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Full text of "California Farmer"

D 2007 130btfll 

California Stale Library 







Price p«r Copy. 10 Cent*.' 



ESTABLISHED JULY. 20. 1S56. 



I Annual Subscription, (5. 







DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 29. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 12, 1879. 



No. 52. 



Office of the San Francisco News Letter, Merchant Street, 

Noa. 607 to 615, San Francisco. 
\ i 

GOLD BARS— 890@910— Silver Bass— 6@16 J^cent. disc. Mexican 
Dollars, 6@7 percent, nom. 

MS" Exchange on New York. &@l-5 per cent. ; On London, .Bankers, 
4V>i ; Commercial, 49£@49|d. Paris, sight, 5 francs per dollar. Tel- 
egrams, 15-100@i per cent. 

W Price of Money here, ?@1 per cent, per month — bank rate. In the 
open market, 1®!^. Demand active. 



CALIFORNIA^ 



At The Play 



The proofs of this magnificent work of art are in every way satisfac- 
tory, and the admiration of every one has been roused by the accuracy of 
the likenesses and the really artistic grouping of the various distinguished 
characters, here brought together in a grand composition. The extremely 
delicate processes, and the great care to be observed in the adjustment of 
the plates, will make it necessary to delay the issue of the picture till the 
19th of July. The presses are at work ni ht and day, but the number of 
impressions — 50,000 — will compel caution and comparative slowness in or- 
der to secure thorough finish and effect. Out of 1,435 photographs sent . 
in, we have taken, in the order of their reception, 300 for the first issue ; 
this number being all that the plate would take. We shall follow up 
these first, however, with the others arranged in classes, so that due jus- 
tice may be done the merchant princes of our city, with the various pro- 
fessions, and all those prominent citizens, whose energies and intelligence 
have contributed to place San Francisco in the proud position she occu- 
pies to-day in the eyes of the whole civilized world. 

Beerbohm's Telegram. — London and Liverpool, July 11, 1879.— 
Floating Cargoes, steady; Cargoes on Passage, rather easier; No. 2 Spring 
off Coast, 43s. ; Red Winter off Coast, 46s. ; California off Coast, 47s. ; 
California Nearly Due, 46s. 6d. ; California Just Shipped, 46s. 6d. ; No. 
2 Spring for Shipment, 41s. ; Liverpool Spot Wheat, quiet ; California 
Club No. 1. Standard, 9s. lOd. ; California Club No. 2 Standard, 9s. 5d.; 
California Average — Western, 9s. 5d. ; White Michigan, 9s. 8d.j Red 
Western Spring, 7s. lld.@8s. 9d.; Extra Amount State Flour in Lon- 
don, lis. 8d.; Extra Amount State Flour in Liverpool, lis. 8d.; Liv- 
erpool Western Mixed Corn, 4s. 2d.; Liverpool Canadian Peas, 6s. 9d.; 
English and French Country Markets, generally dearer. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, July 11th, 
1879. United States Bonds— 4s, 101§ ; 44a, 105£; 5s. 103§. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 864@4 8S£. Pacific Mail, 15. Wheat, 110@120. Western Union, 
— . Hides, 194(0*20. Oil— Sperm, 75 @ 77. Winter Bleached, 87 @ 96. 
Whale Oil, 35(©40; Winter Bleached, 42@49. Wool— Spring, fine, 20® 
30 ; Burry. 11@14 ; Pulled, 25@35 ; Fall Clips, 14@18 ; Burry, 13@20. 
London, July 11th.— Liverpool Wheat Market, 8s. 10d.@9s. 6d. ; Club, 9s. 
4d.@9s. 9d. U. S. Bonds, 5's, 104§. Consols, 98. 

Complimentary to the News Letter. —As we do not meet with com- 
pliments every week, we give insertion to the following from one of our 
live contemporaries: 

Although we allude to the part heretofore taken by the editor of this 
journal in directing attention to the advantages to this country of steam 
communication between California and the Colonies, we by no means 
claim the premier position, which we readily concede to the San Francisco 
News Letter. The information contained in that journal on the subject 
has been at all times of the most reliable character, and the articles 
written were forcible and to the point. — Irish and American Home Afcuv. 

Young Friedlander. — We are pleased to see that our friend, the 
worthy son of Isaac Friedlander, our late Grain Kiug, has made applica- 
tion to the Produce Exchange for membership, being the first applicant 
under the new rules. It is just one year ago since the death of Isaac 
Friedlander. 

London, July 11, 1879.— Latest Price of Consols. 98. 



PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOVERNMENT BONDS. 
San Francisco . . ." July 11, 1879. 



Stocks: and Bonds. 
U. S. Bonds, 5-203 1867-63.. 

Legal Tender Notea 

S. F. City & Co. B'da, 6a, '58 

S. F. City Bonds, 7s 

Sacramento City Bonda. . . . 
Yuba County Bonds, 8s. . . . 
San Mateo Co. Bonds, 7s. . . 

S. F. Gaa Light Co 

National G. B'lt & Trust Co. 
Spring Valley Water Co 



Bid. 
105$ 

105 
105 
28 
100 



86 



Stocks and Bonds. 

Omnibus Railroad Co 

Central Railroad Co 

N. B. and Mission R. R. Co. 
Front St. , M. & O. R. R. Co. 

Fireman's Fund Ine. Co 

Union Insurance Co 

Pacific Bank 

The Bank of California 

Central Pacific Railroad.. . . 
C. P. R. R. Bonda 



Bid. 
30 
40 
65 

115 
115 
112 



D. Z. Yost & Co., Brokers, S.E. cor. Montg'y and California at, 



45 
67 

116 
116 
115 
70 



THE STOCK MARKET. 
The continued decline in the north end stocks has exercised a depress- 
ing influence on the whole general market, and with the heavy assess- 
ments being levied at this time, there seems to be little prospect of any 
immediate recuscitation of values for the present. The balance of the 
Comstocks are heavy, and without demand. Outside stocks show little 
or no improvement. 

London, July 11th.— The scene last night in Committee on the Army 
Discipline bill was most exciting. Parnell, member from Meath, accused 
the Speaker of a breach of privilege and of one-sided conduct. This 
caused an altercation with Raikes, Chairman of the Committee, whom 
Parnell attempted to silence by shouting. A tumultuous debate followed, 
during which recourse to physical violence appeared not improbable. 

Fruits. — Our market is copiously supplied with Apples, Apricots, Ber- 
ries of all kinds, Cherries, Currants, Figs, Pears, Peaches, Plums, etc., 
also Oranges, Lemons, Limes, etc. These are all the product of our own 
orchards. A few Grapes have made their appearance. The crop i* very 
promising, and our Raisin and "Wine makers will soon have their hands 
full. 

"Wool. — Oregon is now sending forward her spring clip. The steam- 
ship Oregon, just at hand, bringing 2,005 sks. The general market is very 
slack at the moment. We quote Eastern Oregon, 18@21c; Valley, 24© 
26c; California rules from 12.Jc. for Burry, Southern, up to 27c. for best 
Humboldt. | 

The bu9ines3 outlook seems bright and cheering. Political troubles 
are practically at an end, the crops are good, the mines productive, and 
the revival of trade in other parts of the country must make an impress 
on this and the other Pacific States and Territories. 



Berlin, July 11th. — It is understood there will be a general election 
for the Prussian Diet in October, when Bismarck proposes to appeal to 
the country on questionsof financial reform and purchase of private 
railways by the Stat e. 

From Philadelphia.— The ship Standard, 147 days from Philadelphia, 
is to hand, and is consigned to George Howes & Co. She brings a large 
and well assorted cargo of hard wood, lumber, demijohns, iron, window 
glass, etc. 

The steam yacht "Enchantress," with the remains of the Prince 
Imperial, has arrived in the Thames, but will lie below Woolwich until 
four o'clock P. M., July 10th. 

London, July 10th.— A dispatch from Cape Town, June 22d, says: 
General Sir Garnet Wolseley arrived to-day and immediately started for 
Natal 

Teas. — Owing to the present scarcity and short supply of Japan Paper 
Greens, the price of diamond " L" and other choice marks have been ad- 
vanced to 35c. 

Telegrams received at Cape Town state that the British forces are 
within twenty-five miles *>f Cetewayo's Kraal. 

FREDERICK A. BEE, 

His Imperial Chinese Majesty's Consul. 
Office: 917 Clay Street. Residence: 6'iO Eddy Street. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AFD 



July 12, 1879. 



PIGTAILS AND SCISSORS. 

After deliberating over the matter for many months, the Courts have 
at last decided that it is unconstitutional to deprive the imprisoned China- 
man of his queue. All right- thinking people will be glad of this. The 
queue -clipping ordinance was'simply a bid for the lowest sort of popular 
applause on the part of the municipal authorities who decreed it. That 
applause was dictated by pure malice, and nothing short of it. _ While the 
matter was in abeyance, the anti-Chinese organs did not hesitate to ap- 
prove of the ordinance— and to attempt to bully the judges into approving 
it— on the ground that no greater humiliation could be inflicted upon the 
Mongolian than the loss of his "pigtail." They argued that this, more 
than anything else, would deter him from committing crimes for the pur- 
pose of getting cosy quarters in jail, and in this strain they ran on, quite 
unconscious of the fact that they were advocating class-discrimination and 
betraying their unwholesome prejudices at every word. If they had been 
equally anxious that some similar scheme of degradation should be de- 
vised for the innumerable white loafers who make a practice of getting 
into prison when stealing-times are hard, then it would have been differ- 
ent. But, no ! The whipping-post for hoodlums they wouldn't hear of ; 
they even doubted the propriety and humanity of a chain-gang. Accord- 
ing' to their gospel, the rights of negroes, greasers and vagabond whites 
must be rigidly respected, but if any special method of persecution could 
be arranged for the benefit of poor "John," they would be delighted. 
As for their talk about queue-clipping being necessary to ensure cleanli- 
ness, that is' all bosh, and they know it. The meanest Chinaman is in- 
comparably cleaner in his person than the class of Caucasians who are his 
jail-mates. You see no filthy, matted shock of hair about him, either in 
prison or out of it. His head is washed daily, and is close-shaven, with 
the exception of a little patch at the back. On that patch the hair is al- 
lowed to grow to what length it may— a fdot or two, perhaps— and being 
combed and plaited with the greatest neatness, is eked out, "for the sake 
of "style," with two or three feet more of silken braid. Compare this 
sleek creature with the unwashed and unkempt brutes who await sentence 
in the dock with him, and you will see that if the Chinaman ought to lose 
his queue for the sake of cleanliness, the Caucasians ought to be flayed 
from head to foot with the same object. 

THE MALTHUSIAN THEORY DOWN EAST. 
From the recently published report of the Boston Board of reg- 
istration many striking facts are elicited suggesting an extensive practice 
of the theories of the late Mr. Malthus. Notwithstanding the increase 
in population the birth-rate has fallen from 11,760 in 1874 to 10,1S5 in 
1878 (in the city of Boston), while in the entire State the annual increase 
per 1,000 has fallen from 30.4 in 1856 to 24.1 in 1877. During the latter 
year 1,233,008 of the native-bom people produced 1G,897 children, while 
418,904 foreigners produced 18,071 ! That is to say the average increase 
of natives per 1,000 was but 13.72, while that of foreigners was 43 per 
1,000. A fair rate of births would have been 33 per 1,000. A comparison 
with recent European statistics shows that in England the births per 
1,000 average 36 per annum ; in Prussia and Austria, 40 per annum ; Italy 
and Spain, 36 ; Netherlands, 36 ; Scotland, 34-i ; Norway and Sweden, 31. 
So it is apparent that in the Old World, where food as a rule is scarce 
and dear, humanity prospers, so far as coming into the world is concerned, 
vastly more than it does in the most enlightened State in the Union. In 
the neighboring State of Vermont, where the foreign element is compara- 
tively smaller, it is noted that in 1877 the native increase was 17§ per 1,000, 
while that of foreigners was 22, so it would seem that the idea had slightly 
infected the latter class. In a farming town in Vermont, which, with an 
equal number of inhabitants formerly contained five schools, but one 
small building is now required. As an old farmer put it : "People don't 
have many children now-a-days— they kill 'em off !" This charge of fceti- 
cide has been frequently urged by doctors and clergymen, who knew what 
they were talking about, and as frequently denied by self-constituted 
champions who either did not know or didn't want to know ; but, in the 
face of official statistics it is no longer wise nor prudent for New England 
people to deny or disregard the incontrovertible. The same authorities 
which we have drawn upon state that when the natives marry it is most 
usually a pre-arranged condition that there shall be no children. Is it any 
wonder then that New England is in a fair way t"o see her Anglo-Saxon 
stock die out and be replaced by the Celt and German? Possibly a people 
or a nation have as much right to commit suicide as an individual, but as 
to the social and political changes foreshadowed, we shall consider them 
hereafter. 

THE DESERT OF SAHARA. 

Among all the great undertakings of the -world it seems as if ere 
long the Desert of Sahara will be taken in hand by some bold projectors, 
so as to try to turn it to some useful purpose. South of the desert is Soudan, 
with a population of 50,000,000 of semi-barbarous but not savage people. 
They produce palm oil, cocoa nuts, dates, figs, wheat, corn, yams, beans, 
tobacco, cotton, indigo, etc.; and there is a trade with Algiers, by horses 
and camels, of 820,000,000 annually, consisting of gold dust, attar of roses, 
gum arabic, ivory, indigo and ostrich feathers, in exchange for cotton 
goods, cutlery and weapons. In the whole region, however, surrounding 
the Sahara there is an estimated population of 150,000,000, and there are 
various projects on foot to open up this country by railway communica- 
tion, advantage being taken of water transportation by the lakes and 
rivers to reduce the expense of continuous communication. The British, 
French and Germans are anxious to open up commercial relations with 
these vast populations. 

The Desert of Sahara is 3,000 miles long and 1,000 miles wide, and, 
though called a destrt, there is much of it that is cultivated here and 
there, and there are occasional high ridges, some of them with a growth 
of timber. When the sea breezes, in passing into the interior, lose their 
moisture, the air becomes very dry, though by no means unhealthy, and 
the soil becomes sterile. It is seriously contemplated to flood the Sahara 
from the Mediterranean, and thus bring an inland lake into this dry re- 
gion, which would promote moisture, and probably in time alter the 
whole climatic conditions of the country and bring into cultivation large 
tracts of fertile soil that only need water to be fruitful. It is estimated 
by a French engineer that the building of a railroad across the Sahara 
would be a much less formidable undertaking than the Pacific Railroad 
was, and there are signs that capitalists are looking in that direction for 
new enterprises. 

Smith's American Organs, 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



EXPLOSION ( AT BODIE. 
Bodie, July 10th. — A terrible explosion occurred at 7:30 this evening 
of a powder magazine, near the old Standard incline. The works were 
blown to atoms, and everything near.them was blown to the ground. The 
Summit works, but a short distance off, were also leveled to the ground, 
and the building shattered to pieces. The shock was distinctly felt at 
Bridgeport, 25 miles distant. It proved to be the magazine of the Giant 
Powder Company, near the old hoisting works of the Standard Mine, 
containing about five tons of giant powder. There were a good many 
buildings, such as boarding houses, dwellings and other houses near the 
magazine, which were torn to atoms. The dead number six as far as 
heard from : Frank Fyle, blacksmith ; Thomas Flavin, miner ; William 
O'Brien, miner ; Charles Molloy, miner ; Hugh McMillan, engineer, and 
John McCarthy. There are others dangerously hurt. The number of 
wounded will not fall far short of forty. There will be no cessation of 
work on the Standard Mine, the new shaft being perfectly competent to 
do all the hoisting required. 

I heard the following amusing story of Mr. J. E. Millais the other 
day: He was introduced to a lady whom he was to take down to dinner, 
but neither he nor his partner caught the other's name. So soon as they 
were seated at table the lady opened fire with the usual stock questions. 
"Have you been to the Academy?" "I have," said Mr. Millais. "And 
did you notice that odious old Millais' pictures ?" "Well, yes, I saw 
them, too." Presently the champagne came round. Said Mr. Millais, 
with his best smile: " I am going to ask you to take wine with me, and 
not a mere sip, but to drain your glass to me, to strengthen your nerves." 
The lady pledged him accordingly. Then said the artist, quietly: "Now 
that you are fortified, I may venture to tell you that I am the odious old 
Millais." The lady put up her hands in horror. " Good gracious! " was 
all she could find to express herself. — T. T.,'in Truth. 

Ku*s George HI. first found his way to Weymouth in 1789, traveling 
by carriage, in a very simple way, with few attendants, and woke up 
sleepy old vil'ages which had scarcely ever realized that royalty was a 
reality. In one of his excursions during his first visit, in the hay harvest, 
he was passing through a field where only one woman was at work. The 
king asked her where the rest of her companions were. She said, " They 
were gone to see the king." "And why did not you go with them?" he 
inquired. " The fools!" she said, " they have gone all the way into the 
town, and they will lose a day's work by it. That is more than I can do ; 
I've five children to work for." "Well, then," said the king, putting a 
piece of gold into her hands, "tell your companions who have gone to see 
the king that the king came to see you." 

Emily Faithful, in her last London Express, June 2d, says: "Henry 
Ward Beecher's great clerical rival, the Rev. Dr. Talmage, of Brooklyn, 
is here. He preached on Sunday at Dr. Davidson's church in Islington, 
and somewhat astonished his hearers by observing that some men spoke 
in their prayers about the sun, moon and stars, and in fact 'gave the 
Lord a great! deal of astronomical information that must be very gratify- 
ing to Him.' English congregations are scarcely prepared for American 
pulpit humor, and Dr. Talmage tried his hearers considerably by further 
remarking ' that it wasn't till Job got his carbuncles and a pest of a wife 
that he wanted to leave this world.' The congregation did not know 
whether to laugh or to he shocked." 

Memorial to the late Baron de Rothschild.— An influential com- 
mittee is being formed for the purpose of founding a fund and college for 
the benefit of widows and orphans of decayed bankers and merchants. It 
is proposed that the fund shall be raised to perpetuate the memory of the 
late Baron de Rothschild, whose name as a merchant "prince," a states- 
man and a philanthropist have endeared him to a wide circle, and thus 
renders one and all, irrespective of creed or profession, unanimous in the 
desire to contribute to the proposed fund, in order to make it an appro- 
priate and fitting tribute of honor to the memory of the deceased Baron, 
and also acceptable to bis bereaved family. — London City Press. 

Californians Registered at the Office of Groves & Blackburne, 

Successors to Charles Le Gay, No. 1 Rue Scribe, Paris, June 20, 1879.— 
Arthur M. Hickox, Mrs. Hickox, Dr. Ellis Martin, James L. Flood, 
Luke E. Donnelly, Mrs. Win. Kohl, Miss Mamie Kohl, R. Sprecklesand 
family, L. Newfield, A. B. McCreary, Chas. McLaughlin, James A. Fol- 
ger, Mrs. A. Folger, Miss Lizzie B. Folgtr, Miss Emily Hochkofler, O. 
Schoemann, E. H. Sanderson, Joe Chambers, Jeremiah Lynch, E. J. de 
Santa Marina, Henry Schmieden and family, Mrs. W. F. Lent and 
family. 

The Annual Circular of St. Mary's Hall, Benicia, shows a prosper- 
ous condition of this excellent seminary for young ladies. Founded in 
1870, the school is now entirely in the hands of the Rev. L. Delos Mans- 
field, as Rector, and of Mrs. Mansfield, as Principal, with an Advisory 
Board, presided over by the Right Reverend J. H. D. Wingfield, D. D., 
LL. D. Among all the schools in our State there is not one which bears 
a higher character or offers more substantial guarantees for the moral and 
intellectual training which go to form a noble Christian character. See 
advertisement in another cclumn. 

Failures Among English Farmers.— Mr. Richard Seyd, the Eng- 
lish statistician, has compiled the following figures : Number of farmers 
whose failures were announced in 1870 were 229 ; in 1875, 354 ; in 1876, 
480 ;. in 1877, 477 ; in 1878, 815 ; and in 1879 (to June 10th), 614. This is 
very clear evidence of the distress among English farmers the last eighteen 
months, and Mr. Mechi, the well-known agriculturist of Tiptree Hall, 
stated in the London Times three days ago that the continued rains had 
given the finishing stroke to the. hopes of a fair harvest in England, and 
that further ruin must ensue to English farmers. . 



Ruffler, in Vanity Fair, June 21st, says : "Baron Lionel De Roths- 
child's personal property has been sworn under £2,700,000 for the probate 
of the will. He was always supposed to be worth between £15,000,000 
and £16,000,000. The will has been found. Gunnersbury and the house 
in Piccadilly are left to Baroness Lionel Rothschild for her life. The 
large Buckinghamshire estates will be eventually divided among the three 
sons. I hear that Mr. Leopold Rothschild will undertake the manage- 
ment of the racing stud. 

SmitL.'.s American Pianos, 300 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



July 12, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SPORTING ITEMS. 
Boxing.— K.lwanl a and Chambers are at Skaters' Spriugs for a little 
relaxation, the hard work they tlul at the California Theater having 
mmiewh.it and them up.-^Mr. William Riley received a telegram from 
Mike Donovan, stating that he would leave Chicago to meet McCleUan 
i»n kCondaj next, and that he wan in good trim for the match. " Me- 
Clellnn is training very hard, and appears anxions for the fight. He is, 

g?rhaps, a trifle too heavy, hut has plenty of time to reduce.^— Fred, 
nshy, the glove-maker, has just finished an entirely novel boxing-glove, 
which is far inparinr to the style now in use. Instead of having fingers, 
the glove is shaped like an apple, with an aperture for the hand to enter ; 
there is a leather rim: inside for the hand to grasp, allowing the fist to be 
properly clenched. The great advantage of the glove is, that it puts a 
st^p to cutting, on account of its peculiar shape,— —Mr. Harry Mavnard 
will npen the gymnasium under the rooms of the Y. M. 0. A., on Sutter 
street, next Tuesday. Harry offers to bet a hundred dollars that in eight 
weeks he can make a good boxer out of any one, besides strengthening 
the muscles and improving the carriage of the pupil. 

Pedestrianism. — The six days' walk now progressing at the Mechan- 
ics' Pavilion is the most important pedestrian contest ever held on this 
coast, and, in some respects, is ahead of any similar tournaments that 
have been held either in America or England. Two of the contestants, 
Messrs. Scott and Mclntyre, made over one hundred miles in twenty-four 
hours, which is good time for the first of a six days' race. The contest 
has already narrowed down, several of the men being virtually out of the 
race. At present it looks as if four of the walkers had a good show for 
the belt, but, in our opinion, it will go to either Scott, Callahan, or Ed- 
wards. Mclntyre looks as if he would not last. Bowman did some good 
work the first day, but fell behind, taking longer rests than most of the 
men. The race will be finished at 12 p.m. Tuesday next. The six day go- 
as-you-please contest, for ladies, will commence July 17th. Mme. La 
Chapelle, Bertha "Von Berg, Fannie Edwards, and several other ladies are 
already entered. 

Swimming. — Professor F. Cavill, who called himself champion long- 
distance swimmer of the world, left town last Monday, and left several 
unpaid bills behind him. His departure was perhaps somewhat hastened 
by the challenge that Daily sent to swim him any distance for any sum 
from five hundred to five thousand dollars.— — We hear that Mr. Wonder- 
lich, of the Newport Bathe, has secured Mr. Flemming as swimming 
teacher.— -There will be a race at North Beach, on Sunday, for the gold 
badge, for members of the Neptune Club, and two handicap races. The 
Neptune boys are working very hard to make their club a success. We 
think they will succeed. Their membership list .is nearly full and they 
nave splendid accommodations. The club numbers among its members 
the best amateur swimmers on the coast.-— Captain Webb left England 
for America on July 7th. ^— The Terrace Baths, Alameda, are adding 
new attractions each week. 

Yachting. — The coming race between the Consuelo and the O'Connor 
excites a great deal of interest among yachtsmen. Opinions as to which 
is the faster boat are very evenly divided. The yachts have been out to- 
gether several times, but never under conditions that would prove any- 
thing.— While escorting the Jeannette out to the heads, last Tuesday, 
the Frolic was fouled by the pilot-boat Geo. Pcahodg, and lost a boat that 
was hanging from the davits. ^—Captain White is building a new 
schooner at North Beach. 

Picnics.— St, Rose's Sunday School, Badger's Park, to-day (Saturday) 
—Ariel Rowing Club, Badger's Park, Sunday.— Italian Mutual Ben- 
evolent Society, Schueteen Park, Alameda, Sunday.— Centennial Mill 
employes, Fassking's Park, Alameda, Sunday. ^—Excursion to Cremorne 
Gardens, Martinez; the steamer S. M. Wh ipple leaves Washington-street 
wharf at 9 a. m. Sunday.— —Excursion to Sonoma; steamer Herald leaves 
Washington-Btreet wharf at 9 A. M. Sunday. 

Rowing. —A barge race has been arranged between the Neptune and 
Ariel Clubs, for a silver pitcher, given by W. H. Bovee. It will most 
likely be rowed at 10 a. m. Sunday, from North Beach, that early hour be- 
ing set because of the Ariel's picnic coming off on the* same day. The 
Neptune Club will use their new barge Kate, which is thought to be a very 
fast boat.— —There will be several races at Badger's Park Sunday. 

Baseball.— Games last Sunday : Knickerbocker vs. Reno; score, 12 to 
2.-^— McMabon vs. Franklin ; score, 9 to 4.^— Oakland vs. Mutual ; 
score, 5 to 4.— Games to-morrow at Oakland Grounds*. Athletic va. 
California.-— At Recreation Grounds : Knickerbocker vs. Eagles. 

Racing. — Running race at Oakland Park to-day (Saturday) ; half mile 
heats; between Mr. Louis* " Sam Brannan " and Mr. Smith's "Stran- 
ger." In addition there will be a trotting race, mile heats, best three in 
five. 

San Fhancisco, July 11th, 1879. 
Dear Editor News Letter: In last Saturday's issue of your valua- 
ble paper, I notice, under the head of " Brilliant Mine Management," the 
question: " Who is he, anyway?" referring to the President, Middlemiss. 
He can be seen at the Palace Hotel dining-room, leering in the most in- 
sulting manner at every lady that enters, and at those who, unfortu- 
nately, sit near him during the entire meal. It is fortunate for him that 
he has never visited Texas, as there they hang horse-thieves on suspicion, 
and his suspicious looking face might condemn him the moment it is 
shown, guilty or not, though his own opinion of himself is simply immense. 

Yours, . 

Dr. Glenn, the Would-be Governor. — This man has been acensed 
by a great many newspapers in this State of the crime of employing Chi- 
nese. We do not know whether he has or not, but we notice with pride 
and satisfaction that, as yet, no newspaper has pitched into his mother, 
his wife or his daughters. This looks as though a period might yet ar- 
rive when a decent man can become a candidate for office, as in other 
countries. 

The School Census of Los Angeles gives the following result : 
White— boys, 1,429 ; girls, 1,548 ; black— total, 9 ; children below 5 years, 
1,220; children at public schools, 1,404 ; do. at private schools, 365 ; of 
American parentage, 2,516. 

Bradbury Pianos, 200 Post street. Established 1854. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Bullion Mining Company Location of Principal place of 
business, Ban Francisco, California— Location of works, Oold Hill, Storey 
County, Nevada— Notice is horeby given that at a mooting of tho Board of Directors, 
ht'lil on tho ninth day of July, 1870, an assessment (No. 10) of One and ono-half Dol- 
lars per share was levied upon the capital stock of the Corporation, payable immedi- 
ately, tn United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the Company, 418 
California street (Union Insurance Building), San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the THIRTEENTH 
day of AUGUST, 1370, will be delinquent and advertised for sale at auction ; and un- 
less payment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the THIRD day of SEP- 
TEMBER, 1870, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JOSEPH GRUSS, Secretary. 
Office — 118 California street, (Union Insurance Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Exchequer Mining Company, --Location of Principal Place 
of Business, San Francisco, 418 California street(Union Insurance Building). — 
Location of Works, Gold Hill, Storey county, Nevada. — Notice is hereby given that 
at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on the 0th day of July, 1870, an assess- 
ment (No. 14) of One and one-half Dollars (lj) per share was levied upon the capital 
stock of the Corporation, payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the 
Secretary, at the office of the Company, 418 California street (Union Insurance Build- 
ing), San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the FIFTEENTH 
day of AUGUST, 1870, will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction ; 
and unless payment is made before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the FIFTH day of 
SEPTEMBER, 1879, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JOSEPH GRUSS, Secretary. 
Office — 418 California street (Union Insurance Building), San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Ffibernia Savings and Loan Society, northeast 
corner Montgomery and Post streets, San Francisco, July 7th, 1870.— At a reg- 
ular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a Dividend at 
the rate of six and three-fourths (6£) per cent, per annum was declared on all de- 
posits for the six months ending with June 30th, 1879, free from Federal Tax, and 
payable from and after this date. 
July 12. EDWARD MARTIN, Secretary. 

HEADQUARTERS DEMOCRATIC STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE. 

The Candidates on the State Ticket and the Members of the 
Committee are requested to attend a meeting of the Committee, to be held 
TUESDAY, July 15th, at 1 P.M., at 218-20 SanBome street. Prompt and full attend- 
ance is desired. By order A. J. UKVA NT, Chairman. 
T. M. O'Connor, Secretary, P. O. Box 1202. July 12. 

HEADQUARTERS DEMOCRATIC STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE. 

The Chairman and Secretary of the several County Com- 
mittees throughout the State are respectfully requested to send their Post- 
office address to the Secretary of the State Central Committee. 

A. J. BRYANT, Chairman. 
T. M. O'Connor, Secretary, P. O. Box. 1202. July 12. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Franco - American Savings Bank. — Guarantee Capital, 
8200,000. 428 Montgomery street. — This Bank has declared a dividend of seven 
(7) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and five and a half (6J) on Ordinary De- 
posits, for last six months, payable July 15th, free of taxes. 
July 12. LUCIEN BRAND, Secretary. 

BY ORDER OF THE PROBATE COURT, 

The Works of the late James Hamilton, comprising- Paint- 
ings and Sketches in Oil and Water Colors, are now on view to the public and 
for sale at SNOW & CO., 20 Po st street. July 12. 

~ FRED H. BUSBY, 

Montgomery Block, 028 Hon (gomery street, San Francisco, 
Manufacturer of Archery Gloves, Finger Tips, Ann Guards, Boxing, Fencing 
and Base Ball Gloves, for Catchers, Long Wrist Fishing Gloves, Belts for Uniforms, 
eta Archery Clubs supplied at reduced rates. Busby's Archery Clubs are the only 
ones in the market that will stand service and give satisfaction. July 12. 

ST. MARY'S HALL, 

Bonicia, Cal. 

The next Academic Tear will begin August 5tn. A Full 
Collegiate Course ; Musical Department under the direction of MADAME 
HORSLEY, tho Distinguished Vocalist; a resident French Teacher; a fine Art De- 
partment' horseback and carriage riding constitute some of the attractions of this 
School. Address, REV. L. DELOS MANSFIELD, A.M., 
July 12. Rector. 



Regular Republican Nominee for Governor, 
GEORGE C. PERKINS, 

Of San Francisco. [July 12. 

Savory * Moore, 1*3, New Bond street, call attention to the recognized 
remedy for 

Asthma, etc. Datura Tatnla. Cigarettes and Cigars, Pastilles for In- 
halation, in boxes, 3s. to 18s. 
Datura Tatnla for Asthma, etc. The entire plant cut and prepared 
for smoking ; Tins, 2s. 6d. to 18s. Economical and Emeacious. 
Savory A Moore's Datura Tatnla in all forms for smoking and inhala- 
tions. Medical Testimonial with each Packet. 

Datura Tatnla for Asthma, etc. Delicate persons use tho remedy as 
Cigarettes, or as Pastilles for Inhalation. 
Datura Tatnla for Asthma, etc. The words "Datura Tatula " and 
" SAVORY & MOORE " on the labels are the only guarantee against the risk 
of imitations. 

For Asthma, etc., Datura Tatula. Prepared only by SAVORY A 
MOORE 143. New Bond street, London, and of Chemists everywhere. 
LJuly 12.] 

I CUN&RD LINK. 

British and North American Royal Mail Steamships be- 
tween NEW YORK and LI VERPOOL, calling at 0.UEENSTOWN, sailing from 
New York EVERY WEDNESDAY. ■.«_»«■ 

SCYTHIA July 16.. Aug. 20.. Sept. 24. .Oct 29 

MiY^SINiA July 23 .. Aug. 27 Oct. l..Nov. 5 

HOTHNlV "" JulySO Sept. S..Oct 8..Nov.l2 

OATJJA Aug. 6.. Sept. 10. .Oct 15.. Nov. 19 

al^erIa::::: :::::::::...: git,igiT»p*M 

Passaire can be secured and all information given on application to 
ir^ajMb^ ^» WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 



July 12. 



213 California st. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 12, 1879. 



THE DELIGHTS OP ENGLISH WAIL MAKING. 

Rowley. REGIS, June 5th. 

I came here to Inquire for myBelf bow much it would coat to deliver 
one hundred tons of coal a month by the Rowley Colliery Cdtopahy; at 
two or three given localities within a distance of ten miles ; and, having 
satisfied myself on that point, much to my pleasure I continued my walk 
from the coalpit up through the fields to Rowley Old Church. I came to 
a place called Bell End, which is apparently a new part of the old village. 
Through a small window I observed a female bead bobbin* up and down ; 
soon I heard the sound of a hammer j and, never having seen any rivet- 
making done by human hands, I threaded my way through some brick 
passages until I came to the little smithy where ' Alice was at work. 
This was the name by which her father called her, whom I met on my 
way and to whom I am indebted for the following remarkable piece of 
knowledge. Alice, I may say, was a young wife engaged in blowing be! 
lows, heating pieces ot iron in a "gleed" forge, and producing rivets from 
an anvil at the rate of 3,000 a day. For this manual labor Alice, her 
father proceeded to tell me in her presence, gets from the warehouse Is. 
Ofd out of which she has to pay for wear and tear of tools Id., carnage 
Id and a like sum for glends, a kind of small coke, made expressly for 
nail and rivet forges. On Monday she does her washing, on Saturday her 
cleaning up : so that she only works at rivets four days in the week, and 
her gross earnings, therefore, amount to 4s. 3d. for forging 12,000 rivets. 
I have said nothing of rent which Alice would pay, and which might 
amount to one shilling a week. She was a sedate young woman, well 
spoken with very fair hair and a low sweet voice. John Price (Alice s 
father) 'then, at my request, took ma to see his neighbors, Edward and 
Phyllis Tromans, who lived and worked at making nails close by. Phyllis 
is a handsome woman, with beautiful white teeth and abundance of flesh, 
which Rubens might have painted ; it is so plentiful and rosy. This 
woman was forging large nails ; and the manner in which she made a nail 
with a point and a head an inch and a-half in circumference fly off a 
piece of hot iron was marvelous to behold. She works from eight o'clock 
in the morning until nine at night, and in four days will forge 541b. weight 
of clout nails, for which she will receive the wondrous price of 3s. 8d., 
out of which she has to pay fivepence for gleeds and twopence for tools. 
Her husband works "as hard as he can drive " from six o'clock in the 
morning until eleven at.night ; and his week's wage amounts to 12s., from 
which tenpence forgleeds and fourpence for tools will have to be deducted, to 
say nothing of rent. Edward Tromans was only forty-three years of age, 
but looked much nearer seventy. Two other young women were hammer- 
ing away at rivets in company with Phyllis ; and never as long as I live 
shall I forget that little black smithy. I once traveled many miles to see 
"Vulcan's "Forge" by Velasquez ; but there was in that famous picture 
no figure to equal that of Phyllis Tromans, and I shall remember Phyllis 
to the day of my death. That such a woman Bhould be slaving in soot — 
blowing bellows, now with her left, and then wielding a hammer with her 
right hand — forging clout nails for twelve hours a day, in order to earn 
less than forty pence in a week, is a phenomenon that I would never have 
believed as being possible in England if I had not seen it. As John Price 
and I strolled into the village, I said: "Why, everybody seems to be 
idling." On which John explained that " They were all on strike." The 
strike, I discovered, was not for more wage, or against the present rate 
being lowered, but against the iniquitous truck system. After the men 
and women at many shops had earned their five shillings for the week's 
wages, they bad to take out the amount in " tommy." That is, they 
would be compelled to pay lOd. a pound for American ham worth 6d., 
8d. for bacon worth 3£d., and so on for butter, cheese, currants, raisins, 
and candles in like damnable disproportion. At last the men struck, and 
they refuse to go to work again unless they can be master of their wages 
and spend them as they like. The masters say that they will comply with 
this demand after their present stock of ham and cheese, bacon, and other 
commodities is exhausted ; but the men steadily refhse to listen to the 
condition. Many of these I saw on the Rowley-road as I walked on to 
Dudley. Some were drunk, but playing at marbles like boys at school, 
and using language that I could not repeat under any circumstances. 
There were also many young women with very pale faces, many of whom 
had lost their front teeth ; nor do I believe that the loss is to be attributed 
to eating too much sugar in any form. Farther on, at Tippity-green, I 
encountered Thomas Tibberts, a very small old man, aged seventy- two. 
He had a childlike smile on his face, and there was a clean crust of bread 
peeping out of his waistcoat pockets. I asked him in a loud voice — the 
tone of which, however, he could not mistake — " why he was loafing about 
there ; on which he gave me a happy, toothless laugh, and said that "they 
had turned him off because he could not make 'em [meaning the nails] fast 
enough ;" he could earn five shillings a week once ; but all that was over, 
and now he got two shillings a week from the parish ; which, he said, 
wasn't much, because he had to pay out of it a shilling aweek for lodging. 
Not one of these people asked me to give them anything, or used a cringing 
or even an angry word. One jester, strong in drink, but able to hold his 
own, requested me as he saw me writing in my ponderous note-book, to 
"put him down for two pounds o' soap." But that was all that passed ; 
and when I did leave something for Phyllis, through John Price, and 
Tommy Tibberts, by which they were to drink good health to me at night, 
they did not seem to be much moved by my presents. It was their way. 
God made them to forge nails as He made sheep for the slaughter. 

From Tippity-green you can see the Clent and Malvern hills, and 
Halesowen and Cradley, which lie in a valley, frpm which Bpring a hun- 
dred tall chimneys ; and these send out at every beat of a man's pulse 
immense volumes of the blackest smoke that coal and bad burning can 
make — hiding sun and sky, green grass and green tree, and clothing the 
whole creation with a horrible darkness. This is the sooty sphere in 
which ten thousand men, women and children labor day and night for 
perishable bread, and for nothing more ; and even that is sometimes de- 
nied them, even though they have given their toil without complaint or 
Btint. —Correspondent Pall Mall Gazette. 

On a honeymoon tour, recently, the young husband, going across 
from Dover to Boulogne, was suddenly very strange. " Are you ill, love?" 
exclaimed the anxious model wife. "Oh! say, Alfred, beloved, are you 
ill?" He was afraid of being doubted, and faintly replied, " I think the 
shrimps I had for breakfast this morning must have been alive." 

Artistic Novelties, manufactured from California quarts, at Ran- 
dolph & Co.'s, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 



AK» 



TH0S. PRICE'S ASSAY OFFICE 

CHEMICAL LABORATORTi 
504 Sacramento Street, S. F. 



Deposits of bullion received, melted Into bars, and returns 
made in from 24 to 48 hours. 
Bullion can be forwarded to this Qfflce from any part of the interior by Express, 
and returns made in the same manner. 

Careful Analysis made of Ores, Metals, Soils, Waters, Industrial Products, etc. 
Mines examined and reported upon. Consultations on Chemical and Metallurgical 
questions. 

Charges: Gold and Silver Bullion. 

Gold Bars on all amounts below $1,600 $2 00 

Gold Bars on all amounts above §1,600 J percent. 

Silver Bars on all amounts below 3400 $2 00 

Silver Bars on all amounts above £400 £ p er ceil t, 

Dore Bars for the Gold 82 00 

Dore Bars for the Silver £ percent. 

Determination of Gold and Silver in any alloy §2 00 

Ores. 

Assay for Tin S5 00 

Assay for Quicksilver 5 00 

Assay for Manganese 5 00 

Assay for Chromium 6 00 



CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY, 

Manufacturers of tbe Standard Syrup, a superior artiele 
put up in barrels expressly for home consumption. Also, Extra Heavy Syrup 
in barrels for Export. Beflned Sugars at lowest market rates. Office, 215 )7ront 
street, up stairs. Dec. 21. 

L. E. Pratt. PR An & METCALFE, J. B. Metcalfe. 

Attorneys and Counselors at Law. 

Rooms 20, 21 and 22, Real Estate Associates' Building:, No. 
230 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Accessible by Elevator at No. 230 
Montgomery street, or on Laura Place, next New Stock Exchange. Dec. 7. 

JOHN L. BOONE, 

Attorn ey-at-Law and Solicitor of Patents, 
Jan. 25.3 320 California street, San, Francisco, Cat. 



Assay for Gold and Silver. S3 00 

Assay for Gold, Silver and Lead...... 5 00 

Assay for Gold, Silver and Copper.. . 5 00 

Assay for Copper 3 00 

Assayforlron 3 00 1 Test for any single metal 200 

Analyses. 

Qualitative Analysis of Ores gl0 00to$25 00 

Qualitative Analysis of Water. §25 00 

Quantitative Analysis of Water 75 00 

Quantitative Analysis of Guano 25 00 

Proximate Analysis of Coal.. 10 00 

Quantitative Analysie of Coal 50 00 

Complete Analyses, qualitative and quantitative, of complex substances, at special 
rates. Nov. 23. 

IN CONSEQUENCE OF SPURIOUS IMITATIONS OF 

LEA A PERKINS* SA17CE, which are calculated to deceive 
the public, Lea and Penins have adopted A NEW LABEL, bearing their sig- 
nature, " LEA & PERRINS," which is placed on every bottleof WORCESTERSHIRE 
SAUCE, and without which none is genuine. 

Ask for LEA & PERRINS" Sauce, and see name on wrapper, label, bottle and stop- 
per. Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & Blackwell, 
London, etc., etc., and by grocers and oilmen throughout the world. To be obtained of 
Nov. 16. MESSR S. CROSS & CO., San FranciBCO. 

ROWLAND'S 

MACASSAR OIL strengthens the Hair and prevents it falling off. The bottles 
have a glass stopper, and not a cork. 

KALYDOR beautifies the Complexion and eradicates Freckles, Tan, Prickly Heat, 
Eruptions, etc. 

ODONTO whitens the Teeth, prevents and arrests decay, and gives a pleasing- 
fragrance to the breath. 

ETJKONIA is a new and delicate toilet powder. 

Ask for ROWLAND'S articles, of 20, Hatton Garden, London, and avoid cheap 

imitations. Sold by Druggists, Bazaars, etc., all over the world. May 3. 

FOR SALE-SUNNYSIDE RESIDENCE. 

I have concluded to sell my Homestead, located in the 
pleasant town of Placerville, El Dorado County, known as the SUNNYSIDE 
RANCH ; forty-five acres of land, orchard of the choicest fruits, house two stories, 
brick cellar, splendid well ot water, windmill, in face every convenience for a country 
home ; 2,000 feet above tide water. Placerville is one of the most pleasant and 
healthful localities in California ; first-class schools, churches and good society. To 
be sold at a bargain. For terms address C. B. BROWN, Placerville, or F. A. BEE, 
620 Eddy street, San Francisco. June 31. 

D. F. Hutchlngs. D. M. Dunkb. J. Sanderson 

PHtENIX OIL WORKS. 

Established 1850.— Hutcbiugrs A €0., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

JOHN JENNINGS 

Hooper's South End Warehouses, corner Japan and Town- 
send streets, San Francisco. First-clasB Fire-Proof Brick Building, capacity 
10,000 tons. Goods taken from the Dock and the Cars of the C. P. R. R. and S. P. 
R. R. free of charge. Storage at Current Rates. Advances and Insurance Effected. 

MIME. B. ZEITSKA'S 

French, German and English Institute, Day and Boarding 
School, for Young Ladies, 922 Post street, between Hyde and Larkin. KIN- 
DERGARTEN connected with the Institute. 
Oct. 26. MME. B. ZEITSKA, Principal. 

EDWARD BOSQUI & CO., 

Printers, Engravers, Lithographers and Bookbinders, 

Xieidesdorff street, from Clay to Commercial. 



IRVINE & LE BRETON 

Have Removed their Law Offices to No. 217 Sansome Street 

[March 15.] 



R. H. LLOYD, 

Attorney-at-Law, Room 13, Nevada Blook. 



July 12, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



PACT AND FANCY. 

Palace of fancy or attic of fact — 

Which will my Interne vi.sit to-night? 
Id it her whim to sec- somebody act. 

Or witness a play by reality's light? 
I am indifferent ; I have no choice — 
Fancy or fact, dearest; which has your voice? 
Fancy shows pictures more lurid, perhaps, 

Shadowed by passion, by vice and by crime; 
Fact counts its misery by the quick tap* 

Of a hid heart beating agony's time. 
Fact lies in darkness and fancy in light ; 
Which will my Imogene visit to-night? 
You can see trials and trouble and care, 

Set off by lustre and gilding and dress; 
Or you can watch them all hideously bare, 

Framed in the pall of their own wretchedness. 
Fact often kills, Fancy crowneth the right — ■ 
Which will my Imogene visit to-night? 
Fact! Do you choose it? Well, fact let it be; 

It is the basis of all of our plays, 
But the five acts of the dramas we see 

Really run throughout numberless days. 
You hardly realize what you have read — 
"Ten years elapse and the victim is dead." 
Here, in this garret, a wife lying ill- 
Only a line from reality's page — 
You've seen the husband ; you may see him still 

Strut any night on a theater stage. 
You've scarce observed him— forgotten him quite, 
Guest at a ball for a dollar a night. 
Just at this moment he's walking about, 

Talking dumb show with the girl on his arm ; 
Dozens like him wander in and pass out, 

Forming the picture that makes the scene's charm, 
And his sole thought as he stands in the set — 
" Is my poor girl at home lingering yet ?" 
She cannot live ; she is past doctor's skill ; 

Well as he knows it he smiles and toils on; 
Thinking at times with a heart-breaking thrill — 

"Kent-day to-morrow, the last dollar gone." 
A single set and a pitiful act, 
Curtain descends on the attic of fact. 
You do not like it ? I thought not, my child ; 

We'll see no more of this terrible play. 
Better the flimsiest fancy run wild 

Than the dread drama of life's ev'ry day. 
Weep at the well-acted woes if you list ; 
Soon dried are tears for what does not exist. 
San Francisco, Ju ly 3, 1879. G- H. J. 

KEARNEY AND THE TRADES UNIONR 

At last the Workingmen are being awakened out of their dream of 
high wages and of wealth to be acquired by denouncing capital and capi- 
talists. For two years they have been talking all sorts of communistic 
nonsense, and threatening all sorts of dreadful things. Capitalists were, 
by some undefined process, to be compelled to yield up at least some por- 
tion of their wealth, and by some other equally undefined process it was 
to be distributed among the workingmen. This was regarded by the large 
mass of ignorant working people as a splendid programme, and although 
they may most of them have doubted its feasibility, still they applauded 
it enthusiastically, not thinking of the harm they were bringing on them- 
selves. They now find that the millenium has not come, but that in 
place of that desired consummation of all things, they are suffering from the 
greatest depression of business that California has ever witnessed, and the 
lowest rate of wages that the State has ever known. How sane men could 
have expected any other result we are utterly at a loss to comprehend. We 
have all along condemned the Sand-lot orators in the interest of the State, 
but really far more in the interest of labor than of capital. As we have 
often said, capital can take ample care of itself ; it is in a San Francisco 
bank this morning, and by noon it has been permanently transferred to 
New York or Boston or London. Capitalists are threatened with all 
sorts of confiscation, and they say, "Let us transfer our means beyond 
the reach of this villainous crew of confiscators," and they transfer their 
capital to some place where confiscation is not one of the fine arts but 
one of the qualifications for a place in the Newgate Calendar.^ One of our 
leading capitalists, a genuine Californian, and owing everything he lias to 
the splendid opportunities this State offered to him, has made large in- 
vestments in real estate in New York because there the communist is in 
danger of the State Prison, while deliberate proposals of robbery are alto- 
gether out of the question. We have no doubt that this gentleman 
breathes more freely when in California at the thought that he has no 
fear of the morrow, no fear of learning his property has been burned down 
by a mob, or that it is at the mercy of a crowd of lawless incendiaries 
and demagogues, such as have clustered around the foul-mouthed impos- 
tor Kearney. We maintain that the Sand-lot leaders have done irrepara- 
ble injury to the State by causing capitalists to transfer their capital else- 
where, and by frightening outsiders from bringing their capital here. 
We read the record of the paralysis of business and of the ruin that have 
resulted in the number and value of deeds and of mortgages of real estate 
recorded in this city in the first six months of the last three years : 
First Six Months Jfo. of Amount of Deeds Amount of Mort- 

of Deeds. of Sales. gages. 

1877 1,880 512,095,000 §12,606,900 

1878 1,268 7,065,300 6,976,200 

1879 1,121 4,838.200 4,943,200 

The valuation by the City and County Assessor of real estate and im- 
provements in this city for tne last three years is as follows: 

Year, Real Estate. Improvements. Total. 

1877 $141,424,870 $49,547,760 §190,972,730 

1878 : 140,384,706 50,761,465 191,146,171 

1879 123,730,820 43,707,065 167,437,885 

If, in the face of such a state of things as the above figures show, work- 



ingrnen can go on hoping that they are going to benefit themselves by 
driving away the capital out of which their wages are to be paid, or that 
they have not seriously injured themselves by their violent and preposter- 
ous conduct, then we can only say they deserve their misfortunes. The 
trades unions, however, are beginning to look at the profit and loss show- 
ing of the Sand Lot movement, and they are somewhat bewildered to 
see that every step in its progress has been ruinous to them. We say, in 
the interests of labor, that the confidence that the Sand-lot impostors 
have destroyed must be restored by the action of the workingmen them- 
selves; and they must reassure capitalists of their sense of justice and 
f>rudence by declaring in emphatic numbers against all the Sand Lot vio- 
ence and rhodomontade, and in favor of the co-operation of laborers and 
capitalists in developing the trade and resources of the State. We know 
that many large buildings are projected in the city which nothing but the 
uncertainty of the attitude and policy of the workingmen keeps from be- 
ing begun. Everywhere people with means are waiting, wondering how 
long this Sand Lot folly iB going to last ; how long Kearney, the worst 
enemy the working classes ever had, is going to be accepted by them as 
their leader ; how much more capital 'they are going^ to drive away from 
this State before they are starved into the wisdom which desires to attract 
capital and raise wages. It would seem, at last, as if the trades union 
leaders are awakening to the fact that the interests of labor must be saved 
from further ruin by a complete reversal of the Sand Lot policy, and the 
sooner it is done the better. 

BANKS. 

THE BANK DF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital 95,000,000 

Witt. ALTORD President. 

THOKAS BROWN, Cashier | B. MURRAY, Jr., Ass't Cashier 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamhurg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
'bo urne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama . Nov. 4. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital $2,000,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, Isaac Wbrmser, Edward Martin, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents — London : Baring Bros. & Co. ; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg- : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer& Co. NowYork: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain,- Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up. 81,SOO,- 
000, with power to increase to 510.000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office— 28 Cornhill, London. Branches— Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Backing Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

May 18. FREDERICK TOWNSEXP, Manager. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, 85, OOO, OOO, of whicli 83,000,000 is fully paid up as 
present capital. Reserve Fund. $360,000. San Francisco Office, 42+ Califor- 
nia street ; London Office. 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER ; 
Cashier WILLIAM STEEL! * London Bankers, Bank of England and London Joint 
Stock Bank ; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston. Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Busi- 
ness in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and all parte of the 
world. March 30. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid TJp $10,000,000. 

Reserve, XJ. S. Bonds 3.600,000. 

Agency at New York, 62 Wall street. 
Agency at Virginia , Scv. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. July 5. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spur and I.olhhRiik. So 526 CalirornlHstreet. Sun 
Francisco OmcBRS : President, L. GOTTIQ. Board op Dirktors.— Fred. 
Boedinc. Chas. Kohler, Dan. Meyer, Edw. Kruse, George H. Egjrers, X. ^ an Benren. 
H. L. Simon, Claus Spreckels. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorney, JOHN B. 
JABBOE. May 18, 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

«| IBOTEE CAPITAI., ...... 8300,000. 

Officers: President. John Piirrott; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretarr, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
Beal Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 216 Sansome street, San 

Francisco. 0°*- **• 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR AND 



July 12, 1879. 



"PLEASURE'S WAND." 

4 We Obey no Wand but Pleasme's/'—ifo m. Moore* 



California Theater. — The present Aimee season promises well. French 
opera bouffe, with its light, sparkling- music, and its spicy, wicked 
dialogue, has found great favor in this moral land. This is Aimee's fourth 
visit to us, and she comes this time with a good troupe and an extensive 
repertoire. As compared with the former organizations, this company is 
not as perfect as those of 72 and 74, but very much superior to that of 
76. As far as can be judged by the few performances this week, its 
principal weakness is in the lack of a good singing secunda. Theater-goers 
will all remember in this capacity M'lle Stani, an admirable vocalist. 
The chief merits of this season will lie in the repertoire. It contains sev- 
eral operas entirely unknown out here, and several others that have been 
presented on our stage in the butchered style characteristic of Mrs. 
Oate's adaptations. Les Cloches de Corneville, as presented on Monday 
night, was something so pleasantly different from the garbled version 
lately seen at another theater, that a new vista is opened as regards the 
charms and attractions of Le Petit Due and La Maiyolaine. The opening 
performance on Monday night was greeted by a perfect crush of a house. 
It reminded one of old times, when this community showed more desire 
to encourage and help efforts to please them ; efforts made by a manage- 
ment far less willing and ready to do its best to meet public favor than 
the present one. The energy shown by these lessees, in striving to place 
before our public all that is talented and successful in present dramatic 
circles, deserves some recognition,^. and it can hardly be said that they 
have received it. In singing, Aimee has improved since her last visits. 
The quality of her voice is better, and in execution and general style there 
is great progress visible. She ha3 lost none of the charm and vivacity 
and thorough chic that serves to make her one of the foremost opera 
bouffe actresses. She Bhows all her wonted vivacity and diableire. In 
appearance, a change, and an unfavorable one at that, is noticeable. A 
life full of fatigue and excitement, leaves its tracks behind it, and age 
will finally tell. Miss Aimee has lost in the last few years some 
of her superfluous flesh, but her features have grown harder and coarser. 
The oldfavorites, Juteau and Duplan, met with complimentary receptions. 
Jouard is a good baritone and a capital actor, and Mme. Delorme an ex- 
cellent bouffe duegre. Mile. Gregoire has a very sweet and sympathetic 
voice, but of very little volume. She possesses the knack of, as the 
French call it, saying a song. That is, to give the full meaning and ex- 
pression to the text, which in opera bouffe is far more important than a 
mere musical rendition of the air, with no attention to the words. Mile. 
Raphael is a person of rather statuesque proportions, and with a hand- 
Bome face, of the Jewish type. Her voice is a light contralto. In sing- 
ing and acting, this member of the troupe is rather tame. Mezieres, the 
character comedian, is a remarkable actor. His " Gaspard," the miser, is 
a wonderful piece of eccentric acting. It is intensely artistic and artistic- 
ally intense. The portrayal of impotent imbecility was the handiwork of 
a master mind. This artist has quite a reputation in his line, and genu- 
ine treats may be expected from him. The orchestra is a very good one, 
and the chorus will undoubtedly become so, although it is as yet a little 
unsteady. The bill this week included, besides Les Cloches de Corneville, 
La Fille de M'me Angot and La Jolie Parfumeuse. On Monday we are to 
have Le Petit Due, and on Thursday La Petite Mariee, said to be a charm- 
ing, spicy work. In criticising and reviewing opera bouffe, it must be 
borne in mind that a mere musical rendering of an opera means nothing. 
A pretty tune is very well in its way, but the audience must be able to 
hear and catch all the witticisms and jokes of the text. The talen,t of the 
artist is to be determined by his . or her ability to do full justice to this 
feature, paying at the same time proper attention to the music. 

Boscovitz's "Pianoforte RecitaL" — A commanding display of sur- 
prising technical intricacies, which patient and long continued application 
can alone insure, seldom if ever arouses the enthusiastic recognition and 
justly deserved appreciation which so much implied industry might rea- 
sonably enough expect and look for. A Pianoforte Recital might very 
easily become the data! basis of some curious reflections, and if it suited 
Mr. Boscovitz's purpose to so wish it and go into details, many a doting 
mamma's expectations would be blighted. Boscovitz has an activity and 
power of finger that can only be attained by incessant labor for hours 
every day, and that, too, for years. Dexterity of finger being a purely 
mechanical acquirement, no amount of talent can supersede actual prac- 
tice.^ His style of playing the piano differs somewhat from the German 
routine usually followed, particularly in this country. Having very small 
hands, he of necessity shuns the Tarantula scramble mode of arranging 
the fingers on -the keys. His motions have none of the High Jinks spider 
action so conspicuous in some of his brother artists, and so thoroughly an- 
tagonistic to all principle and reason. He does not pound the keys as if 
he had studied his mechanism in a stamp-mill ; on the contrary, his style 
is free from the dash and seeming brilliancy which some look upon as es- 
sential in a display of technical ability. 

Clanish in sentiment, his taste inclines to the music of Chopin, who 
was physically unsound and mentally erratic. Ever overloaded by a 
melancholy induced by disease, as might with everything like reason be 
expected, Chopin was never in a proper state of body, or mind either, to 
compose great and lasting works, although certain critics would force 
them into domesticity, while they at the same time proclaim that not one 
professional in a thousand can discover the hidden beauties in them— 
illusive monomaniasm! Fortunate or otherwise, Mr. Boscovitz seems 
very much inclined to depart from the fossil schools— the B. B.'s of an- 
tiquity. With courage, and sense to back it with, he ought henceforth to 
eschew all the worn-out Bach and Beethoven senilities, and, it Chopin 
proves unequal to the task, which it hazards little to say he will, there 
are plenty of others to draw upon. 

Boscovitz, if sometimes fantastic with his hands, is nevertheless an ac- 
complished player— the would-be amiable, if sinister hostility of his pro- 
fessional brethren to the contrary notwithstanding. At the Recital he 
went through a very mixed programme, with very little in it to fascinate. 
Besides Dr. John Bull's " Village Bell" and his own two compositions, 
there was nothing attractive. Performing under a trio of celebrities, he 
betrayed no nervousness. At the tail end of his Steinway grand, Ruben- 
stem looked a good caricature of a pious nigger ; Chopin, modest and 

«.°Hf f i? g ;* W ^ 3 iW rted ,° n *S? risht h y Liszfc > who ^Peared fasci- 
nated at a butterfly fight on the ceiling above. In the garb and with the 
dignity-scowl of an itinerant priest, his attitude and expression are those 
ot a stool-pigeon or bogus bidder at a Peter Funk auction 



Baldwin's Theater. — In last week's issue justice was hardly done to 
the admirable representation at this theater. While the play, The Mar- 
riage by Moonlight, 1b but a weak arrangement of an old-time, improbable 
and impossible melo-drama, still it gives an opportunity for the excellent 
stock company to do some good acting. The total want of appreciation 
exhibited toward Miss Cogblan is something that must remain inexplica- 
ble to theater-sharps and connoisseurs. This lady gives us pictures of the 
highest order of dramatic art, which should set the town agog with ex- 
citement, but they only seem to bring together a corporal's guard of in- 
telligent, appreciating listeners, whose faces are all familiar. They are 
members of the press, regular first-nighters, and, highest tribute of all, 
unemployed actors. Hardly an evening passes but what the intensely 
intelligent and natural efforts of this lady meet with enthusiastic ap- 
plause and recalls, and still the general public keep aloof. In this play 
Miss Coghlan's portraiture of the heroine was something so artistic that 
its equal is rarely seen on the stage. There is not a point lost, every lit- 
tle, minute detail handled as carefully as the more important, broader 
effects, and the result is a finished, perfect impersonation. The different 
phases with which the character abounds— warmth, sensibility, dignity of 
manner, and mental misery — were all effectively depicted. Mr. O'Neil 
gave an intelligent, manly rendition of the character of the hero. His 
acting was very strong in the third act, and particularly so in the last 
scene of the play. Mr. Morrison was intrusted with one of those charac- 
ters in which he is at his best — that of a villain concealed under the 
suavity and polish of a gentleman. The part of " Felix" gave Mr. Robin- 
son a chance to prove that adverse criticism may result in improvement. 
This gentleman has an admirable voice, which he uses with proper elocu- 
tionary effects. The rigidity of manner and appearance which mars 
everything he does was hardly noticeable in this effort, and the result is a 
creditable impersonation. Mr. Bradley does his little bit in his usual 
conscientious, merit-deserving way. Miss Corcoran and Mr. Heme repre- 
sent an element that robs the play of all its plausibility. They are gip- 
sies of an impossible type. Although both of these characters are played 
with unusual ability, the utter absurdity pertaining to their presence in 
the dramatis personse render them of no importance to the reviewer. The 
entre acts in this theater are among the most enjoyable moments of the 
evening, through the music of Harry Widmer's orchestra. This is com- 
posed of finished soloists, and the selections performed are tasteful and 
appropriate. L'Assommoir is announced for Monday next. 

Bush Street Theater. — Mr. Locke announces that there will be one 
week more of old "Uncle Josh." Another proof of the success of this 
remarkably good play. So all of you Yankees, particularly, and every- 
body else generally, should lose no time in witnessing this most perfect 
representation of American country life. From a national and patriotic 
point of view, the picture of the Yankee farmer is a pleasing one. Al- 
though possessing features that cause regret, in the way of lack of polish 
and disregard of conventionalities, it is so full of the nobler traits of 
manhood, truth, honesty and integrity that one's heart warms with pity 
and pleasure. It is through the natural foresight of Mr. J. M. Hill 
that the church-going as well as the theater-going public of the whole 
United States are able to see this splendid production, for he was the first 
to discover Denman Thompson's abilities, and, by securing a good com- 
pany of artists to assist him, completed the success we are all so familiar 
with. Mr. Hill is now about doing the same thing with Lawrence Bar- 
rett. He has engaged him for two years, and will bring to his support' 
the very best available talent. The opening piece will be A New Play, 
one of the most powerful productions ever put upon the stage, and 
the language of which is truly fine. Unless Mr. Hill succeeds in getting 
the Fifth Avenue Theater for a year or more, the play will be produced at 
the Lyceum, New York. We have not the slightest doubt but that, 
with the wonderful business sagacity of this genial gentleman, at the end 
of his engagement Barrett will find himself as popular in his way as 
Edwin Booth or Denman Thompson are in their's. Mr. Locke announces 
as his following attraction Tony Pastor's Variety Troupe. While opinions 
differ as to the merit of variety performances, it is useless to deny their 
popularity with a large majority of our people, and this engagement is 
made in strict accordance with the policy of this theater to meet the 
popular wishes, 

Standard Theater. —Notwithstanding the great counter-attraction of 
Aimee, the Pinafore is still sailing along successfully with a stiff breeze 
of plaudits and ducats. The long run has so familiarized every one with 
their respective parts that everything goes off as smoothly as you please. 
Several of the good voices in the chorus, not anticipating such a protracted] 
success, had engaged themselves to the California, and 1 were necessarily 
compelled to withdraw, but this loss is not noticeable, with the exception 
perhaps of Mr. Harris' basso profundo. The amateurs have sunk all 
manner and semblance of such, and now do their work with the skill and 
ability of veterans. The wonderful youngsters continue to daily-increas- 
ing audiences, and are really a sight to behold. This, Saturday, afternoon] 
and evening will be the last performances in this city of the Emelie Mel- 
ville troupe prior to a tour through the interior ; appearing first at Oak 
land, thence to San Jose, Stockton, Sacramento and San Rafael. Wt 
can tell our country friends they have a rare treat in store. The Juvenilfl 
Company will appear every evening next week, and at the matinees oi 
Wednesday and Saturday. 

At the Revels' Masquerade, July 3d, quite a novel feature was in 
troduced, in the shape of a small hand fire-engine, called "New Yorkyl 
which was loaned for the occasion by the Exempts. On the apparatus waj 
seated, dressed as a " Fire Jake " and carrying a trumpet, the three-yearj 
old son of P. L. Ducasse, the little fellow being a kind of Dave Scanned 
in miniature. It was quite a pretty innovation, and a gladsome sight tj 
the heart of that old vamp, Jerry Whalen. 

Woodward's Gardens offer, on Sunday only, the wonderful chili 
violinist, Master Mitchell Banner ; and to-day and to-morrow the pei; 
forming dogs, the great Wambold and son in equilibristic acts, the aeria 
bars, grand concerts, and Buislay's amazing pantomime, Nigo, the Stupu 
Waiter. No extra charge. 

St John's Presbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason an 
Taylor, Rev. Wm. A. Scott, D. D., pastor. Preaching on Sunday as usml 
at 11 a. m. and7£ p.m. The public cordially invited to attend. Com 
munion (Lord's Supper) at the close of morning service. Sunday SchoJ 
and Bible Classes, 9\ A.M. Prayer and Praise Service at 6£ p.m. 

Conservatory Pianos, $250. 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. I 



July 12, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



Chlt-Chat. 

Sotherns opening piece at the Park will be Crutch and Toothpick. 
- — ;UUu i leraa t'Urk, while in Enr.>|K>, proposes to coniplet* her mu- 
«ral »tu.Ii. n ud it ia ■lao likely that aha may star (! ! :> through En-hmd 

in Brown Homnfa H.i„krr; Daughter. UarloUa l'.itti will soon be 

■V'~ T " '■" J " "ur..lcl will s|wn.l the summer at Gardiner, Maine 
tU» will Ih- here in tune (or the new wwiu nt the California.— Miss l)e 

Buooca takes Miss C;iry'» pUce iu Btnkmch'i company. Miss Thiiraby 

will return to America in September, but goes back to Europe next sum- 
mer. hmmet threatens to bring over from Ireland for his new play 

triU in Jrctand, a lot of real Irish men and women, who will talk the real 
Drogue. Have mercy, Joe ; are there not enough Micks hereabouts ?— 
.Miss ( »ry will not lie in Strakosch's troupe next season. Mapleson has 

made her an offer for his American tour. The rumor that Miss Sarah 

Bernhardt will visit and star in this country will only be confirmed in case 
the lady makes up her mind to resign from the Comedie Francais. This 
because the rules governing this unique organization are perfectly ri-id 
and stringent upon this point, and are to be made still more so. This rumor 
is traced directly to the lady herself, who has announced, it is said, that 
she will come to this country before 1881, without fail.— The French 
Courts have legalized Marquis de Caux's opposition to Patti's appearance 
in 1 aris in conjunction with Mr. Nicolini, and the performances announced 
at the Gaitie for next February will not take place.— Snppe", the light 
opera composer, is an Italian by birth, but an Austrian subject— a Dal- 
matian.— Why does Annie Pixley say she will never return to San 
rrancisco?— The highest yearly subscriptions paid to opera houses are 
as follows : Paris. $175,000 ; Berlin, $140,000 ; Stuttgard, $107 500 • 

Dresden, $80,000; Vienna, $60.000. Byron's The Oirh has reached its 

hftieth performance.^— The Lord Mayor of London has invited the 

Comedie Francais to a banquet in their honor. George Eignold sails 

from Australia to England in August. M'lle Anizette used to be the 

darling of the Empire, and especially admired by a member of the Impe- 
rial family— the present head, Prince Jerome.— The London Times is 
being taken to task for its rather unfair style of dramatic criticism which 
contrasts strongly with John Oxenford's consistent and judicious way of 

writing. Locke has signed a contract with Sothern for next February. 

Fifty per cent of the gross, and railroading for the company from Chicago 
out here and back. Where is the profit to come in ?— Locke also has 
the Colville Folly Troupe, to come out about Christmas time. 

REVTEW OF NEW BOOKS. 

The Yellow Mask By Wilkie Collins. Appleton's Handy Volume series For 
sale by Billings, Harbourne & Co. 

The scene of this story is laid in Italy, a century or so ago. The char- 
acters are few, but admirably drawu. The plot is touching and dramatic 
without being in the slightest degree sensational, and the tale is told with 
all the grace and simplicity which distinguishes the best works of the 
illustrious author. 

The Natural Resources of the United States. By J. Harris Pa'ton. New 
York : D. Appleton & Co., 1879. San Francisco : Bancroft & Co. 

This email book is a primer intended to give, in a brief and very con- 
densed form, a sketch of the natural resources of the United States. 
Within 102 pages it deals with minerals, metals, soil, rainfall, health re- 
sorts, climate, products of the soil, the forest and the sea, and numerous 
other subjects. If he who runs has not time to read it, he may at least 
carry it in his pocket until he finds time. It gives a summary of the lead- 
ing resources of the country, which every intelligent person should be 
aware of, and will doubtless be found very useful for the young, as well 
as for those who in a busy life have not time to read more recon- 
dite works on the subjects of which it treats. 

The "Portfolio" for June has Mr. McWhirter's " Van<mard," a 
striking picture of Highland cattle, under the lead of a bull, toilin» 
through the snow, Merton College, Oxford, and Albert Durer's famous 
'Eitter, Tod und Teufel," besidesthe new College and Castle street, Ox- 
ford. Mr. Lang discourses of High Tory Oxford, with gossip of Queen 
Anne's time ; and Mr. Hamerton closes his notices of Goya, with what 
seems to us a fair explana'ion of the extravagant claims made on behalf 
of this artist by some continental critics : " It is the thinker in Goya, 
and not the artist, who has taken a place in the history of liberal ideas in 
Europe." What a temper the old man had he showed when Wellington 
sat to him. The Duke made some remark on the painter's style, when 
Goya snatched a rapier from the wall and made a thrust, which Welling- 
ton only escaped by leaping nimbly on one side. The Albert Duror is the 
very best copy of the composition we have seen, and Mr. Hamerton says 
its excellence is wholly due to the personal skill of M. Arnaud Durand. 
The Art Chronicle has notes of the better pictures in the Royal Academy 
exhibition, which seems to be on a higher level of merit than usual. Two 
water-color exhibitions are criticised, and there are notices of some ad- 
mirable works in the Continental pictures at Goupil's Gallery and the 
French Gallery in Pall Mall. Merely to read the names of the artists 
represented in these makes one restless. The book reviews commend 
Miss Kate Thompson's " Hand Book to the Public Picture Galleries of 
Europe " as compact and useful, and Mrs. Jameson's "Memoirs," cer- 
tainly one of the most entertaining biographies of the year. Madame 
Cadart's "Annual Portfolio of Etchings," which may be had for a few 
shillings, gives a connected view of the progress of European etching. 
t 'i' 1 ?? Pacific Medical and Surgical Journal."— The number for 
July, like its rival, the Western Lancet, is more valuable for its foreign 
excerpts than for the long-winded lugubrations of local authors. It is a 
great pity that one really good clinical and sanitary journal cannot be 
published in this city. Nothing would contribute more effectually to the 
education of the profession and to a better knowledge of the diseases of 
this coast. We observe a most careless misprint in the name of Dr. J. H. 
Stannard for Dr. J. H. Stallard, the distinguished member of the College 
pf Physicians, London, whose desire to contribute some portion of his 
large experience, sho uld not be discouraged by su ch a glaring mistake. 

to 1116 " Couunercial Herald " says the bonds of the Spring Valley 
Water Works were placed in New York to the amount of $2,000,000, at 
92J. They had been in our market for two years, and could not be sold 
on account of the newspaper clamor against the Company; though, now 
that New York has secured them, capitalists here see their mistake. The 
Berald knows of a lot of $300,000 withdrawn at 92J, for which an offer of 
95 has since been made, and it predicts that the whole §2,000,000 will be 
floated at par and over. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



BUSH STREET THEATER. 

CBAKJ.F.S X!. LOCKE Proprietor. 

POSITIVELY BUT ONE MORE WEEK! 
COMMENCING MONDAY, JULY 14TH, 1879. 

ONLY TWO MORE MATINEES I 

This Saturday, July 12th, 2 p.m.! Next Saturday, July 19th, 2 p,m. 

ITS - SECURE YOTJR SEATS. "S* 



JOENMA-lV THOMPSON, 
AS 

"JOSHUA WHITCOMB." 

[July IS.] 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Barton * Lawlor, Managers ; Barton Hill, Acting Manager, 
AIMER, the Acknowledged Queen of Opera Rouffe, supported by Maurice 
Grau's New and Renowned FRENCH OPERA BOUFFE COMPANY. Sunday, July 
13th, last performance of LES CLOCHES DECORNEVILLE. Next Week— Two New 
Operas. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Sunday Evenings, and at Saturday Mat- 
inee—First and only performances here, in its original form as composed 'by the 
authors, with entirely new and gorgeous costumes, and a mise- en-scene surpassing 
all previous efforts, LE PETIT DUC (The Little Duke). Thursday, Friday and Satur- 
day, Julv 17th, 18th and 19th— First production in San Francisco of Lecocq's very 
successful work, LA PETITE MARIEE, performed in Paris over 200 consecutive 
nights. In Rehearsal— LA MARJOLA1NE. July 12. 

STANDARD THEATER. 

MA. Kennedy, Manager —This (Saturday) Evening, last 
* Night Positively of the EMELIE MELVILLE PINAFORE COMPANY", tor 
the benefit of the OLD LADIES' HOME. This (Saturday) Afternoon, at 2 o'clock, 
LAST EMELIE MELVILLE PINAFORE MATINEE Sunday Evening. July 13th 
Special Performance by the JUVENILE PINAFORE COMPANY. Commencing 
Monday Evening, Julv 14th, and every evening during the week, THE JUVENILE 
PINAFORE COMPANY. Matin ees Wedn esday and Saturday. July 12. 

THE BALDWIN THEATER. 

Manager, Mr. Thomas Maguire.— This (Saturday) Matinee 
and Evening, THE MARRIAGE BY MOONLIGHT. Sunday, July 13th, Ben- 
efit of HERNE and BELASCO-THE MARRIAGE BY MOONLIGHT (positively last 
time), and RIP VAN WINKLE. Monday, July 14th, the great Paris and London 
sensation, L'ASSOMMO IR. July 12. 



HASTINGS' COLLEGE OF THE LAW. 

Lectnres Tor the Year 1879-80 will commence August 7th, 
1879, at the Pioneer Assembly Rooms, 80S Montgomery street. The Middle 
Class will meet at 4 p.m.; the Junior Class wilt meet at 10 a.m. Examinations of ap- 
plicants for admission to the Middle Class and members of the present Class whose 
examination was postponed, will be held Tuesday, August 5th, at tho Pioneer Assem- 
bly Rooms. Gentlemen wishing to enter either Class should apply to the Dean and 
Registrar, No. 2, Court Block, 630 Clay street. July IS. 

MECHANICS' PAVILION! 

Now Wnlklng-.—Grent Six-Day Pedestrian Tournament, 
with the following large list of entries: John Armstrong, W. H. Scott, J. 
Abel, Wm. Chenowith, James Kennovan, C. D. Thompson, John G. Macfarland, Jas. 
A. Santos, Frank Edwards, J. Callahan, P. Mclntyre, Harry Newhoff. The Six-Day 
Contest commenced promptly at 1 a.m. Thursday. Admission, FIFTY CENTS. 
Special arrangement with street cars to run all night. Music by First Regiment 
Band, Uniformed. Re member, just onf hour after Wednesday midnight. 

^MECHANICS' FAIR, 

San Francisco, California, 
OPENS AUGUST 5TH, 1819. 

Science, Art, Industry and Natural Productions will be 
fully represented. Grand Instrumental Concert each afternoon and evening. 
Machinery in Motion, Rare Paintings. Fine Statuary, a Tropical Garden, Fountains 
and Promenades will make this Exhibition the most instructive and pleasant place 
of resort on this Coast. Those desiring space should apply at once. Office : 27 Post 
street. IRVING M. SCOTT, President 

J. H. Cclver, Secretary. July 12. 

MARINE INTELLIGENCE. 



ARRIVALS AND CLEARANCES AT THE PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO, FOR 
THE WEEK ENDING JULY 11, 1879. 

ARRIVALS^ 



VESSEL. 



ly 6 Sfr Alaska 

5 Ship Black Hawk .... 

6 BarkMarpa 

8 Barb F. H. Drews.... 

8 Brig J. B. Ford 

Bark Helen W. Almv. 

lQlShip Standard 



MASTER. 



Seabury... 
Howland . 
Marquy. .. 
Vorsatz .. 

Soto 

Freeman . 
Percy 



WHERE FROM. 



Hongkong .... 

Hongkong 

Bordeaux . 

Vladwostock.. 

San Bias 

Honolulu 

Philadelphia.. 



CONSIGNEES. 



Williams, Blanchard A Co. 

Wm. T. Coleman & Co. 

A. Vignier & Co. 

Master. 

W. Loarza. 

Jones & Co. 

George Howes & Co. 



CLEARANCES. 



July 5 



VESSEL, 



St'r Granada — 
St'r Zealandia.. 

Bark Era 

St'r Dakota 

BarkKalakaua., 



MASTER. 



Cavarly 

Chevalier . . 

Johnson 

Morse 

J oaks 



rt'BBRE BOUND 



Pauama 

Sydney 

Calais 

Victoria 

Honolulu 



BY WUOM CLEARED. 



Williams. Blanchard 4 Co. 
Williams. Blanchard & Co. 
0. w HcNear. 
Williams, Blanchard & Co. 
J. C. Merrill & Co. 



Conservatory Organs, $110. 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 12, 1879. 



THED^Boctii 



r-^-.F BO-M- ■<— 



.^^ciit^^^Ssiaxdcig. 



Berlin, July 4th. — The Tariff Commission to-day agreed to the amend- 
ment introduced by Herr Windthrost, proposing any revenue in excess of 
130,000,000 marks be distributed among the separate States.— London, 
Julv 5th. — The British troop-ship Oroides arrived at Madeira to-day with 
the "remains of the Prince Imperial. The remains were transferred from 
the Boadicea to the Orontes at Cape Town, June 15th.^— Paris, July 
5th. — The Chamber of Deputies has passed the first six clauses of Jules 
Ferry's education bill The debate on the principal clause, against the 
Jesuits, will take place to-day. The petition against M. Jules Ferry's 
bill now has 1,643,000 signatures.-^— Paris, July 5th. — Lepere, Minister 
of the Interior, estimated that in consequence of the bad crop, purchases 
of foreign grain would amount to £20, 000, 000. —LONDON, July 5th. — 
In the House of Commons last night the Government agreed to the mo- 
tion of Henry Caplin (Conservative) for the appointment of a Royal Com- 
mission to inquire into the causes of agricultural depression, and how far 
they were created, or are remediable, by legislation,— St. Petersburg, 
July 5th. — Four hundred Nihilists were arrested at Kieff on the night of 
June 26th, and a great store of weapons seized,— London, July 5th. — 
A Berlin correspondent of the Times transmits a report that the Chinese 
are committing outrages in Kuldja, and thousands of fugitives are seek- 
ing protection at Russian forts. >^— Cape Town, June 14th, via Madeira, 
July 4th. — Col. Newdigate has cleared the country between Hyotyozic 
and Upoko rivers without loss. Intelligence is received of the arrival of 
two more messengers from Cetewayo, at Pietermaritzburg, asking time 
for a conference. They have been sent to headquarters. It is rumored 
that a fortnight's armistice has been agreed to.— Yokohama, July 5th. 
— Ex-President Grant and party arrived to-day from China. -^— Vienna, 
July 5th.— In the election for members of the Reiebsrath thus far, the 
Liberals and 130 Conservatives and Nationalists have been chosen. The 
Liberals lost 33 seats. ^— New York, July 6th. — In consequence of the 
continued high water, Szegedin cannot be rebuilt this year. The inhab- 
itants will live in wooden barracks during winter.^— Nearly 200 delegates 
representing Hebrew congregations have arrived in New York to attend 
the union of American Hebrew congregations.— —Paris, July 7th. — The 
authorities interdicted the great m'eeting at the Bordeaux Alhambra, 
where Blanqui was advertised to speak,— New York, July 7th. — The 
Bulletin prints the following: A private dispatch from Callao yesterday 
from Grace Bros, states that 850 tons of guano are being shipped daily 
from the deposits in the Lobos Islands, and that forty vessels have cleared 
from Callao for that port to load guano.— New York, July 7th. — The 
Panama Star and Herald says: Passengers from the south coast report a 
battle at Coloma and the capture of that point by the allied forces. The 
Chilean losses are stated to be 1,500 killed.— —London, July 7th. — A 
Berlin dispatch says: The new German Consul-General to Samoa has re- 
ceived orders to abstain from interference with internal affairs. The sug- 
gestion of certain interested parties that Germany shall annex Samoa finds 
no favor in high quarters.— -The latest official telegram states that the 
houses of fourteen out of the fifteen wards forming the most important 

Eart of Irkutsk, Siberia, were destroyed by fire on the 4th, and many in- 
abitants are homeless. — Paris, July 8th. — De Lesseps does not think 
the expense of constructing the Darien Canal will exceed two hundred 
and fifty million francs. The difficulties of the work were not so formida- 
ble as those which had been overcome in the construction of the Suez 
Canal, as a railroad already existed along the course of the proposed 
Panama Canal, with a large town at each extremity. De Lesseps fully 
expects commencing work on the Canal next New Year's day, employing 
30,000 or 40,000 workmen, some of them Chinese, and 15,000 Brazilian 
negroes.— Tirnova, July 8th. — Prince Alexander has arrived. His re- 
ception was one of indescribable enthusiasm. — r- Rome, July 8th. — The 
Diritto announces that negotiations between Germany and the Vatican 
are likely soon to result in a general amnesty to transgressors of the May 
laws. -^London, July 8th. — A dispatch to the Daily News from Rangoon 
says: Cholera among British troops at Thayetmyo is spreading.— 
Madrid, July 8th.— In the Chamber of Deputies to-day the Minister of 
Foreign Affairs stated that he had ordered two frigates to prepare to sup- 
port the protest of Spain against the action of San Domingo. Sefior Cas- 
telar demanded that the Government insist upon the summary punish- 
ment of Puerto PIata.-^SAN Francisco, July 8th.— United States Bank 
Commissioner Langford left on the 6th for the East, having completed 
his annual examination of the National Banks in this State. The banks 
under Mr. Langford's supervision embrace all the area west of the Mis- 
souri. As a general thing they have been found in good condition, 
though somewhat depressed by the prevailing stagnation in business cir- 
cles. The depression is especially true of those in this State. The banks, 
as a rule, have been found favorable to the National Bank system.^— 
San Francisco, July 9th.— The Arctic discovery ship Jeannette left here 
yesterday. ^The anchor was hove short about half -past three, and prompt- 
ly at four o'clock the ship swung free, the propeller commenced its revo- 
lutions, and slowly she moved through the water on her way toward the 
Arctic Beas. The Jeannette was accompanied by the following yachts- 
Consuelo, Con. O Connor, Azaline, Clara, Magic, Emerald, Ida, SappJto 
Lively, and others. The tugs Millen Griffith, Governor Irwin, Rabboni and 
Rocket also joined the fleet. When off Fort Point, Major Hasbronck, of 
the * ourth Artillery, commanding the garrison, fired a salute of ten guns 
from the barbette. The courtesy was acknowledged by cheering and dip- 
ping of colors by the Jeannette. 

An ambitious young writer having asked, "What magazine will 
give me the highest position quickest?" was told, "A powder magazine, 
if you contribute a fiery article." 



j SljwMng Sihrerware.— A large assortment of elegant designs at Ran- 
dolpn & Go. s, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

INSTJBANCE AGENCY, 
& 324 California Street, San Francisco, 



Eire Insurance. 



ST. PAUL of St. Paul. 

UNION of Galveston. 

TEUTONI A of New Orleans. 

BERLIN-COLOGNE of Berlin. 

LA CONFIANCE of Paris. 



GIRARD of Philadelphii 

HOME of Columbus. 

NEW ORLEANS ASSOCIATION 

PEOPLES of Newark. 

REVERE of Boston. 

LA CAISSE GENERALS of Paris. 

Marine Insurance. 

PARIS UNDERWRITING ASSUCIATION of Paris. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of LoDdon. 

Capital Represented ¥23,000,000. 

All Iiosses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly 2*aid. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE CO. OF CALIFORNIA. 

Principal Office, 406 California Slreet, San Francisco. 
Cash Assets, January 1, 1877, §595,291 ; Liabilities, 55,952 ; Surplus for Policy 
Holders, §589,339. J. F. Houghton, President ; L. L. Baker, Vice-President ; 
Charles R. Story, Secretary. R. H. MAGILL, H. H. BIGELOW, General Agents. 

Directors. — San Francisco — L. L. Baker, John H. Redington, J. F. Houghton, 
R. B. Gray, Robert Watt, John Currey, L. L. Baker, W. F. Whittier, C. C. Burr, E. 
M. Root, W. H. White, J. L. N. Shepard, W. M. Greenwood, George S. Mann, Cyrus 
Wilson, W. T. Garratt, C. Waterhouse, A. P. Hotaling, A. Block, A. K. P. Harmon, 
G. S. Johnson, W. O. Wilson, A. W. Bowman, H. L. Dodge, Charles R. Story. Ala- 
meda County Branch — V. D. Moody, Chauncy Taylor, A. C. Henry, Robert S. Far- 
relly, Joseph B. Marlin, W. B. Hardy, T. B. Simpson. San Diego— A. H. Wilcox. 
Sacramento— Mark Hopkins, D. W. Earl, Julius Wetzlar, James Carolan. San Jose — 
T. EUard Beans, B. D. Murphy, A. Pfister, J. H. Dibble, J. S. Carter, Jaekson Lewis, 
Jacob Rich, John Auzerais, John Balbach. Stockton— H. H. Hewlett, Chas. Belding, 
J. D. Peters, A. W. Simpson, H. M. Fanning. Marysville— D. E. Knight. Grass 
Valley— Wm. Watt, T. W. Sigouraey. Portland, Oregon— W. S. Ladd, C. H. Lewis, 
P. Wasserman, B. Goldsmith, D. Macleay. Virginia City, Nevada — John Gillig, Isaac 
L. Requa. March 17. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE-UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California Lloyds.-— Established in 1861.— Mos. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash capital $750,000 in Gold Assets exceed $1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
—San Francisco — J. Mora Moss, N. G. Kittle, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Moses 
Heller, Adam Grant, Daniel Meyer, AntoineBorel, Charles Kohler, E. L. Goldstein, 
I. Lawrence Pool, A. Weill, Joseph Brandenstein, Charles Bauio, James Mofiitt, 
Benjamin Brewster, L. Cunningham, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas Liming, John Parrott, 
L. A. Booth, Julius Baum, MylesD. Sweeney, Jas. M. Goewey, Edward Cadwatader 
Bartlett Doe, Gustave Touchard, J. H. Baird, J. G. Kittle, George C. Hickox, C. Du- 
conunun, Wm. Scholle, John Conly, Ig. Steinhart, W. B. Stone, J. O. Eldridge, A. 
B. Phipps. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 
Charles D. Haven, Secretary. Geo. T. Bqhen, Surveyor. Aug 31. 



THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 

FIRE ASTD MARINE. 

Clash Assets, $450,000.--- Principal Office, 218 and 220 San- 
J some street, San Francisco. Officers : — A. J. Bryant, President ; Richard 
Ivbrb, Vice-President ; Charles H. Cubbing, Secretary ; H. H. Watson, Marine 
Surveyor. Board of Directors : — Peter Donahue, James Irvine, C. D. O'Sullivan, 
A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R, Bailey, E. W. Corbert, George O. 
McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. Buckley, 
P. J. White, E. M. Root, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld, Daniel 
Callaghan. P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, Los Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, Sonoma County, H. W. Seale, Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. 16. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBS 'Kii. 
Capital SI, 125.000, U.S. Gold Coin. 

Losses Paid in Gold Coin Immediately After Adjustment. 
This Corporation holds contracts of fifteen other European Insurance Compa- 
nies, re-insuring by far the greater part of every risk, as soon as accepted in our of- 
fice. The combined subscribed Capital which our policies therefore offer to the public, 
Amounts to I Of which 

$16 .912,500, TJ. S. Gold Coin, | $4,338,750 is Paid "Op, 

#*■ sides the Always Available ^Reserve Funds. 

GEORGE MARCUS & CO., General Agents for the PacificCoast, 
_March 15. 304 California street. 

THE MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, ENGLAND. 

[ESTABLISHED 1838.] 
Whole Amount of Jo'nt Stock and Guaranteed Capital. $5,000, 000. 

Whole Amount of Capital paid ap 900,000. 

Cash Assets December 31, 1876 3,710,000. 

The undersigned have been duly authorized to isBue Policies at current rates on 
Freight and Shipments to or from England, Europe, New York, Japan, China, Aus- 
tralian Colonies, Sandwich Islands, and Northern Coast Ports. If desired, policies 
made payable at port of termination. 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., Agents, 

Au g. 10. 218 California street. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Raloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that mav be sus- 
tained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In" the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies willstrictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 225 Sansome St., S. F . 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSUR. CO. OF BOSTON. 

Has transacted the business of Life Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
Sept. 22.] 328 Mont gomery street. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

C Capital 95,000,000. — Agents: Balfour, Gntnrie A- Co., No. 
J 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 



July 12, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



9 



FOLDED AWAY. 

[BT FIDELIA.] 

Day by day, we fold aw;ty 

Some treanure that our heart holds dear. 
Some cherished thine to which we oUog 

And him with many a kiss and tear. 
A shred of lace may hold a place 

That jewels rare nould never win: 
With love untold a ribbon old 

Is laid our dearest shrine within. 
A little tress we fondly press 

I'nto a heart that aehea with pain, 
Then, with a sieh for days pone by, 

We fold it from our right again. 
And ia there not a hallowed spot, 

In memory's casket lying low, 
Where day by day we fold away 

Our heart -thoughts lest the world should know ? 
Many a one, now lost and gone, 

In sweet day dreaming we behold, 
Who, in our sleep, come hack to keep 

With us their vigils as of old. 
And yet, alas! such dreams must pasa, 

Life's sterner duties must be met! 
Quickly we turn and strive to learn 

That cruel lesson — to forget ! 
When from the gleam of love's sweet dream 

Our heart's awake in sad surprise, 
How dimly burn, where'er we turn, 

The lesser lights that meet our eyes! 
When o'er the dead our tears are shed, 

While on the silent lips we press 
The last fond kiss — oh, is not this 

The summit of life's loneliness ? 
And yet we know though all lie low 

Whom we have ever loved or known, 
Still we must live and learn to give 

To earth the claims it calls its own. 
grief untold! with hearts grown old, 

Like flowers blighted in a day, 
How fondly then from sight of men 

We fold our dear dead loves away! 

— Al bany Sunday Press. 

SYDNEY EXHIBITION. 

Editor Newa Letter:— Since you opened your columns to advocate 
the Sydney International Exhibition 1879, reports and correspondence re- 
lating thereto have from time to time appeared. The accompanying is a 
copy of my last communication to the Royal Commission. 

July 8th, 1879. Yours truly, John J. Bleasdale. 

Microscopical Society's Rooms. ) 

120 Sutter street, San Francisco, July 7th, 1879. J 

Augustus Morris, Esq., Secretary Sydney International Exhibition, 1879: 

My Dear Mr. Morris— I missed writing to you by last mail through 
being delayed a day longer than I had anticipated on my return journey 
from the State of Oregon, whither I had gone in search of objects for the 
Exhibition. Communication had been opened with the Vice Consul, 
but only to convince me more strongly of the utter useleasness of depend- 
ing on that class of officials to do anything of a public nature requiring 
time, care and address, outside of their immediate duties. They have 
business of their own, and naturally grudge the loss of time. When, 
however, I arrived at Portland, the Vice-Consul did his best to forward 
the objects of my journey when he understood what was wanted and how 
to obtain it. To him and to Mr. Reid, Secretary of the Board of Trade, 
the thanks of the Commission are due, for they made every exertion to 
induce that body to meet and hear me, but to no purpose, because it 
feared to be called upon for pecuniary assistance. I succeeded, however, 
in securing an extensive collection of grain of all kinds grown in the 
State, both in the straw and cleaned, as well as of grasses and their seeds, 
and salmon. There is some little hope of obtaining samples of woollen 
goods, leather and tanning materials, as also sections of wood and veneers. 

Among the drawbacks of these Republican Governments stands prom- 
inent the fact that there is no manner of means of obtaining from a pub- 
lic source so much as one shilling for any purpose, no matter how patri- 
otic or valuable to local industries it may be. And as to the State Legis- 
latures of these two States, when they last met, as they do once in two 
years, no money could be got for even so important an object as adver- 
tising the States at the World's Fairs of Philadelphia and Paris, while all 
the time the mercantile classes, who are longing for an extension of com- 
merce, and in no direction so much as Australia, have shown themselves 
as mean as the Legislatures. I have personally waited upon a number of 
the reputedly wealthiest of the citizens, both bankers and merchants, to 
solicit them to help this Committee a little with their wealth for the credit 
of the State and city, and the advancement of commercial relations with 
their nearest and largest markets outside of the States of the Union, but 
to no purpose. One merohant — and one only — promised some pecuniary 
assistance, but even that itself depended upon my first obtaining some 
like aid from other parties, which, since I have got none, might as well 
never have been promised. Thus far I have defrayed all expenses myself. 
Now do not run away with the idea that I tell you this as if I expected 
to be re-imbursed by the Commission — nothing of the kind — but that you 
may clearly understand that if the display from the Pacific Coast be not 
nearly so extensive and varied as it should be, it is not owing to any bung- 
ling or want of effort on my part. 

In your most important department of Education, the University Cur- 
riculum, the system of Public Schools of the State will be shown very 
completely, through the courtesy of the University authorities and of the 
Superintendent of State Schools, and also of the Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Instruction of this city and county. By correspondence with the flour- 
ishing University of Michigan, I have obtained the Curriculum there pur- 



sued, as also several interesting educational reports and minor publica- . 
felons, These and whatever more of the kind I can obtaiu will be sent on 
by next month's amil. 

Among the rare and valuable products of this State is a kind of marble 
(not alabaster), which in some respects resembles onyx. It is a wonder- 
fully beautiful substance, about as hard as Carrara marble, of many colors 
and shades of color, and capable of taking the highest polish, so that one 
may look into it, as it were. As much as £300 apiece are paid for a single 
mantel-piece of it. This I have endeavored to obtain, and may now per- 
haps succeed, Bince Lord Loftus told me the other day that he had urged 
the owners and workers of it to send samples to the Exhibition. I have 
seen many rich marbles, but none, to my thinking, equal to this. But 
here again, " surgit amari aliquid, the expense — money out of pocket, 
trifling though it be. Had I had at my disposal only £100 to defray the 
expenses of packing, freight and insurance, I could have more than 
doubled the quantity and value of the exhibits which will be sent. Very 
many have expressed their willingness to send goods to be sold at the 
close of the Exposition for what they would bring, who could on no ac- 
count be induced to incur the preliminary expenses. 

By telegram in the newspapers, I learn that the U. S. Government 
have at length voted £4,000 towards the Sydney Exhibition, and ap- 
pointed a commission of two, and directed that all goods for the future 
must be sent via this port, and I have opened correspondence with the 
Secretary of the Treasury at Washington to ascertain at whose disposi- 
tion the money is placed, and if any portion of it be available for this 
State, and when I learn the result I will advise you. But I am told not 
to look for one cent coming this way. 

Hoping the two ship-loads of exhibits from the Eastern States will make 
a good set-off against the paltry ahoyr of the Western, and trusting to be 
able to judge for myself before the Exhibition closes, I am, as you know. 
Yours faithfully and sincerely, John J. Bleasdale, D.D. 

REGISTRATION. 

Republicans, Attention ! 

Headquarters Republican State Central Committee, Rooms 
\os. 4, 6, 6, 7, 8 and 9, No. 708 Market street, southwest corner Third 
street, San Francisco, June 26, 1879. 

The vital importance of immediate REGISTRATION mnst be apparent to every 
Republican, when the fact is announced that the entire Rep titration of this city 
and county has been wiped out; and that no one will be allowed to vote at the 
September Election unless RE-REGISTERED. The State Central Committee calls 
the earnest attention of Republicans to this matter, and requests them, without 
delay, to register themselves, so as to strengthen the hands ol the organization and 
place it in a position to win the approaching contest No true Republican will 
neglect this moBt imperative and urgent duty. By order of the Committee. 

M. P. Bqruck, Secretary. [June 28.] W. W. MORROW, Chairman. 

THE AVERILL MIXED PAINT 

Is manufactured from strictly pnre White Lead, Zinc, and 
Pure Linseed Oil, to which is added Water Glass, which chemically unites the 
ingredients and holds thorn in solution, so they cannot separate. As a house paint 
it has no equal, producing a brilliant glossy finish, impervious to the weather, and 

Will Last Twice as Long- 
as any other paint made. It is of pure white, and any Shade or Color desired, mixed 
ready for the brush, sc that any one can apply it. 

Our wagon and machinery paints, from the more common colors to the finest ver- 
milion, are specially desirable. 

Our fire-proof roof, barn and bridge paint, manufactured from oxide of iron, is the 
best and cheapest paint for the purpose that can be produced. 

Put up in J, i, 1 and 5 gallon cans, and in barrels, sold by the gallon. Send for 
sample card of colore %iid price list. Address, 

CALIFORNIA PAINT COMPANY, 

July 13. 329 MARKET STREET, San Francisco. 

SWANT0N HOUSE, PESCADER0. 

This Popular Hotel, tog-ether with the detached Cottages, 
which are not the least of its attractive features, have been newly furnished 
throughout, and are now open for the reception of guests. Those desiring to visit 
the most enjoyable of all our sea-side resorts, can make no mistake in deciding upon 
Pescadero. 

IT IS EASILY REACHED, 

and is unsurpassed in the excellence of its climate, the beauty of its scenery, and in 
the attractiveness of its truly remarkable sea beach. Those extraordinary pebbles, 
among which are to be found agates, opals, sapphires, etc., were never so numerous 
as now, the past Winter having thrown up immense numbers of curiously -shaped 
stones, which for ages have been subiected to the everlasting motions of the tireless 
Pacific. GOOD TROUT FISHING is obtainable in the Pescadero river. 
0ST" The hotel prloea are fixed to suit the times. [April 27. 

FAIRFAX MINING COMPANY, 

426 CALIFORNIA STREET, ROOM NO. 2. 

President IOHNW. COLEMAN. 

Treasurer GEN. O. H. LA GRANGE. 

Secretary O. C. MILLER. 

[October 12. ] 

ODORLESS EXCAVATING APPARATUS COMPANY, 

Of San Francisco. 

Empty lng Vanlts. Sinks. Cesspools, Sewers, Cellars, Wells 
and Excavations in the day-time without offense. 
j UD(J 7. Office : 432 KEARNY STREET. 

DISSOLUTION. 

The partnership of Snow A May was dissolved on the 6th 
iD8Unt - wlLRMi* ' 

I shall conduct the business under the name of SNOW £ CO.. and liquidate the 
affairs of the late firm at No. 20 Post street FRANK C SNOW. 

San FnuiciBCO, Mav 31st, ;S7!1. June 14. 

SHEEP RANCH FOR SALE IN OREGON. 

An admirable sheep ranch, well stocked and watered, and 
capable of earn, inur about '20.000 sheep. Substantial residence and improve- 
ments on the property, to be sold at a bargain. Apply to 
May i4. EDWARD J. JACKSON, 2u9 Leidesdorff street, & F. 

©777 * year and expenses to agents. Ontfll Free. Address, 

tjp- < * June?.] p,0. V1CKEKY, Augusta, Maine. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 12, 1879. 



THE DARIEN CANAL AND FOREIGN INTERFERENCE. 
A portion of the great American people is getting desperately wrathy 
because it seems that this country is going to play a very insignificant 
part in the Isthmus Canal project. Certain of our military Bombastes 
Furiosos solemnly claim that in case of a foreign war the canal would 
prove of incalculable advantage to the enemy ; others protest against the 
project from a commercial point of view ; but the greater part are simply 
Bavage because the United States government is not foremost in the under- 
taking. All of these objections are ridiculous enough. A war between 
the United States and an European power would be Bolely a naval war, 
and there isn't a second-class power in the old world that couldn't whip 
our puny navy out of sight and lay our defenseless coast towns under con- 
tribution without need of any such facilities of communication as the 
canal would furnish. If we want to keep our coasts secure, we shall do so 
much more effectually and creditably by building decent vessels and 
bringing our fraudulent naval constructors to book than by hindering an 
undertaking which the interest of the whole world demands. The com- 
mercial objection seems to be based upon the belief that the canal won't 
pay Well, those who think so needn't be shareholders. At the Bame 
time, if De Lessep's latest estimate of total cost— $50,000,000— be correct, 
there can be no doubt about its paying ; as in that case the tax of three 
dollars per ton originally intended would of course be reduced in propor- 
tion to the cost. As for saying that "nothing practicable can come from 
the present agination in Europe upon the subject unless this Government 
takes the initiative," and that we "cannot afford to allow any foreign 
government to Btrike a spade in this project except under the auspices of 
the United States," that is all pigheaded buncombe. The people of the 
United States have had abundant opportunity to construct a canal if they 
wished to. Nobody would have sought to deprive them of "the_ initia- 
tive " if they had planked down their money and gone to work, or if they 
had shown any disposition to do so. Even yet, if they are so terribly 
anxious to head the undertaking, they can do so by paying for the privi- 
lege. But this doesn't suit them. They were quite content to aee foreign 
engineers and surveyors do all the preliminary work, and they are per- 
fectly satisfied that foreign capital and enterprise shall carry the project 
through, but they muat have all the glory, and must have it "on the 
cheap." And, after all, what special affair of ours is it? What have we 
got to do with the Isthmuses of Panama, of Darien, or of Nicaragua 
more than any other nation not inhabiting or owning them ? If the pro- 
ject had any political significance, why, then our national fowl might clap 
his wings and scream about the " Monroe Doctrine" — and his scream has 
always been sharper than his taloDS in that particular, by the way. But 
the canal scheme presents no such feature.' It is not an affair of govern- 
ments, but of individuals, and the only change proposed to be made in the 
political status of the strip of country through which the artery passes is 
that it shall forever be sacredly neutral ground for all peaceful purposes. 
" Under the auspices of the United States," indeed ! Under the jobbery of 
the United States, we suppose that means. It would be a tine field for our 
slippery government contractors to play their tricks in ; but we somehow 
think that they will have to look elsewhere. The down-trodden and 
oppressed subjects of the effete monarchies have got ahead of ua — as they 
always do when science, liberality and the nobler sort of enterprise can 
win the race. We are very smart at stuffing ballot-boxes, celebrating 
glorious Fourths, patenting jiracracks and mixing drinks, but when it 
comes to cutting continents in half, we had better take a back seat. Be- 
sides, if the great powers, or any one of them, were resolved to make the 
canal regardless of us and our wishes, the formidable question would 
arise: What are we going to do about it? And echo would answer, 
What? 

THE OAKLAND STRIKERS. 

There is trouble over in Oakland about the employment of Chi- 
nese in filling in the Railroad Company's long wharf. White men were 
originally employed at 81 50 per day each — considerably more than Chi- 
namen would have been paid, but they struck for $2, and the contractor 
now proposes to bring Mongolians on the scene. Hence all the trouble. 
The argument of the Caucasians, so far as we can understand it, seems to 
be that, since times are hard and business is dull, their wages must be 
increased, which is rather a queer way of putting it. But a more ludi- 
crous feature of the affair is a protest " signed by a large number of citi- 
zens of Alameda county," who therein declare that if Chinamen are em- 
ployed instead of "the sons and daughters of American citizens " they 
will "assert their claimB as did their ancestors at Lexington, Concord, and 
Bunker Hill." Now we will venture to state our belief that not one of 
the actual strikers ia the Bon of an American citizen, and that not one of 
the signers of the protest had an ancestor who was an American at the 
time of the battles mentioned. We are ready to swear that nine-tenths 
of the whole " biling " of them are Irishmen born in Ireland, who, jf they 
knew anything at all about their " ancestors," which they don't, would 
find those worthies in the British ranks if they took any hand in the war 
of independence. When you hear men talk so freely about their Ameri- 
can citizenship, you may always be sure that they have acquired the honor 
very recently, and when you hear them jabber about their ancestors who 
fought and died in the cause of American liberty, you may wager your 
Sunday boots that they are fresh importations from some effete mon- 
archy. 

CAT.TFORNIANS ON WALL STREET. 

Wall street begins, perforce, to recognize the influence and power 
of CaUfornia capital, and the nameB of Keene, Mills and Tevis are be- 
coming as familiar to the Gothamites as to ourselves. The agencieB of 
the Nevada Bank and Bank of California, in New York, command a re- 
Bpect born of their mighty accumulations of the yellow metal. William 
M. Lent, whose luck is akm to that of Baldwin, is gradually educating 
the New Yorkers to a proper appreciation of our mines, and is ably sec- 
onded by a score of old San Franciscans who " know all about it." Be- 
sides Keene's wheat speculation, he is largely interested in Lake Shore 
and telegraph stock, and has recently been elected a Director of the cele- 
brated Erie Railroad. Mr. Mills is also credited with a penchant for 
telegraph stock, and is said to have acquired a large interest in Lake 
Shore, by purchase from Jay Gould. Great things are told of the latter's 
new Central Union Telegraph Company, in which Messrs. Keene, Tevis 
and Mills are also thought to be concerned. One thing is certain, that 
our solid men need fear no comparison with the strongest and ablest of 
Wall streeters. A graduate of our Stock Exchange has nothing more to 
learn — at least, not until he gets to heaven. 



FREE TRADE IN THE EAST. 

It is somewhat singular that while there is a strong tendency to- 
wards free trade in the Atlantic States, where they have amply tested 
the absurdities of protection, the doctrine should find favor with so emi- 
nent a statesman as Prince Bismarck. The German free trade news- 
papers openly avow that in the case of rails the German proprietors are 
combined to enforce high prices at home, in order that they, may sell at a 
loss abroad, and an instance is given where a Westphalian company has 
made a successful tender for the steel rails required by a line in upper 
Italy, at £4 19s. per ton, while another company (the Konigahutte) sold a 
quantity to the Upper Silesian Railway at £8 5s., or £3 6s. more for the 
German than the Italian railway. The Chancellor's new tariff is evi- 
dently aimed at the United States and Russia. The principal articles 
sought to be excluded are petroleum, wheat, corn, horses and cattle, meats, 
canned fruits, tobacco, cigars, lard and cheese. In contra-distinction to 
this short-sighted German policy was the speech or Mr. Foster, M. P. for 
Bradford, of which the summary by telegraph, dated 30th ult., termi- 
nates : " There could be but one meaning to protection or reciprocity, and 
that was a tax on food. The people of England would never stand such 
a tax." The American people have long since discovered that protection 
is nothing more nor less than systematized robbery of the community in 
order to enrich a few individuals. The excessive competition now pre- 
vailing in the Eastern States is due to the premium placed upon competi- 
tion by Government, in the shape of a tariff which excluded foreign trade. 
So keen had that competition become that our manufacturers were forced 
to seek markets for their surplus abroad, even though the prices^ realized 
left do margin for profit. Nothing but our immense food supplies could 
have bo long sustained such unnatural conditions. Now, when our mer- 
chants wish to enter European markets, the Continental authorities feel 
inclined to apply the tu,_quoque argument and say : " You rejected our 
trade these many years, now we reject yours!" Fencing in one's own 
commerce is very pretty, provided we don't fence out our neighbor's. 
Thereby, perchance, we lose many ducats. 

A SPECIMEN CANARD. 

On the 23d ultimo a certain newspaper of this city published one of 
its customary fabrications about a great embryotic revolution in Mexico, 
which would infallibly result in the expulsion of President .Diaz and the 
succession of General Negrete. By late advices from Washington and 
the City of Mexico it appears that all such statements were based prin- 
cipally upon imagination. Minister Zamacona stated to a N. Y. Herald 
reporter that the names mentioned in the article were unknown to him, 
if they even existed, and while denying in toto any danger, present or 
prospective, of the overthrow of Diaz, Seiior Zamacona was of opinion 
that such revolutionary reports emanated from a class of people on the 
border, who, in their eagerness to enforce " claims " against the Mexican 
Government, would hesitate at no means to embroil the two countries in 
war. One of these people possesses 1,400 such " claims," and they are 
usually as worthless as their " owners. Sr. Zamacona felt assured that 
President Diaz would be continued in office by the will of a vast majority 
of his countrymen, who believe in his patriotism, ability and conservatism* 
The Minister also directed attention to the fact that imports into Mexico 
from the United States have risen from §5,000,000 to §7,000,000 annually 
under General Diaz's policy of fostering relations between these coun- 
tries. From Mexico the Two Republics (newspaper), of the 14th ult., in- 
forms us correctly about Negrete's foolish attempt. At the instance of a 
Spaniard, who edited a small sheet at the capital city, General Negrete 
issued his pronunciamento in the columns of said sheet. The entire re- 
sult was that the Spaniard left the Republic " by request," and Negrete, 
perceiving no effect from his attempt, went humbly to President Diaz 
and asked his pardon. The self-styled "General" Negrete was the 
laughing stock of the Mexicans, and his " army " did not even exist on 
paper. It looks as though the "live sheet " had been badly sold, and we 
suggest that it now pull " the documents in our possession " relating to 
tins widely spread revolution ! 

THE ENGLISH LABOR UNION. 
This organization of English mechanics and laborers was formed 
about eight years ago, and 1 now claims a membership of over 3,000,000. 
The weekly dues of 2d. from each individual produce a gross annual in- 
come of more than £1,300,000. These funds are divided among the sick 
bureau, the emigrant bureau and the labor bureau. The emigrant 
bureau has assisted upward of 60,000 people in obtaining passage to New 
Zealand and Australia, and in placing them after their arrival there. 
The labor bureau attends to political affairs and differences between the 
masters and men. If wages are reduced below living rates, the men are 
advised by their Union leaders not to strike, but to inform the master 
that they will not accept the pay, and continue their work. Of course 
this places the responsibility of their discharge upon the masters. Once 
a lock-out is begun, the Union leaders proceed to investigate whether the 
master has been guided merely by avarice, or forced by diminished profit 
to close. In the former case, the difficulty continues, but in the latter, 
the men being satisfied the master is unable to pay higher rates, resume 
their work until prosperous times enable them to do better. There is 
considerably more common sense in such methods than in those in use in 
America. " 

GENERAL GRANT'S MOVEMENTS. 

By late telegrams from Japan it is promulgated that the ex-Presi- 
dent has considerably changed his programme, and that instead of reach- 
ing this city within a few weeks, he now proposes to visit the Australian 
Colonies and the Sandwich Islands. It is generally understood that this 
detour has considerable political significance. General Grant, being a 
very prominent candidate for the Presidency, shakes off all the fatigue 
and worry attendant upon convention work, and leaves his calling and 
election in the hands of his friends. In the meantime he enjoys several 
months more of ease and comfort, and successfully eludes, for at any rate 
a brief season, the adulations and attentions of the military of California. 
It has been hinted that the latter consideration over-balanced all the 
rest. Certainly we shall not see the General in San Francisco for some 
monthB to come. 

We always thought it was bad enough before, but they've struck tl • 
bed-rock at last in Nevada. They call it a Carson complication. This is 
the end. 



July 12, 1379. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISE!;. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

"Hnr tb» Crier!" w Wbai the 4»t11 art tboaT 
"Oo» thftt will i'l»T lh« d»rfl,Cf with yon." 

" H»'d * •tine in his tail is lone as a flail. 
Which made him crow bolder and bolder." 



Three Presbyterian clergymen have gone to Alaska, but, bIm ! 
only for a time. We have an ample supply on hand in this city and Dak- 
land, and prices rule uncommonly low at this season of the year. The com- 
munity has always been somewhat mixed in the far North, but the Cal- 
vinistic element has been wanting, and now is the time to introduce it. 
The nights are long in that region in autumn and winter, and the stock of 
oil unbounded. Clergymen of the Presbyterian persuasion, being gener- 
ally tall iu person, might be utilized as wicks and afford in the process of 
combustion, at one and the same moment, illumination for social gather- 
ings, and materials for a future Calvinistic uiartyrology. It were invidi- 
ous to select among so many ; but our readers will know to whom the 
first place is due in any practical embodiment of our suggestion. 

There are fifty-five different ways of spelling Shakespeare's name, 
each with authority to back it, and Dennis Kearney does but pay the 
penalty of greatness in being misspelled by everybody, beginning with 
himself. The orthography of even so simple a name as Wefler puzzled a 
learned English Judge on a memorable occasion, and we may therefore be 
excused if we ask why people will spell Dennis with one n, and Kearney 
without a Cur. A cockney might answer that even one hen was too good 
for such a cockerel, and that no passable cur would like to be taken for 
one of his family; but after all, why not settle upon a form of spelling un- 
til time has dispelled him altogether? 

Judge Field's decision in the case of the municipal ordinance requir- 
ing the cutting of the queues of Chinamen Is a righteous one in principle, 
whether technically correct or not. The personal dignity of every man 
should be safe in a civilized community. It is the growing conviction of 
the sacredness of the person which has suppressed so many of the degrad- 
ing punishments formerly inflicted on criminals, and the ordinance in 
question flagrantly violated the very spirit of American institutions. At 
the same time, it must be confessed that worse things might have been 
done to the Chinese : they might have been compelled to accept nomina- 
tions to the Board of Supervisors. 

A notorious doctor named Chas. O'Donnell made a complaint before 
the proper authorities against the Chinese Companies of this city, on in- 
formation and belief. The complaint fizzled out, in the classic language 
of the Post. That is more than a charge against Chas. O'Donnell would 
do, if anybody could be found to make it ; but the physical impediments 
in the way of deposition, while both hands are employed in holding the 
nose and the physician's name chokes the wind-pipe, effectually secure the 
man of science against being restrained of his liberty. There are situa- 
tions in life when one may rejoice in the bounty of nature, which gave 
him the polecat for a first cousin. 

A more moral stand than that of the W. P. C, on the Business of 
assessing candidates, it would be difficult to invent in the heat of a cam- 
paign. Any candidate who agrees to pay an assessment is to be dropped 
from the ticket, because the office should seek the man. The W. P. C. 
wander from the point. It is not the office that iB sought by these prom- 
ising-to-pay candidates, but the unhappy beings themselves, who are sought 
out and run to earth by the men who sell offices. And do they sell these 
for moral effect ? We trow not. The terms are and will be cash down, 
or good collaterals ; and when one W. P. C. looks at another, does he 
see any green ? 

Mr. Augustine, of Marin county, addressed it somewhat personal open 
letter, on Monday last, to Dr. Carr, State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction. Dr. Carr doeB not run with the express train, and has a great 
deal of instruction, public and private, to make up ; and these little ob- 
stacles may serve to explain the fact that he has so far held his peace. 
When he does speak there will be richness, for he has chunks of wisdom 
laid away in him, like that intellectual man in the story, who sat thought- 
fully silent through a long dinner, to break out at the sight of the dump- 
lings with this memorable utterance : '* Them's the jockeys for I." 

Can't some inducement be offered Sig. Rotura, of "Suspended Ani- 
mation" notoriety, to visit San Francisco ? Our good city is afflicted 
with several unwholesome characters, whom we would be glad to see sus- 
pended, without the use of the antidote. Par exemple, the Board of Su- 
pervisors could be " sat upon " for a century and a half, with material 
benefit to the community; the ghostly Educational conclave could be 
Mangled for a spell, without causing a tear; and it wouldn't do any harm 
to lay Kearney and the "live paper" on the shelf, where they might 
freeze — and forget to " come to." 

The daily papers continue to advertise " 250 cats wanted, to kill 
gophers, squirrels, etc., wild and of good size ; also female cats, with kit- 
tens, at half price." We would respectfully suggest that the latter de- 
mand could be most satisfactorily filled by applications at the stock boards 
and brokers and lawyers offices. There is a very feline class of females in 
thiB community who could well be spared. They "go for " anything or 
anybody, and if transported would get away with the Jersey Farm and 
all its destructive animals at one fell swoop I 

Mr. King, a newsboy in his youth and a cripple all his life, has just 
presented 2,500 books to the Cincinnati Public Library. The moral is not 
so clear as it might be, but it must be a good one. If you are a newsboy 
you have a fair chance of being crippled ; or if you are a cripple you may 
be transported to Cincinnati ; or if your name is King you'll have to give 
away your books. There's no seeing through it. But it's a good exam- 
ple anyway where pigs are plenty, and so it can have no bearing on this 
coast. 

A Suggestion, not Untimely. Now that Lotta's fountain is carefully 
screened from the public by the ugliest fence on the Pacific Coast, how 
would it do for our city officials to go through the washing of their soiled 
linen there? It has everything convenient : water in the fountain, a fence 
to hang the duds on, and whisky galore in the immediate neighborhood to 
refresh the mind. 

It is a curious and noteworthy fact that nearly all the clerks in the 
Registrar's office wear eye-glasses, whereas their clients are mostly natu- 
ral eyes'd citizens. 



The Gas Inspector has cost the city, from May. 1878, to July, 1879, 
$C>,G90 72, by accurate book keeping. A healthy sum for the supervision 
of wind, or noisome air, which we take gas to be. Accustomed as we are 
to the continual inspection of gaseous bodies, we are devoured with 
envy at the good luck of inspector Bloom field, and think he was not 
Damed in vain. Surely he disports himself in flowery fields and quietly 
draws his pay, to the tune of $300 a month, for trying the bills of fare in 
hotels all over the land. Owlglasa thought he earned his money when he 
eat to bursting for twelve pence ; what can be said of the work the Gas 
Inspector does in that way ? 

That Michigan lady who writes, we are told, with rare truth that the 
thousand" and one vexations of daily life start the fret, is a wonderful 
woman. Her father was Mnrtin Farquhar Tupper and her mother the 
Sweet Singer of Michigan, and she has thrown her beautiful thought into 
verse worthy of both : 

"Yes, it is that confounded corn that makes me make wry faces, 
And the griddle cakes were spoiled to-day, 

and the Call has an affidavit." 

General Bumside's statue, lately described as a " perfect likeness of 
his whiskers, and with a heroic expression on the face," is to be placed at 
one end of the Darien Canal, D. V. (which stands for "De Lesseps will- 
ing"). The great engineer, when cautiously approached on the subject, 
promptly answered, "Why not? If his countrymen could stand the liv- 
ing one; surely other people can put up with the image. At least, that 
can't make a fool of itself." 

The Virginia City folks introduced a little novelty into the Fourth of 
July business. _ A procession, of course, but purely local in character ; 
made up, that is, of miners and mining superintendents, Burleigh drills, 
Indians on foot and on horseback, and the Sazerac Lying Club. Car- 
loads of girls representing the States, and kegs of beer representing 
patriotism, identified the business as American ; but in other respects it 
was wildly original. 

Mr. Julian Hawthorne is no improvement on his father, and a good 
deal so. Every time that a wildly prancing newspaper man or woman 
writes a Moon-Hoax about the Hawthornes, Sir Julian mounts his red- 
roan charger and valiantly hurls defiance at the enemy in a couple of hun- 
dred sarcastic paragraphs. Like Mr. Charles Reade, he is incessantly 
spoiling for a fight; and, also like Mr. Reade, he is fast becoming a nui- 
sance and a bore. 

He doth protest too much. Mr. Perkins declared on Wednesday 
night that he had never, directly, or indirectly, employed Chinese ; that 
is, he guarantees that he has never used Chinese tea, or Chinese sugar, or 
silk, or bamboo, or lacquered ware, or rice, or camphor, or fire crackers, 
or any other thing that is Chinese, selphimgod, and amen. And we never 
heard anything quite like it, or hardly ever. 

Ingersoll's lectures are now offered everywhere at five cents, pathetic 
remarks at his brother's grave included. The coincidence in time 
between his brother's death and the issue of this cheap edition is one of 
those curious accidents which relieve the monotony of life. Where a be- 
reavement can be turned to such good account, it seems a pity that Ma- 
ture has restricted the supply of relatives. 

An English resident of San Francisco excused himself for keeping his 
store open on the glorious Fourth by remarking to a patriot, who was 
remonstrating with him : " Oh, d — n it, ye know, I did not have to wait 
for the fourth of any beastly month to get my independence, you know. 
Never was a slave, in fact, or any thing of that Bort, you know. Pleasant 
day tho', isn't it?" 

The Supervisors passed the tax levy over the Mayor's veto by a vote 
of 9 to 2. Each one of the nine explained his vote iu a way never before 
heard of, as extorted from him by his abiding sense of duty to the public. 
And what a comfort it must be to each one of them to think of duty per- 
formed, when he snuggles in his little bed! Lesser men never know these 
joys. 

