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Full text of "Calendar of state papers, Colonial series .."

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n 







QMfoite\ C'l tne Tttottt. 



2f. ^'^'^'Si^ 



1 





The Master of ffi^TO^ degires to ^mn^affraudii of the Editora of 
Calendars to the following considemtions, with a view to secure uniformity 
of plan in the important works on wliich they aro ^igag^ : — 

He is anxious to extend, as far as is consistent with proper economy and 
despatch, the utility of the Calendars of State Papers now publishing under 
hia control : 1st. As the most efficient means of making the national archivea 
t acoessible to all who are interested in historical inquiries ; 2nd. As the best 
justification of the liberality and munificence of the Government in throwing 
open these papers to the public, and providing proper catalogues of their 
contents at the national expense. 

The greater number of the readers who wiU consult and value these works 
can have little or no opportimity of visiting the Public Record Office, in 
which these papers are deposited. The means for consulting the' originals 
must necessarily be limited when readci-s live at a distance firom the metro- 
polis; still more if they are i^esidents of Scotland, Ii-eland, distant colonies, 
or foreign states. Even when sudi an opportunity does exist, the diificulty 
of mastering the original hands in which these papers are written will deter 
many readers from consulting them. Above all, their great variety and 
number must present formidable obstacles to literaiy inquirer^ however 
ablcj sanguine, and energetic^ when the infoimation contained in them is 
not made accessible by satisfactoty Calendars. 

The Master of the RoUs considers that, without superseding the necessity 
of consulting the originals, every Editor ought to frame his Calendar in such 
a manner that it shall present, in as condensed a foim as possible, a correct 
index of the contents of the papers described in it. He considei-s tliat the 
entries should be so minute as to enable the reader to discover not only the 
general contents of the originals, but also what iheyj do not contain. If 
the information bo not aufliciently precise, il' facts and names be omitted or 
concealed under a vague and general description, the reader wiU be often 
tni&tod* he will assume that where the abstracts are silent as to infonuation 
to bo found in the documents, such information does not exist; or, he will 
have to examine every original in detail, and thus one gi-eat pui-jjoso will 
have been lost for which these Calendars have been compiled. 



Ab the documents are various, the Master of the Rolls considers that they 
will demand a con^e^ponding mode of treatment. The following rules axe 
to be observed : — 

1st. All formal and official doeumenta, such as letters of credence, war- 
rants, grants, and the like, shoulil be described as briefly as possible. 

2nd. Letters and dociunents referring to one subject only should be cata- 
logued BH briefly as is consistent with correctneas. But when they contain 
miscellaneous news, such a description should be given as will enable a 
reader to form an adequate notion of the variety of their contents. 

3ni Wherever a letter or paper is especially difficult to decipher, or the 
aUusiona more than ordinarily obsciu'e, it will be advisable for the Editor to 
adhere, as closely as is consistent with brevity, to the text of the document. 
He is to do the same when it contains secret or veiy rare information, 

4tlL Where the Editor has deciphered letters in cipher, the decipher may 
bo printed at ful! length. But when a contemporary or authorised decipher 
exists it will bo sufficient to treat the cipher as an ordinaiy document 

6th* Striking peculiarities of expression, proverbs, manners, &c. are to be 
noticed. 

6th. Original dates are to be given at the close of each entry, that the 
reader may know the exact evidence by which the marginal dates are 
determined. 

7th. Where letters are endorsed by the receivei*a and the date of their 
delivery specified, these endorsements are to be recorded. 

8th. The number of ^vl'ittea pages of each document is to be specified, as 
a security for its integrity, and that readers may know what proportion the 
abstract liears to the original 

9tb, The language of eveiy document is to be specified. If, however, the 
greater part of the collection be in English, it will be sufficient to denote 
those only which are in a different tongue. 

10th. Wliere documents have been printed, a reference should be given to 
the publication. i 

1 1 th. Each series is to l>e chronological. 

12th. The Prefaces of Editors, in explanation of documents in the volume, 
are not to exceed fifty pages, unless the written permission of the Master of 
the Rolls to the contrary be obtained. 



^^* Editors emidoyed in foreign archives arc io transcribe at full length 
imjiortant and secret pa[jers. 



CALENDAR 



OF 



STATE PAPERS, 

COLONIAL SERIES, 

EAST IITDIES, 

CHINA AND JAPAN, 
1622 — 1624. 




PRBSESYED IN 



;,i .;.:/ 



HER MAJESTY'S^ PUBLIC RECORD OFFICE, 



AND ELSEWHERE. 



EDITED BY 

W. NOEL SAINSBURY, 

OF THB PUBLIO RBCOBD OFFICE, 

HONOBABT MElfBBB OF THB AMEBICAN AKTIQUABIAK SOCIETT A19D OF TlIE BIBTORICAL B0CIETIB8 
OF MASSACnUSETTB, MAINS, NEW YORK, MABTLAND, PENNSTLTANIA, GEORGIA, VIRGINIA, ETC. 

UNDER THB DIRECTION OF THE MASTER OF THB ROLLS, AND WITH THE SANCTION OF 
HER MAJEBTT'S BBGRETART OF STATB FOR THB COLONUL DEPARTMENT. 



LONDON: 
K>N6MAN & CO, Patehnostee Eow; TRtJBNER & CO., Ludgatb Hitt s 

ALSO Br 

FABEEB & CO., OXFORD ; and MACMILLAN & CO., CAMBRIDGE j 

A. & C. BLACK, EDINBURGH ; and A. THOM, DUBLIN. 

1878. 



Printed by George E. Eybb and W. Sfottiswoodb, 
Her Majesty's l^rinten. 



COXTEXTS OF THIS VOLUME. 



Paqb 
Preface - - - - - . - - vii 

Calendar, 1G22-1624 ---... 1 

Gexeual Index ---...- 493 

Errata . . . - . ... o9S 



40645'. Wt. 



PREFACE. 



The last volume of this Calendar comprised all East India 
Papers in the Public Record and India Offices to the 
close of the year 1021. This yoltime begias with 1622, 
and comprises all East India Papers from the same officea 
to the end of 1621. The Domestic and Foreign Corre- 
spondence in the Public Record Office have also been 
examined and every document abstracted which relates to 
the East Indies. The thirty volumes of Holland Corre- 
spondence alone for this period, which contain the des- 
patches of Sir Dudley Carleton, English Ambassador at tho 
HaguCj contribute much valuable information, especially 
in reference to what took place between England and the 
United Provinces respecting the frequent disputes of the 
rival East India Companies, so that we are able to trace all 
the details of those intricate and protracted negotiations* 

The treaty of 1619 turned out as was expected practi- 
cally useless. It was, as we said in our last volume, to 
remain in force 20 years, but in less than 20 months both 
English and Dutch were compelled to reopen fresh nego- 
tiations. The same disputes continued to arise between 
the two Companies and as frequently as before the treaty 
had been signed, and the same complaints were made by 
our East India Company, though louder and more bitter 
than ever, so that after many fruitless efforts to adjust 
differences and remedy complaints a fresh treaty was 
thought upon as the only means of bringing about a final 
settlement. Now the King himself earnestly pressed the 



Till 



PREFACE. 



States Ambassador in England to procure commission, and 
coramandcd Ids own Ambassador at the Hague to move 
the States General to send over Commissioners for such a 
treaty (23 llarcli 1G21), but notbing was done for three 
months, when upon a petition of our East India Company, 
complaining of the ^* insufTcTable WTongs" of the Butch, 
their Ambassador was told by some of the Privy Council 
how sensible the King was of these injuries, satisfaction for 
which had often been promised, and that, althougli unwil- 
ling to take any unfriendly course against the States, His 
Majesty coidd not deny his subjects protection and justice, 
and therefore ho expected speedy redress (16 June 1621), 
Even then more than a fortmglit passed and nothing was 
done. The King at last l>ecame so angry that he refused 
audience to the Dutch Ambassador, because, as His Majesty 
said, the States jested with him (2 July 1621). Sir Noel 
de Caron thereupon i;vTote to the States General that he 
knew that unless tlie King received some satisfaction the 
English would have letters of reprisal against Dutch ships, 
for that His Majesty had sworn his subjects would not 
let him rest until lie had gmnted them. At length on 
28th Nov* 1621 Ambassadors from the States arrived in 
London, and negotiations were at once opened with certain 
Lords of tlie Privy Council who were appointed by the 
King, Lords Commissioners for the treaty. 

A letter from the President and Council at Bata^-ia to 
our East India Company (43) describes some of the chief 
matters which were in dispute at the date at whicli this 
volume begins. The Dutch it appears were aiming to 
compel the English Company to incur heavy charges for 
which they were not liable according to the treaty. They 
requked the English to furnish a ship to remain in the 
Moluccas for a whole year, which the English were not 
able to perform, and adds President Eursland, **we wero 



PREFACE. 



IX 



*^ not bound to do so by the treaty." They also demanded 
that we should have a ship before Bantam; that we 
should pay our part of the charges in keeping soldiers 
there, and setting out vessels to and fro upon that coasts 
whieh they urged ** grew so high " that they could forbear 
this demand no longer, and tliat unless it were complied 
with, they were determined to thrust us out of all trade 
which they, as themselves insisted, had just cause for doing, 
for they bore all the charges* These demands were certainly 
not justified by the treaty. Still the Dutch on their side 
were not without cause of complaint- We want the 
means to send ships with theirs, the English President 
wrote home, and they are sure to allege we perform 
not the agreement in not maintaining ten ships of 
defence. The English Company had clearly undertaken 
to maintain 10 ships of defence, and the neglecting to 
maintain that number was a breach of the treaty. The 
letters in this volume, however, pi^ve that the object of 
the Dutch was to impose such heavy charges upon the 
English as would ultimately compel tliem to relinquish 
their trade in the Spice Islands, and that then the Dutch 
would remain the sole European masters of tliis most 
remunerative commerce. 

General Coen, the Dutch President in the East Indies, 
in the instructions (243) which be left vnth his successor. 
General Carpentier, pointed out the great charges of the 
Dutch Company in the Moluccas, Amboyna, and the 
Bandas, wliich amounted to more than 12 tons of gold or 
500,000 ryals yearly. Both Governors Speult and Soncke 
were, Coen said, too scrupulous, for everything ought to 
be done to obtain prerogative over the English. The 
Dutch Company had rccomjnended to tlieir Governor 
General **in earnest mamicr" to give way somewhat in 
small mattei^s, but to hold fast in matters of importance. 



PREFACE. 

But said Coen, ** the least giving way will breed us 
" the most rest and quiet/* therefore maintain carefully 
sovereignty and the highest jurisdiction without suffering 
the English to enci^oach thereupon, and trust them not 
any more than open enemies. Coen had before warned 
Martin Sonck, Governor of the Bandas, not to tmst the 
English any more than a public enemy ought to be 
trusted. The English President's opinion of Coen's cha- 
racter was that he was fair spoken but a most cunning 
fellow, but he described Carpcntier as subtle and far the 
most malicious against the English (201), 

Tlio coniphiints of the English against the Dutch Com- 
pany (26), with the papers annexed, recite the articles 
of the treaty of 1619 which had been broken by the latter, 
and the negotiations which had taken place up to Eebruary 
1622. A memorial of the English demands for restitution 
was also presented to the English Ambassador at the 
Hague about the same time (12). 

The questions in dispute, and which it was hoped would 
be finally settled at the conferences about to take place, 
were restitution and the future reglement of trade. There 
were several points of difference in both. The question 
of restitution involved the English si dps that had been 
taken by the Dutch, the value of the goods seized in them 
as also at Lantar and elsewhere, and the charges of the 
siege of Bantam. In the future reglement of trade there 
were foiu' very essential points of difference, viz. : — 1, the 
lessening the number of the ships of defence ; 2, jurisdic- 
tion in the East Indies ; 3, the choice of an indifferent 
place of residence for the Council of Defence there ; and 
4fj the building of forts. Tliese four points must be borne 
in mind to arrive, as we think, at a right understanding of 
the subsequent negotiations of 1624, after news had been 
received of tlie Amboyna massacre. 



^ 



JPEKFACB. 



XI 



The negotiations of 1622 were most tedious and pro- 
tracted* The English and Ihit^h Connnissioners held 
many conferences, but the " wayward proceedings " of the 
Dutch Commissioners made most of the Lords careleM to 
meet (108), and the negotiations were broken off more 
than once (p. 13, 32, 64?, p. 29). The Spanish Ambassador 
in England, in an intercepted letter to Count Gondomar, 
written about this time, told him that the controversy 
between the English and Dutch increased daily, and that 
were it not that the King favoured the rebels to the 
prejudice of his own subjects the treaty would have been 
broken off, for the English proclaimed they had no greater 
enemies than the Dutch (114r). *' Scandalous words *' too 
passed between the merchants on both sides, and on one 
oeoasion the papers laid before the Lords Commissioners 
were ordered to be torn up (p. 28) . Both Prince Cliarles 
and the Duke of Buckingham, at tlie express command 
of the King, spoke in secret with the Dutch Deputies for 
" the space of two hours," to try and bring about a recon- 
ciliation and a treaty, but "all was in vain," and the 
Lord Treasurer, tearing up the ** project," cut off all 
further negotiations, saying that he knew how to spend 
his time better (114, 115). Secretary Calvert told Carleton 
tliat after many days disputing and wrangling the treaty 
liad come to a stand ; that the Dutch had with much 
art made many offers varied and gilded over, and '* because 
" we will not swallow the gudgeon they grow angry;' 
The Lords Commissioners believed the Dutch had no 
intention to come to any reasonable terms, and the Secre- 
tary of State himself said that the merchants were 
disheartened, and **wo were all wearied'' (116), Upon 
this King James commanded Sir Edward Conway to xise 
his endeavours to renew the treaty, who "employed his 
«• weak force not without hope to renew it'* (128), but 



xu 



lEFACE. 



was afterwards commanded to go to Newmarket either 
Lcforc or after the Dutch Ambassadors, and not in their 
company, lest notice should be taken of it (176). After 
the lapse of about a month points of accommodation were 
again debated and the negotiations renewed- But the 
Dutch Commissioners were very desirous of negotiating 
with the King alone — they no doubt remembered and 
appreciated his influence in tlie treaty of July 1G19 — a 
proceetling to which the English Commissioners not only 
strongly objected, but pointed out the consequences which 
would cnsuci at the same time that they entreated the 
King not to permit the Dutch Commissioners to enter 
into any debate with him until they promised absolutely to 
submit to his judgment and sentence ; otherwise, as the 
Commissioners said, " they will fly off at the end if His 
** Majesty's resolution be not like to sort to their con- 
" tentment.'* In this Report (165) the Lords Commis- 
sioners venture to give the King advice, in case after 
examination of all tlie particulars His Majesty cannot 
satisfy the Dutch Commissioners, and they continue strict, 
wilful, and opiniative. The King, however, did grant the 
desired audience, and heard with great patience the whole 
afternoon both our merchants and the Dutch Commission- 
ers, but frankly acknowledged that he found it impossible 
to make an end between them. They "shifted off '' the 
King 8 proposal that they should submit the matter to his 
decision, but in the end were brouglit to meet the English 
Commissioners again. The King himself explained all 
this in a long letter to his Commissioners, at the same 
time specially charging them either to make an end as far 
as they could, or make it appear that the Dutch were 
unreasonable, that, in case the treaty should break off, all 
the world might see that the fault was not in the King 
(IGCi, After this the Commissioners had many meetings. 




H^ 



PREFACE, 



XUl 



In their final report to the King of 3rd Bee 1C22 (187) 
they clearly set forth all the points in' difference. As to 
one of these, the most material point of all, as it afterwards 
turned out to he, viz., the future reglement of trade, there 
is a strange inconsistency in their reports of the lOth and 
2 1th Oct. and 3rd Dccemher 1622. In the first of them the 
Commissioners explained to the King (16S) that this point 
was the most important of all, that if it were well settled 
both companies might be made happy enough, and such 
miscliiefs and enormities prevented as Iiad happened ; they 
might have added, and as will happen again if not well 
settled. In their second Eeport (107) they again pointed 
out the necessity of this point being properly settled, and 
besceched His Majesty to consider what hope they could 
have to accommodate these unlucky dilTerenccs when the 
Dutch Ambassadoi's sought to divert all consultation about 
it, more especially as the Lords Commissioners insisted, 
the lives, goods, and liberties of His Majesty's subjects 
wholly depended upon it. And yet, after such decided 
expressions of opinion in their final report, six weeks after 
the Lords Commissioners say they have l)een careful, as 
the King commanded, to keep themselves to tlie treaty 
and not give way to any novelty, so they think the point 
touching reglemont, which merely concerns trade, may as 
well bo agreed upon amongst the merchants themselves, 
who are also of that opinion (187)* It will be seen in 
the sequel that had the Lords Commissioners then insisted 
upon a settlement of the future reglemont of trade most 
of the unhappy disputes v/luch afterwards arose in the 
East Indies bctwocu tho two Companies might have been 
avoided, and the horrible massacre at Amboyna have been 
prevented for t1ie retreat of the English from places (In 
the Since Islands or elsewhere) under the authority of tlic 



XIV 



FKEFACE. 



Dutch might just as well hare been determined upon in 
1622 as it was in 1624 

A treaty was at length signed in January 1623, hut we 
cannot he certain of the exact date as the copy (in French) 
printed in full at pp. 106-7 is undated. Secretary Calvert 
told Carleton on the 9th Feb. 1623 that the original was 
in our merchants' hands (262), Now the States Commis- 
sioners took loaye of the King on the 24th January. 
They were solemnly feasted at Merchant Taylor's Hall on 
the 30th January and entertained with a play afterwards, 
and on the following day they gave a great supper at 
their own lodgings to the merchants (246, 247, 253) • The 
King's Beclaration, " as a supplement to the treaty/* to 
the Ambassadors when they took their leave is dated 
30th January (250). It is therefore prohahle that the 
treaty itself was dated the same day, viz., 30 January 
1623. We have not found a printed copy of this treaty 
in any collection of treaties we have consulted, and neither 
the original nor the ratification is in tlie collection of the 
treaties in the Public Record Office. Upon this, as upon 
the treaty of 1619, the same remarks were made even 
before the conditions were known. Whatever they are 
our East India Company will never be the better for 
them, wrote John Chamberlain, who thought it must 
have been a hard knot that could not have been tied in 
less than 13 or 14 months (233), and the Secretary of 
State himself told Carleton that " we had at last made an 
** end and parted good friends, though with much loss and 
*' disadvantage to the English Company aa was conceived 
(246). Carleton's despatch of 5 Feb. (257) to Secretary 
Calvert telling him the States Ambassador had landed in 
the Macse is also noteworthy, Tbey have made so good 
a report of their business and of the King's gracious usage 



PREFACE. 



XV 



of them during the whole of thek long stay in England 
(said Carieton) that^ they remain here much comforted 
and well assured that our match with Spain will hring 
no diyorce with this State, of which there hath been of 
late days no small jealousy (257) < The treaties between 
England and the United Provinces then fighting against 
Spanish dominion in the Netherlands no doubt greatly 
influenced the King in his dealings with the States 
General and the two Companies, and, as was the general 
opinion at the time, greatly to the prejudice of our own 
East India Company. 

News of the Amhovna massacre was received in 
England on the 29th of May 1024,^ and a *' relation of 
** the pretended treason'* was sent by our Ambassador 
at the Hague to Secretary Conway a few days after. It 
describes how in Eel)ruary 1023 (the 13th of February 162| 
old style) was wonderfully discovered a horrible con- 
spiracy against the Governor and Council of Amboyna, as 
follows (460 I,) :— 

A Japanese soldier, who had before been seen prome- 
nading around the Castle walls at undue hours, came 
during the prayers, and asked a Dutch soldier newly 
arrived who was on duty as a sentinel how many soldiers 
there were in the Castle, and how often they relieved guard 
and at what times. As he had made simUar inquiries the 



1 Neirv^d of the AmboyDa mn^sacrc did not reach Batavia, or was not 
known to the English President there until December 1623» and 'five 
months more elapsed before it wa« known in EnglmuK Letters frnm 
Indin in those days took an enormous time to reach England ; in one 
iastunce in this volume, nenrly two years (415). Everywhere nbrond the 
lime of delivery was very uncertain* Between London and the Ilftguo, 
iiTO days WBs perhaps ihe s^hortest time (6o2), it wat* more generally six to 
ten day^ (575, 534, 614^ 589), and there are instances of eleven and even 
of twelve days (029, 655). 

b 



XVI 



FEEFACE. 



day before, he was arrested and taken before the Council, 
In his examination he confessed that the Japanese soldiers 
in the service of the Dnt^h had conspired to make them- 
selyes masters of Amboyna. Being asked who were their 
accomplices, since they alone were not powerful enough to 
brinf^ so great an enterprise to a successful termination, 
he confessed that they had imdertaken this plot with the 
assistance of the English ^ho had required and indeed 
had induced the Japanese to embark in it. That he and 
other Japanese accomplices had several times consulted 
the English merchants as to the mode of putting their 
enterprise into execution, and that it was at the instiga- 
tion of Capt. Gabriel Towerson and the other English 
merchants that the Japanese had agreed to assist them. 

Upon this confession Captain Towerson and all the 
English merchants in Amboyna were arrested and put 
under a strong guard. They were brought before the 
Governor and Council, and being examined, confessed, 
some before torture, others after very little torture : 

That on New Years Day 1622-3, Captain Towei^on, the 
principal English merchant m Amboyna, and the author 
of the conspiracy, assembled all the English merchants 
together, and after swearing them to secrecy upon the Holy 
Testament, for he said if the business were discovered it 
would cost them all their lives, he communicated a plot to 
them, to which they all agreed. This plot was to be put 
in execution when the Dutch Governor and Ms forces were 
gone forth upon some service as daily happened, and when 
an English ship was at Amboyna, the men of which were 
to be employed in the enterprise, as well as all the English 
slaves. The Japanese soldiers in the Dutch service having 
been won over to take part in this conspiracy, as well as 
the captain of the Dutch slaves, the Japanese who were 
inside the castle were by Towerson's orders to put two 



PREFACE. 



XTU 



men upon each ravelin, and tlie rest in the vale beneath, 
80 as to make certain of the Governor s person. Upon a 
given signal from the English, the Japanese were to malLe 
themselves masters of all points of the castle, kill the 
Govei-nor and all who should offer any resistance, and 
take the rest prisoners. The plot thus successfuUy accom- 
pUshed, and Captain Towcrson master of the castle and 
the country, he was to require assistance from the English 
Council at Batavia, which, if refused, he was to hold the 
castle for himself and his accomplices with the help of the 
Indians or Natives. 

Upon these confessions * the Japanese soldiers, the Por- 
tuguese captain of the Dutch slaves and ten Englishmen 
were executed — two Englishmen having been respited and 
four others, ** accomplices who had a thorough knowledge 
** of all that had passed," pardoned, chiefly it was said to 
take care of the English Company's goods that were in 
Amhoyna, and to he a witness as well in India as in Europe 
to the enormity of the crime of their accomplices and of 
the favour shown to their persons* 

Such in brief was the account of this ** pretended con- 
spiracy '* sent by direction of the States General of the 
United Provinces to the English Government. 

"When " this hea\y news of Amhoyna *' reached Batavia 
in the December follomng, the English President at once 
sent to the Dutch General to know by what authority 
their Governor of Amhoyna had thus proceeded against 
the English. The General replied that Governor Van 
Bpeult derived his authority from the States General, so 



* Aq authentic copy of the confessions aad sentences agaiust M. Tower- 
son fkDil complices, also the resolutions of Gov, Von Speult and of the 
Council taken in this htisinessy tratielated out of their own copy, wan 
published by authority of the Eo8t India Company, London, 1632. 38 pp. 
Brit. Mus. 905o Ub 3, 

b 2 



XVUl 



PREFACE, 



the Euglisli Prosiclont and his Coimcil drew up a protest 
against the Butch Governor's ** presumptuous proceedings" 
for imprisoning, torturing, condemning, and bloodily exe- 
cuting His Majesty's subjectSj and for confiscating tlieir 
goods in direct violation of the treaty, whereby the King 
was disgraced and dishonoured and the English nation 
scandalised (377)* 

The news of the Amboyna massacre caused the greatest 
excitement throughout the whole English nation, and 
spread consternation among the East India Company 
(631). No man would pay in any money (523). All 
sorts of people commiserated the fate of the unhappy 
sufferers, and cried out for revenge (524j), The Lords of 
the Privy Council shed tears at the relation of the tortures 
inflicted by the Dutch upon oui* men (503,534). The 
King himself took it very much to heart (524). Those 
who wished well to the Dutch could not speak or hear of 
it without indignation (465). And none in the Assembly 
of the States General approved the cruel tortures and the 
bloody executions (505). For my part wrote one of the 
foremost men of his time, if there were no wiser than I, 
we should arrest the fli'st Indian ship that comes in our 
way, and hang up upon Dover cliffs as many as we should 
find faulty or actors in this business, and then dispute the 
matter afterwards ; for (he added) there is no other course 
to be hekl witli such manner of men as neither regard law 
nor justice, nor any other respect of equity or humanity, 
but only make gain their god (524). 

The Governor of our East India Company at once 
reported to the King that the Dutch had, without all 
humanity and contraiy to the treaty, without a lawful 
trial before the Council of Defence of both nations, ui^on 
evidences and confessions extorted by the violence of tor- 
ments, and no other M^itucsses than the heathens allied 



PREFACE. 



XIX 



aiid linked with the Dutch, put to death ten of the Com- 
pany's factors and servants, on pretence of a practice 
intended hy the English against the Dutch in those parts 
where their forces were so much above the English as there 
was no proportion between them. The King apprehended 
the fact to be so foul that he could not believe it ; but 
when told that the information was groxmded upon pro- 
tests made by the English President and Council in the 
Indies, His Majesty commanded that copies should bo 
delivered to his Secretary of State, and said that " in case 
** it be proved there would be ways now for liim to force 
** the Dutch to reparation if were he so pleased" (463). 

As soon as the six Englislnnen ^ tliat had been spared 
from execution arrived in England, '* it grew a qucs- 
" tion" at a Court of Committees of the East India 
Company how they should be disposed of, and it was 
resolved that they should be brought before Sir Henry 
ilarten, Judge of the Admiralty, and that their examina- 
tions should be taken upon oath. Richard ATelden, the 
Company's chief factor in the Bandas, who brought them 
away from Amboyna, and whose relation was the most 
material and pregnant of all, was desired to repair to Mr. 
Skynner, to whom was committed the setting down the 
truth of tliat proceeding " for the suppressing of such 
" rumours as were spread amongst the Tulgar in justifi- 
« cation of the Dutch " (p. 296). 

The "True relation of the unjust, cruel, and barbarous 
proceedings against the English at Amboyna,*' compiled 
by Mr. Skynner (521), is printed at full, Ko. 499, i., from 
a MS, copy preserved in the Public Record Office, which 
has been collated with a printed copy in tlic British 



' Tlic'ir namcjs were AtAm I'owJr, Ephitiini Hum.sey, TboH. Ladbrookc*, 
Joha Sadler, Eilward (j^Jliius mi<l .Toliii Bcaumuut (p, 313), 



XX 



PREFACE. 



lEuseuin of the same date^ and tlie few and unimportant 
additions and Tariations noted. The printed pamphlet is 
80 scarce as to be almost miiquc. Seyeral editions which 
are noticed later on continued to he issued from the press 
from time to time for upwards of sixty years after the 
events recorded had taken place. 

This " True Eelation " differs widely from the Dutch 
"True Declaration,*' and is to the foUowiag effect: — ^A 
Japanese soldier in the service of the Dutch walking in 
the night upon the castle wall was ohserved in conversation 
with a Dutch sentinel^ of whom he asked some questions 
about the strength of the castle and the people that were 
in it. He was appreliended upon suspicion of treason, and 
being put to the torture was brought to confess that 
himself and others of his countrymen were to have con- 
trived the taking of the castle. Other Japanese were then 
examined and tortured, as also a Portuguese, the captain of 
the Dutch slaves. During the throe or four days that 
these examinations lasted, the English went about the 
castle as usual upon their business, saw the Japanese 
prisoners, heard of their tortures and of the crime they 
were accused of, but did not suspect that the matter any 
whit concerned themselves, never having had conversation 
with the Japanese or the Portuguese aforesaid. Now there 
happened to he at this time imprisoned in the castle one 
Abel Price, a surgeon, for attempting in a drunken fit to 
set fire to the house of a Dutchman. He was taken by 
the Dutch to see these Japanese who had been ** most 
grievously tortured,'* and was told that they had confessed 
that the English were to have been their confederates in 
the taking of the castle, and that if he would not also 
confess the same tiling they would use liim as they had 
done the Japanese, and worse too. Having given him 
the torture the Dutch soon made him confess whatever 



PREFACE, 



they asked him. Upon this Captain Towerson and all 
the English in Amhoyna were sent for by the Governor, and, 
after being accused of a conspiracy to surprise the castle, 
were told they would be kept prisoners until fuiiher trial. 
The next day the English factors at Hitto and Liuricca 
were also arrested, and on the 20th February the English 
factors at Cambello and Lugho were brought in irons to 
Amhoyna. PuU details are given of the examination of 
each factor, and the tortures they endured before being 
brought to confess ought either against themselves or each 
other, from which it is evident they were innocent of any 
design to surprise the castle or indeed of any conspiracy 
against the Dutch. Timothy Johnson was the first 
EnglLsliman examined and tortured, and John Beaumont 
who was taken into another room heard him cry out very 
pitifully, then be quiet for a little while and then roar out 
afresh. After more than an hour's examination ho was 
confronted with Price and accused by him, but not yet 
confessing anything, Price was quickly carried out and 
Johnson again brought to the torture. After this second 
examination he was brought forth wailing and lamenting, 
all wet and cruelly burnt in divers parts of his body, and 
BO laid aside in a by place of the hall, with a soldier to 
watch that he should speak with nobody. 

The manner of torture is thus described (pp. 306-7). 
The man was first hoisted up by the hands with a cord 
upon a large door, where he was made fast to two staples 
of iron fixed on both sides at the top of the door posts, his 
hands being hauled the one from the other as wide as they 
could stretch. Being thus 'made fast his feet hung some 
two feet from the ground, which also were stretched asunder 
as far as they would reach, and so made fast beneath on 
each side of the door posts. A cloth was then bound 
round the lower part of his face tight at the throat and 



x%n 



PREPACK 



loose at the nose. Then was poured water gently upon Ms 
hsssA until the cloth was full to the mouth and nostrils, so 
that he could not draw hreath without sucking in the 
water, which being continually poured in, came out of his 
nose, ears, and eyes, causing the greatest agony till ho 
became insensible. He was then taken down quickly and 
made to Yomit the water. In this manner were some of 
the English tortured three or four times until their bodies 
were frightfully swollen, their cheeks like great bladders, 
and their eyes starting out of their heads. John Clarke, 
wo are told, bore all this without confessing anything, upon 
which the Dutch Piscal said he must be a devil or a witch, 
mid have some charm about him that he could bear so 
much. So they cut his hair very short, and hoisting him 
up again as before they burnt the bottom of his feet witli 
lighicd candles until the fat dropped from them; they also 
burnt the palms of his hands and under his armpits "until 
*' hill iiiwarcLs might evidently be seen.** Wearied at last 
uud overconii! by the torment he confessed whatsoever was 
wi**lACil; to wit, that Captain Towerson had sworn all the 
Knglitth, witli thn help of the Japanese, to surprise the 
Qtthllf^ **f Aml>oyna, and put the Governor and all the 
Untiibmen to death, 

(iacirge Hlu!rncko told tlio East India Company that 
^V0f ttnd above the torments of fire and water the Butch 
KH^tunl i hiJ brtmitu of nome of the English, and filling those 
ui^ihlu^ with jMivvdi^r Het fire thereto (510), Both Thomp- 
l(^ ^ud (Uiuku hail tlieir breasts slashed and their toes 
^^ "•'< (MiwdiH* pul. lln^nVin and set on fire, so tliat they 
^ id Ui \iiMmvrml to tlio place of execution^ though 

t^ I trUml ttoiue dayH bofoi'c (521, p. 397). 

ii\iimiueil und tortuicd Emmanuel Thomp- 

Ikowuu, Kdvvnnl Culhns, SuumelColson, John 

^, Jiihii Eardu, (Jeurgo Shcrricke, 



PREFACE, 



xxm 



William Webber, John Wetherall, and Ephraim Ramsey ,* 
John Beaumont, John Powle, Wetheraira assistant at 
Cambello, and Tlios, Ladbrooke and John Sadler, servants, 
were examined without torture and saved from execu- 
tion* AU these confessions were then shown to Captain 
Towerson, who nevertheless deeply protested his innocence. 
Colson was then brought to confront him, and told that 
unless he would then make good his former confession 
against Towerson he should again be put to the tortui'o. 
He affirmed the same and so was sent away. Griggs and 
Fardo also justified their confessions to Capt. Towerson*s 
face, but being seriously charged by him, as they would 
answer for it at the day of judgment, to speak nothing 
but the truth, they both fell down upon their knees 
and prayed him for God's sake to forgive them, saying 
all they bad confessed was to avoid the torment. They 
were then again threatened with torture, which they 
could not endure, so affirmed their former confessions to 
be true. Capt. Towerson was then taken up into the 
place of examination, and two great jars of water carried 
after him- ^Tiat he there did or suUered was unknown 
to the rest of the English, but he was made to under \^Tito 
his confession there. 

These examinations, tortures, and confessions were the 
work of eight days from the 15th to 23rd of Pebruary. 
On the 26th of Feb. 162|, all the prisoners were brought 
into the great hall of the castle and solemnly condenmed 
to death. Edward Collins afterwards drew lots with Sam. 
Colson and Eman. Thompson, and saved liis own life. 
John Beaumont also was pardoned at the intercession of 



^ A brief account of these "cruel, barbarous, and inhuman prooeedings'* 
was piibliahed in 1651 by James Riunsuy, an eye witness of tbeir 
intirlyrd9mf*j yndcr tiie title *" Bloutly newcsFroin lliu Ernst Indks/' Brii. 
M\i»* E. 5a0« 



XXIV 



PREFACE. 



two Dutclimen, as were Wm. Webber and Greorge Sher- 
ricke on the morning of the day of execution. Capt. 
Towerson was during his imprisonment kept apart from 
the rest and wrote much in his chamber, but everything 
was suppressed [except a "bill of debt," at the end of 
which he had written these words, " Firmed by the firme 
^^ of me G^abriel Towerson now appouited to die, guiltless 
" of anything that can be justly laid to my charge. God 
" forgive them their guilt and receive me to His mercy. 
" Amen.'* This bill was brought to Welden who paid the 
money and kept the acknowledgment* Welden also got 
possession of a " table book *' in which Bcaxmiont, Griggs, 
Price, and Browne had written that through torment they 
were constrained to speak that which they never meant 
nor once imagined, and this they swore upon their deaths 
and salvation, that the Dutch tortmred them with that 
extreme torment of water which flesh and blood could not 
endure, and that they were guiltless of their accusation, 
Samuel Colson also ^vrotc in the leaves of a prayer book, 
" I do here upon my salvation, as I hope by His death and 
" passion to have redemption for my sins, that I am clear 
" of all such conspiracy, neither do I know any English- 
** man guilty thereof nor other creature in the world. 
** As this is true, God bless me, Samuel Colson.*' This 
book came also into Wclden's hands. 

All things having been prepared for the execution on 
the 27th of February, the condemned men were brought 
into the hall and thence into the courtyard of the castle, 
where their sentence was read to them. Every man 
severally took it upon his death that he was guiltless. 
Thence they were earned to the place of execution, and 
formed part of a long procession through the town, the 
Dutch Governor riding in state, and the way being guarded 
by five companies of Dutch and native soldiers. Ten 



PREFACE. 



XXT 



Englishmen, one Portuguese, and nine Japanese were then 
exeouted with the sword* and all the English saye Capt. 
Towerson were bnried in one pit. The day following the 
execution was spent by the Ihitch in public rejoicing for 
their delirerance from this pretended treason (pp. 315-316, 
521). 

When the President at Batavia reported to the East 
India Company tlie whole circiimstances of this massacre, 
he reminded them that tbey had long since been advised 
of the great danger their servants were in from Dutch 
tyranny, and mentioned as examples the executions of the 
Bandanese at Batavia and the Pooloroonese at Banda, on 
both of which occasions the Dutch General tried to extort 
confessions during torture that the English were con- 
spirators with them. The impossibility of 20 men per- 
forming this supposed treason was dwelt upon by President 
Brockedon as well as the innocence of the EngUsh who 
were executed, which was sworn to '^ upon their salvation '' 
in the bill of Capt. Towerson and by Colson in his psalter, 
both of which were enclosed in this letter to the East India 
Company (pp. 208-9), The impossibility of this pretended 
treason is pointed out at pp. 318-9 of this volume, and it is 
also argued (No. 585) that there were only 12 Englishmen in 
Amboyna, armed with throe swords and two muskets, and 
that their ten Japanese accomplices who were armed with 
catans or short swords could not take a castle garrisoned 
by 200 Dutch soldiers and a company of Amboynese. 
Besides the English had no ships there, and the next ship 



^ The namea of nil of them will be found at p. 315, In tlie frontispiece 
engniviDgs to some of the prinled editions of the ** True Kelation " imdcr- 
neatb the figure of the tortured man is another prisoner on his kneea with 
Ilia hands raised l)efore him which are tied together, and a Dutch soldier 
with a drawn sword is about to cut off the head of the conderaoed roan* 



XXVI 



PREFACE. 



that did arrive there had express orders from the Council 
at Batavia to fetch all the EngUsli away. 

The Enghsh Ambassador also pointed out to the Dutch 
Deputies that there was no imaginahle ground of suspicion, 
nor any accusation but [the confession of one Japanese, 
who led the way to the rest, all forced by torture^ and that 
the first Englishman examined, Abel Price, bad the place, 
pei'sons, and time for treating \rith the Japanese and the 
Englisli dictated to him, which Carleton insisted was an 
undue proceeding and merited pxmishment (549), 

Later on the Commissioners chosen from the Privy 
Council, and appointed by the King to examine into this 
matter, I'eported that after materially considering and well 
weighing the evidence, the relation of those who had com- 
manded at AmbojTia, and the examinations of the six 
witnesses returned from thence, they were satisfied of the 
improbability and almost of the impossibility of the 
attempt imputed (620), 

Every accusation against the English factors in the 
Dutch account was afterwards replied to by oiu^ Company 
in their answer to the " True Declaration/' as well as the 
inconsistencies which it contained. But as this part of 
their answer is printed in fnll at pp» 392-396 we will only 
notice here one inconsistency in the ** True Declaration*' 
which we think fatal to the tmth of the remainder. The 
** True Declaration " states that this plot should have been 
executed when the Governor was abroad upon some action, 
how then should he have been killed in the castle at the 

same time. 

These " unspeakable tyranDies " were first reported by 
Governor Abbott to a General Court of our East India 
Cmnpiiny at tlicir annual meeting on 2nd July 1624. The 
•"Tnie llelation*' had in the meantime (as we have seen) 
^im wmpiled and set down in writing by Mr, Skynner, 



PREFACE. 



XXTll 



and, although it was thought too long to be read at an ad- 
journed meeting, a short account, with the protests of the 
men spared from execution, was read at the meeting of the 
9th July, and afterwards at a full Court of the Company on 
the 27th August following. It was on 9th July held impos- 
sible for the Company to proceed in their trade " except the 
Dutch make real restitution for damages, execute justice 
upon those who had in so great fury and tyranny tortured 
and slain the English and give security for the future,** and 
it was unanimously resolved, if these could not be obtained, 
there was no help for it but to abandon their trade, and 
fetch home what they had in the Indies, It was further 
resolved that if offer should bo made to treat of these things 
it would give tbe Company no content, for they had already 
experienced by a late treaty that the Butch intended 
notliing less than to do the Company right. Nevertbeless 
it was the general desire that the Company should first 
implore by petition the help and favour of the King, for 
they said as it became them in honesty to seek reparation 
for the lives of their servants thus butchered, so it stood 
with His Majesty's honom' to call for an account of his sub- 
jects. It was clearly stated by the Governor that this 
complaint was not to be made against the Dutch nation 
in general, but particularly against the Dutch East India 
Company, who had thus injm*ed this Company and dis- 
honoured the English nation (496, 497). The '^ True 
Relation" was sent by om' Company to Carleton the 
next day, who told the Englisli Ambassador that it was 
grounded wholly upon the protests of their people taken 
upon oath, among whom were some that had " felt their 
** part in that barbarous tragedy," and that they were de- 
termined to present copies of the same writings to the King 
(499 )• So on Sunday the 11th of July the Governor and 
others of the Comj)any attended the King at Wanstead, and 



xxnu 



FBEFACE. 



were brought into liis bedchamber where the petition was 
delivered with the True Relation* His Majesty relumed 
a most gracious answer, encouraged them to proceed in 
their trade, and promised a speedy reparation from the 
Dutch by the strength of his own arm if they did it not 
siiddenly themselves. The King then assembled his Privy 
Council, spent the whole time in the agitation of this 
business, and in the end Mr. Governor was commanded 
to attend their Lordships at Whitehall. The True Relation 
was there read to them, and stirred up much passion in 
their Lordships generally (524, 534, 574). After leaving 
His Majesty's presence the Company had audience of the 
Prince who received them with a cheerful countenance 
(503). And at a Court Meeting of the Company three 
points were resolved on, viz., justice against the mmrderers, 
reparation for injuries, and a separation of the two com- 
paniei^ ami in no wise to yield to a treaty. These three 
points were however, as will be seen, considerably modified. 

News of the " bloody execution '* was spread abroad in 
llullaiid with all the advantage that could be, and without 
a word of the torture that was used, but Carleton pointed 
out the improbability of so small a handful of men under- 
taking such an enterprise, and desired the Prince of 
Orange and the States to suspend tbch' opinions. The 
States General were not content with calling the Bcwint' 
bobbers of tlic Dutch Company to accoimt, but demanded 
that all the examinations and the w^hole process should 
be presented to them in writing, and though some pleaded 
their cause so well that there was bred an opinion that 
the English factors really did conspk-c to take the castle 
of Ambuyno, none approved the torture and execution. 
The conspiracy, Carleton said, must be to common sense a 
matter not only of difficulty but of impossibility (504), 

Ou the lOtli of July the Governor and some few of the 



PREFACE^ 



XXIX 



conxmittces went by the advice of the Lord President of 
the CouncQ to Theobalds, and there in a great presence of 
Privy Councillors the King declai-ed he would in no sort 
give way that the Company should leave their trade; 
that he was content they should have hostages from the 
Dutch for the performance of justice upon the authors 
and executioners of that bloody sentence ; that the Com- 
pany shotdd have forts and in eifect all that they pro- 
pounded in their letter to the Lord President, and that 
for a beginning he had written a " round letter '* requiring 
justice from the States. His Majesty then demanded 
what they would say if he himself came in as an adven- 
Jiurer, but Mi\ Governor prayed for time to consider this, 
he and those few with him had no power to resolve 
in a matter of that importance. Li " the King's answer 
" and offer," sent by Lord President Mandeville to Sec. 
Conway, his Majesty said he would have satisfaction for 
the unjust execution of his subjects, restitution for their 
losses, and pledges for them to remove their goods. Ho 
would also give his subjects liberty to erect forts, and if 
lis propositions were not satisfactorily replied to, he would 

ike stay of Dutch ships in the Narrow Seas. Lastly, 
he offered to be an adventurer in the Company, and if 
they chose he would let their ships sail under his royal 
idard (511). 

Now, Aerssen and Joachimi, Ambassadors from the 
States General, were in England shortly before this time, 
engaged in a negotiation of importance affecting the 
United Provinces. On their return in June 1624, they 
made a thankful report in the Assembly of the States 
General of their treatment, which they said appeared the 
more by his Majesty passing over ** the late accident of 
*' Amboyna " witliout allowing it to interrapt the main 
business. The English Ambassador at the Hague also 



XXX 



PREFACE* 



admired tlic King's wisdom in distingiiishiiig so aptly 
betwixt the States General and the Bewinthebbers, the 
United Provinces, and the East Indies, till he saw whether 
the actions there would be avowed here (480^ 487). 

Now the Bewinthebbers presumed that as things stood 
the King would not come to a dixect quarrel with the 
States but would rather suffer all, so they did what they 
could to weary out our merchants and gain the whole 
trade themselves. The King however commanded Sec, 
Conway to " give them another undei^tanding." Our 
Ambassador was instructed to insist, that as the East India 
trade was so important to this kingdom, so His Majesty 
neither could nor would by art or force be put from it, 
and as to the King not caring to break with the States it 
was rather to be conceived they would not find it advisable 
to break with His Majesty* Under any circumstances 
however the King and his whole Council were resolved to 
support the English merchants and to induce the States 
to do justice, or he would take his own way of obtaining it 
(513). The King had himself told the States Ambassadors 
before they left England that he should expect justice and 
require satisfaetion for the insoleneies of theii' men, and in 
default that he would apply his own actions for remedy* 
And not hearing of anything done Sec* Conway was com- 
manded to say that imless the King had a firm, clear, and 
full declaration from the States of the ways and means 
how and when they would do severe and exemplary justice 
upon those who had cast such a hazardous offence between 
the two Companies and between this Cro^vii and that 
State before the 12th of August next. His Majesty would 
do liimself justice, free his honour, and assure his mer- 
chants of his powerful protection. If, continued Conway 
in this despatch, the question be the troubling of our 
trade justice will be done by troubling their trade, if they 



^^^ 



PREFACF. 



XXXI 



murder and hang our people the like shall be done to theno, 
and if things go on two steps in this way the third must 
be an irreconcileable war. Tlie Secretary of State did not 
consider this despatch threatening, and sent a copy of it 
by the King's commands fo our East India Company 
with advice not to suffer it to bo causelessly divulged, but 
to use it with the moderation fitting a matter of state of so 
great consequence (512). 

The States upon this wrote to the King deprecatbig 
their men's proceedings and promising satisfaction, and 
om* Ambassador told See, Conway that now that this 
** accident '* began to 1)0 better understood it could not be 
more generally decried and detested in our own country 
than it was in the United Provinces. And that the Prince 
of Orange when desired by the States to be a mediator to 
the King refused to embroil himself in such an odious 
business (529). There was a strong suspicion that this 
plot was hatched at Amsterdam (519). 

So the States General appointed three deputies to confer 
with Sir Dudley Carleton at the Hague upon the whole 
business, and papers and proofs were freely communicated 
on both sides. Those from the Dutch were found to be 
imperfect and unsatisfactory, and showed as Carleton 
pointed out, the impossibility of the charge, and that the 
confessions were drawn by cruel and extreme tortures, 
while there was no doubt of the treason which the Dtitcli 
were charged with, of trying to gain the sole trade of 
the Moluccas. Tlie Deputies left Carleton as he said 
expressing much sorrow and " not with the same opinion 
•* they entered his house*" The States General promised 
they would call all who had a liand in the business to a strict 
accovmti and that they would attend to nothing else until 
they had made an end of this, and the Prince of Orange 
devoutly wished that when Spcult began to spell tins 




xxxu 



PREFACE, 



tragedy lie had been hanged upon a gibbet with his 
coxmcil about him. At least this was what the Prince 
told Carlctou, and Carleton wrote Sec. Coaway (619)- 

When after the ti*eaty of 1619 the EngUsh refused to 
* agree to certain restrictions in the sale of cloves in the 
Moluccas proposed by the Dutch they were mightily 
offended, and after many hot words Mons. Bas said openly 
we should repent it, nay he bid us take notice of what he 
said, that we should buy it dearly in the business of the 
Moluccas, and this Governor Abbott said was entered in 
their journal (621). 

It was about this time that the Dutch printed pam- 
phlet appeared entitled '* A true Declaration of the Con- 
** spkacyinAmboyna/* wherein as the English Company*s 
Agent at Amsterdam ^^Totc, '* the libeller would insinuate 
** to the States the upright carriage of the business and 
** the foulness of the fact in ours." 

After describing the conspiracy considerably more in 
detail than did the Dutch accounts before received, the 
author goes on to say that no true Christian would 
pati^onise any such horrible attempt, but would adjudge 
it worthy of death. The Dutch proceedings in Amboyna, 
he argued, were neither against justice nor without for- 
mality, and certainly not with extremity against the 
conspirators. He complained that it had been abusively 
dispersed in England that it did not belong to the Dutch 
to imprison the English or to proceed against and punish 
them, but that, in accordance with the Treaty of 1619, it 
did belong to the Council of Defence resident in Batavia, 
which consisted half of English and half of Dutch, to do 
so. And he declared that " every understanding man " 
(not loving discord) must confess that neither this nor 
any such thing was ordained or decided by that Treaty, 
As to excess in the point of torture, nothing, he said, 



Ak 



^^ 



"PREFACE, 



xxsiu 



astonished or moved him more than this " pretence of 
** exoess,** and that there was little truth in the reports 
spread in England of torture most cruelly inflicted upon 
those English conspirators. That he ever suspected it 
was a gi-cat slander scattered abroad in England by evil 
minded men, who had so foully defaced a just cause, for 
the Dutch nation naturally abhorred this kind of cruelty. 
And that it was well known in England, which the King 
himself had acknowledged ** by his own princely pen," 
that the rack and the manacles were the only tortures 
exercised upon traitoi*s to force them to confess what they 
knew to be dangerous to the State. But, he argued, this 
torture of ours (if any in Amboyna were so tortured) 
was to be judged far less than that of pressing to death, 
which in some eases was used in England, where the male- 
factor was laid upon a table, a plank being then laid upon 
him and so much weight of stone or lead that his body 
was miserably bruized and so pressed violently to death 
(637). 

This pamphlet appeared anonymously, though it was 
thought by some to be the work of Boreel. It created much 
indignation in the minds of Englishmen, The Bewint- 
hebbers of the Dutch East India Company denied the 
authorship and protested they were ignorant of the author 
of it, but said it might be the work of some of the States* 
clerks, for they had all the original papers out of the 
Indies (537-8)- The English Ambassador at once made 
a formal complaint to the States General, being driven, or 
rather, as he said, dragged by the hair to do so by this 
Ubel, which some enemy to the common good, like the 
enemy in holy writ, had sown through the world like 
tares. He said it could come out of no other forgo than 
the Bewinthebbers', being in the self same words as the 
informations set down by them and that to make that foul 



XXXIV 



PREFACE. 



fact fairer, the author had paralleled it with pressing to 
death, which heing a calumniation of the justice of our 
land, Carleton made the chief suhject of his complaint. 
He desired to have the pamphlet declared a libel according 
to their own law, being mthout name of printer or author, 
and both printer and author to be inquired after and 
punishccl. The States showed much dislike of the 
calumniation of English laws, and though the English 
Ambassador could not at once say what coui*se they would 
take, he was quite sure the author would have no thanks 
because Carleton would now haye an opportunity of 
laying the whole matter before the States General in full 
Assembly, which hitherto had rested between him and firo 
of their deputies. He demanded justice against the 
author and printer, and satisfaction for the outrage done 
to the King in the persons of his subjects, or in other 
words a publication against tliis libel and a public act by 
which to assure His Majesty of the certainty of justice* 
The English Kelation had been read in the Assembly of 
the States General only the day before, and was at tlic 
veiy time of Carleton's complaint to be sent by their order 
to the Bewinthebbers to know what they could say to it 
(648, 551). 

The Dutch East India Company stood stiff to it that 
the paniplilet was none of their act, and many wished it 
had not been done (553). The States General soon 
answ^ered our Ambassador's complaint by issuing, aa 
desired, a placard or proclamation against the pamphlet. 
Most of them, and the Prince of Orange in particular, were 
as much offended at it as the English were themselves 
(555), This placard declared '*the True Declaration'* 
of the Dutch concerning the conspiracy to be a scandalous 
and senseless libel, the author, as also the printers, sellers, 
and dispensers of which ought to be punished, and all 



XXXVl 



PREFACE. 



" of under heaven and may be a prescription to the mast 
*' savage pagans to teach them a higher strain of tyran^ny 
** and treachery than (till now) they have ever learnt one 
" of another or of the devil their father/' He bitterly 
regretted that in hoping to be serviceable to liis country 
he should have been hurtful to it, and he called the King 
to witness that ignorance and simplicity were his only 
errors, for he had mllingly sent divers copies to England 
to the Company. And he begged the most favourable con- 
struction to be put upon his un\rise carriage for he could 
say for himself what God said for Abimelech " I know 
'' thou didst this in the integrity of thine heart " (622),^ 

Our East India Company did not allow this libel to 
remain imanswered and they obtained the King's permis- 
sion to print their answer, which so far as it relates to the 
Amboyna massacre will be found printed in full at 
No. 595, together with the preface, showing why the East 
India Company " cometh now at last to the press." They 
declared that the Dutch had pul}lished a pamphlet in print 
not only in justification of '' this barbarous butchery ** but 
in disgrace of the English nation and of their laws and 
justice, and that though this pamphlet was calU-^d in by 
an edict of the States General, yet it had been afterwards 
translated and printed in English and dispersed even in 
this realm to brave and disgmce them at their own doors 
and in their own language. This no English patience 
could bear, the blood of the innocent cried out against it, 
the honour of the nation suflfered in it. These, they said, 
were some of the reasons which induced them to print 
not only their own True Relation but also the Dutcli libel 
and their answer to it. 

There are several entries in this volume in reference to 

I Geneetis xx, 6, 



Jto 



PREFACE. 



XXXTU 



the printing and publishing of these pamphlets. When 
the subject was first mooted at a court of committees it 
was thought fit to use some means for the printing of 
it both in Dutch and in EnglLsh, ** that the truth might 
** appear, and that those innocent sonis that had without 
" either mercy or justice suffered in their persons might 
" not suffer a second time in their reputations '* (623). 
It was said that 500 copies might he printed for 12L 10^. 
hut conceived that 2,000 copies should he printed and 
then to have the press bi'oken; It was also decided to 
give copies to some principal persons of the nobility and 
if they were well taken then to put the rest abroad, which 
if done would pay for the difference (636), 

When the Company requested the King's license to print 
he said he liked it well if it contained no bitterness against 
the States (607). So the license was in due time granted 
and the number to be printed and the ** compounding 
" with the press*' was left wholly to Mr. Munncs (643), 
who though he had been elected declined to he Deputy 
Governor hut served as one of the Committee. At a subse- 
quent Court it was agreed that 2,000 copies should bo 
printed in English ** to he spread here " and 1,000 in 
Dutch to be sent over, and that it might not be taken 
for a b'bol, the arms of the East India Company were to 
bo set upon the front of each book, in token that they 
avowed it to be true (639). Copies were much asked 
after, especially by the knights and burgesses of Parlia- 
ment (544). Ten copies in English and forty copies in 
Dutch were sent to Sir Dudley Carleton, Every com- 
mitteeman had fiTe or six copies and the Lords of the 
Council and the principal nobility residing in and about 
London were each presented with a copy " of the fairest 
** hinding" (060,688). In short it was published and 
dispersed in all parts of England as weU as published in 
putch in the Netherlands (p. 463). 



XXXTlll 



PREFACE. 



These pamplilcts went through several editions, and were 
frequently reprinted. They were, as we have seen, first 
printed and published by authority ia London in 1624 — 
editions being printed both in EngUsh and in Dutch* 
The third impression is dated 1632. We have not been 
able to find a copy of the second edition^ During the 
interregnum between 1651 and 1653 tbrce several ac- 
count-s of the massacre were printed, one being a reprint 
of the original edition of 162-1!, and another an account by 
James, probalily a brother of Ephraim Ramsey — ^r^^ho was 
one of those examined at Amboyua but acquitted — '^aK 
" eyewitness of tbeir martyrdoms, who desired the pub- 
" lisliing thereof tlu'ougbout all England." Then John 
Darell's account was published in 1665, to which is pre- 
fixed an engraving in fom' compartments representing 
the King of England's subjects in India massacred and 
tortured by the Hollanders, viz., the Amboyna tortures, 
Chinese roasted alive, the Dragon and Katherine des- 
troyed, and seventy-one Pooloroons burned. 

In 1672 an edition of the True Relation was again 
printed by authority for William Hope at the North 
Entrance to the Royal Exchange, and in 1688 Elkanah 
Settle pubUshed with allowance another edition, entitled 
Imignia Bataviie, or the Dutch Trophies displayed, with 
an epistle to the Reader in the strongest possible lan- 
gua^'C. Mr. Settle objected to the " invasion *' of 1688, 
and declared that ** Little old England was that fat spot of 
•* ground so much a larger golden land of promise than 
•^ thnt poorer inconsiderable factory of Amboyna, that if 
•• jHiMHiblo greater villanies, a more impious cause, and 
^ lilnt^Iuu* streams of blood shall not be wanting to carry 

Now (Vuletuu stx'ongiy recommended an accommoda- 
liw* i\\\\\ H urul rrglement for the future, mther than a 
U^ihuv lu»lMnm the two Cumpanics (520), He had said 



PREFACE. 



XXXIX 



nothing to the States about our [Company leaving 
their trade, not doubting but that some would rejoice 
at it, and this was approved by Governor Abbott (544), 
80 it was unanimously resolved at a Court meeting 
to reply to the two points of serious importance in the 
King's answer to the Company's propositions — tliat 
there must be a total separation of the two Companies, 
for they had found -by miserable experience the inten- 
tions of the Dutch towards them to be nothing but 
treachery, tyranny, and conquest, and that the condition 
of partnership in trade was a thing too far under the 
dignity and majesty of a king (527) • But this reply was 
not thought satisfactory by the Privy Council who bade 
the Company explain what they most desired for their 
encouragement (541). They then said they were re- 
solved to trade no longer imder the Treaty with the 
Dutch, and they desired the King would declare it void. 
Also that they might have liberty to erect forts in the 
Indies where the Dutch had no possession, and that the 
King would right them and repay their losses by making 
stay of a Dutch ship worth 60,000^. newly arrived at 
Plymouth from the Indies, and of four other Dutch ships 
about to arrive. But as this request was made on the 
7th of August, and the King had given the States a day 
** yet to come,** viz., the 12th of August, by which to 
return a satisfactory answer, they were told by the Privy 
Council that it would be unfit to stay any of the Dutch 
ships before then, and were dismissed with encourage- 
ment to go on cheerfully ^4th their trade, and with 
assurances of the King's resolution to repair their deep 
injuries (643). 

The States Gctieral had in the meantime written to the 
King on tlie 2nd August acknowledging His Majesty's 
signal favours, and his royal alliance, aud regroUing liifi 



„^^^W2 



PRRFACE. 



displeasure at '* a certain process hell by tbeir East India 
** Company at Amboyna." Tliey said tbat out of respect 
to His Majesty they had postponed all other delibera- 
tions, and were determined not to abandon the inquiry 
until it should clearly appear whether wrong were on 
their side, when those who had committed excesses should 
be severely punished. But a^ they could not clear up 
all the points with the papers before them, they entreated 
his Majesty to help them to obtain information from 
those in Amboyna by means of the English Council of 
Defence (535). 

This letter was followed by a letter to See, Conway on 
the 9th August from D'Aerssen, who entreated Con- 
way's good offices with the King not to permit anything 
to be undertaken or precipitated to the disadvantage of 
the States ; for he said the States had neglected nothing 
for ascertaining the truth of the action, and it was not 
His Majesty's intention that they should proceed without 
a perfect knowledge of the matter, and ho hoped the 
letter written by the States to the King would leave 
them a competent time to satisfy His Majesty*s just 
desires (552), 

On the eve of the day fixed by the King for the 
final resolution of the States, the English ambassador sent 
two letters to Sec. Conway (555, 557). In the first he 
said more time was requisite than he had imagined 
and that the States had sent a message their Deputies 
would wait upon him in the evening. The Deputies came 
to their appointment, and brought a "Declaration" 
to Carleton who wrote a second letter the same night 
reporting what had then taken place. This Declaration of 
the States General, afterwards sent to Sec. Conway, 
sets forth that they had taken into fresh consideration 
the writings produced on either side, but that they varied 



PREFACE. 



xU 



80 rery miichj the one side maintaimng a conspiracy, tlie 
other not, the one that part of the confessions were free, 
the other that they were all extorted hy the most grievous 
tortures, and that cTerything was so much enreloped in 
douht and contradiction that it was impossible for them 
to proceed fiu*ther without information. They therefore 
desired His Majesty to appoint a special Commission to 
hare true and good information taken in Amhoyna of the 
whole affair, and promised serere pimishment if the 
English writings prored true, and they entreated the King 
to preyent any interruptions to the freedom of their trade, 
and to he contented with this prorisional Declaration 
desiring Carleton to lend a helping hand (667 I.). 

Carleton*s reply to this Declaration was presented in 
the Assembly of the States General the next day. He 
told them that waiting for information would require two 
voyages to the Indies, and that it was too much in an 
affair so bloody to presume on His Majesty's patience for 
three or four years ; besides, their request to the King to 
assist their inquiry would bo judged impertinent, for it 
would be difficult t^ find men who would run headlong into 
the clutches of those who had so inhumanly mangled their 
companions* And he entreated the States to " really set 
" themselves to work to make reparation," and gave them 
a means of escape from their difficulties by suggesting 
the points that should be inserted in their Declaration 
(567 n., HI.). 

Carleton also wrote a third letter to Sec. Calvert 
acknowledging the extreme difficulties of the negotiation, 
** My hands are as full/' he said, " of as tough a piece of 
*' work as I ever had in my life, which wc must not suifer 
** to be wasted away with words, and how to come to 
** deeds we know not at such a distance, and therefore 
** are much confused'* (658), 



xlii 



PBEFACE. 



The 12tli of August was the time limited hy the King 
for satisfaction ** hoth for the slaughter of our people and 
** the spoil of our goods. Tbe day is come and past, His 
" Majesty is in progress, and we have heard nothing/* 
said Governor. Abbott in a full Court of the Company 
assembled on 27th August (574). So as it appeared 
by express TiTiting from the Dutch Company that they 
had no other purpose hut to justify their craelties (568), 
the Company wrote the next day to Carlcton and 
told him they were astounded (*' put into admira- 
tion ") that the States should imagine their offers could 
any way satisfy His Majesty, considering his resolu- 
tion not to have the fact disputed but punished, and to 
be told that right should be done if found true, above aU, 
that they should speak of remitting it to the Indies where 
the Dutch had absolute power, of examining witnesses 
at Amboyna, which was utterly abandoned by the Englisb, 
and sending our people back thither that were the 
accusers and witnesses of that bloody execution (575) . 

A Court meeting was then held, at which a committee 
was appointed to attend the King at Windsor and to hold 
firmly to one thing, viz., not to give way to any dispute 
upon the business of Amboyna, for that were the way to 
make it infinite. In the meantime it was resolved to 
draw up articles ^* by the advice of civilians and common 
" lawyers *' for the repair of past injuries, to restore what 
had been taken, and to assure against both for the future 
(582). 

The next day Sec. Conway again wrote to Carleton. He 
told him that the King, the Prince, and the Duke of 
Buckingham all acknowledged his wise and dexterous 
pursuit of the business, but that what the States had 
sent was of no consideration. That tbe last time the 
Company wore with the King nothing would do but 



^^m 



PREFACE. 



tIiH 



they must \nthdraw their goods and trade into other 
parts, or make their own fortunes as enemies, *' for with 
** tyrants and faith breakers they could not have 
*' security/* Unless, wrote Conway, the States giye His 
Majesty satisfaction before the arrival of their ships, he 
would give orders to seize them, if they resisted fight they 
must, 80 there must happen the taking of a bloody 
revenge or increase of injury and heartburning. It was 
idle to listen to propositions for examinations in the 
Indies, for the proofs were already made, the witnesses 
come thence, and the whole state of the business in the 
hands of the States, and besides, according to the Treaty, 
things that could not be agreed upon in the Indies were 
to be referred to Europe, therefore there was no way of 
judging the cause but in Europe. So that unless the 
States changed their resolutions " we are (said Conway) 
•' like to be our own carvers shortly, for let the business 
*' of Spain and France go which way they will, we intend 
** nothing more seriously than to put ourselves into such 
** a condition as may bring the States to be plaintiffs, 
** which, if they seek to become even by reprisal, will not 
** diifer a hair from open war. Commissioners are now 
•* appointed to give order for the fii-st seizure ; yet with 
" this protestation in our hearts that we are innocent and 
" the States guilty of the evils that shall succeed '* (584). 
Two days after the date of this despatch Governor 
Abbott also wrote to the English Ambassador (589). Sec, 
Conway had, it seems, delayed sending to the Company 
n copy of Carleton's despatch, which enclosed the States' 
Declaration, for which he had incurred the King's dis- 
pleasure, and had it not been for ** an honorable person- 
age," the Company would at once have made a formal 
complaint to His Majesty. They were so greatly discon- 
tented with the ** double replies" of the States that they 









xliv 



FREFACE. 



had again sent Deputies to the King at Windsor to tell 
him so. They disliked the points suggested hy Carleton, 
which had been sent to them by Sec. Conway for they 
believed the draft to have been prepaied by Boreel, and 
said that though they had before been caught by treaties 
their eyes were now too open to swallow such double-faced 
stufT. Governor Abbott begged Carleton not to take this 
advertisement unkmdly, being done in aflfection, and that 
he miglit so carry the business that it might no way touch 
himself, but rather put it upon the States from whom the 
Governor knew, by experience, Carleton would receive no 
such satisfaction as he desired. The Company conceived 
a coldness had grown upon Carleton from his first zealous 
expressions, so some of them advised the heseechmg His 
Majesty to put it to the judges of the kingdom, l>ut 
mauy of the gentry the relying upon Parliament, for they 
said the only desne of the States was to put off the present 
complaint, hoping that time would mitigate the rest As 
for the Governor himself, Abbott said he was glad he had 
got free from being any of them that should for tbe 
present prosecute this business, which he had endeavoured 
might be modestly pressed. The indiscretion of tbe 
merchants was much blamed, for they were accused of 
trying to put everything into confusion, in order, If 
possible, to be avenged (591). 

We now come to a turning point in the conduct of these 
negotiations, and even Sec. Conway was thought to be 
somewhat partial and leaning to the other side (600). 
So the Company sought another audience of the King at 
Windsor, At tlieir first coming they addressed themselves 
to the Secretary of State, who then intimated to them the 
intention of a Commission to examine the businetis. Tlie 
King had appmved of this Commission, and the Lord 
President of the Council, the two Chief Justices, and the 



PREFACE* 



xlv 



Judge of the Admiralty were, at tlie request of the Com- 
pany^ afterwards joined in Cumniission witli those chosen 

\fwm among the Privy Council, and appointed hy His 
Majesty's Lords Commisssioners (594, 607, 608). 

In the meantime Carlcton drew up a Proposition 
in which he fully represented **the whole state of 
•* om* men's grievances, and the King's just desire 
*' for satisfaction/' in his despatch to Sec. Conway 
transmitting this " Proposition," Carleton dwelt upon the 

^difficulties of carrying on a cross business wherein so 
many were interested, through such diversity of colleges 
and assemblies as there were in that Commonwealth, 
among which, he said, like the wheels of a clock, any 
stop or stay disorders the whole motion (597). At the 

(Bama time he told our East India Company that to 
imiigine that the States would absolutely ordain punish- 
ment and restitution without disputing, as they say, why 
or wherefore was a vanity. Therefore the Company must 
come either to a rupture or a new treaty. If they were 
content to come to a new treaty Carleton promised to 
bring it about without dishonour (600). Our East India 
Company were thus offered one of two alternatives, and 
they had but Hobson's choice, for in the then state of 

(affairs it would have been next to impossible for the King 
to consent to a rupture with the United Provinces, and 
the English Company had firmly resolved not to agree to 
a new treaty. So in their reply the Company returned theii- 
humble thanks for the much labour Carleton had imder- 
gone and for his proposals which were " full of honor and 
son ; " but for the present, they said, the King having 
appointed a Commission, and being entered into a course 
directed by His Majesty they were bound to attend the 
issue. They understood that three Dutch ships had arrived 
fiom Jacatra,and that in them were some of the judges at 



xIti 



PREFACE. 



Amboyna, so tliey hoped that by his means these men 
would be laid hold of (609). 

Now Lawrence de Maresebalk was one of these judges*^ 
He was about 30, the chief Dutch merchant at Amboyna, 
" one of those who had tortured the English, and a prinei- 
*' pal man in the sentencing our people to be butchered ** 
(p- 463). 

lie arrived in Holland in the Wapen van Delft about the 
middle of September (60i)j but was suffered to remain ftdl 
five weeks at liberty, although our Ambassador had advised 
that he should be laid hold of as a pei'son accused of a 
notable crime (644), Nothing would satisfy our East 
India Company but the States must hang him up (618). 
lie was at length sent for by order of the States General, 
although he did not at first appear upon the summons. 
It was thought he was kept out of the way and would not 
appear, and tliat he pretended sickness at Delft (658, 661, 
664, 669). He was however examined on the 24ith Oct. 
(old style), and swore that Collins without any tonnent 
voluntarily confessed the plot before Towerson, and all 
the English not believing they would dare deny it ; that 
Towerson did the same being brought before Collins, who 
kneeling before Towerson asked his pardon, saying, "I 
" must confess the truth, for I do not wish to endure any 
*^ torment for the love of you/' That Thompson per- 
sisted to the last and endured torture, because he said 
Towerson had always reproached him with drunkenness, 
and he was determined that the plot should not be dis- 
covered by him whatever torture he endured (661. ii). 

Marcschalk*s deposition was sent by the English Am- 
bttwwmlor to our Eiist India Company. In theii* reply 
Mifty f*oinplaincd that Mareschalk was not a competent 



I Tlu* tiamcn of all of tWm will bo flnind at Nos, 611, 612, 613. 



PREFACE. 



xlvK 



witness, being himself the chief party concerned next the 
Governor of Amboyna, and that being accused of injustice 
he would not hesitate to swear falsely to save himself 
from condign punishment. That his evidence with re- 
ference to Collins, Towerson, Thompson, and the other 
tortured and condemned Englishmen was false» the 
contrary being affirmed upon oath. That Collins had knelt 
to Towerson was a gross fiction, and Thompson's confes- 
sions were forgeries of Maresehalk, or they would never 
have been omitted in the Dutch accounts. The Com- 
pany were astonishod at Mareschalk's impudence in 
affirming that Collins was not tortured, which they said 
Collins not only justifle4 upon oath in the Admiralty 
and before the President and Coimcil, but produced three 
witnesses who heard him many times roar out very 
pitifully being in the next room, and saw him come out, 
having no doublet on, his shirt all wet, his face swollen 
and his eyes starting out of his head. These three 
witnesses, Sherricke, Weliber, and Ramsey, offered to go to 
Holland and there justify to Mareschalk's face what they 
had swoiTi to, and Collins was sent to Newmarket with two 
of our East India Company to acquaint the King with the 
fidsehood of Mareschalk's allegations (684). Later on our 
Company finding no answer to tlie offer that our men 
might confront Mareschalk, it was thought fit before the 
King to insist that he should be brought to Iiis answer 
(723) • But this was not done. It was also a question 
whether Sherricke should be allowed to leave England 
lest his testimony should be required/ Collins rc-affinneil 



* At a Court Meeting of IS Sept, 1624 consideration was haA of keep- 
ing the six men who came from Amboyna in rendine^A to go iM^fore th^ 
LortU Comniis8ioner(». In the meantime gomethinc; to he allowed to ihci^e 
who hatl not wherewith to support theinHclres* George Sherricke, ^^an 
** honest diligent young nian,** who i etilioned for euiployment, wan lie 

il 



in iiWnmn 



xlviii 



^REFACET 



that he endured the torture of water as he deposed in the 
Admiralty. Webber also confirmed this, and said CuUius' 
hands were so hurt with the binding (of the cord) that he 
could not use his pen seven weeks after (680), 

It was the wish of the East India Company [m Feb. 
1625] to have the whole manner of tortm*ing the English 
in Amboyna set forth in a table by a painter named 
Greenebmy/ and the matter with all the circumstances 
was to have been acted in a play, but the Dutch Ministers 
fearing it might be the cause of some tumult gave notice 
to the Privy Comicil, and then* Lordships took order for 
the staying of all, " and the merchants and the painter 
" were checked for their labours/** 

The advertisement to the reader of the edition of 1651 
of the True Relation describes the fruitless efforts of the 
East India Company for redress, and says that the Com- 
pany seeing themselves obstructed thought fit to presence 
the memories of such a butchery by getting the several 
tortures done at large in oil, but the table was scarce 



first thought of ; be was appointed purser's mate iu the ** Loiidoo ** at 30*. 
ft month* Next cfline Edward Collins, he was again employed in the 
COM u ting- house at 10^. a week. John lieaumont said he was readv to attend 
the Company when called upon* John Powle*a request to be employed 
again us a factor was rct'erred for consideration. Epbraim Kamfiey said 
hf livL'd at Charing Ci-oss, that Lord Holdernesse intended lo present him 
to the King, and that he was able to give His ^igesly a full account of 
** the busine^ss." Lastly Wm. Webber, who desired to be ngain employed 
and siiid lie had been aa assistant factor at Ambuyna, wiw* tuhl to come 
again before the Board in a month's time. They all expi-essed their 
readiness to attend the Lords Commissioners when required (607).' 

* Walpoie in his Aneedotcs of Painters, wiys that Greenebury is men- 
tioned in the Catalogue of the King's Collection as copying two pictured of 
Albert Buna" for the Karl of AxundeL Robert Greenebury, a picture 
drawer, ap|K^ai'8 in a return of recusants of the Justices of the Peace for 
Westminster to the Privy Council in December 1628, Dom* Car. L, 
ToL 123, No. 12, 

* Locke to Carleton, Bom, Corresp. Jas., vol. 184, No. 22. 



PREFACE. 



He advised the Company in conclusion not to stand in 
their own lights for if without association they thought 
to fortify and settle near the Hollanders they could not 
hy right hinder them, hut Jus est in armis as it had ever 
been both amongst Christians and heathens (615). 

Before tliis letter was received the Company had had 
another Court Meethig (20th Sept.), when it was resolved 
that since tlie King's pleasm^e was not to proceed upon 
those depositions and evidences that were pregnant on the 
Company's part, hut to appoint a Commission, it would 
please His Majesty, for preventing further effusion of 
blood or other disaster in the Indies, and for the providing 
for the safety of their goods there, to procure from the 
States and the Prince of Orange effectual letters to the 
Dutch President at Jacatra requiring them to permit the 
English to retire from thence, and to fortify where the 
Dutcli had no real possession whereupon to ground a 
pretence of sovereignty* Upon this there grew some 
question whether they that would not be bound l>y a 
solemn treaty would not less regard a letter ; but this was 
overruled. So a Committee attended Mr. See. Conway, 
who showed " much readiness ** in the matter, and 
doubted not he should suddenly effect the same to the 
good content of the Company, being well satisfied of liis 
Majesty's resolution concerning forts and other things 
(pp. 409- ilO). 

By the 27th of Sept. the Lords Commissioners appointed 
by the King had duly examined the business. They then 
reported that the proceedings at Aniboyna wore murderous 
and that the English died innocently. That the lettei^s of 
the States, though signifying a good intention of justice, 
had produced no effect, hut offers which induced delays 
His Majesty's honour and justice might not brook, and they 
advised liis Majesty that the Lord High Admual should 



PREFACE. 



be authorised to put in readiness so many of the Kjng*8 
ships as should he requisite to seizo outward or home* 
ward hound Dutch East India ships. Upon thi^ report 
an order of the Privy Conncil was issued declaring Ilia 
Majesty's pleasure accordingly (620) • 

Two days after the Company met, when Mr, Ooremor 
reported all that bad hcen done in the business, and that 
being called into the King's presence TTis Majesty told 
them he was resolved to right the Company really, and to 
that end had given directions to the Lord Admiral to 8tay 
Dutch East India ships either outward or homeward hound 
until full reparation should he had of all injuries accord'- 
ing to justice, and "that then only it would 1x3 a fit time 
•* to treat with the Dutch when by the stay of their ships 
" the business should move to a treaty on their parts'* 
(623) • 

But the warrant for stay of the Dutch ships was delayed^ 
and though our East India Company moved the Clerk of 
the Council that some Act of Coimcil might be entereii on 
this business they could not obtain it (623, 628^ 639)| and 
when pressed to hasten it forward Sec, Conway said lie 
would fii-st acquaint the Duke with the King's pleasure, 
and then frame a waiTant accordingly (628), 

Now the advice given by our Ambassador in his last 
letter to the Company was readily accepted. They 
confessed their mistake, but said that as a burnt child 
dreaded the fire, so they thought it unsafe to trust to any 
Dutch writmgs. They also confessed their error in writing 
as they did about the public faith, *' I must confess,*' said 
Governor Abbott, " I much doubted that an absolute 
** breach could be good for us, but such was the violence 
** of our people that as I vrrote your Lordship, I durst not 
*• herein give any direct answer** (629). 

In another letter s^igned by a large majority of the 



lii 



PREFACE. 



Conmiittcc tlio East India Company begged Carleton 
speedily to procure the letter mandatory from the States 
and the Prince of Orange into the Indies already referred 
to. They said tbey had a ship ready to sail which stayed 
only for this letter, as the King had commanded them 
cheerfully to proceed with their trade and had promised 
them protection (630). 

The Duke of Buckingham wrote the same day 
(Oct. 2) to the Prince of Orange teUing him how justly 
irritated the King and the whole English nation were, and 
that those who wished to keep good intelligence between 
the two nations ought, both in prudence and justice, to 
blame the fact and demand reparation. He reminded him 
how the King had overcome every difficulty in granting 
aid of men and money to the States, how patiently the 
King had waited for justice, and that now the merchants 
were driven to despair His Majesty had commanded Buck- 
ingham to arrest Dutch East India ships, which command 
he could not disobey. He therefore entreated the Prince 
to consider the issue and prevent what might lead to the 
shedding of blood in revenge, and to the evils which could 
not be foreseen (631). Carleton also wrot^ to the Prince 
of Orange to the same effect (033), Sec, Conway told 
Carleton (635) tliat the Prince and Duke would be much 
troubled to see all their good offices prove fruitless ; that 
the Duke would delay and moderate by his directions to 
his officers as much as be might, but that if no satisfaction 
came be could not but command and see execution when it 
came to the point. *'Tliis way of giving directions to the 
" Lord Admiral Conway had before thought of and 
" advised as the best expedient to give present content- 
*' nient here and keep things from extremities/' With this 
despatch was enclosed the East India Company^s **Pro- 
" position" to the King which embodied their three points, 



PREFACE. 



given orders for that purpose (643), the English Am- 
bassador strongly advised that His Majesty should suspend 
(without annulling) this order for reprisals, because ho 
said our Company might now boldly proceed without 
hazard, for that the States and the Prince of Orange had 
lyritten to their General, both for sending hither the 
Amboyna Goyernor and Judges, and to hold good 
friendship with the English in general, and in particular 
to accomplish their desu*e in the three points. That 
meanwhile this present resolution would secure our men 
in the Indies, and a more satisfactory course could not 
be thought on than fetching those men out of the Indies, 
for to condemn them unheard the States said agreed not 
with justice, and to have them tried mthout the States 
jurisdiction it was impossible to bring them to consent 
to (644). The Prince of Orange had instructed the Dutch 
Ambassador in England to labour with the aid of his 
friends to induce the King to keep this order for reprisals 
in al>eyance* The Prinee himself promised to neglect 
nothing in his power to accelerate this business, thcu* 
great desire was, he said, to give the King satisfaction to 
whom they were under such obligations, and from whom 
they hoped for the maintenance of their Republic, and 
he added it was now only a question of a little time which 
ought to be conceded to find out the truth. At all events 
the State ought not to be made a party to repair the faults 
of some of her subjects (647). 

At length at the repeated solicitations of om* Company 
the Duke of Buckingham sent on 21st Oct. written in- 
structions to the captain of Pendennis Castle to seize such 
ships and goods of the Dutch East India Company as 
came within his command, and if they quietly submitted 
to take special care for then' safe keeping and the fair usage 



PREFACE. 



Iv 



of the men (G48), But Carleton, though he admitted His 
Majesty could do no otherwise as things had been carried, 
foresaw the danger of putting this order into execution, 
and used his utmost endeavoui's to have this extremity 
prevented. At the same time he warned Sec. Conway if 
it could not he avoided to have it done thoroughly so ** wo 
** receive not a scorn," for he said if tlie Dutch be tlie 
stronger he was sure no command would serve to stop 
their voyage (653). Tlie King's order for reprisals had im* 
fortunately been divulged, and it was feared that the Dutch 
ships would go so fenced with men»of-war as there would 
be no meddling with them (658). Sec. Conway however 
assured Carleton that we should be constrained to lay 
hands on them, and that if we failed wo should fall to the 
fishermen^ and as the sea phrase was make all fish thafc 
came to netj until we had won the horse or lost the saddle 
(655). 

Now the deposition of Mareschalk already referred to 
was sent to England on the 1st of Nov, and with it the 
remonstrance of the Dutch East India Company to the 
States General. This remonstrance contained arguments 
under fifteen heads, forty*two pages in length, in justi- 
fication of the process against the English at Amboyna, 
but they were considered weak and shameless^ frivolous, 
and of no validity to give satisfaction in so hateful and 
bloody a cause (680, 682), Neither of these documento 
therefore advanced the settlement of the dispute. Perhaps 
the Dutch East India Company did not expect they would, 
for they earnestly hoped when sending them that the King 
wuitld not refuse the proper time to find out more exactly 
ail the particulars (661. !•). Mareschalk waa two days 
under examination upon more tlian one hundred interro- 
gatories collected out of our men's relation (608). 

The seventeen directors of the Dutch East India Com- 



Ivi 



PREFACE* 



pany after haying given as ordered 1 y the States General 
an account of their actions were not very well contented 
with the resolution of the States neither to support them 
nor their ministers in the violence of their proceeclings, 
hut to have a strict account for what was past and a 
reglement for the future such as might give His Majesty 
satisfaction. They were much troubled at this change 
in their affairsj as heretofore whether riglit or wrong they 
had always heen supported by the State (678, 679). 

Now the Dutch ships were soon expected to pass through 
the Narrow Seas, so on the 17 th of Nov. it was resolved at 
a Court Meeting of our Company that the Lord Admiral 
should be informed that they wore coming in great strengtli 
to the number of seven or eight in warlike manner, and 
that the Narrow Seas were only guarded by two of the 
King's ships, one having been casually lost, lest the Dutch 
should force their way to the dishonour of His Majesty 
and the defeat of the service (681). A Committee there- 
fore attended Sec. Conway and the Lord Admiral at New- 
market, and begged there might be a supply of ships in 
the Narrow Seas fit for such a service. Mr. Secretary 
admitted it was true the force of the King's slapping 
upon the Narrow Seas was not sufiReient to encounter 
the Dutch East India Fleet, which he understood was 
resolved to fight, hut he said this must be made a busi- 
ness of State and demanded what the Company could do. 
They said that unless protected they must leave the trade- 
Mr. Secretniy replied that His Majesty was not tied to one 
way to right himself and his subjects ; that if the Dutch 
ships were not met upon the Narrow Seas he could stop 
their fishing upon this coast, and seize their ships at his 
pleasure. The Lord Admiral when appealed to promised 
to speak with the King about it. In a second confe- 
rence Sec. Conway told the Company he had no order 



mtk 



Iviii 



PREFACE. 



and all who presided mider lum at the trial and execution, 
sent over, wliicli he was commanded to do at the first 
opportunity. The three points proposed to the States 
hy the King, at the request of the English Company, 
were also sent to the Dutch General, who was required 
to give such answers as were expedient^ the States desiring 
good correspondence, unity, and friendship hetween the 
two Companies (717, 718. lY.)- 

These three points had been under considerable dis- 
cussion, and several alterations were made in the wording 
of them before they were finally agreed to (713, 717, 718). 

In transmitting this final resolution of the States to 
our East India Company, Carleton gaye them this advice : 
Let not your just indignation (he said) carry you beyond 
discretion, but embrace the opportunity of settling your 
trade by such reglement as this accident of AmbojTia may 
produce, and if you can have justice for your men's lives, 
which in the way affairs now are must necessarily follow, 
by holding the King's orders for reprisals in suspense, 
I will so put your affairs into a way of treaty as to bo 
most to your advantage, which, though the Dutch Com- 
pany will mainly shun, the States will think necessary 
and bring them t^ (717). 

On the 10th of Dee. 1624, Governor Abbott reported to 
a full Court of the East India Company all that had been 
done, when it was resolved, as advised by Sec. Conway, 
that they should represent theii* thankfulness to His 
Majesty, who not only held their timle to be a benefit 
but an honour to the land, and had always said he would 
protect them. But whether this was to be done by word 
of mouth or in writing was left to the consideration of a 
Court of Committees. In the end it was agreed that the 
best comae would be by word of mouth (pp. 1(53-1^ 710, 
723). 



fa^^M 



PREFACE. 

And thus the matter rested. Three months after King 
James had ceased to reign, and though efforts were 
ma<^le from time to time by his successor to see justice 
done, whicli were renewed again and again during the 
Interregnum, and even in Charles II/s reign, whenever 
any treaty between England and the United Provinces was 
in question, so the matter rested-* 

It wiU be seen by a reference to the Index that tlic East 
India Company owned fifty-one ships in the years 1022- 
1G24, and how twenty-two of these were employed in the 
East Indies at the close of the year 1623, Durmg those 
three years twelve ships were laden by the Company with 
English goods, consisting chiefly of broad cloths, kerseys, 
quicksilver, lead and tin, and Spanish ryals, as much as 
200,000 i^als being sent at one time to Surat (317) for the 
purchase of Indian commodities, and arrived safely in the 
East Indies. In the Christmas fleet of 1024, COO butts of 
cider, 500 oxen, and 1,500 Iiogs were ordered to be sent 
(p. 412), Willie thirteen ships laden vriih spices, indigo, 
sugar, rice, gumlae, spikenard, aloes, coral, diamonds, 
silks, carpets, calicoes, cotton yarn, and other commodities 
from the East Indies safely amved in England (61, 351, 
640) ; one ship, the Dolphin, arrived with a lading worth 



^ To the treaty of Southampton (9 Sept. 1625) was addcfl a protest hj 
Cbns. L, that if justice were not <l<nie by the SUiU^ in 18 months, tho King 
would be free to revenge himself \*y letters of reprkal, or by iiis own forces 
for ilamages and outrages in Amb<jyna. Tlie 18 months paased^ and tlirco 
Dutch Eftist India ships were arrested at the l«le of Wight, taken to Forts- 
TDotithf where they were detained several montlw, and then ixdeii^d, but 
** by what means and upon what terms ** our Cornpaiiy were ** altogctlver 
** ignorant." An Order in Council of 10 Dec, 1G39, says the King hod 
then proceeded as far for our Company*^ satisfaction an the time could 
nflbrd. and that the mime was then in treaty, and in a fair and hopeful way 
af nccoriJtiKKlntion. And bO it liad been said fifteen yvni% before. 



idbAi 



MH 



Ix 



PEEFACE, 



120^000/, (674). Four ships were wrecked during the 
same period, one, the ^T^ale, laden with silk and other 
goods to tbe value of 150,000/. (463), the loss of which 
was severely felt hy the Company and affected to some 
extent, as may he imagined, the dividend of their stock 
(496). Two ships were sold, the Gamaliell and the Prim- 
rose, the latter, to the Elhan of Shiraz for 400 tonmns, 
equal to 1,330/., " one thousand pounds more than she 
" was worth," the commander of the Surat fleet told the 
East India Company (372). Nine of the Company *s ships 
were laid up in the East Indies either rotten or imfit to 
go to sea, and one, the Swan, which had been taken by 
the Dutch before the treaty of 1619, when offered to be 
restored was refused by the English President at Batavia 
as '* unserviceable *' (9). The last ship built by the East 
India Company, in 1624, was the Swallow, of 100 tons, 
which was fitted with 12 guns. She was launched ia 
August and sailed in the following October for the East 
Indies^ (531, C60). 

It was calculated that in the twenty years ending July 
1620 the Company shipped away 548,090/, in Spanish ryals, 
although they might have exported 720,000/., and that in 
the same term they had exi>orted to the value of 292,286i. 
in l>road cloths, kerseys, lead and tin, &c. The goods 
which had been bought m India for 350^288/* had pix)- 



1 The 51 ships belonging to the East India Compauj m W22-1624 are 
thus accounted for, viz* : — 12 arrived in the Eai>t Indies from Eugland, 
and 12 were also employed in (ratling to and from various places in the 
Eaf?t Indk*^; 13 arrived in England from tbe East Indies; 9 were laid np 
ID the East lodies as unfit to go to sea ; 4 were wrecked and lost at sea ; 
2 were sold ; 1 , the Swan taken hy the Dutch v/na refused hy t!ie English ; 
and I, the Swallow was launched in and sailed from Englund in Oct* 1624, 
which will make the number 54, hut three ehipg are named twice over, 
vi2* : — the Eagle, Hn]% and Star, because they arrived in England in 1622, 
and Bailed again for and arrived in the East Indies in 1624* 



PREFACE. 



duced in England no less a sum than 1/J14,600i. (157-8), 
These extraordinary profits will account for the large 
diridends paid by the East India Company. 

In illustration of the enormous fortunes realised by some 
of the Dutch East India Company, two of the most notable 
Bewinthebbers died in Nov- 1634, who from poor beginnings 
had raised their estates the one to seven the other to eight 
tons of gold (678). Mr. Deputy Governor Clitherow told 
the Eaglish Company ten tons of gold each (p. 465)* A ton 
of gold at the present mint price represents in round figures 
ahout 107,000;., BO that Poppen left about 856,000i- behind 
him. 

In some brief notes concerning the strength and wealth 
which the East India trade brought to this kingdom, it 
is stated that the trade would maintain 10,000 tons of 
shipping and employ 2,500 mariners and as many artizans. 
Commodities from the East Indies were brought to England 
at a quarter of the price hitherto paid in Turkey and 
Lisbon. Pepper alone to the value of 200,000/. was im- 
ported into England in 1623, nine tenths of which was 
exported within twelve months. In 1622 the trade to the 
East Indies brought in a revenue to the King of 40,000/. 
which increased in 1624 to 50,000/. (165, 540). 

The preservation of their ships was a subject of careful 
consideration by the East India Company, and a project of 
TfVm, Beale was entertained to save ships from fire, the 
worm, and the barnacle, " with other coiTuptions," and 
the projector rewarded (477)- Eor the materials " of his 
own devising *' the cost was to be 50^* per 100 tons, and a 
trial was made on a ship then on the stocks of about that 
tonnage (pp. 180, 276). The "Swallow" and the " London " 
w'cre both trimmed against the woim and fire, and the 
English President at Batavia was requested to advertise 
the Company of the effects (723). 



Ixii 



PREFACE. 



r/ 



The fust or old joint stock of the East India Company 
consisted of 400,000/. (56) ; their debt at interest in June 
1G22 was 150,000/., of wbieli 40,000^. was at 8 per cent., 
the rest at 9 per cent., *' which was always wont to be 10 
per cent/' 50,000/. liad been paid off since last year 
(p, 47)- In August 1G21 tlie debt of the East India Com- 
pany was 200,000/., 70,000/. of which was paid off by 
December, and though they had 30,000/. cash in hand — 
one-third of that sum was wanted to discharge the 
** Dolphin *' newly arrived from the East Indies, and 20,000/. 
for the tUYidend at Michaelmas (573, 708), 

The punishment of criminal oiTenccs in India was a 
subject that claimed the attention of the East India Com- 
pany (p. 466). The President and Council at Batavia had 
written home for instructions (p. 203), which were abso- 
lutely necessary for their guidance^ so at a Court of Com- 
mittees held on 15th December 1624 these were debated, 
and it was then resolved that " some experienced clerk *' 
should l)e sent out whose knowledge might assist the 
President and Council, It was at the same time agreed 
that no better general directions could l>e given on tliis 
subject than were at large set down in certain books, called 
in the Court Minute Book of the East India Company, 
Tleas of the Crowns Qo^nptou and LamberVs Justice of 
Feace^ £olton and Fitzherhert^ and these books were 
ordered to be bought and taken out by the clerk to be 
appointed by the Company, and were all sent to the East 
Indies with **some good legal and justifiable course in 
^* causes criminal " in the form of a commission to the 
President and Council which had been submitted to and 
approved by Lord Chief Justice Uobart (628, 636, 710). 
We have been favoured by a friend witli the loan of these 
old law books, and are also indel>ted to him for being able 
to give some account of Ihem, all of which we believe arc 



FRKFACE. 



Ixiii 



now of great rarity. Fitzberbert's (grand) Abridgement of 
Pleas of the Crown was published in three parts in the 
years 1516, 1565, and 1577. It was afterwards enlarged 
by Richard Crompton, with the offices and authority of 
Justices, Sheriflfs, Builiffs, Coroners, &c., and was published 
in 4to. with the dates 1000^1617, Under Crompton's 
editorship another edition was also published, entitled 
** Biehard Crompton's Authority and Jurisdiction of Coiu^s, 
** 4to. 1694-1637/* It is more than probable that Sir 
Edward Coke's ** Institutes of the Laws of England/' the 
third part of which concerns High Treason and other 
Fleas of the Crown and Criminal causes, as well as Sir 
W. Stamford's Pleas of the Crown, which was published 
in 1607, and to which was added an exposition of the 
King's prerogative, were included in the books that were, 
as we liave seen, ordered to be bought by the East India 
Company, The names Compton and Lambert, mentioned 
in the Court Minutes, no doubt refer to (the works of) 
Richard Crompton and to William Lambard*s Eirenarcha, 
i>t the Offices of Justices of the Peace, editions of which 
were published in 1610, 1614, and 1G19. By Polton is 
doubtless meant Ferdinando Pulton, of Lincoln's Inn, whose 
De pace regis et regni, viz,, a Treutise declaring which be 
the great and general offences of the Realm, &c,, was 
printed at London for the Company of Stationers in 1615. 
In Apiil 1622 the King and Prince Charles sent 
messages to the Company that the King had received 
letters from the Great Mogul asking for such rarities as 
this kingdom afTorded in return for rich presents from his 
own country. His Majesty determined to present the 
Great Mogul not only with jewels, but likewise with some 
inventions, and particularly with that of convejdng water 
into their houses in sucli a manner as would be a great 
cooling and refreshing in those extreme hot countries, 



Ixiv 



PREFACE. 



and a benefit much desired by tbe Mogul. The Com- 
pany were told at the same time that the Prince had 
planned an expedition for the weighing up and rccoYering 
of smiken treasure ships in the East Indies by means of 
an engine, devised by one Cornelius Dryvot, wliich should 
fetch up any weight. Also that a boat had been devised 
to go under water, where men might live and, if need he, 
walk imdcr water 20 or 30 yards and use their arms to any 
kind of labour. It was feared by the Company that in 
case these things failed the ships going out might attempt 
something to make up their voyage as had been the case 
in the Earl of Warwick's expedition wbich might en- 
danger the Company*s stock (81)* But though tbe Prince 
sent another message ^ to the East India Company through 
the Lord Admiral earnestly desiring that this business 
" might go on," and that he would give assurance both 
by his word and under his hand that there should come 
thereby no prejudice to the Company's trade, and the 
Duke of Buckingham wished the Company not to oppose 
it, they put off the discussion of it, and ordered their 
secretary to draw up a petition to the Prince on the 
subject " with some touch of the inconveniences in general 
*' that may come to the Conipaiiy if the employment hold/' 
and praying to be admitted to his Highness' presence (96). 
But the Company were not successful in their opposition, 
for on 24th August 1622 the King signed a Commission 
to Sir William Haydon and Charles Glenham to make a 
voyage with two ships to the territories of the Great 
Mogul to satisfy him with some choice arts and rarities, 
and to put their works and inventions in use in those 
climates (136). 



* lleury KnoUut?, who was nt sea with Sir Ilimiphrcy Gilbert, was one 
of liio Princc'ii sorvanr^ (p. 4fil?, Dt»m* Eliz.. Vol. i-3l, Ko, 75}. 



Richai'd Steele, who had been tlie East India Company's 
agent in Persia, submitted to the Company, in November 
1623, a project for erecting waterworks in the East Indies, 
which he c<)nceived would yield 10,000/. per annima, and 
be infinitely pleasing both to the Great Mogul and to his 
subjects, the Great Mogul, as Steele said, " doting upon 
this project," but a similar proposal having been at large 
debated upon the amval of Sur Thomas Roe, who no way 
approved of it, the Company '* had no purpose to entertain 

this project " and so it fell to the ground (339, 347). 

A project of Baiiholomew Jaquin for making fresh 
water from salt water ** with or without fire " was also 
submitted to the East India Company, who, remembering 
that their ships sometimes carried 100 tons of water, said 
that if the project pix>ved feasible they would both enter- 
tain it and gratify the inventor; but though the project 
was again brought before the Company, at their next 
meeting it was "referred to another time," and there is no 
further mention of it (358, 363), so that we may presume 
the project did not prove feasible. Another invention for 
supplying water to the houses of the natives of India was 
also brought before the East India Company. 



A " history at large of the taking of Ormuz Castle " in 
April 1622, is contained in the journal of Edward Monox, 
the East India Company's agent in Persia, but though now 
mutilated and the first leaf missing, it has been printed in 
full in Purc^lias, pp. 1793 et seq*, also a '* relation " of the 
same by Master Pindar. Monox on his return to England 
in July 1623 brought with him a journal of all liis trans- 
actions, together with the above " History " (305), and 
was examined by a Committee of the East India Company 
" upon what warrant the action of Ormuz was grounded for 
*• so much as concerned the Ejiy:lish'* (pp, 126, 127). Ho 



Ixvi 



PREFACE* 



gave in liis examination the reasons why the English had 
assisted the Persians to wrest Ormuz from the Portuguese 
and said he considered that the Portuguese ** did in a sort 
** sell themselves/' for had they victualled Ormuz, it 
might easily have been held against both English and 
Persians. Being demanded about the richness of the spoil 
Monox said that the Portuguese expected a siege, and had 
sent away their wives and childi^en, and therefore it was 
not likely they would leave any treasiu^e, and a^ for goods 
they had none* Captain Weddall said the value of the 
goods taken at Ormuz was 20,000^., " but that the service 
** stood the Company in three times that value" (363). 

When in the following year the rights of the Eaat India 
Company to prizes taken by their ships were in dispute 
before the King and the Lord High Admiral, the spoils 
taken at Ormuz were specially included, and the whole 
question was frequently debated at the Com't meetings of 
the East India Company. The King, finding the Com- 
pany unwilling to give what he considered a proper share 
both to himself and the Lord Adnm-al, arrested them in 
an action for 15,000/. He called the Company pirates, 
and said they had taken in different i)arts of the Indies 
prizes to the value of 100,000;., and that the Duke of 
Buckinfrham demanded 10,000^. for tenths due to him as 
Lord Admiral (303), Upon this the Company consulted 
both ** civil and common lawyers/' and Dr. Steward's 
opinion was that the tenth part of custom belonged to the 
Lord Admiral, if he gave any commission, but there was 
no written law for it, and he did not see why the Lord 
Admiral should i>retend to any right where he gives no 
letters of marque. Dr* Zouch was of the same opinion. 
Yet Dr< Steward declined to be either the Company's 
Coimsel or to deliver liis opinion against the Lord Admiral, 
and no argimients availed to induce him to deliver his 



PREFACE. 



Ixvii 



opinion (413). The King on liis pari said he was no 
tyrant, but allowed his subjects the benefit of law, and 
would have the question so tried, but the Companj were 
naturally unwilling to do that, so resolved " to stand on 
'* their innocency," and to petition the Lord Admiral^ 
'* but to be so cautiously couched that it may neither 
" give him hope to obtain anything of right nor ^q any 
** distaste/' This made the King very angry, and say 
to the Company, ** Did I deliver you from the compUni 
" of the Spaniard and do you return me nothing." So 
the Company^s ships about to saO for the East Tnillrf^ 
were stayed, and the Lord Admiral refused to release them 
until Parliament was moved in the matter* The last 
lutlta Company then resolved to offer 5,000/* aa a com- 
promise, but the King still kept to his demand of 10,000/*, 
and as much for the Lord Admiral. Hi§ Majesty argued 
that 100,000?. was taken either justly or unjustly ; if un- 
justly then all was lost, if justly the Com]iany muit pay 
a right of tenths, and he would not suffer the Lord Ad- 
nxiral to compound- The East India Company petitioned 
the King that 10,000/. nought be accepted, but their petition 
was ill received, and finding it hopeless to contend any 
longer, they resolved to pay the 20/KK)/* Onhrrs wenj 
then given to allow their ships to sail (303). ^U though 
in several Court Minutes this memorandum appcam, ** a 
" great dispute concerning the Lord Admiral omitted, Tmt 
" remains to be seen in the original (425, 437, 445)," 
there are many entries on this subject (pp, 247-2409 &cJ} 

The stay of the East India Company's ships waa the 
cause of an animated debate in the House of C<immona 
M hich is not printed in the Coomons Journal, the only 
reference to it there being " Sir ThM. Esteourt moveth to 
" seamli the East India 8hii>s for moncj*.'* Mr. Deputy 
Governor Abbott reported this debate to the East India 



Ixviii 



PREFACE, 



Company, and it is entered in their Court Minutes (425)* 
Upon speech of tho East India Company in Parliament, 
there was a sudden motion that the East India fleet might 
be stayed. Others cried " stay the money that they send 
** out of the land," which some reported to be 80,000 A 
this year, 1621. The excitement became so great that Mr. 
Bond, cue of the Burgesses of the city, did but whisper a 
few words to the gentleman next him, when he was cried 
to speak out or else to the Bar. Mr. Treasurer Bateman, 
another of the Biu*gesses of London, was then called upon 
" to deliver his knowledge clearly " what money was to go 
in this fleet. He said he could not precisely satisfy them of 
the just sum, but that 30,000/^ in ryals of eight were to be 
sent in these ships. But the House was not satisfied with 
this answer, and cried out "search the books,'* Mr. 
Deputy Governor hearing the motion grew hot, stood up 
and made known that Alderaiau Hallidaie the late Gover- 
nor being dead he was ready to give the House the answer 
they required. He told them that the Company did not 
carry out as much as they brought in and not the hall: of 
what they were allowed to carry. It was true, he said, that 
there was now to go some 40,000/., but their returns when 
not interrupted were 400,000/. per annum in good i^eal 
commodities, as calicoes, indigo, silk, and such like, whereof 
calicoes alone saved the kingdom at least 200,000/. yearly, 
in cambrics, lawns, and other linen cloth. Neither was it 
barren in return of money. He had himself brought last 
year to the mint GO lbs. weight of gold for Indian commo- 
dities exported. Out of the value of 400,000/. imported, 
about 100,000/. served this kingdom, and the rest being ex- 
ported worked itself home again cither in money or com- 
modities that woidd cost money. The Company were ready, 
he added to make this appear to tlie House whensoever it 
should bo their pleasmc. Mr, Munnes then stood up, and 



PREFACE. 



IXIX 



said, that having heard the House cry down the patent 
mth such earnestness he doubted not to satisfy Parliament 
that the strength, the stock, the trade, and the treasure of 
the kingdom were all greatly augmented hy the East 
India trade. The debate then ended. The whole of these 
circumstances were aftenvards reported to the House of 
Commons by Mr Wandesford in the Parliament of 1626, 
20th April, as " exactions by the Duke of Buckingham." 
(See CommoM Journnl, pp. 846-^847. ) 



The prosperity of the English in Japan, as stated in 
the Preface to the previous volume of this Calendar, began 
rapidly to decline after the death of the Emperor Ogusho 
SaJiie in 1616. The present volume contains further 
accounts of the barbarities that wore committed by his 
successor Shongo Same, " to root out the memory of 
" Christianity " in his dominions. This Emperor allowed 
trade only at Firando, and Cocks declared liim to be 
a mortal enemy to the name of Christian, especially of 
Papistical Christian, In a letter written to the East 
India Company in September 1622, the English factor 
described how some friars, under the guise of merchants, 
werc foimd out, sent prisoners to Nangasaki, and roasted 
to death, and how upwards of 100 Japanese men, women, 
and clnldren were put to deatl* by fire and sword for 
harbouring them. He had been to the Emperor s court 
hopmg to get the privileges granted by Ogiisho Same to 
the English renewed ])y his successor, when being asked 
whether the Englisli were Christians, he explained the 
difierence between the English and the Spanish religion, 
which (as he wrote) seemed in some sort to give them 
content. Cocks himself was threatened with death and 
the seismrc of all his goods. He was in 1022 anything 
but hopeful of the tm*n events would take, but expecting 



Trx 



PREFACE. 



that every day would make matters worse, his feryent 
wish was " God send us well out of Japan *' (146), 

At length in July 1623 instruclioBS were receiTcd from 
the President and Council at Batavia for dissolving the 
English factory at Firando, upon which Joseph Cockram 
and Richard Cocks, the English merchants there, wrote 
to the King or Governor of Firaudo, that they had been 
charged to dissolve the factory ** for a time." Great cau- 
tion was necessary in candying out these instructions, for 
the merchants not only wanted to recover all debts abroad, 
but they desired their " friendly dcpai*ture," knowing how 
completely they were at the mercy of the Japanese autho- 
rities^ who might on any pretence have prevented their 
leaving, and even have imprisoned and put them to death. 
So they explained that it was not through any unkind 
usage that they were going to leave, that they had long 
continued the factory at no small expense, and had aban- 
doned all hopes of procuring trade with China, and that 
now, through the loss of one of the Company's ships in 
her voyage from England, richly laden with commodities 
vendilile in Japan, they were altogether unprovided wnth 
goods to supply the factory. Notwithstanding this they 
held out hopes of retinrning to Japan, and proposed certain 
arrangements whereby their houses, etc, might be kept 
for and eventually repossessed by them. They were not, 
however, allowed to depart before they had sent presents 
to the Emperor and his nobility, according to former cus- 
tom. These were of small value in comparison with what 
had formerly been given, but were such as '* their ability 
*' of means would stretch unto," and consisted of em- 
broidered quilts, velvets, satins, silks, damasks, lead, and 
Bussia hides, which were sent by Richard Hudson to the 
Emperor's Court at Miako. Before leaving Firando the 
merchants left a commission in the hands of the Chief of 



PEEFACK. 



IXKl 



the Dutch factory to procure all debts for the account of 
the English Company, and make the same over to their 
President at Batavia, together with a list of the debtors, 
and the amount of each " bill." At the heM of the list 
of debtors is Tonomonsama, the King's brother (pp. 127- 
131). 

The English merchants all left Japan in the ship Bull, 
the latter end of December 1623, and they arriyed at Ba- 
tavia on 27th January 1624, President Brockedon and his 
Council sent the East India Company a very full accoimt 
of this business (415), From their letter it appears that 
express oi'dcrs had been sent from Batavia two years 
before for the mercliants to leave Japan, " except great 
** debts were standing," but that Cocks neither eamo him- 
self nor would suffer any of the rest to come ; and the 
President and Coxmeil believing his excuses to be vain 
sent Cockram in the Bull expressly to dissolve that factory. 
They complained very much of the way in which the ac- 
counts had been kept, nothing having been perfected sinoo 
1617 ; that the debts were ** desperate,** and the greatest 
part of the wares worth little or nothing. They called 
Cocks to account for all this, noted down the " principal 
** faults " committed by him, and declared that there was 
just cause to seize his estate and send liim home as a male- 
factor. Yet, considering his age, "the quality, wherein 
" he hath lived,*' the weakness of his body, and his testy 
and wayward disposition, they were verily persuaded that 
if they had dealt harshly with him (as he deserved) it 
would have been the shortening of his life; so they re- 
solved to deal mildly mth him, and sent him home in the 
Anne, referring him wholly to the more judicial censure 
of the Company. Tliis they thought the most modest 
course to take with a man of liis rank and years. They 
said that his estate did not exceed 1,600 ryals, which they 



Ixxii 



PREFACE. 



admitted was not mucli considering the long time lie had 
lived in the country. Cocks had been upwards of ten 
years in the East India Company's service as their factor 
in Japan. Thus an end was put to our communication 
with Japan, winch was not again renewed for more than 
two eentmies. 



Of Samuel Purchas, the Divine, whose collection of 
voyages is so well known, we have some account. ** One 
** Purchas, that wrote of the religions of all nations," 
undertook eax^y in 1622 " a great volume " of aU the East 
India Company's voyages (38), He applied for permis- 
sion to see the Company's journals of voyages into the 
East Indies, and particularly Sir Thomas Roe's journal- 
The permiHsion was granted, with the reservation that he 
was to take notlxing but what was proper to history and 
was not prejudicial to the Company, and his notes were to 
he perused before he took them out of the house. Two 
years later, in Oct, 1621, Purchas, " that T?iTites a history 
" of the world '^ (639), requested that the Company 
would favour him with a sight of the journal of Edward 
Monox, who had been the Company's agent in Persia, and 
he was allowed to take it away with him on gi\7ng a 
receipt for its safe return. Monos's journal is preserved 
(No* 305) in this volume, though the first leaf is missing, 
and several leaves are mutilated, hut as Purchas has 
printed this journal in full the missing portions mU he 
found in his " Pil grimes," an edition of which, in five 
volumes, was published in 1625-1626. 

It is iny pleasing duty to acknowledge the valuable 
assistance of my colleague Mr. J, E. Ernest S. Sharp, in 
the comiiilation of this volume. 



30th April 1878. 



W. NoEi- Sainsbijey, 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



EAST INDIES. 



Jan. 7- 



1. Philip HarLson to William NicoUr, agent at Malaya in the 
Moluccas. Was prevented from visiting hini at ChrisHtmas, for want 
of means, not will ; the MarJykers not yet retiu*nerl from Sabowa, 
anJ buiiineas goe*i forward slowly for want of help ; the Dutch havi* 
promised to entertain tlieia until next week. A j/row has arriveil 
bringing tliree Mardvkei-s Hed from tlie Spaniard Gamalauia, 
[Qiurrtf^t of a pa,j4% OJl, VvL VII L, Xo. 1023.] 

2. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Complaint of 
Phoeljc Adcomb and 8arali Well ins, against Jolin Lamprier, for an 
unreasonable demand on bond8 of their husbandH. Huccesw of t!ie 
Governor at the Council talile. with ix^erence to the Treaty, The 
Lords disliked the course of the Comjmn^^^s comiilaint^, restitution 
lieing ]>laced foremont, but when alterefl according to their direction, 
being done in more than ordinary haste in respect the King 
demanded the deliver)^ of them by an hour, were jileased to take 
liking ** of that wluch w&h done." He doubt-ed that some of the 
Lords might think themselves neglected, in that the gratifications 
in the kind of New Year s gifts hei'etofore annually given at Court 
were now forborne. It was generally held that to st-op from giving 
now were an unthrifty sparing, at this time of the treaty with the 
Dutch, though now the Company he poor, 1,000/. voted this year as 
the last, and a committee appointed U) consider of the jiersons to whom 
to givej of the proportions and quality of the gifts, whether in goltl, 
in plate, in carpets, or other commodities of the CoiN]*any. A saving 
to be effected if [losaible without leaving otit any eminent person 
whoBe favour might be usefiil to the Comjiany. Great want of 
masters for ships now to go to the Indies. Only Slado entertained. 
Weydmore fallen sick of the jaujiders at Bristol Slade ap|>ointed 
to t-he Discovery. Michael Crouke and Henry Cheetam stewards 
in tht; Blessing and Discovery. [Tvo p<^g*'s a ml (t httlf. Court 

Bkv.rimsoi] 

3. Court Mijiutes of the East India Company. Richard Newall 
appointed to the Reformation, with 20 nobles per month, and 
Richard We3'dmore to the Blessing with 7/* iier month. [Haif a 
pitffe. CoiiH BL v.. 305.] 

40G4a. Wt. 11322. A 



^ 



2 



COLONIAI. PAPERS. 



1622, 

Jan. Yj, 

Buichmn, 



Jan. T%* 

Bntehiun, 



Jan. -^ 

Bdtcbmn. 



4, Thomas Johnson to William NIcoIIb at Malaya. Complains 
Rowle ; "' I vow upon my Baivation he writes fakely.'* The wai 
he has left ; has been force* 1 to borrow of Giles Cole. By Rowle'i 
account the steward's rats have eaten 4,592 pounds of onr rice, th[ 
may be examined into, *' he may well be the Dutch's steward for h< 
knows how to make a Flemish account" Cocoa-nuts would do him 
great good yet. Rowle refuses to let him have a cocoa-nut tree, but 
says he may send for two or three nuts when he wants them ; would 
not go daily to bag a nut so long as he can buy four or five for Id^M 
A junk is boimd to Ainbo3iia in five or six w^eeks, by which letter^B 
may safely l>e Bent- If the Chines durst deal with him he couhl 
exchange rice for boards at a good rate, [Tivo pages and a luilj, 
O.a, Vol. VIIL, Ko. 1024.] 



low 

fa 

feaS 



5, Giles Cole to William NicolLs at Malaya. Rowde, the gunnel 
and Bastian De Castro, assistant, are partner in catching fish, which 
they sell at G lbs, for l8,, whereas if* the blacks sell it to them they 
" truck for rice and cloth/' Advantages of his having two or thre* 
slaves, Comjilains of the extortions and knaveries of the Dutch 
Staves most usefid for many purposes. The Dutch do not allow 
them any cocoa-nuts^ and do not pay the poor Chinese till necesait; 
makes them to take rice to eat. No accoimts have been passed 
Rowle affinus the eontraiy it is an untruth and a fiat He. No ft 
of occasion of strile, lor they now^ remain as two Companies, " 
wares asunder, our coimsell apart, and our love from the teeth out- 
ward only, and us thought unworthy of the knowledge of the least of 
their actions and passages . . they ordering all things as kings an* 
csonquerors/* They endea,vour to obtain information from soldier 
good and bad, " as the bee doth honey out of the som' grass 
the field." Eowles '* courteous handling " of them is all "quilliti 
and tricks " to ensnare them. [Two pages and a half. 0^0^ 
VoL VIIL, iVo, 1025,] 

6. Giles Cole to WilHam Nicolls at Malaya. A Council ha 
been called to consider their complaints of ilbusage by the Dutcli 
especially their refusing tJiem any servants to do household businesay 
**Few days pass that they are not in council], either at the Gunne 
Steward s house or Ancient's chamber, and the end or conclusion is i 
bamboo of tow^acke, which finishetli all things,** The Chinese for- 
bidden b}^ Rowde to serve the English witli timlx-i; or anything, who" 
said he had i-eceived the like order fi'om Governor Houtman. All 
their wants to be made known to him through Tise Stevens. Thos. 
Rowle, ** a Cheny who \va,s lately christened," and all the Chinese in 
fear of the Duteh. As for the Ancient if he be sol»er one day in 
five it is a gt*eat matter, if he hail the means he would be continually 
dnmk ; his justice is like the Mayor of Easom, that will commit, 
men to the stock till after dinner, if to the bOboes there they mv 
be tiU he be sober. The report of the Dutch that, *' like brokei-s ofl 
Amsterdam," they carry a handful of rice up and down the town 
not so ; but the Dutch have lK>ys with a thimbleful of rice to barterJ 
Since the aiTival of Qumiing s last letter the Dutch have done thci 
utmost to fHind a plow toAmbojTia; and *'cimntngly inquired*! 



J 



EAST INDIES. 



1622. 



Jan. 8. 



Jan. 11. 



whether they had any letters from their Rresident for Amboyna or 
Jacatra, Hearn that " the Dutch have taken a Chinas© junk, and 
our ships with tlieirs is gone to sea to encounter witli the Spaniard 
or Portugal" [Two pages. O.C, Vol VI 11^ A a 1026.] 

7. Account of munitions of war found on board the Orange, by 
the master and purser of the Ruby, on their viaitation of her on the 
8th of January, Referred to the Council of Defence at Batavia to 
\te taxed, and to know whether she w*ill be accepted aa " a ship of 
Uefencf or not/' [Que yxi^e and a quarter, 0,0., Voi VIII*i 
No. 1027.] 

8, Court Minutes of the East India Company. Dungeneea Lights 
John Lamprier to pay for mending the walk about the Harsheti for 
the Company's part for 10 acres U. Petition of John Woodikll ; to 
be releaj!k*<l Wages of RobeH Francii^, boatswain. Mr. Amy, a 
preacher, thought too young to go to the East Indies ; decision poat- 
poned. Thomas Conway entertained. OttJey ai>[K>inted to the 
Blessing at 10**. jier montk [Haifa [Mige. Cowd Bk. F., 301-301] 

8. President Richard Fursland, Thonia.** Brockedon, and Gabriell 
Towersun to the East India Company, Their last waa dated 
10 Dec. [see Ko. 1172 in the lad i\tL of CaL\ Their *" new-fleeming 
friendft, the Hollanders/* still give them caoiie of complaint, and 
will do 80 aij long as they *' are conjoined with them/* They 
bouglit tJie good.s of '^a Portugal prize ship from the bailiff of 
the place, but General Coen wouUl not let them have them, 
claiming one-tliirtl for the States, and having commanded the goodn 
to \ye put to *'an open outcnk%'' whicli he «!aid was the custom 
in Holland, forced the sale in lux own favour, and aiterwaitlfl offered 
half to the Engliiih. The Dutch do not Huffer them to trade in 
anything, but make them their ** staler/' and will do »o aa long bm- 
they are subject to their authority. All their complaints of wrong 
to the Dutch General are put off with fahie accusationn against their 
*4e, which their want of power compels them to endure, Hope 
i tly to have redreas from the Company, or they will be quite 
tired out with living in this kind of slavery. Arrival of a Dutch 
pinnace w^th news of the Goa fleet, on the 4th December, at the 
islands of NasBau. Hear from Capt. Fitsdierbert they have lost 
both their monsoon and voyage through the wilfiilneaa or unskil- 
fnlnesa of the Dutch admiral, who overruled the captain's opinion. 
The Dutch have more .shij»H than they know how to employ, and 
make account that the English will pay part of the ex[jense, *' which 
they will l»e sure to make large enough." *• Tlieir f^lae allega* 
tioriH,^ in their last "shameless protest," that the English were the 
euiise of the loss of the voyage, ** our consultations will annihilate/' 
The non-arrival of the shi}is put*! an unlooked-for stop to their 
proceedings, Death of Walter Bennett, master of the Anne, with 
14 men of the fleet. Since their departing many more fell down 
aick daily. The Dutch losses are no leBS. The Swan found un- 
aerviceftble, and so they refused to receive her from tlie Dutch, 
whereupon their Ceneml protested. It is referred to the decision of 

A 2 



I 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1G22. 



the Campaniea at home. " We wisli there were no greater difference 
tlian this between U8 and the Hollanders/' The measeDger sent by 
the Dutch to Bantam returned without efteeting anything, the 
Pengran not vouchsaiinf^f to see hhu. Will make another attempt to 
buy pepper from tlie Pengi*iin (at Bantam) wdien they have means, 
and lio]ie to succeed unless liindered by the Dutch. Perceive by 
letters fi'om Acheen and Jambi that what contracts soever they 
make here with the Dut<;h they violate at the factorie-s, ** using all 
sinister means to circumvent u.s/' ho impossible is it ever to find 
faithftd dealings from those insolent Hollanders. The Unity left 
Acheen two-tlnrds laden, and is seeking the rest along the coasts of 
Sumatra. A gi'cat store of money and goods kept l>y George Robin- 
son (at Acheen), Want of experienced men in tht* factories. The Bee 
gone to Jambi with a cargo of cloth for [Rohi] Jolinson. Wish thu 
debts *' so desiiuratrly '' made of liim may come in better than they 
expect. Hope the James is now^ at Jambi, and \\^ll return in a 
month, wlien she will forthwith be sent to England, though they 
have barely victuals to furnish her. So many men are deceased tliat 
they have not enough to man all tlie ships now iu the roads. The 
Globe, almost worn out, is sent to Amhoyna and the Moluccas 
instead of the Star; slie carries a considerable store of coast and 
8urat cloth for the factories tivere, but a much larger sum must be 
disbursed if the trade is to be profitable. Gabriel Towerson sent in 
this sldp to be agent iu Ambo\Tia, with Emanuel Tliompson a8 
assistant lor language and accounts, in the jdace of Musehamji, wlia 
returns hecuuse of his disability of body. The Company's factorieii 
must sutfer much prtjudice until they can be supphed with moi>2 
able factors. The Gencml has [rromised that they may sell their 
goods without liindranee, w^hich he cannot well deny until Marclx 
next, as tliey have |mid the whole year's charge ; by that time the 
spices will be all received from Ambo^Tia and thi^i Moluccas, How 
the Dutch will deal witli them afterwards is not resolved, for they 
are so faithless in all their promises that we can give no trust to 
thera, and they neither ** fear nor care to offer us wrongs" '* to sen-e 
their own purposes." Tw^o Dutch ships sent to the Red Sea have 
taken two rich ships of Dahul, but the prize creiv being drunk the 
Mooi-s ** cut all their throats," and so escaped with their ships. The 
Sampson arrived at Surat so weakly manned that they could hardly 
bring her in ; she brought no new*s of the other ship. The Dutch 
purpose to dose all those places liitherto free to the English, 
" stirring to make us as odious Uj aD tlie world as themse1vx*s are.*' 
They are gi^owu " a most cruel and bloody people/' and have lately 
in diese paits conunitteil such inhuman acts, in murdering all they 
take and taking all they meet abroad, as well friends as foes, that it 
is abominable before God and man, and we ho|»e your worships will 
seek to clear youim-lves from the conjunction of such inhuman 
people." The London and other ships did not reach the Red Sea, 
but dispei*sed along the coasts of India, where they took three prizes 
and a Uhuul ship, which they otler to return upon satisfaction for 
tlieir lost eaphila. Two shij>s departed from Surat for England ui 
November, and four gi-eat ships and two idnnaces arrived at Surat 



4 



EAST INDIES. 



1623. 



fVora Englanrl Report that the Portugal^ keep fdx galleons hefofi? 
Ormiis to exj>eet our ships which go for Jask. The long ntay of tbo 
Whale and Trial put them in fear **that they are fallen on the tjack 
hkle of Java;" unless they arrive sooa the pepper e3q:>ected from 
Jam hi cannot be shipped to Elngland, nor their lack of provision* 
supplied. The Dutch have ha#l more than oOO tons of pepper thi« 
year from Sangora, yet their heavv^ expenses will make their pepper 
dearer than ours. Europe will this ye^r want no pepper at dear 
prices, Hope for orders to pay a less price for it next year. The 
factory at Siam to be dissolved as unprofitable. Good hope of 
recovering the greatest part of their debts at Succadana, though the 
country in full of troubles ; Edward Pyke ex]>ecte4l thenet! by tlic 
next pasvsagt:. Urge the necessity of pTOvisioa** and sufficient 
merchants. Request a yearly supply of 10 tons of In^er, 10 tirktns 
of butter, chease. olivets, and capers, which would save treble their 
-cost iu other things* also some choice pieces of canary wine for their 
table, with wliich to rctuni the Cfjurtesies of th«.' Dutch. [EndiJi-Aed^ 
" Received Irom Holland the S^^ril September 1G22. by a Dutch 
ship, the West Friesland," [Six p(t(^M, O.C, Vol. VIIL, iVo, 
1028] 

1 1 10. ** Copy of the articles of Ormuz/' signed by Thos. Kerridge 

11 l)ehalf of the East India Company, Provided tiie English Com- 
pany assist in taking the country of Teroone, all money and goods 
taken in the city, cattle, ships, and hous*3s to be equally divided 
between the King of Persia and the Company. A Persian and an 
English governor to reside in the castle. Kerridge will make an 
earnest request U> the Shah to give it up to the ElngliK Persian and 
English Companies' ships and goods to be custom free ; the duties on 
goods Ijelonging to others, and prizes taken» to Ijc ecjually divided 
Christian and Mussubimns prisoners to Ik* left to their owb ooimtiy- 
men. Also concerning Capt. Moore and the Capt, of Teroone. Any 
ports in India hereatHer conquered by the English Company and 
Persians t»:> \jc erjually converted to tlie use of both. Division of the 
expenses. No Mahometan slaves nor Christians going over to the 
Musselmauns to be conveiled, but exich to be restored to his country- 
men. The word Teroone means only the island of Ormuz, and not 
other coiuitries adjacent. [Endorsed as ctbove, and "a« it waa 
delivered by the Company to the Lord Chancellor/* dai^ Hth of ike 
tfwiith, RcdntU'Euvel, in the year of Mtihontet 1031. It appears 6y 
niwthfr cojftf, jAaced, in 1664, vAtk the mme effidorseTnent hij Sir 
Joseph WiJlitnnsan; (hat the copy vms delivered "'upon debate at 
Worcester House. 1664/' A copy of the artid^ concluded with tlie 
King of Pet-aia in Dec. 1621, ** about the customs of Pemia»" is also 
plm-ed in 1664, whe7i the aimounts received for customs was in 
dispute, thre^ pages. East Indies^ VU. IL, No, 1 J 

11-18. 11. Court Minutes of the East India Company, Reque^st of Sir 
RoU^tt Heath for the freedom of the Company for one John Beale 
iefu8cd. but offered for 50/. 6L 13^. 4</. per annum required by 
Lamprier for Dungeness Lights, [Henry] Ha-wley to go the voyage, 
and have 300/. per annum. Businesa of the Court to be kept itecret. 



