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CAUFORNIANA 



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SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

SAN FRANC/SCO HISTORY R09M 

REFERENCE BOOK 
Not to be taken from the Library 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

San Francisco Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/californiaherald8971friix 




*^i'A 





Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




4 357 SEPTEMBtl^, 197C •► 40<t 



INDIAM GRINDING ROCK, NOW PART OF CHO-SE STATE PARK 



I III-: HKIIBKON SLSTEKS 

July 1 1, 1970, the last of the five 
Heilbron sisters, Irma A. Hcilbron 
charter member and Past President, 
of San Diego No. 208, passed througli 
the golden gates to rejoin her sisters: 
Dr. Louise C. Heilbron, PGP; Mrs. 
Alice (Ernest) Damarus, Mrs. Anna 
(Harry) Simmonds, and Mrs. Caro- 
line (Arlington) Eldrcdge, all born 
in Sacramento, together with five 




Top row from left: Dr. Louise C. 
Heilbron, Caroline A. Eldredge and 
Ann Simmonds. Bottom row from 
left: Alice Damaras. Caroline F. 
Heilbron (mother) and Irma Heil- 
bron. 

brothers. The family moved to San 
Diego in 1888, where the father John 
Frederick Heilbron, owned and 
operated a butcher shop at 13th and 
K streets. Three brothers are still 
living of the ten children of this 
pioneer family of San Diego, Fred 
Heilbron of San Diego, John A. Heil- 
bron of Spring Valley, and Richard 
Heilbron of Kansas City. 




From left: Carolyn Riggs and Iter 
aunt the late Dr. Louise Heilbron. 

Dr. Louise Heilbron, became one 

of the first woman osteopath physi- 

(Continued on Page 9) 

PAGE 2 



California Herald 



•PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 



Volume XVIII 



September, 1970 Number 1 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Rancho San Vicente y Santa Monica by Lillian M. Stratton 3 

The Grand President's Corner (^ 

Parlor News 7 

The Lighter Side of It 10 

Historic Adobe Restored (Palo Alto Times) 11 

18th Annual Conference — Jr. NDGW 14 

In Memoriam 15 




For 56c 

a week more 

you can live f lamelessly. 




Does it cost a lot to 
live in a Medallion 
All-Electric Home? 
Without gas? To get 
the facts, we compared 
utility costs of typical 
homes using gas and 
electricity with homes 
using only electricity. 
The average cost was 



560 a week more for 
electric homes. For an 
average of 560 more 
a week, wouldn't you 
rather have the con- 
veniences and com- 
forts of electric living? 



Southern California Edison 



J. J. FRIIS 

I'uhlisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JA.NE FRIIS 
Public Relatioiu 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim, 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim. California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243. Anaheim. California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: 301 
N. Parton St.. Santa Ana. Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mail 
correspondence to CALIFORNIA HERALD. Circulation Department. P.O. Drawer 4243. Anaheim, 
Calif. 92803. When ordering change of address please allow six weeks; please fumiah 
old and new addresses including zip code. NDGW MEMBERS: please send Parlor Number also. 
POST OFFICE: RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED. Please send magazine with address chaage 
to California Herald, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California S2803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
in U.S.A. (50 states). 40c a copy. $3.50 a year; J6.50 for two years; $9.35 for three years, 
other countries: Please apply for rates. Enterod as second-class matter at the Post Offica at 
Anaheim. California, under the Act of March 3. 1879. No part of this magazine may b« re- 
printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



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^^ ANCHO San Vicente y Santa 
)jf^ Monica, the historic 30,00C 
( thirty thousand) acre Rancho 
granted in 1828 to Don Francisco 
Sepulveda, and on which stands 
entirely the original "townsite" of 
Santa Monica, as officially recorded 



in 1875, was recently designated a 
California Historical Landmark by 
Beverly Hills Parlor, Native Daugh- 
ters of the Golden West. 

The "marking" ceremony took 
place in Santa Monica's City Hali 
Council Chamber, where Mrs. 




Air view of the beautiful city of Santa Monica, a major portion of w/iic/t 
stands on historic Ranclio San Vicente y Santa Monica, granted in IS28 to 
Don Francisco Sepulveda. Tlie ranclio site was 'marked" hv Beverlv Hills 
Parlor, NDGW. 



SEPTEMBER, 1970 



Arthur (Erlinda Sepulveda) East- 
man, parlor president, on behalf of 
Beverly Hills Parlor, formally pre- 
sented to Mayor Herbert A. Spurgin, 
of Santa Monica, a bronze plaque. 
The wording on the plaque will serve 
as a reminder that the busy and 
prosperous city by the sea possesses 
a rich, historical background. Mrs. 
Eastman is a great-great grand- 
daughter of Don Francisco Sepul- 
veda, whose memory as a very 
early-day Southern California 
settler, and original grantee of 
Rancho San Vicente y Santa Monica 
142 years ago. was honored that 
night. 

The historical plaque was per- 
manently secured to the west wall 
of the spacious rotunda in the City 
Hall. In keeping with the "'early 
California" theme, the plaque was 
placed next to a colorful full-length 
mural depicting Don Caspar de 
Portola and several members of his 
historically famous expedition of 
1769, seeking the Bay of Monterey, 
traveling along a wilderness path, 
presumably near what is now Santa 
Monica. 

Portola and his men, weary from 
their arduous trek up from Baja 
California, did camp for several days 
under huge sycamore trees shading 
several sparkling springs, just east of 
(Continued on Next Page) 

PAGE 3 



RANCHO . . . 
tCoiuiniied from Page 3) 

Santa Monica. The springs that arc 
found now on the beautiful campus 
of the present-day University High 
School in West Los Angeles, it is 
believed by historians, could well be 
those same springs of delicious water, 
in surroundings described so clearly 
by the brilliant diarist. Father Juan 
Crespi, who accompanied the Portola 
expedition and kept a most remark- 
able day-by-day diary of the 176'^ 
exploring expedition. 

One of the springs on the campus 
already has been "marked" by a 
local chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution. It is known 
as "Father Serra Springs," accord- 
ing to the plaque attached to the 
side of the spring. Some California 
historians have stated that Father 
Junipero Serra had been advised by 
members of the Portola expedition 
about the springs and the serene 
ramping spot under huge, leafy trees, 
thereafter he often stopped there to 
rest, during his arduous travels up 
and down California. 

While the 1769 Portola expedi- 
tion was camped by the springs dur- 
ing their original trek, Portola 
ordered his scouts to ride down to 
the beach (at Santa Monica) and 
gaze northward along the fringe of 
mountains which meet the sea along 
the Malibu. He wanted them to see 
if it were at all possible for the 
expedition to follow a path north- 
ward along the shoreline, in their 
quest to find Monterey Bay. 

It was impossible the scouts finally 
determined, because of the steep 
mountains with sheer downward 
drop to the ocean. So they returned 
to the camp, made their report, and 
soon thereafter the Portola expedi- 
tion headed north from the camp, 
passing through a narrow pass in 
the Santa Monica mountains and 
eventually landing out into San 
F'ernando Valley. This narrow pass 
today (1970) is known as Sepulveda 
Canyon, and through it runs the 
San Diego Freeway, over which 
thousands of automobiles roar daily 
along its asphalt trail. 

That was two hundred and one 
years ago (1769). Fifty-nine yeiu-s 

PAGE 4 



later, in IS2X. Don Francisco Sepul- 
veda. retired soldier and citizen of 
I he pueblo de Los Angeles, petition- 
ed for and svas given possession of 
and provisional title to Rancho San 
Vicente y Santa Monica. It com- 
prised 30,000 (thirty thousand) 
acres, covered almost entirely with 
rich wild-grass, excellent grazing 
land for Sepulveda's livestock. 

The Rancho was provisionally 
granted to Sepulveda during the ad- 
ministration of California's Governor 
Echeandia. This state was then 
under rule of Mexico. Sepulveda was 
officially put into possession of the 
land by Jose Antonio Carrillo, at 
that time (1828) alcalde of the 
tiny pueblo de Los Angeles and the 
representative of the state govern- 
ment. In 1839, the grant to the 
Rancho was confirmed by Governor 
Alvarado. 

The Rancho's land faced the 
ocean, extending from the southern 
edge of the Santa Monica Canyon 
to what is now Pico Boulevard. In 
the rear (east) it reached almost to 
the VVestwood area and took in the 
mountains that overlooked the San 
Fernando Valley. 

Don Francisco Sepulveda, upon 
given possession of the land in 1828. 
moved his more than one hundred 
and fifty head of cattle, his horses 
and sheep out to the Rancho. 
Assisted by several of his sons, he 



built several adobe buildings on the 
Rancho and set out orchards and 
vineyards. This, in addition to his 
live-stock raising. Sepulveda, how- 
ever, maintained his residence in 
Los Angeles, where his home was 
situated on the plaza. 

One of the adobe dwellings which 
Sepulveda built on the rancho, stood 
close by the very same springs where, 
historians are convinced, the Por- 
tola expedition camped in 1769. The 
springs are situated today on the 
campus of University High School 
in West Los Angeles. Through that 
campus very apparently runs an 
underground river with natural 
springs bubbling up out of the earth. 
In digging the foundations for the 
school, in 1924, the workmen would 
strike water. Finally this obstacle 
was overcome and the school opened 
in September of 1924. According to 
■an interesting historical fact-sheet 
published by the school, the natural 
springs on the campus caused vari- 
ous problems in the stages of school 
expansion. The auditorium was bui'.t 
on pilings over an underground river 
and the classroom building and girls' 
gymnasium are built over many 
natural springs. These were capped 
and drained through the concrete 
channels to the area of the gradua- 
tion terrace and into the large pond< 
in the horticultural area. 

During the grading and construc- 
tion of the school, manv artifacts of 




Rear view oj Sail Gabriel Mission in IS~fK 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



Indian and Spanish origin were un- 
covered. Metates, grinding stones, 
arrow and spear heads were plowed 
up. It definitely indicated that this 
area, because of the springs of water, 
was occupied frequently by bands oi 
Indians dwelling nearby. 

Don Francisco Sepulveda was, in- 
deed, a very early-day Southern 
Californian .... because it is a 
matter of historical record (the 
193 1 edition of the Historical 
Society of Southern California's 
publication commemorating the one 
hundred and fiftieth anniversary of 
the founding of Los Angeles in 
September 4, 1781) that Don Fran- 
cisco, as a boy of six years old, in 
the year 1781, accompanied his 39 
year old soldier father, also named 
Francisco, who, along with other 
troops of the Spanish army, was 
assigned to accompany (and guard 
against Indian atacks) the original 
twelve families from Sinaloa and 
Sonora, Mexico, who were to be- 
come the "founders" and first 
settlers of Los Angeles. These famil- 
ies (eleven families finally were 
counted when the expedition reached 
San Gabriel Mission) were per- 
suaded by Capt. Fernando de Riva 
y Moncada to leave their homes 
in the peaceful valleys of Mexico, 
journey to upper California — and 
become the first settlers of Nuestra 
Seriora de Los Angeles de Porciun- 
cula. Each family was promised — 
and received, when they landed 
there — land, four horses, two 
cows, a pair of sheep, a pair of 
goats, a yoke of oxen and tools for 
farming. Also going along on the 
long journey with Francisco's 
soldier-father, in addition to six- 
year old Francisco, were Francisco's 
mother, the former Maria Candelaria 
de Redondo, and their five other 
children. The oldest child was 
.seventeen and Francisco, six, was 
the youngest. 

The 1931 edition of the Historical 
Society of Southern California pub- 
lished a most outstanding article by 
California Historian Thomas Work- 
man Temple the second, of San 
Gabriel, in which he listed (for the 
first time) not only names of the 

SEPTEMBER, 1970 




Santa Monica Mayor Herbert A. Spur gin and Mrs. Artlnir (Erlinda Sepul- 
veda) Eastman, immediate past president of Beverly Hills Parlor, Native 
Daughters of the Golden West, unveil a bronze plaque in City Hall which 
officially "marks" a California historical landmark Ranclw San Vicente y 
Santa Monica, on which stands a major portion of the city of Santa Monica. 
Mrs. Eastman's great-great-grandfather. Don Francisco Sepulveda wat 
granted the rancho in 1828. 



twelve families from Sinaloa and 
Sonora, who settled Los Angeles, 
but also the names of the soldiers 
who accompanied the twelve famil- 
ies — plus the names of the wives 
and each child of the soldiers who 
brought along their own families! 
Thus we know that Francisco 
Sepulveda, the future owner of 
Rancho San Vicente y Santa 
Monica, first came to California in 
1781 at the age of six. 

It is presumed that the Sepulveda 
family, upon arriving in upper Cali- 
fornia in 1781, remained here, as 
so many soJdiers' families did. Be- 
cause when young Francisco Sepul- 
veda grew to manhood, he followed 
in his father's footsteps and he, too, 
became a soldier. He was stationed 
in San Diego. There, in 1802, he 
married Maria Ramona Serrano y 
Silvas. They became the parents of 
twelve children, two passing on 
early in life. 

In 1815, Francisco Sepulveda and 
his family were residing in the pueb- 



lo de Los Angeles. Highly regarded 
by his friends and neighbors, he 
was active in municipal affairs of 
the tiny village. Besides keeping up 
his activities in agriculture and cattle 
raising. 

And so it was, that, in 1828, 
Francisco Sepulveda petitioned for 
and was granted the 30,000 acre 
Rancho San Vicente y Santa 
Monica. Sepulveda died in 1853, 
leaving the Rancho to his wife. In 
1872, the Sepulveda heirs sold the 
Rancho to Colonel R. S. Baker for 
$55,000. In 1875, Baker sold a 
three-fourths interest in the Rancho 
to Senator John P. Jones for 
$162,000. Together, they planned 
a town, a railroad and a wharf. 
Thus it was that, in 1875, the orig- 
inal "townsite" of Santa Monica 
was officially recorded. The "town- 
site" fronted on the ocean and was 
bounded on the northwest by Mon- 
tana Avenue, on the southeast by 
Railroad Avenue (now Colorado 
{Continued on Page 12) 

PAGE 5 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GRAND PRHSIDENT 

Irene Bondanza (Mrs. Jocsph) 

232K Union Street 

San Francisco, California 94123 




IRENE BONDANZA 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbarlc (Mrs. C. F.) 

227I-32nd Avenue 

San Francisco, California 94116 

Office: 703 Market Street. Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



As 1 write this article 1 am plan- 
ning for the statewide celebration 
of Admission Day in Fairficld-Sui- 
sun. September 9th. In my heart will 
be the hope that as we say "Happy 
Birthday California" we pledge our- 
selves to continue work for the pre- 
servation of California History and 
the social and cultural development 
of our State. 

On September 25, 1970 the Order 
of the Native Daughters of the 
Golden West will celebrate its 84th 
Birthday. On Founders Day we look 
back with pride to the group of 
thirteen women who formed Ursula 
Parlor No. 1 in Jackson, Amador 
County. From that beginning a 
chain of Native Daughter Parlors 
spread from one end of California 
to the other. 

Throughout the years Grand 
Presidents of the Order have cher- 
ished the hospitality, enthusiasm and 
interest expressed by members as 
ihey travel the State making "offic- 
ial visits." Such is my privilege now. 
The warmth of friendship, the desire 
of members to promote the pro- 
jects of our Order, the beauties of 
our State, all enhance the roll of .i 
Grand President. 

Recently in my visit to Alturas 
and Mt. l.assen Parlors a little poem 
accompanied their presentation. 
The author as far as I know was 
anonymous but it expressed love 
of members for their Order. Despite 
perils, promises, disappointments, it 
signified to me that Native Daugh- 
ters continue to pledge themselves 
to work with the Grand President. 

PAGE fi 



Jtinerar^ 1970 

SEPTEMBER 

1 Eschscholtzia No. 112 Etna* 

3 Alturas No. 159, Mt. Laisen No. 215 Alturas* 

4 Alameda County Admission Day Dinner 

7 Labor Day 

8 Admission Day Dinner 

9 Admission Day Parade Fairfield 

10 Eltapome No. 55 Weaverville* 

14 ColumbiaNo. 70 (afternoon) French Corral* 

15 Laurel No. 6, Manzanila No. 29, Sierra Pines No. 275 .... Grass Valley* 

18 Orinda No. 56 — 80th Anniversary San Francisco* 

19 Tiki 

21 Colus No. 194, So. Butte No. 226 Sutter* 

26 Sacramento Childrens Foundation Luncheon 

26 Soledad Fiesta Tea, Mission Soledad Soledad 

27 Soledad Fiesta Parade Soledad 

OCTOBER 

4 Mariposa No. 63 Mariposa* 

6 Dardanelle No. 66, Golden Era No. 99, Anona No. 164 Sonora* 

8 Ursula No. 1, Chispa No. 40, Amapola No. 80 Sutter Creek* 

9-11 Junior Native Daughters Conference Oakland 

14 Naomi No. 36 Downieville* 

15 La Bandera No. 110, Calif ia No. 22 and 

Rio Rito No. 253 Sacramento* 

17-18 Grand Officers Meeting 

18 San Francisco Deputies Reception 

19 Auburn No. 233, Placer No. 138 Auburn* 

Susanville No. 243, Nataqua No. 152 Susanville* 

San Juan No. 315, Fern No. 123 Carmichacl* 

Childrens Foundation Luncheon Concord 

Santa Cruz No. 26, El Pajaro No. 36 Santa Cruz* 

Morada No. 199 Modesto* 



20 

22 
24 
26 
28 



♦ Official visits are marked with astericks 



In the riKid that you have travelled 
I know that you have found 
Along with all the pretty things 
Some mighty rocky ground. 

1 also know the Parlors 
Have found in you great good 
You've taken all the better ways 
To help our Sisterhood. 

Day by day you'll travel far: 
Night by night you'll wander. 
Many a busy hour you'll plan: 
Many a dime you'll squander. 

But when your Parlors honor you 
For all your work and fun. 
You'll proudly hear their song of 

praise 
■Well done. Grand President, well 

done." 



I hank you Native Daughters 
everywhere for your trust as I look 
torward to the year with confidence. 



the 




Store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



Parlor Hews 

TIERRA de ORO 

Tierra de O r o No. 304 in co- 
operation with the Grand Parlor 
Americanism and Civic Participation 
Program sponsored by Grand Parlor, 
as well as the Veterans' Welfare pro- 
gram also sponsored on a state-wide 
scale, has for several years sent 
California Bear flags to veterans, 
both overseas and at stations in the 
United States. 



REICHI.INC; 




One such California Bear Flag was 
sent recently to Airman David Nagel, 
grandson of Past President Florence 
Nagel, of Tierra de Oro Parlor, who 
is now stationed at an air base in 
Mississippi. 

In his thank-you note to the Par- 
lor, Airman Nagel included a mes- 
sage from one of his buddies, also a 
Californian, stating that he, too, 
would like to have our State's em- 
blem. In almost every instance where 
a California Bear Flag has been 
sent to one of our servicemen or wo- 
men, there has come a request for 
additional flags for others in their 
contingents. 

For this reason, at the recent 
Grand Parlor, the suggestion was re- 
layed by PGP Eileen Dismuke to the 
incoming State Chairman on Vet- 
erans Welfare that some thought be 
given to allocating some of the extra 
funds provided in the coming Vet- 
erans Welfare budget for California 
Bear Flags to be sent to our service- 
men from the Grand Parlor. The 
American Legion also has a program 
for provision of Bear Flags, and 
funds for this purpose are of primary 
concern. 



The trouble with Father Time is that 
he doesn't make round trips. 

1 -t i 

He who is in love with himself has at 
lca.st this advantage — he won't encounter 
many rivals in his love. 

SEPTEMBER. 1970 














Reichling Parlor dedicates plaque in 
honor of the late Emma O'Connor, 
founder of the Parlor. 

i 1 1 

$55,000 TAPE RECORDER GIVEN 

While an Awards Juror at Free- 
dom's Foundation at Valley Forge, 
Jr. PGP Nancy Conens saw a need 
for a video type recorder. With the 
cooperation of James Ferenz of the 
Ampec Corporation, she was able 
to procure the valuable equipment 
for Freedom's Foundation. 




From left — James Ferenz (hus- 
band of GIS Dolores Ferenz). 
Ampec; Jr. PGP Nancy Conens; 
PGP Edna Williams and Richard 
Foltz, Western Regions E.xecutive 
Vice President w h o accepted the 
video recorder. 



A woman went to the bank and asked 
for a new check book. I'm afraid I've 
lost the one you gave me yesterday," 
she said, "liut it doesn't matter. I took 
the precaution of signing all the checks 
first, so they won't be any good to any- 
one else." 

i 1 i 

Knowledge is power but only when 
wisdom is its governor does justice 
prevail. 



HISTORICAL MARKERS 
PRESENTED BY AiNNIE K. 
HIDWELL PARLOR NO. 168 

Annie K. Bidwell No. 168 offi- 
ciated at the presentation of markers 
to the Ccnterville Historical and 
Recreation Association, designating 
the old Centerville School and Cem- 
etery as historical landmarks. A 
California Bear Flag was also given 
to the school by the Historical and 
Landmark Committee of the Parlor. 
Approximately 200 pc r s o n s 
attended the dedication ceremonies. 
Among them were several descend- 
ants of Charles H i n t z, early day 
resident of Centerville and builder of 
the school. They were his daughters, 
irma Rushmer of Sacramento; Leone 
Reynolds, Vera Ekwall and Frede- 
rica Wilson, all of Chico. Also pre- 
sent were Mrs. Wilson's daughter, 
Kenny, of Chico; granddaughter 
Alicia L o c e y of Sacramento and 
grandson Jeff Hanley. Alumni of 
the school came from as far away 
as Riverside, California. 

Ethel Wilburn, a member of 
Olivia No. 309, Corning, was very 
interested to learn that a forebearer 
of hers, of whose burial place she 
had lost track, was listed among the 
early day graves in the old cemetery. 
At the cemetery services the invoc- 
ation was given by Father Charles 
Fagan. Lois Colman read a short 
history of the cemetery. She and Lucy 
Girdler unveiled the plaque, after 
which the benediction was spoken by 
Father Fagan. A bouquet of iris was 
placed in front of the marker. 

PGP Hazel Mallette, gave the in- 
vocation at the Schoolhouse. She is 
a member of Gold of Ophir No. 190, 
Orovillc. 

The pledge to the flag was led by 
Harvey Johnson of Centerville. Mr. 
Johnson was aLso active in helping 
with the arrangements for the day's 
ceremonies. The singing of the 
national anthem was led by Grace 
Benton. 

Speaker of the day was GP Nancy 
J. Conens. She commended Annie 
K. Bidwell Parlor and the Centerville 
Historical Association for marking 
and preserving these landmarks for 

(Continued on Page 8} 

PAGE 7 



ANNIE K. BIDWELL . . . 
(Continued from Page 7) 

the State. She also told of the found- 
ing of the Native Daughter of the 
Golden West by Lily O. Reichling at 
Jackson, Amador County, on Sept- 
ember 25. 1886. Among dignitaries 
present was GT Betty Read Curilich 
of the Mother Parlor, Ursula No. 1. 
Mrs. Conens also gave a short history 
of the adoption of the California Bear 
Flag. 



II 




From left: Jr. PGP Nancy Conens: 
Lois Colman, Fern Gearhart, Una 
Hargrove a n d Myrtle Hesse, are 
members of Annie K. Bidwell No. 
J 68. 

Helen Gage of Chico read a history 
of the old Schoolhouse. Fern Gear- 
hart. Myrtle Hesse and Una Har- 
grove of Annie K. Bidwell Parlor 
pre.sented the flag to the School and 
when the flag reached the top of the 
pole the bell of the school tolled. 

The marker at the school is dedi- 
cated to Cora Woods Hintz, a former 
teacher there and a desceased mem- 
ber of Annie K. Bidwell Parlor. Mrs. 
Hintz was the aunt of Lois Colman. 
Mr. Carleton Colman. brother of 
Lois, built the standards of native 
stone from the area. The marker 
was unveiled by Grand President 
Conens and Mr. Boon Baker. 

Miss Colman accepted the markers 
and flag in the name of the Center- 
ville Historical and Recreation 
Association and thanked all who 
had worked on the project which will 
preserve some of the history of the 
Centerville area. 

To close the day's ceremonies, 
there was the presentation of the 
redwood site marker on the road 

PAGE 8 



^^r^" 



•IIWELERS 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 



"2 


BACKS 
KAULBARS 

MORTUARY 

1617 W. La Palma at Euclid 
Anaheim 
7721617 



UILGENFELTI 

n MORTUARY 1/ 

Faithful . Courteous. Service 
120 E. Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5--4I05 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 535-7221 

INSURANCE — SURETY BONDS 

M. E. BEEBE & CO. 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim, California 



HOLflnDlREVnOLDS 

GRHDING(||fl)cONTRRCTaR 

BRIDGES • HIGHWAYS - DAMS - RAILROADS 

• Heavy •Equipment 

Hauling For Rent 

535-4233 
505 S. Sunkist Ave. Anaheim 




rlower' 5'^^P 
1215 W. Lincoln. Anaheim 535-4997 



ilie 



MELROSE 



MEMORIAL PARK • MAUSOLEUM 

CREMATORIUM . COLUMBARIUM 

I Orangewood Street at Santa Ana Freewdy 

538-3583 



leading up to the schoolhouse. by 
the Sierra Woodsmen 4-H Club. It 
was under the direction of William 
E. Carman, who made the introduc- 
tions. A 4-H Club history was given 
by Lori Hethcrinton; the site marker 
project by Steve Deadmond; pre- 
sentation of marker by Patrick Car- 
man, president of the Sierra Woods- 
men. 

Father Fagan gave the benediction, 
after which many of the people stayed 
to enjoy a picnic lunch at tables set 
up under the trees on the school 
grounds. During this time the group 
was entertained by the Alton Johnson 
Family Group of Orland. Mr. and 
Mrs. Johnson and their children 
Clayton. Lesonia, Rhoda and Rita. 

The committees of Annie G. Bid- 
well Parlor who worked on this pro- 
ject were History and Landmarks. 
Lucy Girdlcr. chairman, aided by 
Lois Colman. Helen Gage and Nell 
Baker. Mrs. Baker made the corsages 
worn by dignitaries in attendance. 

The Civic Participation Committee 
presented the Bear Flag, Fern Gear- 
hart, chairman, with Una Hargrove 
and Myrtle Hesse assisting. Other 
helping were: Katherine LaBreacht 
sending out invitations; Barbara 
giving out programs at the ceremonies 
and Carola Bammann, writing publi- 
city. 

Y f * 
GKNFA'IEVE 

.Members, their children and 
grandchildren, enjoyed the annual 
"Potluck Day" at Velma Gordon's 
charming home in the Boulder Creek 
resort area. The informal day was 
spent swimming, sewing and playing 
cards. 

Florence Filben was hostess to 
the Bazaar Sewing Club on July 8. 
Delicious refreshments of macaroni 
salad, cake, coffee and lemonade 
were served. 



I.l NCHEON 

When Evelyn I. Carlson of Dolores 
Parlor sought the office of Grand 
Out.side Sentinel at Placerville in 
1925 and was elected, the three 
delegates of Dolores, the late PGP 
May C. Boldemann and a few close 
friends feted Mrs. Carlson with a 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



luncheon. Every year for the 
past 45 years, the Dolores delegates 
;o Grand Parlor have planned a 
unchcon honoring Mrs. Carlson, 
rhis year there were 145 guests. 




'^rom left, standing: Jan Anderson. 
Loretta Mosley. Lynn Audetle. Car- 
nen DeCristoferi. Joan Romero and 
President Mary Soiisa. Sealed : 
SDDGP Mildred Yancy, DGP Ann 
Siggio. Thehna Locatelli and PGP 
Evelyn I. Carlson. 

Rose Cully presided; PGP Edna 
Williams gave the invocation; Past 
Grand President Nancy Conens gave 
a message and PGP Jewel Mc- 
Sweeney spoke for the ten PGPs 
present. The honoree expressed her 
sincere appreciation. 



HEILBRON SISTERS . . . 
{Continued from Page 2) 

clans of California, practicing in San 
Diego and Sacramento, and serving 
the Order of the Native Daughters 
of the Golden West, as Grand Presi- 
dent in 1929. Irma Heilbron grad- 
uated from San Diego Normal 
School, now San Diego State, in 
1908, and taught for more than 40 
years In the San Diego Schools, most 
of the time at Sherman Elementary. 




PGP Fern Adams 

SEPTEMBER, 1970 



One of the last happy events in her 
life, was serving as Chairman of the 
Evening, at the Golden Anniversary 
of San Diego Parlor, on April 10, 
1965, when she received her 50 year 
pin from Fern E. Adams, who was 
Grand President at that time. 

Anna, Alice and Caroline married 
and raised families, living to see their 
great grand children. Caroline, at the 
time of her death in 1965, was a 
member of San Fernando Mission, 
No. 280, where she received honor, 
as a past president. She had looked 
forward to attending the Golden 
Anniversary of San Diego, her first 
Parlor, but she passed on in Febru- 
ary, missing it by little over a month. 

The Order gave much to these 
sisters, and In return, they gave much 
to the Order. May we see them again 
in the bright tomorrow. 

(by Carolyn RIggs, daughter of 
Caroline. In Memorium to my 
Aunts and Mother.) 



TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY 

On June 14th, 1944. in the thir- 
tieth year of membership in the 
Native Daughters of the Golden 
West, 1 was installed as Grand Presi- 
dent, in the city of San Jose. It was 
was a joyous occasion, yet filled with 
apprehension, as it was at the very 
height of World War II. 

We were faced with gas rationing, 
food rationing, clothing and shoe 
rationing. Travel was difficult be- 
cause of the gasoline shortage, and 
therfore it was necessary to attend 
official visits by Greyhound bus. 
Many of our projects were conducted 
under the heading of "War Activ- 
ities'". Native Daughters throughout 
the state worked together as a unit to 
further the principles of our organiz- 
ation. 

Five new parlors were instituted, 
through the splendid work of ap- 
pointed organizers. They were Toluca 
No. 179, San Fernando Mission No. 
180, San Gabriel Valley No. 181, La 
Tijera No. 1 82 and Ramona No. 
183. Many parlors had large "Class 
Initiations" and the gain in member- 
ship was greater than we had had 
for some time. This of course was 
most gratifying. 




PGP Emily E. Ryan and Jr. PGP 
Nancy J. Conens. 



In January 1945. in response to 
a communication received from the 
War Department, reg.nrding the cur- 
tailment of conventions, it was nec- 
essary to call a special meeting of 
the Grand Officers to San Francisco 
and after much deliberation, sign 
away my forthcoming Grand Parlor 
of June 1945. As a Women's Patriot- 
ic Organization, we felt that this 
WAS our duty. 

A nominating committee was 
appointed, the first, and to the pre- 
sent time, the only one in the his- 
tory of our Order. This was for the 
purpose of nominating candidates for 
Grand Parlor Office. The voting 
would have to be done by mail. 

On June 19, 1945, a three day 
"War Conference" was called to 
order at the Century Club in San 
Francisco. It consisted of fifteen 
Grand Officers, twenty Past Grand 
■Presidents and two permanent mem- 
bers, a total of thirty two accredited 
members, plus the Supervising Dis- 
trict Deputy of San Francisco 
County, May L. MacDonald and a 
few of her Deputies, some members 
of Las Lomas Parlor (my parlor) 
and a few local visitors, about sixty 
people in all. A long way from the 
usual number at Grand Parlor, and 
somewhat disappointing, to say the 
least. Four hundred and ten ballots 
{Continued on Page 10) 

PAGE 9 



PGP RYAN . . . 
(Continued from Page 9) 

were received by mail which the ap- 
pointed Board of Election took care 
of. 

On Wednesday evening a class 
of forty-two Native Daughters was 
initiated, a nice addition to our mem- 
bership. During this week, "History 
was in the Making" in San Francisco. 
The United Nations were holdins: 
their first conference in the Veteran s 
War Memorial Building, their eftorts 
being directed toward PEACI-. And 
incidentally, they have just completed 
their 25th Conference in San Fran- 
cisco. Another anniversary. 

In January 1969, Grand Vice- 
President Nancy J. Concns, who had 
been reading my 1944-45 Proceed- 
ings, wrote and asked me if she 
might use the Pass Word that had 
been assigned by me for that year. It 
had been appropriate then and she 
felt that it was even more so at this 
time. I felt very much honored and 
naturally gave consent. She also said 
she would like — in some way — to 
share her Grand Parlor with me. 

On the night of Installation of 
Grand Officers on June 19. 1969, 
in Los Banos, Grand President - 
Elect, Nancy Conens had arranged 
that immediately following the escort 
of all the Past Grand Presidents to 
the stage, there was to be a special 
escort of me by my Supervising 
District Deputy of 1944-45, Louise 
Benedetti. It was then announced that 
I was starting the celebration of my 
25th anniversary as Grand Presi- 
dent. And that was really the begin- 
ning of a most wonderful year. 

It was my privilege, during 
Nancy's year as Grand President, to 
visit the five Parlors that had been 
instituted in 1944-45, on the occas- 
ion of their official visit from her, 
and many courtesies were extended 
to me through her kindness. It v/as 
also most gratifying to find these 
parlors in very fine condition and a 
definite asset to their respective 
communities. 

And now to the 84th Annual 
Session of the Grand Parlor, held in 
Oakland, at the Oakland Hilton Inn. 

PAGE 10 



At the reception on Sunday even- 
ing, many of the Past Grand Presi- 
dents were escorted by their respect- 
ive Supervising Deputy Grand Presi- 
dents, too. On Monday morning, at 
the conclusion of the Opening Cere- 
monies, I was escorted to the Altar, 
then to the stage, where I remained 
for the entirety of the Session, ob- 
serving and participating in all of 
the procedures. The Alameda County 
Convention Committee presented me 
with a beautiful silver bowl; the 
Emily's of 1944-45, a silver butter 
dish: my Parlor, Lo.i Lomas sent a 
delegation of members and made a 
presentation of a lovely silver gift. 
At the annual Past Grand Presi- 
dent's dinner I received the "Silver 
Charm Bracelet" that I had looked 
forward to receiving, as well as many, 
many personal gifts from the "Col- 
lege of Past Grands"; corsages and 
gifts from "the children of my Par- 
lors" to their "Mother", from the 
San Francisco lunch on Tuesday, the 
Supervisor and many Native Daugh- 
ters, an overwhelming monetary gift. 
The third week in June was like 
Christmas week in December. 

When Grand President Nancy was 
to be escorted from the room on 
Thursday afternoon, at the conclu- 
sion of a most successful, beautifully 
conducted Grand Parlor, she handed 
me her gavel, so that I might stand 
at the Podium in her place and share 
these last moments with her. Even 
as I write this, my eyes are filled 
with tears of gratitude. 

May I, through the pages of the 
to the California Herald, extend m\ 
humble and very sincere thanks to 
Junior Past Grand President Nancy 
J. Conens for her generosity to me. 
to the Alameda County Convention 
Committee, The Emily's, Lav Lomas 
Parlor, Grand Officers, Past Grand 
Presidents, the Ragonettcs Junior 
Native Daughters Choral and ALL 
Native Daughters of the Golden West 
and many friends for making this 
one of the very happiest years of m\ 
fraternal and personal life — allow- 
ing me to re-live the "War Con- 
ference" of 1945 with a "real Native 
Daughter Convention". 

I feel that I have now. on my 
25th annivcrsan,-. fully completed my 



year as Grand President, and to all 
who have helped in any way to 
make it possible, I can truly say 
"Mission Accomplished" and may 
God Bless each of you through all 
the years ahead. 

Sincerely and fraternally, 
Emily E. Ryan, Past Grand 
President, NDGW 



NEW OFFICKRS I.NSTALI.ED 




Jessie Stearns became the new Presi- 
dent of Annie K. Bidwell No. 168. 
Pictured from left are DGP Zada 
Harcom: Jessie Stearns and COS 
Icel Beers. 

Ithc lighter 
i side of it i 



"Bu( why," demanded t h e puzzled 
judge, "did you break into the same store 
three nights running?" 

"Well. Judge, you see. I picked out a 
dress for mv wife, and had lo change it 
twice." 



Basically, there are two types of math 
you can learn in school The new math 
— if you want to he creative, imagina- 
tive, and forward thinking. And the old 
math — if you want to be right. 



"Nothing is impossible!" 
"No? Have you ever tried getting off 
of a mailing list?" 



A high-school teacher displays the fol- 
lowing sales pitch on his bulletin hoard: 
"FREE. Every Monday through Friday 
Knowledge. BRING YOUR OWN 
CONTAINERS." 



Advertisement in a Wisconsin paper: 
"Wanted, clean-living dairy helper. If you 
drink, gamble or eat margarme. don't 
iipply". 

CALIFORNIA HERALO 



SANTA MARIA 

On August 4 in an open cerc- 
I mony, Nellie Anderson was installed 
as president of Santa Maria No. 
1 276. A native of Arroyo Grande, 
she has been a resident of Santa 
1 Maria since 1923. Her four daugh- 
ters all of whom were graduated 
from Santa Maria High School, in- 
clude M m e s. George Sheperd of 
i Garden Grove; Carol Sorenson, 
Philip Snow and Manuel Miranda of 
Santa Maria. There are also 13 
grandchildren to help her celebrate 
her 10 years in Native Daughters. 

Colors of the newly installed 
■ president are pink and lavendar, 
which were depicted throughout the 
hall, entry way and dining room in 
the picture of a flower garden. Her 
theme for the year is "Friendship". 

Installed also were Mmes. Bailey, 
Mehlschau, Azevedo, Wilkanoski. 
Powell, Carr, Speakers, Dal Porto, 
Kortner. Cave, Rodriguez and Mc- 
Callister. 

DGP Mary Rule and her corps 
of officers of La Purisima No. 327 
were installing officer. PGP Eileen 
Dismuke from Tierra de Oro No. 



304 also assisted 
Pledge of Honor. 



by giving the 





SDDGP Mary Louise Days 



Mary Louise Days, SDDGP of 
District 31, Edith Webster of Tierra 
de Oro newly appointed DGP to 
Santa Maria and also members from 
San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara 
and Lompoc were present. 



GRACE 

Grace Parlor No. 242 had a most 
successful garage sale on August 28 
and 29 in Fullerton. The annual 
Admission Day Picnic was enjoyed 
at Kracmer Park, Placentia, on 
September 9. A progressive dinner, 
preceded the September third meet- 
ing starting at the home of Elizabeth 
Pittman, Garden Grove. The entree 
was the home of Charlottce Has- 
son's in Anaheim and the dessert 
at the meeting hall in Fullerton. 



HISTORIC ADOBE RESTORED 

The Sanchez Adobe, located near 
the sea at Pacifica, for nearly a 
century and a quarter has been re- 
garded as a "classic example" of 
durability of the early day mud con- 
struction architecture of California 
and the Southwest. 

(Continued on Pa^e 15) 




^ Patio 3 lor lit 



1613 East First Street 
Santa Ana, Calif. 92701 

Telephone 
543-7612 or 543-3038 

AL and PHYLLIS BUTCHER 



THE BASLER HOME 



CONVALESCENT i ELDERLY 
24-Hour Nursing Service 

Tray Service 



Excellent Meals 



LARGE CHEERFUL ROOMS 
ADJOINING BATHS & SUNDECKS 

Life Membership or Monthly Rates 

542-3514 

1015 N. Broadway Santa Ana 



(Ot 



MILK 



lasfes so fresh beoause NS 

926 E. First Street, Santa Ana 
Phone 547-7031 



EL 


TOBRITO 


TACOS and BURRITOS 


5th 


and Bristol 1 


Santa Ana, California 



PGP Eileen Dismuke 

SEPTEMBER. 1970 



In Santa Ana 
OWL DRUG STORE 

1002 E. 17TH STREET 

547-6655 

Sam Calabrese 




In Orange 
WATSON'S DRUG 

116 E. CHAPMAN 

532-6315 

Jim Calabrese 



Prescriptions and Sundries Serving Orange County Since 1912 

MASTERCHARGE and BANKAMERICARD • FREE DELIVERY 



PAGE 11 



RANCHO . . . 
{Coniinued from Faf^e 5) 

Street ) and on the northeast by 
26th Street. All of it lying well 
within the boundaries of Rancho 
San Vicente y Santa Monica. Tre- 
mendous credit must be given 
Baker and Jones for their vision 
and accomplishment in building a 
beautiful city on the serene old 
Rancho. Today the city of Santa 
Monica is a prosperous active com- 
munity of over 90,000 residents; 
beautiful homes and parks; many 
big industries, magnificent buildings, 
smart shops and a tremendous 
future. 

But this story concerns the 
courageous, industrious very early- 
day pioneer, Don Francisco Sepul- 
veda, who first came to Southern 
California one hundred and eighty- 
nine years ago. . . in 1781. when 
California was a wilderness larnJ. 
He raised a fine large family here 
and. when in 1828 the grant to 
Rancho San Vicente y Santa Monica 
was given him. as he, himself, ex- 
plained in part, it was because of 
"his having been an old soldier of 
the country and having worked at 
the most painful period, when 
wandering amidst nomadic tribes, 
suffering untold privations and in 
constant danger of life." 

Mrs. Lillian M. Stratton, history 
and landmarks chairman, was in 
charge of the marking ceremony. 
Descendants of Don Sepulveda at- 
tending the marking in addition to 
E r 1 i n d a Eastman were Ignacio 
Sepulveda, a great-great grandson; 
and Joseph Barnes, a great-great- 
great grandson. Another descend- 
ant. Princess Conchita Sepulveda 
Pignatelli, for many years a well- 
known newspaper writer for the 
Los Angeles Examiner, is a great- 
grand-daughter of Don Francisco. 
She is the daughter of the late Judge 
Ignacio Sepulveda, one of Southern 
California's most respected jurists. 
Judge Sepulveda was the son of 
Don Jose Sepulveda, Francisco's 
eldest son. Don Jose once owned the 
49,000 acre Rancho San Joaquin, 

PAGE 12 




Benjamin Flint 




Llewellyn Bi.xhy. right shown with his wife, the former Sarah Hathwav. 
This was their wedding picture. 

CALIFORNIA HERALO 




James Irvine, Jr., the son of original owner of the Irvine Ranch in Orange 

County. 



in Orange County but sold it in 
1864 to James Irvine, Dr. Ben- 
jamin Flint and Llewellyn Bixby. 
pioneer Southern California land 
owners. It became a part of the vast 
Irvine Ranch. 

Assisting Mrs. Stratton in pre- 
senting the "marking" ceremony 
were Mrs. Senaida Sullivan, an 8th 





GT Laura Blosdale 

West present that evening were 
Past Grand Presidents Mary Bar- 
den, of Santa Monica and June 
Goldie, of San Gabriel. Mrs. Goldie 
is 1970-71 state chairman of his- 



PGT 
Senaida Sullivan 



generation Californian. the parlor's 
civic participation chairman and 
.Mrs. Laura Blosdale, NDGW grand 
trustee. Among representatives of 
the Native Daughters of the Golden 

SEPTEMBER, 1970 




tory and landmarks. Also attend- 
ing was parlor deputy Mrs. Faye 
MacFarlane, of Granada Hills. 

Beverly Hills Parlor is greatly 
indebted to W. W. Robinson, of 
Los Angeles, eminent Californian 
historian, for his interest and assist- 
ance. He advised in the wording of 
the bronze plaque so that facts and 
figures would be correct. His ex- 
cellent book, "R a n c h o Becomes 
Cities," includes a complete and 
historically accurate story of Rancho 
San Vicente y Santa Monica. 



MARYSVILLE 

The history of t h e Marysville 
Parlor, Native Daughters of the 
Golden West, was reviewed by Mrs. 
William Eden at the 62nd birthday 
anniversary of the parlor in the 
Yuba-Sutter Jewish Centre. 

The parlor was instituted in 1908, 
Elizabeth Delay was the president. 
Of the 24 charter members, four are 
still living: Mrs. Ena Wells and 
Mrs. Ada Lewis of Marysville, Mrs. 
Matt Boyd of Yuba City and Mrs. 
Mae Cutler of San Francisco. Mrs. 
Elizabeth Ries was presented her 50 
year pin by President Evelyn Briggs; 
Mrs. Eden, her 25 year pin by 
Mamie Meier. Unable to attend to 
receive their pins were Mrs. Elsie 
Weber (50 year) and Mrs. Clarence 
McCrank (25 year). 




PGP June Goldie 



A red, white and blue arrange- 
ment of Shasta daisies was used on 
the dining table, American and Bear 
flags completed the setting. A birth- 
day cake centered the head table. 

Hostesses were Mmes. Case, Hus- 
ton and Binninger. 

Introduced were Alberta Sargent, 
DGP to Mar y s v i 1 1 e and Mrs. 
Fortna, SDDGP of District eight. 
Mrs. Seirgent and her corps of 
officers installed the officers of 
Marysville Parlor. Mary Monahan 
was chairman of the evening. 

At the birthday dinner were guests 
from South Butte, Oak Leaf, Catrr 
Far West and Mission San Jose. 

PAGE 13 



18th Annual Conference — Junior N.D.G.W. 

To. All Junior and Senior Members of the Native Daughters of the Golden 
West you are cordially invited to attend the ISth Annual Conference 
of the Junior Native Daughters of the Golden West on October 9, 10, 
and 1 1 at the Edgcwatcr Hyatt House. 455 Hegenbcrger Road, 
Oakland. 

Schedule of Events 

FRIDAY — OCTOBER 9 

7-8:30 P.M. REGISTRATION— Foyer of Alameda Room 

8:30 P.M. AMATEUR NIGHT — Informal entertainment by various 

Units — Hayward Room 

SATURDAY — OCTOBER 10 

8-9:30 A.M. REGISTRATION — Foyer of Alameda Room 

9:30 A.M. CONFERENCE SESSION CALLED TO ORDER — 

Alameda Room 

12:30 - 1 :30 P.M. INFORMAL BUFFET LUNCH — Hayward Room 

$2.50 includes tax and tip 

1:30-5:30 CONFERENCE BUSINESS SESSION — Alameda Room 

Election of Junior State Officers. Presentation of Awards 

7:00 P.M. FORMAL BANQUET — Hayward Room $5.00 includes 

tax and tip. Honoring Junior State President Leealyn Baker and her 

Officers. 

8:30 P.M. INSTALLATION OF NEW OFFICERS — A 1 a m e d a 
Room 

SUNDAY — OCTOBER 11 "Playday" 

11:00 A.M. "OLD FASHIONED" COUNTRY PICNIC — Historic 
Hidden Valley Ranch, Mission San Jose District of Fremont, California. 
Swimming, Ball Diamond, Volleyball and Badminton Courts. Horse- 
shoe pitching, also green lawns for sunbathing and sack races, balloon 
stomps, etc. PRIZES! 

Lunch provided by Hostess Unit. Come early - stay late. Admission 
fee: Ages 6-15. 50C 16-19 75t; 20 and up $1.00. 
While in Fremont, take a short drive to Mission San Jose de Guada- 
lupe. Open 10 A.M. - 5 P.M. Admission fee - 25(1;. 

Hotel Reservations and tickets for the Luncheon and Banquet must be 
secured from State Chairman Dolores Ferenz, 3306 Alton Court, Fremont, 
by Friday, September 25, 1970. 

The Grand Parlor Committee for Junior Native Daughters, Fruitvale Junior 
Unit and their Advisors look foward to greeting manv of you to witness 
our "JUNIORS IN ACTION". 





A 


N 


A H E 


1 M 




SAVINGS 


AND 


LOAN 


ASSOCIATION 


Dorothy Y. Ulvestad, President 






J. Bernard 


Soto, Exec. Vice-Pres. 


construction loans 


r 


escrow < 


refinancing 


f collections 


(Main Office) 












ANAHEIM 




HUNTINGTON BEACH 


BREA 


187 W. Lincoln Avenue 




411 Main Street 


770 


South Brca Blvd 


PRopcct 2-1S32 






LEhi(t< «-CS9l 




Ph. sn-4«7t 



PAGE 14 



FORREST— 75lh BIRTHDAY 

The City of Plymouth was in the 
spotlight, when Forrest No. 86 cele- 
brated its 75th anniversary. More 
than 130 Native Daughters, Native 
Sons and guests attended the event 
in the Plymouth Elementary School. I 
Boy Scout Troop No. 502 Plymouth 
presented the colors and the Invoca- 
tion was gven by SDDGP Margaret 
Boitano of Ursula No. 1. 

President of the Parlor, Eva Vaira 
welcomed those in attendance and 
then introduced the following Grand 
Officers escorted by Kathleen 
Mierkey. Grand President Irene 
Bondanza, Jr. PGP Nancy J. 
Conens, GVP Virgilia McComb^ 
GM Rae Rominger, GTs Helen ' 
McCarthy, Mercdyth Burnette and 
June Painter, GIS Dolores Ferenz. 
Also introduced were PGPs Ethel 
Enos, Audrey D. Brown and Norm.i 
Hodson. 

GVP David Mason, NSGW pre- 
sented Grand President Irene Bon- 
danza with a gift in behalf of the 
Native Sons. 

Sadie Tippett, 68 year member 
was unable to attend but 54 year 
member Celia Sharwood was pre- 
sent. Mary Sausman, Phydella Crain 
and Melba M. Withrow received 25 
year embelems presented by the 
Grand President. j 

The original 75 year old hand' 
painted badges of Forrest Parlor 
were worn by the hostesses, Mmes. 
Vaira. Withrow. R. Mierkey. K 
Mierkey. French, Emerson. Mailhot. 
Foyil, and Deppner. 

Forrest Parlor had its beginning 
in the fertile ftx>thills of the Mother 
Lode on August 2. 1895 

f f * 
SAN FRANCISCO DEPUTIES 

The first meeting of the San 
San Francisco County Deputies for 
1970-71 was held at the home of 
SDDGP Edna Garaventa, of San 
Francisco No. 261. Plans are being 
made to have a reception and te.i 
honoring Grand President, Irene 
Bondanza of San Francisco No. 261. 
The reception will be held at the 
Scottish Rite, 19th Avenue and 
Sloat Blvd., Sunday afternoon, 
October 18th. 1970. Plenty of park- 
ing space available. Claire Brake of 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



:>olores No. 169 has been appointed 
rhairman. All deputies will be on 
he committee. 



VHITTIER 

Whittier No. 298 held installation 
3f officers on August 19, 1970 
3GP Leona Carter of Poppy Trail 
vas the installing Officer, assisted 
jy members of her parlor. Mildred 
VIcGee was re-installed as president 
vith the following corps of officers: 
Vlmes. Costantino, Sanders, Wool- 
;ey. Tutt, Funk, Sherman, Cooper. 
>mith, Giancopuzzi, Joseph, Didier. 
Estrada and Doss. 