Mayor Bryant keeps up his stroke. Another veto of the tax levy, 
and the general approbation of mankind, in consequence. A fight so per- 
sistent should have its reward ; and perhaps it will, if the Mayor gets a 
chance to veto anything else. There must be several matters lying about 
in which he could interest himself to this extent. 

" D. J. T." writes to an evening paper that the " meanest vice of the 
polygamist Reynolds is loftier than the noblest virtue ever imported by 
any Chinaman in California." If D. J. T. is the virtue aimed at every 
one must agree with him ; but if he is the vice here spoken of he lacks 
modesty to blow his own trumpet so loudly. 

The telegrams say there is danger that the negro exodus may intro- 
duce infected baggage into Missouri and Kansas. This unworthy fling 
at the physiological- distinction of the African race will bring Senator 
Chandler to the front; but wise men will keep to windward of him and 
his clients, under the circumstances. 

Won't somebody do a little to wake up enthusiasm in this blessed 
political business ? The town is in danger of dislocating its jaws with 
yawning over H. B.s and Pinafore Perkins. A sleepier, more stupid, 
more monotonously silly affair never was known, tasteless as warm water, 
endless as a Bulletin editorial. 

Reform is the order of the day. A vigorous movement was begun on 
Washington-street wharf yesterday by a mule ; but it was, like too many 
others, a backward movement, and ended in the bay. There has been no 
nnity of action among these intelligent quadrupeds since they dissolved 
partnership with Mr. Pixley. 

Denis Kearney went to Stockton on Thursday, but the asylum was 
full, or perhaps they just had plenty of him ; and he went further. All 
the spice has gone out of this poor fellow ; both his talk and his meetings 
are as tame as an Episcopalian canary. 

The citizens of Chickeymucksonville ^re erecting a statue of their 
recent Fourth of July poet He deserved it by losing the fifty-four pages 
of manuscript which he had intended to deliver, and thns does reward 
follow quickly on the heels of merit. 

Will the Academy of Science inform us what occult law of Na- 
ture transforms a hen (at night) into a rooster? 

Has the saying. " It takes nine tailors to make aman,"any reference 
to Superintendent Taylor? It looks like it 

A good name for a female squalling baby is Aurora. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 12, 1879. 



C. P. R. R. 



Overland Ticket Office : Perry Landing, foot 
of Market street.— Commencing- Monday, 
May 19th, 1879, and until further notice, 
Trains and Boats wil leave 

HAS FRA9TCISCO: 



7AA A. M. (daily), Vallejo Steamer (from Market 
,\J\J street Lauding- — Connecting witb Trains for 
Napa (Stages for Sonoma), Calistoga (the Geysers), 
and Sacramento. Connecting: at Davis {Sundays except- 
ed) for Woodland and Knight's Landing - , and at Wood- 
land for Williams and Willows. 

. (Arrive San Francisco 8:10 p.m.) 



7AAA.M. (daily) Local Passenger Tram (via Oakland 
•"" Ferry) and via Livermore arriving- at Tracy 
at 11:30 a. m. and connecting- with Atlantic Express. 
Connects at Niles with Train arriving- at San Jose at 
10:15 a.m. 

(Returning, train from Tracy arrives at 6:05 p.m.) 

8(\f\ A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
.VJVJ i a nd Ferry, Northern Ry. and S. P. & T. R R.) 

for Sacramento, Marysville, Redding-, Portland (Or.), 
Colfax, Reno (Virginia City), Palisade (Eureka), Ogden 
and Omaha. Connects at Gait with train arriving at 
lone at 3:40 P.M. 

(Arrive San Franciseo 5:15 P.M.) 

Sunday Excursion Tickets to San Pablo and Marti- 
nez at Seduced Sates. 



1 f\ aaA.M. (daily) via Oakland Ferry, Local Passea- 
!"•"" ger Train to Haywards and Niles. 

(Arrive San Francisco 4:05 p.m.) 



3AA P.M. (daily) San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
• "" land Ferry and Niles), stopping at all Way Sta- 
tions. Arrives at San Jose at 5:20 P.M. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 A.M.) 



3(\(\ P- ^" (** a '' v ) Northern Railway Passenger Train 
• vr" (via Oakland Ferry) to San Pablo, Martinez 
and Antioch. 
(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a m.) 



4fif\ P.M. (daily) Arizona Express Train (via Oak- 
.UU lam i Ferry, Northern Ry. and S. P. & T. R. R.) 
for Lathrop (and Stockton), Merced, Madera, Visalia, 
Sumner, Mojave, Newhall (San Buenaventura, and Santa 
Barbara), Los Angeles, "Santa Monica," Wilmington, 
Santa Ana (San Diego), Colton and Yuma (Colorado 
River Steamers), connecting direct with Daily Trains 
of the Southern Pacific Railroad of Arizona for Mari- 
copa (Daily Stages for Phcenix and Prescott), and for 
Casa Grande (182 miles east from Yuma), and end of 
Track (Daily Stages for Florence and Tucson). 

" Sleeping Cars " between Oakland, Los Angeles and 
Yuma, 
(Arrive Sau Francisco 12:35 p.m.) 

4(\f\ P. M.(Sundays excepted) VallejoSteamer (from 
• "\/ Market Street Landing), connecting with trains 
for Calistoga, (the Geysers), Woodland, Knight's Land- 
ing and Sacramento ; and at Sacramento with Pas- 
senger Train, leaving at 9:35 P.M. for Truckee, Reno, 
Carsou and Virginia. 

" Sleeping Cars " between Vallejo and Carson. 
(Arrive San Francisco 11:10 a.m.) 



4f\f\ P-M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
•"" (from Wash'n St. Wharf), for Beniciaand Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River. 
(Arrive San Francisco 8:00 P.M.) 



4AA P.M. (daily), Through Third Class and Accom- 
'"V modation Train (via Oakland Ferry, North- 
ern Ry. and S. P. & T. R. R.) connecting at Lathrop 
with Train arriving at Los Angeles on second day at 
11:55 a.m. (Arrive San Francisco 9:05 a.m. 



4 0f) P.M. (daily) Local Passenger Train (via Oak- 
•*-' v - , land Ferry) to Haywards, Niles and Liver- 
more. (Arrive San Francisco 8:35 a.m.) 



^ (")(") P.M. (daily) Overland Emigrant Train (via 
tJm ^ v - / Oakland Ferry and Northern Railway) to 
Ogden, Omaha and East. 

Public conveyance for Mills Seminary connects atSem- 
nary Park Station with all trains, Sundays excepted. 



FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAINS 



From "SAN FRANCISCO," Daily. 



TO 

OAKLAND. 


< 

a 
a 

■< 


g 
otc 
SB 

a 


o 




OH 

2 
« 


pa 

■JE-< 
Woo 
P 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 






B6.10 


12.30 


7.00 


B7.00 


B6.10 


7.00 


7.30 




7.00 


1.00 


8.00 


B9.00 


7.30| 10.001 8.30 


s.oo 


7.30 


1.30 


9.00 


B 10.00 


8.30 p. M. I 9.30 


10.00 


8.00 


2.00 


10.00 


P. M. 


9.30 


3.001 10.30 




8.30 


3.00 


11.00 


B5.00 


10.30 


4.30 


11.30 












11.30 
p. M. 






1.30 


9.30 


4.00 


P. H. 






1.00 


10.00 


4.30 


1.30 




12.30 


h 






10.30 


5.00 


2.00 




1.00 




4.00 


5.30 


11.00 


5.30 


■3.00 




3.30 


*"? 


5.00 




11.30 


6.00 


4.00 




4.30 la 






12.00 


6.301 5.00 




6.30 ■< 








7.00 6.00 
8.10 B*7 nn 
9.20^*8.10 




6.30 








_, 




[ 8.10 


A. M. 


Change Cars 




10.301 *1030 


9.20 


7.00 






b11.45'b»1145 


10.30JP. M. 


West Oakland 








Bll.45 


3.00 







To "SAN FRANCISCO," Daily. 





a 

Eg 
n 




FROM 

EAST 
OAKLAND. 

FROM 
FERN SIDE. 


< 


FROM 

OAKLAND. 
(Broadway.) 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. | A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


p. M. 


B5.40 


B5.40 


7.00 


b 5.io; bs.00 


B-5.00 


B5.20 


12.20 


B6.30 


B6.30 


8.00 


B 5.50 BlO.OO 


B*5.40 


B6.00 


12 50 


8.00 


7.30 


P. H. 


6.40IBU.00 


*8.25 


6.50 


1.20 


10.00 


8.30 


2.35 


7.40| p. M. 


7.00 


7.20 


1.60 


12.00 


9.30 


4.30 


8.401 B6.00 


8.03 


7.50 


2.50 




10.30 
11.30 




9.40 
10.40 


9.00 
10.03 






1.30 




8.50 


3.50 


3.30 


P. M. 


a 


11.401 


11.03 


9.20 


4.20 


4.30 


1-00 s g 


P. M. 




12,00 


9.60 


4.50 


5.30 


3.00 S*= 


12.40 




P. M. 


10.20 


5.20 


B6.30 


4.00 


"•2; 


1.25 




l.OO 


10.50 


5.50 




5.00 


< 


2.40 




3.00 


11.20 


6.25 




6.00 




4.40 




•3.20 


11.50 


6.50 






5.40 




4.00 




8.00 


Change Cara 


A. M. 

7.10 


6.40 
7.50 


6.00 

6.03 




9.10 
10.20 




9.00 
10.10 


B*7.20 

E"8.30 






West Oaklnd. i 1.30 






1...-. . 




!*10.00 






b— Sundays excepted. 


*Alameda Passengers change cars at Oakland. 



Creeb Route. 

From SAN FRANCISCO— DaWy— B5:40, b6:30, 7.20, 8:15, 
9:15, 10:15, 11:15 A.M. 12:15, 1:15, 2:25, 3:15, 4:15, 
5:15, 6.15 p.m. 

From OAKLAND— Daily— b5:Z0, b6:20, 7:10, 8:05, 9:05, 
10:05, 11:05 A. M. 12:05, 1:05, 2:15, 3:05, 4:05, 5:05, 
6:05 p.m. b— Sundays excepted. 



' "Official Schedule Time" furnished by Randolph & 
Co., Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Townb, General Superintendent. 



SUNDAYS. 

Leave San- Francisco: 

8:00 A m. via-Saucelito Fy. 

8:15 a.m. viaS. Quentin " 
10:15 a.m. " " " 

12:50 p m. " " " 

3:45 P.M. " " " 

6:00 P.M. " ". '• 



Leave San Rafael: 
8:50 a.m. viaS. Quentin F. 
11:30 a.m. " " " 

2:15 p.m. -" " " 

4:30 p.m. " " " 

6:50 P.M." " " 



Q A PT A. m. daily, except Sundays, from Saucelito 
u * - rt -' Ferry, Market street, for all points between 
Saucelito and Junction. Returning, leaves Junction 
4:00 p. M., arrives S. F. (via Saucelito) 5:40 P. M. 

9 0A A. m. daily, except Sundays, from San Quen- 
•^ d ^ J tin Ferry, Market street, for all points be- 
tween San Francisco and Olema. Returning, leaves 
Olema 1:55 p. m., arrives S. F. (via Saucelito) 5:40 p. m. 



1A £T p. m. daily, except Sundays, from San Quentin 
**±.0 Ferry, Market Street, THROUGH TRAIN 
for DUNCAN MILLS and Way Stations. Returning, 
train leaves DUNCAN MILLS 6:40 A. M., arriving in S. 
F. 12;05 P. m. 

Sunday Excursions at Reduced Bates. 

8:00 A.H., from Saucelito Ferry, Market street, 
S: 15 A. M., from San Quentin Ferry, Market street, 
for DUNCAN MILLS and RETURN. Fares for Round 
Trip— Olema, 82; Tomalcs, S3; Duncan Mills, 84. 

Above train, returning, arrives in Sau Francisco via 
San Quentin 7:55 p.m. , or via Saucelito 8:10 p.m. 

W. R. PRICE, Gen'l Ticket Agent. 

Jno. W. Dohbrtt, Gen'l Manager. Jun 7. 





Commencing- Monday, June 2:1, 1879, 
and until further notice, Boats and Trains will 
leave San Francisco as follows : 



7 1 A a.m., from San Quentin Ferry, daily (Sundays 
• J - v/ excepted), connecting at San Rafael with 
Mail and Express Train for Petaluma, Santa Rosa, 
Healdsburg, Cloverdale and way stations. Making stage 
connections at Geyserville for Skaggs' Springs ; Clover- 
dale for Ukiah, Lakeport, Mendocino City, Highland 
and Bartlett Springs, Soda Bay and the Geysers; connec- 
tion made at Fulton for Korbel's, Guernevi lie and the 
Redwoods. Returning, arrive in San Francisco at 6:25 
p.m. Passengers goinir by this train will arrive at the 
Geysers at 2 p.m. 



3C\C\ p.m. daily (Sundays excepted), Steamer 
• v - / v -' " James M. Donahue " (Washington Street 
Wharf) , connecting with Mail and Express Train at Don- 
ahue for Petaluma, Santa Rosa, Healdsburg, Cloverdale, 
and way stations. Making stage connections at Lake- 
ville for Sonoma. Returning, arrive in San Francisco 
at 10:10 A.M. 



Sunday Excursions at Reduced Kates. 



8"| K a.m., Sundays only, via San Quentin Ferry 
• -L«J and San Rafael, for Cloverdale and Way Sta- 
tions. Returning, arrive in San Francisco at 7:55 p.m. 
Fares for Round Trip: Petaluma, §1.50; SantaRosa, §2.00* 
Healdsburg, S3 00; Cloverdale, S4.50; Fulton, 82.50* La-' 
guna, 83.00; Forestville, $3.50; Korbel's, $3.75: Guerne- 
ville, $4. 



(^otnmeiiciug' Monday, April 21, 1S79, 
j and until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
San Francisco, from Passenger Depot on Townsend 
street, between Third and Fourth streets, as follows : 



8 0A a.m. daily for San Jose and Way Stations. 
,U\J gj§f- Stages for Pescadero (via San Mateo) 
connect with this train only. 

9 C\ A.M (Sundays only) for San Jose and Way Sta- 
• t) w tions. Returning, leaves San Jose at 6 P.M. 



~\{\ AC\ A-M- daily for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, 
iv.Tv Tres Pinos, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and' 
all Way Stations. g-*p At Pajaro, the Santa Cruz 
R. R. connects with this train for Aptos, Soquel and 
Santa Cruz, gap At Salinas the M. & S. V. R. R. 
connects with this train for Monterey. B5F" Stage 
connections made with this train. (Pescadero Stages via 
San Mateo excepted.) 

Parlor Car attached to this Train. 

(SKATS AT REDUCED RATR8.) 



3QH p.m. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose, 
.*J\J Gilroy, Pajaro, Hollister, Tres Pinos and priu- 
cipal Way Stations. 

ggr* On Saturdays only, the Santa Cruz R. R. will 
connect with this train at Pajaro for Aptos, Soquel and 
Santa Cruz. Returning, leave Santa Cruz at 4.45 a.m. 
Mondays (breakfast at Gilroy), arrivingin SanFrancisco 
at 10:00 a.m. 

^T- SPECIAL NOTICE— On SATURDAYS ONLY, 

the run of this train will be extended to SALINAS 

connecting with the M. & S. V. R. R. for MONTEREY. 
Returning, leave Monterey MONDAYS (breakfast at 
Gilroy), arriving in San Francisco at 10 a.m. 



Freight received at Washinerton st. "Wharf 
from 7 a.m. till 2.30 p. m., daily (except 
Sundays) . 



A. A. Bean, A. Hughes, Jas. M. Donahue, 

Sup't. Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

[June 7.] 



NORTH PACIFIC COAST RAILROAD. 

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 



In Effect from Sunday, June 8th, 1879, 
Between San Francisco and San Rafael. 



JBare Betiveen San Francisco and San Itafael 
REDUCED TO 25 CENTS. 



Leave San Francisco 
7:10 a.m. via San Q'ntin F. 
9:20 a.m. " " «' 

1:45 p.m. " " « 

4:45 p.m. " " " 

5:45 p.m. " Saucelito " 



WEEK BATS. 



Leave San Rafael : 
7:00 a.m. via Saucelito Fy. 
8:00 a.m. " S. Quentin " 
11:00 a.m. " " " 

3:20 p.m. " ", " 

3:50 p.m. " Saucelito " 
5:20 p.m. " S. Quentin " 



O O r\ P.M. (Sundays only) for San Jose and Way Sta- 

4 9 P\ F - M - dail y (Sundays excepted) for Sau Jose and 
•AO Way Stations. 

5An p - M - daily (Sundays excepted) for MenloPark 
.\y\J an d Way Stations. 

6 30 P ' M '~ daily » forMen * oparkandWa y sta tions. 

Excursion Tickets at Reduced Rates 

To San Jose and intermediate points sold on Saturdays, 
and Sunday mornings, good for return until following 
Monday inclusive. 

Also, EXCURSION TICKETS to Aptos, Soquel, Santa 
Cruz and Monterey, sold on Saturdays only— good for 
return until the following Monday inclusive. 

j^~ Principal Ticket Offico— Passenger Depot, Town- 
send street. Branch Ticket Office— No. 2 New Mont- 
gomery street, Palace Hotel. 

A. C. BASSETT, Supt. H. R. JTJDAH, A. P. &T. A. 



SOUTHERN DIVISIONS. 

Commencing: Monday, May 19th, 1879, 
^- Passengers for points on the Southern Divisions 
of the road will take the cars of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 4:00 p.m. daily (Arizona Ex- 
press Train) , and making close connection at GOSHEN 
for Sumner, Mojave, Los Angeles, Wilmington, Ana- 
heim, Colton, Colorado River, Yuma, Maricopa and Casa 
Grande (182 miles east from Yuma). May 31 



July 12, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 



NOTABILIA. 



7 ^ ■ 







THE PEDDLERS SONG. 



Lawn as white as driven enow ; 
Cypress black as e'er was trow ; 
Gloves as sweet as damask ruses; 
Masks for faces and for noses ; 
Bugle-bracelet, necklace, amber; 
Perfume for a lady's chamber; 



Gold quoips and stomachers, 
For my lads to give their dears ; 
Pins and poking-sticks of steel. 
What maids lack from head to heel: 
Come buy of me.come; come buy, come buy, 
Buy, lads, or else your lasses cry. 

William Siiakspeare. 



Helmbold's Buchu has long been known as one of the most val- 
able medicines attainable in certain classes of diseases, such as dyspepsia, 
chronic rheumatism, dropsy, and cutaneous affections. As a diu- 
retic, it is superior to almost any medicine in use, and the great 
care with which it is prepared, the absolute purity of the prepa- 
ration, and the diligence used in the selection of the crude material, 
nave made it known far and wide as a reliable and effective prepa- 
ration, and one that can always be used with safety and benefit. The 
great success of Helmbold's Buchu has led to the production of many 
spurious preparations, which are made cheaply and placed upon the mar- 
ket to be Bold on the reputation acquired by Helmbold's original prepara- 
tion. Parties who desire a really good medicine should be careful and use 
Helmbold's only. 

"Close to Nature's Heart," said the Rev. W. J. Smith; and he 
mounted a hard-trotting mule and rode into Yosemite, leaving one in 
doubt whether the valley or the mule was so near the heart of Nature. 
Perhaps this mystery never will be cleared up, or hardly ever ; but there 
is one thing certain: The man who takes his coffee and muffins or his 
cosy lunch at the Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street, has gone to 
the very heart of the matter ; nature can offer him nothing better, nor yet 
can art. Beady service, perfect quiet, comfort and ease, and the best 
cooking in town at Swain's. 

A little Waterloo Sunday-School miss was asked by her teacher: 
"What must people do in order to go to heaven?" "Die, I suppose," 
replied the little one. The teacher" did not question her any further. 

That terrific tornado in Minnesota, the other day, played some most 
extraordinary freaks. It hoisted a Presbyterian clergyman, weighed down 
with a sermon under sixteen heads ; and was seen making frantic efforts 
to lift a photograph of the Rev. Jos. Cook. One of Montanya's Union 
Ranges was taken by it 800 yards through the air, and deposited in the 
middle«of a park, where it was found calmly attending to business, and 
cooking dinner with the most exemplary steadiness. Not a pot or pan 
was displaced, and things were done to a turn. 

The "Jeannette" is on her way at last to the Arctic, and speculation 
is busy with the possible intentions of her owner in organizing this expe- 
dition. The general opinion is that Bennett expects to cut off a portion 
of the North Pole and set it up in front of the Herald office with one of 
his own hats on top to be adored, a la Gessler. There would be nothing 
Btrange in this if Bennett's hats were furnished by White, 402 Kearny 
street, for all New York would be on its knees before such marvels of art. 

The Emperor of Japan is learning all the European ways and mak- 
ing himself like his brother kings. Witn his beef-eaters and body-guards 
he is already quite civilized, and now he is going to have his Opera Com- 
pany, at an expense of 2,000,000 francs. This is the way to enlighten the 
world ; arid it is noticed that all these excellent ideas have come to the 
Emperor since he became acquainted with the Gerke Wine, which he has 
regularly from Landsberger's, 10 Jones Alley. 

The Detroit Free Press looks back with a sigh to its courting- days 
and says: " Nothing smells of the olden timesjnore than onions." 

The style and finish of articles and work furnished by McNally & 
Hawkins are unsurpassed. They have just received at their store under 
the Grand Hotel, a full assortment of chandeliers and brackets in nickel 
and gold, silver, gold, bronze and brass in all styles, ancient and modern, 
and at prices remarkably low. Perfect taste is the distinguishing mark 
of these goods. 

Dropsy and Dropsical Swellings are certainly cured by Dr. Jayne's 

Alterative. It stimulates the absorbents into healthy action, whereby all 
watery or calcareous depositions are gradually but surely carried off. It 
also increases the power of digestion, and imparts renewed vigor to the 
whole system, thus removing all danger of a relapse. Sold by Crane & 
Brigham, San Francisco. 

Ripe scholars are falling off a little. 



"Of all sad 'words of tongue or of pen, 
The saddest are these— it might have been." 
So sings Whit tier, with profound insight and exceedingly imperfect ear 
for rhyme. What would he have said if he had been able to compare the 
weak representations of his own celebrated face, with a genuine photo- 
graph from Bradley & Rulofson ? It would have been a blow to find that 
he might- have had a likeness if he had gone to them. 



The very best nominations for office cannot be expected of men 
or conventions, unless they are kept up to the very best condition of their 
powers by proper nourishment. No man is fully himself when reduced 
by living on poor diet ; though even with poor food, corrected and supple- 
mented by F. & P. J. Cassin's Golden Plantation Whisky, men do won- 
ders. There is more judgment in a bottle of it than in fourteen conven- 
tions, stimulated in any other way. 

Geologists can tell the age of the stone which David threw at the 
giant. 

The extension of the telegraph report of passengers overland to 
Omaha has been a great boon to those in this city expecting friends. Peo- 
ple are now enabled to order their supplies of Napa Soda in time to greet 
the thirsty travelers before they enter the alkali plains ; and much suf- 
fering is obviated. 

Tapestry Brussels, $1 per yard and upwards ; fine new patterns. Call 
and see them. Window shades, 75 cents and upwards. Window lace, 12£ 
cents and upwards. Cornices,, wall paper, etc. Oilcloths, 50 cents per 
yard and upwards. Hartshorn & McPhun, 112 Fourth st., near Mission. 

A man picked up an extraordinary communication the other day. It 
ran thus: " Dear Charley:— The Nevada Building Association is under 
your management. How much for a chance ?" Mr. Peters wishes it to 
be understood that his address is at "Virginia City, Nevada. 

STOCK BROKERS. 



Geo. C. Hickox. 



GEORGE C. HICKOX & CO., 



E. C. McFarlanb. 



Commission Stork Brokers (San Francisco Stock Fx- 
/ change, No. 230 Montgomery street, San Francisco. May 4. 



J. A. RUDKIN, 



Member S. F. Stock aud Exchange Board, 423 California 
street. STOCKS Bought and Sold on Commission. Liberal Advances 
made n Active Accounts. Oct. 26. 

JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION. 

[ESTABLISHED 1820.] 
ri^he attention of Sportsmen is invited to the following- 

I Ammunition, of the best quality, now in general use throughout England, 
India and the Colonies : Joyce's Treble Waterproof and F 3 Quality Percussion 
Caps ; Chemically-prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wadding ; Joyce's Gas-Tight Car- 
tridges, for Pin-fire and Central-fire Breech-loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, for killing 
game at long distances, and every description of Sporting Ammunition. Sold by 
all gun-makers and dealers in gunpowder. 

FREDERICK JOYCE & CO., Patentees and Manufacturers, 

Sept. 28. 67 Upper Thames street, London. 



STOCK COMBINATIONS. 



June 21.] 



How to Operate Successfully on 
TEN DOLLARS. 

MARTIN TAYLOR & CO., 

429 California Street. 



CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH, 

Stationers. Lithographers and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

Our facilities for making Blank Books of special sizes and 
rulings, Cheek Books, Balance Sheets, Certificates of Stock, Insurance Policies, 
etc., are unexcelled. We are always ready to submit to our customers low estimates 
for Fine Printing or Engraving. 
Nov. 16. 327, 329, 331 SANSOME STREET. 

THE BERKELEY GYMNASIUM. 

A Preparatory School to the University. 

The only fnlly «irtf«ni/«l Preparatory School <►.; the Coast. 
The instructors in the Gymnasium consist of refined and educated gentlemen, 
who are permanently connected with the institution. Boardingestablishmcnt strictly 
first-class. Location healthful and accessible. The third school year will commence 
on the 14th of Julv. Examination of candidates lor admission, llth and 12th. For 
catalogues, address JOHN F. BURR1S, 

July 5. Berkeley, California. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTHACT OF MEAT. 
Inestaud Cheapest Meat-flavoring Stock for Soups. Made 

Dishes and Sauces. March 2. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MFAT 

[sa success and boon for which Nations should feel grate- 
ful. See " Medical Press," " Lancet," " British Medical Journal," etc 



F 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT- 

Caution— Genuine only with fac-slmlle of Baron Llebig's 
Signature, in blue ink, across Label. "Consumption in England increased ten- 
old in ten years." March 2. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT CF MEAT. 

To be hail of all Store-keepers, Grocers and Chemists. Sole 
Agents for the United States (wholesale oulv), C. David & Co., 43, Mark Lane, 
London. England. March 2. 



u 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK AND 



July 12, 1879. 



CRADLE, ALTAR, AND TOMB. 

CRADLE. 

Brownstonb— In this city, July 4th, to the wife of Isaac Erownstone, a daughter., 
Camfield— In this city, July Oth, to the wife of H. Camfield, a daughter. 
Conkunq— In this city, July 6th, to the wife of G. \y. Conkling, Jr., a son. 
Lake- In Santa Barbara, June 29th, to the wife of W. N. Lake, a daughter. 
Levi— In Santa Barbara, June 30th, to the wife of J. Levi, a son. 
Ledgett— In this city, July 9th, to the wife of K. D. Ledgett, a daughter. 
Meyers— In this city, July 7th, to the wife of J. Meyers, a son. 
Piixman— In San Jose, July 2d, to the wife of Wm. L. Pillman, a daughter. 
PdiSHON— In Monterey, June 26th, to the wife of John Peshon, a daughter. 
Puckhaber— In this city, July 7th, to the wife of L. Puckhaber, a daughter. 
Raffour— In Santa Barbara, June 30th, to the wife of L. Raffour, a son. 
Reeves— Near Gitroy, June 27th, to the wife of Oscar Reeves, a son. 
Robbins— In this city, July 6th, to the wife of Captain M. Robbing, a son. 

ALTAR. 

Bates-Kavanaqh— In this city, July 2d, Eugene J. Bates to Anna E. Kavanagh. 
Gawtiiorne-Bruwn— In this city, June 25th, J. F. Gawthorne to Maggie J. Brown. 
Huster-Kahn— In this city, July 3d, P. S. Hunter to Tillie Kahn. 
Hendrie-Carnes— In this city, July 3d, Edwin B Hendrie to Marion Carnes. 
Lean- Johnson— In Red Bluff, July 3d, Wm. P. Lean to Etta Johnson. 
Levy- Wolf— In this city, July 6th, Morris Levy to Saline Wolf. 
Mokley-Webb— In Sacramento, July 3d, ,lohn Mokley to Frances V. Webb. 
Mavfibld-Jktbr— in Lodi, July 3d, James H. Mayfisld to Carrie Jeter. 
May-Sproules— In this city, July 6th, W. May to Miss M. E. Sproules. 
McCreecuy-Harvey — In this city, July 7th, George W. MeCreechy to E. F. Harvey. 
Rankin-Brown— In this city, July 8th, James B. Rankin to Sarah E. Brown. 
Rsichen berg-Kline -In this city, July 6th, B. V. Reichenberg to Fannie Kline. 
Wue8T-Bray— In Winnemucca, July 4th, Peter Wuest to Elizabeth Bray. 

TOMB. 

Boyle —In this city, July 6th, Mrs. Ellen Boyle, aged 58 years and 2 months. 

Carrie— Drowned, in Cloverdale, July 5th, Edwin P. Carrie, aged 20 years. 

Gerdks— In this city, July 8th, Wilhelmina M. Ferdes, aged 28 years. 

Hubbard In this city, July 7th, Frank K. Hubbard, aged 26 years and 5 months. 

Hi'NT— In this city, July 8th, Mrs. Fannie A. Hunt. 

Hanrahan— In this city, July 8th, Edward F Hanrahan, aged 4months. 

Kennedy— In this city, July 7th, Dennis Kennedy, aged 5L years. 

Keylaher -In this city, July 6th, Elizabeth Keylaher, aged 25 years. 

Murray -In this city, July 9th, Mary Anne Murray, aa:ed 32 years. 

Potter— In this city, July 6th, Frank T. Potter, aged 54 years. 

Rick— In San Mateo, July 8th, B. McDermott, aged 50 years. 

Tietjen— In this city, July 7th, Heinrich C. Tietjen, aged 2 years and 8 months. 

THE CUMBERLAND MINE. 

First Report of the Newly-Elected Superintendent, Robert Col- 
lins, of the Cumberland Gold Mine, of Arizona. 

To the President, George M. Oiprico, Esq., and the Directors of the Cumberland 
Mining Companij, 417 fJa/ifornia street, San Francisco— Gentlemen : In this, my 
first report. I have great pleasure in confirming Mr. Wm. Craib's report of December 
1st, 1378, and agree with him in his clo-ing remarks of the vast wealth and import- 
ance of the Cumberland Mine. I am of the opiui-ta that this mine, or ledge, will in- 
crease in size as it goes down to from 50 to CO feet wide My reasons for so thinking 
are that on the south there is a granite wall which forms the foot-wall, and on which 
the ledge rests, while on the north, and U0 feet from this wall, is another cropping 
boldly up. Outside these walls the country is stony and rough, but between them it 
is as smooth as a garden, walk, with hundreds of small quartz veins running through 
it. These veins gradually widen as they go down. Where all these veins come into 
the ledge, they will fill up the whole space between the walls spoken of, making the 
ledge 50 or 60 feet across. 

The Cumberland Mine is a gold-bearing quartz lode from 8 to 10 feet wide, dipping 
to the north and running nearly east and west, with well-defined walls. Free gold 
can be seen in nearly every piece of ore exposed. There has been considerable work 
done upon the mine ; three shafts have been sunk, a good road built up the side of 
the hill, two stone buildings erected, aud also a small corral. The ground has been 
prospected along the vein, and everything is ready to commence operations on a 
more extended scale. The Cumberland ledge can be traced for over one mile, show- 
ing the well-denned character of the lode. 

There are three large veins, or spurs, coming into the Cumberland from the north, 
converging toward each other. The combined width of these veins and the ledge is 
twenty-five feet of solid ore. These veins are rich i:i gold. All the ground from the 
cap. or outcrop of the ledge, down the hill-side to the wash, or creek,is rich in free 
gold, and tons of splendid float can be gathered from the surface— all good specimens. 
The surrounding country is rich in gold and silver ledges, some of them wonderfully 
rich. The Leviathan and Vulture are immense lodes that have been proven to be of 
imense value of free gold. 

Location.— Cumberland Mine is situated on the south side of the Date Creek 
Range, about one and a half miles from Martinez Creek— seven miles from Date 
Creek— and from eighteen to twenty miles from Wickenburg, the nearest post-town 
and telegraph station. The wagon-road to Prescott passes within one aud a half 
miles of the mine. The stage passes every day by another road, and meets the rail- 
road cars at Maricopa Wells. 

Wood and Water.— Water to run any size mill can be got in the Martinez Creek, 
or in Date Creek. Thousands of cords of wood can be seen from the mine, covering 
the level country to the south and west. Labor is plentiful and cheap, and provisions 
at Maricopa Wells very reasonable. 

Recapitulation.— The Cumberland Mine is a most splendid property— a large body 
of ore, very rich ;. plenty of water at hand; wood within one-half a mile; good roads; 
easy communication with any part of the world; labor cheap and plenty, and with a 
record of from §130 to 82G0 per ton. All that I have seen on and around the mine 
impresses me with the belief that this is the most valuable property in the Territory. 
In concluding this short report, I wish to impress upon the minds of the Directors 
and shareholders the value of the Cumberland Mine. It is no wild-cat, but a mine 
that must come before the public either now or at some future day. It is only a 
matter of time, for I am convinced that the Cumberland Mine will be worked suc- 
cessfully for generations to come. The Directors cannot think too highly of the 
Cumberland Mine, for it will be worked when they and their childrens" children have 
passed away. I have inspected the mine and the country around it, and am convinced 
that the Directors have no idea of the immense value of the property they possess. 
The mine is so well situated that it can be worked with very little outlay. The ore 
can be shot from the shafts to the feeding floor, if required. A mill can be erected 
100 yards or less from the ledge, in the gulch below, where water can be had by sink- 
ing 35 feet. The mines worked in this Territory have proven that the richest ore 
is discovered at the greatest depth yet obtained. I shall forward, in a few days, 
some ore from the Cumberland Mine to be tested, that you may have some idea of 
what hundreds of thousands of tons, now in the mine, must be worth. 

Respectfully yours, Robert Collins, 

Superintendent Cumberland Mine. 

Cumberland Mine, Yavapai county, Arizona, July 2d, 1879. 



-The market for grain sacks continues to be demoralized, under 
the influence of heavy stocks and liberal offerings at public sale. Pacific 
Jute bags, 22x36, can be bought at Sgc. cash ; Calcutta, ditto, 8_c. 

Bergstrom Church Organs, at Smith's, 200 Post street. 



HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS 
For the "Week Ending July 11th, 1879. 

Compilebd by Geoiuie C. Hicrox & Co., 230 Mostqombry Street. 



Name of Mine. Sat, 



Argenta 

Andes 

Alpha 

*Alta 

Alpa 

Bullion 

♦Belcher 

Best & Belcher., 

Benton 

Bodie 

Cons Imperial . . 
•Crown Point... 

Chollar 

California 

Con. Virginia... 
Caledonia .• .... 

Confidence 

Eureka Con .... 
Exchequer .... 

Fairfax 

Gould & Curry . 

*Gila 

Grand Prize. .... 
Halt: & Noreros.& 

Julia 

♦JusticeJ 

Jackson 

Kentuck 

♦Leopard .... 
Lady Wash'n . 
Leviathan . . . 

Leeds 

♦Mexican ..., 

Modoc 

Manhattan . . . 
Northern Belle . . 

Ophir 

Overman 

Polosi 

Raymond & Ely 

Savage 

*Sierra Nevada . 

Silver Hill 

Seg Belcher 

•■Solid Silver.... 

Succor 

Silver King-, Ar*a 
Silv King South 

Tip-Top 

♦ Union Con.... 

Utah 

Yellow Jacket.. 



12| 



10 
4i 
6 
5 



HI 



121 



12* 



253 



in; 


18* 


V4 


B« 


H2 




1* 


1* 


M 


5* 


H 


n 





4* 


a 


5 



124 



16} 



Thursd'y. Friday. 
a.m: p.h. 



1-2} 



11} 



in 



10} 



12} 



15} 



3} 
131 
38 
4} 
_*1 

ll 
2 



Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus * 

J. K. PRIOR, 

1123 Market Street and 21 Turk Street- 
rilhe Oldest Established Steam Gas Fitting antl Plumbing 

JL Establishment on the Pacific Coast, where a complete assortment of new pat- 
terns of Gas Fixtures and Plumbing Material are offered at greatly reduced rates. 
Messages sent by American District Telegraph Company free. All jobbing promptly 
attended to. _ Established lB 5ii. July 12. 

LAVER & CURLETT, 

Architects, 

Furnish Plans, Specifications aud Superintendence for the 
Construction or Renovation of Dwelling Houses, and every description of 
Building. Office : 19 S. F. Stock Exchange Building, Pine street, San Francisco. 
[Take the Elevator.] June 15. 

RE-OPENED, 

Perrier's Gymnasium. 

Tbe Athletic Curriculum, No. 333 Sutter street, the best 
appointed Gymnasium on the Pacific Coast, has re-opened under the manage- 
ment of PROF. ALFRED PERRIER, the Celebrated Gymnast and Instructor. 
[April 5.] 

CLAUDE CITTI, 

Engraver on Wood, 

605 Montgomery Street, between Clay and Merchant. S. F. 
fMarch 1. ] 



FOR SALE, 



In a thriving- city, situated In one of the Southern counties, 
a valuable first-class SALOON BUSINESS, with lease, fixtures and furniture. 
For fu ll particulars apply, by letter, "A. B.," News Letter Office Dec. 14. 

"BRITISH BEN EVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL. 

Attendance, dally, from 10 a.m. to- 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to' furnish all information 
relating- to the Society. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 
Oct. 23. 730 Montgomery street. 

QUICKSILVER. 

or sale— In lots to suit, by Thomas Bell A Co., No. 305 

Sansome street, over Bank of California. ■ Nov. 16. 



F 



ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

. 310 Sansome street, San Francisco, Wholesale Dealer 

in Furs. Sept*. 21. 



N f 



REMOVAL. 

The Office of the Selby Smelting- and I<ead Company has 
been removed to No. 416 MONTGOMERY STREET. June 28. 



s 



J. C. MERRILL & CO., 

hipplug and Commission merchants, Agents for the Sand- 
wich Islands Packet Lines, 204 California street, S. F. April 13. 



July 12, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



ART 



JOTTINGS. 

"Lincoln at Gettysburg" is tin- title of a very large painting just 

ijlBesd »n exhibition .it the moms of lbs Art Association on Pins street. 
t btrjr A. II. Btoknsll, a German artist, now resident in Boston, Mass. 
The work (judging from lbs four down jvigea explanatory obtained from 
the door-keeper) DM been naintetl with a view to selling the engraving, 
an outline etching of which hand's near by, tastefully framed and uphol- 
stered. The visitor to see this Immense |iaiuting (it is well nigh a hun- 
dred *|iiarc feet in size) is informed at the outset that the engraving is 
published in connection with the exhibition, and a little further on we 
are told that on a mild midsummer day the artist bad availed himself of 
the opportunity presented bv the occasion to group around the grand 
central figure of Abraham Lincoln some of the most prominent of the 
statesmen and soldiers of the war period. This is all the artist has had 
to do with it, and he has succeeded in placing twenty-one figures on can- 
vas iu the exact position, with just the expressions we might look for if 
they were posed oefore the photographer's camera. Well does the writer 
remember the first time he ever saw the immortal Lincoln ! It was at 
Springfield, III., when Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglass spoke from the 
same rostrum; and in a journey immediately thereafter, over one of the cor- 
duroy roads of Michigan, with the latter, the great power of Lincoln over 
an audience was the subject of many a conversation, and no one who ever 
heard him deliver an address could believe that the pose and expression 
Artist Bicknell has given him was ever present, except very early in the 
morning when no one was around. And does any one believe that, in the 
presence of a multitude of people, Charles Sumner would have been seen 
squinting at Gen. Butler, or vice versa. Mr. Bicknell is, perhaps, a good 
portrait painter, and in this picture we doubtless find twenty-one good 
likenesses ; but there is not an element of strength in the work to entitle 
it for a moment to any consideration whatever as a historical picture. 
The civil war, although its incidents were replete with motiffs for the 
painter's brush, has generally failed to give inspiration for any great pic- 
ture, and this late comer is no exception. Perhaps it is well that it is so, 
for paintings live for generations, and if they are of such a character as 
to indicate a political meeting of a quiet character, so much the better, 
for those who come after will attach less odium to us for engaging in that 
fratricidal strife. 

Another new picture on view this week is a large marine, by De Haas, 
"Wrecked on aLeeShore." Itisat Messrs. Morris & Kennedy's. Although 
not as large as some examples heretofore exhibited by thisnoted artist, it is 
nevertheless one of the best. The action of the water is superb, and the 
perfect harmony of the lowering sky gives the picture a weird look just 
in keeping with such a scene. In the same gallery are to be found sev- 
eral accessions, notably a portrait by Freeman, an artist who came to this 
city four years ago and went to the country, where he has remained ever 
Bince. Mr. Freeman is a painter of the "old school," believes more in 
finish than effect, although the latter is not wanting, especially in ladies' 
and children's portraits. A pleasing example of the latter is in the win- 
dow over the way at Snow & Co.'s. A't this gallery the sale of works by 
the late James Hamilton is meeting with marked success, nearly one-third 
of the entire number being reported sold during the first three days. But 
for the prevailing dullness the entire number would have been " called for" 
on the first day of the exhibition. 

Ta vernier and Rix havegone to the Russian River country on a sketch- 
ing tour, and Thomas Hill (to every one's surprise) is again visiting 
Yosemite Valley, although it must be said that heretofore Mr. Hill has 
depended more upon photographs than original sketches for his Yosemite 
pictures. Let us hope that, after a six month's respite from the labors of 
the studio, he has again put on the armor and gone forth to interpret 
nature on canvas with some of the strength he possessed before neglecting 
his chosen and well-suited profession — art. 

Hahn, too, another painter, whose works a few years ago were the ad- 
miration of everyone, is with us again after a three years' trip to the East 
of Europe. Doubtless his sketch book is replete with subjects, the execu- 
tion of which will give evidence of the improvement travel affords the 
true artist. 

And then we have Deakin back, too. We shall soon see what im- 
provement he has made while intermingling with the notable painters of 
England and the Continent. He has two works in the Salon at Paris 
this year. 

The News Letter's picture, "At the Play," is completed, and will ap- 
pear with the next number. The London journals, the World and Vanity 
Fair, have published similar plates, but not on the scale of this one. 
Their efforts partake more of the character of caricatures than would be 
agreeable in this country. The likenesses are more typical than realistic, 
but their publication has proved a great success to the journals issuing 
them, a single edition of sixty thousand copies of the World containing 
the picture having been exhausted in twenty-four hours. 

The outlook for art at the Mechanics' Fair this season is not encouraging. 
On the whole our artists have not been over-induatrious the past year, and 
bo far, they do not seem to have made any preparation at all for this 
exhibition. Liberal premiums, however, may have a beneficial effect in 
bringing out the usual number of canvasses. 

HOUSES GOING UP? 

The last number of the Quarterly Architectural Review, published by 
Wolfe & Burn ham, contains the following list of projected buildings in 
this City the names of the owners and cost of construction ; J. G. Brack - 
ett, residence, Pacific street, between Octavia and Laguna, $6,000 ; G. G. 
Burnett, residence, California street, between Octavia and Laguna, 
86,000 ; J. G. Ayres, residence, Sutter street, between Jones and Leaven- 
worth, $6,000 ; Home for the Scandinavian Ladies' Relief Society, Fran- 
cisco street, between Powell and Stockton, S6.000 ; Mrs. Blumenberg, 
brick building, Pine street, near Kearny, $8,000; R. James, residence, 
k Howard street, between Fifth and Sixth, $6,000 ; Thomas J. Bergin, 
residence, Jackson street, between Octavia and Laguna, S40.000 ; H. 
Hedge, residence, corner of Scott and Tyler streets, $25,000; Win. Woods, 
residence, Washington street, near Gough, $12,000 ; L. Roffetto, three- 
story building, Broadway, between Dupont and Stockton streets, $13,000 ; 
M. Martell, four-story building, corner of Commercial and Kearny streets, 
$15,000 ; M. Seymour, livery stable, Bush street, near Kearny, $18,000. 

An elegant assortment of Gold Watches and Chains at Randolph & 
Co.'s, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 

Smith's Music Store, 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



H. T. HELMBOLD'S 

COMPOUND 

FLUID EXTRACT OF BUCHU. 

PHARMACEUTICAL. 

A SPE0IFI0 REMEDY FOE ALL DISEASES OF THE 
BLADDER AND KIDNEYS. 



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Nervons Debility, Idver Complaint. 

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Paralysis, General 111 Health* 
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Catarrh, Nervous Complaints, 

Female Complaints, Etc., 
Headache, Pain in the Shoulders, Cough, Dizziness, Sour Stomach, Eruptions, Bad 
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a thousand other painful symptoms, are the offsprings of Dyspepsia. 



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the blood of all impurities, and imparting new life and vigor to the whole system. 

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PRICE, $1 PER BOTTLE, 

Or Six Bottles for 85. 



Delivered to any address free from observation. 

" Patients" may consult bj letter, receiving the same attention as by palling. 

Competent Physicians attend to correspondents. All letters should be addressed to 

H. T. HELMBOLD. 

Druggist and Chemist, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



CAUTIOX! 
See that the Private Proprietary Stamp is on Each Bottle. 



SOLD EVEEY WHERE. 



(June is.] 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 12, ?879. 



A TERRIBLE FOE. 

On Monday last a man who had attempted the life of the Czar of 
Russia perished on the scaffold. He died, we are told, with firmness ; he 
refused all rights of religion. Life for him seemed to have no special 
charms ; death had certainly no terrors. The deed for which he suffered 
the last terrible penalty of the law was attempted in open day, at an hour 
and a spot which insured the capture of its perpetrator. Time and place 
were obviously selected without any reference whatever to the safety of 
the murderer, but only with a view to making the blow as certain as hu- 
man calculation could make it. He met the doom he courted with the 
heroism of a martyr, with the indifference of a fatalist. The apostle 
of Nihilism, like the pioneers of Christianity, count their lives as 
nought; and though they murder and _ overthrow where the apostles 
of the Saviour built up, their success is greatly due to this absence 
of all care for life. The motive is different, the sentiment is differ- 
ent, but the same end is attained. The early Christian positively rejoiced 
when he was " counted worthy to suffer for religion's sake ; he died tri- 
umphing in the arena, 

"Butchered to make a Roman holiday;" 
he sang hymns of praise amid the Barnes ; he beheld, as he lay stretched 
on the rack, visions of a glorious future. The Nihilist has no hope ; his 
theory of life is pessimist, his view of the eternal world is summed up in 
-the terrible words of Couthon : "Apres la mort—U neant" He counts 
himself simply a joint in a vast machinery, which is to bring about cer- 
tain results ; and he does his work without hope of reward, without fear 
of penalty. 

Appalling to the moralist, appalling to the politician, is this contempt 
of life; for, whether a man meet death as a saint or a stoic, a cause must 
have a mighty power over men's minds when it can destroy in them the 
first instinct of humanity, the love of life. Its influence over other 
minds is overwhelming. The vulgar fail to see the broad distinction 
which lies between the cheerful, even joyous sacrifice of life to a holy 
cause, and the brute-like indifference of a man who has neither hope of 
heaven nor fear of hell. He who carries his life in his hand is a martyr, 
be the cause for which he suffers what it may. _ 

But, besides this, the safeguards which ordinarily protect society are 
broken down. As a rule, no man not a madman would think of coinmit- 
ing a murder in open day, and thousands of would-be criminals, even in 
barbarous States, are restrained from secret deeds of violence by the fear 
of possible discovery. The Nihilist is restrained by nothing. If you are 
a marked man, seek not safety in the open street, the crowded ball room, 
the thronged church or theater. In any of these places you may be struck 
down. A man in an opposite box may shoot you; a man who kneels be- 
side you at Mass may stab you; you would not be safe at the very altar, 
with the priests around you. The Nihilist has no belief in God; the 
very sanctuary of the church is no more to him than the paving-stone of 
the square, or the mud of the alley; he does not care that, as yon fall, a 
hundred hands will be stretched forth to grasp him. You are to die- 
therein lies all with which he is concerned. His own fate is absolutely 
ignored by himself and his comrades. It may be Ivan to-day, it may be 
Michael to-morrow, whose duty it becomes to murder some high func- 
tionary, or fire some town. Ivan dies, and Michael looks on in grim in- 
difference, and steps forth next day to fling his own life into the gulf, with 
the same stony calm. 

How is Russb. meeting this intangible, this unconquerable foe? Like 
herself. Tyranny gave birth to the monster Nihilism, and tries to slay 
her own ill-formed child by trampling on it. But it cannot be trampled 
out. The very ferocity of the retaliation shows fear ; fear ever makes us 
angry. Sending 10,000 people to the minss of Siberia will not crush 
Nihilism ; nor will placing cities under interdicts, and arresting^ innocent 
persons on the flimsiest charges. There can be no peace for Russia, no 
escape from the serpent that has coiled around her, until reform is insti- 
tuted in every department of the State and jurisprudence. The Russian 
rule is a gigantic and irresponsible tyranny, as barbarous as the rule of 
Cetewayo, only restrained by a superficial civilization from being as blood- 
thirsty. But it is the worst government in Europe, and unless the rulers 
can be brought to see the imperative need of reform in time, a fearful 
revolution — a complete revulsion — must ere long shake the nation to its 
very base. Who can say that the day, and even the hour, is not already 
discussed —if not fixed — in the secret councils of the Nihilist? — London 
Express. 

HE NEVER TOLD A LIE. 

_ The passenger, a Scotch gentleman, who was going down the Missis- 
sippi for the first time in his life, secured permission to climb up beside 
the pilot, a grim old grayback, who boasted that he never told a lie in his 
life. " Many alligators in the river ?" inquired the stranger, after a look 
around. "Not so many now, since they got to shootin' 'em for their 
hides and talley," was the reply. " Used to be lots, eh ?" " I don't 
want to tell you about 'em, stranger," replied the pilot, sighing heavily. 
" Why?" ",'Caiise you'd think I was a-lyin' to you, and that's sumthin' 
I never do. I kin cheat at cards, drink whisky, or chaw poor terbaccer, 
but I can't lie." "Then there used to be lots of 'em?" inquired the pas- 
senger. " I'm almost afraid to tell ye, mister, but I've counted leven 
hundred allygaters to the mile from Vicksburg cl'ar down to Orleans. 
That was years ago, afore a shot was fired at 'em." " Well, I don't doubt 
it," replied the stranger. "And I've counted 3,450 of 'em on one sand- 
bar," continued the pilot ; " it looks big to tell, but a G-overnment sur- 
veyor was aboard, and he checked 'em off as I called out. Once when we 
grounded on a bar, with an opposition boat right behind, the allygaters 
gathered round, got under her stern, and bumped her clean over the bar 
by a grand push! It looks like a big story, but I never told a lie yet, and 
I never shall. I wouldn't lie for all the money you could put aboard this 
boat." There was a painful pause. " Well," said the stranger, "you 
are a dark man." " I am dark in complexion, but what of that ?" "Why, 
you remind me of my native heather," said the Scotchman, " that's all." 
' Hows that, mate?" "Why," said the Scotchman, "we call them 
low-lying moors. 

™ A ™ th ? rec . ent Army of the Potomac meeting, in Albany-, Francis 
M. Finch read a " Sheridan's Ride " poem, in which he says: " Ride ride 
with your helmless hair!" "Ride, ride with your streaming hair'" 
" Charge, charge, 'tis a banner, your hair! " " Ride, ride, we laurel your 
hair! This may do for poetry; but little Phil always wore a remarka- 
bly close cropped head, and was not afraid. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco, California, for 
the Week ending: July 9th. 

Compiled from the Records of the Commercial Agency, 401 California St. , IS. F. 
Thursday and Saturday, July 3d and 5th- 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



A McCnmifky to Jos Sladky 

J MelchertoGT Grimes 

Geo Taaffe to Ann Taaffe 

E P Baillie to Odd Fellows Snv Bk 
HFW Hoffman et al to. Same .... 

Jacob H Sharp to C Laiidis 

Morris Sharp to Same 

Danl Jones to Isadore Merle 

J O'Neill to Wra Shields 

Terence Bayle to P A Eakins 

Edwin Whitcomb toC Harriman.. 
G W Alexander to Ellzth Stan wood 

E A Lawrence to F Reis 

City and Co S F to Mary T McKee 
Thos Alnlloy to City and Co of S F 

Mary T McKee to Same 

Henry|Winkle Jr to Adam Winkle 
Adam Winkle to Henry Winkle Jr 
Geo T Hawlcy to Jas E Gordon 
Alex Lamar to Jos S Alemany .. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Nw 24th and Guerrero, w 100x50 

Sw 14th av, 262:6 ee L, se 37:6x100 

Sw Jones and Chestnut, w 137:6x137:6 
S Bush, 206:3 w Dupont, w 22:11x63. . , 

Sw7th,150se Bryant, Be 25x80 

E Leavenw'th, 77:0 s Sutter, s 25x112:6 

Same 

Nw Natoma and 11th, sw 90x55 

N Bush, 137.6 w Montjiy, w 68:9x137:6. 

E Dolores, 200 s 24th, s 30x125 

W Olive av, 73 s Union, b 27x25 

W Scott, 27:8# s Clay, s 25x81:3 

Sundry lot? in different parts of the city 

N 24th, 94:6 e Bartlett, e 23x65 

Streets and highways 

Same 

Se Vallejo and Battery, e 97:6x45:10.... 

Und J$ same 

W Fillmore, 72 n Kale, n 48x81:3 

N Hayes, 60 w Polk, w 50x137:0 



$3,500 

100 

5 

9,772 

3,095 

5 

6,500 

8,000 

1 

100 

750 

Gift 

1 

"*i 

1 

5 
5 

5,000 
9,500 



Monday, July 7th, 



Moses Selig to Jas N Block 

Richd Elford to Henrietta Elford c 
Cath O'Neill to Martha ERoss... 
Eliza Harrington to A Comte Jr . . 
Odd Fel Sv Bk to City and Co S F 

J B Harris to Clarisea S Bishop . . 



E B Bishop to Mary E Harris 

W FNelson to Wm O'Brien 

Geo Ldwards lo Marie Schoesow.. 

Same to Leon Carnin 

Leo Ash to Moses Bettman 

German Gen B S to G McWilliams 
Odd Fell Cera to JGFarnham... 
Cath Foley to Barbara Uszynski . 

Jns McKinley to Wm Boyd 

D Rogers to DoloreB A de Lavea^a 
Wm B Allen to Wm M Hinton .. 

WHollistoCE Broad 

Chas E Broad to J S Clnff et al.. 
Aaron Cook to Addie E Vines... 

H Sanders to Anna E Haight 

Willows Ld Asn to Sarah Douglass 



Sw 1st av, 214:7 ee P st, se 35:5x200. 

Suudrv lots in R R Avenue Hd 

Lots 37, 38, blk 51, Citv Land Asen 
E Steiner, 102:6 n Bush, n 25x81:3.. . 
N Army st extension at inter of w line 

of Odd Fell's Sv Bk land, s 64 xne 55 
NeHyde and McAllister, e 35:6x87: 

n McAllister, 165 e Hyde, e 27:6x137:6 

Same 

W Fillmore. 125:6 s B'dway, s 12x137:6 

NC'ipper, 101:10 e Noe, e 25x114 

N Clipper, 126:10 e Noe, e 25:11x114.... 

S Post, 137:6 e Goiurh, e 37:6x120 

HA 124, 125 

Lot 16, California Sec Plat No 1 

Nw Cleveland and Sherman, nw 25, etc. 
S Pine, 206:3 w Webster, w 25x127:6. . . . 
N Waller, 156:3 w Fillmore, 256:3x120 .. 

E Florida, 100 n Solano, n 100x100 

N O'Farroll; 198 w Steiuer, w 22x82:0 . . 

Same.... 

N Sutter, 27:6 e Lagnna, e 27:6x112:6 ... 
S Mission, 137:6 sw Beale, se 137:6, etc. 
W Mission, 160 n 19th, n 25x80 



I 5 

40 

450 

6,000 

1 

32,075 

Gift 

100 

1,150 

1,400 

11,000 

17,250 

275 

1,350 

1,500 

13,500 

2,000 

5 

4,500 

8,000 

1 

2,400 



Tuesday, July 8th. 



Rosaria Lavilla to F Bruckner. . . . | 

Danl Rogers to Mary Whallen 

Wm Alvord to Lewis L Bradbury. 

Tobias Stanly to Cornelia A Stanly 

O Buicelli to G Giuocchio 

Myry Dreibellis to J Schweitzer . . 
Laurel Hill Cem Asp n to A E DaviB 
D Dodge to Helen M Dodge. ... 
Saml P Cole to Antonio Raffo 
Marg Quinn to Ellen Kelley.., 



SwNoeandlOtli, w 50x86 

S Haiirht, 56:3 w Fillmore, w 25x72.... 
S California, 137:6 w Scoit, 100x137:6 ; 

and lots in Hunter Tract 

Se3d and Brannan, s 137:6x137:6 

Sundry lots in Bay City Homestead 

Lots 1339 to 1348, Gift Map 2 

Lot 2330, Laurel Hill Cemetery 

W Stewart, 91:8 s Howard, 22:1 1x45:10. 
W Sonoma pi. 77'6s Union, s 20x37 ... 
E Mission, 212:0 % s 26th, sw 23, etc . . . 



S 5 

900 

5 

18,000 

650 

1,100 

270 

1 

700 



Wednesday, July 9th. 



M Weil to Amelia Haussmann 

PSchriebcr to J N Williams 

Wm R Elford to Ann Holmes 

N M Gordon to Eliza E Gordon. . . 
V A Torras to Mas Sav and Ln Bk 

S Haskell to Same 

Wm Hollis to Emil Krcnz 

Same to Carl E Schoeppe 

Mary Corcoran to Daniel Jones. . . 
J W Morshead to Meyer Gradwohl 
Emil Eugelberg to Wm Helleng... 
Danl E Martin to Hulda Sanders.. 
Hib Sv and Ln Soc to S G Murphy 
Henry Winkle to Edw Katschoke. 
De W L McDonald to S G Murphy 

Philip McGovern to Marg Aal 

Henry Hinkcl to August Wolters . 

Jno Satterlee to Lucy H Mb 

Same to Same '. 



Lot 68, West End Homestead 

Lots 427, 428, Silver Terrace H'd 

Lots 29, 30, R B Av Homestead 

S Fulton, 137:6 w Buchanan, 137:6x137:6 
W Pennsylvania av, 125 n Butte, 50x100 

S 17th, 221:6 w Valencia, w 61x100 

E York, 118 n 25th, n 23x100 

E York, 141 n25th, n 23xlQ'J 

W cor 11th and Natoma, nw 55x90 

LotB727 to 734, Gift Map 2 

Lots lands, blk 21, Excelsior H'd .... 

Lot 23, blk 307, Case Tract 

N Sutter, 24:10 e Jones, e 21x65 

Sundry lots in Silver Terrace H'd 

N Sutter, 24:10 e Jones, e 21x65 

Lots 784, 785, Gift Map 2 

W Webster, 101 n Clay, n 23.8Xsl02:6. 
Nw Washn and Franklin, w 187:6x40.. 
W Franklin, 46 n Washn, n 10x137:6 .. 



1 

35 
6 

4,400 

3,704 

550 

550 

1,100 

850 

800 

500 

1 

1,200 

4,000 

50 

5,125 

9,000 

1,850 




T. A. BARRY, Agent for Naglee's Brandy, is at No. 116 
Montgomery Street. 

W.Morris. MORRIS & KENNEDY, J. F. Kennedy. 

Importers and Dealers in Moldings, Frames, Engravings, 
Chromos, Lithographs, Decalcomanie, Wax and ArtistB 1 Materials, 21 Post 
street, nearly oppo.site Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Feb. 4. 



July 12, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVEKTISKK. 



17 




'The World, 
[Br 



the Flesh, and the Devil. 

Truthful Penman.] 



I saw the other day, in a newspaper, a fancy sketch of the early life 
of Christine Nilwon. Here is the reality. On a remote estate in Sweilen 
lived a Baron Leheusen whose wife was very musical. On these Swedish 
estates the peasants were, until within a few years, practically serfs, and 
are called Bnnde and Torpare. The Bunde have about thirty or forty 
acres, and have to perform certain obligations to their landlords, such as 
tilling his ground with their horses or oxen, etc. The Torpare are cot- 
tagers with a small plot of ground, for which they have to pay a certain 
amount of *' dagswerke," or day's work, each week. Their food is ob- 
tained from the vegetables on these plots, and from about two shillings 
per week for the lab"r of their free days. Nilsson's father was a Torpare 
of Baron Leheusen, and the little Christine used to run about barefooted, 
with a short petticoat on full of holes coming down to her knees. Baroness 
Leheusen one day heard her singing one of the old Swedish ditties, which 
have been handed down from generation to generation amongst the Bunde 
and the Torpare. The Baroness was struck with the sweetness of her 
voice, and ordered her to come up to the chateau ; there she gave her 
some elementary lessons in singing, and then sent her to Paris, where she 
was placed under the tuition of a French professor. After several years 
of assiduous study, she made her debut before the Parisians at— if I re- 
member rightly — the Theatre Lyrique. With the first money that she 
earned, she built up the cottage of her old father, the Torpare, and made 
him comfortable, and he is now a well-to-do peasant. — Truth. I con- 
scientiously went to church in May, a recent Sunday, expecting to hear a 
word about hospitals. The young gentleman who delivered an excellent 
sermon — far above the average — said much about the strait path and the 
wrong path, but not one word about what was supposed to be the subject 
of the day. I am inclined to think that if I had given the congregation 
a simple account of a visit I paid lately to the London Hospital at mid- 
night, I could have unfolded a tale of human suffering and anguish that 
might have at least doubled the collection — the sum being a miserable one, 
dukes and duchesses notwithstanding. I need not afflict the gay world 
by dwelling upon the scene I was called there to witness; but if any wish 
to be impressed with feelings of charity and humanity, I recommend them 
to walk through those silent wards, with the solitary light here and there, 
with the night-nurses flitting about, bringing water to the parched tongue 
and stimulants to the dying, and then tell me, or whom they like, if they 
have not seen a sermon such as they can never hear, and never can for- 
get. — Atlas, in the TTor/rf.--«—The end of the Prince of Orange wasworthy 
of a confirmed Parisian, which he was. He had been suffering for about 
two weeks from an inflammation of the chest, which was in a fair way to 
recovery on Saturday, the 7th of June, when he insisted, against the pos- 
itive prohibition of his physician, in repairing incognito to the Grand Op- 
era Festival on behalf of the sufferers at Szegedin. " I would rather be 
in bed for two weeks more than miss such an opportunity,'" he remarked 
to his favorite servant-man, in his snug chambers at Rue Auber 19, as he 
was dressing. Every precaution was observed for preventing him from 
taking cold again as he was going out after the fete, in the small hours of 
the 8th. But the heat was so intense inside the building, and the weather 
bo damp outside, that a sensation of coolness could not be avoided, and a 
complication ensued, which ended fatally. ——■The last of the Paris Exhi- 
bition Lottery. About seven thousand prizes, of the aggregate value of 
470,000 francs, or close on £19,000, remain unclaimed to this day. They 
are about to be sold by auction in the Pavilion de Flore of the Tuileries, 
and the proceeds of the sale are to be deposited at the Caisse des De- 
pots et Consignations, there to await properly qualified claimants.^— 
A social Russian question has been agitating society tor the last week. 
The Russian Ambassador presented a lady to Lady Salisbury at her recep- 
tion. The lady was married, and had come to England accompanied by 
her husband, who is a gentleman well-known and respected in St. Peters- 
burg. But the lady in days gone by had been divorced. The story of the 
divorce grew and grew, until it was asserted that she had at least six hus- 
bands. " What," said Lady Salisbury, "introduce this female Bluebeard 
to me? Monstrous ! I am insulted, my husband is insulted, my country 
is insulted, my Queen is insulted!" And so the lady has left England, 
which is to be regretted, as she is singularly beautiful. — 2Yu(/t.— Lord 
Norreys, in selling Sir Bevys to Rosthchild, reserved half the stakes of the 
Derby, should the horse win the race. Coming home one evening he 
found his little daughter surrounded by lighted tapers. The child, who is 
a Catholic, had lit them as a votive offering that Sir Bevys might win ; 
and so convinced was she of the effect of the illumination, that she re- 
quested her father to stake her savings (£3) on the horse. This he did, 
and the young lady won £99. — Truth.— — Much regret is felt at the death 
of poor old Lionel Rothschild. He had his faults and also his virtues. 
Although a hard man in business, he was exceedingly liberal in his chari- 
ties. It is curious that only a few days before his death the house of 
Rothschild was obliged to announce for the first time that default would 
be made in the interest on a loan negotiated by it. So vast was his per- 
sonality, that the succession duty which his heirs will have to pay will 
materially aid in reducing the deficit to which Sir Stafford Northcote has 
accustomed us.— The latest fashionable pastime is paper sculpture. The 
requisites for indulging in this art are a pair of sharp-pointed scissors and 
pieces of thin Bristol-board. The flowers are cut out singly, and then 
gathered into a bouquet, and, after being mounted on a piece of black 
velvet, they are covered by a concave glass, and we have a thing of beauty 
and a joy forever. Those flowers most desirable for beginners are pink, 
trailing arbutus, roses, fuchsias, daisies and blue-bells. ■■' ■ Coins bearing 
the effigy of M. Cambetta have been struck in Belgium and smuggled 
into France.— —Nearly nine thousand prizes in the Paris Exhibition Lot- 
tery remain unclaimed, and are to be sold by auction. 



BODIE MINING BUREAU, 

Bodie. Mono County. California. 

CHARLES r. KIRCBNER Manntlrr. 

Rciinnic Information furnished in rrfrnrd to nil Mining 
Matter, ntnosand Mining CUton ixamlned, thoroughly reported «\\ and 
mnpled. Batfcsfhatton guaranteed. Terms moderate. All communications strictly 

l adenllal. Refer to: Anglo California]! bunk, Messrs. W. W. Dodge & Co., 

w liciiton ,t Luhrs, II. Barroilhet, the Cutting Packing Company, Kodgers, Meyer & 
Co., Professor Thomas Price , F. HacCrelUab & Co. July 5. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Saving** mul Loan Society. —For the half year 
ending this date, the Liourd of Directors of the German Savings and Loan Bo- 
olety has declared a Dividend on Term Deposits at the rate of seven undone-fifth 
(7 1-5) per cent pur annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of (fl) per cent, per 
annum, free from Fedcnfl Taxes, and payable on and after the 15th dayof July, 1879. 
By order. GEORGE LETTK, Secretary. 

San Francisco, June 30th, 1S70. July 5. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union, 532 California slreet, corner 
Webb. For the half year ending with Juno 30th, 1879, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of seven (7) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and five and 
five-sixths (65 6) per cent, per annnm on Ordinary Deposits, free from Federal Tax, 
payable on and after July 115th, 1879. [July 5] LOVULL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

YangUe Insurance Association. — - A Cash Dividend of 

J. Thirty-three (3:1) per cent, upon the net prenria contributed during the fifteen 
months ending December 31, 1678, has been declared, payable 30th June, 1879. 
July 5. MACONDRAY & CO., Agents. 

D, V, B. Henarie. Edward Martin. 

E. MARTIN & CO., 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in Wines and Liquors. 

Proprietors of Miller's Extra Old Bonrbon. Sole Agents 
for J. H. Cutter's (manufactured by Milton J Hardy & Co.. Louisville, Ky.) 
and J. F. Cutter's 0!d Bourbon and Rye Whiskies, 
April 5. 408 Front Street, San Francieco. 

HIBERNIA BREWERY^ 

Howard Street, Between Eighth and Ninth. 

Dec. 7. J M. NVNAJf, Proprietor. 



Henry B. Williams. 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION 

No. 213 California st„ 



Henry B. Williams. 
& CO., 

MERCHANTS, 

S. F. [July 27. 



COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Reduction in Price: Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price, 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second St. Jan. 12. 

TABER, HARKER & CO., 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE GROCERS, 
109 and 110 California St., S. P. 

I April 19.] 

F. FOLEY & CO., 

Dealers in Hides, Wool, Sheepskius, Tallow and Furs, 
Nos. 219 and 221 Drumm street, San Francisco, California. Highest Market 
Price Paid. Liberal advances on consignments made through us to our friends in 
the East. April 5. 

l. brownTIvi.d., 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 

Office: Corner of First and Alder Streets, Portland, Oregon. 
[November 9.] 

THOMAS BOYSON, M. D., 

(University of Copenhagen, Denmark), 
T>hysiclan and Surgeon. Office and Residence, 112 Kearny 

Office Hours, 11 a.m. to 1 P.M., and 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday, 11 to I only. 



Telephone in the offiee. 



July 13. 



DR. R. BEVERLY COLE 

Has Returned from the Fast and Resumed Practice at his Office, 
NO. SIS SUTTER STREET. Uune 81. 



REMOVAL. 

BAGS, TENTS AND 

NEVILLE 4 CO., 
Bfo.'s 31 and 33 California Street. S. E, 

San Francisco. 



HOSE. 



corner or Davis, 

LSept. 21. 



L.H.Newton. NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., M. Newton, 

Importers and wholesale dealers In Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, 204 and 200 California street, San Francisco, Cal May 25. 

Newton Booth, C. T. Wheeler, Sacramento. | J. T. Glovbr, W. W. Dodgb, 8. F 

W. W. DODGE & CO. 

nolesale Grocers, corner Front and Clay streets, San 



w* 



Francisco. 



April 1. 



CASTLE BROTHERS, 

ESTABLISHED IK THE YEAR 1850. 

[mporters of Teas and East India Goods, Scs.213 and 215 
Front street, Sa n Francisco. J*"- 13 - 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 1STS. 
old by all Stationers. Sole Agent Tor the United States: 

MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, X Y Jan. 6. 



s 



F 



NOTICE. 

or the very best photographs go to Bradley * Bnlofson's, 

in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. °ct. 29 - 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 12, 1879. 



BIZ. 



The talk of the street in commercial circles is of Sugar and its 
sweetness solidified. It is well known to the trade that for a year or two 
past a regular systematic warfare has been carried on between the local 
Sugar refiners and the few jobbers who persistently went to New York 
and other Eastern cities for their supplies of Sugar and Syrup, the re- 
finers in this city claiming their ability to supply the Pacific coast trade 
with all they required, and of as good quality and at as cheap a rate and 
upon as favorable terms as the Sugar and Syrup could be obtained else- 
where ; in fact, aiming at all times to keep prices upon this coast as low 
or as cheap as Eastern supplies could be imported and laid down here. 
Admitting for argument sake this to be true, one or more grocery houses 
persisted in continuing to order Eastern Sugar, claiming that a certain 
class of their customers required and would have the treble Eastern re- 
fined product. The result of this persistency upon the part of the Cali- 
fornia-street jobbing. house was a refusal upon the part of the local refin- 
ers to sell them Sugars or Syrup at their regular schedule prices allowing 
the usual trade discount. This wealthy firm was accordingly ostracised 
by the refiners in this, and in other ways and in a manner altogether for- 
eign to correct mercantile usages. In fact, other wholesale bouses, draw- 
ing their supplies from the refinery, were actually forbidden to buy the 
Eastern Sugar of the party referred to, and were also prohibited from 
selling CaHfornia Sugar to them. Well, this warfare, single-handed, has 
run on for a year or two, with an occasional outbreak, until a few months 
since, when two (2) prominent Front-street jobbing nouses were threat- 
ened by the refinery and warned not to go East for their supplies, even 
claiming that home industries ought to be encouraged and should be 
maintained at all hazards. These Front-street houses, having some little 
independency of character and wealth to back them up, con- 
cluded that, knowing their rights as free American citizens, resolved that 
they would do as they pleased, and buy and order their Sugar and Syrup 
wherever they could buy the cheapest, and for their interest and conveni- 
ence. They, accordingly, some months since, sent orders to the Messrs. 
Thurbers, of New York, to send them supplies of their different grades 
of Sugar by rail. These Sugar supplies have been coming here for'some 
time past and adorning the sidewalks of Clay and Front streets in a man- 
ner that was very disturbing to the local refiners, and until forbearance 
was no longer a virtue. Then it was that a new programme was issued, 
and the wholesale jobbers of the city, accustomed to buy of the local re- 
finers, were notified and forbidden to sell any of their Sugars to the three 
jobbing houses in rebellion, thus endeavoring to stop, by a regular 
freezing-out process, all imports of Eastern Sugar. And to make the rule 
the more effectual, prices to the trade have been reduced §c. $? ft> on all 
grades of White Sugar, the rates fixed being actually below the cost and 
freight of Eastern Sugars laid down here. What will be the final out- 
come of all this unmercantile fight, we know not. Yet it seems passing 
strange that our wealthy jobbing merchants would lend themselves to 
such a course of business, it being entirely out of the line of legitimacy. 
Following is the price list sent to us, and to which reference is made in 
the foregoing remarks: / 

California Sugar Refinery; office, 215 Front street, San Francisco (Cal. ), 
July 8, 1S79. — Cash prices from date. No order taken for less than 40 
barrels, or equivalent in half-barrels or boxes. Syrup, 30 barrels, or 
equivalent in half-barrels or kegs. Remittance must accompany orders 
from country. (A) Pat. Cube Sugar in barrels, 9§c; (A) Crushed Sugar, 
9£c.; Extra Powdered Sugar, in barrels, 10c; Fine Crushed Sugar, 9£c; 
Dry Granulated Sugar, in barrels, 9ic; Extra Granulated Sugar, in bar- 
rels, 9c. ; Golden C Sugar, in barrels, 8Jc. ; C 1) Sugar, in barrels or S. I. 
kegs, — ; D Sugar, in barrels or S. I. kegs, 73c.; Extra C, in barrels, 8ic; 
half-barrels Jc more, boxes ^c more, for all kinds. S {in diamond) — 
Syrup, in barrels, 42|c; ditto, in half -barrels, 45c; ditto, in 5-galL kegs, 
50c; ditto, in tins 1 gallon each, 60c Cash on delivery. Prices may be 
changed at any time. Discount, 2| per cent. Prices guaranteed. 

Imports during the week embrace two cargoes of Hawaiian Sugar — La 
Girondee, with 4,065 pkgs, and the bark H. W. Almy, from same, with 
7,421 pkgs. The bulk of this Island Sugar comes under contract to the 
California Refinery. Our receipts of Hawaiian Sugars for the first six 
months of the current year aggregates 25,089,777 lbs, against 19,876,421 
lbs for the same time in 1878. From Manila the past six months we im- 
ported only 2,848,822 lbs, against 21,419,118 lbs. Here we find a falling 
off the past six mouths of 18,570,296 ft>s. We submit herewith a state- 
ment of the Sugar trade of this city for the six mouths ending June 30, 
1879: 
Stock in warehouses January 1, 1879, lbs 17,707,295 

IMPORTATIONS. ' 

First six months 1878. First six months 1879. 

Pounds. Founds. 

Hawaiian ; 19,876,421 25,089,777 

Manila 21,419,118 2,848.822 

Central America. 2,318,545 1,239,376 

China 1,381,488 310,358 

Batavia 6,460,602 2,619,303 

Eastern 4,309,500 2,007,660 

55,765,674 34,145,296 



Available for consumption 51,852,591 

Stocks in warehouses June 30, 1879 16,837,932 



Consumption first six months of 1879. 35,013.659 

The great bulk of the Sugars imported here the past two years have 
been of refining grades, thus throwing nearly all our receipts of raws 
directly into the hands of local refiners. Imports from China have been 
stopped since the Hawaiian Reciprocity Treaty went into effect, and so 
also of Manila and other countries, sending us heretofore large supplies. 
The Sandwich Islands are having and reaping the full benefit of the 
Treaty. They are expending large sums of money upon their Sugar 
and Rice plantations— resorting to irrigation largely and erecting mills, 
etc., thus greatly increasing the productiveness of the Hawaiian Empire. 
As the bulk of the Island Sugar comes here under contract to the Cali- 
fornia Refinery, but very little of the very desirable grocery grades of 
Sugar are received here, consequently keg Sugar is very scarce, and it is 
at all times in great demand. The best is now 8c 



Rice. — Imports from China the past six months aggregate 22,422,741 
lbs, and from Hawaii 1,712,882 lbs. These heavy imports cause a 
depressed market, China mixed now selling at 4£c, while Hawaiian table 
has unexpectedly fallen to 5£c. This decline is owing to the prospective 
large receipts of new crop from the Islands. 

Teas. — We have now to announce the arrival of the P. M. S. S. Co.'s 
steamer Alaska from China and Japan. She brought but few Teas for 
this city, only 1,144 pkgs, but for Eastern account, to go forward by Cen- 
tral Pacific Railroad, of 5,126 pkgs. At date our stock of Japan papers 
is very light; quotable at 30c for standard and favorite chops. 

For Australasia.— The Pacific Mail Steamship Zealandia sailed hence 
for the Colonies on the 7th inst. carrying her full compliment of passen- 
gers, government mails, etc., and for cargo, Barley, 8,225 ctls.; Oil, 8,368 
gals. Whale ; Quicksilver, 60 flasks ; Salmon, 350 cases ; Hops, 2,800 lbs, 
besides Lumber, Cheese, Corn, Honey, etc. 

For the Isthmus of Panama.— The P. M. Steamship Granada, 
hence, carried en route to New York, Brandy, 3.881 gals. Native ; Case 
Goods, 650 cases ; Salmon and Fruits ; Wool, 205,306 lbs; Wine, 54,523 
gals. Native. To Callao, 100 flasks Quicksilver. To Arica, Peru, 100 
flasks ditto. En route to England, Silver Bullion, S13.750 ; for Ham- 
burg, S52.309 same. To Central America, Tallow, 5,273 lbs ; Wheat, 
4,101 ctls ; also to same the bulk of 1,808 bbls. flour. 

Freights and Charters. — But very little business has been done in ships 
during the week. Large American ships to Havre or Liverpool direct are 
now held at 42s. 6d., British Iron, 45@47s. 6d. Some ships will no doubt pre- 
fer to load Wheat and Flour upon owner's account rather than accept cur- 
ent low rates. At present there are but few charters offering, and rates at 
best are more or less nominal. The fleet of disengaged vessels in port is now 
22—27,260 tons register. On the berth, 16 vessels, 22,641 tons. In sight, 
or en route to reach here within six months, 165,000 tons register against 
225,000 same time last year. It is now doubtful as to any of the Guano 
fleet coming here seeking. 

Wheat and Flour.— The following table shows the receipts at this 
port of Flour and Wheat from the interior of the State, and the exports 
of same, since July 1st, 1878, as compared with same time in the previous 
year: 

Receipts. Flour, Bbls. Wheat, Ctls. 

From July 1st, 1878, to July 1st, 1879 472,155 10,101,075 

From July 1st, 1877, to July 1st, 1878 382,695 4,454,838 

Exports. Flour, Bbls. Wheat, Ctls. 

From July 1st, 1878, to July 1st, 1879 530,549 10,012,220 

From July 1st, 1877, to July 1st, 1878 442,060 3,969,728 

The following shipments of Flour and Wheat were received from 
Oregon: 

Flour, Bbls. Wheat, Ctls. 

From July 1st, 1877, to July 1st, 1878 98,181 481,325 

From July 1st, 1878, to July 1st, 1879 101,763 300,522 

The vessels carrying above were loaded as follows: 

ilTo. Vessels. Wheat, Ctls. Flour, Bbls. 

At San Francisco 140 6,218,284 36,995 

At Oakland Wharf 57 1,509,147 ; 

At Vallejo 62 2,104,678 82,010 

Totals 259 9,832,109 119,005 

NATIONALITIES EMPLOYED. 

Jfo. Vessels. Tonnage. 

British 158 195,981 

American 80 124.596 

French 6 3,878 

German 10 9,788 

Norwegian 3 2,856 

Hawaiian . . . . : 1 859 

Italian , 1 867 

Totals for 1878-9 259 338,825 

Wheat. Per Cental. 

Average Export Price for 1878-9 gl 70 

" for 1877-8 2 25 

" " " 1876-7 176 

" " " 1875-6 2 01 

1874-5 1 58 

" " " 1873-4 2 05 

" 1872-3 1 80 

There is very little new crop arriving as yet. Shippers offer $L60@ 
SL65 for No 3.; millers pay Sl.70@&L75 for choice No. 1. 

Barley. — Very little of the new crop has yet arrived, quotable at 75c; 
Old Brewing is held at 95c. @§1 per ctl.; Old Feed, 65@70c. 
Oats.— Little doing, stock light ; quotable at SL25@1.65 per ctL 
Quicksilver— The market is Bluggish at 33^c. 

Borax. — SuppHes will soon be increased ; stocks now exhausted : price, 
6£@S£c. 

CoaL— The market is flat at $6 50 for cargoes of Sydney Steam. West 
Hartley to arrive, $7. 

Case Goods. — The canneries are very busy putting up fruits of all 
kinds. Salmon is now held firmly at §1 15 asked, and SI 12£ bid for 
standard brands of 1-lb tins Columbia River fish. 

Coffee. — The market is very firm for all Central American Greens at 
14i@16£c. Imports of C. A. for six months, 9,000,000 lbs— say 66,000 
bags— against same period last year of 86,500 bags. Stocks are very light 
of all kinds. 

The Petroleum Market keeps gaining strength. Transactions dur- 
ing the week have been made on speculation account— 55 to 60 cents in 
tanks per P. C. O. certificates. Sales for actual delivery have taken 
place at 60 to 63 cents. We understand that a good deal of refined has 
been sold ahead by Petrolia and London refiners at from 8 to 9 cents a 
wine gallon, London freights allowed, delivery according to price, the 
earlier deliveries being the cheaper.— Petroleum (Canada) Advertiser, 
June 27th. 

Bradbury Pianos, Agency 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



July 12, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, 



19 



LOVE'S INQUIRY. 

» rose 
Wh«n he onulil Ida an the bush ? 

Or who 

flat nrwt the trap Bush? 

Bat if without the nrden we are door 
'l'n wander lonely on ;* we iry wit. 
Where not a - 

■ 
If in the north, amid whi bow, 

■ in dreams alone :» snnny nook, 
With roioe of birds and river murmuring low - 

a torn we to the picture an 
An. I bo, dear rirl, with rosi 

heart, 
Tli-" p salts, 

nor - ' thy smiles im] 

: fling m '' J lls t *>ne flower, 

And of thy Summer bud 

may have at t»aat one fragrant Bower, 
One gleam of sunlight in a dreary day. 
Write d . which shall seem 

At onoe a bunch oi sang. 

I hate short d ! me half a ream — 

, it*a twenty pages tong. 
Tell me that thou art fond and faithful still, 

I be s«> happy at my side ; 
And mention, also, darling, if you will, 

H'*w much your uncle left you when he died! 



— Puck. 



TERRORIST QUACKS. 

The "Western Lancet," for July, contains some original articles 
of interest to the medical profession, specially on account of a successful 
operation by Dr. W. H. Mays, a gentleman whose able pen has frequently 
contributed to the News Letter. There are, also, some selected papers, 
Illustrating the latest improvements in practical medicine, and many in- 
teresting abstracts from home and foreign medical journals. The journal 
{airly represents the progress of medical science, and should be in the 
hands of all practitioners : 

There is a form of quackery which is essentially of the lowest, if not the wicked- 
est, in the whole field of quackery, which in the most systematic manner deals with 
the more secret and objectionable of human infirmities— 1 mean with diseases which 
Spring out of sensual indulgence. The men who carry out this line of bad business 
are numerous. They are not, as a rule, men who have received any medical educa- 
ting A few of them may have attended classes, and a few may have passed through 
their curriculum and failed in examination. The majority are mere ignorants who 
assume to possess a medical qualification from a medical college of some other part 
of the world. They base their claim to be trusted uii the ground of the secrecy of 
their knowledge, and the secrecy of their proceedings. The very fact that they 
; i es are obscure, hidden, distrusted, is the reason too often why thej are c on- 
aulted by those who, in the matter of their illness, themselves wish to be obscure 
and under concealment. Many a youth, who under ordinary circumstances would go 
to the family physician or surgeon for advice and assistance, goes to one of these 
men because he thinks he can open his mind to such a man freely, and communicate 
his distress without fear of discovery. 

These men do an incalculable amount of evil. They not only directly rob, they 
corrupt their victims. Seizing upon minor failings of a physical or moral kind, they 
distort or caricature such failings until their victim is literally distraught with the 
idea of the life-long misery that is in store for him. Moreover, having raised this 
misery, they do no mortal thing to allay it. It is a part of their shameless policy to 
keep the mental wound open, to offer temporary relief at the most, and to maintain 
silence at the cost of a levying which knows no end so long as the fears of the victim 
hold ascendency over the acts of his life. 

The respectable public cannot think we do wrong in keeping an eye on quacks of 
this order. If the public understood its own interests, if it understood the interests 
of those youths who spring from it, and who are to become the backbone of the next 
generation, it would give us more than thanks for our vigilance; it would give 
us its earnest assistance — 

"To whip these scoundrels naked through the world." 

I am glad to say that the very fact of the existence of our Society has largely 
checked this class of men. Supported by the public- voice, we could put them all 
down in twelve months, and relieve the young of their pestilent influence for this 
generation. -From Dr. Richardson's Presidential Address to the members of the 
Medical Defence Association. 

LORD LOFTUS. 

The new Governor of New South Wales, Lord Loftus, son of the 
late Marquis of Ely, in the peerage of Ireland, proceeded on Monday by 
the ZtaXandia en route to the seat of his Government at Sydney. He has 
just completed a trying diplomatic term at St. Petersburg during all the 
war, and negotiations resulting from it between Russia and Turkey— and 
both those Empires and the States of Western Europe. And it is no 
small matter to think of, that, though advanced in life, his appearance 
was that of a strong and healthy man, and one likely to enjoy the rest and 
quiet of his delightful new home in Sydney. Among the first of his pub 
lie acts will be the official opening of the International Exhibition. Ac- 
quainted as every educated gentleman ought to be with the relative posi- 
tions, both geographically and commercially, of San Francisco ami Syd- 
ney, he naturally expressed his anticipation that there would be a great 
display of the results of cultivation and manufacture from the Pacific 
<.'oast, and appeared much surprised at what it is feared the display will 
prove to be ; yet he could hardly believe, when remembering the boasted 
wealth of the city, aud her interests abroad, that the labor and expense 
of making a collection of objects for the International Exhibition had 
devolved on an Australian gentleman, and that from neither a public nor 
a private source had one cent been contributed in any shape for the fur- 
therance of so patriotic an object. Of course, he was assured that this 
arose out of no want of sympathy to Sydney or her commerce, but was 
the outcome of a chronic condition of public meanness ; and illustrated by 
the conduct of the State and individuals at the great Exhibitions of Phila- 
delphia and Paris. 

Uncle Sam Mining Co., Bodie District, yesterday elected Gen. Geo. 
R. Vernon as Superintendent. The double compartment shaft, now 
down 25 feet, will be sunk to reach the ore body. 



200 Post street is on the comer of Dupont. 



SIGNAL SERVICE METEOROLOGICAL REPORT, WEEK 
ENDING JULY 10. 1879. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 





Hi'lhmt an'l 


l I'irist Barometer, 




Frl. 4 


Sat. 5. 
SO 013 


Sun. 8. 


Hon 7. 


Tue. 8. 


Wed 9. 


Thr 10 


28.8T0 


30 011 


20.096 
29.040 


30.054 


20.978 
20 008 



M.i.rimnm and Minimum Thermometer, 

65 I OS I 01 I OS I 63.5 | ot 
■"■I I Si | 5a 52 53 S3 

Mean Daily Ifumiilitif. 
83.8 | 81.3 | 807 | 81.7 | 85.8 I 82 

Prevailing Wind. 
W. | \Y. | W. | w. | W. | sw. 

Wind— Mii<s Traveled. 
289 | 225 | 809 I 301 I 180 | 230 

State of Weather. 
Clear, i Clear. | Foil-. | Cloudy. | Fair. | Fair. 
Rainfall in Tteenty-fonr Hours. 
I I I I 01 | 

Total JRain Durlna Season hi'ainninu July 1. JS70... 



I 62 

| 78.3 

| SW. 

I 310 

I Clear. 

I 
.01 inches. 



T 



SANITARY NOTES. 
The deaths this week number 84j aa compared with $2 fur the cor- 
responding week last year. Fifty were males, 34 females. There were 
3 casualties, 1 homicide, 1 suicide ; 10 Chinese. The zymotics were — 
typhi, id fever 3, diarrhoea 2, infantile cholera 2, diphtheria 2, croup 1, 
scarlatina 1, whooping congh 3. .The oilier principal causes of death 
were — phthisis 9, pneumonia 5, heart disease 4, brain disease 4, infantile 
convulsions 6, cancer 3, Bright's disease 2, epilepsy 2, enteritis 2, cerebro 
spinal meningitis 1, dysentery, gastritis, paralysis, peritonitis, septicemia, 
1 each. Thirty-two deaths were under 5 years ; 40 were between 20 and 
CO years. There were no deaths in the Fifth Ward, and only 1 each in 
the Third and Ninth ; 11 occurred in the Eleventh Ward, and 12 in the 
Fourth ; the deaths in public institutions were 20. The weather has pre- 
sented every variety of climate, all within a few hours— heat and cold, 
cloud and sunshine, calm and wind, dust and fog, dryness and damp. All 
these mixed up in California confusion, and all calculated to m;ike the 
citizens supremely uncomfortable, if not positively sick. No wonder 
many have gone to the country. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

be Company's steamers will sail as follows at 13 M: 

CITY OF PEKING, August 1st, for YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG. 

CITY OF PANAMA, July 19th, for PANAMA and NEW YORK, calling at MAZAT- 
LAN, SAN BLAS, MANZANILLO aud ACAPULCO, connecting at Acapuleo with 
Company's Steamers for all Central American ports— calling at SAN JOSE DE 
GUATEMALA and LA LIBERTAD to land passengers and mails. 

Tickets to and from Europe by any line for sale at the lowest rates ; also to Ha- 
vana and all West India ports. 

CITY OF SYDNEY, August 4th, at 12 o'dock M., or on arrival of English mails, 
for HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY. $10 additional is charged for pas- 
sage in Upper Saloon. 

CITY OF CHESTER, July 19th, fur VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND, SEATTLE, 
and TACuMA, connecting at TACOMA with Northern Pacific Railroad for PORT- 
LAND, Oregon. Tickets must he purchased before 11 a.m. on day of sailing, at 
Wharf Office. For freight or passage apply at the ofliee. cor. First and Brannan 
streets. [July 12.] WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., AgentB. 

FOR PORTLAND AND ASfORIAT^OREGONT^ 

The Oreg-ou Steamship Company and Pacific Coast Steam- 
ship Company will dispatch every five days, for the above ports, one of their 
new Al In. n Steamships, viz.: OREGON, GEORGE \V. LLDEK, and STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

Sailing Days: 

July 1, 6, 11, 16, 21, 26, 31. j Aug-. 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30. 
A.t 10 o'clock A. M. 

Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lilies for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

K. TAN OTERENDORP, Agent O. S. S. Co., 
No. 210 Battery si ret, San Francisco. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents P. C. S. S Co., 
July 5. No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

OCCIDENTAL AND~0RIENTAI TSTEAMSHIP CO., 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nan street, at noon, tor YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

GAELIC Augtist 15th. 

OCEANIC June 17th, September 18th. 

BELGIC Jul 

For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or No. 21S California street. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Atrent. 
LELAND STANFORD. Preside nt. May 31. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers of Ihis Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
for PORTLAND. Oregon), every 5 days, direct, and tor LOS ANGEL! 
BARB LRA, SANTA CRUZ, SAN DIEGO, SAN LUIS OBISPO and other NORTH- 
ERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS, leaving SAN FRANCISCO about every 
third day. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the San Fran- 
cisco Daily Papers 

Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKINS i CO., Agi 
March 16. No. lo Market street. 

MADAME JULIA MELVILLE SNYDER, 

nin Mason street, between Bnshand Sn iter. --Vocal Mnsie 

\} _|_e3 for Open. Concert or Parlor. Piano and Elocution. Dramatic Elocution 
and Voice Culture Specialties. Terms mad t k Maj 26. 

Smith's Music Store, 200 Post street, corner of Dupont- 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1879. 



DIVERTING THE OXUS— RUSSIA AND CHINA. 
It is reported that for some time past Russia Has had thousands of 
workmen employed in diverting the River Oxus to its ancient bed, in order 
to establish water communication between the Caspian Sea and the regions 
bordering on Afghanistan. The Oxus, as our readers know, at present 
empties into the Sea of Aral, its delta being low and marshy, a very few 
of its mouths navigable even for the smallest craft. Formerly, however — 
and as recently, some say, as 1640 — it 'flowed into the Caspian Sea at the 
Balkan Gulf, where its mouths were free*from obstruction. The ancient 
bed diverges from the present one at a point only some fifty miles, more 
or less, from the Sea of Aral, so that, should the present project succeed, 
the river's course from that point will be the exact opposite to what it now 
is— namely, southwest instead of northeast— while its length will be ex- 
tended by some two hundred miles. The river itself is navigable for 
more than a thousand miles of its length, a forms a highway through the 
heart of Central Asia. The importance of this undertaking to Russia 
cannot be overestimated. With the Volga flowing into the Caspian Sea 
at one end, and the Oxus flowing into it at the other, her troops and mu- 
nitions of war could go by water almost from St. Petersburg to Afghan- 
istan, through a country dominated from end to end by the Czar. 
It is, however, not against Afghanistan that Russia may be expected to 
take advantage of this water way. She has had enough of meddling with 
that country, and is not likely to try it again for some time to come at 
least. But in the steady eastward march of her empire Russia has at 
last come face to face with a power which bids fair to give her more trou- 
ble than the petty Khanates of Central Asia. That power is China, and 
already the impending collision is apparent. Russia respects no rights 
which she is strong enough to ignore, but she has got her match in the 
Celestials. In diplomacy the Chinese are fully as cunning and perfidious 
as the Russians, and can't be overreached like Shere Ali and his neigh- 
boring potentates. The only advantages that the Russians possess are 
superior courage and military skill. The latter may easily be acquired or 
obtained from abroad by the Chinese, and the former is far more than 
counterbalanced by the vast superiority of numbers which the Mongolians 
possess. There "is practically no limit to the armies China can 
put in the field, and recent wars have shown that her Gen- 
erals and Government take no account whatever of the num- 
ber of lives they sacrifice. Then these soldiers can be recruited on 
the spot ; indeed, it is the invariable custom of Chinese generals to press 
into service the inhabitants of the country through which they pass, 
which is looted for subsistence, though very little of that is required for 
men who can live on a handful of rice and a cup of water per diem. Rus- 
sia, on the other hand, must bring the bulk of her troops from Eurdpe, 
and to maintain an army of sufficient strength to cope with the vast hosts 
of the enemy would need an immense commissary and transportation 
train. Then, China is rich, or, at least, has shown that she is willing to 
spend any amount of money to defend her interests and keep her empire 
intact. At the same time her wars are comparatively inexpensive, for she 
never dreams of paying her troops at the front, nor, as we have said, of 
supporting them. Russia, on the contrary, is bankrupt, and cannot bor- 
row money as easily as Turkey. In short, if these two powers should 
once come into open collision, the peoples of Central Asia, who have one 
after another seen their territories invaded and seized by Russia, would 
be likely to have their revenge. Possibly they might find an opportunity 
in such an event to rise against their ancient enemy. Nor is it altogether 
improbable that John Bull would have something to say in the matter. 
But, without any such extraneous aid, it is safe to say that China would 
hold her own, especially if she took a notion to avail herself of European 
modes and implements of warfare. 

ARIZONA. 

Continuing favorable reports come from the newly developed mines 
in Arizona, and we learn that a constant stream of machinery is going 
into the territory, one house alone having forwarded ten quartz mills this 
season to various points, and orders for as many more being now filled in 
this city and at the East. A gentleman conversant with the productive- 
ness of the properties now worked, predicts that this year Arizona will 
yield fully $5,000,000 in bullion, and that a year hence the amount may 
be trebled. All the signs of the times point to a coming era of unexam- 
pled prosperity. New mines are being constantly brought to light through 
the energies of a large number of hardy prospectors, some of whom have 
already realized handsome fortunes from their discoveries. The Silver 
King Mine continues to send forward its valuable concentrations, and 
now that the property is being worked upon an improved system, is re- 
ported to be capable hereafter of prodxicing some 20,000 pounds per week ; 
these have a value of at least one dollar per pound, and it is confidently 
stated by an expert miner who has recently visited this wonderful prop- 
erty, that there is now in sight in the mine not less than two and a half 
millions of dollars at the inconsiderable depth of 260 feet. When we con- 
sider the vast shafts upon the Comstock, reaching down thousands of feet 
into the heart of the earth searching for treasure, we cannot but consider 
that Arizona enterprises, such as many we have described, offer more and 
better inducements than these for the investment of capital, especially as 
the pay ore appears to be found from the surface down, reaching a high 
grade at a comparatively trifling depth. The Tombstone district is taking 
its place as one of the bullion producing sections of the territory, and 
some heavy shipments have already been made to this city. The new mill 
at the Tiger Mine was started last week, and cleaned up some S14,000 
after a seven days' run, and the owners expect to run §520,000 per week 
when they get to work upon first-class ore. A new gold mill has just been 
completed at Yuma from which large results are anticipated. We hear 
of a number of Eastern capitalists who contemplate making the tour of 
the Arizona mines as soon as the heated term is over. The future of Ari- 
zona does indeed look very bright. 



An old convict says that he cannot tell how many crimes are arranged 
in prison and afterwards carried out, but their name is legion. He pro- 
poses, therefore, that we take away the motive from these men by using 
the prison as a preserve for candidates ; and the suggestion offers such a 
ready escape from two difficulties that one is surprised it has never "been 
hit upon before. What to do with our criminals need trouble us no longer; 
and the necessity for conventions and caucusses disappears as by magic. 
Eirst come, first served. Take the convict of oldest date as candidate for 
the U. S. Senate, and so on down. The thing is as simple as A, B, C, 
and has nothing to do with the Legion of Honor. 



SOME VERY PLAIN TALK. 

The Liverpool "Weekly Courier," of June 14th, has a letter, 
signed D. C. M., which gives us some hard rubs, under the title of a 
"Little Plain Truth About California." D. C. M. says that the State is 
overloaded, and that correspondents are generally dined and wined into 
admiration of all our doings and beings. Society he does not think 
much of : 

" There is no doubt that many people there of wealth and a high social 
grade were offenders against the criminal code, who sought retirement 
and oblivion in the distant gold hunt. Some of them now wear the dis- 
guise of Btrange names ; and one of them, more brilliant than the average, 
achieved a high office under the State. 

As compared even with the worst cities of the Eastern States, San 
Francisco is irreligious, immoral, feverish, speculative, dishonest. Drink- 
ing saloons, grocery and other stores are open and transact business on 
Sunday. Yet, strange to say, it is a penal o Jense for a butcher to sell 
meat on.that day. Preaching is at a sad dfs^ount, and the churcheejare 
going to rack. 

As to its immorality, there are all the adjunctive vices of fast living. 
Drinking and gambling are not confined to men, but are indulged in to 
excess by many women of the fashionable element. Nor is even the 
opium den without its attraction for the women. 

I speak of these things as appearances and facts, wishing to be under- 
stood as making exception in point of intelligence, morality and refine- 
ment, in favor of many good people whose presence serves to ameliorate 
the gross character with which this population is marked. 

As to dishonesty, the average Californian in his dealings seems to be 
not only devoid of personal honor and pride, but of policy too. It is true 
that in almost all parts of the world men seek to trick and beat each 
other, but they do it with some discretion and policy, but with Californi- 
ans the inquiry is, " Who's to beat?" and instantly the scramble begins. 
I said, also, that these people were speculative. That is certainly true, 
and it has brought them to grief, and may bring them, as a community, 
to ruin. And now the savings banks are overloaded with mortgages. 

They speak of Italian skieB in California, and there is something akin 
to that if we can so compare about four months' steady sunshine, from 
the 1st of September up to January, which this year was free from the 
miserable typhoons which rule in the summer months. But there is noth- 
ing balmy or mellow about this. The very crop itself is a gamble be- 
cause of the uncertainty of the rains. The raising of Btock is conse- 
quently a gamble because of the uncertainty of fodder. 

On the whole, I think Oregon is a better country to live in. The soil is 
richer, and from year to year the climate is more uniform. The elements 
are more prompt and faithful in their ministrations. The harvest is in 
steadier proportion to the seed. One may farm there upon 50 acres and 
calculate within $100 of the outcome, and that in a manner which would 
ruin one in California. In California there are 800.000 people, 600,000 of 
whom live in cities and towns. That means three non-producers to one 
producer. In Oregon the case is exactly reversed. That State has a pop- 
ulation of 160,000, only 40,000 of which reside in cities and towns, snow- 
ing three producers as against but one non-producer." 

THE MINING OUTLOOK. 

The Eastern papers continue to devote considerable space to the min- 
ing interests of the Pacific Coast, and the subject is one worthy of their 
unremitting attention. The New York Daily Graphic has done a large 
amount of valuable work in this direction, both in the way of description 
and illustration, as have also Harper's Weekly and Leslie's Illustrated News. 
The New York dailies are not behindhand in the good work, and all the 
leading journals of the country bear evidence to the fact that a very wide- 
spread interest in our mining enterprises is being gradually but surely de- 
veloped. It now remains the duty of those interested in this vast indus- 
try to foster it with exceeding care. New York is fast becoming the cen- 
tral rendezvous for multitudinous mining schemes. Many of these are 
well worthy of the attention of capitalists; others should be very care- 
fully investigated, both as to value and title, before any money is invested 
in them. California gold mines, as a class, are good properties. Mines of 
this class that are partjftlly developed, with facilities for cheap working, 
with wood and water abtfn^ant, and access not too difficult, in our opinion 
are almost certain of proving profitable investments. Many such prop- 
erties are working successfully to-day that are never heard of in the stock 
boards. The Bodie mines are of this class, and it is not going far from 
the record to say that the prospects of many other localities are fully as 
encouraging as those of that favored district, and only require the touch- 
stone of capital to make them give up their hidden tr< asures. It is inter- 
esting to know that California gold properties are fast establishing them- 
selves as favorites with Eastern investors, and from all appearances a 
number of these, now idle, will become live and valuable mines in the 
very near future. We gladly welcome to our favored State these " wise 
men from the East." That they will not regret their investments we can 
confidently assure them, if they will only exercise the same amount of 
care in selecting their localities for mining that they would in investing in 
any other legitimate line of business ; for we do emphatically contend that 
mining is legitimate, when properly and economically managed. . 



PROSPECTIVE REFORMS. 

The Chambers of Commerce of all the principal Eastern cities have 
resolved to transact their grain business after 1st September next on the 
central basis which has so long been in use in California. There is a quiet 
but persistent effort being made on the Atlantic side to practically adopt 
the metrical system ; and Government also inclines in that direction. Six 
months' actual use would prove its superiority, but the cost of changing 
weights and measures is the principal drawback. There is a strong dispo- 
sition among the official and commercial classes of Russia to reform their 
old style calendar and bring it in accord with that of the civilized world. 
The change may be looked upon as a foregone conclusion as soon as affairs I 
become more settled in that Empire. Creditors and peasants will no 
doubt ask, " Who stole the twelve days?" as they did when Parliament 
adopted the Gregorian calendar. Last on the list, is an evident desire of 
the American Jews to celebrate their Sabbath on Sunday. Some promi- 
nent rabbins urge that as they are a thoroughly commercial people, it is a 
waste of valuable time to retain their predilection for Saturday. These J 
things show the tendency of modern thought to favor all reforms of uni- 
versal benefit. 






R. R. SWAIN. 



THE ORIGINAL 



E. R. ROBINSON 



SWAIN'S BAKERY 

ESTABLISHED 1856. 

ICE CREAM, CHARLOTTE RUSSE, JELLIES, ETC. 



213 SUTTER STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

The NEATEST and MOST ELEGANT Dining Room in the country. 
The FASHIONABLE RESORT of the BEST FAMILIES In the City. 
Ladies, Unattended by Gentlemen, Prefer this Restaurant to all others. 

THE STATE 

Investment and Insurance Co 

FIRE AND MARINE. 



Principal Office, 2 I 8 and 220 Sansome st, San Francisco. 

OFFICERS : 
A. J. BRYANT, RICH'D IVERS, CHAS. H. CUSHINC, W. H. WATSON, 

President. Vice President. Secretary. Marine Surveyor. 




THE TERRACE BATHS, ALAMEDA. 



HALEY & EDSON, 



Proprietors. 



GUARANTEED THE BEST XN USE ! 



CALIFORNIA S 



IImE co/s 



SILK. 



THE ONLY SILK MA.DE ON THE PACIFIC COAST 




CHAMPAGNE 
BAKING 



Use Only One Teaspoonful to a Quart 
of Flour. 



ENDORSED BY THE 



NEWS LETTER. 




ER-HEIDSICK, 



$7.50 PER TOM ; - - - $4 PER HALF TON. 
MIDDLETON & FARNSWORTH, 

Office and Yard, 14 Post street. Store "Yard, 718 Sansome street. Branch Office, 
J. MIDDLETON & SON, 419 Pine street, opposite California Market. 




FHOTOGRAFHIG STUDIO, 

838 Market Street, 

JONES, RULOFSON & Co., Prop'rs. 

Important Announcement in Life Assurance! 

The EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY of the 

United States make the following announcement to the public: 

The dissatisfaction -which prevails throughout the community with regard 
to onorous conditions contained in life assurance contracts and the judi- 
cial decisions based thereon, together with the public endorsement of the lib- 
eral usages of this Society, as shown by its largely increased business, has led 
the management seriously to consider whether the contract could not be ' 
simplified, and certain conditions erased therefrom which have been the sub- 
ject of much criticism and misconception. 

After a careful examination of the experience of some of the best companies in 
Great Britain, who have shown a greater liberality than has been customary in this 
country, this Society feels justified in adopting a form of contract in which the follow- 
ing important concessions are made to policy-holders throughout the United States : 

1. Policies will lie made incontestable after three years from their date 

2. Each ordinary policy will provide for a definite surrender-value in paid-up assurance, in 
case the policy is forfeited after three years from its date. 

3. Each Tontine Policy will contain a definite surrender-value in cash, in case of withdraw- 
al at the end of the Tontine Period. 

4. The contract will toe concisely and clearly expressed, containing only such provisions as 
are necessary to protect the policy-holders. 

5. The above concessions will hereafter inure to the benefit of all policies already issued 
and in force after three years from their dates respectively. 

WM. D. &AHLAND, Manager Pacific Coast. 

S40 MONTGOMERY STREET. 



Price per Copy. 10 Cents.] 



ESTABLISHED JULY, 20. 1SS6. 



I Annual Subscription, $5. 







DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 30. 



SAN FSAN0IS00, SATUEDAY, JULY 19, 1879. 



No. 1. 



Office of tbe San Frauclsco News Loner, Merchant Street, 

Hoc 007 to 615, San Francisco. 



G 



OLD BARS— 890@910— Silver Bars— 6@16 $ cent. disc. Mexican 
Dollars, 9@9$ percent, nom. 

W Exchange on New York. £@l-5 per cent. ; On London, Bankers, 
49|; Commercial, 49i@49jjd. Paris, sight, 5 francs per dollar. Tel- 
egrams, 15-100@i per cent. 

*3" Latest price of Sterling, 488A@490. 



■ Price of Money here, 5@1 per cent, per month — bank rate. In the 
open market, l@l£. Demand active. 



THE STOCK MARKET. 

The past week has been one of unusual dullness, and with the excep- 
tion of Ophir the entire list shows a gradual shrinkage of values over pre- 
vious quotations. The recent heavy assessments levied, together with the 
inevitable delay attending operations at the mines, have greatly unsettled 
the public confidence as to any immediate change for the better, and un- 
til developments are nrore assured we may not look for any increase of 
speculation. Work is being rapidly pushed ahead, with the view of cross- 
cutting in Union and Sierra Nevada 2300-level, at as early a day as pos- 
sible, but with the usual interruptions, and the trouble experienced from 
water, etc., it will be several weeks before crosscutting can be com- 
menced. At other points there is nothing of particular interest to note. 
The outside stocks participate in the general weakness, and, altogether, 
the prospects of the market are anything but cheerful. Bodie continues 
to decline under a heavy pressure to sell. The drifts and stopes are not 
looking so well, but the winze continues to improve, and at this writing 
shows better than ever before. Mono, North and South Noonday, and 
Syndicate, are looking finely, and promise to develop handsomely. Ad- 
vices from Eureka Con. report an improvement in the mine. 



MINING SWINDLES. 
Four years ago the News Letter began the first crusade in the 
State against mining swindles, and the lesson then administered was long 
remembered. It stopped for a time the infamous swindles perpetrated 
by mining operators and brokers. Lately we observe symptoms of the 
same disease breaking out, and we now warn all intending frauds that 
there is a rod in pickle for them. Soft words avail not against these 
harpies ; they must be held up in pillory for public scorn. Names, not 
fictions, are our password, and some of these swindles must be run to the 
earth. The extortionate assessments lately levied on the Comstock and 
the fly-traps put forth in Bodie shall merit our attention. The same ser- 
vice we rendered in ridding the State of quack doctors will be repeated 
in ridding it of quack raining operators. We ask all aggrieved parties to 
present us with facts and they can rely upon having justice done them. 
It is high time for this community to be relieved from the infamous 
leeches that have prayed npon its prosperity. 



We note with pleasure the return of E. J. Baldwin from his East- 
ern trip, where he has been spending a few weeks with his charming 
young bride. While in Chicago, Mr. Baldwin, who is noted as one of 
our most zealous and liberal patrons of the turf, must have been exceed- 
ingly gratified at the victory won by his favorite horse, the famous mare, 
Mollie McCarty, in a race for the -Garden City Cup, competed for by a 
field comprised of many of the most noted flyers of the Southwest. Mr. 
Baldwin is one of the citizens of San Francisco whose absence, even for 
a short period, is keenly felt, especially in business circles, and we gladly 
welcome his return. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, July 17th, 
1879. United States Bonds— 4s, 102 ; Us, 105& 5s. 104J. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 8G4@4 88A. Pacific Mail, 14£. Wheat, 110@118, Western Union, 
894. Hides, 19i@20. Oil— Sperm, 75@76. Winter Bleached, 87 @ 96. 
Whale Oil, 35(a<40; Winter Bleached, 42@49. Wool— Spring, fine, 20@ 
30; Burry. 11@14; Pulled, 25(5)35 ; Fall Clips, 14@18 ; Burry, 13tS 20. 
London, July 17th,— Liverpool Wheat Market, $s. 10d.@9s. 7d. ; Club, 9s. 
'6d.@9s. lOd. U. S. Bonds, 5's, 105|; 4's, 104fc 4i*s, 109£. Consols, 98. 

There is not the slightest foundation in the statement that the Rev. 
Joseph Cook, of Boston, had sent $100 or any other sum, for his Sunday 
evening lecture i» the First Congregational Church, to Rev. Dr. Stune. 



PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND G0VEENMENT BONDS. 
San Francisco July 18, 1879. 



S/<tcks and Bonds. 
U. S. Bonds, 5-20s 1SU7-G8 

Legal Tender Notes 

S. P. City &Co. B'ds, 6s,'5S 

S. F. City Bonda, 7s 

Sacramento City Bonds.... 

Yuba County Bonds, 8s 

San Mateo Co. Bonds, 7s. . . 

S. F. Gas Light Co 

National G. B'k & Trust Co, 
Spring Valley Water Co 

d. z. y 



| Bid 


Asked 


105| 


— 


90} 


— 


105 


107 


105 


10? 


28 


30 


100 


— 


8-1 


85 


60 


70 


80 


87 


ost & Co. , Brok 



Stocks and Bonds, Bid. 

Omnibus Railroad Co 30 

Central Railroad Co 40 

N. B. and Mission R. R. Co. 65 
Front St. , M. & O. R. R. Co. — 

Fireman's Fund Ins. Co 115 

Union Insurance Co 115 

Pacific Bank 112 

The Bank of California — 

Central Pacific Railroad — 

a P. R. R. Bonds — 

erg, S.E. cor. Montg'y and Californ 



Asked 
86 
45 
87 

116 
116 
115 
70 



The extraordinary pressure upon our columns to-day has forced us 
to hold back many most interesting articles already in type, among them 
an elaborate and most valuable table of statistics relating to Californian 
progress. So great is the demand for the magnificent work, now at last 
presented to the public, that we feel compelled, however reluctantly, to 
sacrifice to the exigencies of its production the advantages we had prom- 
ised ourself from the publication of the papers now withheld. Our Chi- 
nese mail is also excluded. 



From the Orient.— The Pacific Mail steamship City of Peking ar- 
rived yesterday from Hongkong, via Yokohama, with thirty-two cabin 
passengers, five Europeans and 370 Chinese, and for cargo 43,065 pkgs 
mdse, say 3,510 tons, consisting in part, for this city, of 5,967 mats rice, 
4,781 pkgs tea, 10 pkgs silk, 1,872 pkgs mdse, 1,450 bales gunny bags, 189 
mats sugar, 595 pkgs tin ; and to go East, overland, 27,353 pkgs tea, 467 
pkgs silk, 74 pkgs mdse ; a total of 1,979 pkgs mdse, 5,967 mats rice, 
32,134 pkgs tea, 502 pkgs silk. 

The " American Union Telegraph Company of the United States " 
have leased for 99 years from July 1st, all the lines of the Dominion Tel- 
egraph Company of Canada, guaranteeing the latter 5 per cent, annually 
upon its capital, payable in quarterly advance installments. The Ameri- 
can Union is fast extending its lines southerly and westwardly, and ex- 
pects to reach the Pacific Coast in four months. A great reduction in 
rates is promised, most probably one half less than those now charged. 

Freights and Charters.— Our fleet of disengaged vessels now foots up 
22, of 27,000 tons register. We have on the berth for Europe 21 vessels, 
of 31,000 tons, and in sight, to arrive within the next six months, 165,000 
tons. From this it will be seen that about one-half of our surplus grain 
crop is provided for. At this date freights are quite firm at 43to45s. to a 
direct port ; Havre or Liverpool at 47s. 6d.@50s. to Cork or Falmouth for 
orders. 

The S. F. Stock Board's action in regard to the Bullion and Ex- 
chequer assessments is entirely commendable, and should lead to good 
results. The fact of retaining a stock upon ita list carries with it a cer- 
tain responsibility for the proper management of the same, and when that 
becomes no longer possible, the sanction of the Board should be with- 
drawn in the interest of the public. 

The steamship City of Sydney has arrived from the Australian 
colonies, with passengers, Government mails and, for cargo, tin 708 
ingots Sydney block; also, from same, about 500 boxes fruit, lemons, etc. 
She also brings, from Honolulu, sugar 6.419 bags and 65 ke^s, chiefly 
refining grades for the California Refinery; rice, 400 bags; banannas, 500 
I bunches, etc. 

Teas from Japan Eastward.— The bark Frank M'trion, Capt. Dow, 
arrived yestenlav, 30 days from Yokohama, to tbe consignment of the 
Occidental and Oriental "Steamship Company, bringing 14,G8d packages 
tea, to go East by the Central Pacific Railroad. 

To-day we issue the first in tbe Beries of illustrations of California's 
notable sons and daughters. The others will follow with all convenient 
speed. Subscribers to the Sews Letter for one year will receive these 
magnificent pictures free, as issued. 

We have had fifty artist proofs of "At the Play" printed, which 
will be sold at the office for rive dollars per copy. These are printed on 
the finest of plate p aper, 

The Australian steamer arrived so near the time of our going to 
press that \ye can but chronicle the fact, 



Printed aid Pmblished by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, Oaliforaie. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 19, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA'S 



MTimBhm 



To-day we offer to the readers of the News Letter, whose name is le- 
gion, and who are confined to no one locality, but are scattered world- 
wide over the surface of the entire habitable globe, a souvenir of Califor- 
nia that, we are persuaded, will not be lightly regarded anywh. re.( Cal- 
ifornia has made its mark in the world's history. Its wunderful yield of 
the precious metals during the past thirty years has exercised, and is still 
exercisin" an influence upon the commerce of all nations, that the future 
historianmay do justice to, but which may not be fully summed up in our 
time. Just when the marvelous developments of trade, resulting from 
the general use of the steam engine, demanded an enlarged ourrency, the 
discovery of gold was made in this State, and so many hundreds of mil- 
lions of wealth's best representative— i. e., gold— were added to the ever 
expanding uses of commerce that the nations have in consequence been 
enabled to trade with each other to an extent unparalleled in the world's 
history. The treasures of California were discovered just when the whole 
earth was about to stand sorely in need of them. For this reason, if for 
none other, California is a land of intense interest to all people. Travel 
wheresoever you will, the land of gold is eagerly talked about. Its gold, 
its silver, its marvelous yield of grain, its fruitB, its scenery, its wonders 
*■ of nature, its youthful energy, its abnormal growth, its wealth, its beauty, 
its men and its women, are all fertile themes for conversation and for in- 
quiry. No child when first it reads of the imaginary discoveries made by 
Aladdin and his wonderful lamp, is more interested than is the average 
adult inquirer as to the realities of this wonder-land of the far-off West. 
The News Letter is wont to tell of these things. It is racy of the soil. It 
is as cosmopolitan as are our people. In short it is eminently Californian. 
Hence it is read and known everywhere. It is a favorite at home and 
popular abroad ; representing, as it does, the vim, the energy, the enter- 
prise, the intelligence and the life of the Pacific Coast. Our readers are 
to be found in all lands. That we are esteemed a welcome visitor in all 
places of intelligence we know from abundant evidences^ Understanding 
the interest taken in all that is Californian, it is our chief labor to supply 
such facts and figures that concern our material interests, as will keep 
people everywhere posted about us. Desiring still further to gratify that 
keen interest in us which we have but lightly touched upoD, we have hit 
upon the idea of illustrating our people as they are. We have heretofore 
issued faithful portraits of many of our leading men, under the title of 
" Men We Know." The process was slow, only one portrait being issued 
weekly, so that it was impossible to do justice to all within a reasonable 
time. From that beginning we conceived the wider, and better idea, 
which finds execution to-day in the really splendid work of art which ac- 
companies this number of the News Letter. Three hundred of the men and 
women who represent the enterprise, the brains, the culture, the wealth 
and the beauty of our State, are most faithfully portrayed. In order to 
bring them together, happily and appropriately, they are massed 
as "At the Play." Our people love amusements, which are essential to 
the strain of our active business hives. Hence we levy upon the world for 
musical and theatrical talent ; and nowhere is genius better rewarded. 
Prejudices against theatrical exhibitions, which still exist in more Puri- 
tanical cities, have scarcely an abiding, place among our singularly cosmo- 
politan people. Hence, the Eastern or European reader must not suppose 
that any violence is done to the probabilities when the Bishop of tne ortho- 
dox Episcopal Church is seen in pleasant tele a tete with the unorthodox 
divine of the Unitarians, or when the covenanting Presbyter is observed in 
happy contiguity with the Jewish Rabbi, and when all together are met 
in the auditorium of a first-class theater, where nature and human nature, 
and not schisms or creeds, are represented. The picture "At the Play" is 
essentially Californian, because it is exceptionally cosmopolitan. In it 
are grouped together men and women from all lands, of all creeds and 
nationalities, and of varied pursuits and stations in life. They are repre- 
sentatives of all that is useful and successful in our midst. The railroad 
magnate, the bonanza king, the enterprising manufacturer, the skilled 
agriculturist, the successful wine-grower, the able and upright judge, the 
eloquent divine, the foremost law-makers, the brilliant and learned lawyer, 
the skillful physician, the bright litterateurs who wield a power in the 
land, the proprietors of our chief newspapers, our city fathers, our archi- 
tects, our artLts and our actors find a prominent place ; and, not to be un- 
gallant, a fair display of the women who beautify and adorn our social 
circles is to be found. Every picture is a copy from a photograph. The 
likenesses are excellent. No resident of our city need be at a loss to name 
every individual face with which he is acquainted. For the use of strangers, 
an admirably-arranged Key is supplied, by aid of which the ownership of 
each counterfeit presentment may conveniently be determined. It may 
be truly said that this work is full of interest. A copy will reach every 
household in the State, and our people will spend many an hour in pick- 
ing out the faces they know, and in giving expression to the thoughts and 
experiences associated with those faces. When the live men and women 
in it have passed away, it will serve to make their memories live 
after them. Their children and their children's children will treas- 
ure it as a most prized souvenir of these times. Such as it is, we offer 
it to our readers everywhere as a faithful representation of three hun- 
dred of the leading men and women of California. The arranging of 
the materials into this harmonious whole has been a work of labor and 
expense, as well as one of love. The decorative design is by Gariboldi, 
the photographs by Bradley & Rulofson, the drawing by Van de Casteele, 
and the lithographing by Messrs. Britton & Pey. These artists are all 
justly celebrated, and that they find appreciation and profit among us, is 
no slight evidence of the aesthetic tastes of our citizens. The News Letter 
is pleased to have furnished this opportunity for the display of their skill. 
We do not intend it to be their sole effort in the same direction. We are 
conscious that there yet remain many, very many worthy Californians 
who meet "at the play." Indeed, an apology is due to hundreds for 
whom this week there is not even "standing room." Further editions 
will be published in good time, and in the end we hope to do justice to all. 



