(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Calendar Of The School Of Oriental Studies"

00 

u< OU_1 60663 



The Calendar 



OF THK 



School of Oriental Studies, 

(UNIVERSITY OF LONDON) 



FOR THE 



TWENTY-SECOND SESSION 

1937-8. 




THE SCHOOL OF ORIENTAL STUDIES, 
VANDON HOUSE, VANDON STREET, LONDON, S.W.I 

I937- 



Telephone : Telegrams : 

WHITEHALL 4735. SOSLINST, PHONE, LONDON. 



TABLE .OF CONTENTS 

(A detailed Index is given at the end of the Calendar.} 



I. CHARTER OF INCORPORATION ..... 7 
STANDING ORDERS OF THE GOVERNINQ BODY . . 18 

II. GENERAL INFORMATION CONCERNING THE SCHOL 

1. Origins and History . . . . .30 

2. Buildings and Street Plan . . . .45 

3. Scope of Teaching ... .46 

III. REPORT OF THE SESSION 1936-37 .... 49 

IV. OFFICERS, COMMITTEES, AND STAFF OF THE SCHOOL 

1. Patron ....... 78 

2. Visitor ....... 78 

3. The Governing Body ..... 78 

4. The Finance and General Purposes Committee . 79 

5. The Academic Board . . . . -79 

6. The Library Committee .... 79 

7. The Heads of Departments Committee . . 80 

8. The Examinations Board . . . .80 

9. The Forlong and Scholarships Committee . 80 

10. The I.C.S. Probationers Committee . . 80 

11. The Textbook Committee . . . .80 

12. The Modern Language Teaching Committee . 80 

13. The Cambridge Local Examinations Committee 80 

14. The Staff of the School . . . .81 

15. The Administrative Staff .... 87 

1 6. The Library Staff 87 

V. ADMISSION OF STUDENTS ..... 88 

VI. FEES 

1. School Fees ...... 90 

2. University Fees ...... 92 

VII. DATES 

1. Dates of Terms ...... 94 

2. Examination Dates ..... 94 

3. Almanac . . . . . . -95 



4 CONTENTS 

PACE 

VIII. LECTURES, CLASSES, AND SEMINARS . . . .107 

IX. PROCEDURE FOR CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES OF THE 
UNIVERSITY, SCHOOL CERTIFICATES AND 
DIPLOMAS, AND OTHER EXAMINATIONS . 139 

University Examinations, etc. . . . . I 39 

1. Matriculation . . . . . 139 

2. Admission of Students .... 147 

3. Registration . . . . . . .148 

4. Academic Year . . . . . .150 

5. Communications from the University . . 150 

6. Applications for Exemptions . . . * .150 

7. Theses for Higher Degrees . . . .150 

8. Approved Courses of Study . . . 151 

9. First Degrees . . . . . .156 

A. Bachelor of Arts . . . -156 

I. The Intermediate . . 157 

II. B.A. (General) Examination . 163 

III. B.A. Honours Examination . 168 

B. Bachelor of Commerce . . . 177 

C. Bachelor of Laws .... 178 
I. Intermediate Course . . . 178 

II. Final Course .... 178 

10. Higher Degrees . . . . . .180 

A. Master of Arts . . . 183 

B. Master of Laws .... 193 

C. Doctor of Philosophy in Arts . . 194 

D. Doctor of Literature . . . 201 

E. Doctor of Laws .... 202 

11. University Diploma ..... 203 

School Examinations ...... 204 

1. First and Second Year Certificates . . . 204 

2. School Diplomas : 

(i) General Regulations . . . 207 
(ii) Syllabuses . . . . .210 



CONTENTS 5 

PAGE 

Civil Service Examinations ..... 223 

1. Competitive Examinations .... 223 

2. Examinations for Indian Civil Service Proba- 

tioners ....... 223 

I.C.S. Probationary Service Rules, 1937 . . . 224 

Other Examinations ...... 228 

X. SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES .... 229 

XI. THE LIBRARY ....... 233 

XII. THE BULLETIN ....... 234 



XIII. MISCELLANEOUS ....... 235 

1. Office Hours ...... 235 

2. Regulations for Students . . . -235 

3. Common Rooms ...... 235 

4. University of London Union .... 236 

5. Register of Former Students .... 236 

6. Lodgings ....... 236 

7. Foreign Study, Holiday Courses, and Inter- 

national Scholarships . . . 237 

XIV. APPENDIX 

1. Former Governors of the School . . . 239 

2. Former Teachers of the School . . 242 

3. Holders of Degrees, Diplomas, etc. . . 248 

4. Scholars and Prizewinners .... 256 

5. Addresses of Members of the Academic Staff . 259 

INDEX .......... 263 



FRONTISPIECE 



The former building of the School in Finsbury 
Circus from an old engraving 



PART I 



CHARTER OF INCORPORATION 

GEORGE V by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great 
Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the 
Seas, King, Defender of the Faith. 

To all to whom these Presents shall come Greeting. 

Whereas the Most Honourable Robert Offley Ashburton, 
Marquess of Crewe, K.G., lately one of Our Principal Secretaries of 
State has presented to Us in Our Council a humble Petition setting 
forth : 

That by the London Institution (Transfer) Act, 1912, the 
premises and property (except as therein mentioned) of the 
London Institution for the Advancement of Literature and 
the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge were vested in Our 
Commissioners of Works with a view to the use thereof 
for the purposes of and in connection with a School of 
Oriental Studies, and it was provided that the said Com- 
missioners of Works might transfer any property, other than 
real property, vested in them by that Act, on such con- 
ditions as they might think fit, to the Governing Body of 
the School of Oriental Studies upon the establishment of 
such a School. 

That the said Commissioners of Works propose to place at the 
disposal of the Governing Body of the School of Oriental 
Studies when constituted the premises and property so 
transferred. 

That our Government have signified their intention to apply 
to Parliament for a grant of money in aid of the adaptation 
of the premises for the purposes of a School of Oriental 
Studies in connection with the University of London and 
in aid of the maintenance of the School when constituted. 

That the Petitioner is advised and believes that the incorporation 
of the said School under Our Royal Charter pending the 
reorganization of the University of London in general 
accordance with the Report of Our Commissioners on 
University Education in London would be for the public 
advantage. 



8 CHARTER OF INCORPORATION 

And most humbly praying Us in Our Council to grant Our 
Royal Charter for incorporating the Members for the time 
being of the Governing Body of the proposed School of 
Oriental Studies, with the name and title of " The School 
of Oriental Studies, London Institution ", and with such 
powers and privileges and in such manner in all respects 
as to Us in Our Council may seem fit. 

And whereas We have taken the said Petition into Our Royal 
consideration and are minded to accede thereto. 

Now, therefore, know ye that We by virtue of Our Royal 
Prerogative and of all other powers enabling Us in that 
behalf do of Our special Grace certain Knowledge and mere 
Motion by these Presents for Us Our Heirs and Successors 
grant will direct and ordain as follows : 

ARTICLE I 
Establishment Name and Incorporation of the School of Oriental Studies 

There shall be, and there is, hereby established with its principal 
seat at the premises formerly occupied by the London Institution 
for the Advancement of Literature and the Diffusion of Useful 
Knowledge in the City of London a School with the name of " The 
School of Oriental Studies, London Institution ", by which name 
the members for the time being of the Governing Body hereinafter 
constituted shall be and are hereby created one body corporate with 
perpetual succession and a common seal, with full power and 
capacity by and in such name to sue and be sued and to take and hold 
and, subject to such consent as may by law be required, to grant 
demise exchange or otherwise dispose of real or personal property : 
and notwithstanding the Statutes of Mortmain without any further 
or other license, by virtue of this Our Charter, to take and hold land 
to the annual value of 20,000 according to the annual value thereof 
at the time or times when the same shall be taken in addition to the 
value of the land for the time being occupied by or on behalf of the 
said Corporation for the transaction of its business and the actual 
carrying out of its purposes ; and to do all other lawful acts what- 
soever : which School shall have the constitution and powers and be 
subject to the regulations in this Our Charter prescribed and 
contained, and which School is in this Our Charter referred to as 
" The School ". 



ARTICLE II 
Purposes of the School 

The purposes of the School are to be a School of Oriental Studies 
in the University of London to prosecute study and research and to 
give instruction in the Languages of Eastern and African peoples, 



CHARTER OF INCORPORATION 9 

Ancient and Modern, and in the Literature, History, Religion, 
Law and Customs and Art- of those peoples, especially with a view 
to the needs of persons about to proceed to the East or to Africa for 
study and research, for the public service or commerce or for the 
pursuit of a profession or other calling, and to do all or any of such 
other things as the Governing Body of the School consider conducive 
or incidental thereto, having regard to the provision for those purposes 
which already exists elsewhere and in particular to the co-ordination 
of the work of the School with that of similar institutions both in this 
Country and in Our Eastern and African Dominions and with the 
work of the University of London and its other schools. 

ARTICLE III 
Visitor 

We reseWe to Ourselves to be the Visitor of the School through 
the President of the Board of Education. 

ARTICLE IV 
Constitution of Governing Body 

The Governing Body of the School (hereinafter referred to as 
" The Governing Body ") shall be constituted as follows : 

The Chairman of the Governing Body, ex-officio. 

The Vice-Chancellor of the University of London, ex-officio. 

The Director of the School when appointed, ex-officio. 

Two members appointed by Ourselves under Our Sign Manual. 

Three Members appointed by Ourselves under Our Sign 
Manual with special regard to the representation on the 
Governing Body of Universities (other than the University 
of London) in the United Kingdom. 

One Member appointed by Our Principal Secretary of State 
for Foreign Affairs. 

One Member appointed by Our Principal Secretary of State for 
the Colonies. 

One Member appointed by Our Principal Secretary of State for 
War. 

Two Members appointed by Our Principal Secretary of State 
for India. 

Three Members appointed by the Senate of the University of 
London, two of whom shall be appointed after considering 
any recommendation of the Board of the Faculty of Arts. 

One Member appointed by the Corporation of the City of 
London. 

Two Members appointed by the County Council of the Adminis- 
trative County of London. 



10 CHARTER OF INCORPORATION 

One Member appointed by the Council of the Royal Asiatic 

Society. 

One Member appointed by the British Academy. 
One Member appointed by the London Chamber of Commerce. 

Three Members co-opted by the Governing Body with special 
regard to the interests of Commerce. 

Four Members appointed by the Academic Board constituted 
by this Our Charter and being Members of that Board. 

One Member appointed by each of the Bodies who may be 
declared in accordance with provisions hereinafter contained 
to be Contributing Bodies. 

Not more than three Members to be co-opted for special reasons 
from time to time as occasion may arise. Vacancies in this 
category shall be deemed to be casual vacancies. 

Provided that the following (in addition to the ex-officio Members) 
shall be first Members of the Governing Body : 

(1) Sir John Prescott Hewett, G.C.S.I., C.I.E., 

(2) Philip Joseph Hartog, Esquire, M.A., 
appointed by Ourselves. 

(3) Arthur Berriedale Keith, Esquire, D.C.L., D.Litt., 
Professor of Sanskrit and Comparative Philology in the 
University of Edinburgh, 

(4) Edward James Rapson, Esquire, M.A., Professor of Sanskrit 
in the University of Cambridge, 

(5) David George Hogarth, Esquire, M.A., F.R.G.S., 
appointed by Ourselves with special regard to the representation on 
the Governing Body of Universities (other than the University of 
London) in the United Kingdom. 

(6) John Anthony Cecil Tilley, Esquire, C.B., M.A., 

who shall be deemed to be appointed by Our Principal Secretary 
of State for Foreign Affairs. 

(7) The Officer for the time being in charge of the India Sub- 
Section of the Military Operations' Directorate, War Office, 

who shall be deemed to be appointed by Our Principal Secretary 
of State for War. 

(8) Sir Charles James Lyall, K.C.S.I., C.I.E., M.A., LL.D., 
Ph.D., 

who shall be deemed to be appointed by Our Principal Secretary 
of State for India. 

(9) Thomas Gregory Foster, Esquire, B.A., Ph.D., 

(10) Ronald Montagu Burrows, Esquire, M.A., D.Litt., Ph.D., 
(n) The Honourable William Pember Reeves, Ph.D., 

who shall be deemed to be appointed by the Senate of the University 

of London. 

(12) Sir Marcus Samuel, Baronet, 



CHARTER OF INCORPORATION II 

who shall be deemed to be appointed by the Corporation of the City 
of London. 

(13) Harry Evan Auguste Cotton, Esquire, 

(14) Henry Cubitt Gooch, Esquire, 

who shall be deemed to be appointed by the County Council of the 
Administrative County of London. 

(15) The Right Honourable Donald James, Lord Reay, K.T., 
G.C.S.I., G.C.I.E., 

who shall be deemed to be appointed by the Council of the Royal 
Asiatic Society. 

(16) Thomas William Rhys Davids, Esquire, LL.D., Ph.D. 
D.Sc., Professor of Comparative Religion in the Victoria 
University of Manchester, 

who shall, be deemed to be appointed by the British Academy. 

(17) Sir Albert Kaye Rollit, Knight, LL.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., 
who shall be deemed to be appointed by the London Chamber of 
Commerce. 

The Governing Body may by resolution declare that any Body 
whether incorporated or not (not being a Body whether incorporated 
or not which is entitled to appoint a Member of the Governing Body 
and not being conducted for private profit) which has contributed 
a capital sum of 10,000 or which contributes an annual sum of not 
less than 500 to the funds of the School or for any special purpose 
approved by the Governing Body in connection with the School is 
a Contributing Body for the purposes of this Our Charter but in the 
case of a Body contributing such an annual sum as aforesaid only so 
long as the contribution is continued. A Member appointed by a 
Contributing Body shall hold office for five years from the date of 
his appointment but shall vacate office if the Contributing Body by 
whom he is appointed discontinues the contribution in respect of 
which it has been declared to be a Contributing Body. 

Every Governor to be appointed by the London County Council 
shall be appointed for a term of office ending on the date of the 
appointment of his successor, which may be made at any time after 
the ordinary day of retirement of County Councillors next after 
his appointment. 

The first Members appointed by the Academic Board shall be 
appointed as soon as that Board has been established and shall 
vacate office on the 3ist day of August, 1917. Future Members 
appointed by the Academic Board (other than Members appointed 
to fill casual vacancies) shall hold office for one year from the date 
when their predecessors vacated office. 

The first co-optative members shall be appointed at the first or 
second meeting of the Governing Body, and shall be deemed to have 
been appointed on the ist day of September, 1915. 



12 CHARTER OF INCORPORATION 

A casual vacancy in the Governing Body by death resignation or 
otherwise shall be filled up as soon as conveniently may be in the case 
of any Member appointed by Ourselves by Ourselves and in any other 
case by the person or Body who appointed the Member whose 
place has become vacant and the person appointed to fill a casual 
vacancy shall be so appointed for the remainder of the term of office 
of the person in whose place he is appointed. 

Except as herein provided Members of the Governing Body shall 
hold office for five years and the first Members shall be deemed to 
have been appointed on the ist day of September, 1915. 

Except as herein provided, persons appointed to be Members of 
the Governing Body need not be Members of the Body by whom 
they are appointed. A person appointed to be a Member of the 
Governing Body shall be eligible for reappointment at any time. 

The acts or proceedings of the Governing Body shall not be 
invalidated by any vacancy in their number. 

The first Chairman of the Governing Body shall be Sir John 
Prescott Hewett, G.C.S.I., C.I.E., and he shall hold office till the 
3ist day of August, 1920, or until he resigns or ceases to be a Member 
of the Governing Body. Any future Chairman shall be appointed 
by the Governing Body either from among their Members or from 
outside for such term and subject to such conditions as the Governing 
Body by Standing Order determine. 

The Governing Body shall make Standing Orders determining 
who shall act as Chairman at meetings at which the Chairman is not 
present or during a vacancy in the office of Chairman. 

There shall be a quorum when eight (or such larger number as 
the Governing Body shall by Standing Order determine) Governors 
are present at a meeting and (except as herein provided) every matter 
shall be determined by the majority of the Members of the Governing 
Body present and voting on the question. In case of equality of 
votes the Chairman or person acting as Chairman shall have a second 
or casting vote. 

The President of the Board of Education shall summon the first 
meeting of the Governing Body and shall make such arrangements 
for the purposes of that meeting as he thinks necessary and the 
Governing Body shall be deemed to be duly constituted on the 
occasion of that meeting. 

ARTICLE V 
Powers and Functions,, of the Governing Body 

Subject to the provisions of this Our Charter the Governing 
Body shall have such powers of general supervision, direction and 
control over the u School, and the courses of education or any parts 



CHARTER OF INCORPORATION 13 

thereof followed therein, as they consider necessary for the purposes 
of the School ; and shall appoint and may dismiss the Director of the 
School and such staff (whether teaching examining administrative or 
otherwise) and make appointments to such offices or employments 
(whether permanent temporary or occasional) of for or in connection 
with the School as they think fit upon such terms, remuneration, and 
conditions as they determine. 

The Governing Body may, if they consent, be constituted trustees 
of any endowment the trusts of which are consistent with the 
provisions of this Our Charter. 

The Governing Body may also enter into an agreement with the 
Secretary of State for India for the housing of the India Office 
Library or any portion thereof, and may make any such arrangements 
with reference to the custody and use thereof, or otherwise in relation 
thereto, aS may be mutually agreed. 

The Governing Body may award such diplomas or other certificates 
of distinction or proficiency to students of the School and subject 
to such regulations and conditions as they determine. 

The Governing Body shall have power to establish or adopt or 
participate in any scheme for providing pensions for the Staff of 
the School. 

The Governing Body may found and endow Professorships, 
Readerships, Fellowships, Exhibitions, Scholarships and Prizes, 
but, without the consent of the Governing Body and the University 
of London, no member of the teaching staff shall, by virtue of his 
office at the School, be called a Professor or Reader, and no endow- 
ment conferring the title of Professor or Reader in the School shall 
be founded without such consent. 

The Governing Body shall hold at least four ordinary meetings 
in each year and shall publish annually a report of their proceedings 
and a statement of their accounts. 

The Governing Body, subject to the provisions of this Our Charter, 
may make Rules, Regulations or Standing Orders with respect to 
the carrying into effect of all or any of the purposes or provisions of 
this Our Charter. 

The Governing Body may appoint such Committees consisting 
either wholly, or partly, of Members of their own Body as they think 
necessary and may delegate to any such Committee such of their 
powers or functions (except the appointment and dismissal of the 
Director and of Heads of Departments) subject to such conditions 
as they think fit. 



14 CHARTER OF INCORPORATION 

ARTICLE VI 
The Academic Board 

(1) There shall be an Academic Board in the School consisting of 
the Director, who shall be Chairman thereof, the Heads of Depart- 
ments of the School and such other members of the teaching staff 
as the Governing Body, having regard to the importance of their work 
in the School, may appoint after report by the Academic Board. 

(2) The Academic Board shall be established by the Governing 
Body within eighteen months after the date of this Our Charter ; 
and the provisions of this Our Charter which provide for consultation 
with, reports from, or appointments by, the Academic Board shall 
not take effect until the Academic Board has been established. 

(3) The Academic Board, subject to the approval of the Governing 
Body, shall have power to make regulations for the conduct of its 
business and shall deal with such business as the Governing Body shall 
by resolution assign to it and may submit for the consideration of 
the Governing Body resolutions, representations, memorials or 
reports dealing with the academic work and management of the 
School generally and with matters referred to it by the Governing 
Body for an expression of opinion. 

(4) The Governing Body shall consider any reports, resolutions, 
representations or memorials submitted to them by the Academic 
Board under the provisions of this Our Charter. 

(5) The Governing Body shall invite a report from the Academic 
Board on any proposal to establish or abolish any Department in 
the School ; and on any proposal to alter the organization of a 
Department or the conditions of tenure of a Head of Department or 
to appoint any teacher for a period of one or more years. 

(6) If the Governing Body establish a Committee to deal with 
discipline they shall provide for the appointment of a majority of that 
Committee by the Academic Board. 

ARTICLE VII 
The Director 

The Director of the School shall, under the Governing Body, be 
responsible for the general discipline of the School and have such 
powers and duties as the Governing Body may determine. 

ARTICLE VIII 
Appointment and Removal of Heads of Departments 

(a) For the purpose of appointing Heads of Departments a Special 
Appointment Committee shall be appointed in each case by the 
Governing Bociy to recommend a candidate, or candidates, for the 



CHARTER OF INCORPORATION 15 

post. The Special Appointment Committee shall include at least 
two out of the following Members of the Governing Body : 

The Vice-Chancellor of the University of London ; and 

The three Members appointed by the Senate of the University 
of London ; 

And it shall also include the Director of the School, cx-officio, 
and two members of the Academic Board appointed by the 
Academic Board. 

Before recommending the appointment of any person as Head of 
a Department the Special Appointment Committee shall furnish to 
the Academic Board the names of the candidates for the post and 
shall invite and consider a report from that Board. The Special 
Appointment Committee shall transmit together with their recom- 
mendations a copy of the report of the Academic Board to the 
Governing Body. 

(b) If the Governing Body, at any time, desire to remove any 
Head of a Department from his office, such removal shall be subject 
to the following provisions as well as to the terms of his 
engagement : 

(i) The Governing Body shall give the Head of the Depart- 
ment an opportunity of being heard, and if required by 
him give him notice in writing of the grounds upon which 
it is proposed to remove him. 

(ii) The Governing Body shall also notify the Academic Board 
that they have under consideration the question of such 
removal and give the Board the opportunity of expressing 
their opinion upon the matter. 

(iii) The Governing Body, immediately upon removing any 
Head of a Department, shall give him a copy of the resolution 
removing him. The removal will not take effect unless the 
resolution shall have been carried by a majority of the whole 
Governing Body for the time being at a meeting of which 
seven days* notice has been given, with full particulars 
in such notice of the name and status of the person proposed 
to be removed. 

(iv) In the case of any charge being brought against the Head of 
a Department, which, if proved, might be considered a 
sufficient ground for his removal, the Governing Body, or 
in cases of emergency, the Chairman of the Governing 
Body and the Principal of the University of London or such 
other officer of the University as aforesaid, acting together, 
subject to the approval of the Governing Body at their 
next meeting, shall have power to suspend him from his 
office for such time as may be necessary for the investigation 
of the charge. 



1 6 CHARTER OF INCORPORATION 

(c) Nothing in this Article shall apply to the appointment or 
removal of Heads of Departments who, by agreement between the 
University of London and the Governing Body, are appointed by 
the University of London to a University Professorship or Readership 
under University Regulations carrying with it the headship of a 
Department in the School. In those cases the appointment or 
removal of the Head of the Department concerned shall be governed 
by the terms of the agreement in question. 



ARTICLE IX 
Relations of the School to the University of London 

Subject to compliance with the Statutes of the University of 
London the School shall be established in the first instance as a 
School of the University. 

Before making the first appointments of the teaching staff in 
subjects now taught in University of London University College, 
University of London King's College, and the London School of 
Economics and Political Science, and before the establishment of 
any Department of instruction other than in Oriental Languages, the 
Governing Body shall enter into communication with the University 
of London with regard to the co-ordination of the work of the School 
with the work of the University and its other Schools and for the 
purpose of carrying out or facilitating such co-ordination may from 
time to time enter into such arrangements either by way of trans- 
ferring or exchanging Departments of instruction or otherwise and 
upon such terms as may be agreed upon between the Governing 
Body and the University. 

ARTICLE X 
Further Provisions 

Neither sex nor opinions upon any religious subjects shall qualify, 
or disqualify, any person for membership of the Governing Body 
or for appointment to any office or employment or for admittance to 
any course of instruction or for any Fellowship Diploma or other 
certificate of distinction or for any emolument in or in connection 
with the School. 

Unless the context otherwise requires the Interpretation Act, 
1889, shall apply to the interpretation of this Our Charter as it applies 
to the interpretation of an Act of Parliament so, however, that this 
Our Charter shall always be construed and adjudged in the most 
favourable and beneficial sense for the best advantage of the School 
and the promotion of the objects of this Our Charter as well in 
all Our Courts as elsewhere any non-recital, mis-recital, uncertainty 
or imperfection herein notwithstanding. 



CHARTER OF INCORPORATION 17 

The Governing Body may, by resolution in that behalf, passed 
at any meeting by a majority of not less than two-thirds of the 
Members present and voting (being an absolute majority of the whole 
Governing Body), and confirmed at a meeting held not less than one 
month nor more than four months afterwards by a like majority, 
alter, amend, or add to this Our Charter and such alteration amend- 
ment or addition shall when allowed by Us in Council become 
effectual so that this Our Charter shall thenceforward continue and 
operate as though it had been originally granted and made 
accordingly. This provision shall apply to this Our Charter, as 
altered, amended, or added to in manner aforesaid. 

Moreover, We reserve to Ourselves power from time to time to 
alter, amend, or add to these Presents by Supplemental Charter. 

In Witness whereof We have caused these Our Letters to be 
made Patent. 

Witness Ourself at Westminster the fifth day of June in the 
Year of our Lord 1916, and in the yth Year of Our Reign. 

By Warrant under the King's Sign Manual. 

(Sd.) SCHUSTER. 



STANDING ORDERS OF THE 
GOVERNING BODY 

1. There shall not at any time be made or allowed out of the funds 
of the School any Dividend, Gift, Division or Bonus in Money unto 
or between any of the members for the time being of the Governing 
Body or other members of the School in their capacity as members 
of the Governing Body but this provision shall not prevent the pay- 
ment to any person of proper remuneration for services rendered by 
him or her to the School. 

2. The Governing Body shall hold not less than four Ordinary 
Meetings in the year (Charter, Article V) and, unless the Governing 
Body shall in any year otherwise decide, Ordinary Meetings shall 
be held six times each year, two meetings being held in or after each 
School Term. The dates of the Ordinary Meetings for the following 
session shall normally be fixed at the Ordinary Meeting held in July. 

3. After the termination of the period of office of the first Chairman 
of the Governing Body, the Chairman shall be elected for a period of 
one year as from the ist September, and the election to that office shall, 
if possible, take place in the preceding July ; provided that, if the 
tenure of office of the first Chairman or of any successor in the Chair 
shall be determined by resignation or otherwise at a date other than 
3ist August it shall be the duty of the Vice-Chairman of the Governing 
Body to summon a Meeting of the Governing Body to take place 
within one calendar month of such determination for the purpose of 
electing a new Chairman, and the Chairman so elected shall hold 
office until the 3ist August following; further provided, however, 
that if such determination take place between i6th July and 3ist August, 
both dates inclusive, the date of such Meeting may be postponed by 
the Vice-Chairman to a date not later than ist October following. 

4. The Governing Body shall at their Ordinary Meeting in July 
(or if no Ordinary Meeting is held in July then at the last Ordinary 
Meeting held before the ist September) elect a Vice-Chairman to hold 
office as from the ist September following. 

In the absence of the Chairman of the Governing Body at any 
Meeting the Vice-Chairman shall take the Chair ; he shall also act 
as Chairman during a vacancy in the office of Chairman and during 
any temporary inability through illness or absence of the Chairman to 
fulfil his duties. In the event of both the Chairman and Vice-Chairman 
of the Governing Body being absent, a Chairman shall be elected by 
the Members present. 

18 



STANDING ORDERS 19 

5. The Governing Body shall at their Ordinary Meeting in July 
(or if no Ordinary Meeting is held in July then at the last Ordinary 
Meeting held before the ist September) elect a Treasurer to hold office 
for one year from the ist September following. 

6. The Chairman of the Governing Body may at any time summon 
an Extraordinary Meeting of the Governing Body, and shall do so 
on the receipt of a written requisition to that effect stating the purpose 
for which the Meeting is required, signed by not less than five Members 
of the Governing Body. 

7. The Chairman of the Governing Body shall have power to act 
on their behalf in matters of urgency not admitting of delay, provided 
that he shall report any exercise of his powers under this Standing 
Order to the next meeting of the Governing Body. 



8. A summons to attend an Ordinary Meeting of the Governing 
Body shall be posted or delivered to each Member of the Governing 
Body not less than eight days before any Meeting, and an Agenda 
paper for a Meeting shall be posted or delivered to each Member of 
the Governing Body not later than the third day before such Meeting. 

Want of service of the summons or Agenda Paper on any Member 
of the Governing Body shall not affect the validity of a Meeting. 

9. No business shall be transacted at a Meeting other than that 
specified in the Agenda Paper relating thereto, except that any matter 
which the Chairman considers urgent and which has arisen too late 
to be specified in the Agenda Paper may be brought before the Meeting 
by the Chairman or with his consent and dealt with. 

10. When a Meeting is adjourned, notice of the adjourned Meeting 
shall be sent to each Member of the Governing Body. 

11. There shall be a quorum when eight Members of the Governing 
Body are present at a Meeting and every matter shall be determined 
by the majority of the Members present and voting on the question. 
In case of equality of votes the Chairman or person acting as Chairman 
shall have a second or casting vote. (Charter, Article IV.) 

12. If, at the expiration of thirty minutes after the hour at which 
any Meeting of the Governing Body was appointed to be held eight 
Members shall not be present, the Meeting if convened on the requisi- 
tion of Members shall be dissolved ; in any other case, it shall stand 
adjourned to a date to be fixed by the Chairman of the Governing Body, 
and if at such adjourned Meeting eight Members shall not be present it 
shall be adjourned sine die. 

13. Every Member attending a Meeting of the Governing Body 
shall sign his name in the attendance book kept for the purpose. 



2O STANDING ORDERS 

14. The first business at every Ordinary Meeting shall he the con- 
firmation of the Minutes of the previous Meeting except in cases where 
it shall be necessary to elect a Chairman of the Meeting, which business 
shall then be taken first and shall be immediately followed by the 
confirmation of the Minutes. 

15. No motion or discussion shall be allowed upon the Minutes 
except as to their accuracy, and any objection upon that ground must 
be made by way of motion, of which notice need not be given. 

1 6. Every notice of motion (other than a notice of motion relating 
to business included in the Agenda Paper, or to business brought up as 
a matter of urgency by or with the consent of the Chairman) shall 
be in writing signed by the Member giving the notice. It shall be given 
to the Secretary of the School, and shall be open to the inspection of 
every Member of the Governing Body. A notice of motion which 
shall not have been received at latest seven clear days before the date 
of any Ordinary Meeting shall not be specified in the Agenda Paper 
for such Meeting. 

17. Every proposal brought before the Governing Body which would 
have the effect of increasing the expenditure of the School by more 
than 10, shall, unless brought forward on the recommendation of the 
Finance and General Purposes Committee, be referred by the Governing 
Body to that Committee for report and the Governing Body shall, 
before passing any resolution for carrying the proposal into effect, take 
into consideration the report of the Finance and General Purposes 
Committee on the proposal. 

1 8. The Governing Body shall not add to, amend, or revoke any 
Standing Order in force for the time being except at an ordinary 
meeting of the Governing Body and unless notice of the proposed 
addition, amendment, or revocation has been given on the agenda 
paper of the ordinary meeting of the Governing Body next before the 
meeting at which the proposed addition, amendment, or revocation 
is submitted for adoption. 



ACADEMIC BOARD 

19. There shall be an Academic Board consisting of the Director, 
who shall be Chairman thereof, the Heads of Departments of the 
School, the University Appointed Teachers, all Senior Lecturers, 
all part-time Senior Lecturers and six other persons after annual 
recommendation by the majority of the other regular full-time or part- 
time members of the staff frorh amongst themselves, and approval 
by the Academic Board, with liberty to the Board to recommend to 
the Governing Body such additional members as may be necessary 
to secure adequate representation of subjects. (Charter, Article VI.) 



STANDING ORDERS 21 

20. The Academic Board shall advise the Governing Body in respect 
of : 

(i) Any proposals to establish or abolish any department in the 
School. (Charter, Article VI.) 

(ii) Any proposals to alter the organization of a department or the 
conditions of tenure of a Head of Department. (Charter, Article VI.) 

(iii) The appointment or re-apppointment of any teacher for a period 
of one or more years (Charter, Article VI), after considering the recom- 
mendations of the Heads of Departments Committee. 

(iv) All questions regarding the creation of new posts, after con- 
sidering the recommendations of the Heads of Departments Committee. 

(v) All matters relating to the conditions of award of Scholarships 
and Free Places, and the awarding thereof. 

(vi) The General Regulations relating to the award of School 
Diplomas 'and Certificates. 

(vii) Questions relating to the Students' Union Society referred by 
the Director to the Board for its consideration. 

(viii) The academic work of the School generally. 

21. The Academic Board may submit for the consideration of the 
Governing Body resolutions, representations, memorials, or reports 
dealing with any of the matters specified in Standing Order 19, with 
the management of the School generally, or with matters referred to 
it by the Governing Body for an expression of opinion. 

22. The Academic Board shall annually appoint four of its members 
to be members of the Governing Body (Charter, Article IV). 

23. The Academic Board shall, subject to the approval of the 
Governing Body, have power to make regulations for the conduct 
of its business (Charter, Article VI) and may appoint sub-committees. 

24. It shall be the duty of the Academic Board to exercise the 
following powers by delegated authority on behalf of the Governing 
Body and to report their action thereon to the Governing Body : 

(i) To approve the syllabuses for courses of study and examinations 
for Certificates and Diplomas of the School in accordance 
with the General Regulations in force for the time being. 

(ii) To determine the length of courses required of students for 
School examinations. 

(iii) To determine all applications from students for exemption 
from any course of study. 

(iv) To approve all instructions to examiners at School examina- 
tions. 

(v) To appoint unpaid examiners for School examinations. 



22 STANDING ORDERS 

(vi) To consider reports of examiners and to grant Certificates 
and Diplomas in accordance with the regulations in force 
for the time being. 

(vii) To submit recommendations to the Council of the Royal 
Asiatic Society in respect of expenditure from the James 
G. Forlong Fund. 

(viii) To determine what applications shall be made to the University 
of London for the recognition as teachers of members of 
the Staff of the School after considering the recommenda- 
tions of the Heads of Departments Committee. 

(ix) To appoint a text-book committee which shall consider all 
proposals for the publication by the School of text-books 
for use in the School and administer the text- book grant 
and other sums available for the purpose of publishing 
text-books. 

(x) To determine on the recommendation of the Heads of Depart- 
ments Committee the names to be included on the panel 
of Additional Lecturers. 

FINANCE AND GENERAL PURPOSES COMMITTEE 

25. There shall be a Finance and General Purposes Committee 
consisting of the Chairman of the Governing Body, the Vice-Chairman 
of the Governing Body, the Treasurer, the Director, and eight members 
appointed by the Governing Body from among the members of that 
Body, of whom two shall be chosen from the four members appointed 
by the Academic Board. The Treasurer shall be the Chairman of 
the Finance and General Purposes Committee, provided that in the 
event of the Treasurer being unable in any year to act as Chairman the 
Committee shall elect its own Chairman. 

26. The members of the Finance and General Purposes Committee 
appointed by the Governing Body shall be appointed every year at 
the last Ordinary Meeting of the Governing Body held before ist Sep- 
tember and shall hold office for a period of one year as from the ist 
September following their appointment. Provided nevertheless that in 
any year in which under the provisions of the Charter the majority 
of the Members of the Governing Body go out of office on the ist 
September, the Governing Body may, instead of appointing not less 
than eight Members of the Finance and General Purposes Committee 
to hold office for the period of one year from the ist September 
following, appoint such number of Members as it thinks convenient 
to hold office from the ist September following until the first Ordinary 
Meeting of the Governing Body to be held after the ist September 
and in that event the Governing Body shall, at the first Ordinary 
Meeting held after the ist September, fill any vacancies amongst the 
members appointed by them, and the members so appointed shall 
hold office unttl the ist September following. 



STANDING ORDERS 2J 

Any casual vacancy amongst members appointed to the Finance 
and General Purposes Committee by the Governing Body shall be 
filled by the Governing Body as soon as conveniently may be after 
its occurrence. 

27. The quorum of the Committee shall be six. Every question 
shall be decided by the majority of members present and voting 
on the question. In the case of equality of votes the Chairman, or 
person acting as Chairman, shall have a second or casting vote. 

28. The Committee shall meet at least twice in each term, on such 
days as the Committee may fix. The Chairman may at any time on 
his own initiative, and shall at the request of any two members, summon 
a special meeting of the Committee. 

29. The Committee may appoint sub-committees. It may invite 
a minority of persons, not members of the Finance and General 
Purposes Committee, to serve on such sub-committees. 

30. It shall be the duty of the Finance and General Purposes 
Committee : 

(i) To advise the Governing Body as to the expenditure needed 
for the various activities of the School and to submit 
to the Governing Body annually, not later than the first 
meeting in the third term, estimates of income and 
expenditure for the ensuing year and at the same meeting 
to submit revised estimates to the Governing Body for the 
current year. 

(ii) To advise the Governing Body on any question of Finance 
which directly affects the educational policy of the School 
and to consider and report on every matter directly or 
indirectly affecting the income or expenditure of the 
School. 

(iii) To control the banking of the School : to review invest- 
ments periodically ; to make or vary the investments of 
the School within the limits laid down by the Trustee 
Act, 1925, with the exception of section 2, sub-section (i) 
which shall not be binding when, in the interests of 
the School, the Finance and General Purposes Committee 
consider it desirable that stock should be purchased at a 
price exceeding the limits laid down in that sub-section ; 
to report to the Governing Body all investments made 
by the Committee and to recommend other investments 
for approval of the Governing Body. 

(iv) To provide for the examination of all bills and accounts and 
for the discharge of liabilities covered by the annual 
estimates or otherwise authorized by the Governing Body. 

(v) To provide for the examination of the periodical cash state- 
ments, presented by the Secretary, of receipts, payments, 
and balances with the Bank pass-book &id vouchers. 



24 STANDING ORDERS 

(vi) To present to the Governing Body annually an Abstract of 
Accounts and Balance Sheet, together with the Auditors' 
Report thereon. (See Charter, Article V.) 

(vii) To provide for fidelity guarantees of officers of the School 
controlling moneys and for the insurance of property 
belonging to or loaned to the School. 

(viii) To advise the Governing Body as to any Pension or Super- 
annuation Fund Regulations. 

(ix) To appoint or dismiss members of the Library staff, on the 
recommendation of the Library Committee, and such ad- 
ministrative officers and servants as may be deemed necessary 
provided that this section shall apply only to persons at 
an annual salary of less than 500 and provided that the 
expenditure involved is authorized in the Annual Estimates 
or otherwise by the Governing Body. 

(x) Subject to any regulations or directions made or given by 
the Governing Body, to grant members of the teaching, 
administrative, library, or domestic staff such leave of 
absence and sick leave as they think proper under the 
circumstances. 

(xi) To advise the Governing Body in respect of all matters 
relating to the schedule of fees payable by students, after 
considering the recommendations of the Heads of Depart- 
ments Committee. 

(xii) To consider and determine all applications for the remission 
of students' fees. 

(xiii) To consider and report upon any proposals for the alteration 
of the Standing Orders. 

(xiv) To report to the Governing Body all engagements for 
additional lecturing made with persons not on the permanent 
staff. 

(xv) To take such action as may be necessary in regard to all 
matters concerned with the maintenance of the School 
premises. 

(xvi) To purchase equipment for the purposes of the School to 
an amount not exceeding 30 on any one occasion. 

(xvii) To consider and report upon any matter not falling specifically 
within the reference of any other Committee. 

(xviii) To consider, and where necessary take emergency action in 
regard to, all matters which may be referred to the Committee 
by the Chairman of the Governing Body, or, in his absence, 
by the Vice- Chairman, or by the Director, subsequently 
reporting to the Governing Body. 

(xix) To report to the Governing Body on all action taken by the 
Corkmittee under delegated authority. 



STANDING ORDERS 25 

LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

31. There shall be a Library Committee appointed annually by 
the Governing Body consisting of The Director, the Librarian, the 
Heads of Departments of the School, two members appointed by 
the Governing Body out of their number and not being members 
appointed by the Academic Board, and not more than three members 
appointed by the Governing Body after recommendation by the 
Library Committee, such members to be appointed as occasion may 
arise. 

32. The members of the Library Committee appointed by the 
Governing Body shall be appointed every year at the last Ordinary 
Meeting of the Governing Body held before ist September and shall 
hold office for a period of one year as from the ist September following 
their appointment. 

33. The Committee shall at the first meeting after ist September in 
each year elect its Chairman for the ensuing session. 

34. The quorum of the Committee shall be five. Every question 
shall be decided by the majority of members present and voting on 
the question. In the case of equality of votes the person acting as 
Chairman shall have a second or casting vote. 

35. The Committee may appoint sub-committees to act in an advisory 
capacity. It may invite a minority of persons not members of the 
Library Committee to serve on such sub-committees. 

36. It shall be the duty of the Library Committee : 

(i) To administer the present Library and any other libraries 
which may be acquired for the use of the School. 

(ii) To administer the grant allocated to the Library each year. 
The Committee shall set aside out of the annual grant 
a suitable proportion for general purposes and special 
contingencies and shall divide the balance among the 
several departments of the School, the amount thus 
allocated to each department to be expended on the 
recommendation of the Head of the Department. 

(iii) To frame rules and regulations for the use of the Library 
which shall be submitted for approval to the Governing 
Body. 

(iv) To advise the Governing Body in regard to the staff required 
for the purposes of the Library. 

(v) To advise the Governing Bocty in regard to all matters relating 
to the equipment, lighting, heating, cleaning, and general 
administration of the Library. 

(vi) To deal with general questions concerning th Bulletin. 



26 STANDING ORDERS 

(vii) To accept on behalf of the Governing Body such gifts of books 
as the Committee deems advisable. 

(viii) To report to the Governing Body on any action taken by the 
Committee under delegated authority. 



HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS COMMITTEE 

37. There shall be a Heads of Departments Committee consisting of 
the Director, who shall be Chairman thereof, and the several Heads of 
Departments of the School. 

38. The Heads of Departments Committee shall make recom- 
mendations through the Academic Board to the Governing Body 
regarding the creation of new posts and all questions relating to the 
filling of vacancies. All questions relating to reappointments on the 
teaching staff shall be considered in the first instance by the Heads of 
Departments Committee, which shall make recommendations through 
the Academic Board to the Governing Body. 

39. The Heads of Departments Committee shall make recommenda- 
tions direct to the Governing Body on questions of promotion within 
a class and the classification of members of the teaching staff. 

40. The Heads of Departments Committee shall advise the Finance 
and General Purposes Committee in regard to all matters relating to 
fees payable by students. 

41. The Heads of Departments Committee shall have the right 
to initiate business and to report to the Academic Board and shall 
consider and report on such matters as may be referred to it by the 
Academic Board. 



CHAIRMAN OF GOVERNING BODY 

42. The Chairman of the Governing Body shall, by virtue of his 
office, be a member of every Committee of the School. 



THE DIRECTOR 

43. The Governing Body shall appoint and may dismiss the Director. 
(Charter, Article V.) 

44. The Director shall, under the Governing Body, be responsible 
for the general discipline of the School, and have such powers and 
duties as the Governing Body may determine. 

45. The Director shall have poVer to act on behalf of the Academic 
Board in matters of urgency not admitting of delay, provided that he 
shall report any exercise of his powers under this Standing Order to 
the next MeetiAg of the Academic Board. 



STANDING ORDERS 27 

46. The Director shall, by virtue of his office, be a member of every 
Committee, or Sub-Committeej of the Academic Board, of the 
Finance and General Purposes Committee, and of the Library 
Committee. 

STANDING ORDERS 

47. No Standing Order shall be suspended without the consent of 
a majority of the whole Governing Body or of three-fourths of the 
Members present. 

48. Throughout these Orders, if not inconsistent with the context, 
the term " Chairman " shall mean the Chairman of a Meeting of the 
Governing Body for the time being, and words implying the masculine 
gender only include the feminine gender also, and words implying the 
plural number include the singular, and vice versa. 



BANKING ACCOUNT 

49. A Banking Account shall be kept with some fit bankers to be 
from time to time selected by the Governing Body. Every sum of 
money received on account of the School shall be forthwith paid 
to the credit of that account, unless otherwise expressly ordered by 
the Governing Body. 

SIGNING OF CHEQUES, ETC. 

50. All cheques, negotiable instruments, and orders for payment 
for money shall be signed, drawn, or endorsed respectively by such 
person or persons as the Governing Body shall from time to time direct. 

THE SCHOOL SEAL 

51. The School Seal Press shall be kept in such place as the Chairman 
of the Governing Body shall direct. The Director shall be responsible 
for the custody of the keys. 

52. All diplomas issued by the School shall be sealed. All other 
documents to which the Seal of the School shall require to be fixed 
shall be sealed in pursuance of a resolution of the Governing Body, 
provided that during vacation or in case of urgency the Chairman of 
the Governing Body or the Vice-Chairman may give authority for 
the sealing of any such other document. 

The Seal shall be affixed to any document only in the presence of two 
Members of the Governing Body and of the Director, or of the Secre- 
tary, or in the event of the Director and the Secretary being absent or 
unable to act, of some other Member (if the Staff authorized in writing 
by the Chairman or Vice- Chairman, and such sealing shall be attested 
by the signature of the said persons in whose presence the Seal is 
affixed. 



28 STANDING ORDERS 

53. The sealing of every document shall be registered in a book pro- 
vided for the purpose and signed by the two Members of the Governing 
Body in whose presence the Seal was affixed, and shall be reported 
to the meeting of the Governing Body next held after such sealing. 

54. The Director shall keep a book in which the sealing, the date of 
unlocking the Press, and the purpose for which the Seal is affixed 
shall be recorded. This record shall be signed by the Director or, 
in his absence, by some other person authorized in writing to do so 
by the Chairman of the Governing Body. 



ANNUAL REPORT AND STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

55. The Governing Body shall publish annually not later than 
December a Report of their proceedings and a Statement of their 
Accounts for the year ending 3 ist July preceding. (Charter,. Article V.) 



SUPERANNUATION SCHEME 

56. A copy is set out in the Schedule of the regulations made by 
the Governing Body in relation to the Superannuation Scheme estab- 
lished for members of the Staff in conjunction with similar schemes 
established by other public educational institutions (which schemes 
are together known as the Universities Federated Superannuation 
Scheme). 

In cases where the consent of the School is required before a member 
of the Staff can place himself under the scheme, the matter shall be 
reserved for the Governing Body. 



AGE OF RETIREMENT 

57. The date of retirement shall be 3Oth September in the session 
in which the holder of the appointment attains the age of 60, and if 
he attains that age on 3oth September the retirement shall take place 
on that day. Nevertheless, the Governing Body shall not be precluded 
after report from the Academic Board from extending the tenure of the 
post for a further period until the session in which the holder reaches 
the age of 65 years. Such re-appointment shall not be for a shorter 
period than one year or for a longer period than five years. There- 
after, for very exceptional reasons only, and after report from the 
Academic Board, the Governing Body may extend the tenure of a 
particular teacher by annual reappointments for periods of one year. 



SCHEDULE OF THE REGULATIONS MADE BY THE GOVERNING BODY IN 

RELATION TO THE SUPERANNUATION SCHEME 

The Superannuation Scheme shall take effect as from the ist day 
of September, fqij, when the following provisions shall take effect : 



STANDING ORDERS 2Q 

(i) The Scheme shall be compulsory on every Member of the 
Staff appointed after that date immediately upon his 
appointment if he is appointed at a salary of 300 a year 
or upwards, and otherwise immediately upon his salary 
being increased to 300 a year or upwards. 

(ii) Any Member appointed as aforesaid and for the time being 
in receipt of a salary of 200 a Y ear or upwards, but less 
than 300 a year, shall be entitled to place himself under 
the Scheme by an application for that purpose in writing 
addressed to the Institution. 

(iii) Any Member appointed as aforesaid and for the time being in 
receipt of a salary of 160 a year or upwards but less than 
200 may, with the consent of the Institution, place himself 
under the Scheme by a similar application as last aforesaid. 

(iv) Any Member of the Staff holding an appointment on the 
date aforesaid who is then or at any time afterwards in 
receipt of a salary of 160 a year or upwards may, with the 
consent of the Institution, place himself under the Scheme, 
subject to such provision being made as to his benefits (if 
any) under any existing Scheme of Superannuation as may 
be approved by the Institution. 

(v) If a person is a Member of the Staff of two or more Educational 
Institutions who have adopted the Scheme, his salary shall 
be aggregated for the purposes of these provisions. 

(vi) Provided always that no Member of the Staff who does not, in 
the opinion of the Institution, devote his main time to his 
duties as a Member of the teaching or administrative staff 
of the Institution, or who is a Member of the staff of any 
other Institution or body, shall be entitled to place himself 
under the Scheme without the consent of the Institution 
whether it would otherwise be compulsory on him or not. 

(vii) Every Member appointed after the aforesaid date shall on his 
appointment and every Member holding an appointment 
on that date who places himself under the Scheme shall on 
placing himself under the Scheme sign an agreement in a 
form approved by the Institution providing for his being 
bound by the Scheme and giving effect thereto. 

(viii) For the purposes of these provisions " Salary " shall be 
deemed to include any income derivable by a Member of 
the Staff from any endowment of the office held by him 
except in any case in which the Institution shall otherwise 
determine. 



PART II 



GENERAL INFORMATION CONCERNING 
THE SCHOOL 



i. ORIGINS AND HISTORY 1 

The first School for Oriental Languages in London 2 . is believed 
to have been the Oriental Institution, Leicester Square, established 
in 1818 by John B. Gilchrist 3 under the patronage of the East India 
Company, mainly for teaching Hindustani to medical students ; 
but it ceased to exist soon after 1826. In 1825 Dr. Robert Morrison, 3 
the Chinese scholar (whose library was left to University College), 
founded a language institution in the City for teaching Chinese, 
Sanskrit, and Bengali, but that Institution, too, came to an end in 1828. 

At University College, founded in 1826-8, Chairs of Hebrew, 
Oriental Literature, and Hindustani were established at an early date. 
At King's College, founded in 1829-1831, Oriental Languages and 
Literature were taught from 1833 onwards. Further information 
in regard to the history of the Oriental departments at these two 
Colleges is given in the Appendices to the Reay Report. 4 

On 24th January, 1852, Professor II. H. Wilson, Director of the 
Royal Asiatic Society, in a lecture " On the present state of the 

1 From an account by Sir Philip J. Ilartog, K.B.E., in the Bulletin of the 
School, Vol. I. 

2 See Report of Committee appointed by the Treasury (and presided over 
by Lord Reay) to consider the organization of Oriental Studies in London, 
with . . . Appendices, 1909 (Cd. 4560). Price is. ^d. The Report is herein- 
after referred to as the " Reay Report ". The evidence was published as a 
separate volume (Cd. 4561), price 2s. 9>d. 

Professor (later Sir) Thomas Arnold's memorandum on previous efforts 
to create an Oriental School is printed as Appendix III (6) to the Report, 
pp. 45-8. The first schools for Oriental languages in the British Empire 
appear to have been the College at Fort William (1800-1854), of which Gilchrist 
was the first principal, and the East India College at Ilaileybury (1806-1857), 
a secondary school with seven teachers for Oriental languages, also established 
by the East India Company. 

3 See articles in the Dictionary of National Biography on Gilchrist and 
Morrison. * 

4 See Appendix V to Reay Report, pp. 65-6, Memorandum by Dr. (later 
Sir) Gregory Foster and Dr. A. C. Headlam. For information in regard to 
the teaching carried on up to the date of foundation of the School of Oriental 
Studies see the annual Calendars of University College and of King's College. 

30 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 3 1 

Cultivation of Oriental Literature ", said : " As long as English 
society is so incurious with Tespect to Oriental Literature, it need 
not be matter of surprise that the numbers and the labours of English 
scholars should be overshadowed by the much more imposing array 
of Continental Orientalists " (JRAS., xiii, 1852, p. 214). 

At the outbreak of the Crimean War in 1854 it was realized how 
much the study of Oriental Languages had been neglected in England, 
and Professor Max Miiller at that time, and later in 1857 and 1858, 
with the assistance of Sir Charles Trevelyan, attempted to enlist 
further support for these studies ; in the last-named year they proposed 
the foundation of an " Institution for the Cultivation of Asiatic 
Languages ". Nothing, however, was done. 1 

In May, 1884, Dr. G. W. Leitner founded an " Oriental University 
Institute " at Woking, but it is stated that it was never attended by 
any students. 2 From 1884 the Royal Asiatic Society and its members 
took an active interest in the matter. On iQth November, 1883 
[JRAS., N.S., xvi, 1884, p. 38), Professor II. A. Salmone, of King's 
College, read a paper " On the Importance to Great Britain of a study 
Df Arabic ", in which he contrasts the small facilities in Great Britain 
with those in foreign countries possessing Schools of Oriental Studies. 

On i yth May, 1886, Colonel Henry Yule, in his Presidential Address 
to the Society (JRAS., N.S., xviii, 1886, p. iv), stated that Mr. H. C. 
Kay had drawn the attention of the Council to a matter of which they 
were all too conscious, " the deplorably low ebb at which the study of 
Eastern languages and literatures stands in this country/' and had 
suggested the formation of a Special Committee to consider the 
causes of and possible remedies for that state of things. The Council 
of the Society appointed a Committee consisting of General R. 
Maclagan (as Chairman), Messrs. C. Bendall, F. V. Dickins, H. C. 
Kay, and T. H. Thornton, with Dr. R. N. Cust and Major-General 
Sir Frederic Goldsmid, the Honorary Secretary and Secretary of the 
Society ; Sir M. Monier-Williams was added later. The reference 
to the Committee was of a wide character, on the lines suggested by 
Mr. Kay, and included the following : "to consider the best means 
for the promotion of Oriental Studies in England/' The Committee 
investigated the number of British appointments in Oriental languages 
and pointed out that there was a moderate number in England, and 
a larger number in India, but added : " It is a significant fact, and 
one far from creditable to us, that at present the supply of properly 
qualified Englishmen is not sufficient, and that in order to fill some of 
the most important of the existing appointments we are obliged to 
have recourse to scholars trained in foreign seats of learning " (JRAS. y 
N.S., xix, 1887, p. 347). They also stated that the main obstacle 
was that of endowment (loc. cit., p. 348). The Committee further 
reported (loc. cit., pp. 715-720) thai* they did not see their way to 



1 See Appendices III (b) and XVI to Reay Report, pp { 45, 154. 
~ See Appendix III (b) to Reay Report, p. 45. 



32 HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 

recommend an appeal to the Government, either of the United 
Kingdom or of India, for direct support in the shape of University or 
School endowment, but they recommended that letters should be 
addressed to the Governing Bodies of the principal Universities, 
Colleges, and Schools of the United Kingdom, inviting their assistance, 
and that similar letters should be addressed to certain City Companies. 
In the Annual Report of the Society for 1887 (JRAS., N.S., xix, pp. 
x, xi) and in the Presidential Address by Colonel Henry Yule it was 
reported that only thirty-one replies had been received, of which the 
President could only point to one as encouraging, viz. that from the 
Hebdomadal Council at Oxford. The only material support obtained 
was a subscription for ten guineas from the Merchant Taylors Company. 
Yule referred despondently to " the decay or diminution of the pursuit 
of Oriental studies in this country ". 

In the course of a discussion (on Qth May, 1887) on the Report 
of the Committee, Professor Salmone suggested the establishment 
of a special school in London " connected, if thought advisable, with 
the Imperial Institute ", and the proposal was supported by Mr. Hyde 
Clarke and Sir Henry Rawlinson (JRAS., N.S., xix, pp. 504-5). 

In the following September, Major (afterwards Lieut. -Col. Sir) 
C. M. Watson, R.E., following Professor Salmone's suggestion, pro- 
posed that a School for Modern Oriental Studies should be established 
in London in connection with the Imperial Institute. 1 

A new Committee was formed, of which Sir Thomas Wade and 
Sir Frederick Goldsmid were members. The School was formally 
inaugurated by a Lecture delivered by Professor Max Miiller at the 
Royal Institution on nth January, 1890, with the Prince of Wales 
(afterwards King Edward VII) in the chair. As far as can be ascer- 
tained the only practical achievement of the School, which had no 
buildings or permanent income, was to arrange that the teaching in 
Oriental languages given at University College and at King's College 
respectively should no longer overlap. It received a donation in 
1901 of 5,000 from the Misses Ouseley for the purpose of endowing 
scholarships in Oriental languages. The operations of the Committee 
of the School of Modern Oriental Studies of the Imperial Institute 
were brought to a close at the end of the year 1902, and in 1908, with 
the approval of the donors, the Ouseley Scholarship Fund was trans- 
ferred to the University of London. 

From 1892 onwards the history of the movement is closely connected 
with the movement for the organization of the University of London 
as a teaching University. 

Evidence was given on the need for the development of the teaching 
of Oriental studies before the Gresham Commission on the University, 



1 Sec Appendix XVI to Reay Report, pp. 153-6, on the History of the 
School of Oriental Studies founded in connection with the Imperial Institute, 
by Professor Wj'.ndham R. Dunstan, F.R.S. See also Appendix V (6) to 
Report, p. 66. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 33 

which sat from 1892 to 1894, by Professor Max Miiller, Lieut. -Col. 
Plunkett, R.E., and Dr. J. D. Pollen ; and the Commission (of which 
Lord Reay was a member) reported that a large increase of the funds 
available for the teaching under the auspices of the Imperial Institute 
and of University and King's Colleges was necessary to enable the 
School to perform its task adequately ; but this particular recommenda- 
tion, as seen above, led to no result. 1 The Report of the Commission 
and subsequent negotiations and compromises between the various 
bodies concerned led to the passing of the important University of 
London Act of 1898, and the reconstitution of the University in 1900, 
in accordance with the Statutes made by the Commissioners under 
that Act. By the new Act and Statutes the University added to its old 
functions as an examining body certain powers in regard to the control 
and organization of higher teaching in the London area which have 
been developed by subsequent Acts. 

The addresses and speeches at the Anniversary Meetings of the 
Royal Asiatic Society from 1894 onwards contain frequent references 
to the proposal to establish in London an Oriental School " on a better 
basis than the existing one ", and the Society formally decided in 1894 
to do all in its power to promote the establishment of such a School. 2 

In December, 1897, Professor Salmone read a paper before the 
Society (JRAS. y 1898, April, pp. 212-221) " On the Importance to 
Great Britain of the establishment of a School of Oriental Studies 
in London ", and moved : 

" That the Royal Asiatic Society . . . should take the initiative 
in bringing about the establishment of a School for the study of 
Oriental languages in London, and that the Council be requested 
to consider the best means of carrying out the project." 3 

The motion was unanimously agreed to. 

It appears from the Report of the Royal Asiatic Society for 1900 
(JRAS^ 1900, p. 588) that the Commissioners under the University 
of London Act of 1898 were asked by the Council of the Society, but 
refused, to create a Faculty of Oriental Languages, History, and 
Archaeology in the reconstituted University ; and foi the next five years 
nothing more seems to have been done. 

At the Anniversary Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society on nth 
April, 1905 (JRAS. y 1905, p. 592), Dr. (later Sir) George Grierson 

1 Gresham University Commission, 1894 : Minutes of Evidence (C. 
7425) and Report (C. 7259), pp. xxxv-vi. 

2 Speech by Lord Reay, 8th May, 1894 (JRAS. t 1894, p. 591). 

3 The motion is given, not in its original form, but as amended in accord- 
ance with a suggestion by Lord Stanmore and Sir Raymond West, accepted 
by the mover. Apart from the action taken directly by the Society Professor 
Salmone* 's paper led to the bequest by Major-General J. G. R. Forlong of a 
sum of 5,000, of which the interest was to be spent by the Royal Asiatic 
Society on Lectures on the Religions, History, Character, Language, and 
Customs of Eastern races at the School proposed. 



34 HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 

again spoke of the t( crying need" for a School of Oriental Studies; 
and the initiation of the movement which led by consecutive steps 
to the establishment of the present School took place on i3th November, 
1905, when the Academic Council of the University of London, on 
the motion of Dr. A. C. Headlam, 1 resolved to recommend the Senate 
to adopt the following resolutions : 

" That a Committee be appointed to consider the reorganization 
of Oriental Studies in the University and to suggest a scheme therefor. 

" That the Committee consist of (i) Representatives of the Senate 
(2) Representatives of the Board of Studies in Oriental Languages 
and (3) other persons, with power to communicate with other Bodies.' 

The Senate adopted the resolutions on 22nd November, 1905, and 
constituted the Committee as follows : The Chancellor (Lord Rosebery), 
the Vice-Chancellor [also Chairman of Convocation] (Sir Edward 
Busk), Dr. J. B. Benson, Dr. (later Sir) Gregory Foster, Dr. A. C. 
Headlam, Mr (later Sir) H. J. Mackinder, Lord Reay, Senators ; 
Professor (later Sir) T. W. Arnold, Sir Robert Douglas, Sir Charles 
Lyall, Professor J. W. Neill, Professor E. J. Rapson, Professor O. C. 
Whitehouse, Members of the Board of Studies in Oriental Languages ; 
Sir Arthur Riickcr, Principal of the University, Sir Walter Hillier, 
Mr. (later Sir) Felix Schuster, Mr. Walter Smith, and Dr. A. Cotterill 
Tupp, with power to appoint two members to represent the City of 
London College and the London Chamber of Commerce respectively. 2 
Mr. (later Sir) P. J. Hartog, Academic Registrar, acted as Secretary of 
the Committee. 

The Committee invited various public Societies to appoint delegates 
to confer with them upon the subject of their reference, and a Confer- 
ence was held on nth December, 1905, at which representatives of 
the following Societies and Associations were present : British Academy, 
Royal Asiatic Society, Central Asian Society, China Association, 
Anglo-Russian Literary Society, the Society for the Propagation of 
the Gospel, London Missionary Society, British and Foreign Bible 
Society, African Society, and Victoria League. 

The Conference recommended the Senate to authorize the Com- 
mittee to present a Memorial to the First Lord of the Treasury asking 
him to appoint a Departmental Committee to inquire into the subject, 
and to receive a deputation. The Senate, on 2ist February, 1906, 
adopted a resolution on the lines suggested by the Conference, and 
approved generally a Draft Memorial submitted by a Sub-Committee 
of the Conference. The Memorial referred specially to an important 
paper on Oriental Studies in England and abroad, published by 
Professor T. W. Rhys Davids, of University College, in the Proceedings 

1 Then Principal of King's College, London, and later Bishop of Gloucester. 

2 The Committee co-opted Mr. Sidney Humphreys, on the nomination of 
the City of London College, and Mr. J. H. Polak and Dr. H. J. Spenser on the 
nomination of tfie London Chamber of Commerce. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 35 

of the British Academy, vol. i, p. 183. 1 It was presented by a deputa- 
tion introduced by the Vice-Chancellor of the University (Sir Edward 
Busk) and by Lord Reay to Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, First 
Lord of the Treasury, who was accompanied by Mr. Asquith (later 
Earl of Oxford and Asquith) as Chancellor of the Exchequer, and by 
Mr. John Morley (later Viscount Morley of Blackburn), as Secretary 
of State for India. 

Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman received the Deputation favourably, 2 
and on 2oth April, 1907, the Treasury appointed a Committee to 
consider the organization of Oriental Studies in London with the 
detailed reference suggested by the Deputation. The Committee 
consisted of the following : Lord Reay, G.C.S.L, G.C.I.E. (Chairman), 
Lord Redesdale, G.C.V.O., K.C.B., Sir Alfred Lyall, G.C.I.E., 
K.C.B., Sir Thomas Raleigh, K.C.S.L, and Mr. A. R. Guest, with 
Mr. (later Sir) Philip J. Hartog as Secretary. On 3Oth March, 1908, 
Sir Montagu C. Turner was added to the Committee. The Committee 
examined seventy-three witnesses, 3 and signed their report on 23rd 
December, 1908. They summarized their arguments and conclusions 
as follows : 

(1) There is urgent need for the provision of suitable teaching 
in London for persons about to take up administrative or commercial 
posts in the East and in Africa. 

A knowledge of the language, and some preliminary knowledge 
of the history and religions and social customs of the country to 
which they are appointed, is essential to such persons. Time will 
actually be gained, and it will be advantageous in other ways, if the 
first instruction is given in this country. 

(2) To meet the need referred to in the foregoing paragraph, a 
School of Oriental Studies should be built up from the nucleus of 
Oriental teaching now existing at University and King's Colleges, 
and should be incorporated in the University of London. The School 
should have a constitution similar in its main lines to that of 
University College. It should possess a name and home of its own. 

(3) The School should provide both for living Oriental languages 
and for classical Oriental studies ; but the Committee ask for a 
grant to be made from Government funds, at the foundation of the 
School, for living Oriental languages only. The first establishment 
of the School should be on the scale necessary to meet immediate 
requirements, and should be extended gradually. 



1 Read on 24th February, 1904. 

* For report of the proceedings see The Times of 5th December, 1906. 

3 The witnesses included M. Paul Boyer. Professor in, and later Director 
of, the Ecole Speciale des langues orientales vivantes, Paris ; M. Sylvain LeVi, 
Professor of Sanskrit at the College de France, Paris ; and Dr. E. C. Sachau, 
Professor of Semitic Languages in the University of Berlin and Director of 
the Seminar fur Orientalische Sprachen, Berlin. 



36 HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 

(4) The School should possess a library, of which an important 
feature would be a collection of modern Oriental books and periodicals 
kept up to date. 

(5) The Committee desire specially to call attention to the dis- 
advantages under which in this respect London lies as compared 
with Paris, Berlin, and St. Petersburg. As England is the country 
which above all others has important relations with the East, the 
fact that no Oriental School exists in its capital city is not creditable 
to the nation. 

On zyth September, 1909, Lord Redesdale opened a debate in the 
House of Lords on the subject of the Report of Lord Reay's Committee, 
in which Lord Morley of Blackburn, then Secretary of State for India, 
Lord Cromer, and Lord Curzon of Kedleston took part. Lord 
Morley stated that the Government were in full sympathy with the 
objects and with most of the detailed recommendations of the Com- 
mittee. 1 In March, 1910, the Secretary of State for India appointed 
a Departmental Committee with the following reference : 

To formulate in detail an organized scheme for the institution 
in London of a School of Oriental Languages upon the lines recom- 
mended in the Report of Lord Reay's Committee of 1909. 

The members of the Committee were as follows : 

The Right Hon. the Earl of Cromer, G.C.B., O.M. (Chairman) ; 
the Right Hon. Lord (later Earl) Curzon of Kedleston, G. C.S.I., 
G.C.I. E. ; the Right Hon. the Lord Mayor of London, Sir John 
Knill, Bart. ; the Right Hon. Sir (later Lord) Charles Hardinge, P.C., 
G.C.M.G., G.C.V.O. (Permanent Under-Secretary of State for Foreign 
Affairs); Sir Charles Lyall, K.C.S.I., C.I.E., LL.D. (formerly 
Secretary, Judicial and Public Department, India Office) ; Dr. (later 
Sir) H. Frank Heath (Director of Special Inquiries and Reports to the 
Board of Education ; Joint Secretary to the Royal Commission on 
University Education in London) ; Mr. (later Sir) P. J. Hartog, 
Academic Registrar of the University of London, to act as Secretary. 

Sir Charles Hardinge (later Lord Hardinge of Penshurst) retired 
from the Committee on his appointment as Viceroy of India in June, 
1910, and was succeeded by the Right Hon. Sir Arthur Nicolson 
(later Lord Carnock), P.C., G.C.B. (formerly Permanent Under- 
secretary of State for Foreign Affairs). 

Sir John Knill retired from the Committee on 9th November, 
1910, and was succeeded in the Lord Mayoralty of London by the 
following, who were successively members of the Committee : The 
Right Hon. Sir T. Vezey Strong, P.C., K.C.V.O., Sir Thomas 
Crosby, Sir David Burnett, Bart., Sir T. Vansittart Bowater, Sir 
Charles Johnston, Sir Charles (later Viscount) Wakefield, Bart. 



1 For report uf the proceedings see The Times of 28th September, 1909. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 37 

The first question considered by the Cromer Committee was that 
of a site and buildings for the -School. 'The Reay Committee (Report, 
p. 29) had stated that the School should be in a central position acces- 
sible to students from the City and from the Colleges, and in a 
Memorandum submitted to the Cromer Committee by the Secretary 
at their first meeting on i8th March, 1910, it Was suggested that the 
London Institution should be considered, and the Committee accepted 
the suggestion. But the suggestion had already been made in another 
official quarter before the Cromer Committee had been actually 
constituted. In order to understand a somewhat complex situation 
it is necessary to give here a brief account of the history of the London 
Institution and to mention that a new Royal Commission on University 
Education in London, under the chairmanship of Mr. (later Viscount) 
Haldanc, had been set up in 1909. 

The London Institution for the Advancement of Literature and the 
Diffusion of "Useful Knowledge was first founded under a RoyaJ Charter 
dated 2ist January, 1807. The Institution obtained a site in Finsbury 
Circus on which it erected its buildings, including a lecture-theatre 
and a library, the architect being William Brooks. In 1821, with the 
object of securing a steady yearly income apart from voluntary sub- 
scriptions, the Institution obtained an Act of Parliament authorizing 
the Committee of Management to make the share of each Proprietor 
subject to an annual payment not exceeding two guineas, the share to 
be forfeited in default of such annual payment. 

At the time when the Institution was founded, Finsbury Circus 
was a fashionable quarter, but during the course of the nineteenth 
century the majority of the Proprietors had moved to a distance from 
the City, and a very large number, probably the majority, found 
themselves unable to avail themselves of the privileges of their 
membership. On i2th April, 1905, the Proprietors appointed a 
Special Committee to confer with the Board of Management on the 
position of the Institution. 

Various schemes were proposed for the reconstruction or rebuilding 
of the Institution, of which certain portions were suffering from 
structural defects which could not be remedied without serious ex- 
pense. The Board, on i3th March, 1908, reported that a crisis had 
been reached in the position of the Institution ; that a considerable 
sum of money was imperative for urgent repairs, and that in the event 
of the Proprietors abstaining from a decisive vote or action tending 
to place the affairs of the Institution on a secure basis interference from 
outside would almost certainly result. They finally pointed out that 
the Institution had from the outset been crippled from want of funds. 