An Hawaiian motif was used and 
the hall was like a huge garden with 
its beautiful floral arrangements. 

The Parlor's new DGP Edna 
Greenwald of Rancho San Jose No. 
307, was presented at the altar and 
escorted to her seat of honor. There 
were members from Pasadena No. 
290, Poppy Trail No. 266, Rancho 
San Jose No. 307, Grace No. 242. 
Santa Ana No. 235 and Wilmington 
No. 278. Delicious refreshments 
were served following the Install- 
ation. 



CIEN ANOS 

Mrs. Kenneth Hawkins was in- 
stalled as President of Cien Anas 
No. 303 at an open installation, 
conducted by installing officer Lil- 
lian Koeppel and other members of 
Poppy Trail No. 266. Mrs. Hawkins' 
theme for the evening, "Love Amer- 
ican Style" was beautifully exempli- 




fied in decorations and refreshments 
by installation chairman PP Mar- 
garet Pacheco and her committee. 
Opening Chairman was PP Joan 
Calderwood. 

Laura Nesbit, niece of Mrs. Haw- 
kins, lighted the candles on the altar 
on which Laura Furton later placed 
ithc Bible. Colors were presented by 
Dennis Matthews and Mike Mahur- 
in. Escorts for the new president 
were members of Estrellas de Oro 
Junior Unit No. 37 and handing 

SEPTEMBER, 1970 



out the programs was Adrianne 
Oakmen, PP of the Junior Unit. 

Other officers installed were 
Mmes. Hanson, Nesbit, Metzger, 
Palas, Adsit, Elofson, Bone, Adsit. 
Roatcap, Sylvester, Vines, Matthews. 
Coxe, Manges, and Pacheco. 

The anual Luau was held Septem- 
ber 12th, at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Carl Palas in Downey. It was 
a great success. 



ADOBE RESTORED . . . 
(Continued from Page 11) 

Now it has been completely re- 
stored by the San Mateo County 
Historical Association as a "rich 
illustration of the unique way" Mexi- 
can settlement builders "did it in the 
beginning." 

Dr. Leslie Merrill, association 
director, pointed out during a tour 
that the state's original "roofed and 
straight walled" structures were 
fashioned from the material they 
stood on and were literally built from 
the ground up. 

The secret was in wide roof over 
hangs protecting adobe bricks 
fashioned from wet dirt scooped 
from any surface, he pointed out. 
Without these lids, rain would 
have returned the bricks to mud. 

The Sanchez adobe shows each 
brick of the exterior and illustrates 
the resourcefulness that went into 
the building, Merrill said. 

The two-story hotise was com- 
pleted in 1 846 by Francisco Sanchez, 
who moved here from San Francisco, 
where he had served as alcalde 
several terms. 

His father, Jose, one time com- 
mandante of the San Francisco 
Presidio, owned the vast surrounding 
Rancho Buri Buri, and Francisco 
had received a grant from the Mexi- 
can government of a coastal strip. 

But the history of the white man 
on the property predated that of the 
Sanchez tenancy, for the padres at 
historic Mission Dolores had raised 
crops and cattle on it, Merrill re- 
called. 

The restored adobe will be main- 
tained as a museum by San Mateo 
County. 



-m. MIMBBJIAM 




Not lost to those that love them. 
Not dead, just gone before; 

They still live in our memory. 
And they will forever more. 



Jessie Marriott, Alta No. 3, June. 
Josephine Foster, Genevieve No. 132, 

June 10. 
Manuelita Aldecoa, Joaquin No. 5, July 

10. 
Marie Trathen, Manzanita No. 29, July 

8. 
Kathryn Jansen, Aleli No. 102, July 9. 
Muriel Wright. Vendome No. 100, July 

9. 
Irma Heilbron, San Diego No. 208, July 

11. 
Ethel Douglas, Sebastopol No. 265, July 

7. 
Gertrude Pratt, Vendome No. 100, July 

12. 
Mary Battenfeld, Naomi No. 36, June 8. 
Annie Schumacher, Gold of Ophir No. 

190, July 5. 
Roberta Frowein, La Tijera No. 282, 

June 4. 
Audrey Good, Twin Peaks No. 185, July 

17. 
Evelyn Bashline, El Pajaro No. 35, July 

22. 
Bessie Maggert, Bear Flag No. 151. June 

25. 
Freda Germain, Bear Flag No. 151. July 

5. 
Barbara Rodgers, Anona No. 164, June 

26. 
Alice Estrada, Betsy Ross No. 238, May 

14. 
Irma S. Murray, Aloha No. 106, July 30. 
Ruth Wystozki, Lugonia No. 241, July 

31. 
Hdith Wood, Twin Peaks No. 185, Aug- 
ust 2. 
Myrtle Marley. Santa Ana No. 235, Aug- 

ILSt 4. 



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LIMITEf) EDITION 



SPECIAL COLUCTlOrrS 




Official Publication of 

THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




OCTODEI \ 1970 -► 40«t 



OLIVERA STREET. JUST OFF THE PLAZA 



SAN Jl'AN BAITISU 

The San Juan Bautista Native 
Daughter Adobe was the setting for 
a delightful luncheon and fashion 
show. Just fifty tickets were avail- 
able and it was a complete sell-out. 

There were five tables set in the 
dining room with ten place settings 
at each table that was covered with 
white tablecloths. Virginia Creeper 
was laid down the center of each 
table and red delicious apples and 
red peppers were used as decora- 
tions. A large basket of fruit, 




""llHiillliilliilillll iini!i!!"'JililllHM: 

■ "■ J" " j* X '' j?T?iBBr 



California Herald 

■PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 
Volume XVIIl October, 1970 Number 



i 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

i 
Days of the Doiias, by Leo J. Friis 3 I 

The Grand President's Comer 6 

i 
I 

Official Directory of N.D.G.W. Parlors 7 j 

Parlor News 11, 

In Memoriam 12 



.SV(// Juan Bciiiiista i\l)UH Adobe. 

tomatoes, red peppers and colorful 
gourds graced a special tabic that 
held twelve door prizes. 

Large bouquets of marigolds, 
daisies and yellow marguerites were 
the decor. 

The luncheon consisted of a 
fruited chicken salad, rolls, butter, 
coffee and tea and for dessert a 
generous helping of "angel food 
delight." Mrs. William Hill provided 
background piano music while the 
models displayed the beautiful 
dresses, both dressy and casual and 
pant suits from "The Watering 
Trough". Mrs. Arnaldo Andreazzi, 
commentator, described each cos- 
fume as the models entered the 
room. Door prizes were then award- 
ed. 

The models were: Mmes. Cul- 
lumbcr, Lavagnino Jr., Dias Sr., 
Day and ihc Misses Johnston, 
Farney, Bakich and Caetano. 

This affair was to celebrate 
Founders Day. The proceeds will 
go to the Native Daughters of the 
Cioldcn West Childrcns Foundation. 
I h e committee in charge of the 
successful event were Chairman 
Mrs. Anthony Botelho, and Mmes. 
lavagnino Jr., Gucrra, Lucchelli. 
Lyons and Miss McAlcer. 

PAGE 2 




J. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



For 56c 

a week more 

you can live f lamelessly. 




Does it cost a lot to 
live in a Medallion 
All-Electric Home? 
Without gas? To get 
the facts, we compared 
utility costs of typical 
homes using gas and 
electricity with homes 
using only electricity. 
The average cost was 



56^ a week more for 
electric homes. For an 
average of 56^ more 
a week, wouldn't you 
rather have the con- 
veniences and com- 
forts of electric living? 



Southern California Edison 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JA.NE FRIIS 

Public Rclarioni 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Frns. owners and publishers. Anahaiin, 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 
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printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



^aus 



H 



m ik(^ 







Two story Leunis adobe in Calaha.i 



^ ALiFORNiANiANs have a special 
^^£^ affection for that great period 
in their history which has been called 
the Spanisli Arcadia.. No doubt the 
passing of time has added a certain 
glamour to early California ranch 
life, but no one will deny it posessed 
an idyllic charm. 

The ranch period extended over 
half a century and during that time 
much impro\cment was made in 
living conditions. All homes were 
made of adobe bricks. Many of them 
were one-story houses with flat 
roofs, although in later years the 
wealthier rancheros erected more 
pretentious 2-story structures. Floc^ 
of hardened earth or tile were bare. 
as rugs and carpets wcrr rcin^iikTcl 
unsanitary. 

(Coiuiir 



OCTOBER. 1970 



DAYS OF THE DONS . 
(C\>niiniieil I rout I'agv 3) 




A i LEFT — Chapel at Rancho 

(luajome in San Diego County. This 

was one of the largest private 

c/iapels of its time. 



AT RUIHT — Spacious parlor of 

Arcadia Bandini Baker de Stearns 

in the Baker Block, Los Angeles. 




PAGE 4 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



TOP RIGHT — Don Juan Bandini 

and Ids daughter, Ysidora, who 

married Lt. Cave J. Couts. 



The early homes had no chimneys 
and were heated with braziers. 
There was no window glass until the 
American traders came. House fur- 
nishings were originally simple, but 
improved in quantity and quality 
with purchases from the traders. 
Housewives treasured their camphor 
wood chests, covered with leather 
and edged with brass. These baules 
varied in length from 14 inches to 
four feet. 

{Continued on Page 13) 





LOWER LEFT — Parlor at Gua- 

jonie Rancho, owned by Lt. Cave 

Couts. 



OCTOBER, 1970 



PAGE 5 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GRAND PKKSIDHNT 

Irene Bondanza (Mrs. Joseph) 

2328 Union Street 

San Francisco. California 94123 




IRENE BONDANZA 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 

2271 -32nd Avenue 

San Francisco, California 94116 

Office: 703 Market Suect, Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



PRESIDENTS MESSAGE 

Our Order was founded on prin- 
ciples of infinite dignity and worth. 
Thus our aims, objectives, and pro- 
jects have brought us personal satis- 
faction. But even with all this, one 
of the great assests of the Native 
Daughters of the Golden West is 
friendship. 

Today as I write my heart is full. 
I have a sense of sadness, nostalgia 
for a great Native Daughter .... 
Past Grand Secretary Irma S. Mur- 
ray. She was a special Native 
Daughter to me and formed a bond 
that 1 would like to pass on to 
future Native Daughters. 

Irma Murray's service to the 
Order of the Native Daughters of 
the Golden West was essential. Her 
talent and diligence was recognized 
throughout the State. Quality of 
service was always foremost. 

As a young girl she came to our 
Grand Parlor Office and lent de- 
voted assistance to our beloved late 
Grand Secretary Sallic R. Thaler. 
After the death of her dear friend 
Sallie. Irma Murray accepted the 
position of Grand Secretary and 
displayed her sense of responsibility 
and trust. Irma Murray, like her 
predecessor, knew when to advise, 
when to counsel, when to hold back. 
Over the years I appreciated her 
willingness to help. She was object- 
ive in her evaluations, understand- 
ing and concerned. 

Irma Murray, a devoted wife, 
mother, sister, civic worker, and 
Past Grand Secretary, answered the 
call of the Master dh Inly 30. 1970. 

PAGE 6 



Stinerar^ 1970 



OCTOBER 

4 Mariposa No. 63 Mariposa* 

6 Dardanelle No. 66, Golden Era No. 99, Anona No. 164 Sonera* 

8 Ursula No. 1, Chispa No. 40, Amapola No. 80 Sutter Creek* 

9-11 Junior Native Daughters Conference Oakland 

14 Naomi No. 36 Downievillc* 

15 La Bandera No. 110, Calijia No. 22 and 

Rio Rito No. 253 Sacramento* 

17-18 Grand Officers Meeting 

18 San Francisco Deputies Reception 

19 Auburn No. 233, Placer No. 138 Auburn* 

20 Susanville No. 243, Nataqua No. 152 Susanville* 

22 San Juan No. 315, Fern No. 123 Carmichael* 

24 Childrens Foundation Luncheon Concord 

26 Santa Cruz No. 26, El Pajaro No. 36 Santa Cruz* 

28 Morada No. 199 Modesto* 



NOVEMBER 

1 Childrens Foundation Bruncheon OrovilJe 

2 Berryessa No. 192, Olivia No. 309 Willows* 

4 Hiawatha No. 140, Berendos No. 23, Cainillia No. 41, 

Lassen View No. 98 Redding* 

9 Eshcol No. 16 Napa* 

10 Woodland No. 90 Woodland* 

12 Sequoia No. 272, Bear Flag No. 151 and 

Argonaut No. 166 Oakland* 

17 Richmond No. 147, Albany No. 260 and 

Cerrito de Oro No. 306 Richmond* 

18 Lomitas No. 255 Los Banos* 

19 Las Juntas No. 221, Las Amigas No. 311 Concord* 

24 Brooklyn No. 157, Aloha No. 106 and 

Berkeley No. 150 „ „ Oakland* 

26 Thanksgiving 

* Official visits are marked with astericks 



To her dear ones, her sister mem- 
bers in Aloha Parlor No. 106, my 
heartfelt sympathy. 

God willing, I will preside at 
Grand Parlor in San Francisco in 
June l')7l. I will miss my dear 
friend, Irma. whose confidence I 
shared over the years. I owe much 
to her and will always be aware of 
her ureal deeds. God bless her! 



the 



SOR 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



U,d.G.W. d I RECTORY 



GRAND OFFICERS — 1970-1971 
Grand President 

Irene Bondanza (Mrs. Joseph) San Francisco 
No. 261, 2328 Union St., San Francisco 
94123. 

Junior Past Grand President 
Nancy J. Conens (Mrs.) Piedmont No. 87, 4311 
Allendale Ave., Oakland 94619. 

Grand Vice President 

Virgilia McCombs (Mrs. C. F.) Morada No. 199. 

1241 Normandy Drive, Modesto 95351 

Grand Marshal 

Rae E. Rominger (Mrs.) La Bandera No. 110, 
2841 - 69th Ave., Sacramento 95822. 

Grand Secretary 
Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) Alta No. 3, 
2271-32nd Ave., San Francisco 94116. Office, 
703 Market St., Rm. 612, San Francisco 
94103. Telephone: (415) 362-4127. 

Chairman, Board of Grand Trustees 
3etty Read Curilich (Mrs.) Ursula No. 1, 41 
Curilich Lane, Jackson 95642. 

Grand Trustees 

Lila S. Hummel (Mrs. Leonard) La Tijera No. 

282, 836 E. Grand Ave., El Segundo 90245. 
Marian E. McGuire (Mrs. Paul 8.) Berkeley No. 

150. 652 Wildcat Road. Berkeley 94708. 
Helen C. McCarthy (Mrs. James P.) Utopia No. 

252. 4064 - 18th St., San Francisco 94114. 
Meredyth Burnette (Mrs. Paul B.) Dardanelle 

No. 66, P.O. Box 1124, Sonora 95370. 
Laura Blosdale (Mrs. Frank) Beverly Hills No. 

289. 1563 Brockton Ave., Los Angeles 90025. 
June Painter (Mrs. Carl) Lomitas No. 255, 

22321 W. Sunset, Los Banos 93635. 

Grand Inside Sentinel 

Dolores M. Ferenz (Mrs. James) Hayward No. 
122, 3306 Alton Ct., Fremont 94536. 

Grand Outside Sentinel 

Icel Beers (Mrs. T.) Annie K. Bidwell No. 

168, Rt. 1, Box 286, Glenn 95943. 

Grand Organist 

Gracie Scott (Mrs. Robt.) San Juan No. 315, 
5021 Jackson St., N. Highlands 95660. 



PAST GRAND PRESIDENTS N.D.G.W. 

1931— Estelle M. Evans (Mrs. Ellis) Antioch 
No. 223, 314 West 5th Street, Antioch 
94509. 
1932— Evelyn I. Carlson (Mrs.) Dolores No. 169. 
1308 Hoover Street, Apt. 1, Menio Park 
94025 
1934— Irma W. Laird (Mrs. Ralph) Alturas No. 

159, Alturas 96101 
1937— Florence D. Boyle (Mrs.) Gold of Ophir 
Parlor No. 190, P.O. Box 1743, Oroville 
95965 
1938— Ethel Begley (Mrs.) Marinita No. 198 
233 Prospect Ave., San Francisco 94110 
1940 — Orinda G. Giannini (Mrs. Raymond) Orin- 
da No. 56, 2822 35th Avenue, San Fran- 
cisco 94116 
1941— Hazel B. Hansen (Mrs. Louis) Verdugo 
No. 240, 535 N. Howard Street, Glendale 
91205 
1942— Clarice E. Gilchrist (Mrs.) Caliz de Oro 
No. 206, 25 Seaview Ave., Piedmont 
94611. 
1943 — Claire Lindsey (Mrs.) Golden Gate No. 
158, 131 Larkspur Drive, Santa Rosa 
95405. 
1944— Mary B. Barden (Mrs. Harold) Californ- 
iana No. 247, 320 22nd St., Santa Monica 
90402 
1945— Emily E. Ryan (Mrs.) Las Lomas No. 72, 
1371 - 48th Ave., Apt. 201, San Francisco 
94122 
1946— Ethel C. Enos (Mrs.) Morada No. 199, 

Box 174. Modesto 95353 
1947— Loretta M. Cameron (Mrs.) Twin Peaks 
No. 185, 39 Chenery Street, San Fran- 
cisco 94131 
1948— Doris Treat Daley (Mrs.) San Andreas 
No. 113, 1342 No. Lincoln St., Stockton 
95203. 
1949 — Margaret M. Farnsworth (Mrs.) Vendome 
No. 100, Beverly Manor Convalescent 
Hospital, 2225 Dela Vina St., Santa Bar- 
bara 93101. 
1950— Henrietta Toothaker (Miss) Woodland No. 

90, 723 Gibson Road, Woodland 95695 
1951— Anna T. Schiebusch (Miss) Los Angeles 
No. 124, 320 W. Chestnut Avenue, San 
Gabriel 91776 

OCTOBER, 1970 



1952 — Jewel McSweeney (Miss) El Vespero No. 

118, 2845 Van Ness Avenue, San Fran- 
cisco 94109 
1953 — Elmarie H. Dyke (Mrs.) Junipcro No. 

141, Box 300, Pacific Grove 93950 
1954 
1955— Doris M. Gerrish (Miss) Liberty No. 213, 

2709 7th Avenue, Sacramento 95818 
1956 — Norma Hodson (Mrs. Theron) Phoebe A. 

Hearst No. 214, 139 N. Sherman Street, 

Manteca 95336 
1957— Audrey D. Brown (Mrs.) Sutter No. Ill, 

5608 Caleb, Sacramento 95819 
1958 — Irma M. Caton (Mrs.) Argonaut No. 166, 

1166 Powell Street, Oakland 94608 
1959 — Eileen Dismuke (Mrs. Benjamin) Tierra 

de Oro No. 304, 1021 Dela Vina, Santa 

Barbara 93101 
1960 — Maxiene H. Porter (Mrs. Dale) La Tijera 

No. 282, 6436 Elmdale Rd.. Alexandria, 

Virginia 22312 
1961— Edna C. Williams (Mrs. Don) Sequoia 

No. 272, 941 Norvell, El Cerrito 94530 
1962 — Alice D. Shea (Mrs.) Minerva No. 2, 

1850 Woodhaven Way, Oakland 94611 
1963 — Rhoda Roelling (Mrs. Elmer C.) Stirling 

No. 146. 2017 Chickie St., Antioch 94509 
1964 — Lee Brice (Mrs. W. Max) Marinita No. 

198, P.O. Box 41, Res. 66, San Quentin 

94954. 
1965 — Fern E. Adams (Mrs. Emmett C.) Berry- 

essa No. 192, P.O. Box 387, Willows 95988 
1966— Katie G. Jewett (Mrs. A. L.) El Pinal No. 

163, P.O. Box 685, Cambria 93428 
1957 — Annette Caiocca (Mrs. Julius Jr.) La 

Junta No. 203. 1624 Main St., St. Helena 

94574. 
1958— June T. Goldie (Mrs. Wm. L.) San Gabriel 

Valley No. 281, 320 Rosemont Blvd., San 

Gabriel 91775. 
1959— Hazel T. Mallette (Mrs. Everal A.) Gold 
of Ophir No. 190, 45 Dunstone Drive, 

Oroville 95965. 



SUPERVISING D.O.G.P.s 1970-1971 

Appointed by Grand President Irene 
Bondanza 



21— San Francisco County: Mrs. Edna Gara- 
venta, San Francisco No. 261, 1377-21st 
Ave., San Francisco 94122. 

22— San Mateo County: Mrs. Nora Nesper, 
Bonita No. 10, 718 Hopkins St., Redwood 
City 94051. „ . 

23 — San Joaquin County: Mrs. Lois Good- 
paster, El Pescadero No. 82, 229 W. 
Beverly Place, Tracy 95376. 

24 — Tuolumne County: Mrs. Lila Wulzen, Dar- 
danelle No. 66, Rt. 3, Box 317, Sonora 
95370. 

25 — Merced, Stanislaus and Mariposa 
Counties: Mrs. Evelyn Holm, Lomitas 
No. 255, 950 J Street, Los Banos 93635. 

26 — Santa Clara County: Mrs. Verona Goeh- 
ner, Los Gatos No. 317, 121 Loma Alta 
Ave., Los Gatos 95030. 

27 — Monterey, San Benito and Santa Cruz 
Counties: Mrs. Esther Payton, Jumpero 
No 141, 116 Fairground Rd., Monterey 
93940. 

28 — San Luis Obispo County: Mrs. Mary A. 
Warren, El Pinal No. 163, P. O. Box 
636. Cambria 93428. 

29 — Madera. Fresno, Tulare and King 
Counties: Mrs. Anna Marie Hagans. 
Madera No. 244, 401 North H. St.. 
Madera 93637. 

30_Kern County: Mrs. Elma Whitten, Alila 
No. 321, 1821 Inyo St., Delano 93215. 

31— Santa Barbara, Ventura Counties: Man^ 
Louise Days, Reina del Mar No. 126. 
709 Moreno Rd.. Santa Barbara 93103. 

32— Part Los Angeles (Valley Area): Mrs. 
Evelyn Henry, Placerita No. 277, 13622 
Leadwell St., Van Nuys 91405. 

33— Part Los Angeles (Central Western 
Area): Miss Thelma Eisen, Beverly Hills 
No. 289, 917-6th St., 41. Santa Monica 
90403 

34— Part Los Angeles (Eastern Area): Mrs. 
Helen Lugo, San Gabriel Valley No. 281, 
11530 S. Mulhall, El Monte 91732. 

35_Part Los Angeles (Harbor Area): Danella 
Hawkins, Cien Anos No. 303, 13128 Lig- 
gett St., Norwalk 90551. 

35— Riverside and San Bernandmo Counties: 
Mrs. Elsie K. Buchko, Jurupa No. 296, 
20952 Highway No. 395. Perns 92370. 

37— Orange County: Joanne p. Frey. Long 
Beach NO. 154. 236A Argonne. Long 
Beach 90803. 

38— San Diego County: Mrs. Joen ^Graves. 
Mia M. Knox No 320, 11% Bostoma 
St.. El Cajon 92021. 



District 

1 — Humboldt County: Mrs. Merlynn Henry, 
Aracata No. 325, Rt. 1, Box 246, Bayside 
95524. 
2 — Mendocino County: Mrs. Zita Patton. 
Fort Bragg No. 210. Ill So. McPherson, 
Fort Bragg 95437. 
3 — Siskiyou County: Mrs. Eleanor Henricks. 

Eschscholtzia No. 112, Etna 95027. 
4 — Trinity, Shasta and part Tehama 

Counties: Mrs. Doris Clark, Berendos 

No. 23. Rt. 1. Box 714E, Red Bluff 95080. 
5 — Modoc and part Lassen Counties: Ethel 

Dowell, Mt. Lassen No. 215, P.O. Box 245, 

Bieber 95009. 
5 — Part Lassen County: Mrs. Ida Evans. 

Susanville No. 243. 832 Mark St.. Susan- 

ville 96130. 
7 — Butte. Glenn and part Tehama Counties: 

Mrs. Eloise Bettencourt, Berryessa No. 

192, 459 S. Shasta St.. Willows 95988. 
8 — Yuba, Colusa and Sutter Counties: 

Esther Fortna, Marysville No. 152. 1129 

N. Township Rd., Yuba City 95991. 
9 — Plumas and part Sierra Counties: Mrs. 

Lola O. Viera, Plumas Pioneer No. 219, 

Rt. 1, Box 589, Quincy 95971. 
10 — Part Sierra County: Mrs. Abbie B. Borne, 

Naomi No. 36. P.O. Box 224, Sierra City 

95125. 
11 — Sonoma and part Mendocino Counties: 

Mrs. Marie Baranzini, Cotati No. 299. 

8107 El Rancho Dr., Cotati 94928. 
12— Napa, Lake and part Solano Counties: 

Mrs. Eileen Hanna, Eshcol No. 16, 796 

Lincoln Ave., Napa 94558. 
13 — Marin County: Mrs. Mary May, Marinita 

No. 198, 15 Glenwood Drive, San Rafael 

94901. 
14 — Nevada and part Placer Counties: Mrs. 

Gladys Blandchard. Laurel No. 6, 429 

Washington St., Nevada City 95959. 
15 — El Dorado and part Placer Counties: 

Mrs. Mildred E. LaFevre, Marguerite No. 

12, P. O. Box 545, Placerville 95667. 
15 — Sacramento, Yolo and part Solano 

Counties: Mrs. Pamela Muller, Sutter 

No 111, P. O. Box 531, El Macero 

95518. 
17 — Amador County: Mrs. Margaret Boitano, 

Ursula No. 1. 21 French Bar Rd., Jack- 
son 95542. 
18 — Calaveras County: Annie J. Voitich, Ruby 

No. 45. Murphys 95247. 
19_Part Contra Costa County: Mrs. Eleanor 

Hogan, Stirling No. 146, 1337 Columbia 

St.. Pittsburg 94565. 
20 — Alameda and part Contra Costa Counties: 

Mrs. Ethel Murphy, Cerrito de Oro No. 

306. 1152 Portland Ave., Albany 94706. 



STATE CHAIRMEN — 1970 - 1971 

Admission Day (to serve (Dct. 1, 1970 to 
Oct 1 1971): Mrs. Kathleen I. Dom- 
brink. Piedmont No. 87, 1122-4th Ave., 
Oakland 94505. .. ., ,-,..„„ 

Sub-Committee on Bowling: Mrs. Elaine 
Barceloux, Berryessa No. 192, 639 So. 
Merrill, Willows 95988. ... 

Americanism and Civic Participation: Mrs. 
Nancy J. Conens. Jr. P.G.P., Piedrnont 
No. 87, 4311 Allendale Ave., Oakland 

Appeal, Grievances and Petitions: Mrs. 
Norma Hodson, P.G.P., Phoebe A. Hearst 
No. 214. 139 N. Sherman St.. Manteca 

Board of Control: Mrs. Irene Bondanza. G.P.. 

San Francisco No. 261. 2328 Union St., 

San Francisco 94123. , ., , _„ 

California History and Landmarks: Mrs. June 

T Goldie. P.G.P.. San Gabriel Valley No. 

281. 320 Rosemont Blvd.. San Gabriel 

Sub-Committee-California History and Land- 
marks, Art Talent Contest: Mrs. Myrtle 
Degen, Aloha No. 106. 5550 Kales Ave., 
Oakland 94618. ... . • , 

Sub-Committee on Brochure-State Historical 
Sites: Mrs. Loretta G. Trathen, Orinda 
No. 56. 140 Stacey Lane. Grass Valley 
95945 
Sub-Committee on N.D.G.W. Historical Room: 
Mrs. Evelyn I. Carlson. P.G.P.. Dolores 
No. 159. 1308 Hoover St.. Apt. 1. MenIo 
Park 94025. „ ^ ^ r< 

Conservation and Safety: Mrs. Gertrude Doss 
Whittier No. 298. 308 So. Valencia St.. 
La Habra 90631. „. ^. ^, „ ^ 

Credentials: Mrs. Elenore Bianchi, El Ves- 
pero No. US. 2715 Wawona St.. San 
Francisco 94116. 
Education and Scholarships: Mrs. Nellie 
Miller, Verdugo No. 240. 730 Patterson, 
Glendale 91202. 
Extension of the Order: Mrs. Annette 
Caiocca, P.G.P., La Junta No. 203, 1624 
Main St., St. Helena 94574. 
Finance: Mrs. Audrey D. Brown, P.G.P.. 
Sutter No. Ill, 5508 Caleb. Sacramento 
95819 
Grand Parlor Sessions: Miss Jewel Mc- 
Sweeney. P.G.P.. El Vespero No. 118. 
2845 Van Ness Ave.. San Francisco 
94109 r> 

Historian of the Orde':. M". O r i n d a G. 
Giannini. P.G.P., Orinda No. 56, 2822- 
35th Ave.. San Francisco 94116. 
Insurance: Mrs. Irma M. Caton, P.G.P.. 
Argonaut No. 166, 1166 Powell St., Oak- 
land 94608. 

PAGE 7 



Junior Mative Daughters: (E((. Oct. 12. 1970) 

Mrs Lila Hummel, G.T., La Tijera No. 

282. 836 E. Grand Ave., El Segunda 90245. 
Laws and Supervision: Mrs. VirRilia Mc- 

Combs. G.V.P.. Morada No. 199. 1241 

Normandy Dr.. Modesto 95351. 
Legislation: Mrs. Eileen Dismuke. P.G.P. 

Tierra de Oro No. 304. 1021 Dela Vina. 

Santa Barbara 93101. 
Legislative Measures: Miss Marie Stebbins. 

La Bandera No. 110. 118814th Ave.. 

Sacrarrento 95818. 
Leslye A. Hicks Home Health Fund: Mrs. 

Myrtle Ritterbush, Buena Vista No. 68. 

1277 Alemany Blvd., San Francisco 

94122. 
Mission Restoration: Mrs. Mary Mahoney. 

Golden Gate No. 158, 4125 Lincoln Way. 

San Francisco 94122. 
Mission Soledad Restoration: Mrs. Mary 

Silva. Mission Bell No. 316. 312 Copley 

Ave.. KinR City 93930. 
Music: Mrs. Frances A. Simas, Minerva 

No. 2, 1940-17th Ave.. San Francisco 

94116. 
NDGW Childrens Foundation: Miss Jewel 

McSweeney. El Vespero No. 118. 2845 

Van Ness Ave., San Francisco 94109. 

Secretary: Miss Ettielwynne Fraisher. 

San Fernando Mission No. 280, 216 

Alexander St.. San Fernando 91340. 
NDGW Home: 555 Baker St.. San Francisco 

94117. Ctim: Mrs. Hazel B. Hansen. 

P.G.P., 535 N. Howard St., Glendale 

91206. Secretary: Mrs. Lee Brice, P.G.P.. 

Marinita No. 198. P.O. 41, Res. 66, San 

Quentin 94964. 
Official Publication: Miss Doris Jacobsen, 

Grace No. 242, 225 So. Bradford, 

Placentia 92670. Co-Chairman Clarisse 

Meyer, San Francisco 261, 3010 Webster 

St.. San Francisco 94123. 
Pioneer Roster: Mrs. Betty Read Cunlich, 

Chm. Bd. of G.T., Ursula No. 1. 41 Cun- 
lich Lane. Jackson 95642. 
Printing and Supplies: Mrs. Alice D. Shea. 

P.G.P.. Minerva No. 2, 1850 Woodhaven 

Way. Oakland 94611. 
Public Relations: Mrs. Laura Blosdale, G.T., 

Beverly Hills No. 289, 1563 Brockton 

Ave., Los Angeles 90025. 
Ritual and Manual of Instructions: Mrs. Rae 

E Rominger, G.M.. La Bandera No. 110, 

2841-69th Ave., Sacramento 95822. 
Roll of Honor: Mrs. Lucille Kimbark, G.S., 

Alta No. 3, 2271-32nd Ave., San Francisco 

94116. ^ ^ ,j 

State of the Order: Mrs. Fern E. Adams. 

P G.P., Berryessa No. 192, P. 0. Box 

387. Willows 95988. 
Tournament of Roses Float: Mrs. Vera 

Popov, Grace No. 242. 16342 Skymeadow 

Dr.. Placentia 92670. , ,,. 

Transportation: Miss Margaret Locatelli. 

Bonita No. 10. 1261 Jefferson. Redwood 

City 94061. „ . J. . 

Veteran's Welfare: Mrs. Mane C. Landini. 

San Jose No. 81. 860 Warren Way, Palo 

Alto 94303. ^, ,„ 

Welfare: Edrene Gardner. Lugonia No. 241. 

3721 Hemlock Dr., San Bernardino 92404. 
Young Women's Activities: Mrs. Barbara 

Upton. Tierra de Oro No. 304. 2330 Las 

Canoas Rd., Santa Barbara 93103. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Angelita No. 32, Livermore — Meets 2nd Fri- 
day. Carnegie BIdg., 2155 Third St.; Mrs. An- 
gle Marsh. Rec. Sec. 1587 - 2nd St., Liver- 
more 94550. 

Piedmont No. 87, Oakland — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Veterans BIdg., 200 Grand Ave., 
Oakland; Mrs. Elza Paul, Rec. Sec. 6017 Mon- 
roe Ave.. Oakland 94618. 

Aloha No. 106, Oakland— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Tuesday. Monlclair Women's Club. Mrs. 
Gladys I. Farley. Rec. Sec. 4623 Benevides 
Ave.. Oakland 94602. 

Hayward No. 122, Hayward— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. Veterans' Memorial BIdg., 22737 
Main St., Hayward; Mrs. Doris Perez, Rec. 
Sec. 21672 Knoll Way. Hayward 94546. 

Berkeley No. 150, Berkeley— Meets 2nd 
Monday. Berkeley City Club, 2315 Durant, 
Berkeley 94707. 

Bear Flag No. 151, Albany— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday. Masonic Temple. Bancroft and Shat- 
luck; Mrs. Rhea Campbell, Rec. Sec. 2110 
Byron St.. Berkeley 94706. 

Encinal No. 1S6, Alameda— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday. Improvement Club. 1407 - 9th St.. 
Alameda; Mrs. Rulh Schmidt. Rec. Sec. 623 
Taylor Ave.. Alameda 94501. 

Brooklyn No. 1S7, Oakland— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Danish Hall, 164 - 11th St.; Mrs. 
Daveda Windtcll. Rec. Sec, 634 - 15th St., 
Oakland 94612. 

Argonaut No. 166, Emeryville— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday, 4321 Salem St., Mrs. Bev- 
erly La Violette, Rec. Sec. 2424 Erie Dr., 
Concord 94520. 

Bahia Vitta No. 167, Oakland—Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, 410 lllh Street Building; Mrs. 
Dorothy Jordan, Rec. Sec. 1614 101st Ave.. 
Oakland 94603. 

Fruitvale No. 177. Oakland— Meets 2nd and 
4lh Fridays. Foothill Blvd. Women's Club Hall. 
2535 Mason St., Oakland; Mrs. Gertrude Bor- 

PAGE 8 



man. Rec. Sec, 1915108th Ave., Oaklard 
94603. 

El Cereso No. 207, San Leandro — Meets 
2nd and 4th Wednesday. Veterans Memorial 
BIdg.. 110 Bancroft. San Leandro; Mrs. Julia 
C. King. Rec. Sec, 443 W. Juana, San 
Leandro 94577. 

Betsy Ross No. 238, Newark— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, Newark Pavilion, 6420 
Thornton Ave.; Mrs. Barbara Caminada, 38536 
Logan Dr.. Fremont 94536. 

Albany No. 260. Albany— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday. Albany Temple. 533 San Pablo- 
Mrs. Delia Madding, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 6102, 
Albany 94706. 

Sequoia No. 272, Berkeley — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Veterans BIdg., 1931 
Center St., Berkeley; Mrs. Edna Williams 
Rec. Sec, 941 Norvell St., El Cerrito 94530. 

Vallecito No. 308, Castro Valley— Meets 
2nd and 4th Tuesday, 1109 "C" St.. Hayward: 
Mrs. Dorothy Van de Graaf, 19938 Alana 
Road, Castro Valley 94546. 

AMADOR COUNTY 

Ursula No. 1, Jackson— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Tuesday, Native Sons Hall, Court St. Mrs. 
Evelyn Garbarini, Rec Sec, P.O. Box 253, Jack- 
son 95642. 

Chispa No. 40, lone — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Cynthia A. 
Phillips, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 293, lone 95640. 

Amapola No. 80, Sutter Creek— Meets 2nd 
Thursday, N.S.G.W. Hall, Main St. Mrs. Hazel 
Marre, Rec. Sec, 15 Gopher Flat Road, Sutter 
Creek 95685 

Forrest No. 86, Plymouth— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. N.S.G.W. Hall; Miss Melba M. 
Withrow, Rec. Sec, RFD Box 24, Plymouth 
95669. 



BUTTE COUNTY 

Annie K. Bidwell No. 168, Chico — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, N.D. Hall, 316 W. 2nd St.; 
Mrs. Katherine LaBreacht, Rec. Sec, 383 East 
Sixth Ave., Chico 95926. 

Gold of Ophir No. 190, Orovi lie— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, Monday Club, 2385 Mont- 
gomery St.; Mrs. Zada Harkcom, P.O. Box 252. 
Orovi lie 95965. 

Centennial No. 295, Paradise — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. lOOF Hall, 1010 Elliott Rd.. Mrs. 
Lorraine Hubb, Rec. Sec, 1551 Nunneley, 
Paradise 95969. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY 

Ruby No. 46, Murphys — Meets 1st Friday, 
N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Annie J. Voitich, Rec. 
Sec, P.O. Box 152, Murphys 95247. 

Princess No. 84, Angels Camp — Meets 2nd 
Wednesday. I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Celia Bellramo, 
Rec. Sec. Box 302. Angels Camp 95222. 

San Andreas No. 113, San Andreas — Meets 
3rd Friday, Fraternal Hall; Mrs. Mabel Lively. 
Rec. Sec, Box 26, San Andreas 95249. 

COLUSA COUNTY 

Colus No. 194, Colusa — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Monday, N.D.G.W. - N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Hazel 
Nordyke, Rec. Sec, 609 D Street, Colusa 95932. 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Stirling No. 146, Pittsburg— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday, St. David's Church, 12th and 
Harbor; Mrs. Eleanor Hogan. Rec. Sec. 
1337 Columbia St.. Pittsburg 94565. 

Richmond No. 147, Richmond — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, Women's City Club, 2131 
Nevin Ave.; Mrs. Maud E. Alexander, Rec. 
Sec. 219 Nicholl Ave., Richmond 94801. 

Conner No. 193, Byron— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday. I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Catharine Arm- 
strong, Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 63. Byron 94514. 

Las Juntas No. 221, Martinez — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday. Kiwams Youth Center, 
750 Allen St.; Mrs. Clarine Brusatory, Rec. 
Sec, 3510 Estudillo St., Martinez 94553. 

Antioch No. 223, Antioch — Meets 3rd Mon- 
day, lOOF Hall; Mrs. Gloria Biglow, Rec. Sec, 
2118 Alpha Way. Antioch 94509. 

Cerrito de Oro No. 306, El Cerrito — Meets 
1st and 3rd Wednesday, 6712 Portola Drive. 
El Cerrito; Mrs. Ethel Murphy. Rec. Sec. 
1152 Portland Ave.. Albany 94706. 

Las Amigas No. 311, Walnut Creek— Meets 
2nd and 4th Wednesday, Women's Club. 
Lincoln Ave.. Mrs. Evelyn Larsen. Rec. Sec. 
2449 Casa Way. Walnut Creek 94596. 

Concord No. 323, Concord — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. Concord Farm Center; Mrs. 
Edith F. Ferriero. Rec. Sec, 1497 Amador 
Ave., Concord 94520. 

EL DORADO COUNTY 

Marguerite No. 12. Placerville— Meets Third 
Wednesday. Eagles Hall. 2810 Coloma St.; 
Mrs. Mary L. Lyons. Rec. Sec. 2876 Pleasant 
St.. Placerville 95667. 

El Dorado No. 18S, Georgetown— Meets 2nd 
Saturday afternoon. Buckner Hall— Methodist 
Church. Georgetown: Mrs. Elsie M. Ford. Rec. 
Sec; Cool 95614. 



FRESNO COUNTY 

Fresno No. 187, Fresno — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday. Knights of Pythias Hall, 4867 E. 
Fillmore; Mrs. Molly Baker, Rec. Sec, 4568 
E. Iowa, Fresno 93702. 

Coalinga No. 270, Coalinga— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday. Eagle Hall, 156 W Durlan; Mrs. 
Dora C. Phelps. Rec. Sec. 225' Pleatant St.. 
Coalinga 93210. 

Wawona No. 271, Fresno — Meets 1st and 
3rd Friday. Knights of Columbia Hall. 2S40 
Flora Dora St.. Fresno; Miss Beth LaPelle. 
Rec. Sec. 2902 E. Weldon. Fresno 93703. 

Selma No. 313, Selma — Meets 2nd Wednes- 
day. I.O.O.F. Hall. 1710 Tucker St.; Mrs. Alice 
Clapham, Rec. Sec, 1427 Pine St., Selma 93662. 



GLENN COUNTY 

Berryessa No. 192, Willows — Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday. I.O.O.F. Hall, 213-A N. Tehama 
SL; Mrs. Elaine Barceloux. Rec. Sec. 639 S. 
Merrill Ave.. Willows 95988. 



HUMBOLDT COUNTY 

Occident No. 28, Eureka — Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 239 Buhne St.; 
Mrs. Marion Jurrens, Rec. Sec, 1461 Sum- 
mer St., Eureka 95501. 

Oneonta No. 71, Ferndale — Meets 2nd and 
4th Thursdays, Danish Hall, Ocean Avenue 
Miss Margaret M. Smith, Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 
635, Ferndale 95536. 

Reichling No. 97, Fortuna— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. Rohner Grange Hall, Main St.; 
Mrs. Frances S. Lentz. Rec. Sec. 237 Newell 
Dr.. Fortuna 95540. 

Areata No. 325, Areata — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday, Eagles Hall. 1005 Uth St.; Mrs 
Mary K. Foresti, Rec. Sec. 3446 Ribeiro Lane. 
Areata 95521. 



KERN COUNTY 

Miocene No. 228, Taft — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Monday, Veterans Memorial BIdg., Cedar and 
Taylor Streets; Mrs. Bessie Davis, Rec. Sec . 
2OOV2 Pierce St., Taft 93268. 

El Tejon No. 239 Bakersfield— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday. Druids Hall. 501 Sumner; 
Mrs. Grace Acheson. Rec. Sec, 1307 Baldwin 
Rd. Bakersfield 93304. 

Alila No. 321, Delano— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Monday, V.F.W. Hall, 4th and Lexington: 
Mrs. Ruth Brooding. Rec. Sec, 1709 
Kensington, Delano 93215. 



KINGS COUNTY 

Las Flores No. 262, Avenal— Meets 2nd and 
4th Thursday, Redman Hall, Tulare St.; Mrs 
Jessie M. Measell, Rec. Sec, 101 W. Stanis- 
laus St., Avenal 93204. 

Ramona No. 283, Hanford — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thurs., Hanford Frat. Hall. 1015M 10th Ave. 
Glenda Velasquez. Rec. Sec. P.O. Box 1586 
Visalia 93277. 



LAKE COUNTY 

Clear Lake No. 135, Middletown— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday. Gibson Library, Mrs. Dor- 
othy Baldwin, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 566, Middle- 
town 95461. 



LASSEN COUNTY 

Nataqua No. 1S2, Standish— Meets 3rd Wed- 
nesday, Standish Hall; Mrs. Marilyn Blanken 
ship. Rec. Sec. Star Rte. 2. Janesville 96114. 

Mount Lassen No. 215, Biet>er — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday. Legion Hall; Mrs. Marie 
Walsh. Rec. Sec. Bieber %009. 

Susanville No. 243, Susanville — Meets 3rd 
Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Melva Arnold. 
Rec. Sec. 625 Plum St.. Susanville %130. 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY 

Los Angeles No. 124, Los Angeles — Meet* 
1st and 3rd Wednesday. I.O.O.F. Temple. 1828 
S. Oak St ; Mrs. Pauline Brasher. Rec. Sec . 
2346 Portland St.. Los Angeles 90007. 

Long Beach No. 1S4, Long Beach— Meets 
1st and 3rd Thursday. Y.W.C.A.. 550 Pacific 
Ave.; Mrs. Leola Temby. Rec. Sec. 540 E. 
7th St.. Long Beach 90813. 

Verdugo No. 240, Glendale — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall. 520 E. Glenoaks 
Blvd.; Mrs. Phyllis V. Hirst. Rec Sec. 1244 
N. Columbus Ave., Apt. 8„ Glendale 91202. 

Californiana No. 247, Los Angeles — Meets 
2nd Tuesday. Assistance League. 1370 No. 
St. Andrews PI.: Mrs. Anna Crawford. Rec. 
Sec. 958 Magnolia Ave.. Los Angeles 90006. 

Poppy Trail No. 2W, Montet>ello— Meets 
1st and 3rd Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 124 N. 5th 
St.; Miss Adele Foumier, Rec. Sec, 5242 
Repetto Ave., Los Angeles 90022. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



Placerita No. 277, Van Nuys— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, 4924 Paso R o b I e s, 
Incino Mrs. Lois Stevens, Rec. Sec, 6151 
rarmouth Ave., Reseda 91335. .. . , ^ 

Wilwiington No. 278, Wilmington— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday, Women's Club, Lakme and 
Denni Sts., Mrs. Ella Owens, Rec. Sec, 174 
r.old Star Home, Long Beach 9081'J. 

Toluca No. 279, Burbank— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. Campo de Cahuenga; Mrs. Alice 
Mooney, Rec. Sec, 1549 Broadview, Glendale 

San Fernando Mission No. 280, San Fern- 
ando—Meets 1st and 3rd Wednesday, Wo- 
mens Club, 552 N. Maclay Ave.; Mrs. Carolyn 
Riggs, Rec. Sec, 1303 Glenoaks Blvd., San 
Fernando 91340. 

San Gabriel Valley No. 281, San Gabriel — 
Meets 1st and 3rd Thursday, Casa Vieja, 330 
So Santa Anita, San Gabriel; Mrs. Lee Bol- 
len Rec. Sec, 3824 Clark, El Monte 91731. 

La Tijera No. 2B2, Inglewood — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, 8?C Java St., Inglewood; Miss 
Ruth Pavne. Rec. Sec. 230 E. Hyde Park 3lvd., 
Inglewood 90302. . . , . 

Rio Hondo No. 284, South Gate — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday. 10301 California Ave., 
South Gate; Mrs. Virginia Glendon, Rec. 
Sec 9733 Guatemala. Downey 90240. 

Joshua Tree No. 288, Lancaster — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday, Fraternal Hall, Date and 
Oldfield; Mrs. Betty Ladd, Rec Sec, P.O. Box 
306. Lake Hughes 93532. 

Beverly Hills No. 289, Beverly Hillls— Meets 
1st Wednesday, 9461 Wilshire Blvd.; Mrs. Olive 
D. Burke. Rec Sec. 10507 Bradbury Rd., Los 
Aneeles 90064. . ^ „ ^ 

Pasadena No. 290. Pasadena— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday. American Legion Hall, 
179 No. Vinedo; Mrs. Lilly Westover, Rec. 
Sec 400 Merrimac Way, Costa Mesa 92626. 

Whittier No. 298, Whittier — Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, Assistance League, 6339 
Greenleaf: Miss Carlotta Funk, Rec Sec. 
P O Box 15. Whittier 90608. 

Tierra del Rey No. 300. Hermosa Beach— 
2nd and 4th Monday. Womens Club House, 
400 S Broadway. Redondo Beach; Mrs. Alma 
Compton, Rec. Sec, 226 N. Catalina, Redondo 
Beach 90277. 

Cien Anos No. 303, Norwalk— Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday. V.F.W. Hall 12634 Pioneer 
Blvd.: Mrs. Shirley Elofson, Rec. Sec. 12020 
S Hebe Ave., Norwalk 90650. 

Rancho San Jose, No. 307, Pomona— Meets 
2nd and 4th Tuesday, Assistance League. 693 
N. Palomares: Mrs. Senaida Baiz. Rec. Sec. 
'14 S. Marywood Ave.. Claremont 31711. 

El Camino Real No. 324, Granada Hills — 
Meets 2nd and 4th Wednesday, Granada Hills 
Womens Club, 10666 Whiteoak: Mrs. Helen 
T r a m m e I I, Rec Sec, 7901 Vantage, No. 
Hollywood 91605. 

MADERA COUNTY 
Madera No. 244, Madera— Meets 2nd and 
4th Thursday, Womens Improvement Club- 
house; Miss Frances Higuera, Rec. Sec, 
Pro Tern, 321 South B Street, Apt 3, Madera 
93637. 

MARIN COUNTY 

Sea Point No. 196, Sausalito — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, I.D.E.S. Hall; Mrs. Hilda Surles 
Rec Sec, 66 Shell Rd., Mill Valley 94941. 

Marinita No 198, San Pafael— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday. Marist Fathers Hall, 1675 Grand 
Avs.. S;jn Rafael; Mrs. Lee Brice, Rec. Sec. 
PO Box 41, Res 66, San Ouentin 94964. 

Fairfax No. 225, Fairfax— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday, American Legion Hall, San An- 
selmo; Mrs. Doris J. Crocker, Rec. Sec, 25 
Meernaa Ave.. Fairfax 94930. 

Tamelpa No. 231, Mill Valley— Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday, 1.0.0. F. Hail; Mrs. Mary C. 
O'Connor. Rec. Sec. 29 Paloma Dr. Corte 
Madera 94925. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY 

Mariposa No. 63, Mariposa — Meets 1st Tues- 
day. Odd Fellows Hall; Rita Cavagnaro, Rec. 
Sec, Star Route, Mariposa 95338. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY 

Fort Bragg No. 210, Fort Bragg— Meets 2nd 
Thursday, 1.0. 0.F. Hall, Main St.; Mrs. Glenise 
Mallory. Rec. Sec, 117 '.yta Way, Fort Bragg 
95437. 

Ukiah No. 263, Ukiah— Meets 1st Monday 
Saturday Afternoon Club, Church and Oak. 
3rd Monday in Members Homes; Mrs. Dorothy 
Buchanan. Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 87, Talmage 
95481. 