J. M. Litchfield & Co. 415 Montgomery street, rirst-class, way-up 
merchant tailors, have just received some elegant and nobby English and 
Scotch goods. 



CAN'T BE DONE, FRIENDS. 
A political party can't be successfully run by a newspaper. That 
fact may now be taken to be pretty well established. The thing has been 
tried more than once but has always failed. The Bulletin tried its hand 
at it four years ago, only to meet with ignominious failure. It got up the 
so-called Independent Party and ran General Bidwell for Governor, but 
only succeeded in securing a small minority of all the votes cast for its 
ticket. It then wisely retired from the field of party management and 
left that business to the experts. The Chronicle is now trying its hand at 
the game, but with even less prospects of success than those which at- 
tached to the Bulletin. It is floundering in a quagmire of its own mak- 
ing in a most deplorable fashion. It is really pitiable to observe the hu- 
miliating attitudes into which the " live paper" is being forced. It is 
one thing to run a newspaper and quite another to run a successful politi- 
cal party, as De Young and Fitch have found out to ther costly and sore 
discomfiture. In that line they have proven to be failures both. It is 
well that it should be so. The tyranny of a newspaper would be intoler- 
able if it could own and run the nominating machinery of political par- 
ties. If it could reward its friends and punish its enemiei at its sovereign 
will and pleasure then the oppression of no king, czar or emperor would 
equal that of the newspaper proprietor. There would be an end to inde- 
pendence of thought and action. A De Young would issue his mandates 
and men would soon come to vie with each other in their eagerness to give 
them effect. They would make haste to win the favor of the god of the 
machine. It is well that men revolt at the very threshold of all such at- 
tempts at dangerous usurpation. In the interest of journalism we are 
glad that they do. We are persuaded that it is not good for the press 
that its managers should personally wield the scepter of power. If they 
succeeded they would fail as independent critics, and become the apolo- 
gists for the wrong-doing and corruption of their tools and creatures. 
No ! that power of the press is greatest and best which is more felt than 
seen. It may influence, but should not command. It may lead, but can 
never safely be permitted to drive. Honestly and wisely conducted it 
can mold that public opinion which in the end must control all political 
parties. When it goes beyond that and seeks to dictate the mere person- 
nel of politics it makes a great mistake, as is being most curiously demon- 
strated just now. 

MIDDLEMISS, OF THE BRILLIANT MINE. 
Middlemiss, of the Brilliant Mine, is a courageous man. He has 
given us an opportunity to ventilate him in the Police Court. On 
Thursday he preferred a complaint against the News Letter for 
libel, and the matter awaits an examination. The difficulty has come 
about in this wise : Last Saturday week we had an article entitled 
" Brilliant Mine Management." In it we laid bare as impudent a piece 
of humbuggery as was ever brought to the notice of the San Francisco 
public, which is Baying not a little. One J. It. Middlemiss was named 
as the President of the mine. If the statements therein contained were 
untrue the article was grossly libelous. If they are incontrovertible facts, 
as we claim they are, then their publication was a public good. This man 
Middlemiss refuses to challenge them. He carefully avoids allegations 
that are serious, and lights upon ones that are trivial. The article of 
moment against his management of the Brilliant mine he fights shy of. 
He declines to try the question of its truthfulness. If silence gives 
consent, then he consents that it is true. That article being unchal- 
lenged, and unchallengeable he is illy employed when he thinks it worth 
his while to bother about the light and airy touches which appeared in 
a card published on the following Saturday. A gentleman of high 
standing sent us that card, and we published it, and propose to stand 
by it. It good humoredly congratulated him upon not being in Texas, 
where they sometimes hang men as good-looking as he on suspicion, 
whether guilty or not. As he didn't see the joke we now withdraw 
our congratulations and wish he really were in Texas. We will leave the 
spectators, who may be present in the Police Court, to judge whether we 
have not flattered his personal appearance. We trust the worthy prose- 
cuting officer of that court will not think that it is through any inten- 
tional fault of ours that so dangerous a rival in the manly graces haBbeen 
introduced where he, himself, has hitherto reigned supreme. Meanwhile 
we tell this man Middlemiss that whilst he refrains from challenging our 
serious article upon his management of the Brilliant mine, it is the highfc 
of folly, if not of impudence, for him to question the pleasant allusions 
of our contributors as to his personal appearance. 

ICE, 

-WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, 

In Quantities to Suit, Any Hour of the Day or Night. 

35B and 357 TEHAMA STREET. 



Ice Carefully Packed for Shipment to Any Fart of the State. 
[July 19.] 



gATORT ami 
ItTOORE'S 
T>EST FOOD 
"EIOR TNFANTS. 



NOTICE— The Best Food for Infants, prepared by 
Savory & Moore, and supplied to the Royal Nurseries of 
England, Russia, etc., contains the highest amount of 
nourishment in the most digestible and convenient form. 

IT IS THE MOST PERFECT substitute for healthy 
Mother's Milk, possessing all the elements necessary for 
the health, growth and vigor of the child. 

MALTED ON LIElilG's principle, it has only tlu 
sugar natural to milk, and is consequently free from the 
artificial and injurious sweetness of other foods. 

THOROUGHLY COOKED, it is always ready for use, 
saving Mothers and Nurses much time and trouble- 
tins, Is., 2s. 5s., and 10s. each. 

SAVORY & MOORE, 143, New Bond street, London, 
and Chemists, etc , everywhere. 



ANDREW BAIRD, 

Negotiator of Loan and Commercial Paper, 
Broker in Local and State Securities, 

No. 312 California Street San Francisco. 

[2\ O. Box 1,208.] July 19. 



July 19, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



TO PESCADERO 
Pescadero h a very pleaflut pUoe, Mid what is more, tho journey to 
it fprni Han Ftjuicwoo i>< a pleasant one also. From the city to San 
Mateo bj railway ; from than to Pwoadero as Rood ^ road and a* com* 
mixtion* a ooaoh, as smart hones and as civil :* driver as ever need to ban* 
die the ribbons— and that is sayinc a k''><>.l deal. Necessarily the nature 

of the count rv we travel over demands time, U it is not by any means a 
deft'l plain. Rut there is not a mile which is not replete with interesting 

variations of scenery : Quiet glens, with crystal brooks purlins through 
them ; a luxuriance of ever-onanffing Foliage ; quiet hamlets and farm- 
. nestling in picturesque nooks : hills up to sight humlreil feet high, 
comman.linc views of the Hay of San Francisoo on one hand, and the 
Pacific Ocean on the other : then Spanisbtown, "here we stop for lunch, 
and on for miles, over a rolling country, with the ocean close by on one 
hand, with an endless succession of luxuriant wheat, barley and potato 
mops, varied here and there by the beautiful dark blue Bowers of acres of 
flax, on the other. There is no want of variety the whole way, for some- 
thing fresh c uiies into view at every turn of the road — and the turns are 
legion. Arrived at Pescadero, the traveler meets with all the quiet, ele- 
gant comfort he could wish, in one of the best kept hotels. Pescadero is 
not a " watering-place " in the ordinary acceptation of the term ; but the 
sea is easily approached, and the pebbly beach affords endless interest and 
amusement to visitors who can love nature in her beautiful home products — 
minerals and oceanic flowers. There is fishing at all times, and wing- 
shooting in the season, and, taken all together, a climate neither too hot 
to be oppressive, nor too cool to be in the least objectionable ; where all 
kinds of European Bowers and fruits abound, while the scenery of gently 
sloping hills and narrow valleys remind the traveler of the picturesque 
scenery of Devonshire and the West of England. To Pescadero by Btage 
and rail, there and back, S7 is all the cost of travel. 



A GREETING TO AN OLD FRIEND. 
As we start to-day on a literary and pictorial tour "all round the 
world " in a kindly spirit with all mankind, we cannot but pause a mo- 
ment before we embark to greet with a hearty hand-shake a journalistic 
friend, who, starting on his race for public favor almost before our State 
was recognized, has walked by our side these many years. Commencing 
an important career with the first rush of adventurous pioneers, full of life 
and hope, our journalistic friend has been for more than thirty years a 
welcomed visitor in the offices and houses not only of our own people, but 
of thousands around the world. From its high character and enterprise 
in the days when news-gathering was far more difficult than now, it won 
the position accredited to it by the press of the States, of Europe and of 
the British colonies, as the leading journal of this coast, and was then, as 
it i3 now, in many of the centers of industry, influence and wealth, recog- 
nized as the sterling authority on all matters of facts, figures, and of 
interest to the State at large. As the years have come and gone, it has 
maintained, with reputation untarnished and with fidelity to principles, 
its high standing in the foremost ranks of the press, and has earned the 
earnest approval of the community. Its well-won record of fairness in 
criticism of the events of the day, and its labors for the beat interests of 
the city and State have kept the Alta California close to the hearts of its 
friends. Its past career is but a guarantee of its future course. Replete 
with the largest and fullest news gathered from all parts of the world, 
with calm, able and considerate editorials, and representing in its pages 
nothing that can possibly offend the most sensitive mind, the friend of 
long years grows daily more and more in popular favor. We wish it a 
heartygGod-speed in its progress. 

THOSE EXAMINATIONS AGAIN. 
At the last meeting of the Board of Education Director Sullivan, of 
the Committee appointed to investigate the charges against Miss Birdsall 
and Mrs. Danielwitz, make a report exonorating those ladies, and^ recom- 
mending that they should not be forced to undergo another examination. 
The Board rejected the report, for reasons known, perhaps, to themselves, 
but much hidden from the public. All this looks like mean persecution. 
The Committee, Messrs. Sullivan, Mountain and Laven, declare that they 
have carefully revised all the facts and have heard additional testimony, 
and they find nothing against these ladies ; but here they lie under a mis- 
take. Director Taylor is against them, and Director Bacon and Mr. 
Leggett and some other pious men, who care for public opinion and are 
full of virtue, but take all their information in these matters, by Tay- 
lor's own confession, from anonymous letters. Anonymous letters ! And 
if they came from near the Board; from a friend of the Board ? _ Why 
should men be above doing this, whose friends are capable of the infamy 
of believing anonymous charges? The venomous persistence displayed in 
this business is sufficient to damn the leaders in it, all the more that 
these are the very men who quaked before Ewald and ran away from 
responsibility. They trust they may be allowed to disgrace these ladies, 
but they trust in vain. No convention will touch them, but exposure 
will. 

CATHOLIC FUNERAL OBSEQUIES. 

As announced in the Press, the solemn requiem obsequies of the late 
Madam Jovita Haraszthy, daughter of General Vallejo, took place last 
Tuesday at the Roman Catholic Mortuary Chapel, the officiating priest 
being the Very Rev. Father Kaiser, now of Mission San Jose, a personal 
friend of the family. The attendance of relatives and friends was, as 
might have been expected, very numerous. After a solemn Requiem 
High Mass, the Reverend Father, in a few eloquent sentences, 
spoke of the many unobtrusive public and private Christian virtues 
which adorned her life; her devotion to her Creator, her exemplary life as 
a wife and a mother, the education of her children, her never failing char- 
ity to the poor, and that belief in the Catholic religion which has ever dis- 
tinguished her family. Her death was sudden and unexpected, having 
been called away at one of those moments which the world deems most 
happy, but which to friends always seems the saddest — but " the ways of 
the Omnipotent are unsearchable, and His judgments j ustified in them- 
selves, 1 ' and He knows best what is best for His own. 



"The Principles of the Republican Party are Not for a Bay, 
but for all Time-" 



Improvement in the manufacture of gas. The London Times of the 
20th June says that an engineer of Philadelphia has patented a process by 
which it is proposed to increase the production of gas from 7,000 cubic 
feet to 250,000 cubic feet per ton of coal. The coal is first pulverized, and 
then projected into a heated cupola, mixed with steam. 



REPUBLICAN MEETINGS, 

HON. JOSEPH MoKENNA, 

Nominee for Congress, Third District. 

— AND— 

GEORBE T. BROMLEY, ESQ., 

Will Address the People on the Issues of the Day, as Follows: 



Surrnville.... 

Quincy 

Taylorville., 
Susanville ., 
Chico 



. Monday, July 21 
....Tuesday, July '22 
. Wednesday, July 23 
Friday, July 25 

.Monday, July 28 



Eureka Saturday, August 16 

Heiildsburg Tuesday, August 19 

Santa Rosa Wednesday, August 20 

Petaluma Thursday, August 21 

San Rafael Friday, August 22 

Woodland Saturday, August 23 

Marys ville Monday, August 25 

Colusa Tuesday, August 26 

Oroville Wednesday, August 27 

St Helena Thursday, August 28 

Lakeport Friday, August 29 

Napa Saturday, August 30 

Dixon Monday, September 1 

Vallejo Tuesday, September 2 



Red Bluff Tuesday, Julv 29 

Shasta Wednesday, July 30 

Wcaverville Thursday, July 81 

Fort Jones Saturday, August 2 

Yreka Monday, August 4 

Cloyerdale Friday, August 8 

Ukiab Saturday, August 

Cahto Monday, August 11 

Rhonerville Thursday, August 14 

Areata Friday, August IB 

County Committees will please make all requisite arrangements for the meetings. 

By order of the Committee. W. W. MORROW, Chairman. 

M. D. Boruck, Secretary. July 19. 

"The Principles of the Republican Party are not for a Day, 
but for All Time." 



AUlM 



REPUBLICAN MEETINGS. 

GEORGE C. PERKINS, 

Republican. Nominee for Governor, 

—AND— 
ii. A. KNIGHT, ESQ., 

Of Humboldt, 
Will Address the People on the Issues of the Day, as J? 

San Bernardino Saturday, July 19 1 Watson ville Tuesda- 

Anaheim Monday, July 21 j Bakersfleld Thursday 

San Buenaventura... Wednesday, July 23 Visalia Friday, . 

Santa Barbara Thursday, July 24 1 Fresno Saturday, A 

Lompoc Friday, July 25jMened Monday, A;i u t 4 

San Luis Obispo Saturday, July 26 1 Modesto Tuesday, An. i t5 

Salinas Monday, July 28 1 San Francisco Wednesday Amm t6 

County Committees will take due notice and make the necessary arrange. uj, its ..or 
the meetings announced. By order of the Committee. 

M. P. Boritck, Secretary. fJury 19.] W. W. MORROW, Chairman. 

NOTICE. 

To Bullion and Exchequer Stockholders. 

The San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board having been 
informed that great dissatisfaction exists among the shareholders of the Bullion 
and Exchequer Mining Companies, respecting the management of those properties 
by the present Boards of Trustees, have empowered their Executive Committee to 
co-operate with those shareholders who wish an opportunity for the expression of 
their sentiments respecting the same. The Executive Committee intends, with such 
co-operation, to procure the action of the Courts in ordering a new election of Trus- 
tees of those companies. All shareholders in sympathy with this movement are re- 
quested to call at the office of Mr. J. W. COLEMAN," President of the Committee, 
Room No. 1, Stock Exchange Building, and sign a petition to the County Court for 
its action in the premises. CHAS. S. NEAL, 

July 19. Secretary S. F. Stock and Exchange Board. 

"THE SAN FRANCISCO MERCHANT," 

A "Weekly Trade Paper. 

Published Every Friday Morning-. —Especially devoted to 
the Grocery, Tobacco, Provision, Drug and Wine and Spirits Trades. The 
ADVOCATE OF HOME MANUFACTURES. Able editorials on live topics. Newsy 
comments om all affairs appertaining to busiuess. The fullest and most reliable m «r- 
ket reports, and the liveliest and most entertaining trade paper published in the 
United State. Subscription, Two Dollars a year, in advance (postage included), and 
received by all newsdealers, Postmasters and agents of Wells, Fargo & Co. Sample 
copies, free. July 19. 

SWIMMING TEACHER, 

At Neptune and Mermaid SnlmminsBalhs, foot of Ear kin 
and Hyde streets. PROFESSOR J. C. MOHOR is now prepared to instruct 
ladies, geutlemen and children any hour of the day, at the beach, as above. A course 
of ten lessons is about all that is required in ordinary cases. Terms reasonable. 
Suits, etc., furnished. P. S.— One view of the beach and the precautions taken will 
satisfy any one of the perfect safety of beg inner s. July 19. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Enreka Consolidated Mining Company. Ne- 
vada Block, Room No. 37, San Francisco, July IS, 1870.— At a meeting of the 
Board of Directors of the above named Company, held this day, a dividend (No. 45) 
of One Dollar per share was declared, payable on MONDAY, July 2lst, 1379. Trans- 
fer Books closed until the 22d instant. 

July 19. W. W. TRAYLOR, Secretary. 

ALTERATION OF OFFICE HOURS. 

.r. J. II. Slallard, for twenty-five years a member of the 

r Royal College of Physicians, London, for thirty-five years a member of the 

Royal College of Surgeons, England, and formerly Physician of the Great Northern 
Hospital, London, etc., etc., may be consulted at 37 POST STREET, San Francisco. 
Office Hours: 1 to 4 and 7 to 8 P.M. Sundays, from 1 to 2 only. July 19. 

NATURALIZATION ! 

Headquarters Republican State Central Committee. Rooms 
No. 'a 4, 6, 8, 7, S and », No. 703 Market street, southwest corner Third. 
On and after WEDNESDAY, July Mb, 1879, a Clerk will be in attendance at these 
Headquarters, Room No. 5, for the purpose of NATURALIZATION. Office Hours, 
from S a.m. until 9 p.m. By order of the Committee. 

M. D. Bo aics, Secretary. [July 19.] W. W. MORROW, Chairman. 

FRED H. BUSBY, 

Montgomery Rlock. tiSSMontjsroniery street. San Francisco, 
Manufacturer of Archery Gloves, Finger Tij>s, Arm Guards. Boxing, Fencing 
and Base Ball Gloves, for Catchers, Long Wrist rahmjf QtOTea, Belts for Uniforms, 
etc. Archery Clubs supplied at reduced rates. Busby's Archery Clubs are the only 
ones in the market that will stand service and give satisfaction. " July li. 



D' 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 19, 1879. 



WARM WEATHER WISHES. 
O, for a seat in some railroad of chilliness, 

And a swift engine to bear me away, 
Far from the blinding heat, dusty and villainous, 

Into the cool of a mid- winter day ! 
O,i,for a goblet of Amontillado, 

With the ice dewing the liberal glass, 
O, for a century passed in the shadow 

Of breezy treeB, with the frost on the grass! 
0, for the maiden whose haughtiness freezes you ! 

O, for a blast of northeasterly wind ! 
0, for the snow-storm that chills as it seizes you ! 

0, for the coolies and punkahs of Ind ! 
O, for a residence perched on a pinnacle 

Of the tall Andes, the Alps, Pyrannees I 
O, for a yacht with a seat by the binnacle, 

And a free swing at the salt-laden breeze ! 
"Would we were mummies ! The mummy don't suffer, he 

Beats back the beart from Pyramidal works ; 
0, for an antartic voyage of discovery 

Where we'd get shipwrecked and cast on the bergs. 
O, for a drink in an arbor of shadhiess ! 

Well, that at least we can get in a trice, 
And we will have it, too, Ganymede aiding us — 

Waiter, two punches, with plenty of ice ! 
San Francisco, July 11th, 1879. G. H. J. 

PLOWING BY ELECTRICITY. 

Experiments have just been carried out at Sermaize on a new system 
of tilling by machinery devised by MM. Chretien and Felix. The^e gen- 
tlemen, aware of the remarkable properties of the Gramme machine, con- 
ceived the idea of employing the hydraulic forces so distributed in France, 
as well as the stationary engines at the various manufactories, to work 
powerful Gramme machines, producing electricity in considerable quan- 
tity ; and it is this electricity, conducted to distances of 1,000 and even 
2,000 metres, which communicates movement to other Gramme machines, 
connected directly with the windlasses which move the plow. The 
Gramme machines in fact transform motion into electricity, when worked 
by any kind of motor, and electricity into motion when placed in connec- 
tion with any source of electricity. The loss produced by this double 
transformation varies between 30 and 60 per cent, of the initial work, ac- 
cording to the distance of the apparatus and the section of the conducting 
wires. In practice one may, up to a distance of two kilometres (2,187 
yards) from the motor, calculate upon a mean service of 50 per cent, with 
conductors 10 square millimetres in section (140"5 mils diam). Thus the 
inventors have arranged a set of mechanical apparatus for plowing, 
threshing, loading and unloading goods, harrowing, weeding, sowing, and 
all the operations of farming as executed in England by means of travel- 
ing steam engines. 

Two of these sets of machinery have already been established at Ser- 
maize, an apparatus for discharging barges laden with beets, and a double 
windlass for plowing. The former was worked all last winter, and ef- 
fected a saving of about 40 per cent, on the manual labor. It, moreover, 
greatly facilitated the unloading of the beets. The plowing windlasses 
have been at work only during three weeks, and have brought a crowd of 
visitors to the spot ; savants, official functionaries, agriculturists engineers 
and others, including M. Duphenieux, prefect of La Marne, and General 
Clinchaut, commandant in chief of the 6th Corps d'Armee. 

[An illustrated description of the apparatus is here given.] 

The electric cables are suspended upon posts like telegrapn wires. The 
two windlasses are placed 200 metres apart, and, by means of commuta- 
tors, the electricity is transmitted sometimes to the machine of one appa- 
ratus and sometimes to the other. As the wire rope unwinds from one 
drum it is wound upon the other. The windlasses are self-moving, trans- 
port themselves to their destination, and shift their position as the work 
proceeds. One of the prime motora at the sugar-works at Sermaize, 300 
metres from the field, sets in motion two other Gramme machines which 
generate the electricity. About 8 horse-power is used for this purpose. 
In order not to delay their experiments, MM. Chretien and Felix have 
used machines intended for the electric light, and have hadfor the draught 
of the plow only 4 horse-power. But they will shortly have much more 
powerful machines to work plows with 4 shares, and to penetrate the soil 
more deeply than they have hitherto done. At present they use a plow 
with two shares for light soils, and one with a single share for heavy soils. 

The following are a few data relative to the work : "Velocity of the 
Gramme machines at the works, 1,600 revolutions per minute. Velocity 
of the Gramme machines at the windlasses, 800 revolutions per minute. 
Velocity of the friction pullies, 133 turns per minute. Velocity of the 
small drum, 14 turns per minute; of the large drum, 27 turns per minute. 
Velocity of the motor wheels, 4'6 turns per minute. Rate of motion of 
the plow {high velocity), 81 metres ; ditto (low velocity), 50 metres per 
minute. The furrows are "275 metre (nearly 11 in.) in width, and have a 
mean depth of "2 metre (nearly 8 in). With two shares, about 20 square 
metres may be plowed per minute. — Revue Industrielle. 



Immigration and Emigration. — The following are the arrivals and 
departures with regard to California for six months ending June 30th : 
Six Months. Arrived. Left. Gain. 

By rail 18,601 11,267 7,334 

By sea 7,367 5,965 1,402 

25,968 17,232 8,736 

First six months of 1878 25,926 17,940 7,9S6 

Increase 42 750 

Decrease 708 

The gain of 750 over the first six months of last year shows that Califor- 
nia is not at present increasing in attractiveness to settlers. Kearny's 
communism has doubtless a good deal to do with this slow immigration. 



Sterling Silverware. — A large assortment of elegant designs at Ran- 
dolph & Co.'s, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

INSURANCE AGENCY, 
No. 322 & 324 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Fire Insurance. 
GIEARD of Philadelphia. ST. PAUL .of St. Paul. 



UNION of Galveston. 

TEUTONIA of New Orleans. 

UKKL1N-COLOUNE of Berlin. 

LAOONFIANCB of Paris. 



HOME of Columbus. 

NEW ORLEANS ASSOCIAT1 ON 

PEOPLES of Newark. 

REVE11E of Boston. 

LA CAISSE GENERALS of Paris. 

Marine Insurance. 

PARIS UNDERWRITING ASSOCIATION of Paris. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London. 

Capital Represented $23,000,100. 

All Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE CO. OF CALIFORNIA. 

Principal Office, 406 California ttireet, Man Francisco. 
Cash Assets, January 1, 1S77, $595,291 ; Liabilities, 35,952 ; Surplus for Policy 
Holders, S589.339. J. F. Houghton, President; L. h. Baker, Vice-President ; 
Charles ft. Story, Secretary. R. H. MAGILL, H. H. BIGELOW, General Agents. 

Directors. — San Francisco — L. L. Baker, John H. Redington, J. F. Houghton, 
R. B. Gray, Robert Watt, John Currey, L. L. Baker, W. F. Whittier, C. C. Burr, E. 
M. Root, W. H. White, J. L. N. Shepard, W. M. Greenwood, George S. Mann, Cyrus 
Wilson, W. T. Garratt, C. Waterhouae, A. P. Hotaling, A. Block, A. K. P. Harmon, 
G. S. Johnson, W. O. Wilson, A. W. Bowman, H. L. Hodge, Charles R. Story. Ala- 
meda County Branch — V. 0. Moody, Chauocy Taylor, A. C. Henry, Robert S. Far- 
relly, Joseph B. Marlin, W. B. Hardy, T. B. Simpson. San Diego— A. H. Wilcox. 
Sacramento — Mark Hopkins, D. W. Earl, Julius Wetzlar, Jamea Carolan. Sau Jose— 
T. Ellard Beans, B. D. Murphy, A. Pfister, J. H. Dibble, J. S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, 
Jacob Rich, John AuzeraLs, John Balbach. Stockton— H. H. Hewlett, Chaa. Belding, 
J. D. Peters, A. W. Simpson, H. M. Fanning. Marysville— D. E. Knight. Grasa 
Valley— Wm. Watt, T. W. Sigourney. Portland, Oregon— W. S. Ladd, C. H. Lewis, 
P. Wasserman, B. Goldsmith, D. Macleay. Virginia City, Nevada — John Gillig, Isaac 
L. Requa. March 17. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.--UNI0N INS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California Lloyds.--- Established in 1S61. — \os. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash capital 3750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed §1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
—San Fraxcisco— J. Mora Moss, N. G. Kittle, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Moaes 
Heller, Adam Grant, Daniel Meyer, AntoineBorel, Charles Kohler, E. L. Goldstein, 
I. Lawrence Pool, A. Weill, Joseph Brandenstein, Charles Bauin, James Mottitt, 
Benjamin Brewster, L. Cunningham, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas Luning, John Parrott, 
L. A. Booth, Julius Baum, MvlesD. Sweeney, Jas. M. Goewey, Edward Cadwalader 
Bartlett Doe, Gustave Touehard, J. H. Baird, J. G. Kittle, George C. Hickox, C. Du- 
commun, Wm. Scholle, John Conly, Ig. Steinhart, W. B. Stone, J. O. Eldridge, A. 
B. Phipps. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 
Charles D. Haves, Secretary. Geo. T. Boheh, Surveyor. Aug 31. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 

HUE ABJ» JIAKINK. 

Clash Assets, 9450,000.— Principal Office, 218 and 320 San- 
J some street, San Franciaco. Officers: — A. J.Bryant, President; Richard 
Ivers, Vice-President ; Charles H. Cubuing, Secretary ; H. H. Watson, Marine 
Surveyor. Board of Directors : — Peter Donahue, James Irvine, C. D. O'Sullivan, 
A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailey, E. W. Corbert, George O. 
McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. Buckley, 
P. J. White, E. M. Root, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld, Daniel 
Callaghan. P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, Loa Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, Sonoma County. H. W. Seale, Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. 10. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF ilAJlttl 1CU. 

Capital $1,125,000, U.S. Gold Coin. 

Losses Paid in Gold Coin Immediately After Adjustment. 
This Corporation holds contracts of fifteen other European Insurance Compa- 
nies, re-insuring by far the greater part of every risk, as soon as accepted in our of- 
fice. The combined subscribed Capital which our policies therefore offer to the public, 
Amounts to i Of wliich 

$16 .912,500, TJ. S. Gold Coin, | $4,328,750 is Paid Up, 

Resides the Always Available Reserve Funds. 

GEORGE MARCUS & CO., General Agents for the Pacific Coast, 
Jtfarch 16. 3 04 California street. 

THE MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, ENGLAND. ~ 

[ESTAJBZXSSEJ> 1836.1 
Whole Amount of Jo^nt Stock and Guaranteed Capital. .$5,000,000. 

"Whole Amount of Capital paid up 900,000. 

Cash Assets December 31 , 1876 3,710,000. 

The undersigned have been duly authorized to issue Policies at current rates on 
Freight and Shipments to or from England, Europe, New York, Japan, China, Aus- 
tralian Colonies, Sandwich Islands, and Northern Coast Ports. If desired, policies 
made payable at port of termination. 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., Agents, 

Au g. 10. 218 California s treet. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
tained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In' the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9 HARRY W. SYZ. Agent, 225 Sansome st., S. F. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSUR. CO, OF BOSTON, 

Has transacted the business of Life Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has comr^ied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
Sept. 2 -i.l 328 Montgomery street. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL 

C lanital $5,00O,000.— Agents: Balfour, Guthrie & Co.. No. 
J 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 



July 19, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISED. 



[From London Truth.] 
AN INTERCEPTED LETTER. 

LoVDov, Juno, 1879. 

It is sad, but true, Ella; mv little remaining faith in the human race 
has vani-theil. for Juliet, our c<*'K, our treasure, has proved false. Hence- 
forth, let any one talk to me, if he dare, about 'In- ^-ratit'nie of mankind ! 
No tongue can tell, n" pen can describe what are have (lone for Juliet, and 

to think My dear, the recollection of recent v\j.t-rienees uuikes me ill. 

Indignation, combined with disappointment, has left corroding marks 
opon my br<iw, and given birth to a gray hair : 1 asked Aunt Fanny yes- 
lerday whether she wished me go t<> an early grave. "You must be mad 
to put auch an abaunl question, ' she replied. " Well, then," I continued, 
I give y<>u notice that / shall no longer worry about the house. All I 
promise is to engage servants that are total abstainers. I draw the line at 
drunkenness. Lying and stealing in moderation, and shirking of work, I 
shall not resent, whatever you may choose to do. Life is too short to be 
devoted to reforming everybody but one's self.'' Aunt Fanny accepted 
the situation, and has even gone so far as to promise to stand at the helm 
when future household storms arise, so you'll hear little more from me, my 
dear, of domestic muddles. I've been on a strike, and returned to work 
on my own terms. And now I'll tell you the cause of my deliverance, 
wlm-h, of course, you already suspect. I was sitting one afternoon by 
myself, Aunt Fanny and Bob having gone to a reception, when I was 
frightened out of rive year's existence by a heavy fall and a series of 
shrieks. Rushing down stairs, I found the housemaid rushing up. "Oh, 
mum, the cook is dead!'' Hurrying to the kitchen, I found Juliet ex- 
tended on the floor— not dead, however, for breathing was apparent. 
Demanding an explanation, the housemaid declared that Juliet had been 
drinkin_', and, after threatening the servants' lives, had mounted the 
kitchen table to dance a jig; a performance abruptly terminated by a 
false step, which resulted in her present position. "So she's killed her- 
self, mum," said the servants in chorus. " We're not to blame." 

" Who's killed, I'd like to know?" cried the Treasure, raising herself on 
one elbow. " The best thing for you to do, mum, is to discharge these 
girls. They're a bad lot. They're drunk. They've not been sober for a 
week. Killed, am I?" I'll show you whether I'm killed." Suiting the 
action to the word, Juliet picked herself up with great effort, and staggered 
to the fire, seized the soup-pot, and poured the contents into the fire. 
"Now, who says I'm killed?" shouted Juliet, amid the sputtering and 
smoke, waving a big iron spoon over her head. The servants again 
shrieked, and I, for the first time, stood face to face with a drunken 
woman. I had read that infuriated animals are quelled by being looked 
firmly in the eye, so I was inspired to try this treatment on Juliet. "Put 
down that spoon," I said ; "you are drunk." 

"Drunk, mum! Who's been taking away my character? I never 
drank more than a pint of beer a day in all my life." 

"It is useless to lie to me. Your condition is disgraceful. Go to bed 
at once, and we'll settle this matter when you are sober." 

"Indeed, mum, it's the hard work, and being over the fire. It's fits, 
as I've told you." 

" Go to bed, and don't attempt useless deception." 

"You wouldn't deprive a poor woman of her pint of beer ?" 

"Juliet, if you don't go to bed instantly, I'll send for the police." 

At this crisis a huge policeman came down the area steps, thinking 
somebody was murdered. "Same old game!" he muttered, gazing upon 
the raving Juliet. "I've been watching her for some time, and wondered 
whether you knew what she was up to. Why, she's been put out of the 
'public' in the next street half-a-dozen times recently. She's an old 
hand." Think of it, Ella! Our Treasure, our beautiful cook, "an old 
hand !" It was useless to think of reforming her. She had spent all her 
money, pawned all her clothing — even the dresses I had given her — for 
drink ! The policeman brought several assistants, who carried her off in 
a cab. 

The next problem was, where to get a cook ? I once more fell upon the 
newspaper "wants," and finding an advertisement that seemed to suit, 
drove to the place named. Fancy my amazement on discovering that I'd 
been ingeniously lured to a notorious servants' agency, against which I'd 
been warned ! The advertisement read as though the girl were in service 
as the fashionable address given. Being caught, I went in. One super- 
cilious young man was warming his back at the fire ; another was tilted 
back in a chair before a desk. Neither changed his position. "What 
did I want?" "Ob, a cook." "What kind of a cook?" " Oh, ah, the 
one advertised, 'Sarah?'" "Well, yes; ah, five shillings, if you please." 

" But I've not engaged her. I don't tnink that she will suit." 

The proud gentleman with his back to the fire smiled pityingly. " We 
—ah — nevare bring our ladies and servants together, ah, until payment 
of the customary fee, ah. It's good for three months, ah. Sarah is a 
very good cook. 

Like a fool I paid the fee, the young gentleman at the desk condescend- 
ing to make out a receipt, saying : " When we state that Sarah is a good 
cook, we don't guarantee her, you know — oh, not at all. She says she is. 
We take her word for it." 

" Take her word ? What, then, do you mean by this morning's adver- 
tisement? You state positively that she is a first-class cook, and sober." 
( " 0, dear, no ! We don't state anything. She states. It's her adver- 
tisement ; we only insert it." 

The mistress pays five shillings, the maid pay3 half-a-crown, the agency 
advertises its address at the maid's expense, and guarantees nothing. 
Isn't that a capital arrangement for the agency? Enraged with the sys- 
tem, I yet took Sarah's address and departed. In reply to my note I re- 
ceived the following communication : " Miss Sarah Buggins precents her 
cumplimens an cant think uv no sitervashun with late dinnrs sundy and no 
skitchun made." I exhibited this elegant epistle to the young gentlemen 
of the agency, who thought it a capital joke. They grinned from ear to 
ear, until, in a voice'of thunder, I demanded their attention. 

" Very unfortunate, I'm sure, but perhaps we've something in the next 
room that will suit." The " something" appeared in the shape of a hid- 
eously ugly and dirty girl, whose hands were in deep mourning. 
" You are a cook ?" ** Yes, mum." 

" How much experience have you had !" " One month." 
" That will do." And " something " retired. 
" How dare you offer me such a servant ?'' I said to the clerks. 
"These beautiful cads began to think, from my strong language, that 
I must be a grand lady, so they began to apologize. 

" Very sorry, we're sure, ah; but, ah, we do, ah, the best we can. Very 
nice person just from Ireland. Miss O'Flanigan !" 



Miss O'Flanignn appeared. She was very tall, very red-headed, and 
sickly in appearance. 

11 What wages do you ask ?" 

"The highest the best cooks get." 

" Oh, then, you are a professional cook ?" 

" No, I'm not, mum; Vm a dressmaker, but as business is bad in Dub- 
lin, I've come to London to go into service." 

1 And you presume to demand the highest wages, when you can't cook? 
\ on can retire." 

Giving roe a withering look, Miss O'Flanigan returned to the inner 
room, whence came a peal of laughter. Miss O'Flanigan had undoubtedly 
made some pleasing remarks about our interview. 

"I'll have no more trifling," I said to the clerks. "Either you'll en- 
deavor to send me a sober, good cook, or I'll warn my friends against 
your agency." The clerks begged me to see other girls shut up in the pen. 
I refused. " No, you must send me a cook." They promised. A flaunt- 
ing, impudent creature came the next morning, and, on hearing my re- 
quirements, declared I would not suit, as though she would ! Again re- 
viewing advertisements, I again set out in search of the unattainable, and 
was again lured unwarily to another agency, better than the other, but 
unsatisfactory. " The truth is, mum," said the woman, " I can't find 
good servants. The women who come to me drive me mad. They often 
lie, they sometimes steal, and they usually drink to excess. I'll do the 
best I can." She did. She sent me an old woman who was deaf and par- 
tially blind. After this boon had misunderstood balf-a-dozen orders, put 
curry in the soup, pepper in the tarts, and back hair in everything, we 
sent her away. Disgusted with advertisements, disgusted with agencies, 
I cried aloud for help. Where, oh, where, to find a cook? "Go to 
Whitely's," said a friend. I did, dear ; and I'm sure you'll rejoice to 
know that I breathe again. Yours, ever, Puss. 

Miss Ella Graham, Fifth Avenue, New York, U. S. A. 

FAIRFAX MINING COMPANY, 

426 CALIFORNIA STREET, ROOM NO. 2. 

President JOHN W. COLEMAN. 

Treasurer GEN. O. H. LAGRANGE. 

Secretary O. C. MILLER. 

[October 12 ] 

"dissolution. 

The partnership of Suon * May was dissolved on the 6th 
instant. FRANK C. SNOW. 
WM. B. MAY. 

I shall conduct the business under the name of SNOW & CO., and liquidate the 
affairs of the late firm at No. 20 Post street. FRANK C. SNOW. 

San Francisco, May 31st, 1879. June li. 

MECHANICS' FAIR, 

San Francisco, California, 
OPENS AUGUST 5TH, 1879- 

Science, Art, Industry and Nntnral Productions will be 
fully represented. Grand Instrumental Concert each afternoon and evening. 
Machinery in Motion, Rare Paintings, Fine Statuary, a Tropical Garden, Fountains 
and Promenades will make this Exhibition the most instructive and pleasant place 
of resort on this Coast. Those desiring space should apply at once. Office : 27 Post 
street. IRVING M. SCOTT, President. 

J. H. Cclver, Secretary. July 12. 

SHEEP RANCH FOR SALE IN OREGON. 

An admiruble sheep ranch, well stocked and watered, and 
capable of carryiug; about 20,000 sheep. Substantial residence and improve- 
ments on the property. To be sold at a bargain. Apply to 
May 24. EDWARD J. JACKSON, 209 Leidesdorff street, S. F. 

HEADQUARTERS DEMOCRATIC STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE. 

The Chairman and Secretary or the several County Com- 
mittees throughout the State are respectfully requested to send their Post- 
office address to the Secretary of the State Central Committee. 

A. J. BRYANT, Chairman. 
T. M. O'Connor, Secretary, P. O. Box 1202. July 12. 

L. BROWN, M.D., 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 

Office; Corner of First and Alder Streets, Portland, Oregon. 
[November 9.] 

THOMAS BOYSON, M. D., 

(University of Copenhagen. Denmark), 

Physician and Surg-eon. Office and Residence, 112 Kearny 
street. Office Hours, 11 A.M. to 1 p.m., and 6 to S P.M. Sunday, 11 to I only. 
Telephone in the office. July 13. 

DR. R. BEVERLY COLE 

Has Returned from the East and Resumed Practice at his Office, 
NO. 518 SITTER STXEET. IJune 21. 

^REMOVAL. 

BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE. 

NEVILLE & CO., 
So.'s 31 and 33 California Street, S. E. corner of Davis, 

San Francisco. [Sept. 21. 

L.H. Newton. NEWTON BROTHERS & C0 M M. Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers iu Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, 204 and 2(Hi California street. San Francisco, Cal May 25. 

Nbwton Booth, C. T. Wheeler, Sacramento. | J. T. Glover, W. W. Dodgi S. F 

W. W. DODGE & CO. 

Wholesale Grocers, corner Front and Clay streets, San 
Francisco. April 1. 

CASTLE BROTHERS, 

ESTABLISHED IN THE YEAR 1850. 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, >es.213 and 315 
Front street. San Francisco. Jan. 13. 

Berg-strom Church Organs, at Smith's, 200 Post street. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 19, 1879. 



"PLEASURE'S WAND." 

1 We Obey no Wand but Fleasnre^s/'--2Vw» Moore. 



Baldwin's Theater. — The rapid progress made by realism in art, liter- 
ature and on the stage is an important and interesting question. Emile 
Zola is undoubtedly the most powerful writer of those who seek to por- 
tray human nature as it is ; in all classes, with all its ills and ailments. 
" L'Assommoir " is one of the most remarkable books ever written. It is 
disgusting and vile in language and action ; it is true and life-like to the 
most minute of its details. The good that a publication of this sort can 
do is incalculable. It opens the eyes of those who are able to help their 
fellow-men to an existing condition of things little dreamt of in their 
philosophy. The evils and horrors that are concomitants of existence in 
the lowest classes are, to a great extent, remediable through legislation 
and philanthropy, and any writings that tend to keep these subjects before 
the world, aud public opinion interested, are worthy of encouragement. 
The proper field of the stage is more to amuse than instruct, and under 
this view the propriety of a dramatization of such a work as "L'Assom- 
moir" is' a matter admitting of much discussion, pro and con. Zola's 
novel, if it may so be called, doeB not lend itself to dramatization. It is 
not a' book with an intrigue or plot— with the necessary good and bad 
people, and a happy ending. It is simply a description of life in the low 
working classes of Paris, as more particularly exemplified and illustrated 
by the career of a couple of beings. The gradual fall of these people from 
a comparative state of prosperity to the lowest depths of misery is not the 
result of any machination or plot, but the simple consequence of the indi- 
vidual vices, and of an outrageous condition of society. The great lesson 
it teaches is one of temperance. The language is mostly all of the Paris- 
ian Argot, and the scenes and incidents perfectly local, and, therefore, 
inexplicable to outsiders. It will be seen that translation is difficult, and 
successful dramatization uigh unto impossible. Charles Reade, under- 
standing this, has constructed a play based upon those features of the 
book that are illustrative of the evils of intemperance ; and this drama is 
creating a sensation in London. Mr. Reade, through clever management, 
succeeded in receiving from Mr. Zola an indorsement of his action, and 
this effectually silences criticism as to the propriety of such a proceedii g. 
Mr. Reade, to make the play a play, has written up a plot, with a skillful 
use of the dramatis personam In some instances this results in a total 
change of character of some of the individuals. The moral of the book is 
also lost. In the play, " Gervaise " and " Coupeau " fall to their abjected- 
ness through the hunting and hounding inspired by a spirit of revenge on 
the part of " Lautier " and " Big Virginie." The Reade play is evidently 
what the Baldwin Theater is supposed to produce ; but what is being 
played is a sort of hybrid between that and a literal translation of the 
author's own dramatization. In its departure from the book, in plot and 
action, it is Reade's Drink ; in its sketchy nature, lack of continuity, 
tableaux taken here and there from the book, it is a translation. 
This performance ought to possess relish for us, satiated as we are with 
the everlastingly similar run of plays, It is something so different, so 
new that our mental palates ought to be tickled with it. In reality there 
are but two strong scenes; the women's encounter in the wash house, and 
the terrible delirium tremens death episode. The other seven tableaux, 
there are nine in all, fall rather flat, through a lack of clearness, as to 
what it is all about. Between some of them there are supposed to be in-, 
tervals of years or months, and there is nothing, absolutely nothing to in- 
dicate this. To one who has not read the book, the whole performance is 
unintelligible, to one who has perused Zola's pages, it becomes a source 
of anger and annoyance at the different changes. Of the acting of Mr. 
O'Neill, nothing but praise can be written. This is by far the best piece 
of work he has ever done in San Francisco. He seems to have gone into 
the part with heart and soul. It is a most carefully studied and carried 
out piece of acting. The faults that generally mar Mr. O'Neill's efforts, 
an imperfect knowledge of his lines, and a total disregard of the require- 
ments of make up do not exist in this masterly rendition of "Coupeau." 
In appearance, he is a French workman to the life. Every one appre- 
ciates Mr. O'Neill's talent, and when adverse criticism is necessary, a too 
frequent occurrence, by far, it is always done regretfully. On this occa- 
sion he does full justice to himself, and scores a great success. For a hor- 
rible realistic piece of acting, I commend you to his death scene. The 
delineation of the ravings resulting from mania a potu, is to a certain 
extent very difficult. In ordinary cases of dementia, the mind generally 
follows one groove, be it sadness or joy. But the wild delerium of 
alcohol is different ; there Che mind, or what is left of it, flits from one 
subject to another, from laughter to tears almost instantaneously. It is 
a hard task for an actor to portray, but Mr. O'Neill seems equal to it. 
Miss Coghlan plays " Gervaise " as she does everything else, admirably. 
It is not a character exactly suited to her, for her deportment and manner 
of speech are too refined in themselves to fit the unfortunate " Gervaise." 
A whole column might be written upon Miss Coghlan's good acting ; 
upon the satisfaction produced by all her efforts, and the truly artistic 
purity of her school, but it would be like preaching in the wilderness. 
Whenever this artiste leaves us, it is to be hoped that her regrets at the 
want of appreciation shown her, will be tempered by the knowledge that 
there does exist here a small band of friends who admire in her an 
admirable exponent of the perfection of dramatic art. The part of " Big 
Virginie " was assigned to Miss Lilian Andrews, an Australian actress, 
who made her debut on the occasion of Mrs. Judah's benefit. It was 
rendered vigorously and intelligently. Mr. Morrison's conception of 
" Lautier " may have been a satisfactory one to him, but it is about as far 
apart from the author's as the North and South Poles. The management 
have spared no expense in scenery, costumes and appointments. There 
are some features in stage settings that are absolutely ridiculous as re- 
gards the true rendition of things in France, but this is due to the igno- 
rance of the stage manager. It would seem that a simple perusal of the 
book was deemed unnecessary, for if it had been done many errors in 
dress, get-up, etc., would have been avoided. The wash house scene is ad- 
mirably managed ; though it might be suggested that the blows inflicted 
by "Gervaise" upon " Virginie," en petit comite, be made more audible. 
The audience would probably appreciate them, the peculiar nature of the 
punishment, and more fully understand " Big Virginie's " deep resent- 
ment. The novelty of some of the scenes is so strong, that a successful 
run is undoubtedly assured, or ought to he. 

Diplomacy. — Although it is not customary to review benefit perform- 
ances, the production of Diplomacy, at the Grand Opera House last Fri- 
day night, possessed so many meritorious features that comments are in 



order. The individual impersonations were praiseworthy, the ensemble re- 
markable. Miss Lewis' " Countess Zicka" is too well known to our the- 
ater-goers to require extended notice. It is a powerful piece of acting, 
producing a strong impression on the listener, but repeated auditories 
brings one to the belief that that is due more to the character itself than 
to its delineation. The strength and vividness of the author's creation 
carries aloDg the actress that represents it. All this is naturally said 
without any wish to detract in any way from the talent displayed by Miss 
Lewis. The very fact that this is such an excellent effort on her part 
permits of above remarks. Miss Nina Varian was very satisfactory as 
" Dora," though her tenderness towards " Julian Beauclerc " seemed to 
lack depth and warmth. Mrs. Morris made all that was possible out of 
the subordinate character assigned her, and that was of a nature to cause 
the wish to be expressed that she should be given more opportunities to 
appear on the local stage. As the hero of the piece Mr. Piercy did not 
disappoint his admirers. This gentleman possesses qualifications that will 
eventually acquire for him a very high position on the stage. He is in 
every respect an excellent actor, and his " Julian Beauclerc " was an able, 
intelligent performance. His emotion and mental misery was dignified and 
manly. That perfect ease of manner and self -deportment, so character- 
istic of Montague, was sadly lacking though, and this was a strong blem- 
ish on an otherwise faultless impersonation. Mr. Piercy suffers through 
being too ardent a devotee at the shrine of Star -ism. Messrs. Keene, Bil- 
lings and Morris were as good as could be expected, but to Mr. Max Free- 
man special commendation is due. "Baron Stein " was by long odds the 
best acted part of the whole cast. As compared to the French and Ger- 
man schools of acting the English is but crude and undeveloped, and pu- 
pils of the former appearing in conjunction with actors of our stage will 
naturally shine. There is a completeness of finish, an attention to by- 
play, make-up and dress suggestive of intelligence, that forms a strong 
contrast to the utter disregard of such trifles (! !) by our performers. 
Mr. Freeman succeeded in investing the character of "Baron Stein" 
with all the attributes necessary to make it a perfect picture, and our 
native public can now appreciate the high position he occupies on the 
German stage. Negotiations are in progress for the production of this 
play, with the same cast, for a short season at the Standard Theater. It 
is to be hoped that they will be successful. 

California Theater. — Le Petit Due, has run through the week to 
crowded houses. It is a very perfect performance, and so far superior to 
the rendition by Mrs. Oates that comparison is childish. That ease of 
manner and genuine tout ensemble, which are the Btrong characteristics of the 
French stage, are possessed by this troupe to a great extent. This work of 
Lecocq's is more in the nature of an opera comique than any of his other 
works, and there is, therefore, a stronger call made upon the musical fea- 
tures of the troupe. Mile. Aimee sings and acts the part admirably. The 
music of the first act, so sweet and tender in its nature, is Bung with 
remarkable pathos. In the second act the assumption of a character of a 
regular villageoise is a clever bit of acting. The spicy little verses sung 
in connection with this disguise are rendered with true French chic. Miss 
Beaudet is a delicious little beauty. She is a Boston girl of French par- 
ents, and is supposed to be a novice. Although very young, this seems 
hardly possible, for she has all the aplomb and verve of an old stager. 
Her voice, though small and thin, is very sympathetic, and even if it 
were not the audience would not care, for in this case it seems to be more 
a feast of the eyes than of the ears. The different duets scattered through 
the opera are very prettily sung by "Mr. and Mrs. Little Duke." The 
character of " Mile, de la Roche Tonnerre " is assumed by Mile. Raphael, 
and effectively acted by her. With a total disregard of the author's idea, 
this character was burlesqued in the Oates version and made ridiculous. 
Duplan is irresistibly funny in anything he attempts, and his " Frimousse" 
is no exception to the rule. The costumes were remarkably elegant, 
thanks to Mrs. Somebody, whose name every paper in town with singu- 
lar unanimity has mentioned. The " Minuet de la Cour," as danced by 
the bridal pair in the first act, is a pretty, graceful piece of dancing. The 
female chorus, on whom falls a great part of the hard work, is not as good 
or harmonious as the bevy of beauties that surrounded the little hoodlum, 
and the poor little man did not receive as many encores as was his wont. 
But the solfeggio was infinitely better rendered. It is to be doubted that 
many in the audience recognized the last act. In the English version it 
was almoBt entirely cut, and it gave a rather abrupt termination to the 
part. La Petit Mariee will be produced on Monday. Mr. Voegtlin. the 
talented scenic artist of this theater, has arrived in New York, and is at 
work on the spectacle Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea." The 
scenic effects are said by those who have seen it at La Porte St. Martin v 
in Paris, to be wonderful. In all probability it will be produced at the 
California Theater in January. Mr. Voegtlin's connection with this 
theater has not ceased, be is merely away on a short furlough. 

Standard Theater.— The Emilie Melville Pinafore Troupe closed 
their engagement to a full house. Having rested for a week, the3 r will 
leave on their barn-storming tour this evening. While all the other 
Pinafores that were launched were stranded through the inefficiency of 
their respective crews, or were carried down in the maelstrom of public 
indifference, this nobby little ship sailed triumphantly along to the end 
of its journey. That the country trip will he a success is a foregone con- 
clusion. This little band of amateurs can he assured of one thing— they 
carry with them the best wishes of all those who witnessed their admira- 
ble performance. During this week the Juveniles have held the boards, 
and have appeared to good houses. Repeated visits deepen the impres- 
sion produced by the precocity of these youngsters. Little Flora Walsh 
is too cunning for anything. She plays and sings "Josephine" with all 
the semblance and knowledge of an experienced actress. There is not an 
emphasis misplaced or a point lost. This troupe will continue until 
further notice, and any one who attends will be so thoroughly amused 
that he or she will surely recommend a visit to his sisters and his cousins 
and his aunts. Miss Lottie Chissold, to whom all the credit is due foi 
the admirable training of the youngsters, continues to watch over them! 
every evening. 

Grand Opera House. — Another effort is to be made to keep thiEl 
theater successfully open. On Monday evening a spectacular pantomime,! 
containing local hits aud features, will be produced. It is entitled BuUil 
and Bears. This speculation is under the management of Mr. Evans, ancl 
he promises great things. 

Chit-Chat. — Sheridan Corbyn is soon to bring out Jno. Woodard'J 
great drama, California through Death Valley, one of the most striking 
and vigorous of modern plays. The scene of the mirage on the desert i| 
wonderful. 

- ■ ■ — i 



July 19, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



Bush Street The iter Sunday ni hi nofHr. Thompeon'a 

en*rai»vmtnt. It baa been in *v rful one. Thi 

th "f tin- plajp Ua in kha ract that not only does it attract and 

il:\r amusement- seeking, theater going people, but it also 

draws t>> it.* audienosa ;» daai that rarely patroniae a rtx'iilur theatrical 

old-style I'uritans that generally content themselves with 

:..il riaita t» concerts, WH-Hn^ers. Hutchinson, etc., families and 

rli>cke»t to see the old down-Fiwt farmer, who t«> them is a 

■ •f youth. They rt'Coiuile tlii* infraction of their habits 

with their conscience by tl pinion that " Uncle Josh" is nature itself, 

ami not the work of a play actor. Hut they are wrong, for this very 
■ambiance to nature is the quintessence of dramatic art. So much has 
already been sairt in regard to the merits of thi* performance tbat 
farther remarks would be hut tiresome repetitions. Mr, Thompson will 
continue t-» star in " Uncle Josh," under the able and energetic manage- 
ment of Mr. Hill, to whose sagacity and intelligence a great part of his 
• is due. On Monday. Tony Pastor opens with his variety troupe. 
Several of the names on the list are those of old favorites; the others new 
faces, of whom report speaks favorably. 

SPORTING ITEMS. 

Rowing. —The race between Leahey, of the Pioneers, and Stevenson, 
of Vallejo, for a gold badge and the amateur championship of the coast, 
come* off to morrow at Long Bridge. The odds are in favor of Leahey. 
—There was a large race at North Beach last Sunday between scratch 
crews of the Pioneer, Neptune and Dolphin Clubs. It was won by the 
Neptune boys in their barge jT«te.*"— Bank of British North America 
versus Balfour Guthrie & Co, Saturday afternoon last, on Oakland Creek, 
one mile, straight away against the tide. Four oared in rigg barges with 
coxswains. Bank of B. N. A., D. Brown (bow), E. Stanger, G. 
Westland, H. N. Wallace (stroke), G. Moir (coxs.). Balfour, Guthrie & 
Co.-F. W, Reynolds (bow), F. C. Beazley, J. G, Heecas, R. D. Gir- 
vin (stroke), D. MacDonald (coxs.). After a closely contested race, in 
which the Balfour Guthrie had the advantage at the commencement, the 
Bank crew won by a length and a quarter. Time, 8 minutes and 3 sec- 
ouds.^— The St. George and Columbia Rowing Clubs, of Oakland, have 
decided to hold, jointly, a regatta in the latter end of September next. 
The proposed races are as follows: First class — four-oared shell (McKiu- 
lay cup). Second class — four-oared shell, four-oared out-rigged lapstreak, 
four-oared in-rigged barge, single shell, ship's boats, duck hunt. The 
officers of the Regatta Committee are A. MoKinlay, President ; A. J. 
Knight, Vice-President j F. C. Beazley, Secretary, and J. M. Costigan, 
Treasurer. 

Shooting. — A match was shot at Bird's Point last Sunday between 
C. W. Randall and A. Lambert, twelve single rises at 31 yards rise. It 
was won easily by Randall, score 9 to 5. Other matches were shot for 
small sums, the averages made being very good— Lambert killing 34 out 
of 40, and Randall 30 out of 37. There will be several freeze-out matches 
at Bird's Point to-morrow. -^— At the Presidio, Wednesday, about 200 
people gathered to witness the shooting for the selection of a team to 
shoot with representatives from Oregon and Arizona, the best shots to 
represent the Military Division of the Pacinc Coast at the National Rifle 
Tournament in September. The men selected were Lieutenants Ander- 
son and Jones, who were both presented with a silver medal. 

Swimming. — At the annual meeting of the Neptune Club, a gold 
badge and the Club championship was won by Mr. Dean.— —Aquatic 
Polo is becoming very popular, both here and at Alameda.— —Daily, the 
champion, has just saved another person from drowning at Santa Cruz — 
making twenty persoDS rescued by him since he went into the business. 
We should like to see a few gentlemen who are lovers of pluck petition 
Congress to vote Daily a medal for his splendid service. 

Base-ball. — Last Sunday's games were poor exhibitions, at the Recrea- 
tion Grounds, the score stood Knickerbocker 35, Eagle 4. ■■ ■ Franklin 
vs. Company B, score 8 to 6.— -McMahon vs. National, score 10 to 5. 
At Oakland, California vs. Athletic, score 15 to 13. Gaines to-morrow 
at Recreation Grounds, Reno vs. Star. At Oakland, California vs. Oak- 
land. 

Boxing. — Mike Donovan will arrive in San Francisco by Monday. He 
would have been here before, but for the loss of his railroad ticket, which 
necessitated a short delay.— —It is rumored that some sporting men are 
getting up a grand boxing tournament, which will probably take place at 
the Mechanic* Pavilion, on or about the 24th inst. 



MORE FRENCH THAN THE FRENCH. 
The Bulletin, of Tuesday last, kindly took the French nation un- 
der its wing and commended it as, on the whole, a valuable contributor 
to the progress of civilization, and an avant courieur, whatever that may 
he. The Suez Canal, we are told, is a French enterprise, and we believe 
it, partly because there is some historical evidence to that effect. But we 
positively decline to accept a statement, even from the Bulletin, that the 
Mont Cenis tunnel is a French enterprise, unless we are permitted to say 
that because the Chronicle contributes to make people remember the Bul- 
letin, the Bulletin was founded by the Chronicle. The Mont Cenis tunnel 
was a purely Italian enterprise," begun by Sardinia and finished by the 
kingdom of Italy. France came in when she acquired Savoy. The Act 
authorizing the work was passed by the Sardinian Parliament in L857. 
The mountain to he pierced lay entirely within the kingdom of Sardinia. 
The engineers— Grandis, Grattoni, Sommeillier — were Sardinians; and 
the Minister who urged the matter upon the Parliament, and explained 
the plans, and supervised the details, and provided the means, and com- 
municated his own energy to every one, was a Sardinian — the Count de 
Cavour— of whom even the Bulletin ought to have heard by this time. 

~~THE BALDWfN~THEATERr~ 

MftiiRger, Mr. Thomas Maj£iilrc."Trenieiifloiis Hit of* the 
Paris and London Sensation. This (Saturday) livening, ,luly 19th, mid every 
evening, produutiou from models imported direct from the Theatre Ambi^ue, Paris, 
where it created the greatest sensation of the century, L'ASSOMMOlft, in nine 
tableaux, now playing at the Adelphi and Princess Theaters. London, with unhounded 
success, under the title of DRINK. An Extraordinary Cast ! This (Satnrdaj) Af- 
ternoon. at 2 o'clock. FIKST L'ASS* >MMO.H MATINKK July 19. 

MECHANICS' PAVILION. 

Now Walking.--- LatlieV Nix-Day Fortes! rinn Tournament. 
Prizes -The Ladies' Diamond Belt and $1,000 ; $750; $oW ; 5350. Admis- 
BiOn, 50centa. July 10. 



CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

BAKTOX <C I.Airi.oit Manager; 

BABTOX HILL Acting Manager. 



THE OPERA SEASON! 

TRIUMPHANT SUCCESS 

-OF— 

A. I M E E , 

— IN— 

XjiEI T»!E!TIT DUO, 

Which will he Performed Every Evening: this Week, and at the 

Saturday. Matiuee. with its Extraordinary Cast and 

Gorgeous Misa on Scene. 



MONDAY aiifl TUESDAY EVENINGS, 

First Production Here, witli Entirely Xetv Costumes, of an {En- 
tirely New Opera, 
"LA PETITE MARIEE," 
(Performed in Paris Over Two Hundred Consecutive Nights.) 



Wednesday and Thursday Evenings, July 23d and 24th, 

Only Performances of 

••I, A lilt AN III: DIICIIESSE." 



Friday Evening, July 25, GALA NIGHT! 
BENEFIT OF ILLE. MARIE AIMEEt 

First Time Here, In Its Entirety, 

"LA MARJOLAINE." 

AIMEE as "La Marjolaiue," 

(In which she sings the Celebrated Kissing, Good-bye and Beggar Songs). 



8^~ In rehearsal, for speedy production, the following operas: LA BOULANGERE 
A DES EENS (The Rich Bakeress), expressly written for MLLE. AIMEE, and orig- 
inally performed by her for 100 nights in Paris at the Theatre des Varietes ; LA 
BELLE HELENE (first time in five years); LA REI ME INDIGO (Queen Indigo); 
LES BRIGANDS (first time in five years); LE PETIT FAUST (first time in five 
years); GIROFLE-GIROFLA ; and the last European operatic sensation, Offenbach's 
greatest success, MME. FAVART. July 19. 

BUSH STREET THEATER. 

CHAMLES E.LOCKE Proprietor. 



LAST MATINEE TO-DAY! 
FAREWELL APPEARANCES 

OF 

TJNCLE JOSH, 

SATURDAY and SUNDAY EVENINGS, JULY 19th and 20th 



MONDAY EVENING, JULY 21ST, 

TONY PASTOR 

AND HIS NEW DOUBLE COMPANY. 

S3- BESERVED SEATS XOW OX SAX.E.'Ei 

[July 10.) 

STANDARD THEATER. 

M.A. KEXXEDT. Manager. 



THIS (SATURDAY) EVENING. JULY 19TH, 

AND EVERY EVENING, 

And Wednesday and Saturday Matinee During the Week, 

I'ntil 1'iirtlier Xotire, 

THE STANDARD JUVENILE PINAFORE COMPANY. 



THE GREATEST OF WONDERS! 

The Opinion of All I 

A MOST MARVELOUS COMBINATION! 

Seats can be Secured Si'jr Days in Advance. 
[July 19.) 



Bradbury Pianos, Agency 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 19, 1879. 




"The World," the Flesh, and the Devil. 

[ By a Truthful Penman. 1 

We were talking, the other day, to a friend of ours who resided for 
some time at Natal. He tells us that the Zulu men are good-natured, 
cheerful beings, and that the Zulu girls are excessively pretty, most de- 
corous in their behavior, but addicted to flirt and joke. If you wish to 
marry them you have to pay the father about £40. Should you desert 
your wife her relations assegai you, but if she misbehaves herself the rela- 
tions, as part of the bargain, kill her. The ijirls go about in bands; when 
they see a young Zulu warrior they surround him, and make him tell them 
which of them he thinks the most beautiful.— «At Bristol, the otherday, 
two boys were brought before the County Justices charged with theft. 
They were declared by the police to be respectably connected, and noth- 
ing had been previously known against them. The offense of which they 
had been guilty was that of stealing two eggs which they had found in a 
plowed field into which they had wandered in the country. The crime 
was not a very heinous one, -yet it appears to have been considered some- 
what serious by the Bench, for the boys were ordered to pay a fine of 30s. 
each or go to prison for a month. Their father pleaded that a short time 
might be given hiin in which to find the money, but the request was per- 
emptorily refused, and the boys were sent to jail until the necessary sum 
could be procured. Dishonesty should doubtless be promptly suppressed, 
but considering the stigma which always attaches to a lad who has once 
been sent to prison, it seems altogether questionable in the present instance 
whether the punishment lias not exceeded the offense.— There is a funny 
story afloat that Mr. Rivers Wilson lost; ne good graces of the Khedive 
rather through a neglect of Court etiquette than by his financial policy. 
In the Egyptian Court it is regarded as a sine qua non of propriety to wear 
a fez. Europeans as well as Orientals are accustomed to respect this 
prejudice, and fall in with it. Mr. Wilson, however, whether from Brit- 
ish obstinacy or a dislike to exposing his eyes unduly to the sunshine, per- 
sistently retained his black-silk "top hat," to the great indignation of the 
Egyptian Court. So the story goes, and it is probably nothing but a story. 
If it were true, however, there is an historic parallel to be found in the 
incident. The Emperor Paul of Russia conceived a violent dislike to the 
tall black hat, and issued an ukase prohibiting its use under heavy penal- 
ties. The Ambassador of one foreign court, however, insisted on wearing 
the obnoxious headgear, and was dismissed by the Czar. — Court Journal. 
—There is a good deal of controversy just now about the value of merely 
circumstantial evidence. If the following incident has any truth in it, 
therefore, it is somewhat interesting at the present time. It is said that 
one of the learned Judges has received a handsome ring from the United 
States, accompanied by a letter in which the donor, while concealing his 
real name, expresses his gratitude to the gentleman in question. It ap- 
pears that some years ago the man who had been rightly charged with 
having committed a forgery was acquitted, owing entirely to the favorable 
summing-up at his trial. Since that time he has lived honestly, and is 
now honored and respected by those who know him. Comparing his 
present condition with what he might have been had things gone differ- 
ently, he rightly gives the credit of his good fortune to the Judge who 
presided, and encloses the souvenir in consequence. It is laid down in a 
certain well known book on criminal law that it is more expedient that 
innocent persons should suffer than that one guilty should escape. Ac- 
cording to the strict idea of administering justice this may doubtless be 
the case, but in the case of recent blunders it is even pleasant to be 
reminded that the precept has not always been carried out. 
M'lle Adelaide Montgolfier, a daughter of tbe inventor of balloons, is still 
alive, aged 89 years. She is possessed of a large fortune, and presented 
the Museum of the Aeronautical Academy with a copy of the large medal 
executed by Houdon, and representing her father and uncle — who was 
associated with him in the invention of balloons. This medal was exe- 
cuted to commemorate that event. A movement will be got up in France 
for celebrating the centenary of that memorable event, which took place 
in tbe month of June, 1783, in the vicinity of Lyons. — Court Circular.-^ 
Mr. Sothern has arrived safely in Canada, and has left for his salmon 
river on the coast of Labrador, where he, the Duke of Beaufort, Sir John 
Reid and Mr. Florence are to spend two months in salmon-fishing. They 
are to live in a frame-house, sent out from New York, to wear Jersey 
Bhirts and long boots, spend days of angling and nights of poker, lay in 
stocks of health, and accumulate new experiences.— Cardinal Newman 
is still very ill at Leghorn, and can take no food from loss of appetite and 
weakness.— A Russian paper, in describing the execution of Nihilists at 
Kieff, adds that a young girl, who concealed her name despite the use of 
the lash, declared at tbe foot of the gallows that Bhe was Nathalie Gorts- 
chakoff, niece of the Russian Chancellor.^— Sir Arthur Gordon, the 
Governor of Fiji, has been presented with a farewell address by the Abo- 
rigines Protection Society, expressing approval of the policy which he had 
adopted during his rule over that dependency. Sir Arthur was to have 
left England for Fiji about July 5th. — The new Edinburgh waterworks, 
at the Moorfoot Hills, were formally opened on June 13th, by the Lord 
Provost. The Water Trust and a number of leading citizens visited the 
reservoir at Portmore and Gladhouse. The storage capacity of the water- 
works is now increased to about two billions and a half gallons. The 
principal reservoir, which is about twelve miles from the city, has a stor- 
age capacity of one hundred and seventeen millions of gallons.— 
Prince Jerome Napoleon is now fifty-seven. He is a man of wide informa- 
tion, extensive reading, clear brain, and undoubted ability; a born, de- 
bater, he enjoys the by no means inconsiderable advantage of tbe only 
" Napoleonian " features in the family. Of the latter fact, M. Edmond 
About once made capital by graphically describing him as a Csesar 
declasse. This said, the whole of his chance seems to have been summed 
up. He has little or no money, and no personal friends. Indeed, he has 



always been celebrated for an unfortunate knack of disgusting his familiar 
servants and followers by manners and language amounting sometimes to 
rudeness. On the occasion of the Paris Exhibitions of 1855 and 1867, for 
instance, which he superintended with undeniable energy and success, he 
managed to obtain the dislike of almost every exhibitor through his petty 
regulations and unsavory fits of temper.— Is this true — that charming 
Theo is about to leave the stage ? Not for a garnished hotel (she is 
honest) ; not for a title (she is married); but tbe model little wife has her 
eye on a confectioner's shop in the Avenue de TOpera. O, if she makes 
the cakes herself, who would not cheerfully give himself an indigestion on 
petits fours/ By tbe way, while her brothers and sisters are teaching us 
how to act, I wish Madame Then would come over and teach us how to 
make tarts. British pastry is an unpleasant thing at the best, while the 
Parisians — and, still more, the Florentines — have the art of a certain short 
crust, neither buttery nor puffy, which is one of the delights of travel.— 
Anecdotes of the Prince Imperial are cropping up. V/hen the news of 
the burning of the Tuileries reached the Imperial family in their English 
exile, his exclamation was " Quel maheur ! I wonder what they did with 
my bicycle !" 

BANKS. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital 55,000,000 

Wflff. AliTORD President. 

TEOJIAS BROWST, Cashier | B. MURRAY, Jr., Ass"t Casbier 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dunlin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, GAL 

Paid up Capital $2,000,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, Isaac Wormser, Edward Martin, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents — London : Baring Bros. & Co. Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg; : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer& Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Kurope, Chii-a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, $1,800,- 
000, with power to increase to 810,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
somestreets. Head Office--2S Cornhill, London. Branches — Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan — Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Comjmny of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

May 18. FREDERICK TOWNSEND, Manager. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, $5,000,000, ol which §8,000,000 is tally paid np as 
present capital. Reserve Fund, §300,000. San Francisco Otlice, 424 Califor- 
nia street ; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER ; 
Cashier, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, Bank of England and London Joint 
Stock Bank ; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Busi- 
ness in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and all parts of the 
world. March 30. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid Up $10,000,000. 

Keserve, XT. S. Bonds 3,500,000. 

Agency at New Yor.lt, 62 Wall street. 
A.gency at Virginia, Nev. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers* Credits. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. July 5. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar und Kieihbank, No 526 Califomiastreet, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors. — Fred. 
Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Dan. Meyer, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, 
H. L. Simon, Claus Spreckels. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAI-, $300,000. 

Officers: President, John Parrott; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. Oct. 14. 

©7'77 a year and expenses to agents. Onlfit Free. Address, 

np* i * June 7.] P. O. V1CKERY, Augusta, Maine. 

200 Post street is on the corner of Dupont. 



July 19, J 879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



FATE. 

eyes that mate with mine, of all the earth— 

Dear, wistful eye-* that mine have never seen! 

1 pr;ty that ye may never look my way 

Until my grave be green, 
O bauds that would have helped me in my need, 

That never Would have thrust my own aside ! 
Oh, never may ye Union me till I He 

Too pale for pride ! 
feet in listening for whose coming youth 

Went by, while of its leaf-time came no bloom ! 
Tie now t«»> late for ye to come, till I 

K<>r happier hearts make room. 
O lips that would have found my own most sweet 

Of all sweet things that gladden God's dear earth, 
Let the world part us until in tie are cold, 

And dumb, and little worth. 
O heart of all hearts, that was meant for mine, 

That somewhere wanderest, weary for my sake, 
Will some mysterious sorrow thrill thee through 

The day that mine shall break ? 

—Howard Qlyndon, in July LippincotVs. 



FLOGS HIS MINISTERS. 

The King of Siaru is reported to have flogged one of his Ministers, 
and public opiuion has been thereby considerably excited in Bangkok. 
The importance attached in this case to the use of the rod by his Majesty 
Bomdet Pbra Paramindr Maha Khoulalonkorn is,, perhaps, explained by 
the fact of the flagellated mandarin having been connected by marriage 
with an English resident of the capital; for other Kings of Siam have 
been, by all accounts, pretty free in their use of the rattan without excit- 
ing any remark. His late Majesty, who died of a fever when on his way 
to view an eclipse of the sun in October, 18U8, was, of course, an excep- 
tional monarch of Thai. He spoke French and Latin and English, and 
Eossessed a practical acquaintance with the heavenly bodies which would 
ave made him an ornament to any astronomical society in Europe. He, 
consequently, got the credit of being a more oourteous and better man- 
nered kins generally than the other kings of Siam, and especially of hav- 
ing introduced a more polite and gentle system of transacting business 
with his State advisers than was formerly in vogue at Bangkok. It is a 
question, however, whether he quite deserved the reputation he enjoyed 
for being a humane as well as an accomplished prince; and at any rate, if 
he spared the rod, he was about the first King of Siam who did. When 
Captain Hamilton was in the "land of the free," as Siam is rather mis- 
named by its inhabitants, hardly a day passed without the monarch 
whipping some minister. The punishment, he tells us, was administered 
with split rattans, which cut pretty deep into the flesh, leaving conspicu- 
ous marks behind them. " The greater the ^marks appear," says the sev- 
enteenth-century traveler, "the greater the honor they take them to be, 
and the pretty ladies are not exempt from this flagellation for very small 
faults. I have seen some pretty agreeable young gentlewomen with rat- 
tan marks on their shoulders, which they are so far from covering that 
they expose them to passers-by, seeming to glory in being so much taken 
notice of by the greatest king on earth." — Pall Mall Budget. 

ANDES RAIL THE HIGHEST IN THE WORLD. 

A Spanish- American journal gives an interesting account of the 
extraordinary route and construction of the Ferro Caril Transandino, or 
Andes Railway, the highest on the face of the globe. A great part of this 
line is already in use. It begins at Callao, in Peru, runs along the coast 
of the Pacific Ocean as far as Lima, then rises to the Andes, where it 
attains at one place to the dizzy elevation of 14,260 feet, or about a level 
with the summit of Mount Blanc, and almost double the hight of the line 
of perpetual snow in the European Alps. The iron for this incomparable 
line was delivered by England, the wood by California and Oregon. In 
the huge field of rock between the chains of the Cordilleras the line 
passes no less than sixty-one tunnels. Such a railway, traversing bights 
once supposed to be inaccessible, necessarily possesses some wonderful 
bridges. One of the most remarkable is that of Verragos, which rests 
upon two iron columns of 2-10 feet in hight. The view from this bridge 
into the abyss which it spans is said to be truly horrifying, and, as the 
train passes over, the traveler may imagine that he is being wafted through 
the air on an aerial machine. Some points of the amazing landscape 
which are nearest heaven are described as being of " Dantesque infer- 
nality " in character. There are places on the line which are never visited 
by the light of the sun, in spite of their high elevation, the ravines being 
perpetually darkened by the immensity of the "Pics," or mountain sum- 
mits, whiuh rise up toward the sky. At San Matto the line passes a spot 
which is even named by the few inhabitants who are accustomed to the 
terrible gorges and hea\ en-reaching " Pics " of the Andes, the " Bridge of 
Hell " — et Puente de I' Infer niello. This grand line goes at present as far 
as Chicla, at a hight of 7,250 feet above the ocean, and then descends by 
degrees to Oroya. The intellectual creator of this stupendous work was 
the American engineer Meiggs, who died in 1877, the constructor of the 
line between Chili and Valparaiso. As a perpetual memorial to him the 
highest peak of the Andes has been most appropriately named "Pio 
Meiggs." 

French Commerce. — The Imports and exports of France were, in 
1859, 2,400.000,000 francs ; in 1870 they were 7,830,000.000 fraocs. The 
tonnage employed was, in 1859, 3,036,000, of which 1,473,000, under the 
French flag. In 1876 the total was 5,614,000, of which French vessels 
represented 2,302,489 tons. In 1859 the steam marine counted 2,616,000 
tons; in 1876,6,146,034. The railroads transported, in 1859,19,947,790 
tons ; in 1876, 62,131,107 tons. The mails carried, in 1859, 258,900,000 
letters, of which 18,456,730 were addressed to foreign countries. In 1876 
there were 367,443,307 letters, 45,300,664 of these being for foreign coun- 
tries. In 1859 the telegraphic dispatches numbered 698,501, including 
144,703 for points outside of France ; and in 1876, 8,080,964, of which 
those for other countries were 1,027,249. 



Said the Sheriff, as he wedded the two fond hearts : " What God has 
joined let no man enjoin" — which was satisfactory, in spite of its irregu- 
larity. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco, California, for 
the Week ending July 14th. 

Compiled from the Records of the Commercial Auency, 401 California St., S.F. 



Thursday, July 10th. 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



J O'Tiiplln to Louisa B Taplin.. 

Same 10 Wm Patterson 

Sumner J Record to J J Hunt .. 
S Or Murphy to Cornelius Dull .. 
John B Lewis to S (i Murphy... 

John McColl to John Curry 

Thos Joyce to Martin Joyce .... 
E Harrington to U E Harrington 



DESCRIPTION. 



Sundry lots in Precita Valley 

PV Lots 2U7 to 273 

E Ciipp, l:ld n 88th, n 65x115 

N Sutter, 24:19 e Jones, a 21x65 

Same 

Lot 1, blk 511). Buy View H'd 

Lots l to 7, hikl. West End Mup 1 

E Webster, 120 n Fulton, n 17:6x1.37:6. , 

L F Duuiind 10 G P Loi;«eau IS 14th, 275 e Sanchez, e 25, s 101, etc... 

Win Hale to It H Biadshaw jS Cal'a, 82;6 w Laguna, w 27:6x107:6... 



PRICE 



$3,100 

7.000 

2,000 

7,000 

20 

150 

400 

500 

10 

1 



Friday, July 11th. 



Fred'k Pohley To Benj Sturmln. 
D Callahan to Wm B Hooper .... 
Fred'k Wolf to Jnlie A B Wolf . 

J Marchant to C Grosgean , 

Same to M G Cobb 



Jane L Case to Elijah Case.. 
Elijah Case to Jane L Case. . 



M Staeh li to L Deely 

N Sonnichsen to Maria Ford 

Peter J Duuue to Bridget Dunne. 
Mary E Brooks to L M Brook?... 



NO'Farrell,212 wSteiner, w 22x82:6.. $5,000 

N cor 9th and Howard, ne 100x165 5 

W Webster. l07;7?inCal. 50x104:3 Gilt 

Sundry lots in various parts of city. . . . 280 
All property whatever for the benefit of 

creditors 

Sundry lota in Haley & O'N Tract; and 

lots in Case Tract, Alameda Co 20,000 

Lots 21 to 32, blk 290, H & O'N Trac! ; 

and lots in Case T ct, Alameda Co ... | 20,000 

N Cal'a, 25 w Lyon, w 25x80 1,000 

Lot 105, blk 195, Central Park H'd 1,000 

W-Lerov, 70:6 s Sac'to, s 23x58:9 6 

W cor 7th and Channel, nw 240x300 1 



Saturday, July 12th- 



P H Magrath to Sam'l F Sinclair. 
City and Co S F to Anna Roche.. 

W B Hooper to G A Hicks , 

T SMoffltt to Wm D Hohro 

Isaac Swain to Caroline Beals 
L L Robinson to Santa Clara Coi. 
Wm Bryan to Owen McHugh 



Ne29th av, 225 nw J et. nw 25x100 

ELvon, 55 n Post, n 27x110 

S Chestnut, 206:3 w Taylor, 68:9x137:6 
S Clay, 11.8:9 w Steiner, w 25xl27:4H . 

E Jones, 92 s Wash'n, s 24:5x68:9 

W Sanchez, 165 n 14th, n 203, BW 32, etc 
N McAllister, 430:6 w Lyon, 50x137:6 . 



$ 150 

10,000 
4.000 
3,052 
6 
3,500 



Monday, July 14th 



CS Preble to Chas B Preble .Lots 8 an I 9, blk 291, Haley & O'N Tct 

S Davis to H H Bod well N 26th, 77:6 e Bartlett, e 40x80 

J M Barney to Lydia II Barney.... Sw Van Ness and Ellis, s 70x109:9 

Geo B Bradford to Jas Amhrose. . .'Lot 25, blk 50, Cily Land Ass'n 

Wm W R Hatch to Chas E PechiolN Harry pi, 87:6 e Laguna. e 25x80 

John A Snook to Jas M Haven Ne 8th, 225 se Bryant, se 50x60 

Sophie Loewe to S Shoenberg .... Undiv !tf n McAllister, 105 e Laguna, e 

I 25x137:6 

JS Barrett to M Mignelajauregny.lN Bdway,68:9 e Ma-en, e 34:4>jxl37:6 
Chas Cameto to John Dip pie Nw R R av, 53:2 ne 6th av, ne 89:6, nw 

I 105, bw 53, se 119 to com 



f2,500 
1,500 
Gilt 
150 
2,000 
2,000 

700 
4,000 




T. A.. BARRY, Agent for Naglee's Brandy, Is at No. 116 
Montgomery Street. 

THE AVERILL MIXED PAINT 

IsmannfActnreil from strictly pure White I, end. Zinc, and 
Pure Linseed Oil, to which is added Water Qlass, which chemically unites the 

ingredients and holds them in solution, so they cannot separate. As a house paint 
it has no equal, producing a brilliant glossy finish, impervious to the weather, and 

Will Last Twice as Long 
as any other paint made. It is of pure white, and any Shade or Color desired, mixed 
ready for the brush, so that any one can apply it. 

Our wagon and machinery paints, from the more common colors to the finest ver- 
milion, are specially desirable. .... . . 

Our fire-proof roof, barn and bridge paint, manufactured from oxide of iron, is the 
best and cheapest paint for the purpose that cau he produced. 

Put up in i, j, 1 and 6 gallon cans, and in barrels, sold by the gallon. Send for 
sample card of colors and price list. Address, 

CALIFORNIA PAINT COMPANY, 

329 MARKET STREET, San Francisco. 



July 13. 



SWANT0N HOUSE, PESCADER0. 



TnfsPopnlnr Hotel, together with the detached Cottars. 
which are not the least of its attracti%'e features, have been newly furnished 
throughout, and are now open for the reception of guests. Those desiring to visit 
the most enjoyable of all our sea-side resorts, can make no mistake in deciding upon 

Pescadero. __, ,_ 

IT IS EASILY REACHED. 
and is unsurpassed in the excellence of its climate, the beaut;* of its scenery, and in 
the attractiveness of its trulv remarkable sea beach. Those extraordinary pebbles, 
among which are to be found agates, opals, sapphires, etc, were never so numerous 
as now the past Winter having thrown up immense numbers of cunously-shaned 
stones, which for ages have been subjected to the everlasting motions of the tireless 
Pacific. GOOD TROUT FISHING is obtainable in the Pescadero river. 
^~ The hotel prices are fixed to suit the times. [April 27. 



Bradbury Pianos, 200 Post street. Established 1854- 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 19, 1879. 



THE WATER QUESTION — MAYOR BRYANT AND 
THE BULLETIN. 

The Bulletin is nothing if not a grievance monger. It must always 
appear to be fretting and fuming over something or somebody. It was 
only a short time ago that we were wondering what it would find to make 
a special grievance of during the forthcoming campaign. We knew it 
couldn't be happy unless it had somebody to worry. We had begun to 
think, most vainly as it appears, that its stock of grievances had about 
run out. It had made its peace (piece) with the railroad. Ralston had 
been too long in his grave to be again disinterred. Who, and what were 
to be its next subjects of attack? We had not long to wait for an answer. 
Mayor Bryant and the water question are to serve for this special occa- 
sion. The fretting and fuming process is already far advanced. Editorials 
filled with lying and slandering, with malice, and all uncharitableness, 
make their appearance almost daily. The attack has set in with more 
than ordinary Bulletin virulence. Driven by the force of truth from one 
position to-day, it breaks out in an altogether unexpected quarter to- 
morrow. It is lying by day and lying by night, and lying from the very 
lust of lying. It shrieks the word "water," and howls itself hoarse at 
the name of Bryant. We are told one day that Bryant has always been 
the tool of Spring Valley. Then a more sober-minded and truthful con- 
temporary points out the inexorable logic of the facts. It is shown be- 
yond peradventure that our worthy Mayor procured the employment of 
John F. Swift as special counsel for the city, and that he was in earnest 
in all efforts made on behalf of the city as against the Water Company. 
Then the Bulletin, driven from that position, suddenly assumes another, 
and says : "Bryant has recently changed base on the water question." 
The original charge, though disproven, is not withdrawn. An honest 
assailant would at least do that before asking people to believe a second 
accusation. That Mr. Bryant has in any respect "changed," is an asser- 
tion that is unaccompanied by any evidence whatever. Coming from one 
who has just been caught in a malicious lie, it is hardly worth a respect- 
ful answer. His Honor the Mayor has not changed. The water ques- 
tion is at rest, and His Honor will soon be in the same position, so far as 
his official duties go. The Bulletin knows as well as it knows anything 
that the Water Company does not want to sell its works. It prefers to 
keep them for the good reason that the money could not be better placed. 
Bulletin legislation fixed the company's income at 8 per cent ; with that 
the company is satisfied if the city is. If, however, the city insists upon 
owning its water works, then, and in that case only, the company desires 
to sell, as, of course, it would not desire a competitor. But the city is 
not insisting upon anything of the kind. So long as it does not stir the 
subject no one else will. The fact is, the water question is a dead issue, 
and the Bulletin knows it. 

WHAT! SO SOON? 

Verily it is over early for the Workingmen's candidates to begin 
stealing and running away with the plunder. But a commencement has 
been made. One R. A. Leonard was and is the party's candidate for City 
and County Surveyor ; he was also collector of unconsidered assessments. 
What else he was we have no means of knowing. Like most of his par- 
ty's nominees, he had the advantage of being unknown. You can't say 
much about fellows who were never heard of before. They cheat criti- 
cism and defy attack. That was the happy condition of Mr. Leonard, 
until the other day. In an evil hour he was entrusted with the money 
bag. There was but a trifle of three hundred dollars in it, yet even that 
small sum was great enough to tempt his cupidity. He stole it, and ran 
away ; and now Mr. Leonard is not as obscure as he was. Through the 
medium of the Police records, we are told that he is thirty-nine years of 
age, slender of build, dark of complexion, beardless as to face, and with a 
head covering of light-brown hair. He was a pet of Kearney's, and a 
favorite at the sand lots. He was a nominee for an office, which is gen- 
erally supposed to afford more than the average opportunities for steal- 
ing. He couldn't wait the realization of his prospective opportunities, 
but must needs hasten to go for the first thing in sight. He cleared out 
with money collected from the poor dupes of workingmen who follow him 
and his kind. That money was intended to help him and his associates 
to office. It was a paltry sum, yet his honesty was not proof against the 
temptation of stealing it. Is he not a fair specimen of most of the others ? 
We do not know for certain whether he is or not. Therein lies the objec- 
tion to the whole crowd. They are unknown. They may be all Leon- 
ards for ought the general public know. Yet they ask to be put in pos- 
session of the city's treasury. A private individual would want some 
better recommendations before he would yield up control of his safe to 
such people. It is a most monstrous proposition to put the treasury in 
charge of men unaccustomed to handling coin or fulfilling important 
trusts. 

THE POLITICAL SITUATION. 

The political situation is so mixed that there is little satisfaction 
in attempting to describe it at present. The pipe-layers and wire-pullers 
are at work, and until they are through it is difficult to tell how the is- 
sues are to be made up, or who the real contestants are to be. The one 
thing that is certain is, that the Republican ticket, with George C. Per- 
kins at the head, has made a fine start, and that its success seems to be 
beyond a peradventure. The party is united, is in earnest, and is happy 
in the sure and certain hope of success. On the other hand, the varied 
elements in opposition are wrangling among themselves in amost unseemly 
way. There are enough votes in opposition to the Republican ticket to 
defeat it ; but as they cannot, it would seem, be united, in favor of any 
one course of action, the Republicans are likelv to have something very 
like a walk over. That is the way it looks now. Dr. Hugh J. Glenn 
has published a fair and candid exposition of his position, that ought to 
satisfy those who have a reasonable desire to be satisfied. In all matters 
that may arise between the two noted parties, he will be true to his Dem- 
ocratic principles. In regard to all things in which the distinctive princi- 
ples of the new Constitution are concerned, he will adhere to the spirit of 
that instrument, regardless of party. That is his position, and it is a 
clear, distinct and consistent one, notwithstanding the hypercriticism of 
his enemies. White, the Workingmen's candidate, is met with an assault 
upon his good name that would injure him, if he were nominated by any 
other party. But the unwashed crowd have a way of sticking to their 
man all the more because he is a little dirty. They will adhere to Kal- 
loch and White sure. By next week things may be expected to take on 
a more definite form, and by that time we shall see what we shall see. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Primeval. 

Silent and still her mighty reach 

Of winding stream and mountain chain, 
Of whispering woods and wave - lashed beach, 

Of flowery dell and grass - clad plain j 
Her dusky children's step is light — 

They are not many in the land, 
And though her face is glad and bright, 

And though her mien is calmly grand, 
She seems halt wistfully to wait 
The advent of a nobler fate. 

Discovered. 

From Southern seas and sunny sides, 
Behold! a white sail northward flies; 
And, in Spain's name, forevermore 
Cabrillo claims the virgin shore. 
Solitude reigns again. And now 
We see another wandering prow. 
It is the knightly rover, Drake, 
At whose dread name all Spaniards quake. 
No trifler he, with empty boast, 
To idly claim a distant coast ; 
For, lo ! be boldly comes to land, 
Plants England's banner on the strand, 
And with due form and seriousness, 
Proclaims his sovereign lady, Bess ! 

Evangelized. 

From yonder mission walled in white 

A drowsy bell peals on the air, 
Calling the dusky neophyte 

To morning task or evening prayer. 
Listless alike at both is he, 
And wherefore should he not so be, 
Whose life knows neither hope nor- care? 
The purple grape climbs up the hills, 

The fields are gilt with yellow grain, 
Rich, lucions fruit the orchard fills, 

Fat cattle graze upon the plain. 
An exile, learned and refined — 

The long-robed Friar — rules the land, 
Portly, but pious, stern, yet kind, 

The idol of his half-tamed band. 

Transformed. 

Gone, are Friar and neophyte, 

Gone the sleepy days of old, 
Conquered by the Saxon's might 

California yields her gold. 
Waking from her sleep at length, 

She arises in her strength, 
Brings all races to her feet, 

Builds a nation of her own, 
Motley-hued, but as complete 

As the world has ever known. 
San Francisco, July 18, 1879. 



THE JUDICIARY IN DANGER. 

We have no hesitation in saying that the ticket " put up" by cer- 
tain members of the Bar is a menace to the independence of the judiciary 
of this city. It is conceived in sin and shapen in iniquity. It is the 
result of a wickedly designed arrangement among certain legal firms, 
whose desire it is to own our Judges and run our Courts. The possibility 
of its success should be looked upon with, dismay by all honest citizens. 
It is surface reasoning to argue that lawyers are necessarily the beat 
guides in electing an independent judiciary. Their knowledge as to who 
are calculated to make the best judicial officers is unquestionable. But 
their disinterestedness is by no means equal to their knowledge. No, not 
by a great deal. In short, they are liable to be corruptly interested par- 
ties. There are lawyers who like to have a friend on the bench, and it is 
worth not a little to the practitioner to have it known that he has such a 
friend. Clients will always bestow their favors on the attorney that has, 
or is supposed to have, the most influence with the Judge. It is not well 
that Judges should be indebted to particular attorneys for their election. 
If they are, Justice is not as likely to be as blind in such cases as she 
ought to be. She will be very liable to see a friendly aide-de-camp, and 
to cast a favorable squint in his direction whenever occasion offers. 
Human nature is human nature, whether on the Bench or off it. The 
mere fact of clothing a man with ermine will not purify him if the es- 
sence of the thing is not within him. These general principles are true, 
and should make us wary of an attorney-packed Bench. If we were to 
descend to particulars, name every nominee on the ticket, tell of his affili- 
ations, and explain just why his name comes to be there, we should 
demonstrate the terrible danger there is in permitting a few self-seeking 
lawyers to foist a judiciary upon us that is conceived in corruption. A 
little investigation of this subject is much needed. The more it is probed 
the better. If the danger should become more imminent, it will be our 
duty to deal with it less gingerly. There are some ugly facts underlying 
this business, that must come out if the Bar ticket is persisted in. The 
presence of a name on that ticket may almost be taken to be evidence 
conclusive that the nominee is a good man to vote against. There may 
be one or two exceptions, but we doubt that there is one. We say that, 
knowing the motives which got them on the ticket. A few wire-pullers, 
for their own purposes, brought the thing about. It is understood that 
the innocent majority now repudiate the ticket, and realize its evil con- 
ception. It must be defeated at all hazards. 

Mr. Frank W. Gross is the nominee of the Republican party for the 
office of Clerk of the Supreme Court, and a better there could not be 
chosen by any party. The reputation he has made for himself in his 
widely-extended business relations, is a most enviable one, and his fitness 
for the extremely responsible and delicate position for which he has been 
named, will bring forward many active aud energetic friends to work for 
him. It is with sincerity we hope so congratulate him in September. 



July 19, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISKR. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

" H»*r the Cri»r I" " What the 'lenl »rt thout 
•One th*t will pity the tleril. tU with you." 

" He'd a -i itur in his Uil «s King as a lUil, 
Which made Uiui grow bolder and bolder." 



The Pedestrian Fever has intensified to that extent in this vicinity 
that there is every indication that the community can hardly recover un- 
mething is done f<»r its immediate relief. Last Tuesday morning 
rai a general domaetic asnaation over the entire Western Addition. 
Over forty boys had suddenly disappeared from their homes, and in spite 
<>f the industrious search made by their mothers, could be discovered no- 
where, Tuesday night came and still the lost hairs did not report. 
Wednesday morning the agonised parents besieged the police office, and 
specials were sent out in every direction. By Wednesday night the ex- 

ottement was intense, and with the fate of Charley Boss fresh in their 
minds, the distracted relatives scoured the city in person for traces of the 
juvenile delinquents, Thursday morning, as some of the searchers were 
passing a large empty building on a side street, they beheld one of the es- 
trays -little Jimmy Dickerson— busily engaged chalking figures on the 
adjoining fence. *' Oh ! you villain!" screamed his mother, "come 
home this minute, won't I give it to you ?" " Lemme 'lone, said Jimmy, 
still chalking away, "Skinny Briggs has just made his ninety-second in 
twelve forty-two, and I must get it down." Ray — don't you want to go in ? 
(July ten cents !" sang out a snub-nosed urchin at the basement door ; 
" all the walkers now on the track !" The parental delegation entered the 
cellar. It was about seventy-tive feet long and forty wide. It was filled 
with boys, tents, noise and other nuisances. Half a dozen half stripped 
boys, almost cut in two by tightly strapped belts, were staggering around 
the track supported by their trainers. Others were lying on their backs 
with their bind legs in the air, having their blistered feet sponged off and 
painted with arnica. The son of a doctor was sawing out a bunion from 
the puffy toe of the boy who had taken the first prize for attendance at 
Sunday school. Some reptile who had bet no end of glass alleys on 
Reddy McShucks, had been detected in trying to poison Johnny Gibson, 
the Hayes Valley Champion, with a strong cigar, and there was a pro- 
digious row in consequence. Boney Rodgers, who wore the South Park 
belt, had accused the official scorer, Willie Bazembee, of altering the 
record, and the editor of the Peanut was making a speech from the 
Judges stand to the effect that unless the sawdust was immediatly sifted 
for broken glass and things, he'd write a hole through the whole tourna- 
ment in the next issue. By the aid of an entire detachment of police, the 
match, which was really to run four days longer, was broken up, and the 
boys taken home by main force — that is, all but four — they were taken to 
Lone Mountain. 

Multitudinous are the tricks of trade, but for mingled ingenuity and 
rascality the little dodge of a piano-seller, whose store is located not a 
thousand miles from New Montgomery street, takes the cake. His stock 
consists of Hale aud Antisell pianos, but, be it observed, the names of 
those well known firms does not appear upon the instruments. And why? 
Because, to his customers, this gentleman is a great manufacturer of 
pianos (he never had one made for him in his life) and therefore it be- 
comes necessary that his name should appear upon the workmanship of 
others. If a customer wants a " Hale," then, of all j>ianos in the world, 
lie would counsel him not to purchase that particular make. But he has 
an article here of his own manufacture, which for finish, tone, etc., ex- 
cels, etc., anything and so forth. If an Antisell is required, the same lit- 
tle comedy is enacted, and the joke is that in each case the buyer gets 
what be asks for and gives all the credit of manufacture to our enterpris- 
ing and amusing fraud. Perhaps, if he keeps on in this way, he actually 
will be able to start a manufactory of his own some day; but it is the 
cheapest dodge for establishing a reputation, without risk or expense, 
that has yet come under our notice. 

About two months ago two young ladies were assaulted, in the 
night, at Wheatland, and beaten almost to death with an iron bar. 
There are seventeen persons in Wheatland, including a negro, who lives 
by asking for a drink of water and looking at Ida Dunn. All the detect- 
ives of the Pacific coast have been engaged ever since the 15th of May, 
working up the case, and several have been imported from abroad, 
including the f anions Smellemoutski, of Moscow, who discovered thirteen 
Nihilists in the Czar's private library, done up as folio volumes. New 
developments are expected every minute. The iron bar has been ana- 
lyzed, and found to consist of 13 parts cyanide of potassa, 47 parts Ru- 
lnoris, 20 parts Umbrce Nigra, and 20 parts Wheatland horror. Some- 
thing will soon be done. Further search shows traces of undue influence 
in the wrong quarter, and the village is almost depopulated. The griddle 
cakes at the Roddan's yesterday turned up missing, the griddle having 
disappeared. The detectives are now out, following up this clue, and the 
mystery will soon be unraveled. Ten barrels of beer have beeu sent up 
from town, and men, strong men, weep like children* 

H. L. Knight, late of Kearney's gang, paralyzes the universe by a 
"card," in which he solemnly declares that he has " deemed it just and 
wise and proper to rejoin the Republican party," at least until " the 
serpent of secession and shoddy" is trodden under foot, and " our glorious 
flag, like the serpent raised by Moses in the wilderness, carries assurance 
to all that freedom of speech and pen and ballot are secured to them." 
We don't want to insinuate that Mr. Knight has snakes in his boots, hut, 
really, these serpent similes are suspiciously mixed and multitudinous. 
It is interesting to know", however,, that the reptile which old Mose set 
squirming on a pole gave freedom of speech and pen and ballot to the 
Israelites; and, when we come to think of it, a brazen serpent wouldn't 
be such a very inappropriate emblem for a political party after all. 

R. A. Leonard, nominee of the W. P. C. for City and County Sur- 
veyor, has mysteriously disappeared. As Chairman of a Committee to 
start a party paper, he had collected §150. We have known for some 
time that the value of city offices is depreciating, but we should have 
thought the pickings would be worth more than this, especially when we 
censider the risk and trouble of decamping with such a trifle. 

A drummer for an Ogden business house was recantly fined S400 and 
costp, at Winnemucca, for soliciting without a license. We always said 
that Winnemucca was no slouch of a place, and now we say that Winne- 
mucca ought to be made the capital of the Universe. God bless Winne- 
mucca. 



Of the three nominees for 0-overnor, White is accused of having 
'rained a family," Perkins of being in league with the monopolists to 

min the State, and Glenn is of being a perfect ruin in his own proper 
person! morally and mentally. It is unnecessary to add that the truth 
of all these accusations is proved beyond a shadow of doubt by the 
respective political enemies »f the gentlemen in question, so that it 
seems we have to choose between a destroyer of homes, a destroyer of 
Communities, and a blamed idiot for our next chief executive. 

One of those cheap bits of wisdom out of the copy book is now 
traveling round the country, to the effect that this world was not meant 
for mourning, because the flowers are not black. Exactly so ; neither 
was it meant for dining, because dinner-tables are not sky-blue ; nor for 
fishing, because trout don't wear ulsters ; nor for smoking, because to- 
bacco costs money ; nor for sensible men, because Martin Farquhar Tup- 
per lives in it. 

Some persons are very much concerned for the feelings of honest 
Democrats in the present crisis. We have seen them both, and they say 
they have no feelings to speak of ; much obliged, idl the same. We 
have been looking for the honest Republican, but he has gone out of 
town ; and the self-respecting Honorable Bilk died last week. On the 
whole, we may have been wasting our sympathy, and shall bottle up the 
rest of it. 

There is an appalling outbreak of initials in the papers. Meet- 
ings of the Y. M. U. B., the A. O. U. W., I. O. P. R., and the J. G. A. 

are announced without fear of consequences. We mean to stop this by 
explaining these dark hints. Your Most Ugly Bachelors, the Ancient 
Order of Ugly Women, the Immense Order of Prize Roosters and the 
Jackasses Gone Astray are now unmasked and must seek other disguises. 

Murphy has gone. He has " folded his tent like the Arabs and 
silently stolen away." Yet stay, not silently. He made a farewell 
speech, in which he declared that he had become enamored of San 
Francisco. Proudly the Golden City twines this flower of temperance 
amid her wreath of grapes, and hopes next time Mr. Murphy visits his 
new love, to have a splendid crop of drunks for him to operate upon. 

The New York Sun is in partnership with Edison, and is very 
cheerful about prospects in the electric light business. Why don't it help 
him out, then ? The poor man is stopped because platinum costs so 
much, and he can't find anything incombustible to take its place, and yet 
there's the Sun, publishing every day statements warranted to stand hell 
fire, they're so tough, and never a ribbon of them for his partner. 

The Detroit Free Press is witty as ever. It declares that "impeach- 
ment can never be exercised for a higher or holier purpose than for the 
punishment of a chief magistrate who tramples on the laws of his country." 
What, never? Almost always it might be better to impeach the Free Press 
for being as funny as it can, and in hot weather. Lord ! Lord ! so many 
fire-crackers thrown away, and. so near the Fourth of July ! 

Voorhees threw at Burnside in the Senate a phrase which we think 
we have met before : " Et tu, Brute f " Burnside, stirred up by a brother 
senator, demanded an apology for this insult, and Voorhees declared he 
never called him a brute "on the floor of the Senate." He said nothing 
about any other floor, and Burnside smoothed his heroic whiskers. Les- 
seps has not yet apologized for the Darien Canal. 

There is not in all Texas to-day, we learn, a colored beggar, nor one 
who is wi hout food, clothing or shelter. The grammar is a little mixed. 
First, there is not a colored beggar; then there is not a colored beggar 
that is without food, clothing or shelter, but some, presumably, that have 
all these. It is a little mixed, but we believe it. Only the statements 
are colored in Texas, not the beggars. 

The papers tell us that " Louis Jackson, of Coos Bay, after being 
stung by a poisonous insect, died of inordinate thirst. Neither water nor 
milk would satiate his craving for drink." We have known several men 
in the same fix. Undoubtedly it was tarantula juice that hurt Louis. 
Why didn't his friends try a hair of the bug that bit him ? 

Two young ladies in Los Angeles County got drunk under a gum- 
tree. This is the English of an item in Wednesday's papers, and why 
there should be such a noise made over it is more than anybody can tell. 
If young ladies want to get drunk they could hardly chouse a more retired 
spot to indulge the freak. 

Adolph Arm and is his name, and he says Dr. Coggswell's fountain 
is a nuisance, and the Doctor a humbug, and he prays that both may be 
abated, and all the people say Amen ! But the fountain is good enough 
for a tombstone, and Dr. Ooggswell ought to be buried under it. We 
stick to that. 

A telegram to the daily papers says that the counsel of Cox, the mur- 
derer of Mrs. Hull, argues in defence of his client that "the deceased 
was alive until after the post mortem examination." This is the first 
time we have heard of a person being alive " after death." 

An evening paper looks upon the Mayor as a kind of king, and 
speaks of his scepter being in worthy hands. The Mayor himself some- 
times thinks so, and Fernando Wood always hesitated between Mayorality 
and Muroiinltij when writing of his official position. 

The Postmaster-General says the Dead Letter OihVe is the proper 
place for live toads and bugs of all degrees. We have already forwarded 
a choice collection of slugs and spiders, and hope others will contribute 
their mites, with or without cheese. 

" The man who is always offering to pledge his honor has, doubtless, 
had it in pawn many a time." — Alto. What of that, so long as he 
redeemed it? Couldn't pledge a scarcer article. 

The Papers say Civil Service Reform is a failure, but we have our 
doubts. They have reformed it so well in the public offices out here that 
you can't get a civil answer to a question. 

Dr. Glenn writes to say that he has not gone back to his native glens, 
and the T. C. did lie, under a mistake, when it said so. We gladly cor- 
rect the error ; bnt he ought to go. 

The "Pass Christian Gazette" offers this : "If the Louisiana State 
Convention will le.-alize perjury, it will give many who claim residence in 
that State great relief." 

The Chicago Socialists are impress^! with the idea that to be real 
sociable they must have guns, and drill like militia i 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 19, 1879. 



C. P. R- R- 



Overland Ticket Office : Ferry Landing, foot 
of Market street.— Commencing Monday, 
May 19th, 1879, and until further notice, 
Trains and Boats wil leave 

SAST FRANCISCO: 



7AA A. M. (daily). Vallejo Steamer (from Market 
.UU street Landing — Connecting witb Trains for 
Napa (Stages for Sonoma), Calistoga (the Geysers), 
and Sacramento. Connecting at Davis (Sundays except- 
ed) for Woodland and Knight's Landing, and at Wood- 
laud for Williams and Willows. 

(Arrive San Francisco 8:10 P.M.) 



7{\fk A.M. (daily) Local Passenger Train (via Oakland 
."" Ferry) and via Livermore arriving at Tracy 
at 11*30 A. m. and connecting with Atlantic Express. 
Connects at Niles with Train arriving at San Jose at 
10:16 a.m. . ,_ „ _- \ 

(Returning, train from Tracy arrives at 6:0d p.m.) 



8f\f\ A.M. (daily). Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
.UU land Ferry, Northern Ry. and S. P. & T. R K.) 
for Sacramento, Marvsville, Redding, Portland (Or.), 
Colfax, Reno (Virginia City), Palisade (Eureka), Ogdeu 
and Omaha. Connects at Gait with tram arriving at 
lone at 3:40 p.m. ' . 

(Arrive San Francisco 5:15 p.m.) 

Sunday Excursion Tickets to San Pablo and Marti- 

n ez at Reduced Rates. 

1 A AAA-M. (daily) via Oakland Ferry, Local Passea- 
lU.UU ger Train to Haywards and Nilea. 

(Arrive San Francisco 4:05 p.m.) 

3f\f\ P.M. (daily) San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
• UU land Ferry and Niles), stopping at all Way Sta- 
tions. Arrives at San Jose at 5:20 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 A.M.) 



3aa P.M. (daily) Northern Railway Passenger Train 
• tJ'U (via Oakland Ferry) to San Pablo, Martmez 
and Antioch. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a m.) 

4f\f\ P.M. (daily) Arizona Express Train (via Oak- 
•UU i a]1 d Ferrv, Northern Ry. and S. P. & T. R. R.) 
for Lathrop (and Stockton), Merced, Madera, Visalia, 
Sumner, Mojave, Newhall (San Buenaventura, and Santa 
Barbara), Los Angeles, "Santa Monica," Wilmington, 
Santa Ana (San Diego), Colton and Yuma (Colorado 
River Steamers), connecting direct with Daily Trains 
of the Southern Pacific Railroad of Arizona for Mari- 
copa (Daily Stages for Phoenix and Prescott), and for 
Casa Grande (L82 miles east from Yuma), and end of 
Track (Daily Stages for Florence and Tucson). 

"Sleeping Cars" between Oakland, Los Angeles and 
Yuma. 

(Arrive S an Francisco 1-2:35 p.m.) 

4AA P. M. (Sundays exceptedj Vallejo Steamer (from 
.\J\J Market Street Landing), connecting with trains 
for Calistoga, (the Geysers), Woodland, Knight's Land- 
ing and Sacramento ; and at Sacramento with Pas- 
senger Train, leaving at 9:35 p.m. for Truckee, Reno, 
Carson and Virginia. 

" Sleeping Cars " between Vallejo and Carson. 

(Arrive San Francisco 11:10 A.M.) 

4 A A P.M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
.UU (from Wash'n St. Wharf), for Beniciaand Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River. 

(Arrive San FranciscoSiOO P.M.) 



4(~\ f\ P.M. (daily), Through Third Class and Accom- 
• V/ V-F modation Train (via Oakland Ferry, North- 
ern Ry. and S. P. & T. R. R.) connecting at Lathrop 
with Train arriving at Los Angeles on second day at 
11:55 a.m. (Arrive San Francisco 9:05 a.m. 

4 0f\ P.M. (daily) Local Passenger Train (via Oak- 
• O" land Ferry) to Haywards, Niles and Liver- 
more. (Arrive San Francisco 8:35 a.m.) 



5fjA P.M. (daily) Overland Emigrant Train (via 
•"" Oakland Ferry and Northern Railway) to 
Ogden, Omaha and East. ^_^_ 

Public conveyance for Mills Seminary connects at Sein- 
nary Park Station with all trains, Sundays excepted. 



FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAINS 



From ' 


SAN FRANCISCO," 


Dally. 


TO 

OAKLAND. 


< 

a 
3 


Ed 

a 

BS 
m 
fa 


AS 

o 


03 


ofcl 

"a 
m 


J* 
i-3 en 
P 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


B6.10 


12.30 


7.00 


B7.00 


B6.10 


7.00 


7.30 


B6.10 


7.00 


1.00 


8.00 


B9.00 


7.30 


10.001 8.30 


8.00 


7.30 


1.30 


9.00 


B10.00 


8.30 


p. M. 9.30 


10.00 


8.00 


2.00 


10.00 


P. M. 


9.30 


3.00l 10.30 


12.00 


8.30 


3.00 


11.00 


B5.00 


10.30 


4.30 


11.30 


P. M. 


9.00 
9.30 


3.30 
4.00 


12.00 
p. M. 




11.30 
P. M. 




P. M. 
1.00 


1.30 
3.30 






10.00 


4.30 


1.30 




12.30 


H 


3.00 


4.30 


10.30 


6.00 


2.00 




1.00 




4.00 


5.30 


11.00 


5.30 


"3.00 




3.30 


t.p^ 


5.00 


E6.30 


11.30 


6.00 


4.00 




4.30 


fc 


6.00 




12.00 


6. SO 


5.00 




6.30 


"S 


B6.30 


























7.00 
8.10 




j 




9.20Ie«S.10 


A. M. 


Change Cars 




10.301 *1030 




9.20 


7.00 


at 




b11.45!b«1145 




10.30 


P. M. 


West Oakland 








Bll.45 


3.00 







To " SAN FRAWCISCO," Dally. 



P5^ 


!*' 




d h 


■< 




a 


m 




FROM 

EAST 
OAKLAN 

FROM 

FERKSIE 




OAKLAND. 
(Broadway.) 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 1 A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


p. M. 


B5.40 


B5.40 


7.00 


B 5.10; BS.00 


B-6.00 


B5.20 


12.20 


E6.30 


B6.30 


8.00 B5.5O.B1O.0O 


B*5.40 


B6.00 


12 50 


8.00 


7.30 


p. M. 


6.40|b11.00 


•6.25 


6.50 


1.20 


10.00 


8.30 


2.35 


7.40| p. H. 


7.00 


7.20 


1.50 


12.00 


9.30 


4.30 


8.40J B6.00 


8.03 


7.60 


2.60 




10.30 
1130 












1.30 




10.40 


10.03 


8.50 


3.50 


3.30 


P. M. 


H 


11.401 


11.03 


9.20 


4.20 


4 30 


1.00 




P. M. 




12,00 


9.50 


4.50 


5.30 


3.00 2^ 


12.40 




P. M. 


10.20 


5.20 


B6.30 


4.00 




1.25 




1.00 


10.50 


5.50 




6.00 


< 


2.40 




3.00 


11.20 


6.25 




6.00 


m 


4.40 
5.40 




•3 20 
4.00 


11.50 


6.50 
8.00 


Change Cars 


A. M. 

7.10 


0.40 
7.50 




6.00 
6.03 




9.10 
10.20 




t ! P. M. 

aklnd. | 1.30 


9.00 
10.10 




B*7.20 
B"8.30 






West C 














*10.00 








B— Sundays excepted. 


♦Alameda Passengers change cars at Oakland. 



Creek Ronte. 

From SAN FRANCISCO— Daily-B5:40, b6:30, 7.20,8:15, 
9:15, 10:15, 11:15 A.m 12:15, 1:15, 2:25, 3:15, 4:15, 
5:15, 6.15 p.m. 

From OAKLAND— Daily— b5:'60, B6:20, 7:10, 8:05, 9:05, 
10:05, 11:05 A. M. 12:05, 1:05, 2:15, 3:05, 4:05, 5:05, 
6:05 p.m. b— Sundays excepted. 



"Official Schedule Time" furnished by Randolph & 
Co., Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Towne, General Superintendent. 




Commencing Mosul ny, June 2.5. 1879, 
and until further notice. Boats and Trains will 
leave San Francisco as follows : 

7Tj Aam., from San Quentin Ferry, daily (Sundays 
• J. ^ excepted), connecting at San Rafael with 
Mail and Express Train for Petaluma, Santa Rosa, 
Healdsburg, Cloverdale and way stations. Making stage 
connections at Geyserville for Skaggs' Springs ; Clover- 
dale for Ukiah, Lakeport, Mendocino City, Highland 
and BartlettSprings, Soda Bay and the Geysers; connec- 
tion made at Fulton for Korbel's, Guerneville and the 
Redwoods. Returning, arrive in San Francisco at 6:25 
P.M. Passengers going by this train will arrive at the 
Geysers at 2 p.m. 



3(~\0 p - M - daily (Sundays excepted). Steamer 
• V./ V^ «< James M. Donahue " (Washington Street 
Wharf) , connecting with Mail and Express Train at Don- 
ahue for Petaluma, Santa Rosa, Healdsburg, Cloverdale, 
and way stations. Making stage connections at Lake- 
ville for Sonoma. Returning, arrive in San Francisco 
at 10:10 A.M. 



Sunday Excursions at deduced Bates. 



8"| pi a.m , Sundays only, via San Quentin Ferry 
• _L fj and San Rafael, for Cloverdale and Way Sta- 
tions. Returning, arrive in San Francisco at 7:55 p.m. 
Fares for Round Trip: Petaluma, Si. 50; Santa Rosa, $2.00; 
Healdsburg, S3 00; Cloverdale, $1.50; Fulton, $2.50; La- 
guna, $3.00; Furestville, $3.50; Korbel's, $3.75; Guerne- 
ville, $4. 

Freight received at Washington st. "Wharf 
from 7 a.m.. till 2.30 p. m., daily (except 
Sundays). 



A. A. Bean, A. Hughes, Jas. M. Donahue, 

Sup't. Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

[June 7.] 



NORTH PACIFIC COAST RAILROAD. 

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 



In EfEect from Sunday, June 8th, 1879, 
Between San Francisco and San Rafael. 

JSare JZettveen San Francisco and San Jtafael 
REDUCED TO 25 CENTS. 



WEEK DATS. 



Leave San Francisco : 
7:10 a.m. via San Q'ntin F. 
9:20 a.m. " " " 

1:45 p.m. " " " 

4:45 P.M. " " " 

6:45 P.M. " Saucelito " 



Leave San Rafael : 
7:00 a.m. via Saucelito Fy. 
8:00 a.m. " S. Quentin " 
11:00 a.m. " '* " 

3:20 p.m. " " " 

3:50 p.m. " Saucelito " 
5:20 P.M. " S. Quentin " 



StNDATS. 



Leave San Francisco: 
8:00 A M. via Saucelito Fy. 
8:15 a.m. via S. Quentin '" 
10:15 A.M. " " " 

12:50 pm. " " " 

3:45 p.m. " " " 

6:00 P.M. " ". " 



Leave San Rafael: 
8:50 A.M. viaS. Quentin F. 
11:30 a.m. " " " 

2:15 P.M. " " " 

4:30 P.M. " " " 

6:50 P.M. " " " 



Q A^ A.M. daily, except Sundays, from Saucelito 
(-J'^i-r Ferry, Market street, for all points between 
Saucelito and Junction. Returning, leaves Junction 
4:00 P. M., arrives S. F. (via Saucelito) 5:40 p. m. 



9 f\ A. M. daily, except Sundays, from San Quen- 
,£t\J tin Ferry, Market street, for all points be- 
tween San Francisco and Olema. Returning, leaves 
Olema 1:55 P. m., arrives S. F. (via Saucelito) 5:40 p. M. 



1A fC p. M. daily, except Sundays, from San Quentin 
.tfcU Ferry, Market Street, THROUGH TRAIN 
for DUNCAN MILLS and Way Stations. Returning, 
train leaves DUNCAN MILLS 6:40 a. m., arriving in S. 
F. 12:05 p. M. 

Sunday Excursions at Reduced Rates. 

8:00 A.M., from Saucelito Ferry, Market street, 
8:15 A.M., from San Quentin Ferry, Market street, 
for DUNCAN MILLS and RETURN. Fares for Round 
Trip —Olema, $2; Tomales, S3; Duncan Mills, S4. 

Above train, returning, arrives in San Francisco via 
San Quentin 7:55 P.M., or via Saucelito 8:10 p.m. 

W. REPRICE, Gen'l Ticket Agent. 

Jno. W. Doherty, Gen'l Manager. Jun 7. 




C~tommeucin? Monday, April 21, 1879, 
j and until further notice. Passenger Trains will leave 
San Francisco, from Passenger Depot on Townsend 
street, between Third and Fourth streets, as follows : 



8.20' 



a.m. daily for San Jose and Way Stations. 
„ "Stagea for Pescadero (via San Mateo) 
connect with this train only. 

9 C\ a. m (Sundays only) for San Jose and Way Sta- 
• 0\J tioos. Returning, leaves San Jose at 6 P.M. 



~\ ( \ /J.O AMl daily for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, 
J-V/.^fcv/ Tres Finos, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and 
all Way Stations. |g£r* At Pajaro, the Santa Cruz 
R. R. connects with this train for Aptos, Soquel and 
Santa Cruz. 6ST* At Salinas the M. & S. V. R. R. 
connects with this train for Monterey. fc5T" Stage 
connections made with this train. (Pescadero Stages via 
San Mateo excepted.) 

Parlor Car attacbett to this Train. 
■ (seats at reduced rates.) 



3 0f| p.m. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose, 
• £* ^ Gilroy, Pajaro, Hollister, Tres Pinos and prin- 
cipal Way Stations. 

gs^* On Saturdays only, the Santa Cruz R. R. will 
connect with this train at Pajaro for Aptos, Soquel and 
Santa Cruz. Returning, leave Santa Cruz at 4.45 a.m. 
Mondays (breakfast at Gilroy) , arriving in San Francisco 
at 10:00 a.m. 

^T" SPECIAL NOTICE. -On SATURDAYS ONLY, 
the run of this train will be extended to SALINAS— 
connectiug with the M. &S. V. R. R for MONTEREY. 
Returning, leave Monterey MONDAYS (breakfast at 
Gilroy), arriving in San Francisco at 10 a.m. 

3Q|~V p.m. (Sundays only) for San Jose and Way Sta- 
.Q\J tions. 

4Q^ p.m. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose and 
• UO Way Stations. 

K (~\ C\ p. m. daily (Sundavs excepted) for Menlo Park 
O.yjyj a nd Way Stations. 

f* Qf~\ p.m.— daily, for Menlo Park and Way Stations. 
Excursion Tickets at Rednced Rates 



To San Jose and intermediate points sold on Saturdays, 
and Sunday mornings, good for return until following 
Moi.day inclusive. 

Also, EXCURSION TICKETS to Aptos, Soquel, Santa 
Cruz and Monterey, sold on Saturdays only— good for 
return until the following Monday inclusive. 

jj3g"* Principal Ticket Office— Passenger Depot, Town- 
send street. Branch Ticket Office— No. 2 New Mont- 
gomery street, Palace Hotel. 

A.C.BASSETT.Supt. H.R. JUDAH, A. P. &T.A. 



