires to come to France. A. L. in 3d P. 3 p. 

LXX, 41, b. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. July 2. Philadelphia. 

Retreat of the British to Staten Island. Commissions for Ralph 

Izard and William Lee enclosed. A. L. S. Benj [amin] Harrison et 

al. 2 p. (In duplicate.) LIII, 47. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 361. 

From Rod[olp]h Valltravers. 1777. July 2. Passy. 

Has called to see Dr. Franklin on several interesting matters. Asks 
Franklin to appoint a time when he can see him. A. N, in 3d P. I p. 

LXXI, 78. 



264 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Sam[uel] Nicholson. 1777. July 3. St. Malo. 

Safe arrival of Capt. Johnston. Desires Franklin's orders concerning 
the refitting of their vessels. Just heard of the arrival of three of their 
prizes at Nantes; hopes they will fall into the hands of Mr. Williams. 
A. L. S. I p. VI, 91. 

From [C. G. F. Dumas] to Franklin, Deane and Carmichael. 

1777. July 3. 

Acknow^ledging letters of the 20th and 23d ult. ; published them as 
desired in the Leyden Gazette; their habit of altering and cutting such 
contributions. Account of the purchase of certain houses at Flushing 
by unknown parties who allow them to remain empty; possibility of 
their being asylums for the English Ministers in case the King is obliged 
to sacrifice them. Suggestions made to Manson concerning the advan- 
tages likely to accrue to Pomerania and Prussia from the free admittance 
and protection of Americans at Emden; favorable reception given this 
idea. A. L. 4 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 10. 

From Amelia Barry. 1777. July 3. Tunis. 

Her admiration for Franklin's character and sentiments ; may his 
valuable life be extended until peace is attained and may cool and dis- 
passionate posterity rank him with those w^orthies of antiquity who have 
served as models for succeeding ages; gets a melancholoy comfort from 
Franklin's portrait; his little god-daughter kisses his hands. A. L. S. 
4 p. VI, 92. 

From W[illia]m Lee. 1777. July 4. Paris. 

Sorry to miss seeing Franklin the other day. Is about to set out for 
Havre. A. L. S. i p. VI, 93. 

From Dumas & Mallet. 1777. July 4. Geneva. 

Thinks the commercial interests of two republics like Switzerland 
and America could be joined with great advantage to both countries. 
Various kinds of merchandise which his firm could supply. A. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) VI, 94. 

From James Lovell. 1777. July 4. Philadelphia. 

Discontent among the American officers at the influx of foreigners 
who supersede them in command. Brigadier-General Knox beloved by 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 265 

his corps; confusion caused by M. Du Coudray's treaty; resignation of 
Brigadier-General Conway on finding Chevalier de la Barre ranking 
above him. The instruction passed in Congress respecting foreigners 
who do not understand English. Must not be construed as a patent for 
those who do. A. L. S. 3 p. VI, 95. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 79. 

Fro7n Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. July 4. St. Malo. 

Safe arrival in port of Capt. Johnston in the brig Lexington; would 
be glad to know where he is to proceed to next, also if he is to purchase 
guns and arm the Reprisal ; advises the sale of the Dolphin ; thinks there 
is little prospect of doing anything more on that coast; in hopes that 
Franklin will order him and Capt. Johnston to proceed to America; 
their kind reception by the principal people of St. Malo. A. L. S. 2 p. 

VI, 96. 

From W[illiam] L[ee]. 1777. July 5. 

Number of vessels taken by Wickes and his little squadron. The 
capture of the Seine and another French vessel is announced by the 
Admiralty; knows not how this will be received at Versailles. English 
papers also mention that Cornwallis is in great jeopardy and not ex- 
pected to escape. Intended movements of Burgoyne and Carleton. A. 
L. S. 2 p. VI, 97. 

From Chevalier de Richoufftz. 1777. July 5. Douai. 

Has had no answer to his two former letters; cannot believe that 
Franklin received them ; begs him to agree to his former proposal [VI, 
37 and 38; see page 250] and put an end to his misery. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VI, 98. 

Froi7i Richard. 1777. July 6. Paris. 

Hears that there is need in the Colonies for gunsmiths; has been at the 
head of one of the most important manufactories of arms in France; 
offers his services to America. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 99. 

From David. 1777. July 6. Bordeaux. 

The person of whom he spoke to Franklin is frightened by the num- 
ber of vessels captured by the English and has decided to wait until 
the war is over before sailing for America. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

VI, 100. 



266 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Comte d'Escordeck. 1777. July 6. Orleans. 

On his various inventions in arms and w^eapons. A. L. S. 4 p. (In 
French.) LXI, 102. 

From Gourlade. [1777?] July 7. L'Orient. 

Informing Franklin of the arrival, at St. Malo, of The Two Sisters, 
one of the prizes taken by Mr. Wickes; will arrange an immediate sale. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XL, 27. 

From Silas Deane. 1777. July 7. Paris. 

The gentleman from Portugal has arrived; wishes Franklin to see 
him. A. L. S. i p. VI, loi. 

From [Abbe] Nicoli. 1777. July 7. Paris. 

Sends him a letter from Ingen Housz ; if he desires to send an answer 
will provide him with a safe conveyance. A. L. S. i p. VI, 102. 

From Franchessin. 1777. July 7. Paris. 

His brother left for Philadelphia in March, 1776, to serve in the 
American army; heard lately that he had been charged with despatches 
in France; begs for some information concerning this and his brother's 
position in America. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 103. 

From E. Cayrol. 1777. July 7. Amsterdam. 

Would not venture to offer his services to Franklin had not M. 
Coder commissioned him to complete, with M. Dubourg, the equipment 
of two thousand men on the models agreed upon ; his terms, fabrics, etc. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 104. 

From . 1777. July 8. 

Introducing Mr. Brown. N. i p. LXXI, 105b. 

From Rod[olph] Valltravers. 1777. July 8. Paris. 

Requested by Count D'Eyk, envoy of the Elector of Bavaria, to en- 
treat the favor of the Messrs. Franklins' company at dinner. A. L. in 
3d P. I p. VI, 105. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 267 

From P. Penet. 1777. July 8. Nantes. 

Sends a cheese, entrusted to him by Captain Hamor for Franklin. 
Expects to come to Paris before long, and by recounting certain things 
justify himself to Franklin and reinstate himself in his regard. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) VI, 106. 

From J. Cole. 1777. July 8. Paris. 

Desires to devote the rest of his days to the service of America; 
various certificates he can produce in his favor; vi^ished employment on 
board an American privateer. An Englishman by birth but has reasons 
for writing in French. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 149. 

From Silas Deane. 1777. July 9. Paris. 

Suggests the advisability of writing to Mr. Williams on the subject 
of his last. A. L. S. i p. VI, 107. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. July 9. St. Malo. 

Acknowledging his favor of 3d inst. ; desires more particular instruc- 
tions as to sale of the Dolphin. Question of mounting the Reprisal with 
brass or iron guns; wishes to know where Capt. Johnston is to be 
ordered. Three large English privateers are to be sent to cruise off 
Nantes and to take all American vessels bound thither. Only three of 
their prizes arrived and those of the least value ; concludes that the rest 
are taken. A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 108. 

From [Ferdinand] Grand. 1777. July 10. Paris. 

A receipt for a certain sum of money. A. Mem. i p. (In French.) 

VI, 109. 

From J. Temple. 1777. July 11. Richmond Green. 

Sends him this letter by their old friend, Mr. Garnier; congratulates 
him on his success ; has often determined to go over and see him, but was 
always deterred by prudence; should a war with France take place, 
would cross over at once with his little family. Condemns England's 
policy for the last two years. Messages from his wife. Encloses a 
" letter to Lord Chatham " which is much read. Gives him directions 
how to address his answer, which he desires him not to sign. A. L. S. 
4 p. VI, no. 



268 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From De Casson. 1777. July 1 1. Armentieres. 



Desires to enter the service of America; refers Franklin to his sister, 
Madame de Siguenot, in Paris, for an account of his military services. 
Would like a recommendation to Gen. Washington. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VI, iii. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. July 12. St. Malo. 

Mentioning a French ship now at St. Malo which is out of repair 
but would answer their purpose very well; she is well known to be a 
fast sailor; the character of the captain. A. L. S. i p. VI, 112. 

From de Fechter. 1777. July 13. Landrecies. 

Anxious to serve under the flag of the new-born republic ; his military 
services; begs Franklin to procure him a leave of absence for some years. 
L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 113. 

From William Gordon. 1777. July 13. Newbur^^port. 

The present state of affairs; Gen. Gates's refusal to serve under Gen. 
Schuyler; news of the loss of Ticonderoga and Fort Independence after- 
wards contradicted ; rumors that Gen. Howe intends visiting the New 
England states; all his troops are embarked and dropped down to Sandy 
Hook. Gen. Prescott surrounded and made a prisoner. Account of the 
capture by Capt. Manley of the frigate " Fox " of 28 guns ; her Captain 
and two Lieutenants killed. A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 114. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. July 13. St. Malo, 

Acknowledging favor of 4th inst., concerning the disposal of the 
prizes; his own destination; disposition to be made of the Dolphin. 
Three of his people have run away and carried off a French pilot boat, — 
is he responsible for it? A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 116. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 125. 

From Elie de Beaumont. 1777. July 15. Paris. 
Begs Franklin to give an immediate answer to the request of M. le 
ComtedeTressan [seeVI,79]. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 117. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 269 

From S[ilas] Deane. 1777. July 15. Paris, 

Enclosing a letter from Mr. [Arthur] Lee ; the first he had heard of 
Mr. Lee's misfortune; thinks it must be attended with serious conse- 
quences. Invites Franklin to dinner the next day. A. L. S. I p. 

VI, 118. 

From Berthon [de Maisonneuve]. 1777. July 15. Brussels. 

A friend of Mr. Sayre's, who addressed a letter to him in Franklin's 
care, wishes to know if it was forwarded. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

VI, 120. 

From Recules de Basmarin et Raimbaux. 1 777. July 1 5. Bordeaux. 

Complaints against American captains have not been substantiated by 
the facts ; probably the work of Royalists. Account of a battle at Bruns- 
wick between Generals Washington and Putnam and Generals Howe 
and Cornwallis, resulting in victory for the former. Other news, less 
authentic, of the complete destruction of the united armies of Howe and 
Cornwallis. Quotes from a letter of Washington's to the people of the 
neighboring provinces, urging them to enlist. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) VI, 121. 

From Comte de Scordeck. 1777. July 15. Orleans. 

Sent Franklin on the 8th inst. an abstract of a military scheme which 
will render the Americans victorious in two campaigns and will force 
the English to renounce forever the conquest of Boston. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) VI, 122. 

From Le Begue de Presle. 1777. July 16. Paris. 

Concerning a strange occurrence caused by thunder which happened 
at Purfleet ; the facts in the case communicated to the Academy. Wishes 
for news of his brother who crossed the sea to join Washington's army; 
encloses a letter for him. A work on electricity by M. Cavallo. Gives 
a long quotation in Latin from Nathaniel Hulme's History of a Person 
Afflicted with Stone. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 123. 

From Comte de Vergennes to Franklin and Deane. 

1777- July 16. Versailles. 

Complains that the American privateers take refuge in the French 
ports; this constitutes a breach of their treaty with England, which 



270 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

forbids them to allow privateers free access to their ports unless through 
pressing necessity, and also forbids the deposit and sale of their prizes. 
Asks the American Commissioners to make these intentions known. A. 
L. S. 4 p. (In French.) VI, 124. 

Printed in Diplora. Corres., Wharton, II, 364, also in Hale's Franklin in 
France, I, 132. 

From Paulze. 1777. July 17. Bercy. 

His friend, Mr. Martin, wishes to purchase a little vessel, called the 
Jason, and commanded by Mr. Hutchinson, which was captured by the 
Americans. Begs Franklin for information as to her whereabouts. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 125. 

From the Marquis de Mirabeau. 1777. July 19. 

Has been prevented, by unfortunate circumstances, from going to see 
him. Wishes to know when he could see him at Passy and what day 
Franklin could dine with him. N. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) 

LXXI, 9. 

From J. Gruel. 1777. July 19. Nantes. 

Reminding Franklin of his promise to visit him in the present month. 
Congratulates him on the engagements at Brunswick and Amboy; hopes 
the end will be as glorious as the beginning. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) VI, 126. 

From de Gueydon Desdoit. 1777. July 20. Villef ranche de Lauragais. 

Desires to serve under the American flag; begs Franklin to tell him 
what advantages he may expect as an officer in America; his family and 
his military experience ; born an American. A. L. S. 2 p. ( In French. ) 

VI, 127. 

From Henriette du Mesnil de St. Pierre. 1777. July 20. Isigny. 

Owing to an unfortunate affair, her father was obliged to retire twelve 
years before to South Carolina; in 1774 he was lieutenant at Fort 
Charlotte on the Savannah River; for three years they have received no 
tidings of him; begs Franklin to ask the Governor of that province to 
make inquiries as to her father's fate. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

VI, 128. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 271 

From D. Louis. 1777. July 20. Du pont de I'arche. 

Hears that the Americans offer to procure honorable positions for 
priests who wish to cross the seas ; desires to have a part in the glory won 
by Franklin's brave fellow-citizens. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

VI, 129. 

From Joseph Ceronio. 1777. July 21. Genoa. 

Writes for news of his son, Stephen Ceronio, who shipped on board a 
vessel bound for Philadelphia; carried recommendations to Messrs. 
Willing, Morris & Co., who took him into their counting-house; has 
received no letters from him since December, 1775; begs Franklin to 
forward him the enclosed, and if possible to let them know whether he 
has been taken prisoner. A. L. S. 3 p. VI, 130. 

From S[ilas] Deane. 1777. July 22. Paris. 

Sends him certain letters; concerning their correspondence with the 
Comte de Vergennes. A, L. S. i p. VI, 131. 

From Paillier. 1777. July 22. Paris. 

Wishes to make a contract with Franklin to supply any amount of 
shoes or leather goods for the soldiers; supplies his Majesty's troops 
with these articles. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 132. 

Froj7i de Cardone. 1777. July 23. Paris. 

Congratulates him on the success of his armies; wished to know his 
opinion of the memoir he left at his house on a previous visit. What 
dishonor for England to be beaten by those whom she stigmatized openly 
as cowards. Considers Franklin a prophet in politics. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) VI, 133. 

Frorn Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. July 23. St. Malo. 

They are allowed to go on and refit their ship, but very slowly; ex- 
pects to be ready to sail by August; Capt. Johnston arrested by orders 
from the Minister at Paris; has given his parole not to leave port with- 
out permission; he awaits Franklin's orders. Advises the purchase of 
the ship Prince of Conte, but not above a certain price. A. L. S. i p. 

VI, 134. 



272 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Abbe de Charronnes. 1777. July 23. Sorbonne. 

Sending a letter by M. de Chalut which was delivered to him by 
mistake. L. S. i p. (In French.) LXX, 52. 

From J. Lafargue. 1777. July 24. Paris. 

Enclosing a letter and certificate of a friend; begs for an answer to 
his request. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 136. 

From [Lieut.] Soleau. 1777. July 24. Besangon. 

France being at peace, offers his services to the Colonies; his military 
rank and service; his only conditions are a leave of absence, the command 
of a company of cavalry and the cost of his voyage. A. L. S. 3 p. 
(In French.) VI, 137. 

From Le Connu [E. de Baussay], 1777. July 24. La Haie. 

Heard with pleasure that his letter of May 22d was delivered to 
Franklin. Account of affairs in Holland relative to the Colonies. Sir 
Joseph Yorke's attempt to gain over to England two regiments belong- 
ing to the Prince de Waldeck ; reasons why this is likely to prove unsuc- 
cessful. Amsterdam entirely in favor of the Americans; her late peti- 
tions to increase her navy. Death of his old friend, Mr. Jacob Henry 
Chabanet. Rupture between England and France regarded as in- 
evitable. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) VI, 138. 

From A[melia] Barry. 1777. July 25. Tunis. 

Fearing that he had not received her last letter of July 3d, sends a 
copy of it by a sure hand. [See page 264.] A. L. S. 4 p. VI, 140. 

From de Lalaisse. 1777. July 25. Toul. 

Desires to go to America and serve in the army; his reasons are not 
mercenary; wishes to know the conditions, treatment, etc. Many of his 
comrades desire to follow him. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 141. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.], 1777. July 25. Nantes. 

Desires the enclosed letter sent to Mr. Holker if Franklin approves 
it. Reminds him of his intended visit to the salt works at Nantes. 
A. L. S. I p. XXXVII, 99. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 273 

From O'Reilly de Quane. 1777. July 26. Aumale. 

Though unknown to Franklin, has the greatest admiration and affec- 
tion for him. Has made a translation of " Considerations on the Meas- 
ures Carrying on with Respect to the British Colonies in North 
America"; desires to dedicate it to Franklin. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) VI, 142. 

From Jno. Valentz. 1777. July 26. Paris. 

Was formerly an inhabitant of Pennsylvania; compelled ten years 
before on account of his debts to quit the province; his hard struggle 
ever since; desires to return and throw himself on the mercy of his 
creditors, also wishes to take a commission in the Continental ser- 
vice ; has been an officer in the provincial service ; personally acquainted 
with General Washington. Has not a sou in the world ; begs Franklin 
to assist him in procuring a passage; his claim on Franklin's kindness 
as a fellow Mason; member of St. John's Lodge, No. 2, in Philadelphia. 

VI, 143. 
From P. Penet. 1777. July 26. Nantes. 

The accompanying letter is from his associate, M. Pliarne; much 
regrets that Franklin does not deem his letters worthy of any reply. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) VI, 144. 

From Lanib[er]t Wickes. 1777. July 27. St. Malo. 

Acknowledging favor of the 22d inst. The Dolphin will not be suf- 
fered to leave the port until further orders from Paris. Captain Johnston 
arrested at Morlaix and cannot get away without permission ; desires a 
line from Franklin. Question whether the French soldiers will be 
suffered to ship with them. A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 145. 

From [C. G. F.] D[unias]. 1777. July 27. The Hague. 

Concerning Holland's refusal to cede to England the two regiments 
of the Prince de Waldeck; intrigue on the part of Sir Jos[eph Yorke]. 
A. LS. 2 p. (In French.) XXXIX. 14, 

From Coder. 1777. July 27. Paris. 

By September expects to deliver to any specified port the 1,300 com- 
pleted uniforms that have been ordered. Desires no salary, but merely 
the opportunity of serving the United Colonies, where he has decided to 
live or die. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 135. 



274 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Lieut.] Wommrad. 1777. July 28. Mannheim. 

Studied engineering since his earliest years; his military services; 
desires to fight for the American cause; wishes to know what arrange- 
ments must be made. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 146. 

From Col. Tissot Grenus. 1777. July 28. Geneva. 

Concerning two volumes of military works which he cannot afford to 
have printed. Asks Franklin's help ; every soldier ought to have a copy 
of his work. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) VI, 147. 

From Cavoleau. 1777. July 28. Lucon. 

Begs Franklin to save him from the horrors of despair and procure 
him a position in the American army or at least to tell him the means of 
carrying out his desire. Tells a long tale of misfortune; loss of money; 
perfidy of friends. M. Tardiveau, who is about to leave for America, 
under Franklin's auspices, is the only relation and friend he has in the 
world. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) VI, 148. 

From Lecoq. 1777. July 28. Paris. 

A friend of his anxious to know to whom he must apply to procure a 
commission as captain of a privateer; his friend's vessel equipped with 
ten cannon, arms and men in proportion. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

VI, 150. 

From J. Temple. 1777. July 29. Richmond Green, Surrey. 

Mr. Izard goes with his family to reside in France till a chance offers 
to cross to America; he has been detained for two years, like himself, in 
the hope that England would not remain so " madly blind " to its own 
interests. Consults Franklin on the advisability of following Mr. Izard's 
example, with his wife and two boys. Gloom caused by late accounts 
from America ; report of the total destruction of the Newfoundland fish- 
eries has reduced the citizens to sullen silence. A. L. S. 3 p. VI, 151. 

From Dehaistre. 1777. July 29. Paris. 

Having heard that M. Deane has been commissioned to make pur- 
chases for the Colonies, offers his services for the kitchen utensils. A. L. 
S. I p. (In French.) VI, 152. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 275 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr. 1777. July 29. Nantes. 

Concerning a complaint against Capt. Wickes by certain of his crew, 
who claim prize money; encloses the Captain's explanation [2 p.]. The 
capture of Brunswick confirmed. General Tryon and Colonel Walcott 
dead of wounds received at Danbury. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, loo. 

From Guerin. 1777. July 30. Paris. 

Sends him an extract of a letter, which he received from his brother; 
begs Franklin to take immediate action in this matter with M. de Sartine 
so that by his prompt orders the mischief may be averted. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) 

The extract concerns a misunderstanding with the Minister of the 
Marine. 2 p. VI, 153. 

Fro?n Comte de Ranes. 1777. July 30. Auch. 

A friend of his desires to serve the American cause and has asked him 
to find out from Franklin the means necessary to carry out this plan ; 
his rank is high and he will inherit a large fortune. Le Marquis de 
Lafayette is not the only example of a man of the first quality crossing 
the sea to devote his life to the American cause. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) VI, 115. 

From Massequan. 1777. July 30. Nice. 

Wrote Franklin on the 7th of June and sent him the petition of one 
Francis Fowler who desired a commission to command a privateer; 
has received no answer. Wishes to know what Capt. Fowler may ex- 
pect. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 154. 

Froi7i Frederic Le Merle. 1777. July 31. St. Dieppe. 

Sends him some verses in praise of their brave islanders ; trusts Frank- 
lin may find them worthy of being offered to their brother insurgents. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) VI, 155. 

From F. Van Lelyveed. 1777. July 31. Leyden. 

Had the honor to write Franklin December, 1774, touching his letters 
to Mr. Brownrigg, upon the use of oil to still the waves, and in April 
1775) sent him six copies of a paper he published on the same subject; 
believes that he never received either letters or papers. His friend, 
Professor Tollins, is at present in Paris and will present Franklin with 
a copy of his Dutch piece translated into French. A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 156. 



276 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Lanib[er]t Wickes. 1777. July 31. St. Malo. 

The bearer is M. le Baron de Cadignun, who has rendered him every 
service in his power; this is merely to introduce him to Franklin, as he 
has no favors to ask, and does not desire to go to America. A. L. S. i p. 

VI, 157. 

Fro7n [Aime Ambroise Joseph] Feutry. 1777. July 31. Passy. 

Desires to be associated in some way with the Philosophical Society of 
Philadelphia, if only as a correspondent. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

VI, 158. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. August i. St. Malo. 

Acknowledging his favor of July 25th. French seamen now in jail; 
gave themselves up voluntarily. Steps he has taken relative to the 
prize brig. Will be ready for sea as soon as permission is given them to 
start; Capt. Johnston in a like situation at Morlaix. A. L. S. 2 p. 

VI, 159. 

From Capt. de Carantene. 1777. August i. Dieuze. 

Desires to offer his services to America; his age, military experience 
and rank; conditions on which he will join the army; understands Ger- 
man as well as French. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 160. 

From . 1777. August I. Paris. 

Proposed contract for purchasing a vessel. Mem. i p. (In 
French.) LXI, 84. 

From [Pierre Samuel] Dupont [de Nemours], 
1777. August I. Paris. 

Opened the accompanying packet which was addressed to him, but 
intended for Franklin ; no longer enjoys, as he once did, the confidence 
of Government, and letters sent to him are no longer postage free; is 
only too glad to be of any service, but suggests that Franklin's corre- 
spondents should put some mark on their letters so that he will know 
them. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 161. 

From Seth Paddack. 1777. August 2. Marseilles. 

Came over from Philadelphia with the promise of having a good ship 
at Nantes, fitted out in a warlike manner, to go back in ; found it all a 
farce; after various vicissitudes, is now anxious to get a private ship to 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 277 

return home in ; should be glad of Franklin's assistance to obtain a com- 
mission for him in his country's service; will never bring disgrace on 
his family; devoted to his countrj', though Franklin once doubted it. 
A. L. S. I p. VI, 162. 

FrojTi F N . 1777. August 3. St. Omer. 

Is an officer in the British army; desires to know^ if his services will 
be acceptable to the United States; positions he has held in the English 
army; desires, on landing in America, to receive a regiment with the 
rank of colonel, and the expenses of passage for himself and servants. 
Gen. Gates a great friend of his. Expects Franklin to observe the 
greatest secrecy on this matter. A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 163. 

From Mme. Haineville. 1777. August 3. 

Her son, in the American army, has been taken prisoner by the 
English; begs Franklin to allow her an interview that she may tell him 
her trouble. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 164. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. August 3. St. Malo. 

The bearer is M. Becard, of St. Malo, who desires to enter into the 
American trade; as he has been of great service to him (Wickes) hopes 
Franklin will render him any service in his power. A. L. S. I p. 

VI, 165. 
From W. Wildrik. 1777. August 5. Namur. 

Surgeon in the service of the Low Countries; desires to give his ser- 
vices to the American army and take a position in one of their hospitals: 
A. L. S. 3 p. (In French and Latin.) VI, i66. 

From Mile, de Quane. 1777. August 6. Paris. 
Begs Franklin to answer the enclosed. L. in 3d P. i p. VI, 167. 

Fro7n Marquis Devienne. 1777. August 6. Doullens. 

Desires to joint the Marquis de Lafayette to whom he carries the best 
recommendations. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 168. 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 

1777. August 6. Nantes. 

Giving Capt. Hereaud, commander of the Mercury, the highest praise 
in the performance of his duty. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, lOi. 



278 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 

1777. August 6. Nantes. 

Introducing M. de Folique, commander of a French frigate belonging 
to M. Montieu. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 102. 

From Duvaunoel. 1777. August 6. Gaillon. 

Offers his services in the line of business in France and other coun- 
tries; has letters of recommendation from M. Turgot. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VI, 170. 

From W[illia]m Bingham. 1777. August 7. Saint Pierre. 

Introducing M. de Karsaint who commands one of his Majesty's 
armed vessels that has been some time past stationed in ' these seas ' ; 
circumstances would not permit him to refuse this letter. L. S. I p. 

VI, 171. 

From Laiquel Sauvage. 1777. August 7. Calais. 

A shoemaker offers Franklin 2,000 pairs of shoes at three francs, 
twelve centimes a pair. Concerning a debt due him by an officer in the 
service. Cheapness of shirts in his province. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) VI, 172. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. August 7. St. Malo. 

Ready to sail; their powder will not be delivered without a positive 
order from the Minister; Capt. Johnston only waiting for Franklin's 
orders to depart from Morlaix ; the bearer is anxious to sail with him to 
America; promised not to take any French persons on board and carry 
them off without permission from the Judge of the Admiralty; is in 
the same quandary with regard to the Chevalier de Cheffontain, recom- 
mended by Franklin. Has manned his vessel from the crew of a dis- 
armed American privateer; cruel treatment of their captain in England. 
A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 173. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. August 7. Philadelphia. 

Military affairs in America. Loss of Ticonderoga. L. S. B[enja- 
min] Harrison, R[ober]t Morris, James Lovell. 3 p. (In triplicate.) 

LIII, 50. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 373. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 279 

From Ponteney. 1777. August 7. Versailles. 

A$ks for an interview to arrange certain business matters. A. L. S. 

1 p. (In French.) LXI, 121. 

From M. de Germany, 1777. August 8. Paris. 

Requests Dr. Franklin to forward an enclosed letter to its destination. 
N. in 3d P. I p. LXX, 103. 

From [Jean Simon David de] Foucault. 

1777. August 8. Plombieres. 

Health of his wife much improved. Good news from America; 
defeat of Cornwallis by General Putnam and the abandonment of 
Brunswick with a loss of 3,CX)0 men; pursuit of the fleeing army by 
General Putnam. Short of money, his stay being unexpectedly long; 
asks Franklin for an advance of one hundred louis. Expects to go to 
Switzerland; asks for Franklin's orders. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

VI, 174. 

From Col. Chevalier de Champigny. 1777. August 8. Amsterdam. 

Franklin subscribed to his History of England. Sends the first vol- 
ume; reasons for dedicating it to Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick. Offers 
him the first two volumes of his translation of the " Histoire des rois de 
Danemark de la Maison d'Oldenbourg." A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

VI, 169. 
From Real. 1777. August 9. Calais. 

Concerning the unfortunate circumstances of two sailors from Boston, 
Joseph Peach and William Smith, who were taken prisoners by the 
English; they escaped, seized a boat and arrived finally at Calais; de- 
sires Franklin's permission to enable them to sell the boat they arrived 
in, which the officers of the port have made them abandon. Calais 
very often a refuge for Americans who escape from prison. A. L. S. 

2 p. (In French.) VI, 175. 

From John Bondfield. 1777. August 10. Bordeaux. 

Has a small sloop called the Montgomer^^ which he proposes to send 
back, armed, to America; not having a commission, applies to Franklin 
for one. Has two vessels that will sail direct for the continent in 
fifteen days ; any commands that Franklin may care to transmit by them 
shall be duly attended to. A. L. S. i p. VI, 176. 



28o Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Berard. 1777. August 10. Paris. 

Has a letter to deliver from Captain Wickes. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) VI, 177. 

From Mme. Haineville. 1777. August 10. Paris. 

Begs Franklin to take her son under his protection. A. L, S. I p. 
(In French.) VI, 178. 

From Dr. [Jean Francois Clement] Morand. 

1777. August 10. Paris. 

Has examined the list of descriptions of arts and trades sent him by Dr. 
Franklin. Sends him his work, " L'Art d'exploiter les mines de Charbon 
de terre." Is making a collection of engraved portraits of the scholars 
composing the Academy of Science; desires Franklin's portrait for this 
work. L. in 3d person. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 179. 

From W[illia]m Bingham. 1777. August 11. St. Pierre. 

Important news received; junction between Gen. Howe's and Gen. 
Cornwallis's troops at Brunswick; marched as far as Somerset, then 
retraced their steps; Gen. Washington attacked them, whereupon they 
retreated to Amboy and thence embarked for New York; they pillaged 
and destroyed almost the whole town of Brunswick; advantages to be 
derived from this affair. Destruction of the Newfoundland fisheries 
by two Continental frigates and a number of privateers. Capture of 
the frigate " Fox " by Capt. Manley. Reasons why he supplied Mr. 
Davis and M. Baussancourt with money. Encloses a letter relative to 
the differences between British and Hessian troops. Ultimate destination 
of the sloop of war, the Marie Catherine. 

1777. September 9. — News of Gen. Howe's departure from New 
York; speculation as regards his ultimate destination. Thinks the New 
England States will have to bear the whole weight of the winter's cam- 
paign. Capture of Capt. Manly and his prize. L. S. 4 p. VI, 181. 

From Sam[uel] Nicholson. 1777. August 11. Nantes. 

Just setting out for St. Malo where Mr. Williams thinks he had 
better spend about three weeks in order to be out of the way while the 
new ship is being built; has promised Capt. Tanner the master's berth 
and a lieutenantcy to Mr. Dillaway; can easily get a crew. Desertions 
from the Randolph on account of sickness. A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 182. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 281 

i^rom James Bedout. 1777. August 11. Bordeaux. 

Asks for a commission from the Congress to empower him to cruise 
against the English ; describes his vessel ; references he can furnish. A. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 183. 

From Lieut. Martin. 1777. August 11. He de Re. 

Is a lieutenant in the Fifth South Carolina Battalion. Has orders to 
wait on Franklin and receive his commands before returning. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) VI, 184. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 

1777. August II. Nantes. 

Some foundation for the reports from America concerning the affair 
at Brunswick. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 104. 

From J[onatlian] Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. August 12. Nantes. 

Will settle the affair between Capt. Wickes and his men. Concern- 
ing M. de Kerquelin's plan to fit out a vessel of war in the service of 
the United States; has given a letter to the Baron de Gesse who will 
open the whole plan to him. A. L. S. 3 p. XXXVII, 105, 

From J[onatlian] Williams, Jr. 1777. August 12. Nantes. 
Introducing the Baron de Gesse. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 106. 

From Charles Whitehead. 1777. August 12. Boulogne-sur-Mer. 

Thoroughly convinced of the justice of the American cause. As a 
member of the Corporation of London, has constantly voted in opposi- 
tion to a profligate and corrupt Court. Lost the greater part of his 
fortune in the present war; has only his person, therefore, to offer; is a 
descendant of the great Admiral Benbow; begs for a commission in the 
service of America with instructions how to act. His only tie is a 
young daughter dearer to him than life. A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 185. 

From Verseuil. 1777. August 12. Mezieres. 

Wishes to know Franklin's direct address before he reveals his object 
in writing. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VI, 186. 



282 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Ch[arles] Carroll, of Carrollton. 
1777. August 12. Anne Arundel County, Md. 

Requesting him to send the enclosed letter to Mr. Carmichael. Events 
resulting in the loss of the posts of Ticonderoga and Mount Indepen- 
dence. Inaction of Gen. Howe incomprehensible; thinks they will 
eventually direct their entire force against the state of New York. 
Hopes for the ultimate success of their struggle for independence, pro- 
vided they receive the necessary assistance from abroad ; greatest appre- 
hensions arise from the depreciation of paper money. Every member of 
Congress anxious for a confederacy of states; advantages to be derived 
from such a step. Question of introducing foreign mercenaries. Cer- 
tain artisans very much needed ; have been greatly distressed for want 
of salt; means being taken to obviate this; high prices paid for the 
necessaries of life. State of the weather and the crops. A. L. S. 
6 p. VI, 188. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. August 12. St. Malo. 

Orders from the Judges refusing to let him take cannon, powder or 
stores on board, or to depart without further instructions from Paris; 
his indignation at such treatment. A. L. S. 3 p. VI, 189. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 126. 

From Thomas Jefferson. 1777. August 13. Virginia. 

Recommending to Franklin's kind offices Mr. Thos, Shore, a native 
of Virginia, who goes to France to establish a proper mercantile corre- 
spondence. Virginia has deposited the monarchical and taken up the 
republican government with the greatest ease; thinks their cause is safe 
if they can support the credit of their paper; steps to be taken to achieve 
that result. Outlines the consequences should the British Court come to 
their senses in time and acknowledge the independence and sovereignty 
of America. [Conclusion torn off.] A. L. i p. VI, 190. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. [1777?] August 14. Paris. 

Sends M. de Vic to Franklin; his son, M. de Bois Bertrand, crossed 
to America in July, 1776, as lieutenant-colonel, and was taken a few 
days afterwards with Gen. Lee; M. de Vic will explain what happened 
after that ; desires that his son shall return to America. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VI, 191. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 283 

From R[udolph] E[ric] Raspe. 1777. August 14. London. 

Letters he has written to Franklin ; with the last he sent a copy of his 
/atest literary production. Treated in a despicable manner by certain 
persons in Germany and England; if he comes to Paris, can Franklin 
rescue him from that ruin which knaves have attempted to bring upon 
him. Sends a copy of his late English edition of Born's Mineralogical 
Letters. A. L. S. 3 p. VI, 192. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas]. 1777. August 14. "From My Desert." 

Account of a visit he paid to Amsterdam and of his conversation 
with the Factor and M. Van Berkel ; England's desire to force Holland 
into an alliance she wishes to form with Russia and Prussia; has M. 
Van Berkel's word that Amsterdam will never consent to it; his own 
opinion as to the relations of Holland, England and France ; believes the 
time to be ripe for working and intriguing at Amsterdam. Report re- 
ceived that the houses at Flushing were purchased by some merchants 
of Dunkirk; their reasons for this. A. L. S. 7 p. (In French.) 

XXXIX, 15. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. August 15. Nantes. 

Concerning a request from M. Flobergue de la Rocatelle [in French, 
I p.] to forward two packets to America, one to Congress, the other to 
Gen. Washington; will forward them unless he forbids. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 107. 

From J[oiiathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. August 15. Nantes. 

Introducing Mr. Henrj' Newman and Mr. Thomas Cushing. A. L. 
S. I p. XXXVII, 108. 

From Sam[uel] Nicholson. 1777. August 15. St, Malo. 

Arrived at St. Malo. Mr. Elliot recommended by Capt. Wickes to 
go out with him as captain of marines ; asks for a commission for him ; 
wrote before for a commission for M. de Manay, at present master of 
the Dolphin. A. L. S. i p. VI, 193. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. August 15. St. Malo. 

Recommends Mr. Beaugear and his son to Franklin's kindness; aid 
they have rendered him in arming and fitting his vessel. Capt. Nichol- 



284 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

son's arrival at Nantes with a fine new ship; recommends Mr. Elliot 
for his captain of marines. Wishes to know how far he may be justi- 
fiable in complying with the orders of administration for his governance. 
A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 194. 

From . 1777. August 16. Bilbao. 

Have had no reply to memorandum of goods shipped on schooner 
Neptune and of advice as to the Success's departure. Captains Sinclair 
and Williamson arrived at Boston with naval stores after short and 
prosperous passages ; but have not heard from Honorable Elbridge Gerry 
to whom they were consigned. Schooner Lively, Captain Nicholas 
Dupee, twenty-seven days from Newburyport, has arrived with seal oil 
and whale fins consigned to them. Forwards the enclosed sent through 
Captain Dupee in their care. English troops have evacuated Brunswick 
with precipitation ; General Howe may proceed against some of the New 
England settlements. L. i p. XLIV, 16. 

Fro7n. [Lieut.-Col.] de Girard. 1777. August 16. Versailles. 

An experienced officer anxious to join the American army ; his knowl- 
edge of the frontiers of Virginia and Canada. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) VI, 195. 

From de Clermont. 1777. August 17. Bordeaux. 

His desire for glory and his love of war induces him to leave his regi- 
ment and throw in his lot with the insurgents; discovered that he could 
do nothing without express permission from Franklin, which he now 
craves. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 196. 

From Dr. Jalouzet. 1777. August 17. Chatillon. 

Wishes to know if he could obtain remunerative employment as 
physician and surgeon in the United States. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

CI, 26. 
From A. E. Braam Houckgeest. 
1777. August 17. Zutphen in Gelderland. 

As a member of the same society of Harlem, to which he belongs, he 
requests Franklin to obtain commissions for three young men. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) LXII, 59. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 285 

From Chevalier Francois de Rabier de La Baume. 

1777. August 18. Portsmouth, on board "La Princesse Amelie." 

Received a commission in the service of Congress and set sail with 
letters of recommendation ; taken prisoner near Philadelphia ; detained 
two months in New York and then sent to England ; begs Franklin to 
interest himself in his sad state and to make known his intentions through 
the channel of his sister and brother, who will call on him. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) VI, 197. 

From [J. H. Bernardin] de St. Pierre. 1777. August 19. Paris. 

Has known Franklin a long time by reputation; desires exceedingly 
to have the pleasure of an interview; thinks he could interest Franklin 
in favor of his brother, who has gone to share the glory of the American 
cause. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

[Note in English on back of letter.] — An autograph letter of the 
famous J. H. Bernardin de St. Pierre, author of Paul et Virginie, etc. 
The brother, called Dutailly de St. Pierre, entered the American army 
and after some disgraceful adventures was sent a prisoner to France and 
locked up in the Bastille; his release obtained by Franklin; soon after 
this lost his reason and ended his days in a mad-house. L. i p. VI, 198. 

From Fayenberg (?). 1777. August 19. Aubague. 

Has read in the papers of the wretched food distributed to the army 
in America, — worm-eaten biscuit and tainted water. Sends him a 
history of these worms and if this proves of service to the Colonies will 
forward him a pamphlet concerning weevils and one on the ways of 
keeping water pure. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 199. 

From Comte de St. Lambert. 1777. August 22. Termonde. 

Recommending a friend of his to Franklin who desires a position in 
the service; his former services and his knowledge of the American 
coast. Recommends also a young lieutenant now in the Emperor's ser- 
vice. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 200. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. August 22. St. Malo. 

Desires to know his future destination and how he is to act in regard 
to the proceedings of the Admiralty officers at this Port; if he is not 
despatched soon, it will be necessary to clean his hull again. Recom- 
mends Capt. Green, of Philadelphia, if Franklin has any employment 



286 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

for him ; as he will do everything in his power to serve the American 
cause and is very capable of commanding a vessel. A. L. S. i p. 

VI, 201. 

From de Latour. 1777. August 23. Bergerac. 

Cannot obtain employment in France ; implores Franklin to procure 
him a position at Boston in whatever regiment he thinks suitable. A. L. 
S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 202. 

i^ro An Lamb [er]t Wickes. 1777. August 24. St. Malo. 

Will strictly comply with the orders from the Minister at Paris; 
very anxious for his present unhappy detention to cease ; it hurts him 
very much to be treated as he is by the Admiralty officers of this Port; 
if he lives to get back to America will never be persuaded to return to 
France. Is treated with great civility by the gentlemen of this place. 
Very grateful for Franklin's approbation. A. L. S. I p. VI, 203. 

From Rolland. 1777. August 24. Belleme. 

Two worthy families of his acquaintance desire to settle in Pennsyl- 
vania; begs Franklin to give them recommendations and their passage 
to Philadelphia free. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 204. 

From C. P. Geltier. 1777. August 24. Paris. 

Wishes to know why, if dry, cold weather produces the most elec- 
tricity, the greatest storms should occur in a hot, moist temperature. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VI, 205. 

From De Cliniac de la Bastide. 1777. August 24. Toulouse. 

His great desire to serve under the flag of Franklin's republic and 
under a general covered with such immortal laurels. A, L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VI, 206. 

From Richard de la Prade. 1777. August 24. Montbrison. 

Has practised medicine for seven years ; so far has only written a few 
memoirs on chemistry ; very desirous of going to America and under 
Franklin's patronage; thinks he may be of use in the army. A. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) VI, 207. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 287 

From William Lee. 1777. August 25. Holland. 

Warns Dr. Franklin against a certain Mr. Wentworth who has been 
showing to the Dutch Minister of State and others, a copy of what pur- 
ported to be Franklin's memorial to Count Maurepas, wherein he at- 
tempts to excite the French Court to declare openly and immediately in 
favor of America. Heard there were letters at Nantes announcing Mr. 
Ramsey's safe arrival at Baltimore. To make France jealous of the 
Colonies it is reported that letters taken from American vessels state that 
North America promised to the West India Islands and those of Mar- 
tinico that if they would assist them with warlike stores North America 
would, if successful, in turn help them to throw off the yoke of France. 
Burgoyne occupied Ticonderoga after the Americans evacuated it. A. 
L. 3 p. XLIV, 17. 

From Hennet. 1777. August 25. Paris. 

Advises Franklin as to date of delivery of the order for 4,000 sabres. 
Proposes to supply other arms, such as lances, pikes, etc. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) LXI, 117b. 

From J. Ingen Housz. 1777. August 26. Paris. 

Making an appointment to dine with Franklin. A. L. S. I p. 

VI, 208. 

From Galland. 1777. August 27. Luneville. 

His military career; desires to serve in the American army; his reasons 
for wishing this application and Franklin's answer to remain a secret. 
A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 209. 

From Chariot. 1777. August 27. Paris. 

Introduces himself as the nephew of the former chief of the War 
Department and begs Franklin to appoint an hour when he may call 
upon him. L. in 3d P. i p. VI, 210. 

i^roTw D. Martin. 1777. August 28. La Rochelle. 

Gives an account of his voyage ; asks for a loan ; at present detained at 
the Royal Hospital ; as soon as he is able will wait on Franklin for his 
orders. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 211. 



288 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. August 28. Nantes. 

Concerning the trouble between Capt Wickes and his men. Number 
of persons he has helped with money or a berth on a ship. His uncle's 
desire to return to America; begs Franklin to see him and advance him 
twenty louis on his account. His proposals for Mr. Schweighauser's 
daughter received rather coldly owing to his lack of means; his passion 
gradually getting the better of all reason and reflection. A. L. S. 
4 p. XXXVII, 109. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777. August 28. Nantes. 

Major Lutterloh's letter from Philadelphia speaks of the state of the 
army as far superior to his expectations. Evacuation of the Jerseys con- 
firmed, as well as the capture of Gen. Prescott. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XXXVII, no. 

From F. Ludry Michet. 1777. August 28. 

Certifying that Louis Martin, lieutenant in a South Carolina regi- 
ment, has undergone treatment, for a fistula, in the military hospital 
of La Rochelle. A. L. S. (In French.) LVIII, 68. 

From Friedrich Barnzen. 1777. August 29. Hamburg. 

Wishes to become a useful " Subject " of the United States. A. L. 
S. 3 p. LIX, 27. 

From Bedot fils aine. 1777. August 29. Montpelier. 

Solicits an order from Franklin for shoes. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) VI, 212. 

From Bouillon. 1777. August 29. Paris. 

At the request of Mme. la Comtesse de Villeneuve, begs for a letter 
of recommendation for Pierre Rerot, who desires to join the American 
army as lieutenant ; his ardor so great that he will probably sail with 
or without a commission. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VI, 213. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones. 1777. August 30. Portsmouth. 

Congress has put under his command the new sloop of war, the 
Ranger; almost insuperable difficulties he has encountered in equip- 
ping her; will wait on Franklin at the end of his cruise when he will 
point out some effective enterprises; encloses a paper he has hastily drawn 
up on the present evils of navy system; his own feelings about being 
superseded by his inferiors. L. S. 4 p. VI, 214. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 289 

From J. Ingen Housz. 1777. August 30. Paris. 

Has found a coach at a very great bargain ; calculates what it will cost 
them to stay sixteen days on their journey; awaits an immediate answer. 
A. L. S. I p. VI, 215. 

From [Philip de?] Platen. 1777. August 30. Bordeaux. 

His previous military services; desires to quit the peace of Europe to 
seek war in America ; applies to Franklin for his passage money. A. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) VI, 216. 

From Lamb[er]t Wickes. 1777. August 31. St. Malo. 

Has received orders from the Minister of Marine at Paris to depart 
the port immediately and not to enter again on any consideration; his 
surprise and indignation ; desires to be ordered to America at once. 
A. L. S. 2 p. VI, 217. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 128. 

From [William] Lee. [1777. August] ? Chaillot. 

Will set out for Nantes next day and will take care of anything he 
has to send. A. L. in 3d P. i p. XLIII, 200. 

From Marquis Devienne. 1777. September i. DouUens. 

Has written several times of his desire to pass into the service of 
Congress; only asks that his passage and that of one servant should be 
paid. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VII, i. 

From [Comtesse] D. B. [de] Conway. 1777. September i. Auxerre. 

In great trouble over the news of Ticonderoga; begs Franklin to 
relieve her anxiety about her husband and friends. A. L. S. i p. 

VII, 2. 

From Nicolaus Jacob Holterman. 1777. September i. Cassell. 

Asking for a commission in the American army. A. L. S. 4 p. (In 
French.) LXII, 58. 

From De Casson. 1777. September 2. Armentieres, Paris. 

Request to enter the American army. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 31. 

2 — 19 



290 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Pierre Trezarrieur (?). 1777. September 2. Alicante. 

Has heard that Congress thinks of establishing consulates in all the 
ports of Spain; desires the post of Consul in Alicante. A, L. S. i p. 
(In French.) VII, 3. 

From Soeur de Marcrany. 1777. September 2. Doullens. 

Writes on behalf of the nephew of one of the sisters who desires to 
enter the American army ; he belongs to a very ancient family ; has not 
a sou to his name. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VII, 4. 

From Larguier Des Bancels. 1777. September 2. Rochefort. 

Justice of the American cause ; the hoped-for alliance between France 
and the Colonies. His desire to emigrate to America and pursue the 
business of commerce or agriculture. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

VII, 5. 

From James Bedout. 1777. September 2. Bordeaux. 

Is ready to sail ; renews his request for a commission. A. L. S. I p. 

VII, 6. 
Fro7n de Lescun. 1777. September 2. Vannes. 

Has been told that Franklin is charged by Congress to procure officers 
for the army ; oiifers his services. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VII, 8. 

From Comtede la Merville. 1777. September 2. St. Germain-en-Laye. 

Concerning his servant, Le Noir, who leaves him on the pretense that 
Franklin has engaged him ; has too high an opinion of Franklin's honesty 
to believe he would engage a servant wearing another man's livery. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) VII, 8^. 

Fro w Abbe Vic [om]te de Tarride. 1777. Septembers. Beam. 

Appeals to him on behalf of the Vicomte de Tarride who sailed for 
Boston a month before to aid the American cause. A. L, S. 2 p. (In 
French.) VII, 9. 

From William Day. 1777. September 3. Port Louis. 

Account of a cruise under the command of John Manley, Esq.; cap- 
tured nine prizes; expects to sail for America in eight days. A. L. S. 
2 p. VII, 10. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 291 

From O'Cahill. 1777. September 4. Strasbourg. 

Comes of an ancient and noble family in Ireland; brought up at the 
Prussian Court ; his military services ; begs Franklin to procure him a 
position as officer in the army. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VII, 11. 

From T. T. Fournier fils. 1777, September 4. Paris. 

Concerning some type that Franklin wished to order from him. A. L. 
S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 12. 

From Chevalier d'Argreum (?). 1777. September 4. Commercy. 

Desires to serve in the American army, and to take with him six 
officers of his choosing. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 13. 

From Paulze. 1777. September 4. Bercy. 

Concerning a large purchase of tobacco and the difficulties of trans- 
porting it safely. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 14. 

From Charles Guillaume Frederic Dumas. 1777. September 5. 

His situation ; the personal attacks made on him and the losses and 
injury he suffered by being deprived of his position and source of 
living for his devotion to the American cause and the interests of 
Congress. 2 p. (In French.) (Copy.) LIII, 19b. 

From J. Vincent. 1777. September 5. Paris. 

Desires to know if the letter from Holland he left at Franklin's house 
came safely to hand ; returns in a day or two if he desires to entrust him 
with any letters. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VII, 16. 

Fro?n Philip Mazzei. 1777. September 5. Albemarle County, Va. 

Concerning the seeds called Ravizzoni by the Lombards and Cavolo 
rapa in the Tuscan language; their probable usefulness in America. 
Begs Franklin to forward certain letters to the Grand Duke of Tuscany ; 
has a plan in view which he thinks will be very agreeable to that sovereign 
and very beneficial to the colonies. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 17. 

From Philip Mazzei. 1777. September 5. Albemarle County, Va. 

Copy of preceding with an additional note concerning the Cavolo rapa. 
The bearer is Mr. Shore, a gentleman from Virginia. A. L. S. 3 p. 

VII, 18. 



292 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From G[eorge] Wythe. 1777. September 6. Williamsburg. 

Introducing Thomas Shore, a young gentleman of Virginia about to 
embark for Europe, A. L. S. i p. VII, 19. 

From Capt. Lamb[er]t Wickes and Sani[uel] Nicholson. 
1777. September 6. St. Malo. 

Appeal for relief and assistance for their brother officers and men who 
are prisoners in England, and who are suffering for want of the neces- 
saries of life. L. S. 2 p. LX, 26. 

From Baron de Rullecour. 1777. September 7. Blois. 

His plan to raise a body of men in France and the colonies to assist 
the Colonial generals in their operations; demands neither rank nor pay 
for himself, only for those under his orders who have already suffered 
enough in Poland. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VII, 20. 

Fro?n Comte de Bruges. 1777. September 7. Valreas. 

Claims kinship with General Montgomery who fell at Quebec. Asks 
for a letter of recommendation for M. d'Alencon who desires to serve in 
the American army. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 21. 

From Comte de St. Lambert. 1777. September 8. Brussels. 

Entreating an answer to his letter of August 22d. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) VII, 22. 

From Marquis de Rognes. 1777. September 8. Aix en Provence. 

Desires to pass into the service of the Colonies with the same rank he 
has held in France. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 23. 

From R. Hamilton. 1777. September 8. London. 

Has decided to carry his small capital in cash rather than in goods; 
has been offered a free passage to New York; from there will make his 
way to some part of Pennsylvania; begs Franklin to send him the prom- 
ised letter of recommendation. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 24. 

From Forbin de Melleville. 1777. September 9. Paris. 

Pays Franklin many compliments; offers him his life if he will deign 
to accept it ; in the mean time desires to know at what hour he may wait 
upon him. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VII, 25. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 293 

From Beaumont, Comtesse de Feillens. 1777. September 9. Paris. 

Desires a position in the American army for the son of a French 
officer; sure that he will prove satisfactory in every respect. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) VII, 25^. 

From Le Camus Guitton. 1777. September 10. Chatellerault. 

Has three sons, w^hom she wishes to put into the American service. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 26. 

From Duclaux. 1777. September 10. Lyon. 

Desires to enter the American service. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VII, 27. 
From Estourneau de Latouche. 
1777. September 10. St. Jean-d'Augely. 

Desires to obtain the command of an American regiment ; wishes to 
know the price. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 28. 

From Derneux de Brie. 

1777. September 10. Chateau de Brie, Comte de Foix. 

Offers his services and desires, if possible, to obtain a company in the 
new levies that M. deBretigney is recruiting under Franklin's protection. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 29. 

From Begougne. 1777. September 12. Limoges. 

The " war of the Bostonians " opens a possible career to him ; desires 
to become a surgeon in the American army and to procure a salary from 
the moment of embarking. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 30. 

From Lamb [er]t Wickes. 1777. September 12. St. Malo. 

The Admiralty very pressing in their insistance on his departure ; fears 
he will have to sail before the arrival of Franklin's despatches; disposi- 
tion to be made of the Dolphin. A. L. S. i p. VII, 31. 

From Marquis de Puysegur and de Carmainville. 

1777. September 12. 

Asking for a letter of introduction for their friend, M. de Carriere, 
who is going to America. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) LXII, 20. 



294 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Frojti Genlis. 1777. September 13. Paris. 

Recommending to Franklin La Clausse, who desires to enter the ser- 
vice of Congress. A. L. S. I p. (In French.) VII, 32. 

From de Beauvais fils. 1777. September 13. Le Mans. 

Desires to obtain a place in the American army; necessity of keeping 
this fact a secret from his family. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French. ) VII, 33. 

From A. Rodolph Gruner. 1777. September 14. Paris. 

Desires to enter the service of the Colonies, A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) VII, 34- 

Fro w Chevalier de Bermont. 1777. September 14. Vesoul. 

Offers his services ; his past military record ; desires to know what 
would be his rank and salary. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 35. 

From Stephano, Baron de Bissy. 1777. September 14. Versailles. 

Concerning some wonderful discoveries he has made; wishes Franklin 
to test his latest invention for loading cannon ; the advantage this would 
be to the Colonies; what he desires Congress to do for him. A. L. S. 
4 p. (In French.) VII, 36. 

From Bulet. 1777. September 14. La Charite. 

His enthusiasm over the success of the Americans and his admiration 
for the brave fellows; offers to furnish the colonies with certain articles 
necessary to their commerce or to their military operations. A. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) VII, 37- 

From Sam[uel] Nicholson. 1777. September 15. St. Malo. 

The departure of Captain Wickes accompanied by the Dolphin ; John- 
ston afraid he will be obliged to leave the port of Morlaix; expects to 
meet the Dolphin with the rest of his officers at Nantes. A. L. S. 
2 p. VII, 38. 