MERCED COUNTY 

Veritas No. 75, Merced— Meets 1st Tuesday, 
Bear Creek Grange Hall, 3rd Tuesday. 
Homes; Miss Edith Dougherty Rec Sec, 1198 
E. Bel Air Dr., Merced 95340. 

Lomitas No. 2SS, Los Banos— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, D.E.S. Hall, "I" St.; Miss Mary 
Louise Cotta, Rec. Sec, 13780 S. Volta Rd., 
Los Banos 93635. 

OCTOBER, 1970 



Golden California No. 291, Gustine — Meets 
3rd Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 471 • 4th Ave.; Mrs. 
Evelyn Nunes, Rec. Sec, 29431 W. Sullivan 
Rd.. Gustine 95322. 

MODOC COUNTY 
Alturas No. 159, Alturas— Meets 1st Thursday, 
I.O.O.F. Hall, Main St.; Mrs. Zelma McGirr. Rec. 
S3C.. Box 1124. Alturas 96101. 

MONTEREY COUNTY 

Aleli No. 102, Salinas— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Ella Fahey, Rec. 
Sec, 83 Clark St., Salinas 93901. 

Junipero No. 141, Monterey — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. House of Four Winds, Calle 
Principal; Mrs. Mae Layton, Rec. Sec, 344 
Clay St., Monterey 93940. 

Mission Bell No. 316, Soledad— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, Forester Hall, Front St.; 
Mrs. Anita Head, Rec. Sec, 563 Soledad St., 
Soledad 93960. 

NAPA COUNTY 

Eshcol No. 16, Napa— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Monday, N.S.G.W. Hall. Coombs St.; Mrs. 
Eileen Hanna, Rec. Sec, 796 Lincoln Ave., 
Napa 94558. , , ^ 

Calistoga No. 145, Calistoga — Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday. St. Luke's Hall, Myrtle St.; Mrs. 
Ella Light. Rec. Sec, 1401 Washington St., 
Calistoga 94515 .. . , . 

La Junta No. 203, St. Helena— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, Spring St.; 
Mrs. Emma Parnisari, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 
345. St. Helena 94574. 

George C. Yount No. 322, Yountville— 
Meets 2nd and 4th Wednesday, Yountville 
City Hall, Yount St.; Mrs. Idell Crandall, Rec. 
Sec. 243 So. Franklin, Napa 94558. 

NEVADA COUNTY 

Laurel No. 6, Nevada City— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, Veterans Memorial Building, 
N Pine and Cottage; Mrs Marille Hopkins, 
Rec Sec. Rt. 1, Box B-290, Nevada City 95959. 

Manzanita No. 29, Grass Valley— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, St. Patricks Hall; Mrs. Elsie 
Peard, Rec. Sec, 120 High St., Grass Valley 
95945. 

Columbia No. 70, French Corral— Meets Ist 
Friday afternoon, Farrelley Hall; Mrs. Fannie 
M. Moulton, Rec. Sec, French Corral, Star 
Route, P.O., Smartsville 95977. 

ORANGE COUNTY 

Santa Ana No. 235, Santa Ana— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, 6th and Baker; Mrs. Mane 
Brewer, Rec. Sec, 2767 W. 1st Street, Sp. 31, 
Santa Ana 92703. 

Grace No 242, Fullerton — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hail, Lennon and 
Amerige; Mrs. April Lemons, Rec. Sec, 3113 
B Topaz Lane, Fullerton 92631. 

Silver Sands No. 28G, Huntington Beach- 
Meets 1st Tuesday, Lake Park Club House; 
Virginia Segelson, Rec. Sec, 303 13th St.. 
Huntington Beach 92646. 

PLACER COUNTY 

Placer No. 138, Lincoln— Meets 2nd Wednes- 
day. The Womans Club, 499 E Street; Mrs. 
Margaret Schmidt, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 171, 
Lincoln 95648. ^ .. 

Auburn No. 233, Auburn— Meets 3rd Mon- 
day. Veterans Memorial; Mrs. Myrtle Dove. 
Rec. Sec. 130 East St., Auburn 95603. 

Sierra Pines No. 275, Colfax— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Knights of Pythias Hall, Main 
St.; Mrs. Isabelle Eddy, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 55, 
Colfax 95713. 

PLUMAS COUNTY 
Plumas Pioneer No. 2i9, Quincy — Meets 
1st and 3rd Monday. I.O.O.F. Hall. Main St.; 
Mrs. Lola O. Viera, Rec. Sec, R.F.D. Box 689, 
Quincy 95971. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY 
Jurupa No. 296, Riverside — Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 3942 Jurupa 
Ave.; Mrs. Mary Lovell, Rec. Sec. Send mail 
to P. O. Box 1325, Riverside 92502. 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY 

Califia No. 22, Sacramento — Meets 2nd Tues- 
day, NSGW Hall, 11th and J Sts. Mrs. Lillian 
Blackwell, Rec. Sec, 3908-2nd Ave., Sacra- 
mento 95817. 

La Bandera No. 110, Sacramento— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday. N.S.G.W. Hall, 11th and 
J Sts.; Mrs. Fern Werner, Rec. Sec. 2444-39th 
Ave., Sacramento 95822. 

Sutter No. Ill, Sacramento — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, 11th and J StreeU; 
Mrs. Wilma Gutenberger, Rec. Sec, 615 27th 
St.. Sacramento 95816. 

Fern No. 123, Folsom— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday. Community Club House; Mrs. Rose 
Marie Trammell. Rec. Sec. 9424 Golden Dr., 
Orangevale. Send mail to P.O. Box 326, 
Fnlsom 95630. 



Liberty No. 213, Elk Grove — Meets 2nd and 

4th Friday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Elk Grove; Mrs. Ger- 
trude E. Hogaboom, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 72, 
Elk Grove 95624. 

Rio Rito No. 253, Sacramento— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Y.L.I. Club House, 1400 27th 
St.; Mrs. Catherine Bennett, Rec. Sec, 1299 
8th Ave.. Sacramento 95818. 

San Juan No. 315, Carmichael — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Veteran's Memorial Hall, 
Carmichael Park; Mrs. Jean Gibbs, Rec. Sec, 
1331 Arroyo Grande Dr., Sacremento 95825. 

SAN BENITO COUNTY 

Copa de Oro No. 105, Hollister — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 362 Fourth 
St.; Mrs. Evelyn Pivetti, Rec. Sec, 1258 West 
St., Hollister 95023. 

San Juan Bautisia No. 179, San Juan Bau- 
tista — Meets 1st Wednesday, NDGW Adobe, 
4th St., Mrs. Anna Baccala, Rec. Sec, P.O. 
Box 33, San Juan Bautista 95045. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY 

Lugonia No. 241, San Bernardino — Meets 
2nd and 4th Thursday, Brazelton Hall, Date 
and Del Rosa St.; Mrs. Sylvia Gregory, Rec. 
Sec, 1321 Lugo, San Bernardino 92404. 

Ontario No. 251, Ontario — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, Upland Library, C and Euclid; 
Mrs. Ruth C. Ruth, Rec. Sec, 1015 Fuchsia, 
Ontario 91762. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY 

San Diego No. 208, San Diego— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, House of Hospitaltiy, Balboa 
Park; Mrs. Sarah Miller, Rec. Sec, 4117 
Georgia St., San Diego 92103. 

Ilia M. Knox NO. 320. El Cajon— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, Veterans Hall, 136 Chambers 
St.. Mrs. Letha M. Miller, Rec, Sec, 9222 
Wister Dr., La Mesa 92041. 



SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY 

Minerva No. 2, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, 414 Mason 
St.; Mrs. Mary Oertwig, Rec Sec, 40 Pine- 
hurst Way, San Francisco 94127 

Alta No. 3, San Francisco — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday afternoon, N.S.G.W. BIdg, 414 
Mason St.; Mrs. Lucille Kimbark, Rec. Sec, 
2271 - 32nd Ave.. San Francisco 94116. 

Orinda No. 56, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday, St. Marks Square Urban Cen- 
ter, 1101 O'Farrell St.; Mrs. Irmgard Wala- 
schek, Rec. Sec, 447 Carl St., San Francisco 
94117. 

Buena Vista No. 68, San Francisco — Meets 
3rd Thursday, N.D.G.W. Home, 555 Baker St.; 
Miss Carolyn Daley, Rec. Sec, 30O0-24th 
Ave., San Francisco 94127. 

Las Lomas No. 72, San Francisco — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, N.D.G.W. Home, 555 Baker 
St.; Mrs. Emily E. Ryan, Rec. Sec, 1371 - 48th 
Ave., Apt. 201. San Francisco 94122 

Darina No. 114, San Francisco* Meets 3rd 
Monday, Druids Hall, 44 Page St.; Mrs. Thelma 
Wilson, Rec. Sec, 21 Wabash Terrace, San 
Francisco 94124. 

El Vespero No. 118, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd and 4th Tuesday, N.S.G.W. BIdg., 414 
Mason St.; Miss Ruth McAdam, Rec. Sec, 120 
Romney Drive, South San Francisco 94080. 

Genevieve No. 132, San Francisco — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday, NSGW Hall 414 Mason St; 
Miss Elizabeth Brennan. Rec. Sec, 2066 Grove 
St., San Francisco 94117. 

Guadalupe No. 153, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd and 4th Monday, Dovre Hall, 3543 18th St.; 
Ruth A. Stone, Rec. Sec, 270 Ellsworth St., 
San Francisco 94110. 

Golden Gate No. 158, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd and 4th Monday, N.S.G.W. BIdg., 414 
Mason St.; Mrs. Anne Plescia, Rec. Sec, 1378 
■ 26th Ave.. San Francisco 94122. 

Dolores No. 169, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday. NDGW Home, 555 Baker 
St.; Mrs. Evelyn I. Carlson, Rec. Sec, 1308 
Hoover St.. Apt. 1, Menio Park 94025. 

Portola No. 172, San Francisco — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, N.S.G.W. BIdg., 414 Mason 
St.; Mrs. Dorothy Vitalie. Rec. Sec, 162 Cayuga 
Ave., San Francisco 94112. 

Twin Peaks No. 185, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd and 4th Tuesday, Dovre Hall, 3543 18th 
St.; Mrs. Irene Cashman, Rec. Sec, 125 Rus- 
sia Ave., Apt. 2, San Francisco 94112. 

James Lick No 220, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd Wednesday afternoon, lOOF Hall, 26-7th 
St.; Mrs. Jaredna Johnson, Rec. Sec, 423 So. 
Van Ness Ave.. San Francisco 94103. 

Mission No. 227, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday. N.S.G.W. Building. 414 Mason 
St.; Mrs. Bernice Short. Rec. Sec, 330 Foote 
Ave., San Francisco 94112. 

Utopia No. 252, San Francisco— Meets 2nd 
Tuesday, Dovre Hall. 3543 • 18th St.; Mrs. Helen 
C. Scannell. Rec. Sec, 4064 - 18th St., San 
Francisco 94114. 

PAGE if 



Sdi Francisco No. 2S1, San Francisco — 
1st an I 3rd Wednesday. N.S.G.W. BIdg., 414 
Mason St.; Mrs. Clarisse Meyer, Rec. Sec, 
3010 Webster St., San Francisco 94123. 

Verba Buena No. 273, San Francisco- 
Meets 1st Thursday afternoon, N.S.G.W. 
BIdg., 414 Mason St.; Mrs. Julia Bode. Rec. 
Sec, 2112.29th Ave, San Francisco 94116. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY 
loaquin No. S, Stockton— Meets 2nd and 
4tli Tuesday. N SOW. Hall. 809 N. Hunter; 
Mrs. Edna J. Williamson, Rec. Sec, 510 E. 
Mendocino Ave . Stockton 95204 

El Pescadero No. 82, Tracy— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, Muncy Hall, 234 E. 10th St.; 
Mrs. Florence Tisher, Rec. Sec, 2800 Cabrillo 
Way, Tracy 95376. 

Caliz de Oro No. 208, Stockton— Meets Isl 
and 3rd Tuesday, Pythian Castle Hall, 134 W. 
Park St.; Mrs. Edith L. Foster. Rec. Sec, 657 
Lexington Ave.. Stockton 95204. 

Phoebe A. Heirst No. 214, Manteca— Meets 
2nd and 4th Wednesday, M.R.P.S. Hall. N. 
Grant St.; Mrs. Norma Hodson, Rec Sec, 139 
N. Sherman, Manteca 95336. 

Stockton No. 256, Stockton— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. N.S.G.W. Hall. 809 N. Hunter; 
Mrs. Eva Bisagno, Rec. Sec, 927 W. Acacia, 
Stockton 95203. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY 
San Miguel No. 94, San Miguel— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall. San Miguel; 
Mrs. Hortense Wright, Rec Sec, P.O. Box 96. 
San Miguel 93451. 

San Luisita No. 108, San Luis Obispo — 
Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 520 
Dana St.; Miss Mary Mello. Rec. Sec, 777 
Lincoln Ave.. San Luis Obispo 93401. 

El Pinal No. 163. Cambria— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. Masonic Temple; Mrs. Katie G. 
Jewett. Rec Sec, P.O. Box 685. Cambria 
93428. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY 

Bonita No. 10, Redwood City— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Veterans Memorial Building, 
1455 Madison Ave.; Mrs. Louise Gibsen. Rec 
Sec, 1558 Lago Street, San Mateo 94403. 

Vista del Mar No. 155, Half Moon Bay- 
Meets 3rd Tuesday, I.D.E.S. Hall, Main St., 
Mrs Marion Miramontes, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 
496 Half Moon Bay 94019. 

Ano Nuevo No. 180, Pescadero— Meets 3rd 
Wednesday, N.S.G.W. and N.D.G.W. Hall; Mrs. 
Evelyn Cabral, Rec Sec, P. O. Box 27 
Pescadero 94060. 

El Carmelo No. 181, San Mateo— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday. 722 Hillcresf Dr.. Daly 
City; Mrs. Christine E. Hulme, Rec Sec, 305 
Hillcrest Blvd., Milbrae 94030. 

Memo No. 211, Memo Park— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. Recreation BIdg.. Civic Center- 
Mrs. Lillian King, Rec. Sec, 1303 Femside St.', 
Redwood City 94061. 

San Bruno No. 246, San Bruno — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Fireman's Hall, 618 San 
Mateo Ave., San Bruno; Mrs. Edith Hunting- 

94087 '^' ^^'^■^ '^^ """"^"^ ^^^' Sunnyvale 

, h' .f ^^ **°- J^^- Pacifica— Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday. Nick's Restaurant, 100 Rock- 
away Beach Ave.; Send mail to Mrs. Mildred 
Yancey, 1108 Banyan Way, Pacifica 94044. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY 
Reina del Mar No. 126, Santa Barbara- 
Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesday, K. C. Hall, 925 
De La Vina St.; Mrs. Mamie Miller, Rec. Sec 
3131 Calle Mariposa, Santa Barbara 93105 

Santa Marfa r- --6. Santa Maria- Meets 
1st and 3rd Tuesday D.E.S. Club 615 W 
Chapel: Mrs Biancho f Powell. Rec Sec 
508 So. Lincoln St., Santa Maria 93454 

Tierra de Oro No. 304, Santa Barbara- 
Meets 1st and 3rd Thursday, San Roque Parish 
Mall, 3200 Calle Cedro. Miss Edith Webster 
J«<j„Sec.. 185 San Ysidro Rd., Santa Barbara 

La Purisima No. 327, Lompoc— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday. Alpha Clubhouse. Corner 
B and Ocean Ave.; Mrs Mary Rule. Rec Sec 
1401 E. Maple Ave.. Lompoc 93436. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY 
San Jose No. 81. San Jose— Meets 1st -arid 
3rd Thursday. Eagles' Hall, 148 N. 3rd St.; Mrs 
Mane C. Landim. Rec. Sec, 860 Warren Way, 
Palo Alto 94303 

Vendome No. 100. San Jose— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. I O.O.F. Hall. 122 Race St.: Mrs 
Susie T. Engfer, Rec. Sec. 1301 Glen Eyrie, 
San Jose 95125. 

El Monte No. 205, Mountain View -Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday. Masonic Temple, Church and 
Franklin; Mrs. Mary Ausano. Rec Sec, 1112 
Phyllis Ave.. Mountain View 94040. 

Palo Alto No. 229, Palo Alto — Meets 3rd 
Wednesday. Palo Alto Savings BIdg. 1st 
Wednesday-social at members homes: Mrs. 
Mary Bennett. Rec. Sec. 821 No. Delaware 
St., San Mateo 94401. 

Gilroy No. 312. Gilroy— Meets Isf and 3rd 
Thursday, Salinas Valley Community Room. 
Monterey St; Miss Kathleen Holzhauer. Rec 
Sec. P.O. Box 71, Gilroy 95020. 

PAGE 10 



Los Calos No. 317. Los Gatos— Meets 4th 
Wednesday, Colonial Savings BIdg.; Mrs. 
Eola A. Howe, Rec Sec, 2325 Winchester 
Blvd., Campbell 95008. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 
Santa Cruz No. 26, Santa Cruz— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, B.P.W.C. Clubhouse, 240 Ply- 
mouth Ave.; Mrs. Rosaline C. Ollveria, Rec. 
Sec. 446 May Ave.. Santa Cruz 95060. 

El Pajaro No. 35. Watsonville — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall. 17A E. Third 
St.; Mrs. Grace Locatelli. Rec Sec, 623 East 
5th. Watsonville 95076. 

SHASTA COUNTY 

Camellia No. 41. Anderson— Meets 1st Tues- 
day. Masonic Hall, Center and Howard; Mrs 
Rosemary McCabe, Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 104, 
Cottonwood 96022. 

Lassen View No. 98. Shasta— Meets 2nd Fri- 
day. Masonic Hall; Jeanette Hall. Rec. Sec, 
P. O. Box 434, Redding 96001. 

Hiawatha No. 140. Redding— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday. N.D.G.W. Hall 2322 California 
St.; Mrs. Flora E. Jordan. Rec. Sec, 1604 Veida 
St., Redding 96001. 

SIERRA COUNTY 

Naomi No. 36, Oownieville — Meets 2nd 
Wednesday, N.D.G.W. Hall, Commercial St.; 
Mrs. Margaret Elaine Lambert, Rec. Sec, Box 
224. Downieville 95936 

Imogen No. 134, Sierraville — Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, Copren's Hall; Mrs. Mar- 
garet A. Burrell. Rec. Sec, Sierraville 96126. 

SISKIYOU COUNTY 
Eschscholtzia No. 112, Etna— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. Masonic Hall. Main St.; Mrs. Kate 
Berthelsen, Rec. Sec, Star Route, Etna 96027. 

SOLANO COUNTY 

Valleio No. 195, Valleio— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday, Veterans BIdg., 444 Alabama St., 
Mrs. Layol Welter, Rec. Sec, 521 Acorn St., 
Valleio 94590. 

Mary E. Bell No. 224. Dixon— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Reola 
Mudgett, Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 233, Dixon 
95620. 

Vacaville No 293, Vacaville — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, Saturday Club House: Mrs. Vera 
Fadley, Rec. Sec. Rt. 1, Box 3432, Vacaville 
95633. 

SONOMA COUNTY 

Sonoma No. 209, Sonoma — Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday. I OOF. Hall, Broadway St.; Mrs. 
Clare Geisner. Rec. Sec, 575 Studley St., 
Sonoma 95476. 

Santa Rosa No. 217. Santa Rosa— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday. N.S.G.W. Hall, 404 Men- 
docino Ave.; Mrs. Gladys Wing, Rec. Sec. 
1204 Stewart St.. Santa Rosa 95404. 

Petaluma No. 222, Petaluma — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. Herman Sons Hall. 860 Western 
Ave.; Mrs. Olga Lavio. Rec Sec. 4990 D St., 
Pe'aluma 9495? 

Sebastopol No. 265. Sebastopol — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday. I.O.O.F. Hall. McKinley Street; 
Mrs. Ilah Thorp, Rec. Sec, 436 Parquet St., 
Sebastopol 95472. 

Cotati No. 299. Cotati— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Thursday, Women's Club Hall; Mrs. Marie 
Baranzini, Rec. Sec, 8107 El Rancho Dr.. 
Cotati 94928. 

STANISLAUS COUNTY 

Oakdale No. 125, Oakdale— Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday, Grange Hall, F and Lambuth; 
Mrs naitv Uirich. Rec. Sec, 414 West G St., 
Oakda > 95361. 

Morada No. 199. Modesto — Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday. Senior Citizens Center. 211 
Bodem St.: Mrs. Mary E. Clay, Rec. Sec. 225 
Eu-iiPt Blvd.. Modes'o 95351. 

Eldora No. 248, Turlock — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, American Legion Hall: Miss 
Alice Radford, Rec. Sec, 475 Syracuse, Tur- 
lock 95380. 

SUTTER COUNTY 

South Butte No. 226, Sutter— Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday, N.D.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Carolyn 
Childers, Rec. Sec, 1650 Villa Ave., Yuba 
City 95991 

Oak Leaf No. 285. Live Oak— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. Women's Clubhouse, "P" St.; Mrs. 
Maxine Dodge. Rec. Sec, 8991 S. Larkin Road. 
Live Oak 95953. 

TEHAMA COUNTY 

Bprendos No. 23, Red Bluff — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. N D.G.W. Hall, 1439 Lincoln St.; 
Mrs Verona DeWitt. Rec. Sec. 90 Gumsey 
Ave.. Red Bluff 96080. 

Olivia No. 309. Corning— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Solano St.; Mrs. 
Catherine Richardson. Rec Sec, Rt. 1. Box 
58D Corning 96021. 

TRINITY COUNTY 

Eltapome No. 55. Weaverville — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, N.S.G.W. Hall: Mrs. Mar- 
garet J Brown, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 224, 
Weaverville 96093. 



TULARE COUNTY 

Charter Oak No 292, Visalia— Meets 2nd ana 
4ih Wednesday, Visaha Women's Civic Club 
House, Johnson and Center: Mrs Lois Edwards 
Rec. Sec. 2840 Canary. Visalia 93277. 

Tule Vista No. 105, Porterville— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Porterville Women's Glut 
265 North "E" St.; Mrs. Ruth Olsen, Rec. Sec 
681 W. Belleview. Porterville 93257. 
TUOLUMNE COUNTY 

Oardanelle No. 66, Sonora— Meets Isl 
Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Sonora: Mrs. Lucy 
Valerdi, Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 17, Sonora 
93570. 

Golden Era No. M. Columbia — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, N.S.G.W. Hall; Miss Irene Ponc«, 
Rec Sec, Rt. 3. Box 644, Sonora 95370. 

Anona No. 164, Jamestown— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. Rebekah Hall; Mrs. Celia Car- 
boni, Rec Sec, Box 123, Jamestown 95327. 
VENTURA COUNTY 

El Aliso No 314. Santa Paula— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Monday, Moose Lodge Hall, 700 E. 
Santa Barbara SL: Send mail to Natalie Boyn- 
ton, Pres., 1037 S. Sespa, Fillmore 93015. 

Poinsettia No. 318, Ventura — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall 516 E. Main SL. 
Mrs. Ethel Kelly, Rec Sec. 591 Frances St., 
Ventura 93003 

YOLO COUNTY 

Woodland No. 90, Woodland— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, 547 First Street; Mrs. Elizabeth E. 
Elston, Rec. Sec, 920 Cross St., Woodland 
95695. 

YUBA COUNTY 

Marysville No. 162, Marysville — Meets 2ri 
and 4th Wednesday, Jewish Center, 10th ana 
Rameriz St.: Mrs. Evelyn D. Eden, Rec. Sec . 
669 Chestnut St.. Yuba City 95991. 

Camp Far West No. 218, Wheatland— Meets 
3rd Tuesday, Masonic Temple, 4th & Front: 
Mrs. Shirley Ross, Rec. Sec, Rt. 1, Box 50, 
Wheatland 9569Z 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



iSAN FRANCISCO 

I San Francisco No. 261 had a 
! luncheon and bingo game at the 
Grizzly Bear Club under co-chair- 
men, Marie L. Feil and Flora 
Campisi. This was well attended. 
The main course was "Italian De- 
light" prepared by the co-chairmen 
and Bernice Oliva. 



Parlor Uew/s 




The Parlor's 35th Birthday Din- 
ner was held at Sabella's in October 
with three charter officers present 
and several charter members. DGP 
Elenore Bianchi of El Vespero No. 
1 1 8 was a guest chairman Gloria 
Tomay prepared Emerald favors. 
All received a token gift which she 
she also had made. President Edna 
VI. Garaventa welcomed ail. Grand 
President, Irene Bondanza, her twin, 
was unable to be present as she 
u as attending the Junior Native 
Daughter Conference. 



ALOHA 

Aloha No. 106, held a closed 
installation at the Montclair Wo- 
men's Club, with a buffet Dinner. 
The tables were beautifully dec- 
orated and the delicious home 
cooked food was prepared by Alma 
Lilienthal. 

The new president is Alma 
lilienthal. Her Officers installed 
Aith her were Mmes. Harris, 
R e s t a g n o, Abernathy, Peterson, 
Fcrreia. Suico, Page, Degen, Nel- 
son. Farley. Misses Restagno and 
Nathan. Installing officer was DGP 
Dnrothy Jordan, Bahia Vista. As- 
sisting her was her mother. Cali- 
lornia Davis, acting Grand Sec- 
retary; Gertrude Dalton, acting 
(Irand Marshal; and giving the ob- 
liL'ation to the officers-elect was Inez 
C lalardo. 

Monetary Parlor gifts were pre- 
sented to DGP Dorothy Jordan by 
ehairman of the evening, Gladys I. 
I aricy and SDDGP Ethel Murphy 
by Marshal Jennie Peterson. Gladys 
I. Farley presented President Alma 
Lilienthal a beautiful crystal bowl 
on behalf of the Parlor and several 



NDGW — PICTURES 



Because of the greatly increased 
cost of engravings, please send the 
approximately 3x3 inch size for pic- 
tures of PEOPLE to be used with 
the Parlor activity stories. If you have 
larger pictures to l>e sent please cut 
to 3x3 size. 

Pictures of historical sites, build- 
ings, scenes etc. may be larger. Please 
indicate if we may cut them if neces- 
sary. 



friends. Outside Sentinel Katherine 
Nathan was granted a $400.00 
scholarship by the Veteran's Wel- 
fare Fund of Grand Parlor, to allow 
her to continue attending San Fran- 
cisco State College. She hopes to 
become a teacher in the Bay area. 

Following are Grand Parlor 
Appointments by Grand President 
Irene Bondanza: Gladys I. Farley 
— Legislation; Jennie Peterson — 
Conservation and Safety; Adeline 
O'Brien — Mission Restoration; 
Myrtle Degen — State Chairman 
Sub-committee Art-Talent Contest; 
Myrtle Degen — DGP to Piedmont 
No. 87. 

IN MEMORIUM 
The Father's Love 

May Faith's golden ray 
scatter shadows gray 
and Hope point to light above. 
With Joy in your heart 
may aU cares depart 
As you rest in the Father's 
Great Love! 
Members of Alalia Parlor were 
grieved from the loss of their Past 
President I r m a S. Murray, who 
passed away July 30, 1970. She 
also was Past Grand Secretary of 
the NDGW. 

r / / 

MINERVA 

The officers of Minerva No. 2 
were formally installed by DGP 
Verna Cummings of San Francisco 
No. 261, assisted by members of 
her Parlor who were the Acting 
Grand Officers. 

PGP Emily E. Ryan administered 
the obligation, as PGP Alice Shea 
was installed as first vice president. 
Katherine Ross was seated as presi- 




PGP SHEA 



PGO SIMAS 



dent; an escort line was formed for 
President Katherine, by six of the 
1969-1970 Deputy Grand Presi- 
dents wearing their red formals. 
During the escort Hazel Adams, 
organist of Minerva sang accom- 
panied by PGO Frances Simas, also 
of Minerva. 

Honored guests included SDDGP 
Edna Garaventa, and Anne Shaw, 
Supervisor of 1968-69. Pa.st SDDGP 
Marie Feil was Acting Gand Mar- 
shal for the Installation ceremonies. 

After the Installation, DGP 
Verna Cummings introduced the 
new DGP, Bemadette Sullivan. Re- 
freshments were served in the 
Grizzly Bear Club room. 



DOLORES 

Installation of Dolores No. 169 
was held at the NDGW Home. 
Ceremonies were conducted by DGP 
Bernadette Sullivan of Golden Gate 
No. 158 assisted by Jr. PGP Nancy 
Conens and GM Rae L. Rominger. 




JR. PGP CONENS 



GM ROMINGER 



In front of president Rose Calcy's 
station was a large flowered "R" 
standing for "Rose". PGP Evelyn I. 
Carlson explained that each lett'^r 
had a significant meaniiir IV 
stands for responsibihty; 
organization (NDGW>: 
ccrity which denotes '- 
(Conlini! 



OCTOBER, 1970 



DOLORES PARLOR . . . 
(Continued from Pai;e II) 

tions; and "E" for earnestness, a 
serious intent to perform one's 
duties. Putting them all together 
represents the ingredients for the 
making of a worthy president. An 
arm bouquet of pink rosebuds was 
presented to the president by 10- 
year old Debbie Brake. 

Dislinquished guests included 
PGPs Orinda Giannini, Emily Ryan, 
Evelyn I. Carlson. SDDGPs Edna 
Garaventa and Nora Nesper, DGP 
Doris Stidhem, Jr. State Secretary 
Rcnee Cook and Mrs. Harris, mana- 
ger of the NDGW Home. 

A musical program was given by 
young members of lionita Parlor. 
Georgic Jacks and PGO Frances 
Simas. 

y / / 
COLimiBIA 

Grand President Irene Bondanza 
of San Francisco No. 261, made 
her official visit to Columbia No. 
70. September 14. A salad bar 
luncheon was served at noon, with 
the meeting following in Farrelly 
Hall. President Ruth Skoverski pre- 
sided, and Columbia Parlor mem- 
bers in attendance totalled six (the 
entire membership is fifteen). In 
addition to the Grand President. 
Chairman of the Board of Grand 
Trustees Bettv Read Curilich. GT 





GT McGUIRE 



PGP MALLETTE 



Marian McGuire, and PGP Hazel 
T. Mallette were present, escorted 
and introduced. SDDGP Gladys 
Blanchard. of Laurel No. 6. Nevada 
City, and DGP Hilda Sandow. 
Manzanita Parlor No. 29, Grass 
Valley, were also present. Other 
visitors included five from Oak Leaf 
No. 29,5: four from Laurel No. 6; 
three from Naomi No. 36; two from 

PAGE 12 



Marysville No. 162; two from Camp 
Far West No. 218; and one from 
Manzanita No. 29. 

* i i 
JIRIHA 

Mmes. Carol Smith. Steve Buch- 
ko. SDDGP District No. 36 a n d 
Floretta Banks w e r e among the 
fifteen from Jurupa Parlor No. 296, 
Riverside who enjoyed the fund 
raising event for the Tournament of 
Roses float held at the Tiki at 
Monterey Park. 

1 1 i 

SAN FRANCISCO DEPUTIES 

San Francisco members of the 
drill team for the Grand President, 
served tea at the San Francisco 
County Deputies tea and reception 
for Grand President Bondanza in 
October also. They were attired in 
their "Irene" dresses, and assisted 
the supervisor, Edna M. Garaventa. 
of San Francisco County and her 
Deputies 1970-71. 

1 1 i 

JAMES IJCK 

DGP Doris Stidhem entertained 
members of James Lick No. 220 in 
her home with a delicious luncheon. 
After playing the new NDGW 
phonograph record, Jaredna John- 
son presented it to the hostess. PGP 
Emily Ryan gave an encouraging 
message. 

In September PP Ann Ghiselli 
entertained the members in her 
home. The hostess told the guests 
of her recent trip to Hawaii and 
showed her doll collection. 

ill 
I'A.ST PRESIDENTS ASSOCIATION 

Constance Warshaw. State Presi- 
tient of the Association has started 
again on her scheduled official 
visits. On. September 1 4th .she was 
at Association No. 27 — Merced 
County. The dinner and meeting 
was held at the Canal Farm Inn. 
at Los B a n o s. GT June Painter 
from Los Banos Parlor was also 
in attendance. 

On September 17th a dinner held 
at the Pepperwood Coffee Shop. 
San Anscmlo, preceded the meeting 
of AssiKiation No. 22. which was 
held at the American Legion Log 
Cabin. San Anselmo. Beside State 
Director Carolyn I'austine No. 22. 



in attendance, were State Director, 
Regina Reeves, No. 7, Sonoma 
County; Past State President Elvirla 
Woodward, No. II. Past Grand 
President Lee Brice of Marinii,: 
Parlor is President of Associatioi 
No. 22. and conducted the meeting. 

Official visits were also made 
September by State President War- 
to Associations No. 1 1 , Solano 
County on the 22nd; Association 
No. 19, Los Angeles on the 29th 
where eight new members were initia- 
ted into the Past Presidents' Asso- 
ciation and to Association No. 23. 
San Bernardino-Riverside Countic 
on the 30th. 

In October, she will visit Associa 
tion No. 2, Alameda County on the 
12th; No. 20, Fresno-Kings Coun 
ties on the 15th; No. 6 Nevad 
County on the 23rd and No. 25, Cal 
averos Countv on the 26th. 



IN MEMBRIAM 




Katie J. Morosoli, Calistoga No. 145, 

August 1. 
Hazel Mercer. Twin Peaks No. 185, 

August in. 
Lida Knight aicibcrt, El Tejon No. 239, 

July 7. 
Ethel Grace Farley. Golden Gate No. 

148. Augiist2. 
Nettie Aline Christensen. Golden Gate, 

No. 158. August 9. 
Ruth Austin. Centennial No. 295. July 

18. 

Flinor Adams. Joaquin No. 5, August 18. 
Gcraldine Dudlcv. Fresno No. 187. April 

18. 
Mary Margaret Osbom. Bcrendos No. 

2.''. August 21. 
Pearl l.iigomarsino. La Bandera No. 1 10, 

August 29. 
Elsie Williams. Morada No. 199, August 

25. 
I'Kie Jory. Amapola No. 80. August 2L 

Irene StMmi. Golden Gate No. 158. 

.August }0. 
Florabel Brennan. Golden Era No. 99. 

August 4. 
Ooria Phillips. Vcrdugo No. 240, August 

29. 
Mary B. Aaroc. Aleli No. 102. September 

I. 
Jessie Hann. Bonila No. 10, September 

1. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



(Continued from Page 5) 
DAYS OF THE DONS . . 




TOP LEFT — Arcadia Bandini Baker de 
Sterns in one of the gowns popular in 
her era. As the wife of Don A he I 
Stearns, Dona Arcadia was the leader of 
California society. 



LOWER RIGHT — Frog pond on 
Rancho Guajome. "Guajome" is a 
Luisaho Indian word mean i n g 
"Home of the Frog." 




OCTOBER, 1970 



DAYS OF THE DONAS . . . 
iConiiiiiicd froiii l'af;e II) 

II California ladies did not wear 
the latest fashions in apparel it was 
not their fiiuit. They were so far re- 
moved foni centers of culture that 
they knew little of changing modes 
of dress. When Governor Sola took 
office in 1816 the ladies who at- 
tended his inauguration ball came 
dressed in their finest gowns, many 
years out of date. Seeking to pay 
them a compliment the governor 
congratulated them for having re- 
vived the quaint styles of his youth. 
Actually California women were in 
the process of developing their own 
highly individualized styles (uncor- 
seted waist, of course) when a group 
of colonists from Mexico introduced 
them to contemporary European 
modes in 1835, which were forth- 
with adopted. 

The beautiful gowns which bright- 
ened this later period are those most 
copied today as the feminine cos- 
tume of the "Days of the Dons." 
The high, tortoise shell combs, con- 
sidered characteristic of the period, 
did not come into vogue until after 
1840. 

Beef, jrijoles (beans) and tortillas 
were staple foods and were served 
at every meal. Veal was popular, 
but pork, mutton, venison and bear 
meat met with little favor. Chiles 
colorados (red peppers^ were used 




Portrait of "Spanish Lady". The artist was Blanche Collet 
Wagner, wife of California historian and bibliographer. Henry 

R. Wagner. 




I w 




Other than the horse, tlie horse drawn Mageeoach was the 
popular way to travel. 

PAGE 14 



Looking into the kitclien from the 

interior of the living room of the 

Ramirez adobe, located in .Santa 

Barbara. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



generously and lentils, corn, onions, 
'squash and pumpkin were common. 
iCabbages and turnips were rare. 

Sugar, which was of the brown 
ivariety, was costly as was chocolate. 
iCoffee and tea were introduced at 
ia later period. 

i Dairy products were scarce items 
for to milk a wild cow was some- 
thing of a physical feat as well as 
jbeing rather unproductive. With the 
development of better supplies of 
foodstuffs, California cookery at- 
tained a reputation for excellence. 

California ladies loved dancing 
land several variations originated at 
iSan Juan Capistrano. La Jota, re- 
isembling the Virginia Reel, was an 
jold favorite and El Jarehe, the na- 
tional dance of Mexico, was also 
[popular. A special version of Seven 
\Up developed at San Juan Capis- 
trano as did a local adaptation of 
iLa Varsoiivianna. However. La Var- 
isouvianna was frowned upon by the 
clergy as being too intimate. At one 
time the waltz was prohibited under 
f)enalty of ex-communication. 




Several of the popular dances of these early days have been preserved and 
handed down from generation to generation. Above is a scene from "Pepito's 

Posada". 



LOWER LEFT — Camulos Adobe. 

reminiscent of Helen Hunt Jackson, 

author of "Ramona" , who visited 

there. 




LOWER RIGHT— Upper view of 
the inner patio of Rancho Guajome. 




OCTOBER, 1970 



PAGE 15 



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PIONEER PRESS 

Antiquarian & Out-of-print 

Book Division 

presents 

VOLUME THREE 

Orange County Historical 

Society Publication (now 

out-of-print) 

Authors include: Will McPhenon, Terry 
E. Stephenson, Leo J. Friis, Alfonso 
Yorba, Fern Hill Colman. W. M. 
McFadden, E. M. Sunquist and many 
others. 

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iMake check payable to 
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Send to 
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times the author tells what it means to 
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Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 



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U. S. NAVY 



■i(»caic;=ini iBii im »""="|i 



JR. UNIT NEWS 

JUNIOR NATIVE DAUGHTERS 
State Officers — 1970-1971 

President: Kathy Koch, Sequoia Unit No. 

27, 1223 Dewey Street, Redwood City 

94061. 
Past President: Leealyn Baker, Fruitvale 

Unit No. 22, 3530, 66th Avenue, Oakland 

94605. 
Vice Presitlent: Jean Tullius, Argonaut Unit 

No. 3, 2478-47th Avenue, San Francisco 

94116. 
Secretary: Sharon Landt. Fruitvale Unit Na 

22. 344-65th Avenue, Apt. #3, Oakland 

94605. 
Treasurer: Linda Porterfield, Shasta Daisy 

Unit No. 39, 1438 Oregon Street, Redding 

96001. 
Marshal: Renee Cook, Menio . Unit No. 10, 

869 Comet Drive, Foster City 94404. 
Trustees: Laurie Cane. MenIo Unit No. 10, 

3814 Jefferson, Redwood City 94062. 

Margaret Deto, Sequoia Unit No. 27, 1270 

Dewey Avenue, Redwood City 94061. 

Cynthia Allen, Estrellas de Orp Unit No. 

37, 12704 Home Park Drive, Whittier 90606. 
Sentinel: Barbara Kaiser, Princesa del Mar 

Unit No. 40, 296 Lexington Avenue, Goleta 

93017. 
Organist: Kathy Solie, Shasta Daisy Unit 

No. 39, 834 Yuba Street, Redding 96001. 

JUNIOR NATIVE DAUGHTER UNITS 

Argonaut Unit No. 3, Berkeley— Advisor: Mrs. 
Helen Tullius, 2478-47th Avenue San Francisco 
94116. 

Memo Unit No. 10, MenIo Park— Advisor: Mrs. 
Evelyn I. Carlson, PGP, 1308 Hoover Street, 
MenIo Park 94025. 

Camellia Unit No. 15, Anderson— Advisor: 
Mrs. Lois Isley, 1887-3rd Street, Anderson 
96007. 

Fruitvale Unit No. 26, Napa — Advisor; Mrs. 
Esther Ragon, 3479 Davis Street, Oakland 
94601. 

Eshcolita Unit No. 26, Napa— Advisor: Mrs. 
Barbara Bentley, 2715 Soscol Avenue, Napa 
94558. 

Sequoia Unit No. 27, Redwood City— Advisor: 
Mrs. Barbara Koch, 1223 Dewey Street, Red- 
wood City 94061. 

Las Amiguitas Unit No. 33, Walnut Creek- 
Advisor: Mrs. Marge Woodward, 2464 Casa 
Way, walnut Creek 94596. 
Estrellas de Oro Unit No. 37, Norwalk— Ad- 
visor: Mrs. Danella Hawkins, 13128 Liggett 
Street, Norwalk 90650. 

Golden Poppy Unit No. 38, San Francisco- 
Advisor: Mrs. Helen McCarthy, GT, 4064-18th 
Street. San Francisco 94114. 
Shasta Daisy Unit No. 39, Redding— Advisor: 
Mrs. Catherine T. Porterfield 1438 Oregon 
Street. Redding 96001. 

Princesa del Mar Unit No. 40, Santa Barbara 
—Advisor: Mrs. Nancy Fluker, 1829 San 
Pascual Street, Santa Barbara 
Golden Green Valley Unit No. 41, Salinas- 
Advisor: Mrs. Lee Vaughan, 653 N. Madeira, 
Salinas 93901. 



PRINCESA DEL MAR 

The installation of officers of 
Frinccsa del Mar Unit was held with 
members of the unit as the installing 
team. The theme was "Friendship 
through Love." Mrs. Nancy Fluker 
was the installing officer; Mrs. Lor- 
raine Aceves, advisor on the entrance 
march. 

Officers elect included President 
Debbie Lopez and her corps of of- 
ficers: Barbara Kaiser, Lisa Mac- 
Farlane, Cynthia Davis, Kim Cor- 
nell, Karen Amstutz, Mary Rose 
Macdonald. Rhonda Espinosa, Lor- 
( Continued on Page M) 

PAGE 2 



California Herald 

•PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 

Volume XVIII Novi-mbf.r, 1970 Number 3 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Junior NDGW Directory 2 

Junior Unit News 2 

Albert Maver Winn, by John F. Davis. Sr ? 

The Grand President's Corner 6 

Junior NDGW Conference, by Lila S. Hummel, GT, State Chairman 7 

Parlor News 8 

In Memoriam 15 

Thanksgiving Day, by Johann A. P. Schuiz (1800) 15 

Thanksgiving Prayer, by Jan Struther 15 



We're splitting the atom for you. 



Chances are some of the 
electricity you now use is 
generated at the San 
Onofre Nuclear Plant near 
San Clemente. 

Edison plans to add 
additional nuclear units at 
this site. One reason: in a 
nuclear reactor there is no 



combustion, so there are 
no by-products of combus- 
tion. Electricity from clean 
nuclear plants is one of the 
ways Edison is working to- 
day for a better tomorrow. 



Southern California Edison 




.1. J. KRIIS 
Piihlisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



.1 VNK KRIIS 
I'uhlic Kclations 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers. Anahatm, 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim. California. 
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printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



C/lLti yTuav^t (/Jinn 



bif ^^okti ,^_y . zj^avis, .JZ>t 




From left: Betty Read Curilich, 
chairman of the board of Grand 
Trustees, NDGW; Rae L. Rominger, 
Grand Marshal. NDGW; John H. 
Kurtz, Grand President, NSGW; 
Frank S. Christy, chairman and past 
grand historian, NSGW. 



E PAUSE HERE TODAY TO PAY 



homage to Albert Maver 
Winn, who founded the Order of 
the Native Sons of the Golden West. 
He was born April 27, 1810, in 
Louden County, Virginia, the eldest 
of 18 children. His father, the son 
of a soldier of the Revolutionary 
War, was commissioned a captain 
and fought against England in the 
War of 1812. 

Albert was deeply impressed with 
patriotism and love of fatherland and 
grew up with an intense love of 
American institutions that character- 
ized his conduct throughout his 
entire life. 

After the close of the War of 1812 
the family moved to Culpepper 
County. This was not a period of 
prolific interest in education, but 
young Winn did attend school until 
he was twelve years old. Thereafter 

NOVEMBER, 1970 



he helped on the farm until he was 
16, at which time he became an 
apprentice and learned the car- 
penter's trade. In 1824 the family 
moved to Zanesville, Ohio. 

Five years later Winn married 
Catherine Gaffney and the young 
couple moved into Mississippi where 
Albert engaged in the lumbering 
business and carpentry. When he 
attained his legal majority in 1831 
Andrew Jackson was president and 
he became a Jackson Democrat. 

It was during his years in Missisip- 
pi that Winn became interested in 
military affairs. In 1835 he became 
a lieutenant in the milita. In 1836 
Governor Lynch commissioned him 
a major on the staff; from 1840 to 

1844 he was State Drill Master. In 

1845 he became a colonel. 

In this military capacity he be- 
came acquainted with Jefferson 
Davis and was chosen colonel of 
the Mississippi Volunteers of t h e 
Mexican War. At this time (1846) 
he was president of the Master 
Carpenters and Joiners Society of 
Vicksburg and had also served on 
the Vicksburg City Council. 

In spite of Winn's happy residence 
of 17 years at Vicksburg and his 
success in business, military and civic 
life, the lure of the far west beckoned 
and he joined that long train of 
adventurous men who set forth 
for California after the discovery of 
gold. 

Winn left Vicksburg on February 
14. 1849. and settled in Sacramento 
June 25. Since Winn had been n 
man of civic and military experience 
at Vicksburg, it was only natural 
he take an active part in the muni- 
cipal beginnings of Sacramento. In 
the autumn of 1849 he was elected 
the first mayor of Sacramento. 

In 1850 California organized a 
militia of four divisions and eight 



brigades. By resolution of the Legis- 
lature, under date of April 10, 1850. 
Winn was appointed brigadier gen- 
eral. This commission was approved 
by Governor John Bigler. 

During this period a group of 
settlers began squatting on the land 
of Captain John A. Sutter, destroy- 
ing his timber, wheat fields and 
buildings. In an attempt to disperse 
them, riots broke out and Sheriff 
Joseph McKinney was killed. Gen- 
eral Winn organized the Law and 
Order League and used his brigade 
in supplementing the peace officers 
in restoring order. 

Winn not only made his contri- 
bution to the civil and military 
beginning of Sacramento, but he was 
also a prime mover in its fraternal 
and religious life. 



In 1851 he organized the first Odd 
Fellows Lodge on the Pacific Coast 
and was its first Noble Grand. He 
was also instrumental in the estab- 
lishment of Grace Church, the first 
Episcopal Church in Sacramento. 



ecMSCopal 




cbuRCb 



Winn was also a Mason. In 1849 
he organized the Odd Fellows Relief 
Association for Widows and Or- 
phans. Later he had Masons and 
Odd Fellows finance a hospital for 
their sick and destitute. Winn was 
also champion of temperance, hav- 
ine joined the Sons of Temperance 
in^ 1853. 

(Continued on Next Page) 

PAGE 3 



WINN . . . 

(Continued from Page 3) 

While in Sacramento, Winn acted 
as land agent for Sutter and later 
as a notan' public in Grass Valley. 
While living in Sutter County he was 
defeated for the Legislature. He 
moved to San Francisco in 1860 
and engaged in the real estate bus- 
iness. 

His wife died in 1862 and in IS^" 
he married the widow of the mur- 
dered editor, James King of Will- 
iam, whose death brought the sec- 
ond vigilance committee into 
existence in San Francisco. 

In 1869 he attempted to organize 
the Native Sons of the Golden West 
but failed because the boys were too 
young. He tried again in 1875 and 
succeeded. This was done July 1 1 . 
1875. 

On July 4, 1876, he organized 
the Sons of the Revolution Sires, 
which later became Sons of the 
American Revolution. He was also 
champion of the labor movement 
and it was due to his efforts the 
carpenters obtained an eight hour 
day. 

After founding the Revolution 
Sires, Winn retired to his stepson's 
ranch (Charles J. King) of Sonom' 
and died August 26, 1883. His body 
was sent to Sacramento for the 
funeral which was conducted under 





Capi. John A. Sutter 



the ritual of the Native Sons. Every 
organization in Sacramento partic- 
ipated in the procession. The courts 
and civil bodies suspended business 
during the day of the funeral. 

A movement was started in 1887. 
by the Native Sons, to move his 
remains to the Pioneer Plot in the 
Sacramento City Cemetery and erect 
a monument in his memory. A plot 
was purchased and with the consent 
of his son, who later became a 
member of the Native Sons, Winn's 
remains were removed to the new 
location. (Parenthetically, let me 
state here that in 1968 the monu- 
ment, which was erected and edi- 
cated November 28, 1888, was 
vandalized and was refurbished in 
1969 with funds from the City of 
Sacramento. ) 

So then, this was Albert Maver 
Winn. Truly a man of many facets, 
truly a man of great organizational 
ability, truly a great American. 

Winn came to California during 
a period of great upheaval and the 
need for reconstruction was great. 
Many men came here with eyes 
aglitter with fervor and hunger for 
the sight of Gold! But although there 
were many who were rewarded, 
there were more whose hopes and 
dreams were dashed and their 
futures ruined when their expecta- 
tions were not realized. Thousands 
of these gold-hungry men were 



PAGE 4 



ruined, men whose talents could 
have been of great help to the grow- 
ing state, for this was a day of un- 
limited opportunity — the gates were 
wide open for all to come to Cali- 
fornia. Many men recognized this 
golden opportunity and did come — 
not with the mining of gold as their 
goal, but the desire to put their 
talents to use and lend the way to 
the formation of a new territory. 
Each brought ability and experience 
in many fields, agriculture, mer- 
chandising, transportation, politics, 
law, and military, to help build the 
foundation of what was to become 
this great State of California. These 
men had foresight and unique ability 
and they recognized the need for 
leadership in this virgin territory and 
they did not hesitate to give of every 
ounce of their knowledge and ■ 
strength for this purpose. \ 

But none were more talented, 
none were more knowledgable. none 
were more desirous to add to the 
building of this community and 
state than Winn. 

We, the Native Sons of the Golden 
West are primarily interested today, 
in one facet of Winn's abilities, the J 
founding of our great Order. Isn't it " 
remarkable that he should, somehow 
in his busy life, gave thought to the 
»)rganization of such a unique frater- 
nal body as the Native Sons? Isn't 
it strange that Winn, a Virginian. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



would create and foster an idea of 
bringing together young men, native 
born Californians to start a fraternal 
order which has done so much for 
the preservation and restoration of 
California's historically important 
sites? 