SOUTHERN 1 DIVISIONS. 

Commencing: Monday, May 19th., 1879, 

SS^* Passengers for points on the Southern Divisions 
of the road will take the cars of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 4:00 p.m. daily (Arizona Ex- 
press Train) , and making close connection at GOSHEN 
for Sumner, Mojave, Los Angeles, Wilmington, Ana- 
heim, Colton, Colorado River, Yuma, Maricopa and Casa 
Grande (182 miles east from Yuma). May 31. 



July 19, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 



NOTABILIA. 







THE PEDDLER'S SONG. 
Law.i as white as driven snow ; Gold quoips and stomachers, 

Cypress black as e'er was crow ; For my lads to give their dearj ; 

Gloves ad sweet as damask roses; Pins and poking- sticks of steel. 

Masks fur faces and for noses ; "What maids lack from head to heel: 

Bugle-bracelet, necklace, amber ; Come buy of me, come; come buy.come buy, 

Perfume for a lady's chamber; Buy, lads, or else your lasses cry. 

■ William Shakspeare. 

Baron Rothschild's first maxim for success in business was, "Attend 
carefully to all the details." This is a golden rule, too often overlooked 
by those who undertake to meet the wants of the public, and consequently 
they fail, and blame others for their failure. It is at the Original Swain's 
Bakery, 213 Sutter street, tbat one sees tbe perfect application of the 
great banker's rule. Nothing there is left to chance, nothing left undone 
that should be done ; and the result is entire satisfaction to every one who 
enters the place, and an attractiveness that brings him back always for 
his breakfast and lunch and dinner. Swain's are the best and the best 
served in the city. 

There is no deceiving an old smoker as to the qualities of tobacco. 
Your veteran knows that when his throat is left smooth, his tongue sweet 
and the last whiff from the pipe, cigar or cigarette has a cool, pure flavor, 
he has been enjoying a good, genuine smoke. No argument of favor or 
prejudice can hold against what he knows when he has tried the article, 
and brought to this test the famous "Old Judge" tobacco ia absolutely 
unsurpassed, and it seems to be a mere statement of fact to declare it the 
best in the world. Every man recognizes with a shudder the reek left 
behind by poor tobacco, and the room in which "Old Judge" has been 
smoked is as pure and fresh as the outer air. 

The moral law is wider than a rifle-range and higher than a hip- 
pocket. 

Great fault is found, but unjustly, as we think, with our present sys- 
tem of Grand Juries. Good citizens lend their best efforts to carry out 
the theory of the duties laid upon this body, and, so far as unassisted 
human intelligence can work, with a fair measure of success. The short- 
comings which we are obliged to admit are the result of insufficient light ; 
and the responsibility for this justly falls upon the people, which ought to 
insist upon the Grand Jury's being furnished with F. & P. J. Cassin's 
Golden Plantation Whisky, one bottle to a man. 

The English faith in the banking system of Great Britain has been 
severely shaken by the failures in Scotland and elsewhere, and men are 
naturally disturbed in their minds for the safety of their ducats. No such 
anxieties ever afflict the soul of the man whose house is provided with 
Montanya's Union Range. Whatever else may happen to him, breakfast 
and dinner are secure beyond a peradventure, and of a quality not to be 
had from any other range. Such a man feels that fate cannot harm him, 
for whatever may be said of banking, his own system is secure. 

The assistant surgeon is not promoted from the rank of lance cor- 
poral. 

There are two sides to the railroad question, whatever people may 
think of G. C. Gorham's onslaught upon Pixley ; but there is one 
opinion, and only one, with regard to Bradley & Rulofsou's photographs — 
the very best that ever contented loving friends. Surrounded with a col- 
lection of these, a man is ever in the society of those he loves, and the 
faces speak to him even more eloquently than the living lips could. The 
mind, the heart, are brought out upon the features by these excellent 
artists. 

The " Roof of the World " is one of the hyperbolical names given to 
the Panier by the Orientals. Finely suggestive and gorgeous as the 
rhetoric is, it lacks that more practically intellectual turn peculiar to the 
Western mind, where man is recognized as the crown of the world, and 
the roof therefore is, necessarily, the hat which covers the crown. And 
the true World-Roof is, therefore, one of White's hats, from 614-616 Com- 
mercial street. 

Mr. Charles Peters is lending all his experience and judgment to the 
noble enterprise of the Nevada Building Association, which has but 
100,000 shares, and offers extraordinary chances for the charitably dis- 
disposed. The headquarters of the Association, under Mr. Peters' man- 
agement, are at Virginia City. 

Artistic Novelties, manufactured from California quarts, at Ran- 
dolph & Co.'s, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 



All good things go to London, as the commercial capital of mankind; 
and the demand for Landsberger^ Private Cuvee is increasing every 
v. , . U. Not u month ago on,' order for 100 citwes was filled for a London 

house, and others art miogin almost too raj. idly for even the enterprise 

of tliis famous hous,/. Increased accommodations are fast becoming neces- 
sary, ami nothing but the perfect organization of the whole establishment 
has enabled it to keep pace an far with tbe demands made upon it. 

No more infallible sign of taste, or the want of it, than the gas fix- 
tures, chandeliers and plumbing work of the dwelling ; and many, for lack 
of attention to these critical matters, have been shamed in the eyes of 
their acquaintances. The only safeguard is to put these details in the 
hands of McNally & Hawkins, whose long experience is sustained and 
enlightened by admirable taste. Their stock at the Grand is simply 
uurivaled. 

Mr. White, the American Minister to Germany, has commenced to 
eat with Bismarck. His friends can decide whether they will have him 
embalmed and sent home, or buried over there. 



Sure, prompt and thorough are the characteristics of Dr. Jayne's 
Carminative Balsam. Its merit has made it known everywhere for years, 
as a standard curative for Cramps, Diarrhcea, Cholera Morbus, and all 
Diseases of the Bowels ; it is, besides, easily administered to children, 
being pleasant to the taste, and is entirely safe. Sold by Crane & Brio- 
ham, San Francisco. 

"L'Assammoir " is probably the vilest book ever talked about among 
decent people, and it has reached its fifty-fifth edition. It is useless to 
deplore such a condition of things, wholly due to a lack of Napa Soda. 
With an increase in the use of this most wholesome beverage it will be- 
come more and more difficult fbr men to have dirty minds. 

Tapestry Brussels, SI per yard and upwards ; finenewpatterns. Call 
and see them. Window shades, 75 cents and upwards. Window lace, L2J 
cents and upwards. Cornices, wall paper, etc. Oilcloths, 50 cents per 
yard and upwards. Hartshorn & McPhun, 112 Fourth St., near Mission. 

STOCK COMBINATIONS. 



How to Operate Successfully on 
TEN DOLLARS. 

MAHTIN TAYLOR, & CO., 

429 California Street. 
Geo. C. Hichox. 



June 21.] 



GEORGE C. HICKOX & CO., 



E. C. McFarlanb. 



(Commission Stock Brokers (Sun Francisco Stock Ex* 
_/ change, No. 230 Montgomery street, San Francisco. May i. 



J. A. RUDKIN, 



Member S. F. Stock and Exchange Board, 423 California 
street. STOCKS Bought and Sold on Coinraissiou. Liberal Advances 
made n Active Accounts. Oct. 26. 

CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH, 

Importing Stationers and Booksellers. 

We nave in Stock full assortments of the folio wins': Fancy 
Papeteries, Auto, and Photo. Albums, Russia Wallets and Cnrd Cases, Purses, 
Paper Weights, Fancy Inkstands, etc. , and the handsomest and most complete line 
of Diaries ever offered in this market. 

Nov. 16. 327, 329. 331 SANSOME STREET. 



FOR SALE--SUNNYSIDE RESIDENCE. 

I have concluded to sell my Homestead, located in the 
pleasant town of Plaeerville, El Dorado County, known as the SUNNYSIDE 
RANCH ; forty-five acres of land, orchard of the choicest fruits, house two stories, 
brick cellar, splendid welt of water, windmill, in fact every convenience for a country 
home; 2,000 feet above tidewater. Placerville is one of the most pleasant and 
hcu.lt.hful localities in California ; first-class schools, churches and good society. To 
be sold at a bargain. For terms address C. B. BROWN, Placerville, or F. A. BEE, 
680 Eddy street, San Francisco. June 21. 



D. F. Hutciiings. 



D. M. DlWNE. 



J. Sanderson 



PHCENIX OIL WORKS. 



Established 1S50.— Mulchings A Co., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan* S. 

~~ johnTennings 

Hooper's Sonth End Warehouses, corner Japan and Town- 
send streets. San Francisco. First-class Fire-Proof iirick Huildinjr, capacity 
10,1)00 tons. Goods taken from the Dock and the Cars of the C. P. R. R. and S. P. 
R. R, free of charge. Storage at Current Rates. Advances and Insurance Effected. 

MIME. B. ZEITSKA'S 

French, German and English Institute, Day and Boarding 
School, for Young Ladies, 932 Post street, between HvJe and Larkin. KIN- 
DERGARTEN connected with the Institute. 
Oct. 2C MME. B. ZEITSKA, Principal. 

EDWARD B0SQUI & CO., 

Printers, Engravers. Lithographers and Bookbinders, 

Leidesdorff street, from Clay to Commercial. 



CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY, 

Manufacturers of the Standard Syrup, a superior article 
put up in barrels expressly for home consumption. Also. Extra Heavy Syrup 
in barrels for Export. Refined Sugars at lowest market rates. Office, 215 Front 
street, up stairs Dee- 21. 

Conservatory Organs. SI 10- 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 




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July 19, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



:V TO "Al? TUEi VMmAWJ* 



l.TH Goodman Gen Pus? As't PUR 

2. Henry II W II name Alt'i PUSS 00 

A. Lloyd Terle Pros' t w F&Co'sBantE 

4. J BHa^tn Capitalist 

6. Wm T Coleman Merchant and Capitalist 

6. D Mills I. Cnpllitlirt 

7. Win Atvord Ex Mavor and Pres't Hank of Oil 

5. Charles Webb Howard PresM S V W W 

it. Peler Donahue Prist S V & N'I'RR 

10. Wm Sharon Capitalist 

11. John W Coleman Capitalist ami Stock Broker 

19, J W Mtckay Bonanza King 

13. James It Keene Capitalist 

It. Hon A A Sargent D S Senator 

15. Hon John P Jones L* S Senator 

16, Cipl O Eldridge Merchant and Capitalist 

IT. J J Valentine. Gen'I Sup't W F ft Co 

18. Wm BCarr Capitalist 

19. Wm F Babcocb Merchant and Capitalist 

20. John Parrott — Capitalist 

21. Thomas Brown Cashier Bank of California 

22. Peter Sat her Hanker 

23. Joseph A Donohoe Banker 

24. Hon Wm Irwin Governor of California 

96. Hon A J Bryant Mayor of San Francisco 

26. EC Fellows Ase'tGen Sup't C P R R 

27. E J Baldwin Capitalist 

28. A. P Hotaling Merchant 

90. John H Redington. .Pres't Red' ton QuickVrM Co 

30. Charles Main Main & Winchester, Importers 

31. Hon Newton Booth U S Senator 

32. Sir ClatiB Spreckles Pres't Cal Sugar Refinery 

33. Rt Rev Wm Ingraham Kip.... Bishop Diocese Cal 
34 Rev Horatio Stebbins.... Pastor let Unitarian Ch 

35. Charles Lux Land Owner 

3(i. Henry Miller Landowner 

37. Ed D fleaily Dickson, DeWolf & Co, Mchts 

38. C Temple Eminett Attorney-at-Law 

3'.>. Thomas Bell Capitalist 

40. Hon DelosLake Attorney-at-Law 

41. Hon 8 M Wilson Attorney-at-Law 

42. Hon W H L Barnes Attorney-at-Law 

43. J PHoge Attorney-at-Law 

44. Hon Wm M Gwin Ex U S Senator 

45. Hon A Louderbuck Judge Police Court 

4fi. Hon Rob't F Morrison... Judge 4th District Court 

47. F. Marriott Proprietors F "News Letter" 

48. C I Hutchinson H & M Insurance Ayency 

49. ASHallidie Manufacturer Wire Rope 

50. John Bensley Capitalist 

51. AW Scott Supervisor 

52. Adam Grant M, G & Co, Importers Dry Goods 

53. D J Oliver Capitalist 

54. Wm Lane Booker British Consul 

55. Rev John Hemphill Pastor Calvary Church 

5fi. James Phelan Capitalist 

57. Thomas H Blythe Capitalist 

58. Fred W Macondray Commission Merchant 

69, Tihurcio Parrott Commission Merchant 

f,:'.. Edward Cahill Stock Broker 

61. Stewart Menzies Stevedore 

62. Edward F Hall Stock Broker 

6 J. Hall McAllister Attorney-at-Law 

64. Reuben Lloyd Attorney-at-Law 

65. Hon CornelitiB Cole Ex U S Senator 

66. Frank McCoppin Harbor Commissioner 

67. Hon Samuel B McKee Judge 3d District Court 

68. Hon J S Hager Attorney-at-Law 

69. Hon Lorenzo Sawyer.. .Judge 9th U S Circuit Ct 

70. A W Von Schmidt Civil Engineer 

71. James F Houghton Pree't Home Mu ual Ins 

72. Freti'k McCrellish Proprietor " Alta" 

73. John P Juckson Proprietor "Post" 

74. Milton S Latham Pres't N PCR RCo 

75. R G Sneath Proprietor Jersey Farm Dairy 

76. Thomas Acheson ....Supervisor 

77. Com Thco H Allen Stevedore 

7y. Wm Nun-is Secretary S V W W 

79. James Adams Ex -Sheriff 

80. P H Canavan Real Estate Agent 

81 . Richard L Ogden Capitalist 

82. Wm M Lent Capitalist 

83. Philip Roach Proprietor "Examiner" 

84. D J Murphy District Attorney 

85. Charles Keating Sup't Alms House 

8fi. Thomas Reynolds County Clerk 

87. Wm Doolan Public Administrator 

8s. Hon Tho«j W Freelon.. Judge Munic'l Ct of Ap'ls 
89. HonSaml U Dwindle.... Judge 1Mb District Court 
&0. J A Robinson Deputy Surveyor-General 

91. Theo Wagner U S Surveyor-General 

92. Hon J T Farley Us Senator 

93. Charles N Fox Attorney-at-Law 

04, Giles H Gray Late Surveyor of Customs 

95. Henry K Highton Attorney-at-Law 

mi. Romnaldo Puchrco Stock Broker 

97. Jasper McDonald Stock Broker 

98. Mark L McDonald Slock Broker 

99. EmileGrisar .Belgian Consul & Wool Merchant 
100. A Colraau Clothier 



101. C A C Dalsenberg Commission Merchant 

199. Arpad HaraBEtby Wine Grower 

108. RevHTIdaver Rabbi 

KM, Rev a I, Stone Pastor 1st Cong Church 

106. Rev W 1". Mama. ....Pastor Green st. Cong Church 
I0fi, Rev Isaac S Kal loch .. .Pastor Metrop'u Temple 

hit. Rev Wm n Piatt Rector Grace Episcopal Ch 

LOR Henry L Dodge Sup't US Mint 

109, J II Jones Stock Broker 

HO. Horace Hill Stock Broker 

111. HH Noble Stock Broker 

112. James G Carson Attorney-at-Law 

113. J B Metcalfe Attorney-at-Law 

114. Thomas P Ryan Attorney-at-Law 

115. Hon A C Niles.. .Associate Justice Supreme Court 
llll Judge S Heydenfeit Attorney-at-Law 

117. Jas M Gitchell Register in Bankruptcy 

118. C Warren Stoddard Journalist 

119. Charles De Young. . .Proprietor S F ''Chronicle " 

120. M H De Young Proprietor S F "Chronicle '* 

121. Loring Pickering. .Prop S F "Call " & "Bulletin" 

122. Henry F Williams Real Estate Agent 

123. Henry L Davis Capitalist 

124. Eugene L Sullivan Capitalist 

125. Fred L Castle Importer Teas 

126. M H Hecht....M'frand Wholesale Leather Dealer 

127. Jas J Waddell Captain 

125. R KNuttall PhyBician 

129. Gen Scoleld USA 

130. Gen H A Cobb Auctioneer 

131. GtnJamesCoey Postmaster S F 

132. Gen John McComb Editor -'Alta" 

133. Wm P Humphreys City and Co Surveyor 

134. Chas Hubert City and Co Treasurer 

185. J Henley Smith Supervisor 

136. D A McDonald Enterprise Mills 

137. A L Mann Sup't Public Instruction 

138. Thomas Flint Wool Merchant 

13ii. M Castle Capitalist 

140. W W Dodge Wholesale Grocer 

141. F B Taylor Oil and Commission Merchant 

142. Geo U Bryant N & Co, Bags and Bagging 

143. W N Olmsted Insurance Airent 

144. EN Fry Stock Broker 

145. Donald McLennan Manager Woollen Mills 

146. M G Pritchard Mexican Consul 

147. F A Bee Chinese Consul 

148. Aug Berggren Consul for Sweden and Norway 

149. Col Geo W Granniss Real Estate 

150. S P Dewey Capitalist 

161. James White, MR G S....EX M P, Brighton, Eng 

152. Charles Kohler Wine Grower 

153. Robert Dickson Manager Ins Agency 

164. Capt Geo Nairn ton Shipping Agent 

155. Hon M M Estee Attorney-at-Law 

156. Jennings S Cox Real Estate Agent 

157. H B Piatt Contractor 

158. George Lctte Sec'y German Sav and Loan 

159. Hon George C Perkins G P & Co's S S 

160. GenO II La Grange Ex Sup't US Mint 

161. R Beverly Cole Physician 

162. Thomas Price AsBayer 

163. George J Bucknall Physician 

161. Hon E D Wheeler Judge 19th District Court 

165. David P Belknap Attorney-at-Law 

166. Henry Casanova Wholesale Grocer 

107. James G Gauld L&SF Bank 

108. TV Waller L & SF B:iuk 

169. EMickle Agent 

170. PM Bowcn Capitalist 

171. E M Miles Stock Broker 

172. Samuel Brannan Real Estate 

173. John Scott Phjsician 

174. George T Bromley Contractor 

175. P J Casein Wholesale Liquor Dealer 

170. Henry Marsh Pianist 

177. Thomas Bennett. Physician 

17s. George Wallace Pres't Ca) M'gCo 

179. Frank M Pixley Attorney-at-Law 

180. J S Cunningham U SN Paymaster 

181. J M McDocald Vice Pres'l Pacific Bank 

1«2. Alex Campbell Attorney-at-Law 

188. Col Oscar Woodhams 1st Infantry Reg 

184. John V Plume Banker 

185. Edward Curtis Lileratenr 

188. Hon Janus A Johnson Llent-Govcruor 

187. Thomas P Uyan Attorney-at-Law 

188. Charles G Toland Physician 

189. Fred M Somers Journalist 

1!H). CT Mills. D D Mills' Seminary 

191. Wm Barney Notary Public 

192. Jonas J Morrison Lumber Dealer 

198. L L Bullock Real Estate 

194. Charles Clayton Grain Merchant 

195. C V D Hubbard Mining Seen tary 

196. H H Bancroft.. .Historian A: Wholes'e Bookseller 

197. Mrs 11 H Bancroft 

198. Mrs A N Tow ne 

190. A N Towne Gen Sup't C PRR 

200. Mrs James G Fair 



James G Fair Bonanza King 

Miss Jennie Flood 

Mrs J Flood 

J C Flood Bonanza King 

Leland Stanford, Jr 

Hon Leland Stanford Pres't C PRR 

Mrs Leland Stanford 

Mrs Mark Hopkins 

Mrs Cimrles Crocker 

Charles Crocker Vice-Pres't C PRR 

Miss Battle Crocker 

Mrs A Maddick of London 

Alfred Maddick of London 

Stuart M Taylor City and County Recorder 

E W Burr Capitalist 

J C Palmer Wine Grower 

Mrs J C Palmer 

Hon J C Fremont Governor of Arizona 

Mrs J Benton Fremont 

MrsO C Pratt 

Howard Colt Caller S F Stock Board 

Mrs Liliie Coit 

Alex Bartlam City and Co Assessor 

Mrs Alex Badlatn 

Mrs Joseph Austin •' Betsy B" 

Joseph Austin Port Warden 

D J Staples Pres't Fireman's Fund Ins Co 

Mfs D J Staples 

Mrs D Z Yost 

Daniel Z Yost Stock Broker 

Miss Cora Cad tic 

Philip Cadtic Contractor 

Mrs John D Yost 

John D Yost Stationer 

Miss Julia Ruth Shafter 

Hon J McM Shafter Landowner 

Mrs Joseph W Winans 

Hon Joseph W Winans Attorney-at-Law 

George Gedge Captain steamer " Yosemite " 

Mrs George Gedge 

Rev Wm A Scott, D D . .Pastor St John's Pres Ch 

Miss Ida Scoofl'y 

George B Rieman Photographer 

Mrs George B Rieman 

H S Crocker Wholesale Stationer 

T A Harcourt L'terateur 

Mis T A Harcourt 

John Landers Mining Secretary 

Mrs John Landers 

Frank C Snow Importer and Dealer in Pictures 

GGGariboldi Artist 

IT BSIaven Druggist 

Mrs J II Stallard 

J U Stallard. Physician 

Drury Melone Commission Broker 

Mrs Drury Melone 

R B Woodward Prop'r Woodward's Gardens 

Mrs W F McAllister 

W F McAllister, M D Quarantine Officer 

Henry R Mann H & M Ins Agency 

Mrs Wm Ward 

Wm Ward Importer Liquors 

H Chinning Beals "Commercial Herald" 

. „,„„ Tn „„„ [Architect of S F Now City 

Augustus Laver j- H all and Law Courts. 

Frank II Gassaway Journalist 

Louis Low Secretary 

L S Church Land Owner 

Mrs L S Church "Vivace" critic 

Raoul Martinez Belloc & Co.'s Bank 

M J Flavin Prop IXL Auction House 

E CnrtiFB C, C & Welch, StationerB 

Wm M Neileon Literateur 

OLivermnre Real Estate Agi Dt 

Col A Andrews Prop " Diamond Palace " 

Charles Locke Prop " Bush street Theater" 

Thomas Maguire Manager " Baldwin's " 

Barton Hill Acting Manager "Cal Theater " 

Alex D Sharon Le6See "Palace Hotel ' 

Frank G Newlands Attorney- n-Luw 

Wm Willis Mining Secretary 

J B Wattles Stock Broker 

D Albert Hiller Physician 

George Dawson Prop "Pantheon" 

Mr- George Dawson 

Gen w s Roaecrans., .Mining and Civil Engineer 

A A Cohen Capitalist and Attorney-at-Law 

J Burr RotH-rteon «>f London 

Edward J Jackson Our cor "London Times ' 

M £ Crftlifie.. Sup t Savage Ml' Ca Vlra=nia : \ ■/ 

Dr A McMabon of San Joae 

E C Macfarlane Mock Broker 

George Macfarlane of Sandwich Islands 

John Jennings Com'r Aus Bxfalb 

J J Bleasdale.D D Com'r Ane ExMb 

Arthur Nahl Artist 

Judge J C Pennie Justice of Peace 

Charles Mason British Vice ( 

P B Kennedy Importer Dry Goods 

Charles Kaeding Importer of Guns 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO., 

For Japan ami China, leave wharr. corner First anil Bran- 
nan streets, ;it noon, tor YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

GAELIC August lfith. 

OCEANIC. ... June X7th, September 18th. 

BELCIC JuK 16th. 

For Freight, sn|ilv to GEORGE II. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company 8 Wharf, or No. 218 California street. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent 
LELAND STANFORD, President. May 31. 

Smith's American Organs. 200 Po3t street, corner of Dupont. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers ol this Coinpnuy will sail from Brosulwny Wharf 
for PoKTLANlt. Oregon), every G days, direct, had for IX)8 ANGELES, SANTA 
B\Rli\K\ SANTA CRUZ, SAN UIEGO, SAN LUIS OBISPO and other NORTH- 
ERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS, leaving SAN FRANCISCO abort BTflrj 

third day. 

For Day and IT.ur of Sailing, see the Comi«any's Advertisement in the San rrao- 
cfsco Daily I' ■; _, 

Ticket Office, No. 214 Montcomery Street, near Pine. 

OOODALL, PERKINS ft O 
March 15. No- 10 Market street. 

Smith's American Pianos, 200 Post street, corner of Dnpont. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 19, 7879. 



And see the rising moon; 
And oh ! the summer air is sweet 
Beneath the sky of June. 



AT THE GATE. 

And where wereyoujustnow, Mabel? The gate is by the road, Mable, 

"Where have yon been so long? And idle folks go by — 

The moon is up, and all the birds Nor should a maiden brook the glance 

Have sung their evening soDg. Of every stranger eye. 

I saw you loitering down the path, Besides, I thought I saw a cap — 

So lonely and so late, I'm sure you had a mate ; 

Beyond the well and the lilac bush, So tell me who was with you, child, 

And hanging by the gate. Just hanging at the gate. 

I love to hear the birds, mother, Now, you know just as well, mother, 

'Twas only Harry Gray. 
He spoke such words to me to-night, 
I knew not what to say; 
Mycow is milked,myhens are cooped And mother, oh! for your dear sake, 

And washed are cup and plate, I only bade him wait; 

And so I wandered out a while And mayn't I run and tell him now? 

To hang upon the gate. He's hanging at the gate. 

— Harper's Magazine for June. 

AUGUSTINE TO AUGUSTA. 

Almost all the new dresses are made rather lower, and are more 
open at the neck, therefore guimpes, and fichus of lace, crepe, tulle, 
blonde, soft Indian, and other thin muslins are much in request. The 
forms of these tichus are very varied, the most fashionable at the present 
moment being the scarf shape, with broad ends, and the Marie Antoinette 
fichu. If a flower is worn with these fichus, it is generally a single rose 
at the left side of the neck. 

A great many eccentric costumes were to be seen last week at the races, 
and at the flower show ; among them being a coat of mail worn as a 
casaquin, and a conspicuous Parabere dress, with five paniers covered 
with Malines lace. 

The costumes most in vogue for the country are composed of plain 
batiste, printed linen, calico and foulard, the paterns being either the 
Pompadour detached colored flowers of stripes, or the shawl paterns ; 
plain and striped bareges, Voile de veuve, plain cashmere, and, for more 
elegant visiting dresses, changeant, or shot silk ; grenadine and velours 
Z£phir are the most admired. This Ze"pbir is a silk gauze with narrow 
velvet stripes, and is chiefly employed for a tunic, fourreau or polonaise 
over black or dark colored dresses ; for instance, over a skirt of violet faille 
or satin, a tunic of Ze*phir with paniers, or a dress of black striped Ze*phir 
with pointed bodice opening over a high waistcoat of lotus blue. Walk- 
ing or country dresses are made with short round skirts ; the foulard is 
often composed of half plain ground and half printed foulard ; for in- 
stance, the first skirt plain silver-gray, with two flounces, one of which is 
plain, the other of the Pompadour pattern on the same gray ground ; the 
second skirt, draped up slightly over the first, with an apron front of 
Pnmpadour pattern; tunic of the same pattern, drawn up at the sides, 
panier style, and forming a slight half train behind, with border of Breton 
lace ; and bodice of Pompadour pattern, cuirass shape, with plain broad 
turned-back collar, also bordered with lace. 

Kid shoes, and also varnished leather, almost half-boot shape are worn ; 
the toe is much more pointed than a few weeks ago ; these shoes are laced. 

One of the newest bonnets, or rather hats, is the Clarissa Harlowe ; it 
has a high crown of light-colored satin and a straw border ; the strings 
are of foulard, and very broad ; the ornamentation is a cord of gold or 
silver round the crown with full tuft of feathers or a bouquet of flowers in 
front. It looks well also in black straw, with crown of ruby-colored 
satin. — Augustine, in Truth, 

DICKENS' LAST LETTER. 

Mr. Charles Kent has sent a last letter of Charles Dickens to the 
British Museum. A gentleman claims to have another letter written by 
Charles on the day of his death. It is as follows : 

G-ad's Hill Place, Higham, by Rochester, Kent, 1 
Wednesday, 8th June, 1870. j 

Dear Sir : It would be quite inconceivable to me, but for your letter, 
that any reasonable reader could possibly attach a scriptural reference to 
a passage in a book of mine, reproducing a much abused social -figure of 
speech, impressed into all sorts of service, on all sorts of inappropriate 
occasions, without the faintest connection of it with its original source. I 
am truly shocked to find that any reader can make the mistake. I have 
always striven in my writings to express veneration for the life and lessons 
of our Saviour, because I feel it ; and because I re-wrote that history for 
my children— every one of whom knew it from having it repeated to them, 
long before they could read, and almost as soon as they could speak. But 
I have never made proclamation of this from the house-tops. 

Faithfully yours, Charles DlCKENS. 

MARRIAGE A HUNDRED YEARS AGO. 

It may be of interest to know how they arranged marriages a hun- 
dred years ago. An old paper has the following description bearing upon 
the subject : " Married, in June 1760, Mr. William Donkin, a consider- 
able farmer of Great Tossin {near Rothbury), in the county of Northum- 
berland, to Miss Eleanor Shotten, an agreeable young gentlewoman of 
the same place. The entertainment was very grand, there being no less 
than one hundred and twenty quarters of lamb, forty-four quarters of 
veal, twenty quarters of mutton, and a great quantity of beef, twelve 
hams, with a suitable number of chickens, etc., which was concluded with 
eight half ankers of brandy made into punch, twelve dozen of cider, a 
great many gallons of wine, and ninety bushels of malt made into beer. 
The company consisted of five hundred and fifty ladies and gentlemen, 
who concluded with the music of twenty-five fiddlers and pipers, and the 
whole was conducted with the utmost order and unanimity." 

Extract from the sermon of a prominent revivalist: "I feel that 
my Saviour wants me. Now, even now, do I pray that he take me to His 
bosom. Oh, would that He would take me now ! Would you mind clos- 
ing that window, please ? I fear it will give me cold." Fact. 



A naturalist has discovered that crows hold solemn court at which 
offenders are tried— a sort of crow-bar. We presume no bird is tried 
without caws, and that a true bill is necessary in every case. 

General Spinola finds no difficulty in heating New York city at 
present. 



H. T. HELMBOLD'S 

COMPOUND 

FLUID EXTRACT OF BUCHU. 

PHARMACEUTICAL. 

A SPECIFIC! KEMEDY FOB ALL DISEASES OP THE 
BLADDER AND KIDNEYS. 



For Debility, Loss of Memory, Indisposition to Exertion or Business, Shortness of 
Breath, Troubled with Thoughts of Disease, Dimness of Vision, Pain in the Back, 
Chest and Head, Bush of Blood to the Head, Pale Countenance and Dry Skin. 

If these symptoms are allowed to go on, very frequently Epileptic Fits and Con- 
sumption follow. When the constitution becomes affected, it requires the aid of an 
invigorating medicine to strengthen and tone up the system, which 

"HELMBOLD'S BUCHU" 
Does In Every Case. 



HELMBOLD'S BUCHU 

IS INKQriLED 

By any remedy known. It is prescribed by the most eminent physicians all over 
the world, iu 

Rheumatism, 

Spermatorrhoea, 

Neuralgia, 

Nervousness, 

Dyspepsia, 

Indigestion, 

Constipation, 

Aches and Fains, 

General Debility, 

Kidney Diseases, 

_ ,.,. Liver Complaint, 

Nervous Debility, 

Epilepsy, Head Troubles, 

Paralysis, General 111 Health, 

Spinal Diseases, Sciatica, 

Deafness, Decline, Lumbago, 

Catarrh, Nervous Complaints, 

Female Complaints, Etc, 

Headache, Pain in the Shoulders, Cough, Dizziness, Sour Stomach, Eruptions, Bad 

Taste in the Mouth, Palpitation of the Heart, Pain in the region of the Kidneys, and 

a thousand other painful symptoms, are the offsprings of Dyspepsia. 



HELMBOLD'S BUCHU 

INVIGORATES THE STOMACH, 

and stimulates the torpid Liver, Bowels and Kidneys to healthy action, in cleansing 
the blood of all impurities, and imparting new life and vigor to the whole system. 

A single trial will be quite sufficient to convince the most hesitating of its valuable 
remedial qualities. 

BMICE, $1 PER BOTTLE, 

Or Six Bottles for $5. 



Delivered to any address free from observation. 

" Patients" may consult by letter, receiving the same attention as by calling.. 

Competent Physicians attend to correspondents. All letters should he addressed to 

H. T. HELMBOLD, 

Druggist and Chemist, 

Philadelphia, Pa, 



CATJTIOlf! 
See that the Private Proprietary Stamp is on Each Bottle. 



SOLD EVERYWHERE. 

[June 28.] 



July 19, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



LONG AGO 

*Twa« Spring time, nn<! nil Nature stirred, 

The nuon'a puis* waa young; 
On brintlng boughs full many a bird 

Hifl oarelesa carol sung. 
Beneath the Interlacing shade 

AM wind-Mvayt <\ to and fm, 
A pracimis youth and gentle, maid 

Swon fealty long tgO, 
The years had passed, the years had flown, 

Sweet Summer filled the air : 
Then* Walked within the covert lone 

Brave man and matron fair ; 
And round them, with a jocund glee, 

There danced, in life's full glow, 
A troop of children fair to aee 

In days now long ago. 
Twas Autumn next, the year grew pale, 

The farmer reaped his grain ; 
Now walking slowly down the dale 

Behold the pair again. 
Their forms are bent. See in the hair 

Some silver touches show ; 
Childless and sad they wander there, 

And dream of long ago. 
Tis Winter. In the churchyard lone 

The snow lies white and fair 
Upon the simple mossy stone 

That hides the aged pair. 
They have their rest! "Tis Spring again! 

And in God's Land they know 
A love not dimmed by age and pain, 

Like that of long ago. 

— Samuel Pascoe, in the London Graphic. 

SHORT SERMONS TO THE PEOPLE. 

Every political, preas and pulpit demagogue in the land, seeking 
profitable popularity, acts on the same line of thought. First, praise the 
dear people's honesty of purpose, and credit them with virtues akin to the 
angels! Second, select a scapegoat to bear the sins of the world, cast 
upon it the rocks of denunciation, and let it be accursed here and here- 
after. The plan is very simple and works to a charm, but it begins to 
lack novelty, and, as a matter of common justice, it is well sometimes to 
reverse the operation, although the task is perhaps an unpopular one, be- 
cause alt good Christians prefer a vicarious atonement to auswering in 
their own proper persons. 

By what right do the people of this Republic denounce their chosen 
representatives upon a simple presumption of guilt, or merely upon the 
baseless assumption thereof? Yet so it is that official life is made dis- 
honorable, and popular sentiment considers every man in office a thief, 
because, dear fellow-citizens, as you tersely put it, if a man has a chance 
to steal, and does not, he is a fool. That is your logic, and proves your 
own corruption — deny it if you can. From the very circumstances sur- 
rounding official life you have made honesty therein stale, flat and un- 
profitable. You demand short terms, low salaries and a price for your 
voices out of proportion to their value. You surround officials with every 
temptation to dishonesty, and, with a strange inconsistency, blame them 
for yielding. On the other hand, how do you reward the faithful ones? 
Experience answers, with ingratitude, poverty and neglect. He who pan- 
ders to your prejudices or depravity is the god of the hour, whilst whoso 
speaks the truth you consider a superserviceable ass. Life, with you, 
is a fever of speculation, and the almighty dollar is the deity ,to whom you 
sacrifice friendship, love, truth, and all the virtues. Your government, 
good people, is but your self-incarnation, and you cannot accuse it with- 
out self-condemnation. Thus, whenever you feel disposed to crucify some 
public functionary, examine your conscience, as the Catholics say, and 
ask yourselves what you have done— or omitted doing— that this atone- 
ment is necessary. 

There were but four just men in the Ark ; there was but one good man 
in Sodom. Hence, when we hear the self-vaunted virtues of the people of 
this Republic, it becomes a matter of cynical speculation how many 
could stand the test of Fire and Water. 

SALE OF A NOTED HOUSE. 

Gad's Hill Place — the house that will be forever associated with the 
name of Charles Dickens — is in the market. Mr. Dickens gave £1,790 for 
the house as it originally stood. But it will bring at least five times that 
sum. When Mr. Dickens died, a reserve price of £10,000 was put on the 
property. In addition to the associations connected with it, Dickens 
practically rebuilt the house, and added considerably to the land origin- 
ally pertaining to it. Among many other things he did for the house was 
to make a well, the progress with which was a somewhat serious matter 
to him. He used to say — " It is quite a railway terminus : it is so iron 
and so big." He also made underneath the famous tunnel which connected 
his lawn with the shrubbery, in which was placed the still more famous 
chalet presented to him by Mr. Fechter. The last thing he did was to 
build a conservatory, and it was only on the Sunday before his death that 
he had the great satisfaction of seeing this completed. He said to his 
daughter — " Well, Katey, now you see positively the last improvement to 
Gad's Hill." There used to be in the late Mr. Dickens' time an illumin- 
ated scroll which stood on the first floor landing, by way of greeting to 
all visitors. It ran thus — "'This house, Gads Hill Place, stands on the 
summit of Shakspeare's Gad's Hill, ever memorable for its associations 
with Sir John Falstaff in his noble fancy— 'But, my lads, my lads, to- 
morrow morning by four o'clock, early ?-t Gad's Hill ! There are pilgrims 
going to Canterbury with rich offerings, and traders riding to London 
with fat purses. I have vizards for you all ; you have horses for your- 
selves. " 

Freah. (anxious about his rank) to Professor of Mathematics : " What 
will be my rank for the term?" Professor: ''That is not easily deter- 
mined ; it is less than any assignable quantity." 

An elegant assortment of Gold Watches and Chains at Randolph & 
Co.'s, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Bullion hi ii in- Company- Location of Principal place or 
business, Ban Fraoolaco, California Location of worts, Gold Hill. Storey 
County, Nevada -Notice la herobj [riven that at a meeting of the Board <>f Directors, 
held "ii the ninth il ij of July, 1879, an aueasment (No*, m) of One and one half Dol- 
lars per share was levied upon the capital stock of the Corporation, payable immedi- 
aU i\ . in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at tho office of the Company, 418 
California street (Union Insurance Building), San Francisco, California. 

Any Btoch upon which this assessment Bhall remain uupaid on the THIRTEENTH 
day o! AUGUST, 1875), will be delinquent and advertised for sale at auction ; and un- 
less payment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the THIRD day of SEP- 
TEMBER, 1879, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JOSEPH GRUSS, Secretary. 
Officii— 418 California street, (Union Insurance Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Exchequer Mining Company. --Location of Principal Place 
of Business, San Francisco, 418 California street (Union Insurance Building).— 
Location of Works, Gold Hill, Storey county, Nevada —Notice is here!"/ given that 
at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on the 0th day of July, 1879, an assess- 
ment (No. 14) of One and one-half Dollars (1J,) per share was levied upon the capital 
stock of the Corporation, payable immedialely, in United States gold coin, to the 
Secretary, at the office of the Company, 418 California street(Union Insurance Build- 
ing), San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the FIFTEENTH 
day of AUGUST, 1879, will he delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction ; 
and unless payment is made befure, will be suld on FRIDAY, the FIFTH day of 
SEPTEMBER, 1879, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JOSEPH GRUSS, Secretary. 
Office— 418 California street (Union Insurance Building), San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, northeast 
corner Montgomery and Post streets, San Francisco, July 7th, 1879. —At a reg- 
ular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a Dividend at 
the rate of six and three-fourths (GJ) per cent, per annum was declared on all de- 
posits for the six months ending with June 30th, 1879, free from Federal Tax, and 
payable from and after this date. 
July 12. ED WARD MARTIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings ami Loan Society.— For the half year 
ending this date, the Bo-ird of Directors of the German Savings and Loan So- 
ciety has declared a Dividend on Term Deposits at the rate of seven and one-fifth 
(7 1-5) per cent per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of (6) per cent, per 
annum, free from Federal Taxes, and payable on and after the 15th day of July, 1S79. 
By order. GEORGE LETXE, Secretary. 
San Francisco, June 30th, 1879. July o. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union, 533 California sireet, corner 
Webb. For the half year ending with June 30th, 1879, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate or seven (7) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and five and 
five-sixths (5 5 6) per cent, per annnm on Ordinary Deposits, free from Federal Tax, 
payable on and after July 16th. 1879. [July 5.1 LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Yangtze Insurance Association. ---A Cash Dividend of 
Thirty-three (33) per cent, upon the net premia contributed during the fifteen 
months ending December 31, 1878, has been declared, payable 30th June, 1879. 
July 5. MACONDRAY & CO., Agents. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Franco - American Savings Bank. — Guarantee Capital, 
6200,000. 428 Montgomery street.— This Bank has declared a dividend of seven 
(7) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and five and a half (5J) on Ordinary De- 
posits, for last six months, payable July 15th, free of taxes. 
July 12. L UCIEN BRAND, Secretary. 

B0DIE MINING BUREAU, 

Bo die. Mono County. California* 
CBARZE8 F. KIRCKNER Manager, 

Reliable information furnished in regard to nil Mining 
Matters. Mines and Mining Claims examined, thoroughly reported on and 
sampled. Satisfaction guaranteed. Terms moderate. All communications strictly 
confidential. Refer to : Anglo Calif orniun Bank, Messrs. W. W. Dodge & Co., 
Wheatnn A Luhrs, H. Barroilhet, the Cutting Packing Company, Rodgers, Meyer & 
Co., Professor Thomas Price, F. MacCrellish «fc Co. July 5. 

D. V. B. Henarie. Edward Martin. 

E. MARTIN & CO., 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in Wines and Liquors. 

Proprietors of Miller's Extra Old Bourbon. Sole Agents 
for J. H. Cutter's (manufactured by Milton J Hardy & Co.. Louisville, Ky.) 
and J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon and Rye Whiskies, 
April 5. 408 Front Street, San Francisco. 

HIBERNIA BREWERY~ 

Howard Street, Between £ightn and Ninth. 
Dec. 7.] M. yi'yAX, Proprietor. 



Henry B. Williams. 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION 

No. 213 California st. 



Henry B, Williams. 
& CO., 

MERCHANTS, 

S. F. [July 27. 



COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Reduction in Price : Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price, LiO cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 

TABER, HARKER & CO., 

IJHTOltTEBS JlSD WUOLES.ilE OSOCBSS, 
108 ami 110 California St., S. F. 

iA|iril 10.] 

NOTICE. 

For the very best photographs go to Bradley * Kulofson's, 
in an Elevator, 42» Montgomery street. Oct. 20. 

Smith's Music Store. 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 19, 1879. 



ART JOTTINGS. 

"Sarah Bemhard" is the name now uppermost in art circles. It 
matters but little whether the conversation turns to art on the stage or 
in the studio, Sarah Bernhardt, a lady of uncertain age, who, since 1862, 
has been connected with the French stage, is sure to be its principal sub- 
ject. 

She has been associated these many years with the troupe of the 
Comedie Francaise, a theatrical institution under the patronage of the 
French Government, and consequently we are prepared for a little of the 
claque accorded this late light of the (art) world. 

Of all people who cater to the popular taste, the French take the lead, 
and when they were coaching M'lle Bernhardt for her London engage- 
ment, it is little wonder that they did not forget the sister arts— painting 
and sculpture,— and it is to be noticed how readily she has fallen into the 
English custom of private entertainments at one hundred guineas per 
night. Four of these she gives each week, appearing the remaining 
nights at the Gaiety. At these private soirees she takes her easel, 
sketches, chats and recites. Her efforts at art are usually portraiture, 
and she succeeds, according to good authorities, in executing an execrable 
daub, having some little resemblance to the subject, but none whatever to 
a work of art. But she has succeeded in taking London by storm. Her 
evenings are all engaged, and they cry for more. The same people who 
pride themselves on their Royal Academy and admire the works of the 
R. A.'b, although it is well known that many of the worst daubsters in 
England are among the numbers, are now going daft over this shrewd 
woman from over the channel. Sarah Bernhardt was never married, yet 
she is accompanied by her son, aged 13. He is her constant companion. 
She is received into England's drawing-rooms. The nobility vie with 

each other in doing her honor. Lately she preceded Lady M in going 

to the Salon a Mange. Nothing was said of it, however. In olden time 
charity did wonders; in our day cheek does it — nearly all. The London 
Truth has this to say of M'lle and her admirers : "Anent this same 
Sarah, it strikes me that any one who gives this clever young lady some- 
thing like one hundred guineas for performing in private with one or two 
of her comrades a little piece de societe, intended to prove to the unbeliev- 
ing world that she can model, is paying about eight times what he ought 
— unless, indeed, she be used as a bait to attract fashionable people to a 
house, in which case the investment may be a judicious one." Doubtless 
Miss Bernhardt is clever, and any clever woman can, with the aid of the 
artists we have seen from time to time connected with her name, soon 
learns to manipulate paint and mold,, clay into some sort of & likeness, 
and happily for such talent, the great art centres are overflowing with a 
class of connoisseurs who pretend to see great merit in every pretentious 
daub, and prophecy a brilliant future for the perpetrator of it. In due 
course we shall doubtless have this " Jennie at all trades " with us. 

There seems but little to say of local art just now. About all the art- 
ists are out of town, or doing nothing if at home. Miss Strong has on 
view, at Morris & Kennedy's, a Scotch terrier, which in many respects is 
quite equal to anything she has yet done. The drawing is good, the pose 
and expression both excellent. The color is, however, a little faulty, and 
the hair fails of having the right texture. At the Art Association two 
new paintings are on view this week. One is an example of the old 
Dusseldorf school, as interpreted by Paul Weber ; the other illustrates 
the Innis school, as exemplified by George Innis. We have a vivid recol- 
lection of how a wealthy connoisseur of this city, while in Rome, gave 
Mr. a commission for a large work, how in due course it arrived, 

was entered at the Custom-house with an invoice for a large value and 
consular certificate attached. This high value and an examination of the 
painting by Uncle Sam's art sharps led to the belief that the Innis paint- 
ing had been stolen in transitu and a worthless daub substituted. In their 
dilemma, before reporting the loss to the owner, other authorities were 
consulted, who promptly decided that the picture was, sans doubt, genu- 
ine, as no other artist could paint such a work, and probably no one 
would if they could. Nor can there be but little doubt, very little, that 
the owner has many times wished his valuable picture had excited the 
cupidity of some one and induced him to substitute something for the 
daub, which would give him some sort of pleasure to look upon, which 
this high cost work cannot have afforded him. 

Now, to our remembrance, this huge canvas, at the art rooms is a coun- 
terpart, so far as color and manipulation are concerned, of the one before 
referred to, and possesses no merit whatever, except an atmospheric effect, 
produced by the use of such colors as we find here. As to the other large 
picture, it has many good qualities. The distance is well handled, and 
manv parts of it are strongly painted, but the style of the work is decid- 
edly behind the age— dowdyish shall we say. At any rate, there is none of 
that crispness which should belong to asubject such as this. Perhaps these 
pictures are interesting as exemplifying the extremes of two dogmas in 
landscape painting, the painfully realistic and the equally absurd imagi- 
native. 

Mr. Wm. Hahn has placed on exhibition, at Snow & Co's, a work con- 
taining a large number of figures, " Street Scene in New York." From a 
cart on Uniun Square they are selling the evening papers to the news- 
boys, who are seen in lively strife to obtain the earliest papers. This 
style of subject has ever been Halm's forte. He does uot execute his pic- 
tures with the nice finish of J. G. Brown, of New York, whose " Passing 
Show" will be remembered, but they are equally as effective and true to 
life, if not more so. Hahn does not paint a dirty face different from 
what it is, or clean old and patched clothes with his brush; in other 
words, he never tries to improve upon nature. 

At this gallery there is also un exhibition a painting of " King Lear 
and the Fool," by August Scbauer, a German artist of note in his own 
country. The picture will be interesting to students of Shakespeare, as 
illustrating an interesting episode in the life of that good but unfortunate 
monarch. Of course, the type of face in "King Lear" is German, and 
somewhat different from the usually accepted English interpretation of 
it, but it is nevertheless one which speaks plainly to the beholder, and is 
unmistakably that of a lunatic, as is also that of the other figure a fool's. 
He is seen whispering to the old man, and telling him of the doings of 
his unnatural daughter till he exclaims, in the anguish of his heart: 
" How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is 
To have a thankless child!" 

The artist has twined a wreath of flowers in the poor old King's hair, 
as he wore them when near Dover, when Cordelia first beheld her father, 
and in her agony said to the physician : 



"Alack, tis he ; why, he was met even now 

As mad as the vexed sea, Binging aloud ; 

Crowned with rank fumite and furrow weeds; 

With harlocks, hemlock, nettles, cuckoo-flowers, 

Darnel, and all the idle weeds that grow 

In our sustaining corn. " 
The work is a good example of the modern Munich school, and must be 
considered one of the best yet received here from that section of the art 
world. It is not obtrusively German, from the American standpoint, 
which counts several points in its favor. Such a large number of the pic- 
tures brought from Germany are so strongly Teutonic in their character 
that the American public have, in great measure, sickened of them. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Tbe Company's steamers will sail as follows at 13 91: 
CITY OF PEKING, August 1st, for YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG. 

CITY OF PANAMA, July 19th, for PANAMA, and NEW YORK, calling at MAZAT- 
LAN, SAN BLAS, MANZANILLO and ACAPULCO, connecting at Acapulco with 
Company's Steamers for all Central American ports— calling at SAN JOSE DE 
GUATEMALA and LA LIBERTAD to land passengers and mails. 

DAKOTA, July 28th, for Panama and New York. 

Tickets to and from Europe by any line for sale at the lowest rates ; also to Ha- 
vana and all West India ports. 

CITY OF SYDNEY, August 4th, at 12 o'clock M., or on arrival of English mails, 
for HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY. $10 additional is charged for pas- 
sage in Upper Saloon. 

CITY OF CHESTER, July 19th, for VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND, SEATTLE, 
and TACOMA, connecting at TACOMA with Northern Pacific Railroad for PORT- 
LAND, Oregon. Tickets must he purchased hefore 11 a.m. on day of sailing, at 
Wharf Office. For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan 
streets. [July 19.] WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., Ag ents. 

FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON.' 

The Oregon Steamship Company and Pacific Coast Ste m- 
ship Company will dispatch everv five days, for the above ports, one of their 
new Al Iron Steamships, viz. : OREGON, GEORGE W. ELDER, and STATE OP 
CALIFORNIA. 

Sailing Days: 
July 1, 6, 11, 16, 21, 86, 31. I Aug. 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30. 

Jit 10 o'clock A.. M. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent O. S. S. Co., 
No 210 Battery street, San Francisco. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents P. C S. S Co., 
July 6. No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

CGNARD LINE. 

British and North American Royal Mail Steamships be- 
tween NEW YORK and LIVERPOOL, calling atQUEENSTOWN, sailing from 
New York EVERY WEDNESDAY. 

SCYTHIA July 16.. Aug. 20.. Sept. 24.. Oct. 29 

ABYSSINIA July 23.. Aug. 27 Oct. 1..NOV. 6 

BOTHNIA July 30 Sept. 3.. Oct. 8.. Nov. 12 

GALLIA Aug. 6. .Sept. 10. .Oct. 15. .Nov. 19 

ALGERIA Aug. 13.. Sept. 17.. Oct. 22 

Passage can be secured and all information given on application to 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 
July 12. 218 California St. 

REGISTRATION. 

Republicans, Attention ! 

Headquarters Republican State Central Committee, Rooms 
Nos. 4, 5, 6,7, 8 and 9, No. 703 Market street, Bouthwest corner Third 
street, San Francisco, June 26, 1879. 

The vital importance of immediate REGISTRATION mnst be apparent to every 
Republican, when the fact isanuounced that the entire Registration of this city 
and county has been wiped out ; and that no one will be allowed to vote at the 
September Election unless RE-REUISTERED. The State Central Committee calls 
the earnest attention of Republicans to this matter, and requests them, without 
delay, to register themselves, so as to strengthen the hands ol the organization and 
place it in a position to win the approaching contest. No true Republican will 
neglect this most imperative and urgent duty. By order of 'he Committee. ■ 

M. P. Bqruck, Secretary. [June 3&] W. W. MORROW, Chairman. 

BY ORDER OF THE PROBATE COURT, 

Tbe Works of the late James Hamilton, com prising Paint- 
ings and Sketches in Oil and Water Colors, are now on view to the public and 
for sale at SNOW & CO., 20 Post street. July 12. 



THE BERKELEY GYMNASIUM. 

A Preparatory School to the University. 

The on y fully organized Preparatory School o.i the Coast. 
The instructors in the Gymnasium consist of refined and educated gentlemen, 
who are permanently connected with the institution. Boarding establishment strictly 
first-class. Location healthful and accessible. The third school year will commence 
on the 14th of July. Examination of candidates tor admission, 11th and 12th. For 
catalogues, address JOHN F. BURBIS, 
July 5. Berkele y, California. 

F. FOLEY & CO., 

Dealers In Hides, Wool, Sheepskins, Tallow and Fnrs, 
Nos. 219 and 221 Drumm street, San Francisco, California. Highest Market 
Price Paid. Liberal advances on consignments made through us to our friends in 
the East. April 5. 

IRVINE & LE BRETON 

Have Removed their Law Offices to No. 217 Sansome Street. 

[ March 15.] 

QUICKSILVER. 

or sale— In lots to suit, by Thomas Bell A Co., No. 305 

Sansome street, over Bank of California. Nov. 16. 



F 



ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

310 Sansome street, San Francisco, Wholesale Dealer 



N°i 



in Furs. 



Sept. 21. 



Smith's Music Store, 800 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



July_lD, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISKK. 



19 




JAMBS W. MARSHALL, THE DISCOVERER OF GOLD 

IN CALIFORNIA. 

[Drawn hy our ireU-k)iotcit artist, _1. Nahl, from a daguerreotype 

in the possession of Mr, 11. 21. liancroft, supposed t9 be the only 

rjristina portrait of Marshall — at all events, as he appeared in '4H.] 



As the News Letter furnishes its readers this week with the portraits 
of the cream of San Francisco society, it is only fitting that a special 
place should he given to the man whose lucky discovery made our country 
and our people what they have grown to he in the brief space of thirty 
years. It is true, Marshall's discovery was a piece of sheer luck, and was 
made without any effort or forethought on his part; we may, indeed, truly 
say that there is not a man in the picture accompanying this issue who, 
aa an individual, has not done more for the advancement of the State 
than the original finder of gold ; but this will not make less interesting a 
brief sketch of the blind instrument of that chance to which California 
owes her present position. 

James Wilson Marshall was born in Hope Township, Hunterdon 
county, New Jersey, in 1812. His father was a coauh-builder, and he is 
said to have been brought up to the same trade ; but he was a born me- 
chanic, and by no means confined himself to any particular branch of 
work. Being of a restless disposition, he left home when 21, and for 
some years wandered over the Southern and Western States, generally 
supporting himself by working as a carpenter. While in Missouri he 
first entertained the idea of coming to California, and forthwith, in May, 
1844, he joined a party which had been organized with that object. The 
party divided at Fort Hill, and Marshall joined the portion which de- 
cided to enter California by way of Oregon. In that Territory he passed 
a Winter, and in the Summer came down the Sacramento Valley to Sut- 
ter's Fort, where he arrived in July, 1845. Such an ingenious mechanic 
as Marshall was a great prize for Sutter, who at once took the wanderer 
into his employ. With the exception of occasional fights with the In- 
dians, his life was now monotonous enough until the Bear Flag Party, 
under Fremont, hoisted their flag and declared California a free and inde- 
pendent State. Marshall, of course, espoused the cause of his country- 
men, and after doing good work under the Bear Flag, was enrolled as a 
volunteer in the United States forces when that queer standard was re- 
placed by the Stars and Stripes. He took part in all the important military 
operations which followed, and in March, 1847, received his discharge — 
but no pay. He then returned to Sutter's Fort, and resumed his more 
peaceful occupations. At this time Sutter had great need of a saw-mill. 
He had the resources wherewith to build it, and Marshall had the skill, 
so they agreed to set about the work as equal partners. After several in- 
effectual attempts to find a good site, Marshall at length hit upon a 
suitable place, at a spot called by the Indians Coloma, on the South Fork 
of the American River, some thirty-five or forty miles from Sutter's Fort. 
At that time Sutter had in his employ a number of Mormons, who had 
formerly belonged to the Mormon Battalion which had served the U. S. 
during the warin California. Several of these men and a number of Indians 
were placed under Marshall's orders, and work was at once commenced at 
Coloma. By Jan., 1848, the mill was nearly completed. It had been built 
over a dry channel, into which the water from the river was diverted, in order 
to save the labor of excavation. But the tail-race had proved not deep 
enough, and at the time we are now speaking of the chief work on hand 
was to deepen it. This was done by throwing out the heavy stones and 
loosening the gravel during the day, and at night opening the sluice-gate 
and letting the rush of water carry away the lighter stones and soil. 
Marshall used to go down to the race every morning, after the gate was 
Blmt down, to see what had been accomplished during the night, and, as 
all the world knows, it was on one of these occasions that he discovered 
the first glittering particle of gold. 

The matter wasn't king a secret at the mill, and a closer search revealed 
more of the precious metal ; but nobody seemed to appreciate the impor- 
tance of the discovery except Marshall, and many doubted its being gold. 
To satisfy himself on this head. Marshall went down t>> the Fort a day or 
two later, and, in a private interview with Sutter, tested the yellow stuff, 
and established its genuineness. He and Sutter wished to keep the whole 
thing secret, at least until the mill was finished and they had acquired 



a clear title to the gold-field. But though the workmen promised to keep 
silent and proceed with their work f<>r six weeks, the secret leaked out 
through the indiscretion of a Swiss teamster. This man was sent from 
the Kurt to Colon™ with provisions. At the mill ha obtained some of the 
gold, and on his return he offered his treasure in payment for a bottle of 
whisky, at a store kept by Sam Brannan. After this, it was not long 
before the npwa reached San Francisco— then a little hamlet, containing a 
BOOre or no of houses. The excitement and rush from every corner of the 
earth which followed, is a story too familiar and too long for repetition 
here. To return to Marshall. When the rush had fairly set in, he sold 
part of his interest in the sawmill, and went to prospecting for new dig- 
gings ; but luck deserted him, and he failed to find any of value. To 
make matters worse, the miners somehow got an idea that he secretly 
knew where the gold was, and when, after dogging him from claim to 
claim, they failed to catch him unearthing the hidden treasure, they 
reviled him, and declared that he was purposely deceiving them. Ill- 
feeling ran so high against him, that he was finally compelled to go to the 
Southern mines, where he was not so widely known ; but still he met 
with no success. In later years, when the diggings gave out, he returned 
to his old stamping ground at Coloma, where he lived, and, perhaps, is 
still living, in poverty and obscurity. Hargreaves, the discoverer of gold 
in Australia, was rewarded with S75,000 by the British and Australian 
governments. Marshall has never received a cent, but has been actually 
persecuted, plundered and left to rot in his old age. Such is briefly the 
history of the man and the event. 



DEATH OF 'WILLIAM MITCHELL. 

This well known and highly respected gentleman, Tax Collector of 
the city and county, died at his residence on Saturday last, after an ill- 
ness of but a week's duration, the result of a cold which ended in pneu- 
monia. Mr. Mitchell was a native of Sydney, N. S. W., and a Calif or- 
nian since May, 1850. He had been connected at various times with the 
city press, longest with the Evening Bulletin, where he rose to be cashier 
and business manager. This position he resigned two years ago, to enter 
public life as Tax Collector, winning in every situation, public or private, 
the respect and esteem of all. The news of his death cast a general 
gloom over the city, and the expressions of sympathy with his afflicted 
family were general and heartfelt. The funeral took place from King 
Solomon's Temple, under charge of the Masonic fraternity, and was 
attended by the various societies to which Mr. Mitchell had belonged, and 
by an unusually large concourse of citizens anxious to honor the memory 
of a good man. 

THE GREAT CLOTHING HOUSE. 

Colman Brothers have achieved the enviable reputation of being the 
largest and most important house on the Pacific Coast in the clothing 
trade, which draws to it so many enterprising and vigorous minds. In 
this city they have two establishments— thewholesale one at 107 Battery, 
and the retail business at the corner of Bush and Montgomery. Besides 
these, they have the largest and finest clothing store in Sacramento; and 
these advantages, supported by the resources of their immense factory in 
New York, 134 and 136 Duane street— one of the wonders of that won- 
derful city — enable them to distance competition and maintain their 
place in the front for excellence of material, style and finish in workman- 
ship, and moderate prices. The unvarying courtesy and affability of this 
house are as remarkable as their untiring energy and enterprise. They 
are representative California men of the best type. 

Private library to be sold by auction, on Tuesday next, July 22d. 
R. D. W. Davis & Co. will offer at their rooms, 209 and 211 Pine street, 
a remarkably fine collection of books in the best departments of litera- 
ture. Among these are a set of the " Delphin Classics," of which but 
two are known to be in the State; the large edition of "Cook's Voyages," 
in perfect original binding, the much-coveted '" Walpole Letters," 
"Knight's Shakespeare," an exquisite copy of the large paper " Percy's 
Reliques," and many other varities. Such an opportunity but seldom 
occurs to obtain the finest literary editions of standard works, and it is to 
be feared that prices will fall below what a real book-lover could wish to 
see rule. 

"At the Play." Just one fact more in connection with this superb 
collection of portraits will doubtless be of interest to the general reader. 
As most of our male subscribers have reason to know, the Gentlemans 
Furnishing firm of Carmany & Crosett, No. 23 Kearny street, supplies 
the bulk of what are technically termed "fine " gents' goods to our better 
class of purchasers and society men generally. A review of the above 
picture made by that firm elucidates the coincidence that of the 250 and 
odd gentlemen represented in the engraving, 186 (or Dver two-thirds) are 
regular customers of Messrs. C. & C. A better testimonial to the class of 
this popular firm's custom could hardly be imagined. 



ST. MARY'S HALL, 

Beuicia, Cal- 

The next Academic Year will begin August rsth. A Fall 
Oollugtate Course; Musical Department under the direction of MADAME 
IKUISLEY, the Distinguished Vocalist; a resident French Teacher; a fine Art De- 
partment; horseback and carriage riding constitute some of the attractions of this 
School, Address, REV. L. DELOS MANSFIELD, A.M.. 
July 12. Rector. 

Regular Republican Nominee for Governor, 
GEORGE C. PERKINS, 

Of San Francisco. [July 12. 



W.Morris. MORRIS & KENNEDY, J. F. Kennedy. 

Importers ami Dealers in Jfoltllu^s. Frames, Fusmviu^. 
Chromos, Lithographs, Decalcumanie, Wax and Artists" Materials, 21 Post 
street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, San Fraucisco. Feb. 4. 



J. C. MERRILL & CO., 



ihipplng' ami Commission Merchants, Agents for the Sand- 



wich Islands Packet Lilies. 304 California street, 8. F 



April 13. 



Conservatory Pianos, $250. 200 Post street, corner of Dupont.' 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1879. 



"AT THE PLAY." 

Short Sketches of some of the Notables in the Drama of 
'* Life in California." 

T. H. Goodman. General Passenger Agent of the Central Pacific 
Railroad ; perhaps the most accomplished accountant in the whole army 
of railroad officials. 

Lloyd Tevis, a born diplomatist. Not only is he one of the shrewdest, 
and most wealthy business men on this coast, but he is one of the best and 
brightest talkers to be met with anywhere. 

J. B. Haggin is Mr. Tevis' partner, a cool, clear-headed man, who can 
dispatch business with lightning rapidity. 

Wm. T. Coleman, a merchant Prince, who distinguished himself at an 
early day as President and leader of the Vigilance Committee, which 
saved San Francisco from the rule of the mob. 

D. O. Mills, for many years President of the Bank of California and 
one of the " Bolid men" of California. His wealth is estimated at $15,- 
000,000. 

Wm. Alvord, Ex-Mayor of San Francisco and now President of the 
Bank of California. A cultivated, high-minded gentleman. 

Charles Webb Howard, President of the Spring Valley Water Com- 
pany. A rapid and sagacious business man and eminently fitted for the 
high financial position held by him. 

William Sharon, for many years the partner of the late Wm. C. Ral- 
ston, and now TJ. S. Senator from Nevada. He is the largest hotel pro- 
prietor in the world. He owns the Palace Hotel, the Grand Hotel and 
the Cosmopolitan Hotel of this city, three first-class institutions, which 
together have capacity for accommodating over 2,000 guests. 

A. A. Sargent, for twelve years an honest representative of California 
in the Counsels of the National Government. Both as a member of Con- 
gress and TJ. S. Senator, Mr. Sargent was distinguised for his indus- 
try and ability. He was probably the most influential representative in 
Washington California has had for twenty years. 

J. J. Valentine, the accomplished Superintendent of Wells, Fargo & 
Co's Express. A position he has held for many years. He has probably 
no superior in the line of business he follows. 

John Parrott, the eminent financier, worth S6;000,000, and all acquired 
by his forethought and business sagacity. 

Newton Booth, the " scholar in politics." A graceful orator and thor- 
ough student, he fills the position of U. S. Senator from California to the 
satisfaction of his friends. 

Claus Spreckles, one of the leading sugar refiners of America. In ad- 
dition to his immense refineries in this city, he owns large plantations in 
the Hawaiian Islands. For his enterprise in- developing the resources of 
Hawaii, Mr. Spreckles has recently had conferred upon him the order of 
Knighthood by King Kalakua. 

William Ingraham Kip, the Right Reverend Bishop of California, and 
a distinguished author. 

Horatio Stebbins, the successor of Reverend Starr King, of sweet and 
immortal memory. As Pastor of the First Unitarian Church of this city, 
Mr. Stebbins is known far and wide for his learning and eloquence. 

Charles Lux, the largest land-owner in California, and a gentleman of 
great business ability. He is a genial, kindly man, as well. 

Henry Miller, the partner of Mr. Lux, is also distinguished for his 
superior talent in conducting large business transactions. 

Thomas Bell, an eminent merchant and banker, and does a large busi- 
ness with Mexico. 

W. H. L. Barnes, an orator, scholar, wit, poet, soldier and famous law- 
yer ; one of the shining lights of San Francisco. He can probably do 
more things, and do them well, than any man in the State. 

William M. Gwin, whose eventful life would make a history of itself. 
As TJ. S. Senator, Dr. Gwin made a national reputation. He was a 
statesman of commanding influence, even in a Senate where sat Douglas, 
Seward, Sumner and Fessenden. 

John Hemphill, the distinguished Pastor of Calvary Church. Though 
still a young man, he is eminent for his eloquence and learning. 

Thomas H. Blythe, one of the large real estate owners of San Fran- 
cisco. A bachelor millionaire. 

Stuart Menzies, distinguished as one of San Francisco's most efficient 
Supervisors; 

Edward F. Hall, a leading stock broker, and formerly a partner of 
James R. Keene. Mr. Hall is a bright business man of high social 
position. 

Hall McAllister stands in the very fore-front of the San Francisco 
Bar. He is a born lawyer, and ranks among the leading attorneys of the 
United States. 

Frank McCoppin, the distinguished ex-Mayor of San Francisco. Both 
as Mayor and State Senator, Mr. McCoppin won an enviable reputation, 
and is considered one of the handsome men of this city. 

Fred. McCrellish, the popular proprietor of the Alta. 

John P. Jackson, editor and proprietor of the San Francisco Evening 
Post. A bright and accomplished man, who has made a success of every 
enterprise he has undertaken. He has been a lawyer, railroad builder, 
stock operator and editor, in all of which occupations he has made a name 
to be envied. Cal. Jackson is still a young man. 

Wm. Norris, Secretary of the Spring Valley Water Company, and for- 
merly President of the Oregon S. S. Co., stands deservedly high in com- 
mercial circles. He is a lover of books and pictures. 

Philip Roach, one of the editors of the Examiner, is well known all 
over the State. He has been a State Senator, and was appointed by 
President Buchanan Minister to a Foreign Court, Mr. Roach is a man of 
high character, and speaks fluently several foreign languages. 

J. T. Farley, the newly elected U. S. Senator from California, is one 
of the " powers that be " in the politics of this State. As a manager of 
men he has few equals. Of fine personal appearance, and a ready de- 
bator, he will, no doubt, take high rank in the United States Senate. 

W. H. Piatt, the celebrated rector of Grace Church, is noted for his 
profound scholorship and eloquent discourses. He was a lawyer of high 
standing before he took to the ministry. 

Charles l)e Young is the talented and enterprising proprietor and , 
managing editor of the Chronicle. His paper has a very large circulation, 
and was the principal journal in the great contest in favor of the New 
Constitution. 

Loiing Pickering, the great antagonist of the De Youngs. His two 
papers (both daily) are a power in the land. Mr. Pickering is part pro- 
prietor in the Bulletin and Call, both of them leading journals. 



John McComb is a handsome Brigadier-General, and managing editor 
of the Alta. He is a genial and popular gentleman. 

Thomas Flint has been State Senator from the counties of Santa Cruz, 
San Benito and Monterey. He is one of the leading wool-growers of the 
State, and is an educated and accomplished man. 

Donald McLennan, the founder of the great Woolen Mills at the Mis- 
sion. An enterprising and public-spirited citizen. 

Frank M. Pixley, formerly a lawyer of extensive practice. He has 
been Attorney- General of the State. 

Edward Curtis. In the Mail Bag magazine we found the following 
attempted description of Mr. Curtis: "The trouble, when a fellow has 
so many sides and all of them good, is to tell whereto begin. An accom- 
plished writer and a well read man, who knows how to marshal his knowl- 
edge to the best advantage, he is equally good at a joke, a recitation or a 
speech — a pleasant companion, any way you take him. When you dis- 
cover that our friend is all these things, you begin to think you know 
him. Never was there a greater mistake. You have only seen as much 
of him as he has cared to show you. The rest you won't learn this year, 
nor next either." For his scholarly attainments Mr. Curtis has had the 
title of L. L. D. conferred upon him by the University of the city of New 
York. 

James A. Johnson, the genial Lieutenant-Governor of California, was 
formerly a member of Congress from the Sonoma District. He is uni- 
versally popular and an able man. Few men in public life have more 
personal friends or a larger political following. 

C.T. Mills, a Doctor of Divinity and founder of the celebrated Mills' 
Seminary, is a well-known gentleman, with a mind well stored with the 
treasures and graces of a ripe scholarship. 

H. H. Bancroft, the historian of the Pacific Coast, is a hard student and 
a terse writer. He has already published several volumes of his invalua- 
ble history. 

A. N. Towne, the famous General Superintendent of the Central Pa- 
cific Railroad, is beyond question one of the master railroad operators of 
the age. He manages the trains on over 2,000 miles of iron roads, and a 
fleet of steamboats besides. No transportation companies in the world 
are more ably handled than are those under the immediate control of Mr. 
Towne. 

James G. Fair, a man of prodigious memory and wonderful Buccess in 
the development and management of large mining properties. He was 
the Superintendent of the great " Bonanza Mines " when those immense 
ore bodies were discovered, and superintended them in person during all 
the years when they were paying dividends of ©2,000,000 a month. 

James C. Flood, a man of original ideas and good address. Has all 
his life been an apt student in reading men. Few persons are better judges 
of character than Mr. Flood. He is withal a natural gentleman, correct 
in his habits, very fond of his home and family, and an exemplary citizen 
in every way. In his business he is punctual and always keeps his word. 
A king of the stock market and San Francisco manager of the *' Big Bo- 
nanza," he has necessarily made some enemies. No man doing such an 
immense business could do otherwise. His transactions in the Stock Ex- 
change are supposed to amount, during the past five years, to over three 
hundred million dollars. Mr. Flood is also part owner of the Nevada 
Bank, the largest banking institution in the United States. He is one of 
the wealthiest mine-owners in the world. 

Leland Stanford, the word-renowned President of the Central Pacific, 
is a man of blood and iron. In his veins throbs the energies of a thou- 
sand ordinary men. He has with his partners built more miles of rail- 
road by far than any four men in the United States. Vanderbilt, Gould 
and Scott acquired their great railroad properties by Wall street specula- 
tions or by purchase, but Leland Stanford built nearly every mile he now 
controls, and this constitutes the wide difference in the achievements of 
these illustrious railroad magnates. As Governor of the State, before he 
became President of the Central Pacific, Mr. Stanford made for himself a 
great name by the statesmanship and ability he displayed as Chief 
Magistrate. 

Leland Stanford Jr., the only son of Governor Stanford, though only 
eleven years of age, has already displayed decided talent. He is an ex- 
cellent engraver on wood, and has mechanical genius of a high order. He 
naturally takes to railroads, and is fond of studying the peculiarities of 
new inventionss, especially when they relate to locomotives, cars and other 
railroad paraphernalia. 

Charles Crocker, who so ably superintended the whole work of construc- 
tion of the entire overland road from San Francisco to Salt Lake, is now 
President of the Southern Pacific. At one time Mr. Crocker had under 
him 14,000 men — railroad builders — an army greater than that with 
which General Scott won his grandest victory in Mexico. Probably 
through his hands has passed more than one hundred million dollars dur- 
ing the past fourteen years, a large portion of which has been paid out 
for labor. Mr. Crocker has a faculty of dispatching an immense amount 
of business in a very short space of time. He can handle an army of 
men and millions of money as easily as many men can handle a company 
or the contents of a grocer's till. Associated with Governor Stanford 
from the commencement of railroad building in California, he has won a 
national name in the great enterprises with which he is connected. 

Stuart M. Taylor is the present City Recorder of San Francisco. He is 
a graceful orator and a popular gentleman. 

Joseph Austin is one of San Francisco's Port Wardens and an old and 
highly respected citizen of this city. 

D. Z. Yost was formerly private Secretary to Governor Stanford, and 
is now a successful and brilliant member of the San Francisco Stock Ex- 
change. 

T. A. Harcourt was formerly one of the editors of the Overland . 
MontMy. He is an accomplished literateur; in fact, one of the best 
writers in the State. 

G. G. Gariboldi is the celebrated artist and musician. The fine work 
in the great houses on Nob Hill is, much of it, from designs originated by 
Mr. Gariboldi. 

H. Channing Beals is the well known editor of the Commercial Serald, 
the best statistician in the State. 

Wm. A. Neilson was for eight years a distinguished member of the 
Australian Parliament, and one of the leaders of that body. Since he has 
made California his home he has been engaged in literary pursuits. He iff 
one of the must terse and effective writers on the press. 

Frank G. Newlands is the son-in-law of Senator Sharon, and is a young 
and rising lawyer. 



July 19, 1879. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1879. 



THE SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL 
There are signs of rovhul in Ihia fragrant garden of the rulniinistra- 
Hon. Th« directors have coma up freah and hearty from their vacation, 
whethar Mutooed or voluntary, with targe ooUaottona of now documents 
and first-olaet wttoaaaaa tor and asalnst the teachers who have Wen, or 
ar*. or are about to be, uspectod of something. Oontomacinna teachers, 
gtaadily tevfled for six months as pnrchaseraol nneetioiw which nobody 
sold, are hauled op lur&iu ami aaaidaonaly nagged in public by the cour- 
teous Irfk'cctt ami the unfailing Bacon. It doei not yet appear what 
nominations these gttod men are in search of, though some little promises 
have been made In conventions, in a manner perhaps only conventional; 
but one thing is clear, for whatever offices these gentlemen may be 
named, it will be found that their views are eminently practical. They 
do not sell positions in the School Department ; but neither do they run 
about hunting for midday at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. 

Ceneral principles are fitly illustrated by particular cases. President 
Blester, for instance, when lately requested to nominate a person as jani- 
isted DO words. The applicant was not rich, but she had acow, 
Tradition affirms that this was all she had, and also that President Blester 
was in urgent need of a cow to reiuforce the incessant drain upon his 
milk of human kindness. The secret sympathy which brings two hearts 
to beat as one is not without a certain power over the mind ; and it will 
not, therefore, surprise the philosophical reader to learn that the quondam 
owner of the cow is now a janitress in one of the public schools, while the 
useful animal herself chews the cud in President Hiester's back yard. It 
is not given us to know where or in what manner the President of the 
Board of Education himself chews the cud, but the fitness of thewhole 
arrangement inclines one, like Mrs. Skewton on a similar occasion, to 
fold one's hands upon one's breast and say with those wicked Turks : 
"There is no What's-His-Name but Thingummy." 

Money is no object with any of these gentlemen. They are not paid, 
and they give their time to the interests of the public, knowing that all 
good things will be added to them that love the Lord. Nor can we suffi- 
ciently admire the mystery of godliness, through whose working alone it 
has come to pass that one of the Board of Education has been enabled, 
since his election, to change his residence, previously discreetly hidden on 
the back lot of a more pretentious house, for a most stately mansion on a 
wide street, and to distribute the family cares among several hired do- 
mestics, in a household long unacquainted with the brisk energies and 
vigorous methods of Bridget. We see and wonder, how by worrying 
teachers and throwing dust in the public eyes, men turn away attention 
from their own questionable proceedings, and the unmolested Ewald. 

The combination system of investment in stocks, as managed by 
Martin Taylor & Co., is remarkably successful. It has been carefully 
studied out. after a long experience in the handling of stocks, and recom- 
mends itself to the judgment of all as a plan free from the defects of 
other attempts in the same direction, while it brings together all the 
elements of security. The risk of an investment is reduced to the lowest 
possible point when able operators, thoroughly and constantly informed of 
even the slightest variations in value, are on the watch, with ample 
means to seize the critical moment, which makes in these cases all the 
difference between triumph and ruin. The small investor, by this method 
of combination, reaps all the advantages hitherto exclusively belonging to 
the capitalist. The three or four hundred dollars separately applied to a 
purchase by the owner, who is almost entirely in the dark, cannot, even 
at the best, achieve more than a trivial success ; but merged with similar 
amounts from other investors in an imposing sum of 8100,000 or $200,000, 
all the weight and force of capital are put at the service of each small 
proprietor, and the result is almost infallibly profitable to an extraordi- 
nary degree. It is in the power to bring together and to handle with effi- 
ciency these isolated small amounts that M. Taylor & Co.'s services are of 
incalculable value. Intending purchasers should ponder well and deeply 
this truth, so well put in the circular of these gentlemen : ' ■ To be suc- 
cessful, one must be prompt, active and decisive —seize opportunities at 
the right moment, and go luith the tide." And this is exactly what they 
are able to do for their customers. Combinations are constantly forming, 
and terminate every seven, fifteen and thirty days. They are always for 
a specified number of shares -100, 000, 50,000, 25,000 or 10,000. The first 
two are more generally advantageous as investments, because tbey are 
larger. In every case the purchaser of shares can see his liability before- 
hand, and calculate almost with certainty his chances of gain or loss ; and 
while the former almost surely surpasses his expectations, the latter is 
under his hand from t he beginning. 

Mrs. Lewis' Fashionable Dress-making Parlors in Thnrlow 

Block, Kearny and Sutter streets, are the resort of those who lead in so- 
ciety, and meet there to discuss the latest styles. Everything new and 
distinctive from the Paris artists is immediately brought before the criti- 
cal eyes of San Francisco by Mrs. Lewis, and passed upon en petit cotnitc 
in her magnificent rooms. There may be seen such marvels of taste and 
skill as cannot be met with elsewhere in the city. One dress alone, or- 
dered for a grand ball at Vallejo, and now displayed in the outer parlour, 
could have been produced by none but the most accomplished artists. 
working under the eye of a'faultless critic. The richness and beauty of 
this perfect robe and train affect one like a symphony, so exquisitely do 
colour and form blend and melt into harmony. With such a guide as 
Mrs. Lewis, our San Francisco ladies cannot fall below their reputation 
as the best dressed w omen in America. 

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, one of the best known, and 
indisputably among the soundest and most powerful companies in the 
country, has adopted a new form of Simplified Incontestible Policy, 
which gives tne insurer all the certainty of an investment in the public 
funds. The agency of this standard company in this city is in the hands 
of Wm. D. Garland, at 240 Montgomery street, and under his administra- 
tion many policies have been issued throughout the State, and large 
awards have been paid to survivors, without a contest in a single case. 
To point out the advantages of a life assurance at this late day would be 
entirely superfluous. The one thing needful is, that the business man 
taking out a policy shall feel confident of the company's strength and 
sound management, and in these respects the Equitable is absolutely 
beyond reproach thr ough its long history. 

J. M. Litchfield & Co., merchant tailors, 415 Montgomery street, are 
making very nice suits as low as $40 and $45. 



INVALIDS! 

AJVfl OTHEItS 

SEEKING HEALTH, STRENGTH 

.A-iicl Energy, 

WITHOUT THE USE OF DRUGS, 
ARE EARNESTLY REQUESTED TO SEND FOR THE 

ELECTRIC REVIEW, 

A large Illustrated Journal, which is Published 
for Free Distribution. 

It treats upon Health, Hygiene, and Physical Culture, and is a com- 
plete encyclopaedia of information for invalids and those who suffer from 
Nervous, Exhausting and Painful Diseases. Every Bubject that bears 
upon health and human happiness, receives attention iu its pages ; and 
the many questions asked by suffering invalids, who have despaired of a 
cure, are answered, and valuable information is volunteered to all who 
are in need of medical advice. 

The subject of Electric Belts versus Medicine, and the hundred and 
one questions of vital importance to suffering humanity are duly consid- ' 
ered and explained. Young Men and others who Huffier from Nervous 
and Physical Debility, Loss of Manly Vigor, Premature Exhaustion and 
the many gloomy consequences of early indiscretion, etc., are especially 
benefitted by consulting its contents. 

The Electric Review exposes the unmitigated frauds practiced by 
quacks and medical iinposters who profess to " practice medicine," and 
makes plain the only safe, simple, and effective road to Health, "Vigor 
and Bodily Energy. 

The present edition of 500,000 copies of the Review will be mailed 
and distributed FREE throughout the United States, Canada and the 
Provinces. Call, or send your address on a postal card for a copy, and 
information worth thousands will be sent you. Address — 

The ELECTRIC REVIEW, 

513 Montgomery Street, .... San Francisco, Cnl. 



Ledges* Papers. 

Acknowledged to be the best Papers for Blank Hooks, 
Will resist ilic shvhrhst TKST nf erasure and rewriting. 
Received [lie HICIHEST AWVKD over ALL OTHERS 
frmnilic United States centennial CoMMtbs.ii in. 
Have your Blank Books made from I lit; in. and no oilier. 

H. S. CROCKER & CO., Sole Aceits. 



Ladies 

Do you want a puro, bloom- 
ing Complexion 1 If so, a 
few applications of Hagan's 
MAGNOLIA BALM will grat- 
ify you to your heart's con- 
tent. It does away with Sal- 
Iowness, Redness. Pimples, 
Blotches, and all diseases and 
imperfections of the skin. It 
overcomes tho flushed appear- 
ance of heat, fatigue and ex- 
citement. It makes a lady of 
THIRTY appear hut TWEN- 
TY; and so natural, gradual, 
and perfect are its effects, 
that it is impossible to detect 
its application. 



SLA YEN'S Yosemite COLi 



OLD WHISKIES! 



PURE A ND UNADULTE RATED. 

We offer for Sale, on Favorable Terms to Hie Trade, CATH- 
ERWOOD'S CELEBRATED FINE OLD -WHISKIES, of the 
following Brands, namely : 

CENTURY WHISKY. 

Landing ex ateamBhip " State of California," 

25 bbls. Catherwood's Old " CENTURY" Whisky. 

FOR SALE ET 

DICKSON, DeWOLF & CO., Sole Agents. 



"DOUBLE B" WHISKY. 

Landing ex steamship " State of California," 

25 bbls. Catherwood's "DOUBLE B" Whisky. 

FOR SALE BY 

DICKSON, DeWOLF & CO., Sole Agents. 

FINE OLD WHISKIES. 

Landing ex steamship " State of California,* 1 

Choice Old Whiskies, 

Of the following brands : 

"X," "XX" "XXX," "XXXX," "NECTAR" AND "CABINET." 

The above are new brands to this Coast, but well and favorably known 
in all the Atlantic Cities. 

FOK SALE BI 

DICKSON, DeWOLF & CO., Sole Agents. 



EUREKA STONE MANUFACTURING CO., 

Factory: 535 Brannan Street, near Fourth. 

PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL CEMENT AND STONE WORK, 

Building Fronts, Carriage Steps, Garden Walks, 

Side-walks, Cemetery Works, Copings, Etc. 

EUREKA. STONE SEWER PIPE. 

eSTSewers Put In at the Shortest JVb«fee.1£3l 



MULLSR'S 

BPHlffl 




The only Reliable Instrument for Testing 
' mullee ■* Defective Vision. 

Is the leading 

ottician] No . 135 MONTGOMERY ST., 

Near BuBh, opposite the Occidental Hotel. 




£»!£» 




Diseases, like rivers, spring from small causes. The 

roarincr river may not be easily diverted from its course, nor the neglected disease 
from its destructive work. Taken in time, disease, which is merely an interrupt^ 
function, may be averted by the use of Nature's remedy, 

Tarrant's Seltzer Aperient, 

It combines the medicinal properties of the beBt mineral waters in the world. 
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS. 



SEATTLE CO Ala! 



W H Ot L E"S A. ~L. E . 



SEATTLE COAL AND TRANSPORTATION COMPANY, 
30, 32 and 34 Market St., San Francisco. 



CARGOES DELIVERED ANYWHERE ON THIS COAST. 



The best proof of the quality of this Coal for steam is the fact that 
tho Central Pacific Eailroad Company are using from five to Seven thous- 
and tons per month on their locomotives and boats. 




English and American Bicycles. 
THE "HARVARD,"°THE "COLUMBIA," 

And all first-class makes of English Bicycles 

KEPT IN STOCK 

And imported to order. 
Prices only $5 over those in Boston- 

G. LORING CUNNINGHAM, 

SO. 206 BAXSOMJS STXEJBT, 

Office of MACONDRAY & CO., San Francisco. 



r-pRY THE NEW 




ICARETTES 
and TOBACCO. 



STRAIGHT "—Rare Old Virginia. "HALVES"— Rare Old Perique and Virginia. 

New Combination of these Fragrant Tobaccos. 

L & E- WERTHEIMER, - 300 Front St., AGENTS. 

WESTERN FIRE AND MARINE INS. CO., 

OF CAWFOMIA. 
OFFICE; 409 CALIFORNIA. STREET. 



Stockholders. 

San Francisco :— P. Marsicano, John McCabe, P. Hartigan, W. W. Dodge, P. J. 
White, Henry Casanova, George H. Sanderson, E. M. Root, Michael Kane, F. O'Leary, 
N. C. Luhrs, J. Wielaud, F. Wieland, W. H. Stearns, M H. Kelly, J. De la Montanya, 
P. Alferitz, A. P. Hotaling, Nicholas Goetjen, Jonas Schoenfeld, J. MacDonough, P. 
Rossi, Ed. Bosqui, Thomas Jennings, Joseph Figel, S. C. Hastings, G. Ginnochio, 
John Fay, Win. M. Lent. John F. Boyd, Win. Willis, C. D. O'Sullivan, James Phelan, 
J. F. Cowdery, R. McElroy, F. Crowley, John C. Hall, Edmund Marks, J. Maccary, 
B, Frapolli, H. J. McMurray, Geo. O. Smith, Jr., Jno. S. Bowman, Gus. Reis, Dr. G 
Woodward, Angeln Spadiuo. Sacramento:— W. R. Strong, N. Dingley, Geo. W. Ches- 
ley, Rob't M. Hamilton, W. D. Comstock, S. B. Ridgway, O B. Gnodhue, A. S. Hop- 
kins, Dr. G. L. Simmons, Dr. E. Jacobs, E. S. Dennison. Gold Hill, Kevada :— 
Robert P. Keating, Captain Thomas G. Taylor. Lompoc :— J. Rudolph 




-THE- 



3B©sf in th.G JHfarlset. 



A. BUSWELL, BOOK BINDER, Mo. 521 CLAY STREET. 



Price par Copy. 10 CeaU.1 



ESTABLISHED JULY, 20. 1856. 



I Annual Subscription, 15. 



£&sl ff^^[©3©®Q 




DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OP CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 30. 



SAN TRANOISOO, SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1879. 



No. 2. 



Office or the San Frauctsco News Letter, Merchant Street, 

N">. 097 to 815, San Francisco. 

GOLD BARS— 890@910— Silver Bars— 6@16 W cent. diao. Mexican 
Dollars, 9A@10 percent, nom. 

«- Exchange on New York. J@l-5 per cent. ; On London, Bankers, 
49g; Commercial, 49g@4iljd. Paris, sight, 5 francs per dollar. Tel- 
egrams, 15-100@ i per cent. 

W Latest price of Sterling, 485@487. 



tS' Price of Money here, f@l per cent, per month — bank rate. 
open market, 1@1£. Demand active. 



In the 



PKICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOVERNMENT BONDS. 
Sax Frascisco July 25, 1879. 



Stocks and Bonds. 
V. S. Bonds, 5-20s 1867-1 

Legal Tender Notes 

S. F. Citv « Co. E'ds, 6s, '58 

S. F. City Bonds, 7s 

Sacramento City Bonds 

Yuba County Bonds, 8s 

San Mateo Co. Bonds, 7s... 

S. F. GasLightCo 

National G. B'k & Trust Co. 
Spring Valley Water Co 



Bid. 
105J 

99} 
105 
105 

28 
100 

84 
60 

86 



107 

107 
30 



Stocks and Bonds. 

Omnibus Railroad Co 

Central Railroad Co 

N. B. and Mission R. R. Co, 
Front St. , M. & O. R. R. Co. 

Fireman's Fund Ins. Co 

Union Insurance Co 

Pacific Bank 

The Bank of California 

Central Pacific Railroad 

C. P. R. R. Bonds 



Bid. 
30 
40 
65 

115 
115 
112 



D. Z. Yost & Co., Brokers, S.E. cor. Montg'y and Californ ast. 



07 

118 

ho- 
ik. 

70 



GRAIN. 



FLOTJK AND 

Report of Flour and Grain (crop of 1878) remaining in the State of 
California on July 1, 1879, as taken by the San Francisco Produce Ex- 
change : 



! Flour. 1 Wheat. | Barley. 
I Bbls. | Ctls. | Ctls. 



San Francisco and Oakland 
Wharf, including Wheat 
afloat in harbor. 

Northern Coast, Petaluma, 
and Russian River 

Napa Valley Railroad, Val 
lejo, and California Pacific 
Railroad 

Sacramento Valley and Sac 
ramento River 

Lower Sacramento, Lower 
San Joaquin, and Suisun 
Bay 

San Francisco Bay landings, 
east side 

Western Pacific Railroad, 
from San Leandro to Liv- 
more 

Stockton and San Joaquin 
Valley 

Southern Pacific Railroad, 
from Redwood to Hollis- 
ter, including Alviso 

Salinas and Pajaro Valleys.. 

Southern Coast 



Totals. 



16,381 
2,015 

6,300 
4,958 

1,000 
1,000 

500 
2,000 



2,000 

520 

1,112 



37,780 



174,758 
11,360 

32,730 
34,458 

3,210 

11,424 

30,105 
222,350 



47,000 

17,406 

8,450 



593,251 



238,560 
3,400 

12,900 
25,426 

4,875 
90,730 

76,000 
31,963 



50,000 
136,811 

129,000 



806,565 



Oats. 
Ctls. 



21,258 
1,040 



500 



836 
600 



500 

750 

1.000 



Corn. 
Ctls. 



Rye. 

Ctls. 



42,944 
2,030 



4,000 



75 
227 



10,176 



11,061 



98,726 1,000 



26,484! 148,002! 22,237 



W. H. Walker, Secretary San Francisco Produce Exchange. 

Latest from the Merchants Exchange — New York, July 25th, 
1879. United States Bonds-4s, 102 ; 4Js, 106J; 5s. 104. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 85@4 87. Pacific Mail, 141. Wheat, 110@116. Western Union, 
901. Hides, 19.1020. Oil— Sperm, 75@76. Winter Bleached, S7 @ 96. 
Whale Oil, 35@40; Winter Bleached, 42@49. Wool— Spring, fine. 20® 
30 ; Burry. 11@14 ; Pulled, 25@35 ; Fall Clips, 14@18 : Hurry, 13@ 20. 
London, July 25th.— Liverpool Wheat Market, 8s. 8d.@9s. 8d. ; Club, 9s. 
7d.@9s. lOd. U. S. Bonds, 5's, 105}; 4's, 109J; 4J's, 109J. Consols, 98 1-16. 



London. July 25, 1879.~Latest Price of Consols. 98 1-16. 



THE STOCK MARKET. 

The past week has witnessed a succession of breaks, culminating, 
however, yesterday morning, and since then a sharp reaction has set in, 
showing a marked improvement along the -whole line. The sales for 
account of margin buyers have been unusually large, though we are in- 
clined to the belief that the principal sacrifices have already been made. 
Little or no information can be derived from the mines, and operations 
are based almost entirely upon the appearance of the market. Ophir 
seems to be coming to the front as a favorite gamble, and throughout the 
break has stood the slaughter bravely. Bodie took another tumble during 
the week, and at the close shows but little signs of recuperation. The 
news from the mine is particularly unfavorable, the north winze having 
failed to show the anticipated improvement, while the northeast crosscut 
is not looking so well. Mono, however, shows an improvement in the 
east drift, while the stock is well sustained. At the close the general 
market was considerably better. 

Beerbohm's Telegram.— London and Liverpool, July 25, 1879.— 
Floating Cargoes, quieter; Cargoes on Passage, rather easier; Mark Lane 
Wheat, steady; No. 2 Spring off Coast, 43s. 6d.@44s.; Red Winter off 
Coast, 48s.; California off Coast, 47s. ; California Nearly Due, 47s. 
California Just Shipped, 46s. 6d. ; No. 2 Spring for Shipment, 42s. ; Liv 
erpool Spot Wheat, rather easier; California Club No. 1. Standard, 10s. 
California Club No. 2 Standard, 9s. 7d.; California Average — Western 
9s. 6d.; White Michigan, 9s. 9d.; Red Western Spring, 8s. 2d.@9s.; Ex 
tra Amount State Flour in London, 12s. 6d.; Extra Amount State Flour 
in Liverpool, 12s. 6d. ; Liverpool Western Mixed Corn, 4s. 2d. ; Liverpool 
Canadian Peas, 6s. 9d. ; English Country Markets, quieter; French Coun- 
try Markets, tone easier; Weather in England, fine — on Continent shows 
signs of improving; Liverpool Wheat, 8s. 8d., 8s. 9d., 9s. 7d., 9s. 10d.; 
Cotton, quiet; Consols, 97 15-16; Orleans, 6g; Uplns, 6 9-16. 

San Franciscans Abroad— July 3, 1879.— Paris : A. Kohler, Mrs. 
A. Kohler, J. Tevis, Mrs. J. Tevis, Samuel Tevis, S. W. Sears. London : 
T. M. Ames, H. E. Teschemacher. Dresden : Mr. and Mrs. Crocker, 
Miss H. Crocker, Miss L. Tevis. Berlin : Mrs. H. M. Lent. Copen- 
hagen : Mrs. Coit, Mr. and Mrs. Hitchcock. — Continental Gazette [Paris). 
Baden-Baden : J. A. Folger and family, Miss E. A. Hochkofler, C. 
Schoemann. Florence : George L. Massey. — Continent and Swiss Times 
[Geneva), July 5th, 1870 

It is with much regret that we announce the sudden death of a son 
of Mr. W. H. Bovee, the well-known real estate agent. This most prom- 
ising youth, after partaking of a hearty meal, indulged in a swim. The 
sudden immersion of his heated body in the cold water brought on con- 
gestion, the cause of his untimely decease, at the early age of fifteen. The 
family have our sincere sympathy in the great bereavement. 

The New York Dramatic News contains a blackguardly attack this 
week on Frank H. Gassaway, and incidentally mentions him as the the- 
atrical critic of the News Letter. The attack itself is shameful ; still, 
in justice to our theatrical critic, and as information for the " News," 
we have to state that F. H. Gassaway has not written a line of theatrical 
criticisms for this pa per the past two years. 

Mr. Joseph G. Eastland, we are glad to announce, returned on Mon- 
day last, from his absence in Europe aud the East, greatly benefitted in 
health, and full of the old time vigor and energy. The presence of _ such 
men among us gives courage and confidence, and we feel that there's life 
in the old land yet. 

Correction. — In last week's notice of Colman Bros, great business on 
this coast, we inadvertently stated that they had, in addition to their 
houses in this city, the largest clothing store in Sacramento. This was 
an error. What we should have said was that Messrs. Colman supply 
the largest house in Sacramento with goods. 



New York, July 24th.— A parcel of 1,200 bbls. refined sugar sold 
here yesterday, for San Francisco. To-day, by reason of a decision by 
the Secretary of the Treasury, the price of crushed sugar has been ad- 
vanced £c. 

■Washington, July 25th. — Among the nominations made by the 
President for appointments of Second Lieutenants is Francis Fremont, of 
Arizona. 

Col. Harvey Lake, a veteran of the Mexican war. died Thursday 
night at Maricopa, Arizona. The telegram gave no particulars. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 616 Merchant Street, San FranclKO, California, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AKD 



July 26, 1879. 



LAURA' 

Laura now doth sigh and languish 

In a fit of woe and grief, 
And the dewdrops of her anguish 

Gem her pocket-handkerchief. 
Wherefore should this breathing 
flower 

Feel the arrows of despair? 
Wherefore should she but an hour 

Peel the throes of pain and care ? 



S PAIN. 

While perfume is to her blowing 

From some swaying purple bell, 
Still her tear-drops keep on flowing 

From her soul's artesian welL 
She'll not soon with "Yankee Doo- 
dle" 

Make the parlor walls resound — 
This is all because her poodle, 

Clytemnestra, is in pound. 



WINNING COMMERCE. 

Our people should make the most of the land behind them, and of 
the water in front of them; by which we mean that they should fill up the 
interior of the State with thriving industry, and venture out on the broad 
Pacific in quest of markets. That is the way to create a great commer- 
cial port, and build up a permanent and wealthy city. Wheat-growing 
will not last forever, neither will the Comstaek Lode. Both are good in 
their way; they have done much for San Francisco in the past, and they 
will let us hope, do more in the future. But we stand in need of manu- 
factures and of markets, especially the latter. It behooves us to culti- 
vate commercial relations all over the Pacific. It is in that direction our 
commerce must extend, if it is to extend at all. We have promising 
fields in Mexico, South America, China, Japan, Australia, New Zealand 
and in the isles of the Pacific. Up to the present, it must be confessed 
that we have not made the most of our opportunities. China was to 
have been, and ought to have been, a perfect mine of wealth. We were 
to have supplied the teeming millions of that empire with pretty nearly 
all that they import. Yet, up to the present, we have hardly made an 
appreciable inroad into their trade. Their orders are still supplied by 
way of the Suez Canal. The same is true of Japan. With Mexico we 
are doing a trade that might easily be increased. With South America 
much more might be done. With Australia and New Zealand 
the opportunities are immense. They are great importing coun- 
tries. Their population of three millions of English-speaking people 
absorb a large amount of manufactures. We have much to sell that they 
are ready and willing to buy. A more intimate acquaintance would show 
many opportunities for reciprocal exchange of commodities. The colonies 
were well represented at the Philadelphia Exposition. California ought 
to be equally well represented at the forthcoming exhibitions at Sydney 
and Melbourne. It is the experience of these timeB, that if you would 
sell your goods you must exhibit them to customers ; it is also true that if 
you would sel 1 , you must also buy. The Australians ask that we should 
take their fine wools, and offer to take in return American manufactures. 
Their offer is worthy of all consideration. It means business, an exten- 
sion of trade and commerce that will advantage this city. We should be 
on the look out for just such opportunities. That is the way to win com- 
merce. That is the way to build up an enduring prosperity. Better far 
the trade of a Liverpool than all the mines of Peru, or even of Calif o.nia. 

THE JEWS AT HOTELS. 
The uproar made last year over the exclusion of Jews from a hotel 
in the East seems to have advertised the business as well as could have 
been expected. Another publican has taken up the same line this year, 
and is likely to find his account in it. Two of the New York papers 
have fallen into the trap and given the establishment a very effective, 
gratuitous puffing. Henry Ward Beeeher has not yet come out for or 
against the offending landlord, but, if the thing is dexterously managed, 
even this strong support will not be wanting. Except as an advertising 
trick, one is at a loss to see the meaning of this sudden warfare upon a 
religious community. Considered as a method of bringing oneself before 
the traveling public, it is worthy of the greatest commendation; and it is 
a little surprising that a people so keen to see the commercial aspect of a 
case should play so confidingly into the hands of the ingenious hotel- 
keeper. How he must smile as he reads of the Jewish indignation meet- 
ings and the wrath of the high-minded American journals ! For his 
shekels are safe — they will come in upon him like a flood, and be will 
spoil the Egyptians. An inquiry into the family history of this enter- 
prising man would reveal, we cannot but think, a closer relationship with 
some Biblical traders than he suspects. It is difficult to treat 
this matter seriously; and yet it is proper to say that the Jews 
show too little sense of their own dignity in taking any notice whatever 
of such gross devices for attracting custom. We recommend to them the 
following true story, which they can apply for themselves: Five or six 
years ago there was displayed for many months, on a house in Powell 
street in this city, a sign to "this effect: " This house to let, or for sale, but 
no member of the First Baptist Church on Washington street need ap- 
ply." Whether the house was let or sold, we never knew; but the sign 
was seen and read for a long time by thousands of people, many of them, 
no doubt, Baptists, and yet there was no indignation meeting, no 
upheaval of that sensitive religious body. People who have serious ob- 
jects in view cannot waste time on lunatics or peddlers. 



Baron Ferd. von Mueller, Government Botanist of Victoria, Aus- 
tralia. — Among ti.e news items by the last Australian mail I find one as 
pleasing to myself as I think it will be to all lovers of the blue gum tree, 
which adds so much to the avenues and landscapes of California, viz. : 
that the introducer of them over the world — Dr. Ferdinand von Mueller, 
already a Baron of the German Empire, and decorated by nearly all the 
crowned heads of Europe, has been created a Knight of the Royal British 
Order of Knights Companions of St. Michael and St. George. His emi- 
nent services in benefitting the world with the results of bis labors, ren- 
dered Sir Ferdinand von Mueller one of the greatest benefactors of man- 
kind in modern times. Whole countries that had been malarious swamps 
for centuries have been reduced into healthy and productive lands by the 
results of his disinterested labors. Long may he enjoy his honors. 

John J. Bleasdale, D. D. 

Two Memphis politicians have had a duel, and missed each other. 
The people of the district have our heartfelt sympathy in their disap- 
pointment. Let them cheer up. Perhaps the yellow fever may yet suc- 
ceed where the recreant bullets failed. 



Artistic Novelties, manufactured from California quartz, at Ran- i 
dolph & Co.'s, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 



SIGNAI 


SERVICE METEOBOLOQICAL REPORT, 


WEEK 


ENSING JTT 
Hig 


LY 24, 1879, SAN FEAKC] 


SCO, CAL. 


hest and Iioujest Sarometei 


Frl. 18 


Sat. 19 


Sun. 20 


Hon 21 


Trie. 22 


Wed 23 


Thr24 


29.960 


29.950 


29.959 


29.953 


29.969 


29.955 


29.966 


29.923 


29 909 


29.925 


29.933 


29.897 


29.899 


29.926 




Maximum anil minimum Tfiermometer. 




62.5 


61.5 


64 63 1 67.5 I 


65 


63 


54 


53 1 


52 53 54 
Hfean Daily Humidity. 


53 


53 


73 


81.7 | 


75.7 | 80 | 78 | 
Prevailing Wind. 


84.3 | 


83.3 


w! | 


W. | 


W. | W. | W. | 
Wind — SLiles Traveled. 


W. | 


W. 


333 


318 | 


471 | 393 | 299 | 
State of Weather. 


293 | 


307 


Fair. 


| Fair. 

Ba 


Clear. | Clear. | Fair. | 
infall in Twenty-four Hours 


Fair. 


Fair. 


TotalRain During Season beginning Jfuly 1, 3879 01 inches. 



SANITARY NOTES. 
The deaths this week number 84, as compared with 64 last and 93 
for the corresponding week last year— males 52, females 30, Chinese 8. 
There were 5 suicides and 5 accidental deaths. The zymotics were : 
Typhoid 1, diarrhea 2, diphtheria 2, scarlatina 1. The other principal 
causes of death were : Phthisis 8, heart disease 6, pneumonia 4, cancer 3, 
paralysis, enteritis, liver disease, of each 2. There was 1 death each of 
infantile convulsions, diabetes, epilepsy, hcemoptysis, hepatitis, lung con- 
gestion, old age, peritonitis, syphiHs, urosmia. Infantile mortality was 
unusually low. There was no death in the Third Ward, and only one in 
the First and Fifth. There were 12 in the Twelfth Ward and 13 in the 
Eleventh. Nine persons died in public institutions. 



Deplorable Accident.— The many friends of Mr. B. W. Eeagan, the 
Arizona capitalist, will be greatly distressed to hear of the terrible acci- 
dent that occurred to him and his wife, while driving a restive horse at 
Oakland, Thursday afternoon. The animal took fright, the phaeton was 
overturned, and both occupants were thrown out and severely, if not 
fatally, injured. Mr. Eeagan had four of his ribs fractured, and sus- 
tained serious injuries about the head, and has not yet recovered con- 
sciousness. His physicians despair of his recovery. Mrs. Eeagan was 
badly cut about the head, but her wounds are not necessarily fatal. Mr. 
Eeagan is part owner of the Silver King Mine, and one of the most en- 
terprising citizens of Arizona. His many friends there will keenly feel 
his loss, should his injuries result fatally. 

Denis Kearney isn't much of a hero, after all ; indeed, he seems to be 
imbued with more than an average share of cowardice. How his legs ran 
away with him at Santa Ana is a matter of record. Yesterday he appeared 
to prosecute one Davis for an assault with a deadly weapon. He failed to 
prove his charge, though he gave up sundry engagements in the country 
and hastened to San Francisco for that express purpose. According to 
his own showing be cut a sorry figure, was knocked through a baker's 
window, was "struck on the mouth," and was badly used up generally. 
In response to all of which, he appears to have turned the other cheek to 
be smitten also. That may have been amiable, but it is exceedingly inap- 
propriate on the part of the redoubtable General of the W. P. C, who 
was so loud in blood and thunder threats. 



In cock-pits and at dog-fights Con. Mooney and his gang are, 
doubtless, very fine fellows, with very fine ideas of fair play. That is to 
say, it probably would not occur to them to set four or five rough-and- 
tumble bulldogs upon a pet poodle, or to pit the same number of game- 
cocks against a barn-door rooster. But beyond the narrow limits of their 
legitimate and highly reputable sphere, these gentlemen seem to reverse 
their code, and to consider four to one to be about the correct odds in 
favor of the sporting fraternity, when an inoffensive citizen is to be 
bounced. 

The " Stock Report " might find some better occupation for its wit 
than sneering at Bret Harte's pecuniary obligations left in California. 
Mr. Harte is not the only man, in or out of this State, who has debts, 
and if he owes anything to the owners of the Stock Report it would be 
more manly for them to try to reach hira in some less offensive way. It 
does not look brave to make use of one's own paper to attack a man be- 
hind his back. The business is a small one. 



The Khedive's Summing TJp. — "Abdication or Deposition. Such 
is the alternative offered to the Khedive by the Three Powers. The 
intervention of Germany has brought matters to this decisive issue." — 
Egyptian Telegram. 

Abdication is vexation, 

Deposition's twice as bad; 
The Rule of Three it bothers me, 

And Bismarck drives me mad ! — Punch. 



"If the ring carry the primaries all is over." " Go to the primaries 
and work," and much more of the same twaddle fills the papers day after 
day. Every man who writes in this way knows perfectly well that the 
men who live by politics carry and pre-arrange the primaries as much as 
they do the general business of nominations and the working of the ma- 
chinery. Where are your records of better men chosen since the inven- 
tion of this grand cure for all evils ? What honest man has a chance for 
a nomination on any ticket merely because he is fit and honest ? 

It is loudly proclaimed that the attempt at intimidation of a judge, 
made by a morniog paper, is not creditable to journalism. We believe 
you, my boy; but will you please mention anything that is creditable to 
journalism ? Excepting, of course, what modesty forbids our naming. 



July 26, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



"CALIFORNIANS AT THE PLAY." 

Short Sketches of some of the Notables in the Drama of 

" Life in California." 

The "New3 Letter's" faithful portraiture of Californiana is meet- 
ing with gratifying appreciation. Toe res tnrcea of tbia office have been 
taxed to their utmost during the week to supply the demand for copies 
of the picture entitled ** Cahforniana at the Play." An edition of fifty 
thousand baa already been exhausted, and the printers are again :it work 
striking .iff more copies. Thia is a sale unprecedented in our city. Our 
prediction that the picture will find its way into every household in the 
State is being rapidly verified. Moreover, it is being mailed to nil quar- 
ter*. A more welcome souvenir to send to friends in the East and abroad 
could hardly be imagined. Last week we gave as much space as we had 
then available to^ short sketches of prominent men who appear "at the 
plav." We continue that pleasant duty : 

A. J. Bryant, Mayor of San Francisco, Chairman of the State Demo- 
cratic Committee, and a business man nf energy and enterprise, is a truly 
representative Californian. Whole-souled and in dead earnest about 
every thing his hand rinds to do, he knows no such word as fail. Twice 
elected .Mayor of San Francisco, he has held office during an exception- 
ally trying time, with credit to himself and advantage to the city. His 
capacity for work, great as it is, has been tried to its utmost. Excep- 
tional and unusual duties have at different times been imposed upon him 
by the Legislature, he being made President of the Water, New City 
Hall, Police, and some half dozen other Commissions. He will leave of- 
fice at the close of the present year. As the newly chosen chief of the 
Democratic Party in this State, it is expected that he will play an im- 
portant part in the Presidential campaign of next year. His great energy 
and executive ability peculiarly fit him for the position. Observing men 
predict that the future has still higher honors in store for A. J. Bryant. 

James R. Keene was born in London, and though at present one of the 
largest stock operators and speculators in the East, is essentially a Cali- 
fornian. It was in San Francisco that he made his money. Starting as a 
*' curbstone " broker without capital, he soon worked his way to a com- 
manding position as a stock operator. He accumulated money rapidly, 
and was understood to be worth about six millions of dollars when he left 
here two years ago. Since then he has operated largely in New York, 
Chicago and other Eastern cities, and with success. His local reputation 
for conceiving and executing bold and successful enterprises was great, 
but he has rather increased it by his successes in the wider field he has 
chosen for himself. Mr. Keene ia a warm-hearted, generous man of noble 
impulses, who is held in high esteem in California. 

John \V. Mackay is an Irishman, and one of the Bonanza Kings. He, 
with his partners, Flood, O'Brien and Fair, discovered and largely opened 
the great ore body found in the Con. Virginia and California mines. He 
is one of the proprietors of the Bank of Nevada. A few years ago he 
was a working miner ; to-day he counts his wealth by the tens of millions. 
He is believed to be worth not less than twenty millions of dollars. 

The Hon. John P. Jones is United States Senator from Nevada, He 
was born in Wales, but came to America at an early date. Like J. W. 
Mackay, he is a successful miner. His discoveries in the Crowu Point 
mine made him a millionaire. Senator Jones is a man of culture and 
taste above the average. He has made his mark in the councils of the 
nation. On the subject of finances there is no higher authority in the 
United States Senate. 

E. J. Baldwin is another of our very rich men who owes his wealth to 
the gold and silver products of the Corastock lode. He is a successful 
operator in our stock exchanges. His money has been largely invested in 
enterprises beneficial to our city. He is the owner of the large hotel 
known as The Baldwin. His splendid stud of race horses has just won 
celebrity at Chicago. 

His Excellency John C. Fremont, Governor of Arizona, has a name 
and fame that are world-wide. His early association with California will 
pass into history. His presence here antedated the gold discovery. He 
crossed the continent literally cutting his way through forests, and win- 
ning for himself the name of "The Pathfinder." He, with William M. 
Gwin, were the first United States Senators chosen by California. 

The Hon. George C. Perkins is the Republican candidate for Governor 
of this State. His party justly claim that he is a strong nominee before 
the people. His friends enthusiastically support him, and the chances all 
Beein to favor his election. His career is highly creditable. He came to 
California a sailor boy. On his arrival he wended his way to Oroville, 
where by honest industry he achieved a foremost position as a merchant. 
He most creditably represented Butte County in the State Senate. He 
subsequently became a partner in the firm of Goodall, Nelson & Perkins, 
the steamship proprietors of this city. He is the active business man of 
the concern, and in that capacity is esteemed by the mercantile and trav- 
eling community. 

His Excellency William Irwin is the present Governor of the State of 
California. He was elected, four years ago, on the Democratic ticket. 
His administration has been well meaning, economical and honest. He 
will leave office, a few months hence, deservedly respected by all parties. 

The Hon. Lorenzo Sawyer, Judge of the United States Circuit Court. 
A ripe scholar, and an able and upright Judge. 

A. W. Von Schmidt, the great civil engineer of the State, who has 
done many things and done them well. Perhaps the most notable under- 
taking was the removal of Blossom Rock, long a formidable obstruction 
to the navigation of our harbor. 

Judge Samuel Bell McKee is Judge of the District Court of the Third 
Judicial District. He has been nominated, on the Democratic ticket, for 
elevation to the Supreme Bench. A man of pure life and high resolves. 
he is greatly esteemed. Though a Democrat, he has always been elected 
to his present position in a district overwhelmingly Republican. 

A. A. Louderback has for luany years filled one of the most onerous 
and difficult positions in our city. He has been Police Judge. He has 
had to deal with the hoodlum and criminal elements during a most trying 
time. That he has done his duty firmly, fairly and honestly, is the "gen- 
eral verdict. He has been several times re-elected, and is undoubtedly 
the right man in the right place. 

The Hon. Samuel H. Dwindle, Judge of the Fifteenth District Court 
A man who loves the good things of this life— all of them. He has a 
sunny, equable, judicial temperament. 

General C. I. Hutchinson, a pioneer honored and respected by all who 
know him, has carried out several large enterprises, and is the present 
head of the largest insurance agency on this coast. 



Colonel A. Andrews, the prince of jewelers, as all in the business are ready 
to acknowledge. A man of the most varied personal experiences and 
accomplishments ; he Speaks all the leading languages, and has practiced 
his profession in every country of Europe. Colonel Andrews displays the 
most fertile fancy and the moat admirable taste in design. All his pro- 
ductions are his own in conception, as in execution. He is an authority 
on diamonds and precious stones, esteemed as one of the best in America. 
In California he is the pioneer jeweler, and his pride has led him to estab- 
lish what is conceded to be the most magnificently brilliant establishment 
of its kind in the world. There is nothing equal to it in Europe, from 
Paris to Moscow. A courteous and polished gentleman, Colonel Andrews 
has made a host of friends on this coast. He is a member of not less than 
twelve orders, and in the last campaign he was General of the McClellan 
Legion, and chosen by thirty-seven different clubs as Grand Marshal of 
the grandest procession ever seen on the Pacific. His store is one of the 
sights of America, and all strangers are equally charmed with the splen- 
dor of the establishment and the cordiality of the proprietor, who wel- 
comes every one, whether an intending purchaser or not. His fund of 
information is always at the service of visitors, wnom he treats in every 
case as if they were his private guests. 

The Hon. Delos Lake, an able lawyer of extensive practice. He has 
been United States District Attorney, and Judge of the County and Mu- 
nicipal Courts. His handsome and characteristic face is very noticeable 
in the picture, "At the Play." 

The Hon. Samuel Wilson, one of the ablest lawyers in the State; was 
a member of the late Constitutional Convention. 

Henry E. Highton is also one of the luminaries of the Bar. His ad- 
dresses to juries are forcible, perhaps sometimes a little heavy and pon- 
derous, but always logical and effective. 

Reuben H. Lloyd is one of the best known men in the city. A lawyer 
of large practice, be is as bright as a new pin, and as sharp as a steel 
trap. The client who intrusts himself to Mr. Lloyd's guidance must, have 
an exceptionally bad case if he does not come oxit ahead. Educated to 
his profession in San Francisco, Mr. Lloyd is well able to hold his own 
with lawyers of Eastern or foreign training. " Reuben," as he is famili- 
arly called, is quite a popular society man among us. He is unmarried. 

James Adams, a city father, and an ex-sheriff of San Francisco. A 
sturdy, honest citizen, whom to know is to respect. He has won the 
sobriquet, by which he is perhaps best known, of "Honest Jim Adams." 
Honesty with him has had its reward. He is wealthy, and, as a conse- 
quence, is "comfortably fixed." 

Wm. Lane Booker is British Consul at this port. He has held that 
office for many years, and having had the benefit of an extended official 
training, he is well versed in its duties. 

Charles Kohler is one of our most esteemed citizens of German birth. 
Broad minded, large bodied, he is essentially a big man every way you 
take him. Kind, genial and generous, he has a clear head and a culti- 
vated judgment. San Francisco has not within her borders a more 
estimable citizen. He is one of the foremost representatives of our great 
wine growing interest. 

Thomas Acheson, a member of the Board of Supervisors, is a most 
active and useful citizen. Possessing considerable executive ability, he 
has made a worthy city father. 

Henry B. Williams, of the well-known mercantile firm of Williams, 
Blanchard & Co. A merchant in the best sense of the term. As man- 
aging agent of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, he controls a vast 
business. The company's steamers run hence to Japan, China, Australia, 
New Zealand, Hawaii and Panama. 

John W. Coleman, capitalist and stock broker. Mr. Coleman made 
one of the most efficient Presidents the Board of Brokers ever had. He 
has many warm friends, aud is justly popular. 

Captain Oliver Eldridge was agent of the Pacific Mail Company in its 
palmiest days, and in that position won the respect of the business com- 
munity. He is one of the Commissioners charged with the improvement 
of Golden Gate Park, for which position his aesthetic tastes well qualify 
him. 

William B. Carr has been for several years one of the most influential 
managers of the Republican party of this State. He is the owner of a 
large tract of land in Kern county, which he is making fertile by means 
of extensive irrigation works. 

Emile Grisar, Belgian Consul, is a merchant prince, the wool trade of 
the Pacific Coast being largely in his hands. 

Wm. F. Babcock is the managing member of the mercantile firm of 
Parrot & Co. As President of the Spring Valley Water Company, which 
supplies the city of San Francisco, he exhibited executive ability of the 
highest order. 

Thomas Brown, Cashier of the Bank of California, is one of the best 
known men in the State. He fills the onerous position be holds with dis- 
tinguished ability. 

Peder Sather is a well known banker, and a most estimable citizen. 

Joseph A. Donahue is senior partner in the banking house which bears 
his name. He is manager of the Mariposa estate. As a capitalist, who 
is always concerned in solid investments, he is a power in the State. 

E. C. Fellows, Assistant Superintendent of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road. He is the able assistant of A. N. Towue in the management of 
the great lines of railroad under his control. It is safe to say that Mr. 
Fellows is one of the foremost railroad men of the country. 

General James Coey, a brave Union soldier, who bears the marks of 
battle still upon him. He is a warm personal friend of General Grant's. 
General Coey is the Postmaster of San Francisco, and is remarkably effi- 
cient. Many improvements in our local postal arrangements have been 
introduced during his period of office. 

Samuel Brannan is a California pioneer par excellence. He came over- 
land prior to the discovery of gold, and has ever since been closely associ- 
ated with the State's progress. 

Wm. P. llumphrevs has been elected again and again our City and 
County Surveyor. Few men are better known, and none more respected. 
The city owes to him some of its most important improvements. 

R. B. Woodward is a siuimlarly energetic citizen, whose many enter- 
prises have enriched him and benefitted the city. The What Cheer House, 
owned by him. feeds a thousand mechanics every day. The Mission 
Street Railroad, which is also his. carries thousands of people daily to 
their homes in the more distant portions of the city. Woodward's Gar- 
dens are the popular resort of our citizens. They are admirably managed, 
affording recreation and pleasure to thousands. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 26, 1879. 



Mrs. Lillie Coit, a lady of refinement, of culture, of pleasing manners, 
and of a noble nature. She has long been intimately associated with all 
that is good in the society life of our city. No reference to our repre- 
sentative men and women would be complete that did not include her 
honored name. 

The Hon. J. McM. Shafter, a large land-owner in Marin County, a 
learned jurist and a most able man. Should the Republican Party carry 
the State he would have strong claims to the United States Senatorship. 
He was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. 

Augustus Laver, architect. He is the designer of the State Capitol at 
Albany, New York, and of our new City HalL As a draughtsman he has 
few equals, and no superior, on this continent. 

The Hon. Joseph W. Winans, an accomplished scholar, an able law- 
yer, a pioneer, and a most estimable gentleman. He was a delegate to 
the late Constitutional Convention. 