6 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622. 



Jan. 20, 



Jan, 23-25. 



Jan. 10.— Captain Christian refused for this voyage. Mr. Amy, 
preacher, disinksed as too young. 

Jan, 18. — Ellam to give notes of commodities to be bought. 
Next Court to set down what Barhary gold, elephant's teeth, quick- 
silver, and spangles they will send in the .ships, George Sommers* 
petition at)out oars. Letters and cominiHsiony to be hastened. No 
more wine to be bought ; the 80 pipes to be divided amongst the 
three ships. [Thres jyagm. Court Bt F,, 302-4.] 



a 



12. '* Memorial presented io my Lord Ambassador (Carleton) by^ 
Sir Dudley Diggs and Morris Abbott.*' Tho demands of the English 
Commissioners are : — That all goods brought into Europe be restoredjj 
here, since the treaty and explanation appoint no place of restitu-" 
tion, but only that they shall be restored immediately upon publica- 
tion ; that General Coen he punished for not obeying the letters ^^tH 
from the Dutch Commia^ioners into the Indies, and that the Dutc]^| 
Company be ordered to make full satisfaction if the English sustain ' 
any danger of that fault of Coen's, To accommodate this, as the 
Dutch profess their sincerity to perform the treaty, Carleton may 
.satisfy the English if the States order that the arrival of th^^ 
English Bull in the Indies, with the copies and letters, was a su(ii'^| 
eient piildication of the treaty ; that on that publication, on both 
sides, without delay, men, ships, and gooils ought to l>e restored, and 
il* any dispute about the vahu> of goods anse, only the value of so 
much as is in question shall be detained, and the restitution of the 
oveqjlus made without staying for a liquidation from Europe; that if 
the next ships out of the Indies bring news that there is no satisfac- 
tion made there for the goods l>rought into Europe, then the Dutch 
shall restore the goofls here, or that they now deliver a good sum to 
be restored by the EngllHh upim notice of satisfaction made in the 
Indies, as Carlcto]i iirst proposed. Last of all, that the Dutch 
deliver unto the English ail biUs and inventories of theii^ goods 
t^aken in the Indies, and that the duplicate of this order, together 
with lettci's from the Company, \je immediately sent mto the Indies 
for real and sincere execution of the treaty on both sides by the 
English ships now ready to depart, [ExtntA:t from HoUamd Co 
i^spondmwe. Endorsed as above.] 




13, Court Minute8 of the East India Company. A comniitt€»e 
treat i\nth Joshua DouTiing about the chief coouuand of the ships 
Beef and jtork to be taken to Bantam ibr vietualliug. the cargo of 
gix>ds not l>cing snfKeient t^i hll n]> the holds of the ships. The 
supply of victuals to the King's shi[is in the narrow seas to b^H 
continued for thi^e months, though computed at 5flQ0L or 6,OOOJ^* 
Letters to be prepared for Pei^ia and one procured from the King 
to the King of Pei^sia that the Company may have better privileges 
than formerly and more security, upon which motion a dispute arose 
whether that trade should be continued or not Resolved to 
foibomc for one year, thereby to obtain better privileges. Thfl 
manner of forbearing the trade considered, [A vmrginul note state 
iluU thu entry vKis found faidt with hi/ the Court y *'for they have' 
no meaning wholly to reUnquiBh the trade but to draw better con- 



ose 

rhX 




EAST IKDIES* 



1C21 



1622 J 



27. 



ditions to their merchants."] A coraimssion for thk floet to be only 
under the Company's seal, and not under the hroad scaJ of Erij^land as 
time Is short Examination of PhiJip Woorgan, He accused Capt. 
Ball^ the Pre^sident at Bantam, of negli^nce of the Company's interests, 
for he had sent home but one ship when the Dutch sent home eight or 
nine in the year *' by reason wliereof the EngUsh shijis rottcnl, the men 
died and were not regarded " notwitlistanding ho had goo*l store of 
money by him, that came in the Hope, Hound, and Charle.s, and 
that thei^ was pepper enough to be had, HLs testimony confirmed 
by John Mason. Both of them to be further examined, Mrs, Wick- 
ham deaii'e^ the Compan3^'ti absolute answer about her son's estate, 
alleging she had att+^-nded two years and a half, l»ut as he had gained 
it by employing the Company's stock, and it amounted to 1,400?,, 
it was resolved not to give way to this private trade and to defend 
the detaining thereof, " wherewith no ways satisfied she reftised to 
submit herself, and departed:'* Mr. Kirby and Mrs. Harrison sued 
by Mr. Deerow for money due to the joint account of the East India 
and Musco\4a Comi>any. Request of Mrs. Greenwell to transport 
mme stock to her creditors referred. 

Jan. 25. — Petition of Isaac Crowder, steward, for goods taken from 
him in the Indies : is allowed his travelling expenses forgoing into the 
country to see '* a mariner (that as he said) ctin say much in the 
business of Ball/' Concerning the estates of Thomas Crowther and 
Hanis the factor, both deceased. Debate about John Hall having 
the chief command of tlie fleet, is both honest of behaviour^ able in 
tlie knowledge of " navigation, and a veiy valiant man." His 
plainness compared with Totten's eminence ; the Company haa 
seldom gained by employing eminent men ; to have 10/, per month. 
The stock at Surat of the vahie of 170,000/., Ijesides 10,000/. now 
to \n* sent, 20,000/- a year employed there ; it is considortMl that a 
great part of tliis may be employed in Persia, Crispo to write to 
Middellnirg for 2,000 or 3,000 weight of quicksilver for Surat. 
Timber lent for the King's service. [Sin- jmf/es imd a fuilf. CowH 
Bk F„ 305-312.] 

14, '* Sundry reasons why the trade of Persia by the way of Capo 
de Bona Speranza should not be fitting for the Engli.sh nation,*' 
considered under six heads, viz., the distance and length uf the 
voyage ; ** the price of the comunxlity '* 8U|)posed to Im so high ; 
the port offered, situate in a desert, and its security doubtful ; the 
wliole trade of the silk so far al>ove our reach, liaving to be bought 
chit-fly with ready money ; and the great doubts whether Persia 
vnW ever vent any great quantity of English commodity. It is 
therefore generally concluded by the merchants that it is not fit to 
entertain the voyage, there being no probability of benefit to them, 
nor good to the commonwealth in general. [One page and a third. 
East Indies, Vol IL, No. 2.] 

15. Extract out of the Register of the Resolutions of the States 
General of the United Provinces. Loi'd Muys repoits that he has 
told the Lord Ambassador Carleton, by order of their Lordships, 



8 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622. 



Jan. 28. 
Tacomy. 



Jan. 



Jan. 28 

to 
Feb. 4. 



larfi 

Tiratu 
te of 
lome 

\i he 

ou dM 

an^H 
jlentfl 



that they promise that the Englishitsan, Kobert Salmon (whosq 
[iretensions Carleton has seriously recommended), shall within thr 
months lie paid 3,000 grs. for all his pretensions for himself and hi 
owners or niorchaots, for his pretended losses, as well of his artillery 
taken from hini a'^ other goods of hi.s shij). [Exhrui fmvi Holland^^ 

16, Philip Haiison to William Nicolls at Malaya. Richard 
Hanger arrived on the 22nd. Has receive^l letten=., |>er the Corpor 
aboil ts Dent's debts, of which he sends a copy. Tlie Ruby-^jassod 
Sunday, [Qtuirt*fr of a jKige^ 0,a, Vol VIIL, Ko. 1029.] 

17. Protest by the Dutch General Carpentier against the English 
President and Council respecting the ship Swan. [DiUclt. 
page and a quartn\ O.G, VoL VIIL, No. 103L] 

18< Con it Minutes of the East India Comjiany. Reports concern-' 
ing HalFs sufficiency for cliief conmiand of the fleet for Hurat. 
Examination of Philip Woorgan and John Mason as to the state of 
atikirs at Bantaui, who were there in 1017. The Dutch sent home 
eight or nine ships laden mostly with pepper; but Ball, though he 
had six f5hips and a good store of inoney. sent home only one. ~" 
cause supposed to he that Capt. Pei^well and Ball had fallen 
Wedmore, ma^ster of the Blessing, refuses to sei've imder Hall, 
for his comparisons between himself and Hall, and his insolent 
disposition, is discharged fi-om the Company's service. Hall to t^ke 
charge of the Blessing till a sufficient uia^ster lie found* 

Jan, 30. — John Crane entertained for a goo<l fellow. 850 barrels 
of indigo in warehouse, and great store expected this year fron 
Siu-at, the pricen raised to 5^. 4rf. and *'m Hil. Robert Owen 
Thomas Jones to be defended by the Company at the suit of hsdj 
Dale. Jose[>h Bethel I, entertained for this voyage, to have leave to" 
retniTi home in the fii^st ship that returns Imm Surat. Tliomai* 
Butler, surgeon, to be called home at the request of the Countess of 
Bedford, Denton to forbear his business until these dispute^s with 
the Dutch may be ovei-past. fl 

Feb. L — Mrs. Green well renounces lier interests and right in Gerard 
Readers atlventuixi', to his credik»i-s. Ridiai\l Wedmore s submission 
delivered in a ]mper so fidl of the dregs of Ids fonner disconten 
that it was refused ; further inquiries to Ijc made alx>ut him and 
Emanuel Butta, Tyon, a jeweller, oHei-s a jewel for 10,000f,, or el 
will send it to India with a man that hath skill to sell it on his o^ 
adventure ; it is described as a looking-glass of crystal of the Rod 
set with divers fair ballast rubies and other stones of great price j 
the gold valued at 500/, and the workmanship at 1.000/. ; Sir Thoma 
Roe thinks it will l>e much desiivtl by the Mogid, RefiL^es th 
Company *s offer to send it and give them one tliird profit. Richa 
Langford's offer of service declineil. 

FeU, *» — Emanuel Butta appointed to the Ble^s^sing, at 20 nobles j _ 
montk Com plain tj^ from the Indies that money is missing out of 
ftveiy cliejst sent ; order thereon, [Eleven jxiffcs. Ct/urt Bk, V., 312-^ 
322.] 




EAST INDIES. 







Feb. 4. 

Iktrhian. 



Feb. 4. 



Feb. 6. 



Feb. 



M. 7. 
^ MinioV 

Line. 



|19, Thomas Johnson to'^William Nieolb at Malaya. Pmy» that 
GckI may always bt? the guider of his mind and Imnd, and that he 
*' may nev^er want the good fellowship of Tolut's comjianion/' ErroiB 
in the account**. The Dutch will have money allowed for rice Hpent 
in fortifications and hoase j requests instructiouii on tliii* pojn» 
[Thre^^ qiuirters of a imge. O.C, Vfd, VJIf., No, 1030 J 

20* Thomas Locke to Carleton. The East India Merchants oome 
to the Lords with new complaints against the Hollanders ; hoi>ea to 
send the particulars in his next. [Eprtrad from Donietttic Corresp. 
Jac /., Vol CXXVIl, No. 07. Cai, p. 341,] 

2L Comt Minutes of the East India Company. Mrs. Grtt^^nwcU « 
assignment of Gerard Ii«?ade*8 arlventure to crefliturs confirmed, 
Reque.st of the Earl of Montgomery' for the freedom of the fhtn- 
pany for Mr. White ; it im oliered for 50?., but declined. Richard 
Newall discharged, on complaint of the Chief Factorn in the Indies, 
that he did waste and spoil all things under hb* charge. Wedmore, 
submitting to the Court, ap|K»inted inanter of the Refonnaiioii. 
[Two pnum. Court Bk F., 323, 324.] 

22. Thoa. Locke to Sir Dudley Carleton, The Lordii and States 
Commissioners were yesterday in a fair way to ha%'e broken off; for 
it having been agreed that restitution should l>e maile in Holland of 
gooda taken in the Indies from English mercharrl^. 130^. wa« 
demanded for the freight of tlrat which English merchants offered 
i/y bring from thence for under 30/, T!ie States have taken furthi^r 
time to think upon this point, and it is expected they will mo^lemU; 
their demands, else they will hardly come to any e/»nclui»ion. 
[Dmrxestic Corrmp., Joe, /., Vol CXXVIL, No. If*, Vol p. 343,] 

23. Sec. Calvert to (Carleton), The tn-aty here with the States 
AmbaK8ador« about the difl^erenccs in the Indies a^Jvances boislowly^ 
though we sit often, the *lbpate all this whil*^ having been upon % 
liranch only of the first article, touching the restitution of the goods 
brought into Holland, for which they would needft remand \m into 
the Indies for satisfaction, but being Ijeaten from t!»at hold, they 
consented to a reasonable con^sideration for freight and a^miranccf ; 
but when desired to cause their raerchantH k» specify their ilemanrK 
they brought a reckoning of 40,(X)0/, merely for freight and mv^M- 
ranee, whereas the value of the whole goo<ls sold in Holland by 
them will not be confessed to have amounte^l to *30,000^ This 
proceeding aytpears strange, and so far fronj all i nt'l i nation to iw'iMrtu- 
modate these controvei-Hies as we cannot t^-Il what U^ think **f it 
here, nevertheless we go on still with our me<*ting>«, and thi.s after- 
noon have appointed the merchants of either side to bring their 
demands, offers, and reasons in w^riting. The fleet in the Narrow 
Seas, under the Earl of Oxford, hath given an umbrage to thise 
ambassadors, the rather upon the fear, winch they conct'ive of taking 
two of their East India ship« come unto Plymouth, and they have 
not stuck to take notice of it to the Lords (JouimisHiouerH, and to 
crave an audience of the King about this buKincM^ a^ m i«uppo«^<l 
The Lord's answer waa general, pretending neither knowledge nor 



10 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622. 



FeKa 



R^Ka 



to give any moootmt of the King s private instractions 
to Lonl Osfori, bot desijred them to believe that his actions would 
he sndi aa he might justify to all the world, and might well stand 
with the coPfllant friendship and amity between them, and I think 
the mmm loswer would well serve your turn ;" but the King will 
deal tnote nmiidly and plainly with them. Is sorry to see that their 
contmnal barbarous usi^ of Her Majesty's subjects in the Indies 
**(whiaieof we have now !again fresh advertisements) gives us so 
just a provocation as may justify almost the worst thing we can do 
in revenge." [Ejcimd from ffolhnd Corresjh] 

24. Court Minutes of the East India Company, Request of the 
carpenters bound for Surat to return honae after three years' service 
held reasonable. Smitheck and Hawley's wagesw Infonnation of 
Titchboume, the Company's solicitor, that Gteorge Ball labours to 
under bail,; the Lord Keeper thinks it not right to bail him, as 
does Mr Justice Hutton, in re8{>ect of the matters of State laid to 
his charge. The Court wa.s unwilling he should be bailed, for the 
action of the Company against him is for 70,000^ Thomas Jones 
and Rubert Owen to be protected in a suit against them by Lady 
Dale for so much as concerns the Company. Gerard Reade and his 
creditors, Burrell to have 100/. for a lease of the '' Causey " at Black- 
wall for 4G3 yeare, to avoid the statute of mortmain. Philip 
Woorgan to receive WL in full satisfaction for his 3,000 weight 
of iK?pper. [Thiee jmge^. Court BL F,, 325-328.] 

25, The Privy Council to the King. Report on their several 
ci^nfen*nces with the States Commissioners, Have laboured with 
their utmost endeavours to bring the differencos between the King's 
jiul»je€ts ami the JSethorlanders about their trade in the Indies to a 
^hhI aeetmimodation. Specify some of the unreasonable demands 
which tlu* other side have [xn^mptorily insisted upon, but which ih& 
Privy Council cannot in reason or eijuity agree to. The question of 
ivjititutiou was tho first aiiicle of the English merchants' complaint 
Uoth sidcM iUxU^ivd iii set down in \^Titing their reasons for their 
\Wmau\ls so as to bring it Uy a final conclusion. Opinion of the 
IMvv iVHUicil that the goo4ls in question rightfully belong to the 

>ubjiM:ts» and that whatever they allow the Hollanders, either 

' * r»r AasurHncL\ is a dear loss to the English. The States 

u i>i ilosiri>us to pai*s to other branches of this first article 

<Hf^jm^ilf^ ihc nlups and goods wldch the English claim to be restored 

Ilw ihobi Ui the ludie^i but the English Company have a great pre- 

K% %h/h% (H^ui-Ho of ti-eating. Request the King's dh^ections. 

...K • -,ive if the Dutch Comiuissionera should attempt to 

\ from tlie King for yielding any frnther than the 

^. done, or fur proceeding wilh the rest of tlie 

muli^Ua'iuined, that their Lordships' answer may 

Utk€ hiindwnih}(fof Tkos. Loeke.aml etuJorsed b\j 

^ *»'5i3,** to "ivhom Locke probabl}/ sent it Eiist 

^] 

. Lata* iJ" the Governor an<l (*ouq>any of Merchants j 

:|i^a^ HMm Bi»i India against the East India Company 



I 



f 



EAST INDIES. 



11 



1622. 



of the Netherlands ;*' spedfymg the article® of the treaty af Jaly 
16lf>, which have lieen broken by the Ihitch ; by not restoring 
the pepper, silk, and other goods they had taken and brought into 
the Netherlands; by imprisoning, imposing Ones, inHictmg cor- 
poral punishment in the market place, and keeping in iroiiA the 
English ; by not suffering the English to buy merehantlijse and 
victuals of the Indians at Jacatm, liefore the Dutch were first 
served ; by denying the English to finish their houne at Jacatra^ 
and not suttering them to ship pepper they ha«l brought from tho 
King of Sangora ; by imposing at Jacatra new and great taxe^ and 
tolls upon English goods, and levying great fines for non-payment ; 
by denj-ing the Ent^^lish impji-tation and sale of victuals and 
clothing in the Moluccan, Banda, and Amboyna, the moflt profitable 
merchandise for those places ; by preventing the English from 
trading in tliose parts, and sending the Maydeneblick to engrotm 
all the spices before the English ships could arrive there ; by pres- 
sing the English to pay their projxjrtion in money towards 
maintaining the forts and ganisons in those islands, notwithstanding 
they have no ti^e there; by sending forth a fleet without consftnt 
of the English Council, or acquainting them whither the diipH wena 
going; by excludmg the English at Jacatra from free liberty of 
traiie ; and by superadding a new fort now buikling there. The 
East India Company have particular proof of every circmnfftanee 
herein set forth. They are also importuned by their fact^jm, 
mariners and widows, to present their suit for restitution of their 
[Efidorsed No. 1-] Annexed, 

The Dutch Committee to the Amba»58ador» of the Statea 
General of the United Provinces. In reply to the preeadhig 
complaints of the English East India Company, think tt impofi- 
sible to retuni a satisfactoiy answ^er, having finintl the com- 
plaints so confused, obscure, and ill pre[»ared. Intreat them to 
mediate witli the Privy Council to command the Engllidi 
Comi»any, first, to produce proofs to verify every [Kiint of their 
giievances; secondly, to specify particularly "their crjnfiined 
extension of sums *iisordered," and finally if they have any 
more [tretensions, to a^ild them to th** preceding that no noedlew 
trouble may be given by new complaints* Declare IberonelTett 
reaily on their part to do tlie like, and suggest whether the 
shortest way to procei^d would not Ijc " to pursue the eottite cif 
the articles " provisionally concltided between the Commimioneni 
of both countries at the la«t conference held at the Haf^ue in 
January and February of the |»a«t year, Frmn lU eTuhrm* 
in4^nt it ajyimtrs (fiat tkia Utter wii« mni by tlie Aitihamador^ Uj 
Hie Privy CounciL On tim mrtiA* »li£et w tM (mmmr o/— 

The Governor and Company of the EngliMh Ea«t India 
Company tfj the Privy Council Find the Dutch *' go a}>out 
altogether to decline from the real re«titution insist/**! ujxm," 
an€l that they slight the English Company and their reiuwrtw* 
Conceive that their writing was agreeable to their LonMiim' 
directions and in accordance with tiie treaty. Concerning the 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1G22. 



propositions, think it very ''imusefol Jbo reqtiire a proof of a| 

wrong before it be denied, because if it shall be acknowledged, 
no proof will be neeessarj^ ;" that there needs no further particu- 
larizing of the e^stLmate of their damages than has already been 
exhibited in theii* writmg; tliat they cannot estimate their 
" growing damages '' thi-ougli the interruption of their 10 ships] 
Bent lately to Bantam, and having had no advertisements from I 
the Mokicc^.s, Banda and Amboyna ; and that the negotiation j 
at the Hague was but upon a branch of restitntion, viz., of siichj 
goods as were brought int<:> the United Provinces. The Privyl 
Council approved of this answer, and the Ambassadors ordered! 
the Dutch forthwith Uj deliver up the sum of their complaints 
in wTiting. [Endorsed Ko. 2.] 

" The sum of the complaints that the Deputies of the India 

(.*ompany of the United Provinces do exhibit concerning thefl 
jioint wherein they find themselves greatly prejudiced andS 
damaged liy those of the East India Company, subjects to the 
King, by occa^^ion of the non-observance and direct breach of 
many |)rincipal articles of the treaty made between his Majesty 
and the Ambassadors of the Lords* the States in ihc city of j 
London, in July 1 619, since the publication of the same in the^ 
Indies ; the said losses and damages amounting to very greatj 
stims, without comprehending therein the losses sustained before 
that time, which they do reserve to the end, to set dovra like 
wise the state thereof, ami pretend restitution and reparation, 
in case that the English Company will not stand t^:) the tii*st^ 
article of treaty which doth extinguish and take them away 
by an annesty and obli\ion, whereof Uith paHies did in tha 
respect argue." Also, " another declaration of the prizes take; 
by the English Company from the Dutch during the misimder- 
standing and confusions bcfnn^ publication oi" tlie treaty in thi 
Indies," [Endorsed No. 3.] 

" The complaint of tlie Governor and Company' of Merchants 
of London trt^dintj to the East India a^minst the East India 
Company of the Netherlands/' That tlie Dutcli have broken 
the lirst article of the treaty in tliree particulars : in not making^ 
restitution of cei'tain goods taken in India and in the samefl 
specie brought into Holland and there demanded, "the paili-^ 
cular *' makes the total am omit to .^."1,0 14?. 3s. Sd. ; in not making 
restitution of the money and goods taken and yet detained in 
India and there demanded, the particular makes the total 
amount to 104,527 ryalls ; and in not re^lelivering nine ships- 
surprised and detained in India and likev^nse demanded, the 
particular gives^ tlie names and burthens of the ships, and seta 
down the total value of them at 5r»,{)00/. [Endorst'd Ko. 4,] 

Arguments in fa\'our of the I'estitution of the goods of the 
English East India Company brought into Holland. That they 
ought to have lieen restored in s]>ecie, and in Holland, where 
they were found and demanded^ Jan. 7th, 1622. [Endor^d 
Ao. 5. ^1 copi/ of thw imper is e^idor^ecl 7tk Jim. 1021-2.] 



I 



14 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622. 



Jan.? 



FeU 10. 



respondence is emhrsed 14 Ff^h. 1(121-2. TIis above papet'8 are 
endorsed Nvs, 1 to 10. Together 4(3 jmtje^. East Imiies, Vol 11,^ I 
Nos. 4-13.] 

27* Cppie.s of the above papers numbered 5, 6, and 7, [.Fosi 
Jwiie^, Vol IL, Nos. 14-16.] 

28. Locke to Carleton. Tlio Lords have written a large a<;couni1 
to tlie King of their proceedings wiili the States Commissioners, i 
which has come to nothing. It is not likely they will stay long J 
now ; they have otiereJ no tolerable conditions noi\ as it seems, had ' 
any intention of doing* so. [Exlntct from Domestic Con^esp., Jiw. /., 
Yd. VXXVIL, No. m, CaL p. 344.] 



Feb. 11-13. 



of the East India Compa 



Surat. 



. Nineteen ehedts 
Discovery^ foiu* in 

the Reformation, and six in the Blessing. The Dutcli liaving 
sent Borrell the younger into Holland and another to Plymouth, 
and employed a gentleman of quality to Newmarket, about tlieir 
affairs to his Maje.sty, whether the Company shall do the same ; 
Mr, Sec. Calvert's iliiTctions to be taken therein. Accounts 
l>etween Bun-ell and the Com]mny to be settled. Instructions to 
HaU and the masters of the Fleet. The trade had suffered chiefly 
through the defect and ill example of the commanders. They are 
to take care that Ood be dnely served, and themselves present at 
morning and evening prayer. Extraordinary jirovisioiifi to be kept 
foi' the sick, and not wasted in riot and feasting. The stores of 
iHUuition not to be consumed in Jollity, and idle commanders not 
to displace pursers 
they are disurde 

of their coimcil The men to bo kept under ilue command, and 
particidar notice taken of those who .show any lui willingness to do 
their duty. The ships to go to Gravesend the next day or the 
day after. HaU to " 

white biscuit and ^U marks ni }>late. rsiatle s wages 
20 nobles to 7/. per month, as WeyLlmorLrs. The Court wished 
they had a man worthy the sending, as a preacher with Hall ; 
two, named Amy and Rippon, to be incpiired about. David Papil- 
lion and Roquigny to view Tyon's jewel 

Feb. 13. — Letter read from the Lord Keei>er requiring satisfac- 
tion, with reference to the dett^ntion of tlie t'statcs of William and 
Richard Wickham, and Edward Reeve, Richard Wickham went 
out a silly young man at 20/. per annuni, and carried no estate wit)\ 
liim that was knoM^ri or cuuld be imagined, tliereupon it followeth 
in probability tliat be hath unduly gotten the estate either by 
private trade with the Comjmny*s money, or by purloining, in both 
which cases there is nothing due to hinh Notwithstanding, for 
my Lord's better satisfaction, the Court is ready to pay the wage,s 
due to Wickham and also the stock that can be proved lie carried 
out witli him. with some increase. List of del "tors ]»resented 
The Court loth to take any rigorous coui\se. Westrow to talk 



I 



be consumea m juUity, and idle commanaers not 
sers and stewards responsible for stores, unless ■ 
erly, and then iliscreetly and fairly, and by advice ™ 
~he men to bo kept under due command, and 
ken of those who .show any luiwiUingneas to da 
ihips to go to Gravesend the next day or the 
rj have one butt of wine, exti-aordinarj^ some M 
20 marks in xilate. Slade's wages raised from ■ 



I 

I 



EAST im)IES. 



IS 



1622. 



with the parties on the exchange or otherwise, and known their 
fuU reaolutioiiB. Demand of Richard NewaU, a fonner nmster, for 
payment for instruments bought for his use. [Six jX-^ges, Cmivt 

15. 30- Court Minutes of the East India Company. Request of 
Thomsus Hamson, prisoner in *'the hole in the counter, where he 
hath lyen ahnost a year," for empIo;>Tnent refused. The t|uestton of 
his discharge refeiTed to Offley. Petition of Edwanl Ravens for 
three months^ pay in advance. He has sensed 1 1 years, and was 
taken by the Hollanders and spoiled of all he had. Because* of his 
long service and losses, the Company were content to wink at such 
a favour, though repugnant to theh' ordei^s. Interview with the 
Loixl Keeper alxjut iIi*H. Wickham^s business. He showed much 
love and respect to the Company, and in his advice to them said that 
they were not generally well thought of, and though he utterly 
misliked private ti*ade, yet he " wished them to connive at small 
mattei^s.*' lest *' they l)e unfurnished of worthy men to sei^ve them," 
Wages of Jeremy *Shukar and Ricliarjl Langley, second purser's 
mates. The plate allowed to Capt. Hall, viz., two beer cups, two 
wine cups, a salt and six spoons of silver. Otwell and Jerrard*s 
security for 2,000/, for goods bought by Hallsey due at (Christmas 
last. The parties to be summoned to payment. (Jarroway and 
Leate debtors for Dike for a pai*t of that which was set over by the 
Muscovy Company to this Compan)^ A discussion on an account 
for oils bought by Alderman Hamersley. Bell, and Potter, vahied at 
8,000/, or 9,000/. ^Request of Jacob Oyles to take out 100//due to him 
in indigo. Anyone in similai' circumstances may take uut their debt 
in indigo, carpets, or calicoes at the usual price, Mary Jackson, 
sister of George Cokayne, Ijcing a " woman, and therefore not so 
ready or so understanding in accounts as to be satistied with their 
relation " about her brother s estate, to bring a friend to view the 
accounts next Court, A committee apjiointed *' for the dispeeding '* 
away of the Surat fleet. Bail tu l>e granted to George Ball as the 
Company's attorney shall approve. Search to be made amongst 
Capt Pepwells papers for answers to some of his lettei^s to Ball. 
Discussion an<l settlement of Captain Pepweirs estate. Three 
requests of Hanson tiiat they would accept a less freight than 12^/. 
per pound, give a better {»rice for pepper, and increase Capt. 
Pei)weirs wages» refused, Hanson to search for Bairs letters amongst 
Pepweirs papers. [Four pages. CouH BL K, 333-337.] 

Ftjb. 15. 31, Extmct from a [fictitious] Speech of the King in Parliament, 
As the defender ol' his people, the King is obliged to aim vessels to 
\4ndicate the spoils committed ujwn them l»y the Hollanders in the 
East Indies, [lialkin. Extrud from Domestic Corrci^j^.^ Jac. I,^ 
VoL CXXVIL, No. 90, CaL p, 345,] 

Feb- 16. 32- Locke to Carleton, Sentk cojiy of the King's letter to the 
relation of the Privy Council, touching their proceedings with tlie 
St4iic9 Audja^^sadors [icaii/r?/*/]. Since the merchants have presented 
their reaaoni^ to the Privy Council, to show that the new i>oint of 



16 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1C22. 



1 6 
UatehiuLi. 



Feb. 



restitution ought not to lr>e handled imtil the point of the goods 
brought into Holland receive full determination, the States and the^ 
Lords liave not met. [Extixtct frmn Donustic Corresp., Jac, /., Vi 
CXXVIl Ko. 102, CaL p. 34(1] 

33, Thoma.s Jolinson to William Nicolls at Malaya. Complaim 
of Rowlc. Ih in gi^eat want of money. Sends Giles Cole, for wani 
of any other trusty me.Hsenger, [One page, CKC, Vol. VIIL, 
Ko. 1033.] 



1 



1 



Feb. 17 — 34. Consultations aboai-d the English Goa Hcet, on the voyage 
Dec. 22, from the Isles of Comoro to Surat, after the Dutch ha<l left them, 
puqjosely^ as they suppose. Michael Greene chosen to sucxieed 
Capt. Humfrey Fitzherbert ; Bartholomew Goodaille, master of the 
Diamond, transfeiTed to the Royal Anne ; Pliillpott, master of^ 
the Excbanfj^e, to the command of the Diamond ; and Richard^ 
Swanly, master's mate, to con uu and the Royal Exchange. Oct, 1st 
Having seen nothing of tlie Dutch, it is determined to sail for 
Dabub Oct, 14th. Aftt^r waiting a montli on the Indian coast, and 
missing t!ie Portugal Hc'et, as the Dutch have not kept their 
rendezvous and tliey can gain no tidings of them, it is dek-nuined 
to go to Surat. The Royal Exchange considered nnseaworthy, but 
the Royal Anne fit for another voyage to Mozambique. \^Fivt 
pages. O.a, Vol. VI 11., No, 1032 + L] 

Feb. 20-22, 35. Court Minutes of the East India Company, Kenriek offers 
a cabinet of rai'e workmanship to the Company, or wiD adventurej 
it on Ids own account. A>s the Great Mognl is understood to U 
greatly delighti'd witli such rare ties, tlie cabinet and Tyon's jewel 
may be sunt and sold l»y the Company's factors ; Kenriek ano 
Tyon being paid by bills of exchange at 58. per ryal Mar^ 
Jackson brings a friend with her, wdio is satisfied with the Com- 
pany's account with Geoige Coekayne ; but she refuses the settle-r 
nient ** otit of a vain sujiposition that more is due to her.** Richariil 
Langley not a tit man fur [nirser's mat*' in the Disco verJ^ George' 
Diition, chaiged with Jorging a will, to be sent u}> if aboard the 
tiect. Petition of Edward Tynes, engaged as a factor, for mor^j 
money refused ; the Company *' wish him now to stay at home and 
takii his ease/' Concerning Richard Janard and Otw^elFs securityl 
for Halsey's debt. Accounts of Alderman Hannnersley, HoDoway, 
Skinner, and Wiseman. John Williams having in stress of wind, 
fallen from the yjird-arm of the Blessing, bi-eaking his ano, ire, to-l 
have 40». from the poor box, and Woodall, the surgeon, to take carof 
of his cure. 

Feb. 22.— The lettei's for Surat remL Consitle ration about i*uppl>'ing 
that factory and Persia. Only such shipping to l>e sent as might 
supply them with conimodities from hence. 8ur|ilus ships from J 
Bantam to go tliei^e, for an increase of force to waixant the tradeJ 
Cotton yarji to l)e l>ougbt on the Coromandel coast, in Persia, and] 
Surat. One sliij* to be laden witli cottim wools. Walt^^r MouniToixil 
to be sent with Jett^iTs to Sir Dudley Carleton. Aml»assador to UieJ 
States, to allow that which liave passed in this last treaty with 



KAST INDIES. 



17 



1622- 



FelxSl 



Feb. 25, 



TA 23^27 



Dutch, Also to demand from the Directom of the Dutch Company 
the restitution of nutinep^, Tiiace8» and other goo^In taken bjr the 
Duteh at the Lslaniln of Pixjioroon and Lantar, and pepper booglit 
at ligor; with i>ower to receive the goods and give wchaim fijr 
them. He k to have 10/. on account for his joitniey. Bidianl 
Langley admits that he is going into the Indict to defeat hia are- 
ditors, but denies all other luiputationa againat him. He k to be 
employed as pursers mate in the Diacovefy, hia brother-in-law 
Babington Uj be bound for him. [Six pa^fes. Court Ek, V^ S87- 
343] 

36, Sir Dudley Diggea to Sir Dudley Carleton. On Suodajr, 
after writintr hia last letter, he and hin colleague waited en the 
Lord,s by the King's command, whijrre they oj»eni'<l things mom 
largely than the}^ coidd l>efore the King, aiul m ciaariHl CJarleton, 
that Lord Arundel only mentioned the King'n angt-r, but aaid that 
he saw now tliat when Carleton wrote Uiingv were upon fjOoA 
terms, but that the Dutch by a 8u1i8i-x|tjt:Dt Aet had oi ac o y efed 
their ill intentions. They have presented to the Loftla Commta- 
sionerH a statement of the jiroeeedingp between Ihem and the 
Dutch, and expect ere long their leflolution. The great diqittie 
grows by that ciuestion of sovercsignty or eonaaeat^ which the 
Dutch set afoot in Java Major, and their buildiiig the fwt at 
Jacatra^ contrary to the treaty, which if thtfv i*erftiiit in will bnsak 
the treaty. They promised to have wh-need that jxitnt, and if 
tliL-y had said nothing of it, we might liave in m^mn Hort appeaM*«J 
our iliscontented merchantii^ but thi-y clialleuged it, and by it do 
justify their servants* ill-u>iagc of oiir mi^n in the Ijldies^ which 
will, if we permit it, overthrow our trade. Of their endeavour U* 
abuse the Com|>any. by a trick, in the p«jint of restitution, contiary 
to theii' answer to the third demand, he says nothing, liecaujie it 
18 merchants* business, but by the endoeed he may see all titat in 
set down to the Comnussioneng, who are all well affected. [HtAland 
Corrmjh'] 

37- Extract of letter from Sir D. Carleton to Sir Hen. Wotton. 
Here are two ships newly arrived in Ze4itand, richly la^Jen out of 
the East Indies, which thej^ believe hei-e " wen^ lay«,^i for " hy the 
Englj'<?h fleet, but they came by the coairt of France whilst Lord 
Oxford was at Poi-tsmouth. And if the treaty go well in England, 
which he cannot but hope it will, it is no ill lock those Mhips cam** 
so well home, Mddcli liatl they l*een taken, might have made their 
difierences irreconcilable. [Exlrfui fnm% Ilidlaind Cirrrmp,] 

38, Court Minutes of the East India Company. Edward Hopton 

brought up on the charge of carrying 100/. with him for private 
trade; 25/. and two dozen knives. 6^c, found on hiui As he l»ore 
a gooil chai-acter, the Court was content with admonishing him. 
Edward Cliarley, surgeon on the Blessing, displaced Richard 
Parkes, who has been siu-geon on five voyages, to take (.'barley's 
place. Kenriek wishes to send his c^abinet to Surat, on certain 
comlitions. Oils from Greenland. Tichl>orne, the soh'citor, reports 
that Ball has moved in the Star CJhamber, for the Comfmny's intf.»r- 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



int. 

rogatoriejs to be put'ia ; and a.sks for a committee to consider of 
thein. Tbose that had been formerly named to follow the business, 
Atlvance to Capi Hall, chief commander of the Company's shiijs for 
Siirat, 

Feb, 27. — Pai*kes. the mirgeon. examined in the presence of Dn 
Winston and Mr. Fenton and othei-s, found grossly ignorant and 
incompetent, and discharged. The order for displacing Charley 
countermanded. In future all surgeons to be examined before 
engaged. Dr. Winston offers his sei-^nces, for this purpose, free. 
Sir Nathaniel Rich requests that he may pay up his arreaj's in 
the second joint stoek^ without intei*est. The Court, considering^ 
the eircumsfciances, ''the quality and honesty of the gent, and being 
also to go in the King's service," grant the request under certain 
conditions, " One Purchas that wrote of the Religions of all Nations, 
hath now undertaken a gi^eat volume of all tl\eir voyages/* to be 
allowed to see the Company's jounials of voyages into the East 
Indies, particularly the journal of Sir Thomas Rue, but is to take 
nothing but what *' is proper to history, and not prejudicial U> the 
Company." His notes to be perused before they are carried 
out of the houBe, Kemick and Loo to he paid for their cabinet 
at 56, 6d, per ryal, with deduction for expenses, Nicholas Leato 
allowed the same for some jewelry. Models of the cabinet ajid 
jewels to be kept. Eighty oxen witl) a rateable proportion of swini 
to be salted for the Bantam fleet Petition of John Neale, anchor- 
smith, to use the Company's forge at Blackwall to make anchors foi 
the King, refused. [Eight 'pages. CowH Bk F., 343-35 L] 

Feb. 28. 39, Eu.'^tace Man to Sir Thomas Smythe, Govenior, and Morrii 
jiiciitm. Abbott, De|aity Governor. Aii*ival of the Unity laden from Acheen^ 
and the Sumatra coast The Dutch ai'e too liard for them now in 
India, with their exactions and unjust dealings, '* but when they arei 
at highest doubtless they will fall/' though they spare no pains or 
charge to make themselves invincible. [Half a pa()t\ 0.(7., VoL\ 
nil, No, 1035.] 

About Feb. ? 40. " Inventoiy of our known losses to our best estimation.'*] 
Endorsed, '* Invoice of ships and goods hereunder written, besides 
such shipping as are to be restored, as also the goods returned intoj 
Europe, and so much as yet no adveHisement of'' In the Star^,. 
Bear. Dragon, and Expedition, Sampson and Hound, Solomon and! 
Attendance, Swan and Defence, amounting to 211,540 ryals. [0« J 
2^e. Holland Co^resj}.] 

Miuvh 1. 41. Court Minutes of the East India Company, Petition of John 
Votter, who had l>een taken in the Dragon, tor wages. He says the 
Dutch have a lactory at Aden, with three or four factors. They 
bought aloes at Jacatra. Within 500 lea^ies of the Cape they met 
emss winds, and put into the port of **Linelessee," in the Isle of St^, 
l^awrence. The king there sent them GO head of cattle. He de 
livered in writing his observations of the carriage of the Dutch 
iowanls the English. One Francis Leonard, living at Dover, knowq| 
ill (l\t^ killing of Courthope, from an eye-witness. It wa^ coniidentls 



* 



1 



EAST INDIES. 



19 



1(122. 



March 6. 



expected by the men of the Dutch ahip Enchusen that ** the Dutch 
and English would go by the eai's again,*' and •* that thei-e will h 
lusty booties." Potter*8 wages to be paid, and Leonard went fur 
hither. Mi's, Wickham attends with a letter fix)m the Lord Keeper ; 
attempts to prove that her son Richard took property out with him. 
A compromise t^j be made " to content his Lordship," Tichbome, tlae 
Company^s solicitor, in the Star Chamber againnt Georj^e Ball, to Ix- 
paid his expenses. Tiiii>xjr for the Company, lying at Killmar, iu 
Ireland. The account betwt^en BiiiTell and the Company to be made 
out [Four iKiffes. Couii Bk V„ No. 351-355.] 

42. John Jonsone to Tliomas Brockeden. On behali' of two men 
who arc in a most mij^erable condition, liavin^ Iwxtn robbed of all 
that the King of Cochin had given them, except their shirts, and 
aeek employment. The Great Naige dciUiands the reason why the 
English do not desire to trade in bis land as well as the Portuguese, 
and saj^s they shall have jK^pper and anything the land affords. 
The Danes trade there under the name of English, and are mai'\^el- 
lous well used. He has given them a to\^ii and a place to build a 
castle, which is tinished, and haUi 30 pieces of ordnance mounted. 
[Endursfil, '' I think tliis John Jolui^un went out wiUa the Danes." 
Ofw fHuje, O.C. Vol. VIIL, No, 103GJ 

43, President Fursland and Council to the East In^iia Company. 

The [Dutch] General has had conference with them about making 
peace with Macassar, but this will be prejudicial to the trade of 
Ambojma and the Molucca-s, It was concluded tliat the Dutch 
shall still stand out with them [of Macassar], and we to continue 
trade and to accommodate the Dutch with one half of the rice pro- 
cured. They have received an order from the Dutcli General (Coen) 
for proceeding in trade this next year in the Moluccas, " We shall 
buy and sell freely so tar as our means will stretch, paying our 
proportionable [lart of the charge according to the part of s|)ice which 
we shall I'eceive, and what cannot there be justly divided shall lie 
made here good unto us upon the ending of acco\mts received from 
thence." Their propoHi on of charge cannot l>e leas than 20,000 ryals, 
and nothing but loss can be expected for the ensuing year. The 
Dutcli General requii-ed them to ftumsh a ship to remain in the 
Moluccas with theirs (the Dutch), as last year, but their answer was 
they were not able to perfoi-m it, wanting provisions for so long a time. 
The General not satisfied with this answer, meaning **to take the 
advantage of our wants," they use all means, by giving large presents, 
to pixwent us in trade, '* contrary to the meaning of the Accoi-d/' 
Hav^ deferred giving their absolute answer to the General as to 
" following the exploit for the Manillas " until fuHhcr a^lvice from 
England. The Dutch will send six ships. Tlie Dutch Ijave taken 
nine Portugal ships, woitb SO.Onil lyaLs, with lettei-s statiug that the 
Portuguese trade will be utterly i-uined by the Dutch unless they be 
speedily relieved by the King, The Dutch will take advantage of 
this; in short, they wHll overthrow the Portugals trade in all places 
in these parts, and we wanting the means to send (ships) with theirs, 
the Dutch are sure to allege we ijeribrm not the agi'eement in not 

li 2 



20 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1C22. 



maintaming 10 ships of defence, which we must leave to your 
worships to answer ; t(3 perform we ca^nnot They also again demand 
that an English ship should lye l>efurt! Bantam, aiul that we should 
pay our part of the charges they have been at so long in lying there, 
and keeping soldiers there, and setting out vessels to and fro upoa 
thia coast, which charge now grows so high that they can forbear 
us no longer, and sure they make account that you shall pay your 
part, or else they will wholly thrust us out of all ti-ade, and pretend 
they have just cause for it, bearing all the charge themselves. *' We 
venly persuade ourselves that although the order comes from you 
and their uiastei's ti^ make restitution here for what is due unto you, 
yet they will detain all in their hands under pretence of the afore- 
said charges, so that there is no hope ever to come to any reasonable 
agi^eom*-'nt with them by any fair coui-ses, as may ap]>ear by thtdr 
injuriouH deahngs daily with us/* They demanded nine Lascara 
t4iken by the Dutch in the Portugal prize, who had before been 
captured at Macao by the Portugals trom the English, but the 
Dutch General refused them in discourteous manner, saying wo 
might Ijuy them. Account of a plot by the Bandanese to betray the 
town into the hands of the Javas ; discovered to the General (Coen) 
by two of their own confederates ; some of them tortured, twelve 
of the chief plotters condemned to be quartered, iind all the rest tal 
|)erpetual slavery in chains. The prisoners urged upon the torture 
to confess matte* rs against the English, " but a.s it well happened 
there was nothing of any moment to give any advantage against us, 
yet hereby you may see how they seek by all means to entrap us, 
and in what danger we live being under their authority. Can they at 
any time tind any occasion of advantage whereby to bring us withtii' 
compass of their justice we shall be sure to find no favour from them, 
wherelbrc we earnestly desu-e sjreedily to be released from tins bond- 
age." The Eagk^ from Jambi, and Unity from Aeheen, have arrived 
at Jacatra laden with pepper ; less quantity of jieifper fallen this year 
at Jambi than was expected. Understand that the King of Acheen, 
according to his old custom, Ijegan a little to flatter our factors by 
offering them trade at Teeoe if they would pay well for it, Imt it is 
only a wile to get a good sum of money from us as he iliil from the 
Hollanders in tlieir last two years' trade. Both they and the Dutch 
have determined to withdraw their factors from Acheen the lirst 
opportunity The French Admiral having had a licence for 2(i days' 
trading at Tecoe, departed two months since, laden for France. Tim 
Whale and Trial have not arrived. Are compelled to send home the 
Star and Eagle. Invoice of the goods sent in them. 150 t<jns of 
pepper on board the (Jlove waiting for a ship. The Jame^ exjKrcted 
from Jamlii, Imlireet proceedings of the Dutcli with their fact^u-s at 
Pulicat and elsewhere. The Dutch pretend there are standing debts 
of 60,000 pagodas, and by this trick af>propriate to themselves tho 
whole benefit of that investment. Send copies of tlie factors' letters 
from Pulicat. Instead of accommodating us witli house room, they 
turn our factories into a cottage, and that must \je the pattern for us 
to builtl by, which is clean contrary' to what their masters promised*, 
Thos. Mills' account of the charges at Pidicat, not leas than .t>,000i 



I 



EAST IKBIES. 



21 



iej2. 



lyals a year, *• So long as we live under their subjection there will 
be no profit reajx**! from any place where we are conjoined with 
them in their charge." Send copy of the journal kept in this tkctorr 
and the general accounts up to February. Tlicy must now nit still 
ibr want of means and shipping to send to the factories ; if plentiftil 
Mipj)lie8 <lo not come in gciod time, they will not be able to provide 
laiJing for any of their Bhi|>s, which, if it should so fall out^ it will 
nut only he the ruin of your great nhips, **but alao give the Dutch 
such an advantage in trade as we shall never be able to recover/' 
Only the Clove in port, unserviceable until careened, and they have 
neithc r carpenters nor sheathing nails. The Unity and Fortune gone 
to Japara to be trimmed ; the Unity will go to Pulicat and Masuli- 
imta:iii. There is no ship to send to Acheen. The Fortune, Bee, and 
White Bear only fit to go up the Jambi river, and they have no 
victuals for them ; " it is a miser}' to see how near we are driven.'* 
Only 20 men left for the Clove and the junk Welcome. If offioesv 
went made j?trictly to account at their coming home for all they had 
wasted and embezzled the ahipa would not be in such wants as they 
are. Bad sailing of the Eagle ; slighter hhiy^ more serviceable in 
these parts; the Stai* a good pattern, but stronger built ships neetled 
for the voyage to England. Bail usage of the Chinese by the Dutch 
in Jacati-a, which keeps them from trading there. Cruelties practijjed 
towards them. Death of John Davis, pilot major, in December last ; 
liis gtKHls and will will be sent by next passage. Send accounts of all 
those who have (lied» and other accounts, Lewis Smith, John Ferrers, 
and Chamber??, mirgeon of the Supply, sent home as drunken, vicious 
villains. Roljert Burgess, master of the Fortune^ and Harris, mate of 
the Unity, nearly as bad, Howe commended aa a man to whom 
authority may safely be given. In great want of an ex|>erienced 
shipmawter to Im general sin^^eyor of all ships and mariners, who 
would refonn many abuses. Scott, mate of the Anne, returned " an 
old man, not fit to do ^'rvice." Far better to Bend young, lusty lads 
of 18 or 20, who. though no seamen, would soon learn ; such the 
Hollanders send for soldiers and sailorH. Peter Elliot, master of the 
Anne, recommended for some good employment. James Traughton 
"hatli gotten language and some exj»erienco/' but his small wagen 
make him anxioui* to return home to Ijctter his meany. Tbeii- want 
of authority to reward the well-deserving has lost them many able 
men ; hope it will be remedied. The money that arrives in the chests 
htill short. The factors in Acheen have 800 bahary of pepper in 
tttore. In great want of supplies of mone}', victuak, ink, paper, iic, 
and of a secretary. In favour of Thomas Taylor, maater of the 
Eagle. Two Dutch ships ready to sail to Holland with pepper 
and prize goods ; they refuse to take our letters, *' which is absolutely 
against the Articles of Accord, but they give no regard thereunto." 
[Emiorst'jl, '* K4^ceived [jy the Star about the 26th St^ptcmber 1(j22, 
out uf Irt*lan<l " Eleven [ttuits ami a qmirtrr. 0/1, Vol, VIII., 

So. losai 

March li. 44. Commission from President Fursland and Council to John 

B*tiivi.i. Rowe, Ixiund for England with the Star and Eagle, of which he is 

appointed the chief commander. To sail for Saldanha Ba^^, leave an 



COLONIAL PAPERS- 



1621 



SU Miutin*8 
Lftne. 



Mai*ch 6-8. 



nd 

-1 

8] 

ave 
ugh 

liar 



aocoimt of their voyage there, and take letters for Elngland To 
hewai'e of the savages who have surprised and murdered eight of the 
Hose's men and othei-s. To V»e assisted by James Troughton and 
others named as council. His successor in case of death. To '' can*] 
themselves particularly kindly and lovingly '* towards the DutchJ 
though they may have cause to *' comidain of wrongs and damages ' 
from theru. Signed by — Richard Fiirsland, Thomas Brock edon, and 
Aug. Spaldinge. [Tico^xiges mid a lialf. O.C., Vol. VIII., No. 1038 J 

45- Sec. Calvert to (Carleton). The States Ambassadors 
still here, without doing anything more in the treaty than 
acquainted him withal in his last despatch. They should have 
had audience of the King yesterday, but his indisjiosition through 
the pain in his foot (an inlu*mity wliich is now more familiar, 
with him than heretofore) hindered it. [ExtiYict from Holiuj 
Co^resp.l 

46. Coui-t Minute>s of the East India Com]mny. Cases of Mj-s."* 
Wickham and Rol>ert Owen* Owen to be paid his wages, and then, 
with Adam Denton, to attend the Lord Keeper anfl give satisfaction . 
concoming 1,100 ryals of eight taken out of the ifbrt at Jacatra^J 
He is to prove tliat " what was brouglit away of tlie Dutch's money * 
"was a mere gift, and noway to lie charged uj>on the English; 
'' that the Company may be discharged of it.** A committee 
attend the Lorcl Keeper. Rerpie^t of Mrs, Viney for payment 
Capt. Joiirdain's funeral expenses ; adviaetl to forbeai\ lest it should 
lead to the discussion of other matt.ei*s, '* for thei'c were 4,000 ryals 
missing in the chests whereof he had the charge^ and never any^j 
account given of them." Petition of Jonas Viney for his uncle Capt^f 
Jonrdains goods; also for gooils given him by the Queen of Patani.^l 
reftised, l>eeau8e they were imjustly taken l:»y that Queen from the 
Company. No sen^ant may receive presents to his ot^ti u.se^ Other 
claims made by liim to be considered. BrnTell's account of 2101 
building the Blessing to be examined. Robin.son*s accounts. 

March H. — Robinson's accoimts. Interview between the commit 
and the Lord Keeper with reference to Mrs. Wickham and one 
Owen, Sir Thos. Dale's man. His Lordship is fully satisfied wit 
their projiosals, and thinks they have "dealt very liberally," and 
always ** confident in the justice of their dealings." Letter read fron 
Pnison for a gratuity. He saved them above 200/. last year in bolt 
ropes, and expects to save this yeai* 500/, in sails and 1,000/, ial 
cordage. Pruson s merits. Robin.^n defends him, and is blamed for 
insinuating that the Court does not look after its own interests, but 
encourages abuses, Pruson to "have 30t as a thankfulness/' his 
salarj' of 501. to be continued, and to draw up a scale of proportions 
for sails, rigging, and masts of shifis of several tonnage, that the 
Company may see whether they have been abused heretofore^ 
whole capital to be ma^lo up in tx^pper, kc. Frauds Taylor and 
sureties. Adam Denton '* hath made means to some great person ; 
it were better, therefore, for the Company to settle with him 
themselves than that they be called to it by some superior authc 
rity/' Extracts to be made from lett6xis» &c. of '^ whatsoever may bel 




EAST INDIES. 



2a 



1622. 



of force to charge Denton in any sort." 
more about his debt, and then to be 



Jarrard to be warned once 
prosGGutecL [Eight pages. 



v^S. 47. Prote^st of WiUiam NicoUs against Governor Houtman, 
'* delivered to the (Jovernor the day above written," The soldiers, 

who ought only to have their own clothing, are allowed to have 
out their whole means in cooiiiioilities, which they sell to the 
natives, to the ruin of the " sales in the shop.** Thti Governor 
bought 100 slaves for goody, but compelH tlie English to pay 
money for everything, who are also compelled to pay one third 
of 4,007 gildera for fortifications, &c. at Salx>wa, which now is 
mere ** pretence only;" and serve as stores for their own shipping ; 
then- liouses at Motir and Macao have been pulled down by the 
Governor's orders, the men abused, and one Croft beaten ; Johnson 
also has been grossly treated at Batch ian. The Dutch charge the 
English for things which do not eonceni them ; their object is to 
waste English money and g»*t all the trade into their own handa 
[(hiejyage and a half. 0,C.. Vd, VIIL, No. 1034.] 

March 0. 48, Chamberlain to Carle ton, The States Ambassadors were at 
^^'Oftdoiu Theobalds this week, but could not be admitted to audience of the 
King. On Shro\x* Tuesday they were ftmsted by Sir Edwai'd 
CecU with that temperance that they came all sober away, as 
&a\ang had but six healths that went round. [Extnict from 
D&mestie Carrey, Jac, A, Vol CXXVIIL, No. 41, Cid. p. 356.] 

Mirth [). 49. Sir D. Carleton to Sec. Calvert. On the 13th Feb. his 
iBigw?, nephew arrived with Oalverts lettein of t!ie 7th, in the same 
passage with the advocate, expressly employed by the Dutch Am- 
bassadors in England to pnxiui-t* authoiization fi'om the States and 
Directors to submit tlie arbitrament of the disputes between the 
two Companies to thu King*s decision, but with restriction in the 
point of restitution to 50,000/. ; which when he had proposed with 
good allowance of his Excellency and the States, and was gone to 
Amsterflam to treat with the Company, advertisement came from 
England that the Khig wouid not take into his hands any limited 
arbitrament. They esteem thicS a del ili» "ration of much weight, 
and the whole of the 17 directorB are ordered to the Hague ; mean- 
while the advoeat^^ has returned towards England, with orders 
from the States to their Ambassadors not to be so stiH' touching 
the arresting of the first point of restitution, but to give the King^s 
Commis-Hioners contentment in case they will not yield to the 
t? ^f other [K>intH before it l>e concluded. They have here 

pn 1 at Am^stc'rdam a discourse concuraing their latt.' enter- 

prise agauist the Bandas, much difleiing from that ]>ublished in 
* England ; and with tins and the reports of tlieir Ambafssadors in 
England, they breed an opinion as if much vnrong were done them, 
in the blame which is cast upon their men ami the strict manner 
of [*rocet*ding with their Commi.ssioners ; this (leaving the Com- 
pany to then* o'^m passions) Carleton has encountered as best he 



u 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1G22. 

ini^'ht with Ins Excellency and the Ht-ates, whom he finds so well 
affected towards the rontinnance of the treaty, that he laake^ no 
douVit iliat if the Aiiihassadoi's in England swerv^e from reason, 
they will l>e overruled from hence, if it be known before a preju 
(lice be settled by jiartial reports, [Ertracf from HoUand Corr€»ih\ 

Mai*ch 11-15, 50. Court Minutes of the East India Company. DLscussion 
Avith Pruson about his scale of rigging. He is to shuw ]iroof ijf his 
judgment and nkill in the next ship sent forth. Jairard, when 
a| joken to about his debt by the solicitor, makes " great moan ** 
his offers not satisfactory. Whale fins to be sold by the candle next 
Court ; 2i^/. to be the first price, 

March 13.— Case of Mm Wickham. Tlie Court ofier her 30(W. for, 
tjuietness sake, in full discharge of her claims. .laiTard petitions for 
favom-. The Court does not tldnk hiui deserving of it, l>ut post- 
pones action till Lady Day. Mrs. Yiney and Jonas Viney refuso 
the Company's otfers concerning the estate of Capt. Jourdain. Case of 
Mr. Salmon and his wife, late widow of Capt. Bonner, slain in the 
Dragon. Examination of Pruson ; he is again admonished ; Swanley 
to draw up a scale like his for sails and rigging for comparison. 

March 15. — Report^s of Pi'uson ; he is to lie alio we* 1 a fair trial of hi» 
skill. Petition of William ajid Francis Singleton in reference 
estate of their brother Thomas. Letter i-ead from Barlow of th* 
1st of March, touching the maces, nutmegs, &c. taken from the Eng' 
lish at Pooloroon aiul Lantar by the Dutch, who gave no tlirect' 
answer, liut deiiiandeil respite for eiglit days. Order to take out 
a half capital in jtepiiei- confirmed. Price of calicoeSj duttees fixed. 
Complaint of Pldlip Jacob about some ]>urchases. Home satinn, 
tissue^ and scarlet cloths laid with silver and gold, iScc, turned over 
firom the Muscovy t'ompanv, not fit to be sold at the General Court, 
[Nmeparjes, Court Bk. K 3B3-37L] 



I 



Mai'ch L' 



March 15. 
Mil lay H. 

March ^g. 



March ILL 



51. Minutes of a Geneml Court of Sales. Those of the gene^ 
rality absent to be fined 12f/. each. List of goods sold, including 
diamonds, peppei', bastas, duttces, and silks from Persia^ with 
names of purchasers and the prices. [Tint payf^. Cinirt Bk. V.^ 
372-373.] 

52. Declaration of William Nicolls, in reference to a ditferenco 
with Genera] Houtnian, touching accounts. [Three (juurtera of a 
IHifje, 0J\, Vol VII L, No. 1037J 

53. Giles Cole to William Nicolls at Malaya. Ha8 ilelivered thdj 
letters intrusted to him. The Dutch *'only looked upon Mix^rteerc **1 
(Motir), and put to sea before he arrived. HaK receivcfl from Johnf 
Gonninge 300 ryalsof eight, and a slave named SaUaniat, valued at 95 f 
ryals of eight, for Thomas Johnson at Batchian, and has left 10 ryalaj 
witli Gonninge for a debt owing to Perry. {In a jx>stacnpt Co&l 
mys he has (kiivered the slave and m€mrtj fo ThmiasJolinson. OiieJ 
page avd a qnurler 0X\, Vol. VIIL, No. 1040.] 

64. [Pi*esident Fursland and Council] to the East Imlia Com<»| 
pany. Hope the Stai* and Eagle have had a short passage* 






i 



^ 



EAST INDIES, 



26 



1622. 



March 18. 



" Although time is but short since their depirturo (10 days) yet we 
have new occasions of complaints of tlio injuritis offui^'d us l>y 
oiu* false friends the Hollanders/* At Huecjidana Mr. Pirk was 
denied by order of the Dutch General a [>as.sage in their ship. "At 
Jainbi the Dutch also do their best to ovurt^hrow our trade, as to 
their contracts for the equal division of pepper and bringing down 
the price ; they are not ashamed to break all a^cement-vS and j>ro- 
mises passed V*etween uh." They seek to draw all the trade to their 
town of Batavia, and to get all the peyiper trade into their o\%ti 
hands. " To bring their purjjose to pass they care not what it cont 
them, holding this maxim that although they should not get their 
charges by trade for two or three years* time, yet if they may work 
you out their cost will l»e well bestowed, for afterwards they will 
soon get it up again." The Dutch mean to set forth a fleet of 15 
sail, of which seven are great ships and the rest pinnaces; their 
destination is imknown, but a^ they carry all soris of tools and in- 
strumentft for fortification we suppose it. to be Mocawe (Macao ?), 
or some of those islands near iwijoining, and failing that Cai^o 
Sperito Sancto in the Manillas, there to lie in wait for the phi to 
sliip, which comes yearly out of the South Setis. The Italian 
proverb is Chi tutto abbraeia nulla striwj€y and so it may come to 
pass with them for all their greatness- 400 tons of pepper on board 
the James, the rest of her lading expected from Indraghiri, but 
doubt she will arrive in England this season. At Pettapoli and 
elsewhere good sorts may be provided and at less cl^arge than at 
Pulicat* At all place.s where they ai-e under the Dutch the charges 
arc greater, so you ma}^ please consider whether to be free from 
them may not be more beneficial for your trade, than to live under 
their subjection, and take theb leavings. Bantam holds out in it^ 
old manner, no tidings of late from thence ; nrv persuaded this 
Pengran will never make any accord with tlie Dutch. When we 
i\*oeive our capittd we intend to make another attempt to come 
to some agreeuient with him. [Two pages, O.C, Vo. VI I L, 
Ka 1041.] 

55. Court Minutes of the East India Company. " Scandalous 
imputation" on the Company by the grocers as to indigo dust sold 
to them ; " for tlie satisfaction of tlie world/* a committee is ap- 
I>ointeil to examine the indigo. "The States having In^en with the 
King the day before, the Company are to attend the Lords at tlie 
counsel l>oard that afternoon ;" a committee appointed for that 
purpose. Indigo taken by Brettridge on security of 2,400/. in 
the second joint stock. How " to advance the vent of caUcoes.** 
Discussion as to the stock to ho called in next year, and the 
Companv^s del»tii. Thr* first stork, consi.sting of 400,000/., under- 
went the interest of clOO.OOO/. oi' 400,000f., and therefore this being 
so great a stock, may well liear 200.000/. at interest, whereto was 
answered that the eliar<;e of the second is far greattr tlian of tlio 
first, liy reason of the intunniption of trade, returns luive been less, 
ProfM>sals to lessen the charges by dissolving unpniiitahle faetories 
at Japan and the like. No great i[uautity of calicoes to lie 
bought at Surat, as two years* return of those goock and indigo 



26 



COLO>[IAL PAPERS* 



March f^. 

BatchifiD. 



March 22. 



1621 

are expected from otlier jilacea tliiy year. Sufficient stock left at 
Siu'at to lade bume two ships. The charge is great, both for the 
Mobiccu trade and their 30 sail of shipping now abroad. Their 
resolution will depend upon the conclusion with the Dutch, or the 
advice Iroui Bantam by the next ships. 2();000/, proposed to Ik? 
sent yearly to Surat, and 2,000.000 ryals to Bantam. [Three pa/jes. 
Court Bk F., 374-37Ci.] 

March ID. 56. Locke to Carleton. The States had audience of the King on 
Sunday last [ITth] in hia bedchambtu', and they have sat in council 
with the Lords t.^Hce or thrice since they were wont to do. It 
is thought that things will go forward woll now betwixt our 
Commissioners and them, but yet there is nothing come to a heath 
{Extract from Donn^^tic Corresp., Jac. I., VoL CXXVIIL, No. 59, 
Col. p. 3G1.] 

57. Thomas JohuBon to [William NicoUs at Malaya]. Will 
endeavour to procure a general reckoning with Rowle. " For the 
nut trees, if I caimot have them I will t<?ach them a trick not to 
bear, for no^v they hang so long, that they endanger our lives in 
falling down." Sends receipts (annexed) for SGO rvals and the slave 
Sallamat. [0ns page. OC, VoL VIIL, No, 1042'] 

58- Ooui*t Minutes of the East India Company. Pinjson delivers 
his scale for rigging, &c. Long discussion about the indigo. Letter 
read from the King requesting that all accoimts may be eleai-ed 
with Sir Dudley Diggs, whom he intends for sei-viee in Ireland, 
and a reasonable valuation of his adventui'es in the second joint 
«tock be made. It wm held not to be in the power of this Court to 
do so, but his readiness and ability to serve the Company ** both with 
his tmvail and with his pen," and his watehfidness upon all the 
Company's occasions Ln the late Parliament, and His Maje.*^ty s 
request, were considerml HLs adventure is worth 4,000f., of 
which 2,375L is paid ; and he owes 1,500/,, half of which is upon 
intert*8t Hurt chosen by l>allot to succeed Richard Atkinson 
deceased, to pay mariners' wages, &c,, with a aalaiy of HOL Charles 
Charles to l>e his servant. [Three }X({fe8, Cowri Bk, K, 37(>- 
370.] 

59. Sir Walter Aston, the English AmV>assador, to Lord Digby. 
Aljout the -^ih of this montli there departed from LisVjon four car- 
aques with a new vice-king for Goa, and in their company four tall 
ships of wai' vnih soldiei-s and a new Governor for Ommz, which 
makes him believe a report lately spread in the Court, that the King 
of Persia quanvls \nth the Portuguese for what they ix>ssess in the 
Gulf of Persia ; but the Pei-sian having no shipping, he will doubtless 
l>e able to do little hurt to Ormuis. Sir Rolx-rt Sherley, who has lieen 
hei^ some years with a Persian embassf^, is at length despatcheA 
Does not understand that he has coneludod anything of imfjortanee 
but has ]yevn well entertained, and has now 1,000 ducats given him 
for his joumey anrl a jewel for his wife. He goes to Rome, the 
Emperor's Court, Muscovia, and so to Persia by the Caspian Sea. 



Majch23. 

Mail rid. 



SMk 



EAST INDIES. 



27 



162S. 



March 24. 



HftTcb 25. 

Tbm Hague. 



March 27. 



Iwh28, 
April 7, 



28 
May 28. 



He insists much on procuring a trade for the EngliBh East India 
Company out of Pei^ia, by the Caspian Sea, the Volja, and throUiq:h 
the Muscovite*8 country » and says he will himself write to the King. 
[Extract from Spanish CoiTespondence,] 

60. Sec. Calvert to Cai'leton, We have in a manner agreed 
upon the first article with the States Ambassadors concerning the 
restitution of the goods brought into HoDand, if the merchants can 
agi^ee amongnt themselves of the value and of the moneys mado 
upon the sale, which is their work ami not the Commissioners. I 
hope we shall next week proceed to another and find less difficulties 
now the ice is broken. [Extract frmn Holland CoiTesp.] 

61. Carleton to Calvert. The 17 Dii^ectors of the East India 
Company appeai'ed here, but made no stay. They remain at Am- 
sterdam by order of the States untii after news of their Ambas- 
sadors* audience with the King (which they now expect hourly), 
they liave deliberated of tlieir further proceedings. Meanwhile 
nothing is done either there or here in that business. [Extract from 
Holland Corrmp^ 

62* Court Minut43s nf the East India Company. Adam Denton 
desii'es an end of his diftei'ences with the Company. Cirowing 
impatient at the various charges made against him. he demands a 
Ust of them in wi*iting; which is granted. Sir Dudley Diggs requests 
that his petition for the sinking of his adventure may be referred 
to a General Comt, He is to be allowed the SOOZ. given him as *' a 
gratification for his late service in the Low Countries." Otler for 
indigo dust. The Governor sent for to attend the Lord Admiml. 
He requests that some of the committees may accompany him, and 
Uiat Mr. Treasurer Stone and the rest will he^r the petitioners 
attending without. [Three pages. CouH Bk, F., 380^382.] 

63. Mathew Slade to Carleton. Tlie 17 (Dutch Dnectors) 
retumetl from the Hague not well contented with the States order 
which, notwithstan<Ung they have sent to their Commissioner in 
England, and having refused to consider what Mr. Barlow pro- 
pounded on behalf of his mastei-s, are departed hence. They to 
whom Slade has sjK>ken, made show of great desire to compound, 
saying that they know that tliis difierence will othei-vinse turn to 
their ruin, but in their meetings there appeareth much obstinacy, 
[Extrtfi'f fnnn Holland Citrrmp.^ 

64- Abstract of what passed in the treaty in England betwixt 
the States Ambassadoi-s and his Majesty's Commissioners, from the 
28 of March to the 28 of May 1(522. 

March 28. — This day, after his Majesty had given audience to the 
States, the Commissioners proceeded in the treaty. The first thing 
s|V)ken of: the principal sum of the goods brought into Holland, 
not agreed upon in respect of inttTest deuianded by our men ; ordered 
that the merchants meet anil agree if they can, if not to be refeiTed 
to the Commissioners. This jx>intof restitution at an end^ the Dutch 



28 



COLONIAL PAPERS- 



1622. 



\sed 



laii^^ 



exhibit a paper of the taking of the Black Lion for our merchants to 
answer. 

April 1, 2, and 4. — The cixiestion of the price of the pepper 
brought into Holland, and whether sold at a full price discussed 
(on thi\SL' three dayn), the inerehants on both sides dehver in th^ 
) lapel's, l)»it no accommodation being made " upon this difference, 
treaty breaks oftV* 

A]ml 11. — The States having addressed themselves to his Majesi 
upon the difficulty they ibimd for any further proceeding in the 
treaty, he commands his Commissioners to ]>roceed further ** being in 
gi^eat hope and assurance, kc.,'* and the pouit in qnestion is suspended. 
The taking of the Black Lion by four English ships the next 
ffuestion. The papei-s to be tmnslat^d. The King commantls my 
Lord (President ?) to move about the trade of tin. The proi>osition 
touching the liberty of commerce is new unto them ; they have 
] lower to hanille it, but it overthrows the fundamental laws of theii' 
State, and they hope the King will innovate nothing in it. M 

ApT'il 15. — The pafiers reciprocally delivered by way of complaint; 
answer and reply will best sliow the state of the treaty touching the 
Black Lion. Time taken by us to answer their reply. " 

April 29, — The answer t^:) their paper this day read. Comp 
made of songs against the States, kc. Care has been taken to sup- 
press a book printing coneeniiiig the insolencies of the Dutch, but 
on the other side there come tlaily sucli scandalous books out of 
Holland, both against the State and €iovernmont» as is not sufferable. 
Thc cause of this liberty of our merchants in their last paper comes 
from the Commissioners, for when our merchants used an unseemly 
word my Lords rejaroved them for it and caused them to tear th< 
])a|>er in their presence, but at tlieir last meeting, when their i»a] 
contained many scandalous words, they never reproved them for 

April SO and May 2,— The fiict of the restitution of the Bl 
Lion lieing agreed u\>on, tlie meaning of the words *' en eftect" 
tUsinited, we maintahiing that the Black Lion came not eflectually 
because we were none the richer for it, and the other side tb 
it came etiectually, that is really, Ijecause it was in oui* hantls 
days, auii that the wor<l -was put in to distinguish between g( 
}ierishing in tight and those that came really to us. 

May 7, 8, 10. — Being so unfortunate as not to agree about 
interpi^tation of '* en effect," they had recourse to the King, w 
referred the resolution of that j>oint. Then the particulars of i 
loss of our ships were read and the pa|>er delivered in by 
merchants. All ships ought to be delivered by the treaty; soi 
have been restoi-ed, some refused. The arrival of the Bull in the 
Indies certified by Derick, Basse, and Borell to lie a sufficient and 
alisolute publication of the treaty, wlier<*ii|>on the ships ought to 
have Ijeen restored Arguments whether tlie publication of the 
treaty could l>e made in the Indies before the ratiiication anived 
there. Agi^eed according to the article of answer of Derick, Basse, 
nntl Borell. The Swmn is confessed, and the Defence came 



tnly 

1 



IS 



EAST INDIES. 



29 



1622. 



29. 



iheiD. The Dutch deny that doraaml was evor ina*l«* for the ships, 
but our merchants allege that it wan, though tin* puhlication of 
the treaty was a sufficient demand, by the testimony of the factors* 
who made it, and by the answer of Coen himself The Bear 
demanded in August last, but denied ; the Sampson demanded, hut 
denied ; the Attendance in the public service of both Companies. 

May 15. — This day spent in examination of proofs showed by the 
Englidh in demanding the Bear, Dragon, Sampson, and Attendance. 
The Lonls think them sufficient, and give their reason.^. The Dutcli 
cannot admit the publication of the tnmty to have been a sufficient 
demand ; the Defence, Solomon, and Attendance were al>andoned, 
the Star and Swan restored in the Indies, the Expedition last on the 
eal»le uf the Great James, the Dragon refused because spoiled, but 
the Be.ar, Sampson, and Hound it is equitable should be restored. 

May 23.— The States acknowk^dge the ^Titing of the EngUsli 
merchants to be jujst, but deny it contains any sufficient demand for 
restitution of ships. Our merchants do not know of any agreement 
made for a day fixed for the publication. 

May 28. — My Lords maintain that the publication of the treaty 

was a sufficient demand for re^stitution. The States that to demand 
the execution of the treaty is not to demand the restitution of the 
ships. The Lord Treasurer that by the pubhcation of the treaty 
the ships are to lie deUvered. Lord Hamilton that General Coen's 
answer implies a demand waa made, and a man now in England 
will swear the demand of the sliips was made upon the arrival of the 
Bull. This having been so long m debate, and made so plain, to hiy 
it by now were to dispute mueh and <lo nothing, but if it lie accorded 
the States shall find the merchants oveiTuled. Tlie States wish the 
merchanti> to confer, but they having interest are not expected to 
agree when the Lords that are indiffei*ent cannot agree. [El(^fjen 
fHiges. In the handwritinfj of Thos. Locke,, endorseil as above bt/ 
CaddicM, East rndies, VoL IL, No. 17-] 

[iVJS. — After this the EnglidL Commxmwnera and t/tc Dutch 
Andxi^satlom came to a stand (see No, 95), but Offain met an 
10 JiUj/ {No. 112), there having been in the meantwm ''divers 
jxirlcys" between the rne^^hauts (KoAOH). Thei/ eume, hoivever, to 
another stand on t% Jidtj {No. II (J), ami two dat/H afterwanh the 
nt'tjotiatiQns imre quite broken off {No. 117). So the Ktmj com- 
nuiiided Sir Ed. Convxty to endeavour to reniew the treaty, and aft^r 
the laj^ffe of about a ifnonth jxdnts of accommodation ivere detjoied 
before the King on 15 Sept.f upon which negotiaiurDs vmre renewed 
bdwem the English Conimissioncrs and the DuAch AmboHsadont. 
The several jwinfs di^iciisscd and ttte argninents ihat were urged on 
both sides — iwt a single pctjter hnving a date — are ealeridared ami 
ptaced fdl together at p. 80 et seq. Tlte several reports of the English 
LoMs Commissioners to tlte King on the issue of these negotittfionM 
icill be found caltiidai^d, see Nos. 105, 1G7. 17^. 187.] 

85. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Discussion on 
Sir Dudley Diggs' case. " For their respect to the merit of the 
gentleman,'* he is to have the 300;. gratilication (which otherwise 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 







been swallowed up by hia debt), and to give bond ft 
► yHjjriurQt of princijial ami interest of his debt " at a year's day, 
Atkinson^s aecoiintis to be audited at once, that his wido' 
' *^4Bt' - the Court of Orphans *' a peifect inventory* of his 

I' 11 as Uj the stock to be brought in next year. 

mtaA BeedcKl as last. They owe 170,000/. odd, besides I0b,000r 
lll# old joint stock to be paid by ibur half-yearly payments, Hj 
% capiat must be brought in, or the treasurei's threaten to real 
IW mittiir not to te debated at a General Court., as itw necessity 
ilMtityTftii^'l ; yet for tlie "' more giace " and authenticity of 
bufliagj^ it is to be decided at a fuU Court. Motion for raising tlie 
jieioe of indigo, as ** In^mg a business of gi'eat consequence/' ivfe 
tu a fuller Court, rueantinie none to be sold. Complaint of tl 
bbeuit kiker eontrack>r8 ; owing to the badness of last year's wheal 
antl tlie ileaines-s of old wheat, they have lost greatly on theij' coi 
ImA. [Three pages. Coxirt Bh K, 383-^385.] 

381 60* ^h' Jolin Wulstenliohne, 8ir Nic, Fortesctie. and others 
Sir ^.'lerneiit EdiiioiKles. Prict.*s that should l>e allowed for ire 
Cirduiuioe and shot, aud which the East India Company have pai 
i\f late yeai*H. Think 0/. per ton for all above demi-culverins 
IW. \>ev ton for all under, an indifferent price. [Donu^tic Corre»fi\ 
Jm L VaL CXXVIIL, No. 94, CaL p, 3(>3J 

>0 67. CluiiulH^rlain to Carleton. The Stat^^s have been with th^ 
King twice or thrice, and with the Pri\^^ Council oftener. Hear 
the [Dutch] Eiwt India ship that was stayed is restored, and he 
UaUHHl that took her, and his commission taken from hii; 
\Kxtmd /mm Donustic Corresp., Jttc. /,, Vol. CXXVIIL, No. 9fl 
( 'le/, p. 3()0.] 

68, Hubert Bai'low to Carleton, Since the Dutch Coinmia 
HioutTs' aiklienco of tlie Iving thei*e have been several meetings, on( 
of th«j grc'ati'Ht jioiTits of iuiportance l)eing as good as agreed upoil 
vix., coueiM'uiug the rt'stitution iyi those goods which the Dut " 
h<ul bnriigiit hither tmd sold. Having made a 1x*ginning tlier 
XH. no doubt hut tliere will 1j6 a good end, and that our Con: 

tHiny mIuiU have iwvsonable good satisfaction for their damag 
/« ' ^\s that the Marquis Hamilton and Mons. Aerssens wet^ 

|)« Mat lahouitHl most to bring out this good beginning. 

ti\wii the < Suupany liere good content to hear what passes 
ii»„,t.»,iJ tnknciu-ning tbeir business, and they say this being one 
^ik \ hope 1ici\*4iiler there shall never be the like occasion 

Wv^'' » I every point they will perform the contract and not 

4jrK*f IvivH any M'ay by any goods taken from the EngU.sh_ 

o^ there hath been errors cunjmittixl on both side 
\[ long continue would jirov^ th*' hol>vtrsion of bot 
I lloUajxd Corre^p.^ 

i%ih'ort to (Carleton). We stick still here in oil 

^ st-vU^s Amliassadoi*8» not having concluded any on 

{\\AvH and nut ours, whu have yielded uiore tha 

thein nevertheless hacking and taking all ad 



EA8T INDIES* 



31 



Lpril 



vantages upon the least difference. Last week two Dutch East 
India ships were taken in the Narrow Hem hy two of tlio King's 
shipi^ under Sir Heniy Mervin and Capt, Portei'. HLs Majesty, out 
of r^pect to the States, was contented not only to dt*liver the ships 
and goods, but to c-all in Lor<l Oxfonl's Coraniission, and on 
complaint of some o<lil ends embezzled out of the ships, to write 
to Plymouth that they should be restored to the proprietors. 
[Extrad frorn Holland Corref^p.'] 

70- Minutes of Consultations by the Council of the Fleet of 
Defence off the IManlllaB. Directions for the eruizijij^' of the Moycn 
and the PeplKJrcora, and for the bringing in or destruction of 
prizes. The ships to return on the 1st of May, Also for the cruise 
uf tlie Hope and the Elizabeth- 
April 20, off Mamvilla. — ^Reanons for being unable to attend the 
coming of the Plate ship. Four ships to be sent to Macao to sur|>rlHo 
Portuguese frigates and junks. Disposition of the Fleet To direct 
their course for Macao and thence to Firando, about ^\^^^ Tlie 
Portuguese prisoners to In? sent to Mac4io» Ui be exchanged for 
English and Hollandei-s, if thei*e be any tlu r*- : tli.' (1iine»e to Ikj 
put ashore at Maravnlla. 

April 29, offHartts Bay. — Instnictions for tliu tai*ture of two 
C*hina junks, which are said, " by three Cliristian Chines*;; *' of the 
Peppercorn, to lie under the island of Louan. 

May 4/ off Mindoro. — Resolution to land 4(>0 aniied men and 
seize the goods supposed to Ije stored in tlie island t#f Louan. 

May 9, — Only six empty ve^elB tbund, wliich were tuxnl Tlie 
gOO<ls had gone by sea t«i " Bullingan," and thence overland to 
Manilla. The weather lx*ing foul and the coast dangerous, resolved 
not to attack the village on the other side of the island, but the 
whole fleet to leave Mamlla, lum* ships i^^-^ ir-* to Macao, and six to 
the Straits of PL^cadores. 

AuguBt 2, The Netherlanflers Lodge at Firando. — Declaration of 
Admiral William Johnson that the two Manilla voyageii were 
brought to an end, and that instructions an to their future pro- 
ceedings had l^een received fi-nin the Council of Defonce at 
Jacatra. The ships of the two (Jnmpanies t^j separate, and racli to 
lieai' their own charges, '' The Emperor's Majesty liatli ordaitred 
that all the reprisal goods taken by the ship Elizabeth ii: a frigate 
near the island of Formosa" in 1G20 are to be delivered to his 
factor, Ounrockdono, Governor of Nangamki, and that we should 
keep the empty frigate. Resolved not to jiart with our rights oi* 
the goods, unless by furcL* euinpelled, ** in regaid the inatka- is of 
more consequence to us than tlie goods.", [Sir pa(/es, (),€., Vvl. IX., 
No. 1046,] 

7L Court Minutes of the East India Company, The diamonds 
all sold for 3,000/. Pricea of indigo to lie raised to fis. ild. per lb. 
the flat, and Gh, the hard. A sniall [*innac^ to Ije sent to Bantam 
within a month. A committee appointed to endeavour to obtain tlie 



32 



COLONIAL PAPERS- 



IG22. 



April (1. 



Mercury from the Lord Admiral. Mrs. Wickharns business. She W 
urged to accept their Company's offer, but utterly refuses. Discus- 
81 on as to ilie stock to In? called in next year. 2(lO,MOO/. is thought 
Tieccssaiy, hut some think 150,000/. '* would come wiJlingly from the 
adN^enturei-s, and put them in soiite lieart to proceed." Mr. Treasurer 
Stone showed *' that neither tlie Company'^ occasions can be supplied, 
nor theii" credit supported w^itlnjut bnn^ing in the proportion of last 
year," There are goods enough in warehouse to afford a dividend 
to any that shall desire it. Request uf one Loder on behalf of the 
8ons of 8ir William Smith, deceased, t4^)uehing his adventure. The 
intended training of the City bands ; two corslets and two musket** 
to be worn by the Company^s servants on the training day ; four 
more to he Iwught and hung up ready for all good occasions. A com- 
mittee to consider wdiat shall l^e sent in the |dnnace to the Indies. 
Consideration on the request of the factors for more powx-r for 
i-ewarding and punisliing Demands of certain women for restitution 
of goods taken from their huslmnds in the Indies ; referred back for 
payment to the Company by the Dutch » as *" they were come to 
make an end w^ith the Company for all." The petitionei'!^ have 
already received more than was ilue from the Comj>any ; if tliey 
recover anything from the Dutch they shall have it ; but hitherto 
they have not Ijccn mentioned in the treaty, only in t!ic general 
complaint [Three pages. Court Bt K, 835-388.J 

72, Oarleton to ISec. Calvert. The States are newly assembled, 
ami a flying report of one of tlieir Eaiiit India ships stayed about 
Ply mull th dutli much qualify the general joy at the good success of 
the treaty in England, which Carle ton will never a whit the moi"e 
desjiair of, for lie knows that some of tlie States are not soitj% 
because they see some of their owii men so imtractable that nothing 
but constraint will reduce them to reason. [E,rtravt frm/i Holland 
CorrrKp,] 

73. See. Calvert to (Carleton). The fu-st aiiicle is not yet oon- 

cludeilwith the Stat4?s Ambassaders, and all men l>egin to wonder to 
see their stiffness and unrea*sonable hacking at a thne when they 
have 80 mueli reason to give us all just contentment. The point in 
(juestion is the restitution of the pepper hrought into Holland, which 
(tm ajipeai-s by their ow^i books) was sold by them for 41>,(>00/. or 
thereahouts, the first penny as the phrase is, yet they seek to reduce 
it to 41,000/., notwithstanding that tlie goods were shanietully 
undersuld to their own Conqiany, sujiposmg that they must restoix? 
them. This day they have had audience of tlie Kmg. [Ej^tract 
frovt Holland Corresp.] 

April 10. 74. Couit Minutes of the East India Company. Applicatioi 
of Salmon on behall* of his son, married to Mi-s, Bonner, for Capt 
Bonner's wages and 1,000 ryals delivered at Tecoe to the Company s 
use. His .son going to Oreenland. Salmon asks for 200/., but accepts 
100/. on account, himself being surety. Payment to Burrel on 
account, for building the second new ship at Deptford, Considera- 
tiun of what shipping to send to P»antam ; two small sliips to 



April 8. 

WhitehalJ. 



M 

it I 



iMI 



EAST INDIES. 



33 



1622. 



Madrid. 



rApiil 13. 



at a month's int-erval, better than one large one. The committees to 
be present at the General Court in the afternoon » to support the 
propositions with regard to next yeHVH adventin*es, and the remain- 
ing stoek of pepper. Petition of Richanl Bas.s, whose ** father was 
a committee for 5 years," for the remission of his broke. He is to 
pay interest at 10 per cent 

Uinntes of a General Court. The Governor explains that a largo 
amount of stock will he necessary for thin year, though *' neither 
liimself nor any other of the Company had reason to take delight in 
parting with their money, but yet where the necessity and good of 
the Company rec^uired it, he doubted not but all woidd be really to 
bring in their parts," The committees have carefully studied the 
matter, and are convinced that for the two first quarters a-^ much 
^vill be needed as last year, and propose that the amount for the 
two other quarters shall be decided at a General Court to be called 
for the purpose. Objections: it was urged that 200,000/. waa 
brought in last year, and 100,000/, debt promiBcd to be paid. 
Mr. Treasurer Stone answei'ed that the money did not all come in ; 
"the payment of the Royal James drunk up 40,000/." Balance of the 
Company's accounts. Beside the delit of the new stock to the old, 
about 170,000/. was owing, whereof 48,000/, by insolvents, and 
30,000/. '* in provisions at home.*' The Governor said they must 
trust to the committees, " hanish all jealousies, and rest assured that 
more shall not be called in than needs must." Some of the gene- 
rality offer double the sum asked, rather than the trade should 
suffer. The Governor's projwsals agreed to. Sufficient goods to bo 
stayed out of the next importation, to satisfy those who have not 
yet taken out their capital. Committee nominateil to audit the 
accounts and examine the state of trarle. Those wlio do the work 
*' to hQ honestly gratiiied '* when it is done. Indigo and iR']>{xir 
may be taken out " upon the del jt for the 6rst joint stock." [Ehjlit 
pages, Coiui BL F., 388-39G.] 

75. Sir Walter Aston to Sec. Calvert, Great feasts and triumphs 
are preparing here for solejunizing tlie canonization of four Spanish 
saints, Ignatius, foiuider of the order of Jesuits ; Xavier, a Jesuit, 
that died in the Indies ; Inidro, a husbandman ; and Madre Teresa, 
who died 40 years .since, founilxess of the *' discalsed Cai'melites," 
[Extract fr<mi Spanish Covrenp.'] 

76. Locke to Carleton. The East Imlia merchants have as yet 
received no satisfaction from the Dutch. The jioint of restitution 
left forawliile to see if they can accommodate something else. The 
Dutch are now upon their own grievances. Will send him the 
letter from the Privy Council to the King with their proceedings 
somewhat at large. Two of the King's and two DutcJi ships lately 
exchanged shots, because they would not strike sail according to 
custom, and it is repoiied that they came so close to the Kmg s 
ships that if some other had not fallen in l>y accident the King s 
had been in some danger. \^Exlra€i from Bmaestic CorreBp,^ Jac. /., 
Vol CXXIX., No. 36, Cal p. 376.] 



84. 



COLONIAL PAPERS, 



1622. 

April 17, 

The Hague. 



April 17. 



April 20. 



April 25* 

May 5. 
The Hague. 





77. Carleton to (Sec. Calvert). The slow progress of the treaty- 
gives no less distast43 here than in England ; and the Ambassadors 
would soon be overruled concerning the first article,^a.s lat<}ly 
they were written unto, when the Advocate Burrel returned, — but 
they allege tliat their yielding in this would serve for examplej 
and that which in detail is but light, will in gross pitive fio hen: 
that their Company will not be able to b?ar it ; and so they bi 
a jealousy as if it were purposely intended t4> break their Company, 
but if it should turn to a disjunction of the Comjianies, tlieir Ai 
bassadors will have small thanks at thcij' return. The news 
the release of their ship and restitution of her goods brought by 
Brower, one of the deputies expressly sent over, was very gladly 
understood by the States, and he makes no doubt hut good fruit 
will proceed as well of the seizure as the delivery, they U-ing " 
the one made sensible that sooner or later they cannot but 
into our liands, and by the other freed of despair, [Extmct ft' 
ItoUi tad Co nr^yi] 

78. Ooiui Minutes of the East India Company. Discussion 
liusiness T;\nth the Muscovy Company, in reference to various del>t.s 
owing to them and the houses assigned by the Muscovy Comi>air 
to the East India Company. Committee appointed to exami 
these matters. Discussion as to the fitness of two ships of 10^ 
tons for the Company's service, one, the Ursula, offered at S50i, 
the other, a new ship, at 950f. A proposal to await the return of 
some of their own ships overruled. Advise must be sent for su 
plying the trade at Sural and Persia, A committee to look o\ 
for a ship. It %%all be time enough for the second pinnace to 
at the end of the treaty. Payment to John Tapp for printi 
lx)nds for merchants, factors, mariners, &c. ; Id, k bond for the 
greater, and ^d for the less, thought too much. The Commis- 
sioners of his Majesty's navy may have the Coaster, to fetch knee 
timber from Ireland, at 20^?, per month per ton without ordnance, 
or 2h. with. [Four pages. Court Bk. F,, 3D7-400J 

79. Locke to Carleton. The States have concluded nothing 
atout the merchants' business yet, the first point about restitution 
is now refeixed to the King, and they are upon the next, which 
is satisfaction for wrongs they pretend to have been done them ' 
English merchants. [Extract fro7n Boinestic Corresp., Jac^ 
Vol CXZ/X., No. 50„ CtiL p. 378.] 

80. (Carleton) io the East India Company, Earnestly entreats 
them to continue letting hiiu know what passes in tlie treaty, tl 
he may inform the gi^eatcst on this side of the truth, which 
ordinarily disguised with false reports; as also any means wher< 
he may contribute to the advancement of their business, 
nothing to conmiunicate at present, only that he conceives that 
the late taking and release of the Dutch ship may lielp towards 
an accommodation of their controversies, wlien they on this sida 
considering in the one the goodness of his Majesty, and in " " 
other the power which we have of doing ourselves right, will 
kept from despair, and likewise see a necessity of giving sal 



1 

,in9 



ion 
ic^i 

I 

vats 



A 



EAST INDIES. 



35 



nett 



faction; to which he knows the States to stand well resolved, 
[Extmdfi'om Holland Cm^re»p.] 

26-29. 8L Court Minutea of the East India Company, Withexa, a 
brother of tlie C\impany, who has made several com]ilaintfl about 
the last General Court and the conduct of the committees, to be 
called to the Court to declare himself more paiticularly. A^eess- 
ment on the Company's property at Deptford. Committee to settle 
Adam Denton's claims, as " he hath used great means by very 
honorable friends/* and his request is rea^^onable. Committee for 
the Muscovy- business to meet on Monday morning. A new Hhip 
has been found complete, which *' will be had for reason/* Ijt^tt^ii-H 
to be requested from the Loi-d Treasurer to the officers of the 
Customs in all ports westwards as far as Pl3,Tnouth, that on the 
arrival of ships from the Easi. Indies " there ho no goods carried 
ashoiw which is a thing that hath been done to the gi-cat prejudice 
of the Company;" If the letters are granted, one of their aervantt* 
to be sent to Plymouth to see to their execution. The 400/. arU 
venture in question between William Palmer and John Gerrard 
to be detained in the Company's hands by order in Chancery. 

April 2D. — Mes.sages by 8ir William Heydon and Mr. Endymion 
Port-er, servants of the Prince, from the King and Prince. Poller says 
that liis Majesty has received messages and letters from the Great 
Mogul, asking for such rareties as this kingdom aflbrds, in retunn 
for rich presents of that country. His Majesty has determined Ui 
present him not alone with jewels, '* hut likewise with st»me in- 
ventions, and paHieuiarly with that of conveying water into their 
houses in such a manner as will Ix* a great cooling and refreshing 
in those extreme hot countries, and a benefit much desired ly the 
Mogul," His Majesty sends, not to ask the Cumpany^a ju<lgment 
or a<.lvice, but that they might use the Princess sei'vants if they 
so thought good. Heydon says that the Prince has planned an 
expedition for " the weighing up and recovering " of sunken treasure 
ships in the East Indies by means of an engine devised by one 
Cornelius Dryvet, which " shall fetch up any weight/' Also '* there 
is a l>oat devised to go un^ler water, where men may hve, and if 
need V>e a man may go f^jith and walk under wak-r 20 or 30 yards 
and use his arms to any kind of labom-:" No i»rejudice is intended 
to the Company's trade; they will carry no goorls; nor "make 
any desjiemte attempt upon any the shi|>H or places of that country." 
These things heard before hy the Governor from the Marquis Buck- 
ingham, also from the King and Prince, but he wished that the 
whole Court may justly express their duty and '^service to his 
Majesty and his Highness." Arguments. It is feared, partly from 
experience of the Eail of Warwick's expedition, that these shij^H 
" might attempt something Ui make up their voyage (in case their 
first hoi»es should fail), which might endangi^r the Com]*any s 
stock.** The King and Prince will Ix* answerable for their servants. 
It is luged that the Company must yield if the King and Prince 
will, and prassed that the expeditions may }m deferred. Com- 
mittee appoink'd to draw up petition to the King and the Prince. 
Demands of Smifcbeck^ engaged to go factor to Bantam ; he wishes 

c 2 



sm 



m 



^^s^ 



36 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622. 



May 3. 

WhitoUall. 



May 3-10. 



M 



io Ikj President, and refuses to be comiBanded by any man in the 
Indies. The Court, disgusted with '*lii8 pride and overweening of 
himselC and his ingi-atitude aft-er all they have done for him, 
discharge hira without any compensation. A new and suitabl 
ship found hy the committee. [Seven jxxgm. Court Bl\ V., "i01-40S< 

82. Sec. Calvert to (Carleton). The States Ambassadors and 
we his Majesty *s i^ommissioners are again at a nonpluB upon the 
second article, which m a complaint for the restitution of their shi 
the Black Lion, whose goods were casually burnt whilst she wi 
in our men's hands. The difterence is about the understanding 
a gloss made for the clearer interpretation of the fii'st treaty, whi 
clearnes.s is yet so obscure as we cannot agree upon the meaning 
of it. The words are that restitution shall be made '' de part 
d autre " of such goods as shall come into their hancb " en effect,] 
which they would have to imply actual possession ; *' wo on t 
other side *' maintain that tliose goods only are said " perveni 
cum efiectu *' or " in elfectu, ex (|Uibus locupletior factas est." ai 
that we, not being the richer for them, are not tied to restitutio] 
The argument laid down nakedly may seem somewhat weak, a; 
we have not insisted peremptorily on a refusal, but are content 
to leave it in suspense as they liave tlie first article. " Tliis likes 
them not by no lueans, and so wo are broken oti' again, until H. M. 
piece us, which J cuneeivc he will do, the States Imving audienco 
of him to-moiTow/' [Ej-trad fronn Holland Corrfsp,^ 

83. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Mrs, Yine 
t^ Iiave 100/. on account of her brother Capt. Jourdain's cstat 
Petition on behalf of *'a stranger's son bom in England." whc 
father was a free brother, for the freedom of the Com]>any. Stat 
of the treaty, Tlie Dutch demand restitution for the ship Blacli^ 
Lion and her goods. The English Lords Com missionei-s declare that 
neither b}' the treaty, by civil law, nor otherwise, ought this to bo 
done. Levinus [Muncke] confident opinion to the same eifeet, "though 
the English had voluntarily and wilfully fired her;" and becau 
three of the Lords Commissioners ** arc not yet satisfied," a cow 
mittee is appointed to give them further satisfaction in private 
this point, " which Ixdng then done it was conceived necessary 
intreat Mr. Secretary to be a means, that the Lords Commissioned 
will set downe in writing under then- hands, a declaration of the"" 
opinion that the English ought not to restore either ship or goods,* 
The propositions of the Prince's sei'\ants, fur sending a ship 
pinnace into the Indies, Paper brought by Mr. Porter of reason 
of the projectoi>i, for the necessity of so doing. Resolution 
attend the Prince with a petition, for "if this project proceed, 
will be exceeding prejudicial to the Company/' Halsey's petitio 
to the King subscriljed by Sir Sydney Montague, read, A com- ' 
mittee to examine tlie whole Muscovy busmess. 

May G. — Suntlieck*s discliarge unanimously ratified, and his note 
of charges disaUowed, Letter read from the Lord Treasurer to th 
ports westward, in favour of the Company, for the better order 
of the mamiers and others aboard the Company's ships arrivic 
home in reference to carr;>ing goods ashore, to the great prejudice 



EAST INDIES, 



87 



tin 



the Company, " for this the Lord Treasurer's Secretary shall be grati- 
fied as in such cases is usual." Request of Joseph Young, master of 
H.IL ship Garland, for balance upon a bond of one Simon Qamett, 
gone into the Indies. Adam Denton s business to be settled on 
Friday next. 

May 10. — Demands of Handson, husband of the French Company, 
for " imposition and pirate money for certain corals shipped out of 
France " for the Company't? use. There can be no imposition, as the 
coral is not a French commorlity, but only passed througli France ; 
and as for j^irate money it is wholly compounded for in the -i.OOO^. 
tliey pay annually. Committee for the purchase of Dearsly s ship. 
Request of George Ball for his goods and apjmrel to relieve him in 
prison, William and Francis Singleton to Ix^ {>aid 257 rj'als of 
eight, as their deceased brother's estate. At the Company's request 
the Dutch Company will cany letters from them, in their next ship 
to the Indies. [Tm pages, CouH BL V., 408-418.] 

84. Thomas Rastell, Giles James, and James Burford to Wm. 
Methwold, i:c., at Masulipatam. Have received their letters of tiie 
2(Sth February and 29th March. Complain of the many and 
excessive wrongs injuriously sho\\^l to their nation ; example of 
extortion ; their merchants detained five months prisoners at Agra, 
and their propeily embargoed ; they have done no less to their 
friends at Amedenares (Ahmeilabad /), *' merely and wholly for 
the Dutch's roliberiea which in remote places are imputed to the 
English " for that both are supposed one Comimny. The natives 
find that the English are best able to pay, and most fearful to 
offend, whilst the Dutch not having much to lose even awe them 
with their threats. Their petitions, comjilaints, bribes, and daily 
soliciting to the Prince and Governor produce nothing more than 
plausible words and promises unperfonned ; not only is their trade 
disturbed, Vmt they remain on most perilous temis, even to the 
hazard of their masters' affah's and estate in India. The Dutch 
** the undoers of the world ;*' if they have any cause of offence 
against these people, they visit it on this port, not to enrich 
themselves, but to damage the EngMsh trade. Have sent the 
Lion, Rose, and Richai'd to Mocha, to seize the Surat junks, and 
hohl them as hostages for the English and their propery at 
Surat. There can be no safe trade at Surat, unless tlie Dutch at 
homo give orders that the Guzerats shall not be spoiled. With 
the value of the junks and the supplies fi*om England they will Ix) 
*'80imdly stored with means sufficient'* for the southern trade, 
and will be as well stored as the Dutch. Tlie Dutch have greatly 
outstripped them in Moluccas, because the English Company, trusting 
to restitutions by the Dutch, forbad them to make investments in 
Java ; and so 25,51)4 rupees worth of commodities for Sumatra have 
remained unshipped for want of vessels; also pepper lies at Acheen 
all through the '' fleet's detention in Persia/' The fleet (Fitzher- 
bei*t*s) designed for the Malabar coast, has not been heard of, Ijut 
has doubtless diverted its coui'S(* some other way as toward 
Mozambique. The commander would not stop or land much goods 
at Suiat, lest he should fall into theii' predicaments, which *' is too 



38 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622, 



May 12. 

Batavia. 









mean and base an employment for a inan of his rank and quality. 
Will send a horse as requested, either by sea or by '*caphila^ 
As to their relation of the Hollanders' successfid proceedings wi 
the Portugals whom they surprised, the miseries of the Engli 
captives at Macao, and the adventures and kind usage of Richj 
Hatfield in C'oehin China, and the King*» desire of trade with the 
English ; a trial may be made of trade there '* when opportuni 
shall minister occasion ;" in the interim enquiries might be mj 
either of the Prince, his trade or dependencies, and correspondem 
witli the FurtugalSj which they will be thankful participants 
Forbear their censure on the proceeilings of the Persian fleet, aiK 
leave to their more mature judgment what benefits may follow? 
as they (the commanders) have gone so far astray without their 
orders, so they have not dared to meddle as yet till they sec theuad 
" utt<.'nnost success ;*' it is most certainly reported that the t<»\ir^B 
of Oniuiz is sacked, but the castle still holds out, yet some affirm 
that that also is surrendered. Tliat which most discredits thei^y 
is the negligence of the Lion s people in letting Ruy Frere [<l^| 
Andrade, the Poiiugal Governor in India] escajx*, after continue^^ 
orders to guard him carefully. After his escape he sent letters, 
pawning his honour to procm*e the release of all the Englis'" 
prisoners with the Portugese ; whereupon the other Portugui 
prisoners wei*e released, to oblige them the more to perfonnani 
Request that their resolutions conceniing the Guzerats may 
kept secret, especially from the Dutch ; t-o send notice to Jacatra, 
that they intend (if these people hindei* not) to send a shij* and 
pinnace with Sumatra and southern goods in September or Octot 
next. Endorsed, " Copy of a letter fi-om Smut sent to Masuliimi 
and fi*om thence hither/' [Titrce pciges and a half, 0*C,, Vol, L 
No. 1047.] 

86* Richanl Fursland, Thomas Broekedon, and Angus 
Spaldingc to Thos. Mills, at Pulicat. The Dutch wiU make no at 
division of the cloth than proportionaldy according to the capifc 
which each shall invest. If this injuriously affects 1dm he is 
protest, and fierhaps may have to remove altogether from Pulic 
for it is conti-ary to reason that they should pay the hall' of 
diarge and cannot have quarter ]iart of the trade. The [Dut 
General tells them he will gi\\i order for a place to be appointed fd 
them to build a warehouse and lodging, and for sliipping the bali 
they have ready ; answer with frivolous exciise, and are sure by ont 
trick or another to prevent them. Hope he will do nothing in the 
building of a house till he has l»etter means. Suppose the gencr 
spleen (of the Dutch) is now qualified, but if they find no alteratic 
must resolve to bear all with i>atience. Tlie Unity ready to be sea 
to him with 20,000 ryals of eight, which leaves them so bare. ^ 
unless supplies come speedily from England they will bo put to \ 
exigency to defmy their charges. Have not sent any money 
Masidipatam. The capital now sent is to be laid out according_ 
the list formerly sent ; not to rely on any further supplies. 
ship to be dispeeded away for Masulipatam as quickly ^^ possild 
[Mathew] Duke appointed to supc^reede [Wm.] Metwold as age 



EAST INDIES, 



39 



1622. 

and Deckle to be merchant at Ma^ulipatam- To send by this ship, 
U* possible, from 10 to 15 able-bodied man slaves, fvom IG to 22 
yeai-s of age. Send a ruiiJet of 17 gallons of sack. Eadot^sed^ 
" Copy of a letter from Ja^atra sent into Pulicat» and from thence 
into England." [Two poi/^^s. O.C, Vol /X. iW 1048.] 

May 12. 86. Governor Frederick Houtmans reply to William Nicolk 
Mftl»ya« complaint ; es[>ecially in reference to a fight between the English 
and Dutch, and to words spoken by the merchant Peter Peters 
Wa^ensfelt, the younger, at Sabowa to John Alexander, master of 
the Ruby, to the prejudice and disdain uf the English nation. al>«oof 
the little satLsfaction accorded to his foiTiier com|.ilaint.s. Ht* earnestly 
and lovingly requests him to send parti culaix of those complaints in 
\mting, tliat he may justify and cleai* him^ielf of that l>efore passed, 
and do riglit according mito merit for the future. Slf/ned by 
Frederick Moatman, Dutrh, with a tmnslution. [Three qiuirterd of 
a p(ije. OC, VoL IX,, No. 1049.] 

ay 15-17. 87. Court MinutcB of tlie East India Comjmny. Illness of 
Hawley ; entertained to go in the next ship for Bantam. Suit of 
Lady Dale against Thomas Jones, late a factor, fur some goods of 
her husband's ; upon reference to the Trinity House it was certified 
that the goods of any man dying ni-e io be sold at the mainmast, 
and no factor ashore ought to meddle therewith. The caase io tj© 
delivered to some well-experienced advocate for his advice. Report 
of the committee on the Muscovy business, in reference to debta 
owing and due. 

May 17. — Review of the Muscovy business, especially the debts of 
Kiiby and Harrison » and of Decrowe for caviare, Clifton's demands 
for some few cwt. of whale fins out of a parcel of 1 4 tons, but as 
** lie wa.s to take them as they were,'* and bought at 2\d, i>er pound, 
which cost the Company 2^. per |>oimd, nothing was allowed. 
Opinion of Dr. Winston that the last surgeon's chest sent to Suiat 
had a much greater provision than was necessary ; the Indies hath 
dnigs in far greater plenty and perfection than here. WoodaU s 
salaiy of ^01. for the provi^ling of surgeon*8 chests, on account of his 
serv^iees to be continued until Midsummer. The Bantam ship to be 
provisioned for 12 montlis. [Ten pages. Court Bk F,, 418--428.] 

88. Rejdy (in detail) of Governor Frerlerick Houtman to a pro- 
ti'st in six aHicles of William NicoUs. JJukh, See ante, A'^o. 80. 
Si(pied by Fi^ederick Moutman. [Ten jxrje«. O.C, VoL IX., No. 
1050.] 

88. Locke to Carleton, The States continue their wonted 
course in meeting frequently with the Privy Council, but yet have 
not concluded anything. This day they are feasted by Lord Exeter^ 
who keepeth his St George^s feast at home. [Extract from Domestic 
Cwmp., Jac. /., Vol CXXX,, No. 104. Col, p. 396.] 

90. Court Minutes of the East India Company. The [minutes of 
the] Couit wlierein tlie bargain with Leate and GaiToway was made 
to be looked up against next Coiu-t Lady Dale's suit agaiast Thoa. 



av ^^^ 



21. 



Tffay 22. 



40 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



May 23 

Ainbojiia. 



1622. 

Jones; she hopes to recover a good matter from the Company 
through *' a strange oath " taken by Isaac Crowther in the Com-t of 
Admiralty, Expenses paid to Capper for prosecuting Bail in the 
Star Cliamber, and the Dutch treaty. Addy&on to he master of the 
new ship, the Abigail, if he will come on reasonable terms. Bartho- 
lomew Churchman's businees ; he has had all his wage^, and a loan 
of 40/. As to his lending money to tlio Company's ser\"ants in 
captivity with the Dutch, it neither appeai*ed under any one of 
their hands nor had he any w^arrant to do so, therefore the Court 
considered they had done enough, and \Wlled him to msi content. 
Not less than 30,000 or 40,000 lyals thought neees^sary to be sent to 
Bantam. [TJiree jxiges. Coiui M\ K, 42H-431.] 

01. Henrie Woolman to William NicoUs at Malaya. Hears from 
the President that [John] Gonninge is to succeed Nicolk, and Georg© 
Willoughby, Gonninge, who [Geo.] Muschamp could hardly have 
spared, only to relieve NicolUi out of that remote and unprotit- 
able place. The cargazon consigned to him is waiting conveyance 
on board the Dutch ^loming Star ; the Eudracht, apfwDinted for the 
Moluccas, was cast away, and 50 men lost, and nothing saved. 
Tliinks the Amsterdam from Banda will go on to the Moluecas ; he 
has a happy time for leaviug, for there will be a giX'at want this 
year in tlie Moluccas ; on]y the Globe and Supply have arrived this 
year ; the Globe brought rice from Macassar, and cloth, but never 
a penny of money. Musdiamp is forced to bon^ow of the 
** Burgers/* Thinks the Globe will have as many cloves as she is 
able to stow* MiLscIiamp Ls bound for Jacatra, and so for England, 
and t^apt. Towemon is here to succeed. Has procured his owti 
l)l>e Hy also, and puq^oscs going for Englaml^ and hopes to have his 
company. The Supply is bound for Jacatra from Banda, laden 
with nuts and mace. *' John Joste had a great loss, being in the 
Entlracht wlieii she was cast away, who, \vith his simpering wife, 
Perera, conuiiend very kindly unt<3 you," By a frigate from Achecn 
he hears that [Daniel] Wiglit in dead, and George Bohinson remains. 
There is little coiTcspondence with the King, he holding lii^ pepper 
at such extraordinarj^ rates. Nan Ubore in good health, and her 
son (Captain Bread-and-Cheese) hath a son also. Tlie King caused 
the children to be brougbt into the eon H to sec them, and has ordered 
Laxaman t*^ see them lirought up. Senrls a lettter brought by 
Hawkeridge from Ni culls' brother in England ; also a letter to 
Peny from " his quondam mate," now purser at Jacatra. Will send 
him ajar of rack by next conveyance, [Tivo jKii/es. OXl, Vol /X, 
AV 105L] 

May 24-31. 92» Court Minute.s of the East India Company. Petition of 
John EUiot to his lilajesty, sent l>y Sir Cliiistoidn^r Perkins, one of 
the mastei-s' of i*c*quest lor payment of wages and jiroperty taken by 
the Dutch. The case already decided by tlie Jutlge of the Admiralty 
and in ParUament, in favour of the Company. Also petition of 
Denton. Committee sent to ex|jlain ; he is satisfied with regard to 
Elliut; but asked for further instructions, that he might know 
how to answer tho King. Sale of the Gamaliell. Kirby and 



EAST INDIES, 



41 



1622. 



Harriso]i*8 debt Request of Abraham Chamberlain about hia 
calicoes. Oaim of Thomas Sussell to the goods of the late Elizabeth 
Afibdowne. 

May 29, — ^Minute of a General Court of Sales. Those absent to 
be fine<i Itih a piece. List of goods sold, with prices and names of 
the purchasers. 

May 31, — Court Minutes of the East India Company. Payment 
to Samuel Hazard for ryals Kupplied to Fui-sland and BrockendeUi 
factors in the Indies. A request of the Dutch for a list of the 
victuals, ordnance, munitions, iSjc. of the ships taken by them> 
referred to the committees " that had entered into speech with the 
Dutch. Request of Capt, Davis for recompense for an anchor 
and cable, lost through the James coming athwart him. Offer of 
Edward James to go factor. Hawley's wages. Committee to set 
straight the account U-tween Mrs. Harrison and the Muscovy 
Coiufiany. ** It is supposed there will be a good quantity of y>epper 
found between the ceilings of the Great James.'' A charge for 
bringing a letter fi*om Denmark containing a rumour of three liome- 
wanl boimd Englidi shifts allowed. Committee to attend Sir 
Christopher Perknis, on Adam Denton's business. [Seven page^, 
CoxiH BL K, 431-438.] 

June 5 93, Sun^ey of the ships Clove and Supply by John Roberts, 

and commander-in-chief, and others, liy order of the President The 

Aug 3. Clove not fit to be carreened. but if lightened might ride in the 

BatAria Uoiid. roads for a year. The Bujjply, so much eiiten and decayed with the 

worm, antl also the Rother. as to Ijc mirepairable. [Emlarsed, 

** Received by the Lesser James, 18 June 10^3," Three quarters of a 

jKige, 0,a, VoL IX,, No. 1052] 

TC22 ? 94, Petition of Wm. Carmiehell to the Kmg. Although his 

Majesty's CV>mmissioners> have often urged a conchision of the con- 
troversy between the Dutch East India C-ompany and the petitioner, 
he can find no eflectual dealing, but dilatory answers, which he 
has customably had these seven years pant. Prays, in case of longer 
delay, that the King vAW grant liim letteiN of rejirisal against their 
ships within his Majesty's dominions. [^Dofaedir (*orrrsii^ Juc, /., 
Vol CXXXV,, No. 20, CaL p, 474.] 

June 5. 95, Sec. Calvert to (Cai-leton). Our CommisHion with the 

uiMtrhall. States has been at a s^d these uiany days. Believes we have 
80 tired one another as iierhai>s the merchants theniHelvcs will agree 
better upon private confei*ences. [Extract from Hullmtd Corresjy.^ 

June .J. 96. Court Minutes of the East India Com|>any. Directions to be 

given in the next letters to the President to examine the estates of 
those who die in the Indies, that '* it uiay best appear how the sauie 
liatb been gotten." Report of the committee a] (pointed to atkmd 
Sir Christopher Perkins about Adam Dentons claims. Denton 
wishes for a settlement without troubling his Majesty, and is to be 
heard in full Com*t on Friday next Message frosn tlxe Lord Admiral 
that the Prince desires earnestly that tlie business of his servants' 
employment into the Indies might go on, and that his Higlinesa 



d^ 



M 



1622. 



June 0, 

Madrid. 



June 7. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



would give assui^ance, both his word and under his liand, that them 
should come thereby no prejudice to the tro^Je, and tliat hit* Loninhip 
wi8hed the Comi>any not to oppose? it. fur that he irt verily persuaded 
the Prince ^all prevail, and if he find liiniselt' opposed will take i^H 
ill, but if tln-ough the Company's opposition he should fail of hifl^ 
desh*e, the Company might thereby utterly lose liis favour. Reply of 
the Governor that tliere were too few to give ann^^er in a business 
of this importance, but woxild at the next meeting acquaint tliem , 
with it, though he knew beforehand that the motion would conn 
unseasonably. Ordered, that the Company's Secretary draw 
petition to the Lord Admiral, expressive of the Company's gi*i( 
for the danger of losing the Prince s favoui^, witli some touch 
the inconveniences in geneiul that may come to the Company 
tlie employment hold, and that they may be admitted t<:) 
Highness' presence. Committee appointed to attend the Loi 
Admiral with a i>etition. [Three jKtges and a half. Court Bk, 
438-442.] 

97, Sir Walter Aston to Sir Thomas Wilaon. Cannot but mm 
commend the industry of the Hollanders who have so providently 
[irwured ah'eady the Bible translated into the West Indian language,' 
that if their necessity drive them tliither they may prest^ntly 
fall in hand with the plantation of the Gospel. [Eodract f 
CWresp. SiKtin.] 




88, Court Minutes of the East India Company. Leaao 
Buttolph Wharf Mrs. HaiTison's debt. Examination of Adai 
Denton touching the money taken from the fort at Jacatra, and the' 
junk taken at Patani, kc; if the Company were "content to enjoy 
the Ijenetit " they must ** sustain the los.s." He admits that he m; 
" 00 corge of Pintadoes " in then- house at Patani, but not at thei 
charge, of which he will bring testimony under Thomas Jam 
** The Dutch mayors came in, and so the further handling there^ 
was referred imtil the aft-emoon.** Capt. Piing io be examined befo; 
the Lords in reference to a question between this Company aui 
the Dutch, *' whether at the comiultation in the Indies [24 A] 
1620] upon the arrival of tlie Bull, the English had demand' 
restitution of ships and goods or not." He will maintain on oa 
that they did so. He says that Cajit. Speck, a Dutchman, caused tl 
loas of the Expedition l>y taking out ballast in order to stow gootls, " an^ 
being thereby over-lightened she overset in a perry of wind, ridi 
at an anchor." The Dutch tried Uy obtain a certificate that she cami 
'* tliwart the James' hawse," ** but could find no man to be of that mindJ 
Lead sold at G/. Gh\ the fother. Further examination of Adam Denton, 
He ileiiies that the junk was *' taken from the Chinessea/' by his 
direction, or that any of tlie 5,000 do!s, taken came to his hands. 
He had no part of the 1,100 ^lols, taken from the Fort of Jacatm» 
by two of Sir Thomas Dale's servants ; but he had a chain of Yan 
den Bruock*s, which he returned, and for which he could show a 
receipt. His desire that neither Sir Christopher Perkins nor any 
other should l>e troubled with this business, but that the Connmny 
shoulil end it, but they rei>lied they must not slight the Master 



1^^ 



EAST INDIES, 



43 



I $22, 



Requests, and must justify themselTes before the world. Isaac 
CVowther not to Ixi employed a^ steward in the Abigail until some 

"controversies depemling in law** ai-e decided [Tvjo jxtfjesand a 
half. CouH Bh K, 443-446.] 

99* [Geo. Muschamp ?] to [the President and Council at Batavia.] 
Acknowiotln;e8 receipt of letters of Nov. 2. Oct. 25, Feb. IG, and 
Jan, 15, by the Supply, the Globe, and two Dutch ^hips ; also copy 
of complaints, and the Dutch General's answer, which he sent to tJie 
Moluccas and Banda, and directs his own conduct thereby. In the 
thinl article the General declares that the debts of the King of Temate 
are to 1:^? discounted in money, instead of Ix-ing paid in cloves as here- 
tofore ; the Governor alleges '* that it \b a misprision in the General,'* 
and must be decided by the Council of Defence at Jacatra. Con- 
cerning the great charge of the Governor s table and moveables ; the 
General, his chief otBcers, sei-vants, and slaves, not lesslthan 100, daily 
fe*l for upwards of three months. Jealousy of the Governor. The 
Olivier for the Ruby coming hither crossed by Governor Houtman, 
w hich is a great hindi'anee to the safe transporting of goo* Is, as they 
are not able to send to the Moluccas and Banda. Tlie Supply arrived 
Jan. 14 with goods and provisions. Sent her to Welden at Banda 
with rice and money, but shoiily after her aiTival she sprung a leak 
and was ready to sink, but is now fit for the voyage. The Globe 
arrived April 9, whieJi it has been determined to keep here this 
year, sending the cloth, fcc, to the Moluccas by the first Dutch ship 
bound thither. Has sent the Supply to him. The Globe is now 
landing rice and cloth at Hittrj, and has done so at Looho. The 
vehement rains interfere with theii' proceedings. A considemble 
quantity of cloves has come in, some in payment of clebts, and more 
is owing at Hitto and other places. In want of means to discharge 
the garrison and pay for the cloves which the Governor requires. 
Has taken up at interest 3,300 lyals to help pay for this years 
cloves, and to comply with the liteiul sense of the article. Has 
bought a house of Sebastian Dancker (Danckaeiis), a preacher, which 
the Governor would not dispense with, feaiing he should incur the 
Generates displeasure, more convenient, commodious, ami substantial 
than the former one ; the cost will soon be repaid, for the rains are 
so continual that sometimes the goods cannot be aired for a month. 
Requests that his bills may be duly honom^ed ; if payment be not 
made according to promise it will l»e the Company's disgrace. The 
Orankays of Looho took good liking to the cloths, some of which 
are to be sent to the Mohicea.s. The Endraeht cast away c^oming 
from Banda ; lost nearly 50 men, goods, and provisions on her voyage 
to the Moluccas, where there are like to suffer great want in con- 
sequence. Will send George Willoughliy with a iresli caigo. Wishes 
•' the mortality and want of factors were better considered at home j" 
tliey have lost [Sam.] Foxci-oft and George Moore at Hitto, John 
Engle Stewart at Ainboyna, and George Spence killed in a duel 
with a corporal, at Cambello ; the Governor shot the cor|>oT"al to 
death upon Muschamp's demand of justice which he "inquired more 
that the countrj^ should take notice of it, than from a revengeful 
disposition, in regard the quan-el was fuU fairly performed." Sends 



4A 



COLONIAX PAPERS. 



1622, 

Short, whose honesty and sufficiency he commenda, to Jacatra for 
recovery of his health. Has taken Edward Collins, purser of the 
Globe, to remain at Larrica; and pot Samuel Coulson, chief at 
Hitto, in Foxcroft's place. Thanks for his " releasement,'* will 
explain all matters to Capt, Towerson, expects to depart from hence- 
the l>eginning of AiigUiit, The charge of the factories has exceede 
that of last year, occasioned hy the long continuance of the fle<2 
at Hitto, but he has reuionstratcd with tlie Governor and now th 
expenses are reformed. Endorsed, '' Reed, the 4th July per th 
Amsterdam. Copyjof a letter from Aniboyiia/' [ioieven pages and \ 
hid/. O.a, Vol. /jr., Ifo, 1057,] 

June -j^^. 100* Governor Hoiitman to Wdliam NicolLs, About supplyi 
Mtiliiyu. the Ruby with provisions during her stay at Malaya and her sailing 
for Batavia. [Dtddi. Half a jxtge. 0L\, Vol, IX., Ko, 1053.] 

June 9. 101. C^onsultation on board the Ruby. She w^as appointed by 

Malaya Kctia. tlie OouncB of Defence to remain in the Moluccas until relieved from^ 
Batavia by other ships, but her wants are so great that without ^ 
great hazard they cannot longer stay. They have no pro\Tsion.s but 
rice and water, and Governor Houtman absolutely denies them^ 
any relief Their rigging is rotten, they have no cordage, an^H 
they are almost dentitute of sails. Signed by — John Alexander,^^ 
master, Peter Bel!, purser, and live others. [One 2^ige^ O.C., VoL IX., 
Ko, 1054.] 

102- Demand of Governor lloutman, '* First Councillor of India 
Governor and Dh^cctur ovt-r the forts and fivctoriea of the Moluccas,*] 
delivered to William NicoDs by John de Vogel, Cape mereliant, anfl 
others, for the pa}^jlent of 20,GS0 guilders, 1 stuyver, and 4(7., bein|_ 
the remainder of the one-tliird part of the general charges during the 
year ending in May last at Malaya, Calamat (Salmatte), Tolucc|Uo/ 
and Salniwa. He had before desired payment, l>e cause he had not 
laded the third jvart of hi.s cloves, but by the lOtli article of the 
Council of Defence at Batavia no cloves ought to be laden or trans- 
]>orted before the charges ai'e lirst paid. When payment is made 
the Lord General is ready to let them receive and lade the cloves at^ 
their pleasure. 2,477 gs. ^d. to be deducted from said sum, 1>eing^| 
thy third of a fourth ]iait of table charges, *' in consideration of the 
iliet of the Netherlands mercliants/' If Nicolls persist in refusir]_ 
these demands, a protest and claim for damages is to be mad4 
against the English Company. [Two pages, O.C, Vol IX,, No, 1055.]" 

June 14-18. 



June }o. 




103. Court Minutes of the East India Company. About the sal^ 
of Buttolph whai*f Arrival of Capt. Kerridge, late President of the 
English nation at Surat, with the Hart and Roebuck ; is welcomed' 
by the Court ; thanks rendered "(a) CJod for his and the ships* safe 
return/* Reasons why the ships come so late from Sin^at. ^^^Hjfl 
opportunity in future to be taken for returning " as the Dutch do. '^^ 
Ordei-s to this effect to l>e inserted in the seamen's and factor's 
commissions, Tlie ships which go to Jask to return direct from 
theoce to EnglamL Building of the new ship at Deptford, Isaac 
Crowther dismissed the Company's service. Suit deixjnding in the 



EAST INDIES. 



45 



1622. 



Admiralty Ck>iirt between Lady Dale and Thos. JonoB* James 
Burgess, who *' hath been six or seven years at the Indiet*/* recom- 
mended aa a fit man for master. Bartholomew Churcliman also 
"recommended for a stout, resoliito man, a good artsman, and well 
experienced in the East India navigation, wherein he hath been 
emplo^^ed two or three voyages* ; but his carriage in point of com- 
mand is doubted, in regard some conceived he was too mnch inclined 
to drink, and that he is a discontented man, but others were of 
opinion tlmt at sea he would cany himself well ; and that his dis- 
content is against the Dutch, not against the CJompany/' He has 
done many good services to the Company, wliich the Court well 
rememl>ered. Messrs. Kirby and AWy to inquire further of him. 
Robert Sampson, "prisoner in the luAa in the Compter for receiving 
M)S. imprest an^l not performing the voyage," where he has Iain 14? 
or 1 n we€^k8, to be allowed to go the voyage, giving security to pay 
all his debts and expenses out of his wages. Refusal of William 
Langton to go master carpenter to Jacatra imder 5/. per month. 
Advice from Sir Thomas Roe, at Constantinople, al»out managing 
the trade at Surat, the Red Sea, and Pei'sia. Kenidge to 1k3 con- 
sulted about the matter, *' The Dutch, how^oi'ver they make fan- 
show of good corTesj>ondency at shore there, yet at sea they practise 
by robbing and spoiling of all ships and lx)ais they meet withall to 
ruin that trade to the English/* and thus they did with the Sampson, 
that the natives might think the English hail done it. 