From A. Rodolph Gruner. 1777. September 16. Paris. 

Urgent reasons why he desires an immediate answer to the request 
in his letter of the 14th. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 39. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 295 

Fro?n Le Ray de Chaumont. 1777. September 16. Passy. 

Wishes Franklin's decision concerning a frigate which Bernier and 
Gourlade desire to sell. Begs Franklin and his colleagues to dine with 
him and the matter can be concluded at once. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) VII, 40. 

From Scherer de Jouchery. 1777. September 16. Paris. 

Recommended to Franklin some time before by M. le Comte de 
Maillebois, and presented him with a military work of his entitled 
" Nouveau Traite de la Colonne " ; desires to hear Franklin's opinion of 
his book. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VII, 41. 

From Le Brun. 1777. September 18. Paris. 

Encloses a letter for Mr. Deane from M. La Goaner relating to Mr. 
Cunningham, Captain of the Revenge, who is in a Spanish port and has 
applied to M. La Goaner for a sum to refit his ship. Asks Franklin not 
to mention the receipt of this note, as his (the writer's) name has a sort 
of unhappy celebrity which he endeavors to bury in solitude and oblivion. 
A. L. S. 3 P- VII, 42. 

From Le Brun. 1777. September 18. Paris. 

M. La Goaner's talents, position and influence. The advantages of 
certain ports in Spain as a safe retreat for the American privateers. 
A. L. S. 4 p. VII, 43. 

From Berthon de Maisonneuve. 1777. September 18. Brussels. 

Requesting Franklin to forward a letter to Mr. [Stephen] Sayre. 
L. S. I p. (In French.) LXXI, 4. 

Frotn O'Douin. 1777. September ig. Versailles. 

Applies for letters of recommendation for the Marquis of Luce, who 
desires to fight for the colonies and is willing to repair to Philadelphia 
at his own expense. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 44. 

From Marquis de Luce-Seillans. 1777. September ig. Versailles. 

Begs Franklin to name an hour when he may speak of his great desire 
to serve the Colonies; his knowledge of fortifications. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) VII, 45. 



296 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From de Beaubourg. 1777. September 20. Paris. 

Writes to procure for a j^oung gentleman a position as officer in the 
American army. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 46. 

From R[odolp]h Valltravers. 1777. September 21. Bienne. 

Electrical experiments exhibited at Zurich by the Chevalier de Volta 
of Como. Contemptuous treatment of the republics of Switzerland by 
the present rulers of Great Britain ; encloses the fruit of this neglect ; 
adds to it a copy of verses sent by Voltaire to the Comte de Vergennes. 
His Excellency to proceed to Venice to secure that republic in the Bour- 
bonian interest; Portugal already secured. Attitude of Russia toward 
Hanover. Proofs of the Emperor's aversion to republics. Franklin's 
adversaries now crowing over Burgoyne's success in Canada. A. L. S. 
3 p. VII, 47. 

From deLaFaye. 1777. September 21. Roquencourt Castle. 

Introducing M. Ponteney, of Auxonne, who wishes to confer with 
Franklin and Deane about supplies for the troops in America. A. N. 
in 3d P. 2 p. (In French.) LXX, 89. 

From Sani[uel] Nicholson. 1777. September 21. Nantes. 

Arrival of the Dolphin at Nantes; permission given to Capt. Brown 
to refit her and then to depart the port as soon as that is completed. A 
Guernsey privateer cruising outside the mouth of the river which they 
say has taken several vessels coming from South Carolina; the new ship 
going on very well; Mr. Williams's presence much needed. A. L. S. 
3 p. VII, 48. 

From F[elix] A[ntonio] Castrioto. 1777. September 22. Paris. 

Concerning certain pamphlets brought from Holland according to 
agreement which will be delivered to Franklin. A. L. S. i p. VII, 49. 

Fro7n Marquis de Luce-Seillans. 1777. September 24. Paris. 

Asking Franklin to endorse a bill of exchange that he may carry out 
his projects at once; begs Franklin to give at the same time the promised 
letter of recommendation. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VII, 51. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 297 

From James Bedout. 1777. September 24. Bordeaux. 

Disappointed that Franklin could not grant his request for a com- 
mission as he has been at great expense in fitting out his sloop for 
cruising; is determined to sail straight for New England under Dutch 
colors in hopes that Congress will grant him the desired commission; 
begs for a letter of recommendation. A. L. S. i p. VII, 52. 

From Baron de Benyowsky. 1777. September 25. Versailles. 

Asking Franklin to give the bearer a letter of recommendation so that 
after his arrival he may find military employment. Hopes to meet 
Franklin soon for his revenge at chess. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

VII, 53. 

From William Lee. 1777. September 26. Holland. 

Copy of letter of August 25th (XLIV, 17). Fears the letters be- 
tween them are being intercepted. Received the report that Boston and 
Philadelphia are captured, but this is not verified. A. L. 4 p. 

XLIV, 18. 

From John Bay nes. [1777.] September 26. Paris. 

Informing him of a safe opportunity to send his letter to London. 
A. L. S. I p. XLI, 118. 

From A [lex.] Fendrich. 1777. September 27. 

The bearer is a native of Strasbourg; desires to serve as a volunteer 
on an American vessel. A. L. S. i p. VII, 54. 

From Ra[lph] Izard. 1777. September 30. Paris. 

Acknowledging the receipt of the commission and instructions from 
Congress. A. L. S. i p. VII, 56. 

From Abbe Bert de Majan. 1777. October i. Molsheim. 

Begs for news of his brother, whom they have not heard from since 
his departure; asks that the enclosed letter may be forwarded to him. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 57. 

From I. MacMahon. 1777. October i. Militarj' School. 

Recommends to Franklin a clergyman who has received a letter from 
Ireland to be forwarded to Albany in America and desires to know 
the best way of sending it. A. L. S, i p. VII, 58. 



298 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From The Economic Society of Berne. 1777. October i. 

Programme of a contest to be held for a prize essay outlining a plan 
or scheme of legislation for criminal affairs. D. 3 p. (In French.) 

LIII, 51. 

From Joshua Johnson. 1777. October 2. Paris. 

His purpose to load two or three vessels at Lisbon with salt and send 
them to some one of the United Colonies; desires passports to protect 
said vessels from being captured by American cruisers. A. L. S. i p. 

VII, 59. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1777. October 2. Paris. 

Recommends le Chevalier de la Pottere, and begs him to do for this 
young man what he has often granted in less deserving cases. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) VII, 60. 

i^roOT Joy Castle. 1777. October 2. Bordeaux. 

Has got his ship and will sail for Virginia very soon ; is obliged to 
leave his wife in Bordeaux until his return owing to her bad health. 
Desires a pass to protect his valuable cargo. A. L. S. i p. VII, 61. 

Fro7n Edw[ar]d Bancroft to The American Commissioners. 
1777. October 3. Paris. 

Details the events which led up to his being summoned to Paris by 
order of the Committee on Secret Correspondence to aid the Commis- 
sioners by giving information of English affairs ; for nine months en- 
deavored to be useful to the United States; flattered himself that he 
would have received some regular appointment from Congress; being 
disappointed in this and his fortune not permitting him to accept honors 
without benefits he has decided to withdraw from all political pursuits. 
A. L S. 3 p. VII, 62. 

From Chevalier de la Verite. 1777. October 3. Vaureas. 

So far, M. le Comte de Bruges has received no answer to his applica- 
tion for letters of recommendation on behalf of a young officer; high 
position and illustrious connections of the Comte de Bruges merit more 
attention. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VII, 63. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 299 

From J. Thornton. 1777. October 4. Paris. 

Encloses the latest papers brought by him from Dieppe; willing to 
undertake any commission however hazardous. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 64. 

By Abbe Yart. 1777. October 4. Rouen. 

In praise of Franklin on his arrival in France (poem, 3 p., in 
French), and an imaginary address made by him to France, Holland 
and Switzerland. A. Mem. 2 p. (In French.) LI, i (i, 2, 3). 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. October 6. York, Pa. 

Detailed account of the war in America for the last two months. A. 
L. S. Benj[ami]n Harrison et al. 12 p. LIII, 52. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 396. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. October 6. York, Pa. 

Relative to a foreign loan, and to the mode of raising it by appropria- 
tion of vacant land. A. L. S. Benj[amin] Harrison et al. 2 p. 

LIII, 53. 
Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 400. 

From William Gordon. 1777. October 6. 

Has forwarded three anniversary sermons designed for Franklin, 
Deane and Lee ; congratulates Franklin on the great and important news 
that the express will bring him; trusts this event will bring G[reat] 
B[ritain] to her senses. A. L. S. i p. VII, 65. 

From J. Bowman. 1777. October 7. Paris. 

Writes for information concerning the use of fixed air as a solvent of 
stone in the bladder. A. L. S. I p. VII, 66. 

From Comte de Bruges. 1777. October 7. Valreas. 

Wrote a month ago concerning M. d'Alencon ; begs for an answer to 
his request. A. L S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 67. 



30O Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From M[arqu]is de Condorcet. 

[Circa 1777.] October 7. A la Rochequion. 

Requesting a letter of recommendation for M. Abadie, a young 
lawyer going to Boston. Messages from the Duchess d'Euville and 
her family. Refers Franklin to the notice of his works, written by 
him (Condorcet) in the volume of the Academy of Sciences of 1773. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XLII, 133. 

From Doerner, [Jr.]. 1777. Octobers. Paris. 

Asking Franklin to forward the enclosed letter to Sir James Jay, 
who, he believes, is at Spa in Germany. A. L. in 3d P. i p. VII, 69. 

Fro/n John King to The American Commissioners. 
1777. October 9. Nantes. 

Expects to sail in nine days; will take charge of any letters, etc., 
destined for America. J. Gruel & Co. the only firm willing to advance 
their credit in behalf of the State of Virginia. Gives the signals to be 
observed at Cape Henry for those ships going to Virginia and Mary- 
land. A. L. S. I p. VII, 70. 

i^rom Jona [than] Williams, Jr. 1777. October 9. Nantes. . 

Enclosing a letter to M. de Chaumont and a bill of exchange drawn 
on him; not a moment to be lost in its presentation. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, III. 

From Tho[ma]s Thompson. 1777. October 10. Port Louis. 

The arrival in France of two Continental frigates under his com- 
mand: the Raleigh and the Alfred; the ships in need of repairs and mili- 
tary stores; would be glad of advice from Franklin; disposition he will 
make of his prizes. Latest news from America; Howe's fleet hovering 
about, not knowing where to land. Ticonderoga a cursed affair. Move- 
ments of the army near Albany. Avarice and loss of virtue among the 
people; some parts of the continent in a seemingly lethargic condition. 
Arrival of small vessel from Portsmouth ; boarded and searched by 
English frigate and obliged to throw overboard all the mail. Heavy 
losses experienced by Burgoyne. A. L. S. 7 p. VII, 71. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 301 

From J[onathaii] Williams, Jr. 1777. October ii» Nantes. 

Requesting a letter of recommendation for M. Sollicoffre, who sails 
shortly for Virginia. He is an upright, deserving young man who has 
been several years in the counting house of Mr. Schweighauser. Is in- 
duced to ask this from his friendship for Mr. Sollicoffre. A. L. S. 
2 p. XXXVII, 112. 

From J[onathaii] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777. October 14. Nantes. 

Capt. Nicholson gone to L'Orient to aid the captains of the two 
frigates just arrived there. Return of the Mere Bobie. Her Captain 
delivered your dispatches in safety, but has not been so fortunate with 
those he was charged with in return. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 113. 

From Henri Walter. 1777. October 15. Hildesheim. 

Lives in a country which produces immense quantities of linen and 
cotton fabrics which may be useful to the Congress; asks Franklin to 
procure him orders. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 72. 

From Jona[tlian] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777. October 16. Nantes. 

Captain Brown wishes to be excused from taking the Dolphin as his 
owners have directed him to return in the Mars, which belongs to 
them, but he will do as you wish. Now getting in her new mast. 
Would be glad if the Dolphin were not to sail 'till the Lion is ready; 
1000 fuzils arrived from Dunkirk. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 114. 

From William Lee. 1777. October 16. 

Relative to the price of nonpareil letters, in Harlem, and the purchase 
of type. Inadvisable to have the entire Bible in type at once. Cause 

for not signing name. Glad to hear that the military brute P 1 is, 

for a time, deprived of his power to exercise his natural insolence. 
Wishes he was the only British officer in America who could be justly 
charged with brutality. Fears for America and equally for the dear 
bought liberties of England, which will inevitably expire by the same 
wounds that destroy those of the Colonies. L. 3 p. XLIV, 19. 



302 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. October 18. York, Pa. 

Gates's victory over Burgoyne at Saratoga. Shipment of English 
merchandise in French bottoms. (Conclusion missing.) L. 2 p. 

LIII, 54. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 412. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. October 18. Nantes. 

Afraid his letter of the 9th, enclosing one for M. Chaumont, has 
miscarried; begs for a line to allay his uneasiness. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 115. 

From Rolandeau. 1777. October 18. Bordeaux. 

His ardent desire to enter the American service; anxious to obtain 
a letter from Franklin. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VII, 74. 

i^ro/rt Col. Chevalier de Champigny. 1777. October 18. Amsterdam. 

Sending him the second volume of his " Histoire d'Angleterre." A. 
L. S. I p. (In French.) VII, 75- 

From P. Elmsley. 1777. October 20. Paris. 

Will Franklin continue his subscription to Jacquin's Hortus Vindo- 
bonensis; sets out for London on Wednesday; has Franklin any com- 
mands for his literary friends there. A. L. S. i p. VII, 76. 

From La Bastide. 1777. October 20. Fontainebleau. 

Offering his services to the American cause. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) VII, 77- 

From Tho[ma]s Thompson. 1777. October 20. L'Orient. 

Disposition he has made of the prizes ; difficulties in the way of making 
haste. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 78. 

From S[ilas] Deane. 1777. October 23. Passy. 

Goes to a rendezvous with Messrs. Chaumont and Holker; the latter 
desires the letters Franklin promised him. Dr. Bancroft has returned. 
A. L. S. I p. VII, 79» 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 303 

From Charles de Hirschberg. 1777. October 23. Strasbourg. 

Is professor of English at the University of Strasbourg; has translated 
Franklin's Examination in Parliament^ and followed the text as closely 
as possible; offers his services in case Franklin desires to have any of his 
other works translated. A. L. S. 3 p. VII, 80. 

^ See Ford's Bibliography of Benjamin Franklin, p. 133, C, 296. 

From Martin Baumann. 
1777. October 24. Kirchheim, Poland. 

States that a brother of his went to America twenty-eight years ago 
and settled in Delaware, Pennsylvania. Writer and a younger brother 
followed ten years ago. Younger brother entered American army and 
rose to a captaincy. Writer returned to his native city two and one- 
half years ago to receive an inheritance. Wishes to return to America 
and espouse patriots' cause. Asks Dr. Franklin's assistance. A. L. S. 
3 p. LIX, 31. 

From Samuel Cooper. 1777. October 25. Boston. 

Congratulates him on the surrender of General Burgoyne ; account 
of the surrender and the military movements which led up to it ; be- 
havior of the American soldiers; skirmishes around Philadelphia. Effect 
of Burgoyne's surrender on Great Britain and other European countries, 
and on America. Urges Franklin to secure loans for America. (Con- 
clusion missing.) A. L. 12 p. XLIV, 20. 

From Thomas Walker. 1777. October 25. Boston. 

Congratulating Franklin on the success of the American arms in the 
Northern Department; introducing Col. de Masasquelle, a member of 
the Royal Academy of Sciences, to Franklin's notice; his son a colonel 
in the American artillery and pensioned for life by this State, in con- 
sideration of his having introduced the art of founding and boring 
cannon solid, etc. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 81. 

From J[onathan] W[illia]ms, [Sr.] 1777. October 25. Boston. 

Announcing the capture of Gen. Burgoyne and his entire army. In- 
troducing the bearer of the good news, Mr. Jonathan L. Austin. A. L. 
S. I p. XXXVII, 116. 



304 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Sam[ue]l Cooper. 1777. October 25. Boston. 

His only daughter married to Joseph Hixon, Esq., of Montserrat in 
the West Indies; he left Boston in the spring for London; begs Frank- 
lin to forward him the enclosed letter from his wife; should accident 
bring Mr. Hixon to France, asks Franklin's notice for him. A. L. S. 
I p. VII, 82. 

From de Biancourt. 1777. October 25. Fontenay. 

His former military services; his desire to enter the American army 
with the rank of captain. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 83. 

From Benj[ami]n Austin. 1777. October 25. Boston. 

The surrender of Burgoyne and his whole army to Gen. Gates has 
induced the Council of Massachusetts to forward an express to the 
Commissioners at Paris; his son the bearer of this intelligence; begs 
Franklin to grant him his friendship and countenance. A. L. S. 2 p. 

VII, 84. 

From de Guienne. 1777. October 28. Dieppe. 

Desires to obtain a company of infantry or dragoons in the service of 
Congress. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VII, 85. 

From Cat[harme] Greene. 1777. October 28. Boston. 

Mrs. Collas is exceedingly well and quite contented to be delivered 
from Howe's ravages. Supposes he has heard that Mrs. Bache has a 
fine daughter; leaves the great news to more intelligent pens; begs for a 
letter if only a line. A. L. S. 3 p. VII, 86. 

From Edni[un]d De Harold. 1777. October 28. Dusseldorf. 

OfiEers his services; does not wish to quit his present solid establish- 
ment until he knows what conditions he may expect; his former military 
services; well known to any officer in the Irish regiment in France; a 
great friend of Gen. Conway. A. L. S. 3 p. VII, 87. 

From John Langdon to The American Commissioners. 

1777. October 29. Portsmouth, N. H. 

Sends by the Continental ship Ranger the articles of capitulation with 
Mr. Burgoyne and a copy of a letter written by Gen. Gates to Bur- 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 305 

goyne six days before the surrender; had the happiness to be a witness of 
this scene. Magnificent conduct of Gen. Gates. Howe's army in pos- 
session of Philadelphia; his situation thought to be almost as bad as 
Burgoyne's. Description of the retreat of the English, the horrible 
scenes of death and destruction and the final glorious surrender of the 
entire army. L. S. 2 p. VII, 88. 

From John Wendell. 1777. October 30. Portsmouth. 

Congratulating him on the grand events in America; what the Ameri- 
cans owe to Franklin's influence and counsels. His uncle, Col. Josiah 
Quincy, prevented from writing Franklin by the danger of the times. By 
the impolicy of Britain the militia of America have become disciplined 
troops. Britain's perilous situation. His son serving with Capt. Jones 
on the Ranger ; if Capt. Jones should promote him, would be obliged for 
Franklin's support; sure the family of the Wendells and Quincys are 
not disagreeable to him. Mentions Capt. Jones as a sensible, well-bred 
gentleman, who has the honor of America much at heart. A. L. S. 
3 p. VII, 89. 

From John Wendell. 1777. October 30. Portsmouth. 

Introducing Lieut. Thomas Simpson of the Ranger, a most distin- 
guished officer. A. L. S. i p. VII, 90. 

From Thomas Gushing. 1777. October 30. Boston. 

Introducing Mr. Jonathan Loring Austin to Franklin's favorable 
notice. Congratulates him on the success of the American arms in the 
Northern Department; news from the southward not discouraging; 
Gen. Howe and his army said to be preparing for a retreat from Phila- 
delphia; Washington at or about Germantown waiting to cut him off. 
Wishes to know what effect Gates's success will have on England and 
also on the Courts of Europe. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 91. 

From De la Gonterie. 1777. October 30. Paris. 

A manufacturer of materials for soldiers' and sailors' uniforms desires 
to send a cargo of these goods to New England ; failure of a previous 
attempt owing to capture; Is the owner of a well-appointed vessel; de- 
sires Franklin to furnish him with letters of marque that he may carry 
this merchandise safely across. Served some months under Capt. Wickes. 
A. L S. 3 p. (In French.) VII, 92. 



3o6 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From J[onathaii] Williams, Jr. 1777. October 30. Nantes. 

His favor of the 25th inst. he immediately destroyed. Certain debts 
which he must pay. Question of putting arms on board the Lion. A. 
L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 117. 

From [C. G. F.] Dumas. 1777. October 30. The Hague. 

The demand of the Dutch merchants accorded. Believes his services 
can be of some use to America ; risk involved in his present position ; de- 
pends on him to hear as soon as possible of the success of their scheme. 
A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 17. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1777. October 31. Paris. 

Introducing M. le Chevalier du Gravier, a friend of M. Coder and 
an officer of artillery, also M. de Livoys, navy officer, actually in the 
service of America. Enmity of M. des Granges and all his employes 
toward Coder. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VII, 93. 

From Job. Ph. Merckle. 1777. November i. Amsterdam. 

Introducing M. St. Godet, son-in-law of the Governor of St. Eusta- 
tius ; he is interested in all that is most dear to Franklin. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) VII, 94. 

From Arthur Lee. 1777. November i. 

Begs for the papers he mentioned to Franklin, namely: Count Ver- 
gennes's letters, the last memoir to him, the last letter to the Committee 
and the list of stores shipped from Marseilles. A. L. in 3d P. i p. 

VII, 95. 

From J[ame]s Cole. 1777. November i. He de Rhe. 

Very interesting business calls him and two of his friends to Phila- 
delphia ; being unable to pay their passage thither, begs Franklin to pro- 
cure it for them. A. L. S. i p. VII, 96. 

From Gorjy. 1777. November 2. Paris. 

Desires to know from what source he can gain some information con- 
cerning the habits of the colonies, principally of the Quakers and the 
savages; these details are necessary for a work he is contemplating. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 97. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 307 

From J[ean] Holker. 1777. November 4. Rouen, 

Acknowledging Franklin's letter and promising that everything shall 
be executed according to his wishes. Sends message to Mr. Deane. A. 
L. S. 2 p. VII, 98. 

From Gayette, fils. 1777. November 6. Brionde. 

He and two others very anxious to join la Fayette; desires Franklin's 
advice and assistance to attain this end; asks for a letter from Madame 
de la Fayette, who is at present in Paris. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VII, 98!/^. 

From J[onatlian] Williams, [Jr.]. 1777. November 6. Nantes. 

Prizes given to the English by special order of the King; money loss 
less serious than the excuse this will give to spies to live among them. 
A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 118. 

From Le Fevre. 1777. November 7. London. 

Acquainting Franklin with the fact that Miss Lydia B. and her sister, 
of Preston, have lost their mother, and asking him to break the news 
gently to R. B. L. i p. VII, 99. 

From Du Luc. 1777. November 8. Saint Maixent. 

Madame le Baronne de la Courchambeau desires her two sons to enter 
the service of Congress and will make them a certain allowance and pay 
their passage over; begs Franklin to aid them in this affair with letters 
to some one in Congress. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, lOO. 

From Jo[li]n Anderson. 1777. November 8. St. Malo. 

In difficulties about his agreement with M. de Purny; desires to sail 
in the service of his own country; asking for Franklin's advice. A. L. 
S. 2 p. VII, loi. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. November 8. York, Pa. 

Bills of exchange to be presented with this letter. Henry Laurens, 
of Charleston, South Carolina, has been elected President of the Con- 
tinental Congress. A. L, S. Richard Henry Lee and James Lovell. 
I p. (In duplicate.) LIII, 56. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 423. 



3o8 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Chevalier de Marolles de Luce to The Congress of the United 
States. 1777. November 10. Paris. 

Offers his services; encloses certificates of his capacity. A. L. S. 

1 p. (In French.) LXII, 79 and 80. 

By The Continental Congress. 1777. November 10. 

Instructions to the American Commissioners in France and Spain, 
to purchase military supplies. D. S. Cha[rle]s Thomson, Sec[retar]y. 

2 p. LXXV, 31. 

Printed in Journals of Congress, Phila. [1778], III, 488. 

From R[odolp]h Valltravers. 1777. November 10. Bienne. 

Switzerland's attitude concerning the misfortunes of England and 
America; possibility of a reconciliation through the medium of a just, 
equitable, pacifying mediator. A. L. S. i p. VII, 102. 

From P[atience] Wright. 1777. November 10. London. 

Parliament not to meet until more explicit accounts are received from 
Lord Howe; influence this will have on the case of poor Piatt still 
confined in Newgate with others of his countrymen. Begs Franklin 
not to suffer Lord Stormont or any of his tools to prevent the ex- 
change of prisoners proposed. Many young men ready to serve in the 
American army ; mortified at not receiving a line from any of her coun- 
trymen in Paris. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 103, 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. November 11. Nantes. 

Concerning the orders of the French Government to hand over the 
prizes to the English; cannot reconcile such proceedings with common 
honesty; begs to know whether there is a prospect of his getting his 
advances repaid. Praise for Capt. Nicholson. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XXXVII, 119. 

From Frangois Gianolio. 1777. November 12. Turin. 

Desires some position connected with the commerce between America 
and Italy. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 104. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 309 

From ■W[illia]m Bingham. 
1777. November 14. St. Pierre, Martinique. 

Enclosing a copy of a letter from St. Eustatius with news from 
America of the taking of Philadelphia by Howe; this account founded 
merely on reports. Should Washington have been again repulsed, thinks 
his army could not have behaved with that bravery which should have 
distinguished troops in such an important situation; what this event, if 
true, will mean to the English. Gen. Gates's operations in Canada. A. 
L. S. 4 p. [Letter enclosed.] 

1777. November 7. Saint Eustache. 

Announcing the taking of Philadelphia by Howe; the position of 
Washington at Germantown ; Gen. Gates's movements against Burgoyne. 
L. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 105. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1777. November 14. 

Begging Franklin to accord a moment's audience to M. Henri du Bois, 
a merchant of Amsterdam, who has affairs of interest to communicate. 
Sends Franklin an ode and introduces the author of it, M. Courtney 
Melmoth. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 107. 

Fro?n Rolandeau. 1777. November 15. Bordeaux. 

Desires to go back to New England ; begs him to endorse his com- 
missions, which have doubtless been presented by M. le Comte d'Ossun. 
Delay in setting out due to his father's death; begs Franklin to give 
him letters for his superior officers that he may justify his lengthened 
absence. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VII, 108. 

From O'Douin. 1777. November 15. Versailles. 

His promise of letters of recommendation on behalf of a young gentle- 
man, who has been too ill to avail himself of them; begs them for 
two brothers, the Messrs. Poullain ; the elder an advocate in the Parlia- 
ment of Paris, who desires to become a planter; the younger an officer 
in the King's service, who desires a position in the Light Troops. Re- 
members Franklin's kindness to him when detained a prisoner of war in 
Philadelphia; reasons for granting his request. A. L. S. 3 p. VII, 109. 



310 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Jaques J. de Bay. 1777. November 15. Brussels. 

Informing Franklin of the death of Madam Bache, his daughter's 
mother-in-law; offers to be a medium for Franklin's correspondence with 
M. Theobald and his other friends. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VII, III. 

From Martha Johnson. 1777. November 15. London. 

Sympathy for America. Desires to get a position as housekeeper. 
Kindness shown to her by Franklin's friends, Mr. and Mrs. Walker ; asked 
their interest for her son, Sammy, to get him promoted from a midship- 
man to lieutenant; begs Franklin to write Mr. Walker in his favor. 
A. L. S. 3 p. VII, 112. 

From C. G. F. Dumas to The American Commissioners. 

1777. November 18. The Hague. 

A company of merchants is forming in Zealand to trade directly with 
America. Rumor that the Grand Pensionnaire of Amsterdam is incensed 
against the English. Anecdote concerning one of his late pupils and Sir 
Joseph Yorke. Sends the Leyden Gazette with the article quoted from 
the Maryland paper concerning R. H. Lee. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) XXXIX, 18. 

From Recules de Basmarin et Raimbaux. 

1777. November 18. Bordeaux. 

Concerning the construction of certain packets whose object will be to 
carry despatches back and forth at regular intervals ; they will offer their 
services to Congress if they wish to entrust their mail to them; makes 
the same offer to Franklin. His attachment to the cause of America, 
and to Franklin in particular. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VII, 114. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1777. November 20. Nantes. 

Concerning a passage for the Count d'Atterns and the payment of his 
expenses until he embarks. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 120. 

From Guerin. 1777. November 21. Paris. 

Has the honor to present him with the enclosed memoir; M. Dalibard 
would have been the bearer himself but the affair was too pressing; 
begs for a word in reply that he may inform his son of Franklin's de- 
cision. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 115. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 311 

From John Stewart. 1777, November 21. London. 

Asks for information concerning the use of tobacco ashes as a cure for 
dropsical complaints. A. L. S. 3 p. VII, 116. 

From W[illiam] S[trahan]. 1777. November 21. London. 

Writes for a prescription, said to be given by Franklin, for the cure 
of dropsy. Sent him a packet of newspapers w^ith accounts of all the 
news in London. A. L. S. i p. VII, 117. 

From Guerin. [1777. November 21.] 

Is a merchant of Auray in Brittany, petitions for the release of his 
son and another officer of the ship " Le Farges " captured by an Eng- 
lish squadron. Mem. S. 2 p. (In French.) LVII, 106. 

From Le Begue de Presle. 1777. November 22. Chatillon. 

Sends Franklin a pamphlet at the request of the author. Various 
electrical experiments. Certain theories concerning waterspouts. A 
L. S. 4 p. (In French.) VII, 118. 

From A. M. Hevin de Navarre and Francois Antoine, Baron de 
Seyffertit. 1777. November 22. Wurtzbourg. 

Request for money to pay their expenses to Paris and return, to be 
able to tell Franklin their plans for military' service in America. A. L. 
S. 2 p. (In French.) LXII, 87. 

By The Continental Congress. 1777. November 22. 

Directing the Commissioners of the United States, at the several 
Courts of Europe, to deny the report that a treaty had been concluded 
with Great Britain. D. S. Henry Laurens, President. 3 p. In dupli- 
cate.) LXXV, 34-39- 

Printed in Journals of Congress, Phila. [1778], III, 527. 

From Comte de Benyowsky. [1777?] November 23. Paris. 
Desiring a brief audience. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XLI, 119. 



312 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [C. G. F.] Dumas to The American Commissioners. 

1777. November 25. The Hague. 

Congratulating them on the safe arrival, at Nantes, of the Amphitrite. 
Understands that the King of P[russia] has refused passage to English 
troops en route to America. Certainty of a war between Russia and 
Turkey. Second letter on English credit to be printed at once. Ac- 
count of a conversation he had with a great lady, a friend of Sir Joseph 
Yorke, concerning the latter's irritation against him for his espousal of 
the American cause. Information received which leads him to believe 
that the United States could obtain men, for their army and navy, more 
cheaply from Poland than any other nation. Has translated the ex- 
tracts for Mr. Lee and sent him the various gazettes. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) XXXIX, 19. 

FroTH T. and N. Eckhardt. 1777. November 25. The Hague. 

Asking Franklin to subscribe to a work containing a description of 
an instrument invented by them. Encloses a memoir on the capstan, a 
marvelous invention; also begs his acceptance of a new fabric of their 
own make. A statement of the advantages of the capstan. A. L. S. 
6 p. (In French.) VII, 119. 

From Due de la Rochefoucauld. 

1777. November 26. La Rocheguyon. 

Heard with pleasure of the arrival of the Amphitrite with the good 
news. The King of England, in his harangue, seems to consider the 
American war as difficult, but not impossible, if Parliament will grant 
him large subsidies; likens him to La Fontaine's fable of " The Serpent 
and the File." Certain ideas on the circulation of air. Impatient to 
see Franklin and render him the homage of his veneration and attach- 
ment. A. L S. 3 p. (In French.) VII, 120. 

From de Burckwald. 1777. November 27. Strasbourg. 

Applies to Franklin on behalf of a young man who desires a lieuten- 
ancy in the American army. A. L S. i p. (In French.) VII, 121. 

From W[illia]m Bingham to The American Commissioners. 

1777. November 28. St. Pierre, Martinique. 

Congratulates them on the glorious success of the army under Gen- 
eral Gates. General Howe said to be making his retreat towards Wil- 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 313 

mington to embark on his transports, and that several frigates have 
been sunk or destroyed in endeavoring to raise the chevaux de frise in 
the Delaware. Impossible to foretell the effect of this important intelli- 
gence on the politics of Europe. Hopes that the Court of France may 
be influenced by it to take a more decisive part in our favor. The orders 
of the Ministry in regard to American privateers and prizes and the 
restriction of American trade have lately been notified to the Chamber 
of Commerce here, and their execution enacted under great penalties, 
but he does not believe they will be enforced with any degree of rigor. 
Thinks it is only a political stroke. The arrival of the troops destined 
for these islands, and the Spanish galleon in Spain are the real motives 
for retarding their hostile operations. The troops have arrived and he 
is informed that the galleon is to sail in the beginning of December, 
and that the specie, amounting to fifteen million Sterling, has been 
deposited on board twenty-two ships of the line. A. L. S. 6 p. 

VII, 106. 

. From W[illia]m Bingham. 1777. November 28. St. Pierre. 

Copy of letter, VII, 106, with an added note that General Howe is 
retreating and Washington is in quiet possession of Philadelphia. A, L. 
S. 4 p. VII, 122. 

From Sellouf Perrontray [?]. 1777. November 29. Paris. 

Desired by Messrs. Fairholme and Luther, of St. Martin, to forward 
this enclosed letter. L. S. i p. VII, 123. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777. November 30. Nantes. 

The agreeable news of General Burgoyne's surrender with his entire 
army; for all the particulars, refers them to Mr. Austin. A. L. S. 
2 p. XXXVII, 121. 

From Joseph Campagnoni. 1777. November 30. Lugo. 

Desires to dedicate, to Franklin, a small volume of verse, entitled, 
" II Washington " ; the subject is the present war but so handled as to 
be favorable to America and at the same time to give no offense to Eng- 
land. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 124. 



314 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Antoine Felix Wuibert to Messrs. Franklin and Deane. 

1777. November 30. 

Petition of a French officer in the American service who was taken 
prisoner by the English at Fort Washington. Mem. 3 p. (In 
French.) LVII, 9. 

From [Mme.] Brillon. [November, 1777.] 

Has just learned, from Franklin's son, the good news from America 
about the surrender of General Burgoyne and his troops. Wanted to go 
immediately to congratulate Franklin in person. Is going to compose a 
march of triumph. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XLIII, 103. 

From . [1777. November ?] Brussels. 

Congratulates Franklin on the defeat and capture of Burgoyne. The 
news caused a great sensation here in Brussels. Hopes Howe will soon 
be defeated by Washington and that Lee will regain his liberty. L. 
4 p. (In French.) XLIV, 105. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. December i. York, Pa. 

Return to France of the dissatisfied French officers. Their unreason- 
able demands in America. L. S. Rich[ar]d Henry Lee, James Lovell. 
4 p. (Copy.) LIII, 57. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 437. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1777. December 2. York, Pa. 

Summary of the military events of the campaigns just closing. Civil 
affairs. Lifeless condition of commerce owing to British watchfulness. 
More American ships needed. A. L. S. Rich[ar]d Henry Lee, James 
Lovell. 8 p. LIII, 58. 

Printed in Diplom. Corres., Wharton, II, 438. 

From W. Wildrik. 1777. December 2. Namur. 

Raves of his devotion to liberty and his intense interest in the present 
struggle. Wishes Franklin to procure him some position in America, 
either civil or military. A. L. S. 4 p. (In Latin and French.) 

VII, 125. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 315 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1777. December 2. Nantes. 

Question of detaining Captain Young until the arrival of the des- 
patches or sending him off without them. A. L, S. i p. 

XXXVII, 122. 

From The [ma] s Thompson to The American Commissioners. 

1777. December 2. L'Orient. 

Desires the enclosed lettter to be delivered to the Minister of Marine; 
angry at the treatment he and his men have received; insolence of the 
Commissary at I'Orient; attitude of France in playing this fast and 
loose game ; the inevitable delay none of his doing. A. L. S. 3 p. 

VII, 126. 

From Felix Antonio Castrioto. 1777. December 2. Lisbon. 
At his arrival in the Capital found the Court vv^as gone to Villa- 
Vicoza; followed and delivered Franklin's memorial to the Minister, en- 
forcing it with all the reasons he could think of ; awaits an answer ; will 
do all in his power to bring this negotiation to a favorable conclusion. 
A. L. S. I p. VII, 127. 

From Edm[un]d De Harold. 1777. December 3. Dusseldorf. 
Has received no answer to his letter of October 28th; repeats the 
contents of this letter. (VII, 87.) A. L. S. 4 p. VII, 128. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones to The American Commissioners. 
1777. December 4. Nantes. 

Announcing his arrival in the Ranger, having taken two brigantines 
from Malaga laden with fruit for London; met with few opportunities 
of making captures; repairs wanted on the Ranger. Affairs in America 
in the most promising condition. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 129. 

From Carl, Baron von Emerich. 

1777. December 4. Brandeis, near Prague, Bohemia. 
Wishes to enter the American army. A. L. S. 4 p. LIX, 83. 



3i6 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Rod[olp]h Valltravers. 1777. December 4. Mannheim. 

The bearer is Mr. David, the Elector Palatine's Secretary of the Em- 
bassy. Cannot, in a letter, enter into the result of his private inquiries, 
made in Switzerland and at the Courts of Baden and Mannheim, as to 
the possibility of their intercession with the King of England in favor 
of the Colonies, all Europe cries shame on Great Britain; advisability 
of some trusted person high in the King's opinion, such as M. du Luc, 
broaching the subject to him privately; quotes precedents to prove this 
method a successful one. Concerning the preliminary concessions to be 
made on both sides. A. L. S. 4 p. VII, 130. 

From [Conrad Alexandre] Gerard [de Rayneval] to The Ameri- 
can Commissioners. 1777. December 5. Paris. 

Begging Messrs. Franklin, Deane and Lee to name an hour when he 
may wait upon them. L. i p. (In French.) VII, 131^. 

From Du Boisviolette, Genevois & Co. 1777. December 6. Nantes. 

Their ship bound for Virginia with a cargo of salt; their pilot is Mr. 
Joseph Price, from Philadelphia, who is returning to America after 
being a prisoner in England for six months. Desires to know the sig- 
nals to be used off the coast of America ; unknown to Franklin but sends 
references. A. L. S. i p. VII, 132. 

From Le Brun. 1777. December 6. Paris. 

Reminds Franklin that his letters to Messrs. La Goaner, of 
Corunna, were to be sent under his cover, for fear of interception ; un- 
easy on account of Franklin's silence; begs to know if he has written 
direct or not at all. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 133. 

From Jos[eph] Hammond. 1777. December 6. St. Malo. 

Begging Franklin to write M. Duparny to supply him with the 
money he promised; desires to be paid from the time of his engagement 
and receive two months' advance. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 134. 

From W. Moran. 1777. December 6. Dunkirk. 

Sailed from Philadelphia in February as first lieutenant on board the 
Hornet, a Continental sloop commanded by John Nicholson, Esq., now 
in Forton prison; he made his escape from prison with five others; 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 317 

treated with great kindness by Mr, Johnston, in London, who paid his 
expenses to Dunkirk; since his arrival has received no more attention 
than if he were a common sailor; his destitute condition; applies to 
Franklin for aid. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 135. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1777. December 6. Nantes. 

Unless they can obtain the repeal of certain orders lately issued by 
the Ministry, none of the vessels at present loading, can sail. Con- 
cerning the management of ships of war, prizes etc. ; empowered by Mr. 
Morris to act in these matters as his agent; explains his reasons for con- 
senting to this arrangement. A. L. S. 4 p. XXXVII, 124. 

Fro7n J[onatlian] Williams, Jr. 1777. December 6. Nantes. 

Question of a certain bill being accepted. Has sent the pipe of sherry 
wine. A. L. S. 1 p. XXXVII, 125. 

From Goudeman. 1777. Decembers. Paris. 

Congratulating him on the success of the Americans; lays before 
Franklin the enclosed memoir at the request of one of his friends. A. L. 
S. I p. (In French.) 

From Henri Walter. 1777. December 8. Hildesheim. 

Had the honor of writing Franklin, on October 15th, requesting 
orders from Congress for linen and cotton fabrics. [See VH, 72.] 
Repeats the details given in that letter. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VII, 137. 

From Mrs. Catharine McCaulay. 1777. December 8. Paris. 

Has some affairs which demand her immediate return to England; 
danger of seeing or corresponding with her American friends in Paris, 
owing to the suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act; feels sure her im- 
prisonment would greatly distress Franklin ; would sacrifice her life to 
be of any real use to the cause of liberty; at present is nursing her con- 
stitution to be able to write of the civil wars. A. L. S. 2 p. 

VII, 138. 



3i8 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Frotn F. and A. Dubbeldemutt to The American Commissioners. 
1777, Decembers. Rotterdam. 

Concerning the aid they have given to Americans, and the money 
due them for such disbursements. Prices of tobacco and rice. A. L. S. 
3 p. VII, 138/2. 

From John Thurston. 1777. December 9. London. 

Recommending Mr. Fowler to Franklin ; he knows the art of making 
a powder to stop the blood. A. L. S. i p. VII, 139. 

From [Jean- Jacques] Caffieri. 1777. December 9. Paris. 

Congratulating him on the success of the American arms; trusts they 
will continue their victories ; sends a bust of Franklin to his grandson ; 
desires that no one may be allowed to copy it. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) VII, 140. 

From Blin. 1777. December 10. Elbeuf. 

Interested in the defense of American vessels ; hopes it is not an in- 
discretion to ask news of the fate of their arms; the newspapers give 
only contradictory reports. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 141. 

From Du Luc. 1777. December 10. St. Maixent. 

M. de Reveaux de St. Varran and three of his brothers desire to pass 
into the service of Congress; will, himself, be responsible for their con- 
duct and talents ; being of an ancient, but unfortunate family, they have 
no money to pay their passage; asks Franklin if he could procure it for 
them. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 142. 

Frotti Marquis de la Bedoyere. 1777. December 12. Rennes. 

Asking for a place in the American service, for a young man in whom 
he has a particular interest ; his rank, qualities and experience fit him to 
be a good sailor or soldier; wishes information as to the port he must 
sail from, the vessel, etc. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 143. 

Fro ;« Arthur Lee. 1777. December 13. Chaillot. 

Ten thousand blankets ready to be shipped from Bilboa together with 
a quantity of naval equipments; desires to know whether he may order 
M. Gardoqui to purchase ships for these articles or freight them at 
once; question of payment; secrecy and expedition shown by M. Gar- 
doqui. A. L. in 3d P. 2 p. VII, 144. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 319 

From J[oseph] Priestley. 1777. December 13. Calne. 
Franklin is never long out of his thoughts; hopes to see him once 
more. Sympathy for America; thinks the war cannot be continued 
without disgrace and ruin. Sends two volumes of his on metaphj'sics ; 
hopes he has received his third volume on air. A. L. S. i p. 

VII, 145. 

From James Babson. 1777. December 14. St. Antoine. 

Sailed from Bilboa, with his poor naked crew, by favor of M. 
Gardoqui who trusted him with <£ioo Sterling. Account of the cap- 
ture of six fishing vessels from Newfoundland. A. L. S. i p. 

VII, 147. 

Fro /« C. S. Peuch. 1777. December 15. Utrecht. 

His position as editor of the Utrecht Gazette; his sympathies with the 
Americans; desires to publish prompt and authentic news; difficulty 
of obtaining accurate reports; applies to Franklin to procure him a cor- 
respondent for his paper who can furnish news from America. Con- 
gratulates him on their victory over Burgoyne. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) VII, 148. 

From Comte O'Donell. 1777. December 15. Leopol. 

His military career; asks for the conditions for entering the American 
service. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) LXII, 90. 

From Boudet. 1777. December 15. Lyons. 

Begs Franklin to help him to procure a free passage to the United 
States and employment there. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

LX, 97. 

From Jno. Young. 1777. December 16. Nantes. 

Acknowledging Franklin's favor of the 2d inst. along with the dis- 
patches for Congress, which he will secure ready for sinking in case of 
danger. Information received of seven sail of English cruisers off 
Belle Isle; will remain in port until further tidings. A. L. S. 2 p. 

VII, 149. 



320 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From H[enr]y Grand. 1777. December 16. Nantes. 

Expressing his keen appreciation of Franklin's kindness in signing 
himself his " affectionate friend," and thanking him warmly for the 
letters of recommendation. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 150. 

From S[ilas] Deane. 1777. December 16. Paris. 

Has seen Sir George Grand. Begs Franklin to make his excuses to 
Count IVIaillebois as he is too pressed with business to go out that after- 
noon, and tell him that he has not forgotten the case of M. de la Brosse. 
Desires Franklin and M. Chaumont to call on him on their return from 
dinner. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 151. 

From Millon. 1777. December 17. Paris. 

Expressing his sincere appreciation of Franklin's " Constitution of 
Pennsylvania"; in reading it, thought of several points which he wrote 
down and sends herewith. [8 p.] A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

VII, 152. 

From Eliz[abe]th Wright. 1777. December 17. London. 

Thanking him for his kind letter in favor of Mr. Piatt who is most 
grateful for Franklin's offer; a worthy man has paid the money to Mr. 
Piatt and accepted a bill on Franklin, A. L. S. i p. VII, 153. 

From John Webb. 1777. December 17. London. 

Ingratitude he has met with for his past services ; reasons for remain- 
ing in Dunkirk after receiving Franklin's remittance; obliged to give 
his clothes to Captain Cunningham's deserters for fear of worse con- 
sequences should he refuse; can neither go back nor forward unless 
Franklin helps him. A. L. S. I p. VII, 154. 

From A. Y. Ameloo, P. Wittentrin and F. and A. Dubbeldemutt. 

1777. December 17. London. 

Concerning the ship Chester and her cargo; no one has the least in- 
terest in her except the Republic of Holland ; begs Franklin to name some 
one in Charleston to care for their interests ; begs for the restitution and 
compensation due them by incontestable right. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) VII, 155. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 321 

From Pageant de Rivaud. 1777. December 18. Burgundy. 

Begging Franklin to see to the safe delivery of a letter she has written 
to her son in America. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 156. 

From Doerner, Jr. 1777. December 18. Paris. 

His promise to give him letters of introduction to Congress, and to 
gentlemen of consequence at Charlestown and other cities; their inten- 
tion to fix themselves at Charlestown as general merchants; propriety of 
keeping their design secret. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 157. 

From Baron de Heusch. 1777. December 19. Diest, Brabant. 

Request for authority to form a regiment for service in the United 
States. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) LXII, 57. 

From Rihm. 1777. December 19. Ghent. 

Requests a commission in the American army. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) LXII, 106. 

From [Benjamin Sowden], 1777. December 19. Holland. 

Concerning the quarto bibles wanted for America, Hears that the 
gentleman who brought the news of Burgoyne's surrender intends to go 
to England; rashness of this project. Account of a visit from Dr. In- 
gen Housz. His earnest wishes for the establishment of liberty and 
peace. A. L. 3 p. VII, 158. 

From I. MacMahon. 1777. December 19. The Military School. 

The gentlemen of this house all well-wishers to Franklin's cause and 
delighted with the news of Burgoyne's defeat; opinion of the Prince de 
Montbarrey ; the Commander of the above establishment, M. le Marquis 
de Tinbrune, requests Franklin's company at dinner with his grandson, 
Mr. Deane or any other friends he thinks proper to bring. A. L. S. 
I p. VII, 159. 

From de Reynaud. ^ 

1777. December 19. Villeneuve les Avignon. 

Congratulating Franklin on the defeat of Burgoyne; hopes to hear 
soon of his brother Howe sharing the same fate. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) VII, 160. 



322 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Gasp[ard] Morel. 1777. December 19. Dunkerque. 

Enclosing list of wines for which he begs Franklin's orders. Con- 
gratulating him on the victories of the Americans. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) VII, 161. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777. December 20. Nantes. 

Has just returned from Paimboeuf where he saw as fine a ship as 
any in the navy. Expects to see Captain Nicholson and if the obstacles 
are removed, will soon finish the expedition. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 126. 

From Tho[ma]s Thompson. 1777. December 20. L'Orient. 

Describes the ship, Duras, a great bargain but old and in sad need of 
repairs; discusses the advisability of purchasing her. A. L. S. 2 p. 

VII, 162. 

From B. Girandeau. 1777. December 20. La Rochelle. 

His ship destined for Maryland or Virginia; begs Franklin to accord 
his captain letters of recommendation as he knows no one in that part ■ 
of America. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 163. 

From Geo[rge] Walton. 1777. December 20. Savannah. 

Has lately returned from Congress. Sums up the successes of the 
American arms; general opinion that Howe's safety depends on his 
flight; strictness of blockade around Philadelphia where horses are being 
killed for food. News just received of the capture, by the Americans, of 
the Syren and two transports off Rhode Island. Georgia in a tolerable 
state of defense; plundering war carried on by their neighbors in 
Florida. A. L. S. 3 P- VII, 164. 

Fro7n Jean Guillaume Jaeger. 

1777. December 20. Frankfort-on-the-Main. 

Concerning a powder mill which he desires to erect according to a 
new plan of construction, a sketch of which he encloses; applies to 
Franklin, as one of the greatest philosophers and mechanics, for his ad- 
vice; would offer his services to Congress were he not old and fatigued 
with many campaigns. A. L. S, 3 p. (In French.) VII, 165. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 323 

From Bedaulx nee Le Chambrier. 

1777. December 21. Neufchatel. 

Her son sailed in April with the Marquis de Lafayette; begs Frank- 
lin not to lose sight of him. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 166. 

From W. Hayes. 1777. December 22. Paris. 

Writes on behalf of the orphan son of Mr. Huske whom he once 
served as the valet de chambre; his apprenticeship to Mr. Hooper, of 
Wilmington, nearly expired ; begs Franklin to recommend the young 
man to some one of his friends in that part of the world. A, L. S. 
2 p. VII, 167 

From Marquis Lefebure. 

1777. December 23. St. Valery sur Somme. 

Very uneasy about the bark, Le Dillon, and the captain, Francois 
Lefebure, his son ; she was captured on July 24th by an American and 
taken, it was said, to Boston; has had no further news; begs Franklin 
to give him some information of the matter, if possible. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VII, 168. 

From Bertherand Defleury. 1777. December 23. Paris. 

Begging for news of the fate of M. le Chevalier Du Coudray; ties 
of friendship and relationship make him hope that the public rumors 
may not be confirmed. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VII, 169. 

From Patience Wright. 1777. December 23. Bath. 

The bearer is Mr. Geo. Searle, who has advanced the twenty guineas 
for her bill on Franklin, drawn for the use of Mr. Piatt. A. L. S. 
I p. VII, 170. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1777. December 23. Nantes. 

Sending a deposition made by Captain Benet, who was lately taken 
by the English at the entrance of the river. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XXXVII, 127. 

From Thomas Walpole. 1777. December 23. London. 

Thanking Franklin for his valuable present to his son; hopes now 
that he possesses an impression of Franklin's person, he will study to 



324 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

imitate his conduct. Misplaced confidence shown by the legislative and 
executive powers in the present ministers; Lord Chatham's views on 
this subject, as shown by his motion for a cessation of war and a recall 
of the troops ; he and Lord Camden send their best compliments. A. L. 
S. 2 p. VII, 171. 

From Rolandeau. 1777. December 23. Bordeaux. 

Thanking Franklin for the flattering letter he has been kind enough 
to give him; begs that he will join to it an order for a free passage; 
M. Delap, at Bordeaux, the person to write to; his desires to sail at 
once. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 172. 

From Ballainvilliers. 1777. December 24. Paris. 

Asking Franklin to take charge of the enclosed letter to his friend, 
M. de la Fayette. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VII, 173. 

From de Favarez. 1777. December 24. 

Use of tobacco ashes in dropsy; desires to know the dose and the 
method of administering it. His enthusiastic partisanship of the Amer- 
ican cause. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 174. 

From Benj[amin] Webb. 1777. December 25. London. 

Recommending Mr. Roegler; his reputation as a scholar at the Uni- 
versity of Leipzig. A. L. S. i p. VII, 175. 

From Baudouin [Secretary to M. de Sartine]. 

1777. December 25. Paris. 

Has received the letter Franklin sent; will translate and send it to 
M. de Sartine by his courier. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VII, 176. 

From Tho[ma]s Thompson. 1777. December 25. L'Orient. 

Every matter concerning the Raleigh transacted by M. Berard to his 

entire satisfaction ; the port of L'Orient a safe harbor and easy of access. 

A. L. S. I p. VII, 177. 

From Leopold, Comte Barbo. 

1777. December 25. Fidesch, Hungary. 

His former military services; desires to know how he can reach the 
headquarters of General Washington, and if, on his arrival, he will be 
sure to get a position as Major. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VII, 189. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 325 

From Count Kothkowski. 1777. December 26. London. 

Embarked on a Dutch ship bound for Boston with Franklin's letter 
of recommendation to General Washington; was taken prisoner and 
brought to Portsmouth; suffered all kinds of bad treatment from the 
English; his destitute condition; begs Franklin to write a line in his 
favor to Mr. Benjamin Vaughan, of London, who will then procure 
him the means of realizing his former intentions. L. S. 2 p, 

VII, 178. 

From Lavabre & Doerner. 1777. December 26. Paris. 

Enclosing a letter for Franklin from Amsterdam and asking Franklin 
to give the bearer the promised letter of recommendation. L. in 3d P. 
I p. (In French.) VII, 179. 

From Comte de la Cepede. 1777. December 26. Paris. 

Concerning certain experiments which he invites Franklin to witness. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 180. 

From Lambert. 1777. December 26. Basle, Switzerland. 

Congratulates him on the victories in America, and requests a com- 
mission in the American army. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 62. 

From Jean Louis Destelan de Norey. 1777. December 27. Rennes. 

Account of his services and request for a commission in the American 
navy. A. L. S. 3 p. LXII, 89. 

From [George] Arnold. 1777. December 27. Mayence. 

Veneration Germans have for the heroic deeds of General Arnold. Is 
he the son of a Mayence butcher? Was he a monk of the order of St. 
Francis? Arnold wrote to Mayence in 1773. Received papal dispen- 
sation recently. Thinks General Arnold is his son, A copper print of 
Arnold, made in London, in 1776, and sold in Mayence, confirms his 
belief. Others assert that General Arnold was born in New England. 
A. L. S. 3 p. LIX, 12. 

From Jona[tlian] Williams, Jr. 1777. December 27. Nantes. 

Requesting another letter of credit on M. Grand. A. L. S. i p. 

VII, 181. 



326 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Rob[er]t Morris. 1777. December 27. Manheim, Pa. . 

Has been entirely undeceived with respect to his brother; being un- 
able to defend him longer, is determined to give him up entirely to his 
own fate; apologizes profusely to Dr. Franklin and Mr. Deane for 
his conduct in this affair; his error founded on misinformation. L. S. 
2. p. (In duplicate.) VII, 182. 

FromEbenezerS[mith] Piatt. 1777. December 27. Newgate Prison. 