John H. Redington is President of the quicksilver mining company 
which bears his name, and is the largest importer of drugs in the State. A 
man of enterprise and worth. 

JJ. J. Murphy, District Attorney for the City and County of San 
Francisco. He is a most able criminal lawyer, and as prosecuting officer 
he has well served the people. He has been a terror to evil-doers. Genial 
and of a kindly disposition, he has a host of warm friends. 

Arpad Haraszthy is an enterprising gentleman associated with the 
wine-growing interests of the State. The wines of California are taking 
rank with those produced in the south of Prance. They are fast winning 
fame, and to that result Mr. Haraszthy is a principal contributor. 

Pred. W. Macondray, of the well-known mercantile house of Macon- 
dray & Co. His firm is one of the oldest in the city, its good repute is 
known in many lands. It is largely engaged in the China trade. 

Hon. Charles Clayton, grain merchant. Mr. Clayton faithfully repre- 
sented San Prancisco in Congress. He is an esteemed and popular citi- 
zen. He is being urged just now to become a candidate for the nigh office 
of Mayor of the city. 

Charles Main, ol the firm of Main & Winchester, importers. An 
enterprising business man. His sterling qualities of head and heart 
endear him to a wide circle of friends. 

A. P. Hotaling, importer of liquors, does a large and successful busi- 
ness. 

Theodore Wagner fills the important office of United States Surveyor- 
General with incorruptible fidelity and signal ability. 

A. Colman, master clothier, who, from wielding the needle, has 
worked his way to the front rank of manufacturers. 

Edward Cahill, the honest and genial stock broker, who has borne a 
reputation without fear and without reproach that dates from pioneer 
times. 

KEMENTI CONCERT AT DASHAWAY HALL. 
Whether for his own pleasure or our gratification it might be a 
hard matter to determine — either or otherwise — Pemenyi has paid us a 
second visit. While it may not redound to onr hypothetical assumption 
of great classic renown to admit it, it is nevertheless a stubborn fact that 
as an_ accomplished, if somewhat eccentric violinist, Pemenyi is a great 
favorite with our musical ladies, and we are not without many such in 
San Francisco. If Remenyi was less capable he would be more charita- 
bly dealt with by a nationally biased cliqueism, from which little ema- 
nates that is not the immediate issue of bigoted, clannish idolatry and 
dog-in-the-manger selfishness. As a fingerer we hp.ve not seen his equal 
here, and for brilliancy of execution this is the datal essential. His 
staccato and arpeggio bowings are ever masterly, and although his double 
stopping may on rare occasions be doubtful, his single runs cannot for 
correctness be surpassed ; while with harmonics, for certainty, clearness 
and power there has been no one here at all to be compared with him. 
His tone altogether is not of the ordinary fiddler type, but of a finished 
order. As to sentiment and feeling, let us be truly thankful he has little, 
if any, of the order manufactured by Spohr, which was nothing but pre- 
tentious silliness simmered down to incipiency. To such an extreme did 
Spohr carry mere mechanism that he had himself and strongly advocated 
others to permanently divide off or sectinnize their bows, so as to play 
certain passages in certain divisions of the stick. For elemental drudgery 
and general soundness the German musical system will hold its own, but 
of dash, fire and brilliancy it is innocent. Of the greatest permanent 
opera companies in the world— London and Paris— the orchestral leaders 
have never been Germans. It is curious that in London, the professional 
hot-bed of German idolatry, with a prolonged succession of "Viottis, Spag- 
nolettis, Moris and Tolbeques, never once has a German been leader of 
the opera orchestra ; and the same may be said of Paris, but this may be 
reasoned thus : The French crown-head has never been German and able 
to dictate taste to a rich and effeminaLe aristocracy. While it is a signifi- 
cant_ fact the greatest violinists that ever did exist, like the greatest 
pianists, have in neither case been of German nationality, however mixed 
up that may be, so Pemenyi may rest content in the satisfaction that his 
detractors (and he has some) do not in general belong to the order with a 
natural aptitude to judge dispassionately, or command the native-born 
talent to lead public sentiment. With capabilities so conspicuous, how 
comes it that Remenyi keeps on repeating himself, and that, too, in a 
very hackneyed and worn-out channel? He has so far touched upon 
nothing profound or masterly— of uncommon efficacy and grandeur— as a 
display of proficiency in violin playing. Of the pianist, Duleken, he no 
doubt fills the bill satisfactorily enough. As a performer, he is in no sense 
pre-eminently unusual. We have in this out-of-the-wav place some little 
(though they may be old) misses who could give him odds and then lead 
him in Chopm idiosyncrasies. Miss Thurston does her best, and disarms 
comment. 



Says Kalloch: "With my politics 
The^ name of Jesus Christ I'll mix :" 



■"■"^ ua.LUG u* uubuu jurist in mis; 
And never dreams that such vain tricka 
Will some day hurl him into Styx, 
Where he'll be in a pretty fix, 
The victim of the devil's kicks 
And lusty licks from fiery sticks, 

But that's what will happen to Kalloch. 

Spring is so mild now that dirty tramps can lay on the grass of public 
parks, dreaming the happy hours away, while honest mortals are working 
tor a living. 



MORE PROPER SCHOOLING. 

Crops may fail, Kearney may fizzle, and the dove of peace brood 
over H. B.'s and Republicans and Democrats; but one thing changes not, 
is not to be made straight, rejoiceth not in the truth, but abideth forever 
in the crooked and the dark way. Though the earthquake swallow us 
up, it will reject this indigestible Board of Education. Nobody can en- 
dure the Board, and nobody can purify it; nevertheless, it is not wholly 
useless to speak, for the sake of the Republic. The scandalously misman- 
aged investigation, which wearied and disgusted all the State last Win- 
ter, is not yet laid away in its tomb; and it seems likely to be present at 
the perpetual interment of the men who conceived and nourished it. 
These are Messrs. Taylor, Bacon, Leggett and Hiester. Most of the 
teachers, whom these Directors could bully, have been bullied and dis- 
graced and pardoned, out of the infinite mercy of the great men; but 
there are left two, against whom some secret venom stirs up all the 
wrath of these minds, but little less than celestial. Mrs. Danielwitz and 
Miss Birdsall were charged by anonymous letters with having purchased 
the examination questions; and these four Directors have prevailed with 
the rest to compel these ladies to undergo a special examination, or for- 
feit their places. There is no fault found with the record of these teach- 
ers. It is acknowledged that they have done their duty; there is nothing 
to show dereliction on their part. But the anonymous letters accuse 
them ! Certainly, and such letters can be had to accuse anybody of any- 
thing. The writer has seen, within three weeks, anonymous letters con- 
taining charges against Directors Taylor and Bacon; but it does not 
therefore follow that the one is a thief and the other a swindler. A letter 
without a name, it seems to be necessary to tell these gentlemen, may 
have been written by any one of the Board, and even by any one of the 
four we have named. That is the way the public look at the matter. It 
is naturally concluded that men who can attach importance to anything 
so infamouB and so cowardly, are quite capable of originating it. Inno- 
cence has no safeguard, if such documents are to be accepted. 

There is not a man, not a woman, not a child, in this city, of life how- 
ever blameless, against whom anonymous letters could not be written. Is 
any one of these Directors ready to have his wife or his sister attacked in 
this way, and forced to defend herself against the most villainous imputa- 
tions, because men called respectable disgrace themselves by urging them ? 
And what is the conduct of these respectable men in the discharge of their 
solemn trust ? Take a case : A lady, desiring a position in the School 
Department, called on a Director and offered him $250 to have her nomi- 
nated. The Director told her she had made a mistake ; he did not do 
that kind of business. The lady withdrew, but she was shortly after 
nominated by Director Taylor and through his influence elected, and she 
is now teaching in one of the public schools. Men cannot help putting 
two and two together. It might be different if one of the twc I kept out of 
the way. 

It is to be hoped that Mrs. Danielwitz and Miss Birdsall will resist alike 
the threats and the cajoleries of these four men, or the two, who specially 
put themselves forward, Messrs. Bacon and Taylor ; for there is yet a 
remedy before the courts for injustice like that which these small tyrants 
are trying to carry through. 

A BOHEMIAN LION HUNT. 

The Bohemians are after Mr. Whitelaw Reid, famous as the most 
elevated editor on this continent. That is, his editorials are written at a 
greater elevation than any others on this side the Atlantic, the tower at 
the top of which the Tribune sanctum is situated being thirteen feet (by 
actual measurement) higher than the roof of the Herald building, which 
in its turn looks down upon every other newspaper establishment. As 
soon as the name of this exalted representative of journalism appeared 
in the list of passengers westward bound on the overland train, the Bo- 
hemians were on the qui vive. Certain " members of the press " (whom 
Psalm Williams does not recognize as of the most immaculate standing in 
the guild) resolved to get up a dinner, or a dejeuner, in honor of the distin- 
guished visitor. Three or four of these obscure beings (who have never 
enjoyed the felicity of writing for the Bulletin, or received the seal of 
Deacon Fitch's imprimatur, ) proceeded to tender the lofty young editor 
a dinner for the^next ensuing Sunday, in the name of "the Press of San 
Francisco." He of the tall tower accepted. Then the gophering engi- 
neers of the' job, who had elected themselves a committee to manage the 
affair, with full power to appoint sub- committees and run the banquet 
generally, commenced issuing invitations to such of the writing fraternity 
of this city as they deemed worthy of putting on a wedding garment and 
sitting at the feast. And then the agony began ! Were the scribblers of 
the Sunday papers "members of the Press?" Could proprietors who 
never mount the tripod, and do all their editing vicariously, come under 
that classification ? Should Deacon Pitch and Brother Loring be invited, 
and should Charley and Michael of the ( ' live paper " be sandwiched be- 
tween them? Would Parson Bartlett consent to invoke a blessing on a 
spread where Horsey Boruck and Pagan Seabough glared at him with 
eyes of irreverent mirth ? At latest advices these and similar rugged 
conundrums were vexing the tired brains of "the committee." The 
model young editor had accepted the hospitality of " the Press of San 
Prancisco." But, alas ! the d — 1 was to pay, and the big committee, 
aided by all the little committees, were still struggling despairingly with 
the grievous problem : Who are the Press of San Francisco, anyway? 



George F. Bragg. — This well known and universally respected citizen, 
a merchant of many years' standing among those prominent on Front 
street, died on Friday, the ISthinst., of pneumonia, contracted but a few 
days before at the grave of his wife's father, Mr. Dupont. A long, quiet, 
honorable and useful life has been brought to an end suddenly, and, as his 
friends cannot but think, at an untimely age, for Mr. Bragg's temper- 
ance and activity should have kept him, for many years to come, an orna- 
ment of the large circle which now mourns him. 

Valedictory. — We notice, among the departures for England, that of 
Mr. H. W. Hammond, after a visit of a few weeks to this Coast. Mr. 
Hammond is interested in the wire-rope business, and has, we under- 
stand, taken large orders from Nevada and elsewhere. His purpose of 
establishing an agency for this business in San Prancisco at the begin- 
ning of the next year will, we trust, be carried out, and to the success 
it deserves. 

Life is a " Mr."y to a sober man, and a " mizzer "y to a drunkard. 



July 26, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



THREE NAPOLEONa 
"1821. -1873. 1879." 

Three men, three deaths, almost within our times, 
Anil even wa who Ring of lighter ways 
Of lift-, must pooM and Listen ; in these daya 

Sad fancies burst fcheir ways into our rhymes. 

It seems to us a strange decree of fate 

That as each time came f,»r these men to die, 
England, like Deaths Bad envoy, should watch by 

These three, who bear the name that one made great. 

Not always sorrowing as now in tears ; 

For once her face was stern and grave of mien, 
The night she watched the lonely dying scene 

Of her Great Prisoner in the by - gone years. 

The broad - browed Corsican, whose eagles spread 
From snowy Russia down to sunny Rome, 
On a lone English Isle bad found his home, 

And dying captive, bowed his crownless head ! 

Time passed : again we hear the wondrous name, 
Again the scepter rests within their hands, 
And clear and loud there rings throughout the lands 

One word, Napoleon ! through the trump of Fame. 

Again a death - bed watch must England keep, 
Yet now no longer by the far - off wave ; 
But where her sweetest flowers guard his grave 

The exiled Emperor sleeps the eternal sleep. 

How strange that while the Emperor's dying breath 
Should end thus peacefully, if in sad wise. 
His sword but half unsheathed this boy - Prince dies — 

Alone of all his race — a soldier's death ! 

No glory of a conquered world for pall, 

Or victories won o'er bot seditious strife ; 
Only the glory of a stainless life, 

Of gentle manhood passed before us all, 

— Vanity Fair. 

THE MOVEMENTS OP POPULATION. 

The City of San Francisco contains three thousand people less than 
it did a year ago. A contemporary bewails this as a sign of evil omen. 
In our view it is a fact that is by no means to be deplored. It indicates 
that three thousand people have had the good sense to go into the coun- 
try. They have probably ceased to be mere waiters on Providence, and, 
having put their own shoulder to the wheel, have surely ere this made a 
new and promising start in life. They no longer live on the industry of 
others, but have become producers. They are adding to the wealth of 
the State instead of eating it up. They have* done just the right thing. 
In no other way could they have done the city so much service. They 
are placed exactly where they will do the most good, not only to them- 
selves but to the city and State also. If one-third of our city population 
would go and do likewise, the whole State would soon be in a much more 
prosperous position than it now is. The truth is, our city is too large; that 
is to say, there are too many people in it in proportion to the number in 
the country. Over one-tbird of the entire population of the State is found 
crowded within some half dozen square miles of city sand dunes, whilst 
thousands of square miles of fertile country lands furnish homes only for 
the squirrel or the jackass rabbit. No idle, or even unproritably em- 
ployed men are an advantage to the city. By going where they can pro- 
duce more than they can consume they will be doing the right 
thing exactly. They will be placing themselves where they can do 
the most good. It is a fact worthy of note that the inflow of 
population into the United States from Europe is on the increase. The 
number of immigrants that arrived in New York during May is given at 
18,100, as against 12,213 for the same month of last year. The total 
arrivals of immigrants during the year ending May 31st were 92,801, as 
against 71,091 for a corresponding period ending in 1878. The statistics 
in the Land Office show the emigration to the Western country to have 
been unprecedentedly great. As many as 1,200 entries of public lands 
were lately made in six days, which is said to be equivalent to the taking 
up of 192,000 acres of Government land. The movement of population 
has been principally in the direction of Kansas, Dakota and Minnesota. 
It is a pregnant fact that California, with all her boasted advantages of 
soil, climate and productions, does not attract one tithe of the stream of 
population that is pouring into the cold and comparatively inhospitable 
region of Minnesota. We are all talking politics just now, but they are 
petty, miserable little pot house politics, to be sure. If there were but a 
dash of statesmanship introduced into them, we should be concerning 
ourselves about the important problem of attracting people to settle 
throughout the State. We want more people, but we want them placed 
in the country. We have enough and to spare, for the present, in the 
city. 

A charming story of a hair has recently been told as having occurred 
at Vienna. A poor girl with beautiful hair went to a barber to sell it. 
He tried to make a close bargain, saying hair was plentiful this year, and 
declared he could only give her eight florins. The little maiden's eyes 
filled with tears, and she hesitated a moment while threading her fingers 
through her chestnut locks. Finally she threw herself into a chair aad 
said, "Then take it quickly." The barber was about to cutoff the fair 
tresses, when a gentleman sitting in one of the chairs interrupted him, 
and spoke to the girl. "My child." said he, "why do you sell your 
beutiful hair?" " My mother has been nearly five months ill. I can not 
work enough to support us. Everything has been sold or pawned, and 
there is not a penny in the house." "No, no, my child ; if that is the 
case, I will buy your hair, and give you one hundred florins for it." He 
gave the girl the note, the sight of which dried her tears, and he took up 
the barber's shears. Taking the locks in his hand, he selected the longest 
hair, cut it off, and put it carefully in his pocket-book, thus paying one 
hundred florins for a single hair. He took the poor girl's address, in case 
he should want to buy another at the same rate.— Court Journal. 

A " Facer."— Dissipated Tramp: "You'll know me ag'in, Guv'nour!" 
British Workman {who had certainly looked at him): "Not if you washes 
yourself, I sha'n't!"— Punch. 



STATE DEPARTMENT. 
Office oi thk Ssobetaiit to the U. S. ) 
Commissions to the Australian Exhibitions, > 
July 1, 1879. j 
The following Regulations for the conduct of the proposed Exhibi- 
tion at Sydney, Australia, have been issued from the office of the Com- 
mission, Mac«|imrie street, in that city. The attention of American ex- 
hibitors is invited to them. The rules adopted for the subsequent exhi- 
bition at Melbourne do not materially differ from those here presented, 
and will be published iu due course. Chris. C. Cox, 

Secretary of the U. S. Commissions to the Australian Exhibitions. 

UNITED STATUS KXU1BITOK8 

The following instructions arc issued for tbe information of the United States ex- 
hibitors : 

Congress having made no appropriation for tho payment of freight upon the goods 
sent to the Australian Exhibitions, and having assigned no Government vessels to 
the duty of transportation, the United States Commission will assume no direction 
whatever of the movement of goods either to or from Australia. 

It is suggested, however, that they should be strongly boxed, distinctly marked, 
and shipped according to carefully prepared invoices, of which copies should be pre- 
served by tbe shippers, and at least two copies in every instance be furnished the 
United States Commission, 

Upon the delivery of the goods within the Exhibition buildings at Sydney or Mel- 
bourne, and the payment of all charges by tho exhibitors, the United States Commis- 
sion will see that they are properly assigned to the space allotted the United States, 
and that they are catalogued. 

The expense of installation must be borne by the exhibitors, and the United States 
Commission will uot be responsible for expense of any kind in connection with the 
handling, storage, or the loss or injury of exhibits. 

Exhibitors will be permitted to select agents to unpack, have charge of, and watch 
and repack their exhibits, their authority to said agents to be filed with the U. S. 
Secretary of the Commission. Their appointment to entail no expense to the 
United States, and to be revocable at any time by the U. S. Secretary of tbe Com- 
mission. 

No agents shall be recognized in any way until their authority shall have been filed 
with the Commission. 

833" Postscript. — It has since been decided by the Executive Commissioner of the 
Sydney International Exhibition that exhibits will be received up to the closing, in 
March, 1880, and it will be arranged with the Victoria Commission to have them 
sent on in time for the opening of the Melbourne Exhibition in that year. 

John J. Bleasdale, D. D., 
Acting on behalf of the Royal Commission, 

120 Sutter street, and New City Hall. 

REGISTRATION. 

Republicans, Attention ! 

Headquarters Republican State Central Committee, Rooms 
Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, No. 703 Market Btreet, Bonthwest comer Third 
street, San Francisco, June 26, 1879. 

The vital importance of immediate REGISTRATION must be apparent to every 
Republican, when the fact is announced that the entire Registration of this city 
and county has been wiped out ; and that no one will be allowed to vote at the 
September Election unless RE-REGISTERED. The State Central Committee calls 
tbe earnest attention of Republicans to this matter, and requestB them, without 
delay, to register themselves, so as to streng then the hands ot the organization and 
place it in a position to win tbe approaching contest. No trne* Republican will 
neglect this most imperative and argent duty. By order of the Committee. 

M. D. Bobuck, Secretary. [June 28.] W. W. MORROW, Chairman. 

DIVIDEND* NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernla Saving's and Loan Society, northeast 
corner Montgomery and Post streets, San Francisco, July 7th, 1879.— At a reg- 
ular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a Dividend at 
the rate of six and three-fourths (6$) per cent, per annum was declared on all de- 
posits for the six months ending with June 30th, 1879, free from Federal Tax, and 
payable from and after this date. 
July 12. EDWARD MARTIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society.— For the half year 
ending this date, the Hoard of Directors of the German Savings and Loan So- 
ciety has declared a Dividend on Term Deposits at the rate of seven and one-fifth 
(7 1-5) per cent per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of (6) per cent, per 
annum, free from Federal Taxes, and payable on and after the 15th day of July, 1879. 
By order. GEORGE LETTE, Secretary. 
San Francisco, June 30th, 1879. July 5. _ 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Yangtze Insurance Association. •-• A Cash Dividend of 
Thirty-three (83) per cent, upon the net premia contributed during the fifteen 
months ending December 31, 1878, has been declared, payable 30th June, 1879. 
July 5. MACOXDRAY & CO., Agents. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Franco - American Savings Bank. — Guarantee Capital, 
8200,000. 42s Montgomery street.— This Bank has declared a dividend of sl-vuii 
(7) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and five and a half (5$) on Ordinary De- 
posits, for last six months, payable July 16tb, free of taxes. 



posits, for last six months, payable July 1 
July 12. 



LUCIEN BRAND, Secretary. 



EDWARD BOSQUI & CO., 

Printers, Engravers, Lit hog rap hers and Bookbinders, 

Leideadorff street, from. Clay to Commercial. 



HEADQUARTERS DEMOCRATIC STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE. 

The Chairman and Secretary of the several Connty Com- 
mittees throughout the State arc respectfully requested to send their Post- 
otfice address to the Secretary of the State Central Committee. 

A. J. BRYANT, Chairman. 
T. M. O'Cossor, Secretar y, P. O. Box 1302. Jolv 12- 

SHEEP RANCH FOR SALE IN OREGON. 

An admirable sheep ranch, well stocked and watered, and 
capable of carrying about 20,000 sheep. Substantial residence and improve- 
ments on the property, to be sold at a bargain. Apply to 