June 18. — ^Adam Denton's business. A master for the Abigail. 
Capt. Pring's report of Bai-tholomew Cliurch man, whom the Company 
wouM willingly employ if he 1*6 fonnd meet for that charge, in 
respect of his long service, The^^ found him well reported of '' in the 
I>oint of his art, but could have no satisfaction in the point of his 
government." Bm^gess, **an ancient man, peHect in the voyage/* 
** every way fitt/\ and "very desirous to go/* to attend the next 
Court. Eyre to go down to Black wall to-day "to break bulkalward 
the Roebuck." Style and Browne to go down to-niglit to the Hart, 
lying at Erith ; to bo brouglit up t<:) Black wall. An answer to be 
considered to Sir Thomas Roe's letter. Kenidge requests some small 
time to peruse it, 1,0007, to l)e paid at once of the 2,0001, soon due 
for the pirate business, as " the occasion was for the payment of 
mariners, a people not easUy delayed, or delayed of their due/' 
Information that on Saturday last, when the King took barge at 
Black wall, the Roeljuck shot off hve pieces, which made **so wx^ak a 
report that it appears the Company is ill served of powder/' whilst 
the Rainbow, thuugh but " latt^ly arrived from the bottom of the 
Straits," made a very good report. The powder not well kept ; it 
ought to 1x3 aired " in the sun upon fitting days/' and skins are 
pro\4ded for that purpose. The Court did not well like that the 
powder should be so dried ashiplward, because of the many casualties 
tliat may happen, but it may be done ashoix?. The Turkey merchants 
buy powder at the same place, carry it to Constantinople, and yet 
bring it home good. Committee Uj report thereon. Information 
that a bribe was offered by Kirby to rip up the ceilings of the 
James to take out pepper. The matter to be deferred for a week. 



m 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622. 



June 18. 
The Hjigue. 



June 2L 



June 2i5. 
July 5. 

Malaya. 



and Klrby in the meantime to be suspended from the Company^s 
servietj. Complaint of tlio beef; divers conjectures of tlie cause; 
the Thames water may occasion it ; it may be tlie fault of the 
butchers in driving the cattle, and in not bL'taling them enough, for 
fear of decreasing the weight. Thomas Vincent's goods which came 
in the Roebuck, [Niiu /wigr^^. Court Bl\ V,, 446-455.] 

104. (Cai4oton) to Sec, Calvert. The arrival of three ships out 
of the East Imlies puts new life into tliis Compfiny, which did 
languish and was brought so low that they have set out no equipage 
for that navigation tliis year, and tlie news that two English ships 
as richly laden came in consort witli them doth much rejoice them, 
hoping tliat the fruits they mutually reap of their agreement will 
work better effects towards a reconciliation tlian their disputes, of 
whicli nothing arisetli, as their Andiassadors advertise, but more and 
nioi'e distrust and thfierence. Their ^^jnbassadors complain much of 
tlelays, being many times (as they say) sent back unseen when 
api>ointed to come to conference, at which (as Carleton undei*stands 
by the Prince of Orange) the States do very much mutter, aa well 
for the disgrace as for the cost they are at in so long maintaining 
their extmordinaiy amhassage, [Extract froni Holland Corr€S2x'\ 

105. Coiu*t Minutes of the East India Company. Lease of But- 
tolph Wharf The committee to attend Sir Christopher Perkins, 
about Denton's business. The wife of Johnson, master of the Rose, 
to have a ipiilt ami pejiper sent by her husband *' for a token/' The 
Deputy and Sir Thomas Smythe to arbitrate between the Comjiany 
and Mj-h. Fielder. Jeffries to unlade the Hart on Monday. Rebecca 
AganFs claims. Hugh Watts, son of Capt» Watts, to go to the 
Indies under Hawley. His wages. Jamrs Burgess appointed to the 
Abigail. Gratuities to Aylesbury, my Lord Admiral's secretary. 
[Four jHtffes and a hdf, Cowrf Bl\ F., 455-4(i0.] ' 

106. Warrant by Governor Houtman to Wm. Nicolls. To receive 
provisions for the Ruby out of the ship Amsterdam. [^Didch, Half 
jxiAje. 0.G, Fo/. /A^, Ko. 1056.] 



June 26-29. 107. t nmi Minutes of the East India Company. Richanl Dale, 
surgeon, from the Indies, reconunendetl by Dr. Winston as '* a very 
meet man '' for the Abigail ; but his demand of M. per month too 
much for so smali a ship. Concerning Buttolph Wharf. Nicholas 
Towerson offers his ser\nces as a factor. Sir t^hristopher Perkins 
" reasonably well satisfied " with the Company's objections ta Den- 
ton, l)ut wislies two arbitratoi^ to be chosen by each paiiy, and 
i>Hers himself as uminre. Conceniing Kenidge and his goods. He 
thinks that coral from Leghorn should not be sent U\ Surat, until 
they "' be encouraged thereto/' A motion to prepare for a General 
Court ''toucliing the liolding in bank or delivering out the goods 
upon stock." The Court disliked that any lett^^rs out of the Indies 
should be opened upon the Exchange ; no dividend to be made at 
present ; the goods to be left to the disposing of the committees. 
The prices of the goods fixed. Silk at 27^. per lb., &c. 



4 



■i 



EAST INDIES. 



«7 



1622, 



The Minutes of a General Court. The Governor " put them in 
mind fii-st to be thankful to God for his goodness/' in vouchsafeing 
them a return. Two more ships expected this ye>ar from Surat, and 
newB of one from Bantam in a letter read from John Bickell, raai^ter 
of the Charles, of 2 Nov. I*j21. How to dispose of the goods in 
the Hart and Roebuck, Opinion of Dr, Atkins. Accounts and 
state of the Company. The auditor nominated at the last General 
Court on 10 April 1622 ratified. Their debt at interest 150,000A, 
wheixK>f 40,000/. at 8 per cent., and the rest at 9, which was always 
wont to U: at 10 ; since last yeai* 50,000i. had l^een paid off " The 
Royal James drew away in duties and wages 30»000/. ; '' all who called 
in their money last winter were paid, ** though the time« wei'e dead/* 
the treasurers used their own credit " without noise," they have now 
20,000/. in cash, and are of opinion that the two whips nuw come 
home ^ill be discharged with as little as the Royal Jame-s, Ri.'C<.mi- 
mendations of thf committees as to tlie em]»loymenf aurl | triers of 
the goods agi-eed to. Silk at 27&, per lb. Because Wednesday next m 
the very day when the Virginia Company are to hold their Court, the 
General Court for Elections is fixed for Tuesday. 

June 29. — Decrow agrees to give up possession of Buttolp Wliaif, 
to Soame. Denton's business ; it is affirmed that he intends to 
spend 5,000/, in suit with the Company, unless he can have his 
silk and wages, as Sir Christojjher Perkins desired. Isaac Crow- 
thers demands refused and reprimanded. Report of what passed 
1>efore the Prince and Lords at the Council Table, concerning 
the emplo^'ment of two of his Highness' servants to Surat, the 
Princes project being to send a ship and a flat-bottomed boat 
to the Indies, with inventions for tbe Mogul to fish for {tear I 
and to weigh such wi-ecks &h have been sunk in the Indian 
seas. Notwithstanding all objections and opposition of the Com- 
pany, the Prince insisted upon his resolution and offered sufti- 
cient caution that no money should be carried out, or merchandise 
emplo3^ed in trade, or hostile or piratical act atbimpted, or 
merchandise brought home, whereby the Company's trade may 
1>6 damnified on pain of the Company taking said ships intij 
their own power. To do this the Governor answered thai he and 
tlie otliers present had no power to consent, but prayed leave to 
]>ropound it at their next General Court, to wldcli the Piince gave 
consent, but intimat^'d that he ne»jded not to have done this, yet 
the King and himself, out of their love and good respect to the 
Company had taken thi^ coui-se for their satisfaction. Considera- 
tion whether to propound this to the General Court or not ; resolved 
that the draught account of these proceedings read hy the Secretary 
Ije presented to See. Calvert, and his ojunion taken, where- 
upon the Court would proceed accordingly ; the Governor required 
all men to keep this business secret. Answer to Sir Thomas Rof?*s 
letter concerning jewels to be sent to Surat, referred for considera- 
tion. James Bagg thanks ** the Company for theh* favorable con- 
structions of his omissions/* and profe.sses his care and diligence 
for the future. The Deputy to have 10/. for petty exixmses, as 
** boat-hires/* &;c., during the last two years. Gratification of 



mmma 



48 



1622. 



July 1. 

bt. Martiu's 

Lane. 



July 2. 



July 10. 
Btttavia. 




at 
m 



100^ to Barlow for his many good sennces for the Compan^H 
with the Dutch. Request of Sir ClemeDt Ethnondes for the loalm^ 
of 800^.1 on the security of his Jjond, and COO^ adventure ; " the 
Conipanv ai*e not in case to lend/' [Eleven imge^. Caurt Bk, Vm 
400-470.] 

108. Sec. Calvert to (Garleton). We have not met upon that 

commission for the Indies this great while, but there have been 
di%'ers parleys between the merchants, and divers points accommO'^ 
dated. The Ambassadors will meet tlie Lords next Wedncsdaj" 
about some remaining difficidties. Must confess that at fonncr meet 
ings there was much distraction, insomuch as the 'whole company 
was tired, and he caimot deny but that for matter of form and 
ceremony in being sent l>ack many times, and waiting for the 
English Commissioners longer than was fit, they had cunse to com- 
plain of some disi'espect, though their wayward proceedings made 
most of the Lords careless to meet* [Extntet from Hollnr " 
Cor*r€^p,'\ 

109. Coui-t Minutes of the East India Company. Request 
Sir Cliristophcr Perkins that Adam Denton*s silk and wages majl 
be delivered to him on security. The King to be informed 
Den ton *s ** ill carriage"; a committee to cunsider how he *'may Ije 
proceeded against in some legal course," and to inform Sir Chria " 
topliev tliat after submitting liimself to the Court *' ho flew off froD 
this course," though the arbitration was to be finished in a week 
Letter read from the King, taking notice of the silk returned in thea 
ships [the Hart and Roebuck], and encouraging the jirosecution 
that trade "as a matter of gi*eat consequence,'' to Ixj read at the 
General Court, though *' the forbearing of that trade for one year^ 
unless upon better terms" has been detenu tned upon. Letter 
from Sii' Clement Edmondes ; he may sell liis adventures to one no 
free of the Comjmny, and a freedom will be bestowed on the pur 
chaser. The draft of the conference before the Prince and Lor" 
at the Council table concerning tbe Prince's project, aj>prove< 
by Sec. Calvert, to be read at the General Court. Drafls of 
letters to be sent in the Abigail, to l»c prepared. Pepjier not to be 
sold to grocers in town, but to be shipped away. Proposal of 
Carroway to raise tbe price of indigo t4> 7h. per lb. The Si*ci*et 
directed to attend Levinus Muncke, with the Company's |)atent, tl 
searaen*s commissions, and a copy of the la.st commission sent by tl 
Trial to the President and factors at JacattB, and entreat him out i 
all those to conceives commission for the Pi-esident and his "succ 
sors," to be sent by this ship if ready in due time. [Three pages. 
Court BL r, 471-473.] , 

110. Richard Fursland, Thomas Brockedon, and Augustin Spal^^ 
dioge to [Tbos.] Mills, at Pulicat. Have sent 20,000 r>^als of eight 
by the Unity, more than they eould welt spare ; he must not outrun 
his means as he did last year ; they can send him no more. The 
"long hoped for" Trial, laden with provisions. wa.s lost Ujmn a ledg^^J 
of rocks 300 leagues from hence, in 2:2*^ latitude, on the :i5th Mayj^ 
the master and 43 men were saved in the skiff and long boat, all 





EAST INDIES. 



1622. 



'10. 

fttHTia. 



July 13. 



the rest, nearly 100 men, with the letters, ^>crished. She had but 
500 rvaLs in her, Imt is a great Ions, anrl "woe nhall be j)liin^ed 
in our Imsinc'is if Hpeofly supply come not from England, for l»oth 
our meat and monc*y is all spent." The Dutch have lost their ship, 
the. Endracht, of 800 tons, bound for Ainboyna with provi.sions ; 
40 men perished witli her. From thene disastei-s he may giicm 
how unlikely it is that they will send him any further supply thifl 
year, [Endorsed, '' 8ent t<i Pnlieat and from tlieoce to London," 
Onejxige. O.C, Fo^. IX.. Ko, 10.38.] 

HI, Richanl Fm-nJand, Thomas Broekeilon, and Au^^ustin Sjial- • 
dingc to [tlie faetoi-s at Masuli|)atam], The Matrani sent an army 
anrl surprised and mnsackod Succailana some three months past. 
Edward Pike, tlie factor, was killed by an explosion of ^^imjiowder; 
and they fear they have lost upwards of 3,000 ryals, and the Dut<'li 
20,000 ryal*?. " These cros^ses coming on upon the neck of another 
VLiv sufficient to dismay us." Six ships have airived from Holland 
and seven more are expect<>d ; they rojjort that tlio James reached 
England in safety in September last, and that three ships were 
re^dy to set sail for this place. Pray they may safely arrive, " to 
relieve our gixuit wants which now will grow so great a-s we shall 
not l>e able to 8U|»port them." The Charlef* arrived at Saldanha 
Bay the llth of March, and wuuld continue her voyage at the end 
of that mouth. To keep within conipas<s of their means and ''not 
nin upon interest ;" an<i to advise the same to Pulicat. Ho]ie to 
receive this year from their eastern factories a reasonable tjuantity 
of spice, viz., ^00 tons from Amboyna, 120 tons of mace and nut- 
megs from Bamla, '* ^-et the eliarges are so excessive in those places 
that it can gi\e no eont^mt to our masters/' Have sent ujnvaitls 
of 200.000 ryals to the eastern factories; "if we had to deal with 
honest men the business would be worth the following," and |)rodt- 
able, but as it is now canned on, " it were much better for our 
masters that they had never entered into it ;" and they see no hope 
of reformation. Fear the same in Pulicat, Evd*n'sed, "Copy of 
an addition unto a fonner letter sent from the Presi<lent and t'Nrtincil 
at Jaea-tra to the factors of Masuliimt4im ; but what the letter was 
I find not ; thLs addition is dat^d 10 July 1022, sent by Thomas 
Mills from Pulicat l>y the shi|> Dordrecht ; received liy Tho. Cirovo 
the 6 May, by the Lesser James." \One jHiqe and a half. O.C, 
Vol /X, No, 1059.] 

112. Locke to Carleton. The Commissi on ei*s from the States 
and tlie Lords [of the Priv^- Council] met again on the 10th present. 
Senrls abstract of what was then done. Incloses, 

112. I. 77wf abstract above 7nentloned. Whefltf^r restltutwyi is 
to be made in tipecie or in ralue ; in fipecie it is not 
pomble. Question of the %xdue of the grnds, if 'here they 
were honght or nhere taken; the sam*' candition to be 
applicable to HoUfniders as well as EnfflisL [Domestic 
Corresp., Jac. /., l^.^. CXXXIL, Xos. 31*, 30 i., CaL, p. 
424.] 




60 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



TG22. 
Jidy 14. 

Constantiaople 



July 19. 

IjOiidoii. 



1C22? 



July 20. 

St. Murtiii'a 

Lane. 



113. Sir ThoB. Roe, the English Ambaasador, to »Sec. Calvert. 
The King of Pei'sia Is employed to recover Candahar from tho 
Mogul, and in a war with the Portugal in the Gulf. Witli the 
assistance of tlie Engliwh shipping he lias taken the fort of Kishnnee, 
sacked the city of Ormuz, and Wsiegcd the Castle. The English 
landed their ordnance and made tho batt-ery. Doubts they have 
exceeded theii' sea eommii^iou. [Corresp, Turkey] 

114. Vauniage (the Spanish Ambasvsador in England) to Count 
CJondomar at Madrid. The conti^overny between the English and 
Dutch concerning their business in the Indies increases daily, and 
were it not that the King favoui^ the rebels to the prejudice of liis 
own subject^3 the treaty woidil have been broken, for they have pro- 
claimed there that they have no greater enemies than the Dutch. 
The (Dutch) de]>uties had audience with the King last Tuesday, 
and he commanded the Prince and Maiquis of Buckingham to go 
out and speak with them in secret, which they did for the space 
of two hours. Frev^'ff. Endorsed, " Translat d'une lettre inter- 
cepte par les Rochellois/' &c, [Extract from llofland Conrsp. 
There ia a tnnisiathn of (Ms letter in ike Corresponderice wUh 
Spain.] 

115* The States Ambassadors' account of conferences with the 
Lords Commissioners in reference to restitution of goods. Three 
proposals of the Amliassadors rejected by the English Company, 
who maintained that the estimation of the goods ought to be niled 
accoi'ding to proofs. iVnswered liy the Ambassadoi-s, that the work 
of proofs will breed verj^ great coniusion, and that theyai'e charged 
with more than 50,000/* above that which was first demanded. The 
Lords Commissionei-s making difficvdty to meddle at all with the 
business of the Black Liou, whicli his Majesty retains to himself ; 
the Lords Ambassadors ofler their iinal resolution as to the valua- 
tion of said goods to be restored. Arguments on both sides. The 
Lords Commissioners affirm that this article hath nothing in com- 
mon with that of pepper. Astonishment of the States Amlias- 
sadors at the ** unheard-of alteration '* in the project of the Lords 
Commissionei's. '^ All was in vaiji, and the Lord Treasurer, t^^^ring 
the project, cut off all further negociation, saying that he knew 
how to spend his time better.'* [^Fotir pages, Tivo cojyi^s, Firnck 
and Enf/lhk East Indies, Vol II,, Kos, 18, 19,] ■ 

116. Sec. Calvert to (Carleton). The treaty goes on so un" 
towardly through the Ambassadors' fault, that they are now at a 
stand ; and meantime fresh complaints out of the Indies of more 
outrages by thuir men on the King's subjects. The diiMcidty now m 
about I'estitution of the goods taken from the Enghsh in the Indies, 
and not brought into Europe. After many days disputing and 
wrangling (as he may l)etter call it), they got them in a manner to 
yield the point of the value, l:»ut then the difference was about the 
time of the paj^ient; for nothing will satisfy the tn but waiting 
until they send for proois into the Indies out of their own books ; 
" for howsoever M. Aei^sens hath made many offers, and with much ar 



EAST INBIES. 



51 



1622, 



Jidy 31. 



July? 



WhiieluilJ. 



varied and rdlded them over, 3'et all Rtill falls upon that centre, and 
because we will not swallow the gudgeon they grow angry/* Assures 
hiiQ the Lords are all of o]>inion that there is no intention in them 
(the Dutch) to come to any accominodation upon reasonahle terms; 
" the J IK' rch ants are dishearti«ned, and we are all weai*ied, inBotnudi 
m I see no man willing Ui> give any more meetings and to s]>end 
time ao unprolitably, neither have the Statt»8 of late desij*e<l it, Uiat 
I can learn of Wliat they mean to do I know not/' lEMrctct from 
Holland Co^^esp!] 

117. Locke to Carleton, The States and the English Commis- 
sioners liave quite bi*oken oft*. Tlie Council alxiut to make an Act 
setting forth that whereas Coranitssionei^i were sent from the 
States to treat about the wrongs offered to the English EIa«t India 
merchants, who now aftt^r so long time spent, refu*ie to give natii^- 
faction, Engli8h merehanis are tlierefore left to take their remedy 
by course of law or coimniswion in the Admii^lt}^ Court. [^Extract 
from Dtntiestic Con^es}},, Jac. /-, Vol. CXXXII., No, 73, Oei., 
ih 434.] 

118. Petition of the Scottisli East India Company t*:* the Privy 
Council Tlie petitioners undertook with Sir Jas. Cunningham, tlieir 
governor, to set forth a voyage to Greenland, fur killing whales, but 
att-er l>eing at great charges were by the old MuHCo\y Company 
comi>elled to desist. Pai'liament has ordered the Muscovy Company 
to pay certain poor artifice r» [employed by the Scottish Eant India 
Company] who petitionetl for redress. Parliament Ixjing now dis- 
solved the Scottish Ea^st India Company pray that unieni may be 
given to the Musco\y Company t>o pay the balance of ex[)€n8e« 
incurred by the petitioners to Lucas CorseUis, their treaflun^r. 
Inclose, 

118, I, QMer of the House of Lords on the petition of Sir Jas, 

Cvmningham for payment of l24fL by tJi€ M%isc4j^:y Com- 
pany to certain poor artiiicers, 1621, Dec, 18. [Ikmustic 
Corresp., Jac, /„ Vol, djXXII, Noa, 77, 77 1., CaL, 
p. 434] 

119. Order of the Privy Council, Recit^H the complaint ma^lc 

to his Majesty by the East India Company, and what ha.H t-ak*jn 
]>lace thereon. Forasmuch as at the last it evidently apjiears to 
hiH Maje.sty*K Lords Commissioners that the Dutch will not lie 
brought to any reasonable or equal agi'eement, but on all occasioiiH 
seek to protract the treaty by delays and evasions, that the Engli>sh 
by losses and dlscom-agements might !:»♦? inforced to give o%'er that 
rich and profitable tiudc of the East Indies ; and as complaint is also 
made that since the publication of the treaty in the Indies, the 
Dutch have in hostile manner taken iVora his Majesty's subjects 
then* lawful possession of the islands of Lantar and Pooloroon (sin*- 
rendered to liis Majesty*s use by the natives), seized their goods 
and murdered and despiteful ly used their servants, their Lordships, 
bj^ his Majesty's conmmnd, Itereby signify to the mercliant« that 
they should consult upon the best legal course to recover from the 

D 2 



53 



COLO]!^IiU. TAPERS. 



1622, 



All 



i^' 1 2 



Diitcli wliat by right appertains to them, whctlier hy tho Court of 
Arliniralty, or by special commission. It in also resolveil to move! 
liin Majesty to continue his purpose for putting that counsel 
into speedy execution, upon %vhicli assurance the merchants aroj 
cncoumgeil to continue cheerfully in their trade, [East IndicsA 
Vol. IL, Ko. 20.] 

120. Request of John Cionnin;[,^e to Governor Iloutoian, ami tJie 
Governor'8 answer in reference to an account of the j^^oods and the 
namoa of the j>€rsons in the S}>anijsli fri<;^ate Kalckl>oat, t=aken l»y 
the Orange, in October. The slu]>, which was of small value, was 
sent to Batavia in December, and if (Jonnini^^e means to have a share 
in it, it is reason that he participate in the cliarge. Batch, [Three 
l^ujoi^ and a half, 0X\, Vol IX., No. 1QG2.] 



Malay ». 

Aug. 3 
tcj 

Dec, 24. 



Aug. 7. 



121. English tran'^latlon of the preceding. 
Vol IX\ No. lOGl.] 



ITh res pages. 0. C, j 



122- Abstract of the Journal of James Burgess, master of the I 
Abigail, fi'om the Lizard to Cape of Good Hope. Reached the 
Table Land on December 0th, Long Island on the 10th, and 
Saldanha Bay on the 17th, where he met the Little James, ancl two 
Hollanders bound home ; on the 24th he purposed to set sail for 
Jacatra. [Four pages, O.O., Vol IX,, Ko, lOGO.] 

123. Dei^>osition of John Roberta master of the Lesser Jamcj^ 
In reference to the cai>ture of a Cliina jtnik in the Straits of Banca. 
Not the value of one lyal was taken from her to his knowledge. 
After her departure Robert Johnson, the merchant, caHed a consulta- 
tion, and said that if the Dutch met her they would make good 
prize of her, for Geneiul Coen had ordered that all China junks 
trading at any other port than Batavia should be taken ; where- 
upon it was resolved to send the Bear ator her, and take out as 
much of the princijjal goo^ls as she could carry ; pursued her coui'se 
to Batavia, In the Straits they met a Dut-ch pinnace, bound for 
Bata\^a, with blacks on board. [One jmge. OXl, Vol /A"., 

Xo. iog;i] 



Aug. 9 & la 124 
James, 



Examinations of Tlaonias Reignolds, purser of the Lesser' 
Pett^r Garrat, mastc^r gunner, Rol)crt Barker, Injatswain s 
mate, John Necksonn, boatswain, and Nicholas Geryng, surgeon of I 
the White Bear. Concerning the taking of a China junk in the 
Straits of Bankey. No private piillage, nor any injury to the Cliinese 
was alloweri [ToyetheVf i?ii?i€ paijes. OX*., Vu!. IX,, Xos. 1064— 
1007.] 

Auff. 11-14. 125t Deposition of Robert Randall, merchant, and of Abi-aliamJ 
Woofe, "silk-throwster," both of London, before Sir Henry Mai*ten,] 
Judge of the Ailmiralty Courts in answer to 18 articles niinistered 
on behalf of the East India Company. Concerning the Dutch in 
Lantar and Pooloiuun, T<j the ti**st ; tliat Ramlall, as factor of the 
Company, was pix^sent and saw the surrender of the Island of Poolo- 
roon in December 1(116, and that of Lantai* in November 1G20. That 



I 




EAST INDIES. 



68 



1622. 



the Dutch Genei-al, ^4th 16 ships of war, with at least 4,000 men» 
and aliovit 40 Java j>ruws, arrived at Neira road, al^out tlirec miles 
from Lantar, in February 1G21 and all these forces said Dutclx 
General made and bended against Lantar, for at that time he inha- 
bited Lantar, That the En^dinh cai>tain of Pooloroon took possession 
of Lantar upon its surrender an afuresaid, and eon tinned the English 
factory which had Ik^vu estahlisheil there almt^st a year before. That 
soon after the arrival lA^ tin- Dutch in Neira roa<l, fearing a Burprisal 
of said Island of Lantar, he went to the captain of Pooloroon, who 
wrote to tlie Dutch General, intimating that the island Ijelonged to 
the King of England, and that, as an accord had Ix^en made in Eng- 
land between the Englinh and Dutch Com]»aDies, he should forl>ear 
to use any violence against said iwland. This letter (an the mes- 
senger told Randall) the General received very- scomfuHy, naying 
that whomsoever of the English he should find there he would use 
with no more mercy than the country peuide ; that 10 or 12 days, afler 
the Dutch attacked and sulnlued the island, and during the conflict 
Randall witli his servaniH, Ix'ing t\\'o English and eiglit Chiuci^e, 
kept within doors ; but the Dutcli, having taken the castle, violently 
entered the English house (no resistance being made), and in spite 
of their enti^aties, bound and coupled tliem together, cut oif tln-ee 
of the Cliinese's heads, and dragged tlie rest like slaves before the 
General and captains. Here they were humble suitors for mild 
usage, but were pinioneil and tied by the necks fast to a ]>ost, 
expecting t^j be pi^esently executed, whilst the Dutch in inhunjan 
manner, stood thro\\^ng the hearts of the Chinese and Bandanese 
they ha<l executed under their feet. Removed from thence, they 
were bound to another post, and thence carried aboajrl the Dutch 
Admiral the *' Holland." Un their way through the castle ihvy were 
ordered to go over a wall 12 teet Idgh, and when Randall refused to 
attempt it unless unpinioned, they threw him over by which he w^as 
much bruised, *' and without gieat favour of God, had broken Ids 
neck/* They l)eat him grievously with a truncheon fur ignorantly 
Rtep}>ing into the wrong prow, put them all iji irons for 4H hours in 
the beak-liead, and kept them *' in great irons " lor 18 days more, 
until at the coming of the Royal Exchaiige, they set them at 
lil>erty. These Dutch also seised all the English goods at Lantar, 
valued at 7,G5U ryals of eight. To the sixth, seventh, and eighth 
articles he cannot depose. To the ninth he saith, that in Novemlje^r 
1020, Natlianiel Courthopitiv, chief of tlie English at Pooloroon, 
having l»een to Lantar to receive its sunender to the English, was 
iiitercepted on his letum Ijy the Duteli (as he has heard both from 
them.selves and the country i^eoplc wdio were present) and slain with 
small shot, and, as the Dutch told this examinate, they shot him 
twice through before he died. That in IS^ovember 1(120, a Dutch hliip 
was taken by the Bandanese off Pooloroon, in which were let! em 
from the Dutch General to the Dutch in Pooloway and Neira, which 
lettei*s came to the hands of Mr. Hayes, captain of the English at 
Pooloroon, wlio broke tltem open, the etiect Ijcing that, howsoever 
there was a |>eace concluded in England, tliey should use all means 
to engross all the s]>ice they could before tlie arrival of the English 
fleet, as well what Udonged to the English as to themselves. That 



64 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622. 

when the Dutch sulxUied Lantar, they forced the islanders to 
deliver up the principal of their chilflren prisoners, slew many of 
the Bandanese, and carried off all the nliipK and boats, and 1,200 
priaonei'S (rao-stly woraen and ehOdreu), to Jacatra. That after tlio 
Dutch had sacked Lantar and euunnitted these outi^ages they pre- 
sently yiulilished the accoF<l between tlie Companies with gi*eat 
solemnity in Neira Road, and then released him. That Lantar com- 
monly yields 800 or 1,000 tons of nutmeg's and mace yearly, 
besides some cloves, and when suMued l»y the Dutch had 800 tons 
of s]iice nj>on it j but what was npon Pooloroon when it was sub-— 
duecl, or what its fniitfiilnesw, he cannot declai'e. fl 

Aug. 14. — Deposition of Abraham Woofe, of London, silk throwster. 
[To some of the articles his ansivers are i^hnilar to Eafiihtirs,] Tljat 
in 1618 he came to Pooloroon in the Francis as pui-ser, but ibi-sook 
her and stayed at Pooloroon as a soliher, where he sa^v in Mr. Hayes' 
(an English niei chant) house writings, whereljy it apjteared that 
Pooloroon w^as surrendered to the English in 101 G. That he has 
heard that Lantar was firmly sinrendered to the English in Nov. 
1(320, and knows that at that time there were ordnance sent to the 
people of Lantar from Pooloroon by the English (as was said) in lien 
of the said suin-ender. That he was one of the English livhig with 
Mr. RandaU. Gives an account of the att-ack upon their house by 
80 Japanese soldiei^ in the Dutch service. Btdieves that the Dutch 
made signs to the Japanese to kill them all. which, however, they 
understood differently. Account of their ill-treatnient; were most 
grievously beaten, and ke|it 24 hours in irons and 1 iS days l>etween 
decks, until the anival of Capt. Fitzherhert in the Royal Excliange, 
when they were released, Paiiiculai-s of the English goods taken l>y 
the Dutch. C^annot depose to the sixth, seventh, and eighth aHicles. 
Courthope was slain by the Dutch on the 26th Oct. 1G20. That after 
the Dutch at Pooluw^ay and Neiia had news of the publication of 
the agreeuient at Bantam they endeavoure<l to buy all the s]»iees in 
Lantar and Pooloroon, and when tlie ] People refused, in regard they 
had before covenanted with the English, took same violently fron 
theuL Cannot depose to the 1 1 th article. That at the tune of it 
surprisal I^antiir had ujK>n it at least 700 tons of mace and nutiue* 
^W Cojif. Filzltcrbfrf.H Irtler, Mareh 27, lt>21, No. DDT in prcvlou 
vcd. of < kih'itt ii( r. [ Holla nd (Jurrei<2)on dcnee,'] 

Aug. 13. 126, Richard Fursland, Thomas Brockedon,, and Aug. Si>aldi 
Biita^na. to the East India (Jotupany. In reference to the sT.un of 2,300 ryall 
advanced t<j Welden at BamUi, for which they have given bills 
12^ per cent interest on the Comjiany, and request they may 
honoiu'ed and charged to the factorj^ account. [Tkr€4i gaarterB ^ 
apiige. OC, VoL fX,, No, 1008.] 

Aug- 14. 127* Carlet/on to See, Calveii. The States Ambassadors have 
TJh> Hflgue. advertised hither the stop in their treaty in general terms only, 
refemng themselves for jiarticularitiesto their Irtters t^:j the Pi-ince 
of Orange and the SUites Deputies at the camp, what is done here in 
his Excellency *s alisenee l>eing only pro fo'Tnid. His Excellency has 
advised the seventeen dii-ectors of this East India Company now 



EAST IKDIES. 



65 



1G22. 

aHsenibled at Amsterdam to enlarge the commission of theii* deputies in 
England, in that sort tliat they may end that long bu8ine88 when the 
Aiid>aM.sadurH retiini, fur wliich (tliey say) the 24th inst. is appomted ; 
for howsoever the matter may he handled by the Ambassadors and 
merchants, at which lie plainly sees what reason the Lords have to 
take just exceptions, he knows that the puqiose of I lis Excelleuey 
and the States is that they should submit to reason, of which the 
tix;aty should be the rule. But the treaty may be wrested divei*s 
ways by interpretation, and when they meet with difficulties they 
advertise hither that there is no intention in the Lords, who have the 
chief sway in the business, to come to a conclusion, and imjjute the 
delays, which they much complain of, to a mbcture of matters of 
State with mattei-s of merchandise, so tliat one of the chief here 
spared not to say '' that till H,>L knew what will become of Lord 
Digby s treaty in Spain they should not see an end of theirs in 
England." Their merchants, when pressed by the States (as they 
often are), profess to Ijo ready to accomplish what is recjuii-ed by the 
treaty, Itut if more be retpured they leave it to the States to perform, 
who, looking into tht-ir ]>ur.sos, ami Jinding in what stiite they are 
deeply indebted and overcharged with the cost of the war, they are 
amazed and confounded, and like to Ije lost in the lab}'Tinth unles-s 
his Majesty furnish them a thread : for most othur trailes failing, this 
of the East Indies employs their shipping and mariners, and brings a 
coni]>etent profit tti this State. LTpon the re-establishing of this 
Company (whose octroy is within few months of expiration) depends 
the proceeding of the West India Company, and thereupon (as the 
enemy is now yearly and quietly supplied with money from thence) 
a matter of fuiiher consequence to the i»reservation of this State. 
[EjUract fwm Holland Cor^'t^esp,] 

Hig. 15. 128. Sir Edward Conway to Carleton. Wishes the States 
Tbdsor, Ambassadoi"s woidd find a means to give an end to the East India 
disputc»s, which nourish much ilJ-ldood. Since the treaty has bi'cn 
wholly broken oft* he has eiiqiloyed his weak force (not without 
hope) to renew it, though this be a dead time, when aU the Lords 
are dispelled. [Extract from Holland Cmre^p.] 

Fog. 20, 129, John Hitcliens to (the East India Company). Stores 
^»tovia. w^anting for supply of the factory of Jacatra, Endorsed, " Iteceived 
by the lesser James." {One page, OX'., Vol /X, No, 1069.] 



Aug. 20. 



130. John Hitchens to the East India Conipany. Copy of pre* 
ceding, with ad<litional list of stores wanted for supply of the factory 
at Jacatra, which includes flesh, beer, wine» cider, butter, vinegar, 
cheese. cajieiT^, olives, samphire, co|)j)eras for ink, gum, quills, gall, &c. 
[Tivujxiges, 0,0., Vol. IX,, iVa 1077 +L] 



Axig.n, 



131. (Sir Tlaos. Roe) to Sir Edward Herbert, his Majesty's 
C'msiaEiitiAoiile. Resident in France. The Persian hath undeitaken unfortunately a 
war with the Mogid for Candahar, and, as Roe hears, lost his anny in 
a great battle> but with the assistance of the English ships lias 
recovered froDx the Portugals all theii' footing upon the Maui, in the 
Gulf, and besieged Ormiiz, with gi^eat hope of caixying it before thia 



m 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622. 



Aug. 22. 

Venice. 



The Uai^iii", 



Aug. 22. 



Aug. 23 . 

Sept. £ 
[Venice.] 



time, which, if the Portitgals luse, they have lost the best flower of 
India. [Extmct fro7n Fi^etich Corresjk] h 

132. Sir Henry Wotton, the English ilnihassador, to Sec. Calvert.™ 
It is said that seven English ships have assisted the Pei^ians to take 
Onimz, wlueh was a necessary staple of the Portugals to inter- 
mediate tlieir trade in the East Indies, wdiereupon are grown two 
opinions^ one that it will V>reak, and the other that it will facilitate 
the present treaties w^ith 8 pain. ^J 

P.S. — They have this addition to tlie above intelligence ; that thefl 
ca^stle yet held out, but could not long, for w^ant of water, which 
jiarticulaily doth win sonic credit to the rest [£xtntvi from 
Venice Corresjp.] ^ 

133* Carletoii to Sec. Calvcii. The States, desirous of bringing 
their Ea,st India Company to reason in tlie treaty they have in hand 
now in England, have employed two of their body, Oogh, of Ciuel- 
tlerland (one of the framers of the treaty) and Joaehimi, of Zealand, 
first to the camp to his Exct-dlency and thence to the 17 directors at 
Amsterdam, from whence they are newly i\5tnnied, hut knows not 
what they bring. [Extract fnDu Ilufhfud Corrt'r^j/.] 

134. (Thomas Bright?) to Andrew Ellam. Account of the 
voyage of the Trial aftiT leaving the Cape the llHh of Marcli. On 
May 25, tlirongh carelessness, tliey struck upon the rocks, SOU 
miles from the Straits of Sunda ; the hold was full of water in 
instant; Broock, the niaster, got out the skiff, jirovisioned it, chose ^ 
his crew, to tlie number of nine, out of his •* fellows and con.sorts/' 
promised to take him and Jackson on board, '* but like a Judas'* 
slipped away privately without tliern, leaving 12«S souls to God*s 
iiKnTV, whereof ;3<i got off in tlie long boat, and the ship suddenly broke 
ui> before they had got a quarter of a mile. Details their adventures 
and privations, discovery of certain islands, and safe arnvaJ two days 
after Bjoock. SeriouH charges against Brooek ; he has given no 
account of the Comnanv's monev^t spanides, and letters, which the i 
writer saw jiut into the skiff, Init admits that he threw overboard™ 
some of tlie lettei^, after having read iliem, because they were " 
wet, but a« the writer thinks, because *' they would have done 
him no good " if lie had honestly delivered them. He made plots 
against Jackson anrl Ellam, which were 8U]«ported by the fabo 
swearing of his *' consorts'' '* and many more gross villanies/' The 
death of so many witnesses i-endeiis it difficult to prove anji^hing. 
Ho|)es he may never *' go to sea with him or the like.*' He and 
Jackson wt^re much pei^secuted and injured for opposing his ^is*, 
Iionesty. Kempe and Danby have proved very dishonest 
assisting Brnock ; begs for assistance in recovering his debt froml 
Jackson's adventni-e in the second joint stock, to help him ii 
hia "poor and tlisti-essed estate." [FoiLr 2xr</e^. O.C. Vol, /X.j 
No. 1070.] 

135. Sir Henry Wotton to Carle ton. From Aleppo l>oth onl? 
merchants and Italians agree in a piece of news wliich subjccteth 
us to some clamour. The 7iincH is the mme as in the above letierg^ 
iW 132, [llolland Con^^j}.] 



EAST INDIES. 



57 



1622. 
Aog, 2i, 136. Commission to Sir Wm. Haydon and Chas. Glenham to 
make a voya^^ ^v^th two sh\\m to the territories of the Great Mogul 
and other Princen, hetweeu t!ie t 'ape of Gootl Hope and tlie Straits 
of Le Maire ; to satisfy the Mogul with " some choice arts and 
rarities/' and to put their works and inventions in use in those 
climates. [Docqiict Domestic Jac, /., CaL, p, 442. See aim Orard 
Bk, pp. 352, 362, Domestic Jac, I,] 

Ang. 24. 137. Peter Bell, pni*ser, to the East India Comjjany. At his first 
Onbotpdihe entertainment he seemed like a rat^^r^ed colt, unfit for any employ- 
EtB^nm^koad ^*^^^' ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ succeeded Richard Eman, purser of the Ruhy, 
" deceased, l\y Captain FifczherlKTt's ajipointuient. Found the books 
very backward, and had gi-eat difficulty in getting,' tliem straight ; 
many things not entered. Complains of the injuriea they daily 
surter in theae j)arta through the insolencies of the Dutch. In 
case of abuses, the English must wait for redress from England, 
whilst tliey demand it at once, ** nay. it is ahuost corae to such a 
pasH, that if they say it is a fault, we must not deny iL" Can 
say a little about the Moluccas, for the ship rode there for 12 
months as a ship of war. At their first arrival there, on 
31 May 1G21, Malaya wa8 the chief rendezvous, and Governor 
Derickson-Lam, the Dutch Governor treated them with all 
lovo and respect; but his successor, Frederick Houtuian, (who, he 
thinks, ** hath vowed himself an enemy to all your worshii)\s affaii*s 
in these i»arts/') — his coming verified the old English proverli, 
New lords, new laws — as soon as the fleets were gone for 
Bata\"ia l»egan to show his power and malice. He ordered 
tbat the English should l>e turned out of the forts, saying, they 
were l>ound by treaty to secure their goods, yet they were no way 
tied to secure the |»ersons of the English. He would not sufler 
thrrn to buiUl, and pulled down what Mr. HiJntan had }>egim at 
Gnoffiquia, pretending he must build there " a redout, wluch I 
think will be done when I am Lord Mayor of London/' These 
atlVonts can he for no other cause than to bring us into disgi-ace 
with tlie eountiy people. If the trade were profitable, *' this were 
somewhat tolerable;'' but, as the Dutch pay fur everything in 
commofJLities, and tlie English pay their " thirds in ready money," 
a man may Ivoldly say it defrays the whole charge. All the 
Dutch build goes under the name of fortification. All their .soldiei:s 
are paid their wages in linen cloth and stuHs at an unreasonable 
ratc% excei»t four months wliich they term their good months. 
There is no reason why the English sliuultl not jiay their thirds in 
like kmd with the Dutch, and till it be tlius, he thinks their 
third of charges will so far exceed tlieir third of profits, as 
tbat they will soon grow weary of the Molucca commudities* Tliis 
they do by virtue of the 2lh'd jVitiele made at Jaeatra by the 
Council of both r^ouipanies, which is (pioted. What is the Com- 
pany's third of tlic yearly charge in the MukiecaH he is not privy 
to, but he knows their third of cloves is but 10 Baharrs, til catties, 
at tiOO/. the Bahan\ Has sent, Vty President Fursland's orders, the 
original wills of such men as have made any since the ship came out, 
abo the accounts of those who have died since the 3rd Januaiy ; all 



S8 



COLONUL FiiPERS. 



1622, 



Aug. 25. 
Batavia. 



Aug. 2G. 



Aug. 26. 



others, together with balance of Richard Email's books, he has already 
sent to the President. [Ewlorsed, ** Received the 18 June 1023, by 
the Lesser James." Five pages, OXl, VvL IX., Xo, 1071.] 

138. Jolin Broock, late master of the Trial, to the East India 

Company, at Crosliy House, London, Met at the IJape of Good 
Hope with the Charles, Capt, John BickelJ, and would iaio have 
had one of his master's mates, aa neither himself, nor any of his 
mates had ever been tlie dangerous coui^se from this Cape to Jacatra, 
but not one would go without increase of wages. Describes the 
ship's course imti! the 25th of May, when, at 11 p.m., she struck 
upon some sharp sunken roeks, for the most part two fathoms 
untler water. The men were struck in a maze, for they could see 
neither breach, land, rocks, nor .sign of danger. Before she struck 
a second time, the wind began sudtlenly to fresh and blow ; by 
two o clock he had got out tlie long boat and skiff, and seeing the 
sliil^ full of water, and tlte wind to increase, he made all the means 
he could to save his life, and as many of liis comi>anions as he 
could. He put the Company's money, gold, spangles, and letters, 
with his own money and commission and letters, in the \ong boat, 
and sent them by John Norden, Will. Hicca, and John Willoughby, 
but the men Ijeing iii dissension would not sotH-r the boat to be 
lowered into the water, nor the things to be put into the boat, 
but what one put in, the other threw overboard, so that none 
were saved. His people ciying out of the skitf to come in and save 
his life, the ship begirming t^j open, lie ran down Ijy a I'ope over the 
people mto the skiff, which he had near Ijroken, and they put off 
at four in the morning. Half an hour after tlie ship fell in pieces ; 
10 men were saved in the skiff, and 36 in the long boat, in all 
46 men and boys out of 139 wei*e saved, whose names are all 
given. He came away with his boat for the Straits, and fell in 
with the east end of Java» 8th of June, at Bantam the 21.st, and 
Jacatra the 25th. Thty hatl so much min and sea that their boat 
was always half full of water, and their distress was gix^at, as the 
President and his Coimcil, having examined himself and all liis 
people that were saved, were tridy infonned. Tliis island lieth 
false in longitude 200 leagues, as he has found l>y woeful exj>erience, 
as also these siniken rocks, as hy his drauglit will api»eai\ NaiTOW 
escape of a Dutcli sliip in the same place, which rode three days at 
the mercy of God. Capt. Fitzherbert missed this danger narrowly. 
** Always in that course experience of variation is the greatest 
help t<) any man." [Tluet' y^/yr^. O.C., Vol /J., No. 1072.] 

139- Richard Fui-sland to the East India Company. At the 

request of Wm. Hawkeridge, he certifies that no demand has yet 
been umde for restitution of the money taken out of a Cliina junk 
by the Supply the master and company of which are suitors that 
the Company will deal favourably with them. About a Bezoar 
stone, sent home for a debt due to him fiom Edwai-d [? Geoi^ge. m 
endorsed] Pike. [One -page, O.C., Vol IX,, No, 1075.] 

140. Tliomas Brockedon to the East India Company. Asks leave 
to i*eturn hume, though his covenants are not yet expii'ed, lor he 



n 
i 



4 

I 
4 



4 



• ^«A.ST INDIES. 



60 



1622. 



can Bve no longer under the insolence of the Dutch, Thinks it his 
fluty to declare some o{ their iirincii>al abuses which tend to the 
ruin of our trade, and the dishonour of our natioo, the two points 
they cliiefly aim at. The Dutch, ho far from making any restitution, 
]iretend money to be due to them fur j>art of the excessive charges 
of their Fort Batavia, frc. and the iuU number of f^u\^ of defence 
according to contract, which chai'gt*s grow to an incretlible sum. As 
to their glorious pretence of future l>euetit by their wai' withBantanj, 
and Imilding theu* Fort Batavia to curb the Pengran, '* the contrary 
is most appaix^nt," Peace with Bantam might have brought down 
the price of pepi>er ; now they are never like to get trade as long 
as the Pengran liven. With all their lK>asting of Ijcsieging Bantam, 
the Dutch cannot hinder the peojile from fishing or from planting 
ric€% the food they desire, so they will not easily l:>e brought to any 
reasonable conditions of peace, the Pengran refusing absolutely to 
speak with the Dutch or themselves. They retpiiie from the EIngUsh 
one third of the exf>ense3 of the taking of Banda, luit have taken 
to themselves all the spices found upon the island, and sold the slaves 
to their owti benefit. The English have failed to funiish proper 
number of ships of defence, but the Dutch enjoy two tliirds of the trade 
in the Moluccas, AmljojTia, and Banda, and use all indii-ect means 
to exclude them from Ligor, under pretext of a contract long since 
made with the King. The Fort of Bata\aa, in all men's judgments, 
w^ill not be finished in 20 years ; the monthly chai'ges are inerediltle. 
Sends an abstract of the chaiges of the garrison and fortification of 
Neira and other places in Banda, which show^s the strange exactions 
of the Dutch. They exact excise for the arrack om* people drink, antl 
they may not '' kill a wild hog. or gather a cocoa-no t in the wood 
without leave/* and paying the value thereof ** We do more than 
pay the w^holc charge in Banda/' and there is Uttle hope that 
AmbojTia and the Moluccas will prove better. They receive nothing 
but taunts and disgracefid s}>ei.'ches on theii^ complaints for reckess, 
*'Our trade in this ])laee is not woHh the name. ♦ • ♦ No man 
dare buy or sell with us/' In the (Jouneil of Defence, the Dutch 
General continually presides, and whatever he propounds is content 
to hear our opinions, but concludes what he pleaseth, so that we 
mther retain the shadow than sulistance of a Council of Defence. 
Wliatever our sliipa do at sea is called in question, and wx* must 
ajipear at tlieir citation in company with the l>laeks, wdio they 
l>elieve on tlieij' bare afhrmation, having a company of ignorant 
fellows in their council* who do nothing but by the Generars 
appointment. The Chinas report publicly *' they can have justice 
against an Englishman, but not against a Hollander/' Other in- 
sutlerable proceedings of the Dutch, wliich " w ork our disgrace in 
all jilaces/' The English w^itch taken by the Buteh wat^h and im- 
pris4jned lor eight days, and threatened with torture, that they 
might make confessions against the President. They are for- 
bidden to keep any soldiers or court of guard in their house, or beat 
any drum, or shoot off at discharging the watch. Would be content 
rather to live under any heathen [>rince than under those that under 
colour of fiiendslup do us what mischief and disgrace they may. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1022. 



i 



a China junk in the Straits of Banca, which had our pass, and made] 
prize of her by Robt. tJohnson's order. Condemn Johnson and give J 
particulars of the capture. The Dutch make a gi*eat matter of this J 
and have called us lief ore their court, t!iout/h they did the same last j 
year. Without her goods they would not have had oner^^a! left *'hq\ 
poor and nd.Herable is our present state." They have borrowed] 
** Hesh " from the Dutch for provisioning this sliip. Cargo of the 
James, John Roberts master, chiefly mace, nuts, pepper, tliamonds, 
bezoara, and ambergris. The Dutch have raised the price of pepper ^ 
and it is very dear. Account of the stat^ of all the facttirieaW 
under their antliority. Advice from Japan that after much 
troul>le, and payment of one sixteentli part of Uie goods, the , 
Manilla fleet has proceeded on their second voyage ; much disorder | 
among our people, yet some have l>een hanged as they well de-j 
served- Have given orders to Ric. Cocks and others of the factory' 
in Jajmn to come away in the fleet an<l leave John Osterwick 
and two others tliere. Have not thought it tit wholly to remove 
fi-om thence until they see what the next year's business may] 
reqiiire. To Siam they have sent the Fortune with a small cargo 1 
which the factors there are to make sale of, and all come away in 
the ship, first taking leave of the King and dehvcring over their ' 
house until their return. Have given express orders to all the J 
factors at Patani to come away in the same ship. Have sent back] 
Robert Jolinson to Jambi to recover the great number of debts ( 
oiitstanrUn^ there. Are obliged to tnist as well as the Dut<ih, or 
must sit still and get no pepper. In Jambi and all other places all 
scorn and aVnise us because they daily see how the Dut^h domineer ^ 
over us, " that it is almost impossible to repair tlie honour of our ] 
nation." They can do little at Jambi imtil they i-eceive means 
fi'om Iiome. Have given orders to dissolve the factor^" at Tndraghiri. 
Know not whether their people will come from Acheen or stay 
but cannot expect any good news from thence. 200 torts ot 
pcppei^ lyhig at Acheen there and no ship to fetch it. The 
spangles lost in the Trial " woidd have l>een well accepted by 
the King;' They have sent the Unity ^^dth a small cargo and 
20,000 ryals to Puhcat and Masulijmtam, but the factories there 
require much more. Wrongs inflicted by the Dutch at Pidicat, for 
whicli tliey can get no remedy liere. It were good you had never 
anything to do with them. A small matter sent to Masulipatam, so 
cannot expect much fron^ thence this year. The charges at the 
eastern factories of the Moluccas, Amboyna. and Banda excessive, not 
less than 20,000 ryals yearly. At Banda Kicliard Welden, at one 
drunken meeting, "shot away 22 baiTells of ]»owder and loO Rs. in 
shot/' In other factories they expect also to find wasteful ex]K:nses, 
which in due time shall l>c reformed. It were good to make an 
agreement with the Dutch to have a thii-d of the spices and keep no 
factories in those ]ilaces. Wliat those factories yielded in .spices last 
year. Can expect nothing fi'om them next year, for the cajiital sent 
will but pay the charges of the factories, so the Dutch tahII get all 
the trade. The capitals needful to be sent yearly are by calculation, 
for Banda S4',000 ryals, fo!' Amboyna 00,000 ryals, and for the 
Moluccas G0,000 ryals. At Macassar and Jaj>aiu the eastward-bound 



4 



EAST mDIES. 



63 



1622* 



ships ai-o provided with rice, aiTack, and boards, though '* not without 
extraordinary charge of presents and other exactions." WilHain 
Bennett, factor at Japara, hath not Ijroiight his account ; *' it appears 
he s|ient his time wholly in drnnkenness and other lewdness which 
attends that beast-like vice/' He is sent hojne, " to he rewtucled 
according to his desertis/* News from John Edwards, anived from 
Succadana, of the death of Edward Pike by an unfortunatri? accident ; 
account of his estate, from which money is due to Thomas Stavertou. 
The debts at Succa*iana doubtful, on account of the war; the Dutrch 
factors have come away from tlience. '' Batavia, the la-st and worst 
of all the factories/' yields no |u\>tit at all Trade in the hands of 
the Dutch, and no one daK^s t'O buy of the EngUsh. Cannot set 
down a lower propoHion than 400,000 ryals of eiglit for the yearl^'^ 
supply of their factories, except pepper be cheaper and they have 
equal benefit with the Dutch of paying the soldiers in commoilities. 
Ten sliips must be furnished for the tleeis of defence^ Fear the 
Manilla and Goa i3eets must be given over for want of supplies. To 
the former they have given an absolute oi-der to return, l)ut the Goa 
fleet they wish to keep on for another year, to prevent the can-acks 
and galleons from returning to Portugal, and to a%-oid giving occasion 
of protest to the Dutch. Have \v^4tten to the President at Surat 
and Captain Fitzherbert how needful it is to follow the exploit, but 
have cause to doubt nothing will be performed. Particulai's of all 
the Company's ships, and where empkiyed. Eight ships and a 
pinnace in the Manilla and Goa fleets, Tlie Unity shortly expected 
from ^lasulipatam, the Globe from Amboyna with a rich cargo of 
cloves ; and the Ruby from the Moluccas. The Clove and Supply, hero 
in the road, so rotten they cannot be repaired. The ^\Tiite Bear and 
Bee in Jatnbi river and the Fortune at Siam. The Enghsh murmur 
at three meals of fresh meat a week. The Dutch have been content 
with rice alone for a year together, l>ut if the English were f»ut on 
such allowance they would " turn rogues (as many of them are never 
better) to lietray your ships before they would endure it.*' Their 
trade in hazanl of utter ruin for want of necessaiies. Are in need 
of everything but great cables, as they have before aihased. If not 
sujtplie<l l>efore this reaches home, " will be in such desperate case as 
no supply can help ns." Particulai^i of stores wanted, especially liles 
(150,000) to cover houses and for pavement Have given bills of 
exchange, payable in London or Holland, to two Dut'Chmen. Thhik 
now that a b>etter coui-se from the Cape than Capt. Fitzherbert*a 
might be set down, for some of the Dutch ships havt^ narrowly 
escaped *' the south main continent/' Recommend draught of a chart 
by Mr. Bi-oock, whom they find *' a sufficient man for chaise, and of 
good government/' WilUam Hawkeridge's ship past service, and no 
other employment for him. He is sent home vnih high comment 
dation^, and to succeed Jobn Roberts in command in case of 
mortality, John Wood, formerly master of the James, made ship's 
carpenter. If he returns to his old courses of dnmkenness he will 
he sent home. Henry Bate and George Pettus, whose time has 
expired, sent home ; also William Bennett as a prisoner* About 
Joseph Mills, late masters mate in John WcdelFs fleet. Wills, 
inventories, and accounts of John Smelt, deceased in Jambi, Jolm 



64 



COLONIAL PAPKRS. 



1622. 

Davies, and all other dead men ; also copies of letters and abstracta 
af stock rt^rjiaining In the factories are also sent. Have Bpiee and 
]iL'|iper eiioiijjfh to lade a whip of 800 tons. The Dutch General flatly 
ivi fuses to trust them in negociations witli the Pengraii and Materani. 
Are verily persuaded they might *^^et trade at Bantam. The Rnby 
an-ived froui tlie Moluccas with a Kiuall quantity of cloves, a , 
miserable return fur such a charge. Death uf William Nicolls, the 
chief factor there. Anthony Wallis, factor at Motir. sent home a 
]uisoner, having av as ted 800 ryals ; this John Gonning writes of him. 
The want of good factors causes great losses. In want of paper, 
books, pens, ink, an aecouutant, and a secretary perfect in the 
Netherlands language. The Jamea and a Dutch slxip to keep in 
coin]>any, for fear of ]>irates. The Ruby took a frigate from tlie 
llanillas, in the Moluccas, Ijut the men ran ashore with tlie principal 
riches. From lettei^ found aboard it seems the Spaniards and 
Portuguese have su tiered t^^rrible losses, which it is hoped will soon 
wx^arj' out those peo]jle of ail tradt", especially if the Goa fleet have 
good success against them. The conduct of Hawkeridge referred to 
the Company. The state of affairs in ilasulipatam and Pulicat 
related iji Thus. Mills' letters. The Dutch have taken *' jich purchase" 
from i\m Portugiiese, but flatly deny the English any share. The 
t •ompany*s servants at Agra and Amadavas (Ahmedabad ?) have 
been ituprisoned, and their goods embargoed, and only through great 
l)rihes were they released, all through the robberies of the Dutch on 
these people. It is intended to seize the Judrla junks as compensa- 
tion. The Presirlent w^rites that from Ormuz is come most certain 
new.s that both town and castle are surprised, the galleons being first 
jMirposely simk by the PoHugals theiuselves, wdio, till the force of a 
|iowiler mine sent a breach in their walls, Ijehaved themselves ^J 
valiantly. Desire of the Great Naige for trade wuth the English. -H 
Tlie Danes trade under the name of the English, and arc marvel- ^i 
lously well used. A town has been given them and a place to luiild 
a castle, wdiieh is finislied, and has mounted W jueces of ordnance. 
If the (^>mpany may have possession of Ornuiz, and will send nieaBd- 
to maintain it, they have gotten the key of all India, whicli will '* be 
a bridle to our faithless neighbours the Dutch, and keep all Moors in 
awe of US." The Dutch General has protested against them for 
i*e fusing to make a final conclusion in the luatter of restitution, and 
IV^r not paying a share of the expenses of the siege of Bantam. {See 
No, 141.) Send copies of the Dutch protest, with their answer and 
contra protest, Endors&l, *' Receivt* d by the Lesser James the 1 8 June 
1U23/' [Twenfu-tivo jxffjes and a halj: O.C, Vol. IX., No. lOTG.] 

144, President Richard Fursland to tlie East India Company 
A summary of the last [I'^iidorsefl, "Another letter of the same 
date is much larger than this; read it iind pass over this. This came 
by the Dutch ship the Lioness, in comi>any with the Lesser James/* 
Sixjmge^. O.C, VuL IX,, No. 1077.] 

Aug. 27. 145. Alistract of ncw^s from Jacatra, hy the Lioness. The Dutch 

SeptTC. fleets of this year and last anived at Jacatra. The English ship 

Trial cast away on the land of Unity, southward of Java, wdiei'cin 






Aug. 27. 

Baiavia, 



m^M 



^ 



EAST INDIES. 



65 



1622. 



perished 97 souls, and all things else lost. The Sampvson and Wee8i> 
[? Wasp] have arrived at Jacatra from Surat with indigo and cloth. 
Sixteen ships, under Cornelius Reyerssen, with 1,300 men and pro- 
visions for 18 months, gone to obtain trade on the coast of China. 
Banda absolutely at peace ; has 2,500 houLs " of ours," yet in want 
of more jKiople, 6,000 picuk of |>epi>er arrived from Jambi for each 
Company. Succadana taken and ransacked Ijy tliowe of Matarara, 
and then abandoned. The Unity, going from Banda to Amboyna, 
split in pieces on the chfls of Amboyna, with a loss of 43 souls ; 
43 persons were saved, and there is hope of recovering the ordnance. 
The Moon and Hound going towards Cape Spirito Santo to attend 
upon the silver ships of New Spain, and from thence to the Manillas, 
and 80 to Cliina, Bantam seems to incline to peace out of fear that 
they, with the Matarines, shoidd beleaguer it The fleet of deil-ncc 
of 10 ships lies before the Manillas. In the town is extraordinary 
great dearth, and some natives in- the Philippines ix*bel against the 
Spaniards, Jacatra abounds in victuals. The ship Peace arrived at 
Jacatra. The English and Persians said to have taken the town and 
castle of Onnuz, but the Portugals sunk the five galleons before the 
English came. The English have 4,000 packs of indigo and cloths 
lying ready at Surat, Reports from the Coromandcl coast that 
at Surat and Arabia the Datcli are arrested for taking the ships of 
DabuL [Extract Jrmn HoUand Corresp.] 

146. Richanl Cocks to Sir Tliomas Smythe, Governor, and the 
Committees of the East India Comjtany. Refers to his last letter 
of 30 Sept. 1621 (see No. 11} 2, jn-evlotf^ volume of Calendar). 
Ten ships uf the Manilla fleet, Ave English and five Dutch, safely 
returned to Firaiido, having made a far richer voyage than last 
year. Has received instructions from Fursland to leave off' our 
cons^ortship of the fleet of defence with the Hollanders, and to send 
om- five ships to Jacatra, the Palsgrave and Moon to take in their 
lading of pejjper at Jambi, the Pej>f>ercom to stay on the coast 
of China, and the Elizab»eth and Bull to come direct to Jacatra ; 
and bring away all left in Ja])an, leaving John Osterft'ick with 
two assistants and a cargo of 5,000 taies. The Hollanders this 
year made an attack on Amacao (Macao) with 14 or 15 ships, but 
were repulsed with a loss of from 300 to 500 men, and four shijis 
burnt ; the King of China having at length allowed the Portuguese 
to fortify the place, and ordei-ed the Viceroy of Canton to assist 
them with 100,000 men, if necessar>% against tlie Hollanders They 
are now fortitied near to Isla Formosa, called the Isla de Piscatlores, 
where they report a very good harbour, and give themselves out to 
be English, only to bring oui- nation in disgrace with the Chinesi^ ; 
but this contradicti^d by our China friends in Japan, Is afraid that 
theii* attempt against Macao will cause both their nations to lie 
driven out of Japan, for it has overthrown the China trade in these 
jmrts, yet our China friends say we may have trade into China if 
we will; the wars of the Tartar and the death of three kings of 
China in one or two yeai^s the cause we have not ent<.Ted lieforo 
now ; the Hollanders will never Ixj suffered to enter on any con- 
ditions whatsoever Went with Osterwick and two of the Dutch 



66 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622. 



Sept. 9. 
Jambi, 



Sept. 11. 



factors to Yedo, with presents for tbe Emperor, but after 
detained three montTia they met the King of Fii-ando, fi*om wht 
they ha<l many fair promises, yet now order is come that the 
Emperor wil] have all the goods of the prize frigate for hinisel" 
and they were constrained to deliver them " will we or nill we; 
Two fiiars who came in the frigate from Manilla, and 12 oth€ 
Spanish and Portuguese friars, have been roasted to death at Naa-| 
gasaki ; and the captain, a Japanese, and 112 other Japanc^se mei: 
women, and chihlren have been put to death by fire and swoi'd foi^ 
harbourinrj them. Also some friars who amved at Shaama from 
Caggalion, in the Manillas, under the guise of merchants, were 
found out and sent prisoners to Nangasaki, where it is thongh^^ 
they will be roasted to death ; wliiLst the Chinese arc in danger o^| 
losing their lives, and the goods seized upon of Andrea Dittis, the» 
China captain (our fi-iend). Some Spaniards and Portuguese are 
imprisoned, condemned, and all their goods confiscated for attempt- 
ing to caiTy off one of the friai's " which was roasted ; " and two 
Japons (in the Hollanders* service) with their wives and children 
execiitred. **This Emperor Shongo Same being such a mortal 
enemy to the name of a Christian, especially of Papistical Chris- 
tians/' When at the Einperor*s court at Yedo he was often askodj 
whether the English were Christians, and explained the differenc 
between the EngUab and the Spaniard's religion, " which seeme 
in mme sort to give them content." Has stood out long for the" 
prize goods of the frigat<^% but that would not serve the Tono or 
Cliief Justice of Firando, who threat'cned to put Capt. Leonard 
Camps and himself* t-o death, and the seizure of all his goods ; and 
in case of resistance to have burned all our shipping and put 
all to the sword. '' God send us well out of Japan, for I doubt 
will be every day worse than other. ♦ • « And so let this 
suffice for the present state of Japan." Particulars of sales 
gooiis and stock. The Hollanders sent a ship from Jacatra b^ 
Siam to Japan, with goods, which captured three rich Portugal 
frigates bound from Macao to Malacca or Goa, This letter was 
sent in the Dutch ship Trow, but being forced back by stormy 
weather is now sent by the Bull. Cofttinitjid, 866 No, 175. [Fo 
pcKjes and a half, (id. Vol IX., No, 1078.] 

147- Robert Johnson and Marmaduke Stevinton to Ed^ 
Hai^v^ey, chief at Indraghiri. Are soiTy to hear of the great loss by 
untimely fire by villainous people ; they must have patience tiU they 
can avenge it. Wkh he had sent particulars of the losses ; are 
persuaded that pepper will not burn, and hope the cloth was re- 
moved in time. He is to come away at once if possible. He must 
take caro that tlie pepper and 000 ryaLs wliich he proposes 
capture do not belong to friends. \(}ne page, O.C., VoL iXi 
No. 1079.] 

148, Locke to Carleton. The States have done little or nothing 
since his last, the English Commissioners having failed to meet 
them several times. The East India merchants not the only me 
that complain. [Ext/ract Domiestic Cori'esj),, Jac, /., Vol CXXXIIIT 
Na 12, CcU.^p. 446.] 



ris' 

POgJ 

iie^i^l 
the^ 
or 

ard 

his , 

ras 
tormy 

Iwardfl 

"^ by 
ley 
Ekre 
re- 

I 

ing 
11^ 



EAST INDIES. 



67 



Sept U. 

Tlie Hague. 



Sept? 



Sept IG. 



20. 
BiUm. 



149. Carleton to Sec. Calvert, A stnall fleet now going out 
from Anistordam of ten ships, under one Herrnite, aclniiral, who 
ha« htTctofore ti*aded int<5 the East Indies* He has 1,500 men, 
and victuals for sixtc-en months. All that ia known of the voyage 
is that it is westward, and in all appearance by the proportion of 
victuals as far as the Indies, tliough the voice goeth most for 
Momorra (?) in assistance of the Moors against the Spaniards. The 
Ambassadors in England have written hither very comfortable 
letters, of a good inclination in the King to set a final end to their 
long differences, which must be only done by his authority. [Ex- 
iraet from Holland Cm*resp.^ 

150. Order of his Majesty concerning the islands of Pooloroon 
and Lantar. The question being debated at large by the Com- 
missioners on both sides on the 13th present, the King ordered, at 
Tlieubalds. on the 15th, in presence of the Commissioners, that the 
former agreement for Pooloroon should hold good, the island having 
l)een surrendered to the King of Great Britain in 1616 by a solemn 
deed, according to the custom of the country; and that henceforth 
in Lantai* there should Ix; a friendly union between the English 
and Dutch East India (Companies, and that the natives be again 
brought back and replanted upon the island, to which the States 
Commissioners rea^Uly assented, and " the busine^js touching those 
two islands was thus settled/* \Fout pages. East Iridies, VoL II,, 
No. 21.] 

151, Sec Calvert to Carleton. Yesterday was delmted before 
the King the [)088e€ision of the Island of Lantar^ taken by the 
English since tlie making, but before the publication, of the treaty. 
It was accommodat^^^d to the contentment of the Hollanders, that 
the fort shall be demolished, the place remain as it was, and the 
trade be common to both, acc4:>rding to the proportion limited in 
the treaty ; that is, one part to us and two parts to them. They 
acquainted the King with their resolution for setting foi-^^ard the 
West Indian Company, and offered to receive the English into the 
association. [Extmct from Hollmid Corresp.] 

152, Answer of Ricliard Fursland, President, and the Council, to 
John Peterson Coen, General of the Netherlands Company, and 
liis Council. About the taking of the goods of a China junk, in 
the Straits of Banca, which was done without their orders, but 
being taken they think it right to keei> them, as the Duteh did 
those taken by the Gallias last year out of a China junk, and as 
a set off against the rol^bery of the Unicom, and debts owing by 
the Chinese. Some of the delinquents wHl be sent home to be 
judged by the Company. ** Rejoinder to the Duplique of the 
Fis^." It is out of their " elements to deal with fiscals,'* for, " as 
it is a craven cock that cannot crow upon his own dunghUl, so he 
ia no tnie fiscal that cannot prate for his wages, and sustain any 
matter (though never so lalse) without blushing, if it make for 
his advantage ; " but they will " answer briefly that rabble of 
suborned stuff inserted by him/' Here follows *' a brief declaration 

E 2 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622, 






Sept 2L 



Sept. 25, 



of the circumstances in taking the China junk in the Straits of 
Banca, dra^^Ti up from our people's examinations upon their oaths." 
That t!ie English hoarded her with drawn swords in the night, 
and more than 100 Chinese leaped oveiitoard and some w< 
ch'ovnied, *'isone of the grossest lies of all the rest." Nan-ati 
of the facts as they really liajipened {see ante^ iVo. 124), Think 
matter accordin<^^ to the last article of the accord ou^^ht to be settl( 
by the Companies at home. ** Answer to the triplique of the 
advocate fiscal, concerning the taking of the Chma jimk, deli- 
vered over in the Fort Batavia, 10 Oct 1022." A further .statement, 
signed by Tho. Brockedon, Aug. Spaldinge, and Will. Methwold, was 
delivered to the Dutch General in the foH of Batavia, 7 Nov. 1G2: 
[Ten ixiges and a half, OfX, Vol IX., No. 1080.] 

153, The King to the Lords Commissioners for the Treaty wii 
the Ambassadors of the States. This is a copy (dated 21 Sej^ 
of tlio original despatch from the King, dated 21 Oct. 1022, 
Ko. 166. Bmdskmtj has emforsed this vojnf, ^' 21*^ T^'' 1622. The 
K^ L^J to y« L^i» Comr« for y® treaty w^^ y« Duch toucher y© E, Ind» 
Busines." [Eti&t Indies, Vol II., No. 22.] 

154. Locke to Carleton. The States proceed but slowly in the: 
business. Mens. Aerssens told Mons. Beaulieu they had been eigh' 
times at Whitehall by appointment of the Privy Council and lost 
their labour, wherewith they were not very well pleased. [Ext 
from Dorni'stic Corresp.^ Jac. /., VoL VXXXIII., No, 25, Cal,, 
449.] 



1^ 




[Sept* 28.] 155- Commission from the King to the Lord President of 
Council and others. To inquire into the causes of the decay 
trade, and among other things to fhid out whether the East India 
Company justly perform their contract conceniing the exportiinJ 
of coin, and to consiiler by what means that trade which is speeioi^H 
in show may really be made protitable to the pubhc» without ' 
exhausting the treasure of the kingdom. [Domestic Oorre^jj., Jac, I^ 
VoL CXXXIIL, No. 27., Col,, p, 450] 

1C22 ? 156, " A calculation of what moneys less will drive the tradi 

of silks, indigo, and spices by Cape Bone Spei^ than by Turkey,' 
It is argued that the exportation of money for India and Persi 
by way of Cape Bone Spei is not the cause of scarcity of silver 
but the money transported for Turkey from ^larscilles, Leghoi 
Sicily, and Venice. Cost of Persian silk bought in Turkey 
transported yearly to CJiriatendom, and the probability of drawing th( 
money hither when the trade by way of Turkey shaU be diverted. 
Difference between the present cast of the spices and indigo now 
imported, and when they came by way of Turkey. The whole 
sum exported by sea is leas than wouhl buy tlie like quantity in 
Turkey, which is yearly 1,178,366/. 13^. 4(/., and the land is better, 
served. [Two pages and a quarte7\ E^idoTBed aa above. Ex 
Indies, Vol. IL, No. 23.] 

1622? 157- '* Reasons to prove that it is not the East India trai 

which dotli consumo the gold, silver coin, or other treasure of thin 



1 



EAST INDIES. 



69 



1622 ? 



1622 ? 



1C22? 



1C21 
OctD. 



Oct 12, 



Oct 10. 



kingclom, but rather that the said trade is an excellent means 
greatly to increase the same/' Fi-om the foundation of the trade in 
iOOl till July 1G20 the Company only shipped away 548,000/. in 
Spanish ryals, although they might have exjiorted 720,000i. They 
have in the same term exported to the value of 292;280/. in broad 
cloths, kerseys, lead, tin, &c. During the last years more goods 
have been sent to the Indies tlian in the 16 years before. Thirty- 
four ships have been employed in the trade. Goods bought in India 
for 356,288;. have produced in England 1,914,600Z. The Company 
now ship yearly 50,000/, in divei-s wares. Proportion of the trade 
which it is hoped may yearly be brought into England. Great 
cause for suspecting that the Dutch wOl break their agreement. 
[One page and a half. East IndkB, Vol. IL, iVo. 24.] 

158* "Reasons alleged to prove that the trade from England 
unto the East Indies doth not consume, but rather increase tlie 
treasure of this kingdom." Somewhat longer but to the same effect 
as the preceding, [Two pagea and three qvarters. East Indies^ 
Vol IL, No. 25,] 

159, Treatise by Ed, Bennett on the inconveniences of im- 
porting tobacco from Spain, containing also a vindication of the 
East India Company from the charge of their being the cause of the 
scarcity of silver by their exportation. [Six pages. Domestic 
Corresp., Jcie, L, Vol CXXXV, No. 56, Cai, p. 477.] 

160, Sec. Calvert to (Carleton). Has not been at any of the 
conferences of late with the States Ambassadors about the Blast 
India business, and therefore cannot a<lvertise him in what state it 
stands, but doubts there remain difficulties yet on both sides that 
will have much ado to be accommodated. [Extrad from Holland 
Conrs}^] 

161, Locke to Carleton. Message sent by the Privy Council to 
the States Aml>aasadoi's to insist upon things only which were 
reasonable, as the Lords had charged the English merchants to do 
the like, that so a conclusion might be quickly come Ux [Ej:tmct 
from Domestic Corresp,, Jac, I., VoL CXXXIII , No, 49, Cal, 
p. 454,] 

162* Sec. Calvert to (Carleton). Has before advertised him of 
some dLstastc taken liy the States Ambassailors here at the disap- 
pointment of days of meeting, they coming still at the hour prefixed, 
and his Majesty's Commissioneiii di vet's times failing, and l>y that 
means the States, after two or three hours attendance in the Council 
Cliamber, sent hack again for want of a convenient number to treat 
with them. Yesterday, after two or three adjuiuiiments lie fare, the 
States Ambassadoi's coming at the appointed hour found none of tlie 
Commiasioners but Mi\ Treasurer Edinondes, the Master of the RoU.^, 
and himself, who were thus forced to excuse the conference again, 
though with shame enough ; but they took it so ill, as they went 
away in great anger, professing that they would meet no more, but 
would instantly take their leave of his Majesty and be gone, and 



70 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622. 



Oct. IG. 

Firando in 
Japan. 



Oct. 10. 
Firando. 



Oct. 19. 



nothing would pacify them. Thinke when he (Calvert) has 
there they have had less reason than the English for the business* 
itself, yet for the manner used towards them " they have much cause 
to he sensible, for certainly it hath been too bad." Blames nobody 
in particular, but is sure there ha.s been a great fault amongst some 
of the Lords. He will do well for the King*s honour, if any com- 
plaint is made at the Hague, to solve it the liest he can ; for his' 
own part he has complained to the King by letter and expects an 
answer this day. Before seaUng this letter the Lords who wi 
absent sent to the Ambaasadora to excuse yesterday's fault and 
them to meet again this afternoon (only M. Aeiusens was not there) 
They have been wrangling aller the old manner, through their 
Btifihees, who will not yield to anything however clear that shall 
displease their merchants; they can conclude nothing, but are everyi 
day more weary than other. [Holland Corre^p.] 



er^^ 

go^ 



163. [Jos. Cockram] to Marmaduke Stevinton, Piincipal at Jambii 
Concerning the Manilla fleet. Has determined to go himself in 
the Bidl, and leave the Elizabeth to bring away Capt. Cocks, 
William Eaton, and Edward (?Edmimd) Sayer. whilst John Oster- 
wiek will remain principal of the factoiy. The Manilla voyages 
have not proved so profitable as troublesome and chai^gcable. The 
first voyage ]iroduced 39,549 ryals, one-sixteenth of which the; 
were constramed to give to the marinere. Thinks tliis was a politic 
act, and that the last voyage l^dU produce 200,000 lyals. Order fro: 
[the Emperor ?] that the goods of the frigate c^]>tured by the Eli 
both be given up to his factor, Gom*ockdono, but has ^ven thei 
[the ship ?] which is all rotten. By the Palsgrave. [One pagi 
0,a, Vol. /X, Ko, 1083.] 

164, John Osterwick to Mannaduke Stevinton. The Manilla fl< 
safely amved in June last, with a cargo worth 200,000 ryals, since 
when lettei's have been received from Batavia from the Counc" 
of Defence, for dissolving these Manilla voyages, and oi^deiing th< 
Moon and Palsgrave to be sent for Jambi. He will receive advice 
of their troubles conceiving the taking of a frigate by the Elizabeth. 
[One iHige, O.C., Vol IX., No. 1084,] 



I 



4 



165. [The Lords Commissionei's] to the King. According to his 
commandment, signified by the Lord Admiral to the Treasurer, they^d 
have considered the points of the States Ambassadoi-s' memorial,^! 
wherein they ajipeal to his judgment^ and have commanded some 
of the principal of the merchants to attend hLs Majesty, with thdj 
judge of the Admiralty who has assisted them in all their pr 
ceedings, with their written answers. Represent to his Majesty'* 
deeper judgment the great consequence which this audience of th^ 
States Ambassadors will produce one way or other ; eitlier the sub- 
sistence or utter overthrow of that noble and woiihy trade of the 
East Indies, and consequently a revenue to the King of 40,000/., 
and the livelihood and whole fortunes of many of his Majesty'^ 
subjects, and, what is dearer to him than all the rest, the honoul 
of himself and the realm ; cannot ttiU what the Ambassadoi's pre-^ 
tend by craving this sudden audience, but hope that the Ki 



3me I 
thej 



EAST INDIES. 



n 



.1622. 



Oct. 21. 



will not permit thein to enter into any debate, until they shall 
absolutely submit themselves wholly to his Majesty's judgment 
and sentence, otherwise they will fly off at the end if his Majesty's 
resolution be not like ia sort to their contentment ; and if tliey refuse 
this submission, the Lords Commisaionei's think all should be left to a 
legal trial by way of special coumiission which is in that ease a fair, 
a just, and honourable way, and not without precedent, which being 
so ordered there reste no more to be done touching redress of 
grievances past ; ** As als^j if in the examination of all the par- 
ticulars your Maj. shall find the difficulties to be such as that you 
cannot satisfy the said Ambassadors, but that they continue strict^ 
wilfiil, and opiniative upon their own pretended grounds without 
acknowledging by contentment, it will be still always in your 
power and theirs, either to determine it upon tljeir fii-st submission 
according to your own conscience though against theii' liking, or 
else to refer the decision of all or part in that case unto the legal 
course aforementioned as your Maj. in your own great wisdom shall 
think fittest" The reglement of trade for the futm^ the greatest 
importance of all will fall next into consideration, which if well 
settled, may make both Companies happy enough, and prevent such 
mischiefs and enonuities as have happened. This being a business 
of such weight, and requiring so much debate with the merchants 
on both sides, the Privy Council presume his Majesty will not 
trouble himself with it but will refer it to a new conference, wherein 
the Privy Council wiQ proceed so as to cause no complaint of sincerity 
or neglect. Endorsed by Bnidshaiv : " A letter fi-om the Lds. Com»^ 
to the King toucliing tlie Treaty/^ [East Indies, VoL IL, No. 2C.] 

166. The King to the Lords Commissioners for the Treaty with the 
Ambassadors of the States of the United Provijices. YostcTday, after 
having read thfir letter and heard with great patience the whole after- 
nwm lx>tTi om* murchants and the States Ambassadoi-s touching three 
of the five articles, those of the Black Lion, and of damages Wing 
refen^ed to tbc end of the treaty, the King found it impossible to make 
an end between them, and at length called the Ambassadors privately 
and asked theiii, '*to what end they desired this hearing of us, who 
are not experienced in matter of merchandize, and in this business 
had no more power to conclude their voices than they to conclude 
oui-s," They " shifted off " the King's proposal that they should 
submit the matter to his decision, and in the end were brought 
to this, that they should meet the Commissioners again, who, his 
Majesty undertook, should carefully obser^^e the times of meeting, aiul 
labour to bring matters to an end without any unnecessary contes- 
tation, not following the desires of the merchants, but what they shall 
find agi'eeaijle to justice and equity. They are specially charged that 
at his Majesty's coming to TlK^obalds, they either make an end bls far 
as they can, ur make it appear to his Majesty that the Dutch ai*e 
unreasonable, that in case the treaty should break off, all the world 
may see that the fault is not in the King, ** Li the point of the 
siege of Bantam our opinion is, for ought we see, that it is very 
reasonable which the Dutchmen demand, that our [this word oitr is 
written tli4i in the copy, dee ante, No, 153] merchaiits should be at 



72 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1G22. 



Oct. 24. 



Oct. 25. 



Ocfc. 2C. 

London. 



Nov, 5. 
Theobalds* 



half the charge, where the profit is to be common between them ; 
and tlie Ambassadoi-s assure iis that nil of you (saving only you, our 
Treasurt^r) were of the same mind/' Sti/ncd, James R [Aa^f IndieSt 
Vol. IL, No. 270 

167* The Lords Commissioners to the King, Will carefully 

obser\^e his coniinandment dated from Koyaton, tlie 21st iiist. ; and 
since it is his pleasm-e that they should return to the same disputes, 
will most willingly undergo the pains, whatever the success provea, 
which " depends un their conformity to I'eason and not upon ours." 
May not omit to represent to his Majesty the wrong the States Am- 
bassa'lnrs have done the King's Commi.ssionei's in mistaking their 
opinions touching the siege of Bantam, and singling out the Treasurer 
as dj tiering from all the rest in that point concerning the proportion, 
of tlie charge, whereas the truth is, all thou^rht lit there sTiould ' 



i 



°4 



Nov* 5, 

Aboard 
the Discovery 

Nov. 12 

and 
Dec. 30, 

BataviHi 



a i>roportioBaljle allowance made according to the treaty, which 
seems an ill requital for their real and sincere endeavom-s and extra- 
ordinary^ iiatience. Beseech his Majesty to consider what hoi>e can 
they have to accommodate these unlucky differences, when the 
Ambassadors to hiB Majesty seek to divert all consultation con- 
ceniing the future reglement of trade, pretending that it is a matter 
altogether imnecessary, whereas it Is apfjarent enough that the 
whole subsistence of that important tiude, with the safety of the 
lives, goods, and liberties of his subjects, wholly depend upon it 
{Eivsi Indies, VoL IL, No. 28.] 

168. Carleton to Sir Francis Nethersole. The hopes which th€ 
States Amimssadors expressed, at the beginning of this month, of 
sjieedy good end in their treaty, arc since much cooled by ne^ 
delays. Prays God other afikii-s do not cool likewise. {Exintc 
from Holland Corresjh] 

189* Chamberlain to Carleton. The States Commiasioners went 
to Boyston a week ago with intention, as was thought, to take their 
leave, but there being no agi't'ement betwixt them and the English 
East India merchants, the King has undertaken to reconcile the most 
difficult point touching damages, if the latter will rely on his justice 
and not suspect his integrity, otherwise he wiU not mefhlle witJi tlie 
business. [Ext nict from Domestic CorresjK^Jac. /., VoLCXXXIIl,m^J 
No. 59, Cid., p. 45 G.] !■ 

170- Proclamation forbitldmg the sale of any spices, drugs, fruits, 
seeds, and other meix?handise garbleable without l>eing garbled and 
made clean, packed, marked, or made wholesome for man's use, or 
the good severed from the bad l>y the garblers duly appointed, upon 
severe penalties. [Printed. Froclainatiuns.Jar. I., VoL CLXXX VIL . i 
No. 105, CaL, p. 400,] fl 

171. Report of Thomas Reede anrl otiiers upon the defects in the^ 
ship 13iscoverJ^ [One jyage. O.C., VoL IX., No. 1085.] 

172. Tlie Fiscals process against the English for taking the 
China junk. [Datch, mutUated by dump. Tkirty-8cven pcujcs. 
0.a, VoL IX., No, 1081.] 



EAST INDIES. 



73 



Finiiulo. 



1622. 

Nov. 12 173* English tran^slation of the preceding Uy Bartholomew Wayte. 
and Johnson contradicted himself; he *' did not well call U) mind that a 

De<L 30. liar hath need of a good memoiy/' The oaths of the English are 
BaiUtiA. not to be trusted, for **he that dareth to steal %vill both swear and 
lie, to the end he may keep both his ci-edit and tlie booty/' Tlie 
whole of the Sumatra coast fix)m the Straits of Sunda to Acheen is 
called by the Chinese Lampong ; thei'efore it is true that the junk 
was taken off Lampong. The English are ** so impudent in their 
sliiflings " that the fiscal fears " they will presume to say the sun 
shineth not at high noort" Thinks, with Oato, that when a case 
can be made mamfest neither by writings nor witnesses, credit 
should be given to the plaintiff. The English are sentenced to pay 
8,11 5 J ryals to the Chinese for goods taken, and 10,500 to the Dutch 
Government for expenses and damages ; the fiscal to have 200 ; no 
appeal to l>e aUowed, and Robert Johnson not to be exempted from 
further proceedings. An invoice of the goods taken is annexed. 
[Twuty-eiijU imjes. 0L\ Vol /X, No, 1082.] 

174. Richai'd Cocks to the East India Company. Recommends 
the bearer, John Portis, a Scotchman, who when ** a young youth " 
was sent into Spain to learn the language, thence to Mexico, 
afterwards to Manilla, from whence he caiue to Japan, wliere he has 
served theCompanv five or six years, but has never hitherto received 
any wages, {Qne'page. O.a, VoL IX., No. 108G.] 

175- Richard Cocks to the East India Company, The Dutch 
ships sent with his last letter {see No, 146) returned on the 10th 
in great extremity, having been caught in a storm ; others thought 
to be cast away. The Palsgi^ave and PeppercoiTi put to sea on 
17th Oct, as also two Dutch skips. The Moon and Bull to sail for 
Jambi, the Bull liaving a cargo of money and merchandise. The 
Elizabeth will be despatched as soon as their debts come in, Edmond 
Sayer and Richard Hudson rtvady to go to Yedo with presents for 
the Emjjeror and Council Jo^seph Cockram goes in the Bull to 
Jacatra, so Cocks and John Osterwick and Eaton must of necessity 
wait for the ElizaV>eth, The unrulinuss of marinei-s and sailors, and 
some not of the meanest sort, '* who daiJy lie ashore at tippling 
howses." Sends 100/. to pay tOOl. in England of Capt William 
Adams [Addames] moneys, to be paid to liis widow, Mary- Adams, 
and her daughter, A like amount was sent in the Royal James. 
lOne iHige and a half O.C*., VoL IX,, No. 107ti.] 

176. Marquis of Buckingham to Sir Edward Cunway. For 
3'our comijig down with the Dutchmen his Majesty is well ideased 
with it, so that you come either Ix'fore or after them, and not in 
their company, lest notice should be taken of it And when you 
come I pray you bring down yuur hawk with you, for I have told 
the King of her. lExtract frora Douu Jac, /., Vol CXXXIV., 
No. 13, iM.,ii, 40L] 

Nov. 16. 177. Memoranda by Hugh More, purser of the Moon, of havin^^ 
received from Richard Cocks at Firanda, 100 ryals to be let out to 



Nov 14. 
FiniulD, 



Nov, IG. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622. 



Nov. 19. 



Of 

louftfl 

nor 

the 
jhips 



the Moon's company at 1 Os. the ryal, to be paid in England to Mary 
Addames, widow of Captain William Addames. [Chie page, 0.6% 
Vol /X, No, 1087.] 

178. The Lords Coramissionei-s for the Treaty to the King. 
Have, according to his Majesty's commandment at Theobalds, 
given divers meetings to the States Ambajssadors, and followed 
the way his Majesty prescribed, the merchants also met together^ 
the English never failing except once, w^hen they were attending* 
the Privy Council The matter of Bantam wsm first discussed™ 
and refen*ed to the merchanta, who found their demands Vjoth 
unreasonable and exoi'bitant. In the tliree points of the discount 
of pepper V>rought into Holland, restitution of goods at Lantar, and 
exchange of ryals of eight, then' Lonlshi|>8 could obtain no i-eason- 
able satisfaction, nevertheless to show their Lordships^ earnest desire 
of accommodation they proceeded to the reglement of traile. Of 
the many piarticular demands of the English merchants, the Lor 
Commissioners insisted princiimlly on thrive, which seemed of sue 
necessity that the merchants, when earnestly pressed in privat 
to yield to the uttennost, protested vehemently that without 
redress in those things they could not maintain that trade nor 
draw adventm-ers to contribute thereunto. One of these was the 
assignment of placea for ei-ecting forts, which, though their Lordships 
conceive they have liberty to do in the Moluccas, Amboyiia, 
Banda, the three yeai*s limited by the treaty having expired ; _ 
the Ambassadors not only deny it in those places without their 
consent, but in aU other places in the Indies. Secondly, their Lord- 
ships requii^ed that each Company should govern and tax their own 
nation, but ** thereunto we could hud them no ways inclining " forj 
LowBoever they avoided the name of sovei-eignty (which was ev< 
earnestly ]>rotested against) yet they pi-essed the art and practic 
thereof. And lastly, that the number of 20 ships of defence (lo 
certainly indefinite in the treaty) should lie left to the judgment 
the Council of Defence ; for the English Company protest that neithe 
can their trade maintain ilmir proportion of 10 ships, nor has the 
l>oen any necessity for maintaining that number for defence of ifj 
The dispute on this question the Priv-y Coimcil left to the decisio 
of his Majesty and the States by the 30th article of the treaty, and 
for offence it is not w*arranted by the treaty, All these points of 
reglement having been long debated yest-erday, at last the merchants 
left their Lorrlships to wpeak jirivately together, " we conceiving their 
purpose to have been to accommodate their business between our-!_ 
selves^ but contrary to their Lordships' expectations, the Ambassado 
passing by all busincvss, announced their resolution to begin 
journey this morning tom^ards Newmarket/' Thought it stii 
thc)^ should never ac< quaint their Lordshijis with their intention 
six o'clock yesternight, **our carriage we hope having deserved well^ 
at their hands, though we must confess to your Majesty that ye^ter 
day the language both of the Ambassadoi'S and their merchants wa 
in a higher strain of sovei'eignty in the Indies than wo expected,! 
Endorsed hy Bnidshaw, '* Relating passages at the treaty, kcS 
lEast huiies, Vol //., No. 29.] 



^TJieir 
I our-^ 
^doi^l 
theiH 
j-an gj 
»n til^ 
rellj 



EAST INDIES. 



75 



1622. 
Nov. 19. 

Loiuloo. 



^ov. 2i. 



3tov. ? 



179* Sir Francis Nethei-sole to (Carleton). The States Ambas- 
sadofs are going to Newmarket to-mont»w to try if they can there 
come to any end of their business with the King, being out of hope 
of it by way of treaty with the Lords. [Eztruct from Solland 
Corresp.] 

180. Richard Cocks to [the East India Company]. The Bull 
detained by contrary winds. The King of Firando's secretary has 
just paid in 2,000 taios in plate of bars in part papnent of 3,000 
lent hiin last yean Sends inventory of the merclmiidise taken by 
the fleet of defence the first voyage. [Half a paye, O.C, VoL IX,, 
No. 1088] 

181. Locke to Carleton. Ho will see by the enclosed letter 
[nxniting] the progi-ess the States [Ambassadors] are like to make 
in their business \vith the [Elnglish] merchants. Does not hear that 
they [the Ainbassadoi*sv] are yet gone to Newmarket ; ** they play 
&3t and loose stiungely/' [Ejctract frain Dmne^tic Cm^t'cBp., Jac. /.> 
VoL CXXXIV., No. 20, CuL, p. 4G3.] 

182- Edward Grant, purser of the Diamond, to the East India 

Company. Has sent home by Robert Smithy pui*3er in the Jona% 
the accounts of those men who have died since Oct. 8, and nine wills. 
Their long and tedious voyage since 8 Oct. 1621. Fought w\\h 
tliree caiTacks and a galleon of Portugal, and sunk and Hpuiled the 
carmeks, but not the galleon. Makes no doubt Capt. Greene lias 
informed them of particulars of the voyage, and the debts of the de- 
ceased commanders, " as Cai)tain Harbortt (?) and the reat" Capture 
of other vessels, including a junk with **som stoor of negers, wiiich 
was devided by twick the Duch and the English." In the cajiture 
of the caii'acks 300 Portugals were killed, 150 drowned, and 100 
taken prisoners, with two women. Reached Swally 25th of Oct, 
where they have l>een taking in water and [aovisions. The four 
Dutch ships, with the Exchange and Anne, have just sailed for Ooa, 
and the Diamond will follow in fom' or five days. [One page. 0.6% 
VoL IX.. No. 1081).] 

183. [Sir Edward Conway] to his Excellency [the Marquis of 
Buckingham.] Shortly upon the receipt of his letter, one of the 
States Ambassadoi-s [M, Stavines] came to Conway to let him know 
how, after a sharp debate with the Lords [of the Privy Council], 
they had acquainted their Lordships that they had spent much 
time with no fruit, and that they would go to bin Majesty and 
def>end uimn his wisdom, justice, and favour for some happy issue 
of their work. Conway found that to the former question of res- 
titution the English merchants hatl brought in propositions for the 
regulating of trade, and that the question whereon they came to a 
stand was concerQing forts, being the last aHicle. His reasons for 
apprehending that this was not the proper time to dispute the forts. 
Discussion mth M. Stavines, that the States Ambassadors would 
apply themselves in all points that might concern his Majesty's 
honour, the equity of trade, reiiutation of the nation, equality of 
jiuistice.or fieedom of use or conversation. Upon the points of reati- 



mL 



76 



COLONIAL PAPERS* 



1021 



Nov. 25, 

Newmarket 



tution they took a fair and clear way in the balancing of the inter- 

changeaWe charges ; and pro])ounded what would be reason and 
justice witli a little }>olishing ; ** I saw a iniit of niisundei^tanding, 
but could not see the root ; I saw how rawly and dista.stefully the^ 
proposed to go trouble his Majesty/' Therefore he told Mons. Stavina 
how utterly he riikliked tlmt deliberation of theirs, and how wi " 
the Ambassadors' consent he had proposed to Buckingham and thej 
to the Lord Treasui-er a conclusion of the point of restitution b^ 
consenting upon a competent sum in gi*oss ; that he (Conway) 
aaw no iiTeconcileable diflerences in the rule.s of trade ; that the 
Ambassadors if they abruptly parted with the Council must not 
Imjk to have better acceptance with his Majesty, to whose decision 
such point^s only should be loft as needed a supreme judgment and 
authority. Then propoumled he would resume the overture to 
the Lord Treasurer of ending tlie point of restitution by a gross 
sum, which if the Ainbassadom concluded well with our merchan 
would procure the former a gracious address to his Majesty from 
the Lords, "which I did advise them by all means to esteem. Here 
the conference bmke." Early the next moniing Mons, Staving 
entreated Conway to make an overture and ])rocure an intervie' 
between the Lord Treasurer and the States Ambassadors. Accouni 
of Conway's interview with the Lord Treasurer; arguments aa 
whether this time were proper to dispute the fort«, and whether 
it were not more " councellable '* to win a competent sum of ix^stitu- 
tion for tlie merchants and to estal^lish to them a trade, with 
which they might have time to discover where and prepare how 
to make and maintain forts; that the time of buihhng fort^ w; 
three years after the ]Hiblication of the treaty in the Indies, Inter- 
view at Chelsea between the Lord Treasurer and the States Am- 
hassadoi-s, at whicli Conway was present, where was a civil, 
temperate, and effectual fkljatenient of several points too long to 
troulJe his Excellency with. The conclusion was their suit to the, 
Lord Ti'oasurer butli to procure an [interview] with their Lordshiji 
(of the Privy Council) and accommodation of the things treai 
with equity and favour, which the Lunl Treasurer promised 
endeavour, [Four payee. East Indies, VoL IL, No, 30.] 

\_WJicn Cmiimy was mmni Stcretary of State mi IG Jan. 1G22-3|^ 
Chamberlain, in a letter to Cttrleto^i of 25 Jan^, v:rote tJutt the Kin 
co7nmended Conway'if hirth, dCy c£t,, '* othei^s a^ld his courtiership i 
trying to fasten the title of Excellency on Buckingham.*'] 

184. Marquis of Buckingham to Sir Edward Conway* Thanl 

him ibr his good offices between the States Aiubassadors and ouf 
merchants, for which his Majesty also gives hiui many thanks, and^ 
desires liim to go on in the same course. The King takes well the 
Lord Treasurer's civil usag*j of tlie Arubaasadors, seeing they com- 
plained before f>f his hanlness, and desiri'S them both to endeavoiur 
by all means to l»ring mattei-s as near an end as may be before tl 
business he brought t-o his Majesty again. As for the point of the 
foits, his Majesty finds Conway is somewhat mistaken, for althougl 
the mercliants woidd be contented with that course, the King will 
never suffer them to trade in that fashion at the others' courtesy j 



)fi8 I 

>m^l 
ire 

uit^l 
aa^ 

er 

u- I 
th 
>w 

;to 
thej 

1^ 



^ 



^ 





EAST INDIES. 



77 



1622. 



I Nov. 25. 

$e«nitsrk«t. 

[Not. 30. 



but for that point his Majesty would have it left to the last 
[Eit^d Indies, Vol IL, iVo, 31,] 

185, Moiilem copy of the above. [Domiestic Corresp,, Jac, /., 
Vol. CXXXIV,, No. 29, GaU p^ 4Ga] 

186, Locke to Carleton. The States [Ooiumi-ssionoi^] have 
agreed upon nothing but that thi\^e disinti:* rested merchant bo 
choj?en on each side to make an end of tht? differt^nee concerning the 
pep|>er that wa*s brought into Holland, and if they cannot acconi, a 
seventh man is to be chosen *' to cast the voices/' \_Extract frt/m 
Domestic Corre^p,, Jac L, Vol CXXXIV,, No. 39, Col,, p. 465.] 

187, Tlie Lords Commissioners for the Treaty to the King, 
Wljcn the Govei*nor and others of the East India Company attended 
his Majesty at Newmarket upon a sudden warnin^]^ given by the 
States Ambassadors to repair thither, their Lordsliips infoi-med the 
King of the state of those questions as they left tliem at that time. 
Afterwards the Ambassadors, U|X)n second cogitations, tliought fit to 
resume tbe conference [m'€ letierf anU\ No. 178, 10 Nov. Hj22] ; since 
when they have had many meetings, and have ibiven the questions 
to so near a point of agi*eement concerning restitution and future 
reglement of trade as their Lordsliips had hofie to have concluded all 
things without his Majei^ty*s trouble (excej^ting one or two special 
points reserved for his own sacred judgnjent), as will Ijc seen by the 
enclosed note of every particular as it now stands. Have been 
careful, as the King commanded, to keep themselves to the treaty, 
and not to give way to any novelty, howbeit the Ambassadors ofler 
divers propositions as explanatory^ of the treaty, which their Lord* 
ships conceive alter it in sense, and may 1:h^ of great disadvantage to 
liis Majesty's subjects. But as by mutual coasent the questions 
concerning restitution not agreed uj>on at the Board were referred to 
the merchants themselves, in whose hands they yet remain, and 
tlieir Lordships arc informed have proceeded so far as they doubt 
not 'good success, so the Boaixl thinks the other point touching 
reglement, which merely concerns trade, may as well Ik* agreed upon 
amongst themselves, and the merchants arc of tlie same opinion. 
Did much -wonder at the intention of the Amlmssadors, declared to 
the Board yesternight, of waiting upon liis Majesty, seeing the 
Ambassadors have left the business t/o their merchaTits and ours, who 
stay behin<l of purpose to desimtch it, and therefore did what they 
oould to divert them, alleging, among other reasons, his Majesty's 
present iDdisi>osition by the pain in his foot Anne^ced^ 

187. L The points in difference befive*m the English and Dutch 
vieirMmts iia they now sUmd. The merehants arc a^^corded 
concerning the charges of tfie siege of Ban tarn. The dw- 
count on pepper brotight into Hoi land stands refen^ed to 
tivo English and two Dutch merchants. The valuation of 
ryids of eight taken from English nurcfiants in the Indies 
not yet agreed on. The point C4)ncerning the goods of 
Lankir in handling by the nterdiants on both aides. The 
points of reglement ; tlie abridging the number of 10 ships 
far defence likely to be accorded between the merchants. 



78 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1G22, 



Dec. 6. 

KewiimrktH. 



Dec. G. 

Newmarket. 

Dec. 7. 

Londoo. 



Dec. 13. 



Touching jnrisdictwn^ it is agreed th/it either TKition ah 
Juwe tlie govetmnieiit and correcting of their own peo 
Sonme indifferent place to be appointed for the Couricil of 
Defenwe, or the English fa have a 7'emdenm tieur Ja^atr 
ivhere said Council of Defence nmy assemble aliernativelj^ 
Touching the forts, their Lordships still insist as th 
advetimd tJieKvng in their fonner htter.and see- no ca% 
vjhy thiij should be ordered froni it Endorsed by Br 
sItaWj '* Touching y^ treaty." [East Indies^ VoL II., iW 3S 

188» Tho King to the Lords Gonimissioners for the Treaty. 
Maje.sty has received their letters, and given audience to the Stai 
Atnl>asHatlors, rather out of a desii*e that they should not wholly l 
tJieir journey than from any necessity of hearing what they had 
say, since the King's rt^tiirn to Theobalds approacheth so near when 
he expects to hear a fidl account of the bui^iness. In the meantime 
upon the Anibassadonj* return to their conierences the King could 
not but recommend to their Lordships' care the clearing of all 
accounts, and putting the whole business to an end as near as it can 
be, that at liis Majesty s coming he may receive the whole relation, 
which he hopes will be brought to such a point as to need no moi 
but His Majesty's conclusion. An for the point of tlio Musco 
merchants, ordei' to be tiken for the payment of the money acco] 
ingly. [East Indies, VoL IL, No. 33.]* 



un. 



189, Copy of the above. 
Vol. IL, Ko. 31] 



Endorsed by Bradsltaiv, [East Indies, 






190- Cham}>erlain to Carleton. The States went not to Ne 
market, but oiu- East Indian and Muscovy merchants were there 
and attc^nded their coming four or five days, to their great trouble 
and charge, and came away unheard. Tliey went later, but their 
Secretary Hugins having charge of a bag of papei-s and 20f)?. for 
their expense was robbed on tlie way, and although a reward of 
20^. has been offered for thek recovery, they are like to lose boi 
their memorials and money. [Extraei from Domestic Cot*T{ 
Jwc, /., Vd. CXXXIV, iVo. 66, Cal.p, 467.] 

191. Commission to Lionel, Earl of Middlesex, and others, 
examine upon oath what injurie?^ and depredations have been con 
mitted at sea on the King of Spain, oi- his agents, by the Corapa 
of Merchants of London trading to the East Indies, [Minute, ffmi 
Bk, pp. 352, 3G2. Domesfic, Jac. J.. Cal. p. 468,] 



BatnTitt. 



Doc. > «. 

Batuvia. 



192. Extract of a letter from Governor General Coen to Martij 
Sonck, Governor in Banda. [Daick. Three pages. 0»C, Vol. IXi 
No. 1090.] 

193. Translation of the above. Is surprised to hear of the ill- 
doings of those of Pooloroon. Takes it veiy well that at last he has 
undei-st-ood the business better, and punished with death 160 of the 
principal Orankays, Warns him against tlie Bandanese, Trust as 
little tho cliildren of the Rosing^TLs as wc do hei^ the wives and , 



EAST INDIES, 



79 



MMrid. 



children of those of Solamme and Lantar. They will turn Christians 
to act their parts the better. Thoee of Ceram are treacherous people, 
and sent as spies to di^^eem where they may do miscliief Advi8e8 
him to keep no renegades ; if there be no law to punish them as 
spies \i^th deaths or to imprison them, seufl them hither. Charges 
him to keep no Bandanese, but such as he be fully assured camiot 
do any harm. The men of Banda should \ye sent away, and their 
Tddveii and children Ix^ carefully overlooked, so that you bo sure wo 
have no prejudice by them. The people of the coaat are very idle, 
and much subject to diseases, yet he hopes by teaching they may be 
impr<3ved, in which he is to do his best endeavour. Let the 
English keep no more slaves nor people than such a^ can no wa3^s 
be any hindrance unto us. Thinks they had good knowledge of 
the bad intentions of the Poolorooners ; if this can appear you shall 
punish the offenders, without any favour, acc^^rding to former in- 
structions. Trust the English no more than a public enemy ought 
to be trusteii It is necessary that the soldiei-a* clutliing be put on 
their account ; will not make any alterations at their pleasures. Is 
out of measure ashamed, and cannot think where his wits were to 
let Welden buy and consume the rest of liLs powder, so that those of 
Pooloroon antl Ceram and the Renegados of Banda should the 
better obtain their purpose and present their conquests to the King 
of England, It seems you yourself do stir up the enemy to do mis- 
chief ; yet has not any means to send more powder. Certijied 
copy by Peter Derkksoti, London, \7th November 1G29. [Two pages 
cmd a fudj: O.C\ VoL IX., No, 1091J 

184* Extract from a letter TiiTitten from Ma<lrid. A post, which 
has arrived overland from the Elast Indies, confirms the takin»^ of 
Ormuz by the Persians with the help of the English, and they are 
much troubleil with the news here. \_Extrad froui SjKinish Oorrt^p.] 

195. The Earl of Bristol to Sec. Calvert. There has been much 
murmuring at the Cuurt concerning the taking of Ormuz by the 
Persians, which the}" chiefly attribute to the assistance of the English, 
for his former advices from England arc now confirmed by a Correo, 
come overland pur|)osely with the news, at which they hero much 
storm (particularly the Portuguese), it being a place of so gi-e^t im- 
portance to them. Has done all he can to satisfy the ministers by 
letters to the Condes de Gondoraar and Olivares. [Extnwt from 
Spiinish Carresp.] 

196. Chamberlain to Carleton. Upon complaint of the Spanish 
Ambassador of want of justice in the Admiralty Court, a commission 
has been granted to some Lords of the Council to examine the de- 
predations of our East Indian Company in the Indies, and especially 
about the business of Ormuz. [ExtnfM from Bome^ic Vorresp,, 
Jac, /., ra. CXXXIV., No. 80, CcU., p, 470.] 

197. I^Iinutes of the debate with the States Ambassadors. Con- 
cerning the comparative values of white and black rice, taken 
respectively by the Dutch and English, and the freight and insurance 
on pepper. Since this they have met several times, but are not 
grown to conclusion, though eveiy day they hope to come to an 



80 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



I(j22 



end, and most of the points in differences arc ab-cady concIudedT] 
hoth concerning the reglement of trade and restitution. Endorsed ' 
hy Brivhhxw, " Debate of 2 points, pepper and rice." [East Indies, 
Vol. II., Ko. 35.] 



Dec. 2G, 

JIu'lrid, 



The late taking of 



198. TIk' Earl of Bristol to Sc^. Calvert. 
Oiniuz hy thi; Persian tliroiigli tlie assistance (as is alleged) of the 
English, has made a gi'cat noise in this Court, and been much 
aggi-avated by the Portuguese, insomuch that the Conde dc Olivares 
lias treated with him about it, to whooi he has given sucli Batis- 
faction as he thought necessary, and they intend to send Bristol a 
relation of the whole proceeding, with their complaints^ for the 
King. Hopes that accidents of this nature will not be able to 
breed any alteration in the main business, as was supposed. 
[Ext met fr&iii Spanish Corres2).] 

Dec 3D. 199* Locke to Carletou, Sends the proceedings of the Dutch as 

well for reglement of trade as otherwise ; they were at the very 
point to have made an end and now they are tlown oH' again, *'80 
that it will ask some more time." On Monday [0 Jan.] they meet 
again, and there will be no intermission "till they make a bolt 
or a shafl of it." [Eainid fmni Dtmiestic Con'mp.^ Jac, /., Vol. 
CXXXir., XiK 99, Cid.,p. 47L] 

1622-3. 200. The Proceedings of the English Lords Conimissionei-s and 
Sopt»-Jan. the States Ambassadors concerning the treaty between the English 
and Dutch East India C'ompanies {referred to, ante, p. 29), l»etween 
Sept-enilx^r 1022, wlien the negociations were renewed, and January 
1 023. when the States Ambassadors had audience of the King to 
take leave (see Xo. 246). [^4/^ these papers, lyiz.^ Xos. 201-222, l^Tig 
vjitkout date, it has been tkoiKjht hdtcr to place them together,] 

201* *' Concerning the restitution of ships taken by those of the 
Netherlands from the English East India Company/' Arguments 
on both sides. Endorsed : " Reasons that restitution of ships ahould 
be made without demand, with proofs of our divers demands not- 
withstanding." [Three pages. East Indies, Vol. II., Xo. 36.] 

202. " The state of the questions depending as yet undetenuined 
between the English and Dutch East India Companies concerning 
restitution. The English deniand (1) the discount for pepi>er left to 
two indifferent merchants of each nation ; (2) goods taken at Lantar ; 
(3) cloth taken in two ships at Patani ; (4) 8.000 ryals of eight ; 
(5) lO.-*. for every lyal taken from them in the Indies, Also damage 
for delay of restitution, Ai*guments on both sides. \_Tivo pages, twa 
copies. East Indies, Vol II., Xos, 37, 38J " 

203. State of the negociations between the Lords Commissionera 
and the States Ambassadors, The pepper they take to be accorded. 
Tlie sldps taken by the Dutch acconled for a ceitain sum of money. 
Their merchandise taken Wfore the treaty accorded according to the 
value of the place taken. Tlie question arises of changing tlie value 
of the Black Lion. Fifteen bale^ of linen upon the point of accord. 



. / 



EAST INDIES* 



81 



11622^. 
epi.-Jan. 



For PuKcat " they shall have all the treaty gives them." Pooloroor 
shall be restored. [The expenses of coUeges] schools they shall cease. 
" For Banda [Lantar] they will render all in specie/' with interest to 
the full value of those goods here in Europe. For ryals of eight the 
Ambassadors present [sic] restitution in specie. For reglement of 
justice that they (the English) should have justice over themselves, 
the Dutch over themselves. Touching forts also in the Moluccas, 
Amboyna, and Bantam (&{€ ? Banda), they desire that the treaty ho 
obeerv^ed, and joint agi-eeraent where and how many ai'e to be made. 
Touching the ships of defence, the Ambassadors pray they may not 
be pressed to innovate or change the treaty. Arguments. Also 
conceniing the Black Lion, "yet notwithstanding they shall be 
[ready] to hear his Majesty's reasons and y[ield] to a reasonable 
abatement." [Three pages, vmiilated. East Indies, Vol. II., No. 39.J 

204. The States Ambassadors' report of the negociations with 
the Lords Commissioners concerning Banda (called by the English 
Lantai*). In reference to the Dutch occupation of Banda, and the 
loss in consequence which the English declare they have sustained in 
wareii and moveable goods to the value of about 7,000 lyals, for 
which they demand restitution. The Dutch maintain that by treaty 
the English were forbidden to have any wares there, jVfter exami- 
nation by the King at Hamj^ton Court his Majesty proposed that 
the Dutch should keep two thirds of said wares and restore on*; third 
to the English, to which the Dutch assented, so that they might be 
I'ecompenaed for the third part of the cost they had imdergone, and 
this question was put ofl' until the Privy Council and said jlnibas- 
sadors were l>etter prepared for it. The English Company have since 
demanded restitution of the like wares in Eiu'ope, and the Amlms- 
sadors made an offer to them " to the end they may not break off/' 
but the English merchants were not wilUng to accept " so reasonable 
a proffer.'* Reasons why the Arabas,sadors perceive they cannot 
agree, and why the English should content themselves with what 
the Dutch merchants, pei-suaded by their Ambassadoi-s, have with a 
free heart already profiered, *"and that they (the English) woidd not 
think that in anywise the AmbasaELdora will or can go further 
therein." [Two pages, Fremk; also a trandati<m m Englwk 
EaM Indke, Vol. IL, Nos. 40, 4L] 

205. State of the negociations between the States Ambaasadors 
and the Lords Commissioners. " English merchants' charges granted/* 
For rice the Hollanders demand the like price granted to the 
English. For the Black Lion they demand restitution, she being 
lost by negligence, not by the hand of God. Question concerning 
her gooda The Expedition taken by the Hollanders ; overthro^vn 
by the cable of an Englishman ; by the right of the sea to be borne 
half and half, but if the la%\? of the sea bear it not, they will render 
the whole. The goods of Lantar his Majesty hath judged two parts 
to the State.s, and the English the third part in specie. The mer- 
chants retreated from this judgment, the King being misinformed. 
In conclusion the merchants of Holland offer restitution of all, but 



COLONIAL PAFEES. 



1622-3. 

Sept.-Jan. 



than the 



that 



more to one than the other, and that consequently the 
English should be dischai^god from any further charge. Against 
this the Dutch urge that according to the treaty the two Companies 
should bear the charges and enjoy the profits equaDy. [(hie page^ 
French ; also ahatract in Enfjlish. East Indies, VoL II., Nos. 48, 411.] 



I 



210, Keport of the conferences between the States Ambassadors ' 
and the Lords Commissioners concerning the East Indie^s. In 
refei^nce to the English bearing half* the charge where they have 
half the profit, upon which the States Ambassadors insist andH 
fortify by the 10th, 18th, 10th, and 20th articles of the treaty, and ^ 
on being desired to name some particular chai*ge, with much un- 
willingness made instance of the siege of Bantam, where the fotir 
expeditions were not performed at equal charge. It was answered 
that their Lordshii)s had received satisfaction at Hampton Court 

in the expeditions of the 28th April, 22nd May, and 25th December 
1C20; but for that of 8tli NovemlKT 1C21, if the mei'chants had 
faih^l of what the Council of Defence had agi*eed upon, it was 
thought fit the English should make it good. jVrguments on the 
persistence of the Arnljassadors that tlie Council of Defence had no 
power to determine the charge, the proportions being ordered in 
the treaty. Rejjly of the Lords Conunissioners : thai the Pengran 
hath refused to treat with the Dutch, but oflei-eth trade to the 
English ; tlmt it is not reasonable that they who have no aim but 
trade should bear the charges of another^s 'con quest and sovereignty, 
or either be entrapped in oliensive wars or have unknown accoimts 
made upon them. For these and other i^asons theii* Lordships 
thought not fit to yield to that general proposition of equal charge, 
l>ut ever concluded with their fonner otfer that the English should 
bear that part of the charge which was proportioned upon them by 
the Council of Defence, according to the treaty and the explanation 
thereof* In the margin of one copy Sec, Calvert has tvritten : "By 
which it ajipeareth that the business of Bantam is governed by a 
particular reglement, for that afiair only, and not alone by the treaty 
[Five |>ce/7f8. East Indies, Vol II,, Nm. 50, 51. Tim wpies^l 

211, [The States Ambassadors'] minutes of debates with the Stai 
Ambassadors and the Lords of the Privy Council about the businei 
of the East Indies, Recapitulate what has taken place at sevei 
meetings, particularly on the 16th and 18th November {see ante^ 
Ko. 178), when the Lords of the Privy Council desired that the 
two points of the numl>er of ships of defence and building forts in 
the Moluccas, AmbojTia, and Banda should l>e agreed on. To which 
the States Ambassadors replied: That the desire of the Ejiglish 
merchants on the first point was directly contrary to the treaty, 
which his Majesty declared should remain in its entirety ; that the 
number [of ships] is necessary to secure trade, and that if the State's 
did not see the evident danger of reducing tlie number, they would 
be as inclined as the Enghsh t^^ get rid of the onerous expense. As 
to the other of forts : That neither the English nor the Dutch had 
yet recctnnoitred the Indies, nor given any advice what forts, where, 
and how many would be hereafter necessary, which ought first 



teaH 

essfl 




EAST INDIES. 



86 



1622^. 
Sept-Jan. be done according to the 24rtli article of the treaty. 
French East Indies, Vol IL, No, 52.] 



[Ttifo pages. 



212. ** The points necessary to be considered of in the reglement 
of trade for the future/' Concerning the 20 ships of defence and 
their employment mentioned in the 10th ai'ticle ; the Dutch refuse 
to lessen the niimlx^r. Forts in the Moluccas, Banda, and Amboyna ; 
the three years mentioned in the 24th being already expired, the 
Dutcli '* seem to deny ua lil»erty to erect foi-ts/* Pooloroon ; the 
Dutch agree to rCiStore it ; also to demolish the fort at Lantar, and 
that island to be possessed equally by lioth Companies, The King 
has declared that the Dutch are to have two thirds of the tmde, the 
English one third. The place of residence for the English Council 
of Defence ; agreed that some new place shall be chosen ; and the 
punishment of the people of each Company, also agreed upon. 
[Two fKiges. Endorsed, '' 1622" Two copies^ East hidks, VoL II., 
Nos. 53, 54.] 

213t Reglement between the English and Dutch Ea^st India Com- 
panies. In eight articles, corrected and with marginal notes by 
Sec. Calvert. 1. The English Council of Defence to elect an in- 
diflerent place for residence. — " A greed J' 2. Touching the ship^ of 
defence struck out as *' sufficiently j>rovided for by the treaty, unless 
they will explain it as w^e desire." 3. Equal charge for forts ; *' pro- 
vided for in the 8, 12, and 15 art. of the explanation,*' 4. As to 
criioinals, slaves, or rcfuget^s. — '* Agreed '* so far forth as it is not 
prejudicial to the 28th article. 5. Each nation to have the punish- 
ment of its own criminals. — Strm'k o^U. G. Tlie English Company 
not to bear the expences of the colleges, schools, or table of the 
Dutch Governors, or the presents they make. — '' Agreed.** 7. Neither 
letters of marque to l>e granted nor seizure of ships oi* goods made 
on either side, " a new" article and needless.*' 8. Liberty to botli 
Companies to build forts in two (altered to tkree) years, acconling to 
24 article. " It is already at liberty and needs no article."— 
Agreed. "This article was uuderw^ritten Agreed [in my Lord 
Ti-easurers chamljer stncrk oiitl by the desire of the Elnglish 
merchants, who likew^ise before the LoitIs Commissionei's would 
have yielded to the term of three yeais. But the question being 
again renewed the 30th of this present [ ? Dec] it was otherwise 
answered, and by consent of all parties referred to the 24th article 
of the treaty. The general reservation is that if all the articles were 
not settled, it should be nndei'stood nothing was." — Agreed. [Ttvo 
pages, French, East Indies, VoL 11,^ No, 55.] 

214, Memorial of the States Ambassadors to the King. Having 
considered the 'writing which [Sir Ed.] Conway brought them this 
morning to be by them accepted anfl signed, they desire with all 
their hearts to put a final conclusion to this accord to his Majesty's 
satisfaction ; but complain that by this writing the imyments for 
the pepper and vy^h are to be made in a short time in English 
money in London, instead of in one month after the Ambaasadors 
return to Amsterdam. Pray that what has been already agi-eed 
upon may be confirmed, nothing being in dispute but security for 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1622-3. 

Sept, -Jan, 



the fulfiUing of what has been or shall he conduded and signed, for 
which they are ready to pledge the public faith of their State. 
Request sufficient time to make their report, by reason the fi-oet 
niay still exclude them some weeks from their coimtr}.'. Never- 
theless, as a proof to his> Majesty of their integrity, candour, and 
sincere intentions, and seeing how the EngUsh Company distrust 
their promises, said Ambassadui-s are willing that one or two of the 
deputies of the Dutch Company shall remain here as proposed until 
the treaty, and the pa^^nent depending thereon, be satisfied. Pray 
liis Majesty to firoceed to a decision of the Black Lion, to cause the 
convention as agiecd l^etween the two Companies to be signed, and 
to give said Anibassadoi-s leave to finish this negociation, since by 
these means they will have fully satisfied all that could be expected 
from them. [French. Two voptes ; one endorsed h^/ Se^.. Calvert ^ 
" Paper from the vStates Ambassadors." Tuv jmgcs. East Indies, 
VoL IL, Nob, 56, 57.] j 

215. Proposals of the States Ambassadors concei-ning the Black 
Lion. That if it he not possible to escape from the differences of the 
[Black] Lion b}^ a final accord, the King will agree to refer the 
decision to the Parliament of Paris, where it may 1*0 promptly given 
at the instance of the two Companies, caution to be given on either 
side de jiidicahmi aolvi Those of the Low Countries contend thai 
38^000/. is due. That if his Majesty does not approve of this 
reference to the Parliament, that said Amljassadors may he allowed 
to return and rejiort to tlieir sovereigns the state of this difference. 
In either case, those of the Low Countries will he content and ready 
to satisfy all the other ailicles that have been regulated and agreed 
on hy the mediation of his Majesty and the Lords of the Privy 
Council, in order to show their gi'eat inclination to the accor " 
[Onepojrt** Freneh. FJast Indies, VoL II„ No. 58.] 

216. " Disconrse'* of Sir Henry Mai^ten, Judge of the Admiralty, 
concerning the Black Lion, and goods in her, which were burnt 
casually after having been taken l>y the English. Whether a ship 
taken by either East India Company from the other, though it had 
come to their hands and possession, shall he subject to restitution if 
the same hath perished when in the hands, custody, posisession, or 
service of the same Company. ** I say nothing ought to be paid by 
the Enghsh." With the opinion of Sir WilJiam Bp'de, Dean of the 
Arches, that 'Hhe words of the treaty [lOlfi], and the explanation 
thereof, and the fact being as they are therein mentioned, the con- 
clusions thereof **are well warmnted by law to my l3est under- 
standing," [Xiiie paged. East Indies, VoL II., No, 59.] 

217. Answer of the East India Company to the reply of 
Dutch concerning the Black Lion, addressed to "our veiy 
Lortls '' [uf the Privy Council]. Complain much of the confused 
manner of tlie handling of the eontrovei-sies by the Dutch, tbe 
mingling of things of different considerations, and *' casting in a heap 
of imjiertinencies and peti Hones prineipii ;" after which follow long 
arguments in reference to the meaning of that pail of the treaty 
which relates to the restoration of the Black Lion and her goods^ 



nuer- 

f tH 

goofl 



EAST INDIES. 



J022-3. 

ept.-Jan. which arguments are freely interspersed with quotations 

eminent legal authorities in support of same. [Eight pages. 

Imlies, Vol. II.. No. 60.] 



87 



from 



218. Memorial of the States Ambassadoi-s to the King, Concerning 
that which [Sir Ed.] Conway has on the King's part proposed, that 
the States Ambassadors should give caution in this city or pay a 
part of the debt in Dioney down, with caution for the remainder, or 
that all or the greater iiart of them slioukJ stay in tliis city until 
payment be made or other satisfaction given. Tlie Ambassadors 
declai^e that the deputies who accompany them have neither power 
to give caution nor to make any payment without first reporting to 
their principals. Therefore said Ambassadors beseech hLs Majesty 
to proceed Ui a decision about the Black Lion, and to rest satisfied 
that in signing the accord they engage the public faith of their 
State, which has never given caiise of doubt to State or person, and 
they pray his Majesty to grant them an audience and permission to 
report to their sovereigns what they have concluded after a negocia- 
iion of 14 months. [One jmge and a quarter, Frencfu East 
Indus, Vol IL, Ko. GIJ 

219. Accoimt of negociations l>etween the States Aml^assadors 
and Lords Commissioners. That the Ambassadors have promised to 
give caution in the city of London for restitution of the sum 
detained for freight, assuiance, and just charges, the money to be 
paid 80 soon as the English shall have brought the pepper belong- 
ing to those of the Low Countries into Holland. Also to give 
assurance for the 07*000 and odd ryals to be paid in the Indies, and, 
lastly, to give assui-ance w^ithin 18 months to pay the price the 
English merchandizes were sold for. Question of payment in ready 
monej*. The Ambassadors and Dutch merchants ready to sign to 
bind the public faith. Present article for payment of the money at 
a certain time. Refuse, in case tlicy fail to underwrite, that their 
ships and gocxls should be seized on ("because it were shameful for 
them to presu|>pose such a necessity *'), but acknowledge that power 
and justice would then l^e in the King's hand to take entire satisfac- 
tion on their whole estate. [Three imges. East Indies, Vol, II, 
No, 62.] 