Thanking Franklin for relieving his sufferings; in case of an ex- 
change, begs that he may be included therein. A. L. S. 2 p. 

VII, 183. 

From Jean Bauchers & Co. 1777. Decemebr 27. Prague. 

Offering their services as dealers in glass-ware asking for the usual 
measure of window glass in America. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

VII, 184. 

From Chevalier de Bazantin. 1777. December 27. St. Augustine. 

Still another proof of his customary bad luck ; sailed for America 
July 1 8th; arrived at Charlestown; received a sum of money from the 
Committee of Carolina to enable him and the other members of the 
corps to join General Washington ; captured on the way by two English 
frigates; held as prisoners in St. Augustine, Florida; privations and 
miseries; their united desire to return home; begs Franklin to narrate 
these facts to anyone who takes an interest in his fate. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) VII, 185. 

From Cantini. 1777. December 28. Paris. 

Encloses a letter and begs Franklin to send the answer to his care. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) VII, 186. 

From Frere Monezy. 1777. December 28. Bergerac. 

Begs Franklin to intercede for him, a carmelite friar, with Father 
Gautier, in Paris, and to ask that his failings be condoned. A. L. S. 
2 p. VII, 187. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 327 

From W[illiani] Alexander. 1777. December 28. Dijon. 

Introducing Comte de Rostaing a general officer of artillery and a 
man of great worth. Great victories obtained in America. Reminds 
Franklin of his promise to give his son an introduction to the Bishop 
of St. Asaph. A. L. S. 3 P. VII, 188. 

Fro7n The Dowager Duchesse de Deux-ponts. 
1777. December 28. Paris. 

Requests a commission in the American army, for her nephew^, M. de 
Fontevieux. L. 2 p. (In French.) LXII, 46. 

From Chevalier Haudouin. 1777. December 28. Paris. 

Recommending a friend who wishes to enter the American service. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) LXII, 51. 

From Laroque de Montels. 1777. December 28. St. Omer. 

A request to enter the American army. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 65. 

From Lavabre & Doerner. 1777. December 28. Paris. 

Begging Franklin to send, by bearer, the letters of recommendation 
he promised them. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) VII, 190. 

From Gourlade. 1777. December 29. L'Orient. 

Informing him that the two frigates of Congress, the Raleigh and 
the Alfred sailed that afternoon, accompanied by the King's frigate which 
had orders to render them every assistance; during their stay, neglected 
no opportunity of being useful to them. Arrival of Mr. Moylan. A. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VII, 191. 

From James Moylan. 1777. December 29. L'Orient. 

Departure of the Raleigh and Alfred, accompanied by a French 
sloop of war; will communicate with him later on the subject of his 
errand at L'Orient. A. L. S. 2 p. VII, 192. 

From Le Francq. 1777. December 30. Montreuil. 

Begging for news of his son, Antoine-Maximilien-Cesar Le Francq, 
who enlisted under the American flag. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

VII, 193. 



328 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

FrojTi I. Washington. 1777. December 30. Le Haye. 

Believes he is related to the famous general of the same name ; begs 
Franklin to fonvard the enclosed letter to him containing a copy of his 
coat of arms; ardently desires to go over to America, should this re- 
lationship prove to be true. A. L. S. 3 p. VII, 194. 

FroTH Ausquer du Marques. 1777. December 30. Rennes. 

He requests to enter the American army, if in no other way, as a com- 
mon soldier. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) LXII, 82. 

From [Comtesse] B. [de] Conway. [1777?] December 31. Auxerre. 

Congratulating him on the late successes in America ; asks if it is true 
that Mr. Allen has a letter for her from her husband, the General ; good 
wishes for Franklin and America. A. L. S. i p. XLI, 30. 

From W[illiani] Lee. [1777. December ?] Chaillot. 

News in the London papers of the evacuation of Mud Island. A. L. 
S. I p. XLII, 112. 

From [J. Thornton]. 1777. December ? London. 

Delivered all the letters, except those of Lord North and Sir Grey 
Cooper. A. L. i p. VII, 195. 

Frotn M. Adanson. [Circa 1777.] 
Sending his address and requesting that it be given to Mr. Deane. 
N. in 3d P. I p. (In French.) LXX, 12. 

From Amabert. [1777?] 

Requests a commission in the army. Mem. in 3d P. 3 p. (In 
French.) LXII, 2. 

From Mme. Armand. [Circa 1777.] 

Inquiring about her son, Colonel [Charles] Armand [Marquis de la 
Rouerie], who was serving in the American army under General Gates. 
L. I p. (In French.) XLIII, 121. 

From Edw[ar]d Bancroft. [1777. Paris?] 

Arrival of Mr. Hodge from Dunkirk ; Mr. Deane entreats Dr. Frank- 
lin to come to town immediately on business of very great importance. 
A. L. S. 1 p. XLI, 124. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 329 

From Chevalier de Beauteville. [1777?] 

Gives an extract from a letter written to him by Abbe d'Aydie con- 
cerning a young nobleman, M. d'Abzac, who wishes to go to America 
and serve under La Fayette. Asks if Franklin can give this young 
man a passport and a letter of recommendation. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) XLIV, 264. 

From Le Begue de Presle. [1777?] 

Account of how the Board House, at Purfleet, was struck by light- 
ning and what damage was done, mostly to the roof of the building. 
After the accident the lightning rods on the roof were found to have 
a round copper knob or cap at the top, instead of being sharply pointed 
as recommended. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XLIX, 20. 

From [Pere Joseph Etienne] Bertier. [1777?] 

Desiring to serve in the American army. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) XLI, 131. 

From Pere [Joseph Etienne] Bertier. [1777?] 

Inquires if he has any news of M. de Fleury a French officer in the 
service of the United States. A. N. in 3d P. i p. LXX, 27a. 

From de Bretigney to The American Commissioners. [1777.] 

Is a captain of infantry with rank of lieutenant colonel ; proposes to 
bring to America, at his own expense, ten officers, also to fit out a troop 
to be commanded by these officers. M. de Beaumarchais endorses him. 
Mem. I p. (In French.) LXII, 13a. 

From Brisson. [Circa 1777.] 

Offers to supply Congress with flint stones for use by the American 
troops. 

A. E. by Franklin thanking him for his offer and promising to send 
it to Congress. L. i p. (In French.) XLII, 97. 

From W[illia]m Carmichael. [1777?] Wednesday — . 

Sends substance of Lord Chatham's motion. A. L. S. i p. 

XLIII, 153. 



330 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From de Chanteclair. [1777?] 

Request to enter the service of America. Mem. in 3d P. i p. (In 
French.) LXII, 24. 

From Due de Chaulnes. [Circa 1777.] 

Has been to see Abbe Rochon who showed him an experiment in 
electricity with a metal jar on a glass base. Thinks he has found the 
explanation of the phenomena which takes place in this experiment. 
Asks Franklin's opinion of his theory. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

XLIV, 241. 

From Due de Chaulnes. [1777.] 

Urged by one of his friends to recommend to Franklin, de Neuville, 
a French officer who desires to fight in the army of the insurgents; has 
a high opinion of the gentleman's bravery, but considers a recommenda- 
tion of this kind indiscreet and useless. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

XLI, 23. 

Fro/n Le Ray de Chaumont. [1777?] 

Proposal for sending weekly packet boats to the United States. Mem. 
I p. (In French.) LXI, 52. 

From Coder. [Circa 1777.] 

Proposes to furnish uniforms for the American troops. Describes 
and gives cost of each article, which compares favorably with similar 
articles supplied to the French troops. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

XLII, 77. 
From Coder. [Circa 1777.] 

Reports on the clothing and equipment proposed for the American 
troops. Recommends a certain type of uniform and makes several sug- 
gestions. L. S. I p. (In French.) XLII, 76. 

From Coder. [Circa 1777.] 

Urges Franklin to accept his proposals to furnish supplies for the 
American troops and to send skilled workmen to repair and keep the 
equipments and clothing in good condition. Observations on the politi- 
cal situation in England as viewed with relation to the colonies in Amer- 
ica. A. L. 2 p. (In French.) XLII, 79. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 331 

From Coder. [1777?] 

Claims that the uniforms and clothing, supplied by him for the 
American troops, are much superior to those previously supplied by 
others. Requests Dr. Franklin and Deane not to delay their orders, as 
otherwise he would be at considerable loss. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XLII, 78. 
From Coder. [Circa 1777.] 

Concerning the advisability of sending the material to America and 
having the uniforms made there rather than pay such exorbitant prices 
for them in France. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XLI, 26. 

From Coder. [Circa 1777.] 

Makes a report to Franklin on the 12,000 rifles which Dubourg and 
Dalibard propose to furnish to the United States. Approves the model. 
Suggests a few changes. L. S. i p. (In French.) XLII, 75. 

From Coder. [Circa 1777.] 

Describes different plans for destroying England's commerce on the 
sea, makng raids on the English coast, seizing the channel islands and 
forcing England to come to terms with the United States. Submitted 
his plans to M. de Sartine. Deplores that they were not adopted by 
the latter. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XLII, 59. 

From the Compiler of the book "Affaires de TAmerique." [1777?] 

Recommending a young surgeon to the Deputies of Congress. L. in 
3d P. I p. XLIII, 158. 

From [Comtesse] D. B. [de] Conway. [1777?] Paris. 

Report of a battle in America, six hundred English lost, and General 
Washington wounded; desires to know whether her husband and 
brother arrived in time to aid their friends; reminds him of his promise 
to tell her the news, whether good or ill. A. L. S. i p. XLI, 56. 

From de Dangeuil. [Circa 1777.] 

Inquires if Dr. Franklin will be able to come to see him as promised. 
N. S. I p. (In French.) LXX, 77. 



332 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From de Dangeuil. [Circa 1777.] 

Has called to see Dr. Franklin. Was acquainted with him in Lon- 
don in 1768 and a frequent visitor to him and Sir John Pringle. N. 
in 3d P. I p. LXX, 78. 

From d'Arget. [1777?] 

Request to enter the service of America. L. in 3d P. 2 p. (In 
French.) LXII, 130. 

From S[ilas] Deane. Monday. [1777? Paris.] 

Before the express leaves for Nantes, desires to know what sum 
must be paid Captain Bell. A. L. S. i p. XL, 116^. 

From S[ilas] Deane. [1777?] Thursday. [Paris.] 

Advises that a copy of a contract with M. de Chaumont be sent to Mr. 
Williams and also to the Secret Committee. A. L. S. i p. XL, 117. 

From S[ilas] Deane. [1777?] Friday. 

Sending letters, etc., received that evening from London ; congratulat- 
ing him on their important contents. Appointing a time to see him on 
business, relating in part to Captain Hynson. A. L. S. i p. XL, 129. 

From S[ilas] Deane. [1777?] Monday. 

Enclosing a letter from Mr. Bingham with news of the safe arrival, 
at Martinique, of the cargo from Havre. A. L. S. i p. XL, 199. 

From Le Maire de Dampierre. [1777?] 

Request to enter the American service. Mem. in 3d P. i p. (In 
French.) LXII, 30. 

From S[ilas] Deane. [Circa 1777.] Saturday morning. 

Wishes to see Franklin, in Paris that morning, as early as possible. 
A. L. S. I p. XLIII, 164. 

From [Silas] Deane. [Circa 1777.] Monday. 

Inquiring if Dr. Franklin is going to Versailles and if he could give 
him a place. A. L. in 3d P. i p. XLIII, 165. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 333 

From Andre Frangois Broche Denombe. [1777?] 

Request for himself and his nephew, Jean Baptiste de Belgaree, to 
enter the American service. Mem. in 3d P. 2 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 32 and 33. 

From Antoine de Donjeux. [Captain of Infantry.] [Circa, 1777.] 

Petitions for a military appointment in America, where he intends to 
settle with his family. L. 2 p. (In French.) XLII, 82. 

From D'Ornesan. [Circa 1777.] Gascony. 

Desires to enter the American army. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XL, 46. 

From Mme. Duboccage. [Circa 1777?] 

Thanking Franklin for sending her a poetical work entitled the 
" Vision of Columbus." L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) XLIII, 131. 

From Dubourgneuf. [Circa 1777.] Pont-Croix. 

Begs Franklin to procure him a passage to America and the rank of 
«»fficer in the army there. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XLI, 13. 

From [Charles Guillaume Frederick Dumas. 1777?] 

Introducing M. Michel Rey, bookseller of Amsterdam. Books sent 
to Franklin; anxious for news of America; prophesies a great future 
for the country. Admiration for Robertson's histories. (Incomplete.) 
A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XXXIX, i. 

From Dumont. [Son of the Marquis D'aubarede.] 

[1777.] Chaillot. 

Entrusted by Mr. Sayre with certain letters to be sent by the first 
two ships bound for America; desires to know when the next ship will 
sail. A. L. S. 2 p. XLI, 4. 

From Baron Erenatius. [1777?] Paris. 

Request to enter the American service. Mem. in 3d P. i p. (In 
French.) LXII, 41. 

From Alex[ande]r Ewing. [1777?] 

Asks Dr. Franklin's assistance to obtain the release of his ship from 
Dunkirk. A. L. S. 2 p. XLII, loi. 



334 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Jean Baptiste Alexandre Faurines. [Circa 1777.] 

Request to enter the American army. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) 

LXII, 43. 
From Favrot. [1777?] 

Desiring, with several of his friends, to serve in the American army. 
A. L. 2 p. (In French.) XLI, 199. 

From W. Fergusson. [1777.] Paris. 

Announcing the arrival of an express at Lord Stormont's with news 
of an American defeat on October 24th. L in 3d P. i p. XLI, 196. 

From [Aime Ambroise Joseph] Feutry. [Circa 1777.] 

Sending a new translation of Richard, lent by M. Quetant. Will 
let him know as soon as his cannon are in prime condition. A, L. in 
3d P. I p. (In French.) XL, 120. 

From [Aime Ambroise Joseph] Feutry. [Circa 1777.] 

Asking Franklin to accept a gift of some story books which may 
amuse his grandchildren. A. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) 

XLIII, 177. 

i^rom Col. Forester. [1777?] 

Offers his services to the United States if given the rank of Major 
General; would raise and train a regiment of dragoons in America to 
serve during the war with England. Describes how they should be 
armed and equipped. Mem. 9 p. (In French.) LXI, 111-113. 

From Franquelin. [Circa 1777.] 

Offering to supply him with all the information concerning their 
family and their possible relationship. L. i p. (In Frencli.) 

XLI, 153. 

From [Captain] Garanger. [1777?] 

Was to have sailed as an officer with M. Du Coudray for America. 
Could not reach Havre in time. Wishes to be included in the list of 
officers enrolled by M. Du Coudray and be given the means to leave for 
America without delay. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XLIV, 269. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 335 

Fro?n [Ferdinand] Grand. [1777?] 

Proposes, to Franklin, to send the list of articles which Congress 
needs to Holland to get the prices thereof for comparison. N. in 3d P. 
I p. (In French.) LXX, 109. 

From [Ferdinand Grand] to Messrs. Franklin and Deane. 

[1777?] 

Enclosing a warning against a man in Morlaix called Walker. Invi- 
tation to dine with him the following day. A. L. 2 p. (In French.) 

XLII, 185. 

From [Ferdinand] Grand. {Circa 1777.] Tuesday evening. 

Inquiring at what hour he can get Franklin's instructions for Ver- 
sailles and if the latter could lend him his carriage. L. in 3d P. i p. 
(In French.) XLIII, 184. 

From Greenwood. [1777.] Friday Morning. Paris. 

Will wait on Franklin to learn if he has any commands as he leaves 
Paris Sunday. A. L. in 3d P. i p. XL, 31. 

From Hennet. [^Circa iTTJ. Paris.] 

Offering to supply America with arms. L. in 3d P. i p. (In 
French.) XL, 157. 

From James Hutchinson. 
[1777?] Thursday, on board the ship Sally. 

Promising to deliver Franklin's dispatches in Philadelphia, or to de- 
stroy them, should he fall into the hands of the piratical cruizers of 
Britain. A, L, S. i p. XL, 165. 

From Chevalier de Kermorvan. [1777?] Guimgamp. 

Asking for news of his brother who was reported to have sailed for 
America. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XL, 197. 

From Chevalier de Kermorvan. [1777?] 

Writes from America where he is erecting batteries and fortifying cer- 
tain points on the coast. Deplores the lack of unity and activity amongst 
the Americans. Are averse to making any defensive preparations requir- 
ing labor until the enemy is upon them. Explains the difficulties he has 



336 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

to contend with ; engineering skill not appreciated. Learned with regret 
of M. de Woedtke's death in Canada. Solicits promotion to the latter's 
rank so as to have the right to take part in the Councils of War. A. L. 
S. 4 p. (In French.) XLII, 103. 

From Etienne Rousseaux Lacombe. [1777?] 

Petition concerning his son, Jean Rousseaux, who was taken prisoner 
on the brig Lexington after a battle with English warships. D. S. i p. 
(In French.) LVII, 17. 

From Francis Marc Antoine de Lafarge. [1777?] 

Military history; requests to enter the American service. L, in 3d P. 
2 p. (In French.) LXII, 42. 

From [Madame] Noailles de la Fayette. [Circa 1777.] 

Desiring confirmation of her good news from America. Enclosing a 
letter for a poor prisoner from his mother; begs that it may be for- 
warded safely. Wishes to know the first favorable opportunity for 
sending letters to her husband. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XLII, 149. 
From Frangois Le Marege. [1777.] 

Induced by Captain de la Plaigne to enlist in a corps for service in 
the United States. Captured by an English privateer at sea. Lost all 
his money and effects. Appeals to Franklin for assistance. L. 4 p. 
(In French.) LX, 46. 

From E[manuel] P[ierre] De la Plaigne. [i777-] 

Is captain in the ist Georgia regiment; sent to France by the State of 
Georgia on a military mission ; petitions the American Commissioners to 
indemnify him, and his companions, for losses incurred through their 
capture by an English privateer and imprisonment in England. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) LXI, 145. 

From Abbe Le Clere de St. Etvain. [1777-] 

He asks for the appointment of a day to see him and M. de 
Bretigney. Incloses a letter from M. Martin fils to whom Mr. Deane 
promised a letter and who has returned to Sedan to await his recom- 
mendation. A. L S. I p. (In French.) LXII, 13b. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 337 

From [Jean-Baptiste] Le Roy. [Circa 1777.] 

Desiring to know if a young French gendarme can hope for the com- 
mission of officer in the American service. A. L. S. i p. (Partly in 
French.) XLII, 171. 

From [Jean-Baptiste] Le Roy. [Circa 1777.] 

Writes on behalf of a young French officer who desires to enter the 
American army; notable persons who are interested in the j^oung man. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XLII, 176. 

From [Jean-Baptiste] Le Roy. [1777.] Passy. 

Asking the exact date Franklin expects them all for dinner. Sends 
the last proof of his memoir on the form to be given to conductors; 
desires Franklin's observations thereupon. A. L. S. 2 p. XLII, 177. 

From [Jean Baptiste] LeRoy. [1777.] 

Inquires about Franklin's cold and hopes that Mr. Deane is better. 
A. N. S. I p. (In French.) LXXI, 48. 

From de Ligonier. [1777?] 

Gives his qualifications and requests to go to the United States. L. 
in 3d P. I p. (In French.) LXII, 71. 

From Comte de Lismore to the American Commissioners. 

[Circa 1777.] 

Requests a grant of land in one of the provinces of South America. 
Mem. I p. (In. French.) LXII, 72. 

From Chevalier Loudeyx. [1777?] 

Request to enter the service of the United States. Mem. i p. (In 
French.) LXII, 73- 

From Flobergue de la Rocatelle. [Circa 1777.] 

Request to enter the army. Mem. 2 p. (In French.) LXII, 109. 

From Flobergue de la Rocatelle. [Circa 1777.] Toul. 

Concerning his memoir sent months ago to Congress and General 
Washington, a propos of his plan to establish, in America, a school of 
engineering. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XL, 72. 



338 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Due de la Rochefoucauld. [1777.] Monda}^ [Paris.] 

Sending an important letter the contents of which he ought to know. 
Promising him any news he may receive of M. Du Coudray and M. 
Leblond. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XL, 115. 

From Due de la Rochefoucauld. [1777.] 

On behalf of his mother, invites Franklin and Deane to dine at her 
house. Is himself leaving for Rouen to-morrow. Will call and take 
breakfast with Franklin. A. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) 

XLIV, 229. 

From Due de la Rochefoucauld. [1777.] 

Sending Dr. Franklin and Mr. Deane a letter which may interest 
them. A. N. in 3d P. i p. LXXI, 29a. 

From Due de la Rochefoucauld. [1777.] 

Forwards a package to Franklin from Abbe Rosier. Asks if there 
is any truth in the report of the capture of Mud Island and Red Bank 
forts. A. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) XLIV, 226. 

From Due de la Rochefoucauld's Secretary. [1777?] 

Requesting the address of Chevalier de Varaigne. N. in 3d P. i p. 
(In French.) LXXI, 31. 

From de la Malmaison. [Circa 1777.] Chateaudun. 

Desiring to enter the American army. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

XLI, 75. 

Fro?n Chevalier de Marancourt. [Circa 1777.] 

Requests to enter the American service, with suitable rank. L. in 3d 
P. I p. (In French.) LXII, 78. 

Fro?n Chevalier de Marolles [de Luce]. [Circa 1777.] Paris. 

Offers his services to the United States. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) LXII, 81. 

From Marquigny. [Circa 1777.] 

Desire of two French officers of cavalry to enter the American army. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XLI, 66. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 339 

From [Thomas Antoine] de Mauduit, Chevalier Duplessis. [1777.] 

Expressing an ardent desire to enter the American army; asks for the 
same treatment as that already accorded officers of his rank. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) XLI, 57. 

From Nich[olas] McCormick. [Circa 1777?] 

A begging letter from an Irish Franciscan friar. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XLI, 77. 

From Will[iam] M[a]cCreery to The American Commissioners. 

[1777-1778?] 

Circumstantial account of the prize " Portsmouth " captured by the 
Swallow ; expects to be censured as the owner of this vessel ; is in no 
way responsible for the affair. A. L. S. 4 p. XLI, 81. 

From de Moleres. [Circa 1777.] 

The record of his campaigns. Mem. 2 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 116. 

From Hocquet Delulain de Mondrecourt. [Circa 1777.] 

Wishes to enter the American service. Mem. i p. (In French.) 

LXII, 83. 

From Samuel Stanley, Baron De Mons. [Circa 1777.] 

Explains the straits to which he and his family have been reduced by 
the pillage of his plantations near Boston and Charlestown by both 
armies in America. Begs Franklin to help him secure possession of his 
property. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) LXII, 85. 

From Francois Henry Hervee de la Mothe. [Circa 1777.] 

Statement of his military career. Mem. 3 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 53. 

From Joseph Gabriel Mounier de Courtois. [1777?] 

Request to enter the American service. L. in 3d P. i p. (In 
French.) LXII, 26a. 



340 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Joseph Parker. [1777?] 

Concerning his mercantile affairs; desires Franklin's kind interference 
on his behalf. A. L. S. i p. XLII, 122. 

From Captain Pock, of the Ship Benjamin, to The American Com- 
missioners. {Circa 1777.] 

Applies for permission to arm and fit out his vessel as a privateer to 
wage war on English shipping. Mem. 2 p. (In French.) LVII, 55. 

From Baron de Ried. [1777?] 

Gives his qualifications and requests a commission in the army. L. in 
3d P. I p. (In French.) LXII, 105. 

From Baltazard Romand du Rosan. [1777?] 
Request to enter the army. Mem. 3 p. (In French.) LXII, no. 

From Baron de Rullecour. [^Circa 1777?] 

Sends a letter from Abbe Bandeau. Olifers to raise a corps of troops 
and seize the Zafarimes Islands for the United States and to wage war 
on English shipping. L. and Mem. 9 p. (In French.) XLII, 86. 

From J[ea]n Rousseaux. [1777?] Calais. 

His capture on the frigate " Lexington," and arrival in France, desti- 
tute of everything; applies for aid. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

XL, 69. 

From Nathan Rumsey. [Circa 1777.] 

Excusing himself and M. Penet from dining with him owing to a 
previous engagement. A. L. S. i p. XL, 73. 

From Frangois Louis, Chevalier De Saillian. [Circa 1777.] 

Gives his war record and copies of nine letters from different persons 
about him. Mem. 6 p. (In French.) LXII, 115. 

From Sieur de Barre de St. Jean. [Circa 1777.] 

Asks for a commission of lieutenant-colonel in the army. L. in 
3d P. I p. (In French.) LXII, 4. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 341 

From Saint-Lambeu. [Circa 1777.] 

Chevalier Villepre sailing for America to serve as Lieutenant-colonel 
in the service of the United States; asks permission for his nephew to 
accompany him. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XLI, 176. 

From Le Sieur Teissier. [Circa 1777?] 

Is a surgeon of the Salpetriere Hospital at Paris; offers his services 
to the United States. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French. In duplicate.) 

LVII, 98, and LXII, 120. 

From Vaquier. [1777?] 

Offers to produce in the United States, and furnish to the Govern- 
ment all the saltpetre it may need to make powder. Mem. S. 3 p. ( In 
French.) LX, 93. 

From [Felix] Vicq d'Azyr. [1777? Paris.] 

Sending copies of the letters patent granted to the Royal Society of 
Medicine, also a list of its members; desiring his presence at the next 
meeting of the Society. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XL, 127. 

From de Vatteville. [Circa 1777.] 

Request to enter the service of the United States. Mem. 3 p. (In 
French.) LXII, 122. 

From Chalut de Verin. [Circa 1777.] 

Inviting Messrs. Franklin, Deane and Lee to dine with him. N. 
in 3d P. I p. LXII, 45a. 

From Antoine Felix Wuibert. [1777?] 

Is Lieutenant-Colonel of Engineers in the service of the United 
States; taken prisoner on the fall of Fort Washington and confined in 
Forton prison in England. Mem. i p. (In French.) LVII, 52. 

From , [Circa 1777.] 

Jean Conrad Zollicoffer, formerly with Schweighauser of Nantes, 
is going to Philadelphia to begin business. Asks him to recommend 
him to some people there. L i p. (In French.) XLIV, 286. 

From . [Circa 1777.] 

Recommending an officer of artillery who wishes to go to America to 
seek a career there. A. L. 1 p. (In French.) XLIV, 113. 



342 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From . [Circa 1777-] 

Memorandum giving names of two French firms who could supply 
flour, clothing, etc. I p. (In French.) XLIV, 236. 

From . [1777?] 

Has been requested, by the Marquis of Courtauvaux, to speak to 
Franklin about another artillery officer who is as highly recommended 
as M. Mauduit Duplessis. Asks if it would be profitable to send silk 
and other fabrics made at Lyons and Tours to North America. L. i p. 
(In French.) XLIV, 119. 

From . [Circa 1777.] 

"Epistle to the United States and to Franklin." Poem. 4 p. (In 
French.) LI, 43. 

By . [Circa 1777.] 

" To Dr. Franklin, delegate from the United Provinces of America " 
and " to General Washington." Poem. 13 p. (In Latin.) LI, 75. 

By . [Circa 1 777.] 

" Epistle to the Insurgents." Verses. 3 p. (In French.) LI, 77. 

From . [Circa 1 777.] 

On King George and pointed and blunt lightning conductors. 
Verses, i p. LI, 82. 

From . [Circa 1777.] 

With reference to a proposed agreement between a Company in 
France and the United States Congress for the sale of tobacco to the 
former. Mem. 4 p. (In French.) LVI(i), 47. 

From . [Circa 1777.] 

A plan for secretly attacking and setting fire to the English fleet 
in New York Harbor. Mem. 3 p. (In French.) LVI(i), 55. 

From . [1777?] 

Proposal to sell a newly built frigate mounted with thirty-six guns. 
Mem. 2 p. (In French.) LVI (i), 67. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 343 

From . [Circa 1 777-] 

Petition from unknown against Penet, agent for the State 

of Virginia. L. 4 p. (In French.) LVII, 40. 

From . [Circa 1777-] 

Outline of a project for raising, in the name of the King of France, 
a Regiment of Foreigners to be employed as auxiliaries in the service 
of the United States of America. Diss. 5 p. (In French.) 

LXI, 5, 6. 

From . [Circa 1777.] 

List of stores on board of the privateer " Dolphin." Mem. 3 p. 

LXI, 85. 

From . [Circa 1777.] 

Giving particulars of cannon which have been delivered at Havre and 
Dunkerque. Mem. 3 p. (In French.) LXI, 114. 

From to The American Commissioners. [Circa 1777.] 

Requests that Chevalier de la Mothe be put at the head of the 
Engineers because of his great experience and that he be allowed 10,000 
livres for his expenses. L. i p. (In French.) LXII, 56. 

From . [Circa 1777.] 

A young man asking to serve in America. L. in 3d P. 4 p. (In 
French.) LXII, 129. 

From . [Circa 1777.] 

Asks him, on behalf of a Boston printer, whether type for printing 
English and printing ink can be purchased in France. N. i p. 

LXXI, loib. 

From . [1777-] 

M. de Gimat, who went to America with Lafayette, has been ap- 
pointed Captain in the Regiment de Viennois at Martinique. Mem. 
I p. (In Fcench.) LXXI, 105a. 

From . [Circa 1 777-1 

Advice about business transactions with foreigners. N. in 3d P. i p. 

LXXI, 130b. 



344 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Frotn Goudar. 1778. January i. Aubenas. 

Charged by a number of persons to offer him and General Wash- 
ington the homage of their admiration. If among the manufacturers 
of Languedoc any article would be useful to Franklin, they will execute 
his orders gratis; begs in return for a portrait of General Washington. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) VIII, 2. 

From Madame Le Roy. 1778. January i. Paris. 

In Paris a whole month and has not yet seen Franklin; expresses an 
enthusiastic attachment to him; will always glory in having such "a 
papa " as Franklin ; invites him to dine with her father, the Comte de 
MiUy. A. L. 3 P- (In French.) VIII, 2^. 

From Claude Julien. 1778. Januarj^ i. Paris. 
Sends New Year greetings. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VIII, 3. 

From Ra[lph] Izard. 1778. Januray i. Paris. 

Desiring a little conversation with him that evening or the next; 
the gout prevents his leaving the house. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 4. 

From Le Blanc to The American Commissioners. 

1778. January i. Paris. 

Wishing them all good wishes for the New Year. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) LXII, 7. 

From Chevalier de Marolles de Luce. 1778. January i. Paris. 

Congratulating him on the reported surrender of General Howe. 
Hopes Franklin will soon receive word from Congress respecting the 
offer of his services as Captain of Engineers. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) LXXI, 6. 

From Joseph Chase. 1778. January i. Paris. 

Requests the Commissioners, from the United States, to assist several 
American prisoners detained at Dinan, Mayenne, etc., and obtain their 
release. A. L. S. 2 p. LX, 8. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 345 

From Lambert Delassau. 1778. January 2. Chateau Thierry. 

Not content with his position; wishes a commission in the American 
army. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) LXII, 63. 

From Ra[lph] Izard to The American Commissioners. 
1778. January 2. Paris. 

The credit he received from the Commissioners on the public banker 
is exhausted; desires further instruction. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 5. 

From C[ourtney] Melmoth. 1778. January 2. Paris. 

Requesting interviews for tu-o persons ; the one desires to go to Amer- 
ica on the saltpetre and powder scheme; the other, a person who has 
been imprisoned in London for trading in the American service, and who 
has just lost a large cargo of tobacco, but is ready to venture forth 
again. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 6. 

From James Moylan to The American Commissioners. 
1778. January 2. L'Orient. 

Desiring to know whether he is to accept certain proposals of M. 
Gourlade or procure a different connection; necessity of having a letter 
from Franklin addressed to the captains of vessels from America with 
certain instructions. A. L. S. 3 p. VIII, 7. 

From Xavier Casani. 1778. January 2. Florence. 

Is at work on a periodical encyclopaedia, for which a universal cor- 
respondence is necessary ; Franklin's reputation as the most amiable, the 
wisest of men; applies to him, therefore, to furnish some political re- 
flections, etc. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VIII, 8. 

Fro?n Chief- Justice Welleb. 1778. January 3. Basel. 

Reflections induced by having seen certain intended reforms of the 
penal laws in " The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsyl- 
vania." A. L. S. I p. VIII, 9. 

From . 1778. January 3. Wurtzbourg. 

Determined to emigrate to America with his family, in spite of his 
proposition having been refused; asks numerous questions about the 
country. A. L, 4 p. (In French. Final part missing.) LVIII, 108. 



34^ Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From I. MacMahon. 1778. January 4. At the Military School. 

Enclosing news received from the Chevalier de Keralio. Notwith- 
standing all the boasting of Lord Sandwich, he has not chased the Amer- 
ican privateers from the coast of Europe. A. L. S. I p. VIII, 10. 

From Sam[ue]l Cooper. 1778. January 4. Boston. 

Introducing Mr. Bradford whose father is the agent for continental 
prizes in Boston. The rapid depreciation of paper money their greatest 
difficulty. A. L. S. I p. VIII, II. 

From Sir Philip Gibbes. 1778. January 4. Paris. 

Asking Franklin to appoint an hour when he may call. L. in 3d P. 
I p. VIII, 12. 

From J[ames] H[utton]. 1778. January 4. 

Enclosing a letter for Mr. Nathaniel Seidel, in Bethlehem, which, 
if Franklin approves, he desires sent on. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 13. 

From Captain G[ustavus] Conyngham to 
The American Commissioners. 1778. January 4. St. Sebastian. 
Brig " Gracieux " captured by him; refutes the report that an insult 
was thereby given to the French flag. A. L. S. 3 p. XL VIII, 149. 

From I. MacMahon. 1778. January 5. At the Military School. 

Enclosing an invitation from the Duchesses de Mortemart for Frank- 
lin and his son to dinner. Report of the English having taken Mud 
Island, and having had seventy of their officers wounded; put the garri- 
son of four hundred men to the sword. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 14. 

From [Sir] Philip Gibbes. 1778. January 5. Paris. 

Presses upon him to devise the means whereby an honorable negotiation 
may be opened between Great Britain and America. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 15. 

From J. de Sparre. 1778. January 6. Strasbourg. 

Has written many letters, but has received no answer to his offers; 
his interest in the Colonies. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VIII, 16. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 347 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. January 6. The Hague. 

Extract from a dispatch of the Comte de Degenfeld, Dutch Minister 
at Vienna, and a copy of a note from the Prince de Kaunitz, concern- 
ing the termination of the differences between the Austrian and Palatine 
Courts. Publication in the London Evening Post of a pretended Reso- 
lution of Congress of December 30th, 1776; desires to know if there is 
any truth in it; in the same paper, read with admiration their letter 
to Lord North with his pitiable reply. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

XXXIX, 20. 

From Doerner, Jr. 1778. January 6. Bordeaux. 

Thanking Franklin for certain letters of introduction; his desire to 
render himself in some manner useful to them. A. L. S. 3 p. 

VIII, 17. 

From Rogon de Klenguy. 1778. January 6. Lamballe. 

His tenth letter to Franklin but has not received a line of response; 
his earnest desire to enter the service of America. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) VIII, 18. 

From Galevon. 1778. January 6. Ivry-la-Bataille. 

Applies to Franklin for details of the new remedy, tobacco ashes. A. 
L. S. I p. (In French.) VIII, 19. 

From Marston Watson. 1778. January 6. Bilbao. 

Concerning the schooner Hawk's prize Britannia, which was seized 
by the Marquis de Basecourt, General of St. Sebastian, with a design of 
confiscation on a spurious pretense of piracy, the vessel unrigged, the 
cargo unloaded and disposed of, and the crew confined in prison; en- 
treats Franklin's intercession. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 20. 

From Arthur Lee. 1778. January 7. Chaillot. 

Indignant that the despatches to Congress are to be sent under the 
care of Mr. Carmichael; with Deane's and Franklin's sanction, had 
promised them to Mr. Stevenson; this promise is flatly contradicted in 
a letter written to Mr. Stevenson by the Commissioners; objects to 
being kept in the dark and resents the deepest insult that can be offered 
a gentleman: — a direct and unjust impeachment of his veracity. A. 
L. S. 4 p. VIII, 21. 



348 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From James Moylan. 1778. January 7. L'Orient. 

The ship, Duras, for sale at L'Orient, would be a cheap purchase ; 
suggestions in case she is bought. News of Captain Butler of the priva- 
teer ship Molly who left Boston November 15th; took four prizes and 
is headed for some port in Spain. A. L. S. 3 p. VIII, 22. 

From De Pere Meilhan. 1778. Januarys. Mezin. 

A friend of America; has a strong desire to adopt that country for 
his own; law is his profession; desires Franklin's advice as to how he 
could best invest his money. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VIII, 23. 

From Jacobus Oberleithner. 1778. January 9. Vienna. 

Offering his services to the Americans as a physician, provided some 
fixed salary be assured him. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VIII, 24. 

From W. Blakey. 1778. January 9. Liege. 

Congratulating him on the capture of Burgoyne; angry with the 
American Council for not scalping him. Hurt at M. Morand's men- 
tion of him in the former's stuff about pit-coal; encloses letters on the 
subject. Will soon have his "Art of Watch and Clock Making " in 
print; will send it when finished. Rails against the tyranny of England 
and enthuses over the defenders of liberty. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 25. 

From I. MacMahon. 1778. January 9. The Military School. 

Sends another paper of American news; the sea fight between the 
privateers seems true; very different accounts given by the English frig- 
ate. Expects to dine with him at the Duchesse de Mortemart's. A. L. S. 
I p. VIII, 26. 

From John S. Harmanson to The American Commissioners. 

1778. January 9. Bordeaux. 

Requesting to know if any resolve of Congress has been passed in the 
state of Virginia, which would require a person who has property there 
to return after a certain time or forfeit his rights to it. Reasons why he 
has been detained in Europe; his devotion to the American cause; only 
came over to serve his country. A. L. S. 3 p. VIII, 27. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 349 

From Rod[olp]h Valltravers. 1778. January 10. Lyon. 

England will listen to no intercession. Congratulates him on the 
successes in America. His plan for establishing a public bank in France 
impracticable. Has to retrieve his private fortune which has been much 
impaired during his ten years' public services. Sends Franklin an elec- 
trical pistol which discharges inflammable air with great force. A. L. 
S. 4 p. VIII, 29. 

From Courtney Melmoth. 1778. January 11. Paris, 

M. Dubourg and M. Jeuneux very anxious for Franklin to inspect 
some electrical instruments. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 30. 

Fro?n I. Gosum. 1778. January ii. Liege. 

Begging Franklin to honor him with his orders for arms. A. L. S. 

1 p. (In French.) VIII, 32. 

Frojn De Lor. 1778. January 11. a La Flecne. 

Introducing the Lieutenant-General of the Presidial of La Fleche, 
where for the last three months he has been working in experimental 
physics. His pleasure at the success of the American arms. A. L. S. 

2 p. (In French.) V, 12. 

From Ralph Izard. 1778. January 13. Paris. 

Enclosing the Gazette Extraordinary which gives an account of the 
evacuation of Mud Island and Red Bank; expects news of great im- 
portance from the tenor of Howe's letter. A. L. in 3d P. i p. 

VIII, 34. 

From Desparbez. 1778. January 13. Luneville. 

Request for employment in Boston. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 34. 

From Lt. General Forget De Baris. 1778. January 13. Borgonville. 

Introduces Monsieur Gillot, of German Lorraine, who wishes a 
commission in the army. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) LXII, 3. 

From Gullet du Pugieu. 1778. January 13. Lyon. 

Intends to go to America with his small fortune. Asks how to get 
there, etc. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) LX, 109. 



350 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Arnold. 1778. January 14. Metz. 

Asking for news of his brother, Francois Arnold, who went to Amer- 
ica during the war between France and England ; afterward remained 
there as Secretary to the Commissary at Quebec; a soldier of his name is 
serving in the American army; if it be his brother, desires to join him. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VIII, 35. 

From Rodolph Valltravers. 1778. January 15. Lyon. 

Informing Franklin that he has forwarded him a book entitled " Sim- 
lerus de Rebus publicis Helvetiorum." A. L. S. I p. VIII, 36. 

From De Marion Bresillac. 1778. January 15. Castelnaudary. 
Desires to enter the American army. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 37. 

From Due de Moussefat. 1778. January 15. Paris. 

Recommending M. Esckhout, a young surgeon. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) LXII, 86. 

From Hennet. 1778. January 16. Paris. 

Has received no notice of the arrival of the sabres at Nantes, where 
they were sent at Franklin's request; desires payment for the rifles. 
Proposition of the manager of a foundry to furnish cannon, etc., or to 
send his son to America to conduct the business. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) VIII, 38. 

From de Belsague. 1778. January 16. Saint Omer. 

Desires to make other arrangements in case Franklin cannot procure 
him employment suitable to his rank. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

VIII, 39. 

From de Villepatour. 1778. January 16. Paris. 

Desiring to know if Chevalier Duplessis distinguished himself during 
the late victories in America in such a manner that he received a present 
of two horses from Congress in recognition of his bravery; if true, will 
endeavor to procure " La Croix de St. Louis " for this young man. L. 
S. 2 p. (In French.) VIII, 40. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 351 

From de Graff ended, Baron de Worb. 

1778. Januaty 16. Berne. 

Is the possessor of some valuable papers dated in the early part of the 
century concerning the American Colonies; will send them to Franklin 
and desires his opinion of their value, etc. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 41. 

From Arthur Lee to The American Commissioners. 

1778. January 17. Chaillot. 

Sorry that the things to which he objected have been continued in 
the instructions for Captain Jones; prevented thereby from giving his 
signature to them except in the manner which he has the honor to send. 
A. L. S. I p. VIII, 42. 

From Bouvier. 1778. Januar>^ 18. Paris. 

Writes for Messrs. de Gonault & Co. who offer their services to pur- 
chase a supply of shirts for America. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

VIII, 43. 
From J[ohn] C[arroll]. 

1778. January 18. Rock Creek, near Georgetown, Md. 

Congratulates Franklin on his health, position and opportunities for 
meeting interesting people; sees in many ways that Franklin is much 
in mode in Paris. The feeling in America is that France delays too 
long. Sad death of M. Pliarne; foul play suspected. News of Gen- 
eral Schuyler's family; the treatment of the General universally con- 
sidered cruel. His friendship and interest in L'Abbe Brotier. Hopes 
Franklin will soon return to the western world where he will be re- 
ceived with transports. A. L. S. 4 p. VIII, 44. 

From Moursan de Romas. 1778. January 18. Nerac. 

Is the widow of M. de Romas, member of the Academy of Sciences 
and a worker in electricity. Enclosing a memoir concerning a work of 
his on the invention of a new rudder for vessels; offers this work to 
America. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) VIII, 45. 

From Chevalier De Ricard. 1778. January 18. Toulon. 

Request, for himself and his brother, to enter the army. A. L. S. 
4 p. (In French.) LXII, iii. 



352 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From de Carn. 1778. January 18. Amboise. 

Desires to go to Boston to fight for America. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) LXII, 17. 

From August Wilhelm Weyl. 1778. January 18. Bonn on the Rhine. 

Wishes to espouse the American patriots' cause. Is deterred because of 
unfavorable newspaper reports. A. L. S. 2 p. LIX, 89. 

From Degimat Ponylarmont. 1778. January 19. 

Inquiring about De Germat, an officer in la Fayette's army. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) LXI, 70. 

FroTu Js. Rutledge, Bt. 1778. January 20. Paris. 

With reference to an English family who wish to set up in trade 
in the United States. A. L. S. i p. LX, 82. 

From Purtchaires. 1778. January 20. Toul. 

Wishes to settle in the United States. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

LX, no. 

From Fran[ci]s Coffyn. 1778. January 20. Dunkirk. 

Arrival of two wounded seamen taken in the Lexington. Capture 
of the brigantine, L'Amiable Reine. News from New York of the de- 
feat of Cornwallis and 6,000 royalists by General Gates; Cornwallis 
with 1,500 of his men taken prisoner; 900 left dead on the field. 
German troops deserted and joined the American army. Seventy-six 
pieces of brass cannon captured by the Continental troops. A. L. S. 
2 p. VIII, 46. 

From Jno. Emery. 1778. January 20. Bilbao. 

Enclosing two newspapers brought from Newburyport by the Cap- 
tain of a small schooner. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 47. 

From Abbe Arnoux. 1778. January 20. Lyon. 

Future alliance of France and America. Expects to be in Paris next 
month when he hopes to embrace P'ranklin ; what America owes to him. 
His pleasure in the good news from the Colonies marred by the antici- 
pation that Franklin will return to his own country. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VIII, 48. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 353 

From J. B. Rogler. 1778. January 20. Paris. 
Begging Franklin to name a time when he may pay him a short visit. 
A. L. S. I p. VIII, 49. 

From I. MacMahon. 1778. January 21. Paris. 

His promise to dine with him to meet M. de Bussy, formerly Pleni- 
potentiary Minister at the Court of England. The taking of some 
French ships, by the English, on the very coast of France must at least 
rouse the spirit of the Premier. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 50. 

Fro77i The Continental Congress, Committee on Secret Correspon- 
dence, to The American Commissioners. 
1778. January 21. Yorktown, Pa. 

The state of military affairs; evacuation of Ticonderoga and Mt. 
Independence ; Indians perfectly quiet ; General Burgoyne and his troops 
near Boston; the General will not be suiifered to depart until the Con- 
vention of Saratoga is ratified by the Court of London ; enemy in pos- 
session of Rhode Island ; respective positions of General Howe and 
General Washington. A. L. S. Jno. Witherspoon, James Lovell. 
3 p. VIII, 51. 

From Gourlade, Berard freres & Cie, and Demonplaisir, to The 
American Commissioners. 1778. January 21. L'Orient. 

Informed Mr. Beaumarchais that they are ready to account with 
him for the whole proceeds of the cargo of the Amphitrite; sorry that 
the accounts of their disbursements for the two frigates exceeded Frank- 
lin's expectations; consider Franklin's expressions disagreeable; their 
disappointment at receiving such treatment. A. L. S. 3 p. VIII, 52. 

From [James] Hutton, 1778. January 21. Passy. 

Desires that his brethren's settlements on the coasts of Labrador 
may not be molested by any of the American armed vessels ; every 
year supplies are sent to the missionaries on that coast, who would starve 
should the vessel be taken. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 53. 

2—23 



354 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Tlio[ma]s Shore. 1778. January 22. Cape Francois. 

Sending Franklin some introductory letters received from his friends 
in Virginia. Begs Franklin's assistance in the choice of correspondents, 
and his influence in recommending their firm. A. L. S. i p. 

VIII, 55. 

From W. Wildrik. 1778. January 22. Namur. 

Begs for a letter, favorable or otherwise. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) VIII, 56. 

From Pigou. 1778. January 23. Paris. 

Has discovered a new way of using gun powder, by which it is pos- 
sible to fire twelve shots a minute from cannon and with increased ve- 
locity and effect. Wishes an interview. A. L, S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XLIX, 22. 

Fro7n James Moylan. 1778. January 23. L'Orient. 

Report brought by a vessel from Baltimore of the capture of New 
York and Rhode Island by the American troops; this spur needed to 
enliven the merchants of L'Orient and St. Malo. The ship Duras too 
old for any profitable purpose. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 57. 

From Comte de La Crespiniere. 1778. January 23. Gace. 

Request to enter the American service. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 26b. 

From Chevalier d'Eon. 1778. January 24. Versailles. 

Called to congratulate him on the latest events in America; drank his 
health at the house of his friend M. Le Ray de Chaumont. Invitation 
from his brother-in-law, le Chevalier O'Gorman, for Franklin to visit 
him. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VIII, 58. 

From Baronne Demahuet Olivier. 
1778. January 24. Pont-a-Mousson. 

Desires the enclosed letter to be sent to a relative of hers at Salem, 
M. Andre Olivier. A. L. S. 1 p. (In French.) VIII, 59. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 355 

From Dufourny de Villiers. 1778. January 24. Paris. 

Encloses a memoir to be forwarded to Congress if Franklin approves ; 

his desire to become a citizen of Philadelphia. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 

French.) VIII, 60. 

From Rev. Erhard Christien Hechtfischer. 

1778. January 25. Ickelheim, near Windsheim. 

Rejoices at the success of the American arms ; his countrj^men of Ans- 
pach unwilling to fight against the Americans. Desires to emigrate to 
the United States. A. L. S. 2 p. LIX, 87. 

From [Capt.] de Franval. 1778. January 25. Paris. 

His brother uneasy at receiving no answer to his letter to Franklin 
written three weeks before, inclosing an important receipt ; begs that 
it may be returned to him at once. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 61. 

From J. B. Junck. 1778. January 25. Luxembourg. 

Desire on the part of certain iron founders and workmen skilled in 
every trade, to settle in America, and pursue their various callings ; con- 
cerning a grant of land and privileges ; being Catholics, they wish to 
know if their religion may be practiced openly. A. L. S. 4 p. (In 
Latin.) VIII, 62. 

From Comte de Montagnac. 1778. January 26. Nevers. 

Enclosing a prospectus of a history of the Marechal de Turenne, 
which he expects to publish shortly ; desires to dedicate it to General 
Washington ; wishes to know how many copies he shall retain for the 
United States. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

Dedication and prospectus of a new history of the Marechal de 
Turenne. 7 p. VIII, 63. 

From Van den Yver & Co. 1778. January 26. Amsterdam. 

Desires to open a business connection with Franklin. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VIII, 64. 

From Arthur Lee. 1778. January 27. Chaillot. 

Begging Franklin to revise and certify the enclosed state of facts in 
order to prevent painful disputes. Color of roots of trees and plants 
when deprived of light. A. L. in 3d P. i p. VIII, 65. 



356 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Regnier. 1778. January 27. Vannes. 

Asking for advice and information on the question of settling in 
America. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) LX, iii. 

From Fran[ci]s Coffyn to The American Commissioners. 
1778. January 27. Dunkirk. 

Afraid that the account of the action between General Gates and 
General Cornwallis was premature; condition of the English in New 
York. The wounded men from the Lexington given every attention; 
the cutter which took the Lexington has been captured by an American 
armed ship. A. L. S. 3 p. VIII, 66. 

From Edrobal. 1778. January 27. 

Report of a proposition made by Lord Chatham for a suspension 
of arms in America during the winter; question of freedom of trade 
with various countries. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VIII, 67. 

From Comte d'Attems. 1778. January 27. Nantes. 

Asking that the bearer be given his gold watch; mortified to have in- 
convenienced Franklin thus. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VIII, 68. 

From James Hutton. 1778. January 27. London. 

His ardent desire for reconciliation between Great Britain and Amer- 
ica; believes anything short of absolute independence would be prac- 
ticable. A. L. I p. VIII, 69. 
Printed in Works (Sparks, VIII, 233). 

From Joseph Duhattoy. 1778. January 28. Ivry. 

Requests to enter the American army. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 35. 

From B. Maiguien. 1778. January 28. Paris. 

He asks permission for his brother, a surgeon, to enter the service of 
the United States. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) LXII, 77. 

From Courtney Melmoth. 1778. 28. Paris. 

Sends him a copy of his last work, with an impromptu poem, by his 
wife, addressed to Franklin on his presenting his portrait to a lady. 
A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 70. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 357 

From Ra[lph] Izard. 1778. January 28. Paris. 

Concerning the Article under consideration by the Commissioners as 
to whether an exemption from duty on molasses is an equivalent for a 
total exemption of all the exports of North America to the French West 
Indies; bitterly opposed to the execution of this article; his reasons for 
this; complains of not having been consulted earlier on this point. A. 
L. S. 4 p. VIII, 71. 

From Emmery pere et fils. 1778. January 29. Dunkirk. 

Pressure of business prevented them from informing Franklin of the 
arrival of Captain Berthelot from New York; enclosing an abstract in 
French of the Captain's report of that unhappy town. A. L. S. 2 p. 

Abstract of Captain Paul Berthelot's account of affairs in New York. 
2 p. (In French.) VIII, 72. 

From Courtney Melmoth. 1778. January 29. Paris. 

Has sustained the loss of a large fortune; no longer able to support 
his family with his pen ; disappointed in obtaining a secretar^'ship with 
the Commissioners; in immediate need of £60; desires Franklin either 
to put him in the way of earning this sum by writing, or advance it to 
him as a loan. A. L. S. 3 p. VIII, 73. 

From Davies Inglesina. 1778. January 29. Paris. 

Visiting Paris; desires to wait on the ingenious inventor of the 
" Divine Armonica." A. L. S. i p. VIII, 74. 

From Ra[lph] Izard. 1778. January 30. Paris. 

The extraordinary neglect with which he has been treated ; forced 
to complain to Franklin ; begs him again to reconsider the Article, which 
was the subject of his last letter, or at least to make the Treaty for a 
term of years only. A. L. S. 3 p. VIII, 75. 

From Arthur Lee. 1778. January 30. Chaillot. 

Stating his objections to the admissibility of the 12th Article con- 
cerning the duty upon molasses in the proposed commercial Treaty. A. 
L. S. 4 p. VIII, 76. 

Printed in R. H. Lee's Life of Arthur Lee, I, 126. 



358 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From James Moylan. 1778. Januar\' 30. L'Orient. 

Informed that the Government has ordered 2,000 seamen to be raised 
in Nantes and 2,500 in St. Malo, besides a number of bakers who are 
all to proceed at once to Brest; no fishing vessels bound for New Found- 
land are to be admitted into the seaports, A. L. S. i p. VIII, 77. 

From Davies Inglesina. 1778. Januar>^ 30. Paris. 

Regretting their inability to dine with Franklin owing to his sister's 
late illness, but hopes to have the honor of waiting on him. A. L. S. 
I p. VIII, 78. 

From Courtney Melmoth. 1778. January 30. Paris. 

Dr. Franklin and Mr. Deane indifferent to his labors. Mrs. Mel- 
moth ill of a fever. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 80. 

FroTti [Conrad Alexandre] Gerard [de Rayneval] to The American 
Commissioners. 1778. January 30. Versailles. 
Acknowledging their letter; will examine the translation. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) VIII, 81. 

From Quemizet. 1778. January 31. 

Desires to emigrate to America and obtain a position as a master- 
dyer; wishes to know if this plan is practicable. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) VIII, 79- 

From [Silas] Deane to The American Commissioners. 
1778. January. 

Concerning the opening of Mr. Lee's despatches by Mr. Carmichael 
and the latter's intention of taking the book, in which they were written, 
to America; Mr. Deane has written for a copy of them. They contain 
a libel on two of the best men in America. Mem. i p. VIII, 85a. 

From Millin de Labrosse. [^Circa 1778. January.] 

Urges Franklin and Deane to indemnify him for the losses he in- 
curred whilst serving in the United States as Lieutenant-Colonel and 
during his imprisonment in England. Offers his services again if re- 
imbursed for his losses. Mem. 4 p. (In French.) (In duplicate.) 

LXI, 142 and 143. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 359 

From W[illia]m Carmichael. 1778. February i. Nantes. 