May 24. EDWARD J. JACKSON, 209 LeidesdorfF street, S. F. 

~~~ REMOVAL. 

BAGS, TENTS AND 

raviLLE 4 CO., 
IVo.'s 31 and 33 California Street, 8. 

San Francisco. 



HOSE. 



corner of Davis, 
[Sept. a. 



Berestrom Church Organs, at Smith's, 200 Post street. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 26, 1879. 



mmw wm> M ii »■■ piiAiv 



TH Goodman Gen Pbbs Ag't C PRE 

Henry B Williams A<r*t P M S S Co 

Lloyd Tevis Pres't W F & Co's Bank 

JBHagsin Capitalist 

Wm T Coleman Merchant and Capitalist 

D O Mills Capitalist 

Wm Alvord ..Ex Mayor and Pres't Bank of Cal 

Charles Webb Howard Pres't S V W W 

Peter Donahue Pres't S F & N P E. R 

Wm Sharon Capitalist 

John W Coleman Capitalist and Stock Broker 

J W Mackay Bonanza Kin? 

James KKeene Capitalist 

Hon A A Sargent U S Senator 

Hon John P Jones U S Senator 

Capt O Eldridge Merchant and Capitalist 

J J Valentine Gen'l Sup't W F & Co 

WmBCarr Capitalist 

Wm F Babcock Merchant and Capitalist 

John Pariott Capitalist 

Thomas Brown Cashier Bank of California 

Peter Sather Banker 

Joseph A Donohoe Banker 

Hon Wm Irwin Governor of California 

Hon A J Bryant Mayor of San Francisco 

E C Fellows Ass't Gen Sup't CPRK 

E J Baldwin Capitalist 

A. P. Hotaling; Merchant 

John HRedington.. Pres't Red'ton Quickp'rMCo 

Charles Main Main & Winchester, Importers 

Hon Newton Booth US Senator 

Sir Claus Sprecbles Pres't Cal Sugar Refinery 

Rt Rev Wm Ingraham Kip. . . . EL-hop Diocese Cal 
Rev Horatio Stebbins.... Pastor 1st Unitarian Ch 

Charles Lux Land Owner 

Henry Miller Land Owner 

Ed D fleatly Dickson, DeWolf & Co, Mchts 

C Temple Emmett Attoroey-at-Law 

Thomas Bell Capitalist 

Hon Delos Lake Attorney-at-Law 

Hon S M Wilson Attorney-at-Law 

Hon W H L Barnes Attorney-at-Law 

J P Hn«e Attoruey-at-Law 

Hon Wm M Gwin Ex U S Senator 

Hon A Londerback Judge Police Conrc 

Hon Rob't F Morrison. ..Judge 4th District Court 

F. Mtirriott Proprietor S F" News Letter" 

C I Hutchinson H & M Insurance Agency 

A S Uallidie Manufacturer Wire Rope 

John Bensley Capitalist 

A W Scott .-..Supervisor 

Adam Grant.... M, G & Co, Importers Dry Goods 

D J O liver * Capitalist 

Wm Lane Booker British Consul 

Rev John Hemphill Pastor Calvary Church 

James Plielan •. Capitalist 

Thomas II Blythe Capitalist 

Fred W Macondray Commission Merchant 

Tiburcio Parrott Commission Merchant 

Edward Cahill Stock Broker 

Stewart Menzies Stevedore 

Edward F Hall Stock Broker 

Hall McAllister Attorney-at-Law 

Reuben Lloyd Attorney-at-Law 

Hon Cornelius Cole Ex U S Senator 

Frank McCoppin Harbor Commissioner 

Hon Samuel B McKee . . . .Judge 3d District Court 

Hon J S Hager Attorney-at-Law 

Hon Lorenzo Sawyer. . .Judge 9th U S Circuit C't 

A W Von Schmidt Civil Engineer 

James F Houghton Pres't Home Mu ual Ins 

Fred'k McCrellish Proprietor " Al ta " 

John P Jackson Proprietor "Post" 

Milton S Latham Pres't N P C RRCo 

R G Sneath Proprietor Jersey Farm Dairy 

Thomas Achesou ....Supervisor 

Com Tceo H Al len Stevedore 

Wm Norris Secretary S V W W 

James Adams Ex-Sheriff 

PH Canavan Real Estate Agent 

Richard L Ogden Capitalist 

Wm M Lent Capitalist 

Philip Roach Proprietor " Examiner " 

D J Murphy District Attorney 

Charles Keating Sup't Alms House 

Thomas Reynolds County Clerk 

Wm Doolan Public AdmiDistrator 

HonThod W Freelon..JudgeMunic'lC't ol'Ap'ls 
Hon Saml H Dwinelle... Judge lbth District Court 

J A Robinson Deputy Surveyor-General 

Theo Wagner US Surveyor-General 

Hon J T Farley U S Senator 

Charles N Fox Attorney-at-Law 

Giles H Gray Late Surveyor of Customs 

Henry E Highton Attorney-at-Law 

Romualdo Pacheco Stock Broker 

Jasper McDonald Stock Broker 

Mark L McDonald Stock Broker 

Emile Grisar . .Belgian Consul & Wool Merchant 
A Colman Clothier 



101. C A C Duisenberg Commission Merchant 

102. Arpad Haraszthy Wine Grower 

103. Rev H Vidaver Rabbi 

104. Rev A L Stone Pastor 1st Cong Church 

105. Rev W E Ijams Pastor Green st Cong Church 

106. Rev Isaac S Kalloch .. .Pastor Metrop'n Temple 

107. Rev Wm H Piatt Rector Grace Episcopal Ch 

108. Honry L Dodge Sup't US Mint 

109. J H Jones Stock Broker 

110. Horace Hill Stock Broker 

111. H H Noble Stock Broker 

112. James G Carson Attorney-at-Law 

113. J B Metcalfe Attorney-at-Law 

114. Thomas P Ryan Attorney-at-Law 

115. Hon A C Niles.. .Associate Justice Supreme Court 
116 Judge S Heydenfelt Attorney-at-Law 

117. Jas M Gilchell Register in Bankruptcy 

118. C Warren Stoddard Journalist 

119. Charles De Young. . .Proprietor S F "Chronicle " 

120. M H De Young Proprietor S F "Chronicle " 

121. Loring Pickering.. Prop S F "Call "& "Bulletin" 

122. HenryF Williams Real Estate Agent 

123. Henry L Davis Capitalist 

124. Eugene L Sullivan Capitalist 

125. Fred L Castle Importer Teas 

126. M HHecht....M'frand Wholesale Leather Dealer 

127. Jas J Waddell Captain 

128. R KNnttall Physician 

129. Gen ScoSeld USA 

130. Gen H A Cobb Auctioneer 

131. GtnJamesCoey Postmaster S F 

132. Gen John McCorob Editor "Aita " 

1*3. Wm P Humphreys City aud Co Surveyor 

134. Chas Hubert City and Co Treasurer 

135. J Henley Smith Supervisor 

136. D A McDonald Enterprise Mills 

137. A L Mann Sup't Public Instruction 

138. Thomas Flint Wool Merchant 

13U. M Castle Capitalist 

140. W W Dodge Wholesale Grocer 

141. F B Taylor Oil and Commission Merchant 

142. Geo H Bryant N & Co, Baps and Bagging 

143. W N Olmsted Insurance Ayent 

144. EN Fry Stock Broker 

145. Donald McLennan Manager Woollen Mills 

146. M G Pritcbard Mexican Consul 

147. FA Bee Chinese Consul 

148. Aug Berggren.... Consul for Sweden and Norway 

149. Col Geo W Grannies Real Estate 

150. S P Dewey Capitalist 

151. James White.MR G S... .Ex M P, Brighton, Eng 

152. Charles Kohler Wine Grower 

153. Robert Dickson Manager In s Agency 

154. Capt Geo Naunton Shipping Agent 

155. Hon M M Kstee Attorney-at-Law 

156. Jennings S Cox Real Estate Agent 

157. H B Piatt Con tractor 

158. George Lette Sec'y German Sav and Loan 

159. Hon George C PerkinB GP& Co's S S 

160. GenO H La Grange Ex Sup't U S Mint 

161. RBeverlyCole Physician 

162. Thomas Price Assayer 

163. George J Bucknall Physician 

164. Hon E D Wheeler Judge 19th District Court 

165. David P Belknap Attorney-at-Law 

166. Henry Casanova Wholesale Grocer 

167. James GGauld L & S F Bank 

163. TV Walter L & S F Bank 

169. EMickle Agent 

170. PM Bowen Capitalist 

171. EM Miles Stock Broker 

172. Samuel Brannan Real Estate 

173. John Scott Physician 

174. George T Bromley Contractor 

175. P J Cassin Wholesale Liquor Dealer 

176. Henry Marsh Pianist 

177. Thomas Bennett Physician 

17S. George Wallace Pres't Cal M'gCo 

179. Frank M Pixley Attorney-at-Law 

180. J S Cunningham U SN Paymaster 

181. J M McDonald Vice Pres't Pacific Bank 

1S2. Alex Campbell Attorney-at-Law 

183. Col Oscar Woodhams 1st Infantry Reg 

184. John V Plume Banker 

185. Edward Curtis Literateur 

186. Hon JameB A Johnson Lieut-Governor 

187. Thomas P Ryan Attorney-at-Law 

188. Charles G Toland Physician 

189. Fred M Somers Journalist 

190. C T Mills, D D Mills' Seminary 

191. Wm Harney Notary Public 

192. Jonas J Morrison Lumber Dealer 

193. LL Bullock Real Estate 

194. Charles Clayton Grain Merchant 

195. C V D Hubbard Mining Secretary 

196. H H Bancroft.. .Historian & Wholes'e Bookseller 

197. Mrs H H Bancroft , 

198. MrsAN Towne 

199. A N Towne GenSup'tCPRR 

200. Mrs James GFair 



201. James G Fair Bonanza King 

2 #. Miss Jennie Flood 

203. Mrs J C Flood 

204. JC Flood Bonanza King 

205. Leland Stanford. Jr 

206. Hon Leland Stanford Pres't C P R R 

2(i7. Mrs Leland Stanford 

208. Mrs Mark Hopkins 

2u9. Mrs Charles Crocker 

210. CharleB Crocker Vice-Prea't C P R R 

211. MissHattie Crocker 

212. Mrs A Maddick of London 

213. Alfred Maddick of London 

214. Smart M Taylor City and County Recorder 

215. E W Burr Capitalist 

216. J C Palmer Wine Grower 

217. Mrs J C Palmer 

218. Hon J C Fremont. Governor of Arizona 

219. Mrs J Benton Fremont 

220. Mrs OC Pratt 

221. Howard Coit Caller S F Stock Board 

222. Mrs Lillie Coit 

223. Alex Badlam City and Co Assessor 

224. Mrs Alex Badlam 

225. M p s Joseph Anstin "Betsy B" 

226. Joseph Anstin Port Warden 

227. D J Staples Pres't Fireman's Fund Ins Co 

228. Mrs D J Staples 

229. MrsDZYost 

230. Danie! Z Yost Stock Broker 

231. Miss Cora Cadnc 

232. Philip Cadnc. . „ Contractor 

233. Mrs John D Yost 

234. Oohn D Yost Stationer 

235. Miss Julia Ruth Shatter , 

236. Hon J McM Shafier Landowner 

237. Mrs Joseph W Winans 

238. Hon Joseph W Winans. Attorney-at-Law 

239. George Gedge Captain steamer " Yosemite " 

240. Mrs George Gedge 

24 1 . Rev Wm A Scott, D D . . Pastor St John's Pres Ch. 

242. Miss Ida Soooffy , 

243. George B Rieman Photographer 

244. Mrs George B Rieman 

245. HS Crocker Wholesale Stationer 

246. T A Harcourt L'terateur 

247. MisT A Harcourt 

243. John Landers Mining Secretary 

249. Mrs John Landers 

250. Frank C Snow... .Importer and Dealer in Pictures 

251. GGGariboldi Artist 

252. HBSlaven Druggist 

253. Mrs J H Stallard 

254. J H Stallard Physician 

255. Drury Melone Commission Broker 

256. Mrs Drury Melone 

257. R B Woodward Prop'r Woodward's Gardens 

258. MrsW F McAllister 

259. W F McAllister, M D Quarantine Officer 

260. Henry R Maun H & M Ins Agency 

261. Mrs Wm Ward 

262. Wm Ward Importer Liquors 

263. H Chinning Beals "Commercial Herald" 

m. Anitas Layer } ^SSSS'dSSlSS*. 

265. Frank H Gaeeaway Journalist 

266. LouisLow Secretary 

267. L S Church Land Owner. 

268. Mrs L S Church "Vivace" critic 

269. Raoul Martinez Belloc & Co.'s Bank 

270. M JFlavin Prop ISL Auction House 

271. ECurtiPS C, C & Welch, Stationers 

272. Wm M Neilson Literateur 

273. OLivermore Real Estate Agent 

274. Col A Andrews Prop " Diamond Palace" 

275. Charles Locke Prop "Bnsh street Theater" 

276. ThomasMaguire Manager " Baldwin's " 

277. Barton Hill Acting Manager "Cal Theater" 

278. AlexD Sharon Lessee "Palace Hotel ' 

279. Frunk G Newlands Attorney-at-Law 

2ti0. Wm Willis Mining Secretary 

281. J B Wattles Stock Broker 

232. D Albert Hiller Physician 

283. George Dawson Prop "Pantheon" 

284. Mrs George Dawson 

285. Gen W S Rosecrans.. .Mining and Civil Engineer 

256. A A Cohen Capitalist and Attorney-at-Law 

257. J Barr Robertson Of London 

288. Edward J Jackson Our cor "London Times" 

289. M G Gillette.. .Sup't Savage Mg Co, Virginia, Nev 

290. Dr A McMahon of San Jose 

291. E C Macfarlane Stock Broker 

292. George Macfarlane of Sandwich Islands 

293. John Jennings Com'r Aus Exliib 

294. J JBleasdale.DD Com'r Aus Exhib 

295. Arthur Nahl Artist 

296. Judge J C Pennie Justice of Peace 

297. CharleB Mason British Vice Consul 

298. P B Kennedy Importer Dry Goods 

299. Charles Kaeding Importer of Guns 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO., 

For Japan and Ch inn. leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

GAELIC August 15th. 

OCEANIC June 17th, September 13th. 

BELGIC July 15th. 

For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. MCE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company's "Wharf, or No. 218 California street. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
LELAND STANFORD, President. May 31. 

Smith's American Organs, 200 Post street, corner of Dupont 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from Broadway 'Wharf 
for PORTLAND, Oregon), every 5 days, direct, and for LOS ANGELES, SANTA 
BARBARA, SANTA CRUZ, SAN DIEGO, SAN LUIS OBISPO and other NORTH- 
ERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS, leaving SAN FRANCISCO about every 
third day. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the San Fran- j 
Cisco Daily Papers. 

Ticket Office, Wo. 314 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
March 15. No. 10 Market street. 

Smith's American Pianos, 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 26, 1879. 



"PLEASURE'S WAND-" 

* We Obey no Wand out Pleasure's."— To*" Moore. 



California Theater. — The relative merits of Offenbach and Lecocq as 
composers admit of but little discussion, for the superiority of the latter 
is undeniable. Opera bouffe of ten years ago was the quintessence of 
musical buffoonery. The plots and situations of all of Offenbach's were 
of a nature to allow of any exaggeration or eccentricity in acting. In 
fact, there was no limit placed upon the actor or actress' individual comi- 
calities. The school of to-day is vastly different. The popular craving is 
still for the humorous, but it desires to be more legitimately moved to 
laughter. The librettos of Lecocq's works and of the late productions of 
Offenbach are in the required style. La Petite Mariee is undoubtedly one 
of Lecocq's most felicitous compositions. The music is charming through- 
out. The plot is spicily French. For an English or American audience, 
it contains too much dialogue to become a favorite. The plot is in no 
sense conveyed to the auditor by the action, and this renders the per- 
formance uninteresting. I have rarely seen even at the Bouffes-Parisiennes 
or at the Variete's anything so well played or mounted. The chorus was 
a little weak, it is true, but everything else went off swimmingly. The 
costumes were remarkable for their tastefulness and picturesqueness. 
The one worn by the " Podestate," in the second act, was so handsome as 
to deserve special mention. The leading characters were acted with that 
care and desinvolture which forms the great charm of the French stage. 
M'lle Aiinee, as "Graziella," though rather mature in appearance for the 
character of an innocent young bride, was as usual the life and spirit of 
the performance. She sang all the numbers of her score remarkably 
well. Jouard, the baritone, is a good actor, but has a flat voice and 
moreover sings badly. Juteau, Mezieres and the rest were as usual per- 
fect in their respective parts. In the Grande Duckesse this company gave 
proof of more talent than in anything else so far. This is one of the 
earlier opera bouffes, extravagant and comically ridiculous in the extreme. 
To my mind, it was the best performance of this somewhat hackneyed 
piece ever given in San Francisco. M'lle Aimee is irresistibly chic as the 
peculiar sovereign ; the oiteslin she sang with true feeling and tenderness. 
Jouard is a most remarkable " General Boum," and along with Mezieres 
as " Baron Puck " must be seen to be appreciated. Juteau plays '"Fritz" 
very much as Dupuis, the Paris original, did, and this is sufficient praise. 
Poyard, though a rather indifferent singer, has proved himself one of the 
very best actors in the troupe. His " Montefiasco," in La Petite Mariee* 
and his " Prince Paul" in this performance, were both excellently played. 
The text being rather sketchy, opportunity is given the actors to fill it 
out, and they did this very wittily and cleverly. Taken all in all, it was 
a most amusing performance, and will undoubtedly bear repetition. La 
Marjolaine was played last evening for AimeVs benefit, too late for 
review. On Monday La Bovlangere a des Ecus will be produced. An 
opera bouffe ball will shortly be given at this theater, under the auspices 
of this company. It was first announced for August 2d, then postponed 
until August 9th, but it has been finally decided to hold it on Thursday, 
August 7th. All details will be announced soon, and the management 
will spare no efforts to make it a complete success. It remains with the 
public to insure this. Let it recognize the enterprise shown, and this will 
be sufficient. 

Baldwin's Theater. — The sensational intensity of some of the scenes 
in the play now running at this theater, coupled with the lesson of tem- 
perance the whole drama conveys, have excited public interest, and the 
audiences have been large. But the great merit of the performance lies 
in the individual efforts and acting of several of the cast. Mr. O'Neill's 
"Coupeau" is a masterly performance, deserving of unstinted praise. 
"Gervaise " is a character one would hardly suppose Miss Coghlan would 
care or like to play. She must feel that, however admirably from an 
artistic point of view she succeeds in acting the character, still the innate 
refinement of her manner, speech and appearance, is in the way. Miss 
Coghlan is a handsome woman, and the blonde wig of "Gervaise" be- 
comes her well. The new-comer, Miss Lilian Andrews, is a decided 
acquisition to our local stage. She is effective without exaggeration. One 
of the best bits of acting in the whole cast is the delineation of the old 
croque mort by Mr. Jennings. This favorite actor has evidently read 
Zola's novels, for in make-up and conception it is true to the author's 
idea. For characters of this kind Jennings seems to possess particular 
qualifications. Mr. Morrison continues to play the French dandy work- 
man, after the pattern of a Happy Valley hoodlum. There is not the 
slightest tinge of Gallicism about this impersonation ; and it is greatly to his 
discredit, for Mr. Morrison in other instances gives proof of talent and 
intelligence. Where, where, did Mr. Billings discover what he seems 
to think is the uniform of a Paris sergeant-de-ville ? Leaving aside all 
other considerations pro and con, this performance deserves encourage- 
ment. It is a terrible phillipic against the evil of intemperance, the 
national sin of this fair land, aDd on this ground alone is worthy of public 
patronage. Steele Mackaye's play, Won at Last, originally produced at 
W attack's, and since revived at the Madison Square Theater under the 
title of Aftermath, is to be the next novelty at this house. This is a very 
chamr'n ; play, rumor says, and will undoubtedly be done justice to by 
Miss Coghlan and the rest. It will receive its initiatial performance on 
Thursday, the 31st of July. 

Bush St. Theater.— Tony Pastor's Troupe has been playing during the 
week to crowded houses. Taste for variety pei'formances is strong in this 
community. Mr. Pastor's present organization is the best of its class that 
has ever performed here. Among those who deserve special notice for 
the artistic manner in which they render their acts are Sheehan & Jones, 
who give a new sketch, called the Ash-box Inspector, which almost con- 
vulses the audience with laughter. In their territic combat, a la Donny- 
brook, they display a mixture of fighting, wrestling, facial contortion and 
brogue that would make a Quaker meeting smile. John Morris gives a 
series of costume and character changes in full view of the audience, who 
are puzzled to know how he does it. Thatcher s funny speeches have the 
merit of originality and a freedom from the least tinge of vulgarity that 
makes him a great favorite with the audience, who seem never to have 
enough of him. The French sisters, who, by the way, are English and 
not related, are very pretty, and do some neat song and dance business. 
Niles & Evans, two young men just brought by Tony before the public, 
are very good in a burlesque on the typical English swell, and will in 
time rank high in their profession. Tony Pastor sings a budget of popu- 
lar topical song?, and seems a greater favorite than ever. The closing 



piece was very tame, the characters being poorly sustained. We wereat 
a loss to tell whether it was comedy, farce or tragedy. Mr. Locke in- 
tends in August to completely renovate this theater, besides making some 
important alterations in the entrance. This will be a great improve- 
ment, and can but augment the already great popularity of the Bush St. 
Theater. 

Standard Theater. — The children have been playing Pinafore during 
the week to good business, and close with the performance to-morrow 
(Sunday) evening. It has been a most amusing spectacle, and those who 
have not seen it should not miss the few opportunities left. Children on 
the regular stage are generally parrot-like in their speech, and too artificial 
for anything in their action. Nothing like this is visible in this gallant 
little crew. It may be for want of contrast on the same boards with big 
folks, or else from the fact that the little ones feel morp at ease being by 
themselves, but whatever the reason, these youngsters have all the 
self-possession and naturalness of their older confrees. Last evening the 
performance was for the benefit of the fair instructress, Miss Chissold. 
The house was large, and the attractions enhanced by several novelties 
on the part of the children. Miss Lottie Chissold has given proof of pa- 
tient talent in teaching these young people, and deserves all praise. On 
Monday the Diplomacy Combination commence an engagement, which it 
may safely be expected will be a successful one. At one time it seemed 
as if through the exorbitant demands of one of the cast, this proposed pro- 
duction would fall through, but all difficulties have been smoothed over. 
Diplomacy is itself a very strong piece, and these ladies and gentlemen do 
full justice to it. The cast includes Messrs. Piercy, Keene,JBillings, 
Freeman and Morris, and Miss Lewis, Varian, Young and Morris. 

Grand Opera House. — Pantomimes, when well gotten up and well 

Eerformed, are very attractive spectacles, and the boxing-night shows in 
iondon are among its principal theatrical attractions. The performance 
at this theater is, without exception, the most wretchedly bad I ever saw. 
Everything goes wrong — the tricks fail, the scenes won't move— in fact, it 
is a perfect fizzle. How any sane man could ever have for a moment en- 
tertained the idea that this performance could draw paying audiences, is 
something past belief. Still, the pantomime is amusing from the fact 
that it is a fizzle, and I confess to hearty laughter at the failure and 
breaking-down of even the simplest trick. 

Pinafore.— The Emelie Melville Troupe have appeared, since our last 
issue, at San Rafael, Sacramento and San Jose. In all of these placeB 
their performances were completely successful. It is possible that they 
may make a more extended tour, and this would undoubtedly be a good 
and profitable enterprise. The powers that be have not as yet decided 
upon this question. 

Chit-Gnat. 

Frank Mayo is playing Davy Crockett in London.— —Lizzie Harold, 
our coming soubrette, is in Philadelphia on a short visit to "pop" and 
"mom."— — Patti will open at the Gaiete". Paris, on February 16, 1880. 
-^The Williamsons have paid Boucicault §5,000 for Australian rights in 
his new play. — James O'Neil gets S200 and Miss Coghlan $250 a week. 
— — -A New York manager has offered Faure, the French baritone, S200,- 
000 for a seven-months' engagement in the United States, the cash to be 
deposited in advance in the Bank of France. All expenses of traveling 
and living for himself and family are to be paid by the American impres- 
sario. Faure has not yet accepted the offer.— — Haverly's Lyceum, with 
the Georgia Minstrels, is the only New York Theater open. -^—Arthur 
Sullivan has just been created Mus. Bach, by Oxford University.-^ 
Sarah Bernhardt has written a comedy called VF.pingle <£Or, of which the 
heroine is a certain Miss Mary, an English caniatrice.-^— London has 
found out that Miss Kellogg is so modest that she never forces herself to 
the front. Strange nobody ever observed that here.— —It is announced 
that Mme. Theo, one of the three leading stars of the Paris stage, will 
soon retire and open a confectioner's shop in the Avenue de l'Opera.-^— 
Mr. Coghlan has been engaged for the Court Theater, London, and will 
open in September.— —The fuss the London critics and public are making 
over Sarah Bernhardt is simply nauseating, and has had the effect of caus- 
ing everybody in Paris to remember her defects.^— It is proposed to open 
a monster variety show in Paris at the Cirque Americain building.-^— 
The leading man at Booth's is to be John Clayton, Boucicault's son-in- 
law.— Neilson opens in Brooklyn October 5th, and then plays in this 
country continuously (only five nights a week) until May. This will be 
her last engagement in the United States, as it is not expected by her 
physicians that she will live two years longer.— —The Union Square man- 
agement expect to score another one hundred nights' run with the pro- 
posed revival of The Two Orphans.— —Drink and the Comedie Frangais 
are still the furores in London. -^After their tour through the interior, 
the Melville Amateurs will give a farewell week at the Standard. It is 
not true that on the opening Monday they will make a street parade. 



A GOOD PLAN. 

Anybody can learn to make money rapidly operating in 
Stocks, by the "Two Unerring Rules for Success," in Messrs. Lawrence & 
Co.'s new circular. The combination method, which this firm has made so success- 
ful, enables people with larjre or small means to reap all the benefits of largest cap- 
ital and best skill. Thousands of orders, iu various sums, are pooled into one vast 
amount and co-operated as a mighty whole, thus securing to each shareholder all the 
advantages of the largest operator. Immense profits are divided monthly. Any 
amount, from $5 to $5,000, or more, can be used successfully. N. Y. Baptist' Weekly, 
September 26th, 187S, says : " By the combination system $15 would make $75, or 
5 per cent. ; $50 pays $350, or 7 per cent. ; $100 makes $1,000, or 10 per cent, on the 
stock, during the month, according to the market." Frank Leslie's Illustrated 
Newspaper, June 29th : " The combination method of operating stocks is the most 
successful ever adopted." New York Independent, Sept. 12th: "The combination 
system is founded upon correct business principles, and no person need be without 
an income while it is kept working by Messrs. Lawrence & Co. Brooklyn Journal, 
April 29th : " Our editor made a net profit of $101.25 from $20 in one of Messrs. 
Lawrence & Co.'s combinations." New circular (mailed free) explains everything. 
Stocks and bonds wanted. Government bonds supplied. 
July 26. LAWRENCE & CO., Bankers, 57 Exchange Place, N. Y. 



ANDREW BAIRD, 

Negotiator of Loan and Commercial Paper, 
Broker in Local and State Securities, 

No. 312 California Street San Francisco. 

[JP. O. Box 1,208.] July 19. 

Conservatory Pianos, $250. 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



July 20, 1879. 



CALIFOKNIA ADVERTISER. 



SPORTING ITEMS. 

Boxing. -The sparring exhibition, held «t the Mechanics' Pavilion lttt 
Wednesday evening, was the beat show of the kind ever given on this 
coast. Not only ma it :. pecuniary sacoesSt but it was conducted with ;i 
decorum unusual j»t exhibitions of the manly art, ami it will il«> much fco 
make sport popolar and respectable. The first set-to was between Kd- 
warda anil -McH'lillan, both men looking in good condition, though too 
heavy. In the first round they did good work, Kdwar.ls showing great 
science in avoiding the powerful blows of Mct'lellan, and making good 
counter hits. The second round Edwards got in a good face hit that 
brought down the house. MeClellan replied by an upper cut that showed 
him to i-o a man DOt to be trilled with. This round was in favor of Ed- 
wards, who made the most clean bits. The third round McCIellan forced 
the work, but got no special advantage, Edwards parrying his blows clev- 
erly and countering in good style. He showed, however, that the work 
Was severe enough to weaken him a little. Hogan and Haggerty were 
the next, Hogan seemed to lose his temper, striking wildly and getting 
the worst of the encounter. Donovan then set-to with Chambers, male 
ing a pretty exhibition. In spite of his superior hight and weight, Dono- 
van got no advantage in the first round, Chambers stopping most of his 
blows and putting Donovan on his mettle to avoid cross-counters and 
body blows. The second round Chambers, finding it difficult to reach 
Donovan's head, rushed in, planting bis left in good shape, but failed to 
get away quick enough to avoid a clinch, which resulted in his getting 
his head in chancery. The audience disapproved of this so strongly 
that they hissed, though we are at a loss to see any cause for complaint in 
Chambers being overweighted, or Donovan proving that he understood 
his business. Next on the programme was a set-to between Riley and 
Maynard. Riley broke his thumb a few days ago and consequently could 
not do himself justice, being unable to upper cut, or, in fact, use his right 
hand at all ; but he proved that in good condition he would make a 
hard fight with his antagonist. Sharp and Toland then insulted the au- 
dience by giving a " set-to " that would disgrace the veriest tyros. They 
left the impression on the minds of the spectators that they had been 
paid for their work in advance, and did not care to earn the money. The 
"set-to "that followed, between Edwards and Chambers, was the best 
match of the evening. Both men are perfect masters of the art, and did 
their best, proving themselves worthy of their Eastern reputation. Dono- 
van then came on again and *' set-to " with Sharp, who got enough in the 
first round and wanted to quit, but was prevented by Billy Jordan, the 
M, C. The evening's entertainment finished with a '* set-to" between 
McCIellan and Maynard. The latter bothered his opponent a good deal, 
and displayed great cleverness and wonderful activity. McCIellan fought 
a little too hard at first, striking blows that would have knocked May- 
nard out of the ring had he not evaded tbem ; but when McCIellan settled 
down he showed his skill to better advantage, and fought his man into the 
corner, getting him on the ropes, but declining to take advantage of it. 
•—Mike Donovan goes across the bay to^train for his coming fight with 
McCIellan. He is under the charge of Joe Winrow and Fred (.TOtobed. 
He will probably be seconded by W. Riley. ^—McCIellan trains in town, 
making Maynard's gymnasium his headquarters. He has not yet selected 
a trainer.^— There is great probability of a fight being arranged between 
Harry Maynard and Arthur Chambers. Both men express themselves 
as desiring the meeting. 

Rowing. —The St. George and Columbia Rowing Clubs will hold a re- 
gatta on Oakland Creek about the end of September, of which further 
notice will be given. There will be seven races, the principal one being 
for the McKinley Cup, four-oaied shells ; a race for Becond-class shells, 
race for four-oared lapstreaks, single scull race, four-oared barge race, race 
for ships boats, and uuck race. The regatta will be governed by the rules 
of the Pacific Amateur Rowing Association, no entries being admitted 
except from clubs belonging thereto. — — The Bingle scull race, between 
Dan Leahey, of the Pioneers, and Stevenson, of Vallejo, was won by the 
former.-^— There will be a single scull race to-morrow, at 10 a. m., be- 
tween Leahey and Ed. Nelson, for $1,000 and the championship, over the 
usnal course.^— Balfour, Guthrie & Co. have challenged the Bank of 
British North America for a return match ; the race to come off on the 
16th of August next. The challenge has been accepted. 

Pedestrisnism. — The first bona tide six days' walking match for ladies 
ever held was won bv Madame Exilda La Chapelle at the Mechanics' 
Pavilion last Tuesday. The distance made was three hundred and six 
miles and five-sevenths.— —A match is talked of between Frank Edwards 
and Mclntyre for $2,000, the one covering the greatest distance in six 
days to be the winner. It will be managed by the Olympic Cluk^— Some 
sporting men of this city are about to get up another six days go-as-you- 
please match for men, to take place within six weeks. 

Shooting. — The Cosmopolitan Shooting Club had their first shoot at 
Milbrae last Sunday. Some good shooting was done by Messrs. Ault, 
Brooks, Cord, Villegra and Maskej f ; Ault winning first prize, a barrel of 
flour.^— - Grand sweepstakes match at Bird's Point, Alameda, to-morrow, 
at 10 o'clock a. ar. Fifteen members, at $10 each. Prizes, §75, §40, §25, 
S10 ; twelve birds each ; ties, single birds at twenty-six yards ; entries to 
be made on the ground. Freeze-out and glass-ball snooting after the 
match. 

Baseball. — Games at the Recreation Grouuds last Sunday : Reno vs. 
Star ; score, 7 to 4. Gatling vs. Cadets ; score, 17 to 10. National vs. 
Company B ; score, 6 to 24. Eureka vs. Eagle, Jr.; score, 27 to 21.-^— 
At Oakland : California vs. Oakland ; score, 8 to 2.-^— Games to-morrow 
at the Recreation Grounds : Reno vs. Eagles.*^— At Oakland Cricket 
Grounds : Knickerbocker vs. Athletic, for a purse of $500. 

Picnics.— French Ladies' Relief Society at Shell Mound Park, Berke- 
ley, Sunday. Special performance by the Ajmee Troupe. -^—Columbia 
Lodge, No. 127, at Schuetzen Park, Alameda, Sunday.— Excursion to 
Cremorne Gardens, Martinez, Sunday. Steamer Whipple leaves Wash- 
ington-street wharf at 10 a. m. 

Yachting. — The race between the Con. O'Connor and the Consuelo, for 
$1,000 a side, was won by the former, which made the distance over the 
regular course — twenty-eight miles— in three hours and twenty minutes. 
She was sailed by Marston, the Consuda being sailed by Captain Turner. 
It was a fair test, no mistake being made by either boat. 

Fishing. — There is excellent trout-fishing at Cloverdale and Sulphur 
Creek. -^— A gentleman recently from San Audreas Lake reports an aver- 
age daily catch of sixty.— Around Sacramento cattish are very plenti- 
ful. ^—Several shad were taken in fyke nets, near Freeport, last week. 



PEDESTRIAN INSANITY. 
Pedestrian insanity is now epidemic in San Francisco. The par- 
oxysm was at its hight week before hist, when thousands of infatuated 
spectators, high and low, rich and poor, old and young, gentlemen and 
ladies, assembled to witness the termination of as poor a contest as over 
graced the annals of pedestrianism, and to crown with laurels a set of 
used-up cripples, whose best claim to public recognition was the patience 
and endurance with which they carried out their miserable task. Never 
was seen in public arena a more melancholy spectacle of used-up human- 
ity after so short a tramp. With the sole exception of the winner of the 
belt, not a single man had been adequately trained and cared for. The 
commonest precautions against the ordinary contingencies of pedestrian 
contests appear to have been neglected. Men were taken directly from 
their work and urged by injudicious friends to efforts destructive of their 
strength. It was enough to draw tears of pity to see the noble-hearted 
Mclntyre painfully crawling round the track, vainly struggling to 
maintain his place beside the well-trained Edwards, who alone retained 
bis^ vigor to the end. One man was crippled by obesity; another was 
ridiculously old. Bad shoes, bad food, bad care, made good men fail and 
weak men worse. Scarcely a man knew how to carry his body properly, 
use his muscles to the best advantage, and to economize his respiratory 
movements while securing perfect aeration of his blood. And to think 
that it was for this that the theaters have been deserted and the homeB 
forsaken. If we are to have struggles of this nature let us at least have 
the best. • We believe in the physical improvement of mankind, and in 
the wholesome desire of every one to prove his skill and test his powers 
to the uttermost, but we protest against exhibitions got up by selfish 
speculators to entice decent men from their peaceful avocations to enter 
upon contests for which they are totally unprepared against one or two 
professional candidates able to walk away early with the chief rewards. 



BUSH STREET THEATER. 



Brilliant Success of the Inauguration of a Limited Engagement of 
TONY PASTOR 

AND HIS GREAT DOUBLE TROUPE! 

Composed of the Very Finest of Variety Artists. 



tS- MATINEES SATURDAY AT 2. -ffiS 
[July SO. J 



THE BALDWIN THEATER. 

Manager MM. TMOMAS MA.GUIME . 

EAST NIGHTS OF 1/ ASSOMMOIR ! 

Positively Last Lt'Assommoir Matinee, this Saturday, July 26th. 
Thursday Evening, July 31st, 

Production of 
WON AT LAST. 

ROSE COGHLAN in her original character of GRACE FLEMING. 

JAMES O'NEILL as JOHN FLEM1NU. 



CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Barton & I,awlor, nniinscr.. : Barton Hi II, Acting Manager. 
AIMEE the tiueen of Opera liouffe. Sunday Evening, July 27th (h.v special 
request) and positively last time of LA PETITE MAU1EE. AIMEE (positively ap- 
pcarin") as URAZIELLA. Nest Week— Two New Operas. Monday and Tuesday, 
Julv 28th and 29th, LA BOULANGERE A DES ECUS (The Rich Bakeress), written 
expressly for AIMEE. Wednesday Evening, July 30th, the Event of the Season! 
First tinie in this city of the reigning European Sensation, MADAME FAVART. 
Thursday Evening, August 7th, Grand Opera Bouffe Masked Ball, under the auspices 
of M LLE. AIMEE and all the Artists of her Company. Ju'y 20- 

BUSH STREET THEATER. 

Charles T.. IiOcke, Proprietor. ..(Jrnuii Nnccessful Innngn- 
ration of TONY/ PASTOR'S ENGAGEMENT. Standing Room Only. Greeting 
the fresh appearance of TONY PASTOR and his Great Double Troupe The Rest 
Coinuanv Tunv Pastor has ever brought to this Coast. TO.NY PASTOR himself ap- 
pears at each performance. FAMILY MATINEE SATURDAY. July 20. 

STANDARD THEATER. 

MA Kennedy. Manager. —Last Bilgbts of the Standard 
JUVENILE PINAFORE COMPANY. The Greatest of Hits. This (Saturday) 
nd Sunday Evenings. Julv 26th and 27th. Saturday Afternoon. July 2Mb, at 2 
o'clock LAST MATINEE OF THE. JUVENILES. Monday Evening, July 28th, DI- 
PLOMA CY, with its Great Cast Scats at the Box Oftiic July 26. 

" MECHANICS' FAIR, 

San Francisco, California, 
OPENS AUGUST 5TH, 1879- 

Science, Art, Industry and N»tnral Productions will be 
fullv represented Grand Instrumental Concert each afternoon and evening. 
Machinery inMotion, Rare Paintings. Fine Statuary, a Tropical Garden, Fountains 
and Promenades will make this Exhibition the most instructive and pleasant place 
of resort on this Coast. Those desiring space should apply at once, office: 2. Post 
ot resort on wis coa.,,. b IRVING M. SCOTT, I'rc-ident. 

J. H. Cclver, Secretary. JUI > l - 

""MADAME JULIA MELVILLE SNYDER, 

fit r» Mason street, between Bushand Sutter. --*ocnl Mnsie 
I > I .> lor Opera Concert or Parlor. Piano and Elocution. Dramatic Elocution 

and Voice Culture Specialties. Terms made known at residence. May - D - 



A Medicinal Food. PANCREATIC EMULSION. Prepared by SAVORY 
J\. & MOORE. For persons suffering from 

C-lonsumntion and Wasting Diseases, and for counteracting the ton. 
J den " ■ thereto Nourishes the system by the introduction of stable solid Fate, the 
TVTecessary Food in Consumption, and takes precedence of fluid fats, 
I\ oils and' Oily Emulsions of all kinds. 

A l> net lie. Strength and Weight are increased, and digestion m AU, 
A. eases improved by taking it. 

Pancreat ic Emu Ision is prescribed by the Medical Profession in all parts of 
the world, and is prepared by 
Savory * Moore, 1*3, Sew Bond street, London, and sold by all Chemists. 
[July 86. ) 

Conservatory Organs, $110. 2O0 Post street, comer of Dupont. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 26, 1879. 




"The World," the Flesh, and the Devil. 

[By a Truthful Penman.] 

Captain Barry, just returned from Australia, has "recognized" the 
Claimant as Thomas Castro, and the Claimant has "recognized" Cap- 
tain Barry. This last is a truly prodigious effort of memory. The Claim- 
ant has been in prison nearly six years, and left Australia somewhere 
about nine ysars ago, so that the "boy" must have been very young 
when he saw him last ; yet, he knows him at once! A black boy, too! 
We have known men remarkable for their quickness in physiognomy, who 
have declared the almost impossibility of recognizing black men after 
even a short period. Yet the Claimant, who forgets so many things, re- 
members this nigger, who must have passed from childhood to youth 
Bince he beheld him in the happy Wagga-Wagga days. Unfortunately 
for the Claimant, we are not all Guildford Onslows and Quartermaine 
Easts.— A few weeks ago a young gentleman whose friends live near 
Chislehurst arrived from the Cape. It was intimated to the Empress that 
if she cared to see him he would wait upon her. She was delighted, and 
listened with rapt attention to all he had to tell. When he described the 
assegai used by all the Kaffir and Zulu tribes she expressed a wish to see 
one. They were in the hall, and were forthwith produced. The Empress 
all but fainted at the sight of them, and then hurst into a flood of tears. 
* Do not think me weak,' she said ; ' but until I saw these terrible wea- 
pons I never realized the danger my son ran." At that very moment he 
had been killed by assegai wounds, seventeen in number.—— "Honor 
among thieves " does not always hold good. John Kelly, a footman, rob- 
bed his mistress, residing in Cumberland street, S. W., and one Shread, 
another thief, robbed Kelley of part of his booty. Both gentlemen have 
been committed for trial, though how it can be robbery to abstract from 
A what wasn't A's at ail, but B's, is a moot point, we should say. — Lon- 
don i£ep> - m.— -Victor Emmanuel, son of King Humbert of Italy, has 
just been subjected to eight days' arrest, the withdrawal of his honors at 
table, and the forfeiture of military salutes. The offence committed by 
the little ten-year old Prince was the utterance of a threat while playing 
with the Marchesa Montereno's daughter. " As soon as I am king I will 
have your head chopped off," cried the heir of the House of Savoy, in a 
passion, and his father deems it wise to administer a salutary lesson be- 
times. — I&z'tZ.^— The frequenters of Hawkesbury Station, England, are 
mourning the loss of the clever fox-terrier dog, who used to ring the bell 
on the approach of the train, to the great amusement of the passengers. 
Poor "Pincher " performed this feat for the last time on Sunday evening; 
he then imprudently left the signal hox, got upon the line, and was cut to 
pieces.— The Court Circular's correspondent, "Flaneur," says: "I see 
that American ladies are reviving the fan drill, a kind of amusement upon 
which Addison dilated in the Spectator when he spoke of private meet- 
ings to exercise fans. The American ladies, it would seem, however, 
practice in public; for I see that at the recent "carnival of authors," 
celebrated in the Horticultural Hall of Philadelphia, a squad of charm- 
ing young ladies performed the following evolutions: Entrance march ; 
the audacious flirt; handle your fans ; unfurl yourfans; flutter your fans; 
the majestic wave ; the scornful wave ; the coquettish flutter; the bash- 
fuljflutter ; the angry flutter; the merry flutter ; the amorous flutter; the 
repellent flutter ; gossip ; salute ; present your fans; shoulder your fans ; 
carry your fans ; furl your fans ; charge your fans ; discharge your fans ; 
ground your fans; march; retreat ; triumph; surrender; recover your 
fansj; the greeting; farewell ; salute; the Parthian retreat. This would 
be rather amusing at a ball, and the gentlemen might take it easy and 
look on at the manoeuvres.— The Freemason says there are about 14,580 
lodges in the world. In the United States and Canada the Freemasons 
number about 7,00,000, and we feel sure, from clear calculations, that in 
Europe they may be estimated at about 300,000 more. If we take South 
America and the East into calculation, we probably arrive at a grand to- 
tal of something like 1,300,000, and with that "tottle" we must be con- 
tent, eschewing fabulous legends and mythic millions. Probably the next 
few years will witness a rapid increase of our Order, and it is not impos- 
sible that, in the year of light and grace 2000, the Freemasons in the 
world may reach 3,000,000.— Vanity Fair, says: "We continue our re- 
view of the results which would have been attained by those who took 
our advice, given under this head in 1876, as to twenty different invest- 
ments." Vancouver Coal, which we next recommended, is an instance 
showing that even the best of commercial companies are liable to depre- 
ciation from circumstances over which they have no control. The output 
of this company is at present much larger than it has ever been, but so 
extremely low is the price of coal at San Francisco, that instead of pay- 
ing, as it used, ten per cent., it just now barely makes its ends meet. But 
this depression is no doubt only temporary. We had at the beginning of 
the year 1876 recommended our friends to sell Hudson's Bay shares (26,) 
which were then at 21^ ; and on 3d June we remarked, "We recommend 
holders to sell them " even at the price." The shares have since suffered 
a further decline. They have for some time past been marked in the 
Times with the ominous asterisk, and they can now only announce a beg- 
garly dividend of 8s. a share. — The British Trade Journal, in noticing 
the Trade Frauds of California depicted in the columns of the News Let- 
ter, says: "There is hardly an article of food consumed in the United 
States which is not adulterated with impunitv. Colored clay is made to 
do duty for coffee beans, cayenne pepper is adulterated with 'red lead, al- 
most every description of pickle is charged with poison, " probably half 
the vinegar sold is rank poison," and "several mills in New England, and 
probably many elsewhere, are now engaged in grinding white stone into 
powder for purposes of adulteration." The stone powder is sold at £c. per 
pound, and mixed with soda, sugar, or flour. Flour is also adulterated 
with plaster of Paris, bone dust, sand, clay, chalk, and other articles. In 
short, the catalogue of adulterations given by this Boston authority is so 



gruesome as to make one thankful that one lives in a land where some 
slight check is imposed upon wholesale poisoning. Wine, for example, 
appears to be often pure poison as sold in the States, and the practice of 
teetotalism is therefore necessary to the preservation of life." 

"Tile Principles of the Bepiiblican Party are Not for a Day, 
but for all Time." 



REPUBLICAN MEETINGS, 

HON. JOSEPH MoKENNA, 

Nominee for Congress, Third District* 

—AND— 

GEORGE T. BROMLEY, ESQ., 

Will Address the People on the Issues of the Hay, as JPollotcs: 



Sierraville Monday, July 21 

Quincy Tuesday, July 22 

Taylorville Wednesday, July 23 

Susauville Friday, July 25 

Chico Monday, July 2H 

Red Bluff Tuesday, July 29 

Shasta Wednesday, July 30 

Weaverville Thursday, July 31 

Fort Jones Saturday, August 2 

Yreka Monday, August 4 

Cloverdale Friday, Augusts 

Ukiah Saturday, August 9 

Cabto Monday, August 11 

Rhonerville Thursday, August 14 

Areata Friday, August 15 

County Committees will please make all requisite arrangements for the meetings. 

By order of the Committee. W. W. MORROW, Chairman. 

M. P. Borpck, Secretary. July 19. 

"The Principles of the Bepublican Party are not for a Bay* 
but for All Time." 



Eureka Saturday, August 16 

Healdsburg Tuesday, August 19 

Santa Rosa Wednesday, August 20 

Petaluma Thursday, August 21 

San Rafael Friday, August 22 

Woodland Saturday, August 23 

Marysville Monday, August 25 

Colusa Tuesday, August 20 

Oroville Wednesday, August 27 

St Helena Thursday, August 28 

Lakeport Friday, August 29 

Napa Saturday, August 30 

Dixon Monday, September 1 

V'allejo Tuesday, September 2 



REPUBLICAN MEETINGS, 

GEORGE C. PERKINS, 
Republican Nominee for Governor, 

-AND— 
G. A. KNIGHT, ESQ., 

Of Humboldt, 
Will Address the People on the Issues of the Day, as Follows : 



San Bernardino Saturday, July 19 

Anaheim Monday, July 21 

San Buenaventura. . .Wednesday, July 23 

Santa Barbara Thursday, July 24 

Lompoc Friday, July 2f< 

San Luis Obispo Saturday, July "" 



Watsonville Tuesday, July 29 

Bakersfield Thursday. July 31 

Visalia Friday, August 1 

Fresno Saturday, August 2 

Merced Monday, August i 

Modesto Tuesday, August 5 



Salinas Monday, July 28 j San Francisco Wednesday Augusts 

County Committees will take due notice and make the necessary arrangements for 

the meetings announced. By order of the Committee. 
M. P. Borcicr, Secretary. f July 19.] W. W. MORROW, Chairman. 



NOTICE. 

To Bullion and Exchequer Stockholders. 

The San Francisco Stock aud Exchange Board having been 
informed that great dissatisfaction exists among the shareholders of the Bullion 
and Exchequer-Mining Companies, respecting the management of those properties 
by the present Boards of Trustees, have empowered their Executive Committee to 
co-operate with those shareholders who wish an opportunity for the expression of 
their sentiments respecting the same. The Executive Committee intends, with such 
co-operation, to procure the action of the Courts in ordering a new election of Trus- 
tees of those companies. All shareholders in sympathy with this movement are re- 
quested to call at the office of Mr. J. W: COLEMAN, President of the Committee, 
Room No. 1, Stock Exchange Building, and sign a petition to the County Court for 
its action in the premises. CHAS. S. NEAL, 

July 19. Secretary S F. Stock and Exchange Board. 

"THE SAN FRANCISCO MERCHANT," 

A Weekly Trade Paper, 

Published Every Friday Morning. --Especially devoted to 
the Grocery, Tobacco, Provision, Drag and Wine and Spirits Trades. The 
ADVOCATE OF HOME MANUFACTURES. Able editorials on live topics. Newsy 
comments on all affairs appertaining to business. The fullest and most reliable m ir- 
ket reports, and the liveliest and most entertaining trade paper published in the 
United State. Subscription, Two Dollars a year, in advance (postage included) , and 
received by all newsdealers, Postmasters and agents of Wells, Fargo & Co. Sample 
copies, free. July 19. 

SWIMMING TEACHER, 

At Neptune and Mermaid Swimming Baths, foot of Lark In 
and Hyde streets. PROFESSOR J. C. MOHOR is now prepared to instruct 
ladies, gentlemen and children any hour of the day, at the beach, as above. A course 
of ten lessons is about all that is required in ordinary cases. Terms reasonable. 
Suits, etc., furnished. P. S.— One view of the beach and the precautions taken will 
satisfy any one of the perfect safety of beginners. July 19. 

^NATURALIZATION ! 

Headquarters Repnblican state Central Committee, Rooms 
No.'s i, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, No. 703 Market street, southwest corner Third. 
On and after WEDNESDAY, July 9th, 1879, a Clerk will be in attendance at these 
Headquarters, Room No. 5, for the purpose of NATURALIZATION. Office Hours, 
from 8 a.m. until 9 p.m. By order of the Committee. 

M. D. Boruck, Secretary. [July 19.J W. W. MORROW, Chairman. 



FRED H. BUSBY, 



Montgomery Block, 02S Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
Manufacturer of Archer> Gloves, Finger Tips, Arm Guards, Boxing, Fencing 
and Base Ball Gloves, for Catchers, Long Wrist Fishing Gloves, Belts for Uniforms, 
etc. Archery Clubs supplied at reduced rates. Busby's Archery Clubs are the ouly 
ones in the market that will stand service and give satisfaction. * Julv 12. 



F 



QUICKSILVER. 



lor sale— In lots to suit, by Thomas Bell A- Co., No. 305 

Sansome street, over Bank of California. Nov, 16. 



ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

. 310 Sansome street, San Francisco, Wholesale Dealer 

in Furs. Sept. 21. 



N< 



Smith's Music Store, 200 Post street, corner of Bupont- 



July 26, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



A WHITE ROSE. 
There wm a day when from my hair, unhindered, 

You might have I 
Its lush rod nater, or pi ok apple hltwsoms, 

Freshly wind-ahaken. 
Ah, that una day that was! I may not, even 

Fur its Bweet s:ik.- 
Give y>u the pnauH that are thought's dear solace, 

In lone heart-break. 
In all the train nf days it hath no double — 

Vet we unthinking. 
Unknowing, blind, tdown the heavens saw its 

Sun go sinking. 

Into our calm to-day its ghost comes gliding— 

Known all too late! 
Take from my hand its emblem, and the emblem 

Of our strange fate. 
Silence! its pale lipa Bay: the snow-white silence 

01 you sad stone. 
Yet — lingering joy— the sharers, even of silence 

Are not alone. 



THE CHINESE SITUATION. 

It is not assuming too much to say tbat all the signs of the times 
tend to prove the incontrovertible fact tbat the Chinese people located in 
California are a most important factor in her labor system, and that the 
eyes of the eutire cmntry are centered upon her, mildly wondering at the 
sanguinary language of the King of the Sand Lot and of the daily press 
of the State, when dealing with this question. Then oar friends of the 
East turn with inquiring iniuds to the maps of the State of California 
and Oregon, and find a vast area of territory all idle, only awaiting labor 
for its development ; they find many old worked-ont river-beds, not 
worthy of the attention of white labor, utilized, and their hidden wealth 
saved by the work of the patient Chinamen ; they see a continental rail- 
road, with branches extending north into Oregon and south into Utah 
and Arizona, and elsewhere, traversing vast plains and deserts, pioneering 
into new countries, with the end in view to build them up, yet knowing 
that years mtist elapse before the requisite expenditures in the enterprises 
can come back, in the shape of interest or dividends — roads that could not 
have been constructed with any but Chinese cheap labor. Island mo- 
rasses, looked upon as valueless, have, through this same patient labor, 
been leveed and reclaimed, and now are among the most valuable proper 
ties in the State. The farmers cannot depend upon the vaunted white 
labor for the harvesting any more than the Southern planter can upon 
the negro for the gathering of the crops. Without the balance-wheel of 
the Chinese, California in many of its most natural interests would suffer 
vitally, and the common sense view of the situation should not be over- 
looked in the desire to cater to the taste of the "man who votes." 

Recent advices from Washington report the safe return to Peking of 
Hon. George F. Seward, U. S. Minister to China, and it is now promul- 
gated, from the State Department, " that he carried with him special in- 
structions from Secretary Evarts to obtain an interview with Prince 
Kung and bis associates, notifying them that the United States Govern- 
ment desires a modification of the Burlingame Treaty, to the end tbat re- 
strictions be placed upon Chinese i in migration to the United States. His 
instructions are of an urgent and specific nature, and he is directed to 
leave no room for doubt as to the earnestness of this Government in thus 
desiring to place some limitation upon Mongolian immigration to this 
country." We believe that the very sensible Chinaman will come here, 
treaty or no treaty, as long as our needs demand his presence and he can 
get value received for his labor. When white labor can develop the 
worked out river beds and low grade placer claims of the State, can build 
railroads and reclaim lands for reasonable wages, without "striking" 
three or four times whenever they get the " bloated bond-holding em- 
ployer " in a tight place, then the influx of Chinese will very rapidly de- 
crease. 

Aside from the national aspect of the situation, the employment of 
large numbers of the Chinese in the cotton fields and sugar plantations of 
the Southern States is one of the possibilities of the future. The negro 
"continues to exodus," and thus opens wide the door for the only labor 
known that can work, and live, in that section of the country. The Chi- 
nese are naturally tillers of the soil ; they grow cotton, sugar, rice and 
tobacco in their own country, and know how ; they are not afraid of the 
broilng rays of the sun, for they can stand 115 degrees in the shade with- 
out a cover on their heads ; and as for yellow fever and other climatic 
epidemics, they " have no fear." What if the Chinese should go South ? 

Were a steady and persistent effort to be made, they might be induced 
to take the overland trip, and if wages could be promptly paid, would work, 
and work faithfully and well, with an average result at the close of the 
season equal to the best in the old slave times, and their labor would be 
low enough to insure to their employer a very handsome return on his 
investment. Sooner or later, we believe that a new era of prosperity will 
be brought about in the South through "Chinese cheap labor," for we 
know from actual undertakings that white labor in that region has sig- 
nally failed. 

We hear that Natchez is fast becoming a manufacturing center, and it 
is hinted that two large cotton mills now building there are to employ 
Chinese labor. In New Orleans several of our Chinese companies have 
branch stores, and elsewhere the Chinaman is taking root. Only yester- 
day we learned of three who went to Indianapolis, and others to St. Louis. 
We are firm in the belief that the Chinese are a mo3t valuable element in 
the labor of the whole country, and well worthy of the most thoughtful 
consideration. General Grant has visited the land of the yellow man. 
His impressions will be valuable to a large mass of the American people, 
and we feel sure that Sand-lot sentiment will not find any indorsement 
from him. 

Says the London World : " The Daily Telegraph ought to be well 
posted up in its Old Testament, anyhow. Yet it informs us that the sub- 
ject of Sir Frederick Leightou's great picture is Jeremiah fed by an 
angel !" 

An elegant assortment of Gold Watches and Chains at Randolph & 
Co.'s, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

INSURANCE AGENCY, 
No. 322 <£ 321 California SI1..1, Man Francisco, Oil. 

Fire Insurance. 

QIRABD of Philadelphia. ST. PAUL of St. Paul. 

HOME or Columbus. UNION of Galveston. 

NEW ORLEANS ASSOCIATION TEUTONIA ol Now Orleans. 

PEOPLES of Niwark. BERL1N-OOL0ONE o! Berlin. 

REVEKE of Button. LA CONK1ANCE ot Paris. 

LA CA1SSE GENERALS of Paris. 

Marine Insurance. 

PARIS UNDERWRITING ASSOCIATION of Paris 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London. 

Capital Represented $23, 000, COO. 

Al l Lossvs Equitab ly Adjusted and Promptly Prtirf. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE CO. OF CALIFORNIA. 

Principal Office, 406 California street, San Francisco. 
Cash Assets, January 1, 1877, $505,291 ; Liabilities, §5,952 ; Surplus for Policy 
Holders, S58D,339. J. F. Hough tun, President; L. L. Baker, Vice-President; 
Charles R. Story, Secretary. K. H. MAC-ILL, H. H. BIOELOW, General Agents. 

Directors. — San Francisco— L. L. Baker, John H. Redington, J. F. Houghton, 
R. B. Gray, Robert Watt, John Currey, L. L. Baker, \V. F. Whittier, C. C. Burr, E. 
M. Root, W. H. White, J. L. N. Shepard, W. M. Greenwood, George S. Mann, Gyrus 
Wilson. W. T. Garratt, C. Waterhouse, A. P. Hotaling, A. Block, A. K. P. Harmon, 
G. S. Johnson, W. O. Wilson, A. W. Bowman, H. L. Dodge, Charles R. Story. Ala- 
meda County Branch— V. D. Moody, Chauncy Taylor, A. C. Henry, Robert S. Far- 
relly, Joseph B. Marlin, W. B. Hardy. T. B. Simpson. San Diego— A. H. Wilcox. 
Sacramento— Mark Hopkins, D. W. Earl, Julius Wetzlar, James Carolan. San Jose— 
T. Ellard Beans, B. D. Murphy, A. Pflster, J. H. Dibble, J. S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, 
Jacob Rich, John Auzerais, John Balbaeh. Stockton— H. H. Hewlett, Chas. fielding, 
J. D. Peters, A. W. Simpson, H. M. Fanning. Marysville— D. E. Knight. Grass 
Valley— Wm. Watt, T. W. Sigourney. Portland, Oregon— W. S. Ladd, C. H. Lewis, 
P. Wasserman, B. Goldsmith, D. Macleay. Virginia City, Nevada— John Gillig, Isaac 
L. Requa. March 17. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.--UNION INS. CO. OF S. >7 

The California Lloyds.— Established in 1861.— Nos. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash capital §750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed $1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Kates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
— San Francisco— J. Mora Moss, N. G. Kittle, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Moses 
Heller, Adam Grant, Daniel Meyer, Antoine Borel, Charles Kohler, E, L. Goldstein, 
I. Lawrence Pool, A. Weill, Joseph Brandeudtein, Charles Bauiu, James Moftitt, 
Benjamin Brewster, L. Cunningham, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas Luuing, John Parrott, 
L. A. Booth, Julius Baum, Myles D. Sweeney, Jas. M. Goewey, Edward Cadwalader 
Bartlett Doe, Gustave Touchard, J. H. Baird, J. G. Kittle, George C. Hickox, C. Du- 
commun, Wm. Scholle, John Conly, Ig. Steinhart, W. B. Stone, J. O. Eldridge, A. 
B. Phipps. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 
Charles D. Haven, Secretary. Geo. T Bqhen, Surveyor. Aug. 31. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 

I EEEE AND MARINE. 

Clash Asaets, 9450,000.— Principal Office, 218 and 220 San- 
j some street, San Francisco. Officers: — A. J. Bryant, President; Richard 
Ivers, Vice-President ; Charles H. Cashing, Secretary ; H. H. Watson, Marine 
Surveyor. Board of Directors : — Peter Donahue, James Irvine, C. D. O'SulIivan, 
A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailey, E. W. Corbert, George O. 
McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke. H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. Buckley. 
P. J. White, E. M. Root, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Roscnfeld, Daniel 
Callaghan. P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, Los Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, Sonoma County. H. W. Seale, Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford. San Jose. Feb. 16. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG. 

Capital 81,125.000, U.S. Gold Coin. 

Losses Paid In Gold Coin Immediately After Adjustment. 
This Corporation holds contracts of fifteen other European Insurance Compa- 
nies, re-insuring by fai the greater part of every risk, as soon as accepted in our of- 
fice. The combined subscribed Capital which our policies therefore offer to the public, 
Amounts to i Of which 

$16 .912,500, TJ. S. Gold Coin, | $4,328,750 is Paid Up, 

Besides the Always Available Reserve Funds. 

GEORGE MARCUS & CO., General Agents for the Pacific Coast, 
March 16. 304 California street. 

THE MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, ENGLAND^ 

[ESTABLISHED 1836. J 

Whole Amount of Joint Stock and Guaranteed Capital.. $5, 000, 000. 

Whole Amount of Capital paid up 900,000. 

Cash Assets December 31, 1876 3,710,000. 

The undersigned have been duly authorized to issue Policies at current rates on 
Freight and Shipments to or from England, Europe, New York, Japan, China, Aus- 
tralian Colonies, Sandwich Islands, aud Northern Coast Ports. If desired, policies 
made payable at port of termination. 

WILLIAMS. BLANCHARD & CO., Agents, 

Aug. 10. 21S California street. 

~~ THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 3,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10, 000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
tained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HARRY W. SYZ. Agent, 225 Sansome St., S. F. 

MEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSUR. CO. OF BOSTON. 

Has transacted the business of Life Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to overFoiRTEKs Mllliox Dollaks. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Oxlt Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
hascomr.'ied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EYERSON, General Agent 
Sept. 22. ] 32S Montgomery street. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

/Capitol 85.000.000 Aseuts: Balfnnr. Gnlhrle A Co., So. 

\y 310 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 26, 1879. 



CUTTING THE CONTINENT. 
Ferdinand De Lessepa is evidently in dead earnest. He means busi- 
ness. The payment of ©400,000 to secure the franchise has been made. The 
great engineer is coming himself to America in November, and he prom- 
ises that the first sod of the cutting shall be turned on the first of Janu- 
ary next. Application for laborers has been made to the Emperor of 
Brazil. No doubt Chinese can be usefully employed, and we shall not 
be surprised if the work is almost wholly performed by them. They will 
stand the climate better than Caucasians. It is eminently fitting that 
they should be engaged in an enterprise the completion of which will 
bring their country so much nearer to Europe. There are those who be- 
lieve that John Chinaman has a great destiny before him— that he is 
bound to become the workman of the world. If that be so, it is proper 
that he should have a hand in a work that will afford him a new and 
nearer route to the industries of the earth. He will be simply clearing 
his own way to his forthcoming conquest of labor. In a short time De 
Lesseps will open subscriptions fur eighty millions of dollars, and it looks 
as if lie will get them. Ihe money assured, the canal ia only a matter of 
a very few years. The Eastern press is still indulging in absurd opposi- 
tion to De Lesseps because they do not like the route he has adopted. 
The United States sent representatives to the Paris Conference ; the 
question was fully considered, and a decision dispassionately arrived at. 
There can be no doubt that that decision is a wise one. The Nicaragua 
route, favored by certain New York papers,_ ia objectionable in many 
respects. It would require from twenty to thirty locks, which are unde- 
sirable for a ahip canal. Moreover, earthquakes, which are of frequent 
occurrence, would be likely to injure the locks, and possibly deatroy the 
entire work. The route adopted follows the line of railroad extending 
from Aspinwall to Panama. The line is a little over forty-five miles in 
length from sea to aea, which is about half the length of the Suez Canal. 
In its course there is a granite mountain which rises to the height of 295 
feet above the sea level, and is four miles wide. But M. de Lesseps is by- 
no means frightened at this obstacle. He proposes to cut an open trench 
clear through it. That accomplished, the remainder is comparatively 
plain sailing. We are persuaded that many a man already advanced in 
years will live to see this continent cut in twain by means of the Darien 
Canal. The work is one that dwellers on this coast will wish " God- 
speed." Its effects upon the world's commerce will be immense. It will 
marry the Atlantic to the Pacific, and bring the east and the west 
together. 

WANTED, TWO MILLIONS. 
The generous souls who consent to manage our mines want two mill- 
ions this month. They have levied assessments to that amount, and have 
published the usual notices that if payment is not made within the next 
thirty days our shares will be sold. Well, now, it must be admitted that 
two millions are a pretty considerable tribute to pay in one month, especially 
as times go. We howl ourselves hoarse over the burden of the city's tax 
levy ; we declare that it is too high ; we plead that times are not what 
they were, and demand that the city government in all its branches should 
be run at prices to suit the times. We kick at paying some four our five 
millions for a whole year of city government, but submit with the docility 
of lambs to the payment of two millions in a single month to mine man- 
agers. For the one we get education, police protection, light, safety from 
fires, administration of law, street improvements, and all the other bene- 
fits of good government ; for the other we get well, what do we get ? 

It puzzles us to tell just what substantial consideration is ours for those 
two millions. There are no dividends, and no prospects of any. It is 
true that we get a few gay and festive mine managers, a la Schultz, who, 
verily, are dear at the price. We get a system of gambling the most un- 
equal, as against the non-dealer or outsider, that the world ever saw. But 
it is just that gambling game, and the love we have of it, that makes us 
submit to the payment of two millions a month. We expect to win, who 
ever else loses, and so we put in our stakes with a light heart. If we lose, 
we try again, and keep on trying until there is nothing to try with. That 
is the history of the business in a nutshell. When people are content to 
accumulate slowly but surely, when they make up their minds to eschew 
the gambling spirit and stick to their legitimate callings, then, and not 
until then, will business be on a sound basis, and not until then will pros- 
perity be general and widespread. Those two millions a month mean a 
great deal. They mean depression of business, hard times, heart break- 
ings, want, sorrow, and a thousand attendant evils. But then, we are a 
wonderful people. Where is the other city in the world that has the 
temerity to throw two millions monthly into so many valueless holes in 
the ground? There are signs that these people are getting jnst a little 
restive at the operation. They are going to investigate Schultz — that's all. 

SUPREME JUDGES ON A STRIKE. 
The July term of the Supreme Court has just commenced, with a 
calendar of some 500 cases, but the Judges appear to have gone on a 
strike. Anyhow, they have resolved to take up no casea, except a few 
criminal ones that will not permit of delay. Why this determination has 
been arrived at, the public have not been' informed. It is an unfortunate 
resolve, that shows supreme indifference to the interests of suitors. It is 
believed, in well informed quarters, that their Honors mean to do little, 
if anything, more during their term of office. They are reported to be 
soured in temper, and deem themselves a discredited body, having but 
little power for further usefulness. That ia a distorted and an unhealthy 
view of things, which ought to be dissipated forthwith. It is a morbid 
sensibility to alights that are not intended. If their Honors will start in 
to work with vim, and a determination to clear their calendar of the 
crowd of business that encumbers it, their digestion will be improved, 
their tempers mended, and they will better deserve the respect of the 
people whose servants they still are. We are of those who regret that 
the present Bench has been legislated out of office. We do not think that 
it is likely to be improved upon. At present the chances seem to be all 
the other way. Yet,_ if the present Judges undertake to leave a whole 
half-year's accumulation of work to their auceessors, they will lose many 
frienda, and their enemiea will say that the fact is evidence of the wisdom 
of their removal. When the Constitutional Convention had not decided 
the future, their Honors worked like beavers, and cleared their calendar 
for the first time in^ years. If, now that the future is decided against 
them, they go on strike, while regularly drawing their salaries, they will 
pass away to a merited oblivion. As warm friends of the present Judges, 
we urge them to make no such unworthy record. 



INFLUENCE OP HARD TIMES ON THE ELECTION. 
It may be taken for granted that in a normal state of affairs, with 
the working classes fully employed and contentment generally prevailing, 
the Kearney movement and the adoption of the new Constitution would 
have been simply impossible. They were, as might have been expected, 
the natural results of the dissatisfied condition of the laboring element, 
and unless conservative men desire to see the lesson of the 7th of May re- 
peated in September, they should profit by past experience and take away 
from the demagogues their most potent weapon — the cry of Hard Times ! 
It ia admitted on all sides that, notwithstanding our great crops, trade ia 
extremely depressed, and mechanics and laborers are, as a rule, living 
from hand to mouth. It is useless to appeal to the principle or patriotiam 
of hungry or penniles3 men — they invariably gravitate to the aide which 
magnifies their grievances and unsparingly denounces the presumed 
authors of their woes. Now, what in reality is the present aspect of 
politics ? The Democracy does not exist as a political factor, and may be 
counted out of the fight. The Republicans, while apparently atrong and 
hopeful of victory, contain many discordant elements, which are apt, at 
any time, to jump the track, and either abstain from voting or go over to 
their opponents. The H. B.'s and the Workingmen are practically pull- 
ing together, excepting on their State tickets. Now, should they secure 
between them a sufficient majority in the Legislature, they will possess all 
power requisite to their ends, and will not be scrupulous in using it. The 
whole question in a nutshell is, shall they be permitted to gain that posi- 
tion when prevention is possible ? The idea is this : let our capitalists, 
manufacturers, and solid men generally, inaugurate without delay enter- 
prises to give employment at living rates to the now discontented and un- 
employed workingmen. Assume that better times are coming and appeal 
to their self-interest to assist in bringing them about. The money spent 
in labor will return to circulation, stimulating trade and adding to your 
profits, whereas, now, by shutting up your funds, there is a positive loss. 
Money is like ice — it does not remain stationary, but must either increase 
or diminish. The content arising from employment will make the em- 
ploye 1 much more tractable, and, confidence being restored, we shall 
resume our normal prosperity. Else, it must be remembered that the 
11,000 majority in May will be found difficult to overcome, especially with 
the considerable increase since then of " the dissatisfied." 



WHERE BLOOD AND MONEY GO. 
This age is boasted of as an exceedingly utilitarian one. The knight 
errantry, the false heroics and the improvidence of past times have, it is 
alleged, departed, never more to return. This is claimed to be a cool, 
calculating era of common sense. Life is deemed of all things the most 
valuable. Money comes next. How best to preserve our blood and our 
coin is a matter of supreme consideration to every man. Yet when we 
look at the frightful loss of both that has resulted from war during the 
past twenty-five years, one would imagine that life and gold have no ap- 
preciable value. The St. Petersburg Gazette calculates that the Crimean, 
Italian, Prusso-Austrian, Mexican, Franco- Prussian, Eusso-Turkish and 
American wars, have cost 2,548,000 lives. This does not include deaths 
from diseases inseparable from war, nor the thousands of mangled and 
disabled men. The total cost in money is estimated at £2,473,000,000. 
Even then, says an English paper, the estimate falls under the actual 
figures, for the services of millions of men engaged in those conflicts were 
lost to their countries and to the world while they were engaged in cutting 
each other's throats, and, of course, the dead men produced nothing more 
for the benefit of their native land, which put them to so bad a use. If 
that money, so brutally wasted, and the services of those men, so badly 
employed, had been utilized in great enterprises, hard times might have 
been wiped from off the face of the earth. Africa might have been sur- 
veyed and opened up to population as perfectly as England ; lines of rail- 
way might permeate it in every direction ; the Dover Tunnel would have 
been bored ; the Darien Canal dug, and yet the two and a half thousand 
millions scarcely touched ! While we encourage wars at home or abroad, 
it is the wildest nonsense to speak of this as an age of common sense. 



THE BOTTOM DROPPED OUT. 

The bottom has dropped out of the Bulletin's raid upon Mayor 
Bryant, During the past three weeks there have been editorials almost 
daily. The city was to be defrauded out of untold millions. Possible and 
impossible water rights were to be purchased, and taxpayers were to be 
committed to an enormous expenditure. The process by which the gigantic 
swindle was to be accomplished did not appear, yet the thing was to be 
put through. The Bulletin swore that it was, and everybody was, in con- 
sequence, expected to yield an implicit belief, notwithstanding the evi- 
dent improbabilities, and even impossibilities of its assertions. The Mayor 
had entered into a corrupt bargain to buy Bundry water supplies at three 
times their intrinsic value. The thing was to be hurried through. Un- 
der the New Constitution, which the Bulletin opposed, no such robbery 
was possible. Hence it was necessary to put the job through before the 
end of the year. It knew just what was going on. It spoke with au- 
thority. It seemed to be on the inside. It told how the Democratic 
Convention was run in the interests of the Spring Valley Water Com- 
pany, and how the New Constitution party was pulling the same way. 
It was a huge, infamous and unparalleled job — that it was! Mayor Bry- 
ant was the rascally engineer of the damnable conspiracy. More shame 
to him ! These are but faint echoes of what the Bulletin told us evening 
after evening. Now comes the denouement. The water commission, of 
which Mayor Bryant is a member, has held a meeting and unanimously 
declared that it has no intention of buying any water rights whatever. 
Thus, in an instant of time, the bottom dropped out of the Bulletin's won- 
derful story. Verily, it still lieB by day, and lies by night, and lies from 
the very lust of lying. 

Judge Morrison has delighted the community by stopping the trade 
in Readers; but the Board of Education answer his decision by a circular, 
calling for a little discretion on the part of teachers, since the Board will 
have authority to decide upon text-books in January next. No doubt; 
but not this same Board, and therein is the point. What " discretion" 
means the Board do not say, neither does it matter. If the charge of 
text-books could have been carried with a high hand, it would have been; 
and perhaps there may be a few teachers who know too much about the 
juggling business. If these were recommended to be discreetly silent, 
there was some meaning in the circular. 



July 2(5, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

"He»r tbo Cri«r!"* "Wh*l the *!•»!! »ri ihonT 
'On* that will i> lay the d.-vil, «i.* with you." 

" He'd * utms in his tail a* ionic as a flat). 
Which made him crow bolder and bolder." 



Since our picture, "At the Play," appeared last week, this office 
has been perpetually besieged by parties who indignantly want to know 
why they weren't among the audience. This sort of thing has got to stop, 
as our time is valuable. Those who don't appear may consider them- 
selves to be behind a pillar, or making a mash behind the scenes ; or, may 
be, they have gone out to get a clove : or, perhaps they took a seat among 
the gods that night, in which case their portraits are about three inches 
above the upper edge of the picture. Doubtless, too, a good many will 
find themselves in the vestibule by holding the sheet up against a strong 
light ; while some sat so far back that they went clean through the paper 
when the picture was printed, or were driven so far into the lithographic 
stone that they can only be recovered with a cork-screw. Let no one, 
therefore, fail to take advantage of the last opportunity of buying the 
picture on the ground that his phiz doesn't appear in it. By prospecting 
with a peu-knife, most people can find themselves somewhere, and those 
who think the bar-room a likely place will discover that resort by sinking 
a shaft under the left wing of the curtain. 

Superintendent Mann was the first to discover the wisdom of Provi- 
dence, long cunningly hidden from the rest of us, in making parents of 
both sexes. One shudders to think what might have happened if Provi- 
dence had been caught napping about the time when parents were in- 
vented. But 'tis Mr. Mann who said it, and it's greatly to his credit. 
And he, or some one else, says likewise, that if Bennett, Jr., had not had 
a father he could not have done what he is doing ; whieh seems reasona- 
ble, but one would like more light. Mr. Mann himBelf, for instance ; is 
he willing to lay his hand upon his heart and swear (or affirm, as the case 
may be,) that, if he had had a father, he could have done something? 
This is an extremely serious business, and no man should trifle with it, 
even if he is a double-ender. Providence was no less wise in this case 
than in that of the parents, and effectually barred all Mr. Mann's pre- 
tensions by creating him out of Director Leggett's eloquence and the air 
of Sacramento. 

Monarchs retired from business are not so entirely without resources 
as one might at first imagine. Each one of them is still the Lord's 
anointed and the fountain of honor; and as a matter of fact, they all do a 
snug little trade in titles and patents of nobility. In every country of 
Europe are thousands of men — counts, barons, marquises, etc., — who have 
bought their title of distressed sovereigns, and only occasionally betray, by 
a foolish trick of speech, or a movement of the hand once familiar with 
the persuasive napkin, that their first years were spent in the kitchen. 
Americans have lately learned this royal Voad to noble descent, and a 
small tallow-chandler of an interior town has just burst upon the aston- 
ished world as the Marquis de Sebo, a dignity conferred upon him by Don 
Carlos for cash in hand. 

The Vierra lamp-guides are beautiful to look at, but you have to be 
quick if you want to see them. They lift up in vain their appealing fingers 
to Heaven. The remorseless small boy and the malignant tramp drag 
them down and twist them off in exactly 26 hours after their first appear- 
ance. To be sure, they are generally accorded a burial in the cemetery 
grounds ; but even this brings no comfort to the weeping tax-payer. One 
feels like kicking the men who invent these Benseless things, and the 
Supervisors who buy them. The plain way is always the one no city 
government will take. Why not paint the name of the street on the 
corner house, or on the shaft of the iron gas-lamp? These cannot be 
twisted round by festive young men in the small hours. 

Ever since the collapse of that little speculation in chloral hydrate 
the Bulletin has been looking for a patent medicine, without partnership 
rights, and seems to have found one at last in a wonderful root, or tinc- 
ture, or mixture, chat cures drunkenness quicker than winking. One or 
two testimonials have been published which remind us of the retired phy- 
sician whose sands of life have nearly run out, and it really begins to 
look as if the evening paper had struck a bonanza. Certain mysterious 
printed circulars, scattered along Market street on Wednesday, become 
intelligible when referred to this new enterprise; and one is filled with 
admiration of the ingenuity which turns an honest penny in the very face 
of the medical societies and the law. 

Statues are now turned out to order, and there is no excuse for our 
poverty in this respect. The only thing we have is the sublime Lincoln 
on Fifth street, which everybody takes for Senator Bones, with a carpen- 
ter's apron in his hand. Could not something be done with Dr. Coggswell, 
in a petrified state, on the top of his tombstone. He would make a first- 
class lodging-place for pigeons, if his arms were spread out and a scroll 
Btuck in his mouth, with the words — " Prize Fool of the Century." Even 
Honolulu is to have a statue. We must kill our Coggswell speedily, or 
we shall be left behind. 

Dr. Glenn, it is said, never reads the newspapers. What of that ? 
Many great men never read the newspapers. Socrates, Plato, Julius 
Caesar, Herod, Josephus and Judas Iscariot never read the newspapers, 
and they never wanted to. They couldn't tell you the price of Consols, 
or Erie, or Consolidated Virginia ; they never heard of the Zulus, or 
Prince Napoleon, or Sara Bernhardt (Lord ! how happy they must have 
been !) ; De Lessens would be worse than a Turk to them, and their 
opinion of the coming election wouldn't be worth a straw. Dr. Glenn is 
a great man. 

The New York Herald's wits have been frozen solid iu the search 
for the North Pole, and this accounts for its ridiculous statement that 
130,000 San Franciscans signed a petition to the President for the release 
of a man known as the Truth-Seeker, now in prison. The people of this 
city would be glad enough to see a Truth Findei; but seekers after truth 
are common with us as strawberries all the year ; and, moreover, there 
are not 130,000 persons in this metropolis that know how to sign their 
names. 

The Boston wool market is without activity, and nothing is doing in 
the foreign article. Per contra, Southern wool has been inquired for in 
Kansas, and there is a lively movement from the Gulf States upward — 
mostly in medium unwashed. 



The Reverend Robert Ingersoll lias taken up the obituary business 
and while he is more diffuse than the great Childs, he can hardly be called 
more successful. On the whole, we prefer the sweet, soft verses of the 
Philadelphian : — 

Our little Josie's gone to Heaven, 

Wa3 called away at half-past seven. 
The Reverend Robert is more prolix, and one cannot with brief time read 
nim. Likewise, his rhetoric is cheap and tawdry, and because of endless 
yawning over it, one is like to faint away. It would be a noble deed to 
put him in a boat with Mr. Childs, and send them adrift to compose obit- 
uaries for each other. 

How they stand it in Europe nobody can guess, but here every- 
body is crying out for a rest from Sarah Bernhardt. We have had 
enough of her, and gay and alert as she is there is a unanimous feeling 
that Bomebody ought to snuff her out. She furnishes her living room 
with skulls, and she herself is a skeleton in body and at everybody's 
feast. Let some one pack her into the coffin, which stands ready in her 
closet, and we shall take up a contribution to reward him. It's a wonder 
that Abraham don't take her to himself, though perhaps she harps too 
much on that little affair with Hagar. 

The Darien Canal is done for, gone up, fizzled, flabbergasted, and 
whatever else is most significant of almighty smash. The Hastings De- 
bating Society has decided that it would be injurious to the commerce of 
the United States; and now there is no balm in Gilead, no money in Lon- 
don.no laborers in China, no nothing nowhere that can save it. De Les- 
seps name is Ichabod, and the Hastings Debating Society sit, meta- 
phorically, on the ruins they have made, and generations yet unborn are 
weeping; in point of fact, boo- booing. 

Mr. Tracy Turnerelli (his real name is Tupman), who devised the 
golden laurel wreath which has been refused by Lord Beaconsfield, is now 
trotting around the country offering the unlucky gift to every man he 
comes across. 'Tis ever thus ; the man and the meat are thousands of 
miles apart. And yet there should be enterprise enough left in California 
to forward the Emperor Norton by Wells, Fargo & Co. to London, and 
let Mr. Turnerelli crown him with the wreath of bays. 

One of those revenges of nature, which come from time to time to 
show that the great mother does not sleep, is now brought to the knowl- 
edge of our citizens. The bay is covered with schools of smelts, im- 
mensely popular and public, and contrived a double debt to pay, by 
suggesting instantly the smells which possess the streets of San Fran 
cisco, and the schools we have been holding our noses over for eight 
months. The world is full of wonders. 

The bravest man of the century is a "Tulare Settler," who writes 
to the H. B. organ that he longs to see the " cowardly carcasses of Stan- 
ford, Crocker & Co. placed in the front rank of a motley brigade." Pity 
such heroism should be wasted. Could not the detectives hunt up this 
Achilles from the back office of the organ ? He would be simply priceless 
to keep chickens out of a flower-garden, or to slay in single combat the 
furious carpet-moth. 

What constitutes a wife? is the latest conundrum. We have 
received three hundred answers, varying in length from ten lines to ten 
pages, and shall publish them all in small doses between this and Christ- 
mas-time. Meanwhile, we offer an infallible test for rough and ready use. 
Until further inquiry you may safely assume that the woman a man neg- 
lects the most is his wife. 

They have a queer population in Vermont. A Dr. Stokes, who 
has spent a year in jail on a charge of malpractice, has just been tried 
and acquitted by a "jury of his peers," the paper says— meaning, no 
doubt, twelve doctors charged with malpractice. In Texas the horse- 
thieves let a man off if he promises not to do it again ; but Vermont 
rather betters this. 

There is great discontent among the Russians in London, and their 
noses are all out ot joint since the arrival of the Siamese Embassy. The 
Stroganoffs and Troubetskoia have no chance at all against such names 
as Chamua Laraibhaiy and H. E. Paya Bhashakarawnngae. Since these 
names were first published the flag has been at half-mast on the Russian 
Embassy. 

In a decidedly non-committal article in Wednesday's Bulletin, the 
public was warned that the fistic set-to at the Mechanics' Pavilion was 
likely to degenerate (or improve) into a prizefight. It is hard to say 
whether this was a wiley way of advertising the business or a reh'gious 
kick from the Deacon. We prefer the former solution. 

There is a young woman in Massachusetts dangerous to more than 
the peace of mind. She has been engaged, in succession, to three highly 
accomplished young men, and each of them, when the happy "Yes ! 
faltered from her lips, went away and drowned himself. Here is a chance 
for the champ'.on swimmer of America. 

Ex-Gov. Rice says that the most imposing buildings in Colorado are 
school-houses ; and they do seem to have imposed upon him. We have 
much the same opinion of our own school buildings ; but no imposition in 
that line is regarded as complete in San Francisco, if the Boards are left 
out. 

Mr. W. H. Mallock has a great deal to answer for. It is only two 
weeks since his new book, "Is Life Worth Living ?" reached this city, 
and on Thursday a Chinaman said he didn't think it was, and cut hi3 
throat. 

The Stock Report, when it looks at the history of England's recent 
wars, feels tempted to ask the British Lion : " Why don't you hit a fel- 
low of your size?" How can he, when the Report refuses to give h im a 
chance ? 

It must be some time since Mr. Gorham has looked into Dean Swift's 
works ; and yet his late chivalrous performance seems to be an effort of 
unconscious cerebration, working on the woful ballad of " Duke upon 
Duke." 

Mr. Willard, a prominent citizen of an Oregon town, was kicked by a 
horse last week and bad several ribs broken. Served him right ; he 
shouldn't be so prominent. 

A Connecticut paper declares that the hardest-working man in that 
State is an iron molder. Likely enough, for no Connecticut man ever 
was suspected of stealing. 



14: 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. AND 



July 26, 1879. 



C. P. R. R. 



Overland Ticket Office : Perry Landing, foot 
of Market street.— Commencing Monday, 
May 19th, 1879, and until further notice. 
Trains and Boats wil leave 

SAV FRANCISCO: 



7f\(\ A. M. (daily), Vallejo Steamer (from Market 
• vU Street Landing — Connecting with Trains for 
Napa (Stages for Sonoma), Calistoga (the Geysers), 
and Sacramento. Connecting at Davis (Sundays except- 
ed) for Woodland and Knight's Landing, and at Wood- 
land for Williams and Willows. 

(Arrive San Francisco 8:10 p.m.) 



7/w\ A.M. (daily) Local Passenger Train (via Oakland 
• Vf" Perry) and via Livermore arriving at Tracy 
at 11:30 a. M. and connecting with Atlantic Express. 
Connects at Niles with Train arriving at San Jose at 
10:15 a.m. . . 

(Returning, train from Tracy arrives at 6:05 p.m.) 

8 fin A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
.UU land Ferry, Northern Ry. and S. P. & T. R R.) 
for Sacramento, Marysville, Redding, Portland (Or.), 
Colfax, Reno (Virginia City), Palisade (Eureka), Ogden 
and Omaha. Connects at Gait with train arriving at 
lone at 3:40 P.M. . 

(Arrive San Francisco 5:15 p.m.) 

Sunday Excursion Tickets to San Pablo and Marti- 
nez at Reduced Sates. 



1 A Affc A - M - (daily) v ' a Oakland Ferry, Local Passea- 
J-l/.l/U ger Train to Haywards and Niles. 

(Arrive San Francisco 4:05 P.M.) 



3f\f\ P.M. (daily)San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
AJ\J land Ferry and Niles), stopping at all Way Sta- 
tions. Arrives at San Jose at 5:20 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 A.M.) 



3 A A PM - (daily) Northern Railway Passenger Train 
• U" (via Oakland Ferry) to San Pablo, Martinez 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a.m.) 



and Antioch. 



A AA P-M. (daily) Arizona Express Train (via Oak- 
TC.UU lan d Ferry, Northern Ry. and S. P. & T. R. R.) 
for Lathrop (and Stockton), Merced, Madera, Visalia, 
Sumner, Mojave, Newhall (San Buenaventura, and Santa 
Barbara), Los Angeles, "Santa Monica," Wilmington, 
Santa Ana (San Diego), Colton and Yuma (Colorado 
River Steamers), connecting direct with Daily Trains 
of the Southern Pacific Railroad of Arizona for Mari- 
copa (Daily Stages for Phcenix and Prescott), and for 
Casa Grande (182 miles east from Yuma), and end of 
Track (Daily Stages for Florence and Tucson). 

" Sleeping Cars " between Oakland, Los Angele3 and 
Yuma. 

(Arrive San Francisco 12:35 p.m.) 



4AA P. M. (Sundays excepted) Vallejo Steamer (from 
,\J\J Market Street Landing), connecting with trains 
for Calistoga, (the Geysers), Woodland, Knight's Land- 
ing and Sacramento ; and at Sacramento with Pas- 
senger Train, leaving at 9:35 p.m. for Truckee, Reno, 
Carson and Virginia. 
" Sleeping Cars " between Vallejo and Carson. 

(Arrive San Francisco 11:10 A.M.) 



4f\f\ P.M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
• VJW (from Wash'n St. Wharf), for Beniciaand Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River. 

(Arrive San Francisco 8:00 p.m.) 



4(\ f\ P. M. (daily), Through Third Class and Accom- 
• ^-/jr^ modation Train (via Oakland Ferry, North- 
ern Ry. and S. P. & T. R. R.) connecting at Lathrop 
with Train arriving at Los Angeles on second day at 
11:55 a.m. (Arrive San Francisco 9:05 a.m. 

4 0H P.M. (daily) Local Passenger Train (via Oak- 
• OV/ land Ferry) to Haywards, Niles and Liver- 
more^ (Arrive San Francisco 8:35 a.m.) 



K Of") P.M. (daily) Overland Emigrant Train (via 
*-**yj\-f Oakland Ferry and Northern Railway) to 
Ogden, Omaha and East. 

Public conveyance for Mills Seminary connects at Sem- 
nary Park Station with all trains, Sundays excepted. 



FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAINS 



From "SAW FRAMXISCO," Dally. 







< 


H 


TO 


a 


O 


OAKLAND. 


< 

< 


S 
fa 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


B0.10 


12.30 


7.00 


B7.00 


7.00 


1.00 


8.00 


B9.00 


7.30 


1.30 


9.00 


B10.00 


8.00 


2.00 


10.00 


P. M. 


8.30 


3.00 


11.00 


B5.00 


9.00 


3.30 


12.00 




9.30 


4.00 


P. M. 




10.00 


4.30 


1.30 




10.30 


5.00 


2.00 




11.00 


6.30 


"3.00 




11.30 


6.00 


4.00 




12.00 


6.30 


5.00 






7.00 


6.00 






8.10 


B*7.00 






9.20Ib*8.10 






10.301 *1030 






b11.45!b*1145 





SE5 



B6.10 
7.30 



10.30 
11.30 
P. M. 
12.30 
1.00 
3.30 
4.30 
5.30 
6.30 
7.00 
8.10 
9.20 
10.30 
Bll.45 



A. M. A. M. 

7.00 7.30 
10.00 8.30 
P. M. 9.30 

3.001 10.30 
11.30 
P. M. 

1.00 
3.00 
4.00 
6.00 
6.00 



*■■«« 



8.00 
10.00 
12.00 
p. M. 
1.30 
3.30 
4.30 
5.30 
B6.30 



To "SAIT FRANCISCO," Daily. 



2^ 



A. M. 

B5.40 

B6.30 
8.00 
10.00 
12.00 

P. M. 
1.30 
3.30 
4.30 
5.30 

B6.30 



Si 

s s 

m 

a 



10.30 
11.30 
p. M. 
1.00 
3.00 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 



A. M. 

7.00 
8.00 






A. M. 

Change Cars 7. 10 

at I 

WestOaklnd.j 



a. m. | A. M. 
B5.10J B8.00 
B 5.50 BlO.OO 

6.40|b11.00 

7.40| p. M. 

8.401 B6.00 

9.40 
10.40 ; 
11.40! 
P. M. 
12.40 

1.25 

2.40 

4.40 

5.40 

6.40 

7.50 

9.00 
10.10 



A. M. 

B*5.00 

B*5.40 

*0.25 

7.00 

8.03 

9.00 

10.03 

11.03 

12,00 

p. M. 

1.00 

3.00 

"3.20 

4.00 

6.00 

6.03 

B*7.20 

B"8.30 

♦10.00 



OAKLAND. 
(Broadway.) 



A. M. 
B5.20 
B6.00 
6.50 
7.20 
7.50 
8.25 
8.50 
9.20 
9.50 
10.20 
10.50 
11.20 
11.50 



P. M. 

12.20 
12 50 
1.20 
1.50 
2.50 
3, 

3.50 
4.20 
4.50 
5.20 
5.50 
6.25 
6.50 
8.00 
9.10 
10.20 



b— Sundays excepted. 
♦Alameda Passengers change cars at Oakland. 



Creek Route. 

From SAN FRANCISCO— Daily— b5:40, b6:30, 7.20,8:15, 
9:15, 10:15, 11:15 A.M. 12:15, 1:16, 2:25, 3:15, 4:15, 
5:15,6.15 P.M. 

From OAKLAND— Daily— B5:'d0 s b6:20, 7:10, 8:05, 9:05, 
10:05, 11:05 A. M. 12:05, 1:05, 2:15, 3:05, 4:05, 5:05 ; 
6:05 p.m. b— Sundays excepted. 



"Official Schedule Time" furnished by Randolph & 
Co., Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt, 
A. N. Towne, General Superintendent. 




Commencing; Monday, June 3d, 1879. 
and until further notice, Boats and Trains will 
leave San Francisco as follows : 



7 1 A a.m., from San Quentin Ferry, daily (Sundays 
• J-*-' excepted), connecting at San Rafael with 
Mail and Express Train for Petaluma, Santa Rosa, 
Healdsburg, Cloverdale and way stations. Making stage 
connections at Geyserville for Skaggs' Springs ; Clover- 
dale for Ukiah, Lakeport, Mendocino City, Highland 
and Bartlett Springs, Soda Bayand the Geysers; connec- 
tion made at Fulton for Korbel's, Guerneville and the 
Redwoods. Returning, arrive in San Francisco at 6:25 
p.m. Passengers going by this train will arrive at the 
Geysers at 2 p.m. 



3 0(~fc p. m. daily (Sundays excepted), Steamer 
• ^-'^-' "James M. Donahue" (Washington Street 
Wharf) , connecting with Mail and Express Train at Don- 
ahue for Petaluma, Santa Rosa, Healdsburg, Cloverdale, 
and way stations. Making stage connections at Lske- 
ville for Sonoma. Returning, arrive in San Francisco 
at 10:10 a.m. 



Sunday Excursions at Seduced Bates . 



8~| K a.m., Sundays only, ,via San Quentin Ferry 
• A tl and San Rafael, for Cloverdale and Way Sta- 
tions. Returning, arrive in San Francisco at 7:55 p.m. 
Fares for Round Trip: Petaluma, §1.50; Santa Rosa, §2.00; 
Healdsburg, S3 00; Cloverdale, §4.50; Fulton, §2.50; La- 
guna, §3.00; Furestville, §3.50; Korbel's, §3.75; Guerne- 
ville, §4. 



Freigrht received at Washington st. Wharf 
from 7 a.m. till 2.30 p. m., daily (except 
Sundays) . 



A. A, Bean, A. Hughes, Jas. M. Donahue, 

Sup't. Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

[June 7.] 



NORTH PACIFIC COAST RAILROAD. 

SVMMEK ARRANGEMENT. 



In Effect from Sunday, June 8th, 1879, 

Between San Francisco and San Rafael . 



Save Between San Francisco and San JZafaeZ 
KEDTJCEB TO 25 CENTS. 



WEEK DATS. 



Leave San Frasciscq : 
7:10 a.m. via San Q'ntin F. 
9:20 a.m. " 

1:45 p.m. " ** " 

4:45 p.m. " " " 

6:45 p.m. " Saucelito " 



Leave San Rafael : 
7:00 a.m. via Saucelito Fy. 
8:00 a.m. " S. Quentin " 
11:00 AM, " " " 

3:20 p.m. " " " 

3:50 P.M. " Saucelito " 
5:20 P.M. " S. Quentin " 



SUNDAYS. 



Leave San Francisco: 
8:00 a M. via Saucelito Fy. 
8:15 a.m. viaS. Quentin " 
10:15 A.M. '• " "■ 

12:50 r M. " " " 

3:45 P.M. " " " 

6:00p.M." 'I " 



Leave San Rafael: 
8:50 a.m. viaS. Quentin 1 
11:30 a.m. " " .* 

2:15 P.M. " " * 

4:30 P.M. " - " ' 

6:50 P.M. " " * 



Q A_P\ a. M. daily, except Sundays, from Saucelito 
u * - tt -' Ferry, Market street, for all points between 
Saucelito and Junction. Returning, leaves Junction 
4:00 P. M., arrives S. F. (via Saucelito) 5:40 P. M. 

9 0Al». daily, except Sundays, from San Quen- 
•«V/ tin Ferry, Market street, for all points be- 
tween San Francisco and Olema. Returning, leaves' 
Olema 1:55 P. M., arrives S. F. (via Saucelito) 5:40 p. M. ' 



1A £^P. M. daily, except Sundays, from San Quentin 
.tfc«-> Ferry, Market Street, THROUGH TRAIN 
for DUNCAN MILLS and Way Stations. Returning, 
train leaves DUNCAN MILLS 6:40 a. M., arriving in S. 
F. 12:05 p. m. 

Sunday Excursions at Reduced Bates. 

8:00 A.M., from Saucelito Ferry, Market street, 
8:15 A.M., from San Quentin Ferry, Market street, 
for DUNCAN MILLS and RETURN. Fares for Round 
Trip— Olema, §2; Tomales, §3; Duncan Mills, §4. 

Above train, returning, arrives in Sau Francisco via 
San Quentin 7:55 p.m., or via Saucelito 8:10 p.m. 

W. R. PRICE, Gen'l Ticket Agent. 

Jno. W. Dohertv, Gen'l Manager. Jun 7. 




jMouimenciiigr Monday, April 31, 1879, 

\j and until further notice. Passenger Trains will leave 
San Francisco, from Passenger Depot on Townsend 
street, between Third and Fourth streets, as follows : 



8f)f| a.m. daily for San Jose and Way Stations. 
• ^iw [^g= Stages for Pescadero (via San Mateo) 
connect with this train only. 



90 f\ a.m (Sundays only) for San Jose and Way Sta- 
• " ^ tions. Returning, leaves San Jose at 6 p.m. 



~l (\ Af\ A - M - daily for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, 
JLVAtfcV-/ Tres Pinos, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and 
all Way Stations, gsf^ At Pajaro, the Santa Cruz 
R. R. connects with this train for Aptos, Soquel and 
Santa Cruz, ga^ At Salinas the M. & S. "V; R. R. 
connects with this train for Monterey. g3^"" Stage 
connections made with this train. (Peseadero Stages via 
San Mateo excepted.) 

Parlor Car attached to this Train. 
(seats at reduced rates.) 



3 0H p.m. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose, 
• t> VJ Gilroy, Pajaro, Hollister, Tres Pinos and prin- 
cipal Way Sjtations. 

ggr"" On Saturdays only, the Santa Cruz R. R. will 
connect with this train at Pajaro for Aptos, Soquel and • 
Santa Cruz. Returning, leave Santa Cruz at 4.45 a.m. 
Mondays (breakfast at Gilroy) , arriving in San Francisco 
at 10:00 A.M. 

t^= SPECIAL NOTICE. -On SATURDAYS ONLY, 
the run of this train will be extended to SALINAS— 
connecting with the M. & S. V. R. R. for MONTEREY. 
Returning, leave Monterey MONDAYS (breakfast at 
Gilroy), arriving in San Francisco at 10 a.m. 



30 (~\ p.m. (Sundays only) for San Jose and Way Sta- 
*OV tions. 

4 9 PL p.m. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose and 
*AfJ way Stations. 



fT AAp,h. daily (Sundays excepted) for Menlo Park 
0,\J\J ari d Way Stations. 



6.30 



p.m.— daily, for Menlo Park and Way Stations. 



Excursion Tickets at Reduced Rates 



To San Jose and intermediate points sold on Saturdays, 
and Sunday mornings, good for return until following 
Monday inclusive. 

Also, EXCURSION TICKETS to Aptos, Soquel, Santa 
Cruz and Monterey, sold on Saturdays only— good for 
return until the following Monday inclusive. 

JTW* Principal Ticket Office— Passenger Depot, Town- 
send street. Uranch Ticket Office— No. 2 New Mont- ' 
gomery street, Palace Hotel. 

A. C. BASSETT, Supt. H. R. JUDAH, A. P. & T. A. 



SOUTHERN DIVISIONS. 

Commencing" Monday, May 19th, 1879, 
83P~ Passengers for points on the Southern Divisions 
of the road will take the cars of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 4:00 p.m. daily (Arizona Ex- 
press Train) , and making close connection at GOSHEN 
for Sumner, Mojave, Los Angeles, Wilmington, Ana- 
heim, Colton, Colorado River, Yuma, Maricopa and Casa 
Grande (182 miles east from Yuma). May 31. 



July 26, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



NOTABILIA. 




THE PEDDLERS SONG. 

Lawn as white as driven snow ; Gold quoips and stomachers, 

Cypress black as e'er was crow ; For my lads to give their dears ; 

Gloves as sweet as damask roses; Pins and poking-sticks of steel, 

llasks for faces and for noses ; "What maids lack from head to heel: 

Bugle-bracelet, necklace, amber ; Come buy of me.come; come buy .come buy, 

Perfume for a lady's chamber; Buy, lads, or elBe your lasses cry. 

William Shakspeare. 



The honeymoon is always spoken of 
which one looks forward with hope and on 
gretful glance as the years carry him away, 
treals at Swain's, 213 Sutter street, has a 
fort and serene pleasure, unmarred by a sin 
before him with each day that dawns, and 
pictures of the perfect dinners and lunches 
the year are honeymoons at Swain's. 



as the golden time of life, to 
which a man turns back a re- 
Yet the man who takes his 
perpetual honeymoon of com- 
gle cloud. Hope is perpetually 
retrospect has none but joyful 
he has made. All months of 



Men are ready to do anything to keep off the ravages of age, and se- 
cure to themselves something of the vigor of youth, while they descend 
the hill so quickly. They go to this Doctor and that, they take one tonic 
after another, and yet the very essence of youthful vigor and elasticity 
is within their reach in F. & P. J. Cassin's Golden Plantation Whisky. 
Properly taken, as a gentleman should take everything, it will keep up 
strength and vivacity to the last moment. 

That was a peculiarly "set" conductor who refused to permit a 
gentleman to get his children aboard the horse-car ; the conductor's objec- 
tion being that he was putting on heirs. 

Dr. Carver has been making the Britishers open their eyes ; and it is 
reported that the fragments of glass from the shattered balls are made 
into jewels and worn by the aristocracy, amid the envious murmurs of 
applause from less fortunate persons, braasher would have been a better 
name for him than Carver ; and, like him, Montanya's Union Range 
smashes all others, and carves the life out of them. The best cooking ap- 
paratus ever known or seen or dreamed of. 



A clear complexion and a healthy skin can never be obtained 
while the pores of the skin are obstructed or the blood is in an impure 
condition. Dr. Jayne's Alterative will, however, restore the purity of 
the skin, and will thoroughly dense the blood. It will also remove the 
obstinate state of the pores, and free the perspiration from all impurities 
and gross particles. A trial will establish its efficacy. Sold by Crane & 
Brigham, San Francisco. 



Everyone is enchanted with the grand publication "At the Play." 
The crowds gathered at every window where it is exposed are as full of 
interest as they can be, recognizing with delight every face of the beauti- 
ful, the great and the famous among our people. Only one improvement 
has been suggested : that the hats, all from White's, 604 Commercial 
street, should be shown, to let us see a fitting finish to so many stately 
heads. 

The Zulu evening toilet consists of a fan and a ring in the nose. — 
Excltange. What extravagance ! They should be satisfied with the fan 
in the nose, and give the ring to the poor. 

The political pot boils, and the noise of its boiling is heard all over 
the land, and people run to the front door to know what is the matter, the 
air is so full of a humming sound. No one knows the meaning of all the 
stir, and the strength of the men at the business unless he has seen their 
likenesses at Bradley & Rulof son's, the place for perfect pictures and the 
headquarters of photographic art. 

McNally & Hawkins are the oldest, best known, most popular of all 
the gas fitters and plumbers in the city. Established for more than a 
generation, they have given their skill and taste to the fitting up of the 
finest residences, and their Btock of bronze, nickel and gold-plated, 
antique, steel finished and burnished copper gas-jets, candelabra and 
fittings of all kinds for gas and water is new and splendid. 

Lost at sea— The sight of land. 



The reason why Joseph Cook was so speedily cooked in this com- 
munity is that our people are clear-headed, cool, intelligent and wide- 
awake, as all men are who use Napa Soda. No cobwebs, no metaphysical 
conumdrums, no balderdash can impose upon minds kept sound and 
clear by this fine beverage. 



While claret is the true wine for dinner tables, the steady-goer, the 
blond-nourieher, there is n.» such beverage for the breakfast as a genuine 
white win*. The popularity of the Rhine wines comes from this ; and 
the Rhine wine <»f the Pacific Coast is the Gerke, from Landsberger's. 
Even on the storied river the fame of this exquisite California vintage is 
well known and ratified by general consent. 



The saddest reflection at the end of a day is that we have lost it- 
have done nothing good, learned nothing ; and all must rejoice when they 
see an opportunity like that offered by Charles R. Peters, at the head of 
the Nevada Building Association, Virginia City. It has but 100,000 
shares. 

Tapestry Brussels, SI per yard and upwards ; fine newpatterns. Call 
and see them. Window shades, 75 cents and upwards. Window lace, 12£ 
cents and upwards. Cornices, wall paper, etc. Oilcloths, 50 cents per 
yard and upwards. Hartsho rn & McPhun, 112 Fourth St., near Mission. 

STOCK COMBINATIONS. 



June 21.] 



How to Operate Successfully on 
TEN DOLLARS. 

MAHTIN TAYXOR & CO., 

429 California Street. 



Geo. C. Hickox. 



GEORGE C. HICKOX & CO., 



E. C. McFarlanb. 



Clommlssion Stock Brokers (San Francisco 
1 change, No. 230 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



Stock Ex- 
May 4. 



J. A. RUDKIN, 



Member S. F. Stock and Exchange Board, 423 California 
street. STOCKS Bought and Sold on Commission. Liberal Advances 
made n Active Accounts. Oct. 2ti. 

FOR SALE-SUNNYSIDE RESIDENCE. 

I have concluded to sell ray Homestead, located in the 
pleasant town of Placerville, El Dorado County, known as the SUNNYSIDE 
RANCH ; forty-five aires of land, orchard of the choicest fruits, house two stories, 
brick cellar, splendid well of water, windmill, in fact every convenience for a country 
home ; 2,000 feet above tide water. Placerville is one of the most pleasant and 
healthful localities in California ; first-class schools, churches and good society. To 
be sold at a bargain. For terms address C. B. BROWN, Placerville, or F. A. BEE, 
620 Eddy street, San Francisco. June 21. 



D. F. Hutcuinos. 



D. M. Donne. 

PHCENIX OIL WORKS. 



J. Sandersoh 



Established 1850.— Hatchings & Co., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH, 

Stationers, Lithographers and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

Our facilities for making Blank Boohs of special sizes and 
rulings, Check Books, Balance Sheets, Certificates of Stock, Insurance Policies, 
etc., are unexcelled. We are always ready to submit to our customers low estimates 
for Fine Printing or Engraving. 
Nov. l(t. 327, 329, 331 SANSOME STREET. 



MME. B. ZEITSKA'S 

French, German and English Institute, Day and Boarding 
School, for Young Ladies, 922 Post street, between Hyde and Larkin. KIN- 
DERGARTEN connected with the Institute. 
Oct. 26. MME. B. ZEITSKA, Principal. 

CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY, 

Manufacturers of the Standard Syrup, a superior article 
put up in barrels expressly for home consumption. Also. Extra Heavy Syrup 
in harrels for Export. Refined Sugars at lowest market rates. Office, 215 Front 
street, up stairs Dec. 21. 

HIBERNIA BREWERY, 

Howard Street, Between Eighth and Ninth. 
Dec. 7.] M. SVXAX, Proprietor. 

Henry B , Williams. Henry B. Williams. 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

No. 218 California at., S. F. [July 27- 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Reduction in Price: Wholesale Price, 5a cents per barrel; 
Retail Price, <i0 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 

TABER, HARKER & CO., 

IMPORTERS JLXD WHOLESALE OROCERS, 
10$ mill HO California, St., S. F. 

(April li>. J 

JOHN JENNINGS 

Hooper's South End Warehouses, corner Japan and Town- 
send streets. San Francisco. First-class Fire-Pivot Brick Buildinc, capacity 
10.U00 tons. Goods taken from the Duck and the Cars of the C. P. K. K and S P. 
R. R. free of charge. Storage at Current Rates. Advances and Insurance Effected. 



NOTICE. 

For the very best photographs tso to Bradley dt Rulofson's, 
in an Elevator, 4?y Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 

Smith's Music Store, 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 26, 1879. 



THE RESOURCES OP CALIFORNIA. 
We cannot convey a better or more accurate impression of the great 
resources of our State than by the following tables, which will spealc for 
themselves: Statement of the amount of the Precious Metals produced 
in the States and Territories west of the Missouri River, for the six months 
from January 1st to June 30tb, 1879 : 



States 
and Territories. 


Gold Dust aud 

Bullion, 
by Express. 


Silver Bullion, 

by 

Express. 


Ores and Base 

Bullion, 

by Freight. 


Total of Gold, 

Silver, and 

Lead. 




37,680,675 

55,916 

284,170 

27,479 

312,715 

841,000 

201,302 

1,260,000 

41,500 

98,130 

1,050,000 


S385.017 
9,189.344 


8350,000 
3,125,000 


§8,415,692 




12,370,260 




2S4.170 


Washington 






27,479 
606,932 


184,217 
640,000 
1,169,361 
725,000 
165,000 
361,866 


110,000 

550,000 

1,510,000 

4,000,000 

20,000 

450,000 




2,031,000 


Utah 


2,880,663 




5,985,000 




226,500 
909,996 




1,050,000 












811,852,887 


812,819,805 


$10,115,000 


834,787,692 



Production of Gold and Silver in the United States west 
souri River: 

Year. Gold. Silver. 

1870 $33,750,000 S17.320.000 

1871 34,39S,000 19,286,000 

1872 38,177,395 19,924,429 

1873 39,206.558 27,483,302 

1874 38,466,488 29,699,122 

1875 39,968,194 31,635,239 

1876 42,888,935 39,292,924 

1877 44,880,223 45,846,109 

1878 37.576,030 37,24S,137 

1879 (Jan. to 3 une) .... 15,000,000 17,000,000 

Exports of Flour, Wheat, Barley and oats by sea from San 
Tear. Flour, bbls. Wheat, clU. Barley, ctls. 
1874 535,695 



1875 497,163 

1876 508.143 

1877 434,684 

1878 489,642 



8.054,670 
7,505,329 
9,967,941 
4,931,437 
8,062.287 



222,596 
126,188 
351,897 
90,330 
303,969 



of the Mis- 

Total. 

$51,070,000 

53,684,000 

58,101,824 

66,689,860 

68,165,610 

71,603,433 

82,179,856 

90,726.332 

74,824,167 

32,000,000 

Francisco : 

Oats, ctls. 

78,354 

5,377 

3,721 

4,544 

31,927 



PRODUCTION OF CALIFORNIA WOOL. 



Year. Pounds. 

1854 175,000 

1855 390,000 

1856 600,000 

1857 1,100,000 

1858 1,428,351 

1859 2,378,250 

1860 3,055,325 

1861 3,721,998 

1862 5,990,300 

1863 6,268,480 

1864 7,923,670 

1865 8,949,931 

1866 8.532,047 



Year. Pounds. 

1867 10,288,600 

1868 14,232,657 

1869 15,413,970 

1870 20,072,660 

1871 22,187,188 

1872 24,255,468 

1873 32,155,169 

1874 39,356,781 

1875 43,532,223 

1876 56,550,970 

1877 53,110,742 

1878 41,862,061 

1879 (January to July). . ..20,651,039 



The total production of wool in California from January 1, 1854, till 
June 30, 1879, a period of fifteen and a half years, amounted therefore to 
444,092,880 pounds. 

The production of California Wines during 1877 and 1878 was as follows . 
Year. Bay. 

1877 2,208,138 gallons 

1878 2,891,156 gallons 

Increase in 1878—646,483 gallons. 

PRODUCTION OF Ci 

Year. Bay. 

1877 108,770 gallons 

1878 97,404 gallons 

Decrease in 1878 — 22,552 gallons. 

IMPORTS OF SUGAR 

1876. 
Pounds. 

Manila 33,629,083 

Hawaiian 21,171,133 

Batavian 2,795,430 

Central American 469,471 

China 9,252,716 

Mexican 365,033 

Peruvian 12,298 

East Indian 423,856 



Coast. 


Total. 


128,515 gallons 


2,336,653 gallons. 


91,980 gallons 


2,983,136 gallons. 


LIFORNTA BRANDT. 




Coast. 


Total. 


17,554 gallons 


126,324 gallons. 


6,368 gallons 


103,772 gallons. 


AT SAN FRANCISCO 




1877. 


1878. 


Pounds. 


Pounds. 


16,974.792 


40,889,094 


21,168,680 


36,357,664 


7,573,347 


6,584,255 


901.371 


4,823,450 


7,357,619 


1,640,320 


240 




37,979 


1,395,935 


3,655,285 


322,924 



Totals 68,118,930 57,669,313 92,023,642 

The following were the exports of Sugar by sea from San Francisco : 
1876. 1877. 1878. 

Pounds. Pounds. Pouvds. 



China 12,304 

Japan 57,653 

Mexico 60,917 

British Columbia 581,001 

Other countries 1,997,106 



Totals 2,708,981 



460,842 

57,744 

255,271 

1,470,301 

216,617 

2,460,775 



Year. Flasks. 

1865 42,469 

1868 44,506 

1871 15,205 

1872 13,089 



EXPORTS OF QUICKSILVER. 



Av. Price. 
55c 
55c 



1873. 



Year. Flasks. 

1874 6,770 

1875 28,960 

1876 41,140 

1877 46,280 



6,359 90c@$1.10 1878 34,280 



8,826 

38,593 

104,622 

1,483,217 

345,860 

1,981,118 

Av. Price. 

$1.10@1.50 

$1.50@1.65 

70@45@55c 

45c 

45@39c 



The total production of Quicksilver in 1877 was 69,886 flasks, and in 
1878, it was 62,192 flasks, so that the home consumption is less than the 
amount exported. China and Mexico are our two principal customers — 
the former taking about two-thirds of the whole export. 

RECEIPTS OF NATIVE AND FOREIGN COAL AT SAN FRANCISCO. 





Mount 


J Vancou- 


Austra- 




All other 




Year. 


Diablo. 


Seattle. ver. 


lian. 


English. 


Sources. 


Total. 




Tons. 


Tons. ! Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


1874 


206,2551 9,0271 51,017; 139,109 


37,8261 88,713i 531,947 


1875 


142,808 67,106 


61,072 136,869 


57,849 72,505 538,209 


1876 


108,078 95,314 


100,965 131,695 


121,948! 90,388 648,388 


1877. 


96,172 102,333 


102,421 100,513 


89,362 85,959| 576,760 


1878 


122,034 


116,008 


140,323 


131,678 


44,005 


72,685 


626,733 



IMPORTS OF COFFEE AT SAN FRANCISCO. 

From. 1876— Lbs. 1877— Lbs. 

Central America 8,426,320 14,983,650 

Manila 1,191.760 848,783 

Java 1,073,370 420,000 

Hawaii 106,800 144,582 

Eio 87,220 258,991 

Other Countries 58,441 23,446 

10,943,911 16,679,452 

IMPORTS OF TEA AT SAN FRANCISCO. 



1878— 7.6s. 

14,111,840 
587,305 
516,588 
118,100 
380,158 
9,250 

15,723,241 



Year. China, 

1873 4,104,972 

1874 2,828,570 

1875 1,881,651 

1876 1,095,800 

1877 4,721,858 

1878 3,249,082 



Total, lbs. 

12,536,776 

13,214,901 

19,872,229 

18,652,036 

18,229,116 

17,116,668 



Total Value. 
$4,805,687 
5,163,238 
7,010,294 
6,244,871. 
5,456,099 
4,533,094 



Japan 
8,431,804 
10,386,331 
17,990,578 
17,556,236 
13,507,258 
13,867,586 

The Imports of Rice were, in 1876, 54,215,426 lbs. ; in 1877, 42,543,698 
lbs. ; and in 1878, 48,726,566 lbs., more than ninety per cent, of which 
came from China. 

The Receipts of Lumber at San Francisco in 1878 amounted to 258,- 
814,052 feet, and the Exports to 14,596,422 feet. 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE AT SAN FRANCISCO. 

Year. Imports. Exports. Total. 

1876 $35,708,782 $31,314,782 $67,023,564 

1877 32,276,653 29,992,393 62,269,046 

1878 : 35,565,139 34,155,394 69,720,533 

The San Francisco Mint, organized in 1854, has turned out the following 
values in coinage from that time till the present: 

Gold $506,678,657 

Silver 64,005,925 



Total $570,684,582 

EXPORT TRADE OF SAN FRANCISCO FOR SIX MONTHS. 

The following table shows the export by sea of Merchandise during the 
six months ended June 30th, as compared with the same period in 1878: 

Months. 1879. 1878. 

January -. . . $2,072,496 $1,575,294 

February 2,186,511 2.260,725 

March 2,439,393 2,256,424 

April 2,591,464 1,924,863 

May 2,457,774 1,897,382 

June 2,852,940 1.511,730 



$14,600,578 $11,426,418 

In 1877 the exports for the first six months amounted to $14,782,120, and 

in the same period of 1876, $9,976,858. 

Of the $14,600,578, the exports to Great Britain amounted to $5,269,767; 

to New York, $2,839,340; to China, $1,632,783; to the Hawaiian Islands, 

$964,792; to Mexico, $629,719; to France, $547,618; to British Columbia, 

$499,710. 

MINING ASSESSMENTS DELINQUENT. 

No. of Assessments. Amount. 

January to July, 1879 275 $8,714,300 

January to July, 1878 237 7,848,300 



Increase in 1879 38 8866,000 

This amount in the first seven months of 1879 is a very large amount to 
levy in the present impoverished condition of the people of the Pacific 
States. 

REPORT OF THE CENTRAL PACIFIC RAILROAD FOR 1878. 

The gross earnings of the Company for 1878 were as follows : 

Passengers $5,284,914 

Freight 10,802,276 

Mails and Express 674,595 

Other sources 769,073 



$17,530,858 
The Working Expenses, including Taxes, etc., were 8,786,118 



Net Earnings $8,744,740 

Rental of Leased Lines $2,485,058 

Interest ' 3,954,779 

6,439,837 



Surplus $2,304,903 

Out of which an appropriation for the Sinking Fund will have to be 
made. The gross earnings of 1878 exceeded those of 1877 by $1,059,700, 
and the total expenses exceeded those of 1877 by $1,011,700. 
The principal assets on January 1, 1879, were : 

Cost of Railroad and Appurtenances $134,650,527 

Cost of Rolling Stock 7,956,113 

Real Estate and Buildings 2,843,041 

Other Items— in all 12,624,031 



Total $158,073,712 






July 26, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Xiw York, July 14, 187ft, 

The struggle for commercial ad%ain. im'i.t, f»r tcqojaitioi), U>r social 
ailmiratimi a&d favor and Um responding oonpauution, have too often 
recalled the aaj retrospect that Fraed invites in simple and touching 
word* : 

" Many the thoughts that go unheacd 
That deep in the bosom burn." 

Do you remember a letter I wrote yon some ten years since— partly 
private, otherwise referring to the Pacifio Mail and its prospective 
policy? You made an extract and printed it— some forty lines— under 
the beading of "An occasional correspondent from New York." The 
extract referred to the imjmrtance <>f Pacific Mail adopting a policy that 
would lead to a development of the Australian trade, by at once antici- 

Sating the future and securing against any other line the* large benefit to 
ow from the growth of that connection. As the State increased in pop- 
ulation, hence importance, the business controlled by the P. & O. Com- 
pany could l»e diverted into the Pacific States. 

^ Toe arbitrary course of the P. & O. Company would find its compensa- 
tion iu the loss of business as soon as the merchant could be satisfied with 
the stability of the new trans-Pacific line, and the traveling public 
assured that the comfort and security alike equal to the Cape of Qovd 
Bopcf could be enjoyed. 

That prediction of mine has been verified, and when read to some of the 
officers at the time from your paper, they laughed at it as the dream of a 
benevolent fanatic ! who wanted to use other people's money to confirm 
his conviction;?. 

The representatives of the entire trade circles— ship brokers, owners of 
vessels andmerchants— as I appeared " on 'Change" the day of the notice 
of the appointment by the Journal of Commerce saluted me as President 
Lesseps, took off their hats and laughed at the joke created by the " wit- 
tiest man upon the floor !" 

It is unnecessary to recite here the revolution in trade, etc., that canal 
has produced. 

I see by the papers that there is a disposition to hound Lesseps because 
he has the nerve to undertake what no one in this country will do, either 
by effort or subscription. 

Dexter A. Hawkins, a popular and able lawyer of this city, has been 
an earnest advocate, in tact is the originator, of the move for the adop- 
tion of educational laws by all the States, and by such means to increase 
the knowledge and power of a people who profess to govern their country 
by intelligence. 

Hawkins, with all of his foresight on this subject, which foresight indi- 
cates a preparation upon the part of the masses to prevent after his death, 
(and "long may he live"), the union of Church and State, or the suprem- 
acy of an^ particular faith, 

Hawkins evidently has not mixed much with our "prominent mer- 
chants," or he would give them a lecture tha,t might not savor of sympa- 
thy with the Monroe doctrine, but would teach these " trade princes " 
that the work to be undertaken by Lesseps will bring more satisfactory 
results to the future prosperity of our country than any development since 
we seceded from Great Britain. 

1 hope to see your natural astuteness in an editorial that will shew its 
harvest, like to the mustard seed, in advocating aid and support iu an 
undertaking toward which foreign capital will flow ; and while the inves- 
tor will obtain his satisfactory foreign interest, America will, our States 
and our people, enjoy the fruit which the distance of foreign countries 
cannot pluck. 

There is a good deal of "cuteness" in our country, but we are too 
young yet to understand the wisdom of age, or to reverence the knowledge 
that our inexperience and youthfulness as a nation naturally forbids our 
possessing. 

A Chicago man, whose lot and store is mortgaged for more than its 
value to an Eastern money-lender, will tell you that any expansion of 
this country or excessive growth of other cities can undermine the 
value of his property or diminish its future. 

With equal confidence and a surer future, you, as an old Californian, can 
tell your people, and those here who decry the merit of De Lesseps, that 
the glory of their commercial strength will only begin to shew its charac- 
ter when De Lesseps completes the Darien Canal. 

The whole subject, i. e. the direct and indirect benefit to your State and 
whole people, and the future acquisition of Mexico, which will follow the 
construction of the Darien Canal, is too exhaustive to take up in such an 
informal manner. 

I cannot believe, with your admiration for Friedlander, the Grain 
King— yes, Brain King of the cereal production and wealth of your coast 
— I say, I cannot but believe you will take up this subject and let Cali- 
fornia appear as the first State to advocate the construction of the canal. 

I may be quite young "to pit" my convictions against the wealth of 
our merchants, or the " finessing" or brains that have forced its accumu- 
lation, or even the underlying mental forces that daily ridicule such an 
enterprise, by refusing to keep it or calling upon political wire-pullers to 
insist upon a respect being paid to the Monroe doctrine. But I hope you 
will live to see the blunder bear its bad fruit, if any other policy except 
that of co operation or approval have its sway. 

I _ remember, as a boy, often riding or walking to the top of the hill 
behind the Presidio of San Francisco to see the sun set "in" and beyond 
the Pacific Ocean. I can remember the alternate bright and dull sky 
overhead all day, culminating in those scattered, fleecy clouds directly 
opposite to the Golden Gate, and as the sun went from sight of the eyes, 
the rays of the sun's reflection rested upon and gilded them. I fancied 
the picture then because I was young. I saw nothing in the phenomena 
to impress the mind. But I am satisfied now, to paraphrase Milton : 
"From whence a voice, 
From midst a golden cloud, thus mild was heard : 
' Servant of God, well done !' " 
Will be said as you look out upon the same scene of earlier years later on, 
and know that the Darien Canal is finished by Lesseps. 

Superintendent Mann says the standard of scholarship has been 
raised in the schools by the frequent examinations held. We should like 
the remark better if it were not near election-time; and, furthermore, not 
one of the scholars examined has shown any acquaintance with the great 
truth, discovered by Mr. Mann last winter, that parents are providen- 
tially of different sexes. Does he call this progress? 



NBVER MORE. 
O sweetness that can never more return! 

Thou art passed out of life and whither flown? 
The hard-pruned bough may heal, and sprout anew, 

And some light hearts may all too quickly learn 
To spare the brave and live without the true. 
But as some painter that yet seeks in vain 

The long-wooed color of his hungry eye, 
And dreams it woven on some foreign loom, 

To wake and find it missing 'neath his sky, 
So have we lost a glory to the tomb. 
Spring shall come round, and all her sounds be dear, 

And sweet her lips with all-ambrosial dew, 
The wooing sun shall set earth's heart astir, 

And she rejoice, and we have rapture too, 
But one hushed chord shall no more answer her. 
Out of life's sunny woof one thread is drawn, 

Death's face hath bleached for us her fairest dye; 
One flower that bloomed is fallen— later flower 

Will never shine as sweet against our sky, 
Fill this blank place, that fragrant scent restore. 
Ah, painter! take thy brush, for life is short, 

And use the colors left thee— they are fair — 
But carry still the hunger at thine heart 

For that which is not there. 
Henceforth upon thy pallette and my life 

One unfilled place lies bare. — The Spectator, 

MARINE INTELLIGENCE. 



ARRIVALS AND CLEARANCES AT THE PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO, FOR 
THE WEEK ENDING JULY 25, 1879. 

ARRIVALS. 



DATE. 


VESSEL. 


MASTER. 


WHERE FROM. 


CONSIGNERS. 


J'ly 20 
.. 22 


St'r Newbern 


Metzg-er .... 
Blouchard . . 


Victoria 

Yokohama.... 


J. Bermingham. 
Williams, Blanchard & Co. 
A. Cheeaeborough, 


.. 22 





CLEARANCES. 



DATE 


VESSEL. 


MASTER. 


WHERE BOUND. 


BY WHOM CLEARED. 


J'ly 19 
.. 19 
.. 19 


St'r City of Panama. . . 
SLY City of Chester 


Connolly . . . 
McKee .... 
Humphreys. 
Marston .... 
Winding . . . 
Cook 


Victoria .... 

Honolulu 

Honolulu 

Queenstown . . 
Queenstown... 


Williams, Blanchard & Co. 
Williams, Blanchard & Co. 


.. 19 
. 19 
.. 22 


Bark Lady Lampson . . 
Bark Forest Q^ueeu .... 


Welch & Co. 

Williams, Blanchard & Co. 


.. 24 


Ship Warwick 


G. W. McNear. 



GEO. STREET, Agent News letter, 30 CornJMl, _E. C, Jjondon. 

IN CONSEQUENCE OF SPURIOUS IMITATIONS OF 

LEA. & PERRINS' SAUCE, which are calculated to deceive 
the public, Lea and Perrins have adopted A NEW LABEL, bearing- their sig- 
nature, " LEA & PERRINS," which is placed on every bottle of WORCESTERSHIRE 
SAUCE, and without which none is genuine. 

Ask for LEA & PERRINS' Sauce, and see name on wrapper, label, bottle and stop- 
per. Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & Blackwell, 
London, etc., etc., and by grocers and oilmen throughout the world. To be obtained of 
Nov. 16. MESSRS. CROSS & CO., San Francisco. 

ROWLAND'S 

MACASSAR OXL strengthens the Hair and prevents it falling off. The bottles 

have a glass stopper, and not a cork. 
KALYDOR beautifies the Complexion and eradicates Freckles, Tan, Prickly Heat, 

Eruptions, etc. 
ODONTO whitens the Teeth, prevents and arrests decay, and gives a pleasing 

fragrance to the breath. 
EUKONIA is a new and delicate toilet powder. 

Ask for ROWLAND'S articles, of 20, Hatton Garden, London, and avoid cheap 
imitations. Sold by Druggists, Bazaars, etc., all over the world. May 3. 

JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION. 

[ESTABLISHED 1820. J 
ri"Mie attention of Sportsmen Is invited to the following 

JL Ammunition, nf the best quality, now in general use throughout England, 
India and the Colonies : Joyce's Treble Waterproof and F 3 Quality Percussion 
Caps ; Chemically-prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wadding ; Joyce's Gas-Tight Car- 
tridges, for Pin-fire and Central-fire Breech-loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, for killing 
game at long distances, and every description of Sporting Ammunition. Sold by 
all gun-makers and dealei-s in gunpowder. 

FREDERICK JOYCE & CO., Patentees and Manufacturers, 
Sept. 28. 57 Upper Thames street, London. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 



F 



Inestaud Cheapest Meat-flavoring 

Dishes and Sauces. 



Stock for Soups. Made 

March 2. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTBS.CT OF MEAT 



[sa success and boon for which Nations should feel grate- 
ful. See " Medical Press," " Lancet," " British Medical Journal," etc. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

Caution— Genuine only with fac-simile oi Baron Xdeblg's 
Signature, in blue iuk, across Label. "Consumption in England increased ten- 
old in ten years." March 2. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EX T RACT OF MEAT. 

To be had of all Store-keepers, Grocers and Chemists. Sole 
Agents for the United States (wholesale only), C. David & Co., 43, Mark Lane, 
London, England. March 2. 

200 Post street is on the coruer of Dupont. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 26, 1879. 



THE PLAYGOER'S PIPE. 

BY G. EDWABDS. 

Ho ! Keeper of the boxes' keys, just list to me to-night; 

Come, pop me in where I may smoke, and quickly bring a light ; 

And mind that you conceal me well from managerial view ; 

Here's guerdon for thy trouble, slave— I'll pay for what you do. 

Thus spoke I to a harpy on the outlook for his fees ; 

Theatrical attendants, if you pay them., strive to please ; 

The rules and regulations they'll permit you to defy, 

And knowing this, I thought to have a whiff upon the sly. 

He took the bribe, he popped me in, but 'ere I struck a spark 

He asked a special favor—" Would I please to keep it dark?" 

Their rules, he said, were very strict— infringement might upset 

His manager, who never smoked, and pat him in a pet. 

Thus cautioning, he went away. The play at once began, 

But as it started, in there came to me a shrivel'd man ; 

His face was lean and wither'd, and his dress was black and tight. 

What was it made me shudder so? what filled me with affright? 

"It's very cold," I muttered, as my blood quite chilly ran. 

"D'ye think so?" was the answer bland of that same shrivel'd man ; 

" I don't feel cold " — and as he spoke a glow lit up his face — 

"Come, if your not unwilling, sir, I'll gladly taKe your place." 

We shifted seats, and then again I keenly scanned him o'er ; 

I saw that he was not so aged and wrinkled as before. 

His cheeks were round and ruddy, and his hair had changed its hue, 

And as I looked I felt quite sure 'twas some one that I knew. 

Instinctively I pressed two hands on what I thought my brow, 

And then I saw — oh ! horrid sight, methinks I see it now — 

That they were withered, shrunk, and lean — forget it ne'er I can — 

That he was me, that 1 was he— I was the shrivel'd man! 

To shout I tried, but found my voice was harsh, and cracked, and thin ; 

" You thief, give me my body !" — all he gave me was a grin. 

"Call louder if you like," he said ; "I neither care nor fear, 

3Tor 'mid this din that voice so thin no mortal well can hear." 

"Nice body this of yours," he said; "it fits me to a T ; 

The arms a trifle short, it's true, but that don't trouble me ; 

A front tooth loose — perhaps you find that spoils a pleasant chat — ■ 

Now, when you get your body back, pray don't say I did that." 

"Talking of arms, just let me ask you'll not throw mice about 

So wildly, they are fragile, and perchance you'll wear them out. 

Talking of teeth, just let me beg that mine you will not grind; 

We have no dentists down below — in surgery we're behind. 

"And now, perhaps, you'd like to know what 'twas that brought me here ; 

Well, give me close attention and you very soon shall hear : 

A smoker all my life, I loved tobacco or cigar — 

Virginia, Birds-Eye, Golden-Leaf, beat all the joys there, are. 

"'Ere I was ten I used to smoke — at school I learnt the trick — 

Sometimes it castigation brought, sometimes it made me sick ; 

Yet toffee, apples, sugar-plums, nor jam had charms for me 

Like those of surreptitious pipe — I weary you, I see. 

"No? Shall I, then, recount its joys? Would you through life have pax? 

Would you avoid half human ills? Forget jour income tax? 

Of toothache be oblivious? or grim poverty despise? 

Find quick relief for any grief ? Try 'bacca — you'll be wise. 

" Ten pipes a day on earth I smoked ; now, by a hated law, 

For twice five years I have not had a single blessed draw ! 

Doion there to smoke is not allowed, unless the smoker first 

Puts on a body — curse the rule, I'd break it if I durst ! 

"Quite recently we have resolved that smoking ghosts, who get 

Permission from their owners, may — now, pray don't fume or fret — 

Put on their bodies for a time — of course, they're only lent" — 

" You fiend !" I cried, " you know right well you ne'er had my consent." 

" It's vulgar to call names, my frienrl," the smoker quick replied ; 

" If I, like you, were angry, I should tell you that you lied ! 

You must remember, surely — I'll not overstate the case — 

You gave consent most willingly for me to take your place." 

And as the fiend thus rambled on, my anger higher rose; 

I clenched his fist, I felt inclined to strike hiin on the nose. 

Proverbial wisdom stayed my hand — discretion, we define 

The better part of valor, and / knew that nose was mine ! 

Just then, in tones familiar, came the words, "Good-bye; best thanks; 

For you I would do, if I could, as much. Excuse my pranks !" 

I wa3 alone. The ghost had gone through roof, or floor, or crack ; 

I cared not how; 'twas joy to know I'd got my body back. 

Next morn a summons I received ; was brought before the beak, 

Who heard my story, smiled, and said that my defence was weak; 

And then remarked that if I would with ghostly folk hob-nob, 

I might expect to come to grief —he, fined me forty bob. 



RULES FOR ACQUIRING WEALTH. 
Be Hone3t. If Satan tempts you to defraud your neighbor, it is only 
that he may rob you of your ill-gotten gain in the end.— Be Temperate. 
Liquor has made more paupers than all other vices combined.— Be Indus- 
trious. Improve each day as if you expected to die on the morrow. In- 
dolence, Debt and Disease are brothers.— Let your word be your bond. 
Good credit is a fortune to begin with.— Limit your expenses by necessity 
and comfort, leaving a good margin for balance saved.— Invest your funds 
carefully and intelligently. Beware of the brilliant bubbles that are 
blown up to tempt ingenuons speculators.— Give your personal attention 
to your business. To do this keep brain and body healthful. 

A malicious scribe in Western Massachusetts declares that a Boston 
woman with a son in college, alarmed by some startling reports of the cold 
weather at Wilhamston the past winter, actually wrote to President 
Chadbourne to see if something couldn't be done about it. 

j Sterling Silverware.— A large assortment of elegant designs at Ran- 
dolph & Go. s, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco, California, fox 
the Week ending July 21st. 

Compiled from the Mec&rds of the Commercial Age?icy, 401 California St. , IS. F. 



Tuesday, July 15th. 



GRANTOR AND GBANTEE. 



C Peterson to S & L Soc'y 

S & L Soc'y to Michael Bogue 

Mury E Collins to Eugene Collins. 

Solomon Jacob to Sam'l Patek 

C A Hooper to Augusta W Ames. , 



DESCRIPTION. 



Lots 326 to 335, Gift Map 1 

Lots 3-26 to 334, Gi It Map 1 

Lol6,blkD,R R H'd 

S 0'Farrell,45:6eLarkin, e 23x90 

E Taylor, 103:6 b Jackson, b 3-1x137:6 ; 

e Taylor, 137:6 s Jackson, s 4x137:6.. 

W CLittle to same „ !E Taylor, 103:6 s Jackson. 6 34x137:6.. . 

E Battery. 60 s Jackson, s 30x67:6 ; nw 

Stevenson, 293 nc 4th, ne 15x70 

E Shotwell, 105 n 26th, n 25x115 

S 20th , 230 e Dolores, e 50x114 

Nw Was tui andLeavth, 137:6x137:6.... 
N Geary, 175 e Dupont, e 20x122:6; and 

e Fair Oaks, 61 n John, u 61x117.6... 

Same 

W Webster, 45:6 b Fulton, e 23x82:6.... 

S Hill, 330 w Valencia, w 25x100 

Sundry lots in various parte of city 

S Sacto, 137:6 w Scott, w 137:6x137:6. . . 
Nw Jessie, 436 sw 5th, sw 23x80; Be 

Mission, 140 no 7:h, ue 45x35; and bw 

Corbett and Capp, s 110x32:6 

Se Jessie, 297:6 sw4th, bw 22:9x70 

Por O L Bike 1018, 1047, 1046, 961, 962, 

1025 and 1020 

Sundry lots in P N and W A 

Sundry properties in various parts city 
Por L Blks 973, 964, 965 



J G Werlin to John Pforr . 

W W Thompson to D F Riordan . 

T H Hyatt to Lily L Ransom 

RS Baker to JH Wise 

P Tourqnet to Sophie Duchesne.. 

Sophie Duchesne to E E Tourquet 
H A Jones to Isabella M Jones . . . 
Tlios B Biahop to Albert Miller .. 
Sarah E Bourn to R Sherwood ..., 
N M Gordon to Eliza E Gordon . . 
J McMeuomy to Anne McMenomy 



Nellie T Malony to Mary Jones . . . 
Camillo Martin to La Soc Franc'e, 



Same to same.. 
Same to same., 
Same to same, 



$ 500 

1,375 

300 

5.000 

Gift 
Gilt 



500 
5 

1 
1 

Gift 

10 

23,000 

5 



Girt 
5,000 



"Wednesday, July 16th. 



C Wiley to AT Green 

R H Rogers lo S F Savs Union . . 
Conrad Bergbofer to Heury Saal . 

Marcus Hart to J P McGonigle. . . 

BMcNnltytoPA Fiuigan 

Pat'k Noonau to City and Co S F. 

A H Rutherford to A Weill 

City <fc Co S F to Jno Wright et al 
Jno Wright et al to City & Co S F. 
Peoples Hd Asen to Job Myrick ., 

Chas Foster to Murg Murphv 

Wm Ehlcrt to Elizabeth Ehlert... 
Win L Hopkins to J C Wagner.., 
T A Hopkins to Wm L Hopkins 

L B Maetick to Frank Otis 

Katie Whitney to Wm Bennett.. 
W R Sloan to Wm Sinon 



;Sw 24th and Vickslmrg, w 25x102:8.... 
Nw Miseioo, 320:6 sw 4th, sw 18:6x90.. 
[Sundry lots in various parts of city, 

i subject lo mortgage for $5,000 

SeFolBom and 22d, s 35x122:6 

Lotl,blk33. Excelsior H'd 

|E Polsoni, 325 n PrecitaPl, n 26x100 .. 
>N Pine, 81:3 w Buchanan, w 25x110.... 
Nw Sacramento and Polk, n 67:43^x53:3 

• Streets and highways 

Isnndry lots in People's Homestead ... 
jN Harry pi, 247: • e Laguna, e 27:6x80. . 

Nw De Boom, 100 ne 2d, ne 21x80 

[Sundry lots in Golden City Homestead. 

.Same,, 

[N Vallejo, 124:6 e Van Ness, c 25x122:6 
'S Clay, 165:6 w Powell, w 28x71:6... 
1 W Hyde, 71:6 s Filbert, s 33x137:6; and 
] other lots in same part of the city . . . 



I 5 
5 

10,100 
5,500 
350 
1,100 
5,000 

""i 

115 
510 
Gift 
300 
900 



Thursday, July 17th. 



R E Associates to Wm Hollis. ... 
S C Armstrong to M Greenwood . 
Nevada Bank to City Cab & T Co 
City Cab & T Co to F Margeston.. 
Pac R & Buln Ex to Selbv S & S Co 
City & Ca S F to Wm O'Brien.... 

Jean Encloses to J P Verges 

T B Valentine to A Oomtp, Jr 

Wm Mitchell to Cat.h Mitchell .... 
Sarah Baer to C Relnnke 



C Rehmke to J Spniauce .... 
Camillo Martin to Geo Hyde., 
Same to same , 



A Durand to La Soc Francaise ... 
S and L Soc'y to Elizih Cavanagh. 



S Clay, 187:6 c Leav'th, e 27:6x114 

S Washn, 239:6 w Maple, w 33:4, etc. .. 

Sundry lots in various parts of city 

Same 

Sundry lots in various parts of city.... 

S 23d, 25 e Columbia, e 25x105 

I W Dolores, 51:6 n 29th, u 2-1x100 

IE Steiner, 102:6 o Biwh, n 25x81:3 

IN Lombard, 137:6 eStockt'u, 27:6x137:6 
W Hizh st, 405:6 s Ocean House Road, 

I Be 00, sw 103:6, etc 

Same 

Por O D Blks 963, 96 1, 965 

For O L Blks 1048, 1047, 1046, 961,962, 

1025 and 1026 

|Sc Vallejo and Front, e 137:6x137:6.... 
IN Day, 80 e Church, c 50x114 



$2,750 
450 



500 

1 

Gift 

1,000 

300 

5 

5 

5 

700 



Friday, July 18th. 



T W Jackson to G B Bradford 

CH King to John Wolfe 

Tyler Beach to Frank Barnard 

Di^ea Todd to J M Bowers, 



Lot 8, blk 532, Bay View H'd , 

N Clay, 225 w Devisdo, w 27:6x137:6.., 

E Landers, 185 8 14lh, b 25x125 , 

Se TVuama, 150 ne 6th, ne 25x80. 



J Kittrrdge to Hyam Joseph |W Front, 20 s Wash'n, s 4-2x68:9 , 



Geo Grant to Bertha Goldstone.. 

I Wilson to C A Burgess 

A Pastcne to Henry Casanova . 



D Giovannini to M Lordan , 

A Lndemann to W Ludemann... 

J Humphrey to J Duhoney 

S F Sav Union to Oscar Fobs..., 
D J McCarthy to Owen McCabc. 



S Geary, 220 w Steiner, w 22x82:6 

S Ellis, 83:7>£ c Hyde, e27xS7:K 

Sw Tyler and Fillmore, w 137:6x137:6, 

subject to mortgage for $15,500 

N Army, 18) w Church, w 27x114 

Und # n O'Farrel! 74 w Lkin, 63:6x120 
S Brosnan, 185 e Guerrero, e 50x30..... 
Nw Mission, 320:6 sw 4lh, sw 18:6x90.. 
jLot 172, Precita Valley Lands 



$ 2T0 

6,000 

500 

3,000 

26,750 
4,000 
7,000 

2,000 
1,000 
6 
1.000 
5,000 
100 



Saturday, July 19th. 



T J Gallagher to M;iry Gallagher. . ;E Van Ness, 63:10 s Sutter, b 73:Sxl09 
JM Comerford to Mary E Brandt. N Duncan, 151 w Church, w 23:0x105 

Thos Magee to P F Dundon \W Scott, 77 3 Geary, s 33x96:6 „ 

Pat Meloy to Rose Meloy (Lot 4, blk 123, Mission V H; lot 47, blk 

I 50, City Land As'n 

A ParrotttoH McSherry jNe Greenwich and Octavia, e 100x38:9. 

A J McPhail to Eugene Moriarty.. S Waller, 131:3 w Webster, 25x120 .... 
Arthur Paul to Ida Precht ... ! Sqndry lots in various parts of city 



t 1 

1,700 
1,200 

500 
1,000 
1,000 
2,500 



Monday, July 21st. 



G W Friuk to J T Wayne.. 



Wm O'Brien to City and Co S F . 
Ricka Cole to Julie Loewe 



Rosa Haberer to same 

W H Culver to Mas Sav & L Bank 

A E Head to Bank ofCal 

Thos Farley to Hugh Farley... 
City and Co to Geo Barstow. . . . 



Rosb Avery to Laurence Cotter.. 



Se Pt Lobos ave and Henderson ave, b 
116;4#, c 25, etc 

Streets and highways 

Und l-60th n McAllister, 105 e Laguna, 
e 25x137:6 

Und H Bame 

N Jackson, 6S:6 e Mason, e 23, etc 

Ne Spear, 276 nw Harrison, 137:6x137:6 

Nw CheBtnut and Van NeeB, n 275x55.. 

Sw Bdway and Fiilmore, w 68:9x137:6 ; 
s Bdway, 6S:9 e Fillmore, e 68:9x137:6 

Lot 53, Gift Map 3 



$1,000 
1 



15,000 
1 



July 26, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA A= 



CRADLE, ALTAR, AND TOMB. 



CRADLE. 
Frmxi— In IhbcHjr. July list, to Ifaa wins i Polar Fustini, a daughter. 

Gray In Ihfa iity. Ju!\ loth, U) Um wife of II S. Cray, a daughter. 

sp In thla city, July 10th, to the » if. ol J. B. Ooldstone, n *ni. 
Jombkbu I" thta city. Jul? Hat, t-> the wife ol I*. Jofgvnaen, twin sons. 
In tlrs cttj , July 17th, to the wife i>f U, C, Mojree. « dkughtor. 
it>, July 2ist, to the wife • ( John McCarthy, .i son. 
In this oity . July 4th, to the wile "f the laic Harry llertOD, a son. 
In this city, July 16th, t<» the wife ol John Newell, a sun, 
July 13th. t" the wife ol J Pbbley, n son. 
twom. In thin nllj. Jnli 18th, totb« wif^of II. K Bunmons, a daughter. 
Scukubher— In thi* city, July JUst, to the wife ol L-mis W, Behroader, a son. 
TiEk.\ET -In this city, July nd, bo the wife "f p. Tierney, a daughter. 

ALTAR. 

Bi-R!(ETT-TRirp~ In Sacramento, July pub. Richard Burnett to Mrs. Louisa Tripp. 

Oi alt — In this city, July Slat, Wilson 8. Bander to Jennie E. OuaJt. 
BoDBOs-HABua—lu this city. July I8tb, Win a. Hudson to Elisabeth B. Harris. 

N"LF\-Maklin -In San Lorenzo, July 20th, M. J RolM to Josephine Marlin. 

■ kapmr In Sacranieuto, Julj 20tb, Warren A. Rouse to Carrie Grnbucr. 
Tiklwasn-m tck In Napa t'liy, July 17th, Henry Tieluuum to Susanna R. Suter. 
Vai oiis-Grkknleaj- — In \l eaverviUe, July 13th, W. Vaughn to Maria (.ircenleaf. 
White-McKail— In this city, July 10th, James White to Annie MeKail. y 

TOMB. 

Asperson -In this city, July *21st, Joban Anderson, aged 4ft years. 
Bovkr— In this city, July 23d, Grant K. Bovee, aged 15 years. 
BtrftiBR— In this city, July K3d, John Joseph Butler, aged 17 years. 
Cocoas — In this city, July 20th, Ann Coogan, aged 53 years. 
Carlin — In this city, July 19th, Mary D. Carlin, aged 32 years. 

In this city, July S3d, Mary P. Cook, aged 47 years and 9 months. 
DoraiiTT— In this city, July 10th Fannie B. Doughty, aged 45 years, 
pi nroit— hi tliis city, July 23d, Henry Dutton, aged 00 years and 3 months. 
VRIBMBf— In thin city, July I8tb, Michael Fitzhei.ry, aged 53 years. 
JOHNSTON— II this city, July 13th, Captain Henry W. Johnston. 
Keeller— In this city, July L'lst, Bridget Keeller, aged 34 years. 
Lot'Dos— In this city, July' 21st, Maud B. Loudon, aged 18 years and 3 months. 
Linfh in— In this city, July 22d, Dennis Linehan, aged C2 years. 
May — In this city, July 19th, George B. May, aged 39 years and 8 months. 
Mcl>o?«oGii— In tliis city, July -Hid, Catharine McDonogh, aged 45 years. 
Powell— In this city, July '23d, J. K Powell, aged 54 years. 
Si'llivas— In this city, July 17th, Kate Sullivan. 
Troy— In this city, July 22d, barah Ann Troy, aged 23 years. 
Taltv— In West Oakland, July 22d, Thomas P. Taity, aged 21 years. 

M. DE LESSEPS' CANAL. 

Vanity Fair, the well-known society paper of London, states the fol- 
lowing facts regarding the Panama Canal : It says that M. de Lesseps 
will within a short time issue proposals for a first subscription of £16,- 
000,000, and that the work, it is reckoned, will cost altogether £32,000,000 
sterling. The money, it thinks, will be forthcoming, because the Suez 
Canal shares, which were issued at £20, are now worth £30. The canal 
will follow the line of the railroad, the distance being a little over 45 
miles from sea to sea, that is, about half the length of the Suez Canal. 
The highest elevation is 295 feet, and M. de Lesseps intends cutting an 
open trench through this part about 300 feet deep and about four miles 
long. Vanity Fair says, among other advantages enumerated, that the 
canal will give a shorter route to China and Japan, and place within 
easier reach the great corn-growing districts of those Western States of 
North America which now find so much difficulty in transporting their 
grain. 

M. de Lesseps has, we are informed by telegraph, incorporated a com- 
pany, with a capital of 400,000,000 francs, or £lb",000,000, though in all 
probability this is an under-estimate of the total cost, regarding which 
exact calculations have not as yet been made. We would remark, how- 
ever, that the Panama Canal will not shorten the route to China, nor, we 
believe, to Japan, as the Suez Canal route has the advantage of shortness, 
and convenience in having so many ports of call both in Europe and 
Asia. As to bringing grain from the Western States of North America, 
which must mean the Pacific States, as California and Oregon are the 
only wheat-growing States that it can possibly affect, we do not place 
much importance on the canal. Expensive modes of transit may suit 
with tea, silk or indigo, articles of great value ; but wheat, worth from 
one cent to two cents per pound, must go by the very cheapest mode of 
transportation, and that, we believe, will continue to be by the clipper 
ship going round Cape Horn. The line of the route through the Suez 
Canal touches on countries with about two-thirds of the population of 
the world ; the line of the Panama Canal passes by a few paltry islands 
in the West Indies, and then to the west coast of South America or the 
Pacific States, or over the comparatively uninhabited Pacific Ocean to 
Australia. It has no field of business at all to bo compared with the Suez 
Canal. 

BUSINESS FAILURES. 
City of San Fiancisco : 
First Six Mouths. No. of Failures. Liabilities. Assets. 

1879 122 §3,918,964 82,438,271 

1878 116 1,';27,627 81,150,968 

Increase in 1879 6 82,091,337 81,287,303 

The State of California, outside of San Francisco : 

First Six Months. No. of Failures. Liabilities. Assets. 

1879 156 81,801,314 8912,029 

1878 139 1,343,607 863,942 

Increase in 1879 17 8457,707 948,087 

State of California, including San Francisco : 

First Six Months. No. of Failures. Liabilities* Assets. 

1879 278 85.720,278 83,350,300 

1878 255 3,171,233 • 2,014,911 

Increase in 1879 23 82,549,045 81,335.389 

It is evident from these figures that the improvement in business that 
has set in at the East has not yet extended to California. 

Cast your bread upon the waters, hut be careful how you throw 
lighted matches into the river when an oil pipe has burst. 



. ADVERTISER. 



21 



THE COSTA RICA RAILROAD. 

The Government of Costa Rica in engaged in constructing a line of 

railway from Port Linton, on the (tiilf side, to .'until Aivnus, on the 

Pacific, putting through San Joset, the capital city of the Republic. The 
line will be Completed in about eighteen months, and will form a strong 
opposition to the Panama Railroad. The finances of Costa Rica are in a 
healthy condition, its animal revenues bring upwards of 83,000,000, while 
the expenditures arc $1,800,000, and its credit abroad is considerably 
higher than that of most of the republics to the south of US. The most 
difficult portion of the road is already built, and in running order. There 
is A very profitable field in Costa Rita for the extension of California's 
commerce, and whoever takes time by the forelock will reap abundant 
profit. Already our imports of coffee from that country are of the first 
importance ; but there is every reason why our capitalists should invest 
Borne of their surplus cash in the coffee plantations, and realize the benefits 
of production as well as of importation. The Sandwich Islands invest- 
ments afford a good example of the wisdom of this theory. 



In Stanstead, Canada, a man sold ten-cent packages, "warranted 
sure death to potato-bugs; no risk of poisoning animals, as with Paris 
green." The packages were not to be opened until time to use them. One 
victim having three, opened one, and found two square blocks of wood, on 
one of which was written: "Place the bug on this block and press 
firmly with the other." 

BANKS. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital 85,000,000 

WW. ALVORD President. 

THOMAS BROWN, Cashier I B. MURRAY, Jr., AssH Cashier 
Agkkts : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacinc Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antweip, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Svdney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 



FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paiil up Capital $2,000,000, Golfl. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, Isaac Wormser, Edward Marthi, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents— London : Baring Bros. & Co. Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuuian&Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to cheek or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chiua and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.-— Capital paid up, 81,800,- 
000, with power to increase to §10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office- -2S Corn hill, London. Branches— Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subjectto Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered [lank. 

May IS. FREDERICK TOWNSKXP, Manager. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, 85,000,000.01 which 83,000.000 i» rally paid np as 
present capital. Reserve Fund, $360,000. San Francisco Office, 424 Califor- 
nia street ; Loudon office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ABTHUR SCRIVENER ; 
hShier, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, Bank of England and London Joint 
Stock Bank ; Now York, Drexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Bad- 
ness in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and all parts of the 
world. March 30. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid Tip $10,000,000. 

Reserve, V. S. Bonds 3,500,000. 

Agency at New York, 62 Wall street. 
Agency at Virginia . .Vcr. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers'" Credi ts. This Hank has pp. cial facilities for dealing in Bullion. Ju : v *>. 

^THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

DentscheSimruiid L,eihbnuk. So 526 Call fornin street. Sun 
Francisco Officers: President, L. G"TTUJ. Boakd of Dirvctors.— Fred. 
Reeding. Chas. Kohler, Dan. Meyer, Edw. Erase, O«orge H. Eggers, N. \ an Bergen, 
H L Simon, Claus Spreckels. Secretary, GEO. LETT E ; Attorney, JOHN K. 
JARBOE. . -"■'-'■ 1- - 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GlARASiTEE CAPITAL. 8300.000. 

Officers: President. John Parrott : Vice-President. Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, W. s. Jones . Attorney, Sidney \ Smith. Leans made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : Xo. H£ Sansonie s 

Francisco. 

Bradbury Pianos, 200 Post street Established 1854 



Oct. 14. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 26, 1879. 



A LOVERS QUESTION. 

A Utle mole is growing, John, And I will be disfigured, John, 

Just underneath my chin ; For life, I sadly fear. 

It gives me so much grief, dear John, And so I want to ask you, John, 
I'm growing pale and thin. Will e'er your love grow cold ? 

Another one is coming, John, Oh, answer me at one, dear John, 

Just here beneath my ear, Will you love me when I'm moled ? 

BOOK NOTICES. 

The Christ of the Apostles 1 Creed. The Voice of the Church against Arian- 
isra, Strauss and Renan, with an Appendix. "By Rev. W. A. Scott, JD.D., L.L.D. 
New York : A. D. F. Randolph & Co. 
In this volume the reverend author states, with great ability and fair- 
ness, the argument of the Orthodox Church for the received theories of 
the personality and the mission of Jesus. The Apostles' Creed, as Dr. 
Scott well puts it, is common to all believers in Christ; and the discourses 
here brought together illustrate with vividness and eloquence this immor- 
tal document. The scriptural learning displayed is wide and genuine, 
and the years have not diminished the venerable writer's force or dimmed 
his natural enthusiasm in the cause of his Savior. The appendix treats 
the aspect of modern thought on this vital subject with remarkable tem- 
perance and courtesy, and recognizes, with a robust intelligence, the ser- 
vice done to the deeper studies of criticism by the scholarship of Strauss 
and Itenan. It is no doubt by an oversight that Dr. Scott allows himself 
to say, on page 412, that the age of Augustus was the age of Josephus, 
Tacitus, Cicero, and Seneca: a collocation of names which cannot, by any 
permissible license, be brought within the Augustan age. 

The Fortnightly 's most noticeable articles for July are the " Simple 
Way out of the Indian Difficulty," " Modern Parliaments," " The Col- 
ored Man in Australia," '* Agricultural Prospects," and the leader on 
" Cardinal Newman." Mr. Lowe's cure for the financial troubles of In- 
dia is a paper currency, redeemable in gold; and he argues his case with 
great ingenuity. Prof. Pearson shows that the initiative in political 
thought has passed from within the parliaments of to-day to the public 
outside ; the chief function left to the legislature being the discussion of 
details which have been thought out and ratified elsewhere. The Colored 
Man in Australia is not the man and the brother, but our friend John 
Chinaman, and Mr. Wisker describes the measures adopted to exclude 
him from the Colonies, with a general approval of the feeling against him 
as, on the whole, an undesirable immigrant. One argument in answer to 
the claim of the Chinese for a place in Australia we do not remember to 
have seen before. "If," says Mr. Wisker, "China is crowded with peo- 
ple and must seek relief, why do not the Chinese found colonies of their 
own, instead of settling where they rouse a fierce hostility ?" The Earl 
of Airlie considers that the drift of the Agricultural changes and difficul- 
ties in England is towards measures to facilitate and cheapen the transfer 
of land; measures which he thinks would be advantageous to all classes. 
The book review|is chiefly concerned with Theophrastus Such and Mr. 
Kobert Browning's "Dramatic Idylls." The question of popularity has 
been already decided against both of these, the general public consenting 
to take George Eliot's psychology only when mixed in with a story ; and 
Theophrastus Such, like the knife-grinder, has no story to tell : while, at 
the same time, Browning's scorn for grace and beauty and perverse diving 
after unfishable pearls weary most readers. 

Pbactical Boat-Sailing: A Concise and Simple Treatise on the Management 
or Small Boats and Yachts under all Conditions, with Explanatory Chapters, 
etc,, supplemented by a Short Vocabulary of Nautical Terms. By Douglas 
Frazar, etc. Boston: Lee & Shepard. 1879. A. L. Bancroft & Co., San 
Francieco. 
This little volume is excellent. The language is direct and easily intel- 
ligible, and there is no waste of words. AH the essentials of boat man- 
agement are so treated that the beginner may have a certain confidence in 
approaching the practical application of the principles here laid down. 
More than this no book could give, for there is no making a seaman 
without wind and water. Yet something may be learned on land — for 
instance, the making of knots, as explained by Mr. Prazar and illus- 
trated by diagrams ; the steering and sailing rules ; the handling of bal- 
last, and other details. Practice is needed in all cases ; but a yachtsman 
who begins his salt-water life with a comprehension of this treatise begins 
with great advantages, and our San Francisco amateurs are constantly 
recruiting and adding to their number. With our glorious bay and the 
long stretch of coast outside, we have a boundless field for the cultivation 
of this most manly and healthful recreation. 