It was clear that the Board had in their mind that it might be held 
before long that they were not in a position to carry out their charitable 
trust, and that their property might therefore go into the hands of the 
Attorney- General. A scheme for the amalgamation of the Institution 
with the Royal Society of Arts, originally placed before the Proprietors 



38 HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 

in 1905, was considered at a Special Meeting, and a ballot on the scheme 
was taken on I5th February, 1909, in which 322 votes were recorded 
for and 218 against the amalgamation, but the Board did not think 
that the support was sufficient to justify them in proceeding with the 
negotiations. The Corporation of the City of London on 4th February, 
1909, suggested a working arrangement in connection with the Gresham 
Trust as an alternative to the Royal Society of Arts scheme, and the 
Town Clerk inquired on 25th February, 1909, what were the most 
pressing needs of the Institution " to prevent its removal from the 
City of London ". At this stage, on 9th March, 1909, the Royal 
Commission on University Education in London informed the 
Institution that the Commission regarded it as coming within their 
reference. Lord Aldenham, the President of the London Institution, 
and Mr. R. W. Frazer, the Principal Librarian and Secretary, furnished 
a statement to the Commission and gave evidence before them on 
24th February, 1910, and the Chairman of the Commission suggested 
that the Institution might be utilized for a School of Oriental Languages 
or for the study of higher commercial subjects. Lord Aldenham 
stated that the Proprietors were divided, and that while some of them 
" regarded with great desire the educational value of the Institution " 
and would be prepared to do anything and sacrifice anything in order 
to promote education and the original objects of the Institution, 
others regarded it as a comfortable club, and would oppose bitterly 
anything that interfered with that ; while some again held the " pre- 
posterous notion " that the property of the Institution might be 
sold and the proceeds divided among the members. 1 

In June, 1911, the Cromer Committee issued their First Interim 
Report, 2 in which they suggested that the site and buildings of the 
London Institution should, if possible, be acquired for the purposes 
of the School. The Committee pointed out that the negotiations with 
the Committee of Management and the Proprietors of the London 
Institution must finally be conducted by His Majesty's Government, 
but offered to assist in bringing the negotiations to a satisfactory 
conclusion. The Report was accompanied by plans drawn up by 
Professor F. M. Simpson, F.R.I.B.A., showing what additions and 
alterations should be made in the buildings of the London Institution to 
adapt them for the purposes of the School, and stated that their cost was 
estimated by the Committee at from 20,000 to 2^,000. The negotia- 
tions were conducted between Dr. (later Sir Frank) Heath, acting on 
behalf of the Government, and a Special Committee of the Institution, 
and were carried out successfully. The Proprietors gave their assent to 
the scheme submitted to them at a general meeting on 25th March, 
1912 ; and the text of the London Institution (Transfer) Bill was issued 



1 See Appendix to First Report of Royal Commission on University Educa- 
tion in London, 1910 (Cd. 5166, plice 2s. yd.\ pp. 118-19, 230-3. 

a Interim Report of (East India) Oriental Studies Committee (Cd. 5967 
price 4^.). The Report is accompanied by Appendices relating to the site 
and buildings, ^jbrary, legal constitution, and financial position of the London 
Institution. It also contains a note on the Berlin School of Oriental Languages. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 39 

in May. In the debate on the Second Reading of the Bill in the House 
of Lords on 8th October, 1912, Lord Haldane, then Lord Chancellor, 
stated on behalf of the Government that a grant of 4,000 would be 
made to the new School, and that 25,000 would be expended on 
adapting the buildings of the London Institution for the School. 
The Royal Assent was given to the Bill on I3th December, 1912. 

Under the Act the real property of the Institution, i.e. the land 
and buildings, were vested in H.M. Commissioners of Works for the 
purposes of and in connection with the School of Oriental Studies. 
The funds belonging to the Institution, including 35,000 (nominal) 
invested in Consols, together with 12,000 and such further sum as 
the Treasury " might approve " out of moneys provided by Parliament, 
were placed at the disposal of the Institution (i) for the discharge of 
all the liabilities of the Institution, (2) for the purpose of paying to each 
Proprietor a sum of 25 in respect of each share held by him, and 
for compensating each life member on a corresponding basis, 1 and 
(3) for the payment of pensions or lump sums in lieu thereof for the 
benefit of the past and present members of the staff of the Institution 
and their families as the Committee of the Institution in their discretion 
might think fit. Certain books and manuscripts agreed upon by 
the Commissioners of Works and the Committee of Management of 
the Institution were retained by the Institution for immediate trans- 
ference to public institutions determined by the Committee of Manage- 
ment. Under this provision some valuable books and manuscripts 
were transferred by the Committee to the British Museum, and others 
to the Library at the Guildhall. The Commissioners were also given 
power to transfer any property other than real property (including the 
library of over 100,000 volumes) vested in them by the Act, to the 
Governing Body of the School of Oriental Studies upon the establish- 
ment of the School. The Act further provided for the creation of 
a body of persons designated as Continuing Members, who were to 
be entitled for so long as they desired to the exclusive use of two rooms, 
the reading-room and smoking-room respectively, and to such use 
of the library, theatre, and other buildings and property vested in the 
Commissioners as was in the opinion of the Commissioners reasonable 
and not calculated to interfere with the main purposes for which 
the property was intended to be used. The Continuing Members 
consisted of Proprietors and other persons who had certain rights in the 
Institution when the Act was passed. The Act further provided that 
the Continuing Members should be subject to the obligation to pay 
an annual subscription of two guineas to be applied for their own 
benefit ; and further, that if in any year the income derived from 

1 Lord Aldenham and twenty-four other Proprietors, including Sir Home- 
wood Crawford, the City Solicitor, and Dr. Edwin Freshfield, the two Pro- 
prietors who were chiefly responsible foi the movement for retaining the 
Institution in the City of London, generously handed the sums received by 
them under the Act (amounting in all to 625) to Lord Cromer and Lord 
Curzon, for the purposes of the School when founded. The donees formed a 
trust and transferred the fund to the School shortly after i& foundation. 



40 HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 

subscriptions and any voluntary payments made by or on behalf of 
the Continuing Members should fall below 170, then at the conclusion 
of that year the rights of the Continuing Members should be finally 
determined. There was no provision for the creation of new Con- 
tinuing Members. 1 The rights of the Continuing Members were 
extinguished towards the end of 1932 by agreement, on payment to 
those who survived of a sum of money by the Governing Body. 

The Treasury requested the Cromer Committee to supervise, 
in conjunction with a representative of H.M. Office of Works, the 
necessary alterations to be carried out at the London Institution, 
and sanctioned the employment of Professor F. M. Simpson as archi- 
tect. They stipulated, however, that the detailed plans should be 
approved, not only by H.M. Office of Works and the Committee, but 
also by the representatives of a number of the bodies which would 
eventually be represented on the Governing Body of the School. 
This process took some time, and was prolonged considerably by the 
necessity for entering into negotiations with the owners of large new 
buildings in course of erection on the east side of the School. Mr. 
Frank Baines, M.V.O., a Principal Architect of the Office of Works, 
settled with the owners a party -wall award, and arranged for important 
concessions to be made to the School, both in regard to the height of 
the new building and the use of white bricks in its construction, which 
prevented the School from being materially affected by loss of light. 
The plans were finally completed and approved in March, 1914. By 
that time there was a strike in the building trade and the Office of 
Works was unable to issue the contract for the building until the 
following November, four months after the outbreak of the War. 

In January, 1914, a City Appeal Committee was constituted under 
the chairmanship of Sir Montagu Turner, a former member of Lord 
R cay's Committee, Chairman of the Chartered Bank of India, Australia, 
and China. 2 In connection with the work of this Committee, the Lord 
Mayor, Sir. T. Vansittart Bowater, held a Mansion House Meeting 
on 6th May, 1914, in order to raise funds for the School. Lord 
Cromer, owing to illness, was unable to attend the Meeting, and Lord 
Curzon of Kedleston moved the following resolution, which was 
seconded by Lord Reay : 

" That in view of the great imperial and commercial interests 
dependent on adequate provision being made for instruction in 
the languages, the literature, and the social customs of Oriental 



1 After negotiation, the Office of Works as from December, 1916, vested 
the whole of this property other than real property in the Governing Body, 
subject to the condition that the Governing Body should not sell or lend any 
of the books of the Library without the consent of the " Continuing Members ", 
or failing such consent, of the Office of Works, who were to be the final arbiters 
in case of disagreement on this matter between the Governing Body and the 
Continuing Members . 

2 Mr. H. R. Beasley acted for a considerable time as Secretary of this 
Committee and 1 of the larger Appeal Committee referred to below. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 41 

and African countries, this meeting desires heartily to support the 
scheme for the foundation of a School of Oriental Studies in the 
City of London." 

Lord Inchcape proposed and Mr. Faithfull Begg (as Chairman of 
Council of the London Chamber of Commerce) seconded the 
following resolution : 

" That this meeting desires to commend to the commercial com- 
munity of the City of London, and to the general public, an appeal 
for the funds necessary to enable the School of Oriental Studies 
to be opened in 1915 on a satisfactory financial basis." 

A vote of thanks to the Lord Mayor was proposed by Lord Crewe, 
Secretary of State for India, and seconded by Sir Montagu Turner. 

The City Committee was merged in a larger Committee in 1916, 
of which Ijord Curzon became Chairman, and which included among 
others Mr. Asquith (later Earl of Oxford and Asquith), Mr. (later 
Sir) Austen Chamberlain, Lord Chelmsford, Lord Crewe, Lord 
Grey of Fallodon, Lord Hardinge of Penshurst, Mr. Arthur Henderson, 
Lord Lansdowne, Mr. Bonar Law, Lord Morley of Blackburn, 
Lord Reay, and Sir Marcus Samuel, Bart, (later Viscount Bearsted). 

The object of the Committee was to raise an endowment fund of 
150,000. 

The view of the Government in regard to the relation of the School 
to the University of London was affected by the views of the Royal 
Commission, whose final Report was dated 2jth March, 1913. As 
stated above, the Reay Committee had reported that the School should 
be incorporated in the University. At the date of their Report Univer- 
sity College had already been so incorporated (on ist January, 1907), 
and the Act for the incorporation of King's College had received the 
Royal Assent ; the latter College was incorporated on ist January, 
1910. The question was one which closely affected the School, as 
the Reay Report proposed that it should be built up from the nucleus 
of Oriental teaching at the two Colleges (see above). The Royal 
Commission, while approving of the proposals of the Reay 
Committee in general, recommended that incorporation should not 
take place until the University as a whole had been reconstituted 
in accordance with the plan which they advocated, and that the 
School should then form " A University Department of Oriental 
Studies governed by a Delegacy of the Senate " ; in the meantime 
they recommended that it should be established as a School of the 
University. 1 The Government endorsed the views of the Royal 

1 Final Report of Royal Commission qp University Education in London 
(Cd. 6717, price 25.), 1913, pp. 262-3 and passim. For the views officially 
expressed on behalf of the Government in regard to the question of incorpora- 
tion see (i) speech by Lord Morley on 27th September, 1909, in the House of 
Lords ; (2) replies to questions by Mr. G. Lloyd and Sir W. J. Collins on 
loth March, 1910, in the House of Commons. 



42 HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 

Commission and requested the Cromer Committee to assist them by 
preparing the first draft of a Charter, on the lines suggested. Lord 
Crewe, as Secretary of State for India, applied to the Privy Council for 
a Charter for the School (see London Gazette, loth February, 1914). 
Various bodies, including the Senate of the University of London, 
the London County Council, the British Academy, and the Royal 
Asiatic Society, made representations in regard to the Draft Charter, 
which finally issued on 5th June, 1916. 

Under the Charter, Sir John Prescott Hewett, G.C.S.I., C.I.E., 
formerly Lieutenant- Governor of the United Provinces of Agra and 
Oudh, was appointed first Chairman of the Governing Body, and its 
first meeting was held at the Offices of the Board of Education, under 
the chairmanship of the President of the Board, the Rt. Hon. Arthur 
Henderson, M.P., on 22nd June, 1916. At that meeting Mr. (now 
Sir Philip) P. J. Hartog was asked to act as Honorary Secretary of the 
Governing Body, a position which he held until i9th March, 1917, 
when he was obliged to resign owing to the pressure of other duties. 

On 2oth October, 1916, Dr. (later Sir) E. Denison Ross, C.I.E., 
Keeper of the Stein Antiquities at the British Museum, previously 
Professor of Persian at University College, Principal of the Calcutta 
Madrasah, and Officer in Charge of the Records of the Government 
of India, was appointed Director of the School, to take office on ist 
November. 

On 3oth June, 1916, the School forwarded to the Senate of 
the University of London the communication required under Article 
IX of the Charter before the Governing Body could make the first 
appointments to the teaching staff. On i^th December, 1916, the 
Senate resolved to transfer, under certain conditions, to the School, 
as from ist January, 1917, the members of the staffs of the Oriental 
Departments at University and King's Colleges other than those who 
did not desire to be so transferred. All the teachers concerned at 
the two Colleges, except two, accepted the proposals of the School, 
but it should be pointed out that certain Oriental subjects, e.g. 
Egyptology, Assyriology, and Hebrew at University College, and 
Assyriology and Hebrew at King's College, continue to be taught at 
those Colleges. The Senate on the same occasion decided to transfer 
on loan to the School books immediately needed for the teaching work 
of the transferred teachers, and to consider at a later date the question 
of the transfer of other Oriental books to the School. 

The " China Association's School for Practical Chinese ", which 
for some years had carried on teaching successfully in conjunction 
with the authorities of King's College, resolved, with the concurrence 
of the Delegacy of the College, to transfer its support to the School 
of Oriental Studies, and to pay its income, amounting to about 
350 a Y ear > to the School. 

On 28th November, 1916, the School applied for admission as a 
School of the \Jniversity. A preliminary announcement was issued in 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 43 

December, 1916, and the School opened its doors to students on 
1 8th January, 1917. The charge of the School buildings was formally 
transferred from Lord Cromer's Committee and the Office of Works 
to the Governing Body as from 9th January, 1917. 

On 29th January, 1917, Lord Cromer, who had taken so active a 
part in the promotion of the scheme for the School, died. Lord Curzon 
of Kedleston, who had been Acting-Chairman of the Oriental Studies 
Committee since Lord Cromer's illness in 1914, succeeded him as 
Chairman, and the final meeting of the Committee took place on 
22nd February, 1917. The final Report of the Committee to the 
India Office was dated 26th March, 1917. 

On 23rd February, 1917, the School was formally opened by H.M. 
King George V. An account of the memorable proceedings is given in 
the Bulletin of the School (Vol. I, pp. 23 ff.). 

The number of students taken over by the School from the pre- 
existing institutions was 9, a number much less than the normal 
owing to the War. By July of the same year the total number of names 
on the register had increased to 125. Ten years later over 3,000 
students had passed through the School, with an average attendance of 
550 in the past five sessions. During the first year instruction was 
given in the following subjects : Amharic, Arabic, Assamese, Bantu 
Languages, Bengali, Burmese, Chinese, Dravidian Languages, 
Gujarati, Hausa, Hindustani and Hindi, History of India, Indian 
Law, Japanese, Malay, Marathi, Pali, Persian, Phonetics, Sanskrit, 
Sinhalese, Tibetan, and Turkish. Since that time seven University 
Chairs (Arabic, 1 Persian, 1 Sanskrit, 1 Chinese, Swahili and the Bantu 
languages, History and Culture of British Dominions in Asia with 
special reference to India, Phonetics) and nine University Reader- 
ships (Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Hindustani, Indian Law, Malay, 
Persian, Tamil, and Telugu) have been made tenable at the School, 
and many other lectureships established. 

Ever since the acquisition of the Bloomsbury Site by the University 
of London, it had been the intention of the Governing Body ul- 
timately to transfer the activities of the School to the new University 
quarters. By this move the School will be brought into much closer 
touch with other departments of the University and will also benefit 
by being in closer proximity to the British Museum. In January, 
1936, a favourable offer for the Finsbury Circus Site having been 
received, negotiations were at once entered into for temporary 
premises for the School, and during the following Easter Vacation 
the contents of the Building in Finsbury Circus were moved to 
Vandon House, Vandon Street, and to Clarence House, Matthew 
Parker Street in Westminster, the teaching and administration 
being located in the former premises ^and the Library in the latter. 

In July, 1937, the Governing Body resolved that its deep apprecia- 
tion of the services rendered to the School by Professor Sir E. Denison 

. -_. - -_ . _ . - 

1 Tenable previously at University College. 



44 HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 

Ross, who was to retire from the office of Director at the end of the 
session, should be placed on record. Previously the Governing Body 
had appointed Professor R. L. Turner, M.C., M.A., Litt.D., to succeed 
Professor Sir E. Denison Ross as Director of the School. Professor 
Turner had been Professor of Sanskrit in the University of London 
since 1922 and was formerly a Fellow of Christ's College, Cambridge. 
For some years he was in the Indian Educational Service and was on 
war service from 1915 to 1919 as an officer attached to the 2nd Bn. 
3rd Queen Alexandra's Own Gurkha Rifles. 



BUILDINGS 



2. BUILDINGS 



45 



The School is temporarily established at Vandon House, Vandon 
Street, within two minutes* walk of St. James's Park Underground 
Station. In the present building there are forty-five class-rooms, 
separate common-rooms for the staff, for men students, and for women 
students, and administrative offices. The Library is accommodated in 
a separate building about seven minutes' walk from the School and 
five minutes' walk from St. James's Park Underground Station. The 
address of the Library is Clarence House, 4 Central Buildings, 
Matthew Parker Street. The exact positions of the School and the 
Library in relation to surrounding streets are shown in the plan 
below. 



_ _^^ .. Tube & Underground 
^^ Stations 




George Philip & Son. l*.d 



46 SCOPE OF TEACHING 

3. SCOPE OF TEACHING 

Instruction is given in the following subjects : 
Languages * : 



Bari 

Dinka 

Efik 

Ewe 

Fanti 

ca 



Arabic : 

Classical 

Egyptian 

Iraqi 

Sudanese 

Syrian 



AFRICAN 
Hausa 
Ibo 

KiKuyu 
LuGanda 
Mende 
Nuer 

SEMITIC 



Shilluk 

Sotho-Chwana 

Swahili 

Twi 

Yoruba 

Zulu-Xhosa 



Ambaric 
Aramaic 
Ethiopic 
Modern Hebrew 





TURKISH 






GEORGIAN 






INDO-EUROPEAN 




Armenian 
Iranian : 


Indo-Aryan : 
Sanskrit 


Maratbi 


Avestic 
Old Persian 
Persian 
Pashto 


Pali 
Prakrit 
Assamese 
Bengali 
Gujarati 
Hindi 


Nepali 
Oriya 
Panjabi 
Shina 
Sindhi 
Sinhalese 




Hindustani 


Urdu 




Kashmiri 





Kanarese 
Malayalam 



DRAVIDIAN 



Tamil 
Telugu 



Tibeto-Burman ; 
Tibetan 
Burmese 

Tai: 

Shan 
Siamese 



SINO-TIBETAN 

Chinese : 
Classical 
Modern 
Cantonese 
Amoy 
Swatow 
Foochow 



1 Endeavour will be made to provide instruction in any Oriental or African 
language which is not included in the curriculum and for which there is a 
demand. * 



SCOPE OF TEACHING 47 

MON-KHMER 

Khasi - Medieval Mon 

AUSTRONESIAN 

Indonesian : 

Malay Melanesian Languages 

Polynesian Languages Micronesian Languages 

PAPUAN 

JAPANESE, MONGOLIAN 
Phonetics : Practical and Theoretical. 

Culture and History : 

History of Oriental and African countries, with special courses on 
the history of India and the Middle East, of Hindu and Muhammadan 
political institutions, and of the Far East. 

Burmese, Hindu and Muhammadan Law, and Law of Palestine. 
Indian Criminal Law, the Indian Evidence Act. 

The Literatures, Religions, Philosophies, and Customs of Oriental 
and African countries. 

Oriental Art and Archaeology. 

Linguistics : 

The Comparative Grammar of the following language families : 

Indo-European (with special reference to Indo-Aryan, ancient 

and modern). 
Semitic. 

Austronesian (with special reference to Indonesian), 
Bantu. 

French and German : 

Elementary classes are held in French and German by private 
arrangement for Research Students requiring to read these languages 
for the purposes of research. 

Miscellaneous : 

The School is a recognized School of the University of London in 
the Faculty of Arts. 

Courses are provided in Oriental History, Hindu and Muhammadan 
Law, Indian Criminal Law, Law of Evidence, and in various modern 
languages respectively for those examinations under the Faculties of 
History, Law, and Economics (Commerce) (pp. 135-13^). 



48 SCOPE OF TEACHING 

Under inter-collegiate arrangements, students can attend lectures 
held at other Colleges or Schools of the University. 

Students are eligible as candidates for a certain number of Scholar- 
ships and Bursaries offered for Oriental subjects (pp. 229-232). 

The lectures and classes are open also to those who have not 
matriculated and do not wish to follow a full University course 
especially to those who are going to the East or to Africa in any 
capacity, whether in the service of Government, or as missionaries, 
or to engage in a profession or in commerce ; or those who have 
temporarily returned from the East and wish to continue their studies 
while in England. 

Gramophone Courses form part of the regular instruction given in 
Chinese (Modern) and Persian. There are, in addition, records of 
many African and Asiatic Languages. Students may borrow records 
from the Gramophone Library (p. 92). 

Particular attention is paid to the practical phonetics of modern 
languages ; and the Department of Phonetics is now able to give 
special facilities for instruction and research in African languages 
(PP- I 3 I ~4)- 

Public lectures are delivered from time to time by members of the 
Staff and other Orientalists (p. 66). 

The School offers special facilities for post-graduate research, 
under the supervision of professors and readers or otherwise. The 
Library is open all the year (pp. 233-4). 

The Secretary of State for India has sanctioned the addition of the 
School to the list of Universities and Colleges approved by him in 
connection with the probation of selected candidates for the Indian 
Civil Service (p. 223). 

The School issues a journal, The Bulletin of the School of Oriental 
Studies, in which is published original work by the Staff and students 
and by other scholars (p. 234). 



PART III 



REPORT OF THE SESSION 1936-37 



THE PATRON 

At their meeting in February the Governing Body were informed that 
a Memorandum had been received from the Privy Purse Office, 
Buckingham Palace, stating that H.M. King George VI was pleased 
to grant his. Patronage to the School. 

THE GOVERNING BODY 

The Governing Body were informed in November that Professor 
W. B. Stevenson, one of the Crown Members of the Governing Body, 
had resigned his appointment. At their meeting in February a report 
was received that the King had been pleased to approve that Mr. E. A. 
Benians should be a member of the Governing Body in the room of 
Professor W. B. Stevenson. 

It was with regret that the Governing Body learnt in November that 
Mr. J. H. Oldham, who has done so much for the promotion of African 
Studies in this country and who was co-opted in 1932 as a member of 
the Governing Body, had resigned his appointment. 

In December the Governing Body were informed that Mr. A. C. 
Hearn had accepted an invitation to serve as a member having special 
regard to the interests of commerce. In welcoming Mr. Hearn as a 
member of the Governing Body the great appreciation of the School 
was expressed to him for the generosity of the Anglo-Iranian Oil 
Company, Limited. 

The Governing Body were informed in February that Brevet-Major 
E. K. Page had succeeded Major H. C. T. Stronge as the Officer in 
Charge of the Language Subsection of the Directorate of Military 
Operations and Intelligence and that the representative on the 
Governing Body appointed by the Secretary of State for War was 
accordingly changed. 

The Governing Body at their meeting in June received with much 
pleasure a report that Lord Hailey had accepted the invitation of the 
Governing Body to serve as a member. 

DIRECTOR 

At their meeting in June the Governing Body decided that in honour 
of Professor Sir E. Denison Ross, the Director of the School, who was 
to retire at the end of the session, a Dinner should be held and that 
subscriptions should be invited towards the cost of painfing a portrait 

49 D 



50 ANNUAL REPORT 

of the Director which would for the future hang in the School. 
Tributes to the great work accomplished by Sir Denison Ross during 
his period of office since the foundation of the School in 1916 were paid 
both at the Dinner held by the Governing Body in his honour on the 
ist July and at a Dinner given by the Teaching Staff for Sir Denison 
Ross on the 25th June. 

OBITUARY 

At their meeting in November the Governing Body received with 
regret a report of the death of Sir Charles C. McLeod, Bart., who was 
from 1916 to 1932 a member of the Governing Body appointed with 
special regard to the interests of commerce. 

It was with the deepest regret that the Governing Body and the 
School learnt of the sad death of Sir Edwin Deller. At their meeting 
in December the Governing Body passed the following resolution : 

That the Governing Body desire to place on record their deep 
regret at the loss sustained by the University on the death of 
Sir Edwin Deller and to express their gratitude for the valuable 
services which he rendered to the School of Oriental Studies. 

At their meeting in March the Governing Body learnt with regret 
of the death of Sir James Stewart Lockhart, who had been a Governor 
of the School appointed by the Royal Asiatic Society from 1925 to 1930. 

The Governing Body learnt in June of the death of Mr. J. D. 
Rockefeller, Senior, and a message of condolence was sent to the 
Rockefeller Foundation on behalf of the Governing Body. ' The 
Governing Body recalled the debt of gratitude which the School owed 
to the Rockefeller Foundation for the support the Foundation had given 
to the work of the African Department. 

CONGRATULATIONS 

At their meeting in November the Governing Body resolved that 
congratulations should be sent to Dr. J. A. Stewart, Lecturer in 
Burmese, on the award of the Leverhulme Fellowship for two years. 

The Governing Body decided at their meeting in February to 
send their sincere congratulations to Dr. L. D. Barnett, on whom the 
honour of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath had been conferred 
in the New Year Honours List. 

At their meeting in June the Governing Body received with much 
pleasure a report that a Knighthood had been conferred in the 
Coronation Honours on Dr. A. Mawer and on Mr. F. H. Brown. 
The Governing Body sent their congratulations to Sir Allen Mawer 
and to Sir Frank Brown. 

The Governing Body were ilso informed in June that a message 
of congratulations had been sent on behalf of the School to Mr. H. L. 
Eason, Vice-Chancellor of the University on his appointment as 
Principal. 



ANNUAL REPORT 51 

BLOOMSBURY SITE 

At their meeting in February the Governing Body were informed that 
the Bloomsbury Site Sub-Committee had received from the Architect 
sketch-plans and a schedule showing how it was proposed to meet 
the requirements of the School in the proposed new building in 
Bloomsbury. In view of the estimated cost of the new building which 
had been submitted by the Architect, a meeting had been held with 
the Bloomsbury Development Committee of the Court. After dis- 
cussion it was agreed that modifications in the scheme proposed were 
desirable. The Governing Body were informed that, in accordance 
with an agreement made with the University, a revised specification 
had been drawn up by the Bloomsbury Site Sub-Committee and that 
the revised proposals by the School had been submitted to the Architect 
through the Court. The School is now awaiting the revised proposals 
of the Architect. 

ACADEMIC STAFF 

Dr. Walter Henning was appointed in October to the Parsee 
Community's Lectureship in Iranian Studies in succession to Dr. H. W. 
Bailey, who was appointed to the Chair in Sanskrit at the University 
of Oxford. 

At their meeting in November the Governing Body were informed 
that funds were available for the establishment at the School of a 
Research Lectureship in Hebrew Palaeography and Dr. Birnbaum 
was appointed a Research Lecturer in this subject. 

The School has had the valuable assistance during the session of 
Miss J. R. Watt, who has succeeded Miss II. M. Lambert as Part-time 
Lecturer in Marathi. 

At their meeting in June the Governing Body were informed that 
Mr. V. Minorsky, Reader in Persian, had accepted the offer made by 
the Senate of the University of the Chair in Persian tenable at the 
School. Mr. Minorsky will succeed Professor Sir Denison Ross on 
his retirement. 

At their meeting in March the Governing Body reappointed Dr. L. D. 
Barnett to the Senior Lectureship in Indian History and Sanskrit, 
and Mr. J. R. Firth to the Senior Lectureship in Linguistics for the 
session 1937-38. 

At their meeting in March the Governing Body decided that it was 
desirable to effect some reorganization in the Department of the 
Languages and Cultures of India, Burma, and Ceylon consequent on 
the appointment of Professor Turner as Director of the School. 
Mr. Sutton Page was appointed Head of the Department of India, 
Burma, and Ceylon (a), and it was agreed that sections (a) and (c) 
of this Department should be rearranged in one Department under 
Mr. Sutton Page, and that the Department of India, Burma, and 
Ceylon (b) remain as at present a separate Department under 
Dr. Grahame Bailey. The Senate have approved the modifications 
proposed in the terms of appointment of the teachers coi/cerned. 



52 ANNUAL REPORT 

Dr. I. C. Ward has been appointed Acting Head of the Department 
of African Studies for the session 1937-38, and Dr. E. D. Edwards has 
been appointed Acting Head of the Department of the Far East. 

During the session the Governing Body were informed that the 
following had resigned their appointments as members of the Panel 
of Additional Lecturers : 

J. B. Danquah, Ph.D. 

Miss Phulrenu Datta, M.A. (Calcutta). 

A. S. Fulton, M.A. 

The Governing Body were also informed that the following had been 
appointed members of the Panel : 

S. K. Bhuyan, M.A. (Calcutta) for Assamese. 
Col. H.L.O.Garrett, M.A. (Cantab.) Indian History. 



E. G. Hart 

B. G. Herouy 

Edith A. How 

G. W. B. Huntingford 

B. Matsukawa 

Sir E. Denison Ross 

H. de C. Stevens-Guille, 



Indian History. 

Amharic, Ethiopic, and Galla. 

ChiNyanja. 

Central African Languages. 

Japanese. 

Islamic Studies. 

Sesuto. 



M.A. (Oxon.) 
J. Walker, M.A. (Glas.) ,, Arabic and Arabic Epigraphy. 

Professor H. A. R. Gibb resigned his appointment as Professor 
of Arabic from the end of the session on being appointed to the 
Laudian Chair of Arabic in the University of Oxford. Professor Gibb 
came to the School as a student at the end of the War. In 1921 
he was appointed to a Lectureship in Arabic, in 1929 to the Readership, 
and in 1930 to the Professorship of Arabic. It was with deep regret 
that the Governing Body accepted Professor Gibb's resignation 
from the Chair in which he had carried out exceptionally distinguished 
work. His resignation is a serious loss to Islamic Studies in the 
School. 

Professor Sir Reginald Johnston, who was appointed to the Chair 
in Chinese in 1931, resigned his appointment as from the end of the 
session. Sir Reginald Johnston, whose long and distinguished services 
in China give him a very rare and intimate knowledge of that country 
and its languages, will be much missed in the School, both on academic 
and on personal grounds. 

During the session Mr. R. T. Butlin, Dr. Betty Heimann, and 
Dr. A. N. Tucker have been recognized by the University as Teachers 
in Phonetics, Sanskrit and Indian Philosophy, and African Linguistics 
respectively. 

The School contributed a small grant towards the expenses of 
Dr. L. S. B. Leakey, Additional Lecturer for KiKuyu, in order to 
assist Dr. Leakey in his field work on the AkiKuyu. 



ANNUAL REPORT 53 

At their meeting in June Dr. M. D. Ratnasuriya was appointed as 
from the beginning of session,i937~38 to a Lectureship in Sinhalese, 
Epigraphy, and Indian History. 

The appointments of Mr. Chiang, Assistant Lecturer in Chinese, 
Shaykh M. M. Gomaa, Lecturer in Arabic, Dr. Walter Henning, 
Lecturer in Iranian Studies, and the Rev. Dr. G. P. Bargery, Senior 
Lecturer in Hausa, have been renewed. 



LEAVE OF ABSENCE 

During the second term Professor H. A. R. Gibb was in Cairo in 
connection with his work as Titular Member of the Royal Academy 
of the Arabic Language. 

During the first and second terms of the session Mrs. Ashton was 
granted leave of absence by the Governing Body *to visit East Africa. 
During her absence the work of Mrs. Ashton was carried out by 
Miss M. A. Bryan, formerly a student of the School. 

GRANTS 

The School received with great satisfaction during the first term a 
report that the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, Limited, had decided 
to make further generous donations towards the Chair in Persian at the 
School for the five years 1937-1941. A resolution of sincere thanks 
was passed by the Governing Body and sent to the Anglo-Iranian Oil 
Company for their generous grant. 

At their meeting in November the Governing Body were gratified 
to learn that the Secretary of the N. M. Wadia Chanties had sanctioned 
the payment of 100 per annum for a period of three years to the 
Lectureship in Iranian Studies at the School. At the same meeting 
the Governing Body were informed that the Secretary of the Trustees 
of the Parsee Punchayet Funds and Properties had resolved to continue 
the payment of their annual contribution of 100 towards the Lecture- 
ship in Iranian Studies for a further period ending 3ist December, 
1939. The Governing Body expressed their great appreciation of the 
assistance given by the Parsee Community to the Lectureship in 
Iranian Studies and resolutions of thanks were passed and sent to the 
N. M. Wadia Charities and to the Trustees of the Parsee Punchayet 
Funds and Properties. 

The Governing Body passed a resolution of thanks in November for 
the kind donation to the School funds made by the National Bank of 
India. 

A resolution of thanks was also passed by the Governing Body in 
November for Messrs. Volkart Brothers* further kind subscription to 
the School Funds. 

It was with great satisfaction that the Governing Body learnt in 
December that the Court of the University of London had decided 
to increase by 1,500 per annum the grant made to the School in 
respect of the quinquennium, 1936-37 to 1940-41. The Governing 



54 ANNUAL REPORT 

Body passed a resolution of sincere thanks to the Court for this increase 
in the annual grant. 

Among those who have contributed subscriptions or donations to 
general funds are Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ltd. ; Barclays Bank 
(Dominion, Colonial and Overseas) ; W. A. Browne & Co. ; The 
Corporation of the City of London ; National Bank of India, Ltd. ; 
Ottoman Bank ; Mrs. W. Reid ; United Africa Co., Ltd. ; Volkart 
Brothers. 

The School is also grateful to the several contributors to the Ahad 
Ha'am Lectureship in Modern Hebrew. Among those who have 
contributed during the session are Sir Montague Burton ; Mrs. A. 
Davis ; Federation of Synagogues ; Inter- Jewish Federation ; Mrs. H. 
Irwell ; Mr. S. Lourie ; Mr. Oscar Philipp ; Mr. Cyril Ross ; 
Mr. J. A. de Rothschild. 

The School is grateful to the Nathan and Adolphe Haendler Charity 
and to Professor Jopson for the fund provided for the Research 
Lectureship in Hebrew Palaeography. 

GRAMOPHONE RECORDING 

The gramophone recording apparatus installed in the Department 
of Phonetics has been kept in constant use throughout the session. 
The apparatus has been modified during the session, and its capacities 
increased. It is now possible to record on one side of a i6-in. disc 
approximately 20 minutes of consecutive speech. 

The languages recorded, for research and instruction, were : Yoruba, 
Ibo, Fante, Twi, Zulu, WolofF, Mende, Tagalog, Modern Hebrew, 
Burmese, Persian, Urdu. Many foreign students have made records 
of their English pronunciation. 

Advantage was taken of the presence in London for the Coronation 
of African rulers to record their languages. 

Extensive use is made of the apparatus in practical language teaching ; 
records made by students, with corrections made in the studio by the 
teachers are a regular feature of the teaching in some departments. 

The British Institute of Adult Education has conducted an inquiry 
into the use of the gramophone in education. The section appointed 
to investigate the use of the gramophone in language teaching was 
presided over by Professor Lloyd James : its report, drawn up by 
Mr. R. T. Butlin, who acted as Secretary, is a notable contribution to 
pedagogical literature in this field. 

APPEAL 

At their meeting in June the Governing Body approved an appeal 
which a special Sub-Committee appointed for the purpose had drafted. 
This appeal for funds to various Dominion and Colonial Governments 
was sent to the Colonial Office and the Dominions Office. The School 
hopes that favourable consideration will be given to the claims of the 
School to additional financial support in view of the work which is 
carried out by the School for Dominions and Colonies overseas. 



ANNUAL REPORT 55 

I.C.S. CLUB 

There have been twenty-three Indian Civil Service Probationers 
during the year, of whom nine are of British domicile. As a body they 
have shown marked capacity and initiative and the activities of the 
I.C.S. Club have been varied and successful. A series of lectures on 
" The Modern Trend in Indian Thought " was organized at India 
House by the Probationers, of whom the Chairman, Tarlok Singh, 
should be specially mentioned ; the lectures were delivered by 
distinguished authorities and were attended by a large public and 
attracted considerable notice. In addition there have been regular 
meetings for tea or luncheons at the St. James's Court Hotel, where 
distinguished old members of the Indian Civil Service and others have 
accepted the hospitality of the Probationers and have addressed them 
on various aspects of their future careers. The Club has also organized 
tournaments among its members at various games. 

ANNUAL DINNER 

On Thursday, the 4th March, the Annual Dinner of the School was 
held at Grosvenor House under the Chairmanship of Sir Harcourt 
Butler. The School was honoured by the presence of many 
distinguished guests including the Secretary of State for the Colonies, 
the Rt. Hon. W. G. Ormsby-Gore, the Rt. Hon. Lord Hailey, the 
Under Secretary of State for the Colonies, Sir John Maffey, Mr. Samuel 
Courtauld, and Sir Hubert Young, Governor of Northern Rhodesia. 

LIBRARY 

The accessions to the Library since the last report was drawn up 
number 2,938, 2,213 books and pamphlets being acquired by purchase, 
while 115 pamphlets, 3 palm-leaf manuscripts, and 607 books were 
received as gifts. 

Among the more important purchases were the Burmese translation 
of the Pali Tripitaka in 30 volumes ; Kokuyaku issaikyo, the Japanese 
edition of the Tripitaka in 155 volumes ; Ts'ung Shu Chi Ch'eng in 
1,000 volumes (part of which only has so far been received) ; Corpus 
papyrorum Raineri (iii series arabica) ; Nyrop's monumental 
Grammaire historique de la langue francaise ; Sammlung und Bearbeitung 
Zentralafrikanischer Vokabularien by Heinrich Barth and the Catalogue 
of the Chester Beatty Library. 

The Library Committee has greatly benefited by the expert advice 
of Dr. Walter Simon in the purchase of books for the department of 
the Far East. 

It is gratifying to record that in spite of the temporary separation 
of the Library from the School building no falling off has been notice- 
able in the number of readers. The only disadvantage of the present 
situation is the inaccessibility of the Library to members of the Staff, 
who in normal conditions would naturally visit it more frequently. 

The Library is greatly indebted to the East India United Service Club 



56 ANNUAL REPORT 

for the gift of a large collection of Parliamentary Papers relating for the 
most part to India ; to Professor J. A. Lundell for 20 volumes of 
his valuable series Archives d y Etudes Orientales ; to Miss Mary Witten 
for a number of books in the Ga language ; to Mrs. Jukes for a collec- 
tion of Arabic and Persian Books formerly belonging to her husband, 
the late Rev. Worthington Jukes ; to the Deutsche Morgenlandische 
Gesellschaft for their Glossar zu Firdosis Schahname compiled by 
Dr. Fritz Wolff for the Firdausi Millennium ; to the British and 
Foreign Bible Society for their most recent translations into African 
languages, and finally to Sir John Gumming for further generous 
gifts of books relating to India from his own Library. 

Donations were also received from the following : Mr. A. A. Abdel 
Mageed ; Dr. Leonhard Adam ; Universite d'Alger ; Dr. T. Grahame 
Bailey ; Dr. Pestanji P. Balsara ; Baroda, The Director of Archaeology; 
Baroda, The Director, Oriental Institute ; Mr. M. C. Baroova ; 
Mr. H. Bartlett ; Mr. E. Stuart Bates ; Belgium, Universite Coloniale ; 
Professor S. K. Bhuyan ; Bihar and Orissa Research Society ; The 
British and Foreign Bible Society ; The British Museum (Natural 
History) ; Burma, The Director of Public Instruction ; Cairo, 
Bibliotheque Egyptienne ; Cairo, Universite Egyptienne ; University 
of Calcutta ; Cambodia, Bibliotheque Royale ; University of Cape 
Town ; Mr. Y. Chiang ; Miss M. Clapton ; Mr. E. Machell Cox ; 
The Crown Agents for the Colonies ; Damascus, Institut Francais ; 
Mr. S. Desikavinayakam Pillai ; Mr. J. A. Edham ; Professor S. 
Elisseeff ; Dr. Fritz Epstein ; Dr. S. G. Vesey FitzGerald ; Comm. 
Alf. M. Galea ; Sir Stephen Gaselee ; Glasgow University Oriental 
Society; M. V. Goloubew ; H.E.^The Governor of the Gold Coast ; 
Sir George A. Grierson ; Hanoi, Ecole Francaise d'Extreme Orient ; 
Sir Philip J. Hartog ; Dr. W. Henning ; Professor J. Hertel ; The 
Hispanic Society of America ; Mr. C. A. Hooper ; Mr. G. E. Hubbard ; 
Hyderabad, H.E.H. The Nizam's Government ; Hyderabad, Osmania 
University ; The High Commissioner for India ; India Office, The 
Librarian ; The Secretary of State for India ; The Japanese Embassy ; 
Dr. Gunnar Jarring ; Dr. Ku Teng ; Leningrad, The Academy of 
Sciences ; M. Jean Leyder ; University of Liverpool ; University of 
London ; Malay States Information Agency ; Manchester, The John 
Rylands Library ; The Air Ministry ; Mr. V. Minorsky ; Pro- 
fessor Khagendranath Mitra ; Musee Guimet ; Muslim Mission and 
Literary Trust ; Nairobi, The Principal, Jeanes School ; Mr. Nasir 
al-Din Hashmi ; M. Basile Nikitine ; Mr. P. E. O'Brien Butler; 
Mr. M. Orenstein ; Oslo, Academic des Sciences ; Dr. Salomon 
Pines ; Mr. H. Raffaty ; Rhodesia, Director of European Educa- 
tion ; Miss G. Ricardo ; Rome, Unione Missionaria del Clero in 
Italia ; The Royal Institute of International Affairs ; The Rev. P. P. 
Saydon ; Mr. Shichisaburo Itazu ; Mr. J. S. Scott ; Lieut.-Colonel 
C. R. Scott-Elliot ; Singapore, The Raffles Library ; Sir Aurel 
Stein ; Sudan, The Director Of Education ; Teheran, Ministre de 
L' Instruction Publique ; Universite de Teheran ; Maung Tet Htoot ; 
M. R. Thoumin ; Tokyo, Kokusai Bunka Shinkokai ; Tokyo, 



ANNUAL REPORT 57 

Maison Franco-Japanaise ; Tokyo, Waseda University ; University 
of Toronto ; Mr. E. B. Vellaj Mrs, A. R. Waite ; Mr. W. H. Why- 
mant ; Mr. I. Wolfensohn ; Dr. Irwin von Zach. 

BULLETIN 

Two numbers have been published during this session, Volume VIII, 
Part 4, in January, and Volume IX, Part i, in June. 

STATISTICS OF STUDENTS 

The usual tables are given below showing the number of students 
who have attended the School during the session. 

A considerable number of students attended more than one course 
of instruction and occur under more than one head. Accordingly 
at the foot of Table I the total number of students is shown, the 
numbers of men and women being given separately. 

Table I shows that Arabic remains the language for which the 
largest number of students come to the School for instruction. The 
number was in fact 3 more than in 1935-36. Students in the 
Department of India, Burma, and Ceylon showed a small increase 
in numbers on the previous session as did the numbers in the Depart- 
ment of African Studies. There was a large increase in the number 
of students in the Department of Oriental History and Law. Several 
of the students in Indian History came for a course of study which 
would qualify them to enter for the Indian Civil Service Open Com- 
petition, a change in the regulations having made it necessary that 
candidates at the London examination should have taken a course 
of study for at least a year in a university in the United Kingdom. 

Amongst the subjects which were taught in 1936-37 but not in the 
previous session may be observed Malayalam, Manchu, Amharic, 
Aramaic, Kanuri, and Nuer. 

With regard to Table II it is interesting to observe that whilst the 
number of foreign students is almost identical for sessions 1935-36 
and 1936-37, there is an increase of 25 in the number of students 
classified as coming from the British Empire overseas. A large 
proportion of this increase is represented by 16 additional Indian 
students. 

It will be observed in Table IV that the number of Full-time 
Students was 26 more than in the previous session. This substantial 
increase of 37 per cent was made up by an increase of 2 in the 
number of students working for a Higher Degree, 16 in the 
number of students working for a First Degree, and 10 in the number 
of Indian Civil Service Probationers. 

The number of Part-time Students shows an increase of 14 
on the previous session, or approximately 22 per cent. The main 
increase under this head is seen to hav^e occurred in the number of 
missionaries attending courses of instruction, being 18 in 1936-37, 
as against i in 1935-36. 



58 ANNUAL REPORT 

The number of Occasional Students shows a very considerable 
decline as against the previous session, being 174 in 1936-37 compared 
with 243 in 1935-36, or a reduction of about 28 percent. Except under 
one head that of Armed Forces of the Crown, where the number 
in 1936-37 was more than double that of 1935-36 all classes of 
Occasional Students show a marked decline. 

Intercollegiate Students show an increase of n per cent, from 
72 in session 1935-36 to 80 in 1936-37. The rise in the number of 
Intercollegiate Students attending the School during the last three 
sessions is of much interest and shows that the School is playing an 
increasingly important part in the work of the University as a whole. 

The Grand Total is 21 less than in 1935-36, but is 4 more than 
the average figure of 424 for the six sessions 1931-32 to 1936-37. 
It will be seen in Table I that 324 men and 104 women attended 
the School during the seasion. In 1935-36 the corresponding figures 
were 325 and 124. Thus during 1936-37 the number of men was 
only i less than in 1935-36 but there were 20 fex^er women at 
the School. 

Of the total of 428 students 347 stated that they would be going 
abroad on the completion of their course of study. The countries 
to which these students are proceeding is shown in Table III. As 
in previous Sessions the destinations of those who have been taught 
at the School are distributed over the three continents of Asia, Africa, 
and Australasia. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

TABLE I SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION 



59 





j 




] 

1 


"ull- Part- Occa- Inter- 
k ime time sional collegiate 


Total 




i 




INDIA, BURMA, AND CEYLON 






(a) Burmese . 


4 ii 


15 


Comp. grammar of Indo- 






European 


3 : ~ i 


4 


Epigraphy : Indian 


I 2 


3 


Sinhalese . 


I 


i 


Indian Philosophy 


6 i 


7 


Pali . . 


3 i i 2 


6 


Religions 


I I 


2 


Sanskrit 


21 I I 12 


35 


(b) Hindustani : Hindi 


4 ~ 3 ~ 


7 


Urdu . 


7 i 15 ! 


23 


Nepali 


, x __. 


i 


Pashto 


! ' * : 


1 


(r) Bengali 


6 i i i 


9 


Gujarati 


3 l 


4 


History of Bengal 


__ j 


i 


Malayalam 


i : ' 


i 


Ma rath i 


5 i i i 


7 


Religions 


< i | i 


2 


Sinhalese 


T 


I 


Tamil 


3 ; i 2 I 


6 


Telugu . . . i 


2 j 2 | 


4 


FAR EAST 






Chinese 


5 12 14 


3i 


Chinese Calligraphy 


i 3 2 j - 


e 


Japanese 


7 5 


12 


Malay 


10 8 4 


22 


Manchu 


i 


I 


Shan .... 


j ' j 


I 


Tibetan 


3 ! 


4 


NEAR AND MIDDLE EAST 






Amharic . . . | 


i ' J 


I 


Arabic 


14 18 30 4 


66 


Arabic Paheography 


( i 


i 


Aramaic 


i i 


2 


Ethiopic 


3 i 


4 


Hebrew (modern) 


4 5 | 6 


15 


Hebrew Philosophy 


i i 


2 


Iranian Studies 


2 > ' 


2 


Islamic History . . , 


23 i i 6 


30 


Persian 


ii 4 i 13 6 


34 


Turkish 


212 


5 




1 J 





60 ANNUAL REPORT 

TABLE I SUBJECTS OF INSTRUCTION continued 



] 


7 ull- Part- Occa- Inte 


ir- Total 


1 


ame time sional jcolleg 


iate 




i i 




AFRICA 






Comparative Philology , 


I 

! 


! 


(Bantu) . 


23 


5 


Comp. Philology (West 






African Languages) . 


I j j 


i 


Chi Nyanja 


j , - 


: I 


Hausa . . . ! 


__ j 3 


4 


Ibo . 


I 3 , -~ 


4 


Kanuri 




2 


LuGanda . 


3 2 - 


! 5 


Nuer 


J - J. 


i 


Swahili 


3 10 i 


14 


Twi .... 


j 


i 


Xhosa 


j ^ 


i 


Yoruba 


ii 


2 



PHONETICS AND LINGUISTICS 

Comp. Philology (Gen. 

Linguistics) . . 6 

Methods of Lang Study I 

Phonetics ... 28 



i i 18 

10 3 I 13 

30 41 j 27 ; 126 



ORIENTAL HISTORY AND LAW 

History (Indian) . 
Law (Indian) 



50 
23 



4 
20 



57 
43 



TOTAL NUMBER OF STUDENTS 



Men . 
Women 



85 

ii 



63 
15 



107 
67 



69 
1 1 



324 
104 



428 



ANNUAL REPORT 

TABLE II STATISTICS OF STUDENTS 



61 



Great Britain 



254 



British Empire 

but not in 

Great Britain 

126 



Foreign. 



48 



Total 



428 



The 174 Overseas students were made up as follows :- 



No. of 
Students 


EUROPE. 




Belgium 
France 


i 

2 


Denmark 


2 


Germany 
Holland 


10 
I 


Irish Free State 
Italy . 
Latvia 


4 

2 

I 


Lithuania 
Poland 


3 

2 


Russia 


I 


Switzerland . 


I 



ASIA. 

Afghanistan 
Burma . 
Ceylon . 
China . 
India 
Iran 
Iraq 
Palestine 



No. of 
Students 

i 
i 

5 

i 

. 99 

2 
2 
9 



AFRICA. 
Egypt . 
South Africa 
West Africa . 



AMERICA. 
Barbados 
Canada 
U.S.A. 



TABLE III COUNTRIES IN ASIA, AFRICA, AND AUSTRALASIA TO WHICH 
STUDENTS ARE PROCEEDING 

The following students are proceeding to the countries named 
below : 



Afghanistan . . i 

East Africa . 41 

South Africa . 2 

West Africa . . 29 

Arabia ... 3 

Assam . . i 

Burma. . 17 

Ceylon . . 6 
China . . .21 

Cyprus . . i 

Dutch East Indies. i 



Egypt . 

India . 

Iran 

Iraq 

Japan . 

Malaya 

New Guinea 

Oceania 

Palestine 

Sudan . 

Turkey- 



15 

138 

12 

3 
3 

22 

I 
I 

16 

12 
I 



62 



ANNUAL REPORT 





to 


























t"> 


I 


ON CO tO 






M 


NO 


OO 


H i-c r4- 1-1 OO ONNO 


00 


t^ d t^ ON ON 


rj- 





00 






d to d 












d M M 




M M 10 tO Tf 




00 


d 


ON 


to 




















M 




^l" 


1 

M 


M 


























ON 


NO 


























t/T 




























H 


1 


r^ t-> to 


N| C 


i 


ON 


o 


NO * 


H 1 rf TJ- M 00 O 


rj- 


00 O NO 10 rt- 


ro 


d 


ON 






d M M 












I d d 












u 


S 




















d 




Tj- 





M 


























H 




























CO 




























w 


10 


























H 


ro 




























I 


t^ M ^ 


<* 


c 


o r* 


d 


10 ( 


N| M Tf- ro ^f d ^4- 





1OOO IO O O 


ro 


*t- 


rf. 


S 

M 


to 


ro M M 








^ 






VO 


M d NO Ti-oo 


ro 
d 




d 
<f 


8 




















( 








i 




























a; 




























w 


to 




























i < 


1 
ro 
to 

& 


OO ** Tf 




i 


N}00 


ro 


^ 


NO d I> ro d r^ 


>? 


M d O ro t^ 


CO 

d 


* 


10 

ro 


Q 




























j 


to 


























<j 


to 


























j 


1 


ON ON d 


c 


* 


M 


to 


OO 


d ro -i 10 o\O 


O 


NO o ~t- o oo 


ro 


f^ 


ro 


O 


ro 


d M d 








^ 




d 




>-< d NO rooo 


d 
d 


* 


ON 

ro 































O 




























ttT 


ro 


























JS ' 


M O M 


H 




ro 


NO 


f> 


NO t^ !o d r^ I 


^- 


ro ONOO 10 d 


|v^ 


ON 


NO 


? s 


to d d 








^ 




d 1 


10 


M 10 10 d oo 


to 
d 


<* 


l-l 


H 































fa 

o 



H 

< 

< 



3 

PQ 

s 



.2 5 

. Jl. .. 

o 2 

J. . .M . . 
S - 1 

H JU </3 rn fli > 

S K o C . 

y U) <urrj ii w <u 

| Q |a^; 

M S Q g'S's.a 2 

^2l||.| 
^KE^<oSo 







-5 % 

'"eg .8 

, .y > 

F 3 











5t ^ 

2 . . . 


J. 




\^ ffi 


i 




w +* 5R 

^ 8 c 
S S.S '55 


Q 

1 ' 


g 


Q W > D 

B a S s 

o^-n^ 

M-t^-, 2 C 

IllJil 

^<u6 


ER- COLLEGIATE 

Students 


GRAND 1 



ANNUAL REPORT 63 

CONFERMENT OF DEGREES 

GEORGE PERCY BARGERY . .... D.Lit. 

(For works on llausa including a Hausa-English Dictionary and an 
English-Hausa Vocabulary.) 

MARGARET SMITH, Ph.D. .... D.Lit. (Arabic 

(For works on Islamic Mysticism.) and Persian) 

CYRIL HENRY PHILIPS, B.A. (Liverpool) . . M.A. (Liverpool) 

PRATUL CHANDRA GUPTA .... Ph.D. (History) 
Thesis : " Baji Rao II." 

SERAJUL HAQUE ...... Ph.D. (Arabic) 

Thesis : " Ibn Taimiya and his projects of reform." 

RATTAN CHAND LAI ..... Ph.D. (History) 

Thesis : " Reorganization of the Punjab Government (1847-57)." 

ABDUL Aziz PURI ..... Ph.D. (History) 

Thesis : " Muslim Rule in Sind in the 8th, Qth, and loth centuries." 

GERTRUDE HENRIETTA STERN .... Ph.D. (History) 

Thesis : " The Life and Social Conditions of Women in the Primitive 
Islamic Community as depicted in the eighth volume of 
ibn Sa'd's Tabaqat Al Knbra and the sixth volume of ibn 
Hanbal's Musnad." 

ABDUL ALIM ..... B.A. Hons. (History, III) 

AJITPRASAD CHAUDHURI . . . B.A. Hons. (History, III) 

1 ABDUL-HAFEZ KAMAL .... B.A. Hons. (Arabic) 

RAGHUBIR SINGH KAPUR . . . B.A. Hons. (History, III) 

1 CIIAIM RABIN ..... B.A. Hons. (Arabic) 

NEPAL SINGH ..... B.A. Hons. (History, III) 

DEVI PROSAD SINHA .... B.A. Hons. (History, III) 

1 ROBERT HAMILTON BLAIR WILLIAMS . B.A. Hons. (Indo-Aryan) 



1 HUBERT WILLIAM SPILLETT, B.D. . . B.A. Hons. (Chinese) 

(External) 
ABDUL-AZIZ AMIN ABDEL MAGEED . B.A. Gen. (External) 

1 ist class honours. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE STUDENTS 
MELCHIOR BALAGUER .... Ph.D. (Philosophy) 

Thesis : " Law as the Basis of Morality in the philosophy of Hobbes, 
Cumberland and Locke." 

LEONARD JAMES BEECHER . . . M.A. (Education) 

TRILOKI NATH KAUL .... LL.M. 

BARBARA BEST ..... B.A. Hons. (History, II) 

MURIEL BURGESS ..... B.A. Hons. (history, II) 



64 ANNUAL REPORT 

WlLMETT FOX ..... 

MARY GROOM ..... 

NORAH JESSIE RAWUNS .... 

MARGARETTA MARY SHEA 

SYLVIA BETTY WHORLOW 

EMMANUEL EDMUND PEIRIS 

LOPUP AMIRDANADAR SINGARAYER . 

AKSHAI CHANDRA BANSAL 

ABUL KASEM MAHAMMAD BAQUER . 

DEV RAJ CHOPRA ..... 

PARBATI PROSONNO GHOSE 

SHIB CHARAN KISHORE .... 

GARLADINNE GURUMURTHI RAO 

KHUSHWANT SINGH .... 

HENRY ISAAC SOPHER .... 

IBRAHIM ANIS . 

ERNST FRIEDRICH HARTMUT BRODFUHRER . 

JOHN GILBERT LENNARD 

AYYAMPERUMAL MUTHUSWAMY 

ABUL BARKAT MUHAMMUD HABIBULLAH, 

Ph.D. 

EDWARD TEMPLE GRIEVESON, B.A. . 
ANTHONY HAYDOCK HILL, B.A. (Oxon) . 
PHILIP WATER HINDE, B.A. (Cantab) 
GEORGE GEOFFREY STEELE HUTCHINSON, 

B.A. (Cantab) 

CLEMENT WILLIAM JACKMAN, B.A. (Oxon) 
GEORGE EDGAR JANSON-SMITH, 

B.A. (Oxon) 

STUART DRUMMOND LADE, B.A. (Adelaide) 
GERWYN ELIDOR DAVID LEWIS, 

B.Sc. (Econ.) 
GEORGE DOUGLAS MUIR, 

M.A. (St. Andrews) 
JOHN JOSEPH O'MEARA, 

B.A. (Nat. Univ. of Ireland) 
JAMES SABISTON, M.A. (Aberdeen) . 
CHARLES THURSTON SHAW, B.A. (Cantab) 
MARJORIE HOPE TAYLOR, B.A. 



B.A. Hons. (History, II) 
B.A. Hons. (History, II) 
B.A. Hons. (History, II) 
B.A. Hons. (History, II) 
B.A. Hons. (History, II) 
B.A. General 
B.A. General 
LL.B. 
LL.B. 
LL.B. 
LL.B. 
LL.B. 
LL.B. 
LL.B. 
LL.B. 

Intermediate Arts 
Intermediate Arts 
Intermediate Arts 
Intermediate Laws 
Diploma in Librarian- 
ship 

Teacher's Diploma 
Teacher's Diploma 
Teacher's Diploma 
Teacher's Diploma 



Teacher's 
Teacher's 

Teacher's 
Teacher's 

Teacher's 
Teacher's 

Teacher's 
Teacher's 
Teacher's 



Diploma 
Diploma 

Diploma 
Diploma 

Diploma 
Diploma 

Diploma 
Diploma 
Diploma 



DIPLOMAS 

During the session four Diplomas have 
Governing Body as follows : 



been awarded by the 



ANNA OISERMAN . 
THEODORA RUTH SARNA 

HOSSEIN RAFFATY . 
EDITH JOHNSON . 



Hebrew (Modern) 
Hebrew (Modern) 

(with distinction) 
Old and Middle Iranian 
Persian 

(with distinction) 



ANNUAL REPORT 65 

CERTIFICATES 

Seven candidates entered for the Certificate Examinations, of whom 
one failed to qualify, the others reaching Certificate standard as 
follows : 

Second Year Certificates 

THEODORA RUTH SARNA . . . Arabic (Modern) 

ISAK SAMSON SCHIMEL, LL.B. . . Arabic (Classical) 

HOSSEIN RAFFATY ..... Old and Middle Iranian 

(with distinction) 
DAVID BOWMAN ..... Turkish 

(with distinction) 
First Year Certificates 

ANNE URSULA RICKMERS . . . Chinese (Classical) 
PERCIVAL RUPERT CHRISTOPHER WREN . Japanese 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

A Forlong Research Studentship was awarded to : 
BERNARD LEWIS, B.A. 

A Forlong Scholarship was awarded to : 

ALEC GEORGE MORRIS BEAN, B.A. 

The Aga Khan Travelling Scholarship in Persian was awarded to : 

EDITH JOHNSON 

Ouseley Memorial Scholarships were awarded as follows : 
Arabic : THEODORA RUTH SARNA 
Hindi : ROBERT HAMILTON BLAIR WILLIAMS, B.A. 
Persian : ERNST FRIEDRICH HARTMUT BRODFUHRER 

Free Places at the School for the session 1937-38 were awarded to : 
ALEC GEORGE MORRIS BEAN, B.A. 
CHAIM RABIN, B.A. 



66 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PUBLIC LECTURES 

The following Public Lectures arranged by the Indian Civil Service 
Club were delivered at India House, by kind permission of the High 
Commissioner for India : 

Subject 

-Past and Present." 
Ideas of India and 



Lecturer 

THE MARQUESS OF ZETLAND 
DR. BETTY HEIMANN . 



the 



MR. LAURENCE BINYON 
DR. ARNOLD BAKE 
MR. W. SUTTON PAGE 

SIR ABDUL QADIR 

MR. K. DE. B. CODRINGTON 

MRS. RAMA RAU 



" India- 
" Basic 

West." 

" Indian Painting." 
" Indian Music." 
" The Early Days of Rabindranath 

Tagore." 

" Humour in India." 
" The Lesser Communities of 

India." 
11 Position of Women in India." 



Public Lectures by members of the Staff were given outside the 
School as follows : 



Lecturer 
MR. S. K. BHUYAN 



MR. R. T. BUTLIN 



DR. J. B. CHAUDHURI 



MR. Y. CHIANG 



MR. K. DE. B. CODRINGTON 



Subject 
11 Assam." 

I.C.S. Probationers, London. 
" History and Civilization of 
Assam." 

Under the auspices of Instituto 
Italiano per il Medio ed 
Estremo Oriente, Rome. 
" An Examination of the Validity 
of Certain Current Phonetic 
Ideas." 

The Philological Society. 
" Problems of Speech Standardiza- 
tion." 

Toynbee Hall. 
" Narira Kavya-pratibha." 
Bengali Literary Society, 
London. 
" Nan." 

(Read in the writer's absence 
by a friend at the Annual Con- 
ference of Chittagong Literary 
Association, Chittagong, Ben- 
gal, India.) 

" Chinese Girls and their Family 
Life." 

The Elliott Central School, 
Southfields. 

" Indian Sculpture," " Islamic Art 
in India." 

Oxford and Cambridge. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



6 7 



Lecturer 



THE VEN. ARCHDEACON E. S. 
DANIELL 

DR. C. A. RHYS DAVIDS 



MR. J. R. FIRTH 



DR. BETTY HEIMANN . 



MR. S. HILLELSON 



PROF. A. LLOYD JAMES 



Subject 
"Fardapur," an Indian Village. 

India House. 
" Play and Ritual in Society/* 

Warburg Institute. 
General Missionary Addresses at 
London, Weymouth, Chelten- 
ham, Dorchester. 
" Road-Sense in Religion." 

SouthalL 
" Buddhism." 

Birmingham Theosophical 
Society. 

" The Chief Symbols of Budd- 
hism." 

Bath Sufi Society. 
" That Art of Living." 

London World Fellowship of 
Faiths. 

" The Phonetic Structure of a 
Cypriot Dialect." 

Philological Society of Great 
Britain, Oxford. 

" The Basic Ideas of India and 
The West." 

Indian Civil Service Club, 
London. 

" Indian Contemporary Philo- 
sophy." 

International Federation of 
University Women , London. 
" Aspects of Muhammadanism in 
the Sudan." 

Royal Asiatic Society. 
" Speech and the State School." 
Hampshire Teachers' Associa- 
tion. 

" Literature and the Spoken 
Language." 

Scottish Verse- Speaking 
Association, Glasgow. 
" Speech Education in Training 
Colleges." 

Training Colleges of Welsh 
University. 

" Some Aspects of Language 
Education " (two lectures). 
Devonshire Teachers' Associa- 
tion. 



68 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Lecturer 



PROF. SIR REGINALD JOHNSTON 



MR. I. KAZI 



MR. R. LE MAY 



MR. W. BUTTON PAGE 



MR. C. H. PHILIPS 



DR. S. RAWIDOWICZ 



Subject 
" Some English Dialects/' 

British Broadcasting Cor- 
poration. 

" Introductory lecture to Series 
on Language. " 

British Broadcasting Corpora- 
tion. 

" China and Japan/' 

Oxford. 

" Two Chinese Poets of the Eighth 
Century. " 

Japan Society, London. 
" Kanzan and Jittoku." 

Oxford. 



" Significance of Aashuraday in 

the history of Semitic Peoples." 

Three Nuni Hotel, Aldgate. 

" Evolution of Religion and its 

Last Phase." 

Sion College, Victoria Embank- 
ment. 

" Buddhist Art in Siam." 

Cambridge University Arts 
Society. 

" The Early days of Rabindranath 
Tagore." 
India House. 

" The East India Company 
* Interest ' and the English 
Government, 1783-84." 
Royal Historical Society. 

"The Philosophy of the ' Has- 
kalah ' ." 

Inter- University Jewish 

Federation, H arrogate. 
"The Institution of Shabbath." 

The Anglo-Palestinian Club, 

London. 

"The Philosophy of ' Hibbath 
Zion '." 

Week-End School F.Z.Y., 

London. 

" Fundamentals of Hebrew Cul- 
ture." 

" Berith Hanoar Haibri," 

London. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Lecturer 



MR. F. J. RICHARDS 



PROF. SIR E. DENISON Ross 



DR. W. SIMON 



Dr. MARGARET SMITH 



DR. W. STEDE 



Subject 
" The Maccabeans." 

" Beth Zion," London. 
11 The Development of Hebrew 
Literature." 

North London Zionist Society. 
" The Ideologies of ' Spiritual 
Centre ' and Diaspora." 

" Tarbuth," London. 
" H. N. Bialik." 

Worker's Circle Friendly 
Society, London. 

11 History of Modern Hebrew 
Literature." 

" Tarbuth," London. 
" India : Physics and Politics." 
Cambridge I.C.S. Pro- 
bationer's Club. 

" The Making of Modern Turkey." 
The Halton Society, R.A.F. 
Camp, Aylesbury. 

Course of lectures on " The Otto- 
man Empire." 

King's College. 

" The Making of Modern 
Turkey." 

The Royal Central Asian 
Society. 

" Some Travel Book of the Six- 
teenth and Seventeenth 
Century." 

English Society, University 
College. 

" Antonio Tenreiro et ses voyages 
en Iran et en Arabic au com- 
mencement du XVI e siecle." 
Muse'e Guimet Sous les 
auspices de la Socie'te des Etudes 
iraniennes. 

" Has the Chinese Language Parts 
of Speech ? " 

Philological Society. 
" Islam : its History and Teach- 
ing." 

Kennaway Hall, Stoke 
*Newington. 

" The Path of Salvation in Indian 
Wisdom " (four lectures). 
Leeds Lodge of the Theo- 
sophical Society. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Lecturer 



DR. J. STEELE 



PROF. A. J. TOYNBEE 
DR. A. N. TUCKER 

DR. I. C. WARD 
MR. I. WARTSKI 



Miss R. O. WINGATE 



Subject 

" The Inner Ruler Immortal/' 
Theosophical Society in Eng- 
land (Headquarters). 

"The Secret Lore of India." 
International Institute for 
Psychical Research. 

" Impermanence." 

Mahabodhi Society. 

" Religions of India." 

London. 

" The Chino-Japanese situation in 
the light of history." 

London. 

" The Great Sixth Century, B.C., 
in Greece, India, 'and China." 
London. 

" Peaceful Change." 

London School of Economics. 

" Music in the Southern Sudan." 
Women s Guild of Art, London, 
and at Conference of Nursery 
School Teachers, London. 

" Modern English Pronunciation " 
(two lectures). 

University of Berlin. 

" Stages in the Development of 
the Hebrew Language." 

Tarbuth Association. 
" The Teaching of Post-primary 
Hebrew " (ten lectures). 
Jewish Higher Education 
Centre. 

" Life in Central Asia." 

Brighton, Chichester, Reading. 



MR. J. ALLAN . 
MRS. E O. ASHTON 



PUBLICATIONS 

. " Catalogue of Coins of Ancient 
India in the British Museum " 
1936. 

. " The Structure of a Bantu 
Language with special reference 
to Swahili or Form and Function 
through Bantu Eyes." (B.S.O.S., 
vol. VIII, part 4). 



ANNUAL REPORT 



7 1 



MAJOR L. F. I. ATHILL 
DR. T. GRAHAME BAILEY 



DR. L. D. BARNETT . 



MR. S. K. BHUYAN 



DR. S. BIRNBAUM 
DR. C. O. BLAGDEN 

MR. R. T. BUTLIN 



Articles in the Spectator on 
Abyssinia, etc. 

" Pronunciation of Kashmiri." 
(Forlong Bequest) in the Press. 

" Note on the Discovery of a Carey 
First Edition (Hindi Gospels) 
in the Baptist Missionary 
Society Library, London." 
(J.R.A.S.) 

" Dhola-Marura Duha ; a Ballad 
from Rajputana : is the present 
conclusion original ?" (B.S.O.S.) 

Reviews inJ.R.A.S. and B.S.O.S. 

Article on " Om Mani Padme 
Hum " in B.S.O.S. 

" Assamese Literature : Ancient 
and Modern." (Government of 
Assam, Shillong, 1936.) 

" Bulletin No. Ill of the Depart- 
ment of Historical and Anti- 
quarian Studies, Assam." 
(Government of Assam De- 
partment of Historical and Anti- 
quarian Studies, 1936.) 

" Nawab Mir Jumla's Invasion of 
Assam, A.D. 1662-3 " m f ur 
parts. ('Avahan,' Calcutta, vols. 
VII and VIII, 1936-7.) 