Unexpected attack on his character made by Mr. Arthur Lee; gives 
a detailed account of his conduct since his residence with Mr. Deane; 
his means of support, etc. Informs Dr. Franklin of the death of Mr. 
Thomas Morris. Expects to sail in eight days. A. L. S. 5 p. 

VIII, 82. 

From [Edme Jacques] Genet. 1778. February i. Versailles. 

Introducing M. Bordot, one of the first victims of England's resent- 
ment ; his zeal for the American cause ; begs Franklin to make him their 
agent in the town of La Rochelle. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 83. 

Fro?n Arthur Lee. 1778. February i. Chaillot. 

Enclosing a note, sent by the Baron Schulenberg, with information 
of the price of arms in the King of Prussia's manufactory with per- 
mission to let the Commissioners have whatever they order. A. L. S. 
I p. 

Note of the prices of arms. I p. (In French.) VIII, 84. 

From [Conrad Alexandre] Gerard [de Rayneval] to Messrs. Frank- 
lin and Deane. 1778. February i. Versailles. 

Acknowledging Franklin's letter, in regard to Article 12 of the 
Treaty of Commerce; afraid it is too late to take notice of Franklin's 
request to have Articles 1 1 and 12 omitted. A. L. S. I p. (In French.) 

VIII, 85. 

From Tartivot. 1778. February i. Courcelles. 

Recommending two young men who propose to go to the United 
States. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) LX, 113. 

From Henry Johnson to The American Commissioners. 
1778, Februar}^ 2. Rotterdam. 

Escaped from Mill Prison, England, in company with Captain 
Eleazer Johnson. Shocking condition of prisoners at Mill Prison. A. 
L. S. I p. LIII, 61. 



360 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From The Navy Board of the Eastern Department to The American 
Commissioners. 1778. February 2. Boston. 

Bills of exchange for £100 have been drawn upon the Commissioners 
in favor of William Dennie, of Boston, in order to procure money for 
John Adams, about to embark to join the Commissioners. A. L. S. 
W[illiam] Vernon, Ja[me]s Warren. 2 p. LIII, 60. 

From Goudar. 1778. February 2. Aubenas. 

Hopes that he will accord him an answer to his former letter, and at 
the same time send him the portrait printed on paper of General Wash- 
ington. Desires to send him a box of truffles, an article celebrated in 
his Canton. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) V, 49. 

From Arthur Lee. 1778. February 2. Chaillot. 

Desiring the loan of two Boston papers and wishing to know if any- 
thing has been decided relative to supplying him with the necessary 
funds for his appointment in Germany. A. L. i p. VIII, 86. 

From S. Hartley. 1778. February 3. London. 

Desired by his friend, D[avid] H[artley], to forward the enclosed 
letter. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 87. 

From Santoux. 1778. February 3. Bordeaux. 

Asking for information concerning the use of tobacco ashes in drop- 
sical complaints. His method of treating venereal diseases. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) VIII, 88. 

From [Capt.] de Franval. 1778. February 3. Versailles. 

No answer to his or his brother's letter; begs Franklin to return his 
brother's note and the letter of Congress. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 89. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1778. February 3. Nantes. 

Left the Lion at St. Nazare ; has done with both French ships ; afraid 
the Brune will be left. Death of Mr. Morris in his absence. A. L. S. 
I p. XXXVII, 128. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 361 

— Fournier le jeune. 1778. February 3, Paris. 



The type is ready to be sent. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

VIII, 90. 

From Lucas Butot. 1778. February 3. Bodegraven. 

His zeal for the American cause ; encloses a memoir concerning a new 
process of making bullets. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VIII, 91. 

From Charles d[e] Hirschberg. 1778. February 3. Strasbourg. 

Sent some time ago a copy of Franklin's Interrogation which he had 
translated into French. A. L. S. I p. VIII, 92. 

From [A.] Rodolph Gruner to The American Commissioners. 
1778. February 4. Paris. 

Presenting them with a picture which he has composed, and begging 
permission to dedicate it to them. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 93. 

From Ra[lpli] Izard to The American Commissioners. 

1778. February 5. Paris. 

When Congress sent him a commission for the Court of Tuscany 
they did not inform him to whom he must apply for money ; desires to 
know if they can furnish him with a letter of credit. A. L. S. i p. 

VIII, 94. 

From de la Radiere. 1778. February 5. Orbec. 

Begging Franklin to forward the enclosed letter to his son, an officer 
[colonel] in the American army. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 95. 

From Comte de Sarsfield. 1778. February 7. Paris. 

Accepting an invitation to dine with Franklin provided he can be re- 
leased from a previous engagement. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

VIII, 96. 

From Comte de Turin. 1778. February 7. La Ferte-Bernard. 

Begs Franklin's advice and assistance, in procuring from America, 
various animals and birds, that they may be introduced into France. 
His desire to visit America; hopes that his only son will take up arms 
for that country. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VIII, 97. 



362 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Fro}7i DuMont. 1778. February 8. Paris. 

Published years before a Histor}^ of the English settlements in Amer- 
ica; the new interest attaching to this subject makes him desirous of 
remodelling his work and continuing it up to the present time; M. Du- 
bourg has assured him of Franklin's interest and his wish to see the 
History; encloses a copy. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VIII, 98. 

From G. Tackoen. 1778. February 9. Mechlin. 

Desires information as to some printer or postmaster in America to 
whom he can apply for a newspaper containing authentic accounts of 
actions in America. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 125. 

From The Continental Congress, Commercial Committee, to The 
American Commissioners. 1778. February 9. York, Pa. 

Announcing William Lee's appointment as Commissioner to the 
Court of Prussia and the removal of Thomas Morris from the Com- 
mercial Agency; directed by Congress to desire Franklin to appoint one 
or more suitable persons as Commercial Agents in France. L S. 
William Ellery, James Forbes, Fra[ncis] Lewis, i p. VIII, 99. 

The same in duplicate with resolution of Congress. 2 p. (Copy.) 

LXXV, 46. 

From Joseph Ceronio. 1778. February 9. Genoa. 

Asks for tidings of his son; last news of him was from St. Domingo. 
A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 100. 

From John Hancock. 1778. February 9. Boston. 

His ill health obliged him to leave Congress for a time. Recom- 
mending a young gentleman, Mr. Wm. Vernon, to his particular notice; 
he desires to enter some mercantile house. A. L. S. i p. VIII, lOi. 

Frojn Bar[nabas] Deane. 1778. February 10. Boston. 

Recommending to Franklin's protection a son of his brother, Silas 
Deane, who may be absent from Paris when the child arrives; desires 
that he may be placed in a good school. A. L. S. 1 p. VIII, 102. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 363 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones to The American Commissioners. 
1778. February lo. Paimboeuf. 

The affair of Quiberon in every broker's mouth. Were any conti- 
nental marine power in Europe disposed to avail themselves of the pres- 
ent situation of affairs in America, a single blow would finish every- 
thing; explains how the enemies' fleet could be surprised and crushed. 
L. S. 2 p. VIII, 103. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. February lo. The Hague. 

Extract from the despatch of M. Berkenro[o]de, Dutch Minister at 
Paris, concerning certain warlike preparations in France; extract from 
a German letter concerning the arrival of General Rewitzki from the 
Court of Vienna, a propos of the trouble with Bavaria. Possibility of 
a war between England and France. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XXXIX, 21. 

From Ferdinand Weisheim. 1778. February 10. Cologne. 
Offering his services. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) LX, 84. 

From Cambon and Massart. 

1778. February lo. Dunkirk. 

Have studied medicine under the best masters and have had experience 
in the army ; they wish to enter the American service as surgeons. A. L. 
S. 3 p. (In French.) LXII, 18. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1778. February ii. Nantes. 

Arrival of Captain Jenkins from Nantucket; reports that General 
Lee was exchanged for General Prescott; the army in high spirits and 
in want of nothing; the English driven within Kingsbridge by General 
Gates, who, it is thought, will attack New York before he joins General 
Washington. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 129. 

From de Hellfriedt. 1778. February 11. Marseilles. 

Desiring Franklin to appoint a time and place for an interview; will- 
ing to come all the way to Paris to lay before Franklin certain proposi- 



364 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

tions of very great consequence to North American commerce; drops 
certain hints of the intended proposals but dares not speak further in 
writing; the need of absolute secrecy. A. L. S. 3 p. VIII, 104. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1778. Februarj'^ 12. Paris. 

Asking why he failed to appear at dinner at the house of Mesdames, 
les princesses de Sapicha and de Sangusko; the ladies were inconsolable. 
Sending two memoirs from Mile. Basseporte and messages from Messrs. 
Reignier and Coder. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VIII, 105. 

From Le Goiieslier de Montcarel. 1778. February 12. Versailles. 

Begging Franklin to forward the enclosed letter from M. de la Ra- 
diere to his son in America. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VIII, 106. 

From Philip Jacq. Kaum. 1778. February 12. Strasbourg. 

Sending Franklin a letter from George Michel Bishoff in Sonnen- 
burg. A. L. S. I p. VIII, 107. 

Fro77i [Isaac] Van Teylingen. 1778. February 12. Rotterdam. 

Concerning the ship Chester, captured by an American privateer and 
taken to Charlestown; entreats Franklin to consider the circumstances 
and procure for the losers some indemnification. L. S. 4 p. (In 
French.) VIII, 109. 

From Arthur Lee to Franklin and Deane. 
1778. February 13. Chaillot. 

Acknowledging Messrs. Franklin and Deane's letter acquainting him 
with their purpose to send away the public despatches on Monday next ; 
desires to know if this is to be done without consultation upon them or 
upon the person (unknown to him), to whom they are to be confided. 
A. L. S. I p. VIII, no. 

From Sam[ue]l Cooper. 1778. February 13. Boston. 

Introducing the bearer, William Cooper, the son of his eldest brother. 
A. L. S. I p. VIII, III. 

From W[illiam] S[trahan]. 1778. February 13. 

Sends to Dr. Franklin and Mr. Deane a stilton cheese. A. L. S. i p. 

XLIV, 21. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 365 

From Gentzkow. 1778. February 15. Paris. 

An officer of the English army, forced to leave England for killing 
another officer, requests service in the American army. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) LXII, 47. 

From Arthur Lee to Franklin and Deane. 

1778. February 15. Chaillot. 

Complains of a want of consideration for him relative to the sending 
away of the public despatches; has not been consulted about this matter 
at all ; desires to know why he should be placed in the light of an in- 
capable or suspected person; his close attention to all public business; 
desires to wait on them with several proposals of importance concerning 
the public despatches. A. L. S. 3 p. VIII, 113. 

From Rawleigh Colston. 1778. February 15. Cape Frangois. 

Is the agent for the Commonwealth of Virginia in the island of Mar- 
tinique; has been denied the privilege of buying and selling in his own 
name and compelled to connect himself with a French merchant at the 
expense of half his commissions; applies to Franklin to have these restric- 
tions suspended in the case of American agents ; mentions another French 
law, the Droit d'Aubaine, which is sufficient to destroy the credit of any 
foreigners. A. L. S. 3 p. VIII, 114. 

From Col. Jacques Roberdeau. 1778. February 15. Haguenau. 

Begging Franklin to forward the enclosed letter to General Rober- 
deau whom he is persuaded is related to him. L. S. i p. VIII, 115. 

From Chevalier de Franval. 1778. February 16. Orbec. 

Surprised that Franklin has paid no attention to his or his brother's 
repeated requests ; trusts that only a pressure of affairs causes this neglect 
and begs that the desired papers may be returned. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) VIII, 116. 

From Prince Mostouski. 1778. February 16. Pres de Paris. 

Having read Franklin's interrogation and having examined the beauti- 
ful Constitutions, has entirely changed his sentiments; desires an inter- 
view with Franklin. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) VIII, 117. 



366 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Le Blanc. 1778. February 16. Paris. 

Complaining of unfair treatment by Mr, Deane. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) LXI, 63. 

From Sam[uel] Nicholson. 1778. February 18. Quiberon Bay. 

Account of a small difference between Captain Vorvisca and himself; 
confusion this created ; timely arrival of Mr. Williams to whom he 
refers Franklin for an unprejudiced account of the affair; convinced 
he has been ill-treated. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 118. 

Fro /« Baron de Geusau. 1778. February 18. Paris. 

Came from Vienna expressly to offer his services to America; is trav- 
elling strictly incognito. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VIII, 119. 

From Courtney Melmoth. 1778. February 19. Paris. 

Understands that the Abbe Condillac has just come to town; asks 
Franklin for the letter of recommendation to him which he left in 
Franklin's hands; a plan which is not yet fit for Franklin's observation. 
A. L. S. I p. VIII, 120. 

From W[illia]m Parsons. 1778. February 19. Dieppe. 

Has a wish to help America; his brother's position in the English 
army; his unexceptional family connections; his military services. A. L. 
S. 3 p. VIII, 121. 

From Delagrange. 1778. Februarj^ 19. St. Quentin. 

Unable to feed and clothe his wife and five children on his small 
salary; applies to Franklin for money. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 122. 

From Roger Wilbraham. 1778. February 19. Paris. 

Applies to Franklin for a remedy for dropsy, on behalf of a lady at 
Vienna. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 123. 

From John Risdel. 1778. February 19. St. Malo. 

Served on Captain Wickes's ship, the Reprisal, for a space of twenty 
months; has been in the hospital three months; is now well again but 
greatly in need of clothes and money; wages and prize money due him 
from the ship ; desires Franklin to send him a certain sum. A. L. S. 
I p. VIII, 124. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 367 

From D[avid] H[artley]. 1778 February 20. London. 

Concerning Lord North's plan of reconciliation ; admires the spirit 
of Franklin's sentiments to Lord Howe; urges the arrest of any fatal 
treaty with the House of Bourbon. Danger of reporting things said in 
public counsel. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 125. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VIII, 237). 

From Millin de Labrosse. 1778. February 20. Paris, 

Renews his request for a settlement of his claim for expenses incurred 
in America and England whilst in the service of the United States as a 
military officer. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) LXI, 141. 

From Michel Bonniot and Eymas Labate. 
1778. February 21. Bordeaux. 

Enclosing a letter just arrived on the ship Bordelais; cause of the de- 
lay; oiiEer their services to Franklin. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

VIII, 126. 

From La Goaner & Co. 1778. February 21. La Corunna. 

Enclosing the desired accounts. Concerning the seizure by the com- 
manding general of the Province, of certain funds proceeding from prizes 
taken by Captain Conyngham; also a letter of Arthur Lee's as Com- 
missioner, desiring them to retain at his disposal the half of the net 
profits of prizes, which belong, in his opinion, to Congress. L. S. 3 p. 

VIII, 127. 

From Arthur Lee. 1778. February 23. Chaillot. 

Mentioning the titles of the bills moved by Lord North ; his opinion 
that Mr. Hartley gave in too much to the King's and Lord North's 
temporizing policy. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 128. 

From Count of Kothkowski. 1778. February 24. London. 

Wrote to Franklin in an earlier letter of his being taken prisoner, 
deprived of everything and brought to Portsmouth whence he proceeded 
to London. Messrs. Vaughan and Towgood promise him help if Frank- 
lin will write them a letter on his behalf; desires to join the brave de- 
fenders of liberty. L. S. 4 p. VIII, 129. 



368 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From M[ichael] Hillegas. 1778. February 24. Yorktown. 

The bearer, the Baron de Holtzendorff, not having obtained the 
service he expected is returning to France. Acknowledging Franklin's 
favors of January 23d, 1777, per Mr. Lutterloh to whom he will show 
all the civilities in his power. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 130. 

From Arthur Lee. 1778. February 25. Chaillot. 

Desiring Franklin's presence, the next day, to superintend the ex- 
amination of the public papers of the late Thomas Morris ; desires to 
get away to Germany as soon as possible. L. in 3d P. I p. 

VIII, 131. 

From La Goaner & Co. 1778. February 25. La Coruna. 

Concerning the seizure of the funds by the Commander-General of 
the Province; enclosing a copy of all their accounts with Captain Con- 
yngham; news of the cargo of the Black Prince; feasibility of selling 
prizes in the above port. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) VIII, 132. 

From Arthur Lee to Franklin and Deane. 
1778. February 26. Chaillot. 

The return of their despatches by Mr. Simeon Deane is an event 
from which great public consequences may flow ; hurt at not being con- 
sulted in the matter; points out unpleasant results of this step; desires 
a consultation on the subject. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 133. 

From Arthur Lee. 1778. February 26. Chaillot. 

Making an appointment to meet Dr. Franklin and Mr. Deane the 
following day. A. L. in 3d P. I p. VIII, 134. 

From Boux. 1778. February 26. Nantes. 

Difficulties in the way of his taking passage at once; little difference 
he has had with Captain Nicholson; kindness of Mr. Williams who 
wrote Dr. Franklin the enclosed letter on his behalf. Desires a small ad- 
vance of the amount due him to pay his current expenses. A, L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VIII, 135. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 369 

From Duchesse de Melfort. 1778. February 26. Paris. 

Stating her claim to certain settlements in New Jersey and New York 
through her cousin, Lord Drummond, of Perth; desires an audience 
with Dr. Franklin. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VIII, 136. 

From Henricus Godet. 1778. February 26. Paris. 

Wishing to know Franklin's address in case he should have occasion 
to write him from Holland, and giving his own address there. A. L. 
S. I p. VIII, 137. 

From Keay. [1778.] February 27. Paris. 

Sends him a political pamphlet, by the author's desire. A. L. S. i p. 

XL, 198. 

From G. Becker. 1778. February 27. Bayonne. 

Desires to go to America and there pursue his commercial career. A. 
L. S. 4 p. VIII, 139. 

From Arthur Lee to Franklin and Deane. 

1778. February 28. Chaillot. 

The propriety of postponing his proposition. The necessity of send- 
ing the treaties in French; offers to copy them himself. Advises the 
immediate sailing of the convoy. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 140. 

From Carolus Gaudini. 1778. February — . Genoa. 

Discusses the present methods of investigation in medicine; encloses 
a printed statement composed by himself, of physiological problems de- 
duced from the teachings of Hippocrates. L. S. i p. (In Latin.) 

VIII, 138. 

From [Jean-Pierre] Berenger. 1778. March i. Lausanne. 

His plan for writing a history of the United States; Lord Clives 
offered him the materials, but the work was to be done under his direc- 
tion and he preferred to remain free; aid given him by M. Le Sage; 
asks Franklin's advice as to various books and maps to be consulted. 
Encloses letters concerning his exile. Sends his " History of Geneva " 
desires " Le Bonhomme Richard " in return. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 141. 
2 — 24 



370 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Fro7ti W[illiam] Lee. 1778. March 2. Chaillot. 

Willing to submit his judgment to Franklin's and deliver to him 
the trunk containing the late ]\Ir. Thomas Morris's papers; desires an 
important letter for America to reach Mr. Deane before he sails. A. 
L. S. I p. VIII, 142. 

From Fran[ci]s Coffyn to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 2. Dunkirk. 

Announcing the arrival, at Dunkirk, of Captain Henry Johnson, late 
commander of the Lexington, and Eliazad \_sic'\ Johnson, captain of the 
Dalton ; both made their escape from Plymouth prison ; desires Franklin's 
orders relative to Captain Henry Johnson. Total loss of the cargo of 
the brigantine, I'Hirondelle. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 143. 

From Whitechurch. 1778. March 2. Paris. 

Reminding Franklin of the letters of recommendation he brought him 
last October from Messrs. Raspe and Dalrymple; reasons for his long 
absence. Will return to Paris later, and wishes to consult Franklin 
before proceeding to America. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 144. 

From [James] Hutton. 1778. March 2. 

Acknowledging letters of February ist and 12th. Franklin's advice 
such that little use can be made of it; as a peace-wisher, not being tall 
enough to be a peace-maker, he cannot propose the points Franklin 
hinted at. Always grieved at the treatment Franklin met with in 
England. Hopes the past may be forgotten and that both sides may 
embrace cordially. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 145. 

By J. D. R. de Raudiere. 1778. March 3. Tournay. 

The "Ameriquiade." On the war between England and the Amer- 
ican Colonies. Predicting its disastrous results for England. Dedicated 
to Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane and Arthur Lee, American Com- 
missioners in France. Poem. 31 p. (In French.) LI, 58. 

From D[avid] H[artley]. 1778. March 3. London. 

Lord North's conciliatory bill; Lord George Germain's hearty con- 
currence with it and strong desire for peace. A. L. S. I p. VIII, 146. 
Printed in Works (Sparks, VIII, 245). 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 371 

From S[ainuel] Wharton. 1778. March 3. London. 

Sends by Captain All, the Parliamentary Register, the Remonstrance, 
newspapers, etc. ; the captain a sincere well-wisher to America. A, L. S. 
I p. VIII, 147. 

From P[atrick] Henry. 1778. March 3. Williamsburg. 

Captain Lemaire has agreed to procure, for Virginia, such articles 
as are absolutely necessary for her defense ; he carries an invoice to 
William Lee ; question of paying for the articles with tobacco ; begs 
Franklin to render aid in this matter. Chesapeake Bay guarded by 
English ships; no hope of facing Britain on the water unless assisted by 
France. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 148. 

From Arthur Lee. 1778. March 3. Chaillot. 

Postponing the meeting till the following day at Passy; begs for the 
Committee's letters. L. in 3d P. VIII, 149. 

Frofn Jona[than] Williams, Jr. 1778. March 3. Nantes. 

Question of the 50,000 livres being paid. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XXXVII, 130. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1778. March 3. Nantes. 

Rejoiced at M. Chaumont's success. If the 50,000 livres are paid in 
America, asks how he is to be reimbursed for his expenses and commis- 
sions. Reasons why he does not wish to take his powers from Mr. Lee; 
Mr. Morris's failure to keep his part of the agreement made between 
them; refers Franklin to the enclosed extracts [4 p.] for his entire con- 
nection with the Lion. His brother Jack to sail in a day or two. A. L. 
S. 6 p. XXXVII, 131. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 3. Nantes. 

Duchesse de Grammont still at St. Nazare ; question of a new convoy. 
Arrival of Captain Chapman, from Boston, in the brig Nantes; no 
further news from America. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 132. 



372 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 3. Nantes. 

Affair of the prizes. Concerning the acceptance of the bill for 50,000 
livres; disposition of the effects of Mr. Josiah Crosby, who died of 
smallpox. A. L. S. 4 P- XXXVII, 133. 

From W[illia]m Bingham. 1778. March 5. St. Pierre. 

Unhappy at having his letters neglected ; his reasons for desiring to be 
informed of anything of importance; protection the Americans meet with 
in the ports of Martinique; their prizes sold openly. No attention paid 
to the violent clamor of the English governors; daring behavior of an 
English frigate in capturing an American privateer under the very guns 
of a French fort. A. L. S. 4 p. VIII, 150. 

From Richard Peters. 1778. March 5. York, Pennsylvania. 

Honored with several letters by the hands of foreign gentlemen, de- 
sirous of serving the cause; impossible, owing to their ignorance of the 
language, to find places for them. Very anxious to obtain some news of 
his father whom he fears is prevented from communicating with him. 
A. L. S. I p. VIII, 151. 

From Ra[lph] Izard to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 5. Paris. 

Intends setting out as soon as his gout and the weather permit, for 
the Court of Tuscany to which Congress has appointed him ; desires to 
be informed of any proceedings entered into with the Court of France, 
also wishes copies of any treaties concluded with that Court. A. L. S. 
I p. VIII, 152. 

From Sam[uel] Vaughan. 1778. March 5. London. 

Introducing his son John who is about to become an inmate in the 
house of Messrs. Barton & Co., at Bordeaux; requesting Franklin to 
give him any necessary advice. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 153. 

From Benjamin Vaughan. 1778. March 5. 

Great variety of opinions concerning America. Description of a de- 
bate in Parliament concerning a peace in America; opinions of the Dukes 
of Grafton and Richmond and Lords Weymouth, Radnor, Hillsbor- 
ough, Suffolk and Temple. A. L. S. 8 p. VIII, 154. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VIII, 246). 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 373 

From W[illiam] Lee. 1778. March 6. Chaillot. 

Sending the keys of the trunk containing Mr. Thomas Morris's 
papers; desires an answer that night to his letters to the Commissioners 
relative to the commercial agents. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 155. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 6. The Hague. 

Enclosing extracts from ministerial despatches ; trouble caused by 
the arrival at Lisbon of the English vessel the Hero, suspected of 
being a privateer. Possible rupture between France and England. 
Conversation held with the Grand Pensionnaire of Amsterdam show- 
ing the attitude of Holland towards America. Lawsuit in Amster- 
dam owing to the purchase of sugar from American vessels by the 
French who loaded it on Dutch vessels. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

XXXIX, 22. 

From I. Rocquette, A. Elserier and P. Rocquette to The American 
Commissioners. 1778. March 6. Rotterdam. 

Two vessels are ready to depart, one to Curasao and the other to 
St. Eustatia; will take charge of any letters they may have to those 
places. Prices of tobacco and rice ; glad to receive consignments of 
these articles. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 156. 

From John Ross. 1778. March 7. Nantes. 

The abuse of power by Mr. William Lee as Commercial Agent, in 
seizing, privately searching and carrying off the books, papers, etc., of 
Messrs. Willing, Morris & Co. and the private correspondence of Robert 
Morris with his deceased brother; considers it an arbitrary insult 
to the laws of their country; in need of Franklin's advice and opinion 
as to his future conduct in this matter. L. S. 3 p. VIII, 157. 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 7. Nantes. 

The Duchesse de Grammont still waiting their permission to proceed 
to sea. Attempt made to procure a ship to carry the remaining goods. 
A. L. S. 3 p. XXXVII, 134. 



374 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From G. Ganseford. 1778. March 7. Bordeaux. 

Desires to ship a cargo of tobacco but the custom's officer in Bordeaux 
refuses to give him the necessary clearance papers; begs Franklin to 
speak to M. Necker in order that the edict of the King of 1721 
may be enforced. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VIII, 158. 

From Comte Dalet. 1778. March 7. Venice. 

Asks for a commission in the army. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

LXII, I. 

From Mme. d'Hardancourt Brillon. [1778.] March 7. Passy. 

A jesting pretense of being his spiritual adviser; absolves him of all 
sins past and present provided he loves God, America and herself; 
acquits him of all the seven cardinal sins, except a weakness for women. 
A. L. S. (In French.) 2 p. XLIII, 19. 

Printed in Putnam's Monthly, Dec, 1906, 310. 

From Lucas Butot. 1778. March 8. Amsterdam. 

Is absolutely convinced of the effect of the bullets; desires only two 
hundred guineas for his secret. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 159. 

From Chevalier de la Pleigniere. 1778. March 8. Caen. 

Sends with this letter a package of his printed papers; trusts the 
papers may be useful to Franklin's young compatriots. A, L. S. i p. 
(In French.) VIII, 160. 

From Becker. 1778. March 10. Madrid. 

Writes on behalf of his brother, who desires to pursue his com- 
mercial career in America [see VIII, 139]. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 161. 

From W[illiam] Lee. 1778. March 11. Chaillot. 

Complains of the delay in placing before the Commissioners his propo- 
sition about appointing agents in the ports. An account of his journey 
to Nantes to take possession of Mr. Thomas Morris's papers and the 
unjustifiable behaviour of Mr. Ross in that matter; resents the letter 
[see VIII, 157] Mr. Ross wrote to the Commissioners concerning him, 
and their attitude in approving it. A. L. S. 3 p. VIII, 162. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 375 

From Jno. Emery. 1778. March 11. Bilbao. 

The case of Captain James Babson ; his prizes were restored by the 
French; injustice of this; will compensation be made Captain Babson 
for his loss? A. L. S. i p. VIII, 163. 

From Peter Le Poole. 1778. March 12. Amsterdam. 

Sends a copy of two commissions delivered to him by the respective 
Governors of Virginia and North Carolina, as their agent for re- 
ceiving and selling. Begs to be allowed to forward his letters under 
Franklin's care to friends in America. Desires news of two brigantines, 
in which he has an interest. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 164. 

From de Gruff y. 1778. March 12. Paris. 

His proposed visit to America. Takes advantage of the Comte de 
Conway's recommendation to offer his services to Franklin. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) VIII, 165. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.]. 1778. March 12. Nantes. 

Sending two of Franklin's banker's books, which he found among 
his papers. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 135. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 13. The Hague. 

Extracts from ministerial despatches concerning European affairs; 
trouble between Austria and Bavaria; war-like preparations; rumored 
war between Turkey and Russia. Desires to know what he must 
say if questioned concerning Mr. J. P. Merkle and his enterprise. 
Acknowledging Mr. Wm. Lee's favor of the 8th inst. ; will publish 
his good new^s in the Gazette. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

XXXIX, 23. 

From Rod[olp]li Valltravers. 1778. March 13. Bienne. 

Has received no intimation that his six previous letters to Franklin 
arrived safely. Warns him against the five bribed and bribing emis- 
saries sent by England to make a show of transacting peace; results 
to be expected should America reject proposals of reconciliation. 
Sketches the indemnification England ought to grant. Laughs at the 
dreaded alliance between France and America; no ally in need of 
protection was ever benefitted by France. A. L. S. 4 p. VIII, 166. 



37^ Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Fro?n Harmon Courter. 1778. March 13. Coruna. 

Account of his journey to Coruna and the difficulties of weather, 
roads, etc. Curiosity of the people as to his business. Will embark 
that evening in disguise. News of Captain Conyngham, A. L. S. 

2 p. VIII, 167. 

Frotn Sam[ue]l Martin. 1778. March 14. Whitehaven. 

Hopes to shake off the gout soon and pay Franklin a visit; refers 
him to the bearer, Mr. Nathaniel Dowse, for all particulars. A. L. S. 
I p. VIII, 168. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr, 1778. March 14. Nantes. 

Recommending M. de Fontevieux; his wish to embark on the Duchesse 
de Grammont. News of Mr. Deane's recall; slanders which may arise 
from this circumstance. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 136. 

From J[onatlian] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 14. Nantes. 

Informed by Mr. Grand that his bills still remain unapproved; 
fears such delay may hurt the credit of his paper. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 137. 

From ^gidius Du Jardin. 1778. March 14. Gand. 

Begs for information concerning the principal houses dealing in 
tobacco, rice, sugar, etc., the sort of merchandise it is expedient to 
send to America, the safest route for his ships to take, and the differ- 
ence of money, etc. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VIII, 169. 

From Chevalier O'Gorman. 1778. March 14. Tonnerre. 

Has sent the wine Franklin ordered ; the bottle of white wine is a 
small mark of his attachment ; encloses the accounts for the other 
bottles. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VIII, 170. 

From Courtney Melmoth. 1778. March 15. Paris. 

Introducing M. Monie, a painter of portraits, to Franklin's notice. 
A. L. S. I p. VIII, 171. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 377 

From Henricus Godet. 1778. March 16. Amsterdam, 

His desire, and that of other merchants, to see Franklin in Hol- 
land; would take that opportunity to introduce him to the principal 
leaders at Court; thinks it would tend to the mutual service and public 
good. A. L. S. I p. VIII, 172. 

From Courtney Melmoth. 1778. March. 16. Paris. 
Card of introduction. N. S. i p. LXXI, 7a. 

From Mme. d'Hardancourt Brillon. [1778. March] 16. Passy. 

Declines to engage in a discussion with Franklin on the Ten Com- 
mandments. Points out the reserve and discretion in conduct which 
women are obliged to observe and the liberty allowed to men in their 
relations with the opposite sex. 

Postscript about a collection of Scotch airs received from Mr. Alex- 
ander. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XLIII, 20. 

Printed in Putnam's Monthly, Dec, 1906, 311. 

From Courtney Melmoth. 1778. March 16. [Paris.] 

Introducing a gentleman who wishes to see Franklin about a dis- 
covery relating to powder and saltpetre. A. N. S. i p. LXXI, 7b. 

From Eliz[abeth] Clough. 1778. March 17. London. 
Enclosed letter for her only son in America. A. L. S. i p. 

VIII, 173. 

From Jno. Walke to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 17. Bordeaux. 

Announcing the conclusion of the dispute between Mr. Bond and 
himself; verdict of the court gives him leave to depart from Bordeaux 
with his vessel; each party to pay their own costs; advisability of 
carrying on the suit. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 174. 

Fro7n The Governor of Georgia. 1778. March 17. Savannah. 

The son of a Georgian, Mr. O'Brien, who was sent to school at 
Smith's Academy near London, the report prevails that he has been 
trepanned on board a British man-of-war in the Thames and de- 
tained as a prisoner; begs Franklin to inquire into this matter and if 
it is true, effect exchange of prisoners. A. L. S. John Houstoun. 2 p. 

VIII, 175. 



378 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Edward Bridgen. 1778. March 18. 

Introducing M. Garnier, Secretary to the French Embassy, who 
desires the honor of being known to the greatest man living. A. L. S. 

1 p. VIII, 176. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1778. March 18. Nantes. 

Recommending Captain Dunn and Mr. Curtis, lately arrived from 
Georgia. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 138. 

Frorn Courtney Melmoth. [1778.] March 19. Paris. 

Sending the promised pamphlet on American affairs. A. L. S. 

XL, 106. 

From [Antoine Court de] Gebelin. 1778. March 19. Paris. 

Enclosing a letter from Mr. Hutton. Disappointed at not meeting 
him at the house of the Marquis of Mirabeau. Will send him the 5th 
volume of the " Monde Primitif " for which he subscribed. A. L. S. 

2 p. (In French.) VIII, 179. 

From W[illiam] Lee to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 19. Chaillot. 

Asking for a copy of the treaties they have entered into with the 
Court of France, that he may not propose anything inconsistent there- 
with to the Courts of Vienna and Berlin. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 180. 

From Jonathan Poop. 1778. March 19. Paris. 

With reference to a fatal quarrel between a civilian and some officers 
and to a court trial resulting therefrom. L. S. 4 p. (In French and 
English.) LXXI, 126. 

From [C. G. F. Dumas] to The American Commissioners. 

1778. March 20. The Hague. 

Congratulating them on the union of America and France; the re- 
ception of the news and the rumors afloat. Quotes his own letter to 
the Grand Factor. Offer of protection for himself just received. A. 
L. 3 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 24. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 379 

From Roches de Condormes. 
1778. March 20. St. Nicolas-de-la-Grave. 

Concerning a work of his, which sets forth an admirable method 
of learning the French language. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 181. 

From Montaudouin. 1778. March 21. Nantes. 

Delighted at the commercial treaty between America and France. Has 
a medallion of Franklin in terra cotta, very well executed ; quotes the latin 
motto to be inscribed thereon. Sends messages to various friends. Ex- 
presses, for Franklin, the greatest admiration and alifection. A commercial 
proposition of one of his friends, which he desires Franklin to com- 
municate to Mr. William Lee. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 182. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 21. Nantes. 

Matters concerning the Duchesse de Grammont. The Dolphin's 
seizure and the sentence of the Admiralty on it; encloses Tonnay's 
account. 3 p. (In French.) XXXVII, 139. 

From I. MacMahon. 1778. March 22. At the Military School. 

Congratulating him on the results of the negotiations with France; 
thinks America's independence is assured — when will poor Ireland's 
turn come? Concerning a fine poem inscribed to Franklin by a lawyer 
of Avignon. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 183. 

Fro /« J. D. R. de Raudiere. 1778. March 22. Tournay. 

Has written Franklin a poem entitled " The Ameriquiade " which 
he sends with other papers; promises never to offend in this manner 
again. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) VIII, 184. 

From [J. D. R. de Raudiere] to The American Commissioners. 

[1778. March 22. Tournay.] 

Addressing his poem " The Ameriquiade " to Franklin, Deane and 
Lee. Hope they will do something to alleviate his distress. Verses. 
I p. (In French.) LI, 60. 



380 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From William Lee. 1778. March 23. Chaillot. 

Will wait on Franklin the next da}^ to take leave of him and hopes 
the copy of the treaties will be ready for him. A. L. in 3d P. i p. 

VIII, 185. 

Fro?n Samuel Wharton. 1778. March 23. London. 

Several of his friends disposed to lend money to the United States; 
desired by one of them to find out the manner in which the loans arc 
made and the amount of interest. L. i p. VIII, 186. 

Fro?n Fran[ci]s Coffyn. 1778. March 23. Dunkirk. 

Congratulating him on the glorious conclusion of the treaty with 
France. His devotion to the cause of America. All the English ships 
in the harbor have been stopped by order of the Court; the captains of 
the French vessels fearing a retaliation, dare not proceed to sea. 
Recommends Captain Chandler as an able pilot. A. L. S. 3 p. 

VIII, 187. 

From Pere [Joseph Etienne] Bertier. 1778. March 23. I'Oratoire. 

Expressing the greatest interest on the part of himself and his con- 
freres in Franklin's success; trusts that the affair which Franklin has 
charge of will come to a successful issue. L. in 3d P. i p. (In 
French.) VIII, 188. 

From F. Dilkes Hore. 1778. March 24. St. Omer. 

A declaration of war on the part of Great Britain makes it neces- 
sary for him to apply to Franklin for permission to remain at St. Omer 
with his family; has endeavored for many months to get to Boston 
but without success; has offered his services, through General Gates, 
to the Congress. Has written Franklin many letters under a disguised 
name ; Colonel Mercer will inform Franklin who he is. A. L. S. 2 p. 

VIII, 189. 

From John Adams. 1778. March 24. Brest. 

His advice to Captain Landais was to apply to the Intendant of 
Marine for such materials and workmen as were needed to repair the 
ship; disposition to be made of the prisoners. Applies to Franklin for 
clothes on behalf of the midshipmen and other petty officers. A. L. S. 

2 p. VIII, 190. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 381 

From [C. G. F.] D[uinas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 24. The Hague. 

Rumors of war between England and France. Foreign news; war 
decided upon between Turkey and Russia. Amusing dialogue between 
the French Ambassador, M. de Berenger, and Sir Joseph Yorke. Is 
no longer laughed at for his chimerical views, but is spied upon worse 
than ever. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 25. 

From P. Nicephore. 1778. March 24. Gien. 

Is a Capuchin monk, therefore cannot aid the Americans in the ca- 
pacity of a soldier but is extremely anxious to go over as chaplain to 
the regiment in which two of his brothers serve; with some difficulty 
has obtained permission from his Superior; begs Franklin to intercede 
with M. de Sartine in his behalf. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

VIII, 191. 

From de Gruffy. 1778. March 24. Paris. 

As he has decided to live in America, begs Franklin's permission to 
call on him as a compatriot; has a letter for him from the Comtesse de 
Conway. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VIII, 192. 

Frow Mme. Brillon. [1778. March] ? 25th. Passy. 

Cannot give Franklin a list of his sins, as it would be too long; they 
all spring from one source, however. Cannot approve or tolerate the 
dangerous principle, which Franklin seems to have adopted, that love 
and friendship can be divided up ad infinitum and distributed amongst 
any number of persons. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XLIII, 97. 

From Du Mont. 1778. March 25. Paris. 

Reminding Franklin of his promise to aid him in his design of con- 
tinuing his History of the English Colonies in America. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VIII, 194. 

From [Edme Jacques] Genet. 1778. March 25. 

Concerning the manufacture and purchase of various cannon. Propo- 
sition of M. Hannet to establish an iron foundry in America. L. I p. 
(In French.) VIII, 194a. 



382 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Hennet. 1778. March 25. Paris. 

Very anxious to know when he may pay his respects to Franklin and 
talk with him on certain matters of importance. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) VIII, 195. 

From Gastellier. 1778. March 26. Montargis. 

Overjoyed at Franklin's triumph over his enemies; congratulates him 
on the intrepidity with which he has upheld the cause of liberty. A. L. 
S. I p. (In French.) VIII, 196. 

From Joh. Ph. Merckle to Messrs. Franklin and Deane. 
1778. March 26. Amsterdam. 

Forms with his friends a considerable expedition, which is almost 
ready to sail. The person from whom he purchased arms, conformable 
to the Commissioners' list, insists upon his taking them on board; im- 
possible to place such an article in the cargo; begs them to interfere. 
A. L. S. I p. 

A. E. dated April 13, by Franklin. The Commissioners have done 
everything incumbent on them relative to Mr. Merckle's affairs, and 
do not incline to have any further concern with them. VIII, 197. 

From de Laval. 1778. March 26. Paris. 

Desires to ask Franklin's advice on certain matters. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VIII, 198. 

From Montecot. 1778. March 26. Paris. 

M. Baillot has invented a new metal of a whitish gray color suitable 
for coins of small denomination. Offers to disclose his secret and to 
send a sample of the metal made by him. Mem. 2 p. (In French.) 

LIII, 62 ^a. 

From Derglanieres. 1778. March 27. Chaillot. 

Sending Franklin an article on the love of liberty, and proposing a 
system of revenue for the United States instead of the ruinous and un- 
just taxation in force in most countries. L. and Diss. S. 11 p. (In 
French.) LVII, 65. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 383 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 27. The Hague. 

Arrival of their good friend, the Factor. Awaits only an important 
letter from them before setting out for Amsterdam ; explains the several 
preliminary steps before the proper moment arrives for Franklin to ap- 
pear on the scene; impossible to push affairs further without important 
instructions from them. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 26. 

From Due de la Rochefoucauld. 1778. March 27. Brest. 

At last America and France are declared friends, and Franklin, 
Minister Plenipotentiary. Anxious to know if Mr. Deane is really re- 
turning to America; desires to see him before he sails. Expects to dine 
with Captain Jones in a day or two on board one of the French frigates. 
Begs for news. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VIII, 199. 

From Arthur Lee. 1778. March 27. Chaillot. 

Decided that, owing to his connection with the Spanish Court, he 
could not venture as far as Germany; his brother has therefore set out. 
Concerning the business of the loan bills. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 199^. 

i^ro?/z John Johnstone. 1778. March 27. St. Malo. 

Narrating a series of misfortunes befallen him since he sailed from 
Dartmouth on the 27th of June. Is now at St. Malo, in France; begs 
Franklin to obtain his freedom that he may return to his native 
country. A. L, S, i p. VIII, 200. 

From Recules de Basmarin et Raimbaux. 
1778. March 28. Bordeaux. 

The close bonds between France and America. The admiration due 
to Franklin's talents and the homage due his character. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) VIII, 201. 

From [Capt.] Emanuel Pierre De la Plaigne. 
1778. March 28. Bordeaux. 

Difficulties and discussions he has had with Messrs. Bayard k Co. 
on the score of passengers; fears that they will not keep to their agree- 
ment. Expects to leave for I'lsle de Re the following Monday. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) VIII, 202. 



384 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From John Ross. 1778. March 28. Nantes. 

Introducing Mr. John B. Paschen, a native of Hamburg, who desires 
the honor of meeting the first Ambassador of the United States of Amer- 
ica; assistance he has received from Mr. Paschen in his claim against the 
city of Hamburg. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 203. 

From Du Mont. 1778. March 28. Paris. 

Thanking Franklin for the information he has given him ; if he con- 
tinues his " History of the English Colonies," will make use of it. A. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) VIII, 177. 

From Ra[lph] Izard. 1778. March 29. Paris. 

Concerning the desirability of granting, to a certain man, a passport 
to Italy. Disappointed at receiving no explanation on certain points 
mentioned in his letter of January 30th, wherein he thought himself 
injured. Desires to know if he is to expect any answer from the Com- 
missioners to his letter of the 5th inst. A. L. S. 2 p. VIII, 204. 

From Wyss. 1778. March 29. Longwy. 

Request to enter the American army. A. L. S. 7 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 126 and 127. 

From de la Genetiere. 1778. March 29. Paris. 

A long account of misfortunes. To Franklin alone could he con- 
fide his sorrow without shame, and beg for assistance. A. L. S. 4 p. 
(In French.) VIII, 205. 

Fro7n John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 30. Bordeaux. 

Acknowledging his appointment as commercial agent for the Secret 
Committee of Congress at the ports of Bayonne, Bordeaux, Rochefort 
and La Rochelle; will observe all orders implicitly. A. L. S. i p. 

VIII, 206. 

From James Moylan. 1778. March 30. L'Orient. 

Capture by the frigate Oiseau of a privateer brig of sixteen guns be- 
longing to London. Arrival of the ship Harmony Hall, loaded with 
tobacco, rice, slaves, etc., from Newbern, North Carolina. A. L. S. 
I p. VIII, 207. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 385 

From Lambert. 1778. March 30. Paris. 

Hopes Franklin will find in the enclosed letter enough to justify his 
troubling him. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) VIII, 208. 

From Lambert. 1778. March 30. 

Copy of a letter sent to M. Sabbathier, Secretary of the Academy 
of Chalons, on the suppression of mendicancy together with his answer. 
L. 4 p. (In French.) VIII, 208a. 

From Abbe de Rochemure. 1778. March 30. Paris. 

Begs for the honor of a moment's audience. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) VIII, 209. 

From Goudar. 1778. March 30. Aubenas. 

Begs Franklin to procure him an engraving of General Washington. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) VIII, 210. 

From Ra[lph] Izard. 1778. March 31. Paris. 
Considers that he has acted justifiably. A. L. S. i p. VIII, 211. 

From Jno. Williams. 1778. March 31. Nantes. 

His nephew (Jonathan's) departure for Bordeaux. Sends the public 
papers. Gives extract from a letter (i p.) concerning the probable des- 
tination of the English fleet, which left New York on October 19th. 
A. L. S. I p. XXXVII, 171. 

From Arthur Lee to Messrs. Franklin and Deane. 
1778. March 31. Chaillot. 

The report of Mr. Deane's intending departure from Paris obliges 
him to repeat the request that the public accounts should be settled; 
reasons for this demand. L. S. i p. VIII, 212. 

From Chevalier O'Gorman. 1778. March 31. Tonnerre. 

Concerning the wines he sent Franklin; reason for their dearness; 
desires the account settled as soon as possible. A. L. S. 2 p. 

VIII, 214. 

2—25 



386 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1778. March 31. Nantes, 

Cargo of the Duchesse de Grammont; certain claims made by one 
of the workmen; attitude of their chief, M. Mercier. [Dr. of answer 
on back of L. in handwriting of Arthur Lee.] A. L. S, 3 p. 

XXXVII, 141. 

From W[illia]m Hodge. 1778. March 31. Cadiz. 

Account of his cruize since leaving Bilboa; number of prizes cap- 
tured; chased by two English frigates; final arrival at Cadiz; desires 
advice and orders. A. L. S. 3 p. VIII, 215. 

From Courtney Melmoth. [1778. March.] Sunday. Paris. 

Reason why the salt-petre man failed to keep his engagement. Ques- 
tion of his obtaining the promised small appointment from Mr. Deane 
or Dr. Franklin. A. L S. 2 p. XL, 108. 

From Chevalier de Bazantin. [1778. Circa March.] 

Went to America in 1777 with a troop of Chasseurs; captured by 
the English and imprisoned at St. Augustine in Florida; cruel treat- 
ment; request for his release or exchange. L. in 3d P. i p. (In 
French.) XLI, 98. 

By . 1778. March. 

Ode to King Louis XVI entitled " The Awakening of France." 
Poem. 7 p. (In French.) LI, 9. 

From Patience [Wright] Lovell. [1778.] March. 

Relations between England and America. Political information. 
A. L. S. 3 p. XLII, 46. 

From Sam[ue]l Tucker to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April I. Bordeaux. 

His arrival after a fatiguing passage of forty-two days; sends by Cap- 
tain Richard Palmer a copy of his instructions and signals; desires to 
know his further destination; busy getting the ship in readiness for sea; 
captured the ship Marthy from London bound for New York; has 
only one lieutenant at present; desires advice as to appointing others. 
A. L. S. 2 p. IX, I. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 387 

Fro ?« Marquise de Chasseneuil. 1778. April i. Saint Foy-la-Grande. 

Reminds Franklin of a half promise to give her the address of a 
compatriot in America to whom she could send her wines to sell on 
commission. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) IX, 2. 

From G. Vincent, fils. 1778. April i. St. Malo. 

Enclosing a letter from one John Johnstone said to be an American 
but has the misfortune to make one of the crew on board an English 
cutter, detained for twelve weeks in the harbor; begs to be informed if 
he is really an American. A. L. S. i p. IX, 3. 

From Arthur Lee. 1778. April 2. Chaillot. 

Expressing great anger and indignation at being kept in ignorance 
of M. Gerard's mission to America and also of Mr. Deane's departure. 
L. S. 4 p. IX, 4. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VIII, 257, Note). 

From Delaire. 1778. April 2. La Rochelle. 

His joy at the alliance between the United Provinces and France; 
his knowledge of the theory of commerce; his familiarity with lan- 
guages; desires to form an establishment at La Rochelle for the in- 
struction of young men in the knowledge of commerce ; wishes Franklin to 
become the patron of the establishment and to recommend it. A. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) IX, 5. 

From Polier de Corcelles. 1778. April 2. Lausanne. 

Plan of several Swiss gentlemen to raise a regiment of 1,500 infantry 
to serve in America. Suggests their being raised in the name of France, 
the States' new ally ; secrecy to be observed ; puts himself in Frank- 
lin's hands on condition that he is assured a suitable rank in the forth- 
coming levy. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) IX, 6. 

From Arthur Lee. 1778. April 3. Chaillot. 

Information received from M. Grand that Mr. Williams continues 
drawing on the public funds, though he has received no orders to answer 
his drafts; has not been consulted in this matter, but considers it an 
irregularity. A. L. S. 3 p. IX, 7. 



388 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

FroTti [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 3. The Hague. 

Extracts from foreign letters; war with Austria inevitable; France 
endeavoring indirectly to keep peace between Russia and the Porte. 
Rumored withdrawal of Lord Stormont from the French Court. 
General opinion in Rotterdam that England will be forced to recog- 
nize the independence of the Colonies. Desirability of a commercial 
treaty between Holland and America. Recent agitation in Holland 
over the augmenting of their land forces; attitude of M. de Berken- 
ro[o]de, Dutch Minister to France. Conversation held with M. Van 
Berkel; assurances of Holland's perfect neutrality; urges the wisdom of 
profiting by the friendship and commerce of the United States. Advises 
their writing an official letter to the Grand Pensionnaire announcing the 
treaty of the United States with France and stating America's friendly 
attitude towards Holland. A. L. S. 5 p. (In French.) 

XXXIX, 27. 

From Matt [he] w Ridley to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 3. 

Introducing Mr. Ebenezer Piatt, whose sufferings in the cause of 
America are known to Franklin ; lately released from prison and mar- 
ried to a daughter of Mrs. Wright; their only mode of returning to 
America is through France. A. L. S. i p. IX, 8. 

From [Gov.] Th[omas] Johnson. 1778. April 3. Annapolis. 

Notifying him of the appointment of Joshua Johnson as agent for 
Maryland in soliciting military stores. L, S. I p. LXI, 24. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 4. Bordeaux. 

Arrival at Bordeaux of John Adams, Esq., who sets off at once for 
Paris. News of various vessels. Desirability of France announcing a 
fixed time when a convoy will attend the ships destined for North Amer- 
ica. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 9. 

From Ra[lph] Izard. 1778. April 4. Paris. 

Compelled again to request the explanation so often promised him; 
also the reasons in writing why the alterations in the treaty of com- 
merce were not to be communicated to him. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 10. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 389 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 4. The Ranger, Cameret. 

Is now perfectly ready to proceed with the Fortunee of thirty-eight 
guns and the tender sent by Comte d'OrvilHers ; deeply concerned at 
the time lost; will make the better use of that to come. Concerning 
the large frigate built for America at Amsterdam ; hopes to find her 
ready on his return. Saluted the French flag at Brest with thirteen 
guns and received in return two guns less; possible reasons for this. A. 
L. S. 3 p. IX, II. 

From Comte de Sarsfield. 1778. April 4. 

Reminds him of his promise to bring Mr. Adams to dine at his house 
and requests Franklin to return him the Spanish grammar and Gibbons's 
History of Rome. A. N. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) LXXI, 58b. 

From De Lattre Dalkerque. 1778. April 4, Dunkirk. 

Acknowledging his letter of the 8th of February, enclosing two letters 
of recommendation for the captain of his frigate, la Comtesse de 
Brionne; she sailed for America on the 2d inst., well armed and richly 
loaded. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 12. 

From Miiller de la Piolotte. 1778. April 4. Lure. 

Has charge of glass works at Champagney ; his experience and knowl- 
edge of the manufacture of glass; desires to establish glass-works in 
America; lays this project in detail before Franklin and asks his ad- 
vice; his reasons for wishing to take this step. A. L. S. 4 p. (In 
French.) IX, 13. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr. 1778. April 5. Nantes. 

Introducing Mr. Hawkins of Carolina. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 142. 

From Arthur Lee. 1778. Aprils. Chaillot. 

Not knowing anything of the transactions referred to him, cannot 
judge whether it is fit to discharge the enclosed accounts. A. L. S. i p. 

IX, 14. 



390 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Rob[er]t Montgomery. 1778. April 5. Alicante. 

Has been established in the above port of Spain twelve months and 
has acquired business and consequence. Afraid if Spain declares war 
against England, he will be treated as a British subject; begs Frank- 
lin to send him a certificate of his identity as an American ; encloses a 
paper to prove his nationality; refers to Mr. Thomas Morris for par- 
ticulars. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 15. 

Frojn Baron de Schonfeld. [Circa 1778.] April 5. Paris. 

Sending Franklin a letter from the directors of one of the most 
reliable manufactories of fire-arms in Germany. L. in 3d P. i p. 
(In French.) XLI, 182. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 6. Bordeaux. 

Concerning repairs, etc., on the ship Boston ; Captain Tucker's action 
in not reporting the arrival to the Admiralty Board; his salute to the 
Castle not returned, no instructions having been received from the Board 
of War on that head. English fleet still lying between Capes Ortegal 
and Finisterre. The Spanish fleet expected shortly from Cuba. A. L. 
S. 2 p. IX, 16. 

From [Sieur de] Pommereuille. 1778. April 6. Fougeres. 

Concerning the hard case of his brother, M. de Martigny, who fol- 
lowed M. du Coudray to America in hopes of aiding in the defense 
of liberty; his subsequent disappointment and return to France; ex- 
penses incurred ; begs Franklin to obtain from M. de Sartine the set- 
tlements of his brother's just demands. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

IX, 17. 

From Col. Chevalier de Champigny. 1778. April 6. Amsterdam. 

Reasons for sending his second volume of the History of England 
before the first one, which will follow later together with the first two 
volumes of his Translation of the History of Denmark. Congratulates 
him on his new dignity. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 19. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 391 

From John Bondfield. 1778. April 7. Bordeaux. 

On the strength of Mr. Hancock's letter to Franklin in favor of Mr. 
Cooper, will advance that young gentleman the necessaries he stands 
in need of. A. L. S. i p. IX, 20. 

From A[ntoine] L[ouis] Brongniart. 1778. April 7. Paris. 

When he w^ill make certain experiments in electricity; hopes Frank- 
lin will have sufficient leisure to attend. Successful treatment of certain 
sick people by means of the electric fluid. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

IX, 21. 

From [C. G. F. Dumas] to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 7. The Hague. 