220, Draft of the " article *' refciTed to in the previous paper, in 
which the Dutch Company undertake to pay the English East India 
Company the sum of \left hlmik'], in current money of Englaml, tbe 
10th day of March next ensuing, in the East India House, commonly 
called CVosby, in Bishopsgate Street, in the city of London, and in 
default the Dutch Commissioners bind themselves and their prin- 
cipals, with their ships and goods, to pay the sum of 150,000^. to the 
English Company. [0>ie iKHje and a qitarter. French, East 
Indies, Vol. II, No, G3.] 

221, " An article touching the realls of eight." Tlie Netherlands 
Company is indulited to that of England in the sum of 1*7,320 lyals 
of eight found in the ships Star, Bear, and Dragon at the time of 
their capture, which they promise to restore in specie to tlie English 
Company in London within one month after demand made by the 



^ 



m 



lAL PAPERS. 



Sept.-Jan. 



Di^c. SI. 

Fimtiflo. 



1G22 ? 



(1G22.) 



English deputies at AmBterdam. [^Tliree quarters of a page. Fi*enc 
EaM hidim Vol IL, Xo. 04,J 

222. *' Agreement between the States Amlms-sadors and tlie EasI 
India Company in England." That after long debate the King's' 
Commission el's and the States Ambassadors have finally agreed upon 
and settled all diffei-ences between the two companies, by which 
decision the sum of (sw, hlanl^ becomes payable within three niontha 
to the Enghsb Company according to the articles agreed on, part at 
the bottd commonly called Crosby House, in the city of London, and 
part at Amsterdam, and moreover that out of that part to be paid in 
London the sum of 20,000/. sterling be paid in advance. [Ttm 
piige8* Frmich, Endorseil as above. East Indi€S, VoL II., Nos, G5, ■ 
66, Tiuo copies,] | 

223. Richard Cocks to the East I ndia Company, His las 
dated 14 Nov., w^as by the Bull ; account of the cargo then sent^^ 
also in the Elizabeth now going to Jacatra. The Dutch have sole 
great store of broadcloth, and have written for more, as he has] 
done. The reason of these sales is the rumovn- of war; a great| 
conspiracy having been discovered against the person of the Em* 
peror Shongo Same by eight or nine of the greatest and power- 
fullest princes in Japan, and it is thought his own brethren and 
nearest kinsmen have a hand in it, and that the King of this place 
is not free. It is thought, the adverse party being so strong, that 
the Emperor dare not meddle with them, but will mnk at tlie 
matter and n)ake peace with them. The Dutch have sent great 
store of money and provisions to then* fort at Piscadores, thinking 
to get trade with the Chinas, which Cocks is persuaded will not 
fall out to their expectation, except they take the China junks 
boimd to Fonno.sa, called by them Taccasanga ; and if they do this 
there will be no staying in Japan for them, for the Emperor of 
Japan lias given the Chinese his pass or gosban t<> trade w4th 
Japan, Airival of Edmxmd Sayer, wuth Rio. Hudson and twa^| 
Hollanders, at iliako, on their way to Yedu, with jji-esents for^ 
the Em|jeror and his Council ; there all men speak ill of them and 
cry out against them, so lie knows not wdiether their pi-esents wtU 
be acce}>ted. Silk has fallen in jjiice, and is not worth so much as 
at the anival of the fleet; has sold most of his stock on trust| 
Andrea Dittis, tlie China captain, still maintains that our nation 
but not the Hollanders may have trade into China, He hopes to 
come towards England next monsoon. [One page Wnd a }udf.{ 
O.a. Vol IX., No. 1093.] 

224. Thirty Articles particularly recommended by the commission 
for trade for its advancement, with observations. The 28th article 
concerns the East India merchants, "that their tiading turn not to 
the prejudice of the kingdom.'* [Three pages, in the ha7}(hrriting\ 
of Sir MobeH Heath, Dovmtic Con^esp., Jac, L, VoL CXXXV 
ATo. 53, Cal, p. 477.] 

225. A second request of Augustine Spaldiiige to the President and 

Council. Whereas his formei* request was to have their allowance^ 






EAST INDIES. 



89 



(16220 

for his going homo with the Palsgrave, his time of covenanted 
serving m the country being expired, and his body sickJy and weak. 
Their reasons so far prevailed with him, as to l>e willing to stay 
until the departm*e of the next ship. But having receiveil letters 
from his wife and friends in England, that the Company have Ix-en 
most falsely informed by some that went home in the Royal Jamea, 
that he has committed misdemeanours to the prejudice and wronging 
of the Company, his earnest request is that they would make 
enquir}^ of those chief points which his wife and friends wT-ite he is 
fiaJsely accused of, especially as so many men of note and worth ar^ 
now met here together, that are best able to testify the contrary ; 
and give a certificate how they find it, and fm^ther, what his car- 
riage and care of the Company's service has been, bo that if it 
should please God to take him out of this vale of miseries unto the 
hill of His mercies before his i-eturn to England, he may send same 
to his wife and friends, for the Company's better satisfaction of his 
truth and honesty. The chief things he is accused withal are: — 
That he has not only prejudiced the Corupany by private trade, but 
that on the coast of Sumatra and Jacatra has sold many bales of 
silk for his own account Acknowledges that he sold at several 
times goods to the value of 4-50 or 500 ryals, which were truly his 
own, not to spend in riot and wantonness, but f<ir the V»etter relief 
of his wife and family ; but he never wronged or i^rejudiced his 
employers in the least measui-e. Endorsed, " Copy of a Request made 
by Augustine Spalding, 1G22." [Oiie jxtge and a fmlf, 0.0,^ 
rolIX.,iYo. 1109.] 

1622. 226. Copies of the King's firmans to all Rahdai^ and to Mul- 

fftTtt! [? Herat,] laiml:>eg, and of the Kings demands. Tlie taking silk from Guy Ian 
or Shir wan for Ispahan to be tree. All viziers and governors to 
be ready to provide camels and mules without delay, and to guard 
them from [ilace to jilace. The King demands coats of mail, gims 
of six i>alms length, fine cloth, moi^e teeth, ma«?tills, water and 
land spaniels, Irish greyhoimds, and the smallest lap-dogs to be 
found, weU-tempered knives, some singular pieces of goldsmiths' 
woi^k, some of the finest and choicest sort^ of china, some of the 
drug called Mamoora di China, drinking glasses, and ''Dehauin 
Franck, a kind uf blue stone, whereof they make powder for eyes.'* 
Endirrsed, '* 1G22. The King of Persia his demands, with other 
privileges granted us, at the agents' being at Court," [One fKige 
and a half. 0,C„ FoZ, /Z„ No, 1113.] 

1G22. 227. Catalogue of writings sent for England in the Palsgrave, 

1622, comprising wills, inventories, accounts, consultations, pro- 
ceedings, protests, answers, lettem, and ceitificates. Endorsed, *' Cata- 
logue of all the writings sent troni Jacatra *fce. into England by the 
Palsgrave." [One jmge and a half, 0,a, Vol fX,, No, 1110.] 

1622 ? 228. Notes of bad debts, &c. at Jambi and elsewhere to Ixs 

charged to W. M[anistone*s] account. [One page. 0L\, Vol, IX,, 
No, 1112.] 

(1622.) 229* Account of goods brought into HoUand by the Dutch East 

India Company and there sold, restorable to the English ; consisting 



m 



(1622,) 



1G22-1C24 




of pepper valued at 46,6 2 3f, 128. Orf., silk at 1,786^ 8^. lOrf.. and 
"the iinicom's horn " at 400/., total 48,810/, Os. lOiL ; from which is 
to be deducted for freight and aasumnce 10,837/. 12«. llrf., leaving 
37,072/. 7s, lid. net [Exinict frmn Holland Corresp.] i 

230* Extracts from letters containing accounts of the sale of 
divers jewels in Surat belonging to Morris Abbott, and othei*s. The 
1,000/, jewel sold for 5/280 rupees. The pair of pendant peail^ at 
2,300 rupees. Two pair enierakls, weighing 117 and 13G carats, set . 
in gold with two small rubies to adorn them, sold for 2,910 rui>ee8J 
nett. [fjne jxuje. 0,a, Vol. IX„ No. 101>2.] 



1622, 

Petitions to the East India Company of Persons who solicit Ernployment, Increase 
Wiige»> or Payment of VVngei* due to their Relulives in the Conipnii) s Service. 



Bate. 


Name of Petiiioner. 


Subject of Petitioii. 


Reference!. 


i6sa. 






Court Min. Bk, 


Jan. 4 


M»ria» Starr _ - ^ 


Pjirt of her hu»baDd*s wages 


V. 


299 


11 tf * 


Williim Walker, emrgeon's mate 


Kecompense for service - 


If 


»i 


„ 11 


Willifitn WillsoQ 


Part of son'w wages 


t* 


302 


II ♦! " 


Thoa. Corbett - 


William Kouodcy'iWtgeg 


11 


303 


» IG 


Abel Afth worth 


[Not atatedl 
[Not staled] 


*i 


ft 


f» f» * 


Sunih n oil ice - * - , 


II 


u 


w »» 


Philiip Wo organ 


About pepper 


j» 


n 


f» ♦» * 


Samuel (iooch - - - 


[Not stated] 


w 


II 


i» »» * 


Edw»nt Bilton • 


[Ditto] 


. _ - 


»» 


% ** 


11 II * 


George 8miih - - - 


[Ditto' 


_ 


■• 


*i 


i» »i " 


Gilbert L«dge - 


[Ditto^ 


- - , 


•» 


M 


fl ft ' 


Joan Nichotsoii 


[Ditto] 


- - - 


n 


If 


it f* * 


Francis Cbamberleyn - 


About providing cooks • 


»» 


II 


It f* 


Lucy Biiylj - _ • 


[Not stated] 


»» 


f» 


„ia 


Widow Leiitniau 


Her husband's wages, &c. 


*♦ 


30; 


n *t 


Phillip Wo organ 


About pei>pt*r » - * ^ 


i» 


t* 


,. 85 


Isaac Crowder, steward 


200 ryals, part of bie» good« 


1* 


310 


>i i» 


Do. - 


l,aoo rviils (»f Tboman Crow t her, 
purser, dtccatted* 


II 


»i 


♦» i* 


Widow [Ann] Ta>|or - 


Allowanc<? for timber 


I'* 


311 


n 30 


Edward Charley, &nrgeoD 


Wages of hi it servant, Thomas 
Dobbinip who die^l at Poolo- 
TOon. 


t* 


315^1 


»t 11 


Do. - 


Increase of bis boh George's 


11 




»» »» * 


Dr. HilU 


wages. 
Employment for bis nepbew 


If 


316 ' 


IP It 


Martin CViesttT, master guimef 
of the Ulesiiing. 


iDcreiiiie of wnge^» SiC. * 


ft 


3IS 


11 


Edward Tj iies - 


50/, for his outfit 


It 


318 


II » 


Maiy Jttckaon - - - 


Her brother George Cockayne*8 
estate. 


li 


"M 


Feb. 1 


Viseount Mandeville, IxHrd Pre- 
sident of the t'ouncil. 


Euiploymont for Philip Wood, 
his kin*iroftn. j 


ff 


,M 


II »• 


Thornan Drvfielil 


Purchase of indi^'-o 


II 


3il^ 


II 4 


Aiiee Titjior • - » 


Euiplfjyment for ber son 


*» 


sri 


II ti 


KntbcriDe Hamlin 


George Su 


tL% btr servant's wages 


19 


•t ^J 



EAST INDIES. 



91 



Dftte. 


Name of Petitioner. 


Subject of Petition. 


Reference. 


1 1622. 






Court Min. Bk. 


1 F*?b. e 


Mrs. FiUherbert 


Fart of her husband's wages 


V. 824 


1 §• •! - 


Isaac Crowder - . • 


AUow&Doe Ibr 203 pieces of 8 - 


*i ft 


I ., » - 


Th<? ship** carpenters - 


Payment of wages 


n 327 


■ .. . - 


Philip Woorgan 


Allowance for bis pepper 


ti «* 


1 ■" ■ 


Mary Jackxon * - - 


Her brother George Cockayne's 
eatate. 


1. 328 


■ ., .. 


— Hanson - _ _ 


Captain Pepweirs estate - 


„ 329 


■ ..13 - 


Mayor and jurats of Dover 


Wage« of Thos. CuUen - 


„ a8S 


.. 20 


Bartholomew WayW!«> auditor - 


Eniptoyment for hi^ son - 


*> 832 


n *t 


Hohert Owcu - 


Wageij . - . - . 


»« r» 


t» r» ~ 


Edward Cratiy - - - 


ServanVs wagm ... 


*• ft 


>» >f 


Joan Orion " ♦ 


Servant's wacfca ... 
Her hnuband s wages 


It *f 


•♦ »» ~ 


Rebecca Fvmandiu^ widow 


n n 


♦* »» 


Ann Jeffer>% widow 


Charity • - - - _ 


u 340 


?f n 


Thomas Robinson 


Wage* in advance - - , 


If tt 


»f *f 


Edward BUiou - - 


His servant's wages 


»* »i 


H. »** 




Part of ber brother Joseph 


n 348 


■ 


Kendall. 


Benson's w»(:es. 




V nSS - 


Henry Mitchell • - - 


Hin brother Mordochay's eatate 


*l M 


\ .... 


Margaret Sherwood 


Part of her bujiband^s wages 


M 348 


I «27 - 


William Beadle* 


Otle^ Painter - - . 


„ 847 


^^& » tf 


— Alford, on behalf of Wra. , 
and Fra*?. Singleton, 


Their brother Thomaji' estate - 


„ 35U 


^^^ »» W 


George Loreyt and Alice Tyler 


Payment for paintbg the Com- 
panyN* house at Blackwall. 


M n 


■ ite. 1 


Henrj Edeus - * - 


PvDiiion for his liou'f servicea - 


» 3&1 


■ " " ' 


Priikcilla, wife of Henry Rick- 


Part of her husband's wages 


It ♦* 


■ 


Maadelin Selby, widow 


Her late hudhand'i wages 


n 332 


P •• »f * 


Robert Rolf . * . 


Part of two stTvants* wages 


n 3M 


f » 6 - 


Jane A 1 brook - . - 


Part of her brother's wages 


„ 358 


1 n »t " 


John Crowther . • ♦ 


His son's estate 


•, 3til 


f " '' ' 


Sibil Clarke - 


Her son Williitm Symondson's 
estate. 


„ 362 


» 11 


Elizabeth Wood 


Part of her husband's wages 


rt 368 


u 13 


Abigail Carpenter 


Part of wages of Stephen La- 
rimer. 


„ 869 


,• 15 - 


Emanuel Butta, master of the 
Blejising. 


Hiapay 


„ 370, 5 


t. 18 


Margery Mom - - - 


Part of her huBband'* wages 


,1 375 


«v *• 


Wife of Thomag Ecb«ll 


Part nf her husband's wagc» « ' 


(» ** 


« 27 


Mary, wife of John Burre<l 


Her servo nt*s wages 


„ 381 


*» ft 


Eliiabt th, wife of Gilbert 
Richardson. 


Part of her husband's wages - 


ft n 


99 IS 


Sibilla Fieldur - 


Her son Robert Carter's property 


n ** 


•f tf ~ 


Jane Albrooke - - - 


Her husband's wages - 


„ 382 




Grncc, wife of Michael Willis - 


Part of her bushand'H wages - ' 


tf tf 


*f M * 


Anne, widow of Roger Smith - 


Her late hatband's pay * 


*f n 


|W It * 


lliomas Eajst, waterman 


Part of his nervaut Joj»cph Tar- 
rant's wages. 


n n 


„29 - 


Wife of Richard Jone», ftftUor - 


Port of ber htisband^s pay 


„ 38iS 


April 10 


George Lovett and Alice, widow 


Payment for paint ing the Com- 
pany ')« bouHe at Blackwall. 


«, 3»l 




of Thomas Tyler, 




ta t» ~ 


Muudt^lin Selby 


ChwHty ... - 


M 392 




KItJuiWth Alexander - - ' 


Part of htT husband's wugea 


m II 


»# 


Kichnnl Hole . - - 


Payment for making nails 


„ 328 


^ 


Afartha Miller - 


Part of her liUNband't* wages 


ft It 


*t tf 


Joan Jackson - 


Ifer discharge from Newgati; - 


I» H 


« 17 - 


Samuel Bius - - - 


His wages ... 


,, 322 


#t »« * 


Sihilhi Fielder - 


Her hoq'k [jroperly 


„ 40O 


,•26 


Thomas Jones - - - 


II in. wages - _ . 


„ 4ua 




Henry Gold well 


Purser's place - | 


,. 404 



92 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



Date. 


Name of Petitioner. 


Subject of Petition. 


Reference. 


1622. 






Court Min. Bk. 


May 


8 


Isaac Crowtber ... 


Estate and employment - 


V. 


410 


»> 


» 


Fielder and wife 


Estate of Robert Carter, de- 
ceased. 


» 


411 


9) 


6 


Tobias Harris, steward - 


To be a purser ... 


» 


415 


>l 


*» 


Arthur Fowkes - - - 


To be a purser's mate - 


» 


>» 


» 


10 


Isaac Crowtber 


Balance of wages 


)) 


417 


» 


»» 


Peter Pett - - . 


His servant's wages 


99 


418 


>» 


15 


Captain Pring . . - 


1,500/. of his wages - 


t) 


422 


>» 


17 


Bartbolomew Churchman 


Money disbursed to the Com- 
pany's servants in their cap- 
tivity in the Indies. 


» 


427 


» 


» 


Dorothy, wife of John Bowe - 




f* 


» 


9> 


22 


Margaret Burton 


Part of her husband's wages - 


>9 


429 


» 


»i 


John, father of Thomas Crow- 
tber. 


His son's estate 


M 


99 


»» 


» 


Rebecca, wife of Thomas Agard 


Her husband's wages - 


91 


430,3 


>» 


» 


Joan, widow of Thos. Perkins - 


The Company's cooper's work - 


W 


>t 


June 5 


George Haiard . - . 


His brother Samuel Haxard's 


9> 


438 








estate. 






99 


»» 


Mayor and Commonalty of Bristol 


A legacy of 250/. from Bichd. 

Wickham. 
Employment for his son under 

Property of her husband 


99 


440 


» 


» 


Captain Watts ... 


99 


441 


» 


13 


Jane Yard, widow 


»> 


448 


» 


» 


Cyprian Mills . - . 


Porter at Crosby House 


»» 


449 


91 


» " 


— Hawley 


Richard Robinson to serve him 


99 


» 


>» 


»» 


Do. .■"... 


100/. advance of wages - 


» 


»» 


»9 


>» " 


Katherine Barbour 


Part of her son's waffes 

Part of her husband^ wages - 


M 


450 


» 


M 


Mary, widow of William 


» 


451 






Streamer. 








» 


18 


Rebecca Agard ... 


Her pepper . . - 


>• 


455 


>» 


21 


Elizabeth, widow of Nicholas 
Sadler. 


Allowance on her husband's ac- 
count. 


»> 


456 


» 


»» 


David Bourne - - - 


His adventure in 1st joint stock 


» 


458 


» 


26 


Valentine Markham, auditor - 


Increase of wages 


» 


463 


»» 


29 


Thomas Thomborough, purser - 


Allowance for 8 cwt. of pepper 


» 


469 


)» 


»> 


Christopher Brown, master 


Do. 18 do. 


»> 


471 


» 


»» 


[Randall] Jesson 


Do. 4 do. 


99 


»> 


tf 


>» 


— WaUer 


Do. 4 do. 


» 


19 


»» 


w 


Valentine Pretorius Dantisker - 


Do. 50 books of calico 


>♦ 


» 



1622. 
Names of Persons admitteti and sworn Free Brethren of the East India Cokpant. 



Date. 


Free Brethren. 


To whom bound. 


By Fine or otherwise. 


Reference. 


1622. 
Feb. 13 
May 15 


Elias Smith - - . 
William Bayart ... 


John Dike 


10#. to poor box - 
By patnmony 


Court Min. 
BookV. 

331 
417 & 422 





^^^^^^^^^^^AST INDIES. 




^^H 




^^^^ 


^^^r Transfers of Adventurbb in tbe East India Company, 


^H 


Date, ' 


From. 


To. 


Amotrnt. Nanie of Stoclt. 


Reference. ^^^^^| 


R»i. 






£ 




Court Min. ^^^^| 
Book V. ^^H 


JftQ. 11 


WUliftfn Beian - 


Sampson Newport - 


400 


Second joint stock 


aos ^^H 


^,s 23 


Hobert Pincheti - 


I«»ac Van Paine 


' 500 


Do. 


^^H 


^k S2 


KatheriiQe CoUoo (deed.) 


John Cotton - - j 


aoo 


Fir^t joint stock 


ail ^^H 


H, 28 


Augusti&e Lucotella 


Morris Abbott - 


soo 


Second join tfltock 


^^^H 


■L 90 


? Robert B*:U - 


Robert Cumbell 


200 


Do. 


^^H 


^^Bi^ 


Do. 


Cicely Dun»combe - 


200 


Do. 


^^^^^H 


^■b. 


Mrs. Greenwell - 


— GckIbuuIi 


200 


Old jt>lrit stock - 


819 ^^H 


^^Bi 


Do. 


Churles BoRtock 


300 


Do. 


^^^^^^H 


^^^b 


Do. 


A<lxtin Boildins 


400 


Do. 


^^^^^^^^^^^1 


^^Hi> 


Sir Willium Rossell 


Robert Leroan - 


800 


S&cond joint stock 


321 ^^^^H 


Hit 32 


Gwrge Scott 


George Scott and 
Tbomas Brace. 


3,200 


Do. 


341 ^^^^H 


^Hl* M 


Gile* ^lartin 


John Cordall 


300 


Old joint stock 


^^^^^^^^1 


^^ft f» 


Richard Heanie, Alder- 


Richard Cham pin 


400 


First joint stock 


^^^^^1 


^^H » 


Richard WagfgBtaffe 


Isaac Penoington 


too 


Old joint Htock * 


^^^^^^H 


H,. 


Williflm B avert - 


Geoffry Kirby 


&00 


Second joint stock 


347 ^^H 


■par. 


Gabriel Barbor - 


Morris Abbott and 
Marj Harrison. 


4t9 , 


Do. 


^^^H 


H » 




Ifiaac Van Paine 


500 


Do. 


967 ^^H 


^^H t* u 


Mrs. Greenwell, widow - 


Derick Hoest 


Remitinderof 
400 
100 


First Joint stock 


^^^^^1 


H n 15 


i Do. 


Tlmmoa Hanjpson 


Do. 


^^^1 


^H » » 


Do. 


Richard BtTcsford 


Remainder of 
4(H> 
151) 


Do. 


^^^^^H 




George Scott 


Willi/im Rolph - 


Second joint stock 


881 ^^^k 


^^^VV H 


Daniel Penningtoo 


Isaac Pennin^on 


1 ,00*) 


Do. 


^^^^^^H 


■ ; S3 


George Scott a&d ThomsB i 
Brace. 


John Woodward 


400 


Do. 


^^H 


^■A^mllO 


Barbara Cromptoii 


William Palmer 


400 


Do. 


^^H 


^1 .. 


John Denly 


Ktilherine Leaver 


800 


Do. 


^^^H 


■ lUy 6 


Sir John Wolatenholmc * 


Alderman Ualliday - ! 


2,250 divsi. 


Do. 


41S ^^^H 


^H 


John Denly 


Mrs. Leaver 


800 


Do. 


A\h ^^^M 


H » 


Robert Leman • 


Richard Beresford - 


800 
S3 e 8 


Do. 


^^^1 


^H 9 


QwtBrey Prcacott 


Thomuji Burton - 


First joint stock 


^^^^^^H 


^H M )* 


Do. 


Kichohifl Earte * 


83 6 8 


Do. 


^^^^^H 


^H t« n 


Do. 


Ellis Crispe for J 
Carew Sanders - \ 


83 6 6 


Do. 




^V f »i 


Do. 


668 13 4 


Second joint stock 


^^H 


K » 


Sir Thomas Smythe, fori 
KicUard We»tby, de- i 
deased. J 


Sir Thomas Smjthe - - 


400 
400 


First joint stock 
Second joint stock 


^^H 

^^^^^H 


H « 14 


WilliMn Bftjrart, Kenr. . 


William Bayart» jun. - 


800 


Do. 


484 ^^^1 


H)iiae ( 


John Ooghill - 


Heniy Coghill - 


8,500 


Do. 


440 ^^H 


^B n 


John Sarifl 


William Stone, Trea- 


300 


First joint sto^k 


^^^H 






surer. 






^1 


■ 1623. 


1 


^B Jan. 4. 231* Locke to Carleton. The States and our Commission 


ors have ^^^| 


^H agreed on divers pointa, as ajipeai's by the enclosed note [see 1 


io, 232]. ^^1 


^^^H It is expected every day that they should make an end, ai 


id it ^^^1 


^^^H said that the King will see it done before he goes. [Extra 


ci from ^^^H 


^^m DmiuBih Corresp., Jac, /., Vd, CXXXVIL, Mo, 4, CaL, p, 4 


^H 



u 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



[Jan, 4.] 



1623, 
Jan. 4, 

London- 



Jan. 9. 

BmUviu. 



232. " Points remaining to be concliided in the East India busing 
The tii*Ht eight articles are the same in substance as in No. 213, but 
there are two additional articles concerning the charge of the garri 
sons in the Moluccas, Arnboyna, and Banda, and the restitution of 
Pooloroon t^ the Enjijlish. To each article are the words, *' desired 
by the English " or ** desired by the Dutch." A general article is to 
be conceived to enjoin both Companies to a full observance of all 
things contained in the treaty. Endorsed as above by Sir Dvjdlef^ 
Carleton ; aim *' Sent with my letters the ith of Jany. 1622-3." [~ 
Images. East hidies, VoL II., Ifo, 67.] ' 

233* Chamberlain to Carleton, The States [Commissioners] make' 
long work ; thinks it were a hard knot that could not be tied or 
untied in less than 13 or 14 months that they have been about it; 
However the InisinesH be ended or whatever the conditions, Chamber- 
lain donlits our East India Company will be never the better for, 
them, [Exfnivt frmn Damestic Cari*e»p,, Jac, L, VoL CXXXVIL, 
No. 5, Cal, p. 476.] 

234. Thomas Brockedon, Augustus Spalding, and William IQBM 
wold to the General and Council of the Dutch Company, WheHH 
on the 7tli of Nov. 1G22 they dehvered a protest against the General, 
and therein appealed from the sentence given against their employers' 
(concei-ning the Rurprising of a China junk) to the King of Greafe 
Britain and the States General, according to the 30th article of tha, 
Accord. But said General on the 2nil of this month sent the Secre- 
taiy of the Council of the Fort Batavia and others Avnth an extract 
from the council book of the Council of India declaring the appeal 
void, and demanding the pajanent of 8,115|^ryals ; to which Richard^ 
Fursland and his Council answered that they stood to theii* appeal^ 
and could not in such manner part with their master's goods, therefore 
the General might proceed as he ]>Ieased, The next day the same 
demands were made, and 24 houi-s given to '* exhibit the aforesaid, 
sum," to which the like answer was returned as before. At this the 
General was much offended, and " in threatening manner advised us 
not tn) engage our pomons in tliis business/' and sent the fiscal, town 
baihtf, and four others, who took the keys of our warehouse and 
seized in China goods fonnerly surjuised, goods amounting to 
16.182 rytdn, whereas our mastoid have received but the value of 
6,205 ryaLs, by which partial and rigorous proceedings the conti-act 
is not only violated, but the loss and disgi-ace of our Company cldefly 
intended. Neither are we ourselves without danger, seeing that tha 
speaking of " you may do what you ]>lea*^e '* may so far incur the 
Generals displeasure as to " ingage our persons/* Wherefore, having 
no other refuge left, we hereby [irotest against the violent and 
injurious proceedings of said General and Ins Council, and declare 
how much our emi>loyers are wronged and damnified in reputation, 
and estate, especially by l>eing deprived of apjieal, the only lueans 
of relief ordained by the Accord. " Delivered in the Fort Batavia 
to the General and his Council, by us hei^ underwritten, tlie da3^and 
year above written." Endositre in a letter from Sc€. Coiivxii/ to Sir 



EAST INDIES, 



1623. 



1C23? 



Ian, 9. 



Dudlet/ CarUton fit the Httgue, of 2^th June 1621, Endorsed, 
** Received in London, 29th May 1024, out of Hollaed by the Pinnace 
Hazewindt/' [Tvh) pages. Holland GoTTtsp,\ 

235, Complaints of the East India Company against the Dutch, 
That tliey pit'vent tlie English from cnjojing a third pai't of tho 
fmitfi of tho Moluccas, which is contrary to the treaty, and deny the 
English the liberty of paying their men as the Dutch do, with 
clothes and victuals. The injuries done to the English in tho 
Moluccas, consisting of 30 articles, the Comi>any have sent over to 
be debated in Holland. Also " concerning the taking of the Chinese 
junk '* by the English. \Two pages amd a half, Eatft Indies, VoL //,, 
No, GS.] 

236. Collection, in 36 articles, of several parcels which the (Dutch) 
Governor of the Moluccas, Amboyna, and Bamla has constrained the 
deputies of the EngUsh Company to pay in those parin, again.st all 
i^eason and justice ; delivered to the Ueneral of the Netherlands 
Company by President Fui-sland and Council, desiring that he would 
make restitution for those parcels which belong not to our Company 
to pay, and to moderate othei^ according to equity and justice. 
These have reference to the excessive chargers in Banda for a galley 
*' wholly rotten," and for 29 Tingans left there by the Dutch Ceneral 
after the taking of Banda ; to the allowances made to the slaves and 
prisoners in the Moluccas, Amboyna, and Banda ; to buildings not 
fortifications, but summer houses, warehouses, shops, merchants* 
chambers, and lodgings of brick and stone ; to schools in the Mo- 
luccas. AmlKjyna, and Banda, and a new school-house in Pooloway ; 
io double allowances to soldiers in the hospital ; to tlie Covernor's 
beddbag, haaigings, and apparel for the Ixjys ; to unreasonable gifts 
extraordinaries, and voyage of the Governor of Amboyna " to enlarge 
the dominions and conquest of the Netherlanders " ; to refusing the 
English t-<j particii»ate in one-third part of all the spices the places 
afford, conti-ary Uj tlie contract. In all places rotten and decayed 
rice is given the hogs, hens, kc, and decayed cloth to the siugeons, 
and yet charged at the dearest rati! the best is sold for ; the account 
of gifts, fortification, and gairison most excessive in Amboyna ; also 
for the soldiers' allowance, and yet no extra^irdinary table kept for 
the ofiicers — a plain en*or. The ex)>enses of the (JoveiTior's table in 
all places uni^easonable, especially in Banda, being more than the 
whole ganison of soldiers, who are 13 times as uiany. At Pooloway 
their ships were detained until tliey had paid for a school newly 
buUt. The Governor of Banda restrained their people from sending 
boats to sea to surprise their enemies the Ceramiers, and through 
the unfriendly proceediugs of the Governor of Pooloroon they wholly 
lost their debts there. They do not enjoy the third part of the vent 
of clothing, rice, and other conmioditiijs, as by agreement ; the soldiers 
are paid in clothing, and sell same to the inhabitants at a third lea« 
than the market value, to the utter spoil of the trade ; gifts, slaves, 
provisions, ^c. are taxoil at what rate the merchant thinks good, 
and "our cloth lies rotting upon our hands/' They dare not trust, 
because of tho Netherlanders* order that they shall not constrain 



96 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 



16231 



1623. 

Jan. 15. 
Batavift. 



Jftn. M» 
BatftTift. 

Jan. if. 

Mudrid. 



Jan. l^, 

Madrid, 



payment All benefits, as customs, imjwsts &e., are enjoyed to the 
particular use of the Netherlander^. " Anything that h for the 
Netherlands' arh'antage they will have present performance of, but 
what^^oever makes against their benefit, though never so unreasonable, 
they will have referred to Batavia," *' and to call any tiling in question 
is on om* part accounted heinous crime and an opposing of the 
GoveiTLor*s authority:'* [Seven /xcjfcs and a fudf, Etist hidies, 
Vol IL, iVa (>90 

237. '' Extracts out of our advices received out of Holland." Much 
discoui-se in the Assembly concerning the managing of their trade of 
spices, seeing they had or were like to have tlie sole trade of the 
Moluccas, Amboyna, ke. The price of cloves, nutmegs, and mace 
was to be raised while that of pepper, others dividing the trade with 
them, was to be so depreciated as to make it a loss to export it from 
the Indies. [Half a page. East Imlks, Vol. II., A'l>. 70.] 

238» Extract out of the book of the Resolutions of the Council of 
Defence. Tlie committees of the English Company, having shown 
that they have not had any supjjly from England, that it is impos- 
sible for them to send to the Moluccas, Anibo^Tia, and Banda, and 
that they thought fit to withdraw their men altogether from the 
said quaiiei^, desired the General to counsel them, and accommodate 
them as much as possible ; whereupon he answered and promised 
that tliey should leave a man or two in the princiijal places ; that 
what their merchants have I'emaining thei'e, according to the esti- 
mation in really money, shall be accepted ; that out of the nia«s of 
spices, their contingent shall be here delivered pro mta; and that 
their men and goods shall 1m3 brought hither in oui' ships, for such 
freight as shall be found fitting. Which the committees did thank- 
fully accept. Signed : Kichaid Fursland, Thomas Brockedon. Augustin 
Spalding, Wilham Metliwold, Jan Fieterson Coen, Pieter de Car- 
pentier, Willem Janssen, and Jacques Specx. [Duteh. Two pages 
aiid a half. O.G., Vol IX., No, 1093 -fl.] 

230. English translation of the preceding. [Two pages aifid a half. 
O.O.. VoLX.,No.lU^. 

240* The Earl of Bristol to Sec. Calvert. Touching Ormuz ; they 
have here appointed the the Marquis of Montes Claros, the Conde de 
Gondomar, and one Mendo Mota, a Portugal, to treat thereof; from 
whom he daily expects a relation of the whole business of their 
grievances and demands, together with some propositions which lie 
undei-stands they [mrpose to make concerning the Engli.sh trade in 
the East Indies, which as soon as he has received he will send. 



[E; 



I froni Spi> 



n^esp,] 



241* Extracts from a letter from Madrid. They have of late been 
much troubk'd here at the taking of Ormuz by tlie Persian, assisted (as 
they say) by the English, which is nnicli aggravated by the Portu- 
guese. Daily expects a relation of the whole business which he 
intends to send to King James, that such satisfaction may be given 
as shall lie thought fitting. Hopes accidents of this nature will not 



4 

4 



n 



4 



EAST INDIES. 



1623. 



Fan. 17. 
Bitiftvia. 



Ian. 



any way internipt the main business (of the Spanish match). [£^7- 
tract from Sjmnish Corresp.] 

242. Extract of letter from the President and Council to the 
East India Company lat^i'ly amved hy Holland ships. It was re- 
solved on the Ist January' in Council in no wise to yielfl conijcnt to 
tlie Dutch General's proposition for privat^e trade with Bantam from 
the Dutch ship as most prejudicial to the respective Companies tra^Io 
and design.s and against all Bcnso and reason that the Dutch should 
under jiretence of he,sieging Bantam not only draw the English into 
part of that needless charge but also debar them from the trade. 
whilst privately trading themselves, and so furnishing the city with 
money, the necessity whereof is tliought to be the only means to 
reduce them to reason. This answer the Dutch General seemed to 
take veiy discontentedly, becoming veiy bitter and uncivil^ often- 
times "giving the lie," and not being able to conceal the '* secret 
malice he liare" to President Brockedon, upon a conct-it that 
Brockedon ha<l written against him concerning the wldpping of 
William Clarke. If the Dutch undertake that tratle without their 
consent, thc-y will endeavour to do the like. On the lOtli iast the 
Dutch Geneml sent a most insolent answer to thc-irs of tlie (>th (a 
copy whereof they send htavwith) deniamling how and in what 
manner they had wronged the English which would l»e necilless 
for us to i*eitcrate. Continue their resohition to remove from 
hence and foilify upon Ressoe, nidoss tlie Dutch rosist them by force; 
for they are pei^uade<l that tln^ Dutclj long for some occasiun to do 
them what mischief they may, and tlds veiy day one of their people 
told them tliat, being in a taveni the day before, a Dutchman 
who beareth good affection to our nation told him, " that their 
General intended very shortly to do some great villainy against us 
wishing ns Uj look to oumelves.'* This report, though they cannot 
affirm it to be true, may give them just cause to doubt the woi-st. 
**God of his mercy deliver us fr-om this bloody nation," [Two 
pages. Ectst Indies, Vol IL, No, 72.] 

243* John Peterson Coen*s Instructions left in the Indies with 
Peter de Carpentier, Governor General, and the C^ouncil of the Indies. 
It is well known that those of Portugal and 8j>ain have in fonner 
times dra%*Ti great riches out of the trade of the East Inflies, as have 
likewise certain particular Comjianies, Ix^th Dutch and English ; yet 
afterwanls the General Netherlands (Company have in 18 years 
*' repai'ted " no more than two capitals, with the charge of aUjve 
50 tons of gold taken up at interest, without augmenting their 
capital in the Indies. The best course to give furUje ranee to the 
Netherlandish Company, and hinderance to their eneudes. Fii'st, to 
strengthen the Company in the Indies with jieople and their capital 
with a good sum of money. A very gi^eat niuulx-r of people is 
necessary for the inhabiting of Batavia, the Moluccas, Ambo}Tia, 
Banda, and other places, as well for the prosecution of offensive war 
^"ith more power than hereto) fore, as to defeml the estate of the 
Company* Moi-e money is rerpiisitt^ to send great returns into the 
Netherlands and overcome the great charge of shipping. How to 
send greater returns than heretofore without any great new supplies 



98 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1023. 



from the Netherlands ; to Bet rules for managing all expences ; 
toEs impositions, and tenths ; to jxjople tlie Comjtany'.s lands withl 
great ntnnlici' of nlaves ; and to eaiiy on a gi*eat trade of Oiina 
wares in Japan, The gi^eat charges waste the profits and amount to 
more than 12 tons of gold or 500,000 lyals of eight yearly; how 
spent For refonnation of tlii.s ill-management, all "our pooi^lu " 
have contributi^d *' a reasonable good penny and i-ansom'*; tlie 
order to maintain the fiame in the iloluceas, Ambopia, and Banda 
must be executed iu all things. It ia a shame so much shoidtl b ^ 
spent upon diet for the Governor s table and the factories in Band^l 
AmbojTia, and the Moluccas, and it Ls more than time that every 
man be constrained to set plantation and tillage on foot. For wages ; 
discharge officers who have served their time and can best be spared, 
they may have wives given them of the natives if not already marric 
and l)e paid mth clothes as much as may l>e. Expenses of flipping i 
be well examined, and aO things to Ije pro\nded at Batavia, or whe 
we have sovereign jurisdiction, that so the Company and none 
have the benefit of tlie expense. The fortitications in Batavia, 
Moluccas, iVmboyna, Banda, Pulicat, and Solor in so good cajse, tl 
liercaftei' not a ryaJ need be spent thei-ein ; and theii* reparati 
and maintenance " may l^e done " hy the Company's subjects, slavd 
and pi isonei-s ; this will save 200,000 lyals yearly. More cost 
buildings to l>e bestowed at Batavia. Presents heretofoi'e amount 
to about 50,000 r^^als the year: there ought to be no more giv< 
but upon assm-ance of gixjator liencfit to be ma<le thereby. As 
levying tolls ; make a levy upon the natives ai Batavia, ke^ 
and upon the cattle slaughtered, for what is consumed in that kind 
may maintain a garrison of fJOO men. Tolls must be established 
AmlKjyna, and Banda, not less than 10 per cent, on imports 
exports wherein heretofore Govemoi-s Speult and Soncke have 
too scnipidous. Thus a suqdusage may be gained » needful 
Imying in ordinaiy returns, so that no more monies need Ix? seij 
Tht; peopling and gathering of slaves of extraordinary great con^ 
cjuence. Batavia, AnitK)}Tia, and Banda already so [leopled. By T 
addition of a further reasonable number of peo]>le and compet 
tolls, suflicient means will be found to bear all tlie chai'ges of 
ships, forts, and gamsons ; and the presimiption of the Ternatans tlic 
of Lohoe (Lugho) and tlieir accomplices will lie l»etter tamed in 
manner than by force of arms. To send ships with the next soul 
east wind to Silan and other places along the Coromandel coast 
buy up as many he and she slaves, especially young people, as can 
got. No people in the world do us (the Dutch) bettt»r service than 
the Chinese, Send also a ship or two to Ma<lagascar and the eo 
of Afiica for slaves. " Tliere can be at first no Ix'tter service donei 
the Company than in gathering a multitude of i>eople from all parts \ 
people our country withall. Hei'cby service and honour will be do 
to Almighty God, the Company shall grow the mightier in the Indid 
the forts and garrisons shall be maintained without the Company^ 
charge, and the jirofit of the inland tratle shall then 1m3 employed in 
buying in of returns to be sent to our native country;'* It is of moi'o 
consequence than biij^ing cloth and other gooils. For the buying of 
slaves thoi'e hath been order given ever since 1614, but nothing 



EAST INDIES- 



99 



1623. 



done therein but what Governor Van Uffle began in 1622. Pm^Kueit 
constantly above all other wares in all parts of the Indies where slaves 
are chea]>est and buy a« many as the Conijiany's ships can conveniently 
stow. Let the buying in of a multitude of yoiuig slav<»s go furward 
l^eforc any other work. Needful to employ divi.'i's llet-ts heroin. 
This buying of slaves to proceed to many thousands, yea ti3 an 
infinite numter. In Batavia there cannot bo too many. Rule« rmi«t 
be e^stablished over them, and they employed in planting, bree*!- 
ing cattle, fishing, and all kinfls of services. Profits and a<ivan- 
tages, Wagi'-s of the Mardikers and slave.s and their maintenance. 
How to get the China trade to Pehoe, and to have 800,000 or 
1,000,000 r>*als capital more than at present. By trade fi'om Pehi>c 
to Japan we should advance al>ove 20 tons of gold yearly. It 
must l»e constantly ]>rosecuted " were it for ten, yea 100 years 
together.*' The Company*s sei*vants and goods are ali^ady removed 
from Battani (?Patani), Sangom, Siam, Acheen, Suec^Iana, Gre^sic, 
and Japara, and tlie like is to 1:>e dono from Haceho to Jambi, Con- 
cerning the trade between Surat and Batavia. Directions for pur- 
chasing slaves on the coast of Coromandeh The ntaple of trafle 
must be estaljlinhed in the Cattle of Ambo>^m and Fort Nassau in 
Banda. Recommendn him Lu the highest degree to handle the 
matter so that, " as we have long time project4?d/' all the cloves, 
mitmega, mace, i>epper, &c. may be gotten withf.iut laying out one 
ly^al of money. It is a great en*or that there fthould be so gi-eat a 
sum of money bentowed in pepper at Jamin and Patani, whereunto 
they were forced by the English, who now have no money there. 
The trade on the coast of Sumati*a, &c. Needled to send an ainbas- 
sage with a good present to the Materan, to the Emperor of Japan, 
and to Ceucheu for the furtherance of the China trade. Concerning 
Bantam, they munt have ])atience and hold the town besieged ^mtil 
a composition happen. An agreement must be made with the 
English to buy up the pepper ; " and in reganl our mantel's have 
been at excessive charges above tlie English, and Ixjtter i>ro\dded of 
money and goods, it will be needful to stand hard upon it to obtain 
prerogative above the English and all others by some advantage in 
the buying in of pepper and otlier (liina M\ares." It is in no sort fit 
to deal with Bantam l>y the mediation of the English (as the Pengran 
would have it) unless with some notalile advantage. How the 
Dutch stand in the Materan's way in Batavia ; and the good which 
may come fmm thence. How the Dutch Company^s capital might lie 
augn^cnt^d in the Indies ; whereby might be spared 30 tons of gold, 
which the " yearly erpu pages " amoimt to, according to the letter of 
the 17 Committees, dated from the Hague, 24th April H>22. Not 
needful either now or next year to send one lyal into the Moluccas, 
Banda, and Amijoyna ; the tolls and impositions will l>e enough for 
buying nutmegs and mace. Cloves must be altogether Ixjught with 
clotlies, rice, and other mei-chandize. Directions for cany iog on tho 
" inland trade ;*' and on the Coromandel coast, Battania (Patani ?), 
Surat, Mocdia, the Moluccas, ami Peho. The China trade will take 
u]i the greatest pait of theii* money. In one voyage to Japan above 
75 jier cent, may be gained ; sufficient to buy up all the returns 
needful for Europe* Traile witli the Materan's country. Recom- 

G 2 



xoo 



[.ONIAL PAPERS. 



162S. 






mends orchards and gardens Ix^ing planted on the "void ground 
the city of Bata%^ia; for the l>etter furthering of this planting and 
breeding of all necessaries at Banda and Amboyna, and to put "~ 
into the people to pro\ide beef and bacon, it vn]l be good that 
from hunceforth no provisions exce]it wine be sent thither. Upon 
complaints out of the Indies the mayors are very much troubled 
witli thii English and French, and think the Danes will in like so 
complain. Hereupon the t]omniittee of 17, in their said letter of i 
14th April 1022, written in a sharji htimour, recommend in eame 
manner that they shouhh as far as is possible, *' avoid all occasion of 
ques<tion, giving way somewhat in small matters, but holding fa;st in 
matter of importance, taking heed of attemptbig anything by way of 
fact if it may be." " Hereujion we say that the least giving way will 
breed us the most rest and quiet, for by how nmch the more way 
is given imto Malajjert proud and ]iresumptuous |jei*sons the more 
they think themselves worthy of, and the more they desh-e." ♦ • • 
" The English an<l Frencli seek nothing but actions and quarrels 
against us by right and wrong : it being so, who can help them ? 
Do justice and maintain carefully the sovereignty and highest juris- 
iliction in Batavia, the Moluccas, Banda, Amlxjyna, Pulieat, Selor 
(Solor), and other places aj >pertaimng t^j the States, w^ithont sharing 
or suffering tlie Eugli.sh or any other to encroacli thereupon. Trust 
them not any more than o]»en enemies, ami give no way to the 
shoT^tening of the sovereignty and common good, nor of the respe^^ 
reputation, and count-enance of the same, not w^eighing too scr^| 
]>ulously what may fall out." A third part of the trade in th'^ 
Muluccas, Aml»oyna, and Banda is grantetl to the English, and 
nothing more, they paying a third of the toU*^ requisite for 
maintenance of aU the forts, garrisons, kc. More than this th^ 
cannot ]>retend, or let them have so much less of the trade as 
toll comes to, to avoid disputes and for other reasons ; but it wou 
Ikc I test, if agreement could be made, that they shoidd receive 
third part of all the clotlies, nutmegs, and maces in Batavia at a price 
certain. If an oi>portmiity happen you maj' do w^eli to make 
overture. To have a great quantity of rice by way of a const 
store. News arrived since %vriting the above that our ]>eople 
forbidden trade inUi China, and have entered into open war with 
the Chinese. As trade cannot b^ gotten by friendly means, it ia 
requisite l\y this present monsoon to send another fleet to visit 
coast of China and take prisoners as many men, women, and cldld 
as possible. Ships fit for this ]iurj^tose. An express ambassage shoe 
1)6 S4:'nt to China, with a letter to Tourscliirt Chien, Governor 
Hoochien ; l>ut if no good answer be thereupon given, let the tr 
of the Chinese be hindered in all parts of the In<lies, except at 
Batavia. They must hinder them of Macao in all places, as weU as 
the Chinese, If the war proceed against China special charge must 
be given to bring together as great a strength as is possible, and 
extraordinary diligence and an especial foresight must be used to 
take a very great number of Cliinese (ctspecially w^omen and children) 
for the peopling of Batavia, Ambo^Tia, and Banda ; herein will be a 
*gi-eat servdce done for the Company, and by this means will lie 
found all the charge of the war, The ransom of the Chinese to be 



and I 

m 

>u^fl 

re a 
price 
e th^ 

staS 




EAST IXDIEa 



101 



1623. 



JaiL ? 



set at 60 ryals a piece ; ** but by no means you must not suffer any 
women to return to Cliina, or any other part out the Company's 
jurisdiction, but with them to people the same." Not yet con- 
venient to seek any other place of iT^,sidence on the coast of China 
hut that ah^a<ly begun in Peiho. If the occa«iuu will jK^nnit let 
there he two pinnaces sent next Octol>er to tlie south coant l>ehind 
Java to (liacover the same. Internal management of the etttleinenta 
and trade in the Moluccas, Ban da, and Ambo^Tia. " Consider 
eameiitly hereof, and make it so that the returns for our native 
coimtry be made out of the gains of the inland iinde an<l tlie 
onJinary revenues, bisides all charges/' thus shall the Company be 
better serveil than heretofiire. [Tioe-nii/'two pages and a quarter. 
O.a, Vol IX,, No. 1093 + 2], 

244. Sec, Conway to the King, 

Miiy it please your Majesty, for the good of your merchants and honor 
and surety of i/our [f/tel ti^lc, at tlie audience to be glvr-n to the Ainlia*iMi- 
clorn [of the Staff'sji to cidl to mind your roynl {mr|>os^^ of making a protes- 
tuition* That your Majesty expects that yotir merchants sliall build a jilace 
of residence for the reciprocal habitation of the Couueil of JX'feiice, with 
honor and f^nrety. Anil thai your Majesty dolhex(>ect tiiat the 24th article 
of the treaty, touching foit."^ in Moitucas, liot/jta^ and Battinm [? Banda], 
shall be resumed and within two year** deej<led and aceorded^ eaneerning 
how many and in what plaec'» furts s^hall be built by your subject:^. An»l 
further to declare that your Majesty liohls it free for your nierebants to 
build in all other parts of the Ea^t Indies, where the States are twt alrradif 
jfeattd [^hare not baUdvd Jorts], Anil that your Majf j^ly doth expect that 
if the States' subjects have made any forts in those isbunis for 8urety, that 
they will demolish them and build no other in those islandfi, but according 
to tho treaty. Anil further, your Maji^sty having ohsuryed by the eom- 
plaints of your merchantj* and by tlie tiebatc^s and disputee of this liiFt 
treaty, that a fj^reat cause of otlences whieli ar rived near hare risen (/arc 
almost'\ to the utter brt*ach of the arniiy i>etween the Coniponies, and 
trenched deep into that of the nations liath been, the iusolency of /yowr 
\their'] [the Dutch] Governors and niiiiistera there, with liberty, di.ssolute- 
ness, and Joui^ Jf^^^^y vain braveries [praritiff'\ of words of inferiors 
against the honor of your Majesty's person and nation ; that you expect 
that there be given a smart reprcndre [ro[u iinand] to the Governors, and 
that justice and puuishrncnt be executed upon the inferior ofiTeuders when 
they ehall be declared \jlevelvdy decele]. That all ostentation of sovereignty 
be laid away both in actions an<l words, \ittur\ that justice t*e not enterpn,^^! 
upon your nation, but deferred to themselves. That your subjects be not 
oppressed with the table of the ( ioveruors Jtrra^^^jp ? [rewards] or schools 
further than with tlie full consent of your subjectvS and in iheir [the] com- 
mon name* And laslly, that your Majesty doth expect tlud the Company 
of the Low Countries will think of and hasten as much \j,s] in them is iho 
lessening of the charge of the 10 ships, as [an] intollerable condition for 
the Ck>mpany of English to iM'ur, fruitlessly consuming the wholr benetit of 
the trade, and that the Comjjany of the Low Countries will conform them- 
selves as much as possibly to employ those ships tor traiupori [fransportu- 
tion\ of merchandise. And that the Lords Estates will order the choice of 
discreet and meet person** to carry thctr ['Ac] trade in the Indies, as his 
{j/our'] Majesty will likewise advise and command the Company of the 
English, as [thai"] imi)ertinent questions and disorders may be avoided and 
amity conservech 

[Three pages. OHgiTud draft in the hmidwriimg of Sir Edward 



102 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 



mdovsed, " His Majt 



estation 



States 



Jan. 



Jan. 24. 

WhitebalL 



Jan. 25. 



Jan. 28. 

M&drid. 



Jan. 29* 



Jan. 30. 



I 



Commy. 

cerning the East India Tmde.' 

printed in Italim and in bnickets. lEttst Indies^ VoL IL, Nip, 73.] 

[The Dukk Amhassachrs had audknce of (he Kimj on 2Uh Jari^ 
1G23» to take leave, This letter was probably tvritten shortly befor^^ 
and co7itai7w the substance of the Kimfs Declaration^ ^^o. 250, 
referred to in Sec. Calvert's letter of 25th March, See Ko, 281.] 

245. Copy of the preceding, except where the woixis am printe^l 
in italici^, when the won Is printed in brackets ai*e snUstitiitcMl in thL 
copy, and with this addition, ** j\iid tliat your Maj. people be equattj 
dealt withal in the payment of the ganisons as the Dutch Company,' 
[East Indies, Vol IL^No. 74.] 

246* Sec. Calvert to Carleton. After some thirteen monthti' 
debate with the States Ambas8adoi*s about our Elast Indian quarrel 
we have at last made an end and parted good friend.s, though wit 
much loss and disadvantage t^ the English Company, as is conceived 
This day they take their leave of the King. Will send the article 
within a veiy few days. See No, 263. [Extmct from Uollui 
Corrcsp.] 

247- Chamberlain to Carleton. Hears the States [Conmiissioner 
went yesterday to take their leav^e at Court, and have made a kin^^ 
of end, but knows not what it is. [Extntct from DomeMic Corresp^ 
Jac. I„ Vol CXXXVII., No, 27., Cal.p, 483.] 

248. Earl of Bristol to Sec. Calvert. Has received a great com^ 
plaint and relation in writing of what passed at Omuiz, and gc 
to-mon*ow to tixjat with the Lords of the Junta about some thin^ 
contained in it. Will send aU the papers by next posL [Extractfn 
Spa n ish Corrmp^^ 

249. Sec. Conway to the Lord Treasurer. Concerning ryals 
eight to be taken up by the Dutdi merchants for payment 
2();0()0i. to the English merchants trading to the East Indies. 
[Minute, drnxmys Letter Bk..^^- L Cal, p. 485,] 

250. The Iving's declaration touchbig tlie East Indies. ** Point 
whereupon his Majesty doth declare himself touching the East Indi 
business/' L It is understood and intended that thei*e be full ar 
altsolute liberty to both Companies to erect forts in all paiH^ of th^ 
Indies, pro^^dcd they are n^t within less than 10 leagues one of 
another, except only in the Moluccas, Banda, and Amboyna, and in 
those places at the end of two yeai's, 2, Tlic English Company to 
Iniild a residence for the Council of Defence. 3. The Dutch Com^ 
pany to demolish any new forts in the Moluccas, Banda, and iVm^l 
boyna, built by them since the treaty. 4. As touching the 10 ships 
the number to be moderated and may be employed in merchandis 

5. Each Company to punish offences committed by their own bodj 

6. The jiretence of sovereignty to Ix^ laid aside on either par 

7. The English to be dealt with equally in the payment and vie 
tualling of the gan'ison. 8. It having appeaix?d hy tlie complaint 
of the English merchants, and the debates and lEsputes of this la 
treaty, that the chief cause of the injuries which have been offere 
in those }>arts, tending almost to tlie utter ovei-throw of the union of 
the two Companies, have sprung from the iusolencies of the Dutct 



ies. 

mJM 
idifl 

thfl 



rfi 



EAST INDIES. 



103 



1023. 



fan. 30. 



(Jan.?) 



Fetr 



Ft 4, .> 



Feb. r,. 



governors and ministers, their loose convei-sation and arrogant 
sp€eches against the honour of the English nation, his MajeHty 
expects that said govemoi's shall be rebuked, and those of meaner 
quality i*cccive exemplary punishment, and his Majesty promises that 
the like coumes shall ho taken against his own Ruhjects con\'icted 
of sucli crimes, 9. That both the States' General and the English 
Company choase discreet persons fit to manage the traffic in the 
Indies so as to avoid all disputes and occasions of disorders in those 
part«. Also *' touching Greenland," anil ** concerning the fisliing hi 
general/' Endorsed, *' His Majesty's declaration touching the East 
Indies/* This is errmieon^sly datal Ii}20{-1), tmd Cftkndured tmth 
the papers of tfuit year in (he previous volume, Ko, Dijo. [Three 
l>a(/es. East Indies^ VoL 11.^ No, 7-5.] 

251. Abstract of the above, in etiect tlie same as Sec. Conway's 
letter to the King [ante iVo. 244] upon which the preceding 
declaration was foimded, [Three pages. East Indies^ VoL IL, No. 70.] 

252. Francois D'Aerssens to (See Conway)* Tho accord is 
^Titten in proper fonn, and they have employed the article of tlie 
Black Lion, flamages, and rice, in the same manner as the King lias 
his declaration, wdthout inferring anything to the disadvantage of 
either Comi^any. On any matter of tlie It-ast eonsideration to his 
Majesty he will find that they wiD |)roceed in good faith ami 
according to the decisioii amved at yest*^rday* French, [lloUand 
Corresp.} 

253» LtiKike to Carleton. It will not be long before the States 
[Commissitjnei's] depart; they were solemnly feasted by the mcr- 
cbants at Mei-chant Taylors' Hall on 30th Jan,, and were enteiiained 
with a play after ; yesterday the States gave a great supper at thi'ii" 
lodging to the merchants. [Extract from Dmnmtw Vurresih, Jac, /,, 
Vd, CXXXVIIL, No, 3, CaL, p. 486.] 

254« Inventory of goods taken out of a China junk in the 
Sti-aits of Banca by the White Bear, and rated in Batavia according 
to the price cmTent, amoimting to 5,058 ryals. Endorseily '* Received 
the 18th June by the Le>5ser James, 1623/* [Two pages, OX*, 
Vol IX,, No. 101)3 + 3.] 

255. Particular of goods taken out of the godown and seized 
by the Dutch fiscal for the sum of 8115 ryals, at which the Dutch 
General an*! Ids council valued the goods that were taken out of the 
China junk by the WTiite Bear l>y Robert Jolinson s order. Total, 
0,117 ryals. [Oiie page, O.C., VoL IX., No, 10041 

256. Certiticate given by order of Rich. Fui^land and his coimcil, 
signed l»y Joseph Clark, carpenter of the Ruby, and othei-s, that the 
Glolie is rotten and unfit for further sei'vice. [Half a page^ O.C, 
Vol, IX,, No, 1095,] 

257. Carleton to Sec. Calveit, The States Ambassador's landed 
in the Maeso on Monday laist, and have made so good a report of 
their business, and of the Iving's gracious usage of them during the 
whole of their long stay in England, that they remain here much 



104 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 



Feb. 8. 



Feb. .S. 



Feb. 8. 
Biitavia. 



Feb. S. 
From abouid 
thi? Elbiibi'tli, 



comforted, and well assured that our match with Spain will breed 
no divorce with this State, of whicli there hat!i Ixjeu of late days no 
small jealousy. [Extract froDi Jlidlaml Ccyn^esp.] 

258, The Governor and Deputy GoveiTior of the Elast India Com- 
l>any to Carleton. Aeknowled;^^e his readiness in their affairs. Have 
had a ti*difHis and inconstant i»rosecutiuu of their business through , 
the King*8 unsettled abode, and a desire of the Dutch " to bring the 
business within the compass/' It is now at an end and they hope 
well of a <^ood performance hereafter. WOl send him a copy of their 
agreement, if he lias not already received one. The King, wlien the * 
Andm-ssadors took their Iccave, propounded some things for the better I 
regulation of the Company's tmde for the future, and desii-ed that 
Carleton should receive a copy. Find it ia not yet sent, neither havo ] 
they yet got a sight of it. Will make further requests to Idoi when 
they liave seen it, [One jKigc, IloUand Corre^h] 

259, dohn Hitchens to the East India Company. He sent an 
account of English stores by the Lesser James, and briefly advised of 
wants to lie Kiipjilicd. Encloses coi)y of same, with such addition off 
provisions as the President, «fcc, have thought fit for their yearly pro- 
[Mjrtion for ships and factories. The stores may l»c rather increased I 
than any way lessened, aa may appear by the balance of account, f 
Tnclosctft 

250, I, A Indance of English atorest Sc. ^^mmining in tlie factot'y of\ 
Baiavia. [Trnjether, hvo pages. 0,C,, Vol IX,, No, 109G.] 

260, John Brooke, inaster of the Trial, to the East India Com- 
pany, Has explained in ITks letters by John Rohei-ts and William 
Hawkeridge his " hard and miserable crass" (sic), how the Trial waa 
lost, and lie and 45 men and hoys preservetl in boats. Tliey com- 
pared their judgments with Ca|>t Fitzherhert's journal, which was 
their ruin ; he missing the danger, Wing a ledge of sunken rocks, 
not 15 leagues, as by hia draught sent them by the President and 
Council will appear. His desim is homewanl, but is willing to uso 
his best endeavours for 12 or IS months more than his time con* 
ditioned, being required by the President and Council. Dedres them 
io Riipjily his wife's wants with (jOl. or HOI. more. [One page* 0,C., 
Vul. IX., iV^o. 10D7,] 

261, Eduiund Leniuyes to the East India Company, His last 
was per the Great James from Firando, whert-in he related bin 
departure from Jacatra, 21st May liVIO for Japan, Since they havo 
mode two voyages for Man ilia, the lii-st in Jan. 1621 with four 
English and four Dutch shij^s, in which they Ujok five junks ; the 
second in Nov. with five English and five Dutch ships, in which 
they took six junks and two frigates and liumt seven or eight. 
Our consoii^ihip being ended, and each (Company upon their own 
account, order came fi-onx the President for the Peppercorn to lie off 
the Straits of Malacca, the Moon and Palsgi-ave to sail for Jambi» 
the Bid I for Jacatra, and the Elizalx'th to stay for the merchanta 
and money. The moneys have safely arrived but the merchanta 
cannot end their business as they say. The Bvdl disabled and 
not yet arrived, but they amved in Jacatra Roacl 4th Feb. 1623, 



4 



EAST INDIES. 



105 



162a 



Feb, 1). 

>VliitcliiUK 



ies3? 



mid have been upon this voyage 34 months. Finds the PaLsgmve 
ready laden and btmnd for England, Mourns to s<?e how tho Dutch 
flourish here, "we being subjects unto them both in govciimH'nt 
and tribute, which might have b(3tm ours when time was/* The 
small return fur the Company a great charges is a grief to any 
honest man. By the loss of the Trial tlierc is nothing to fit their 
ships with sails, cables, and cordage; neither have the surgeona 
means for the relief of sick men. Gave Capt Pring a draught of 
Ills journal from Tecoe to Firando, and for the Manillas. Complains 
of their powder. Much envy amongst them ; every one strives to 
be gi'eat. Beseeches them if there be any imputation upon hirn 
not to beUeve them, " for if I have not been an honest man since 
1 came into your service, let me lose my life, • * # But there 
i^ a strong champion called strong drink that liears such a sway 
amongst us, and lie that will not encounter stiffly with him is a 
fool, or proud, or hath more wit in his own concL*it than all the 
parish and the like/' Begs them in their comudssion to put such 
an article against this vice ** that you may wring out all the juice 
out of then* brains/' [Two pafjes, O.a, Vol IX., iVo. 1098.] 

262. Sec. Calvert to Carleton. This despatch has stayed longer 
than it should have done, because he could not get the copy of 
the treaty out of our merchants* hands ; the original they have yet 
among them. Besides the particulars caj^itulated in the treaty, 
there were divers things propounded on both sides for regulating 
the trade hereafter, of which w^e could not agree ; and therefore 
the King, as a supplement to the treaty, made this declaration to 
the Ambassadoi's when they tfjok their leave, which he sends here- 
with [see ante, Ko. 250]. And thus, after many long and tedious 
conferences, not witliout some hai^shness and discontents un both 
sides, we are at last parted g(>o<l friends, and I hope shall so for 
ever continue. [Extriict fvi/m UoUtind Chri^esfp."] 

263. Copy of the treaty agreed upon by the English Lords Com- 
missionei*H and the States Amljassadors on behalf of the English 
and Dutch East India Companies, Tliis treaty consists of 14 articles, 
and (1) engages each Company to obser\^e all the articles of the 
treaty [of July 1010] and tlie explanation thereof; (2) not to grant 
letters of niarrpie against each other ; (3) perfect freetlom of traffic ; 

(4) not to supply the natives with arms or other munition of war; 

(5) the expenses of the Council of Defence to be terne equally by 
both Companies \ {(\) to maintain their resj>ective quotas for forts 
and garrisons, according to the treaty; (7) each Company to main- 
tain its 10 ships of defence, according to the 10th and 11th artick\s 
of Haid treaty ; (H) to contribute equally to open a trade with 
Cliina ; (0) not io receive or conceal criioiimls or delinquents ; (10) 
tlie English Company, iritk the approbalfun of the Didch ihinpany, 
to choose an imliiierent place of residence for the Council of Defence ; 
(II) the English Company to be left to punish their own pL'itple 
in the Mohiccas, Handa, and Ambo^iiia, and to rnjoy all their former 
privileges at the Fort of Pulicat ; (12) and not to \m Uahle for the 
expenses of the eolkges, schools^ presents, or table of the Dutch 
Governor or people; (13) the Fort of Pooloroon to be restored ; and 



106 
1G23. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



(14) finally, to agree in a short time upon the number of fortresse 
and "where necessaiy. 

This k tlte exact teai of fJie above trendy, which iJie Editor of tJm 
Cakncktr hits not been able to find prhUed vn any collection 
treatim that he has conmUtfd. '* The orhjlnal *' {Sec, Calvert ttl 
Carldon) ''tliey have yd aiiwiiff thera!* Neither the oHffinal m, 
the ratification is in tfiS collection of treaties in tite PxMio ^ 
Office :— 

Comme ainsi soit que sar le double du vray sens et intcDtioii d 
(livers articles contemiz au Traicle goncral, en L'Explanatiou, et au; 
K^iglemens cIq Coiiseil tie Defence faicls cy devant pour lo bieo commu 
entre les doulx CompaignieB d*AiLgletorre et des Fays-bas trafficejua] 
aux Indies Orientales, phisieurs conventions ayroient este negligees 
scroknt tombeea en iiiobservation,dontaussi peroient suiviesdegnindes 
niesintclligences, non eans tiL»sapptirent danger de debvoir on lt?nr con- 
tinuation produire une rupture de lenr bonne et necessaire societe ail 
n'y estoit proniptemeDt pourvcu de remede^ eonvenables par une plus 
ekire explication dcs clioses qni y pourroient estrn rencontrees dou- 
teuse«. Pour ces civuses Ic Roy de La Grande Bretagno et les Seigneurs 
Esttitz des Provinces Uuies^ dcsireux de les fairc cesser, et de restablirj 
entre ellcs la vraye amitie, avec la sincere correspondence, qui requiert 
uii negoee de si grande importance, auroient a cet elfect depute, scavoir 

sad** Ma**^ de La Grande Bretagne, les etlesd** 

Seigneurs les Estatz les leurs Ambassadeurs, 

authorisez de part et d'nnltre les qiielz ayaus ^ ceste tin tenu diverees 
assemblees par ensemble ont finalement conclu et arrest6 au nom de sa 
Ma^^ et dejH 8eig^ Estatz pour le bieu de leurs subjects respectivement 
les articles qm j?\msuivent, 

1. Preniieremcnt que ciiascunc des Comimignies sera tenue d*ol»sen*er 
et fftire obscrvir roii<lomeiit et einc^rement tons ct cbascun des Articles 
dud* Traicte et son Explication, a vecq les Reglemons et Resoluciona da 
Conseil Coramun de Defence establi aux Indes qui explicquent la vraye 
intention dn Traict<^\ 

2. Qu'il ne se accordera point de lettres de marque, ny ne se fern 
aucune saisie de navires ny marcbandiseii apiiartenans a Tun ou Tautre 
Compaignie, sinon aprt^s le nianifeMe deny, ou extraordinaire delay de 
jnstiee laquelle I'interesse aura a poursuivTe convenablement, premier 
quo de lechercber des voyes extraordinaires. 

3. Qu*il gera libro et en la volonte des peoples Indieus et traffiquans 
le>iqneU aulcune dcs Coropaignies ne tiendra point pour enncmiz de 
naviguer en seurete, et de pouvoir olh'ir et vend re leurs denrees et 
murcb an discs, aux lieux ou le commerce n'est point eommun ny regk^, 
aux dculx Compaigniea ensemble, ou a telle Compaignie en pailiculicr 
comme bon lour scmblera, sans que Tautre Comp. pourra ^ cette cause 
donner aux lU** puples aueun dcstourbue, ou molestation par prin»es ou 
saisies, par Icsquelles Tordi-e et la liberie dn commerce viendroit k 
s'interrompre au des^a vantage de Tyne ou de Taut re Compaignie. 

4. Qn'il sera expressementdeteiidu aux deulx Compaigm'es de foumip 
les Indiens en aulcune fa^on, par dons, vente, esebauge, ou aoltre voye, 
d'artillerie, d'aimes, de munitions de guerre, ou de semblables lustru- 
menus qui les pouiroient ai-mer contro lea dictes Compaignies. 

5* Quo la de.spence qui se fera aux entrcpnnses qui concement le 
bien eommun des deulx Compaignies en execution des deliberations du 
Consc'il de Defence, sera portee i>ar portions esgales entre les doulx 
Compaignies, apres avoir faict preceder retJtimatiou des navires, afio 
de prevenir toute dispute. 



4 



I 



EAST INDIES. 



107 



1G23. 






6, De mesme, que les dculx Comp^*** seront t43nue3 de fournir nans 
aulcuoe iiiterruption, leur part et quote rat^e nuTraict^, pour l*entretien 
des forts et des garniaous, selou le Reglement clw Conseil de Defeocc, 
encor ciu'elles UDissent i ctitremetti e le tralHcq pour quelque temps, en 
aulcuu de» liextx. 

7. Chasque Compaignie sera tetiue tie foumir ft entrc-tenir deuement 
et oontinuellement, leur ilix navircs de guerre, Galcrcs, Fregattes, etc., 
oomme il est porto par le 10* et 11*' art. du Traielt^, pour estre vi^ur- 
etisseioeDt employez a la defencM du commerce*, pour Touverture du 
TrafGeq tie la Chine, et aiDsi que le Conseil tie Defence rordonnera. 

8- Que les deulx Compaignies auront a contribueresgaleracut afin de 
faciliter rouveiturc et la liberte da coinmeree de la Cliiue, et d'aidtrei* 
pays pour le bien commuii, mais si Fun ou I'autre veuoit a y defailUr, 
celle qui n'aura poiDtcoutnbue sa moietie, ne »era rcceueaux avautages 
dud* traffieq qu'apres q'elle en aura plenement couteiit^ celle qui »era 
trouvec avoir avance la despense. 

9, Que nulz criminelz ny delinquans ne seront par aulcune dei 
Comp<'« rcceuz, cachez, detcnuz, ny protegez on fraudo do ceulx a qui 
Hz appartieoneut, eoubz quelque couleur que ce soit, aina LDcontineut 
renduz ou renvoyez saos aulcune retnise. 

10, II sera perinis a ceulx de la Compaignie d'Aiiglet4SiTe, rle fairc 
uv€cq approbation tie ceulx des Paya-bas^ election d'un lieu commode 
et mxxr pour les deulx CompaipiieH, ou par tour e^;gal de trois en trois 
moii*, le Conseil commun de Defence pourra prendre sa residence, tvins 
qu^il ."^era tenu de la continuer d*ordinaire comme il a c»t^ faict juaqucs 
ley dans la ville de Jacatm. 

11 , Comme aussi Isui* sera laim^e aux Molucques, Bamla, ot Am- 
boina, la punition de leurs gens proprca en toutes mauieres trotfetises 
qu'ilz s^entreferont, sans pour ce e.*<tre subjects al a justice de ceulx 
des Payi*-bas, et y jouyront, comme aussi an Fort de Palicate ( Pulicat), 
de tons les privileges et Ubcrtez qui lour s^out conceditz et liniitez au 
Traicte, en rexplanation, et aux Reglemens du Conseil de Defence. 

12, Et ne j*cront tenuz ny attraiables aux fraiz des CoUegen, et 
Escboles, ny il la table et nourriture dee Gouveroeura de ceulx dea 
Paye-bas, ny aux don,*i et prescns qu*il» feront, si cc n'est du conseute- 
ment de leurs ministres, et au nom commun, 

13, Le Fort do Pouleron leur sera aussi restitue an mesme 6statqu*il 
efftoit an tempt* tie la conclusion du Traicte, s*il se trouve que ceulx du 
Paye-bns y ayent faict aulcune innovation, 

14, Finulenient les deulx Comp** d'Angleterre et desPayB-bae fei-ont 
dans un biieiT tenipH recognoistre et aviser par leursi mini st res aux Irrdc^ 
eniiemblem* combien de FortercfiHe^ quellen, et en quelle?^ plaeen, Heron t 
doreaenavfint necesMiircHj afin de remuner la question des Fort/; et la 
tellement accommoder tju'ellc iiuisso reussir au contentcmeut comnnni 
et reciproque dea uns^ et des aultres. 

\Si4Jc p(t<je8. East Jndica, Vol IL, No, 77.] 

264. Richard Fur^lanJ, Thos. Brockedon, and Augiistin Spalding 
to the Ea8t India Company, Their laat letter wa^ dated f^ { January, 
sent by General Caen. What was tlien writkn shall bo enlarged 
in this ; send alno transcript of their letter of 27th Augiint last {»ee 
ante, Ko. l^*!). Tlie account** received from the Moluccas, like the 
former, and more unreasonable. Have dehvereil their objectionn in 
the form of articles to the General and Council ; but the time of 
General Coen s stay was ro short that he could not give an answer in 
writing to tht?ir demands, but left hia successor to perform it. Have 
not yet i-eceived the answer, and have no hope of any restitution or 



108 
1623. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



reformation. In reference to the Dutch accounts. These and their 
former objections sutKciont to lay open the mattei^ of most im- 
portance wherein they are wronged. The accounts must be audited 
by impartial men, and such particuki-s reformed as are unreasonably 
taxed ; which " arc so many that it i.s almost (impossible) that any 
agreement can be made between us.'* Unless they may pay, as the 
Dutch du, with commodities, there will be no fullowing that trade for 
them, for " you will soon be eaten out of your means, and the Dutch 
made rich by your monies." Send the account^s of a year's charges 
and all the spices received, whereby they may perceive how dearly 
they buy those cormnodities. Yery needful to make a new accord 
for accounting the year from jh imo May to primo May, for in that 
time all the ye^r*s spices will be received, and so no wrong can Ixj 
done them, except apparent fraud 1»e used. The Dutch pretend 
there must be adiled the wages of 200 soldi el's to the cliarges of the 
fanison, which must not Ijc consented to. Expect but a small 
quantity of spice, fur their capital is so small that mast of it will l>e 
eaten up in charges, Uttt^rly destitute of ready mt>ney to supply 
those factories ; next year they liave resolved to i-ecall all the fact^jrs, 
except two in each place wl^ere there are houses to keep them ; and 
for want of victuals and a ship have in treated the Dutch to suffer 
them to come away in ihvlr ships. About the ri^-mains of their 
goods. The Dutch have condemned them in 40,000 lyals for the 
goods of a Chinese junk, taken by Robeii Jolmson, and 10,500 ryaLi 
for a fine. They ai»pealed to the King and States Geneitd, but the 
General and Council have aiuiihilated their a|>|)eal. Their protest 
touching their accounts with the Dutch. If hereafter the Dutch Ije 
siiHereil ''to proceed in such nuinagement against you, and to con- 
deum us at their pleasure, there will be no living in these jiarta for 
us ; for they will and daily do extend their sovereignty so far, that 
if you speedily i>revent them not, it will stretch over all the Indies/* 
Tliey entitle themselves *' Governors of the Netherlands Indies, and 
do tht-ir best to bring both English sind all oihei-s under their sub- 
jection ; l>ut we constantly hope that they sliall never be sutfered to 
effect it upon our nation." The chief plotter and actor of all busi- 
ness, General Coen, the Company w^iil find a fair spoken* but most 
cunning fellow. Heartily wish they weix^ i>resent Uy confront him. 
His suecessoi', C€ar[>entien is as sul^tfe, and far more malicious against 
all English. Accounts of William Nicolls, he has *' lavishly and 
vainly spent "; about the inventory of his estiite and his will Accounts 
received from Banda full of jirofusc expense ; have put the excess upon 
Mr. Welden's account. Mistakes made in the amount of " carracks 
money," sent from lience in chests ; have to deal with such uncon- 
scionable and dishonest men. Miserable state of their atfaii-s w^h en 
they must tmst men with their estates who dare io conceal the sums 
that come to them by mistake. Chest sent to Pulicat, in the 
Unity, from which money was stollen. Pray that this may l^e 
remedied. Accounts of Mr. MetliwTild from Masulipatam. Bi-ass 
ware, received by Thomas Jones out tif Sir Thomas Dale\s fleet, and 
attestation of James Trough ton and Edward Hutton as to the weight. 
Visit of Methwold, in company of the Dutch Governor, to the 
diamond mine, about two years since. 200 pagodas left in the han<ls 



EAST INDEES, 



109 



1623. 



of one Bam pa, a servant, to be invested for the Company ; but upon 
Banipa's return, in company of the Dutch tjervauts, they were set 
upon, by thieves, woundetl and robbed, and so the Corupany s means 
were lost. Differonce.s between Metli wold and his .successor, Matthew 
Duke, who advised the Couif»any that the 20t) pagodas were Meth- 
wohl's ; remarks theri*on ; refer the deciding of tlie matter to their 
womhips. Otiier particuiars in Methwolds accounts ; heailily wish 
" yoiu* disideasurc were not the cause of his not retui^, whose 
absence from the chai'ge he was employed in will cauise you preju* 
dice/' Gools laden on board the Palsgrave, Charles Clcvenger, 
commander, sent for England, consisting of pe]iper, cloves, nutmegs, 
gumlac, long cloth, fine clotli, green ginger, and cotton yam, to the 
value of 7G,874 ryak. Remarks on the pnees of same. The gum- 
lac bought by Adam Dent^i^n. Many passengers sent in the Pals- 
grave, some of whom they wish they could have pei-suaded to stay^ 
but the gi*eater pail are good for nothing ; and more such they have 
yet to send. Briefly touch the deserts of all now sent, and refer to 
copies of their consultations for the order of their proceedings against 
such as have been displaced or otherwise punished for their niis- 
behavioui*. Have gi-anted William Me th wold's retimi, his request 
being iieasonabie and their jier'suasions not prevailable to stay him to 
clear himself of all imputations. George Musehamj*, also a suitr^r to 
go home, they could not in rea.son deny, in regard of his disability 
of body by the want of one leg, he cannot perform his service as he 
desires : he is a very sufficient merchant, and hath been faithful, 
honest, and careful in his charge, and in the accounts of Amboj-na, 
in which place *• we have lieen as nnich exacted upon as in any 
other, and in divers particulars grossly abused,'* he can tlioroughly in- 
form the Company. Have likewise, u|»on John Hinchley's request, 
licensed his return because his age makes him so peevish tliat his 
men will not be governed by him ; otherwise he is a sufficient 
man, and a good husband of his ship and provisions. Also Richaixl 
Wooil, Pickering, and Spottis. surgeons, honest men, long in the 
countiy, but for whom at present they liave no emjiloyment. John 
Wood, sometime master of the Lesser James, a good for nothing, by 
reason of his continual l)eastlike drunkenness, and not to be refoiiued, 
they have sent home, his services not worth his meat and drink. 
Gideon Johnson, also sent homo, is such an rme tliat the whole fleet 
caimot contain him, he is so troublesome, William Kendall, witen 
at the be^t was good for Iittk% but now l>eing good i'or nothmg is 
sent home, Henry Woohuan, who is out of cash 4(37 ryals, and 
Beverley, who stole money at Aml>o3nia, they have kejit to work out 
»ome part of the money. John Rose, the chief raiser of a nuitiny in 
the ship 01(J»e, and formerly condemned to be hanged for running 
awa^^ is censured to be sent in irons. By the Palsgrave and Eliza- 
beth, with letters from Japan, they have understood the whole pro- 
ceedings of the Manilla fleet in their second voyage, where there has 
been b<;tter agreement l>etween the Dutch and our |ieople than they 
expected. Two (liina junks taken richly laden, and three others ; 
also the Palsgrave, Ix'fore Macao, took a frigate* richly laden with 
silk; one half of which for our pax't amounts to 19t>,250 ryals, 
whereof the factoi-s, Mr. Cocks and the rest, have sent in the Elizabeth 



no 

1623. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



and BilQ 150,007 lyals. Know not what account they shall have of 
the fii-st, voyage. Have absolutely clmrgcd Cocks, Sayer, and Eaton to 
come away, leaving 5,000 taies with John Osterwick, but they scarce 
so much as take notice of the order, neither can fihow any excuse for 
their stay. Have earaestly required their nceoimts for two years, but 
it iM to be douLted tliey can give none, and if all be true which is 
reported, it is a misery to know that men of such antique yeara 
shoidd be so miserably given over to vohii»tuousness, regarding not 
what they consiune therein. Next monsoon they will send some fit 
man to bring them all away from thence, '' This purchase taken by 
the fleet *' will help towards the Company's great charge, and what 
they have received give some life t<i their declining aifairs. No shai'es 
have been allowed to the mariners this voyage, but know not what 
they have sharked and stolen. Relation of the success of the other 
Fleet of Defence, sent from hence for Goa ; out of the three ships 1,50 
men were lost, many of w*hom died of surfeit at tlie Comoros, 
including Capt. Fitzherbert, for whose untimely death they sor- 
row and shall tind great want of him. On 1 kh July the fleet of 
three English ships, the Exchange, Roya! Ann, and Diamond, and 
two Dutch ships meet with three carracs and a galleon to the south 
of Mozambique ; they fought witli them all that day and the next. 
They simk the three carracs» and out of the Vice Admiral saved 
(i8,553 lyals. They also chased one other caiTac and a galleon. These 
and all the treasure they might have taken, but for the Dutch Ad- 
miral without Capt. Fitzherbert*H consent, sending two of his shi|>s 
to the Red Sea for his own puiposes ; by which proceedings the 
Com])any has just action against the Dutch for the overplus of sliips 
and all damages. Cajit, Fitzherbert's protest to the Dutch Admiml, 
Jacob Dedel, thereon. Said fleet now l>efoi'e Goa, but returns liither 
" at the fine of March." Arrival of the Discovery, Slade master, 
with clotli and six chests of ryals from Surat, and 30,000 ryals from 
the Goa Heet, Rasteli writes that this ship is so weak and baldly 
built that she cannot last long ; *' what a misery it is to have a new 
ship, in two or three years to be utterly decayed and unsei'viceable 
through falseliood of the builder.** TIte taking and sacking of Ormuz 
prrrves not so profitable as they hoped, the fault l:>eing in the com- 
manders giving too much credit to the Persian's promises. The 
London, Jonas, and Lion ready to sail for England 10th December 
last. Haii hoped the Siam and Pat^ni factories wouhl have Wen 
cleared, and the factors come from thence, but are deceived in both. 
Excuses of Edward Longe, factor at Siam, for not coming by reason 
of some remains and debts he cannot get in, the King ^so is very 
unwilling our people sliould depart before he receive answer to his 
letter from his brother the King of England, to wliich piu*pose he 
has sent hither in the Fortune, two of his gentlemen, \^ith a lettei* 
anil present, desiring to continue the league of friendship, ofi'ering 
any privileges we \^t11 demand in any part of liis countiy. If it be 
profitable for the Company to follow that tmde where they may 
find great vent of cloth, will send hereafter factors again thither, 
wherefore they should procure the King's letter in answer to that 
(with the present) last sent from the King of Siani by Lucas 
Anthcunis, and therewith send some present. These things will be 



EAST INDIES. 



Ill 



1G23. 



most acer>ptablo to hira : some curious picture of men and women ; a 
picture of the people and habits of all countries ; and a pictiu'e of all 
wild beasts, which a fair map may sufficiently express ; a curious 
perspective glass, fair and good ; a fail* and neat case of |»istols ; an 
English watdt ; six yank of tine scarlet ; scarlet baize so much as will 
cover his white Olifaiit [Elepliant] which may Ije some iifteen yards, 
with any other novelties of no great value. At Patani, Jourdain 
bath run himself so far in del>t if or china wares contmry to com- 
mi^ftion that he cannot come from thence until they send 4,000 ryal.s 
to release him ; expect to find a bad i*eekoniiig of all business passed 
there by hun, *' he heing given over to his jdeasure." In Indraghiri, 
factor}'', before the factors could clear to come from thence '* yom* 
hoiLse was fii-ed by some of those villainous and treacherous people ;" 
guess the loss will not Ixj under 1^000 ryals, This loss l>rought 
with it another greater mischief, for by the rash proceeding of 
E^lward Saniey and the rest of the factors in taking six of tlic 
country people, it cost Sarney his own life, and, the lives of John 
Darby, master of the Bear, and one of liis men, occasioned by Robert 
Johnson's denial to deliver the foresaid men to the King of Jambi 
when he demanded them, and '* Johason himself and Byrd, master 
of the Bee, had lik*.^ to have tasted of the same cup, for they were 
boun<l an<l the stroke reavly to Ixi given, but God altered the King's 
heait and they escaped." These broils almost the ruin of the Com- 
pany's aflah*s at Jambi. The price of }>epper will not abate so long 
as the Dutch and we vie who shall get most. Johnson left the 
factory until they sent him express order to dissemble the wrong 
received until a more convenient opportunity for revenge, Johnson 
hopes to get half the Moon's lading. Have made him chief factor 
again, for Stevinton is utterly insufficient Johnson very earnest 
to come fixjm tliencc, so that they Avill be wholly improvivled with 
a sufficient man in that factory. At Acheen, the pepper still lies for 
want of a ship» which they will send as soon as the monsoon permits. 
Have received moix? cloth from Masulipatam and Pulicat than they 
know how to dispose of. At Pulicat the factors com]ilain (like as in all 
other places where we are under the Dntch authority) how they exact 
upon us. The last years charges raised the cloth at least 30 jhu- cent 
Inti^nd dissolving that factory. Have given orders to dissolve the fac- 
tories of AmbojTia, Bantla, and Moluccas. About Macassar and Japara. 
The latter a petty factcjry only for timber and boards. The Com- 
pany may not lessen the proportion of stock set down, if they mean 
to follow the Moluccas business, and maintain so many ships of 
defence. Send copies of their general books, wherein the chargers in 
evcr>* factory may plainly appear. In Japan, Siam, and Jaml>i there 
have t>een either wasteful expenses or many debts which will never 
bo recovered ; also of their journal and pursers* accounts, wills, Lnvcn* 
tones, and copies of consultation letters, &c. Their general wants 
cannot be reckoned less than they were by their last advices, the 
necessity whereof retpiire^s them to \k* most importunate, Employ- 
it»ent of all the Company's sliips : — the Excliange. Ann, and Diamond 
with Uie Dutch fleet afore Goa, wliich they expect in May or June, 
unprovided of all things. The Moon at Jand>i, to take in what 
pepper may be procured. The Bull and Peppercorn at Japara, 
driven thither by contrary winds and the current, the latter a poor 



112 



COLONIAL PAPEE& 



1623. 



rntten ship ; her master doubts he shall hardly bring her hiihe" 
Tlic White Bear at Jambi tit for nothing but the river. Tlie junk 
or pinnace Welcome on her voyag:e to Maci^sar. The Elizal>eth> 
Ruby, Unity, Discovery, and Bee hei-c in the road of Jacatra, also 
the Foii.unc, good for little, and the Clove and Globe, ready to be 
hauled ashore. Ixjth being tinrcpairahk\ The Supply lately laid up. 
and the pinnace Dra^^on s Claw the Goa fleet was fain tci ca^^t otf" 
at sea, where she sank with all her provisions and nmnition^s. These 
ai-e all the ships you have i-emaining in thase parts under our autho* 
rity. Intend as soon as the moonsoon serves to send to Acheen, 
Ma.sulipatam, Sumatra, Jambi, and Siam, and aftei-wards for Japan. 
Wish tlie Bantam trade were open, which might hinder the sending 
t<j some of those places. Have now received the new Generals 
answer to their articles formerly delivered to General Coen and 
contra-protest Find, as they supposed, nothing but framed answers 
and delays, without any hope of reforination, l>eing according to their 
ordinary cust<3m " stutied with colored ^^osses and false matters," 
wlicrcin they stand so much on their sovereignty, that they com- 
prehend all men in all partes of the Indies to be their subjects. '* It is 
liigh time to abate their pride and make them know tliemselves, 
whic!i w^e hope our King's Majesty will perform/* Success of the 
Dutch at ilacao and the Piscadores, and fight with a carrac at Ca{)e 
Bona Speranza. Had many conferences l>efore General Coen 8 dejtar- 
turc alwivut making peace with Bantam, but received for a final 
answer from the Pengi^am that if the Dutch will have peace they 
should first demolish tlieir fort at Jacatra and deliver over the 
country, and then they may come and be at Bantam upon sudi 
teriuL^ as foniierly ; but with us English the Pengram saith he never 
had any wai*s, therefore we may come thither when we will. Mean 
shortly to speak to the Dutch thereon. Conceive it necessary to 
recommend Chas. Clevenger*s deserts, not doubting but the Company 
will reward and cherish him and all well deservdng men. Must 
still put them in mind of their want of sufficient merchants, also of 
a secretary that can }>erfectly translate Dutch, and is experienced in 
law. It is most needful to set down some good order for the well 
governing of the Company's people which is the prosperity of their 
aH'aii-s, for the seamen ai'e so disorderly that severity and exemplary 
pimishment must Ite used. Have a sensible want of three or four 
gooil penmen ; that such are needed may a]>pear by copies of letten* 
now sent ** wdierein you may find so many faults committed that if 
we could help it we might reap shame in sending them.'* Express 
(irders required as to the victualling of the ships ; this must l»e i-e- 
nuHiied at liome or there will be nothing Imt murmuring and 
nmttering. The commanders must l»e stinted as well, for in Ix^er, 
wine, &;c. they will not be controlled. *'At pi"esent we feed our 
people with fresh meat, giving them two meals in the week, and to 
e^rch mess four pounds of flesli, and five meals in the week they have 
I'utter to their ince. Jlurmuring and grumbling enough we have 
Avith them, but such as are honest (the number whereof is very 
small) are cont^-'Ut, seeing there is no remedy." Expect the Dut<ih 
will cross their design for Bantam, because it so nearly concerns 
their new plantation. Hope it will not be long before the Company 



EAST mDIESL 



118 






aamroiB Oidgr eoime for their going to Bantam. [F!fi€tn ]><W^ ^^^^^ ^ 
JUv^ .£iid<»r9oef ^ ** Gopy* , . the original hereof wns received bv 
the Bid^mve/ ftC. Vol. IX., Na. 1099.] 

265. Thomas Brockefion to Christopher Lanman, chief accountant 
to tlie East India Comiiany. Copies of books and accounts sent per 
this ship Pakgrave, From Patani, where John Joiirdain remains^ 
tiiey can neither get accounts nor the man, though expreasly sent 
far, but undei-stand he is so much indebted he could not come. But 
a small matter resting in Siam, but in Jambi there will \k' 15,000 
ryals (^) in liail debts. The charges of the Molucca.^, AinlHi>-Tia» ami 
Banfla so excessive that a great part of the remains will U: eon- 
BomedL In Kacassar are several debts made for account of the 
first joint stock by keeping Pooloi-oon. wdiieh th(*y Mnll be forced 
to make good ; are informed that in Jajian the charges ai'e most 
excessive, and great debts standing out likely to prove deiipei*at<». 
Never could get accoimt^ from thence. Cocks and the rest vrvm 
expressly sent for, but they neither come themselves nor send any 
account Tlie Succadana debts are all desperate, the (Jueen lieing 
taken by the Materan s people^ and the natives He<b Particulars of 
the accounts and want of men to keep them. Twenty reams of 
paper may be yearly sent, and some gum, galls, and copperas 
to make ink. Hopes the Company have granted his retpiest to 
return next ye-ar for England. " By the Palsgrave, wliom Qod 
preserve." [Tino pages and a half. O.a, Voi IX,, iVo. 1100] 

266. Jarne^s Slade, master of the Discovery, to the Eni-t India 
r^Mmiiany. Refei-s to his letter from Sural, liy the fjondoa and 
Jonas, giving an account of what hail happened since his departure 
from England. Left Sumt Dec. 14, with the six chestH of money 
they brought out of England, together with 400 and odd Imles of 
goo*ls for Jacatra, to which place ho wtiH botmd by coimin«Mion, as 
alsL> to Goa, in search of the Fleet of iJofL-iieu. Arrived at (loa the 
22nd, and rec<^ived from Capt. Green 30,000 ryals of eight, some 
sandal woo<i, and 22 slaves, and dej»arted the 28th, leaving the 
Fleet of Defence, viz.. the Exchange, Anne, and Diamond, an<l four 
Hollanders, to hinder the Purtugals of sending any goods this year 
into Poi-tugal, there being but one carac this year to lade. Arrival 
at Jacatra, 4th inst, Fel>., where they found the Palsgrave ladt^n for 
England, Mr. Clitfinghara [Clias, Clevenger] eonmiander, (by whom 
he has thought good to advise the Company). Found liere also the 
Elizal>eth, Ruby, Unity, Forttnie, and Bee ; and the Globe and 
Clove decayerl, '* an<l little hoi>e of her recovery, for want of all 
kind of provisions." of which the factory and most of tlieii" sliijis arc 
in great want. The Moon is at Janibi.and the Bull and Peppercorn 
at Japara. The Fleet of Defence to come hither from Ooa to bo 
cai^ened. Knows not when they shaU return, for there are so 
many ships of greater V)urtheu, and as yet no lading for tliem : liut 
wore it not for the Dutch, there would be hope to have tlieni ?ill 
lai^len from Bantam. {Tvm pages. O.fl, VoL X., Nu. 1140] 

Feb. 10. 267. CliamU*rlain to Carleton. The States [Ambassadors] left 
JjoDOofk* this day seveniglit. il" they had been so disposed they might have 



114 



PAPERS. 



1623. 



Feb. n. 



Ftb. 11. 

Tlteobalds. 



Feli. 11. 

Batavia, 



Feb. 14. 

Ai the C»pe. 



Feb. U. 

Butaviu. 



It 

1 



I 



coTicluderl the Imsmess as well in two months as in all this 
with so iiiTich ti'ouble and charge. The liing gave them very ^ 
words at jiarting, and tliey were feasted by the East Indian Com 
pany at Merchant Taylorti' Hall two days l>efoi*e going away, whem"^ 
were divers of the council and most of tlie lords and gallants about 
town ; the feast very confascd and disorderly liecanse so ill handled. 
Hears Mons. Aer^sens* son is made a gentleman of the Priv 
Chamber, and stayi^ behind to woo Mistress Smith, Lady Exet-er' 
daughter, of whom he is much enamoured. [Extract from Doinestii 
Corre&p,, Jac, /, Vol, CXXXVIIL, No, 23, Cal.p, 489.] 

268* Sec Conway to the Lord Treasurer. The King desires hini 
to be diligent in the business of Irelancl and the East Indies, and tOH 
go in hand with the articles conceniiog Sir Anthony Wclden anii^| 
Sii' Rubt. Banister. [Dom^dtic Correap^j Jac. /., Vol, CXXXVIIL, 
No. 20, CW.,p. 490.] 

269. Sec. Conway to Sec. Calvert, For prepaiing the business 
1)6 sent to Sir Dudley Carleton touching the East Indies, fishing, ki 
[Mintde, Commijs Letter BL, p. 1, CaL, p. 490.] 

270. John Alexander to Sir William Halliday, Grovemor of th^^ 
East India Company. In need of pitch, tar, cordage, and canvas fui^| 
presei-vation of their shipping, *' the which it is my charge, at thi^^ 
time, for to look imto," [iMe page, 0£\ Vol IX., No, 1101.] 

271. John Barnes, master's mate, and others to *' Mi*. Lordemian 
HoUyday," Governor, and the connnittees of the East India 
Company. Certify the ill -carnage of two of their factors [Geor^ 
Jackson and Thos.] Bright, and one of the master's mattes, David 
Ai*nold, in usm-piug authority, setting liad examples, and \ritt 
*' plots of Machevilianes," seeking the displacing of Mr, Cradle and 
the good, lionest, and worthy carriage of their commander, whose 
people not only fear but love him. for he spends none of his provi- 
sions extraordinary, Init gives to each man a like poHion. [TtcioH 
pages, miitUated by darnj). OXl, Vol, JX., No. 1108.] ^B 

272. Answer of the Dutch General Coen to six and thirty point 
** raped '* together by the committees of the English Companjii 
touching the common charge of the Moluccas, Ajnl>oyna, and Bamla 
which their worships do say to be constmined to pay to the ful 
(against all right and reason) to the Netherlands Company. If thd 
galley be valued at more than it was worth, the same must h 
restoreil again to the English ; good shipping must be maintained in 
Banda as well in peace as in war, a good garrison of soldiei-s, 
hundi*ed marinei's, and an armada of 30 tingans and other sraii 
Ixjats must be maintained by the tolls of merchandise, Whatevt 
each nation may happen to conquer, by right appertains to it 
80vei*eign lord, whereto no merchant that pays the toll has ought 
to pretend. As to the wages paid to the slaves and prisoners, the 
Dutch General will better inform himself, and *' mediat-e '* the 
charge, if found too high. If any buildings be found charged to tliaH 
tolls which concern not the fortifications, we will make those go^j^B 
to the English Company, Schools for bringing up the chilren in 



an 

1 

its" 



EAST INDIES. 



115 



1623. 



B^bw 15. 



tlic ClTristian religion are among the best works that can l3e done, 
and must be charged to the tolls, nntil the lords of the land find 
some other revenues. The double cliarge for the soldiers sick in 
lio«j>it-al Is a great fault of the respective governors, and shall be 
reformed. The furniture of the Governors chamlicr and the clothing 
of his Ixjys must be put to the general charge, but those of the mer- 
chants U) that of each Company. If any presents were gdven for 
services done to Governor Lam, the same must he done good to the 
English again; but thase made by General Coen in AmbojTia were 
Inr matters of State, with which the merchants ought not to trouble 
themselves. The voyage of the Governor of Amboyna was to prevent 
the designs of the Moors, and keep every one in their own limits, 
and not to blaze out the conquest of the Netherlands, as is alleged. 
If the English can prove the promise of a third of tlie cloves received 
by the Netherlands Company for the King of Temate's debts, it Ls 
reason they should enjoy the same. No other than good rice and 
clothing are sent uiwai*ds ; it is fit that the lr)ad be given to the hogs, 
poultry, and sm*geons. WUl procure direct advice from the Governors 
concerning price. They wUl inform themselves l^etter on tlie next 
articles. If the taxation of goods is unreasonable, aroends si i all be 
made. The English ai*e not forbidden to ''cross" the common 
enemy to both, but only not to hinder the fiiends of the Dutch 
trading at Banda. It is moi*© than reason that each provide his 
people with meat drink, and apparel ; what can a soldier purchase 
for nine guildei's a month. The officers receive their hire in ready 
money. If the soldiers sell again, how can the Dutch help it; if 
there be deceit in bringing goods to account, it must be pr^n-ed. 
The most hinderance Ixith Companies suffer in the matter of clothing 
is caused by the Spaniards, PurtugaLs, Macassars, Javans, Malayans, 
Guzerats, and particular Hol]andei*s and English, especially English, 
and the Dutch, for their parts, would do the best t!iey can to remedy 
it The Netherlanders taught by a del)t of 211,4HJ) (ryals) still out- 
standing, have lent nothing since the Accord, and ttierefore the 
English ai-e misinfonned. In the Moluccas, the NetJierlands Company 
ir^p no benefit of tolls, &c. In Banda and ^Vmbo^yTia they are now 
in hand to do it ; no other may make pretence to the fruits of the 
land than the owners, and those of the Moluccas, Banda, and Am- 
boyna do not defray the extraordinary charges for shipping, &;c. 
" Meantime wo must with patience endure the charge that we rake 
all piTjfits to the Netherlands Company," whereas, on the contrary, 
it is long ago that the charge of the ships of Defence, which are of 
necessity in the Moluccas, has but shifted on the Netlierlands Com- 
pany. It is fit that a reasonable tax he imposed upon all wares 
given out, and that the abuses in accounts Ix* corrected and reformed, 
they shall appoint comruittees so speedily as the English Company 
plcAse. [Eight pages. East Indies, VoL IL, No. 78.] 

273. Carleton to Sec. CalvcH. The 17 directors of the East Indian 
Company are now to meet about the accomplishment of their con- 
ditions with our men resolved on in this last treaty. The nine 
ahii^s which were unladen at Gore last year, upon the alarm of a 
Spanish armada, are now setting out again ^\dth the same admii*al 

H 2 



1G23, 



COLOKIAL PAPERS. 



anil the same equipage, but the desi^Ti, thou^^h fitiU kept secret, is 
plainly seen to be for the Inflies. [Extract from Holhind Correspr 



csp.^i 



Feb. 22. 274. Barlow to Carlcton. Has received a letter from the Gover 
Autsterdam. ^nd Comrriittee of the East India Company, advising that the Stat 
that were Ambassadors in England sent to his honor the Kir 
declaration euncerning the futnre trade of both Companies, to which 
they |U"omiscd to return answer, both from the Slates and the Con 
pany liere, which the English Company much (lcsire> that they ma 
give the better directions to their servants in the Indies. Desin 
he will further the eame, so they may have it before their shif 
depart [Holland CoiTesp,] 

Feb. 24. 275, Cai^leton to Sec. Calvert. Tlie Ea.st India merchants, ^M 
The Hague, well Bewpitlielibers, a.s the chief of the Participants, arc all here in 
dcbati! aliout their private ditferenccs, whicli falls out opportunely^ 
for tlic Aml>assadoi^ and States, to induce them to payment of 
money, at the just time accorded by the treaty, wherein otherwis 
by reason of diversities of humoui^ and interests, there might ha% 
been some default. [Extract from Mollavd Corre^pJ] 

March G. 276, Carleton to Sec. Calvert. The Amlmssadors preten^ 
TheUtigui?. ignorance of the declaration which the King made, as a supplemci 
to the East Indian treaty, ha,s delivered the writing to them ; boca 
all the direetoi-s of the Dutch Company ai^e here at present, and he 
perceives that the English Directors expects to hear wliether these 
men w411 accommodate themseKTs to the King*s declaration, to the 
end they may govern themselves accoi'dingty in the in^structioi 
they are now sending to theii:. factors in the East Indies. [Exi 
frovi Holland Corres}).^ 




March VV- 277. Extract out of the Records of the Council of State betwei 
Tiirifi. Andrew ih Launay, merchant and citizen of Roseoft' in Brittany, vr _ 
Tlios. Marteau substituted in the rigiit of Ilelias Frutc\ one of the 
directors of tlie Conipany established in Fi-ance for tmding int<j thiiJ 
East Indies, plaintiff', and Matliew Harvey, Wm. Noel, Rich. Beav»| 
Jas. Goulde, Edward Rlacarelb Thos. Ilelcott, and their partners,*^ 
English, inerclmnts, defendants ; and again between Harvey and 
partnei-i^, Riipellants of a .sentence given by tlie Lord Cliauibrieu 
and Laimay and Marteau, respundents, [Prlnfrd. Seven jntf, 
East Indiea, Vol IL, No, 79.] 

March 8. 278. Christopher Rosons to John Banggani, at Surat. Al 
SwaUy Sands. Investment of moneys specified in liis letter by Mr. Lancaster. [H^ 
a page, 0X% Vol IX., Kck 110k] 

March 9. 279, William Hoare to Christopher Rosons. To give notice __ 
Cut^tym Hoase, Mr, Woodcock of the aiTival of the six bales, '* which t>elong to him 
Sarat, ^^^ ^^^^n g^^^^ trunks of his, ice, whieh came down w4th Johi^ 
George, if not already aboard the Dolphin, to be put aboard tfafl 
Whale, in which ship Hoare is appointed to go with [Edw.] Hcynes!^ 
Concludes he will remain at Surat. [Ilulf a ixiqe, O.C\, Vol IX., 
.Yo. 1105.] I J I J J 



EAST INDIES. 



117 



1623. 
March 10. 



I 



SardL 



March 25. 

St. Mjirtin*« 



280. Joseph Hopkinson to Christopher Rosons, or in his abscence. 
to Thos. Hawkeridge. Had always assisted him when reqiiirerl as 
Jno. Banggam and The, Hawkcridgo will no doubt have advised hinu 
Entreats him to see five bales, nmiked with the writer's name, sent 
aboard the Wliale. [Haifa payt. 0X1, Vol. IX., 3o, 110(>.] 

281. Sec, Calvert to (Carlefcon). Marvels that the States Am- 
bassadors should pretend ignorance of the King's declaration in 
those points concerning the East Indies and Greenland [ttee ank\ 
No, 250], seeing that his Majesty delivered it to them vivA voce in 
every particular at Whiteball at their last autlience, a.s my Lords 
Commissionei's can witness who were then present and himself 
amongst the rest [see ifute, Ko. 258], besides it was sent imto them 
in writing by See. Conway the next day. But a man may see by 
this c/mnia quai cunmt sema rtienUnerunt, and nothing else. [Ex- 
tract fnnn Holla ml Corresjx} 

arch 2G. 282. (Carleton) t^3 Sec. Calveil. The States have been chiefly 
busied in according the ditierence betwixt the Bewinthebhers of their 
East India Company and the Paiiieipants, and in timling money for 
the satisfaction of our East India Company, on which tho.se of tliis 
country do labour to put a great part on the Generality, and these 
things remain still imdeeided, though the Assernhly which hath the 
chief voice in the chajiter of the (Generality separated on Saturday 
last. ♦ ♦ • • * • The fleet fitting out at Gore, is aug- 
mented to 13 sail, in which are to go 1.500 land-men. The design 
remains yet secret in three men's breasts only, but in all conjecture 
it Ls for the West Indies or the islands that way. [Extract froTii 
Holland C^rreBp^l 

283. Locke to Carieton. The business between the East India 
Companies is concluded, yet a little difl'erence has lately fallen out 
about security t^> be given by our merchants for transporting some 
pe|»j)er in which the merehaTits adventurers should have joine<I with 
our East India Com|mny, but refused, Sends copy of an al^solute 
order from the Privy Council to make them do it. [Extract fronn 
DcmieMic Corresp.j Jac. /., Vol. CXL., Xo. 5, CaL^^p. 541.] 

March 3L 284, Thos. Benson to Edward Nicholas, secretary to Lord 
Zouch. Sir Henry Mainwainng has three projects for his own 
future employment, one of which is to go to the East Indies, whither 
Bc^nson wishes him a very prosperous voyage. [Extract frmn 
Diyniestic Corr€»ih^ Jae. /., Vol CXL.^ No, 77> Caf., p, 544.] 

March ? 285, Petition of Robt. Salmon and Elizal>eth Ins wife, late wife 
of Capt, R<:»bert Bonner, deceased, to the Privy Council. Robt. 
Bonner, captain of the Dragon, who was slain by the HoJlanilers in 
the East Indies in IGIO, Ixdbre his deatli, delivered to the fact^;)rs of 
tlie East India Company 1,000 lyals of eight, to be repaid Uy his 
executors in England. The Company aft^-^r detaining the ryaln 
three years and five months paid the petitioners in Feliruaiy 
last, but allowed only 5^. upon the dollar {sic) the ordinary 
exchange being lOi?. the ryaL The Company being too great 
for the petitioners to deal with by ordinary course of law. 



March 27. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



ISSS. 



April 20. 






ihey pray that the Governor and committees may be summons 
before the Piivy CouncU. and order given for them to do what 
reasonable. [Doffiesiic Corresp., Jac, /., Vol CXL,, No. 83» d 
p. 545] 

286. Amer Ben Said, King of Socotiu, to King James, He 
the first of all Oriental Kin^^ to enter into perjxjtual peace ai 
friendship with Capts. William Keeling and William Hawki] 
and afterwaixls his Majeisty, by two letters imder his own hani 
TOttchsafed to account the King amongst his Majesty's faitliful suh- 
jects* Since then the cajitains have kept the peace so firaily and 
religiously that all his ships have traded salely and securely in all 
|iart8 of the Indies. Having now an opportunity of \\niting to his 
Majesty, he vows and de<]icate« his whole person, his Island of 
Soeotra, and his small port8 into his Majesty's hands. Let liis 
Miye^ty no otherwise esteem his small temtory than his own pro[)er 
England, and reckon himself amongst his must humble Hubjecf 
[Latin. Dated, " Ikgeb 1032." Twrkey Royal Uttera. Easta 
Prhiccs.] 

287. Copy of the preceding. [East Irulks, Vol. 11,, N'o. 80.] 

288- English tmnslation of the above. [Turkey Royal Lett\ 
Kit stem Princ<^s,] 

289. Copy of the preceding, [East TndUs, VoL IL, No. SI.] 

290. Thomas Staverton to Mons. Lemonoy. You^ have 
considered deliberately in taxing me with coming to your hoi 
in threatening maimer against tlie Italian, who, though servi 
your Company, is never the lionester or better man. It can 
no breach of peace between Kings, or of the friendship whi 
our President vouchsafes towards you, to chastise a varlet, wh" 
lielongs to no nation, or rather to every nation, a ti^aitor» wil 
insinuating paracitieal tongue and fawning gesture. I pretend 
tpiarrel or strife against you at present, or any of the French 
nation here with you, but if you seek strife, you may have your 
hands fiiU. I protest against you Hig. Lemonoy in particular, , 
and against all the French here with you and against the Frem^fl 
Company in general. iVnd whereas you tax me wrongfully, i»^ 
prt^tending I have often said I would never do good Uy Frencli if 
In my power to hurt, witness my many friendships to Sig. Guali 
Rir which I have received reprehension from my siiperioi*s, 
lUe King of Macassar, many of the chiefe in this place, and 
IWtugals here resident. Ask Sig. Gualters himself, for liujnftm 
fjm ifmtiam bene vierentl non reponit, which I may well apply 
y<HL This is my answer to your causeless protest. Delivei-ed 
Sig, Lemonoy by Hemy Short, W^m. Danby, and Wm. Withers. 
' \hw [Huje. 0.a, Vol X, iVo. 1114.] 

291. Petition of Thomazin Powell, widow, to the Piivy CouneiP 

it -oTi [William Powell] about six yeais since was employed to 
u Indies in the Swan, sei'\^ed in the gix»at fight with the 

I which the General [Benj. Joseph] was slain, and 
>t taken in the Solomon, with many hundreds more at 







^m 




EAST INDIE& 



119 



1623. 




May lU. 

Afuttcpdani. 



(Jun*^ 21.) 



Moluccas by die HoUandezBi who spoilied tun laf ill hk goods ud 
gtarv ed him to death in pmoiL She ha^ Icng be^i a fi^oitor la ihe 
East India Cotni^any for necompeose. Prays their Lordships media- 
tion with the Companv or the Stalea of HoUasdL IDomedicOom^^ 
Jae. L, Vol. CXXIV., Xo. 103, CU^ jn 329.] 

293. Report of the Masters of the Trinity House to the Pri^-y 
Council ufHjn the demands of the [abiove ?j and other pelitiofieia 
[sr^e afeo 3V<t 361, 362,] They have received one-third part of wa^^ea 
irom the East India Company by mediation of the Jodge of the Ad- 
miralty, and on their pursuasioinihe Company have coo^-nted to \Ay 
the other two thirds, teas eetiain dediietion& Had hope^I they bad 
de.served so much of thepetiiioiiers that they would not have fiirtber 
troubled their LordshipeL [One pag$. Bad Indu^, Yd. JL. Xo, 82.] 

293. Barlow to Carleton. There is no news of moment &um 
the Indie.s. The proceedinf^ of the Dutch fleets off Macao, Goa. and 
Malacca are not known. The English Company has a ship home 
with I^epper, mace, and nutmegs^ The Dutdi have lost a Jihip of 
great value, bound for Amboyna^ and the English one coming from 
Eiigland vnih full lading, on the coast of Java ; these here have 
begun to perform the Accord made in England, and have paid him 
200,000 guilders, the rest, he makes no doubt, will follow. Hopes 
no further questions will arise, for if ihtse had never been^ both 
Companies had been in better estate than now they are, by at least 
2,000,000^ [IloUand Ci/rre^p.] 

294. (Carleton) to Sir W. Aston and Sir Edward Herbert Tlie 
fleet he has before mentioned has now feset out from the nuw haven of 
Helfordsluy8 (Hellevoetsluis), victualled for 30 montlis. Their design 
is not yet divulged, but by common opinion their voyage lie^i for the 
East Indies, but Caileton has many reasons for tliinldng that tliey 
go to seek theu- adventure in the West Indies, and if they tind 
notliing to settle upon, to return by Le Maire*s passage, and take 
in a lading in the East Indies. Two Dutch ships not over richly 
iaden have arrived, bringing news that the Dutch have burnt five 
small frigat-es aljout Malacca, and lost a gix^at ship with 43 men, 
between Banda and Aiiilxiyna. The English Company have lost a 
fair ship, the Trial, with ber full lading from England and 97 men, 
on the coast of Java ; in recompcnee whei-eof they have a i^hip from 
thence, laden with pepper, mace, and nutmegs. The Dutch begin to 
perform the Accord, having paid 200,000 guilders to the English 
factor at Amsterdam, in part of what was agreerl on for rei?titution, 
and the rest will Bpeedily follow. Endorsed, '' To Sir 11. Wotton, 
Sir Thos. Roe, and Sir Isaac Wake, the 27th May 1023;* [Ej:lract 
from Holland Corre-f^p^ 

295. "The Command of Sultaun Dower Buckesh, gran<lcbil(lo 
to the Splendor of Mahomet'.s Religion, the VictoiiouH Jahangeer 
Paudshawh/' " Now it hatli pleased his Exeellencio to giaunt tlii« 
mandatt ; that the Wor^l Tho. Rastell, Cap*, of tho English, iiiaio 
freely land with hi« people and reside in t!ie Port of Surat^ ajid 
contentively prosecute their allaires for whatsoever is agreed in 



lao 



CX)LONIAL PAPERS. 



issa 



Jtme 27. 

Plktlpc»l Laite, 



June 30. 



July L 

St. Murtin's 
lout*. 



July 1. 

LtiDlhjlTi. 



July 2. 



wrighttzig and concluded by the Honorable Sief Chaun and Venerat 
Musseeh £1 Zemaun and the Marchants of Suratt. What they have 
agreed unto I doe rattefy as my owne deed ; and henceforth none sha 
toake elaime or question touching the said agreement; but ever here 
after the Englishe ahall Ijc kindly accomodated with good usag 
an<J furthei-ance in their busines. Dated on Satterday the thiitl 
the niontli Azer in the eighteenth yeare of His Ma*y'« raigne/ 
Eiuiarsed, " Translat ion of the young Prince s Finnan, &c^" U^^^ff 
a page, 0,0,, VuL IX,, No. 1103.] 

296. Sir Thus. Smythe to Sec. Conway. Capt ChriHtian is gone 
dowTi to the Bonaventurc and ready to sail M-ith the first wind. He 
waH unal>!e to wait upon Conway iK'fore his depaiiure. [BajJiestic 
Con-iiMp,, Jiu\ I. Vol CXLVIL, No. 7G, CaL, p, 022.] 

297- (Sec Conway) to Sec, Calvert. His Majesty recommends to 
his judicious handling the intimations to the merchants (of the East 
India Company) of the serious and grievous complaints of the Am- 
bassadors of Spain, and otherwise of thegrt^at \»Tong8 and spoils madi 
by them to then* inlimt+i enriching, at Arm use (Ormuz). These comJ 
plaints are new and piessed hard, the issue of which must be attended 
to, anil can do iia hurt if men be well warned. [Extract from Do 
Corresp., Jac, L, Vd. CXLVIL, No, 88. Cal, p, G24,] 

298. Sec, Calvert to [Sec. Conway]. Has intimated to the 
merchants of thu East India Comiiany the King s commands touching 
Orniuz, l»ut will send to morrow furtht.' Governor himseli and let hinx^ 
know the Kings [ileasure, [Extract from Bomestic Corresp,, Jac, /<j^| 
Vol. aXLVIIL, Xo, 5, Cal, jk 2.] ^ 

299. Capt. Thos. Conw^ay to his father, Sec. Conwa}'. 
most assisting hand for a lady, not named, in obtaining the King 
especial commission to his Commissionei's of the Navy for her l)ett 
procurement of her seized on estate out of the han«.ls of the E 
India Company. [E.vtrud froin Dmtiestic Corresp,, Joe. /., VoL 
CXLVIIL, Xo, 0, Cid., p. 2.] 

300. Minutes of a General Court of the East India Company,^ 

Those absent to be lined VM. a piece, accord nig to former order' 
Arrival of the Lesser James ; a {>ortion of the pep^jer to be sold ill' 
town to keep the Butch out of the market. Price of maces set at 
88. 0(/. and .js. iVL per lb., and of nuts (nutuiegs) Zs. pt^r lb. ThQ 
first half capital of those wlm have not taken it out in goods to 
paid in money at Michaelmas. Alderman Hallidaie, thougli he 
earnestly excuses himself on the ground of weak health, re-elected 
Govemoiv and consents to act for another year, the Court under- 
taking to B|»are liim as much as possible. Morris Abbott, now that 
the business of the treaty is over, desired the Court io consider that 
he hath served eight years and gi^ows old, and liath need of rest and 
to enjoy himself; but he is re-elected Deputy. William Stone and 
RoV>ert Bateman elected Treasui'ers, after a disscussion about the 
auditing of tlie accounts. Six of the 24 committees being changed 
^^'^^y yoar, Joab Harby, Simon LawiTuce, Rolx-^rt Parkhurst, Gilt 
Martin, George Strowd, and William Cokayne are elected in pL 



Pravs hia^ 
he King'^ 
her l)ettei^| 

the East^l 



ijl^ 
at 



it^ 



^ 



EAST INDIES. 



121 



1623. 



of Sir Edwin Sandys, Nicholas Crispe, Mr, Koightly, Henrj- Robinson, 
Henr>' Powlsteail, and Thomas Millward, Roljert Bacon, the Sec- 
retary, Andrew EUani, and Chrietc^pher Lanuian^ book-keepera, and 
Richard Mountney, hiLsband of the Comi»any, an* re-ulected. A 
letter ia delivered to Mr, Goveiiior in opL»n court, directed to the 
Generalty and 9uVi8cril>ed George Ball, by John Ulostor, a goldsmith 
of Southwark. who aftinns that it Is a copy and not the original. 
Unanimously resolved not to n?a<l it, but to complain of the matter 
to the Lords of the Pri\^ Council [Five jMujes. Court BL VL, 
1-5] 

July 4-23, 301. Court Minutes of the East India Company. In reference to 

Mr Suiitheck 8 petition to tlie King, t^j which Mr Comptroller and Sir 
Edward Sackville w^ere appointt^d refereeH. tliey entreat the Company 
to l»est<iw something upon [x^titfoner for hLs fi>ur monthn* attendance 
at the Court, but the Court taking it he was* the only cause of hia 
own discharge for the unreasonable terais he stood upon, saw no 
eaufie t*y give him anything. Letters brought from the Earl of 
Holdemess, in l^ehalf of Lewii* Smith, who claims wages at 30/. per 
annum, but the Court Book .shows that hii§ wages are 20/. per 
amuim, theixdbro Smith, w^ho is sent over to answer hia misdemeanours, 
has received all lie could have demanded if he had faitlifuUy scribed, 
but as he deserved ill, he could with no reason expect so much. The 
Earl ]> rayed to be satisfied witli this answer. The Company to 
stand out about the payuK-nt of the Lizard light, the Trinity House 
hokling it altogether unnecessaiy and fruitless, but have compounded 
for theii* part, though they could wish the business brouglit to a new 
dispute. The CouH is inlbrmed by Mr. Deputy [Morris Abbott] that 
Sec. Calvert having sent for some of the Company, himself, Mr. 
[Robt] BelL and the Company's secretary [Robt. Bacon] attended at the 
Star Chaml»er antl spoke with Sec. Calvert, who .said he ha^l received 
two or three lettei*s from Sec. Conway, signifying that the Simnish 
Ambassador had pressed the King touching the Inisines*^ of Omiuz, 
and that his Majesty's pleasure was he should s]>eak with tht; Com- 
]»any concerning the same, and now he wished them to send to Sec. 
I'onway in writing such satisfaction as they can at present give, 
taking knowledge of what he had saiil imto tliem. The Court took 
consideration of this business, which being Aveighty (all circuni stances 
considered), they conceived thei-e could not be too much caution 
used in tlie veiy entmnce, and therefore thought fit Uy for liear writing, 
Viut entreated Sir, Dej^uty and ilr. Bell to repair tu Mr. See. (Conway) 
at Windsor, and the ('ompany s secretary to attend tliem. Tlie 
Charles to victual at Eritli, for the better keeping of the men aboard. 
Some of the men of the Lesser James examined as t-o whether they 
had Wnm the cause, *' through their unfurtunat<4y not dj tier big far 
froTU a umtinyr of carrying the ship into In lanrl. The men to l»o 
paid, but the ortieers respited for the present. Mr. Stone, ** one of 
the city's council/' to lie appointed arbitrator with Mr. Jeffreys, 
between the Company and Mr, Pattison. in i>lace of Mr, Coxe, of the 
Temple, wdio has '* to ride a circuit'* Demands of Mary, wriduw of 
[1 Mary Jackson, sister of, see anle. No, 30] George Cokayne (slain in 
tixe Company's service), about a house in Succadana: she produced one 



ifa 



122 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623, 



BalH 
ence^ 



Hay ward as a witness, *' a man that for an offence not to be namen 
was sent liome and had deserved to be han*:c*:?d ni the IntUes ; 
resolved, that «he must i*est contentt^d with what she hath had. CoH'^ 
sideration of a master for the Charles : Swann's demand of 200^. per 
amiuui, and 50/, gratuity to set liim out; the Court not doubting 
they should find choice of able men for the coinmand of that shii*, 
"would follow no man in Ids umeasonaVile demandK,'^ 

July 9. — An order in Chancery read that Ball should have his 
wearing apparel, linen, fcc., his goods, l>ecause they are permhing, to 
be sold and sequestered into some iiidifferent hand, and his hook^ 
and pa]>ei*s deposited at Guildhall, where he may have access to 
them. The Court ]UNjpounded whether they might not attach hi 
goods, but Sir Jolm Walter advised that the Company in no 
proceed at common law and in the 8tar Chamber lx}th at once, 
to come in the afternoon for his wearing ajiparel, &c. In reference" 
to the business of Mrs. Wickliam, it was determined to consider th© 
Lord Keeper's offer to give the case *' a short anil summary hearing, 
or to refer it to arbitrament." Mr, Bell and Mr. Stile to advise with 
the Attorney General thereon. William Cokayne, elected at the last 
General Court one of the committee, recpiests leave to resign, on 
account of his ha\ing in hand a very great business ; to be refenxni 
to a Genei*al Com-t. The Great James, because the heat of the season 
woidd do mucli hurt to her sheathing, to l:>e laimched, and the Lesser 
James to take her place. The fitting of the Eagle and Star for sea 
at a charge of 300/, and 250Z. deferred until the Court heai^s again 
from the Indies. Master named for the Charles, but because she is 
a ship of great charge and is to go alone, the Court are extraordinary 
cai"eful to fit her with a good master, but took distaste to Mr. Swann's 
peremptory demands, yet because they had experience of his honestyi 
and sufticiency he is to be once more spoken with, and if he shaP 
continue in his i*esolittion the Company will never ti^eat with hi 
again. Tlie Court informed that 150 batTels of powder ai*e to bel 
had, but it must not Ixi known ; ordered that they be bought and laid 
\^) at Dejitford, and a man appointed to wat<?h then^. Petition of 
Woodall, the Compan^^'s siugeon, against any other being allowed to 
provide the sm-geon's chest for the Charles ; debate tibereon, and 
resolution that a trial medicine chest for TOO men, with the prices^ 
be provideil by those that will undertake it, Mr. Deputy [Abbott] 
reported that he and Mr. Bell attended Sec. Conway concerning tha 
lnLsiness of 0rmu2, and delivered what Sec. Calv<^rt had said : h- 
found tbat complaint had been made to his Majesty, but did nofcj 
perceive that it is much pressed at the instant, that the King wouL' 
be in London on Wedne.sday, when, if there were cause, Sec. Conwa; 
would send for them. Oilers for mace, nutmegs, and indigo at ceri 
prices. Petition of David Bomiie, who was arrested for a debt dw 
to the Company for goods, and sold his adventure in the first join 
stock to pay it, that the remainder be paid to him ; some present 
relief to be gi'anted io the petitioner. The Court hold the light on 
the Lizard to be very unnecessaiy and imuseful to this Company^ 
and are therefore deteimined not to contribute to the payment of iU 
The charges of the Company's proctor to be audited* 



EAST IOT>IES, 



123 



1C23. 