" Baharistan-i-Ghaybi " Persian 
Chronicle, translated into English 
by M. Islam Borah, Ph.D. 
General editor S. K. Bhuyan. 
2 vols. (Government of Assam, 
Department of Historical and 
Antiquarian Studies, 1937.) 

" Judezmo " (Jiwobleter) Reviews. 

Reviews in B.S.O.S., J.R.A.S., 
and Man. 

Report of the Commission of 
Inquiry into the Uses of the 
Gramophone in Education, con- 
ducted under the auspices of 
trie British Institute of Adult 
Education : Language Section 
and General Conclusions. (In 
Press.) 



72 

DR. J. B. CHAUDHURI 



ANNUAL REPORT 



MR. Y. CHIANG 



MR. K. DE B. CODRINGTON 



DR. C. A. RHYS DAVIDS 



In various Bengali journals : 
Samskrta sahityera dui jana nari 

kavi : Vijja o Morika. 
Samskrta nari kavira cintara dhara. 
Samskrta sahityera nari kavi 

Alamelamma. 
Nari kavi Vikatanitamba o Sila 

Bhattarika. 
Samskrta nari Kavi Birabayira 

mate Ramaniya Darsana. 
Samskrta nari kavi Ramabai. 
Samskrta nari kavi Ramabhad- 

ramba o Raghimathamba. 
Nari kavyamrta [Selection from 

Sanskrit Verses by Women]. 

" Modern Chinese "Art." (The 

Studio, April, 1937.) 
" Chinese Calligraphy, its aesthetic 

and technique." (Methuen.) 
" A Chinese Silent Traveller in 

English Lakes." (Country Life.) 

11 The Use of Counter Irritants 
in the Deccan." (J.R.A.I., vol. 
LXVI.) 

" What is your Will ? " (Rider 
& Co.) 

" Erlosung in Indiens Vergangen- 
heit und in iinserer Gegen- 
wart." (Eranos Jahrbuch, 1935- 

36.) 

" Towards a History of the 
Skandha-Doctrine," I and II 
(Indian Culture, January and 
April, 1937). 

" The Supreme Spiritual Ideal : 
the Buddhist View." (Hibbert 
Journal, January, 1937.) 

" About the Going and the Goal." 
(The Aryan Path, March, 1937.) 

" An Inquiry into Buddhist Cata- 
loguing." (The Vi'sva-Bharati, 
II, 2, 1937.) 

"The Self: an Overlooked 
Buddhist Simile." (J.R.A.S.) 

" The Child of Promise." (Jaina 
Shri Atmanand Centenary Com- 
memoration Volume, 1937.) 



ANNUAL REPORT 



73 



REV. C. L. DESSOULAVY 
DR. E. D. EDWARDS . 



MR. J. R. FIRTH 



COL. H. L. O. GARRETT 



MR. M. M. GOMAA . 
DR. BETTY HEIMANN . 



" The History of a Symbol." 
(The London Quarterly and 
Holborn Review, July, 1937.) 

" The Problem in Early Buddhist 
Thought of * Making Become '." 
(Visva-Bharati) Tagore Birthday 
Number : 1937.) 

Reviews (B.S.O.S.). 

" Chinese Prose Literature of the 
T'ang Period (A.D. 618-906), 
vol. I. Miscellaneous Litera- 
ture." (Probsthain, 1937.) 

" The Structure of the Chinese 
Monosyllable in a Hunanese 
Dialect (Changsha)." (B.S.O.S., 
vol. VIII, part 4.) 

" The Tongues of Men." (Watts & 
Co., 1937.) 

" Events at the Court of Ranjit 
Singh." (Being an edited trans- 
lation of the papers in the 
Alienation Office, Bombay) in 
conjunction with Dr. E. L. 
CHOPRA. (Monograph No. 17 
Punjab Record Office Series.) 

"The Punjab 100 Years Ago." 
(Being an annotated translation 
of the journals of V. JACQUE- 
MONT 1831 and A. SOLTYKOFF 
1842). (Monograph No. 18 
Punjab Record Office Series.) 

" The Career of Sir Claude Wade." 
(Army Quarterly Review.) 

11 The Christian Monumental In- 
scription in the Punjab, Baluchi- 
stan, North- West Frontier Pro- 
vince and Sind, 1905-36." 

" Further Light on the Home of 
the Semites." (Bulletin of Dar 
el Ulum College, Cairo.) 

" Indian and Western Philosophy, 

a comparative Study." (Allen & 

Unwin.) 
" Dkmtung und Bedeutung indis- 

cher Terminologie." (Proceed. 

Intern. Congr. of Orientalists, 

Rome, 1935.) 



74 



DR. W. B. HENNING . 



ANNUAL REPORT 



MR. S. HILLELSON 



REV. DR. W. G. IVENS 



PROF. A. LLOYD JAMES 



PROF. SIR REGINALD JOHNSTON 



THE RT. REV. A. L. KITCHING 



MR. B. MATSUKAWA . 



Reviews in J.R.A.S. : Biblio- 
graphic Bouddhique, Paris. 

" Uber die Sprache der Chvarez- 

mier." (ZDMG, 90, 314.) 
" Ein manichaisches Bet und 

Beichtbuch." 
A list of Middle-Persian and 

Parthian words. (B.S.O.S., 

vol. IX, part i.) 

" Encyclopaedia of Islam." s.v. 

Nuba ; Sudan (Eastern). 
" The Source of a Story in the 

Mathnawi, and a Persian parallel 

to Grimm's Fairy Tales (ibid.)." 
" Religion in the Sudan." (" The 

Anglo-Egyptian Sudan from 

Within ".) 
Review in Man. 

" A grammar of the Language of 
Florida, Solomon Islands." 
(B.S.O.S.) 

" Joseph Wate, the first Mala 
Deacon." (Melanesian Mission.) 

Articles in Archiv fiir Sprach und 
Stimmelheilkune und augewandte 
Phonctik and The Listener. 
11 Basic Phonetic Reader." 
" Pronunciation of Foreign Place- 
names." 

Four Articles on : " A Visit to 
Manchuria," " The Political 
Situation in the Far East," 
" China and Japan," " Far 
Eastern Problems." (National 
Review.) 

Two Articles on " Great Britain 
and Japan." (National Review.) 

Review articles on Far Eastern 
affairs in The Journal of the 
Japan Society, J.R.A.S., Inter- 
national Affairs, Oriental Affairs, 
and B.S.O.S. 

" Two Folk Tales " (vernacular). 
(Longmans, Green & Co.) 

Translation into English of Lt.- 
Comdr. Tota Ishimaru's " The 



ANNUAL REPORT 



MR. V. MINORSKY 



MR. W. SUTTON PAGE 



MR. C. S. K. PATHY 



MR. C. H. PHILIPS 



DR. S. RAWIDOWICZ . 



75 

Next World War." (Hurst & 
Blackett, 1937.) 

" Hudud al-'Alam." (English 
Translation and Commentary 
in Gibb Memorial Series.) 

" Les etudes historiques et gco- 
graphiques sur la Perse, II." 
(Acta Orientalia.) 

" Une nouvelle source persane 
sur les Hongrois." (Nouv. Revue 
dc Hongrie.) 

" Mughan, Musha'shaV (Encyclo- 
pedia of Islam.) 

Reviews in B.S.O.S., Religions, 
Deutsche Liter aturzeitung. 

" The Story of Haris'candra as told 
in the Markandeya Purana." 
(Religions.) 

Reviews in J.R.A.S., B.S.O.S., 
Religions. 

" The Review of the Trade of 
India for 1936." (Fair play 
Annual.) 

" The East India Company ' Inter- 
est ' and the English Govern- 
ment, 1783-4." (Transactions : 
Royal Historical Society.) 

" M. Hess as a Philosopher." 
(The Future, New York, 1937.) 
" Mendelssohn's German Trans- 
lation of the Psalms." (Klausner 
Jubilee book, Tel-Aviv, 1937.) 
" The Philosopher of German 
Enlightenment." (The Future, 
New York, 1936-37.) 
" Johann Georg Hamann and Men- 
delssohn's ' Jerusalem V (Kam- 
inka Jubilee Book, Vienna, 1937.) 
" Jewish Philosophy " ; u Jews in 
Philosophy " ; " Plato " ; " Aris- 
totle " ; " Pantheism " ; 4< Neo- 
Platonism " ; " Free Will " ; 
" Creation " ; c< Spinoza " ; 

4< Kant." (Articles in Vallentine's 
Jewish Encyclopaedia, London, 

X 937-) 



ANNUAL REPORT 



MR. F. J. RICHARDS 



MR. C. A. RYLANDS 
DR. MARGARET SMITH 



DR. W. STEDE 



DR. J. A. STEWART 



"The Historian S. Dubnow." 
Jewish Chronicle, London, 1937.) 

" Palestine and the Diaspora." 
(Moznayim, Tel-Aviv, 1937.) 

" The Theory of ' Shutafuth '." 
(Jeudische Rundschau, Berlin 



MR. S. H. TAQIZADEH 



" Problems of Hebrew Culture." 
(Haolam, Jerusalem ; Barkai, 
Johannesburg; Baderech, Warsaw, 

I936-37-) 
" Diaszpora es Kultur Mozga- 

lom. J> (" Mult es Jovo, Buda- 
pest.") ^ 

Reviews in Kiryaih Sefer, Jeru- 
salem ; Jewish Chronicle y London. 

. " The Cultural Geography of My- 
sore." (Being Chapter II, vol. I, 
pp. 81-127 of The Mysore Tribes 
andCastes.) (The Mysore Univer- 
sity, Mysore.) 

. Reviews in B.S.O.S. and J.R.A.S. 

. " The Teaching of al-Ghazali on 
the Sufi Path." (The Sufi. 
October, 1936.) 

" The Pantheistic Monism of Ibn 
al-'Avab " (The Sufi, January, 

I 937-) 

Reviews in B.S.O.S., J.R.A.S., 
J.R.C.A.S. 

. Reviews in J.R.A.S., and in the 
Orientalistische Liter aturzeitung. 

. " Classified Burmese Vocabulary 

of 1,000 words." (S.O.S., Uni- 

versity of London, 1936.) 
" An Introduction to Colloquial 

Burmese." (British Burma Press, 

Rangoon, 1936.) 
" The Song of the Three Mons." 

(B.S.O.S.) 
Review of " Mon Inscriptions of 

Burma." by Dr. Blagden. 

(B.S.O.S.) 

. " A New contribution to the 
Materials concerning the life of 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PROF. A. J. TOYNBEE 

DR. A. S. TRITTON . 
DR. A. N. TUCKER . 

PROF. R. L. TURNER 

DR. H. G. QUARITCH WALES 



MR. J. WALKER 



DR. I. C. WARD 



77 

Zoroaster." (B.S.O.S., vol. VIII, 
part 4, 1937.) 

" Survey of International Affairs, 
1936." 2 vols. (Milford, 
London.) 

Reviews in B.S.O.S. and J.R.A.S. 

" Analysis of Livingstone's 
Sechuana Grammar." (Scottish 
National Memorial to David 
Livingstone.) 

" Some Conditions of Abnormal 
Soundchange." (Transactions of 
the Philological Society, 1937.) 

" The Exploration of Sri Deva, 
An Ancient Indian City in 
Indo-China." (Indian Art and 
Letters, vol. X, No. 2, Decem- 
ber, 1936.) , 

" Exploring Sri Deva." (Asia, 
October, 1936.) 

" Ancient India in Indo-China." 
(Discovery , December, 1936.) 

" Early Indian Art from the 
Siamese Jungle." (The Illustrated 
London News, 3Oth January, 



" History and Coinage of the 
Sultans of Kilwa." (Numismatic 
Chronicle, 1936.) 

" The Coinage of the Second 
Saffarid Dynasty in Sistan." 
(Numismatic Notes and Mono- 
graphs, No. 72," New York, 



" The Arabian Larin." (Islamic 
Culture, January, 1936.) 

" The Coinage of All Dinar of 
Darfur." (Sudan Notes and 
Records, 1936.) 

" The Use of the Vocal Mechanism 
in Some African Languages." 
(Speech, January, 1937.) 

" Practical Suggestions for Learn- 
ing an African Language in the 
Field." (Memorandum of the 
International African Institute, 
April, 1937.) 



78 ANNUAL REPORT 



Phonetic Phenomena in African 
Languages." (Archiv filr Ver- 
gleichcnde Phonetik, January, 



" Grammar and Tone in West 
African Languages. " (Pro- 
ceedings of the Philological Society, 

1936.) 
Reviews in Africa and B.S.O.S. 

MR. S. YOSHITAKE . . . " A New Classification of the 

Constituents of Spoken Japan- 
ese/' (B.S.O.S.) 



PART IV 



OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL 



HIS MAJESTY THE KING 



THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 



Chairman SIR HARCOURT BUTLER, G.C.S.L, G.C.I.E., D.C.L., 

D.Litt., D.L., ex officio. 

^Vice-Chairman SIR JOHN GUMMING, K.C.I.E., C.S.I., M.A. 
^Treasurer MR. DEPUTY J. H. WHITE. 
THE VICE-CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY OF LONDON (Sm 

ROBERT HOWSON PICKARD, F.R.S., D.Sc., Ph.D., F.I.C.), 

ex-officio. 
THE DIRECTOR OF THE SCHOOL (PROFESSOR R. L. TURNER, M.C., 

M.A., Litt.D.), ex-officio. 
4 THE OFFICER IN CHARGE OF THE LANGUAGE SUBSECTION OF THE 

DIRECTORATE OF MILITARY OPERATIONS AND INTELLIGENCE 

(MAJOR E. K. PAGE, M.C.). 
"FREDERICK ANDERSON, ESQ. 
I RNEST ALFRED BENIANS, ESQ., M.A. 

6 Sm WILLIAM BEVERIDGE, K.C.B., D.Sc., LL.D., M.A., B.C.L. 
8 SiR EDGAR BONHAM-CARTER, K.C.M.G., C.I.E. 
6 Sm ATUL CHANDRA CHATTERJEE, G.C.I.E., K.C.S.I. 

13 PROFESSOR H. H. DODWELL, M.A. 

13 Miss E. DORA EDWARDS, M.A., D.Lit. 
13 DR. S. G. VESEY FITZGERALD, M.A., LL.D. 

2 Sm STEPHEN GASELEE, K.C.M.G., C.B.E., Litt.D., M.A., F.S.A. 

3 Sm WILLIAM F. GOWERS, K.C.M.G., M.A. 
14 THE RT. HON. LORD HAILEY, G.C.S.L, G.C.I.E., M.A., D.Litt. 

!Sm PHILIP J. HARTOG, K.B.E., C.I.E., LL.D., M.A., B.Sc. 
12 A. C. HEARN, ESQ. 
^PROFESSOR A. LLOYD JAMES, M.A. 

14 THE RT. HON. LORD LUGARD, P.C., G.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O., 
D.C.L., LL.D. 

'SiR ARTHUR C. MCWATTERS, C.I.E., M.A. 

6 Sm ALLEN MAWER, Litt.D., M.A., F.B.A. 

See footnotes on page 80. 
79 



8o COMMITTEES AND BOARDS 

PROFESSOR THE RKV. A. C. MOULE, Litt.D. 

l SiR ALEXANDER R. MURRAY, K.C.I. E., C.B.E. 
^ARCHIBALD ROSE, ESQ., C.I.E., F.R.G.S. 

8 SiR RONALD STORRS, K.C.M.G., C.B.E., M.A. 
IO PROFESSOR F. W. THOMAS, M.A., Ph.D., F.B.A. 

? ALD. COL. THE RIGHT HON. VISCOUNT WAKEFIELD OF HYTHE, 
G.C.V.O., C.B.E., LL.D. 

9 Sm OLIVER WARDROP, K.B.E., C.M.G., M.A. 



THE FINANCE AND GENERAL PURPOSES COMMITTEE 

Ex-officio members : The Chairman of the Governing Body (SiR 

HARCOURT BUTLER), The V T ice-Chair man of the Governing Body (SiR 

JOHN CUMMING), The Treasurer (MR. DEPUTY J. II. WHITE), The 
Director (PROFESSOR R. L. TURNER). 

Appointed members : F. ANDERSON, ESQ., SIR EDGAR BONHAM- 
CARTER, SIR ATUL C. CHATTERJEE, PROFESSOR H. H. DODWELL, SIR 
WILLIAM GOWERS, SIR PHILIP J. HARTOG, PROFESSOR A. LLOYD 
JAMES, SIR ALLEN MAWER. 



THE ACADEMIC BOARD 

THE DIRECTOR (Chairman) ; MRS. E. O. ASHTON ; DR. T. GRAHAME 
BAILEY; REV. DR. G. P. BARGERY ; DR. L. D. BARNETT ; R. T. 
BUTLIN, ESQ. ; PROFESSOR II. H. DODWELL ; J. HEYWORTH-DUNNE, 
ESQ. ; DR. E. D. EDWARDS ; J. R. FIRTH, ESQ. ; DR. S. G. VESEY 
FITZGERALD ; Miss B. HONIKMAN ; COMMANDER N. E. ISEMONGER ; 
G. E. LEESON, ESQ. ; PROFESSOR A. LLOYD JAMES ; PROFESSOR V. 
MINORSKY ; W. SUTTON PAGE, ESQ. ; C. S. K. PATHY, ESQ. ; C. H. 
PHILIPS, ESQ. ; DR. M. D. RATNASURIYA ; C. A. RYLANDS, ESQ. ; 
DR. W. STEDE ; DR. J. A. STEWART ; DR. A. S. TRITTON ; DR. A. N. 
TUCKER ; DR. I. C. WARD ; I. WARTSKI, ESQ. ; SIR RICHARD O. 

WlNSTEDT ; S. YOSHITAKE, ESQ. 



THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

F. ANDERSON, ESQ. (Chairman) ; THE DIRECTOR AND LIBRARIAN 
(PROFESSOR R. L. TURNER) ; DR. T. GRAHAME BAILEY ; DR. L. D. 
BARNETT ; SIR JOHN CUMMING ; PROFESSOR H. H. DODWELL ; DR. 
E. D. EDWARDS ; PROFESSOR A. LLOYD JAMES ; PROFESSOR V. 
MINORSKY ; W. SUTTON PAGE, ESQ. ; DR. J. A. STEWART ; DR. A. S. 
TRITTON ; DR. I. C. WARD. 



Appointed by the Crown. 10 Appointed by the British Academy 

Appointed by the Secretary of State for Foreign " Appointed by the London Chamber of 
Affairs. Commerce. 

Appointed bv the Secretary of State for the Colonies. " Co-opted by the Governing Body with 
Appointed by the Secretary of State foi War. special regard to the interests of 

Appointed by the Secretary of State for India. commerce. 

Appointed by the Senate of the University ol London. lf Appointed by the Academic Board of 
Appointed by the Corporation of the City of London. the School. 

Appointed by the Ixnidon County Council. 14 Co-opted bv the Governing Body for 
Appointed by the Royal Asiatic Society. special reasons. 



COMMITTEES AND BOARDS 8 1 

THE HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS COMMITTEE 

THE DIRECTOR (Chairman) ; DR. T. GRAHAME BAILEY ; PROFESSOR 
H. H. DODWELL ; DR. E. D. EDWARDS ; PROFESSOR A. LLOYD JAMES ; 
W. SUTTON PAGE, ESQ. ; DR. A. S. TRITTON ; DR. I. C. WARD. 



THE EXAMINATIONS BOARD 

DR. E. D. EDWARDS (Chairman) ; THE DIRECTOR ; THE CHAIRMAN 
OF THE MODERN LANGUAGE TEACHING COMMITTEE (PROFESSOR A. 
LLOYD JAMES) ; C. A. RYLANDS, ESQ. ; DR. A. S. TRITTON ; DR. A. N. 
TUCKER ; SIR RICHARD O. WINSTEDT. 



THE FORLONG AND SCHOLARSHIPS COMMITTEE 

PROFESSOR H. H. DODWELL (Chairman) ; THE DIRECTOR ; DR. E. D. 
EDWARDS ; DR. A. S. TRITTON ; DR. I. C. WARD ; SIR RICHARD O. 
WINSTEDT. 



THE I.C.S. PROBATIONERS COMMITTEE 

THE SUPERVISOR OF I.C.S. PROBATIONERS (DR. S. G. VESEY FITZ- 
GERALD) (Chairman) ; THE DIRECTOR ; G. H. G. ANDERSON, ESQ. 
(Nominated by the Secretary of State for India) ; PROFESSOR H. H. 
DODWELL ; PROFESSOR A. LLOYD JAMES ; W. SUTTON PAGE, ESQ. ; 
DR. J. A. STEWART. 



THE TEXTBOOK COMMITTEE 

W. SUTTON PAGE, ESQ. (Chairman), THE DIRECTOR, PROFESSOR 
A. LLOYD JAMES ; DR. I. C. WARD. 



THE MODERN LANGUAGE TEACHING COMMITTEE 

PROFESSOR A. LLOYD JAMES (Chairman), THE DIRECTOR, R. T. 
BUTLIN, ESQ. ; DR. E. D. EDWARDS ; J. HEYWORTH- DUNNE, ESQ. ; 
W. SUTTON PAGE, ESQ. ; DR. J. A. STEWART ; DR. I. C. WARD ; 
S. YOSHITAKE, ESQ. 



THE CAMBRIDGE LOCAL EXAMINATIONS COMMITTEE 

W. SUTTON PAGE, ESQ. (Chairman) ; THE DIRECTOR ; DR. T. 
GRAHAME BAILEY ; DR. E. D. EDWARDS ; PROFESSOR V. MINORSKY ; 
J. O. ROACH, ESQ. (Nominated by the University of Cambridge Local 
Examinations Syndicate) ; C. A. RYLANDS, ESQ. ; SIR RICHARD 
O. WINSTEDT. 



82 TEACHING STAFF 

STAFF OF THE SCHOOL 

Director 

1235678 iop ro fe S sor R. L. TURNER, M.C., M.A., Litt.D. (Cantab.). 

i. Department of the Languages and Cultures of India, 
Burma and Ceylon (Two Departments) 

(a) 

2 3 W. SUTTON PAGE, O.B.E., B.A., B.D. (St. And.). 
Reader in Bengali in the University of London. Head 
of Department (a). 

GROUP I ANCIENT INDIA 

1235678 io R L TURNER, M.C., M.A., Litt.D. (Cantab.). Late 
Fellow of Christ's College Cambridge. Professor of 
Sanskrit in the University of London. 

2 3 9 C. A. RYLANDS, M.A. (Cantab.). Senior Lecturer in 
Sanskrit. 

2 3 9 W. STEDE, Ph.D. (Leipzig). Senior Lecturer in Sanskrit 
and Pali. 

2 3 G 9 12 i5 L D BARNETT, C.B., M.A. (Cantab.), Litt.D. (Viet.). 
Senior Lecturer in Indian History and Sanskrit. 

9 BETTY HEIMANN, Ph.D. (Halle). Lecturer in Sanskrit 
and Indian Philosophy. 

2 M. D. RATNASURIYA, Ph.D. Lecturer in Sinhalese, 
Epigraphy, and Indian History. 

K. DE B. CODRINGTON, M.A. Hon. Lecturer in Indian 
Arts and Crafts. 

9 F. J. RICHARDS, M.A. (Oxon.), LC.S. (Retired). Hon. 
Lecturer in Indian Archaeology. 

Panel of Additional Lecturers 

CAROLINE A. RHYS DAVIDS, M.A., D.Lit. Buddhist 
History and Literature. 
J. ALLAN, M.A. (Edin.), F.S.A. Indian Palaeography 



See footnotes on page 87. 



TEACHING STAFF 83 

GROUP 2 BURMESE, ETC. 

2 3 9 J. A. STEWART, C.I.E., M.C., M.A., LL.D. (Aber.), 
I.C.S. (Retired). Senior Lecturer in Burmese. 

Panel of Additional Lecturers 
C. W. DUNN, C.I.E., M.A. (Cantab.). Burmese. 
G. C. TEW, B.A. (Cantab.). Burmese. 
C. O. BLAGDEN, M.A., D.Litt. Old and Mediaeval 
Mon. 
CAPT. H. J. INMAN. Shan. 

GROUP 3 DRAVIDIAN 

2 C. S. K. PATHY, M.A. (Edin.), D-es-L. (Montpellier). 
Lecturer in Tamil and Telugu. 

Panel of Additional Lecturers 
,T. N. MENON, B.A. (Madras). Malayalam. 

GROUP 4 MARATHI, ETC. 

S. G. KANIIERE. Lecturer in Marathi and Gujarati. 
A. MASTER, C.I.E., B.A. (Oxon.). Lecturer in Marathi. 

Panel of Additional Lecturers 
]. F. B. HARTSHORNE, B.A. (Oxon.). Gujarati. 

GROUP 5 BENGALI, ETC. 

2 3 W. SUTTON PAGE, O.B.E., B.A., B.D. (St. And.). 
Reader in Bengali in the University of London. 
2 M. D. RATNASURIYA, Ph.D. Lecturer in Sinhalese, 
Epigraphy, and Indian History. 

Panel of Additional Lecturers 
S. K. BHUYAN, M.A. (Calcutta). Assamese. 
Lt.-Col. P. R. T. GURDON, C.S.I. Assamese and Khasi. 
J. B. CHAUDHURI, Ph.D. Bengali. 
GERTRUDE M. SUMMERS. Bengali. 
Rev. H. W. PIKE, B.A., B.D. Oriya. 
Rev. G. S. WILKINS. Oriya. 

(b) 

GROUP 6 HINDUSTANI, ETC. 

2 3 6 T. GRAHAME BAILEY, M.A., B.D., D.Litt. (Edin.). 
Reader in Hindustani (Urdu and Hindi) in the Uni- 
versity of London. Head of Department (b). 
2 G. E. LEESON. Lecturer in Hindustani. 

Panel of Additional Lecturers 
S. G. A. BOKHARY . . Pashto. 

I. KAZI .... Sindhi. 

See footnotes on page 87 



84 TEACHING STAFF 

2. Department of the Languages and Cultures of the Far East 

1 2 3 6 E. DORA EDWARDS, M.A., D.Lit. Reader in Chinese in 

the University of London. Acting Head of Department. 

W. SIMON, Ph.D. (Berlin). Lecturer in Chinese, 

Japanese, Tibetan, and Manchu. 
Y. CHIANG. Assistant Lecturer in Chinese. 
2 Commander N. E. ISEMONGER, R.N. (Retd.) Senior 

Lecturer in Japanese. 

2 9 S. YOSHITAKE. Senior Lecturer in Japanese and Mon- 
golian. 

239 Sm RICHARD O. WINSTEDT, K.B.E., C.M.G., M.A. 
(Oxon.), D.Litt. (Oxon.). Senior Lecturer in Malay. 

Panel of Additional Lecturers 

JANET BALMER. Chinese (Hakka). 
MARGARET MARION DUNCAN-WHYTE. Chinese (Swatow). 
ROSA M. ELWIN. Chinese (Ningpo and Shanghai). 
REV. P. J. MACLAGAN, M.A., D.Phil., D.D. (Edin.). 
Chinese (Swatow). 

REV. JOHN S'TEELE, M.A., D.Lit. Chinese (Swatow). 
CECEL MARY WINN. Chinese, Modern. 
A. E. WOOD, M.A. (Oxon.). Cantonese. 

A. D. WALEY, B.A. Chinese Poetry. 

B. MATSUKAWA. Japanese. 
G. MERE. Japanese. 

C. O. BLAGDEN, M.A., D.Litt. Malay. 
G. N. OWEN. Malay. 

REV. A. CAPELL, M.A. (Sydney). Polynesian, Melanesian, 
Micronesian, and Papuan Languages. 

REV. W. G. IVENS, M.A., D.Litt. (N.Z.), Litt.D. 
(Melbourne), F. R.A.I. Melanesian Languages. 

REGINALD LE MAY. Siamese. 

J. MICIIELL. Siamese. 

H. G. QUARITCH-WALES, M.A. (Cantab.), Ph.D., Siamese. 

H. LEE SHUTTLEWORTH, M.A. (Oxon.). Tibetan, spoken 
language. 

3. Department of the Languages and Cultures of the Near 
and Middle East 

2 3 A. S. TRITTON, M.A., D.Litt. (Edin.). Reader in Arabic 
in the University of London. Temporary Head of 
Department. 

2 9 J. HEYWORTH-DUNNE, B.A. Lecturer in Arabic. 
SHAYKH M. M. GOMAA, B.A. Lecturer in Arabic. 
KADRY ZAFIR, Hnn. M.A. (Cantab.). Lecturer in Arabic. 
2 3 4y MINORSKY. Professor of Persian in the University 
of London. 

See footnotes on page 87. 



TEACHING STAFF 85 

9 G. H. DARAB KHAN, M.A. Lecturer in Persian. 
SAYYID HASAN TAQIZADEH. Lecturer in Persian. 
ALI RIZA BEY. Lecturer in Turkish. 
S. TOP ALI AN. Lecturer in Armenian and Turkish. 
W. B. H. HENNING. D.Phii. (Gottingen). The Parsee 

Community's Lecturer in Iranian Studies. 
2 I. WARTSKI, B.A. Senior Lecturer in Modern Hebrew 
(Ahad Ha'am Lecturer). 

S. BIRNBAUM, D.Phil. (Wiirzburg). Research Lecturer 
in Hebrew Palaeography. 

Panel of Additional Lecturers 

MAJOR L. F. I. ATHILL. Amharic. 
B. G. HEROUY. Amharic, Ethiopic, and Galla. 
LT.-COL. C. F. KEY, C.M.G. Amharic. 
JOHN WALKER, M.A. (Glas.). Arabic and Arabic 

Epigraphy. 

S. HILLELSON. Sudanese Arabic. 
MARGARET SMITH, M.A. (Cantab.), Ph.D., D.Lit. 

Syrian Arabic. 
A. GUGUSIIVILI. Georgian. 

S. RAWIDOWICZ, Ph.D. (Berlin). Hebrew Philosophy. 
REV. C. L. DESSOULAVY. Maltese. 
RACHEL WINGATE, M.A. (Cantab.). Turki. 

-Department of the Languages and Cultures of Africa 

239ioj DA c. WARD, B.Litt. (Durham), D.Lit. Nigerian 
Dialects. (With African Assistants.) Acting Head of the 
Department. 

2 ETHEL O. ASHTON. Lecturer in Swahili. 
2 3 9 Rev. G. P. BARGERY, D.Lit. Senior Lecturer in Hausa. 
2 9 IOA. N. TUCKER, M.A. (Cape Town), Ph.D. Comparative 

Bantu and Sudan Languages. 

BEATRICE HONIKMAN, M.A. (Cape Town). Southern 
Bantu dialects. (With African Assistants.) 

Panel of Additional Lecturers 

The Rt. Rev. A. L. KITCHING, M.A. (Cantab.). Acholi. 
G. W. B. HUNTINGFORD. Central African Languages. 
EDITH A. How. ChiNyanja. 
Major HANNS VISCHER, C.M.G., C.B.E. Hausa. 
L. S. B. LEAKEY, M.A., Ph.D. (Cantab.). KiKuyu. 
The Yen. Archdeacon E. S. DANIELL, M.A., O.B.E. 

LuGanda. 

H. de C. STEVENS- GUILLS, M.A. (Oxon.). Sesuto. 
N. A. FADIPE, M.A., B.Sc. Yoruba. 



See footnotes on page 87. 



86 TEACHING STAFF 

5. Department of Phonetics and Linguistics 

1236 14^ LLOYD JAMES, M.A. (Cantab.). Professor of Phonetics 

in the University of London. Head of Department. 
2 9 R. T. BUTLIN, B.A. Senior Lecturer in Phonetics. 
2 3 9 J. R. FIRTH, M.A. (Leeds). Senior Lecturer in Linguistics 
(on leave of absence in India). 

Research into African Languages: 

2 39 IOJ DA c. WARD, B.Litt. (Durham), D.Lit. Senior Lecturer 

in Phonetics and Linguistics. 
2 9 10 A. N. TUCKER, M.A. (Cape Town), Ph.D. Senior 

Lecturer in African Phonetics and Linguistics. 
2 BEATRICE HONIKMAN, M.A. (Cape Town). Assistant 
Lecturer in Phonetics. 

6. Department of Oriental History and Law 

1 2 3 4 H. H. DODWELL, M.A. (Oxon.). Professor of History 

and Culture of British Dominions in Asia, with special 

reference to India, in the University of London. Head 

of Department. 

2 C. H. PHILIPS, M.A. (Liverpool). Assistant Lecturer in 

Indian History. 
2369i2i5 L D BARNETT, C.B., M.A. (Cantab.), Litt.D. (Viet.). 

Senior Lecturer in Indian History and Sanskrit. 
2 M. D. RATNASURIYA, Ph.D. Lecturer in Sinhalese, 

Epigraphy, and Indian History. 

2 39 C. A. RYLANDS, M.A. (Cantab.). Early History of India. 
2 3 4 V. MINORSKY. History of Persia. 

1 29 13 S. G. VESEY FITZGERALD, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D. Senior 
Lecturer in Indian Law. Supervisor of Indian Civil 
Service Probationers. 

Panel of Additional Lecturers 

A. MACGREGOR, M.A. (Edin.). Burmese Buddhist Law. 
Col. H. L. O. GARRETT, M.A. (Cantab.). Indian History. 
E. G. HART, D.S.O., M.A. Indian History. 
4 Sir E. DENISON Ross, C.I.E., D.Lit., Ph.D. (Strass.). 

Islamic Studies. 

Professor A. J. TOYNBEE, B.A. (Oxon.). History of the 
Near East. 

Instruction in other languages and subjects can sometimes be arranged 

if required. 



See footnotes on page 87. 



Director 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF: LIBRARY STAFF 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



Secretary . 

Accountant 

Registrar . 

Clerks : 
Principal 
ist Division 
2nd Division 
yd Division 



Professor R. L. TURNER, M.C., M.A., Litt.D. 

(Cantab.). 

G. W. ROSSETTI, M.A. (Cantab.). 
EFFIE A. BUCK. 
MARJORIE A. E. BEAVIS. 

NANCY W. ANGUS. 
GLADYS M. HOFFERT. 
RUBY F. LEETE. 
ESTELLE H. MEYLER. 



Librarian 

Sub-Librarian . 

Assistant Librarian 

Assistants : 
ist Division 
2nd Division 

Technical Assistant 



LIBRARY STAFF 

Professor R. L. TURNER, M.C., M.A., Litt.D. 
(Cantab.). 

OCTAVIA MURRAY BROWNE. 
EDITH M. WHITE. 

FRANCES HOLT. 
MARY FLETCHER. 
ETHEL M. GREIGGS. 



1 Member of the Governing Body. 

^Member of the Academic Board. 

'Member of the Board of Studies in Oriental Languages and Literatures. 

4 Member of the Board of Studies in History. 

5 Member of the Board of Slavonic Studies. 

^Member of the Board of Studies in Comparative Philology. 

'Member of the Board of the Faculty of Arts. 

8 Chairman of the Board of Studies in Oriental Languages and Literatures. 

Recognized Teacher of the University. 
"Member of the Board of Studies in Anthropology. 
"Member of the Board of Studies in EconorAics and Political Science. 
12 Member of the Board of Studies in Archaeology. 
13 Member of the Board of Studies in Laws. 
14 Member of the Board of Studies in Education. 
15 Member of the Board of Studies in Palaeography. 



PART V 



ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 



1. No student will be admitted to the School who has not attained 
the age of 16 years. 

2. Application for admission to the School should be made on 
a special form to be obtained at the School. The form provides for 
a declaration by the student that he will conform to the prescribed 
rules and regulations (p. 235). Applications for admission from 
Indian students must in all cases be made through the High Com- 
missioner for India. 

3. It is important that candidates for University degrees or for 
the Civil Service Examinations should apply for admission before the 
beginning of the First Term. They will be interviewed by Heads 
of Departments and Lecturers on the day before the beginning of term. 

4. It is desirable that other students also should attend from the 
beginning of a session or at least of a term ; but, for those who cannot, 
special arrangements can sometimes be made. 

5. On receiving a Form of Application for admission duly com- 
pleted and signed, the Registrar will issue two cards to the student, 
which must be presented to the Head of the Department in which the 
student intends to study. These cards, after being completed by the 
Head of Department, will be returned to the Accountant and the 
Registrar, the former of whom will collect from the student the fees 
payable. No student will be allowed to begin his course of study until 
his fees have been paid. 



CANDIDATES FOR UNIVERSITY DEGREES 

6. Before a student can be registered as a candidate for a First 
Degree (Internal) of the University of London, he must either have 
passed the London Matriculation Examination or have obtained exemp- 
tion from it. Under the University regulations, however, a student 
may enter upon a degree course at the opening of a session before he 
has matriculr ted, and provided that he becomes a matriculated student 



ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 89 

not later than the following January may have his registration ante- 
dated to the beginning of that session. Further information as to 
matriculation requirements may be obtained from the Secretary of 
the Matriculation and Schools Examination Council, University of 
London, W.C. i. (See also p. 139.) 

7. Students desiring to follow a course for a higher degree (e.g. 
M.A., Ph.D.) must produce evidence of their graduation at an approved 
University, with a degree implying study up to the standard of a 
first degree in the faculty in which they wish to proceed. (See pp. 
180-202.) 

8. In order to avoid disappointment, students desiring to come 
to London from abroad to work for a higher degree, should give notice 
of their desire and supply full particulars of their qualifications 
at least five months in advance. 



PART VI-FEES 



i. SCHOOL FEES 

All fees are payable in advance. Cheques should be made 
payable to "the School of Oriental Studies", and crossed 
" Westminster Bank, Ltd." 

(A) Regular Courses : 

Hours 

per week. Terminal Fee. Sessional Fee. 

i 4 45. od. 10 i or. od. 

* 5 5*- od - 2*3 & 6d - 

3 6 6s. od. 15 15$. od. 

4 7 7 s - od - ** 7 s - 6d - 

5 8 8s. od. 21 os. od. 

6 9 9$. od. 23 125. 6d. 

7 10 los. od. 26 55. od. 

8 11 H5. od. 28 175. 6d. 

An additional fee of one guinea per term, or two and a half guineas 
per session, is payable for every additional hour per week attended. 

Persons who are not following Regular Courses of study at the 
School will be permitted to attend certain courses in History and 
Religions at the rate of one guinea for a course of five hours or less 
and of two guineas for a course of six to ten hours. 

(B) Special and Vacation Courses : 

(a) Individual. 

During term . . .105. 6d. per hour 

During vacation. . . 125. 6d. ,, ,, 

(b) Classes (Term and Vacation.) Special classes for groups 
of students can sometimes be arranged, for which special 
fees will be charged. Application should be made in the 
first instance to the Secretary. 

(c) First Degrees : 

B.A. (Intermediate, Pass or Honours). 
Per Session, 34 135. 

(D) Higher Degrees : 

M.A. (a) For Honours graduates of the School. 

Per Session, 15 155. 
(b) For other students. 
Per Session, 21. 

90 



FEES 91 

Ph.D. 1 (a) For Honours graduates of the School. 

Per Session, 15 15$. 
(b) For other students. 
Per Session, 21. 

(E) Certificate Courses : 

First or Second Year Certificates. 

Per Session, 26 55. 

(F) Diploma Course : 

Per Session, 34 13$. 

(G) Inter-collegiate Courses : 

Subject to arrangement. 

(H) Civil Service Open Examination : 
Per Session, 52 los. 

(i) Indian Civil Service Probationers : 

For, all instruction required for the compulsory and optional 
subjects 

Per Session, 42. 
Per Term, 14 los. 
(j) Diploma Examination Fee : 

s s*. . . . 

Re-examination in the subsidiary subject only, i is. 

(K) Certificate Examination Fees : 

ist and 2nd Year Certificates : 

For students who have attended a regular course of study at 
the School, and approved by the Head of the Department, 

i " 

For other students approved by the Academic Board, 

2 2s. 
An extra fee of i is. will be charged for an examination held 

at a special time. 

(L) Research Fee : 

5 5 s - P er Session. 
(M) Library : 

(a) Students of the School are entitled to the use of the 

Library without the payment of any additional fee ; 
and to the loan of books not exceeding three in number 
at any one time, subject to the deposit of i. 

(b) Other persons may use the Library for the purpose of 

reference, and may borrow books not exceeding three 
in number at any one time on payment of a fee of i is. 
per annum ; they may also be allowed, subject to the 
discretion of the Director, to make occasional use of 
the Library, for the purpose of reference only, without 
payment of a fee. 

1 " In the case of part-time students for whom, by reason of their being 
engaged in other work, a longer course than two years is prescribed by the 
University, the total amount payable is (a) 31 10$., or (b) 



92 FEES 

(c) Gramophone records of languages, contained in the 
Library, can be borrowed on payment of a deposit 
of 1 and a fee of los. per Term, or i2s. 6d. with 
Book of Instructions. Application should be made to 
the Sub-Librarian. 

(N) Gramophone Record Library : 

Certain records in the Gramophone Record Library in the Depart- 
ment of Phonetics and Linguistics may be borrowed by students after 
permission has been obtained from Professor Lloyd James, Head of 
the Department. The fees payable for the use of records in the 
Library, which may not be in any circumstances taken out of the 
School building, are as follows : 
i is. per Session, 
i os. 6d. per term. 

(o) Gramophone Recording : 

(1) No fees are payable by staff or students for records made in 
connection with the following purposes : 

(a) Records made for the School Gramophone Record 
Library. 

(b) Records made by a member of the School staff or by 
students for use in connection with the work of a class. 

(2) Records made by staff or students for private work in connec- 
tion with Oriental and African Languages, i.e. for work which is not 
specifically part of the work of a class : 

Single-sided ic-inch, zs. 6d. ; double-sided io-inch., $s. 

(3) Records made by members of the staff or students of material 
not connected with the work of the School : 

Single-sided io-inch, los. 6d. ; double-sided io-inch, i is. 

(4) Special arrangements can occasionally be made for the record- 
ing of language material and making copies of records. Special 
fees will be charged for such work and application should be made 
in the first instance to the Secretary. 

No records will be made under sections (2), (3), and (4) above except 
with the consent of the Department of Phonetics and Linguistics. 



2. UNIVERSITY FEES 

Matriculation : 

Matriculation Examination . . 2 125. 6d. 

Additional fee of 2 2s. for each Oriental or African 
language taken. 

Students exempted on passing Special Entrance Examination : 
Registration fee . . . -33*- 

First Degrees : 

Intermediate examination . . 6 6s. 

\dditional fee of 5 5$. for each Oriental language taken. 



FEES 93 

Part of Intermediate Examination . i is. per paper. 
With a maximum fee of 6 6$. 

B.A. (Pass or Honours) Examination . 6 6s. 

Additional fee of 5 55. for an Oriental subject (other 
than Hebrew and Aramaic). 

Fee for registration as an Advanced Student in the case of 
a graduate of another University who is exempted from 
the whole of the Intermediate Examination, 5 5$. 



Higher Degrees : 

M.A. Examination . . . . 10 IQS. 

Additional fee of 5 55. for an Oriental subject. 
Ph.D. Examination .... 21 
D.Lit. Examination . . . 21 

Fee for registration of a Post-graduate Student who is not 
a graduate of the University, 5 5$. 

Fee for special qualifying examination, 5 55. 

Fee for qualifying examination which is part of a final exam- 
ination, i is. per paper ; with a maximum fee of ^6 6s. 



PART VII 



DATES 



THE SCHOOL TERMS. 

1937-38 
FIRST TERM Thursday, yth October, to Thursday, i6th December, 

1937- 

SECOND TERM Tuesday, nth January, to Tuesday, 22nd March, 1938. 
THIRD TERM Tuesday, 26th April, to Tuesday, 28th June, 1938. 

1938-39 
FIRST TERM Thursday, 6thOctober, to Thursday, 1 5th December, 1938. 

Students should attend the School during the morning of the day 
preceding the first day of each term to consult the Head of the Depart 
ment in which they are studying. 

THE UNIVERSITY TERMS 

I 937-38 
MICHAELMAS TERM Thursday, yth October, to Thursday, i6th 

December, 1937. 

LENT TERM Tuesday, nth January, to Tuesday, 22nd March, 1938. 
SUMMER TERM Tuesday, 26th April, to Tuesday, 28th June, 1938. 

1938-39 

MICHAELMAS TERM Thursday, 6th October, to Thursday, i5th 
December, 1938. 

DATES OF EXAMINATION AND DATES OF ENTRY 
UNIVERSITY EXAMINATIONS 

(Internal Students) 
Intermediate : 

Entry closes : zyth April, 1938. 
Examination begins : 4th July, 1938. 
B.A. Final (General and Honours) * : 
Entry closes : yth March, 1938. 
Examination begins : I3th June, 1938. 

SCHOOL EXAMINATIONS 
First and Second Year Certificates : 

Entry closes : 2nd May, 1938. 
Examination begins : I3th June, 1938. 
Diploma : 

Entry closes : 2nd May, 1938. 
Examination begins : I3th June, 1938. 

Other Diploma examinations may be fixed for any date 
during term eight weeks (reckoned only in weeks 
of term time) after the first application of the candidate 
for permission to enter. The fee (p. 91) must be 
paid as soon as the application has been approved. 

1 Except the B.A. Hons. Examination in History, for which see detailed 
Regulations ..o be obtained from the Academic Registrar of the University. 

94 



ALMANAC 1937-1938 



OCTOBER, 1937 


i 


F 


Entry closes for B.A. General Exam. External Students 
Matriculation Pass Lists published. 


2 


S 




3 


& 




4 


M 




5 


T 




6 


W 


Time Tables arranged 10.30. 
Heads of Departments 2.15. 


7 


Th 


First Term begins. 


8 


F 




9 


S 







10 


& 




ii 

12 


M 


Academic Council 4.30. 


T 


Convocation 5.30. 


13 


W 




M 


Tli 


Royal Asiatic Society. 


15 


F 


Last day for submitting titles of M.A. Theses (May Exam.). 
Board of Studies in History. 


16 


S 




17 


S 


Entry closes for Inter Arts Exam. External Students. 


18 


M 




19 


T 




20 


W 


Senate 4.30. 


21 


Th 


Academic Board 2.15. 
Board of Studies in Oriental Languages and 
Literatures 4.30. 


22 


F 




23 


S 




2 4 







25 


M 


Academic Council 4.30. 


26 


T 




27 


W 


Lecture by Professor Doi 4.30. 


28 


Th 


Library Committee 2.30. 

Board of Faculty of Arts 4.0. 
Last day for applying for entry forms for Special Univer- 
sity Entrance Exam. 


29 


F 




30 


S 




31 * 
As the dates 
revision, 


of Examinations and Entries thereto are subject 
reference should be made to the Regulations. 


to 



95 



9 6 



ALMANAC 



i M 


NOVEMBER, 1937 

Last day for presenting M.A. theses (December Exam.). 
B.A. (Gen.) Examinations begin External Students. 


2 T i 


3 ! W 


Finance and General Purposes Committee n.o. 


4 Th 


Heads of Departments Committee 2.15. 
Forlong and Scholarships Committee 3.30. 

Last day of entry for Special University Entrance Exam. 


5 F 




6 


S 


Last day for submitting names of Intermediate candidates 
taking Classical Oriental Languages. 


7 


S 




8 


M 


Academic Council 4.30. 


9 


T 




10 


\V 


Lecture by Professor Doi 4.30. 


ii 


Th 


Board of Faculty of Arts 4.0. 
Royal Asiatic Society. 


12 


F 


Board of Studies in History. 


13 


S 


M 


$ 


15 


M 


University Library Committee 4.30. 


16 


T ! 


i? 


W 


Governing Body n.o. 

Senate 4.30. 


18 


Th ! 


Academic Board 2.15. 

Celebration of Foundation Day. 


19 
20 


F 


S 


21 





22 


M j 


Academic Council 4.30. 


23 


T i 


^4 


w 1 


Lecture by Professor Doi 4.30. 


25 Th 

i 


Board of Studies in Oriental Languages and 
Literatures 4.30. 

Last day for applying for entry forms for Matric. Exam. 


26 F | 


27 i S i 


28 


j ; Foundation Day. 


29 


M i 


30 
As th 

i 


T ! 

e dptes of Examinations and Entries thereto are subject to 
revision, reference should be made to the Regulations. 



ALMANAC 



97 







DECEMBER, 1937 


I 


W 


Finance and General Purposes Committee n.o. 

Entry closes for Matriculation Examination. 


2 


Th 


Special University Entrance Exam, begins. 


3 


F 




4 


S 




5 


* 




6 


M 


Academic Council 4.30. 
M.A. Examination begins Internal Students. 


7 


T 


Special University Entrance Exam. Pass Lists published. 


8 


W 




9 


Th 


Board of Faculty of Arts 4.0. 
Royal Asiatic Society. 


10 


F 


Board of Studies in History. 


ii 


S 




12 







13 


M 




14 


T 




15 


W 


Governing Body n.o. 

Senate 4.30. 


16 


Th 


I.C.S. Probationers' Committee 2.15. 
First Term ends. 


J 7 


F 




18 


S 




IQ 







20 


M 




21 


T 




22 


W 




23 


Th 




24 


F 




25 


S 


Christmas Day. 


26 


* 




27 


M 


Boxing Day. 


28 


T 




29 


W 




30 


Th 


-\ 


31 


F 




As th 


e dates 
revision, 


of Examinations and Entries thereto are subject to 
reference should be made to the Regulations. 



ALMANAC 



I 


S 


JANUARY, 1938 


2 


5 




3 


M 




4 


T 




5 


W 




6 


Th 




7 


F 




8 


S 




9 





10 
ii 


]VI Time Tables arranged 10.30. 
Heads of Departments 2.15. 


T 


2nd Term begins. 

Matriculation Examination begins. 


12 


W 




13 


Th 


Royal Asiatic Society. 
Last date for giving notice regarding Oriental subjects at 
B.A. (Gen. and Hons.) Examination. 


14 F 




15 


S 




16 g 




17 M 


Academic Council 4.30. 


18 


T 


Convocation 5.30. 


19 ! \v 




20 


Th 


Academic Board 2.15. 

Board of Faculty of Arts 4.0. 


21 | F 


Board of Studies in History. 


22 $ 




23 i 




24 


M 




25 


T 




26 


W 


Senate 4.30. 


27 


Th 




28 


F 




29 


S 




30 


* 




As th 


M Academic Council 4.30 

ie dates of Examinations and Entries thereto are subject to 
revision, reference should be made to the Regulations. 



ALMANAC 



99 







FEBRUARY, 1938 


I 


T 


First day for submitting Inter., B.A. Gen., and B.A. Hons. 
Exams, entry forms (see yth March and i7th April). 


2 


W 


Finance and General Purposes Committee n.o. 


3 


Th 


Heads of Departments 2.15. 
Board of Studies in Oriental Languages and 
Literatures 4.30. 

Last day for applying for entry forms for Special Univer- 
sity Entrance Exam. 


4 


F 




5 


S 




6 


8 




7 


M 




Last day of late registration B.A. (Gen. and Hons.) 
Examination External Students. 


8 


T 




9 


W 




10 


Th 


Royal Asiatic Society. 
Last day of entry for Special University Entrance Exam. 


ii 


F 


Board of Studies in History. 


12 


S 




13 







M 


M 


Academic Council 4.30. 


15 


T 




16 


W 


Governing Body n.o. 
Library Committee (after Governing Body). 


17 


Th 


Academic Board 2.15. 

Board of Faculty of Arts 4.0. 


18 


F 




19 


S 




20 


8 




21 


M 


University Library Committee, 4.30. 


22 


T 




2 3 


W 


Opening of the School by H.M. King George V, 1917. 

Senate 4.30. 


24 


Th 




25 


F 




26 


S 


Matriculation Pass Lists published. 


27 


9 




28 


M 


Academic Council 4.30. 


As th 
i 


e dates < 
evision, 


>f Examinations and Entries thereto are subject to 
reference should be made to the Regulations. 



IOO 



ALMANAC 







MARCH, 1938 


I 


T 


Entry closes for M.A. Examination Internal Students 
May Examination. 


2 


W 


Finance and General Purposes Committee n.o. 


3 


Th 


Board of Studies in Oriental Languages and 
Literatures 4.30. 


4 


F 




5 


S 




6 


& 




7 


M 


Entry closes for B.A. (Gen. and Hons.) Examination 
Internal and External Students. 


8 


T 




9 


W 




10 


Th 


Royal Asiatic Society. 
Special University Entrance Exam, begins. 


ii 


F 


Board of Studies in History. 


12 


S 




13 


* 




M 


M 


Academic Council. 


15 


T 


Entry closes for Ouseley Memorial Scholarships. 
Special University Entrance Kxam. Pass Lists published. 


16 


W 


Governing Body n.o. 


17 


Th 


Examinations Board 2.15. 

Board of Faculty of Arts 4.0. 
Last date of late registr'n Inter. Arts Exam. Exter. Students 


18 


F 




19 


S 




20 







21 


M 




22 


T 


I.C.S. Probationers' Committee n.o. 
2nd Term ends. 


23 


W 


Senate 4.30. 


24 


Th 




25 


F 




26 


S 




27 







28 


M 


Academic Council 4.30. 


29 


T 




30 


W 




31 


Th 


Last day for applying for entry forms for Special Univer- 
sity Entrance Exam. 


As tli 


ic dates 
revision, 


of Examinations and Entries thereto are subject to 
reference should be made to the Regulations. 



ALMANAC 



101 



APRIL, 1938 





i 


F 




2 


S 




3 







4 


M 




5 


T 




6 


W 




7 


Th 


Last day of entry for Special University Entrance Exam. 


8 


F 




9 


S 




10 







ii 


M 




12 


T. 




13 


W 




14 


Th 


Royal Asiatic Society. 


15 


F 


Good Friday. 

Last day for presenting M.A. Theses (May Exam.). 
Last day for submitting titles of M.A. Theses (December 
Exam.). 
First day for submitting entry form for Ph.D. Exam. 


16 


S 




i? 


S 


Easter Day. 

Entry closes for Inter. Arts Examination Internal and 
External Students. 


18 


M 


Easter Monday. 

Last day for applying for entry forms for Matriculation 
Examination. 


19 


T 




20 


W 




21 


Th 




22 


F 




23 


S 




24 


S 


Entry closes for Matriculation Examination. 


25 


M 


Time Tables arranged 10.30. 
Heads of Departments 2.15. 


26 


T 


3rd Term begins. 
Forlong and Scholarships Committee 2.15. 


27 


W 




28 


Th 




29 


F 





30 


S 




As the dates of Examinations and Entries thereto are subject to 
revision, reference should be made to the Regulations. 



IO2 



ALMANAC 



I 


8 


MAY, 1938 

Last day for submitting Entry form for Ph.D. Examination. 


2 


M 


Last day of entry for Certificate and Diploma Exams. 


3 


T 




4 


W 




5 


Th 


Examinations Board 2.15. 
Academic Board 3.15. 

Special University Entrance Exam, begins. 


6 


F 


Board of Studies in History 4.0. 


7 


S 




8 


8 




9 


M 


Academic Council 4.30. 


10 


T 


Convocation 5.30. 
Special University Entrance Kxam. Pass Lists published. 


n 


W 


Presentation Day. 


12 


Th 


Board of Faculty of Arts 4.0. 
Royal Asiatic Society. 


13 


* 




M 


S 




15 







16 


M 


University Library Committee 4.30. 


i? 


T 




18 


W 


Senate 4.30. 


19 


Th 


Examinations Board 2.15. 
Library Committee 3.0. 


20 


F 




21 


S 




22 


8 




23 


M 


Academic Council 4.30. 
M.A. Exam, begins Internal and External Students. 


24 


T 




25 


W 


Finance and General Purposes Committee u.o. 


26 


Th 


Heads of Departments 2.15. 
Board of Studies in Oriental Languages and 
Literatures 4.30. 


27 


F 




28 


S 




29 


8 




30 


M 




3i 


T 




As tli 


ie dates 
revision, 


of Examinations and Entries thereto are subject to 
reference should be made to the Regulations. 



ALMANAC 



103 







JUNE, 1938 


I 


W 


Governing Body n.o. 

First day for presenting Ph.D. theses. 


2 


Th 




3 


F 


Board of Studies in History. 


4 


S 




5 





Whit Sunday. 

Last day for presenting Ph.D. theses. 


6 


M 


Whit Monday. 


7 


T 


Matriculation examination begins. 


8 


W 




9 


Th 


Academic Board 2.15. 

Royal Asiatic Society. 


10 



F 




II 


S 




12 







13 


M 


Diploma and Certificate Examinations begin. 

Academic Council 4.30. 
B.A. (Gen. and Hons.) Examinations begin Internal and 
External Students. 


M 


T 




15 


W 




16 


Th 


Board of Faculty of Arts 4.0 


17 


F 




18 


S 




19 







20 


M 


Forlong and Scholarships Committee 2.15. 


21 


T 




22 


W 


Senate 4.30. 


23 


Th 




24 


V 


Board of Studies in History. 


25 


S 




26 







27 


M 


Academic Council 4.30. 


28 


T 


Examinations Board 2.0. 
Academic Board 3.0. 
3rd Term ends. 


29 


W 


Finance and General purposes Committee n.o. 


30 


Th , 


Board of Studies in Oriental Languages and 
Literatures 4.30. 


As th 

i 


e dates 
revision, 


of Examinations and Entries thereto are subject to 
reference should be made to the Regulations. 



ALMANAC 



I 


F 


JULY, 1938 


2 


S 




3 


8 




4 


M 


General Inter. Arts Examination begins Internal and 
External Students. 


5 


T 




6 


W 




7 


Th 




8 


F 




9 


S 




10 


8 




ii 


M 


Academic Council 4.30. 


12 


T 




13 


W 


Governing Body n.o. 


14 


Th 




15 


F 




16 


S 




17 


& 




18 


M 




19 


T 




20 


W 


Senate 4.30. 


21 


Th 




22 


F 




23 


S 




2 4 


Jv 




25 


M 




26 


'P 




27 


W 




28 


Th 




29 


F 




30 


S 


Matriculation Pass Lists published. 


31 

As th 

i 


8 

e dates < 
revision, 


[>f Examinations and Entries thereto are subject to 
reference should be made to the Regulations. 



ALMANAC 



I 


M 


AUGUST, 1938 
Bank Holiday. 


2 


T 




3 


W 




4 


Th 




5 


F 




6 


vS 




7 


& 




8 


M 




9 


T. 




10 


W 




ii 


Th 




12 


F 




13 


S 




M 







15 


M 




16 


T 


Last day for applying for entry forms for Special 
University Entrance Exam. 


17 


W 




18 


Th 




19 


F 




20 


S 


Last day for applying for entry forms for Matric. Exam. 


21 







22 


M 




23 


T 


Last day of entry for Special University Entrance Exam. 


24 


W 




25 


Th 




26 


F 




27 


S 




28 


& 




29 


M 




30 


T 


Entry closes for Matriculation Examination. 


31 


W 




As th 

] 


te dates 
revision, 


% 

of Examinations and Entries thereto are subject to 
reference should be made to the Regulations. 

> 



IO6 ALMANAC 



I 


SEPTEMBER, 1938 

Th 


2 


F 1 


3 


S i 


4 




5 


M | 


6 


T 


7 


W | 


8 


Th i 


9 


F ! 


10 


S ; 


ii 


* \ 


12 


M 1 


13 


T Matriculation Examination begins. 


14 , W ! 


15 


Th ! 


16 


F ; 


17 


S I 


18 1 


19 


M 


20 


T ! Special University Entrance Exam, begins. 


21 


W 


22 


Th 


23 


F ! 


24 


S 


25 


j| Entry closes for M.A. Examination Internal Students 
i December Examination. 


26 


M : 


27 


T Special University Entrance Exam. Pass Lists published. 


28 


W 


29 


Th j 


30 ! F. _._!__ ._. ... 

Thursday, 6th October. First day of First Term, Session 1938-39. 

As the dates of Examinations and Entries thereto are subject to 
revision, reference should be made to the Regulations. 



PART VIII 



LECTURES, CLASSES, AND SEMINARS 

The Lectures, Classes, and Seminars are shown under the following 
heads : 

PAGE 

i. Department of the Languages and Cultures of India, Burma, 

and Ceylon. . . . . . . . in 

Department A 

GROUP I : ANCIENT INDIA. 

Sanskrit, Pali, and Prakrit . . . in 

* Indian Philosophy . . . . .112 

Indian Palaeography . . . . .112 

GROUP 2 : BURMESE, ETC. 

Burmese . . . . . . .112 

Khasi . . . . . . . .112 

Old and Mediaeval Mon . . . . .112 

Mon . . . . . . . .112 

Shan . . . . . . . .112 

GROUP 3 : DRAVIDIAN. 

Kanarese . . . . . . .113 

Malayalam . . . . . . .113 

Tamil . . . . . . . .114 

Telugu . . . . . . . .115 

GROUP 4 : MARATHI, ETC. 

Marathi . . . . . . .115 

Gujarati . . . . . . .116 

GROUP 5 : BENGALI, ETC. 

Bengali . . . . . . .117 

Oriya . . . . . . . .118 

Assamese . . . . . . .118 

Sinhalese . . . . . . .118 

Department B 

GROUP 6 : HINDUSTANI, ETC. 

Urdu . . . . . . . .119 

Hindi . . . . . . . .119 

Sindhi ........ 120 

Punjabi . . . . . . .120 

Nepali ........ 120 

Kashmiri .... 120 

Shina ........ 120 

Pashto .... ... 120 

107 



I08 LECTURES, CLASSES, 

PAGE 

2. Department of the Languages and Cultures of the Far East . 121 

I. SINO TIBETAN LANGUAGES. 

(i) Chinese 

Literary and Colloquial Chinese . . . 121 
Cantonese . . . . . .122 

Amoy ....... 122 

Swatow ....... 123 

Foochow . . . . . -123 

(ii) Tibeto-Burman 

Tibetan . . . . . . -123 

(iii) Tai Languages 

Siamese . . . . . . -123 

II. JAPANESE ........ 123 

III. TURCO-MONGOL. 

Mongolian . . . . . .124 

Manchu . . . . . . .124 

IV. AUSTRONESIAN LANGUAGES. 

(i) Indonesian 

Malay ....... 124 

(ii) Melanesian and Micronesian . . . .125 

(iii) Polynesian . . . . . . -125 

V. PAPUAN LANGUAGES . . . . . .125 

3 . Department of the Languages and Cultures of the Near and 

Middle East 126 

I. SEMITIC LANGUAGES. 

Amharic ........ 126 

Arabic ........ 126 

Aramaic ........ 128 

Ethiopic ........ 128 

Modern Hebrew . . . . . .128 

Hebrew Palaeography . . . . . .128 

North Semitic Epigraphy . 128 

II. TURCO-MONGOL. 

Ottoman Turkish . . . . . .128 

Turki, Uighur . . . . . . .129 

III. GEORGIAN 129 

IV. INDO-EUROPEAN LANGUAGES. 

(i) Armenian . . . . . . .129 

(ii) Iranian 

Persian ....... 130 

Old and Middle Iranian Languages . -130 



AND SEMINARS 109 

PAGE 

4. Department of the Languages and Cultures of Africa . . 131 

I. GENERAL. 

Structure of African Languages . . .131 

II. BANTU LANGUAGES. 

Swahili 131 

KiKuyu ........ 131 

LuGanda . . 131 

Sotho-Chwana and Zulu-Xhosa . . . 131 

Comparative Grammar . . . . 131 

III. WEST AFRICAN LANGUAGES. 

Hausa ........ 132 

Ibo, Efik, Twi, Yoruba . . . *32 

Ewe, Fanti, Ga, Mende . . . 132 

IV. SUDANESE LANGUAGES. 

Dinka, Nuer, Shilluk, Bari . . . -132 

V. GRAMOPHONE RECORDS . . . 132 

5. Department of Phonetics and Linguistics . . . 133 

A. COMPARATIVE OR HISTORICAL GRAMMAR . . -133 

B. PHONETICS AND LINGUISTICS. 

General Phonetics . . . . . 133 

Phonetics of Asiatic Languages . . 134 

Phonetics of African Languages . . . .134 

English Phonetics . . . . . 134 

Experimental Phonetics . . . . 134 

Gramophone Recording . . . . *34 

Linguistics . . . . . . 134 

Methods of Language Study . . . 134 

Preparation for Linguistic Research . . 134 

6. Department of Oriental History and Law . . 135 

I. HISTORY. 

Near and Middle East . . . . . 135 

Indian ........ 135 

Burma . . . . . . . 135 

Ceylon . . . . . . . .136 

Jewish . . . . . . . -136 

The Farther East 136 

Malaya . . . . . . . -136 

China ........ 136 

Japan ........ 136 

II. LAW. J 

Burmese Buddhist Law . . . . -136 

Indian Law ...... 136 

Law of Palestine . . . . . 137 



110 LECTURES, CLASSES, 

TERMINAL LECTURE LISTS 

Leaflets are published each term showing the lectures arranged 
in Religions. The courses of Lectures specified in the leaflets may be 
attended at special fees by persons not following regular courses of 
study at the School. For copies of the leaflets application should be 
made to the Secretary. 



TIMES OF LECTURES 

Should necessity arise, the published times of lectures, classes, and 
seminars may be modified. 



NOTES 

Subjects and courses in the Time Tables against which an asterisk 
is placed are arranged when required and the fees payable will be 
found on page 90 of the Calendar under the heading " Special and 
Vacation Courses ". 

The examination or examinations for which a course is suitable 
is indicated by one or more of the following letters prefixed to the 
title of the course : 

a. Matriculation. 

b. B.A. Intermediate. 

c. B.A. General. 

d. B.A. Honours. 

e. Higher Degrees (M.A., Ph.D.). 
/. B.Com. Intermediate. 

g. B.Com. Final. 

h. LL.B. Intermediate. 

j. LL.B. Final. 

ja. LL.M. and advanced Law Students. 

ka. Diploma in Librarianship. 

kb. Diploma in Archaeology. 

q. Civil Service Open Examination. 

r. i year I.C.S. Probationers. 

rb. 2 (and year). 

s. Examination of the Institute of Civil Engineers. 

t. Examination of the Institute of Secretaries. 

u. Army Interpretership Examinations. 

x. First Year Certificate. 1 

y. Second Year Certificate. 1 

z. Diploma. 

1 Recognized (a) by the Government of Northern Nigeria and of 
Tanganyika ; (b) as the respective equivalents of the Preliminary and Advanced 
Examinations of the Palestine Government. 



AND SEMINARS III 

i. DEPARTMENT OF INDIA, BURMA AND 

CEYLON 

DEPT. A. 

GROUP I. ANCIENT INDIA 
SANSKRIT, PALI, AND PRAKRIT 

PROF. R. L. TURNER : 

dy e, z. Inscriptions of Asoka. [30 hrs.] 

dy e, z. Comparative Grammar of the Indo-European lan- 
guages, with special reference to Sanskrit. [60 hrs.] 
dy e, z. (1938-39) Comparative Grammar of the Indo-Aryan 

languages. [60 hrs.] 

e, z. Seminar for advanced students in the linguistic 
history of Indo-Aryan. Times to be arranged. 

DR. BARNETT : 

d, e, q, z. Vedic Religion. [5 hrs.] W., 4. Fortnightly. 

DR. W. STEDE: 

0, by x. Elements of Sanskrit for beginners. [90 hrs.] M., 

W., and F., n. 
Cy y. Sanskrit Grammar and Composition. [30 hrs.] 

F., 12. 

Cy d, z. Sanskrit Texts. [30 hrs.] Th., n. 
0, by x. Elements of Pali. [60 hrs.] M., Th., 12. 
Cy d, z. Pali Texts. [60 hrs.] M., F., 10. 
Cy dy z. Pali Grammar and Composition. [30 hrs.] W., 10. 
d, e, z. Main Tenets of Pali Buddhism. [20 hrs.] Th., 3. 

[ist and 2nd Terms.] 

By z. Seminar for advanced students in Pali. Times to 
be arranged. 

MR. C. A. RYLANDS : 

r. Sanskrit Course for I.C.S. Probationers. [60 hrs.] 

Tu., Th., 12. 

Cy dy z. Elements of Prakrit. [30 hrs.] F., 10. 
d, e y z. Vedic Texts. [30 hrs.] W., 2. 
a y b t y. Sanskrit Grammar and Composition. [30 hrs.] 

F., 10. 

c, dy q y z. Rgveda Selections. [30 hrs.] W., 12. 
c t dy <7, z. Sanskrit Texts. [30 hrs.] F., 12. 

Sanskrit Grammar and Composition. [30 hrs.] 

M., 2. 
dy q t z. Question Papers on " Sanskrit Civilization ". [30 hrs.] 

M., 12. 

c> d, q, y, z. Sanskrit Drama. [30 hrs.] F., 2. 

NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. up. 



112 LECTURES, CLASSES, 

INDIAN PHILOSOPHY 

DR. B. HEIMANN : 

d, e y q, z. Vedanta Texts. [30 hrs.] Th., 3. 

d, e, q, z. Alarhkarasastra. [30 hrs.] Tu., 3. 

d, e, q y z. Nyaya or Samkhya. [30 hrs.] F., 3. 

d, e, q y z. Introduction to Indian Philosophy. [30 hrs.] W., 5. 

INDIAN PALAEOGRAPHY 

DR. M. D. RATNASURIYA : 

e y ka, kb. Introduction to Indian Epigraphy. [60 hrs.] Tu., F., 3. 
e y ka, kb. Reading Indian Inscriptions. [30 hrs.] W., 3. 

GROUP 2. BURMESE, ETC. 

BURMESE 

DR. J. A. STEWART : 

b. Grammar and Composition. [30 hrs.] Th., 2-3. 

b. Texts. [60 hrs.] Tu., F., 10.30. 

c, z. Grammar and Composition. [30 hrs.] Tu., 2.30. 

r, xr. Texts. [60 hrs.] Th., n-i. 

c, cr. History. [30 hrs.] F., 2.30. 

MON-KHMER LANGUAGES 
*KHASI 

LT.-COL. GURDON : 

Courses will be arranged as required. 