The Coast Review, for July, is full of suggestive facts. The legal 
status of the co-operative companies, and their extraordinary mortality as 
compared with that of regular life insurance companies, form the subject 
of three articles. The fire record for the first four months of 1879, for 
the United States, is a singularly gloomy one, as shown by this com- 
parison : 

Fire Loss. Ins. Loss. 

1876 $23,227,900 $13,239,900 

1877 21,608,C00 12,700,700 

1878 21,828,500 12,77'i,800 

1879 32,381,600 19,662,300 

The marine disasters for the six months ending June 30, 1879, are 
recorded as not num rons but important. 

Captain Codman's New Book.— One of the finest books of the sea- 
son is a volume of travels entitled " The Round Trip," by Captain John 
Codman, the celebrated litterateur of Boston. The author of this charm- 
ing and instructive work describes the country he saw and the people he 
met in his journey of 10,000 miles through Idaho, Utah, Nevada, Califor- 
nia and Oregon. There is a vast amount of information hid away in this 
modest volume, which will amply repay any man for reading it through. 
For sale by Billings, Harbourne & Co., No. 3 Montgomery street. 

Western Addition Music Hall.— The third series of entertainments 
to be given at this hall will commence Friday evening, August 1st, with 
Led Astray. The cast embraces some of the most talented amateurs in 
San Francisco. New scenery has been painted, and no expense or pains 
spared to make it a success. 

There is a Mr. Langtry attached to the household of Mrs. Langtry, 
the English beauty. He attends to the photographs. 



T 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

be Company's steamers will sail as follows at 12 M: 

CITY OF PEKING, August 1st, tor YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG. 

DAKOTA, July 28tb, for PANAMA and NEW YORK, calling at ACAPULCO, also 
SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA to land passengers and mails. 

Tickets to and from Europe by any line for sale at the lowest rates ; also to Ha- 
vana and all West India ports. 

CITY OF SYDNEY, August 4th, at 12 o'clock M., or on arrival of English mails, 
for HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY. $10 additional is charged for pas- 
sage in Upper Saloon. 

ALASKA, July 30th, for VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND, SEATTLE, and 
TACHMA, connecting at TACOMA with Northern Pacific Railroad for PORT- 
LAND, Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before 11 a.m. on day of sailing, at 
Wharf Office. For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan 
st reets. [July 20J WILLIAMS, ELANCHARD & CO., Agents. 

FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON. 

The Oregon Steamship Company anil Pacific Coast Steam- 
ship Company will dispatch everv five davs, for the above ports, one of their 
new Al Iron Steamships, viz. : OREGON, GEORGE W. ELDER, and STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

Sailing: ]>ays: 
July 1, 6, 11, 16, 21, 26, 31. | Aug. 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30. 

At 10 o'clock A.. M. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent O. S. S. Co., 
No 210 Battery street, San Francisco, 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents P. C. S. S. Co., 
July 5. No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

CdNiED LINE. 

British anil North American Royal Blait Steamships be- 
tween NEW YOKKand LIVERPOOL, calling at QUEENSTOWN, sailing from 
New York EVERY WEDNESDAY. 

SCYTH1A July 16.. Aug. 20. .Sept. 24. .Oct 29 

ABYSSINIA July 23.. Aug. 27 Oct. l..Nov. 5 

BOTHNIA July 30 Sept 3.. Oct. 8.. Nov. 12 

GALLIA Aug. 6.. Sept. 10. .Oct. 15. .Nov. 19 

ALGERIA Aug 13.. Sept. 17.. Oct. 22 

Passage can be secured and all information given on application to 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 
July 12. 218 California St. 

CALIFORNIA AND MEXICAN S. S. LINE, 

For Cape St. F.;icas. La Paz, Mazatlan and Otiaymns, 
touching at MAGDALENA BAY should sufficient inducement offer.— The 
Steamship NEWBERN (Wm. Metzger, Master) will leave for the above ports on 
TUESDAY, Aug. 5th, at 12 o'clock m., from Folsom-street Wharf. Through Bills 
of Lading will be furnished and none others signed. Freight will be received 
on Monday, July 28. No Fieight received after Monday, August 4, at 12 o'clock si., 
and Bills of Lading must be accompanied by Custom House and Consular Clearances. 
For freight or passage, apply to J. BERMINGHAM, Agent, 
July 26 No. 10 Market street. 

ST. MARY'S HALL, 

Benicia, Cal- 

The next Academic Year will begin Angast 5th. A Full 
Collegiate Cuurse ; Musical Department under the direction of MADAME 
HoRSLEY, the Distinguished Vocalist; a resident French Teacher; a fine Art De- 
partment; horseback and carriage riding constitute some of the attractions of this 
School. Address, REV. L. DELOS MANSFIELD, A.M., 
July 12. Rector. 

FAIRFAX MINING COMPANY, 

426 CALIFORNIA STREET, ROOM NO. 2. 

President JOHN W. COLEMAN. 

Treasurer GEN. O. H. LA GBANGE. 

Secretary O. C. mil/LEB. 

[October 12 ] 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF GAL. 

Attendance, daily, l'rom 10 a.in. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Suciety. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 
Oct. 23. 730 Montgomery street. 

REMOVAL. 

he Office of the Selby Smelting and Tiead Company has 

been removed to No. 41ti MONTGOMERY STREET. June 28. 



T 



S' 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 1S7S. 
old by all Statioucrs. Sole Ageut for the United States: 

MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. ¥. Jan. 5. 



FOR SALE, 

In a thriving 1 city, situated in one of the Southern counties, 
a valuable first-class SALOON BUSINESS, with lease, fixtures and furniture. 
For full particulars apply, by letter, "A. B.," News Letter Office Dec. 14. 

Regular Republican Nominee for Governor, 
GEORGE C. PERKINS, 

Of San Francisco. [July 12. 



W. Morris. 



MORRIS & KENNEDY, 



J. F. Kennedy. 

Importers ami I>eaiers in Moldings, Frames, Engravings, 
(Jhromos, Lithographs, Decalcomanie, Wax and Artists' Materials, 21 Post 
street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Feb. 4. 

J. C. MERRILL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, Agents for the Sand- 
wich Islands Packet Lines, 204 California street, S. F 



April 13. 



BY ORDER OF THE PROBATE COURT, 



The Works of the late James Hamilton, comprising Paint- 
ings and Sketches in Oil and Water Colors, are now on view to the public and 
or sale at SNOW & CO., 20 Post street. July 12. 



July 26, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



23 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

M. Hyacinthe Loyson hu been arlvocatuu the practice of oonfowion 
ugly in hi* conferences at the hall in the BonleTard dea Capncinea 
that many of Uh friend* believe he i^ retrograding towards the Church of 
Borne. 

The < lothworkera 1 Company have roted £108 to the guarantee fund of 
mmittee for establishing the new SomarviUe Hall, fur the higher 
lion of women, at t htford, 

(.'.in. .n Beadon, of North 8toneham, Southampton, who was believed bo 
be in his 103d year, died on June 14tb. 

On June loth the Lord Mayor and T.auy Mayoress entertained at 
luncheon at the Mansion House the members of the Cnme'die Francaise, 
Dow playing in London, and several gentlemen and ladies connected with 
the KwgifaA dramatic profession. 

About 2.000 miners are out on a strike in the Tarn worth District in 
Consequence «>f a notice Erom the colliery owners that it would he neces- 
sary to euforce a reduction of wages. The strike was followed by a wan- 
ton destruction of property by organized gangs of the miners at several 
of the pits. 

The remnants of Temple Bar, which have stood opposite a portion of 
the new law courts during the past eighteen months, have at last been 
removed, and not a atone of the structure is now left as marking the 
boundary between the cities of London and Westminster. 

The Hrst shot from one of the 100-ton guns was hred at Woolwich on June 
Ititii. The experiment, which was one of much interest, was conducted 
under the supervision of General Younghushand, It. A., the head of the 
gun factories, and President of several scientific committees. One shot is 
said to be sufficient to sink the strongest ironclad. 

There is every probability that the Gothard tunnel will be completed 
by the end uf November. The point now reached on the Airolo side is 
L281 meters, that on the Goeschenen side 649 meters from the center of 
the mountain; and it is expected that the junction of the two galleries 
will be made some 300 meters from the center, on its southern side. 

The cost to the London Corporation of freeing Epping Forest for the 
use of the people for ever has amounted to close upon £40,000, nearly 
half of which has been absorbed in legal expenses. 

The honorary freedom of the city of London has been presented to Sir 
Rowland Hill. 

Twice during the past week there was neither charge nor summons for 
hearing at the Mansion House, and kid gloves were presented to the pre- 
siding Alderman on each occasion. 

A man 110 years of age is reported to have arrived at Portadown, hav- 
ing just come across from America to revisit the country from which he 
emigrated in the eighteenth century. 

The Emperor of Austria has just been presented with a suit of clothes. 
The wool from which the garments were made was upon the sheep's 
backs eleven hours before the suit was completed. The same thing was 
done at Newbury, in Berks, last century. 

In consequence of the reduction of the number of lashes to be inflicted 
in the army, it has been decided to observe the same limit in the Royal 
Navy. — European Mail, July 5th. 

The wealth of Arizona is beginning to come to light. In a com- 
munication dated July 17th, from. Mr. Robert Collins, Superintendent of 
the Cumberland Mine, it is stated that an interest in the Leviathan, 
which is seven miles from the Cumberland, and said to be on the same 
ledge, has been disposed of for $500,000. On the 23d (last Wednesday) 
we were informed by Mr. Irelan, the assay er, that Gen. Fremont has 
succeeded in effecting a combination of capital, to the amount of several 
millions, for the purchase of property in and around the Cumberland and 
Date Creek districts. He said, further, that a portion of the Leviathan 
had been sold for half a million. This corroborates the statement made 
by Mr. Collins, though, to those who know him, there can be no need of 
additional testimony. A gentleman, inquiring about the Cumberland, 
said, when he heard the name of the Superintendent, that he needed 
nothing more to assure him, so high was the reputation of Mr. Collins 
in Australia for ability and probity. The ore received from the Cumber- 
land continues to show richer and richer; and the Superintendent's report, 
which has excited such eager curiosity regarding the mine, will soon be 
supplemented by publication of the assays from the office, 417 California 
street. 

The " Wilderness. " — Native Indian butlers, especially those attached 
to regimental messes, are great in the nomenclature of their menus. We 
remember orce to have been somewhat puzzled by the occurrence of the 
word " wildtrness " toward the end of our dinner bill of fare. Master 
butler was summoned, and it appeared that his dictionary gave "wilder- 
ness" as a synonymous term for desert (the extra s was of no great 
moment), and the former word having a more noble appearance, he had 
boldly employed it, In the jungles we had as a rule no "wilderness," 
but we were once reduced to making our entire dinner off a plate of rice 
and the remains of a tin of black currant jam, and on another occasion 
off a cocoanut and some brown sugar. — Prater's Magazine, 

There is no change in the money market. Rates, according to the 
Commercial Herald, are nominally 9@10 per cent., and there are but few 
transactions. In miscellaneous stocks there is nothing doing, and the 
mining share market remains depressed, with free assessments. The 
Berald sees the good time almost at hand for this coast, crops of all kinds 
being abundant and good, and all conditions favorable to a solid pros- 
perity. The failure of the wheat crop in the East, and in various 
European countries, including Russia, our great rival in the markets, 
will secure good prices for our surplus grain this year. 

No feature is more attractive than a good set of teeth, and the one 
condition which secures this is regular cleaning with a pure dentifrice, like 
that prepared by Dr. J. A. W. Lundborg, Geary and Stockton streets. 
This preparation is soft as velvet, pleasant in flavor, and leaves the mouth 
perfectly clean and sweet; and Dr. Lundborg should feel it a duty to 
bring this tooth powder within reach of the public, by putting it in every 
drug store. 

St John's Presbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and 
Taylor. The Rev. Dr. Scott, pastor, will preach on Sunday at 11 a. V, 
and 7i p.m. The public cordially invited. Sunday School and Bible 
Classes, 9.\ a.m. Prayer and Praise Service at i)\ p.m. 



THE AVERILl MIXED PAINT 

Is maunrnctiircil from strletl* pare White Load, Zinc, anil 
Pure Unseed "it. to which is ulded water Glass, which chemically unites the 
rite and holds them in solution, bo they oannot separate. As a house paint 
it has no aqua], produoiiui a brilliant glossy finish. Impervious to the weather, ami 

Will Last Twice as Lone 

as tiny other paint made, it is o! pure white, ami any Shade or Color desired, mixed 
ready for the brush, bo that any one can apply it. 

our wagon and machinery paints, from the more common colors to tho finest ver- 
min. .n, ore specially desirable. 

Our toe-prool roof, barn and bridge paint, manufactured from oxide of iron, is the 
beel and cheapest paint tor the |iur|«>so that can W produced. 

Tut up in J, h, l and :*. uollon cans, and in barrels, sold by the gallon. Send for 
sample card of colors and price list. Address, 

CALIFORNIA PAINT COMPANY, 

Ju 'y 13 - ^ 329 MARKET STREET, San Francisco. 

SWANTON HOUSE, PESCADERO. 

This Popular Hotel, together with the detached Cottages, 
which are not the least of its attractive features, have been newly furnished 
throughout, and are now open for the reception of guests. Those desiring to visit 
the most enjoyable of all our sea-side resorts, can make no mistake in deciding upon 
Pescadero. 

IT IS EASILY REACHED, 
and is unsurpassed in the excellence of its climate, the beaut;- of its scenery, and in 
the attractiveness of its truly remarkable sea beach. Those extraordinary pebbles, 
among which are to be found agates, opals, sapphires, etc., were never so numerous 
as now, the past Winter having thrown up immense numbers of curio usly-shaped 
stones, which fur ayes have been suhiucted to the everlasting motions of the tireless 
Pacific. GOOD TROUT FISHING is obtainable in the Pescadero river. 
(E^~ The hotel prices are fixed to suit the times. [April 27. 

THE BERKELEY GYMNASIUM. 

A Preparatory School to the University. 
he on y folly organized Preparatory School o«t the Coast. 

The instructors in the Gymnasium consist of refined and educated gentlemen, 
who are permanently connected with the institution. Boarding establishment strictly 
first-class. Location healthful and accessible. The third school year will commence 
on the 14th of July. Examination of candidates tor admission, 11th and 12th For 
catalogues, address JOHN F. BURR1S, 
Ju 'y 5 - Berkeley, California. 

DISSOLUTION. 

he partnership of Snow «fc May was dissolved on the 6th 

in stant. FRANK C. SNOW, 
WM. B. MAY. 

I shall conduct the business under the name of SNOW & CO., and liquidate the 
affairs of the late firm at No, 20 Post street. FRANK C. SNOW. 

San Francisco, May 31st, 1879. June 14! 

D. V. B. Henarie. 



T 



T 



E. MARTIN & CO. 



Edward Martin. 



Importers and Wholesale Dealers in Wines and Liquors. 

Proprietors of Miller's Extra Olit Bourbon and J. F. Cut- 
ter Extra Old Bourbon anil Rye Whiskies. 

April 5. 408 Front Street, San Francisco. 

L.H.Newton. NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., M.Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers in Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, 201 and 206 California street, San Francisco, Cal May 25. 



Newton Booth, C. T. Whkklkr, Sacramento. | J. T. Glover, W W Dodqb S F 

w. w. DODGE & CO. 

Wholesale Grocers, corner Front and Clay streets, San 
Francisco. April 1. 

CASTLE BROTHERS, 

ESTABLISHED IN THE YEAS 1850. 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, Ncs.213 and 215 
Front street, San Francisco. j an> i3_ 

DR. R. BEVERLY COLE 

Has Returned from the East and Resumed Practice at his Office, 

WO. 518 SUTTER ST REET. | June 21. 

FREDERICK A. REE, 

Hia Imperial Chinese Majesty's Consul. 

Office: 917 Clay Street. Residence: 620 Eddy Street. 

L. E. Pratt. PRATT & METCALFE, J. B. Metcalfe. 

Attorneys and Counselors at Law. 

Rooms 30, 31 and 28, Real Estate Associates' Bnlldliigr. BTo. 
230 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Accessible In Elevator at No. 230 
Montgomery street, or on Laura Place, next New Stock Exchange Dec. 7. 

JOHN L. BOONE, ~ 

Attorn ey-at- Law and Solicitor of Patents, 

Jan. 25.] 320 California street, San Francisco, Cal, 

R. H. LL0YD~ 

Attorn ey-at- Law. Room 13, Nevada Block 

CLAUDE CITTI, 

Engraver on Wood. 
605 Montgomery Street, between Clay and Merchant, S. F. 

[March 1. 1 

IRVINE & LE BRETON 

Have Removed their Law oilier* to X<>. 217 San some Street. 

r March 15.] 

(2*777 n year and expenses to agents. On i tit Free. Andreas, 
V* * ' June?.] P.O. V1CKERY, Augusta, Maine. 

Bradbury Pianos, Agency 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



24 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER.. 



July 26, 1879. 



FRANCE AND THE PRINCE IMPERIAL. 

France has the reputation of being gallant and chivalrous, but the 
way in which her Government has acted in the matter of Prince Napo- 
leon's death seems to show that whatever she may have been under 
kings and emperors, she has lost those qualities under the coarser regime 
of the republic. It is acknowledged on all sides that the death of the 
Prince practically put an end to the hopes of the Bonapartists, and left 
the Government nothing to fear from that direction. But even had the 
effect been the contrary, it was no time to show an ungenerous and mean 
hostility. He who had once been the petted darling of the tickle people, 
the descendant of men who had made France glorious, even if they had 
made her unhappy — lay cold in death and harmless forever. She who 
had lately been Empress of the French, and had more than once been 
regent of France, was now not only a widow, but childless, hopeless and 
heart-broken. At this juncture, when surely even the hottest hatred 
might have turned to forgiveness and pity, the French Government 
refused to let its President send a simple message of condolence to the 
bereaved mother; studiously avoided any demonstration of respect or 
mourning; peremptorily forbade all who were connected with it to 
attend the funeral, and now, the telegraph informs us, has severely 
punished several officers who attended the JEtequiem Mass at the church 
of St. Augustin. 

Even the German Court, whose arch-enemy the father was, went into 
mourning for the son, and it remained for England, the old foe of the 
boy's grand-uncle, to perform the last sad rites for the nephew. The 
French Government and newspapers have seen fit to growl at England 
for honoring the dead Prince and comforting the anguished mother, but 
every growl they utter sinks them lower in the estimation of the world. 
Old England has ever been a safe refuge for the exile, whether friend or 
foe, and the polite Frenchman has much to learn from blunt John Bull 
in such trifling matters as magnanimity and true nobility of heart. 
While President Grevy scowled at the bereaved Eugenie, Queen Vic- 
toria was condoling with her in private — the widow comforting the 
widow, the mother lately robbed by death of a daughter, consoling her 
who had just lost a son. While the French nobles, who would fain be 
loyal, were indecently withheld from the funeral by threats of disgrace 
and banishment, the English Princes of the Blood Royal were bearing 
the coffin to its grave. 

SCIENTIFIC SUICIDE. 

A dreadful case of suicide was discovered this morning (says the Bris- 
bane Telegraph of the 28th May), at Graves' Cafe" Royal Hotel. A man 
named R. S. Stevens, who had recently arrived from Sydney to endeavor 
to find employment under the Education Department, was found in his 
room with his throat cut, perfectly dead. The unfortunate man had for- 
merly been employed as a school teacher at Nanango, and had been in low 
spirits ever since his arrival. He had been heard to express a wish that 
he could return to his family. This morning, when a servant went to 
call him, no response was given to the summons, and on looking into the 
room through the skylight, he was seen lying on the bed deluged with 
blood. The police were communicated with, and the door was forced 
open, when it became evident he had been dead some hours. Some bot- 
tles of ehlorodyne were found, which had been apparently emptied into a 
tumbler and consumed, with the exception of about a teaspoonful, while 
the razor, with which the fatal wound was inflicted, lay close by the bed. 

Several papers — such as certificates, records of promotion, etc., — were 
found. Dr. Hobbs was called, and pronounced that death was caused by 
a severe gash under the left ear, which had severed all the arteries. 
There is little doubt that the unhappy man was insane at the time of the 
deed. A letter was found, which stated that the writer was not mad, but 
far from it. As a student of Huxley, Darwin, Tyndall, Clifford and 
Bain, cummuUis allis, he had come to the conclusion that man was sim- 
ply the apex of the animal kingdom, and that, therefore, when tired of 
life, he had a perfect right to leave it when he chose, and that he was 
aware that his body would pass into various gases, and become part of 
the cosmic whole. It is also stated that he merely wrote the letter so that 
there should be no misconception as to how he died. 

NATURE'S SOAP FACTORY. 

On Smith's Creek, in Elko County, says a Nevada paper, there is a 
most remarkable stratum of steatite resting horizontally on a steep bluff 
of volcanic matter, which flanks the eastern side of Smith's Creek Valley. 
The stratum of steatite is from three to ten feet in diameter. It is easily 
worked, and is a veritable soap mine. In fact, the farmers, cattle men 
and sheep herders iu that region, all use the natural article for washing 
purposes. Chemically considered, this peculiar clay is a hydrated silicate 
of alumnia, magnesia, potash and lime. When the steatite is first dug 
from the stratum, it looks precisely like immense masses of mottled Cas- 
tile soap, the mottling element being a small percentage of iron oxide. 
Prof. Stewart received a sample of this natural soap, prepared by a firm 
in Elko, who have undertaken to introduce it into the market. It is 
similar in appearance to the Castile soap sold in large bars. Nothing is 
added to the mineral but a trifle more alkali and some scenting extracts. 
Its detersive qualities are as powerful as those of any manufactured 
soap. — Arizona Sentinel. 

Important Discovery in Gardening. —Peter Henderson, the vete- 
ran gardener, made a very significant statement during the course of his 
remarks here before the Convention of Nurserymen and Florists. This 
statement embodies the remarkable fact that if garden seeds, when 
planted in the Spring, are firmly pressed when under earth by the ball of 
the foot at the time the gardeners are putting them in the ground, they 
will invariably grow, drouth or no drouth ; and, what is still more impor- 
tant, they will spring up earliest, and grow faster and mature better than 
any of their kind which have not been subjected to this discipline. The 
same rule of pressure, he says, holds true in regard to transplanting trees, 
shrubs and plants. Henderson said that though he had been extensively 
and steadily engaged in the business of gardening for more than a quarter 
of a century, yet he had not made and proved this discovery until a few 
years ago. — Cleveland Herald, 



From South Africa. — Cetawayo is reported to have said that his 
opponent is correctly described by the names of three islands, to the 
neighborhood of which he is advised to return — viz. : Scilly, Wight, 
Man. — Judy. 



THE IMPENDING CONFLICT. 
It is somewhat singular, but nevertheless true, that the great conflict 
between labor and capital which has so long been expected in the civilized 
world should begin in California, one of the outposts of civilization. 
With the adoption of the new Constitution the contest was fairly inaugu- 
rated, and there is now no retrospection on either side. If labor is to 
rule, its triumph must be upon the ruin of capital ; but if the latter is to 
come out victorious, it means such a subordination of labor as will make 
it impossible for the conflict to be renewed. It is useless to disguise the 
fact that the vote of 7th May has had an influence coextensive with the 
Union, and that influence will continue and gather strength unless it is 
met in the September election by a negatur as decisive as that which 
elected to continue the agitation. In the face of these things, why do 
men hesitate to make up their minds on the side of conservatism. To 
hesitate is to lose. As you make your beds, so shall you lie upon them. 

A good story is told of a London city merchant who lost a gold 
watch, quietly advertised for it, and paid for its recovery £10 to a man 
who confessed that he had stolen it. Being anxious to know how it had 
been done, this condoner of felony asked for the story. The thief, having 
the ten sovereigns safe in his pocket, stated that he had run up against 
him in Bow Lane, and so abstracted the watch. With admiring atten- 
tion the owner of the watch showed the thief out of his house, and 
returned to congratulate himself and to tell the story to his wife, When 
he got inside again, however, he found the watch gone a second time, and 
the £10 with it. 

The twenty -fifth anniversary of Calvary Church is to be celebrated 
to-morrow (Sunday). This Church was founded in 1853, by the calling of 
Rev. Dr. Scott from New Orleans to the pastorate, and over which he 
presided with great ability and success until the breaking out of the war, 
when he resigned and went to Europe with his family. After this he was 
again called to this coast as pastor and founder of St. John's Presbyterian 
Church, of which he is still the earnest, faithful and laboring head. Dr. 
Scott is yet in the sixties, but is uncommonly vigorous for a man of his 
years. 

One would scarcely have imagined that it was possible for one 
man to realize as much as £70,000 out of paper collars and cuffs, consider 
ing the short time they have been in vogue. Yet this is the amount left 
by the late Mr. Francis Stephen Foley, of Enfield, a well-known paper 
collar manufacturer, who recently died. Hi3 business goes to his eldest 
son, and as the popularity of "paper linen" is still as great as ever, 
there is no reason why he should not make another £70,000 out of the 
concern. 



Mr. Donald Mackenzie, the well-known African explorer, sailed 
from Bristol in the steamship Corsair, Captain William Reed, bound for 
the new trading station of Cape Juby, which he has lately fixed upon. 
In accordance with the treaty lately entered into with the chiefs of that 
part of the continent, he expects to open up a large trade with the interior, 
with 3 view to which he has purchased from a Bristol firm the well- 
known trading brig Amazonia, and dispatched her to the same point to 
serve as a tender to the expedition. 

Four Chinamen have committed suicide in as many weeks past. This is 
a new departure for John to take, and it looks very much as if he pre- 
ferred Hell to California under the new Constitution. If this sort of 
thing should keep on Kearney's occupation will be gone, and he will either 
have to return to his dray or cut his throat and follow the heathen to 
Hades, where he might agitate against the Devil's monopoly of souls and 
protest against the employment of Chinese to make hot fires for Irish- 
men. 

That distinguished star of the fashionable world, Mrs. Langtry, has 
taken passage in one of the White Star liners, and will shortly leave Lon- 
don for New York. The lady is understood to seek rest in a trip across 
the Atlantic and a quiet tour through the States. In all probability she 
will visit California and Vancouver's Island. 

Young.ladies who use hair dyes should take warning by the death of a 
girl at Manchester, Eng. , who, in order to keep level with the fashion of the 
day, bought a bottle of hair dye for the purpose of turning her black hair 
into a golden hue. She used the preparation for some time, but very 
soon fell ill, and at the inquest the evidence showed that her death was 
mainly due to blood poisoning, caused by the hair dye. 

Only thirty to hear Kearney speak at his la^t meeting. This calls for 
action and a heroic treatment. Santa Ana fired up the lagging zeal ; 
Davis, on Hayes street, stirred the embers. One more beating might 
help the agitator to subside with a show of submission to destiny. Now 
he is petering out. 

One of Mr. Irving's female admirers (says the World) petitioned for 
the chain which he had worn as " Hamlet " for a hundred nights. She 
sent him another in exchange, which is also to pass to a devotee, after a 
hundred more nights. Beautiful feminine romance ! Another lady leaves 
a boquet morning by morning at his door. 

There is great danger of the collapse of the W. P. C. If that body 
goes in, who will go out? Only D. K. Suppose both events came to 
pass — could we survive it? We should then have upon our hands the 
broken and dishonored fragments of a once-glorious, etc. And what 
could we do with the Sand-Lot? 

A lisping boy was out in the back yard pounding on a tin-pan. The 
father came home tired and sullen, and being disturbed by the noise, cried 
out : " What's that turned loose in the back-yard— a wild animal ?" The 
little fellow answered, " Yeth, thir; it's a pan-thir." 

The total of the nation's liabilities is, according to the June state- 
ment, §2,349,567,482. The debt has been decreased in the last year 
$8,579,575. 

The current number of " Les Missions Catholiques" contains an 
account by Pere Schmitt of a journey to Loango, in Western Africa. 

The Maharajah Dhuleep Singh is writing music for an opera. Did 
any one ever hear the Maharajah Dhuleep Singh?" 



Prio* per Copy. 10 Cent*.] 



ESTABLISHED JULY, 20. 1856. 



[Annual Subscription, $5. 



B&K rgAKi©ii©ot 




DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 30. 



SAN FEAN0IS00, SATURDAY, AUG. 2, 1879. 



No. 3. 



Bee of the San Francisco News Letter, Merchaut Street, 
Nos. 607 to 615, San Francisco. 



G 



OLD BARS— 890@910— Silver Babs— 6@18 # cent. diac. Mexican 
Dollars, 8&@94 percent. 

■ Exchange on New York. § per cent. ; On London, Bankers, 493@ 
49£; Commercial. 49g@50d, Paria, sight, 5 francs per dollar. Tel- 
egrams, 15-100@i per cent. 

- Latest price of Sterling, 483.J@485£. 

" Price of Money here, 
open market, 1@1£. 



@1 per cent, per month — hank rate. In the 
Demand active. 



PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOVERNMENT BONDS. 
Sas Francisco August 1, 1879. 



Stocks and Bonds. 

U. S. Bonds, 4s 

Legal Tender Notes 

8. F. City & Co. B*ds, 6s,*68 

8. F. City Bonds, 7s 

Sacramento City Bonds. . . . 

Tuba County Bonds, 8s 

San Mateo Co. Bonds, 7s. . . 

S. F. Gas Light Co 

National O. B'k & Trust Co. 
Spring Valley Water Co. . . , 



Bid. 

102J 


Asked 


105 
105 
28 
100 


107 
107 
30 


90J 
60 
83 


91 

56 
83} 



Bid. 



Asked 
35 
45 
67 



Stocks, and Bonds. 

Omnibus Railroad Co 

Central Railroad Co 

N. B. and Mission R. R. Co, 

Sutter St. R. R.Co 

Fireman's Fund Ins. Co 

Union Insurance Co 

Pacific Bank 

The Bank of California 

Central Pacific Railroad 

C. P. R. R. Bonds 

Andrew Baird, 312 California street 



116 
116 

115 
70 



THE STOCK MARKET. 

At the beginning of the week the market took a lively tumble, 
after which a sharp reaction set in, infusing considerable activity into the 
leading stocks, but the advance was short-lived, and stocks are quietly 
nettling back again to old figures. The rise was occasioned by the myste- 
rious whisperings of favorable reports from the drillings of the 2,400 level 
of Sierra Nevada, and the heavy orders from the inside gave a color of 
truth to the rumors, which had the effect of thoroughly demoralizing the 
shoi'ts. Nothing definite can be known regarding the condition of Sierra 
Nevada and Union until cross-cutting takes place, which cannot be for 
five weeks at least. In the meantime, the market will probably remain 
quiet and tend towards a lower range of values. Of the outside stocks, 
Bodie is not looking so well as at our last writing. The stopes are getting 
poorer, while the indications in the winze are not at all favorable. At 
the close the market showed a slight improvement. 

Beerbohm's Telegram.— London and Liverpool, Aug. 1, 1879.— 
Floating Cargoes, steady; Cargoes on Passage, steady; Mark Lane Wheat, 
firm; No. 2 Spring off Coast, 43s. 6d.; Red Winter off Coast, 48*. ; 
California off Coast, 47s. ; California Nearly Due, 47 *.; California 
«fust Shipped, 46s. 6d. ; No. 2 Spring for Shipment, 42s. 6d.; Liverpool 
Spot Wheat, quiet but steady; California Club No. 1. Standard, 9s. lOd. ; 
California Club No. 2 Standard,- 9s. 7d.: California Average — Western, 
9s. 4d. ; White Michigan, 9s. 9d. JRed Western Spring, 8s. ld.<S8s. lid.; Ex- 
tra Amount State Flour in London, 12s. 6d.; Extra Amount State Flour 
in Liverpool, 12s. 6d.; Liverpool Western Mixed Corn, 4s. 2d.; Liverpool 
Canadian Peas, 6s. 6 L; Liverpool Wheat, 8s. 5d., 9s. 8d., 9s. 6d., 9s. 10d.; 
Cotton, quiet; Consols, 97 15-16; Orleans, 6 9-16; Uplns, 6£ 

Sydney International Exhibition, 1879.— An inspection of the ores 
of silver, gold and quicksilver, which Dr. Bleasdale has collected for the 
Sydney Exhibition, is the most extensive and varied ever exhibited in San 
Francisco. It will be on view at the Pavilion during the Mechanic's 
Fair this month, and will be forwarded to Sydney by the October steamer, 
together with the wines, brandies, etc. There will be on view the samples 
of grain and grass see Is, which the Doctor obtained at Portland, illustra- 
tive of the produce of Oregon, and alongside of it a somewhat similar col- 
lection of California grain. These and the numerous other miscellaneous 
articles, such as eggs of birds indigenous to the State, shells, butterflies, 
paints, oils, gums, etc., will form a new and separate feature in the Me- 
chanics' Exhibition. 



The Pacific Mail Co. 'a ateamer City of Sydney sails for Hawaii, 
New Zealand and Australia on Monday next. She takes a full compli- 
ment of passengers, also a number of articles for the Sydney exhibition. 
C. C. Cox, the Secretary of the American Commission, is a passenger. 



CALIFORNIANS 



'At The Play 



We regret that it will not be possible to add to the number of 
our first issue. A few copies have been reserved for visitors to the 
Industrial Exhibition, with difficulty, so great is the interest mani- 
fested in this work, both at home and abroad. Six other issues will fol- 
low. Details of these will be given in future numbers. 



Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, Aug. 1st, 
1879. United States Bonds-^s, 102& ; 4£s, 106£; 5s. 102. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 83@4 85. Pacific Mail, 14|. Wheat, 110@118. Western Union, 
90£. Hides, 19£@20. Oil— Sperm, 75@76. Winter Bleached, 87 @ 96. 
Whale Oil, 35@40; Winter Bleached, 42@49. Wool— Spring, fine, 20@ 
30 ; Burry, 11@14 ; Pulled, 25@35 ; Fall Clips, 11@14 ; Burry, 13@20. 
London, Aug. 1st. — Liverpool Wheat Market, 8s. 6d.@9s. 8d.; Club, 9s. 
6d.@9s. lOd. U. S. Bonds, 5's, 105g; 4's, 105; 4£'s, 109§. Consols, 98 1-16. 
Bullion into Bank of England, £58,000. 



Washington, August 1st. — The debt statement shows the increase of 
debt for July to be $6,086,344 ; cash in Treasury, $282,905,273 ; gold cer- 
tificates, $15,240,700 ; silver certificates, $2,785,850 ; certificates of de- 
posit outstanding, $40,330,000 ; refunding certificates, $6,058,350 ; legal 
tenders outstanding, $346,681,016; fractional currency outstanding, $15,- 
814,823. The increase of debt is due to payments on account of arrears 
of pensions and from United States notes held for redemption of frac- 
tional currency as provided by the act of June 21, 1879. 

It is strange that our daily city papers have not chronicled the fact 
that J. C. Henderson, who signed the contract for the new and largest 
steamship ever built for the Pacific Coast, in New York last week, is our 
old and well-known friend the popular engineer of the steamship Oregon, 
of the Portland line, which vessel he also superintended from thetime the 
keel was laid until she was finished, and engineered by him to this port. 



The Thames and Mersey Insurance Company, of Liverpool, is 
a sound and substantial association, with a capital of $10,000,000, and 
well known throughout the world. It is now represented here by Mr. 
Wm. C. Harrison, 413 California street, who has just been appointed 
agent. His nomination to this responsible office has given great satisfac- 
tion to hiB numerous friends, and cannot but be advantageous to the com- 
pany. 

Alluding to the amulet found rouDd the Prince Imperial's neck, the 
Voce della Verita tells us that it had belonged to Charlemagne, and that 
it had descended from king to king until it came into the possession of 
Napoleon I., whose family it had not afterwards left. 

Personal property taxes for county purposes will become delinquent 
on the 5th. The office of the Tax-Collector will be open this (Saturday) 
evening to accommodate those who cannot attend at any other time. 



San Franciscans Abroad— July 10, 1879.— Paris : H. H Maynard, 
W. Sears. London : Mr. Spruance and family. Geneva : W. Ch. Suth- 
erland.— Continental Gazette {Paris). 



The late Khedive's dinner and breakfast services cost £919,000, 
and they were purchased while his people were dying of hunger. 

The funeral of the late B. W. Reasan will take place to-morrow (Sun- 
day), at 2£ o'clock, from his late residence, Telegraph avenue, Oakland. 

Treasurer Hubert reports a cash balance for August 1st of $1,052,- 
800, of which over $740,000 belong to the various Sinking Funds. 



A jeweler advertises that he has some precious stones for disposal, 
adding that " they sparkle like the tears of a young widow." 

Duties paid at Custom House, for seven months, to August 1st, 
were, in 1878, $3,688,023; in 1879, $3,361,020. 

The steamer "City of Peking" yesterday took for China $107,600 
treasure, and 3,050 flasks quicksilver. 



Printed and Publisned oy ta« Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



A us. 2, 1879. 



SPEAK SOFTLY. • 

Speak softly, gently ever ! Speak softly, gently ever ; 

There is no wiser part ; There is no better plan— 

"For harsh words pierce like steel For angry words can never 

The yearning, loving heart. Effect what kind ones can. 

As gems reflect in brightness For, oh ! a soft word spoken 

Every flitting beam, May move the stubborn soul 

Let words reflect in kindness That still would prove defiant, 

Love'a sunny, love-lit gleam. Should words of thunder roll. 

Speak softly, gently ever ! 

WordB breathing naught save love ! 
And soon our blighted Eden 

Will bloom as realms above ! 
For faith and fond affection, 

In true love-knot entwined, 
With firmer cords than temper'd steel 

Each happy heart can bind. — Public Opinion. 

MIDDLEMISS AND MINE MANAGEMENT. 
Mine management in San Francisco too frequently passeth all under- 
standing. A trustee appears to be an individual who may do what he 
pleases with other people's property. That is what Schultz did, and a 
high-toned grand jury held him harmless for doing it. The case of the 
man Middlemiss, in his management of the Brilliant Mine, exemplifies 
how the thing is done. The facts are extraordinary. A president, secre- 
tary and treasurer run the institution. Middlemiss is the president. 
Since February they have levied $30,000 worth of assessments. They pay 
themselves salaries. A friendly but nominal superintendent is employed. 
They have voted themselves §25 for each and every meeting they hold. 
At that figure it is perhaps not to be wondered at that their meetings are 
frequent. We look at minutes and see how the thing is done. Here are 
fair average entries : " May 30th, 1878. Present, Middlemiss, Smith and 
Stone. Minutes read and approved. Adjourned to May 31st." That's 
twenty-five dollars' worth. The next clay they come again, and the fol- 
lowing entry appears: "May 31st. Present, Middlemiss, Smith and 
Stone. Minutes read and approved. Adjourned to June 2d." That's 
another twenty-five dollars' worth ! Similar entries follow on ad infini- 
tum. For meetings thus held they need more office accommodation, for 
the secretary appears as authorized to engage it and "furnish it suitably." 
At this point it is proper to ask what these men manage ? One would 
suppose from the high salaries, the frequent meetings, the engagement of 
additional office room, etc., that there is something tangible to manage. 
Well, there is. The assessments need to be legally and regularly levied, 
carefully collected, and duly distributed. That's all. The company is 
carrying on no other operations that we can learn of. It has no works, 
no miners employed, and has not even a hole in the ground. It has, or is 
supposed to have, a mining location at Gold Hill, Nevada. The presi- 
dent would appear to have been iu doubt about that the other day ; any- 
how he drew §500 to go up and see. He is good at drawing coin, for the 
books indicate that his personal account is overdrawn some S900. One 
would suppose from that fact that the company is in good funds. Quite 
a mistake ! The president has just been authorized to negotiate a loan of 
$3,000. Evidently another assessment is in order. The reader will be at 
no loss to see that these men have a soft thing. We allude to these facts 
now not for the first time. They meet with no explanation and no an- 
swer. The man Middlemiss has thought it worth his while to try conclu- 
sions with us in a libel suit, but not because of our description of his 
imprudent management of the Brilliant Mine. That music he dares not 
face. He prefers to go upon some comparatively innocent banter, which 
appeared in a card written by a valued correspondent. While he is silent 
about that which is really grave, he need not be so loud about that which 
is merely gay. 

SEVERAL THINGS TO BE EXPLAINED. 

At Western Addition Hall, on Wednesday evening last, Colonel 
Withington, an old "college chum" of Mr. J. W. Taylor's, made a little 
speech to the effect that the Republican nomination for City School 
Superintendency was due to the old chum of Colonel Withington ; and he 
wishes he may get ib. Perhaps he may ; but there are several things to 
be explained before even the Republican nomination can save him. What 
is the true inwardness of that little affair of §250, offered to another 
Director for a place by a lady, whom Mr. Taylor put in the School De- 
partment? What is the reason that people persist in associating Mr. 
Taylor with the mysterious and timely disappearance of John A. Moore ? 
Why does every one say "Ewald" whenever Mr. Taylor's name is pro- 
nounced, and a trip to the East spoken of ? Why his fervent zeal for 
investigations, up to a certain point, and his lukewarmness when that 
point is reached? Why does he especially favor anonymous letters, and 
why do they flow to him as naturally as water goes down a waste-pipe ? 
For what reason did he make such a bitter fight in the Board last Decem- 
ber to regain the chairmanship of the Committee on Furniture and Sup- 
plies, which he had lost ? The dead-lock which he occasioned at that 
time interfered with the discharge of public business for several weeks ; 
and the public has not forgotten it, and would like to hear his reasons for 
it. At the same time, it might not be amiss for Mr. Hiester to give us a 
little light on his circular to the teachers, asking for their influence with 
the Republican Convention to have him nominated as Sheriff. Mr. 
Hiester is in an exceptionally good position for explaining himself, since 
he has control of a newspaper and frequently blows his own trumpet 
therein, to the edification of mankind. A few solid reasons for election- 
eering among the teachers would give dignity to the circular, and, per- 
haps, rally two or three votes to his support. But, in any case, Messrs. 
Taylor and Hiester have the floor. What with cows already come, and 
nominations that are to come ; what with purses of $250, offered to 
somebody, and by no means lying around loose ; what with dead-locks 
and the perpetual Ewald, there is the material for a little eloquence from 
each of these gentlemen. We are all ready to hear them. 

Martin Bulger, the efficient Superintendent of the Pacific Mail Com- 
pany, is a rough diamond in his way, as everybody knows ; but he some- 
times meets with his match. An employe, most industriously engaged in 
painting the stern of one of the company's steamers, indulged himself in 
whistling a lively air. Bulger was on the deck, and at a loss for some 
time to tell where the sound came from. At last, discovering his man, he 
said, brusquely, " Say, young fellow; do we pay you f..r whistling?" 
"No, sir, said the man ; "that's thrown in for nothing." 



THE JUDGES OF OUR CRIMINAL COURTS. 
Under the new Constitution the present classification of our Courts 
is abolished. There will be no Municipal, Criminal or District Courts, 
but all will be merged under the one general title of Superior Courts, for 
which twelve Judges have to be chosen at the forthcoming election. The 
fact ought not to be lost sight of, that two or three of the twelve require 
to be specially qualified for the conduct of the city's criminal business. 
Judge Blake, it is understood, declines to be renominated, which is to be 
regretted, for he has made a careful, painstaking and firm expounder of 
criminal law. Itwill be difficult to fill his position with an equally com- 
petent official. Judge Ferral has been nominated by the Workingmen; 
he will be indorsed by the Democrats, and in that event will be elected. 
Judge Louderback, it is understood, will receive the Republican nomina- 
tion, and good citizens of all parties will vote for him. His re-election 
ought to be beyond a peradventure. He has filled the position of Police 
Judge with great fidelity, and distinguished ability. The experience he 
has gained must not be lost to the public service. No man has done such 
service as he in dealing with the hoodlum and criminal classes. Firm, 
resolute, and yet fair beyond question, he has proven himself the right 
man in the right place. He ought to be one of the twelve Judges elected, 
undoubtedly. - 

A child drank concentrated lye on Tuesday last, and died, poor little 
thing. Patriotic citizens take theirs in every style — concentrated, diluted, 
compounded, amalgamated and mixed— and it seems to make them fat, 
which shows that patriotism has its uses. 

WAKELEE'S AURE0LINE 

Produces the Beautiful Goldeu Hair so Much Admired. 

SUPERIOR TO THE IMPORTED ARTICLE 

—BY REASON OF ITS — 

FRESHNESS AND CARE USED IN ITS PRODUCTION. 

PRICE, LARGE BOTTLES. $S. 

Manufactured by H. P. WAKELEE & CO., Druggists, corner 
Montgomery and Hush streets, S. IF. [Aug. 3. 

HEADQUARTERS DEMOCRATIC STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE, 

319 BUSH STREET, 

Booms Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. 

T. M. O'Connor, Secretary. [Aug. 2.] A. J. BRYANT, Chairman. 

MITCHELL'S MAGIC LOTION. 

Quick and sure cure for bruises mid sprains—relieves toe 
pain instantly ; perfectly harmless ; will prevent the eye turning: dark after a 
blow ; good for aching feet ; gives instant relief from soreness after horseback riding 
or any over-exertion ; very serviceable as a gargle after speaking or singing. Mr. A. 
W. Huasey, Stock Broker, says : "After my runaway accident, my eye was much 
discolored and I could not bend my knee. The next day after using your Lotion, my 
knee was as well as ever and the bruise marks nearly gone from the eye. It is won- 
derful stuff and everybody ought to know about it." Sold by all Druggists and by 
GEORGE H. MITCHELL, 5 07 California street. Price, 25 cents. Aug. 2. 

HASTINGS' COLLEGE OF THE LAW. 

Lectures for the Year 1879-80 will commence August 7th, 
1879, at the Assembly Rooms of Academy of Sciences, southwest corner of 
California and Pine streets. The Middle Class will meet at 4 p.m. ; the Junior Class 
will meet at 10 a.m. Examinations of applicants for admission to the Middle Class 
and members of the present Class whose examination was postponed, will be held 
Tuesday, August 5th, at the Pioneer Assembly Rooms. Gentlemen wishing to enter 
either Class should apply to the Dean and Registrar, No. 2, Court Block, G36 Clay 
street. , Aug. 2. 

ZAMLOCK. 



THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

(Limited), 
Of Liverpool, England. 

Capital $10,000,000. 

W. C. HARRISON, Agent, 

Aug. 2. 413 California street. 



PIANOS AND ORGANS. 

£k'fl ~1 4^4\ Pianos "illy 8322.50: $370 Organs only $96.35; 

m5_LjJL""t $325 Organs only §73.75. Tremendous Reduction during the 
Midsummer months. Having been elected Mayor of my city and intrusted with its 
bonds should be sufficient proof of my responsibility. Latest Circulars and Illus- 
trated Newspaper free. Address, DANIEL F. EEATTY, 
Aug. 2. Washington, N. J, 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Botlie Consolidated Iff iuing- Company, Room 
62, Nevada Block, San Francisco, July 19th, 1S79.— At a meeting of the Board 
of Directors of the above-named Company, held this day, a Dividend (No. 1) of One 
Dollar (SI) per share was declared, payable FRIDAY, August 1st, 1879. Transfer 
books will be closed Friday, July 25th, 1879. 
Aug. 2. WM. H, LENT, Secretary. 

J. M." Neville. REMOVAL. Geo. H. Bryant. 

BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE. 

NEVILLE & CO., 
No.-s 31 and 33 California Street, s. E. corner of Davis, 

San Fbascisco. [Aug. 2. 



MILLS' SEMINARY. 

The next Term of this well-known Institntion will com- 
mence on WEDNESDAY, Julv 30th, 1879. For Circulars, giving particulars, 
address REV. C. T. MILLS, 

Aug. 2. MjIIb' Seminary, Alameda county, California. 

HAPPY CHILDREN. 

be roty-cheeketl children of San Francisco Is the evidence 

the JERSEY FARM DAIRY lias of the purity and richness of its milk. 
Aug. 2, City Depot : 837 HOWARD STREET. 



T 



MADAME JULIA MELVILLE SNYDER, 

it t Q Mason street, between Bush and Sutter.— Vocal M usio 
|)_LO for Opera, Concert or Parlor. Piano and Elocution. Dramatic Elocution 
and Voice Culture Specialties. Terms made known at residence. May 25. 



Aug. 2, 1879. CALIFORNIA 

HONORABLE. HUMOROUS. HUMBUGGING BILKS. 

A more pestilent gall was never displayed than that of the Bilk 
onran and it» party. (lUncing f*»r a moment at the grim humor of nomi- 
nating a land monopolist on an anti-monopoly platform, one is next struck 
with the glaring inconsistency exhibited in selecting as candidates for 
office men who were avowed opponents of the New Constitution. 01 
course these perverts avow their reconstruction, but like the cry of " any- 
thing to beat Grunt** such tactics seem like " anything to get office." 
Then their claim of |*ossessing all the virtue extant perhaps does not run 
counter to the true inwardness of a party which professes its willingness 
to share everything belonging to everybody else. It must be amusing to 
Republican*, Democrats and Worldngmee u> have themselves denounced 
as disreputable liars and scoundrels in one breath, and in the next to be 
Ittplored in the name of the American Bagle, Saint Patrick or any other 
man, as they value their lives, their fortunes and sacred honors, to save 
the country by voting the Bilk ticket. Aa for their Mongolphobia, that 
deceive* nobody. Poor, patient John has only to retain the Bilk "duds" 
to force the |»arty into liquidation in more senses than one. Your gain is 
too transparent, good Bilks. "Thou hast pared thy wit o' both sides, and 
left nothing in the middle." Kearney has been " heard " several times 
since the 7th of May, and the Sand-lot is not yet squelched. The Repub- 
licans have vigorously bounced you out of camp, and the fierce Democ- 
racy have decapitated your ticket. There was an instance once where a 
headless rooster existed for sometime, but it was also a fact that he was 
neither ornamental nor useful. Now this party of Headless Roosters, it 
will be found, made a mistake in living after they should have died. 
There is yet time to rectify the omission, but in any event the Bilks will 
bilk only themselves. They are too well known to make anything else 
possible. 

THE "LOTTA FOUNTAIN." 
Among the many striking displays of taste and skill of which San 
Francisco may justly boast, the most remarkable is, beyond question, the 
"Lotta Fountain." The design of the structure was very bad— it could 
hardly have been worse — but so long as its color was dull brown, or a far- 
away imitation of bronze, its defects were scarcely noticed ; now, how- 
ever, since it has been painted in all the colors of the rainbow, with vari- 
ations, its deformity has become painfully evident. The object in 
painting the fountain like a barbers pole, "only more so," is a mystery. 
Of course the painter was permitted to work his own sweet will in the mat- 
ter, as no sane and sober man in authority could ever have instructed 
him to do what he has done ; and the question arises, why did he adopt 
the harlequin style ? It may be that he was a man of taste, and that he 
intended to bring upon the fountain the ridicule it richly deserves ; or, 
perhaps, he felt sure that such a monstrosity would not be endured, and 
that he would be called upon to re-paint it, thus securing another profitable 
piece of advertising. Perhapsthe intention was merely to perpetrate a huge 
practical joke at the expense of the residents of the city ; but if that was 
the idea, the painter has abused the license awarded to practical jokers. 
At all events, although the fountain, in its present condition, would be a 
great success in Central Africa or the Fiji Islands, or, possibly, among 
remote tribes of North American Indians, it can only excite ridicule 
where it is, and give strangers visiting the city the impression that the 
taste of our people is peculiar, to say the least. It is safe to say that 
nothing to be -compared with this fountain, aa it now appears, can be 
found in any other city in the civilized world ; and the sooner some 
painter, less gifted than the genius last engaged upon it, is employed to 
re-paint it, and return it, as far as possible, to its former state of semi- 
obscurity, the better. 

TREASURERS ANNUAL REPORT. 

Treasurer Hubert has filed his annual report in the office of the 
Clerk of the Board of Supervisors. The Treasurer says : The amount of 
money on hand this year shows a larger balance then ever before, which 
is accounted for by the fact that all outstanding loans have been called in. 
The statement of receipts and disbursements is as follows : 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance to credit of City and County on June 30, 1878 $425,771 24 

Receipts during the year .6,775,518 08 

Total $7,251,287 32 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Demands paid during the year 5,528,352 71 

Credit balance $1,722,936 61 

In conclusion, the Treasurer says : " It gives me pleasure to report 
that I have been able to call in bonds of different issues for surrender, and 
it is to be regretted that all the bonds issued by this city and county 
under the different Acts passed by the different Legislatures are not issued 
on the same principle. It would save the city and county considerable 
money, which now always has to be provided for and paid out for interest 
due semi-annually. 

THAT CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE. 
The Committee appointed by Congress to inquire into the causes 
of the depression in trade and industry, began its initial labors in Chicago 
on the 28th ultimo, and if one were to judge by the telegrams, the afore- 
said committee is simply being made the means of puffing the unparalleled 
prosperity of the metropolis of the lakes, and advertising its altogether 
superlative advantages to the outside barbarians of the Union. Every- 
thing is couleur de rose, as might be expected in such a phenomenally 
gigantic city, which counts New York and St. Louis as mere suburbs, to say 
nothing of JDuluth. It is, of course, nothing to the point to say that New 
York and Boston hold a death-grip (otherwise yclept mortgage) upon all 
that is worth owning in Chicago, and that the debts arising from a certain 
conflagration some years ago have not yet been wiped out. Indeed, one 
brash farmer asserted that all the farms in Wisconsin were mortgaged to 
their full value, and we believe a similar state of affairs would be shown 
to exist in Illinois if the average Chicagoan did not have such a (perhaps 
natural) antipathy to telling the truth. For boldly asserting and plausi- 
bly maintaining a transparency, we commend Chicago to the world, and 
confidently expect on Judgment Day to see its people classified amongst 
the goats. We, of course, will be found amongst the sheep. That com- 
mittee must change its ground speedily or degenerate into an advertising 
medium for Chicago. P. S.— No charge for this " ad." 



ADVERTISER. 



MARINE INTELLIGENCE. 



ARRIVALS AND CLEARANCES AT TUB PORT OP SAN FRANCISCO, FOR 
THE WKKK BNDINQ AUG. 1, 1879. 



ARRIVALS. 



DATB. 


V FN SCI., 


MASTKR. 


WIIERK l'HOM. 


CONSIGNEES. 


JTy 2« 


Bark iMuioraig, 


Storm 


Sydney 


Parrot & Co. 


.. 27 


St i Colima. 


Searlo 


Panama 


Williams, Blanchard & Co. 


.. 27 


Ship Gilroy. 


Loslie 


Dundee 


Henry Lund. 


. 27 


Ship New \ork. 


tluirhes 


Liverpool..... 


Dicksitn, DoWolf & Co. 


.. 21) 


Ship Cheeseborough. 


Dlnsmore. . , 


Cftllao 


A. Choeseborough. 


.. 31 


ship Templar. 


Armstrong . 


New York... 


Williams, Blanchard &Co. 




Whitmore .. 


Newcastle 


Dickson, DeWolf & Co. 













PATE. 


VESSEL. 


MASTER. 


WHERE BOUND. 


BY WHOM CLBARBD. 


J'ly 28 

.. 28 
.. 28 
.. 23 




Seabury .... 

Dawes 

Brown 


Queenstown . . 
S. J. de Guat'e 


Williams, Blanchard & Co. 
G. W. McNear. 
Schleiden & Scholle. 


Ship Matchless 


.. 29 




Queenstown... 
Victoria .. . . 
Queenstown... 
Melbourne ... 

Tahiti 

Yokohama.. .. 

Queenstown . , 


Parrot & Co. 

Williams, Blanchard &Co. 


.. 30 




.. 30 




Baratoux... 
Thorndyke. . 


.. 31 


Bark Dclphine Melanie 


Dempster & Keys. 


Aug 1 
.. 1 
.. 1 


St'r City of Peking .... 
Ship Baring Brothers. . 
Ship Francis Thorpe.. 


Williams, Blanchard & Co. 
Rodgers, Meyer & Co, 
G. W. McNear. 



TO MEDICAL MEN. 
A man named J. Linstrom Burrows, or J. Burrows Linstrom, is go- 
ing around among medical men inquiring as to their diplomas, and creat- 
ing the impression that he is so employed by the Neios Letter. We repu- 
diate him. He is not authorized by us, and we know of no good purpose 
that can be promoted by what he is about. Medical men should show 
him the door without ceremony, for he has no authority to busy himself 
about affairs in which he has no concern ; and when he does, ho obviously 
raises the presumption that he has a motive, which is probably not a dis- 
interested one. The police are now actively engaged in enforcing the 
anti-quackery law, and they are doing it, we believe, with reasonable effi- 
ciency. To them the work properly belongs. They are very capable of 
carrying it on without the interference of this questionable busybody. 
We recommend them to make strict inquiries into the doings of this man 
Burrows, with a view to learn whether or not he is legitimately making 
money by his interference in what is exclusively their business. We shall 
be glad to hear from medical men upon whom he may call, and will take 
care that his doings are duly investigated. We have some good reasons 
for these suggestions. Burrows is of middle hight, with sandy colored 
hair, and whiskers. 

Business continues to be depressed, with the exception of the jobbing 
trade for the interior. The Commercial Herald calls attention to the 
remarkable contrast between this state of things and the activity which 
prevails in New York, and can see no valid reason for the stagnation on 
this side. Is not the lack of competition one among several reasons? If 
we had a Boston and a Philadelphia pushing us hard, should we not be 
more wide-awake and more energetic? There has been something of an 
improvement in miscellaneous stocks, and prices are rather on the rise. 
Mining stocks are variable, with smaller transactions. Money is plenty, 
with rates unchanged — 9@12, nominally. The Herald undertakes to teach 
the Cincinnati Enquirer the difference between real money and fictitious ; 
a fruitless task, for the Enquirer belongs to the class of journals which 
love to argue wrong-end-first. A banker's daughter runs away with his 
coachman, after resumption ; therefore, resumption made her run away. 
The Enquirer talks foolishly of finance, after resumption ; therefore, be- 
cause of resumption. But to admit this were to fly in the face of nature, 
which denied the Enquirer a commodity of brains. 

The "Templar's " long and perilous voyage of 320 days from New 
York has finally terminated by her arrival here July 31st. She belongs, 
we believe, to the Bellingham Bay Coal Company, having been purchased 
soon after leaving New York. In the north Atlantic the Templar expe- 
rienced very heavy weather, receiving damages that compelled ber to put 
into Bio for repairs. While there the captain was taken with the yellow 
fever and nine of the crew died of it. After the recovery of the captain 
and the ship had received necessary repairs she resumed her voyage for 
this port. When but a few deys out from Rio the "yellow jack " again 
made its appearance, this time Captain Armstrong, his wife and daugh- 
ter, and several of the crew being very sick with it. The captain's wife 
and two seamen died and were buried at sea. In addition to all this mis- 
fortune, June 24th the first mate fell overboard and was drowned. The 
vessel has now been quarantined and will be thoroughly ventilated and 
fumigated before coming to the wharf. 

During the week there have been large sales of Gas from 88 to 90, 
and now 90*j is bid, without finding sellers. The stock of the Bank of 
California has also been freely dealt in, and is in demand at 69$ as we 
write, in anticipation of the effect of the proposed reduction of her capi- 
tal stock from $5,000,000 to §3.000,000. The stock of the National Gold 
Bank and Trust Company is offered freely at 55 without finding buyers ; 
whilst that of the two other local banks, the " Pacific " and the First Na- 
tional, is freely sought for, but as there are only about twenty stockhold- 
ers in the list of each of these two corporations, it is easy to see that the 
stock is very difficult to buy, and equally so to sell. Spring Valley Water 
atock is offered rather freely at $33£. There is a larg« amount of money in 
private hands seeking employment, but holders are very cautious in. the 
selection of collaterals. 



The Great Chiarini Circus opens shortly. A treat is in store for all 
circus-goers, who well know Mr. Chiarinis wonderful faculty of horse 
training, as well as the great aggregation of talent he presents. 

Conservatory Pianos, $350. 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



-Aug. 2, ?879. 



THE LITTLE WOMAN. 
Don't talk to me of Olympus' maids, 

"Divinely tall and fair" — 
Of Cleopatra's imperial form, 

Of Juno's stately air. 
Those mighty dames, with redoubted names, 

May erst have held their sway: 
'Tis the little woman— bless her heart! 

Who rules the world to-day. 
With her wilful, winsome way3, 

Her artful, artless smiles — 
Her airy grace, and her fairy face — 

Her wisdom, wit and wiles, 
She mocks the pride and she sways the strength, 

She bends the will of man, 
As only such a despotic elf — 

A little woman — can. 
Though her pathway may lead through the darkest ways, 

She always finds a light; 
Though her eyes be dazzled by fortune's rays, 

She's sure to see aright ; 
Though her wisdom be of no special school, 

Her logic "just because" — 
The first has settled a kingdom's fate, 

The last has made its laws. 
'Tis the little woman that goes ahead 

When men would lag behind, 
The little woman who sees her chance, 

And always knows her mind — 
Who can slyly smile as she takes the oath. 

To honor, love, obey, 
And mentally add the saving clause, 

" In a little woman's way." 
Would the diamond seem such a perfect gem 

If it measured one foot round ? 
Would the rose-leaf yield such a sweet perfume 

If it covered yards of ground? 
Would the dew-drops seem so clear and pure 

If dew like rain should fall? 
Or the little woman be half so great 

If she were six feet tall ? 
'TiB the hand as soft as the nestling bird 

That grips the grip of steel ; 
'Tis the voice as low as the summer wind 

That rules without appeal ; 
And the warrior, scholar, the saint and sage, 

May fight and plan and pray, 
The world will wag till the end of time 

In the little woman's way. 

THE EX-KHEDIVE OF EGYPT. 

The following extract from a private letter has been sent to us, and 
will be interesting to our readers: 

" My dear , . . . Before leaving Egypt, of course I went to 

see the" Khedive — the ex-Khedive as he is now. Subsequent events have 
made the interview interesting, so I will send you my notes of it. It was 
two days after Mr. Vivian, before going on leave, had told Pharaoh that 
he ("Vivian), speaking quite unofficially and as a true friend, was sure that 
abdication was a necessity if he wished to avoid deposition and keep the 
rule in his family. It was the day before M. Tricou conveyed the same 
idea, by no means in the same friendly language, and without the same 
justification of old and pleasant acquaintance; so I fell upon troublous 
times. I was not kept long waiting at the palace. Bankers, or people 
who in Egypt are called by courtesy bankers, were hanging about, but I 
was received at once. There was the same pleasant smile, the same em- 
pressemcnt, the same cordial greeting ; but the ex-Khedive looked worried 
and his face at first was very grave. You know what he is like, I have 
often told you: a little man, middle aged, dressed in a black official coat, 
black trowsers, and a red fez, stout, short-necked, with big ears, and a 
very plain face until he begins to tall?, and then the intelligence makeB 
you forget the plainness, and you go away thinking him good-looking. 
He produced cigars from his breast-pocket, called for coffee, and settled 
himself down for a talk on the sofa by the window, taking even more care 
than usual that he should have the light at his back. Nobody was in the 
room Bave ourselves. We first talked of his palaces. He said he lived in 
the country at Gizeh Palace, but he came into town for business ; his 
work was long and hard, he added — he began at 6 and ended at midnight 
— but ' short sleep means good sleep.' When I said G-izeh was very pretty 
and ought to be very camfortable, he said it was ; but he grumbled bit- 
terly at the coBt of it. All the palaces, he said, took a lot of money and 
returned nothing. Thfe grounds of the G-ezireh garden he had partly con- 
verted into a kitchen garden to lessen the cost, and he had got rid of all 
his wild beasts there. (Some of them starved first for want of food). 
Gizeh cost him annually above £9,000 more than its cultivated land 
yielded.^ *And the figure was right,' he added; 'I examined the ac- 
counts like a chef comptable de premier force.' * It was machinery that did 
it,' he added ; and he doubted whether steam pumps, with their cost of 
maintenance, were advisable at all in Egypt. And then he got on to one 
of his great hobbies, irrigation and agricultural progress in Egypt. High- 
level canals tapping the Nile in Upper Egypt, and a vast barrage at the 
head of the Delta, spreading the waters all over the Nile valley, would, 
he said, double the productiveness of the country; 'bais comment faire, 
men cher, l'argent manque,' he ended with a sigh ; and his face grew 
grave and he smoked hard and silently. In a minute or two he began 
again, talking rapidly and filling up the gaps when his Erench failed him 
with his well-known ' comme ci, comme ca,' etc. It was Gordon now he 
talked of, ' the greatest and best of my officials.' News of the final sup- 
pression of the slave-dealers who were in revolt in the Bahr Gazelle dis- 
trict had just reached him by telegraph from Khartoum, and he was de- 
lighted. Then he told me anecdotes of Gordon's bravery: how he never 
went armed, and how once he went into the camp of the Darfur King to 
parley and refused any guard whatever: ' Et il avait raison ; c'est 1'auoace 
quigagne; depuis lors personne n'ose le toucher.' When I chimed in 



with the commonplace that just confidence in oneself was a great force, 
he replied with a sigh: 'A quoi bon cette confiance en soi, mon cher, quand 
vous avez tout le monde contre vous — il vous faut aussi des hommes et de 
l'argent.' He then changed the talk to Zululand, and made me describe 
minutely the cause of quarrel, the number of men engaged, the position 
of the territory, and so on. Next he went to Afghanistan, and asked if 
the fighting was really finished. Then he passed to Burmah, and seemed 
surprised when I said there was nothing in that ' scare.' After thinking 
a little, he said: " Yes, but you have too many colonies ; they are a weak- 
ness ;' and when I assured him all sensible English folk would bave no 
more, he laughed and replied that that was all very well, but then I was 
in the Opposition at home, and it was not the Opposition that would de- 
cide. * But you are quite right to criticise,' he added, ' and abuse all ag- 
gression as unjust.' And then he ended the audience. I went next day 
by invitation to breakfast with him ; but between the two interviews, 
M. Tricou, the French Consul-General, had been and told him his abdica- 
tion was necesaary. This was the second warning. He was almost ab- 
solutely silent ; ate little and only drank water ; and as I took leave he 
apologised for his Bilence, Baying he was busy and preoccupe. 

That is the last I shall ever see of Ismail Pasha. A week afterward 
his son was reigning in his stead." 

BANKS, 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $5,000,000 

WM.AI.TOBD President. 

THOMA8BBOWN, Cashier | B SURRA Y, Jr., Ass* I Cashier 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the rincipal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburg*!, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Paid up Capital $2,000,000, Gold. President, B.C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, Isaac Wormser, Edward Martin, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents — London : Baring Bros. & Co. Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid np, $1,800,- 
000, with power to increase to $10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
somestreets. Head Office— 28 Cornhill, London. Branches — Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada — Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland — British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

May 13. FREDERICK TOWNSEND, Manager. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, 95,000,000, of which $3,000,000 is fully paid op a» 
present capital. Reserve Fund, §360,000. San Francisco Office, 424 Califor- 
nia street ; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER ; 
Cashier, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, Bank of England and London Joint 
Stock Bank ; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. 
This Bank ia prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Busi- 
ness in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and all parts of the 
world. March 30. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid TJp $10,000,000. 

Reserve, TJ. S. Bonda 3,500,000. 

Agency at New Tork, 62 Wall street. 

A.gency at Virginia, Nev. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. This Ban k has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. July 5. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar nnd I.eihbauh, Bio 536 California street, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors.— Fred. 
Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Dan. Meyer, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggerp, N. Van Bergen, 
H. L. Simon, Claus Spreckels. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, $300,000. 

Officers: President, John Parrott ; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. LoanB made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San 
Fran cisco. Oct. 14. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the nnder- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 

Oct. 23. 730 Montgomery street. 



.Aug. 2, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



'ALT A 



AN OPEN LETTER TO THE EDITOR OF THE 
CALIFORNIA,' SAN FRANCISCO. 

New York, July lfith. 1879. 

Dear Sir :— I have read with much surprise your editorial of Tuesday, 
July 8th, headed " M. Lessens ami ltis ]'rnpos?<1 CanaL" You seem to 
have put aside the good results to flow toward your own State and your 
own country by the construction "f the Darien Canal, simply to deal in a 
l>er>nnal attack u|M»u a man i>f M. Leesep's distinguished position. The 
world at large, as yon know anil understand, accepts individuals and en- 
terprises by the success that accompanies them. Even admitting that M. 
Lesseps might have conceived the project of the Suez Canal, from the 
fact that earlier races had already been engaged in a similar work with 
less extensive length and less cause for commercial facilities ; even admit- 
ting that he was opposed by the strongest European Governments from 
political suspicions and objections, and that the interests which aided its 
completion almost despaired of success ; still he risked his reputation, 
and accepted the doubts of the selfish and short-sighted diplomats and 
business men as only incentives to the pmsecution of the work. The very 
nation that feared political drawbacks has become the chief patron, and 
this great work, i. t, Suez Canal, has changed the entire character of her 
marine, with attending advantages to other countries all over the globe, and 
made Egypt the gateway to the Indies, and placed England in the fore- 
ground as the barrier to the Russian advancement for the control of more 
territory. 

Do you suppose that the projected railway from Syria to the Indies, 
with Cyprus as a monitor, would have been proposed unless the Suez Ca- 
nal had changed the relations of the countries bordering on the Indian 
Ocean to the varied interests of the European continent ? Do you sup- 
pose that England alone is to be bene6tted by this grand onward march 
of civilization and the material development of sections of a continent 
which the Monroe doctrine forbids us to join in, but does not interfere 
with our competing for a portion of the trade? If our peauefulness de- 
pends upon distance from such an enterprise, possibly we may be gener- 
ous and let other countries enjoy the profitable results of any trade flow- 
ing from an investment of capital, that our Monroe doctrine induces us to 
keep here. 

When you take up a theme like the " Darien Canal," and make it the 
cause for creating personal and national prejudice against a man whose 
zeal and persistency have overcome obstacles, and invited the most 
thoughtful reflections upon the future political interests and conflicts in 
connection with the Government near to and far away from the Suez Ca- 
nal, I fear you are losing that manliness of action and freedom of thought 
that gave your paper its position during the memorable Vigilance Com- 
mittee days of 1856. You object to Mr. Lesseps' route for the Darien 
Canal, and almost demand that our Government should resist its con- 
struction because the money expended by our Government in surveying 
for a route has not been considered as an equivalent for the selection of 
that preferred by our officers. If our Congress for years has been op- 
posed to any appropriations for internal improvements, by which our own 
people were to be benefitted, do you suppose they will appropriate money 
either for their own offices or Mr. Lesseps to build the Darien Canal ? 
If the capitalists of our country would invest no money in the Suez Ca- 
nal because it was too far away, and our far-seeing merchants ridiculed 
its construction because they saw no immediate use for it, you will soon 
discover that they will take the same view of the Darien Canal, but, after 
construction, will be delighted to use it and pay the transit fees, because 
it will be economy for them to do it. If your Monroe Doctrine means 
that at some future time the Americans (of the Unitad States) are to ex- 
tend their domain to Patagonia, I do not think you are wrong in protest- 
ing against Mr. Lessep'B ambition. 

If you believe that the enormous tonnage yet to seek the Pacific should 
go via Cape Horn, because Mr. Lesseps, and those who accept his faith and 
judgement, is and are willing to put up their money to carry out the pro- 
ject, you also know that the tonnage will continue to pass around Cape 
Horn, because neither the United States nor its people will subscribe. The 
construction of the Panama Railroad is the best proof of that statement, 
and in place of the men who gave their personal means, aided alone by 
foreign capital, and their abilities, being honored by their country and its 
people, as Lesseps has been throughout the continent, they are left to the 
memory of their families only! 

I suppose my old State has been benefitted by the Panama Railroad 
Company to the same extent that Clipper ships via Cape Horn improved 
upon ox-teams from the Mississippi River to San Francisco Bay ; to the 
same extent that the Transcontinental Railway has advanced the State's 
interests, and reacted in a similar measure upon the country this side of 
the Sierra Nevadas — " the great American Desert!" The American Press 
should rally to the support of Mr. Lesseps, and not intimate interference 
unless the route laid down by our officers should be adopted: unless our 
Congress and our people intend to construct it! Mr. Lesseps doeB not in- 
tend to conciliate this country unless the finances of this country con- 
tribute to the Canal, any more than you will concede your convictions in 
the management or editorials of your paper unless the "marplots" pay 
for it! 

The construction of the Darien Canal means the conquest of Mexico! 
It means the extension of the State of California, unless you prefer 
Lower California to be under another local government. I do not believe 
there are many Americans who would care about living south of Mexico, 
if they knew as much about the country as some of us who have crossed 
the narrow Central American strips of land. It will be a long time be- 
fore this country need have any anxiety about any disregard for the 
Monroe doctrine, and to insist that foreign Governments and foreign cap- 
ital should respect it, simply means that we have or intend to establish 
protectorates, which is not the policy of our Government or its people! 
When you refer to the Canal as a " swindling scheme," you must remem- 
ber that you have not surveyed all the routes, nor has the Canal been 
finished and proved a failure ; and your words are mis-used and you mis- 
lead the ignorant. You cast aside by such irrelevant language all the 
future prospective good that will belong to your coast and your city by 
the enormous increase of trade that will flow into your harbor from purely 
economic reasons. 

Every progressive step by labor or capital is a benefit to tne masses, 
and, with the Darien Canal completed, San Francisco becomes to Asia 
what New York is to Europe. Let De Lesseps' name be withdrawn from 
the construction of the Darien Canal, and the project will fall as readily 
to the ground as the Panama Railroad would have done save for the nerve, 
resources and influence of Aapinwall and Chauncey. 



Give your paper to indorsement and not to carping! Respect the rapid 
changes that are acting as a Revolution upon all obstructive rules and 
policy. Let a future generation take care of the Monroe Doctrine, so far 
as it relates to Central American countries, because, long before that 
period arrives, our nation will have been tried by the forces Macauley has 
predicted will arise, and, passing through them, we can dictate terms to 
the stockholders of the Darien Canal, and De Lesseps will have been 
glorified. Yours truly, Advocate. 



A GOOD PLAN. 

Anybody can learn to make money rapidly operating In 
stocks, by the "Two Unerring Rules for Success," in Messrs. Lawrence & 
Co s now circular. The combination methud, which this firm has made so success- 
ful' enables jienple with large or small means to reau all the benefits of largest cap- 
ital and best skill. Thousands of orders, in various sums, are pooled into one vast 
amount and co-operated as a mighty whole, thus securing to each shareholder all the 
advantages of the largest operator. Immense profits are divided monthly Any 
amount from $5 to So.000, or more, can be used successfully. N. Y Baptist Weekly 
September 28th, 1S73, sajs : " By the combination system *15 would make S75, or 
5 per cent.; $50 pays *350, or 7 per cent. ; 8100 makes 81,000, or 10 per cent, on the 
stock, during the month, according to the market." Frank Leslie's Illustrated 
Newspaper, June :29th : •• The combination method of operating stocks is the most 
successful over adopted." New York Independent, Sept. 12th: "The combination 
system is founded upon correct business principles, and no person need be without 
an income while it is kept working by Messrs. Lawrence & Co. Brooklyn Journal, 
April 20th: Our editor made a net profit of 8101.25 from 820 in one of Messrs. 
Lawrence & Co. s combinations." New circular (mailed free) explains everything. 
Stocks and bonds wanted. Government bonds supplied 
Ju 'y 26 - L.AWRENCE.& CO., Bankers, 67 Exchange Place, N. Y. 

"ANDREW BAIRD," 

Negotiator of Loans and Commercial Paper, 
Broker In Local and State Securities. 

No. 31S California Street San Francisco. 

" [i». O. Box 1,208.] July 19. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hlberuia Savings and Loan Society, northeast 
corner Montgomery and Post streets, San Francisco, July 7th, 1879. —At a reg- 
ular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a Dividend at 
the rate of six and three-fourths (6}) per cent, per annum was declared on all de- 
posits for the six months ending with June 30th, 1879, free from Federal Tax and 
payable from and after this date. 
_JulyJL2. ED WARD MARTIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Yangtze Insnrance Association. — A Cash Dividend of 
Thirty-three (33) per cent, upon the net premia contributed during the fifteen 
months ending December 31, 1S78, has been declared, payable 30th June, 1879. 
Ju 'y °- MACONDRAY & CO., Agents. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Franco - American Savings Bank Gnarantee Capital, 
8200,000. 428 Montgomery street.— This Bank has declared a dividend of seven 
(7) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and five and a half (6i) on Ordinary De- 
posits, for last six months, pavable July 15th, free of taxes. 
July 12. " LUCIEN BRAND, Secretary. 

EDWARD B0SQUI & CO., 

Printers, Engravers, Lithographers and Bookbinders, 

Xieidesdorff street, from Clay to Commercial. 



HEADQUARTERS DEMOCRATIC STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE. 

Tbe Chairman and Secretary of the several Coanty Com- 
mittees throughout the State are respectfully requested-to send their Post- 
office address to the Secretary of the State Central Committee. 

A. J. BRYANT, Chairman. 
T. M. O'Coskor, Secreta ry, P. O. Box 1202. July 12. 

SWIMMING ^TEACHER, 

At Neptune and Mermaid Swimming Baths, foot of Larkin 
and Hyde streets. PROFESSOR J. C. MOHOR is now prepared to instruct 
ladies, gentlemen and children any hour of the day, at the beach, as above. A course - 
of ten lessons is about all that is required in ordinary cases. Terms reasonable. 
Suits, etc., furnished. P. S.— One view of the beach and the precautions taken will 
satisfy any one of the perfect safety of beginners. July 19. 

NATURALIZATION ! 

Headquarters Bepnblican State Central Committee, Booms 
No.'s 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, No. 703 Market street, southwest corner Third. 
Ou and after WEDNESDAY, July 9th, 1379, a Clerk will be in attendance at these 
Headquarters, Room No. 6, for the purpose of NATURALIZATION. Office Hours, 
from 8 a.m. until 9 p.m. By order of the Committee. 
M. D. Boruck, Secretary. [July 19.] W. W. MORROW, Chairman. 

FRED H. BUSBY, 

Montgomery Block, <128 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
Manufacturer of Archery Gloves, Finger Tips, Arm Guards, Boxing, Fencing 
and Base Ball Gloves, for Catchers, Long Wrist Fishinj* Gloves, Belts for Uniforms, 
etc Archery Clubs supplied at reduced rates. Busby's Archery Clubs are the only 
ones in the market that will standsenice and give satisfaction. July 12. 

J. K. PRIOR, 

112S Market Street and 21 Turk Street. 

The Oldest Established Steam Gas Fitting and Plumbing 
Establishment on the Pacific Coast, where a complete assortment of new pat- 
terns of Gas Fixtures and Plumbing Material are offered at greatly reduced rates. 
Messages sent by American District Telegraph Company free. All jobbing promptly 
attended to. Established 1S52. July 12. 

BY ORDER OF THE PROBATE COURT, 

The Works of the late James Hamilton, comprising Paint- 
ings and Sketches in Oil and Water Colors, are now on view to the public and 
or sale at SNOW & CO. , 20 Post street. July 12. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 1878. 
old by nil Stationers. Sole Agent for the rnited State*: 

MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. T. J»". 5. 



s 



Smith's American Pianos, 200 Post street, comer of Dnpont. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



-A Tig. 2, ?S79. 



"PLEASURE'S WAND." 

"We Obey no Wand bnt Pleasure's."-- Tow Moore. 

Baldwin's Theater. — Bo much has been said about the merits of 
Steele Mackaye's play of Won at Last, that its production was awaited 
with curiosity. It enjoyed a long run at Wallack's, and was lately re- 
vived at the opening of the author's own theater. It seems iucredible 
that the play at Baldwin's should be the same thing, for it possesses so 
many faults that its success cannot be imagined. The subject is an ad- 
mirable one. The story is that of a perfectly blase, phlegmatic man of 
the worldj who marries, at his dead father's testamentary request, a girl 
who loves him passionately, and who believes her affection is returned. 
On the wedding day the confiding girl discovers that her husband is per- 
fectly indifferent to her, and her mental anguish is hightened by the ap- 
pearance on the scene of a former Parisian mistress of his, who has mar- 
ried an American, and pursues him with her love. The gradual awaken- 
ing of the better feelings of the man, hardened through attrition with the 
world, the love for his wife, a noble and virtuous girl, which is slowly but 
surely creeping into possession of his heart and soul, and the final happy 
culmination, form a beautiful story, and one can easily imagine a good 
play based upon it. But, as written by Steele Mackaye, it is absurd and 
farcical. The lines are either stupid or ridiculous— some of them so 
much so that it is past belief that an educated, sensible being could ever 
have written them. There is the usual American dramatist's error of 
introducing exaggerated, impossible characters, but this seems to be the 
peculiar idiosyncrasy of that class, and must be endured. Mr. Mackaye 
pretends to follow the French school. This play is, in treatment, utterly 
at variance with the teachings of that school. Plausibility and truth to 
nature are cardinal principles with modern French writers, and these 
canons are magnificently violated in this play. Mr. Mackaye, with this 
Btory, so pathetic and true, bad an opportunity to write a good American 
play, but failed to grasp it. I cannot believe that, in its present dress^ 
with its childish," idiotic lines and ridiculous business, Won at Last passed 
the gauntlet of New York critics. And still an evening passed at this 
theater is a very enjoyable one. The stock company is an admirable one, 
and in the last play some of the talented members have good opportuni- 
ties. Won at Last was excellently well acted. Miss Coghlan, as the 
heroine, was all that the most captious critic could desire. In the first 
act the girlish, inexperienced confidence she feels in a perpetual honey- 
moon, and the true modesty of her manner and demeanor, were admira- 
bly portrayed. The next act allots to her conflicting emotions difficult to 
represent. The struggle between the dignity and pride of the woman, 
the trampled-upon but still existing love, is one requiring talent and 
intelligence to depict. By simply saying that Miss Coghlan fills every 
requirement of the role, all possible praise is awarded. Every new char- 
acter this lady appears in substantiates the opinion expressed at her first 
appearance — that she is by far the best actress in her line that ever came 
to this city. O'Neill has a rather thankless character on his hands, but 
plays it in his usual manly style. This gentleman is doing intelligent, 
conscientious work now, a strong contrast with his former careless, don't- 
care way. • Jennings played the character of an old Professor with rare 
delicacy. It is a part suited to his prominent peculiarities of voice and 
manner, and this, coupled with true artistic acting, formed a very satis- 
factory picture. The little scene at the return of his supposed lost-at-sea 
son was a touching bit of pathos. Miss Corcoran surprised the audience 
again by her clever rendition of the Frenchwoman, " Mrs. Bunker." The 
vernacular was properly pronounced and spoken, and the dialect faithful 
to nature. This little lady is brim-fnll of talent, which is rapidly matur- 
ing. The house was good on the opening night, and ought to continue 
so, for Miss Coghlan's acting is a rare treat, and it is to be feared she 
will leave us soon. The New Babylon is underlined. 

Bush-Street Theater. — The strong hold that variety entertainments 
have on a majority of our people is well evidenced by the throngs that 
nightly fill this theater. Tony Pastor has brought with him a company 
which, in its peculiar line, is truly an admirable one. To me there is a 
certain sameness and staleness about all the jokes and acts of perform- 
ances of this character ; but, after all, what is the difference if one laughs. 
It is better in all things to refrain from analyzing the causes that move 
our feelings or emotions and accept the effects. For the appreciation of 
the fun and humor of a variety show, no particular amount of inherent 
intelligence or of momentary mental taxation is necessary. In this way 
it has attractions for both the refined and vulgar. To the latter it is the 
quintessence of fun and amusement ; it is wit to the hight of their un- 
derstanding. To the intelligent and intellectual it is a relaxation from 
the mental activity and worry co-existing with a highly developed condi- 
tion of the brain. In this must lie the causes of the popularity of variety 
performances in this country — popularity so great that managers become 
very rich, and song and dance and specialty people command salaries that 
are ridiculous in their magnitude. In this troupe there are some very 
clever people who deserve special mention. George Thatcher is a droll 
and humorous genius. He tells his jokes and anecdotes in such a dry, 
mirth-provoking way, that he is nightly received with shouts of laughter 
and applause. The French sisters please through very pretty faces and 
skillful manipulation of the clogs. Bryant and Hoey, who are old favor- 
ites, repeat their laughable musical act in a slightly altered form. The 
troupe is strong in Irish dialect artists ; the two teams, Sheehan and 
Jones and Kelly and Ryan, being very clever in their particular line. 
Tony Pastor himself sings the usual kind of songs, the merit of which 
lies solely in their perfect (if I can coin a word) apropos-nes3. The bill is 
to be changed weekly, and several novelties are in reserve. Political al- 
lusions are hardly in place on the stage, and such idiotic gags as some of 
the performers indulged in during the week should be excised by the 
stage-manager. 

The Fourteenth Industrial Exhibition of the Mechanics' Institute 

will be opened on Tuesday next, August 5th, at 2 p.m., by Exercises at 
the Grand Opera House, Mission street. The public is learning to expect 
these displays every year, and to count upon them for a season of mingled 
pleasure and improvement ; and there is every reason to believe that the 
attendance at the opening will be worthy of the untiring exertions of the 
managers. The programme includes an address by the President, music 
and singing, a poem by Miss Julia C. Jones, an oration by Dr. Guard, 
and an Exhibition March, composed for the occasion. 



Standard Theater. — The revival of Diplomacy has undoubtedly been 
a judicious move in the history of this theater. The audiences have been 
large and seemingly well pleased. This play is without exception one of 
the strongest comedies on the modern stage. It is admirably constructed, 
the different incidents, exciting and interesting as they are, seem so true, 
and follow in such natural sequence, that the whole play is as a picture 
from real life. The easy, conversational tone is the one that this tri- 
umph of Sardou's ingenuity requires for proper development and execu- 
tion. The great merits of the performance given by the Montague party 
was in the proper appreciation of that fact. The tout-ensemble of that 
troupe was perfect. The present combination lacks this feature, hut 
makes up a little for it by the stronger individualization of some of the 
characters. This performance is deprived of the care and finish of the 
other party, but is, nevertheless, very creditable. The compliments and 
favors that have been showered upon Miss Lewis for her impersonation of 
the " Countess Zicka " have produced the usual result of exaggerated 
praise. In her efforts to improve a good piece of acting she has only suc- 
ceeded in making more prominent those particular points that were the 
blemishes of the former representations. In tone and gesture she is now 
at times extremely exaggerated, 'and her play of features has become, if I 
can so express it, more sardonic. All these defects are of a nature that per- 
mits of easy improvement, especially at the hands of a woman of talent, 
and no one can deny Miss Lewis' claims to this title. The principal char- 
acteristics of poor Montague's acting were a certain indescribable aristo- 
cratic ease and gentlemanly self-possession that was very agreeable to be- 
hold. If the part assumed by him required such points, it was a success- 
ful piece of acting ; if not, it was then readily seen that Montague was 
but an indifferent actor. His " Julian Beauclerc " was, taken all in all, a 
charming picture, but lacked the essential of manliness. His emotion, as 
portrayed in the great trio scene of the second act, was weak and effemi- 
nate. Mr. Piercy's conception and carrying out of the character is a 
decidedly preferable one. More particularly in the above mentioned 
scene does a comparison inure to his credit. The grief and sorrow ex- 
perienced by a man wounded in his love and honor is depicted, by Mr. 
Piercy in a manly, honest way, pity -inspiring' in its truthfulness to na- 
ture. If study can efface two faults that this actor is afflicted with, he 
has undoubtedly a promising future. These faults are : a too marked 
self-consciousness that imposes itself, and a nasal twang, noticeable only 
when the pitch of the voice is raised. Mr. Max Freeman plays "Stein" 
with all the ability and talent this genial act>r possesses. In all the de- 
tails and adjuncts, Mr. Freeman gives evidence of intelligent study and 
proper discrimination. At his hands the character receives all the atten- 
tion possible, and becomes one of the most prominent figures in the play. 
The audience nightly testify their appreciation by a recall to Mr. Free- 
man. All the other characters are in good hands. The setting of the 
play is neat and tasty. The children's Pinafore is still produced in the 
afternoons to fair houses. It might be proper to suggest to Mr. Keene 
that in polite society it is not customory upon introduction to a lady to 
encircle her waist familiarly. 

California Theater. — Aime'e and her company have produced, since 
last issue, La Marjolaine and Mme. Favart. The Alice Oates troupe 
familiarized us with some of the beauties of the former operetta, but, as 
usual, failed to give us the correct thing. This work of JLecocq's is replete 
with pretty airs and elaborate instrumentation. Though this company is 
musically weak, it is so strong from a point of view of acting, that that 
weakness is lost sight of in the admirable tout ensemble presented. Little 
Beaudet was as cute and cunning as ever. The peculiar charm of this 
little girl lies in the combination of perfect youth in appearance, with 
great maturity in the rouerie and chic of a bouffe actress. That Bhe is a 
pupil of Aime'e is evident from her every move and gesture. Aime'e, her- 
self, was at her best, and sang the "TJTn petit sou " plaintively and pa- 
thetically. The admirable acting of Meziere's and Duplan made this pro- 
duction greatly the best so far. They are both good comedians. Meziere's, 
in his line of character impersonations, stands very high, and there are 
but few actors on our own stage his equal. A good word is deserved, as 
usual, by Juteau Jouard, the latter for his acting only, as his singing is 
anything but artistic. The voice is hard and flat, and shows great ten- 
dency to getting out of tune. Mme. Favart is Offenbach's latest composi- 
tion. Annoyed and aggravated by the success of Lecocq, who, through 
richness of melody and elaboration of harmony, had entirely supplanted 
him, he sought to reassert his rights and regain his position by the com- 
position of this operetta. It is an evident attempt at the comparative 
higher style of opera bouffe music, but is, as such, a failure. Offenbach's 
peculiar talent is the writing of rollicking bouffe tunes, coarse and vulgar, 
musically speaking, and admirably adapted to the text set to them. Here 
and there sprinkled among his many operas you will find bits of delicious 
harmony classically pure, but they are few and far between. In 1866 he 
made an attempt at something of a higher order, and composed Robinson 
Crusoe. This contained some pretty numbers, but as a whole, proved 
that he could not cope with the requirements of opera comique. Addi- 
tional proof of this fact is given by the music of Mme. Favart. The few 
things in it that are pretty are those composed in his old style, and they 
are but sparse in number. The rest of the score is an imitation of Lecocq, 
and a poor one. The subject of the opera is a rather interesting one. It 
was admirably performed by this troupe. Aime'e and Juteau sang their 
respective parts neatly and acted them well. The latter remark can be 
applied also to Jouard. Meziere's gave another one of his remarkable 
characterizations as "Pontsable*." His impersonation of the senile, de- 
crepit, but still lecherous old man, was an artistic performance. It was 
actually disgusting in its apparent truthfulness. These two operas were 
produced with all the wealth of costume this company possesses. They 
are remarkable for beauty and elegance. La Boulangere a des Ecus, was 
played last night too late for review. Next week the bill is a varied one. 
On Monday and Wednesday Girofie Girqfia, on Tuesday Les Brigands, on 
Friday La Belle Helene, and on Saturday Le Petit Faust. This will make 
thirteen operas produced during this season — a rather extensive repor- j 
toire. 

Opera Bouffe Ball. — In New York the masked balls given every 
year by the Avion Liedev Kranz and Gercle de L'ffarmonie are notable 
events, looked forward to from season to season. The ball that takes 
place next Thursday is of a similar character, and will undoubtedly have 
the corresponding sweets. The rules adopted governing the maskers are 
admirably adapted to further all jollity and fun. On the floor, masking] 
will be compulsory with the ladies and optional with the gentlemen. This 
is a remarkable good feature of the ball. A woman under a mask adds to 



Aug. 2, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



all her other chum* that «>f mystery, iwrl gives Impetni t*> the most agree- 
able of KDftUoiu imaghifttion. M »»k.>i, a man beonmos mora heavy 
and belp]«av, and out y figure. The above rule enrares a suo- 

ceae. At th»- door, gentlemen coming in will \w required to show their 
feat n rf!*. hut the masked Been i y of the iadta will remain inviolate. The 
amnjfenientt for decoration, music, supper, oloak moms, dressing rooms, 
til >>f the most perfect kind. Thfl musiowul l»ea particular 
feature, am! the fl'M.r large and nmrny. ITw scene will be ■ brilliant one. 
All the costumes at the command »»f the different theaters will he brought 
into requisition. To many of us, who have «i«?nt winters in Paris or new 
York, this ball brings np jolly recollections nl nights at the Grand Opera 
Br academy of Ifnsic. If the people out here would once get into the 
habit of these things, they would wonder how they ever pot along without 
them. So all of yon bring costumes, and a general rendezvous is an- 
nounced for next Thursday evening. 

The Grand Complimentary Testimonial tendered by the legal 
Dsjofsssiou of San KranciscM to the estimable gentleman and actor, Mr. 
Samuel W. Piercy, is certainly the most notable theatrical testimonial 
aver given in this city, inasmuch as this gentleman is almost a native of 
this city, having arrived here with his parents at the age of six months. 
He is so widely and thoroughly known in San Francisco that words of 
commendation seem almost superfluous. Mr. Piercy left us a mere 
novice in the profession which he early espoused. He has returned 
full of honors and with a reputation which has been fairly earned. He 
will ai>pear as " Iago" in Shakespeare's play of Othello, and the cast will 
include Mr. T. \V. Keene, Miss Jeffreys-Lewis and several members of 
the legal profession, including Eugene N. Duprey, John M. Chretian, 
Lucian Tewksbury and James H. Ryan. We feel assured in predicting 
the Grand Opera House will be crowded on the eveniDg of Friday, Au- 
gust 8th, the time fixed for Ibis grand testimonial. Miss Lilian Andrews 
plays "Emelia" for Mr. Piercy s benefit. 

Chit- Ghat. 

The Ballet girls for the new spectacle at Niblo's will be mostly Ital- 
ians. They are already en route from Italy.— —Capoul is advertised to 
appear with Paola Marie September 11th, but his coming is still in doubt. 
' Linda Dietz canceled her engagement at the Union Square to be near 
her mother, who lives in ill-health in London. Miss Dietz will join the 
Haymarket company.— — Boucicault makes occasional visits to Brighton 
beach.— Henry Ward Beecher will lecture at Cape May.— — Neilson 
has been gambling at Monte Carlo. —Joe Polk will have a new play on 
the road next season.— Katherine Rogers is spending the Summer on 
Long Island with her four daughters, who are at school on the Hudson. 
—•Raymond was so affected by the heat in New York recently that he 
refused an offer to match half dollars. ^—Fatinitza is to be done in 
Philadelphia by children.— —Pearl Eytinge will act a short engagement 
in this city in September.— — ISAssommoir has been translated into Flem- 
ish. ^— Mapleson agrees to pay Gary §75,000 for five months.— —Little 
Willie Deutsch swears he will bring back Patti.^— Eastern papers pre- 
dict that Currie, the Texas murderer, will never hang.^— When Sarah 
Bernhardt stands alongside of David Davis she will look like a punbeam 
shining upon a haystack.— — Emmett and Mayo are big successes in Eng- 
land.-^ Henry Irving will not come to this country this season.-^ Alice 
Harrison has received an offer in London and will remain there. -^— Sam. 
Piercy may possibly belong to Steele Mackaye's Madison Square Thea- 
ter next season.— —Off the stage Juteau is a small, very dark-complex- 
ioned man of 45.— Aime*e is worth §200,000. After the local engage- 
ment she returns to Europe. Her age is about 38.— The great attrac- 
tion at the California for baldbeads, etc., is the plump Chartre with the 
rosebud mouth. —On the second night of La Grande Duchesse the role 
of " Gen. Bourn " was assumed by Vinchon, the chorus-master of the 
troupe, and he made an instantaneous and wonderful hit. It was an ad- 
mirable effort. 

BUSH STREET THEATER. 



TONY PASTOR, 

AND HIS GREAT DOUBLE TROUPE! 

Another Entire Change of Programme for Monday, August 4th. 



S3- MATINEES SATURDAY AT 8. "\SS 

Monday, August 11th, the Great Jiurlesque, 

CANAL BOAT PINAFORE. 

• [Aug 2.1 

CHIARINI'S ROYAL ITALIAN CIRCUS 

AND 

PERFORMING ANIMALS 

Will commeuce tUeir Grst season ill San Francisco since 
his return from his tour nrouud the world on 

THURSDAY EVENING, AUGUST 7TH. 
—ON THE— 
Mammotli Circus Jjot, corner of Mission and Sevetith Streets, 
I with the GRE.vriiST AGGREGATION OF TALENT ever presented in this city. The 
I Eonipany that will appear iu this Great Show consists of EQUESTRIENNES, 
• EQUESTRIANS, ACROBATS and GYMNASTS, selected by Sigjior chiarini from 
lamong the Best Talent to be found in Europe and America, aud the 
TRAINED ANIMALS, 

■ consisting of Signor Giuseppe Ohiarini'9 MAGNIFICENT STUD OF HORSES, which 

■ have been the theme of universal admiration, augmented by the engagement of 
|Mr. G. Bartholomew's STUD OF MAKVKLOUS BRONCHOS. 



PRICES O-*' ADMISSIOX: 

■Private Boxes, with Six Chairs 35. I Gallery 60 Cent 

§Dress Circle Chairs SI. j Children Half Price. 

Seats can be Reserved without Extra Charge. 

Performance Every Evening at S o'clock. 
IATTXEJES : Wednesday and Saturday Afternoons at % o'clock. 

~ Doors open one hour previous to the commencement of the performance. 

[August 2.] 



COMPLIMENTARY TO MR. PIERCY. 

Snn Francisco. Juit 2,ii, 1979.— Samuel W. Piercy, Esq.-- 
DbarSir: Understanding thai vou are about to retornto the Eastern States 
to fulfill ■ professional engagement, the undersigned, members of the liar of San 
Francisco, dosJre to testify t.> you their appreciation of (he Industry, ambition and 
patient study which have brought bo deserved prominence as an actor, one who first 
ad tptod the law as a pursuit We rememberwfth pleasure your debut as "logo," and 
respectful!} requesl you to repeal the performance at an early day, that we and the 
public may substantial!,] express our appreciation of your merit as an actor and your 
character as a man. Yours, etc., 

w. n L, Barkks, GeorqbG. W. Hoob, Joseph Napiitally, 
Okorok P. Sharp, R. II. Lloto, Jos, W. Winans, 

K 0. Marshall, Hall McAllister, Josr F. Godot, 

Walter F. Lkvy, And fifty-three others. 

REPLY. 

Gentlemen :— Allow mo to express my heart-folt thanks from your complimentary 
letter. 1 am happy in your favorable opinion, and I can assure you, that by careful 
study and close application, I shall endeavor to justify it. In reply to your kind and 
fluttering request, permit me to name Friday evening, August 8th, 187!) (the anniver- 
sary of my birthday), as the time, and the Grand Opera House as the place, for the 
performance of OTHELLO. Respectfully and gratefully, 

Samuel W. Piercy. 

To Messrs. TV. H. L. Barnes, Ilall McAllister, and others. [Aug. 2. 

ZAMLOCK. 

STANDARD THEATER. 

MA. Kennedy, JUaua^cr.—Aii Instantaneous Success! 
» This (Saturday) Evening, August 2d, and every evening during the week, 
will be presented Sardou's Greatest Success, DIPLOMACY, unanimously pronounced 
to be a Play perfect iu construction, grandly acted, magnificently mounted, and of 
absorbing interest from beginning to end. With Scenery, Costumes and Appoint- 
ments entirely uew, <ind a cast including Miss Jeffreys Lewis, Miss Nina Varian, Miss 
Florence Wood, Miss Belle Chapman, Mr. S. W. Piercy, Mr. Max Freeman, Mr. Felix 
Morris, Mr. A. D. Billings, Mr. Walter M. Leiuan, etc. Only DIPLOMACY MAT- 
INEE on Saturday, August 2d. Box Office open daily from 8 a.m. Seats can be se- 
cured six days in advance. By general request, the JUVENILE PINAFORE COM- 
PANY every afternoon (except Saturday) during the week, when many new features 
will be introduced. Aug. 2. 

ZAMLOCK. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Barton * I. an lor. Manager*: Barton Hill, Acting Manager. 
Positively the Last Week of A1MEE. Mondav, August 4th, Benefit of DUPLAN, 
(alBO Wednesday, August 6th), GIROFLE-GIROFLA. Tuesday, August 6th, Benefit 
of MLLE. RAPHAEL -LE3 BRIGANDS. Thursday, August 7th, no performance 
on account of the GRAND OPERA BOUFFE MASKED BALL Friday. August 8th, 
Benefit of MEZ1ERBS- -LA BELLE HELENE. LAST AIMEE MATINEE SATUR- 
DAY— LES BRIGANDS. Saturday, August 9th, Farewell Night and Benefit of 
MLLE. GREGOIRE— LE PETIT FAUST. Seats at the Box Office. Aug. 2. 

ZAMLOCK. 

THE BALDWIN THEATER. 

Manager, Mr. Thomas Mugnire.-- This (Saturday) Evening, 
August 2d. Enthusiastic Reception of J. Steele Mackaye's New York (Wal- 
lack's Theater) success, WON AT LAST. Mr. James O'Neill, Mr. Lewis Morrison, 
Mr. J. W. Jennings, Mr. C B. Bishop, Mr. F. Robinson, Mr. A. D. Bradley, Miss 
Rose Coghlan, Miss Katherine Corcoran, Miss Jean Clara Walters, Miss Mollie Revel. 
FIRST " WON AT LAST" MAT1KEE on SAT URDAY. Aug. 2. 

ZAMLOCK. 

BUSH STREET THEATER. 

Charles E. Locke, Proprietor. «A Particularly Brilliant 
Success. TONY PASTOR and his GREAT DOUBLE COMPANY, every eve- 
ning (including Sunday) and Saturday Matinee. Novelty Programme No. 2. Every 
Act, Song and Sketch iNew, Entire Change of Programme. Ladies' Matinee Satur- 
day. T ONY PASTOR appears at each Entertainment. Aug. 2. 

GO A S YOU PLE ASE. 

Grand Pacific Coast Six-Day Pedestrian Tournament, 
Commencing About September 20th, 1879, 

Under the Management of Messrs. 
W. S. LAWTON and D. R. McNETXIi. 



These gentlemen having for many years been thoroughly 
identified with amateur athletic sports in this city, the citizens of San Fran- 
cisco, who are desirous of witnessing a six days' contest which they are satisfied will 
be conducted with good faith to all, have solicited them to take the management of 
an Entertainment of this kind,, and feeling assured that they have the confidence of 
the public and that their personal guarantee will he accepted that the programme 
will be carried out as represented, they have decided to conduct an Entertainment 
of this kind, and have engaged the MECHANICS' PAVILION for that purpose, and 
now offer the following inducements to Pedestrians. One-half of the net proceeds 
will be divided among the contestants, as follows : 

The contestant accomplishing the greatest number of miles in the 142 hours shall 
receive 50 per cent, and a diamond and gold medal valued at $350, to be known as the 
Pacific Coast Champion Medal. 

The second man will receive 30 per cent, and a gold medal valued at $100. 

The third man 1'2 j per cent, ana a silver medal valued at . 

The fourth man l\ per cent. 

The medals will be the absolute property of the winners. All other contestants 
accomplishing 350 miles will receive $100 ; 375 miles, $150; and 400 miles, $200. As 
a guarantee of good faith, an entrance fee of $100 will be charged, and must be paid 
as follows : 25 per cent, on entry ; the balance on or before September the 10th, 
when the entries will close. Contestants are requested to enter their names as soon 
as possible, in order that suitable arrangements may be made for their accommoda- 
tion Any other information required may be obtained by calling on or addressing 

W. S. LAWTON, 
Olympic Club Rooms, 119 Post street, S. F. 



Aug. 2. 



ZAMLOCK. 



MECHANICS' FAIR, 

San Francisco, California, 
OPENS AUGUST 5TH, 1879, 

Science, Art, Industry and \ninn»i Productions will be 
fully represented Grand Instrumental Concert each afternoon and evening. 
Machinery in Motion, Rare Painting*, Pine Statuary, z. Tropn-ii Garden, Fountains 
and Promenades will make this Exhibition tht; OftOpt instructive and plea^aut place 
of resort ou this Coast. Those desiring suapo should applv at once, office : 27 Post 
street IR\IN'G M. SCOTT, President 

J. H. Culver. Secretary. July 12. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 2, 1879. 




"The World," the Flesh, and the Devil. 

[By a Truthful Penman.] 

The following story of the loves of two girls tends to show that fem- 
inine affection may be carried too far. Miss Lillie Over and Miss Ella 
Hearn were both pretty and attractive, and they resided at Pokomoke, 
Maryland. They had been " classmates at the same seminary, where 
they both graduated with high honors," and they became intimate friends. 
One day Miss Over requested Miss Hearn to accompany her for a walk. 
What followed is related by the latter young lady before her death: 
" Lil got awful mad, and came up to me and said — * Before heaven, Ella 
Hearn, if you don't go into the woods with me to-morrow, I'll never ask 
you to go anywhere else.' Next day Lil came around ; I was sewing. 
Lil got up to leave two or three times, and snatched my work from my 
hands. My ma told me to go to the door with Lil. Lil turned back, 
shut the door, and asked me would I take back what I had said, and 
attempted to kiss me. I pushed her down and then laughed. Lil said I 
hurt her a little. When she got up she commenced talking, I told her 
to go home. Lil then asked me if I loved Ella Forster better than her, 
and I answered: ' Yes.' Lil stepped back and said: ' Repeat that and I'll 
shoot you.' " And this threat Lil carried into effect with so fatal an aim 
that Ella Hearn died of her wound. Lil is now being tried on a charge of 
wilful murder, and she " insists that the shot which put an end to the life 
of Ella was an accidental one, and that this ill-starred friend died of 
chloral f administered by the physicians after the shooting."-^— At a ball 
at Paris the other day, ladies were given a sort of cheque-book with 

counterfoils. On these cheques were printed: " Good for dance." 

These they gave signed to their intended partners, and then wrote the 
name of the partner on the counterfoil. By this means all mistakes were 
avoided.— ^Depression in the diamond trade is undoubtedly a bad sign 
of the times. We know a fashionable diamond merchant in the west. 
For June last hiB sale transactions amounted to only £4,000. In June 
1878 they were £14,000, and as compared with an average of £20.000 in 
the same month of preceding years. — London World.—— Another story 
about the Great Sahara (Bernhardt). That a Personage went behind the 
scenes and was introduced ; that the Personage removed his hat and re- 
placed it ; that the Great Sahara turned to a number of admirers who 
stood bareheaded by, and said with exquisite moqu trie, " Couvrez-vous, 
messieurs!"^— An interesting experiment is being tried at the London 
Zoological Garden's. Eggs laid by an ostrich have been cunningly painted 
to resemble an emu's, and placed under a male emu to be hatched. Should 
they come to light and life all right, fancy the feelings of that emu when 
they develop! One can foresee domestic broils.^— The exact date of the 
Prince Imperial's death was not the 1st of June, as generally misstated, 
but Saturday, May 31st, at four in the afternoon. We gather from a let- 
ter from the seat of hostilities that he was slightly lame, owing to an 
abscess in the hip, and this may have prevented him from vaulting into 
the saddle with his usual alert skill. He was very active, and was a noted 
runner at the athletic sports of the Woolwich cadets. But the quickest 
and lightest of men are not always in form. >^— Roman loungers were 
treated to a rare spectacle lately on the Via Appia; a bicycle race between 
two ladies, who both belong to the best society, and are celebrated for 
their beauty. They appeared on their iron steeds arrayed in the most 
coquettish of Spanish hats, vests and tights. The fair winner was Madame 
Le Ghait, the wife of the First Secretary of the Belgian Legation.—^ 
We shall be much surprised if the ball recently given in Mr. Gladstone's 
old house by Lady Olive Guinness be surpassed by any entertainment 
this season. The hostess's sister-in-law, Mrs. Guiness, had what may be 
called a floral fete of marked brilliancy only a week before ; but on this 
occasion the flowers were, in beauty and abundance, hitherto unheard of 
in London, though perhaps to be equaled at Rome or Nice. There were 
festoons of real roses, banks of gardenias, and mantelpieces of stephanotis ; 
while here and there towered huge blocks of ice, with hot-house blossoms 
frozen into them. The effect was admirable ; but we are not surprised to 
hear that it was attained by an expenditure of rather over four thousand 
pounds. What chance has the commonplace ball-giver after this ? Mrs. 
White of Ardharroch must look to her laurels. — World.— —At Hurling- 
ham he said to her: " Yes, the sky is overcast, and there is no sun. But 
the good people tells us there is always something to be thankful for, so 
we must be thankful that there is any sky at all." She, languidly: 
"Yes ; I suppose we ought to be thankful for that. If there were no 
sky, we below would see the legs of the saints — and there is a Lord Cham- 
berlain. — JFoWri.— Marceline Guiot, twenty-six years of age, has just 
been condemned to death by the Court of Assizes of the Vienne for one 
of the most abominable crimes on record. She forced her stepdaughter, 
a littlegirl of eight, to take with her soup sixteen pins, two needles and 
some pieces of wood, and the unfortunate child perished in the most hor- 
rible torments. There could be no recommendation to mercy even from 
a French jury in such an atrocious case.— —It is pleasant to hear that the 
Whyte-Melville Memorial Fund is progressing. So greatlv was the late 
Major Whyte-Melville liked in the hunting-field that Northamptonshire 
farmers have sent up half-sovereigns, while hunt servants, many of whom 
had never seen him, but only knew him through his books, have given 
their humble half-crowns. 

It is argued that the sale of beer favors the cause of temperance, in 
that it crowds out stronger liquors. A man with a small keg of beer in 
his stomach has no room for a bottle of whisky. 

Sterling. Silverware. — A large assortment of elegant designs at Ran- 
dolph & Co.'s, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 



Ode to Spring — A grudge for not coming sooner. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

rUStTBANCE AGENCY, 
No. 323 & 324 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Eire Insurance. 



ST. PAUL of St. Paul. 

UNION of Galveston. 

TEUTON! A of New Orleans. 

BERLIN-COLOGNE of Berlin. 

LA GONFIANCE of Paris. 



G1RARD of Philadelphia. 

HOME of Columbus. 

NEW ORLEANS ASSOCIATION 

PEOPLES of Newark. 

REVERE of Boston. 

LA CAISSE GENERALE of Paris. 

Marine Insurance. 

PARIS UNDERWRITING ASSOCIATION : of Paris. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London. 

Capital Represented $83,000,100. 

All Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE CO. OF CALIFORNIA. 

Principal Office, 406 California Street, San Francisco. 
Cash Assets, January 1, 1877, ,$595,291 ; Liabilities, $5,952 ; Surplus for Policy 
Holders, §589,339. J. F. Houghton, President ; L. L. Baker, Vice-President ; 
Charles R. Story, Secretary. R. H. MAGILL, H. H. B1GELOW, General Agents. 

Directors. — San Francisco — L. L. Baker, John H. Redington, J. F. Houghton, 
R. B. Gray, Robert Watt, John Currey, L. L. Baker, W. F. Whittier, a C. Burr, E. 
M. Root, W. H. White, J. L. N. Shepard, W. M. Greenwood. George S. Mann, Cyrus 
Wilson, W. T. Garratt, C. Waterhouse, A. P. Hotaling, A. Block, A. K. P. Harmon, 
G. S. Johnson, W. O. Wilson, A. W. Bowman, H. L. Dodge, Charles R. Story. Ala- 
meda County Branch — V. D. Moody, Chauncy Taylor, A. C. Henry, Robert S. Far- 
relly, Joseph B. Marlin, W. B. Hardy, T. B. Simpson. San Diego— A. H. Wilcox. 
Sacramento — Mark Hopkins, D. W. Earl, Julius Wetzlar, James Carolan. San Jose— 
T. Ellard Beans, B. D. Murphy, A. Pfister, J. H. Dibble, J. S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, 
Jacob Rich, John Auzerais, John Balbach. Stockton — H. H. Hewlett, Chas. Belding, 
J. D. Peters, A. W. Simpson, H. M. Fanning. Marysville— D. E. Knight. Grass 
Valley— Wm. Watt, T. W. Sigouruey. Portland, Oregon— W. S. Ladd, C. H. Lewis, 
P. Wasserman, B. Goldsmith, D. Macleay. Virginia City, Nevada — John Gillig, Isaac 
L. Requa. March 17. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.-UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

Tbe California Lloyds.— Established in ISO 1.--- Nos. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash capital S750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed $1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
—San Francisco — J. Mora Moss, N. G. Kittle, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Moses 
Heller, Adam Grant, Daniel Meyer, AntoineEorel, Charles Kohler, E. L. Goldstein, 
I. Lawrence Pool, A. Weill, Joseph Brandenstein, Charles Bauin, James Moffitt, 
Benjamin Brewster, L. Cunningham, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas Luning, John Parrott, 
L. A. Booth, Julius Baum, Myles D. Sweeney, Jas. M. Goewey, Edward Cad walader 
Bartlett Doe, Gustave Touchard, J. H. Baird, J. G. Kittle, George C. Hickox, C. Du- 
commun, Wm. Scholle, John Conly, Ig. Steinhart, W. B. Stone, J. O. Eldridge, A. 
B. Phipps. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 
CnARr.Es D. Haven, Secretary. Geo. T. Bqhen, Surveyor. Aug. 31. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 

IIHE AND MARINE. 

Clash Assets, 9450,000.— Principal Office, 218 and 220 San- 
j some street, San Francisco. Officers :— A. J. Bryant, President ; Richard 
Ivers, Vice-President; Charles H. Cubbing, Secretary; H. H. Watson, Marine 
Surveyor. Board OF Directors : — Peter Donahue, James Irvine, C D. O'Sullivan, 
A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailey, E. W. Corbert, George O. 
McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. Buckley, 
P. J. White, E. M. Root, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld, Daniel 
Callaghan. P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, Los Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, SonomaCounty. H. W. Seale.Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. 16. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG. 

Capital $1,125,000, U. S. Gold Coin. 

Losses Paid in Gold Coin Immediately After Adjustment. 
This Corporatiou holds contracts of fifteen other European Insurance Compa- 
nies, re-insuring by far the. greater part of every risk, as soon as accepted in our of- 
fice. The combined subscribed Capital which ourpolicies therefore offer to the public, 
Amounts to i Of ■wHicli 

$16 913,500, IT. S. Gold Coin, | $4,338,750 is Paid Up, 

JSesides the Always Available Reserve Funds. 



March 15. 



GEORGE MARCUS & CO., General Agents for the Pacific Coast, 

304 California street. 



THE MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, ENGLAND. 

[ESTABLISHED 1836.] 
Whole Amount of Joint Stock and Guaranteed Capital- .$5,000,000. 

Whole Amount of Capital paid up 900,000. 

Cash Assets December 31, 1876 '• 3,710,000. 

The undersigned have been duly authorized to issue Policies at current rates on 
Freight and Shipments to or from England, Europe, New York, Japan, China, Aus- 
tralian Colonies, Sandwich Islands, and Northern Coast Ports. If desired, policies 
made payable at port of termination* 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., Agents, 

Aug. 10. 218 C alifornia street. 

~~ THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED^ 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
tained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 225 Sansome St., S. F. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSUR. CO. OF BOSTON. 

Has transacted tbe business of Life Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Polic3'-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
Sept. 22.] 328 Mo ntgomery street^ 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Clapital $5,000,000 Agents: Balfour, Guthrie A Co., No. 
J 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 



Aug. 2, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



WEAVING THE "WEB. 
"This morn I will wean my w,-h," she mud. 
• A- *lie hUkxI by the loom in the rosy tight, 

And her young eyes, hopefully glad And clear, 
Followed nftir the swallow 1 ! flight. 
" As ji'iin as the day's Hot ta>ks are done. 

While yet I am Freab :m,l strong," *A\d she, 
**I will hasten to weavt* the Innutiful Web 

Whose pattern is known to none but me. 
** I will weave it fine, I will weave it fair. 

And ah! how the colors will glow! " she said, 
41 So fadeless and strong will I weave my web 

That periutpi it will live after I am dead." 
But the morning hours sped on apace ; 

The air new sweet with the breath of June ; 
And young Love hid by the waiting loom, 

Tangled the threads as he hummed a tune. 
" Ah! life is so rich and full," she cried, 

" And morn is so short though the days are long! 
This n«*on I will weave my beautiful wen, 

I will weave it carefully, fine and strong." 
But the sun rode high in the cloudless sky ; 

The burden and heat of the day she bore ; 
And hither and thither she came and went, 

While the loom stood still as it stood before. 
11 Ah! life is too busy at noon," she said ; 
" My web must wait till the eventide, 
Till the common work of the day is done, 

And my heart grows calm in the silence wide!" 
So, one by one, the hours passed on 

Till the creeping shadows had longer grown ; 
Till the house was still, and the breezes slept. 

And her singing birds to their nests had flown. 
"And now I will weave my web," she said, 

As she turned to her loom ere set of sun, 
And laid her hand on the shining threads 

To set them in order, one by one. 
But hand was tired and heart was weak ; 
" I am not as strong as I was," Bighed she. 
"But the pattern is blurred, and the colors rare 

Are not so bright or so fair to seel 
" I must wait, I think, till another morn ; 

I must go to my rest with my work undone ; 
It is growing too dark to weave," she cried, 

As lower and lower sank the sun. 
She dropped the shuttle, the loom stood still ; 

The weaver slept in the twilight gray. 
Deal' heart. Will she weave her beautiful web 
In the golden light of a longer day ? 

BOOK NOTICES. 

Classical Writers. Edited by J. R. Green. Milton.— By Stopford A. Brooke. 
D. Appleton & Co., New York. A. L. Bancroft & Co., San Francisco. 

If the growing generation does not know the great men of the past, it 
is not for want of information to be had. What with Primers and 
Handy-Books, such as Appleton is publishing every day, one needs to hide 
himself if he will not learn. These books are almost always well-written 
and by competent critics. Mr. Brooke's Primer of English Literature 
has made him a kind of authority with the public, and the present vol- 
ume on Milton brings together all that is needed for an introduction to 
the reading of him ; for therein lies the real value of these publications. 
Unless they rouse a desire to know the authors treated of, at first hand, 
they have failed to do their best ; and Mr. Brooke's judgment is so far 
independent and manly, even in the presence of the great poet, that a 
student should go to the Poems from the perusal of this essay with some- 
thing of a fair conception, both of the genius and the character of Milton. 

Monet. A Tale. By Jules Tardien. D. Appleton & Co., New York. A. L. 
Bancroft & Co., San Francisco. 

One of the handy-volume series, and a very entertaining little thing. 
Pierre Roland, a journalist, has money left him by a rich baroness, who 
admires his high sense of professional honor. He sends for an old friend 
and his daughter from the country. On the way down the daughter, 
who is extremely pretty, of course, saves the life of a child playing on the 
railroad track, by signaling to the engineer, and then gives him a bouquet 
tied with her handkerchief. The engineer is the son of a rich man in 
Paris, and, after many mystifications and small tangles, Marguerite and 
Paul are happily married, and everybody feelB better. The translation is 
a little forced and stiff. 

The " North American," for August, has no great variety, and the 
editor does not seem to have exercised his power of discrimination in an 
entirely laudable way, when he admits such padding as an article by 
Wendell Phillips on Garrison, and Mr. Jno. L. Stephens' superficial talk 
about Mehemet Ali. Phillips has worn out the patience of the most 
long-suffering, and never can, by accident, speak a reasonable word ; while 
Stephens was a mere tourist, without education of any kind to fit him 
for understanding serious matters. Mr. Freeman's article on " The 
Power of Dissolution " is full of information and suggestion. " The 
Work and Mission of My Life," by Richard Wagner, is immensely enter- 
taining, with its unconscious vanity and reckless misstatement of tenden- 
cies in life and art Why must patriots, political or artistic, be perpetu- 
ally whirling their hats in the air? The "Diary of a Public Man," 
wisely left anonymous, is of no significance to anybody. It notes down 
the mere rumors of the day, trivial, even if they were well-founded. The 
" Future of Resumption " is one more contribution to the much be-written 
money problem, and does not dispose of it. Mr. Jno. Fiske's notices of 
" Recent Works on Ancient History and Philology " are extremely inter- 
esting and well-considered. 

" Applkton's Journal," for August, is full of most interesting articles, 
many of them permanently valuable. Matthew Arnold's study on 
Wordsworth, Francisque Sarcey's account of the Comedie Franyaise, 
Morison's " Mirabeaus," the few vigorous translations of the yet untrans- 
latable Theophile Gautier, Schopenhauer's Thoughts on Men, Books and 



MusiV, and Mr. Mjtedon&ld'A furnish Saunter are papers one wants to 
keen. With them in sketches, and Bporting papers and novels, and the 
Monk Notices, always well done. 




T. A. BARRY, Agent for Naglee's Brandy, is at No. 116 
Montgomery Street. 

GEO. STREET, Agent Netvs Letter, 30 CoruhUl, E. C, London. 

IN CONSEQUENCE OF SPURIOUS IMITATIONS OF 

LEA A PERKINS' sahi;. which are calculated to deceive 
the public, Lea and Perrins have adopted A NEW LABEL, bearing their sig- 
nature, " LEA & PERRINS," which is placed on every bottle of WORCESTERSHIRE 
SAUCE, and without which none isgenuine. , 

Ask for LEA & PERRINS' Sauce, and see name on wrapper, label, bottle and stop- 
per Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & Blackwell, 
London, etc., etc., and by grocers and oilmen throughouttbe world. To be obtained ol 
Nov. 16. MESSRS. CROSS & CO.. San Francisco. 

ROWLAND'S 

MACASSAR. OIL strengthens the Hair and prevents it falling off. The bottles 

have a glass stopper, and not a cork. 
KALYDOR beautifies the Complexion and eradicates Freckles, Tan, Prickly Heat, 

Erupiions, etc. 
ODONTO whitens the Teeth, prevents and arrests decay, and gives a pleasing 

fragrance to the breath. 
ELTKONIA is a new and delicate toilet powder. 

Ask for ROWLAND'S articles, of 20, Hatton Garden, London, and avoid cheap 
imitations. Sold by Druggists, Bazaars, etc., all over the world. May 3. 

Asthma, and difficult breathing arising from affections of 
the Respiratory Organs, promptly relieved and paroxysms averted by 
Datura Tatnla Inhttlatious, for which purpose the plant is prepared In 
all the usual forms for smoking, and also as pastilles and powder for burning 
on a plate or censer. In 

Asthma and Aualagons Diseases the superior efficacy of thisplant, 
prepared as above mentioned, has been for the last 40 years recognized by the 
Medical Profession and the public in all parts of the world. Prepared only by 

Savory A Moore. 143, New Bond^street. Testimonials accompanying each 
box of Cigarettes, Cigars and Pastilles. Tins, in the economical form of tobacco, 
and also in powder for burning, from 2s. 6d. to 21s. Of chemists, etc., everywhere. 
[June 21.] 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 



F 



Inestaud Cheapest Meat-flavoring 

Dishes and Sauces. 



Stock for Sonps, Made 

March 2. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT 

[sa snecess and boon for which Nations should feel grate* 
fill. See " Medical Press," " Lancet," " British Medical Journal," etc. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT- 

Caution— Genuine only with fac-slmile of Baron I.iebisr's 
Signature, in blue ink, across Label. "Consumption in England increased ten- 
old in ten years. " March 2. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

To be had of all Store- keepers, Grocers and Chemists. Sole 
Agents for the United States (wholesale only), C. David & Co., 43, Mark Lane, 
London, England. March 2. 

Nbwton Booth, C. T. Whekler, Sacramento. | J. T. Glover, W. W. Dodge, S. F 



w 



W. W. DODGE & CO. 



holesale Grocers, 

Francisco. 



corner Front and Clay streets, San 

April 1. 



CASTLE BROTHERS, 

ESTABLISHED IK THE YEAR 1S50. 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, Ncs.213 and 210 
Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 13. 

DR. R. BEVERLY COLE 

Has Returned from the East and Resumed Practice at his Office, 

XO. BIS SUTTER STREET. I June 21. 

FREDERICK A. BEE, 

His Imperial Chinese Majesty's Consul. 

Office: 917 Clay Street. Residence: 62X> Eddy Street. 

R. H. LLOYD, 

Attorney-ct-Law, Room 13. Nevada Block. 

IRVINE & LE BRETON 

Have Removed their Law Offices to No. 217 Sansome Street. 

f March 15.] 



N' 



ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

o. 310 Sansome street, San Francisco, Wholesale Dealer 

in Furs. Sept. 21. 



$777 



a year and expenses to agents. Onlfit Free. Address, 

June 7.] P. O. VICKERY, Augusta, Maine. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 2, 1879. 



KALLOCH AND COX. 
Kalloch and Cox are fitting candidates to face one another. Parsons 
both, they are both blatant political humbugs, who bedraggle the cloth to 
which they belong in the mire. What has San Francisco done to be 
cursed at home and disgraced abroad by these unsavory candidates for the 
chief magistracy of our city ? We are told that these men are put for- 
ward as an offering to the religious sentiment of the community. It is 
stated as a fact, and there is some evidence that it is- true, that the church- 
going portion of our people are ranking themselves on the side of Kalloch, 
and believe that morality and religion will, in some unexplained and mys- 
terious manner, be promoted by his election. We have many good rea- 
sons for our opposition to this man, but perhaps the most weighty one is, 
that his candidacy is a slur upon religion and an insult to good morals. 
We can imagine nothing that is mere calculated to bring religion into con- 
tempt than the nomination of this bad representative of it. His record is 
not that of a man of average cleanliness. ^ It is impossible to discuss him 
without befouling one's mouth. The giving of most exceptional promi- 
nence to his name cannot be for the advantage of the Church. Moreover, 
there is surely something unseemly in a Christian minister wallowing up 
to his neck in the filthy pool of politics. Partisan strife and the doctrines 
of the meek and lowly Jesus do not go well together. There is an unfit- 
ness in the combination that ought to strike religious people above all 
others. The manner in which this man Kalloch is conducting himself 
evidences the incongruity of his position. Here is a specimen : "Mr. 
Kalloch said the day he was nominated he drove down to Union Hall and 
engaged it for the night before the election ; also, all the streets around it: 
A few days ago the Republicans went down there and said : ' We want 
the hall.' They were told they couldn't have it, for Kalloch had engaged 

it. ' What !' said they, ( that d d preacher.' Well, I got ahead of 

them, and they will find that that d d preacher will get ahead of them 

all the time. Three cheers and a tiger were thereupon given for Kalloch." 
That was a speech a'ddressed by Kalloch to Kearney and his followers. 
Kalloch has evidently been converted to blasphemy and vulgarity by 
Kearney. Will any well-wisher of religion say that the Bpirit or language 
of such a speech is calculated to favorably impress non-religious people? 
Bah ! We apolgize to men of sense for arguing thus seriously with fools. 
If the religious sentiment of San Francisco demands Kalloch, then hea- 
ven save us from the religious sentiment of San Francisco. 

EMPLOYING CHINESE. 
An eleventh commandment has been added to the decalogue, more 
patent than all the other ten. It is that employment shall not be given 
to a man if he happens to have been born in China. Californians are not 
remarkable for their particularity about the other commandments, but 
about this one they are of the strictest sect of the Pharisees. That is to 
say, they are if we are to believe the daily press. No man must dare run 
for office that ever permitted a Chinaman to clean his boots. It is said 
that a promising candidate for Governor lost his nomination because, 
being tumbled into the bay by a capsizing yacht, he submitted to being 
rescued by a Chinese fisherman. He saved his life, but committed the 
unpardonable sin, which forever will deprive him of the right to serve his 
country in official position. Seriously, there is a good deal of humbug 
about this lateBt test of official availability. If no man is to be voted for 
who has ever had a menial act performed for him by a Chinaman, then it 
is very certain that we shall have to send elsewhere for our office-holders. 
The rule, rigidly enforced, would exclude us all. White had a Chinese 
cook, Perkins collects fares and freights from Chinese, and Glenn permits 
them to save his falling grain. Yea, even the sand lots are not free from 
their touch. Boots are made, cigars are manufactured, and shirts are 
washed for sand-lotters by the "moon-eyed lepper." Even our babes 
drink the milk that is drawn from the cow by John Chinaman. Query : 
Would that disqualify the child in after life from receiving the votes of 
free and independent emigrants from the Emerald Isle ? Great heavens ! 
where is this evil to stop ? Who is to be free from the contaminating 
touch of honest John, all the way from China? Begorra, if we don't 
stop the hathen coming here, even the blue-blooded Patrick from Ireland 
will lose his conspicuous and manifold qualification for office-holding. 
The thing is getting serious and must be stopped — that it must. If a 
revelation of the eleventh commandment is to send us to perdition, who 
among us may expect to be saved? In that case, there is none good — no, 
not one. Even Kearney had his child carried to the grave, the other day, 
in a hearse, the owner of which employed a Chinaman. He should be de- 
posed from the Presidency of the W. P. C. forthwith. 

ATTEND TO THE ELECTION OF THE JUDICIARY. 

There Is danger that the next Judiciary of this city will be the weakest 
ever chosen to administer the litigation of the most litigious people on the 
face of the globe. One cause for this, perhaps, is that the salary has been 
reduced to a point at which it ceases to attract men of the requisite talent. 
It is a huge mistake to underpay judges. It is false economy. Bad de- 
cisions will inevitably cost more money than would suffice to procure the 
services of the very ablest men as judges. But low as the salary is, better 
men are obtainable than many that seem likely to be elected. The truth 
is, too little attention is being given to the election of the Judiciary. 
There are so many offices going, and so many people scrambling for them, 
that attention is not sufficiently focussed upon the delicate and difficult 
task of selecting honest and capable judges. Party spirit is rife, and 
purely partisan tickets are likely to be successful even in the case of the 
Judiciary. This is a misfortune that can be, and ought to be, avoided. 
Judicial talent is the monopoly of no one political party. We Bincerely 
trust that no independent voter will vote a straight party ticket for the 
Judiciary. The nicest discrimination Bhould be used in choosing the very 
best men from all the tickets, and a sturdy resolution should be formed 
to vote for such men, quite regardless of party nominations. If that pro- 
cess of seeking the survival of the fittest is diligently pursued, we may 
get a fair Judiciary. It is the only sure way that remains to us, now that 
purely partisan nominations all round are decided upon. It looks as if the 
Republican State ticket will be elected, and yet it would be a calamity 
for all the Republican nominees to be chosen to our next Supreme Court. 
On general principles it would be an evil to have that body filled from one 
political party. Moreover, on that ticket there are two of the very worst 
nominations for the Supreme Bench that have been made by any party. 
Who, for instance, believes that Wheeler ought -to be elevated to the Su- 
preme Bench? A weak lawyer, and a dubtful man in everyway, his 
name ought to be scratched by every thoughtful Republican. The party 
can gain nothing by his election. The chniee of an honest Judiciary 
should engage the very best attention of all good citizens. 



A LITTLE SISTER OF CHARITY. 

[An Actual Incident of a Hotel Reading-room.] 

A gambler and a rake was he 

Whose days and nights were wild, 
A wan and weary midget she, 

A crippled, beggar - child. 
Reclining at his ease he lay, 

When, lispingly, she said : 
" Please give me somethin 1 , sir ; all day 

I hasn't had no bread." 
But he is moody with the fumes 

Of a prolonged debauch ; 
And drink the appetite consumes 

Like flax beneath the torch. 
He speaks the truth, then, when he says, 

Turning impatiently : 
** I've eaten nothing these three days ; 

Go, brat, don't pester me !" 
She goes — poor, shivering little one— 

luto the cold, dark night ; 
Unheeding her, the man broods on 

In comfort, warmth and light. 
An hour goes by — he feels a touch 

TJpnn his folded hands ; 
There, leaning on her tiny crutch, 

The baby - beggar stands. 
" Please, sir, take this, (a copper cent), 

I'se sure that you must be 
(Her eyes were filled with wonderment) 

Much hungrier than me." 
" Three days ! Why I can hardly keep 

Alive a single one ! 
No — take it, please, I'se goin' to sleep, 

An' shan't feel hungry then." 
A flush of shame sweeps o'er his cheek, 

Hot tears bedim his eyes, 
His quivering lips refuse to speak, 

Then, kissing her, he cries : 
"Thou tiny minister of grace, 

A woman's heart is thine; 
Lift up thy blessed little face, 

Let thy lips hallow mine." 
" I'll keep thy copper for thy sake 

Until my dying day, 
And thou, sweet child, my gold must take — 

To-night I shall not play." 



A SPEECH TO BE REMEMBERED. 
A great deal of twaddle is being uttered at this political campaign. 
Issues are being discussed that have more of buncombe than good sense in 
them. But there was one notable exception the other night. The speech 
of Mayor Bryant, because of the practical subjects it discussed, stands 
out in bold relief and in striking contrast with the insufferable bosh of 
these times. The stump was never so weak as now. It spouts and spouts 
in one everlasting wish-washy flood. It spends its best efforts upon 
Glenn's farming, Perkins' sailor-boyism and White's Kearneyism — just as 
if the destinies of cities and States depended upon such trivialities. The 
people are much more concerned in knowing whether their government is 
efficient and economical. To those questions Mayor Bryant applied him- 
self, and in doing that dealt with telling facts and figures with the weight 
of one having authority. He showed just what the city is paying for 
good government, and whilst the expenditure in the different depart- 
ments is still a matter of close scrutiny and criticism, with a view to 
greater economy and efficiency in the future, the broad fact remains that 
the administration of affairs during the past four years will bear compari- 
son with that of any former period. Many substantial improvements 
have been made, a considerable portion of the city has been permanently 
paved, the Channel street nuisance has been abated, the new City Hall 
has made progress, new schools have been built and an increased number 
of children educated, the people's park has been greatly improved, a free 
library has been established, and nearly one million has been added to the 
Sinking Fund to pay off the city's indebtedness incurred by previous ad- 
ministrations ; and while all these things have been accomplished, the 
total of the city's tax levy of last year was only a trifle more than that of 
1875, divided, as it is, among a larger number of people, and spread over 
an increased area of property. That is the showing which the facts and 
figures justify. An ounce of proof is worth a pound of assertion. 
Mayor Bryant has made a most important contribution to the discussion 
of public affairs. He has shown just what the city gets and what it pays, 
and in doing that he has supplied the best possible justification of his own 
administration. He has now given a must practical turn to the considera- 
tion of city matters. If future discussion will keep in that groove, and if 
candidates will vie with each other in suggesting economies, and how to 
promote efficiency, they will be engaging themselves, like business men, 
with the matters that really concern ub at this time. 



THE NEW TELEGRAPH COMPANY. 
Since our former notices of the American Union Telegraph Com- 
pany, and its possible effect upon Western Union, we note that the stock 
of the latter corporation has declined ten per cent, in the New York Stock 
Exchange. The indications are that it will go down to at least 50, if not 
further, and such a result is to be expected, when it is borne in mind that 
the new company expect to complete their lines at a cost of about one- 
fourth of the capital at which Western Union is stocked. Late improve- 
ments in telegraphy are given as the prime reason, but we suspect that 
the watering of stock is the principal factor in the movement. Some 
leading California capitalists are said to be large investors in the Ameri- 
can Union. We shall eagerly watch the progress of this scheme, which 
promises a great reduction in rates and superior facilities for business men 
and newspapers. It cannot be completed too soon. 



2, 1879. 



CALIFOKNIA ADVEKTISKK. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

"H#*r th« Mar!" "Wh»t the *U»ll art ihoaT 
' On» tb»l will plaj th» d«vU,«n with you." 

" H*\l a fttnc in hi* tail as ,orwr •» ■ A*''. 
Which made him crow boMtr and bolder.'* 



Dramatic authors don't always haw a Mr show nt the cutset, what- 
ever the managers may say. At least thai is what a young friend of ours 
— who writes plays because hii name happens to be Buckstone— thinks, 
and theae are the facts he put in evidence : He says that he called at 
une of the Hush-street theaters the other morning, ami said t*i the mana- 
ger : " Will, sir, you toM me to call in a couple of weeks for your opinion 
of that play I left with you.** " Play play ! " said the manager, rubbing 
his care-corrugated brow, " what play?* " Why, mine ; don't you remem- 
ber—realistic California play, Snort* r /oJht or The Ihtys of '49?" "Oh ! 
yes, of oouna. Well, what about it? " *' Well, as it's been here over two 
months, 1 dropped in to know whether you have accepted it." "Well, 
the fact is," said the autocrat of the boards, shutting the door and assum- 
ing a confidential air, "the fact is, your drama is a remarkably strong 
wi>rk, my dear sir; remarkably strong, but it needs— it needs pruning," 
" Does it ?" " Yes : and then there's the third act. The action all through 
it needs livening up some, and the tableaux at its end isn't strong enough." 
"Want something more striking ? " " Exactly, and then you'd better 
introduce a comic character or two ; and — lem me see — wedge in a song or 
something." "How would a clog dance strike you?" "Well, I don't 
know about that. But by all menus try to kill the heavy villain earlier 
in the last act — kill him with poison, if possible, pistols frighten the ladies 
in the audience, you know." " Think so, do you ? Is that all?" "Ye-e-s, 
that's all I can think of just now. Here's the manuscript," fishing it 
out of a pigeon hole. "Just oblige me by opening it," said the author 
gloomily. The manager did so, and it disclosed nothing but a few quires 
of blank paper. And with an unearthly scowl the dramatist stalked out, 
leaving the astounded manager as much confused as one of his craft was 
ever known to be. And yet we talk about the encouragement of native 
talent. 

The public will be glad to learn that Mr. Skithers, the eminent clog- 
dancer, who last appeared at Mnguire's old theater about fourteen years 
ago, is to have a benefit next week. Mr. S. is rather old to do much 
dancing, but then he slipped down on a banana peel last week, and his 
friends immediatelj' arranged for him a Grand Complimentary Testimo- 
nial. Miss Aurora Malone will also benefit next week. Miss Malone, it 
will be remembered, was the young lady who made an unsuccessful debut 
here in a minor part, some two years ago. Miss M. is suffering from a 
bad cold, and it is to be hoped that the public will respond liberally. It 
will gratify the great body of our theater-goers to learn that Tommy 
Skidmore, the eminent young lemonade seller in the lobby of the Cali- 
fornia Theater, will be the recipient of a testimonial benefit on the thirty- 
third of this mouth. This is tendered him by a long list of our promi- 
neut hankers and merchants, as can be seen by announcement in another 
column, and over forty brokers' clerks are now selling tickets. Mr. Bud- 
weiser Boothe, the eminent shoemaker, will take a benefit shortly at 
Piatt's Hall, which has been hired for the purpose. Mr. Boothe is not a 
distant relative of Edwin Booth, as is erroneously reported, but has con- 
cluded to drop the final " e " from his name, which entitles him to a ben- 
efit. The public can find no worthier object for their generous patronage 
than Mrs. Pat Slushey, the eminent seamstress, who will take a benefit at 
the Grand Opera House this evening. Mrs. S. is not strictly a profes- 
sional, but she sprained her ankle badly while coining out of the Standard 
Theater last week. Little Mike Slushey will sell his mother's photo- 
graphs during the act — ankle, sprain and all. These photographs are 
cheap at 50 cents. Come one, come all ! 

The London correspondent of an Eastern paper represents that 
the " fashionable world of the British metropolis" was thrown into a 
state of excitement recently by the startling piece of society intelligeuce 
that " at an aristocratic dinner party the host led Sarah Bernhardt down 
to dinner first" in a company where " there was a Duke," and where 
" Marquises and Earls were as thick as Generals and Colonels in Arkan- 
sas." It is no wonder that such an outrage against the conventionalities 
should have produced a sensation in the British metropolis. Of course, 
all intelligent Americans are -too familiar with the laws of precedence 
which govern the etiquette of the English dinner to require to be told 
that the host should have offered his arm to the Duke, and taken him in 
first. The Earls and Marquises should have come next, arm in arm, in 
the order of rank. As for M'lle Bernhardt, she having no title, the cor- 
rect thing would have been for her to go in last, with the butler. The 
slighted Duke seems to have acted with great moderation under the cir- 
cumstances; for, as every one knows, he would have been perfectly justi- 
fied by the British social code if he had rebuked the host for the indignity 
of giving precedence to a plebeian woman by drawing his revolver and 
putting a bullet into his abdomen. That is the usual course pursued in 
cases of this kind by all high-Bpirited English noblemen. 

It comes over us like a breath of the sweet South to read that the 
negro Williams, arrested on suspicion of having passed near the Roddan's 
house, at Wheatland, at the time of the distinguished outrage on an iron- 
bar, five or six years ago, will soon be called up for examination ; that is, 
some time between this and the year 1887. 1 he energy of those Wheat- 
land people is appalling. They are on the track of the cup of cold water 
said to have been asked for by the negro in April or May last, and if the 
heavy fogs continue, they believe that one or the other of the girls may 
wink with her left eye before long. Needless to say that if any corner of 
the State is green in the dry season, it is not Wheatland. 

Alas! Grant isn't coming! And now the question is, What will 
Achilles A. Tudor — we beg the poet's pardon, Hector A. Stuart — do with 
that " Ode of Welcome ?" After these painful months of incubation the 
result shouldn't be lost to the world. By the bye, the Hon. Barney P. 
Moon, ex- Alderman of New York city and a prominent ward statesman, 
is announced to arrive here next week. Could not the high-descended 
bard adapt the ode to the occasion ? Ulysses S. Grant! Barney P. Moon! 
There are about as many poetic feet in the one name as in the other. 

The Glasgow "Mail" says that Talmage wants earnestness, and 
originality, and knowledge of effect. For a canny Scot the Mail is 
singularly dull. Nothing of all these does Talmage want ; he only wants 
the coin of the realm— and he gets it. 



The official inquisitor of the Washington Htralrf having recently 
brought his boring apparatui to bear upon one A. 0, Buell, suddenly 
struck oil of an unusually rich quality. Mr. Hindi, as soon as tapped, 
deolaredthAl the country was not only going to the devil, but was almost 
there. The American people were all cynics in politics; they expect no 
good of their public men. if they find a man sincere, they call him a 
fanatic; if they find him honest, they oall him h d- d fool. * The Ameri- 
can character, so far as there is any," says Mr. B., "is a compound of the 
bad manners of the English and the bad morals of the French, both made 
worse than the originals by awkwardness in the copying." This is 
trenchant, if not truthful. Hut, in addition to these graces, it seems that 
" wo (the Americans) have begun to absorb the hoggish traits of the Ger- 
man race," and to " drink in at once the beer and the venality of the 
Butch." Mr. Buell seems to be a typical American. The bad manners 
and the hoggishness are apparent, and we may safely assume the rest: 
" For he himself has said it, 
And it's greatly to his credit." 

The Boston "Post "states that the Duke of Argyll was actually 
permitted to pasB through the Hub without a municipal demonstration ! 
No brass band dogged his footsteps. The Commun Council did not cor- 
ral him in a hotel parlor and compel him to shake hands with all the 
bores and bummers connected with the Government ; and the Mayor did 
not inflict upon him his windy eloquence in a half-hour speech. These 
singular facts would seem to warrant the cheerful conclusion that snob- 
bery is dying out in the American Athens. But, alas ! later advices 
destroy the pleasing illusion. It appears that the Common Council had 
gone off to a clam-bake, the Mayor was laid up with a sore throat, and 
the Boston bands are so high-priced that in these hard times nobody 
could be found to pay the piper. But 0. W. Holmes will send the 
Duke a poem. 

"Pull Dick, pull devil." Hallelujah Cox for Mayor! Reverend 
S. Kallawag for Mayor! How happy could we be with either, were 
t'other dear charmer away! Reverends to the front! Why not choose 
the clergy, in a lump, foreverything ? They make such a mess of religion 
they ought to do better in politics. Let's vote for them all. The Bishop 
of California would make a good Governor, Bishop Wingfield Lieutenant- 
Governor, Hemphill for Chief of Police, Stebbins for Auditor— no, that 
won't do, he wants others to hear him. We might make him the Board 
of Education, and Dr. Stone would do to run with the machine as Fire 
Commissioner. 

The Califoraian " Historian of the Future " will be apt to rub his 
eyes when he comes to chronicle the first political contest in the State 
under her new Magna Charta. When he begins to study up the current 
literature of the day in search of material, he will find it demonstrated 
that Perkins, the " Black Republican " candidate, voted against the Fif- 
teenth Amendment ; that White, the " Workingman's " candidate, never 
did a day's work in his life ; and that Glenn, the candidate of the Anti- 
Monopoly, Anti-Chinese party, is a land -monopolist on a prodigious scale, 
and tills the 55,000 acres of his monopoly by the aid of Chinese labor! 

We are authorized to state, and in point of fact have seen the docu- 
ments, duly certified, which prove that George C. Perkins never did 
charge ten dollars a dozen for addled eggs to a lone widow sitting by the 
shore of the sounding sea ; and Farmer Glenn, we are also in a position to 
affirm, did not hunt down with Cuban bloodhounds and crucify on a red- 
wood tree three innocent white laborers, because they were not Chinese. 
These infamous falsehoods, which are making the tour of the world and 
startling the remote Botocudo in his wilds, will henceforth excite only the 
loathing and contempt of those who have any to spare. 

The Trustees of the Public "Library, at their last meeting, had an 
" informal discussion," in which they wrestled strenuously with the conun- 
drum : What is the correct manner of presenting Library bills to the 
Board of Supervisors? The Hon. J. S. Hager was in the Chair, and he 
ought to have an opinion on a point of social etiquette. For ourselves, 
we are clear that the correct thing would be to present the bills on a silver 
salver. The Supervisors would appreciate the elegance of that style ; and 
if the messenger were a strong man, armed to the teeth, he might be able 
to get out again with the plate. 

An Italian riot is expected to occur in New York every minute. It 
seems that the residents of that nationality erected in Central Park 
a statue of Columbus, holding the globe in his hand. The very next 
morning it was discovered that some infamous advertising man had 