July 11. — Wooclall presents one John Hedlow (Headly) as master 
Burgeon to tlie Charles, Doctoi^s Atkins and Winston t<j make proof 
of and re]>ort on his proficiency, Richard Swan entei-tained master 
of the Charles at 15/. per month ; if he brings his whip laden, and 
touches at no port until he come to the Downs he shall have lOOL ; 
for thene favourn he promises to use no private trade, and to 
hinder it in otiiei's. Report made that Sir John Walter continues 
still of the niind that the Company shall do best not to proceed 
against Ball at common law, so long as the suit in the Star Chamber 
is depending. Mi's. Wickham s ease. Mr, Attorney to ** move at tlie 
next seal " that BalFs books and papei'a may " stay here," and that 
the proceeds of his goods and a competent proportion of his linen be 
delivered to him, and no more, Re^solution to vent their maces 
themselves at S^. 6t/, and os. 6d per lb,, for the Dutch have but a 
small quantity in Europe, though cloves in abundance, for though 
they have two parts and the English but one, they trade with them 
to the Coromandel coast. The indigo not to Ije sold undur price, as 
this is the season for the dyeing of all the wools. Bond seale<l t^) 
abide the decision of the arbitrator conceming al! questions Ix'tween 
the Company and Benjamin Pattisoa Submission of Roe, late 
master of the Star, to the chains of going to Ii^land, wasting 
powder and provisions in enteiiaining the Dutch, and appropriating 
goods from a prize ; he alleges the disobedience of his men, who 
altered the ship's course whilst he slejit ; that his ent^?rtainment of 
the Dutch was in courtesy, but extended not to riot, and his expeasc 
in powder was nothing near to that of the Dutch ; that he had from 
the prize but 100 lbs. of cloves and a few trifles, as the captain*s 
girdle and hangers with buckles of silver, a taffeta quilt, but nothing 
of value. Committee appointed to end the business. 

July 16. — Commissioners named for examining witneases at Ply- 
mouth in Mrs. Wickham*s case, Alderman Allen to nominate those 
for Bristol. Payment on account of wages to the wife of Capt. 
Fitzherlx?rt. To speak with Sir Henry Marten and Dr. Zouch con- 
cerning the proceedings with Capt Hawkeridge in the Admiralty 
Court. A Court of Sales to be held on Wedni'sday afternoon next, 
and bills of sales to be set up at the Exchange and othfjr usual places. 
Certificate of Doctors Atkins and Winston that of three surgeons 
examined by them, John Headly is the most sufficient. HaiTison's 
accoimts. Petition of William Bennet, sent home prisoner in the Lesser 
James, for a copy of the true charge against him. The Court con- 
ceived this Uj be a demand ini\!,sed into him l>y some crafty counsel, 
and therefore wished him rather to C4}niefts his offence and show 
how he is able to give satisfaction. 5Z. to be given to the King's 
waiters for the ship James, and 40s. to the Farmer's waitei-s, as 
hath been usual in like cases. 

July 18. — Aiiival of the Lonrlon, Jonas, and Lion in tbe Downs, 
Committees appointed to go abuai^d and keep all the goods aboard, 
as well those of the mariners as of the Company, Letters brought 
by the purser of the London read,] 



124 
1623- 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



July 23. — ConsiJeration of Pattison*3 business ; agreed to pay 
110/. in full of all pretences on account of the estate of Henry 
Pattison Jece^setl, as well from William Pattison, the father, as from 
Bi'iijannn and Ralph Pattison and Ann King, brothers and sister 
Uj the testator. Jolm Conyers a|>point4?d tailor on board the Charles, 
but to learn to do tlic work of a mariner also. Information that 
Capt. Hawkeridge had aiTeMed George Pettus on an action of 
1,()00^, which being only for vexation and in revenge of some 
t cport to the Company concerning Capt Hawkeridge, resolved that 
ilr. Mountney, their husband, and Mr. Cappur, their remembrancer, 
Ije bail for said Pcttu-s. Rei>ort of Walter Mountford that a great 
tjuantity of pepj>er was sold out of the [Lesser] James in Ireland » and 
that Kobtris, the master, contracted himself thei-e to a girl of 13 years ; 
be is to appear l)efore the Court on Frida}'. Report of Mr. Deputy 
that the Commissioners of the Na\y require some help of victuals 
from the Comi>any for setting forth his Majesty's ships; he had 
oHered to lend 13,000 of bread, but they required 20 hogsheads of 
lieef, and he demanded whether that quantity may l>e spai-ed ; the 
Court made answer that where there is a necessity for the King's 
sei'vice they will not sufler tlieitiselves to be compcUed, but readily 
yield to what they can Ao, though with much inconvenience, as the 
Ijeef provided is to supply their people in the Indies. Mr.^Gano- 
way to attend the Comniissionei*s and satisfy them with a less 
quantity J if not, the Company would not be wanting to his Majesty's 
service. Report of Mr. Deputy that the tiovernor, himself, and some 
cjthers of the Company being summoned liy the King to attend his 
Majesty a.t Whitehall on Sunday last [20t!i], they went, except the 
Governor, whose health did not jiermit, and liis Majesty commanding 
the chaml>er to be voided of all other company, t-old them he had 
understooil from the Duke of Buckingham that the Company had 
Ix'fore liis going promised to gratify the Duke» which promise had 
been conhnned since at a court ; the King tiierefore advised them to 
do it now in his absence, when the gift will come the more accept- 
ably, because thereby it woidd ajipear they had been mindfnll of 
him. His Majesty said further (and spake it cheerfully) that the 
fratiti cation to the Duke had been stayed until the business of 
driiiuz were cleared, and that their ships being now arrived, his 
Majesty iloubted not they would perfonu wliat they intended and 
willed, Mr. Deputy to send their answer wherever his Majesty 
sh(juld be in progi'ess. The Court consideiTd the Lord Admiral s 
favours to the Compiiny, and the continual use they have of his 
favour, and that this business of Ormuz may form a strong opposi- 
tion, also that howsoever the King liad foi-merly said the Duke 
should have nothing from the Company for the business of the 
Dutch, yet it is both fit to gratify him and is expected at their 
hands, the rest of tJie lords having Ijeen gratified. Resolved, with 
one consent, that for his favours in tlie last treaty with the Dutch 
and to sweeten liiii^ tor tlieir future occasions, and particularly for that 
of Ormu55, he shall liave '2.000/., and tlmt the King be acquaint^il 
with this resolution, Ofler of Natlianiel Cobb to serve the Comjiany. 
[Twenty-one piujcs. Court Bk. VL, G-25,] 



I 



« 



4 



EAST INDIES. 



125 



July 23. 

f July 23 to 
lli24. 



523. 
July 25, 



302. Minutes of a General Court of Sale^. List of goo^ls sold, 
coasisting of Bozoar stomas, dJamontls, and pepper, with tho natoes 
of purcba-sers and the prices. [Ttvo pages and a half. Court Bk^ 
VL, 20-28,] 

303. SUnutcs, in tho handwiiting of Edward Nicholas, ** touching 
the business of Ormnz, and moi^e especially tlie j^rize^ taken in the 
Indies by the East India Company;'* The King sends for the 
Gbvemor to gratify the Lord A<lmiral in his ahHcnce ; resolved with 
one consent by the C'ourt that he should have 2,000^, **a3 well for 
favor slio\vTi in the business of tho Dutch b^ to sweeten him for their 
future occasions, and particularly for that of OriTiuz/' First over- 
ture of a demand for the business of Onuuz and other reprizala 
taken by the East India Company ; a committee appointed^ but the 
Company resolved to stand on their innocency. Dr, Stewards 
opinion that the 10th part belongs by euntom to the Lord Admii-al, 
but there is no law for it. Dr Zouch's opinion. Tlie (^mipany 
unwilling t^:) contend witli the Lord Admiral, and hofK' to satisfy 
him that he has no right to tenths in their case. The Company a 
ships stayed, upon a motion in Parliament The Company hath 
taken in value 100,000/. in several ])art8 of the Indies. Tlie Dutch 
in such c^sea give five per cent, to the StaU»-s an<i as nmch to the 
Prince of Orange, Demands of the King and the Lord Admiral ; 
the latter protests the 8hi[)s shall not go till the Company have 
compounded with him. The King calbi tho Company piratea, arresU 
the Company in an action for 15,000?., and will not coraiKJUnd for 
less t.han 1 0,000/. The Comj^any unwilling to go to law with tho 
King; he tells tlie committee he was promised 1,000/, for the busi- 
ness of Ormuz, He says ho is no tyrant ; he allows his subjects 
the benefit of law. and would have it so tried The Lord Admiral 
refuses to release the ships till Parliament is move^l. Tlie King 
says to the committee, " Did I deliver you from the complaint uf 
the Spaniard, and do yoti retui-n me nothing ?*' Resolved that 
5,000/, be offered. The *King demands 10,000/. for himself and m 
much for the Lord Adjuiral ; he says that 100,000/. is taken justly 
or unjustly, if unjustly all is last, if justly yet they mnst pay a r* 
[right of tenths], and he will not suffer tlie Lord Admiral Uy compound. 
Resolved that 10,000/. be offered for the King to shut up all busi- 
nesses. The King insists on hLs former demand.H. An end must l?e 
made liefore the ships will l>e released. Rc^solved to petition the 
King that 10,000/. might l>e accej)ted. The Company's ships have 
leave to depart %^ March 1024, Tlje King takes the petition ill, 
and demands 15,000/, now and 5,000/, on the return of the ships 
from Surat. 1,000/. paid to Sir Allan Apsley, CoiTespondence with 
Lord Conway as to the payment of the 20,000/. At the King's 
express pleasure the money is paid* How the Company thinks fit 
that the acrpiittances should be worded. [Six parjes, Emlorsed as 
ahorf\ Eant LuVies, Vol, IL, No. 83.] 

304. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Pt^tition of 
Richard Bishopp, prisonfr in Saint Katlierines, for 25/, detained 
from his wages on a charge of taking a woman from Macassar, 
which woman was delivered to the King's factor at Japni-a, by 
order of Bennett, the Company's principal factor there ; the matter 



126 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 









cannot be settled until the accounts come from Macassar, Anthon;^ 
Wallis, also a ]»risoner, )>etitions to ^ay his debt of 800 ryals at St. 
per lyal, and prays for his lilierty. The Court replied that to a bad 
servant, as lie wns both at Surat and to the southward, whence hi 
was shipped home as a delinquent, there is notliing due ; the mati 
deferred. Re]iort of a committee that they found the London 
better case than ever they saw any ship return out of the Indies, 
** lier men all and lusty, commending their captain for a loving and 
kind man, and lie them for honest and serviceable men/* Monis 
Jones appointed surgeon's mate to the Chai^les. A letter from 
Spalding shown by Mr, Jackson to the Company, concerning 4Q0r, 
given to mariners and certain pieces of damask sent in the Lesser 
James ; a giT^t probability of alteration observed in the figure^^f 
which are blotted, Walter Mountford's account of his inquiries i^^ 
Bristol and Ireland ; that 1,000/. worth of pepper and cloves had 
>3een sold from the Lesser James in Ireland, but he coidd not learn ou<| 
either buyer or seller ; Roberts, the master, had contracted himse 
to a wench of 13 or 14 years, and Capt. Hawkeridge to a daught 
or near kinswoman of the Lady Southwell Mountford offers 
account for all sums received by him and not accounted for (which 
he guessed to be about 700/.) in a fortnight ; is much blamed for^ 
his slackness, and ordered that he be no more employed until he ha^| 
accounted. In future all their servants so employed to account for 
their disbiu-seraents wdthin three or four days, while tlungs are fresh 
in mcmoiy. Committees to unlade the Lion, Jonas, antl London. 
Delits of Lawrence Greene and Mv. Jeames. Bevei-sham, master of 
the Lion, lately returTied from Surat, ** gently blamed " for leaving 
his ship before she \ras unladen ; explains by what means Ruy Frere, 
the Portugal commander, escaped through the negligence of the 
watch, though he had set a guard of six men with rapiers and 
pistols. Robert Hayes, late the Company's factor in tJie Indie 
who had l>een discharged for a gross en-or, acknowledges his fau 
and begs for employment ; after discussion, he is appointed to go 
the Charles, upon rebate somewhat of his wages. Expences 
Richard Betton, hurt aboard one of the sliips, to be paid by Mountnej 
The London and Jonas wi]l cost COOt per annum to keep them afloat^ 
opinion thereon defended. 

An afternoon meeting, appointed principally for conference wii 
Mr. Monox, lately returned out of Pei-sia in the Lion. An abstn 
of bis journal read. Being demanded upon what warrant the acti 
of Ormuz was grounded for so much as concerned the English, he 
answered that, fii-st, his Majesty s commission to defend and offend^^u 
secondly, a consultation at Surat ; and lastly, the instructions reeeivo^f 
by the commanders of the ships for the weakening and ruining 6^^ 
the Portugals that had fought with our ships, slain our men, and 
impeached the freedom of om' tmde, were in their judgments induce- 
ment and waixant enough to do what they did ; but there wafl ^ 
another reason above all these, which was that the Company ha\HDg . 
goods ashore to a very great value, and their factors there with 
them, the Persians did deny to give way to put the goo<ls aboardjj^ 
refusing leave for their camelsi to carry them to the shore, exce| 



io^l 



EAST INDIES. 



127 



1623, 



[1621-2.] 



Jaly 25 io 
Dec. 22. 

Finrndo. 



the English would aid him for the gaining of Onniiz; abo when 
the Persian coxnmandei^ came aboard the English ships and pro- 
pounded the service there api>eai-ed no possibility to get the Com- 
pany's goods aboai-d without it, and they thought they might take 
that opportunity to disable their enemies and repair their former 
wrongs, and that they were wan-anted theiH^imto by his Majesty's 
commission and those other directions they had. Discussion in 
itderence to how it appeared the Company's goods were in danger if 
the English assisted not the Persian. Monox affirmed it to be a 
happy turn for the Poi'tugals that the English were there, for at 
their earnest request the English received them into their ships and 
saved them all, which afterward they ill requited, for they plotted a 
ti'eachery upon a frigat^^ of the English, which was discovered. 
Being demanded of tlie richness of the spoil, Monox made answer 
that the Portiigals expected a siege and had sent away their wives 
and children, and therefore it was not likely they would leave any 
treasure there, and as for goods they had none; and that they 
expected a siege appears by a letter directed to the King of S})ain, 
which Monox aaid he saw in the hands of the King of Ormuz, and 
hath a copy of it Also he is of opinion that the Portugals did in a 
sort sell themselves, for Ormu55, with two months* siege, was in that 
want of victuals that it could not have held out, which had it been 
victualled had been easy enough to be kept both against the English 
and Persian. Monox said the sea commanders and pursei^ sold the 
goods the English took there much underfoot, for there were none 
suffered to buy but Persians ; the Armenians who came do"WTi fi-om 
Gombroon to buy wei-e not suflered to do so. Tlie factoi-s at Surat 
had accounts of the sale. For other circumatances concerning Onnuz, 
Monox referred the Company to his journal [see below], which he 
begged might be safely restored io him. Notice from the bailiff and 
justices of Ipswich, that indigo, pepper, and calicoes have come to that 
port fi'om the Lion, on behalf of the master and others ; the goods to 
be stayed until further orders, and the messenger paid SOs. Orcleied 
that a dividend of half a capitaJ in pepper from the Lesser James, 
the London, Jomas, and Lyon be declared, and that a General Court 
be held on Wednesday next for that and for settling the price, as 
also to make known God's goodness to the Company in the safe 
return of the ships. [AVr^^n pages. Court Bk\ VI., 28-35.] 

305. Journal of Edward Monnox, agent in Pei'sia. being a narmtivo 
of transactions with the Persians and Portuguese previoiLs, during, 
and sulisequent to the expidsion of the Portuguese from Ormuz ; also 
a *' Histoiy at large of the taking of Oraiuz Castle, being delivered up 
to the English.** [The first leaf is miming and several leaves are 
mutilated, but the ivkok of this paper is pinnted in Purchas, II,, 
pp. 17f)3 et seq. Fifty-four p<:iges. O.C, Vol VI 11, No. 1032.] 

306« Consultations and other writings upon diasohdng the English 

factory at Firando, in Japan, in 1623, and account of the presents 

given to the King and great men at our coming away from thence. 

Consultation upon giving advice to the Emperor of Jai>an 

and the King of tliis place, of our dissolving the factory. 

Whereas they have received a letter from President Fursland 



128 
1623. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



anil ftiimcil, confirmed by a conmiission to Joseph Cockrara, 
iiiercliaiit, in the sliip Bull, for dissolving this factory, and 
ctjiuin;^^ all wfiy for Batavia upon sai<l sliip, in rogpect of the 
Biuall benetit, or rather loss in keeping the factoiy so long, they 
with all willingness obey. Have resolved to give advice hereof 
to the Governor or King of this i>lace, Fegeno Camme, at pre- 
Hent at Miako, and the Lords of his MajevSty's Council of Japan, 
IwMni^ tliereiinto coimselled by the |aincipal men of this place^ 
who affirm that, without leave of the Emperor, they cannot 
depart all out of this country. They stand in doubt that certain 
presents^ as at former times, are expected, which at present 
they hold not convenient ; for if the Emperor should be at his 
t 'ourt at Eado (Yedo), it -would be dou!>tful their return in 
time to depart with the ship, besides they aix; not provided of 
fitting ]iresents. Have resolved* therefore, to send their juro- 
basso, Coe Juan, to-morrow on this journey, with letters to his 
Majesty 8 Council and the King of this place, desiring tbeirfriendly 
fleparture, and excushigtlie not coming themselves. Sifj/ifid by 
Jtjseph ( Vjckram, Richard Cocks, Jno. Osterwick, William Ekton, 
and Edmond Sayer, Firando. 25th July 1623. 

Letter to Fegeno Canitne, King or Governor of Firando, sent 
by our jurobaaso, Coe Juan, to the Emperor's Com-t now at 
Aliako. Are strictly charge<l by their General and Council of 
India to recover in all debts abroad, and for a time to diiiisolve 
the factory, and come away every one of them ; which com- 
mand they may not infiiuge, l)ut do resolve by the prime of 
Noveml>er next to depart. The reasons are not proceeding out 
of any unkind usage here, but rathci' the danger of the seas 
Ijebween this and Batavia, having lost within three years two 
gi'cat ships bound for this place ; the sma!l hopes they have of 
procuring trade with China, paiily upon wliich hopes they 
have continued the factory here thus long, at no small expense; 
and now lastly, the loss of one of the Company's ships in her 
voyage from England, richly laden with conmiotlities vendibk* 
in Japan, by which they are alt<:^gether unprovided of goods to 
supply this factniy. Notwithstanding, if next year prcKluce any 
better encouragement, they niay return again ; upon wliicli 
ho]»e they intend not to sell their houses and godo^^Ti, but 
according to their GeneraVs order to leave them to hi>s Highness, 
entreating they may be kept for them and repossessed l»y them 
if they return again, of whieh his Highness shall have advice 
every year. Have written and enclosed letter to the Lordjs of 
his Majesty's Council, whieh, if his Highness find recpiisite, he 
may cause to be delivered. Entreat him to excuse their not 
coming themselves, in respect of their short time of stay, and 
not Ijeing furnished with materials needful to present his 
Majesty's Council of Japan, Sir/ned hy Joseph Cockram, 
ami Richard Cocks. Englisli Factoiy, Firando, 26th July 1623, 

Letter to the Lords of his Majesty V Council of Japan, sent 
Viy our jurobasso, Coe Juan, t^ ih<i Emi»eror's LbuH at Miako 
for the time being. With tlie free consent and Ucense of his 



EAST INDIES. 



129 



1623. 



Majesty the Emperor, tliey have thus long continiiecl their 
factory at Firaiido, without any molestation or injuiy ; and 
being now by their general and Council of Inilia ca.lled from 
lience, with order for a time to dissolve this factoiy and come 
all away foi- Batavia, upon the ship expressly sent for that pur- 
pose, they have tliouglit fitting Piereof to acquaint them, that as 
they had first admittance to settle a facboiy here, and to remain 
in his Majesty's country, so likewise that they may have the like 
favor now for their departure. The i"ea,sons moving hereunto are 
largely expressed in their letter to the Goveraor of this place, 
Fegeno Camme, from whom they acknowdedge to have received 
many courtesies. Tliey would themselve^s have been the 
messengei'S hereof, but that their occasions are more urgent 
here, the time of their stay being short. Sigurd hi/ Richard 
Cocks, and Joseph Cockram. English Factor^', Firando, StHh 
July 1G23. 

Consultation conferred upon sending an Englinliman to the 
Emperor's Couit at Miako with present** to his Majesty and 
others his nobilit3^ Whereas on the 20th of July last they 
sent their jurobasso to the Emperor's Court at Miakn, with 
letteiTS of advice to his Majesty's Council and the King or 
Governor dissolving this factory, they ai"e now^ given to imder- 
stand, by the King s brother and other gentlemen, that it is 
cxpressl}^ required that one or two Englishmen he sent about 
this business, otherwise they shall not liave leave to depart. 
Also that they must send {presents to his Majesty, and others 
his nobility, according to former custom, wduch this year they 
have endeavoured to excuse by all means possible, WTierefore 
they are forced to yield, and therefore by Ricliard Hudson, an 
assistant in the factory, send presents to his Majesty of Japan 
and the Lords of his Council, directed by letter to the King of 
this place, intreating his favourable excuse that they are no 
l^etter, they being indeed of small value to what formerly hath 
yearly been given. Signed hi/ Richaixl Cocks, Joseph Cockram, 
Jno. Osterwick, Wm. Eaton, and Edmond Sayer. English 
Factory, Fii^ando, 2nd August 1623. 

The account of presents given to the Emperor of Japan, 
Owendono, his secretaiy, Shemada Jeboydono, Owtadono, of 
the Council, and his secretary, Itande Quenosquedono, Caqu- 
samondono, and the hosts at Miako and Osaka, consisting of 
embroidered (piilts, velvets, satins, silks, damasks, and tafietas, 
to the value of 208 taies in all 

Letter to Fegeno Caumie, King or Governor of Firando, sent by 
Richard Hudson to the Emperor's Court at Miako. Their last of 
2tjth July, by their jurobasso, craving their friendly departure and 
excusing the not coming themselves, they well hoped would have 
prevailed; but, contrary to expectation, they understand by 
Tonomonsama, his Highnesses brother, and others his nobdity 
here, that it is required that they send an Engli.shman in perfor- 
mance of this Imsiness, which they well hoped their jurobasso 
might have effected. And now^ seeing it cannot be otherwise, they 
send the bearer, Richard Hudson, with certain small presents for 

I 



130 
1623. 



LON]AL PAPERS. 



2nd 

i 



his Majesty s Council, such as the time will afford a 
ability of laeaDS stretch imto, intreating him to l\jrthcr the 
dispatch of this messenger. They have also dehvered to thifi 
bearer his Majesty's goshem which was granted for their free 
trailic in Japan, being thereunto required hy Tonomonsama 
and Naygcnsama, as doubting by them it would be demanded 
to l)e delivered up to his Majesty's Council. But they would 
intreat the continuance of it in their hand8, or in his Highness' 
custody, that returning again they may have the freer entrance. 
Entreat his favourable assistance, and hope to see him at 
Fkando and take a friendly farewell. Signed by Richaixl 
Cocks, and Joseph Cockram. Engliah Factory at Firando, 2nd_ 
August 1G23. 

Consultation upon giving presents to the King of this pi 
Fegeno Camme, and others his nobility and gentlemen, accoi 
ing to former custom. Whereas yearly it hath Ijeen accustom* 
to give presents to the King, his brother, and other hi^ gentle- 
meUf and it is daily expected of them as a due debt, m respect 
they pay no customs ; they have resolved to ordain their 
presents at as small a charge as they may. Had intended to 
have forborne their deliver^^ until " a day two or three " before 
their depaiiure, but in respect of monies owing by the King's 
brother and other gentlemen, together with the merchants of 
the street, they have thought more convenient to deliver them 
at present, hoping thereby they will be mindful to give satis- 
faction for what they ai'e omng, and cau>se the merchants of 
the sti^eet to do the like, of which they have the better con- 
fidence in respect the King himself is now here in person. 
Signed by Richard Cocks, Joseph Cockram, Jno. Osterwick, 
Wm. Eaton, and Edmond Sayer* English Factory, Firando, 
21 st November 1623. j 

Accoimt of presents given to Fegeno Camme, the King SJ 
Firando, Tonomonsama, the King's brother, Naygonsama, chi^J*^ 
justice, Tarosaymondono, Tackamondono, Semidono, Dashen^ 
dono, Caquemondono, Cofleodono, and *'the sea bungow^H 
consisting of satins, embroidered velvets, lead, Russia hid^^ 
damasks, silks, and taffetas, amounting in value to 774 taiei*. 

Consultation upon the factors all coming away from Japan 
and flissolving the Company's factory at Firando. Have used 
their best endeavours, lx>th by courteous means and by co 
plaining to the justices, yet many debts are standing forth st 
amounting to 12,821 taies, and no certain hope of recovering* 
of them ; for where they sliould find most right they are m^ 
abused, which is by the justices, who being nidebted themseh 
will neither make payment nor force othei-s thereto, and ha 
no longer hopes of recovering more, they Ijeing for the 
part ]»oor and not worth the money they owe. A longer nt 
of the ship upon uncertainties would but breed a further char 
and they find the debts altogether so desperate that they rati 
conclude to come all away than to leave any behind u[>on no 
hope of benefit Have resolved to le^ve a power with Capt. 
CorncliuB Nowrode, principal of the Holland factoiy, to recover 



EAST INDIES. 131 



1623. 



the debts ; and their houses and godowns they will deliver into 
the King's hands, who has promised they shall be safely kept 
and looked unto, and returning again be delivered into their 
hands ; and for more security they have determined to take a 
writing of him or some of his " bundewes. Signed by Richard 
Cocks, Joseph Cockram, Jno. Osterwick, William Eaton, and 
Edmond Sayer. English Factory, Firando, 16th December 1623. 

Commission left in the hands of Cornelius Newrode, chief of 
the Hollanders' factory of Firando, " at our departure thence." 
Notwithstanding their best endeavours, many of their debts 
are standing out still, which time will not permit them before 
their departure to recover ; wherefore they presume, " according 
to our President's order and your General's grant," to repose 
their trust upon him, intreating his good endeavours for pro- 
curing all such debts as they shall leave behind, for account of 
the English Company, and what he shall recover, to make over 
to their President in " soma or seda plate." Enclose a Japan 
writing or letter of attorney, authorising him to demand and 
receive all moneys due to their Company, and also the account 
of debts. Signed by Richard Cocks, Joseph Cockram, Jno. 
Osterwick, Wm. Eaton, and Edmond Sayer. English Factory, 
Firando, 22nd December 1623. Enclosed, 

Account of Debts due to the Company fi-om their factory of 
Firando, by Japonei-s and othei-s, as per their bills left with 
Captain Cornelius Newrode, principal of the Hollanders factory 
in Firando, to recover : 

Ts. ms. cond. 

Tonomonsama, the King's brother, as per his bill - 417 7 

Semidono - - „ - 670 6 

Owkeno Camme 

Tackamondono 

Sansamondono 

Soyemondono 

Shefeodono 

Eado Shoboydono 

Congawa Lizamondono - 

Kemore Jewboydono, 

China Captain Andreas „ 

Matsnanga Kitchzamondono 

Cawabuch Kewierodono 

Amea Shimboidono 

Aweamatch Sansadono - 

Yoshemoro Shojerodono - 

Cusamondono, of Nangasaque 

Yoshemondono and Cofeodono of Nangasque, as 

per his bill - 291 8 3 
Coe Juan, jurobassoe - - „ - 200 

Grosayemondono, sometime jurobassoe „ - 19 7 5 

Somma totalis - 12,821 8 

[Together, eleven pages. 0,0., Vol. X., No. 1115.] 

I 2 



33 

- 437 

- 70 4 

- 18 

- 30 

- 17 7 3 

- 100 

- 51 6 9 
6,636 

- 153 5 9 

- 200 

- 50 2 

- 51 4 
3,218 

- 155 5 4 



132 



COLOmAL PAPERS. 



1623. 

July 26. 



July 30. 



JiUy 30. 



July 30. 



Jidy 30 

Aug. G. 



307- ChaTnT>erlai!i to Carleton* Our East India Company was' 
ow cl)li luit is now soniewlxat afloat again hy the arrival of tl 
ships richly laden, but hear as whispering that the Spanish Am- 
bassador hath a meaning to ari^est them upon pretence of the business 
of Ormuz. [Ext met favn Dom^sfw Corresp,, Jac, /,, VoL, CXLIX,^ 
i\a 48, Cal, ]k 30.] 

308. [8ec. Conway] to ilr, Fotlieriey. The Kijig has diix^eted tl 
East India merchants to present to the Duchess of Buckingb 
2,000?. in gold. Her Grace is to be acquainted with it that the 
money may be disposed of for the advantage of the Duke s sci*\aee* 
[Doniestk ComsiK Jac. /.. l^f>/. CXLIX., Xo. 97, CaL, p. 38.] 

309. Sec Conway to the Duchess of Buckingham. The King 
corunianded Iiiin to infonn her Grace that the East Intlia Cora[ 
will attend her with a present of 2,000?. and that Mr. Fotherley wiU 
wait on her with information of the mont proper way for the dis 
tribution of it. [Domestie CorrcJ^p,^ J(fi\ L, VoL CXLIX,, Xo. OS, 
Cffl, p. 38.] 

310. Sec. Conway to the Governor of the East India Company 
is the King's plea.siire that the "2,000/. in gold be given to th© 
Duchess of Buckingham to be by her disposed of to the use of her 
Lord. [Doiiustk Corrcsp,, Jac. /., VoL CXLIX., lYo. »9. CaL.p, SB.]^. 

311* Court Minutes of the East India Company. Request 
William Biilduljili concerning his chest and goods on the Jonas, 
Motion on liehalf of Sir Randall Cranfield, formerly a suitor to tl 
Company, whose brother the Lord Treasurer had requested wil 
importunity, that the Com^mny would give him out the money 
liad paid into the new stock, which w^as refused a^^ not in their 
power to do, but it was agreed to give the Lord Treasurer contei 
to grant three freedoms if they may procui*e the sale of Sir RandalT 
adventure, and both himself and the Lord Treasurer be satisfii 
(hder of C-hancery presented hy CSeorge Ball for tlie delivery 
certain things in a note annexed ; it is observed, that Ball by o1 
and private importunities doth gain much upon the Comjiany, 
that his successes do much pufi* him up ; conmiittee to inform thj 
Lord Keeper that the Company had peiformed the orders in 
liberal manner, as for his wearing apparel, but to deliver IGO shi 
and other things as the nroportion of necessity » they did not concei' 
to lie his Lordship's meaning; howbeit they w^ould obey his directions 
therein. Distrilnttion of the committees by two and two for unlad- 
ing the Lion and Jonas, eacli two to sen^e for one <iay and no moi 
Extraordinary care and pains of Mr. Swanley for stowing aD th 
alvoard tlie Charles, (concerning the pepper in the Lesser James ; 
is thought fit tliat a dividend of half a capital be taken out by tb 
that will Discussion whether the price of i>epper should be ISd, 
IdiL referred to a General Court, 

Minutes of a General Court of the East India Company ; th^ 
absent to be fined 12d. each. Half a cajiital to be divided 
pepper, the price to be lowered Id. The Dutch at variance amo) 
themselves as to price, yet they have contracted for as much as wi 
fill the markets of all Christendom, The Governor declared ti 



the 

riU 

lis- 
08. 

i 

ler 
'8jj 

las. 

1 

lien 



EAST INDIES* 



133 



IG23. 



** their affairs both in the one and the other Indies are in reasonable 
good state.'* 

Aug- 1.— Court Minutes of the Eaat India Company. Measra Abily 
and Eyem reported that they, with Mr. William Cokayne, had 
received the accounts concerning the estate of Geoi^ Cokayne, on l>e- 
half of Marj" Coka^Tie. executiix to her husband, the Imither of the 
said George [? Mary Jackson administratrix to her brother George, «^€ 
ante, No. 30, pp, 90-1 J and find no reason to allow any more than hath 
been already paid ; it was therefore the general o[union of the Court 
tliat the Company hath paid what can l^e justly chaHenged.and this was 
their final answer. Concerning the Lord Keeper's order for deliveiy 
of Ball's apparel, kc, it wa.s explained that he intendt^d not the 
delivery of any merchantable stuff; his Lordship very boDOumbly 
minded towards the Company. Theii* course in the Star Chamber 
against Ball in some danger to be last and to fall heavy on the 
Company through w^ant of well following : it was therefore thought 
fit, that albeit Mr. Tichl>orne is entertained to solicit the business, 
Messrs. Bell, Style, and Harby do oversee the proceeding. Motion 
concerning the dividend of James Coxe by his brother Charles Coxe, 
C'Ounsel to be taken of Sir Heniy Marten, Drs. Steward and Zouch, 
and Mr. Stone, whether the niarinei"s of the Lion, having reaped the 
benefit of the spoil of Ormuz, should also have wages ; some thought 
they should, and that it had been the practice of the Company to pay 
them, and instanced the case of Sir David Middletonand Sir Thomas 
Dale, who both took prizes and yet the men were paid, to whicli it 
was answered, the case differeth, for this was not a pillage at sea 
but a proportion allotted out of the geneml spoils of the places 
taken ; resolved to consult coimsel thereon. All WeddalFs goods 
aboard the Jonas, to l)e brought up to the Company's house before 
anything be delivered to him. Request of Anthony Wallis, prisoner 
in St. Katherine's, aljout payment of arrears in his accounts. 
Messrs, Alnly and Eyers to see the weight and tale of the lyals now 
to be sent in the Charles. Request of Mr. Hackwell on liehalf 
of the widow of Isaac Stevenson, late master of the Dolphin, for 
payment of 350i Ss. Oil 

Aug. 4. — Such as desire it may take out one third of their 
dividend in Calicut pepper. As to the bill of exchange formerly 
presented by the widow of Stevenaon, albeit the Comjiany hold 
it unreasonable to aOow the rate of Qs. per ryal, yet they are 
tender of the reputations of their factors (Rastell and James) and 
will not protest the bills. Whereas it had Ijeen moved that there 
be stay made of paying the Lion s men, in resjiect of their share of 
the spoils of Ormuz ; it was now held fit to let fall that pretence 
and stay payment in respect the Comi>any*s goods aboard that sliip 
have received 1,000^, damagt* by iU-liandling in the stowage. 

Aug. 6. — Request of Mr. Friday, a preacher returned out of the 
Indies, to take up his goods, the greatest part Ixnng in<ligo, Mi^. 
Stevem^on^s bill of exchange ordered to be paid, James Beckfuivl, a 
factor retui-ned in the. London, present^id two packets of letters out 
of the Indies, which he received from Mr. Blythe. Answer of 
Beversham, master of the Lion, in reference to the ill-stowage in his 



134 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 



hIiij* to the value of IfiOOl ; also as to the escape of Ruy Frei-e, the 
captain of the Portugal The Court altogether unsatisfied with hi^ 
answer, and that Bevei'sham not ordy let him go, but with him the 
commission which gave him order to ruin the trade of the Englia 
in those parts, which had been a matter of veiy gi^eat moment to 
Company, the (Jompany having been given to undemtand that Ri 
Frere ottered CajjL Wedilall tliat had him formerly in keepi 
1,00(V, to wink at his escape, and it was not unlikely that now 
he sought to make his way by money, and afterwards wrote that 
the drunkenness of the master and company he escaped* Beversha 
confessed he had sent some goods in a catch to Ipswich, and agaii 
next Friday is to set down what goods have been canned out of th 
ship and to whom they Ijelong. The farmers of his Majesty 
Customs to be intreated to cpiestion one "Brooke of tlie Customs \ 
Portsmouth, who did very much slight the Company, and l»eing *' i 
inward acquaintance '' with Bleth (Blythe) captain of the Londod 
refused to give a note of the entries of goods landed out of tk 
Lonilon. Order to Mr. Mountney that certain Indians come hon 
in these ships, that have done good seiTice, and some apprentices 
who.se times are not yet exj>ired shall be forthwith appareUed 
Mr» Deputy reported that he and Mr. Munnes had audience of his 
Majesty at Brempton, a house of Sir Edward Ba^naton, whither tl 
King was retired from Salisbur)% They gave thanks to his Majest 
for directing them a way to gain so noble a friend as the Duke 
Buckingham by gi^atifying Iiim in his absence, and said that not- 
withstanding their low estate they were content to gratify the 
Duke with 2,000/. The King made answer it was well, and aske 
when it shoidd be paid ; they answered w^hen his Majesty sbou 
appoint and desired to know to whom it shoidd be paid ; the Ki 
said to the Duchess of Buckingham. Mr. De]>uty said the Company 
hoped the Duke would take notice of tlieir love and resjieet, Ui 
which the King replied, it should be his care to make him know i^ 
and prepare them to requite it. Mi\ Deputy further made knowjH 
to the King that the Company will l)e able to give a good account of*" 
the service at Ormuz. His Majesty said he was glad of it and asked 
what lading their ships brought and what vent they had for the gre ~ 
mass of caUcoes that yearly come, to wliich was answered they vea 
in England, whereby the prices of lawns, cambrics, and other ling 
cloth are brought down, that England is now made the staple fa 
that connuodity, which having first served his Majesty's doininioD 
the overidus is transporti*d to foreign pails in the nature of a hon 
bred commo^Uty. The King approved exceedingly of their answ< 
and said that was the ready way to bring treasure into his kingdoa 
Request of Mr, Woortof t, a lirother of this Company, attentling ujx 
the Lord Keeper, for Edward Langford and \\' illiam Sandy to 
entertained for the next shipping. Concerning Henr}^ Bate's petitioiT 
for recompense for overplus of service, the Cotnpany have had no 
time to peruse their letters. Request of Mary Cokayne [? Jackson] for 
a furtliL*r answer concerning her late brother s estate, and tlie nionej 
he had laid out on the Company's house in Succadana. Report tli 
the account of the prize taken by the Richard is too short and thi 
goods were spoilt by Bevei^ham's fault The account to be deliver 



iot- 
the 



mm 



EAST INDIKS, 



135 



1623. 

U) his Majestj^ concerning Omiuz mU8t be leferred till his retiUTi 
from progi*esi:5. Sir Henry Marten altogether excuses himself from 
being counsel in the doing of it, and Dr Steward is far off The 
Governor ha^ receive<l fi-om Weddall good satisfaction in four par- 
ticulai^ — fii-stly, that there was a necessity of their aiding the Pei-sian, 
because the Company's goods and Servian t« anhoi'e had iKion in danger ; 
seconfUy, they gave no help hy any land service ; thirdly, two of 
those Portugal shipw then at Ormuz were appointed to serve against 
the English ; fourtldy, tlic English mollified many rigorous coui-ses 
intended against the Poiiugals, and lent them their own ships to 
caiTy them to a place of .safety. The Court thought tit that a 
report 'fit to be delivered to his Majesty be drawn up '*by f*omewell 
chosen civilians/' but that it be verbal and not in writing, unless the 
King command it [Sixteen jmyes. Court Minute Book, VI., 
2?/?. 35-5 L] 

312. [Sec. Conway] to [Morris] Abbott and [Kobert] Bell Con- 
ceming 15,000/. impost money to be paid in for the 8hij>s lately 
an-ived out of the East Indies. [Minute, Conwmjs Letter JJook^ 
p. 70.] 

313. Frances Lady Wi Hugh bye to Lord Zoiich* The bearer, 

A>scugh, hath a great inclination to go the East India voyage, as 
the Company will not entertain him without the recommendation 
of some nobleman ; ret^uests Lord Zouch's letter in his behalf, not for 
any place or pi-efei-ment but that he may go the voyage. [Domestic 
Corre^p., Jac. L, Vol CL, No. 39, Cal, p. 40.] 

Aav, ^15. 314. Court Minutes of the East India Company, A certain box 
of lettiTs brought in the London, and by Blythe brought alxjard the 
Jonas, to l>e called for. TIk* farmers of the Custfjms to l)e requesteJ 
to order their otficc!"s not to make entry of any goods out of the 
Company's ships, without first making them acquainttvd. Me.sscnger 
from the Lord Treasurer requiring that Mr. Deputy and Mj-, Bell 
should attend him at Chelsea that afternoon : the Comj^any's secre- 
tarj^ to attend Mr, Bell thither. 

Aug. 9. — A letter rea<l Irom Sec. C*onway to Mr* Deputy and 
Ml*. Bell, that his Majesty having understood by them at Thea!>alds 
that there was to come into his coffers 15,000/, really money for iin|iost 
on tlie Company's goods in the London, Jonahs, and Lion, had first im-d 
that money for a very special sei^vice, which ** was weighty and could 
not otherwise be supplied," and thej^efore gave order the same should 
be paid to the Lord Treasurer ; the Court found that, considering 
then* silk (which is a gix-at pai't of their lading) pays no impost at 
all, calicoes half impost, and much to Ix* paid Ijaek for goods shipped 
out, and that jie^iper, the least parcel of the three, only pays whole 
impost, the King's paH will not come to above 3,000^, It was said 
that Dr. William Garroway has a patent to receive the whole and 
pay l^ack as men transport, and it was asked of Mi*. Garroway 
whether if the whole impost were paid to the King, his father will 
pay back what shall be clue upon shipping out; his answer waa 
that except he received it, they could not expect it from him, and 
he was intreated to make known the case to the Lord Treasurer. 



136 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623, 




Gan^oway makes known that certain goods were landed at the 
Custorii House t|uay belonging to Weddall, master of the Jonas, and 
a watch set upon them, but whether by corruption or negligence 
they were conveyed away to the Tower of London. It appeal's 
that some of the officers of the Custom House " are overforward in 
helping our jieople to take up their goods" and must be restrained 
liy a more commanding hand ; a letter to be gotten from the Lord 
Treasurer to tliat effect. J 

Aug, Kl— Mr, Deputy and Mr. Bell have satisfied the Lord Trea- 
surer and Chancelloi- uf the Exchequer that their words were merely 
mistaken by his Majesty^ having reference to the Customs and not 
to the iiupost ; and now it is only required that the impost be paid 
in as soon as it shall appear what it is. No wages to be paid to 
Evans, who lieing made master of Ca] »t. Roe's prize. ** did break bulk 
and serve his own turn." Stay to be made of the monies payable to 
Mi-s. Stevenson, for that her husband was a freeman of the city of 
London, "and therefore the orphans pai*t is to be paid into tin 
chamber." Capt, Blythe, commander of the fleet, now returned froi 
Surat, came into court and received the loving salutes and welcoi 
of the Company. He promised that his jouiTial and those of ] 
officers and men should be brought in, and spoke of the victuals 
Capt. Hall's fleet The Company wished him to deal fairly witl 
them concerning his goods brought Iionie on his own account, and 
to deliver a true inventory of them all, and he should find all lovinj 
and kind dealing ; lie promised t<j do so, and craved the Company 
pardon in that he had thought on a way of private conveying h^ 
goods away, out of fear lest there might have l>een a sequestratioi 
of them and perhaps of his person. He said that Willson, who came 
home surgeon in Ids Hln\\, had undertiikcn to set down some busi- 
ne*sses wdiereat he had not beeii ]iresent, but gi^ounded merely upon 
relation, and that the join^nal was at a scrivener's shop to be writtefl^| 
out, for whose use lie knew not, and the Court, apprehending tha^l 
through such idle dbcoui'se the Company might receive prejudice, 
intreated a couple of committees to go to the scrivener and get U>th 
copy and original, which they did. Capt. Blythe further delivered 
a writing subscribed hy Portugals of the better mi% testifying tl 
good usage they had from the English. Beversham came in ar 
delivered a note, wherein was set down that there was no likel} 
hood that Blythe had been offered 1,000/. to wink at Ruy Frere'^ 
escape, for Blythe had written to the President at Surat to set him 
at liberty ; whereto Blythe made answer, that it was most true thajH 
he had iK-en offered 1,000/. (whereof mention is also made ioH 
Willson's journal), and that the letter to the President w^as not to 
deliver Ruy Frere, but to use him courteously, as a prisoner of his 
quality* Tlic Court told Beversham that they had received no 
satisfaction by tliis wi-iting conceiTiing tiie escape of Ruy Frere, and 
that lie had given no inventories of his own gooiLs nor of the goodj^ 
conveyed out of his ship ; they thei*efore ordered him the secoE 
time to bring both inventories in on Friilay next, Mr, Le4 
moved that some allowance be given to Mr. Kirkham for bis care iJ| 
sending and receiving the Company's letters by way of Aleppo, ' 



i 



red 
tb^ 



EAST INDIES. 



137 



1623. 



Company having given Mr, Chapman 20 marks for four years* ser- 
vice of the like nature, 100/. to l>e paid ti3 Capt. Monox on account 
of liis wages. When Sir Humphrey Handford and the other referees 
from the King meet concerning the business of Capt. Bonner, Messrs, 
Abdy and Coxe to be present concerning the business of Lady Dale* 
Mr Venn declared tliat if called to his oath, he must swear that Sir 
Thomas Dale wrote liomc " that when he lost Iiia ship, he lost all 
that he had to his very shirt." Silk to be sold to any that will buy 
at the price fixed. Ten barrels of indigo to be sent to Amsterdam, 
consigned to Robert Barlow, to discourage the Dutch from fetching 
it iVo allowance to be made above 58. per ryal on bills of exchange 
under the hands of the factors at Surat. Request of Sir Richard 
Westxin, Chancellor of H.M. Exchequer, coneemjng Ms adventure 
of 500/, in the second joint stock. The Court was possessed with 
a good opinion of Mt". Chancellors readiness to pleasure the Com- 
pany, but could not aUsolutely clear his brokes at that time, yet 
doubted not to find out some means to give him conk-nt. GO/, to 
be paid to David Bourne : '* the Court foresaw that the Company 
shall be losei-s by the rLfckoning, j^et the distress of the man did call 
up their charity to a present consideration and commiseration of 
those extreme wants whereunto prisoners are subject.'* 

Aug. 13. — A Court held " to end the difTerences l:>etween the 
Com|:jany and Mr. Roe/' Mr. R*je was questioned concerning goods 
taken by him out of the prizes in his voyage from Surat to Jask, 
and was also charged with five or six bales of cloth ; his answer wa-^i 
that if he liad not been taken by the Hullandei-s at l*ecoe, where he 
lost all he had, he could have yielded a jiarticular reason of every 
thing ; but he freely acknowledged that by his error the Company 
had sustained much damage, antl he would rest contented with such 
end as this Couniiittee would niakL\ The C[uestion lieing j>ut 
whether to take 200/* or 150/., upon consideration of his free sub- 
mission and fair canuage, it was fixed at 150/. ; with which he 
rested satisfieil, but desired he might be cleared of the imputation 
of drunkenness, and Iiave the Ixmefit of 000 wt. of gumlack, soLl by 
the' Company. To the fiist he received answer that he was cleared 
already, and for the second the committee would move the Court. 

Aug. 15,— Leave of absence granted to Mr. Fother'by, the Com- 
pany's servant at Black wall. The Court considered it over early to 
think upon a recompense for Mr. Kirkham for conveying the Pei-sian 
letteiia by way of Aleppo. The Master and Wardens of the Com- 
pany of Watermen shuwed an Act of their Company, confinned by 
Act of Parliament, for disjiusiiig of apprentices and their earnings 
alV'r the death of their masterH. Ordered that if upon warning, 
Hugh Crosse, the ajtprentice in question, come not, they will jjroceed 
without him. The men of the Jonas to be paitl, except the ofiicers, 
who of custom do stay till their stores, accounts, and journals be 
tlulivered. Com]ilaint of the beef and pork in Cai>t. Hall's fleet, 
Mr, Roe to have tlie money for a parcel of gumlae belonging to him 
discliarged uf freight. Concerning goods sent away by Beve!*sham 
from tlie Lion in a ketch of Ipswich. A letter from the Lord 
Treasurer, delivered by Sir Philip Carey, to this purpose : that 
whereas the Company has made composition for fees with the 



138 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



162a _ 

inferior officei*s of the CustomH, " tliey should likewise make somi 
fan- agreement alx)vc stairs/' j\ji(h'e%v Evans to be heard nexi 
week. Concerning lettera of a<lminijjtration of the goods of one 
Frewd, grounded oo a will made liefore his going to se^. As to th©^ 
disposal of the Conipany*s silk, caheous, and indigo, and the prii 
As to the silk there is expectation of good quantities \joth frora' 
Tuj'key antl Muacovia, hut the Company has all Legee silk, where< 
the price is risen, and the other is Ardas. They have promised to 
the last contractors to hold up the price till Michaelmas next. 
Leave to Mr. Swarm, master of the Charles, to cut out two poiis 
under tlie hah' deck for moimting a couple of sakers, Mountford'j 
accounts to Ix? audited. A committee to inform themselves whaj 
lias been sent for the forts to be erected in the Indies, and report 
the Court. Matthew ]MalV»erry, a nailor, enteilained to go into the] 
Indies at 30^, per month. Letter read from the Lord Mayor, thai 
whei*eas stay ha<l been made of Mi^. Stevenson's money, in respect 
her deceased husband was a freeman of London, '* that the or|3hans 
portions were now secured to the Chandjer, and therefore that 
lett was taken away *' ; the money ordered to be paid. Sir John 
Ogle having viewed James Browne'^ plots, and conjerred with him 
touching fortification, tliought he might be a fit man to serve thi 
Com|iany as engineeiv Bro\^Tie demanded (KU. per ann. for hiniselfij 
and 24/. for his servant, which the Comi, thought over gi'eat, am 
willed them to come to tlie Couit on Wednesday next. Mr. Stom 
** of counsel with the Company/' to draw a bond of 500/. ** foi 
honest service and from private trade,*' for RoWrt Hayes, enter 
tained to go factor into the Indies ; and as the said form shall h 
ol>served for all othei"s, care to be had that it be matle strong f 
the Company, and a proportion of blanks to be printed accordingly, 
Hayes to have for the fii-st two years 100/. |ier ann., and 150/, 
ann. for the remainder of seven years ; 20/. per ann. to be [Daid 
here to his wife and mother, and 30/, per ann. to himself for his 
inaintenance in the Indies, l«oth on account of his wages. [Eighteci 
jiitgas. Court AliniUc Bool', VI., pp, 51-69.] 

Aug. IH. 315. Sec. Calvert to [Sec. Conway]. The Ambassadors have 
St. MitrtiD'8 renewed their complaint against the East India Company for thi 
spoil of Ormuz, provoked, it seems, by some bragging speeches 
a captain of one of the East India ships who was in that actioi 
[Extract from Dmnestic Carresp., Jac, L, VoL CLL, AV. 5, CW^ 
p, 58.] 



me 
ce^fl 

to 
a. 

is 

1 



Lune. 



Aug. 18. 

Abniiril tbe 
Palsfrriive in 



316. William Methwold to the East India Company, By the only 
mercy of Almighty Go«l, the Palsgiave is safely at anchor in the Downs " 
from whence, tlie pui*ser being dispeeded with the chest containir 
the relation of the whole of their affairs in India, he has only taken 
occasion to advise briefly the occurrences of their voyage. They set 
sail from Jacatra 11th Feb., but through advei^e winds got not out 
of the straits of Sunda until 2nd March ; on 9tli April they descried 
the Golden Lion, dispeeded from Jacatra four days after thei 
departure. On 28th May had sight of the island of St. Helei 
Here they foimd the Delftshaven, and the Golden Lion driven froK 
her anchor, iIl-pro\dded of water, and weakly manned, ha\"ing burie 
of DO men which she brought from Jacatra 12. The 2nd of June" 



EAST INDIES. 



139 



Aug. ^l 
Loodon. 



1623. 

arrived there the Dutch General Coen, with three other shipB, who 
had met in Saldaiiha Bay four Dutch ships outward hound, a fifth 
was jmssed by, and the -sixth cast away in a fog upon Boavista, 
one of the islands of Cape Verd. Set sail the 5th, leaving General 
Coen to follow in thi*ee or four days, and the loth discovered Scilly. 
Of 135 persons brought from Jacatra have lo!>t 18, and there are 
yet sickly 30 or 40. Few ships have returned worse ^ietualle<i 
their flesh being five years old. Their greatest trouble and danger 
oci^sioned by leaLs. Awaits their eonnent for liia departure. [O-fie 
jMige ami a /utlf. O.C, Vol. X,, No, 1117.] 

317. Complaint of the Spanish Ainbassa*loi^, the Marquia de La 
Ynojosa and Don Carloa Coloma, to the King concerning the action 
at Ormitz. Since they confciTed with his Majesty concerning the 
excess of the East India Company's ships that were at the taking of 
Ormuz, in company with the Pei>^ians, they find that the»e things 
following are to be added:— That in the ship London art* brought 
goods stolen from their King^s subjects, to the value of 5011,000/, ; 
that the very dishes that tlie lowest and Imsest sort of the crew put 
their meat in are of silver, stamped with the arms of many families 
of Portugal, whom they have miserably sacked and slain ; that the 
gold, jewels, kc, sacked in that city are inestimable ; that the 
captain of the London doth boast that with his own hands ho hath 
taken the Castle of Ormuj?;, killed an infijiito numl:»er of Purtugals, 
and binut two caracs named El Salvador and Todos Los Santos, by 
which the Company is beholden to him that for three years no sliip 
can come to the King of Spain with East India wares ; that the 
Portugals and other nations, subjects of the Catholic King, were 
made slaves, and Peisians who had reiioimced Mahomet wen?, at the 
request of their own nation, delivered up to be barbarously' toni iu 
pieces ; and that on theii' arrival in England, having (though faLsoly) 
heard that the match with the Infanta was liroken oft', the crew 
made no difficulty to shoot off all the artillery, and for a gi^eater 
demonstmtion of joy, the captain giving the example, threw their 
hats and caps into the sea These men (who are unworthy of the air 
they breathe) are now upon tlie James, triumpliing with the spoils 
of Spain, where none that depend upon tJiat Crown think of any- 
thing more earnestly than to give content to his Majesty and the 
Prince of Wales. Beseech his Majesty that these ships and all tli(*y 
bring maylx^ put in seipiestration, to the end that a restitution with- 
out deceit may be made of all things found to have been roblied from 
Spanish subjects, and that the authoi-s (especially the captain of the 
London) of so great a disorder, never hctard of between King's sulj- 
jects, unleas declaimed enemies, may he personally punished, and in bo 
doing his Majesty shall perfoim that which the Spanish Ambassa<lors 
expect of his justice and greatness, and which belongs to the affection 
and sincerity which proceeds from all the actions of his Catholic 
Majesty, Tf^te orighud, also aii English hxtiislatwn, [Three pages. 
Spdnish Co^rresp!\ 

|jktig' 19-20. 318* CouH Minutes of the East India Company. Resolution 
about what the Lord Treasm^er reqidred concerning satisfaction tt^ 
be given to the officers of the Custom House above staii^, defeiTed 



140 



COIONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 



till Sir John Wolstenholm may be spoken withaU. Letters from 
Portugal advertise that only one galleon is aixiveil there with pepj^ver 
and calico, and no moi-e expected this year, because the English and 
Dutch keep their ships from coming fbith. Jame8 Browne, engineer, 
not thought fit for employment, as well for some ill parb* in the man, 
as also for that he hath been altogether tramed up in the service of 
the Dutch, Mn Hurte's accounts to be audited. [Thos.] Mill ward t*3 
make trial of one bale of Bengala silk ; it was conceived that the 
Company will tind no benelit by bi-inging it hither. Certain inter- 
rogatories presented from the commissioners concerning Lady Dale ; 
some of the Company are to be examined on Friday next ; Messi-s, 
Westrow, Bell, Browne, Lanman, and Cappur to draw cross inter- 
rogatories. Weddall, ma^stcr of the Jonas, and Bcvershani, masti^r of 
the Lion, presented their journals. The secretaiy, upon infoniiation 
from Capts. Blythe and Weildall, to set down ivhat passed by way of 
hustility between the English and Portugals in the parts of Persia 
and Surat in IG'Il and 1022, Weddall to receive IQQL, and 
Beversham 50^,, on account of wages. 

Aug. 20,— Concerning '* the officers of the Custom House alxive 
stall's/' viz,, surveyoi^, collectors, and controlei's, *' t*eing persons of 
quality," Sir John Wolstenholme a<Jvised and a committee was 
named to confer with them. James Brown, engineer, and his man 
UolxTt Poole entertained ; himself at ^yoL per annum and 10/. per 
annum for his man. Lamnan desired direction concerning Mi^. Baffin's 
business ; " a troublesome impatient woman " ; she has receiveil 
lOOL, and as private tirade exceedingly prejudices the Company, it 
was thought fit to move Sir John Wolstenhohae t^ cause her to have 
patience awhile. Treasurer Stone report.s he has in readiness 1 1 -I.OOO 
lyals towards the 150,0t)0 ryals to be sent in this ship [the Charles]. 
Examination of William Taylor, niate of the Jonas, concerning a 
prize taken in the Red Sea by the Little Richard ; want of water 
constrained them, and they took from her rice, and 500 pieces 
of gold, which Mr. Davis, who did what he listed, delivered to the 
Lion for the Company's use though told he had no commissioD to 
give chase to Portugals, much less to Turks and Arabians. The 
Court feared that their servants at Aden must answer it, and held 
it fit tliat Davis should answer the fact himself, at his return. The 
Master and Wardens of the Company of W^atci-men attend for 
answer to their petition for the wages of Hugh Crosse, late apprentice 
to Katlierine Browne, deceased, and produced to justify their claim 
an order of their Company giounded upon an Act of Parliament, 
whereb}^ the wages of all apprentices whoso masters or dames do 
decease before the expiration of their apprenticeship i^ to be disjMXsed 
of by the Master and Wardens of the Comimny for the use of ilio 
poor, who are also to appoint a master for such an aj>piH3ntice for the 
remainder of his time ; agreed that 5/. of Hugh Crosse*s wages be 
jmid to the Company of Watermen, and 3/. to Mary Brow^ne, daughter 
and executrix of Katherine Browne, his late mistress ; only the Court 
desired of the Watermen that they would accept 20.'*. for tin* uae of 
their poor and give the other 4/. to Crosse, in regard he hail lost his 
eye in his laj5t employment ; whereto they seemed to assent, only 



^i^MflHA 



EAST INDIES. 



141 



Aug. 21. 



Aug. 22. 



1623. 

requested the favoiu* of the Court that for coa^^ideration of their right 
it might be' left unto them who promised to deal well with Crosse 
for the Company's sake, whereto the Court readily gave way. Joseph 
Purser, Edward Midsley, John PattLson, and Tlio. Cadway, newly 
come home in the Jonas» are pressed to serve the Ring : Mr, Bacon 
the secretary to mediate with Sir Thos. Sraj^he for their discharge. 
Joan Norris complained of RolK?rt Smith, purser of the Jonas, that 
he had received money of her husband and given no account of the 
same ; but by his accounts it appeared that he had honestly dis- 
charged himself of the trust rei>0Qed in him. {Elijht pages. Court 
Mlnwte Book VL, jyp, 69-76.] 

319. [Sec Conway] to Attorney General Coventry. The King is 
exceeding sorry to hear of the great imlispusition of Sir Wm, Holla- 
day [Hallday], Governor of the East India Company, and a very 
worthy and well deserving magistrate and minister, and recommends 
his servant. Sir Henry Mildmay, to his good offices that he sufier not 
any prejudice in i-eference to the estate he is to receive by his wife. 
[Dmmsilc Corresp., Joe. L, Vol CLL, No, 23, Cal, p, 6L]* 

320. [Sec. Conway] to Sec. Calvert. The Spanish Ambassador s 
secretary has made a complaint eonceming tlxe business of Oimuz. 
Sends copy of what they now offer [see ante, No. 317], The 
King has commanded an examination of the officers and men of the 
L«>ndon to be taken upon tlie articlas to be delivered by the Ambas- 
sadors, but there can be no further proceedings during this vacation ; 
if the infoi-mation be true, the King conceives the complaints to bo 
very grievous and foul. [Extract from Doraedic Oorresp,, Jac. L, VoL 
CLL, No. 38, Col., p. m) 

321. Sec. (Conway) t-o the Spanish iVmliassndors. Has received 
theirs of the 17th current conjointly with tliat ad^lressed to the King 
(«e!€ No. 317). His Majesty conceives that these comj skints arc very 
weighty and will go ill with those who have eonmiitted the faults, 
and be^seeches the Ambassailors not to doubt his jiLstice or mistake 
the virtue and candour of his intention, on account uf the formality 
of his proceedings; for in this time of vacation when the judges are 
absent and the council of state dispersed, it is impossible for his 
Majesty, without spreading teiTor and fi-ight among his people, to 
give sentence and adDiinister justice or to go further than an 
information. But he has given orders to Sec. Calveit to examine 
carefully and strictly, not only the otlicL'rs and men uf the London, 
but also any others that tlie Ambassadors may present for ex- 
amination ; and though the formality of examination must precede 
sequestration, his Majesty begs hin^ assure the Ajubassadorw tliat 
every kind of justice shall be done, and in due time order shall 
be given lor sequestration and restitution also, in strict accordance 
with justice, the close liond of fritmdship between lus Majesty and 
his good brother of Spain and his respect for their own pow^erful 
gracCvS and virtues. [FrcneL Extract from Spanifih Corresp.] 

Aug. 22-29. 322, Court Minut-os of the East fndia Company. Lanman pre- 
sented his answer t^j Lady Dale\s interrugatories ; l>ut the Court 
held it not tit to hear it read, but left him Iree to answer the Com- 



Aug. 22. 

Beaulleu, 



142 



COLONIAL PAPERa 



1623. 



inissioners aocorcling to his conscience, Disciiaaion with Mi\ Swann 
al>out his having the gioat cabin ; the Couii have a purpose to 
establish a standing oitler, that henceforth no master of any ship 
shall have the great cabin, but it shall be reserved for the mer- 
chants, whilst they continue aboard ; his reasons overcome, Swann 
rest-ed satisfied and submitted to the pleasure of the Com-t, Dis- 
cussion about lessening the proportion of rj*als to l^e sent *' on this 
ship " [the Charles], the Court remem1x*red that 20,000 rj^aLs will lie 
employed to buy diamonds, and also supposed that Bantam might l>e 
opened, resolved to ratifj^ the former proportion of 150,000 ryals. 
Concoming Sir Humphry Handford and the other commissi onei-a 
for Capt. Bonner's business, who thought it just that a geneml release 
should be given, on pa^mient of the bill of exchaiage for 1,000 ryals, 
but desired the Company for their sake to bestow something on 
the ^vidow " by way of gratification " : the Court foreseeing that a« 
this solicitor was to have half of what he recovered, it would be 
an encouragement to other brokei^ and solicitoi-s to undertake suits 
against the Company, resolved to make i>ayment of the 1,000 ryals, 
but for gratification they would give none, and i-athcr held it fit to 
complain of Mi\ Abdy for exhibiting scandalous petitions against 
the Company. Resolved to send three ships to Surat next spring. 
Hr. Swanley represented that he takes extraordinary pains night 
and day, has ridden divers hanl joumeys to Pl}TBOuth» Slilford, &c., 
and is out of pui-se 00?. for extraordinary diet and other expences : 
the Court duly considering the sufiieiency of the man and his extra- 
ordinary care and pains, resolved that 100/. be given him for 
past services, and 30/. per ann. added to his allowance for extra- 
ordinary fliet, Szc. in all 150/. per ann. Mr. Governor sent to make 
known, tliat whereas there is an Indian hoy at his house which 
come home in the London, Mr, Friday the minister had this morning 
demanded the boy with some un^seemly carriage, and he desired the 
Court to examine whose the boy was. Mr. Friday said he was at 
Mr, Govemi)r*s house to see whether the boy were brought up in 
the profession and knowledge of a Christian, because himself had 
taken some pains with him in that kiml, hni for property in the 
boy he disclaimed it ; so the Court sent the boy to Mr, Governor again 
entreathig that ho would as formerly give him entertainment again, 
Richard Barl>or to l>e paid his wages. One Young, an east country 
merchant, supposed to have the estate of George Ball in his hani^ls, to 
be examined in the cause depending between the Company and Ball ; 
as also Ball's brother's mfe. John Lukin, hii*ed by Capt. Bonner in 
the Downs, to have his wages. Cliarge against Andrew Evans for 
taking goods out of a Portugal junk ; ho answered with great impre- 
cations tliat he broke no hold, Ijut had indeed both tin and cloves, 
which he delivered for the Company's use : the Court for the present 
dismissed him. From the pepper and cloves come in the Palsgrave, 
** they might divide half a capital and yet have cloves sufficient" As 
to whether a capital and a half of all commodities may not be divided ; 
it was answered the Company must Im cai^ful of three things : first> 
to maintain the trade ; secondly, to pay their debts ; thirdly, to provide 
monies to divide to those that take not out upon stock. The Com- 
pany *s debts grow so great that they must call in the Michaelmas 




^ 



EAST INDIES. 



143 



1623. 



BXk<\ Xmas payments : more mterent to be imposed on those tliat 
have l)een slack, else no man will bring in hm money : this business 
to be put to a General Court How to put off their great return of 
calicoes, so as the Company may make three for one. In the 
opinion of the Court it will be fit to divide half a capital of pepper 
and cloves. 

Aug. 25, — Tlie ships at Black wall, lately n tm-ned fi'om the Indies 
viewed, viz., the Little James, the Eagle, the 8 tar, the Lion, aiul 
til ' James. Rstimat«*.s of repaii's required. Divens Viags of 

n ! ruits and seven hhds. of beef to be given to the poor of 

Stepney, especially to such widows and fatherlei*s childi'en whtjse 
husbands or fatliei's had died at the Indies Ln the Coinimny's 
serWce, 

Aug, 27.— Concerning the account of Thomas Rejmolds, purser of 
the Leaser James ; was told he mu.st bring an account of the goods 
landed and sold in Ireland. Report of the committee tliat had 
viewed the ships at Black wall, viz.» the Lion and Lesser Jauies, the 
Eagle and the Star, concerning what ships will Imj fit U\ be sent for 
Sui-at in the spring, considei-ation being had that '* the Portugals 
will not in likelyhood sit down 1»y his loss and overthrow, but think 
ujion revenge/' and lyesides it is said there are two French ships bound 
for the Red Sea, it was thought fit to send a ship of extraordinary 
** countenance *' for Admiral, and for that servnce the Great Jarncs is 
ordered to be finished, caulked, and tarred; tlic Lesser James to go 
a:^ Vice Admiral if upon ropoi-t she shall appear fit ; and the Star for 
a third ship. Estimate delivered by Stephens for repairing th<« 
Great James. Jolm Ducy to be measurer of timlier and overlook 
the workmen about the ships, at 12s. pi"r week, instead of ilatthew 
Graves, brought in by Stejihens ; for it was conceived a very unfit 
thing that the carpenter who is to use the timl:>er shotdd appoint the 
measurer, which were all one as to be his o^ti carver. George [? John] 
Bro\^Tie, late the Company *s serv^ant, deceased in the Indies, made 
the Comp. his executors, but Ix-queathed them nothing ; they therefore 
i^nounced the executorship. The inhabitants of Ratclifi* Limelnnise, 
Poplar, and Mile Eufl petition for relief and pension for their poor, 
alledging that many seafaring men that ilie in the Indian voyages 
leave their widows and orphans on the parish ; acliest with a hole at 
the top to be put up in Mr. Hiirte's office, and each mariner, factor^ 
and other put in mind to do something as he receives Ids wa^n^s : 
the Comjtany do not forget the poor of those places at Christmas 
time vntn money and at other times, with relief from the slaughter 
house at every killing, and at the returns of the ships wqth such 
victuals as remain, but in no ca-se will \ye tied to anything. Mates 
that have brought in their journals to receive their wages. Ibn- 
cerning the sale of calicoes and the price ; also of silk. Mr. Deputy 
and some committees to go aboard the Palsgrave, newly come into 
the river, and welcome the captain, kc, and licence them to como 
up ; and for imlading the ship Walter Mountiurd, and Boatswain 
Ingram to be alniard. Mr Johnson, master of the Rose, who liFid 
order to discover a place fit for refreshing about the Cape to plant 
upon, C5oald find none, but by his journal (" which Is not as yet 



144 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1 



1623. 

digested *'), it did appear he liad discovered something in the Gidf of 
Persia that may tnni out to the Company's benetit : meantime he is 
to receive WL of his wages, Morris Jones, surgeon's mate in the 
Charles, to have a free gift of 51. in regard of his poverty and " to 
wipe away all pi'etences of merit in his former services," 

Aug, 29.— Sir John WoLstenliolme acquaints the Court that he 
hears of divei^s pei"sons who take waixants to ship out pepper and 
very <lishonestly steal it back again, by which not the Company .^ 
only but the King is deceived, for they take Ijack their imposts ;M 
prays the Company to make an example, otherA\nse, as he is a farmer V 
of Ills Majesty's customs, and has taken lioth an oatJi and a fee, he 
must take such a course as will be a trouble to many honest men : 
the matter ti3 be propounded at a general court to be held at after- 
noon. He fuilher said he ha<l spoken with Sir Philip Carey con- 
ceming the gratification expected by the officers of the CustxiJm House 
alwDve stall's, who refuses Uj treat till *' S^ John " Ijc returned out of 
the country, at whose request the Lord Treasurer wrote to the Com- 
pany. One Rose, accused of mutiny alward the Palsgrave, to attend 
on Wednesday next. Opinion to be delivered to the general court 
that all broth ei*B of the Company iimy under \\Ti to one whole capital 
of calicoes to ship out, at a price somewhat less than to sell in town. 
Concerning the price to I>e set upon the cloves ; Methwold, a factor 
returned in the Palsgrave, called ; the price set at Gs. Cd. garbled 
anil 5s. 8d. ungarbled. Mr, Treasurer has cast up the arrears of 
adventures ; 92,000/, owing to the Company ; to l>e brought to a 
general court. Refusal of the Charles' company to w^eigh anchor 
imiess they may have the imjirest as usual ; the Court conceives 
that the motion proceeds from such as have a puqiose to " coosen " 
the Company, for enough has been said to satisfy honest men. Mr. 
Punnctt to pilot the Charles into the Downs, The great cabin in 
the Qiarles appointed to the factors, but Mr. Swann to have liberty 
to sit M^ith them. Capt. Pring's motion for gi-atification refused; 
the Court answered that 40 marks a month for so many years a»s 
he served was gratification sufficient and more than he had de^ser^'ed. 
Drs, Atkins and Winston, conceraing the surgeons chest for the 
Charles ; Woodall ordered to bring in his medicines at the same 
time. Report of Stephens that for 5.5tK he will make the Le^sser 
James fit for her voyage to the Indies ; ordered to be repaired* 
James Browne entertained to go in the Charles as an engineer, for 
l)ui]ding such foiis as the Company shall direct to be built in the 
Indies. The extraordinary expense of wine and powder in the Lion 
to be examined. [Sixieen pifgc^^ Court Minute Bk., VL, />/>. 76-92.] 

Aug. 29, 323. Minutes of a General Court ; those absent to be fined 
12rf. each. The Governor having been grievously afflicted with 
sickness, and not able to come out of his house, Mr, Deputy exhorted 
them to give humble thanks to Almighty God for sending in safety 
from Surat tlie London, Jonas, and Lion, richly laden with silk, 
indigo, calicoes, and other petty commodities, and the Palsgrave 
from Jacatra with pepper and cloves ; whicli bring not only the 
best returns that ever came, but also adveHisements that tliey have 
at Sui-at and Jask in a readiness as good a retuin for next year, and 



I 

I 



* 



EAST INDIES. 



145 



leu 



Aug. 
'after. 



at Jacatra, notwithstanding some petty discontents with the Dutch, 
there is hope of good trade, and that when the Charles, now ready to 
be gone, has anived there, the Company will have the greatest stock 
in the ladies they have ever had. Discussion about the disposing 
of the goods returned : ordered, that any brother of the Company 
may take out his fifth half capital in pepper and cloves in equal 
proportions, and two or three half capitals io calicoes, to ship out at 
the price fixed ; the book for underwriting calicoes to remain open till 
ChrLsftmas. Mr, Deputy acquainted the Court that some have made 
a show of shipping out their pepper, but stolen it in again, and that 
in no small proportion, wherein not only the Company is prejudiced. 
but the King cozened : ordered, that whosoever shall hereatter ofiend 
in tliat kind shall pay 5L for every bag of pepper, and 20 per 100 
for all other commodities, l>t^sides such punishment as by ordinary 
course of justice Ls to be inflicted on such as defraud his Majesty of 
his customs ; the party that commits the deceit to be taken to Ixi 
the offender, and not the underwriter. On the motion of Sir John 
Wolstenhohne, the Governor, Deputy, treasurers, and committees 
ordered to be gratified for the year jmst, as they were for the year 
preceding, which they thankfully accepted. Mr. Deputy acquainted 
the Court that it is time to i>ro pound the business of those who '* are 
run into broakes thmugh want of paying in their at] venture ;" some 
being noblemen and gentlemen, some widows, some orphans, some 
at so low an ebb as they lie in prison m a mlsemble case ; some able 
tt) pay have pur[)0sely forborne, ** that they might be in the wind 
until the action might mend, or if it fell, to sufler the les,s ;" some 
have made but one payment, and some one, two, three, four, or live 
years* j»ayments. Committee appointed Sir Bandall Ci anfiekl, Munnes, 
Oibb, Cator, Backhouse, Bank es, Arm itage, Crispe, Andrews, and Bon- 
ham, or any six of them, to examine the cases aforesaid, and report to 
a General Court. [Five pages. Court Minute Book, VL, pp. 93-97.] 

324, Mathew Brownrj* g to the East India Company, Has received 
theii-s of the 20th. Eevursham, Wheatley, the pui-scr, and Kitchen, 
the surgeon, of the Lion, and sumlry others of the C^orapany, did 
enter some indigo, pepper, and calicoes in theii' own names, as the 
officers of the Custom House do certify. They are fearful of some 
hard measure ; beseeches they may be kindly dealt with. Has 
known Bevcrsham 20 years, and is pursuaded they have not a 
more faithful servant, " howsoever he did ovcmee himself in sending 
these goods fi*om the bhii> as lie did. ^ * * It is not good for 
the Company to give discouragement to such men,'* [One page, 
fXa, VoLA^No. 1118] 

325. Brief reply of the President and Council at Batavia to 
the answer which the General of the Netherlands Company ex- 
hibited the ^^ August 1023, against several ^ratings concerning 
the trade of Bantam, common defence, &c. Whereas those of the 
Netherlands Company vaunt of their endeavours of observing the 
contract ; the contraiy is most apparent, as in our protest of October 
to the General at large will appear. First, concerning the ships 
of defence : it is answered we may lawfulJy lade the English ships 
of defence for England ; neither do we hold uurselve.s any way 



ad 

m 

irKM 



liable to continue those hostile and offensive exploits (where our 
tirade is in no way oppased) tending more to the particular ends of 
the Netherlanders, and upholding their greedy desire of sovereignty 
than to any expectation of benefit to the respective Companies ;j 
especially shoeing that the Netherlanders Company have wilfuDjr 
broken the most fundamental points for which the defence w; 
erect-ed, namely, by appropriating the trade of Cliina, excluding ua' 
by exactions and bloody executions in the Moluccas, AmbojTia, and 
Banda, from trade in those parts, opposing our free trade at Bantam, 
Sangora, ka., and by theh' faithless pi'oceedings in the last exploit ft 
Ck>a, &c. Yet we are always ready to imite our forces with tlie: 
against those who shall oppose our common trade. And though' 
20 ships be named, we hold it agi*eeable to the contract to lessen 
the numljor according to tht? occasions offered. Secondly, the 
Pengran absolutely refused to treat with the Dutch^ but for the 
English, said he had no w^ar or difference with them, and if Hie; 
would come again at Bantam, they should be welcome, am 
their house ready for them. But more especially when they senl 
PhiHp Badnedge in company witli the Dutch, the 28th Novembo 
Key mas worga, the Pongran's brother, was sent with a final answe*,- 
that unless the Hollanders would demolish their fort at Jacati-a, the 
Pengran would not gi'ant them trade or make peace with theni^^ 
This being reported in the General s own presence, we marvel they ar^H 
not ai5hamed to infer to the contrary. As to the love shewed to the 
English being onl}' to work the Pcngi'an^s own ends and bring up 
the old monopolies of pepper, the cause of the former excessive price 
was the greedy desire of either Company to get all to tliemselveSj 
which is now taken aivay by the union of the two Companies, who 
may |>ut such prices as they tliiuk good. Extmct^ from the con- 
sultations of Apiil and May 1620, showing how unjustly the Nether- 
lands Company pretend to lay upon the English all that concenia 
'' the forcing of Bantam to seek peace f those have reference to the 
foi'ces to be employed on both sides to batter and besiege the town 
of Bantam, and to what followed thereon, and the unjust pretences 
of the Dutch to bring tlie English into pail of their fj-uitless and 
uimecessary charges of the pretended siege of Bantam, That the 
Netlierlandera should suspect the English of private intelligence 
with Bantam is altogether without gi-ound, while their own sinister 
dealings are notorious. Thirdly, in j^eference to the obstinate opjio- 
sition of the Netherlands Company in denying the opening of the 
Bantam trade to be the only hope of bringing dowTi the price of 
l>epper elsewhere, Keply to their accusations of our unfaithlul pro- 
ceedings in Jambi, Patani, &c., at which we camiot but mangel 
Fourthly, it was the General's own motion that the pepper of 
Bantam goes to decay, and it is tlie general report that the people 
Buff^?F theii^ trees to go to decays pepper being nothing worth, and 
addict themselves wholly to the planting of paddie for their main ten* 
ance. " With what brazen face " can the Netherlanders lay the charge 
upon us of taking the China junks before Bantam and Batavia, so 
that they fear to come for this place, when themselves have bmned 
above 80 sail of their junks, and proclaimed war againi^t them. 
Our reasons for taking the China junks Imng chiefly for the great 




EAST INDIES. 



147 



1623. 






«gU€. 



Sept 3^26. 



debts owing to our employers by the Chinas, and theii- refusing to 
deliver the goods, ordnance, &c, taken out of the Unicorn. But that 
through lying of two ships belure Bantam » the bringing the business 
of Bantam veiy shortly to a wished for end, we know to be impos- 
irible, having above four years vainly expected some good conclusion. 
Refer themselves to the divers instniments sent into Europe con- 
cerning the business of Admiral Dedell, Recapitulate the causes 
the Netherlands Company have given the English to desist ft'om 
those offensive exploits by them so mainly urged where the trade 
of the English Company is no way opposed or liindereJ. '* If these 
many wrongs being the only grounds for which the common defence 
was erected be not sufficient motives to desist from joimng with 
those that most unjustly seek \%ath oui- master's overthrow to build 
up their own sovereignty, let the impai-tial judge." Refer to the 
relations and examinations of those that am come from Amboyna 
and were fellow-feelers and spectators of those inliuman actions for 
what conceras the barbai'ous executions there. Reply to the Nether- 
lander s answer to " our Act" delivered the 10th July 1623 : First, 
in reference to the damage the EngUsh camp have sustained by the 
faithless dealings of Admiral Dcdell ; second, to the breaking of 
the chief articles of the Accord by the Netherlanders ; and third, 
to tlie force offered l»y the Netiierlanders in all matters that 
conceiTi their own benefit, for wliich we doubt not to liave redress 
in due time. As lo our demand whether the General approve of 
the execution of our people in Amlxi^Tia, he not onl}' maintains the 
.same, but denies to give us " their forced and tortured confessions and 
examinations " lest we might thereby learn the truth of Governor 
Speult's bloody and intlii'ect proceedings. *' We wUl refer the clearing 
and searching out of the tmth thereof to the impartial in Europe, 
not doubting but Almighty God (the searcher of all hearts, and tlie 
avenger of such blood}* practices) will in his due time reveal the 
truth of this matter, and bring the same to hght, to the conlusiou 
of such cruel and inhuman butchers," Finally, although we liave 
often declared that the Dutch exactions, usuipations, and bloody 
executions have justly caused us to give over the trade of the 
Moluccas, Amboyna, Banda, and Pulicat, and to leave off those 
hostile and otiensive exploits, we have offered to settle again in the 
MoluccaSj &c., if we may enjoy those privileges granted by the con- 
tract, and have declared our readiness to join in the common defence, 
where our good trade is opposed. EadorseiJ, ** Necessary instructions 
for the handling of several Acts, especially for the trade of Bantam/' 
[Eight pcujes, 0,C., Fo^. A\, A a 1138.] 

326» Advices from the Hague, Four ships richly laden from the 
Eaiit Indies, bring news that the Hollanders wth help of their 
friends have besieged Goa* [Extract J rum Holland Corresp.] 

327* Court Minutes of the East India Company. License to 
be given to Richard Andrews, that went mate in the BLscovery, 
to return by the next shipping. The calicoes to be set at such a 
price that the Company may make 2 J for 1. The schoolmaster of 
Merchant Tailors' School ]>resented a youth named Richard He}Tie 
as an appentice to serve the Company in India; the Court found 

K 2 



148 

1623. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



him to be *' but a leanier," either for his pen or arithmetic^ and 
conceived it nm«t be a grounded iiierchant and accountant that must 
Sf!rve their tuins. Motion on behalf of [Rubt.] Johnson at Jamhi, 
Avho has made over 101^/. to he paid here out of men's wages; he 
hath served the Company long, and " carries a good report/' therefore 
given way that he shouhl have it The men of the Charles refuse 
to weigh anchor except they have their imprest money j and as it 
would be a great loss if the ship should lose her monsoon, ordered 
that they come up 20 at a time and receive it, hut that three or 
four of the ringleaders l*e discharged. Concerning Beverj^ham's 
goods remaining at Ipswidi, and Wheailey's, jiurser uf the Lion. 
The indigo to be sent up hither, John Phelp's journal to be 
examined, and his services aboard the Little Richard reported to this 
Conrt. Mr Iwimte to have his tlividends upon condition that he 
discharge his ow^n and Ids son's arrears within one month. Com|)osi- 
tion made l\y tlie coiuiiiittees for compoimding with the men for goods 
gotten by private trade with Jolm Rarlau', wlio is to have 250/. for 
his 244 ]>iece8 of calicoes. Offer of Alderman Hodges and partners 
for all the Company's rich indigo ; they shall liave it at Gs. Hit per 
pound. Request of Mr. l)e la Barr for his son to be made free of 
the Company ; the hooks to be searclied. 10/. to be given to John 
Rimd, of Deal, for pilotage of tlie Lion. William Mosse, cook of the 
London, 10/. to he stopped out of his w^ages for calicoes. Capt«. 
Blj^the and Weddail to receive the full of their wages. 148,000 ryaU 
of eight to be sent in the Charles. [AVm.J Metli%vold, returned in the 
Palsgi'ave, to have 100/, on account of wages* and his goods brought 
up to the house. A list of ** parcels'* to he delivered to George 
Ball out of the great chest and the lesser chest, including cloaks, 
hangings, cushions, neckcloths, girdles, *' two standishes of ivory,*' 
nightcaps, waistcoats, najjkms, kv. John Rose sent home in irons, 
and formerly condemned to be hanged for mutiny, to l^e heard together 
with the mast<3r, Mr, Hincldey. Mr. Tieldnirne, wlio follows the 
Company's business in the Star Chamber and Chancery, to i*eceive 
20/. on account for fees and disljursements. Concerning the wages 
of John Roln^rts, late master of the Lesser Jamea Petition of 
Henry Bate for bett.er wages, liaving sei'\^ed seven years^ and his 
wages never above 40/. a year ; the C'ourt remembered that ha was 
in the Bear, when Barwick rendered her to the Dutch, &c„ and 
would not grant ii 40s. out of the poor box given to Paul 
Sogosino, a " Polonian," that escaped out of slavery and came home 
in tlie Jonas, to enable liim to pass to his own country ; and 20 
nt»bles, as a free gift, to Jolm Muskett, a man maimed in the 
Company's service. Report of Mr. Martin that the lesser James is 
not worth repairing. At the reijuest of Elijsabeth Pierce» her son 
William, in tlie Discovery, is licensed to come for England. Com- 
plaint of John Heath, <piartermaster in the London, that some lewd 
W'OUian, under colour of being his wife, had received o/. of his wages; 
Mr. Hurte doubts not to find out tlie woman. 1(>/. to be paid to 
Lady Dale for tuV>acco she had sent to her husband, who being dead 
it w^as sold for so much. 3/. paid to David GLUy for advertising 
the arrival of the Jonas and Lion. Petition of Thomas, brother 
and exccuior of William NicoUs, deceased, for his brother a estate ; 



I 



i 



EAST INDUS. 



149 



1623. 



the testator was found mrlebted to the Company ; besides it waa 
rememljeit*d Le was the man that had persuaded the King of Acheen 
to the prejudice of the Company. Mr. Eliam to look up his letters. 

Sept 4.— Report of Swanley and Stephens on the inautticiency 
of the Little Jaiaes; to be broken up, and the Jonas brought into 
dock at her stem. An inventory presented by Mr. Ball of his three 
cabinets ; referred for an answer till Monday next. Agreed to rent a 
slip of ground adjoining the south end of the long storehouse (at 
Black waU). 

Sept. 5. — Siu*geons* chests having been provided for the Charles 
by Drs, Atkins and Winston, and also by Mr. Woodall, against 
whom objections are made, the Company do not hold it just to 
displace an old servant before they have heard him ; the chests to 
he viewed by the master and wardens of the apothecaries, the master 
and wardens of the surgeons, and certain physicians, who are to 
give their judgments on both chests. The Governor of opinion that 
a smaller projiortion of ryals than has been set down to be sent to 
the Indies will serve the turn ; the Court considering that a good 
proportion is to be sent to Masulipatam for diamonfls, that Bantam 
will surely open, that the Moluccas must be furnished, and there is 
hope of a new factory elsewhere, and that there is no likelihood of 
so good a ship to caiTy st<:>ck ; ordered that 37 chests be sent by the 
Charles. Capt. Clevenger, of the Palsgi*ave, welcomed home : Messrs. 
Bell and Harby rej>ort the hull as well stowed and in as good order 
as ever they saw any. Clevenger desired to he righted against a 
company of mutinous people, the men " of so dissolute conditions, as 
either he must make his ship a Bridewell to punish their vices, or 
suffer them to be so ill-governed as lie should be ashamed to see his 
country." Stay to be made of their wages, and the Company will 
stand by Capit. Clevenger. Tlie princi|>al men of the mutiny aboard 
the Charles to be next day '* convented before the mastei's of the 
Trinity House/* also Rose, the mutineer. Concerning frauds com- 
mitted by Ilol>ert Stone and Robert Pretty in making show to ship 
out pepper without doing so. Ordered that the merchants who take 
goods to ship out enter into a bond to bring a certificate where they 
are landed. Concerning the i>rize ; tlie hold waa opened by Evans, 
who affirms they had no drink alxjard but what was in the 
hold, and necessity enforced him. Roe's bill of charges to be au- 
dited ; he desired he might purge himself of the charge of being *' a 
common diunkard, a vice he hath ever hated,'' by questioning his 
accuser ; the Court made answer that it is not their manner to beget 
suit in law by delivering parties names, much less in this case where 
they find one man merely mistaken for another, but they acquitted 
him of the accusation, and assured him of their opinions to the con- 
trary. Richard Bix, *' an ancient sober man, entertained to go factor 
in the Charles, to be one of the four of council (at Jacatra), if there 
be a place void, otherwise to come in the first vacancy, and to have 
an imprest of one third of his year s wages. Suit of William Bennett 
for release from prison in St. Katherine's for misspending the Com- 
pany's stock in the Indies; answered until he makes confession of 
his fault in writing he must expect no favour. Request of Mr, Levett, 



jg^ 



150 

ld23. 



COLONIAL PAPESS 



ss, 



a l>rother of the Company, to have 13?.., left him by a friend deceased! 
in the Indies. 

Sept. 10. — Drfl. Atkins and Winston, having had their surgeons'^ 
chest viewed and allowed by the College of Physicians, will not 
come into contestation by surgeons, as a thing ill l>econiing their 
calling : the Court, however, resolved to view both it and WoodaJr^. 
The Trinity House advise the Company to proceed against the 
mutineers in the Charles before the Judge of the Admiralty ; and 
for Rose, who was sent home in irons for the like offence, their 
opinion is that he had been punished enough : he is to be called t<3 
the Court to receive his flismission as a favour from the Company, 
George BalFs caskets to be viewed by Messrs. Garroway and Eyres, 
and *' such toyes ** delivered to him as they shall think fit. Pilotage 
allowed to Thomas and John Punnyett for the Lesser James, Londoi 
the Jonas, and Palsgrave. The estate of Thomas Trewman, decea8ed| 
in the Indies, a fi'eeman of the city of London, to be stayed, at the re- 
quest of the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, till the orphan's part 
be paid to the Chamber On a motion that Browne, the engineer, may 
be sent abroad, in respect he undergoes some danger of arrest, *' thej 
Court entered into a serious consideration of their fortification intended] 
in the Indies, that the same may be undertaken with that foresigh 
tliat may nnt deserve censure either from the Dutch, who are veryl 
intentive upon our proceedings, or from his Majesty and the State, 
by whose direction and command the work is undertaken, and the: 
fore to leave the weight of such a business upon one man's shoulders,] 
whose life is casual, w^ill not stand with the gi'avity of this Court 
it was therefore considered where to find a man fit to be joined with 
BrowTie, that hath skill in fortification;" Walter Mountford and 
another mentioned, and the matter referred to Messrs, Stile and 
Venn; if Browne has a lusty man to carry with him, skilful in 
bricklayer's work, they will aHow him. Request of Mr, Fisher, a 
brother of the Company, to take out his dividend in goods, though 
his pa^Tuents are in arrear ; the precedent dangerous, referred to 
committee. Petition of Andrew Evans, master s mate in the Londoi 
acknowledging the opening of the hold of the prize taken in th< 
Persian Sea, and showing his many services^ and the miseries he h; 
sustained in captivity w^th the Dutch after the taking of that prize, 
and submitting to the Court j a fine set upon him of bi for the relie: 
of mariners' widows. Request of Mrs* Stevenson concerning her 
husband s goods ; the committee wished her to have ]>atience till the 
President of Surat s accounts arrive. Petition of Thomas Bottes, 
late gunner of the Globe, that in saluting Amboyna by night it w 
bis hard fortune to kill a couple of slaves, for which he was fined ' 
the Dutch 150 ryals ; the Court made answer that it was whoU; 
the gimner's fault that had not laden pieces for that salutation 
without shot, or been sure to clear the mouth from any object of 
danger, but being moved with the poverty of the man, gave him 
freely lOl. towards that loss. Petition of Thoma.s Powell, a corporal, i 
maimed by the discharge of his piece, which brake in his hands; tq^| 
receive 10^, as free charity from the Company, The wages of de-^^ 
ceased apprentices to be paid to their masters and not to their 




«s. 
raa^l 

ion^ 



EAST INBIES. 



161 



1628. 



friends. Request of Tlromas Nicolls for the wages of his deceased 
brother William ; brings a letter from Sir William Bird» his cousin, 
to that purpose : is told he has troubled Sir William needJensly, for 
he cannot fail of right from tlie Company without the help of letters, 
but must have patience till the accounts and letters lie looked upon. 
Petition of John Broker, an ajjprentice, whose liand and arm were 
shiimk ancl scorched with powder at the siege of Ormiiz, for charity ; 
to have 3/* Cloths to be bought for the Indies. Petition of Alice 
Harrison for the wages of her son Philip, who went out in the 
London, and (as she says) was enticed ashore and slaui ; the Court 
conceived that he ran away, but understanding she is very poor, and 
giievcd with the loss of her son, the Court was contented she should 
receive them. Request of Sir William Pytt for some consideration 
for his sister-in-law, the wife of his brother, deceased, for his extra- 
ordinary pains in accoinnioJating the Company's ships in Ireland ; 
the Court having lost much already by their ships going into Irelainl, 
desired to be spared more charge. Report of Messi^. Stile and Abdy 
in favour of Mr. Towerson, of Portsmouth, who has been ever forward 
to do the Company all kindness ; the Court willingly condescend 
that he shall be gratified, and because his quality is not mercenary, 
ordered that a piece of plate, value 10/., with the Company's arms 
upon it, lie presented to him. Request of Da\d<l Gei7i\ane about his 
goods ; refeiTed to the committee for the goods of private trade. 
Petition of RobeH Sargcant, who in rowing the barge to fii^e five 
ships before Ormuz, was shot through both knees and one of his feet 
burnt, for charity ; to have 20 nobles as a tree gift, 

Sept. 12. — View to be taken of lx>th the surgeons' chests provided by 
Drs. Atkins and Winston and Mr. Woodall, at which Di-s. Mountford 
Mayerme, and Hudson, the masters and wardens of the Apothecarias 
and Surgeons, and such of the surgeons now returaed (from the 
Indies) as can be foimd, are to be pre^sent, Allen Colly, a factor for 
*30 yeai^s in Russia, Prussia, &c., who has the French, Italian, and 
Russia languages, and cooies recommended by Sec. Conway, to be 
thought upon for purser when their servants i-etumed from the 
Indies are provided for. Thomas Thoniborough, who has faithfully 
served In three voyages, to be pui'ser of the Groat James. Pursers 
to take the oath set down, and for their better countenance, instruc* 
tions shall be drawn to warrant their authority. Request of Bryan 
Beddowes, who was stayed to testify in the business of George Ball, 
about his imprest for going in the Charles. The men of the Palsgrave 
to be paid, the boatswaiji to be convented before the Judge of the 
Admiralty for the supposed killing of one of the men by disorderly 
and cruel beating. William (mistake for Thomas) Nicholls, who 
had been a suitor for his brother s estate, now informs the Court that 
he now stood upon no other pretences but desired only his brother's 
wages. The gunnei-s, masters, and factors to be warned of their 
" intemperance " in the use of powder, a material proper for defence, 
and not for cauaelcas triumph. No witness to be examined for the 
Company l>efore the commmsion at Bristol for examining \\ntnesses 
on behalf of Mrs. Wickliam. Concerning the wages of one Pichell 
or Prichell, a trumpeter in the Palsgrave, who was to bo examined on 



152 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 



tlie Company's l»ehalf against Geoi-ge Ball. r^omplaint against 
Hinchley by three irien of the Palsgrave, that V»esides striking them 
and keeping baek their cine of victuals, he had thrown over* 
Ixiard soinu of tlieir clothes ; the answer was that the linen ■' was no 
other but a comp>any of noisome rags able to poison the whole ship," 
but one of the men rejilied that *" one piece was a shirt which cost 
him lOw. of Mr, Hpalding, and stood Mi*. Spalding in J)<i'' The 
Court saw not how tliey could relieve these men save only by way 
of treaty to procure them recompense from Hinchley. 

Sept. 17." — Hugh Cooley, boatswain of the Charles, to be paid 50s. 
The Coiu't approved of the 17 or 18 chests of coral provided by " the 
Guadania of Florence." The purcha.so of a parcel of wlieat come out 
of Barbary to be refeiTed to a committee. Mr. Hinchley refrains 
to come to this Conii:., '* because it ii? given out that six or seven 
persons have vowed his death;" to come on Friday. In reference 
to Thomas Nicolls' request, the CouH found that upon examination 
his brother, William Nicolls, " had been an ilbservant to the Com- 
pany/' but were content to ]my 30/. for his wages, and in respect he 
came recommended by Sir William Bird, gave lOL more as a free gift. 
Methwold's calicoes to be delivered tcj him *' only of eacli sort that 
the Company hath not, some few to be reserved for musters." Mr. 
Treasurer Stone acquainted tlu' Court of importint reasons that the 
payments for Michaelmas quarter must he brought in- 

Sepi 19.^ — Application of [Arthur] Hatch for his full wage«, 
amounting to 2o7L ; ordered to be paid, James Troughton enter- 
tained factor, to go in the Charles ; leaves a l>oy, his kinsman, 
George Jackson, with Alexander Gill, master of Powle's [St Pauls] 
School, to whom Hi. per annum of Troughton s wages are to be paid. 
The wages of Francis Ma^^ors, deceased, to be paid to his widow, 
Ann Ma}^oi's, ^Villiani Kendall, reported to have been good for 
little while lie stayed in the Indies and now good for nothing, and 
who says he was taken and " miserably handled '* by the Dutch, to 
have his wages. Concerning the bond of Robert Hutchinson em- 
ployed at a factory at Surat. William Lovering, son of the master s 
mate in the Supply, imtertained in the Company's service, and a 
gratuity bestowed upon him. Resolution not to pay Edwai*ds his 
wages, and to [>roceed again.st him for his neglect of service aboard 
tlie Palsgiuve, and his slander concerning Jolm SlattcT to the Com 
pany. Request of the master and wardens of the watermen thai 
John Taylor, prisoner in the Compter for striking the boatswain oi 
the Palsgrave, and servant to Thomas Bleake, a waterman, may be 
delivered to them, to ease his master of the eliarge of his imprison- 
ment and they will handle him with more severity tlian a bare re- 
straint ; it was answered he must first answer for his misdemeanor and 
battery at the sessions. Complaint of Capt Clevenger that Nicholas' 
Cripps, coxon of the Palsgrave, challenged him into the field, which 
lie refused, ** knowing tlie dispro|»oiiion of their qualities ; " to be 
called before Mi*. Recorder, as well as William Lovering, and any 
other whom Capt Clevenger shall name of the dishonest crew. A' 
ae^sment of 5s. per acre upon the Company's lands at Blackwall, for 
the maintenance of the East Marsh of Poplar, ordered to be paid. 



4 

1 



EAST INDIES. 



153 



1623. 



Committee appointed to inform themselves of the reasons for hrinf^mg 
in the Michaehn»a.s payment, and ro}x*rt next Wednesday. William 
Kitchin, surgeon of the Lion, to pay frei^lit for loO pieces of calico 
at 3^, a piece, for the Court will in no sort give encouragement to 
their men to bring home by private trade commodities proper to the 
Company s trade. Concerning the estate of John BLndon, deceaaed. 
Letter read from the Earl of Rutland requesting employment for 
Stejihhen Robinsiin as a purser or purser's mate ; he was held inca- 
pable of eitlier, but might go in the quality of a soldier if that stood 
with his liking. Alk^n Colly recommended by Sir John Merricke, 
Decrowe, and Sec. Conway, as a purser ; if they need one at the time 
of election they will as soon make choice of him as of any other. 
Estimate for repairing the Jonas. Petition of Jolm Hinchley, who 
excused his not attendance at the Court because he went in danger 
of some envious and bad persons, for his wages ; he is to have a 
quarter of them. 

Sept. 24. — Me^si-s. Keightly and Coxe to be gratified with 501. for 
bringing alx)ut the Eagle and Star On the arrival of any of their 
ships Mr, Mountney to make entry of the Company's goods, and see 
that entry is made by other men, and that all the goods are con- 
veyed to the custom house. Garroway and Abdy to confer with 
such as are held fit t/) be masters of the Great James and Jonas. 
To consifler about calling in the Michaelmas quarters payment. 
Petition of James Browne, lately entertained engineer to go in the 
Charles, that when aboard at Tilbury he was arrested for a matter 
of 20i., and prayed the Company to pay the debt on account of Ids 
wages ; the Court suHpecteil it to be a device between him and 
lus creditors, and entreated Messi's. Stile and Munnes to take c^re 
that the Company be not cozened. About John Bindon*s estate. 
Report of Mr, Mtmnes that Capt. Blythc said he had Ix^en forewarned 
to take heed how he went in the Great James, for she is so rotten 
•' that a man miglit thrust out her side with his foot " ; but Mr. 
Stepheas affirmed she i.** as strong a ship as can l>e. Capi BIyihe 
to be waiTied at the next court and bring with him the author of 
that report. No wages to be allowed to servants taken by mastei-s 
and captains of ships into the Indies and there placed in factories. 
Dividend of Charles Coxe. 

At Mr, Governor's House in the aftemoon,^ — Pi'oposition of Morris 
Abbott, Deputy Goveraor, for calling in the Michaelmas quarter's 
payment; Mr. SU>ne said the kno^m receipts between this and 
Christmas will be but 77;0001 towards |mymcnt of the dividend 
of the half capital and the debt to tlie old stock, and that he con- 
ceived the next y rear's payments will not countervail the disbui"se- 
ments, and that it were better to call in monies than to stand at 
interest, wherein he for his part had gone as far as he could ; but it 
was answered that it is now too long driven to call for a Micliaelraas 
payment, and that the returns having been such last year and this, 
have bred an expectation in many of thicker dividends rather than 
of more payment^s ; and it was therefore better that the Company 
made some shift fur money to supply the necessities of their dis- 
bursements than by a sudden call for money to discredit the action 



154 

1623. 



COLONIAL PAFERi^. 



wliicli needs no such discouragement, and as for next year's dis 
bui-acments they may be supplied by sales of commodities, and 
money may be raised upon their silk. In the end it was resolved 
that the Michaelmas pa^^inent be spared and monies taken up at" 
interest if there be cause, and that it be published at the next , 
General Court that there must be payments at Cliristmas and Lad/j^M 
Day next. Hard indigo rated at ijs. 4rf, Mj\ Deputy acquainted "^ 



he J 

i 

11 

I 

d 



Mr, Governor that the complaints of oui* people of the Dutch out of 
the Indies are veiy frequent and importunate, and instanced the 
difference about the fi-uits of the Moluccas, and the imposition of the^ 
fine of 40;000 ducats on the Company at Jacatra^ and the levy 
part thereof on the Company *s goods, which if put up with, wi 
beget new insolencies and injuries not to be suifered Opinion 
the Govenior that they should send over to require satisfaction, 
Divers men were propounded, but the matter was referred to another 
time ; in the intt^rira two men to be found out, one of whom shall 
** have the French/' and one or both well understoo<:l in the Com- 
pany s affairs ; am] the opinion was that the Duteh will more wil 
lingly treat with merchants than gentlemen, Mr, Governor brough 
to theh n^membrance the favoui-s done by Sir Dudley Carle ton i; 
the late treaty with the Dutch ; that now no man shall Ije able to 
give a good account of his employment if not countenanced by him ; 
that notwithstanding he had never been gratified since he received 
200/. for his favour to ^Ir. Deputy and Sir Dudley Diggs, and t<r 
leave him imremembered until they employed over others, were t 
tell him that they thought not upon him but at their need ; that his' 
lady is now in tOT;^^! and upon the point of her depaHure. The 
motion generally applauded, and it was resolved that Lady Carleton 
sliall lie [iresented with 200/, as a tliankfulneas from the Company ^J 
143 her husljand, and with a carpet and caUcoes to the value of 20^^| 
for hei-sell James Browne, the engineer, discharged from arrest for" 
debt upon certain terms. 

Sept. 26, — Claim of Mrs, Stevenson to Ix^ deferred until the Com 
pany receive satisfaction from their President at Surat. Letter 
be presented to Lady Carleton at Gravesend, to certify that the' 
Company have given orders to Mr. Barlow to deliver to his Lordship 
[her huslmnd] 200/., and also a Persian carpet and silk quilt to tho 
value of 20/. Request of [Edw.] Monnox to know the Company*) 
pleasure concerning his goods and wages ; his goods to be \new^e<: 
and his accounts prepared, and the objections against him looki 
out Request of Capt Weddall concerning his goods, intimating hi 
hopes to speed as well as Capt. Blythe, who hath both wages an^ 
goods ; discussion thereon ; WeddaU s goodB Ui be \iewed, and Blythe' 
questioned for his ]vrivate ti-ade. Order concerning the goods of the 
master, purser, and mariners of the Lion. Bill of 4/. 19d. 4d. of 
Mr. Woodall for curing John Martin, who fell from the main-yanl] 
of the Charles and broke his leg, to be paid Cappur, with advicej 
of the C'orapany's ]>roctor, to proceed against the nine pirates s 
prised by Sir Richard Bingley taking a hoy with cables and othe: 
goods lielonging to the Company, and Sir Richard to be gratifi( 
with three or four pieces of calicoes. The names of the Company ^i 






EAST nSTBIES. 



166 



1623, 

debtors to be brought to the next court. Petition of William 
Thomas, mate of the Lion, for 5L of his servant a wage8, detained 
for five pieces of calicoes purloined by the servant ; the calicoes 
being re-delivered to the Company and the party whipped for taking 
them. Petitions of John Heath, r^uartermaster of the London, for 
5L paid in his absence to one that pretended to be. his wife j and 
Nicholaa Sneering, for two montlis' wages paid in the same way : 
the Court ordered jiayment, but charged ijr. Hurte to be more 
carefid hereafter, [Forty-six pages. Court Minute Bk., F/., 
pp. 97-143.] 

Oct* 1 . 328. Henrie WoUman to the East India Company. Has been a long 

Achecn. time in In«15a in their employment, being left here by Capt. Keeling, 
and has obtained both " Molayo and Portingale language." Has 
lived in Amboyna, under George Muschamp, and made account to 
come home in the Palsgrave with him ; but President Fui-sland 
sent him merchant for Acheen on the Elizabeth, with a cargo of 
Surat cloth, which came in the Discovei^' to Jacatra, where he 
found Geo, Robinson, chief of the factory, Ria Allen and John 
Coward, his a%sist-ant8. Arrived at Acheen 2 May 1623, and by 
end of Sept. had laden the ship with pepper. The King of this 
place hath taken great distaste against Robinson, and forbidden 
him his presence, In that Robinson is " not so beneficial by jiresents *' 
as Nicolls was, who gave a very ill precedent by his large gifts. 
Could wish all their servants were indued with some of Robinson s 
qualities. Beseeches them to consider hLs poor salaiy. which is liut 
13^, 4s. per annum, and the place he is able to discharge in their 
emplo^Tnent*. Rolnn.son proceeds upon the ship, and he remains 
in his place with a small remainder of goods against the anival of 
the next ship. The Elizabeth takes 1,055 bahara of pepper, every 
bahar being 380 lbs. English. Has had many '* malignant friends." 
being he came out a aailor and has attained to a better place than 
8ome of them ; but refers himself to those who know him, Messrs. 
Muschamp and Methwold. Endorsed, *' Henry Woolman, in Acheen, 
1 Octr. 1623. He is now chief factor in Acheen, Reed, by the 
Elizabeth." [One page and. a half. O.C, Vol X, A^o. 1119.]' 

Octr 1-15. 329. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Request of 
Moore, a naibr, to leave, as he cannot give the Company content, and 
to put another in his place. Letters of Daniel White and John 
Slade. containing divers accusatiorLS against Capts. Clevenger ami 
Browne, for embezzling goods in the Manilla voyage*^, to l>e parti- 
cularly liandled on Friday afternoon next; as also the release of 
John Slade s wages. Report of Westrow and Abdy, that Daniel 
White the pursers goods being but 80 |)ieccs, they were delivered 
to him ; that Capt. Weddall had 458 pieces, and Mr. Monnox 900 ; 
and also that Capt. Weddall had GO cwt. of pepper. The C'ourt 
concluded to take Weddall's pepper at the price they bought theirs, 
and for his calicoes, " to gratulate his well deservings/' were con- 
contented to deliver them free of freight, provided he shipped them 
out ; and in consideration of his good services in bringing the Jonas 
and Lion into the Do\^ms, without stopping anywhere, to allow him 
a gratuity of 1 001. He was called in and thankfully accepted the 



156 

1623. 



COLONIAL PAPEBS. 



Compajiy's kindnesa. Mr. Monnox's goods not to be handled till lie 
should give fiirther aecotmt of himself. Speedy provision to bo 
made of wants advised by Capt Swann, of the Charles, Capt. Blythe 
to be sent for» to manifest that his clearing was merely by mistckke 
of his name for another, the Company not using to pafis by men of 
his quality without fiirther consideration. Models of a galliot, 
showed bj^ Capt Weddall, that might be sailed with eight men to 
the Indies, and manned with 60 men, mth 18 oars aside, would be 
vessels of good defence and of special use for the conveyance of 
goods which are with danger carried by land, and would also com- 
mand the frigates which now disturb the passage in the river. 
Mr. Stevens to confer with WeddaU about building two of them to 
go with this present fleet The Court, taking notice of Capt. Wed- 
dalFs readiness in offering his services, fell into consideration how 
to treat with him upon a new employment this year for Surat 
He first demands 40 marks a month, but the Court desired him to 
clear his thoughts to make a second demand, the former being over 
much. It was finally concluded to give him 200Z per annum, and 
50/. towards hi% setting out, which he thankfully accepted. Declara- 
tion of George Muschamp, a merchant, now returned in the Palsgrave, 
of his services and misfortunes by the loss of a leg ; the Court took 
notice of his good reputation in India, and therefore bestowed a 
gratuity of 100/. upon him. Being demanded what he required for 
a second voyage, he asked 250/. per annum ; the C^urt thought 
15QL would be a competent aDowance. but he accepted not of it, 
and so was dismissed for the present. The wages of Thomas 
Trewman, formerly stayed by the Lord Mayor, having been settled 
for the g*x>d of the children, ordered to be paid. Robert Fotherby's 
wages advanced to 80/. i>er annum, to execute the offices of clerk of 
the stores, yard, and check. Nich. Crispe [?Cripps], having given ' 
Capt Clevenger satisfaction for having cliallenged to fight with 
him, is to receive his wages ; also John Johnson, master of the Bose. 
40«- bestowed on John Jaye, who lost the use of an arm by a wound 
from a poisoned arrow, at the island of " Mintam " (?) Petition of 
John Stanbridge for debts due from Thomas Jackson^ deceased ; is 
referred to the churchwardens of Stepney, to whom the Company 
have promised Jackson's wages for maintenance of his children. 
One month's wages of Mathew Spurgeon allowed to Margaret, his 
wife, whose extreme want *' was certified under the hands of the 
churchwarden, collector, constable, sideman, and hedborough of 
Lymehouse." Part of hLs waores allowed to Stephen Norris, who 
came away from the Indies without leave. Gratuity to Ann Moore, 
widow. Petition of Judith Hubbert for the wages of her servant, 
Henry Blakeler, who ran away fi-om the Company *s service ; but 
the Court answered there were no wages due to those that run away. 
Petition of Thos. Wilkinson, in reference to William Winck worth ; 
he is to be dismissed as unfit the Company's service, '* having been 
a tapster and never at sea.'* John Roberts, late master of the Lesser 
James, to have 20/, on account of wage.s. Petition of Richard 
Porter, Henry Davies, John Dre^sHtt, Ralph Thomjison, John Wright, 
and Godfrey Jacob, coiiiplauiing of the hardness of their voyage to 
the Moluccas, by the space of 18 months, suggesting many scandaloi 



I 




pretences to the dispai-agement of the Company s service ; l»iit the 
Luurt conceiving them Uj be idle, woiikl give no way to their 
lequeat for gi'atification. 

Oct. 3. — Peter Bell, purser of the Ruby» in the Molucca voyage, 
affinned that the suggeationa intimated in the *' scandalous petition " 
af Richard Porter and others (before mentioned) were unjust, and 
signified that Lumkin, the gunner, once in a vain idle humour boiled 
the feet and skin of a goat, but had no necessity, the ship being 
stored with rice and other provisions such as the place woulil aftbrd. 
The i^etitioners weixj called in and said the goat skins were boiled 
two or tliree times, and pottage made thereof, [but confessed that 
the " buds of trees and grass," which they pretended were boiled for 
their relief, were '* good sallcts/* to l>e t>aten with other meats. Bell 
affirmed that the ship s company would not content themselves with 
tliree flesh meals a week, as allowed by the President and Council, 
but had five, by reason whereof, being in a place where no flesh wa.s 
to be had, they wanted flesli about five months, but had divers other 
provisions. The Court held it necessary *' to (juestion these men for 
this scandalous petition," and ordered that none of them hereafter Ije 
employed in the Conipany's service, exce]it John Wright, who cer- 
titled that the othei-s had used his name in the petltiuu, but he liad 
never heard it read. Elliott, cbiet" mate to Capt. Swann, not being 
'* a man of government and eomiDitnd/* the Court noniinnted Mr. 
Bix to take command in case of mc*rtality, and Mr. Ellam was 
•* required to make his boxes of successinn accordingly." Mr, Mus- 
champ, having taken time to consider the Company's projjositions, 
accepts the salaiy of 150^. yearly otitrod him, but desires to be em- 
ployed for Sui*at, Concerning Beverslianrs wages. An ofier to buy 
40 or 50 bales of Bilk ; also^ [project to buy aU the Company's silk 
and deliver it in Fi-anee. [Edw.] Monnox being called in, Mr. Deimty 
briefly recapitulated his eiToi*s and mLseaniages in Persia, and ap- 
pointed Wednesday next to bear his business, wherewith he n-sted 
satisfied, protesting he shall be well able to auswer all objections 
against him. To take care in choosing Muscovia cordage, as it is 
affirmed to be made of bad hemp. John Womb who went out mastt-r 
of the Little James, and w^as sent home by the President as good for 
nothing and debauched in his carriage, demanded his wages ; he said 
he was never a drunkard, but since his coming home Mr. Bell jiro- 
tested he had seen him led between two women ; to receive payment 
for the time he served in the James. 2d. per lb. to be abated of the 
price of nutmegs. Committees entreated to make collections both 
against [Wm.] Methwold and [Edw,] Monnox, by Wednesday. 
John Pashley entertained to go master*s mate? in the Chai*les, at 
U, lOd. per month. Committees to advise wnth Mr, Treasurer Stone 
concerning the debts upon bills, kc. Wages of John Tombles. 
Gratuity to William Crascombe, who fell from the nmin-yard of the 
London and broke his leg. Request of Richard Wood, in reference 
to 102 ryals stolen from him by Anthony Bellinghani. Considera- 
tion of the objections against Capt. Clevenger and Mr. Browne, 
exhibited by Daniel White, purser ; some acknowledged to be true, 
and soma utterly denied; appointed to be heard on Tuesday, by 



OOM)NIM- PAPERS, 



&e pmaer is r eqa i r e d to make a valuation of the goods 
tl^ tbe eaplam and nmst^r for {Ullage, and to inform himself 
w%aX fdkge was allowed to the Datch. Ordered that Mr. Tjanman 
t» mmk9 itsdy the account of Ormuz. 

OoL & — ^Twenty-five oxen bought at l7s, &/. per cwt., and 300 
ht^ at S2&. per cwt., for salting. Some thought 500 oxen will 
\m the least the Company should need, it being very requisite to 
have 100 m provision always. Petition of William Bennett, who 
came home prisctfier in the James, *" cunningly eonfe^ing the charge 
of 2,800 rj^aJs put upon him by the President and factors in India, 
but not acknowledging hinaaeJf debtor for it ; *' the Court oliser\ing 
his obstinacy and cunnuig, willed him to trouble them no more with 
petitions. Conceming tli« accounts of Ormuz given to the President 
of Surat by Eklwin Guy, pursser of the London, and Robert Smith, 
purser of the Jonas» the fix^ accounting for pillage or purchase, and 
the oilier for entertainment ; the puiBeis and Capt Weddall to attend 
anil give further reasomi on Wednesday next. Discussion about 
calling a General Court for the division uf calicoes and other business, 
sQdUe complaining of the prev^^nt course, which C4:>mplaint was backed 
by a message from Lonl Brooke, *' with some addition of some dislike 
of government, mariners hardly dealt with, [and that] the opinion of 
some few in the committee overswade the rest." Mr. Deputy to wait 
on his Lonlship and satisfy him ** of these subjections," and of the 
committee's management of afiairs ; reaolved to debate the matter at 
the next Coml. 

Octs 7. — ^Petition of Robert Stacy, cook of the Lion, eonceming 
tallow ; it is answered that the cooks have formerly taken tallow as 
a fee or ** vales/' but for prevention of abuse tlie Company have of 
late taken away those fees. ^Examination of the objections against 
C^pt. Clevenger and Mr. Browne, exhibited in 10 articles by the purser, 
Daniel White, eonceming goods taken at the Moluccas and converted 
to their owni use. The Court, considering the many dangers and 
difficulties that these men had passed thixiugh and their good services, 
and finding tliat howsoever tlie purser had well dischaiged his duty 
in tliose informations, few of the objections were matt»rial, some being 
acknowledgetl and othci^ denied, were in a straight how to pix)ceed, 
hilt in tine the captain and master were required to give bond in 
AQM.. to l»e accountable fijr what shall hereaftei* be proved against 
them, and not to take exceptions against the purser, who had but 
|»vif(v>niie^i hw iluty, whereto they readily consented* 

V)ci S. "About victualling the four ships now bound for Surat ; 
]| %«y^ thought necessary to pravide 000 oxen and 1,500 hogs^ 

r ^y y\M and Clevenger and Mr. Browne affinn that beef is 

)H^rk for such as go to the southward, because they 

', ,. • ,v cJi'l no bread; ordered therefore that the proportion be 

; • t iuilf i>ork. Repurt of the solicitor that [Adam] Denton 

. i * had moved that his bills in the Company's hands 

*lli:^3 ^ v^\Mii|{ht into Court ; the solicitor to move the lord keeper 

iJ^Qi^ W^i^l^ ^^ the money due by them. Committee appointed, 

il^^Mil olieitor, to examine, with Sir John Walter, 

^^ ,^.^KV*^to^ .. ' [George] Ball. Richard Swanley, at the 



160 
1023. 



COLOmAL PAPERS. 



as should be thought meet. Concerning one Wood, a surgoon, 
reitirneil in the Palsgmve, whether to send him to the doctors to be 
examined or not; he is entertained to go in the James, having 
served the Company long and being approved by the President and 
Capts, Weddall and Ctevenger. Edward Pike and Pete^r Bell to 
receive wages. Appointment for election of pursei-s, mates, stewards, 
factijrs, &c. for the next tleet. Edward 8eagar, purser general, 
ordered to perfect his l>ooks. Demand of the mother and executrix 
of Richard Eman, late purser of the Ruby, about the wages and 
<lebts of her son ; deferred. Petition of Sybilla Rynd to the King, 
underwritten by a master of requests, to allow her 30?. pi^r annum 
till her husband retura ; the petition Is stuffed with false suggestions, 
but is referred. Part of Jackson s estak^, wlio died in the Indies, to 
Ih^ iiaid to the overseers of the poor of RatcUff to bind apprentices 
his two chihiren left *' in their hamlet/* 

Oct. 13. — Letters reatl from the Charles, in Margatt! Road, from 
Capt Swann and Mr. Hayes, signifying that IGO men were aVioard ; 
the Co\irt took this business into serious considemtion, as much im- 
porting the life of their trade that there be no want of men to man 
their ships in the Indies and bring ships home, and ordered that 180 
at least should proceed in the ('harles, and that seamen be entertained 
in the Downs to make up that complement. About the suit l>etweun 
Mr. Decrow and Mr. Chamberlain concerning the debt of Mi's, Harri- 
son and Mr. Kirby to tlie Joint Company (East India and Muscov}'). 
The accounts of money and goods taken at Onimz delivered by the 
jmraers CUiy and Smith to be audited Report of Mr. Deputy that 
[Edw,] Monnox had been found to be very foul in all the objec- 
tions against him, that he went out poor and hath had 30 bales of 
]>rivate trade at one time, and was ever contentious, both towards 
liis soperioi^ and inferiors ; the business once more to be heard on 
Tuesday next. Calicoes stolen from the l*ackyard ; none but 
packing porters to come there, who should be answeraltle, and the 
]>orter of the gate to look carefully that no suspicious peraons loiter 
alnjut the house. The giving of spices to the committee,s referred 
until Mr. Governor might lie piiesent Conceniing the calling of a 
Cteneral Court for dividing and shipping out calicoes. The objecti<m^} 
against the farmei*s a mere calumny, but trenched so deeply into tho 
government that it concerns the Committee^^ to vindicate? themselves 
from such aspersions, " these indignities being intollerable and not to 
be connived at by the committees." Roe and Johnson tender their 
services to be employed as masters ; Johnson dismissed as unfit, Roe 
to be conferred with. Mr. Friday desired to tender his service to 
the Company in "a sermon of thanksgiving " and received answer 
that they will acquaint Mi\ Governor therewith. 

Oct. 15. — Resolved plainly to declare that the caus^ of calling the 
generality txjgether was to consider the order made at the last 
Cteneral Court for division of calicoes to be exported. Concerning 
[►epper and calicoes belonging to Capt Weddall ; he acknowledgea 
having sold 25 l>ales of gumlac to [Edw.] Monnox. Certiticatcs 
and other writings from the President and Council in India pre- 
sented by Jackson to justify Spalding s proceedings, who also moved 



i 



fl^ 



EAST INDIES. 



IGl 



Oct. 15 

and 

1624, 

Jan. 9. 



for payment of 1,100/. ; referred to another Court. Capt. Weddall 
presented tlie names of Capt. Clevenger and Messrs. Browne, Roe, 
Johnson, EvanB, Pyan, and Phellpes a,s fit to imdertake prime places 
in the next fleet. [Edward] Monnox having been found foul in 
almost all the objections against him, but having submitted himself 
to the Court, it was ordered, after much debate, that he should allow 
the Company 250/. for all damages su.stained by his means, rejmy the 
600 larees detained by him on the Ormuz account, and the present 
from the Khan of Shiraz, which he converted to his own use, and pay 
fireight for Km calicoes at 3^. per book. Monnox conceived this censure 
too harsh, and being ordered to withdraw a second time, an<l the Court, 
** ovei'come by his submLssion/' agix^ed to abate 50/, of the 250/., con- 
ditionally that he rested satisfied therewith, whereto he freely as- 
sented. Forty chests of coral have been ordered, the finer sort to come 
overland from Marseiles, and the coai'ser from Florence I »y sea. Com- 
modities to be provided for Surat ; and u])on debate concerning the 
Red Sea trade, and the hope of trade at Ormuz, the following were 
ordered, vi^. : 200 cloths, red and green ; 30 tons of elephants' teeth, 
which sell to good profit ; gold and silver lace ; 40 or 50 pieces of 
satins, crimson and green, of Bologna or Florence ; 200 tons of lead ; 
20 tons of iron to be sent in the next ship for Jacatra ; 20 or 30 
*'bidlioons ** of ciuicksilver, and tapestries for 1,500/., that commodity 
yielding 50 per cent profit : the committees to see Mr. Corsellis* 
tapc^atiies, who is said to have good ciioice. No cloth of gold, tin, 
velvets, or amber beads to be sent this year, an they are found to 
yield no profit Nothing OM^ng to Mrs. Rynde's husband. Report 
of the treasurer that the pajTuent of this «li vision will require 
20,000/., besides 3,000/. or 4,000/. to pay bills of exchange, and that 
there is but 3,000/. in cash, and desired the Court to nominate com- 
mittees whose credits might be used to take up money for the 
present occa^sion ; the warranto to be perused to see who may be 
entreated to stay for two or three months, in which time moneys 
will come in. Mr. Fortney to receive iO». foi' translating French 
into English. Wages of John Slade, in tlie Pal.sgrave, stayed on 
complaint of Capt. Clevenger, to be i*aid. [Fortij-three j^gcs, Cmirt 
Minute Book, VL.pp, 144-184 ami 194-197.] 