Winn's idea to organize the Native 
Sons of the Golden West must have, 
indeed, been a strong idea. He did 
not abandon his plans when in 1869 
he tried and failed to bring the or- 
ganization into being, he held this 
idea in his mind and kept the first 
group of men interested until 1875. 



for as research shows, most of these 
young men joined as charter mem- 
bers and were noted in the 1869 
group. That these men were young 
is shown in the records. The grand 
officers of the first Grand Parlor 
were upwards from twenty years of 
age and the first Grand President 
was the "old man" of the group at 
24 years old. The second Grand 
President was between 21 and 22 
years old when he was elected. 

From the idea of organization of 
the Native Sons fostered by Winn. 



our Order has been active in a great 
many restorations and/or preservat- 
ions of historically important sites 
such as Sutter's Fort in Sacramento. 
El Camino Real and the Mission 
chain throughout the length of Cali- 
fornia, Vallejo's Home in Sonoma, 
Fort Ross on the Coast and many 
others. The Native Sons and Nati»'e 
Daughters were among the first to 
help save our magnificent redwoods 
and since 1883 the Native Sons bavp 
sponsored the State Admission D-^v 
celebrations, with the exception of 
six years. 

(Continued on Page 12) 




Restored Sutter's Fori in Sacranwnlo 



NOVEMBER. 1970 



PAGE 5 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GRAND PRhSIDI-NT 

Irene Hondanza (Mrs. Joseph) 

2328 Union Street 

San Francisco, California 94123 




RENE BONDANZA 



SAN JUAN BAUTISTA 

San Juan Bautista held their first 
meeting of the new term at the 
Adobe. Mrs. Amaldo Andrcaz/i, 
president presided. 

Refreshments were served at 
tables decorated in the historical 
theme before the meeting with the 
California History and Landmarks 
committee in charge. Mrs. Henry 
Slibsager read a history of California 
and all joined in singing "I Love 
You California" with Gertrude Hill 
at the piano. Committee members 
were: Mmes. Archibald, Slibsager, 
Hill, McConnell, Scott and Zanetta. 
The Charter was draped in memory 
of Irma S. Murray, Past Grand Sec- 
retary of the Grand Parlor. The 
following reported: Mrs. Jim Lyon 
on standing rules; Mrs. L e o n o r 
Joseph on scholarship fund; Mrs. 
Andreazzi on the Native Daughter 
Home; Mrs. Frank Ovilla and Mrs. 
Anna Baccala on the meeting of the 
San Juan State Park Advisory Com- 
mittee parking problems. Since Mrs. 
Agnes King was unable to attend to 
receive her 50 year pin. her niece 
Mrs. Frank Avilla will present it to 
her. 

The Harvest Dance on November 
14 at the Community proved to be 
a most delightful occasion. 

■t i i 
VERDUGO 

Verdugo No. 240 recently hon- 
ored Mrs. G u s s i c Anderson at a 
luncheon on the occasion of her 98th 
birthday. The luncheon was held at 
the Red Vest Restaurant in Glen- 
dale. Thirty members were present. 

Mrs. Anderson has been a mem- 
ber of the Native Daughters for 71 
years, joining the Order in San 
Francisc<i in 1 899. She was a mcm- 

PAGE 6 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 

227 1 -32nd Avenue 

San Francisco, California 94116 

Office: 703 Market Su-eet. Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



Jtinerar^ 1970 

NOVEMBER 

1 Childrens Foundation Bruncheon Oroville 

2 Berryessa No. 192, Olivia No. 309 Willows* 

4 Hiawatha No. 140, Berendos No. 23, Camillia No. 41, 

Lassen View No. 98 Redding* 

9 Eshcol No. 16 Napa* 

10 Woodland No. 90 Woodland* 

12 Sequoia No. 272, Bear Flag No. 151 and 

Argonaut No. 166 Oakland* 

17 Richmond No. 147, Albany No. 260 and 

Cerrito de Oro No. 306 Richmond* 

18 Lomitas No. 255 Los Banos* 

19 Las Juntas No. 221, Las Amigas No. 311 Concord* 

24 Brooklyn No. 157, Aloha No. 106 and 

Berkeley No. 150 Oakland* 

26 Thanksgiving 

DECEMBER 

1 Seapoint No. 196, Tamelpa No. 231 Sausalito* 

2 El Carmelo No. 181 Daly City* 

6 San Francisco Childrens Foundation Breakfast 

8 Utopia No. 252, Guadalupe No. 153, 

Twin Peaks No. 185 San Francisco* 

10 San Bruno No. 246, Menlo No. 211 San Bruno* 

11 Bahia Vista No. 167, Encinal No. 156, 

Fruitvale No. 177 Oakland* 

15 Reina del Mar No. 126, Tierra de Oro No. 304 Santa Barbara* 

* Official visits are marked with astericks 



ber of Las Lomas Parlor for thirt\ 
years. On November 26. 1929. she 
joined Verdugo Parlor and has held 
membership in the parlor for 41 
years. A beautiful orchid corsage 
and many cards and gifts were pre- 
sented to Mrs. Anderson. Until 
recently she has been an active mem- 
ber. 

f f Y 

Jl'RUPA 

Mmes. Carol Smith, Steve Buch- 
ko, SDDGP District No. 36 and 
Floretta Banks were among the 
fifteen from Jurupa Parlor No. 296, 
Riverside who enjoyed the fund 
raising event for the Tournament of 
Roses float held at the Tiki at 
Monterey Park. 




Jurupa Parlor No. 296. From left: \ 
Mmes. Carrol Smith. Sieve Bucko 
and Floretta Banks. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




JUNIOR N.D.G.W, 

CONFERENCE 



by 

iiia S. Hummel, 

G.T. 

State Chairman 

of Junior 
Hative Daughters 



The 18th annual conference of 
J u n i o r Native Daughters of the 
Golden West was held at the Edge- 
water Hyatt House in Oakland on 
October 9, 10 and 11. Friday even- 
ing the Junior State Officers and 
Grand Officers enjoyed fellowship 
at a dinner. The decorations were 
in the fall colors with bouquets of 
asters on the tables. Leealyn Baker, 
Junior State President, and Dolores 
Ferenz, Grand Inside Sentinel and 
State Chairman of Junior Native 
Daughters, shared the honors of the 
dinner. Later in the evening a hi- 
jinx was held with the Units enjoy- 
ing the antics of their junior mem- 
bers. 

On Saturday morning the 1970 
Conference was called to order by 
Mrs. Esther R a g o n. Advisor to 
Fruitvale Unit No. 22, Oakland. The 
escort team from Fruitvale Unit 
wore long, flowered dresses while 
the members of the Unit wore 
short, flowered dresses for the formal 
opening. Grand Officers attending 
were: GP Irene Bondanza, Jr. PGP 





Nancy Conens 
Jr. PGP 



Virgilia McCombs 
GVP 



Nancy J. Conens, GVP Virgilia Mc- 
Combs, GM Rae Rominger, GS 
Lucille Kimbark, GTs: Betty Read 
Curilich, Chairman of the Board, 
Lila Hummel, Marian McGuire, 
Helen McCarthy, and GOS Icel 
Beers. PGPs were: Evelyn I. Carl- 
son, Irma Caton, Edna Williams, 

NOVEMBER, 1970 



and Alice Shea. Civic dignitaries 
introduced and extending greetings 
were: Oakland City Councilman 
Frank Ogawa, George Kirkland of 
the Oakland Chamber of Commerce, 
and GT James Hubbard, NSGW. The 
business session was conducted by 
Junior State President Leealyn 
Baker, Fruitvale Unit No. 22, Oak- 
land, assisted by her corps of Junior 
State Officers. During the initiation 
ceremonies five new members were 
welcomed into the Order. Special 
recognition was given to Golden 
Green Valley Unit No. 41, Salinas, 
whose delegation was attending a 
Junior Conference for the first time 
have been organized this past year. 




Rae Rominger 
Grand Marshal 




R. Curlich 
Bd. of GTs 





Marion McGuire 
Grand Trustee 



Helen McCarthy 
Grand Trustee 



At the beginning of the afternoon 
session GP John Kurtz, NSGW, Napa 
Parlor, was escorted to the platform. 
He extended greetings to the Juniors 
and commended Leealyn on her 
term of office. During the afternoon 
session Mrs. Dolores Ferenz, State 
Chairman of Juniors, announced the 
awards: Year books: First, Menlo 
Unit No. 40, Santa Barbara; Second 
Sequoia Unit No. 27, Redwood City; 
Membership: Fruitvale Unit No. 22, 
Oakland, with a net gain of 10 new 
members; Essay: First, Teresa 
Ertola, Sequoia Unit No. 27, Red- 
wood City; Second, Marilyn Baker. 
Fruitvale Unit No. 22, Oakland; 
Third, Barbara Kaiser, Princesa del 




Irma M. Caton 
PGP 





V- 




Edna Vi/illiams 
PGP 



Alice T. Shea 
PGP 



Mar Unit No. 40, Santa Barbara. 
Scholarship: Linda Cane, Menlo 
Unit No. 10, Menlo Park; Unit Parti- 
cipation; First, Princesa del Mar 
Unit No. 40, Santa Barbara; Second, 
Fruitvale Unit No. 22, Oakland; 
Third, Las Amiguitas Unit No. 33, 
Walnut Creek. 

A formal banquet on Saturday 
evening officially ended the terms of 
State President Leealyn Baker and 
the corps of officers serving for the 
year 1969-1970. Installation of the 
1970-1971 Junior State Officers was 
conducted by State Chairman 
Dolores Ferenz. The Bible was es- 



fP 




V 



Dolores Ferenz 
GIS 



corted to the altar by two members 
of Sequoia Unit carrying lighted 
candles. An escort team from Se- 
quoia Unit, wearing formats and 
white satin ponchos, performed a 
drill during the installation of State 
(Continued on Page 8) 

PAGE 7 



JR. CONFERENCE . . . 
(Continued from Page 7) 

Junior President Kathy KcKh, 
Sequoia Unit No. 27. Other Junior 
State Officers installed were: Past 
President Lcealyn Baker, Fruitvale 
Unit No. 22, Oaidand; Vice Presi- 
dent Jean Tullius, Argonaut Unit 
No. 3. Oakland; Secretary Sharon 
Landt, Fruitvale Unit. No. 22, Oak- 
land; Treasurer Linda Porterfield, 
Shasta Dai-sy Unit No. 39, Redding; 
Marshal Rence Cook, Menlo Unit 
No. 10, Menlo Park; Trustee Laurie 
Cane, Menlo Unit No. 10, Menlo 
Park; Trustee Margaret Deto, Se- 
quoia Unit No. 27, Redwood City; 
Trustee Cynthia Allen, Estrellas de 
Oro Unit No. 37, Norwalk; Sentinel 
Barbara Kaiser, Princesa del Mar 
Unit No. 40, Santa Barbara; Organ- 
ist Kathy Solie, Shasta Dai.sy Unit 
No. 39, Redding. 

Kathy Koch, Sequoia Unit No. 27 
newly installed Junior State Presi- 
dent, spoke on her theme '"Wishing 
Makes It So" and encouraged each 
Unit to stress participation in the 
Junior activities. She appointed the 
following Junior State Chairmen: 
Membership, Jean Tullius, State 
Vice President; Welfare, Kathy 
Slater; Publicity, Laurie Carey; and 
Admission Day, Nadinc Bechmeyer. 
Past Junior State Presidents present 
were Cheryl Patterson Wilson, 1966- 
67, and Marsha Metzger 1967-68. 

Grand Trustee Lila S. Hummel 
was installed as the State Chairman 
of Junior Native Daughters of the 
Golden West for the term 1970-1971. 
Mrs. Lillian Stetson of Bonita No. 
10 and Mrs. Eda Mazzini of Hia- 
watha No. 140 were introduced as 
members of the State Committee of 
Juniors for 1970-1971. On Sunday 
a picnic was enjoyed by the Junior 
members at Hidden Valley Ranch, 
the former Stanford estate. 

1 i i 

JUNIOR NEWS . . . 
(Continiii-d jroiii Page 2) 

raine Contreras and Rosemary Bar- 
ragan. The officers presented Debbie 
with a stuffed lion. Barbara Kaiser 
was presented with a charm of last 
year's conference. 

The officers introduced their fami- 
lies, after which delicious refresh- 
ments were served. New Members 
arc Carol Ann Pascaloff and Lvnda 
'ell. 

PAGE e 



GOLDEN GKEEN VALLEY 

Golden Green Valley Junior Unit 
No. 41 recently installed its new 
corps of officers. Assuming the gavel 
was Miss Carrie Taylor. The follow- 
ing young ladies joined her for the 
coming term; the Misses Laurel 
Nelson, past president; Trina Burke, 
vice-president; Lianne Nelson, mar- 
shal; Susan Ottona, secretary; Mar- 
lene Jefferson, sentinel; Marti Jo 
Turano, Janet Fleming and Maxinc 
Damron, trustees. The hall was 
decorated in California Poppies (the 
official flower) and the dining room 
in a Halloween decor. Recently Miss 
Lori Farmer was initiated into the 
unit. 



■IE 



EIEIE 



ilDE 



EIEIE 



Parlor Uews 



^QE 



EIQE 



EIQE 



ElEE 



EIQ 



LUGONIA 

Lugonia No. 241 dedicated the 
site of the first Santa Fe depot in 
San Bernardino. The station was 
located about 400 feet from the 
dedicatory stone. The first depot 
burned to the ground in November. 




Picture of stone dedicated on July 
10, 1970 bv Lugonia Parlor No. 
241. 



1900. On that same evening the large 
civic auditorium was entirely de- 
stroyed by fire. Participating in the 
ceremonies were President Marie 
Rittcr, Superintendent Higginson, of 
Santa Fe railroad in San Bernardino, 
Inez Cisncros, Josephine Lynn. Lois 
Noland and Ivy Carr. 



riEKKA DEL REY 

Tierra del Rey No. 300, Hermosa 
Beach, held a pot-luck dinner pre- 
ceding the regular meeting and 
courtesy night, October 12. 

Parlors attending were; Wilming- 
ton No. 278; La Tijera No. 282; 
Inglewood; Rio Hondo No. 284, 
South Gate; and L<mg Reach No. 
154. Also attending was Frances 
Bruckler, DGP to Tierra del Rey. 
from Rio Hondo. After the meet- 
ing. Vera Mcintosh, President oi 
Tierra del Rey, was surprised with 
a birthday cake. 




JAMES LICK 

At the October meeting of Jame.s 
Lick Parlor, the official visit com- 
mittee made its report on plans. A 
luncheon was held honoring the 
October birthday members: Ann 
Shaughnessy, Hazel Griffith, charter 
member Mabel Walker and last 
term's DGP Doris Stidhem. 

«■ f r 
VENDOME 

A whiriwind of activity has been 
taking place in recent weeks. 
Western Night turned out a gala 
event with musical entertainment by 
the "Bell Tones". The honored 
guests were officers from San Jose 
No. 81, El Monte No. 205. Palo 
Alto No. 229, Los Galos No. 317. 
and Gilroy No. 312. A gift was 
presented to each visiting officer. 
The refreshments were delicious. 

Twenty nine members of Ven- 
dome Parlor and members from 
Palo Alto Parlor had a friendly get 
together at Mings Restaurant. 

Vendonie Parlor nimble fingers 
sewing club gave a delightful lunch- 
eon sponsored by the ladies league 
of Mountain View. Irene Lial was 
chairman of this successful affair. 
The outstanding culinary achieve- 
ment was due to Mnies. Engfcr, 
Garino, Schmidt, Gordon, Postier 
and Yakobovich. Ser\ing Hostes.scs 
were Mmcs. Figoni, Bonito, Howard. 
.Amann, Cantania, Murtha and Fair- 
child. 

A fabulous bazaar was held on 
October 8. Velma Gordon was chair- 
man of this successful event. Letter- 
man Hall was beautifully decorated 
with booths draped in festive colored 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



material furnished by President 
Betty. A large crowd attended which 
!made it a great monetary success. 
The members worked all year for 
this event. Special thanks to Connie 
Desmond, a non-member for her 
untiring work. 




From left: Kathleen McCanan, 
, Myrtle Poole, Edith Walker and 
\Judy Reno. 

I 

The Parlor had its Halloween 
I c o s t u m e party on October 20. 
!janiece Baker and Joyce Bray were 
: in charge. Prizes for the best cos- 
tumes were awarded to Mmes. Yako- 
bovich, Falbo. Howard, Morgan and 
Baker. 

i i i 

!sAN DFEGO PARLOR 

San Diego No. 208 has had many 
activities these past months. A dime- 
a-dip dinner planned by Margaret 
Helton to benefit the Children's 
Foundation, with movies on Cali- 
fornia afterwards, was enjoyed. 

Ways and Means chairman Ellen 
Stone planned an ice cream social 
and a waffle bruncheon. Both affairs 
were held in members' patios, as 
was a super Italian dinner. All help- 
ed swell the treasury a mite as well 
as a theater party and the sales of 
candy and greeting cards. 




President Catherine Higdon pre- 
sented a Calfomia Bear Flag to the 
U.S.O. for their new building for 
the service men in this area. She 
was accompanied by PP Emily 
Welch, currently the civic participa- 
tion chairman for San Diego Parlor. 

NOVEMBER, 1970 



The Pioneer Society of San Diego 
County entertained Parlor members 
at its October meeting, an annual 
custom. San Diego Parlor voted 
$100 to assist in reforestation of 
land in our county recently de- 
nuded by those devastating fires. 

All regret that the Las Flores 
del Mar Parlor had to relinquish its 
charter but a happy note is that 
the majority of its members have 
retained their membership in the 
Order by transferring to San Diego 
Parlor. 

i i i 

LILAC DEPUTIES 

For the 13th Anniversary Dinner, 
chairman Lucille K i m b a r k and 
Madeline King chose the Gold 
Mirror Restaurant. All except four 
of the Lilacs came to honor "First 
Lady' Irma Caton and SDDGP 
Frances Simas. Mrs. Simas gifted 




SDDGP Simas 

each with a useful present and PGP 
Irma treated with some "goodies". 
The evening closed in memory of 
the deputies of 1957-1958 who 
were watching from that "Great 
Place on High.' 

i i i 
SAN JUAN BAtlTISTA 

Refreshments of strawberries, ice 
cream, cookies, coffee, and tea were 
served on October 7th. before the 
regular meeting of San Juan Baiitista 
Parlor at its Adobe. The committee 
in charge included Mrs. Lawrence 
Freitas, Miss Rita Cadcmartori, Mrs. 
Doyle Day and Mrs. Pete Sutti. 
"Happy Birthday" was sung to Miss 
Rita Cademartori and Mrs. Harriet 
Chappel, a guest from Salinas and 
each was presented with a cup cake 
with a candle. 

DGP Genevieve Patterson, from 
Aleli was present and audited the 
books before the meeting. 

On October 26 when Grand Presi- 
dent Irene Bondanza paid an official 
visit to Santa Cruz Parlor, a 6:30 
dinner preceded the meeting at the 




San Juan Bautista NDGW Adobe 

Santa Cruz Hotel. There was a 
salad bar given by Junipero Parlor 
in Monterey at The House of Four 
Winds on October 20. The Parlor 
was also invited to a tour of the 
N.B.C. television studio in Burbank. 
Mrs. Anthony Botelho chairman 
of the luncheon and fashion show 
gave a report on the affair, it being 
a huge success financially and social- 

It was voted to allow the Past 
Presidents Club of the Native 
Daughters of San Juan and Hollister 
to use the Adobe for a meeting on 
October 27. The set of standing rules 
were read and after some discussion 
they were laid over to the next 
meeting. 

Mrs. Silvio Bottini reported that 
plans are progressing for the Harvest 
Ball to be held on November 14th 
at Community Hall. A buffet supper 
will be held and Gandelatia's or- 
chestra will furnish the music. Other 
committee members are Mrs. George 
Diss Sr., Mrs. Hazel DeRoza and 
Velma Silva. The annual Thanksgiv- 
ing dinner will be included with the 
Harvest Ball. 

Certificates of "Life Membership" 
were presented to Mmes. Clara 
Zanetta and Mayme Avilla. One will 
be sent to Dorothy Slaven. 

Refreshments were served at the 
regular meeting November 4 by 
Mmes. Avilla, Zanetta and Hazel 
DeRoza and Lucchelli. 



MARINITA 

The members of Marinita No. 198 
heard of a native born California 
lady who was about to celebrate her 
100th birthday. She resides in Marin 
County convalescent hospital, the 
"Parkway," and having no family 
and having outlived most of her 
friends, it did not seem likely that 

(Continued on Page 10) 

PAGE 9 



PARLOR NEWS . . . 
{Continued from Page 9) 

she would have much of a party. 
However, Murinila members decided 
to help make this 100th birthday 
memorable for Mrs. Emma Young, 
who, although not a member of our 
order was born in Kehlo, Mendocino 
County and had lived in California 
all her life. On the afternoon of her 
birthday, a large delegation of mem- 
bers assembled at the Parkway to 
celebrate with Emma. Jill Soldavini 
of Mariniui baked a birthday cake 
and decorated its beautifully, add- 
ing all the really professional-looking 
touches of massed roses, lettering 
and candles. A dozen red roses were 
presented from Marinita Parlor and a 
exquisite orchid corsage was con- 
tributed bv Marinita member, Lillian 
Dorr. 

Mrs. Young who graduated from 
Pasadena Junior College in 1900 
was thoroughly delighted by the 
party and all the attention she 
received. A highlight of the festivit- 
ies came when a card of congratula- 
tions which had been sent from 
President and Mrs. Richard Nixon 
was read. 

Some of the members from 
Marinita who helped in the party 
were Jean Hedemark, Elida Hecht. 
Jill Soldavini, Mary May, Lee Dorr, 
Georgia Gabb, and President Oda 
Santinello. 



SEQUOIA 

With Winifred McKee and Mary 
Scott as chairmen, the new officers 
of Sequoia No. 272 were installed 
at Veterans Memorial Building. The 
hall was decorated with a profusion 
of blooms. 

SDDGP Marjorie Jacobson, and 
a member of El Cereso No. 207 was 
assisted by officers of her Parlor 
in the installation rites. Ethel 
Murphy had charge of the opening 
of the ceremonies. Tillie Ruinlan 
acted as grand marshal and Jennie 
Agresta gave the obligation. Mrs. 
McKee was at the piano. 

While at the altar, Lorretta Del 
Carlo, the new president was ser- 
enaded by the many preprescntatives 
of other Parlors. Later in the even- 
ing, she presented gifts to her officers 
and gifts were given to the install- 
ing staff. 

Because of the publicity given for 
the Parlor and of the special features 

PAGE 10 



B?^^B^^^ 


S 


Hv«^ 


. ^H 




v^H 



Standing at the altar for her installa- 
tion as President of Sequoia No. 
272 is Lorretta Del Carlo. Behind 
her is installing marshal Tillie Ruin- 
lan of El Cereso No. 207. 



appearing in the California Herald, 
the Parlor's press book was dedi- 
cated to Clara Barton. She was also 
given a gift from Mrs. Del Carlo. 
Miss Barton is a past president of 
the Parlor. 

Special guests for the evening 
included Past Grand Presidents. 
Edna C. Williams who organized the 
Parlor in 1939, Nancy Conens. 
Irma Caton and Alice Shea. They 
were introduced while at the altar 
and each received a remembrance 
from the Parlor. Mrs. Caton was the 
spokenswoman for the Past Grand 
Presidents. 

Following the evening's activities, 
refreshments were served in the 
large dining room with the Parlor's 
new president and past grand presi- 
dents, the installing staff and DDGP 
at the head tables. Mrs. Jacobson 
has been renamed as the deputy for 
Sequoia Parlor. She was given a 
corsage. The tables had center pieces 
of various colored summer flowers 
and greenage. 







BACKS 




•3 




KAULBARS 

MORTUARY 




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1617 


w. Li Palma at E 
Anahalm 
772-1617 


uclld 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 535-7221 

INSURANCE — SURETY BONDS 

M. E. BEEBE & CO 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim. California 



N.D.G.W. "HOME HAPPENINGS" 

Grand President Irene Bondanz^ 
appointed the following members to 
serve on the Native Daughters of 
the Golden West Home Committee 
for the next three years: Charlotte 
Ludeman of Orinda No. 56. PGP 
Lee B r i c e of Marinita No. 29^ 
Marie Fell of San Francisco No. 261 
Eliza Paul of Piedmont No. 87 and 
Pauline Brasher of Los Angeles No. 
124. 




Charlotte Ludeman 



The newly elected officers of the 
Home Committee are: PGP Hazel 




PGP Lee Brice 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




NDGW Home prior to 1924 




PGP Hazel Hansen 

Hansen of Verdttgo No. 240, re- 
elected as chairman; PGP Edna 
Williams of Sequoia No. 272, 1st 
vice chairman; 2nd vice chairman, 
Anita Gillick; Treasurer, Charlotte 
Ludcman and PGP Lee Brice, 
•iccretary. 

"The Home Improvement" will 
be the special project of the com- 
mittee this year. The home like any 
other residence needs constant up- 
' eon and repairs. Safety and fire 
'"•vs continually change and it is 
f^and^torv that these chance; arc 
installed in the home. These items 
are costly so the Home Committee 
is depending on the generosity of 

NOVEMBER, 1970 



our members and parlors to make 
donations to this fund . . The Native 
Daughters Home is the only project 
of our order that we do for our own 
Native Daughters. Your assistance 
will be greatly appreciated — help 
us help our own. 

/ r / 
EL CAMINO REAL 

Members of El Camino Real No. 
324 brought home their second 
trophy from the Frazier Park Pioneer 
Daze Parade. This year they attended 
attired in Spanish costumes on a 
decorated truck accompanied by 32 
dozen cascarones which made a 
rainbow of color along the parade 
route. Past President Tda Grossi 
valiantly piloted the tr u c k and 
throwing out the cascarones were 
President Edie Bartlett. History and 
Landmark Chairman Marie Harring- 
ton (the sponsoring group), Gloria 
Mellon, Ella Entin, Harriet Mc- 
Govern, Audrey Haselbusch, 



Yvonne Leroux and sons and 
daughters of members. 

Their trophies were featured at 
the Parlor's 11th birthday party. 
Surprise gift of the evening was a 
book of the Parlor's first decade in 
publicity presented by Mildred Rub- 
ier, Parlor organizer, now residing 
in Oregon — Milly was also charter 

(Continued on Page 12) 




Patio Jlori^t 

1613 East First Street 
Santa Ana, Calif. 92701 

Telephone 
543-7612 or 543-3038 

AL and PHYLLIS BUTCHER 



THE BASLER HOME 



CONVALESCENT & ELDERLY 

24-Hour Nursing Service 

Excellent Meals - Tray Service 

LARGE CHEERFUL ROOMS 
ADJOINING BATHS & SUNDECKS 

Life Membership or Monthly Rates 

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Santa Ana 



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MILK 



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926 E. First Street, Santa Ana 

Phone 547-7031 



EL TOBRITO 


TACOS 


and BURRITOS 


5th 


and Bristol 


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Ana, California 



In Santa Ana 
OWL DRUG STORE 

1002 E. 17TH STREET 

547-6655 

Sam Calabrese 




In Orange 
WATSON'S DRUG 

116 E. CHAPMAN 

532-6315 

Jim Calabrese 



Prescriptions and Sundries Serving Orange County Since 1912 

MASTERCHARGE and BANKAMERICARO • FREE DELIVERY 



PAGE 11 



PARLOR NEWS . . . 
(Coiiiinued from Page II) 

president — and Marie Harrington, 
charter third vice president. 




From left: Ella Entin. Gloria Mellon. 
Marie Harrington and Edie Bart- 
tell. 



The History and Landmark com- 
mittee also sponsored a Family Fun 
Day at Fort Tejon on Sunday, 
October 18 when a Civil War battle 
was re-enacted. A potluck dinner 
sponsored by the busy Parlor's Ways 
and Means committee was held at 
the Bartlett home on October 10. 
Gloria Mellon was in charge of 
plans. 



ALBERT M. WINN . . . 
(Continued from Page 5) 

It is imperative that I mention 
that from the same idea of organiza- 
tion came the organization of the 
Native Daughters of the Golden 
West. September 25, 1886 in Jack- 
son, Amador County, with the 
institution of Ursula Parlor No. 1. 

(The foregoing biography of 
General Winn is taken from a talk 




Lilly U. Reichlmg, Founder of NDGW 



given by John F. Davis. Sr. at the 
recent Founders Day luncheon of 
the Native Sons at Sacramento. GM 
Rae Rominger, NDGW, represented 
GP Irene Bondanza on this occasion. 
Betty Read Curilich, chairman of 
the Board of Grand Trustees, 
NDGW was also in attendance.) 



UILGENFELn 

n MORTUARY 1/ 

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120 E. Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5-.4I05 





A 


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A H 


E I 1VI 




SAVINGS AND 

Dorothy Y. Ulvestad, President 


LOAN ASSOCIATION 

J. Bernard Soto. Exec. Vica-Praa 


construction loans 


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escrow i 


refinancing 


i collections 


(Main Office) 
ANAHEIM 

117 W. Lincoln Avenue 
PRopect 2-1532 


HUNTINGTON BEACH 

411 Main Street 770 
LEtiigh S-t591 


BKEA 
South Braa Blvd. 
Ph. S2t-4t71 



T^VO BIRTHDAYS 

La Purisima No. 327 celebrated 
its si.xth birthday and the annivers- 
ary of the organization of the first 
NDGW Parlor in Jackson, Septem- 
ber 25, 1886 in Amador County, 
founded by Lilly O. Reichling. 

Honored were all the past deputies 
to La Purisima Parlor. Turkey and 
all the trimmings were ser\ed. Mary 
Rule was chairman of the dinner. 
Table decorations were made by 
chairman Elouise Alexander who 
used place mats with California 
poppy, quail, grizzly bear, bear flag 
and the seal of California. 

On a decorated manzanita were 
hung keys with names of members 
of the parlor, in the colors of the 
organization. M y r t h Simmons, or- 
ganizer of La Purisima made a beau- 
tiful cake decorated with the Native 
Daughters emblem. The cake was 
served by DGP Blanche Powell, 
from Santa Maria Parlor. A surprise 
visit was paid to the birthday party 
by Bcrnice Henning. 

Guests were from Santa Maria No. 



PAGE 12 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



176 Reina del Mar No. 126, Ticrra 
'e bro No. 304. PGP EUeen Dis- 
nuke gave an outstanding talk on 
he NDGW Order and its principles 
nd projects. 




PGP Eileen Dismiike 

President Jessie Ramming intro- 
luced the guests and presented each 
k'ith a beautiful corsage of a spider 
mum" in brilliant color. Entertain- 
nent was provided by Chairman 
Jarbara Pohlhammer and prizes 
t'ere awarded. The Alpha Club was 
lecorated in beautiful flowers and 
he NDGW colors. Honor was given 
o those who six years ago started 
M Purisima No. 327: Frieda Stan- 
ch, Mary Rule and Myrth Sim- 
nons. 




FIFTY YEARS 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Prielipp 
celebrated their 50th wedding anni- 
versary with a reception of friends 
and relatives at their daughter's 

NOVEMBER, 1970 



home. The reception was hosted by 
the families of the Prielipp's son, C. 
E. Prielipp and daughter, Mrs. L. J. 
Donohoe, also of San Francisco. 

Alice has been a member of 
Portola Parlor No. 172 for many 
years, and is the financial secretary 
of her parlor. 

■f -f f 
OFFICIAL VISIT TO ORINDA 

The official visit by Grand Presi- 
dent Irene Bondanza to Orinda No. 
56, was an affair long to be remem- 
bered. The Urban Center, turned 
into a Japanese fantasy, transported 
the audience to the calm and tran- 
quility of the Far East. Adorning the 
walls were small branches with 
cherry blossoms. Tori gates, lovely 
curved bridges and artifacts could be 
seen throughout the room. 

In this atmosphere, Orinda wel- 
comed Grand President Irene. A 
triple event celebration, the Parlor 
honored "first lady" Irene; cele- 
brated the 80th birthday of Orinda 
Parlor and extended greetings to 
Sister City, Osaka, Japan. Orinda 
Giannini, PGP, Chairman, and Alma 
Klahn, Co-Chairman, and their com- 
mittee, directed a performance 
worthy of an "Oscar." 

Grand President Irene was a most 
gracious and charming guest of 
honor. While she was at the altar. 



MELROSE 






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I Orangewood Street at Santa Ana Freeway 

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Brenda Wells Thompson sang the 
tune "Poor Butterfly" with lyrics by 
Alma Klahn. After the escort team, 
dressed in Japanese kimonoes, led 
her to the seat of honor, a small 
"Japanese headband" was placed 
upon her head. 




PGP Orinda G. Giannini 

PGP Orinda Giannini opened the 
evening by her presentation of the 
history of Orinda Parlor and the 
pride in celebrating the Parlor's 80th 
birthday. The theme, appropriately 
titled "Sister Greet Sister", stressed 
the closeness of the Native Daughters 
of the Golden West. In addition, we 
extended greetings to San Francisco's 
Sister City. Osaka, Japan, and her 
EXPO 70 held in that city. To retain 
the flavor of this evening, were 
Japanese ceremonial dances by 
Madame Fujima and her lovely and 
graceful young ladies. In their color- 
ful costumes, they told a story by 
their movements and gestures. 

The President of Orinda, Esther 
Bloom, presented the President's 
Book, as well as gifts to Native 
Daughters Home, General Scholar- 
ship Fund, Mission Soledad and the 
(Continued on Page 14) 

PAGE 13 



PARLOR NEWS . . . 
(Coniiniu'd from Page 12} 




Soledad Mission with Sallie R. Thaler Memorial Museum and historical 

room 



Historical Room, to Grand Presi- 
dent Irene. The book was decorated 
in a Japanese decor; a white cover 
with a turquoise fan spread over 
the top. Throughout the pages were 
pictures and small reminders of our 





J 



Parlor President Esther Bloom (in 
formal gown). 

Sister City and Japan. In addition, 
O r i n d a ' s XOth birthday was an- 
nounced as well as a key c.xtcndini; 
the open door to Orinda Parlor. 

PGP Orinda presented five old 
and precious gifts to Evelyn I. Carl- 
son, PGP, State Chairman, Historical 

PAGE u 



PGP Evelyn I. Carlson 

Room. These gifts were donated b\ 
Orinda Sisters, F a y e Curtis and 
Orinda Giannini. A clock, given to 
Faye, by PGP Eliza D. Keith; a blue 
Delft bowl, which belonged to 
George Carner who was born in a 
covered wagon; a perfume flagon 
which belonged to the sister of early 
California Governor Birdsall 
Another gift was a magazine "Signs 
of the Times" an earthquake special, 
printed by Pacific Press Publishing 
Company, May 23. 1906; a piece 
of stationery of Admission Day. 
September 9. 1910 (given 
Orinda); a badge dated August 22, 
!S9() and a copy of Grand Parlor 



Sessions of 1891 with the story o 
the institution of Orinda Parlor. 

President Esther spoke hricfl_\ 
concerning the occasion. 

The names of the 50-year mem 
bcrs of Orinda and the names oi 
the Past Presidents, still active ir 
parlor activities, were called. All 
those present assembled at the altar 

Before the Grand Presidcnfi 
message, she was given a gift. To 
the delight of all, she opened her 
gift to discover a gigantic Chinese 




PGP Jewel McSweeney 

cookie. Appropriately, Jewel Mc- 
Sweeney. PGP, in her brief message 
called GP Irene a "lucky cookie. 
The Grand President's report was 
inspiring and moving. Her love and 
devotion to the Native Daughters 
organization is evidenced by her 
profound and meaningful words. 

Brenda Wells Thompson, accom- 
panied by Frances S i m a s at the 
piano, sang her farewell song at the 
conclusion of the program. The din- 
ing tables were gaily and e.xoticalK 
decorated with Japanese knick 
knacks. The refreshments blended 
with the oriental theme. 



the 



SQR 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



CALIFORNIA HERALO 



m MiMeittM 




Jot lost to those that love them. 
Not dead, just gone before; 

fhey still live in our memory. 
And they will forever more. 



ilnora Barton, Annie K. Bidwell No. 168, 
September 8. 

leanor Daley Costa, James Lick No. 
220, September 8. 

^ouise Costa Dubuque, Naomi No. 36, 
September 9. 

Elsie Schitterer Case, San Diego No.<208, 
September 12. 

Jally Thomas, Bonita No. 10, September 
10. 

lelen A. Tucker, Gold of Ophir No. 190, 
September 14. 

31eta L. Meyer, San Andreas No. 113, 
September 14. 

Dorothy M. Sears, Chispa No. 40, Sept- 
ember 14. 

Veil McElhatton, Palo Alto No. 299, 
I September 18. 

Irma J. Hansen, Oneonta No. 71, Sept- 
ember 18. 

Ella Chisholm, Caliz de Oro No. 206, 
September 20. 

Louise M. Miller, San Diego No. 208. 
September 18. 

Barbara S. Rhyne, Dolores No. 169, Sept- 
ember 21. 

Ruby Molinari, La Junta No. 203, Sept- 
ember 18. 

Elizabeth Goodman, El Cereso No. 207, 
August 30. 

Florence Macdonald, Genevieve No. 132, 
I September 15. 

Ethel Cook. Portola No. 172, September 
25. 

Ruth Lane, Encinal No. 156, September 

: 27. 

|Vcta Owen. Auburn No. 233, October 1. 

Maurine DeBisschop. Golden Era No. 99, 
September 30. 

Genevieve Christie, Vallejo No. 195, 
September 28. 

Theresa Stafford. Ontario No. 251. Sept- 
ember 27. 

NOVEMBER, 1970 




THANKSGIVING DAY 

by 
Johann A. P. Schulz 
(1800) 

We plow the fields, and scatter 
The good seed on the land, 
But it is fed and watered 
By God's Almighty hand; 
He sends the snow in winter, 
The warmth to swell the grain. 
The breezes and the sunshine. 
And soft, refreshing rain. 



THANKSGIVING 



P RAVER 




by 
Jan Struther 



We thank you Lord of Heaven, 
We thank you Lord 
For all the joys that greet us 
For all that you have given 
To help us and delight us 
In earth and sky and seas; 
The sunlight on the meadows, 
The rainbow's fleeting wonder, 
The clouds with cooling shadows, 
The stars that shine in splendor — 
We thank you, Lord, for these. 

For swift and gallant horses. 
For Iambs in pastures springing, 
For dogs with friendly faces. 
For birds with music thronging 

Their chantries in the trees; 
For herbs to cool our fever. 
For flowers of field and garden, 
For bees among the clover 

With stolen sweetness laden — 
We thank you. Lord, for these. 

For homey dwelling places 
Where childhood's visions linger, 
For friends and kindly voices. 
For bread to stay our hunger 
For zeal and zest of living. 
For faith and understanding 
For words to tell our loving. 
For hope of peace unending — 
We thank you. Lord, for these. 





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Authors include: Will McPhcrson, Terry 
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McFadden, E. M. Sunquist and many 
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ITS HISTORY" 

by 

March Butz 



Fine history on town of Yorba Linda. 
Orange County, birthplace of Pre«i- 
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of pictures. Index. Cloth Bound. Avail- 
able al Yorba Linda District Library 
or from Pioneer Press. 

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WAS 21" 

by 

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Winner of several awards. 

Illustrated, Annotated. Index. No. 2 
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"REACHING OUT" 

BY 
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Twenty-two poems of Inspiration including "My Scriptural Insurance 
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JR. UNIT NEWS 



n r i n i i m i i rn i .ii-- 



"Sl BURBANEriE" JUNIOR 
DRILL TEAM 

The •'Suburbanettc" Drill Team of 
Las Amiguitas Unit No. 33 of Wal- 
nut Creek has just completed its 
first year of participation in parade 
competition with a good share of 
success. 




Siihiirbaneite Drill J earn of Las 
Amifiiiitcis Unit No. 33. 

Re-activated this year after being 
inactive for three years, t h e team 
participated and won first place 
awards in the Alameda County Fair 
Parade in Pleasanton, the Contra 
Costa County Fair Parade in 
Antioch. and the Admission Day 
Parade in Fairfield. Second place 
was won at Napa in the Napa County 
Fair Parade and in the Walnut Fes- 
tival Parade in Walnut Creek. They 
also marched in the Youth Festival 
Parade in Concord and four of its 
members presented the Colors at the 
recent Junior Conference. A beauti- 
ful gold trophy and SI 25.00 in cash 
awards were presented the team for 
their efforts. 

Beverly Beckemever led the tcant 
as Captain, while L a u r a Carey 
assisted as Lieutenant. The other 
members of the team were Kara 
Valentine, Jackie Tweed. Nadine 
Beckemcycr. Chris Nelson. Char- 
lene and Lori Thomas, Nancy Le- 
Valley, Charlotte Piper and Cheryl. 
Shirlenc and Cherie Colon. 

Plans for 197! are already under- 
way for a large group of seventeen 
girls plus a military Color Guard, 
which will enable the team to com- 
(Cnnliniieii on Pa^e S) 

PACE 2 



California Herald 

•PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE' 

Volume XVIII Df.cember, 1970 Number T 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 



I 



Jimior Unit News 2 

Christmas in Anaheim, by Dr. Leo J. Friis ? 

The Governor and P. B. C. by Edythe C. Russell 4 

Historical Marker, by Muriel M. Blodgett _ 5 

The Grand President's Comer 6 

Tournament of Roses Float, by Laura Blosdale, G.T 7 

Parlor News X 

In Memoriam 10 

Christmas is Always 14 

The Three Wise Men 15 

We Three Kings 15 



>\feVe spliftit^ the atom for you. 



Chances are some of the 
electricity you now use is 
generated at the San 
Onofre Nuclear Plant near 
San Clemente, 

Edison plans to add 
additional nuclear units at 
this site. One reason: in a 
nuclear reactor there is no 



combustion, so there are 
no by-products of combus- 
tion. Electricity from clean 
nuclear plants is one of the 
ways Edison is working to- 
day for a better tomorrow. 



Southern California Edison 




J. J. I'RILS 

PiiblLsher 



LEU J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JA.NE FRIIS 

Public Relations 



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printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




NAHEIM HAS TWO SPECIAL 

Christmas customs that touch 
the heart. For many years, residents 
I of the city of Mexican descent parti- 
' cipated in a religious ceremony 
which they called La Posada. (Pos- 
ada is a Spanish word for lodging 
house or inn.) 

On nine consecutive evenings be- 
fore Christmas, a goodly number of 
people marched in procession 
' through the streets of their immedi- 
ate neighborhood, carrying lighted 
I candles, saying prayers and singing 
hymns in anticipation of the com- 
, ing of the Christ Child. At the head 
I of the group marched a young wo- 
man and a young man who had 
assumed the roles of Mary and 
Joseph. They stopped at a house 



which had been selected as the "inn" 
for the evening, rapped on the door 
and asked admittance. 

The head of the house and his 
wife appeared and refused their re- 
quest, explaining that there was no 
room for them in the inn. There- 
upon the friends accompaning Mary 
and Joseph begged earnestly that 
the young couple be admitted, ex- 
plaining that they were poor and 
that the wife was soon to become a 
mother and needed shelter for her- 
self and her baby. 

The innkeeper was adamant and 
only after more pleading did he 
relent. When the door was opened, 
all entered the house. The Rosary 
was said, a hymn was sung and more 
prayers were offered. The ceremony 



ended with the passing of refresh- 
ments. 

On the following evening the 
group returned, thanked t h e inn- 
keeper for his hospitality and march- 
ed in procession to the next "inn." 
Christmas Eve was, of course, the 
climax of La Posada. After entering 
the house and offering prayers, all 
joined in singing lullabies to the 
newborn Infant Jesus. 

Unfortunately, this fine custom 
has become considerably curtailed in 
recent years, but it will not soon 
be forgotten. 

Anaheim has another custom that 
I did not learn about until after a 
long residence here. No doubt this 

(Continued on Page 13) 



K^lttlsimas In y^^nah^ 



<^ttn 



^. L.O ^. S^.u. 



DECEMBER, 1970 



PAGE 3 



^' 



bij Cdvjthe C. Tlussell 



_^^ HEAVY HAZt OF AUTUMN CUR- 

cSUi taincd the San Gabriel mount- 
ain range w h i c h sweeps its blue 
heights across the north of Pasadena 
until it recedes into the distance of 
San Bernardino county. The swathe 
of the proposed Foothill Freeway, a 
garden-like green belt now had 
swallowed up the land where the 
East Pasadena Boys Club had been 
established 22 years ago by Tommy 
Thompson and Kenneth Cartzdafner. 
the son of Aimee a member of Pasa- 
dena No. 290 and her husband 
Percy. When the Villa street facilit\ 
was completed and dedicated the 
two men realized that East Pasadena 
needed a unit laso. With an Arm\ 
quonset hut as the first clubhouse 
the project began. 

Tlien came the Freeway and the 
need for new quarters. So today was 
THE day and at 3230 E. Del' Mar 
Blvd. the people were gathering in 
the parking area to await the honored 
guest. .A platform had been erected 
with chairs, flags, speakers pulpit 
and microphone. 

Brightly dressed in red jackets 
and blue trousers with white stripes 
down the sides the Pasadena Boys 
Club Band played several bounc\ 
show tunes. Small boys and girls 
clustered closely to the rostrum and 
photographers set up their tripods. 

Native Daughters from Pasadena 
Parlor were in attendance, some 
standing in the shade of the sycamore 
trees and others like myself close up 
to take snapshots of the V.I.P.'s. 

A half hour after the announced 
arrival time, while the band valiantly 
played on under the excellent direc- 
tion of Paul Kiliam, a shout arose, 
"He's here!" a n d we craned our 
necks and stood on tiptoe to get the 
first glimpse of our handsome 
Governor Ronald Reagan. Escorted 
by three boys. Frank Laughlin. Craig 
Yamaoka and Manuel Morris, one 
from each branch of B o y s Club. 
Governor Reagan greeted the audi- 
ence. He smiled at the "Reagan 
Girls" from La Canada and Pasa- 

PAGE 4 




(iovenior Rtniald Reayaii and P. B.C. 
Oijicer' 



dena with their "Reagan '70" rib- 
bons from shoulder to waist then 
proceeded into the new buildings on 
the tour with his aides and the Club 
officials. 

Meanwhile John Hoover, Boys 
Club Board president, opened the 
program. The National Anthem 
was played; the Pledge of Allegiance 
led by Phil Musik^of the P. B.C. 
b a n d and the Invocation by Dr. 
Wesley P. Ford of the First Christ- 
ian Church of Pasadena. Mr. Hoover 
said that the new building cost about 
half a million dollars, of which about 
4.'^'7 had been received in cash and 
pledges to date. Alta Ryerson, past 
president of Pasadena Parlor and 
Campership secretary of the Boys 
Club presented a Bear flag from the 
Parlor to Mr Hoover. 




Local dignitaries present were 
John Adams, vice-mayor of Pasa- 
dena, Donald Yokaitis and Floyd 
Gwinn, Board members from the 
East Pasadena districts and Richard 
John president of the Pasadena 
Chamber of Commerce. 

A charming incident occured. A 
lad from Boy Scout Troop No. 38, 
Cory Cierk, presented a Hallowe'en 
pumpkin for Governor Reagan. 
While the band played a medley of 
"It's a Grand Old Flag" and "I'm 
a Yankee Doodle D a n d y" the 
security guards "checked out" the 
pumpkin and okehed it with a smile 
and a nod. 

At 2:30 Governor Reagan 
mounted the platform, congratulated 
the band and accepted a plaque with 
man and boy figures on it. 

Noticing how nattily the governor 
was dressed the lady by my side 
commented that his suit was in olive 
toned stripes with a matching dark 
gray-green windsor tic. His white 
shirt had french cuffs and handsome 
gold cuff links. 

Governor Reagan speaks easily. 
has a warm smile and friendly man- 
ner and amused us with a storv 
about when he was a boy. As he 
couldn't play an instrument he was 
made the drum-major. In a parade 
one time he was following a man 
on a white horse. When the horse- 
man turned aside he kept straight 
ahead. Surprisingly the music faded 
away and when he finally looked 
back he found he was marching 
alone as the band had followed the 
horseman around the corner! 

As we were waiting for our car 
at the curbing I turned for a last 
look at our honored visitor still on 
the platform surrounded by clamor- 
ing youngsters w h o wanted his 
autograph. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




fOSEPH HAMPTON KERR Came 
from his native Pennsylvania on 
the steamer llias in the spring of 
1852, crossing the Isthmus of Pan- 
ama and arriving in San Francisco on 
the steamer Golden Gate on May 27. 
He was a blacksmith, and followed 
his trade in Nevada County until 
September, 1856 when he located at 
Old Elk Grove, a post office and 
Ntage stop. While there he purchased 
a squatter's title to 160 acres, which 
he later purchased. Kerr married 
Angeline Worthington who had come 
across the plains from Iowa with her 
family. 

He built a fine Uvo-story Cali- 
fornia style home in 1877 at a cost 
of S3,000 for his family, of redwood 
and square nails to endure for future 
generations. It had four bedrooms 
on the second floor, a parlor for 
elite company, a sitting room, a din- 
ing room, a huge kitchen and a hall 
hall way running the full length of 
the first floor. An ornate Italian 
marble fireplace heated the high 
ceiling rooms and tall windows add- 
ed to the spaciousness of the large 
rooms. A balustratcd balcony sup- 
ported by four Corinthian columns 
commanding a sweeping view of the 
countryside from the upper story: 
bay windows with windows seats 
looked across the vineyards and fer- 
tile fields. A graceful walnut ban- 
istercd staircase curved to the upper 

DECEMBER 1970 



floor, and the large carved oak door 
with its ornate knocker was always 
open with the hospitality for which 
Kerrs were noted. 

It was a showplace and had a 
setting to match. Beautiful shade and 
ornamental shrubs and trees sur- 
rounded the house; including orange 
trees, a large magnolia, and a tall 
stately ivy covered palm. Oleanders 
and magnificant locusts lined the 
driveway to the carriage house at 
the rear, a fountain played near the 
bay windows, and a white picket 
fence enclosed the premises. 