Extracts from German letters; warlike preparations throughout the 
country. Account of a considerable quantity of cannon and arms for 
sale. Further suggestions for their official letter to the Grand Pen- 
sionnaire; desirability of crushing the English party in Holland. In- 
trigues in Dutch politics. A. L. 4 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 28. 

From M. de Sarsfield. 1778. April 7. 

Requesting Franklin to be at his house at 2 o'clock for dinner, as 
Prince de Aingry will be there. A. N. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) 

LXXI, 59a. 

From S[ilas] Deane. 1778. April 8. Aix. 

Their arrival at Aix. Begs Franklin to make his adieus to certain 
friends at Paris, which he failed to do from lack of time. Thanking him 
for the friendship and confidence he has honored him with and for the 
honorable testimony he has given him to Congress. Wishing him all 
happiness and prosperity. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 22. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 230. 

From Desegray Beaugeard, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 8. St. Malo. 

Congratulations on their glorious transactions with the French Min- 
istry. An English frigate seen lately in their neighborhood. Enclosing 
a letter from Mr. J. D. Schweighauser in w^hich he seems to have been 
appointed to represent the American agent in Brittany; desires to know 



392 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

if that letter is conformable to their orders. [Copy of M. Schweig- 
hauser's letter in French, enclosed.] A. L. S. 3 p. IX, 23. 



From J[onatlian] Williams, Jr. 1778. April 8. Nantes. 

Concerning the unfortunate condition of Captain Collas, the husband 
of Jenny Mecom, now a prisoner in England. His late indisposition; 
expects to set out for Paris shortly. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 143. 

From Jona[thaii] Williams, Jr. 1778. April 8. Nantes. 

Introducing Mr. George Readhead, of South Carolina, and Mr. Craig, 
of Philadelphia. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 144. 

From [Col.] J[acques] de Roberdeau. 1778. April 8. 

His delay in answering Franklin's favor of February 21st due to 
the mislaying of General Roberdeau's letter; sends it now. Congratu- 
lations on the success of his endeavors for his country. A. L. S. 2 p. 

IX, 24. 

From Farry [?]. 1778. April 8. Chateauneuf. 

His experience as surgeon on his Majesty's ships; desires to be of 
service to the American people; proposes certain conditions under which 
he is willing to practice medicine in the Colonies. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) IX, 25. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Jr.]. 1778. April 9. Nantes. 

Begging his favorable attention to the request of the American cap- 
tains for a convoy off the French coast. Constant applications for 
wages and prize-money, by Frenchmen who served on board the Lexing- 
ton. Mr. M [orris] sold what was brought in here and the money is 
the Lord knows where. Wishes the Commissioners had given up what 
was carried to their credit and taken the loss of Mr. M [orris] 's conduct 
on themselves, it would have saved an infinity of credit which the 
service has suffered. Question of Mr. William Lee having given 
his appointment to Mr. Schweighauser; reasons why he resents this; 
action he has taken in the matter. A. L. S. 3 p. XXXVII, 145. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 393 

From The Captains of American Merchant Vessels at Nantes and 

Neighboring Ports to The Ministers Plenipotentiary of 

the United States at the Court of France. 

1778. April 9. Nantes. 

Requesting them to apply to the French Court for a convoy off the 
coast sufficient to protect the American vessels. L. S. 2 p. LXI, 12. 

From The Navy Board of the Eastern Department to The American 
Commissioners. 1778. April g. Boston. 

Encloses gazettes to date. Cannot risk other packages. L. in 3d P. 
I p. LIII, 37. 

From W[illiam] Lee. 1778. April 9. Frankfort-sur-le-Maine. 

The presence of any one on their part at Berlin will not be of any 
use. The Vienna scheme will be prosecuted; England will not declare 
war until Burgoyne and his troops are got safe, lest they should be 
intercepted. Proposes a plan to send La Motte Picquet with certain 
ships to be joined at Boston by others, the whole to proceed immediately 
to Halifax which must fall into their hands with all the naval stores. 
A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 26. 

From Abbe Le Clere de St. Etvain. 1778. April 10. Paris. 

Asking for the letters of recommendation he promised to M. Mereau 
de Mannevan, who has left for Amsterdam. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) IX, 27. 

From Elaud Guillaud. 1778. April 10. Cadiz. 

England has altered her Mediterranean passports, so that the ones 
they had before the war are rendered useless. Plan of a certain mer- 
chant to enter into peace negotiations with the Emperor of Morocco ; 
he has written Franklin more particularly on this subject; it will all 
tend to the prosperity and happiness of America. Captain Cunning- 
ham still at Cadiz. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) IX, 28. 

From Vicomte de Toustain. 1778. April 10. Josselin. 

Concerning his paper, " A Challenge to Lord Suffolk," and other 
similar reflections and explanations; his desire to enter the American 
service under certain conditions. A. L. S. 8 p. (In French.) 

IX, 29. 



394 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Gravier. 1778. April 10. Marseilles, 

Wishes to settle in America. Inquires as to what assistance he might 
hope for. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) LX, 104. 

From D'Alagnan. 1778. April 11. Clermont-Ferrand. 

Begging for information of one of his relatives, named le Chevalier 
de Pontgibaut, who left Nantes on October nth to pass into the 
service of America with letters to M. de Lafayette and to General Con- 
way; his father's anxiety at receiving no news of him. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) IX, 30. 

From Jean Butler Madden. 1778. April 11. Nantes. 

Considerable commerce between France and America; need of an 
interpreter at Nantes to assist the French and American captains in 
their business relations; offers himself for the position and begs Frank- 
lin to obtain it for him from the French Admiral. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) IX, 31. 

Fro?n Aubin de St. Lambert. 1778. April 11. Termonde. 

Has served in the French navy as captain of various vessels; desires 
to pass into the service of the Colonies; his knowledge of navigation 
and acquaintance with several languages; certificates he can furnish. 
A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) IX, 32. 

From J[ames] H[utton]. 1778. April 11. 

Introducing Mr. D'Aguiton, of Geneva; he has an affair of merchan- 
dise to settle with a Mr. Heywood, of Paris; announcing the death of 
Mr. Falconer. A. L. S. i p. IX, 33. 

Fro7n De Gruyere. 1778. April 11. Paris. 

A note enclosing the letter from Wyss. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 128. 

From Dumagny. 1778. April 12. Partenay. 

His enthusiasm for the American cause; desires to serve in the army 
of the republic. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 35. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 39s 

From Fran[ci]s Coffyn to The American Commissioners. 
1778. April 13. Dunkirk. 

Has just learned that Mr. Deane has left Paris; desires orders as 
to the providing for American prisoners and seamen who may, in future, 
arrive at Dunkirk. Congratulating Mr. Adams on his safe arrival in 
France. A. L. S. i p. IX, 36. 

From Serrier. 1778. April 13. Damvillers, 

Desiring to know Franklin's remedy for dropsy, which he has read 
about in the newspapers; one of his parishoners has been a sufferer 
from the disease for twenty-eight years. In exchange for this important 
service, will bestow on Franklin the title of benefactor. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) IX, 37- 

From Prince Mostouski. 1778. April 13. Paris. 

Desires a personal interview; begs him to name the day and hour. 
L. in 3d P. I p. (In French.) IX, 38. 

From Jacques von Dohren to The American Commissioners. 
1778. April 13. Hamburg. 

Offers his services to the Republic in case the Commissioners see fit 
to establish an agency at Hamburg; advantages resulting from such an 
office; should this idea meet with their approval, has a plan for the es- 
tablishment of an American depot at Hamburg. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) IX, 39. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 14. Nantes. 

The Duchesse de Grammont set sail on the 7th inst. Question of 
paying wages to a French sailor who escaped from prison after being 
taken in the Lexington. A. L. S. 3 p. XXXVII, 146. 

From Rod[olp]h Valltravers. 1778. April 14. Bienne. 

Desires news of the safe arrival of certain important letters. Trusts 
the treaty between France and America does not preclude Great Britain 
forever from proper connection with the States. Suggests an alliance 
between the thirteen Cantons and the thirteen United States. His plan 
for eliminating poverty in the United States. A. L. S. 4 p. 

IX, 40. 



396 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From John Bondfield to Messrs. Franklin and Lee. 

1778. April 14. Bordeaux. 

Captain Tucker almost ready to sail. Present unsettled state creates 
great stagnation in trade; many opulent merchants whose operations 
are suspended until war is declared or peace established. A. L. S. 2 p. 

IX, 41. 

From P. Penet. 1778. April 14. Paris. 

Sends a memoir, forwarded to him by an American captain; de- 
sires to know if the Minister of Marine will grant the demands in 
the aforesaid memoir; advantages to be gained from such concessions, 
such as the greater safety to their vessels, etc. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) IX, 42. 

From de Lugny. 1778. April 14. Bordeaux. 

Is a geographical engineer in the above city; if, by these means he 
can render himself useful to the States, offers Franklin his services. A. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 43. 

From D'audibert Caille to The American Commissioners. 
1778. April 14. Cadiz. 

Concerning peace between United States and Emperor of Morocco. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) LXI, 11. 

From John Reynolds. 1778. April 14. Paris. 

As recommended by him, he wrote to Mr. Jonathan Williams at 
Nantes for information as to certain American articles which he had 
a clear channel of introducing into England ; will proceed on his re- 
turn journey the following night. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 44. 

From M. and Mme. de La Frete. [1778.] April 14. Paris. 

Hopes that Messrs. Franklin have not forgotten their engagement 
to dine with them. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) XLIII, 178. 

From Latache. 1778. April 15. Angouleme. 

His plan of establishing a manufactory of maps in America; the 
means to be employed in its formation and the advantages to accrue 
to the Colonies from such an establishment. A. L. S. 4 p. (In 
French.) IX, 45. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 397 

From Ant[om]e F. Prat. 1778. April 15. Lyons. 

Begs Franklin to procure him a position as secretary. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) LX, 88. 

From L'Enfant. 1778. April 15. Paris. 

Begging Franklin to forward the enclosed letter to his son in Amer- 
ica; Mile. Basseporte joins with him in imploring Franklin's favor for 
this only child. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) IX, 46. 

From Le Roy. 1778. April 15. Cherbourg. 

Concerning John Burnell, captain of the privateer Montgomery, now 
in prison at Plymouth. Failure on the part of M. Dulonprey to answer 
his demands for the money due to Burnell; applies to Franklin for as- 
sistance. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 47. 

From [Etienne Francois, Marquis] Turgot. 1778. April 15 [?]. Paris. 

Reminding Franklin of his engagement to dine with him; if Mr. 
Adams, the new Commissioner has arrived, desires his company also. L. 
in 3d P. I p. (In French.) IX, 48. 

From Vicomte de Sarsfield. 1778. April 16. Paris. 

Asks Franklin's interest and patronage on behalf of M. Somers, the 
son of a rich merchant of Lille who wishes to send some goods into 
America. Prevented from seeing Franklin for some time, owing to 
illness; is about to leave for the Chateau de Marly where he and Mme. 
de Sarsfield unite in hoping Franklin will visit them. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) IX, 47 5^. 

From Tarteron. 1778. April 16. Mende. 

An ode to Franklin ; compares him to Solon ; the glorious treaty which 
he arranged with France. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 49. 

From Chevalier de Monts. 1778. April 16. Vesoul. 

Describing an invention of his for writing secret despatches on cotton 
cloth where it is invisible until made to appear by the use of certain 
chemicals; desires to make a present of this discovery to America. A. 
L, S. 6 p. (In French.) IX, 50. 



398 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Fro?n James Lovell to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 16. Yorktown. 

Notice of the authorization of William Bingham to draw bills of 
exchange upon the Commissioners. A. L. S. (In triplicate.) i p. 

XLVIII, 173,174. 

Printed in Wharton's Diplom. Corres. of the Amer. Rev., II, 553. 

From Dupont, fils. 1778. April 16. Colmar. 

Has not the honor of being known to Franklin, but M. Voltaire, 
the genius of France, is an old friend of his father and M. Gerard 
knows his family well; desires to enter the American army. A. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) IX, 51. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee for Foreign Affairs, to 

The American Commissioners. 1778. April 16. Yorktown. 

Resolve of Congress, authorizing William Bingham, agent of the 

United States at Martinique, to draw on the Commissioners for certain 

sums. An uncommon fatality has attended their despatches; anxious 

for news. A. L. S. James Lovell. i p. IX, 52. 

From Simeon Deane to the American Commissioners. 

1778. April 16. Falmouth. 

Announcing his safe arrival and his immediate departure for Con- 
gress. No intelligence received as yet of the Continental fleet which 
left France in February. The spirits of the people very high ; makes 
us doubt that the good news which he bears will give the greatest satis- 
faction. Report of the taking of Quebec, though it is not confirmed. 
A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 53. 

From J. Irwin. 1778. April 17. Marseilles. 

Is a British subject and an ex-officer in the English army. Wishes 
to be allowed to remain in France with his family. Offers to act as 
Consul for the United States at Nantes or Bordeaux. L. S. 2 p. 

LX, 72. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 399 

FroTii James Moylan to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 17. L'Orient. 

Begging them to procure the enlargement of one, James Wiggins, 
sailor, a native of America and now detained on board the Hawk, a 
privateer belonging to London. A, L. S. i p. IX, 54. 

From Caetanus d'Amraff. 1778. April 17. Paris. 

His wife and two children in great distress; applies to Franklin for 
help; knows eight languages; is versed in art, music and commerce; 
desires Franklin to procure him some position either in America or 
Europe. A. L. S. 2 p. (In Latin.) IX, 55. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 18. Nantes. 

Questions of repairing arms and shipping them to America. Con- 
gratulating Mr. Adams on his safe arrival. A. L. S. 3 p. 

XXXVII, 147. 

From I. L. Boeckmann. 1778. April 18. Carlsruhe. 

Asking Franklin's advice about the placing of a lightning conductor 
which the Margrave of Baden desires to put on his chateau. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) IX, 57. 

From [Sir] James Jay. 1778. April 18. Paris. 

Again requests the information he desired. A. L. S. i p. 

LXI, 61. 

Frotn Louis Gabriel Le Roy to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 19. Paris. 

Concerning his invention of a military stretcher. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) LXI, 104. 

From Tronson-Desjardins. 1778. April 19. Paris. 

Requesting Franklin to obtain for him a certificate of the death of 
his brother in America. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) LXX, 81. 



400 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From M. Livingston. 1778. April 19. Paris. 

Asking that the papers may be sent by bearer. L. in 3d P. i p. 

IX, 58. 
From J. D. R. de Raudiere. 1778. April 19. Tournay. 

Imploring an answer to the poem and letter delivered to Franklin 
two months before; begs him to forgive the wildness of his thoughts 
and the disorder of his style, owing to his detention for a very small 
debt. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 59. 

From J[ames] H[utton]. 1778. April 19. 

Denies having given copies to anyone of the two letters of February ist 
and 1 2th, yet has been reproached for these copies by Lord Shelburne. 
Regrets that spirit of revenge which appears in a brave people who have 
vindicated their liberties, and which belongs rather to cowards. Inde- 
pendence as great a novelty as taxation without representation ; the 
only wise business is peace-making. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 60. 

From Rawleigh Colston. 1778. April 20. Cape Francois. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council of Virginia their agent at 
Cape Francois; begs Franklin to use his influence to procure him an 
exemption from certain French laws which cripple his trade and must 
infallibly destroy his credit. A. L. S. 4 p. (In duplicate.) 

IX, 61 and 62. 

From Marquis de Courtanvaux. 1778. April 20. Paris. 

Regrets that the only day Franklin has to dispose of is the day his 
family leaves for one of their estates in the country. L. in 3d P. I p. 
(In French.) IX, 63. 

From Knoepffellius. 1778. April 20. Nordhausen. 

His earnest desire to go to America, preach the gospel and instruct 
the youth of that country in Latin, Hebrew, Greek, German, Geography 
and Economics. A. L. S. 2 p. (In Latin.) IX, 64. 

From John Keeling. 1778. April 21. Paris. 

Recommending Mr. Martin Savage who has estranged his relations 
by his attachment to the American cause; he desires a letter of recom- 
mendation to any captain in the American service, that he may obtain 
employment in the navy. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 65. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 401 

From John Luther. 1778. April 21. St. Martin de Re. 

Concerning eight French officers who desired him to procure them a 
passage to America; wishes to be honored with Franklin's commands 
in case like affairs happen regarding the Continental business. A. L. S. 
2 p. IX, 66. 

From Francois Lieliendahl. 1778. April 21. Angouleme. 

Sending a memoir with a request to lay it before the illustrious Con- 
gress of the United States. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) IX, 67. 

From Frangois Lieliendahl. [1778. April 21.] 

Proposes to plant and grow vines in South Carolina for making 
wine. Mem. S. 3 p. (In French.) LX, 92. 

From John Vaughan. 1778. April 22. Bordeaux. 

Has found Mr. B. the warm friend to England he expected but 
thinks his conduct has been exaggerated; he leaves for England shortly. 
Is surrounded, unfortunately, by English people and enemies to the good 
cause. Private opinions on the present outlook. Many neutral ves- 
sels are carrying on the trade. Report of Count d'Estaing's squadron 
having sailed for America. A. L. S. 3 p. IX 68. 

From [Aime Ambroise Joseph] Feutry. 1778. April 22. 

Sending a memoir to Franklin and asking him to interest himself in 
the matter. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) LXX, 92. 

From Gamba and Archdeacon. 1778. April 22. Dunkerque. 

Apply for the United States Consulship at Dunkerque for M. Gamba. 
Advise Franklin of a shipment of forty bottles of rum for him. A. L. 
S. 2 p. (In French.) LX, 69. 

From Des Rivieres. 1778. April 22. Paris. 

He tells of his offer to go to Canada with three or four hundred 
men; of his literary efforts and Voltaire's criticism of them; asks to 
enter the American service. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) LXII, 107. 
2 — 26 



402 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Bersoll. 1778. April 22. Brest. 

The arrival of the Lord Chatham, a prize taken by Captain Jones 
of the Ranger; her cargo; desires orders as to her disposition. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) IX, 69. 

From C[ourtney] Melmoth. 1778. April 23. Paris. 

M. Dubourg having finished the translation of his ( Melmoth 's) 
pamphlet, sends the original back with a request that it be despatched 
amongst the next parcels for America. A. L. S. i p. IX, 70. 

From Paul Merault de Monneron. 1778. April 23. Amsterdam. 

Failure to receive the letters of recommendation promised him by 
Franklin; hopes held out to him by M. I'Abbe le Clerc and M. le 
Vicomte de Flavigny. His reasons for wishing to go to America, and 
also those of his friend M. Pallard, who awaits his letters of intro- 
duction. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) IX, 71. 

From . 1778. April 23. 

M. Merault de Monneron and M. Pallard are on the eve of de- 
parting for America and only wait for his letters of recommendation 
that they may not be looked upon as adventurers. L. i p. (In French.) 

IX, 72. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. April 23. Amsterdam. 

The model for their official letter to the Grand Pcnsionnaire perfect. 
Refusal of the Comite d'HoUande to augment the number of troops. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 29. 

Frotn [Madame] de Flavigny. [Circa 1778.] April 23. 

Asks for news of M. de Fleury, one of the French officers in America; 
his parents anxious concerning him. Her invalid much better; his hope 
to visit Mme. de Chaumont in June ; will have many infidelities to 
pardon when she sees Franklin in November. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) XLI, 146. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 403 

From Sir George Grand. 1778. April 24. Amsterdam. 

Favorable disposition shown towards the loan the United States de- 
sires to negotiate; other money matters. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

IX, 73. 

From Bersoll. 1778. April 24. Brest. 

Concerning the prize-ship, Lord Chatham, and the proper steps for 
him to take in the matter. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 75. 

From James Harriman. 1778. April 24. Florence. 

Applying for the post of Consul for the United States at Florence 
and Leghorn. L. S. 3 p. LX, 70. 

From Lucas de Boismauger. 1778. April 24. Caudebec, 

Desires some employment in the present war. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) IX, 76. 

From D'Isle de Lamothe. 1778. April 24. Brest, 

His brother, having entered the service of the Colonies, was taken 
prisoner in November and carried to Fort St. Augustine; begs Frank- 
lin to procure his exchange as soon as possible. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) IX, 77. 

From Ra[lph] Izard. 1778. April 25. Paris. 

Astonished to find himself so often obliged to ask for those assurances 
that would justify Franklin's conduct to him ; the cautious manner 
in which the departure of Mr. Deane and Mr. Gerard was concealed 
from those who had a right to know of it. Begs Franklin not to 
amuse him with further promises or excuses, but either give him the 
explanation or refuse it outright. A. L. S. 3 p. IX, 78. 

From Christian A. Tilebein. 1778. April 25. Barcelona. 

Offering his services as Consul for the United States at Barcelona 
and in Majorca. L. S. 4 p. LX, 76. 

From Franklin Laboureau. 1778. April 25. Paris. 

Acknowledging the gracious reception Franklin wished to tender 
herself and her husband ; desires to know if he can see her on a certain 
day and hour. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 79. 



404 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Dariban, Sr. 1778. April 26. Agen. 

Writes as agent for the royal tannery to solicit orders for shoes for 
the troops. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 81. 

From Loiseau de Berenger. 1778. April 26. 

Decision of the Director-General allows the forty bottles of tafia 
to come in free of duty, as it is a remedy; desires to know at what 
port it will arrive. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 83. 

From [Baron] J [an] D[erck] Van der Capellen. 
1778. April 26. ZwoUe. 

His delight at the surrender of Burgoyne and the treaty between 
France and America. Concerning a memoir he wrote against the de- 
mand of the King of England on the subject of the Scottish brigade 
in the service of the Netherlands; opposition this met with. Trans- 
lated the observations and additional observations of Dr. Price and 
added to it a preface of his own. His views on the credit of America 
as contrasted with that of England; proposals Congress might make 
to induce his compatriots to transfer their funds from England to 
America. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) IX, 84. 

From Claude Julien. 1778. April 26. Paris. 

Concerning a quantity of pit-coal with which he desires to furnish 
Franklin for the service of the Colonies. Begging his protection for 
le Sieur Broche Descombes who desires to enter the American service 
with the rank of Major; has everything in his favor; twenty-three 
years old and simply covered with wounds. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

IX, 85. 

From de Liniere. 1778. April 26. Mans. 

Has a slight knowledge of surgery and experimental physics; de- 
sires Franklin to procure him a lodging in Paris and the means to 
pursue the study of these sciences; will repay him in time; desires later 
to settle in America under Franklin's protection. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) IX, 86. 

From Aubin de St. Lambert. 1778. April 26. Termonde. 

Concerning a plan which would be of great service to the Colonies. 
His desire to enter the service. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) IX, 87. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 405 

From Couturier de Versan. 1778. April 26. Bordeaux. 

Offering his services in the affairs of M. Lemaire who left for Vir- 
ginia charged with a particular mission. Delighted to have found this 
occasion to prove his interest in the United States of America. A. L, S. 
3 p. (In French.) IX, 88. 

From James Moylan. 1778. April 27. L'Orient. 

Has just received an account of the arrival, at Brest, of the prize- 
ship Lord Chatham, loaded with beer and iron, taken by the Ranger. 
A. L. S. I p. IX, 89. 

From Jh. Mazurie. 1778. April 27. Landerneau. 
Desiring the position of Consul at Brest. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 90. 

From Hawkins. 1778. April 28. Paris. 

Begs the favor of the pass, his Excellency was so kind as to promise. 
L. in 3d P. I p. IX, 91. 

From Aguiton. 1778. April 28. Paris. 

Sending a letter from his friend Hutton. Desires to know whether 
he may call and pay his respects before he leaves the country. L. in 3d 
P. I p. IX, 92. 

From Benjamin Vaughan. 1778. April 28. 

Illness of Lord Chatham; afraid the great man is dying; quotes all he 
can recollect in Lord Chatham's short speech of the 7th of April on the 
subject of independence and the attitude of France. Inaccuracies of the 
debate-writers for the newspapers. Reply of the Duke of Richmond 
rather commonplace. Lord Chatham carried out of the house in a 
swoon. Abstract of Lord Shelburne's prodigious speech of April 8th. 
Irish bills will not pass. Hears Mr. Hartley is the twentieth ambassa- 
dor Franklin has had. If Lord Chatham had remained well, a change 
of ministers might have been looked for. Concerning the protection 
of certain property belonging to his family. Expected publication of 
a correspondence between Dr. P[ringle] and Dr. P[riestl]y upon the 
latter's metaphysical writings. A. L. 15 p. IX, 93. 



4o6 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From John Montell. 1778. April 28. London. 

Has discovered a method of making and refining common salt and 
using it to preserve flesh and fish; offers to instruct any person in this 
method, whom Franklin may name, for the small premium of two 
thousand guineas. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 94. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 28. The Hague. 

Measures taken to insure the publication of their official letter as 
soon as it is presented. Need of convincing the public that Congress 
will not make peace with England except as an equal. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) XXXIX, 30. 

From Sebastian Hartwig. 1778. April 28. Gotha. 

Wishes loan of 100 Louis d'Ors. (See LIX, 68.) A. L. S. 3 p. 

LIX, 80. 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Jr.], to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 28. Nantes. 

Supplies received from Holland ; anchors imported from Spain ; ques- 
tion of ships to transfer the goods to America. A. L. S. 4 p. 

XXXVII, 148. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1778. April 28. Nantes. 

Question of the prize-money. Defends himself against the accusation 
of showing Franklin's letters. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 149. 

From Ra[lph] Izard to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 29. Paris. 

Giving an account of the dreadful fire which broke out in Charles- 
town on the morning of January 15th; the loss is three millions of 
dollars. Concerning the possibility of obtaining relief from France 
either by application to the Government or by private subscription. 
A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 95. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 407 

From Pollock. 1778. April 29. New Orleans. 

Has been appointed agent for the United States; informing Franklin 
of various prizes taken by Captain James Willing and Lieutenant Mcln- 
tyre; desires news from Franklin's part of the world; direction for 
sending him letters. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 96. 

From Thomas Barker. 1778. April 29. 

Enclosing two packets; begs Franklin to forward them to America 
and by each conveyance to recommend his case favorably to Congress 
or to some of Franklin's friends. A. L. S. i p. IX, 97. 

From Sain[ue]l Tucker to The American Commissioners. 

1778. April 29. Bordeaux, 

Sorry he cannot follow their orders of the 26th inst. ; cannot get the 
ship to sea in less than eighteen days. Has received their recommenda- 
tion of Mr. Livingston; he will proceed as second lieutenant. A. L. S. 
I p. IX, 98. 

From [Mme.] Morin Elie de Beaumont. 1778. April 29. Paris. 

Writes on behalf of two young persons who desire to pursue their 
trades in America ; they are too poor to pay the required passage money ; 
begs Franklin to procure their passage for them. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) IX, 98^. 

From Martin. 1778. April 30. Moscow. 

Begging for news of the Chevalier La Coste de Meziere, who quitted 
the service of Russia eighteen months before; hears that he saw Frank- 
lin in Paris and entered the service of America; his family most anxious 
about him; begs for news of his whereabouts. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) 

[A. E. by Franklin.] Knows nothing of M. Maziere; America is 
a large place ; he might have arrived there without his having heard of it. 

IX, 148. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 

The American Commissioners. 1778. April 30. Yorktown. 
Perplexed what steps to take as regards foreign afifairs, not having 
received any despatches since May; aware that the cause for this de- 



4o8 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

lay was the loss of Captain Johnston and Captain Wickes and the 
robbing of John Folgier; advise triplicate despatches. Their anxiety 
to know the truth before they receive any proposals from Britain in 
consequence of the scheme in Lord North's speech. The necessity of 
their currency being supported in due credit, after which they can bid 
defiance to Britain and all her German hirelings. A. L. S. James 
Lovell. 3 p. (In duplicate.) IX, 99. 

From Chevalier de Berny. [1778. April ?] 

Sending Franklin his essay on the Ministry, the fruit of his residence 
in various courts. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XLI, 88. 

From The Charity Association. 1778. April. Paris. 

Invitations to meetings of Charity Association for the assistance of 
poor prisoners and for the liberation of prisoners in debt for the care 
of their infants. Printed N. i p. LXXIII, 56. 

Fro7n W[illia]ni Cooper, Jr. 1778. April. Bordeaux. 

Enclosing certain letters to be forwarded to their respective owners; 
the letter of recommendation from the Hon. John Hancock, Esq., he 
sends unsealed. A. L. S. i p. IX, 100. 

From Jh. Malibran. [1778. April.] 

Desires to know immediately if Franklin has received a letter from 
Mr. Tillebein of Barcelona; would be flattered at receiving a brief 
audience. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XLI, 62. 

From Chevalier de Monts. [1778. April.] 

With reference to a secret for writing with ink on linen and effacing 
the writing at will. N. I p. (In French.) XLIV, 294. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. [1778. April.] 
Arrival of Mr. Hartley. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 150. 

From Abbe Chalut. 1778. Friday, May i. 

Inviting Franklin to dine at his brother's house to meet an Ambassa- 
dor who desires to see him. Mr, Adams and Franklin's grandson, are 
also invited. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) XLIII, 148. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 409 

From M[arqu]is de Condorcet. [1778?] May i. 

Begging Franklin to recommend to some of his friends, at Philadel- 
phia, M. de Beaulieu, officer in Pulaski's legion. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) XLII, 131. 

From Alex[ander] Ewing. 1778. May i. Dunkirk. 

Protests against being detained with his vessel in French waters. 
A. L. S. 3 p. LXI, 65. 

From D. E. Reine. 1778. May i. Versailles. 

Sends him some fine rice and bean seed which he brought from the 
Cape of Good Hope and the coast of Malabar; how to sow these seeds 
and cultivate the plants. How rice and coffee are prepared for con- 
sumption. Deplores the dangerous custom of giving wine and alco- 
holic drinks to the crew during a battle. Found a refreshing and 
stimulating drink whilst serving in the French Colonies in India; de- 
scribes how it is made. A. L. S. 9 p. (In French.) XLIX, 27. 

From James Moylan. 1778. May i. L'Orient. 

Forsees future trouble from the restrictions Captain Jones has laid 
the Intendants of Brest under respecting the prize-brig Lord Chatham; 
thinks Franklin may adopt a wiser plan. A. L. S. i p. IX, loi. 

From Rich[ard] Bache. 1778. May i. Manheim. 

Introducing Dr. Rigger; he visits Europe with a view of improving 
himself in the profession of medicine. Sally and the children well. 
A. L. S. I p. IX, 102. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 

1778. May 2. Bordeaux. 
News of the expected arrival of letters and packets for the Com- 
missioners. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 103. 

From Comte de Sarsfield. 1778. May 2. Paris. 

Announcing the postponement of his visit to Chaillot upon the oc- 
casion of Mrs. Macaulay's translation. Begs for news. A. L. in 3d P. 
I p. IX, 104. 



41 o Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From D'Hargicourt. 1778. May 2. St. Quentin. 



Offering his services as clerk or secretary. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) LX, 86. 

From The Old Hermit of Bruxiieil. 1778. May 2. Bar-sur-Seine. 

Deploring the fate of Philadelphia in the hands of the English. Com- 
plimentary verses to Dr. Franklin. A poem. 2 p. (In French.) 

LI, 4, a and b. 

From Des Rivieres. 1778. May 2. Paris. 

His affairs with vv^omen were his only fault, as he is becoming gray- 
haired he can no longer be reproached with this fault ; offers his ser- 
vices again and would like a decided answer; would send Franklin 
copies of his works but he has none worthy of him and he is too poor 
to get any more. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) LXII, 108. 

From Comte de Sarsfield. 1778. May 2. Paris. 

Introducing a young man who is determined to go to America; 
asks for him a letter of recommendation ; besides his training in archi- 
tecture he thoroughly understands fortifications. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) IX, 105. 

From Bayard. 1778. May 2. Paris. 

Begging him to lend a favorable ear to the proposals of M. Jolly 
de la Tour. Hopes Franklin will be satisfied with his treatment 
of Mr. Piatt. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) IX, 106. 

From Abbesse de Mancler. 1778. May 2. La Fere. 

Has heard that Franklin intends visiting the Royal School of Ar- 
tillery established at La Fere; begs him to accept her hospitality; her 
maternal grandmother was a Franklin of Ireland, therefore hopes 
she can claim relationship. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 107. 

From Dousset. 1778. May 2. Paris. 

Introducing his nephew, who desires to pass into the service of Amer- 
ica; will gladly pay his expenses as far as L'Orient from which port 
he hears the ship La Jeunesse is about to sail. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) IX, 108. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 411 

From John Guy Gautier. 1778. May 2. Barcelona. 

His interest in the Colonies and his best wishes for their success. 
Applies for the position of Consul-General in the province of Catalonia; 
his knowledge of various languages and his general fitness for the 
position; refers him to Mr. Grand for his connections and reputation. 
A. L. S. 3 p. IX, no. 

From Pere [Joseph Etienne] Bertier. 1778. May 3. Paris. 

Acknowledging the receipt of Franklin's book. Asking Franklin's 
protection for a young soldier who desires to serve the republic. Ap- 
pointment of Mr. Pringle as non-resident member of the Academy. A. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, in. 

From Marniquel. 1778. May 3. Charleville. 

Asking him to refund a certain sum of money which he lent to 
Lieutenant Selin for his journey to Passy three years before. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) IX, 112. 

From Beroard Rochette. 1778. May 3. Grenoble. 

Asking that he might be given the management of a printing house 
in the name and at the expense of the Colonies. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) IX, 113. 

From James Moylan. 1778. May 4. L'Orient. 

Arrival of the schooner Milford, Captain Blackwell, from Rappa- 
hannock river in Virginia, bringing news that the new levies were com- 
pleted and that they were to march in a few days to General Washing- 
ton's camp, about sixteen miles from Philadelphia; the people in good 
spirits and the army pretty well clothed ; all ports blocked by English 
frigates. A. L. S. i p. IX, 114. 

From John Seaward. 1778. May 4. Brest. 

Arrived in port with the ship Lord Chatham; what steps have been 
taken; if the vessel is to be sold would be glad of Franklin's orders. 
A. L. S. I p. IX, 115. 



412 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Jh. Fichet. 1778. May 4. St. Malo. 

Enclosing a letter from the commanding officer of his ship, Le Pru- 
dent, which was not only seized, but plundered, by an American pri- 
vateer called the Lion, and then conducted to Martinique; desires 
Franklin to give the necessary orders on the subject. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) IX, 116. 

From Vignier and Bonnet. 1778. May 4. Rodez. 

Request to enter the American army. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 123. 

From Chevalier de Mauduit Duplessis. 

1778. May 4. Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. 

Franklin's kindness having enabled him to be useful to America, de- 
sires to send him the copy of the resolution with which Congress has 
honored him. The army celebrating the conclusion of the treaty of 
alliance between France and America; the noise of artillery and cheer- 
ing will not make the enemy dance at Philadelphia. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) 

Enclosure. Resolve of Congress, bestowing a brevet of lieutenant- 
colonel of artillery on the Chevalier Duplessis, as a reward for his 
services and an encouragement to his merit, i p. IX, 117. 

From Abbe Dupont de Jumeaux. 1778. May 4. Paris. 

His brother, aged eighteen years, is very desirous of passing into the 
service of America; wishes to know what means must be employed; 
can procure him letters to the Marquis de la Fayette. A. L. S. I p. 
(In French.) IX, 118. 

From Griinberger. 1778. May 4. Munich. 

Requesting a passport to go to the United States. L, S. 4 p. (In 
French.) LX, 105. 

Fro/// Lieutenant GeneralIg[natiu]sSalern. 1778. May 4. Munich. 

Certificate testifying to the ability of M. Griinberger as a professor 
and civil engineer. D. S. i p. (In French.) LX, 106. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 413 

From de Chantereyne. 1778. May 4. Cherbourg. 

Having aided several Americans in a pecuniary way, desires Frank- 
lin's authority to assist other American officers who may come to Cher- 
bourg; will follow orders implicitly and will furnish an account of 
the different events relative to the ships of the American Colonies. A. 
L. S. 3 p. (In French.) IX, 119. 

By The Continental Congress. 1778. May 5. 

Resolution empowering the Commissioners to withdraw the eleventh 
and twelfth articles in the Treaty of Amity and Commerce. D. S. 
Cha[rle]s Thomson, Sec[retar]y. i p. LXXV, 56 and 57. 

Printed in Journals of Congress, Phila. [1779], IV, 258. 

From Arnold Henry Dohrman. 1778. May 5. Lisbon. 

Account of the foundering of an American ship, named Heart of Oak, 
off the coast of Portugal ; aid he has given to the officers and sailors 
who were saved from the wreck; will procure them a passage to Amer- 
ica or France; tells this to Franklin to prove his friendship for America 
and his willingness to render greater services if it is in his power. A. L. 
S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 120. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1778. May 5. Nantes. 

Assistance rendered Captain Cumstock, who lately escaped from 
prison; both he and Mr. Chandler in want. Prize sent into Brest by 
the Ranger, Captain Jones. Desires an apartment near Franklin's 
taken for him at Passy. A. L. S. 3 p. XXXVII, 151. 

From Nathaniel Dowse to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May 5. Bordeaux. 

Sailed from Virginia, April 14, 1777, as commander of the ship 
Mercer; his crew rose against him on the 4th of May and carried the 
vessel into Whitehaven, whence his escape and final arrival at Bordeaux. 
Begging to know if they have any employment for him. A. L. S. 2 p. 

IX, 121. 
From Harmon Courter. 1778. May 5. Boston. 

Safe arrival at Boston after a rough passage of fifty-one days, also 
the arrival of Captain Nicholson at Portsmouth and Mr. Deane at 
Plymouth. A. L. S. i p. IX, 122. 



414 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Edme Jacques] Genet. 1778. May 6. Versailles. 

Sending the enclosed, which have just arrived from London. L. in 
3d P. I p. IX, 123. 

From Lefebvre de Longeville. 1778. May 6. Paris. 

Proposal to sell a type-founding plant to the United States. Mem. 
2 p. (In French.) LVII, 15. 

From Barre. 1778. May 6. Marseilles. 

Desires to serve under the American generals; sends a memoir in 
w^hich his military services and his request are both set forth. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) IX, 124. 

From G. L. de Lorthe. 1778. May 6. Bordeaux. 

Had the honor of calling on Franklin in Philadelphia and following 
with Mr. Roger his experiments in electricity; takes for granted Frank- 
lin's knowledge of mathematics; asks his advice therefore on the works 
enclosed. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) IX, 125. 

From Due de Charost. 1778. May 6. Paris. 

Recommending le Sieur Despret who has been employed in the 
management of the vessels now being built by his house. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) IX, 126. 

From J[onathan] Williams, [Sr.] 1778. May 7. Boston. 

Received the good news of their alliance with France. Opinion in 
America of Lord North's policy; extreme measures advocated against 
Great Britain. Thanking him for his kindness to Jonathan. Arrival 
of Mr. Holker in fine health and spirits. Everybody pleased with the 
enclosed Resolve of Congress. News of his family and friends. A. L. 
S. 3 p. XXXVII, 152. 

From Reinier Arrenberg. 1778. May 7. Rotterdam. 

Desiring an answer upon the affair of the English bibles which 
Franklin designed to have printed in Holland ; begs for authentic news 
from America as the news in the English Gazette is nearly all false. 
Congratulates him on the happy change in the affairs of America. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 127. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 415 

From Jh. Malibran. 1778. May 7. Paris. 

Enclosing a letter from an old friend of his in Barcelona; if Frank- 
lin desires an interview relative to this friend's affairs, will wait on him 
at any appointed time. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 128. 

From Lefebvre de Longeville. 1778. May 7. Paris. 

Desires to send him a memoir, showing the advantages to accrue to 
America from the acquisition of a foundry. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) IX, 129. 

From Comte de Sarsfield. 1778. May 7. 
Recommending Tessier. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) LXII, 121. 

From The Prevost d'Exmes. 1778. May 8. Paris. 

Address to Dr. Franklin on his mission to France. A. poem. 4 p. 
(In French.) LI, 67. 

From Thorn [as] Simpson to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May 8. Brest. 

Account of his conduct which led Commodore Jones to suspend 
and put him under arrest. Requests a fair and open trial and if his 
trial cannot be brought on in Brest that they will order him to be 
sent immediately to America to take his trial there. Refers to a letter 
written to them by John Langdon, of Portsmouth, for his character. 
A. L. S. 5 p. XLVII, no. 

From Thom[as] Simpson to The American Commissioners. 

1778. May 8. Brest. 

Narrating in detail his conduct from the time Captain Jones put 
him in charge of the English man-of-war, Drake, to his arrival in 
Brest, a prisoner, placed under arrest by Captain Jones for a breach 
of his orders; denies having disobeyed him; begs for a fair trial, if 
possible, in America; can never serve his country under the command 
of Captain Jones. A. L. S. 4 p. (Copy.) IX, 130. 

From Niou, aine. 1778. May 8. Brest. 

Announcing the arrival of John Paul Jones, with an English man- 
of-war, taken after a bloody fight. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

IX, 131. 



4i6 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [John Paul Jones] to The American Commissioners. 

1778. May 9. " Ranger," Brest. 

Announcing his arrival with the British ship of war, Drake, the 
English colors inverted under the American stars; has brought in 
nearly two hundred prisoners; advises their exchange or their being sent 
back to America on the Drake; has suspended and confined Lieutenant 
Simpson for disobedience of orders. L. 3 p. IX, 132. 

From Madame Bertin. 1778. May 9. Paris. 

Begging Messrs. Franklin and Lee to dine with her on Saturday. 
L. in 3d P. I p. (In French.) IX, 133. 

From M. and Mme. De Lafrete. [1778?] May 9. Suresnes. 

Inviting Franklin, his grandson, and Mr. Adams to dine with them 
at Suresnes. A. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) XLIV, 238. 

By The Continental Congress. 1778. May 9. 

Forbidding the American Commissioners to recommend foreign offi- 
cers for the navy of the United States. D. S. Cha[rle]s Thomson, 
Sec[retar]y. i p. (In duplicate.) LXXV, 59 and 60. 

Printed in Journals of Congress, Phila. [1779], IV, 276. 

From S. and J. H. Delap. 1778. May 9. Bordeaux. 

Enclosing two letters that have arrived for Franklin. L. S. i p. 

IX, 135. 

From Deucher, Riedy & Co. 1778. May 9. Nantes. 

Offering to procure a passage to Virginia for a Member of Congress 
who he hears desires to return to his country by the first opportunity; 
begs Franklin to speak to the Minister in order to hasten the sailing 
of the vessel. A. L. S. 3 p. IX, 136. 

From [Pahin de Champlain] de la Blancherie. 
1778. May 9. Paris. 

A multitude of occupations has prevented his testifying his grati- 
tude to Franklin ; will make amends at his first leisure moment. A. L. 
S. I p. (In French.) IX, 137. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 417 

From De La Porte. 1778. May 9. Belle He. 

A young French officer desires to enter the service of the Colonies; 
has all the talents of a brave officer. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

IX, 138. 
From Seguin. 1778. May 10. Lacepede. 

With reference to Jean Jerome Seguin who wishes to obtain some 
employment in the United States. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

LX, 83. 
From R[ichard] Price. [1778.] May 10. 

Is there any truth in the report that General Washington is grown 
unpopular, that his army deserts in great numbers and that the suf- 
ferings of the Americans are excessive? The Commissioners feel as- 
sured that the terms they are empowered to offer by the Conciliatory 
Bills, though much short of independence, will be accepted. Messages 
to Franklin from various friends; Mr. Curtis and Mr. Webb both 
broken and ruined. L. 2 p. IX, 140. 

From Douairiere Duchesse de Deiix-Ponts, Comtesse de Forbach. 
1778. May 10. Forbach. 

Her affection for him and her regrets that she will not see him 
till the following winter. The interest she has in his glory and success 
and the keen desire she has for news of all which concerns him. A. L. 
S. 4 p. (In French.) IX, 141. 

From Aguiton. 1778. May 10. Paris. 

Sets out for London the next day and offers to execute any com- 
mands Franklin may honor him with. L. i p. IX, 142. 

From de la Grange. 1778. May 10. Brancourt. 

Unable to support his family, consisting of a wife and five children, 
on the slender pittance he receives; in want of the very necessaries 
of life; begs assistance; refers him to various people for the truth of 
these assertions. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French, in duplicate.) 

IX, 143 and 144. 

From Antoine Flottes de Raissan. 1778. May 10. Paris. 

His admiration for Franklin; begs for a moment's audience. A. L. 
S. I p. (In French.) IX, 145. 

2 27 



4i8 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From James Moylan to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May II. L'Orient. 

Information of the arrival of Captain Jones with a prize of sixteen 
guns. A. L. S. I p. IX, 146. 

From [J.] de Sparre. 1778. May 11. Strasbourg. 

The plan he addressed to M. de Sartine concerning the United 
Colonies. Desires Franklin to employ him either in America or in 
his own town. Proposals he has had to enter the service of England, 
all of which he has rejected. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 147. 

From Jh. Malibran. 1778. May 11. Paris. 

Desiring to know if Franklin received the letter he sent him from 
M. Tilebein, of Barcelona. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) IX, 149. 

From Dalmas Desportes. 1778. May 11. Franconville. 

Believes he can be useful to the Colonies in his capacity as a lawyer. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 150. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May II. Brest. 

Gallant action performed by Captain Jones; his intention to equip 
the Drake and send the prisoners in her to America; money needed to 
do this. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 153. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May 12. Bordeaux. 

Arrival of the brig Peggy from North Carolina, laden with tobacco ; 
Captain Tucker and himself making all expedition to get the Boston 
ready for sea. Jersey privateers seen hovering along the coast of 
Spain and, owing to that country's neutrality, even enter their ports. 
The Marquis D'Armando named as Spanish Ambassador for the Court 
of Great Britain ; expected at Bordeaux the next day on his way to 
England. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 151, 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 419 

From Courtney Melmoth. 1778. May 12. Paris. 

Asking for the loan of fifteen more guineas and promising to re- 
pay the entire debt in a short time; he and Mrs. Melmoth ready to 
start for England in a day or two; begs him to keep the fact a secret. 
A. L. S. 2 p. 

Franklin's answer enclosed. Inconvenience he experienced in favor- 
ing him with the fifty guineas; relies on his honor and punctuality 
for a speedy repayment; sorry to hear that his trip to England must 
be kept secret. A. Dr. of L. i p. IX, 152. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May 12. Bordeaux. 

Concerning an offer made to Mr. Livingston of a vessel to be com- 
pletely fitted out and armed, provided they will grant a commission; 
advance in rank this will give Mr. Livingston on his arrival in Amer- 
ica. A. L. S. I p. IX, 153. 

From Comte de Milly. 1778. May 12. Paris. 

Asking his protection for M. Douson, a surgeon of talent, who de- 
sires employment in the armies of the Americans. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) IX, 154. 

Frojii Marquis de Cosse. 1778. May 12. Paris. 

Recommending M. de Masson; his knowledge of politics and fa- 
miliarity with various languages. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

IX, 155. 

From Gabriel and Pierre Bouffe and Louis Guillaume Le Veillard. 
1778. May 12. Paris. 

Requesting Dr. Franklin to purchase land for them, near Phila- 
delphia. Mem. 2 p. (In French.) XLII, lOO. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May 12, The Hague. 

Has induced certain Dutch merchants, friends of his, to send a 
vessel directly to America. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

XXXIX, 31. 



420 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Pierre Bouffe, Gabriel Bouffe and Louis G. Le Veillard. 
1778. May 12. Paris. 

Wish to purchase lands near Philadelphia and request Dr. Frank- 
lin to have the purchase made by some trustworthy person on the spot. 
Mem. S. 2 p. (In French.) XLII, lOO. 

From Le Roux. 1778. May 12. Paris. 

While Franklin works for the happiness of men, he occupies him- 
self with that of children; hopes his waitings on the subject may merit 
Franklin's approbation. A, L. S. i p. (In French.) IX, 156. 

From James Moylan to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May 13. L'Orient. 

Account from Lisbon of the arrival of the Peace and Plenty, priva- 
teer from Belfast, bringing in the brig Dolphin, Captain Turner, from 
Boston ; Captain Turner destroyed the despatches from Congress. A. L. 
S. I p. IX, 157. 

From George Arnold. 1778. May 13. Mayence. 

Wishes to know if the General Arnold of whom he reads so often in 
the newspapers is his son, from whom he has not heard for some years; 
his name, birth-place and station, as the son of a butcher, tally exactly 
with his son's history. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) IX, 158. 

From D. Montessuy. 1778. May 13. Paris. 

His wish to obtain from the Colonies timber, hemp, resin and tar 
for the supply of the Royal Marine. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

IX, 159. 

From [Mme.] De La Corbiere. 1778. May 13. Paris. 

M. le Comte de Maillebois desired to interest Franklin on behalf 
of their boarding-school for girls. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

IX, 160. 

From J. C. Hornbostel. 1778. May 13. Marseilles. 

Requesting the position of Consul at Marseilles. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) IX, 161. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 421 

From Le Goiieslier de Montcarel. 1778. May 14. Marseilles. 

Enclosing letters from M. de la Radiere to his son in America. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) IX, 162. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 

The American Commissioners. 1778. May 14. Yorktown, Pa. 

Good condition of affairs in America. The low political methods 
of the English Court. The treaty with France. L. S. Richard 
Henry Lee, James Lovell. 5 p. LIII, 41. 

Printed in Wharton's Diplom. Corres. of the Amer. Rev., II, 574. 

From Chevalier de Keralio. 
1778. May 14. L'Ecole Royale Marine. 

Reminding Franklin of the merchant at Brest who desired to be- 
come the representative of Congress at that port. Sends the enclosed 
note in favor of le Chevalier de Bazantin ; sure that a recommen- 
dation from Franklin would do much towards procuring liberty to those 
unfortunate officers. Messages from Mme. la Douairiere des Deux- 
ponts. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) IX, 163. 

From [Pahin Champlain de] la Blancherie. 

1778. May 14. Ancien College de Bayeux. 

Charged by M. Le Roy to inform Franklin that the members of the 
Academy of Sciences have appointed him one of four commissioners; 
names the time of the meeting, which he hopes Franklin will honor with 
his presence. Sends him a translation of Volta on the inflammable air 
of swamps. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IV, 85. 

From [Marquis de Chartier de] Lotbiniere. 1778. May 14. Paris. 

Begging him to see that the enclosed letter from M. Holquart gets 
safely to its destination in America and begs him to say a few words 
in his favor to M. de Vergennes. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

IX, 164. 

From Christ [opher] Gadsden. 1778. May 14. Charlestown. 

Introducing Mr. Thomas Waites who goes to France on business 
for the common cause. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 165. 



422 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From The Board of War to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May 14. 

Captain Courier has been assisted on his journey to Congress. Cap- 
tain Senneville has been received with every mark of attention. The 
improved outlook in America following the treaty with France. A. L. 
S. Sam[uel] Ph[ili]ps Savage, Pres[iden]t. 2 p. LIII, 66. 

From Tuthill Hubbart. 1778. May 14. Boston. 

Enclosing a letter from his Aunt Mecom to Franklin; account cir- 
culated of Franklin's life having been atttempted and of his being 
left in a languishing condition ; the real pleasure the news of his wel- 
fare gave his friends. A. L. S. i p. IX, 166. 

From Bianot. 1778. May 15. Paris. 

Asking his good offices in favor of M. Gellee. A. L. S. i p. 

IX, 167. 

From And [re] w Carmier. 1778. May 15. Calais. 

OfFering his services for the position of Consul at Calais; refers 
him to M. Grand for further particulars. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 168. 

From Abr[aha]m Livingston to Messrs. Franklin and Deane. 

1778. May 15. Charlestown. 

Requesting his advice and assistance for Mr. Jos. Brown who is on 
a tour of Europe. A. L. S. i p. IX, 169. 

Fro7n The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 
The American Commissioners. 1778. May 15. Yorktown. 

Amount of tobacco lost in the attempt to send it to France; ad- 
vantage of France opening the trade from her own ports. Reasons 
why Congress thinks it best to expunge Articles 11 and 12 from the 
treaty with France. Doubtful which to wonder at more, the folly of 
the English in making themselves so hated or their scandalous bar- 
barity in the expression of their resentment. Concerning the contract 
which the Commercial Committee has signed with the agent of Mr. 
Beaumarchais. A. L. S. Richard Henry Lee and James Lovell. 3 p. 

IX, 170. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 423 

From Chevalier O'Gorman. 1778. May 15. Paris. 

Has returned from Burgundy and desires to pay his respects to 
Franklin. L. in 3d P. I p. (In French.) IX, 171. 

From J[ames] H[utton]. 1778. May 15. 

Acknowledging his favor of the loth inst. Concerning passports to 
insure the safety of the sloop, Good Intent, which goes from London 
to Labrador with articles for the use of the Indians and missionaries. 
Does not even yet despair of peace. A, L. S. 2 p. IX, 172. 

From William Hodge. 1778. May 15. Cadiz, 

Enclosing copies of two letters sent to the Governor of Cadiz, one 
relative to the English Consul claiming three sailors belonging to Cap- 
tain Conyngham ; the other concerning three American prisoners who 
swam ashore from an English frigate, but were retaken and probably 
suffered death for desertion. The number of prisoners who make 
their escape and arrive at Cadiz in the most destitute condition, A. L. 
S. 6 p, IX, 56. 

From Samuel Wharton. 1778. May 15, 

General Burgoyne arrived in London to get the convention confirmed, 
but this will not be done, Mr, Hartley told Lord Camden that he was 
sure the Commissioners, and particularly Dr, Franklin, were much dis- 
contented with their situation at Paris, for they might as well, he said, 
live at the Bastile as be exposed, as they were, to the perpetual observa- 
tion of the French Ministerial spies. Lord Camden says he has good 
reasons to believe another ministerial negotiator went to have a talk with 
the Commissioners. A. L. (In cipher,) I p, XL VII, 113. 

From T[homas] Paine. 1778. May 16. Yorktown, 

Gives a detailed history of military affairs since the nth of Sep- 
tember, including the actions at Brandy^vine and Germantown and 
some minor expeditions ; his final arrival in Yorktown ; his publica- 
tion of the Crisis No. 5 to General Howe; has begun No. 6 which 
he intends addressing to Lord North. Lord Howe's contemptible af- 
fair of December 4th ; his report to Lord Germain, representing Wash- 
ington's camp as a strongly fortified place, is absolutely false. Descrip- 
tion of the camp at Valley Forge; thinks the fighting is nearly over; 



424 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

England has done her utmost. Desires to consult Franklin about the 
History of the American Revolution. News of the Commissioners hav- 
ing sailed from England. Message to William Temple Franklin. A. 
L. S. 14 p. IX, 173. 

From T[honias] Paine. 1778. May 16. Yorktown. 

Has sent him a long letter [IX, 173], but in case it should not come 
to hand, mentions certain of its contents. A. L. S. i p. IX, 174. 

From The Sailors put on the Drake. 1778. May 16. Brest. 