crawled up and painted on the globe, "Use Skidmore's Pills." All the 
New York militia are under arms as we go to press. 

An interesting collection of bald-pated old fogies, calling themselves 
"The National Board of Health," recently resolved, in solemn conclave, 
that their Secretary should be forbidden to " furnish any information to 
the press." The fun of the thing is seen in the fact that the reports and 
bulletins of this bumptious and exclusive "Board" are made up entirely 
of items collated from the columns of the newspapers. 

An Englishman, just returned from Cairo, informs Truth that the 
donkey-boys name their beasts after European celebrities ; and that the 
most satisfactory jackass he found was the Bishop of London. If .this 
Briton will take the trouble to come to the Pacific Coast, he will find rev- 
erend jackasses that can give the Bishop of London odds and leave him 
out of sight or bearing. 

Zadkiel does the prophecy business for Great Britain and Ireland, and 
Benner for the United States, with general applause. When he declares, 
however, as he does in the last issue, that fat hogs will rule low this year, 
he takes an unfair advantage of the public, since he can bring his own 
prophecy to pass at any moment by throwing himself on the market. 

Bro. Pickering commences a leading editorial in his issue of Thurs- 
day with the important announcement that " This office is now in com- 
munication with one of the heaviest raisin houses of Malaga, Spain." 
From this we infer that the business of Bro. P.'s paper is no longer to be 
limited to peanuts. Henceforth it will be '* peanuts and raisins." 

Mrs. Bazenbee, of Hayes Valley, has applied for a divorce because 
Mr. B. came home late the other night, fearfully "set up," and, holding 
a string of salt mackerel over her head, solemnly assured her that he had 
been to Saucelito all day fishing. 

It is contrary to the law to cut down trees in Cyprus, and if G. W. 
had tried his little hatchet there he would have saved young America a 
great deal of trouble and disgust. The ways of Providence are in- 
scrutable. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 2, 1879. 



C. P. R. R. 



Overland Ticket Office : Ferry Landing:, foot 
of Market street.— Commencing 1 Monday. 
May 19th, 1879, and until further notice 
Trains and Boats wil leave 

SAW FRA1VCISCO: 



7AA A. M. (daily), Vallejo Steamer (from Market 
• \J\J street Landing — Connecting: with Trains for 
Napa (Stages for Sonoma), Calistoga (the Geysers), 
and Sacramento. Connecting at Davis {Sundays except- 
ed) for Woodland and Knight's Landing, and at Wood- 
land for Williams and Willows. 

(Arrive San Francisco 8:10 P.M.) 



7 AA, A.M. (daily) Local Passenger Train {via Oakland 
• \/l/ Ferry) and via Livermore arriving at Tracy 
at 11:30 a. M. and connecting with Atlantic Express. 
Connects at Niles with Train arriving at San Jose at 
10:15 a.m. 

(Returning, train from Tracy arrives at 6:05 p.m.) 



8f\f\ A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
■ UU land Ferry, Northern Ry. and S. P. & T. R R.) 
for Sacramento, Marysville, Redding, Portland (Or.), 
Colfax, Reno (Virginia City), Palisade (Eureka), Ogden 
and Omaha. Connects at Gait with train arriving at 
lone at 3:40 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 5:15 p.m.) 

Sunday Excursion Tickets to San Pablo and Marti- 
nez at Reduced Rates. 



1 f\ AAA.M. (daily) via Oakland Ferry, Local Passen- 
1\J.\J\J ger Train to Hay wards and Niles. 

(Arrive San Francisco 4:05 P.M.) 



3AA P.M. (daily) San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
• vU land Ferry and Niles), stopping at all Way Sta- 
tions. Arrives at San Jose at 5:20 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a.m.) 



3(\{\ P.M. (daily) Northern Railway Passenger Train 
• \f \f (via Oakland Ferry) to San Pablo, Martinez 
and Antioch. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a m.) 



4fif\ P.M. (daily) Arizona Express Train (via Oat 
■W land Ferry, Northern Ry. and S. P. & T. R. R.) 
.for Lathrop (and Stockton), Merced, Madera, Visalia, 
Sumner, Mojave, Newhall (San Buenaventura, and Santa 
Barbara), Los Angeles, "Santa Monica," Wilmington, 
Santa Ana (San Diego), Colton and Yuma (Colorado 
River Steamers), connecting direct with Daily Trains 
of the Southern Pacific Railroad of Arizona for Mari- 
copa (Daily Stages for Phccnix and Prescott), and for 
Casa Grande (182 miles east from Yuma), and end of 
Track (Daily Stages for Florence and Tucson). 

" Sleeping Cars " between Oakland, Los Angeles and 
Yuma. 
(Arrive San Francisco 12:35 p.m.) 



4AA P. M. (Sundays excepted) Vallejo Steamer (from 
• "v Market Street Landing), connecting with trains 
for Calistoga, (the Geysers), Woodland, Knight's Land- 
ing and Sacramento ; and at Sacramento with Pas- 
senger Train, leaving at 9:35 P.M. for Truckee, Reno 
Carson and Virginia. 
" Sleeping Cars " between Vallejo and Carson. 

(Arrive San Francisco 11:10 A.M.) 



4t~\(~\ P.M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
• W (from Wash'n St. Wharf), for Beniciaand Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River. 

(Arrive San Francisco 8:00 P. M.) 



4AAPJ, (daily), Through Third Class and Accom- 
•*-',>' modation Train (via Oakland Ferry, North- 
ern Ry. and S. P. & T. R. R.) connecting at Lathrop 
with Train arriving at Los Angeles on second day at 
11:55 A.M. (Arrive San Francisco 9:05 a.m. 



4 9A P.M. (daily) Local Passenger Train (via'Oak- 
**J\J kind Ferry) to Haywards, Niles and Liver- 
more. (Arrive San Francisco 8:35 A.M.) 



£ (")/") P.M. (daily) Overland Emigrant Train (via 
*-'•*-' ^ Oakland Ferry and Northern Railway) to 
Ogden, Omaha and East. 



Public conveyance for Mills Seminary connects at Sem- 
nary Park Scat.on with all trains, Sundays excepted. 



FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAINS 



From "SAX FRASTCISCO," Daily. 



A. M. 
B6.10 
7.00 
7, 

8.00 
8.30 
9.00 
9.30 
10.00 
10.30 
11.00 
11.30 
12.00 



P. M. 

12,30 
1.00 
1.30 
2.00 
3.00 
3.30 
4.00 
4.30 
5.00 
5.30 
6.00 
6.30 
7.00 
8.10 
9.20 

10.30 
Bll.45 



I 



7.00 
8.00 
9.00 
10.00 
11.00 
12.00 

P. M. 
1.30 
2.00 
"3.00 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 
B*7.00 
♦8.10 
1030 
1145 



A. M. 
B7.00 

B9.00 
B10. 00 
P. M. 

B5.00 



£2 



A. M, 

B 6.10 7.00 
7.30| 10.00 
" 30 



A. M. 

7.3C 



9.30 
10.30 
11.3 

P. M. 

12.30 
1.00 

3.; 

4.: 

5. 30 J 
6.30 

7.00- 
8.10 



• fll. I il.OLT 

3.001 10.30 
11.30 



NUOJ p. 
. Ib11.45I 3.00 



P. M. 
1.00 
3.00 
4.00 
6.00 
6.00 

B6.30 



P 



A. M, 
B6.10 

8.00 
10.00 
12.00 
P. M. 
1.30 
3.30 
4.30 
5.30 



To " SAST FRANCISCO," Daily. 



o£a 


aJ 
Eg 


55 M 


FROM 

EAST 
KLAND. 

PROM 

RNBIDE. 


J 

Cm 


■FROM 
OAKLAND. 


g uj 


n 




< 


(Broadway.) 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 1 A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


p. M. 


B5.40 


B5.40 


7.00 


B 5.10; B8.00 


B-5.00 


B5.20 


12.20 


B6.30 


B6.30 


8.00 


B 5.50 B10.00 


B»5.40 


B6.00 


12 50 


8.00 


7.30 


p. M. 


6.40IBU.00 


•6.25 


6.50 


1.20 


10.00 


8.30 


2.35 


7.40| p. M. 


7.00 


7.20 


1.50 


12.00 


9.30 


4.30 


8.40] B6.00 


8.03 


7.50 


2.50 




10.30 
1130 






8.25 
8.50 


3.20 
3.50 


1.30 




10.40 


10.03 


3.30 


p. M 


a 


11.401 


11.03 


9.20 


4.20 


430 


1.00 a g 


P. M. 




12,00 


9.50 


4.50 


5.30 


3.00 °-5 


12.40 




p. M. 


10.20 


5.20 


B6.30 


4.00 


"■a 


1.25 




1.00 


10.60 


5.50 




5.00 


< 


2.40 




3.00 


11.20 


6.25 




6.00 




4.40 
6.40 




•3.20 
4.00 


11.60 


6.60 
8.00 


Change Cars 


A. M. 

7.10 


6.40 
7.50 




5.00 
6.03 




9.10 
10.20 


1 


t 1 P. M. 
aklnd.| 1.30 


9.00 
10.10 




B*7.20 
B"8.30 
*10.00 






WestC 














B— Sundays excepted. 




♦Alameda Passengers change cars at Oakland. 



Creek Route. 

From SAN FRANCISCO— Daily— B5:40, b6:30, 7.20, 8:15, 
9:15, 10:15, 11:15 A.M. 12:15, 1:15, 2:25. 3:15, 4:15, 
5:15, 6.15 p.m. 

From OAKLAND— Daily— B5-.ZQ, b6:20, 7:10, 8:05, 9:05, 
10:05, 11:05 A. M. 12:05, 1:05, 2:15, 3:05, 4:05, 5:05, 
6:05 p.m. b— Sundays excepted. 



"Official Schedule Time" furnished by Randolph & 
Co., Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Townb, General Superintendent. 




Commencing- Monday, June 2d, 1879, 
and until further notice, Boats and Trains will 
leave San Francisco as follows : 

7 1 A a m. , from San Quentin Ferry, daily (Sundays 
• S.\f excepted), connecting at San Rafael with 
Mail and Express Train for Petaluma, Santa Rosa, 
Healdsburg, Cloverdale and way stations. Making stage 
connections at Geyserville for Skaggs' Springs ; Clover- 
dale for Ukiah, Lakeport, Mendocino City, Highland 
and Bartlett Springs, Soda Bay and the Geysers; connec- 
tion made at Fulton for Korbel's, Guerneville and the 
Redwoods. Returning, arrive in San Francisco at 6:25 
p.m. Passengers gointr by this train will arrive at the 
Geysers at 2 p.m. 

3C)f\ p.m. daily (Sundays excepted), Steamer 
• v - /v - / "James M. Donahue" (Washington Street 
Wharf) , connecting with Mail and Express Train at Don- 
ahue for Petaluma, Santa Rosa, Healdsburg, Cloverdale, 
and way stations. Making stage connections at Lake- 
ville for Sonoma. Returning, arrive in San Francisco 
at 10:10 A.M. 

Sunday Excursions at Reduced Bates . 

8"| K A.M., Sundays only, via San Quentin Ferry 
• J-t/ and San Rafael, for Cloverdale and Way Sta- 
tions. Returning, arrive in San Francisco at 7:55 p.m. 
Fares for Round Trip: Petaluma, §1.50; Santa Rosa, 32.00; 
Healdsburg, S3 00; Cloverdale, 34.60; Fulton, $2.50; La- 
guna, §3.00; Furestville, §3.50; Korbel's, 33.75; Guerne- 
ville, 34. 



Freight received at Washington at. Wharf 
from 7 a.m. till 2.30 p. m., daily (except 
Sundays) . 

A. A. Bean, A. Hughes, Jas. M. Donahue, 

Sup't. Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

[June 7.] 



NORTH PACIFIC COAST RAILROAD. 

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT. 



In Effect from Sunday, June 8th, 1879, 
Between San Francisco and San Rafael. 



JEare Eetween San Francisco and San, Rafael 
REDUCED TO 25 CENTS. 



WEEK DATS. 



Leave San Francisco : 
7:10 a.m. via San Q'ntin F. 
9:20 a.m. " " " 

1:45 p.m. " " " 

4:45 p.m. " " " 

5:45 p.m. " Saucelito " 



Leave San Rafael : 
7:00 a.m. via Saucelito Fy. 
8:00 a.m. " S. Quentin " 
11:00 a.m. " " " 

3:20 p.m. " " " 

3:50 p.m. " Saucelito " 
5:20 P.M. " S. Quentin " 



SVNDATS. 



Leave San Francisco: 
8:00 a m. Via Saucelito Fy. 
8:15 a.m. viaS. Quentin" 
10:15 A.M. " " " 

12:50 P M. " " " 

3:45 p.m. " " " 

6:00 P.M. " ". " 



Leave San Rafael: 
8:50 a.m. viaS. Quentin F. 
11:30 A.M. " " " 

2:15 p.m. " " " 

4:30 p.m. " " " 

6:50 p.m. " " " 



Q. A.K a. m. daily, except Sundays, from Saucelito 
^•^^J Ferry, Market street, for all points between 
Saucelito and Junction. Returning, leaves Junction 
4:00 p. m., arrives S. F. (via Saucelito) 5:40 p. m. 

O Q f~\ a. m. daily, except Sundays, from San Quen- 
f»^" tin Ferry, Market street, for all points be- 
tween San .Francisco and Olema. Returning, leaves 
Olema 1:55 P. m., arrives S. F. (via Saucelito) 5:40 P. M. 

1J C p.m. daily, except Sundays, from San Quentin 
• *(J Ferry, Market Street, THROUGH TRAIN 
for DUNCAN MrLLS and Way Stations. Returning, 
train leaves DUNCAN MILLS 6:40 a. m., arriving in S. 
F. 12:05 p. m. 

Sunday Excursions at Reduced Rates. 

8:00 A.M., from Saucelito Ferry, "Market street, 
8:15 A.M., from San Quentin Ferry, Market street, 
for DUNCAN MILLS and RETURN. Fares for Round 
Trip— Olema, 32; Tomales, 33; Duncan Mills, S4. 

Above train, returning, arrives in San Francisco via 
San Quentin 7:55 p.m., or via Saucelito 8:10 p.m. 

W. R. PRICE, Gen'l Ticket Agent. 

Jno. W. Doherty, Gen'l Manager. Jun 7. 




3.30 ' 



/^omtnenciiij? Monday, April Bl, 1879, 

\_y and until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
San Francisco, from Passenger Depot on Townsend 
street, between Third and Fourth streets, as follows : 

8 0A a.m. daily for San Jose and Way StationB. 
• £\J f$gjf Stages for Pescadero (via San Mateo) 
connect with this train only. 

9 C\ a.m (Sundays only) for San Jose and Way Sta- 
• *J\J tions. Returning, leaves San Jose at 6 p.m. 

1 (\ 4-0 AM ' dauv . for San Jose - Gilroy, Hollister, 
-LvJ.tiV-' Tres Pin'os, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and 
all Way Stations, g^p At Pajaro, the Santa Cruz 
R. R. connects with this train for Aptos, Soquel and 
Santa Cruz. ESf" At Salinas the M. & S. V. R. R. 
connects with this train for Monterey. $p&~~ Stage 
connections made with this train. (Pescadero Stages via 
San Mateo excepted.) 

Parlor Car attached to tills Train. 
(SEATS at reduced rates.) 

p.m. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose, 
Gilroy, Pajaro, Hollister, Tre3 Pinos and prin- 
cipal Way Stations. 

ggf* On Saturdays only, the Santa Cruz R. R. will 
connect with this train at Pajaro for Aptos, Soquel and 
Santa Cruz. Returning, leave Santa Cruz at 4.45 A.M. 
Mondays (breakfast at Gilroy) , arriving in San Francisco 
at 10:00 a.m. 

6^= SPECIAL NOTICE— On SATURDAYS ONLY, 
the run of this train wilt be extended to SALINAS — 
connecting with the M. & S. V. R. R. for MONTEREY. 
Returning, leave Monterey MONDAYS (breakfast at 
Gilroy), arriving in San Francisco at 10 a.m. 

3Q (~\ p.m. (Sundays only) for San Jose and Way Sta- 
,Q\J tions. __ 

4 9 £C p.m. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose and 
.AiO Way Stations. 

K. C\f\ p. m. daily (Sundays excepted) for Menlo Park 
*J*\J\J an d Way Stations. 

(\ ^O P - M -— daily, for Menlo Park and Way Stations. 
Excursion Tickets at Reduced Rates 



To San Jose and intermediate points sold on Saturdays, 
and Sunday mornings, good for return until following 
Monday inclusive. 

Also, EXCURSION TICKETS to Aptos, Soquel, Santa 
Cruz and Monterey, sold on Saturdays only— good for 
return until the following Monday inclusive. 

(E^~ Principal Ticket Office— Passenger Depot, Town- 
send street. Branch Ticket Office— No. 2 New Mont- 
gomery street, Palace Hotel. 

A. C. BASSETT, Supt. H. R. JUDAH, A. P. &T. A. 



SOUTHERN DIVISIONS. 

Commencing- Monday, May 19th, 1879, 
|gF" Passengers for points on the Southern Divisions 
of the road will take the cars of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 4:00 p.m. daily (Arizona Ex- 
press Train) , and making close connection at GOSHEN 
for Sumner, Mojave, Los Angeles, Wilmington, Ana- 
heim, Colton, Colorado River, Yuma, Maricopa and Casa 
Grande (182 miles east from Yuma). May 31. 



Aug. 2, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, 



13 



NOTAB1LIA. 



*ii ^ 




THE PEDDLERS SONG. 
hite as driven snow ; Gold quoins and stomachers, 



Law.i as 

CjpnilB Muck u o'er was crow ; 
- sweet 3s d&ma&k ruses 
Masks for faces and for noses ; 
Bugle-bracelet, necklace, amber; 
Perfume for a lady's chamber ; 



For my lads to give their deard ; 
Pins and pokjng-sticks of steel. 
What maids lack from head to heel: 
Come buy of me.come; come buy,come buy, 
Buy, lads, or else your lasses cry. 

William Siiakspeare. 



It is very properly declared that the United States cannot rest con- 
tented with anything less than a complete neutralization of the Darien 
Canal, with guarantees entirely satisfactory to this end. Nothing else 
could have been expected, for we ourselves have said it and its greatly to 
our credit ; and it is equally sure, or even more so, that entire neutraliza- 
tion of hunger and thirst and the consequent ills of life is the lot of those 
who are fortunate enough to take their breakfasts and lunches at Swain's, 
213 Sutter street. The very best dining-rooms in the city, and the 
choicest of all things, in or out of season. 

There seems to be some danger of the disappearance of the old 
Irish language as a spoken lauguage, and scholars are deploring the fact, 
while they seize and preserve every distinctive feature of it before it 
fades into the limbo of forgotten things. The death of a national speech 
is a mournful event, and touches the thoughtful observer like the loss of 
a friend. For this latter there is happily a compensation. No one whose 
photograph has been taken by Bradley & Rulofson can ever pass away 
from this world. We may meet him no more, but the very light of his 
face remains with us. 

The man who composed " Take Me Back to Home and Mother," is 
playing a banjo in a concert garden at Vicksburg. 

The advent of the mysterious and colossal helmet in the courtyard 
of the Castle of Otranto has never been explained to the readers of that 
thrilling romance ; and irreverent suggestions have been whispered that 
the author himself did not know where it came from, or what to do with 
it after it was landed. In plain English, he is said to have been smothered 
by the head-piece he invented. The exact opposite of this is true of 
White's hats, from 614 Commercial street. These are so essential to 
the finish of the man, that one feels lost without them. 



The destruction of houses by fire in Russia is most appalling, if 
we are to believe the published statistics ; and there seems to be no reason 
for doubting their correctness. One reflection forced upon the mind by 
the contemplation of so much ruin, is that nothing of the kind would 
have been possible had the plumbing arrangements of these houses been 
confided to such men as McNally & Hawkins, the oldest house in San 
Francisco, and the best-Bupplied with every improvement in water and 
gas pipes, chandeliers, faucets and lamps. 

The "Liebig Extract of Meat Company" has its great factory, 
covering 20,000 sq. ft. on the Uruguay River, in the midst of the count- 
less herds of cattle that roam the Pampas. The consumption in the sea- 
son is often 1,000 to 1,200 head in a day ; all well-developed, sound ani- 
mals of at least four years of age. Every tin of the extract is tested at 
£he factory, and again on arrival at Antwerp, and the standard of purity 
is inflexibly maintained. One pound of extract represents 45 lbs. of best 
beef, and the uses to which it is applicable in household economy are 
every day extending. 

A small boy threw a lump of ice at another boy on Market street, and 
came very near being arrested for carrying congealed weapons. 

It Is thought that the new German tariff will greatly disturb the 
currents of trade, especially for Austro-Hungary, which must hereafter 
largely depend upon the wearisome navigation of the Danube. But why 
should the navigation of the Danube be so wearisome, when every one 
knows that the river is a noble one and the scenery on its banks most 
striking? The answer is plain: F. & P. J. Cassin's Golden Plantation 
Whisky has not yet been added to the resources of the steamers, and 
life is dull, uncheered by this admirable stimulant. 



The report of large purchases of war supplies on account of the rev- 
olutionary party in Mexico is not generally credited in New York, where 
every inquiry has failed to bring to light the " tried and trusted " person 
who is said to have been acting for the principals in the matter. The 
case is very different with Montanya's Union Ranges, which have been so 
thoroughly tried that they are trusted in every part of the country, and 
cannot be kept out of sight. People will have those and no others ; and 
people know what they want. 



No exercise more decidedly strengthens the lungs and expands the 
ohtsl than swimming, and to indulge in this properly one requires the 
open air aod ma. At. the Neptune end Mermaid Swimming Bathe, foot 
of Lark m and Hyde street*, Prof. aCohor, who is a most accomplished 
teacher, nvee every care and aseiatMoe necessary to inspire confidence 
even in the most timid novices. The beach is natural, and the waves 
come indirect from the ocean, so that the conditions are exceptionally 
good, whether for beginners or fur those already skilled in the art. The 
supervision is strict, and everything is done to make the establishment 
worthy of public support. 

The Chilian Government is making very large purchases of arms 
and military goods of all kinds in the East, to the great delight of man- 
ufacturers ; and all purchases are paid for, cash down. This is the right 
Way t<> do a wrong thing, for the amount of money wasted on these tools 
{2T.R"™? wni,ltl restore and preserve harmony and kindly feeling between 
Chili and Peru if it were invested in Landsberger's Private Cuve*e, the 
most exquisite and agreeable wine known to men. 

A young man talks only the more when he gets down on his lip. 

Cramps, Colic, Cholera Morbus, Sour Stomach, Diarrhea and Dysen- 
tery are speedily cured by Dr. Jayue's Carminative Balsam. It removes 
all soreness of the Bowels, quiets the Stomach and restores its natural 
action. As a family remedy for many Affections of the Bowels, prevalent 
among children and adults in the summer months, it is especially recom- 
mended, being prompt in its operation, perfectly safe and easily adminis- 
tered. Sold by Crane & Brigham, San Francisco. 

Next to the duty of providing for one'B family, is the obligation to 
aid the suffering wherever they may be. Charity begins at home, no 
doubt, but it does not end there,' and Mr. Chas. Peters is doing all that 
even his energy can accomplish to make a success of the Nevada Building 
Association, at Virginia City, with its 100,000 shares. 

The Zulu force has been wiped out of existence by telegraphy. 

Yellow fever, like every other fever, may be controlled if the system 
is kept cool and sweet. There is nothing more certain than that neglect 
in this direction is dangerous, and the beverage supplied by nature in the 
Napa Soda is the very corrective needed. Fever of any type is impossi- 
ble if one drinks this. 

Tapestry Brussels, $1 per yard and upwards ; fine newpatterns. Call 
and see them. Window shades, 75 cents and upwards. Window lace, 12J 
cents and upwards. Cornices, wall paper, etc. Oilcloths, 50 cents per 
yard and upwards. Hartshorn & McPhun, 112 Fourth st., near Mission. 



STOCK COMBINATIONS. 



flow to Operate Successfully on 
TEN DOLLARS. 

MABTIN TAYLOE & CO.. 
June 21.] 429 California Street. 

FAIRFAX MINING COMPANY, 

426 CALIFORNIA STREET, ROOM NO. 2. 

President.. - . JOHN W. COLEMAN. 

Treasurer GEN. O. H. LA ORANGE. 

Secretary O. C. MILLER. 

[October 12.] 

Geo. C. Hiokox. b. C. MoFablanb. 

GEORGE C. HICK0X & CO., 

/ lorn mission Stoclt Brokers (San Francisco Stock Ex> 

\j change, No. 230 Montgomery street, San Francisco. May 4. 

J. A. RUDKIN, 

Member S. r. Stock and Excbange Board. -123 California 
street. STOCKS Bought and Sold on Commission. Liberal Advances 
made n Active Accounts. Oct. 26. 

Henry B. Williams. Henry B. Williams. 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MBKCHANTS, 

No. 218 California st., S. F. [July 27. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Reduction In Price : Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price. 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan, 12. 

TABER, HARKER & CO., 

IXPOIITERS AJfD WHOLESALE QROCEH9, 
10S and 110 California St., S. F. 

(April 19.] 

JOHN JENNINGS 

Hooper's Sou Hi End Warehouses, corner Japan and Town- 
send streets, San Francisco. First-class Fire-Proof Brick Building, capacity 
10,000 tonb. Goods taken from the Dock and the Cars of the C. P. R. R. and S. P. 
R. R. free of charge. Storage at Current Rates. Advances and Insurance Effected. 

NOTICE. 

For the very best photographs gro to Bradley & Rnlofson's, 
in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 2ft. 

HIBERNIA BREWERY, 

Howard Street, Between Eighth and Ninth. 
Dec. 7.] M. XUXJJT, Proprietor, 

200 Post street is on the corner of Dupont. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 2, 1879. 



ART JOTTINGS. 

Mr. Geo. H. Burgess, a painter whose specialty heretofore has been 
portraiture in oil and water colors, ha3 just placed on view, at Morris & 
Kennedy's, a large painting representing "Changing the .Shift." The 
artist, in signing the picture, says that it is "partially from a painting 
by Frenzeny." Some years since, a water-color picture was executed by 
that artist, and from this, or a photograph of it, Mr. Burgess has pro- 
duced a work of which he ought to be thoroughly ashamed. In referring 
to Mr. Burgess, as a painter of portraits, it should have been said that 
he is better known as a retoucher of photographs. For many years be 
retouched in India ink, later on in water colors, and still later in oil. It is 
little wonder, then, that, in attempting a work such as "Changing the 
Shift," he should have made so disgraceful a failure — copy, though it is — 
for a work of this character requires the very highest grade of artistic 
skill. And to think that a painter, who ought never to aspire to any- 
thing outside of retouching, except it be to paint a miniature on ivory, 
should for a moment consider himself competent to arrange forty figures 
on a canvas of this size, and produce therefrom a work of art. It is as- 
tounding ! And to think, too, that a man making any pretensions to art 
culture, either as an artist or connoisseur, who has resided for so many 
years in what is usually known as something of an art center, should 
paint Buch a work and be in blissful ignorance of its execrable character. 

The painter has generally followed the original drawing, or sketch — for 
such it was — and little mistakes in pose which crept into it, as they usu- 
ally will in hastily executed drawings, have been elaborated in this pic- 
ture to a painful degree. For example, in Frenzeny's drawing too much 
and unnatural motion is given to a brawny fellow who has just emerged 
from the shaft, and is making his way hastily to the door. In Mr. Bur- 
gess' picture this fellow appears to be running. The chap sitting on the 
timber, Frenzeny had in an exceedingly easy attitude, lighting a pipe. 
Mr. Burgess seats him in a most painful position. Of course, in a large 
painting the faces had to be more elaborate, and such a looking set of be- 
ings as one sees here does away entirely with any idea he may have had 
regarding the perfect physique of those Comstock miners whose labors 
have given so many millions of coin to the world, the past few years. 
These fellows not only look like criminals, but they appear to be near 
akin to the early visitors of sidewalk beer-barrels. 

And when we come to texture, there is no difference whatever between 
that given to the accessories and the figures themselves. The iron floor, 
the wooden ceiling, the huge timbers, the men's clothing, and even the 
flesh itself, are all alike, so far as distinctive quality is concerned, and one 
can only be discerned from the other by the form. The shirt on a man's 
back, in this picture, is, of course, supposed to be of a textile fabric, but 
the painter has rendered it just as if it were of wood. A same- 
ishness of color pervades the entire picture ; the painter seems to have 
mixed it with no confidence in himself, and he has hit upon such tints as 
make it all but impossible to render an object with any degree of 
luminosity. 

There is just one spot in the picture which may be considered good, 
and that is CoL Fair's portrait. The striking and violent contrast be- 
tween this and the rest of the picture is seen at a glance, and tells but too 
plainly in what direction Mr. Burgess' talent as a painter lies, and the 
very fact of his having rendered this one figure bo conspicuously, when by 
its position it is not entitled to it, must be taken as conclusive evidence 
that the painter is quite ignorant of the most necessary quality in a genre 
work of this character— relative position. 

The painter says after his autograph, "Partially from Frenzeny's 
sketch !" What doe3 he mean by this? Ffpm what is the other part of 
the picture taken — from nature? Is he not aware that, although a figure 
may be changed here and an object there, it is a copy pure and simple ? 
The few changes, even if they were an improvement, does n,ot, can not, 
redeem it. It is safe to say that there are not six artists in the United 
States who could treat, to a successful conclusion, a subject such as this, 
upon so large a scale; and why a painter of practically no experience with 
such subjects should make himself ridiculous by attempting it, is truly 
marvelous. 

It will be remembered that some years since a large photographic pic- 
ture was made of the officers and attache's of the Bank of California. The 
photographs of each figure were pasted to a large canvas in the desired 
positions ; the whole was then retouched in India ink. This was done by 
Mr. Burgess, and a most excellent work it was too, of its kind ; but the 
artistic ability to do such work is of quite a different character from that 
called for in the picture under review. 

Wm. Keith has on view at this gallery a superb work, " Landscape 
with Cattle." It is the first work we remember to have seen by this art- 
ist where he has rendered cattle so successfully, although they are not as pro- 
minent as in manyof Fred. Voltz's or Van Marc's pictures. They, however, 
compare favorably with the efforts of these masters, while the landscape 
could not well be excelled by any one. Mr. Keith is busy at work upon 
a sketch taken during his recent southern trip, and which he believes will 
be the greatest success he has yet achieved. 

Rix has returned from the north with material for several new pic- 
tures, which he purposes pushing to completion at an early day. 

Art at the Fair this year will be about as usual. At any Tate, under 
the present management the galleries will not be farmed out to any East- 
ern dealer in the "queer," and, of course, such stuff of home manufac- 
ture would not be appreciated. The fact is that, even admitting the ad- 
visibility of making an art display at a mechanic's fair when we have a 
public art gallery capable of displaying twice as many paintings as are 
produced, the gallery is altogether too large and barn-like. Even a 
work of exhibition size is lost in it, and for small pictures it is still worse. 
Mr. Bicknell's group of portraits ought by all means to go there. 

Charles Kertell has completed a bust of Toby Rosenthal, which for a 
wood carver, whose works heretofore have afforded more amusement than 
instruction, must be considered a success. The likeness is unmistakable, 
the expression tolerable, but the pose is bad— too dramatic. Toby Rosen- 
thal carries himself with an easy and cultured mien. 

A. A. Cohen has pronounced White an honest man. There, that set- 
tles the question. But what is A. A. after now ! Slapping the Chronicle 
in the face and patting Kearney on the back means something. If 
White had paid A. A. as he paid Casserly — i. e., greenbacks for gold — we 
wonder how A. A. would have pronounced then. Eh ? 

A country cannot be called peaceful when its Congress is in session. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's steamers will sail as follows at la M: 
CITY OF TOKIO, Oct. 4th, Deo. 27th, March 20th-CITY OF PEKING, Nov. 
15th, Feb. 7th, May lst-for YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG. 

COLIMA, August 5th, for PANAMA and NEW YORK, calling at ACAPULOO, 
SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA, LA LIBERTAD and PUNTA ARENAS. 

Tickets to and from Europe by any hue for sale at the lowest rates ; also to Ha- 
vana and all West India ports. 

CITY OF SYDNEY, August «h, at 12 o'clock M. , or on arrival of English mails, 
for HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY. $10 additional is charged for pas- 
sage in Upper Saloon. 

CITY OF CHESTER, Aug. 9th, for VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND, SEATTLE, 
andTACoMA, connecting at TACOMA with Northern Pacific Railroad for PORT- 
LAND, Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before 11 a.m. on day of sailing, at 
Wharf Office.- For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan 
streets. [Aug. 2.) WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., Agents. 

FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON. - 

The Oregon Steamship Company and Pacific Coast Steam- 
ship Company will diopatch every live clays, for the above ports, one of their 
new Al Iron Steamships, viz.: OREGON, GEORGE W. ELDER, and STATE OP 
CALIFORNIA. 

Sailing- Days: 
Aug. 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30. | Sept. 4, 9, 14, 19, 24, and 29. 

At 10 o'clock A. M. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Liues for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent O. S. S. Co., 
No 210 Battery street, San Francisco. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents P. C S. S Co., 
Aug. 2. No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

OCCIDENTAL AND^ORIENTAL~STEAMSHIP C0.,~ 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

GAELIC August 23d, December Gth, February 28th. 

OCEANIC September 13th. 

BELGIC October 25th, January 17th, April 10th. 

For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or No. 218 California street. 

Special Notice.— The S. S. OCEANIC, sailing from San Francisco Saturday, Sep- 
tember 13th, will continue on from Hongkong to Liverpool, offering superior accom- 
modations for Tourists en route Around the World. 



LELAND STANFORD, President. 



T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
May 31. 



CUNARD LINE. 

British and North American Kvyal Mail Steamships be- 
tween NEW YOEK and LIVERPOOL, calling atQUKENSTOWN, sailing from 
New York EVERY WEDNESDAY. 

SCYTHIA July 16.. Aug. 20.. Sept. 24.. Oct 29 

ABYSSINIA July 23. .Aug. 27 Oct. L.Nov. 5 

BOTHNIA July SO Sept. 3.. Oct. 8.. Nov. 12 

GALLIA Aug. 6. .Sept. 10..Oet. 15. .Nov. 19 

ALGERIA Aug 13.. Sept. 17.. Oct. 22 

Passage can be secured and all information given on application to 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 
July 12. 218 California St. 

CALIFORNIA AND MEXICAN S. S. LINE, 

For Cape St. Lucas, La. Paz, JIazatlau and (inaymns, 
touching at MAGDALENA BAY should sulHcient inducement offer.— The 
Steamship NEWBERN (Wm, Metzger, Master) will leave for the above ports on 
TUESDAY, Aug. 5th, at 12 o'clock M., from Folsom-street Wharf. Through Bills 
of Lading will be furnished and none others signed. Freight will be received 
on Monday, July 28. No Fieight received after Monday, August 4, at 12 o'clock m., 
and Bills of Lading must be accompanied by Custom House and Consular Clearances. 
For freight or passage, apply to J. BERM1NGHAM, Agent, 
July 26. No. 10 Market street. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers ©I this Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
for PORTLAND, Oregon), every 5 days, direct, and for LOS ANGELES, SANTA 
BARBARA, SANTA CRUZ, SAiN DIEGO, SAN LUIS OBISPO and other NORTH- 
ERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS, leaving SAN FRANCISCO about every 
third day. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the San Fran- 
cisco Daily Papers. 

Ticket Office, Bio. 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
March 15. No. 10 Market street. 

THE BERKELEY GYMNASIUM. 

A Preparatory School to the University. 

The on y fully organized Preparatory School o.. the Coast. 
The instructors in the Gymnasium consist uf refined and educated gentlemen, 
who are permanently connected with the institution. Boarding establishment strictly 
first-class. Location healthful and accessible. The third school year will commence 
on the 14th of July. Examination of candidates tor admission, llth and 12th. For 
catalogues, address JOHN F. BURRIS, 

July 5. Berkeley, California. 



T 



DISSOLUTION. 

he partnership of Snow A May was dissolved on the 6th 

instant. FRANK C. SNOW, 

WM. B. MAY. 

I shall conduct the business under the name of SNOW & CO., and liquidate the 
affairs of the late firm at No. 20 Post street. - . FRANK C. SNOW. 
San Francisco, May 31st, 1870. June 14. 

FOR SALE, 

In a thri Ting- city, situated in one of the Sonthern counties, 
a valuable first-class SALOON BUSINESS, witfi lease, fixtures and furniture. 
For full particulars apply, by letter, "A. B.," Newa Letter Office. Dec. 14. 

J. C. MERRILL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, Agents for the Sand- 
wich Islands Packet Lines, 204 California street. S F. April 13. 

Bradbury Pianos, 200 Post street. Established 1854. 



J, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA A1>YKK1IS>K 



15 



SPORTING ITEMS. 
Pedestrianism. — Wi»t<>n m ith » handsome piece <>f 

plate and a RoM watch and ehain ftl the AN ximdrta Palace, near London, 

July r.:h. Sir John Aatley and G. A Sala mule the presentation.— 
The *i\ day's »*»ik at Agricultural Hall, London, walking time limited t<> 
1-4 hmira a «lay, was woo by Vangban, who made 390milea; Met 'arty, 
:>77 miles; Petti t, third. 36] milea.*^-St«ve Brodle, known as 
la* New fork Newsboy, arrived here last Tuesday. He oomee to the 
coast t*> walk Frank Edwards for the California belt. The match will 
il-lv mme off in September. ^^ Mr. Lawton, Superintendent of 
the Olympic Club, and Mr. McNeil, <>f the Caledonian Club, have made 
ine-nta for a nix day go-aw-you please match, to take place at the 
Mechanics* Pavilion on or about September SO, 1879. Valuable medals 
are offered, an<l in addition, GO per cent, of the gate money will he divided 
mongat the winner*. Thin is as it should he, and we are glad to see two 
such well known and highly respectable gentlemen as Messrs. Lawton 
and McNeil undertake the management of the content. The reason that 
s|xirt in California has languished so long is that hitherto gentlemen of 
means and position have held aloof from professional contests, and as a 
natural consequence such contest" have almost invariably been gate 
money fircles. ■^■•George Hazael has deposited £25 with the publisher of 
hrll's Lift to walk Weston for the world's championship, or join a sweep- 
stake with Bowell and Blower Brown. -^— A six hour's walk will take 
place at Saratoga Hall, Geary street, on Monday, August 3d, commencing 
at 12 m. The contestants are H. Williams, L. C. Straus, L. D. Swil- 
tera, M. Goldsmith and A. Etlinghouse, all of whom are under 17 years 
of au'e.^— Lt'NT»»N, August 1st.— Six members of the London Athletic 
Club and six other amateurs have given notice of their willingness to go 
to America. 

Fishing.— Good pike-fishing along the Feather river.— —Young stur- 
geon are reported to bite freely in the Sacramento river, near Bannon's 
Mongh. ' Big Meadows, Plumas county, is one of the best places in 
California for fly-fishing. Streams are nuirerous, and have enough large 
pools t" allow the augler to use as much line as necessary.— —The Gwal- 
hallo and its tributaries are at present the best trout streams near the city. 
A party of San Francisco gentlemen, who spent a week on this stream, 
caught over four thousand fish — one gentlman taking eighteen hundred 
alone. They report that the fish are in splendid condition. The easiest 
way to reach this stream is by rail to Duncan's Mills, thence by stage to 
the river, where there is a good hotel, in which first-class accommodations 
can be had for one dollar and a half per day.— -Fly-fishing on Lake San 
Andreas is now very good. The fish are abundant, and take the fly raven- 
ously, both casting from shore and trolling. Pilarcitos Lake also affords 
good sport. ' 'Lake Chabot, at San Leandro, is a paradise for fishermen, 
the trout being large and in full flesh ; in fact, they are the finest lake 
trout in the State, both for sport and the table. 

Rowing. — The single-scull race between Leahey and Nelson for an ad- 
vertised §1,000 and the championship was rowed at Long Bridge last Sun- 
day. The course was from a stake-boat off Channel street around a stake- 
boat off the Powder Works beyond the Rolling Mills, a distance of one 
mile and a half, and return. The start was made at 11:05, Leahey going 
to the front at once, pulling thirty-eight to the minute, and keeping the 
lead all through. At the Powder Mills he was six lengths ahead, winning 
easily in 27:05 ; Nelson's time being 27:40.^^Leahey has telegraphed to 
W. Cottswortb, of Victoria, B. C, accepting his challenge for $1,000 and 
the championship, and offering to pay his expenses here iu the event of a 
match being made.— —The sailing race for Whitehall boats, last Monday, 
was won by Henry Hoyt, in the Captain Guion, Sea Gull second, Jabez 
Howes third. —A telegram has just been received from Mr. Cottswortb, 
stating that he will not row Leahey unless boats with stationary seats are 
used. Of course, this puts all chance of a race out of the question, and 
entitles Mr. Leahey to the championship of this coast. 

Boxing. — Arthur Chambers and Harry Maynard signed articles on 
July 30th to fight a fair, stand-up, glove contest for a purse of $1,500 and 
the light-weight championship; the meeting to take place within two 
weeks from fate. Both men have gone into active training. W. Ed- 
wards will second Chambers, W. Riley will most likely second Maynard. 
It is highly creditable to the pluck of Harry Maynard that he should 
have arranged a meeting with so redoubtable a champion as Chambers, 
and we think a lively fight may be looked for.^— Mike Donovan and 
W. McClellan are both training very hard for their coming battle. 
Mike's headquarters are at Joe Dieves' Three-mile House, San Leandro 
road. McClellan stays iu town, but keeps very close.— —Since the above 
was set in type, the match between Maynard and Chambers has been de- 
clared "off." 

Baseball. — Games last Sunday at the Recreation Grounds: Reno vs. 
Eagles— score, 20 to 2 ; Gattling vs. Franklin — score, 13 to 9. At Oak- 
land last Saturday: Oakland vs. Athletics — score, 9 to 4 j Knickerbocker 
vs. Atldetics — score, 11. to 1. GameJ next Sunday at the Recreation 
Grounds: Knickerbocker vs. Star. At Oakland: California vs. Mutual. 
—On Sunday, August 10th, the Knickerbocker and Omaha Clubs will 
come together, and, as both clubs are pretty evenly matched, a good 
game may be expected. As yet it has not been settled as to whether the 
game will be played here or in Oakland. Due notice of the selection of 
place, however, will be given next week. 

Picnics.— Italian Bersaglic Sharpshooters, Willow Grove Park, West 
Berkeley, Sunday.^— California Jager, Fairfax Park, Sunday. ^^Work- 
ingmen's Benevolent Society, Badger's Park, Sunday. ^—Caucasian Joint 
Picnic, Shell-mound Park, Berkeley, Sunday.-^— Columbia Lodge, No. 
127, I. 0. B. B., Schuetzen Park, Alameda, Sunday.-^— Excursion to 
Cremorne Gardens, Martinez. Steamer S. M. Whipple leaves Washing- 
ton street wharf 10 A. M. Sunday.^— Excursion to Sonoma. Steamer 
Herald leaveB Washington-street wharf 9 a. m. Sunday. 

Bicycling. — David Stanton rode a race against three trotting horses, 
at Lillie Bridge, London, July 10th. At twenty-one miles Stanton was 
so far ahead that the horses were withdrawn. The bicyclist kept on till 
he had made forty miles ; time— 2 hours, 21 minutes and 28 seconds. His 
time from twenty-six miles (1 hour, 30 minutes and 2 seconds) being the 
best on record. 

Harriman, the Maine pedestrian, who was second to Rowell in the 
great six days' walk in New York, has just accomplished another pedes- 
trian feat. He has walked off with another man's wife. The outraged 
husband at present holds the stakes. 



Shooting. ,-Deer hunting in the mountains around Salinas, Santa 
Cruz and Uloverdale is the sport of the season for onr oity sportsmen. 
Borne of the largest bucks seen for many years have been killed this sea* 
son. The law as it now stand*, forbidding the killing of does and fawns, 

DM a good effect, as it saves many hundred deer, and bucks are more plen- 
tiful every year. At Bird's Point last Monday C. Robinson shot a match 

with R. It, Johnson for $100 a wide. The former won easily ; score. C to 
-1 at Single birds, and 3 to 1 at double birds. H. Parker and Mr. John- 
son then shot a draw at six nigh birds, a freeze-out draw by Robinson 
Lambert, both killing all their birds and dividing the money.— — A target 
match was shot at Berkeley last Sunday between Lieutenants McElhin- 
ney and Jenkins, "one hundred shots at two hundred yards. The latter 
won ; score, 411 to 406. There will be a grand pigeon shooting tourna- 
ment at the Sacramento State Fair next week, that will bring together all 
the best shots in the State— -There is some talk of matching John Ruth, 
of Oakland, against the Utah champion, to break 500 glaBS balls, Ruth to 
use a Ballard rifle and his opponent a shotgun— Deer are plentiful along 
the ridge between Deer Creek and Yuba.— Doves are plentiful a short 
distance north of Sacramento.— —Snipe shooting commenced Friday, 
August 1st. A dispatch from Reno reports bags of forty at Truckee 
Meadows, a few miles from Reno.*-— Hares are very abundant in the 
Santa Clara Valley. There will be splendid coursing when the grain 
is cut. i A target shoot is now progressing at the Presidio. It com- 
menced yesterday and will finish at 12 m. to-day. There are thirty 
competitors, ten from each military division of the Pacific coast, from 
whom will be selected a team to represent this coast at Creedmoor in 
September. 

ARIZONA. 

Last week the News Letter gave an account of the tesrible accident to 
Mr. B. W. Reagan, one of the owners of the Silver King mine, and now 
we have the sad duty of chronicling the death of this estimable gentle- 
man. The news will be most distressing to his many friends in the Ter- 
ritory. 

Col. Harvey Lake, an old pioneer of Arizona, who died last week at 
Maricopa, was buried in this city on Tuesday with Masonic and military 
honors. Col. Lake left San Francisco but a few short days ago, with the 
intention of mining and shipping the ores of the Ajo Copper Mines, 
having entered into a contract with the company to do so. 

We hear of a party of seven mining engineers, who left New York on 
the 28th ultimo for a tour through Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona. 
They make the journey in the interest of capitalists of New York and 
Philadelphia, and will doubtless be welcome guests in the mining locali- 
ties that they may visit. 

The Atzlan Mill, owned by a new York company, was burned by sup- 
posed incendiaries on the 19th ultimo. The loss aggregates S12,000, and 
is a serious disaster for the Groom Creek and adjacent districts. 

The Tiger Mill is running smoothly, turning out bullion at the rate of 
$2,000 per day. 

The Big Bug mining district has become the favorite with Chicago 
capitalists, who have at present some twenty properties bonded and 
favorably entertained. The Gross and the Storm Cloud mines are 
reported as sold for $16,000. Gov. Fremont having reported favorably of 
the Crook Mine, one-half of it has been sold in New York, and early in 
the present month active work, upon an extended scale, will be com- 
menced. Gov. Fremont has done a great deal, during his Eastern visit, to 
foster the interests of Arizona and to bring them into prominent notice, . 
for which his constituency should feel a large share of gratitude. We 
expect shortly to see him in this city, en route for the territory. In 1875 
or 76 was discovered, some twenty-eight miles northeast from Prescott, a 
very extensive copper deposit, the lead croppings being from 12 to 16 feet 
wide, with ore which assayed as high as 40 per cent. The owners of the 
property have recently begun its development, and their prospects are 
most encouraging. Most of the travel to Arizona from the Ea3t now 
goes by way of the Atcheson, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad, which route, 
in comparison with that via the Union Pacific and San Francisco, is 
shorter in time and the expense is less. The news from the Silver King 
and Tombstone districts continues encouraging, and new mines are daily 
being located and developed. The drift of capital appears to be steadily 
heading for Arizona, from New York, Philadelphia, Chicago and St. 
Louis, and we are much mistaken if these favored localities do not absorb 
a large share. The pump at the Vulture mine was, at last accounts, 
working well, and the mill was to commence work on the 21st ult., with 
a very large supply of good ore on the dump. 

The weather in Arizona just now is intensely hot, and will so continue 
for some weeks. When the cooler season comes, we have every reason 
to believe that a large number of enterprising men, controlling capital, 
will visit the territory. 

BILKS IN CHURCH. 
Last Sunday was the 25th anniversary of Calvary Church, and the 
Senior Elder, James B. Roberts, was called upon to make a statement of 
its condition, progress, etc. This he did, showing commendable progress 
in every good word and work. But what surprised and grieved us most 
was that an Elder in the Church of Christ should stand up before the pul- 
pit and an audience of one thousand persons, and, after complimenting 
them, declare " that there were bilks in the church !" Not Honorable 
Bilks, but men who persistently subscribe literally to the church debts 
just to swell the list, and yet who never pay, and, for that matter, never 
intended to pay. Hence it was, he said, that the church was now in debt 
£10,000. This same Elder went on to say that the sexton had much 
trouble in endeavoring to please every one in regard to church ventilation. 
A fat woman wanted more fresh air, while others not so favored desired 
the windows closed, etc. Then he fell upon the young men who go to the 
theaters and stand in the lobbies for hours inhaling tobacco smoke, etc, 
"and yet they come to church and complain of the want of pure air." 
Barring these vulgarisms and the Elder's egotism the report was every 
way creditable to the church and congregation. 

ZAMLOCK. 



St John's Presbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and 
Taylor. The Rev. Dr. Scott, pastor, will preach on Sunday at 11 a. m. 
and 7£ P.M. Sunday School and Bible Classes, 94 A.M. Prayer and 
Praise Service at 6i P.M. 

Berg-strom Church Organs, at Smith's. 200 Post street- 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 2, 1879. 



TheIMtBook 



-J-.FROM "5— 



S&tufday to Saturday. 



St. Petersburg, July 26th.— The Minister of the Interior reports 
3,501 fires during June, causing a damage of over 12,000,000 roubles. 
Five hundred and eight fires were of incendiary origin. The theater in 
Kremlin, Moscow, has been burned by Nihilists.<^— Paris, July 26th. — 
The Municipal Council has renamed a large number of streets, including 
the Boulevard Haussman, named during the reign of Napoleon III.^— 
New York, July 28th.— Argument will be heard to-day in the Supreme 
Court by Justice Porter, on the application of the Pacific Mail Steamship 
Company for an injunction restrainingthe city from collecting the unpaid 
tax laid on the company in 1874.-^— Washington, July 28th.— The Sec- 
retary of the Interior Saturday rendered a decision in the application of 
the New Idria Mining Company, of California, for a review of the de- 
partment's decision of 1871, which rejected their application for a patent 
for 480 acres of mineral land in California. Secretary Schurz concurs in 
the decision of 1871, "in holding that a larger. quantity of land is em- 
braced in this application than was contemplated or authorized by law." 
By the decision the New Idria Mining Company, by its purchase of pro- 
perty, " did not acquire the right to have or take a patent for more than 
160 acres of land."— -New York, July 28th.— At a largely-attended 
meeting of the trades, including piano makers, cabinet makers, varnish- 
ers, carvers, molders and wood workers, on Sunday, resolutions were 
adopted favoring the shortening of a day's labor to eight hours, pledging 
themselves to drop the question of wages. ^—Seattle, July 28th.— The 
fire Saturday evening proves to have been disastrous. The buildings de- 
stroyed are all wooden structures, occupied principally by saloons, ware- 
houses, shops, etc. Some leading business houses are heavy losers by the 
removal of their goods, which were greatly damaged and lost.' New : 
ark, N. J., July 28th.— Four thousand Germans, in mass meeting yester- 
day, protested against the enforcement of what they termed the obsolete 
Sunday laws, which are chiefly directed against Germans, and at war 
with the spirit of liberty and humanity.— New York, July 28th.— 
The Jteport of the Canadian Commissioner of Fisheries presents valuable 
statistics of the fishing industries throughout the Dominion. In 1877 the 
value of the total catch was §12,029,955. Last year it amounted to $15.- 
315,679. Fresh salmon packed in ice represented a value of $306,982, 
while the fish in cans was worth 8988,576. Of this, British Columbia 
represented the larger proportion. On Fraser River 2,500 white men and 
Indians are engaged in fishing. Chinese do the work of canning. It is 
proposed to stock Fraser River with the young pf California. Seven es- 
tablishments are devoted to fish culture in the Provinces.— Paris, July 
28th. — The Senatorial Committee on Ferry's Education Bill has voted all 
the clauses except three, one being Article 7, which forbids members of 
unauthorized societies from teaching in the schools.— -Memphis, July 
28th. — Ten additional cases were reported to the Board of Health this 
afternoon, six negroes. The special policemen engaged in taking the 
censuB of the city, completed their task to-day. Their report shows the 
population of Memphis to be 16,110; whites, 4,283; blacks, 11,287; 
adults, 10,551, children 5,559. Of the whole, 8,743 have had the fever, 
leaving 5,367 susceptible to the disease.— —Paris, July 28th. — In conse- 
quence of the ravages of the phylloxera in French vineyards, the Minis- 
ter of Commerce and Agriculture promises, as soon as the Government 
Commissioner has reported on the question of planting American vines, 
he will give immediate effect to its decision.-^— Versailles, July 29th. — 
The Chamber of Deputies, by a vote of 249 ayes to 166 noes, has adopted 
the proposal of M. Proust for the demolition of the ruins of the Tuiller- 
ies. The site will be transformed into agarden.-^SAN Francisco, July 
30th. — The amount of customs dues paid in this port this month is $548,- 
453, making a total since January 1st of ©3,292,988, against $3,520,845 for 
the corresponding period in 1878. There are now in port under engage- 
ment to load wheat twenty-two vessels, of 30,000 tons, having a carrying 
capacity of 900,000 centals. There are 35,000 tons of disengaged tonnage 
in port, and 170,000 tons on the way here.— — Whole fields of ripening 
grain in West Chehalis county, Oregon, have been found to be shriveled. 
—The burning of stacked hay in Santa Clara county is of frequent oc- 
currence. -^Fires on Willow Creek, Amador county, have burnt much 
timber and dry feed.— Battle Mountain, Nevada, will ship over 100,000 
pounds of wool this year. — Lieutenant Farrow and Umatilla scouts 
have discovered the " Sheepeater" Indians on Crooked River, Idaho, 100 
strong. Farrow will attack as soon as a position is secured.— Much ex- 
citement prevails in Beaver county, Utah, over the discovery of placer 
gold on Gold Creek, forty miles from Beaver. 

LIVE FOR SOMETHING. 

Live so that your virtues will excel your vices, and shine brighter 
and brighter as the years grow less and less. Live so that you can look to 
the past without regretting that you have done too little in this life. La- 
bor for something noble and praiseworthy. Live so that in passing from 
this to another shore you will leave behind you 

Footprints on the sands of Time. 
Live for something. There is no one but what can do some good — no one 
who need say, "I can accomplish nothing;" none who need spend their 
lives in idleness. Life is a blank book, every page of which must hear 
something worthy of record, or a blot that can never be erased.™ Social 
Notes. 

Moscow still holds its own as the London of Russia, in spite of St. 
Petersburg and its port and palaces. Moscow commands the commerce of 
the Empire, and stands at the top in the Report of Customs Duties, 
which it heads with 15,000,000 of roubles in 1S78, against 9,200,000 rou- 
bles for St. Petersburg, a falling off from 1869, when St. Petersburg 
reached 11,000,000 and Moscow not quite 9,500,000. The Russian custom 
duties for 1878 were 58,000,000, exceeding those of 1877 by 27,000,000. 

An elegant assortment of Gold Watches and Chains at Randolph & 
Co.'s, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco, California, for 
the Week ending: July 30th. 

Compiled from the Records of the Commercial Agency, 401 California St. t S.F. 



Wednesday, July 23d. 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



G U Lawlor to Anna P Lawlor. . . . 
O P Cem'ty As'n to A Wagner. . . . 

Saml Crim to John S Fells 

Peter Taylor to Wm J Adams 

T C Edwards to L W Kidd 

J M Comerl'ord to Jno Heberlan .. 

R B Horn to Louis Taussig 

"Wm R Dunn to Caih E D linn 

L Larsenenr to Edna M Cutler .... 
Jacob Buss to PFriedrichs .... ,. 



Cath E Dnnn to Wm R Dunn . 

E Judaon to W R Dunn 

W Laidlaw to Same 



P "Von RensBelaar to R F Morrow 



DESCRIPTION. 



I PRICE 



N Haight, 106:3 e Buchanan, e 60x137:6 
Lot 2, Harmony Division plat 5 of Cem 

W Folsom, 95 s 2tst, s 60x122:6 

Sundry properties in various parts city 

S 25tb, 101:9 w Sanchez, w 24x114 

N Duncan, 244:6 e Sanchez, 23:6x105.. 

S 27th, 356:5 e Ellen, e 50x114 

Sundry properties in Mission Blocks .. 
Ne Geary and Baker, e 137:6x137:6 .... 
Und % e Treat av. 170 s 20th, 50x122:6, 

sub to mort $3,300 

Sundry properties in Mission Blocks . . 

W Guerrero, 250 n 24th, n 60. etc 

W Guerrero, 250 n 14th, n 60x140; and 

w Maple Court, 250 n 14th, n 30x110:2 
Und % sw 16th and Florida, e 40x200. . 



Gift 

$ 80 

5 

5 

5 

1,600 
5 

6,000 

3,250 

2,650 

6,000 

1 

1 
12,000 



Thursday, July 24th. 



JVPlumeto HCollln... 

Geo Barstow to City and County.. 
Lena L Du Val to Putnam Robson 

Jno Hunt Jr to J G Kittle 

A Dinkelspiel to S Shoenberg 

H Kreidsheimer to Jnlie Loewe. . . 
Jno Hannan to Terence Caldwell.. 

J D Hooker to M Landers 

Wm Sharon to AD Sharon 

Board of T L Com'rs to H S Smith 
Masonic Cemetery Assn to Same.. 

J T Dowling to Wm Irwin 

J A Cardnefl to J Q, uinn 



Sw Burgoyne pi and Pacific, w 60x77:6. 

Streets and highways 

Nw Folsom, 127:6 sw 12th. 87:6x137:6.. 

S Burry, 137:6 e 7th, e47:6xl20 

Und 2-60 u McAllister, 105 e Laguna, e 

25x137:6 

Und 1.12 Same 

W 23d av, 230 n Pt Lobos, n 25x120. . . . 
S Fulton, 82:6 w Webster, w 55x137:6.. 
E cor Jessie and Aunic, ne 117:6x68.... 

Ne 7th, 250 se Howard, se 25x90 

Lot 92, Fountain plot 

3 cor 4th and Mission, se 80x70 

S Hancock, 315 w Sanchez, w 40x114 . . 



94 

231 

350 

1,000 

5 

9 

62 

3,000 

1,000 



Friday, July 25th. 



J A Stanly to Mara Freeman . . 
Same to John Glenn and wife.. 
Sav & Ln Soc to Ann'e A Murdock 

Same to Chas Murdock , 

City and Co to Geo WFriuk... . 

Same to Same , 

C F Doe to Wm Schilling 

D Mahoney to Hib Sav & Ln Soc 

J B Houghton to E H Black 

Geo Hudson to Julia A Travers.. 
Henry Kohn to Alvina Vidaver... 
Henry Hinkel to H L E Mjyer... 



W Noe, 239 n 17th, n 25x105 , 

W Noe, 205 n 17th, u 25x130 

N 30th, 4;;5 w Church, w 2oxll4 

N 30th, 380 w Church, w 25x114 

Nw Haight and Buchanan, 87:6x137:6. 

E Texas, 350 s Yolo, s 83x100. 

WBeideman.lOOn Ellis, n 25x90 

Rmcho Lagnoa Merced 

Sundry lota in Outside Lands 

N 19th, 39:11 w Guerrero, 126 x n 309. 
Lot 7, blk 13, Paul Tract Homestead . 
Nw Clay and Webster, w 93x33 



625 
700 
400 
400 



Saturday, July 26th. 



Geo W Frink to City and County . \ 
O N Florine to C H Hellstrommer 
S F Sava Union to J L Warren .... 
S Schoenberg to Julie Loewe 

Michl O'Brien to Robert Flatten. 
W W Thompson to W Asmnssen 
F F Taylor to Winnefred Jennings 

Same to A Morgenthal 

Christian Rcis to Geo Hearst.... 

HS Ridley to MT Barry 

Cath E Quinlau to Oatn Sutton .. 

Geo Mayes to Wm Coffey 

Gustavus Briggs to Chas Rohn 

J Barkhanseu to Chas O Zacbrison 



Streets and highways 

N Pine, 206:3 w Fillmore, 34:4^x137:6. 

S Sacramento, 180:5 e Pierce, e 29:8, etc 
lUud 17-60 n McAllister, 105 e Laguna, e 

| 25x137:6 

IB Beideman, 100 n Ellis, n 25x90.... 
|Ne 26th and Shotwell, n 30x90 

Se J st and 36th av, s 600x110 

W 35th av, 165 n K st, w 100 x n 55 . 

Und H se Irwin, 275 ne 7th, ne 275x210 
jN Vallejo, 174:6 e Van Ness, e 25x122:6 

Lot 5, blk 2, College Homestead 

W Bagley pi, 95 n O'f arrell, n 40:6x60 

S Erie, 123:ll!£e Mission, el04:4&, etc 

E Franklin, 100 n Tyler, n 20x63:9. . 



5,000 
12,000 
1,800 



Monday, July 28th. 

Peter Schneider to Felice Ghio IN Filbert, 111 w Montgomery, 1:6x137:6 

Jno McClellan to O J Callaghan .. Ne Bitch, 75 nw Harrison, nw 25x80... 

Paul Keyser to F Gambo [Sundry lots in Hudson Garden Tract.. 

Sav and Ln Soc to E W Burr IN Br'd way, 121:11 e Franklin, 62x137:6 

C Bohn to Charlotte Schmitt 'S Erie, 123:11 & e Mission, e 104:4X, etc 

Max Davis to Max Wolfen IN Sutter, 82:6 w Sieiucr, w 27:6x100.. . 

P J Kelly to M Wright Se Turk and Scott, e 32:6x120 

Sarah Landers to Michl Landers ..|Lots 11, 15, Precita "Valley Lands 

JP Verges to R Bergfeld W Dolores, 51:6 n 29tb,n 35x100 

David WooBter to Blanch Weems . W Clara a v, 723 n 18th, s 24x136 

Ellen Murphy to Cors Uonahan ...|Se Stevenson, 125 ue 6th, ne 24x70 




Tuesday, July 29th. 



O C Pratt to City and County . 



A Cramer to Jno Wieland 

Henry Fisher to O Alessio 

Henry Armstrong to Geo Edwards 

WmD Farren to L E White 

C E Woodbury to WE Hilton 

Chas Malloy to Edward Wall 

SF Sinclair to G?o E Twitchell .. 

A J Snyder to Chas Phillips 

Same to Same 

Win Jameson to Daniel Jones .... 
Daniel Jones to Michl Donlan .... 



S Army, at e line of Kerrisons laud, s 

48. e 10, p 49, sw 10 to com 

W Castro, 71:6 n 17th, n 126, w 425, etc 

W % lot 7, blk G, R R Homestead 

W Noe, 76:6 n 23d, n 25x105 

E2dav, 188 n 17th, n 36x120 

10 acres, Woodbury Tract 

Se Tehama, 143 sw 8th, sw 21x80 

jLot 5. blk 182, University Ex Hd ..... 

Se Everett, 125 ne4th, ne 50x80 

IwPotreroav, 100 s 22d, s 45x100 

jNo Dora, 130 nw Harrison, nw 25x75 . 
iSame , 



"Wednesday, July 30th. 



J S Alemany to F T McCanu IS PtLobos av, 50 w Wood, w 25x125. 

W S Dibble to C Holbrook I S 17th, 150 c Sanchez, e 60:3x100. 

Theresa S French to M B French , 

C P Duane to S C Hastings 

G Baumeister to Emma Beckman. 

Wm I Wilson to Jno Porter , 

M M Hnmburg to BE Tittle 

City and Co to Earl Barilett 

Wm A Ray to F A Ramsell 

Wm Fulton to Geo Edwards 

Geo Edwards to Cbas Brumm.... 
JnoLempke to Francis Fritsch. . 
Wm Jameson to Louis Zephyr ... 
Mary A Elliott to LEBulkley... 
Henry Hinkel to Jno T Evans ... 
Same to Hugh Marshall 



Nw Miesion, 450 sw 4th, bw 25x160 .... 
Se 4th and Harrison, s 160, e 300, etc . , 
N Grove, 100 e Octavia, e 27:6x63:9 
Sundry lota in City Land Association.. 

S Bush, 255 w Kearny, w 20x137:6 

Sundry lots in Outside Lauds 

W Cambridge, 200 s Wayland, 120x100 
E Chattanooga, 125 s 23d, s 25x117. .... 

S Jersey, 100 e Sanchez, e 25x114 

Lot 217, Gift Map 3 , 

W7th, 105 n Harrison, n 50x85 , 

Und 1-7 n Bosh, 87:6 w Jones, e 25x100 
W WebBter, 33 n Clay, n 22x90 .. 
W Webster, 55 n Clay, n 24:6x90 



Aug. 2, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVEKTISEK. 



17 



CRADLE, ALTAR, AND TOMB. 



CRADLE. 

■*. »s-ln OmkUn.l. .tub lsth. lo Um irift • f Alexander Buchanan, » aon. 
In thbdtr. Jul) J7U». U> the wife ■ •( r I * .11, * no. 
Dull,— Intake rily, July 29th, U> the- * if. <f .1 w IMI. * dauchUT. 

(nA \ Fisher, • son. 

Jamae O. Muoi:, r daughter. 
Mfirt • :,-. July 20th, t" thr wife ■ ■( J. II. Murphy, n ton. 

OrrtniiiiMiA - In AIiiiiinIi, Julv ttth, bo Um wife, ofl Juan <>p|«.nhcimor, a daughter. 
Pitht .1'ilv I ih. t-. the wife .-f H. Pecht. hm.ii. 

n— In thta city, July 20ih, to tin- wife ot Sidney 0. RoUoaon, a son. 
8TOC*TOX-ln Lne Hani'., July Uth, t-> Um «i(. ofR, li. BtOCktOO, a daughter. 
Stkorrl— In this attar, Julv nb, to the wife "f J. F. MroWl, a daughter. 
Wot— In this city, July 2Sth, to the wife of Win. West, a son. 

ALTAR. 

Ford-Bowman — In West Oakland, July 27th, C .1. Ford to Jennie E. Bowman. 
II U n-LMUB- In thi.-* city. July Mth, K. W, M.uii*e to Ida II, Leslie. 

► eld-Mat— In this city, July 27th. Peter tllrsehfeld to Elise May. 
Jakmikk-Hkrhmann— In this city, JuJj 27th, C. .Javnlcko to Susanna Borgmnnn. 
McDeutorr-MrRRY— In this dtjr, Jul] 23d, John J McDernmtt to Annie M. Murrj'. 
Mcl>o\ALD-CVx»t'KR -In BooOBUk July 25th, James R, McDonald to Emma Cooper. 
Wohlbr-De La Veoa— In this city, July ittrth, A. Wobler to Rosario De La Vega. 
Wis a>s-Drakk— In North San Juan, July 24th, S. Winans to Mary F. Drake. 

TOME 
Asns-In this city, July 28tb, Edward C. Ashe, aged 25 years and 10 months. 
Brro— In Oakland, July 22d, John A. Berg, aged 74 years and 11 months. 
Clink— In this city, July 27th, Sine A. Ctine, aged IS years. 
Cooniassb — In this city, July 26th, August* Cogniasse, aged 52 years. 
Ckarlry— At Bartlett Springs, July 2mh, Cyrus G. Ccarley, aged 23 years. 
OotttU - In this city. July 28th, Mrs. Johanna Collins, aged 28 years. 
H.m.an -In this city,. Inly Mth, Bridget Hagan, aged 68 years. 
Human— In Oakland. July 27th, Charles E. Homan, aged 30 years. 
Jones— In this city, July 24th, Charles E. Jones, aged 15 years. 
Lake -At Maricopa, A. T , July 24th, Col. Harvey Lake, aged 53 years. 
Morton- In this city, July 20th, Frank Morton, aged 30 years and 7 months. 
O'Brien— In this city, July -6th, Kate O'Brien, aged 35 years. 
PEXA-At Newcastle, July 5th, Joseph E. Pcna, aged 29 years. 
Proctor— In Sebago, Maine, July 2d, Captain Fred Proctor, aged 86 years. 
Sheldon— In this city, July 25th, Thomas T. Sheldon, aged 23 years. 
Wilson— In this city, July 27th, Maggie Wilson, aged 20 yearsand 11 months. 
Wall— In San Rafael, July 28th, Peter Wall, aged 58 years. 

CHARLES MATHEWS AND J. L. TOOLE. 
The following letter was addressed by the late Mr. CharleB Mathews 
to Mr. J. L. Toole. It is still in possession of the last-named eminent 
comedian, and it has never been published. It may prove amusing to 
many of the readers of the Era Almanack : 

" Belle Vve Mansions, Brighton, August 6, 1873. 

"My Dear Toole : — Were you ever in a mess? If you never were, I 
can explain it to you, having been in several ; indeed, I don't mind con- 
fessing to you that I am in one now, and strange to say, you are perhaps 
the only man who can get me out of it. You need not button up your 
pockets, it isn't a pecuniary one. Only fancy, after thirty years' practice 
and experience, I have made a mistake in my dates, and for the first time 
in my life find myself engaged to two managers at the same time ! Now, 
they say a man connot serve two masters, but I can — if they will only 
come one after the other — only one at a time — one down, t'other come on j 
but to play at Bristol and at the Gaiety on the same night (and keep it up 
for a week), I don't see my way to accomplish. In a moment of enthusi- 
asm I engaged to begin with Chute on September 29th, and I had scarcely 
done so when Hollingshead reminded me that I was booked to begin with 
him on that date, and that it could not be altered. Conceive my dismay ! 
Chute holds fast— 'can't be altered' — so does Hollingshead — 'can't be 
altered.' 

"Now, Toole — dear Toole — beloved Toole — can't you play a week 
longer at the Gaiety ? Can't you let me begin there on Monday, Oct. 6th 
{as I thought I did), and get me out of my dilemma ? CAN'T you make 
this sacrifice to friendship and put three or four hundred more into your 
pocket? Virtue is not its own reward, but an extra week of fine busi- 
ness is. 

"Now, Toole— adored Tooley— best of men — first of comedians— most 
amiable of your sex — burst into tears — throw your arms round my neck 
and sob out : ' Do with me as thou wilt — play me another week — play me 
another three hundred, and be happy." 

" Breathless with anxiety, yet swelling with hope, I await your answer. 
Pity the sorrows of a poor old man, and even telegraph 'Yes,' rather than 
keep me in suspense. 

" What's a week to an able-bodied low comedian ? Child's play. Why, 
you'll be wanting to throw in morning performances as well to keep you 
from rusting. It is a chance for you— avail yourself of it and bless me, 
and I'll bless you, and Hollingshead will bless us both, and Chute will 
bless us all. 

"With my intermediate blessing, ever faithfully yours, 

"C. J. Mathews." 

SUPPER AT PEKIN. 

The repast was charming. What dishes, bowls and plates there 
were! Birds'-nest soup, sharks'-fin soup, chicken broth, lap wings '-eggs 
soup, and countless other dishes, all cooked to perfection — from the fish, 
with sharp sauce, to the apricot kernel milk, and the sweet salad of young 
radish-tops. Loutalou offered us, with his chop-sticks, a piece of roast 
duck. We reciprocated by taking, now from the dish, now from our 
plate, pieces of fowl nr pork, and placing them on his. "A preserved 
Canton orange for Miss Perfumed Jade," a water-chestnut for another 
lady, for each guest, if he wishes to be polite, must pass half his time in 
heaping up his neighbors' plates with different kinds of fuod, and accept- 
ing, with many " tching, tching," or " touo shie," all that is offered him 
in return. 

An Arkansas paper puts it this way: " We knew a man that won 
enough money on the horse race Saturday to hire a negro to hoe cotton a 
week." 

Artistic Novelties, manufactured from California quartz, at Ran- 
dolph & Co.'e, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 



THE AVERILL MIXED PAINT 

I" iimmifnc! urv.l from strictly |iur« White l.rml. Zlur, and 
Pan LhMMd Oil, to which \a ufcM Wa**r Qtan, which chenilcallv unites the 
inmdluta tnd holds them In notation, so Ihtj osnnot setmrmta Am :i boon psinl 
It has no equal, producing a brilliant glosay fml«h, Impervloua to the weather, and 

• Will Last Twice as Long- 
as any other paint made. It is of pure white, and any Shade- or ColordeBlred, mixed 
ready tor the brush, so thai any one can apply it. 

<iur wagon ami machinery paints, from the more common colors to the finest ver- 
milion, are socially desirable, 

our QTQ-prool roof, bam and bridge paint, manufactured from oxide of iron, is the 
beat and cheapest paint for the pUTpOM that can he produced. 

Put up in i, J, 1 and 6 gallon cans, and in barrels, Hold by the gallon. Send for 
samplo card of colors and price list. Address, 

CALIFORNIA PAINT COMPANY, 

July 18. 829 MARKET STREET, San Francisco. 

SWANTON HOUSE, PESCADERO. 

This Popular Hotel, together with the tletnched Cottages, 
which are not the least of its attractive features, have been newly furnished 
throughout, and are now open for the reception of guests. Those desiring to visit 
the most enjoyable of all our sea-side resorts, can make no mistake in deciding upon 
Pescadero. 

IT 13 EASILY BEACHED, 
and is unsurpassed in the excellence of its climate, the beauty of its scenery, and in 
the attractiveness of its truly remarkable sea beach. Those extraordinary pebbles, 
among which are to be found agates, opals, sapphires, etc., were never so numerous 
as now, the past Winter having thrown up immense numbers of curiously-shaped 
stones, which for ages have been subiected to the everlasting motions of the tireless 
Pacific. GOOD TROUr FISHING is obtainable in the Pescadero river. 



* The hotel prices are fixed, to suit the times. 



[April 27. 



REGISTRATION. 

Republicans, Attention 1 

Headquarters Republican State Central Committee, Rooms 
Nob. 4, 5, 6,7, 8 and 9, No. 703 Market street, southwest comer Third 
street, San Francisco, June 2(3, 1879. 

The vital importance of immediate REGISTRATION must he apparent to every 
Republican, when the fact is announced that the entire Registration of thie city 
and county has been wiped out ; and that no one will be allowed to vote at the 
September Election unless RE-REGISTERED. The State Central Committee calls 
the earnest attention of Republicans to this matter, and requests them, without 
delay, to register themselves, so as to strengthen the hands of the organization and 
place it in a position to win the approaching contest. No true Republican will 
neglect this most imperative and argent duty. By order of the Committee. 

M. D. Boeuck, Secretary. [June 28.] W. W. MORROW, Chairman. 

NOTICE. 

To Bullion and Exchequer Stockholders. 

The Sau Francisco Stock and Exchange Board having been 
informed that great dissatisfaction exists among the shareholders of the Bullion 
and Exchequer Mining Companies, respecting the management of those properties 
by the present Boards of Trustees, have empowered their Executive Committee to 
co-operate with those shareholders who wish an opportunity for the expression of 
their sentiments respecting the same. The Executive Committee intends, with such 
co-operation, to procure the action of the Courts in ordering a new election of Trus- 
tees of those companies. All shareholders in sympathy with this movement are re- 
quested to call at the office of Mr. J. W. COLEMAN, President of the Committee, 
Room No. 1, Stock Exchange Building, and sign a petition to the County Court for 
its action in the premises. CHAS. S. NEAL, 

July 19. Secretary S. F. Stock and Exchange Board. 

"THE SAN FRANCISCO MERCHANT," 

A Weekly Trade Paper. 

Published Every Friday Morning-. --Especially devoted to 
the Grocery, Tobacco, Provision, Drug and Wine and Spirits Trades. The 
ADVOCATE OF* HOME MANUFACTURES. Able editorials on live topics. Newsy 
comments on all affairs appertaining to business. The fullest and most reliable in ir- 
ket reports, and the liveliest and most entertaining trade paper published in the 
United State. Subscription, Two Dollars a year, in advance (postage included) , and 
received by all newsdealers, Postmasters and agents of Wells, Fargo & Co. Sample 
copies, free. July 19. 

CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH, 

Importing Stationers and Booksellers. 

We have in Stock full assortments of the following: Fancy 
Papeteries, Auto, and Photo. Albums, Russia Wallets and Card Cases, Purses, 
Paper Weights, Fancy Inkstands, etc., and the handsomest and most complete line 
of Diaries ever offered in this market, 

Nov. 16. 327, 32 9, 331 3ANSOME STREET. 

LAYER & CURLETT, 

Architects, 

Furnish Plans, Specifications and Superintendence for the 
Construction or Renovation of Dwelling Houses, and every description of 
Building. Office : 19 S. F. Stock Exchange Building, Pine Btreet, San Francisco. 
[Take the Elevator.] June 15. 



D. F. Hutchinqs. 



J. Sanderson 



D. M. Donne. 

PHCENIX OIL WORKS. 

Established 1850.— Mulchings & Co., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

MME. B. ZEITSKA'S 

French, German aud Euglish Institute, Day and Boarding 
School, for Young Ladies, 922 Post street, between Hyde and Larkin. KIN- 
DERGARTEN connected with the Institute. 
Oct. 26. MME. B. ZEITSKA, Principal. 

CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY, 

Manufacturers of the Staudard Syrup, a superior article 
put up in barrels expressly for home consumption. Also, Extra Heavy Syrup 
in barrels for Export. Refined Sugars at lowest market rates. Office, 215 Front 
street, up stairs. Dec. 21. 

QUICKSILVER. 

For sale— In lots to suit, by Thomas Bell A Co., No. 305 
Sansome street, over Bank of California. Nov. 16. 

Smith's American Organs, 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 2, 1879. 



"BIZ.' 



Money continues to be superabundant, yet securely locked up — idle 
for want of employment. Interest rates here, as well as elsewhere, are 
lower than ever before known. There seems to be a want of confidence 
in tbe future. Improvements going forward in the city are very meagre, 
but few buildings being erected, yet bxiilding material is cheaper than 
ever, and the cost of erection far below any previous period in our his- 
tory. Recently there seems to be an increased inquiry for Real Estate in 
desirable localities for residences. This is particularly noticeable upon 
California street and other streets traversed by cable railroads; California 
street property seemingly having the preference by reason of its altitude 
and the superior birds-eye views obtainable as one glides along in the Pal- 
ace Cars that are ever kept scrupulously clean" aud neat. These cars now 
run out to Cemetery Avenue direct, and are attracting much pleasure 
travel in that direction. 

The Bag Ring, with its fifteen millions of Burlap Grain Sacks under 
lock and key, continues to call forth considerable comment upon 'Change 
and elsewhere. It is very generally understood that last year's combina- 
tion sold out their entire stock to present holders, and at low figures. It 
is said that the Bags are being carried at 7^ per cent, interest. Wm. T. 
Coleman & Co. are the agents. Lazard Freres are said to be parties to 
the lock-up, but whether the Jute Bag Factory Company are entirely 
disinterested in the movement is not altogether clear. Our own opinion 
is that farmers and interior traders are better supplied with Bags than is 
generally supposed. We know that fanner Glenn, the embryo Governor, 
has secured his 340,000 Grain Sacks, and so of Dr. Toland, Parrott, and 
other large grain producers. Oregon is also well stocked, and so it goes. 
We are not believers in the Bag Ring combination price — ll^@12^c. 

Borax. — This month and for the year onward there is to be an increased 
output over that of the last twelve months, but not to an extent to break 
prices. Eastern orders are here for 400 tons at some abatement from the 
prices ruling the past twelve months — say 6£@Sic. 

Case Goods.— Our canners are very actively engaged putting up 
Peaches, Tomatoes, etc., having had thus far a tine season, good fruit in 
abundance, and at low rates. Salmon from the North is coming forward 
in moderate supply, but the bulk of the Columbia river catch and that of 
Frazer river will be shipped direct to England. Our best customers this 
season seem to be Chicago and other cities East of it. Sales of 5,- 
000 cases Salmon to goby rail may be noted at $1 12i for 1-tb. and SI 75 
per dozen for 3-lb. tins. The Oregon steamship State of California brought 
us 7,400 cs. Columbia river Salmon. 

Wheat and Flour. — The arrivals are now steadily increasing in 
valume, but shippers are less anxious buyers at last week's prices of SI 75 
for No. 1 Shipping, and now only offer SI 70@S1 72h for best samples. 
The City of Pekin, for Hongkong, carries several thousand bbls. of Flour, 
at an average cost of S5. We note sales, this week, of 2,000 bbls. Extra 
Genesee Mills for Callao, and 1,000 bbls. of same for Central America. 
The price of Superfine is S4 25; Extra Superfine, §4 50@S4 75; Extra 
Family and Bakers' Extra, S5 25@$5 75, the latter rate for Silk-dressed 
Extras. 

Barley. — The Eastern demand seems to be filled for tbe moment. The 
bark Colusa has sailed for Wilmington to load 1,500 tons Brewing for 
New York. The Fr. bark Delphine Melaine has 1,200 tons Chevalier, 
for Melbourne. We quote the latter, SI 50@S1 60; Feed, 75@80c, and 
Brewing 87ic. for New, SI 05 for Old. 

Coffee. — The market continues firm at 15c@16£e for fair to best quality 
of Central American Greens. 

Sugar. — Eastern supplies are now coming forward more freely than for 
a long time past, several thousand bbls of Refined having been bought for 
this market prior to the late advance of he per pound in New York. All 
this could and would have been avoided by a little good management. It 
is bad business for our refiners, who feel called upon to keep down prices 
here much lower than they would otherwise do. We quote Island Raws, 
6ic@Sc in bags and kegs ; Bay Cube, 9|c@10c : California Crushed, 93c ; 
Yellow Coffee, 7|c@8£c. 

Eije. — The stock of China is large. We quote Mixed, 4§c; No. 1 
China, 5Jc ; Sandwich Island, 5£c. 

Teas. — On the6thinst. S. L. Jones & Go. will sell at public auction 
3,500 packages of Comet Oolongs and Japan Greens, of tbe importation 
of Messrs. Macondray & Co., all well worthy the attention of the trade. 

Metals. — The market is sluggish for all leading staples and quotations 
are more or less nominal. 

Quicksilver.— Holders very generally asks 34^@35c, but the City of 
Peking will carry supplies bought at 34@34^c. 

Coal.— Supplies from the North coast and from British Columbia are 
liberal, selling at low prices. The cargo of Liverpool Steam, 2,300 tons, 
per ship New York, i3 reported sold at S6 25. 

Freights and Charters. —But few charters have been written during 
tbe week for any voyage. The tonnage en route to this port, so far as 
known now, aggregates 165,500 tons, against same time last year of 210,- 
000 tons. The disengaged tonnage in port 40,000 tons, against 58,000 tons 
same period last year. We have on the berth, at date, 25,000 tons 
against 56,000 tons same date last year. The present Spot rate for Wheat 
to Havre or Liverpool, direct, 44@45s.; to Cork or Queenstown, for or- 
ders U. K., 50s.; or to tbe Continent, 50(a>52s. 6d., according to the port 
of discharge. Coal freights from the North coast and British Columbia 
are nominal at S2 50, but engagements to any extent could not be 
secured, even at $1 50, owing to coal strikes at Seattle and Wellington 
mines. 



ZAMLOCK. 



Mr. Julius M. Keeler is likely to be chosen Republican candidate for 
the City Superintendency of Schools. Mr. Keeler was the organizer of the 
Oregon public schools, afterward took charge of the Pacific University, 
at Forest Grove, in that State, and later became Superintendent of the 
Public Schools in Portland District. His qualifications are undoubted, 
and his record a most honorable one ; and his experience as an officer of 
Cavalry during the war cannot have lessened bis executive abilities. 

Salvini wants to make another farewell tour of America. 



SIONAi SERVICE METEOROLOGICAL REPORT, 


WEEK 


ENDING JU 
-EKfl 


LY 31, 1879, SAN FRANC] 


SCO, CAL. 


hest and Lowest Saromete 


Prl. 85 


Sat. 26 


Sun. 27 


lion. 28 


Tue. 29 


Wed 30 


Thr31 


29.954 


29.878 


29 839 


29.902 


29.935 


29.939 


29.867 


29.865 


29 809 


29.7S9 


29.873 


29.892 


29.866 


29.730 




Maximum and Minimum Tltermometer. 




63 


63 


64.5 I 64 1 64 


64 


76 


53 


53 


66 55 54 
Mean Daily Humidity. 


55 


54 


83.7 


86 


86.7 | 82.3 | 84.3 
Prevailing Wind. 


82.3 


68 


W. | 


SW. | 


W. | W. | W. | 
Wind — Miles Traveled. 


W. | 


W. 


281 


285 


24t) | 270 | 245 | 
State of Weather. 


303 | 


239 


Fair. 


| Cloudy. 


Fair. | Fair. | Fair. 


Fair. | 


Clear. 




Rainfall in Twenty-four Hour* 


. 




Total Rain During Season beginning July 1, 


1879 01 inches. 



SANITARY NOTES. 

The deaths this week number 62 as compared with 84 last, and 76 
for the corresponding week last year. There were 6 Chinese. Four acci- 
dents, but neither suicide nor homicide. The zymotics were: 2, diptheria ; 
3, typhoid fever; 2, infantile cholera ; 1, croup. Diseases of the respira- 
tory organs are less fatal. There were : 5, phthisis ; 5, pneumonia, and 1, 
bronchitis. The other principal causes of death were: 3, infantile convul- 
sions ; 3, enteritis ; 3, heart" disease. Two each of brain disease, Bright's 
disease, debility, and one each of apoplexy, alcoholism, puerperal convul- 
sions, epilepsy, old age, pyoemia tumor. There were no deaths in the 
Third or Fifth Wards, and one only in the First and Eighth. Ten per- 
sons died in the public institutions. 

Photography has its disadvantages. A friend of ours who has just 
returned from Egypt tells us that the donkey-boys of Cairo call their 
quadrupeds by the names, not only of our eminent men, but of the fash- 
ionable beauties whose photographs adorn our shop-windows. He success- 
ively gave a trial to Mrs. Langtry, Lady Lonsdale, Mrs. Wheeler and 
Mrs. Cornwallis West. The first he found very lazy, the second had a 
disagreeable habit of rolling in the sand, the third walked well but trotted 
unevenly, while the fourth was skittish, and threw her head up in a jerky 
manner. Then he hired Sir Stafford Northcote, but this beast, although 
sure footed, was slow in his movements, and after riding several other of 
our statesmen, he fell back upon the Bishop of London, whom he de- 
scribes as a very serviceable jackass. But our friend, who is a very fer- 
vent member of the Church of England, was much pained by the boy to 
whom the Bishop belonged frequently beating him with a heavy stick, 
and addressing him as a " deevil." Our friend suggests that the Foreign 
Office should instruct our Consul- General to protest against the names of 
English divines and English ladies being given in this irreverent spirit to 
Cairo donkeys, and certainly it does Beem that, if Lord Beaconstjeld is 
not sick of his " spirited foreign policy," there is an opportunity for a 
stern exercise of his Lordship's Imperial instincts toward the Cairo don- 
key-boys. — London Truth. 

The Terrace Baths, Alameda, are attracting hundreds of people in 
this glorious weather. The water is pleasantly free from chill, and many 
remain in the water an hour or more without shivering with cold. It is 
always high tide at the Terrace, it being constructed like a dam. The 
water is changed nearly every night, and is sparkling and clear, causing 
the most luxurious sense of enjoyment. Everything is well-ordered and 
respectable ; and there is a separate department for ladies. Last night 
there was music for the entertainment of the crowds who went over; 
and we should not be surprised to see 1,000 there this evening, reveling in 
tbe warm air and soft water and delicious moonlight. 

ZAMLOCK. 



Mrs. Lewis, Thurlow Block, corner of Kearney and Sutter streets, is 
the fashionable dressmaker of the city and State. Her fitter is the most 
experienced in the city, and able to tell at a glance, as the celebrated 
Worth does, where the dress is at fault or where it needs another touch. 
Her dresses give a satisfaction in wearing, and fit with an exactness not 
attained in any other establishment. All the fashionably-attired ladies 
of our first circles go to Mrs. Lewis, as a matter of course ; and her or- 
ders from the interior cities and the coast are increasing with every day. 

It is often remarked by visitors to this coast that our California 
belles are as remarkable for exquisitely tinted complexions as their fair 
English sisters, and their cousins and their aunts, and they are surprised 
at the fact, seeing the dryness of our climate. The truth is, and we vio- 
late no confidence in publishing it, that M'me Rachel's Enamel Bloom is 
on the toilet table of every San Francisco lady, and to its admirable 
quality of protecting the delicate skin is due the preservation of the 
charms native to our high-bred beauties. 



Surprising the Irish. — Price has just finished three of his finest and 
most costly sets of famous carvers, for John D. Barbour, of Barbour 
Bros., the well-known thread and linen manufacturers of Lisburn, Ire- 
land. No doubt they will be as much surprised in Ireland as they were in 
England, France and Germany to see such cutlery made in a new coun- 
try like California. With all the experience of the Sheffield manufac- 
turers, their finest work will not compare with that of M. Price, of this 
city. 

"The Popular Science Monthly " for August comes just as we go to 
press. Some of the articles are : " Removal of Tendencies to Disease," 
"Re-Education of the Adult Brain," "Food and Feeding," Part II., and 
" The November Meteors." 

Smith's Music Store, 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



2, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



TEARS AGO. 
She wan t*&4«<] cloae beside tm, " Wm ibt rich V' now that is funny. 

l>n a May day, yean i mini twmi 1 "iij; ago: 

i-t noti bide n i land* or money? 



I wm but a t»<y, you 
Tbn.i~-.-r.'. ninmd it. 

euro: 
or. if ! did steal it, 
I wa» l>ut a boy, you know. 
Wm «hc pretty 1 Did I love bar! 
Heart of mine "twits* year* ago; 
And that pan over, 

I was but a boy, yon know. 



ti a boy, yon know. 
And you parted bow yonmbst 1 bar. 

■ mine Waa yeara ago: [bar, 1 
"And vonpraaaad harhand and kuaad 
I waa bal a boy, you know. 
l>,. i lora bar yet 0, olden, 

- pBjit, thou heart of mine. 
Sea, tin.-* look of hair i< golden, 
And the bead that wore it thine. 



WHO ARE THE ZULUS'? 
An expensive English war, and the murder of the Prince Imperial, 
(rive an interest to the qoeanon, " Who are the Zulu*?" The reader who 
desire* a length?, detailed and historical aiawrnT. "ill 6nd it in an exceed- 
ingly raadaUi atly pnblbhed in London, of which Captain 
Lucas, of the Bnitbh Army, who baa long resided in South Africa, is the 
author. For the purposes of this article, it may he briefly stated that the 
Zulu Kingdom is of comparatively recent origin, Its founder waa ;t 
bloodthirsty and ambitions savage, named < 'haka, who, hearing in 1813 
from some ihipwrecked English sailors of Napoleon the First, formed the 
insane idea of rivaling the great Corsican conqueror. He had just then 
succeeded to the chieftainship of a petty tribe dwelling on the sea coast, 
and as he subdued tribe after tribe, they were compelled to take the name 
of Zulu, which in their language means "heaven." That Chaka was a 
most remarkable savage, and had a great talent for war, is undoubted, 
since he invented what may he termed the Zulu Phalanx, and that pecu- 
liar method of fighting which proved so fatal to the British at Isandula. 
He saw, with true Napoleonic instinct, that owing to the scarcity of 
cover in Znluland, it was better to fi^ht in the open ground in heavy 
masses, Sonie of these were forty deep. The attack commences at rifle- 
range. The center, then, is trained to give way, as though in rapid 
retreat, the wings making off to the right and left. Their enemy then 
naturally pushes off in pursuit. At a given signal, the Zulus halt, and 
wheeling, rush upon the foe with frightful yells, protecting themselves 
with their shields, and dealing death with their abort assagais. Every 
soldier carries three or four throwing assegais, but his chief reliance is the 
short, heavy bladed' assegais, for close quarters. During the present war 
they have, at long range, made use of the Martini Henry rifle. The 
officers march in the rear and communicate their orders by swift runners, 
trained for that purpose. In battle, the General, with his staff, seeks 
some rising ground, and keeps one of the oldest regiments as a reserve, as 
waa the custom with Napoleon. From 1813 to 1828 Chaka carried out his 
terrible policy, devastating adjacent countries and forcing the inhabitants 
to acknowledge his rule. A more cruel monster never ruled even in Da- 
homey. His ferocity proved his ruin, for, hearing that his troops had suf- 
fered a defeat, he ordered the execution of two thousand of their wives, 
among whom were the wives of his two brothers, Dingana and Umlan- 
ganc. These conspiring against him, caused him to be murdered while he 
slept. The two brothers then fought |to Bettle the succession, and Din- 
gana, having slain his rival, became King of the Zulus. This monster 
invited some seventy Dutch Boers to a banquet, to talk over some dis- 
puted question, and massacred them, and suddenly marching upon their 
settlement, murdered nearly seven hundred women, children and old 
men. TKis treacherous bloodthirstiness is the foremost characteristic of 
the present King, Cetewayo. He has been a terrible scourge to the 
Boers on the one side and to the English settlers of Natal on the other. 
The British Government could not, in justice to its South African sub- 
jects, permit this savage to longer continue robbing and murdering the 
settlers. Either he had to be subjected or the settlements abandoned. It 
is said that the Chaka family, in some degree, resembles that of Napoleon, 
whom the Zulu chief desired to imitate. The death of the heir of Napo- 
leon, by the hands of the Zulus, gives an interest to the resemblance. 



ZAMLOCK. 



SAN FRANCISCO'S MIXED POPULATION. 
The following is a classification of voters in San Francisco, as regards 
nativity : Alabama, 61 ; Arkansas, 10 ; at sea, 21 ; Austria, 292 ; Austra- 
lia, 153 ; Azores, 5 ; Barbadoes, 5 ; Belgium, 37 ; Bermuda, 1 ; Brazil, 6 ; 
British America, 4 ; Buenos Ayres, 3 ; Canada, 573 ; California, 1,488 ; 
Central America, 7; Chili, 24 ; China. 5 ; Cape of Good Hope, 1 ; Con- 
necticut, 401 ; Corsica, 1 ; Cuba, 3 ; Delaware, 56 ; Denmark, 280 ; Dis- 
trict of Columbia, 87; East India, 6; England, 1,436; Fayal, 1; Florida, 
13 ; France, 665 ; Georgia. 58 ; Germany, 5,644 ; Gibralter, 1 ; Greece, 6 ; 
Hayti, 1 ; Holland, 62 ; Honduras, 1 ; Illinois, 280 ; Indiana, 172 ; Iowa, 
60; Ireland, 10,027; Isle of Man, 7; Italy, 221 ; Jamaica, 25; Java, 1 ; 
Kentucky, 335 ; Louisiana, 318 ; Maine, 1,334 ; Maryland, 448 ; Massa- 
chusetts, 2,501 ; Mexico, 28 ; Michigan, 180 ; Minnesota, 15 ; Mississippi, 
53 ; Missouri, 284 ; New Jersey, 390 ; New Hampshire, 422 ; New York, 
4,416 ; North Carolina, 54 ; Norway and Sweden, 475 ; Ohio, 740 ; Ore- 
gon, 21; Peru, 5; Phillipine Islands, 1; Poland, 132; Portugal, 42 ; 
Prince Edward's Island, 43 ; Pennsylvania, 1,229 ; Rhode Island, 255 ; 
Russia, 196 ; Sandwich Islands, 13 ; Scotland, 479 ; Spain, 23 ; Society 
Islands, 1 ; South Carolina, 97; South America, 3 ; St. Croix, 2 ; St. 
Helena, 1 ; Surinam, 2 ; Tahiti, 2 ; Tennessee, 98 ; Texas, 28 ; Turkey, 2 ; 
Van Diemen's Land, 2 ; Vermont, 397; Virginia, 366 ; Wales, 86 ; Wash- 
ington Territory, 7; West Indies, 34 ; Wisconsin, 147; total, 38,008. Of 
these electors, thirty-five States and Territories of the Union furnished 
16,911, while fifty-four foreign States furnished 21,097. Of these latter, 
the United Kingdom is credited with 12,035, and Germany comes next on 
the list with 5,644 ; leaving 3,418 from the rest of the world. These sta- 
tistics do not fully represent the cosmopolitan chai-acter of our people, be- 
cause there are numerous unnaturalized persons from other countries. 
Our present population being in excess of 300,000, the registration above 
enumerated gives one voter in every eight inhabitants. There are now 
upwards of 25,000 children {native born), between six and seventeen years 
of age, attending the public schools, who, as they attain their majorities, 
will materially alter the complexion of the ballot. 

Bradbury Pianos, Agency 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS 
For the Work Ending Au K . 1st, 1819. 

COHI'lI-ltD ST QBOROI C, UtCIOl I 00-, 00 HOOTOONHV STRKBT. 



Nam* or Mink. Sat. 



aigoota , 



Alpha 

•AlU. 

Alps 

Bullion 

♦Belcher 

Beel a Belcher. 

Benton . 

Bodlc 

Cons fanperial . 
Crown Point.. . 

Chollar 

California 

Con. Virginia.. 
Caledonia .... 
Confidence .... 
Eureka Con... 
Exchequer. . . 

Fairfax 

Gould & Curry 

Gila 

Grand Prize 

Hale & Norcros.b 

"Julia 

Justice 

Jackson 

Kentuck 

♦Leopard 

Lady Wash'n 

Leviathan 

Leeds 

♦Mexican 

Modoc 

♦Manhattan 

Northern Belle . . 

Ophir 

Overman 

Potosi 

Raymond & Ely. 

'Savage 

Sierra Nevada . 

Silver Hill 

Seg Belcher 

Solid Silver 

Succor 

Silver King, Ar'a 
Silv King South. 

Tip-Top 

'Union Con 

"Utah 

Yellow Jacket... 



MOKDAT. Tl-MPAT. V 

A.M T. M. A.M. r M A.M. P.M. 



ml 



10J 



1** 



l»i 



12J 



22J 



TneuMii'v. 

A.M. P.M. 



31J 35 

- 163 
15i 



13j 






2 
10J 



_8I 

35 



1 

H 



22 



30 
15 
151 



Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus * 

Savory A Moore. 143, New Bond street, London, prepare 

The Best Food for Infants. Supplied to the Royal Families of England 
and Russia. To be hud of Chemists, etc., everywhere. 
The Best Food for Infants. Most digestible. Contains the highest 
amount of nourishment in the most convenient form. 

Malted on Elebig's Principle. Sweet and wholesome in itself. En- 
tirely free from Beet-root Sugar, the bane of Condensed Milk and Swiss Foods. 
The Best Food for Infants. More closely resembles healthy Mothers' 
Milk than any other kind of Food. 

A Thoroughly Cooked Food. Always ready for use. Saving Mothers 
and Nurses much time and trouble. 
The Best Food for Infants. Contains all the elements necessary for the 
Growth, Health and Vigor of the Child. 
Savory* Moore. 143, New Bond street, London, and sold by all Chemists. 
, [Aug. 2.] 

ST. MARY'S HALL, 

Benieia, Cal- 

The next Academic Year will begin Aug-nst 5th. A Full 
Collegiate Course ; Musical Department under the direction of MADAME 
HORSLET, the Distinguished Vocalist; a resident French Teacher; a fine Art De- 
partment; horseback and carriage riding constitute some of the attractions of this 
School. Address, REV. L. DELOS MANSFIELD, A.M., 

July 12. Rector. 

Smith's Music Store, S00 Post street, corner of Dupont- 



D. Y. B. Henarie. 



Edward Martin. 



E. MARTIN & CO., 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in "Wines and Liquors. 

Proprietors of Miller's Extra Old Bonrbon and J. F. Cot- 
ter Extra Old Bourbon and Bye Whiskies. 



April 5. 



408 Front Street, San Francisco. 



Regular Republican Nominee for Governor, 
GEORGE C. PERKINS, 

Of San Francisco. . [July 12. 

WJtorrisT^ MORRIS & KENNEDY, J. F. Kennedy. 

Importers and Dealer** in Holdings, Frames, Engravings, 
Chromos, Lithographs, Decakomanic, Wax and Artists' Materials, 21 Post 

street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Feb. 4. 



L.H.Newton. NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., M. Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers in Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, 204 and 200 California street. San Francisco, Cal May 25. 

Conservatory Organs, $110. 200 Post street, corner of Dupont- 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Aug. 2, 1879. 



CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATIONS IN LONDON AND IN 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

England has been passing through a period of severe depression, and 
the shop-keepers, more particularly in London, are feeling the hard times 
more than most other classes, owing to the growth of co-operative asso- 
ciations for the supply of articles of domestic consumption. These asso- 
ciations are incorporated under the Limited Liability Act, and to a great 
extent the customers are the shareholders. The principle is to make a 
large turn-over at a very small profit, and thus to dispense with the shop- 
keepers and to save the large profit which the London tradesmen have 
hitherto put in their pockets. The effect of these co-operative stores 
has been so serious in London that deputations of shop-keepers have 
gone to the leading members of the Government and to prominent, mem- 
bers of Parliament, to try to induce them to make it illegal for any per- 
son, in any position under the Government, to participate in the manage- 
ment or directorship of these companies. This step has been taken be- 
cause the movement was begun by members of the civil service, who felt 
that the prorits of shop-keepers were so exorbitant that they were wast- 
ing annually a large part of their incomes, which by co-operative action 
they could easily save. The straitened circumstances of large classes, 
■within the last few years, have caused them to resort to these co-opera- 
tive stores, where they can supply themselves at but little over wholesale 
prices; and the shop-keepers are finding that not only are they suffering 
from hard times, but that they are being deserted by their former cus- 
tomers. _ This has spread alarm in their ranks, and promises to affect 
very seriously the value of property, because, in a city like London, good 
positions for shops are sought after, and do a great deal to sustain the 
value of property. Rents are thus coming down, and, altogether, it is 
probable that there will be a re -arrangement of the retail trade of London 
on a much more economical basis than hitherto. A saving of probably 
ten per cent, on the cost of living will prepare the Londoner to meet the 
competition of the world, which is every day growing fiercer. 

And now we come to San Francisco, and we offer the opinion that the 
rents that have been paid on Montgomery street and Kearny street have 
been, all things considered, much higher than those paid in Regent street 
or Piccadilly in London, where the principal fashionable shops are situa- 
ted. Retail profits in San Francisco have been enormous, though no 
doubt now very much reduced ; and we think there is ample room here 
for the introduction of co-operative stores, where large business and frac- 
tional profits will pay the shareholders, and at the same time make up to 
a considerable extent to the bulk of consumers for their diminished in- 
comes. Economy mast be practiced here as elsewhere, and to be able to 
live cheaply by cutting off gigantic profits is to remove a grievous burden 
with which the open-handed and extravagant Californian has all along 
been handicapped. Every saving to the consumer is a benefit to the 
State, and the time has passed in the history of our El Dorado when lav- 
ish expenditure could be a matter of indifference. Times are depressed, 
all classes are complaining, and it is only through industry and frugality 
that general prosperity can be restored. The Sand Lot and the new Con- 
stitution have done much to paralyze all business, and now we must suit 
our modes of living to our diminished incomes and diminished expecta- 
tions of income. In this matter of co-operative stores there is a field for 
genuine benefit to this whole city of consumers, and we trust that by 
some conjoint action of leading citizens a movement of such vast import- 
ance will be begun, If this is the most enterprising city in the world, 
and there is no doubt it is, why should this promising field for co-opera- 
tion remain unoccupied ? 

ENFORCING THE QUACKERY LAW. 
The police have recently been engaged in a good work in enforcing the 
anti-qnackery law. It is meet and proper that so important a penal law 
should be put in force by the duly constituted authorities. It is useless 
for the Legislature to pass laws if they are to remain a dead-letter en the 
statute-book. Laws are framed and passed to subserve good purposes, 
and are presumably intended to be real, active, live instruments for the 
suppression of wrong. The presence of uneducated, impudent, death- 
dealing quacks in such large numbers in this city was an intolerable nui- 
sance, and a great danger to the many who had no means of discriminat- 
ing between the dangerous charlatan and the true physician. The 
wretched impostor, who intruded himself into the. sick-chamber, who 
gained admission to the holy of holies — to the inner sanctum of our fami- 
lies — was a rascal whosepunishment could hardly-be- made severe enough. 
He was a public enemy, who has rightly been placed under the ban of a 
most righteous law. It is true that the law might have been a better one. 
It has allowed a number of rascals to escape. The setting up of three 
fiee and easy examining bodies was a great mistake. There has been a 
most shameless laxity in giving licenses to unworthy and incompetent 
applicants. But, admitting this, there yet remains a considerable residu- 
um of good in the working of the law. Quackery is at last made illegal, 
odious and punishable. The policeman can now lay his hands on the ras- 
cally quack. The officer specially detailed to this duty appears to be 
attending to it efficiently. Several prosecutions have been successful, 
fines have been imposed and quacks are quitting the business. These are 
desirable results. We congratulate ourself and our readers upon them. 
The News Letter's contribution to this good work will not soon be forgot- 
ten. There is now an active and healthy public opinion upon this subject 
that will never again tolerate the shameful state of things which existed 
when the News Letter began its memorable raid upon quacks and quackery. 
The police are doing well. When they have driven out all the unlicensed 
rascals, there are some licensed ones that they may well turn their 
attention to. There are several murdering- abortionists with shingles on 
Kearny street. . 

A blonde youth, of Bohemian proclivities, runs the Honorable Bilk 
machine. He is the Secretary, and exhibits Herculean prowess in re- 
porting the progress of country clubs. Conscious that on him alone de- 
pends the fate of the Bilks, he said the other day : "I am my own adju- 
tant, quartermaster-general, and Heaven knows what all." "Yes," re- 
marked a brother Bohemian, " and your own trumpeter." 

"We always thought that if there was not "a bottomless pit " in 
California there ought to be one. It turns out that there is. Why it 
has selected this particular period in which to open a yawning mouth is 
very apparent. There are too many wicked politicians around. Nature 
hath made nothing in vain. 



ADMIRAL AMMEM'S CHEEK. 

It seems impossible for the American to be connected with any 
earthly enterprise, no matter what its nature may he, but what specula- 
tion, jobbery and fraud must immediately show their heads. In their 
churches their parsons and deacons-are on the make — or somebody is sure 
to say they are ; to be one of their legislators is prima facie evidence of 
being corrupt; their business-mea must have a swindling " corner " in 
something. In short, your Yankee sees a " job " in every bush, and, if it 
isn't his own, he sets up a howl about it which might wake the dead. 

Nevertheless, we might expect that such a dignified and sublime under- 
taking as the construction of a canal to connect the Atlantic and Pacific 
might prove an exception to this rule, when we consider that the project 
is being considered from a purely scientific point of view, and has not yet 
assumed a monetary aspect, that it is under the auspices of the first 
Powers,~and that practically the honor of the civilized world is staked on 
its faithful performance. 

But the International Canal Congress has not escaped the accusation of 
fraud, and, of course, the accuser is an American. That he is an Admiral 
in the United States Navy and the chief representative of this country in 
the Congress itself, makes his offense all the more grievous. Admiral 
Ammem sees two parties of " speculators " in the Congress, and to accuse 
men, who practically represent their respective governments in a scien- 
tific debate, of using their position to speculate on their private behalf, 
is the same thing as calling them cheats and knaves. One of the Admi- 
ral's " speculators " is Lieutenant Wyse, of the French navy, and ac- 
cording to this gentlemanly American tar, no less a man than De Lesseps 
is the Lieutenant's chief confederate. " Moreover," says the gallant Ad- 
miral, "there were enthusiastic manifestations of approval whenever a 
vote of ' Yes ' (in favor of the Panama route) was given, which would 
hardly have been the case had the audience regarded the action as de- 
pending wholly on the natural conditions or physical cauBas." The Admi- 
ral evidently thinks that if scientific men signify their approval in the 
ordinary manner, when their professional opinions are indorsed by a ma- 
jority, they must have some "personal interests " to subserve. In con- 
clusion, the Admiral recommends that the United States Government ig- 
nore the decision arrived at by a vote of 75 to 8 in the European Congress, 
and take the whole matter into its own hands by renewing the discussion 
in this country. Maybe there isn't any impudence in this proposition. 

But, aside from the Admiral, a later telegram treats us to a specimen 
brick of bombast from the New York World. Among other things, that 
Fourth-of-July cracker remarks that "the whole world will be apprised 
of the determination of the American people not to permit the establish- 
ment on the Isthmus of Panama of a European protectorate over the 
commerce connecting the Atlantic and Pacific States." Now, it is not at 
all surprising that Smith, Jones or Robinson should endeavor to earn his 
penny a line by scribbling such ridiculous rubbish, but it is a trifle strange 
that a journal which pretends to a dignified position should humor the 
young gentleman by printing it. May we venture to inquire what " the 
American people " are going to do about" it if " the whole world " should 
calmly " apprise " this mighty nation of its intention to build a canal 
where it (the whole world) saw fit? To hear these spoiled darlings of the 
Press prattle, one would think that the soaring American Eagle had only 
to flap its wings in order to flabbergast the universe. But in this particu- 
lar matter of the canal, the bird will find itself "out and inj ured " unless 
it Btops screaming and behaves better. 

NO USE BUCKING AGAINST THE RAILROAD. 

The locomotive is barely half a century old. George Stephenson 
declared his discovery to an assemblage of English engineers on. the 27th 
of October, 1829, and on the 17th of September, 1830, the first railroad 
was opened between Liverpool and Manchester. The iron horse did not 
come into the service of the world without much opposition, but its mar- 
velous power was not to be resisted. The bucking against the locomotive 
has always hurt the power that bucked. This result was early foreseen. 
George Stephenson foretold it even before he was allowed to make a start. 
Said a member of the committee of the House of Commons: "Suppose 
your engine were coming along at the rate of eight or nine miles an hour, 
and a cow happened to be in the way, wouldn't that be very unfortunate ?" 
"Yes," replied Mr. Stephenson, in his broad northern dialect, " vera un- 
fortunate for the coo." The Greut Engineer was right. The " coo " was 
as nothing when pitted against the locomotive. Our own Indian tried to 
lasso the thing, but he lost his arms for his temerity. He might be pow- 
erful when holding on to a buffalo, but he was nowhere when fast lo a 
steam engine. All attempts to stay the triumphal progress of the great 
motor have been alike futile. The iron horse ha3 mounted the steeps of 
the Sierras, pierced the Alps, and will soon even dive under the ocean 
from Dover to CalaiBi Its onward march is irresistible. In less than half 
a century 200,000 miles of railroad have been constructed, enough to en- 
circle the earth nearly ten times. The United States alone have 82,000 
miles, and are building more every day. It is estimated that the capital 
employed in building the railroads of the world amounts to $15,000,000,000; 
an enormous capital for a single industry not yet as old as hundreds of 
thousands of living men. Here is a fact in political economy never seen 
before since the world began. It has exercised a predominating influence 
over all human relations, sensible not only in the material relations of 
life, but in the intellectual and moral condition of civilized people. It has, 
in a degree, annihilated time and space. Railroads have entirely changed 
the conditions of production. They, with steamships, have enabled thinly 
settled localities of the world, to produce immens; crops upon virgin soil, 
and compete with and triumph over the denser population but worn-out 
soil of older countries. If fifty years of steam communication have pro- 
duced such an astonishing result, what may we not expect at the end of a 
second half century ? The locomotive has got a long start on its destined 
journey. It is under a full head of steam, and it will now, more than 
ever, be unfortunate for any stray " coo " that may get in its way. Yet 
there is, hereabouts, some talk of an animal weakei and sillier than a cow, 
proposing to buck against the locomotive. They call the creature a poli- 
tician. If he puts his carcass on the road he will get terribly mangled, 
sure. The locomotive can take care of itself, so can the capital employed 
in running it. The fifteen billions of money invested in railroads will not 
permit itself to be confiscated by politicians. One per cent, upon that 
sum would buy all the politicians that have ever lived, from the days of 
Moses until now. No ; Pailroads cannot be confiscated, nor can the lo- 
comotive be stopped. Its triumphs have only just begun. They are but 
fools who attempt to buck against it. 



PriM pw Copy. 10 Can 



ABLISHED JULY. 20. 18S6. 



I Annual Sub.crlption, (5. 



sAB j rR^9es®« 




DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 30. 



SAN FRAN0IS00, SATURDAY, AUG. 9, 1879. 



No. 4. 



Ofllce or Ihe s»n FmnciHco News I. filer. Merchaut Street, 
N09. 607 to 615, San FniDcisco. 



G 



OLD BAR.S-«90@910-Silver Bars- 
Dollars, 8@9 |>er cent. 



fc* cent. disc. Mexican 



' Exchange on New York. J per cent. ; On London, Bankers, 493@ 
49.J; Commercial. 49|@50d. Paris, sight, 5 francs per dollar. Tel- 
egrams, 15-100(5 j per cent. 

' Latest price of Sterling, 483@4S5. 



' Price of Money here, |@1 per cent, per month — bank rate. In the 
open market, l@li. Demand active. 



PKICES OF LEADING ST0JKS AND GOVERNMENT BONDS. 
Sas Francisco Augusts, 1879. 



Stock* and Bonds. 

V. S. Bonds, 4s 

S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 6s, '58 

8. F. City Bonds, 7s 

Sacramento City Bonds 

Yuba County Bonds, 8s 

San Mateo Co. Bonds, 7s. . . 

S. F. Gas Light Co 

Natioual G. B"k & Trust Co, 
Spring Valley Water Co. . . . 
Omnibus Railroad Co 



Bid 


Asked 


101] 


102 


105 


107 


105 


107 


28 


30 


100 


— ■ 


100 


— 


90} 


91 


48 


51 


83 


83} 


30 


35 



Stocks and Bonds. 

Central Railroad Co 

N. B. and Mission R. R. Co, 

Sutter St* R. R. Co 

Fireman's Fund Ins. Co ... . 

Union Insurance Co 

Pacific Bank 

The Bank of California 

Central Pacific Railroad 

C. P. R. R. Bonds 



65 


67 


23 


25 


115 


111) 


115 


116 


112 


115 


69 


70 



Andrew Baird, 312 California street. 



THE STOCK MARKET. 

The market for the past week has been one of unusual activity, 
and for a time it looked as though the long expected market was at hand. 
Simultaneous with the commencement of drilling in Sierra Nevada and 
Union the North End stocks advanced rapidly, upon supposed favorable 
results of the drill, and the mystification that attended the whole affair 
seemed to incite more speculation than the hitherto open method of cross- 
cutting. As nothing definite can be ascertained regarding the condition 
of the lower levels, the " street " are completely in the dark as to results, 
and the matter remains enveloped in complete mystery. For the past 
two days it has been apparent that a heavy unloading has been going on, 
and at the close a still further unloading is observable. Of the outside se- 
curities there is little to note. Bodie continues to look badly, while a 
great improvement is noticeable in Mono, the adjoining mine, the im- 
provement being in the joint east cross-cut on the line. Stockholders of 
the Bonanza mines have been made happy with another dividend of fifty 
cents, though it is generally believed to be the final one. At the close the 
market was a shade stronger. 

The Commercial Herald's review of the import and export trade 
for the first six months shows the following : Ships entered, 1,604 ; ton- 
nage, 710,518. In 1878 the figures were 1,532 and 697.320; in 1877, 2,006 
and 821,592 ; in 1876, 1,955 and 760,182 ; and in 1875, 1,997 and 871,597. 
There is a decrease in steam tonnage with China and Japan of 14,112, and 
with Australia of 3,438 ; and an increase of 8,606 with Victoria, and 2,210 
with Panama. Freight money paid in 1879, $1,006,724 ; in 1878, $1,690,- 
767. Merchandise exported by sea, in 1879, $14,210,601 ; in 1878, $11,- 
687,776. Receipts of treasure, in 1879, $28,733,648 ; in 1878, $35,519,761. 
Treasure exported (exclusive of amounts by IT. S. mail), in 1879, $9,029,- 
321 ; in 1878, $23,530,448. Money paid for duties at Custom House is 
less by $22,786, in 1879. The coinage at the Mint was, double eagles, 
$12,540,000 ; half-eagles, $108,750, and standard dollars, $5,500,000. 
Money has been in plentiful supply for the six months, and at moderate 
rates, but little called for. The Herald thinks the depression has reached 
the lowest point, and that we are on the eve of revival. 

Beerbohm's Telegram.— London and Liverpool, Aug. 8, 1879.— 
Floatine Cargoes, quiet; Cargoes on Passage, quiet ; Mark Lane Wheat, 
steady; No. 2 Spring off Coast, 43s. 6d.; Red Winter off Coast, 48s.; 
California off Coast, 47s. ; California Nearly Due, 47 «. ; California 
Just Shipped, 46s. 6d. ; No. 2 Spring for Shipment, 42s. 6d. ; Liverpool 
Spot Wheat, quiet ; California Club No. 1. Standard, 9s. lOd. ; Cal- 
Oalifornia Club No. 2 Standard, 9s. 5d.; California Average— Western, 
9s. 3d.; White Michigau, 9s. 7d.; Red Western Spring, 8s.@8s. 10d.; 
Amount State Flour in London, 12s, Oil.; Amount State Flour in Liver- 
pool, 12s. 6d.; Liverpool Western Mixed Corn, 4s. 2d.; Liverpool Cana- 
dian Peas, 6s. 9d.; Weather in England, unsettled; English Country 
Markets, steady; French Country Markets, turn easier. 



SILVER. 

We recur to this subject to note with satisfaction that, according 
to official advices from the National capital, one of the greatest obstacles 
to the thorough international re-monetization of silver has been removed, 
by the German Empire giving in its adhesion to bi-metalism. There is 
now no doubt that a conference of the nations will be held, at no distant 
day, and we take this opportunity of again calling general attention to 
the pre eminent right of the Pacific Coast to be represented in the Con- 
ference, and the pre-eminent ability of Senator Jones to represent it. 
The restoration of this metal to its natural place in the economy of ex- 
changes means, beyond doubt, a widespread and active prosperity for all 
the silver-producing States and Territories. In this connection, we also 
note an increased demand in the East for the circulation of the much, 
and undeservedly, abused standard dollar. 

Quicksilver. — Supplies are light and the market firm at 35c. The 

City of Peking, for Hongkong, carried 3,050 flasks ; the Newbern, for 

Mexican ports, 242 flasks. Our exports by sea for the first six months of — 

, 1878 , , 1879 , 

To Flasks. Value. Flasks. Value. 

Mexico 5,060 $166,930 5,289 $153,589 

New Zealand 120 3,854 36 1,067 

China 9,124 305,267 19,920 586,130 

Japan 435 14,629 625 18,539 

Central America 42 1,369 84 2,392 

Australia 160 5,482 400 11,887 

British Columbia 27 900 8 231 

South America 1,000 33,077 640 17,674 

Java 1 31 

New York 500 13,196 

Totals 15,968 $531,508 27,503 $804,736 

The French Government and the Coinage of Money.— The 

French Government has hitherto had the coining of money done by pri- 
vate contract, but the disadvantages of that course have become so 
marked that M. Leon Say, the Minister of Finance, has had a bill passed 
through the French Senate authorizing the Government to carry on the 
coining as a public undertaking. France, Belgium and Holland are the 
only countries that have the coining done by private contract. The 
French Treasury proposes to discount Mint receipts for the deposit of 
bullion, thus making the bullion immediately convertible into cash, as in 
England is done by the Bank of England. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange. — New York, Aug. Sth, 
1879. United States Bonds— 4s, 101| ; 4£s, 106; 5s, 102|. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 83@4 85. Pacific Mail, 14£. Wheat, 105@114. Western Union, 
93§. Hides, 19&@20. Oil— Sperm, 75@76. Winter Bleached, 87 @ 96. 
Whale Oil, 35@40; Winter Bleached, 42@49. Wool— Spring, fine, 20@ 
30 ; Burry, 11@14 ; Pulled, 25@35 ; Fall Clips, 11@14 ; Burry, 13@20. 
London, Aug. 8th.— Liverpool Wheat Market, 8s. 6d.@9s. 7d.; Club, 9s. 
6d.@9s. lOd. U. S. Bonds, 5's, 105|; 4's, 105; 4£'s, 109£. Consols, 97 11-16. 

San Franciscans Abroad— July 17, 1879.— Paris : Th. F. Barry, 
Mrs. G. Hearst, W. R, Hearst, C. Raymond, Mrs. C. Raymond. Wies- 
baden : Mrs. H. Welter. — Continental Gazette {Paris). Geneva: Mr. 
George Jost and family, Mr. F. A. Woodworth. Baden-Baden : Mr. 
Lewis Homburg, Mr. and Mrs. H. Schmeidell.— Continent and Swiss 
Times (Geneva), July 19th. 

Business for the week has been but nominal. Money is offered freely 
by private parties, who are gradually competing with the savings banks 
for investments, and call loans have been made at rates below those 
quoted as current in New York. 

At the Baldwin Philadelphia American Works are now engaged 
1,900 operatives, who are working night arid day on large orders for loco- 
motives for Australia. 



" China as a Field for Future Enterprise " will appear in our next 
issue, by G. James Morrison, M. I. C E. 

Fifty cents each will be paid at the counter of this office for Wews 
Letters of April 19th, 1879. 

London. Aug. 8th, 1879. —Latest Price of Consols. 97 11-10. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 9, 1879. 



MR. A. A. COHEN AND THE RAILROAD PEOPLE. 

Mr. Cohen is a man of undoubted ability, and has carved out a career 
for himself in this State that has placed him to-day in the finest residence 
in Alameda county, and in the enjoyment of a large fortune. How his 
wealth was acquired we shall not inquire into too closely, but we shall 
simply state the fact that he has been brought before our Law Courts on 
very serious charges as to the acquisition or the appropriation of money, 
and that if the citizens of California were looking round for a man whoBe 
character was without stain or without reproach, they would place Mr. 
Cohen very far down on the list of eligible candidates. One of his chief 
legal escapades was that in which the Central Pacific Railroad Company, 
two or three years ago, accused him of breach of trust in acting as their 
agent. The trial was a lengthened one, and Mr. Cohen himself, though 
assisted by some of the best lawyers in the State, made a remarkably able 
speech, in which he introduced some of the raciest personalities and crit- 
icisms, regarding the chief members of the Railroad Company, which 
have ever been made in this land of free tongue and free press. Since 
that time Mr. Cohen has been the sworn enemy of all the railroad people, 
and the self-appointed advocate of public rights against railroad wrongs. 
One thing perfectly evident is that Mr. Cohen made the bulk of his own 
fortune out of the very system he condemns ; and when he comes before 
a Piatt's Hall audience to explain to them how the railroad magnates 
made their immense fortunes, and how the people of California ought to 
confiscate a large part of that wealth, the very first proposal which he 
ought to have made should have been that he was prepared to pay over 
to the State his share of what he thought the railroad people had unjustly 
acquired. But Mr. Cohen had and has no such sense of consistency, no 
such sense of justice and honor. His feelings of private hatred and de- 
sire for revenge cause him to try to turn an ignorant and unreasoning out- 
cry to his avowed purpose of vengeance ; and from such a man as Mr. 
Oohen we cannot expect any exalted idea of private virtue or disinter- 
ested conception of public duty. It would have been better for the party 
with whom he for the time finds it to be his interest to act, if he had re- 
mained in the cool shades of his Alameda chateau, nursing his wrath in 
the repose and obscurity which are the natural ending of a distinguished 
career in a line of success which does not approve itself to honorable men. 
In this commun'ty Mr. Cohen is a-strong man in business arts, but when 
he moves out of the orbit of his own private devices, he is as thoroughly 
alone, as utterly without recognition by all that is best and worthiest in 
this State, as if he belonged to a world that shall be nameless. He may 
play the part of a guerilla skirmisher in support of a party that are fran- 
tically calling Ishmaelites and all other stray souls, whether saints or 
devils, to their assistance ; but this same party know very well that the 
name of Mr. Cohen is not one to conjure with, though in the extremity 
of their desperation they are not unwilling that he Bhould give vent to his 
spleen so long as the party are not called upon to indorse Mr. Cohen 
himself. 

"With the figures that this gentleman has produced as to the fortunes of 
the railroad magnates the public are already perfectly familiar, so that 
Mr. Cohen on the railroad question, instead of being a new revelation, is 
simply a thirty-times-told tale — full of sound and fury, spoken by an ene- 
my, signifying nothing. He shows that these railroad magnates have in 
their hands the largest property on the Pacific coast, and the suppressed 
inquiry that seems everywhere on the tip of his tongue without his having 
the boldness to utter it is : why is this vast property not in my hands, the 
great A. A. C, with a few crumbs for some of those Honorable Bilks 
that find in me merits congenial to their feelings and purposes ? We can 
only say to this professional detractor of men who have done so much for 
this State and for the Pacific States generally, that every available dollar 
that they can command is being thrust into railroad and other enterprises 
for the development of the country ; and as half of the projectors of this 
vast railroad system have passed to their graves while still in the midst of 
their gigantic labors, so it seems destined that the remaining projectors 
will never relax their immense efforts in the extension of railroad commu- 
nication so long as health and strength are left to them. They are no 
idlers, retiring or retired from their labors and enjoying their fortunes. 
They are to-day the foremost men of enterprise in the State, and what 
they can do with their large resources and their extensive connections, no 
other men nor corporation can do. What capitalists in the State or out of 
it would have built the Southern Pacific Railroad without a subsidy from 
the Government? It is easy to criticise, and to sneer, and to detract, but 
the responsible people of this State quite understand the advantages of a 
large corporation like the Central Pacific people weaving a net-work of 
railroads all over the Pacific States, that no other than a large and wealthy 
corporation could hope to effect. All the fortunes that they possess have 
been acquired by strictly legal means — and that is more, perhaps, than 
even Mr. Cohen, the enlightener, can say for himself. At the same time, 
the public have their rights as well as the railroads, and we have no doubt 
that as between these two conflicting interests, justice will be done by the 
Commissioners. It would, however, ill-become the free and enterprising 
citizens of this State to act on the advice of a subtle pettifogger like Mr. 
Cohen, who has purposes of revenge, not of public duty, to promote. 
Amid much selfish action that this State has witnessed, the principles of 
justice have always ultimately prevailed, and we believe that with the 
exception of the ignorant and unthinking rabble, and of the envious and 
unscrupulous detractors and demagogues, the heart of California is still 
true to that fair field and no favor that has built up the State and .has led 
some men to wealth and left others with but little of this world's goods. 
To pronounce the word confiscation is to undo the work which for more 
than a century Americans have been proudly building up ; and we do not 
think that California is the State that will take the lead in pronouncing 
the doom of American republicanism by violating the legal rights and 
vested interests of private property. If private envy is to take the place 
of public duty, then our institutions will have proved a failure, and all 
thinking persons will feel that it would be better to return to monarchical 
institutions than be robbed by the sand-lot demagogues and their silent 
abettors among people who ought to know better. We have, however, an 
abounding faith in the great good sense of American citizens, and to them 
we think the cause of justice may be fearlessly and safely committed. 

"Have you any objects of interest in the vicinity ?" the tourist asked 
the Burlington man. " I have, I have," eagerly replied the other, " but 
I can't get at it to show it to you. It's a ninety days' note, and it's down 
in the bank now, drawing interest like a horse-race or a mustard-plaster." 
The traveler smiled as though an angel kissed him. But it hadn't. 



ART JOTTINGS. 

It is a little singular that bo pretentious a picture as " Changing the 
Shift " Bhould have met with so little notice from the press. While yet 
in Mr. Burgess' studio a very flattering notice of it appeared in one of the 
dailies, but, subsequently, and after it was exposed to the public, the 
same journal said of it, that "being a copy in all that is interesting, we 
shall not criticise it. " We understand that the criticism which appeared 
in the News Letter last week did not meet the views of parties in interest. 
For this we are sorry — very — but that it was just, there can be no ques- 
tion. If, however, the artist, or his friends, feel aggrieved, they will 
doubtless meet with little difficulty in finding some one to defend the pic- 
ture as publicly as it has been defamed, provided, it can be demonstrated 
that it is susceptible of defence. 

The usual collection of '*all sorts " appears in the Fair this year, but in 
the absence of. a catalogue it is impossible to review the collection with 
any degree of satisfaction. The rooms of the Art Association have been 
completely denuded for this exhibition at the Pavilion, not a single pic- 
ture remaining on the walls of either of the two galleries. The Tojettis 
are executing a large canvas^ there, and it will doubtless demonstrate 
their great abilities as decorative artists. 

Mr. Bradford is said to have completed his large Yosemite picture, and 
it is to be hoped that before long it will be shown to the public. Of all 
works produced by an artist, none are so profitable to exhibit as those 
painted to fill commissions ; it stimulates other patronB of the Fine Arts 
to go and do likewise. 

Work on the double compartment shaft of the Uncle Sam Mine 
will be pushed forward with great rapidity. Gen. George R. Vernon, the 
superintendent, returned to Bodie for that purpose on Monday last. Gen. 
Vernon's report on the mine and its great prospects will soon be published. 
A. W. Robinson, Secretary U. S. 

The Pall and Winter styles of suitings have just arrived at J. M. 
Litchfield & Co.'s, 415 Montgomery street. Neat and nobby. 



COMPAGNIE UNIVERSELLE DE CANAL INTEROCEANIQUE. 

Capital Frs. 400,000,000. 

800,009 Shares of 500 Francs Each. 

President MR.F. De LESSEPS. 



The Company is formed with the object of constructing- a Ship 
Canal through the Isthmus of Panama, to unite the Atlantic and 
Pacific Oceans. 

An International Subscription to the Stock ofjthe said Company 
will be opened on the 6th and 7th of August, simultaneously in 
Europe and America. 

Referring? lo the above, the undersigned beg- to inform the 
public that they are authorized to receive subscriptions at their office in New 
York, and also at the office of the 

BANK OE NEVADA AT SAN FRANCISCO, . 

where further information and printed forms of application for shares may be ob- 
tained. 

Subscribers will be required to deposit 25 francs (or $4 85) per share on application; 
100 francs (at current rate of exchange) on allotment. 

The balance to be paid on a previous notice of at least three months. 

Interest at the rate of 5 per cent, per annum on the capital paid is guaranteed by 
the Company to the shareholders during the time of the construction uf the Canal. 

New York, July 26th, 1879. 

Aug. 9. j CREDIT LTONNAIS, New York Agency. 

SYDNEY INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION. 

Round the "World Tickets. 

The Pacific Mail Steamship Company will issue Bound the 
World Tickets, saving first-class accommodations for the entire route, at the 
low price of $650 • For particulars apply to 

WILLIAMS, BLANCH ARD & CO., General Agents, 
Aug. 9. Corner First and Brannan streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Standard Con. Mining Company, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., Aug. 2d, 1379.— At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
above-named Company, held this day, Dividend No. 6, of Fifty Cents per share, 
was declared, payable on TUESDAY, August 12th, 1879, at the office in this city, 
or at the Agency of the Nevada Bank of San Francisco, in New York. 

WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 29, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. Aug. 9. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of Consolidated Virginia Mining- Company, Room 26, 
Nevada Block, San Francisco, Aug. 7th, 1879. —At a meeting of the Board of 
Directors of the above named Company, held this day, a Dividend (No. 50) of Fifty 
Cents per share was declared payable FRIDAY, 15th instant. Transfer books 
closed until 18th instant. [Aug. 9.] A. W. HAVENS, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of California Mining Company, 23 Nevada Block, San 
Francisco, August 7th, 1879.— At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
above-named Company, held this day, a Dividend (No. 33) of Fifty Cents per share 
was declared, payable SATURDAY, August 16th. Transfer Books closed until 18th 
i nstant. [Aug. 9.] C. P. GORDON, Secretary. 

UNCLE TOM'S CABIN, 

Fourteen -Mile House, San Bruno. 
he above institution will be open on and after Sunday, 

August 3d, 1879. I Aug. 9. J AUGUST JENEVEIN, Manager. 



T 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Home Mutual Insurance Company u ill pay its regular 
monthly dividend of One (1) Dollar per share upon its capital stock on Aug. 
11th, 1879. CHARLES R. STORY, Secretary, 
Aug 1 . 9. 406 California street. 

FOR SALE. 

£L~t 4Wk A second-hand Piano in good order. The party 



Aug. 9. 



is about leaving the city, and desires to realize immediately. 

Address " B.," this office. 



Conservatory Organs, $110. 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



9, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



8 



THE REGISTRATION FIGURES. 
The registration of voter* U 

The fact 
eooM* i*ainfullv bo Hffht lb tl lly numerous. 

1 (..TV will he ut least 

n( this number the Work- 

tviug the balance of 

other parties. Th 

urea »rv e«tim*t'-.! by thorn who hare ti.v! the best opportunity of jodg- 

oorrect raking them to be 
rmuH ..f th.- v.tv Important dtyeleetion that takes place three 
weeks hence bi rof figuring. That twenty- 

idea hetween three partiee in Bach a way 
an |o leave one of tbamwttfa a majority over Ml* workingman'a feorteen 
\, i- pretty o-ruin. The prime factor in the calculation that 
attention "f all rooH dtiaaaa, is that there i« a clear 
_'.iin-t the Kearney crowd. The earnest, pa- 
triotic endeavor of all thoughtful men ought bo Ik? directed to uniting that 
majority in favor <>f a capable ami honest ticket. The good government 
of th«' citv is not :i question «>f party ; it is one that affects equally cit- 
t all parties. San Francisco has time .it-h I time again set aside 
mere partisan nominations by uniting upon a Pe iples', Citisens' or Tax 
payers' ticket. Never was the nee.l fur non partisan nominations so great 
as now, and. deplorable to say, never was the probability of being cursed 
partisan ones no imminent as at present. Surely, in the face of 
the irre.it d.iio-r that i-* presented of the city being overrun by the Goths 
and Vandals of the sand Iota, there is practical wisdom, not to 
say patriotism, enough to induce honest, thoughtful citizens of all shades 
of opinion, to lay aside their little differences and unite for 
the common good. The fbrthc tming election is exceptionally im- 
p-it wit. Every office in the City Government is to be filled. 
The Judiciary is to be chosen. The faithful and capable administration 
of the laws is a matter hiirh above all party considerations. It concerns 
every man who desires to be protected in his rights of property and per- 
son. It is one of vital moment to every law-abiding citizen. A Board of 
Supervisors, with vast powers for good or evil, is to be chosen. School 
Directors are to be elected, and obviously they ought to be men imbued 
with a deep sense of the value of education. Now, can any citizen, of 
good understanding, conscientiously declare that the ignorant crowd of 
nobodies, who for the most part constitute the Kearney ticket, offer any 
reasonable assurances that they are the right men in the right places ? 
They are little known, and what is known ox them is not good. They are 
ignorant and irresponsible. They are the result of the passion of a class, 
and that class the lowest and least cultured. It is the bottom coming to 
the top; it is ignoraucce, stupidity and prejudice, against brains, educa- 
tion and enlightenment. It is the men who have not, against those who 
have. It is the unrest of the dissatisfied, against the success of the suc- 
cessful. It is an attempt to subordinate the fittest to the untittest. 
In the trial of such an issue, thoughtful, educated taxpayers, ought to be 
united as one man ; they ought to be in one fold, and fighting shoulder to 
Bhoulder for the common good. This is no time for a division in the 
ranks of responsible men, when the irresponsible ones are joined to do 
mischief. The success of the most ignoraut class in capturing the city 
government in all its departments, would be deplorable in every view of 
the situation. We are persuaded it would work dire mischief at home, 
and it would give our city an unsavory reputation abroad that would 
be most damaging to our future prospects. The mischief can be averted, 
and it ought to be. If it is not, we envy not the scorn that in the evil 
days which are to come will fall upon the heads of the stupid partisans of 
this hour, who have the power, but not the will, to save us from the im- 
pending calamity. 

OPEN ON SUNDAYS. 

The year has brought the regular Mechanics' Fair, opened on Tues- 
day last with good promise of success; and once more people begin to ask 
why the Exhibition is to be closed on Sunday. It is most likely that 
the Board of Managers has not even yet thought of considering this mat- 
ter; and it is to be feared that the four or five weeks during which the 
Fair is to last will pass away before any decision is come to. Yet it is 
high time that the Puritanical opposition to a measure, in every way so 
moral and so useful, were silenced. The police arrangements for the 
preservation of order in the building have always been good, and there is 
no reason to fear that they would be found inadequate on Sunday, any 
more than on Saturday. What, then, is there to be feared, if the build- 
ing is opened to the public on Sunday? Many Jews visit the Exhibition 
on Saturday, without being therefore worse Jews or worse citizens. Why 
may not Christians have a similar privilege? If the piety of the former 
cau endure the contact with the array of industrial efforts and triumphs, 
may not even the faith of the Christian survive the shock? And if it can- 
not, is it worth saving? 

We know that the Lord's Day must be kept holy, and we frequently see 
it so ; but if peoplecan enjoy an innocent hour ortwoat Woodward's Gar- 
dens, or on the beach, or at the Park, on Sunday, why must they be saved 
from the Fair as from hell-fire? Many of the clergy set their faces against 
the opening of galleries of art and exhibitions of industry on the Lord's 
Day with a reckless fury, which confounds men whose countenances are 
more subject to wear and tear ; but, curiously enough, it is never reported 
that these shepherds are met with in the neighborhood of the Barbary 
Coast on Sunday, trying to seek and to save that which is lost. They 
prefer to beat the air from their pulpits and to fight shadows. In all 
countries, even the most conservative, innocent and improving recreations 
are being offered on Sunday to the general public. Here is a display full 
of suggestion, of food for thought, and for intelligent curiosity ; and for 
many, who are obliged to earn their bread during the week, the display is 
wholly lost, because the Rev. This and Deacon That decree that it shall 
be so, and the managers fear to offend them and their toothless friend, 
Mrs. Grundy. We say nothing of working men, because they are now 
gentlemen of elegant leisure ; but there are some industrious people, me- 
chanics and others, who cannot afford to spend an hour at the Fair during 
the^ week. And, even if there were no mechanics in the community, the 
I' air ought to be open on Sunday, and the Board of Managers should 
take heart of grace, meet this afternoon, and settle the thing at once. 

The youag man who loved above his station was always getting out 
at the wrong depot. 



The Naglee Brandy Thin I ntety pure brandy will he 

kepi and retailed In the Wine Room of the Mechanics' Pavilion during 
the exhibition. We have been nhnwn to-day a private tetter of General 
H. M Friend, in which the General says : " 1 have had all 

that I could do to till the order* received, commencing with August." Mis 

enthusiasm about hi (pis now making him its 

appropriate return. 

The greatest nuisance in a house is a smoky chimney, and with 
bad coal even the best ohimnev will smoke, as if it resented the imposi- 
tion pot upon it. Mr. .1. McDonoogh, 2fi Market street, has just received 
per snip Qilroy 2200 tons Hamilton Scotch Splint, the best coal known 
For house use. It makes very little Mho*, deposits no snot, ami burns 
with remarkable evenness, makln r a steady, hot fire, which can be grad- 
uated according to pleasm o, Full weight and moderate prices have made 
and established Mr. McDonough'a business. 

CHIARINI'S ROYAL ITALIAN CIRCUS 

AND 

PERFORMING ANIMALS 

WILL PERFORM EVERY EVENING, 

-ON THE- 

Mammoth Circuit Lnt, corner of Mission and Seventh streets, 

with the GREATEST AGGREGATION OF TALENT over presented in this citv. The 
Company that will appear in this Great Show consists of EQUESTRIENNES, 
EQUESTRIANS, ACROBATS and GYMNASTS, selected by Signer Chiarini from 
among the Best Talent to he found in Europe and America, and the 

TRAINED ANIMALS, 
consisting of Signer Giuseppe Chiarini'a MAGNIFICENT STUD OF HORSES, which 
have been the theme of universal admiration, augmented by the engagement of 
Mr. G. Bartholomew's STUD OF MARVELOUS BRONCHOS. 



PRICES OF ADMISSION: 

Private Boxes, with Six Chairs $5. I Gallery 50 Cent 

Dress Circle Chairs SI. | Children Half Price 

Seats can be Reserved without Extra Charge. 

Performance Every Evening at 8 o'clock. 
STATUTE ES : Wednesday and Saturday Afternoons at 2 o'clock. 

C3T" Doors open one hour previous to the commencement of the parformance. 
[August 9] 

BUSH STREET THEATER. 

CHARLES E.LOCKE 



.Proprietor. 



MO.XBAV. AU«»ST 1ITH, 

Positively Last Week of 
TONY PASTO R'S DOUB LE TROUPE! 

Revival of the "Ash,Box"Inspector." 
A PULL GRAND OLIO PROGRAMME, 

And Tony Pastor's Burlesque, 

CANAL BOAT FINAEOEE1 

Produced with all the Original Effects that made it such aGrand Success in N. Y. city. 

ISO- MATINEE SATURDAY AT 3. P. M. Sb 



THE BALDWIN THEATER. 

Manager, Mr. Tlios. Miignlre. --This (Saturday) Afternoon, 
August 9th, positively last WON AT LAST MATINEE. Positively last nights 
of ROSECOGHLAN in California. This (Saturday) Evening, August 9th, Farewell 
Benefit of ROSE COGHLAN, on which occasion MISS JEFFREYS-LEWIS and MR. 
T. W\ KEENE will appear in conjunction with the Great Baldwin Company. Tre- 
mendous Bill ! A HAPPY PAIR, PLOT AND PASSION, to conclude with the Quar- 
rel and Screen Scenes from THE SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL. Notice.— The sale of 
seats for Rose Coghlan's Benefit will commence on Monday, August 4th. Sunday 
Evening, August 10th, Grand Special Bill ! Monday, August nth, LOTTA in her 
new play, MUSETTE. The sale of seats for the LOTTA Engagement commenced 
on Wednesday, August 6th . Aug. 9. 

STANDARD THEATER. 

MA. Kennedy, Manager.— Saturday and Sunday Eve- 
* nings, and Saturday Matinee, positively last performances of H. M. S. PIN- 
AFORE. Commencing Monday Evening, August 11th, ZAMLOCH, the Great Aus- 
trian Magician, TRIAL BY JURY, CQMMODORE NUTT, and GRAND GIFT EN- 
TERTAINMENT. One Hundred and Six Magnificent and Costly Presents given away 
Nightly and at the Wednesday and Saturday Matinees. Six Principal Ciftg at each 
Performance ! For display of gifts see show windows of Aekerman Brothers, Les- 
zynsky & Bro., Sutter and Kearny streets, and Benedict & Smith's, under Occi- 
dental Hotel, daily, commencing Saturday, Aug. 9th. Seats now ready. Ausr. 9. 

METROPOLITAN TEMPLE. 

The World's Wonder, J.Harry Shanuon, the Boy Orator, 
only Ten Years of Age. Familiar with every Orator of National Repute of the 
past two centuries and the present, of either English, Irish or American birth. 
MONDAY EVENING, AIGlSi 11TH. 

Reserved Seats $1. I Admission 50 Cents. 

&& Sale of Seats commenced ou Thursday, August 7th, at 10 a.m., at Baldwin's 
Theater Box Office. Au g. 9. 

"BUSH STREET THEATER. 

Clinrles E. Locke, proprietor. --.Every Night this Week ! 
toother Grand Gala Programme, TONY PASTI >R ! A Great Bill this Week- 
Oddities. Novelties, Rarities. MATINEE SATURDAY at 2. Monday, August Ilth, 
the Great Burlesque, CANAL BOAT PINAFORE. Positively Last Week ot TONY 
PASTOR. Wednesday. A ugust 11th -ACTORS' MATI NEE. Aug. 9. 

MECHANICS' FAIR, 

San Francisco, California, 
OPENS AUGUST 5TH, 1879- 

Science, Art, Industry and Natural Productions will be 
fully represented Grand Instrumental Concert each afternoon and evening 1 . 
Machinery in Motion, Rare Paintings, Pine Statuary, a Tropical Garden, Fountains 
and Promenades will make this Exhibition the most instructive and pleasant place 
of resort on this Coast. Those desiring space should apply at once. Office : 27 Post 
street. IRVING M. SCOTT, President. 

J, H. Cclver, Secretary. July 12. 

Bradbury Pianos, Agency 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 9, ?879. 



SKELETON SKETCHES. 
A Tragedy of the Desert. 

I Note.— The history of this singular paper is briefly as follows: Some years ago, 
a sergeant in a cavalry company stationed at a frontier post near the Colorado Desert 
(for the sake of the parties concerned we suppress names, places and dates) disap- 
peared suddenly from the Fort. There had always been a mystery about the man. 
His educat'o \ breeding and bearing- showed him to be a gentleman, and it was sup- 
posed that he was English. But though much liked by officers and men for his gen- 
tle manners, he was too reserved for any to attempt to gain his confidence, and who 
he was or what had induced him to enlist in the ranks, is a secret to this day. When 
he disappeared it was hard to believe he had deserted, for such an ant seemed en- 
tirely opposed to his scrupulously honorable character; but all conjecture was si- 
lenced for a time by a still stranger event; On the same day there also disappeared 
the daughter of the commandant., a young lady gifted in mindand person far beyond 
ordinary women. Not the least singular part of the affair was, that it never oc- 
curred to any one at the Post that they had eone together, for neither had ever been 
known to speak to or of the other, and all who knew the girl would have scouted 
such an idea. Search for both proved fruitless. His name was dropped from the roll 
as a deserter, and she was mourned as the victim of some unusually daring band of 
Indians, who, it was thought, had waylaid her while taking one of her customary 
long and solitary rides. Some of our readers will doubtless remember the sensation 
caused by the matter. Nearly three years later, the hones of both were found to- 
gether in the heart of the Desert, and near by lay an old Russia leather pocket-book 
containing the terrible record which we now commit to print for the first time. How 
the original came into our hands matters not Suffice it to say that, though the 
secret was long kept for her father's sake he is now dead, and the necessity for si- 
lence exists no longer. The document is naturally incoherent, fragmentary, and, in 
many respects unsatisfoctory. The reader must interpret its awful suggestions as 
best he can, and decide for himself what portion of it was written under the influence 
of delirium. Perhaps only tho?e who are familiar with the weird horrors of the Col- 
orado Desert can fully appreciate it. ] 

July 3d. — Now, while she sleeps, I will begin to record as I intended 
the splendor of the life that is dawning upon us. It is four days since 
we left the Fort, and all danger of pursuit is past. Pursuit ? Who 
would follow us into the desert? Who would dream that we had ven- 
tured into the Valley of the Shadow of Death ? What are its perils to 
me? lam as sure of finding that oasis as I am that Irene loves me. 
They say that there is neither tree, water, grass nor any living thing in 
the direction I am taking, but I know better. My ancient Spanish Friar 
knew more than they. He saw the oasis with his own eyes ; he laved in 
its sparkling streams, ate of its delicious fruits, and reposed in its shady 
groves. True, that was near three hundred years ago, but so much the 
better. The book in which he wrote of his travels would be Jess rare were 
it less old, and others might discover my Eden. I have his distances and 
bis directions — somewhat vague, of course, but have I not studied them 
for months ? We have provisions and water enough to last for days, and 
our horses will carry us a long way yet. Yes, I am sure of my oasis; and 
there, alone with rny beloved, forgetting all else and utterly forgotten, 
the dream of my life will be realized. Forgetting, do I say ? Aye, there 
even my past may be buried. I have sought solitude and I shall find it, 
for my Paradise is unknown to man. Even the savages have no knowl- 
edge or tradition of it. .Like the white man, they abhor the desert and 
fear it. They skirt its hideous borders, but this, its jeweled heart, they 
have never seen. 

Jult 5th. — Two days since my last entry, and we have traveled fast, 
yet the horizon is still unbroken. But I have been very careful to follow 
the Friar's directions, and am content to wait. Sleep on, my poor Irene, 
the weariness of which you complain not must end in rest to-morrow. 
How I dread to tell you that the second horse has just died! 

July 7th. — This is terrible! My darling can walk no farther, and the 
water is nearly gone. My God! what have I done! The sight of those 
poor little blistered feet and that wan face might turn a devil's heart to 
pity. She tells me that she is " only tired," and that I must kiss her once 
and then try to save myself. I will die first. Lord, guide us and have 
pity on us! 

July 8th.— The sun has driven Irene mad, I think. She looks and acts 
very strangely. We have dragged ourselves several miles since yesterday, 
and she declares that a Shadow is following us — a shadow without a sub- 
stance. There is only one swallow of putrid water left. I gave her a 
mouthful to-day ; I must keep this for her till to-morrow. Poor child! 
poor child! Accursed that I am, I dare not ask either her or God for 
pardon. 

[This apparently ends the entry for the day, but the dates cease after the 
8t/i. From this point the manuscript often becomes absol utely illegible, though 
in other places the writing is firm and distinct. Horrid oaths and blasphe- 
mies, too, begin to appear. These, together with some perfectly meaningless 
sentences, we have omitted, but the curious can see the entire MS. at this of- 
fice. The respective paragraphs were evidently written at separate, though by 
no means lucid intervals. — Editor] 

I have seen it — the Shadow which Irene saw. It dogged me for an hour 
at noon, and then faded out of the sand. For it lies on the sand as the 
shadow of a man might. It moves whithersoever it will, and has no visi- 
ble cause. Irene has gone. I think the angels have taken ber from me. 
But a hideous hag, who sings nursery songs and calls herself Irene, hob- 
bles at my side and will not be driven away. I know she wants to steal 
the mouthful of water I have saved, but I am going to drink it myself 
when she isn't looking. 

Last night the bag pointed to the westward, and I knew the Shadow 
was coming. She has told me its name, but I dare not write it ; she has 
defined its shape to me, but I may not describe it. It crept up to us in 
the moonlight, it circled about us, it passed between us, and whispered as 
it went. The hag was speechless with horror at the answer I gave, but 
when I struck her she wept. 

I have heard the Voices of the Desert, and they have told me what I 
must do. I tried to conceal it from the hag, but she caught my eye and 
knew all and trembled. " Take 033- blood," she cried, if you will ; but I 
am Irene," Then I cursed her, and for the lie she told she shall quench 
my thirst. But I am weak and must wait till she sleeps. 

I could not wait. She moaned with terror as I crept upon her, but I 
gave ber no time to struggle or cry out. I am saved. From her blood has 
sprung a plashing stream of bright water, with grassy banks. I have 
tried once to drink, but stooped and found mouth and eyes full of hot 
sand. But I shall be stronger soon, and shall reach the stream and drink 
it dry. Ha! What bird is that that dares flap his wings in my very eyes ? 
The poor vulture is thirsty 

[Here the MS. ends abruptly.] 



The dog, after stealing a bone, is seen to walk off with his s-wag. 



BANKS. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital 55,000,000 

WM.ALVORD President. 

THOMAS BBOWX, Casbier | B. Ml'KRAY, Jr., Ass'l Cashier 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation, 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paitl up Capital $2,000,000, Cold. President, B. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, Isaac Worniser, Edward Martin, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents— London : Baring Bros. & Co. Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Co. NewYork: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.--- Capital paid np, 81,800,- 
000, with power to increase to 310,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office- -28 Cornhill, London. Branches — Portland, Oregon; Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

NewYork, Chicago and Canada — Bank of Montreal; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand — Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

May 18. FREDERICK TOWNSEND, Manager. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid TJp $10,000,000. 

Reserve, U.S. Bonds 3,500,000. 

Agency at New York, 62 Wall street. 

Agency at Virginia, Nev. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. July 5. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, $5,000,000, of which $3,000,000 is f ally paid up as 
present capital. Reserve Fund, 3360,000. San Francisco Office, 424 Califor- 
nia street ; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER ; 
Casbier, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers, Bank of England and London Joint 
Stock Bank ; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. 
This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Busi- 
ness in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and all parts of the 
world. March 30. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar una I^eihbauk, Bio 526. Calif orniastreet, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors. — Fred. 
Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Dan. Meyer, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggerp, N. Van Bergen, 
H. L. Simon, Claus Spreckels. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

Gl'ARAMEE CAPITAL, 9300,000. 

Officers: President, John Parrott; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. Oct. 14. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a. in. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 
Oct. 23. 730 Montgomery street. 

LAVER & CURLETT, 

Architects. 

Furnish Plans, Specifications and Snperintenilence for the 
Construction or Renovation of Dwelling Houses, and every description of 
Building. Office : 19 S. F. Stock Exchange Building, Pine street, San Francisco. 
[ Take the Elevator.] June 15. 

MME. B. ZEITSKA'S 

French, German anil English Institute, Day and Boarding? 
School, for Young Ladies, 922 Post street, between Hyde and Larkin. KIN- 
DERGARTEN connected with the Institute. 
Oct. 2^ MME. B. ZEITSKA, Principal. 

CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY, 

Manufacturers of the Staudard Syrup, a superior article 
put up in barrels expressly for home consumption. Also, Extra Heavy Syrup 
in barrels for Export. Refined Sugars at lowest market rates. Office, 215 Front 
street, up stairs Dec. 21 . 

"QUICKSILVER. 

or sale— In lots to suit, by Thomas Bell A Co., No. 305 

Sansome street, over Bank of California. Nov. 16. 



F 



Smith's American Organs, 200 Post street, corner of Dupont. 



9, 1879. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



"STAY." 
I nkfct wpuk "f n ,it hlubinff, 

• 11 won, 
Yt-t the M---1 t.. i i- rushing 

Aj I fiitiV dona. 

thought ir :■ no me 

Recatm< <<f d 
Ah. rUrhog] how little roa knew me 

If moo won jroor huicjr in truth. 
Y-m RTnided in-' .ill through tail Mason, 

Tnoogb. yi 1 knew it full well; 

And ' ■•■■•! at the rat 

That v.'ur pride waa too stubborn to tell. 
And last night, aa we stood by the river, 

An«l yon sni-1 " far well :** a* y*>n know 
T»w » (u*rtini; that mi-lit l»e furaver, 
, how ooold I bear von t«> go? 
You could tell me with no word nl warning 

(if the atop yon were g -imj to take— 
Hut tout pride and my own I waa scorning 

As T ■obbed»*" Dearest, stay for my Bake." 
Then your answer came softer ami fonder. 

As you owned what 1 always had known — 
You braved all Bocaety's slander 

To call me your darling, your own. 
And yet, though you're mine, mine forever, 

This poor heart i* ready to hurst, 
And I Wish, with r\ blush and a shiver 

That I had— had not spoken the first. 
Let you go! No ; that were not in reason, 

The ivy must cling to the oak ; 
Though my blushes charge my love with treason- 

You'll try to forget 'twas I spoke. 



PRODUCTION OP COAL IN THE UNITED STATES AND 






OTHER COUNTRIES. 






United States, 






1869. 


1876. 


1877. 


1878. 


StaU or Territory 






Tuns. 


Tont. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Pennsylvania ( Anthracite). 


13,866,180 


21,436,667 


23,019,1111 


17,605,262 


Do. (Bituminous] 


7,798,617 


11,500,000 


12,500,000 


13,500,000 


Illinois 


Do. 




2,629,563 


3,500,000 


3,500,000 


3,500,000 


Ohio 


Do. 




2,527,285 


3,500,000 


5,250,000 


5,000,000 


Maryland 


Do. 




1,819.824 


1,835.081 


1,574,339 


1,679,322 


ULiaBoiiri 


Do. 




621,930 


noo;ooo 


900,000 


900,000 


West Virginia 


Do. 




608,878 


800,000 


1,000,000 


1,000.000 


Indiana 


Do. 




437,870 


950,000 


1,000,000 


1,000,000 


Iowa 


Do. 




263,487 


1,500,000 


1,500,000 


1,500,000 


Kentucky 


Do. 




150,582 


650,000 


850.000 


900,000 


California 


Do. 




148,722 


108,078 


96,172 


122,034 


All others 


Do. 




353.878 


1,834,000 


2,104,000 


1,946,000 



Total for United States.. 31,220.716 48,513,826 53,804,422 48,652,618 

The above figures are compiled from the Quarterly Report of the Bureau 
of Statistics, with the exception of those for California, which we have cor- 
rected. The figures inserted by the Bureau are those of the production of 
California and the imports from other States and from abroad, amounting 
in all to about 600,000 tons per annum ; but the production of the State 
is as we ha