He had two orchards with cher- 
ries, figs, persimmons, peaches and 
apricots, a 12- acre vineyard and 
also raised hay and grain. He made 
his own wine from his grapes in the 
wine cellar he constructed on his 
property, and his well built bams 
and corrals housed many head of 
blooded horses and cattle. Irrigation 
was by a number of windmills. 

He was known far and wide as a 
prominent, civic minded, progres- 
sive, farsighted individual, and a 
staunch Republican whose first presi- 
dential vote was cast for Zachary 
Taylor. 

He donated the property for the 
first Elk Grove High School in 1893 
when the Elk Grove Union High 
School was organized. He also gave 
a lot in 1 893 to the Women's 
Christian Temperance Union on Elk 



Grove Boulevard and Derr Avenue. 
They established the first free 
county library in California. 

The name of Joseph Kerr is per- 
petuated in memory through the 
naming of the Joseph Kerr Junior 
High School in June, 1964. 

Elk Grove Liberty Parlor No. 213 
NDGW and Elk Grove Parlor No. 
41, NSGW dedicated a historical 
plaque at the First Security Bank, 
the site of the Joseph Hampton 
Kerr home, honoring Kerr as one of 
Elk Grove's leading citizens during 
the early days of California. The 
introduction was given by Liberty 
Parlor President Irene Smedberg: 
the welcome by Sophie Lent, chair- 
man of History and Landmarks; the 
pledge of allegiance by Phyllis Krull 
and the invocation by GM Rae 
Rominger. Grand President Irene 
Bondanza dedicated the plaque. 




Front lejt: Gl' John Kurtz. NSGW; 
GP Irene Bondanza, NDGW; Sophie 
Lent, Chm. History and Landmarks 
Committee and President Irene S. 
Smedberg. fjoth of Liberty Parlor 
No. 213. 

Distinguished guests included 
Grand President Irene Bondanza, 
GM Rae Rominger, GT June 
Painter. GIS Dolores Ferenz, GOS 
Icel Beers, PGPs Doris Treat Daley. 
Jewel McSweeney, Audrey D. 
Brown, Fern Adams; SDDGP 
Pamela M u 1 1 e r, DGPs Josephine 
Dorsa and Lillian Simpson. Grand 
Officers of the NSGW were GP John 
H. Kurtz and GTs Sheehan, Lemos. 
Pic.xoto and PGP Joseph B. Perez. 

In charge of the affair were Sophie 
Lent, chairman and Muriel Blodgeti. 
co-chairman of the History and 
Landmarks Committee for Liberty 
Parlor, NDGW and Henry Lynch. 
Secretary of Elk Grove Parlor. 
NSGW. 

PAGE i 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GRAND PRrsiDENT 

Irene Bondanza (Mrs. Joseph) 

2328 Union Street 

San Francisco. California 94123 




IRENE BONDANZA 



Dear Sisters: 

As we approach the Christmas 
Season I am thinking of the members 
of the Native Daughters of the Gold- 
en West. 

It is a time to think of friends, it is 
a time for hope, a time for joy and a 
time for all of us to join in prayer for 
the well-being of our nation and our 
people. 

It is my wish that lo\c. health and 
contentment will fill your hearts and 
homes this Holiday Season. 

May you enjoy a Christmas bless- 
ed by the inspiration of your indi- 
vidual faiths and a New Year filled 
with all good things. 

Sincerely yours, 
Irene Bondanza 
Grand President 

f 1 i 

NENDOME 

\ bus load of \'e>\domc members 
lunched at Fisherman's Wharf and 
later attended the Ice Follies. Rich- 
ard D w y e r, star performer, pre- 
sented a bouquet of flowers to the 
oldest lady present. Young 92 years 
old Sue Mattei received that honor. 

Another Vendome member. Ade- 
line Schmidt, a senior citizen was 
crowned "Oueen of the 26th An- 
nual" Santa Clara County Fair on 
"Senior Citizens' Day", Queen Ade- 
line has 17 grandchildren and 16 
great-grandchildren. 

President Betty Yakobovisch and 
officers h a v c outlined the Parlor 
program for the balance of the year. 
It is an interesting and busy schedule. 

Isbella Stevenson, chairinan of 
The California Hcndd, has broken 
all N'endomc records in the past for 
the number of subscriptions received 
for the magazine from I'ciulomc 
members. It was a >>uccessful sub- 
scription drive. 

"AGE 6 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 

227l-32nd Avenue 

.San Francisco, California 94116 

Office; 703 Market Street. Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



Jti'nerart^ 1970 

DECEMBER 

1 Seapoini No. 196, famelpa No. 231 Sausalito* 

2 El Carmelo No. 181 Daly City* 

6 San Francisco Childrens Foundation Breakfast 

8 Utopia No. 252, Guadalupe No. 153, 

Twin Peaks No. 185 San Francisco* 

10 San Bruno No. 246, Menlo No. 211 San Bruno* 

11 Ba/iia Vista No. 167, Encinal No. 156, 

Fruitvale No. 177 Oakland* 

15 Reina del Mar No. 126, Tierra de Oro No. 304 Santa Barbara* 



1971 

JANUARY 

1 Tournament of Roses Parade Pasadena 

5 Junipero No. 141 Monterey* 

6 Stirling No. 146, Antioch No. 223, Donner No. 193 Pittsburg* 

7 Verba Buena No. 273, Alta No. 3. and 

James Lick No. 220 (afternoon) San Francisco* 

S Palo Alio No. 229. El Monte No. 205 Mt. View* 

I 1 Mission Bell No. 316 Solcdad* 

12 Poinseliia No. 318, El Aliso No. 314 Ventura* 

13 La Purisima No. 327, Santa Maria No. 276 Lompoc* 

14 Alelit<io. 102 Salinas* 

16 Piedmont No. 87 (75th Anniversary) Oakland* 

1 8 Home Board Dinner for Grand President 

19 Sutler ^o. Ill Sacramento* 

20 Sunia Rosa No. 217. Sebastopol No. 265 Santa Rosa* 

21 Co/on' No. 299, S<j»ioma No. 209, Pe/a/H/na No. 222 Cotati* 

23 Gold Discovery Dinner San Francisco 

25 Poriola No. 172, Golden Gate No. 158 and 

DarinaHo. 114 San Francisco* 

26 Valleciio No. 308, El Cereso No. 207 and 

Betsy Ross No. 238 Hayward" 

27 George C Yonni No 322. Vallejo No. 195 Yountvillc* 

28 flo/i/wNo. 10 Redwood City* 

• Official vi.<!iis are marked *Tih :islcrick\ 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




TOURNAMENT 

OF 

ROSES 

FLOAT 




PPROXIMATELY 600 Native 
Sons and Native Daughters of 
the Golden West attended the Luau 
at the Tiki's in Monterey Park. The 
event was sponsored by the Tourna- 
ment of Roses Float Committee 
composed of members from both 
Orders. This year's NDGW state 
chairman is Vera Popov, Past Presi- 
dent of Grace No. 242. Others on 
the committee are Helen Trammell 
and Hilda Garcia. Assisting for the 
event were Past State Float Chair- 
men Evelyn Henry and Philomena 
Wooster. 




From left: Grand Presidents John 
Kurtz, NSGW and Irene Bondanza, 
NDGW; State Chairman Vera Po- 
pov; Don Porter, Forestry Service; 
Joe Phelps, NS Slate Chairman and 
Don Bent, Float Builder. 

DECEMBER, 1970 



NSGW State Chairman Joe Phelps 
introduced the grand officers in 
attendance — Irene Bondanza, 
Grand President; Betty Read Curi- 
lich, Chairman of the Board of 
Grand Trustees; Laura Blosdale, 
GT; Eileen Dismuke, PGP. Dignit- 
aries of the NSGW were John Kurtz. 
Grand President and Jack Henry, 
GT. 

Don Bent, member of Pasadena 
Parlor NSGW, who was awarded 
the float contract by the Committee, 
displayed an artist's conception of 
the 1971 tournament of Roses 
Float to be entered by NS-NDGW 
in conjunction with the United 
States Forestry Department. 

"Always on Duty" is the theme 
of the float and will feature "Smokey 
the Bear" on fire watch. Posters, 
created with fresh flowers, will de- 
pict the best Fire Prevention posters 
for the past twenty-five years which 
will be on moving panels turned by 
two cub bears. 

"It is a very timely and colorful 
float and we hold great expectations 
that it may be a winner" expressed 
Don Porter, Assistant Information 
Officer for the United States Forestry 
Department. 

This year, as in the past, the appli 
cation of the flowers will be done by 
volunteer members of both Orders. 
Many hands are needed to see the 
project through. As one Native 
Daughter who has worked on every 
float entry from the past 20 years 
remarked "It is such a wonderfully 
rewarding experience to see our float 
go down Colorado Avenue in Pasa- 
dena in one of the world's greatest 
parades which is also witnessed by 
millions on TV via telestar all over 
the world, that all the work it 
entails is worth it." 

Members and friends who wish to 
help in building the float State Chair- 
man Vera Popov will be glad to 
greet you at the new Tournament 
Bldg.,'700 Seco Street, December 
26 to 31 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
The last three nights 10 a.m. to 11 
p.m. Directions: Down the hill and 
across from the baseball diamond. 
Plenty of parking, well lighted. 
Building will be heated. Bring scis- 
sors, knives and glue brushes. 



Hippolyte Bouchard, with two priva- 
teers flying the flag of Argentina, raided 
the California coast in 1818, looting as he 
sailed southward. He burned the town of 
San Juao Capistrano. 




Diamonds — Silvcrwar* 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / S33-3107 



BACKS 
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MORTUARY 

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505 S. Sunkist Avt. Anahtim 



the 



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lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



PAGE 7 



JR. UNIT NEWS . . . 
(Continued from Page 2) 

pete more equally with Junior Drill 
Teams from other organizations and 
to extend their activities to include 
field competitions. 

Former "Suburbanette" Drill 
Teams have held the title of Native 
Daughter State Champions for many 
years (when the participation of 
other Junior Drill Teams of the 
Order formed the nucleus for a 
State Native Daughter contest), and 
for four years the team won the 
title of Open State Champion Junior 
Girls' Drill Team. 

These past achievements have 
never been forgotten and the present 
team has much to accomplish, but 
their aim is to once more become 
the top Junior Drill Team in Cali- 
fornia by winning the Open State 
Championship title in the annual 
field contest held yearly in Snnta 
Clara. 

/ r < 

PRINCESA DEL MAR 

Members of Princesa del Mar 
held a rummage sale which earned 
$196 for the Fun Activities Fund. 
The girls also made tray favors 
which were presented by Advisor 
Nancy Fluker to the Women's Aux- 
iliary of Saint Francis Hospital. 



HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO 
MINERVA'S MOLLIE 

.Mollie Meagles of Minerva No. 
2 celebrated her 90th birthday. The 
members of Minerva Parlor gave her 
a birthday party, presenting her with 
a pretty sweater, a monetary gift and 
much love and good wishes. Each 
member brought a birthday card. 




Mollie joined the Native Daugh- 
ters of the Golden West in 1S89 — 
71 years ago! Her affiliation was 
with Sans Soiid Parlor which con- 
solidated into Minerva in 1964. 
Mollie is a life memlicr of the Par- 
lor, along with 20 other members 
who are given life memberships 
after 50 years. 

Mary Ann O'Keefe planned games 
and refreshments. 



MARY WEGENER 

Mary Wegener, a member of the 
Nati\e Daughters of the Golden 
West for over forty years, and a 
past president of Tierra de Oro No 
304, celebrated her 85th birthday 
at a party hosted by her children 
and grandchildren. 




Mary Wegener 

Mrs. Wegener was born in Los 
Angeles, at 10th and Spring Streets, 
on July 7, 1885. In 1886 her family 
moved "away out in the countrv", 
at 14th and Hill Streets. She attend- 
ed the 16th Street School, and was 
graduated from high school on 
Bunker Hill in 1904. In October. 
1904 she married William 
Wegener, and lived for a few years 
in Los Angeles, where her eldest 
daughter and son were born. In 1909 
they homesteaded 40 acres in V'crde- 
mont. and resided there until 1918, 
when thev moved to Sacramento. 




©«^ 



111 1915 she spent a month's 
vacation with her parents in Hono- 
lulu long before it was spoiled by 
modern development, and in that 
year her daughter, Gertrude, now 
PP Gertrude Reed, of Tierra de 
Oro. was born. From 1919 until 
1922 the famiiv lived in Winters. 



^ ' I P " i n i i n i i ni= 

Parlor Neu/s 

= " i n i i n i i n r i nr= 

near Sacramento. In 1922 they 
moved to Santa Barbara where they 
built their home ard here their 
youngest daughter was born in 1923. 
In 1930 Mary Wegener became a 
Native Daughter. She served as presi- 
dent of her Parlor in 1940, and was a 
charter member of Tierra de Oro at 
the time of its institution December 
1949. She has held a number of 
offices in the Parlor the last as Past 
President during the year 1969-70 
Mary Wegener was active for many 
years as a member of the Homeless 
Children's Adoption Committee in 
the Parlor and is an active member 
of the Past President's Association 
as well as a member and hostess 
many times for the Chatter Club of 
the Parlor which meets monthly for 
lunch and to work on Parlor pro- 
jects. 

In 1941 PP Mary Wegener and 
her daughter, PP Gertrude Reed. 
transported PGP Eileen Dismuke 
to the Grand Parlor in Los Angeles, 
presided over by PGP Hazel B. 
Hansen, at which time PGP Dis- 
muke became affiliated with the 
Order of Native Daughters of the 
Golden West. A class of 100 mem- 
bers was received into the Order 
at that exemplification of the ritual, 
and included members from all of 
Southern California. 



ASO NUEVO 

The Fashion and Wig Show 
luncheon sponsored by Ano Nuev<> 
No. 180 was voted a huge success 
This was the first fashion and wig 
show to be held in the Pcscadero 
area. Luncheon was served by the 
Ladies Guild of the Community 
Church. 

Guests were from W o o d s i d e, 
Menlo Park, Los G a t o s, Portola 
Valley, San Francisco, Redwood 
City, and a large representation from 
Half Moon Bay. Darlinc Moore, 
president of Ano Nuevo gave a short 
talk on th aims and objects of the 
Order. 

The models were all members of 
Ano Xiievo Parlor: Delight Pierce. 
Ruth Moore. Linda Pripan, Phyllis 
.Marchi. Phyllis Terra. Jan Rutegar 
and Dianne Castillo, and two "very 
iunior" Native Dauchters. Natalie 



PAGE 8 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



' Marchi and Jianne Rodrigues. Bal- 
lard's Department Store supplied 
the clothes and hand crocheted gar- 
ments were made by Geneva 
Colendich. 

Moderator Rose Lowenthal, own- 
er of Golden West Wigs furnished 
the wigs; Hacienda House of Beauty, 
the high style hair designs; Elsie 
Bloomquist, the paintings; Podesta 
Plant Acres, the Potted plants and 
flowers; Branch Flowers, Inc. the 
dried materials used to decorate the 
tables. 



POPPY TRAIL 

Poppy Trail No. 266, participated 
in Montebeilo's 50th Anniversar\' 
Celebration Parade. Their entry was 
a 1915 Studebaker, 7 passenger car, 
and those riding in the car was the 
owner and driver, Mr. Rube Bixel; 



PLACERITA 

Mrs. Peter Blanchard was in- 
stalled as president of Placeriia No. 
277 at the Encino Woman's Club. 
Based on the theme "It's A Small 
World" those inducted were Mmes. 
Doyle, Forbes, Smith, Rumsey, 
Stevens, Cheadle, Wrankle, Brand- 
enburg, Crocker, Moyer, Jones, 
Brandenburg, Terry, and Stevens. 

Conducting the ceremonies was 
Placenta's past DGP, Jean Rasmus- 
sen, who was assisted by officers of 
Pasadena No. 290. 

Evelyn Henry was chairman of 
the evening. Refreshment chairman 
Gutt, was assisted by Mmes. Peak 
and Terry. 

Decorations of red, white and 
blue were carried out in corsages of 
white flowers with red or blue edges. 
The flags that have flown over Cali- 
fornia were displayed in back of the 
president's station. 



dames Nelson, Eaklc, Plank and 
Jaques. AH were presented with gifts 
from the parlor. 

The meeting had been preceded 
by a pot luck dinner. Charlcne Zie- 
lesch was in charge. At the close 
of the meeting. Past Grand Presi- 
dent Toothaker gave a short histor> 
of the founding of the Native Daugh- 
ters in Jackson in 1886, and the 
institution of Woodland Parlor ten 
years later. She quoted old clippings 
from the '"Woodland Democrat" 
describing the occasion in the flow- 
ery language of the day, ending with 
the comment of t h e reporter on 
watching the women come out of the 
meeting hall and enter the hotel din- 
ing room for a banquet, "There 
wasn't a homely woman in the 
crowd!" 



^K id|^flH& 


/; 


rl—J^ttl .^^^M^Bm 






1 


M^wTiaiiu' 


HH 



Front seat: Rube Bixel and Viola 
Salgado. Back seat from left: Mike 
Robles, Jr.; Camelia Robles; Gerald 
Mendoza, Jr.; Leola Butler and Liipe 
Mendoza (partly shown). 



Camelia Robles, president of Poppy 
Trail, Viola Salgado, Leola Butler, 
Lupe Mendoza, Gerald Mendoza, 
Jr. and Michael Robles, Jr. Cos- 
tumes worn were carried out in the 
1915 period, especially Viola 
Salgado's — a beaded gown with a 
feather boa and a very ornate large 
hat. The printed poster on each side 
of the antique car proudly displayed 
the name of our Order. 

The Parlor recently joined other 
organizations in the area in spon- 
soring the Montebello Hot Line, 
which it is hoped will be of great 
assistance to young people >vho are 
seeking solutions to their problems. 

DECEMBER, 1970 



WOODLAND 

Woodland No. 90 observed its 
annual Veteran Members and Past 
President's night. This event also 
marked the Parlor's birthday as it 
was founded on October 10th 1886. 
Highlight of t h e evening was the 
presentation of two 50 year pins. 
Verda Isham and Estella Temple- 
man were presented with their pins 
by PGP Henrietta Toothaker, who 
is herself a 50 year member. Twenty- 
five year pins were presented to 
Mmes. Duncan, Motroni and Elston. 
The presentation was made by PP 
Nellie Jaques. Other 50 year mem- 
bers present who were honored were 
Mesdames Kergel, Germeshausen. 
Weider and Calloni. Also present as 
a guest was Gladys Fisher, a 50 year 
member from E 1 1 ap o me. Other 
twenty-five year members present 
were Mesdames Miller, Sandrock. 
Ghidossi and Anderson, all Past 
Presidents and Mmes. Abele and 
Frank. Past presidents present 
who were also honored were Mes- 




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PAGE 9 



I>H MEMBEi-AM 




Xol lost to those tluil love them, 
Mot dead, just none before; 

I'hey still live in our memory, 
And they will forever more. 



Mary Gandolfo, Reina del Mar No. 126. 
October 8. 

Mary Donnelly, Camellia No. 41, August 
31. 

Veronica O'Connell, Copa de Oro No. 
105. October 12. 

Alice Fcaly, Hiawatha No. 140, October 
16. 

Fleanor Gentry, Fruitvale No. 177. Oct- 
ober 16. 

Florence Wolcott. Berryessa No. 192. 
October 14. 

Fllen Sargent, Occident No. 28, October 
14. 

Annie Jaeger, El Dorado No. 186, Oct- 
ober 18. 

Lily Ancell, Berendos No. 23. October 
25. 

Winifred Poole. Vallejo No. 195, Oct- 
ober 2.1. 

Annie Donovan. Minerva No. 2, October 
17. 

Callic Shaffer. Marinita No. 198, October 
28. 

Mvrtle A. Loebbing. Golden Gate No. 
158. October 25. 

Fvelvn Cauffel. Dolores No. 169. Oct- 
ober 29. 

Lottie Colm, Annie K. Bidwell No. 168. 
October 29. 

May Herold. Placer No. 138, February 
23. 

Josic Cramer, Richmond No. 147, Oct- 
ober 29. 

Julia Peterson, Bear Flag No. 151, Sept- 
ember 26. 

Frances Summers, Mt. Lassen No. 215. 
November 7. 



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Telephone 535-7221 

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132 North Anaheim Boulev.ird 

.^naheim. Californi.i 



DISTRICT FOUR 

Grand President, Irene Bondanza, 
made her official visit at a joint 
meeting of the four parlors of Dis- 
trict Four on Wednesday evening 
November 4. The meeting was held 
at the Native Daughters Hall in 
Redding and was preceded by a din- 
ner at the Elks Club. Parlors parti- 
cipating were Berendos No. 23, 
Camellia No. 41; Lassen View No. 
y.S, and Hiawatha No. 140. 

Other officials besides the Grand 
President who were escorted and 
introduced were GT Betty Read 
Curlich, Chairman of Board of 
Grand Trustees, GOS Icel Beers; 
PGT and Chairman of Veteran's 
Welfare Marie Landini, SDDGP 
Doris Clark, Deputies Katie Kuney, 
Bonnie Procbstel, Berness Medford, 
Ruth Griffin and Ella Brownfield. 
Marolyn Hanton for Hiawatha and 
Betty Bowden for Camellia were 
initiated. 

The Grand President presented 
twenty-five year membership pins 
to Mmes. Griffin, Tinsman, Jordan. 
Livingstone, and Wood of Hiawatha 
Parlor and to Mmes. Dinnine, Rich- 
mond and Rodriques for Berendos 
Parlor. 

A clever and unique presentation 
was made by Aurclia Shuffleton. 
Carrying out the Grand President's 
theme motto of '"K e y s". she pre- 
sented her with a large gold key 
holder as the assembled members 
sang a ditty concerning the use of 
keys to the tunc of "Smiles". The 
hall was decorated with large color- 
ful floral arrangements and several 
larce eold kevs. 



JIRUPA 

The meeting of District 36 was 
hosted by Juriipa No. 296. An in- 
formal meeting was led by SDDGP 
Elsie B u c h k o and DGPs Mary 
Foster, Lillian Piatt, Inez Cisneros 
and Senaida Baiz. After the meeting 
prizes for the best costumes were 
received by Santa Claus Kathleen 
McCanan, Tramp Myrtle Poole, 
from Raicho San Jose: Ballarina 
ghost Edith Walker, Jiirupa and 
Witch Judy Reno, Lugonia. 

Following the costume parade re- 
freshments were served in the dining 
room by chairmen Florence Davis 
and Dorothy Jackson. The beautiful 
table decorations consisting of table 
mats and autumn leaves were made 
by the Cerebral Palsy children of 
Sunshine School. 



BONITA 

Mrs. Marvin 
president 



I 



Rene was install 
as president of Bonita No. 10, in 
the Redwood Room of the Veterans 
Memorial Building. "California 
Heritage" Mrs. Rene's theme for her 
term was carried out in the dec- 
orations with covered wagons on 




each table, at the stations stood our 
golden state with pans of gold and 
the miners pick. An authentic 
wagon wheel placed at the presi- 
dent's station brought back mem- 
ories to Mrs. Rene of her childhood 
days in the little town of Cedarville. 
Modoc County. 




PAT.E 10 



Early day miner with 

gold pans tinder his arm 

and a pick resting on his 

shoulder 

DGP Anne Biggo and her corps 
of officers from El Camelo No. 181, 
installed Mrs. Rene as president and 
corps of officers Mmes. Amaya, 
Falk, Grace, Stetson, Williams, 
Patrignani, Gibson, Locatelli, Car- 
penter. Casarctto, Curry and Boel- 
sems. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



A corsage was pinned on Mrs. 
Rene by her daughter. After receiv- 
ing her regalia her husband honored 
her with her own personal gavel. 
Mrs. Rene a nurse at the Redwood 
Medical Clinic introduced her family 
and friends. 

Bonita paid respect to their out 
going president Mary Sousa, who 
has completed her second term as 
president. A gift from the parlor was 
presented to her by PGP Evelyn 
1. Carlson, an honorary member of 
all San Mateo County Parlors. 

1 ■< i 

I'KIAH 

On November 2, Vkiah No. 263 
celebrated with a Grand Deputies 
Night. February 1, 1971 will be the 
official visit of the Grand President 
to the Parlor. All Native Daughters 
in the area and visiting members 
from other parlors are invited to 
meet with Vkiah on the first (busi- 
ness) or the third (social) Mondays 
of the month between September 
and July. All will receive a warm 
welcome. 



CERRITO DE ORO 

Greeting members and guests of 
Cerrito de Oro No. 306 at Lucky 
Lanes was Leona Peralta, chairman 
of the Parlor's 20th anniversary 
dinner. Guests were the parlor presi- 
dent Virginia Stanford and DGP 
Mary Scott of Sequoia, Lola Vicra 
of Plumas Pioneer, first DGP to 
Cerrito de Oro, Estelle WiUiams. 
parlor organizer and charter mem- 
ber, and GT Marian McQuire, past 
DGP to the parlor. Others were 
Myrtle Estudillo, Bahia Vista: Lola 
Bredehoft. Sequoia: Josephine Lauri- 
celli; Argonaut: Antoinelle Stallone, 
Albany: Ethyle Kern, formerly of 
Aloha. SDDGP Ethel Murphy, 
Cerrito de Oro and DGP Marge 
Jacobsen. The affair proved to be 
an outstanding evening. 

Recently the members participated 
ill a bazaar held at the El Cerrito 
Plaza. It was a most profitable 
affair with the proceeds going to 
activities and projects of the Order, 



%0s 



MISSION 

At Mission Parlor's December 
meeting, which will be somewhat 
early for Christmas, there will be 
an exchange of gifts. Members 
who don't attend too often are 
urged to come out and join in the 
festivities. Esther Krause, Presi- 
dent, who is annual Reno "Fun 
Trip" Chairman for the Parlor, 
announced that the buses would 
be going January 30-31, 1971. 
and that reservations for same 
should be to her by January \5. 

197: 



I. A HLRISIMA 

La Purisima No. 327 celebrated 
its 6th anniversary with a turkey 
dinner and entertainment at the 
Alpha Club. All members were 
urged to attend and bring a native 
Californian as a guest. 




On December 5 the Parlor under 
the direction of President Jessie 
Ramming enjoyed dinner and bazaar 
at the Veterans Memorial Hall. Din- 
ner chairman was Christine Hogan: 
fancy work, Mary Rule and candy 
and bake sale, Mildred Rande. 

This year, La Purisima's officers 
include President Jessie R^imming 
and Mmes. Kern, Henning, Rande. 
Benson, Rule, Summers, Bromser, 
McCollu, Larsen, Hogan, Palmer. 
Trigueiro. Feland and Jacobs. 



A.NME K. BIDWELL 

Installation ceremonies were held 
for the officers of Annie K. Bidwelt 
N'o. 168 at Native Daughters Hall. 
Jessie Steams is president assisted 
by her corps of officers: Mmes. 
Bearse, Risher, Cooley, Blevins, La 
Breacht, Beers, Pearl, Schroeder. 
Bammann Spangler, Arena, Taylor 
and Prendergast. DGP Zada Hark- 
com conducted the ceremony with 
Ethel Osborne as Grand Marshal. 
The president's theme is "Family - 
Fellowship - Fidelity". 

Dignitaries presented at the altar 
included GOS Icel Beers, PGPs 
Florence Boyle and Fern Adams, 
SDDGP Eloise Bettencourt and DGP 
Clara S t a h e 1 i. Three permanent 
members of the Parlor were pre- 
sented; Nell Baker, Grace Wade and 
Bessie Shults. Recognition was also 
given to State Director of Past Presi- 
dents, Katherinc La Breacht and 
State PP Lucy Girdler. 

Installing organist, Eillenc Gott- 
man accompanied the drill team 
who performed and sang to the 
president. A memory book was pre- 
sented Mrs. Stearns by GOS Icel 
Beers and a gift from the Parlor by 
Deputy Zada Harkcom. 



DECEMBER, 1970 



The first stage of the Butterfield Over- 
land Mail left Tipton. Mo. on Sept. 16, 
1858, and reached San Francisoo on 
Oct. 10. 

PAGE II 




Old St. Mciry'.s ( liiirch. San Francisco 



ANO Nl'EVO 

A group from Aiu> Niievo No. 1 80 
visited the Native Daughters Home, 
San Francisco. A "No Hostess 
luncheon and a tour of the home 
was enjoyed. 

The Historical Room with its 
collection of early California hia* 
lorical mementoes, was the point of 
interest. Also visited were Mission 
Dolores. St. Mary's Cathedral and 
Ghiradelli Square. Other historical 
trips are being planned. 

Lillian Woodhams. a charter 
member who is now confined to her 
home was visited bv members of the 
Parlor. 



poiNSErriA 

Carmelita F I o r e s. President of 
Poinsetlia No. 318. Mrs. Ed Canet. 
age 97, owner of the property; and 
PGP Eileen Dismuke, who served 
as Mistress of Ceremonies at the 
dedication of Santa Gertrudis Asis- 
tcncia Chapel, proudly display 
beautiful bron7e plaque commemora- 
ting historic site, and large stone 
monument built with stones ex- 
cavated from the ruins of the chapel 
site during highway excavation for 
the new Ojai Highway 33 freeway. 

PAGE 12 



and saved for this purpose until the 
completion of the highway. Monu- 
ment was designed by the late 
Robert S. Raymond, Santa Paula 
.Architect, and construction was 
funded by the County Board of 
Supervisors of Ventura County, 

1 i 1 

TIERRA DEL REV 

Helen Whiteman became a new 
member of Twxra del Rey No. 300, 
at the last recular meeting, Novem- 
ber 9. 

Also attending the initiation cere- 
monies were DGP Frances Bruck- 
ler, and SDDGP Danella Hawkins. 




After the meeting, Mrs. White- 
man was surprised with a birthday 
cake and cards from officers and 
members of the Parlor. 



PAST PRESIDENTS ASSOCTAnON 

State President Constance War- 
shaw has been a very busy proxy 
traveling on her official visits. She 
visited Association No. 2, Alamedu 
County. At A v e n a 1 she visited 
Association No. 20, Fresno-Kings 
Counties. 

In the Mother Lode country, 
accompanied by GS Lucille Kim- 
bark, Mrs, Warshaw went to Associa- 
tion No. 6, Nevada County and in 
San Andreas, Association No. 25, 
Calaveras County. Association 25 
honored eight eight of its members 
who are over 80 years old, seven of 
which hold offices in their ND par- 
lors. 

On N o V em b e r 5, she visited 
Association No. 15, Fresno County: 
on November 6, Association No. 5. 
Butte County; on the 19th at 
Association No. 21, Chico, and on 
the 20th, Association No, 28, Santa 
Cruz-Monterey Counties, 

On December 7 she was a guest 
of Association No. 4. Sacramento 
County, after which she will v.ication 
until February I, 197L 



El, MONTE 

El Monte No. 205 held its 
"Chicken Barbecue" at Mar> 
V'edova's home. Chairman Marie 
Smith and Mary Ausano agreed 
that this ways and means project 
was a great success. 

The annual Pot Luck was attend- 
ed by 60 members and guests, in- 
cluding Native Sons, San Jose No. 
22, Honored guests included DGP 
Marion Howard. V e n d a me and 
SDDGP Verona Gochner. Z.<u 
Gatos. Mary Ausano and her hus- 
band Aldo showed slides of their 
trip and Europe, 

El Monte celebrated its 57th 
anniversary at Valhs A 1 v i s o on 
November 5, 1970. A delicious din- 
ner was enjoyed by 31 members. 
The tables were decorated in red. 
white and gold. Honored euests 
were DGP Howard and Si5dGP 
Goehler. Chairmen of the evening 
were Marie Smith and Mary Ausano. 



A young lawyer opened his office in 
his father's dry cleaning eslablishmenl. In 
the window he placed a sign which read: 
"Suits Pressed. Attorney at Law." No. 
the local bar association didn't think it 
was funny. 



California's first grapes were of the 
Mission variety. They made a good, white 
dessert wine. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




"^ CHRISTMAS IN 
ANAHEIM 

(Continued from 
Page 3) 



custom is so intensely personal in 
, its nature that those who observe 
I it seldom speak of it. 




I It was not until about twenty 

' years ago that I chanced to visit our 
pioneer cemetery during the Christ- 
mas holidays. I saw more flowers 
there than on a Memorial Day. Pre- 
dominating were poinsettia plants 
and wreaths of holly tied with big 

; bows of red ribbon, dripping with 

I sparkling ornaments. 




Then there were the little Christ- 
mas trees. I choked with emotion as 
I approached the grave of a little 
girl. At the head of the tiny mound 
stood a little fir tree covered with 

DECEMBER. 1970 



tinsel and loaded with wee, shining 
balls, At the top hung a doll wrapped 
in cellophane. 

I am greatly moved when I mental- 
ly relive this experience. Christmas- 
time is indeed a season of joy. but 
it also has its heartaches. 



MORADA 

■'Harvest of Friends", was the 
theme for Morada No. 199, when 
Grand President Irene Bondanza. 
made her official visit. The event 
began with a banquet at Harry's 
chuck wagon restaurant, and was 
followed by a meeting in the senior 
citizens' center. Colorful arranee- 




ments of autumn leaves were used 
and a huge horn of plenty overflow- 
ing with fruits and vegetables was 
displayed before the altar. 

Introduced as 50-year members 
at the event were: Mmes. Katherinc 
Kopf, SPP Edna Hunsucker, Hap 
Pflagging, all of the Morada Parlor. 
Also welcomed were charter mem- 
ber Harriet Young of San Francisco, 
and Dianne Dietzel. a new mem- 
ber. Among the Grand Officers 
present: GP Irene Bondanza; GVP 
Virgilia McCombs: GT's Betty R. 
Curiich, and June Painter; GOS 
Icel Beers; PGPs Hazel B. Hansen. 
Ethel C. Enos and Lee Brice. Ethel 
C. Enos of Morada Parior, is cele- 
brating her 25th year as a past 
grand officer. 

There were 38 visiting members 
representing 17 parlors in attend- 
ance 



Official visit of Grand President to 
Morada Parlor. From left: Grand 
President Irene Bondanza and Presi- 
Dorotliv Fetlierland of the local par- 
lor. 





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Phone (714) 633-4551 

Orange, California 92668 



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524-1321 



PAGE 11 



Ghrzistmas is Alaya^ys 



^fcj A time to cease worrying about 
what the world is coming to 
and to rejoice in what has come 
to the world. 

Jfc.- Christmas registers our protest 
against pessimism. It re- 
veals light in our darkness, 
hope in our despair. 

'J»» New experience through a rad- 
iance which renews us; through 
a rapture which enthralls us; 
through a hope which enlists 
us. 



§*> Tlie glory of love, the wonder 
of kindness, and the miracle of 
goodness. 

^b-' C h r i v / m a .v ix forgetting our 
feuds and hates, our animosities 
and angers — and living the 
life God intends us to live. 

'^' A joyous event of the present, a 
a recurring e.xperience of won- 
der, mystery and joy — the 
lighting of a fresh, glowing 
candle of expectancy. 





PAGE 14 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 




The Wise Men 



Saw you never, in the twilight, 
]Vhen the sun had left the skies 
Up in heav'n the clear stars shining 
Through the gloom, like silver eyes? 
i>o of old the wise men, watching. 
Saw a little stranger star, 
ind they knew the King was given. 
And they followed it from far. 



fleard you never of the story 
^ow they crossed the desert wild, 
'ourney'd on by plain and mountain. 
Till they found the holy Child? 
fiow they open'd all their treasure, 
Kneeling to that infant King; 
"Jave the gold and fragrant incense, 
jQve the myrrh in offering? 



Know ye not that lowly baby 
Was the bright and morning Star? 
Tie who came to light the Gentiles, 
And the darken' d isles afar? 
And we, too, may seek his cradle; 
'There our hearts' best treasures bring; 
\Love, and faith, and true devotion 
\For the Savior, God, and King. 
— Cecil Frances Alexander, 1853 




We 



K 



IIM* 



^g- 



Oh, star of wonder, star of might. 
Star with royal beauty bright, 
Westward leading, still proceeding. 
Guide us to thy perfect light. 




We three kings of Orient are. 

Bearing gifts we traverse afar. 
Field and fountain, moor and 

mountain, 
Following yonder Star. 



Born a babe on Bethlehem's plain. 
Gold we bring to crown Him again; 
King forever, ceasing never. 
Over us all to reign. 

Frankincense to offer have 1: 
Incense owns a Deity night, 
Pray'r and praising, all men raising. 
Worship God on high. 

Myrrh is mine; its bitter perfume 
Breathes a life of gathering gloom; 
Sorrowing, sighing, bleeding, dying. 
Sealed in the stone-cold tomb. 



Glorious now behold Him arise. 
King and God and Sacrifice, 
Heav'n sings "Hallelujah" 
■•Hallelujah!" earth replies. 



PAGE IS 



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Printing Publishing 

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SPECIAL COi r r 



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THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




jj-.¥5;;v*jiit. s.!»s£.-r.fc (?i v^ -.K V ■ 






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JAMUAPY, 1971 ■► 40<t 



The Hacienda Chapel of the Holy Cross. Santa Cruz Is!; ' ' 



-ipc:aic;=ini inr inf= "^'=;i 

III 

JR. UNIT NEWS 



K=]G[= 



3BG 



3QE 



3Gt= 



=iC- 



FRUnVALE JUNIORS 

Members of Los Amiguitas Jr. 
Unit and Escholita Jr. Unit were 
guests at the installation of Fniilvale 
Jr. Unit. Susan Fleming was installed 
president. Veronica Hogan was in- 




Nancy Conens 
Jr. PGP 



Stalling officer. PGP Nancy Conens 
and CIS and Past Jr. State Chairman 
of Juniors, Dolores Ferenz, were also 
present. 



California Herald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 

Volume XVIII January, 1971 Number S 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 



I 



Junior Unit News 2 

The Life and Death of a Printing Press, by Dr. Leo J. Friis 3 

Parlor News 4 

The Grand President's Corner 6 

Ballad of James Lick, by Margaret Hayes 8 

In Memoriam 9 

Christmas in Santa Barbara, by Vera Pabst Smith 10 

NDGW "Home Happening", by Isabella Stevenson 14 




Dolores Ferenz 
GIS 

On December 11, Fruitvalc Jun- 
iors served as escort team for the 
official visit of GP Irene Bondanza 
on her visit to Fruitvale No. 177. 
On December 12, a Christmas party 
was held. Anne Conway was chair- 
man. The girls entertained the Little 
Sisters of St. Joseph Home for the 
Aged. They also presented them with 
a basket of canned foods. On Dec- 
ember 19, the Juniors visited the 
NDGW Home .sponsored a bingo 
party and sang carols for the resid- 
ents. 

f * ■f 
LAS AMIGUITAS UNIT 
No. 33 NDGW 

The Installation of Las Amiguitas 

Jr. Unit No. 33 was held. The new 

president of the Unit is C'harlcnc 

Thomas. Her corps of ofTicers in- 

{ Continued on Page 11) 

PAGE 2 



We're splitting the atom for you. 



Chances are some of the 
electricity you now use is 
generated at the San 
Onof re Nuclear Plant near 
San Clemente. 

Edison plans to add 
additional nuclear units at 
this site. One reason: in a 
nuclear reactor there is no 



combustion, so there are 
no by-products of combus- 
tion. Electricity from clean 
nuclear plants is one of the 
ways Edison is working to- 
day for a better tomorrow. 



Southern California Edison 




i. J. FRUS 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JANE FRIIS 
Public Relations 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners •nd publishers, Anihaim, 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243. Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: Ml 
N. Parton St.. Santa Ana, Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mail 
correspondence to CALIFORNIA HERALD. Circulation Department, P.O. Drawer 4243. Anahaim, 
Calif. 92803. When ordering change of address please allow six weeks: please fumiah 
old and new addresses including lip code NDGW MEMBERS: please send Parlor Number also. 
POST OFFICE: RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED. Please send magazint with addrtis chaaga 
to California Herald, P.O. Drawar 424J, Anahaim, California «2tM. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
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Other countries: Please apply for rates. Entered as s«cond<lats matter at the Post Office at 
Aj'aheim, California, under the Act of March 3, 1(79. No part of this magazine may tw re- 
prirted without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




Cpfc Jiijc and JDcati) of a printing ^vess 



by JLeo 7- ^riis 



^OHANN GUTENBERG'S PRINTING ptCSS is but a Step 

^^ in advance of the old wine press, and Charles Rust's 
Washington hand press is but a refinement of Gutenberg's 
invention. 

R. Hoe & Company gained control of Rust's patents 
and plans in 1838 and thereafter manufactured large 
number of these presses, many of which printed the 
pioneer newspapers of the West. 

It was on one of these pieces of equipment that John 
A. Lewis and John McElroy first printed the Los Angeles 
Star which made its debut on May 17, 1851. The first 
issue consisted of four pages of five columns each. A 
Spanish section, subtitled La Estrella. was edited by 
Manuel Clemente Rojo, a local attorney. 

The Star struggled along until January 14, 1856, 
when it was acquired by Henry Hamilton, an excellent 
writer and a fervent Democrat. During the Civil War he 
bitterly assailed President Lincoln. The nomination of 
General McClellan as the Democratic standard bearer in 
1864 was a bitter pill. After all, how would one demand 
peace and at the same time select a General for a candi- 
date? 

Due to financial difficulties occasioned by his virulent 
attacks on the Administration, the Star suspended pub- 
lication on October 1, 1864. 

Phineas Banning, founder of Wilmington, acquired the 
Star's press and equipment and on November 1 1 issued 
a new paper which he called the Star until Janu;u7 14, 
1865, when the name was changed to Wilmington 

JANUARY, 1971 



Journal. The paper's press was used in printing the 
Irresistable, a "Banning for Senator" sheet. The Journal 
retired on June 22, 1867, Banning pointing out that the 
Los Angeles Republican was now well enough established 
to meet the needs of the Republication party. 

The veteran Washington hand press lay idle until 
1870 when Banning gave it to George W. Barter to print 
Orange County's first newspaper, the Anaheim Gazette 
It was moved to a building on the northeast comer of 
Anaheim Boulevard and Lincoln Avenue in Anaheim 
and the first issue of the Gazette appeared on October 
29, 1870. In the following year Barter sold the paper 
to Charles A. Gardner, who changed its name to the 
Southern Californian on December 16, 1871. Gardner 
sold the paper to Richard A. Melrose and George C. 
Knox in the following year. Knox retired from the firm 
in 1875, selling out his interest to F. A. Athearn. 

The Gazette was moved to the second story of Kuchel 
Hall, a wooden structure on the east side of Anaheim 
Boulevard midway between Lincoln Avenue and Char- 
tress Street. According to a contemporary news item, 
"it took some doing" to get the heavy press up the stairs. 

Shortly before midnight, on January 16, 1877, fire 
broke out in a neighboring building. As the town was 
without a fire department, the flames spread rapidly and 
quickly enveloped Mrs. Kuchel's building, completely 
destroying it. The Washington hand press, which had 
faithfully served three newspapers became ;i mass nf 
warped and tangled iron. 

PAGE 3 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

Grand President Irene Bondanza 
made her official visit to Reina del 
Mar No. 126 and Tierra de Oro 
No. 304, Sanla Barbara on Decem- 
ber 15, at which time birthdates 
took prominence over the holiday 
season - the birth date of the Christ 
Child, which we always observe at 
this time of the year, and the com- 
ing birthday of Reina del Mar on 
April 20, 1971, when that Parlor 
will celebrate its 70th year of ser- 
vice to the Native Daughters of the 
Golden West. Tierra de Oro Parlor 
also called attention to its coming 
of age, with the 21st birthday of the 
Parlor taking place on December 10. 
just five days before the official visit. 

This year's observance, because of 
the special significance of the birth- 
days of the two hostess Parlors, and 
with special permission from the 
Grand Presidents, took the form of 
an open meeting preceded by a din- 
ner at the Santa Barbara Holiday 
Inn. Special guests of the two Par- 
lors for dinner were the following: 
Rev. Virgil Condano, O.F.M., 
Guardian of Old Mission, Santa 
Barbara, who gave the invocation; 
Rev. Maynard Geiger, Archivist and 
Historian of Old Mission Santa Bar- 
bara and the new Archive Library 
located there, who tied the history 



Parlor Neu/s 

of the founding of Santa Barbara 
Presidio in Santa Barbara on April 
19-21, 1782 with the founding date 
of Reina del Mar Parlor on April 
20, 1901, and the accomplishments 
of the Parlor in the field of history 
and landmarks since the date of its 
inception, extending compliments to 
both Parlors for their contrbutions 
to their community and state over 
the almost one hundred combined 
years of their existence; Russell Ruiz, 
local historian on the hispanic era 
and the Presidio of Santa Barbara, 
and artist, who told of plans for 
restoration of the Santa Barbara 
Presidio by the Trust for Historic 
Preservation and the State of Cali- 
fornia through its Parks and Recrea- 
tion Department; Miss Pearl Chase, 
long associated with the California 
Conservation Council and organiz- 
ations of civic importance, and a 
member of the Honor Roll of the 
Native Daughters of the Golden 
West in recognition of her man- 
years of dedication to the State of 
California; Mrs. Gladys Carr, City 
Councilwoman, representing Mayor 
Gerald Firestone; SDDGP Marv 
Louise Days, Reina del Mar, who 
also served as Toastmistress for the 





Sanla Barbara. "Queen >/ the Missions' 



PAGE 4 



SDDGF Mary Louise Days 

evening's program; DGP Margery 
Abem. Poinsetlia No. 318, DGP 
Mary Rule, La Purisima No. 327. 
Grand President Irene Bondanza 
was the special honored guest, and 
also GIS Dolores Ferenz, who ac- 
companied the Grand President to 
the official visit from the Bay Area. 
GT Lila Hummel, La Tijera No. 282, 
was also seated at the head table, 
as were Miss Deborah Lopez, Presi- 
dent of Princesa del Mar Unit No. 
40, two Presidents of the hostess 
Parlors, Mrs. Beverly Sorenson, 
Reina del Mar Mrs. Mary Weather- 
bee. Tierra de Oro: PP Mamie 
Miller. Reina del Mar and over 40- 
year member, who traced the his- 
tory of Reina del Mar and its con- 
tributions to Santa Barbara and the 
Order over the almost 70 years of 
its existence, highlighting many 
important projects over the years; 
PGP Eileen Dismuke. charter Re- 
cording Secretary and organizer of 
Tierra de Oro No. 304, who like- 
wise recorded for the members and 
guests in attendance, the many con- 
tributions of her Parlor to the com- 
munity, state and our Order. Also 
attending were City Councilman 
and Mrs. Franklin Lowance, DGP 
Ambcrt Phillips of Reina del Mar 
and DGP Edith Webster. Tierra de 
Oro No. 304. Many visitors were 
in attendance from Poinsetlia and 
and La Purisima Parlors, as well as 
husbands and family members and 
friends of Parlor members. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




PGP Eileen Disnnike 

Princesa del Mar Unit No. 40, 
Jr. NDGW members entertained 
those assembled following the speak- 
ing part of the program with an 
English version of a Mexican Pos- 
ada, and presented a beautiful pic- 
ture in their Mexican costumes, 
singing, and carrying the traditional 
creche scene in the candlelite 
processional. They then entertained 

^ Honored guest GP Irene Bond- 

anza and traveling companion GIS 

Dolores Ferenz: also GT Lila S. 

Hummel. 




Irene Bondanza 
GP 




Dolores Ferenz 
GIS 

I JANUARY, 1971 




Lila S. Hummel 
GT 



with Christmas Carols, and broke a 
Santa Claus piiiata to the delight of 
all present. 

The gift of the two Parlors, a cup 
and saucer to the new china set the 
Grand President is building from her 
money gifts from Parlors during this 
year, was presented by IS Claud- 
ine Wullbrandt, of Tierra de Ore. 
Reports for the current year, en- 
closed in beautiful, artistic covers 
prepared by Marianna Schmitter, 
of Reina del Mar were presented by 
1st VP Beth Olivarius, of Tierra de 
Oro to the Grand President. Greet- 
ings were extended by the two 
hostess Presidents at the beginning 
of the dinner, and following the close 
of the program members and guests 
enjoyed meeting and visiting with 
our distinguished guests. The even- 
ing, which was a complete departure 
from the usual official visit, proved 
a delightful change, and huge 
success. 

Committees from the two Parlors 
planning for the official visit were: 
Reina del Mar Nancy Fluker. 
Chairman, also Mmes. Days, Joyal. 
Klinger, Mariana Schmitter and Miss 
Days; Tierra de Oro, Eileen Dis- 
muke, Chairman, also Mmes. 
Grimm, Olivarius, Reed, Webster, 
and Wullbrandt. Hortensia Cuerrar 
served as organist. 



CHISPA 

President Charlotte Goulding, of 
Chispa No. 40, presented a book 
on the History of California to Mrs. 
Barbara Mace, librarian at the lone 
Elementary School. Mr. Tony Car- 
lin, history teacher at the lone 
High School, accepted the book 
"Amador County History" for his 
class room use. Both books were 
gifts from Chispa Parlor. 

A delegation of Native Daughters 
also surprised Chispa's secretary. 
Cynthia Phillips at her home a few 
days before Christmas and presented 
her with a book on Amador Counts 
History also. This was done in 
appreciation for the loyal secretarial 
work she has performed for the 
Native Daughters throughout the 
years. 



berr>f:ss.\ 

Berryessa No. 192 had a dinner 
at Top's Restaurant, Willows, to 
honor the birthday anniversary of 




Fern E. Adams 
PGP 



Fern Adams, Past Grand President 
and member of Berryessa. A no-host 
cocktail hour preceded the turkey 
dinner. The honored guests received 
numerous gifts, many of which were 
humorous. The tables were dec- 
orated in a birthday theme. A birth- 
day cake centered the main table 
where the honored guest, her hus- 
band Emmett, her mother, Stella 
Biggs and her son Bob and wife were 
seated. 




The special event was for mem- 
bers as well as for guests. Among 
those attending the party from out 
of town were GOS Icel Beers and 
husband, DGP Muriel Schroder and 
Kathryn La Brechett and husband, 
all of Chico. A poem was written 
and read by Rusty Schnurbusch. a 
member of Willows Parlor in ap- 
preciation to the honored guest for 
all the work and guidance given to 
the local parlor. 

y -f i 

SMOKEY ON DUTY 

Although NS-NDGW float did not 
win as everyone had hoped it would. 
it still was an extremely beautiful 
and effective float. The $12,000 cost 
of the float was divided with the 
Forestry Service paying $6,000; the 
Native Sons, $2,000; the Native 
Daughters; $2,000 and each Order 
put in $1,000 worth of work on the 
float. 