Testifying in favor of Lieutenant Simpson's conduct on board the 
Drake. Mem. S. Benj. Hill and twenty-four others. 3 p. 

LXI, 99. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Commerce, to The 
American Commissioners. 1778. May 16. York, Pa. 

Concerning the contract between the house of Roderigue, Hortalez 
& Co., and the Committee of Commerce; instructions on that head. 
The obstructions of the bays and harbors to the southward has pre- 
vented the intended shipping of tobacco. Congratulates them on the 
treaties. A. L. S. William EUery, Richard Hutson, Thomas Adams. 
2 p. (Copy.) IX, 175. 

From Sutaine de Dosnot [?]. 1778. May 16. Paris. 

Concerning the papers of his nephew Du Coudray. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) IX, 176. 

From Arthur Lee to Franklin and Adams. 
1778. May 17. Chaillot. 

Enclosing certain important papers; they will make such alterations 
as they judge proper; dreadful consequences to be expected from the 
disobedience and extravagance of certain subordinate servants. A. L. S. 
I p. IX, 177. 

From Rodolph Valltravers. 1778. May 17. Bienne. 

Afraid Franklin's letters are subject to inspection ; directions in case 
their correspondence should be more regularly established in favor of 
both the American and Swiss Cantons by the mediation of France. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 425 

Manner in which a mutual, sincere friendship between the two re- 
publics might be brought about; suggests several particular considera- 
tions of true interest on both sides; oilers his services to promote such 
an alliance; for this he would need credentials and some pecuniary 
assistance. A. L. S. 4 p. IX, 178. 

From P. Penet. 1778. May 17. Paris. 

Concerning the sale of the two vessels, Le Lion and le Due de 
Choiseul. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) IX, 179. 

From Christ [ian] Stenger and William Stragham to The American 
Commissioners. 1778. May 18. Brest. 

A petition from the captains of the Dolphin and Lord Chatham, 
captured by Captain Jones, begging Franklin to procure their deliver- 
ance; their families entirely dependent on their industry; the best 
means to adopt, in order to secure their libert}'. A. L. S. i p. 

IX, 180. 

From Ruault. 1778. May 18. Paris. 

Sending the large dictionary of the Academy and nine volumes of 
Abbe de Mably's works. N. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) 

LXXI, 52. 

From Ferrand Dupuy. 1778. May 18. Paris. 

Requesting his intervention and assistance for a j-oung man who 
had volunteered his services to the United States and was taken prisoner 
when his vessel was captured by the English on the voyage to Boston. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) LX, 35. 

From J. J. Defrancq. 1778. May 18. Orchimont. 

Begs Franklin to procure him some civil or military employment. L. S. 
4 p. (In French.) LX, 102. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May 18. Brest. 

Captain Jones has received a letter from Mr. Schweighauser who, 
in consequence of one from Mr. Lee, claims the disposal of the prizes 
sent into this port by the " Ranger." He informs Captain Jones that 



426 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

he has the management of public business and that Mr. Williams pre- 
tends to what he alone has authority for. Mr. Williams came hither 
with the sole view of assisting Captain Jones in his affairs and has not 
attempted to alter the channel the commercial part of the business has 
taken. The sale of the " Lord Chatham " will probably be made by 
the Admiralty, if not, it will fall into the hands of Mr. BersoU, by 
whom the " Ranger " was furnished and to whom Captain Jones has ap- 
plied for his present wants. The " Drake " is fitting to convey the 
prisoners to America. Captain Jones's great object to secure the re- 
lease of two hundred American prisoners in exchange for those he 
captured ; possibility of effecting this exchange in France ; in that case 
suggests their purchasing the " Drake " to carry their supplies to Amer- 
ica. A. L. S. 4 P- XXXVII, 154. 

From Marc Le Fort. 1778. May 18. Marseilles. 

Enclosing an extract from a letter from Antoine Gautier, with in- 
formation of the capture of the vessel, L'Elegante, Captain Collineau; 
begs Franklin to write to the General Counsel or the Congress, at 
Williamsburg, for a detailed account of what happened and whether 
any part of the cargo or its value can be recovered. A. L. S. 5 p. ( In 
French.) IX, 182. 

From John Vaughan. 1778. May 19. Bordeaux. 

Reasons why it would be more prudent for him to obtain an ap- 
proved certificate of his nationality as an American. Departure of 
the Boston. Report from Martinique of an American frigate being 
blown up in an engagement with a sixty-four-gun ship ; only four 
lives saved. News of the French, English and Spanish squadrons. 
A. L. S. 3 p. IX, 183. 

From Chevalier de Bongars. 1778. May 19. Traillet par Eu. 

Asking for a commission in the army for a French gentleman of 
noble birth. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) LXII, 9. 

From du Buat. 1778. May 19. St. Malo. 

Anxious for news of his vessel, le Vicomte de Veaux, which left 
L'Orient, December 31st, in company with Le Lyon, commanded by his 
brother-in-law. A. L S. i p. (In French.) IX, 184. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 427 

From [James Hutton]. 1778. May 19. 

Reasons for England sending the Commissioners to America; the 
delegates in France would not speak any other language than that of 
independence; England's fear of French influence; threatening atti- 
tude of France towards England ; the Toulon squadron ; the effect 
of M. de Noaille's papers, delivered on March 13th; shed tears over 
it; prophesies that the French connection with America will be a 
ruinous one, A. L. S. " Cassander." 3 p. IX, 185. 

From Mesny. 1778. May 20. Paris. 

Enclosing a hundred copies of a work by M. de la Faye, on the 
Roman method for preparing lime; begs Franklin to add a recommen- 
dation to them and forward them to America; leaves him to fix the 
price. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) IX, 186. 

From Ferrand Dupuy. 1778. May 20. Paris. 

Surprised at the reply that was made to the young man in question. 
Renews his appeal in behalf of the latter who seeks assistance to go 
to Boston having lost all his effects when he was taken prisoner during 
the previous voyage. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) LX, 36. 

From Caille. 1778. May 20. Paris. 

Asking for particulars concerning the remedy for dropsy, published 
by Franklin in the Paris newspapers; such kindness on his part will win 
the eternal gratitude of a sufferer from the disease at Frankfort. A. 
L. S. I p. (In French.) IX, 187. 

From J[ani]es Leveux. 1778. May 20. Calais. 

Acknowledging Franklin's letter of the 15th inst. authorizing him 
to help all the subjects of the United States who stand in need of 
assistance. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 188. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May 22. The Hague. 

Difficulty experienced by the Grand Pensionnaire in responding to 
their letter; his wish to send a verbal reply. Desires information as 
to the reception given by the United States to the British Commis- 
sioners. Refusal of Holland to increase the number of their troops. 



428 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Reports that all the French volunteeers have orders to quit the German 
army. Asks for confirmation of the report that Quebec is in the hands 
of the Americans. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 32. 

From Thorn [as] Simpson to The American Commissioners. 
1778, May 25. Brest. 

His treatment since he was placed under arrest by Captain Jones; 
is detained now in the common gaol at Brest; no one allowed to see 
him; his ignorance of French, and general miserable situation; thinks 
this treatment of a lieutenant in the American navy, for an imaginary 
fault, unwarranted and unjust in the highest degree; begs them to 
intercede in his behalf or at least get him a passage to America, where 
he may undergo a fair trial. A. L. S. 5 p. IX, 189. 

From Arthur and W[illia]m Bryan, Jr. 1778. May 25. Dublin. 

Recommending Captain Joy Castle, of Philadelphia, who, with his 
family, was driven away by the calamities attending on war, but 
now, upon the prospects of peace, is anxious to return. A. L, S. i p. 

IX, 190. 

From Taverne Demont d'Hiver. 1778. May 25. Dunkirk. 

Recommending the commercial house of Poreau, MacKenzie & Co., 
who desire to enter into business relations with Franklin; their attach- 
ment to the good cause. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 191. 

From Girardot, Haller & Co. 1778. May 25. Paris. 

Their correspondents, Messrs. F. and A. Dubbeldemutt, of Rotter- 
dam, anxious for a speedy answer to their letter of the i8th inst., con- 
cerning their visit to establish a correspondence in America. L. S. 
I p. IX, 192. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1778. May 26. Nantes. 

Avoided doing the Ranger's business through fear of disagreeable 
consequences; in spite of this, has received a letter from Mr. A. Lee 
in which he is distinctly censured; sends copies of his correspondence 
with Mr. Lee; hopes to prove to Franklin, personally, the entire honesty 
of his conduct. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 155. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 429 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May 27. Brest. 

Account of his late expedition, since leaving Brest on April lOth; 
capture and sinking of various prizes; a detailed description of his 
attempt on Whitehaven on the 22d; spiked their guns and burnt many 
of their vessels; account of the engagement between the Ranger and 
the Drake, ending in the capture of the latter. Events leading up 
to Lieutenant Simpson's suspension and arrest for disobedience. His 
present dilemma for want of money; his draft on M. BersoU has not 
been honored and even the daily provisions for his men arc not forth- 
coming; complains of such a reception. A. L. S. 12 p. IX, 193. 

From Marc Le Fort. 1778. May 27. Marseilles. 

Enclosing an extract from a letter of Antoine Gautier, contain- 
ing news of the capture of the ship L'Elegante commanded by Captain 
ColHneau; begs Franklin to take the matter into consideration. A. L. 
S. 3 p. (In French.) IX, 194. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Commerce, to The 
American Commissioners. 1778. May 28. York. 

Orders relative to the arrival of the brigantine Baltimore, laden 
with a cargo of tobacco ; news of the arrival at Boston of various ves- 
sels. L. S. William Ellery, Richard Hutson, Thomas Adams. 2 p. 

IX, 195. 

From Chevalier de Berny. 1778. May 28. Strasbourg. 

Reminding Franklin that he had the honor to dedicate and address 
to him a manuscript entitled " L'Qilil du Maitre ou Essai sur le Min- 
istere " ; desires to know if it came safely to hand. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) IX, 196. 

From Dabadie. 1778. May 28. Bordeaux. 

About to embark for America with M. De la Plai[g]ne; at M. Tur- 
got's solicitation he obtained a letter to Mr. Williams, at Boston; 
his destination changed; desires a letter now to some one in Georgia. 
A. L. S. 3 p. IX, 181. 



430 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From W[illia]m Bingham to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May 29. St. Pierre. 

Has written several letters to Congress on the subject of remit- 
tances for several debts he has contracted on the public account; should 
these fail to come, must draw on Franklin for the desired sum. Mercan- 
tile operations almost suspended owing to the appearance of an ap- 
proaching war. News of the loss of the Randolph, Captain [Nicholas] 
Biddle; due to his intemperate courage and the cowardice of Cap- 
tain Thompson of the Raleigh, who refused to give him any assistance; 
out of three hundred and five persons, only four were saved. A. L. S. 
4 p. (In duplicate.) IX, 197 and 198. 

Fro?n [Benjamin Vaughan]. 1778. May 29. [London.] 

Doings of Parliament; Burgoyne's speech. Lord Chatham's debts 
unpaid. Desires Jamaica given to the French, not to the Spaniards. 
Lord Sandwich a coarse and vulgar liar; torn to pieces and laughed 
at on all sides. A. L. 3 p. (First part missing.) LVIII, 69. 

From Jon [a] th [an] Trumbull to The American Commissioners. 
1778. May 29. Hartford. 

The bearer Is Captain Niles, commander of the schooner Spy,' who 
has in charge despatches from Congress. The article of lead much 
needed in Connecticut; desires a certain quantity put on board the Spy; 
question of paying Captain Niles's expenses while in France. A. L. S. 
I p. IX, 199. 

Fro7n Henri Serre. 1778. May 29. Geneva. 

Concerning the electrophore of M. Volta; discusses the possibility 
of explaining this invention by Franklin's method of electricity. A. L. 
S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 200. 

From Louvel de Boirargues. 1778. May 29. Paris. 

Has endeavored, in the enclosed verses, to place Franklin's well- 
known attainments in such a light as to reflect credit on a reign, 
already glorious. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) IX, 201. 

By L[ouvel] de Bfoirargues. 1778. May 29. Paris.] 
To Dr. Franklin. A. Sonnet S. i p. (In French.) LI, 44. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 431 

From Ralph Harding. 1778. May 30. Calais. 

Request to enter the American army. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 50. 

From Jon [a] th [an] Trumbull. 1778. May 30. Hartford. 

Asking Franklin's advice and assistance for the bearer, who is com- 
missioned to buy a small font of letters for the use of printers in Con- 
necticut. A. L. S. I p. IX, 202. 

From J. de Sparre. 1778. May 30. Strasbourg. 

Wrote Franklin some time before, enclosing letters from M. de 
Sartine and M. de Villevault, in the hope that Franklin would em- 
ploy him in the affairs of America; having received no answer, begs 
for the return of the letters of introduction. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) IX, 203. 

From Comtesse de Choiseul. 
1778. May 30. L'Abbaye St. Antoine. 

Asking for a letter of recommendation for an officer who desires 
to enter the service of America. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

IX, 204. 
From Richard Peters. 1778. May 31. York. 

Writes again for news of his father; hopes he is still alive; wishes 
him to be informed of the state of American affairs and also of various 
family matters; wishes his father to come and spend his last days with 
them; desires Franklin to advance him a supply of cash which he will 
repay. British tyranny departing at a rapid rate; the English covered 
with disgrace, are preparing to leave Philadelphia; brilliant prospects 
for America. News of the Bache family. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 205. 

From Josh[ua] Babcock. 1778. May 31. Westerly [R. I.]. 

Means taken for the defense of Rhode Island against the enemy; 
slaves emancipated to serve in battalions. General Spenser's abortive 
attempts against the enemy. Exorbitant prices charged for the neces- 
saries of life. Does Franklin know any better expedient for mending the 
currency than severe taxation? Congratulates him on the negotiation 
of the treaties with France. The King and Queen of France and his 
Excellency daily toasted in the political circles of America. Concern- 
ing Franklin's address to Lord North on behalf of his captive country- 
men. Pays him many compliments. A. L. S. 4 p. IX, 206. 



432 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Abraham Whipple. 1778. May 31. Paimboeuf Harbor. 

His arrival; enclosing his orders from Congress and from the Navy 
Board. His departure from Providence and his running the blockade; 
details of his trip ; has twelve prisoners with him ; desires orders relative 
to them. Enclosing a draft of the bill for reconciliating measures 
between Great Britain and America, published by General Pigot, Com- 
mander at Rhode Island ; it was received with all the marks of indignity 
and burnt by the common hangman. L. S. 4 p. IX, 207. 

From Mrs. C. Neate. 1778. May 31. London. 

Three years since she lost her husband; begs Franklin's advice as 
to the best means to take to procure the payment of the debts justly 
due him, amounting at his death to £140,000, of which £30,000 have 
since been paid. A. L. S. 2 p. IX, 208. 

From Debons. 1778. May. Paris. 

Petition for the release of Chevalier de Bazantin, a prisoner in the 
hands of the English at St. Augustin, Fla. D. 3 p. (In French.) 

LVII, 16. 

From [Jean Baptiste] Le Roy. [1778. Cfrca May.] 

Sends him a letter wherein will be seen that M. Lalande Robinot 
is a good and honest merchant, and asks him to give Mr. Robinot a 
letter of recommendation to America. A. L. S. 2 p. XLIV, 170. 

From [Jean Baptiste] Le Roy. [1778. May ?] 

Reminds him about the letter of introduction for M. Lalande- 
Robinot of Nantes, who was going on his own vessel with a valuable 
cargo to America. Mme. de Marunay intends to go to see Franklin 
on Sunday and dine with him. Encloses a paper containing a request 
on behalf of Baron de Wimpfen. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

XLIV, 169. 

From Rob[er]t Montgomery. [1778. Circa May.] Alicante. 

Repeating his former request that Franklin would confirm his certi- 
ficate of allegiance and so save him from further persecution ; claims 
his protection as head of the first American business house established 
in Spain. A. L. S. 3 p. XLI, 60. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 433 

From Sam[ue]l Cooper. 1778. June i. Boston, 

The treaty between France and America; Britain dare not engage 
in a war with both France and the United States. Reception given 
to the conciliatory bills. Prospect of the English leaving Philadelphia. 
Difficulty of recruiting the American army. Anecdote showing the 
cowardice of Lord Percy at Dorchester Heights. Enclosing the pro- 
ceedings of the court martial in which Colonel Henley was tried and 
General Burgoyne showed himself in the most contemptible light; 
justification of Colonel Henley. Encloses a printed copy of the pro- 
posed Constitution. Desires any news of public significance. A. L. S. 
4 p. X, I. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones. 1778. June i. Brest. 

Encloses papers to prove that his roses are not without thorns. 
Plans for keeping his present crew; should their home-sickness continue, 
suggests the advisability of certain exchanges. Willingness of tUe Due 
de Chartres to aid him in obtaining the ship built at Amsterdam ; dis- 
advantages of the Ranger. Splendid results which might be obtained 
with the aid of two or three fast-sailing ships. Repairs needed on the 
Ranger and Drake. The people murmuring at not receiving their 
prize-money. A. L. S. 4 p. X, 2. 

From [Benjamin] Sowden. 1778. June i. Rotterdam. 

Concerning the proposals of Mr. Arrenberg on the question of print- 
ing the bibles for America. Franklin's splendid work; hopes it will 
bring the besotted, pur-blind Ministry of England to their senses. 
Concerning the proposition in the States-General of the Netherlands to 
declare America independent. A. L. 3 p. X, 3. 

From Sam[ue]l Wharton. 1778. June 2. London. 

Sends various papers, by Mr. Pringle, also copies of letters which 
have passed between Mr. Williams and himself on the subject of an 
aspersion of his (Wharton's) character; denies these accusations. The 
arrival of the Andromeda man-of-war at New York, carrying a copy 
of the proposed Bill of Concession; the treaty with France ratified eight 
days before her arrival. General Clinton assumed the command of the 
army April 24th; Sir William Howe, the Guards, and Burgoyne's 
regiment of dragoons expected to embark for England, May 7th. 



434 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Resignation of Lord Suffolk. Negotiations with the Rockinghams and 
Lord Shelburne entirely broken off; all parties angr}' with Lord Sand- 
wich for his imposing on them as regards the navy. A. L. S. 2 p. 

X, 4. 

From F[elix] A[ntonio] Castrioto. 1778. June 2. Lisbon. 

Complains bitterly of receiving no answer to his letters; congratu- 
lates Franklin on the treaty with France. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 5. 

From Girardot, Haller & Co. 1778. June 2. Paris. 

Refers Franklin to their last letter concerning the request of Messrs. 
Dubbeldemutt, at Rotterdam. A. L. S. i p. X, 6. 

Fro?n de Bout. 1778, June 2. Paris. 

Repeating his request for the letter of the Chevalier de Bazantin, 
prisoner at St. Augustine, together with that written him on the Cheva- 
lier's behalf, by the Comtesse de Lameth. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

X, 614. 

From C. [G. F.] Dumas to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 2. The Hague. 

Return of the French Ambassador. Waits only for a copy of the 
treaty to pay his respects to the Grand Pensionnaire. Anecdotes of the 
Duchesse de Chartres and the Princesse de Lamballe, who are making 
a tour in Holland. Approves thoroughly of the Latin quotation to 
be placed under Franklin's portrait. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XXXIX, 33. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 3. Brest. 

Acknowledging his favor of the 25th ult. ; craves pardon for sign- 
ing a draft on Franklin in order to supply his people with necessary 
clothing, etc. ; has never touched a dollar of public money for any private 
purpose of his own. Disposition made of the prizes he captured. 
Inconvenience of finding no Continental agent at Brest. If Franklin 
is in possession of any resolution of Congress which will authorize 
the sending of Lieutenant Simpson to America, should be obliged for 
a copy of it. A. L. S. 4 p. X, 7. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 435 

From V. C. Fautrel. 1778, June 3, Havre. 

Thanks Franklin for using his influence with M. de Sartine to ob- 
tain for him the rank of lieutenant in the Royal Marine. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) X, 8. 

From [Madame] de Pouteney. 1778. June 3. Besangon. 

Enclosing samples of merchandise that her husband can furnish. A. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

A. E. by Franklin. Having discontinued the purchase of goods for 
America, will deliver the samples to some of their merchants; Would 
give him pleasure to be of service to M. or Mme. de Pouteney. X, 9. 

From Elijah Hall to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 3. On board the Ranger. 

Begs them to point out some method to bring the prizes to sale, 
that the men may get their share; their families at home in a distressed 
condition ; have been seven months from America, and not two of them 
at sea. Considers the treatment of Mr. Simpson most unfair; com- 
plains of Captain Jones ; no American of spirit can ever serve with cheer- 
fulness under him ; asserts the courage and good behaviour of the men 
on the Ranger, Captain Jones to the contrary, notwithstanding. Mr. 
Bersoll has denied them all supplies ; the beef they get very bad. L. 
S. 3 p. X, 10. 

From Moucherel. 1778. June 4. Nancy. 

Ready to give to the public two works on law; practicability of 
adopting this new code to the laws and customs in use in America. 
A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) X, 11. 

From D[avid] Hartley. 1778. June 5. London. 

Authorized by the Administration and the Board of Admiralty to 
make certain propositions concerning the exchange of the poor prisoners ; 
the port of Calais chosen as the most suitable for this exchange. A. 
L. S. 2 p. X, 12. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 203. 



436 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Fairholme and Luther. 1778. June 5. St. Martin. 

Reminding Franklin of their letter of some weeks before, concern- 
ing their refusal to answer for the passage of some French officers with- 
out Franklin's orders; desires an answer to this. Requesting Frank- 
lin to empower them to act for Congress in the event of prizes ar- 
riving at St. Martin. In need of assistance. L. S. 2 p. X, 13. 

From A[melia] Barry. 1778. June 5. Tunis. 

Felicitates him on the glorious results of his labors; her husband's 
failure to make a success of his business; begs Franklin to secure for 
him a consulship in whatever port he can most easily obtain it. A. L. 
S. 7 p. (In duplicate.) X, 14 and 15. 

From Tho[ma]s Bond, Jr. 1778. June 5. Bethlehem. 

Presenting the bearer, Dr. Jacob Rieger, who goes, via France, to 
Germany to improve himself in his profession ; his faithful apprentice- 
ship under the writer's father, Dr. Bond; begs Franklin to introduce 
him to some medical gentlemen in France. His present position as 
Assistant Director-General of the General Hospital. Their want of 
certain instruments that Dr. Rieger is directed to purchase. The Bache 
family all well. British army about to evacuate Philadelphia. A. L. 
S. I p. X, 16. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones. 1778. June 6. Brest. 

Acknowledging his esteemed favor of the ist inst. [giving him the com- 
mand of the great ship built at Amsterdam], deeply sensible of the 
honor conferred upon him ; expects soon to wait upon him at Paris. 
Suggests that the Providence and Boston should rendezvous at Brest. 
A. L. S. I p. X, 17. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 

1778. June 6. Bordeaux. 

Question of certain debts he has had to discharge. The affair of 

the conspiracy has been examined by the proper officers appointed by 

the Intendant, but nothing could be proved. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 18. 

From Lalande Robinot. 1778. June 6. L'Orient. 

His vessel on the eve of departure for North Carolina; begs for a 
line from Franklin to facilitate his return to France. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) X, 19. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 437 

From T[homas] Barker. 1778. June 7. Nantes. 

Intends taking passage on a vessel bound for North Carolina ; de- 
sires Franklin's opinion as to what part of the coast of America would 
be most free from English ships. A. L. S. i p. X, 20. 

From G. Anquetil Brutiere & Co. 1778. June 7. Granville. 

Fitted out his vessel the year before for the cod fisheries off New 
Foundland; she was boarded by an American privateer who forced 
her to take on board seven English prisoners and transport them to 
Europe without supplying provisions or necessaries of life; the loss of 
money this occasioned him ; applies to Franklin for compensation. A. L. 
S. 4 p. (In French.) X, 21. 

From Baron de Hupsch. 1778. June 7. Cologne. 

A zealous defender of liberty; has charge of the Universal Gazette 
published in Cologne; the interest with which he has always printed 
anything of note concerning the Americans; discredit thrown on Amer- 
ica by the Protestant gazettes of Germany; begs Franklin to make 
contributions from time to time to his paper on those subjects which 
concern the glory and credit of America. His own work in natural 
history, economy, and mineralogy; believes he could be useful to Con- 
gress. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) X, 22. 

From The Navy Board [of the Eastern Department] to The Ameri- 
can Commissioners. 1778. June 8. Boston. 

Agreeable to the directions of the Marine Committee, they have 
provided the schooner Despatch for the purpose of conveying to the 
Commissioners some packets of great importance ; orders relative to sup- 
plying the captain and crew with provisions and money. L. S. J [ames] 
Warren, J[ohn] Deshon. i p. X, 23. 

From Meinert & Co. 1778. June 9. Nantes. 

Forwarding a petition from a poor prisoner at Brest. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) LX, 123. 



438 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From The Council of Massachusetts Bay to The American Commis- 
sioners. 1778. June 9. Watertown. 

Packets from the Secret Committee of Congress to the Commissioners 
are transmitted by Corbin Barnes, Captain of the Despatch. Packets 
may be returned the same way. A. L. S. Jer[emiah] Powell, Pres- 
[idenjt. I p. LIII, 68. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 9. The Hague. 

Extracts from German letters showing the imminence of war with 
Austria. Increased sympathy in Holland for the American cause. De- 
lighted with Mr. A. Lee's approbation. Prophesies that the Belgian 
lion will soon be snatched from the teeth and claws of the British lion. 
A. L. S. 5 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 34. 

Fro7n Jno. P[aul] Jones to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 10. Brest. 

Sale of one of the Ranger's prizes by Messrs. Delap; wrote to them 
requesting that the captor's part of the prize might be remitted to Mr. 
Williams; no attention paid to this request; begs Dr. Franklin to give 
the necessary orders that the uneasiness of his officers and men may be re- 
moved. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 25. 

From Rawleigh Colston. 1778. June 10. Cape Francois. 

The bearer. Major du Bouchett, was taken prisoner on his passage 
home and sent from New York to Martinique; honored his draft for 
a certain amount in order to defray the expenses of his passage ; the 
Major's honorable service in America. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 26. 

From Pierre Maubaillarcy. 1778. June 10. Brest. 

Applying for the commission of Consul for the United States at 
Brest. Mem. i p. (In French.) LX, 74. 

From J[am]es Leveux. 1778. June 10. Calais. 

Concerning the case of Ralph Harding, a retired officer in the service 
of India, who wrote Franklin a letter with a detailed account of his 
experiences in attempting to join the English army in America and at 
the same time offering his services to Franklin ; has received no answer 
to this letter; begs Franklin to relieve Mr. Harding's anxiety. A. L. 
S. 2 p. (In French.) X, 27. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 439 

From The Continental Congress, Marine Committee, to The Ameri- 
can Commissioners. 1778. June 10. York, Pa. 

Requesting them to purchase twenty-eight cannon and ship them to 
Portsmouth or Boston. A. L. S. Richard Henry Lee, Chairman, i p. 

X, 2^y2. 

From Sikes. 1778. June 11. Paris. 

Like Franklin, he has made great progress in science; sends him a 
prospectus of an instrument, invented by himself and approved by the 
Royal Academy of Sciences; desires to show him this invention. A. L. 
S. I p. (In French.) X, 28. 

From Massieu. 1778. June 11. Caen. 

Wrote to Mr. Deane in the beginning of April concerning M. Du- 
mesnil de St. Pierre who was killed three years before in the service 
of Congress and of whose death some authentic certificate is wanted ; 
encloses an extract of his letter to Mr. Deane as the best way to ex- 
plain the affair; begs for an answer. A. L. S. 4 p. X, 29. 

FroTH [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June II. The Hague. 

His interviews with the Grand Facteur a propos of the advisability 
of presenting to the Grand Pensionnaire a copy of the treaty with 
France. Has just seen the fine, spirited Resolution of Congress on the 
subject of the Conciliatory Bill. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

XXXIX, 35. 

From Georgelin Du Cosquer. 1778. June 11. Paris. 

His project for duration of law-suits in France; hopes Franklin will 
second his undertaking; Article 25 of the wise Constitution of Penn- 
sylvania is the model which he intends to propose to France for imi- 
tation. A. L. S. I p. Enclosing a sketch of this plan (3 p.). (In 
French.) 

Copy of Franklin's answer. Avows his attachment to France; 
praises M. du Cosquer's laudable intention, but pleads his ignorance 
of French law as a reason for his being unable to judge of the work. 
I p. (In French.) X, 30. 



440 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Mme. Brillon. [1778. June?] Thursday nth. Passy. 

Assuring Franklin of her friendship. Advantages of friendship over 
love. Places implicit trust and confidence in Franklin. A. L. 2 p. 
(In French.) XLIII, 93. 

From James Moylan. 1778. June 12. L'Orient. 

Arrival of the frigate Boston, Captain Tucker, from Bordeaux; she 
will sail the next day in company with the frigate L'Oiseau. A. L. S. 
I p. X, 31. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 13. Bordeaux. 

Acknowledging the punctuality with which his drafts have been 
honored. Causes for the high price of fresh beef. A, L. S. 2 p. 

X, 32. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 13. Bordeaux. 

Acknowledging their favor of the 25th ult. Will transmit every 
month whatever disbursements his department may receive and will 
communicate any occurrences meriting attention. A. L. S. i p. 

X, 33. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 14. Bordeaux. 

Introducing the bearer. Captain Casstle; he and his wife desire to 
return to Philadelphia; the Captain's business in Paris is to obtain the 
restitution of a ship belonging to him and his brother; if he succeeds, 
will make her American property and proceed at once to America. A. 
L. S. 2 p. X, 34. 

From Rich[ard] Bache. 1778. June 14. Manheim. 

At Franklin's request made inquiries about Richard Cooke, a native 
of Rotterdam; he has been living in North Carolina, but starts for 
Europe with letters to Franklin, with the intention of looking after 
the legacy, said to have been left him. Acknowledging Franklin's 
letters. A. L. S. i p. X, 35. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 441 

From H. Archer to The American Commissioners. 

1778. June 14. Paris. 

Though a native of England, it is his wish to go to America and 
enter into one of the regiments of horse ; will be glad to serve at first 
as a volunteer at his own expense. Inveighs against Great Britain; 
expresses the greatest admiration for America. Proposes to wait on 
Franklin in company with Baron de Ridberg. A. L. S. 3 p. X, 36. 

From Johann Wilhelm Harcken. 1778. June 15. Hamburg. 

Offers his services as clergyman. Asks free passage to America for 
himself and family. A. L. S. 2 p. LIX, 62. 

From Abraham Whipple to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 15. Paimboeuf. 

Acknowledging their favor per Captain Jones; desires orders relative 
to his prisoners; his masts being prepared; offers to carry arms and 
clothing to the United States. L. S. i p. X, 37. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 16. The Hague. 

Question of presenting the treaty still pending; attitude of the Grand 
Facteur. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XXXIX, 36. 

From ■W[illia]m Bingham to Messrs. Franklin and Lee. 
1778. June 16. St. Pierre. 

Surprised at receiving no information of the Treaty of Commerce 
concluded between France and America. As agent for the United States 
in the West Indies, cannot discharge his duties with any credit to him- 
self or his country, if he is to be kept in ignorance of such important 
information. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 38. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 16. Bordeaux. 

Captain Conyngham's arrival at Corunna from Cadiz, having cap- 
tured four prizes on the way. The Jersey privateers still continue on 
the coast of Spain; news of other vessels. A. L. S. i p. X, 39. 



442 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Antoine Salvator. 1778. June 16. Cadiz. 

Begging his acceptance of a small work (poem) as a proof of his 
ardent and active interest in America. His intense admiration for 
Franklin, Washington and the new Republic. Certain rumors cur- 
rent as to why the Spanish fleet has not arrived. A. L. S. 5 p. (In 
French.) X, 40. 

From D[avid] H[artley]. 1778. June 16. London. 

Acknowledging Franklin's favor of June 5th, relative to the ex- 
change of prisoners; transcribes his own letter of June 5th on the same 
subject, for fear it may have miscarried. A. L. S. i p. X, 41. 

From Ra[lph] Izard. 1778. June 17. Paris. 

Concerning the account Mr. Pringle gave him of his interview with 
Franklin ; takes great offense at some of Franklin's expressions. No 
attention has ever been paid to his repeated requests to be told why 
all knowledge of the treaty with France was withheld from him; con- 
siders Franklin's reasons for his conduct are not the true ones; tells 
him what he thinks were his real motives. Arthur Lee's chivalrous 
defense of Franklin in the day of his tribulation and his ungrateful 
return. Wishes to know if it is true that the French ministry de- 
sired that Mr. Arthur Leee and himself should be kept in ignorance 
of certain matters. L. S. 8 p. X, 43. 

From . 1778. June 17. 

Remarks on the political situation in England during the war with 
the American Colonies. The interests of the other European powers 
will impel them to oppose England in this war. Sees no prospect of 
England being able to subdue the Colonies and thinks she should at- 
tend to her affairs at home. Would be folly for her to declare war 
against France or Spain in the present state of her affairs. Diss. 
M. 8 p. (In French.) XLIX, 55. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 18. Paris. 

Astonished at their refusal of offers on the part of certain vessels 
to cruise against the English, at their own expense and under the laws 
of the American navy; the principal promoter of this enterprise is an 
old associate of the Marquis Roux of Corsica, well-known for his 
audacity and courage. A. L. S. 4 p. X, 44. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 443 

From Fran[ci]s Coffyn to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 18. Dunkirk. 

Desires an answer to his letter of the 8th inst. Concerning the two 
vessels now being fitted out for America, which will carry letters and 
any news they may care to send. Contradictory reports as to the where- 
abouts of the English squadron. Certain American seamen who are 
in distress and claim protection ; advises their being helped, otherwise 
they are sure to go over to Great Britain. A. L. S. 3 p. X, 45. 

From Victoire Laubertie. 1778. June 18. Brunswick. 

Concerning Colonel de Donap who, before his death, sent to one 
of his friends at Kassel, 8,000 ecus to be placed to the credit of his 
children, who are also hers and whom he legitimatized before his depart- 
ure for America; this sum of money detained by the Council of War 
at Kassel; begs Franklin to find out if Colonel de Donap did not leave 
a will in America in favor of his children, in order that they may not 
be deprived of all his effects. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) X, 46. 

From Fran[ci]s Coffyn to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 19. Dunkirk. 

From certain reports, believes that Admiral Keppel's squadron was 
seen off Portland the 15th inst. Rumor that Lord Byron's squadron 
sailed from Plymouth the loth inst. Refusal of a French vessel to 
carry to America, as passenger, James Bearus who was wounded while 
on board the Lexington. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 47. 

From James Lovell. 1778. June 20. Yorktown. 

Forgot to forward the Resolve of May 5th with the ratifications of 
the treaties. The American troops entered Philadelphia on the i8th; 
the intention of the enemy in evacuating it not yet explained. Com- 
missioners will be particularly nominated to transact affairs at Lisbon 
and The Hague, if those courts are well-disposed toward America. 
A. L. S. 2 p. X, 48. 

From The Continental Congress, Committee of Foreign Affairs, to 

The American Commissioners. 1778. June 21. Yorktown. 
Arrrival of the British Commissioners; an answer to their propositions 
is printed in the Pennsylvania Gazette of the 20th inst. General 



444 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Clinton's evacuation of Philadelphia on the i8th; General Washing- 
ton is pursuing the enemy into Jerse}^ Desire the most exact informa- 
tion concerning the authenticity of Mr. Holker's mission to Congress, 
touching their treaty with Great Britain. A. L. S. Richard Henry 
Lee, Tho[ma]s Heyward, James Lovell. 2 p. X, 49. 

From William Moore to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 21. Paris. 

Petition for a pass. A. L. S. 2 p. LXXIV, 117. 

From Joy Castle and William Castle, of Philadelphia, to [The 
American Commissioners]. 1778. June 22. Passy. 

Petition for papers to permit them to proceed to America with a 
cargo. A. D. S. i p. (In duplicate.) LXI, 31, 32. 

From Peirce Powers to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 22. Brest Hospital. 

Was midshipman on board the Ranger in her action with the Drake; 
lost his right arm and received a bad wound in his left hand; being 
unable any longer to serve his country, desires to be provided with a 
passage to America. A. L. S. i p. X, 50. 

From Masson. 1778. June 22. Paris. 

Saw with pleasure in the Courier de I'Europe, a translation of the 
famous latin verse, which so truly applies to Franklin ; thinks the trans- 
lation, though good, lacks the brevity of the original ; his own render- 
ing is: 

"II arracha par ses rares talents 
La foudre aux dieux, le sceptre aux tyrans." 
A. L. S. 2 p. X, 51. 

From John Bondfield. 1778. June 23. Bordeaux. 

Eclat with which the Marquis d'Almadora is received by the chief 
officers of Bordeaux ; expects his residence in London will be a short 
one. A. L. S. i p. X, 52. 

From Sir Francis Montresor. 1778. June 23. Bordeaux. 

Has been very busy fitting out the Vengeance ; account of her guns, 
crew, etc. His attachment to the United States. X, 53. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 445 

From Veuve Lalanne et fils. 1778. June 23. Bayonne. 

Concerning one of their vessels, L'Esperance, which was captured in 
a manifestly illegal manner by the Captain of the Nottingham and whose 
cargo they hope to be able to recover with Franklin's assistance. A. L. 
S. 3 p. (In French.) X, 54. 

From John Boylston. 1778. June 24. London. 

Pictures Franklin at the helm in these stormy times, the thunder 
rattling round his head and securely shrouded under his own intel- 
lectual rod of fortitude and truth. Hopes the enclosed will be of some 
service to their unhappy townsfolk. A. L. S. i p. X, 55. 

From Samuel Mather. 1778, June 24. Boston. 

Congratulating Franklin on the success of his prudent and faithful 
negotiation. Promising aspect of things in the New World ; the suc- 
cess of General Gates against " the pompous, histrionical Burgoyne " 
has communicated no small terror to the enemy. His experiences in 
Boston during the siege. Is seventy-two years old ; hopes before his 
death to see his country peacefully established in the happy state of 
liberty and independence. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 56. 

From Gaulay. 1778. June 24. Strasbourg. 

Desires to enter the service of America in the capacity of surgeon ; 
his past experience. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

A. E. by Franklin. Has no orders to send surgeons to America and 
can therefore give him no encouragement. X, 57. 

From Hez[ekiah] Ford to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 25. Nantes. 

Reasons why he has decided to take passage on board Mr. Ross's 
schooner bound to Virginia. Thanking him for the letter of recom- 
mendation. His indignation at the cruelty which has lately marked 
General Howe's conduct in wantonly destroying the property of in- 
dividuals up the Delaware. Anathematizes George III. A. L. S. 4 p. 

X, 59. 



446 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Drouet. 1778. June 26. Paris. 

Has been occupied for forty-two years on a plan, which, while it 
assures the growth of power to a nation, promises at the same time a 
real and lasting well-being to its people; the work has been immense, 
but the summary is finished; desires to read it to Franklin in order 
to obtain his opinion. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) X, 60. 

Frotn Capt. Emanuel Pierre De la Plaigne. 
1778. June 26. Plymouth Dock. 

An account of their being attacked, on May 1st, by the corsair Lively 
and obliged, after a sharp fight, to surrender; treated like savages, 
ironed and imprisoned ; his relations and domestics dependent on his 
aid while he is reduced to the lowest misery; begs for assistance. A. 
L. S. 3 p. (In French.) X, 61. 

From . 1778. June 26. 

In praise of Dr. Franklin and M. Dubourg. Verses, i p. (In 
French.) LI, 65. 

From Girardot, Haller & Co. 1778. June 26. Paris. 

Begging for letters of recommendation on behalf of Mr. Solomon 
Kitt, a gentleman of good family in Germany, who desires some pro- 
tection in America, for which country he has the sincerest attachment. 
Entreats him to answer their repeated letters for Messrs. Dubbel- 
demutt, of Rotterdam. L. S. i p. X, 62. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 

1778. June 27. Bordeaux. 

Concerning the engagement of " La Belle Poule " and its possible 
consequences. America does not appear to be Admiral Byron's des- 
tination. Hopes the arrival of good news in America may promote the 
recruiting service. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 63. 

i^rom Lt.-Col. de Forestier. 1778. June 27. Hesdin. 

Concerning a man in town who calls himself de Bonne and who 
professes to be a captain in the service of the United States ; his past 
unsavory record ; thinks he will throw discredit on the service, there- 
fore writes Franklin this warning. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

X, 64. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 447 

From John Thompson. 1778. June 27. Brest. 

Was wounded in an engagement with an English vessel whilst 
gunner on the Lexington. Lost his leg and is in the hospital at Brest. 
Appeals to Franiclin for money and clothing. L. S. 2 p. LX, 44. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 27. The Hague. 

Account of his presenting the treaty to the Grand Pensionnaire. 
Expected arrival of M. Van Berkel. Reported loan of three million 
florins raised by Holland. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 37. 

From Poreau, MacKenzie & Co. 1778. June 27. Dunkirk. 

Concerning a bond which they are to sign and which they hear is 
to be presented to them by Mr. CofiFyn; sorry to tell Franklin that he 
is a most improper person for such a trust; begs that the bond may be 
sent by another hand. L. S. 2 p. X, 65. 

From Abraham Whipple to The American Commissioners. 

1778. June 27. Nantes. 

Expects to be able to sail by the 20th of July; if he is to take 
any goods on board, would be glad to know of it. A. L. S. 3 p. 

X, 66. 

From de Romas. 1778. June 27. Agen. 

Remembering the correspondence that Franklin had with his brother, 
takes the liberty to ask his influence with M. le Prince de Montbarrey 
to obtain letters exempting his nephew from examinations at the school 
of Mezieres; wishes to bring his nephew to call on Franklin. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) X, 67. 

From Le Sieur Teissier. 1778. June 27. 

Reminds Franklin that he was presented to him by the Comte de 
Sarsfield ; is about to sail for America to offer his services as surgeon 
to the United States ; begs for the promised letter of recommendation. 
L. in 3d P. I p. (In French.) X, 68. 



44^ Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Samuel Parson. 1778. June 28. 

Certificate as to the diligence, skill, and modesty of Chevalier dc La 
Neuville, and his brother Major Normont de La Neuville, Inspector 
and Deputy Inspector of the army under General Gates. D. S. i p. 

LIII, 69b. 

From James Moylan to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 29. L'Orient. 

Account of the arrival of the frigate Oiseau with the prize Hope, a 
privateer, vi^hich had taken the brig Sally, of Massachusetts; gives the 
names of the sailors from" Marblehead who were prisoners on board; 
procured their liberty and sent them to join Captain Jones of the 
Ranger. A. L. S. i p. X, 69. 

From Peter Amiel. 1778. June 29. Nantes. 

Captain Jones has granted him leave to stay at L'Orient to settle 
his private affairs; since then, has been ofiEered apartments in the 
the chateau of M. de Chaumont; begs for an extension of leave. A. 
L. S. I p. X, 70. 

FroT7i Lalanne. 1778. June 29. Paris. 

Desires to know if the two propositions made to Franklin have met 
with any success. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

A. E. by Dr. Franklin. The Commissioners have no authority to 
purchase wine for America, nor, as yet, to appoint consuls. X, *]!. 

From Hiriart. 1778. June 29. St. Sebastian. 

Has read in the papers a latin verse which ought to be put at the 
foot of Franklin's portrait; suggests a slight emendation; this is his 
first attempt in poetry. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) X, 72, 

From Hez[ekiah] Ford. 1778. June 30. Paimboeuf. 

Account of an engagement between two privateers belonging to the 
state of Connecticut, and two British men-of-war, ending in a victory 
for the Americans. Fears to return to Virginia in Mr. Ross's schooner 
on account of the numerous cruisers now on the coast. A. L. S. 3 p. 

X, 73. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 449 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 30. Bordeaux. 

A vessel from Louisiana reports the seizure, by the back settlers of 
Georgia and Carolina, of all British posts on the banks of the Mis- 
sissippi, together with two valuable vessels laden for London. Other 
captures reported. Count d'Aranda's passage through Bordeaux on 
his return journey from Madrid to Paris. A. L. S. i p. X, 74. 

From Fran[ci]s Coffyn to The American Commissioners. 
1778. June 30. Dunkirk. 

Information received of the arrival in England of six Russian ships- 
of-war and the expected advent of six more; the captains and officers 
on board are English and Scotch and the sailors Russian. A. L. S. i p. 

X, 75. 

By . [1778. June ?] 

Lines on the refusal by the Church authorities to hold a religious 
service over Voltaire's remains. Verses, i p. (In French.) LI, 85. 

From The Sailors on board " The Ranger " to The American Com- 
missioners. 1778. June. 

Petitions for relief from their grievances at the hands of Captain 
[John Paul] Jones. Praise of Lieutenant Simpson. Mem. S. Eben- 
ezer Watson and seventy-seven others. 3 p. LXI, 97. 

From Christ [ia]n Stenger and William Stragham. 
1778. June. Brest. 

Two captains of merchant vessels hailing from Ireland, captured by 
the Continental ship " Ranger," petition the American Commissioners to 
be released and allowed to return to their families. L. i p. LX, 21. 

Fro//z Mich [e]l Comyn. 1778. July i. Marseilles. 

OfiEering his services in the capacity of Consul for the City of Mar- 
seilles and requesting Franklin's protection and recommendation to 
Congress; his experience in trade and his knowledge of French and 
English. Was instrumental in procuring for the Continental army 
some officers of distinguished merit, such as the Count Pulaski, and 
M. le Chevalier de la Baume. A. L. S. 3 p. X, 77. 

2 — 29 



450 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Sain[ue]l Cooper. 1778. July i. Boston. 

Proceedings of the British Commissioners; they stumbled at the very 
threshold and in their first communication to Congress advanced a 
palpable falsehood ; if they have nothing further to offer, they have 
come upon a fool's errand. The crj^ everywhere is " Independence and 
fidelity to our treaties." News of the army; General Washington, 
with 20,CX)0 men, not far from Princeton; General Clinton, with 12 
to 15,000, at Mt. Holly. No authentic report of Comte d'Estaing's 
arrival on the American coast ; Boston harbor alive with French vessels 
and their prizes. Bright prospects for America. A. L. S. 2 p. 

X, 78. 

From Mme. Brillon. [1778?] July i. Passy. 

Witty and bantering reply to Franklin who had compared himself to 
a beggar asking alms from a bishop. Declines to give Franklin the 
kind of charity he asks for. Is wM'Uing to give him her friendship, 
considers him as her father but cannot entertain his proposals of love. 
A. L. 2 p. (In French.) XLIII, 26. 

Printed in Putnam's Monthly, Oct., 1906, 37. 

From [Edme Jacques] Genet. 1778. July 2. Versailles. 

Glad that Franklin approves of the use he has made of his letters; 
only waiting for the news from America promised him by Franklin, 
to publish it to all Paris. Will do his best to send him the London 
Evening Post and Chronicle but in the present state of affairs can- 
not guarantee their arriving regularly. A. L. S. 3 p. X, 79. 

From Charles Epp. 1778. July 2. Altdorf. 

His opinion concerning the strength of the Americans to fight any 
foreign power ; the difficulties that overtake a commonwealth after 
the enemy has been driven out ; the evils to be avoided in a repub- 
lican government. A. L. S. 4 p. X, 80. 

From The Navy Board of the Eastern Department to The American 
Commissioners. 1778. July 2. Boston. 

Sends by the bearer. Captain Ayres, four packets from the Honorable 
Committee for Foreign Affairs, and the Gazettes of Boston. Recom- 
mends Captain Ayres to Franklin's notice as an officer ready upon all 
occasions to render his best services to his country. L. S. J[ames] 
Warren, i p. X, 81. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 451 

From Abraham Whipple to The American Commissioners. 

1778. July 2. Nantes. 

Acknowledging his favor of the 23d ult. with the agreeable contents. 
Nearly ready for sea; desires that the necessary merchandise might be 
put on board as soon as possible. Encloses an exact return of prisoners. 
L. S. 3 p. X, 82. 

Fro w Henricus Godet. 1778. July 2. Amsterdam. 

Has been applied to for assistance by one David Welsh, who saj's 
he was second lieutenant on board the Lexington, was subsequently 
taken prisoner, and carried to Plymouth ; desires Franklin's orders be- 
fore he takes any steps in the matter. A. L. S. i p. X, 83. 

Frorn Thom[as] Simpson to The American Commissioners. 

1778. July 3. Brest. 

Acknowledging the receipt of their favor of the 3d ult. and thank- 
ing them for their interposition on his behalf. Has been released 
from prison by Captain Jones on his signing the enclosed parole. Dis- 
cusses the question of his passage home; his lack of funds, having 
received no money since the winter before. A. L. S. 3 p. X, 84. 

From James Moylan to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 3. L'Orient. 

Arrival of the frigate Boston, Captain Tucker, having taken four 
prizes; Mr. Livingston has set out for Paris to inform them of the 
disagreeable cause of this vessel's quick return ; has undertaken to supply 
his wants, as Mr. Schweighauser has not had time. A. L. S. i p. 

X, 85. 
From Benjamin Vaughan. 1778. July 3. 

Thinks it right to keep up the characters of the men in power, though 
their conduct has in general seemed unintelligible and to have no bottom 
but courtiership and pride. Believes America will feel with England 
in her distress and not let France and Spain push her to the wall; 
acknowledges England's weakness and believes it probable that the 
French will land and even stay for a season. Lord Bute's desire to come 
into power with Lord Chatham and the latter's repudiation of him. 
Franklin's opinion of Lord Chatham erroneous. Private business 
matters. Messages to Mr. Williams. A. L. 4 p. X, 86. 



452 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Fairholme and Luther. 1778. July 3. Isle de Re. 

No answer received to their two letters, announcing the arrival at Isle 
de Re of an English prize, and offering to act for Congress in this 
and similar matters; desire the necessary orders. A. L. S. i p. 

X, 87. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 3. The Hague. 

Account of loan greatly exaggerated. Communicated the treaty to 
M. Van Berkel and to the Chief Burgomaster of Amsterdam; their 
high opinion of it. Has made good use of the papers they sent as 
shown by the enclosed newspaper cuttings. Delighted at the safe ar- 
rival of the Deane as his dear friend Mr. Carmichael is on board. A. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 38. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 3. Passy. 

According to their orders has stopped the reparation of the arms at 
Nantes. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 157. 

From Perrot and Boyer. 1778. July 3. Paris. 

Begging Franklin's acceptance of a dozen bottles of wine as a feeble 
token of their regard and admiration ; hopes they will prolong Frank- 
lin's days. A short poem, representing America as resting, after their 
struggle, under the shadow of the lilies of France. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) X, 88. 

From Sam[ue]l Tucker to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 3. L'Orient. 

Announcing his arrival in port; took four prizes; gives his reasons 
for returning so soon ; the bearer, Lieutenant Livingston, will give 
them a detailed account of the whole affair; disposition to be made 
of the prisoners on board ; regrets that, owing to ill health, Mr. 
Livingston will not be able to remain with him. Sighted the English 
fleet on June i6th. A. L. S. 3 p. X, 89. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 453 

From Harriott Heathcote. 1778. July 3. St. Omer. 

Recalls to Franklin's memory the great civility her mother received, 
when in Philadelphia, from the late Mrs. Franklin; desires some news 
of the welfare of Miss Franklin. A. L. S. i p. X, 90. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 4. Bordeaux, 

Arrival of Captain Barry, in the Union, from Edenton. Wilful 
misconduct of the pilots situated at the passes on the Carolina coast 
M. de Sartine's offer to aid in the fitting out of armed vessels. Mr 
James Willing headed the party which cut off the English settle 
ments on the Mississippi. News of other arrivals. A. L. S. 3 p 

X, 91 
From Arthur Middleton. 1778. July 4. Charleston. 

Introducing Alexander Gillon, Esq., a gentleman who has accepted 
the commission of commodore to oblige the state of South Carolina; 
he needs no other recommendation than the fact of his having given up his 
own independence to assist in establishing that of America. A. L. S. 
I p. X, 93. 

From Junker [Censor Royal]. 1778. July 4. Paris. 

Desire on the part of le Sieur Gross to enter the service of the United 
States in the capacity of surgeon ; his past experience ; his refusal of 
other offers in order to serve America; he has a sister living in Phila- 
delphia. A. L. S. I p. (In French.) X, 94. 

From [De] Lafrete. 1778. July 5. Magnauville. 

Concerning the affairs of Messrs. Veuve Lalanne et fils, relative to 
the ship Esperance, unlawfully captured and conducted to New York; 
has an interest in this vessel, therefore joins in begging Franklin's 
counsel and protection. Courteous messages from his wife. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) X, 95. 

From De La Faye. 1778. July 6. Rocquencourt. 

The nephew of Abbe Tailhie, desires exceedingly to make a voyage 
to America, and for this purpose, desires letters of introduction, that 
he may not arrive there quite unknown. Messages from Monsieur and 
Madame de Boisroger and Mile, de Pontenil and their wish to have 
him visit them in the summer. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) X, 96. 



454 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Jean Baptiste] Le Roy. 1778. July 6. 

Asking for letters to people of consequence in the Carolinas, on be- 
half of an honest merchant. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) X, 97. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 

1778. July 7. Bordeaux. 

Arrival of news from Edenton in sloop, Sally; capture of the 
entire fourth regiment. Advantages America would reap from hav- 
ing consuls or agents established at different places, to transmit monthly 
returns of the imports and exports. A. L. S. 3 p. X, 98. 

From Fran[ci]s Coffyn to The American Commissioners. 

1778. July 7. Dunkirk. 

Extraordinary conduct of Poreau, MacKenzie & Co. who have en- 
deavored to wrong him in Franklin's estimation [see X, 65] ; wants 
nothing better than a chance to justify himself; returns the commission, 
instructions and bond. News of the capture of several French vessels; 
their crews conducted to prison at Plymouth. Admiral Keppel's squad- 
ron ready to proceed to sea to meet the French squadron. Disposition 
to be made of American seamen. A. L. S. 3 p. X, 99. 

From Poreau, MacKenzie & Co. to The American Commissioners. 

1778. July 7. Dunkirk. 

Certain Americans held back in their desire to distinguish them- 
selves, from lack of opportunity and funds; Franklin's willingness to 
grant them a commission, provided their captain should be a man whom 
he could trust ; Captain Amiel answers this description, but he wants 
a larger vessel than they are willing to provide. Mortified at discov- 
ering that their letter to the Commissioners was shown to Coffyn. 
Begs that the commission may be sent in spite of Captain Amiel's 
withdrawal. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) X, lOO. 

From Peirce Powers. 1778. July 7. Brest. 

Begs that Franklin will not forget him; recalls the fact that he was 
midshipman on board the Ranger, where he lost his arm in the engage- 
ment with the Drake; desires to return home as he is not fit for sea- 
service. A. L. S. I p. X, loi. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 455 

Frotn James Moylan to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 8. L'Orient. 