*OLD AND MEDIEVAL MON 

DR. C. O. BLAGDEN : 

Palaeography and practice in reading the Mediaeval Mon 
Inscriptions. 

Grammar and Syntax of Mediaeval Mon. Times to be arranged. 

* MON 

DR. J. A. STEWART : 

Courses will be arranged as required. 

TAI LANGUAGES 
* SHAN 

CAPTAIN INMAN : 

Courses will be arranged as required. 

* SIAMESE 

(See Department of the Far East.) 



NO:E. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



AND SEMINARS 113 

GROUP 3. DRAVIDIAN 
KANARESE 

MR. PATHY and Assistant Lecturers : 

(Hours to be arranged. The numerals after each class show the 
number of hours per week.) 

COLLOQUIAL KANARESE 

x. A.I. Sentence Drill. 2. 
x, y. A.2. Conversation, i. 

KANARESE SCRIPT 
x. B. Introduction to Script, i. 

GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 

x. C.i. Junior Class, i. 
a y y. C.2. Senior Class, i. 

TEXTS 

x. D.I. Phonetic Texts, i. 

x. D.2. Prose Texts. 2. 

x. 0.3. Prose Texts. 2. 

a, y. 0.4. Prose Texts. 2. 

a, y. 0.5. Prose Texts, i. 

HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

History of South India. T., 2. 
History of Kanarese Literature, i. 

MALAYALAM 

MR. PATHY ; MR. T. N. MENON : 

(Hours to be arranged. The numerals after each class show the 
number of hours per week.) 

COLLOQUIAL MALAYALAM 

x. A.I. Sentence Drill. 2. 
x, y. A. 2. Conversation, i. 

MALAYALAM SCRIPT 
x. B. Introduction to Script, i. 

GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 

x. C.i. Junior Class, i. 
#, y. C.2. Senior Class i. 



NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



114 LECTURES, CLASSES, 

TEXTS 

x. D.I. Phonetic Texts, i. 

x. D.2. Prose Texts. 2. 

x. D.3. Prose Texts. 2. 

a y y. 0.4. Prose Texts. 2. 

a, y. 0.5. Prose Texts, i. 

HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

History of South India. Tu., 2. 
History of Malay alam Literature, i. 

TAMIL 

MR. PATHY and Assistant Lecturers : 

COLLOQUIAL TAMIL 

Ty x. A.I. Sentence Drill. Tu., F., n. 

Coolie Tamil. M., Tu., W., Th., F., 10. 
Ty Xy y y z. A. 2. Conversation. Tu., 3. 

TAMIL SCRIPT 

Ty x. B.I. Introduction to Script. Th., u. 
r, rb. B.2. Advanced Script. F., 2. 

GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 

Ty x. C.i. Junior Class. M., n. 
a, by Cy y, z. C.2. Senior Class. W., 3. 

c. C.3. Development of the Tamil Language. 
Th., 2. 

TEXTS 

Ty x. D. i. Phonetic Texts. W., n. 

Ty x. D. 2. Prose Texts. Tu., Th., u. 

Ty x. D. 3. Prose Texts. W., F., u. 

ay y. D. 4. Prose Texts. M., F., 3. 

y. D. 5. Prose Texts. Th., 3. 

by z. D. 6. Prose Texts. M., 10. 

z. D. 7. Prose Texts. Th., 10. 

c. D. 8. Prose Texts. M., 2. 

Zy b. D. 9. Poetical Texts. W., F., 10. 

c. D.io. Poetical Texts. W., 2. 

HISTORY, LITERATURE, AND RELIGION 

Xy y y z. E.I. History of South India. Tu., 2. 
Cy y y z. E.2. Tamil Literature. F., n. 

.3. The Influence of Buddhism in South 

India. Th., 2. 

.4. The Development of Religion in South 
India. Tu., 2. 



NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



AND SEMINARS 115 

TELUGU 

MR. PATHY and Assistant Lecturers : 

(Hours to be arranged. The numerals after each class show the 
number of hours per week.) 

COLLOQUIAL TELUGU 

r, x. A.I. Sentence Drill. 2. 
r, x y y, z. A. 2. Conversation. 2. 



r, x. 
r. 


TELUGU SCRIPT 

B.I. Introduction to Script, i 
B.2. Advanced Script, i. 


GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 


r, x. 


C.i. 


Junior Class, i. 


a, b, c, y, z. 


C.2. 


Senior Class, i. 


c. 


C. 3 . 


Development of the Telugu Language, i 






TEXTS 


r, x. 


D. i. 


Phonetic Texts, i. 


r, x. 


D. 2. 


Prose Texts. 2. 


r, x. 


D. 3. 


Prose Texts. 2. 


a, y. 


D. 4. 


Prose Texts. 2. 


y- 


D. 5. 


Prose Texts, i. 


b, z. 


D. 6. 


Prose Texts, i. 


z. 


D. 7. 


Prose Texts i. 


c. 


D. 8. 


Prose Texts, i. 


z, b. 


D. 9. 


Poetical Texts. 2. 


c. 


D.io 


Poetical Texts, i. 



HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

x, y, z. E.I. History of South India. Tu., 2. 
, y, z. E.2. History of Telugu Literature, i. 

For lectures on Religions, see under Tamil above (p. 114). 

GROUP 4. MARATHI, ETC. 

MARATHI 

MR. KANHERE ; MR. A. MASTER. 

COLLOQUIAL MARATHI 

r, x. A.I. Sentence prill. Tu., F., n. 
r i x > y> % A. 2. Conversation. Tu., 3. 



NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



Il6 LECTURES, CLASSES, 

MARATHI SCRIPT 

r, x. B.I. Introduction to Script. Th., n. 
r y z. B.2. Modi Script. F., 2. 

GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 

r, x. C.i. Junior Class. M., n. 
a > by c > y> % C.2. Senior Class. W., 3. 

y y z. C.3. Translation. M., Th., 2. 

TEXTS 

r, x. D. i. Phonetic Texts. W., n. 

r, x. D. 2. Prose Texts. Tu., Th., n. 

r y x. D. 3. Prose Texts. W., F., n. 

y. D. 4. Prose Texts. Th., 3. 

, _y. D. 5. Prose Texts. M., F., 3. 

b, z. D. 6. Prose Texts. M., Th., 4. 

c, z. D. 7. Prose Texts. W., 5. 
z. D. 8. Prose Texts. F., 5. 

y. D. 9. Poetical Texts. W., 2. 
6, s. D.io. Poetical Texts. W., F., 4. 
c, z. D.I i. Poetical Texts. M., 6. 

HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

, jy, z. E.I. Marathi Literature. M., 5. 

x, y, z. E.2. History of Maharashtra. Tu., 2. 

GUJARATI 

MR. KANHERE ; MR. J. F. B. HARTSHORNE : 

(Hours to be arranged. The numerals after each class show the 
number of hours per week.) 

COLLOQUIAL GUJARATI 

x. A.I. Sentence Drill. 2. 
x, y t z. A.2. Conversation, i. 

GUJARATI SCRIPT 

B.I. Introduction to Script, i. 
B.2. Advanced Script, i. 

GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 

x. C.i. Junior Class, i. 

a, b, c, y, z. C.2. Senior Class, i. 

y, z. C.3. Translation. 2. 



NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



AND SEMINARS 
TEXTS 


X. 


D. i. 


Phonetic Texts, i. 


X. 


D. 2. 


Prose Texts. 2. 


X. 


D. 3. 


Prose Texts. 2. 


y- 


D. 4. 


Prose Texts, i. 


y- 


D. 5. 


Prose Texts. 2. 


b, z. 


D. 6. 


Prose Texts. 2. 


c, z. 


D. 7. 


Prose Texts, i. 


z. 


D. 8. 


Prose Texts, i. 


y- 


D. 9. 


Poetical Texts, i. 




D.io. 


Poetical Texts. 2. 


Cy Z. 


D.n. 


Poetical Texts, i. 


HISTORY AND LITERATURE 


y, * 


E.I. 


Gujarati Literature. 


y, Z- 


E.2. 


History of Gujarat. 



117 



GROUP 5. BENGALI, ETC. 
BENGALI 

MR. W. BUTTON PAGE; Miss G. M. SUMMERS; DR. J. B. 
CHAUDHURI : 

COLLOQUIAL BENGALI 

r, x. A.I. Sentence Drill. Tu., F., n. 

x. A.2. Sentence Drill. M., W., Th., 2. 

r > x > y> z- A. 3. Conversation. Tu., 3. 

x, z. A.4. Conversation. M., F., 3. 

x. A. 5. Conversation. W., 3. 

x. A. 6. Conversation. Th., 3. 

y y z. A.y. Phonetics of Bengali. M., 6. 

BENGALI SCRIPT 

r, x. B.I. Introduction to Bengali Script. Th., n. 
r, z. B.2. Advanced Bengali Script. F., 2. 

GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 

r, x. C.i. Junior Class. W., n. 
a > by c > y> z- C.2. Senior Class. W., 3. 
a > by c, y, z. C.3. Translation. M., Th., 2. 

c. C.4. Development of the Bengali Language. 
M.,4. 



NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



Il8 LECTURES, CLASSES, 

TEXTS 

r, x. D. i. Phonetic Texts. W., u. 

r, x. D. 2. Prose Texts. M., Th., 11. 

r, x. D. 3. Prose Texts. Tu., F., n. 

x. D. 4. Prose Texts. W., F., 2. 

y. D. 5. Prose Texts. Th., 3. 

a, rb, y. D. 6. Prose Texts. M., F., 3. 

b y z. D. 7. Prose Texts. M., Th., 4. 

c. D. 8 Prose Texts. M., 6. 

y. D. 9. Poetical Texts. W., F., 2. 

b y z. D.io. Poetical Texts. W., F., 4. 

c, z. D.I i. Old Bengali Texts. W., 5. 

z. D.i2. Old Bengali Texts. Th., 6. 

HISTORY, LITERATURE, AND RELIGION 

r, j, z. E.I. Bengali Literature. M., 5. 

x y y y z. E.2. History of Bengal. Tu., 2. 

.3. Hindu Worship and Festivals. F., 12. 

.4. Hindu Mythology. Tu., 12. 

* ORIYA 

REV. H. W. PIKE ; REV. G. S. WILKINS. 
Courses will be arranged as required. 

* ASSAMESE 

LT.-COL. GURDON ; MR. S. K. BIIUYAN. 

Courses will be arranged as required : 

SINHALESE 

DR. RATNASURIYA : 

COLLOQUIAL SINHALESE 
x. A.I. Sentence Drill. Tu., F., n. 
x. y. z. A.2. Conversation. Th., 12. 

x. A. 3. Conversation. Tu., F., 10. 
x. A. 4. Conversation. W., 10. 

SINHALESE SCRIPT 

x. B.I. Introduction to Script. Th., n. 

z. B.2. Advanced Script. M., 2. 

c. 6.3. Sinhalese Inscriptions. M., 3. 

GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 

x. C.i. Grammar and Composition (Junior). 

M., n. 

a > by Cy Jy %- C.2. Grammar and Composition (Senior). 

W, 2. 



NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



AND SEMINARS 119 

TEXTS 

x. D.I. Phonetic Texts. W., n. 

x. D.2. Easy Prose Texts. Tu., Th., u. 

x. D.3. Easy Prose Texts. W., F., n. 

a, b y y. 0.4. Prose Texts. M., 10. 

a, b, y. D.5. Poetical Texts. Th., 10. 

y. D.6. Prose Texts. Tu., F., 3. 

z. D.y. Prose Texts. M., W., 12. 

c, z. D.8. Prose Texts. Tu., 12. 

c, z. 0.9. Poetical Texts. F., 12. 

HISTORY, LITERATURE AND RELIGION 
x, y t z. E.I. History of Ceylon. Tu., 2. 
c y y, z. E.2. History of Sinhalese Literature. F., 2. 

.3. Buddhism in Ceylon. Th., 2. 
DEPT. B. 

GROUP 6. HINDUSTANI, ETC. 

INDO-ARYAN 

URDU 

DR. T. GRAIIAME BAILEY ; MR. G. E. LEESON : 

r, x. i. Sentence Drill and Elementary Grammar. 

M., 12. 
a, b y c, /, g, y, z. 2. Senior Grammar. M., 2. 

r, x. 3. Composition, First Year. Tu., 2. 
a > ^> / y- 4- Composition, Second Year. Tu., 3. 
g, c, z. 5. Composition, Diploma, B.A. Tu., n. 

x. 6. Conversation, First Year. Th., 2. 
a t ^> /> y- 7* Conversation, Second Year. Th., 3. 
g, c, z. 8. Conversation, Diploma. Th., n. 

x. 9. Texts, Easy. F., 12. 
b, /, y. 10. Texts, Inter. F., 3. 
c. ii. Texts, B.A. F., n. 
z. 12. Texts, Diploma. 

rb. 13. Texts, I.C.S. M., Tu., W., Th., 3. 
r, rb. 14. Phonetics, Elementary. W. 10. 
z. 15. Phonetics, Advanced. W. n. 
x. 1 6. Script, Elementary. W., 12. 
z. 17. Script, Advanced. W., 2. 
/, g. 18. Commercial. Tu., 3. 

19. Seminar. F., 2. 

20. History of Literature. F., 3. 

21. Islam in India. F., 2. 

HINDI 

DR. T. GRAHAME BAILEY ; MR. G. E. LEESON : 

r, x. i. Sentence Dril? and Elementary Grammar. 
M., 12. 

NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



120 LECTURES, CLASSES, 

a, b y Cyfygyy t z. 2. Senior Grammar. M., 12. 

b t c, z. 3. Old Texts. M., n. 

x. 4. Composition, First Year. Tu., 2. 

a, by fy rby y. 5. Composition, Second Year. Tu., 3. 

gy Cy z. 6. Composition, Diploma, B.A. Tu., n. 

x. 7. Conversation, First Year. Th., 2. 

*> ^> fy r b> y- 8. Conversation, Second Year. Th., 3. 

gy Cy z. 9. Conversation, Diploma. Th., n. 

Ty x. 10. Texts, Easy. F., 12. 

ay by fy rby y. n. Texts, Inter, (including Braj). F., 3. 

c. 12. Texts, B.A. (including Avadhi and Bundel- 

khandi). F., n. 

z. 13. Texts, Diploma (including Avadhi and 

Braj). 

r. 14. Texts, I.C.S. M., 12 and 3. Tu., W., Th., 

F., n. 

Ty rb. 15. Phonetics, Elementary. W., 10. 

z. 1 6. Phonetics, Advanced. W., n. 

x. 17. Script, Elementary. W., 12. 

z. 18. Script, Advanced. W., 2. 

/, g. 19. Commercial. Tu., 3. 

20 Seminar. F., 2. 

21. History of Literature. F., 3. 

*SINDHI 

MR. I. KAZI : 

Courses will be arranged as required. 

'PANJABI 

DR. T. GRAHAME BAILEY : 

Panjabi Phonetics. [30 hrs.] 

Times to be arranged. 
Other Courses will be arranged as required. 

* NEPALI 

DR. T. GRAHAME BAILEY : 

Courses will be arranged as required. 

* KASHMIRI 

DR. T. GRAHAME BAILEY : 

Courses will be arranged as required. 

*SfflNA 

DR. T. GRAHAME BAILEY : 

Courses will be arranged as required. 
IRANIAN 

* PASHTO 

MR. S. G. A. BOKHARY : 

Courses will be arranged as required. 

(For Old and Middle Iranian and for Persian see Department of 
the Near and Middle East.) 

NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p no 



AND SEMINARS 121 

2. DEPARTMENT OF THE FAR EAST 
I. SINO-TIBETAN LANGUAGES 

(i) CHINESE 

DR. EDWARDS ; DR. W. SIMON ; MR. Y. CHIANG : 

CHINESE (Literary and Colloquial) 

Sessional Courses 

a,b,y. S.i. Intermediate texts. [60 hrs.] 
Cy dy z. 8.2. B.A. General texts. [90 hrs.] 

8.3. B.A. Honours texts. [120 hrs.] 

Diploma texts. [120 hrs.] 
e. 8.4. M.A. texts. [120 hrs.] 
dy e, z. 8.5. Chinese Poetry. [30 hrs.] 

Oy by Cy dy e t x, y y z. S.6. Japanese [for the special needs of 

Students of Chinese]. [60 hrs.] 

a, b y c, dy x y jy z. 8.7. History of Chinese Literature. [30 

hrs.] Times to be arranged. 

Terminal Courses 

(Background subjects for School Examinations.) 

ayfyUyX. T.I. Geography of China (ist term). 

[10 hrs.] 
a, fy iiy x. T.2. Modern Chinese Institutions (2nd 

term). [10 hrs.] 
a, by c, dy e,f y g, u, x,y y z. T.4. History of China, 1644-1911 (ist 

term). [10 hrs.] 
a.b.CydyC.fygyUyX^y.z. T.$. Chinese Literature (2nd term). 

[10 hrs.] 

a.b.c^d^e^fyg^UyXyyyZ. T.6. Religion and Philosophy (3rd term). 

[10 hrs.] 

PHONETICS 

Uy x. (See Department of Phonetics and 

Linguistics.) 

NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



122 LECTURES, CLASSES, 

CHINESE 

FIRST YEAR (BEGINNERS') COURSE 

ist term 2nd yd Total 
hrs. hrs. hrs. hrs. 

a, u, x. i. Elements of Colloquial Chinese 4 3 3 100 
u, x. 2. Conversation (with Chinese 

Lecturer) . . . 4 4 4 120 

a, M, x. 3. Calligraphy (with Chinese 

Lecturer) ... i i i 30 

x. 4. Phonetics ... i i 20 

a, x. 5. Introduction to Literary 

Chinese 1 i 10 

.v. 6. Tuition in Background sub- 
jects .... ii 20 
1 Cannot be taken alone. 

SECOND YEAR COURSE * 

b,f,y. i. Elements of Literary Chinese 4 3 3 100 

b,f t y. 2. Conversation and Translation 

from Colloquial and vice 

versa (Chinese Lecturer) .3 3 3 90 

b,f,y> 3- Calligraphy (Chinese Lecturer) i i i 30 

b, f, y. 4. Tuition in Background sub- 

jects, including Bibliography i i i 30 

1 This course is open only to students who have already taken one year's course 
in Colloquial Chinese. 

THIRD YEAR COURSE l 
(a) Colloquial Chinese 

xr. i. Advanced Colloquial Chinese 2 2 2 60 

XT. 2. Conversation, Composition, 
Translation Advanced 
course (with Chinese 
Lecturer) ... 3 339 

(b) Literary Chinese 

c,d,g,z. 3. Texts .... 2 22 60 

r, d, g, xr. 4. Translation and easy literary 

essays (Chinese Lecturer) 2 2 2 60 

d, s. 5. Japanese (for the special needs 

of Students of Chinese) .2 2 2 60 

1 Courses (a) and (b) are alternative. 

* CANTONESE 

MR. A. E. WOOD : 

Courses will be arranged as required. 

*AMOY 

DR. STEELE : 

Courses will be arranged as required. 
NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



AND SEMINARS 123 

* SWATOW 

DR. STEELE ; MRS. M. M. DUNCAN- WHYTE : 
Courses will be arranged as required. 

*FOOCHOW 

Courses will be arranged as required. 

(ii) TIBETO-BURMAN 

* TIBETAN 

DR. W. SIMON ; MR. SHUTTLEWORTH : 

(a) Literary : Beginners* Course. [60 hrs.] 

Advanced Course. [60 hrs.] 

(b) Colloquial : Courses will be arranged as required. 

BURMESE 

(See Department of India, Burma and Ceylon.) 

(iii) TAI LANGUAGES 

* SHAN 

(See Department of India, Burma and Ceylon.) 

* SIAMESE 

MR. R. LE MAY ; MR. MICHELL ; DR. QUARITCH-WALES : 
Courses will be arranged as required. 

EL JAPANESE 

COMMANDER ISEMONGER ; MR. YOSHITAKE ; MR. MATSUKAWA : 

Sessional Courses 

COLLOQUIAL 

x i. ist year Course. [3 hrs.] M., W., F., 12. 
y. 2. 2nd year Course. [2 hrs.] Tu., Th., n. 
z. 3. 3rd year Course. F. 2. 

READING AND GRAMMAR 

x. 4. istyear Texts, etc. [3 hrs.] M. W., F., n. 
y. 5. 2nd year Texts, etc. [3 hrs.] Tu., W., 

Th., 10. 
z. 6. Diploma and B.A. Hons. Texts, etc. [6 hrs.] 

M., Tu., Th., 2. 

b. 7. B.A. Intermediate Texts, etc. [3 hrs.] M.,W., 

F., 3- 

c. 8. B.A. General Texts, etc. [4 hrs.] M., Tu., W., 

Th., 2. 

NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



124 LECTURES, CLASSES, 

TRANSLATION INTO, AND COMPOSITION IN, JAPANESE 

x. 9. ist year Course. M., 3. 
y. 10. 2nd year Course. Tu., 3. 
z. ii. 3rd year Course. Th., 3. 

Japanese for the special needs of students of Chinese (see Chinese, 
3rd year Course). 

Terminal Courses 

x. 12. Geography, Outline of Japanese History. 

M., 2. 

y. 13. Japanese History. Tu., 12. 
z. 14. Cultural History of Japan. W., 2. 
z. 15. History of Japanese Literature. W., 3. 
z. 1 6. History of Japanese Religions. Times to be 
arranged. 

ffl. TURCO-MONGOL 

* MONGOLIAN 

MR. YOSHITAKE : 

Times to be arranged. 

MANCHU 

DR. W. SIMON: 

Beginners* Course [60 hrs.]. 
Advanced Course [60 hrs.]. 

OTTOMAN TURKISH : * TURKI : * UIGHUR 

(See Department of the Near and Middle East) 

IV. AUSTRONESIAN LANGUAGES 

(1) INDONESIAN 
MALAY 

SIR RICHARD O. WINSTEDT : 

a, /, w, x. Elements of Phonetics and Grammar. M., 2. 
Composition and Conversation. W., 2. 
Texts. F., 2. 
a > ^> /> u t y- Grammar. M., 3. 

Composition and Conversation. W., 3. 
Texts. F., 3. 
c > g* w > z - Grammar and Composition. M., 4. 

Texts and Conversation. W., 4 ; F., 4. 

* MALAYAN SERVICES COURSES 
(12 weeks) 

September-December, M., T., W., Th., F., 10.30 (10 hours per week.) 



NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



AND SEMINARS 125 

c > *, y, # History of British Malaya. F., 5. 

e, z. The Comparative Philology of the Indonesian 

Languages. W., 5. 

#, y, z. Folklore and Popular Religion of the Malays. 
M., 5. 

(ii) * MELANESIAN AND MICRONESIAN 

REV. A. CAPELL ; REV. DR. W. G. IVENS : 
Courses will be arranged as required. 

(iii) * POLYNESIAN 

REV. A. CAPELL : 

Courses will be arranged as required. 

V. * PAPUAN LANGUAGES 

REV. A. CAPELL : 

Courses will be arranged as required. 



NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



126 LECTURES, CLASSES, 

3. DEPARTMENT OF THE NEAR AND 
MIDDLE EAST 

I. SEMITIC LANGUAGES 

* AMHARIC 

MAJOR ATHILL ; MR. B. G. HEROUY ; Lx.-CoL. REY : 
Courses will be arranged as required. 

ARABIC 

SESSIONAL COURSES 
DR. TRITTON ; MR. J. HEYWORTH-DUNNE : 

a, by q, Sy t. S.i. Intermediate Texts. [30 hrs.] 

Cy q. S.2. B.A. General Texts. [80 hrs.] 

d. 8.3. B.A. Honours Texts. [120 hrs.] 

e. 8.4. M.A. Texts. [120 hrs.] 

<?, z. 8.5 Diploma Texts. [120 hrs.] 
a, Ty rby s y t, x. S.6. I.C.S. Course (Grammar and Texts). 

[90 hrs.] 

d, e, z. S.y. Theory of Arabic Grammar. [30 hrs.] 
dy c y z. S.8. History of Arabic Literature. [30 hrs.] 
d, e, y, z. 8.9. Islamic Religion and Dogma. 

dy z. S.io. South- Arabian Inscriptions. [30 hrs.] 

e. S.i i. Seminar for Research Students. 
(See also Department of History and Law.) 

TERMINAL COURSES 
DR. TRITTON and Lecturers : 

PHONETICS 

A.I. Elementary Arabic Phonetics. F., n. 
A. 2. Advanced Arabic Phonetics. Th., n. 
A. 3. Dictation and Phonetic Practice. W., 2. 
(See also Department of Phonetics and Linguistics.) 

GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 

a > byfy q, Ty Sy t, Uy x. B.I. Elements of Arabic. Tu., F., 12. 
a > byfy q, Sy t, Uy x. B.2. Elements of Arabic (Evening Course). 

M.,W., 5 . 

fl> b,f, q, $> t y u y x. 6.3. Arabic Script. W., 12 
dy byfy ^, Sy ty Uy x. 6.4 Elementary Grammar and Composi- 
tion. M., W. F., 3. 

NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



AND SEMINARS 127 

a y byfy q y s y t y u y x. 3.5. Sentence Drill. Tu., Th., n. 

a y byfy q, s y t y u y x. B.6. Elementary Conversation and Oral 

Composition. W., n. 

byC y g y q y u y y. 6.7. Continuation Grammar. Tu., F., 12. 
by Cy gy qy U y j. B.8. Continuation Grammar (Evening 

Course). M., W., 5. 

c y d y g y q y u y y y z. 6.9. Syntax. Th., 12 or 3. 
byfy qy Sy ty w, j>. B.io. Intermediate Composition. W., 10 ; 

F., n. 

c y d y g y q y u y z. B.I i. Advanced Composition. Tu., Th., 4. 
/, g. B.I2. Commercial Correspondence. Th., 
12 or 5. 

TEXTS 

a y b y /, q y r y s y t y u y x. C.i. Elementary Texts. Tu., n ; F., 10. 
a y b y f y q y s y t y u y x. C.2. Elementary Texts (Evening Course). 

Tu., Th., 5. 

a y b y f y q y r y s y t y u y x. C.3. " Arabian Nights." M., Th., 2. 
<*y byfy q y r y s y t y u y x. C.^. Easy Prose. M., W., n. 
ay by gy q y s y t y u y y. C.5. Prose Texts. W., F., 4. 

/, g. C.6. Commercial Texts, Tu., F., 12 or 5. 
u. C.7. Military Texts. \ 

C.8. Arabic Journals. ^mes 

C. 9 . Advanced Prose Texts. J arr ng ed. 
C.io. Advanced Poetry Texts. / 

COLLOQUIAL ARABIC 

/, u, x. D.I. Elements of Colloquial, ist Course. 

Tu., F., 2. 
/, u y x. D.2. Elements of Colloquial (Evening 

Course). W., F., 5. 
/, u y x. 0.3. Elements of Colloquial, 2nd Course. 

M., W., Th., 12. 

g y u y y. 0.4. Continuation Courses. j Times 

to be 
g y u y z. 0.5. Advanced Conversation. I arranged. 

* ARABIC EPIGRAPHY AND PALAEOGRAPHY 

MR. WALKER : 

Times to be arranged. 

NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



128 LECTURES, CLASSES, 

* ARAMAIC 

MR. WARTSKI : 

Aramaic Grammar. 
Aramaic Texts. 

Times to be arranged. 

* ETHIOPIC 

DR. TRITTON ; MR. B. G. HEROUY : 

d, z. Elements of Ethiopic. [30 hrs.] 

Other courses may be arranged as required. 

MODERN HEBREW 

MR. WARTSKI : 

Hebrew Grammar. 

Hebrew Texts. 

Conversation and Composition. 

History of Modern Hebrew Literature. 

Jewish Life in the Middle Ages. 

Times to be arranged. 

HEBREW PALAEOGRAPHY 

DR. BIRNBAUM : 

Times to be arranged. 

NORTH SEMITIC EPIGRAPHY 

DR. BIRNBAUM : 

Times to be arranged. 



EL TURCO-MONGOL 

OTTOMAN TURKISH 

ALI RIZA BEY ; MR. TOPALIAN : 

COLLOQUIAL TURKISH 

, x. A.I. Beginners' Course. [2 hrs.] M., W., 3. 
/, M, y. A.2. Continuation Course. [2 hrs.] Tu., 

Th., 3. 
, u t z. A. 3. Advanced Course (as required). 

GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 

w, #, xb. B.I. Elementary Turkish Grammar. 

[2 hrs.] M., F., ii. 

0, b, /, w, y, yb. B.2. Second Year Course (Arabic and 

Persian Elements). [2 hrs.] M., 
W., 10. 
a, b y c, g t w, z. Advanced Composition (as required). 

NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



AND SEMINARS 1 29 

TEXTS 
(i) Roman Script 

w, x. C.i. Elementary Prose Texts. [2 hrs.] 
M., W., 10. 

a t b> c t / g> u > y* z - C.2. Prose and Poetical Texts. [2 hrs.] 

Tu., Th., ii. 
a j by c,f,g, u, y, z. C.3. Turkish Journals, [i hr.] F., 12. 

(ii) Arabic Script. 

x. C.4. Elementary Texts. [2 hrs.] Tu., 

Th., 2. 
a, by y. C5. Prose and Poetical Texts. [2 hrs.] 

M.,W., 2 . 

r, #. C.6. Advanced Texts (as required). 
z\ C.j. Old Turkish Texts (as required). 

MISCELLANEOUS 

x y y, z. D.I. Manners and Customs, [i hr.] W., 5. 
c,x,y,z. D.2. History of Turkey. [2 hrs.] M., 

W., 12. 

z. 0.3. History of Turkish Literature, [i hr.] 
M, S . 

* TURKL * UIGHUR 

Miss R. WINGATE i- 
Times to be arranged. 

* MONGOLIAN 

(See Department of the Far East.) 

ffl. * GEORGIAN 

MR. GUGUSHVILI : 

Courses will be arranged as required. 

IV. INDO-EUROPEAN LANGUAGES 

(i) ARMENIAN 
MR. TOPALIAN : 

a > c > x > y- Armenian Grammar and Composition. 
a j c > x > y* Armenian Texts. 

c, x, y. History of Armenian Literature. 
Times to be arranged. 



NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 





130 LECTURES, CLASSES 

(ii) IRANIAN 
PERSIAN 

PROFESSOR V. MINORSKY : G. H. DARAB KHAN ; 
SAYYID H. TAQIZADEH : 

a, x. Elementary Persian. M., Tu., W., F., n. 

a y x. Elementary Composition. M., 3 ; F., 5. 

b t c, y. Continuation Composition. M., 4 ; Th., 5. 

d, z. Advanced Composition. W., 12 ; F., 3. 

x, y, z. Conversation and Oral Composition. M.,4; 
Tu., 2; W., 2; Th., ii ; F, 4. 

a. Elementary Texts. Tu., 12; F., ii. 

x. First Year Certificate Texts. Tu., Th., 4 ; 
Commercial Texts and Correspondence. 

Tu, 5. 
y. Second Year Certificate Texts. Tu., 3. 

F., 12. 
z. Diploma Texts (as required). 

b. Intermediate Texts. M., W., 12. 

c. B.A. Texts. M., Th., 3. 

d. B.A. Honours Texts (four hours per week). 
d, e, z. History of Persia. Tu., 12. 

d, e, z. Persian Literature. W., 3. 

d, e, z. Historical Persian Grammar (as required). 

q. I.C.S. Competitive. W., F, 4. 

r. I.C.S. Probationers. Tu., Th., 12. 

u. Military Texts (as required). 

OLD AND MIDDLE IRANIAN LANGUAGES 

DR. W. HENNING : 

d, e y z. Avestan : Texts in Reichelt's Avesta Reader. [30 hrs.]. 

d, e y z. Old Persian : Texts in Tolman's Ancient Persian Lexicon 

and Texts. [30 hrs.]. 

e. Pehlavi : Texts in Nyberg's Hilfsbuch des Pahlavi. [30 hrs.]. 
e, z. Sogdan : Vessantara-Jataka. [30 hrs.]. 

e. Manichaean Middle-Iranian : Select Texts. [30 hrs.]. 

e. Iranian Comparative Philology. [30 hrs.]. 

e. New Iranian Dialects. Times to be arranged. 

* PASHTO 

(See Department of India, Burma and Ceylon.) 

NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



AND SEMINARS 131 

4. DEPARTMENT OF AFRICA 

L GENERAL 

DR. WARD ; MRS. ASHTON ; REV. DR. BARGERY ; DR. TUCKER : 
Structure of African Languages. Terminal Course. Tu. n. 
[10 hrs.]. 

II. BANTU LANGUAGES 

SWAHILI 

MRS. E. O. ASHTON : 

a, x. Elementary Course. 

Elements of Swahili. 
Texts and Conversation. 
y. Intermediate Course. 

Grammar and Composition. 
Texts and Conversation. 
z. Advanced Course. 

Texts and Conversation. 
Composition. 
Elements of Swahili. 
Courses of 60-120 hours per term can 
be arranged for ist and 2nd year 
Certificates. 
Times to be arranged. 

* KIKUYU 

DR. L. S. B. LEAKEY ; DR. TUCKER ; Miss HONIKMAN : 
Courses will be arranged as required. 

* LUGANDA 

DR. TUCKER ; THE VEN. ARCHDEACON E. S. DANIELL : 
Courses will be arranged as required. 

* SOTHO-CHWANA and * ZULU-XHOSA 

DR. A. N. TUCKER : 

Introductory courses will be arranged as required. 

Courses in other Bantu Languages will be arranged, where 
possible and when required. 

COMPARATIVE GRAMMAR 

DR. A. N. TUCKER ; MRS. ASHTON : 

e, z. Comparative grammar of the Bantu Lan- 
guages. Times to be arranged. 



NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



132 LECTURES, CLASSES 

10. WEST AFRICAN LANGUAGES 

HAUSA 

REV. DR. G. P. BARGERY : 

M, x. Grammar and Elementary Composition. 

[2 hrs.] 

u y x. Colloquial and Texts. [2 hrs.] 
u. Religion and Customs. [2 hrs.] 
y. Grammar and Advanced Composition. 

[3 hrs.] 

y. Colloquial and Texts. [3 hrs.] 
y. Religions, Customs, and History. [3 hrs.] 
Times will be arranged as required. 

These courses are also suitable for the Staff College and the 
Nigerian Government Lower and Higher Examinations, and for Army 
Interpreters. 

IBO, EFIK, TWI, YORUBA 

DR. WARD ; Miss HONIKMAN : 

Courses will be arranged as required. Native assistants for 
conversation. 

*EWE, *FANTI, *GA, * MENDE 

Courses in EWE, FANTI, GA, MENDE, and other languages can 
generally be arranged as required. 

These are given by native teachers under the supervision of a 
European member of the Staff. 

IV. * SUDANESE LANGUAGES 

DR. A. N. TUCKER : 

Elementary courses in DINKA, NUER, SHILLUK, BARI. 

V. GRAMOPHONE RECORDS 

Gramophone records of HAUSA, TWI, IBO, YORUBA, ZULU, XHOSA, 
are available for the use of students. Other languages are in preparation. 



NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



AND SEMINARS 133 

5. DEPARTMENT OF PHONETICS AND 
LINGUISTICS 

A. COMPARATIVE OR HISTORICAL GRAMMAR 

PROFESSOR TURNER : 

d, e, z. Comparative Grammar of the Indo-Aryan 

languages. Tu., F., 12. [60 hrs.] 
d, e, z. Comparative Grammar of the Indo-Euro- 
pean languages, with special reference 
to Sanskrit. (1937-38.) [60 hrs.] 
DR. TRITTON : 

d y c, z, Comparative Grammar of the Semitic 

Languages. Times to be arranged. 
SIR RICHARD WINSTEDT : 

e y z. The Comparative Philology of the Indonesian 

languages. F., 4. 
DR. TUCKER : 

e. z. Comparative Grammar of the Bantu lan- 
guages. Times to be arranged. 



B. PHONETICS AND LINGUISTICS 

PROF. LLOYD JAMES ; DR. WARD ; MR. BUTLIN ; DR. TUCKER ; Miss 
HONIKMAN ; MR. FIRTH (Leave of Absence in India) ; DR. 
GRAHAME BAILEY ; MR. SUTTON PAGE. 

GENERAL PHONETICS 

5.1. PROFESSOR LLOYD JAMES: General Elementary Phonetics for 

Missionaries.! F., 2. [10 hrs.] 

5.2. MR. BUTLIN, DR. TUCKER, Miss HONIKMAN : Practical Element- 

ary Phonetics and Ear-Training for Missionaries.! F., 3 
[7i hrs.] 

8.3. MR. BUTLIN : General Phonetics for Language Students. 

W., ii. 

A.I. PROFESSOR LLOYD JAMES and Miss HONIKMAN: General 
Phonetics for Indian Civil Service Probationers. W., 10. 
[30 hrs.] 

A. 2. PROFESSOR LLOYD JAMES, DR. WARD, DR. TUCKER, Miss 
HONIKMAN : Special Course of Phonetic Training for 
students of Anthropology. Tu., 10 ; second hour by arrange- 
ment. [30 hrs.] 

A.3. PROFESSOR LLOYD JAMES, MR. BUTLIN : General Phonetics for 
students of Indo-Aryan Philology. Time to be arranged. 
[30 hrs.] 

A. 4. PROFESSOR LLOYD JAMES and MR* BUTLIN : General Phonetics 
for students of Semitic Philology. W., 12. [30 hrs.] 

NOTE. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 
t Terminal Courses. 



134 LECTURES, CLASSES 

PHONETICS OF ASIATIC LANGUAGES 

8.3. MR. BUTLIN : Continuation Course for students of Indian 

Languages who have followed S.i and S.2f. Tu., 2. 
[10 hrs.] 

8.4. MR. BUTLIN: Phonetics of Arabic (Elementary).f F., u. 

[10 hrs.] (Advanced.)t Th., n. [10 hrs.] 

8.5. PROFESSOR LLOYD JAMES : Phonetics of Persian.f F., 10. 

[10 hrs.] 

8.6. MR. SUTTON PAGE : Phonetics of Bengali. M., 4.30. [30 hrs.] 

8.7. DR. GRAHAME BAILEY : Phonetics of Hindi, Urdu, Panjabi. 

Times to be arranged. [30 hrs.] 

8.8. MR. BUTLIN : Phonetics of Dravidian Languages.-)- Tu., 12. 

[10 hrs.] 

8.9. MR. BUTLIN : Phonetics for students of Malay.f Th., 2. 

[iohrs.] 

8. 10. MR. BUTLIN : Phonetics of Japanese.! W., 10. [10 hrs.] 
S.n. MR. BUTLIN: Phonetics of Chinese.f Tu., 3. [10 hrs.] 

PHONETICS OF AFRICAN LANGUAGES 

8. 12. PROF. LLOYD JAMES, DR. WARD, DR. TUCKER, Miss HONIKMAN. 

Times to be arranged. 

ENGLISH PHONETICS 

8.15. PROF. LLOYD JAMES, MR. BUTLIN: Phonetics of English for 
foreign students. Th., 10. [znd and 3rd Terms only.] 

EXPERIMENTAL PHONETICS 

8.13. MR. BUTLIN : An Introduction to Experimental Methods, with 

Practical Work. Tu., 12. [30 hrs.] 

GRAMOPHONE RECORDING 

The Department of Phonetics and Linguistics is equipped with 
modern electrical direct recording apparatus, which is available for 
pedagogical and research purposes. A course of instruction in the uses 
and technique of speech recording can be provided for those intending 
to carry out linguistic research in the field. Intending students should 
in the first instance consult the Head of the Department, Professor 
Lloyd James. 

LINGUISTICS 

A.6. MR. FIRTH : (On leave of absence in India.) 

METHODS OF LANGUAGE STUDY 

8.14. Mr. SUTTON PAGE : Methods of Language Study. F., 5.30. 

[10 hrs.] 

PREPARATION FOR LINGUISTIC RESEARCH 

Special courses are arranged to meet the needs of individual students. 



t Terminal Courses. 



AND SEMINARS 135 

6. DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL HISTORY 

AND LAW 

I. HISTORY 

NEAR AND MIDDLE EAST 

PROFESSOR GIBB ; DR. A. S. TRITTON : 

History of the Near and Middle East (600-1040)^.3. 
History of Egypt and Syria (800-1517). ist Term. 

Time to be arranged. 
Islamic Institutions. Tu., n. 

PROFESSOR .V. MINORSKY : 

History of the Middle East (from 900). Tu., 12. 
Historical Geography of Western Asia. M., 12. 

PROFESSOR MINORSKY and PROFESSOR GIBB : 

History of the Ottoman Empire from 1300. ist and 
2nd Terms. Time to be arranged. 

PROFESSOR DODWELL : 

Egypt from Mehemet AH to Cromer. M., 5. 
[10 hrs.] 

PROFESSOR GIBB : 

The Political Ideas of Islam (2nd Term). Tu., n. 
The Crusades in their Eastern Aspect (1097-1131). 
[iohrs.] M., W., 5. 

INDIAN 

(i) General 

DR. RATNASURIYA : 

The Hindu Period. Time to be arranged. [30 hrs.] 

PROFESSOR DODWELL : 

The Sultanate of Delhi. Tu., 2. (First Term.) [10 hrs.] 
The Mughal Empire. T^u., 2. (Second and Third 

Terms). [20 hrs.] 

History of India from 1500 to 1784. W., 2. [30 hrs.] 
Indian Historical Geography. M., 4. (First Term.) 
The Origins of Contemporary India. (Tidies to be 

arranged.) 



136 LECTURES, CLASSES 

(2) Political Ideas 
DR. BARNETT : 

Hindu Political Ideas. [30 hrs.] (First Term.) 
Time to be arranged. 

(3) Institutions 
DR. BARNETT : 

Indian Institutions (Hindu Period). [30 hrs.] 
Times to be arranged. 

PROFESSOR DODWELL : 

Indian Institutions (Muslim Period). Tu., 2. 

MR. C. H. PHILIPS : 

Indian Institutions (British Period). Tu., 3. [30 hrs.] 

(4) Special Subject 
MR. C. H. PHILIPS : 

British India (1858-1917). M., 2. [30 hrs.] 
Second Year Courses. M., 3. 

(5) Seminars 
PROFESSOR DODWELL : 

British India (1773-1858). Tu., 5. [30 hrs.] 

(6) Provincial 
MR. W. SUTTON PAGE : 

History of Bengal. Tu., 2. 

MR. KANHERE : 

History of Maharashtra. Tu., 2. 

MR. PATHY : 

The Dravidians in India. Tu., 2. 

(7) Courses for I.C.S. Probationers 
PROFESSOR H. H. DODWELL : 

History of India (i year course). M., 2, and W., 12. 

[60 hrs.] 
History of India (2nd year). W., 4. [30 hrs.] 



BURMA 

DR. STEWART : 

History of Burma. 

Times to be arranged. 



AND SEMINARS 137 

CEYLON 

DR. RATNASURIYA : 

History of Ceylon. Tu., 2. 

JEWISH 

MR. WARTSKI : 

Jewish Life in the Middle Ages. 
Times to be arranged. 



THE FARTHER EAST 

Malaya 

SIR RICHARD WINSTEDT : 



History of Malaya. F., 5. 

China 
DR. E. D. EDWARDS : 

T'ang History, A.D. 712-756. M., 5. 

Japan. 
COMMANDER ISEMONGER : 

Geography and Outlines of Japanese History M., 2. 
Japanese History. Tu., 12. 

MR. YOSHITAKE : 

Cultural History of Japan. W., 2. 

H. LAW 
BURMESE BUDDHIST LAW 

Courses will be arranged as required. 

INDIAN LAW 
DR. VESEY FITZGERALD : 

hj r, rb. Indian Penal Code and Code of Criminal Procedure. 
[35 hrs.] First and Third Terms of each session. 
Tu., 10, and Th., 10, at S.O.S. 

r, b. Hindu and Muhammadan Law and Institutions (with 
occasional law classes on other subjects). [60 hrs.] 
At S.O.S. Tu., Th., 12. 

j. Hindu Law. [30 hrs.] .At S.O.S. Tu., 2. 

j. Muhammadan Law. [30 hrs.] At S.O.S. Th., 2. 



. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p^. no. 



138 LECTURES, CLASSES AND SEMINARS 

y, r. Indian Evidence Act. Second Term of each session. 
At S.O.S. Tu., and Th., 10 a.m. 

ja. Seminars in Hindu Law, Muhammadan Law. At 
University College. F., 2.15. (For 2nd year LL.M. 
students) alternate Fridays at 12 for ist year LL.M. 
students. 

LL.M. Students can attend any of the above lectures, and assistance 
will be afforded, as far as the resources of the School permit, to students 
studying the Law of India upon any given point. 

LAW OF PALESTINE 

y, ja. At University College. F., 10. 

ja. Seminar in Palestine Law. At University College. 
Alternate Fridays at 12. 



NOT*. For meaning of letters prefixed to courses, see p. no. 



PART IX 



PROCEDURE FOR CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES OF 
THE UNIVERSITY, SCHOOL CERTIFICATES AND 
DIPLOMAS, AND OTHER EXAMINATIONS. 



UNIVERSITY EXAMINATIONS 

[N.B. Although the following information is taken from the 
University Regulations, students are strongly recom- 
mended to consult the actual Regulations and pamphlets 
issued "by the University (to which references are given) 
since these alone are authoritative. 1 ] 



i. MATRICULATION 

Before being registered as a student of the University (either 
Internal or External) and being entitled to proceed to a degree, a person 
must either 

(i) have passed the London Matriculation Examination, 
or (2) have passed the Special University Entrance Exam- 
ination of the University of London, 
or (3) have satisfied the conditions for matriculation at the 

Senior or General School Examination, 

or (4) have obtained exemption from the Matriculation 
Examination in view of his holding some other 
qualification accepted for the purpose by the University 
of London. 



1 The following Regulations and Pamphlets can be obtained on applica- 
tion to : 

(a) The Academic Registrar, University of London, W.C. i. 
General Information for Internal Students. 
Regulations in the Faculty of Arts for Internal Students. 
Regulations in the Faculty of Laws for Internal Students. 
Regulations for Degrees in Commerce for Internal Students. 
General Information in regard to the Degree of Doctor of 

Philosophy (Ph.D.). 
Admission of Students from other Universities as Candidates 

for Higher Degrees. 
(6) The External Registrar, University of London, W.C. i. 

Regulations for External Degrees in the several Faculties, 
(c) The Secretary of the Matriculation and Schools Examination 

Council, University of London, W.C. i. 
Regulations for Matriculation. 

Regulations relating to the Special University Entrance 
Examination. 

139 



140 



MATRICULATION 



(i) The Matriculation Examination. 

This is held three times a year, and candidates must take English, 
Elementary Mathematics, a language, and two other subjects to be 
selected from a list given in the Regulations for Matriculation. 
Candidates must be sixteen years of age, and should apply to the 
Principal, University of London, W.C. i, for an entry form, by the 
dates shown in the following table. The examination fee is 2 izs. 6d. 
The examinations are held as follows : 



Date Examination 
begins 


Entry Forms must 
be applied for by 


Entry Forms must 
be completed and 
returned by 


Candidates must 
have completed 
their sixteenth 
year by 


i Second Tuesday 
in September 


20th August 


14 Days before 
beginning of 
examination. 


1 5th September 


2 Second Tuesday 
in January 


25th November 


ist December 


1 4th January 


3 First Tuesday 
in June 


1 8th April 


24th April 


3 ist July 



For full details regarding the regulations governing the Matricula- 
tion Examination see the " Regulations for Matriculation ", which may 
be obtained on application to the Secretary to the Matriculation and 
Schools Examination Council, University of London, W.C. i. 

Courses are provided at the School in the following subjects for 
matriculation : the numbers indicate the page on which information 
as to the courses can be found (the letter a placed before the title of 
the course shows it to be suitable for candidates for the Matriculation) : 



Arabic (p. 126) 
Armenian (p. 129) 
Bengali (p. 117) 
Burmese (p. 112) 
Chinese (pp. 121-123) 
Fanti (p. 132) 
Ga (p. 132) 
Gujarat i (p. 116) 
Hausa (p. 132) 
Hebrew (Modern) (p. 128) 
Hindi (p. 119) 

Hindustani or Urdu (p. 119) 
Japanese (p. 123) 
Kanarese (p. 113) 
Malay (p. 124) 
Malayalam (p. 113) 



Marathi (p. 115) 

Pali (p. in) 

Panjabi (Gurmukhi and 

Perso-Arabic) (p. 120) 
Persian (p. 130) 
Sanskrit (p. m) 
Siamese (p. 123) 
Sinhalese (p. 118) 
Swahili (p. 131) 
Tamil (p. 114) 
Telugu (p. 115) 
Turkish (p. 128) 
Twi (p. 132) 
Yoruba (p. 132) 
Zulu-Xhosa (p. 131) 



For the full list of subjects see " Regulations for Matriculation ". 
Candidates may choose two subjects out of the five necessary from 
the above list. For fees see pp. 90-93. 



MATRICULATION 141 

SYLLABUSES 

[Candidates are advised to verify from the University Regulations the 
following information concerning syllabuses.] 

SANSKRIT, PALI, CLASSICAL HEBREW, AND CLASSICAL 

SYRIAC. 

The paper shall be drawn up as nearly as may be practicable in conformity 
with the following syllabus : 

The paper shall contain (a) an easy passage or easy passages for translation 
from the language in question ; (b) an easy piece of translation into the language 
in question, or, as an alternative, an essay of a simple character to be written 
in the language in question ; (c) questions on grammar, limited to accidence 
and elementary syntax. Candidates will be required to satisfy the examiners 
in each of the three sections of the syllabus. 

MODERN ORIENTAL AND AFRICAN LANGUAGES 

(other than Arabic and Modern Hebrew). 

The paper shall contain : 

(a) Translation into English. 

(b) Translation into the language. 

(c) Translation into the language of sentences chosen to test grammatical 
knowledge. 

(d) Free composition on one of three subjects. 

ARABIC AND MODERN HEBREW 

The paper shall contain : 

(a) Translation into English. 

(b) Pointing an unpointed passage. 

(c) Translation into the language (pointed). 

(d) Translation into the language of sentences chosen to test grammatical 
knowledge. 

(e) Free composition (unpointed) on one of three subjects. 
Candidates offering Modern Hebrew are required to use the square script, 

but are permitted to make use of Hebrew grammatical terminology where 
the English terminology is difficult of application. 



142 SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 

(2) The Special University Entrance Examination. 

All communications relating to this examination must be addressed 
to The Secretary of the Matriculation and Schools Examination 
Council, University of London, W.C. i. 

i . The following classes of persons may apply for admission to the 
Special University Entrance Examination instead of entering for the 
ordinary Matriculation Examination : 

SECTION I. 

Persons of nineteen years of age x and upwards who present (a) Certi- 
ficates of Matriculation in Dominion or Colonial Universities, 2 or 
(b) Indian 2 or Foreign Certificates from an Academic or other Educa- 
tional Authority which in the opinion of the Principal indicate that 
they have attained a standard prima facie involving an education 
equivalent in their own country to that required in England for 
Matriculation in this University. 3 

SECTION II. 
Persons over 23 years of age. 4 



2. Each candidate will be required to pay a fee of five guineas, and 
to make on his entry form a written declaration that it is his bona fide 
intention to proceed to a Degree or Diploma of the University. 

3. The examination shall be conducted by printed papers, together 
with a viva-voce Examination in every case in which the Examiners 
decide that it is necessary. 

There shall be no syllabus, but the Board of Examiners may apply 
any test they may consider necessary in the case of any candidate. 
Candidates proceeding as Internal Students to the Intermediate 
Examination in Arts with Latin, will be required to pass in the subject 
of Latin ; and those proceeding as Internal Students to the B.Sc. 
(General) or B.Sc. (Special) Degree will be required to pass in Elemen- 
tary Mathematics. 

1 The age of a candidate with regard to admission to this examination is 
reckoned thus : 

A candidate who attains the age of nineteen years between I4th January 
and 3ist July of any year will be admissible to any Special University 
Entrance Examination held between those dates or subsequently ; and a 
candidate who attains the age of nineteen years between ist August of any 
year and the i4th day of January in the year next ensuing will be admissible 
to any Special University Entrance Examination held between those dates 
or subsequently. 

2 Diplomas of Degrees granted by approved Universities entitle the holders 
thereof to registration as Matriculated Students without further examination. 

8 The foreign certification, which must be either the original certificate or a 
certification signed by the Registrar of the University at which the examina- 
tion has been passed, on which the application is based must be submitted to 
the University when the application is made, and must be accompanied by 
a translation thereof in English. The candidate must be prepared, if required 
by the University, to procure the attestation of this translation by a Consul 
or other official Representative of his Government in England. 

4 Applications from persons under 23 years of age will not be considered. 



SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 143 

In no case shall a candidate be passed if he fail to attend the viva- 
voce examination when called upon to do so by the Examiners. 

A candidate who fails to reach the required standard in one subject 
only may be " referred/' i.e. he may be permitted, if the Examiners 
so decide, to present himself in that subject alone, on one occasion 
only, at one of the next four examinations, on payment of a fee of 
two-and-a-half guineas. A referred candidate who does not pass in 
his referred subject on the occasion of his re-entry will be required, 
if he again enter, to present himself for the whole examination, and to 
pay the full fee. The fee for re-entry to the whole examination is Five 
Guineas. 

4. The Examiners will report to the Senate through the Matricu- 
lation and School Examinations Council the names of the successful 
candidates, who may be registered forthwith as students of the 
University. 

5 . If a candidate withdraw before the last day of entry to the examina- 
tion, his fee "shall be returned, but if he withdraw after the last day 
of entry, or fail to present himself at the examination, he shall receive 
back half the fee paid. His standing in the University can be reckoned 
only in accordance with the Regulations as applied to the examination 
at which he actually appears, and not to that for which he first made 
application. Nevertheless, should a candidate on account of illness 
either fail to present himself at the examination, or, having presented 
himself, retire therefrom, the Principal may, at his discretion and on 
receipt of medical evidence satisfactory to him, return to the candidate 
the fee paid less one guinea, and in the case of infectious illness 
(whether of the candidate himself or of a person with whom he has 
been in contact), the amount of the whole fee paid. 

Note. No certificate will be delivered to a successful candidate save only 
the ordinary notification of registration as a matriculated student as issued by 
the appropriate Officer. 

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES. 

SECTION I. 

6. Candidates applying under Section I must give their age and 
must write individually, not less than five clear weeks before the 
Examination, to the Secretary of the Matriculation and Schools 
Examination Council for an entry form, stating what Dominion, 
Colonial, Indian or Foreign Certification they are prepared to submit. 

7. This entry form, duly filled in, must be returned to the Secretary 
of the Matriculation and Schools Examination Council by the appointed 
date, 1 together with the certification aforesaid, a certificate of age, and 
the appropriate fee. Evidence of age and certificate must be official. 

8. Where a foreign certification is submitted, it must be accompanied 
by a translation thereof into English ,' and the candidate must be 
prepared, if required by the University, to procure the attestation of 
this translation by a Consul or other official Representative of his 
Government in England. 



144 SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 

SECTION II. 

9. Candidates applying under Section II must give their age and must 
write individually, not less than five clear weeks before the Examination, 
to the Secretary of the Matriculation and Schools Examination Council 
for an entry form, which must be returned by the appointed date, 1 
together with a certificate of age, and the appropriate fee. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

10. The examination is a shortened form of the Matriculation 
Examination ; it is held in London only ; the written portion occupies 
two days, and there is an oral examination, for which attendance on 
a further day will be required, in every case in which the Examiners so 
decide. 

11. The written portion of the examination for all candidates will 
usually be conducted in accordance with the following scheme : 

Candidates will be examined in either four or five subjects which must be 
selected from the following Groups : 

I. * English. (Obligatory on all candidates.) 

II. Elementary Mathematics or Logic at the choice of the candidate 
except that candidates proceeding to a Degree in Engineering or in Estate 
Management, or as Internal Students to the B.Sc. (General) or B.Sc. 
(Special) Degree must take Elementary Mathematics. 

III. Candidates are required to select their Third Subject according to 
the degree to which they are proceeding, as set out below : 

Divinity. Latin, Greek, or *New Testament Greek. 

Arts, Music. Latin, Greek, French, German, Spanish, Italian, 
or Dutch ; but candidates proceeding as Internal Students 
to the Intermediate Examination in Arts with Latin will be 
required to pass in Latin. 

Laws. Latin, *History (English), Logic, French, German, 
Spanish, Italian, or Dutch. 

Medicine, Pharmacy. Chemistry, * Physics, Botany, Zoology, 
or * General Biology. 

Science (including Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary Science). 
* Physics, Chemistry, Botany, Zoology, or * General Biology. 

Engineering. Mathematics (More Advanced), Mechanics, *Physics, 
or Geometrical and Mechanical Drawing. 

Economics, Commerce, Estate Management. ""Economics, *History 
(English), or Geography. 



* See par. 13. 

1 " The appointed date " is four clear weeks before the date of the examina- 
tion at which the candidate elects to present himself. 



SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 145 

IV. The Fourth Subject must be elected by the candidate either from 
among those given under Groups II and III above, provided that it has not 
already been taken, or from among the following : History (*Modern Euro- 
pean, or * Ancient, or *British Empire), Geology. 2 

V. English-speaking candidates who do not take one of the Languages 
given under Group III above as one of their four subjects must take, as 
a Fifth Subject, an alternative paper in one of the Modern Languages given 
in that Group. This paper will consist only of Translation from the foreign 
language into English, and will occupy one hour. 

N.B. Candidates' choice of subjects is further limited as follows : 
Candidates offering Greek may not offer also New Testament Greek ; 
candidates offering General Biology may not offer in addition Botany or 
Zoology. Candidates offering both Elementary Mathematics and Logic 
are required to take the Morning Paper in Mathematics. Only one Branch 
of History may be offered. 

Candidates whose native language is not English are not permitted to 
offer their native language at this examination. In the case of bi-lingual 
candidates, and in all cases of doubt, the candidates must consult the Uni- 
versity as to which language he may take, and the decision of the University 
shall be final. 

(Note. The time allowed for each paper will be two hours, except in the 
Alternative papers in modern foreign Languages, in which one hour is 
allowed .) 

The examination will as a rule be held four times a year, in March, 
May, September, and December. The written portion of the examina- 
tion will take place as a rule on Thursday and Friday. The oral 
examination will generally be held on Friday and Saturday in the week 
following the date of the written examination ; but candidates from 
a distance will, as far as practicable, have their oral examination on 
the Saturday following their written examination. 

12. There are no published syllabuses or examination papers ; 
but in both these respects the written part of the examination, except in 
the case of subjects marked with an asterisk, corresponds approximately 
to the Matriculation Examination. 

13. The attention of students is directed to the following notes on 
the subjects marked with an asterisk : 

(i) For candidates who are not English-speaking students, the examina- 
tion in English consists mainly of an Essay ; but English-speaking candidates 
will also be examined, orally or otherwise, in English Grammar, and may 
further be examined as to their general reading in English Literature. 

(ii) The examination paper in Physics includes questions in Heat, Light, 
and Sound, as well as questions in Magnetism and Electricity ; candidates 
may obtain full credit by answering questions either in one or in both 
sections, but may not offer the two sections as separate subjects of 
examination. 

(iii) The examination paper in Economics will contain questions both 
in the principles of Economics and in Industrial History ; candidates may 
obtain full credit by answering questions eAher in one or in both sections, 
but may not offer the two sections as separate subjects of examination. 



* See par. 13. 

2 This subject will be discontinued in and after 1937. 



146 SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 

(iv) The examination in English History covers the whole period 55 B.C. 
A.D. 1901 ; a choice of questions is allowed. 

(v) In all other subjects marked with an asterisk a general elementary 
knowledge is required. 

14. All students who intend to enter for this examination, and who 
are in any doubt as to the choice of their subjects or as to any other 
point in the Regulations, are advised to communicate directly with 
the Secretary of the Matriculation and Schools Examination Council 
before commencing their preparation for the examination, giving an 
account of past studies and stating for which Degree they propose 
to study. 

15. (a) Entry forms for the examination must be applied for not 
less than five clear weeks, and must be returned complete in all respects, 
not less than four clear weeks before the first day of the written 
examination, which will be in 1937. 

Thurs., 4th March ; Thurs., 6th May ; Tues., 2ist Sept., Thurs., 

2nd Dec. 
in 1938 

Thurs., loth March ; Thurs., 5th May ; Tues, 20th Sept. 

(b) Cards of admission to the examination, on which are given all 
necessary instructions, will be despatched from the University one 
week before the date of the examination. 

1 6. At two o'clock on Tuesday in the week after the conclusion 
of the examination, there will be published a numerical list of the 
candidates who have passed, and of the candidates who have been 
referred to later examinations. 

17. An individual communication will be sent to every candidate 
within a fortnight from the date of the written examination. Candidates 
who have satisfied the examiners will be notified that they have been 
registered as matriculated students of the University. Candidates 
who have not satisfied the examiners, or who have been " referred ", 
will be so informed. No further particulars are supplied to candidates 
in any case. 

1 8. Students who have passed the Special University Entrance 
Examination should observe carefully that, while they are entitled 
within the University to all the privileges of matriculated students, 
it does not follow that other public authorities, or Bodies outside the 
University, will accord to them the facilities or exemptions which they 
have undertaken to accord to students who have passed the Matricula- 
tion Examination of the University of London. All inquiries as to 
the conditions under which such facilities or exemptions are given 
must be directed not to the University but to the Bodies from whom 
such privileges are sought. " 



ADMISSION 147 

2. ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 

Internal Students are admitted in one or other of the following 
classes : 

(1) Undergraduates, registered in accordance with the following 

conditions : 

(i) as matriculated, and 

(ii) as pursuing an approved course of study for a first 
degree of the University in a School of the University or 
under Recognized Teachers. 

(2) Advanced Students registered in accordance with the following 

conditions : 

(i) as having passed (a) the examinations required for 
an Internal or an External degree of the University, or (6) 
approved examinations required for a degree in another 
University, or (c) equivalent approved examinations ; and 

(ii) as matriculated ; and 

(iii) as pursuing an approved course of study in a School 
of the University or under Recognized Teachers for a first or 
bachelor's degree of the University. 

(3) Postgraduate Students registered in accordance with the 

following conditions : 

(i) as having passed (a) the examinations required for 
an Internal or an External degree of the University, or (b) 
approved examinations required for a degree in another 
University, or (c) equiva^nt approved examinations ; and 

(ii) as matriculated ; and 

(iii) as pursuing a course of study in a School of the 
University or under Recognized Teachers for a Master's or 
Ph.D. degree. 

(4) Diploma Students, registered as pursuing a course of study : 

(i) in a School of the University or under Recognized 
Teachers for a post graduate diploma, or 

(ii) in a School of the University for an ordinary diploma. 

(5) Research Students, registered as pursuing in a School or in a 

public educational institution under one or more Teachers 
of the University, an approved course of research. 



148 REGISTRATION 

3. REGISTRATION 

Students of the University are either Internal, External, or Associate. 

Internal Students of the University are students who have 
matriculated at the University and are pursuing a course of study 
approved by the University in a School or Schools or under one or 
more of the teachers of the University. 

External Students as a rule do not follow regular courses of 
study at a School of the University before taking their degree 
examinations, although External Students are in no way precluded 
from working at a School of the University. For information 
relating to registration as an External Student application should 
be made to the External Registrar, University of London, W.C. i. 
Such students may, if they desire, attend lectures and classes at the 
School on payment of the fees specified in each case. 

Associate Students. Students taking a recognized course for the 
First or Second Year Certificate or a Diploma of the School may be 
registered as Associate Students of the University of London. For 
information apply to the Registrar. 

A matriculated l student of the University who wishes to proceed 
to a first degree (B.A. Pass or Honours) as an Internal Student at the 
School of Oriental Studies should, in addition to completing the form 
of admission to the School, apply to the Registrar of the School for 
a Registration Schedule. These Registration Schedules are supplied 
by the Academic Registrar of the University to the Authorities of 
Schools or Institutions, and, after they have been issued to students 
and filled up, are returned by these Authorities to the Academic 
Registrar. A card is sent by the Academic Registrar to each student 
whose application for registration is approved, notifying his registration 
as an Internal Student. 

Applications for registration as an Internal Student should normally 
be made within three months from the first attendance at the course 
on account of which registration is desired and before the end of the 
session in which such course was begun. The period of three months 
will be reckoned as from the last day of the month in which course in 
question was begun. 

No fee is required on the registration as an Internal Student of a 
student who is matriculated. An Internal Diploma or Research 
Student who has not matriculated is required to pay a fee of los. 6d. 
on registration as an Internal Student, to cover the whole period of 
his registration provided that it is continuously pursued. Such students 
may apply for re-registration on payment of a fee of 55. 

1 It should be clearly understood that matriculation is distinct from 
registration as an Internal Student, but that it is an essential preliminary of 
registration as an Internal Student for all who wish to proceed to degrees to 
the University as Internal Students. It is not required for diploma students, 
except in so far as prescribed by the regulations for any particular diploma. 



REGISTRATION 149 

A fee of ios. 6d. is payable in respect of each application received 
at a later date and acceded to. 

Students who begin their course of study in October and who 
passed either the Matriculation Examination in the following January 
or the Special University Entrance Examination in the following 
March may be registered without payment of a fine, on the receipt by 
the University of a registration schedule not later than 3ist March. 

A fee of IDS. 6d. will be payable in respect of applications for the 
retrospective approval of courses for higher Degrees. 

Note. Students are advised to apply for Registration as soon as qualified. 
Students whose names have been returned by the Authorities of a School or 
Institution as having discontinued attendance at an Approved Course of 
Study and whose names have consequently been removed from the Register 
of Internal Students may be re-registered, after notification by the Authorities 
of a School or Institution that they have resumed an Approved Course of 
Study. Fees payable in respect of late Applications for re-registration will 
be on the same scale as those payable in respect of late Application for 
Registration. 



150 ACADEMIC YEAR: EXEMPTIONS 

4. ACADEMIC YEAR 

The word " year " when used without limitation means a calendar 
year. 

By the term " academic year " is ordinarily meant the period 
intervening between any Examination and an Examination of the 
next higher grade in the following year ; which period may be either 
more or less than a calendar year. 

5. COMMUNICATIONS FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

Communications sent from the University to an individual student 
must be regarded as applying to that student only. 

6. APPLICATIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS 

Applications to the Academic Council by Internal Students for 
exemption from any of the Regulations for Internal Students shall be 
made through the Head of the College, School or Institution to 
which they are attached, and shall not be entertained by the Council 
unless accompanied by a statement from such Head stating whether he 
supports the applications or not. 

7. THESES FOR HIGHER DEGREES 

Theses shall be deposited in the University Library and shall be 
open for public reference, and a register shall be kept in which the 
names of persons referring to these Theses shall be entered. 



COURSES OF STUDY 151 

8. APPROVED COURSES OF STUDY 

Note. References to the B.A. (General) and B.A. Honours Examinations 
and Courses are applicable, respectively, to the B.Sc. (General) and B.Sc. 
(Special) Examinations and Courses. 

1. An approved course of study shall consist of approved 
instruction-courses l in each of the subjects of the course of study in 
which the student presents himself for examination, subject to any 
exemptions granted by the University or under these regulations. 
No student will be admitted to an examination as an Internal Student 
unless he shall present a certificate of having attended the appropriate 
course of study therefor in accordance with these regulations. 

2. An approved course of study for a first Degree must, in accordance 
with the Statutes, extend over not less than three years, and must also, 
unless special exemption be obtained, be continuously pursued. (See 
also Section 16 below.) 

Note. In the case of students admitted under the Regulations for Advanced 
Students the duration of the course of study may be not less than two years. 

3. An Internal Student after completing an approved course of 
study for a first Degree will be permitted to present himself for the 
Final Examination for that Degree at any time subsequently, provided 
that he shall be examined in accordance with such regulations for the 
Degree as may be current when he presents himself for examination. 

4. A certain number of hours shall as a rule be fixed as the minimum 
for an approved instruction-course. In the case of an evening course 
for students who shall produce certificates from their employers to 
the effect that they are engaged in their service for not less than 
25 hours a week (designated below as certificated evening students) 
this minimum may be less than for the corresponding course for day 
students. (See schedule on p. 155 below.) 

Note. Certificated evening students may count attendances at classes 
held on Saturday morning. 

5. An approved course of study for an Intermediate Examination 
shall extend over at least one academic year and an approved course 
of study for a Final Examination shall extend over at least two academic, 
years. 

6. A certificate of attendance at an approved course of study for 
an Intermediate or Final Pass Examination shall certify, subject to 
any exemptions granted under these regulations, 

(i) that the student has attended an approved instruction-course 
in each subject in which he presents himself for examination, to the 
satisfaction of the Teachers concerned ; and 



1 An instruction-course is a course in a single subject of the curriculum. 
It is to be understood, however, that a group of instruction-courses by one 
or more Teachers may be approved as though forming a single instruction- 
course. 



152 COURSES OF STUDY 

(ii) that in the case of those examinations for which a minimum 
number of hours' attendance is prescribed in the schedule to these 
Regulations, that the student has attended for the prescribed 
minimum number of hours, such attendance being attested, 

(a) in the case of a student who has pursued the complete 
course of study for the examination at a School of the University 
by the Principal Officer on behalf of the Governing Body, or 

(b) in the case of other students, by the Officer approved for 
the purpose at each School or Institution concerned, who shall 
certify as to the actual number of hours of attendance at each 
instruction-course. 

7. A student may be permitted to take subsequently to the passing 
of the Intermediate Examination a course of study extending over not 
more than one year in another University approved for the purpose 
in lieu of an approved course of study taken in this University, provided 
that not later than 3oth June in the session previous to that which he 
proposes to spend in such other University he submit to the University 
for approval details of the course of study which he proposes to pursue 
therein. 

It will be required as a general rule that the extent and nature of 
the course taken in another University should be similar to that which 
the student would have been required to take in this University. 