PAGE 5 



The Grand 
President's Corner 




CRAND PRhSlDtNT 

Irene Bondanza (Mrs. Joseph) 
2328 Union Street 
San Francisco, California 94123 
Telephone: 931-0145 (Area 415) 



RENE BONDANZA 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 

2271-32nd Avenue 

San Francisco, California 94116 

Office: 703 Market Street, Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



A NEW YEAR'S PRAYER 

Eternal Father, who makest all 
new, yet abidest forever the same, 
grant us so to pass through this com- 
ing year with faithful hearts, that we 
may spend all our days in service, 
and in all things do thy loving will: 
through Jesus Christ our Lord. 

Amen 

— Prayers, New and Old 



PAST PRESIDENT ASSOCIATION 

Grand Secretary Lucille Kimbark, 
who is to be general chairman for 
the up-coming 1971 Past Presidents 
Association Convention, to be held 
in San Francisco, April 24-26, called 
a meeting of her committee chair- 
men, delegating each chairman her 
duties for the coming session. The 
sessions are to be held at the Belle- 
vue Hotel on Geary Street, San 
Francisco. The meeting of Associa- 
tion No. 1 was "An evening for 
Grand President Irene Bonanza". 
Marie Feil of San Francisco No. 
261, was chairman assisted by mem- 
bers from San Francisco Parlor, of 
which the Grand President is a 
member. As GP Irene was escorted 
to the altar, for introduction, the 
song "Irene" was sung by DGP 
Hazel Adams, accompanied by PGO 
Frances Simas. 

State officers present were State 
President Constance Warshaw, State 
Secretary Madeline King and PSP 
Loretta Trathcn. Grand Native 
Daughter officers present were GT 
Helen McCarthy, GS Lucille Kim- 
bark and PGPs Evelyn Carlson, 
Orinda Giannini, Emily Ryan, Lor- 
etta Cameron and Alice Shea. 
SDDGP Fdna Garaventa was there 
to greet her sister. 

PAGE 6 



1 

5 
6 
7 

8 
11 

12 
13 
14 
16 
18 
19 
20 
21 
23 
25 

26 

27 
28 



8 

9 

11 

14 
16 

18 

20 

22 

24 



3tinerar^ 1971 



JANUARY 



J 
I 



Tournament of Roses Parade Pa.sadena 

Junipero No. 141 Monterey* 

Slirling No. 146, A ntiocli No. 223, Donner No. 193 Pittsburg* 

Yerba Bitena No. 273, Alta No. 3, and 

James Lick No. 220 (afternoon) San Francisco* 

Palo Alto No. 229, El Monte No. 205 Mt. View* 

Mission Bell No. 316 Soledad* 

Poinsettia No. 318, El Aliso No. 314 Ventura* 

La Purisima No. 327, Santa Maria No. 276 Lompoc* 

Aleli No. 102 Salinas* 

Piedmont No. 87 (75th Anniversary) Oakland* 

Home Board Dinner for Grand President 

Sutter No. Ill Sacramento* 

Santa Rosa No. 217, Sebastopol No. 265 Santa Rosa* 

Cotati No. 299, Sonoma No. 209, Petaluma No. 222 Cotati* 

Gold Discovery Dinner San Francisco 

Portola No. 172, Golden Gate No. 158 and 

Darina No. 114 San Francisco* 

Vallecito No. 308, El Cereso No. 207 and 

Betsy Ross No. 238 Hayward* 

George C. Yoimt No. 322, Vallejo No. 195 Yountville* ' 

BonitaNo. 10 Redwood City* 

FEBRUARY 

Ukialt No. 263 Ukiah* 

Clear Lake No. 135, Calistoga No. 145 and 

La Junta No. 203 St. Helena* 

Genevieve No. 132, Mission No. 227, and 

Minerva No. 2 San Francisco* 

Coalinga No. 270, Las Flares No. 262 Coalinga* 

Californiana No. 247 Los Angeles* 

Ramona No. 283, Charter Oak No. 292 and 

Tule Vista No. 305 Porterville* 

San Francisco Deputies Breakfast, NDGW Home San Francisco 

Los Angeles No. 124. La Tijera No. 282 and 

Beverley Hills No. 289 Los Angeles* 

El Pescadero No. 82, Phoebe A. Hearst No. 214, 
Joaquin No. 5, Stockton No. 256 and Caliz de Oro No. 206 .. Stockton* 
Leslye A. Hicks Home Health Fund Tea. NDGW Home .. San Francisco 
Washington's Birthday 

Oak Leaj No. 2%5, Mary sville No. 162 Live Oak* 

' SanJoseNo. 81, VcndomeNo. 100. LosGatosNo. 317 . Los Gatos* 

* Official visits are marked with astericks 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



I 

kt CAMINO REAL 

I El Camino Red No. 324 held iLs 
hrst Mexican Dinner at the historic 
Andreas Pico Adobe in Mission 
Hills. Greeting guests was Edie Bart- 
lett, parlor president and Audrey 
Haselbusch, welfare chairman in 
charge of the dinner. Her committee 
members who cooked and served the 
meal included Esther Wilkinson, 
Shirley Bongiovanni, Sherry Norris. 
Ida Grossi, Marie Harrington, Helen 
Trammell and Gloria Mellon. 

The parlor's members are noted 
for their Mexican dinners, some of 
which previously have been held at 
San Fernando Mission and the Har- 
rington's adobe residence. The Pico 
Adobe, dating back to 1834 is the 
second oldest residence in Los 
.Angeles city limits and was restored 
by Dr. Harrington in 1930. It is 
now owned by the City of Los 
Angeles and administratered by the 



San Fernando Valley Historical 
Society. Members of the Society and 
El Camino Real serve as docents 
under the chairmanship of Marie 
Harrington. 

Proceeds from the dinner were 
used for the Parlor's holiday welfare 
program which included two families 
with a total of 15 children and to an 
Indian widow in Newhall. 



HAPPY HOLIDAY VISIT 

The spirit of "Happy Holidays" 
prevailed December 8 when Grand 
President Irene Bondanza made her 
Official Visit to Guadalupe, Twin 
Peaks, and Utopia Parlors in San 
Francisco. Grand Trustee Helen 
McCarthy called at GP Irene's home 
and presented her with a box of 
candies then drove her to the meet- 
ing hall where our Grand President 
was welcomed bv the three hostess 




Helen McCarthy 
GT 

Parlors. Thirteen of the San Fran- 
cisco County Deputy Grand Presi- 
dents formed an escort when GP 
Irene was introduced at the altar 
where she was serenaded by DGP 
Hazel Adams accompanied with 
music by former Grand Organist 
Lucille Kohl of Mission Parlor who 
also supplied the music for the entire 
meeting. Deputy Grand Presidents 
forming the escort were Mmes. 
{Continued on Page 8) 




Misidn San Fernando, Rey de Espana, founded by Fr. Fermin Francisco de Lausen, scene of many El Camino Real 

Mexican dinners. 

JANUARY, 1971 PAGE 7 



HAPPY HOLIDAY VISIT . . . 
(Continued from Page 7) 

Adams, Bianchi, Cully, Cummings, 
Dcaton, Dcnictrak, Fett, G a I v i n, 
Gillick, Hcxuni, O'Connor Stidhcni 
and Sullivan. Distinguished guests 
escorted and introduced were; Jr. 
PGP Nancy Conens, GTs Marian 
McGuirc, Helen McCarthy, PGPs 




Marion McGuire 
GT 



Evelyn 1. Carlson, Loretta Cameron, 
Jewel McSweeney, SDDGP of San 
Francisco Edna Garaventa, hostess 
Parlor DGPs Verna Cummings and 
Edna H e x u m, and Junior State 
Marshal Renee Cook. 

An added highlight to this festive 
evening was the presenting of 50 
year service pins to three members 
of Twin Peaks Parlor - PGP Loretta 
Cameron, Emma Wall, and Hazel 
Blodgett. A ritual team selected of 
officers from the three hostess Par- 
lors conducted the evening ceremon- 
ies. Presiding President Dorothy 
Mowat and her corps of officers 
initiated two new members, Mrs. 
Marie Philipic and Mrs. Grace Muir, 
also obligated three reinstated mem- 
bers, Mrs. Vivian Kecbler, Mrs. 
Ebba Kraus, and Mrs. Catherine 
Tracey, all new additions toUtopia 
Parlor. PGP Loretta in behalf of 
the hostess Parlors presented the 
Grand President with a personal gift 
and GT Helen McCarthy presented 
monetary gifts for the Native Daugh- 
ters' Home and the Native Daugh- 
ters' Historical Room from the three 
Parlors. 

General Chairman Audrey Rose 
and her three Parlor committee car- 
ried out their holiday theme in the 
Christmas spirit. Each officer's 
station was adorned with three foot 
striped candy canes on white back- 
grounds and Santa Claus held a 
prominent place at the President's 
station. The refreshment rooms was 
festive with a seven foot lighted 
decorated Christmas tree and tables 
were set with large candles, small 

PACE I 



Christmas trees, figurines, Christmas 
garland and festoons. The food also 
took on the holiday spirit with the 
serving of turkey sandwiches and 
colored cup cakes topped with a 
snowman. Approximately 160 mem- 
bers and guests were in attendance 
and left for home with the spirit and 
anticipation of coming Happy Holi- 
days. 



LUdlow 8-1753 

BELL HAVEN GUEST HOME 

For Ambulatory Senior Citizens 
4726 Clara Street, Cudahy 

GUSSIE J. GUIDOTTI 
Member. Sea Point Parlor 196 
Sausalito 



(405) 724-6316 


Growers - Packers - Shippers of 
Fruits and Vegetables 


Box 230 
Watsonville, California 95076 



the 



S()K 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



HoLflnolfiEvnoLDS 

6RROING(M)c0NTRRCT0R 

bridges • highways - dams ■ railroads 

• Heavy •Cquipmenl 

Haulini For Rent 

535-4233 
505 S. Sunkist Ave. Anahaim 



Fine Cosmetics 

DRUG CENTER 

. . . Our Sptiahy 

KE S-I1I5 

201 West Lincoln 

Anaheim. California 

S A H Green Stamps 



JAMKS LICK 

James Lick No. 220 was 49 years 
old and the members celebrated with 
a luncheon before a short meeting. 
Charter member Mabel Walker gave 
a few high lights of the initiation of 
the Parlor in 1921. Charter member 
Ella Hillman was unable to attend 
but sent a note. Tillic Leeman began 
as a member of Calaveras in 1898 
and is the only member living who 
consolidated with James Lick in 
1937. Each member present added 
a few words of their years in the 
Parior. 

DGP Marian Fetts gave an inter- 
esting talk. 

f f Y 

Ballad of James Lick 

by Margaret Hayes 

James Lick sailed through the 
Golden Gate 
To Verba Buena's shore 
The LADY ADAM's shipper 
shrugged 
And called him daft and more. 



No man with mind would want to 
buy 
A cow-pathed sanded waste 
But one-suit Lick made up his 
mind 
■And bought — though not in 
haste. 



The villagers all thought him fool 
To pay out forty-grand 

For wind-swept dunes and barren 
lots — 
At best, expensive sand. 



I 



The cow-path, now Montgomery 
Street, 
Lick bought and sold again. 
With gold-thumb touch he got more 
land 
And prospered his domain. 



A miser-millionaire was Lick Hj 

Who worked and walked alone. 

In a world turned gold-dust mad, he 
was 
A scavenger for bone. 

But the daft one held his dream for 
years 
Then gave all his wealth away. 
He helped the poor and brought 
renown 
To his City by the Bay. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




Not lost to those that love them 
Not dead, just gone before; 

They still live in our memory. 
And they will forever more. 

Velma Tackaberry, Reina del Mar No. 
126, November 9. 

Barbara Giannoni, Mary E. Bell No. 224, 
May 1. 

Hattie Rehmke, Mary E. Bell No. 224, 
July 8. 1969. 

Henrietta Newman, Pasadena No. 290, 
November 8. 

Florence Hassett, Sutter No. Ill, Novem- 
ber 11. 

Isabelle Parkinson. Sutter No. Ill, Nov- 
ember 13. 

Myrtle Bartges, La Junta No. 293, June 
30. 

Esther Stephens. Ruby No. 46, November 
16. 

Dolores Walther, Las Juntas No. 221. 
November 13. 

Minnie L. Sawyer, Califia No. 22, Nov- 
ember 21. 

Dell Hart, Reichling No. 97, November 
22. 

Alice Wildes, Stirling No. 146, Novem- 
ber 23. 

Nellie Sullivan, Buena Vista No. 68. 
November 8. 

Ann Turnbull. Fruitvale No. 177. Nov- 
ember 25. 

Edith Berheimer. San Diego No. 208, 
November 27. 

Maude loppini. El Pinal No. 163, Nov- 
ember 28. 

Geraldine Williams, Fort Bragg No. 210. 
November 28. 

Madeline Copello. San Andreas No. 113. 
November 23. 

Grace Tiscornia, San Andreas No. 113, 
November 23. 

Lottie Lunt Upton, Chispa No. 40, Nov- 
ember 28. 

Sarah Reilly. Alta No. 3, October 15. 

Emily Rogers. Aloha No. 106, December 
1. 

Rose Alvares, San Luisita No. 108, Nov- 
ember 15. 

Marie Nunes, San Luisita No. 108, Nov- 
ember 12. 

Catherine O'Connell, Golden Gate No. 
158, November 30. 

Carmella Allen, Golden Gate No. 158. 
December 1 . 

Ethel May Henle, Woodland No. 90, Dec- 
ember 2. 

Martha Powell. Dolores No. 169, Dec- 
ember 3. 

Mae Elizabeth Silva. Piedmont No. 87. 
December 4. 

Eugenia Latasa. La Tijera No. 282, Dec- 
ember 2. 

JANUARY, 1971 



THANKS 

Past Supervisor Lucile Ashbaugh 
and daughter Gene wish to extend 
their thanks for the cards and phone 
calls at the time of the passing of 
Joseph Ashbaugh. 



LOU — ANNS 

The regular yearly dinner and 
"get-together" of SDDGPs Ann 
Shaw and Lucile Ashbaugh and their 
deputies was a delightful affair. 
PGP Edna Williams was a guest. 
PGP Maxiene Porter lives now on 
the East coast and could not be 
present. 







Edna Williams 
PGP 



Maxiene Porter 
PGP 



Deputies Georgia Robinson and 
Helen Clifton chose the Gold Mirror 
on Taraval and decorated the tables 
for the affair. The evening closed in 
memory of the members who are 
gone never to return. 



LA TIJERA 

La Tijera No. 282 members are 
having a pot-luck dinner for their 
American Field Service students on 
Tuesday, February 2 at the hall. The 
students enjoy pot-lucks immensely 
so the membership is urged to bring 
favorite dishes. 

Ruth Payne and Margaret Strouse 
represented the Parlor and took 
Christmas packages, a grocery order 
and a money gift to a needy family 
this Christmas. 




Flower' 3'^'^p 
1215 W. Lincoln, Anaheim 535-4997 






MELROSE 



MEMORIAL PARK • MAUSOLEUM 

CREMATORIUM • COLUMBARIUM 

I Orangewood Street at Santa Ana Freeway 

538-3583 



THE BASLER HOME 




CONVALESCENT 4 ELDERLY 

24.Hour Nurtiiie Service 

Excellent M^als ■ Tray Service 

LARGE CHEERFUL ROOMS 
ADJOINING BATHS & SUNDECKS 

Life Membership or Monthly Rates 

542-3514 

1015 N. Broadway Santa Ana 




TaQles so freeb becauos H^ 

926 E. First Street, Santa Ana 

Phone 547-7031 



EL TOBRITO 

TACOS and BURRITOS 

5th and Bristol 
Santa Ana, California 



In Santa Ana 
OWL DRUG STORE 

1002 E. 17TH STREET 

547-6655 

Sam Calabrese 




In Orange 
WATSON'S DRUG 

lis E. CHAPMAN 

532-6315 

Jim Calabrese 



Prescriptions and Sundries Serving Orange County Since 1912 

MASTERCHARGE and BANKAMERICARD • FREE DELIVERY 



PAGE 9 




I^hristmas in 
Santa ^jaToaTa 
by Vera Pabst Smith 



1 



SAN JOSE 

San Jose Parlor No. 81 presented 
the USO in San Jose the American 
Flag and the California State Bear 
Flag. President Elizabeth Bringmann 
made the presentation on behalf of 
the Parlor to Louis Rossi. Members 
included in the presentation were 
Thelma T a n n o, Maria Fenech, 
Lavina Hogan, Helen Fregosa and 
Mildred McGrath. Refreshments 
were served immediately following 
the presentation. 

Recently, San Jose Parlor gained 
a new member with the initiation 
of Edna J. Wilkins. Guests included 
SDDGP Verona Goehncr of Santa 
Clara County, District No. 26. 

r / / 
ALOHA 

Aloha No. 106 held its annual 
Christmas Party December 22, 1970 
at the home of Gladys I. Fariey, 
Christmas Party Chairman assisted 
by M m e s. Restagno, Peterson, 
S u i c o, Restagno, and President 
Lillicnthal. There was a beautifully 
trimmed Christmas tree, Christmas 
candles burning and a cheery fire in 
the fire place. Refreshments were 
served after the exchange of gifts. 
DCiP Dorothy Jordan was guest of 
honor. 

Alalia purchased 60 pairs of 
tennis shoes for the children at 
Sncdigar Cottage again this year, 
1970. Aloha Cheer Committee wrap- 
ped gifts for the elderiy which were 
given to a San Leandro Convales- 
cent Home at Christmas time, and 
also sent in a donation to the Vete- 
ran's Welfare Fund for the Christ- 
mas Committee. 

PAGE 10 



DISTRICT No. 20 CHILDREN'S 
FOUNDATION BREAKFAST 

Mrs. Ethel Murphy, SDDGP of 
Alameda and part Contra Costa 
County, assisted by all the Deputy 
Grand Presidents of District No. 20, 
are planning to host a breakfast on 
Sunday. March 7, 1971 - 10:30 a.m. 
at Goodman's in Jack London 
Square, Oakland, to raise funds for 
our Children's Foundation. 




Jewel McSweeney 
PGP 



Miss Jewel McSweeney, PGP and 
State Chairman of Children's 
Foundation, will be our guest 
speaker. General Chairman for the 
Breakfast is Mrs. Minnie Silva, a 
member of Hayward No. 122. 

Reservations are $4.25 closing on 
February 26th. Mail requests to Mrs. 
Ben Coats, 111 Dancfield Place. 
Moraga, California 945.56. 



The moon spills its golden brilliance 
Through the gnarled branches 
Of an ancient olive tree 
Facing on the joot-worn terra cotia 

patio 
Of a rambling hacienda. J 

Twinkling lights radiate ' 

From holly wreaths on the balconies_ 
And the far away pealing 
Of the Mission bells 
Tolling the Angelus 
Breaks the Silence. 



VENDOME PARLOR 

Christmas came to Vendomc No. 
100 via a holiday party in the lOOF 
Hall. Approximately 100 members 
with visitors from other parlor in 
Santa Clara County, children and 
grandchildren atended. Second VP 
Janice Baker played the role of St. 
Nick, greeting and presenting t he 
children with gifts. The Bell Tones 
Musical Group of the Bell Telephone 
Company entertained w i t h a pro- 
gram of Yule melodies. Delicious 
refreshments were served at tables 
decorated in the Christmas tradition. 

Thirty-nine members, including 
guests from Los Gatos No. 317 and 
El Monte No. 305, attended the 
annual Christmas dinner at Mariani's 
Restaurant in Santa Clara, followed 
by an exchange of gifts. 

The parlor donated a large carton 
of Christmas gifts to the local USO 
for shipment to our "boys and girls" 
in Vietnam. A monetary gift was 
sent to the Veterans Hospital Admin- 
istration, Palo Alto, to make Christ- 
mas a little merrier for the patients. 

President Betty and Treasurer 
Jeane Postier visited "shut-ins" at i 
Christmas time with remembrances 
from the parlor. 

President Betty Yakobovich, ac- 
companied by a corps of her officers 
and members, attended the official 
visit of GP Irene Bondanra to Palo 
Alto No. 229 and El Monte No. 205 
at Mountain View on Januray 8. 



In 1911 the California I^gislatu 
adopted the Bear Flag as its official flag.1 
Until recently the exact delineation of thel 
bear was left rather indefinite. (One in I 
possesion of the Anaheim Public Library| 
looks more a wolf than a bear). 

CALIFORNIA HERALbJ 



ANNIE K. BIDWELL 

The Christmas Party of Annie K. 
Bidweil No. 168 was held in Native 
Daughters Hall on December 10, 
with the Drill Team Committee, 
GOS Icel Beers, Chairman, Elsie 
Bearse and Muriel Schroeder res- 
ponsible for decorations and refresh- 
ments. 

In the dining room Mmes. Beers, 
Bearse, Bryan, and Speer had dec- 
orated using Santa Clauses, sleighs, 
snowmen, red candles. 

In the meeting hall a large dec- 
orated lighted Christmas tree stood 
in one corner. It had been decorated 
by President Jessie Steams, and 
Mmes. Bearse, Beers, Hesse and 
Schroeder. A lighted Santa Claus 
stood before the president's station 
and red stockings hung at the other 
stations. The piano held a candela- 
brum with lighted red tapers. 

Miss Genevieve Jezler was open- 
ing chairman. The meeting presided 
over by President Jessie Steams. 
The secretary read Christmas mes- 
sage from Grand President Irene 
Bondanza, the Board of Grand 
Officers and DGP Clara Staheli of 
Olivia No. 309. 




Florence D. Boyle 
PGP 

A communication from PGP 
Florence Boyle of Gold of Ophir. 
reported on the financial success of 
the recent Childrens Foundation 
Bmncheon held in Oroville. 

Thank you notes were read and 
reports of the various committees 
were given. A basket for a needy 
family was provided. Guides for 
Bidweil Mansion were requested. It 
was voted to donate to the Mansion 
three gas light fixtures which were 
originally in ND building when 
owned by the Lusk family. Mmes. 
Beers. Hesse, Taylor and Baumann 
reported on various meetings 
attended. 

Refreshments were hot stuffed 
rolls, molded cranberry salad, 
relishes, candies, coffee, tea. cookies 

JANUARY, 1971 



and white Christmas ice cream balls 
topped by tiny red candles. Assist- 
ing regular committee were Mmes. 
Hesse and Murray. Around the 
Christmas tree, fun gifts were ex- 
changed. 

f Y f 

JUNIOR UNIT NEWS . . . 
(Continued from Page 2) 

elude: Charlottee Piper, Bev Becke- 
meyer, Nancy LeValley, Nadine 
Beckemeyer, Kara Valentine, Cheryl 
Colon, Jackie Tweed, Shirlene Colon 
and Laura Carey. 

The Installing Officer was Laura 
Carey. The Jr. State Marshal. Renec 
Cook, acted as Installing Marshal, 
the Jr. State Secretary, Sharon 
Landt, as Secretary, and the Jr. 
State Past President, Leealyn Baker, 
acted as the Past President. Also, Jr. 
State Trustee, Laurie Cane, attended. 
The President of the Mother Parlor, 
Las A migas No. 3 1 1 attended and 
presented the President with a gift. 

The Unit's Merit Trophy, for most 
points earned by doing things in the 
Unit, was won by Nadine Becke- 
meyer. The evening was closed with 
entertainment and refreshments. 



ORINDA 

Orinda Parlor's annual Christmas 
Party was a fun evening from the 
moment it started. Held at Urban 
Center, in San Francisco, there were 
43 in attendance, including three 
Native Sons, coincidentally all from 
Pacific Parlor. Eleanor Begovich. 
Chairman, and her committee, Gene- 
vieve Parks and Vivian Hall, pre- 
pared a festive and gala party and 
brought the Chirstmas spirit right 
into the room. 

A glass of bright red punch was 
served upon entering the room. The 
tables were covered with Christmas 
decorations, and the meal served 
was fit for royalty. Prepared and 
served by Al Heard and his assist- 
ants, the dinner started with a lovely 



apple salad, then roast beef, with 
broccoli and mashed potatoes, rolls 
and butter, and topped off with ice 
cream on top of cake and coffee 
for dessert. 

As the exchange gifts were receiv- 
ed, an alphabet was placed on the 
package and these were called out 
as Santa delivered the presents. 
Eleanor Begovich entertained with 
some Christmas melodies on the 
piano; in addition, Verena Friede 
played as the girls sang Christmas 
carols. Brief messages were given by 
Orinda Parlor, Esther Jennings. By 
each plate was a colored tube stuffed 
with wrapped candies prepared by 
the President. It was one of the gay- 
est Christmas parties Orinda Parlor 
has had, and certainly one of the 
happiest evenings in 1970. 



LESLYE A. HICKS HOME 
HEALTH FUND TEA 

The annual Leslye A. Hicks Home 
Health Tea will be held at the Native 
Daughter Home on Saturday, Febru- 
ary 20, 1971 - 1 to 4 P.M. Please 
note the date and plan to attend. 
There will be a program under the 
direction of Frances A .Simas, fol- 
lowing refreshments. 

This Fund which is affectionately 
referred to as "Mother's Cookie Jar" 
was established in memory of our 
Grand President Leslye A. Hicks. 
Its purpose to supplement medical 
needs and to provide other com- 
forts when needed, to our members 
residing at the Home. The committee 
members are; Myrtle E. Ritterbush, 
Bitena Vista No. 68 assisted by: 
Eleanore Bianchi. El Vespero No. 
118 and GT Helen C. McCarthy, 
Utopia No. 252. 

Members and friends unable to 
attend the tea and who wish to 
assist, may send contributions, or 
memorials to the project. 





A N A H E 1 Wl 




SAVINGS 


AND LOAN 


ASSOCIATfON 


Dorothy Y. Ulvestad. President 


J. Bernard 


Soto, Exec. VicePres. 


construction loans 


Y escrow r 


refinancing 


Y collections 


(Main Office) 








ANAHEIM 


HUNTINGTON BEACH 


BREA 


117 W. Lincoln Avenue 411 Main Street 


770 


South Brea Blvd. 


PRopect 2-1532 


LEhigh E-CS91 




Ph. S2S-M71 



PAGE 11 



SAN JOSE 

San Jose No. SI, held its fourth 
annual Luncheon and Fashion Show, 
Saturday, December 5, 1970 at 
Zorba's in San Jose. 

Theme for the afternoon was 
"Christmas Fantasy". Topiary trees 
made of styrofoam packing material 
sprayed gold and trimmed with red 
ribbon decorated the tables. Julie 
La Metre, daughter of the General 
Chairman Pat La Metre, handed out 
red programs designed with a gold 
topiary tree. 

Over 100 guests attended includ- 
ing GT Marion McGuire, SDDGP 
Verona G o c h n e r of Santa Clara 
County and DGP Henrietta Marcottc 
of El Monte No. 205. 

General Chairman Pat Le Metre 
was the mistress of ceremonies who 
welcomed Native Daughters, friends 
and relatives including husbands to 
the luncheon. It was the hope of 
San Jose No. 81 that our "Christmas 
Fantasy" would put everyone in the 
spirit for a festive holiday. 




Marie C. Landini 
PGT 



"The Fashion" of the Valley Fair 
Shopping Center in San Jose pro- 
vided the fashions. Marie C. Landini, 



MULTI-LISTING SERVICE 

LEATHERBY REALTY 

NORA GRANGETTO 
772-1552 or 533-3632 

702 W. LINCOLN ANAHEIM 

Estate - Home - Income Property 



•2 



BACKS 
KAULBARS 



MORTUARY 
1617 W 



Li Palma at Euclid 
Anahalm 
7721617 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 535-7221 

INSURANCE — SURETY BONIiS 

M E BEEBE A CO 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim. California 



a member of the Parlor, was the 
commentator assisted by Mary 
Asselin, Bernice C r o w I, Shirley 
Svindal, Mar> Sholes, Agnes Bring, 
Lavina Hogan, Dolores Knox and 
Marie Knox as models. 

Many door prizes were donated 
by members and merchants and a 
money tree was donated by Marie 
C. Landini which was won by 
Dorothy Porfido, a member of San 
San Jose No. 8 1 that the "Christmas 
a Christmas Tree decorated with red 
ornaments and 25 one dollar bills 
tied with red ribbon. 



PAST PRESIDENTS 
ASSOCIATION No. 21 

Past Presidents Association No. 
21 NDGW entertained State Presi- 
dent Constance Warshaw. The din- 
ner and meeting were held in Native 
Daughters Hall. 

The dining room tables were laid 
with white cloths and decorated with 
greenery and hydrangea blossoms, 
also paper dolls in green and pink 
dresses. After partaking of the din- 
ner, members gathered in the meet- 
ing hall. The pink and green colors 
were used here with baskets of roses 
at each station. At the president's 
station the flowers were contained 
in a miniature wheel barrow. A 
placque with a San Francisco cable 
car completed the decor. Bertha 
Cooley was responsible for the deco- 
rations. Mrs. Warshaw was escorted 
to the altar for introduction and 
then taken to her seat of honor. 
Mrs. Cooley presided at the meeting. 
Introduced were Past State Presi- 
dents Elvina Woodard, Lucy Girdler: 
State Directors Ella Brownfield and 
Kathcrine LaBreacht; State Organist 
Dorothy Rose; PGP Florence Boyle 
and GOS Icel Beers. 

Mrs. Warshaw was accompanied 
to Chico by Mrs. Marge Skelly. 

Two new members Edna Wilson 
and Gladys Rose were initiated into 
.Association No. 21. 

The drill team performed in honor 
of the State President and sang two 
songs of welcome. The team wore 
pink and white formals and carried 
nosegays of pink roses surrounded 
by green feathers. The team was 
under the direction of GOS Iccl 
Beers. Members in the team were 
Mmes. Beers, Hesse. Gerholdt. 
Nystrom. Schroeder. Bearse. Gird- 
ler, Dctrick. Logan and Handley. .\\ 
the end of the drill Mrs. Schroeder 



PAGE 12 



presented a of flowers with 
greenery consisting of a monetary 
gift to the State President. 

Mrs. Ivy Hoar presented the 
.Memory Book which she reported 
had been compiled by Mrs. Dorothy 
Evans. President Bertha Cooley had 
made gifts of the evening for each 
visiting dignitary, also all her officers. 
The gifts were yard sticks encased 
in colorful burlap holders decorated 
with crocheted flowers. 

Mrs. Warshaw spoke to the mem- 
bers, reminiscing how she had at- 
tended the Past Presidents Assembly 
held in Chico and also the home- 
coming celebration for Past State 
President Lucy Girdler. She also ' 
thanked the Association for many 
courtesies extended to her. Others 
who spoke were Past State Presi- 
dents Woodard and Girdler, State 
Organist Dorothy Rose; State Dir- 
ectors Ella Brownfield and Kather- 
ine LaBreacht; PGP Florence Boyle 
and GOS Icel Beers. 

Members were present for 
Associations No. 1, San Francisco; 
No. 5, Oroville; No. 11. Solano 
County; No. 14 Shasta-Tehama and 
No. 21 Chico. 

■til 

EL DORADO 

El Dorado No. 186 held its Dec- 
ember meeting with Kathleen Flynn 
whose interesting home is furnished 
with many antiques. There were 16 
members present. Three members 
from Marguerite No. 12 and Presi- 
dent Georgia Gardiner's granddaugh- 
hters were also present. ' 

A turkey dinner preceded the 
meeting. A Christmas tablecloth and 
bowls of holly and candles added •■ 
to the festive occasion. There was ^ 
an exchange of gifts. Plates of delic- 
ious food were taken to shut-ins in 
the neighborhood. | 

y Y * 

SAN FERNANDO MISSION 

San Fernando Mission No. 280, 
San Fernando, moved t h e Annual 
Harvest Festival this year to the 
Golden Valley Auditorium, on Sher- 
man Way in Van Nuys, where there 
was more than double the attend- 
ance, had more room for the var- 
ious hand work displays and barcain 
counters, and evenione said they had 
triple the fun! General Chairman, 
was Beverly Swaner, Past President. 
Members wore old-style countr> 
gingham dresses. Country store 
Bingo, with the prizes being grocer- 
ies, and tumbola a game with lots of 

CALIFORNIA HERALD « 



orizes, entertained during the even- 
ng. Paintings were auctioned off, by 
<eith Swaner, along with flower 
irrangements and chopping blocks. 
Door prizes were donated by the 
■ arious merchants and members. 
3rand prize was a 3 day holiday at 
Las Vegas. At the close of the even- 
ng, those attending, were served 
lome made pies, and coffee and tea. 
This is one of the main ways and 
Tieans projects of the parlor. The 
.ither is serving the annual Christ- 
mas luncheon for the Women's Divi- 
sion of the Chamber of Commerce, 
on the first Wednesday in December. 
Various organizations take part in 
the competitive table settings and 
approximately 300 are served a swiss 
steak luncheon. Grace Trimble was 
General Chairman of this event. 

i i -f 

SAN JUAN BAULISTA 

San Juan Bautista Parlor enjoyed 
a delicious pot-luck Christmas dinner 
and party at their Adobe. Several 
guests were present including DGP 
Genevieve Patterson from Aleli Par- 
lor, also two members of /4/e/i Par- 
lor and one of Soledad Parlor. 





^ 


w 'ilr 


1 Ml H^"* 

HHlLiuUlffiu 




San Juan Bautista NDGW Adobe. 

After the dinner a short meeting 
was held with Mrs. A r n a 1 d o 
Andreazzi, president, presiding. The 
members were invited to a pot-luck 
dinner and Christmas party in Sal- 
inas on December 10 given by Aleli 
Parlor and to a luncheon and fashion 
show on December 5 in San Jose 
ilso a Christmas breakfast on Dec- 
ember 6 at the Grand Ballroom in 
the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco. 
A Christmas greetings letter was 
read from the Grand President 
Irene Bondanza. 

After the meeting everyone 
lathered downstairs around a lovely 
lighted Christmas tree for an ex- 
change of gifts with punch and candy 
being served during the festivities. 
The committee who were in charge 

JANUARY, 1971 



of the evening were Mmes. Cook, 
Andreazzi, A v i 11 a, Johnston and 
Slibsager. 

The January 6 meeting was in 
charge of the Youth, Education and 
Scholarship committee composed of 
Mmes. Joseph, Scott, Johnston and 
Bottini. 

f i -f 
EL CARMELO 

On December 2, Grand President 
Irene Bondanza made her official 
visit to El Carmelo No. 181. Three 
fresh green Christmas trees (one 
on each side of the podium and a 
huge one at the fireplace) were in 
keeping with the Christmas Wonder- 
land theme. While styrofoam doves 
with white nylon wings and tails 
graced the branches. Resting bet- 
ween the branches were nests of 
angel hair complete with silver eggs. 
A large four foot standing angel (of 
papaiermache ) holding a basket con- 
taining the gifts of the evening was 
placed at the Station of the First 
Vice President. Glass encased scenes 
to be used as Christmas ornaments 
were presented the Grand Officers 
by Stella Arcimas. Angels of various 
shapes and sizes stood about the 
hall . . . some holding candles, others 
playing musical instruments. A love- 
ly modern arrangement of glass 
bubbles with a fountain effect was 
placed in front of the President's 
Station. 

Opening ceremonies were by 
Chairman Christine Hulme present- 
ing President Jane Cuneo and her 
corps of officers followed by the 
presentation of GP Irene Bondanza. 
Also presented were GIS Dolores 
Feren, GTs Marion McGuire and 
Helen McCarthy; PGPs Evelyn I. 
Carlson and Orinda Giannini and 
DGP Loretta Mosley. The Grand 
President was gifted with an orchid 
wristlet and a fairy tale Swiss type 
music box that contained a monet- 
ary gift. 

A w e 1 1 conducted meeting was 
highlighted by initiation of six 
candidates, presentation of a 50 year 




PGP Orinda G. Giannini 

pin to Teresa Lanford and 25 year 
pins to Mmes Mackintosch, Koskela, 
Gillespie and Murphy. 

Reports of Parlor activities and 
donations to projects were presented 
to the Grand President by secretary 
Christine Hulme. 

Helping to make the evening a 
success were the musicians Georgia 
Jacks and Frances Simas, Chairman 
Christine Hulme and her assistants: 
clever decorations, Marian Helen; 
arrangements Jane Cureo and re- 
freshments, Alice Aldham. 

/ / *■ 
POPPY TRAIL 

Poppy Trail No. 266 members 
are beginning to plan for their larg- 
est money-making project — the 
Thieves Market in May 1971. They 
urge all members to begin making 
hand made Articles, collecting good 
rummage and getting potted plants 
growing. 



m 



Faithful . Courteous, Service 
120 E.Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE S-'^IOS 




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"A Full House of Insurance" 

Fire — Auto — Theft — Casualty 
Compensation — Bonds 

Phone (714) 633-4551 
150 North Feldner Road / Orange, Californh 9'"^V- 



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// 



NdGW 

"Home Happening 

by Isabella Stevenson 

Grand President Irene Bondanza 
appointed Marie Landini of San Jose 
Parlor No. 81 to the Home Com- 
mittee, to fill the vacancy left by 
our late Past Grand Secretary Irma 
Murray, for the remainder of the 
year. Chairman, PGP Hazel Han- 
sen, welcomed Marie Landini in 
behalf of herself and the Home Com- 
mittee. Marie previously served 
three years on this committee and 
her outstanding business acumen 
and knowledge of state and federal 
labor laws makes her a welcome 
asset as a member of this board. 




PGP Hazel Hansen 

The Home Committee expresses 
their sincere appreciation to Grand 
President Irene for the monetary 
contributions derived from coin 
marches at her official visits. Wc are 
grateful for your generous help Irene! 

On December 15, a Christmas 
luncheon was held at the home. All 
the residents of the home and mem- 
bers of the Home Committee attend- 
ed this festive occasion. Isabella 
Stevenson of Vendome No. 100, was 
chairman of this event, assisted by 
Helen Butts of Copa de Oro No. 
105, Verona Mason of George C. 
Yount No. 322, PGP Edna Will- 
iams of Sequoia No. 272, Verona 
DeWitt and our Grand Secreeary 
Lucille Kimbark of Aha No. 3. 
Lucille graciously gave each person 
in attendance a china tulip nut dish. 
This is just one of the many nice 
things that Lucille is always doing. 
No affair would ever be successful 
without the cooperation and help of 

PAGE 14 



manager Frances Harris of El Car- 
melo No. 181. Such was the case 
of the Christmas luncheon. 

The Home Committee would like 
to remind everyone of "The Home 
Improvement Fund". Contributions 
may be sent to: Mrs. Lee Brice, 
PGP, P.O. Box 41 —Res. 66, San 
Ouentin, California 94964. 



LA PURISIMA 

La Purisima No. 327, on Decem- 
ber 9, had a Christmas party for the 
children of the parlor members. The 
children met around a large dec- 
orated tree and participated in an 
animated story under the direction 
of Mrs. Peter Pohlhammcr, chair- 
man for the evening. To the tune of 
Jingle Bells, Santa Claus entered 
with his bag full of toys and sugar 
plums. Each child receiving a home- 
made stocking filled with gifts and 
fruit. Santa talked with each child 
and asked them to make their 
Christmas wishes known by writing 
him at the local address. 

As the children adjourned for re- 
freshments and games. La Purisima 
members continued their business 
meeting making their plans for the 
new year. Visiting Lompoc will be 
the Grand President Irene Bond- 
anza. Chairman Mrs. A. Randc 
reported on plans being made. This 
included a barbecue. Santa Maria 
No. 276 will be acting as joint host 
with La Purisima. Decorating Chair- 
man, Mrs. A. Rande, reported that 
the decorations would be in colors 
of gold, green and peach. Refresh- 
ment Chairman, Mrs. Mary Beard, 
reported on the refreshments wanted. 
Santa Maria Parlor's general chair- 
man is Mrs. Robert Cave. General 
Chairman representing La Purisima 
Parlor is Mrs. Alfred Ramming, The 
decision was for the theme to be 
"New Year's Jubilee". Chairman 
Mrs. G. E. Benson said the bazaar 
was a very successful event. Mrs. 
W. Rule won the pretty gingerbread 
house made and donated by Mr. 
and Mrs. Lewis Ethridge. Chairman 
for Veterans. Mrs. William Zvolanek, 
announced that the Christmas box 
and lap robes were made and 
donated for the Veterans hospital 
in Palo Alto. Chairman Mrs. Ernita 
Fcland sent a box of delicacies to the 
residents of the Native Daughters' 
Home. A donation was made to the 
"Christmas Cheer throughout the 
Year" locally. President Jessie Ram- 
ming complimented Chairman Mrs. 



Pohlhammcr on the decorations and 
theme. Table decorations were 
marshmallow snowmen, nutcups and 
pinecone Christmas trees. A beau- 
tiful Christmas tree flanked ice 
cream and fancy cupcakes and 
cookies decorated in the Christmas 
spirit of snowmen, trees and bells. 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

Grand President Irene Bondanza 
made her official visit to Brooklyn 
No. 157, Aloha No. 106 and Berke- 
ley No. 150 at the Montclair Wo- 
men's Club. Stom?" weather didn't 
dampen the spirit of enjoyment of 
members present. A corsage was pre- 
sented to the Grand President before 
the meeting. 

Theme of the evening was Peace. 
Garlands of white and violet tissue 
paper roses were on the drapes 
behind the President's station. At 
other stations were white rattan 
baskets filled with white and violet 
roses with white bells depicting the 
Mission Bells project and white dove 
of Peace placed above the baskets. 
General Chairman Gladys I. Farle) 
of Aloha opened the meeting. The 
Peace Team comprised of officers 
of the three hostess parlors, entered 
the hall and were seated. President 
Alma Lilienthal of Aloha presided 
at the meeting. The Grand President 
was introduced at the altar and 
escorted to her seat of honor by j 
marshal of the evening. PP Jenniei 
Peterson of Aloha. 

Among dignitaries introduced at 
the altar were PGPs Lee Brice, 
Edna Williams, Irma Caton, Emity 
Ryan and Evelyn I. Carlson; GT 
Marian McGuire; GOS Icel Beers, 
GIS Dolores Ferenz; SDDGP Ethd; 
Murphy; Dorothy Jordan, DGP to 
Aloha: Charlotte Ghiseli, DGP to 
Berkeley. Also intrtxluced at the 
altar was Berkeley's charter member 
Mrs. Amanda Higgs, 64 year mem- 
ber. Each one was presented a gift 
of the evening by 1st Vice Presi- 
dent Vivian Harris of Aloha as they 
passed her station. The gift was a 
recipe holder with the following 
recipe attached. PEACE SOUFFLE: 
A delicate, superb dessert — prepare 
carefully. Mix together gently by 
hand (no electric beaters): 1 cup of 
CONFIDENCE, 1 cup of TOLEI^ 
ANCE - H cup of UNDERSTAND 
ING- I'j cups of DIPLOMACY - 
2 cups of PATIENCE - when mijj 
ture is a smooth consistency fold in 
Vz cup of COMPRISE - to pliabl 

CALIFORNIA HERAUO 



but firm consistency — last fold in : 
i cups of FRIENDSHIP - be sure it 
!s a reliable brand. Pour into a 
muttered baking dish, set in a pan 
)f purified water. Bake slowly in 
«0 oven for 1 hour. CAUTION; 
Remove from oven carefully, place 
iway from any cool draft to prevent 
he souffle from collapsing. SERVE 
o all the peoples of the world to be 
;njoyed by all mankind. 

Carol King of Piedmont No. 87 
jresided at the piano during the 
;vening's activities. General Chair- 
nan Gladys I. Farley of Aloha pre- 
sented the Grand President with a 
leautiful dinner plate for her china 
,et on behalf of the parlor. Monetary 
lifts were presented to DGP Dorothy 
lordan; DGP Charlotte Ghiselli and 
>DDGP Ethel Murphy. Gladys Far- 
ey presented GP Irene three yearly 
ictivity Reports enclosed in lovely 
"olders. 

; GT Marian McGuire presented 
^ue J. Irwin's PGP's Regalia and a 
S50.00 donation to GP Irene to 
pe given to the Historical Room. 
:rhe Grand President presented them 
.0 P G P Evelyn I. Carlson. State 
phairman of the Historical Room. 




PGP Evelyn I. Carlson spoke for 
the Past Grand Presidents. In speak- 
ing about the Historical Room, she 
mentioned that Arthur Murray, 
donated the following articles in 
memory of Irma; Irma's PGS's 
Regalia; PGS Salle R. Thaler's pink 
iSpanish evening shawl; PGP Olive 
.Matlock's yellow Spanish evening 
shawl; two old fashioned dolls, one 
whittled out of wood, belonging to 
Art's mother Clara Blais Murray. 
PP of Aloha 

Initiated into membership was 
Berkeley's Candidates : Alberta 
Vance, Marguerite Monteallegria 
and Hazel Zerolis. The coveted 50 

JANUARY, 1971 



year emblem was presented to 
Marjorie Bellerine of Argonaut No. 
166 by Grand President Irene. State 
Chairmen present were Myrtle Deg- 
gen, Aloha No. 106, State Chairman 
Sub Committee-California History 
and Landmarks. A r t Talent Con- 
test; PGP Evelyn I. Carlson, Dolores 
No. 169, State Chairman Sub-Com- 
mittee on NDGW Historical Room; 
Kathleen I. Dombrink, Piedmont No. 
87, State Chairman Admission Day; 
PGP Irma Caton, Argonaut No. 166 
State Chairman, Insurance. 

At the request of the Grand Presi- 
dent the coin march receipts of 
S32.00 was to be donated to the 
Native Daughter Home. After the 
meeting members were served 
strawberry short cake, tea and 
coffee at tables set with white hand 
crocheted table cloths and violet 
napkins. Garlands of white and 
violet tissue paper roses were placed 
along the center of the tables. There 
were Dove of Peace nut cups. 

Committees in charge were gen- 
eral chairmen, Gladys I. Farley. 
Aloha, Elsie Clements, Brooklyn and 
Marjorie Benedech, Berkeley. Leona 
Suesman was in charge of publicity. 



ALOHA 

Aloha is now in possession of a 
beautiful 30" by 40" original oil 
painting of a California hillside, 
showing a sprinkling of California 
poppies. The beautiful blue sky and 
the green rolling hills would enhance 
anyone's living room. It is framed 
beautifully, measuring 3 ft. by 4 ft. 
The picture was painted by Artist 
Jack Galliano and donated to Aloha 
to swell the Children's Fund. It is 
valued at S500.00 Contributions are 
now being received and the pro- 
ceeds will be presented at the 
Alameda County Children's Founda- 
tion Breakfast, March 7, 1971 in 
memory of Past President Kathryn 
Madden. If interested contact 
Recording Secretary, Gladys I. Far- 
ley, 4623 Benevides Ave. Oakland, 
Calif. 94602. Presentation: February 
23, 1971. 

Arthur Murray has donated sev- 
eral items to the Historical Room at 
the NDGW Home in memory of PGS 
Irma Murray. The pink Spanish 
evening shawl was a gift to Irma 
from her beloved friend PGS Sallic 
R. Thaler, who wore it many times. 
The yellow Spanish evening shawl 
was bequeated to S a 1 1 i e Murray 
Lovisonne - Irma's daughter - by 



PGP Olive Matlock.There are two 
precious old fashioned dolls. The 
wooden one was whittled by Phillip 
Blais in 1890 for his daughter Clara 
Elais, Blais Murray, mother of Art 
Murray, who was born in Rich 
Gulch, in Calaveras County, in 1876. 
She is a Past President of Aloha. 
The little wooden man looks like 
a European with his formal suit and 
peeked hat. He is 8" long and has 
moveable arms! The cloth doll with 
the porcelain head is obviously made 
from scraps. The little pillows serve 
for legs made it possible to sit up, 
but there is no indication of arms. 
The shirt and pants are all made 
by hand and the old fashioned 
drawers are darling. Irma's PGS 
Regalia was also donated. 



VENDOME 

Vendome Parlor and the Past 
Presidents Association No. 3 hosted 
a surprise birthday luncheon for Sue 
Mattel on her 93rd birthday. It was 
beautiful affair held at the San Joe 
Elks Club. Members from San Jose 
No. 81, El Monte No. 205 and Las 
Gatos No. 3 1 7 were in attendance. 
Sue was presented with an orchid 
corsage plus many birthday cards 
and well wishes. Special thanks to 
DoUie Weller and Irene Lial who 
arranged this event. 

Members this year had a delight- 
ful two days at Lake Tahoe. Emily 
Falbo and Elsie Figoni were the 
lucky ones. The group attended the 
dinner show at Harrah's. Fun time 
was had by all. 

Irene Lial, as chairman for the 
sewing for next year's bazaar is busy 
working on her project, assisting her 
is Jennie Cantania, Emily Falbo and 
Isabel Ucovich. 

The Parlor had a Childrens' 
Party. All members in Santa Gara 
County were invited to bring their 
children and grand children. Janice 
Baker substituted for Santa Claus 
that night. Entertainment was fur- 
nished by the "Bell Tones". 

Packages for Vietnam soldiers 
were prepared by Louise Bartscher, 
who has returned from a journey 
around the world. 

Officers and members had their 
Christmas Party at Mariani's Restau- 
rant. There was an exchange of gifts. 
Jeannie Postier was in charge of this 
affair. " ^ 

PAGE 15 



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"REACHING OUT" 

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Twenty-two poems of Inspiration including "My Scriptural Insurance 
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THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




FLLUL/\PY, 1971 -► 40<t 



HOME OF PHINEAS BANNIN'T 



GRAND 

PRESIDENTS 

NDGW 

Past and Present 



California Herald 

•PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 
Volume XVIII Ff.bruary, 1971 NuMBrK 




Esther R. Sullivan*, PGP 

Presided at the 44th Grand Parlor, June. 
19?0. at Oakland. 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Grand Presidents, NDGW, Past and Present 2 I 

Mission Archive-Library, by PGP Eileen Dismuke 3 

George Harmon's Tale, by Margaret F. Hayes 5 

The Grand President's Corner f* 

A Tribute, by GT Helen C. McCarthy 7 

Parlor News ^ 

In Memoriam '^ 

A Chinese Feast 1" 

Cucamonga Mansion — Landmark or a Memory, by Thelma Bounds . 12 




May C. Boidemaiiii* , PGP 

Presided at the 29th Grand Parlor. June. 
1915, at San Francisco. 



* Deceased 



^\fel^e splitting the atom for you. 



Chances are some of the 
electricity you now use is 
generated at the San 
Onof re Nuclear Plant near 
Sem Clemente. 