330. William Bell, Thomas Barker, John Pnrefey, and John 
Haywarde to (the East India Company). Then- last was dated 
" Spahan," 28th March, whereof they send a copy. After they had 
received his Majesty and the Coin]>any*s letters, and had well 
weighed the resolution of either maintaining or dissoK^ng their 
Persian trade, it was conchided on 16 Jime that Bell and John 
Benthall should repair to the Shah. On 26th they proceeded 
towards the Court, but being informed that the King was at Coogee, 
four **jomadas" from thence, and had made prohibition to any 
public person, without his licence to be admitted his presence, they 
aiidressed their lette^rs to Aga Emeere, the seeretaiy, and Mahomet 
Alii beg, "oui' mehmander or presenter, to solicit hi>s Majesty," and 
seven daj^ after received answer they might repair to Court ; not- 
withstanding, on their amval the 8hah*a intention was changed. 
They followed hiin to Noorc and Uamoan, where thry received 

L 



162 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 



I 

i 



letters from Spalian, with encloaures fi'om [Miv Kirkham] the Consul 
at Alejjpa, and Richaixl Wedmore, master of the Reformation ; 
" what news is therein mentioned we shall (with grief) intreat 
your worships to accomj»any our sorrows with peruj^l of his own ^B 
lines/* Contraiy to all expectations the King proceeded directly for^^ 
Spahau, without making any stay or giving answer to any, whom 
following they overtook tlio next day and placed themselves w*here 
he must i>ass, whom approaching with due reverence they saluted J 
and he having sight of them called them unto him, and entered! 
into familial' discourse conceming our King's health, whether' 
they had brought a letter from him, but principally of the state of 
the Hollanders. He suffered them not once to mention their ^J 
present business, and they could never after obtain speeeli of hiin H 
till thuir arrival at Spahau, he going before with his women, and no " 
man being suffered but eunuchs to come within a league of him. 
" The 24 of Augast he entered Sf*ahan with all his ambassadors and 
guests, who accompanied him homo to his own palace, and that , 
day were feasted by him, where we delivered our King's Majesty's 1 
letter in ]mblic view, and he honorably received it, and showing it] 
to tlie Tartar, Turkish, and Uzljeg Ambassadors, wath the rest of the j 
great men present, according to his custom i>ulling off the seal andl 
reserving it in liis bosom, returned the letter to be translated intaj 
Persian, which we having in readiness delivered the next day 
his secretary, Aga Emeere, the King himself at pai'ting with a smilingi 
countenance, desiring that hereafter our King s Majesty would wTJtc^ 
to him in Persian, and he would return him answer in Fi*ancks." In 
answer to their gi^ievances and requests for the better accommoda-j 
tion of the trade — through the troubles of Bagdad and some injuric 
by the Turk, as they well perceived by his disgracing the Ambassador 
of the Grand Signor, the King was grown to such a height of melan-| 
eholy, that he foi-sook all company— his reply was, ** till the an-ival 
ol our ships he would give no answer at all,*' but would grant them 
a firman to free them from all troubles [see ante. No, 226] 
Mahomet Allibeg told them that the Khan of Shiraz being come tol 
the city they should do well, in rcgaixl their principal business lay! 
in his countiy to visit Mm, whidi they presently did. In hi 
company they foimd Lalabeg and Mullayimbeg, and after ilivers coui^ 
pliments, complained that last year bringing but 53 bales of cloth,j 
they could find no vent for them, neither receive silks but at 
dear rates and great travail that they could get no profit, havir 
notwithstanding, so many yeai's been always ready to furnish hi a 
csountry with all manner of commodities he could desire at reasonable] 
rates. *' Wliereat MuEayimbog was much daimted, Lalabeg having 
always formerly taken fi*om us that commodity and he now refusing^ 
but at a base price/' The Khan willingly granted them a firman tal 
fi^ee them from all Rahdars throughout his coimtry, Camleta taken 
in barter for money, steel, china ware, morse-teeth, benjamin,^ 
guinlac, &c. Benthall was dispeeded to Sliii'az with four bales of 
cloth and the aforesaid firman, the 28th of September. The Khaal 
of Shiraz next day had much conference with the King in private j 
whereof having notice they sent their linguist to Aga Emeere, who" 
was pi'esent at said conference, of whom as Irom the King he received 



in ■ 
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EAST INDIES. 



163 



the following answers* viz., that the King would not give them leave 
to bmld any house at Port, lest under the name of house they should 
make a castle, but that the Khan should give them two houses 
in Guniroon (Gombroon) to sit in. The Khan answered "why then 
brought you them hither and give thorn not leave to be gone, they 
have never yet wi'onged you, whereto he was silent" He then 
began to discourse of these Hollanders now come, that they had 
brought the King a present of 40 or 50 tomans, and tliat we this two 
years have brought notliing ; to which the Khan replied that we' had 
brought a coach of much worth, bairels of pieces, i>icture8, complete 
armour, k^c, which himself requested, and being here arrived, would 
not be accepted ; to what puipose should they bring another with 
so great cost and travel in vain. For particulai' demamls he refeiTed 
them to Mahomet AUibeg, to whom the King had givt^n or<ler ti> 
make known to them his pleasure concerning the taking his sUk at one 
third money and two tliirds commudities, that the King never made 
any sucli promise ; they had to follow the King for silk, and to receive 
it where and at what price he w^ould appoint, but it has now pleased 
him to appoint Mahomet AUilieg to do all their atfaii-s. For abuse at 
Lar yearly offered by the Sultans there, he strictly charged the Khan, 
that upon the first complaint, he should cut off the Governor's head 
for example to othei's, and send it to Spahan, For Mr, Robins 
debt, a session of justices sixould Ix; called, and '' if they could not 
prove his goods were in oui- hands at time of his death they should bo 
restored." For Rahdai's, the Khan has given them a lirman to free 
them^ also til-mans for a house, whei'ever they would, am] for recovery 
of an old debt from the mint master at Shiraz. The silk lost at 
Kasbin to be restored. For the other points of the Company's letter, 
some whereof are not much ]iertinent, and some not to tje obtained, 
and again this King ^^^ll not adioit of any long discoui^e : stamping 
of money is a prerogative of tlie King, who has taken all the mints 
into his own hands, they could not think fitting to make such 
a proposition at present; he wUl not \\ithout &*st satisfaction, 
adventure his silk into the Khan's countr}^ Touclung the gains of 
the Turkey merchants, also the sale of cloth ; the poverty of the 
people affords not such lunng invitations as before the tradt* was 
known* Their whole stock employed in silk, l>efore receipt of letter 
by the Blessing. According to order, two factors, Tho. Thompson and 
Christopher Rosons, have taken shipping for Surat. Having receivt-il 
the King s '' mind,'* they disjieed a servant of theu' own l>y way of 
Tebriz for Aleppo, and will send a transciipt by another messenger, 
very hard to provide, by reason of the troubles in Bagdad and 
Tin-key. Now proceed to answer theirs of the 3rd March lti:23, 
received the 17th September following. Are rejoiced to hear of the 
safe arrival of the two ships with silk, yet are sorry to hear it came 
so ill-conditioned for want of reimbaliug. Answer in reference to 
the want in ryak of eight, and in the weight and mea*sure of several 
commodities; there w*as once gi*eat'suspicion of the Minister Mi-. Cardro 
now with God ; but it grieves them exceedingly to find their wor- 
ships so bitter with them, for tliere is not (almost) any sort of com- 
mo<iity; but will dry much in hot countries. The -reason why they 
wrote for tin, the price much advanced, anil none coul*l come but by 

L 2 



164 



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1U23. 



th 



Cannot buta littk 



< 



nder '* we have so greatly faulted ' 
in not advising tho Company concerning the taking of Ormnz, 
sidering how by three several expresses they have more or less 
touched something whereby their worships might understand Ormuz 
was taken both city and ciistle, and likewise Capt Blythe, Capt. 
Weddall, and Mr. Monox*.s letters therein enclosed ; who they hope 
ere this are safely arrived, and who must be accountable for alL 
Protest that notwithstanding Monox wrote them to take so many 
bales of silk on credit, whicli should bo satisfied by the spoils, yet 
never could they see either penny, jewell, or commodity, butaU were 
sold in Cn>nibroon, at base rates, shared among themselves and what 
remained .shipped for Sm-at Touching the articles ; the commanders 
carried away the original with them, wherein they have much 
wronged us for upon any ditference with tlie Khan, they have^d 
not liiH liand and seal to show, wherefore they may please to send^| 
it by the next ships. Tht.'ir ships may safely ride under the Castle 
of Ormuz, which the Persian has strongly fortified, enlarged that of^_ 
Kishme, and erected a very strong one in Gombroon, and placed^| 
gaixij^ons in all ; but it may be doubted whether they will defend^! 
youi" ships Irom the Portugals, if protection of the castles reciprocally 
should be refused, wherein we know not what to say, you having 
given us no order. This present now sent they hope will be very 
acceptable to the King, and procure answer of their Sovereigns 
letter. Trust they will not so suddenly give over their trade with 
so mighty a monarch, who so %vell atlecteth his Majesty, having in 
effect obtained tlieir desires. Meantime they will make sale of the 
goods and invt-st the same in silk. Account of goods sold and those 
on hand ; prices. Sugar yields good profit, and is in abundance 
spent by this country people. Cannot give account of Mi*. Darell's 
goods, for he had employed for India, more than his whole estate in 
jewels, carpets, ic., and what remainerl was only his apparel Con- 
cerning Pi^oliert Jetferies estate ; in John Benthall's hands. The 
Hollandei*s have attained Spahan, having brought 114 loatls of cloves, 
nutmegs, benjamin, .sandal- wood, and mace, :;2 5,000 ryals in money, 
four bales of rich shashes (mc), and two of girdles, with some musk 
kc, all free of customs^ and other charges ; their piincipal giving 
out that he was an and>assador and tlie goods were a present for 
his MaJL'sty. till he arrived within two days of Spahan. Sent to 
visit the Dutch and presented them, some being sick, with two large , 
glasses of wine and other necessaries, but he (their principal) " being] 
swelled up in pride, would never come to us, but expected first I j 
should come visit him, which perceiving I would not do." On the 
sixth present, the King made a general feast for all his guests, 
whereto the Dutcii were called, '* \^dio coming with trumpet before 
were in the magiliske (or place of 1 lanquet) placed under us," Upon 
the Kings approach t^ view his guests, the Dutch rose up and I 

saluted him to wlioni they *' pretended their aars ** (demands in tht J 

manjin), to which bis Highness only said this '* what had they to^B 
do with Ormuz," tliey havmg formerly propounded to the Khan^^^ 
that if he would deliver the castle intfn their hands, they would 
defend it against the Portugal "withal leaving them, and so pajssed 
into his magiliske." This day the Dutch delivered their present 




EAST INDIES. 



165 



162a 



of spices, sashes, and g^irdles, to the value of 40 tomans, and had 
Mullayimbeg by the King appointed for their merchant, to whom 
they sold their goods for the sum of 5.000 tomans for which 
(the prices are noted,) they desii'ed satisfaction in silk, but were 
not contented to pay at the rate of 50 tomans per load in what 
sort they pleased. Not herewith contented the King suddenly 
departed for Bagdad. Conceive their goods being in the Kings 
hands, they must take wliat and where he pleaseth. *' The pride 
of this man [**the Dutch [irincipal "] doth still forl^ear to visit me 
expecting first I should see him notwithstanding he hath understood 
from the King's own mouth, that we are his ancient guests and he will 
have us respected. But let his memory drown with his pride." Send 
copies of the Kiugs letters to '* our Sovereign/' and to the Khan of 
Shiraz, both which were dispeeded by the Blessing for Surat, that 
thereby his Majesty rnay be infon:iied " how much thi.s Empeior alTccts 
himself, his nation, and this tiude." Desire their worahips not here- 
after to give them discouragement in the prosecution of their atiairs 
the tlijficulty whereof is only known to the employed. Have sent 
double copies hereof to the Consul at Aleppo, one to be sent by land 
the other by sea. The Hollanders arriving denied to pay us custom, 
referring themselves to the arbitrament of the King and Khan, 
through whose sudden departure, the matter is not yet decided. 

Postscript. — ^9 Jan. 1623-4, — Send these lines to accompany a copy 
of theirs of the 1 5th October past» sent by express to Mr. Kirkham, 
Consxd at Aleppo. Cogiah Nazer, Governor of the Armenians, dis- 
peeding a *' shatir '* for Aleppo. Expect a letter from Tlioma^s Barker, 
who depail/ed for Gombroon the 7th of November. The Hollanders 
have two ships arrived at Ormuz, laden with southern commodities, 
and a good *' cavidall " of money to invest in silk, lliey have met 
with a good time, through the stoppage of the ways, and ** your 
worships* forbearance [of] supplies." *' Now we have broke the ice 
they find good fishing.*' They report that at their ship's departure 
from Surat, we had three ships also ready to sail for Persia. Have 
not made any sales since their last. Their cloth, which Mullayimbeg 
yet refuses to take at former rates, they hold l>etter to keep in their 
hands, seeing the King's siege of Bagdad ** not only letteth the 
bringing of cloth, Vnit hinderetb likewise the export of silk," for not 
any Armenian will undertak*.' carriage thereof in these times of 
trouble, so that AlejipD will find sniall quantities for some time. 
Sigried by William Bell, John Piu-efey, John Haywarde. This 
letter, and the one referred to herein, were read at a Court ** to 
consider the Persian Trade," on 24tft N'ove7nber 1624 (wkich see) 
ivfien it was resolved to}y\irBXie this trade. [Ten pages, O.C., Vol. JT., 
No, 1120.] 

Oct. 17-21. 331. Court Minutes of the East India Company, Mi*. Misselden, 
** reputed a proper merchant, and a good civilian," and now going to 
reaide in the Low Countries, to be conferred with, to be emjiloyed in 
the next treaty with the Dutch. Mr. Skynner also named, but he 
cannot be spared from his employment. Request of Misselden, on 
behalf of the widow of Philip Oakland, who fell overboard the 



166 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 



Palsgrave and was drowned, to i^eceive lOL on accoimt of his wi _ 
Messrs. Westrow and Kirby to have the cotton wool at lOrf. per IbO 
[Edward] Monnox, if he desire it, to have his freedom of thia societyj 
paying to the poor box. Debate concerning pepper underwritten 
for by Sir Henry Roe, for Sir Thomas Roe, his mother, and himself. 
Motion concerning [William] Biddulph's gooda and calicoes. Petition 
of certain of the Palsgrave s rnen for one sixteenth part of the re- 
prisall goods taken in the last ManUJa voyage ; ordered that Capt. 
Clevcnger, Mr. Browne, and petitionei-s l>e at Court on Monday 
moming. Mr- Kirby intreatcd to speak to Sir Paul Banning to lend 
2,000if. or 3,000L ** upon the credit of private men." Petition of 
Richard Wild, a merchant, sometime servant to Lawrence Greene, 
who had been employed at Malaga 11 years; speaks the Spanish 
tongue, and is skillful at accoimt, to sor\^e the Company five years 
in the Indies, and demands 100/. per annum ; a committee informed 
the Court that he knew petitioner 15 years since, and " his vanities 
were keeping of hounds and gaming/* that he may be now reclaimed, 
professing he never heard of any notable vice he had ; Messrs. Venn and 
Bell to inquire of him against next Friday, Request of Mi\ Edwards, 
the apothecary, a brother of the Company, for favour for his kinsman^ 
William Kitchen, surgeon of the Lion, to remit the freight of his 
calicoes ; Init tlie Court remembered that much damage had been don© 
in the Lion, bales ripped open and goods stolen, and would not alter 
what had been ordere^l Wages of John Taylor to be paid to the 
Master and Wardens of the Watermen and his own master. Report 
of Mr. Deputy concemiDg fVViJliam] Methwold's business : (1.) That 
Pattison went out poor, but havuig got Mill ward's estate and the 
Company's into his hands, died rich, whereui>on Methwold had 
imdei-taken the executorship : he could not well deny having paid 
the legacies with the Company's pepper, but affirmed that if he did, 
he put other in the storehoases instead thereof (2.) That Methwold 
canied to the diamond mine 400 pagodes for himself and 200 for the 
Company, as he pretended, though he made no mention thereof till 
all was lost ; to which he answered that he did not hold hinLself 
Ixjund to give accoimt of his proceedings to any of them, and yet had 
made it known to Mi\ Cartwright, who is now dead ; but it was held 
fit Methwold should l>ear the loss of those 200 pagodes, (3,) He 
confessed to private trade, yet not in so great quantities as Mr, Duke 
accuseth him for. (4.) And lastly, as to plotting with BaU to the 
prejudice of the Company, he not only justified the letter he had 
written to Ball, but declared that the respect of a friend is more than 
of a sers^ant, and said of Ball that ** the Company had discontented 
him," and Methwold pretended he intended no hurt to the Company ; 
but by the most favourable construction *' it was a pestilent letter 
against the Company." Being demanded whether he would submit 
himi^clf or stand upon his justification, his answer was that he was 
not culpable for the pepper ; for the pagodes he had been questioned 
before the President, and given satisfaction ; for private trade, he 
had bought only so much cloth as made him 100 shirts; and for the 
letter, he desired them to make a favoumble construction of it, 
wherein he intended no ill, and in a sort seemed willing to submit 
himself to the Court, yet did it not bo freely as that the Court would 



< 



i 

4 



H 



EAST INDIES. 



167 



1623. 



accept thereof, and therefore for the present he departed the Court 
notlung further bt^ing concluded in this business. 

Oct 17* — Minute.s of a General Court Tliose absent to be fined 
12rf* per piece. Declamtion of Mr. Deputy that thej were called to 
consider the order for dividing calicoes, and also about bringing in 
pajTnents at Christmas an<l Lady day ; that the committee's found 
it necessary to bring in the Christmas payment, a8 well to support 
the charge of setting out this next fleet, which will cost 160,000/., as 
to pay the half capital payable tlien to the old stock. Here it wa« 
observed by one of the Generality that 18,000?. in debts were long 
since due to the Company, and Mi\ Treasurer replied that of this gieat 
sum much was secured by transport of adventures. After deliate it 
was ordered to have four auditors to examine the state of the 
accounts, the choice of men and salaries to he settled at a Genci-a) 
Court this day thi-ee weeks. Then was debated an order of the last 
General Coml for di\nding calicoes upon stock to ship out, whether 
to confirm or resolve to deliver calicoes to sell in town : opinions 
and augumentb on both sides; the resolution referred to anotlier 
General Court 

Oct 20. — Mr. Tichbume made known Rir John Walter's opinion 
about the order Mr. Denton had procured concerning his bUls; 
reference to be made to Alderman Molson thei-eon. Mr. Huiio's 
accounts to be audited. Consideration of what is fit to bo done at 
the next General Court concerning the order for division of calicoes and 
bringing in (vhristmas p)ayment; the motion for anditr»r s propounded 
by Ml'. Mynn, to be seriously debated on Wednesday morning ; yet this 
to be plainly made known to the Genei^lity, that without the Chmt- 
mas payment this committee cannot tell how to order their business 
as it ought to be. Mr. Treasurer signified that Sir Paul Banning 
was content to lend 2,000/. on Messrs. Bateman^ Clitherowe, and 
Munne*s bond. Mr. Treastu^r directed to put a list of the committees* 
names in his pocket that those if\Tlling to lend may make choice of such 
committees as tKey like, the Coiu-t undertaking to save them harmless. 
Sir William Cokayne will lend 1,000/. The Court then took into 
consideration the work of the day, which was to confer with divera of 
the Palsgrave's company, alx)ut a sixteenth pait for their last voyage 
to the Moluccas [aic ? Manillas]. As they had it in the former 
voyage, it was held fit to compose this business rather than expose 
the Company to such a clamour as might ensue, especially as 
Brockendon promised it on the half deck, and the Dutch had allowed 
their people in lieu of it two months' pay, and the captain and mastei' 
aflmned that all the English commanders at Japan at the setting 
out of the second expedition to the Manillas were forced to engage 
themselves body and goods to the mariners for payment of this 
sixteenth part and that the Dutch had much moi*e piUage than the 
English. The petitioners Bartholomew Ale, Thomas Cove, John Jay, 
William Con^ant, and the rest are called into Court, and several 
propositions roadie to them which they reject, but in the end they 
submit to the favour of the Company and accept one mouth s pay 
in fill! of all demands. Certificates presented by Joseph Jackson on 
behalf of Augustine Spaldinge, subscribed by President Brockedon 



168 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



and others ; >iiit the Court conceived them altogether insufficient to 
. clear him. Metliwohl called in and questioned ; he desired to be 
made a notoiioiis example if he Imd lieen a notorious offender in 
private trade, and hi ing required to make hi« demands desired 
400/, for wage.s and 370?. in the pui*ser' a book, and concluding it 
neither safe nor honest for him tf> contend with the Company, he 
whoUy suhmittetl lumsLiif to tlieir favour, who, accej^ting his sub- 
mission in good part, required him to attend for further answer onJ 
Friday next [Sixteen pages. Court Bk, VL, pp. 184-194, 197»20L]j 

Get. 20. 332* See. Calvert to Sea Conway, The artillery demanded byj 

St. MnrtinV t^j^e Spanish AnUiaesadoi's is intended to he sent to Lisbon and from " 

^^"' thence to the East Indies, to supply the store at Ormuz formerly 

spoiled by the English. [Extract from DmiUfMic Corresp., Jac^ /.,. 

Vol. CLIIL, No. 79, CoL, p 100.] ' y 

Oct 21-24. 333, Court Minutes of the East Lidia Company, Petitions 
for emplo^Tnent considered [see fables at emi of the year 1623, j 
pp. 219-225], It m imputed to all pursers as a fault, that they I 
take no knowledge of private tmde. They are to be counte- 
nanced in their place, as in the King s ships, where they are next to 
the master. Robert Smith to be purser of the Jonas, and Daniel 
White of the Star, Allen Colly, who went purser to Ru^ia, to 
be purser's mate in the James or Jonas. Robert Loftiis, " said to 
kee}» accounts by way of debitor or creditor,** to be considered of for 
a puiTscrs mate or underfactor. 

Oct, 22. — Sir Richard Smith delivered a letter from Lord Chief Jus- 
tice Hobart, wherein he sinfiiifies that alwut three years since he was 
visited with sickness, ami the Company accepted wliat he had then 
paid in, being 1,500/. of the 3,000/. unden\Titten, which he desires 
may now Ix^ confirmed, that he may the better order his affairs 
the Court called to mind what then passed, viz., that if he recovered, 
he would pay in the remainder orderly, but that if he died the 
(^omi>any would call for on more. The Court book was called for, 
but tlie onk-r not being n-adily found, it was promised to return an 
answer tfj Lui'd Iluliart's letter. 

[N.B.^In the martjin is ivritfen the date A ay. 22, 1620; biU ag 
tfi^^*e are no Gotm-t Afirmtes betimen April 1620 ajui Jxdy 1621, the 
Court Book cojttain In g the above order relating to Lord Chief Justice 
Hobart s adrcnture is ntissing.] 

Sir William Cokayne is content to lend 1,000/, tor six months on 
Messrs. Clitherowe and Styles* bond ; the Court entreated them ta 
h'ud their credits upon this occasion, or an^^ other committee en* 
ijfaged to sup]>ly money lor the present, and for their indemnity i 
was ordered they should have the Company's seal, and be disengaged 
witli tlio first money that comes in. Consideration what was fit to.' 
i*eprt;sent to the General Court in the afternoon concerning the order of 
:2!»th August last, for dividing three and a half capitals of calicoes to sell 
in fown and for bringing in the Christmas payments, A proposition 
for huying all the Company's silk withdrawn, one bale having dis- 
paraged the whole parcel. As to what was fit to be done conceraing 



4 



EAST INDIES. 



169 



1623. 



Mr. Misselden s employment ; opinion that he beintr Deputy of the 
Merchant Adventurer's, and Mr. Barlow a merchant residing there 
[in Holland], could not Ik) eoKily tirod out %vith delays and the 
dilatory procee^ling« with the Dutch, and therefore were fittest " to 
attend this treaty/' Mr. Governor represented that Sir Randall 
Cranfield had c^ven out very uncivil speeches of the Gov^ernor, 
Deputy, and couimittees, which reached higher than to them, as 
particular men, and trenched deep into the government, and that 
upon the Exchange he had " offered personal disgraceful woitls to 
Mr* Westrow." Some were of opinion to move it at a General 
Court, others to go Iiigher, since these artVonts disparage the govern- 
ment and ai*e disordci's taken notice of by the gentry of the Com- 
pany. Mr. Parkhurst declared that he had heaixl ** very wild words 
against the Guvenior, Deputy, and committ*.'es, uttered by Sir 
I^ndall, and if callcfl thereto will accuse him ore tenns!* Tlie 
opinion was to leave these things to further considemtion, but " if 
once the complaint be undertaken, that it l:>e pursued effectually for 
precedent sake, to affright others from the like." 

Oct 22. — Minutes of a General Court, Mr. Deputy declared that 
the disorder of the last Com-t wa.s the cause of this ; and represent<;d 
that disorder hurts not the Governor and committees, but it hurts 
the Company in general, and that the committees need not call 
them together U|»on this business of dividing calicoes or the like. 
Mr. Governor's oi»inion was that the order of the 20th August last 
concerning the division of calicoes to ship out was well grounded, 
and upon such reasons tliat no experienced merchant could contra- 
dict; there rested 47,5 5 5^ worth to be divided, wliich would produce 
half a cApitab more or less ; it was left to the Court to annihilate or 
establish their former order. *' A Grave Citizen " delivered his opiniun 
that the Act fonuerly made ouglit not to be repealed ; firsts " in point 
of justice, whicli, as Snlumon saith, establisheth a cruwn ; and if a 
crown, then all sid.Mirdiuate governments;" next that tlds Act was 
settled V»y a dc^ubli^ (.'ourt., upon whom it would draw imputation of 
instability, and he doubted the linen drapers wlio had bought 
quantities of calicoes u[»on bills, would refuse to perfonn payment 
when there slmuld be so manj retailers. By the patent, power is 
given to the coiumittc^es to order divisions, sales, and other business, 
and he advised not to draw this power from thorn, for " where my 
Lo. (Omnis) once rules, he quickly overthrows all" After further 
discussion, it was resolved that the former order should stand in 
force; and that a penalty of 20 per cent should be laid on all such 
as directly or iiidireetly im|iort their calicoes again ; and, on the 
proposition of Mr. Garruway, one of the farmers, Sir RamhiU (Jran- 
field and othei^s were intreated to solicit the Lord Treasurer for a 
proclamation to prohibit tlie im porta tiun of calicoes. Mr. Deputy 
then made known that there is i*2,0()U/. in arrear by adventurei"s, 
and that tickets sent out to the several adventurers had brought in 
above 1,000/. In November last, 3il of tlie Generality were nomi- 
nated to join with the standing committees and consider the govern- 
ment of the Company, who have met once, and now desire to meet 



COLONIAL PAPETtS. 



1623. 



again ; but beoAii.se so great a number cannot easily be brought 
together, it is ordered that any 10 of them and 10 of the standing 
committee shall proceed with that business. Concerning the Persian 
trade, the committee has already settled it, till the Company ha^ 
ftirtlier advice from thence. 



J 



Oct. 24. — In reference to the services of Jeremy Sambrooke \ 
Mr, Pni^son, Mr, Ticbbimie, the Company's solicitor, made known 
that the Lord Keeper had made an order that when the Company 
bring in the liills Denton .shall bring in the money, and Mr, Alder- 
man MolBon is to certify whether these bills or the money due by 
them woie questioned at the time he made his umpirage ; whe-reupon 
his Lordship will proceed to a conclusion without further charge or 
witnesses ; the Court liked well this pix>ceeding. Sir John Walt-er 
has taken a view of the state of the suit with Ball, " and procured an 
oinler for publication peremptory' the first day of the next term in both 
causes, viz., in Star Chamber and Chancery ;" meantime both {parties 
to examine their witnesses : Mr. Hinchley to be sent for to town. 
Ordered that Capt. Weddall must either .ship out his calicoes as the 
Company do, or have patience tiU Christmas. A son of Sir William 
Smj^th declared that Sir William " left his estate very distracted ii^ 
great men's hands, which could not yet be gotten in/' and thei^fom| 
on behalf of his Hve sons and two daughters moved that the 1,100?. 
paid in may stand for his whole adventure, they Ixjing unal 
to supply the rest. Mr. Bacon to certify Mr, Cooke, master 
requests, that there is nothing due to Mrs. Rynd, her husl 
having taken up all in the Indies, Lord '* Hubberte^s" request i 
ceming his adventure referred t<i another Court. Mr. Neville desii 
the freedom of the Company for his serv^ant. Richard Abbott, but i 
he had served but three years, it not be granted, Allen Colly to be 
purser's mate of the Great James, Tliomas Thomborough being purser, 
Mr. Friday made known that he is aiTcsted for 200/, of the estate 
of Henry Edmonds, which the Com]mny had paid two years since : 
the Court will maintain that payment, but will not engage to flave 
Mr. Friday harmle,s.s, not knowing on what other pretence tlie 
was commenced. Consideration of the choice of masters: Caji 
Clcvenger and Messrs. Roe, Browne, Pynn, Evans, Phelps, Addisc 
Robeiis, Pinder, and Sommerson conmiended for able, sufficient me 
but the choice fell upon Capt. Clevengcr for the Jonas, with 10/, 
month. In order ** to second their attempts upon the Portugals wii 
strength of sliipping," it was ordered that the th3*ee ships for Bur 
and the one for Jacatm should go together by way of Surat Cap 
Clevenger gi-atified with 100/. for bringing the Palsgrave into tl 
Downs^ and left to divide it with Mr. Browne. Demand of Henr 
Bate for disbin-sements for the Bear, but the Court insisted on thefr 
former answer that they owe him none. Piochin, a brother of tl 
Company, conceniing his calicoes, which are now delivered to a line 
draper in Cornwall ; I'esolvod to charge the broke of 20 per ceii 
on his account. Complaints against Mi% Hui-t to be examine 
Committees to Iw named to " sue out " the proclamation to prohibit 
the importation of calicoes. Petition of Robert Willoughby for th 




heir 
3edH 



EAST INDIES. 



171 



1623. 



<M2J 



Oct 31. 



burial charge of his servant, Francis Willson, *' who was slain with 
a fall from the Great James"; to bo paid, [Tioelve pages and a 
halj: Couii Minute Book, V7., pp. 201-213.] 

334. Sir William Hallidaie, Governor, and Morris Abbott, Deputy 
Governor of the East India Company to Carletoa By late lettei« 
out of the Indies they have received advice of new injuries offered 
by the Dutch, wherewith they have forbom to acquaint the King or 
the State, hoping to receive friendly satisfaction ]>y a private treaty, 
to which end they have sent two commLssionors, Edward Misselden 
and Rol)ert Barlow, to treat with the Netherlander^^ and have Mingled 
out two pailiculani only to be handled ; and as there may be occasion 
to toucli ujxjn some matter of State, they liave directed them to 
have recourse to his Lordship. [Hollund Ctyires'p.] 

335. Court Minutes of the East India Company, Mr Tichburne 
informed the Court that Mr. Sherill' Mowlson had t-old Denton that 
he would never do good in hin suit with the Company, and there f'oj-c 
\i-i.sbed him to cease ; also that Hinchlcy, a material witness against 
Ball, desires to be excused coming up, and that the Company would 
procujx? a commission to examine him in the countiy : the Court 
answered that they had no other purpose towards him than to make 
n-' of his testimony, '^ and that if he used the help of the Ipswich 
^^;vU^'on to take his passage therein, his charges shall be borne/' 
.Ml, Cappur to go to-moiTOW to testify on oath between the Com- 
j*iiLiy and Mr. Decrow. The secretaiy to the Commissioners of the 
Navy ** delivered to the Company/* that the commissioners in Lady 
Dale's business have examined all her witnesses and arc content to 
examine the Company's, which the Court took thankfully. OU'er of 
[Rich] Steele, sometime servant to the Company, to do great services 
in Surat or Persia, and thinks it possible to gain the whole trade of 
Pei'sia from the Portugala ; was told they bad no occasion at present 
to use his sei'v^ices, but if he would set down anything in writing for 
the bettering of the Persian trade, they would gladly liearken to it. 
Richard Laugford recommended for purser by Sir Robert Napier ; 
entertained second purser a mate in the Great James. Concerning 
Mr. Soanes purchase of the Company's interest in Buttall wharf 
Otfer of Mr C^roppenbergh and son to become security for the 
monies to be paid by tlie Dutch ; but as the sums are great, tii-st. 
for bringing home the pepper, and then 25,000 ryals a tlebt ; after 
acquainting the Dutch Company he shall know further the mind of 
the Company. Provision to be made of *' Bulgaiy hides/* ** being a 
commodity they cannot well want/' Demand of a brother of Robarte 
Jeoffries, who has purposely come out of Somersetshire for ttiat busi- 
ness, for his brother's wages ; to have 201. or SOL on account. Suit 
of Mr. Weddall to have his pepper, calicoes, &c, ; the Court let him 
know that in the ship ho came home in, divers pieces of calicoes had 
been stolen, " and in a derision old mariners' clothes thrust in to till 
up the pack ;' lie excused himself of having faileil in any part of his 
duty, and the C^urt were contented he should take out his goods, 
]>utting in 200/. bond not to sell in Uywn. He propounded Mr. 
Johnson to go master in the thii*d ship, and spake much of his suih- 



172 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 



(1623.) 
B»tkm. 



(1623.) 

Bat arm. 



cieney. Mr, Deputy acquainted the Court he had received summona 
to attend the Lords at the Council table concerning the pirate 
business and the Company's payments ; te answer that the Company 
are not behind hand in their pa^Tiients, and to pray that an exact 
account may Ix* taken of that business. Answer to be returned to 
Lord Hobart. that the sinking or not sinking of adventures is referred 
te a mixed committee of this Court and the Generality. William 
Bryan, on the recommendation of Sir Thomas Bendi&h, entertained 
for a soldier in their intended new fort, at 18^. per month. Meth- 
wold to be abated 150/. of his wages in i*epect of the 200 pagodes. 
Letter read from Mr» Swann, master of the Charles, dated &om the 
Downs, Oct. 8. Robert Barsten, recommended by Lady Hohart, to 
go in the next shipping aa steward's mate. Monday appointed to 
consider of delinquents in their payments ; and Tuesday to read as 
many i>etitions as tliey can, te the end the house may be delivered 
of the multitude of suitors that resort hither daily. Capi Biddulphs 
goods brought up, but a great parcel of indigo the Court will in no 
wise give way that he should have the selling of ; the rest he may 
have. [Fotirjmges and a half, Caurt Minute Book, VL,pp, 213- 
217.] 

336. Randoll Jesson [Msuster of the Coaster] and Henry Cheetam, 
purser, to (the East India Company). Hope the letters of Capt. 
Bickley and Mr. Browne have come to their hands. Theii' passage 
from the Cape was from the last of July to the 2nd of October. 
Found here the Exchange, Hart, Roebuck, Diamond, Unity, and 
Rose, and our late President [Fursland] verj^ sick, who deceased the 
16th of October Is at this present bound for Jambi, although 
hk agreement was not to go to that place. Has caused a crane to 
be made and set in the ship, for the more easy heaving of the ship 
up the river of Jambi, for two or three in the crane shall heave 
more than 20 men at the capstan. After closing his letters from 
the Cape, tliought good to take the PoHugal captain and seven of 
his men with him, first for clearing himself in what was taken and 
of the beginning of the fight, secondly that the shiji should not go 
for India, and lastly for redeeming Forbnisher and his wife. Have 
delivered to the President 400 ryals of eight, all that he found in 
the prize, but hoped the President and Council would have bestowed 
it upon them, considering the smallness of their jiillage and their 
gi-eat hazard in gaining it. Endorsed, *' Randall Jesson, master of 
the Coaster, from Batavia, 1623 without date, rec^ by the Exchange," 
[One page mid aqtvaiier. O.C., Vol. X, iVo. 112L] 

33 7» Same to same. Have sent an abstract of the men deceased 
in their ships, and copies of their accounts and inventories*, and 
delivered to the President an abstract of their expences from the 
Cai>e to Jacatra, and tlie stores appointed for the factor}^ at Batavia. 
IjampritT *' mucli dishonest *' in putting down more nails, &c. than 
were sent. Thomas Mai tin, sailor, drowned at the Cape, 29 Jtily, 
and Hugh Clarke, their surgeon, who departed suddenly 24 Oct., died 
w ithout wills. Endorsed as the j^Teceding. [One page* O.C.^ VoL X*^ 
No, 1122.] 




EAST INDIES. 



173 



1623. 
Nov. 3. 

BataviA. 



338. Richard Hasellwood to Robert Johnson, chief merchant at 
JambL Thanks him for the sale of his small parcel of steel. Has 
paid Stevinton 20 ryals of eight The Exchange is taking in the 
Moon's pepper, an*l is to be dispeeded away with the Elizalieth. 
President Fm^alanJ has departed this life, and Brockedon by suc- 
cession taken his place, [Half a patfe. O.G., Vol. X., No, 1123,] 

loir. 3-11. 339* Court Minuk^s of the Ea^t India Company. Consideration 
how to reward the merit of [John] Phelps, howsoever William Taylor 
seemed to be a competitor with Phelps for his good service in the 
pinnace Richard, wherewith the_ Portugal ship was taken, also for 
his successful shooting at the Castle of Chisme [Kishme] when he 
dismounted a piece of ordinance, and for being the first that entered 
the Isabella of Goa ; Phelps is rewarded with 25L and conceived 
tit to go master in one of the pinnaces now building. Capt. BIythe 
of opinion it were better t<:> V>uy Malabar frigates than to build 
pinnaces here. Mr. Wykk\ iiro|»ounded for a factor, attended to 
know the Company *s pleasure ; lie was well reported of, '* only he 
had played once for a great sum/' and kept greyhounds, and it 
was thought meet to refer the answer till Mr. Strowd might be 
present Occasion was taken to blame the " nnsecrecy " of the 
Court, because things spoken in Court ai"e delivered upon the Ex- 
chaoge* The gentleman that solicited Capt Bonner's business 
presses for a gratification, but the former resolution not to give any 
was confirmed, Mi\ Deputy declared to Mr Methwold the resolution 
of the Court to abate out of his entertainment 150/., but he referred 
himself to a second consideration after he should have presented 
a declaration of ivhat ha<i passed, the Court being of opinion to 
examine him on new interrogatories concerning Ball Mr. Steele 
read certain obser\'ations of his own concerning the Persian trade 
and the waterworks projected by liimself ; Mr. Deputy observed 
that he attributed too much to himself conceraing business at the 
Magore's Court, and for the waterworks it had been debated in 
Sir Thomas Roe's presence ; the matter was referred. Mr, Bro%vne 
willing to go in the. third ship, demands 12/. per month, but the 
Court would enlarge themselves no further than to 8/., which he, 
not accepting, was left to consider till next Court Examination of 
complaints against Mr, Hurte touching moneys received by him 
from Mathias Waterhouse, Elizalieth Hotlges, Robert and Elizabeth 
Pea<lle, Michael Ungle, an<l othei-s ; the business left for further 
consideration. Mr. Prusson's business to be heard this day seven- 
night 

Nov. 3, — Minutes of a meeting of the *' committees for broakes.** 
Mr, Crlspe propounded that the same course may be held as in the 
plantations in Ireland, which is to say, interewst on so much of the 
sum underwritten as in not brought in, and the party that so fails 
to stay his '* divisions," The delinquents in not i>aying in their 
adventures were then distinguished into three sorts, viz., 1, insolvents, 
and towards such it was conceived cruelty to use extremity ; 2, 
widows and orphans, who have no ability Ui supply what is under- 
written ; S, those that are able, yet purposely lye in wait and will 
not bring in, and to such no favour is to be shown. Discussion 



■Ma 



m 



latti^Mii 



COLONIAL PAFEBS, 



tVio CJeDerality added to the comiiiittees for broke??, so that eVCTjrj 
meetinf,^ may be full Tickets to be sent to adventurers in ati 
that if they bring in all their paymente by the 10th Dec, tbey 
may expect a mitigation of brokes, otherwise the whole broke of 24 
per cent, to 1h^ ciiarged to theu" accounts. The Chrifitmas payment 
to l>c paid in, the necessity of the Company's affairs requiring it, hut, 
to givL* reputation to this stock, and content to the adventurers, ao 
new subscjiption to he made until Oliristmai? come four years, Con- 
ceiTiing the election of four auditoi-s, 

Nov. 10, — Court Minutes. Coneeming the defects of the GreaL 
James ; nhe in found every way sulKcient to perform her voya 
Petition of Pcadle concerning tlie estate of John Frowde, the 
rogative Court having made void the administration of Edward 
Parsons. Upon this occasion was i^^nowed an old motion of great 
importance, that the Company should cause administrations to stay 
six or 12 months before they Vjc paid, l^kut nothing was ordered 
therein. Report of Walter Mountford» tliat the Charles set sail on 
Friday last, the 7th in.st.^ and delivered in the **old boxes of succes- 
sion," &c. Ans%ver of Methwold to the objections against him ; he 
freely submits to the censure of the Court, and desired a moderation 
of his former sentence of loOL, but it was ordered to stand good ; 
he then moved to have allovvance after 9 per cent, for his wages, as 
was promised, to have liis freedom, and tliat the money coming to 
him may remain in the Company s hands at interest at 9 per cent 
from Michaelmas last. Certain interrogatories presented by the 
Company's .solicitor concerning Lady Dale's business. Edward 
HighaFii's reasons for default in his adventure to be represented to 
tlie double committee. Objections against Pnisson to be heard the 
next day. Edward Tyiies to keep account of canvas, &c,, Jeremy 
Sambixjuk not having leisure. Concerning ill's. HaiTison's business. 
Capt. Fitzherbert's widow having come to London purposely to 
clear her account with the Company, the account to be audited, 
'' that she may retui'n before winter come too far on." Petition 
of Thomas Beale, a mathematician, to be entertained as a marine 
man in place of a masters mate, but was refen-ed to be entertained 
aa " a good fellow ** at 25s. or 268. per month if he please, 

Nov. 11. — Complaint against George Lilly, a steward, for being 
" a wasteful man ;*' if found true, he is to be dismissed, Mr, Cocks 
acquaints the Cuiut that he is ser\'ed with '' a writ ad testificandum " 
in Mrs. Wickham's nuit, which business, a« also the interrogatories 
for Lady Dale, are ordered to be carefully followed. The instruc- 
tions, &e. useftil in the next treaty, to l>c made ready to be sent to 
Messrs. Misselden and Barluw. Complaints against Mr. Pruson, pre- 
feiTcd by Mr. Munnes, in reference to the quality of masts, sails, 
and ropes supplied by liini to the Company and his charges for 
same, &c. ; to his refusing English and employing Dutch workmen, 
which wa,9 conceived dangerous, and to other matters. He also 
complained of words spoken by Pruson to one wlio tt>ld the Governor 
'* that Israel could not thrive untO Achan and all his should be 
cast out and stoned to deatii," the roeaning uf wliicli words Munnes 
afterwards understood to refer to some notable bribery or corruption 



KAST INDIES. 



177 



J 623. 



<ov 11. 

The Uagae. 



Nov. 12. 



in the Company. The Court conceived that if the particulars were 
tnie they were foul matters against Mr. Pruson There grew a 
question on some particulars, and Pruson being called in replied to 
the objections laid to his charge, excusing and defending himself, 
saying that every one must live by his trade, that he made his saila 
according to the measure received from the shipa carpenter, &c. 
" Here Mr, Pinison coutil contain himself no longer, but burnt out in 
a passion, * * • contesting iiiith Mr. Manner in such uncivil 
manner, and threatening to bring him to his answer in another 
place, that the Court took knowledge of his insolent carriage, 
tending so much to the Jispai*agement of the government, that it was 
not to be endured in so grave an assembly ; whereupon Pruson told 
the Court he desired to be heard by inditiei'ent judges." The day 
being much spent the business was left to be resolved at another 
Court. [Twenty-eight pages. Court Mimde Book, VI^^pp, 218-24?8,] 

340t Carleton to the Governor or Deputy Governor of the East 
India Company, if it had lain in his power to have done their Com- 
pany any service upon their former letters, he would not have de- 
ferred writing until now, that he is in^^ted by their courtesy both to 
himself and his wife, for which they both give hearty thanks ; but 
such has l>een the distraction iii this C^ompany, by disputes between 
Bcwinthebbers and pai'ticipants, that they know not how to l>egin 
any good correi^pondence with uh hy a necessary reglement for the 
futui^. Only they declare to Carleton their resolution not to swerve 
fmm the treaty, but to maintain it pimctually, of which the lasses 
they as well as we have sustained make them the more careful, espe- 
cially as the commissions to Misselden and Barlow show that we 
seek rather to compose and settle matters in friendly manner, of 
which Carleton has already made the chief of them sensible. Will 
not fail to give them the assistance they require. [Hvllmid 
CortespJ] 

*" 341. Articles of Agreement between the English and the Guze- 
rats upon the seizure of their junks, for the better conservation of 
amity, peace, and free commerce with the English, who have " jufltly 
complained of simdry abuses and hijidrances." It is agi^eed and 
granted U:) Thos. Rastell, President, with his Council, that— 1* Tliey 
shall l*e pennitted fi*ee trade, as well in the ports of Surat, C*ambaya, 
Gogo, Sinda, and Bengala, as in all other places within the ilomi- 
nions of Jehangeer Paudshah, without prohibition of any commodity 
or limitation of places, times, or quantities* 2. There shall no 
governors, custoraei's, or other officei^i engross to themselves, in the 
name of the King or Prince, such commodities as the English bring, 
more than shall be " properly nee<lfid for the use of the King or 
Prince, their crrcares." 3. The house, &c. of Cojah Hassen Allee in 
Siu-at, shaU Ije let them to lease. 4. They shall have free license 
for the buying, building, and careening in Surat, Baroach, or Qun- 
divee, of four frigates a year. 5. Neither carts nor boats shall be 
denied for transport of their goods, or any water forbidden upon 
pretence of duties to the Governors of Urpall, who shall cease to 
exact the same, 6. The actions of any other Christian nation shall 



178 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 

be no way imputed to the English for them to be liable. 7. The 
rahdars or diitie^s at Uncklisearcs, Daita, Bayara, Kcrka, or any 
other places shall for ever hereafter he remitted. 8. There shall no 
violence be practised aj2:ain8t their people, and if in defence of them- 
selves any manslaughter should happen to any snliject of this 
kingdom they shall he free of any punishment- 9. Not any of 
their " eaphilaes " shall be hindered upon any pretence whatsoever ; 
but difteroneefi that might cause the same shall be referred for trial 
and accommodation Ix^fcwixt their chief and the Governor in Surat. 
10. They filiall Ix^ pennitted to be instant possessors of their own 
goods and rarities at their ]>resent landing, which no governor or 
other officer shall detain in custom house, or enforce from them at 
their own rates, and suffer them (the English) to house into their 
own warehouses, where, and nowhcn^e else, shall be the place of 
recourse for their markets, 11. They shall freely exercise their 
o\vn religion, wear arms for their defence, and exercise justice on 
their own people, though the offence be done to a Mussclman, 12, 
Their brokers shall have free liberty of speech before any governor, 
and shall not be abused, or daily fined, imprisoned, or detained by 
every inferior officer upon trivial occasions. 13. The goods, lyafe, 
and other treasure jewels of the English shall for ever hereafter 
be free of the accustomed duties usually paid in Siimt, with con- 
dition that they shall pay a constant rent of 40,000 nis. per 
annum to the King's circare, 14. In case of mortality to any 
Englishman, his estate to remain to the rest of his nation, and in 
case of no English left living, the governor of the place shall reserve 
the same to the use of such English as shall come to challenge itv 
15. The past or present stoppage of the King, Prince, or his subjects* 
junks shall not be imputed to the English as an offence, seeing 
that want of justice has justly enforced them to extremities ; where- 
fore they shall not l>e liable to the suiTender of any goods or 
treasure taken out of said junks, nor shall any of tbc English 
nation be hereafter called in question for the same, "with an 
absolute remittance of all things never hereafter to be questioned, 
[Three pages, 0,C., Vol X, No. 1179.] 

Nov. 12-21. 342, Court Minutes of the East India Company. John Phelps 
is entertained master of the best of the pinnaces now buihiing, at 
5L per month, and to confer with Mr. Stephens how she shall bo 
built. Demand of Jackson concerning Augustine Spaldinges estate,] 
or allowance for it for the time the Company holds it. The Court 
answered it is not their fault he is not akeady come home ; they 
wTote by the Trial, but the ship miscaiTying, the letter also perished ; 
but make no question he will come home in the next smps ; and 
as they expect himself so shortly, they hold it not reasonable that 
** use money " should be demanded. Petition of Jonas Viney for 
1,000^, the remains of the monies due to Capt. Jourdain, deceased, 
which petitioner claimed under his said uncle s will, to whom Mrs, 
Viney, the mother of said Jonas, was sole executrix, but she dying 
made her said son her executor. The Court was not satisfied that 
he, being within age, could give a dischai'ge for the money, albeit 
divers civilians were of that mind, but were contented he shall 



i 



i 



EAST INDIES, 



179 



1623. 



reoeiye 400?.. provided he shall hold himself quiet, without being 
further troublesome to the Company until he Rhall l^e arrived to tho 
full age of 21 years, which he thankfully aceepted. Petition of the 
wife of one John Wood for monies pretended to be due to her hus- 
liand, ** but in an immode8t manner threatens the Company that if 
she failed of her pretences^ she would follow them in the etreeta 
until they were wearied with her importunities," The Court was 
much di>stasted with her impudence, and consulted where to complain 
for redress, but was contented that if Wood will receive his wa^^s 
for the time ho served in tho James, he may. Petition of Wm. 
Whaley for gratification for the loss of his leg in the Company s 
service ; he was told the Company held themselves no way bound 
to recompense his *' mayme/' for they give wages, and are bound to 
no more ; notwithstand^g, they were content to bestow upon him 
IQL as a free gifL Messrs. Bell, Venn, and Abdy attended the 
Lords at Whitehall, concerning certain mariners whose wives com- 
plained they could not have right from the Company for their 
husbands' goods taken by the Hollanders. Suit on behalf of Mi*s. 
Fitsdierbert for monies due to her husband ; when the President's 
accounts shall come the Company will do her right ; in the mean- 
time she may receive lOOL on account, Arnold Broi;\Tie entertained 
to go master in the Star at 0/. per month ; Mr. Johnson, of tho 
Eagle, at 7^. ; and Mr, Ppin, of the le.sser pinnace, at 41, 10&. Con- 
cerning the charges against Hurte ; he denied all, and when asketl a 
second and third time, still stood upon his innoccncy ; but at length 
confessed his fault and submitted himself to the favour and grace of 
the Court ; some were of opinion that he might be so warned as to 
become a good servant to the Company ; others ^vished to remove 
him ; and after much arguing, he was warned to attend on Friday 
next. 

Nov. 14. — Motion of Harlow for a gratification to poor ministers, 
which had lieen done in former years, though last Christmas omittetl ; 
the Coui"t made answer that their former charity had drawn such 
multitudes of ministers from all parts as the Company hath Ijecn 
oppressed with suitors ; and after some debate, that they would not 
set down anything positively until they had acquainted Mr. Governor 
therewith, and understood his mind, Sii^ Wm. Garroway thinks 
himself hardly dealt \^ithal in that they dcman<l 130^. for interest^ 
whereas he, as a fanner of the customs, hath forborne greater sums 
from the Company, and for longer time. Demand of the Lord 
Treasurer in respect of the oveqdus of the compound '* money for 
spices spent in the land ;" he is desirous to clear that account, 
l)ecause from henceforth the Duke of Richmond is to receive it, by 
a late grant from his Majesty ; ordered that tho account be searclied. 
About Mr. Pruson's businass ; the Company nothing satisfied with 
his service nor with his skiU ; he had cairied himself with much 
contempt to some of the committee and scandal to others, had not 
answered well at the former Court, and shall not be employed again ; 
notwithstanding, if he could set down anything in writing for the 
Company's good, he should l>e heard. Mr. Munnes intreated to 
look into the accounts of the purser of the London, concerning the 
goods taken at Ormuz ; and Messrs. Bownest and Lawrence to audit 

M 2 



180 



COLONIAL PAPERS* 



162a 



Mr. BickforrVs account. Report of Mr. Treasurer Stone, that he wiU 
not be al Je to pay out the dividend and otlier pajTiiente now due, 
and can har<l]y see how the disbursements of all kinds will bo pro- 
vided for; after consideration, it was thought fit to get out of debt 
by putting off some commodities rather than to seek monie^s at 
interest, but nothing was at present resolved. Petition of Robert 
Tr'llowe to remit the fine imposed on him by the President, in the 
Iiidies.of four months' pay, for fighting with an Englishman, but the 
Co^irt left the fine still upon hira. Conipvlaint of ** the portera of 
the tackling hou.se ** that their lal>oui's were imdervalued ; to be 
examined. The Comt acquainted that Sherifl* MowLson is resolved 
to re]>ort in the business between the Company and Adam Dentoo. 
Mr. Tichbume to receive 51, on account of his bill. • 

Nov. 1 7* — Mr, Treasurer Stone acquaints the Court that a sub- 
pama was served upon him out of Chancery to answer a bill 
prefeiTcd against him at the suit of the Earl of Suffolk; Mr. Cappur 
to answer thereto for avoiding contempt, 

Nov, 19. — Project presented by Mr* Beale, whereby ships may be 
preserved from the worm and sudden firing. The inventor made 
some demonstration to the Court how the material laid upon board 
it would keep it from firing, with divei-s other virtues, and for 50s. 
extraordinary^ I»er 100 tons he will trim all their sliips with it; 
committee appointed to consult with Capt. Clevenger and some 
masiei*s and gunners and report tlieir ojiinions. In reference to 
allowance for Capt. WeddaU's pepper, the Comt understood the ryal 
to be five mamoodees. The Court of opinion that they are not 
boimd to answer the Earl of Suffolk's bill, except there appear 
matter directly against thom. Allowance to Mi\ Punnyett " for 
carrying about the Charles," &c., and to Michael Nicholls for taking 
up a cable. Committee appointed to confer with Capt. Weddall 
about the value of his pepper. Debate how to provide moneys for 
the setting out of the ships now bound forth. The fleet of four 
sliips and two pimiances will stand the Company in 14,000?. at 
least, and it will be fit to send to both factories 150,000 ryals Ijeside^ 
what shall l:>e bestowed in cloth. Discussion whether they shoiUd 
fill low or not the Persian trade and send fewer ships, to which wa5 
answered that the danger will be the same, besides it may be 
the Governor will not altogether, give over Ormuz; moreover, that 
the trade of tlie Retl KSea ought not to l>e neglected ; whether Surat 
commodities mil sei-ve for Ormuz ; the benefit which Ormuz pro* 
miseth is not to he neglected. All good courses to be taken to liring 
in money ; committee appointed to consider of it and advise with 
the treasurer. The maces which were set at Ss. 6rf. to be now sold 
for 88., and the middle maces that were at 5s. Gd. for Ha, Mr. Barlow 
writes from Amsterdam that a customer there wHU buy half the 
Company's silk, and wishes it sent over. The Court will not agree 
to send their silk thither ; if the Netherlands have a mind to buy, 
they must send their deputies hither. The appointment of auditors 
and the General Court put off in respect of the want of health both 
in Mr. Governor and Mi^ Deputy. Request of Mr. Lamman that 
Edward LjTies may assist Jeremy Sam brook with the accounts until 
it shall please God to ^ve him health. 



4 



4 
I 



EAST INDIES. 



181 



1623. 



Nov. 21. 



Nov. 23. 



Kov. 21, — Concerning the gumlac sent home on the account of 
Augustine Sjmldinge. The Court willing to al»ate the price of indigo 
so as they may sell 100 barrels in a parcel. Composition accepted 
by Mr. Weddall for his pepper. About Beversham*s goods landed 
out of the Lion, and a large carpet^ quilte, and other things 
set by for the Lord Ti^asuier at first cost, and a carfiet for Mrs. 
Hallidaie for her own use. Claim by the friends of [William] 
Baffin, deceased in the Company's service, of an estate of S3oL, 
whereof 5001. in money ; the Court could not conceive how Baffin 
could raise such estate with honest dealing ; it was conceived by 
some he might have gotten much of his estate at Ormuz, to wliich 
was answered that Baffin died before Onnuz was taken, and that he 
carried 1,000 marks with him ; the Couit was contented to come 
to end with him> and therefore declared that i£ those that prosecute 
for the estate \\t11 refer to the Company, they will do them right. 
Report of auditors on Walter Mountford's accounts, which they find 
so intricate and out of onlt^r *' that it will ask a long time to audit 
thera ;" all his disbursements not vouched, and he is to account fur 
1»500Z. ; ordered that until this be done no more money for salaiy 
or other employments is to be paid to him. George Ball, according 
to an order on an old petition to the Lord Keeper, to be allowed 
to make copies of certain papei-s, provided Messrs, Waytes and 
Tichburne be present. The Company advised to examine Ball in 
the business between them and Lady Dale. Concerning [Adam] 
Denton's debt to the Company. Some exception against their beer 
being serve<l by Dutchmen, l)ut there is small clioice of English 
hrewei^, only Mcssi*s. Morgan and Du|jpa Ijeing able to serve them ; 
agreed that Duppa should do so. Great want of Spankh iron hoops ; 
the difference great Ixith in the weight and price, the Spanish being 
22s, per cwt. and English 27s., which weighs much more* Patrick 
Niccolls, Master of Aiis, of Broadgates Hall, in Oxenford, offered his 
service t<5 go preacher in the fleet for Surat ; Mr. Cappur to v\Tite to 
his brother in Oxenford to inrpiire of him. The widow of [William] 
Baffin, accompanied by Mr, Bonnie, made demand of her huBljand's 
estate, who deceased in the Indies in the Company's service ; the 
Com-t told them that if Baflin's estate were questioned it might 
prove dangerous to the widow, especially if* it be true, which .she 
]»retends, that he canied 600/. out in muney, a thing utturly urdaw- 
ful ; if he carried no estate wath him then is it possible that any 
great matter can be coming to him, and therefore wii^hed an 
end might be ma<le by some to be indifferently chosen on both sides. 
Mr. Bourne desired time to consider it, INhieteen pages. C&uj-t 
Minute Book, VL, pp. 248-267.] 

343. Ailvices from the Hague, At Goeree a ship from the East 
Indies has again amved, and another is on the way. Four more 
great ships are ei|uipped to start from the Indies by the first, with 
80 young girls, who in time will make honest mairiages in the 
Indies, [Freneh. Exiract from Molland Corre^p,] 

344. Minutes of a meeting of committees at Blackwall in refe- 
rence to smiths', c^xypei-H*, and other work done there, [0}ie page, 
Cmrt Minute Book, VL, pp, 2G7-2G8.] 



182 



COLOISJIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 
Nov, 24, 



Nov. 25. 



345, Court Minutes of the Blast India Company. Committee 

appointed to which petitions of wives for their husbands' pay and 
for servants' wages are to be wholly referred. George Page, who 
had petitioned for employment as a factor, presented copy of a 
translation out of Dutch uito English ; to attend at next Coiu-t 
Earnest request of Mr, Miller in reference to Capt. Fitzherbert's 
estate in behalf of his widow ; after discussioo, the Court was pleased 
that Mi"s. Fitzherberfc shouM receive 150^. on account. Mr. Ellam 
to make a survey of factors abroad against the next Court. Ques- 
tion between Mr. Browne, master of the Star, and Daniel White 
purser; both to attend the Court at their next sitting. William 
Fall, formerly steward of the Jonas, appointed steward of the Star 
instead of John (or George) Lilly, dismissed '' because he would 
sometimes be overdone in drink." Robert Leake appointed steward's 
mate in the Great James. Concerning a request of Messrs. Lee, 
Langham, and Sherrington to take out their six half capitals, four in 
cloves and two in calicoes. William Jones, foimerly set down for ti^l 
stewards mate, dismissed. Thomas Leeson refuses to go as stew^ard*^^^ 
mate. Robert Loftus, a very honest young man, to be purser's mate 
of the Eagle and underfactor in the Indies. Mr. Parkhurst, one ofj 
the committte for buying those commoctities, to view Mr. Fishbume'i 
satins ; crimsons and greens the colours to be bought. Consider 
tion of the number of ryals to be sent ; 1 50,000 rj^als. with 50,00C 
ryals in goods " a fit cargazone, as well to buy the MaUabar's pepper 
(whereof it is supposed good store may to be had, because the PortugaJaj 
have been kept in two years together) as also to manage the Re 
Sea and Persian ti-ade, together with the trade of Ormuz and th€ 
Persian Gulf ;" ordered to have a Court purposely for settling the 
businesses on Wednesday next, meantime Jeremy Sambrooku, by 
dircMition of Mr. Munnes, to make a computation of the Company's 
stock at Surat and Pei^ia. [Four pagc^. Court Minute Book, VI*t 
pp, 268-272.] 



late 

e of^ 

neW 

ara-H 

000^ 

>per 

gala;^ 

Redfl 

th^ 



346. Minutes of a meeting of a mixed company of the com* 

mittees and some of the generality. Three businesses to be handled 
at this Court, viz., concerning delinquents, the clovei?, and the choice 
of auditors. All delinquents not in like case, some able to pay and 
some not. The list of insolvents examined, and 60,000^. found in 
such hands who for very poverty cannot pay, and no promise of 
mitigation can do gcK)d upon them, but it nmy do hurt where 
men are good. Advised that those that are good men should be call 
upon to bring in their arrears and brokes without mitigation, and 
Company may deal kindly with them afterw^aixls and the Co 
moved to suffer the insolvent to take out his stock already paid in, 
to lay a fine upon arrears, and take legal course against those that 
ai*e able to pay; discussion thereon. In the end it was thought 
fit not to end this business at present, but everj' man to arm himself 
with the l>est reasons he can, that it may be ended at the m 
meeting on Tuesday next. The business of the cloves put off 
after Christmas. Seventeen men put in nomination for audito: 
general, of whom were chosen by erection of hands, Roger Gilibrd, 



I 



. of 

in, 
hat 
ght 
self 
extj 
tiH 



EAST INDIES. 



183 



1623. 



Nov. 26, 



Thomas Colthui-st, Ralpli Handson, — Cranmer, Thomas Eyans^ and 
Richard Swift [Tvjo pages avd a half. Court Minute Book, VI,, 
pp. 272-274.] 

347» Court Minutes of the East India Company. Petition of 
Thomas Latham, executor to Mrs. Mary Fettiplace, deceased^ that 
whereas lie is to dispose of divers legacies given by her and hath 
only her a^lventure of 800/. which he cannot sell except at great 
loss, and shall be forced to continue it in his own name, that he 
may be made free of the Company ; which is granted on his 
paying 5^* to the poor Im^x on his own life only* Advice from 
Marseilles of 80 chests of coral bought for the Company's use, 
which there is good likelihood may be here time enough to be 
sent by the next ships for Surat. Account of Edw, Guy, piu^ser 
of the London, presented to the Court, wherein is set dovra the 
goods taken at Orniuz, but neither money, jewels, nor plate, the 
&ame being delivered (as he said) to President Rastell and Giles 
James ; the Court conceived that the Company is much wronged by 
the underrating of the goods sold, and that they have not received a 
due account of the plate, money, and jewels taken, neither could a 
just one sixth be paid to their men, when there was no just account 
of the whole ; tlie pui"ser therefore blamed for not giving a better 
account, and enjoined to prepare a better on Friday next. Con* 
sideration of the propoHion of ryals to be sent to Surat and how to 
be provided. 200,000 ryals to be sent in the next tleet for Surat, 
and SB the '* cash is very ' lene/ " and a parcel of ryals duo from the 
Hollanders is but a weak supply for such a sum, four or five of the 
committees are entreated to supply the necessaiy occasions of the 
Company, by privately taking up some 4,000/, or 5,000^, which was 
conceived to stand best ^nth the reputation of the Company. Offer 
of Turkey merchants to take a good quantity of indigo, if they may 
have it at a reasonable price; not to have less than 100 barrels at 
3«. 9d. per lb., instead of 4d., to ship to the Sti-aits. 

Consideration of [Kichard] Steele s propositions; he propounded 
the freighting of goods and passengers from Synda to Onnuz, which 
would produce 20,000^. benefit per ann. viz. at 14 per cent, freight 
which the PortugaLs have employed these 100 years, but of late 
by reason of their cruelty the merchants have carried their meix^han- 
dise through Candahar, which trade might easily l>e had again if the 
English woidd undertake the business ; here it was observed that the 
Portugals have seated themselves upon the mouth of the river Synda, 
and fortiiied on both sides and must first be disabled there to make 
good the project. He then marie offer of his service and pretended 
another benefit to the Company in reference to the buying of indigo 
within five days' journey of Lahore. His next proposition was for 
tlie waterworks formerly projected, which he conceived would yield 
10,000/. per ann., and be infinitely pleasing both to the Great Mogul 
and to his sulijecta " the Grand Mayor doting upon tliia project ;" 
but this having been at large debated upon the aiTival of Sir Thos. 
Roe, who no way approved of it, the Company had no purpose to 
entertain this project. The third proposition was that they should 
not trade with the King of Pei-sia, but endeavour to be at liberty to 



184 



COLONIAL PAPERS, 



1623. 



Nov. 28, 



trade anywhere ; to which was answered that this had been take 
into consideration and our Kings letters were sent purj>osely to] 
procure that privilege. Steele was of opinion that Persia yearly] 
yields 30,000 bales of silk, though others said not alx>ve 5,000, and 
that on the coast of Malabar 500 tons of pepper are to be had 
yearly, being but five or six days* sail from Jask. Steele being with- 
drawn, the Court remembered that his propositions were old, and 
that Sir Tlios. Roe was and is of opinion that it is dangerous to j 
employ him, that his defence formerly was very weak and therefore,! 
because the Company expect messengers from Persia, resolved to I 
answer that they have no emplojinent for him ;'and concerning hisj 
propositions, when they hear what these messengers will .say, theyj 
will coasider further on him. Discussion on Steele's propositions I 
after his departure. Petition of William Kitchin, late surgeon of the ' 
Lion, for al3atement of freight, having earned himself very honestly 
abroatl anrl civilly at home ; ordered that he pay 2s, freight per book 
for 150 pieces of calico instead of 28. [Eight jxige^. Court Minute 

348. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Gratuities'] 
given to the poor of Stepney, together with the old beef and biscuit] 
and ** other vayles of beef* as liave been usually distribute^i to the I 
|joor there. Bills to be set up in the usual places declaring that a ' 
Court of Sales shall be held on Wednesday afternoon next. The 
pui^ser of the London given till Monday next to bring in his account*^- 
Mr, Hui'te s business. Mi" Ellam's collection of the factors in tlidj 
Indies, being in number ** Fowei*skoare,** shown to the Court ; some] 
thought the nuraljer over great, but others remembered that they] 
have had heretofore a much greater ; further consideration for supplyj 
of factors refened imtil the Company heai' from Persia, which thatl 
they had not done in so long time, they much wondered at, " the' 
passage being so ordinary" as it is " Request of Mrs. Baffin al:K)ut 
lier husband's estate ; discourse thereon ; the Court readily consented 
that the business might faii'ly be debated and two were chosen on 
either side to end the business. Differences between Arnold Browne,! 
master, and Daniel IpVTiite, purser, of the Star, concerning their resj^eej 
tive " quality and power,*' reconciled by the Com-t ; and the duties or 
their office explained : the like charge ^nven to Richard Swanley,] 
master of the Gix^at James, under Capt, Weddall, and that the nhip] 
fall down to Gravesend by the middle of January. C<»mniittee9| 
appointed to take care of eAcli of the outward-bound ships. Royal] 
James, Jonas» Star, and Eagle, Motion that Mr. Biddulph. who hath I 
been a faithful servant to the Company, may sell his indigo ortrans-l 
port it; but the Court rather inclined to reward his servdce^ ml 
some other kind, and in no wise would permit him to dispose of I 
his own indigo. Inventory of goods presented, supposed to belonc 
to John Browne who died at Patani, Offer of Sheriff Freeman anc 
Ml . Coxe to funiish the Company with Bnlgary red hides. Request 
of George Ball to have the originals of some papers useful to him ; 
answered that he might copy out any of his books or papers in th€ 
auditor's office, but in no wise would the Court consent to part withi 
the originals. [Four pages. Comi Mimde Book, VI., pp. 27^278.] 



EAST INDIES. 



185 



1623. 
Nov. 29. 



(1623 ?) 



Dea 1-5, 



349. Advices from the Hague. The West Indian fleet has passed 
some days, in company with the four East Indian ships, towards the 
Texel, to sail thence by the first. [Frerick Extract from Holland 
Corre^lKll 

350. (Carleton) to the Duke of Buckingham, In speaking with 
the Prince of Oiunge, after the return of the Prince and Duke from 
Spain, he mentioned, amongst other distasts which incline the King 
towards the Spanish overtures of friendship, the "entering (by the 
Dutch) in the East Indies into open hostility avowed by a public 
act of the States General," which ill course has been pursued for 
some years. [Extract from Holtuml Correal}.] 

351. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Letter read 
from tiord Danvers, recommending one Johnson as a factor ; the 
Court, upon examination, did find no great matter in him, and so 
gave him for answer they had no use of him. Long discussion on 
the suit of William Biddulph for increase of his wages and for a 
gratuity for his long and faithfrd service, Accoimt presented by 
Robert Smith and Edwin Guy, pursers of the Jonas and London, of 
the money, plate, kc. found at Onnuz, whidi account was sent home 
from [Thos.] Eastell, President, and [Giles] James, a prime factor at 
Surat ; the Court thought it a very poor account, that of so great 
a wealth as was found there not 20,000/. is come to the Company's 
account, and blamed the pursers that better order had not l>een 
taken to keep what was taken, and resolved that a gi^eater charge 
be laid on the pursers than foimcrly, and did not at that time 
consent that they should have their w^ages. [J ohn] Wood, late master 
of the Lesser James, to receive the wages due to his serv^ants, John 
Flowers, William Beckwith, and John Keyes. 

Dec* 3. — Wages of Edwin Guy and Kobert Smith, pursers of 
the London and Jonas. Proportion of spices to l:*e bestowed on 
Mr. Grovenior, Mr Deputy, the treasure i*s, and committee, acconling 
former custom, with the quantities and the prices. Oifer of Mr, 
Robertes to go master in one of the Company's greater ships, but 
not in a meaner place ; the Court conceived by that offer that the 
masters of their ships do gmw ambitious of title and desire to com- 
mand in the quality of captains, but it was resolved that none but 
Capt. W^eddall shall go with that title, Mr. Bickford's entertain- 
ment to rise 10/. yearly to 60^. till his seven years are exjiired. 
Mr. Biddidph to have at the rate of Ss, per dollar, to stand to his 
adventure of 400/,, and for his long service, not without some par- 
ticidar merit to the Company, to have 100/, over and above his 
wages, and be made a free brother and sufiered to sell bis calicoes 
in town, John Hinchley, summoned by a writ out of the Star 
Chamber to testify in the cause between the Company and Gcurge 
Ball, to have 40a. for his charges* George Page entertained at 
100 marks per annum for three yeai-s, and lOOL for the other four 
years. 

Minutes of a General Com-t of Sales. — Those absent to be fined 
12cZ. each. List of commodities sold, comprising pepper, wet, dried, 
and garbled ; cloves, wet and garbled ; maces, laige brown, middle 



dHHMitii 



186 

1623. 




COLONIAL PAPERS. 



brown, garbled, and dust ; nutmegs, broken and wet ; and silk ; wi*^^^ 
the prices and names of the purdiasers; 18 barrels of gmalac ^' 
grains and 60 barrels of dust of indigo not soli 

Dec. 5, — Court Minutes, Letter from Sir John Suekling, that 
the officers of the custom house be gratified for goods exporte*/ 
The Court luade answer that nothing is due, and therefore desii-ed 
to be spared, but it was replied that very likely the Lord Treasurer 
will be moved in it, and then the request will come stronger ; and | 
" advised that those of the custom house demand none but wairant- 
able fees, which the Company will pay, and to remember that a 
Parliament may examine it, a.s in the late sitting had been begun." 
Petition of George Pike, brother and executor of Edward Pike, late 
the Company s servant, deceased at Succadana, for the estate of his 
deceased brother. Discussion with Mr. Chamberlain about the price 
of cloves and pepper and dust of indigo, which was set at 18d. per 
lb.; but he refused to take it at more than 1 2d., whereupon the 
Comi fell to a resolution of sending ten barrels of it to Mr. Barlow 
to prove what vent it will find in the Low Coimtries. Report of the 
surgeon's chest prepared by Mr. Woodall; ordered that Woodall 
receive 40i. by way of imprest for that service, and that the com- 
mittees crave the help of lK>th surgeons and physicians to view the 
tilings proper to their several faculties. Appointment of a con- 
ference with Ca]>t. W^eddall and Messrs Blythe, Kerridge, and 
Monnox, on Monday next, concemiog the Company *s affairs in the 
Indies. Resolution (if Monday's conference hinder it not) to send 
200 cloths to Surat and 100 to 0rmu2. The Governor of opinion 
that U0,000 lyals will suflice to be sent *' in these ships," which, as 
there is no great likelihood of the opening of Bantam, l^ecause the 
Hollanders make no show of any such expectation, the Couil ordered 
shall be sent, and 20,000 more if they may. Report of Mr, Harrison, 
an under officer of the custom house, that he had followed the 
business of the Company, to the Lord Treasurer, concerning the 
licence for exportation of their calicoes frc^ of custom, and was to 
giutify Mr. Jacob, my Lord*s secretary, with 3/. The Court ordered 
he should have not only the 3^. but 30.9. more for his own pains, 
and 208* for Mr, Jacob's servant. Walter Mountford's debts to the 
Company ; resolved to shorten the unnecessary expence of fresh 
victuals to their ships upon the coast, which is made the greater by 
permitting of such resort of strangci^s as come daily aboard ; Mount- 
ibrd to attend the Court so soon as his health will permit 

Minutes of a General Court concerning the price of cloven ; no 
sign of falling in price ; when any such thing ajvpe^i-s, will be time 
to consider of some course to be taken. As to the business of delin- 
quentB» the committee found so many difliculties tJiat they thought 
it not fit to be dealt in as yet. Choice of four general auditors in 
addition to Messrs. Waytes and Markham, that have heretofore been 
employed ; to have a salary of 100/. per annum each. Their instruc- 
tions; no account to be allowed except vouched, Proixxsal that 
Pnisson should be employed to assist the auditors ; much dispute 
thereon; his petition read. Though the Company would never 
refuse to hear any discovery of abuses, yet they were wary of suffer- 



EAST INDIES. 



187 



1623. 



tec a. 



Jacatra - 



\i 



ing a man to insinuate himself into their services who had done so 
ill offices to them ; for a man may justly be suspected that propounds 
for his own gain. In the end a selected committee of the generality 
were appointed to hear what he had to say for the good of the Com- 
pany, the committee generally desiring to be spared. [Fifteen pages. 
Court MiniLie Book, VL. pp. 280-301.] 

352. A List of all the Factors and Assistants in the Indies, under 
the command of the President at Batavia, and where employed : — 
Dead f Tho. Brockedon, President. 

Henry Hawley.T - ., ^. .| 
Jno. Gunning: )«f»'l'<^^°™<^'l- 
Richd. Haselwood," 
LOeor. Bruen, 

"George Willeby, Factor. 
Roht Huntchins, Clerk of the Stores. 
Edward Traiford, 
Jno. Ox>per, 
•^ Jno. Cartwright, ^Factors. 

Thomas Johnson, 
Dead MarmatJuke SteventonJ 

Thomas RobinsonA * • ^ ^ 
LHeiuyDucie. jA.^^^nU 

- fThomas Mylls, Agent. 
Returned < Francis Futter,"1 t^ . 
Dead L John Dodd, ^ Factoid. 



•} 



Merchants. 



At Jacatra 



At Masulipatam 



i 01 

I. 



In the Ann fl^^J^' Johnson, "1 ,, , 

Dead Thorn. StavertonJ^'-"™^'^"'* 
Dead J Chn Bogan, Factor. 
At Jambi - - ] Rubt. Randall, 1 

Jonas Col bach, l^ Assistants. 
^David Owen, J 

f Heniy Woolman, Factor. 
J Richd. Allen, 1 . w a 
L John Hay ward J ^^*^^*-^ 

{Andrew Coggins, Factor. 
Jno. Dent, Assistant. 

- fHenry Short, Merchant. 
Dead \Richd, Danby, Factor. 

{Philip Harrison, Factor. 
Andrew Weekes, AssLstants. 

- Henry Sill, Factor. 
Deail Benjamin Moore, Factor. 

In the Ann TRichd. Cockes, "1 ^i, , 

Joseph Cockeram. J- "«'^'^*^"'«- 
Returned J John Osterwick. 
At Japan - In the Ann ) Willui. Eaton, 1 ^ . 

- - EdmondSayer,)^^^^- 

Henry Dodswortli, Assistant 



At Acheen 

At Japara 
At Macassar 

At the Moluccas 

At AnilR)}Tia 
At Ban da 



In the Ann 
Returned 



188 



COLOKIAL PAPERS, 



1623. 



Dec 6. 

JumbJt 



1623 ? 



1023. 



Factors. 



J 



Factors. 




In the Ann fEdward Long, 
Ketunied J John Jourdain, 
At Siam and Ma^ulipaiam j Willm. Well, 

Returned [^Edward Scudamore, , 

Dead TTho. Bright, Factor, 
In the ship Discovery -< 

Dead LRich. Robinson, Assistant 

In the ship Abigail - Geo. Cristmas, Factor, 

fRob. Hayes, 
Went since -^ Ricd. Bicke, 

Dead [^Jamiiii Tmnghtonj 

[Endm*8ed, 5 Dec^ 1624t, ihis doetmient is mrongly dated 1623, 
hiU slif/htly endarsed 1624 to whidi year it properly belongs, 0.(7,,' 
VoLX.,Ko, 1124.] 

353, Protest of Robert Johnson against Adrian Vanderd 
principal at Jaiiibi for the Netherlands Company. Adrian Vander 
diissen and Bartholomew Skunst, second merchant, with otherSi 
have this day not only broken the agreement between the Companies 
of ^^^* 1621, in not permitting them to take their part of pepper 
duo from Nochoa Linico, a Chinese ; but struck at their people, 
throw their sacks away, and \Holently kept their men from entering 
Limco*s prau, using many unci\dl and imfit speeches to stir up strife. 
Whereas the English have not only permitted the Dutch quietly to 
take their part of debts out of such praus as they have first seizcil, 
but liave also weighed out pepper to them out of the house, [0714 
pafjc, O.a, Vol X, No. 1 125 J 

354. Petition of Thomazin Powell, widow, to the Privy Coimcil, 
Recapitulates the contents of her previous petition [dec ante, No. 291], 
and prays for satisfaction from the States of the Low Countries, as she 
can have no relief from the East India Company, for that the gooda 
came not to their hands. {Domestic Corresp., Jew. L, VoL CXXIV^ 
No. 104, Cal, p. 32D.] 

355. Court Minutes of the East India Company. The Court 
reminded of a motion for a gratification to the superior officers of 
the Custom House for goods imported ; but ** did not hearken to Uie 
motion." Motion of the Lord Treasurer for hiii brother, Su- Randall 
Cranfield, to receive again the full money he has paid in, and he 
discharged of his adventure ; but it is not to be done, for the 
example and consequence was such as would draw an apparent 
mischief upon the Company, *' there being divers, whereof some of 
honourable quality, that do but att-end the success of that motion." 
His Lordship also desired some silk quilts, which were promised at 
the best rate they can Ix? afforded. The Court informed that some of 
the committees had been summoned to the Privy Council — but were 
not called in respect the Prince sat in Council upon some private 
business— alx)ut a petition of Widow Powell and two other women 
against the Comimny, supposing that in the late treaty the Company 
had recovered monies from the Dutch in recompense of all loas&s^ 
whereas tlio Dutch had utterly rejected the motion ; it was remem- 



EAST INDIES. 



189 



1623. 




Dec 8. 

Jumbi. 



Dee 10. 



10. 



berecl that PowelFs wife, having made known her poverty^ had lieen 
formerly gratified, and that at hor humble .suit they had sent a son 
of hers into the Indies to their great charge, wherewith she wa^* 
very thankful; hut now they resolved to call home her son, and 
make known to the Lords the unjustness of the complaint Lc*tter 
read from Sir Heneage Finch, Recorder of the City, in behalf of 
Peter Bell, purser of the Eagle, for certain moneys which he claims 
to be due to him. Tlie gratification to preachers for goofl res[)ects 
forborne Uie last year, held fit to he likewise forl>ome thi^ year. 
Petition of Thomas Reynolds, late purser of the Lesser James, for 
money disbursed by him in Ireland, Also of William Rooters and 
Richard Foord about the estate of Arthur Ht^th, a sailor, who wt^nt 
out in the Hart and died in the London. Report of Mr. Eyei-s that 
the arbitrators on V>ehalf of Mrs. Baffin demanded 800/., and wrmld 
not abate above 100/. ; but it was put to them whether she woidd 
accept 300/., and they desired time to confer w^th her, [Three jHUfes. 
CouH MintUe BL, VI., pp, 301 -30+.] 

356. A second protest of Robert Johnson against Adrian Van- 
derdussen. They are again forced to proceed against him ; for when 
the firsi protest was delivered he scornfully threw it under his feet^ 
and spumed it from him, saying his masters were more able to buy 
pepper at ten ryals the picul than ours at eight ; and as once when 
a difference happened betwxMEm their people although he did the wi'ong, 
he sent forth his people (the cause unheard) and gave them charge, 
to kill, stick, and slay all the English. In regard of these wTongs 
they protest they may not, without apparent danger, longer tntst to 
sudii dealings, and that the loss, hui*t, or damage arising thereby is 
the fault of Vanderdussea [One page, O.C\, Vol. J,, No. 1120.] 

357. John Brooke to the East India Company. By the Lesser 
James and Palsgi-avo he advised them (to his great grief) of the loss 
of the Trial, and that the Roebuck escaped narrowly. The 29th of 
October last the President and Council sent him upon disooveiy in 
the Little Rose, and he was '' wanting " some 18 days. The river of 
Chamysoare upon Sumatra and Great Bessee arc very good places, 
but Sabacoare he likes not so well, Hopes his draughts of the^se 

E laces will give them great content. The President and Coimcil 
ave made him Capt. Robert Adams* successor, commander of the 
Moon, of which he hopes to make a sufficient ship to go home in 
Noveml:»er next ; and the President has promised to go home in her. 
The Moon must be carcenecL " He leflb his wife furnished for 
30 months, but now his time will be some 18 months more, so intreats 
them to let her have 60/, more. Has lost them one ship, but hopes 
he shall save them two by industry, care» and pains. Endormd, 
'* John Brooke, &c., concerning his search of a place to foHify in, 
&c" \pw page, 0,a, Vol, X, No. 1127.] 

358. C*ourt Minutes of the East India Company, Mr. De la BaiT 
presented Mr. Bartholomew Jaquin, a stranger, wdio offi*red a project 
for making fresh "wat^^r from salt [water], with or without fire : the 
Court remembered that their ships carry sometimes 100 tons of 
water, and answered that if the project proves feasible they w^ill both 



190 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 



Dec. 11 

to 

16*24, 

Jan. 9. 



1623? 



entertain it, and gratify the inventor. Questions to CapL Blythe con- 
cerning Ormuz ; he is of opinion that the Persian Governor truly 
intended to hold friendship with the English, for Onniiz is not tenable 
without the help of shipping ; ships may ride in great safety close 
under the walls of the castle, and the Company have houses allotted 
theui in OiTniiz of gix*at capacity and conveniency ; that the Persian 
having luul experience of our faithful dealing will be loving and 
kind to our nation ; the island is no fertile place but is supplied from 
other parts ; English cloth is in little use there ; at Christmas is 
the fittest time to set out from hence to Surat and Persia. He 
jirotested that 700 books of calicoes, 8 hhds. of pepper, and 100 wt. 
of indigo were all the goods he brought home, and expected the 
reward promised for bringing his ship so far without touching by 
the way ; the Court answered that he can in no sort challenge the 
reward, for he stayed at Portsmouth, where not only his own goods, 
but a far greater quantity by means of his evil example, were 
conveyed ashore. He offered to submit himself, but for some good 
reasons the Court foreboro to conclude with him at that time. 
Errors in the pureers* accounts ; cattle bought without vouchers, and 
no accounts for passengers, whereof they have sometiraea 100 at a 
time. Letter from the Countess of Kildare to borrow the Company's 
house at Deptfoi'cl, there to entertain her poor neighbours of Deptford 
in the Christmas time ;** the Court remembered some favours done 
by her Ladyship, and were content to pleasure her with the house 
until Candlemas ; an inventory to be taken of the goods left in the 
house. Letter from Sir William Bird, judge of the pi-erogativej 
court to stay the estate of John Han^ett, because it is now in 
(pestion before him whether the pretended executor John Sympson 
be lawfully authorised ; ordered that stay should be made accord- 
ingly. Gregory Clement engaged as a factor for seven years, at 
100 marks per annum for the first three years, and lOOi. for th< 
other four, Francis Smith, a young lx>y, entertained to go as 
j'-onker," at S^. per month. The secretary to write to Mr, Browning' 
of Ipswich to entreat him to cause James Beversham to come up 
forthwith, or they will take a course to fetch him by authority. 
IFour fKige^ and n half. Court Minute Book, F/., ;>;?. 329-333,] 

359, Examinations of John Weddall, Richard Blythe, Charles^ 
Clevenger. Gamaliel Embrey. surgeon of the London, and Jas. Bever 
sham. Concerning the value of the prizes taken by the East India 
Company's ships under their command, Portuguese and Chinese ; also I 
the value of the spoil at the taking of Ormuz, in diamonds, jewels 
cliains of gold, plate, monies, &c. Capt. Weddall says it was 
between 22,000^. and 25,000/. [Sixteen pages, mith vmrffinal noie9 
in the handivritivtj of Ed. KickoUis. EaM Indies, Vol IL, JVo, 84.] ■ 

360. " Propositions concerning the profits to be raised to hifil 
Majesty from the island of Ormuz." The King of Persia cannot 
hold Ormuz one year without aid by sea, and it is doubted whether 
that King or our merchants have possesion of it now j it is reported 
that the latter, upon the taking of Ormuz, had the customs of that 
island and half the spoil. The customs were worth to the King of 
Spain 400,000^, per annum [sic], and would be again if merchant 



I 

r 
It 

i 

r- 

les - 

4 



EAST INDIES. 



191 



1623? 



1623 ? 



1623? 



might traffic in safety. It is said that our merchants now make 
100,000/, per annum of the customs. Six men of war and 200 men in 
the castle under a goveinor, at a cost of about 50,000/. per annum will 
defend the island against the Spaniard. No fear of the Portugals 
but two months in the year. All customs from other nations will 
come into his Majesty's coflens. Tlie King of Persia si i on Id be 
moved to deliver up Ormuz to his Majesty, under certain conditions, 
and it should then Ije the maH town for our merchants. [En<kyi^8ed 
€18 above, O^ic page. End Indies, VoL IL No, 8o.] 

361- Petition of Xhomazin Powell, with 30 other poor distressed 
widowfi, to Viscount Mandeville, President of the Privy Council. 
Set forth the loss of their htisbands' and children's Hves and goods, 
violently taken from them at the Moluccas by the HoUandei-w. The 
Council promised that as the State?i of Holland gave the merchants 
satisfaction, so the merchants should give the petitionei^ satisfaction, 
who were thereupon referred to the Trinity House [see ante, No. 292], 
and thence to the Admiralty Court to produce proof of their losses. 
Sir Henry Marten, Judge of the Admiralty, will allow them nothing 
but wages, out of which deductions are made by the East India 
Company, Pray for fui*ther relief, as being ready to starve and 
destitute of all comfort. [Domeaiic Can^esp,, Joe L, VoL CXXIV.^ 
NiX 105, Cal. 2h 320,] 

362. Abstract of divers petitions and complaints against the 
Dutch for wrongs done in the East Imlies. The names of the 
petitioners are as follow, viz. : — 



1828. 
Dec 12. 



Chambers, Marie. 
Cobb, Elijs, 
Coke, Katherine. 
Cowley, Barbaia. 

Eehill, Sam. 
Garlick, Eliz. 
Greene, John. 
Grice, Ann. 

Howlett, Robi 
Johnson, Marie* 
Jourdain, Charles. 
Jourdain, John (deed.) 
Knight, Alice. 
— [Tim pcujes. End IndieB, 



Vol 



LamlMTi, Gartwright. 
Langram, Susan. 
May, Margaret. 
May, Thorn asine. 
Meade, Valentine. 
Miller, Marie. 
Powell, Thoniaflin. 
Rickman, Priscilla. 
Selbie, Maudlin, 
Thomson, Martha. 
Tucker, John. 
Vinney, Susan. 
Watkins, Nat, 
//., No. m.] 



363* Court Minutes of the East India Company. Gi*eat sums of 
money having been brought to account for fresh victuals expended 
aboard their ships outward bound, and the fonuer allowance having 
been an oc<^a,sion to draw a gi^eab number of strangers aboard Uy the 
Comj>any*8 great charge ; ordered that no fresh victuals shall Ijo 
thenceforth allowed after they are once past Tilbury Hope. The 
Lord Treasurer, de^siring to buy 40 or 50 silk quilts, ordered that ho 
shall have them at M, per cptilt. An ofler of Dutch merchants to buy 
325 Imles of silk at 22s, per lb. ; accepted on certain conditions, but to 
be kept secret. The project for fresh water to be made of salt water, 
and what recompence will bo fit to be given to the inventor re- 



192 



COLONIAL PAPEBS. 



162a 



Dec 12, 

ButaviA. 



ferrecl to another time. Concerning the sufficiency of Henry ((Seorge^^ 
in the VKtrgin) Wheatley, mate in the Jonas, Examination of 
Capt Worldall, as to the value of the goods taken at Ormiiz ; he said 
he esteemed them at 20,000?., '* but that the service stood the Com- 
pany, one way and another, in three times that value :" further that 
he ha*l received summons to attend the Lord Admiral ; the Court 
advised him to deal clearly and to make true am^wer to an^^ing 
that shall l>e deoianded of Wm, In reference to the complaint oi 
Willow Powell and others to the Council their Lordships have 
ordered that according to such payment as the Dutch have agreed to 
make to the English for pillage, the Company shall make restittition 
to the marinei-s that lost their goods and no otherwise ; the Court 
remembered that in the late treaty, the motion being made l>efore 
the Lords, the Dutch rejected the ssume, and as for Powell's widow, 
she had received money at several times, and the Company had sent 
her son into the Indies to ease her (though able to do them no 
scr\ace), but since she has become so troublesome it was noiv re- 
solved to send for him home again. Committee appointed to attend '| 
the Lords an<l give them satisfaction concerning that business. 
Comjilaint of Messre. Moore and Buggins, servants to the clerks of 
the Council, that they have not been considered for services in the 
late treaty ; to be gratified with 208, each. The Lord Treasurer to be 
moved about the exportation of calicoes. The Company's secretary 
to l)e pj-esent at the meeting of the Grcnemlity concerning Mr. Pmsson. 
Rei>oi*t ef the committee apfjointed to consider the purser's book of 
the Jonas ; that they find no vouchei^, and it is a common tiling for 
pursei-s to deliver such accounts ; ordered that aU masters and pui^rs 
1x3 at the Court on Wednesday next, where they shall lie reproved 
and admonished : some of opinion that if one of the pui-sers be 
removed, the rest wiU be warned. [Three pages and a half. Court 
Minute Book, VL, pp. 304-308.] 

364* Protest by John Goninge, Eichard Welden, and George Bruen, 
l)y order of President Thomas Brockedon, against the Dutch General, 
Fieter de Carpentier and Council. That they have to the uttermost 
of their power inviolably kept the articles of the treaty of 1619 
concerning the general trade, but that the Netherlanders have 
wilfully violated and broken the most material and important 
articles of which the English have often complained in vain, and 
liave long laboured to reconcile and reform. They will in this 
instrument only insert the chief heads of their complaints, and so 
leave them to the consideration of competent judges. First, the 
Netherlanders exact custom in Batavia against the fourth article, 
and in Banda constrain the English to pay excise; and will not 
Buffer thera to make sale of slaves. Secondly, they protest against 
the intolerable exactions of the Nethelanders in the Moluccas, Am- 
boyna, and Banda, under pretence of maintenance of garrison and 
foHification, the English Company being forced to pay twice as much 
as they are bound by the contract ; all wliich abuses they collected 
int<3 36 articles and delivered to the Dutch General on £) January last 
{see ani€,No.2^G). Tlurdly, they protest against the Netherlanders 
assuming legal authority over all the subjects of the King, and 



* 



I 
I 



EAST INDIES. 



193 



1623. 



subjecting them to seizures, bodily punLshments, and oonfifications, 
*' and of late Hannan Van Speult, your Governor of AiiilK>yna, after 
he had with meet tmsufferable and hellish torments, not hei^etofore 
heard of amongst Christians, forced certain Japans to accuse our 
people of treason, and then with tlie like torments constrained our 
people to confess such impos-sible conspiracies as no mortal enemy 
of our nation would ever have l:»elieved, so that the very heathen 
did exclaim and wonder at those cruel procedingfs, and last of all 
proceeded to the barbarous execution of Capt. Gabriel Towei-son and 
nine others, factors and assistanta of his Maj. subjects in Ambc^yna," 
which said execution the General and his Council have approved, 
and have denied the English copies of the examinations and forced 
confessions. Fourthly, that the Netherlanders restrain them from 
the commerce of Bantam, being the main pilJar of ail their (the 
English) employments in these parts, notwithstanding their protest 
of 25 June last, wherein they amply confuted the vain pretences of 
the Netherlanders to the contrary, who still declare their reeohition 
to oppose the English going to Bantam by force of anns, whereby 
the English remain destitute of cheap lading, and are constrained to 
procure pepper elsewhere at intolerable mtes ; that the Nether- 
land's committee make a show of besieging Bantam for their own 
ends, those of Bantam having egress and regress as freely as ever 
they had in times of peace, and the Netherlanders u.sing all means 
to provoke them to bring pepper aboard their shijKs and suffer 
others to go and come \inder their free passes ; only the English 
are debarred ; that the Netherlanders suffer the Chinese freely to 
buy pepper brought fi*om Bantam, and at Sangora and Ligor the 
English are prohibited trade under pretence of a contract made with 
the King before the articles of Accord, which is expressly against 
the meaning thereof. Fifthly, that by the 10th article of the treaty, 
the defence was chiefly to be employed for gaining the trade of 
China, to which end the English had set forth two stout fleets for 
the Manillas in company with the Netherlanders ; notwithstanding 
the Netherlands General dispecded a gieat fleet to sur}>rise Macao, 
and failing there liavc foi-tified the Pisca<Jores, hoping thereby to 
gain the ti'ade of Cldna to thenaselves, for Capt. Clevenger arriving 
before Macao in the Palsgrave, offered to land his forces in the 
same attempt mth the Dutch, but their commander, Reyerssen, 
scornfully rejected Capt. Clevenger s assistance, saying tho exploit 
was for their own Company alone, and the Engli-nh had no interest 
therein. Sixthly, that in the fleet, by joint consent set forth for 
the cx)ast of Goa and Mozambique, in 1022, Admiral Jacob Dedell, 
in contempt of his commission, and against the ^vill and consent of 
Capt Humphrey Fitzherbert, sent away two of hm ships aliout 
private merchandizing to the Red Sea, which proved the uttr*>r 
overthrow of the voyage ; for when tliey came before MozaTnbiquo 
with three English and two Dutch ships they met three camcs and 
a galleon, exceeding rich, the Viceroy licing in person, and had 
taken them all if their forces ha^l been imited, whereas they only 
got a small sura of rj^als out of a carac they sunk. And the more 
to confirm Adoiiral DedelFs faithleas and oljstinate }>rQcecdings botli 
commanders agreed to sail from Choul, and the English fleet 
accordingly went there and lay there almost a month ; but Dedell 

N 



194 



COLONIAL PAPERS* 



1623. 



Dea 12. 



Dec, 13, 

Batavio. 




sailed directly for Sumt about the paiiicular affairs of his master's 
and meantime another carac and galleon anived safely in Go 
" which tloublo dealing of you of the Netherlands Conipany hath 
given us just cause to, to suspect your sincerity in such actions o| 
defence/* or rather offensive war, seeing your performance extenfls"' 
no fiu-thcr than makes for your particular ends and Ijenefits, 
St^venth, that they refuse to deliver up to us the island of Poolo- 
roon absolutely, according to Ai'ticle 9 of the Accord, but with 
restrictions and limitations, and having formerly put to death all 
the inhabit^mts under the ]>retence of treason, I'efuse to let the 
English peo]>le the island. Lastly, that the General of the Nether- 
lands' Company on -^^ August 1(523, protested against the Engl is! 
for not continuing " tliose hostile and offensive exploits shadowec 
under the name of necessary common defence ; but the prer 
being seriouslj^ weighed, namely, their appropriating the tiude 
China, their exactions and bloody executions in the MoKicc 
Amboyna, and Banda, their opposing free commerce with Bantan 
Sangora, &c, and their faithless dealing in the common defence 
who can justly blame the English for refusing to unite in exploit 
where their trade is no way opjiosed. Therefore the President anr 
Council in behalf of the English Company protest against the 
Netherlands Company, and their General and committees in parti^-^H 
cular, for all the losses and damages sustained by the English^l 
Company, and more particularly against their usurpation of power 
and authority over the subjects of our gracious Sovereign, and for 
those indignities drawn upon him by their " reproachfid oppressions. 
}>arbarouH executions, and confiscations ;'* against their unjust exac 
tions in the Moluccas, Amboyna, and Banda (a principal cause thatj 
they are constrained to desist from trade there) ; their refusal 
deliver Pooloroon, according to agi-eement and the articles; theii 
opposition of free commerce at Bantam and elsewhere ; their advan^ 
tageous and cautelous proceedings in remote defence or rathe 
offensive war ; and more particularly for all losses sustained by the 
sinister practices of Admirall Dedell, and for the attempt agair 
Macao and fortification of the Piacadores, without their knowledga 
and consent. Also, they disclaim the charge pretended for the sie 
of Bantam, and refuse to join in any action otherwise than 
expressed in their former Act. Endorsed, *' Received in LondoB 
29 May 1624, out of Holland, by the Pinnace Hazewindt.** A €'i>/>s 
of this iMper was hulosed by Sec. Conway to CarUton m letter oi 
25 Juru 1624: see ante li^o, 364, [Eight pages. East Indies, Vol if 

No. no 



365. Copy of the latter part of the above protest. Imperft 
Four jyages. The foUovnng vwmorandum is added in Latin : " Th 
schedule was shown to Jeremiah Sam brook the 24th July 1654, and 
mention is made thereof in his deposition given on the part of thi 
Anglo-Indian Company before the Anglo-Dutcli Commissione 
Guilh. Chrymes in the presence of John Theod, Borchloon." [0.(7. 
Vol X, AV 1128.] 



3^ 



366. President Thomas Brockedon to William HalHdaie, CJovemop' 
of the East India Company. Whereas in several private letters to 




EAST INDIES. 



195 



1C23. 



Dec? 



their Preaident deceased, the Governor gave order for examination 
of divers offencc% whereof AugiiBti no Spaldinge was accused more 
than a year before, Spalding ma^le request to the President and 
Council^ that they would examine the matter, and give certificate to 
the Company if they found him guiltless ; and finding after exami- 
nation that most part of those matters whereof he was accused were 
fab*e, a certificate was delivered to him, copy whereof is sent here- 
with (jinmtingy From private trade he cannot wholly clear himself. 
but that he should drive so prejudicial a trade as ia reported is most 
imtnie. The order for suppreasing private trade shall not want 
their endeavours to execute so far forth as Uiey may. In reference to 
his own employment ; haa often been a suitor for license to return for 
England ; his covenanted time was but five yean*, but was content to 
sta}^ one year longer. Cannot conceive a fitter man for *' this prime 
place of President/* than Henry Ilawley. Is sorry his poor endeavors 
have not given the Company content, but entmatH his favorable 
construction in such matt^:*i's wherein he has failed, and imputes the 
same to the many businesses heaped upon him by the death of the 
President. Hope.s he will not construe amiss his resolution to return 
next year. The factoi*s in Jarabi, Japan, Siam, and Patani are not 
yet arrived, nor have they given account as they ought, but next year 
he intends to balance up the general accounts. Sends by Spaldinge 
a "Caccatoa** to his worship, and a China bedstead to Mr< William 
Freeman, legacies from Mr. rui*sland. Prays that, seeing he is des- 
titute of friends, he will take him into his protection. [Two jH^fQ^s. 
Endorsed, **By the Exch[ange]." O.C, Vol. X, JVa 1129.] 

367. Thomas Brockedon, Aug Spaldinge, Henrie Hawley, and 
John Ooninge to Robert Johnson and the rest of the merchants at 
Jambi. Stevinton's letters and accounts sent by the Moon, came to 
their hands the 30th October, and they were not a little grieved to 
understand the gi*eat leak sprung upon the Moon, whereby her 
intended voyage for England is made void. They^take notice of the 
great trouble caused of their unruly people ; Powell tlioy will call to 
account for his *' beastly fault.'* Are sorry to understand of their 
continual trouble and danger by *' that perverse king and people " ; 
all which might be easily remedied if the Dutch did not so ob- 
stinately oppose their going for Bantam, the want of which trade 
constrains them to sutler more indignities than were othei-wiae 
tolerable. Can prescribe no certain order to redress or prevent those 
abuses, but they must make no breach with the King, or give over 
trade there, for the Company exceedingly piess for retunis which 
must chiefly come from Jambi, seeing Bantam continues shut and 
small hope of alteration without further order from Europe, If they 
think it needful for security to keep on lx>ard a ship before the 
town, and out of her to make sale of their commoditieB, hold it not 
amiss, so it may be done without giving oiTence to the King, If no 
fair com-ses may prevail with hira, and he is obstinately bent to 
overthrow their trade and endanger their lives, then refer it to them 
i^ prevent his mischievous purposes in the liest manner they may, 
Tlie Coast and Sumt ships not yet amved, wherefore they will 
dispeed the Rose with such cloth as they advise for. If they can 

K 2 



Jii 



196 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1G23. 



DndoH 
badH 



not put offtlie Japan silver, let it be sent to them. Intend to give 
John Bailey his deserts; when bodily punishment will not restrain 
the unniliness of their people, they should be punished in the purse 
by tines, for which the Company has given full authority. The 
Diamond, the Abigail, which long since is sent to the coast of 
Sumatra, ami the Rot'buck all draw too much water to go over the 
bar at Jam hi. Conccriiin<^ the price of pepper; our masters com- 
plain exceedingly of the high price. Rcfjiiire that they *' inviolably 
observe '' their agi^eement with tlie Dutch. To brin^ pepper lower 
than 6i ryals the picul they hold it not convenient. To use the 
pinnace Spy to cany their goods and niomes up the river. Weak- 
ne^s of the Dutch in the Straits of Malacca. Do not a little wondc 
that there should te such great ditference betwixt his (Johnson'i 
accounts and Stcvinton's ; he had done well to have sent 
Jona8 [Col bach]. The Unity arrived lately from Tecoe \Wth pepperj^ 
and ufTon advice of Mr. Man, &c. they dispeeded the Discovery and 
Abigail thither, Daily expect the Elizabeth and Reformation laden 
from Acheen. In want of their accounts, for the CJompany require 
an inventory of all their stock in India. Wax Irom Japara is very 
dear; they need buy no quantity. They cannot send a ship to 
Malacca on purpose to cany the Portugals to their own doors. They 
did well to put Oliver Strank from his stewardship. Johnson's 
request to come from Jambi upon the Anne and so for England 
they have granted, and have sent Thomas Staverton to succeed him 
as principal, to whom the goods, monies, provisions* moveables, 
slaves, &c. belonging to the Company are to be delivered by inven- 
tory, to be subscril>ed by Staverton and Bogan. All debts standing 
may be acknowledged before the King or Sabander, and a distinction 
be made between good and desperate debts. Have determined to 
lade the Moon's pepper aboard the Royal Exchange, and hope to 
have the Elizabeth from Acheen to dispeed for England in her 
company. Instructions as to the employment of the Coaster, tl 
Bear, the Bee, and the Rose. Hold it dangerous to send one sli 
for England alone, because of the abundance of pirat<?s lurking in ; 
places. Have sent three chests of money and other goods; Hope 
to furnisli them plentifully with cloth. Two assistants go with 
Mr. Stavei-ton, viz., Robert Randall and Richard Croft. Desire they 
furnish themselves plentifully, having such choice, and send hither 
the unprofitable drones that they may be sent for England. To 
communicate their letters to Tliomas Staverton, and take his advice 
in all matters of consequence* Sen<l a Portugal captain whose ^i^| 
was taken by the Coaster, having given him his liberty on promisP^ 
to use his uttermost endeavours to obtain the release of our people 
at Malacca. Our employers have after much trouble concluded with 
the Dutch for matter of lestitution, and are in hand to frame certain 
orders for reglement of trade in these parts ; it is liigh time, for as 
it now stan<Js our masters must needs be great losers. Have de- 
livered Staverton a commission for govemrnent of the Company's 
servants in Jambi both ashore and aboard the ships, and certain 
orders from England, strictly to be observed. Express order waa 
sent by the Anne to seize the estate of Tho. Turner, purser of the 
~ ip, whose diBhonest practices at the taking of the caraos are oiadi^J 



th^ 
sh« 



EAST INDIES* 



197 



1623. 




Bitiria. 



more manifest, and yet Johnson advises nothing of what he has 
dono- Require him to \mt that order in execution as he will answer 
the contrarv^ Hope they will procure the Anne*8 lading so that 
she may be di8i>eeded for England this year. Po-s/^err/?/.— President 
Richard Fursland departed this life the 18th October last, to the 
inestimable loss of our employers. [Sis: pages. 0,C,^ Fcrf. X., 
No, 11.53.] 

368. Thomas Brockedon, Henrie Hawley, and John Goninge to 
the East India Company. Their last was of the 9th of February by 
the Palsgrave {see ante, No, 204), since which time the Abigail, 
Roebuck, Hart, and Coaster have arrived ; the Abigail making a 
long passage, whereby she lost seven men. Through the deep lading 
of the Roebuck she narrowly escaped the same rock where the 
Trial was cas't away. She lost four men. The Hart lost but three 
men. By the passages of these three ships it appears that in that 
southerly latitude of 40"^ the winds are most constant and strong 
from May tiU October. The Coaster lost two men. About 500 
leagues short of the Cape she took a Portugal vessel of 150 tons 
after a doubtful fight of 12 hours; this vessel, which was '*so 
spoiled in fight'* as to be unable to proceed for India, came out 
of LislKjn with three caracs, three galleons, and another vessel, for 
the regaining of Oroiuz; she had 8G men in her, but nothing of 
value. The captain and nine men wore brought to this place. At 
Saldanha Bay the Abigail met the Lesser James in company of 
her consort the Dutch Lioness and the Maid of DoH ; the Roebuck 
met the London, Jonas, and Lion, all well. The Hart found letters 
of the anival of General Coen at the Cape, but the Palsgrave was 
not anived, though more than three months from this place. Have 
received the full nuiober of chests of ryals, lead, and provisions, 
according to invoice ; also several letters, '* the lx>ok of the tractate, 
articles of agreement for restitution, the King^s Commission, decla- 
rations/' &a WiU endeavour in future to be as perspicuous as they 
can in all important matters. The satisfaction required by the 
Comi>any for the murder of George Cokayne cannot with justice 
be performed upon the Chinese, for those who committed that vile 
fact were not men of any account, but rogues, who after they had 
acted their bloody villany fled to Malacca. Besides, your worships 
have found by experience how the Dutch here have handled us 
for meddling with the Chinese in a case more clear than tbis; 
and though you write us we should not be deterred by them, yet 
when you shall undenstand their late abominable and detestable 
proceedings against your servants in Ambo3Tia, we doubt not but 
you will confess that we have reason to beware how we incur 
their unlimited tyrannous injustice. For those of Cheribon the 
case is the same ; fur the Clove in her last voyage brought in a 
praw of that place, but General Coen ** in a kind of between entreat- 
ing and threatening fashion'' sent to wish us to deliver over the 
praw and men ; and had we not granted his will, we well per- 
ceived ho was resolved to have forced us with disgrace to have 
released them, so that we must forbear to medtlle with them until 
by strong power and authority from our Sovereign we may be freed 



COLONIAL FAPEES. 




from the yoke we are now subjected under. Concerning the beneti 
a£ tEftdtng in Sangora and Ligor» mil best be able to relate, 
Bee ahall return from SianL Remarks on the Company's view of 
Qfdering the trade in conjunction with the DuUJi in the Moluccas, 
Amboyna, and Banda ; answer the points referred to them by the 
Company, which they say are worthy of better consideration : they 
were not so well experienced as they could have wished, and had 
none to direct them but their competitors, the Dutch, unto whom 
IIm Company referred them for information. Conceived that son^e 
ttiogB in theii* agreement would be to their prejudice, yet found not 
sufficient reasons for them to break oft* with the Dutch, and not 
make trial of that trade ; whereas if they had refused to join^ the 
Dutch might justly have complained and protested against them for 
breach of the ai-ticles. Are now better acquainted with the manner 
qI trade in those parts; in reference to the "fruits" which are 
yearly reaped and the charges : the manner of growing and receiving 
dovBS is once a year. Their debts come not in so speedily as the 
aopposedf and they can get nothing but frivolous answers fix>m 
Duteh. The stock sent to those factories was not sufficient, but 
Dutch had suflered them to pay their third of the charges as the 
selves did (viz., in cloth and victuals), one third part of that 
have been advanced to the Company's profit, Hojie the Compa 
will receive full satisfaction for the sums they can prove the Dutch 
have unjustly extorted for them. Yielded conditionally to the 
clothing and feeding of the soldieirs by the Dutch with then* own 
provision«i. Under pretext of necessary cloths and \ictuals, 
Dutch pay the soldiers their whole wages therein, and thereli 
defeat the Company of the vent of their merchandize, contrary 
the articles of agreement. Acknowledge it to be verj' needftil thai 
a limited numl>er of soldiers lie established by the Council on both 
sides for the several garrisons, but the Dutch will not sutler the 
to meddle or make herein, which notwithstanding it be absolut 
contrary to the articles of accord, yet in this and all other matt 
of importance their wills are laws, and by tlieir forces they do \ 
will 80 maintain it, without regard either to reason, justice, 
erpiity ; which may also Vie applied to Coens going in person to the 
Moluccas, where the Company say he ought not to have undertak^y 
any such service before he had propountled it to the Council ; it ]|H 
most certain he made them not acquainted for what place and pu^fl 
poso he intended his forces, thoitgh he said all men loiew he went 
for Banrla, Concenting trade in the Moluccas ; will deal as caut 
ously with the Dutch as they may, and hold them to the articles 
the treaty, but to reduce, them to conformity and concurrence wi 
themselves in that trade is utterly impossible. To prevent 
wrongs tliere is but one way, and that is wholly to separate our-, 
selves from them. Wherefore have Ix^gun to give over that tmt^H 
and have just cause wholly to relinquish it except otlier order coio^ 
firom the Company. Reasons why the Company's project of sending 
% -sliip for the Red Sea from Masulipatam cannot be effected in 
rfvort a time as they conceived ; have wTitten to the factors there 
mlvise them what goods are fitting for such a voyage. In repl; 
the Company's order that they yield no conformity to the 



aw^ 
"eliH 
tha^ 



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sovereignty of the Dutch, but protest against all their proceedm^^ ; 
they heartily wiali the Company had sent them such orders from 
the King as might have freed them from that intolerable yoke, for 
until such aUsolute poMcr come tliey have no hope to obtain remedy. 
Perceive the slow proceedings of the Dutch Commissioners ; but if 
the Company hail rightly weighed the desperate state they now 
stand in, they would have fuunJ it most needful to have sent 
sufficient order before all other biiBine^s, to release and free them 
from 8uch mischievous and devilish practices against their persons 
and affairs. Are in hope t^o receive orders for their freedom, and in 
the interim commit themselves to God, who hath hitherto preserved 
them out of the jaws of those more fell than lions. The Dutch 
have at least 16 ships on the coast of China and at their fort of the 
Piscadores, but if any good be done they will let the Company have 
no share in their achievements. The English factoi-s have not 
sufficient capacity to prevent the manifold deceits, framlulent tricks, 
and circumventions of the Dutch, Some more resolute and discreet 
should be appointed to undertake the gi-eat charge the Company 
has, contrary to the writc^r's desire, put upon them. Have not been 
wronged by the Dutch in the matter of their joint consultations, 
as the Company conceived ; but confess they (the English) have 
not taken the place of precedence which every other month is due 
to them in regard of the greatness and sovereign power in this 
place of the Dutch. Do not repent in thi.s, but if they have done 
wrong ask pardon for their ignorance and eiTor (if any be com- 
mitted). The Company's blame of them concerning Capt, Fitz- 
herbert is undeserved ; have always given him his due respect, and 
he had little cause to write that he was your water-bailif, for 
never man of his place did less in that charge. If not admitting 
him in the Council of Defence were the cause of his discontent, 
they only followed the Company's ordei^. After his return from 
the Moluccas, where he was appointed principal for directing those 
atfairs, he was aiimitted one of the Council of Defence, but how little 
help they ha<J from him, himself well knew ; " more we could say 
concerning him, but Ijeing dead we leave him." Having now l>etter 
lielp of writers, they will scnrl in future double copies of their letters 
by the Dutch ships. Plainly perceive by *' the book of the tractate'- 
sent to them the Company's sincere and royal proceedings with the 
Dutch Comudssioners in handling the ditferences which *' our lordlike 
competitors hero will never be brought to, as derogating from their 
greatness.'^ The Company seem to be very jealous that theni^ sliould 
not be faithful dealing in the buying of diamonds ; tliose that 
lx>ught them are since returned to England, and can best answer for 
themselves, and clear suspicion. Have written to the factors at 
Masulipatam that if the mine be open again they may see '* how you 
weixj opinion'd and what you will have further perfonned in pro- 
viding greater quantities of that commodity." The Bezoam received 
of George Ball were belonging to the old joint stock. Cannot excuse 
Robert Johnson's irregidar courses, yet cannot ** miss him in tliat 
factory " ; hope he will make amends for what he hath done amiss, 
for the misery of that [tlace (Janiln) i« such that not one new couier 
in ten can have his health there. Smelt s many debts will hardly 



200 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623, 



satisfy what he owes the Company ; both his brothers are dead at 
Amboyna, Cooceming dead men's estates. The want of good car- 
penters is exceeding gi'eat ; not the fourth of those sent know any- 
thing what belongs thereto, nor indeed ever were of that profession. 
Will endeavour to reforai the " vain and idle shooting of powder." 
Do not marvel they found many of the pursers' accounts so confused; 
many that coidd scarce write, much less keep any formal account, 
have been employed. The death and removing of pursers for their 
insufficiency is a principal cause of this disorder. They take notice 
of the reducing of both stocks into one ; the " implements at the 
factory of Japan of Bmall value, and the houses there will be seized 
on by the Kings or must be left at the coming away of the factors 
from Japan, Patani, and Siara, so that little or nothing will be made 
of them. There were no anchors remaining at Jacatra when the 
Dutch sacked the Compan^^^s house there, nor any other goods or 
provisions. Their accounts by the Star will make plain they had 
no great stock remaining, the want thereof was the cause the Com- 
jiany had no more returns. The adventurers if they had rightly 
understood the state of their afiairs in these parts,'and how their stock 
was employed, would have small cause to fall into admiration and 
never enter into consideration of the charges they are at by entring 
into that new doiensivc or rather otfensive business with the Hol- 
landers, and how the Hollanders sent out as much money in one 
year as they did in tbree. As for the reports that the pursuit of 
pleasure by most of the factors, and the negligence and improvidence 
of the rest, has been the cause of their small retoms, can prove the 
contrary. Are glad to hear that the Hart, Roebuck, Charles, Star, and 
Eagle arrived safely, and hope that the other three ships from Surat, 
with the James and Palsgrave, are since airived also safely, and will 
again add some life unto their declining affairs. Their uttermost endea- 
vors shall not be wanting to send returns, but if tlieir potent enemies 
the Dutch forcibly cross their designs, it lies not in their powers to 
remedy it. Have not yet absolutely accounted with the Dutch for 
the freight of monies and goods, but doubt not they vnll be brought 
to more i-eason. Have proceeded with their resolution according to 
the Company's desires to withdraw their ships from the Manilla 
fleets. It is most true that the Dutch in those exploits intend 
chiefly conquest and sovereignty, and " the issue on your part cannot 
be other than the consumption of your ships and ruin of your 
stocks, than which the Dutch desire nothing more." On account of 
the proceedings of Admiral Dedell. so faithless and contrary to the 
meaning of his commission on his la^t voyage and exploit at Mozam- 
bique, to the inestimable loss of both Companies, as may appear by 
their declaration, they have utterly refused to join in a second 
exploit for Goa, or in any other like exploits of those remote defen* 
sive or rather offensive wars in places wliere they have no trade or 
residence, until their losses by Dedell be first repaired and their 
freedoms restored, according to the articles of agreement, yet ia 
cause of just defence their utmost forces ever are and shall l>c in 
readiness. Send copies of the demands of the Dutch committees 
and their replication. The business of Admii^al Dedell was here 
referred to the committees of both Companies, but they found the 



^j 



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201 



162a 



Dutch so obstinate in maintaining DedelFf* actions that this businea 
could not tie brought to any concla-^ion, but is rc^furrcd to Europe. 
The opinion that tlie Company slmll receive good recompence for the 
damages they sustained on the voyage. The whole proceedings are 
at large declared in a l)ook herewith sent. One thing only they 
will note, that Michael Green charges the Admiral with 03 bags of 
money received by him tor which he gives no account. In reference 
to their supplies of money and the factories at Acheen and Jambi, 
cannot find they have sent monies t4> many unprofitable factories as 
tlio Company write ; how long it was before the Company despatched 
any supply is best known to themselves, but it pleased God to send 
relief l>efore any came from the Com|iany, and again to put life into 
their aftairs, then at the last gasp, the like whereof they hope shall 
never befall them. The supplies now sent had come aa happily as 
they could have wished for buying pepper at Bantam; if their mali- 
cious friends, or rather enemies, the Dutch, would consent they might 
go thither to open trade, which would not be denied [by the King 
of Bantam] ; but the Dutch, seeking to confirm their sovereignty in 
this place, delay them with slight reasons and trivial excuses. The 
Dutch are well content with what their masters have fraudulently 
obtained from you for one year's pretended charges of their lying 
before Bantam, and hope of the like for the next year. The 
proceedings of the French in Roanne with tlie Dutch. What 
was done jointly could not l>e lesa, except free trade should have 
l>ecn permitted them at Bantam. See no reason why the French 
have to que^stion the Company for it. Concerning the seeking a 
convenient harbonr for security of the Company's shipping; there 
are manifold difficulties, for they are certainly assured the Kings 
will oppose with all their power the English fortifying in any part 
of their dominions. Sent by the Clmrles draughts of tlie princiiml 
forts in the Moluccas, Amlxiyna, and Banda. If they intend to have 
forts there, those of most importance are Vjest worth the demanding 
and keeping, viz., the fort in AmbojTia, tlie fort Neira upon Banda, 
and the fort at Malaya. Are of opinion that tlie Netherlands com- 
mittees never intended the Company should have any footing in 
any of their dominions ; wherefore it were much better to separate 
from them upon any conditions. Will observe the cautions and 
limitations the Company have prescribed in tlie power given to them 
of increasing wages to men of desert. Are sorry they are not 
thought to have deserved increase of salary as well as otliers, but as 
they intend to come home shoi'tly, will rest contented. Have 
ailraitted Henry Hawley to be one of the Council of Defence, and 
wish the Conqjany had sent two or three such men ; but the numl>er 
of factories Wing reduced, will not need so many new men as 
formerly. Death of John Povey, master's mate of the Abigail, but 
entertaineil master carpenter on 2*)th Sept. The Globe, Fortune, and 
Clove all so rotten they can swim no longer, and the Peppercorn and 
Bear must also be laid up. Hector's Island more commodious than 
Japara for trimming ships. The late bloody executions of the 
Dutch in the Moluccas give us just cause to abandon that trade, 
notwithstanding your order to the contrary, whicli we doubt not 
you will approve. The Danish ship went from the coast of Pulicat 



EAST INDIES. 