A student availing himself of this regulation will be required to 
submit together with his entry-form for the Final Examination (i) 
certificates of attendance in respect of the portion of his course pursued 
in the University of London in accordance with the General Regulations 
as to Approved Courses of Study, and (ii) certificates of satisfactory 
attendance and progress in each of the subjects in which he has 
attended a course at another University duly signed by the authorities 
of that University. 

8. A certificate of attendance for an Honours Examination shall 
certify that the course of study has been pursued to the satisfaction of 
the teachers, in so far as they are severally concerned. The certificate 
shall be attested by the Principal Officer of the School or Institution 
concerned (or by the Officer approved for the purpose at each School 
or Institution concerned) and by the Teacher or Teachers under whose 
direction the student has pursued his course. 

9. If dissatisfied with the conduct or diligence of any student the 
certifying authority may withhold a certificate of attendance either 
temporarily or permanently. 

10. A student who is exempted in accordance with the regulations 
in any Faculty or by special permission of the University from 
attendance at one or more instruction-courses composing a course of 
study will be allowed a corresponding reduction in the minimum 
hours of attendance, if any, prescribed in the schedule for that course 
of study. 



COURSES OF STUDY 153 

11. Should the Teacher responsible for an instruction-course in 
one of the subjects of the Intermediate Examination certify through 
the authorities of the School or Institution concerned that a student 
who would in ordinary circumstances attend this course has such 
knowledge of this subject as to render it undesirable that he should 
attend it, then the student shall be permitted to omit the course, but 
he will be required to substitute therefor, either in the Intermediate 
year, or in the year next following, such approved instruction-course 
(in the same or another subject) as shall be sanctioned by the authorities 
of the School or Institution to which he is attached, provided 

(1) that the total number of hours in the whole course of study 
for the Intermediate and Final Examinations for the Degree shall 
not fall below the minimum, if any, prescribed by the University ; 

(2) that no students shall be allowed to omit the instruction- 
courses for the Intermediate Examination in more than one subject 
unless the substituted courses be taken in his first year ; 

(3) that no person shall be admitted to the Final Examination for 
a first degree in the University as an Internal Student unless and 
until he has completed an approved course of study comprising 
all the subjects in which he presents himself. 

12. If the attendance of a student, through illness or other 
exceptional circumstances, shall fall short of the requirements set 
forth in the foregoing regulations, he shall only be admitted to examina- 
tion after special application made on his behalf by the authorities 
of the School or Institution to which he is attached. 

13. Honours courses will be arranged by the authorities of the School 
or Institution at which the student is studying. 

14. Internal Students who have pursued an Honours course and 
who, with the approval of the authorities of the School or Institution 
at which they are studying desire to substitute therefor a Pass course, 
may, with the approval of the Academic Council, be exempted from 
attendance in subjects other than those originally included in the 
Honours course for the period during which that course has been 
pursued, provided that such exemption shall not be granted in respect 
of a period exceeding one session. 

If such change from an Honours to a Pass course be made not later 
than the beginning of the second term of the Honours course, with 
the approval of the authorities of the School or Institution at which 
it is pursued, exemption from attendance as above will be granted 
without application to the Academic Council. Such change must, 
however, be notified by the authorities of the School or Institution, at 
the earliest possible opportunity, to the Academic Registrar, for report 
to the Academic Council. * 

Internal Students who have pursued a Pass Course extending over 
not more than one session may, with the consent of the authorities 



154 COURSES OF STUDY 

of the School or Institution at which they are studying, substitute 
therefor an Honours Course including a subsidiary subject in subjects 
in which they have already attended Pass Courses. 

15. A student who has matriculated in January, or has been 
exempted from Matriculation as from January, may be registered as 
an Internal Student as from the date of the beginning of his course of 
study, provided that such date be not anterior by more than four 
months to the date of the first day of the Matriculation Examination 
which he passed, or in respect of which he was registered. 

1 6. Any student who has passed the Intermediate Examination in 
any Faculty as an External Student 1 or who has been exempted from 
the Internal Intermediate Examination on the ground of having passed 
the Higher School Examination may be admitted to the Final 
Examination in the same Faculty as an Internal Student, if he has 
attended satisfactorily an approved course of study for the Final 
Examination extending over at least three years. If, however, he has 
attended as an Internal Student an approved course of study extending 
over two years for the Final Degree Examination in the same Faculty 
as that in which he passed, or was exempted from, the Intermediate 
Examination, in accordance with the requirements of the University, 
he may present himself for the Final Degree Examination at the end 
of such two years' course. 

(I) If he passes that Examination he will be admitted to the 
Degree without further examination, but not until he has com- 
pleted three years of study as an Internal Student by attending 
subsequently to passing the Final Examination a further course 
of study approved for the purpose and not unless the Authorities 
of the School or Institution at which such course is held have 
certified that his attendance and progress have been satisfactory. 

The Senate will approve in individual cases as a third year's 
course of study for such students (i) a course of one year approved 
as part of the course for the Final B.D. Degree ; (2) a course for an 
Honours Degree 2 ; (3) a course of one year approved as part 
of the course for a Higher Degree ; (4) an advanced course of study 
consisting of portions of two or more Honours courses in the 



1 A student who has (i) been " referred " in one subject at an External 
Intermediate Examination or at a Higher School Examination, or (2) is required 
to pass in a fourth subject in order to qualify in accordance with the Regulations 
for exemption from the Intermediate Examination in Arts or Science on the 
ground of having passed the Higher School Examination, may enter on an 
approved course of study for the Final Examination as an Internal Student 
under this Regulation as if he had completed the Intermediate Examination ; 
but he shall be required to complete the Intermediate Examination or his 
qualification for exemption therefrom (at an Internal General or Special 
Intermediate Examination) before entering for the Final Examination for 
Internal Students. 

2 Students are expected normally to include in such course one of the 
subjects taken by them for the Pass Degree. 



COURSES OF STUDY 155 

Faculties of Arts, Science, or Economics ; (5) research under a 
Teacher approved for the purpose ; or (6) in the case of students in 
Commerce, regular courses of study, normally consisting of not less 
than 4 hours lectures a week together with the prescribed written 
work, etc., in a subject of the B.Sc. (Econ.) or B.Com. Part II 
Examination in which they have not already attended such courses, 
together with courses in Economic Theory. In no case will a course 
for an Intermediate Examination be approved as a third year's 
course under this regulation. The third year's course of study 
must be continuously pursued and subsequent alteration of an 
approved course will be allowed only in exceptional circumstances. 

(II) If he fails at that examination he will not be permitted to 
re-enter for the examination until he has either 

(a) completed three years of study as an Internal Student in 
the manner provided above for a student who passes the 
Examination ; or 

(b) completed three years of study as an Internal Student by 
attending during one year instruction-courses approved for the 
Final Examination (Pass or Honours) in one or more of the subjects 
in which he presents himself and has made the following minimum 
attendances, 1 viz. for the Final Examinations in Theology, Arts, 
Laws, and Economics 120 hours, for the Final Examination in 
Music 90 hours, for the Final Examination in Science 150 hours, 
for the Final Examination in Engineering 180 hours. 

17. All questions relating to the modification of courses of study 
by students or to the granting of exemptions from such courses, except 
in so far as they are dealt with in foregoing regulations, shall stand 
referred to the Academic Council. 

Schedule 

The minimum attendance in hours at a course of study to 
be required from a Student shall be as shown in the following 
table for the examinations specified : 

Certified Evening 

Faculty. Examination. Day Students. Students. 

Arts . . Intermediate . . 192 176 

Final . . Double the number of hours 

required for the Intermediate 
Examination. 



1 The minimum number of hours' attendance will not be reduced in the 
case of evening students. 



156 

9. FIRST DEGREES 

No student will be admitted to a First Degree until he has com- 
pleted a course of study extending over at least three years, except 

(i) Persons who have passed approved examinations required 
for a degree in another University ; provided that prior to admission 
as Internal Students they have pursued an approved course extending 
over not less than three years, and 

(ii) Graduates of the University of London who have taken 
degrees as Internal or as External Students, 

who may be admitted after a course of study extending over at least 
two years. 

For regulations regarding approved courses of study see pp. 151-155. 

The only First Degree for which the School registers students 
is Bachelor of Arts (B.A.). 

Certain courses, however, are provided for candidates for other 
First Degrees, namely : 

Bachelor of Commerce (B.Com.) (p. 177) 
Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) (p. 178) 

Candidates for these degrees may attend the relevant lectures at the 
School, but can only take a complete course as Internal Students by 
registering elsewhere. 

A. BACHELOR OF ARTS (B.A.). 

Students are registered at the School for the B.A. Degree only 
if they intend to take Honours in an Oriental Language or Oriental 
History, or the Pass Degree with at least one Oriental Language. 

Students are advised to make themselves acquainted with the 
uniform system of grammatical terminology as set forth in the 
11 Report of the Standing Committee on Grammatical Terminology " 
(published by John Murray, 1917, price is. y postage ii</.), of which 
Examiners are authorized to make use in examination papers in 
Classics and in Medieval and Modern Languages. 

University Regulations. Full details of the regulations 
governing the degree are given in a pamphlet entitled " Regula- 
tions in the Faculty of Arts for Internal Students " ; which 
may be obtained from the Academic Registrar, University of 
London, W.C. i. 

The information given below refers only to Internal Students 
except where otherwise specified. 

A pamphlet entitled " Regulations in the Faculty of Arts 
for External Students " can be obtained from the External 
Registrar, University of London, W.C. i. 



INTERMEDIATE 1 57 

I. THE INTERMEDIATE 

Courses are provided at the School in the following subjects l for 
the Intermediate Examination. A b placed before the title of any course 
on the pages referred to shows it to be suitable for candidates for the 
Intermediate. 

Arabic (p. 126) 
Bengali (p. 117) 
Burmese (p. 112) 
Chinese (p. 121) 
Gujarati (p. 116) 
Hindi (p. 119) 
Japanese (p. 123) 
Malay (p. 124) 
Marathi (p. 115) 
Pali (p. in) 
Persian (p. 130) 
Sanskrit (p. m) 
Sinhalese (p. 118) 
Tamil (p. 114) 
Turkish (p. 128) 
Urdu (p. 1 19) 

Candidates must offer four subjects in all (for the complete list see 
the " Regulations in the Faculty of Arts for Internal Students "). Of 
these one must, subject to the provision set out below, be Greek or 
Latin ; the remaining three may be chosen from the above list. 

A candidate who is a native of Asia or of Africa and is not of European 
or American parentage may apply to the Academic Registrar for per- 
mission to substitute for Latin with Roman History or Greek with 
Greek History any one of the following Languages : Classical Arabic, 
Classical Persian, Classical Hebrew, Sanskrit, Pali, Classical Chinese, 
but a candidate whose mother-tongue is Hebrew may not take Classical 
Hebrew, and a candidate whose mother-tongue is Persian may not 
take Classical Persian. Applications should be made within one 
month of the beginning of the session, and if granted the candidate 
will be required, until further order and except in the case of Classical 
Hebrew, to pay a special fee of five guineas in addition to the ordinary 
fee. A candidate will be required to send to the University original 
documentary evidence clearly establishing his claim to take a sub- 
stituted language. 

Any candidate, however, who is proceeding to an Honours 
Degree in Oriental Languages may apply to the Academic 
Registrar for permission to offer a Classical Oriental Lan- 
guage in lieu of Latin or Greek. 



1 In these languages an additional fee of 5 gs. must be paid on entry for 
the Examination. 



158 INTERMEDIATE 

Students who are required to pass part of the Intermediate 
Examination will be permitted to enter for that part of the Examinatioi 
on one occasion only during the first year of the course of study 
Students who fail to satisfy the examiners in all the subjects in whicl 
they are required to pass will forfeit the exemptions granted to then 
under these Regulations and will only be permitted to proceed to th< 
Final Degree after passing the whole of the Intermediate Examinatioi 
and attending a course of study extending over not less than three year; 
from the date of registration. 

Natives of Asia or Africa and not of European or American parentage 
may apply to the Academic Registrar for permission to substitute 
in place of Greek or Latin, any one of the following : Arabic, Chinese 
Pali, Persian, Sanskrit (for procedure see " Regulations in the Faculty 
of Arts for Internal Students "). 

Candidates for B.A. Honours in an Oriental language are advisee 
to offer French or German or both. 



INTERMEDIATE 159 

SYLLABUSES 

[Candidates are advised to verify from the University Regulations the 
following information regarding syllabuses.] 

ARABIC 

1. Set Books, 1 with questions on Arab History. Questions on Grammar. 

2. Translation into English of easy passages not prescribed. Composition. 

BENGALI 

1. Translation from specified texts, 2 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Bengali ; questions on Grammar. 

BURMESE 

1 . Translation into English from specified books. 3 

2. Translation of an unprescribed easy passage from Burmese. 

3. Translation of an easy passage from English into Burmese prose. 

4. Questions on Grammar. 

CHINESE 

1. (a) Translation from specified texts, 4 with questions on their language 
and subject-matter. 

(b) Translation from unspecified texts. 

(c) Questions on the Chinese language. 

2. (a) Translation into Chinese and free composition. 
(b) Questions on a prescribed period of Chinese history. 4 



1 Prescribed Books in Arabic for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : R. A. Nicholson. 
Second Reading Book, pp. 1-71 (Camb. Univ. Press, 1909-30). Selection from 
the Annals of Tabart, edited by M. J. de Goeje (Semitic Studies Series, No. i. 
Leiden, 1902). Period of Arab History, A.D. 600750. 

2 Specified texts in Bengali for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : Intermediate Bengali 
Selections (Calcutta University, 1933) ; Candidates whose mother- tongue is 
not Bengali may, if they wish, offer only pp. 90-393 of Intermediate Bengali 
Selections, on condition that they submit to an oral test, including dictation, 
reading a passage of printed Bengali, and conversation. 

3 Specified texts in Burmese for 1937 : 

(a) Vessantra Jataka Vatthu chapters i to 7 inclusive. 

(b) Zagadoungza Vattu U Gyi, chapters i to 5 inclusive. 
Specified texts in Burmese for 1938 and 1939 : 

Selections from Jataka Stories (ed. Saya Pwa), vol. i, items 5-9 inclusive. 
Maung Sein Tin and others : Khitsan Ponbyin, vol. i, part i, items i, 
6, 8-10 ; part iii, item i ; part iv, items 2, 7 ; part v, item i. 
U. Kha : Chwetagyin, part i. 

4 Specified texts in Chinese for 1938 and 1939 : 

Haenisch : Lehrgang der Chinesischen Schriftsprache (Leipzig, 1929) vol. i 
(Chinese text). 

Kuo wn tu pn (National Literature Reader, compiled by Chiang Hdng- 
yiian, Commercial Press, Shanghai), vol. i, part i, pp. i-ior. 

Ma Ying : Kuo hstieh kai lun, part i (Ta Hua Press, Shanghai). 

Period of History : The Manchu Dynasty (1644-1911). 



l6o INTERMEDIATE 

GUJARAT! 

1 . Translation from specified texts l with questions on their language 
and subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Gujarati ; questions on Grammar. 

HINDI 

1. Translation from specified texts, 2 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Hindi ; questions on Grammar. 

JAPANESE 

(1) Translation from specified texts. 3 

(2) (a) Translation into Japanese (Romaji) ; (b) Questions on the Japanese 
language as spoken and as written. 

MALAY 

Translation of selected passages from the Pelayaran Abdullah and Sejarah 
Melayu (first ten chapters). 

Translation of an unprescribed easy passage from Malay. 
Translation of an easy passage from English into Malay. Grammar. 

MARATHI 

1. Translation from specified texts 4 with questions on their language 
and subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Marathi ; questions on Grammar. 

1 Specified texts in Gujarati for 1938 and 1939 : 

(a) Kdvya Dohana, pp. 31-82 (Govt. ed.). 

(b) Nandasankara Tuljasankara : Karana Ghelo, pp. 101-200. 

(c) Navalardm Lakfmirdm, vol. iii, pp. 1117. 

(d) Pancdsar-no Jayasikhari, part i, pp. 1-79 (C. J. Vyas). 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Gujarati may, if they wish, offer 
only (a) and (6) on condition that they submit to an oral test, including reading 
printed documents and conversation. 

2 Specified texts in Hindi for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 

(a) Ayodhya Slh Upadhyay : Adhkhild Phul. 

(b) Maithili Saran Gupt, Pair avail. 

(c) Lachman Sih, Sakuntald. 

(d) Sri Dhar Pajhak, Ujar Gam. 

Candidates whose mother- tongue is not Hindi may, if they wish, offer 
only (a) and (b) on condition that they submit to an oral test, including dictation, 
reading printed Hindi, and conversation. 

8 Prescribed book in Japanese for 1937, 1938 and 1939 : 

A Rose-Innes : Japanese Reading for Beginners, vol. ii, pp. 1-131 ; vol. iii, 
pp. 48123 ; and vol. iv, pp. 3078. 

4 Specified texts in Marathi for 1937 and 1938 : 

(a) Navamt (ed. R. S. Godabole), pp. 14-29, 143-171, 348-355. 

(b) H. N. Apte : Kdlakut. ' 

(c) K. P. Khadilkar : Kdncangadci Mohnd. 

(d) R. G. Gadakari : Vedyacd Bdjdr. 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Marathi may, if they wish, offer 
only (a) and (c) on condition that they submit to an oral test, including reading 
printed documents and conversation. 

Note continued on page 161. 



INTERMEDIATE l6l 

PALI 

1 . Translation from specified texts, 1 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter and on the outlines of Indian History up to the first century 
A.D. (i.e. the period covered by Rapson's Ancient India). 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into Pali ; 
questions on Grammar. 

PERSIAN 

Translation of passages from prescribed works. 2 

Translation of an easy passage from an unspecified work. 

Translation of an easy passage into Persian. 

Grammatical questions (Ranking's edition of Platts' Grammar). 

SANSKRIT 

1. Translation from specified texts, 3 with questions on their language 
and subject-matter and on Indian History up to the first century A.D. (i.e. the 
period covered by Rapson's Ancient India). 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Sanskrit ; questions on Grammar. 

SINHALESE 

1. Translation from specified texts, 4 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Sinhalese ; questions on Grammar. 



Note continued from page 160. 

Specified texts in Marathi for 1939 : 

(a) Navanit (ed. R. S. Godabole), pp. 14-29, 144-148, 160-169, 221-233, 
246-252, 334-338, 348-355. 

(b) H. N. Apte : Kdlakuf. 

(c) K. P. Khadiokar : Kdncangadci Mohnd. 

(d) R. G. Gadakari : Vedyacd Bdjdr. 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Marathi may, if they wish, offer 
only (a) and (c) on condition that they submit to an oral test, including reading 
printed documents and conversation. 

1 Specified texts in Pali for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : Anguttara-nikdya, 
Catukka-Nipdta, Uruveld, Cakka, and Rohitassa Vaggas (Pali Text Society ed., 
vol. ii, pp. 20-54). 

Khuddakapdtha, iv ix. 

Commentary on Numbers iv, vii, and ix of Khuddakapdtha. 

* Prescribed books in Persian for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : Gulistdn : Books i 
and ii without Muqaddima. Kwandamir, A History of the Minor Dynasties 
of Persia (ed. G. S. A. Ranking, Oxford Univ. Press, 1910), pp. 1-62. 

3 Specified texts in Sanskrit : 

For 1937, 1938, and 1939 : Lanman : Sanskrit Reader, i-xxxiv (selections 
from Nala, Hitopadesa Kathdsaritsdgara, Manu, ftgveda). 

4 Specified texts in Sinhalese for 1937 and 1938 : 
(a) Daladd Sirita (ed. Rajasekara, 1920). ' 

(6) Paravi Sanddsa. 

(c) Amdvatura, chs. xvi-xviii (ed. Richard de Silva, 1912). 

(d) Kavsifumina, cantos i, ii. 

Candidates whose mother- tongue is not Sinhalese may, if they wish, offer 



l62 INTERMEDIATE 

TAMIL 

1. Translation from specified texts, 1 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Tamil ; questions on Grammar. 

TURKISH 

Translation of selected passages from : 

Abd el Hakk H^mid : Dukhtari Hindu. 

Namuna'i adabiyyat. 

Murdd Bey : Mukammal Tdrtkhi Usmdni, vol. 7. 

Translation of an unprescribed easy passage from Turkish into English. 
Translation of an easy passage from English into Turkish. 
Grammar. 

URDU 

1. Translation from specified texts, 2 with questions on their language 
and subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Urdu ; questions on Grammar. 



only (d) t (b), and (c), on condition that they submit to an oral test, including 
dictation, reading, and conversation. 

Specified texts in Sinhalese for 1939 : 

(a) Nikdya-Sangrahava (ed. Dhammakitti, 1907). 

(b) Milinda-prasnaya, pp. 108-182, i.e. mendaka-prasnaya (ed. U. P. 
Ekanayaka). 

(c) Muvadev-dd-vata (ed. Kumaranatunge). 

(d) Sdvul-sandesa (ed. 1925). 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Sinhalese may, if they wish, offer 
only (a), (b), and (c), on condition that they submit to an oral test, including 
dictation, reading and conversation. 

1 Specified texts in Tamil for 1937, 1938, and 1939.: 

(a) V. G. Suryanarayana Sastri : History of the Tamil Language (Nadarajan, 
Madura). 

(b) A. Muttutambi Piljai : Bhdrataccurukkam (Navalar Press, Jaffna), chap. 
28 to the end. 

(c) Ndladiydr, ch. 21-30. 

(d) G. U. Pope: Tiruvdsagam. 

(e) V. R. Ramachandra Dikshitar : Studies in Tamil Literature and History 
(Luzac and Co., London). 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Tamil may, if they wish, offer only 
(0), (6), and (c), on condition that they submit to an oral test, including dictation, 
reading, and conversation. 

2 Specified texts in Urdu for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 
* Abdul Halim Sharar : Mansur-Mohana. 

Mir Hasan : Matnavi. 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Urdu may, if they wish, offer 
only the first half of both texts on condition that they submit to an oral test, 
including dictation, reading Urdu books, and conversation. 



B.A. (GENERAL) 163 

II. B.A. (GENERAL) 

The Approved Instruction-courses for the Final Examination may 
be taken in two years or more, but no Candidate will be admitted to 
the Final Examination unless he has been a Student in a School of the 
University or under Recognized Teachers for at least three years 
(unless specially admitted under the Regulations) and has satisfied in 
other respects the General Regulations as to Approved Courses of 
Study (pp. 151-155). 

Courses for the Final Pass are provided at the School in the following 
subjects. 1 A c placed before the title of any course on the pages referred 
to shows it to be suitable for candidates for the Final Pass Examination. 

Arabic (p. 126) 
Armenian (p. 129) 
Bengali (p. 117) 
Burmese (p. 112) 
Chinese (p. 121) 
Gujarati (p. 116) 
Hindi (p. 119) 
Japanese (p. 123) 
Malay (p. 124) 
Marathi (p. 118) 
Pali (p. in) 
Persian (p. 130) 
Sanskrit (p. in) 
Sinhalese (p. 118) 
Tamil (p. 114) 
Turkish (p. 128) 
Urdu (p. 119) 

Candidates must offer three subjects in all (for the complete list see 
the Regulations in the Faculty of Arts for Internal Students). Any 
three subjects in the list given in the Regulations may be chosen. 

1 If one or more of these subjects be selected, notice must be given and the 
fee paid, together with a special fee of Five Guineas, five calendar months 
before the beginning of the Examination. 



164 B.A. (GENERAL) 

SYLLABUSES 

[Candidates are advised to verify from the University Regulations the 
following information regarding syllabuses.] 

ARABIC l 

1. Set Books. 

2. Translation into Arabic prose ; and unseen translation from Arabic 
into English. 

3. Questions on Grammar and History. 

ARMENIAN 

No syllabus has yet been published. 
BENGALI a 

1. Translation from specified texts, 3 with questions on their language 
and subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Bengali. 

3. Questions on the Language, Literature, and Grammar. 

BURMESE 

1. Set Books. 4 

2. Translation into Burmese prose and unseen translation from Burmese 
into English. 

3. Questions on the Language, Literature, and Grammar. 

CHINESE 

1. Translation from specified texts, 5 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

2. (a) Translation from unspecified texts ; (b) questions on Chinese 
literature. 

3. (a) Translation into Chinese and free composition ; (b) questions on a 
prescribed period of Chinese history. 6 

1 Prescribed books in Arabic for 1937, I 93%> and 1939 : 

Ibn al-Tiqtaqa : Al-Fakhri (from accession of 'Abdalmalik to end of 
al-Mutawakkil) . 

R, A. Nicholson : Third Reading Book (Cambridge, 1911). 

Special Historical subject : History of the Muslim Empire from A.D. 750 
to 833. 

2 An elementary knowledge of Sanskrit will be assumed. 
8 Prescribed texts in Bengali for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 

(a) Dinescandra Sen: Bangiya Sdhityapancay, part i, extracts from 
Ketakadas Ksemananda (pp. 259-285), Mukundaram Kabikankan (pp. 338- 
368), Krttibas (pp. 489-524), Kasidas (pp. 664-690). 

(b) Rabindranath Thakur: Gitdnjali (Bengali Edition). 

(c) Taraknath Ganguli : Svarnalatd. 

(d) Bankimcandra Caftopadhyay .- Devi Caudhurdni. 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Bengali may, if they wish, be excused 
(a) on condition that they submit to an oral test, including dictation, reading 
Bengali manuscript, and conversation. 

4 Prescribed books in Burmese for 1938 and 1939 : 
Maniratanabon, the first nine groups of precedents (Hanthawaddy Press 

edition, 1901, pp. 5-117 inclusive). 

U Kha : Chwetagyin, part 2. 

U Lu Pe Win : U Ponnya Myittaza, with Notes and Introduction, items 
114 inclusive. 

5 Prescribed texts in Chinese for 1938 and 1939 : 

Haenisch : Lehrgang der Chinesischen Schriftsprache (Leipzig, 1929), vol.iii, 
pp. i 60. 

Kuo win tu pen (National Literature Reader, compiled by Chiang Hng- 
ytian, Commercial Press, Shanghai, vol. i, part i, pp. 1-145). 

Note continued on page 165. 



B.A. (GENERAL) 165 

GUJARATI 

1. Translation from specified texts 2 with questions on their language and 
su bj ect-matter . 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Gujarati. 

3. Questions on the Language, Literature, and Grammar. 

HINDI l 

1 . Translation from specified texts 3 with questions on their language and 
subj ect-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Hindi. 

3. Questions on the Language, Literature, and Grammar. 

JAPANESE 

* ^Translation from specified texts. 4 

3. (a) Translation from English into Japanese (to be written in Japanese 

script in the colloquial style). 
(b) Questions on Japanese grammar and writing. 

MALAY 

1. Set Books. 5 

2. Translation into Malay prose and unseen translation from Malay into 
English. 

3. Questions on Grammar and History. 



Note continued from page 164. 

Ma Ying : Kuo hstieh lai hm, part ii (Ta Hua Press, Shanghai). 

Mencius, book i, parts i and 2. 

Periods of Literature and History: 1368-1911. 

1 An elementary knowledge of Sanskrit will be assumed. 

2 Prescribed texts in Gujarati for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 

(a) Premananda : Okhdharana. 

(b) Anjariya : Kavitd Pravesa. 

(c) M. C. Bhatta : Juni Vdrttd. 

(d) Navalardmd Lak$mirdm, vol. ii, pp. 237-421. 
(2) Narma Gadya, pp. 1-150. 

(/) Ranchodabhal Udayarama : Nala Datnayanti. 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Gujarati may, if they wish, offer 
only (6), (c\ and (/), on condition that they submit to an oral test, including 
reading printed documents and conversation. 

3 Prescribed texts in Hindi for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 

(a) Tulsi Das : Rdmcaritmdnas Aranya Kdnd. 

(b) Prem Cand : Prem Purnimd. 

(c) Ke.4av Das : Sanksipt Ram Candrikd : Bdl Kdnd (Nag. Prac. Sabha). 

(d) Misr Bandhu : Hindi Sdhitya kd Sanksipt Itihds. 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Hindi may, if they wish, offer 
only (a) and (6), on condition that they submit to an oral test including dictation, 
reading printed Hindi, and conversation. 

4 Prescribed texts in Japanese for 1937, ^938, and 1939 : 

A. Rose-Innes : Japanese Reading for Beginners, vol. iv, pp. 52-238. 
Meiji Shoin : Kokubunsen, vol. v (1933), chaps, i, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 13 and 14. 

5 Prescribed Books in Malay for 1937, 1938 and 1939 : 
Sejarah Melayu ; Hikayat Abdullah. 

History of British Malaya from 1786-1876. 



i66 B.A. (GENERAL) 

MARATHI 1 

1. Translation from specified texts, 2 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Marathi. 

3. Questions on the Language, Literature, and Grammar. 

PALI 

1. Translation from specified texts, 3 with questions on their language 
and subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into Pali. 

3. Questions on the Language, Literature, and Grammar. 

PERSIAN 

1. Set Books. 4 

2. Translation into Persian prose and unseen translation from Persian into 
English. 

3. Questions on Grammar and History. 

SANSKRIT 

1. Translation from specified texts, 5 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Sanskrit. 

3. Questions on the Language, Literature, and Grammar. 

SINHALESE 

1. Translation from specified texts, 7 with questions on their language 
and subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English into 
Sinhalese. 

3. Questions on the Language, Literature, and Grammar. 

1 An elementary knowledge of Sanskrit will be assumed. 

2 Prescribed texts in Marathi for 1938 and 1939 : 

(a) Moropant : Sabhd Parva. 

(b) H. N. Apte : Karmayog. 

(c) Raghunathapandit : Naladamayantt. 

(d) N. C. Kelkar : Totaydc'e Banda. 

(e) V. L. Bhave : Mahdrd$tra Sdrasvat. 
(/) K. P. Khadilkar: Vidy'dharan. 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Marathi may, if they wish, offer 
only (b), (c), and (/), on condition that they submit to an oral test, including 
reading, printed Balabodha or lithographed Modi documents, and conversation. 

8 Prescribed texts in Pali for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 

Iti-vuttaka, Eka- and Duka-Nipdtas, Tika-Nipdta, vaggas i, ii, iii. 

Vinaya-Pitaka, cullavagga xi, xii (P.T.S. ed., vol. ii, pp. 284308). 

Milindapanha, vaggas i, ii (Trenckner ed., pp. 24-50). 

4 Prescribed Books in Persian for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 

Fava'id ul-Adab (Class V), published by Ministry of Education, Teheran. 

6 Prescribed texts in Sanskrit for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 

Rgveda, Mandala i, 41, 42, 115, 143, 154 ; ii, 12, 27 ; iii, 33, 59 ; iv, 19 
(These hymns are in Bohtlingk's Sanskrit Chrestomathie, 3rd ed., 1909). 

Nalopdkhydna, ed. Eggeling. 

Meghaduta, ed. Hultzsch (R. Asiatic Soc.) without Commentary. 

6 An elementary knowledge of Pali will be assumed. 

7 See note on next page. 



B.A. (GENERAL) 167 

TAMIL 

1 . Translation from specified texts, 1 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English. 

3. Questions on the Language, Literature, and Grammar. 

TURKISH 

1. Set Books. 2 

2. Translation into Turkish prose and unseen translation from Turkish 
into English. 

3. Questions on Grammar and History. 

URDU 

1. Translation from specified texts, 3 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts ; translation from English. 

3. Questions on the Language, Literature, and Grammar. 



7 Prescribed texts in Sinhalese for 1937 and 1938 : 

(a) But Sarana, pp. 1-154 (i- e - i-ioo) ed. Valivitiye Sorata, 1929. 

(b) Kavsi/umiifa, cantos iii x (inclusive). 

(c) Sdlaihini Sandesa ed. Kumaranatunga. 

(d) Epigraphia Zeylanica, vol. i, No. 4, pp. 4157 (i.e. Anurddhapura. Slab 
Insc. of Kassapa V) and No. 21, pp. 241-251 (i.e. Vevdlkdtiya. Slab Insc. 
of Mahinda IV). 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Sinhalese may, if they wish, offer 
only (a), (b), and (d), on condition that they submit to an oral test, including 
dictation, reading, and conversation. 

Prescribed texts in Sinhalese for 1939 : 

(#) Dam-piyd-atuvd-gatapadaya, pp. 195, i.e. end of appamdda vaga 
(ed. D. B. Jayatilaka, 1933). 

(b) Dharmapradipikd, p. 218 to the end (ed. Dharmarama, 1915). 

(c) Sasaddvata. 

(d) Kdvyasekara, cantos i-ix inclusive. 

(e) Kokila Sandesaya (ed. Mudliyar W. F. Gunawardhana). 
Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Sinhalese may, if they wish, offer 

only (#), (b) and (c), on condition that they submit to an oral test, including 
dictation, reading, and conversation. 

1 Prescribed texts in Tamil for 1938 and 1939: 

(a) Sabhapati Navalar : Dirdvidap-pirakdsikdi (Madras, 1927), pp. 549. 

(b) N. M. Venkatasami Nattar : Nakkirar. 

(c) Tiru-valjuvar : Kural, Arattuppdl, ch. 138. 

(d) Arumuga Navalar : Tirukkbvai . 

(e) V. Swaminada Ayar : Paditruppattu (Madras). 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Tamil may, if they wish, offer 
only (a), (b), and (c), on condition that they submit to an oral test, including 
dictation, reading, and conversation. 

2 Specified texts in Turkish for 1937, I938f and 1939 : 
History of Na'ima, vol. i : years 1035-1040 inclusive. 

E. J. W. Gibb : History of Ottoman Poetry, vol. 6 : passages from Fuzuli, 
Baqi, Nedim, and Shinasi. 

3 See note on next page. 



1 68 B.A. (HONOURS) 

III. B.A. HONOURS 

Courses for the B.A. Honours Degree are provided at the School 
in the following branches. A d placed before the title of any course on 
the pages referred to shows it to be suitable for candidates for B.A. 
Honours. 

1 Arabic (p. 126) 
1 Chinese (p. 121) 
Hebrew (p. 128) 
1 Indo-Aryan (p. in) 
1 Japanese (p. 123) 

Pali (see Indo-Aryan) 
1 Persian (p. 130) 

Sanskrit (see Indo-Aryan) 
1 Oriental History with special refer- 
ence to the History of India (p. 135) 
1 Oriental History with special refer- 
ence to the History of the Near and 
Middle East (p. 135) 
1 The History of the Far East with 
special reference to China (p. 137) 
Archaeology (A. China, B. India) 

No candidate will be allowed to take more than one branch at one 
and the same time unless his course occupy at least three academic 
years after the completion of the Intermediate Course. Graduates in 
one branch may take a second branch after a further approved course 
of study extending over at least one year. 

Candidates who have taken the B.A. Pass or B.A. (General) Degree 
may present themselves for Honours in any one branch, after a further 
approved course of study extending over at least one year. 



3 Specified texts in Urdu for 1937 and 1938 : 

Muh. Husain Azad : Ab i Haydt (Lahore, 1917), pp. 1-372, excluding the 
verse portions of pp. 301-372. 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Urdu may, if they wish, offer only 
pp.i-2Oo on condition that they submit to an oral test, including dictation, 
reading Urdu books, and conversation. 

Specified texts in Urdu for 1939 : 

(a) Muh. Husain Azad : Ab i Haydt (Lahore, 1917), pp. 1128, omitting 
the verse. 

(>) Altaf Husain Hall : Muqaddama, pp. 65-196, omitting pp. 71-77. 

(c) Ruh i Nazm, pp. 34-81, 99-103, 111124, 136-145. 

Candidates whose mother-tongue is not Urdu may, if they wish, offer 
only (a) and (b) on condition that they submit to an oral test, including dicta- 
tion, reading Urdu books, and conversation. 

^ If this subject be selected, notice must be given, and the fee paid, together 
with a special fee of Five Guineas, five calendar months before the beginning 
of the Examination. 



B.A. (HONOURS) 169 

SYLLABUSES 

[Candidates are advised to verify from the University Regulations 
the following information concerning Syllabuses.] 

ARABIC 

Eight papers will be set, with an additional optional paper in Hebrew and 
Aramaic, 

i -4. Translation from specified books. 1 

5. Translation from unspecified books. 

6. Translation into Arabic. 

7. Grammar (including the technical terms of Arabic Grammar). 

8. Questions on (i) Arabic Literature ; and (ii) either the History of Islam 
or the Comparative Grammar of the South-Semitic Languages. 

9. An additional optional paper in elementary Hebrew and Aramaic, 
consisting of pointed passages for translation from specified texts and questions 
on accidence. 2 

ARCHAEOLOGY 3 

Students who have had no previous training in Archaeology are recommended 
to pursue a course extending over three years. 

Archseology'is divided into the following Groups. 4 A student must state, on 
beginning his course, which Group he intends to take : A. China. B. Early 
Christian to A.D. uoo. C. Egypt. D. Europe : From A.D. 1000 to A.D. 1500. 
E. Europe : From A.D. 1450 to A.D. 1700. F. Greece. G. India. H. Italy to 
the End of the Republic. I. Western Asia. J. Roman Empire. K. Western 
Europe : Prehistoric. L. Western Europe : From A.D. i to A.D. 1000. 

Specialization within these different Groups is expected. In all Groups 
except Group A, the candidate must have a reading knowledge of German and 
either French or another modern language approved by the University. In 
Group A the candidate must have a reading knowledge of French, and either 
German or another modern language approved by the University. He will 
also be required to prepare, during his course, a series of drawings illustrative 
of his subject, for inspection at the examination. In Groups K and L practical 
experience in the field before or during the course is essential. 

The Examination in each Group will consist of 7 papers and a viva-voce 
examination. The papers and viva-voce examination will be framed to test 
the candidate's practical as well as theoretical knowledge. 

1 Prescribed books in Arabic for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 

Either Riwdydt al-Aghani (Catholic Press, Beyrout), vol. i, pp. 1-151 ; 
or (i) Conti Rossini; Chrestomathia arabica meridionalis (Rome, 1931), select 
inscriptions ; and (ii) S. A. B. Mercer : Ethiopic Grammar ; Chrestomathy. 

Al-Qur y dn f Surahs, 720. 

Noldeke : Delectus carminum veterum Arabicorum. 

Badi' az-Zaman : Maqdmdt (ed. Muhammad 'Abduh), i-x. 

Selections from the Sahih of al-Bukhdri (ed. Torrey). 

Hebrew : Amos ; Psalms i~8. Aramaic : Daniel, ch. 27. 

2 Prescribed books for Arabic, paper 9 : 

(a) Hebrew : Amos, Psalms 1-8. 

(b) Aramaic : Daniel, chs. 2-7. 

[In 1937 and thereafter the following books may be offered in place of 
Riwayatal-Aghani : Conti Rossini : Chrestomathia Arabica Meridionalis 
(Rome, 1931), select inscriptions, and S. A. B. Mercer: Ethiopic Grammar, 
Chrestomathy.] 

3 The question of the abolition in and after 1939 of the Examination for 
the B.A. Honours Degree in Archaeology is under consideration by the authori- 
ties of the University. If the Degree is abolished, archaeological subjects will 
be included as subjects of examination for the B.A. Honours Degree in other 
Branches. 

4 For syllabuses in Groups B to F and H to L see the detailed Regulations 
of the University for Internal Students in the Faculty of Arts. 



170 B.A. (HONOURS) 

A: CHINA. 

1. Outline of the history of Chinese civilization and chief foreign influences. 

2. Detailed study of two periods to be selected by the candidate and 
submitted for the approval of the University. 

3. General knowledge of the arts and crafts of China. 

4. Evolution of style and technique as exemplified in one of the arts or 
crafts to be selected by the candidate and submitted for the approval of the 
University. 

5. General knowledge of religious beliefs and ritual. 

6. Elementary geography of China. 

7. Chinese language. 

Candidates will be examined in the following : 

(i) Bullock : Progressive Exercises in the Chinese Written Language (3rd 
Edition, 1923, pp. 1-42). 

(ii) Karlgren : Sound and Symbol in Chinese (1923). 
(iii) Elements of Epigraphy. 

8. Elementary facsimile drawing. 

9. Elementary human skeletal anatomy. 

There will be seven papers covering the sections 1-7 above. Candidates 
will be required to pursue a course of instruction in sections 8 and 9. 

G : INDIA. 

1 . Outline of history and geography of ancient India and adjacent countries. 

2. Detailed study of a special subject to be selected by the candidate and 
submitted for the approval of the University. 

3. Social and economic life and organization. 

4. Elements of religious history, beliefs, and practices. 

5. Arts and crafts and the chief technical processes used in them. 

6. Elementary epigraphy and numismatics. 

7. Sanskrit language. 

8. Elementary physical anthropology. 

9. Elementary surveying. 
10. Facsimile drawing. 

There will be seven papers covering the sections 1-7 above. The papers 
on 3, 4, and 6 will have particular reference to the special subject selected by 
the candidate. The paper on the language will consist of (a) questions on 
grammar, (b) translation of simple unprepared passages. Candidates will 
be required to pursue a course of instruction in sections 8, 9 and 10. 

CHINESE 

Eight papers of three hours each. 

14. Translation from specified texts. 1 

5. Translation from unspecified texts. 

6. Translation into Chinese and free composition. 

7. Either (a) Questions on the language and subject-matter of the 
specified texts or (b) Japanese. 

8. Questions on a prescribed period of Chinese Literature and History. 

1 Prescribed books in Chinese for 1938 and 1939 : 

Haensich : Lehrgang der chinesischen Schriftsprache (Leipzig, 1929), vol. iii, 
pp. 6-130. 

Kuo wen tu pen (National Literature Reader, compiled by Chiang Heng- 
yuan, Commercial Press, Shanghai), vol. i, part i. 

Ma Ying : Kuo hsueh kai lun, part iii (Ta Hua Press, Shanghai). 

Poems of Li Po, Tu Fu, Po Chti-i, Meng Hao-jan, Liu Tsung-yiian, Wang 
Wei (T'ang shih san pai shou : Three Hundred Poems of the T l ang Dynasty). 

Li Chi, book xvi (Hsueh chi) and book xxviii (Li ytieh), part i. 

Chung Yung. 

Note continued on page 171. 



B.A. (HONOURS) 171 

HEBREW 

There are four sections as follows : 

Section i. Hebrew with Aramaic (including Syriac). 1 

Ten papers will be set in Hebrew, Aramaic, and Syriac, with an additional 
optional paper in Elementary Arabic as follows : 

I. Hebrew. 

(1) Selections from unspecified books of the Old Testament for translation 
and comment (one paper). 

(2) Selections from specified books of the Old Testament for translation 
and comment, with special regard to the Greek version (one paper). 

(3) Selections from both specified and unspecified post-Biblical works for 
translation and comment (one paper). 

(4) Hebrew composition (one paper). 

(5) Hebrew Grammar, Syntax, and Pointing (one paper). 

II. Aramaic and Syriac. 

(6) Selections from unspecified Aramaic and Syriac texts for translation 
and comment, and Syriac composition (one paper). 

(7) Selection's from specified Syriac texts for translation and comment 
(one paper). 

(8) Selections from specified texts of Biblical Aramaic and Targum for 
translation and comment (one paper). 

III. Comparative Grammar and North Semitic Epigraphy (one paper). 

IV. Hebrew, Syriac, and Aramaic Literary History, including introduction 
to the Books of the Old Testament, Text and Ancient Versions, and an out- 
line of a literary period or periods to be fixed and announced previously in 
the Regulations (one paper). 

V. An additional paper in elementary Arabic, consisting of passages from 
selected easy prose, text, vocalized and unvocalized, together with questions 
on accidence (one paper). 

(A special note will be placed against the names of successful candidates 
who have satisfied the Examiners in the paper in Elementary Arabic.) 



Note continued from page 170. 

Japanese : Rose-Innes : Japanese Reading for Beginners , vol. iii, 1-83 ; 
vol. iv, 1-51. 

Periods of Literature and History : 

(a) From the beginning of the Chou Dynasty to A.D. 1368. 
or (b) From 1368 to 1911. 

1 Prescribed texts in Hebrew and Aramaic (including Syriac) for 1937, 
1938, and 1939 : 

Hebrew : Isaiah 1-39. Jeremiah 1-25. Psalms 90-106. Midrash Leviticus 
rabba. 

Aramaic and Syriac : Aramaic portions of Daniel and Ezra. Targum 
Jonathan on Genesis 41-50. Targum on Micah. Het Leven van Johannes 
van Telia door Elias ; The Gospel of Matthezv in Syriac. 

North Semitic Epigraphy : G. A. Cooke : A Textbook of North Semitic 
Epigraphy. 

Literary History : Wright: Syriac Literature (whole period). The Hellenistic 
Literature from 150 B.C. to A.D. 50. Books recommended : E. Schiirer : 
Geschichte des Jiidischen Volkes, vol. iii (4th 'edition). Susemihl : Geschichte 
der Griechischen Literatur in der Alexandrinerzeit, 2 vols. Zeller : History 
of Greek Philosophy. 

Elementary Arabic : Nallino : Chrestomathia Qurani Arabica, pp. 32-50. 
Nicholson : Elementary Arabic, 2nd Reading Books, vol. 3, pp. 1-20. 



172 B.A. (HONOURS) 

VI. A general viva-voce examination. 

Note. The candidate is recommended to make use of the following works : 

Gesenius Kautzsch : Hebrew Grammar (translation by Cowley). 

Dalman : Grammatik des Jiidisch-Paldstinischen Aramaisch. 

Noldeke : Die Semitischen Sprachen. 

Noldeke : Kurzgefasste Syrische Grammatik. 

Driver : Notes on the Hebrezv text of the Books of Samuel with an Intro- 
duction, etc. 

Driver : A treatise on the Hebrew Tenses. 

Strack : Grammatik des Biblisch- Aramaisch. 

Strack- Siegfried : Die neuhebrdische Sprache. 

Wright : Lectures on the Comparative Grammar of the Semitic Languages. 

Wright : A short History of Syriac Literature. 

Section II. Hebrew (Ancient and Mediaeval) with Aramaic. (Ten papers.) 

1 . Selections from unspecified books of the Old Testament for translation 
and comment. 

2. Selections from specified books of the Old Testament for translation 
and comment. 

3. Selections from both specified and unspecified post-jBiblical works 
for translation and comment. 

4. Hebrew Composition. 

5. Hebrew Grammar, Syntax, and Pointing. 

6. Selections from specified Mediaeval Hebrew texts for translation and 
comment. 

7. Selections from unspecified Medieval Hebrew texts for translation and 
comment. 

8. Selections from specified texts of Biblical Aramaic and Targum for 
translation and comment. 

9. Comparative Grammar and North Semitic Epigraphy. 

10. Hebrew and Aramaic Literary History, including introduction to the 
books of the Old Testament Texts and Ancient Versions, and questions on 
Mediaeval Hebrew Literature to A.D. 1500. 

(Papers 1-5 and 8 and 9 are as in Section I ; paper 10 as in Section I with 
Mediaeval Hebrew Literature to A.D. 1500 in place of Syriac Literary History.) 

Section III. Hebrew with Arabic (ten papers). 

1 . Selections from unspecified books of the Old Testament for translation 
and comments. 

2. Selections from specified books of the Old Testament for translation 
and comment. 

3. Hebrew Composition. 

4. Hebrew Grammar, Syntax, and Pointing. 

5. Comparative Grammar. 

6-7. Translation from specified Arabic books. 

8. Translation from unspecified Arabic books. 

9. Translation into Arabic. 

10. Arabic Grammar (including Arabic technical terms). 

(Papers 1-5 above are identical with papers i, 2, 4, 5, and 9 of the present 
syllabus with the omission of North Semitic Epigraphy in paper 9. Papers 
6-10 are identical with papers i, 4, 5, 6 and 7 of the present syllabus in Arabic.) 

Section IV. Hebrew with Assyrian (nine papers). 

1 . Selections from unspecified books of the Old Testament for translation 
and comment. 

2. Selections from specified books of the Old Testament for translation 
and comment. 

3. Hebrew Composition. * 

4. Hebrew Grammar, Syntax, and Pointing. 

5. Comparative Grammar. 

6. The Ancient History of the Near East 330 B.C. 

7. The Religion of Mesopotamia. 



B.A. (HONOURS) 173 

8. Translation irom specified and unspecified Assyrian texts. 

9. Assyrian Grammar. 

(Papers 6-9 are identical with the corresponding papers in the present course 
in Mesopotamian Archaeology. Papers 1-5 are as in Section II.) 

(Note. Specified Books in Arabic, Assyrian, and Mediaeval Hebrew will 
be issued later.) 

INDO -ARYAN 

The Examination will consist of four sections, two in Sanskrit and two in 
Pali, together with one general paper. Candidates must take both sections 
of one language, to be chosen by each candidate and the first section of the 
other language, together with the general paper. Candidates must notify 
their choice at the time of giving notice of entry for the Examination. There 
will be two papers in section i and three papers in section 2 in each language. 
Each paper will be of three hours. 

SANSKRIT 
Section i 

1. Translation from specified texts, 1 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

2. Translations from unspecified texts. 

Section 2 

1. Translation from specified texts, 1 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts. 

3. Translation from English into Sanskrit ; questions on Grammar. 

PALI 
(Syllabus as for Sanskrit above) 

GENERAL PAPER 

At least six questions will be set on the history of literature and religion 
in India, together with at least six questions on the comparative philology of 
Sanskrit, Pali, and Prakrit, which may include questions relating to the principles 
and history of the subject and to the sounds, forms, meanings, and syntax of 
Sanskrit, Pali, and Prakrit. Candidates will not be required to answer more 
than six questions in all. 



1 Prescribed texts in Sanskrit for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 

Sanskrit, Section i : Manusmrti (Nirnayasagara Press, Bombay), Book 7. 
Meghaduta with Vallabhadeva's Commentary (ed. Hultzsch.) Nalopdkhydna, 
ed. Eggeling. 

Sanskrit, Section 2 : Rgveda, Mandala i, 41, 42, 115, 143, 154 ; ii, 12, 27 ; 
iii, 33, 59 J iv, 19, 3<>, 33 ; v, 81', 84, 85 ; vi, 9, 50, 74 ; vii, 28, 46, 49, 
54, 57, 61, 76, 83, 102, 103 ; viii, 30; x, 51, 108, 117, 119, 129, 146, 185. 
(These hymns are in Bohtlingk's Sanskrit Chrestomathie, 3rd ed., 1909.) 
Katha Upani$ad, with 6amkara's Commentary on Vallis, 1,2. Svapnavdsava- 
dattd, ed. G. astri. 

Pali, Section i : Majjhima-Nikdya, suttas 57-66. Commentary on the same ; 
Papaflca-sudani, (P.T.S.), pp. 100-172. > 

Pali, Section 2 : Vinaya-Pifaka, Mahavagga i, Bhanavaras 3 and 4 ; Mah3- 
yagga (iii P.T.S., ed., i, pp. 24-43, 137-156). Apaddna, Vagga 54 (P.T.S. ed., 
ii, pp. 463-486). Dhammasangani, ekaduka-ti-vidhena rupasahgaha (P.T.S. ed., 

. 583-876). 



174 B.A. (HONOURS) 

JAPANESE 

Six papers of three hours each. 
1-3. Prescribed texts. 1 

4. Translation from unspecified texts. 

5. Translation from English into Japanese (to be written in Japanese script). 

6. Japanese writing and literature. 

PERSIAN 

Eight papers will be set. 

i 4 .Translation from specified books. 2 

5. Translation from unspecified books. 

6. Translation into Persian. 

7. Persian and Arabic Grammar. 

8. Persian Literature and History. 



HISTORY BRANCH III. ORIENTAL HISTORY, WITH SPECIAL 
REFERENCE TO THE HISTORY OF INDIA 

1. The History of Hindu and Muslim Rule in India. 

2. The History of European interest in Asia from 1497. 

3. The Political and Constitutional History of England and the British 
Empire from 1714 to the present time. 

4. General History of the East since A.D. 600. 

5. General European History, either (a) A.D. 395-1500 or (b) from A.D. 1500. 

6. History of Political Ideas. 3 

7. An Optional Subject, chosen from the list below (i paper). 

8 and 9. A Special Subject, chosen from the list below (2 papers). 
10. One paper containing passages for translation into English. 4 



1 Prescribed texts in Japanese for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 

A. Rose-Innes : Japanese Reading for Beginners, vol. 5, pp. 3-38 and 94-105. 

Kofukan : Chugaku Kokubun Kyokasho, vol. 6 (1934), Chaps. 4, 8-n, 13, 
1 6, 19, 21-24. 

Meiji Shoin : Kokubunsen, vol. 7 (1933), Chaps, i, 4-6, 8, 10, 12, 13, 17, 
18, 20. 

2 Prescribed texts in Persian for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 
Siydsat Ndma. 

Firdawsi : Shdhndma, Episodes as in Pizzi's Antologia Firdusiana. 

Hafiz, Odes, 1-50. 

Nizami : Haft Paikar. 

Nizami-i 'Arudi-i Samarqandi : Chahar Maqdla. 

Either : Bundahisn Book I (in H. S. Nyberg : Hilfsbuch des Pehlevi I, 
Upsala, 1928), 
or : al Fakhri (ed. De*renbourg), r>p. 263-291 (Reign of Harun ar-Rashid). 

3 This paper will include questions relating to the Political Ideas of the East. 

4 Candidates must show a competent knowledge of two languages, either 
two of the following : Sanskrit, Arabic, Persian, Portuguese, Dutch, French ; 
or one of the foregoing with an Indian vernacular language. 



B.A. (HONOURS) 175 

HISTORY BRANCH IV. ORIENTAL HISTORY WITH SPECIAL 
REFERENCE TO THE HISTORY OF THE NEAR AND MIDDLE 

EAST 

1. History of the Near and Middle East from 395 to A.D. 1040. 

2. Either History of the Near and Middle East since A.D. 1040, or History 
of Russia, Poland, and the Southern Slavs. 

3. General European History, A.D. 395-1500. 

4. History of the " Eastern question " since 1500. 

5. General European History since 1500. 

6. History of Political Ideas. 1 

7. An optional subject chosen from the list below (i paper). 

8 and 9. A special subject chosen from the list below (2 papers). 
10. One paper containing passages for translation z into English from the 
following languages : Greek, Latin, French, German. Passages will also be 
set in Italian and Spanish if candidates when submitting their entry-forms 
notify the University of their intention to offer these languages. Permission 
may be granted to offer another language in place of one of the foregoing, 
provided that the candidates apply for such permission not less than six months 
before the examination. 

HISTORY BRANCH V. THE HISTORY OF THE FAR EAST, WITH 
SPECIAL REFERENCE TO CHINA 

General Papers. 

1. The History of China to 1368. 

2. The History of China from 1368. 

3. The History of the External relations among the states of the Middle 
and Far East to 1368. 

4. The History of the External relations among the states of the Middle 
and Far East from 1368. 

5. The History of Europe to 1500, or The History of Europe from 1500. 

[N.B. -This paper is common to Branch II.] 

6. The History of European Influences in Asia from 1497. 

[N.B. This paper is common to Branch III.] 

7. One of the following optional subjects (one paper). 
The History of Japan. 

[Other subjects will be added later.] 

8 and 9. A special subject (to be prescribed later) (2 papers). 
10. One paper containing passages for translation 2 into English from the 
following languages : Chinese, Japanese, Dutch, German, French. 

HISTORY BRANCHES III, IV AND V GENERAL NOTES 

General European History shall include some reference to the history of 
European Colonies and daughter-States. 

The Political and Constitutional History of England and the British Empire 
shall include the actual working of the British Constitution comparatively 
treated. 

Historical Geography and the History of Political Ideas shall be studied 
mainly in connection with the Branch of History selected. Candidates will 
be examined in Historical Geography by means of questions in all the five 
papers under i to 5 in each Branch. 

The optional subjects shall be studied as far as possible in original documents, 
and so far as Greek, Latin, and French are concerned, the documents shall 
be studied in the original languages. 



1 This paper will include questions relating to the Political Ideas of the East. 

1 Candidates will be expected to attempt translation of passages from at 
least two languages. They will be permitted to bring dictionaries for use in 
the examination. 



176 B.A. (HONOURS) 

The special subjects shall be selected by candidates from a list of special 
subjects to be prescribed from time to time (see below), such subjects repre- 
senting various periods of Ancient, Medieval, Modern, and Oriental History. 
Part at least of one of the special subject papers will be devoted to Historical 
Evidence, and the questions thereupon will be compulsory on all candidates. 
Candidates will be supplied in the examination-room with the appropriate 
collection of prescribed documents. 

OPTIONAL SUBJECTS FOR BRANCHES III AND IV 

(a) Indian Political Institutions. 

(b) Islamic Institutions 

SPECIAL SUBJECTS FOR BRANCHES III AND IV 

(a) Constitutional Development in British India, 1858-1917. To be studied 
in the following authorities : 

Ilbert (Sir C. P.) : The Government of India, 3rd ed., 1915-16. 
Mukherji (D.) : Indian Constitutional Documents, vol. i (Thacker Spink, 

Calcutta, 1918). 
Morley (Viscount) : Recollections, vol. 2, pp. 149-343. 

The following books are also recommended : 

Report on Indian Constitutional Reforms (1918). 
The Sedition Committee Report (1918). 
Buchan (John) : Life of Lord Minto. 
Banerjea (Sir S.) : A Nation in Making. 
Ronaldshay (Lord) : The Life of Lord Curson, vol. 2. 

(b) The Crusades, 1095-1131. 

To be studied in the following authorities : 

(i) Anonymi Gesta Francorum et aliorum Hierosolymitanorym (ed. Bre*hier 
Classiques Franais du Moyen Age). 

(ii) Raimundi de Agiles : Historia Francorum qui ceperunt Jerusalem (Migne 
vol. 155, cols. 591-668). 

(iii) Fulcherii Carnotensis Historia Hierosolymitana (Migne, vol. 155, 
cols. 826-940). 

(iv) " The Damascus Chronicle of the Crusades, " translated by H. A. R. 
Gibb. (London : Luzac. 1932.) Part I. 

(Note. Candidates in Branch IV who have not taken Latin at the Inter- 
mediate Examination in Arts may apply for permission to be examined on 
French translations of books (ii) and (iii) above.) 



B. COM. 177 

B. BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (B. COM.) 

For this degree the School provides courses in the following 
approved modern foreign languages. 1 The letters/ and g placed before 
the title of any course on the pages referred to show it to be suitable 
for candidates for the B. Com. Intermediate and Final Examinations. 

Arabic (p. 126) 

Bengali (p. 117) 

Burmese (p. 112) 

Chinese (p. 121) 

Gujarati (p. 116) 

Hindi (p. 119) 

Japanese (p. 123) 

Malay (p. 124) 

Persian (p. 130) 

Swahili (p. 131) 

Tamil (p. 114) 

Telugu (p. 115) 

Turkish (p. 128) 

Urdu (p. 119) 



1 Candidates taking these languages must, three calendar months before 
the beginning of the Examination, give notice in writing to the Academic 
Registrar and pay a special fee of Five Guineas in addition to the ordinary fee. 



178 LL.B. 

C. BACHELOR OF LAWS (LL.B.) 

For this degree the School (in conjunction with University College) 
provides courses in the following subjects. The letter h placed before 
the title of any course on the pages referred to indicates it to be suitable 
for candidates for the Intermediate, the letter j for candidates for the 
Final Examination. 

I. INTERMEDIATE COURSE 

Indian Penal Code and Indian Code of Criminal Procedure (p. 137) 

The principal emphasis will be on the Indian Penal Code. Candidates will 
be expected to discuss intelligently the guiding principles of the Code and to 
solve simple problems involving a familiarity with the definitions of offences. 
A detailed knowledge of English Law is not required, but it should be referred 
to for contrast and comparison, especially in reading chapters iv, xvi, and xvii 
of the Code. 

Elementary questions will also be set on the main principles of Criminal 
Procedure, but will be confined to the following portions of the Code of Criminal 
Procedure, the numbers given throughout being inclusive : 

Sections 4~99> 100-105, 146-259, 266-273, 286-311, 337-373, 403-431, 
464-475, 496-502, 509-512, 526, 529-564 (except 542, 554, 561, 56iA) 
and the forms of charges in Schedule V, No. xxviii. 

II. FINAL COURSE 

Muhammadan Law (p. 137) 
Hindu Law (p. 137) 
Law of Palestine (p. 138) 

The Indian Evidence Act and Civil Procedure of the Indian Courts 
(PP- i37 J 3 8 )- 

SYLLABUSES 

MUHAMMADAN LAW 

Muhammadan Jurisprudence : the origin, history, and development of the 
law and of its different schools and the present day distribution of the schools 
throughout the world ; the law relating to marriage, including dower, iddat, 
and divorce ; the doctrine of acknowledgment and its various applications ; 
guardianship ; maintenance ; succession including (a) administration, (b) 
legacies, and (c) inheritance ; the doctrine of death sickness ; gifts, waqf ; and 
pre-emption. 

The examination will be mainly on the law as enforced in India, that is to 
say, a knowledge of Hanafi and Shia law and of Indian judicial and statutory 
modifications will be principally required. But opportunities will also be 
given for candidates to show a knowledge of the law on the subjects above- 
mentioned, in force elsewhere in the British Empire, its dependencies and man- 
dated territories as well as Egypt and Iraq, including the law of other schools 
prevalent therein. 

In the law of inheritance candidates will be required to show a grasp of the 
principles involved ; but problems to illustrate those principles will be chosen 
from cases which might readily occur in everyday life ; and, so far as possible, 
arithmetical complexities will be avoided. 

KINDU LAW 

The persons to whom, and the cases in which, the Hindu Law is applicable 
in British India. Statutory limitations on its application. Sources. History 
and development. Custom and its relation with the literary law. Change 



LL.B. 179 

of personal law. Jurisdiction of the Courts in matters of caste. The different 
schools of Hindu law and their rules concerning : Marriage, adoption ; 
the joint family and the rights and duties of its members ; maintenance ; 
partition ; guardianship and minority ; inheritance and survivorship ; wills ; 
the estate taken by female heirs ; Stridhan ; Hindu idols and endowments ; 
impartible estates. 

Candidates will not be required to know the order of succession to Stridhan, 
nor the law of Dam Dupat. Of the law of inheritance to males they will be 
required to know the principles in outline, but problems set will be simple 
in character and such as might easily arise in everyday life. The order of 
precedence of the various heirs as printed in Trevelyan, Mulla, and other 
writers may be omitted. 

LAW OF PALESTINE 
Examination in this subject will be confined to : 

(a) Those portions of the law administered in the Civil Courts in Palestine 
which are founded in Muhammadan Law. 

(b) The problems of international and inter-religious private law peculiar 
to Palestine. "These arise from the existence and jurisdiction of communal 
courts administering separate systems of personal law, from the status of 
foreigners, and from the legal situation of the mandated territory. 

(c) The rudiments of Muhammadan jurisprudence and of the history of 
Muhammadan law from its earliest beginnings to the fall of the Ottoman 
caliphate. 

m In (a) candidates will be required to know : 

(i) The Mejelle so far as it has not been abrogated by subsequent legislation. 
Where^the effect of such subsequent legislation has been to modify 
the law without entirely abrogating the provisions of the Mejelle, 
candidates will be required to know the existing law. Articles 
1329-1403, 1685, 1686, 1700-1735, and 1784-1851 will be omitted. 

(ii) The system of title transfer and rights in land as it exists at the present 
day including the law of Waqf as applied to immovables, but excluding 
purely fiscal questions. A knowledge of obsolete provisions of the 
Land Law, 1858, will only be required so far as they are essential 
to the understanding of rights still in existence ; but the later Turkish 
enactments, especially the Provisional Laws of Inheritance, Disposal, 
Mortgage and Partition, will be included. 

A knowledge will be required of the Palestine Orders in Council 1922-23 
and of such other Orders in Council and Ordinances of the Government of 
Palestine as affect the spheres of law above outlined. Where, however, as 
in the case of the Partnership Ordinance, 1930, the effect has been to substitute 
law founded on English models for the earlier law, the details of such later 
enactment will not be regarded as falling within the scope of this subject. 

LAW OF EVIDENCE IN INDIA 

The examination will be in the main an examination on the Indian Evidence 
Act. Candidates will be required to have a thorough knowledge not only of 
the Act but also of the logical principles of evidence and the principal criticisms 
that have been levelled at the Act. They should be familiar with leading cases 
both English and Indian ; and be able to compare and contrast English Law 
where necessary with the provisions of the Act. The standard of the paper 
will be the same as that for English Law of Evidence. 

The law of Benami will be treated as part of the law of Evidence and not a 
part of either Hindu or Muhammadan Law. 



l8o HIGHER DEGREES 

10. HIGHER DEGREES 

The School provides courses or supervision for candidates for the 
following Higher Degrees : 

Master of Arts (M.A.). 
Master of Laws (LL.M.). 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). 

Candidates may prosecute research work and, in certain cases, 
receive guidance at the School for the following degrees : 

Doctor of Literature (D.Lit.). 
Doctor of Laws (LL.D.). 

GENERAL INFORMATION AND DIRECTIONS ESPECIALLY INTENDED FOR 
STUDENTS FROM OVERSEAS 

1. All degrees in the University are open to men and women on 
the same terms. 

2. Students can be registered as candidates for the Master's or 
Ph.D. Degrees (under Teachers recognized by the University or 
under persons specially appointed by the University for the purpose) : 

(i) at Incorporated Colleges (referred to below briefly a~ 
Colleges) ; 

(ii) at Schools of the University (referred to beiow briefly as 
Schools) ; 

(iii) at Public Educational Institutions at which there are 
Recognized Teachers (referred to below briefly as Institutions). 

3. Overseas Students who desire to obtain a degree in the 
University of London are advised to make application for 
registration as Students of the University before coming 
to London, and, if possible, in the Session before that in which 
they desire to begin their work. The University Session begins 
early in October ; applications should be received at the University 
not later than ist May, or in the case of Students from Australia or 
New Zealand not later than ist March, preceding. These dates 
have been chosen in order that students whose applications are acceded 
to may, if possible, be informed of the decision of the Senate in good 
time. A student who applies for admission at a date other than those 
mentioned above will be permitted to enter on a course of study as 
soon as suitable arrangements can be made ; but, as a rule, it is to the 
advantage of a student to be registered as from the beginning of a 
Session. Applications for admission from Indian Students 
must in all cases be made through the High Commissioner 

for India. 



4. An Overseas Student is strongly recommended to apply directly 
to the University and to await the decision of the Senate before leaving 
his own country. 



HIGHER DEGREES l8l 

5. An application forwarded from Overseas must supply 
particulars in the following form : 

(a) Name of applicant (in full, with surname first, to be written 
clearly in printing characters). 

(b) Address to which communications with regard to the applica- 
tion should be directed. 

(c) Date of birth, and age last birthday. 

(d) Statement of subjects in which the applicant passed at each 
of the examinations leading up to the degree or other qualification 
for registration which he already holds. 

(e) Name of Incorporated College, School, or Institution of the 
University at which, and the Teacher under whom, the applicant 
desires to pursue his course for the Degree. 

(The University will, if so requested, advise Students as to the 
selection of the Incorporated College, School, or Institution at 
which, and the Teacher under whom, they should study. Application 
for such advice should be made to the Academic Registrar.) 

(/) Date on which applicant proposes to begin his course of 
study for the Degree. 

(g) General nature of subject on which the applicant desires to 
submit a Thesis (the candidate will be required to submit the 
subject for approval in a more detailed form at a later stage, as 
prescribed by the Regulations ; but he may give on his application 
any details which seem to him suitable). 

(h) Any other information which the applicant wishes to submit 
to the University. 

With the foregoing information should be transmitted : 

(1) A copy of applicant's certificate of having obtained a degree 
or of having passed the examinations for a degree. 

(2) A statement of the course of study which the applicant has 
pursued, certified by the Head of the Institution from which he 
comes. 

(3) A Calendar or Prospectus of that Institution and any additional 
publication furnishing information as to the requirements in respect 
of courses and examinations. 

(4) Testimonials from applicant's Teachers as to his fitness to 
enter upon the proposed course of study and research. 

(5) Copies of any papers published by the applicant. 

Signature. 
Date. 



l82 HIGHER DEGREES 

6. If an Overseas student decides not to submit his application until 
after his arrival in England, the application should be submitted 
through the authorities of the College, School, or Institution of the 
University to which he decides to attach himself, on a form which 
will be supplied by them or may be obtained from the University. 
A student may, if he so wish, consult the Academic Registrar either in 
writing, or by means of an interview, in regard to the College, School, 
or Institution to which he should attach himself. 

7. Applications for registration are considered individually by 
the Senate, and in every case a decision with regard to the application 
will be made as soon as possible. 

8. Candidates must produce the originals of their University 
Diplomas or Certificates when required to do so by the Academic 
Registrar. 



MASTER OF ARTS 183 

A. MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) 

The M.A. Degree may be taken at the School in the following 
branches : Oriental Languages, Comparative Philology, History 
(Oriental only), Philosophy (Oriental only). 

Except as provided below, the M.A. Examination will take place 
twice in each year commencing on the first Monday in December 
and on the fourth Monday in May, provided that if the fourth Monday 
in May be Whit-Monday the Examination will commence on the 
'following Tuesday. No unsuccessful Candidate will be permitted to 
re-enter within one year from the date of his first entry without the 
permission of the Examiners. 

Except as provided below, every candidate at the M.A. Examination 
must have taken the B.A. Degree as an Internal Student at least two 
Academic Years before the M.A. Examination or have satisfied the 
requirements of the Regulations for post graduate students proceeding 
to a higher degree (see the University Regulations). 

A student who, having passed the External Intermediate 
Examination, is admitted as an Internal Student to the Final B.A. 
Examination after pursuing a two years' Course of Study, and passes 
that Examination, may submit as his third year's Course of Study for 
the B.A. Degree a course for the M.A. Degree in accordance with 
Section 16 of the General Regulations as to Approved Courses of 
Study. If at the end of a third year's Course of Study he obtains the 
B.A. degree, he will, provided that he has otherwise complied with the 
Regulations, be permitted to present himself for the M.A. Examination 
after the lapse of one further academic year. 