Steps he has taken relative to Captain Tucker's prizes. The jealousy 
subsisting between Captain Tucker's officers and the French part of 
the crew has reached such a pitch that it is to be brought before the 
Admiralty. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 102. 

From Fran[ci]s Coffyn to The American Commissioners. 

1778. July 9. Dunkirk. 

Enclosing a certificate, in French, from the officers of the Admiralty 
Court at Dunkirk which he hopes will obviate, in some measure, the 
bad impression made by Poreau's false insinuations; will send other 
vouchers of his character and conduct. A. L. S. i p. X, 103. 

From Peter Amiel to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 9. Dunkirk. 

Hearing that Messrs. Poreau, MacKenzie & Co. have written a 
letter to Franklin attempting to injure Mr. Coffyn's character, begs 
that they will suspend judgment until he can lay all the particulars be- 
fore them. A. L. S. i p. X, 104. 

From Chevalier de Champigny. 1778. July 9. Amsterdam. 

Sends third volume of his translation of the History of Denmark. 
Hopes Franklin will remit balance due on his subscription to his works. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XL V, 128a. 

From Deplaine. 1778. July 9. Verdun. 



Quotes some Latin lines of his own composition which he begs may 
be written under Franklin's bust in the salon. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) XLI, lo. 

From Chevalier de Berny. 1778. July 9. Strasbourg. 

Has received no answer to his letter enclosing a manuscript, bear- 
ing the title " L'CEil du Maitre ou Essai sur le Ministere " ; begs to 
know if Franklin received it and if his opinion of it was favorable. 
A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) X, 105. 



456 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Y. Gouvion. 1778. July 9. Paris. 

Is about to leave for Germany; sorry that he is too much pressed 
for time to make Franklin his adieu ; begs him to take charge of the 
enclosed letter which is destined for America. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

X, 106. 

FroTu Rich[ar]d Grinnell. 1778. July 9. Dunkirk. 

Detailing his movements since he obtained his discharge from the 
Belle Isle where he had been impressed without his leave; his de- 
sire to obtain a commission, go to the Brazils and destroy all the London 
fleet. Voyage he made in the employ of Captain Coffyn who desires 
to engage him again ; waits however to hear from Franklin. Has heard 
that his brother, Wm. Grinnell, was lieutenant on board the Columbus 
in her engagement with the Glasgow. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 107. 

FroTti D[avid] H[artley]. 1778. July 10. London. 

No answer received from the Admiralty relative to Franklin's letter 
of June 1 6th concerning the exchange of prisoners. A. L. S. i p. 

X, 108. 
Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 204. 

From Fran[ci]s Coffyn to The American Commissioners. 

1778. July 10. Dunkirk. 

Sending three other certificates in order to convince Franklin of his 
trustworthiness. Congratulates him and every American and French- 
man on the arrival at Brest of the vessel bearing the ratification by 
Congress of the treaties so gloriously concluded. A. L. S. 2 p. 

X, 109. 

From [Capt.] E[manuel] P[ierre] De la Plaigne. 
1778. July II. Plymouth. 

Ordered to repair to Okehampton in Devon, a prisoner on parole, 
with his family and fellow passengers; had the honor to write Frank- 
lin of his destitute condition ; begs that he may at least receive the 
salary due him since May, 1777. Kindness of the United States Consul, 
who alone knows his real name and station. A. L. 2 p. (In French.) 

X, no. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 457 

From Lallement. 1778. July 11. Paris. 

If jealousy could enter into the hearts of Free Masons, all the Lodges 
in Paris would envy " Des Neuf Soeurs " who enjoy the honor of pos- 
sessing Franklin as a member. Invites him to a fete given by the head of 
his Lodge on the i8th at three o'clock in the Bois de Boulogne. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) X, iii. 

Frotn Benjamin Reed and Benjamin Bates, Officers on Ship Boston, 
/o The American Commissioners. 1778. July 11. Port Louis. 

Complaining of the desertion of French sailors and their falsehoods 
concerning the conduct of the officers of the Boston. L. S. 2 p. 

LXI, 94. 

From [Comtesse] D. B. [de] Conway. 1778. July 12. Auxerre. 

Sending Franklin a letter for her husband [General Thomas Con- 
way], which she begs him to forward. A. L. S. i p. X, 1 12. 

From D. E. Reine. 1778. July 12. Versailles. 

Concerning various specimens of rice and beans cultivated by him. 
Advising the use of coffee on board the vessels instead of intoxicating 
drinks; encloses a receipt for orange wine. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

X, 113. 

From Samuel Tucker. 1778. July 12. Port Lewis. 

Detailing the quarrel between the French part of his crew and the 
other sailors; unjustifiable attitude of the Frenchmen; General La 
Touche's conduct in interfering in the matter and ordering the French- 
men on shore; justifies the behaviour of his officers. Waiting for Frank- 
lin's orders to put to sea in hopes of joining Captain Whipple. A. L. 
S. 3 p. X, 114. 

From de Baer. 1778. July 13. Paris. 

Asking Franklin's good offices on behalf of the bearer, Mr. Meyer, 
who served with distinction on board the Ranger; he is anxious to 
return to Brest but does not possess one sou; begs Franklin to obtain 
from Captain Jones an advance of ten louis d'or as part of the debt 
due Mr. Meyer from the sale of prizes. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

X, 115. 



458 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Ja[me]s Nassau Colleton. 1778. July 13. 

Is descended from one of the first proprietors of the Province of 
South Carolina; his claim to an estate there; begs Franklin to repre- 
sent his case favorably to Congress and the Assembly of South Carolina 
in order that he may repair thither and take possession of his estate. 
D. 2 p. X, n6. 

From D[avid] H[artley]. 1778. July 14. London. 

Recounting the answers of the Board of Admiralty, relative to the 
exchange of prisoners; proposed terms of this exchange. His convic- 
tion that an ultimate reconciliation w^ill take place between the two 
countries. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 117 and 118. 

Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 205. 

From Will[iam] Strahan. 1778. July 14. London. 

Has received no answer to his letter of March 13th, possibly on ac- 
count of its contents. Quotes from a letter from Franklin dated March 
28th, 1763, in which America is spoken of as England's strongest ally, 
and France referred to as "that perfidious nation"; laments the change 
in affairs since that time; hears that Franklin's son was imprisoned 
in a common jail and his wife died of a broken heart. Mr. Hall's failure 
to pay the debt due him. News of his family ; his son George happily 
married ; all the others single ; believes that connections of that kind, 
to be happy, should be quite voluntary. Sir John Pringle in perfect 
health. A. L. S. 3 p. X, 119. 

From Fournier le jeune. 1778. July 14. Passy. 

Ready to commence work on the font of type Franklin ordered. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) X, 120. 

From Geraud. 1778. July 14. Bordeaux. 

Has studied mathematics, physics, mineralogy and chemistry; his 
interest in metallurgy and in powder and saltpetre; desires to obtain 
employment in the service of the United States. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) X, 121. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 459 

From Sam[ue]l Tucker to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 14. Port Lewis. 

Concerning the proposed exchange of prisoners; sends a list of those 
he has on board; mentions certain men in Mill Prison whom he is 
anxious to have exchanged. Treatment the Frenchmen received on 
board his vessel; assures Franklin their story is false; their present 
anxiety to return to the ship; if only he could man his vessel with 
Americans he would deem himself a happy man. Desires to join 
Captain Whipple on the 20th. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 122. 

From [Mme.] Brouttin-Mollien des Sombres. 
1778. July 15. Calais. 

Requests Franklin to procure a position in the United States for her 
brother. A. L S. 2 p. (In French.) LX, 87. 

From Pierre Libertati. 1778. July 15. Geneva. 

Desires to know the conditions requisite for a young man to enter 
the service of the American Congress. He writes under an assumed 
name and will give his true name when Franklin answers his letter. 
A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) LXII, 70. 

From Christ [opher] Gadsden. 1778. July 15. Charlestown. 

Introducing the bearer, Commodore Gillon, to Franklin's notice; his 
great services to the American cause; has been appointed Commodore 
by the Assembly of South Carolina, and in that capacity goes to Europe 
to build or purchase three frigates for the State; his knowledge of 
affairs. A. L. S. i p. X, 124. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 

1778. July 16. Bordeaux. 

Encloses a statement in French concerning different duties on salt; 
the smallness of the tax at L'ile de Re or Nantes and the excessive 
charges at Bordeaux ; hopes their Honors can effect a change in this state 
of affairs. A. L. S. 3 p. X, 125. 



460 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Veuve Min Cornic et Min fils. 1778. July 16. Morlaix. 

Informed that a citizen of Nantes has been made agent for Congress 
at Morlaix; extremely hurt at this appointment; reminds Franklin of 
the zeal and attachment with which their house has attended to the 
affairs of the United States which will certainly suffer if this unknown 
person interferes. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) X, 126. 

From Levent. 1778. July 16. Paris. 

Concerning a general commercial directory which is in the course 
of preparation ; has written to different trade-centers for information 
as to their productions, industries, etc. ; desires Franklin to give him 
some account of the principal places in America. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) X, 127. 

From [Jean Baptiste] Le Roy. 1778. July 16. 

Reminding Franklin of a previous request for letters of introduc- 
tion on behalf of M. Lalande Robinot, merchant at St. Brieuc, who 
is lading a rich vessel for America. Begging for news of one, M. 
Ganot, captain in the service of the United States; his father and 
mother a prey to the cruellest fears, having received no word from him 
for some time. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) X, 128. 

From Pigault de Lepinoy. 1778. July 16. Calais. 

Offering his services as Commissioner for the United States at Calais. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) LX, 75. 

From Laureau. 1778. July 16. Paris. 

Having had so much to do he was not able to send him the memoir 
before. If this is to be translated in France, he requests that it 
be done by some one who will regard it as confidential. He also 
introduces a friend who wishes to enter the American navy. He con- 
gratulates Franklin on the success of his work in Europe. A. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) LXII, 66. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones to The American Commissioners. 

1778. July 16. Passy. 

Enclosing a copy of Thomas Simpson's parole, dated June loth, 
promising, though released from prison, to consider himself under ar- 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 461 

rest until called upon to meet Captain Jones face to face before a court- 
martial. Is willing to let the dispute between Lieutenant Simpson 
and himself drop forever by returning him his parole, an act which 
will entitle him to command the Ranger; bears no malice, and if he 
has done him any injury, this will make amends. L. 2 p. (Copy.) 

X, 24. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1778. July 16. Passy. 

Submits the enclosed letter to the officers and men of the Ranger 
for approval. A. L. S. i p. XXXVII, 158. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 17. The Hague. 

Concerning the rejection by Amsterdam, of the proposition to in- 
crease the number of troops. Sketches the character of the Grand 
Pensionnaire ; his opinion of him should he fail to answer their letter; 
his fear of compromising himself with the Court; good results pro- 
duced by the presentation of the letter. Further proof that war be- 
tween Austria and Germany is inevitable. Asking for the remittance 
due him, according to the compensation previously arranged. Begs 
for letter of recommendation for his brave Dutch merchants who sail 
shortly for America. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 39. 

From Thom[as] Simpson to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 18. Nantes. 

Announcing his arrival at Nantes and his expected departure in the 
Providence for America, where he hopes to be brought to an immediate 
trial. A. L. S. i p. X, 129. 

From William Hill Sargeant to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 18. Bordeaux. 

Announcing his arrival, from Virginia, in the Despatch, whose owners 
desire to have her armed in France ; begs Franklin to grant him a com- 
mission for that purpose; his references; will carry back any freight or 
despatches they may care to send. Difficulty of keeping a crew- of Amer- 
ican sailors in order in a French port. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 130. 



462 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Frojn S. and J. H. Delap to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 18. Bordeaux. 

Forwarding a letter from Captain Wm. Hill Sargeant (X, 130) ; 
ofFers their house as security that he will make no improper use of the 
desired letters of marque. A. L. S. I p. X, 131. 

From Raw[lin]s Lowndes. 1778. July 18. Charleston. 

Commodore Gillon commissioned to procure ships-of-war in Europe 
for the State of South Carolina. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 132. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VIII, 287). 

Fro?n Richelet. 1778. July 18. Dormans. 

Has heard of the union of the thirteen Provinces of America; a 
strange coincidence that his own little manor is also cut up into thirteen 
cantons; encloses a colored plan of his estates, showing the divisions 
and vineyards ; desires Franklin to visit him at the Hermitage ; has 
heard of the extreme simplicity which characterizes his mode of life, 
therefore does not hesitate to oi¥er him lodgings merely for himself, 
his private secretary, valet de chambre and two lackies, also promises 
him a good soup and two entrees. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

X, 133. 

From D'herime. 1778. July 18. Ath [?], Austria. 

The orders from his Court, in hastening his departure, deprive him 
of the precious advantage of seeing Franklin once again ; desires con- 
firmation of the news that Count d'Estaing has arrived in Boston, and 
that Philadelphia is evacuated. The sincere attachment which he and 
his wife have vowed to Franklin. Encloses the extract of a letter, giving 
an account of the movements of Frederick the Great and M. de Laudon 
[the war of the Bavarian succession]. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

X, 134/2. 

From Joseph Kendall. 1778. July 19. Nantes. 

Offers himself to Franklin to serve in any capacity of which he may 
think him competent ; by profession is a surgeon, but will exert him- 
self in any other line. The number of privateers fitted out at the 
islands of Guernsey and Jersey and their success in destroying the 
American trade. Lays before Franklin a plan to land a small body of 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 463 

men there by night and destroy the shipping; knows an American 
prisoner there who will co-operate in any plan they may decide on ; 
will make one of thirty men in this attempt, if Franklin approves. 
His desire to go to America; needs clothes and money. A. L. S. 4 p. 

X, 135. 

From N. Leleu. 1778. July 19. Amiens. 

No news received of the vessel Benjamin, commanded by Captain 
Ricot, which sailed from Carolina on April 20th; no doubt of her 
being captured and taken to America; begs Franklin, for the sake of 
M. Ricot's family, to find out the whereabouts, and to procure favor- 
able treatment and a prompt exchange for the Captain. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) X, 136. 

From John Spencer. 1778. July 19. Nantes. 

Enclosing a letter delivered to him at Plymouth by a captain of the 
first battalion of the Georgia Continental troops; begs Franklin to aid 
him in his present unhappy situation. A. L. S. i p. X, 137. 

From H[ezekiah] Ford to The American Commissioners. 

1778. July 21. Jersey. 

On his passage to Virginia on board a small cutter, was taken prisoner 
and carried to Jersey; names the passengers who are fellow-sufferers 
with him ; they are obliged to go to England, from which place they 
will take the first opportunity to return. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 138. 

Frotn [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 21. The Hague. 

Dissolution of the Holland Assembly; affair of the two Dutch ves- 
sels taken by the English. English frigate Digby captured by the 
French fleet; news of a naval battle hourly expected. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) XXXIX, 40. 

From M. Livingston. 1778. July 21. Nantes. 

Delivered his letter to Captain Whipple; will set out at once for 
L'Orient with instructions to Captain Tucker. Begs Franklin for 
two or three lines to the President of Congress, mentioning Captain 
Tucker's report of his conduct while on the Boston; expects to take 
passage for America in a few days. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 139. 



464 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

i^row George McCall. 1778. July 22. Glasgow. 

Introducing Messrs. Lawrence and Robert Brooke, sons of Rich- 
ard Brooke, of Virginia, who have finished their education under his 
care and are now desirous to return to America via France; these 
young gentlemen will be a comfort and credit to their parents and 
friends and an honor to their country; begs Franklin to promote their 
safe return. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 140. 

From [Edme Jacques] Genet. 1778. July 23. Versailles. 

The letter Franklin sent him will be printed in No. 47 [Affaires 
d'Angleterre'\, which appears in two days; the following number is ready 
to receive any news which may have arrived from America. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) X, 141. 

From James Ferrier. 1778. July 24. London. 

His cousin-german, Mr. Samuel Johnston, is one of the delegates 
in the General Congress of the United States. Considers the acknowl- 
edgment of America's independence only a question of time; in such 
a case they will need officers to regulate their branch of the military 
service; offers himself in that capacity to take charge of the artillery; 
his rank of brigadier-general ; his experience ; offers various evidences 
of his capacity for the work; refers Franklin to his superior officers for 
proof. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 142. 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 24. The Hague. 

Rumored war between France and England. Acknowledging the 
receipt of the packet from the Committee of Secret Correspondence. 
Likens his efforts to those of David against Goliath. Enclosing ex- 
tracts from Ministerial despatches concerning foreign affairs. A. L. S. 
4 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 41. 

From C. F. de Wiebel. 1778. July 24. Erbai. 

Request to enter the American army. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 124. 

From Martin Paschke. 1778. July 24. Potsdam. 

Begs Franklin to forward the enclosed letter to his son, who is an 
assistant quarter-master general in the American army. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) X, 143. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 465 

From Conway. 1778. July 24. Paris. 

Concerning the weight and price of two brass cannon and where 
they are to be seen. Wishes to know if there is any recent news from 
America, especially if there are any tidings of his son [General Thomas 
Conway]. A. L. S. 2 p. X, 144. 

From [Major Henry Emanuel] Lutterloh. 
1778. July 24. Brunswick. 

Begging Franklin to send the enclosed to his brother and permit 
the answer to be addressed to his care. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

X, 145. 
From D. E. Reine. 1778. July 24. Versailles. 

Mr. Willing despatched by Congress with a ship and thirty men to 
raid the left bank of the Mississippi; damage he inflicted. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) X, 146. 

From Guichard, aine. 1778. July 25. Marenncs. 

Claims a certain sum due his brother, Augustin Guichard, now in 
prison, who was officer on board the Lexington for a year and whose 
salary for that time and his share of the prizes are still due him; men- 
tions various people who will endorse his brother's application. A. L. 
S. 2 p. (In French.) X, 147. 

Fro 7« [Edme Jacques] Genet. 1778. July 26. Versailles. 

Sorry No. 49 appeared before he received Dr. Cooper's letter; it 
shall be published in No. 50 \_Aff aires d'Angleterre] with an account 
of the arrival of the Duchesse de Grammont. The intention of two 
printers to establish a Gazette in Boston composed principally of articles 
from France, likely to promote the union and welfare of both countries; 
suggests a similar enterprise of which he desires to be the head ; sketches 
his ideas on this point. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

P. S. Question of the probability of a large sale of these papers in 
America. L. 4 p. (In English.) X, 149. 

From Rod[olp]h Valltravers. 1778. July 26. Bienne. 

Ignorant of the fate of his last two letters. Sends by M. de Gruffly, 
the bearer, a sketch of a few principles whereon to build a lasting 
foundation of friendship between the thirteen republican states of Amer- 

2—30 



466 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

ica and of Switzerland ; if Franklin approves it, desires that it may 
be conveyed to Congress, after submitting it to the Minister of His 
Most Christian Majesty and through his ambassador, to the several 
cantons ; offers his services in case of a similar alliance between the United 
States and the naval republics of Venice and Genoa; begs for the 
promised copy of the treaty with France. A. L. S. 3 p. X, 150. 

From [Louis Guillaume] Le Veillard. 1778. July 26. 

Declines the invitation on the plea that his affairs do not permit 
him to quit Paris. A. L. i p. (In French.) X, 151. 

From Chevalier de Berny. 1778. July 27. Strasbourg. 

Five months have elapsed since he took the liberty of dedicating 
and sending to Franklin a pamphlet entitled " L'oeil de Maitre ou Essai 
sur le Ministere"; this work was kindly received by le Comte de Ver- 
gennes to whom his services and talents are known; begs Franklin 
to acknowledge its receipt. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) X, 148. 

From Thorn [as] Simpson to The American Commissioners. 

1778. July 27. Brest. 

Has received his appointment and taken command of the Ranger; 
disposition to be made of his prisoners; the prizes not yet sold. A. L. 
S. 3 p. X, 152. 

From Nicolas Moreau. 1778. July 28. Cadiz. 

Since the treaty between the United States and France, supposed that 
all merchandise loaded in England on French ships would be safe; 
this was not the case with the ship Fortune on her passage from London 
to Cadiz; she w^as taken by the Americans and carried to Boston; the 
cargo was owned by him and he begs Franklin to aid him in recover- 
ing its value. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) X, 153. 

From Isaac Iselin. 1778. July 28. Basel. 

Has been engaged for years on a periodical publication destined to 
enlighten his fellow-citizens on the needs and rights of humanity; be- 
lieves there is a germ of perfection in mankind that can be developed 
by cultivation ; for this purpose desires to know those facts which are 
worthy of imitation; America can furnish a great number of these; 
begs Franklin to point out to him at Philadelphia or elsewhere, a cor- 
respondent who will furnish him, from time to time, with papers of 
this kind. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) X, 154. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 467 

From John Ay res to The American Commissioners. 
1778, July 29. Bordeaux. 

Announcing his arrival from Boston with a packet for their Ex- 
cellencies; unable to deliver it himself owing to illness, so sends it 
by a trust-worthy hand. Has a commission as captain in the Continental 
navy if his services are desired. A. L. S. i p. X, 155. 

From Pelletier. 1778. July 29. Paris. 

Enclosing a plan for founding alms houses or state institutions for 
the indigent and homeless. A. L. S. 2 p. and Diss. 15 p. (In 
French.) XLIX, 15. 

From J[ean] Holker. 1778. July 30. Rouen. 
At M. Lalanne's request, recommends the bearer, M. le Baron de 
Reuschenberg to Franklin's kind notice. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

X, 156. 

From Sieulanne. 1778. July 30. Santa Cruz de Teneriffe. 

Copies of his letters to and from M. Cologan and to Franklin, con- 
cerning the arrest of his vessel by order of the Governor of the Canaries ; 
this vessel was the English brigantine, the Countess of Moreton, which 
he was conducting to Martinique by order of Captain Cunningham ; 
reasons given for the detention of this vessel ; desires Franklin to use 
his influence with the Court of Spain to obtain indemnity for his en- 
forced delay and satisfaction for the insults offered to Captain Cunning- 
ham and to the flag. L. 8 p. (In French.) X, 156^. 

From Philip Hancock. 1778. July 30. Amsterdam. 

Has come to Paris to inform him of past proceedings and to pro- 
cure instructions for the future; has information to impart that was 
judged imprudent to be sent by letter. A. L, S. i p. X, 157. 

From Abraham Whipple. 1778. July 31. Paimboeuf. 

Reasons for his delay in sailing; acknowledging Franklin's favors 
of the 13th and i6th insts. ; has w^ritten Captain Tucker to join him with 
the Boston and to Captain Simpson to fit the Ranger for sea with all 
possible despatch. His cargo and provisions on board and his men 
in good health and high spirits; hopes to pay his respects to the 
Guernsey and Jersey privateers. L. S. 2 p. X, 159. 



468 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [C. G. F.] D[umas] to The American Commissioners. 
1778. July 31. The Hague. 

Quoting extracts from ministerial despatches. Frequent desertions 
in the Dutch army. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 42. 

From Titus Ogden. 1778. July. L'Orient. 

Account of his former arrival in Nantes and the despatch and 
economy with which Mr. Moylan repaired and loaded his ship; con- 
trasts him with Mr. Puchelberg, a foreigner, appointed by Mr. Schweig- 
hauser, who does not speak English, but knows very well how to charge. 
A. L. S. 2 p. X, 76. 

From James Moylan to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August I. L'Orient. 

The frigate Boston sailed that morning with her three prizes. Of- 
fering to freight certain goods which were left behind by Captain 
Tucker. A. L. S. i p. XI, i. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1778. August i. Paris. 

Enclosing letters which he begs to have forwarded to M. d'Arcel, 
at Boston ; begs that twelve Louis d'or may be sent to M. Bresson's 
brother-in-law, now in prison at Okehampton, and also five Louis d'or 
to his companion in captivity, the writer's nephew, Dubourg de la 
Blanchardiere ; counts on Franklin to procure their exchange as soon 
as possible. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 2. 

From Benj[ami]n Vaughan. 1778. August i. 

His letter filled him with the utmost transports; dares not tell him 
what he had feared. The leaves Franklin wrote for are sent, directed 
to M. de Chaumont. Concerning the accounts with Johnson. A. L. S. 
3 p. XI, 3. 

From Veuve Jean Martin Smets. 1778. August i. Anvers. 

A packet has been expressed to him received from Mr. Aychmayer 
of Rotterdam. L. S. i p. (In French.) XI, 4. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 469 

From Comte de Bussy Dagoneau. 
1778. August I. Enclos du Temple. 

His desire to fight the enemies of America; illness and law-suits 
keep him in France; some day he will arrive in Boston, too late for 
his own glory, but in time to admire that of America. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) XI, 5. 

From Peter CoUas to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August I. Passy. 

Empowering the commissioners to act on his behalf with regard 
to indemnity for his vessel Triton. A. L. S. 2 p. LXI, 64. 

From Pezerat. 1778. August i. Dijon. 

Wishes to settle in the United States with his family. L. S. 4 p. 
(In French.) LX, 108. 

Fro7n Patrick Clear or Cleary. 1778. August i. Lisbon. 

His brother, Timothy, resided in Newburn, North Carolina, and 
on dying, bequeathed a considerable fortune; prevented by illness from 
going at once to America with full power of attorney; informed of 
an act whereby the lands and effects of all those who did not ap- 
pear before a certain time were confiscated ; begs Franklin's advice and 
assistance. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 6. 

From Chevalier O'Gorman. 1778. August i. Paris. 

Including Franklin's nephew, Mr. Williams, in an invitation for 
the following Monday. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XI, 7. 

From Leslie Grove. 1778. August i. London. 

Writes on behalf of Thomas Truman, a passenger on the Lord 
Chatham, who was taken prisoner and is now at Brest; has a wife 
and three little children ; begs that Franklin will give orders to set him 
at liberty. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 8. 

From Ischiffely. 1778. August i. Berne. 

Wishes to devote his remaining days to the political welfare of 
society; nothing could better contribute to this end than the diffusion 



470 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

among all peoples of the new constitutions of America; proposes to 
translate them for his own country, Germany and Italy; finds fault 
with the partial collection translated by M. Regnier. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) XI, 9. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1778. August 2. Paris. 

Concerning the memoir from M. Poissonier, recommending M. Mau- 
baillon for the office of Consul at Calais. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

XI, 10. 

From Hannah Sowden. 1778. August 2. Rotterdam. 

Announcing the death of her father; begs Franklin to communicate 
the fact to Mr. Gordon. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, ii. 

From [Philip(?) Hancock] to The American Commissioners. 

[1778. August 2. Paris.] 

Has assisted many subjects of the United States imprisoned at Ply- 
mouth Dock, England, to escape. Came to Paris to confer with the 
Commissioners and was robbed by a companion. Begs for assistance to 
return home. A. Dr. by Benjamin Franklin of L. i p. LCi)* 45* 

From [Edme Jacques] Genet. 1778. August 3. Versailles. 

Is hard at work translating the interesting Gazettes of Pennsyl- 
vania of May 30th and June 20th ; is hourly expecting the English 
accounts of the battle of the 27th ; begs Franklin to send at once cer- 
tain articles on the affairs of England. A. L, S. i p. (In French.) 

XI, 12. 
From Fyot. 1778. August 3. 

Has long desired to show him certain discoveries, useful to humanity ; 
concerning his own invention of a mechanical pulley, shown at the 
last meeting of the Society of Emulation ; it received the approval 
of M. Millon; to this discovery he adds that of the trisection of the 
angle and other mathematical inventions. A. L. S. 4 p. ( In French. ) 

XI, 13. 

From Borel. 1778. August 3. Pierefitte. 

The plate engraved according to the design is well-advanced ; begs 
Franklin to give him an hour to make certain changes. A. L. S. 1 p. 
(In French.) XI, 14. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 471 

From Clouet. 1778. August 3. Paris. 

Concerning a letter he received from le Sieur Fouquet, Master Gun- 
powder Maker at Yorktown, Pa., enclosing three bills of exchange on 
Franklin ; desires to know where he can receive the amount ; begs Frank- 
lin to forward him certain important letters. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) XI, 15. 

From James White. 1778. August 3. 

Desires to go to America with his family; begs Franklin to assist him 
in this project. Has made a most valuable discovery for which Eng- 
land, France and Spain have offered him 10,000 pounds each, but 
they shall never get it, provided Franklin will aid him to go to Amer- 
ica. A. L. S. I p. XI, 16. 

From Tessier. 1778. August 3. Bordeaux. 

Proposes to emigrate to the United States with six farmers. In- 
quires about concessions granted to emigrants. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) LX, 114. 

From Person de Granchamp. 1778. August 4. Senoncourt. 

Request tor his son to enter the American army. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) LXII, 48. 

From W[illia]m Parsons. 1778. August 4. London. 

His journey to Paris with his wife to ofiEer his services to the United 
States, which were rejected ; his friends and family in England turned 
against him and his money was soon exhausted ; returned to London, 
leaving his wife in Paris, but has been so threatened that he dares 
not stir out of his room; Chevalier Hickey will inform Franklin of 
his wife's wretched situation ; hopes he will aid her to join him. L. S. 

2 p. XI, 17. 

From Chevalier Carre de Goyon. 1778. August 4. Lisbon. 

Recommending M. Boniface, of Lisbon, for the position of consul. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 18. 



472 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From ■W[illia]in Bingham to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 5. St. Pierre. 

Drawing upon them for a certain sum of money. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) (In duplicate.) XI, 19 and 20. 

Frotn W[illiam] Lee. 1778. August 5. 

Authorizing him to deliver to Mr. Ross all the papers of the late 
Mr. Thomas Morris either of a private nature or relating to the house 
of Messrs. Willing, Morris & Co. ; those that relate to public business, 
Franklin will doubtless continue to keep. A. L. S, 2 p. XI, 21. 

From Abbe de Tristan-Brission. 1778. August 5. 

Concerning an important letter, addressed to Franklin, which he begs 
him to send for. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 22. 

Fro?n [Edme Jacques] Genet. 1778. August 6. Versailles. 

Returns Dr. Cooper's letter together with some English Gazettes 
just arrived; No. 50 [Affaires d'Jngleterrel will appear in two days. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XI, 23. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 6. Passy. 

Terms on which the Ranger's seamen were engaged ; advances he 
made them out of his own pocket ; begs Franklin to order receipts 
to be given him for his indemnification and also for his stores, furniture, 
etc. ; asks also that the men who landed with him at Whitehaven may 
be recommended to the bounty of Congress. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 24. 

From W[illia]m Bingham to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 6. St. Pierre. 

According to the instructions of Congress, has drawn a bill on 
them for a certain amount, payable at a given time. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) XI, 25. 

From Person de Granchamp. 1778. August 6. Senoncourt. 

Apologizing for having forgotten his address in his former letter. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) LXII, 49. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 473 

From Stadel. 1778. August 6. Paris. 

Desires him to state what style of knives and forks he wishes. A. L. 
S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 26. 

From Suavelier. 1778. August 6. Caen. 

Concerning three sailors who claim to be Americans; made prison- 
ers by the English but effected their escape; writes to Franklin at 
their request to procure them the means of returning to their country. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 27. 

From A[lexander] Fowler to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 6. London. 

Served in the British army for eighteen years; the harsh treatment 
he received from Generals Gage and Howe, owing to his well-known 
sympathy with the Sons of Liberty; returned to England with his wife 
and brought an action against General Gage for damages; the trial 
was quashed and a hearing denied him ; begs them to procure him and 
his wife a passage to any part of the United States. Encloses testi- 
monials of his conduct and character, also an extract from an Eng- 
lish officer's letter, showing the prejudice held against him. A. L. 
S. 7 p. XI, 28. 

From A[ntoine] L[ouis] Brongniart. 1778. August 6. 

The new experiments he has made in electricity have excited 
quite a sensation among the physicists; invites Franklin to witness 
certain experiments which he proposes to attempt at his own house. 
A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XI, 29. 

From Rob[er]t Niles. 1778. August 6. Nantes. 

His arrival at Paimboeuf; will proceed at once on his voyage; en- 
closing a bill for the purchase of type. A. L. S. i p. XI, 30. 

Fro?n Baron F. E. de Reuschenberg. 1778. August 7. Paris. 

Having experienced domestic troubles and the loss of a considerable 
fortune, is determined to expatriate himself ; desires to enter the army 
of the United States, provided he receives the rank of officer. His 
wish to raise a legion, to be formed according to the ideas of the 
late Marshal de Saxe; if his services are rejected, desires still to live 
and die in America, preferably in Pennsylvania, because that Province 
produced a Franklin. A. L. S. 11 p. (In French.) XI, 44a. 



474 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From John Atwood, Jacob Vere and Nathan Chadwick. 

1778. August 7. 

American prisoners who have escaped to France; appeal for assist- 
ance. L. S. I p. LX, 5. 

From De St. Martin. 1778. August 8. Versailles. 

Request to enter the army. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 117b. 

Fro ;7z [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1778. Augusts. Paris. 

Recommends the enclosed memoir to Franklin's notice, although he 
does not expect a favorable reply, but the sender would have taken it 
ill if he had refused ; begs for at least a few lines he can show the 
applicant. A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XI, 31. 

From Granville Sharp. 1778. August 8. Old Jewry. 

Recommending Mr. Lawrence Brooke, of Virginia, to Franklin's 
friendship ; the object of his residence in Europe was to pursue his 
education, but he has not imbibed the least prejudice against his 
native land ; he desires to return to America with his brother, Mr. 
Robert Brooke, and Mr. Robert Nicholson; requests Franklin to favor 
them with his advice and good offices to forward their intended voy- 
age. A. L. S. I p. XI, 32. 

From John Gibson, Auditor-General, to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 8. Philadelphia. 

Informing them that the Treasury Board has made certain resolu- 
tions as regards the bills of exchange. A. L. S. i p. XI, 33. 

From Tarteron. 1778. August 9. Montpellier. 

Addressed an ode to Franklin, some time in April, composed in honor 
of the insurgents ; having received no answer, fears his letter mis- 
carried. A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XI, 34. 

From Philipp Conrad Katz. 

1778. August 9. Biidingen near Hanau on the Mayn. 
Desires information concerning his brother, Georg Theobald Katz, 
who went to Philadelphia, in June, 1774, with his wife and three 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 475 

children. Has heard that his brother resided for a time with a wheel- 
wright, Johannes Brubacher, near Lancaster. Encloses letter to Bru- 
bacher and to his brother. A. L. S. 2 p. LIX, 85. 

From W[illia]m Bingham to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 10. St. Pierre. 
Repeats his announcement made in letter 25, concerning a bill 
drawn by him on the Commissioners. A. L. S. I p. (In French.) 

XI, 35. 

From John Murphy. 1778. August 10. Boulogne. 

Sailed from Rhode Island the 26th of August, 1777, in the sloop 
Swallow; had the misfortune to be taken and sent to Jamaica, thence 
in irons to England, where he made his escape from prison and ar- 
rived in Boulogne ; begs for a line. A. L. S. i p. XI, 36. 

From Col. Chevalier de Champigny. 1778. August 10. Amsterdam. 

Fragment of a letter, concerning the payment of a subscription. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XI, 37. 

From J[am]es Leveux. 1778. August 10. Calais. 

Concerning two Americans who escaped from an English prison, 
and whose expenses to Paris he defrayed ; one is Edward Leger, lieu- 
tenant on the Hornet, the other, Thomas Barnes, surgeon on the Hamp- 
den. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 38. 

From the Continental Congress. 1778. August 11. 

Consigning the cargoes of several vessels to the American Com- 
missioners at Paris. 

D. S. Cha[rle]s Thomson, Sec[retar]y. i p. (In duplicate.) 

LXXV, 65 and 66. 

From Mrs. R, Parsons. 1778. August 12. Paris. 

Her astonishment that Franklin denied having given Mr. Parsons 
the least encouragement to go to America; protests against this view 
of the case. Details her miserable condition, alone in a foreign land, 
and in hourly expectation of being sent to prison for debts; begs Frank- 
lin to render her some assistance. A. L. S. 3 p. XI, 39. 



476 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From James Moylan to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 12. L'Orient. 

Containing an extract of a letter received from Lisbon, announ- 
cing the arrival there of the Albion, a seventy-four gun ship and one 
of Admiral Byron's squadron. A. L. S. i p. XI, 40. 

Fro /« Col. Chevalier de Champigny. 1778. August 12. Amsterdam. 

Asking for a certain sum still due on his subscription to the History 
of England; desires him also to subscribe to the History of Den- 
mark or if he does not care to, to return the volumes. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) XI, 41. 

From Guichard aine. 1778. August 12. Marennes. 

Calling Franklin's attention once again to the affair of his brother, 
Augustin Guichard, to whom a certain sum of money is due for his 
service on board the Lexington. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XI, 42. 

From Perronet. 1778. August 13. 

Sending a plan of the battle between the " English fleet and the 
King's army." N. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) LXX, 80a. 

From Richard Peters. 1778. August 13. Philadelphia. 

Begging Franklin to forward the enclosed important letter to his 
father; repeats his request to Franklin to supply his father with money. 
The recovery of Rhode Island and the capture of the British troops 
there daily expected. General Clinton besieged in New York by General 
Washington ; the former's misfortune at Monmouth has taught him 
not to be adventurous. A. L. S. i p. XI, 43. 

From Baron F. E. de Reuschenberg. 1778. August 14. Paris. 

Lays before Franklin the advantages of the legion as a military 
formation and the extreme usefulness both on land and sea of amu- 
settes, a small piece of artillery; ardently desires to fight for America. 
A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XI, 44. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 477 

From D[avid] H[artley]. 1778. August 14. London. 

Exchange of prisoners. Remarks concerning peace, suggested by the 
report of the late negotiation between the Congress and the English 
Commissioners. A. L. S. 3 p. XI, 45. 

Printed in Works (Sparks, VIII, 295). 

From Vial du Clairbois. 1778. August 14. Brest. 

Begging Franklin to accept a copy of his book on naval architecture. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XI, 48. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones to The American Commissioners. 
1778. August 15. Brest. 

Concerning a general report on the Ranger and through it to the 
French fleet, that he is turned out of the service and his place, with 
a captain's commission given to Mr. Simpson, and that his letter of 
July i6th releasing Mr. Simpson from parole was forced from him; 
demands that he be afforded immediate redress by a court-martial. 
Compares his heart-whole devotion to America with the conduct of 
Simpson. A. L. S. 3 p. XI, 49. 

From Rob[er]t Cochran. 1778. August 16. Charlestown, S. C. 

Acknowledging Franklin's kindness to his little son, whose behavior 
he trusts is such as to merit Franklin's approbation. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XI, 50. 

From James Hutton. 1778. August 16. Zeist. 

The passport for the vessel going to Labrador failed to arrive and 
the ship had to sail without it. Wishes to know if a French officer, 
M. Gaiault de Boisbertrand, got safely to France; he broke prison 
in England, having in vain attempted to procure an exchange. De- 
sires passports for some of the Moravians who are going soon to Beth- 
lehem. News of English friends. A. L. S. 3 p. XI, 51. 

From Durand. 1778. August 16. Paris. 

Has just been appointed Consul for France in Sardinia. Applies 
for the Consulship of the United States at Barcelona for his father, 
Gabriel Durand, a resident of the latter city. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) LX, 68. 



478 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 17. Bordeaux. 

Captain Ayres very ill ; fears he will not be able to proceed to sea ; 
the vessel will be ready to sail by Saturday. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 52. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 17. Bordeaux. 

Desires their instructions in case Captain Ayres's health does not 
permit him to proceed to sea. Concerning a plan he had the honor 
to lay before them, the results of which would tend toward the 
restoration to confidence of the currency of America. A. L. S. 3 p. 

XI, 53. 

From [Mrs.] R. Parsons. 1778. August 17. Paris. 

Applies again for assistance, and gives the most pitiable account of 
her destitute and miserable condition. A. L. S. 3 p. XI, 54. 

From James Moylan to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 17. L'Orient. 

News just received from Virginia; the enemy's ships still in the 
Delaware; Count d'Estaing's fleet daily expected; General Washing- 
ton's army consists of 18,000 men; the people in high spirits and the 
money increasing in value. A. L. S. i p. (In duplicate.) 

XI, 55 and 56. 

From La Douairiere Duchesse de Deux-Ponts, Comtesse de Forbach. 
1778. August 18. Forbach. 

Anxious for news of him. Asks for news of her young nephew, 
M. de Fontevieux, who sailed on the " Duchesse de Grammont." A. 
L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XI, 57. 

From [C. G. F.] Dumas to The American Commissioners. 
1778. August 18. The Hague. 

His letter to M. Van Berkel (2 p.), acknowledging his friendly 
efforts on behalf of America, announcing the scornful rejection by 
the Americans of England's proposals, and dwelling on the danger 
of Holland losing certain commercial advantages with America by 
their too great caution. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XXXIX, 43. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 479 

From Faillieux. 1778. August 18. Paris. 

Delivered a letter to Franklin from one of his correspondents at 
Amsterdam and left his address that the answer may be returned to 
his care. L. S. i p. (In French.) XI, 58. 

From Drouet. 1778. August 18. Paris. 

Begging him to name the day and hour when he may obtain at the 
same time his memoir and Franklin's opinion of it. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) XI, 59. 

i^roOT Benjamin Chew. 1778. August 19. Bordeaux. 

Writes in behalf of his brother-sufferers in Forton prison who are 
in want of the necessaries, whose relief would be great if they could 
get a small part of what is due them. Urges him particularly to 
assist Mr. Alexander Dick, a gentleman of considerable fortune in 
Virginia who is in a wretched state of health, and has not a farthing 
with which to purchase decent food. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 60. 

From Millin de Labrosse. 1778. August 19. Paris. 

Recalls that two years before, he obtained from Mr. Deane em- 
ployment in the American army ; unhappy result of that step ; was 
harshly dealt with. Desires now to go to America, as a simple citizen ; 
wishes a small piece of land in Pennsylvania or Maryland, suitable 
to his rank of lieutenant-colonel, a free passage over for himself and 
servant and some letters of recommendation. A. L. S. 4 p. (In 
French.) XI, 61. 

From Abraham Whipple to The American Commissioners. 
1778. August 19. Brest. 

His delay caused by finding that none of the prizes belonging to 
the Ranger had been sold and that the unfortunate crew had not re- 
ceived a single sou for all the time they had been in France; allowed 
them a respite of a day or two to sell their prizes and obtain their 
money; interference at this point of Captain Jones who threatened 
he would be the ruin of all those who meddled with the business; 
indignant at this conduct. L. S. 3 p. XI, 62. 



480 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From E. Hinman. 1778. August 19. Brest. 

Arrived at Brest on the 17th and embarked on board the Provi- 
dence, frigate, Captain Whipple; expects a speedy and safe passage. L. 
S. I p. XI, 63. 

From [Sir George] Grand. 1778. August 20. Amsterdam. 

Acknowledging his favor of the 7th inst. ; sums he has paid out at 
Franklin's request ; praises Mr, Hancock as the most honest man he 
ever knew. Concerning the purchase of cannon and the difficulty 
of transporting them. Sends a letter from the good Hutton, that angel 
of peace; number of Franklin's friends at Amsterdam. A. L. S. 3 p. 
(In French.) XI, 64. 

From [Jean-Pierre] Berenger. 1778. August 20. Lausanne. 

Franklin's approval of his History of Geneva and his offer to aid 
him in his project of writing a History of the Thirteen United States; 
sent him a letter on this subject but received no answer. The books 
of reference he has at his disposal ; begs for any manuscripts which 
may assist his purpose; his plan to send his work to Franklin from 
time to time and receive his advice and criticisms; desires information 
about the best maps. Encloses two printed letters showing the reasons 
why he was banished from his country. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

XI, 65. 

From Peter Fred [eric] k Dobree to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 20, Nantes. 

Hears that he is accused of being a spy; desires to meet his accuser 
face to face and refute the falsehood. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 46. 

From Charriere. 1778. August 21. Cossonay. 



Desires to know what inducements are held out to people who 
want to settle in the United States. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

XI, 66. 
From G. Tasink. 1778. August 21. Plymouth. 

Sending a letter to Franklin from his friend M. Gambie de la Plaigne. 
Begs Franklin to honor him with his protection and confidence and 
recommend him at the French Court. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XI, 67. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 481 

From Mailhe. 1778. August 21. Castel-Nau de Magroae 

His horror of England's tyranny and the justice of the American 
cause have inspired the enclosed poem. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XI, 68. 

From Jean Daniel Simon. 1778. August 22. Vieux Linange, 

Plan on the part of six or eight German men of letters, holding 
prominent public positions, to go to America and found a college for 
the education of young gentlemen of every religion; at first it vi^ould be 
destined only for Germans until their mastery of English should be 
sufficient to justify their teaching in that tongue. A. L. S, 7 p. 
(In French.) XI, 69. 

From Chevalier Delahaulsse. 1778. August 22. Metz. 

Offers his services to the United States. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

LXII, 52. 

From George Finlay, et al., to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 22. Ancenis. 

Four prisoners, who claim to be American masters of vessels seized 
by the privateer, Boston, appeal to be released and allowed to go home. 
L, S. I p. LX, 9. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. August 23. Bordeaux. 

Report received from Edenton of the arrival of the French fleet. 
Captain Ayres unable to proceed to sea; recommends Captain Hatch 
as his substitute. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 70. 

From Meschinet De Richemond fils. 1778. August 23. Rochelle. 

Announcing that the privateer, General Mifflin, has taken and sent 
to Rochelle, the ship, Hunter; this makes their eleventh prize. A. L. 
S. I p. XI, 71. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones. 1778. August 24. Brest. 

Wishes not to be thought impatient, but considers the moment is 
ripe when he ought either to be in search of marine knowledge with 
2—31 



482 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

Count d'Orvilliers, or in search of honor in some private enterprise. 
Hopes Franklin will send the enclosed letter to the Prince de Nassau 
if he approves of it. In spite of all his disappointments, is persuaded 
that the Court still has intentions in his favor. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XI, 72. 

From M. de Paneboeuf. 1778. August 24. Bordeaux. 

Offering his services to serve in the United States. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) LX, 81. 

From John Channing. 1778. August 24. London. 

Recommending to his kindness, Captain Tristram Barnard, an Amer- 
ican w^ho has distinguished himself by his generous behavior towards 
many unhappy prisoners. A. L. S. i p. XI, 75. 

From Berube de Costentin. 1778. August 24. Brest. 

Charged by Mr. Schweighauser with the direction of the vessels 
and their prizes belonging to the United States. Desires Franklin's 
orders as regards the 150 prisoners now on board the prize-ship Pa- 
tience; since the Ranger's departure the prisoners have been guarded 
by a very few soldiers; their attempts to escape; the constant men- 
ace they prove to the community ; the expense of keeping them ; begs 
Franklin to devise a remedy. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XI, 76. 

From [Dr.] James Smith. 1778. August 24. Paris. 

Complains of his treatment by the custom-house officers, at Calais, 
in detaining part of his baggage, on the pretext that it was contraband ; 
is an American returning to his native land by way of France; ap- 
plied consecutively to Mr. Lee, M. Grand, and Dr. Franklin for 
redress but without result. A. L. S. 7 p. XI, 74. 

From M. Livingston to The American Commissioners. 

1778, August 24. Nantes. 

Concerning the three prizes sold by Captain Tucker to M. Puchel- 
berg & Co., of L'Orient, and certain duties on them, which, if paid, 
ought to be returned. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 77. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 483 

Fro7n Puchelberg & Co. to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 24. L'Orient. 

Enclosing a letter for them from Mr. Lee. Associated with Mr. 
Schweighauser, and therefore offers his services to the Commissioners. 
A. L S. 3 p. (In French.) XI, 78. 

i^roOT G. W[illiams]. 1778. August 24. London. 

State of affairs in London ; all men agree that the conquest of Amer- 
ica is now utterly impracticable. Refers him to Captain Channing 
for particulars. A. L. S. i p. XI, 79. 

From Comte de Thiaud. 1778. August 24. Boulogne. 

Recommending an Englishman whom he encountered at Boulogne 
and who desires to go to Boston ; his total ignorance of the French 
language. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 80. 

From [James Hutton]. 1778. August 24. The Hague. 

The passport came too late, as the Labrador ship had sailed. 
Desires to know the name of the vessel in which General Montgomery's 
monument has gone to America; loves the man's memory and would 
do anything in his power to have the monument restored, should the 
vessel be taken. L. 2 p. XI, 81. 

From Rod[olp]h Valltravers. 1778. August 25. Bienne. 

Thinks the reason he has received no answers to his last three letters 
is owing to their not having been freed at Paris. Solicited by his 
good old neighbor, Baron de Graffenried, to obtain some information 
concerning his inheritance in America as explained in the enclosed 
memorial (4 p.). A. L. S. 3 p. XI, 82. 

From Ra[lph] Izard to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 25. Paris. 

The necessity of interesting the ministry in favor of any loan that 
may be attempted in Genoa, as the Genoese may require the security 
of the Court of France. Americans deterred from entering into the 
Mediterranean trade through fear of meeting the cruisers belonging 
to the states of Africa; provisions relative to this danger stated in the 
8th Article of the French Treaty of Commerce. A. L. S. 3 p. 

XI, 84. 



484 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Chevalier de Berny. 1778. August 25. Strasbourg. 

The sixth letter he has written, begging to know if Franklin re- 
ceived his book, entitled " L'ceil du Maitre." A, L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) XI, 85. 

From Clouet. 1778. August 25. Paris. 

Enclosing a packet for M. Fouquet, employed in America in the 
manufacture of powders and saltpetre; encloses six pamphlets on the 
method of making saltpetre. A. L. S. i p. XI, 86. 

From Peter Collas. 1778. August 25. Nantes. 

His immediate departure to Boston, where he hopes to meet with 
Franklin's worthy sister and her amiable daughter. His gratitude 
for numberless favors shown him by Franklin with whose family he 
has the honor to be connected by marriage. A. L. S. i p. XI, 87. 

From Tho[ma]s Read to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 25. Nantes. 

His vessel cleaned and nearly fitted out; if there is no urgent need 
of his returning home at once, desires to cruise for three months in 
the Mediterranean ; believes he could cover expenses and something 
over; his knowledge of those waters; would need a French or English 
pass. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 88. 

From MoUier, Poincheval et Brulley. 1778. August 25. Rouen. 

Destined by their parents for the law; their enthusiasm for America; 
their earnest wish to become her citizens, but they feel that the chances 
of succeeding there would be greater if Franklin would grant them 
his protection. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XI, 83. 

From Trottier. 1778. August 25. Tours. 

If it is the intention of the United States to establish commercial 
agencies in the principal cities of France, they could not find a more 
suitable person than himself. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XI, 89. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 485 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 26. Bordeaux. 

Announcing the arrival of a prize-brig, the Archangel, taken by 
the privateer General Mifflin ; the American arms may be said to ex- 
tend to the poles; patriotism shown by such a cruise v\^hich can afford 
no other object than to destroy the British whale fishery. Has placed 
Captain Ayres in the country to try if change of air will do him 
good ; the doctor's opinion unfavorable. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 90. 

From W[illia]m Bingham. 

1778. August 26 and September 6. St. Pierre, Martinique. 

Lists of exchange drawn by William Bingham on the American 
Commissioners under the Resolve of Congress of April 16, 1778. 
Mem. 2 p. LXIV, 18 and 32. 

Fro7n James Moylan to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 26. L'Orient. 

The arrival of the privateer General Mifflin, Captain McNeill, who 
has been cruising for two months in the North Seas; has taken thirteen 
prizes; has about fifty English prisoners on board; desires to know 
if they would not procure the liberty of an equal number of his suf- 
fering countrymen now in England. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 91. 

From Puchelberg & Co. to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 26. L'Orient. 

The arrival of the privateer General Mifflin, with a French ves- 
sel recaptured from a Guernsey Corsair; Captain McNeill's wish to 
have it sold on his own account ; desires Franklin's orders in the 
matter. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XI, 92. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1778. August 26. Nantes. 

Monies advanced to Mr. Porter, of Connecticut. Assistance re- 
quested by Mr. Leger, Captain Nicholson's first lieutenant; begs Frank- 
lin to limit the term. A. L. S. 2 p. XXXVII, 159. 



486 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From J [am] es Leveux. 1778. August 26. Calais. 

Concerning the arrival, at Calais, of two Americans escaped from 
prison in England; furnished them with eight Louis d'or to pay their 
expenses to Paris; since then has assisted John Marsey, late Captain 
of the Swallow, and also M. Rolandeau, officer in the fifth regiment 
from Charleston, who was captured on his way back to America; de- 
sires to know if he is to continue to furnish assistance on the same 
footing. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 93. 

From [Sir George] Grand. 1778. August 27. Amsterdam. 

Mr. Hancock, having waited in vain for the three trunks arrived 
from England, has decided to go to Paris; money he has advanced 
him for the journey. Sends a letter from the good Mr. Hutton. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XI, 94. 

From D. E. Reine. 1778. August 27. Versailles. 

Concerning a new invention which reunites bones in all cases of 
fractures. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 95. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 28. Brest. 

Has just heard from M. de la Privalaye that he can no longer 
furnish a guard for the prisoners taken by the Ranger and now on 
board the prize-brigantine. Patience; will do all in his power to have 
the guard prolonged until this reaches Franklin's hand. Begs him to 
apply at once to the French Minister that his favorite object, a cartel, 
may not be lost. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 96. 

From [C. G. F.] Dumas. 1778. August 28. The Hague. 

Presence at The Hague of Mr. Hutton; his avowed purpose is to 
attend the wedding of his friend, M. de Saigas; possibility of some 
secret negotiation being at the bottom of his trip. A. L. S. 3 p. 
(In French.) XXXIX, 44. 

From [Mme.] de Chaisinet. 1778. August 28. Paris. 

Emboldened to confide her misfortunes to him and implore his 
assistance. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XI, 97. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 487 

From Guigon. 1778. August 29. d'Agde. 

Sends a small work on engineering. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XI, 97/2. 
From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 

1778. August 29. Bordeaux. 

The immediate purchase of fifty-six pieces of cannon ; desires to 
know to what part of the United States he shall forward them. Ad- 
vices concerning vessels and their prizes. Alarm in the trading interest 
caused by the misconduct of the convoy who forsook the French ships 
from the West Indies, off Bermudas. A. L. S. 3 p. XI, 98. 

From Hill. 1778. August 29. Paris. 

Has received, from Franklin, the sum of 500 pounds on account. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XLIII, 192. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones to The American Commissioners. 
1778. August 30. Brest. 

A generous offer on the part of his good friend, M. de la Porte, 
the Intendant, to furnish a vessel, place on board the prisoners from 
the Patience and send them with a flag to England; urges them to 
accept this offer at once; advantages of such a direct exchange. A. L. 
S. 2 p. XI, 99. 

From de Fleury. 1778. August 30. St. Hippolyte. 

Begs for news of his only son, who, report says, was made prisoner 
with other French officers on the Delaware and conducted to St. 
Augustine. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XI, lOO. 

From James Ferrier. 1778. August 30. Lisbon. 