203 



1C23. 



people out of the fort (Jacatra), but certain Japan plate waa given to 
Denton» and one chedt of plate to Sir Tho. Dale, a^ a present from 
the Duteli, hoping thereby to have the better usage fi*oni him. Am 
persuaded the Dutch will not 1:m3 aide t'O prove that any of our people 
received anything but of mere gifi. Send the Ijook of charges* of the 
fort of Puiicat; l>egan 13 June 1020. In several writings against 
the Dutch, mentioned in the book of defence, have at large 
declared the reasons mo\ing them to depai*t from Puiicat, Cannot 
sufficiently marvel that tlie Company write they have contrilnitijd 
8,000/. towaixls the pretended charges of the siege of Bantam, for 
in writings delivered to the Dutch General they have sutiiciently 
proved the Company to be no way liable, and have disclaimed idl 
paat and future charges. Have had occasion to handle this point at 
large wdth the Dutcli, coi»ie.s whei^eof are herewith sent in the book 
of defence, which they entreat may be seriously perused, ^Tiat their 
endeavours have been to ojien the ti^arle of Bantam, an»J how strongly 
opposed by the Dutch, will also plainly appear. Would have bei-n 
veiy glad to have received " an absolute and authentic reglement for 
trade/' The Dutch much slight the copies sent, not being sub- 
scril>ed ; so that imtil there be further order and confirmation of 
them, are like to enjoy no benefit thereby, Have good cause to 
desist from joining with the Dutch in offensive wars ; refer to their 
consultations and the handling of tho matter with Dedeh Concern* 
ing the Dutch forcing payment of the garrisons with victuals and 
apparel ; must have yielded to them or have had no trade in those 
parts ; neither yet are like to havc^ luJess they continue to contribute 
to their unreasonable exactions and subject themselves to their 
bloody tyranny. Have handled at large the Dutch Generals pro- 
ceedings in taking Banda in then* answers to the Netherlandci"s of 
5th Sept. ; it was a great neglect that our people did not protest 
against his proceedings in Banda. The Dutch have built forts upon 
lantar, and to require them to demolish them might *' bring our 
persons in danger for meddling wnth their sovereignty/* Have sent 
the Rose with John Brook to search out the mo&t convenient jtlace 
to fortify in. It is not strange that the Dutch have gi*eat advantage 
in their consultations ; thumselves |>roceeding in all sincerity accord- 
ing to the contract, whereas the Dutch contrary wise. If the writ- 
ings now sent be seriously perused conceraing the common defence, 
besieging of Bantam, theu' desistanco from the ti-ade of Moluccas, 
Ami H3yna, and Banda, their complaints against Dedell, and answers 
to the writings of the Dutch, are confident that the advantage will 
nut appear so great. It is worth noting that ever since they refused 
to yield unto all points, tliey could never agi^ee on any matter of 
impoiiance. The Dutch ''will have their wills or conclude nothing." 
Have received the Kings commission, and will to the uttennost of 
their power endeavour to gov^em those under their command with 
moderation, but desire some fonn of law for proceeding in capital 
causes, The Dutch are very precise in this kind, for they have an 
express loile set down for punishnient of all offences, from the least 
to the greatest. The Company s seal-at-arms m so great they can 
make no use thereof, having none but hard wax, John Humplirey 
bath leave to go home in the first ship ; continue to send homo 



1623. 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



thoae that have been longest in the country. Will send home by 
every ship the tamarinds advised for. The journals and ledgers of 
the pursers ai-e herewith sent, also the books of John Booth, purser 
of the Star. Thomas Sprake (Spragge) is long ninco dead, who in 
his lifetime was a common drunkard, and fit for no employment ; he 
was sent from Siirat ^^^th others of the like quality ('* being such as 
commonly that factory can afford us "). Concerning the accounts of 
Robert Hayes ; can give no I'eason how the money was taken up b}" 
Courthope, Send hoi^ewith a journal of daily passages, beginning 
with the departuix? of the Palsgrave, 11 Feb. 1623, and continued by 
the late President, Richard Furslaiid, until 22 Sept 1623. The 
IGth Oct. it pleased God to take hirn to his mc^rcy, and the next 
day he was buried. The journal has been continued by Thomas 
Brockedon, who was desirous to have gone for England, but pre- 
ferring the Company's ser\dce before his particular benefit, was con- 
tented to remain one }*ear longer. Tlie Goa fleet, viz., the Royal 
Anne, Exchange, and Diamond, aixived in this road in May and 
June, having in a manner made a lost voyage, through the perfidious 
dealing of the Dutch Admiral Dedell, diiefty by sending away two 
of his best ships fi>r the Red Sea about particular merchandizing, 
the want whereof was the only occasion of not taking three rich 
cnraca and one galleon. The value taken amounts to 3G,591 rj^ab. 
In this, as well as in the Manilla voyages, there haa been exceeding 
grosH pilfering by the commanders as well as mariners. Michael^ 
Green, elected chief commander of the English forces after Capt Fitz-^ 
herbert's decease, shoH in his account 8,453 ryals, part given to 
Bartholomew Goodale, master of the Ann, and Thos, Turner, 
purser ; have ordained liis estate to be seized to tJie Company's use, 
and send him to England to answer his demerits. Intend calling 
the others to account on their return from Jambl Send certain 
relations against Mr. Muntlen in his Manilla voyage. Edmond 
Lenmyes, commander of the Elizal>eih, accused to have embezzled 
great matters in his Manilla voyage ; only a small matter found at 
his death. Send draughts of several places in the Straits of Sunda, 
whereof the isle of Gn^at Bessee U the most convenient to fortify in 
at small charge ; an excellent harltour, and no place better situated 
for trade ; but without mhabitants or victuals, unless the Pengran 
of Bantarii give his consent (of which they have litUe hope) the 
difficulties will be exceeding great, and they must bring everj'- 
thing in their shij^s from elsewhere. The late loss of the master 
of the Rose and live othei^, sent ujx>n discovery of this business, 
has taught them that no trust is to be given to those barbarous 
jieople. Have motioned this matter to the Dutch, but received a 
doubtful answer, so cannot without further order begin any fortifica- 
tion. Their goods in no small danger of tire in straw houses ; shall 
be constrained to build warehouses. Complain of the quality of 
provisions sent ; the casks so slight and thin that half the arrack and 
butter leaks out before it arrives. The coixlage is likewise very fl 
bad. The cheeses iitterly spoilt by laying in tar. Leud in pigs not " 
so vendible as in l»ars. and above 30 j>er cenL difference in price. 
Bixmd cloth and '' tine peq>otuano3 of good and lively colours ** 
would ym^l^* vend in these pai't^; also tour or five mastiffs '*of 



I 



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EAST INDIES, 



205 



1623, 



a fair and stout kind f five or six cases of strong waters (of rod 
and yellow coloui's), and some fair pictures of small value very 
acccptalile for presents. The King of Mticassar is very kind to 
our nation, and would willingly pay for st^veral things noted here- 
with- Send an abstract of the stock in India in all places, 
except Janihi, Japan, Siam, and Patani : the three latter factories 
dissolved. Have trimmed this year the Exchange, Ann, Hose, and 
Unity, and there remain to be sheathed the Moon, Ruby, Bee, and 
Diamond ; exceeding want of earpentem, the mortality very great, 
principally through their own disorderly drunkenness* Tlie ships 
remaining in the Indies are, the Moon, Ann, Hart, Discoveiy, Ruby, 
Roebuck, Diamond, Coaster, Abigail, Unity, Bull, Rose, and Bee. 
Hope to lade the Moon and Ruby for England next year, and the 
Ann, now at Jambi, and Discovery, on the coast of Sumatra, this 
year. The Coaster and Rose are sent for Jambi, the Abigail for 
Sumatra, and the Roebuck for Macassar, to lie out for Portugals 
coming fi^oui Macao. The Bear must be laid up. The Bull not yet 
arrived from Japan, nor the Bee from Siam. Will send the Hart, 
Diamond, and Unity to Aeheen and the coast of Coromandel The 
Clove, Supply, Fortune, Peppercorn, and Globe laid up ; the Pepper- 
cora lying at Hector's Island fur a careening ship. Have augmented 
the wages of the following men : — Robert Johnson, long chief at 
Jambi, offered 120L per annum if he would remain two years longer, 
but he refusing, returns for England. Thomas Staverton to remain 
threey ears at 1 001. per annu m and to succeed Johnson. John Hutchins, 
clerk of the stores^jto have 50 J, per annum rising 10/. for three years ; 
the same to Edward Chapman, wlm is since dead ; and to Aiidrew 
Coggins» who has served eight yearn and is now chief at Japara ; and 
61. per month to Robert Hack well, master of tlie Rose, the better to 
encoumge deserving men of his coat. Have uiade ehoicfj of Langton, 
mate in the Coaster, to succeed Povey, deceased. Others, earnest 
suitors, either to go home or have their wages augmented. Request 
of Tliomas Stave rton to pay two thirds of his wages , and other suras 
due to him from Edward Pike and Capt, Toweraon to Capt. John 
Watte, of Matton [? Watkni] in Hertfordshire ; he is an honest and 
sufficient man. Fursland on his death-brd much complained that he 
had not kept so exact account of his particular estate as was requisite ; 
he brought a good stock out of England, and Brockedon can witness 
his manner of augmenting it ; disposition of his estate ; the account 
for his mother sent open for the Company's perusal. Have appointed 
Kobcrt Adams coimnander of the Elizalieth, Uapt. Lenrnyes hiding 
deceased, John Brooke, commander of the Moon, and Mr. Mundcn, 
to go home master of the Exchange under Aug. Spaldinge. Com- 
menrl Richard Swanley, lung time master of tlie Exchange, for 
preferment The Danes have laden this year at the Coast about 
4D0 tons of pepper with some calico from Denmark. The Prince of 
Tanjore or Naick of those parts hath often invited us to live in his 
country, promising gi'cat privileges and favours^ and now by the 
Ruby is come an Englishman named Johnson, who hath lain about 
18 months at the Naick s couii, " iw> a pawn for the pejiper first sent 
home by tlie Danes," who rejiorts that the Naick, having heard the 
English to be a peaceable nation^ has a great desire that they should 



l^_ 



206 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 






trade in his dominions, wherefore hare resolved to send a ship thith* 
The Portugals have lived long in his country, but he reiiLses to hav 
the Dutch, and has demoliKhed a fort they l:»egan at Tinegapatan, say in] 
*' he hath heard how they encroached upon other Prince's dominion] 
and thei-efore 8hould not live in hhJ* Tliink it best to defer sen" 
a ship from Masulipatam to the Red Sea until fui-ther advice froi 
Surat, unleas the expected trade for Tanjore should fail. Variatio: 
in the price of gtinilac. Tlie coast will yearly vend good quantiti' 
of coral, lead, and broad cloth. Tlie Dutch sell great quantities of 
cloves, nuts, and mace there at very great profit Have great store 
of Japan silver, which in vain they have tried to '* put off," and h; 
much liindered their employments ; unless they caii do so at the coas 
(of C*oronmndel) will l>e forced to send it for England. Great erroi 
committed by Denton in the accounts received from Patani. Edwar^l 
Long daily expected from Siam. Have delivered Aug, SpaldingeJ 
four signets [detscribed] of deceased men, for theii' wives or friends^ viz.^ 
Capt Fitzherbert, Walter Bennett, Nicholas Ufflete, and another*^ 
Augustine Spalding goes home in the Exchange, and Richard WeldenJ^ 
late chief in Banda, in the Elizalm-th. When he went to Amboyna 
ho " found om* people executed your business in a confusion and the 
English Company much indebted ; he received certain goods fi*on^| 
the Dutch which he sold and paid the said debts, and brought aE^ 
our people fi*om thence except two men, to lie in our house until 
further order, affirming that he had left order with Henry Sill, in 
AmlxjjTia, to accept of no goods or housing from the Dutch Governor, 
seeing he had sei^^d upon the said goods, and suffered them to be 
spoiled and part embezzled, while they were in the Netherlandcra'j 
hands, in the time that our people were attacked and mui^dei-edJ 
Upon which advice, we have made the Dutch debtor in Aml»ojTi%| 
accoimts for the said goods and money, which we found wanting tol 
balance the dead men's several accounts, all amount to S0,000 ryalsj 
but contrary to the advice of Mr. Welden we have since receiver 
letters fi-nm Henry Sill imparting that according to the order lef 
him by Mr. Welden he hath received part of the goods from thel 
Govemor, which were in so ill condition that by his report they willl 
not y]i}\d one fourtli part of the aforementioned sum." Blame Welden 
for leaving such an oriler with Sill and reporting to tliem tJie contrar)^, 
but it seems Welden chose rather to please them with an untnithl 
than to report ho had agi*eed to receive back sairl goods. Have|i 
however, brought the valuation of said goods and wants nponJ 
the account of the Netherlands Company and will protest agains 
them for the same, " for if the persons had lived they mustl 
have made good the wants in their accounts, and if the goods bej 
spoiled in the Dutch Company's hands by them violently seL 
uijon, we see no reuson but that they ought to make good the loss of 
them unto your accounts/' Send herewith particulars of swd 
goods, and what Welden and Beamont received back, as also what 
debts were lost by the Pooloroonese, put to de^th by the Dutch in 
Banda. Tlie Dukh General offers to make good said del»t8 of 
Pooloroon if we can prove ihvm, but he knows it is the custom to 
take their word only ; the particulai's will not content the Dutch, 
so are referred to England, Great wants in the accounts of the 



208 



COLONIAL PAPEBS. 



1623. 



sioge of Bantam. Cannot conceive why they should contribute 
such an excessive sum towards the fif^t year's charge, for it is most 
false that the Dutch kept any praus before Bantam, as they pretend ; 
the most part of that time, " we kept ships there as well as they ;" 
and iDOiit part of the Dutch ships were utterly decayed and un- 
serve cealile for any voyage. Secondly, the intollerable exactions 
and bloorly executions committed by the Dutch in the Moluccas, 
Amlmyna, and Banda, which have justly constrained us to give over 
that trade until further order from Europe. The Dutch exactions 
arc more than one half of the charge of the garrisons and fortifica- 
tiuTiH and the gifts. Exploits of the Governor's, charges of his table» 
and vain expenses of powder, amount to far more than the necessary 
charge, but can get no allowance from the General. The Dutch 
General will give way to no reason ; so send the original accoiints 
of the Moluccas, Amboyna, and Banda. By paying their soldiers, 
rnardikers, kc, in chith and victuals, our goods lie rotting on our 
han^ls, tlie market being glutted by the soldiers. Our thii^d part 
paid in money will pay the total charge ; so the best agreement to 
make with the Dutch is to receive our third part of all the spices 
there. The gains of the Dutch in those parts amount to more than 
300.000 guildei*s per annum ; the charge they now bring to account 
is intoleral>le, and will eat out all the profits of that ti'ade. Another 
benefit the Dut<;h have to themselves is from customs and excise. 
Tlieir pride and insolency is gro^vn to such a height that " we can 
no longer live under their subjection." Long since advised the great 
danger their jierson^ were in from Dutch tyranny ; for when the 
Bandanese were executed in Bataviafor preU:;nded treason, the Dutch 
General caused them in the extremity of their torment to declare 
whether the English were not conspirators with them ; and the like the 
Governor of Banda did by the Pooloroonese executed there. If the ex- 
trend ty of torment had forced confession from them, as the Duteh it 
shouhl seem desired, we had undoubtedly suff'eix'd the like tonnentfi 
and cniol death that our people did lately at Aral>oyna, the inarLner 
whereof we will Ijriefiy relate : — Having given order to oiu- people 
to come from the Moluccas. AmbojTia, and Banda on the Dutch 
ships, the Governor of AmbojTia cau.sed a certain Japon to l>e taken 
vipou suspicion, and caused him to be tortured, thereby to confess of 
neveral others uf his nation (sic) to be accessory of treason and taking 
the fort of AmbojTia, and afterwards by extremity of toiment forced 
him with nine others to accuse the English to be conspirators with 
tliem ; whereupon Ca|>t. Towerson and all the re.st of the English 
thereabouts were apprehended and laid in irons, and after mast 
inhuuian toiiures, were forced to confess what the tonnentors 
pleased, ami Towerson and nine were executed. ** It is worth the 
noting that the Ja]jons lying in irons as our people passed by and 
were caixied to be tormented, they railed upon them, demanding 
when they spoke with the English at any time, so that they made 
the Japons believe our people had accused them ; but when the 
Ja|»ons saw om* people wtrre tortured, and aftenv^ards led to execu- 
tion, as well as themselves, they then exclaimed against the Dutch 
tyranny, and both English and Japons look upon their death to be 
guiltless. The impossibility of performing such an action with 



4 
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EAST INDIES. 



209 



1623. 



20 men is sufficient to clear them of this supposed treason. Besidei 
several letters wx-itten by Capt. Towcrson a little before his attach- 
ment show that he hare a good affection for the Dutch, and if he 
had found himself guilty of any such crime he might have flerl, 
being eight days at liberty after the Japons were apprehended. 
With the examination there goes a psalter of Mr. Cokton*s, wherein is 
written in two several j*laces he takes it upon his salvation he died 
innocent, and a bill made by Capt. Towerson declares as much," 
' llunk the AmtojTia Governor would not have put this " hellish 
project '' in execution without order from Cocn, who reported '* that 
our people had been exceeding insolent in those parte, and it was a 
shame for the Govenior to sufler it." It was tiae Dutch policy to 
make known to the inliabitants how baisely they esteemed our 
nation, tho«e people ha\Tug always had the English in re^spect, and 
honoring the Dutch more for fear of their power than love for them. 
Refer to the Company's wisdom whether those exactions and bloody 
executions be not sufficient motives to remove the remainder of oui' 
people until further order ; for who would live imder such cannibals^ 
that with tortmx*d confessions can have colour to execute any one 
under thera that shall oppose thcij' imjust proceedings. Not long 
since an Englishman " falling at some words " with a Dutch soldier, 
with the help of another was thrown into the rivur and drowTied ; 
hut the Dutch were cleared, and nothing was done to them. Thirdly, 
the traile of China, for which the [tleets of] defence were chiefly 
erected, is wholly appropriated to tlie Dutcli. The demand to settle 
the CTiina trade upon Pulo Condor and the Liguros, according to 
the contract, was received with a frivolous answer. Fourthly, the 
Company may perceive by the faithless pi-oceedings of Ad mi ml 
Dedell how much they are wronged by joining in defence with sucli 
perfidious people. The Dut^ch imagine to have a gi*eat matter 
against us for leaving the common defence ; motives are descrilwd 
** more than sufficient to give o\'er those hostile and offensive 
exploits." Have likewise given over Pulicat, seeing the trade thei*eof 
depends wholly upon the sales of the Moluccas, AmbojTia» and 
B^da. Hold it good to refuse Pulicat, for the goods of the Niack s 
country &r exceed Pulicat in colours, goodness, and eheapness, with- 
out paying such a costly garrison. Want rathei^ time than matter 
to relate the continual wrongs of the Dutch. More paitieulars ; at 
Siam the Dutch pursuaded the great men to put Edward Long to 
death. Besides the goods seized upon in Amboyna and tlie debts 
lost by their (the Dotch) occasion in Banda, have paid them in tho 
Moluccas and Amboyna 30,9G3| rj^als more than the first yeai's 
chaiiges ; for which the Dutch offer them 1,434 lbs. cloves, 23,374 lbs. 
nuts, and 7,287 lbs. mace, Holland weight. This proved a ba<l year 
for cloves, so think the Company may get spices better cheap in 
England than the Dutch deUver here. Money due to the late Wm, 
Reeks. On John Ferrar's request to the late President to further a 
collection for a free school in Virginia, a collection was made lx>th 
on shore and aboard the ships, and is entered in the purser's accounts. 
Wm. Morgan, chief mate of the Elizabeth, prefeixed master. Edward 
Grant — Half a jmge torn avMy, [Thirty-one x>ages^ closely mritten^ 
OXJ., VoL X., No. 1130.] 

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Dec, L5. 



Dec. 15. 

Batavin. 



369, Court Minutes of the East India Company. Request of 
Mr. Tyler to take out in cloves what he had tmderwritten for in 
pepper, calicoes, &c., hut the Court made answer they could not 
do it. The diet for the committees when they come aboard 
the sliips in harbour to Ije limited. Offer of Abraham Chamberlain 
on commission from some Dutelimen, of 21 8. per lb. for the whole 
parcel of the Company^s silk ; the Court gave no ear to that motion^ 
and referred his owti reipiest for 10 or 12 bales to the committees of 
the warehouse. Ortlured that the time "to consider" the estates 
deceased persooB, foi-merly set at six months, be reduced to four^ 
montbH, when if there appear no just impediment, will be paid what 
shall appear due. Thomas Eyans to he one of the four auditors in 
the place of Nicholas Crantnert who does not accept of his election, 
Mr. Hopkins being contenb to serve cloths to the Company and taki 
payment in indigo and silk, AldLTinaii Ducy is entreated to assist] 
the committees in viewing them. Doubts whether cloths of winter'j 
dressing wiU serve, and care to be taken that they be not sappy but' 
clean cloths. Letter from Thompson, a factor in the Moluccas, for 
some Devonshire kerseys ; also a motion to send 300 or 400 pair o] 
stockings to Siu-at, Ijut nothing at present resolved. [Tv:o pagm\ 
awL a ludf. CmiH Minute Booh, VL^j^p-, 308-310] 

370. John Goninge to the Company. Will briefly relate the 

estate of the Moluccas dnring his abode there. Eight castles and; 
folios posaesse<l by the Dutch ; eight also possessed by the Spaniards 
Malaya on Ternate their chief seat ; where situated. Four forta. 
dissolved hy the Dutch .since our joint trade. The King of Temate 
is allied with the Dut-ch, and the Kingof Tidore with the Spaniards 
The Dutchj finding them.selves in quiet possession of AmbojTia and 
Banda, which ykdd spices enough to fumish all Christendom, have 
resolved only to hold defensive war witli tlie Simniards. The Ter- 
nateans holding it no reason that they should war with their 
neighbours and kindred, the Tidorese^, to their own disquiet and 
hindrance of commerce for content *>f the Dutch, made a truce with 
theui in 1621, who now sell s]>ices to the Sjmniards at a deai*er rate 
than they can to the Dutch. The blacks receiving many discontents 
fi*om the Dutch have not cared to i>hick their cloves as in foretimes^ 
having by peace foimd other means to maintain themselves. Since 
the truce he has always found the blacks hut indifferent friends to 
the Dutch, because of their cruelty to their allies in Banda, and en* 
croaching upon the King of Ternate's possessions, and desire to hold 
the Spaniard and HoDanders in equal Imlance. ITie Dutcli hold 
only a defensive war in that fpiarter, and care not to drive out th© 
Sjianiards, though they could ; that they may keep the blacks in 
better awe, who equally fear either nation that should get the upper 
hand. Arrived at Bata\da on lOth Oct. last in a Dutch ship fi[X)tD 
the Moluccas, where he dissolved seven fruitless factories, and 
brought all the English away with him, except two or three persons 
left according to order. How the Dutch have abused them in all 
|»oints the Company wUl understand from the general letters, &c 
It is too late now to wish their worships had at first only maile a 
mere contract of peace with the Dutch, and not joined with them in 



i 

it 
n 
1. 

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211 



1623- 



Dec> 15- 



Aboard the 




Dec 16. 

[Sum], 
aboud the 

HlmiDir. 



matters of defence, and in consent to force Bantam, through which, 
and their dishonest practices. '*the consequences have been your 
more disprofit than the lonsea sustained by the former hostility/' 
But it is not too late to wish to follow their own affairs without 
leave of the Dutch. " Tlio bloody massacre of your poor innocent ser- 
vants at AmlnijTia, committed by the Dutch, hath strooken as well fear 
as grief into us, Ending no security of oiu- persons and 3^our worships* 
mcaas under their yoke/' All hope their woi^hips will prosecute 
that biLsiness in such earneat manner as the Dutch shall have small 
cause to rejoice in such villanies. Desires that two thirds of his 
salary lahy still be paid to Nicholas Crispe for his use, EmlorBedt 
"Received by the Exchange." [Three jKtges. O.a, Vol X, No. 
1131] 

371. Capt. Jolm Bickell to the East India Company. An-ived 

safely at the Cape 29th May and left a letter to give their worships 
to understand of aU ships passed for England ; viz., the London, 
Jonas, and Lion from Surat and Persia, and from Batavia the Lesser 
James, all of wliich, with the Palsgrave, he hopes have arrived in 
England, Airived at Batavia the 3rd August, being five months and 
six daya on then- passage from the Lizard. Pipe staves very needful 
Pitch and tar precious. Could find work for moi'e carjienters ; many 
die here. The Hart has lost 22 men. [One page, O.C, YvL X*, 
No. 1132] 

372* John Hall to the East India Company. Set sail for 
Gombroon on Dee. [li»22] with the Blessing, WHiale, Dolpliin, and 
Reformation. By the 1 8th Jan. had got oft' all their goods, being 
SCO bales of silk. The Persian sent his chief noble and solicited 
them to go to Muscat, but was put off with fair words. Set sail 
from Onnuz on 2(i Jan. " with a very st<:>rm of wind and dirt and 
rain." Sold the small ship» '' which we found to Ije a very bauble, 
to the 'Caunn,' being very desirous of her," for 400 demaimds, 
(1,330Z.), 1,000?. more than she was worth. Arrived at Swally bar 
Feb. 1 1, and the next day the President and Council came alx)ard 
and willed him to go fur Dal>id with the Blessing and Ilefonnation, 
the latter to touch at Choul. Brought the Blessing to anchor in the 
road of Dabul, where they had very good, refreshing, and kind 
usage> and RobeH Hutchinson went ashore every day. For having 
beaten two Malabars from the coast, "the people did like marvellous 
well of our nation." AccoTmt of the taking of two frigatej? which 
lay afore the custom house, supposed to lie Itound for Mocha, very 
rich. He told the Dabulers ** they knew well in what manner they 
had robljed us,'^ and that our coming was for satisfaction. Had them 
both off in less than half an hour, but at the entrance they let fly 
small shot and arrows so tliick tliat they could hardly walk upon 
the deck. They let fly into the town and at the castle almost 1,000 
great shot, all that night and the next day, battering the town ; 
their loss in disowned and slain was 20 men, including Richard 
Wedmore, ** a proper young mam" Set sail with the two frigates, 
and came to anchor in Swally road 23rd March, and the 31st 
were despatched for Mocha, where they arrived the 24th May, 
and found the Dolphin, Having conmiission from the President and 

o 2 



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COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 



Council to seize all jtmks, not one escaped: tliey took "one beloi 
ing to Cliovil imto the Deckeneis (Deccan) country, wherein w 
found 40,000 ryalii, Ijesides goods also," "the great Shawhee," "tl 
Conjava," and one belonging to Gogo, Met off Damoan two Dutch 
ships in the night, and " making account they were Poitugals, I le5 
fly five or six pieces at them before I could get them to anchon^ 
Anchored in Swally road on 5 Oct, with eight junks, where thi 
foimd the William, Capt. Chiistopher Brown, and *' gave them (tl 
Surat people) to imdei-stand of our demands,'* and now " our mer- 
chants are better used than ever they wci-e, but how long it will 
last I know not." The Blessing and William bound for Gombroon, 
and the K-efoiTiiation for the southwards. Hopes at their return to 
lade for England, with the William, but if they cannot get cleai* of 
the coa^t by the last of March they [must winter there. Ervdorsedf 
" John Hall, ili*. (? Captain) of the Blessing." [F<nvr pages. 
Vol, X., No. 1134.] 



^h ' 



^^1 



obS 
anjjH 
^th^ 



Dec, 16. 373, Emmanuel Butta to the East India Company. Account of 
S wiiiley Hoad, " the pa&sages and navigation " of the Blessing in company with the 

'^BleLiDg^ Discovery and Reformation Left the Lizard, in Coniwall, 3 April 
1622, and anchored in Swally road 3rd Oct., and met there the Lon- 
don, Jonas, Whale, Dolphin, Lion, Rose, and four Flemings. The 24th 
Oct. the Exchange, Anne, and Diamond came in ; and the 22nd Nov. 
the Exchange, Anne, and four Flemings set sail. Set sail on 
6th Dec. with the Whale, Dolphin, Reformation, and Primrose for 
Pereia ; and left the London, Jonas, and Lion lx)und for England, 
the Discovery for Jacatra, the Diamond and Rose for the fleet of 
defence, and two Flemings in the road. Arrived at Gombroon 
30th Dec. and foui^ factors came aboard, viz., Messrs. Dorrell (who 
died before we came away), Barker, Bcnthall and Thompson; and 
Rawson they left on shore. On Jan. 9, the Whale and Dolphin 
sail for Surat with 250 bales of silk, ** we finding the coast to 
clear of Portugals/' Sold the Primrose to the " Caumi " for 400 torn; 
every toman 21. 6a. 4tf. The Blessing and Reformation set sail with^ 
570 bales of silk; and anchored at Swally on the 11th Feb. Five 
Malabar junks taken, but let go, having pa'^ses from the fleet of 
defence and from Mr. Saltbanke and Haines from Mocha. Account 
of the taking of two frigates out of Dabul harbour and of the fighting 
which " continued most part of the night and the fourth day we beat 
down their ' barracathoes ' and dismounted four pieces of ordnance 
that pla3'ed on us all night.'* Capt. (Hall) would needs go ashore 
with 90 men to take the town, but was glad to run to the boats again 
losing 19 men outright, slain and drowned. Took the two frigates 
with them to Surat, where after taking the goods out of one, she was 
set on fire. Mutiny on board the Blessing, forty of the men saying 
they would not weigh anchor imless they had the goods of the 
frigate aboard ; so a council was called and some were punished and 
the principal condemned but not put to death* Met "the Dolphin 
who told ns the unlooked-for news that great misfortune to th( 
Whale." Went Imck to Swally 24 March, '' and so ended our Dabi 
voyage, 1623." Accoimt of their Mocha voyage where they arrive 
24tb May and found the Dolphin. Set saU for Sumt Aug 7 



EAST mDlES. 



213 



1623. 



Dec 17. 



Di^. 17. 

Aboard the 



Gave chase to the Courtmamotos of Choul, took her monies and 
goods out of her and dismissed her ; other vessela taken. Heard of 
Mr. Wodmore's death in Persia. '' Stood up altogether/' 4th Nov. 
in the road of Swally^ and on the 12th "our President and the 
Governor firmed to the articles of pcaee between us, and the l7th 
day they went all ashore, and so we ended our Red Sea voyage." 
Are now bound for Persia. Emiorscd, *' Emanuell Butta m^ of 
the Blessing. Received by the Dolphin from Plymouth 30 July 
162V [Four Images and a lialf. 0,a, Vol X. No. 1135.] 

374. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Gratification to 
Mr. Browne, lecturer of the parinli of Great Saint Helen s (4i. as 
last Christmas), for tlie paias he takcth in preaching at hi« appointed 
times. Agix^ed by erection of hands that 53 chests of coral at 
Leghorn, to be laden on board the London for London, Ix; not insured* 
Grievances of John Holloway about hLs stock. Concerning the ac- 
counts of Robert Smith, purser of the Jonas ; he is thought to be honest, 
but takes no right course to apj^ear so. Remarks of Capt. Wcddall 
and Mr. Browne on the great sums disbursed for victuals ; also in 
reference to the surgeon's cheats. Examination of Henry Wieatley, 
purser in the former voyage, as to the money paid by passengers from 
the Retl Sea, whereof they were sometimes 80 or 100 at a time ; also as 
his sufficiency for ma-ster's mate in the Jonas. [Robert] Smith to 
go purser. Conc^^ming the complaints made by Powell's widow and 
the rest, to the Pri\y Coimcil, fur their husbands' goods aboard the 
ships taken by the Dutch ; their LortLships having been truly informed 
said, ** that if those women did further trouble them they should be 
whipped.*' The salaries of John Blunt, one of the clerks of the 
warehouse, and of the Company's secretaiy ai-e increased 201. and 
20;> respectively, {Three jxtgrn ami a half. Court Minute Book, VL, 
pp. 313«31G.] 

375. John Beamont to Henry Sill in Amlxjyna, Aller his de- 
partui*e from Amlx>yna it pleased God to visit him with sickness 
and lameness, and on his anival at Batavia he was carried before 
the GenemI and Council of the Dutcli, where he was fu[rced to aljledge 
the untruth again, for fear they wTjuld have tortured him. The 
General told him they came as condemned men to die there, but in 
regard of Si>eult's " gracious letters of me — he did pardon me ** ; but 
the President would not be '* beholding " to the General, but ordered 
that we shoidd be sent into England for justice, and that if we wei-e 
found there guilty hy om* laws we should have according to our 
de^serts, if not that all the rest were murdered, as he was of opinion 
they were. The President sent to know of the General if Speult 
had order from him and his comicil to put the King's solijects to 
death (which was against the aiiicles), but hears of no answer he 
gave but *'that Speult had authority from the Prince of Holland/' 
The matter is so bad, they do not love to hear of it, but there is a 
God above, and no doubt he will revenge theii* bloody murders of 
innocent persons. Is glad that now they are clear of '' their Bata 
via," where they lived in fear of some new trick the Dutch would 
put upon them, for the President and Council *' intend not to stay 
long in then* Batavia." If the old President had lived to have gone 
for England, he would have followed our busineas closely, but makes 



214 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623. 



Di^c. 10. 



no doubt that the Company will "inccnd" the King, "with the 
friends of the murdered, that our enemies may not glory in it as 
they do/' Ha.s delivered the particulars of money and gold taken 
from him at Araboyna by the Governor, which the President 
demanded from tlie Dutch General, but he denies to pay, but doubts 
not to recover it all in England. Re(|uesta he will pay any debts 
he may receive to Mi\ Cartwright. The Exchange and Eli2abeth 
set sail from Bata\4a on 15th Dec. "God send ns well into our 
native country." Augustine Spaldinge, himself^ and [ilichael] Hol- 
nifin, John Perry, Malachi Martin, George Sherricke, Ephraim Ram- 
sey, [MattliL^w] Duke, and Munday in the Exchange, and Capts, 
Welden and Adams, and Messrs, Morgan, George Robinson, [John] 
Powle, William Webbe, Dawkes, John Chesterton, Harry Doleman, 
and [George] Collins in the Eli7^beth. Found in the road on coming 
to Batavia the Exchange and Discoveiy ; the Roebuck gone for 
^[acassar, the Aun for Jambi, and the Abigail for Tecoe with the 
Diamond. Since have arrived the Hart from England with the 
Coaster, the Unity, [Moo]n, and Elizabeth, with pepper from 
Sumatra coast and Jarabi, the Ruby from the coasts and the junk 
Welcome from ^[aca&.sar, with Mi\ Staverton, who is gone to be 
chief at Jambi. Hears from England that the Hollanders aj*e com- 
l>c4led to pay the Company a great sum for injuries done aforetime, 
that they ai'e to have free tratle at Bantam (but what has been 
agreed upon at home the General and his Council will not agree to 
here), and to have Pooloroon and half of Lantar. Have ill tidings 
that the Whale, with a rich cargo from Persia and Surat, " sunk 
right down in the sea 10 leagues off the road '* of Surat, 36 men 
dro^Tied, and nothing saved of her goods, " by reason of a plank that 
sprung in her/' As yet no ships come from Surat, but this news 
came overland to Masylipatam. Commends himself to Signer Ga- 
ratt, "my comacbe with her child/' WiUiam Bonn, George Calahira 
and hia wife, Robin Showmakar, old Mr. Johnson and his wife, 
William Bell, and alJ the rest of our friends. If he can do him any 
service in England, he may direct his letters to '* Mi% John Buckock's, 
Haberdasher s house, at the sign of the Hat with the Golden Hatband, 
in Lombard Street, right over against the George/* [Tivo pages, 
Motlhded by duvip. OJl, Vol. A\, No. 113C.] 

376- Court Minutes of the East India Company. A course resolved 
upon ti> remove John Lamperey, [Lemprier] late the Company's ser- 
vant at Blackwall, who holds still the house there, and " doth not 
avoid for any warning/' Robert Smith, purser of the Jonas, to receive 
wages due for his last voyage, Examination of William Waulker, the 
Company's porter^ chaigcd witli having rudely carried himself 
towai'ds Mr. Goveiiior Hallidaie s w^ife, who for some service in her 
garden had best<:Aved a piece of gold on him ; he made his boast 
that she had given it for informing against Mr. Hurte ; but he 
answered that he never spake any such words, and desired to justify 
himself to his accusers face. The secretary to look up what was 
given in new year s gifts last year. The bonds entereil into by 
Messrs. Monnox and Roe with the Company for their employment 
to be cancelled. Touching the will of John Challicombe, Nicholas, 
his brother and executor, makes choice of Arthur Bray as his 



I 



4 

I 

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4 



EAST INDIES, 



215 



1623. 



Dec. 20. 



curator or guardian (himself being under age), to receive what is 
due to him. The will must first be proved and the curator allowed. 
Nicholas Bix entertained as undcrfactor for seven years, at 30/. per 
annum for the first two yeai*s, rising aft4_Twai'ds 10^, per year. The 
distribution of money and victuals to the poor of St4.*pney not to be 
left to the chmxh wardens, but the Court were contented they sho^dd 
be pix^sent at the distribution if they pleased. [Fou7* p(^g€s. Cov/rt 
Minute BL, VL, ^rp, 310-320J 

377. President Thomas Brockedon, Henry Hawley, and John 
Gonninge to Hai-raan Van Speult, Governor of Amboyna i — 

To the Right Worahipful Harman Van Speult, Governor of 
Amboyna. 

The infallible signs of neighbourly respect between the realms of 
England and the United Netherlands, lieing in nothing more con- 
spicuous than in the late agreement of differences between his 
Majesty of Great Britain and the high and mighty Lords States of 
the United Netherlands in the year 101 J), for the regulating the 
subjects of both nations in these parts of India with equal place and 
power by proceeding and successive turns monthly, doth seriously 
enforce us to admiration how you, Harman Van Hpeult, Governor 
of Amboj^a, do presume and authorise not only to exact and extort 
upon his Majesty's subjects of Great Britain, contrary to all that can 
be intended by any of the said articles, but to imprison, torture, am I 
condemn, and bloodily to execute his Majesty's subjects, with con- 
fiscation of their goods, to the violating of that bond of amity and 
unity in tlie said articles, and in contempt of those acta so sincerely 
agi'eed between his Majesty of Great Britain and the Lords States 
aforesaid 

Now forasmuch as, contrary to the said articles and in contempt 
of both our Sovereigns, you have not only assumed the power of 
magistracy, but proceeded against his Majesty's suljjects by tor- 
mented confessions and without either vohmtaiy accuser or probable 
accusation, and thereto have added such tyrannical tonnents neither 
usual nor tolei-able amongst (Christians. 

We, the President and Council for the honourable Company of 
England, are thereby sufficiently gi^ounded solemnly to protest 
against all your said presumptuous procfedings, and in particular 
for imprisoning IH of his Majesty's subjects, whereof 10 bloodily 
executed, their own proper goods confiscated, and the goods of our 
noble employee by the execution havocked and ruinated, the 
majesty and renown of our gracious Sovereign in these parts with 
disgi-ace dishonoured, the nation in general scandalised, and in par- 
ticular the i>oor innocent released prisoiiers Wreaved of all cn.'dit 
and estimation. For whicli not<jrious wrongs, violence, and indig- 
niiiea, together with your former exactions, couched under the name 
of necessary- maintenance for foiis and garrisons. 

We, the President and Council aforesaid, do by tliese presents 
make public your said oiipressions, which is not only in and by 
your own pei'son to be answered and satisfied, but as you are sub- 
stitute and have your power from su|>eriors, so is it al&o intended 
i^ainst youi' honoui-able employers, the Company of the United 



216 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1623, 



Netherlands trading East India, or any else whom it shall or may 
conc43m, from whom in general and particular we, in the name of 
his Majesty of Great Britain and for our honourable employers, the 
English East India Company, do and will expe<;t aatiafaction. 

1. Fu^t, the breach of confederacy intended by the articles agreed 
anno 1619. 

2. For your barbaixius and bloody execution of 10 of his Majesty's 
subjects and our honourable employexs' factors and servanta 

3. For reparation of credit for those poor eight innocents pardoned 
and acquitted, 

4. For tho restoration of aU their goods and estates, as well theirs 
executed as theirs pardoned and acquitted. 

5. For satisfaction of our honourable employers* goods and estate 
in those pai*ts by yoiu* owti occasion havocked and ruinated even in 
quantity and value, to be restored as they were rated and valued 
by general consent of both Dutch and English, to be sold at Am- 
boyna without defalcation of whatsoever since sold by Kichard 
Welden or Henry Sill, that had them from yoiu* hands after the 
execution without om- order or consent. Yet whatsoever the said 
Kichard Welden or Henry Sill have out of the said capital and 
moans (by you committed unto their ordering) paid and disbursed 
for the use of our noble employers, that shall be defalked and 
deducted out of the general estate of those parta The rest we must 
exp<;ct restorable at your hands and the hands of your noble 
employers as aforesaid. 

C. We expect repayment of all your fonner exactions passed 
under the name of necessary maintenance for forts and garrisons. 

7- We require repair for the dishonour unto his Majesty of Great 
Britain and our noble employers for your preposterous dealings to 
the disgrace of our nation in general. 

8. And lastly, for our honorable employee* loss and trade in 
those isle^ of Moluccas, Ainbo>^ia, and Banda, for our loss of housea 
and building there, and our abandoning of those parts, all which 
being occasioned by yom* said intolerable exactions, usurjmtion of 
authority over liis Majesty's subjects of Great Britain, and this said 
bailmrous execution. 

We will (as reason is we should) expect from you and your 
honourable employen*, the Netherlands Company aforenamed, repa- 
ration, satisfaction, and really in every part, redress of aU our said 
losses and disgraces, with such interests, liamages, penalties, and 
inconveniences as by our Christian laws for sudi wilful and pre-i 
siunptuous offences is and shall be found fitting. 

For which purpose we, the President and Council for the honour- 
able Company aforesaid, do make this act autlientic by our joint 
suWription, and send the same to Henry Sill, to be delivered 
unto you, the said Governor Speult, that thereby both himseV 
and his noble employei-s and those whom it may concern may lio 
prepared for answa^ to each paiticular before our competent judgea 
in Euroj)e or elsewhere. 

Dated in Bata\'ia, Thomas Brockedok. j 

the 20 December 1623, Hexry Hawley. 

stilo Angliffi. John GoKNli^GE. 



4 



EAST INDIES. 



217 



1623. 



Dec, 20. 



23-29. 



[Two pages and a half. Mutilated by damp; (lie uvrds destroyed 
are mipplied frorn tlvc copy below, Emiorsed, *' • • • intratiir." 
O.C, Vol. X:, No. 11370 

378. Copy of the preceding protest. Endm*8edj "Received in 
London, 29 May 1624, out of Holland, by the pimiaee Hazewindt." 
A copy was also inclmed in Sec. Conway's Utter of 2Dth Jmie 1C24 
to Candmi. [Eemt Indies, VoL IL, No, 71. 

379* Court Minuteii of the East India Company, Petition of 
William Whalely, that he had been in tlie Company s service at 
Ormnz against the Portugals, and had loet a leg in a fight at sea, and 
had petitioned for some recompense, bnt I'efiised 10?, from the Com- 
pany as a free gift ; now prays for the place of porter at Biackwall, 
but the Company ha\nng observed his former stuhliomness aaswered 
they had no place void for him. No need for the Company to take 
any violent course against John Lamprier, as he intends forthwith 
" to avoid " the house at Biackwall. Concerning a supply of powder, 
all Evel^Tx's powder, and what can be got elsewhere ; is taken up by 
special warrant to supply his Majesty's forces. The Duke of Rich- 
mondj having undertaken to find his Majesty's house with spices, is to 
receive (among other things) his Majesty's impost on spices from the 
Indies, which, (as he wm informed) will amount to 2,000f. per annum, 
and desires to be nobly dealt withall. His Lordship was informed Uiat 
he will find the propoHion very far short of that sum. The Court 
considered what answer they would make, for that it was remembered 
that Mr. Barrett compounded with the Company, and had iOOL per 
annum, when many times it came far shoit of that pro]iortion ; the 
answer to be made to the Duke. Request of Mr. Friday, the preacher, 
concerning his indigo ; the Court made answer they were sorry that 
a man of his jirofession should so much injure the Company by 
his example, 'and he must expect no more than they allow him. 
Bequest of the Lord Treasm-er that he may have 70 quilts at 5L 
apiece, but the Court fomid the example very hurtful, and chose 
rather to seU him 50 at G/. apiece, and give him the other 10. Com- 
mittee appointed to consider the new year's gifts. Proposals of a 
servant of Lady Dale concerning the business between her and the 
Company, but he was desired to forbear to move further imtil Mr, 
Lanman re^in his health. 

Dec. 29,— Concerning Mr. Hurt's unlawful exacting, and his having 
taken a bril>e. As to the proportion of wines and cider for the ships, 
half the wanted quantity of cider to be sent, being only for the sick ; 
the rest had rather drink water, because the cider, when stale, " doth 
extraordinarily \^Tring the belly*" Fheworks and 500 fire pots to 
be made ready for Capt. Weddall's ship, and proportionably for the 
rest. Offer of Mi*. Willen, a student in divinity, and preacher of 
Charterhouse Hospital, to go as preacher into tbo Indies ; but the 
Court wished that Mr. Copeland be first spoke with, who had been 
in the Indies, and shown himself a sober, discreet mam The Court 
moved about underwriting for calicoes, and swearing in the new 
auditors. The Duke of Etchmond and the Company in reference to 
the rate of composition for spices exjiorted ; the Company ready to 
^ve 4fO0?. per anniun, as they had formerly done. Conoeming the 



218 



COLONIAL PAPERS^ 



1623. 



1623, 



silk quiliM, the Lord Treasui-er would not hearken to their offer, hut 
pursued his desii*e to ahate the piice ; resolved to forbear to hav^H 
iiirther npeech of them for a smaM time, Letter read from Sir Jam€^| 
Ley, Lord Chief Justice of England, on behalf of Anthony Walli^^ 
that they would employ him again ; the Court presumed that his 
Lordship had not boen acquainted with his fault in mis-spending 
800 dollars of their money, and ordered that their secretary attend 
his Lordshij} and satisfy him thereon. Mr. Dejjuty acquainted the 
Coui-t that he and others had been entreated to deal witli [Thoa.fcB 
Kenridge for his going agam into the Indies, who was ready t-o em^| 
brace the emidoyment on these comhtions ; Not to be tied to stay 
above three years, to have oOOl. per annum wages, and to leav^_ 
1,000/. in the Company's hands, and if he die within the four 3'eai|(H 
the Company sliall pay back only the said 1,0001., but if he lives, 
then he requires to have 2,000?. ; the Court thought the demand_ 
somewhat high, yet lx?cause he had given good proof of his servic 
in former years, they intreated Mr. Govcmor and Mr» Deputy 
agree with him as goml cheap as they may. Letter read from Mr, 
Mjsselden, one of the Company's Commissioners, to treat with the 
Dutch, dated Dec, 5, 1623, that they are like to make long work in 
respect the Bewinthcbbcrs are by order of the States tied to hold 
their assemblies^ which were wont to V)e in Holland, now in Zealand 
for two years. Mr. Deputy gathers by Mr. Barlow's letter ** that the 
Dutch intend to cast some rubs in the Commissioners' way, for tl 
some of them delivered an account of some great matter coming ' 
them upon the siege of Bantam," [Eight page^ and a qtiat 
CmiH Mhmte Book, VL, pp. 320-328.] 

380. " Translation out of Gallo-ljelgicus upon the Princ 
journey," It is sufficiently known how much the King of Englfi 
and his predecessors have assisted the Hollandei-s, their neighbour 
but they have declared themselves such as he could not have receive 
greater loss from open enemies, for when some principal Londo 
merclmnts began to trade into the East Indies the Hollanders tool 
their ships and merchandize, and by losses constrained the merchant 
to give over the trade. The King conceived it not fit for them (th4 
merchants) to take revenge for so great insolencies, but determining 
to embrace their cause and protect them against all enemies and 
pirates (and by other name the Hollanders cannot be called for this 
perpetrated mischief), his Majesty had ^Titten to the States far 
for restitution, who answered that those merchandizes were to be 
thought of in the place where they were taken, which could be no 
ways acceptable. Therefore, seeing liis own Majesty so muc" 
offbnded, lie had detenu incd by all means possible to take revc 
on the Holland ships, wherever they might be met ^ith, until ; 
damage shall be recompensed. [E^draci frtyin S^Kinwh CoiTe^p] 



mucb^ 

^eng^ 

such I 



EAST INDIES. 



219 



1623. 

Petitiohs to the East India Company of Persons who solicit Ernpbymetit, Increafl^ of 
Wftges, or Payment of Wages due to their Relatives, &c. in the Company's Service. 




Naiuc of PetitloDer. 



Subject of Petition. 



Heferenoe. 



less. 

Julj 4 




AfllhoDj WhIUs 

Phoebe Adcombe, widow - 

Jaoe, widow of C«pt. J oho Davis 



ThomAt Carpenter 

Willi&m Cburcti&r 

Gertnide, widow of Willimm 

Lambert, 
Apprt'Dtices id the Leiscr James 

Tbonias Bourne 

Walter Starr , . - - 

Wiltia^m Pyl»ourDo 

Mildred, widow of Henry Car- 

nabjr. 
Widows of the Trial's men 
George Fettua - - - 



Mar3f Cockalcie - » - 

Tbomas Bell, the Company 'a 

amith for 20 years. 
Kobert Hayes - - - 

John Tumbleji, master mate of 

Lesser James. 
Mr. Robert ft. master of the Jame^ 
AntboQj WsJliSi prisoDer in Bt, 

Katbenne*fi. 
Henry Bute . , , 

John Felpw (Pbelp»), mate of the 

RichiLrd. 
Emma Che«more, widow 
Ann Fryar, widow 
Sibill a, w i fe of J aa , Ityud , preacher 
J amen Browne, engineer * 
Ellen Chesterton 
David Bourne (insolvent) 
Jarncs Tron;2hton 
Widow of William Baffin, the 

late ma^^ter of the London. 
Bmite Gread, carpenter 
Thomas Grove, steward 
John Lilly - . . 

Ann, widow of Roger Smitb 
Hnmphrey Dovey, porter of the 

Brid^rebouse. 
John Parkes and Wioifred hh 

wife. 
Master and Wardens of the Com- 
pany of Watermen, 
Rebeeea, widow of Edward 

Start iipp. 
Thomas Grove - - - 

Ann Merrvt 



Release from prison 

Her huHhand*0 eetate . . . 

Her husband's wages, and compen- 
sation for his impri?«onment by 
the Dutch. 

Chanty * . . _ 

His wages - - . . 

Her husbaxid's wiges - - - 

Wa^es and employment in the 

Charles. 
Allowance for cloves ... 
Increase of wn^es - - . 

Allowance for cloves - - , 
Her husband" tf and two scrrants* 

wages. 
Their husbands' waces 
Wages and compensation while 

prisoner with the Dutch, from 

March 1 61 G to Oct. ItilS. 
Her brother's estate 
Charity . - . . 

Employment . . ^ 

Wages . . . . - 

Wages - . . - 

Helease from prison 

Increase of wages • , . 

A portion of his wages 

Relief - , . . 

Relief . . . . , 

Monies* of her husband 
Employment about fortifications - 
W«ir»'w of huEihund and i^entiiit 
Transfer of his advcnturo - 
Impreht on wages - . - 

Her husband's estate of 800/. be- 

sides his wagQ«, 
Wages for his boy 
Increase of wagets . , . 

Wages of his servant, Mork Mayes 
Charity - ... 

Allowance for work 

Her bTother,RichardWesthy'8 estate 

Wages of Hugh Cro«se, late servant 

to Katherine Brown e» deceased. 
Wages of her husband and servant 



Court Mim Bk. 
VL»p. 6 

„ 14 



15 




Emploj-ment in the Charles - 
Wages of htr servant, John Thomas, 

deceiised. 
Part of hir husband's wages 
Her hsubaud'a and §ervanl*s wages 



N 


9« 


W 


»» 


l» 


»t 


M 


9* 


n 


17 
18 


n 


19 

21 




ft 
23 



37 



43 



44 



4a 

4'i 



51 



« 53 


„ 59 


» €0 


» €1 


n C6 


„ 67 

>i it 


« 67 
„ 69 



^^^■^ 220 


1 


COLONTATi PAPERS. ^TJ 


1 


I 


^^^^^H 


Name of Petitioner. 


Subject of Petition. 




^^^^^^^^^B 


1623. 






Court Min. Bk. 


^^^^^H 


20 


— Iknne , « - 


Hia deoeaaed brother's estate 


VL, 


p. 78 


^^^^^^^^^B 


II 


— Needham, a miniBter 


£mpli>3rment Id the Indies • 


>» 


i» 1 


^^^^^^^B 


ft 


John Bonner, gtmner of the 
Jonas. 


Pepper got by private trade - 


i> 


" ■ 




»> 


Parser Btnd mariners of the Lion 


To sell their goods at Ipswick 


f* 


75 ■ 


^^^^^^^^^B 


»» 


Widow of Capt. Thos. Batten - 


Gratification for her husband's eX' 
traordinary eerviees. 


t» 


" 1 


^^^^^^^H 


II 


Richard Montfort 


son's wages. 


*f 


- 1 


^^^^^^^^^^H 


'' ff 


Margaret Saunders, widow - ! 


A debt due to her husband 


•) 


» ■ 


^^^^^^^^H 


II 


Ralph Wade for Edward Walker 


Wages of Ed ward Da vi5on, Walker's 
servant. 


t* 


' 1 


^^^^^^^^^1 


w 


Rachel Moore - - ^' 


Waives of her servant, Robert Qapper 


♦i 


-6 ■ 


^^^^^^^^^H 


If * 


William Kirby - 


Employment , • . 


ft 


" ™ 


^^^^^^^^^^H 


n 


Nicholas, wife of Jam us Gnttrie 


Part of her busband^s wages 


}f 


f$ 


^^^^^^^^^^^B 


n 


Barbara, wife of Robert East • 


Same - . - , 






^^^^^^^^^H 


»» 


John Powell - - - 


Wages of his apprentice, Stephen 
WoTiley. 


it 


^^1 


^^^^^^^^^^H 


fi " 


Eliaabcth Birt - 


EmplojTnt'Qt for her son Richard - 


pf 


^^H 


^^^^^^^H 


22 


Henry Sturmy - 


Allowance of wages - - . 


t* 


H 


^^^^^^^^^B 


25 


John Ducy - , - 


Employment in the dockyard 


n 


84 ■ 


^^^H 


8 


^- Alexander, master of the 
Diatnond. 


20/. of his wages to be paid to his 
mother J Thomasine. 


»* 


101 ■ 


^^^^^^^^^B 


f* 


Alice Ilarrison - 


Her son's wages - 


,, 


^1 


^^^^^^^^^K 


M 


Ileury Clarke 


Employment - . . - 


»» 


^^B 


^^^^^^^^^■* 


i> 


John Lilly 


Wages of hifl servant, Mark Mayres 


ft 


104 ■ 


^^^^^^^^^B 


tt 


Thoma^s Thomeborongb, purser 


To be purser to the Great James - 


ri 


^^H 


^^^^^^^^^H 


n 


James and Elizabeth Bale - 


Estate of their son Edward Barnard, 
f^urgeon, deceased. 


11 


^H 


^^^^^^^^^B 


n 


ThomanShesh - 


10/. on accountof his servant. Thus. 
Bond. 


« 


105 ■ 


^^^^^^^^B 


>» * 


Hugh Crosse . - - - 


** Charitable recompense *' for loss 
of an eye. 


t* 


^^B 


^^^^^^^H 


Jt " 


Jane, widow of Thomas ArcbbelJ> 
mojtter of the Jonai, slain 
Ijcfore Orranx. 


" Charitable comfort " for herself 
and four fatherless children. 


II 


106 H 


^^^^^^^^^^H 


t* " 


Ann, wife of James Sterling 


Two months of heP husband's pay 


fi 


^H 


^^^^^^^^^^H 


*l 


William LoTcring 


" Charitable consideration ** - 


ti 


^^H 


^^^^^^^^^^^B 


it 


Joane, wife of Philip Beck 


Part of her husband's wages 


11 


^^^1 


^^^^^^^^^^^H 


i» 


Jane, wife of Richard AJcock - 


Same , . - - 


3t 




^^^^^^^^^B 


if 


Alice Soutlieme 


Clothing for her son» an apprentice 


tf 


*i ^^B 


^^^^^^^^^^^B 


n 


Philip Fabian , - - - 


Considenition for S4;r vices* - 


tf 


■ 


^^^^^^^^^^^B 


»> " 


Margaret, wife of Henry Smith - 


Part of her husband's wages - , 


f> 


^^H 


^^^^^^^^^^^1 


5 


Will tarn Kitchin, sargeon 


Calicoes^ landed from the Lion 


tt 


108 ■ 


^^^^^^^^^^^1 


i» 


Masterof the Primrose, of Ipswich 


HLs servant's wage* 


Jt 


^H 


^^^^^^^^^B 


»i - [ 


Samuel CollHon - - - 


Increase of wages - - . 


ft 


109 B 


^^^^^^^^^^^B 


>j 


JiuneH Weall * - - - 


49 hooks of caBooea, &e. • 


ft 


■ 


^^^^^^^^^B 


ti ■• 


Stephen Norria . - - 


His wages - - - - . 


ff 


•f ^^H 


^^^^^^^^^^H 


10 


Do. 


Srtme . - - - 




■ 


^^^^^^^^^B 


it " 


Cbureh wardens of Ratcliffc 


The wages of Thomas Jackson^ de- 
ceased, for his children, 


fJ 


^^B 


^^^^^^^^^1 


ff 


Jane, widow of John UuSe 


Charity - ^ , . 


1^ 


lisk H 


^^^^^^^^^B 




William Kitchen, surgeon 


CahcoeSt Itinded from the Lion 


1 f 


^^^1 


^^^^^^^^^B 


n 


SuMn, widow of Gideon John«^on 


Her husband's wagea 


H 


^^^1 


^^^^^^^^^B. 


t* 


Joane Beek ... 


Part of her bu8band*s wages 


t| 


120 H 


^^^^^^^^^B 


If 


Basil Bowrller, purser's mate 


Three months' imprest 


f| 


^^^1 


^^^^^^^^^^B 


12 


Samuel Colls on _ * . 


Increase of wages - - , 




122 ■ 


^^^^^^^^^^H 


»i 


John Boomer, gunner 


His pepper from the Jona» 


l> 


128 ■ 


^^^^^^^^^^H 


w 


Ur«ula, widow of John Hilla 


Relief .... 




^M 


^^^^^^^^^1 


l> 


Marjs widow of Thomas Hartley 


Part of her husband's pay * 






^^^^^^^^Hr 


»i 


Let dee, wife of Michael Young - 


Part of her hutiband's wages 




^H 


^ 


f» 


Mftry Towers 


The goods of Luxon, her debtor - 


»» 


^H 


^^^^^^^B 


17 


Rachel, wife of Thomas Barnes, 
mate in the Elizabeth. 


Wages of Alexander Uickes, an ap. 

prentice, executed in the Indies. 


If 


^M 


^^^^^^^ 


19 


Christopher Chitwortby - 


Charity for loss of hand - 


It 


127 H 


^^^^^^^^^ 


ir " 


-^ Crew . - - - 


Wages of his deceased brotiier Jalin 


■ 


180 ■ 





EAST 


INDIES. 


1 


^^H 


K Date. 


Name of Petitioner, 


Subject of Petition. 


Reference. ^^^| 


B 1GS8, 






Court Min. Bk* ^^H 


■bci^l9 


Joseph Wjfttt, trompeter 


Wagea . - - . 


Vl„p 


^^^1 


■ ^ n 


Eicbard Preteott 


Employment sit purser 


tt 


i^^^^^^l 


^ « 24 




28/. owing by Tbomas Quince 


tr 


135 ^^^M 


» 2« 


Henrjr Bate, fector 


303 ryals disbursed for the Bear - ; 


*i 


140 ^^^1 


^^ 9* » 


Sarah Hall - - , . ' 


20/. of her father*s wages, Captain 
Robert Adams. 1 


»t 


141 ^^H 


^^B «•» 


DaTidGiUy 


His wages - - . _ 


i» 


^^^^^^1 


^H »v n * 


Philip Davison - - - i 


Employment 


}) 


^^^^^^^H 


^^m >9 »» 


EliJiabeth, widow of Bichajrd 

Browne, 
Nicholas WooUey, purser's mate 


Part of her hushADd*s wages - 


., 


^^^^^^H 


^^H 9« » 


Employment . ^ . 


it 


^^H 


^^H »« 


Peter Bell, porter - - 


His wa^es - - - - - | 


a 


^^H 


1 .. » 


WiUamHall . - . - 


Benevolence for wounds in fight 
with the Portugals. 


f» 


^^^^^^H 




John Wright 


Employment - . . 


jj 


^^^^^^^H 


^^H » »f 


John White 


Wages and debts due - . - 






^^M 


Susan Homphrejs - • \ 


Part of her husband's wages 


}i 


^^^^^^^1 


^H » 


Alice Knight . . _ 


BeueTolence ... 






^^i 


Elizabeth Garlick 


Same -..--* 




^^^^H 


■ „ ^ 


Alice, widow of Elias Kirkwoode 


Hiiifiband*B wagea • . . 




^^^^1 


1^^" 


Robert Stokes - * - | 


Estate of Simon Mountford - 




^^^H 


•^ Oct. 1 


John Lomprier ... 


Continuance of employment - 


tt 


^^B 


H »t » 


BobertDay 


Gratuity for his service* - 


11 


^^^^1 


k" - 


Jane Boyde, alias Porter, widow 


A debt out of Francis Wadsworth's 
estate. 


It 


148 ^^H 


" » » 


John Johnson, master of Rose - 


Remainder of his wages - 




^^^^H 


>f #« 


John Wood, master of Lesser 
James, 


Part of Thomas Haiiiian*s tfag€« - 


» 


^^^^^^1 


^^H 


William Morris - - - 


Benevolence for wound at Ormuz - 




^^^^1 


^^1 


Ann, wife of Simmel Jenkins 


Part of her husband *8 wages - 




^^^^H 


^^1 n ft 


William Taylor, a bov 
John Allen," ship Wright - 


Benerolence for services - 




^^^^H 


^H 


Part of wages of his two serynnts^ i 




^^H 






Thomas Bay ley and Wm. Dredge. 






^H $9 n 


Elixabcth, wife of Nicholas Hnf- i 
field. 


Part of her husband's wages - 


>» 


^^^^^H 


^H »• >f 


Ellen, wife of Samuel Prichelt - 


Same - - - - 




^^^H 


^H 


Lydifl Bacon, widow 


Remainder of servant John Bryant's 


»» 


^^^^^M 


^H 


John Woodfidl 


wages, 
Part of servant Richard Lyteficld's 
wages. 


n 


^^^^^H 


^H 


Richard Hanley, shipwright 


Part of servant Thomas Gerrard's 
wages* 


*t 


^^^^^^H 


^^K 


Moyses Boomer - - - 


Benevolence for the toss of an eye • 




^^^^H 


^H ai »» 


Robert Pickering - 


Bene vol enoe for ** his long nnd 
miserable voyage.*' 


tt 


^^H 


^H 


Peter BeU 


Hifl waget - - 

Part of her servant John Hitch- 




^^^^^H 


^H 


BoBCf widow of Willm. Farrington 


" 


^^^^H 






cock's wages. 




^^^^H 


^B » N 


John Rose, the prisoner 


Uh wage« - - . ^ 


" 


^^^^^ 


^H 


Marian Baxter - 


loi. of Thomas Johnson's wages - 




^^^^1 


^H 


Ellen, wife of John Chesterton - 


Part of her husband's wagei* 


n 


^^^H 


^H » t» 


Susan, wife of William Collins - 


Same . - . . 


** 




^H *» H 


Alice, wife of John Shorting 


Snme - _ , , . 


n 


^^^^^^^H 


^B «i ») 


Klifiabeth Burte, widow • 


Benevolenoe - - . 


" 


^^^^H 


^H 


Helen, wife of Henry Searle 


Part of her husband's wages - 


*i 


^^^^^^^H 


^H *» n 


John Tombles, mate 


His wages - . - 




^^^^1 


H 1. a 


Peter Bell, purser 


His wages - , - _ 




153 ^^^H 


^H » 


Jtidith Huhbert 


Her servant Henry Blackler'a wages 


" 


^^^1 


^^H 


AMoe Shorting - 


Part of her husband's wages 






^m n „ 


Mathias Waterhonse 


Cloth, of Richard Smith, deceased - 


' 


^^^1 


^1 


John Goodrich, surgeon - 


Part of his servant Wm. Peirce*s 


>» 


^^^^^^1 


^H 


Dorothy Chadsley 


wagep. 
Part of Jeremy Davies' wages 




^^H 


^H w It 


Elizabeth, wife of Symon Anderson 


Part of her hoshand's wages 




^^^^1 


^H 


Ann Long ... 


Joho Crow*B estate - _ , 


" 


^^^^H 


^H 


Arthur Hatch, preacher - 


A grat ideation • . 


t* 


^^^^^^^H 


^H »* »• 


Robert Brownrigg, gunner 


Increase of wages - . . 


n 


^^^^^^^H 
^^^^^1 



222 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



Date. 


Name of Petitioner. 


Subject of Petition. 


Reference. 


1623. 






Conrt Klin. Bk. 


Oct 


3 


WitliiimUidc 


John Goodaoo*8 estate 


VLiP 


,157 


»> 


6 


Joau Boyd - ... 


Money owing to her 


>r 


159 


» 


8 


Robert Stacy - ^ , 


Hifi wages _ . - - 


II 


157 


n 


» 


Exors. of RoljertJeffi-icft - 


Jlw estate - - 


II 


163 


»» 


II 


Henry Jacksoa * - - 


Employment - - - - 


11 


171 


t» 


II 


Marj' Eman, widow 


Her deceased son Richard's e<<tate 


II 


9* 


$f 


II 


Mr, and Wardens of Watermen - 


Wages of John Taylor, a prisoner- 


»* 


»• 


n 


10 


Mr, Alcxanderi Benrant of the 
Prince. 


WageHof John Alexander, lost in 
the Hope- 


II 


na 


i» 


II 


John Smith . - - - 


Estate of his brother, Richard Smith 


It 


175 


») 


II 


— Pingley ... 


Oversight of the salting of beef - 


I* 


It , 


If 


II 


liubL'rt Holmea ^ . . 


John Hinchley'a wages - 


II 


176 


n 


13 


Daniel W bite, parser of the PrIs- 


Purserof the Jonas - - - 


II 


177 


t> 


n ■ 


grave. 
Eobert Loftus - 


Employment . , . 


If 


179 ■ 


f» 


15 


Mrs. Baffin - - - - 


Her husband's estate 


It 


1S3 ■ 


>t 


II 


Katherioe Cluff - 


Benevolence . - - ^ 


II 


133 ■ 


11 


II 


A^nes, wife of Thomas Bellamy 


John Chftll comb's estate - - ( 


tl 


195 


>» 


II • 


Aron Ellis - - "- 


Gnitifieation for «crr vices - 


II 


«i 


11 


ft 


Edmund rar-^onB 


John Frowde*8 e^ntate - - - 


II 


M 


M 


*i 


Elizabeth, wife of Gilbert Rich- 
ardson. 


Part of her husband's wages - 


II 


>» 


tf 


II 


Margaret, wife of Richard Mailer 


Some - . - - 


II 


196 


n 


11 


Katherine Cook . - . 


Wages of her husband, a runaway 


II 


tt 


11 


II 


Edward Hessand - - - 


Part of *fervant*8 wages 


»l 


ffi 


H 


II 


Thomas Border 


" Reward " for loss of leg - 


1) 


fi 


» 


It 


Thomas Warwick, a aalter 


Employment - - - - 


II 


*f 


>1 


II 


Hehecca Barnes 


Part of her son's wages 


ft 


ft 


n 


II 


Wilham Copp - - - 


Recompense for loss of his servant 


tl 


»» 








at OrmiuE. 


w 


It 


if 


i» 


Elisabeth Kiinn - - - 


Wages of her Bervant, James Hants 


*i 


n 


It 


i» , 


John Goodrich, Barber stirgeon 


Wages of his servant 


»t 


Tt 


»> 


n 


Ann TayJor - - - 


Botit-hircof her liiii^haudj ciu^cnter 
of the Charles. 


fi 


1 


fi 


II 


Jane Ell more - - - 


Wage$ of her servant 


It 


>* 


» 


II • 


Giorpe Maddox . , , 


Payment of monies from the Supply 


•» 


ff 


n 


II 


Elizabeth Lcgatt 


Estate of her kinsman, liandal 
Grimes. 


It 


»t 


i> 


11 


Magdalen Halea, widow 


Charity - . . - 


II 


197 


»t 


tl 


Richard Wilkinson - - - 


5/. paid to a pretended wife - 


II 


$t 


fi 


»i " 


Joane, wife of Randall Jeswin • 


Wages for a deceased servant 


II 


*» 


II 


f* 


Elizabeth, wife of Bartholomew 
Ooodale. 


Part of her husband's wage* 


11 


ft 


It 


II 


John Brewer 


His wages - - . - 


II 


*t 


»i 


»i 


Jane Scott, widow • 


Benevolence - . - - 


tl 


** 


II 


17 


Alice* widow of Eli as Kirk wood 


Part of her husband's wages - 


II 


185 


i> 


21 


James Dover - - - 


Steward's place - - • 


If 


201 


If 


r» 


Nicholas Wcwlcy 


Employment as a writer in the Indies 


tl 


f* 


t» 


II ~ 


David Gilley - - . . 


To be n purser's mate 


It 


>f 


II 


ji * 


John Boulter - - - i 


Steward's place ... 


II 


II 


fi 


II 


John Lilly - - _ - 


Same _ . , - 


II 


n 


II 


•» 


George Smith - - - 


Purser's mate - ... 


If 


208 


n 


tl 


John Thatcher - ^ - 


Employment as a landman « 


♦• 


91 


II 


It 


1 Robert Leek - . - 


Stew^^'s place - - * 


It 


•1 


II 


II 


Anthony B^rry - - - 


Employment a« a marine man 


II 


m 


91 


II 


Thomas Keelcson - . 


Steward's place . , - 


ft 


M 


tl 


II 


— Slow and — Bottomley 


Employment as noldier* 


w 


» 


»l 


n 


William Browne , . - 


Steward or mate's place - 


M 


n 


II 


If 


— Biigbfirrough 


Employment 


19 


•1 


II 


II 


John Thorowj^ood, Henry Wil- 
liams, Charles Latham, and 
divers more. 


Pursers, purser's mates, stcwardii, 
or steward's mates. 


tf 


ft 


II 


M 


Henry Jackson ... 


Employment * . , 


f* 


211 


1) 


24 


Wiltiain Zoach, Thomas Snow, 
and Robert Norria. 


Employment as factors - . - 


II 


913 


Nov. 


4 


Stephen Miller . - , 


Steward In tlie Jonas 


If 


328 


II 


II 


Arthur Dtvia . . • 


Purser's nuOe or steward 


tl 


w 







EAST INDIES- 


1 


223 ^^1 


^m Dtte* 


Narae of Petitioner, 


Subject of Petition. 


Reference, ^^^^H 


^m 






Court Min. Bk. ^^H 


^B KOY, 


. 4 


JoKboa Bryan and John ITyder - 




VL,p 


^^^H 


^^^H 


»* * 


Edmnnd (iader - - - 


Employment in the Indies • 


)t 


^^^^^^H 


^^H 


» 


John Cole and WiiHam Knightly : 


Empkiymeiit - . . 


>i 


^^^^^1 


^^H 


n 


John Norrii* - - - 


Employment as factor - * - 


1* 


^^^^^1 


^^H^^-** 


ft '^ 


Richard Wild - . - * 


Same . - . - 


f* 


^^^^^^H 




1 


Robert Jynntn^. John Coonihet, 
U en ry W il 1 ia rns , I'^d ward 
HapkinSi William Perry, James 
DuDnings, Baptist ' Norris, 

tborne, John Wil&on, Michael 
Noyes. 1 


Employment - -] 

* 


n 


^^^^^^H 




»» 


Rowland Dell - , - 


Swabber or swabber's mate - ! 


»f 


^^^^^^H 






George Pettus > - . 


The cliargesof an arre«t 


*i 


^^^^^^H 


^^^V 


„ 


Joane, wife of Randall Je«son - ' 


Employment, for her husband 


tt 


^^^^^^H 


^^H 


ti 


Judith, wife nf John GriAHeU . 


Her husband's wngea 


» 


^^^^^^H 


^^H 


}f 


Ann, wife of John Tumbles 


20/. on account of her hnsbEmd's 
wages. 


»> 


230 ^^H 


^^H 


»> 


Joseph Waytea - - - 


Allowance of wages 


If 


^^^^^^H 


^^H 


11 


GtK)rge Pettus - - - 


Increat^e of wageN and law charges 


*} 


243 ^^H 


^^^^^_ 99 


12 


Angus tin Kingsmell 


Employment in the Indies 


t* 


349 ^^^M 


^^^^H" 


f) 


Johia Border - - - - 


Compensation for the loss of a leg, 
or employmoDt. 


»» 


350 ^^H 


^ «t 


» 


Mr. BushctI, on behalf of the 
Lord Viscoimt St, Albans. 


Employment for Isaac Oader 


t* 


^^H 


^^^r 


14 


Hiinry Bale 


Repayment of moneys diubuttted - 


n 


^^H 


^^H 


»* * 


John Kingston 


Employment as iaclor 


n 


256 ^^H 


^^H 


»i 


Robert Loftus - ^ - 


Employment in the Indies - 


*♦ 


^^^^^^H 


^^H 


•• 


George Page - - - - 


Same . . - - 


M 


^^^^^^H 


^^H 


17 


Susan Andrews - - - 


Part of her huiiband's wages - 
Employment as stewafd^s mate or 


It 


258 ^^H 


^^H 


>i 


William Greene 


|> 


^^^^^^H 








landman. 






^^H 


N 


John Thomas • - - 


Payment of wsges - - * 


II 


^^^^^^^^1 


^^H 


21 


William aud Francis Sandcroft, 
and George Barrett. 


Estate of John Sandcroft, dcseased 


It 


^^H 


^^^B 


»• 


Klizabetb, wife of Edward Twells 


Her huaband^s wages 


11 


264 ^^H 


^^H 


H 


W^m. Methwold 


IJis wages » - . - 


l> 


^^^^H 


^^H 


» 


Divert coopers - - - 


Employnieut at Blackwall - 


»» 


^^^H 


^^H 


»» ~ 


John Wood - . - 


His servant's wages 


»t 


^^^^^^H 


^V 


J» 


Edmund Wodar - - - 


Employment ^ , _ - 


II 


^^^^^^^^1 


^^H 


24 


John Pilchard . ^ - 


Employment as mcrchaQt - 


II 


^^^H 


^^H 


t» 


laaac Crowther 


Employment in the Indies 


11 


^^^H 


^H 


„ 


Richard Barbury - - - 


Employment um steward or mate - 


II 


^^^^1 


^^H 


26 


Jane Milb<>me - - - 


Her servants* wages - - - 


II 


379 ^^H 


^^m 


it 


John and Winifred Parkcs, only 
Binter of Richd. We«tby, 


Richard Westby's estate - 


II 


^^^^^H 


^^^m 


»* • 


Helen Jeronimo, a Moore - 


Her husband's wages 


II 


260 ^^^1 


^^^^^^ »# 


tf 


Rot>i?Tt Holmes - - - 


Wa^es of John Hcnchely (Ilmchley) 


1* 


^^^H 




19 


John Eobert^f late master of the 
Little James. 


Hifl wages - - - - 


II 


3«4 ^^H 




l| 


Robert Uames ... 

John Bradbury . * • 

Joane Stamp - - - - 

Ann Kemp - - - _ 

Rebecca Jiames - - - 

Ann Stanley . - * - 

Judith Grissell - 

Mary Linklatter _ . . 

Katherine Morris 

Katherine Cooke - _ _ 

Joan 1 1 ebb . , , 


These are bracketed together, some 




1 




r» ~* 


being for more than two months' 
yearly of their huabandH' wages, 
and others for sertants" wages. 


* 11 


^^^^^1 






Su»aD Andrewes 






^^^^1 




i 


William Currant - , - 






^^^^1 




1 


Robert llerriott 






^^^^H 




1 


Ales Luckier - • * - 






^^^^H 




1 


Wiikam Burcli - - - 






^^^^H 




I 


John Sympson 






1 



224 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



Date. 


NBme of Petitioner. 


Sabjeet of PetitioD. 


I 
Reference- 


16i3. 






Court \rm.Bk. 


Not. 26 


Joane Archbell, widow - 


Charity [her hutbaod slainat Onniul 


VL,p 


.S84 


It H 


Sarah Roorae, widow 


Same - . • . . 


99 


>i 


If ft * 


Amy Walker, widow 


Same 


*> 


tf 


t$ 1* 


My nam Turner, widow - 


Same - , _ . 


M 


«i 


l> f> 


Ricbard SampiUl - - - 


Same 


*f 


285 




Jane Miuion _ - - 


A legacy of 5/. - . . 
Employment aa purser'i mate or 




ft 


tl 1' " 


Atherton Leake . - - 


H 


» 






steward. 






_ 


Samuel Wliite, boatswain 


Part of his serrant's wages 


Tf 


»f 


f> r» 


Jolrn Thomns, late cook of Pals- 


Part of his wages detained 


l» 


i» 


» )| 


grave* 
Richard, son of Aaron Barte 


Employment and apprenticeship - 


»1 


» 




Oliver Havers - - - 


14/. given to his pretended wife - 


w 


*« 


i> t> * 


Ale«,[ Alice] widowofUcJiryChirki* 


loA of her hoahand's wages - 


tf 


»» 


II tt 


William Kendall - - * 


Compensation for 137 ryals cbargeil 
by Ball for unvendable safroo. 


n 


t>$ 


fi J> 


Eiizabvth, wido^ of Tlumuu 

Gidwyn. i 


Wa^es of her servantp, Peter Chap- 
man and John HalL 


»» 


tt 


** it 


Jane Milbome 


Her servant Henry Morgan's wages 


t« 


S8e 


rt >» 


Eliaabeth Browne 


Part of her servont, AJexaoder 
Pierce's wa^ea. 


» 


*» 


i» >f * 


John Wright - - - - 


Employment and an allowance 


jj 


rt 


It t* * 


William Rice - 
John White, bontswiiin 


Apprendoeahip ... 
AJJowazico Of wagca ... 


tt 


tt 
If 


i> ft 


Rachdl Barnes ... 


Wagei of her acrraiit Alexander 
Hiie. 


tt 


It 


»t ♦» * 


Robert Pickering, iurgeon 


Re-employment as surgeon * 


n 


t» 


»t 28 


John Er3*field - 


Employment as factor 


II 


275 




WiLUam Doyly - - - 
Gregory (or George) Clement * 


Same . - _ . 


tt 


11 


i> ♦» ~ 


Same . . . _ 


tt 


i« 


tt 19 


Richard Ha>Tieii, son of the master 
of Merchaut Taylors' School 


Employment aa a writer 


t* 


278 


Deo. 1 


James Bickford _ . , 


His wage» .... 


•• 


S8#H 


»l M 


AlexandtT Coachman - 


Employment as purserV mate or 
steward. 


ft 


** .^H 


_ 


James Bickford ... 


Interest on wagea forborne 


tt 




ft ft ~ 


Bibilla, wife of James Rynd 


Wages of her husband, a preacher • 


ff 


ssSH 


tt »» ~ 


George Buttery • - - 


His wogea . - - . 


>» 


«• ^H 


tf ** 


Peter Bell, purser - - - 


401. stayed from his wagea 


tt 


^H 


f, 3 


Richard Adeombe - - - 


EntertainmcDt aa apprentice - i 


>i 


2SlljH 




Robert Cooelcy - _ - 


Employment as factor 


»» 




_ 


Edward Plommer 


Same - - - . - 


n 


M 


;; 5 




Her brother, William [mc George] 
CokajTie's estate. 


19 


a»s 


9t tf " 


Thomas Reynolda, pttrser 


Repnyment of money disbursed - 


tt 


ma 




John Pilchard - - - 


Employment aa factor 


t* 


wiW 


I! 8 


William Knightly - 


Employment .... 


*« 


wtM 


»» » 


Gunners of the Royal James, 
Jonas, Star, and Eagle. 


Harbour wages . . * 


II 


^m, 


>i if> 


Alice Alexander, widow 


Charity - . - - 


I* 


55A 




Elizabeth Milliard, widow 


Same 


it 


m ^m 


» tt ' 


Mwgery Parfect, widow - 


Same .... 


B> 


n m 




Joftoc Uowell, widow 


Same - - ... 


tt 


" ■ 


t> >f 


Lucy Bayly, widow 


Same .... 


•f 


- ■ 




NicholaB Byxe - - . 


Employment as factor ... 


•» 


„ ■ 


tl n 


Christopher Snell 


Same .... 


HI 


l» 




John Cole - - - - 


Same - 


>» 


»l 


»» »» * 


William Perkins - 


Employment as common man 


tl 


*l 


>» » * 


John Dickmaa . - . - 


Einplovment ai smpson - 


fl 


ad3 


H »> "" 


Mary Hartly • 


Her husband's popper and wages - 


»» 


•1 


„ 12 


Nicholas Woolley - , - 


Employment as factor 


It 


307 


» u 


Edward Lee, the Company's 
BolJcitor. 


A gratification - - • , 


•* 


" ■ 


t> ** 


Adam Bowen - - - 


Increase of wages ... 




^^ ■ 


>» 15 


Abraham Chamberlain - 


One Bixi! to go as £M:tor - 


tt 


309 


i> » ~ 


— Brownlowe _ - . 


Employment as factor - . . 


ft 


at 


ri « 


Nicholns Chaliicombe • • , 




•» 


t* 



EAST INDIES. 



225 



Date. 


Name of Petitioner. 


Subject of Petition. 


Reference. 


1623. 






Court Min.Bk. 


Dee 


15 


Widow of Percival Hudaon 


Money due to her husband 


VI., p 


.309 


99 


»» ■ 


The Company's secretaiy 


A gratification for 1^ years* sendee 


)> 


310 


■y 


17 


John Hiochlej - - - 


To go to the Indies as master or a 
passenger. 


»» 


313 


99 


»» 


— Friday, a preacher - 


His indigo . - - - 


99 


814 


99 


19 


Tichbome, the solicitor 


Money disbursed - 


»> 


317 


99 


« 


Gabriel Hawley - - - 


Employment in the Indies - 


» 


»> 


99 


»» 


Arthur Clifford - - - 


Allowance for 2 hhds. of nutmegs - 


» 


818 






Jane Herbert - - - 


Part of her son's wages 


9> 


319 


» 


>» 


Robert TeUowc - 


Remission of a fine imposed by the 
President. 


» 


» 


» 


» 


Ann, wife of Samuel Jenkins - 


Part of her husband's wages 


99 


320 


yy 


»> 


Francis Haldanby ... 


Employment as a soldier 


» 


» 


w 


M 


Alice Ramsey - - 


Relief for the deserted child of 
Lawrence Peters. 


9> 


w 


»» 


23 




Increase of wages - - - 


W 


321 




»> 


Thomas Chancey - - 


Same - - . - 


» 


322 


»» 


» 


William Waulker, porter . 


Same -.-.-- 


» 


» 


9» 


» ** 


Thomas Teggin . - - 


Recompense for assisting the beadle 
in warming the general courts. 


» 


»» 


>» 


»> 


John Grimston, beadle 


Consideration for the hire of Teggin 


9> 


» 


»> 


" ' 


Nicholas WooUey - 


Place of purser's mate 


99 


324 



1623. 



Names of Persons admitted and sworn Free Bretdren of the East India Cohpant. 



I>ate. 



Free Brethren. 



To whom bound. 



By Rne or 
otherwise. 



Reference. 



1628. 

Jalj23 

« 25 



Aug. 1 

99 «7 

SepClO 
* 19 

Oct. 8 

,, 10 

„ 81 
IfoT. 26 
Dee. 5 



Thomas Pursclow 

Jean Turetine, merchant, of 

Genoa, and kinsman of Bur- 

lamacbi. 
William Ashwell 
Thomas Elton - - - 

John De la Barr ^ - 
Lacas Corsellis ... 

JohnKepp . : . 

William De Vischer 

Richard Abbott . . - 
Thomas Leatham 

Richard Boothby - - - 

Samuel Cooley . - - 



The Earl of Devonshire 



Alderman Johnson - 
Mr. Maddoz, deceased 



Mr. Ncvill 

Robert Offley , haberdasher 
John Poole, mercer 



10s. to the poor box 
50/., and lOs, to the 
poor box. 

30«. to the poor box 
10«. to the poor box 
20/. - - - 
50/L, and }0s, to 

poor box. 
100 marks, and 10». 

to poor box. 
40/., and 20«. to poor 

box. 
10«. to poor box - 
5/. to poor box 
10«. to poor box . 
10«. to poor box . 



Court Min. 

Bk.VI. 

25 

81 



39 

89 

115 

129 

164 

175 

217 
278 
295 



^^^^^226 


^^^^^^f COLONIAL PAPERS, 




■ 




1628* 




^^^^^H Traksfehs of A DYKKTirBKS ill the East Ikdia Company. ^^^^^I 


^^^^^1 


Wfom 


To 


AauMmt. 


Kiime af Stock. 


Reference. 












ConrtMia. ■ 


^^^^^H 






£ 




Bk. VI.^ 


^^^^^B Jtily 4 


Sir John Merrick 


Bichard Swift > 


1,000 


Beyond joint stock 


» m 


^^^^H 


Sir Frttiicii* Bkin«lt?ll 


William Spuretowe 


500 


Some - 


89 ■ 


^^^^H 


Edmund Tyringham 


Henry Whittttker 


500 


Same 


<S ■ 


^^^^^H Aug, 


Peter Ri chant 


B«jbe"rt Smith - 


2,000 


Same - 


« n 


^^^^^^^^^^^H 


Hobort Smith 


Hamman Claxton 


2»000 


Same 


t* 


^^^^B 


WiUiara Burrell - 


Istmc Van Fajnie 


700 


Same - 


SI J 


^^^^^H 


JaqaesUyk-a - - - 


Samuel De Vlscher • 


1 ,500 


Same 


53 ■ 


^^^^^H 


Ellis Crispe 


Kicholas Crispe 


1,333. 6«.8c/, 


Same - 


vn ■ 


^^^^^^^^^^^H 


Kot^crt litttexnnn, treasurer 


ThooMft Symmons 


50G 


Same 


■■ ■ 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


TbwphiliiH Bn^rton 


William Farrar 


1,350 


Same - 


'- ■ 


^^^^^^^^^^^1 


Doctor Raven 


William Hubbert 


500 


Same 


" m 


^^^^H 


Nieholafi Crispe 


Johu Knnd - - - 


333. 6^. 8^. 


Same - 


181 ■ 


^^^^^B 


Hobert La Burr - 


John l^u Barr - 


500 


Same 


144 ■ 


^^^^B 7 


IIi'Tiry I'ifther 


Sir Humphrey Lynn - 


2,600 


Some • 


S30 H 


^^^^H 


William Btareblock^ df- 


James Bcareblock 


1,000 


Same 


SSI ■ 


^^^^H 


Sir Henry Tichbnrne 


Lucas Consellis 


400 


Same - 


3«4 H 


^^^^H 


Mary Fettiplace, deccAs^ed 


Thomas Latham • 


800 


• 


379 ■ 


^^^^^^^^^H 


Itichard I^mbe - 


MBeach Hai« • 


800 


Second joint fetock 


- ■ 


^^^^^H IQ 


IVter rriaiili - 


John Kepp - 


200 


Same 


931 ^ 


^^^^^^^^^^^H 


Jeremy Fisher, deceased 


Giles Debult - - - 


800 


Same - 




^^^^H 


Jeremy Fislier, deceased 


James JacobsoQ - 


300 


Same - * 


907 ^ 


^^^^^^^^^^H 


Edward Lee 


Richard Edwards 


50 


SaDie 


SOS M 


^^^^^^^^^H 


Peier Pruulx 


John Kepp 


200 


Same - 


•• ■ 


^^^^H 


.1 ohn Biinger 


James Hughesson 


200 


Same 


316 H 


^^^^H 


itinrj Furrar, widow 


Thomas Keightly - | 


— 


Same 


322 ^1 


^^^^^^^^^B 


Nicholaj Farrar - - , 


Same- 


" 


Same - 


888 


^H J 


^^^^^H Jan. 2-5. 381. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Capt. Weddel^H 


^^^^^^^^ desire to havo Mr, Willen rather than Mr. Copland for preache^B 


^^^^^^^H refen-ed. Messi-s. Venn and Stone discharged from underwriting for^| 


^^^^^^^H dividend. Motion of 8ii' William Throckmorton, brother to La^ly Dal^| 


^^^^^^^^H concerning his sinter's business ; answered that his Majesty havit^| 


^^^^^^^^H granted a commission to end the same, it became not this Couil t^| 


^^^^^^^H deeUne tliat course, but to attend the issue thereof Gratificati<i^| 


^^^^^^^H of U. to Thomas Parr, for copying out the examinations in La<1^| 


^^^^^^^V Dale's business, containing 100 sheets. Bond of Biekford, Iat<*l^| 


^^^^^^^V returned out of the Indies, to be deHvered to him. Capt Weddo^l 


^^^^^^^K informed the Court that he had mustered 214 men a1x)ai\l the Qfl^| 


^^^^^^^H James, but that the most part of them have no clothes ; the s^Pi^| 


^^^^^^^^H be paid on Thm^sday next, but none to receive pay except such a^| 


^^^^^^^H shall have their clotlies aboard. On the entreaty of a worthy gentl^| 


^^^^^^^H man, brother to '' Lord Aburgajme}'," the estate of Thos. Bromle}^| 


^^^^^^^^B deceased, late the Company's servant, to be paid to his brothe^^f 


^^^^^^^^H Jacob Hcrewin, a stranger, but a free denizen, to have his &eedou^H 


^^^^^^^^^B paying 100 marks fine. Information tliat the Company 8 new year^^f 


^^^^^^^^^P gifts ai*e well accepted, and that his Majesty had expressed himfie^H 



EAST INDIES. 



227 



1624. 



weU satisfied with the l:>enefit the kingdom received by the trade of 
the East Indies. The comoxittee to conclude with Kemdge con- 
cerning his ent^rtainmeni Mi\ Governor much gTieved tliat Hurt^^, 
a man recommended by him, should give any jiint cause to be 
questioned : he is called in and told of hia want of due respect to 
Mr. Dejmty ; ordered that the business bo suspended. Mr, EUhani 
to attend wholly to the Company's letters to the Indies, Measrs. Venn 
and Parkhurst to fiimisli green and crimson satins to bo sent to the 
Indies ; the l>est choice of those coIoufh is in the Low Countries. The 
cloths ready, and part of the quicksilver. Elephants' tcetli and 
tapestry to be provided. 

Jan. o. — ^Oaths taken by the audit<")rs, Rali>h Handson, Roger 
Giiibrd, and Thos* Colthiirst, to proceed with two pair of l>ooks at 
once ; the Company's debts, rate of inteixist, price of ryalls, and the 
like to l»e kept secret ; and l>ecanse the work was gix'at, the opinion 
was to begin with the second stuck, tho^tii-HtJ^eing ended in that ; Mr. 
Evans, the fourth auditoi", to att<md (»n Wf dne-sday to meet the R'sI, of 
the auditors. Report, of Mr. Deputy that the committee appointed for 
that purpose had conferred with Mr. Kerridge, and had come to an 
ifisue, if the Court approved, that he should serve the Company tlxreo 
years in the Indies for 400/, per annniii ; TOO/, to set him tn st*a, and 
300/, gratification at the end of four years ; that he shall ileliver 1 ,000^. 
to the Company, for whicli if he survive four years he shaO receive 
2,000/., but if he die, only l,000i, ; he shall forbcai" all privat*? tnidc 
and hinder it in others by alt possible meanSf and shall have the 
like commis.sion that the Pr<?sident at Bantam liad. Affcer somo 
conference with Kerridge, the Court ratified the above-recitt^d 
agi*eemeiit, and represented the Company's love and good opinion 
towards him, the necessity of his restraining private? trade, and the 
damage which hath happened to the Company by ri}>ping o|X!n liales 
and embezzling calicoes, for prevention whereof he was desired to 
take care ; and it was ordered that a new article be inserted in the 
seii commission, to be read once every roonth, that if any damage 
in that kind shall accrue to tlie Company, the Tiiariuers shall give 
satisfaction out of their wages. The services recommended to 
Mr. Kerridge are that he should settle the trade at Sumt, the 
business of the Red Sea, the affairs of <)r!nu7., and the Pemian 
trade, some of wliich might perhaps require his presence. Two 
months* imprest to be allowed the mariners at the discretion of 
Capt Weddell. The committee to view Messrs. Andrews, Burlamachi, 
and Coi-sellis and Sir Francis Crane's tapestries, and buy *' the 
l>est and best cheap." Anthony Varneworthy, ])rojiounded for a 
factor, to be inquired of further. Sir Himiphrey Handford tu l>o 
satisfied why the Company gave G8. the dollar to the widow of 
Isaac Steevenson ; and to make a report in the business of Capt. 
Bonner. Mr. Lord, a preacher, refeiTcd to another time. Henry 
Bate, lately r<itumed from the Indies, to have his bond cancelled and 
his fi'eedom of the Company. 

Minutes of a meeting to consider of commodities to be sent to 
Sumt upon this fleet. It was thought fit to add to the fii'st pro- 
portions ten pieces of velvets (mostly crimson), ten suits of tapestiy, 

P 2 



230 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1624. 



Jan. 1%. 

Ispabaii. 



himself, by Charles Wood's counsel Sends book of wills, inven^ 
tories of dead men, and some run away at Ormuz. Mr. Billing 
formerly purser of the Wliale, is placed purser of the Reformatioi! 
bound for Bantaiu. Eiulorsed, "John Facie, purser's mate in the^ 
Reformation,' [Om jxige. O.G, Vol. X\, No. 1140,] 

386, Extract of letter from Ispahan, delivered by the Bewin- 
theblxis to [Robt.] Barlow at Amsterdom, and by him sent to thi 
East India Company. That the Portu^ls came by night wit 
rowing vessels under the castle of Ormuz, and shortly was tl 
Reformation an<l two Moors ships set on fire. The Moors wer 
wholly buint, but the fire in the English ship was quenched by th€ 
lielp of the Netherlaudei's. She was iu the gi^atest peril, having 
her men sick, to tlie number of 40; and the Netherlands* ship (the 
Huesduna) left her It) men to bring her to Suiat. [lyatcL Half i 
jxvgc. O.a, VqL A'„ No. lUh] 



Jan, /h. 



Jan. 9-16, 



[Half a page. O.C,, Vol Xj 



387* Translation of the preceding. 
No. 1142 J 

388* Court Minutes of the East India Company. No man to be 
suilered to let his accoimt iim out all the year long. In ca.** 
Messrs, Miaselden and Barlow cannot execute the treaty in Zealand 
the^ States to he moved by the Lord Ambassador to authorise tin 
Company there to appoint two commissionei-s to treat at Amsterd 
Mr. Barlow to make known to the Dutch that if they stand upoB 
security for bringing hotiie their pepper they must give the like foi 
the Company's monies. Re(|uest of John Holloway concerning iiv-j 
tcrest The secretary to attend Sec. Calvert, with the earnest 
quest of the Company, that he will move the King forthwith foi 
his licence to build forts in the Indies, Capt, Fowkcs recommended 
by Sir H. Vere, under whom he served in Bohemia, to command in" 
tlio Cora] zany's intended fort in the Indies; he demanded 150/. |>er 
annum, which the Court thought too great a salary, "neither (li<l 
tliey think it fit to send a captain tilt they had a fort ;" notwith- 
standings to prevent others that might perhaps be of less merit, and 
yet ]>rocure strong reconunendation, the Court were content to speal 
with him on Monday next. Petition of PhiUip Hill» recommen<lec 
l*y his Majesty, for a lieutenant's [divce. Request of Mi\ Clitherowfi 
that he may send his son Robert into the Indies, imder the care oj 
Ml*, Kerridge, upon like tenrns for Iiis passage as ha<l been granted 
Mn Towei'sons son. John Cappur to draw up the ailicles betweei 
the Company and Mn Kerridge. Muster taken by Capts, Weddel 
and i^ovenger ; 190 men aboard the Admiral and 14 aboard tli<! 
Vice-Admiral ; to l>egin to pay impix»st on Monday next, and care 
be taken as to tlie mariners sureties, for it is said that divt-rs that 
are contented to victual aboard, do give out that they will not gc 
the voyage. Complaint of excessive expense of victuals aboanl the 
Khij>s outward hound ; the pLu*ser8 to send home their accounts. 
The lettera for the Indies to be made ready, and Mr. EUam to. 
attend at the Courts on the usual days, 

Jan. 12.— Motion on behalf of Thomas Wade and the orphans oi 
Mr, Oelstrop]!, deceased, concerning their dividends in doves and 



EAST INDIES. 



231 



16S4. 



calicoes. The present price of cloves not to be abated Mr. De- 
crowe'a account concerning the joint stock of the United Comjtany 
delivered to the solicitor, for the better defending of the suit with 
Decrowe* Offer of Bishop, a jeweller, to sell two rich f*earls weighing 
18 carats a piece, and other jeweU ; to be considered, the Court 
i-ememljering that good profit had formerly accrued by pearls. 
Chai*ge for interest on billB to be taken off. Sir William Garro way 
not to be charged with interest due on biUs, the Company having 
Ijeen beholden to him for forbearance of moneys to as great a value. 
Examination of the accounts of Edward Pike, deceased ; also of his 
brother, George Pike, who had also served tlie Company as a factor 
at Surat ; to be allowed 4^, per ryal, notwithstanding his brother's 
private trade, in regard Edward Pike lost hiB life in the Company's 
affain^. R^iquest of Mi% Lanman, " now rc^y to proceed with his 
Ijooks/' for the accounts of Edwaid Seagar and of John Lamprier^ 
who supplies the place of purser general in John Youngs stead. 
Report of Mr. Munnes that the Governor is very weak and ill. being 
much grieved at a mcvssage sent him fi-om Sir Randall Ci-anfield, 
** which was to have his money, or otherwise he would come by it 
how he could ;" this, Mr. Governor conceived, had relation to Sir 
Randalls adventure, but Mr. Munnes understood it of his di\^dend ; 
if it be his dividend the warrant is to be forthwith delivered to him. 
Complaints concerning the miscandage of divei-s at the conmiittee of 
the generality for pui-sers' business. A General Court to be called, 
*' both to set out the diligence of the committees in [)oint of reforma- 
tion, and to question the miscarriage of some particular committee" 
Order to be given to the factors in India to forbejtr to use lime for 
white ing of calicoes, which bums the cloth and ilisgraces the use 
thereof, whereas it wouM lie whited in tliree or four days raoi-e in 
the ojien air. Motion of Kerridge on l»ehair of John Nonns a« a 
writer at Surat ; some thought the Company already over charged 
with factors, others that the Company hatli l>een ill served by factoi'S 
made of maiinei^, and would Ix* still if able factors wx^re not sent 
from hence ; resolved that a note of the factoi's alreat^ly eutei'tained 
Ixs presented to the next Court, when Norris and one Varnewortby 
shall lx>th receive answer. 

Jan, 14, — Order conceniing the sending of Ma\ Clitherowe's son to 
the Inflies. Augustine Spal dingers wages may supply his a<l venture 
so &r as they will go. Concerning Sii* Randall Orautietd's message 
to the Governor (see above) ; messenger sent to his house, but frnmd 
him not at home. Advice of a parcel of coral »ent to Roanne 
ibr tlie Comf»aiiy*s use. Conceniing the money claimed by the 
widow of Mr. Baffin, late master of the London, deceased in 
the Indies, for her husband's estate ; the pi-etence was for 835^. ; 
ordei"ed by general consent that she shall have 500/. in full of all 
demands, provided that RoV)t, Boiime, who is authoiized ''there- 
unt(3, together with the said late wife of Baffin and her present 
hu.«5band shall join in a discharge to the Company ; also that tlio 
woman, Ijeing in yeai"8 and deaf, hatl made an unecpial choice, and a 
man not of the hest governed, the Court promif^ed ho to work with 
the husband that some honest means may be allotted her out of 



232 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1624. 



the same." On the petition of Beversham to ship out his indigo, the 
Court wished him to ex&tniae his carriage towiu^ds them, and then 
judge whether he deserved the favour or not ; and it must also be 
romembered that he let go Rnj Frere, the late general of tlie Portu- 
gal fleet at Onnuz; referred for consideration, Andrew Evans, 
formerly master of the Ann, to be master of one of the pinnaces. 
Letter read from Mr. Barlow with demands of the Dutch of " many 
petty sums ** due to them from the Comjmny, amounting to 2,847Z. ;| 
answer to be returned that what can be proved to have been received 
to the Company 8 use they will pay. Note read of the names of all 
the factors entertained to go in these ships. John Norris entertained 
as a writer for seven years. Pruson to see the Company's books in 
presence of one of the auditors and Mr. Lanman Mr. Deputy and 
two others to attend Mr. Attorney and Sir John Walter concerning 
the business of Ball in the Star l^amber. Mr. Guy, an examiner 
in the Star Chamber, to be gratified to the value of 40j*. in calicoes. 
Capt. Gerrard Fowkes again offers his services to command in the 
intended fort in the Indies ; resolution to give hun 200 marks per 
annum ; he desires time to consider. Demand of Henry Bate for 
303 ry^als disbursed in the Bear rejected. Provision of cloth to be 
furnished from the Lady Craven, where the best conditioned is to be 
had. Offer of three samples of tapestiy at 3/. and 4/. the Flemish 
ell ; too liigh priced. Gratuities to Messra Graves and Coxe^ the 
keepers of the council chamber door. Motion of Mary CokajTie 
about her brother s estate ; Messrs. Browne and Bownest to take a 
review of the business and report to the Court 

Jan. 10. — Letter received from the directors of the [Dutch] East 
India (*ora|iany dated fV J^^-> ^ be translated agaiast next Court 
Concerning the payment of money from Mrs. Harrison for so much 
charged to her late husband's account. Maiy Cokayne attended with 
" one of the secondaries of the coimter," and Mr. Da vies, a lawyer, and 
desired to l>e heard ; ordered that Mr. Lanman deliver unto them 
the truth of the case, and if they be not satisfied therewith, let her 
take her course. Mr, Lord, lately entertained to go a preacher, having 
giv^en testimony of his suthciency by a sermon preached at St. Helens, 
to have 201. to buy him bmjks, and two month.s* pay by way of imprest 
The opinion of Sir Horatio Vere to be asked about Capt Fowkes. 
John Parker, a youth whose father died in the Company's service, 
ent*Ttainod, on Capt Love's recommendation. Discussion and agree- 
ment witli Mr. Roe, last master of the Star, to go master in the same 
ship at 7(. per month, to take the son of Capt, Parker, deceased ui 
the Company's service, into his care. Draught articles between the 
('oiiipany and Mr. Kerridge read, concerning his intended employ- 
ment at Surat ; to have priority of Mr. RasteU ; he expects to be the 
priiiio man at Surat, where he wished to settle, and that Mr. RasteU 
might go to Ormuz ; the Court pressed Kerridge to go for Ormiuc 
and begin a factory there, who answered RasteU might do the 
liiLsines.s in Pei-sia as well as he, for that he for his pai-t is utterly 
unacquainted either how to deal with princes or how to treat wnth 
a people whoni he understands not, nor they him, and thought a 
fitter man than cither might be thought upon/and named Methwold ; 



I 



4 
4 



EAST JKDIES. 



233 



1624. 



Jan. 17. 

London. 



Jan. li 



the Court saiJ they did not expect he should treat with the King of 
Pei^sia, for the OoveiTior of Shiraz would suffice, besides the Court 
was informed that Capt. Weddel offers to undertake to treat and 
to nettle the trade of Ormuz, if the Company will allow him but 
200/. above covenant, so Hexihle he holds the Persian and apt to 
entertain the Enn^lish. Kerridge contented to treat with the Gover- 
nor of Shiraz, and promised his best endeavours for the settling of 
the tmde, but desired he might be authorized to have priority of 
Rastell, which the Court yielded unto, only they desired Kurridgc 
BO to carry it as might give least offence, who also promised that if 
Rastull shall refuse to go for Ormuz he will then take the business 
and settle it to the Ixjst of his .skill, '* The Cuuit w^as very careful 
if) endeavour the settling of Onnuz, and to gain the trade which the 
Portugals had formerly in that place, and were of opinion that if 
the Cumpany had once estabiahed a factory there they should have 
l>oth silk and other commoditit'S broucrht thither in barter for Surat 
commodities.*'' Kerridge to be careful to send away the ships as he 
can get them laden, except where the safety of the fleet is respected, 
the stay of the ships being over chargeable to the Company, 
Knives, feathers, and strong watei-s to be sent in these ships. James 
Reymond, a boy little of growth but of extraordinary forwardness, 
whose father tost bis life in the Company s service, to bo entertained. 
[Nineteeti pages. Court Minv4e Book, VI,, 2>p. 345-3(85.] 

389. Chamberlain to Carleton. Thinks Sir Robert Sherley with 
hi.s Persian wife have come out of the clouds, as he cannot learn 
where Sherley has been all this while. Hears his request for an 
audience in quality of an aiidja;ssador is granted at Newmarket, 
because he lies not far off at his sister's, La^iy Crofts, '* the best 
retreat and means he hath here.'* [Extract fivm Domestic CorrcsjXf 
Jfu\ L, Vol. CLVIIL, No, 33, Cal.j^^ 149.] 

390. [The President and Council] to the East India Company, 
Advised them at large of the state of their affairs on 15 Dec. last 
[1023] by the Royal Exchange and the Elizalx^th. Enclose copies of 
their protests against the Dutcli in Batavia and Amboyna [see anti% 
No8. 3(]4, 377] to be delivered to Governor Speult, and are resolved to 
call their people from thence, as formerly advised. Have referred 
all their controversies witli the Dutch into England, being utterly 
hopeless to bring them t*> any reason here. This pinnace is tlispeeded 
cxpreasly with advice. The General has Injen veiy irre.soluto 
whether to send her or no ; but may Ije, he did it of |>urpose to pre- 
vent us from sending large advices Ijy lier that tliey might complain 
first. Their jealousy is such that they dare not trust their letters 
with us, ** measuring uur actions by their own sinister practices." Have 
refused to sign the receipts sent to them by the General for sjiices 
and powder, because they are ialse and unjust. Explanations ''so 
that the lavish exjiences, and gifts of the Governor, their exploits 
abroad upon particular concjuests, their j»articular buildings brought 
upon account of fortiticatioii and gallies, tingans, «tc,, brought to 
account, ♦ » * y^r\\i amount unto twice as mucli as in equity we 
ought to contribnti? '' ; and are constrained to jiay for their one 
tliird of spices more than the Dutch for their two thii'ds. Cai^go of 



S84i 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1624. 



Jan, 17, 



Jan. 17. 

Biitavin, 



the Exchange in i>epper and doth to the value of 72,751 n-aJs, 
of the Elizaljeth in pepper, spices, and tamarinds, to the value 
70,884 lyals. Jesson in the Coa^ster ha.s gone uj> the river (of Jarnbi) 
for the rest of tlie Ainie\s ladbig, hut of the Bee and Beai* he writes 
not. Intend to ilesjiateh the Anne for England if she amve in time^ 
hut if it be the inidtlle of March before she can be made ready the 
seanien will Ite very unwilling to go in her, being unprovided of 
clothes to keep them warm, and fearful to meet with foul weather 
upon our coajst. Coai^ie clothes should be sent to encoui^age them 
to undertake the voyage at any time. Fear the Discovery will 
not come fully la*len from Acheen, as there are so many Dutch on 
the coast of Sumatra. Great want of *'stufl'" to trim the ships, 
especially the Moon, Ruby, Diamond, and Unity. [Tivo -pages, 
mutiliited and iinperfecL OXl, Vol X., No, 1133.] 

391. Extract ol' letter from Tliomas Brockedon, Hemy HawleyJ 
and Jolin Goninge to the East India Company, with marginal notesij 
in Italian, The Dutch have delivered a general account of thai 
charges of the Moluccas, AmbojTia, and Banda, which are now sent. I 
Bemarks on the diflerent items, In every particular imi^easonablej 
to allow a certain sum for soldiers and fortifications, but all other j 
excesses should be rejected; tlieij" new buildings in Banda amount toj 
an excessive sum. Excessive gifts and extraortlinarie^ given without ' 
our knowledge ought all to be overviewed ; the expense of the Gover- 
nors table and riotous shooting of powder no way tolerable. There | 
should be a moderation of taxes and rating ; and a narrow examina- 
tion of all the accounts, being so generally full of exactions. The 
second year's account amount*^ to more than the first. AiTival of th© « 
Discovery on the 14th from Sumatra with only 317 bahars of pepper. I 
Great hope that the Abigail will get her latiing. In reference to the] 
money owing the Company in Pooloroon. The reason Mi'. Weldenj 
did not demand the del>ts owing at the time the Pooloroonese were] 
attacked was that at the cruel torturing of the Pooloi'oonese the! 
Cfovemor Sonck exceetlingly urged them to confess whether the 
English were not accessory in tlieir pretended treason against tho 
Hollanders, and knowing tho Governor to l^c his enemy, Welden ha^l 
just cause to doubt of his safety, if he should at that time have 
given the least occasion of distaste. The Dutch may well make J 
good said debts, out of the gi'eat quantity of gold found amongst j 
'* those miserable people of Pooloroon, whereof tlie Governor (l>y| 
report) had no small share." It vnll be seen that spices can be \ 
bought better cheap in England than the Dutch offer them here. 
Thus *'they daily invent one new device or other to heap diargaj 
upon you/* [Six jjnge^, 0,C,, Vol, X., No. 1144.] 

392. Henry Hawley to Thomas Keightley. Refers to letter 
sent by the Elizal>eth and Exchange which dej>arted the 15th Dec] 
His most material cause of writing is to signify the state of 
their trade in union with the Dutch. Unless their *' potent and 
partial'* construction.s of tho agreement of 1619 be rectified in 
Euro]je confusion will follow. Before Batavia the Dutch keep nevcir 
less than 20 ships ; the Piscadores are fortified with 15 or 10 ; the Mo- 
luccas with six, seven; or eight ; and Masulipatam and Pulicat with 



i 



EAST INDIES, 



235 



,1624. 



more or less. Hath any man reason to conceive that this excessive 
chai-ge can be maintained with the traclo of three ships ? As for 
their plantations, the best of their peofilc are Cliinese, and their 

bnrghei's being such of their own nation as are married with " the 
scum sent out of Holland;' or with the Indians, prove the woi*«t 
neighb*jurs merchants can desire. These things move him to ctmsider 
that the greatest of their inconveniences is theii^ imion with the Dutch, 
for howsoever it seems necessary, fii^st, for security, secondly, for ac- 
commodation of trade, and thirdly, for particijjation in tlie Moluccas, 
&c., these are but dehLsions, First, they not only live in suspicion 
throughout all India, in respect of this confederacy with such noto- 
rious tyrants and eneroachers, but ai'e every day in danger in their 
own persons from their feigned friendi^. Secondly, it is a{>|»art*nt 
that all their agreements " ai'e but as nets to entangle poor knais." 
Thirdly, the variety of devices in strange stratagems and strained 
governments will make our own Pooleroon prove more available 
than all we shall enjoy with the Dutch. Why Uiey have hastened 
their resolution to remove from this place, The Dutch " upon every 
sleeveless pretence " make whom they li.st their euemies, and forbid 
us fi'om trade with them, a^ they have done witli China, Bantam, 
and Ceram, whose people they exasperate with the most barbarous 
cruelties. These things must be prevented in Eurojx?, and so ordered 
that each may freely pass into all parts of India (the Moluccas, &c. 
only excepted). Pooloroon will stand us in good stead for spices> 
yet for cloves the Dutch most be agreed with, whose store is far 
more than the world can consume, or the S|ianiards. It is resolved 
f^^inst the spiing to send a ship to Tanjore and plant a factoiy 
there. If Molucca spices camiot be obtained » trusts some good order 
will be taken for rej>lanting in Pooloroon. This fountlation btang 
laid, viz., first, that all parts oi" India may be free ; secondly, that 
their projects for fortification and commerce with Bantam may 
Hiicceed ; thirdly, that Pooloroon may Ijc restored ; and la.stly, that 
Tanjore fad them not, it will follow of necessity that the Dutch 
"must change their copy,'* or the Englisli will sink them iji all their 
designs. Then it will be neceasary tliat ships of greatest bunlen pass 
to and from England, and only small vessels be kept in India for 
exjjedition. (Postscript.) — The China Ambaiisadors have been pub- 
licly feasted by the General, and they purpose before going, to 
communi* with them of their willingness of friendly commerce. A 
principal ]»oint to 1x5 handled in EurojiCj is that peactmble trade be 
free for all that are not professed enemies. It is likewise to be 
remembered that order and Christian duties in tliese heathenish parts 
Rhonkl shine as tlie diadem over all the rest, for which cause a 
rcdigious and well-qualified teacher ought not to be neglected, whose 
words and works concur. Jlr, Wren intends not to stay above one 
yean **The Univerity aboundeth witli excellent men that want 
means, but unless his preaching lie in deeds as in doctrine, I wish 
rather none, for a dissolute head must needs have a diseased body/' 
Wishes to be furnished with a prescription of Statutes, Acts, Ordi- 
nances, and orders fit for this trade and government. Heai*s (*'and 
not improbably ") that the Dutch intend some mischievous ]dot to 
ruin them ; but will [prevent ** then* longing for opportunity, if the 



236 



COLONIAL PAPERS, 



1024. 



Jan, UK 



Jan. 20, 



Devil himself sit not at the stem to pick occasions where none is 
otFcred." Very much mtdil<iied by dam}}; in parts iUer^ihle. 
\_Seveyi jHtgcs, O.C, Vol. X., No. 11 4t5.] 

393. Court Minutes of the East InJia Company. One hundj'ed 

clotlr.s to be sent fur Onniiz» of stanimels, greens, and other light 
cqIovh's. Browne, master of the Star, having ruilely said he would 
not lie aboai\l, is discliargud frooi the Company's service. Complaint 
of Capt. Clevenger of the Jonas, that his ship is abridged of the 
wonted proportion of cider. Capt. Clevenger, of the Jona.a^ and 
Mr, Swanley, ma^^ter of the Great James, promined to amend their 
faidt in not \ying aboard their ships ; Capt. Wcddell and Mr. Johnson 
to be warned t^o receive the like charge at the next Court. Com* 
plaint that vagrants thi*ust themselves aboard the Company's shijjs 
and consume the victuals ; ordered that the pursers i-equire the 
names of those that eat Mi*. Deputy i-eported Mr. Attorney General s 
readiness to advise and assist the Company in the suite against 
Genige Ball in the Star Chamber and Chancery, as also that both he 
and Bir John Walter refused any fee for the same. Nomination of 
Messrs. Roe and Roberts in place of Mr. Browne, for master of the 
Star ; to attend on Monday next. Concerning the estate of Harrison, 
late the Company's treasurer. Letter read fi*om Air. Bevei'sham, 
late master of the Lion, wherein he labours to excuse himself of 
having given way t:> the escape of Ruy Frere, prisoner at the taking 
of 0rmu2, but speaks nothing of bringing in his indigo, .Src. Letter 
also read from Mr. Barlow that " the Dutch intend to hold the Com- 
pany hard to it/' and tliat tliey claim divera petty f^ums. Mr. Ellam 
to reipiire an account current fi'om Barlow for monies and goods 
receivetl Suit uf John Holloway renewed, to take off 4G0/. interest 
charged to his account in the first j'oint stock, for six several reasons ; 
ordered that he l>e discharged of said interest. Petition of 21 
grocers that divera parcels of pepjier underwritten to be shipped out 
may be sold in town, for there is a want of pepper to serve the 
land ; resolved not to give way to it. Mr. Swanley^ master of the 
Great James, " fairly repreliended for not lying aboard ; " " his 
answer was mild and full of resjiect, promising to amend that fault," 
and the Court were content to aDow him fresh \dctuals for his own 
taljle, but w^ould not give w^ay to such immodcrat<3 e.xpence as had 
been. [Five jxttjes. Court Minute Book, VI., pj). 306-371.] 

394. Report [of Sir John Coke] to the Duke of Buckingham^ 
'* concerning the spoils and depredations made in the Indices." That 
the East India Company is |ios.sessed of goods taken from the Por- 
tugals at Ormuz and at sea, vahu'd by them.selves at 2G,000/., and 
from the Clunese at 28^000/., besides the golden prize, stuff prize, 
date jirize, rice piize, 17 pieces of ordnance, and the ** clialow junk,** 
unvalued ; the total cannot be .so little as 100.000?. It is argtie<l 
that these goods were taken either liy piracy from friends or by 
repri.sal from enemies, and if piraticiiliy taken, tliat botli goods imd 
ships are forfeited to his Grace, and the takers and their estates at 
hi« Majesty's ntercy ; but tliat if the goods were lawfully taken by 
reprisal, then a tenth is due to hisGi"ace. Reasons against question- 
ing the Company for piracy : that it would dishonour the nation 



I 



EAST INDIES. 



237 



1624. 



Jan. 21-2G. 



abroad j be doubtful against so great a Company ; tend to the over- 
throw of the Company find trade; and prejudice his Majesty, who, 
besides the main support of his customs, hath by this Company a 
considerable strengtli by sea agail^st any enemy ; also in favour of 
compounding witli tlie Com|mny for tenths, which it is easier to 
obtain, and Vjy encoura^ng seamen in those parts, niay happily exjiel 
the Portugal and get the whole tra«le of the East into our hands. 
Also conceiTiing the consul at Leghorn. [Three pages. EastltidieBt 
Vol IIL, No. 2.] 

395. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Choice made 
of crimson and other light colour velvets. Motion on behalf of Su* 
John Suckling; Comptroller of his Majesty's house, that the money 
owing to him from the old stock may make good his arrears to the 
second joint stock ; after serious <iispute on both sides, the Court 
considered that he is "a person of a tjiiality/* and that a courtesy 
done him cannot l>e lost, and remitted the brokes, provided he forth- 
with made good his payments, with proiuise to pay duly heix^after. 
Message sent to " a great pers^jn '* to pay in the arrear of his adven- 
ture, who told Mr. l)e|7uty that if there were no remedy he would 
pay it, but if he should understand that any other adventurer wem 
borne withalh of what quality soever, the Company must expect to 
hear of it. Letter read from the Dutcli East India Company, dated 
15 Jan. lf>24, that, whereas they are to pay to the English 23,000rv^als, 
the assurance formally offered may be accepted, intimating that it 
may fall out that those ryals are already paid in the Indies. The 
Court tcK>k knowledge of no other assm-ance than Messrs. Crojipen^ 
bergh, father and son, which is no way equivalent with that required 
by the Dutch, and they cannot require less ; but if the Dutch think 
upon a more reasonable security of their pai-ts, '' l)e it by charter- 
party or such like,'' this Conqiany is ready to meet with them in all 
friendly performance, and in a reciprocal quality according to tlve 
words of the treaty ; Mr. Bownest to speak privately to Mr. Crop- 
penbergh coneeming the same. John Ducy to have lodgings at 
Blackwalh late in the occupation of ilr. Fotherby. Complaints of 
the contents of the beef cask and of the tmdersized fish. One Cowper, 
earnestly recommended l>y Lord Annand [/^/r] and Mr, Attorney 
General, entertained stewaiTVs mate ; as also Nicholas Woolley. who 
had before refused to go in other condition than fact-fjr. Complaint 
against David Gelly, pui-ser's mate in the Jonas, for slack atU'ndance 
al»oard, that he is a French nmn, married to a jeweller's daugliter, 
and provider* himself with money for private trade ; lie is to attend 
the next Court. 

Jan. 23. — ^Request of Mr. Hopkins, that whereas Lady Dale, 
in right of her late husband, owes him GOO/., and is for assurance 
content to assign to him her adventutc in the second joint stock, 
the Company would give way thereto ; it was answered that tliey 
were to make good theb own just pretences against Sir Thos. Dale, 
as well upon his stock as otherwise, and may not prejudice their 
legal proceedings with Lady Dale ; also that the Dutch must Ijo 
satisfied for monies taken out of theii* Ibrt by Sir Thos, Dale. 



238 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1624 



E<3qiieAt of Thoa, Wade and the orphans of Mr. Calthrop concerninrj 
the taking out of their dividends. Ordered that the ships should 
hasten and fall down to Gmvesend, ** for that if the Portugal^ as he 
IR now pi^ovoked, shoiiJd light upon the Company's ships without 
this supply, it niight 1hi^ an occasion of great mischief" Francis 
Cowper to go aboard the Star and acquaint himself with the work 
of stewai'ds mate, and deliver his answer after a week's trial, which 
favour was shown him in respect he h^l l>een recommended by my , 
Lord of Annand and Mr. Attorney Genemh Ttet[ue8t of one Fish, 
sometime servant in the salting-house at Blackwall, for consideration 
for work done several nights and holidays ; the CouH gave him for 
answer that they will allow him nothing, for if he wrought some- 
times by night he was oftentimes spared by day. The names of Uie 
Scout and the Spy given to the two now pinnaces built for this 
voyage. The seci*etaiy forthwith to provide Caj>t. Weddell's com- 
missions. Motion of Sherringt'On antl partner concerning Mr. Taylor s 
* lei it. Edwin Guy, late purser in the London, to receive his wages, 
as Mr. Bownest finds little matter to object against him. 

Jan. IG (26). — As the Star cannot take in all the stores for 

Jacatra, the rest to be disclosed of in the otlier ships. Concerning 
the desire of Mr. Prusson to see the pursers* books which are kept 
by Mr, Slunnes, which the auditors refuse to show, save what apper- 
tains to cordage, which the Court approved of, and ordered accord- 
ingly, provided they be shown in the presence of two auditors and 
filr. Lanman, and that Prusson l>o not pei"mittcd to toss over the 
books at his pleasure. Report of Messrs. Style and Venn, that Sir 
Horatio Vere speaks much g<X)d of Mr. Fowkes, who is |>roponnded 
for captain of the fort in the Indies, lioth for his sufficiency- and 
good caiTiage as '* a soljer, discreet young gentleman, and free li-om 
the vdce of cbnmkening incident to soldiers, only lie had never com- 
manded, but been a gentleman of a company •/' also that Sir John 
Burlacy had seconded Sii" Horatio's good testimony, and Col. Ogle 
pmmised to give him such instructions as should make him more 
serviceable in liis place. The Cotirt rested satisfied upon theae 
Recommendations of the fitness of the man, but respited further 
proceedings until Fow^kes declared whether he would accept the 
CojTipany's offer of 200 marks a year or not. Examination of Mi\ 
Thornhill and John Walker in reference to the complaint of the 
smallneas of the fish supplied to the Company, Bavid Gelly, who 
went out purser's mate in the Dolphin, and returned pursers mate 
in the Lion, is questioned whether he hatli not married jdnce his 
entertainment a jeweller's daughter, and is furnished with money 
and goods for private trade ; he answered tlaat he had married a 
French schoolmaster's daughter, wherein he had committed an error 
against the orders of the Company ; that his wife's brother wa^ a 
j>oor working jeweller, and that he was neither furnished with 
means nor instructions for private trade ; with which answers the 
Court was satisfied. Report of Messrs. Abdy and Coxe, that they 
have given Humphrey Hand ford full satisfaction of the reasons 
inducing the Company to allow Stevenson*s widow 08. per rj'al 
and Cai>t. Bonner s widow only 6 8.. and they think the Company 



4 

i 



EAST mBIES. 



239 



1C24. 



Jan. 27. 



Jan. 27. 



JartSS. 



will hear no more of it Discussion about the sealing of a release 
to Mrs. HarriHon in inspect of her accounts. ITie stock of one 
Barkham, deceased (which was thought to be Mr, Decrowe's money), 
to be detained for satisfaction of the sum of 400/. in difference 
between Hairison an<l Dc*crowe. Mr, Soane's account of moneys 
duo to the Conjpany for Buttall WTiarf ; to bo examined. Mr. Wylde, 
ono-of the factors of this fleet, to receive 30/. imprest. The dt-sire 
of Mr. Ken-idge to go in the Jonas and have the great cabin to 
himself, assented to. [Eler^n /m(/es and a ludf. Couii MintUe 
Book, VL. 2^p. :i71-382.] 

396. See. Calvert to [Sec. Conway]. Encloses; a petition fi-om 
tlie East India merchants, upon which he requests Conway to ascer- 
tain the King'^ pleasure, Rememt)ers the business very well, having 
been one of the commissioners that treated with the States. What 
the merchanta now desire was then agreed upon. [Ejirad firrni 
D&mestic C<yrr€sp., Jac. /., Vol. CLVIIL, Xo. 51, Col., p. 15^] 

397. Sir William Cokayne, Raphe Freman, Nich. Leatt. Morris 
Abbott, Hum. Slany. Robt. Bell, Christ. Clitherow, and Rich. 
Ven to the Privy Council, Ai-e sorry to observe their displea- 
sure about Capis. Gyles and Pett. Have long since paid Cai>t. 
Gyles two months' entertainment more than his due. Contracted 
with Capt Pett to build two pinnaces for 1,270/,; have paid his 
workmen and lent him great sums over and a1x>ve his contmet, and 
are ready to accoimt with him, which he rejects. Request, therefore, 
reference to the Commissioners of Na\^'' or whoever their Lordshijjs 
shall appoint. [Domestic Corresp., Jac. L, Vol. OLVIIL, No. 53, 
Cat, p. 15a] 

398. Couit Minutes of the East India Company. Desire of Mr. 
Semper to take out two half capitals in calicoes, but the book being 
shut, for so small a quantity the Court will not open it Complaint 
that some that took calicoes to shi]> out sell them in iovn\. The 
Court, observing that Mr. Beversham, late master of the Lion, 
absents himself and slights the Company, resolved to procure a 
warrant from the Lords of the Coimcil to fetch him, and que8tion 
him as well for his breach of order as for the escape of Ruy Frere. 
David Gelly, pumer's mate in the Jonas, not to go further than 
Surat. for that having mairied a jeweller 8 daughter, the Company 
are jealous lest he shouM fall to private trade. In reference to the 
employment of Capt Fowkes ; he is called in and after discussion 
entertained as captain in their intended fort at 200 marks per annum, 
to begin at Midsummer next and to forbear private trade, but it was 
resolved not to send him until their next tlespateh for Jacatra. 
Request of Mr. Chamberlain to have 20 barrels of indigo to ship for 
France ; the Court, hopeful that the whole tra*le of indigo for France 
might be drawn this way, were of opinion that they might pleasure 
him. Henr^^ WieaUey thought upon to supply the place of purser 
in the Great James, Thos. Tliornborough, by some visitation of 
sickness, \mng unable to do service. Refjuest of Thomas Bostoek 
that he may continue tenant for certain lan<Ls at Deptford, at the 
rate of 40s. per acre, his ancestors having held it for 60 yeai-s : the 



340 



COLONIAL PAPEES. 



1G24. 



Jan. 28. 

B{itavm« 



Company contented that he should hold it from year to year a 
rent, (lairn of ])n Page to certain tithes from the Company 
lauds in Deptford, The Court retaining '* a worthy memory " of 
Mr Harrison, late treasurer of the Company, oi-dered that Mrs. Har- 
rison shall receive a quietus est and full diseliarge from the Company. 
Petition of the gunners of the Jonas, Star, and Eagle that they are 
denied eacli of them a servant, as in foniier voyages, hut have boys 
thrust upon them ; resohx'd that these boys be sent as the gunners' 
apprentices. Request of Mr. Lord, the preaeher, to be aDowed a boy 
to attend hini the voyage ; was told he might make choice of simdry 
boys already shipped, whom he shall find apparelled to his hand, 
and when he came in the countr}.' he may take liking of some Indian 
boy, as others of his profession have done 1>efore him, with which 
answer ho rested satisfied, [Five jxtges. Court MimUe Bk.^ F/., 
jqi. 382^3870 

399, John Goningo and Joseph Cockrara, in the name of the 
President and Council, to General Pieter de Oaipentior and Council, 
in answer to their acts of the i^th and ^ [jth inst. In reference to 
the sums that the Pooloroonese were indebted to them during tlie 
time of Robt. Haies, as proved by tlie books of John Cartwright, 
factor, and tlie reasons said debts were not demanded at the time 
the Pooloroonese were apprehended and im{>risoned, as RichanJ 
Wclden and others have alledged ; tliat having intelligence that the 
Pooloroonese were often mainly urged *' upon the torture " to confers 
whether tlie English were not accessory to their pretended treason, 
it put* them in no little fear; for if they should have accused the 
English, there had been as little favour to Ije expected as others, by 
woeful expenence, have found at Ambnyna, " so thut they attributed 
their deliverance to the gi^eat mercy of God, by giving such constancy 
to those miserable j>eopk^, being otlierwise impossible for fle.sh and 
blood to suffer such tonnents rather than to accuse the innocent." 
May not accei>t the *' trifle " of spices they offer in satisfaction of 
the Governor's riotous exjtense of jtowder in Eanda, except provi- 
sionally. Cannot sutheiLTitl}^ marvel that Governor Speult should 
now liring in new charges, never thought of in the time of [Geo,] 
Musehamp, for they never henrd of the jiinnaces Arahem and Sunit, 
and believe said charges to 1m* inventions of the GoveiTior s. The 
English reipiired to join in the charge, but denied to paiiicipate in 
the proht. Conjunction upon terms of such ine(pia]ity altogether 
unfit, but these matters already referred into Europe. Know not what 
they mean by peniicions attemjits, misdemeanors, insolencie-s, fcc. or 
that they had ever cause to fbrewam their people, much less to 
"judge, t-o whip, to seize» to distnnn, to confiscate, t>o tc^rture, and to 
execute his Majesty's subjects of Great Britain as your own vassals." 
Suppose that the tractate? which authorised us to cut timber to 
** build • • • did also intend that our |>eop]e should live in houses. 
Room is not so scant in the vast fields of Eata\ia that of necessity we 
must lodge our slaves in oiu* ovnx chamlx'i's. Neither are our blacks 
more dangerous than those other multitudes of the same rank, that 
scarce have a knife to offend. But it seems yom* eye is upon every 
occasion that may disaccommodate us^ and you will play at small 



4 

I 
4 



EAST INDIEa 



241 



1624. 