Students are advised to make themselves acquainted with the uniform 
system of grammatical terminology as set forth in the " Report of 
the Standing Committee on Grammatical Terminology " (published 
by John Murray, 1917, price is., postage i\d.\ of which Examiners 
are authorized to make use in examination-papers in Classics and in 
Medieval and Modern Languages. 

The M.A. Examination in all branches and subjects except 
Mathematics will include : (i) a Thesis, (2) a written examination, 
(3) a viva voce Examination especially on the subject of the Thesis. 

The Thesis shall be either a record of original work or an ordered 
and critical exposition of existing data with regard to a particular 
subject. 

Every candidate will be required to forward to the University with 
his entry-form a short abstract of his thesis (four copies) comprising 
not more than 300 words. 

A Candidate will not be permitted to submit as his Thesis a Thesis 
for which a Degree has been conferred on him in this or in any other 



184 MASTER OF ARTS 

University, but a Candidate shall not be precluded from incorporating 
work which he has already submitted for a Degree in this or in any 
other University in a Thesis covering a wider field, provided that he 
shall indicate on his Form of Entry and also on his Thesis any work 
which has been so incorporated. 

The title proposed for the Thesis must in all cases be approved by 
the University, for which purpose it must be submitted to the 
University not later than i5th October for the next ensuing May 
Examination or not later than i5th April for the next ensuing December 
Examination. 1 Any title submitted later than the prescribed date must 
be accompanied by a fee of IQS. 6d. 

The Time-table of the Examination will be furnished by the 
Academic Registrar to each Candidate. 

Every Candidate entering for this Examination must apply to the 
Academic Registrar for a Form of Entry, which must be returned 
duly filled up, together with the proper Fee, not later than ist March 
for the May Examination and not later than 24th September for the 
December Examination. 

The Candidate must furnish, not later than I5th April for the May 
Examination and not later than ist November for the December 
Examination, not less than four typewritten or printed copies of the 
Thesis. 2 

An Internal Student submitting a Thesis in typescript will be 
required to supply, before the Degree is conferred on him, one of 
the four copies of his Thesis bound in accordance with the following 
specification : 

Size of paper, quarto, approx. 10 inches by 8 inches, except for 
drawing and maps on which no restriction is placed. A margin of 
1 1 inches to be left on the left-hand side. Bound in a standardized 
form as follows : J art vellum or cloth ; brown art paper sides ; 
overcast ; edges uncut ; lettered boldly up back in gold ( in. to 
\ in. letters), FACULTY, DATE, NAME ; short title written or 
printed neatly and legibly on the front cover. 

[The name and address of a firm of Bookbinders in London, who 
will bind Theses to this specification at a cost of 55. a copy, may be 
obtained from the Academic Registrar.] 



1 Candidates are advised to submit, if possible, the titles of their Theses 
not later than ist May or ist December in the year previous to their entry to 
the M.A. Examination in order to avoid delay in regard to the approval thereof. 

2 No candidate will be permitted to publish his Thesis as a Thesis approved 
for the M.A. Degree without the special permission of the University. Appli- 
cations for such permission must be made after the Degree of Master of Arts 
has been granted. Any Thesis in respect of which such permission has been 
granted shall bear the following inscription on the title page : " Thesis approved 
for the Degree of Master of Arts in the University of London." 



MASTER OF ARTS 185 

If the Examiners consider that a candidate's Thesis is adequate, 
but that he has not reached the required standard in the written portion 
of the Examination, they may, if they think fit, recommend that the 
candidate be exempted on re-entry from presentation of a Thesis. 
Similarly, if the Examiners consider that the candidate has reached the 
required standard in the written portion of the Examination, but that 
his Thesis is not adequate, they may, if they think fit, recommend that 
he be exempted on re-entry from the written portion of the 
Examination. In both the above cases the Examiners may, if they so 
desire, examine the candidate again viva voce when he re-enters for the 
Examination. 

Fee 

The fee for each student is 10 guineas for each entry to the whole 
Examination.. Students taking an Oriental language (other than 
Groups I to IV in Hebrew and Aramaic) will be required to pay a 
special fee of 5 guineas in addition to the ordinary fee. 

The fee payable on re-entry by candidates who have been exempted 
either from the written portion of the examination or from the presenta- 
tion of a thesis is 5 guineas. 

All cheques should be made payable to the University of London, 
or Bearer, and, crossed " Westminster Bank, Ltd., Tavistock Square, 
W.C. i, University of London Account/' 

Candidates who have taken the M.A. Degree in one branch or in 
one of the languages included in the branches of Medieval and Modern 
Languages and Oriental Languages may enter for the M.A. Degree 
in another branch or another language at any subsequent M.A. 
Examination on payment of a fee of 10 guineas, provided that they 
comply with the Regulations in all other respects. 

The fee payable for registration in the case of a Postgraduate 
Student who is not a graduate of this University will be five guineas. 

The fee payable on entry for the qualifying examination will be 
five guineas for a special examination or one guinea per paper or 
practical examination taken, up to a maximum of six guineas, for 
part of a final examination. The full fee of ten guineas will be 
payable on entry for the Master's Degree Examination. 

A list of candidates for the M.A. Degree who have satisfied the 
Examiners, arranged in alphabetical order in the several branches, will 
be published by the Academic Registrar. A mark of distinction will 
be placed against the names of those candidates who show exceptional 
merit. 

A diploma for the M.A. Degree, under the Seal of the University 
and signed by the Chancellor, will be delivered to each candidate who 
has passed after the Report of the Examiners shall have been approved 
by the Senate. 



1 86 MASTER OF ARTS 

The Syllabuses and special Regulations are as follows : 

I. ORIENTAL LANGUAGES 

All candidates, before proceeding to the M.A. Examinations in a branch of 
Oriental Languages, will be required to pass the B.A. Honours Examination 
in that subject unless in any special case the Senate, on the report of the Board 
of Studies, grant exemption from the general rule. 

The M.A. Degree in Oriental Languages may be taken in any of the following 
subjects. The letter e placed before the title of any Course on the pages 
referred to shows it to be suitable for candidates for the M.A. Examination. 

1. Indo-Aryan * (p. in). 

2. Arabic l (p. 126). 

3. Persian l (p. 130). 

4. Hebrew and Aramaic (including Syriac) (p. 128). 

5. Chinese l (p. 121). 

6. Japanese l (p. 123). 

The special Regulations in the several subjects are as follows ,; 

i. INDO-ARYAN 

The candidate must select one of the following eight sections. 2 In each 
section the written portion of the examination will consist of five papers of 
three hours each. 

A, Classical Sanskrit, including the Epics 

1-2. Translation from specified texts 3 (including commentaries therewith 
printed or quoted in the editions cited), with questions on their language 
and subject-matter. 

3. Translation from unspecified texts. 

4. Translation from English into Sanskrit ; questions on Grammar. 

5. Questions on the history of Sanskrit literature and of philosophy and 
religion in India. 

B. Pali 

1-2. Translation from specified texts, 4 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

3. Translation from unspecified texts. 

4. Translation from English into Pali ; questions on Grammar. 

5. Questions on the history of Pali literature and of Buddhism. 



1 If this subject be selected notice must be given and the fee paid, together 
with special fee of five guineas, five calendar months before the beginning of 
the examination. 

2 Candidate must notify their choice at the time of giving notice of entry 
for the Examination. 

3 Prescribed texts in Classical Sanskrit for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : Manusmtft, 
Books i-iv- (Nirnayasagara Press). Sdmkhyakdrikds . Veddntasdra (ed. Col. 
Jacob). Pdnini, Book ii of the Astddhydyt, together with commentary 
(extracted from the Kdsikdvrtti, published in the edition of Srls'a Candra 
Vasu, Allahabad, 1894). Kddamban (ed. Peterson, Bombay), vol. i, pp. i-i 8 . 
Kumdrasambhava, Books i-viii. Kdvyddarsa (Bibliotheca Indica), Books i-ii . 
Sakuntald (ed. Monier- Williams). 

* Prescribed texts in Pali for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : Samyutta-Nikdya,xxii, 
Bhara-Attadipa-, and Naturnhaka-Vaggas (P.T.S. iii, pp. 25-52). Pafisam- 
bhiddmagga (P.T.S. ed., vol. i, pp. 22-42). Commentary on same (Saddhamap- 
pakdsini), i, pp. 109-201. Buddhadatta's Abhidhammdvatdra (P,T,S. ed, 
pp. 1-88). Jinacarita (J.P.T.S, 1904-5, pp. 1-31.) 



MASTER OF ARTS 187 

C. Vedic Sanskrit 

1-2. Translation from specified texts, 1 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

3. Translation from unspecified texts. 

45. Questions on Vedic philology, including phonology, morphology 
syntax, accentuation, metre, and textual criticism. 

D. Epigraphy and History 

Candidates will be examined either in Sanskrit inscriptions with the History 
of India, or in Pali and Prakrit inscriptions with Early Sinhalese and Indian 
History. 2 

i. Translation from specified texts, 3 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

2. Translation from unspecified texts. 
3-4. Questions on History. 

5. Questions on Palaeography. 

E. Prakrit 

1-2. Translation from specified texts, 4 with questions on their language and 
subject-matter. 

3. Translation from unspecified texts. 

4. Questions on the Comparative Philology of Prakrit. 

5. Questions on the history of literature and religion as represented in 
Prakrit. 

, F. Philosophy 

i2. Translation from specified texts, 5 with questions on their language 
and subject-matter. 

3. Translation from unspecified texts, with questions on their subject- 
matter. 

4. Translation from unspecified texts, with questions on their subject- 
matter, to be chosen by the candidate 5 from either (a) one of the six Darsanas, 
or (b) Buddhist Philosophy, or (c) Jain Philosophy. 

5. Questions on the history and literature of Indian Philosophy. 

G. Linguistics 

1 . The general principles of linguistics (including the elements of phonetics). 
The history of the Indo-European family of languages with special reference 
to the Indo- Aryan. 

2. The history of the sounds, forms, meanings, and syntax of Sanskrit 
(including Vedic). 



1 Prescribed texts in Vedic Sanskrit for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : Rgveda, 
Mandalas ii-iii. Aitareydbrdhmana y Book i (Bibliotheca Indica, Calcutta, 
1895). Satapatha-brdhmana, Book i. Chandogyopanisad. 

2 Candidates must notify their choice at the time of giving notice of entry 
for the Examination. 

3 Prescribed texts in Epigraphy and History for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 
Sanskrit inscriptions : Epigraphia Indica, vols. i viii, all Sanskrit inscriptions. 
Pali and Prakrit inscriptions : Hultzsch, Inscriptions of Asoka. Epigraphia 
Indica, vols. i-xv, all Prakrit inscriptions. 

4 Prescribed texts in Prakrit for 1938 and 1939: Aydratigasutta, ed. H. Jacobi. 
Kalpasutra, ed. W. Schubring. Karpuramanjart, ed. S. Konow. Die Avasyaka- 
Erzdhlungen (ed. E. Leumann, Abhandlungen fur die Kunde des Morgenlandes, 
vol. x, no. 2, Leipzig, 1897). Bhavasattdkahd (ed. H. Jacobi), i. 

* Prescribed texts in Philosophy for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : Rgveda, x, 
90, 121, 129, 130. Upani$ads ; Kafka ; Svetdsvatara ; Brhadaranyaka^ ii, i 
and 4, iv, 3-5, vi, 2 ; Chdndogya, iv, 1-15, vi, 1-16, viii, 1-4. 



1 88 MASTER OF ARTS 

3. The history of the sounds, forms, meanings, and syntax of Pali and 
Prakrit. 

4. The history of the sounds, forms, meanings, and syntax of the modern 
Indo-Aryan languages with special reference to one to be chosen by the Can- 
didate. 1 

5. Passages for translation from Sanskrit, Pali, Prakrit, and the selected 
language. 

2. ARABIC 

The written portion of the examination will consist of five papers of three 
hours each. 

1-2. Passages from prescribed books for translation into English, with 
questions on their language and subject-matter. 2 

3. Passages from unspecified texts for translation into English. 

4. Questions on the history, literature, and institutions of the Arabs. 

5. Translations from texts, with questions on their subject-matter, on 
one of the following subjects : (a) Quranic Exegesis, or (6) Islamic Theology, 
or (c) Arabic Grammarians. Candidates will be required to show a general 
acquaintance with the principal Arabic and European works on the subject 
selected, and a more detailed knowledge of one or more prescribed books. 

3. PERSIAN 

Five papers will be set. 

1-3. Passages from prescribed books. 3 

4. Passages from unprescribed books. 

5. One of the following subjects : (a) Sufism, or (b) The Epic in Persian 
Literature, or (c) Iranian Philology. 

4. HEBREW AND ARAMAIC (INCLUDING SYRIAC). 

Candidates must select one of the five following Groups : 

Group I. The Old Testament in the original, including the " Introduc- 
tions " to the several books. Hebrew Philology. History of the Canon. 
Criticism of the Text and knowledge of Greek and Aramaic versions 
relating thereto. History of the Hebrew people and Hebrew religion to 
A.D. 70. 

N.B. Candidates will be expected to translate an ordinary passage of the 
Jewish commentators and from the Greek and Aramaic versions bearing upon 
a given Old Testament Text. 

The written portion of the Examination in Group I will consist of two 
papers on Translation of text and versions ; one paper on Philology (Composi- 
tion and Grammar) ; one paper on History and Religion of the Hebrew 
people ; one paper on the Canon, History of the text, and History of the 
versions ; one paper on Introduction to the Books of the Old Testament. 

1 Candidates must notify their choice at the time of giving notice of entry 
for the Examination. 

* Set Books in Arabic for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : Al-Qur'dn. Ibn Khaldun : 
Prolegomena. Ibn Qutayba : 'Uyun al-Akhbdr, Book i. Ten Ancient Arabic 
Poems (ed.Ly all). Majani'1-Adab, vol.vi. For Paper 5 (a) : Suyuti : Al-Itqdn. 
For Paper 5 (b) : Shahrastani (ed. Cureton), pp. 1200 ; Al-'Aqd'id an- 
Nasafiya, with commentary of Taftazani. For Paper 5 (c) : Kitab Sibawayhi. 

8 Selected Subjects in Persian for 1937, 1938, and 1939 : 

Section A : Ta'rikh-i Jahdn-Gushdy, vol. iii (James G. Forlong Fund, 
London, 1931). Ta'rikh-i Wa$$dp, Book i. Shams-i Qays : al-Mu'jam. 

Section B: Khdqdni (ed. Lucknow, 1908), vol, i, pp. 1-151. Rumi : 
Mathnawi, Books i and ii. Sa'di : Tayyibdt. Muh. 'Awfi : Lubdbu'l-Albdb 
(ed. E. A. Browne and Mirza Muhammad, London-Leiden, 1906), vol. i, 
chaps, i-vii. 



MASTER OF ARTS 189 

Group II. Rabbinic and Talmudic Literature and Languages. (Six papers.) 
(j) The Mishna divided into four sections to be taken in rotation : 
J 935 tne Order of Zeraim and Moed 

1936 the Order of Nashim 

1937 the Order of Nezikin 

1938 the Order of Kodashim 

(2) The Talmud, divided into four sections, to be taken in rotation : 

1935 from Berakhoth to Megillah inclusive 

1936 from Yebamoth to Sotah inclusive 

1937 from Baba Kamma to Abodah zarah inclusive 

1938 from Sanhedrin to Hullin inclusive 

(3) The Rabbinic commentator on the Bible, commentaries to be under- 
stood in the narrower sense. 

(4) Midrash. 

(5) Jewish Medieval philosophical authors : the following three groups 
in rotations : 

1934 Bahya, Jehudah ha-Levi, Abraham ibn Daud and Crescas. 

1935 Saadia, Gabirol, and Maimonides. 

1936 Joseph ibn Saddik, Levi B. Gersom, and Joseph Albo. 

(6) History of Jewish Literature, to the year 1600. 

(7) Liturgy and Poetry, to include only those of the Spanish Hebrew Poets. 

The written portion of the Examination in Group II will consist of one 
paper on Mishna and Talmud ; one paper on Rabbinic Commentaries ; one 
paper on Midrash; one paper on Liturgy and Poetry (including grammar) ; 
one paper on Philosophy ; one paper on History and Literature. 

The paper on Mishna and Talmud will include questions on the grammar 
of both. 

The following 'books are recommended to the candidate for study : 

Bacher, W. : Agada der Tarmaiten, i, ii ; Agada der palaestinischen 

Amorder, i, ii, iii ; Agada der babylonischen Amorder ; Anfdnge der 

hebrdischen Grammatik (from ZDMG, vol. 49) ; Die Massora 

(from Winter und Wiinsche, see below). 
Winter, J. und Wiinsche, A. : Die ju dische Liter atur seit Abschluss des 

Kanons y i iii, 1894. 

Margolis, M. L. : Lehrbuch der aramdischen Sprache. 
Levias, C. : A grammar of the Aramaic idiom. 
Segal, M. H. : A grammar of Mishnic Hebrew. 

Derenbourg, J. : Essai sur Vhistoire et la geographie de la Palestine (Paris). 
Schriier, E. : History of the Jewish people in the times of Jesus Christ. 
Mielziner : Introduction to the Talmud. 
Krauss, S. : Archseologie des Talmuds, i-iii (Berlin). 
S track, H. : Introduction to the Talmud and Midrash. 
Zunz, L. : Die gottesdienstlichen Vortrdge der Juden \ Literaturgeschichte 

der synagogalen Poesie. 
Waxman : History of Hebrew Literature. 

Group III. Aramaic (including Syriac) Language and Literature (ex- 
cluding Modern Syriac and Mandaitic). History of Aramaic (including 
Syriac) Literature. 

The written portion of the Examination in Group III will consist of three 
papers on Translation (including the various dialects) : two papers on Epi- 
graphy, Philology and Composition ; one paper on Literature and General 
History. 

Group IV. North Semitic (Aramaic* and Canaanite), Epigraphy and 
Palaeography. Comparative Semitic Grammar (Wright's Comparative 
Grammar of the Semitic Languages, Earth's Nominalbildung, etc.). Antiquities 
including Numismatics. Comparative study of Semitic Religion. The 
results of archaeological research. 



IQO MASTER OF ARTS 

The written portion of the Examination in Group IV will consist of one 
paper on Comparative Philology (Aramaic and Canaanite) : two papers on 
Epigraphy and Numismatics ; one paper on Palaeography ; one paper on 
Comparative Religion ; one paper on Antiquities of Ancient Syria and Palestine. 

Group V. Ethiopic. Genesis, Exodus, Ch. i-xxi, Joshua, Judges, 
Samuel, and Kings, Fatha Nagast (ed. Guidi). Kebra Nagast (ed. Bezold). 
Chaine : Grammaire Ethiopienne. Hebrew. Biblical books as above for 
Ethiopic. Arabic. Beladhuri. Comparative Grammar. Wright. Noldeke : 
Beitrdge. Brockelmann. Epigraphy, including South Arabian Inscriptions 
Cooke : Textbook, Lidzbarski : Handbuch. Hommel : Sudarabische 
Chrestomathie. Muller(D.H.). Glaser, Literature. Dillmann : Introduction 
to his Lexicon. Nicholson : History of Arabic Literature. 

[NOTE. Candidates offering Group V will be required to pay an additional 
fee on entry for the Examination. For further information application should 
be made to the Academic Registrar.] 

5. CHINESE 
Five papers of three hours each will be set. 

1-2. Translation from specified texts, 1 with textual criticism* and questions 
on subject-matter. 

3. Translation from unspecified texts. 

4. (a) Translation into Chinese and free composition, (6) questions on the 
general subject of the section chosen under 5 below. 

5. Translation from texts, 1 with questions on their language and subject- 
matter, on one of the following subjects at the option of the candidate :- - 
(i) Confucianism, (ii) Buddhism, (iii) Taoism, (iv) History, (v) Philosophy, 
(vi) Poetry. 

Candidates will be required to show a general acquaintance with the principal 
Chinese and European books on the subject, and a more detailed knowledge 
of the prescribed texts, of the section selected. 

6. JAPANESE 

The candidate will be required to present a thesis on a subject chosen from 
Japanese literature or Chinese literature. The written portion of the examina- 
tion will consist of four papers, viz. : 

(1) Two papers of three hours each in translation from unspecified texts 
(Japanese or Chinese according to the branch of study chosen for the thesis). 
The candidate will be allowed to use native dictionaries. 

(2) Two papers of three hours each in Japanese Cultural History with 
special reference to language and literature. 



1 Prescribed texts for 1938 and 1939 : 

Tso chuan. 

(i) Confucianism : The Five Classics and the Four Books, 
(ii) Buddhism : The Ch'an School. 

The Sixth Patriarch's Fa pao t'an ching (Bunyiu Nanijo's Cata- 
logue, No. 1525). 

Yu hsiian yu lu (Yung-ming Ch'an shih). 
(iii) Taoism : Early Taoist philosophy and the innovations of Ko Hung. 

Lao Tzfi : Tao te ching ; Chuang Tzu ; Pao P'o Tzu : Nei p'ien. 
(iv) History : One of the following periods with the official histories : 

(a) Former Han. 

(b) T^ng. 

(c) Ming. 

(d) Ch'ing. 

Note continued on p. 191. 



MASTER OF ARTS 19 1 

II. COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY 1 or 
COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY (PHONETICS) 

In addition to a thesis and an oral examination including a practical test in 
Phonetics, there shall be a written examination consisting of two papers of 
three hours each, as follows : 

1. History and Principles of Linguistics and Comparative Philology ; 

2. Either (a) Phonetics (General phonetic theory) 

or (b) General History of a selected group or sub-group of 
languages, their phonology, morphology, vocabulary, and 
syntax. 

Schedule of Groups and Sub -Groups for Paper 2 (b) 

I. Indo-European Groups. 

A. Indo-Iranian (Sanskrit and Early Iranian dialects). 

Sub-Groups : i . Sanskrit, Pali, and Prakrit literary and epi- 
graphical ; 

2. Sanskrit and Modern Indo-Iranian ver- 

naculars ; 

3. Old Iranian and Middle Iranian ; 

4. Old Iranian and the new Iranian dialects. 

B. Hellenic (Ancient Greek dialects). 
Sub-Group : Classical and Modern Greek. 

C. Italic (Ancient Indo-European dialects of Italy). 
Sub-Group : Latin and Romance Languages. 

D. Celtic. 

E. Balto-Slavonic. 

Sub-Group : Old and Modern Slavonic Languages. 

F. Teutonic. 

II. Semitic. 

III. Chinese. 

IV. Finno-Ugrian. 
V. Indonesian. 

VI. Bantu. 



III. PHILOSOPHY 

All candidates, except candidates registered under the Regulations for 
postgraduate students proceeding to a higher Degree and specially exempted 
by the Senate on the ground of having passed an equivalent Examination in 
Philosophy approved by the University, will be required to pass the B.A. 



Note continued from p. 190. 

(v) Philosophy : The texts specified under (i), (ii), and (iii) above, 
(vi) Poetry : Shih ching (Classic of Poetry), Part I. T'ang shih san pai 
shou (Three Hundred Poems of the T'ang Dynasty). 

1 Before proceeding to the M.A. Degree in (Comparative Philology, candidates 
who have not passed the B.A. Honours Examination of this or another approved 
University in a relevant branch will be required to pass a qualifying examination 
approved by the Board of Studies. In special circumstances the B.A. (General) 
Degree of this University in relevant subjects may be accepted. 



IQ2 MASTER OF LAWS 

Honours Examination in Philosophy, except the paper on a selected alternative 
subject under Section 6 (see the University Regulations), before proceeding to 
the MA. Examination. 

The written portion of the M.A. Examination will consist of two papers, as 
follows : 

1 . One paper on the whole branch of study to which the thesis belongs, 
e.g. Ethics, Psychology, Ancient Philosophy, etc. 

2. One paper connected still more closely with the thesis. 

IV. HISTORY 

All candidates entering for the MA. Degree Examination in History who 
have not previously obtained First or Second Class Honours at the B.A. 
Honours Examination in this University or in the History School of a University 
approved for the purpose will be required, before proceeding to the M.A. 
Examination, to take the paper 1-6 in the relevant branch of the B A. Honours 
Examination and to reach at least Second Class standard therein. 

Each candidate, in submitting the subject of his thesis, as provided in the 
General Regulations of the University, must furnish a statement of his ante- 
cedent Course of Study or Academic record. The candidate will thereupon 
be informed in what subject or subjects cognate to that of his thesis he will 
be examined by means of one or more papers. 



MASTER OF LAWS 193 

B. MASTER OF LAWS (LL.M.) 

Every candidate must select three subjects from a list including 
the following, in which courses are provided in connection with the 
School : 

Hindu Law and Muhammadan Law (p. 137). 
Law of Palestine (p. 138). 



IQ4 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

C. DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (Ph.D.) 

For this Degree in the Faculty of Arts candidates are registered at 
the School for any subject connected with Oriental or African 
Languages, Literature, Culture, or History. 

REGULATIONS 

1. The Degree of Ph.D. for Internal Students is conferred in 
subjects within the purview of the Faculties of Theology, Arts, Music, 
Science, Engineering, and Economics. 

2. The standard of the Ph.D. Degree is definitely higher than that of 
the M.A. and M.Sc. Degrees in the same subject. 

Qualifications for Registration 

3. A candidate for registration for the Degree of Ph.D. must 
either 

(a) have previously graduated in any Faculty as an Internal or 
External Student in the University, or 

(b) be a graduate of another University, or 

(c) have passed examinations required for an approved diploma 
in certain approved educational institutions of University rank, 

and must comply with the following requirements unless exempted 
therefrom in special cases : 

(i) He must produce a certificate from the Governing Body of 
a College or School of the University, or from a Teacher or Teachers 
of the University, stating that the candidate is in their opinion a fit 
person to undertake a course of study or research with a view to the 
Ph.D. Degree, and that the College, School, or Teacher is willing 
to undertake the responsibility of supervising the work of the 
candidate. 

(ii) He must produce evidence satisfactory to the University of 
the standard he has already attained and of his ability to profit by 
the course. If the evidence first submitted is not satisfactory, the 
candidate may be required to undergo such examination as may be 
prescribed by the University. 

(iii) In the Faculty of Arts he must possess qualifications not 
inferior to those required before proceeding to the M.A. in the same 
branch. 

Candidates applying for registration as Postgraduate Students for 
the Ph.D. Degree in the subjects set forth below are required to hold 
the qualifications stated : 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 195 

Archaeology. 

A candidate is recommended to proceed, in the first instance, to 
the M.A., and not to the Ph.D. Degree. Before registering for the 
Ph.D. Degree a candidate should normally hold the M.A. Degree in 
Archaeology of this University, or some academic qualification con- 
sidered by the University adequate to justify exemption from the normal 
requirement. 

Philosophy. 

A candidate who does not possess the M.A. Degree in Philosophy 
' of this University must produce evidence of his competence to under- 
take research work of the standard required for the Ph.D. Degree in 
Philosophy. 

4. If a student fails to pass the qualifying examination prescribed in 
his case at his first entry therefor, he will not be permitted to proceed 
with his coifrse or to enter again for the qualifying examination without 
the permission of the University. 

5. No student who is or has been registered as an Internal Student 
for the Ph.D. Degree will be permitted to proceed to the Ph.D. Degree 
as an External Student except in special cases and with the approval 
of the Academic Council. 

6. Applications for registration submitted later than three months 
after the date* on which the course was begun must be accompanied 
by a statement from the Head of the College, School, or Institution in 
explanation of the delay. Retrospective registration will only be allowed 
in exceptional circumstances. A whole-time student may be granted 
retrospective registration for not more than four terms and a part-time 
student for not more than seven terms. 

7. A candidate whose application has been acceded to must register 
without delay. In no case will such student be permitted to defer 
registration to a later session than that in which he began his approved 
course of study. 

8. If a student does not begin his course of study in the University 
within one calendar year from the date of the approval of his applica- 
tion for registration the approval of his application will lapse and he 
must apply again to the University for registration if he still desires 
to proceed to a higher Degree. 

9. A candidate for the Ph.D. Degree who desires to proceed instead 
to the Master's Degree must apply through the authorities of his 
College, School, or Institution for permission to do so. The amount 
of the further course of study, if any, which he will be required to 
pursue for the Master's Degree will be prescribed in each case by the 
University. * 

A fee of one guinea is charged to Internal Students who have taken 
a qualifying examination in connection with their registration for a 
Higher Degree and are subsequently permitted to transfer their 



196 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

registration for such Higher Degree to registration for another Higher 
Degree. 

Course of Study 

10. Every candidate must pursue as an Internal Student 

(a) A course of not less than two years of full-time training in 
research and research methods, or 

(b) a part-time course of training in research and research methods 
of not less than two years and not more than four years as may be 
prescribed in each individual case by the Academic Council. 

[NOTE. The expression " two years " in these Regulations will be 
interpreted in the case of students registering for the Ph.D. Degree in 
October as the period from the beginning of that month to the June in 
the second year following. In other cases i. will be interpreted as two 
calendar years.] 

11. A student who is employed as a junior teacher, such as a 
student demonstrator, engaged in teaching work in a College or School 
of the University, may be accepted as a full-time student provided 
that the total demand made on his time, including any preparation 
which may be required does not exceed six hours a week. 

12. The course must be pursued continuously, except by special 
permission of the Senate. 

13. It is essential that the student, whilst pursuing his course of 
study as an Internal Student, should be prepared to attend personally 
for study in a College, School, or Institution of the University during 
the ordinary terms at such time or times as his supervising Teacher 
may require. 

14. The student shall, during his course of study, pay a fee to the 
College, School, or Institution in which he is working. 

15. If the material for the work of a student exists elsewhere, the 
student may under proper conditions be allowed leave of absence, if 
such absence do not exceed two terms out of a total of six, and provided 
that neither of these two terms is the first or the last of the course. 
Such leave will not be granted during the first year of the course in the 
case of students who are attending the course in order to qualify for 
the conferment of their first Degree. 

1 6. Before the end of each session the student must submit to 
the University, through the authorities of the College or School where 
he is pursuing his course of study, or in the case of an Institution other 
than a College or School through the Teacher of the University 
authorized by the University to supervise his work, a Report setting 
forth the details of his work. 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 197 

17. Not later than one calendar year before the date when he 
proposes to enter for the Examination the student must submit the 
subject of his thesis for approval by the University. The University 
will at the time of the approval of the subject of a thesis inform the 
candidate of the Faculty within whose purview the thesis will be deemed 
to fall. After the subject of the thesis has been approved it may not 
be changed except with the permission of the University. 

1 8. A student is not allowed to register for or to proceed to another 
Degree of the University during the currency of his registration for the 
Ph.D. Degree. If he is allowed to change his registration for registration 
for another Degree (see para. 9 above) his Ph.D. registration will lapse. 

19. A student registered as a candidate for the Ph.D. Degree, after 
having studied to the satisfaction of the authorities of the College or 
School (or in the case of an Institution other than a College or School 
of the Recognized Teacher or Teachers) concerned for the period 
prescribed "by the University, may be admitted at any time within 
one calendar year of the completion of such period to the examination 
for the Degree. A student who does not present himself within one 
calendar year of the completion of the prescribed period must apply 
again to the University for admission to the examination if he still 
desires to proceed to the Degree. 

20. A student who, having passed the External Intermediate 
Examination^ is admitted as an Internal Student to the Final B.A. 
or B.Sc. Examination after pursuing a two years' course of study and 
passes that Examination may submit as his third year's course of 
study for the B.A. or B.Sc. Degree a course for the Ph.D. Degree, in 
accordance with Section 16 of the General Regulations as to Approved 
Courses of Study. Before presenting himself for the Ph.D. Degree 
every student will be required to have pursued, after passing the B.A. 
or B.Sc. Examination, a course of study for the Ph.D. Degree to be 
approved by the University. 

Thesis 

21. On completing his course of study every candidate must submit 
a thesis which must comply with the following conditions : 

(a) The greater portion of the work submitted therein must 
have been done subsequently to the registration of the student 
as a candidate for the Ph.D. Degree. 

(b) It must form a distinct contribution to the knowledge of 
the subject and afford evidence of originality, shown either by 
the discovery of new facts or by the exercise of independent 
critical power. 

(c) It must be satisfactory as regards literary presentation and, 
if not already published in an approved form, must be suitable 
for publication, either as submitted or in an abridged form. 

22. The Degree will not be conferred upon a candidate unless the 
Examiners certify that the thesis is worthy of publication as a " Thesis 



198 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

approved for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the University of 
London ". 

23. The thesis must consist of the candidate's own account of his 
research. It may describe work done in conjunction with the Teacher 
who has supervised the work provided that the candidate clearly 
states his personal share in the investigation, and that this statement 
is certified by the Teacher. In no case will a paper written or published 
in the joint names of two or more persons be accepted as a thesis. 
Work done conjointly with persons other than the candidate's teacher 
will only be accepted as a thesis in special cases. 

24. The candidate must indicate how far the thesis embodies the 
result of his own research or observation, and in what respects his 
investigations appear to him to advance the study of his subject. 

25. Every candidate will be required to forward to the University 
with his thesis a short abstract thereof comprising not more than 
300 words. 

26. A candidate will not be permitted to submit as his thesis 
a thesis for which a Degree has been conferred on him in this or in 
any other University ; but a candidate shall not be precluded from 
incorporating work which he has already submitted for a Degree in 
this or in any other University in a thesis covering a wider field, 
provided that he shall indicate on his form of entry and also on his 
thesis any work which has been so incorporated. 

Entry for Examination 

27. Every candidate must apply to the Academic Registrar for 
a form of entry, which must be returned accompanied by (i) four 
copies of his thesis, printed, type-written, or published in his own 
name, (ii) the proper fee, and (iii) a certificate of having completed 
the course of study prescribed in his case. 

[NOTE. In view of the Long Vacation, which extends from the 
end of June until October, a candidate who is eligible to enter for 
the examination at the end of the session runs the risk of considerable 
delay in the decision as to the result. Such a candidate will, therefore, 
be permitted to submit his entry form and fee between i5th April 
and ist May and his thesis between ist June and 5th June.] 

28. An Internal Student submitting a thesis in typescript will be 
required to supply, before the Degree is conferred on him, one of the 
four copies of his thesis bound in accordance with the following 
specification : 

Size of paper, quarto, approx. 10 inches by 8 inches, except for 
drawings and maps on which no restriction is placed. A margin of 
i \ inches to be left on the left-hand side. Bound in a standardized 
form as follows : \ art vellum or cloth ; brown art paper sides ; 
overcast ; edges uncut, lettered boldly up back in gold (J inch to 
\ inch letters), FACULTY, DATE, NAME ; short title written or 
printed neatly and legibly on the front cover. 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 199 

[NoTE. The name and address of a firm of bookbinders in London, 
who will bind these to this specification at a cost of 55. a copy, may be 
obtained from the Academic Registrar.] 

29. The candidate is also invited to submit as subsidiary matter 
in support of his candidature any printed contribution or contributions 
to the advancement of his subject which he may have published 
independently or conjointly. In the event of a candidate submitting 
such subsidiary matter he will be required to state fully his own share 
in any conjoint work. 

Fees 

30. Except as provided below, a candidate for the Ph.D. Degree 
must pay on each entry a fee of twenty guineas. A candidate who 
has previously taken the M.A. or M.Sc. Degree in the same Faculty 
in this University will be required to pay a fee of ten guineas only. 
All cheques ^should be made payable to the University of London, or 
Bearer, and crossed " Westminster Bank, Ltd., Tavistock Square, 
W.C. i, University of London Account". 

1 31. A student who is required to enter for part or the whole of 
an examination before beginning his Ph.D. course will be required 
to pay a fee of six guineas on his first entry for such examination and 
a % further fee of fourteen guineas on his first entry to the Ph.D. Exam- 
ination ; but he must comply with the Regulations in regard to entry 
forms for the fh.D. Examination. 

Examination 

32. After the Examiners have read the thesis they may, if they 
think fit and without further test, recommend that the candidate 
be rejected. 

33. If the thesis is adequate the Examiners shall examine the 
candidate orally and at their discretion by printed papers or practical 
examinations or by both methods on the subject of the thesis and, 
if they see fit, on subjects relevant thereto ; provided that a candidate 
for the Ph.D. Degree in the Faculty of Arts who has obtained the 
Degree of M.A. in the same subject in this University shall in any case 
be exempted from a written examination. 

34. If the thesis is adequate, but the candidate fails to satisfy the 
Examiners at the oral, practical or written examination held in connec- 
tion therewith, the Examiners may recommend the Senate to permit 
the candidate to re-present the same thesis and submit to a further oral, 
practical, or written examination within a period not exceeding eighteen 
months specified by them, and the fee on re-entry, if the Senate adopt 
the recommendation of the Examiners, shall be half the fee originally 
paid. 

35. If the thesis, though inadequate, shall seem of sufficient merit 
to justify such action, the Examiners may recommend the Senate to 



1 This paragraph applies only to students who were registered before October, 
1936. 



200 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

permit the candidate to re-present his thesis in a revised form within 
eighteen months from the decision of the Senate with regard thereto 
and the fee on re-entry, if the Senate adopt such recommendation, 
shall be half the fee originally paid. Examiners shall not, however, 
refer any thesis without submitting the candidate to an oral examination. 

36. For the purposes of the oral, practical, or written examination 
held in connection with his thesis the candidate will be required to 
present himself at such place as the University may direct and upon 
such day or days as shall be notified to him. 

37. Each Report of the Examiners shall state (a) the subject of 
the thesis submitted by the candidate ; (b) a list of his other original 
contributions (if any) to the advancement of his subject ; (c) a concise 
statement of the grounds upon which he is recommended by the 
Examiners for the Degree. 

38. A Diploma for the Degree of Ph.D., under the Seal of the 
University and signed by the Chancellor, shall be delivered to each 
candidate who has passed, after the Report of the Examiners shall have 
been approved by the Senate. 

39. Copies of all successful theses, whether published or not, will 
be deposited for reference in the University Library. 

40. Any thesis approved by the University for this Degree and 
subsequently published must bear the following inscription on the 
title-page : " Thesis approved for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
in the University of London." 

41. A person who has taken the Ph.D. Degree as an Internal 
Student in the Faculty of Arts, Science, Engineering, or Economics 
may proceed to a higher Doctorate (D.Lit., D.Sc., D.Sc. (Engineering), 
or D.Sc. (Economics), as the case may be) in the same Faculty without 
pursuing any further course of study. For the further conditions 
under which such higher Doctorates may be taken, reference must 
be made to the special Regulations relating to them. 

42. A student who fails to pass the Ph.D. Degree Examination 
will be required on re-entry for the Examination to comply with the 
Regulations in force at the time of his re-entry. 

Publication Fund 

A Publication Fund has been instituted for the purpose of facilitating 
the publication of Advanced Lectures given for the University, successful 
Theses, or other results of Research by members and teachers of the 
University. 

Applications will be considered twice a year and must be received 
not later than 3oth September or 28th February by the Academic 
Registrar, University of London, W.C. i, from whom detailed Regu- 
lations may be obtained. 



DOCTOR OF LITERATURE 201 



D. DOCTOR OF LITERATURE (D.Lit.) 

[An Overseas Student is strongly recommended to apply directly 
to the University and to await the decision of the Senate before leaving 
his own country.] 

A candidate for the D.Lit. Degree must have previously obtained 
the M.A. Degree, or the Ph.D. Degree in the Faculty of Arts, as an 
Internal Student. 

Nevertheless a candidate who has obtained the B.A. Degree as 
an Internal Student may, in exceptional circumstances, be exempted 
from this requirement on the ground of published work. 

Any teacher in a School or Institution of the University whose 
name is on the Register of fully Recognized Teachers of the University 
may submit himself as a candidate for the D.Lit. at any time not less 
than two years after the date of his full Recognition by the Senate. 

Such Recognized Teacher will not be required to have obtained 
any lower Degree in this or in any other University or to have pursued 
d course of study approved by the University, but in all other respects 

the ordinary Regulations for Internal Students will be applicable. 



A candidate may make application at any time for the Degree and 
must at the same time submit evidence of his qualifications, such 
evidence to consist of published papers or books, containing original 
contributions to the advancement of knowledge. In the event of 
a candidate submitting any conjoint work in support of his candidature 
he must state fully his own share in such conjoint work. 

The Examiners may at their discretion require the candidate to 
present himself for an interview. 

Every candidate must apply to the Academic Registrar for an entry 
form, which must be returned accompanied normally by not less 
than four copies of his work or works and by the proper fee. 

Every candidate for the D.Lit. Degree must at each entry pay 
a fee of twenty guineas, except as provided below. 

All cheques should be made payable to the University of London, 
or Bearer, and crossed " Westminster Bank, Ltd., Tavistock Square, 
W.C. i, University of London Account ". 

A diploma for the Degree of D.Lit. *under the Seal of the University 
and signed by the Chancellor, shall be delivered to each candidate who 
has passed, after the Report of the Examiners shall have been approved 
by the Senate. 



202 DOCTOR OF LAWS : DIPLOMAS 

E. DOCTOR OF LAWS (LL.D.) 

Guidance is given at the School to candidates for this Degree 
prosecuting research in any of the following subjects : 

Muhammadan Law (p. 137). 
Hindu Law (p. 137). 
Law of Palestine (p. 138). 



DOCTOR OF LAWS : DIPLOMA 203 

ii. UNIVERSITY DIPLOMA 

Diploma in Librarianship 

The School provides courses in the following subjects : 

(i) Arabic (Classical) (p. 126). 
Sanskrit (p. in). 
Oriental Palaeography (pp. 112, 127, 128). 

(ii) Arabic (p. 126). 
Chinese (p. 121). 
Malay (p. 124). 
Persian (p. 130). 
Turkish (p. 128). 



204 

SCHOOL EXAMINATIONS 1 

i. FIRST AND SECOND YEAR CERTIFICATES 

1. The School grants a First Year Certificate and a Second Year 
Certificate. Any one of the subjects in which instruction is given at 
the School may be offered as a subject of examination for the First 
and Second Year Certificates. A mark of distinction may be awarded 
to a candidate who shows excellence in a Certificate Examination as 
a whole. 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR ADMISSION 

2. Students of the School who have attended a course of study 
of at least 120 lectures are eligible for admission to the First Year 
Certificate Examination, on payment of the entrance fee of ^i is. 
Students who have attended a course of study of at least 240 lectures 
are eligible for admission to the Second Year Certificate Examination 
on payment of the entrance fee of ^i is. Students who have not 
attended the prescribed courses may be admitted to either of these 
Examinations on payment of an entrance fee of 2 2s., if approved by 
the Academic Board, on the recommendation of the Head of their 
Department. 

3. Students of the School who receive short notice to take up 
appointments in Africa or the East may, at the discretion of the Academic 
Board, be permitted to present themselves for examination for First 
and Second Year Certificates before the end of the Third Term, on 
payment of the appropriate fees. 

4. Persons on leave from Asia and Africa, who have taken a course 
approved by the Academic Board as students of the School, may with 
the consent of the Academic Board present themselves for examination 
for First and Second Year Certificates at any period of the Academic 
Year, on payment of the appropriate fees. Applications should be 
made in the first instance to the Secretary. An extra fee of i is. is 
charged for an examination held at a special time. 

DATE OF EXAMINATION 

5. Examinations for the First and Second Year Certificates will 
be held each year at the end of the Third Term. Entries must be 
received not later than the first Monday of the Third Term. 

FIRST YEAR CERTIFICATE 

6. For the First Year Certificate in a language the examination 
shall consist of two written papers of three hours each and a viva voce 
examination. 

1 Copies of examination papers for certain past years may be obtained on 
application to the Registrar; prices, Certificate Papers, i/- per set of one 
subject, Diploma Papers, 2/- per set of one subject. 



SCHOOL CERTIFICATES 205 

First Paper : 

(a) Translation from specified l and unspecified texts. 

(b) Grammar questions. 

Second Paper : 

(a) Translation from English. 

(b) Free composition (optional in classical languages). 

(c) Questions on one or more of the following : Geography, 

Literature, History, Religions and Customs of the country 
or countries concerned. 

Viva Voce Examination. 

The Examination shall consist of two parts : 

(a) To be conducted entirely in the language (optional in a 

classical language). It may include any or all of the 
following : 

(i) Dictation which may be in one or more of the 

following scripts : 
(a) phonetic. 
(/3) orthographic, 
(y) romanized. 

(ii) Telling a story of candidate's own choice, 
(jii) Describing a picture of candidate's own choice, 
(iv) Reading aloud from an unprescribcd text, 
(v) General conversation. 

(b) To be conducted in English. It may include any or all of 

the following : 

(i) Questions on the language, 
(ii) Translation at sight from English, 
(iii) Questions on grammar, etc. 
(iv) Questions arising out of the written papers. 

SECOND YEAR CERTIFICATE. 

7. For the Second Year Certificate in a language the examination 
shall consist of three written papers of three hours each and a viva voce 
examination. 

First Paper ; 

Translation from specified l texts with questions on their 
language and subject matter. 

Second Paper : 

(a) Translation from unspecified texts. 

(b) Translation from English. 

(c) Free composition (optional ii* classical languages). 

1 Syllabuses and lists of specified texts for Certificate Examinations may be 
obtained on application to the Registrar. 



206 SCHOOL CERTIFICATES 

Third Paper : 

(a) Questions on grammar. 

(b) Questions on one or more of the following : Geography, 

Literature, History, Religions and Customs of the country 
or countries concerned. 

Viva Voce Examination. 

The Examination shall consist of two parts : 

(a) To be conducted entirely in the language (optional in 

classical languages). It may include any or all of the 
following : 

(i) Dictation, orthographic script, 
(ii) Describing a picture previously unseen, 
(iii) Reproducing a short story told to the candidate on 

the spot. 

(iv) Reading an unseen passage and talking about it. 
(v) General conversation. 

(b) To be conducted in English. It may include any or all of the 

following : 

(i) Questions on the language. 

(ii) Translation at sight from English, 
(iii) Questions on grammar, etc. 
(iv) Questions arising out of the written papers. 

EXAMINATION IN PHONETICS 

8. The examination in Phonetics shall consist of two written 
papers with a Practical Test for the First Year Certificate and three 
with a Practical Test in Experimental Phonetics and a Practical Oral 
Test for the Second Year Certificate. These include (i) General 
Phonetics with reference to European Languages ; (2) General Phonetics 
with reference to any two of the following : African Languages, Indian 
Languages, Arabic or Persian, Chinese ; (3) Transcription, etc. 

[Note : At examinations for the First and Second Year Certificates know- 
ledge of grammar will be tested in accordance with the methods of instruction 
followed at the School.] 



SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 



207 



2. SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 

i. GENERAL REGULATIONS 

i. The School grants a Diploma in the following subjects : 

(i) Arabic (Classical), 

(ii) Arabic (Modern), 

(iii) Bengali, 

(iv) Burmese, 

(v) Chinese (Literary), 

(vi) Chinese (Modern). 

(vii) Comparative Grammar of the Bantu Languages, 

(viii) Comparative Grammar of the Indo-Aryan Languages, 

(ix) Comparative Grammar of the Indonesian Languages, 

(x) Comparative Grammar of the Semitic Languages, 

(xi) Gujarati. 

(xii) Modern Hebrew, 

(xiii) Hindi, 

(xiv) Hindustani. 

(xv) Indian Palaeography and Epigraphy, 

(xvi) Indian Philosophy, 

(xvii) Old and Middle Iranian, 

(xviii) Japanese, 

(xix) Malay, 

(xx) Marathi. 

(xxi) Pali, 

(xxii) Percian. 

(xxiii) Phonetics, 

(xxiv) Sanskrit, 

(xxv) Sinhalese, 

(xxvi) Swahili. 

(xxvii) Tamil, 

(xxviii) Tibetan, 

(xxix) Turkish, 

(xxx) Urdu. 



QUALIFICATIONS FOR ADMISSION 

2. The Diploma Examination is open to (i) students who have 
pursued one year's course of study in the School after obtaining the 
Second Year Certificate in the subject offered, and (2) other persons 
who have pursued a course of study at the School extending over at 
least one term or ten weeks in all and who are regarded by the Academic 
Board as qualified to enter. 



DATE OF EXAMINATION 

3. Examinations are ordinarily held at the end of each term ; 
entries must be received not later than the end of the second week 
of term, except in the third term wh<?n entries must be received not 
later than the first Monday of Term, the examination fee being payable 
at the same time. In exceptional cases examinations may be held at 
other times subject to the approval of the Academic Board. 



208 SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 

RE-ENTRY TO EXAMINATION 

4. A candidate who has failed in the examination may re-enter 
for the same examination. A candidate so re-entering shall take the 
whole examination ; provided that, having previously failed only in 
Paper 5 (b) *, where this includes questions on a subsidiary classical 
language or other subsidiary subject, he may be permitted by the 
Academic Board to take again only that portion of the examination, 
viz. Paper 5 (b) l . 

5. A candidate who has gained the Diploma in one subject may, if 
he satisfy the conditions of regulation 2, enter for the examination in 
another or other subjects. 

FEES 

6. The fee for each entry to the examination shall be 5 5$.: 
provided that for a candidate who is re-admitted to a part of the 
examination under regulation 4 the fee shall be i is. 

AWARD OF DIPLOMA 

7. Successful candidates shall be given a Diploma bearing the 
Seal of the School and signed by the Chairman of the Governing Body 
and the Director. A mark of distinction may be awarded to a candidate 
who shows excellence in a Diploma Examination as a whole. Diploma 
holders of the School are permitted to use after their names the letters 
Dipl.O.S. 

SCHEME OF EXAMINATION 

8. The Examination consists of not more than six 2 written papers 
of three hours each and a viva voce examination which shall be optional 
or compulsory according to the subject. 

9. Details of the syllabuses for the written papers in the various 
Diplomas will be found below. Candidates are informed that : 

(i) Papers of translation from specified texts shall include 
questions on the language and subject matter of the texts 
except when otherwise provided in the syllabuses. 

(ii) Paper 6 (7 in Swahili) shall, unless otherwise provided, be 
divided into three sections on : 

(a) The literature, 

(b) The religion and customs, 

(c) The history, 

of the countries in which the language in question was or 
is used. Each section shall contain at least four questions 
and the candidate will be required to answer six in all. 

1 Except in Swahili where the relevant Paper is 6 (b). 

* Except the Diploma in Swahili where there are seven written papers of 
three hours each. 



SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 2OQ 

Viva Voce Examination 
The examination shall consist of two parts : 

(a) To be conducted entirely in the language (optional in 

classical languages). It may include any or all of the 
following : 

(i) Dictation. 

(ii) Reading a manuscript and explaining its meaning, 
(iii) Reading and explaining the meaning of an unseen 

piece of modern prose, 
(iv) Reading and explaining the meaning of an unseen 

piece of modern poetry, 
(v) Reading and explaining the meaning of a piece of 

archaic prose or poetry. 
. (vi) General conversation. 

(b) To be conducted in English. It may include any or all of 

the following : 

(i) Questions on the language, 
(ii) Translations at sight from English, 
(iii) Questions on grammar, etc. 
(iv) Questions arising out of the written papers. 



210 SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 

ii. SYLLABUSES 
ARABIC (Classical) 

Six papers and a viva voce examination which may, at the candidate's option, 
include a colloquial text. 
1-2. Translation from specified l Arabic texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Arabic texts. 

4. (a) Translation into, and (b) free composition in, Arabic. 

5. Questions on Arabic grammar. 

6. Questions on (a) Arabic literature, (6) Muhammadan history, (c) Islam. 

ARABIC (Modern) 

Six papers and a viva voce examination in a selected colloquial dialect or 
modern literary Arabic. 
1-2. Translation from specified Arabic texts. 2 

3. Translation from unspecified Arabic texts. 

4. (a) Translation into, and (6) free composition in, Arabic. 

5. Translation from al-Qur'an, suras 5, 7, 9, 36. 
Grammar (including grammar of the Qur'an). 

6. (a) History of Egypt and Western Asia from 1800. 
(b} Islam, including Modern Movements. 

(c) Modern Arabic Literature. 

BENGALI 

Six papers and a viva voce examination, including a colloquial test. 
1-2. Translation from specified 3 Bengali texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Bengali texts. 

4. () Translation into, and (6) free composition in, Bengali. 

5. (a) Questions on Bengali grammar. 

(b) Translation from a specified 4 Sanskrit text. Questions on Sanskrit 
grammar. 

6. Questions on (a) Hinduism, (b) the literature, and (c) history, of Bengal. 

1 al-Qur'an : Suras 5-9, 36, 51-60, 71-80. 
Al-Bukhari: Selections from the Sahih, ed. C. C. Torrey. 

Ibn Khaldun : Selections from the Prolegomena, ed. D. B. Macdonald. 

Ibn Battutah (ed. C. Defremery), i, pp. 261-405. 

either Noeldeke : Delectus Veterum Carminum Arabicrum, 

or Al-Baidawi : Anwar at-tanzil, chap. 3, 

or Ibn al-Tiqtaqa : al-Fakhrl, ed. H. Derenbourg (or Cairo editions). 

2 Muhammad 'Abduh : Essays in Ta'rikh al-Ustddh al-Imdm, by Rashid 
Rida, vol. ii, pp. 215-341. 

Al-Manfaluti : an-Nazardt t vol. i. 

Taha Husain : al-Ayydm. 

Poetical passages contained in al-Mukhtdrdt (ed. R. Nakhla, Bairut), vol. ii. 

3 Dinescandra Sen : Bangiya Sahityaparicay, the selections from the works 
of the following : Ksemananda, Mukundaram, Krttibas, Kasidas, Candidas, 
Brndabandas, Ramprasad. 

Rabindranath Thakur : Galpaguccha, Pt. 3 (2nd edition). 
Intermediate Bengali Selections (Calcutta University, 1924). 

4 Nalopakhyana, ed. Eggeling, 15. 



SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 211 

BURMESE 

Six papers and a viva voce examination, including a colloquial test. 
1-2. Translation from specified l Burmese texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified texts, including a passage from a news- 
paper or magazine and a passage in the colloquial style. 

4. (a) Translation of a passage in dialogue into colloquial Burmese. 

(b) Translation of a continuous passage into modern literary Burmese. 

5. Questions on grammar, etymology and prosody. 2 

6. Questions on the religion, customs, history, and literature, 3 including 
one question with three options, the answer to which shall be written in modern 
literary Burmese. 



CHINESE (Literary) 

Six papers and a viva voce examination, which may, at the candidate's 
option, include a colloquial text. 

1-2. Translation from specified texts. 4 

3. Translation from unspecified texts. 

4. (a) Translation into Chinese ; (b) Free composition in Chinese (wen-li). 

5. Questions on Chinese Language. 

6. Questions on (a) the literature, 4 (b) the religion and philosophy, and 

(c) the history 4 of China. 

NOTE. Students may offer the First Year Certificate in Japanese instead 
of paper 5. 



1 (i) Vidhura Jdtaka Vatthu, Hanthawaddy Press, Rangoon, 1906 

(2) Shtvepyizo Wuttu, by U Lat, Chapters 1-6, Rangoon, 1929. 

(3) Chetwagyin by U Kha, Part 2, sections 19-23, Prome, 1931. 

(4) Kyabin Tayaza, with introduction by U Po Sein, Rangoon, 1933 

Selections. 

2 A Manual of Burmese Composition, by Saya Lun, Rangoon, 1931 the 
descriptions of metrical forms from p. 135 onwards. 

3 (i) Harvey's History of Burma, Longmans, Green and Co., London, 1925. 

(2) A Dictionary of Burmese Authors, by U Ba Thein, translated by 

G. H. Luce and Maung Ba Kya : in Journal of the Burma Research 
Society, vol. x (1920), page 137 ff. 

(3) Sagabon Hnit Htaung by Maung Taing, Hanthawaddy Press, Rangoon, 

1899 or other collection of Burmese Proverbs obtainable. 

4 1938 and 1939. 

Haenisch, Lehrgang der chinesischen Schriftsprache (Leipzig, 1929), vol. iii, 
pp. 6-130. 

Kuo wn tu pen (National Literature Reader, compiled by Chiang Heng- 
yiian, Commercial Press, Shanghai), vol. i, part i. 

Ma Ying, Kuo hsiieh kai lun, part iii (Ta Hua Press, Shanghai). 

Poems of Li Po, Tu Fu, Po Chu-i, Meng Hao-jan, Liu Tsung-yiian, Wang 
Wei (T'ang shih san pai shou : Three Hundred Poems of the T'ang Dynasty). 

Li Chi, book xxviii (Li ytieh), part i, Chung Yung. 

Japanese : Rose-Innes, Japanese ReaSing for Beginners, vol. iii, 1-83 ; 
vol. iv, 1-51. 

Periods of Literature and History : 

(a) From the beginning of the Chou Dynasty to A.D. 1368 
or (b) From 1368 to 1911. 



212 SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 

CHINESE (Modern) 

Six papers and a viva voce examination, including a colloquial test. 
Modern : 
1-2. Translation from specified texts. 1 

3. Translation from unspecified texts. 

4. (a) Translation into, and (b) free composition in, Chinese. 

5. (a) Translation from a Classical Chinese text 2 ; (b) questions on Classical 

style. 

6. Questions on (a) the literature, 3 (b) the religion and philosophy, and 

(c) the history, 4 of China. 

NOTE. Students may offer the First Year Certificate in Japanese instead 
of paper 5. 

COMPARATIVE GRAMMAR OF THE BANTU LANGUAGES 

Six papers and, at the option of the examiners, a viva voce examination. 
Candidates will not be required to read or write any script other than Roman. 
12. Translation, with questions on the language only, from specified 

texts in one principal and two subsidiary Bantu languages chosen 

by the candidate. 

3. Questions on the General Principles of Linguistics. 

4. Questions on the Comparative Grammar of the Bantu languages. 5 

5. Questions on the sounds, forms, and syntax of the three languages 

selected by the candidate for papers i and 2. 

6. Questions on the Ethnology and Anthropology of the Bantu. 

COMPARATIVE GRAMMAR OF THE INDO -ARYAN 
LANGUAGES 

Five papers and, at the option of the Examiners, a viva voce examination. 
Candidates will not be required to read or write any script other than Roman. 

1. Translation, with questions on their language only, from specified 6 

texts to be prescribed from (a) Vedic and Sanskrit literature, (b) 
Avesta or Old Persian. 

2. Translation, with questions on their language only, from specified 7 

texts to be prescribed from (a} Pali, (b) Inscriptions of Asoka, 
(c) Prakrit, (d) a Modern Indo-Aryan language to be chosen by the 
candidate. 

1 Rattay, Current Chinese, books i, iii, and iv. 

Ma Ying, Kuo hsueh kai lun (Introduction to Sinology), part i. 
Selected texts from modern authors. 

2 Either Li chi (Book of Rites), chaps, xxxix (Ta hstieh), or K'ung chiao hsin 
pien (Confucian Ethics), by Cheng Hsiao-hsu. 

3 4 A.D. 1368-1911. 

6 Meinhof u. Warmelo : Introduction to the Phonology of the Bantu Language. 

Werner : Language Families of Africa. 

Structure and Relationship of African Languages. 
Bleek : Comparative Grammar of Bantu. 
Torrend : Comparative Gra?nmar of Bantu. 

6 Macdonell : A Vedic Reader for Students, the first 10 hymns. 
Lanman : Sanskrit Reader, Nalopakhyana 1-5. 

Reichelt : Avesta Reader, pp. i-t2, and pp. 81-4 to the end of the Selection 
of Ysama 32. 

7 Andersen : Pali Reader, pp. 130. 

Hultzsch : The Inscriptions of Asoka, The Rock Edicts. 
Woolner : Introduction to Prakrit, Extracts 1-7, 15-17, 19. 



SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 213 

3. Questions on the General Principles of Linguistics. 

4. Questions on the sounds, forms, and syntax of Sanskrit, Pali, and Prakrit. 

5. Questions on the sounds, forms, and syntax of the Modern Indo-Aryan 

languages, with special reference to the language chosen for paper 



COMPARATIVE GRAMMAR OF THE INDONESIAN 
LANGUAGES 

Five papers and, at the option of the Examiners, a viva voce examination. 
. Candidates will not be required to read or write any script other than Roman. 

1. Translation, with question on their language only, from specified texts 

(to be prescribed from (a) Old Javanese literature, (b) inscriptions 
in Old Javanese, Old Malay, and Cham). 

2. Translation, with questions on their language only, from specified texts 

to be prescribed from (a) a language of the Philippine Group 
(or of the Minahasa sub-group), or a dialect of Malagasy, or of 
flatak ; (b) another modern Indonesian language at the choice of 
the candidate. 

3. Questions on the General Principles of Linguistics. 

4. Questions on the Comparative Grammar of the Indonesian languages. 

5. Questions on the sounds, forms, and syntax of a sub-group of the 

Indonesian languages selected by the candidate, with special 
reference to one language selected by the candidate from such sub- 
group. 

COMPARATIVE GRAMMAR OF THE SEMITIC LANGUAGES 

Five papers and a viva voce examination. 

1. Translation, with questions on their language only, from specified texts 

in (a) Classical Arabic, 1 (6) Classical Hebrew, 2 (c) Biblical Aramaic. 3 

2. Translation, with questions on their language only, from specified texts 

in (a) either (i) Ethiopic 4 and (ii) South Arabian Inscriptions 5 ; 
or(i) Talmudic Aramaic 6 or Syriac 7 and (ii) North Semitic 
Inscriptions 8 ; (b) a modern Arabic dialect or Modern Hebrew. 
3 Questions on Phonetics and the elements of Linguistics. 

4. Questions on the Comparative Grammar of the Semitic Languages. 

5. Questions on the sounds, forms, syntax, and historical development 

of the language selected under 2 (b). 

[NOTE. In place of paper 5, candidates may submit a thesis embodying 
the results of original research within the field of the selected language.] 

Specified Texts : 

1 Thornton and Nicholson, Second Reading Book, pp. 1-55. 

2 Amos, Psalms, 1-8. 

3 Daniel, chaps. 2-5. 

4 Mercer, Ethiopic Grammar (Oxford, 1920). 

5 Conti Rossini, Chrestomathia Arabica mendionalis (Rome, 1931), Select 
Inscriptions. 

6 Baba Mesi'a, Babylonian Talmud, first t twenty pages. 

7 Selections from the Syriac Julian Romance (ed. Gottheil, Semitic Study 
Series). 

8 G. A. Cooke, Handbook of North Semitic Inscriptions (Cambridge, 1930), 
Select Inscriptions. 



214 SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 

GUJARATI 

Six papers and a viva voce examination including a colloquial test. 
1-2. Translation from specified l Gujarati texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Gujarati texts. 

4. (a) Translation into, and (b) free composition in, Gujarati. 

5. (a) Questions on Gujarati grammar. (b) Translation from a specified * 

Sanskrit text. Questions on Sanskrit grammar. 

6. Questions on (a) the literature, (b) the history, and (c) the religions, of 

Gujarat. 

MODERN HEBREW 

Six papers and a viva voce examination including a colloquial test. 

1-2. Translation from specified 3 Biblical, Rabbinic and Modern Hebrew 
texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Modern Hebrew texts. 

4. (a) Translation into, and (b) free composition in, Modern Hebrew. 

5. (a) Questions on Hebrew Grammar, classical and modern, (b) Transla- 

tion from a specified 4 Aramaic text. Questions on Aramaic 
Grammar. 

6. Questions on (a) Jewish Life in Europe in the Middle Ages ; (b) the 

tenets and practices of Judaism ; (c) the History of Modern Hebrew 
Literature. 



1 Nandasarikara Tujajasahkara : Karan Ghelo, 1916, pp. i-ioo. 
Manilala Chabarama : Gw'ardt-nt juni vdrttd, 1917, pp. 118166. 
Navalarama Laksmirama : Akbar ne Birbal, pp. 1-55 ; and Navala- 

Grant hdvali, 1891, vol. iv, pp. i-ioo. 

Rgvedi : Ancient and Modern history of Aryan festivals, 1916, pp. 33-44, 

295-355,4377-465' 

Narmada-Sahkara : Narma Gadya, 1914, pp. 1-50. 

D. K. Pandya : Amarasatra Ndtak, 1902, pp. 1-50. 

Mahlpatarama Ruparama : Kdvya Dohana, 1905, pp. i 6, 1320, 136, 
155> i 6 7, J 68, 260-305, 326-328, 368-373, 425, 443, 450-474. 

H. G. Anjaria and Karim Muhammad : Kavitd Pravesa, 1922, pp, 2, 5, 7> 
8, 16-18, 26-31, 58-66, 86, 87, 92, 129-131. 

H. G. Anjaria : Kdvya Mddhurya, 1920, pp. i, 2, 37, 43-46, 67-71, 94-96, 
102, 114-117, 120, 121, 147, 148, 150. 

2 Nalopakhyana, ed. Eggeling, 1-5. 
3 /. Samuel, chaps, i-io. 

Amos, with commentary of Rashi, chaps. 1-5. 

The first eight Psalms ; the first five with commentary of Kimhi, ed. Schiller 
Szinessy. 

The Ethics of the Fathers, complete. 

The Book of the Aggadah ; Ravnitski and Bialik, vol. i, book i, pp. 80-93. 

The Letters of S.D. Luzzatto : Nos. 14, 20, 28, 32, 35 (Part I) only. 

Mendele Mocher Sepharim : Maseoth Benjamin Hashshelishi, the first 
three chapters. 

Peretz : five sketches. $ 

Bialik : ten poems. 

Ahad Flaam : Hasi Nehamah ; Tehiyath Haruah. 

Tchernichovsky : five poems. 

4 Daniel, chapters 2-3 . 



SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 215 

HINDI 

Six papers and a viva voce examination including a colloquial test. 
1-2. Translation from specified 1 Hindi and Avadhi texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Hindi texts. 

4. (a) Translation into, and (6) free composition in, Hindi. 

5. (a) Questions on Hindi (including Avadhi and Braj) grammar. 

(b) Translation from a specified 2 Sanskrit text. Questions on Sanskrit 
grammar. 

6. Questions on (a) Hinduism, Hindi literature, and (b) the history of 

Hindustan. 

HINDUSTANI 

Six papers and a viva voce examination including a colloquial test. Know- 
ledge of both Persian and Nagari script will be required. 

12. Translation from specified 3 Hindi and Urdu texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Hindi and Urdu texts. 

4. (a) Translation into Hindi and Urdu, (b) Free composition in Hindi 

or Urdu, at the candidate's choice. 

5. Questions on the historical grammar of Hindustani, with special reference 

to its Arabic, Persian, and Sanskrit elements. 

6. Questions on (a) the literature, (b) the religions, and (c) history, of 
~"""* Hindustan. 

INDIAN PALAEOGRAPHY AND EPIGRAPHY 

At least five papers and, at the option of the Examiners, a viva voce exam- 
ination. 

I. PAUEOGRAPHY. 

(a) General History and development of the Indian alphabets (including the 

derivative alphabets). 

(b) North Indian alphabets including the Eastern and Western varieties and 

Kharosthi. 

(c) South Indian alphabets. 

(d) Burmese and Mon alphabets. 

(e) Siamese and Cambodian alphabets. 
(/) Javanese alphabet. 

(g) Sinhalese alphabet. 
(h) Cham alphabet. 



1 Ayodhya Sih Upadhyay : Adhkhild Phul. 

Hans' Candr : Satya Harts Candr. 

Lallu Ji Lai : Rdjniti. 

Tulsi Das : Ayodhya Kdnd, Nagari Pracharini Sabha, ed., doha, i64~end. 

8 Nalopakhyana. Ed. Eggeling, 1-5. 

3 Ayodhya Sih Upadhyay : Dev Bald. 

Lallu Ji Lai : Rdjniti, Stories i and ii. , 

Tulsi Das : Kiskindhd Kdnd. 

Rusum i Hind, either pp. 1171 or 172350. 

'Abdu'l Halim Sharar : Firdaus i Bart. 

Altaf Husain Hall : Dlvdn i Hdli. (Rubd'idt and Qita'dt ii, 1-612.) 



2l6 SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 

II. EPIGRAPHY (Public inscriptions and documents of public interest). 

(a) General introduction (including matters connected with the fnaterials 

used for public inscriptions and documents). 

(b) (i) Asoka and Prakrit (including Pali) inscriptions ; (ii) Sanskritic 

inscriptions (Gupta, etc.). 

(c) South Indian inscriptions (Tamil, Karanese, etc.). 

(d) Burmese and Mon inscriptions. 

(e) Siamese and Cambodian inscriptions (including Sanskritic inscriptions 

of Cambodia). 
(/) Javanese inscriptions. 
(g) Sinhalese inscriptions. 
(h) Cham inscriptions (including Sanskritic inscriptions of Champa). 

In sections (b) to (h) translation from facsimiles of original inscriptions 
will be required, and the candidate may be asked to make etymological and 
historical comments on the text. 

Every candidate will be required to take sections I (a) and II (a\ one other 
section in I and the corresponding section in II (b) (i) and (b) (ii) ^ach counting 
as a section and at least one other section, making a minimum of five sections. 
The candidate may, at his own option, take an additional paper on another 
section. For example, a candidate interested in Burmese would take I (a) 
and (c) and (d) and II (a) and (d), and if also interested in Pali he could take 
H0)(i). 

INDIAN PHILOSOPHY 

Five papers and, at the option of the Examiners, an oral examination. 

1 . Questions on specified texts, 1 which may include passages for translation. 

2. Translation from unspecified philosophical texts. 

3. Questions on the history of Indian Philosophy. 

4. An essay on one of a choice of subjects. 

5. Questions on a special subject or branch of Indian Philosophy to be 
chosen by the candidate, subject to the approval of the Academic Board. 

OLD AND MIDDLE IRANIAN 

Six papers and, at the option of the Examiners, a viva voce examination. 
The candidate may select one of the following two sections : 

2 SECTION i 
Papers. 

1-2. Translation from specified Avestan and Old Persian Texts. 
3. Translation from unspecified Avestan texts. 