Edison plans to add 
additional nuclear units at 
this site. One reason: in a 
nuclear reactor there is no 



combustion, so there are 
no by-products of combus- 
tion. Electricity from clean 
nuclear plants is one of the 
ways Edison is working to- 
day for a better tomorrow. 



Southern California Edison 




1. J. FRns 

Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JANE FTUIS 

Public Reladons 



(Coniintu'd on Page 13) 



KDIIOK'S NO IK — This is jusi a 
fi'H i>f the man) Past (^rand Presi- 
dents. Wk h!i>i' no pielures for some 
of Ihem. 



PAGE 2 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Fnis, owners and publishers. Anahaam. 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243. Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: JOl 
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printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



II 



cMission (^rcljive -Jiibvarxj 

h 7^7 CiUen JZ>i$muke 

Member of the Santa Barbara Mission Archive-Library Board 



fHE VOLUMES AND documents of 
Archive -Library date to the 
.ery founding of Mission Santa Bar- 
bara, December 4, 1786, including 
the registers of baptisms, marriages 
and deaths in the hand of Father 
Presidente, Fray Fermin Francisco 
de Lasuen, and the already used 
registers inscribed by Padre Junipero 
Serra for the Presidio of Santa Bar- 
bara. April 21, 1782. In the early 
period of its existence the two 
entities, archivo and biblioteca — 
iarchive and library, were referred 
to as such, and in 1833 Padre 
Narciso Duran. president of the 
missions, transferred his head- 
quarters from Mission San Jose to 
Mission Santa Barbara, bringing 
with him all the documents of the 
mission chain which had accu- 
mulated since 1769. These have re- 



mained at Mission Santa Barbara 
since that time. Thus, Mission Santa 
Barbara became the final depository 
of the documents of the early mis- 
sion period. 

Mission Santa Barbara is the only 
mission of the twenty-one founded 
between 1769 and 1823, in which the 
Franciscan padres have continued 
to live uninterruptedly since its 
founding. Between 1854 and 1885. 
the mission became an apostolic col- 
lege or seminary and for a period of 
that time was also a boarding school 
for students of high school and col- 
lege age who studied here for secular 
pursuits. The correspondence for this 
period has also been preserved, 
forming a new collection in the ar- 
chives. The total number of original 
documents for the period between 
1769 and 1885, comprising the His- 




Mision La Reina de Santa Barbara 



FEBRUARY, 1971 



panic and College periods, amounts 
to over 3,000 ranging from one to 
fifty pages and more per docu- 
ment. 

In 1968 the mission archive fell 
heir to the De la Guerra Collection, 
the second largest family collection 
of documents after the Vallejo Col- 
lection of the state. These comprise 
over 12,000 pages of original mater- 
ial. In time they e.xtend from 1798 
until about 1885, and cover every 
phase of activity in California dur- 
ing the Spanish, Mexican and Earh 
American periods, military, political, 
religious, commercial. maritime, 
Indian and Mission affairs. These 
documents are arranged in alpha- 
betical order. Those for the mission 
period. 1769 to 1885. are arranged 
in chronological order. 

In recent years xeroxed copies of 
the Alexander Taylor Collection 
from the Archdiocesan Archives in 
San Francisco, amounting to over 
2.300 documents have been obtained 
for the Santa Barbara Mission Ar- 
chive. These documents to a great 
extent comprise the correspondence 
between the California missionaries 
and the governors and military and 
cixil officials of California until 
IS4<S. These copies have been in- 
grated with copies of the original 
mission documents because the mat- 
ter in both pertains to the same or 
similar categories. 

From the Honold Library. Clare- 
mont, copies of several hundred 
documents of a genealogical nature 
were obtained for the archives. Cop- 
ies of documents in photographic, 
photostatic and xerox form, several 
thousand in number, have been 
obtained by the archivist, the Rev. 
Maynard Geiger, O.F.M.. between 
1941 and the present year, from the 
principal archives of Spain, Mexico. 

(Continued on Page 4} 

PAGE 3 



ARCHIVE-LIBRARY . . . 
(Continued from Page 3) 

the United States aiu! R o m e, to 
supplement the original material pre- 
served here from the beginning. The 
chief archives in i|uestion are those 
of Sevilla, Madrid, and Mallorca in 
Spain, the three extensive archives 
in Mexico City, Huntington and 
Bancroft Libraries in California, the 
University of Texas in Austin, and 
a host of smaller archives and libr- 
aries, both private and public. 

A digest of each document has 
been made through the years and 
these, together with the names of the 
sender and recipient, the date, year 
and place of origin, a statement as 
to the number of pages, the type of 
document, original, photo, photo- 
stat, xerox or transcript, with a given 
serial number, have been typed into 
ten loose-leaf binders which re- 
searchers may consult prior to using 
the documents. The total docu- 
mentation amounts to slightlv over 
75,000 pages. 

Access to the archive proper is 
not permitted. The archivist attend- 
ant brings the required documents 
to the library room where the re- 
search is understaken. The recipient 
signs for each document received, 
one at a time, and receives a receipt 
upon its return. As a rule originals 
are not consulted. They are kept in 
a safe for their better preservation. 
Qualified students, usually from col- 
lege age on, teachers, writers, re- 
searchers are most welcome to use 
the archives. For the greater num- 
ber of documents, a knowledge of 
Spanish is necessary. Others are in 
Latin, French and Italian, while a 
significant number of the De la 
Guerra Collection, especially those 
after 1848, are in English. 

The Library is a supplementary 
to the archives. It contains the ori- 
ginal books of the California mis- 
sionaries, which they purchased in 
Spain and Mexico. The books of 
the Colleges of San Fernando, Mex- 
ico City, and of the College of 
Guadalupe. Zacatecas, are repre- 
sented in this collection. They are 
bound for the most part in leather 
and vellum, their origin dating from 
the sixteenth the nineteenth centur- 
ies. They number about 3,000, and 
are classified a.s encyclopedias, 
dictionaries, histories, biographies. 
literature, agriculture, music, math- 
matics. Scripture, ethics, civil and 
canon law, architecture, hagiography. 

B*GF « 



and religion in general. These have 
been catalogued in chronological 
order. The remainder of the books, 
some 3, ()()() in number, in the main 
relate to Spain and Hispanic Amer- 
ica. 

The storage rooms in the basement 
house a large selection of reference 
tools relating to the Hispanic back- 
ground, and include three bound 
copies of the ancestors of the Santa 
Barbara New.s-Press for the 1870's 
and 1880's, as well as bound and 
loose copies of many California and 
out-of-state newspapers, especially 
commemorative editions. There are 
100 large scrapbooks with material 
going back to the nineteenth century 
on such items as Junipcro Serra, 
the missions in general and parti- 
cular. El Camino Real, many on 
Santa Barbara, civic affairs, and 
Franciscan developments in the 
west, etc., since 1885. There is a 
large section of articles on Hispanic 
and Hispanic-American items, per- 
sonages, places, and things, dating 
from the 1880's to the present, fill- 
ing twenty files, alphabetically ar- 
ranged. 

In a special room there are pre- 
served about 12,000 photographs of 
the late mission period in California. 
Spain and Mexico, categorically 
arranged in boxes of proper size, a 
small section of original mission 
music, over 1,000 brochures and 
pamphlets, a significant number of 
which are long out of print and 
valuable for the period in which they 
appeared. The Archive-Library 
likewise has a limited number of 
old maps and some copies of disenos 
of Santa Barbara and Ventura 
Counties' land grants of the past 
century. Some selected historical 
paintings and sketches adorn the 
area of the archives, such as the 
Ferdinand Deppe painting of Mis- 
sion San Gabriel done in 1832, the 
only known painting of a mission 
before scculari/alion. the water 
color painting of the mission and 
presidio chapel done by J. N. Alden 
in 1853, thirteen Borein mission 
drawings and others by Alexander 
Harmer and Russell Ruiz. 

The new archive wing of three 
stories, built of steel and concrete, 
fire-proof and earthquake proof, 
constructed in 1967-1968. is added 
to the original mission buildings of 
1769-1812, at right angles to the 
front wing at the opposite end of 
ihc church. Entrance to the Archive- 




T/ie author, Eileen Dismuke, Paat 
Grand President of the Native 
Daughters oj the Golden West and 
current President of Tierra del Oro 
Parlor No. 304. NDGW. ■ 



Library is to the left of the main 
entrance to the living quarters of 
the mission at the head of Upper 
Laguna Street. The top floor is 
vacant at present and is reserved for 
future development. The lower or 
ground level floor contains the per- 
iodical-directory rooms, the dead 
storage room, receiving or delivery 
room, the tape library, a micro stor- 
age and equipment room, janitor's 
room, shop and storage rcKim for 
mechanical equipment (air condit- 
ioning and humidity control. ) 

The main floor of the Archive 
Library, entered from the front cor- 
ridor (the middle floor), contains 
a reception room for meetings an. I 
lectures with a seating capacity for 
fifty persons. Adjacent to this is 
the archivist's office, just off the 
main interior corridor entered 
through a secretary's office, and a 
consulting room. To the west of the 
office is the archive proper, a work 
room and a safe where original docu- 
ments and rare books are kept. 
immediately to the north of the 
archivist's office is a spacious libr- 
ary. 

A donation of $300,(HH) from 
Mrs. Elizabeth H a g e m a n, of 
Albuquerque, New Mexico provided 

CALIFORNIA HERALO 



:he impetus for building the modern 
Archive-L i b r a r y. An additional 
imount of approximately $100,000 
ivas raised by a capital fund drive 
led by Miss Rosario Curletti, of 
Santa Barbara. The remaining con- 
jtruction funds of nearly $300,000 
kvere borrowed through the courtesy 
3f the Old Mission and the Franc- 
iscan Fathers of California. Current 
expenses, not including utilities, for 
new books, binding of old ones, etc. 
are provided by a group known as 
'Friends of the Santa Barbara Mis- 
sion Archive-Library." One may 
become a member of this group for 
a tax deductible contribution of as 
little as $10.00 per year. The Mis- 
sion Archive-Library has been given 
tax exempt status by both the United 
State Government and the State of 
California. Hence the institution is 
regulated by a Board of Directors. 
The archivist in charge is the sole 
: full-time employee, who serves with- 
|out pay. There is no hired help on 
I salary. The Archive-Library receives 
'no government aid, nor is it sub- 
isidized by any foundation, grant or 
^private individual. Service is given to 
iqualified researchers and readers. 
I The Archive -Library is closed on 
iSundays, Mondays and holidays. It 
I is open on Saturdays from 9:30 to 
i 12:00 noon, and from 1 to 4:30 
I p.m. Tuesday through Friday at the 
present. Board meetings are held on 
, the second Friday of each month 
from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. during which 
hours the Archive-Library is closed 
to readers and researchers. Mem- 
1 bers of the Board are: Ernest Pink- 
lerton. President: Rev. Virgil Cor 
idano, O.F.M., Vice President; Dr. 
Doyce B. Nunis, Jr., U.S.C, Vice 
: President; Frank Miller, Treasurer; 
^ Mrs. Ernest Menzies, Secretary; 
I Rev. Maynard Geiger, O.F.M . 
! Ph.D., archivist; Bogdan Deresie- 
wicz, U.C.S.B., Mrs. B. C. Dismuke. 
I P.G.P., N.D.G.W.. and Hobart Sko- 

1 field. 

I 

i The information about the Ar- 
chive-Library contained in this ar- 
ticle has been taken from a brochure 
on the Santa Barbara Mission Ar- 
chive-Library, which was distributed 
at the time of the dedication of the 
Archive-Library on October I I 
1970, at which time members of 
both Tierra de Oro Parlor No. 304 
and Reina del Mar Parlor No. 126 
served as hostesses for the hundreds 
of visitors attending the dedication 
ceremonies and the tour of the ;'r 

FEBRUARY, 1971 



chive-library which followed. The 
narrative for the brochure was pre- 
pared by The Rev. Maynard Geigji 
O.F.M.,' Ph.D., Archivist for t' e 
Archive-Library, author on Mission 
History, and speaker of renown. 



Oeorge Harmon 's Tale 

by Margaret f. Hayes 



When miles and years bore down on 

him 
Like grind of an avalanche 
Old Charlie left the mountain route 
And bought himself a ranch. 

He cast his ballot in Soquel 
When only MEN could vote. 
In after years he came to us 
Then cancer gnawed his throat. 




t^MO^'' 



Old Charlie was my father's friend 
Old Charlie with one eye 
Who lived in a cabin on our farm 
And drank his nip of rye. 

He had left New England for the 

West 
At bid of Stevens and Birch 
To drive their California stage 
In the golden nugget search. 

Old Charlie reckoned a hundred 

tales 
To spell-bind me in youth . . . 
Of orphanage and coach-and-six 
And each was told in truth! 

There was clatter and click of horse- 
shoe steel 

In his stories of Mother Lode 

And a bandit's call, "Throw down 
that box!" 

Near oak-screened bend of road. 

But Charlie Parkhurst's answer came 

In flash of six-gun lead — 

A crack of whip on his leader's 

rump — 
And a highwayman lay dead. 



GEORGE HARMONS TALE is 

based on material compiled by Mabel 
Rowe Curtis for her booklet. THE 
COACHMAN WAS A LADY, pub- 
lished by Pajara Valley Historical 
Association, Watsonville. California. 
George Harmon authenticated the dis- 
covery of Charlie Parkhurst's sex by 
the statement of the doctor who 
attended her death on the Harmon 
Ranch, near Watsonville. In reality. 
Charlie Parkhurst was the first woman 
to vole in the United States. Her grave 
is in the Pioneer Cementery, Freedom 
Blvd. Watsonville. 



"I've something to tell — but it 

can wait," 
Old Charlie often said — 
My father wondered what it was 
That plagued his sick friend's head 

No secret came from the stricken one 
To dad or any human. 
Death unmasked the mystery — 
Old Charlie was a WOMAN. 



PARLORS GREET 
GRAND PRESIDENT 

Calling themselves "New Year 
Parlor", Alta. James Lick, and Yerha 
Biiena Parlors greeted Grand Presi- 
dent Irene Bondanza on January 7. 
Lunch was served at noon in the 
Grizzly Bear Club with the meeting 
following. Grand Secretary Lucille 
Kimbark was general chairman. 




A team made up of officers of the 
three Parlors initiated three candi- 
date for Yerha Buena. Several 
grand officers and past grand preis- 
dcnts were in attendance. The Grand 
President told of trimming the float 
for the Tournament of Roses and 
also her impressions of the parade. 
PGP Orinda Ciannini, mother of 
Parlor and PGP 
adopted mothr-- of 
• or spoke brio:''> 

PAGE 5 



Yerha Buenc 
Emily Ryan. 
James Li< ' ' 



The Grand 
President's Corner 




GRAND FRHSIDHNT 

Irene Bondanza (Mrs. Joseph) 
2328 Union Street 
San Francisco, California 94123 
Telephone: 931-0145 (Area 415) 



IRENE BONDANZA 



JL'NIPERO 

Grand President Irene Bondanza 
made her official visit to Jiinipero 
No. 141, on January 5. In the after- 
noon she dedicated a Bear Flag, pre- 
sented by Junipero Parlor to the 
San Carlos School in Monterey. 
Sister Christina, the principal, and 
Mrs. M.E. Evans, president of the 
San Carlos Parents' Club received it 
on behalf of the school. 

A dinner in honor of the Grand 
President was hosted by President 
Elaine Linares of Junipero Parlor. 
Distinguished guests were PGPs Lee 
Brice and Elmarie Dyke, and the 
State Chairman for Veterans Wel- 
fare, Marie Landini. 

The formal meeting of Junipero 
Parlor, held in the Friendship Room 
of the House of the Four Winds, 
included initiation ceremonies for 
two new members. Each station was 
draped with white and was decorated 
with Grand President Irene Bond- 
anza's motif of Golden Keys to 



X I 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 

2271-32nd Avenue 

San Francisco, California 94116 

Office: 703 Market Street. Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



Love, Friendship, Knowledge and 
Understanding. She gave a thought- 
provoking talk about the member- 
ship of the Order and expressed her 
hope that new parlor memberships 
might yet equal or exceed parlor 
losses in the remaining months of 
term of office. She requested that the 
proceeds of the coin march be given 
to the Native Daughter Home. She 
closed with an interesting account 
of the 1^71 Tournament of Roses 
Parade and of her participation in 
the decorating of the float. 

PAGE 6 



3tinerar^ 1971 

FEBRUARY 

1 Ukiah No. 263 Ukiah* 

2 Clear Lake No. 135, Calistoga No. 145 and 
La Junta No. 203 St. Helena* 

4 Genevieve No. 132, Mission No. 227, and 

Minerva No. 2 San Francisco* 

8 Coalinga No. 270, Las Fiores No. 262 Coalinga* 

9 Californiana No. 247 Los Angeles* 

1 1 Ramona No. 283, Charter Oak No. 292 and 

Tule Vista No. 305 Portcrville* 

14 San Francisco Deputies Breakfast, NDGW Home San Francisco 

16 Los Angeles No. 124, La Tijera No. 282 and 

Beverley Hills No. 289 Los Angeles* 

18 El Pescadero No. 82, Phoebe A. Hearst No. 214, 

Joaquin No. 5, Stockton No. 256 and Caliz de Oro No. 206 .. Stockton* 
20 Leslye A. Hicks Home Health Fund Tea, NDGW Home .. San Francisco 

22 Washington's Birthday 

23 OaA:Lea/No. 285, Marj'.yv/7/eNo. 162 Live Oak* 

24 San Jose No. 81, Vendome No. 100, Los Gatos No. 317 ... Los Gatos* 

MARCH 

2 San Miguel No. 94, San Luisita No. 108 and 
El Pinal No. 163 San Luis Obispo" 

3 San Juan Bautista No. 179, Copa de Oro No. 106 .... San Juan Bautista* 

4 Gilroy No. 312 Gilroy* 

6 San Mateo County Luncheon 

7 Alameda County Childrcns Foundation Breakfast 

8 Marinita No. 198, Fairjax No. 225 San Rafael' 

9 Angelita No. 32, Hayward No. 122 Hayward' 

10 Ruby No. 46, Princess No. 84, .S"a/i Andreas No. 113 ... Angels Camp* 

11 Fresno No. 187, Wawona No. 271, Madera No. 244 and 

Selma No. 313 Madera* 

13 District Meeting — District 19 Contra Costa 

16 Camp Far West No. 218 (50th Anniversary) Wheatland* 

1 7 Gold of Ophir No. 190, Annie K. Bidwcll No. 168 and 

Centennial No. 295 Orovillc* 

20-21 Grand Officers Meeting San Francisco 

23 Ptacerita No. 277, Totuca No. 279. San Fernando Mission No. 280, 

Joshua Tree No. 288 and El Camino Real No. 324 Burbank* 

25 Verdugo No. 240, Poppy Trail No. 266, San Gabriel Valley No. 28 1 , 
Pasadena No. 290 and Whittier No. 298 Los Angeles' 

27 San Fernando Mission Tea 

28 Southern Counties Brunchcon. Beverly Hilton 



* Official visits are marked with astericks 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



by QT Helen C. McCarthy 



HiLE VIEWING AN Admission 
Day Parade in San Francisco 
September, 1910, a young girl and 
her girlfriend decided that they 
wanted to be members of the Native 
Daughters of the Golden West. They 
didn't know which Parlor they 
wanted to join so decided that they 
would choose the Parlor who wore 
the "'prettiest dresses" in the Parade. 
This took quite a bit of mindmak- 
ing as these young girls were very 
impressed by the beauty and pag- 
eantry of this grand Parade. But 
they finally reached their decision 
when, in their opinion, the "prettiest 
and most outstanding" Unit marched 
by. Because of this mementous 
decision, PGP Evelyn 1. Carlson and 
her girlfriend were initiated in 
Dolores Parlor No. 169 in San 
Francisco March 20. 1911. 

Little did the Parlor realize that 
with the initiation of one of theie 
young girls how much the Parlor 
and our Order was to benefit by 
her membership. Dolores Parlor 
was just two years old when Evelyn 
joined and she immediately endeared 
herself to the members, because, 
then as now, she constantly worked 
for the advancement and prosperity 
of her Parlor by actively participat- 
ing on all Parlor committees. Not 
long after her initiation Evelyn be- 
came an officer in the Parlor and 
presided as Parlor President Janu- 
ary to July 1915 during the Panama 
Pacific Exposition. In 1915 she 
served on her first State Committee, 
appointed by Grand President May 
C. Boldcmann to the Extension o 
the Order Committee. She ioireH 
Past President's Association No. 1 
of San Francisco August 7, 1917 
and holds the distinction of being 
the oldest member in point of mem- 
bership, in the State Past President's 
Association having continuous mem- 
bership 53'/2 years in the Mother 
Association No. 1. 

She attended her first Grand Par- 
lor Convention as a delegate in 1915 
in San Francisco. In 19 IS she was 

FEBRUARY, 1971 



appointed Deputy Grand President 
to Presidio No. 148 in San Fran- 
cisco. Again, in 1924 she was a 
delegate to the Convention held in 
Santa Cruz, and at the 1925 Con- 
vention in Placerville she aspired 
and was elected to the office of 
Grand Outside Sentinel. In rapid 
succession of years she was elected 
and served as Grand Inside Sentinel, 
Grand Trustee, Grand Marshal, 
Grand Vice President, and became 
the Order's 46th Grand President 
June 1931 in Santa Rosa. This short 
succession of six years attests to the 
high esteem the members of the 
Order held for Evelyn. 




PGP Evelyn I. Carlson 

On that evening in June 1931 in 
Santa Rosa a lovely lady took over 
the reins of our Order, dressed in 
her beautiful white taffeta gown with 
cerise train, surrounded by numer- 
ous large red roses which bedecked 
the hall. It was a most memorable 
evening, many honors and gifts were 
extended, only marred by the ab- 
sence of her dear husband and 
family as she could not share this 
grand evening with them because 
installations then were not public, 
no drills or other type of escort were 
conducted. 

Grand President Evelyn's pro- 
jects for her year was the advance- 
ment of Membership. Homeless 
Children, and Veterans. Her pro- 
jects were most successful during her 



reign. She became a •'Fraternal 
Mother" during her year with the 
the addition of two Parlors, Ontario 
No. 251 of Ontario, December 19, 
1931 with 26 Charter Members 
organized by PGP Hazel Hansen, 
and Utopia No. 252 of San Fran- 
cisco June 3, 1932 with 40 Charter 
Members organized by Alice Cum- 
mins. This brought a total of 162 
Parlors in the Order. She created 
Sewing Clubs in the Parlors through- 
out our State from which baby 
clothes were made for the Homeless 
Children's Committee. It was re- 
ported by the Secretary of the Com- 
mittee as of March 31, 1932 more 
garments were received from Par- 
lors than in any previous year, that 
the response to the call from Grand 
President Evelyn for baby layettes 
was almost unbelievable and that 
100 boxes filled with baby garments 
were received. Veterans' Welfare en- 
joyed a most profitable 1931-32 
year. Monetary donations were 
needed and a call for donations went 
out September 29. 1931 and at the 
end of October 1931. 103 Parlors 
had responded. By the end of the 
t?rm 156 Parlors had contributed to 
this project enabling the committee 
to send donations to various United 
States Administration and Govern- 
ment Hospitals and during this vear 
added the United States Naval Hos- 
pitals at Mare Island and San 
Diego. It was reported by the State 
Chairman that more monies were 
received during 1931-32 than ar> 
pre\ious year. 

Grand President Evelyn presided 
at Convention 1932 in Merced. 
Governor James Rolph. who was a 
member of the Native Sons, flew 
from Sacramento to escort Evelyn 
in the Grand March and he present- 
ed a basket of red roses to t'^e 
Grand Parlor. It was a largely at- 
tended Grand Parlor. 17 Grand 
Officers. 23 Past Grand Presidents, 
and 352 Delegates, a total of 154 
Parlors represented, 8 non-represent- 
ation. It was also a very bus\ 
Grand Parlor having lengthy meet- 
ing Monday through Thursday and 
an evening session Thursday even- 
ing preceding Installation of Officers, 
but it was a successful Grand Parior 
ably presided over and conducted 
by Grand President Evelyn. Many 
gifts and honors were bestowed on 
Evelyn during this Convention week. 
{Continued on Page 8) 

PAGE 7 



EVELYN I. CARLSON . . . 

(Continued from l'ai;c 7) 

Her hand of friendship was extended 
to all in attendance. Many friend- 
ships were cemented during her 
years as a Grand Officer and dur- 
ing her year as Grand President. On 
her last day presiding at Grand Par- 
lor Convention in Merced she told 
all assembled "the ticking of the 
clock would ever remind her of the 
heart beats of the members". 

During the term of 1932-33 while 
serving as Junior Past Grand Presi- 
dent, Evelyn was the first Deputy 
Grand President appointed to her 
•'Baby Parlor" Utopia No. 252. Her 
patience, guidance, and knowledge 
started this Parlor of just a few 
weeks of age well on its way to 
taking its place in the furtherance 
of our Order. 

Not only has her fraternal love 
been extended to the senior mem- 
bers of the Native Daughters but 
she is deeply concerned with the 
welfare and progress of the Junior 
Native Daughters. She has been one 
of the advisors of Menlo Junior Unit 
No. 10 in Menlo Park for 29 years. 
Her guidance and knowledgable ad- 
vising has certainly helped to make 
this an outstanding Unit. 

Since relinquishing the gavel as 
Grand President, Past Grand Presi- 
dent Evelyn has continued to be one 
of our businest Native Daughters, 
never ceasing in furthering the Good 
of the Order. She has served as 
State Chairman of Laws and Super- 
vision, Extension of the Order, Vete- 
rans, Junior Native Daughters, Fin- 
ance, Appeals and Grievances and 
Petitions, Historical Room, 1939 
San Francisco Grand Parlor Ses- 
sions, Printing and Supplies, and 
served on Home Committee, State 
of the Order, 1954-55 San Fran- 
cisco Grand Parlor Sessions, this 
year she is co-chairman 1971 San 
Francisco Grand Parlor Sessions. 

Evelyn has received many honors 
these past many years not only as 
Grand President but in the ensuing 
years. Some of these honors, to name 
a few — each year at Grand Parlor 
a luncheon is held in her honor, 
this yearly luncheon was started in 
1925 by her Parlor when she first 
aspired for Grand Office and we 
will be looking forward to attending 
her 46th annual luncheon at Grand 
Parlor this June. Her Silver Anniver- 
sary as presiding Grand President 

PAGE 8 



was observed at the Convention in 
Oakland in 1957 where she was 
introduced at the Altar flanked by 
an Honor Guard from the Alameda 
County delegation and was pre- 
sented with a Life Membership in 
Dolorcx Parlor. In 1968 the Super- 
vising Deputy and Deputy Grand 
Presidents of San Mateo County 
bestowed an honorary membership 
in Past President's Association No. 
9 of San Mateo County. All this 
further attesting to the esteem and 
love of the members of the Order. 

Evelyn Carlson is synonymous 
with "Friendship". She has extend- 
ed the true meaning of friendship to 
all she has met along this 60 year 
road of Native Daughter service. 
Friendship has always, and will al- 
ways be, uppermost in her heart and 
thoughts. She has said on several 
occasions "I have never met a 
member of the Native Daughters I 
didn't like" and as she told the 550 
members assembled at her Home 
Coming Official Visit June 1 1 , 
1932 — 
"A friendship isn't just a word. 

It's something fine and true; 
New ties are made, old love-dreams 
fade. 

But still I'm friends with you. 
Our friendship isn't just today. 

It's for the years to be. 
And I shall find no fate unkind 

While you are friends with me." 

This most gracious lady has given 
.so very much service to her beloved 
Native Daughters of the Golden 
West and now as she approaches 
her 60th Anniversary in our Order 
on March 20th, we arc privileged 
and proud to say. 

Dear Evelyn: 

Thanks for the memories of pro- 
gress, work, and fun. 
Those never to be forgotten years, 
the joys you gave to everyone. 

We thank you for your friendship, 
so deep and warm and true. 
We thank you for allowing us to 
be close friends with you. 

You helped to keep our Order 
great because you took the time. 
To dedicate 60 years of ser\ice 
with a heart so loving and kind. 

Your YESTERDAYS contributed 
many achievements for our Order. 
TOD.AY you emerge as one of our 
grandest Native Daughters. 



TOMORROW brings promise of 

more joys to come. 

From a lovely Past Grand Pre i 

dent who will always be "forever 

young". 



We take this opportunity to wi 
you a happy 60th Anniversary 
With our love so deep and true, 
And to tell you we are better 
Native Daughters 
Because of knowing you. 




1 
I 



LUdlow 8-1753 

BELL HAVEN GUEST HOME 

For Ambulatory Senior Citizens 

4726 Clara Street. Cudahy 

GUSSIE J. GUIDOm 

Member, Sea Point Parlor 196 
Sausalito 



the 




store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



MULTI-LISTING SERVICE 

LEATHERBY REALTY 

NORA GRANGETTO 
772-1552 or 533-3632 

702 W. LINCOLN ANAHEIM 

Estate - Home - Income Property 



JIWELERS 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 
CALIFORNIA HERALO 



^HAWATHA 

Officers for Hiawatha No. 140 
S'cre installed in formal installation 
.•eremonies on January 20 at the 
Native Daughter Hall in Redding, 
XJP Bonnie Proebstel, assisted by 
ler corps of officers from Lassen 
View No. 98 of Shasta, was the in- 
stalling officer. Eda Mazzini was 
;eated as president of the parlor. 
Shasta Daisy Junior Unit No. 39 
brmed an honor guard as La Niese 
Vlazzini, escorted the president to 
ler station. It was through the efforts 
af Mrs. Mazzini that Shasta Daisy 
Unit was instituted in 1969. Follow- 
ing the installation ceremonies, the 
Juniors, attired in rainbow hued for- 
mals presented a delightfully intri- 
;ate drill. 

Other officers installed were 
Mmes. Winters, Johnson, Van Noy, 
Rodgers. Boring, Jordan, Heryford. 
Shuffleton, Pasley, Evans, Hanton. 
Swarts, Kirkpatrick and Valentine. 
I Among the dignitaries in attend- 
ance were COS Ice! Beers, from 
Anne K. Bidwell No. 168; PSP Vir- 
ginia B a n i g a n. Past President's 
.Association; DGP Ella Brownfield 
State Director of the Past Presidents. 

The beautiful decorations in the 
hall were arrangements of pink roses 
and large fans, arranged by Mar\- 
.Mazzini. Refreshments of sand- 
jwiches. cake and coffee were served 
jfollowing the ceremonies. 

i i i 

OFFICIAL VISIT 

The theme of "New Year's Jubi- 
,lee" was chosen by Santa Maria No. 
276 and La Piirisima No. 327 for 
|the official visit of Grand President 
; Irene Bondanza on January 15. The 
entry hall, dining room and meeting 
;hall were all colorfully decorated 
with streamers and flowers worthy of 
I any New Year's party. The corsages 
iwere made by Betty Cave, in the 
icolors of the Grand President, peach, 
I green and gold. 

: Chairman for the evening Marion 

; Schuyler of La Piirisima. introduced 

President Nellie Anderson of Santa 

I Maria and her corps of officers, who 

I did the initiatory work. President 

Jessie Ramming of La Piirisima and 

her corps of officers, had opening 

and closing ceremonies. The escort 

team of Santa Maria escorted both 

Parlors into the hall. The flag bearers 

■ and drill team of Santa Maria es- 

j corted the flags of our Country and 

I State. When the Grand President was 

escorted, the escort team each pre- 

I FEBRUARY, 1971 



Parlor Neu/s 

sentcd her with a key dating back 
to 1881. They were placed on a 
special board which held a large gold 
key, which is the Grand President's 
theme for her year. 

Guests of the evening were PGPs 
Eileen D i s m u k e and Lee Brice; 
S D D G P Mary Louise Days and 
DGP Edith Webster and Blanche 
Powell. 

Initiated into Santa Maria was 
Mona Truesdale and into La Piiri- 
sima were Lorraine Friis, Eleanor 
Lefkowitz and Nadine Pate. Grand 
President Irene told of different pro- 
jects. Presentations were made by 
Betty Cave of Santa Maria: reports 
by Barbara Pohlhammer of La Piiri- 
sima and Bethal McCallister of Santa 
Maria. The coin march was designa- 
ted to go to Mission Restoration. 
Margaret Silva and Florence Green 
of Santa Maria each received their 
25-year pins from the Grand Presi- 
dent. Special thanks went to chair- 
men Jessie Ramming and Betty Cave 
and their committees for making the 
evening a huge success. 

f -f * 
WILMINGTON 

Wilmington No. 278 installed new 
officers. Instead of the usual white 
formals, the officers wore centennial 
dresses. The new president is 
Catherine Erven who served ten 
years ago as president of Wilmington 
Parlor. Into this year's ceremony was 
woven mementoes of that past 
installation. 

Bible bearer for the occasion was 
Mrs. Erven's four year old grand- 
daughter Leslie Sue. The members 
and officers are looking forward to 
an outstanding year. 

111 
SAN MIGUEL 

The Native Sons and Native 
Daughters of San Miguel held a joint 
Christmas party for members and 
friends at Padre Martin Hall, San 
Miguel. The hall was decorated with 
Christmas greens and a beautiful 
pine tree. 

A delicious pot luck banquet was 
served, with the Native Sons furnish- 
ing the ham and turkey. After the 
feast three members of San Miguel 
NDGW No. 94 were presented with 
50-ycar membership pins. The pins 
were presented by the oldest mem- 
ber Past DGP Elsie Loose. Members 



receiving their 50-year pins were 
Mrs. Nell Wickstrom, Mrs. Eli (Hor- 
tense) Wright, and Mrs. Harry 
(Bertha) Dittamore. The balance of 
the evening was spent playing games, 
and all enjoyed a real fun night. 

Ill 
BINGO Ll'NCHEON 

On March 10 at 26, 7th Street, 
San Francisco, James Lick and 
Genevieve Parlors will hold a 
"Luncheon Bingo" this affair is for 
the general welfare committees of 
both Parlors. 



im MEMBRIAM 




Not lost to those that love them 
Not dead, just gone before: 

They still live in our memory. 
And they will forever more. 

Mary Tillotson. Woodland No. 90. Dec- 
ember 6. 

Ida C. Corrigan, Dolores No. 169, Dec- 
ember 9. 

Mary Velter. Orinda No. 56, December 6. 

Flora Jacobson, Califomiana No. 247, 
December 10. 

Estelle Flick, Californiana No. 247, Dec- 
ember 10. 

Ada Reich Durham. Mission Bell No. 316. 
December 14. 

Sarah Charonnat, Laurel No. 6, Decem- 
ber 14. 

Lucy Ponciano, Berryessa No. 192, Nov- 
ember 1 1. 

Mary C. Souza, El Cereso No. 207, Nov- 
ember 23. 

Emily Means. El Cereso No. 207. Dec 
ember 12. 

Gwendolyn Wyllie. San Andreas No 
113. December 14. 

Carrie I. Schmidt. Twin Peaks No. 185 
December 19. 

Margaret Patterson. San Diego No. 208 
December 23. 

Fdilh S. Madrid, Ch irter Oak No. 292 
August, 

Julia F. Bode, ''.erba Buena No. 273 
December 26. 

Margaret McCarty, Portola No. 172, Dec 
ember 20. 

Fmma Nevins. La Bandera No. 110, Dec 
ember 18. . 

Mary Bibhcr. Concord No. 323. Jannarv 
1. 

PAGE 9 



4^ dPfinese ^cast 




^ong Jlce, 
lenders a banquet 




Jong lee, the wealthiest Chinese 
merchant in Oroviiie, and 
probably in Northern California, and 
likewise the most progressive one, 
tendered his American friends a 
magnificent banquet yesterday after- 
noon at his residence and place of 
business at the foot of Lincoln 
Street. The affair was very select 
and was given, regardless of expense, 
with true Celestial magnificence. 

The dinner was announced for 
4 p.m. and half an hour before that 
time the guests found themselves at 
the door of Fong Lee's store where 
they were received with deep cour- 
tesy by the host, his intimate friem' 
and associate Hi Loy, and a retinue 
of cousins, clerks, lackeys and 
white-robed coolies. The guests were 
at once escorted to the main recep- 
tion room. This apartment was in 
a state of gorgeous decoration and 
arranged in a circle around the room 
were chairs of state, high-backed, 
solid ebony affairs, each one cover- 
ed with silken drapery embt)ssed 
with solid gold embroidery. On the 
walls were silken placards of wel- 
come which being intcrpertcd by 

PAGE 10 



Fong Lee to his guests signified: 

"Welcome "Melican Man, Heap 

Good Fiend Fong Lee," "Melican 
Man Will Now S a b e Chinaman 
Chow-chow," "Eat Plenty in the 
Abode of Bliss," "When the Mouth 
is Full, forget not the Benefactor," 
"Take Cockel's Pills after Dining," 
etc. 

The preliminaries were com- 
menced by the serving of delicate 
Imperial Moy Une tea, imported lor 
the occasion (contrary to the Geary 
Act) in delicate and extremely valu- 
able Gorody-Shonshi ware, which 
had been in the host's family for 
over 400 years. At this stage Fong 
Lee announced that the festivities of 
the occasion would soon commence 
and while the guests drank tea, he 
would bombard the devil with bombs 
and firecrackers. Giving the signal 
to his menials the fun commenced. 

The whole front of the elaborately 
decorated building was hung with 
festoons of firecrackers worth $75 
a string, while from the subterranean 
store rooms coolies in flame colored 
fire proof robes brought out box 
after box of bombs, firecrackers and 



daylight illuminations, and for hall 
an hour the noise was deafening. 
After the devil had been effectualb 
driven Irom the premises and oui 
of the constitutions of the guests, to 
effect which, probably SI 500 worth 
of powder had been burned. Fong 
Lee and Hi Loy, preceded by a 
band of Chinese musicians led the 
way to the festival board. The witch- 
ing harmonies of the band so affect- 
ed the guests that they called for u 
renewal of the bombardment. 

The massive teak and ebony 
tables, inlaid with Mother-of-Pearii 
were spread with Oriental splendor 
in the dining hall opening from the 
main reception room. The hall wa» 
likewise decorated with silken and 
cloth of gold banners bearing mot- 
toes signifing, as the host explained, 
"Fong Lee's Venerable Ancestors 
desire W e I c o m e," "Big 'Melican 
Man' Fat Here Today," "Melican 
Man no Talkee Japan War," and 
other fitting and appropriate say- 
ings. 

The tables were models of neat- 
ness and extravagant elegance. Pure 
yellow Tusseh silk table cloths, raf- 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



1st Moonga silk napkins, each em- 
Woidered with the guest's initials, 
ncient ivory bronze and gold filigree 
hop sticks and solid silver knives, 
orks and spoons with the rarest and 
lost delicate of Chinaware em- 
lossed in gold and worth in them- 
elves a fortune. The old miners 
mong the guests had seen vast 
tores of gold, but the embellishment 
i| this Chinese merchant's table 
nade their eyes bulge to a degree 
hat compensated for the expansion 
)f their vests after the feast. 

At the head of one table on a 
aised dias sat Fong Lee, attired in 
;ountless silk brocaded coats, which 
IS the feast progressed and the 
iressure became heavy, he discarded 
)ne by one until the hem of his 
•xpensive undershirt was apparent. 

At his right sat his "good fiend" 
vlajor Frank McLaughlin, who with 
irue politeness, copied his host by 
jnbuttoning various portions of his 
iittire occasionally, and down on 
pither side sat J. A. Lawrence, 
Banker C. H. Schiveley. H. W. 
Smith, G.H. Cordy, C. H. Deuel, 
3. W. Braden, Judge H. C. Hills, 
Vlajor H. V. Reardan. At the head 
.if the adjoining table sat Hi Loy 
-obed in a gorgeous combination of 
green silk, red satin, gold silver and 
pearl embroidery and E. A. Hal- 
Btead, Senator A. F. Jones, H. N. 
Almy, George F. Geisse, County 
Clerk Ed Harkness, Carleton Gray, 
iM. Reyman, O. Enslow, J. V. P.irks 
and J. A. W e 1 d o n. Whiterobcd 
waiters brought in the dinner in 
countless courses. 

I As the first course consisting of 
japoetizing pickles, preserves and 
Chinese Cavair was being removed. 
la wild refrain burst from the or- 
chestra, which was stationed in a 
-velvet draped alcove, which was fol- 
[iowed by a thunderous discharge of 
Ibombs. So alarming was the peal, 
ithat the guests feared an attack 
ifrom the Japanese hordes of Biggs. 
;lt speaks volumes for the civiliza- 
tion of our State, that only thirteen 
ipistols were drawn — the balance of 
ithe guests being armed with bowie 
Iknives. 

I A word of explanation from the 
1 polite hosts assuaged these ground- 
;less fears, and thereafter the music 

of the orchestra and the boom of 
[firecrackers were drowned by the 
■ popping of champaign corks. 

After the sixth course had been 
'removed, the curtains at the end 

of the main room were drawn to 



one side and six of China's loveliest 
dancing maidens were disclosed to 
the guests. The stately dances or 
rather motions, of the ancient 
Chinese ceremony were pictured to 
the delighted guests. The curtain 
slowly dropped over an effective 
grouping and the feast resumed its 
course. 




Words would fail to truly depict 
the gorgeousness of the dances, and 
our reporter confesses himself not 
equal to it this morning, owing to 
a serious tightness above the ears. 
Curious to say, this epidemic seems 
to have struck the leading citizens 
of the town, almost all the offices 
bearing notices, "Called out of town; 
back tomorrow at noon." After the 
thirteenth course, Ki Yang, the 
Chinese magician, displayed h i s 
marvelous skill, but his most as- 
tounding feats of disappearance 
called upon the guests who had been 
watching Surveyor Enslow's atten- 
tion to the viands. The competition 
seemed to have been entered into 
between himself and Mr. Geisse to 
clear the tables for the succeeding 
course. Dr. Karsner reports this 
morning no further dangerous symp- 
tons reported in; both gentlemen 
will resimie business within two or 
three weeks. 

With dessert, speeches were in- 
dulged in and thanks returned to the 
hosts by Senator Jones in a speech 
replete with pigeon English and 
Chinese witticisms. 

MENU 
Saki Pekin Gin 

Birdnest Soup Hang Chee Fou 

Trepang (Beche de Mer) 
Tai Ung Melver Cabanct 

Hilling Tiot Nai Ning Soy 

Paul Masson Champagne 



Fin Ga Tee so Ohy Nai Yaht 

Chi soy Ningpo soy 

Mumm 

Yange go Hop Tung Gha 



^11 



Turkey 


Pigs 


Ducks 


Chicken 




Goose 



Mumm 



Teheen Lycce Ohn Uai Pay Lees 

Canton Ginger Oranges 

Tea Brandy 

Cigars 



FEBRUARY, 1971 



Letters of regret were read from 
Sheriff Wilson, District Attorney 
Sexton and Banker Fogg, The 
former gendemen being called to a 
murder case and the latter gendeman 
having hired a fast horse and carri- 
age in the morning. The Sheriff's and 
District Attorney's offices and the 
bank are open for business today. 

The thanks of the guests were 
tendered in the choicest Orovilie 
Chinese by Major Frank McLaugh- 
lin, who seemed too full for utter- 
ance. Songs were rendered by Mr. 
Almy and the really beautiful Miss 
Fong Lee, in the daintiest of Chinese 
costumes, having handed around 
the cigars, the same were lit at the 
glowing countenance of G. W. Brad- 
den, and, with three hearty cheers 
for their hosts, the guests left the 
hospitable domicile. 

(PGP Florence D. Boyle sent to 
the California Herald a clipping from 
the Orovilie Mercury, February I . 
1895, describing this elaborate ban- 
quet and entertainment given by 
Fong Lee. ) 



In his recent book, former Governor 
Brown suggests the feasibility of div'/'ing 
the State into two parts. Well. S-^n'h-m 
California voted to rfo that in !"' '' 
sotnehow Congrt'^"; ignored th 
thing. 

PAGE 11 






^ "J^cltKO. "SauHeU- 



gVRHE OLD cucAMONGA Rancho 
^ home was built over 108 
years ago by John Rains. It is one 
of the most historic homes in the 
San Bernardino Valley. Historians 
say it is probably the second oldest 
brick house in Southern California. 

The first owner of Rancho Cuca- 
monga was Tiburcio Tapia who re- 
ceived his grant in 1839. He was 



MELROSE 



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EL TOBRITO 


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5th and 


Bristol 


Santa Ana, 


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alcadc of Los Angeles at that time 
so later in 1 840 moved to the 
Rancho and built the original adobe. 
Cucamonga is an old Indian name 
signifying "rocky canyon". 

In 1858 John Rains became the 
Rancho owner. It was he who built 
the pretentious dwelling. From the 
Cucamonga hills came the red clay 
for the bricks. The tar for thatch- 
ing the roof came from the La Brea 
pits. 

Misfortune seemed to stalk the 
Rancho. It is said Rains, in 1863 on 
his way to Los Angeles, may have 
been carrying money from the sale 
of beef during the Civil War when 
he was ambushed and murdered. 
His body was hung on a tree on the 
roadside. His wife was suspected 
of having a hand in the affair but 
this was never proven. 

She later married Jose C. Carrillo 
and the Rancho again became a 
social center. Without the business 
acumen of Rains, Maria lost the 
Rancho and was greatly in debt at 
her death. 

In 1873. the ranch was acquired 
by B. Dreyfus and Co., I. W. Hell- 
man, L. M. Hellman and e.\-gover- 
nor John G. Downey. Throughout 
the years owners have come and 
gone. 

Today the old landmark is in 
danger of passing into oblivion. 



In Santa Ana 
OWL DRUG STORE 

1002 E. 17TH STREET 

547-6655 

Sam Calabrese 




In Orange 
WATSON'S DRUG 

116 E. CHAPMAN 

532-6315 

Jim Calabrese 



Prescriptions and Sundries Serving Orange County Since 1912 

MASTERCHARGE and BANKAMERICARD • FREE DELIVERY 



Although many public citizens and 
organizations have tried to raise 
funds to preserve this historic trea- 
sure, the public at large seems not 
to care in the least. Tragedy comes 
again to the once beautiful Cuca- 
monga Mansion. 



The Russians established Ft. Ross ir 
1 81 2. The old wooden chapel, which had 
been rebuilt after the earthquake of 1906. 
recently burned to the ground. 

^ -ii ^ 
Gold was discovered at Sutter's Mill, on 
the .American River, on January 24. 1848. 

is i! it 

Despite the fact that Helen Hunt Jack- 
son, on many occasions stated that the 
heroine of her "Ramona" was not the 
portrayal of any person, several individu- 
als have claimed to be the prototype. 

ir ir ii 

Alta California's first mission was es- 
tablished at San Diego in 1769. 

ij ir ii 

California's first governor, Peter H. ' 
Burnett, became a justice of the Califor- 
nia Supreme Court. 

ir ir ir 

California Indians who had been coi^i 
verted to Christianity by the Francisca- 
padres were called "neophytes." Nativei' 
not converted were called "gentiles," 

^ ^ K" 

A teacher tells of a small boy who fell 
in a school hall and skinned his knee. 

As she examined the slight wound sbe 
said to the boy, "Remember, big boy» 
don't cry." 

"I'm not gonna 
gonna sue!" 



cry," he said, 'Tb 



PAGE 12 



ir ir ir 

Gen. Kearney claimed be won the Battle 

of San Pascual because he was in po- 
session of the field after the fight. How 
could he help it? Gen. Pico's men 
had him surrounded. 

ir ir ii 

Thn! is a woman's world. When a 
man is born people ask. "How is the 
mother?" When he marries they exclaim 
"What a lovely bridcl" And when he dicv 
they inquire. "How much did he leave 
her?" — Mexican-American Review. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



=>AST GRAND PRESIDENTS 
Continued from Page 2) 




IT RIGHT: Bertha A. Briggs*. 

'GP. ^ 

Presided at the 35th Grand Parlor. June. 
1921, at San Francisco. 





-^AT LEFT: Mrs. Emma W. Lillie 

Humphrey*, PGP. 

Presided at the 24th Grand Parlor, June 
1910, at Santa Brabara. 

* Deceased 



2 


BACKS 
KAULBARS 

MORTUARY 

1617 W. La Palma at Euclid 
Anaheim 
772-1617 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 535-7221 

INSliRANCE — SURETY BONDS 

M E UEEBE & CO. 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim, California 




:s 



1215 W. Lincoln, Anaheim 535-4997 



dOLflODlREVnOLDS 

GRROING(|j|)CONTRHCTOR 

BRIDGES - HIGHWAYS - DAMS - RAILROADS 

• Heavy •Equipment 

Hauling For Rem 

535-4233 
505 S. Sunkist Ave. Anaheim 



Tifyjfnijnr 



. MORTUARY J 

Faithful , Courteous. Service 
120 E.Broadway, Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5--ai05 



Evelyn I. Carlson. PGP 

^resided at the 46th Grand Parlor. June. 
1932, at Merced. 

I FEBRUARY, 1971 



HIGHEST INTEREST ON INSURED SAVINGS 



Payable Quarterly 

Accounts 

Now Insured 

up to 

$20,000.00 

200 W. Commonwealth, Fullerton 
1203 E. Yorba Linda Blvd., Placentia 




• Compounded Daily 

FULLERTON 
SAVINGS 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 



871-4244 
524-1321 



PAGE 13 




^ 



Edna B. Brings*. PGP 

Presided al the 53rd Grand Parlor, June, 
1939. at San Francisco. 




Norma Hudson, PGP 

Presided at the 70th Grand Parlor. Juni 
1956, at San Luis Obispo. 



Y BELOW: Mae B. WUkin*, PGP 
Presided at the 7th Grand Parlor. June, 1893. at Wafsonville. 




PAGE 14 



Irma M. Calon. PGP 

Presided at the 72nd Grand Parlor. June, 
1958. at Santa Barbara. 

CALIFORNIA HERAIil 




Grace S. Stoermer*, PGP 
'resided at the 32nd Grand Parlor. June, 1918. at Santa Cruz. 



47" RIGHT: Anne C. Thuesen*. PGP ^ 

■'resided at the 50th Grand Parlor, June, 1956, at Stockton. 



(This series will he continued next month.) 



FEBRUARY. 1971 




Emily E. Ryan. PGP 

Elected to preside at the 59lh Grand Par- 
lor, June. 1945, at San Francisco. 



Jr. PGP Nancy J. Conens 

Presided at the 84th Grand Parlor, June, 
1970, at Oakland. 