JaxL 28? 



Jan. 30. 

Newnorkct, 



Jan. 30. 

N^vrmarket. 



Jan, 30. 



game* ratlier than sit out/' These imkindneHses profiaging moro 
dan^a^rous con>sequences, persuade us to remove from hence, and have 
thought gootl in friendly maimer to give notice thereof. Remark 
upon the 24th, 3rd, and 27th articles of the tractate eonceniing 
fortifications as contradictory. It were fai* liettcr to nhake hands in 
time than to [continue their brawjhngj^ to the shanio of themselves, 
their countries, and the religion they [profess]. [Three jyagm and a 
qwtrtet\ Muiibiied by d*imp ; m jwrts ilUfjihU. O.C., Vol X., 
No. 1146] 

400. " List of all the writings sent in this packet from Jaoatra/* 
viz. : — Copy of general letter sent in the Exchange and Elizalieth. 
General account of the Moluccas, &c., in Dutch. Copy of giievances 
deHvered the Dutch the iyth Jan, Acts in Dutch of \^ and i-^- Jany. 
Protests delivered the Dutch in Batavia, 12 Dec. 1G23 ; against 
Govenior Speult, sent to Ainbo^Tia per the Amsterdam ; and against 
the Dutch in Jamhi» Letter directed to the Governor and Councih 
Particular letters to Thomas Keightley and to the honourable Com- 
pany, [Half a i7a(fe. O.C,, Vol X., No, 1147,] 

401. Sec, Conway to the Eaat India Company. Requires their 
arlvice on an offer from the King of Pei^ia for free trade, brought to 
his Majesty by Sii' Robt. Sherley, whose expenses must Ix* defrayed. 
[Alinute. Convxiya Letter Bk, p. 104, Cal., p. 155.] 

402. Sec. Conway to Lord Treasurer Middlesex. Acquaints him 
with his letters to the East India and Turkey Companies, and re- 
quests him to consult ^\dth the merchants thereon. Concerning the 
defraying of Sir RobeH Sherley *s expenses. [Mimite. CotmtMys 
Letter BL, p. 105, CaL,p, 155.] 

403. Couit Minutes of the East India Company. Rerpiest of 
Allen Colly, pursers mate of the James, tor t!ie place of pui-ser, 
having undei"stood that Thos. Thumborough is visited w^ith sickness. 
Application of Mr. Hoane, " the city's farmer of Butta!l wharf/* 
for consideration of his pains taken in the collection of the Com- 
pany's rents, Henry Wheatley, mate in the Jonas, chosen to go 
purser in the Great James ; Capt. Weddall prayed eamestly that 
Wheatlcy might Ik? continued mate as befoix^, but it being the 
geneial opinion that " he is a spirit more than ordinarj^," the Court 
conceived he is the fitter to make a pui-ser, "who, if he be a milksop, 
will he subject to continual abuse,*' He was called in and ad- 
monished, but the Court was "content to wink at his errors in his 
last return,'* out of a hope that by his future diligence he will redeem 
what is past. The power of the pursers taken into consideration, and 
ordered that all the masters and pursers be at Court on Monday next. 
The excessive expence of the Company's wine and powder discussed ; 
which the Court utterly misliked, antl gave orders to forbear in 
future ; only it was left to the discretinn of raa-^tcrs to do honour to 
&ti*angers of quaHty. Here it was remembered that the Ann, meet- 
ing Capt. Pring in the main and near no land, shot off 135 pieces; 
resolved to give mastei*s and gimnei's particular charge to refraiu 
that excess, Tlie Great James chawing much water, and Ijcing now 

Q 



24,2 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1624. 



Feb, 3, 



dee]ily Ifwleii is to be carried to Tilbury. Motion of Capt, Weddall for 
150/. duo to him by bond from Capt. Hali Request of Messrs. 
Lan;j^hain and Sliemngton for G0/> for interest on aceoimt of Francis 
Taylors adventure in the tii-st juitit .stock. Suit of John Hollo way 
in reference to Ins bills ; Sir John Wild and Mr. TowTi Clerk to be 
made acquainted tliere%vith. Concerning an order in Chancery in a 
cause between William Pahner, plaintiff, and John Garrett and Francis 
Waldoe, defendants, about an adventure in this Company. The coral 
expected at Dover to be sent in the shifis. [Four jtaQ^ ^'***^' ** 
half. Court Mhmte Book, VL, pp. 3«7-302.] 

404. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Mr. Deputy 
and others to deliver to the Lords of the Council the petition 
against Beversham, and to inform their Lordships of hin negligence 
in Bufferiug Ruy Frere to escape. Letter from Mr. Misselden con- 
taining three jiarticulars, first, whether the treaty shall be pui"^ued 
at Amsterdam or in Zealand ; secondly, what should be demanded 
for damage at the Moluccas, in both of which the Court had de- 
clared themselves ; and, thirdly, concerning a law case to be sent 
over, which Dr. Zotich hail truly and ingeniously laid down copy 
to l>c sent to Mr. Misselden, and the secretaiy to ili-aw a letter in 
answer to the said three jmrticulars. Discuasion as to the disposing 
of the factoi's in the several shi[>s ; KeiTidge has made choice of the 
great cabin in the Jonas, CJapt. Weddall of that of the James, and 
Measrs, Muschamp and Clement to be accommodated in that of the 
Star, and Mr. W^ild and Mr. Johnson (on account of his extraordinary 
! I eight anrl the lowness of the roundhousej in that of the Eagle. 
Letter read from Sec. Conway, dated at NewTuarket, Jan, 30, 1G23-4, 
signifying his Majesty's pleasure that the East Indian and Levant 
Companies should defray Sir Robert Sherley's ehargea (who a fe 
days past had audience as Ambassador from the Emj)eror of Persia),' 
because they were like to reap the benefit of his negotiation, wliichi 
he had apportioned at 4-?. per week for household expenees, and 51. pi- 
week for house rent, and *' gave a touch that the Company were yet 
imder the account of Onnuz " of a declaration of my Lord Duke of 
Buckingham's good afleetion i>o this Company, and his well wishing 
for the prosperity thereof The Court fell irrbo serious consideratioi 
of the business, and with it was remembered that Sir Robert came out 
of Persia seven years .since, and his commission was for Spain ; that in 
his foiTQer amhassage he came Umi for Spain, next offered the trade 
to the Hollanders, and when his ]iroposition3 took no effect he last 
came to England, and wrestt^d from the Company divers sums of 
money. not%vitliHtanding which he liad done ill service to the Com- 
pany, anrl mi let 1 against them, and lie would never have came to 
England if his negotiation iii Spain had taken effect, or if he could 
have passed through Muscovia. The Court conceived that he wasi 
no Ambassador, but hafl usurped the title, yet because his Majest; 
took notice of him as an Andjassador it became not the Company 
make show of the coutraiy, but rather to ai'm themselves witl 
reasons t<:> put oft* the charge, as he Iiad l»een so long absent froi 
IVi'sia tiiat he camiot l»e acquainted with the state of the Comfiany 
affairs there, and the ojdnion of the Court was that the Lord Admiral 



4 
4 






EAST INDIES. 



243 



1624 



be attended to know in what state the Company now stands before 
the ships dopartnre, '* whether they he Dia]efacto"H or not '* concerning 
Ormuz, having a resolution if this business he M'ell settled to embrace 
the trade of Ormuz. After further discussion it was moved that two 
committees l>e sent to Sec. Conway to make relation of all Sir Rol»ert'8 
l>roceedin|fr3, and that the Company uni lei's tand that two Persians 
are coming as Ambassadors upon the sliips shortly to be exf>ected 
to treat alwut tlie Pei-sian trade; but resolution was referred to 
another Court, to wliieli Mr. Munnox is to l>e warned* The business 
of t1»e surgeons chests taken into consideration ; those furnished by 
Wheatley and Woodall viewed ; proposal tliat Sir WilUam Pady and 
Dr. Raven be joined with Drs. Atkins and Winstrm as examiners. 
To the motion that the surgeons entertained be exainined, it was 
answered that the surgeons of this fleet are all experienced men 
who have been in the Indies long, Jiave ]>erformed extraordinaiy 
cures, and are men approved for their sufficiency in their [^rofes- 
sion, and such as will scorn to be examined ; thereupon th^^ 
opinion of the CotU't was that such surgeons as come home well 
approved fi^om the Indies and procc^eJ again shall not Ik'. sul^jeet to 
examination, but if a new unloiowTi man be propounded, then to 
have him examined. [Four pet gee. Court Minute Book, VI,, pp. 
3D2-39G.] 

Feb. 3, 405* Sec. Conway to [Sec. Calvert]. The King has rcfeired 

[Newmarket.] the petition of the East India merchants t^o the committees fonnerly 
appointed to treat with the Butch upon those affairs, witli the sig- 
nification that concerning tlie forts they advise n|»on a course agree- 
able to the intent of the former treaty, the King's honour, and tlio 
security of his merchants and tlieir trade. AH ix^spcct is to be had 
to the resolution lately taken respecting the ordnance, which is to 1k3 
only employed in fortifying the merchants' forts there and seeming 
their trade. [E.iimd fvmn Diyinedic Corresp,, Jae. /,, VoL CLIX,, 
No. 7, Cat, p, 158.] 

Feb. 4. 406, Hugh Hamersley, Govenaor, and the Company of Tnrkey 

London, lltirchants to Sec, Sir Edward Conway. Have, according to liis 
direction, considered the overture of Sir Robert Sherley, propounded 
to his Majesty as Ambtissa*lor from tlie King of Persia. Are veiy 
confident that his proposition of trade into Pei>iia can he no way 
advantageous nor ajipertaining to them tv* merchaiits tradhig int-o the 
dominions of the Grand Signor, and so the charge no way behingiiig 
to them* Signed by Hugh Hamei^ley, Governor, Nic. Leate, Dejiuty 
Governor, and twelve others. [One puije. East Indies, VoL III, 
No. 3.] 

Feb. ? 407- Propositions made by Sir Robert Sherley to the King in the 

name of the King of Persia. The King of Persia, whom he actually 
serves through his Majesty's sufferance, ha^s commanded him to make 
ceii^in propositions to the King which may be for Ids Majesty's 
profit, by mereastng his customs, and no whit prejudicial to his sub- 
jecta, Fii-st, that in the English sliip[iing, which have begun alreatly 
to make a league of friendshifi wnth the King of Persia, may be 
carried gallies, so that he may be able by his own ].>ower and at hLs 

Q 2 



gn 



244 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1624. 



Feb. ? 



Feb. 7-9, 



own cbai^go to ^eciu-c all English shipping that shall trade to bim ; 
anrl for requital the King will lie ready to further any enterprise bis 
Majesty may have in those parts with 20,000 or 25,000 men, armed 
and paid, and will ]>rocure all the Indian Princes his allien to bo 
leady at all times to second it. Secondly, because t)ie King of Persia 
is desirous to remo%^e the rich trade out of his kingdom from Turkey, 
and pliint it where he is better pleased so great a benefit should pass, 
and iH?eause the present corabiistion in the Turkish empire is grown 
to such a height that it is not likely to be suddenly appeased, 
whereby the Pemian merchants run great hazard by venting their 
goods that way ; and because likewise the English are restrained 
from canying any great quantity of bulJion out of his Majesty's 
kitigdoms for talking so great a quantity of silks, dnigs, and other 
rich commodities as ai'o to be hafl in the Persian kingdom, and so 
are vinable to take the himdredth paH of them ; the King, l>eing 
veiy desirous to establish a peqietnal league of finendship with his 
Majesty, and to weaken all he can the common enemy, desires that 
his subjccis may pass their goods on English shipping, paying freight- 
age and such custom at his Majesty's ports as is usually paid by his 
Majesty's suliject'^. Sherley humlily desires his Majesty to consider 
that by these coui^ses neither himself nor his subjects can nm any 
hazard or be put to any charge, but the benefit will redound every 
way to them, and as upon trial ho shall like it^ his Majesty may 
proceed or leave it at bis pleasure, Only two gallies for the short- 
ness of the time ai'e presently desired. [Two pages. Printed in 
ShMeif Brothers, pp. lOO-1 10. East Indies, Vol. II L, No. 4.] 

408. Copy of the above. [Three pages. East iTidiss, VoL III,, 

Ko. 5.] 

409. Court Minutes of the Ea.st India Company. Concerning the 
petition of Henry Bate to the Lords of the Council for 303 rj-als 
which he pretended he had laid out for the Bear. Letters read from 
Mn Barlow, that he had contract€*d for a parcel of striped caliooee, 
and also fur quicksilver to be baitered for indigo. Ofter of Messrs. 
Burlamachi, Vandeputt. and others to buy all the Comimny'a silk at 
22s,, but were imwilling to contract on so short a time as the Com- 
pany oflered ; the Court doubted not of a sale to better benefit, for 
the price in Italy is risen 25 per cent. Otfcr of Aldenimn Cam bell to 
take the whole pamel at '22s., but took till Monday morning to con- 
sider whether he would accept the Company's time. Motion to kill 
beef and pork for store, if Uie Company send a ship about Midsummer ; 
but the opinion was that out of the former proportion of 500 oxen 
and 2,000 hogs there will be a sufficient supply. 

Feb. 9. — Copy of the A\Titmgs to be sent to Mr. Barlow, as were 
s?nt to Mi\ Misselden, with a collection of reasons for the Companjr'a 
demand for damages in the Moluccas. The order for the surgeons 
appointed for this fleet to attend Dr. Atkins suppressed by Woo<lall. 
Infuniiation of Sir. Deputy that he had spoken with a learned 
physician, who wondered that physicians should take upon them to 
set down surgeons* proportions, the same not being proper to their 
art, save only for matter of physic ; it was therefore thought very 
lit that in mattera of physic they consult with physicians, and for 




■fa 



EAST INDIES. 



245 



1624. 



matter of surgery the Burgeons give satisfaction to the committees. 
The ordei-s set ilown in a late Coui^t conceniincr masters and pursers 
to l»e copied out and delivered Ijoth to masters and purserH. Capt. 
Clevengerat his own request t^j 1n> almt^d six pipes of his white wine 
and have instead six pijies of '' Canara wine" and 10 pipes of cider ; 
the proportion of wino for his own expence to be thought upon. 
Abuse in the packing of goods in the Indies ; the \om to be equally 
borne by those on }juixvd as well as hy those on shore. Respite 
granted to Sir Thomas Suiythe to give answer concerning Bartlett in 
respect of Ids health, iMrs. Wickliam having taken advantage of 
thu Court s lenity in allowing mariners their chest of goods, to justify 
her son's private trade ; ordered that private ti*ade in mariners shaU 
be wholly forborne, but with jtower to the Court to tolerate it 
wlirre they S€*e cause. In tX'ference to the profiosal of Sir Fmncis 
< "i.iue to Bend a suit of hangings into the Indies. Carter entc-rtained 
to go mate in the Star at 5/. per month. Offer of Lewis Powell to 
go to the Indies referred. Suit of John HoUoway concerning monies 
due to hiin ui>on the old stock ; but as he is far in arre^r Uj the new 
stock, it must l>e made good by the old so far as it vnU go. Letter 
to be sent to Mr, Punnyett to cany down the Great James. The 
payment of 20 nol^les i>er annum to be contbiued to Mr. Laiupley 
[Lamphigh] for the maintenance of lights at "Dungen Ness*>,'' so- 
long as his i»atent shall stand in force. [Six jxtges, CouH Minute 
Bk, VL.pp. 397»403.] 

410. Thomas Rastell to the King of Socotra, ** the effect of a 
letter written in Pei-slan." His letter came to hand by liis sei-\^ants 
Sade Sheckaune and Essuf Turcke, whom he has always assisted 
w^ith his best furtherance. The King's knowTi favoiu- to tlie English 
is most thank fidly accepted, and his letter has been sent to his 
Majesty of England, As to his desii'e of assistance in ships and 
soldiers, the English are willing to do him service, as it shall redound 
to the honom^ of their King, but this year having bnt one ship 
arrived fi*ojn England, they are diHableil to assist hinj with a ship. 
Desires lie will not receive any of the Dahulers and Choulmen or 
their goo*ls into any of Ids vessels, [ikne /Mi^e, O.C*, VoL X., 
iW 1148,] 

11-13. 411. Court Minutes of the East In<lia Company, The com- 
mittees to consider tlie letters for Surat on Saturday morning, 
Nicholas Woolley declining to go stew^ard's mate in the Eagle, Thomas 
Leeson and Cab, Hawdey, suitoi*s for that emiiluyment, are to attend 
on Fj-iday next, Divers letters read, from Ca{>t. Biekell in the Hart, 
Mr, Brown in the William, and son\e fi'om the Coaster, which were 
brought by the Dutch ship Heliiedam from tht^ (*a]M\, which arrived 
at Delft four montliH wince. The Court oljser\'ed an injury tiuit their 
letters should be detained so long, and therefore ordered Mr, Ellham 
to wi'ite to Mr. Barlow^ to certify the receipt of some letters after 
four months* detention, together with the manner of their sending, 
without any address at all from the Mayoi-s to tlie English ; also 
that this Company takes notice of divei-s provisions lent to the 
Schiedam at the Cape, for wdiich the Dutch in their last account 



Feb. i). 

Sunit. 



246 



COLONIAL PAPERS* 



1624 



have given no credit ; and lastly, tliat divers letters are missing. 
Request of Mr. T!*otter to lie discharged of certain engagements to 
the Company for Mr. Wiseman. Suit of Widow Powell for charity ; 
it was reinenihered that she had received what she could pretend to 
Ik! due, either for her deceased son s wages or otherwise, and that 
tlie Company had suurlry tiineH V>estowed charity upon her, notwith- 
standing which slie petitioned the Lords against them, and was by 
them recommended to the Company's benevolence, whereupon the 
Court wa^ inclinable to bestow upon her 40.'^. out of the poor box, 
but being called int*> court she demanded (j/., which exorbitant 
<lL'mand tbc Court so much misliked that they would give her 
nothing. Request of Peter Bell, purser of the Eagle, for a convenient 
cabin. Mr, Corscllis to be eonclude<l with concerning his hangings ; 
the committee either to make Mr. Coi^sellis an honest gainer if he will 
honeHtly declare the first cost of them or otherwise to mitigate the 
prices demanded. Suit of Anthony Vanieworthy, foi*merly pro- 
pounded for a factor, to be entertained now, but without expectation 
of salaiy till liis employment began : *' here was questioned the 
man's soundness in religion, because he had served a Spaniard and 
lived (j or 7 years in Mexico ; Ijut tbat objection was answered, that 
now he is a diligent frequenter of the church, and often heoro 
Ur. White in Cornwall, that he hath taken the oath of supremacy, 
and is ready to take it again/' The Court being thus satisfied 
offered him 50/. per annum for the two first years, and 10/* rising 
yearly for the five last, which he accepted, 

Feb. 13. — One Moore, a nailor, to lie i-eraoved fi^om the Company's 
house at Deptford ; request of Thonilx>rough, late purser in the 
James, to take it. The committees for the buying of hangings to 
conclude with Mr, CorseUis. Mr. Bonnie to be exempted from 
engagement in Baffin's business. Suit of Trotter conceiTiing a debt 
of Wiseman. Suit of Leeson, late steward in the Palsgrave, for 
employment ; onlered that he supply tlie place of Woolley, aa steward, 
who *' falls off"." Offer of Sir Edw^ard Cecil of a bargain of elm timber 
to the Company. Concerning the sale of the Company's silk. Letter 
to be written to Mr. Barlow% about sending the quicksilver, elephants' 
ti^eth, and ryals lie has |U'ovided for the Compan3^ Information of 
Mr. DL'ptity, tbat he had taken an op|iortumty to move the Duke of 
Buckingham t^3 understand " in what ca^e the Company stands for 
their business at Ormuz," and it pleased his Lt>rdship to give no dis- 
couragement to the trade of Persia ; since when a gentleman had 
sent fur Mr. Deputy, wlio desired his name might be spared until 
the Company had been made acquainted that it was conceived, that 
Ormuz and the Counjany's repri.sals in other paiis of the Indies had 
produced 100,000/. wliereof one was called the Golden Prize» but 
was content to give a meeting ; a committee appointed to give him 
a meeting accoixliugly, but to enter into no manner of dispute upon 
the business, only if he shall charge the Company either in p>oint of 
piracy or otherwise to his advantage the answer to be *' tliey hope 
it will not fall out to be so ; " and it was resolved that if tlie 
Company shall tliink fit to come to any conclusion ; not to make 
any ofler but to stand upon their innocency, Jn tlie margin is 



4 
4 
n 
4 



EAST IND1K8. 



2J.7 



1624. 

%oriUen, " A proposition matle darkly to the Company concerning the 
Lord Admirals right for goofJs taken in tlie Indies/' Ordered to 
buy 200 pair of Bulgar[ia] liides at S^s. per pair, and pay for thera in 
calicoes. Suit of John Young to be again employed, the riot laid to 
liis charge is foui* yeai-^ old and he has since married, and for the 
mattter of striking the labjurers in the yard, it was when he could 
not otherwise get them to do their duties ; orfered that he shall 
serve in Walter Mountford's place, who v^^as discharged the 
Company *s service, but is thought upon to bear office in one of the 
Company's intended forts in the Indies. [Court Minute Book, VI., 
pp, 403-410.] 

'Feb. 17, 412, The King to the East India Cbmpany. Our poor subject 
Edmond Traves, late a merchant, is by divers losses fallen into extreme 
misery, and bt^ing desirous to get a maintenance for his wife and 
children without danger of arrest, prays the Company will accept so 
much of his estate i-emaining in their hands as will satisfy their 
debts and deliver the residue of his stock to his creditoi*s. His 
Majesty is pleased to assist him with these letters of recommendation, 
not doubting that the Company wilJ accommodate him in this his 
request, which his Majesty will esteem a charitable act in the Company 
and take it in very gracious part. Kndormlt " Ilis Maj. lett*.*r to the 
Deputy and committee of the East India Company, and particularly 
to Sh' Thos. Sjuith and Sir Edw. Barkham, in the behalf of 
Edmond Travea" [Om imge. East Ivdita, Vol, 11 L, No. 6 J 

"Feb. 18-23. 413. C^ourt Minutes of tlie East India Cumjiany. Discussion 
concerning the request of [Thos.] Kurridge to be allowed int^jrest fur 
so much of his wages as remained in the Company's hands ; two 
orders of Court read of 22nd Dec. l(jl.5» and 30th Jan. full o%ving, 
mentioning an allowance of 10 [wj-r cent, for facto r*8 wagt*s ; this 
motion generally disliked, and howsoever Mr Mt4hwold had been 
paid interest on those two ordei*s, the Court conceived tlie [irecedent 
dangerous and very prejudicial to the second stock, and therefore it 
was moved to abrogate them. Kerritlge to receive answtT at the 
next year. Three things of s])ocial constHrpifnce tj be handJed at 
this Court, viz. : the hu.siness Ijetween the Lord Admiral and the 
Company, the sale of silk, ancl Pmson's proceedings. For the first, 
Me&ira, Bell and Abdy, having been entreated to take advice both of 
civil lawyers and common, reported that they had confeiTcd with 
Dr. Steward representing the Company's case ; that merchants by a 
commission immediately from the King do set forth voyages into 
remote countries to discover trade both ibr the honor and bt?uetit of 
their country, in prosecution of which voyages the merchants being 
by hostile actions mterrupted, endeavom- to right tliemselves and 
take reprizals, in which ca.sc they desirejl t*i understand whether tlie 
Admiral of the country wherein these merchants dwelt couKl by law 
pretend any right ttj any part of such reprizals. The Doctor 
answered that the tenth part of custom belongs to tlie Lord Arlmiral 
if he give any commission, but said there was no written law for it, 
neitlier saw he any reason why the AJmiral should pretend any 
right where he gives no letters of mai'quf, but upon furtlier confer- 
ence Dr. Steward declared he would neither be of the Conqmny's 



COLONIAL PAPERS* 



1024. 



ComiBel in ihh caune. nor deliver his opinion against the Lord] 
Admiral of England, and all arguoients used to induce him to deliver 
his ojiinion '* would not avail/' As to the jurisdiction of the Ad* 
miralty he said it extended everywhere U)>on the main, and in fine 
wa« entreated to keep this conlerence secret. In their conferencdi 
with Dr, Zouch, the committee showed the Comi>any's patent, 
giving wan^ant to perform what they had done, and Dr. Zouch 
declaimed there was no law for the Admirars demand of tenths but 
said they had been given of custom where letters of mai-que had 
been by him granted, and that was grounded upon the custom ot 
Normandy, whei-e the Admiral is at great charge in i^iich expeditions,^ 
Case recited by Mr. De|>uty conceming the jurLsdiction of the Ad- 
nm-alty, Further report of Dr. Zouch's opinion in the business, whaj 
desired to have a coi>y of the patent, when he would set down iji 
writing the grounds upon which to exempt the Company from th 
demand. The opinion of Sii- John Walter, after a conference, was] 
to delay giving an answer, and that the tleet should proceed wdtl 
commission as formerly. \\Tiat was to be done 'was then taken into] 
consideration, and it was moved that a committee armed witl 
reasons from Dr. Zouch be authorized to answer the party employe 
by the Lord Admiral, the C'om-t i-emembering that the former Lor< 
Admu-al by Sir Jolm Trevor had made the like pretence, but th( 
Company had given nothing to any purpose, and that when lettei 
of moi'que are granted, the party paying a tenth is free from ai 
ilirther trouble. In conclusion, it was held meet to give answer 
Mr. Cooke tliat the Company desire tlie continuance of my Lord'r 
favor, that they had formerly in Ms Lordship's absence upon th 
occasion given 2,000/,, "hoping the account of Oi-muz would hav 
borne it," that they are not T»\ilhng to contend with my Lord, ani 
hope to give reasons that of right no tenths are due to his Lordshii) 
This business to l>e kept secret and not dividged abroad. Consider- 
ation of the business of selling the Company s silk. Discussion oi 
the differences of the committee of the generality concemi 
PruHon's business, *' wliich is growTi to such a head of faction, that ii 
is high time to restrain tlieir proceedings f report that some of th< 
couimittee w^ould uphold Pruson, if it be to maintain a faction 
ordered that an apjieal be made to the Cteneral Com*t to be righted^ 
since Prusen casts aspersions upon the Government as though 
only were an honest man, and to conceive an answer to Prus<m*i 
scandalous petition exlrdbited to the General Coin-t. 

Feb. 20. — Mutiun of Dowles to take a lease of the house i; 
Deptford, and the Court conceived it fit to grant it, and to evi^ 
Moore s brother'in-law^ Warrant giunted for 40^ to take out copi( 
of examinations in the causes concerning Ball in the Star Cliaml»ei 
and Wickham and others in Chancery. Committee apyiointod 
hear at his request certain propositions of Altlerman Hamersleyi 
who had underwiitten for 32.0U0L in the first and second joint stocF 
but by reason of the misfoHuno of the Company's ships and oth< 
casualties was become inde1»ted 23,000?., the burden of which 
ffirtunes lay so heavy upon him that he could supply no longer^ 
Request of Widow Jackson, who had lost her dividend warrant, for 
new one ; referred for fm-ther consideration. The conunittee foi 



i 



EAST INDIES. 



249 



1624. 



merly nominated to confer with the gentleman employed by the I^ord 
Admiral concerning his demand of the Company, to give the answer 
mentioned in the lant Court, and also to attend Sec. Conway and give 
a general answer to his letter concerning the Persian Amlmssador, 
Mr. Bacon related some conference between Sea Calvert and himself 
touching the said business, and that Sir John Crofts brought him to 
the Ambassador, and demanded what the Company would give to 
have a yearly vent of 30,000 cloths in Persia ; '' but this propoiiion 
was conceived frivolous/* Certain articles propounded by the Am- 
bassador read, [i^e ante^ No, 407J, wliich seemed neither fit nor 
feasible, *' for neither is it fit to arm the Persian by sea, neither can 
the Corapany*8 ships carry gaUies i-eady framed ; " opinion of the 
Court, to give '*a general dilatory answer,'* that the Company will 
be ready to meet and satisfy any dejiuties that shall be appointed to 
confer in any propositions of Sir Rol^ert Sherley. The Commis- 
sioners of the Navy taking notice of the great quantity of powder 
bought by the Company and of the small i[uantity of saltpetix^ made 
in England, and that the Dutch bring great quantities fi*om the 
coaat of Coromandel, desired this Company would liring some home 
for the service of the State ; the Court readily condescended that a 
ship may yearly be laden and sent liome from thence, which will 
return t<i the profit of the Comimny. Copies of Randall Jesson's 
letter concerning the fight with the Portugal to be delivered to Sii' 
Robert Mansell and Sir Oliver Cromwell, wlio enquired for i-elations 
wherein the Portugals have attempted any thing against the 
English. 

Feb. 23. Concerning the business of silk and propositions from 
France and from Amsterdam for buying the whole parcel; both 
offers rejected. Long discussion on offei-s of Al<leniian Cainbell 
Burlcmiachi and others, but none would proceed on the tenns the 
Court had concluded on. Report that the committee had conferr^.id 
with Sec. Conway about the Persian Ambassador s business, w^ho 
showed his commission in Pci^ian, which they had desired might be 
translated, and that the Company might have a copy. Also that 
they had conferred with the gentleman enqjloyed by the Lord 
Admiral about his demands, who being told the reason of giving the 
2,000/. seemed nothing satisfied therewith, neither would he signily 
so much to the Lord Admiral, nor let him know tliat tlie Company 
desired his noble favour to lay aside all pretence of right, the gentle- 
man refusing to intercede on the Company's behalf* It was resolved 
to petition the Lord Admb'a], but to be so cautiously couched that 
it may neither give him hope to obtain anything of right nor give 
any distaste. Suit of Hill, a druggist, for payment of Bartlett's 
dividend, which was stayed at Sii* Thos. Smythe's request. Motion 
of Capt. Weddall to entertain another minister ; he presented Mr. 
Morehouse, who was appointed to attend at the next Com-t. 
[Fifteen pages and a luilf. Court Minute Book, VL, pp, 411-426,] 

Feb, 24. 415, Thos. Brockedon, Hen. Hawley, and John Goninge to the 
Baum. East India Company. Refer to their letter- [of 17 Jan. last] and 
enclosures sent by the Dutch ship Ley den, copies of which are 
now also sent {see No. 3S)0]. Arrival of the Bull from Japan 



252 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 





[1624.] 
Fell. 2(i. 



1624. 
Fek 25. 416* Court Minutes of the Ea«t India Company, On the mot 
of Ca|)t8. WecUlell ami Clevenger for entertainment of anotl 
minister, some were of opinion to g^ive way thei^eto, but others 
remenibei'ed that ** it is without jirFjcedent to send two proacliers in 
one fleet to one place, and howsoever the thing in itseli* were 
yet the debauched carriage of divers aboard had almost discoi 
from sending any ;" i-eferred for farther consideration. Consider 
tion of a petition exhibited by Mr. Beversham, wherein he seemed 
to have justified himself for Ruy Frere^s escape, and to desire pardon 
for his error in private trade ; but the Court took knowledge thai 
he was in a poursuivant's custod3^ and must attend the Lords, 
therefore ordei^d to desire that when the Lords hear the busL 
tl»e Company may be called. Francis Cooper, steward of the St 
dismissed for insufBeieney and uncleaidinesa, and one Hawley to 
warned to the next Court. Concerning the estate of Edward Pike, 
deceased. Letters of administration taken out by Thomazin Clarke, 
w^i<low» sister of the deceased, and of George Pike, who pi'eaented 
them. [Ttvo pn^jes. CoxiH Minute Book, VL, pp, 426-428.] 

417. ^h^ Robt Sherley to [Sec. Conway"]. The Duke of Bucking- 
ham will not give him any warrant to the Commissioners of 
Navy without a privy seal from the King. Labours without 
fur the general welfare of this kingdom, therefore requests him to 
procm'e it and oblige a gentleman who will trumi>et \m fame and 
virtues. {Domestic Corresp., Jac* L^ Vol. CLJX,, No. 81, Cal, 
p 170] 

Feb. 27-28, 418, Court Minutes of the East India Company. Debate 
ceming the sale of the parcel of silk upon the Company's ha 
ami the price. The Great James, which di'aws 20 foot of wi 
and the rest of the fleet now outward bound, to fall dowTi to Tilbu 
Request of 8ir Thos. Smythe concerning the payment of a debt 
to him fi*om one Bartley [^ BaHlett] ; but it was eonsidei-cd that 
man is very jmssionate, and if they stop his money, may fall upon some 
violent course, and it was therefore ord<n-ed that Sir Thos. should 
show cause why it shoidd be paid. Draught of jietition to the Lord 
Achninil reail ; it was considered that the ease grows dangerous to 
the Company '* for the Portugal anus in earnest and Is tilled A»it 
anger and revenge by the late ilefcats they received in the Inc 
so as if the English shall be subject to question for what they do 
their just <lefence it will dishearten all seafai'ing men from doing 
service to the Company," The custom in these cases is to grant 
lettei's of marque, and if it j^lea^e the Duke to grant letters of 
martiue the Company wiU willingly allow him his right. The 
general opinion was to give a fair answer to the Duke, and not to 
forget to let him know that the Portugal hath aimed a force against 
the English. It was also reported that civilians *'are of opinion 
that for goods taken beyond the line the Loi'd Admiral has no juri^' 
diction, and therefore can require no tentli, but the Court thou^H 
it no fit course to dispute the (>:mipany*s right [m']^ but to deal wilff 
the Duke by way of mediation, and thereinto use aome such person as 
hath interest in him, who may jjersuadL* him to waiv-e his pretence 
of interest and to let him know that the Company shall have coc 



landH 

kvatM 

Ibu^l 

*lue 

the 



idiM 
do IT 



EAST ENDIES, 



25S 



tiniial use of his &voQr. Fifty chesta of ryais to be disposed of in 
Uia ships now outward bound, viz,, 20 in the Jame8, 15 in tho 
Joiia», eight in the Star, and seven in the Eagle. As BeverHljam, laU} 
master of the Lion, is to be convented Ix^fore the Lonls this after- 
noon concerning the Company's complaint against hiiii» Mr. Deputy 
and others are intreated to be there. Motion of Woodall for snr 
geons for the two pinnaces, two young men '' bred up in the art of 
surgery," who can and will do other latK>ur in tlie ship, ent*^rtained. 
L' tt< r read from Mr. Crashawo, riiinlster of God's Word, rve«>in- 
mending Jlr. Morehouse as a preacher; answered that they have 
one alraekdy provided for the fleet. Those who tiave under\mtton 
for pepper to be transported, to be allowed to sell it in town ujx>n 
paying a mulct of 20^. i>er bag. Motion of Capt Clovengcr for 
Mr. Adilison to go mate with him in the Jonas, but he refusrHl to 
go for lei« than 8/. Suit of Kerridge, entertained t<i go PrcHith^ut 
for Surat, for interest for money (wages) forborne. The <jischarge 
of Cowper, steward's mate in the Star, confirmed ; ami Gabriel 
Hawley entertained stewards mate in the Eagle, Ofler of Philip 
Hill to herve in their intende<l fort as " ancient" Two men of 
gt>od service alrea^ly entertained. 3^et the Court, ca^sting thr-ir eye 
on Hill as a man specially recommended by his Majesty, who has 
a brother near attending about his Majesty, and has nerved l)uth 
by sea and land with more than ordinary conimeTidation, ordorect 
he Rhall be employed as '* ancient of a company ;* Inn wagen not 
settled. Concerning wages due to factors, whether the Coni|iany 
will allow interest or not ; fo inner orders on this subject Ut \x* 
oV»8t^rved, but henceforward the Company will give no " nm " 
(interest) for their wages. Motion that the money duo to John 
Gonninge for wages !>? paid to ilr* Crispe ; but no pa>"ment can Ijo 
expected imtil the Company have notice that lie hves, which they 
have not lately had* 

Feb. 28, — In reference to two persons not of the committeo being 
warned to a meeting by direction of Mr. Woodward, grocer, one oj* 
the Genei'al Committee, wliich kiml of dealing wan noted '* to savour 
of no good humour,'* divers members re]ilied '* with atlnionition to 
maintain love and unity in the Company, for that diviMion is the 
forerunner of mischief in all societies/* Petition of Bevershain to 
the Lord President that divei-s persons now outward bound may be 
examined concerning the escape of Ruy Frere ; refeiTed to the Lord 
President ; ordered that Dr, Zouch's advice be taken for drawing 
interrogatories for the Company, Draught of petition to the Lonl 
Admiral concerning the pretence of right for goods tak(*n from the 
Portugal^ in the Indies, Ix^ing read, it was conceived a har<l matter 
so to couch an^^hing in writing, but that it would give advantagi? 
against the Company ; committee appointed *' to consult of some tit 
Vxxiy that hath interest in the Lord Admiral/ and may inform his 
Lordship of the true state of the business. Complaint of .lulnison, 
master of the Eagle, of the want of eider, he having Ijut IH butts, 
whereas the proportion wa.s wont to he IW*. Motion on l^'half of tlin 
wife of Capt. Hall, gone admiral in the Blessing as to an allowaiiee 
out of her husband's wages. Answer to Mr, Barlow's letter that it 



COLONUL PAPERS, 



Feb. 28. 

Surat 



ies4 

i» not tieedful to satisfy the motion of the Dutch concerning the price 
of tlieir silk, for they are not without agents from whom they fa^H 
not of weekly inteliagence ; other offers made for the same at 22^^ 
per lb. ; committee appointed to ti^at thereon. Offer for some good 
quantity of indigo for Hamburgh, and of Mr. Deputy (Morris 
Abbott) to take indigo in payment of certain jewels which he hath, 
and thinks very fit to send to Surat. The ships to be hasted away to 
the Downs, [Nhw i}ages and a half. Court Minide Bk\, VL 
428-437.] 

419. Tho8. Rastell, Giles James, anJ Joseph Hopkinson to P. V; 
Broecko, Commander for the Netherlands Company at 8urat. 
arrival of our shipa from Pel's i a being very shortly expected, and t] 
doultt that many of our people through ignorance of our troubles ma; 
bolfUy aflventure on shore and so become liable to our sufferin;^ 
induce us to desire your friendly assistance to warn them of thi 
danger of their sudden landing, and also to deliver the enclosed letter 
to them. Annt\€€d, 

419. L P. Van BrcM'cke to tJie East India Conijxtny, Since th^af 
preJtenslon and great dishcnwrs doi\4* to your servant 
oar good friends hi' this jilacr, I fuxiY received of tJwm tM 
htfer, 'wlikk 1 nnfl perfonn, and do any serv'wc to (A 
honoarahlr Comjmny, so it be vnthout prejvdice to 
nutHters, which Idier I could not iieglect but send, ^i^rtb 
your konoiirs may ptrtly sec the state of their seriunis fier 
I hope that throiufh their troiibks toe may vot C4>nic to th 
like. Attested copies. Iwo pages. Sent by the Mayor 
from Amsterdam^ v:hu *' kept back the original, which is 
be questioned/' An endorsf^ient states that "said or 
was brought out of the Indies June 1G25." O.C., Vol, 
Ko. 115L] 

Feb. 28, 420* Another copy of the preceding, endorsed, " Copy of a lett 
8umt. from the Englii^li fact<:jrH imprisoned at Surat, to the Dutch Com- 
mander there ; copy of another letter from said Commander to the 
English Company/' [Ttvo page^^. East Indies, Vol IIL, No. 7.] 

Mai'cli --G. 421, Court Minuten of the East India Company. Concerning 
ill*' difference between the Company and Henry Bate^ who had 
partitioned the Privy Council ; ordered to draw a petition to the Lord 
Pj'osident for a new reft;ren€e to tlie Jud^^^e of the Admiralty. Direc- 
tionH to Capt. Weddall, for stowiny away "the hair lying loose about 
the ships,'* which he considers dangerous in respect of fire. Commit- 
tees to go down on Friday Uy dispeed away the ships. The cloth, 
coral, and tai>estry^to Iji^ sent down on Thursday, and the money in a 
hoy, well guarded with muskets and pikes, the beginning of next" 
week. 

March 5.^ — Pruson's writing to be delivered to the auditors ; 
desired to Ik? heard concerning his petition, exhibited in the G^ner 
i*ourt. The Company's shijKs now bound to the Indies having beeD 
stayed in conse^pience of a motion made in Pailiament, the DeputyJ 
with othei^s of the committee, sought the Lord Admiral as humble 
^uitoi-a lor the i*elease of their ships ; his liordship said that he ha 



EAST INDIES, 



265 



not been the occasion of their stay, but having heard the motion with 
much earnestness in the Upper House, could do no less than give the 
the order ; but, he said, ** he had something in his pocket would do 
them good," and willetl them to si't duwn what reasons they could, 
and he would acquaint the House therewith, and was pleased to give 
way that their ships might fall down as low avS Tilbury to attend 
further directions. On jx^tition of the Company, the Lord President 
ordered that the Judge of tlie AdiniraUy shall K- added to the other 
two referees in the business bet\veen themselves and Henrj" Bate. 
Ck)noeming the coral sent away b}* Mr. Lear, PajTiient urdered to the 
secretary for fetching out depositions, examinations, and dupUcatenof 
patents out of the offices of Star ChatrdxT and Chancery. Care to l>e 
taken to haste away the shii^ *' so soon as their shijis shall get loose of 
the commandment laid upon them l»y the »Statt\" Gratification to the 
examiner and clerk in the Star Chaml K?r and Chancery of two jiiecog 
of calicoes of 108. the piece, for their diligence in dispatch of the 
Company s business in those court's. Two or three bushells of English 
baxlej to be provided for the surgeon h use on t»oard the ships for the 
health of the men " to spare French barley," and an extra proportion 
of lemon water, 

March 6. — Recapitulation by Alderman Hammersley of his several 
propositions to the eomniittees appointed to confer with him conceiTi- 
ing his a«l venture » which at one time was ;K),000/. Imt at | present in 
for 10,000/., signifying that tlie pre^sent ** value of the action is hut 
80 per cent.,** and desiring they would settle his adventure at 8,000^. 
and sink the rest, lor his case was singular, his family great, anti hiH 
present foiiune would not permit so gi*eat a sum to lie dead ; the 
power of ordering this business not in this C'onrt al<tne, therefore it 
was resolved to call the joint committee together, when Mr Alelerman 
might propound his o^\^l request AgiTement having been made 
with Mr Burlamachi and partners for the whrdo ]jarcei of nllk ; the 
contract was read and contirmeil Ordered that Messi^. Bacon ami 
Cappur draw interrogatories with all convenient speed, and examine 
Beversham's ten witnesses concerning tlie escape of Ruy Frere» and 
any other that c^n speak materially in the matter. The Court 
utterly refused to suffer Aklennan Hearne*s son to paas into tho 
Indie-s in the Jonas ; being intbrmed that it was to wean hiuj from 
ev^l company, and conceiving it very dangerous that his example 
would do much hurt among their servants. Motion in favour of 
Mrs. Barkeley to receive the money, due to fier, agreed to as 
Sir Thos, Smji^he's attachment is dissolved* Letter read from [Thos.] 
Kenidge, wherein he lays down the grounds of his demand of 
interest for his wages <liiring tlie time it remained in the Company's 
hands, which had been denied him at the last (Vmrb, and in con- 
clusion he desiiTid to l>e excused from the voyage ; after discussion 
with him, the Court "setting apart his disjiute of right," by erection 
of hands, gratified him with 100 marks in full of all demands, which 
he thankfiilly acce|jte<l, "but ]>rofessed it waa less than he expected." 
Nathaniel Halliday eriterituned at '^UL per annum to waitujum him. 
Report of Mr. Bell that iSir Henry Marten knew notlnrig of the stay 
of the ships, but advised that they should know from Pexall what 



256 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1624. 



Mai'ch ? 



1G24 t 



Marcli ? 



March 8. 




warrant ho had ; it was moved to draw a petition '* to signify that 
tht3 stay of tho ships liad not hastened the Company's coming to my 
Lord Duke." Two gi*eat oriental emeralds offered by Mr. Deputy in 
barter for indigo, which divers lapidariei^ and goldsmiths concun^ 
were ** of the new rock and right oiiental." Letter showTi by 
Mr. Traves from the King, wherein wa.H denired that his adventure 
uviglit go to the satisfaction of his creditors ; referred to the meeting 
of the joint committee. The dismissal of Francis Coo]>er, steward s 
inat<t in tlie Star, on com)daints of Mn Roc, confirmed. Copy of 
contract between Philiii Builamachi and partners and the Company, 
for the whoh:^ remainder of tho Pei"sia raw silk, at 22^. the pound. 
[Eleven jKigm and a half. Court AlimUf* Book, VL, pp. 437-44*J.] 

422. Names of persons to be examined, which include Robt 
Addamn. captain of the Moonc, John Hall, captain of the Blessing, 
concerning the ships taken by the East India Company from th^ 
Portuguese and Chinese since HUG, some being laden with silks, 
others with gold and silver. In Edn\ Niclu^lad' Mnd, [(}n€ page. 
End Indies: Vd. Ill, Ko. 8.] 

423* Copy of the preceding ; on the Imck is another copy of part 

of the same paper, ^ith the addition that one Cottle is employed as 
attorney to follow the busine^is in Pai-liamenL House for .seamen 
against the East India Company. [One page a/ad a tudf, £ast 
Indies, Vol IIL, No, 9.] 

424. Memorandum, signed by Jas, MaHin, that certain ships were 
fitted out in May 1020 by tho East India Company from Jacatra for 
capturing Chinese and Portuguese vessels, and that they continuixl 
in that course three years, *'the true number whereof will appear to 
the Hon^l'5 House of Conimons assembled in Parliament upon oath.** 
Endorsed hy Edward Nicholas, " That there were divers goodi* 
taken by the E. I, Co. servants a** 1620." [i}n€ poge. East Indies^ 
Vol III, No. m] 

425* Court Minutes of the East India Company. The Court 
acr[uaint^'d l»y Mr. Deputy that ui)on occasion of speech of the Eaal 
India ( *oinpany in Parliament there was a sudden motion that tho 
East India fleet might be stayed, others cried out, " stay the money 
that tliey send out of the land/' which some i-eported to bo 80,000^, 
this year ; that the heat was such that Mr, Bond, one of the burge.8se» 
of the city, did but whisper a few words to the gentleman next him 
and was cried to speak out else to the bar ; Mi\ Treasurer Batcman, 
another of the liurgesses of London, was called up U) deliver his 
knowledge clearly what ntoney is to go in this tleet ; he said he 
could not precisely satisfy them of the just sum, but that there in 
to be sent in these ships 30,000;. in ryak of eight The house was not 
satisfied with that answer, and cried out, ** search the books." 
Mr. Deputy, hearing the motion, grew hot, stood up, and made known 
that iUilermar^ Hallidaie the late Govenior being deceased, he was 
ready to give ansvv^er to the house what they r-equlre ami sai*! that 
tlie Company carry out not so much as they l)ring in, and not half 
what they arc allowed to carry ; it is true there is now to go soma 



EAST 1^^DIES. 



257 



1624. 



40,000?., but that their returns when not intemipted are 400,000?. 
per annum in good real commoditie8, as calicoe.^, indigo, silk, and such 
like, whereof calieoe^ alone save the kingdom the expense of at 
least ^(H},OOOL ^x^arly; in cambric, lawns, and other linen cloth, 
neither is it barren in return of money ; that he himself last year 
brought to the Mint 60 lb. weight of gold for Indian commoditiea 
exported ; and that of the value of 400,000/. imi>orted, about 
100,000/. serves this kingdom, and the re«t being exported, works 
itself home again, either in money, or commodities tliat would cost 
money, and tliat the Company will be ready to make this apj>ear 
to the House whensoever it shall bo their |>leasui"e to call them. 
Mr, Mujmes, having heard this relation, and that the House had with 
such earnestness cried down the patent, said '' he doubted not to 
satisfy the Parliament that the strength, the stock, the trade, an<l the 
treasure of the kingdom are all greatly augmented by the. East. 
India trade/* Then fdlovm this rn-em : ''In this C^ourt was a great 
dispute concerning the Lonl Admiral, omitteJ but remaines to lie 
seen in the original." [Chie page and a fuiff. Court Minute BL, 
VL, 449, 450] 

[N.B. — The dispute in question has been referred to 171 prevlt)UA 
Court Minutes. It had reference to the *' Lord AdMirorH rujhta** 
to his share of ivhat was ctiptnred htf the EoM Ivditt Vomj}<in*/ at 
the taking of Ormu^ ; and eventualli/ led. to (he Duke of BuA'klngham 
moving in the Houm of Lords ''for stay of ths Company s Hhijm,*' 
Tfte rvhole rt rmrnsfances were reported to the House of Common.'^ 
by Mr. Wamlesford in the Parlianumt of 1026, 20 April, as 
'^tj^wtious by the Duke uf Burkingha;ttiJ* See Commovs JourfUif^ 
pp. 84G, 847. The debate above abstracted does not appettr in thet 
Coninions Journul , the only refei'eiue to the subjed bring as follows: 
**Sir Thos. Estcourt moveth to search the E, I. shijis for money," 
Ibid,, p. 678.] 

ch 10^13, 426- Court Minutes of the East India Company. Information 
that ail their ships are fallen down to Tilbuiy Hope ; expecting 
further order. Committee for despatcli of the Hhij>a to go thmn 
with next evening's tide ; but the money, whicli is to l>e ma<le up t<r 
48 chests of ryals, not to go down till the shi|js be fully reli^JUied, 
[Geo.] Mtischaiop, one of the Company's factors, actpiainti'd tho 
Court that his intention was always to serve t!ie Company at Surai 
and not elsewhere, for some respects best known tu liimsolf ami 
principally for his health's .sake ; but the Cooi-t made answer tliat 
they always intended his employment to Jacalra. Motion for 
payment of 20/. ]jretended to be given by the comimny of tho 
Coaster towards building a school in Virginia ; but the t*tnirfc con- 
sidering they had no warrant but only a letter from Randall Jesson, 
the master, with the names and proportions of each man's gift, 
conceived they could not safely pay it. Ordered that Mr. Deputy 
may send into the Indies '* two fair oriental emeralds " on his own 
adventure, and receive the |)roceeds here at 5*^, per ryal. Report 
that Sec, Calvert had recommended the deaire of Mr. Minn to sell 
in town the calicoes he took to ship out j Mi*. Deputy enti-eated 

E 



258 




COLONIAL PAPERS. 



March 14. 

WbitcbiOl. 



1624, 

to acquaint Mr. Secretary *' of the impassibility to satisfy his desir 
with the reputation of the Court/* William Beane, brother and 
ailministrator of John Beane, to receire what is due on the a^coun^j 

of hiB brntlier, John Beane, late purser s mate in the Jonas. ^M 

March 13, — The auditor's report to be examined concerning Mr. 
PnLson. Hoary Bate to be warned tliat Sir Hemy Marten, jutlge 
of the Admu-alty, has been added to the former referees about his 
business^ Tfm foUotumg Tueniomndum is added :— " Here was 
omitted a dispute concerning the Lord Admiral, but is to be seen 
in the original" [Four pages. Court Minute Bk, VI,, 450-454,] 

427- Warrant from Sec Sir Ed Conway to the Clerk of tho^ 
Signet to prepare a l^ill to pass the Privy Seal to make allowanceH 
of 30/. a week to Sir Robert Sherley, Ambai^sador with his Majesty 
from the King of Porsia, to coumvence fix^m 28 Jan. last, the day 
of his audience, and to be continued during his abode as Amba^Bsador 
here. [Qivarter of a pti/e. Ead Indi^j Vol I J I,, No. IL] 

March 14, 428, Minute of the above. [Ihid., No. 12,] 

Whirehull. 

March 14. 429, Protest of John Hall, Chr. Browne, Ed. Heynes, Ri^ 
From the Lancaster, and Thos. Waller, addressed to their 'Moving friends 

^M Jsuri^'.^ [the Dutch], Know not why the Dutch resolutely protc-ct the 
India junks, their enemies, who to their own knowledge have 
manifestly dishonoured the King's Majesty of England and wronge 
their masters, the honoiu^able Company, by seizing their whole estat 
and imprisoning their servants. Utterly disclaim any intent 
infringe the articles and capitulations (if themselves give not 
cause of first breach), which require that if one nation be wrong 
by foreign nations, the injury done should he taken as common 
both ; but assure theui that these junks, colourably protected 
them, shall not part ''from imder our command until wc undt! 
stand better of the estate and condition of our President and Coima 
in Surat, which by all circmustances we may justly suppose 
both beti*ayed and entlvralled by your instigations and underhand 
dealing with om* enemies, these people/* ^iirfor^ec?/* Copy of ou 
protest against Uio Dutch. Made [k^-] by the Wilhn* and Blesair 
[OneiKige. OXl, Vol X, No, 1152.] 

March 16. 430. [Sec. Conway] to the East India Company. His ncphe 
Tracey informs him that a brother of his was heretofore employe 
in the East Indies as one of then- factors, where ho died, and tl: 
some i>art of his wages are due. Thinks it needless, yet J^ecai] 
of his alliance recommends him to their favour, [Dmnestic '" 
Jew, L, Vol CLX,, No, 87, Cal,p. 19a] 

March 17. 431, Minutes of a General Court of the East India C^rm' 
Those absent to be fined 1 2d. per piece. Question whether a 
Court can be called without a Governor, the Governor being Hen 
but it was declared to be lawfully called, and the proceedings 
binding as if there had been a Governor present ; ** neither w< 
it ci\nl to elect a new before the deceased Governor had receiv 
his last rights.*' Long discussion conceining the businede of 



K 



EAST INDIES. 



259 



1624. 



larch 21. 



braxid Pnison, in reference to the quantities of timber, cordage, and 
other materials alleg(?d to have been supplied by him to the Com- 
pany. One said he hatl been told by Pruson that where he served 
the Company with oarn at 48, the dozen he was a fool, for he should 
serve them at Ts. the dozen, provided Pnison might have a shai^e in 
the gain, and he should sei'vc all theii* oars and put off all his 
rotten stuff*. Mr. Deputy said tliL^y ha<l more need to join in aflec- 
tion than nourish factiim ; that Pni.son had joined with Hir Jas. 
Cunningham and Sir Thos. Dorrington for the overthrow of the 
Company ; Btill he had done the Company some service, though hLs 
abuses were aa foul aa any man's. Pra8on*s petition, and a relation 
of his proceedings, were then read, and it was said that the Com- 
pany hath not alone suffered hy trusting Pruson, but that being 
question for some falsehood in his Majesty's service, he burnt his 
books. It was in the end agreed, by erection of hands. *' that the 
accusations against Pinison appear to be just, and that he shaU in no 
soit be employed in the Conipany^s service or be admitted to the 
sight of any of their l>ooks." Mr, Deputy declared he was to move 
the Court in a private business nearly concerning the Corajjany, 
which will light heavy on them ; but the greater part, " understand- 
ing well what wa.s meant," ad\dsed to call some of the greatest 
adventurers and treat privately of that business, the publishing 
whereof might much wrong the Company. Resolved that none be 
admitted to the Courts, or permitted the sight of the Company s 
books, that hold any correspondence with the mayors of the Dutch 
Company. A General Court to be held on Tue.s^lay next, for the 
election of a new Governor, *' Here endes Mr. Altfran. Halliday's 
Ooverm^'* [Six pd^es mul a half, Cmiii Miii lUe Bkj VI,, p}^ 45 4f- 
460.] 

432. Tliomas Broekedon, Henrio Hawley, John Goninge, and 
Josej>h Cocki'am to Thomas Staverton, at Jambi, Are soiTy to hear 
of the King's ill dealing, because the necessity of lading ships for 
Englaml consists chiefly upon the pepper of JambL Cannot suffi- 
ciently blame Johnson's incliscretioQ for making such large {>romiacs 
to the King, and for his abrupt departure. For assisting the King 
they find the Dutch no way inclined, but resolved to temporize ; 
but if the Achinder come they vnll secure their people and goods 
aboard their o\\ti ships, and neither assist the one nor the other. 
The General has promised to order his peo])le in Jambi to observe 
sincerely the contracts for joint buying of pepper, w^hieh Staveiton 
should also observe. Desire him to keep good con*espondence %vith 
the Dutch, and rather endure a small injury than break friendship 
with them ; yet if they practice by sinister means to circumvent 
him, in such case to give measure for measure. Johnson^ feaiing 
to Ije kept prisoner, made such jiromise of ansistance as the King 
required, but that formerly made was upon condition tlmt the King 
should be a means to get in their debts, and suffer none to trans- 
port pepper but the English and Dutch; but he has observed 
neither, Staverton may answer the King that the English wiU 
be as ready to give him assistance as the Dutch, but to receive 
his people aboard the ships would be a dishonoxir to the nation. 

R 2 



260 



COLONIAL PAPERS, 



1624. 



If he has intelligence of the Achinder coming, or finds the Kii 
unreasonable, he must trust tis little ashore as possible, as the Dut 
intend to do. He did well to lend the King 500 rj'als.to take awa 
all jealousy, for heretofore he has paifl his delits very well. If iHi 
King tlirust them out, and sutier the Dutch to i^emwn, he maj 
demand of the Dutch half the trade, by virtue of a former con 
tract, sent herewith ; and if they refuse, protest against tlien 
Concerning the cargo of the Rose and the pnce of the pepper 
Bogan to send his accounts to compare with Johnson's, Tl>e exce 
sive sum of desperate and doubtful debts in Jambi, if Bantam tr 
open, will dissolve that factory. Instructions for carrying on th 
trade. Reasons why they have not thought fitting to move 
the matter of fortifying in Jambi River. Will consider of the 
employment of the Rose for Malacca, '' but being a slug will nev( 
make a good man-of-war/' Cbromend themselves to Mr, Hb 
well Have ordained Helmore the mate, master of the Coaster i^ 
room of Randall Jesson. In reference to a ** base trick " which 
Dutch General told them of in a taunting manner, request he 
let his actions be such as may be jostifiable at all times. Advice' 
from [Thomas] Rast4^U from Sumt that their ships have had good 
success upon the junks of those parts, Ai-e resolved to send 
three ships for England this year, which will partly recompcnfio 
the loss of the Whale last year, which with her full lading sunk 
in the sea and drowne<l most part of her men. The Moon 
rotten there is no hope to save lier. so have resolved to send 
Bull to Japai'a to relieve her. Dispeeded the Royal Anne for En 
land 25th Feb. last. Intend to dispose of the ser\'iceable shi{x«$ i 
present here as follows, viz, : — The Hai-t for a new plantation on 
the coast, w^here the Danes reside ; the Unity for Masuliimtam ; tli 
Discovery for Acheen ; and the Diamond and Abigail for the we 
coast of Smnatra, so that they shall not have one serviceable sh^ 
romaining. Have granted Bogan increase of wages to 70^ yearlj 
and will not be forgetful of Croft if he contmues diligent and car 
fuL If Randall be not tit for that place, send him to us. Hav^ 
been mindful in their letters to the Company of his particular 
business, and doubt not they w*ill gi*ant what he desires. Approu 
of his lending pepper Ui the Dutch, and wish him to continue sue 
kind offices, for the continual jar rings of Johnson's time have mucli 
prejudiced both Companies. On further conference with the Dut 
have thought good that if the Achinder come thither, he with 
Dutch should entreat him to forl:)ear to sack Jambi, alledging the 
great debts, which would Ix^ lost, Imt not to resist him by for 
for they are persuadtHl the Achinder will offer no violence unle 
he fii-st V^egins. Hold it necessary that he trust no more 
ashore; but if the King shall thi-ust them both from the trade, 
take eounsell with the Dutch anil seize the Jambi jxmks, to for 
the King to some good composition. To usi* his l»est endeavoi: 
to bring down tlie ["rice of pepper from 7 to 6 r3'als per picul 
consultation with the Dutch ; conceniing this matter the Gene: 
has promised to give express order. Provisions sent for the facto :»^ 
[Five ]Xfg€S. EiidorHed, "Rec. in Jambi p the ship Coaster, 
April 1C24/* O.a, VoL X> No, lloij 



f the 
leve^ 
Iac« 
ter i^H 
1 t« 
i wi]lH 
^vice 

^ood 

^end 

cnso 

mik 

gnM 



Liar 
LidH 




J 



EAST INDIES. 



261 



1624 
March 23. 433. Minutes of a General Court of the East India Company for 
the election of a Governor. Mr. Deputy said '' it might be expected 
he should say something in commendation of their late Governor, 
who is Mith God, but he should hut sully his \drtue8 through want 
of a due expression, and therefore he would be silent/' The follow- 
ing wei-e named, viz., Morris Abbott, 8ir Wnu Cokayne, Mcssra. 
Aldeiinan and Sheriff Freeman, Alderman Kamersley, Alderman 
Cambell, and Aldenuan Ducy, and 8ir Hujophrey Handford, Dis- 
cussion thereon ; and a-s to whettier any one of the Custom House or 
any Turkey merchant is capable of being elected Governor. Mr. Alder- 
man and Sheritf Freeman excused luuiself from election, but said lie 
should tliink bis stock the Iji'tter if the jiresent Deputy were chosen 
Governor Mn Alderman Hamersley moved concerning his adven- 
tm-e of 16,000/.. to cut off tlie one half ; but the Court referred all caaea 
of this nature till God shall please to send home their next ehipa 
Question how to jiroceed to the election of a Governor. Resolved not 
to choose by the ballotting box, but by ihc erection of hands, as had 
been usual. The election found to rest between Sir Wm. Cokayne 
and Morris Abbott. In the end the Company were ** numbered by 
the poll," in the Stone Court, when the election fell upon Morris 
Abbott, who took bis oath as Governor till the next day of election 
in July next, according to former custom. Of those named for 
Deputy-Govenior, viz,, Christoi>her Eyres, Tho. Munnea, Anth. AMy, 
Tho. Styles, Christopher Clitherowe, and Robt. Bell ; the major part 
of hands were for Mr, Munnes, who though absent, was ek^cted accortl- 
ingly. [Four jm^jm and a /aiJf, Court Minufe Book, VI. y 4C2-46G.] 

434. Protest of the Dutch against the English. John De Vogeb 
March 24, Joachim Hendricks, and Gregory Cornelis, Cape merchants, com- 
™^i^mthc manded by Frederick Houtman and Jaques Le Feber. Governors of 
eront*?. ^YiQ Moluccas, to recpiire of John Gonninge, agent fur the English 
Company, the sum of'' 84,083 guMens 13 stivers 15 pens," the third 
part of the general chai'ges in the ^lohiccas from the ultimo March 1023 
{sk) to the ultimo Februar}^ of this present year ; the said Gonninge 
gave this answer, in Enghsh, in Minting : " I am willing and ready to 
pay the whole remainder of tlie charges wliich the English Company 
oweth unto the Netherlands Company, for their third part of the said 
charge due for tliis year, from the ultimo March 1G22 («/c) to the 
ultimo February 1623 ; and for that at present I am not able to pay 
the same in ready money, I proffer unto the said Governors to make 
them full satisfaction of the said remainder in goods and cloths at 
reasonable and indifierent prices ; " concerning which, for that accord- 
ing to contract the English Company is obliged to pay their thu*d part 
in ready money, and said Gonninge cannot accomplish the same, there- 
fore, by order of the above-mentioned Govern oi-s, and in their name, 
the Dutch proteat against the English Company for all damages 
which said Netherlands Company may any way sustain thereby, 
Endomed, *' Translated by L, Wayt. Protest made by the Dutch 
against us for nonpayment, 24 March 1023," This btlovifs to the 
year 1023. [One page and a half. OXl, VoL IX., A^o. 1107.] 

1624. 435. Court Minutes of the East India Company, Mr. Governor 

*^h 26. reported that himself and the rest that had been named and desired 



262 



COLONUL PAPERS. 



1G24. 



March 27, 



to attend the King, could not come to a full speech with hixn coS 
corning the sum of money required, but his Majesty Ls pleased t(3 give 
way that the ships may depart ; whereupon an expreas ha*i been 
sent to the Downs, but Mi\ Kerridge, " the man extraordinarily 
trusted," stayed a whole day in London, notwithstanding his promise 
to make speed, " By oecasion of thin eiTor, the Company called to 
mind his condition, which was noted to be haughty and given to 
avaiioe/' &c,, so that some were of opinion he should not go ; it was 
also observed that the embroidered pieces, also the ruby and pearl 
refused by the Company, are gone on some private man's account. 
The quicksilver, ** oelophantes " teeth, and all other things now 
aboard, and the ships veiy lieep laden, insomuch that the James draws 
23 foot water, ami has 80 tons of ballast, most of which might have 
been supplied with '* lead and otlier heavy and sa<l commodities." 
Mr. Fotherby to buy a parcel of tiles at 11«, or 12«. per 1,000, 
Advice from Mr. Barlow that the money he has to send be no other- 
wise adventured than by bills of exchange, *' because the Dunkerkers 
are very busy ;" and what he cannot excliange he will send by the 
English cloth ships. Information that the cause grows rife for a 
hearing 1>etween the Company and George Ball, and the hearing in 
the Star Chamljer shall l>e first, Divei-s of tiie Company ha\TJig 
been sued by Ball with process out of Chancery, Sii* John Walter 
is inti'eatod to direct the drawing of the breviates by Mr. Tichbume, 
for otherwise the cause may suffer much prejudice, and to be attended 
concerning the adventure of Mr. Osborne, a free brother of the Com* 
pany, and the pm*ehaso of some " excellent good coi^dage " at 24a» the 
100- A survey to be prepared of all the Company's stores against 
'* Thursday in East week*/' also estimate tor repairing the rest of 
their ships, whereof the Lion and London are already m dock at 
Blackwali. The Couit, put in mind by ^Ir. Governor, to have in 
rea<liness what has been required from the Parliament on Tuesday 
come sennight. Copy of the order of the Court of Parliament de- 
11\ ered liy a servant of Lady Dale, upon her petition, whereto the 
( V>un>any is reqwed to appear on Tuesday come sennight. R^fiisal 
of Mr. Munnes to take n\>on him the office of Dejuity ; discuf^ion 
thereon ; the Governor doubted whether the Company will disj^nse 
with Mr. Munnes, neither is it in the power of this Court to do so, 
and he expressed the great comfort he should receive by Munnes* 
assistance ; hut Mr, Mimnea replied that he Iiad given his answer 
liMifore, and persisted constantly in his resolution not to accept the 
place of Deputy. [Three 'pogcs and a half. Court Minute Book, VI , 
pp. 46G-469.] 

436. The President and Council to the Naick of Taniiier 
(Tanore ?) or Tanjore. His Highness' letter, which has they sup- , 
pose been lost by the negligence of their agent at Maaulipatam, they ' 
hxmibly entreat might excuse this abinipt coming to "his Majesty" 
before they coidd commend his gracious favom*s to their own 
Sovereign ; but since their knowledge, by Mr. Johnson's relations, 
of his good inclmation towards their nation, they have dispeede<i . 
the bearer, Joseph C?ockram, with said Johnson to offer their service 
in the aooommodation of commerce, with such sincere respects as 



4 



~\^^r^- ,«2fl, *■ 



EAST INDIES. 



263 



1624. 



[pril 2. 



Api-il 3. 

!5unit 



may ever remain ** a band of amity between the Houses of Taniurr 
and Great Britain," Their intents aj*e only to tran^jwrt such com- 
modities of the kingdom of Tanincr as may conveniently Ik; spared, 
and furnish such necesaaiy provisions as tJiey shall understand are 
wanting. Endorsed, " Copy of a letter, &c to the Nayge of 
Taniner, &c/' [One page. 0,a, Vol X, No. 1155,] 

437- Court Minutes of the East India Company. Inquiiy to be 
made whether the ruby, pearls, and embroideries refused by the 
Company are, notwitlistanding, .sent to the Indies. Concerning the 
breviates in BalFs business ; the Palsgrave to be brought up from 
Erith to Black wall Report of Mr. GoveiTior, that himself and 
others had attended his Majesty, and praying a mitigation of the 
demand of 20.000?. for goods taken in the Indies ; made offer of 
10,000/., as had been agreed j "the rest of this dispute was for some 
special reason omitted, but remains to be seen in the original/* 
Ordered that, in the conclusion of this business with his Majesty, 
Mr. Governor an<l others shall "procure from his Majesty a deelam- 
tion for the direction of their ]>eopIe in the Indies, that there be no 
place left for any future question concerning any occurrents there 
between his Majesty's subjects and any others whatsoever/' Infor- 
mation that the executor of one Withington has preferred a bill 
against the Company in Parliament, A fee of 40s. given to Mr. 
Aylesbury on the warrant for release of the ships, '* wherewith 
he seemed nothing well contented/' One hundred tons of cordage 
contracted for at 2 k. per cwt» Ordered tliat the bond of [Wm.] 
Methwold» late the Company's servant in the Inrlies, be delivered to 
him. Petition of Lady Dale exhibited in Parliament read, together 
with the order of Parliament that the Company shall appear to it 
on Monday ; agreed to use the help of some expert lawj^ers ; Mr. 
Stone to be one, and Sir John Walter's advice to be taken what 
other lawj-er to entertain* [Thte pages, CoitH Minute Book, VL, 
pp. 470-472,] 

438* Consultation held at Surat in prison by Thomas RasteU, 
Pi-esident, Giles James, WilliauT Martin, Joseph Ho]>kinBon, William 
Hoare, redster, with John Glanvill, John Banggam, and Nathaniel 
West. The pertithous dealings of these people in nullifying M^hat 
they had by solemn oaths contracted, their captming and euibargo- 
ing the Company's servants and estates, and the probability of 
reconcilement appearing in former consultations ; the President 
advised the Comicil that, notwithstanding all possible endeavours to 
pve satisfaction, and finding their estate no whit bettered, but time 
spent in frivolous disputes, neglecting the luain business of ** licensing 
their lilierties " and the lading of their goods, for which the Blessing 
and the William have been attending ever since March 12, whose 
much longer stay cannot be secured from the foul weather daily 
expected upon these coasts, besides their necessity of provisions, 
these people denying them supplies in any quantity ; he proposed 
in ease it V)e not allowed U> them to lade off at least one ship with 
indigo, whether the two ships should attend the Company's affauT 
in other poHs, or ap|>ly themselves to the redemption of the Com 
pany s estate and servants by seizing the Guzerat^J* ships returning 



264 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



1624 



Ajiril 7-1 <J, 



from their places of trade. To ihi^ proposition three obstacles 
main import offered themselves, viz., the danger of their per 
being all prisoners in theii* power, and no hope of getting ofl'; tl 
doubt that it may excite the Dutch to use the benefit of their for 
in other places, since theii* estates and persons will be also en^ 
to the same exigence of spoil and viulance as their own ; and lastlj 
a doubt if tlie expected junks will equal the worth of the eatate 
the two Companies ashore ; all which being refeired to the Council 
it was agreed : — 1. That they are willing to undergo all hazard ; 2. 
That what the Dutch may do against them in other placets concemeth 
not so mucfi a» the necessity of their present occasions ; 3. For the 
poverty of the junks, the greatness of their wealth cannot be a^ssured. 
so neither need it be doubted that there will be sufficient to countervail 
the Company's estate, being by estimate about 2(3,000/. or 27,000?,, for 
one ship from Judda is worth more in treasure only. So agreed by 
all, except Giles James and John Glanvill, that the seizure should 
l>e endeavoured. What mainly ioiporteth '* the effecting of on 
intended design " is then considered, and whom they are to requi 
to assist in tins business, and that all vessels encountered beloE 
to Guzeratj Choul, or Dabul shall be seized ; also what is to 
done after seizure and to i)revent purloining from any ve^el^ and 
the punishment to be inflicted on the party offending. Reasons ^ 
Giles James and John Glanvill for not agreeing with the above, tlw 
chief reason being that in all likeliliood the junks wiD return fron 
Mocho this year so poor that it will be labour lost. Addressed 
Capt. John Hall and Chiistopher Browne, commanders, and Edwar 
Heynes and Richard Lancaster, merchants, aboard the English shif 
at Bar Surat. '* Let this our commission be not opened until yo^ 
arive 10 leagues to the S'^ward of Damaun, Perused by the 
Capts. k' 2 merchants only/' [Six pages and a half. East ItuH 
VoLIIl.KoAZ,] 

439, Court Minutes of the East India Company. Bequest of tli 
Muscovia Company liy divers petitions to the Lonl Treasurer 
have a sight of the books of this Company that concern both Com- 
panies when they were a mixed Company. Request of Jolir»-- 
Lamprier to have his wages till Midsummer last, also to have a fki^ 
trial concerning those masts which are said to be missing, and ihm^ 
he niay take out his dividends as other adventm^ers do* Joh^^^i 
Youngs account to be audited ; 10/. k* be paid to the church warder^"* 
of 8t. Mary Axe for tlie Company's warehouse there ; the inferic — ^ 
accounts to be audited ever^' six months. 210 ban-els of ind 
sold at 4*j. 6tl Abraham Chamberlain content to take 170 bar^- 
of indigo to ship for France and the Netherlands on certain e- 
tions. Opinion of the Governor that they may drive back tl 
tra<.le of indigo from Turkey into the Indies, and draw it this wf 
by keeping down the price, " or until tliey cannot be txmied." 
Vandeputt's motion to buy indigo* Ann Waldoe having recei^ 
Sa, a week since 1G17 for the education of her children, by spec^^sd 
grace and not out of any due* ordered that she shall have 4^. a w r^r^ 
for one whole year, and then the pension to ceAse, and, if desirc::::^^ 
to send any of her sona into the Indies, she may pix»poiind 




EAST INDIES. 



266 



1624. 



Report of the Governor, that himself and others had att<?nded at 
Parliament House to answer the complaint of Lady Dale, but could 
not be lieard ; it was told them by the serjeant of the Parliament 
that a woman had exliibited nnother petition against the Company. 
Mr. Governor acquainted the Court that they are to pay to hift 
Majesty and the Lord Admiral in tlie whc^le the sum of 20,000^., 
which being a great sum, he dt\sired the CouH to consider what 
discharge it will be lit to i-equire for the same ; resolved, to intreat 
Sir John Walter, with Mr, Stone anil other lawyers and civilians, 
to consult thereon, the King having promised that the Company 
shall have any discharge they will atlvise, Agreeoient with Thos, 
Punnyett for pilotage into the Downs of the Great James, the 
Jonas, and the Star. 

Aj>ril 0,— Copy of Witliington's bill against the Company in 
Parliament to be taken from the Clerk of the House according to 
order. Concerning payment of John Lamprey's wages. Informa- 
tion that the wife of [Robt. ] Salmon, late wife of Capt Bonner, has 
exhibited her bill in Parliament, but the Court made little reckoning 
of an^i/hing she can do, being conscious that they have done her no 
wrong. Sampson Newport's petition for time for jiaymenfc of bills 
for 560^., granted on certain conditions. Concerning Mn Barlow's 
accounts, which were presented audited, and the Company's monies, 
which he detains in his hands. Barlow is a man trusted, and a 
commissioner in a treaty with the Dutch, together with Misselden, 
for matter of great weight ami conscrpience, though " there is little 
to be hoped for froui the Dufccli by that wa}^ of treaty." There are 
elected, Ijy order of the State*, nine to be joined with the mayors, 
to govern the trade there, but it was answered, " that this adds 
little to the business considering the quantities of gold bullion that 
Is furnished unto the State there from the East India merchants." 
Motion that 100?., being a quailer's payment for the composition of 
spices due to the late Lord Steward of the King's houee, due at 
Christmas, be paid to Sir William Hewett, agreed to. Petition 
reatl from Thomazine PoweU to the Lord President, from whom it 
came recommended to Mr. Governor, wherein are contained several 
unjust pretences of monies due from the Company ; recapitulation of 
what has been tlone for her; notwithstanding, to avoid the clamour 
and satisfy the reference, it was left to Mr. Governor t^o endeavour 
to satisfy her, her own demand being Init 61., ** rather than l^e 
troubled Ijy her daily clamour." The Articles of Peace between 
England and Spain, the Comi>any's Patent, and tlie Treaty with the 
Dutch, to be got leatly to be shown to counsel for the business 
betM^een his Majesty, the Lord Admiral, and the Company. [N.B. — 
Pp, ^81-484 are left blank] 

April 14. — The committees to press the lawyei's. Sir John Walter, 
Mr. Noy, Dr. Duck, and Dr. Zoucb, to a speedy meeting concerning 
the Company's discharge from liis Majesty and the Lord Admii-al 
and strengthening their patent concerning goods taken in tlie Indies; 
for hia Majesty's occasions will require the rest of the money. 
Mr. Treasurer to pay l,000f. more to Sir Allen Aijsley for victuals 
for his Majesty s shiiis. Information that the business of Lady Dale 



266 



COLONIAL PAPERS- 



1G24-. 



will be brought to a hearing before a committee of tho Lower House ' 
of Parliaiiient on Friday ne^t, iti*. Attorney to have notice to 
pit^pare himself for the hearing of the caiLse pending in the Star 
Chamljer between George Ball and the Company, Alderman 
Hammersley to have copies of certain orders concerning the contract 
between the joint Companies of the Indies and Mn^covia and 
Alderman Freeman, as also concerning the business of Sii" Jas. 
Cunningham, and the 900L formerly demanded by him, which is i 
now again revived. The contractors for the silk to have warning to I 
attend the Coiui on Wednesday, concei-ning their securities fori 
payment, &c. It was desired that the Company would not be too 
quick m censuring Mr. Barlow's dealings, for he has returned 30,000L 
of money received from the Dutch, and he is named a commisaioper 
for the Company to treat with the Dutch in business much import- 
ing this Company ; notwithstanding, the Court thought fit to pix>ceed j 
still l*y charging liills weekly upon him, but not to declare any real ' 
distrust of the man. Report of Mn Kirby conceraing his survey of 
the whaif at Deptford, but as at the breaking up of the Lesser James 
there will 1^ stuff sufficient for the repairs there, Messrs. Steevens 
and Ducy are ap]>ointed to view the w^ork and report thereon to the 
Cornet, Offers of 4/, per annum for the nailers' house at Deptford, 
but the Court was informed that ol. will be given, and therefore 
resolved '* to take their best chapman:" Information that Sir Chas. 
Comwallis (>rosecutes afresh fur the estate of John Browne deceased 
in the Indies, and brings an inventory of diamonds, bezoars, and 
other things of his, come to the Company's hands ; Mr. Lanman to 
report tliereon to the Couii. Letter read from Mr. Misselden, dated 
5th April, w^th a ease in French altered from that penned by 
Dr. Zouch, upon wliieh Misselden obtained a subscription of sundiy 
civilians at the Hague in favour of this Company, conceiTiing the 
seizure of their goods upon a scutence at Jacatra; Misselden*8 care 
and i)ains therein well approved of, and the secretary oixiered to 
express so mncli in a letter to him. A release presented from the 
widow Powell, to whom ol. has been given, not as a due, but to rid 
both the Lord President and this Company from her importunities 
Report of the Goveraor that Mr. Price, a member of the Parliament 
Huiise, takes himself to be wronged in the estate of his brother;] 
whereto Mi'. Goveraor made answer that he shall do well not to 
insist upon generals but to charge the Company with particulars, 
and they will endeavour his satisfaction. 

April IC— Nicholas Girdler '*a common lunaway," who the second 
time received imprest money and went not the voyage, stands com- 
mitted for that offence. Report of the Governor that he had 
received from Mr, VV'right, Clerk of the Parliament, an order to 
appear in the afternoon at a committee concerning Lady Dale's 
btisiness ; also that Mr. Tichbome has drawn such tedious breviates 
in Qeorge Balls business *'that counsel will not stand to peruse 
them ; *' he justifies them to be well dia^Ti, affirming that for 20 yearo 
he has never failed in any cause in that Court, but Sh* John Walter 
utterly mislikes them, Mr. Attorney has promised a meeting on 
Sunday next to be informed in that business ; it was therefore th© j 



EAST INDIES. 



267 



a624. 



desire of the Court that tho8« who had foraierly followed the 

business against BaU should be present, and that *' such Lords as are 
interest-ed in the Company may be also " solicited to be at the hearing 
and to g^ive lK)th eoimk'nance and other furtherance to the business/' 
Downing to have the nailor.s house afc Deptford, paying 5/. per 
annum. Answer to be written to Mr, Misselden in reply to his 
last letter concenxing the payment from Mr. Barlow of monies 
disburseil for the Company*s use. Mr, Governor acquainted the 
Couil that sundry Parliament men take great exception to the East 
India trade, and some of them have been desirous to hear what 
answer he could make, which was this, "that the Company will 
not hold the trade except it may appear to be mainly beneficial to 
the State;*' he said that on Thurs^lay next the Company, with 
other Companies, are to l^e at the committee for trade when not the 
India trade alone but that of other Companies will be taken into 
consideration, and they must have their patent ready, if called for. 
The Court entreated the Governor to be present at said committee 
and the Deputy (Munnes) and Messrs, Westrowe, Bell, and Abdy to 
accompany him. There gi*ew a question which patent to carry, for 
therc are divei*s differing in that point that will he most disputed, 
viz. : the matter of money to be expoiied, which is in one patent 
30,000?., in another GO,OdOJ„ and in a third 100,000/. sterling. It 
was propounded to carry but one of these patents, but argued that 
the three have reference one to another, and therefore fit to cany 
all. The order of the House required '' a metliuni of issues and returns 
for the foiu^ last yeai-s/' and it was resolved *'to deliver to the Parfia- 
ment that as the trade shall be made appear worthy or unworthy it 
may stand or fall." The Governor of opinion that this wiU be the 
main business, for "as for the death of marinei-Sj killing of beef, and 
expense of timber, these arc already blo^^Ti away," and said that 
admitting the uttc*rmoat of 100,000?. to he exported the returns are 
400,000/, at the least, whereof 1 00,000/. of those commodities will 
suffice the kingdom and the rest being exported will work itself 
home again in money or commodities that yitdd money ; for example, 
England issues for hoi lands, lawns, and cambrics to the value of 
500,000/, yearly, and no%v^ half of this is saved by importation of 
calicoes ; s])ices, which are now bought cheap out of the Indies, would 
cost five times as nmch, and not be had but for ready money ; besides, 
if the tra^Je be so much to Ix; slighted, why do the Danes, HoUanders, 
and others plant there with so infinite charge { and it is to be noted 
that neither the Hollander, Venetian, nor Genoese ** are so cui*ious to 
forbid exportation of money as the English are," and *' it is the honour 
of the English nation that at this day they carry more Indian com- 
modities into the Straits, than they were wont to fetcli thence hither, 
and so long as there is no privation but commutation of trade the 
kingdom hath no loss." The merchant advcntin*ers who were wont to 
bring wares for wares now bring money for wares, and his Majesty's 
customs and the shipjiing of the kingdom arc increased to a 
remarkable proportion by tlie East India trade, and the exporation 
of the overplus of commodities. Many other auguments were used, 
wliich ** are digested into a form by the industry of Mr. Deputy/* 
for the Company's use. Messrs* Browne and Eyers to infomi them* 



268 



COLOKIAL PAPERS. 



1624. 

selves of the time state of the b^isiness between Kendall and George 
Ball concerning the satfron, ami report to the Court, [2%ir(een 
pages. Court Minute Book, VI., irp. 473-480, 485-490.] 

April 18* 440. Jno. Purefcy and Jno. Hay ward to the East India Company, 
Jspikhnii. nieir last by [Wm.] Bell, " whom it has pleased the Almighty 
to take to his mercy," related to the several treaties with this 
Emperor, who has granted them the choice of his silk, and to have 
it brought to Ispahan, lyut not the taking of their commodities at 
any ceitain rates. Refer to their more judicious opinions to resolve 
either of the continuance or dissolution of this hitherto so barren a 
trade. Have had lately but small sales or investments, by reason 
of the King's absence with his army. Cloth and (sugar) candy, the 
most vendilile com mo<li ties have advanced, the price of the latter 
being a coTomodity the Persian can in no wise forbear. Have 
bartered moi-se'teetli and *' bulgars '' for carpets. The agent (Wm. 
Bell), after a seven-nights' sore visitation with a burning fever, 
notwithstanding the advice and endeavours of the Kings be^t 
plxysicians, *' was dissolved, delivering his soul into the hands of his 
Redeemer, the 24tli P'elK, Ix^ing not only accompanied with the 
Hollanders and such Fi*anks as were resident, but likewise with 
Cogiah Nazer and other the principal of the Armenians, with all 
their churclimen, to bury him, and at least 5,000 Julfalines and 
other Xpians ;" amongst whooi were many poor who they were 
obUged to maintain at some extraordinary charge; also in enter- 
taining such gi^eat men as came to visit them, according to the 
manner of the country, in the case of any eminent mans deatlh 
The Hollandei-s, in money, spices, Indian copper, &c., have brought 
this year into Persia COO camels' load, and **are like to fare better 
by your forbearance in sending supplies ;" but although the Hol- 
lander by giving himsell' out as an Ambassador escaped scot-free, 
their goods tlds year, by virtue of a tirman from the Kl^an, are 
detained at Gombroon tiU customs, rahdars, &c*, of both years be 
satisfied, whereat the Dutch agent was not a little vexed, they (the 
English) receiving at same time a friendly letter from the Kha 
One of the Dutch factors sent for Guylan [Ohilan] to make choic 
of silk, and after long delay were constrained to receive Legee silk. 
0rmii2 has "small frequent of merchants," who ai-e fearfiil of the 
security of their goods upon the English ships, through the boasting 
bravadoes of the Portugals- [Thos.] Bai^ker safely arrived, who 
will answer the neccssaiy points of the Company's letter here 
omittecL [ Tivo pages. O.C, Vol X, A'b . 1 1 57.] 

April 22-24. 441. ConH Minutes of the East India Company. Mr. Wheatley 
charged with ha\dng taken caUcoes to ship out, and not having 
done so, but contrariwise some alight had been used to blind those 
that should have seen them shipped out ; he was enjoined to ship 
them out imder pain of forfeiting 20 per 100. In reference to 
accounts between the Company -and himself, *'he desires to cut 
scores *' with the Couipany. Complaint of the contractors for silk, 
that they came short in tlie whule parcel two or three cwt. ; discus- 
sion tliereon. Motion of SanderoiTt and his V^roUier concerning the 
satfi*on between them and the Comi>any. Petition of Beversham to 



EAST INDIES- 



269 



1624. 



be released ; but his business is in question before the Lords con- 
cerning Ruy Frere, and for the? carrying away of bis goorLs tbo 
Company must riglit theinselvc-s as they may. Demand of Capt, 
Hawkeridge for bis wages, ifcc. Mi\ Governor said he bad observed 
bim to hover al>out the ParHament House, where it will not soimd 
well that they detain bis wages without cause shown ; the Court of 
opinion that the best course is to connnence their action with him 
in the Admiralty, and in case the business be anywhere legally 
depending, the House will not meddle with it ; he ehaDenged 140^. 
lent on the puim^rs book, 100 wt. of lienjamin, anil a parcel of 
Cliina roots, and confessed that he kept ^00 ryals taken out of a 
China junk. The Court told him that w!iere they give wages they 
aUow no sharing of goods taken, wdierein ht) of all others should not 
have offended considering that he went at the gieatest wages that 
ever any did in so small a ship ; in tln' end he submitted to the 
Court, which was well taken at Ids hands, and h(* was appointed 
to set down the quantity and condition of bis goods landed in 
Ireland, and a committee ordered to report what they find to be due 
to him, Conceraing the Imsiness in the Guildhall against John 
Lampi'ey, resolved that the l>i?st way to proceed will be by an 
action of trover. Tlie Governor aci]uaint(?d the (Jourt that " Lady 
Dale, at the Committee of Parliament, did by her coimsel press 
fotdly against the Company ; and that which stuck most against the 
factora was the testimony of Crowther, considering who was but 
slvf/idaris teMh,'' In the end there was a motion by Sir Ed. Coke, 
that though the Company were no way faulty, yet to give some- 
thing to Lady Dale, and it was moved to refer it to the Commis- 
sioners of the Navy, the Chancery, or to four of the House, to Ijo 
indifferently named by the Company and Lady Dale, whereto Sir 
William Tlirockmoilon, brother of the Lady, would m no wise give 
consent, and so they broke up ; it was resolved not to attend any 
more until another summons. Sir Edwin Sandyn, one of the 
Committee for Trade, having told the Governor that ho did not 
remember that the Comi>any's patent had been commanded to be 
brought in, it was thought fit not to a}>pear again at the committee 
but upon a direct summons. Nicliolas Girdler, having been sen- 
tenced by Sir Henry Marten for takiog im]»i'est of the Conijiany for 
two voyages, and going neither, t<] be ducked at the yard-ann 
according to the fashion of the sea by the Serjeant of the Adujiralty 
at Blackwall ; ordered that the Company *s servants there assist at 
the execution of said sentence accordingly. 

April 24. — Sir Jubn Wolstenhoime to be conferred %vith alx>ut the 
custom of the coral Mr Cater desired that Sir Richard Smitli> 
Sir William Russell, and himself, might see those orders of Court 
which concern the Muscovy business, for every man to pay the 
money rated hy tfie Couimissioners ; but was an^iwered they no 
way concerned the business in band. C^onceming a siut in Chanceiy 
between John Ball and the two brothers of John Sandcrofte, de- 
ceased, aljout Sandcrofle's estate. The two men in the Marsbalsea, 
according to the sentence of the Judge of the Admiralty, to be ducked 
at the yard-arm to terrily other runaways who have received 



270 



COLONIAL PAPERS, 



1624. 



April 25. 

WliitehalL 



April 25. 

April 25. 



April 26. 



loiprest, and that their prison fees be discharged by the Companj 
rather than this exemplary pimishment should be neglected. Suit 
of the nister of George Cokayne concerning her brother's estate ] 
ordered that the books be searclied against Wecbiesday next, and! 
William Cokayne to be then present, with whom the Court would 
end the business. Concerning the complaint of the contractors for the 
silk of short weight. The Court utterly misliked that their weighta 
should bo defective in the least, and blamed such of their Servian ts 
as knew it and concealed it, and Buffered such a scandal to lye upon 
the Company ; ordered that the weights be proved, and, if found too 
light, forthwith defaced, it being a gi^eat sJiame for the Comimny if j 
tijey should connive at such an error. Information of the Governor i 
that the Lord Admii*al *' presseth exceedingly to have the money," 
and has given order to Sir Henry Mai1,en for a sentence in the 
Admiralty to discharge the Company. Mr. Noy has made a draught 
of the release fi'orn the King, which is to be carried to Sir John 
Walter for his opinion ; but as the Admiral s money is pressed to be^ 
paid with such e^inicstness, four of the committees are entreated to I 
accompany Mi-, Governor this afternoon to Sir Henry Marten to set " 
forward that discharge. By the opinion of both common and ci^iJ 
lawyers these discharges will be in force only against the King and 
my Lord, but cannot free the Company from the Spanish Am- 
bassador if he commence suit against them. Discussion on Mr. 
Hawkeridge's business ; his accounts to be conipai*ed with Lanman's 
books. No calicoes to be cairied out of the back gate, but when 
M r. Blunt shall be present, as a fraud has been rliscovered. Hum- 
plirey HoOoway having sold his dividend to one Wat.son, who being 
no freeman, the Company cannot reach him, but it was resolved to 
send for HoUowa}^ and Tully to answer their omission at the next 
Court. [*s'cre?i payc^ and a half. CotiH Minute Book, VI., 490- 
4970 

442. Sec. Conway to Morris Abbott, Governor of the East India 
Cumimny. Refers to liis Majesty's letters to the Company on behalf 
of Edmond Traves [of 17 Feb. last] which was obtained at the suit 
of a servant of his Majesty, attending near his person, who wall con- 
tiniie his solicitations. Would much rather present to hi^ Majesty 
tlieir ready conformity, than be forced when asked to answer tl)at 
they have returned no account, or faU to give the King good satw 
faction. [One jHige, East Indies, Vol. Ill, No, 14.J 

443. Minute of the above, [Commy's Letter Bk,, p. 117. Ihvi- 
Cal. p. 223.] 

444. [Sec Conway] to Sir Thomas Smythe and Sir Ed^i^ 
Barkham. Begs them to continue their favourable mediation fc^i 
making a composition betw^een Edmond Tmves and his credito'E-^ 
because he is unable to procure a sum of money due to him fro:«i 
the East India Company. [Dmne^tic Con^eep., Jac. I, Vvl, CLXIJ^ 
Klk 49, (Jal, j). 223.] 

445. Com-t Mioutes of the East India Company. As the 

are valued at 318^., the action against John Lampi-ey to be for 



4 



EAST INDIES* 



271 



1624. 

Thmi foUoivs this mem, : — " Hero is a great dispute concerning the 
King and the Lord Admii-al omitted, but i-emains to be seen upon 
the original copy " {dc}. Half a page. Cmurt Minxite Bk, VJ., 
jh 498,] 

April 28. 446. The Duke of Buckingham's ac(|uittance for 10,000/. received 
of the East India Company. Whereas the East India Company or 
their agents have seized and made prize of divern ships, gold, silver, 
jewels, wares, and commodities in the parts of Asia and Africa 
beyond the Line and the Cape of Crood Hope> of or from some 
piincea, states, and tlieir subjects, and have disposed and converted 
the same to their oum xxse. His Grace has accepted the sum of 
10,000^, from tlie Company as a full satisfaction for aU tenths, 
duties, fees, oi* other rights due to him from the Company by virtue 
of the office of Lord High Adniu'al of England, at any time here- 
tofore from Jany, 28th, 1619, untU the date of these presents, [Two 
pages. Ecist Indies, Voh III. No. 15.] 

April (28), 447. Account of proceedings in the Court of Admiralty in the 
above matter. That on the 10th March 1024, before Sir Henry 
Marten, Judge, &c., appeai-ed Dr. Thomas Ryves. Advocate of the 
King, and of the High Admii^al of England, and allegod that a sura 
of 15,000^., piratically taken by Capts, Richard Blythe. John Weddall, 
and others on the high seas near Ormuz and in other places, had 
come to the hands of the treasurers of the East India Company, and 
he prayed that said sura might be attached by warrant of this Court, 
and deposited with the Registrar of the Court, but that on April 28, 
a special wairant, dated April 27, from the Duke of Buckingham, 
Lord High Adnifral of England, was exhibitt^Ll, acknowledging that 
his Grace had received of the East India Company the sum of 
10,000?. in full satisfaction of all his claims, Whereupon Sir Henry 
Marten released and acquitted the Com|>any fix)m all claims, [Latin. 
Ten pages and a half East Indies, VoL IIL, No. ItS,] 

324 ? 448. Account of the proceedings between the East India Com- 

pany and the Lord Advocate, concerning reprisals in the bidies. 
The Governor having given notice to the Duke [of Buckingham] of 
their pi^oceedings in the East Lidies, that he might claim his due for 
the spoils and misdemeanors there committed. The Duke acquainted 
the King thei-ewitli, and Sir John Coke was willed to treat with 
some of the piincipa! of the Company about it, which he did, and 
showed them that what had been done must have been either by 
way of reprisals, in which case one tenth would l>e reserved to the 
Lord Admiral, or voluntarily, when he could pursue them as pirates, 
when not only the spoils, but also the goods of the offenders and 
their abettors would 1:m? forfeit. The ti^nth for reprisalls would 
amount to more than 10,000/,, but the Company were left free to 
stand to a legal proceeding if they w^ould. They daose the legal 
way; but when the Judge of the Admimlty commanded thefr 
Treaeurer to pay the money into Coui-t, or jneld his body to |)riyon, 
ttie Lord Admiral sent his servant to mitigate the pimishment 
incuiTed» whereupon they eflected a composition. [Two pages. East 

A)^./;r> VnJ JIJ Nn. 17.] 



272 



COLONIAL TAPERS. 



1G24. 

April 28-30. 449. Court Minutes of the Eaat India Company, Miscarriage of 
a letkii* sent from Mr. Kirkham, consul at Aleppo, by way of Mar- 
seiles in May last. Motion for a place to stow the Company's cables 
and boats for supply of their sihips in the Downs, as the house built 
for that purpose is ordered by tlie Lord Warden to be removed, 
because it is seated between the castles of Deal and " Wamore," 
so an the ordnance of those castles cannot scour between them. 
Entitnato of timber for building the pinnace» repairing the LondoQ 
and Lion, and such boats as are to be built. Couaniittee appointed 
to report on a Flcmish-built ]iinnace about 120 tons burden, offered 
for sale. Touching a bargain of masts, and " the Court entreated 
the Deputy and Mr. Kirby to have consideration, that over great 
masts do overclog a ship, and therefore to choose them well sized in 
whole trees." Consideration of Capt. Hawkeridge's business, and 
that it were fit to have an end with him. because the Company 
imdergoes an ill report, when Ijusiness of tliis nature hangs long 
undecided ; it was therefore thought fit to cast up the value of his 
goods and moneys in the Company's hands, and having deducted for 
his disservice to the Company, such a proportion as may in some rea- 
Honable sort punish his citoi^s and deter nthers, to order him the rest. 
Resolved to take a proportion for freight of cloves, pepper, &e. He 
excused his going to Ireland, because the Dutch would not touch 
upon English coast ; many other things were laid to his charge, as 
expense of fresh victuals, powder, &e. He submitted himself to the 
censure of the Court, hoping to do the Company good ser\aco here- 
sitiew and so wifie away these strains and set him.self upright again 
in their favours ; liy his priv^ate trade he had forfeited a bond of 
1,000 marks to the Company. In the end it was ordered that he 
|)ay for the ryals taken in the junk at 8^, per ryal, also for the 
lw3njamin and china roots and for freight and wasteful expense of 
powder and resolved to cut off his wages, being 250?., wherewith 
(Japt Hawkeridge was satisfied, which the Court, taking in good 
|»art, as also his submission and jironiises, reduced to 200f., and 
ordered payment of the rest. Mr. Governor acquainted the Court 
that he hath been tired with solicitations for the 4,000^., residue of 
the 10,000^ to the Lord Admiral, and Mi*. Aylesbury has brought a 
proxy for a full discharge to the Company ; motion that, *' considering 
this real forw^ardness in the Duke/' jiart of the 4,000/. might be paid 
in. The Court was contented IfiOOl. more shall be paid when called 
for, and Mr. Deputy and others were entreated to be at the Court of 
Admiralty at afternoon to see that all things pass freely for the Com- 
pany. The releavse to be signed by the Lord Admii-al read and allowed. 
For the 10,000^. to the King, the resolution was to pay only 5,000^ 
as hatl l:*een promised, and the other 5,000^ in his due time ; some 
have advised with counsel what tlischarge will be fit for the Com- 
pany from Ids Majesty, and find that the King may discharge the 
Cornpany against the Spaniard by way of covenant, but not other- 
wise. Motion on belialf of Mary Jackson, sister of George Cokayne 
that died at Succadana, who now pretends there is more money due 
to her. The Court thought it no reavson further to trouble Uiem- 
selves with that business, but if some reasonable matter would con- 
tent her, would rather give it than be subject to clamour, but^ as 



I 
I 

I 



I 



EAST INDIES, 



273 



1624, 



she was resolved to accept of no less than her fiill <1emand, they left 
her to her course. A new warrant for a dividend to lie given to 
Mr. Fisher, he hav^mg ca'^iially lost his old wairant. Payment to 
William Wade for water casks, laboiirefs, and caiTiage aboard the 
ships lately lK)imd for Surat. Demand of GOL for custom of coral 
unladen at Dover, but Sir John Wolst^^nliolme has promised to move 
the rest of the fanners therein, that the C-ompany sball be reason- 
ably dealt withall. Suit of Roberts, late master in tbe Lesser James, 
for his wages; resolved to deduct only 10/. as a light punishment 
for his great eiTor in carrying liis hhip into Ireland, which cost the 
Company some thousands, said 10/. to be put into the poor's box. 
Project recomraendetl by Sir Thos, Suiythe, consisting of seven 
several particulars, viz. : to preserve ships and sails from " mid -fire/' 
and the worm, and the hatches froru sticking in men's feet, and to 
preserve a ship sweet and her keel smooth for three or four yearp, 
and the charge of thus triunning a ship will not cost a1x)ve 40n. per 
100 tons. The Court remeuil>erutl that this very project hatl been 
formerly oflere<], but then, as now, resolved not to entertain it witliout 
due proof of the particidai's. 20L to be paid to Kendall in i'ull 
discharge of Ids wages» 

April :^0. — Twenty ncdiles to be paid ta Mr. TichViorne, the Com- 
pany's solicitor, for his quarter s wages, due at Lady Day. Sir Jidni 
Walter to '* move for a dismission " in the business between tlio 
Company and Adam Denton in the Chancer)^ Informatioii of 
Tichliorne that thtj business witli George Ball is ordered to be lirst 
heard in the Star Chamber next tenn, before auj' liearing in 
Chancery. Suit of Messi*s. Browne and Paget for increase of time 
in certain lands held by them in De|»tford, Paget desiring 40 yeai-n, 
in respect he Is to buihl upon his part. Demand of Mary Jackson 
for certain moneys she prek^nds aie due to her brother, George 
C^kayne, tleceased ; she had formerly rec^dved 77^. 10s., antl as 
she refused any courtesy except she miglit hnvv ber full Jeiuand, 
the Court would bavi.^ no parley with her, luit left her to her 
course by law. The penalty set upon Mr. Rolxjrts reduced to 5/,. 
08 theit! is but 7/. odd due to him, Mr. Wight, a brother of tbe 
Company, came into Court and craved pardon if he delivered the 
opinion of divers gi^ave men to whom it would give gieat conbnt 
if the Company would deliver out goods for no more than 8 J ea]iiUils 
until order be taken for jjayment of theii* debt, and said the Muscovy 
Company failed in that and smarted for it. Mr. Governor said tlic 
motion was good, though no new tiling to the Company ; that 
tit care had been taken therein, aii<l that it was conceived after 
payment of the last dividend there would be enough Icfl to 
answer all debts, but that siuco the setting out of six ships some 
things have haiipened that Iiavo made an alteration. Suit of Mr. 
Bugges that he might be.stow his dividenil of ciilicoes (to the value 
of 180/*) amongst his 12 dauglitrcns ; wldch being ordered to be 
transjjorted, the Court woidd in no wise grant, but for a matter of 
20 pieces they would not question it. Letter reail Irom Mr. Sec, 
Conway, wherein he takes notice of a former letter ol" hm Majesty 
on behalf of Mr. Traverse, for sinking his adventure and making 
uae of the money paid in for satisfying his creditoi-s ; the Court 

H 



274 



COLONIAL PAPERS. 



April 30, 
Delft. 



1024. ^ 

answered that they had denied that favour to divert, and the Lor 
Treasui-er had import imed them on behalf of his hrother, and thatj 
Mr Secretary shall be attended and aati.stied. Howsoever there wa 
a i*elea»se from the Lord Admiral promised tor discharge of th€ 
10,000/., yet because the money was paid to Mr. Oliver, it were no 
amias to have a receipt of his hand for same, which it was revsolv* 
to require. [Eight pages and a half. Court Minute BL, F/., 
pp. 498-50G.] 

450. Edward Misselden to Carleton, Has advertised the Eas 

India Company of his "noble proiienslon '* towards their cau8€ 
Sent for Barlow on receipt of C^arlet-on s letter, and they ha%1 
wTit ton jointly to the 17 in Zealand. Tlie Prince of Bohemia hatfc 
invited himself to Uio Company to dinner on Tuesday next. En-J 
treats to know whether there be any purpose in tlie Queen to 
there. [Holland Corresp.] 

May t5-14. 451, Court Minutes of the East India Company. Petitions. Oi 
motion of the Governor the Lord Keejier has appointed Mrs* WickJ 
ham's case peremptorily to be heard before himself, having wondcrec 
it had nut yet lieen ended. Jin offer to take quicksilver in l>art 
for indigo tleclined. Mr. Traverse renewed his request of favoui 
from the Com|iany to sink his adventure, but was told that albeij 
for his own particular they should hold it a trifle to do in the favom 
he desii'ed, tlie precedent was so dangerous as they might in no sor 
adveutiu-e it, for every one in arrear might challenge the like favoui 
In otedience to a summons from the Lower House of Parliament 
the Company had sent in six pat<;aits» and there is a demand mad^ 
of 10s* fee for any patent so sent in ; on delivery of them *' it -wi 
wished by Sir Edward Coke that the House fall upon such thing 
as they were likely t-o go through withall, implying thereby thaj 
tlie East India business was none of those:** Considemtion of wha 
discharge will Ije fitting from the Lord Admiral for the 10,000/*. 
was conceived, and it seems had been so advised by counsel, tlm 
the Company take one discharge under the seal of office, and anothc 
tmder the hand of the Lord Admiral ; Mr. Aylesbuiy to be enti*eatc 
to receive the Lord AdmiraFs order and deliver the same to Sii 
Henry Marten, who thereupon wiU sign the release. Tlie Cour 
was informed *' that the Company will be exceedingly pressed to 
the pajTnent of 5,000^. to his Majesty, and the rather because at thi^ 
time the Exchequer is shut up, notwithstanding there is a waiTanI 
for the press of 30 merchants' ships " ; and " Mr. Governor advised 
the Company to take hold of the present occasion, for that as th^ 
state of the Exchequer and the King's occasions now stand, thej 
shall more easily procure satisfaction concerning the future tlw 
they can hereafter, but advised them to part with no money unt 
all were finished/' Reasons why it was considered that the busine 
can have no present dispatch. There is a draught of covenaiil 
ready, wherein was inserter! that the Company should be tlefen<l 
from the Spaniard, but tho.se words wore held not fit to lie offend 
to his Majesty *s signature, and it was advised by Sir John Walt^: 
to be thus expressed, **that his Majesty will protect in case 
question, and so leave it to geueml interpretation " ; Mr* Noy 



EAST INBIES. 



275 



1624. 



draw a covenant to that piTrjiose. The Court was acquainted by 
Mi\ Deputy that though the j>aiiis of Mr, Governor and others m 
this businesa wore well known to this Court and their desire to be 
freed from this eiuplov^nent, 3*0 1 they had not cRcaped uncensured, 
" for it is said that ii' thiire had not been Bome falBe brothers amongst 
us, the Company needed not to have paid the money to the King 
and the Lonl Admiral " ; wherefore it was moved that the party 
may bo called to discover those false brethren if there be any such ; 
the Court corninanded an entry to be made of the motion. Report 
on the Dutcb pinnace, that she must be strengthened, which will 
cost 250/., and Iier price is now 500/. ; tlte Court utterly refused to 
mediUo with hen Suit of Simon Bowr>' to have part of the yai'J 
at Deptford, including the further dock. 

May 7.— Mr. \\lit'ateley charged with l»ad dealing conceniing the 
shii^ting out of his calicoes, having endeavored by a fraudident 
[jractice to keep his calicoes to be sold in town : the Court took it in 
ill jmrfc tliat their ordei-s should be so much neglected, and that he 
had so much deceived them., and was put in mind that he liad as 
much disturbed the peace of the Company concerning their surgeons, 
as Pni.son hath done in another kind, al»o that the Company has 
l>L*en ill served of lemon water by him ; after discusi^ion it was 
thought fit to impose the broak of 20 per cent, on him, but first 
that he should he warned to be at the Court on Monday next* 
Sundry Dutchmen desirous to come into the brotherhood of this 
Company, so a8 they may be admitted witliout personally appearing 
tf» tnke the oath. The Court tli ought it not reasonable that strangers 
Bhould have more ]>rivilege than natives, and therefore would not 
sgi'ee that they should be atlmitt<*d without oatli, but if they will 
come in with an oath, as the English do, tl»ey shall be welcome, and 
the fine not to exceed 100 marLs. Provision of jjowder only to bo 
had either out of the Tower by 8j)ecial wairant, whertj tlie whole 
8toi*e is, or else to send to Hamburgh, where it is lit'LJ to lie nothing 
so good as in England ; the Court thought fit to send into the Low 
Countries to Mr. Barlow for 50 barrels, and to Mr. Bladwell to 
Hambm'gh for other 50, but fii>5t a petition to be delivered to the 
Lords of the Council for such a quantity as may serve four ships 
into tlie Indies, and a trial to be made of what may \>q done by 
means of Mi*. Evelyn. Infoi-mation by one of the committee that it 
is spoken of al)road with no gi'ace to this Court that Mr. Hurt, 
though found faulty in his place, Is continued in the Coml^any*8 
service ; after discussion it was resolved to displace liim ; yet as 
might least tend to his disgrace, for their lat<^ Governor's sake, who 
recommended him, so before the court of election they will resolve 
concerning him. An order of the Lord Keeper, presented by Mrs, 
Wickham, for hearing lier cause on Saturday, the 8th ; coimsel to 
be instructed in the business, an<l Mr, Deputy and others to be 
present at the hearing. Mr, Ca]»pur acquainted the Court he had 
found much difficulty in liringing Sir Jolin Walter antl Mr, Noye 
trijcther, l)ut in the end there was a draught made of the discharge 
li'iii the King, only it yet wants fomi ; he is to follow it with 
diligence, because the Company s pcrfoimance will be expcctad 
suddenly. 

8 2 



276 



COLONIAL PAPERS, 



1624. 



May 12. — By order of tlie House of Parliament. La4y Dal^ 
business is appointed to be heard at a committee in the Cheque or 
Star Chamber this afternoon ; Mr. Deputy and others are entre^te*! 
to be j^resent for the Conijiany, and to have no counsel at all, but to 
infumi the committee that the business L% by special comniisision 
and at the suit of the la<ly hei-self, referred by his Majesty to the 
Cummissionei's of the Na\y^ Sir John Wolsteiiholme being present 
on other occasions, the Governor told him that the Company thinks 
much that so great custom should be taken for coral not landed but 
shipj>ed in the Downs or foul and unpolished coral, as for the best 
polished coral, and he promised that the Company fiiiall be well 
dealt \Wthall Suit of Mrs, BarkeleJ^ widow of George Baikeley, 
for |iaynient of money due Uj her late husband, in the first joint 
stock, which had been stayed for 1 2 montlis on pretence of a debt 
to Sir Thomas Smythe ; ordered to lie paid. Account rendered by 
the Company's secretary of a petition by him delivered, by order of 
the Court, to the Privy C^ouueil, who seldom meet now by reason 
of the wxnghty aflairs in Parliament, praying to Ik? supplied with 
j>owder for their next fleet out of the Towner, where by order from his 
Majesty is laid up the whole store of the kingdom ; whereto was 
answered that the kingdom is not yet sufficiently furnished with 
powder in case there should l>e any extraonlinary cause to use it, 
antl therefore the Comjiany nnist seek supply elsew^here. Project of 
**an ancient mau, one Mr Beale," to triiu their ships with "a stuff 
of liis own devising," wliich should save them from firing, '* either 
w^itli wild fire or otherwise,*' the worm, the barnacle, or other foul- 
ness, for four ye^rs ; liis terms ; ordered that trial be made on a ship 
of about 100 t^^ns now on the stocks. Desire of Mr. Wheatley to be 
hearil ; lie " makes no question but he shall pm*ge himself of the 
imi>utation of fraud " in not shipping his calicoes ; but not being w^ell, 
desires now to be spared : reasons w^hy the motion ple-ased not the 
Court ; resolved to refer the fuiiher hearing to a General Court. 
Sir William Strowd to be informed that the Company is desirous to 
satisfy hiui iu searching out the al>u.se he complains of against 
Mr. Hurte. Report of Mr. Deputy that the hearing of Mrs. Wick- 
ham's case in Cliancery was put off to the fir^t Monday in next term ; 
also of some uncivil behaviour towards the Company by one of the 
counsel of Mrs. Wickham : the Court were sensible of the injuiy, 
and resolved '* not to suffer the Company to receive disgrace in that 
kind/* and it was thought if more of the principal committees 
w^ould show themselves at such times it would bridle the liberty of 
speech, 

May 14.— Information that a ship of Denmark was riding at the 
Cowes, homeward bound from the coast of Corouiandel ; the Court, 
desirous to hear news out of those parts, sent to Mr, Burlamachi, 
who is in comuuinication with the agent for Denmark. Report of 
the Governor that he liad received an order fi^om the Lower House 
of Parliament for some of tlie Com]jany to attend that afternoon 
concerning the business of the Lady Dale. It was conceived some 
motion would be made for a compromise, and the Company pressed 
to something by the tViends of the lady being allied to sundry 
gentlemen of quality in that House ; but the Company were i^esolute 



4 



4 



EAST INDIES. 



277 



1624. 



May 18. 

London. 



May 18. 

LoQiloti. 



[0-26, 



not to yield to anything by way of right, i>ut to stand upon their 
fornit^* trite allegations, and entreated Mr. Deputy and others to 
attend the committee without counsel, and to ani^wer only thus, 
that his Majesty having granted a commission to hear the businesi^, 
the Coin|>any thought it their duty nut to waive that course. Motion 
of Mr. Dearde.s to forbear the ratitication of their order to set brokes 
upon Wieatley for not shipping hi^ cdicoea Resolved to wiite to 
Hamburgh for 100 barrels of powdei* an<l to Danake for 100 more, 
" and Mr, Bownnest undertook for a trial to procure from Amsterdam 
20 ban*el% that port 8o looked unto for that inhibited commodity 
that a greater ([uantity at a time will not easily be procured/* 
Complaint of John Webb against Francis Adams and Willtam 
Pingle, for accusing him of purloining the Company's beef. Offer of 
Mr* Strowd to procure 100 good trees fit for the Company*s use at 
26^. Sdr; there was also some speech of Sir Edward CeciTs elm 
timl:>en [Slrteen pages a ad a half. Court Minute Bk, VI., 
pp, 507-523.] 

452. Sir Robert Sherley to the King. Time has passed away 

so h.ing in silence since he received audience from his Majesty that 
he is forced to offer suit to his Majesty to take into his princely and 
present considei-ation himself and his business. liis Majesty cannot 
but judge him an unworthy servant if he should Uyo long neglect his 
master's affairs ; ami finding his long stay here too lieavy a btuden 
ibr him to bear (unless he may receive some relief)^ l>eseeches hia 
Majesty to cast his thoughts on the propositions oftered by the King 
of Persia, which lie assures hLmself ^^all prove very advantageous to 
his Majesty and his kingdom. [One page. East Indies^ VoLIIL, 
No. 18 j 

453. Sir RobeH Sherley to Sec. Conway. Beseeches hiiu to 
believe that he is not so negligent a servant, but that he has sufiered 
ranch Ijy the delay his ''airant" has received ; which consideration, 
pressed on with his own necessities, has made him presume to write 
to his Majesty, to press his resolution in the one and to beseech his 
favour in the other, in both which he must very earnestly entreat 
Conway s assistance. [Om page. East Indies, Vol. IIL, No. 19.] 

454. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Conceraing 
timber and planks. The elm timber (at Wimbledon) offered Ijy Sir 
Edward Cecil, lieing very largt* and an extraordinary parcel, to Lk3 
bought at 2S^. per 100. Mr. Deputy acquainted the Court that he 
and Messrs, Bell and Abdy liad attended the Conimittt^e of the 
Lower House of Parliament concerning the business of Lady Dale. 
and that of five gentlemen named by the House there met but 
three, and those " of near alliance or inward correspondency with 
the Lady Dale and her friends ;" that the Company received very 
coarse usage, and not witliont some words of rt*i>roacli an<l scandal, 
whereto they made sucli answer a,s was fit for their defence, liaving 
always a reserved cart? not to give just otfence to the niembei^ of 
the House, and offered to show Ijooks of aceoimts and what else 
might conduce to the clear understanding of that business; but 
further said that the business was, at the suit of tlie lady, depending 



278 



COLONIAL PM*ERS, 



1G24. 



before Commissioners from his Majesty, and therefore the Company 
dui-st not decline that course. In i-eference to a former act of Court, 
the first and second stocks stand so severed that the one is not liable 
to make good tlie other ; but the Court ordered that mthall the old 
stock of Lady Dale s must satisfy the Company their other just 
pretences. Order received, that some of the Company shall attend 
next day at the Upix*r House of Parliament Committee appointed 
to do so. Oifer of Simon Bowrj^ to rent a part of Deptford Yard, 
Mr. Deputy aeqiiainted the Court that he and Mr. Bell ha*l been 
summoned to attend Mi*. Sea Conway at Greenwich, who declared 
the pres^ent necessity for monies, and required not only the 5,000?. 
which is to be paid to his Majesty upon the sealing of the waitings, 
but likewise the other 5,000/,, which was not to be paid till after 
the arrival of their next ships from Surat, allegijig the ui^ney of 
the present ser\-ice, and that the victualling of the sliips intended to 
be set out 8ta3 ed ^^J ^^^ those nionies. They made answer in 
accordance with their former promises of pa}Tnent, and that the 
Court would consider of all on Wednesday next. Mr. Secretary 
further added, *' that if anything were yet depending between the 
Dutch and them undecided, he would willingly interi>ose to the 
States Ambassadors here present for the composing thereof, wheixnu 
Ills labour should be to make up all breaches between both Com- 
panies ;" for which they gave him humble thanks, aiiirming it shoiild 
be a gi'eat favour to the Company if a settled and firm amity might 
by his means be brought between them, Eequest of Mr. Ncw^jort 
touching his stock. 

May 22. — Letter read from Mr. Barlow conceniing the sale of the 
indigo and provision of elephants' teeth. Report of the Governor 
in reference to the jiroceeding before a Committee of the Lower 
House about Lady Dale*s business, that howsoever the Coraj^any 
had maintained and defended their cause well, yet the pi-oceeding 
of tJae Committee was verj^ partial, wholly prc^udjcating the actions 
of the Company and laying tmjust aspersions upon them ; and 
lastly, when they could prevail nothing by way of mediation, they 
threatened to report to the House. The Governor also imported 
that he and othei-s had been sent for to attend the Lords' Committee 
for petitions of the UpjKir House upon the complaint of divers 
marinci^ who had been taken by the Dutch though that business 
has been divers times handled by the Judge of the Admiralty and 
the last Parliament, who adjudged no wages to be due, but pm3'ed 
the Company to ]>ay them in ix^gaixl of the misery they endured, 
which the Company perfoiToed and the mariners had given acquit- 
tances in full ; but tecause they came improvided %vith some writings, 
the Lords had appointed a new meeting ; also, Sergeant Frend had 
complained, who pretended a promise from the Company to do 
somewhat for Caiit. Bonner's A\idow, made by Mr. Abdy to Sir 
Humphrey Handford. Mr. Abdy denied making any such promise, 
but the Lords insisted on a certificate lx»ing procured from Sir 
Hura|ihrey whether any such promise wei*e made or not The 
Court Book to be searched for m hat hath passed in this business ; 
also, it was ftirther declaitid that Sir William Throckmorton had 






I 




EAST INDIES. 



279 



1624, 



complained to the Lords' Committeo about Lady Dale*s business, 
but theu" Lord-ships ^seemed unwilling to euibract* the complamt but 
rather leave it to Ijb detennincd in a judicial course, where now it 
depends before the Corumis.sionei'^ of the Navy ; and lastly was read 
petition of Capt Bla^^den, who pretended he Mas undone by the 
Company ; bub answer was given that none of the Company re- 
membered either the man or the matter. Letter read from Lord 
Annandale reqiuring tlie Governor, Deputy Governor, and Mr. Bell 
to attend the King that afternoon at Greenmch ; therefore a com- 
mittee was appointeil t<j attend tlie Lortls' Committees in the after- 
noon on tliese complaints, with such liooks, <S:c. as ndght best avail 
for the Company's defence. Report of Mr. Munnes that Mr. 8ea 
Conway earnestly insists upon payment of the 10,000/., using many 
pei-suading arguments, as that it woukl do my Lord Duke an especial 
favour, would be a good sei'vice to tlie Stat^?, and thc^ Iving would 
thank them, and that the j>resent payment would be good for the 
Company ; but they excused themselves as having no wairant from 
the Company so to do. The business being taken into consideration, 
there was much debate concerning it, and it was obsei^ved that it 
is one of the worst pains belongmg to a con^raittee, to go Ijotwcen 
the King and the Company ; " finally, it wa.s resolved, upon passing 
the writing, to pay the fij-st 5,000/., and for tht* other 5,000/. to 
make it a certain debt at a reasonable time, which was hoped would 
give content. Mr. Governor also repf)rbed Mr Secret-ary's rea<liness 
to perfonn any good offices lietween t?iem and the Dutch, to which 
purpose it was thought meet that t}ie l>usiness be rh^awn up next 
week and presented in writing to Mr. Secretary. Fees to be paid 
to Dr. Zouch and Dr. Duck, and a gratification to Mr. Noy, con- 
coming custom demanded for elejihants' teeth^ cpucksilver, and 
coral* 

May 26. — Infonnation of Mr. Tichhiim, the Company's solicitor, 
that the cause l^^tween them and Mrs. Wiekham is appointed to be 
heard in Chancery on Saturday, but he makes question whether it 
will be hear<l or not in respect Parliament ends on that day, and he 
wisheil the Company (in respect George Ball is Mi*s. Wickham's 
main witness) to use means to put ofl* her cause until BaU's cause in 
the Star Chamber may first be heard, presuming it will fall out so 
foul against Ball as will much weaken his testimony. Mr. Attomey 
to be moved to make that motion ; Mr. Governor and the aldermen 
and principal coiomitt4:*es to attend the hearing; and a petition t(3 
bfj drawn to Ids Majesty to recommend to the Lords the cause with 
Ball so far forth as the complaints of the Company against him 
BhaU prove just. Some of the committees to be also present at tlu' 
heai'ing of I)ecrow*H cause next week. llej)ort of tlie Governor, tliat 
he and Mr. Deputy anil some of the commitee attended his Majesty 
on Saturday, who gave them gi^acious hearing in his coach, there 
being with him the Lord of Annand. His Majesty, with much 
eaniestness» desired to have the latter 5,000/., wliich in the end they 
yielded to pay, as liad Ijeen agreed at a court of comtnittees, pro- 
vided his Majesty would grant a discharge for all things passed 
between the Company and otliera in the Indies, and that some good 



•>LVl PAPERS. 



..'i.r:- Lirection, whereto his Majesty gave 

_ . *_-: A :".r. Mr. Sec. Conway ; this he i»roiniseil 

ay anil acquainted Mr. Attorney that 

... - ;i>s<-.l was well liked, but for the otlior 

■ LT A::..niov desired to see the Company's 

:•. '^: wor House of Parliament, but should 

.- ^- .i.-r.nnod that the latter 'yfiOOL shall not 

..::[■ the Company *> hands, Imt it may be 

.:-^ I- :!;e ust^ of the Navy, and the Treasui*er 

. . V tiionthly i>ayments. Mr. Sec. Conway 

r'.r '.t' hi^ favour bv endeavourinir to recon- 

- :- i.^■ viC dof»on«ling l»etween the English and 

. . ::ivsi.' two ca.<^'s now in del»ato in Holland 

.:•. s>;.. iit'i-s of both countries, viz., the lousiness of 

• -*.iztire of moneys and gocnls upon pretext of 

..^■i.r-i. w:is drlivt-rod to him, who promised to deal 

\-.'a the L)nU the States. Report of the Go- 

t Wiuty. and othei-s had attended a conmiittee 

■ ^>^.. dco.udinLT to order, where the Company was 

. ^' .nil pivtenees, one upon the comjjlaint of 

.!:•. Putch who pressed for restitution for their 

^ ^.K 10 their wages while in captivity with the 

-i'r> tuiswer; whereupon the Lords appointenl 

_: '. L:<ine<s, and would not hearken to the marin«'iV 

a: t <.'f prizes taken in the Indies. Capt. King, 

...i>:vr^> of his Majesty's Navy, to have wages and 

.:' '^:> si'rvants amoimting to 8/. Excu.ses of Mr. 

. .\-'.-r::ng his calicoes, and request that he may 

. .-. 'J . • .. v:i! Court : ordered that he should tii^t boiui 

. ,'i!:A t<. and afterwards [move for favour. Com- 

y. . *. ii.Sv r/^ aeeount being imjierfect. Soager to 

V ■ '. \ \V;::ktr "into a ledger.'* Retpiest of AMir- 

'v\yv..i::: vf money, which Monox acknowk-dgtd 

'. ' > l\v.ktr. vKe<.'ased. Letter read from Caj>t. 

,..:v!v.j^ tli:U he has been hardly dealt withall by 

■ ;v. i:V.>tauding, he said in the hearing of Wm. 

.• '.'. :.i "lie woujtl rip uj) the Company at the 

', V.*.*: sV.v^^w cause, they an» ready to do him reason. 

.. '::\:i iliat had taken imprest and come away : 

. . ■ -i;! vr pay the moniy back '' or be continued 

. ::i! ^.Vuri of Sales to be held on Thui*sdav, June Tl 

' Miiiute Buul\ VL.pp, 523-.")3G.] * 

s*..'!', ;s».i». pui-ser, to [President at Batavia]. Death 

...-. .!i IX April, and of Tho. Bright, merchant, on 

^., v^hiantity of i)ei>per l>ought and the ]>rices. 

x. Priaman in n gard of some abuses j^rotferetl 

..r .'. \\- the peojjle trade. Daily expect the Abigail 

. -'a jleth. tliat is vendible. 

, :> '.!:o Abigail on the 7th, and has this d