1 Specified texts : 

The following Upanisads with Sainkara's Commentary: Aitareya, Taittiriya, 
Brhaddranyaka, iv, 3-5, Chdndogya, vi, 1-16, and viii ; Sdmkhya-kdrikd, with 
Gaudpada's Commentary. 

2 Section I. Specified Texts : 

(a) Avestan and Old Persian. 
The five Gathas. 

Yasts to Horn (Yasna 9-1 1), Ardvisur, Mihr and Tistr. 
Videvdat, chaps. 12. 

Old Persian texts in Tolman : Ancient Persian Lexicon and Texts ; 
and Kent : The Recently Published Old Persian Inscriptions. 

Note continued on page 217. 



SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 217 

4. Translation from specified texts in either Western Middle Iranian or 

Sogdian or Saka. 

5. Questions on Grammar of Avestan and Old Persian. 

6. Questions on (a) literature, (b) religion, and (c) history down to about 

A.D. 800. 



1 SECTION 2 
Papers 

1-2. Translation from specified texts in either Western Middle Iranian or 
Sogdian or Saka. 

3. Translation from unspecified texts in the language selected in papers 

1-2. 

4. Translation from specified texts in Old Iranian (either Avestan or Old 

Persian). 

5. Questions on Grammar of the language selected in papers 12. 

6. Questions on (a) literature, (b) religion, and (c) history, to about A.D. 800. 



Note continued from page 216. 

(b) Western Middle Iranian, 
^ahlavi Menok I Khrat, chaps. 2-20. 

Texts in Andreas-Henning : Mitteliranische Manichaica am 
Chinesisch-Turkestan II. 

(c) Sogdian. 
Vassantara Jataka, 1-765. 

(d) Saka. 

Vajracchedika, in Hoernle, Manuscript Remains of Buddhist Literature 

found in Eastern Turkestan. 

23 in Leumann, Das nordarische (sakische) Lehrgedicht des 
Buddhismus 2 Heft. 

1 Section II Specified Texts : 

(a) Western Middle Iranian. 

Texts in Andreas-Henning, Mitteliranische Manichaica aus 

Chinesisch-Turkestan I-II. 
Menok I Khrat with Pazand. 
Bundahisn, chap. i. 
Husrau ut Retak. 

(b) Sogdian. 

Sutra des Causes et des Effets. 
Vessantara Jataka. 

Dhyana Text in Reichelt, Soghdische Handschriftenreste des Britischen 
Museums I. 

Old Sogdian Letters 1-4 in Reichelt, Soghdische Handschriftenreste 

des Britischen Museums II. 

Christian Sogdian texts, the passages from Luke in F. W. K. Miiller, 
Soghdische Texte I. 

(c) Saka. 

The texts of manuscript E, ed. Leumann. 
Vajracchedika. ^ 

Aparimitayuhsutra. 
Samghatasutra. 

(d) Avestan and Old Persian. 

Videvdat, chap 2 ; Yat, viii. 

Behistun inscrintion. and the Snsa Palare insnrintion of Darius. 



2l8 SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 

JAPANESE 

Six papers and a viva voce examination including a colloquial test. Can- 
didates will be required to write Kana-majiri in Kaisho. 
1-2. Translation from specified 1 Japanese texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Japanese texts. 

4. (a) Translation into, and (b) free composition in, Japanese (to be written 

in Japanese script in the modern written style). 

5. (a) Questions on the Japanese language, written and spoken. 
(b) Translation on specified 2 Kambun text. 

6. Questions on (a) the literature, (b) the religions, and (c) the history, of 

Japan. 

MALAY 

Six papers and a viva voce examination including a colloquial test. A 
knowledge of both Arabic and Roman script will be required. 
1-2. Translation from specified 3 Malay texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Malay texts. 

4. (a) Translation into, and (b) free composition in, Malay. 

5. (a) Questions on Malay grammar. 

(b) Either Translation from a specified 4 Arabic text ; questions on 

Arabic grammar and on the Arabic loanwords in Malay, 
or Questions on the Comparative grammar of the Indonesian 
languages. 

6. Questions on (a) Malay literature, (b) Malay history and customs, 

(c) Islam. 

MARATHI 

Six papers and a viva voce examination including a colloquial test. 
i2. Translation from specified 5 Marathi texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Marathi texts. 

4. (a) Translation into, and (b) free composition in, Marathi. 

1 A. Rose-Innes : Japanese Reading for Beginners, vol. v, pp. 3-38 and 
94-105. 

Kofukan : Chugaku Kokubun Kyokasho, vol. vi, pp. 144 and 70160. 

Meiji Shoin : Kokubun Shinsen, vol. vii, pp. 139. 

* T. Inouye : Chugaku Kambun Kyokasho, vol. i pp. i-io. 

3 Sejarah Melayu (Malay Literature Series), chap, n-end. 
Bokhari : Taju-s-Salatin, chaps. 5-10 (Batavia, 1827). 
Seri Rama (J.R.A.S. Straits Branch, No. 71), pp. 51-268. 

Abdullah bin Abdul Kadir : Hikayat Abdullah (Malay Literature Series, 
pp. 1-207. 

Shaer Bidasari, cantos 1-3. Either ed. W. R. van Hoevell, Batavia, 1843 
(Verh. Bat. Gen. XIX) or ed. H. C. Klinkert, Leiden, 1886. 
Pantun Melayu (Malay Literature Series) quatrains 4-361. 

4 Qur'dn, chap. 12, vv, 1-55. 

5 D. B. Parasmis : _Savdi Mddhavardo Pesvydcd Darbdr, 1908, pp. 1-93 
Ramabai Ranade : Amcyd Ayusyatil Kahldthavam, 1910, pp. 1-150. 

C. V. Vaidya : Sri Rama caritra, 1917, pp. i-ioo. 
H. N. Apte : Mdyecd Bdjdr, 192^, pp. i-ioo. 
Khaidlkar : Vidydharana, 1923, pp. 150. 
Jhdnesvart, ed. R. V. Madgavkar, 1907, pp. 26-50. 

Navanita, ed. R. S. Goclbole, 1923, pp. 14-28, 47-84, 122-132, 181-209, 
314-326, 348-355, 449-400. 

Kesavasuta, ed. S. K. Damle, pp. 9-14, 51-62, 9598, 1502. 



SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 2 19 

5. (a) Questions on Marathi grammar, (b) Translation from a specified l 

Sanskrit text. Questions on Sanskrit grammar. 

6. Questions on (a) the literature, (b) the history, and (c) the religions, of 

Maharasfra 

PALI 

Six papers and, at the option of the Examiners, a viva voce examination. 
A knowledge of Roman transliteration only will be required. 

1-2. Translation from specified 2 Pali texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Pali texts. 

4. Translation from specified 3 and unspecified Sanskrit and Prakrit texts. 

5. Translation into Pali. Questions on Pali grammar. 

6. Questions on (a) the literature, (b) the religions and philosophy, (c) the 

history, of India prior to the fifth century A.D. 

PERSIAN 

Six papers and a viva voce examination, including a colloquial test. 
12. Translation from specified 4 Persian texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Persian texts. 

4. (a) Translation into, and (b) free composition in, Persian. 

5. (a) Questions on Persian grammar ; questions on Historical Persian 

grammar, (b) Translation from a specified 5 Arabic text ; questions 
on Arabic grammar. 

6. Questions on (a) the literature, (b) the religion, and (c) the history, of 

Persia. 

PHONETICS 

1. General Phonetics of European Languages. 6 

2. (a) General Phonetics of Asiatic Languages. 
(b) General Phonetics of African Languages. 7 



1 Nalopakhyana, ed. Eggeling, 15. 

* Pali, Section i : Majjhima-Nikdya, suttas, 57-66. Commentary on the 
same ; Papanca-sudam (P.T.S.), pp. 100-172. 

Pali, Section 2 : Vinaya Pitaka, Mahavagga Khandhaka, i ; Bhanavaras, 3 
and 4, and Khandhaka, iii (P.T.S., ed. i, pp. 24, 43, 137-156). Apaddna, 
Vagga, 54 (P.T.S., ed. ii, pp. 463-486). Dhammasangani, Eka-duka-tividhena 
rupasahgaha (P.T.S., ed. 583-876, pp. 124-167). 

3 Selections from Lanman : Sanskrit Reader. 

4 Firdawsi : Shahnama, Episodes as in Pizzi's Antologia Firdusiana. 
Hafiz, Odes 1-50. 

Siyasat-nama. 

Chahar Maqala. 

Rumi : Masnavi, ii, 11250. 

5 Qur'dn, chap; 12, w. 1-55. 

8 Jones : Outline of English Phonetics. 
Ward : The Phonetics of English. 

Armstrong and Ward : Handbook of English Intonation. 
Armstrong : The Phonetics of French. 
Armstrong and Coustenoble : French Intonation. 
Victor : German Pronunciation : Practice and Theory. 
Barker : German Intonation. 
Trofimov and Jones : Phonetics of Russian. 
Noel-Armfield : General Phonetics. 

7 Westermann and Ward : Practical Phonetics for Students of African 
Languages. 



22O SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 

3. Experimental Phonetics. 

4. Practical, Ear Training, etc. 

5-6. An Essay on some subject dealing with the Phonetics of an Asiatic 
or African Language. 

N.B. Students admitted under 2 (i) of the Diploma regulations will 
be required to have passed the Second Year Certificate Examination in the 
language studied. 

SANSKRIT 

Six papers and, at the option of the Examiners, a viva voce examination. 
1-2. Translation from specified * Sanskrit texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Sanskrit texts. 

4. Translation from specified 2 and unspecified Pali and Prakrit texts. 

5. Translation into Sanskrit ; questions on the grammar of Sanskrit, 

Pali, and Prakrit. 

6. Questions on (a) the literature, (b) the religion and philosophy, (c) the 

history, of India prior to the Muhammadan invasion, or 
Questions on the Comparative Grammar of the Indo-European 
languages. 

SINHALESE 3 

Six papers and a viva voce examination, including a colloquial test. 
1-2. Translation into English from specified 4 Sinhalese texts. 

3. Translation into English from unspecified Sinhalese texts. 

4. (a) Translation from English into Sinhalese, and (b} free composition 

in Sinhalese. 

5. (a) Questions on Sinhalese grammar, (b) Translation from a specified 

Sanskrit or Pali text 5 and questions on Sanskrit or Pali grammar. 

6. Questions on (a} Sinhalese literature, (b} the religions, and (c} the history, 

of Ceylon. 

SWAHILI 

Seven papers and a viva voce examination, including a colloquial test. 
Candidates must use Roman script, except in one question to be specified 
in Paper 4, in which the answer must be written in Arabic script. 

1-2. Translation from specified 8 Swahili texts, including one passage in 
Arabic script. 

1 Sanskrit, Section i : Manusmrti (Nirnayasagara Press, Bombay) Book 7. 
Meghadiita, with Vallabhadeva's Commentary (ed. Hultzsch). Mahdbhdrata 
Selections (Bohtlingk : Sanskrit-Chrestomathie, 3rd ed., pp. 56-104). 

Sanskrit, Section 2 : Rgveda selections 1-36 (Bohtlingk : Sanskrit-Chresto- 
mathie, 3rd ed., pp. 1-20). Kathopanisad (Bohtlingk : Sanskrit-Chrestomathie, 
3rd ed., pp. 46-54). Ratndvali (Bohtlingk : Sanskrit-Chrestomathie, 3rd ed., 
pp. 326-382). 

2 Selections from Andersen : Pali Reader. 
Woolner : Introduction to Prakrit. 

8 An elementary knowledge of Sanskrit or Pali will be assumed. 
4 Sinhalese (a) Saddharmaratndkara, chaps, i and 2. 

(b) Kdvyasekhara, cantos 1-6. 

(c) Sidatsangard . 

(d) Amdvatura, chaps. 1-4. 

(e) Sdlalihini-sandesa . 

8 Nalopakhyana 1-5. Eggeling (Sanskrit). Jataka, vol. ii, pp. 1-14 (Pali). 
6 See note on next page. 



SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 221 

3. Translation from unspecified Swahili texts, which shall include one 

passage in Arabic character. 

4. (a) Passage to be translated into Swahili and written in the Arabic 

script. 
(b) Translation into Swahili. 1 

5. Free Composition in Swahili. 1 

(a) Questions on Swahili grammar. (6) either Translation from a 

specified 2 Arabic text. Questions on Arabic grammar, or 
Questions on Bantu comparative grammar. 

Questions on (a) the literature, (b} the religion and customs, and (c) 
the history, of that part of Africa which is bounded on the south 
by the Zambezi, on the west by the Great Lakes, on the north 
by Abyssinia. 

TAMIL 

Six papers and a viva voce examination, including a colloquial test. 
1-2. Translation from specified 3 Tamil texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Tamil texts. 

4. (a) Translation into, and (b) free composition in, Tamil. 

5. (a) Questions on Tamil grammar, (b) Translation from a specified 4 

Sanskrit text. Questions on Sanskrit grammar. 

6. Questions on (a) Tamil literature, (b) the religions, and (c) the history 

of South India. 

TIBETAN 

Six papers and at the option of the Examiners a viva voce examination. 
1-2. Translation from specified 5 Tibetan texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Tibetan literary texts. 

4. Questions on Tibetan grammar. 

5. Questions on (a) the literature, and (b) the history of Tibet. 

6. Questions on the religion of Tibet. 

6 " A Swahili History of Pate," Journal of the African Society, 1915. 
" Utendi wa Ayubu," Bulletin of the School of Oriental Studies, vol. ii. 
" Uhuru wa Watumwa." 

" Inkishafi," ed. Stigand, in Grammar of Dialectic Changes in the Kiswahili 
Languages, pp. 80-95. 

" African Aphorisms," Taylor. 

" Tuli vyoona na Tulivyofanya Uingereza," H. M. Kayamba. 
" Safari ya Haj," A. A. Seif, Normal Magazine, Zanzibar, vol iii, No. 12, 
and vol. iv, Nos. 1-12. 
Selections from : 

" Maangano Mapya," British & Foreign Bible Society. 

" Angano Jipya" British & Foreign Bible Society. 

" Angano Jipya," Wuerttemburg Bible Society, Stuttgart. 

1 A selected list of books recommended for further reading in connection 
with this paper may be obtained on application to the Secretary, School of 
Oriental Studies. 

2 Qur'an, chap. 12, vv, 155. 

3 Selva-kesavaraya Mudaliyar: Kalingattup-parani Katdsangirakam. 
Selva-kesavaraya Mudaliyar : Tamil. 

Swami Vedacalam : Ancient Tamilian and Aryan. 
Saminathaiyar : Introduction to edition of Manimekalai. 
Suryanarayana Sastrl : History of the Tamil Language. 
B. R. Raj am Aiyar : Kamaldmbdl. 

Rural, book 2. Porutpdl with Parimelalagar's Commentary. 
Naladiyar, book I. Arattuppdl, with commentary. 

4 Nalopakhyana, ed. Eggeling, 1-5. , 

5 Schmidt : Der Weise und der Thor (Petrograd, 184^, pp. 1-159). The 
Story of the Ti-Med-Kun-Den (Bibl. Indica N.S. No. 1326), ed. E. D. Ross, 
Calcutta 1912, pp. 1-33. Smaller Sukhdvati-vyuha Bonzo-waei gappeki Jo-do 
sambukyo, by U. Wogihara, E. Kawaguchi, M. Miiller, J. Takakusu, Tokyo 
Daito Shuppansha, 1932. 



222 SCHOOL DIPLOMAS 

TURKISH 

Six papers and a viva voce examination, including a colloquial test. 
1-2. Translation from specified 1 Turkish texts, 

3. Translation from unspecified Turkish texts. 

4. (a) Translation into, and (b) free composition in, Turkish. 

5. (a) Questions on Turkish grammar. 

(b) Translation from a specified Arabic 8 or Persian 3 text. Questions 
on Arabic or Persian grammar. 

6. Questions on (a) Islam, (b) the literature, and (c) the history, of Turkey. 

URDU 

Six papers and a viva voce examination, including a colloquial test. 
1-2. Translation from specified 4 Urdu texts. 

3. Translation from unspecified Urdu texts. 

4. (a) Translation into, and (b) free composition in, Urdu. 

5. (a) Questions on Urdu grammar. 

(b} Translation from a specified Arabic 5 or Persian * text. Questions 
on Arabic or Persian grammar. 

6. Questions on (a) Islam, (b} Urdu literature, and (c) the history, of 

Hindustan. 



1 Ottoman Poetry, ed. E. J. W. Gibb, vol. vi, pp. 21-29, 33~37i 74~79 
86-87, I 33~ I 49 179-182, 192-201, 227-229, 240-257, 302-208, 321-3^ 
351-357. 

Turkish Anthology, ed. Ebuz-Ziya Tevfiq Bey, pp. 10-13, 37-38, 40-42, 
i 10-120, 151-166, 248-252, 268-270, 281-284, 304-305, 315-318, 321-3381 
371-382. 

Suleyman Shevkat : Guzel Yazilar, vol. iv, pp. 1324. 

2 Qur'dn, chap. 12, vv, 1-55. 

3 Gulistdn^ book i, without Introduction. 

4 Alj.af Husain Hall : Muqaddama, pp. 1-126. 
Muhammad Husain Azad : Ab i Ilaydt, all prose to p. 128. 
Riih i Nazm, pp. 34-81, 99-103, 111-124, 136-145. 

5 Qur'dn, chap. 12, vv. 1-55. 

6 Gulistdriy book i, without Introduction. 



INDIAN CIVIL SERVICE PROBATIONERS 223 

CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS 

i. INDIAN CIVIL SERVICE 
EASTERN CADETSHIPS 
CONSULAR SERVICE 

Students who intend to enter for this examination should consult 
the Supervisor of Civil Service Candidates (The Secretary) who will 
advise them as to their course of study. 

Full details of the Examination can be obtained from the Secretary, 
Civil Service Commission, 6 Burlington Gardens, London, W. i. 

The School provides courses in the following subjects : 

The letter q placed before the title of any course on the pages 
referred to shows it to be suitable for candidates for this examination. 

Arabic Language (p. 126). 
Arabic Civilization (p. 126). 
Persian Language (p. 130). 
Persian Civilization (p. 130). 
Sanskrit Language (p. in). 
Sanskrit Civilization (p. in). 

Courses in other subjects are provided by Intercollegiate arrange- 
ment. For fees see pp. 90, 91. 



2. EXAMINATIONS OF SELECTED CANDIDATES FOR THE 
INDIAN CIVIL SERVICE 

The School is an Approved Institution for probationers. 

Candidates are advised to give early notice to the Director of their 
intention to enter at the School, and to consult the Supervisor of 
Selected Candidates for the Indian Civil Service (Dr. S. G. Vesey 
FitzGerald) as soon as possible. 

Courses are provided at the School in all subjects of the examination 
both compulsory and optional, except Riding. 

Terminal Examinations will be held in all subjects taught at the 
School. All students must attend these Examinations. 

All probationers must pay the deposit for obtaining books from 
the Library. 

For fees see pp. 90, 91. 

Full details as to the Examinations can be obtained from the 
Secretary, Civil Service Commission, Burlington House, London, W. i. 



224 LC - S - PROBATIONARY RULES 

I.C.S. (PROBATIONARY SERVICE) RULES, 1937- 

In exercise of the powers conferred by paragraph (a) of subsection (i) 
of Section 247 of the Government of India Act, 1935, the Secretary 
of State hereby makes the following Rules : 

1. (i) These Rules may be cited as the Indian Civil Service (Pro- 
bationary Service) Rules, 1937. 

(2) They shall apply to all persons appointed under Rule 2 of these 
Rules during the year 1937. 

2. A person selected, either in India or in the United Kingdom, 
and whether or not as the result of written examination, for admission 
to the Indian Civil Service, shall be appointed to be a member of 
that Service on probation, and a person so appointed is hereinafter 
referred to as "a probationer ". 

3. Every probationer shall spend one year after appointment at 
one of the following universities : The University of Oxford ; the 
University of Cambridge ; the University of London, School of 
Oriental Studies ; or the University of Dublin, Trinity College. 

4. Unless the Secretary of State for special reasons otherwise 
directs in a particular case, the whole period of probation shall be 
passed at the same university. 

5. A probationer who fails to comply with the provisions of these 
Rules or to obey any order which he may receive from the Secretary 
of State, the Civil Service Commissioners, a Supervisor of Probationers, 
or any other duly constituted authority acting on behalf of the Secretary 
of State, or who wilfully neglects his probationary studies or is guilty 
of conduct unbecoming an officer of the Indian Civil Service, will be 
liable to removal from the Service. 

The Secretary of State shall decide any question arising under this 
Rule, and his decision shall be final. 

6. Periodical reports on the conduct and progress of probationers 
shall be made to the Secretary of State by the Supervisor at each 
University (in the case of Trinity College, Dublin, by the Registrar 
of the Indian and Home Civil Service School) and the Secretary of 
State, in cases of misconduct or unsatisfactory progress, will take 
such disciplinary action as he may consider necessary. 

7. Any communication which a probationer may be required or 
which he may wish to make to the India Office, or to the Civil Service 
Commissioners, and, in particular, all applications for permission to 
join an Inn of Court or to pursue an extra course of study, all com- 
munications in regard to the payment of the probationary allowance 
or of the overland allowance, and all applications for permission to 
make his own arrangements for proceeding to India, shall, if circum- 
stances permit, be addressed, in the first instance, to the Supervisor 
at the University where the probationer is passing his period of probation 
(in the case of Trinity College, Dublin, to the Registrar of the Indian 
and Home Civil Service School). 

8. Probationers shall, at or about the end of the year of probation, 
undergo an examination, to be called the Final Examination. The 



I.C.S. PROBATIONARY RULES 225 

subjects of this examination and the marks respectively obtainable 
for them shall be as follows : 

(i) Indian Law ...... 600 

(ii) Indian History ..... 400 

(iii) A vernacular language, or, in the case of a 
Probationer who is not required to offer 
such a language, an alternative subject 
approved by the Civil Service Com- 
missioners ...... 600 

(iv) Riding ....... 200 

9. (i) Each probationer shall offer for examination the vernacular 
language shown in Column 2 against his Province in the following 
table unless he is already familiar with that language or with a language 
closely allied to it. A probationer assigned to Madras who is familiar 
with one only of the languages named shall offer the other. 

Col. i Col 2 Col. 3 

Madras Tamil or Telugu 

Bombay Marathi 

Bengal Bengali 

United Provinces Urdu 

Punjab Urdu 

Bihar Hindi Bengali 

Central Provinces Hindi Marathi 

Assam Bengali 

(2) A probationer who is not required by sub-rule (i) to offer a 
language named in column 2 shall offer the language, if any, named 
in column 3 against his province, unless he is already familiar with 
that language or with a language closely allied to it. 

(3) A probationer who is not required under the preceding sub-rules 
to offer a vernacular language, shall offer an alternative subject approved 
by the Civil Service Commissioners. The alternative subjects which 
may be approved for this purpose are : 

(a) Another approved vernacular ; 

(b) A classical language selected from Sanskrit, Arabic, and Persian ; 

(c) British History ; 

(d) European History ; and 

(e) Currency, Banking, and Public Finance. 

Any question as to the interpretation and application of this Rule 
shall be decided by the Civil Service Commissioners. 

10. In additional to the Final Examination in riding, probationers 
may be required to attend for examination in this subject at such 



226 I.C.S. PROBATIONARY RULES 

time or times during the probationary period as the Civil Service 
Commissioners may appoint. 

1 1 . Such deductions shall be made from the marks assigned 
to probationers at the Final Examination as the Civil Service Com- 
missioners may consider necessary in order to secure that no credit 
is allowed for merely superficial knowledge. 

12. Probationers may be required to attend lectures in other 
subjects, including Hindu and Mohammedan Law, Indian Social 
Welfare and Public Health, besides those which are prescribed for 
the Final Examination. 

13. The Civil Service Commissioners shall prepare a list of the 
probationers in order of merit as indicated by the marks awarded 
at the Final Examination. The seniority of probationers inter se shall 
be determined by the order in which their names appear in this list. 

14. The Civil Service Commissioners may, in their discretion, 
at any time prior to the grant of the Certificate of Qualification referred 
to in the next succeeding Rule, institute, or cause to be instituted, 
such inquiries as they may deem necessary in respect of the nationality, 
age, health, character, and conduct of a probationer, and if the result 
of such inquiries is unsatisfactory in any of the above respects, the 
Secretary of State may, after consultation with the Civil Service 
Commissioners, forthwith remove the probationer from the Indian 
Civil Service. 

15. The probationers whose performance in the subjects of the 
Final Examination is such as to satisfy the Civil Service Commissioners, 
and who have also satisfied the Commissioners as to the eligibility 
in respect of nationality, age, health, character, and conduct during 
the period of probation, shall be certified by the Commissioners to 
be qualified for further employment in the Indian Civil Service. 

1 6. Every probationer in respect of whom the certificate referred 
to in the last preceding Rule is granted shall execute a Covenant in 
the form annexed to these Rules and shall pay the stamp duty of one 
pound thereon. 

17. A probationer who fails to satisfy the Civil Service Commis- 
sioners at the Final Examination shall thereupon cease to be a member 
of the Indian Civil Service unless the Secretary of State shall, after, 
reference to the Civil Service Commissioners, allow him to sit for 
re-examination in the subject or subjects in which he failed. The 
marks awarded to a probationer on re-examination shall not be taken 
into account by the Commissioners in assessing the order of merit 
as prescribed by Rule 13. 

1 8. If any probationer is prevented by sickness or any other 
adequate cause from attending, or from completing his course of 
study for, the Final Examination, the Commissioners may, with the 
concurrence of the Secretary of State, allow him to appear at the 
Final Examination to be held in the following year, or may arrange 
for him to be specially examinedun any or all of the subjects prescribed 
for the Final Examination after such interval as may seem to them 
suitable having regard to the circumstances of the case. The marks 



I.C.S. PROBATIONARY RULES 227 

awarded to a probationer in respect of such a special examination 
shall not be taken into account by the Commissioners in assessing 
the order of merit referred to in Rule 13. 

19. A probationer who wishes to join an Inn of Court or to pursue 
an extra course of study, in addition to the course prescribed in these 
Rules, shall first obtain the permission of the Secretary of State. 
Permission to pursue an extra course of study will be accorded only 
in exceptional circumstances, and, if accorded, will be subject to 
review at any time. 

20. (i) No salary shall be payable to a probationer in respect of 
his service during the probationary period, but each probationer shall 
receive an allowance of 300, or, if he has an Asiatic domicile, 



r 

(2) The allowance shall be payable by the High Commissioner for 
India in twelve monthly instalments, the first of 65 (90 in the case 
of probationers with an Asiatic domicile) on appointment, and the 
last, of ^35, after signature of the Covenant. The remainder of the 
allowance shall be payable in ten equal instalments of 20 (22 los. 
in the case of probationers with an Asiatic domicile). The Secretary 
of State may, if he thinks fit, direct the continuation of the allowance 
to a probationer whose Final Examination is postponed, in circum- 
stances over which he has no control, but in no circumstances shall 
additional payments be made to a probationer whose departure for 
India is delayed on account of his failure to satisfy the Civil Service 
Commissioners at the Final Examination. 

(3) Each probationer shall intimate to the Under-Secretary of State 
for India, Services Department, the address to which it is desired 
that the instalments of his allowance should be sent. 

21. On appointment, each probationer shall execute an agreement 
binding himself and one surety jointly and severally to refund all 
moneys he may have received in pursuance of these Rules in the 
event of : 

(a) the refusal of the Civil Service Commissioners to issue a 
certificate under Rule 15 in respect of the probationer ; or 

(b) the failure of the probationer to execute the Covenant pre- 
scribed by these Rules and to proceed to India at the time and in 
the manner directed by the Secretary of State. 

22. (i) A free passage to India shall be provided by the High 
Commissioner for India for every officer who has been directed in 
accordance with these Rules to report for duty in India. If such 
an officer elects to travel overland from London to Marseilles, he may 
apply for payment of the overland allowance as fixed from time to time. 
No baggage expenses or other allowance will be admissible. 

(2) An officer who desires to make his own arrangements for pro- 
ceeding to India must first satisfy the Secretary of State that he has 
good reasons for wishing to do so and that the arrangements which 
he proposes to make are suitable. He may then be granted an allowance 



228 OTHER EXAMINATIONS 

of such amount as may be determined from time to time by the Secre- 
tary of State. 

23. Nothing in the foregoing Rules shall be construed as limiting 
the power of the Secretary of State to remove, at any time, a probationer 
from the Indian Civil Service if reasons exist which, in his judgment, 
justify such action. 

Those probationers who can afford to do so are strongly recommended to 
become Students of an Inn of Court for the purpose of keeping terms, but 
they must not undertake legal study for c.dl to the Bar without permission 
above-mentioned . 

OTHER EXAMINATIONS 

Arrangements can be made to meet the requirements of candidates 
for other examinations such as : 

Government examinations in the vernaculars of various African 
and Eastern Colonies and Dependencies. 

The Preliminary Examination of the Institution of Civil 
Engineers : Hindustani, or any other important modern Eastern 
or African language approved by the Council. 

The Intermediate and Final Examinations of the Chartered 
Institute of Secretaries : Any Eastern or African languages 
approved by the Council. 



PART X 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES 

OUSELEY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS IN ORIENTAL LANGUAGES 

1. Three Ouseley Memorial Scholarships in Oriental Languages 
of the value of 50 each for one year may be awarded annually on 
the results of an examination to be held at the University in July. 

2. One Ouseley Memorial Scholarship will be offered in each of 
the following languages : 

(i) Arabic ; (2) Persian ; (3) Urdu. 

3. Candidates for examination in the above-mentioned languages 
must send to the Academic Registrar, on or before March I5th, a 
form of entry for the examination. Copies of the form will be 
forwarded on application. 

4. If no entries are received for the examination in Arabic or Persian, 
one Scholarship will be offered in Chinese or Sanskrit alternately. 
If no entries r.re received for the examination in Urdu it will be offered 
in Hindi or Bengali alternately. 

5. Candidates for examination in the alternative language or languages 
must send their form of entry to the Academic Registrar on or before 
1 5th May. 

6. If there should be no candidate of sufficient merit to justify 
the award of a Scholarship in any one of the languages, it will be 
open to the Examiners to recommend that two Scholarships be 
awarded for proficiency in any one of the other languages taken. 

7. A candidate to whom a Scholarship has been awarded may 
apply to the University for an increment of the Scholarship on the 
ground of financial difficulty, and it shall be open to the Senate after 
making due inquiries to grant an increment not exceeding 50 to 
any one candidate. 

8. It shall be open to the holder of a Scholarship, who is registered 
for a First or Higher Degree of the University, to apply to the 
University, not later than 3ist December following the award, for an 
extension of his Scholarship for a further period of one year. If an 
increment to the Scholarship has been granted during the first year 
a fresh application must be made to the University for an increment 
during the second year of tenure of the Scholarship. In very exceptional 
circumstances, an application may be made for an extension of the 
Scholarship for a third year under the same conditions. 

229 



230 SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES 

9. Candidates will be expected to show 

(a) a knowledge of the grammar of the language according to the 

system taught in Europe ; 

(b) a general acquaintance with the history of the language and 
of its relationship to cognate languages ; 

(c) ability to translate unseen passages of moderate difficulty 
from standard authors into good English, and to translate 
simple passages from English into the language in question. 

10. A successful candidate will be required to pursue his studies 
in the language in an Incorporated College or a School of the University, 
or in some other public institution under a Recognized Teacher of 
the University, so long as he holds the Scholarship ; provided that 
a candidate who has already so studied for an academic year may be 
permitted to continue his studies in some oriental country, under 
conditions approved by the University. 

11. The Scholarships shall be restricted to candidates of European 
origin. 

For the names of previous holders see pages 256, 257. 

THE JAMES G. R. FORLONG ENDOWMENT 

One or more bursaries from the above Endowment may be granted 
to Students of the School by the Council of the Royal Asiatic Society 
on the recommendation of the Academic Board. The bursaries will 
usually be applied to the payment of School fees. Application should 
be made to the Secretary. 

One Forlong Research Studentship of the value of 150 was 
awarded during the Session 1936-37 and a similar Studentship may 
again be available in the Session 1939-40. Further information may 
be obtained on application to the Secretary. 

FREE PLACES 

A limited number of Free Places are available each session for 
candidates of European origin. Candidates must be Honours 
Graduates of a British University and have the expressed intention 
of taking up some branch of Oriental or African Studies as their career. 
Further information in regard to these awards may be obtained from 
the Secretary. 

UNIVERSITY POSTGRADUATE STUDENTSHIPS 

i. The Senate offers nine Postgraduate Studentships of the value of 
150 per annum open to Internal and External graduates of the 
University in any Faculty. A graduate x who has completed his 25th 
year on or before ist June in the year of award will not be eligible for 
a Studentship. 

1 The term " graduates " in these Regulations includes students who have 
passed the Final Examination for a Degree after a two years' course of study as 
Internal students in the June or July prior to the date of the award, and who on 
the completion of a further year's course of study as Internal students will be en- 
titled to receive the Degree at the end of the session in which the award is made. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES 231 

2. The Studentships will be tenable for one year in the first instance, 
but may be renewed for a second year at the discretion of the Scholar- 
ships Committee. Applications for renewal will be considered by 
the Scholarships Committee simultaneously with applications for 
first awards. 

3. Applications must be made on a prescribed form, which may be 
obtained from the Principal, and must be accompanied by two 
testimonials and the names of not more than two persons to whom 
reference may be made ; selected candidates will be required to attend 
at the University for an interview with the Scholarships Committee. 

4. Candidates must submit a scheme of work for the approval of 
the University. 

5. The awards will be made by the Scholarships Committee, who 
may at their discretion invite experts in any Faculty concerned to 
attend as Assessors the meeting of the Committee at which the awards 
are made. Save in exceptional circumstances awards will only be 
made to candidates who have obtained First Class Honours at their 
Degree Examination, or a Higher Degree. 

6. The amount of the Studentships will be paid in instalments at 
such times as may be decided in each case, each instalment (with the 
exception of the first, which will be paid in advance) being payable 
only on receipt by the University of evidence that the holder of the 
Studentship is satisfactorily pursuing his studies. 

7. The awards will be made in June, and applications must reach 
the Principal not later than ist May. 



UNIVERSITY POSTGRADUATE TRAVELLING STUDENTSHIPS 

1. Two University Postgraduate Travelling Studentships, each of 
the value of ^275, for one year, will be awarded annually by the Senate 
if candidates of sufficient merit shall present themselves. 

2. The Studentships are open to Internal and External graduates 
of the University in any Faculty. A graduate 1 who has completed his 
28th year on or before ist June in the year of award will not be eligible 
for a Studentship. 

3. If, for any reason, a Studentship is not awarded in any year, an 
additional Studentship may be awarded in a subsequent year. 

4. Candidates will be required, if elected, to spend the year of 
tenure abroad, and must submit a scheme of work for the approval 
of the University. 

1 See Note on page 230. 



232 SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES 

5. Applications must be made on a prescribed form, which may 
be obtained from the Principal, and must be accompanied by two 
testimonials and the names of two persons to whom reference may 
be made ; selected candidates will be required to attend at the 
University for an interview with the Scholarships Committee. 

6. The awards will be made by the Scholarships Committee, who 
may at their discretion invite experts in any Faculty concerned to 
attend as Assessors the meeting of the Committee at which the awards 
are made. Save in ' exceptional circumstances awards will only be 
made to candidates who have obtained First Class Honours at their 
Degree Examination, or a Higher Degree. 

7. The amount of the Studentships will be paid in instalments at 
such times as may be decided in each case, each instalment (with 
the exception of the first, which will be paid in advance) being payable 
only on receipt by the University of evidence that the holder of the 
Studentship is satisfactorily pursuing his studies. 

8. The awards will be made in June, and applications must reach 
the Principal not later than ist May. 

POSTGRADUATE STUDENTSHIPS ON THE RESULTS OF FINAL EXAMINATIONS 

1. The following postgraduate award, of the value of 100 tenable 
for one year, will be made by the Senate on the results of Final 
Examinations : 

The Derby Studentship in History. 

2. The Studentship will be awarded to the best candidate who 
obtains First Class Honours at the B.A. Honours Examination, 
whether Internal or External, on the recommendation of the External 
Examiners. 

3. The holder of a Studentship must satisfy the University of his 
intention to pursue a course of advanced study or research and will 
be required to present during the tenure of his Studentship such 
reports upon the progress of his studies as the University may from 
time to time direct. 

4. The holder of a Studentship will normally be required to carry 
out his postgraduate studies in a School of the University, unless 
circumstances make it desirable for him to study elsewhere. 

5. Unless the University otherwise determine in any special case, 
Studentships awarded on the results of the Final Examinations will 
be tenable from the beginning of the University Session following 
the award. 



PART XI 



THE LIBRARY 

The Library contains about 79,300 books and pamphlets on Oriental 
and African subjects. 

RULES 

1. The Library is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, except on 
Saturdays, when it is closed at i o'clock. 

The Library is closed for the last week of the Christmas vacation. 

2. (a) Professors and Lecturers on the Staff of the School are 
entitled to make use of the Library for any purpose 1 , subject to such 
conditions as the Librarian may impose. 

(b) Students of the School are entitled to the use of the Library 
without payment of any additional fee ; and to the loan of books 
not exceeding three in number at any one time, subject to the 
deposit of ji. 

(c) Other persons may use the Library for the purpose of 
reference, and may borrow books not exceeding three in number 
at any one time on payment of a fee of i is. per annum ; they 
may also be allowed, subject to the discretion of the Director, 
to make occasional use of the Library for the purpose of reference 
only. 

3. All persons using the Library must sign the Visitors' Book. 

4. Readers must apply for books on loan to one of the Library 
assistants, to whom they must also return them. Books must in no 
case be replaced on the shelves by the borrower. 

5. Books will be issued on loan for a period not exceeding one 
calendar month, at the end of which time they must be returned to 
the Library. A fine of id. per day will be charged for each book not 
returned in accordance with this rule. Should any book be at any 
time urgently required, it may be recalled at the discretion of the 
Librarian or Assistant Librarian. 

6. Dictionaries, grammars, and books of reference will on no 
account be issued on loan. Special conditions obtain in regard to 
the loan of text-books and of rare works not included in these categories. 
It is in the discretion of the Librarian to decide all questions arising 
under this rule. 

233 



234 THE LIBRARY : THE BULLETIN 

7. Books returned through the post must be protected by card- 
board or a thick layer of paper inside the outer wrapping. The name 
and address of the sender must be enclosed. Borrowers who return 
books belonging to the Library in a damaged condition must pay 
compensation or provide a new copy. 

8. Books are lent on the understanding that they are used only by 
the borrower. 

9. Borrowers who fail to comply with these rules may be deprived 
by the Library Committee of the privilege of borrowing books. 

10. The Library is closed for the Annual Stocktaking for seven 
days during the Christmas Vacation. All books must be returned to 
the Library for this period. Borrowers not complying with this 
rule must pay a fine of is. a day for each book, the sum so forfeited 
not to exceed the value of the book or books. 



PART XII 



THE BULLETIN 



The Bulletin of the School of Oriental Studies is issued at irregular 
intervals about twice a year, and is published by the School, price 
15$. per part. The Agents for sales are Messrs. Luzac and Co., 46 
Great Russell Street. 

The Bulletin contains contributions to the knowledge of Oriental 
and African languages, Culture, History, and Literature. Considerable 
space is devoted to reviews and notices of books on Oriental and 
African subjects. 

All papers, etc., for which publication is sought should be sent 
to the Editor at the School. 

Authors and publishers wishing to have books reviewed should send 
them to the Editor, to whom also applications for exchange of journals 
from learned societies or Editors of other periodicals may be made. 



PART XIII 



MISCELLANEOUS 



OFFICE HOURS 

The Office of the School is open for inquiries from 1 1 to 4 daily ; 
Saturdays, n to 12.30; and at other times by appointment. 



REGULATIONS FOR STUDENTS 

1. All fees are payable in advance, i.e. at the beginning of the 
student's course. 

2. Students are required to be punctual and regular at all lectures ; 
* register of attendance is kept by each Lecturer. When unable to 
attend, students are required to communicate the fact to the 
Registrar immediately. 

3. Students are required to notify the Registrar of any 
change in their address. 

4. Misbehaviour of students and absence from lectures are at 
once reported to the Director. 

5. Smoking is strictly prohibited except in the Common Rooms ; 
a fine of 25. 6d. is imposed for smoking in other parts of the building. 

6. The School cannot accept responsibility for the loss of students' 
property in the School buildings. 

7. All communications (except as otherwise stated) should be 
addressed to the Director, at the School. 



COMMON ROOMS 

Separate Common Rooms are provided for men and women Students. 
They are open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and are supplied with the leading 
daily and weekly papers, magazines, and with writing materials, etc. 

Notebooks, stationery, and reed pens may be purchased at the office. 

Lockers, for which a small rent is charged, are placed for the use 
of students in the lobby and in the corridors leading to the Common 
Rooms. 

235 



236 MISCELLANEOUS 

UNIVERSITY OF LONDON UNION 

The University of London Union was founded in February, 1921, 
with the object of establishing a centre for student activities, a platform 
for debates, a library and reading room, etc. Temporary premises 
have been acquired on the proposed Bloomsbury site in Malet Street, 
which comprise a Debating Hall, with a seating capacity of 500, 
General Lounge, Women's Common Room, Committee Rooms, etc. 
Arrangements have been made to supply teas, suppers, light refresh- 
ments, etc. Membership is open to all matriculated students, members 
of the Academic Staff, etc. Further particulars may be obtained from 
the Hon. Secretary of the University of London Union, The University 
Union, Malet Street, W.C. i. 



REGISTER OF FORMER STUDENTS 

A Register of former Students of the School is kept. Students are 
invited on leaving the School to fill up a Registration Form, which 
may be obtained at the Office, and to advise the Secretary from time 
to time of any change of address. 

No fee is charged for Registration. 



LODGINGS 

Students who want help in finding suitable lodgings accommodation 
may apply to the University of London Lodgings Bureau. The Bureau 
acts in an advisory capacity ; and all the addresses on the Register 
are visited. It is desirable to call to see either the Lodgings Officer, 
or her Assistant ; but if this is not practicable the student should send 
his or her particular requirements in writing. Each student's needs 
will be carefully considered. Applications should be made to Mrs. C. 
B. Moore, Lodgings Officer, University of London Lodgings Bureau, 
68 Torrington Square, W.C. i. 

Information about lodgings may also be obtained from the High 
Commissioner for India. 



FOREIGN STUDY, HOLIDAY COURSES, AND 
INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Universities Bureau of the British Empire have prepared the 
following summary list of the principal publications dealing with 
foreign study, holiday courses, and international scholarships : 

Vacation Courses in England and Wales and Scotland. 6d. net. (Issued 
annually by the Board of Education.) London: H.M. Stationery Office. 

Table of Holiday Courses on the Continent for Instruction in Modern Languages 
and other Subjects, ^.d. net. (Issued annually by the Board of Education.) 
London: H.M. Stationery Office. 

Handbook of Student Travel in Europe. 4th edn. 1934. International 
Confederation of Students, Commission for Internat. Relations and Travel, 

3 Endsleigh Street, London, W.C. i. 

The Intelligent Student's Guide to Europe. 1931-32. International Con- 
federation of Students, Commission for Internat. Relations and Travel, 3 
Endsleigh Street, London, W.C. i. 

German Universities. A Manual for Foreign Scholars and Students. 
Published by the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst E.V. (German 
Academic Exchange Service), Berlin C 2, Schloss. 1932. 

Guide Book for Foreign Students in the United States. 4th edn. 1934. 
Published by the Institute of International Education, 2 West 45th Street, 
New York. 

A List of International Fellowships for Research. The International 
Federation of University Women. 2nd edn. 1934. 2iS - 

Fellowships and Scholarships open to Foreign Students for Study in the United 
States. Bulletin issued by the Institute of International Education, New York. 

University Exchange in Europe. English, 2nd edn., 1929, 3$. 6d. or $i ; 
French, 2nd edn., 1932, 18 Fr. frs. ; German edn., 1928, RN. 2.50. League 
of Nations Institute of Intellectual Co-operation, 2 rue de Montpensier, 
Paris ler. 5 Fr. frs. (or is. or R.M. i, or $0.50). 

Les Associations Internationales d'etudiants. 1931. 5 frs. League of 
Nations Institute of Intellectual Co-operation, 2 rue de Montpensier, 
Paris ier. 

Students Abroad. Bulletin of organizations concerned with students abroad. 
Half-yearly. League of Nations Institute of Intellectual Co-operation, 2 rue 
de Montpensier, Paris, i er . 

Holiday Courses in Europe, 1936. Compiled by the League of Nations 
Institute of Intellectual Co-operation. English ed., Allen and Unwin, London, 
W.C. i. 2s. ; The World Peace Foundation, 40 Mount Vernon Street, Boston, 
Mass., 50 cents. French ed., Institute of Intellectual Co-operation, 2 rue 
de Montpensier, Paris i er , 7.50 frs. German ed., Alfred Lorentz, Kurprinz- 
strasse 10, Leipzig, R.M. i. 

Ferien-Kurse in Deutschland, 1936. Deutscher Akademischer Austausch- 
dienst E.V., Berlin N.W. 40, Kronprinzen-Ufer 13. Free. 

Culture and Language Courses for Foreigners in Italy in 1936. Segretaria 
della Regia Universita Italiano par Stranieri, Palazzo Gallenga, Perugia. 

Directories of the Universities and other learned institutions of the world. 
Minerva, Erste Abteilung I. Band A-L, II, M-Z, Index and Register, 1933 ; 
Zweite Abteilung Universitaten u. Fachhochschulen, 1934. Walter de Gruyter 
& Co., Berlin and Leipzig. Index GeneraFs (by Prof, de Montessus de Ballore, 

4 editions, French, English, American, Spanish), annually. Editions Spes, 
17 rue Soufflot, Paris ; London Agents : Dent & Sons, Ltd., 10 Bedford 
Street, W.C. 2. 



238 MISCELLANEOUS 

Annuaire General de VUniversitd et de VEnseignement Francois. 1935-1936. 
Re"dig et publi^ par 1' Information Universitaire. Paris 8 bis? rue de 1' Arrived 
(XVe). France, 26 fr. Etranger, 31 ou 36 fr. 

Atlas de VEnseignement en France. Commission Francaise pour PEnque'te 
Carnegie sur les Examens et Concours en France. 1934. International Examina- 
tion Enquiry, Muse Pe"dagogique, 29 Rue d'Ulm, Paris, V eme . 

The German Educational System. A Survey submitted by the Deutsche 
Padagogische Auslandstelle, Berlin W. 35, Potsdamerstrasse 120, and the 
Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst E.V., Berlin C 2, Schloss. 1932. 



Coordination des Bibtiotheques. Guide des Services Nationaux de Renseigne- 
ments du Pret et des Echanges Internationaux. Deuxieme Edition. 1933. 
League of Nations Institute of Intellectual Co-operation, 2 rue de Montpensier, 
Paris i\ 



PART XIV. -APPENDIX 



i. FORMER GOVERNORS OF THE SCHOOL 

4 S. Aftab, Esq 1918-25. 

5 Prof. Sir Maurice Sheldon Amos, K.B.E., 

M.A., K.C i93 2 -37. 

5 Prof. Ernest Barker, M.A., D.Litt., LL.D. 1920-28. 
3 Major J. R. Barry, D.S.O. . . . 1928-30. 

12 The Rt. Hon. Viscount Bearsted, LL.D. 1916-27. 

3 Major F. C. Bedwell, M.C. . . Jan.-July, 1919. 

11 C. O. Blagden, Esq., M.A., D.Litt. . . 1917-23. 

3 Lt.-Col. D. Borden-Turner . . . 1919-20. 
11 Prof. J. P. Bruce .... 1929-31. 

Dr. R. M. Burrows, M.A., D.Litt., Ph.D. 1916-20. 

Prof. H. E. Butler, M.A. . . . 1925-26. 

13 The Rt. Hon. Baron Catto, of Cairncatto, 

C.B.E i93-35. 

4 Sir Rajagopala Chari, K.C.S.I., C.I.E. . 1925-26. 

3 Major V. C. Climo .... 1916-17. 

6 Sir H. E. A. Cotton, C.I.E. . . 1916-22. 
8 A. E. Cowley, Esq., M.A., D.Litt. . 1925-30. 
8 T. W. Rhys Davids, Esq., LL.D., Ph.D., 

D.Sc., F.B.A. .... 1916-22. 

11 Prof. H H. Dodwell, M.A. . . . 1927-29. 1932-35, 

7 Rt. Hon. Sir Henry Mortimer Durand, 

G.C.M.G., K.C.S.I., K.C.I.E., . . 1916-17. 
1 H. L. Eason, Esq., C.B., C.M.G., M.D., 

M.S., L.R.C.P., F.R.C.S. . . . 1935-37. 

1 Prof. L. N. G. Filon, C.B.E., T.D., M.A., 

D.Sc., F.R.S 1933-35. 

1 Sir Gregory Foster, Bart., B.A., Ph.D. . 1916-30. 

4 R. W. Frazer, Esq., LL.B. . . . 1920-21. 
4 Sir Edward A. Gait, K.C.S.I., C.I.E. . 1922-25. 
1 Prof. E. A. Gardner, Litt. D. . . 1924-26. 

11 Prof. H. A. R. Gibb, M.A. . . . 1931-33. 1934-37. 

6 H. C. Gooch, Esq., J.P. . . . 1916-20. 

1 Sir Alfred Pearce Gould, K.C.V.O. . 1916-17. 

3 Lt.-Col. C. A. L. Graham, D.S.O. . 1924-25. 

See footnotes on p. 241. 
239 



240 FORMER GOVERNORS 

Sir George A. Grierson, K.C.I.E, LL.D, 
D.Litt 



1917-25. 
1927-28. 
1928-30. 



3 Major R. R. de C. Grubb, M.C. 
5 W. R. Halliday, Esq., M.A., LL.D. 
1 J. L. S. Hatton, Esq., M.A. 
3 Major L. F. Hay .... 

13 Sir John Hewett, G.C.S.I., K.B.E., C.I.E. 
3 Lt.-Col. W. T. Hodgson 

13 D. G. Hogarth, Esq., C.M.G., M.A, 
D.Litt., F.B.A. .... 

3 Major V. A. Jackson, D.S.O. . . 

11 Prof. A. Lloyd James, M.A. . . 

10 G. Jamieson, Esq., C.M.G. . . 

10 Rt. Hon. Sir John Jordan, P.C., K.C.B., 

G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E. . . . 

13 Prof. A. Berriedale Keith, D.C.L., D.Litt. 
7 Sir James H. Stewart Lockhart, K.C.M.G., 

LL.D ....... 

14 Sir Charles P. Lucas, K.C.M.G., K.C.B. 

7 Sir Charles J. Lyall, K.C.S.I, C.I.E, 

M.A, LL.D, Ph.D. . . . 

8 Prof. A. A. Macdonell, M.A, Ph.D., 

LL.D. ...... 

7 Sir Edward D. Maclagan, K.C.S.I, 
K.C.I.E, M.A ...... 

10 Sir Charles Campbell McLeod, Bart. . 

3 Lt.-Col. C. G. Maude, D.S.O, O.B.E, 

M.C. ...... 

14 Sir George Maxwell, K.B.E, C.M.G. . 

C. E. A. Oldham, Esq., C.S.I. . . 

16 Dr. J. H. Oldham, M.A, D.D. , . 

11 Rev. W. Sutton Page, B.A, B.D, O.B.E. 1922-24, 26-28, 32-36. 

4 Dr. Raghunath Purushottam Paranjpye, 

D.Sc, M.A. ..... 1929-31. 

1 15 Sir Edwin Cooper Perry, M.D, F.R.C.P. 1917-26. 



1916-30. 
July-Nov, 1919. 

1916-27. 
1918-19 

i93!-34- 
1916-20. 

1920-25. 
i9 l6 ~35- 

1925-35- 
1917-30. 

1916-20. 
1923-25. 

1935-36. 
1916-32. 

1926-27. 

i93 -33. 
1920-22. 
1932-36. 



4 Sir Muhammed Rafique 
13 Prof. E. J. Rapson, M.A, F.B.A. . 

7 Rt. Hon. Lord Reay, K.T, G.C.S.I, 

G.C.I.E 

11 Rev. W. Hopkyn Rees, D.D. 

See footnotes on p. 241. 



1926-29. 
1916-35. 

1916. 
1923-24. 



FORMER GOVERNORS 241 

5 The Hon. W. Pember Reeves, Ph.D. . 1916-20. 
9 Sir Albert K. Rollit, LL.D., D.C.L., 

D.Litt. ...... June-Nov., 1916. 

17 Prof. Sir E. Denison Ross, C.I.E., D.Litt. 

Ph.D 1916-37. 

1 Sir Sydney Russell-Wells, M.D., B.Sc., 

M.R.C.P., M.R.C.S. . . . 1920-22. 

11 A. Sabonadiere, Esq., I.C.S. (retd.) . . 1924-32. 

6 A. E. Samuels, Esq., LL.B., J.P. . . 1933-37. 

1 Rev. John Scott-Lidgett, D.D., M.A. . 1930-32. 
15 Dr. Thomas Franklin Sibly, D.Sc. . . 1926-29. 
13 Prof. W. E. Soothill, M.A. . . . 1928-35. 

3 Major R. A. Steel .... 1916-17. 

6 Sir Harry L. Stephen, LL.M. . . 1921-34. 

13 Prof. W. B. Stevenson, D.D., D.Lit. . 1935-36. 

3 Lt.-Col. F. C. Tanner, C.M.G., D.S.O. . 1920-24. 

3 Major A. P. D. Telfer- Smollett, D.S.O., 

M.C. ...... 1925-26. 

2 Sir John A. C. Tilley, K.C.M.G., C.B., 

M.A. ...... 1916-21. 

10 Sir Montagu C. Turner . . . 1916-34. 

11 Prof. R. L. Turner, M.C., M.A., Litt.D. . 1925-27. 1928-31. 
1 Sir Holburt J. Waring, C.B.E., M.S., 

B.Sc., F.R.C.S 1922-24. 

11 Prof. Alice Werner, LL.A. D.Lit. . . 1918-22. 

3 Lt.-Col. F. E. Whitton, C.M.G. . . 1917-18. 
' 7 W. Perceval Yetts, Esq., O.B.E., M.R.C.S. 1925-30. 

1 A. Yusuf All, Esq., M.A., LL.M., C.B.E. . 1917-18. 



1 Vice-Chancellor (ex-officio). 

2 Appointed by the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs. 

3 Appointed by the Secretary of State for War. 

4 Appointed by the Secretary of State for India. 

5 Appointed by the Senate of the University of London. 

6 Appointed by the London County Council. 

7 Appointed by the Royal Asiatic Society. 

8 Appointed by the British Academy. 

9 Appointed by the London Chamber of Commerce. 

10 Co-opted by the Governing Body with special regard to the interests 

of Commerce. 

11 Appointed by the Academic Board of the School. 

12 Appointed by the Corporation of the City of London. 

13 Appointed by the Crown. 

14 Appointed by the Secretary of State frr the Colonies. 
16 Principal of University of London. 

16 Co-opted by the Governing Body for special reasons. 

17 Director of the School (ex-officio). 



242 



FORMER TEACHERS OF THE SCHOOL 



2. FORMER TEACHERS OF THE SCHOOL 



O. Adefolu 

E. W. Addo 

K. K. D. E. W. B. Adikaram, 

M.A 

J. S. Adoo 

M. G. Zubaid Ahmad 

M.K.Ahmed 

J. H. S. Ahuma 

A. Yusuf All, C.B.E., M.A., 

LL.M. 
Mohamid AH 
J.Allan, M.A. . : 



J. D. Anderson, M.A., 

Litt.D., I.C.S. 
J. Andrews 

Lilias E. Armstrong, B.A. . 
fSir Thomas W. Arnold, 

C.I.E., M.A., Litt.D. 

A. S. Atiya, Ph.D. . 
W. E. A. Ofori Atta 

C. G. Austin, B.A. 
Muhammad Takir bin Awang 
Rev. Father W. P. Azoo 

II. W. Bailey, M. A., D.Phil. 

B. S. Banerjea, M.A. 
A. Baptist 

J. T. O. Barnard, C.I.E., 

M.B.E. 
F. L. Bartels 

D. Beatty 

Hajji A. M. Belshah . 

C. O. Blagden, MA., D.Litt. 



F. G.Blandford, M.A. 
tMabel K. H. Bode, Ph.D. 

H. Bonar 

J. Percy Bruce, M.A., D.Lit. 



Margaret A. Bryan, M.A. . 
Rev. A. T. Bryant 

L. A. Cammiade, B.A. 
H. J. Cant, M.Sc. 

B. O. Cartwright, B.A. 

C. O. Ch'ang . 



Additional Lecturer in Yoruba . 1922-24 

Additional Lecturer in Fanti . 1934-35 

Additional Lecturer in Sinhalese . 1931-32 

Additional Lecturer in Twi . . 1927-28 

Additional Lecturer in Arabic . 192829 

Additional Lecturer in Arabic . 193234 

1936-37 

Additional Lecturer in Fanti . 1933-35 

Lecturer in Hindustani. . . 191719 

Additional Lecturer in Hindustani . 1919-21 

Additional Lecturer in Swahili . 1927-30 

Additional Lecturer in Sanskrit . 191922 

Additional Lecturer in History . 193132 
Additional Lecturer in Indian 

Palaeography 1933- 

Lecturer in Assamese and Bengali . 1917-19 

Additional Lecturer in Bengali . 1919-20 

Additional Lecturer in Swahili . 1929-30 

Additional Lecturer in Phonetics . 1917-25 

Lecturer in Arabic . . . 191720 

Professor of Arabic . . . 1920-30 

Additional Lecturer in Arabic . 1933-35 

Additional Lecturer in Twi . . 193435 

Additional Lecturer in Tamil . 1929-30 

Additional Lecturer in Malay . 1928-29 

Additional Lecturer in Arabic . 1920-21 
Parsee Community's Lecturer in 

Iranian Studies . . . 1929-36 

Additional Lecturer in Bengali . 1929-30 

Additional Lecturer in Yoruba . 1920-22 
Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Kachin) 1929-30 

Additional Lecturer in Fanti . 1934-35 

Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Hokk : en) 1931-32 

Lecturer in Arabic (Iraqian) . 1917-23 

Reader in Malay and Head of De- 
partment of S.E. Asia and the 

Islands . . . . . 1917-35 

Dean of the School . . . 1922-35 
Additional Lecturer in Malay, and 

Old and Medieval Mon. . . 1935- 

Additional Lecturer in Phonetics . 1929-30 
Lecturer in Pali and Buddhist 

Literature .... 191720 

Lecturer in Japanese . . . 1917-18 

Additional Lecturer in Japanese . 1918-20 

Professor of Chinese . . . 1924-32 

Additional Lecturer in Chinese . 1932-34 

Assistant Lecturer in Swahili . 1935-37 

Additional Lecturer in Xhosa and 

Zulu . . . . . 1930-37 

Additional Lecturer in Tamil . 193132 

Additional Lecturer in Chinese . 19233! 

Additional Lecturer in Siamese . 1925-28 

Lecturer in Chinese (Mandarin) . 1922-23 



Formerly member of Staff of University College. 



FORMER TEACHERS OF THE SCHOOL 



243 



P. H. Chang . 
Tak Loong Chang 

B. Chatterjee 
S. K. Chatterji 
*W. C. Ch'en, Ph.D., M.A. 
A. Chennappa 
Bien Ming Chiu 
T. H. Chiu 

V. Y. Chiu 

G. L. Chopra, M.A., Ph.D. 

K. Cleetus 

H. O. Coleman 

Rev. E. Coulbeaux 

J. B. Danquah, Ph.D. 
Ghanashyam Das, B.A. 
Tatini Das 
S. K. Das, M.A. 
J. K. Dasgupta, M.A. 
Phulrenu Datta, M.A. 
T. N. Dave, M.A., Ph.D. . 
Caroline A. F. Rhys Davids, 
M.A., D.Lit. 



C. C. Davies, B.A., Ph.D. 



Major R. B. Denny . 

Shrimati Devi . 

Y. K. Dimmock 

W. Doderet, M.A., I.C.S. 

Sheikh Kadhim Dojaily 



A. S. Doniach, B.Litt. 

*Rev. S. B. Drake 
E. Ebito . 
S. M. Edwardes, 

c.v.o. 

R. E. Ellison . 
B.A. English . 

D. E. Evans, B.A. 

E. N. Eyo 

J. Feiglin, LL.B. 



Lieut.-Col. M. L. Ferrar, 
C.S.I., C.I.E., O.B.E. 

A. P. Firth 

tR. W. Frazer, B.A., LL.B., 
I.C.S 

D. S. L. Fu, B.A. 



Lecturer in Chinese (Mandarin) . 1922-24 
Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Swatow) 1929-30 

Additional Lecturer in Bengali . 1933-34 

Additional Lecturer in Bengali . 1920-21 

Lecturer in Chinese (Mandarin) . 1917-22 

Additional Lecturer in Kanarese . 191823 

Lecturer in Chinese . . . 1930-31 
Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Amoy) 1924-26 
Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Cantonese) 1921 -22 

Lecturer in Urdu . . . 1922-23 

Additional Lecturer in Urdu . J 923-25 

Additional Lecturer in Malayalam 192122 

Additional Lecturer in Linguistics 192124 
Additional Lecturer in Amharic and 

Ethiopic .... 1917-20 

Additional Lecturer in Twi . . 192636 

Additional Lecturer in Oriya . 192527 

Additional Lecturer in Bengali . 1928-29 

Additional Lecturer in Bengali . 192128 

Additional Lecturer in Bengali . 1931 33 

Additional Lecturer in Assamese . 193537 

Additional Lecturer in Gujarati . 1930-31 
Lecturer in Pali and Buddhist 

Li terature 191 7-3 3 
Additional Lecturer in Buddhist 

History and Literature . . 1933- 

Lecturer in Indian History . . 1929-36 

Supervisor of Indian Civil Service 

Probationers .... 193236 

Additional Lecturer in Chinese . 1923-24 

Additional Lecturer in Gurumuki . 1918-19 

Additional Lecturer in Luganda . 192728 

Lecturer in Gujarati . . . 191729 

Lecturer in Arabic (Iraqian) . 192429 

Additional Lecturer in Arabic 

(Iraqian) 
Ahad Ha'am Lecturer in Modern 

Hebrew ..... 192124 

Lecturer in Chinese (Mandarin) . 1917-21 

Additional Lecturer in Efik . 1928-29 

Additional Lecturer in Kanarese . 1923-26 

Additional Lecturer in Kanuri . 1936-37 

Additional Lecturer in Hindustani 1921-22 

Lecturer in Hindustani . . 1929-36 

Additional Lecturer in Efik . 1929-30 

Additional Lecturer in Modern 

Hebrew 1929-30 

Additional Lecturer in Persian . 1931-32 

Additional Lecturer in Swahili . 1929-30 

Reader in Tamil and Telugu . 191719 
Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Swatow) 1927-28 



* Formerly member of Staff of King's College, 
t Formerly member of Staff of University College. 



244 



FORMER TEACHERS OF THE SCHOOL 



A. S. Fulton, M.A. 



D. Ghambashidze 

B. B. Ghosh 

J. C. Ghosh 

H. A. R. Gibb, M.A. 



J. Withers Gill, O.B.E. 

Rev. A. Guillaume 

P. L. Gupta 

S. N. Das Gupta 

S. P. Sen Gupta 

Khin Maung Gyi 

G. Hagopian 

N. Hagopian 

Sir Wolseley Haig, K.C.l.E 
C.S.I., C.M.G., C.B.E., 
M.A. . . . 

Ungku Abdul Ilamid 

A. H. K. Hamzav" 

Rev. J. M. Harden, M.A., 
D.D., LL.D. . 

T. Harwood . 

P. P. H. Hasluck 

Frank Hawley, B.A. . 
W. A. Hertz, C.S.I. . 
M. Heshmat 
Negib Hindte . 
H. Hirschfeld, Ph.D. . 
Rev. G. Holmes 
Foo Hong 

L. C. Hopkins, I.S.O. 

tA. L. Hough . 
Edith A. How . 

Rev. W. G. Howe 
I. M. al-Husaini 

Saleh Ibrahim 

G. E. lies, O.B.E., M.A. . 



A. D. Innes, M.A. 
Charlotte Inwood 
S. A. A. Iqbal 
Subramania Iyer, M. A. 



Lecturer in Arabic 

Additional Lecturer in Arabic and 

Arabic Palaeography . 
Additional Lecturer in Georgian 
Additional Lecturer in Bengali 
Additional Lecturer in Bengali 
Lecturer in Arabic 
Reader in Arabic 

Professor of Arabic and Head of the 
Department of the Near and 
Middle East .... 
Lecturer in Hausa 
Lecturer in Arabic 
Additional Lecturer in Bengali 
Additional Lecturer in Bengali 
Additional Lecturer in Bengali 
Additional Lecturer in Burmese 
Additional Lecturer in Turkish 
Additional Lecturer in Turkish 



Lecturer in Persian 
Additional Lecturer in Malay 
Additional Lecturer in Persian 

Additional Lecturer in Ethiopic 
Additional Lecturer in Yoruba 
Additional Lecturer in Arabic 

(Moroccan) 

Additional Lecturer in Linguistics 
Lecturer in Burmese 
Lecturer in Arabic (Egyptian) 
Additional Lecturer in Arabic 
Additional Lecturer in Ethiopic 
Additional Lecturer in Ruanda 
Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Cantonese) 
Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

Palaeography 
Lecturer in Burmese 
Additional Lecturer in Yao . 
Additional Lecturer in ChiNyanja . 
Additional Lecturer in Swahili 
Additional Lecturer in Arabic 

(Palestinian) 

Additional Lecturer in Arabic 
Additional Lecturer in Arabic 

(Sudanese) 

Lecturer in Arabic (Sudanese) 
Lecturer in History of India . 
Additional Lecturer in Hindustani 
Additional Lecturer in Urdu 
Additional Lecturer in Tamil 



M. C. Jame 

Bai Bolar Janaki 

V. L. Javetz-Jakubowitz 

B. Jenazian 

Rev. J. W. de Graftjohnson, 

O.A., D.C.L., F.R.Met.S. Additional Lecturer in Twi 



Lecturer in Chinese (Cantonese) 
Additional Lecturer in Kanarese 
Additional Lecturer in Ethiopic 
Lecturer in Turkish 



1917-18 

1918-37 
1918-23 
1932-33 
1930-31 
1921-29 
1929-30 



1930-37 
1917-28 
1930-31 

IQ2I-22 
1921-22 
1920-21 
1922-25 
1918-19 
1918-19 



1926-33 
1925-28 
1931-32 

1918-36 
1919-20 

1922-30 
1931-35 
1925-33 
191 92 I 
1920-26 
1922-34 
1930-31 

1926-27 

1918-25 
1917-24 
1919-20 

1937- 
1927-34 

1930-31 
I9I8-20 

1923-26 
1926-33 
1919-22 
1936-37 
1921-22 
1919-20 
1920-27 
1917-20 
1927-28 
1935-36 
191819 

1928-30 



t Formerly member of Staff of University College. 



FORMER TEACHERS OF THE SCHOOL 



245 



Sir Reginald F. Johnston, 
K.C.M.G., C.B.E., M.A., 
LL.D. 

Daniel Jones, M.A. . 

N. B. Jopson, M.A. . 

P. M. Joshi, M.A. . 

Hamisi bin Juma 

Shaykh H. Abdel Kader . 

Y. Kalemba 

A. H. Kamal 

Kwaja Kamaluddin 

N.Kato . 

J. Kenyatta 
T. Khori 
M. Kinoshita 
T. Kitamura 

A. H. Koi ... 

Alice F. Kwok 

Hester M. Lambert, M.A. . 
A. O. Larbi 
Florence Lederer 

R. Levy 

Sung Ho Lin 

W. M. McGovern, D.Phil. 

A. A. Majekodunmi . 

A. Q. Malik 

Prof. B. Malmowski, D.Sc., 

Ph.D. 

M. J. Martin (Miss) 
A. N. Mayanja 
H. J. Melzian, Ph.D. 

M. T. Merican 
L, M. Monare 

K. Motsete 

I. H. Mougy, M.A. . 

K. C. Mukherjea 

Esther M. Mullins, B.A. . 

U. C. Nag, Ph.D. 

A. N. P. Narasimhia, M.A., 

Ph.D 

R. C. Nathaniels 
tJ. W. Neill, LC.S. . 

H. F. O'Hara . 

Count Le"on Ostrorog, LL.D. 

H. Palmer 

T. G. F. Palmer 

Dr. Mabel Pantin 

Sir Harold Parlett, C.M.G. 
J. A. Peters, B.A., L.T. 
Lieut.-Col. D. C. Phillott, 
M.A 



Professor of Chinese and Head of 
the Department of the Far East 

Additional Lecturer in Phonetics . 
Additional Lecturer in Albanian 
Additional Lecturer in Marathi 
Additional Lecturer in Swahili 
Lecturer in Arabic (Egyptian) 
Additional Lecturer in Luganda 
Additional Lecturer in Arabic 
Additional Lecturer in Hindustani . 
Lecturer in Japanese 
Additional Lecturer in Japanese 
Additional Lecturer in Swahili 
Lecturer in Japanese 
Lecturer in Japanese 
Lecturer in Japanese 
Additional Lecturer in Japanese 
Additional Lecturer in Twi . 
Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Cantonese) 
Lecturer in Marathi 
Additional Lecturer in Twi . 
Additional Lecturer in Persian 

Prosody 

Additional Lecturer in Arabic 
Lecturer in Chinese 
Lecturer in Japanese 
Additional Lecturer in Yoruba 
Lecturer in Hindustani. 
Additional Lecturer in Linguistics 

Additional Lecturer in Ibo . 
Additional Lecturer in Luganda 
Lecturer in African Phonetics and 

Linguistics .... 
Additional Lecturer in Malay 
Additional Lecturer in Chiswina, 

Sepedi, and Xhosa . 
Additional Lecturer in Chiswina and 

Sechuana .... 