The wish of every honorable person must be to lend a helping 
hand to assist the cause of America, a cause which supports the rights 
of such a large portion of mankind. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, loi. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones. 1778. August 31. Brest. 
Copy of XI, 72. Complains of receiving no answer from Dr. 
Bancroft to his letter. Report of the Jamaica fleet having got clear 
of the Brest fleet owing to Count d'Orvillier's unwillingness to break 
his line in the chase; would be sorry to find it true; his own situ- 
ation cannot be altered for the worse. A. L. S. 3 p. XI, 73. 



488 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Jean] Holker. 1778. August 31. Rouen. 

Recommending the house of M. Le Couteulx, of Cadiz; reasons 
why they merit Franklin's attention. This letter will be delivered 
by their partner, M. Le Normand, whom he begs Franklin to rely 
on and to recommend to his compatriots. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XI, 102. 

From Abbe Patrice Cleary. [1778. August?] 

Petitions Franklin to help him secure possession of the estate of his 
brother, Timothy Cleary, who died in 1775 in North Carolina. L. in 
3d P. 3 P- (In French.) LVII, 124. 

Fro w Baron [F. E.] de Reuschenberg. [1778. August.] 

Requesting a definite reply to his proposition to give his services to 
the United States as an officer to help in raising a body of troops. A. 
L. S. 2 p. (In French.) LXXI, 25. 

From Dr. [James] Smith. [1778. August.] 

Desiring that certain of his effects, detained at the custom-house, 
but now at Passy, may be delivered to the bearer, Mr Arthur. L. in 3d 
P. I p. XLI, 179. 

From . [1778. Circa August.] 

Inviting Franklin to assist at the funeral services for M. Le Roy's 
deceased son. N. i p. (In French.) LXXI, 36 b. 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1778. September i. Paris. 

Begging for information as to the value in Boston of 4,000 piastres 
in paper and the interest obtainable from investing such a sum. De- 
sires Franklin to recommend to Mr. Williams, at Boston, M. Jean 
Darcel, who is at present in that town. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

XI, 104. 

From Guichard, aine. 1778. September i. Marennes. 

Writes again to request the payment of a certain sum due his 
brother for Continental service; desires to soothe his brother's captivity 
and also to pay himself back for the sums he has advanced. A. L. 
3 p. (In French.) XI, 105. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 489 

From [Comtesse] de Forbach, 

La Douairiere Duchesse de Deux-Ponts. 1778. September 1. Paris. 

Will expect Dr. Franklin to-morrow. Was unable to go to see 
him owing to many urgent affairs. A. N. in 3d P. i p. LXX, 95. 

From W[illia]in Bingham to The American Commissioners. 

1778. September i. Martinique. 

In accordance with the Resolution of Congress of April 6th last, 
he has drawn on them, to the order of Dr. [Arthur] Lee, for the sum 
of 2,200 livres tournois. L. S. i p. XI, 103. 

From John Bondfield. 1778. September 2. Bordeaux. 

Does not like to decline the repeated requests of the Marquise de 
la Fayette that she might deliver to Franklin in person some despatches 
or packets; the kindness and consideration he has received as Frank- 
lin's agent from the Marquise and other families of distinction. A. L. 
S. I p. XI, 106. 

From [Silas] Deane. 1778. September 2. Philadelphia. 

General Sullivan's attempt to make good his retreat from Rhode 
Island. Deplorable situation of the currency. General irritation at 
the conduct of Comte d'Estaing; first in going to the southward which 
caused him to miss the Jamaica fleet and allowed the enemy to es- 
cape from the Delaware; and, second, his quitting Newport to follow 
Lord Howe after an express agreement with General Sullivan to 
attack that town. Has not settled any measures as yet with Con- 
gress but hopes to rejoin Franklin early in the following winter. A. 
L. S. 2 p. XI, 107. 

From D'Urbainville. 1778. September 2. Toulouse. 

Sends Franklin a " Diatribe in Verse on England and the Eng- 
lish " in which he speaks of their declining power and the defeats 
and disasters they have recently suffered in different parts of the 
world. A. L. S. with Poem. 6 p. (In French.) LI, 27. 

From Chevalier de Marolles de Luce. 

1778. September 2. Paris. 

Begging him to be present at a meeting of scholars to be held at 
" L'ancien College de Bayeux." A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

XI, 108. 



490 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From M[ary] Cavendish {alias Stewart). 
1778 September 2. Calais. 

Surprised at receiving no answers to her letters, especially as Frank- 
lin promised his protection for a work which cannot be brought over 
until the Court grants her permission ; has been detained in Calais 
with regard to some business of the Duchess of Kingston, which is 
now finished. A. L. S. i p. XI, 109. 

From [Pahin de Champlain de] la Blancherie. 

1778. September 2. Paris. 

Requesting Franklin's presence at his house for a meeting of scholars ; 
promises him a view of some interesting objects. A. L. S. I p. (In 
French.) XI, no. 

From [C. G. F.] Dumas. 1778. September 3. The Hague. 

Account of the meeting, at Frankfort, between an Amsterdam mer- 
chant and Mr. [Wm.] Lee, who said he was empowered to negotiate 
a loan at Amsterdam of 700,000 Florins on behalf of the United States; 
willingness of the town council to authorize this loan; question of 
Mr. Lee's being the proper channel for such a negotiation. A. L. S. 
3 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 47. 

From Sir George Grand. 1778. September 3. Amsterdam. 

Concerning certain negotiations of Mr. W[illiam] L[ee] which 
would be contrary to the interests of the United States and preju- 
dicial to their credit. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XI, 1 12. 

Fro?n Penet, D'Acosta & Co., to The American Commissioners. 

1778. September 3. Nantes. 

Enclosing a letter arrived from Boston, and ojffering their services 
in any capacity. L. S. i p. (In French.) XI, 1 13. 

From de Perygnon. 1778. September 3. Paris. 

Asking for information about the legality of a marriage celebrated 
in the Catholic church at Philadelphia. A. L. S. 5 p. (In French.) 

XI, 114. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 491 

From Tho[inas] Mante. 1778. September 3. Au Fort L'Eveque. 
His wretched situation in prison ; suffers torments from the stone, 
without the smallest means of procuring alleviation ; accuses le Comte 
de Boisgelin of being his persecutor and at the same time his debtor 
for a large sum of money; implores assistance. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XI, 115. 

From Berube de Costentin to The American Commissioners. 

1778. September 4. Brest. 

In conformity with their orders, Mr. Thomas Wilkinson has left 
for the town of St. Paul de Leon, where he will live in peace; has 
taken every precaution for his personal safety. Is awaiting orders, 
relative to the prisoners who cause him much annoyance and anxiety. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XI, 116. 

From [C. G. F.] Dumas to The American Commissioners. 
1778. September 4. The Hague. 

Begs them to write him a letter enclosing either a plan for a 
general treaty of friendship or commerce with the United States, or a 
declaration that the Republic wishes to conclude with the United States, 
a treaty similar to that with France; no time to be lost in getting 
this affair in train. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 48. 

From Louis Fouche. 1778. September 4. Romegoux. 

Requests Franklin to help him to obtain some employment in business 
in the United States. L. 6 p. (In French.) LX, 103. 

From [Pierre Augustin Caron] de Beaumarchais. 

1778. September 5, Paris. 

Desires to know when he can confer with him and Mr. Lee on the 
subject of the ship " La Therese," as he is being urged to sell her 
at once. L. in 3d P. i p. (In French.) XI, 117. 

From [Benjamin Vaughan]. 1778. September 6. Essex. 

Public opinion in England hard to describe; a strong inclination 
for peace with America but war with France; lack of confidence in 
the Ministry. The people shocked at the duplicity of Lord North 
and Lord George Germain in disavowing their former intentions 



492 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

respecting America, and have burned them in effigy. Crisis in the 
spring when a surrender looked imminent, but Lord Sandwich won 
the King by his review and sights in the dockyards and by his flum- 
mery. Inactivity of the French and Spaniards. The financial con- 
dition. Prodigious effect of the accounts of America lately printed 
in the newspapers; the people grown almost callous to National honor. 
Condition of manufacturers and merchants; probabilities of trade being 
shortly opened to America. His opinions concerning d'Estaing and 
Clinton. His reasons for indignation against the Rockinghams. A. 
L. 12 p. XI, ii8. 

From [Baron] J. D. Van der Capellen. 1778. September 6. Zwolle. 

Announcing his receipt of a letter from Jonathan Trumbull, Gov- 
ernor of Connecticut, in which he finds ample compensation for all 
the hardships incident to his connections with the affairs of America. 
L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XI, 119. 

From Horneca, Fizeaux & Co., to The American Commissioners. 
1778. September 7. Amsterdam. 

In receipt, by Mr. Whitehall, of the book containing the promissory 
notes of Congress; nothing needed now to commence negotiations 
but certain orders and instructions from the Commissioners. A. L. 
S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 120. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 

1778. September 8. Bordeaux. 

Announcing the arrival of the privateer schooner. Success, from 
Virginia, with news that the Comte d'Estaing left the Bay of Chesa- 
peake for New York on the 9th of July, leaving five French frigates 
in the Bay. English prisoners brought into Bordeaux by American 
privateers. Frequent altercations betwixt masters and their seamen. 
Advantageous results to be expected, should all American vessels re- 
port first to the agents of the Commissioners. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 121. 

From Heitz. 1778. September 8. Strasbourg. 

Strong desire on the part of himself and two friends to establish 
themselves in America; encloses a list of twenty-one questions which 
he begs Franklin to answer. A. L S. 4 p. (In French.) XI, 122. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 493 

Fro7n [C. G. F.] D[uinas]. 1778. September 8. The Hague. 

Concerning the affair of the projected loan; the merchant and Mr. 
Lee together at Aix-la-Chapelle. The Grand Facteur's suggestion 
that they should delicately insinuate, in their letter, that the United 
States may grant some privilege to the English and French for the 
sake of peace, if the Republic continues so backward in meeting their 
advances. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XXXIX, 49. 

From Robert Ellison. 1778. September 8. London. 

Desires authentic proof of the exact date of the treaty between 
France and the United States. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 123. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1778. September 10. Nantes. 

Informed that the Jersey and Guernsey privateers obtain provisions 
at Bilbao under the flag of the United States. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 160. 

From [Capt. Jacques] Le Maire. 1778. September 10. Nantes. 

Encloses the official report of his inspection of rifles to prove that 
he has procured the best possible quality of arms for Virginia. A. L. 
S. 5 p. XI, 126. 

From Charles Gadd. 1778. September 10. Marstrand. 

The above port is the only safe and convenient one for bringing 
the American products to the markets of Sweden, Denmark, Russia 
and Poland and a part of Germany; begs Franklin to appoint a con- 
sul or agent there to take charge of the American interests; such a 
commission must be authorized by the King of Sweden ; offers him- 
self for the position. A. L. S. 4 p. XI, 127. 

From [C. G. F.] Dumas. 1778. September 11. The Hague. 

Affair of the projected loan; Mr. Lee's concealment from the mer- 
chant of the negotiation at present in the hands of Messrs. Horneca, 
Fizeaux & Co. ; his assumption of the title of Commissioner of Con- 
gress; his own correspondence with Mr. Lee. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) XXXIX, 50. 



494 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. September 12. Bordeaux. 

Impossibility of having the cannon completed before February; has 
concluded to close with the forges of Petigore. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XI, 128. 

From Geo[rge] Scott. 1778. September 12. Leeds. 

Went to London and delivered the messages committed to his care; 
necessity of settling his affairs in England before pursuing his project; 
asks Franklin's permission for this indulgence. A. L. S. i p. 

XI, 129. 

From Saint Sauveur, fils aine. 1778. September 12. Trieste, 

Account of his descent from a maternal grandfather named Fran- 
quelin and of the fortunes of the family; trusts that the similarity in 
names will give him some right to Franklin's esteem and kindness. A. L. 
S. 4 p. (In French.) XI, 130. 

From Saint Sauveur. 1778. September 12. Trieste. 

Expressing the same sentiments of esteem and veneration for Frank- 
lin as his son does; possibility of his being known to Franklin as he 
had the honor of serving in Canada as Secretary of the Government. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 131. 

From Fournier le jeune. 1778. September 12. Paris. 

Concerning a font of type ordered by Franklin. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) XI, 132. 

From Branche. 1778. September 12. Paris. 

Recommended to Franklin by le Comte de Vergennes, as engraver 
of medals, seals, stamps, etc., for the new republic. A. L. S. 2 p. 
(In French.) XI, 133. 

From Comte d'Ossun. 1778. September 12. Bordeaux. 

Writes on behalf of M. Rolandeau to whom, the winter before, 
Franklin granted a letter of recommendation ; his capture by the enemy 
and loss of all he possessed ; his unchangeable resolve to return to 
America with two of his brothers; begs for them a second letter of 
recommendation. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XI, 134. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 495 

From [C. G. F.] Dumas to The American Commissioners. 
1778 September 13. The Hague. 

Account of affairs in Holland; strong feeling against England owing 
to the seizure of certain Dutch vessels; resolution passed in the Holland 
Assembly to protest vigorously against the violation of their rights. 
A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 51. 

From Baron de Seyffertit. 1778. September 13. Cologne. 

Is about to set sail for Virginia with all his family; begs Frank- 
lin for letters to the Governor of that Province and to certain other 
gentlemen; has sufficient fortune not to be a charge on anyone, and 
also the ability and desire to serve America either in a military or 
commercial line; offers to come to Paris and receive any orders Frank- 
lin may have for America, his reward being the acquaintance of a 
man, whom all Germany reveres as well as France; necessity of secrecy. 
A. L. S. 6 p. (In French.) XI, 135. 

From Moucherel. 1778. September 13. Nancy. 

Since the letter he wrote announcing his work on the Civil and 
Criminal Code, has received orders from the Keeper of the Seals, to 
forward the work to him ; presumes he owes this to Franklin having 
spoken to the Minister, and that the work has been delivered over to the 
Censors. A. L. S.- i p. (In French.) XI, 136 

From Frangois Grasset et Cie. 1778. September 13. Lausanne. 

Sends catalogue of their library; solicits his orders. A. L. S. i p. 
(In French.) XI, 137. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones. 1778. September 14. Brest. 

Encloses two letters, one, written by him on the 9th to the Pj-ince 
of Nassau, the other to the Minister (M. de Sartine). Reasons why 
he mentioned his rank. Has written the Marine Committee his 
reasons for remaining in Europe. However great the mortification, 
would prefer to return to America, though unemployed, before the 
winter, than to remain in Frence amused by unmeaning promises until 
the spring — and then be disappointed. Knows positively that the 
Minister has ships to bestow, if he wishes ; if he was worth his notice 
at the beginning is not less so now. A. L. S. 3 p. XI, 138. 



49^ Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Pahin de Champlain] de la Blancherie. 

1778, September 14. Compiegne. 

Offering his services to be employed in the United States. A. L. 
S. 3 p. LX, 79. 

From Dom Bernard. 1778. September 14. Chalon-sur-Saone. 

Is a Benedictine monk and has been prior for five years at the 
Abbey of St. Pierre de Chalon ; towards the end of his term he lost 
a considerable sum at play which he is unable to repay. Begs Frank- 
lin to assist him and save his reputation, that being his only treasure, 
and above all, to keep his secret. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

A. E. by Franklin. " Wants me to pay his gaming debts and he 
will pray for success to our cause." XI, 139. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 

1778. September 15. Bordeaux. 

Arrival from Virginia of the cutter Tartar which left York River 
the 29th of July, bringing a report that Comte d'Estaing had taken 
five English frigates, that New York was closely blockaded and the 
ultimate surrender of the English forces expected. Attended the last 
earthly services of Captain Ayres. A. L. S. i p. XI, 140. 

From [de] Kerguelen. 1778. September 15. Saumur. 

Requests the command of one of the frigates being built in Holland. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) LXII, 60. 

From Silas Deane. 1778. September 15. Philadelphia. 

General Sullivan made a good retreat from Rhode Island ; General 
Clinton's arrival with a strong force the morning after he left. Lord 
Byron's fleet reported at Newport. Comte d'Estaing repairing dam- 
ages at Boston. The enemy's superiority at sea; damage they did 
at Bedford ; their evacuation of New York hourly expected ; con- 
jectures as to their destination. Congress, the day before, made choice 
of Franklin as the Minister Plenipotentiary to the Court of France; 
unanimity with which it was carried. The foolish game the Commis- 
sioners are playing. For many reasons is impatient to rejoin Franklin ; 
has received no letters from him since leaving France. A. L. S. 3 p. 

XI, 141. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 497 

From Dan[iel] McNeill to The American Commissioners. 

1778. September 15. Paris. 

Concerning the brig, L'Isabelle, from Guadeloupe, recaptured by 
him from the English privateer; hears that the former owners are 
going to lay claim to her; begs them to apply to the French Ministry 
that said vessel may be tried according to the lavv^s of the country. A. 
L. S. 3 p. XI, 142. 

From John Apreece. 1778. September 15, St. Germain-en-Laye. 

A former officer in the English army who resigned his commission, 
rather than fight against the United States, appeals to Franklin for 
assistance. A. L. S. 3 p. LXX, 16. 

From Coder. 1778, September 15. Paris. 

Enclosing the Minister's answer to the note he spoke about to Frank- 
lin; begs him also to take notice of the enclosed memoir and if he 
approves, speak of it to M. de Sartine. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

XI, 143. 

From Rich[ar]d Grinnell to The American Commissioners. 

1778. September 15. Guernsey. 

Sailed with Captain Barnes from Paimboeuf on August 29th, but 
was captured by an English cutter whose captain treated them more 
like brothers than prisoners; Captain Barnes destroyed all his papers, 
as did also Captain Niles who was likewise captured by a Jersey 
privateer. A. L. S. i p. XI, 144. 

From [Conrad Alexandre] Gerard [de Rayneval]. 
1778. September 15. Passy. 

Invitation to attend a reception of the Free Masons, to be followed 
by a banquet and a ball. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XI, 145. 

From de Perygnon. 1778. September 16. Paris. 

Desires him to send Congress the decision of the Counsel of St. 

Domingo which demands a notarial document from Philadelphia. A. 

L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 146. 
2—32 



498 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From W[illia]m Bingham to The American Commissioners. 

1778. September 17. St. Pierre. 

Drawing upon them for a certain sum of money. A. L, S. i p. 
(In French.) XI, 147. 

Fro7n W[illiam] Lee to The American Commissioners. 
1778. September 17. Paris. 

Requests a conference on an important subject concerning which 
profound secrecy must be preserved. A. L. S. i p. XI, 148. 

From Croiset. 1778. September 17. Paris. 

Requested by a merchant of La Rochelle to forward the enclosed 
to Franklin and beg his interest in the contents; his friend desires to 
render himself useful in the new alliance between France and the 
United States. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 149. 

From Elizabeth Angelique Faucon V[euv]e La Louelle. 
1778. September 18. St. Malo. 

Petition from the relatives of Bernard La Louelle who was surgeon 
on the frigate Reprisal, Captain Lambert Wickes. D. 2 p. (In 
French.) LVII, 22. 

From The Treasurer of Loans to The American Commissioners. 

1778. September 18. Philadelphia. 

Transmits lists of the numbers which the bills of exchange are to 
bear, in order that the Commissioners may detect counterfeits. Ac- 
companied by an invoice of the bills furnished to each state up to 
date. A. L. S. Fra[nci]s Hopkinson. 3 p. (In triplicate.) 

LIII, 72. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones. 1778. September 18. Brest. 

Announces the return of the fleet, having been absent a month and 
accomplished nothing. Arrival of the frigate Juno with the English 
frigate Fox; if the minister will give him nothing better, would rather 
accept the Fox and the Alert as a tender, than remain idle. His 
letter of the 13th to the Minister, approved of by the Duke de la Roche- 
foucauld. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 150. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 499 

From Nethard. 1778. September 18. Strasbourg. 

Desires Franklin to procure him a position ; thinks his talents will 
do credit to any place. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XI, 150^. 

FrojH Jno. Emery. 1778. September 19. Bilbao. 

Desires instructions relative to the prize-money due to the owners 
and captors of the two prizes taken by Captain Babson. A. L. S. 
I p. XI, 151. 

From Jon[athan] Loring Austin to The American Commissioners. 

1778. September 19. Passy. 

His intention of going to Holland and thence to America. Ask- 
ing for letters to Congress and to the Council of the State of Massa- 
chusetts Bay from whom he was despatched with the important news 
of Burgoyne's surrender. His reasons for requesting a small advance, 
necessary for his expenses to Holland and back. A. L. S. 3 p. 

XI. 152a. 

From S. & J. H. Delap to The American Commissioners. 

1778. September 19. Bordeaux. 

Acknowledging their letter of the i8th of July, with one for Cap- 
tain Wm. Hill Sargeant, and a blank bond for him to fill up and 
sign; enclosed is the said bond. L. S. i p. XI, 153. 

From Christin. 1778. September 19. Carlsruhe. 

His curious works in clock and watch-making; his marine inven- 
tions; if Franklin judges his works worthy of attention, hopes he 
will write to him. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XI, 154. 

From [Capt. Jacques] Le Maire. 1778. September 19. Nantes. 

Encloses a copy of a letter he wrote to [Arthur] Lee, as well as a 
proposition on M. Gruel's part to ship all the articles ordered by the 
government of Virginia. Has written several times to Mr. Lee, con- 
cerning his want of necessary money to meet expenses ; applies to 
Franklin for a sufficient sum to meet these debts. A. L. S. 3 p. 
(In French.) XI, 155. 



500 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Guiot. 1778. September 20. Nantes. 

Wishes to settle in America with his family. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) LX, 107. 

From de Vanquelin de Boisroger. 1778. September 20. Menars. 

Desires to purchase a plantation in South Carolina belonging at 
one time to M. St. Pierre, who was killed two years before by the 
Indians; wishes to know if the United States will allow the title of 
fellow-citizen to a Frenchman, if he might serve in the army, and if 
Franklin will grant him his protection. Only thirty-three years old, 
yet has long been acquainted with Franklin's theory of electricity. A. 
L. S. 2 p. XI, 156. 

From A[melia] Barry. 1778. September 20. Tunis. 

Has received no answer to her last three letters; fears they may have 
miscarried ; puts all her hopes in Franklin ; could bear poverty alone 
but cannot endure to think of Mr. Barry and the children suffering 
from privations. A. L. S. 3 p. XI, 157. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones. 1778. September 21. Brest. 

Enclosing letters to the Duke de Chartres which he begs Franklin 
to suppress, should he disapprove of them; if they are delivered, begs 
him to write a line to the Duke about the same time. Wishes to accept 
of the ship Fox with the Alert, unless something is immediately offered 
and bestowed. Fear of losing the Fox, too, unless application is im- 
mediately made. A. L. S. i p. XI, 158. 

From Joseph Pine. 1778. September 21. Josselin. 

Was captured by an American privateer while on his way to New 
Foundland ; ransomed his vessel and was on his passage to England, 
when he was taken by a French frigate and has been kept prisoner 
ever since ; hopes it is in Franklin's power to procure him his liberty. 
A. L. S. I p. XI, 159. 

From M. Livingston to The American Commissioners. 
1778. September 21. Bordeaux. 

Will have a very fine ship ready for sea immediately; desires ad- 
vice as to the quantity of freight, etc. A, L. S. I p. XI, 161. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 501 

From Rolandeau. 1778. September 21. Paris. 

Owing to illness, has been unable to wait on Franklin and deliver 
two letters to him; begs for an early audience; his impatience to re- 
join his regiment. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 162. 

From [Jean Baptiste] Le Roy. 1778. September 21. Viry. 

In the midst of their affliction, they have not forgotten Franklin's 
promise to visit them at Viry, one of the loveliest spots near Paris. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 163. 

From George Anderson. 1778. September 22, Lisbon. 

Was to have been the bearer of the Ratification of the Treaty 
between France and America, together with letters and papers from 
Congress and from the Governor and Council of Virginia; was taken 
prisoner near the Bay of Biscay, when he destroyed all his papers; 
is now at liberty, and owing to the kindness of Mr. Dohrman, is 
promised a passage to France or America. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 164. 

From Madame Bonte de Kerguelen. 1778. September 22. Paris. 

Owing to her poor health she cannot present her husband's letter, 
so sends it by one of M. de Kerguelin's relatives. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) LXII, 61. 

From [Capt. Jacques] Le Maire. 1778. September 22. Nantes. 

Sorry to annoy Franklin again, but he must have 6cx) livres to 
meet his expenses; encloses a copy of [Arthur] Lee's letter, refusing to 
furnish him with certain sums, as well as his answer and the pros- 
pectus (c and d. 2 p. In French) of the equipment of the ship which 
is to carry the articles to Virginia; begs Franklin's aid in the fulfillment 
of his mission. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 165. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 

1778. September 22. Nantes. 

Concerning certain of his accounts which he encloses. The Despatch, 
Captain Barnes, taken and carried into Germany. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XXXVII, 162. 



502 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

i^rom Am [ol]d Henry Dohrman. 1778. September 22. Lisbon. 

Capture of an American schooner, " Sally," by the British packet boat, 
" King George." Captain, crew and passengers of the " Sally " were 
landed at Lisbon. He received them in his house, provided for their 
wants and will send them home at the first opportunity. Encloses letter 
from Mr. Anderson, owner of the schooner. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) XLIV, 23. 

From de Ville. 1778. September 22. Nantes. 

Was formerly Commissary to the Baron de Benowsky, General of 
Madagascar; at present is without employ; begs Franklin to inter- 
cede with M. Lemaire on his behalf, who otherwise can do nothing 
for him. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XI, 166. 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones. 1778. September 24. Brest. 

His desire to obtain the " Fox " and the " Alert " which are both well- 
calculated for an object he has in view; the Minister has here an oppor- 
tunity to give him a small command ; trusts the ship and tender may 
be reserved for him. The Prince of Nassau has not answered his 
letter; considers it unkind to leave him in the torment of indolence 
and suspense. A. L. S. 3 p. XI, 167. 

From Davies Inglesina. 1778. September 24. Paris 

Expressing the keenest appreciation of Franklin's friendship on be- 
half of his mother, sister and himself. A. L. S. i p. XI, 168. 

From Jona[than] Williams, Jr., to The American Commissioners. 
1778. September 24. Nantes. 

Concerning the inventory of the Magazines of Arms. A. L. S. 
I p. XXXVII, 163. 

From Deuersine, <'? rt/. 1778. September 24. Paris. 

A confectioner, a distiller and a restaurant keeper beg Franklin 
to procure them a free passage to the United States where they wish 
to engage in their respective occupations. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

LX, loi. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 503 

From Carl Wedel. 
1778. September 24. Neunkirchen near Ciisel. 

Wishes to emigrate to the United States with his family. A. L. S. 
2 p. LIX, 86. 

From Baronne de Lindau. 1778. September 25. Near Eisenach. 

Begging Franklin to interest himself in favor o-f her son, a lieu- 
tenant in the battalion of the Prince of Hesse-Hanau in the service 
of England, and now a prisoner in Boston. A. L. S. 2 p. (In 
French.) XI, 169. 

From John Apreece. 1778. September 25. St. Germain. 

Is in distressed circumstances. Renews his appeal for assistance. 
A. L. S. 2 p. LXX, 17. 

From Jos[eph] Wharton to The American Commissioners. 

1778. September 26. Paris, 

Proposes to send several cargoes of salt from Portugal to Amer- 
ica; desires passports for these vessels in order to insure the protection 
of American ships-of-war and privateers, who might otherwise hold 
that mistaken belief in the unfriendliness of Portugal and the United 
States. A. L. S. 2 p. XI, 170. 

From W[illiam] Alexander. 1778. September 26. Auteuil. 

Encloses a paper containing a short sketch of Dr. Black's Doctrine 
of Latent Heat; refers Franklin to his brother for the whole extent 
of the doctrine. A. L. S. i p. XI, 171. 

From Montaudouin. 1778. September 26. Nantes. 

Sends this letter by M. Blanchet. Many English corsairs, sailing 
under the American flag, buy their provisions at Bilboa. A. L. S. 3 p. 
(In French.) XI, 172. 

From Machillot Desplaces. 1778. September 26. Paris. 

Is the valet de chambre to the Marquis de la Fayette ; begs Dr. Frank- 
lin to return him the sum of 400 livres which he lent to M. Le Maire 
on July 30th for one month only and which is still unpaid. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) XI, 173. 



504 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From James Laurens, Jr. 1778. September 27. Le Vigan. 

Desires a passport for himself and family to enable them to travel 
through France without difficulty; his home is in Charleston, South 
Carolina, and he came abroad in search of health ; his brother is 
Henry Laurens, President of the General Congress in America. A. 
L S. 2 p. XI, 174. 

From Dr. Hennessienne. 1778. September 28. Vienna. 

Claims to have discovered a secret by which he can render gun- 
powder non-inflammable and non-explosive and to restore, at will, 
its natural properties. Offers to disclose his secret for a reward and 
to demonstrate his discovery before duly appointed delegates. A. L. 
S. 2 p. (In French.) XLIX, 21. 

From Le Cordier. 1778. September 28. Port Louis. 

Offers his services as commercial and shipping agent for the United 
States at Port Louis. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) LX, 62. 

From [Edme Jacques] Genet. 1778. September 29. Versailles. 

Requested by his friend, Ed [ward] Bridgen, to forward Franklin the 
enclosed packet. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XI, 175. 

From [Comte de] Sarsfield. 1778. September 29. Rennes. 

Enclosing a letter written by him to Madame Macaulay which will 
show Franklin how the matter stands; she confided the books to one 
Brown, who was taken prisoner by a Jersey privateer; if Franklin 
has any plan for recovering these books, begs him to write her of it. 
A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XI, 176. 

From Matt [he] w Ridley to The American Commissioners. 
1778. September 29. Paris. 

Met accidentally in London with a manuscript book of the Com- 
missioners of the English Navy a few years back, containing an ac- 
curate description of ships then in commission ; begs leave to present 
this find through Franklin to Congress, and hopes it will prove of 
some small advantage. Owns property in Maryland and wishes to 
derive his only security therein from the joint powers of the United 
States. L. S. 2 p. XI, 177. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 505 

From de Gruffy. 1778. September 29. Paris. 

Has just received a letter from the Comtesse de Conway who is suffer- 
ing from the most acute anxiety respecting her husband from whom 
she has had no news whatever; the Gazettes say he has been wounded 
in an affair with Colonel Cadwalader; begs Franklin to relieve this 
cruel uncertainty. Offers to procure America a loan from Switzerland. 
A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XI, 178. 

From Borel. 1778. September 30. Paris. 

Reminding Franklin of his promise to send him the arms and stand- 
ards of the independent States of America. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) XI, 179. 

From de la Lande. 1778. September 30. Au College Royal. 

Addresses Franklin as the " Eagle of the West." His friend's, M. 
Cerisier's work , " Un Tableau des Provinces Unies," whose dedi- 
cation Franklin has accepted on behalf of the thirteen United States. 
A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XI, 180. 

From Chevalier de Coux. 1778. September 30. Paris. 

Is commissioned to offer Franklin a vessel for the use of the Colonies ; 
begs for an interview on the subject. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XI, 181. 

From Edw[ar]d Bancroft. [1778. September] ? Chaillot. 

Enclosing a letter from Captain Jones, at Brest, and an English 
newspaper. Mr. Walpole's information that the British Ministry 
contemplates applying for terms of peace. Mr. Coffyn's message con- 
cerning the three American prisoners. A. L. S. i p. XLI, 93. 

From Is[aac] Van Teylingen. 1778. October i. Rotterdam. 

Concerning the ship Chester, which was seized by the Americans; 
Franklin's promise to place the matter before Congress and obtain 
redress for the owners, who are Dutch merchants; over a year has 
passed and nothing has been done, A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) 

XII, 2. 



5o6 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From [Mrs.] R. Parsons. 1778. October 2. Paris. 

Is compelled by dire necessity to appeal to him once more; begs for 
the loan of twenty pounds to prevent her landlord turning her out of 
doors. A. L. S. 2 p. XII, 3. 

From C. G. F. Dumas to The American Commissioners. 
1778. October 2. The Hague. 

England's indifferent attitude toward the representations made by 
Holland. Urges them to enclose him a declaration concerning the 
desired commercial treaty between the two Republics; explains what 
they had better say; good purpose it will serve; enclosing copies of 
two letters (5 p.) from M. Van Berkel concerning the projected 
treaty. A. L. S. 3 P- (In French.) XXXIX, 52. 

From Chevalier de Servoulles. 1778. October 2. Turin. 

Request to have his debts paid and to be given an appointment in 
the army. A. L, S. 2 p. (In French.) LXII, 1 18. 

From Lieut.-Col. Winbert, Joseph Lunt and Edward MacKellar. 
1778. October 2. Forton Prison (Gosport). 

Inquiring why the exchange of prisoners has been so long delayed, 
and asking Franklin's interposition in the matter. A. L. S. i p. 

XII, 4. 
Printed in Hale's Franklin in France, I, 209. 

From G. Williams. 1778. October 2. London. 

Captain Barnard has shown much kindness to unfortunate Amer- 
icans; asks Franklin to grant him any favor in his power. 

A. E. by Franklin. Praising Mr. Williams, a surgeon, for his 
kindness to the American prisoners. A. L. S. i p. XII, 5. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. October 3. Bordeaux. 

Concerning the sale of a vessel belonging to Mr. Ross, whose agent 
refuses to pay the seamen, who shipped on her, their due wages; refers 
the matter to the Commissioners. Sends them two hogsheads of wine 
of Medoc. A. L. S. 3 P- XII, 6. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 507 

From Thomas Grant and Joses Hill to The American Commissioners. 
1778. October 3, Bordeaux. 

Crew of the vessel Nancy, of Edenton, North Carolina, at Bordeaux, 
petition them to adjust their claims with the French Admiralty. L. S. 
3 p. LXI, 69. 

From [Capt. Jacques] Le Maire. 1778. October 3. Nantes. 

M. Gruel's vessel the safest means of sending the various articles 
to Virginia. As [Arthur] Lee refuses to advance him another sou begs 
Franklin to let him have the necessary sum. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XII, 9. 

From Rolandeau. 1778. October 3. Paris. 

Asks if there is a letter for him in Franklin's keeping; desires a 
certificate of his service in the American army, of his imprisonment 
and subsequent arrival in Englanck A. L, in 3d P. I p. XII, 10. 

From G. B. [David Hartley]. 1778. October 4. 

Proposition concerning a treaty of peace. A. L. S. 3 p. XII, 12. 
Partly printed in Works (Sparks, VIII, 301, Note; Bigelow, VI, 219, Note). 

From Jona[than] Williams, [Sr.]. 1778. October 4. Boston. 

Introducing Mr. Henry Bromfield, of Boston. A. L. S. i p. 

XXXVII, 164. 

.From G. B. [David Hartley]. 1778. October 4. 

Peace and friendship between the two nations still practicable ; his 
plan for getting over the chief stumbling block. A. L. i p. XII, 13. 

From [Mrs.] Robert Herault. 1778. October 4. Calais. 

Begging for news of the cutter Benjamin, commanded by Cap- 
tain Pierre Ricot, which sailed for the United States a year be- 
fore ; her husband was second in command and she is in the deepest 
anxiety about his fate. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XII, 14. 

From J. Ingen Housz. 1778. October 5. London. 

Prevented from coming over to Paris by his undertaking a work 
on the subject of smallpox and inoculation. Promises to show him 



5o8 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

certain experiments he has made with inflammable air. Hears that Dr. 
Mesmer is in Paris and has been presented to the Royal Academy, 
also that his stuff about magnetical effluvia, too insipid to gain the 
ear of an old woman, is believed in by M, Le Roy, who protects him 
and will recommend him in London. A. L. S. 2 p. XII, 15. 

From [Madame Herbaut de] Marcenay. 1778. October 5. Epinay. 

On what day would Franklin do her sister and herself the honor 
of dining with them; as not until he has honored them by his presence 
can they enjoy the pleasure of dining with him at Passy. A. L. S. 
2 p. (In French.) XII, 16. 

From [Dr. Jean Frangois Clement] Morand. 1778. Octobers. Paris. 

Desires to use an illustration of the Franklin stove in his book and 
begs Franklin to write a brief explanation of it to accompany the en- 
graving. A. L. S. 4 p. (In Fren(?h.) XII, 17. 

From Moreau. 1778. October 5. Versailles. 

Sending Franklin two letters delivered for him to the porter of the 
Comte de Vergennes. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XII, 18. 

Frojji The Continental Congress. 1778. October 6. 

Directing the American Commissioners to inform Dr. Price that 
it is the desire of Congress to consider him as a citizen and to receive 
his assistance in regulating their finances. 

D. S. Cha[rle]s Thompson, Sec[retar]y. i p. LXXV, 67, 68. 

Printed in the Secret Journals of Congress, Boston, 1820. II, loi. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. October 6. Bordeaux. 

The arrival of a small cutter from Baltimore; no word of Comte 
d'Estaing's operations. News of other vessels. A. L. S. i p. 

XII, 19. 

From Charlotte Amiel. 1778. October 6. Auteuil. 

Begging to know what prospect there is of Mr. Amiel's succeeding 
at Brest, and praying him to push the matter on; hopes the disap- 
pointment he experienced at Dunkirk will not be repeated. A. L, S. 
I p. XII, 20. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 509 

From Vicomte de Galbert. 1778. October 6. Brest. 

Concerning sugar belonging to him on board the Isabella, which 
was captured by a Guernsey corsair and delivered by an American 
frigate. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XII, 21. 

From Richard Grinnell. 1778. October 7. Passy. 

With reference to the English whaling vessels manned by Amer- 
icans sailing from London and protected by the British fleets. L. S. 
6 p. LX, II. 

From Robert Harrison. 1778. October 7. Dinan. 

An American seaman, taken prisoner on an English privateer, asks to 
be sent home. L. S. 2 p. LX, 13. 

From Jno. Emery. 1778. October 7. Bilbao. 

Arrival of the schooner, Lively, Captain Dupuy, from Newburyport, 
with the enclosed papers; therein Franklin will see the dispositions 
made to attack Rhode Island, and their probable failure owing to 
Comte d'Estaing's conduct in refusing to wait twenty- four hours and 
assist General Sullivan. A. L. S. i p. XII, 22. 

From de Tournelle. 1778. October 7. La Corogne. 

Enclosing a packet for the Canary Islands. A. L. S. i p. (In 
French.) XII, 23. 

From Luet de Biscontin. 1778. October 8. Venice. 

In case America establishes consulships in foreign countries, offers 
himself for the position at Venice. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) 

XII, 7. 

FroTu Cathallet Cotiere. 1778. October 8. St. Sulpice de la Pointe. 

Desires information concerning the remedy of tobacco ashes in cases 
of dropsy. A. L. S. 4 p. (In French.) XII, 8. 

From Merlet. 1778. October 8. Paris. 

Enclosing a copy of a letter ( i p. ) received from his two nephews, 
M. de La Neuville, general of division under General Gates, and 
his brother, aide-de-camp to General Conway; begs Franklin to for- 
ward the enclosed letters to them. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

XII, 24. 



510 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Cadet. 1778. October 8. Paris. 

Sends him some bread made out of potatoes; a discovery by him- 
self and his friend, M. Parmentier; its advantages as compared with 
flour bread. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XII, 25. 

From Peter Collas to The American Commissioners. 
1778. October 8. Passy. 

Having bought certain articles in France, he was carrying them to 
America when he was captured by a Guernsey frigate and, after mak- 
ing his way back to Calais, his trunk was searched and his possessions 
taken from him as English manufacture; begs them to help him re- 
cover these articles. A. L. S. I p. XII, 26. 

From William Keating. 1778. October 8. Dinnant Castle. 

Is a native of Virginia to which country he is desirous of returning; 
the various vicissitudes he has encountered ; begs Franklin to obtain 
his release from prison and a passage on board some American vessel. 
A. L. S. I p. XII, 27. 

From Jacob Henemer. 1778. October 8. Mannheim. 

The Palatinate Academy of Sciences, wishing to show its admira- 
tion for Franklin, desires to present him with five books, dealing 
with history and philosophy ; the fourth volume contains four papers 
by himself on electricity. Regrets his ignorance of English and Frank- 
lin's lack of acquaintance with German. Suggestions for rendering the 
works of the various Societies more widely known. Urges the desira- 
bility of establishing a German Society in Philadelphia; encloses a 
catalogue of the books necessary to carry out such a project. A. L. 
7 p. (In Latin.) XII, 28. 

From Andrew Douglass. 1778. October 8. Senlis jail. 

His misfortunes since he sailed from Boston in April ; his miserable 
situation in a French prison ; begs Frankln to obtain his release and 
promises to serve America in any capacity he may suggest. A. L. S. 
3 p. XII, 32. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 511 

Frotn Tristram Barnard to The American Commissioners 
[1778.] October 9. 

Absent from America four years; employed in the English service; 
desires to return home and share his country's fate; asks for papers 
which will protect him against American vessels. Full account of a 
most valuable whale-fishery discovered by England since the present 
contest opened ; details the movements of the ships employed therein. 
A. L. S. 4 p. XLI, 104 and 105. 

From D[avid] Hartley. 1778. October 9. 

Quotes the answer from the Admiralty Office to his letters concern- 
ing an exchange of prisoners ; their refusal to make any exchange 
except man for man. A. L. S. 2 p. XII, 29. 

Fro7n Chevalier de Berny. 1778. October 9. Strasbourg. 

Has received no answer to the five or six letters he has written 
Franklin, though it is a year since he sent him a pamphlet entitled 
" L'CEil du Maitre." The King, Queen and other sovereigns have 
honored him with kind acknowledgments; claims a similar courtesy 
from Franklin. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XII, 30. 

From Buffet de Millery. 1778. October 9. Santenay. 

Franklin's promise to obtain some news from America of M. le 
Vicomte de Mauroy, whose affairs were left in his hands. A. L. S. 
I p. (In French.) XII, 31. 

From Ra[lph] Izard to The American Commissioners. 
1778. October lo. Paris. 

Indignant at M. de Sartine's letter of the 7th inst., in which he is 
referred to a course of law for the recovery of his baggage on board 
the ship Nile, carried into Marseilles by a French privateer; founds 
his claim upon an article in the treaty; begs that they will speak of 
it to M. de Sartine. A. L. S. 3 p. XII, 34. 

From Bailly, aine. 1778. October 10. Nantes. 

Concerning a bill of exchange drawn by Mr. Bingham on Messrs. 
Franklin and Adams. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XII, 35. 



512 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. October 10. Bordeaux. 

Applying for a letter of marque for Mr. Livingston's new ship, 

named after that respectable family. The case of Louis Lizete, a 

citizen of Quebec who desires to become a subject of France. A. L. 

S. 2 p. XII, 36. 

From Lesguillon. 1778. October 10. 

Writes on behalf of one of his old domestics, who left his service 
to enter that of Captain Jameson, an American, who has paid him no 
wages. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) XII, 37. 

From [Capt. Jacques] Le Maire. 1778. October 10. Nantes. 

Implores Franklin, once again, to advance him sufficient money to 

fulfil his orders from the Government of Virginia. A. L. S. 2 p. 

(In French.) XII, 38. 

From Alexander Niehaus. 

1778. October 10. Haseliinne in Miinster. 

Wishes to supply the American army with Osnabrvick linen and with 
stockings. A. L. S. 4 p. LIX, 84. 

From Chevalier de la Prade. 1778. October 10. Souillac. 

Desires to ser\^e in the army of the United States; his former mili- 
tary experience; offers to raise a troop of deserters, a course which 
has before proved very successful. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) 

XII, 39. 

From J[onathan] Williams, Jr. 1778. October 10. Nantes. 

Concerning a dispute between Mr. Schweighauser and himself relative 
to the ship Drake; explains the affair in detail. A. L. S. 5 p. 

XXXVII, 165. 

From Jacob Rieger. 1778. October 10. Heidelberg. 

Begging Franklin to enclose certain letters in his next packet to 
America. While travelling in Germany, has worn his uniform of 
an American officer and, from the lord to the peasant, has found 
only friends to the cause. Discontent among the Protestants in 
Germany owing to their rulers being chiefly Catholics. Opinions ex- 
pressed as to the present war between the Emperor and the King of 
Prussia. A. L. S. XII, 40. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 513 

From James Moylan to The American Commissioners. 

1778. October 12. L'Orient. 

Difficulty in disposing of Captain McNeill's prisoners. Concerning 
proposals received from the original proprietors of the French Reprisal, 
to allow Captain McNeill a third thereof for his protection. A. L. 
S. 2 p. XII, 41. 

From de Stettenhoven. 1778. October 12. Geneva. 

Has a great desire to serve America and believes he can be useful 
either through his talents or his bravery; his former military experience. 
A. L. S. 2 p. XII, 42. 

From Pattulls. 1778. October 12. St. Germain (-en-Laye). 

Laying before Franklin certain plans for the future welfare of Amer- 
ica, after her independence is assured. A. L. S. 3 p. XII, 43. 

From Dan[ie]l McNeill to The American Commissioners. 
1778. October 12. L'Orient. 

Desires to know what is to be done with his prisoners; wishes their 
opinion on the law-suit in regard to the Isabella, whose former pro- 
prietors are doing all in their power to delay the course of justice. 
A. L. S. 2 p. XII, 44. 

From Andrew Douglass. 1778. October 12. Saint Denis. 

Setting forth the same grievances as those in his letter of the 8th 
inst., only with more detail, and begging to be put on board some 
American privateer. A. L. S. 3 p. XII, 45. 

From James Lovell to The American Commissioners. 
1778. October 12. Philadelphia. 

Sending the last prints of Dunlap with the Boston papers; will 
not pretend to unravel the designs of the enemy. A. L. S. i p. 
(In duplicate.) XII, 46. 

From [C. G. F.] Dumas. 1778. October [12?]. The Hague. 

Concerning a certain passage in the Declaration made by the Burgo- 
masters of Amsterdam. Makes some excuses for the attitude of the 
Grand Pensionnaire. His intention to present Mr. Austin to the French 
Ambassador. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 53. 

2—33 



514 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From John Lemon, Edw[ar]d Driver and John Nichols. 
1778. October 12. Dinan. 
Begging Franklin to obtain their release from prison. L. XII, 47. 

From John Bondfield to The American Commissioners. 
1778. October 13. Bordeaux. 

Number of prizes taken. An engagement between a Spaniard and an 
English privateer which has occasioned the sending out of two Spanish 
frigates in pursuit. Offers to send a load of woolens and such season- 
able articles to the States without delay. A. L. S. 3 p. XII, 48. 

From R[odolp]h Valltravers. 1778. October 14. Bienne. 

Having received no answer to his last four letters will cease troubling 
Franklin. His regret at the failure of his plans for the union of 
Switzerland and the United States. The enclosed letter on behalf 
of Colonel Minning he hopes will be graciously received by Franklin 
and President Laurens. A. L. S. 3 p. XII, 49. 

From [Pierre] Poissonnier. 1778. October 15. Paris. 

Commissioned by the Royal Society of Medicine to renew Franklin's 
invitation to attend their public meeting on the 20th of that month. 
(In French.) XII, 49 >^. 

From J [onathan] Williams, Jr. 1778. October 15. Nantes. 

Hard treatment meted out to Captain Lemaire, the officer appointed 
by Virginia for the inspection of military stores. A. L. S. 2 p. 

XXXVII, 166. 

From [Ferdinand] Grand. [1778, October 15.] 

Note on a letter by Franklin to the Court of Spain. Thinks it should 

be more specific, and he might add that he is going to lay the complaint 

before Congress with a view of obtaining satisfaction for Captain Conyng- 

ham's misconduct. A. L. 2 p. (In French.) XLV, 132, c. 

From [C. G. F.] Dumas. 1778, October 16. The Hague. 

Wishes to know the truth of the report that Rhode Island is taken 
and two vessels of Byron's fleet captured. Promises him a great recep- 
tion when he shall visit Holland as the United States Minister; time 
not yet ripe. A. L. S. 3 p. (In French.) XXXIX, 54. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 515 

FrojTi Baron de Razetti. 1778. October 16. Paris. 

Desires to serve in the American army; his military experience; 
at present, owing to debts, is hiding in Paris. A. L. S. 3 p. (In 
French.) XII, 50. 

From Buchoz. 1778. October 17. Paris. 

Enclosing two catalogues of his library, which he is willing to sell 
on advantageous terms. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) XII, 51. 

From [C. G. F.] Dumas. 1778. October 18. The Hague. 
Introducing M. Huet Du Plessis. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

XXXIX, 55. 

Fro /« Robert Harrison and John Lemon. 1778. October 18. Dinan. 

Two American prisoners taken into British vessels petition for their 
release and for means to return to the United States. L. S, 2 p. 

LX, 14. 
From A Sincere Patriot. [Joshua Steele.] 
1778. October 18. London. 

Dares not put his name to a mere philosophic letter while his country 
is under the sway of ignorance and malevolence. Sending him a pub- 
lication of the Society of Arts and a pamphlet, just out, entitled The 
West India Merchant. The injuries done to those defenceless islands 
by American privateers have failed in their purpose of wounding Eng- 
land; the desire of many planters, if not for peace, for neutrality; 
plead the Islanders' cause. A. L. S. 3 p. XII, 53. 

From Mane. 1778. October 18. Paris. 

Has made a medallion of Franklin, in ivory, for the Royal Academy 
of Sciences, and takes great pleasure in sending a duplicate to Frank- 
lin. A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XII, 54. 

From . 1778. October 19. 

A wealthy person residing at Liege makes an offer to Franklin 
to supply the free states of America with all kinds of arms, at a 
much lower price than they are now paying and payment to be made 
only on delivery. Reply to this offer to be sent to M. Montecot, 
attorney in Parliament at Paris. L. 2 p. (In French.) XLIV, 24. 



5i6 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

From Jno. P[aul] Jones. 1778. October 19. Brest. 

Is disgraced in the eyes of Brest and the French fleet; his indignation 
against M. de Sartine who has done him such dishonor. Concerning 
his letter to the King and the best means of delivering it. His filial 
veneration for Franklin and his earnest desire to hear from him. A. 
L. S. 3 p. XII, 55. 

From Girardot, Haller & Co. 1778. October 19. Paris. 

Recommending to Franklin's protection, Mr. Foache, bookseller of 
Neufchatel. L. S. XII, 56. 

From Rich[ard] Penn. 1778. October 20. London. 

Through his marriage to Franklin's late ward, Miss Masters, as 
well as by inheritance, he owns great property in Pennsylvania and 
New Jersey, yet for more than two years has been unable to procure 
a shilling from that country; probably by this time, his agent, Mr. 
Tench Francis, has a considerable sum in hand for him ; desires Frank- 
lin to point out the best way for him to procure a temporary subsistence. 
A. L. S. 4 P- XII, 57. 

From M. Cadet (-le-jeune). 1778. October 20. 

The Lieutenant-General of Police accepts the appointment made 
for their meeting at the Hotel Royal des Invalides. Will discuss 
the question of bread made from potatoes and bread-making in general. 
M. Parmentier, the celebrated chemist, will present a work of his 
to Franklin on the subject. A. L. S. 2 p. (In French.) LXX, 40. 

From Abr[aha]m Livingston to The American Commissioners. 
1778. October 20. Charleston. 

Explaining why his hopes of sending remittances to France on the 
public account have been frustrated. A. L. S. I p. XII, 58. 

From Chevalier de Marolles de Luce. 1778. October 21. Paris. 

Describes his cruel situation ; his wife ill, and he himself suffering 
intensely from a wound in his thigh, without proper food, medicines 
or money; begs for two or three Louis d'or to help him regain his 
health; M. Elie de Beaumont has spoken to Franklin in his favor. A. 
L. S. I p. (In French.) XII, 59. 



Letters to Benjamin Franklin 517 

From [Barbeu] Dubourg. 1778. October 21. Paris. 

Begging for a letter of recommendation on behalf of a friend's nephew, 
who is about to sail for Charleston. A. L. S. i p. (In French.) 

XII, 60. 

From W[illia]m Keating, et al., to The American Commissioners. 
1778. October 21. Dinan. 

Ten American prisoners confined in Dinan Castle renew their ap- 
peal to be released and employed in the service of the United States. 
L. S. I p. LX, 15. 

From S[ilas] Deane. 1778. October 21. Philadelphia. 

Enclosing a translation of certain letters and despatches of Mr. 
Izard which, though written to a private friend, were introduced into 
Congress, read and filed ; was too modest to follow literally some of the 
most abusive parts. The enemy about to make an expedition of some 
consequence. Mr. Lee's estimate of a suitable salary for himself and 
Mr. Adams. A. L. S. 3 p. 

Enclosure. A translation of the letters of Ralph Izard to Henry 
Laurens. Giving an account of his situation, expressing his hatred 
of Franklin and Deane, his desire to see them stripped of all honors, 
and his own overwhelming ambition. 6 p. XII, 6i. 

From James Moylan to The American Commissioners. 
1778. October 21. L'Orient. 

Arrival of Captain Thomas Bell with despatches for them. Captain 
McNeill's uneasiness over the presence of the prisoners on board his 
vessel. A. L. S. i p. XII, 62. 

From George Swaller. 1778. October 21. Dinan. 

Account of his capture, first by the English and then by the French, 
and his present imprisonment at Dinan ; begs that he may be sent home 
to serve his country. A. L. S. 2 p. XII, 63. 

From Sam[ue]l W. Stockton. 
1778. October 21. Frankfort-on-the-Main. 

A ship arrived at Bordeaux reports Rhode Island taken and the 
British troops made prisoners; hopes it is authentic. Rumors afloat 



5i8 Letters to Benjamin Franklin 

that the Court of Spain has resolved to take an immediate and open 
part in favor of America. Reports in the English papers of the dis- 
content in France against M. de Sartine and Franklin, who (they say) 
had to take refuge at Versailles from the resentment of the mob. A. 
L. S. 2 p. XII, 64. 

From John Langdon to The American Commissioners. 

1778. October 21. Portsmouth, N. H. 

Offering to furnish the navy of France with masts if any gentle- 
man there will take the contract ; his terms. A. L. S. 2 p. XII, 65. 

From Abbe de Pellizer. 1778. October 21. Paris. 

At work on a Spanish, French and Latin dictionary; it has just 
occurred to him to add to these the English and so make the work useful 
to the United States; begs Franklin's interest and protection in this de- 
sign. A. L. S. I p. (In French.) XII, 66. 

From J. Witel. 1778. October 21. Paris. 

Introducing himself as a member of the Societe Typographique de 
Lausanne, and begs for an interview. A. L. S. i p. XII, 67. 

From Rich[ard] Bache. 1778. October 22. Philadelphia. 

Their removal into town a month before. News of Captain Fred- 
erick de Wernecke being alive and well. Mr. Lutterloh's answer to 
the Count de Wiltgerstein's demand. Will inquire into the Duchesse 
de Melfort's business in the Jersey's. Desires to know the value of cer- 
tain types which he has sold to the State of Virginia. Congratulates him 
on his appointment as Minister Plenipotentiary; Pennsylvania the only 
state which voted against him; the openly expressed enmity