Additional Lecturer in Arabic 
Lecturer in Bengali 
Additional Lecturer in Marathi 
Additional Lecturer in Bengali 



Additional Lecturer in Telugu 

Additional Lecturer Ewe 

Lecturer in Marathi, History of 

India and Indian Law 
Additional Lecturer in Japanese 
Hon. Lecturer in Ottoman Law 
Additional Lecturer in Linguistics 
Lecturer in Hindustani . 
Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Foochow) 

Additional Lecturer in Japanese 
Additiona 1 Lecturer in Tamil 

Additional Lecturer in Persian 



I93I-37 

1917-24 
1926-36 
1932-33 
1932-33 
1923-30 
1930-31 

1936-37 
1918-19 
1917-18 
1918-20 

1933-34 
1919-20 
1917-20 
1918-28 

1933-35 
1927-28 

1924-27 
1935-36 
1926-28 

1927-28 
1920-21 
1929-30 
1918-25 
1930-32 
1919-22 
1935-36 

1927-28 
1926-35 

1932-35 
1928-29 

1926-28 

i 926-29 

1934-37 
1919-20 
1935-36 
1925-27 

1931-32 
1930-31 

1917-19 
1922-23 
1925-30 
192022 
1919-29 

1924-25 
1928-30 
1927-28 

1921-27 



t Formerly member of Staff of University College. 



246 



FORMER TEACHERS OF THE SCHOOL 



L. de la Valise Poussin 



Abdul Qadir Khan 
Edith E. Quick, B.A. 
M. Harun-ur-Rashid . 
H. C. Ray, M.A. 
Sidney H. Ray, M.A . 



Sujata Ray, M.A., M.Ed. . 
Shaykh M. H. Abd el Razek 
Rev. W. Hopkyn Rees, D.D. 
M. Rhodes 
S. A. Richards . 

A. E. Rigg 

H. C. F. Rodda 
fSir E. Denison Ross, C.I.E., 
D.Litt., Ph.D. 

A. Rowan 

A. Sabonadiere, I.C.S. 

M. Said .... 
P. C. Sarbadhikari, Ph.D., 
D.Sc 

D. K. T. Sarbah 
R. H. Sawy 

A. H. El Sayed 

A. Sen . 

Sukumar Sen 

S. F. Shadman 

Paul Sheldon . 

C. C. Shu 

N. K. Sidhanta 

W. W. Skeat . 

G. H. R. Pye-Smith . 

Dr. A. C. Stanley Smith 

Katharine H. Nixon Smith 

Sidney R. Smith, Ph.D. 
H. Spencer 

fC. D. Steel, B.A., I.C.S. . 
C. A. Storey, M.A. . 
Shaykh Mansur Sulieman . 
S. Sugiura 
M. H. Syed, M.A., Ph.D. . 

E. Tagoe 
Yumin Tao 
Y.Tcheng 

Rev. O. H. Thompson, M.A. 

Sir George J. F. Tomlinson 

C.B.E., M.A. 
P. Tonapetean . 



Lecturer in Sanskrit and Tibetan . 1917-19 

Additional Lecturer in Sanskrit and 191921 

Tibetan. 

Additional Lecturer in Pashto . 1929-30 

Additional Lecturer in Phonetics . 1922-25 

Additional Lecturer in Hindustani 1921-22 

Additional Lecturer in Bengali . 1928-29 
Additional Lecturer in Polynesian, 

Melanesian, Micronesian, and 

Papuan Languages . . . 1918-35 

Additional Lecturer in Bengali . 192426 

Lecturer in Arabic (Egyptian) . 191723 

Reader in Chinese . . . 192024 

Additional Lecturer in Hausa . 192122 

Additional Lecturer in Methods of 

Language Study . . . 1919-20 

Additional Lecturer in Burmese 

Buddhist Law . . . 1929-34 

Additional Lecturer in Malay . 1931-32 

Director of the School, Librarian, 

and Professor of Persian . . 1916-37 

Additional lecturer in Islamic Studies 1937 
Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Cantonese) 1924-25 

Lecturer in Indian Law . . 1919-30 

Reader in Indian Law . . 1930-32 

Additional Lecturer in Arabic . 1934-35 

Additional Lecturer in Bengali . 1923-31 

Additional Lecturer in Fanti . 1926-30 

Additional Lecturer in Arabic . 191921 
Additional Lecturer in Arabic 

(Egyptian) 1929-31 

Lecturer in Arabic (Syrian) . . 191726 

Additional Lecturer in Bengali . 192122 

Additional Lecturer in Persian . 193336 

Additional Lecturer in Swahili . 1929-30 

Lecturer in Chinese (Modern) . 1924-29 

Lecturer in Bengali . . . 1922-23 

Additional Lecturer in Malay . 1918-19 

Additional Lecturer in Malay . 1928-29 

Additional Lecturer in Ruanda . 1930-31 
Additional Lecturer in Yao and Chi- 

Nyanja ..... 1929-34 
Additional Lecturer in Ibo . . 1929-32 
Additional Lecturer in Hindustani 1918-19 
Lecturer in Hindustani. . . 1917-20 
Additional Lecturer in Arabic . 1919-27 
Additional Lecturer in Arabic . 1919-20 
Additional Lecturer in Japanese . I934~35 
Additional Lecturer in Hindustani . 1930-31 
Additional Lecturer in Ga . . 1928-29 
Lecturer in Chinese (Modern) . 1931-33 
Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Wenchowese) 1929-30 
Additional Lecturer in Arabic 

(Syrian) 1929-30 

Lecturer in Hausa . . . 1928-30 

Additional Lecturer in Armenian . 1918-19 



t Formerly member of the Staff of University College. 



FORMER TEACHERS OF THE SCHOOL 247 

F. G. Trayes . . . Additional Lecturer in Siamese . 191923 
Y. H. Tsan . . . Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Cantonese) 1924-26 

Additional Lecturer in Phonetics . 192930 
Additional Lecturer in Iranian 

Languages 192122 

Additional Lecturer in Japanese . 192022 
Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Cantonese) 1929-32 

Additional Lecturer in Siamese . 1927-30 

Additional Lecturer in Indo- Aryan. 1931-35 

Additional Lecturer in Malay . 1929-30 

Additional Lecturer in Persian . 1919-22 
Additional Lecturer in Amharic and 

Galla ..... 1928-29 

Additional Lecturer in Tibetan . 1919-20 

Lecturer in Marathi . . . 193637 
Additional Lecturer in Indian 

Administrative Law 1926-35 
Additional Lecturer in Amharic and 

Ethiopic^ . . . . 1917-35 
Reader in Swahili and Other Bantu 

Languages .... 191722 
Professor in Swahili and the Bantu 

Languages .... 1922-27 
Head of the Department of the 

Bantu Languages . . . 1927-30 

Additional Lecturer in Swahili . 1918-25 

Lecturer in Swahili . . . 1925-30 

Lecturer in Chinese and Japanese . 1920-21 
Lecturer in Sinhalese and other 

Dravidian Languages . . 1917-20 

Reader in Tamil and Telugu . 1920-29 
Lecturer in Sinhalese and the 

Epigraphy of India and Ceylon 192932 

Additional Lecturer in Arabic . 192325 

Lecturer in Persian . . . 191726 

Additional Lecturer in Pashto . 1922-23 
Lecturer in Chinese Art and 

Archaeology 1930-32 
Additional Lecturer in Chinese 

(Ningpo) ..... 1923-29 



H. J. Uldall 

J. M. Unvala, Ph.D. 

Rev. N. Utsuky 
G. C. Valpy 

L. Prakong Vijasman 

Raghu Vira, Ph.D. . 

Hajji A. Wahab 

Annie R. Waite 

Craven H. Walker, O.B.E. . 

E. H. C. Walsh, C.S.I. 
Jane R. Watt, M.A. . 
T. A. H.Way . 

H. Weld, B.Litt. 
*Alice Werner, D.Lit., LL.A. 



Mary Werner 

A. N. J.Whyman, . 
M. de Z. vVickremasinghe, 
M.A., D.Lit. 



J. S. Willmore . 
tC. E. Wilson, B.A., Ph.D. . 
M. Yakub Khan, B.A., B.T. 
W. Perceval Yetts, O.B.E., 

D.Lit. 
Z. L.Yih 



* Formerly member of the Staff of King's College, 
t Formerly member of Staff of University College. 



248 



HOLDERS OF DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS 



3. HOLDERS OF DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS 
I. DEGREES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF LONDON 



1919-20 D.Lit. . 

1920-21 D.Lit. . 

,, 

1921-22 Ph.D. (Sanskrit) 

M.A. (Arabic) with 
special distinction. 

1922-23 Ph.D. (Ind. Hist.) . 
M.A. 



1923-24 Ph.D. (Bengali) 

(Ind. Hist.) . 
B.A. Hons., ist Class 
(Arabic) 

1924-25 Ph.D. (Ind. Hist.) . 

,, (Sanskrit) 
Ph.D. and M.A. 

(Indo-Aryan) 
M.A. (Persian) 

(Ind. Hist.) . 
B.A. Hons. (Arabic) 
(History, 

Branch III) 

1925-26 D.Lit. (Arabic) 
Ph.D. (Sanskrit) 
Ph.D (History) 
Ph.D. (Bengali) 
Ph.D. (History) 
M.A. (Persian with 

distinction . 

1926-27 D.Lit. (Sanskrit) 
Ph.D. (History, 

Medieval Eastern) 
Ph.D. (Arabic) 
Ph.D. (Hindu 

Philosophy) 
LL.D. . 

B.A. Hons. (Hist., 
Branch III) 



W. J. Edmonston Scott, M.A. 
(Edin.). 

Sunti Kumar Chatterji. 
Sushil Kumar De. 

Bibhutibhushan Raychaudhuri, 
Kullidaikurichy Naranyier Sitaram. 
Hamilton Alexander Rosskeen 
Gibb, M.A. (Edin.). 

Gulshan Lall Chopra. 
Sailendranath Dasgupta. 
Jatis Chandra De. 

Jyotisgobinda Sen. 
Susilkumar Datta. 

Jacob Leveen. 

Sukumar Banerji. 
Sudhendu Kumar Das. 

George Pieris Maalasekera. 
Gulam Osmanali Hlidayatali Ansari. 
Imtiaz Mohammad Khan. 
Mohammad Zafrul Alam. 

Des Raj Bhandari. 

Syed Jafar Husain. 
Banarsi Das Jain. 
Bijan Raj Chatterji. 
Prabhucharan Gahathakurta. 
Kisorimohan Gupta. 

Rashid Ahmad. 
Siddheshwar Varma. 

Hassan Ibrahim Hassan. 
Arnold Platts. 

Paul Yevtitch. 
V. K. John. 
Lakshmi Datt Joshi. 

Ghanashyam Das. 



HOLDERS OF DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS 



249 



1927-28 D.Lit. (History, 

Medieval Eastern) 
Ph.D. (Arabic) 

Ph.D. (Indian 

History) 
M.A. (Indo-Aryan) 

M.A. (Persian) 
B.A. Hons. (Chinese) 

1928-^9 Ph.D. (Arabic) 
Ph.D. (Ancient 

Indian History) . 
Ph.D. (Persian) 
Ph.D. (Persian 

Literature) . 
Ph.D. (Phonetics) . 
M.A. (Indo-Aryan) 



B.A. Hons. (History) 
B.A. Hons. (Indo- 
Aryan). 

1929-30 D.Lit. . 

Ph.D. (History) 



Ph.D. (Indian 
Philosophy) 
Pli.D. (Persian) 

Ph.D. (Sanskrit) 



1929-30 Ph.D. (Urdu) 

M.A. (Indo-Aryan) 

B.A. Hons. (History) 



B.A. Hons. (Persian) 

1930-31 D.Lit. (External) 
Ph.D. (Persian) 
Ph.D. (Indo-Aryan) 
Ph.D. (Philosophy) . 



Hassan Ibrahim Hassan. 
Saeed Hasan. 
Margaret Smith. 

Yadunath Prasad. 
Rangacharya Vasudevacharya 

Jahagirdar. 

Abdel Wahhab Azzam. 
Yung Chuan Li. 

Mohammad Shayur Zubaid Ahmad. 

Rama Shankar Tripathi. 
Hadi Hasan. 

Mohammad Wahid Mirza. 
Archibald Norman Tucker. 
Vidyadhan Nahar Sardesai. 
Narhar Govind Sa&wadkar. 
Krishna S war up. 
Mahaduragi Dharmasiri Rat- 
nasooriya. 

Nalinaksha Datta. 
Dhirendra Chandra Ganguli. 
Amarprasad Das Gupta. 
Hemchandra Ray. 
Lanka Sundaram. 

Bharatan Kumarappa. 

Qari Sayyid Kalimullah Husaini. 

Syed Mohammad Siddiq. 

Tarapada Choudhury. 

Har Dayal. 

Shivalingayya Channabasawayya 

Nandimath. 
Raghu Vira. 

Sayyid Ghulam Muhiuddin Qadri. 
Purendra Nandkrishnalal Majmudar. 
Govinda Rangacharya Raddi. 
Bidytu Kumar Palit. 
Mian Ahmad Said. 
Ravi Varma Ravi Varma. 
Gholam Hossein Darab Khan. 

Eva*igeline Dora Edwards. 
Moayyidul Islam Borah. 
Trimbakalal Nandikeshwar Dave. 
Dhirendralal De. 



250 



HOLDERS OF DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS 



Ph.D. (Arabic) 

Ph.D. (History) 
Ph.D. (Indian 

History) 
Ph.D. (Indian 

History) 
Ph.D. (History) 



Ph.D. (Sinhalese 

External). 
M.A. (History) 
M.A. (Indo-Aryan 

External). 
B.A. Hons. (History) 

> 

B.A. Hons. (Persian) 
B.A. Hons. (History) 



T 93 r ~3 2 Ph.D. (History) 

Ph.D. (Arabic) ! 

Ph.D. (Indo-Aryan) 
Ph.D. (Persian) 
Ph.D. (History) 

Ph.D. (Urdu 
Literature) 

Ph.D. 

(Anthropology) 

M.A. (Persian) 

B.A. Hons. (Arabic) 

>> 

B.A. Hons. (History) 

yt 

1932-33 D.Lit. . 

Ph.D. (Indo-Aryan) 



Ph.D. (History) 
Ph.D. (Bengali 

Literature) 
Ph.D. (Persian) 
Ph.D. (Indo-Aryan) 



Abdul Husein Faizullah Hamdani. 
Abu Nasr Mohammad AH Hasan. 
Garrett Champness Mendis. 

Banarsi Prasad Saksena. 

Bhasker Anand Saletore. 
Kasi Nageswara Venkatasubba 

Sastri. 

Barbara Justine Stewart. 
Mahadurage Dharmasiri 

Ratnasuriya. 

Chandrakant Dwarkanath Dharkar. 
Kalutara Koralalage Don Edward 

Winifred Britto Aclikaram. 
Bantval Surendranath Baliga. 
Bhabani Charan Bhattacharya. 
Mohamed Mahmud Gomaa. 
Sanatkumar Hajra. 
Srichand Lall. 
Amir Hasan Siddiqi. 

Kunwar Mohammed Ashraf. 

Ibn Hasan. 

Shaikh Inayatullah. 

Syed Ajaz Husain Jafri. 

Sumitra Rao Mangesh Rao Katre. 

Abdul Waheed Khan. 

Kahan Chand Khanna. 

Abdur Rahim. 

Muhammad Hafiz Syed. 

Horace Geoffrey Quaritch Wales. 
Gholam Hossein Darab Khan. 
James Heyworth Dunne. 
Ishaq Musa Husseini. 
Mohamad Sadiq. 
Sailesh Chandra Sarkar. 

Sir Edward Denison Ross. 

Ida Caroline Ward. 

Kalutara Koralalage Don Edward 

Winifred Brittoo Adikaram. 
Arabinda Barua. 
Aziz Suryal Atiya. 

Jayanta Kumar Dasgupta. 
Syed Yamin Hashmi. 
Syed Sajjad Husain. 



HOLDERS OF DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS 



251 



'933-34 



J934-35 



Ph.D. (Sanskrit) . 
Ph.D. (Indo-Aryan 

and Dravidian) 
Ph.D. (Indo-Aryan) 
Ph.D. (History) 

B.A. Hons.' '(History) 



B.A. Hons. (Persian) 



Ph.D. (History) 
Ph.D. (Indian Art) 
Ph.D. (Sanskrit) 
Ph.D. (Indo-Aryan 

and Dravidian) . 
Ph.D. (Indo-Aryan 

Comparative 

Philology) . 
Ph.D. (Persian 

Literature) 
Ph.D. (History) 
Ph.D. (Arabic) 
M.A. (History) 
B.A. Hons. (Arabic) 



B.A. Hons. (History) 



LL.D. . 
Ph.D. (History) 
Ph.D. (History) 
Ph.D. (Indo-Aryan) 
Ph.D. (History) 
Ph.D. (Indo-Aryan) 
Ph.D. (Arabic) 
Ph.D. (History) 

Ph.D. (Indo-Aryan) 
Ph.D. (Arabic) 
Ph.D. (History) 
B.A. Hons. (Arabic) 
B.A. Hons. (History) 
B.A. Hons. (Chinese) 
B.A. Hons. (Persian) 
B.A. Hon. (History) 



Prabodhchandra Lahiri. 
Agaram Narasimha Pandit 

Narasimhia. 

Bhairaoprasad Shiwnath Pandit. 
Binaychandra Sen. 
Puttaparthy Sreenivasachar. 
Safdar Ali. 
Evan Ediriwira. 

Azeem Husain Budruddin Tyabji. 
Mohammad Ahmad. 
Ibrahim Mohamed Amin. 

Bantual Surendranath Baliga. 
Moti Chandra. 
Jatindrabimal Chaudhuri. 

Kilimanoor Godavarma. 



Sudhakar Jha. 

Wajahat Husain Andalib-i-Shadani. 

Amir Hasan Siddiqi. 

Charis Waddy. 

Syed Ashan Shere. 

Laurence Paul Elwell-Sutton. 

Chandsaheb Husainsaheb Shaikh. 

Rattan Chand Lai. 

A. F. M. Khalilur Rahman. 

Surjeet Singh. 

Sitaram Raoji Tawade. 

Hans Raj Vohra. 

Seymour Gonne Vesey FitzGerald. 

Bhabani Charan Bhattacharya. 

Sambidananda Das. 

Alfred Masih-ud Daula. 

Mahdi Husain. 

Mian Tasadduque Husain. 

Ishaq Musa Husseini. 

Purushottam Mahadeo Joshi. 

Appasaheb Ganapatrao Powar. 

Lajwanti Rama Krishna. 

Sanaullah. 

Harnarayan Sinha. 

Mirza Muzaffar Ahmad. 

Zafferuddia Ahmad. 

William Burton Dallas Doxford. 

Ann Katharine Swynford Lambton. 

Satya Vira. 



252 



HOLDERS OF DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS 



1935-36 Ph.D. (History) 

Ph.D. (Dravidian 

Philology) . 
Ph.D. (History) 



Ph.D. (Indo-Aryan). 
M.A. (History) 
B.A. Hons. (History) 
B.A. Hons. (Chinese) 
B.A. Hons. (History) 



B.A. General . 
B.A. Hons. (Arabic) 

(External) . 
1936-37 D.Lit. . 
D.Lit. . 
Ph.D. (History) 
Ph.D. (Arabic) 
Ph.D. (History) 
Ph.D. (History) 

>> 

B.A. Hons. (History) 



B.A. Hons. (Arabic) 
B.A. Hons. (History) 
B.A. Hons. (Arabic) 
B.A. Hons. (History) 

B.A/Hons. (Indo- 
Aryan) 
B.A. Hons. (Chinese) 

(External) 
B.A. General 

(External) 



Abul Barkat Muhammud 

Habibullah. 

Kanthasamy Kanapathipillai. 

Laurence Lockhart. 

A. F. M. Khalilur Rahman. 

Parmatma Saran. 

Oliver Hector De Alwis Wijesekera. 

Bimalchandra Mitra. 

Syed Karimuddin Ahmed. 

Alec George Morris Bean. 

Mirza Mahmud Ali Beg. 

Swampillai Joseph. 

Mohibbul Hasan Khan. 

Bernard Lewis. 

Mirza Said Ahmad. 

Abdel Hamid El Sayed. 
George Percy Bargery. 
Margaret Smith, Ph.D. 
Pratul Chandra Gupta. 
Serajul Haque. 
Rattan Chand Lai. 
Abdul Aziz Puri. 
Gertrude Henrietta Stern. 
Abdul Alim. 
Ajitprasad Chaudhuri. 
Abdul-Hafez Kamal. 
Raghubir Singh Kapur. 
Chaim Rabin. 
Nepal Singh. 
Devi Prosad Sinha. 

Robert Hamilton Blair Williams. 
Hubert William Spillett, B.D. 
Abdel-Aziz Amin Abdel Mageed. 



HOLDERS OF DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS 



253 



1918-19 

1919-20 
1920-21 



II. THE SCHOOL DIPLOMA 
Persian . . Harry T. Wickham. 



1921-22 
1922-23 

1923-24 



Sanskrit 
Arabic . 



Chinese (Classical 
and Mandarin) 
Japanese 
Persian 

Chinese (Mandarin) 
Japanese 

Bantu . 

Persian 

Turkish 



Arabic . 

Chinese (Classical) . 

> 

Chinese (Mandarin) 



Hindustani (with 
special reference 
co Hindi) . 

Marathi 

Persian 

Swahili . 

Turkish 



1924-25 Bengali . 



Chinese (Classical) . 
Chinese (Mandarin) 



1926-27 Arabic (Classical) 



Bengali 
Modern Hebrew 



Subramania Iyer. 
Aaron S. Doniach. 

Ethel C. Dudley. 
H. A. R. Gibb, M.A. 
Thomas G. F. Palmer. 

E. Dora Edwards. 
Noel E. Isemonger. 
Annie R. Waite. 

Friedrich W. Zuber. 
Gerald Mere. 

Clement M. Doke, M.A. 
Sarkis Topalian. 
A. Beryl Carson. 
Frederic W. Chardin. 

Samuel Yeivin, 
Herbert J. Cant, M.Sc. 
Chamley Duncan. 
Eileen A. Bennett. 
Herbert J. Cant, M.Sc. 
Chamley Duncan. 
Cyril G. C. Wayne. 



Guy E. Leeson. 
Roland E. Loasby, B.A. 
Florence Lederer. 
Mary H. Werner. 
Gilbert V. Holmes. 
Stephen M. Mackay. 

Alice de Zoete Elliot. 
Ethel M. Payne. 
Marc Kasanin. 
Harold E. Milner. 
William B. Paton, M.A. 
Gwendoline M. Russell. 

Percy G. Butcher, B.A. 

A. M. H. Moulvi, M.A. (Khansahib). 

Gertrude M. Summers. 

Sheikh Hamed Abd el Kader. 

Sheikh Mohamed Amer Mohandis. 

Simon J. Woolf. 



254 



HOLDERS OF DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS 



1927-28 



Persian 



Swahili 
Tibetan 

Modern Hebrew 
Persian 



1928-29 Arabic . 

Burmese 
Modern Hebrew 
Swahili . 

1929-30 Comparative Gram- 
mar of the Bantu 
Languages 

Chinese 

Modern Hebrew 

Swahili . 

1930-31 Arabic (Classical) . 
Bengali . 

Modern Hebrew 



Swahili . 

1931-32 Chinese (Classical) . 

1932-33 Modern Hebrew 

>> 

Swahili . 



1933-34 Arabic (Modern) 

Comparative Gram- 
mar of the Semitic 
Languages, 
Hebrew (Modern) . 
Persian . 

Swahili . 



Turkish 



Sheikh Hamed Abd el Kader. 

Mohamed M. Gomaa. 

Sheikh Mohamed Amer Mohandis. 

Frederick Johnson. 

Millicent H. Morrison. 

Mohamed Mahmud Gomaa. 
Abdulsamad Mohmed Hayat 

Moulvi, Khan Sahib, M.A. 

(Bombay). 

Thomas Hayward Baldwin, M.A. 

(Cantab). 

Lillie Hannah Lawley. 
Millie Janikoun. 
Gladys Margaret Taylor. 



Frederick Johnson. 
Charles Patrick Fitzgerald. 
Mohammed Atieh el Barashy. 
Alfred Philip Firth, B.A. (Lond.). 

Roy Clive Abraham, B.A. (Oxon.). 
Jessie Joyce Shearman, L.L.A. (St. 

Andrews). 

Simon Josiah Goldberg. 
Helena Leah Schonberg. 
Archie Frederick Bull. 

Edith Therese Czech von 
Rechtensee, Phil.D. (Vienna). 

Hilda Rosalie Snowman. 
Arthur Saul Super, B.A. (Cantab.). 
John Willoughby Allen, B.A. 
(Oxon). 

Gordon Lloyd- Williams Mackenzie. 
Ishaq Musa Husaini, Lie. es-lettres 

(Egyptian University), B.A. 

(Lond.). 
Bernard Lewis. 
Henry Comyn Maitland, B.A. 

(Cantab.). 
Margaret Arminel Bryan, B.A. 

(Cantab.). 

Brian Dalton Copland. 
Ibrahim Mohamed Amin, B.A., 

LL.B. (Egyptian University), 

B.A. (Lond.). 



HOLDERS OF DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS 



2 55 



1934-35 Chinese (Modern) 



Hebrew (Modern) . 

1935-36 Chinese (Modern) . 
Chinese (Classical) . 
Chinese (Modern) . 
Swahili . 

T 93^~37 Hebrew (Modern) . 
Hebrew (Modern) 

(with distinction) 
Old and Middle 

Iranian 

Persian (with distinc- 
tion) . 



Alec George Morris Bean. 
Rev. Padre Benedetto Fedele, O.F.M. 
Ernst Mauritz Torstensson Friis. 
Rev. Padre Luigi Vannicelli, O.F.M. 
Siegfried Ko-sterich, D.Phil. (Frank- 
furt a/Main). 
Ralf Bernhard Bonwit. 
Gustav Herdan, LL.D. (Prague). 
Cecel Mary Winn. 
Hugh Stanley Senior, B.A. (Oxon.). 
Anna Oiserman. 

Theodora Ruth Sarna. 
Hossein Raffaty. 
Edith Johnson. 



256 SCHOLARS AND PRIZEWINNERS 

4. SCHOLARS AND PRIZEWINNERS 

(i) Gilchrist Scholarships 

1920 . Chinese . . Louis M. Chefdeville. 

1921 . Chinese . . George E. King, M.B. 

Turkish . . Margaret A. Duggan. 

1922 . Chinese . . Herbert J. Cant. 

Turkish . . Alice B. Carson. 

1923 . Chinese . . Chamley Duncan. 

Turkish . . Stephen M. Mackay. 

1924 . Chinese . . Irene Milton. 

Turkish . . Gilbert V. Holmes. 

1925 . Chinese . . Frederick C. C. Egerton. 

Turkish . . Francis F. Rynd. 

1926 . Chinese . . George F. Pal. 

1927 . Chinese . . Charles D. Webb, D.Litt., M.A., B.Sc. 

1928 . Turkish . . Henry Merceron Burton. 

1930 . Chinese . . Charles Patrick Fitzgerald. 

1931 . Arabic . . James Hey worth Dunne. 

1932 . Chinese . . Edith Therese Czech von Rechtensee, 

Phil.D. (Vienna). 

J 933 Chinese . . Cecel Mary Winn. 

(ii) Ouseley Memorial Scholarships 

1920 . Persian . . Cecil C. Polhill. 

1921 . Arabic . . Samuel Yeivin. 

1922 . Arabic . . Jacob Leveen. 

Urdu . . Mabel Griffiths. 

1923 . Arabic . . Naqdimon S. Doniach. 

Hindi . . Guy E. Leeson. 

Persian . . Annie R. Waite. 

1924 . Arabic . . Annie R. Waite. 

Persian . . Naqdimon S. Doniach. 

,, . . Florence Lederer. 

Urdu . . Guy E. Leeson. 

1925 . Persian . . Stephen M. Mackay. 

Urdu . . Elizabeth Law. 

1926 . Arabic . . David Cardozo, B.A. 

,, . . Margaret Smith. 

Urdu . . Joseph Hayim Abraham. 

1927 . Persian . . Wilfred W. McVittie. 

1928 . Arabic . . D. Harcourt Kitchin. 

1929 . Arabic . . Olaf Henry Thompson. 

1930 . Arabic . . James Hey worth Dunne. 

Urdu . . P?rcy Weston Heward. 

1931 ..... No award. 

1932 . Urdu . . Roderick Wallis Parkes, B.A. 

1933 . Arabic . . Laurence Paul Elwell-Sutton. 



SCHOLARS AND PRIZEWINNERS 257 

1934 . Arabic . . Bernard Lewis. 

Persian . . Edith Johnson. 

. . Ann Katharine Swynford Lamb ton, 

B.A. 

1935 . Arabic . . Chaim Rabin. 

1936 . Arabic . . Dorothee Metlitzky, B.A. 

Hindi . . Robert Hamilton Blair Williams 

1937 . Arabic . . Theodora Ruth Sarna. 

Hindi . . Robert Hamilton Blair Williams, 

B.A. 
Persian . . Ernest Friedrich Hartmut Brodfuhrer. 

(iii) Aga Khan Travelling Scholarship in Persian 

1935 . . . Ann Katharine Swynford Lambton, 

B.A. 

1937 . ... Edith Johnson. 

(iv) For long Scholarships 

1934 . Research 

Studentship . Thomas Burrow, M.A. 

1935 . Scholarship . Alec George Morris Bean. 

1936 . Scholarship . Alec George Morris Bean, B.A. 

1937 . Research 

Studentship . Bernard Lewis, B.A. 
Scholarship . Alec George Morris Bean, B.A. 

(v) Free Places 

1934 . Swahili . . Margaret Arminel Bryan, B.A. 

1935 . Swahili . . Margaret Arminel Bryan, B.A. 

1936 . Chinese . . Alec George Morris Bean, B.A. 

George Edward Taylor M.A. (Birming- 
ham). 

J 937 Chinese . . Alec George Morris Bean, B.A. 
Arabic . . Chaim Rabin, B.A. 

(vi) Bialik Prizes for Modern Hebrew 

1926 . ... Hamed Abd el Kader. 

Michael Marchant. 
Helena Leah Schonberg. 

1927 . ... Mohamed Mahdi Allarn. 

Ruth Daiches. 
Rose Snow. 

1928 . ... Millie Janikoun. 

Annie Addess. 
Annie Goldenberg 



258 SCHOLARS AND PRIZEWINNERS 

1929 . ... Mohammed Atieh El Barashy. 

Lily Lubran. 

1930 . ... Cornelia Julia Polak. 

Edith Schonberg. 

1931 . . . . Maurice Selzer. 

(vii) Arabic Studentships 

1933-35 A. S. Atiya, Ph.D. 

J. Heyworth Dunne, B.A. 

(viii) Derby Studentship in History 
7 Bernard Lewis, B.A. 



ADDRESSES OF MEMBERS OF THE ACADEMIC STAFF 259 

5. ADDRESSES OF MEMBERS OF THE ACADEMIC STAFF 

(The Lecturers whose names are printed in italics are on the Panel of 
Additional Lecturers) 

J. Allan, Esq., M.A., F.S.A., Dept. of Coins and Medals, British 

Museum, W.C. i. (Museum 8621.) 

MRS. ASHTON, 9 Longstomps Avenue, Chelmsford, Essex. 
Major L. F. I. AMU, Provincial House, 98/106 Cannon Street, E.C. 4. 

(Mansion House 0630.) 
T. GRAHAME BAILEY, Esq., M.A., B.D., D.Litt., Laganville, 236 

Nether Street, N. 3. (Finchley 0506.) 

Miss Janet Balmer, 29 West Heath Drive, N.W. n. (Speedwell 4573.) 
REV. G. P. BARGERY, D.Lit., St. Colomb, 2 Egmont Road, Sutton, 

Surrey. (Sutton 1445.) 
L. D. BARNETT, Esq., C.B., Litt.D., M.A., F.B.A., 19 Prince Edward 

Mansions, Pembridge Square, W. 2. (Bayswater 3545.) 
S. K. Bhuyan, Esq., M.A., 2 The Drive, Golders Green, N.W. n. 

(Speedwell 8104.) 

S. BIRNBAUM, Esq., D.Phil., 103 Cranwich Road, N. 16. 
C. O. Blagden, Esq., M.A., D.Litt., 40 Wychwood Avenue, Whitchurch 

Lane, Edgware, Middlesex. 
S- G. Bokhary, Esq., Royal Empire Society, Northumberland Avenue, 

W.C. 2. (Whitehall 6733.) 
R. T. BUTLTN, Esq., B.A., Flat 2, 3 Thurlow Road, Hampstead, 

N.W. 3. (Hampstead 2335.) 

Rev. A. Capell, M.A., 17 College Crescent, Swiss Cottage, N.W. 3. 
J. B. Chaudhuri, Esq., Ph.D., 19 King Henry's Road, N.W. 3 and 

India Office Library, S.W. i. (Whitehall 8140.) 

YEE CHIANG, Esq., 50 Upper Park Road, Hampstead, N.W. 3. (Prim- 
rose 4283.) 
K. DE B. CODRINGTON, Esq., M.A., Indian Museum, South Kensington, 

S.W. 7. (Kensington 6371, Ext. 101.) 
The Yen. Archdeacon, E. S. Daniell, M.A., O.B.E., Litton Cheney 

Rectory, Dorchester, Dorset. 

G. H. DARAB'KHAN, M.A., Fern Lodge, St. Mary Cray, Kent. 
Mrs. C. A. Rhys Davids, M.A., D.Lit., Chipstead, Surrey. (Downland 

485-) 

Rev. C. L. Dessoulavy, 171 Fentiman Road, S.W. 8. 
PROFESSOR H. H. DODWELL, M.A., Dover House, Chertsey, Surrey. 

(Chertsey 3278.) 
C. W. Dunn, Esq., C.I.E., M.A., Manting House, Meldreth, Combs, 

near Royston, Herts. 
J. HEY WORTH- DUNNE, Esq., B.A., 75 Antrim Mansions, N.W. 3. 

(Primrose 0289.) 
Miss E. D. EDWARDS, M.A., D.Lit., 26 Ashley Court, S.W. i. 

(Victoria 4585.) 

Miss R. M. Elwin, 42 Fairholme Estate, Bedfont, Middlesex. 
N. A. Fadipe, Esq., M.A., B.Sc., Toynbee Hall, 28 Commercial Street, 

E. i. (Avenue 7181.) 



260 ADDRESSES OF MEMBERS OF THE ACADEMIC STAFF 

J. R. FIRTH, Esq., M.A. 

S. G. VESEY FITZGERALD, Esq., M.A., LL.D., Warrenhurst, West 

Drive, Virginia Water, Surrey. (Wentworth 8.) 
Col H. L. O. Garrett, C.I.E., M.A., Sidros, Cooden Drive, Bexhill. 
SHAYKH M. M. GOMAA, B.A., 196 Clifton Gardens, W. 9. (Abercorn 

4026 and Welbeck 4096.) 

A. Gugushvili, Esq., Commonwood House, Chipperfield, Herts. 

H. de C. Stevens-Guille, Esq., M.A., 75 West Hill Avenue, Epsom, 

Surrey. 
Lieut.-Col. P. R. T. Gurdon, C.S.I., c/o Lloyds Bank, 6 Pall Mall, 

S.W. i. 

E. G. Hart, Esq., D.S.O., M.A., 204 Regents Park, Southampton. 
J. F. B. Hartshorne, Esq., B.A., Reade House, Farnham Common, 

Bucks. (Farnham 313.) 
Miss BETTY HEIMANN, Ph.D., 201 Gloucester Terrace, W. 2. 

(Paddington 8388.) 
WALTER B. H. HENNING, Esq., D.PhiL, 5/13 Northwood Hall, Hornsey 

Lane, N. 6. 

B. G. Herouy, Esq., Ethiopian Legation, 5 Prince's Gate, S.W. 7. 

(Kensington 7433.) 
S. Hillelson, Esq., 4 Porchester Court, Porchester Gardens, W. 2. 

(Bayswater 1350.) 
Miss B. HONIKMAN, M.A., Crosby Hall, Cheyne Walk, S.W. 3. 

(Flaxman 4519.) 

Miss E. A. How, 24 Antrim Mansions \ N.W. 3. (Primrose 4183.) 
G. W. B. Huntingford, Esq., Dunstall Vicarage, Burton-on- Trent, 

Staffs. 
Captain H. J. Inman, Eaton Lodge, Buckingham Road, Hampton, 

Middlesex. (Molesey 1268.) 
COMMANDER N. E. ISEMONGER, Connaught Club, 75 Seymour Street, 

W. i. 
Rev. W. G. Ivens, M.A., D.Litt., Litt.D., F.R.A.L, The Rectory, 

Warehorne, Ashford, Kent. 
PROFESSOR A. LLOYD JAMES, M.A., 43 Hollycroft Avenue, N.W. 3. 

(Hampstead 1348.) 

S. G. KANHERE, Esq., 12 Dinton Road, Kingston-on-Thames. 
/. Kazi, Esq., " The Cottage," Station Road, Esher. 
The Right Rev. A. L. Kitching, M.A., All Saints Rectory, Dorchester, 

Dorset (Dorchester 633.) 
L. L. B. Leakey, Esq., M.A., Ph.D. 
G. E. LEESON, Esq., 13 Crescent Wood Road, S.E. 26. (Forest Hill 

1404.) 

A. MacGregor, Esq., M.A., Hopetown House, Gerrards Cross, Bucks. 
Rev. P. J. Maclagan, M.A., D.Phil., D.D., Oakmede, Bell's Hill, 

Barnet. (Museum 7768.) 

ALFRED MASTER, Esq., C.I.E., B.A., The Vicarage, Lacey Green, 
Aylesbury. 

B. Matsukawa, Esq., 270 Carlton Road, Gidea Park, Essex. (Holborn 

85230 
Reginald S. le May, Esq., Pembroke College, Cambridge. 



ADDRESSES OF MEMBERS OF THE ACADEMIC STAFF 261 

T. N. Menon, Esq., B.A., 200 Hurst Road, Sidcup, Kent, and India 

Office Library, S.W. i. (Whitehall 8140.) 

G. Mere, Esq., 38 Great Cumberland Place, W. i. (Paddington 7481.) 
J. Michell, Esq., 2 Oakhill Road, Beckenham, Kent. (Beckenham 1083.) 
PROFESSOR V. MINORSKY, 2 Wentworth Road, N.W. n. (Speedwell 

3478.) 
G. N. Owen, Esq., 139 Clarence Gate Gardens, N.W. i. (Paddington 

0518.) 
W. SUTTON PAGE, Esq., O.B.E., B.A., B.D., 12 Crescent Road, 

Chingford, E. 4. (Silverthorn 2169.) 
C. S. K. PATHY, Esq., M.A., D-es-L., 18 East Drive, Carshalton 

Beeches, Surrey. (Wallington 2385.) 
C. H. PHILIPS, Esq., M.A., 190 Queen's Parade Mansions, Muswell 

Hill, N. 10. 
Rev. H. W. Pike, B.A., B.D., 15 Grange Avenue, Woodford Green, 

Essev. (Holborn 1624.) 
M. D. RATNASURIYA, Esq., Ph.D., 2 Willoughby Road, Hampstead, 

N.W. 3. 

S. Rawidowicz, Esq., Ph.D., 16 Randolph Crescent, W. 9. 
Lieut.-Col. C. F. Rey, C.M.G., Resident Commissioner, Bechuanaland 

Protectorate, Maf eking, Cape Province, S. Africa. 
F. J. RICHARDS, Esq., M.A., IA Collingham Road, S.W. 5. (Flaxman 



ALI RIZA BEY, 48 Sinclair Road, W. 14. 

Sir E. Denison Ross, C.I.E., D.Lit., Ph.D., 229 St. James's Court, 

Buckingham Gate, S.W. i. (Victoria 2360.) 
C. A. RYLANDS, Esq., M.A., Brown's Field, Ightham, Sevenoaks, 

Kent. 
H. Lee Shuttleworth, Esq., M.A., 36 Lambolle Road, N.W. 3. (Primrose 

2578.) 
WALTER SIMON, Esq., Ph.D., 13 Lisbon Avenue, Twickenham, 

Middlesex. (Popesgrove 3860.) 
Miss Margaret Smith, Ph.D., D.Lit., u Elm Park Mansions, Park 

Walk, S.W. 10. 
WILLIAM STEDE, Esq., Ph.D., 227 Valley Road, Streatham, S.W. 16 

(Streatham 6892.) 
Rev. John Steele, M.A., D.Lit., 34 Birchwood Avenue, Muswell Hill, 

N. 10. 
J. A. STEWART, Esq., C.I.E., M.C., M.A., LL.D., 17 Avenue Road, 

Bishop's Stortford, Herts. (Bishop's Stortford 503.) 
Miss G. M. Summers, 12 Crescent Road, Chingford, E. 4. (Silverthorn 

2169.) 

S. H. TAQIZADEH, Esq., 21 Eagle Lodge, Golders Green Road, N.W. 1 1. 
G. C. Tew, Esq., B.A., Bovingdon Cottage, Marlow, Bucks. 
S. TOPALIAN, Esq., in Sinclair Road, W. 14. (Shepherd's Bush 

5765.) 
A. J. Toynbee, Esq., B.A., 3 Melina Place, St. John's Wood, N.W. 8. 

(Cunningham 1430.) 
A. S. TRITTON, Esq., M.A., D.Litt., 29 Kensington Park Gardens, 

W. u. (Park 8277.) 



262 ADDRESSES OF MEMBERS OF THE ACADEMIC STAFF 

A. N. TUCKER, Esq., M.A., Ph.D., 36 Petts Wood Road, Orpington, 

Kent. (Orpington 2699.) 
PROFESSOR R. L. TURNER, M.C., M.A., Litt.D., Haverbrack, Bishop's 

Stortford, Herts. (Bishop's Stortford 135.) 
Major Hanns Vischer, C.M.G., C.B.E., 2 Richmond Terrace, Whitehall, 

S.W. i. (Whitehall 9191). 
H. G. Quaritch-Wales, Esq., M.A., Ph.D., Royal Societies Club, 

St. James's Street, S.W. i. (Regent 2817.) 
A. D. Waley, Esq., B.A. 
John Walker, Esq., M.A., Dept. of Coins and Medals, British Museum, 

W.C. i. (Museum 8621.) 
Miss IDA C. WARD, B.Litt., D.Lit, 17 Monkville Avenue, N.W. n. 

(Speedwell 2876.) 
I. WARTSKI, Esq., B.A., 70 Anson Road, Cricklewood, N.W. 2. 

(Gladstone 3831.) 

Mrs. M. M. Duncan-Why te, 6 Collingham Gardens, S.W. 5. 
Rev. Gordon S. Wilkins, 21 Whitmore Road, Beckenham, Kent. 
Miss R. O. Wingate, M.A., Park Hill, Horsell Rise, Woking. 
Miss C. M. Winn, n Trevor Square, Knightsbridge, S.W. 7. (Kensington 

7312.) 
SIR RICHARD O. WINSTEDT, K.B.E., C.M.G., M.A., D.Litt., 95 

Westbourne Terrace, W. 2. (Paddington 5524.) 
A. E. Wood, Esq., M.A., ^ Lexham Gardens, W. 8. 
S. YOSHITAKE, Esq., 55 Denbigh Street, S.W. i. 
KADRI ZAFIR, Esq., M.A., 50 Sinclair Road, W. 14. 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Academic Board, Members of . . . . . . . .80 

Academic Year ..... ..150 

Additional Lecturers, Panel of . . . . . . 8286 

Administrative Staff ...... 87 

Admission of Students . . . . . . . . 88, 147 

Addresses of Members of Academic Staff . . . 259 

African Languages, Courses in .... .131 

. f Li st of ........ 46 

African Linguistics . . . . . . . . 133 

Aga Khan Travelling Scholarship in Persian . .257 

Almanac, 1937-38 .......... 95 

Amharic, Courses in ......... 126 

Amoy, Courses in . . . . . . . . . .122 

Annual Report (1936-37) ... .... 49 

Arabic : 

Courses in ...... ... 126 

List of Languages ......... 46 

Studentships .......... 258 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination ..... 141 

Intermediate Arts Examination. . . . .159 

B.A. (General) Examination ..... 164 

B.A. Hons. Examination ...... 169 

M.A. Examination . . . . 188 

School Diploma . . . . . . .210 

Aramaic, Courses in . . . . . . . . .128 

, Syllabus for M.A. Degree in Hebrew and . . .188 

Archaeology, Syllabus for B.A. Hons. Examination . .169 

Armenian, Courses in ...... 129 

, Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . .141 

, Syllabus for B.A. (General) ...... 164 

Art, Oriental ........ . . 47 

Assamese, Courses in ... . . .118 

Associate Students ..... ... 148 

Austronesian Languages, Courses in ..... 124 

f Li st of ....... 47 

B.A. (General) Degree . . . . . . . . 163 

B.A. Hons. Degree . . . . . . . . .168 

B. Com. Degree 177 

Bantu Languages : 

Comparative Grammar of, M.A. Examination in Comparative 

Philology . . . . .191 

, Syllabus for School Diploma . . 212 

Courses in ......... 131,133 

Bari, Courses in . . . . . . . . .132 

Bengali : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . .117 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . 141 

Intermediate Arts Examination. . . . .159 

B.A. (General) Examination . . . . .164 

School Diploma . . . . . - .210 

Bialik Prizes 257 

Boards : 

Academic, Members of ....... 80 

Examinations, Members of . . . . . . .81 

263 



264 INDEX 

PAGE 

Bulletin of the School 234 

Burmese : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . . .112 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

Intermediate Arts Examination . . . . .159 

B.A. (General) Examination . . . . .164 

School Diploma . . . . . . .211 

Buddhist Law, Courses in . . . . . . . 137 

Bursaries, James G. R. Forlong Endowment : 

Application for ......... 230 

Holders -257 

Cambridge Local Examination Committee, Members of . 81 

Cantonese, Courses in . . . . . . . .122 

Certificate Examinations. (See also Examinations.) .... 204 

Certificates, awarded ......... 65 

Charter of Incorporation ......... 7 

Chinese : 

Amoy, Courses in . . . . . . . .122 

Cantonese, Courses in . . . . . . .122 

Classical, Courses in . . . . . . . .121 

Foochow, Courses in . . . . . . . .123 

Modern, Couises in . . . . . . . . - 121 

Swatow, Courses in . . . . . . . . .123 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

Intermediate Arts Examination . . . . 159 

B.A. (General) Examination . . . . .16^ 

B.A. Honours Examination . . . . .170 

M.A. Examination . . . . . .190 

M.A. Examination in Comparative Philology . . 191 

School Diploma ...... 211,212 

Civil Service Open Examination. Fees for Course . . . .91 

Classes, List of 107 

Common Rooms .......... 235 

Comparative Grammar of Bantu Languages. See Bantu Languages. 
Comparative Grammar of Indo- Aryan Languages. See Indo- Aryan 

Languages . 
Comparative Grammar of Indonesian Languages. See Indonesian 

Languages. 

Comparative Grammar of Semitic Languages. See Semitic Languages. 
Comparative Philology : 

Syllabus for M.A. Examination . . . . . . .191 

Culture and History ......... 47 

D.Lit. Degree .......... 201 

Degrees : 

Approved Courses of Study . . . . . . .151 

B.A. Course . . . . . . . . . .156 

Admission of candidates for ....... 85 

First . . . . . . . . . . .156 

Higher ........... 180 

Higher, conferred ......... 63 

Holders of 248 

Registration for . . . . . . . . .148 

Departments of the School ........ 82 

Dinka, Courses in . . . . . . . . . .132 

Diploma, Examination. (See also Examinations.) . . . .207 

, awarded .......... 64 

, Holders of ......... 253 

Diploma in Librarianship ........ 203 

Director .......... 14, 82 



INDEX 265 

PAGE 

Dravidian Languages, Courses in . . . . . .113 

, List of ....... 46 

, M.A. Examination in Comparative Philology . 191 

Efik, Courses in 132 

Epigraphy, Arabic, Courses in . . . . . . . .127 

, Indian, Palaeography, Courses in . . . . .112 

, North Semitic, Courses in . . . . .128 

, Diploma in . . . . . . . . .215 

Ethiopic, Courses in . . . . . . . . .128 

Ewe, Courses in . . . . . . . . .132 

Examinations : 

B.A. General Degree . . . . . . . .163 

L.A. (Hons.) Degree 168 

B. Com. i?7 

Board 81 

Certificate, School 204 

Consular Service ......... 223 

Courses of Study for . . . . . . . 151 

D.Lit. Degree . . . . . . . . . 201 

Dates of Entry. ......... 94 

Diploma of the School ........ 207 

Eastern Cadetships ......... 223 

Fees . . . . . . . . . .91,92,93 

Civil Service .......... 223 

Indian Civil Service Course ....... 223 

Institute of Secretaries ........ 228 

Institution of Civil Engineers ....... 228 

Intermediate Arts . . . . . . . . 157 

Libraripnship Diploma . . . . . . . .203 

LL.B. Degree 178 

LL.D. 202 

LL.M. 193 

M.A. 183 

Matriculation . . . . . . . . . .139 

Ph.D. Degree ......... 194 

Procedure for Intending Graduates . . . . . 139 

Registr?*ion for Degree Courses . . ... 148 

School Certificates ......... 204 

School, Dates of ......... 94 

Special University Entrance Examination . . . . .142 

University, Dates of ........ 94 

External Students . . . . . . . . . .148 

Fanti, Courses in . . . . . . . . . .132 

Fees : 

Civil Service Open Examination Course . . . . 91 

Examination . . . . . . . . .91, 92, 93 

Gramophone Record ........ 92 

Indian Civil Service Probationers' Course . . . . .91 

Library . . . . . . . . . . 91, 92 

Research . . . . . . . . . .91 

School .......... 90, 91 

University . . . . . . . . . 92, 93 

Finance and General Purposes Committee, Members of . .80 

Finno-Ugrian, M.A. Examination in Comparative Philology . . 191 

Foochow, Courses in . . . . . . . .123 

Foreign Study, Holiday Courses and International Scholarships . . 237 
Forlong, James G. R., Endowment : 

Bursaries ......... 230, 257 

Research Studentship ....... 230, 257 

Scholarships ......... 230, 257 



266 INDEX 

PAGE 

Forlong and Scholarships Committee, Members of . . .81 

Free PJaces 230, 257 

French ............ 47 

Ga, Courses in . . . . . . . .132 

Georgian, Courses in . . . . . . .129 

German ........... 47 

Gilchrist Scholarships : 

Holders of .......... 256 

Governing Body : 

Former Members ......... 239 

Members of .......... 79 

Gramophone . . . . . . . . . 92, 132, 134 

Gujarati : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . .116 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

Intermediate Arts Examination . . . .160 

B.A. (General) Examination . . . . .165 

School Diploma . . . . . . .214 

Hausa, Courses in . . . . . . . . . .132 

, Syllabus for Matriculation Examination ..... 141 

Heads of Departments, Committee of, Members of . . . .81 

Hebrew, Syllabus for B.A. Hons. Examination . . . .171 

Hebrew and Aramaic, Syllabus for M.A. Degree . . . .188 

Hebrew, Classical, Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . 141 

Hebrew, Modern, Courses in . . . . . . . .128 

See also Modern Hebrew. 
Hindi : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . .119 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . 141 

Intermediate Arts Examination. . . . .160 

B.A. (General) Examination . . . . .165 

School Diploma . . . . . . .215 

See also Hindustani. 

Hindu Law, Courses in . . . . . . . 137, 138 

, Syllabus for LL.B. Degree . .178 

Hindustani : 

Courses in . . . . . . . .119 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

School Diploma . . . . . . .215 

History, Oriental : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . .135 

Syllabus for B.A. Hons. Examination .... 174, 175, 176 

M.A. Examination . . , . . . .192 

History and Culture ......... 47 

of the School ......... 30 

Holiday Courses .......... 237 

Ibo, Courses in . . . . . . . . .132 

Indian Civil Service : 

Courses for Probationers . . . . . . . .223 

Fees . . . . . . . . . . .91 

Probationers Committee, Members of . . . . .81 

Rules for Selected Candidates ....... 224 

Supervisor to Probationers ...... 86, 223 

Indian Law, Courses in . . . . . . . . 1 37, 138 

Indian Palaeography and Epigraphy, Courses in . . . . .112 
, Diploma in . . . .215 

Indian Philosophy, Syllabus for School Diploma . . . .216 
Courses in . . . . . . .112 



INDEX 267 

PAGE 

Indo-Aryan Languages : 

Comparative Grammar, Courses in . . . . . 111,133 

, M.A. Examination in Comparative 

Philology . . . . . .191 

1 Syllabus for School Diploma . . . 212 

Courses in ......... 115-120 

List of ........... 46 

Syllabus for B.A. Hons. Examination . . . . . 173 

M.A. Examination . . . . . .186 

Indo-European Languages : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . .115-120 

List of . 46 

Indo- Iranian, M.A. Examination in Comparative Philology . . .191 

Indonesian Languages : 

Comparative Grammar, Syllabus for School Diploma . . .213 

, M.A. Examination in Comparative 

Philology . . . . . .191 

Courses in . . . . . . . . .124 

Institute of Secretaries ......... 228 

Institution of Civil Engineers ........ 228 

Inter-collegiate arrangements ........ 48 

Internal Students . . . . . . . . . .148 

International Scholarships . . . . . . . .237 

Iranian, Courses in . . . . . . . . .130 

, List of Languages ........ 46 

, M.A. Examination in Comparative Philology . . . .191 

, Old and Middle, Syllabus for School Diploma . . .216 

James G. P. Forlong Endowment. See Forlong. 
Japanese : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . .123 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

Intermediate Arts Examination . . . . .160 

B.A. (General) Examination . . . . .165 

B.A. Hons. Examination . . . . . .174 

M.A. Examination . . . . . .190 

. School Diploma . . . . . . .218 



Kanarese, Courses in . . . . . . . .113 

, Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . .141 

Kashmiri, Courses in . . . . . . . .120 

Khasi, Courses in . . . . . . . . .112 

KiKuyu, Courses in . . . . . . . .131 

LL.B. Degree 178 

LL.D. Degree .......... 202 

LL.M. Degree . . . . . . . . . .193 

Law, Courses in . . . . . . . . .137,138 

Lecturers at the School. See Teaching Staff. 

Lecturers, Panel of Additional ....... 82-86 

Lectures, Classes and Seminars . . . . . . .107 

Lectures : 

Public, given during Session 193637 ...... 66 

Librarianship, Diploma in ........ 203 

Library : 

Bulletin ........... 234 

Report ........... 55 

Rules ........... 233 

Library Committee, Members of ....... 80 



268 INDEX 

PAGE 

Linguistics, Courses in . . . . . . . . 133 

Lodgings ........... 236 

LuGanda, Courses in . . . . . . . -131 

M.A. Degree 183 

Malay : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . .124 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

Intermediate Arts Examination . . . . . 1 60 

B.A. (General) Examination . . . . .165 

School Diploma . . . . . . .218 

Malayalam, Courses in . . . . . . . . .113 

, Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . .141 

Marathi : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . .115 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

Intermediate Arts Examination . . . . .160 

B.A. (General) Examination . . . . .166 

School Diploma . . . . . . .218 

Matriculation Examination . . . . . . . .139 

Syllabus ....... 141 

Medieval Mon, Courses in . . . . . . .112 

Melanesian Languages, Courses in . . . . . .125 

Mende, Courses in . . . . . . . . .132 

Methods of Language Study . . . . . . . .134 

Micronesian Languages, Courses in . . . . . . .125 

Modern Hebrew : 

Bialik Prizes, Holders of . . . . . . . . 257 

Courses in ........ .128 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

School Diploma ....... 214 

Modern Language Teaching Committee, Members of . . . .81 

Mongolian, Courses in . . . . . . . .124 

Mon-Khmer Languages, Courses in . . . . . . .112 

Mon, Old and Medieval, Courses in . . . . . .112 

Muhammadan Law, Courses in . . . . . . 137, 138 

, Syllabus for LL.B. .... .170 

Nepali, Courses in . . . . . . . . . .120 

Nuer, Courses in . . . . . . . . . .132 

Office Hours .......... 235 

Officers of the School ......... 79 

Origins and History . . . . . . . . .30 

Oriya, Courses in . . . . . . . . . .118 

Ouseley Memorial Scholarships : 

Holders of ......... 256, 257 

Regulations for ......... 229 

Overseas Students, Regulations for . . . . . . 180,181 

Palaeography, Courses in Indian . . . . . . .215 

, Courses in Hebrew . . . . . . .128 

Palestine, Law of . . . . . . . . . 137 

Pali : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

Intermediate Arts Examination . . . . .161 

B.A. (General) 166 

School Diploma . . . . . . ,219 

B.A., Hons. and MJV. See Indo- Aryan Languages. 



INDEX 269 

PAGE 

Panjabi, Courses in . . . . . . . . .120 

, Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . .141 

Papuan Languages, Courses in . . . . . . .125 

Pashto, Courses in . . . . . . . . . .120 

Persian : 

Courses in . . . . . . . .130 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

Intermediate Arts Examination . . . . .161 

B.A. (General) Examination . . . . .166 

B.A. Hons. Examination . . . . . .174 

M.A. Examination . . . . . .188 

School Diploma . . . . . . .219 

Ph.D. Degree . . . . . . . . . .194 

Philology, Comparative. See Comparative Philology. 

Philosophy, Syllabus for M.A. Examination . . . . .191 

Phonetics : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . .133 

Syllabus for School Diploma . . . . . . .219 

Plan, Street 45 

Polynesian Languages, Courses in . . . . .125 

Prakrit, Courses in . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 

, Syllabus for B.A. (General) Hons. and M.A. See Indo- Aryan 

Languages. 

Prizes. See Modern Hebrew. 

Professors, Readers, etc. . . . . . . . .82 

Public Lectures : 

Session 1936-37 ......... 66 

implications by Members of Teaching Staff ..... 70 

Readers, etc. .......... 82 

Register of Former Students . . . . . . . .236 

Registration for Degree Courses . . . . . . .148 

Religions, Courses in . . . . . . . . .no 

Report for Session 1936-37 ........ 49 

Sanskrit : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . . .in 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

Intermediate Arts Examination. . . . .161 

B. A. (General) 166 

School Diploma ....... 220 

B.A. (General) Hons. and M.A. Examinations. See 

Indo-Aryan Languages. 
Scholarships ........... 229 

Forlong and Scholarships Committee, Members of . . .81 

Forlong, awarded . . . . . . . . .257 

Gilchrist, awarded . . . . . . . . .256 

International . . . . . . . . . .237 

Ouseley Memorial, awarded ...... 256, 257 

School Buildings .......... 45 

Terms, Dates of . . . . . . . . .94 

Scope of Teaching .......... 46 

Semitic Languages, Comparative Grammar of (Syllabus for School 

Diploma) . . . . . . . . . .213 

, Courses in . . . . . . . .126 

, List of ........ 46 

, M.A. Examination in Comparative Philology . . 191 

Seminars, List of . . . . . . . . .107 

Shan, Courses in . . . . . . . . .112 

Shilluk, Courses in . . . . . . . . . .132 



270 INDEX 

PAGE 

Shina, Courses in .......... 120 

Siamese, Courses in . . . . - . . .123 
Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . 141 

Sindhi, Courses in . . . . . . . - .120 

Sinhalese : 

Courses in . . . . . . . .118 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . H 1 

Intermediate Arts Examination . . . . .161 

B.A. (General) Examination .... 166 

School Diploma ....... 220 

Sino-Tibetan Languages, Courses in . . . . . . .121 

, List of ....... 46 

Sotho-Chwana, Courses in . . . . . . 1 3 i 

Staff : 

Administrative ......... 87 

Library .......... 87 

Teaching .......... 82 

, Former Members of ..... . 242 

Standing Orders of the Governing Body . . . . . .18 

Street Plan 45 

Students : 

Admission of . . . . . . . . . .88 

Associate ......... 148 

Classified statistics of . . . . . . 59, 60, 61, 62 

Register of Former ......... 236 

Regulations for . . . . . . . . .235 

Sudanese Languages, Courses in . . . . . 132 

Supervisor of I.C.S. Probationers ...... 86, 223 

Swnhili : 

Courses in . . . . . . . 1 3 1 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

School Diploma .... . 220 

Swatow, Courses in . . . . . . . . .123 

Syriac. See Hebrew and Aramaic. 



Tai Languages, Courses in . . . . . . . 112, 12.1 

Tamil : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . .114 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . 141 

Intermediate Arts Examination. . . . .162 

B.A. (General) Examination . . . . .166 

School Diploma . . . . . . .221 



Teaching, Scope of ...... 46 

Teaching, Staff 82 

, Addresses of ........ 259 

, Former Members ....... 242 

, Publications by ....... 70 

Telugu, Courses in . . . . . . . . 1 1 5 

, Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . .141 

Terms 

School, Dates of ......... 94 

University, Dates of ........ 94 

Text Book Committee, Members of . . . . . . .81 

Theses for Higher Degrees . . . . . . . .150 

Tibetan : 

Courses in .......... 123 

Syllabus for School Diploma . . . . . . .221 

Tibeto-Burman Languages, Courses in . . . . . 112, 123 

, M.A. Examination in Comparative 

Philology . . . . . .191 



INDEX 271 

PAGE 

Turco- Mongol . . . . . . . . . .124 

Turki, Courses in . . . . . . . . . .129 

Turkish : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . .128 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

Intermediate Arts Examination . . . . .162 

B.A. (General) Examination . . . . .167 

Syllabus for M. A. Examination in Comparative Philology . .191 

School Diploma ....... 222 

Twi, Courses in . . . . . . . . .132 

Uighur, Courses in . . . . . . . .129 

Union of the University of London . . . . . . .236 

University Degrees, Candidates for . . . . . . 139 

Terms, Dates of ........ 94 

University of London Union . . . . . . . .236 

Urdu : 

Courses in . . . . . . . . .119 

Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . . .141 

Intermediate Arts Examination . . . . .162 

B.A. General Examination . . . . .167 

School Diploma ....... 222 

West African Languages, Courses in . . . . . .132 

Yoruba, Courses in. . . . . . . . . .132 

, Syllabus for Matriculation Examination . . . .141 

Zulu-Xhosa, Courses in . . . . . . . . .131 

, Syllabus for Matriculation Examination ..... 141 



Oriental Books, Indian & Persian Art, MSS., Bronzes, etc. 

Inspect Our 

GALLERY OF ORIENTAL ART. 

All the books prescribed for students at the School of Oriental 
Studies and the Universities are kept in stock. 



THE MATHNAWI OF JALALU'-D-DIN RUM1 

EDITED FROM THE OLDEST MANUSCRIPTS AVAILABLE. 
With critical notes, translation, and commentary by 

REYNOLD A. NICHOLSON, Litt.D., LL.D. 

Vol. VII. Containing the Commentary of the First and Second Books. 
Roy. 8vo, cloth, pp. xxxiii, 373. Price 20/-. 

(E. J. W. Gibb Memorial Ser. New Series, IV.) 

HUDUD al-'ALAM 

"THE REGIONS OF THE WORLD." 

A Persian Geography, A.H. 372 (A.D. 982) 
Translated and explained by V. MINORSKY. With the preface by V. V. BARTHOLD 

(d. 1930) translated from the Russian. 
Illustrated by 12 maps. Roy. 8vo, cloth, pp. xx, 524. Price 25/-. 

(E. J. W. Gibb Memorial Ser. New Series, XI.) 

PERSIAN LITERATURE 

A BfO-BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SURVEY by C. A. STOREY. 
Section II, Fasciculus 2, C-L. SPECIAL HISTORIES OF PERSIA, CENTRAL 
ASIA, AND THE REMAINING PARTS OF THE WORLD EXCEPT INDIA. 

8vo, sewn, pp. 200. Price is/-. 

THE CERA KINGS OF THE SANGAM PERIOD 

r By K. G. S. AIYAR. 

8vo, cloth, pp. vii, 183. Price 6/-. 

Almost ready 

An important work on the 
BEKTASHI ORDER OF DERVISHES 

By J. K. BIRGE. 
The above will form Vol. VII of Luzac's Oriental Religions Series. 



LUZAC'S ORIENTAL LIST AND BOOK REVIEW 

A Quarterly classified bibliography of New Oriental Literature now in its 47th year of issue. 

Will keep you informed of the latest publications on any Oriental subject. 

Sent post free for 31- a year. 



LUZAC & CO. 

Oriental and Foreign Booksellers. 

Agenti to the Royal Asiatic Society; School of Oriental Studies. London; Asiatic Society of 
Bengal, Calcutta ; Bihar and Orissa Research Society, India ; Siam Society, Bangkok, etc.. etc. 

46 GREAT RUSSELL STREET - LONDON, W.C. 1. 

(Opposite the British Museum.) 



II it's out ol the ordinary 
if's our speciality 



ORIENTAL AND CONTINENTAL 
TYPESETTING 

IN THE LANGUAGES OF THE WORLD 

COMPOSITION IN PHONETICS 

AS APPROVED BY THE 

INTERNATIONAL PHONETIC ASSOCIATION 

PERIODICALS 

BOOK PRINTING 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 



Arabic 



on 
maa rmnxa 



Phonetic* 

rjgiBo-naBdint^u 
sathbiamdind^a oe igk^o:mo 



Burmese 

8c^os 03803 G6p i oa 
oaogcSi (oocSooGcoocS) oac^sc 



Hindi 



Sf ^R 



Chinete 



Greek 

KaraAoyoi ct; riyv KO^O, u 
yAwaaav clvai 
f cvos ayopaj 



Siamese 



Spec/men Book of Types free on application 



rn? 



STEPHEN AUSTIN & SONS, LTD. 

Phone : Hertford 546/547 

I FORE STREET, HERTFORD, HERTS 



APPOINTMENTS 

ABROAD . 

OUTFITS 

far 




INDIAN 
POLICE SERVICE 

INDIAN 
MEDICAL SERVICE 

INDIAN 
CIVIL SERVICE 

CONSULAR 
SERVICES 

WEST AFRICAN 
MEDICAL SERVICE 

COLONIAL 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

SERVICE 



Special estimates of Kit for the above and similar appointments 

Fully illustrated catalogue sent on request 



O(kU 



CAMBRIDGE CIRCUS, LONDON, W.C.2 



Telephone : 
Temple Bar 1814. 
(Private Exchange). 



Telegrams: 
Alclothes, Westcenc 
London. 



OUTFITS 

FOR 

I.C.S., U.L.I.A., I.P., I.M.S., 

and 

FOREIGN & COLONIAL OFFICE 
APPOINTMENTS 

Thresher and Glenny have records in detail of outfits supplied for 
every conceivable purpose, Military and Civilian, during the 
past eighty years. 

General outfitting catalogue, and estimate for any purpose 
or appointment on application, 

Thresher & Glenny Ltd. 

152 & 153 STRAND, LONDON. W.C. 2 

(next door to Somerset House). 



HUNTING GIFTS 

WHAT could be more acceptable as a seasonable gift 
for your friends who ride or huntthan something 
connected with this great sport ? 
Our splendid stock of Hunting Whips, Canteens, 
Flasks, Gloves, Saddles and other accessories give you a 
wide range of choice, and in dealing with us you have the 
knowledge that every article is in keeping with our long 
reputation for quality and reasonable price. 

Description of Goods Illustrated. 
HUNTING CANTEEN, 5| x 5* x !{ in., containing Sandwi. h Box 

m Britannia Metal with fall-back lid and Hunting flask, K.P. 

bayonet top 60/- 

SANDWICH BOX in Britannia Metal with fall bark lid, in leather 

case, 5$ x ',}$ x 1 in. deep, complete ..... 30/- 
COPPER HUNTING HORN . . . . 15 /-and 12/6 each 

LEATHER CASE for same 18/6 and 22/8 

HUNTING WHIP, Lad>s' and Gent's, j.laitcd leather, silvtrmoimt, 

withthons 25/- 

Ditto, with E. P. mount . 21/- 

W rite Jar Full Lists 

GEORGE PARKER & SONS 

ONLY ADDRESS: (SADDLERS) LIMITED 

12 UPPER ST. MARTINS LANE, LONDON, W.C. 2 




Telephone: TEMPLE BAR II64 



Telegrams: " CAVESSON, LESQUARE, LONDON." 



HEFFER'S BOOKSHOP 

We have a large select stock of both 
new and second-hand books, with an 
extensive Oriental Department. 

We will buy good books and journals 
in every field of literature have you 
any to sell ? Catalogues on all sub- 
jects free on request. 



W. HEFFER Al 
& SONS, Ltd. 



Cambridge, 
England. 



FOYLES 

Booksellers to the World 

Special Department for 

ORIENTALIA 



119-125 CHARING CROSS ROAD, W.C. 2 

Telephone : Gerrard 5660 (12 lines). 



CLAPHAM PARK RIDING SCHOOL 

NO. 1 1 GROVE ROAD, BALKAN, S.W. 12 

The Largest and best equipped COVERED School in London 

SPECIAL CLASSES AND RATES 
FOR I.C.S. PROBATIONERS 

PHONE or WRITE for BROCHURE-INSPECTION INVITED 
Principal Capt. S. J. LAWRENCE Tulse Hill 6749 

The School is easily accessible by the " MORDEN TUBE" or 
Victoria to BALHAM (Southern Railway) 



For all inquiries relating to advertise- 
ments in the Calendar, communications 
should be addressed to P. C. Bartlett, 
Garrick House, 27 Southampton 
Street, W.C.2. 



STEPHEN AUSTIN AND SONS, LTD., 

ORIENTAL AND GENERAL PRINTERS, 

FORE STREET, HERTFORD.