PAGE 15 



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MARCH. 1971 + 4Ce 



THE HISTORIC PICO HJO ^ ANGELES 



GRAND 

PRESIDENTS 

NDGW 

Past and Present 

(Part II) 




California Herald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE' 

Volume XVI II March, 1971 Number 7 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Grand Presidents, NDGW, Past and Present •. ;. .1.; 

The Aerial Feats of John J. Montgomery, by Rev. Francis J. Weber . . 

rhc Historic Pico House, by Dr. Leo J. Friis 

The Grand President's Corner 

Historic Landmark, by Eileen Woodyard 

Parlor News 

Golden State Rodeo, by Sid Smith 1 

Alice D. Shea, by Edna C. Williams, PGP I 

In Memoriam 1 



PHOTO CREDITS: Picture on the cover of the historic Pico House: courtesy, Historical 
collections. Security Pacific National Bank. 



Audrey D. Brown, PGP 
Presided at the 71st Grand Parlor. 
June. 1957. at Oakland. 





Electricity is vital 
to your way of life. 
So is a healthy 
environment. 
We're working to 
bring you both. 




Southern California Edison 



Hazel li. Hansen. PGP 
Presided at the 55th Grand Parlor. 
June. 1941 . at Los Angeles. 

(Continued on Page 15) 



J. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRnS 
Editor 



JANE FRnS 
Public ReladoM 



KDIIORS 


NOIK 




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Past 


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atv nil 


pictures 


for 


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(if Ihciii. 













PAGE 2 



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(ju r^GU. ^^ tancis ^3/ • fAJGOet 



m^ 1883, THOMAS EDISON'S elcctric 
^ light was only four years old; 
the photograph six, and the tele- 
phone eight. The fact that those who 
experimented with control flight 
Kvere subject to ridicule explains 
'how John Joseph Montgomery 
1(1858-1911) came to make the 
|-first flight on wings" without head- 
llines or fanfare of any kind. Even 
(so, Alexander Graham Bell declared 
'that "all subsequent attempts in 
'aviation must begin with the Mont- 
gomery machine." 

i~ The son of California's famous 
IZachariah Montgomery, Assistant 
United States Attorney General in 
the Cleveland administration, John's 
rare vision and splendid genius en- 
abled him to become the first per- 
son to learn and enumerate the basic 
laws of aerodynamics. 

Even as a youth, Montgomery was 
fascinated by the possibility of air 
travel and he spent long hours 
analyzing the graceful flights of sea- 
gulls over San Francisco Bay. Later, 
he studied physics at Santa Clara 
and, by the time of his graduation 
from Saint Ignatius College, in 1879, 
Montgomery had built and tested 
several ornithopters in his primitive 
workshop. 

Six years before the widely- 
heralded flight of Otto Lillienthal, 
near Berlin, in 1891, Montgomery 
constructed and had ready for use 
the world's initial air-supported 
glider. 

Early on the morning of August 
28, 1883, John and his brother 
James loaded their secretly-con- 
structed, thirty-eight pound glider 
on a wagon and covered it with hay 
so as to attract no attention. On the 
crest of gently-s loping Wheeler 

MARCH, 1971 




Hill, on Otay Mesa, just south of 
San Diego, the two brothers waited 
for the opportune moment. When 
a breeze finally came up, James 
grabbed hold of a forty foot tow 
rope, and the glider, with John 
Montgomery aboard, soared to an 
altitude of thirty feet, for about an 
eighth of a mile (603 feet), toward 
the ocean to accomplish what Octave 
Chanute described as "the most dar- 
ing feat ever attempted." 

It was an epochal day. Mont- 
gomery had made the first success- 
ful attempt to fly and safely land a 
heavier-than-air ship, seventeen years 
before the Wright Brothers made 
years prior to the power flight, on 
December 17, 1903, at Kitty Hawk. 

In the following two years. Mont- 

• About the Author 

The author of this historical event is 
Archivist for the Archdiocese of Los 
Angeles and Professor of History at 
Queen of Angels Seminary, San Fern- 
ando, California. 



gomery built three more gliders to 
demonstrate his theory, now an ac- 
cepted principle, that a curved wing 
section is essential to flight. The in- 
ventor's experimental verification of 
parabolic curvature was used most 
recently on the fins of the earliest 
space rockets. He subsequently ori- 
ginated the tandem monoplane type 
of craft which formed the basis for 
the aerodromes of Samuel Pierpont 
Langley. 

In 1897, Montgomery was named 
Assistant Professor of Physics, at 
Santa Clara, and entrusted with a 
workshop in t h e basement of the 
college. There he built an "aero- 
plane" named the "Santa Clara." 
When that glider, piloted by Daniel 
'ohn Maloney, was pulled up to 
4,000 feet by a hot air balloon, on 
April 29. 1905. it set a world record 
by remaining aloft for twenty-two 
minutes and executing all the form*^ 
(Continued on Pnc ■ a 3) 

PAGE 3 



THE HISTORIC PICO HOUSE 



BY DR. LEO J. FRIIS 



■If N THIS tRA oi- bulldozing, when 
^ reminders of our fascinating 
history arc being rubbed off the land- 
scape, it is comforting to know that 
a few of our historic structures re- 
main. Among these fine buildings 
is the Pico House that has witnessed 
over a hundred years of Los Angeles 
history flow past its doors. 

Lovers of California's yesterdays 
do not need material structures to 
remind them of Governor Pio Pico 
or his brother. General Andres Pico, 
but there is a feeling of pride to 
know that buildings they erected 
over a century ago still stand. Some- 
how it is symbolic of the durability 
of these fine Californians. 

On February 4. 1934, Los 
Angeles Parlor No. 124 placed a 
plaque on Pico House. The dedica- 
tion of this marker was an historic 
one. Among those present was our 
dear friend, PGP Grace S. Stoermer. 
No one loved the Los Angeles Plaza 
more than she did. GP Irma W. 
Laird was there, as were many 
others. 

On that occasion a remarkably 
fine address on the history of Pico 
House was delivered by historian 
Marie T. Walsh. (In the same year 
her fine book, Tlw Mission Bells of 
California, was published.) At that 
lime Miss Walsh was a member of 
I. OS Anifcles Parlor. 

Thirty-seven years later on Febru- 
ary 16. 1971 Los Angeles Parlor 
re-marked Pico House. The occasion 
was even more dramatic than the 
original dedication. 

Los Angeles Parlor Past President 
Rdna T Neikirk was chairman of 
the event. The program commenced 
with the Pledge of Allegiance to the 
Flag led by G I Laura Blosdalc. 
Mrs. Neikirk then intriKluced dis- 
tinguished guests present. 

PAGE 4 



Marie (Mrs. Mark) Harrington, 
the former Marie T. Walsh, now 
past president of El Camino Real 
Parlor No. 324, again delivered an 
address on the history of Pico 
House. On this occasion she said: 

'"From its early pueblo days until 
almost the turn of this century, the 



Plaza area was the heart of Lot 
Angeles. In this small section were 
the city homes of the Spanish and 
Mexican well-to-do citizens witk 
bu-iness establishments close by. So 
it is natural that our city's first sky- 
scraper — three-story Pico House 
— should have been erected in this 




I III' laic rar (Irace S. Stoermer who was present at the 
first marking of the Pirn House in 1934. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



corner. However, it was not our 
'irst hotel. That honor goes to the 
Bella Union built in the 1840s on 
Sorth Main Street, which held sway 
for si.xteen years. The second hotel 
was the Lafayette built opposite the 
Bella Union. On this Main Street 
corner the two-story adobe home of 
Don Jose Antonio Carrillo stood 
until it was razed in 1869 by Don 
Pio Pico, California's last Mexican 
governor and Carrillo's brother-in- 
law. 

"The Pico House was completed 
and opened on June 19, 1870. It is 
reputed to have cost Pico and his 
brother, Andres, $85,000. There 
were 80 rooms, a small interior 
patio, the first gas lights in our city's 
hotels (the Bella Union had used 
drip candles) and it also had the 
first two zinc bathtubs in a Los 
■Angeles hotel. These were free to 
the guests. The hotel was so well 
constructed that later earthquakes 
failed to crack its walls. 

"On opening day a gala ball and 
supper was held and the soldiers' 
band from Drum Barracks at Wil- 
mington came up to play for the 
event. By this time the railroad had 
connected San Pedro and Los 
Angeles and a single fare ticket was 
$L50 as against $5.00 charge the 
Banning stages had made for the 
same run in earlier days. 

"Wells Fargo maintained offices 
on the Main Street side on the first 
floor while the billiard room and 
bar were south of the entrance. The 
dining room faced the Plaza. 

"A friendly rivalry soon sprang 
up on the Main Street side for just 
to the south, William Abbott erected 
the city's first theatre, the Merced. 




Don Pio Pico, last Mexican Governor in California 



for his bride, Mercedes Garcia. 
Dofia Mercedes insisted that her 
building "be just a little bit higher 
than Pio's" which it is. 

"The Pico House continued to be 
the city's focal point for many years 
and was the scene of many gala balls 
lasting until daybreak. The late Don 
Carlos Prudhomme once told me 
that if he received a ball invitation, 
he was free to invite others to come 
along with the result that a half 
dozen or more came on a single 
invitation. 





Drum liiiiiiAih.\ at Wilnun<'tvii 



MARCH. 1971 



Marie Harrini;ton who delivered the 
address at the marking. 



"Being next door to the theatre 
brought many theatrical people to 
the hotel — when they could afford 
it. Otherwise they went down to the 
Bella Union. An 1874 advertisement 
says "the unpleasant odor of gas has 
entirely disappeared since the buiid- 
ing of the new sewer" — w u i c ii 
shows the pueblo was growing up 

"Don Pio Pico and his tiniv 
too well known to go into >' 
he will always b" rcp- 
losing CalifoT ■'' 

(C '0) 

PAGE S 



The Grand 
President's Corner 




GRAND PRESIDENT 

Irene Bondanza (Mrs. Joseph) 
2328 Union Street 
San Francisco, California 94123 
Telephone: 931-0145 (Area 415) 



RENE BONDANZA 



SAN JUAN BAIJTISTA 

San Juan Bautista Parlor cele- 
brated its 61st birthday. President 
.Mrs. Arnaldo Andreazzi presided. 
Marshal Alice Beuttler escorted 
charter member Mayme Avilla and 
Clara Zanetta, both past presidents 
to the altar where PP Mrs. Miram 
Righenburg read a tribute to them. 
They were pinned with a carnation 
corsage. Charter member Dorothy 
Slaven was unable to be present. 




GRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 

2271 -32nd Avenue 

San Francisco. California 94116 

Office: 703 Market Street, Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



San Juan Bautista NDGW Adobe. 

Reports were made by Parlor 
chairmen concerning history and 
landmarks, the historic room, 
scholarships and ways and means. 

After the meeting, refreshments 
were served at beautifully appointed 
tables. The president read a news- 
paper article reporting the cele- 
bration held by the Parlor on its 
.*;()th birthday. The Parlor was or- 
ganized in 1910. Committee includ- 
ed Mmes. Cullumbcr, Dias, Sr., 
Farney and Wyrick. 

On March 7>, at the adobe. Grand 
President Irene Bondanza was 
honored by San Juan Bautista and 
C()pa tic ()ri> Parlors, A 6:30 dinner 
was held at Cademartori's. On 
March 4 a tour of the Mission was 
enjoyed. 

PAGE 6 



Stinerary. 1971 



MARCH 

2 San Miguel No. 94, San Luisita No. 108 and 
El Pinal No. 163 San Luis Obispo* 

3 San Juan Bautista No. 179, Copa de Oro No. 106 .... San Juan Bautisti 

4 Gilroy No. 312 Gilro] 

6 San Mateo County Luncheon 

7 Alameda County Childrens Foundation Breakfast 

8 Marinita No. 198, Fairfax No. 225 San Rafael< 

9 Angelita No. 32, Hayward No. 122 Hayward* 

10 Ruby No. 46, Princess No. 84, San Andreas No. 113 .... Angels Camp' 

1 1 Fresno No. 1 87, Wawona No. 27 1 , Madera No. 244 and 

Selma No. 313 Madera 

13 District Meeting — District 19 Contra Cost 

16 Camp Far West No. 218 (50th Anniversary) Wheatland 

17 Gold of Ophir No. 190, Annie K. Bidwell No. 168 and 

Centennial No. 295 Orovillc 

20-21 Grand Officers Meeting San Francisc 

23 Placerita No. 277, Toluca No. 279. San Fernando Mission No. 280, 

Joshua Tree No. 288 and El Camino Real No. 324 Burbank 

25 Verdugo No. 240, Poppy Trail No. 266, San Gabriel Valley No. 281. I 
Pasadena No. 290 and Whittier No. 298 Los Angeles*] 

27 San Fernando Mission Tea | 

28 Southern Counties Bruncheon, Beverly Hilton | 

APRIL 

6 Veritas No. 75. Golden California No. 291 Merced* 

1 1 Easter 

13 Miocene No. 228, El Tejon No. 239, Alila No. 321 Bakersfield' 

15 Long Beach No. 154, Wilmington No. 278, 

Cien Alios No. 303, Tierra del Rcy No. 300 Norwalk' 

17 Santa Clara County — District 26 Luncheon Santa Clar 

18 Childrens Foundation Brunch Fresn 

18 Meet Your Neighbor Breakfast 

19 Eldora No. 248, Oakdale No. 125 Oakdalc 

20 Vacaville No. 293, Mary E. Bell No. 224 Vacavillc 

21 Marguerite No. 12 Placervillc* 

23 Past Presidents Assembly San Franciscr 

24 Past Presidents Assembly San Francisc 

26 Santa Ana No. 235, Grace No. 242 and 

Silver Sands No. 286 Santa Ana 

27 Lugonia No. 241, Ontario No. 251, Jurupa No. 296 and 

Rancho San Jose No. 307 Pomona* 



* Official visitj are marked with astericks 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



Historic Landmar/( Parlor Neu/s 



by Eileen Woodyard 

History and Landmarks Chairman 



fHE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT 
of the Interior National Park 
Service has made Los Cerritos 
Ranch House a National Historic 
Landmark. The dedication was held 
on October 22, 1970 at 3 p.m. 
Theodore R. Owings, assistant dir- 
ector of the National Park Service 
called the 127 year old ranch house, 
"the largest and most impressive ex- 
ample of domestic adobe architec- 
ture in the State. 




Group of Native Daughters who at- 
tended the dedication of the Los 
Cerritos Ranch House, a National 
Historic Landmark. 



I Others taking part in the program 

I were: Dr. John Schwamm, invoca- 
tion; Eileen Woodyard. flag salute; 

I City Librarian Frances Henselman. 
address of welcome; Historical Cura- 
tor, Fredrica Whyte, introductions; 

I The Honorable Craig Hosmer, re- 
marks; and Theodore R. Owings, 

' dedication. Mayor Edwin W. Wade 

I and City Manager John R. Mansell. 

j acceptance of the plaque. 




Los Cerritos Rancho is located at 
4600 Virginia Road, Long Beach. 
When the Ranch House was open to 
the public. April 3, 1955, Long 



Beach Parlors, No. 154 NDGW and 
No. 278 NSGW presented a Cali- 
fornia Bear Flag. 



ORINDA 

One of the most important events 
for Orinda No. 56 was the ceremony 
for the Installation of Officers for 
1971. Madeline Janowski and her 
committee, Mmes. Kelly, Weaver, 
Demetrak and Klahn arranged the 
installation. 

President E le a n o r Begovich, 
dressed in a long, gold gown, ac- 
cepted her office very graciously and 
efficiently. As she was introduced at 
the altar, Brenda Thompson sang 
to her with lyrics written by Alma 
Klahn. She was escorted to her 
station by the escort team who wore 
lovely colored gowns and carried 
flowers, carrying out the theme "An 
Old Fashioned Garden." 

A lovely archway, decorated with 
paper flowers, was in the center of 
the room and all of the officers had 
to pass through it before assuming 
their new stations. Frances Simas 
accompanied Brenda as she sang 
many songs during the evening. The 
refreshments were ice cream cups 
and cookies and coffee and tea. 




Frciiu t"- SiDui^. Miompanist 

Kathy Riner, newly installed Mar- 
shal, presented her grandmother, 
Jean Galli. newly installed 1st Vice 
President, with the Past President's 
gift. DGP Anita GiUick installed the 
new officers. The officers for Orinda 
for 1971 are: President Eleanor 
Begovich and her corps of officers 
Mmes. Galli. Parks, Kelly, K. Riner. 
Janowski, V. Riner. Friede, Mo- 
haupt King, Walaschek. Jennings. 
Ralph, Weaver and Hall. 



California's poet, Richard Armour, 
wrote a poem called "Mincing No Words" 
in which he says you can't determine the 
ingredients of a mince pie by taste or 
look. 'You've got to have faith," he says. 



MARCH, 1971 



VENDOME 

A crowd of 145 turned out at the 
lOOF Hall for the Spaghetti-Meat- 
ball Dinner sponsored by Marshal 
Jennie Millar. Jennie is chairman of 
the Children's Foundation and the 
net proceeds of S350.00 derived 
from the dinner and raffle have been 
earmarked for that worthy cause. 
This affair was a tremendous success. 

The nimble fingers sewing club 
held its first meeting of the new year 
at the home of Liz Hagaman. Liz 
served a sumptuous luncheon to die 
28 members present. Numerous 
prizes were donated for the raffle, 
which netted $28.00 for chairman 
Irene Lial's sewing materials fund 
for the annual bazaar. President 
Betty Yakobovich hosted the sewing 
club on February 10, serving delic- 
ious refreshments to the "B u s y 
Bees". 

Ida Bonito has crocheted a beau- 
tiful afghan to be raffled April 20 
for the "Home Benefit". Isabella 
Stevenson was recently appointed 
SDDGP to Gilroy No. 312. The 
parior donated a large cartoon of 
"Valentines" for use by the incapac- 
itated children in the Valley Med- 
ical Center Hospital. 



HONORS FOR 
NATIVE DAUGHTERS 

Two prominent Santa Barbara 
Native Daughters have just been ap- 
pointed to serve as members of the 
Santa Barbara County 1971 Grand 
Jury. Their names were submitted 
for consideration by the Honorable 
Superior Court Judge John B. Rick- 
ard. An original panel of sixty n;unes 
was submitted to the Presiding 
Judge from the six Superior Court 
Judges of Santa Barbara County. 
From the original drawing of 60 
names, 30 names were drawn to 
provide a venire for the drawing of 
the 19 names necessary for this 
year's Grand Jury. 

Grand Jurer No. 8 is Mrs. Amelia 
(Fred C. Sr.), Acres, a member 
of Reina del Mar No. 126 since 
the I920's, has served as a member 
of the Grand Parlor Childrens 
Foundation Committee for a three- 
year term, has been SDOGF and 
DGP in her district many times. anH 
has been an active member, '~ 
on the Grand Parlor and lo. ' 
during the years of her me- 
in the Order. ' ' ' 
she served ^!'* 

PAGE 7 



PARLOR NEWS . . . 
{Continued from Page 7) 

Santa Barbara County District 
Attorney's office, from which oft ice 
she is now retired. She is Assisiaiii 
Secretary to the Trust for Historic 
Preservation, an organization dedi- 
cated to the reconstruction of the 
Santa Barbara Presidio Area; is a 
member of the Santa Barbara His- 
torical Society, and active in church 
and civic endeavors. She is a past 
president and a charter member of 
Santa Barbara Legal Secretaries 
Association, is the mother of twins, 
and a proud grandmother. She was 
appointed the first D G P to Santa 
Maria No. 276. She is an indefati- 
able worker for many projects, and 
talented in artistic endeavors of 
many kinds. She was born on a ranch 
owned by her parents in Goleta, 
and has lived her entire life in Santa 
Barbara County. This, together with 
her long years as a dedicated County 
Employee, will make her an invalu- 
able member of the 1971 Santa 
Barbara County Grand Jury. 

Juror No. 9 drawn for this year's 
panel is PGP Eileen (Mrs. Ben C.) 
Dismukc. PGP Eileen Dismuke is 
well known in her community for 
her many civic endeavors, on a local 
as well as a statewide basis. She 
was bom in Santa Barbara, has also 
lived her entire lifetime in Santa 
Barbara, and also is a long-time 
career employee of Santa Barbara 
County, having retired in .June of 
1968. 

Her service to Santa Barbara 
County began in 1940 when she was 
appointed a secretary in the Santa 
Barbara County Probation Depart- 
ment. When her position was phased 
out because of the war, she became 
secretary to the County Superinten- 
dent of Schools, in which capacity 
she served for a number of years. 
She was appointed Chief Deputy 
County Treasurer and Public Ad- 
ministrator in November 1951, and 
served in that capacity until her 
retirement in 1968. 

She became a member of the 
Native Daughters at the Grand Par- 
lor held in Los Angeles in June 
1941, and was immediately elected 
an officer in her Parlor. She organiz- 
ed two Parlors in Ventura Countv. 
Las Tres Vistas No. 302. Oxnard. 
and Poinsettia No. 7>\?,. Ventura, 
which have since been consolidate«I. 
and her own Parlor. Tierra de Oro 

PAGE t 




From lejt: Rev. Noel F. Moholy, OFM, Vice Postulator jor the Cause of 
Jimipero Serra and member of the Committee for El Camino Real; PGP 
Eileen Dismuke: Ralph Buffon, Executive Secretary of Mission Trails Asso- 
elation and then Governor Edmund G. Brown holding attractive certificate 
issued to donors of El Camino Real Bells. Mrs. Di.smuke's Parlor, Tierro de 
Oro No. 304 was the recipient of the first certificate. 



No. 304, in Santa Barbara, which 
was instituted by then Grand Presi- 
dent Henrietta Toothaker on Dec- 
ember 10, 1949. She served as State 
Chairman and a member of many 
Grand Parlor Committees prior to 
her election as a Grand Trustee of 
the statewide Order in 19.'>2 in 
Sacramento. She became Grand 
President at the installation held in 
Santa Barbara in June, 1958. Dur- 
ing her year as Grand President she 
organized the Committee for Fl 
Camino Real, composed of repre- 
sentatives of historical groups inter- 
ested in return of the n a m e of El 
Camino Real to Highway 101 after 
its renaming by legislative action in 
1957 to Cabrillo Highway. She 
hacked legislation prepared and sub- 
mitted by the late State Senator 
John J. Hollister, Jr., of Santa Bar- 
bara, for return of the name to the 
highway. The bill was passed in 
April of 1959 and signed by the 
Governor, making it possible not 
only for the highway to again be 
known as El Camino Real, but for 
placement again of the historic bell 



guideposts on the highway denoting 
this highway as the pathway of the . 
Padres. In January 1960 she was I 
appointed as a member to the State 
Historical Landmarks Advisory 
Committee, on which she was the . 
only woman member of a seven- 
member panel, and which she served 
as Secreary for seven years, on ap- 
pointment by Governor Edmund G. 
Brown. She was a member of the 
original El Pueblo Viejo Committee 
appointed by Mayor Edward L. 
Abbott, in 1960. dedicated to pre- 
serving the Santa Barbara Presidio 
area as nearly as possible to its ori- 
ginal architectural form. She is a 
member of the Public Affairs Com- 
mittee of the Santa Barbara Wo- 
mans Club, and laison to the Santa 
Barbara County Board of Super- 
visors in this capacity. She is a 
member of the Santa Barbara His- 
torical SiKiety, and has just been 
elected .Secretary of t h e Womens 
Project Board of that organization. 
The Womens Projects Board is res- 
ponsible for the maintenance and 
staffing of two historical houses 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



lice 
I I. 



iwned by the Santa Barbara His- 
iirical Society. She is a Past Presi- 
Icnt of the Santa Barbara Legal 
crctaries" Association in which she 
lield membership for about thirty 
.curs during the years of her em- 
Moym.ent. She is a member of the 
^resbyterian Church, and has just 
ccently been appointed a member 
'f the Board of the Santa Barbara 
Mission Archive-Library, which 

fouses historical books and docu- 
lents dating back to the beginninjis 
if the City and County of Santa 
kirbara, and our State of California. 
\s a native Santa Barbaran and 
cg-time employee of the countv. 
Vlrs. Dismuke's service on the 1971 
?antT Barbara Countv Grand Jury 
should prove an invaluable tool. It 
I s a considered honor to have two 
• Tiembers of a Grand Jury represent- 
I ng over 200.000 population in the 
I rounty at the present time. 



BONTTA 

Emerald green and gold not only 
A as the decor of the hall but also 
)ur Grand President Irene Bondanza 
Mas beautifully gowned in the hue 
■)f the evening when she made her 
pfficial visit to Bonita No. 10, Red- 
Ivood City. KEYS of Love, Know- 
ledge. Understanding and Leader- 
ship were carried out in every detail 
by chairman of the evening Mary 
Sousa. Flanking the Grand Presi- 
|ient as she addressed the 150 mem- 
bers was a gold and green sign 
^ringing forth the theme "KEYS'" 
bf our Grand President. Jeweled 
fityrofoam keys and smilax wel- 
comed Bonita's President Gloria 
kene and her corp of officers upon 
reaching their stations. 

Bonita's Escort Team attired in 
pink lace, under the direction of 
baptains Marie Panto and Marion 
O'Connor performed an outstanding 

Srill. Carrying keys to our hearts 
lade by Madeline Wallace the team 
received a large round of applause 
as their chairman Dolores Boz/n 
kmiled with pride. 

' As GP Irene. DGP Lee Ri.st, 
PGPs Jewel McSweeney and Evelyn 
I. Carlson, Jr. State President, Kathy 
Koch, Jr. State Trustee Margaret 
jDeto, were escorted and introduced 
jthey received as the gift of the even- 
(ing wooden key shaped key holders. 
■ President Gloria placed the first 

key on the Grand President's kcv 

I 

IMARCH, 1971 



holder which contained a personnel 
gift and a donations to the Native 
Daughters Home and the Native 
Daughter Historical Room. 

A jewel box covered with keys 
and containing a donation to the 
Junior Scholarship Aid Fund was 
presented to the GP by Rene Nash, 
President of Sequoia Jr. Unit. Fif- 
teen Sequoia Juniors svho are spon- 
sored by Bonita Parlor, attend in 
pastel formals. formed an escort for 
their presidents presentation. 

Junior State President Kathy 
Koch honored the GP with a pop[)y 
designed candy dish. VP Ed Ver- 
Lindin representing Redwood Par- 
low No. 66 NSGW with PGP Joe 
Oeschger, Messrs. Wallace, and Tay- 
lor, pinned on a yellow orchid as he 
welcomed the GP to Redwood City. 

DGP Lee Rist was honored with 
a gift of thanks from President 
Gloria for her continued help os 
deputy to Bonita. Upon receiving the 
parlor's activity report the GP 
praised Bonita Parlor as one of the 
largest parlors, active in welfare 
Native Daughter Home. Arbor Day. 
Native Daughters, Admission Day. 
Children's Foundation Civic partici- 
pation, and contributing leaders to 
the order. 

Recess was called and Chairman 
Mary invited the Jr. State President 
Kathy, to entertain the members 
with a piano solo. 

In her messages to Bonita Parlor 
PGP Jewel McSweeney highlighted 
on the progress of the Children's 
Foundation. PGP Evelyn thankt-d 
the GP for turning over the coin 
march to the Historical Room of 
which she is State Chairman, and 
expressed her pride of being an 
honorary member to all San Mateo 
County Parlors. 

The main table was ccntereil with 
a theme cake made by chairman 
Mary who has become a conioisscur 
of unusual cake design for the activit- 




Jewel McSweeney 
PGP 



ics of the Native Daughters. Refresh- 
ment chairman Norman De Cristo- 
feri served tamales pie, salad, french 
bread and cake to top off the even- 
ing of EMERALD GREEN AND 
GOLD. 



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PAGE 9 



PICO HOUSE . . . 
(Continued from Page 5) 

Imrsc race to Jose Sepulveda in 
which $60,000 was involved. For- 
tune finally frowned on Don Pio 
and he lost most of his properties 
including the Pico House, through 
mortgage foreclosures. He retired to 
his ranchito near Whittier where he 
spent his last years. The Pico House 
finally became the property of a 
Charles Prager and in 1930 was sold 
to a Guiseppe Pagliano, who had 
been renting it. Los Angeles Parlor 
marked many historic sites and 
buildings in the 1930s and I am 
proud that I had a part in it, not 
the least of which was the original 
marking of this hotel which we re- 
mark today. 

"1 often think of Don Pio's words 
to the California Mexican Legisla- 
ture and of how prophetic they were: 
"We find ourselves threatened by 
hordes of Yankee immigrants, who 
have already begun to flock into our 
country and whose progress we can- 
not arrest. Whatever that astonish- 
ing people will next undertake I 
cannot say, but on whatever enter- 
prise they embark, they will be .sure 
to be successful." 

Following Mrs. Harrington's ad- 
dress, GP Irene Bondanza, assisted 
by PGP June T. Goldie and GT Lila 
S. Hummel, performed the dedica- 
tion ceremonies. The plaque, which 
was unveiled by Mrs. Bondanza and 
Vivian Morse. President of Los 
Angeles Parlor appears as follows: 




Unveiling plaque re-marking Pico 
House are from left: GP Irene Bon- 
danza and V'ivian Morse. 

(Poppy (Seal of Stale) Poppy) 

Design) (of California) Design) 

PICO HOUSE 

Built by Gov. Pio Pico 1869 

Marked by 

Los Angeles Parlor No. 124 

Native Daughters of the Golden West 

February 4, 1934 

Remarked February 16, 1971 

Fl Pueblo de l.os Angeles State Historic 

Park Commission 

California Registered Historic Landmark 

No. 159 

The Plaque was accepted by 
Joseph A. Vargas, Vice President 
of EI Pueblo de Los Angeles State 
Historic Park Commission. Benedic- 
tion was pronounced by the Rev. 
Fr. Albert M. Vazquez, priest of 
Our Lady Queen of the Angels 
Church. 



In addition to those taking pan 
in the ceremony there were present 
Miss Ruth Pico of Jurupa Parlor 
a blood relative of Governor Pico 
and devoted student of Califurniii 
history; William J. Probert, Geneal 
Manager of the Fl Pueblo de luM 
Angeles State Historic Park Coia- 
mission and his secretary, Mrs. Irene 
McCarter; Councilman Gilbert W. 
Lindsay; GT Marie Landini; Cap- 
tain Harold and PGP Mary Barden; 
Vera Walsh of San Gabriel Valley 
No. 28 1 , Deputy to Los Angeles No. 
124, and Supervising District Deputy 
Thclma Eisen of Beverly Hills No. 
2S9; and many other Native Daug|K 
ter members and friends. 

Following the dedication ncariy 
100 members and guests enjoyed an 
excellent luncheon at El Pasco Inn 
on Olvera Street. Chaiiman of the 
luncheon was Noma Stretcii, who 
was assisted at the door by Juanita 
Porter. Beverly Slobojan Chairman 
of the Parlor's History and Land- 
marks Committee, presided at the 
luncheon. 

News coverage was furnished by 
TV channels .5 and 1 1 . 



MULTI-LISTING SERVICE 

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NORA GRANGETTO 
772-1552 or 533-3632 



702 W. LINCOLN 
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PAGE ID 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



>AST PRESIDENTS ASSEMBLY 

The 49th PAST PRESIDENTS 
\SSEMBLY of the NDGW will be 
leid in San Francisco. April 23-25. 
1971, at the Bellevue Hotel, corner 
irf Geary and Taylor Streets, and 
^resided over by State President 
Tonstance Warshaw of Mission No. 
127. All the events of the Assembly 
vill be held in the hotel. Registration 
■)f delegates and guests will start Fri- 
iay afternoon, from 2 to 3 p.m., then 
e-open 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. This will 
Se under the supervision of chairman 
vlarie Fell. Saturday registration will 
,tart at 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. 
Dpening session of the Assembly is 
planned" for 9:00 a.m. Saturday. 
April 24. The reception will be held 
Friday evening, April 23 at 8:30. 
PGP Evelyn I. Carlson is chairman. 




Constance Warshaw, State President, 
Past Presidents Assembly. NDGW. 

Saturday morning at 10:00, his 
Honor, .Mayor Joseph Alioto, will 
bring greetings from the city and 
county of San Francisco to the As- 
sembly. A no-host luncheon is plan- 
ned for Saturday, following the 
11:00 a.m. jMemorial Service to be 
conducted by PGP Orinda Giannini. 
Saturday night the annual banquet 
will be held with Inga Meyer, chair- 
man, assisted by Marge Skelly. 

Installation of the newly elected 
officers of the Assembly for the year 
1971-1972 will take place Saturday 
night. GT Helen McCarthy is chair- 
man of this event. Dorothy Jordan 
of Association No. 2. Oakland will 
be the incoming President. GS Lu- 
cille Kimbark of Association No. 1 
is general chairman for the Assem- 

MARCH, 1971 



biy. She also has the drill team from 
Association No. 1 getting ready for 
the big event. 

It is expected that Grand Presi- 
dent Irene Bondanza will be in atten- 
dance as well as many others of our 
N.D. Grand Officers. 

"You all" come! 



^dd 



e^ Siaie 



by Sid Smith 

The opportunity of seeing exciting 
professional rodeo at its best is 
available to Native Daughters of the 
Golden West, their families and 
friends. 

The 9th Annual Pacific Indoor 
Rodeo, which will be held March 
19-20-21 at the Long Beach Arena, 
offers a ticket discount plan of $ 1 .00 
off the regular price for any seat in 
the house for the Friday, March 19, 
8 p.m. performance and the Satur- 
day matinee, 2 p.m., March 20. 

Anyone interested in seeing the 
nation's top cowboys pit their skill 
against California's meanest rodeo 
animals, many who have never been 
ridden, is urged to contact Stan 
Mack, Ticket Manager, Long Beach 
Arena Ticket Office, 270 East Sea- 
side or call (213) 432-4671. Jun- 
iors under 16 will be admitted to all 
performances at half price. 

The rodeo will present perform- 
ances Friday, March 19, 8 p.m., 
Saturday, March 20, 2-8 p.m. and 
Sunday, March 21, 3 p.m. 



"Sammy," said his mother. "I wish you 
would run accross the street and see how 
old Mrs. Brown is this morning." 

A few minutes later Sammy returned 
and reported, "Mrs. Brown says it's none 
of yoiu- business how old she is." 
1 1 -t 

A Las Vegas newspaper heads its vital 
statistics column on births, marriages and 
divorces as: "Hatched, Matched. De- 
tached." 



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PAGE n 



AI.KI.I 

Ali-li No. 102 added history worth 
remembering when Grand President 
Irene Bondanza made her official 
visit to Salinas accompanied by PGP 
Lee Brice. 1 he meeting with 107 in 
attendance was held at the Town 
House Hotel, especially for members 
who were unable to climb the stairs, 
of the 56 members present, nine- 
teen were past presidents. Parlor 
representatives from San Jose, Santa 
Cruz, Watsonville, San Juan Bau- 
tista, Soledad and Monterey were 
also in attendance. Aleli was in- 
stituted in 1898. The gavel and the 
original Bear Flag are still in the 
possession of the Parlor. 




Miss Rose Rhyner, permanent chair- 
man of Aleli Parlor. 

A full page news — covering of 
the planned meeting, an Aleli cook- 
book, A I e I i directories, program 
booklets and an arrangement of 
home grown dill, arranged by Rose 
Rhyner greeted the Grand President 
and her traveling companion PGP 
Lee Brice. 

Flaming colored carnations and 
magnolia leaves decorated the ban- 
quet room. Place cards were in the 
shape of keys. Seated at the head 
table were GP Irene Bondanza. 
PGPs nimaric Dyke and Lee Brice. 
President Evelyn Alioto. Permanent 
member Rose Rhyner. and Mmes. 
Payton, Twitchell, Silva, Landini. 
Fahey. Nail and Little. Ella Fahey 
gave the invocation. Mmes. Olivera 
and Borchcrt were responsible for 
the banquet arrangements. 

A bunch of keys was presented 
to the Grand President "keeper of 

PAGE 12 





From left: Grand President Irene 
Bondanza and her t ravel inf; compan- 
ion PGP Lee Brice. 

the keys". Each officer's station was 
decorated with three foot golden 
keys with the key words "Love. 
Understanding, Friendship and 
Knowledge". Rina Thurman made 
the poppy nosegays for the escort 
team. The corps of officers wore 
antique keys hung from green velvet 
ribbon. 




Lee Vaughn, Green Valley Junior 
Unit organizer and senior advisor. 

Lee Vaughn, organizer and senior 
advisor of Golden Green Valley 
Junior Unit was introduced. The 
Juniors gave a "lost key" skit. 

Gifts of two $2.*) checks for 
scholarship funds, a monetary gift 
for GP Bondanza, coin march gift 
of $3 1 for Mission Soledad restora- 
tion were presented. 

Mmes. Mayerberg, S m i t h and 
Burden received their 25 year pins 
from President Irene. Mmes. Lyons. 
Bledsoe, Col burn and Fisher were 
unable to attend to receive theirs. 

Aleli welcomed eight candidates. 
Mrs. Ray Adams provided tiny keys 
for their corsages. Following the 
meeting refreshments were served. 

rile following morning, the tradi- 
tional breakfast of abelskibers were 
served by Rose Rhyner at her home 
to bid farewell to the Grand Presi- 
dent. Several Aleli members were 
also guests. Miss Rhyner has been 



a member for more than 48 year 
and has served as Parlor secrctar\ 
for 37 years. She was made a "per 
manent member" by the Parlor. 

(» FKIAI. VISIT 

Santa Rosa No. 217 and Seh 
topol No. 265 were hostesses wfc 
Grand President Irene Bondan 
made her official visit. The mcctio 
was held at the Native Sons hall h\ 
Santa Rosa, and was preceded 
a dinner at the Holiday Inn. IT 
G rand President's thcmc-moti 
"keys" was carried out in the cs 
team from both Parlors. Etta Ur 
of Sehastopol Parlor sang a solo- 
"Keys to Heaven." The meeting ha 
and banquet room were dccorat 
with red camellias and ivy. 

Other Grand Officers preseldl 
were: GT Helen McCarthy o 
Utopia: PGPs Claire Lindscy o 





From left: GT Helen McCarthy ant. 

Chairman of Veteran's Wei fart 

Marie Landini. 



Golden Gate and Lee Brice ot 
Marinita. Chairman of Vcter.m'' 
Welfare Marie Landini; SDDGF 
Marie Baranzini, Cotati; DGPs Mar- 
garet Williams, C o t a t i: Kathleen 
Dillon. .Santa Rosa; Claire Gcisiicr 
Sonoma: Etta Urton. Seba.si<>i<(>l 
Gladys Wing, Santa Rosa ant 
Katherinc Healy, Sonoma. 

The Grand President prescnteil ; 
fifty-year membership necklace t> 
Rub\ Jewell and a twenty-five ycai 
membership pins to Susan Mcdcirc 
and Edna Newberry of Santa Ron. 
Parlor and to Flora S c h a n k ot 
Sehastopol Parlor. 



Sutler No. Ill, of Sacramento, 
is very proud of its President Mrs 
Thomas ( Melanie ) Conover as she 
was presented by the Californiy 
Historical Society with an award ol 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



lerit at their Annual Luncheon and 
.wards Meeting on Saturday, Feb- 
iar>' 6 in Pasadena. The luncheon 
as held at the Athenaeum on the 
ounds of the California Institute of 
echnology. 

Mrs. Conover is the first woman 
I Sacramento County to receive 
lis award for her services to the 
jrious organizations interested in 
le preservation of history in Cali- 
)mia. While consideration was 
ven to her many activities in behalf 
f the history of our state, particular 
ibute was paid for her outstanding 
adership in May of 1969 during 
le Gold Spike Centennial, when as 
lairman she made possible the very 
^tractive and interesting parade 
lat was held in Sacramento the 
ight before the Centennial train left 
n Promontory, Utah. 

Mrs. Conover was chairman in 
970 of the Sacramento birthday 
inner which is held in August of 
ich year commemorating the land- 




Cap/. Jo/ill A. Sutter 



ng of Captain John Augustus Sutter 
nd the founding of the city of Sacra- 
nento. At present while serving as 
'resident of Sutter Parlor, she is 
Iso Secretary of the Old Sacramento 
Itate Historic Park Advisory Com- 
nittce, chairman of the Historical 
.andmarks Committee of the Sacra - 
nento Woman's Council and a dir- 
ctor of the Sacramento County His- 
orical Society of which her hus- 
land is President. 

'ARCH. 1971 



Walter C. Frame, father of Suiter 
Parlor's third vice president Mrs. 
Dwight (Be mice) Norris. also 
received a merit award for his svork 
for many years in the preservations 
of history, having served as chair- 
man of the California Heritage 
Preservation Committee, the Leg- 
islative Committee of the Conference 
of California Historical Societies and 
as President of the Conference of 
California Historical Societies. 




PGP Brown 

PGP Audrey D. Brown (a mem- 
ber of Sutter Parlor) accompanied 
Mrs. Conover to Pasadena where 
they also attended the dinner on Fri- 
day evening where Fellowships in 
the California Historical Society 
were presented to two distinguished 
Californians: Dr. Carl Dentzel, Dir- 
ector of the Southwest Museum in 
Los Angeles and Karl K o r t u m. 
founder iand director of the San 
Francisco Maritime Museum. 



AERIAL FEATS . . . 
(Continued from Page 3) 

of controlled flight possible in air- 
planes today. 

Other aeroplanes were built and 
demonstrated at exhibitions in the 
years prior to San Francisco's 
disastrous earthquake of April 18. 
1906. Thereafter, .Montgomery was 
forced to turn his "attention to other 
subjects" and let the aeroplanes rest 
for a time. In 1909, the Austrian 
Flying Technical School officially 
proclaimed John J. Montgomery the 
"First to Conquer the Air." 

Following fifty-f i v e successful 
flights, over a two-week period. 
Montgomery was killed in a test, on 
October 31. 1911, on the slopes of 
Evergreen Valley, when his single- 
wing glider stalled in take-off and 
nosed over. It was the ship which 
Mongomery had planned to equip 
with a power-driven engine. 



Unfortunately, many of John 
Montgomery's effects, along with 
his pioneer glider, were washed into 
San Diego Bay, when the Otay Dam 
burst, in 1916, demolishing the 
Montgomery homestead on the old 
Fruitland Ranch. And so it is that 
the fame of this "Father of the 
Gliders" remains known mostly to 
aeronautical historians. 



IRSULA 

During the regular meeting of 
Ursula No. 1, the officers for the 
ensuing year were installed. The 
meeting was opened by President 
Florence Harvey and closed by the 
newly installed President, Clara 
Dotta. Guests were in attendance 
from the Parlors in the District 
(Amador County). Chispa No. 40, 
Amapola No. 80. and Forrest No. 
86. Other Parlors represented were 
Seauoia No. 272, La Bandera No. 
I 10. Placer No. 138. 

The escort of V.I.P.s honored 
DGP Patricia Woolsev. Chispa No. 
40: Betty Retd Curilich. Chaiiman 
of the Board of Grand Iruslees. 




From left: Kathleen Mier Key. presi- 
dent of Forest No. 86 and Betty 
Reid Curilich, Chairman of Board 
of Grand Trustees. 

Urstda No. I. and DGP Margaret 
Boitano, also of Ursula. Other 
Deputy Grand Presidents in attend- 
ance were Mary Louise Stewart, 
Janie M. Flagg and Iris Gesdalil. 
Parlor Presidents in attcnd.mce were 
Fva Vaira, Forrest anil Doris Helms. 
Chispa. 

The ceremony of instaliati^ ■ 
conducted by TjGP Patiicir, '> 
sey with grac< d precision. *.; ^i: 
/ ■ 'lied on Pc:^ 14) 

PAGE 13 




Alice D. Shea, PGP 



ALICE D, SHEA 

by Edna C Williams, P.G.P. 

PGP Alice D. Shea wishes to ex- 
press her thanks for the many cards 
and gifts sent to her since she has 
been hospitalized. Alice appreciates 
the many kind words of encourage- 
ment from her sister Native Daugh- 
ters. It will be a long time lx:fore 
she is out of the hospital so keep 
the cards coming. 

Please note her new home address: 
941 Norvell Street. El Cerrito. Cali- 
fornia 94530. Hospital: Notre 
Dame, Broadway and Van Ness 
Avenue, Room 384 San Francisco, 
California. 

PAGE 14 



URSULA PARLOR . . . 
(Cuiitinitcd from Page 13) 

in the capacity of Grand Marshal 
and Past Grand President were Mary 
Louise Stewart and Lorraine Thomp- 
son, both of Chispa. Several other 
members of Chispa acted as Grand 
Officers by filling the stations dur- 
ing the installation ceremonies. The 
"Hymn to California" was sung by 
(/ r s II I a's Third Vice-President, 
Sandra Tollctt. 

Following is the list of officers 
for 1971: President Clara Dotta and 
her corps t>f officers: Mmes. Har- 
vey, Carpenter, Boitano, Tollctt. 
Garbarini, Shea, Flagg, Hall, Perano, 
Eurilich. Pixlesta. Vinciguerra. Wid- 



nier and Previtale. The honorci 
office of Senior Past President wil 
be filled by Eva Geis, while Emm. 
Ewingle will serve as Junior Pas 
President. 

The new President's remarks wen 
encouraging for the promotion o 
Native Daughters as well as com 
munity projects. It was her uniqui 
privilege to introduce her five sisters 
all members of the Mother Parloi 
and in atcndance. These "Bachich' 
sisters arc: Frances Oneta, Man 
Perano, Josephine Carpenter. Terc 
Molfino, Anne Previtale, and Prc» 
dent Clara Dotta. Ursula Parlor h 
justly proud of this "six-sister mem 
bership". 

Both the Deputy Grand Preside 
and the Supervising District Deput 
Grand President addressed the mem- 
bers. A gift was presented to DGF 
Patricia Woolscy by GT Betty Roac 
Curilich, with complimentary re- 
marks in regard to the manner if 
which she discharged her duties a* 
a representative of the Grand Presi- 
dent. Past President Florence Har- 
\ey presented a gift to SDDGP Mar- 
garet Boitano and spoke of her own 
and the Parlor's pleasure and pridi 
in the sincerity of her conduct as thi 
ritualistic authority in the District 
A gift of appreciation was presentei 
to the retiring President, Florenci 
Harvey, by Margaret Boitano, oi 
behalf of her fellow officers of thi 
past year. Due to the special effor 
of Past President Florence, nine ncv 
members were taken into the Park 
during her term as President. 

Following the meeting, refresh-| 
ments were served and a uniq^ 
program was presented. Table de 
orations were in the theme 
"Down on the Farm". In the mee 
ing hall, the native flora of the sur 
rounding hills predominated. Tlu 
■good old days" of the wood burr 
ing stove and the kerosene lanteri 
were in evidence. 

The program, arranged an^ 
■"emcecd" by Betty Read Curilich 
was introduced by asking the ques 
tion, "C 1 a r a, do you remembc 
when — ?" Each member prcscn 
who had served as an officer dur 
ing the year 1933, when Presidcn 
Clara first served the Mother Par 
lor as its President, asked this quo 
tion and then recounted some hap 
pening" shared by both. Seated a 
a special table, in addition to Belt; 
Read Curilich were Mmes. Zancai 
Boitano, O a t e s and Capetanich 

CALIFORNIA HERAU 



t 



KjP Cynthia Phillips, Chispa No. 
b Deputy Grand President to 
'rsula Parlor, 1933, and SDDGP 
filda E s o I a, Amapola No. 80, 
articipated in the program. The 
te Gladys E. Noce, of Amapola 
:irIor, serving as Grand President 

the' Order of the Native Daugh- 
rs of the Golden West, made 1933 

year that stands out in the history 
f Native Daughters in Amador 
ounty. 

The committee appointed to pro- 
de the fixins" for this important 
jcasion included Eva Geis, Chuir- 
lan; and Mmes. Flaggs, Ingram, 
j'arpenter, and Garbarini. Other 
lembers volunteering their help 
ere Mmes. P o d e s t a, Curilich, 
oitano, Hall, and Perano. 



\N FRANCISCO PARLOR 

Three Parlors of the Native 
•aughters of the Golden West met, 
)r the official visit of Grand Presi- 
ent Irene Bondanza, San Francisco 
arlor No. 261. Formal entry was 

- lade by hostess Parlor Tide Vista 
: to. 305, Porterville President Ella 

- jValker; Charter Oak No. 292, 
: risalia. President Mercene Jordan; 
: \ainona No. 283, H a n f o r d Pat 

Mmentel, President. 

The decorations carried out the 
jjrand President's theme of "Key 
lember of her Parlor" in the form 
f golden keys and her colors of 
.old and green. 

I An initiation team of members 
I the three Parlors were as follows: 
/Imes. M. Jordan, S. Jordan, Pimen- 
:1, D a t e s, Thompson, Stevenson, 
)lson, Sickels, Price, and Edwards, 
oloist was Annette Patterson. 

Presentation of gifts from the Par- 
3rs were made to the Grand Presi- 
ient by Pat Pimentel for Ramona. 
-ucy Spuhler for T ii I e Vista and 
/lary Newton for Charter Oak. 

Accompanying the Grand Presi- 
lent on her travels through the Val- 
ey for official visits were: GOS 
Dolores F e r c n z. and PGP Lee 
'irice. 

Reports were presented to the 
jfand President by the three Par- 
ors in attendance. The coin march 
;ift was given to the NDGW Home. 
!jrand President Irene spoke on the 
pims and objects of the Order of 





IH MEMBRIAM 



From left: GOS Dolores Ferenz and 
PGP Lee Brice 

the Native Daughters. Refreshments 
were served following the meeting 
by a Committee of the three Parlors. 



GRAND PRESIDENTS . . 
(Continued from Page 2) 




PGP Orinda G. Gianninni 
Presided at the 54th Grand Parlor, 
June. 1940, at Oakland. 

[This series on Grand Presidents, 
Past and Present will conclude with 
the next i.^sue.] 




JiWELERS 





Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 



I 



lARCH, 1971 



Not lost to those that love them 
Not dead, just gone before; 

They still live in our memory, 
And they will forever more. 



Margaret Creighton, Genevieve No. 132, 
December 27. 

Ruth Grant, Golden Era No. 99, Janu- 
ary 8. 

Emma Young, Sea Point No. 196. Janu- 
ary 11. 

Helen Cleu, Fruitvale No. 177, January 
12. 

Elsie Isherwood, Santa Rosa No. 217, 
January 7. 

Gertrude Knox, Centennial No. 295, Nov- 
ember 30. 

Anne Williams, Minerva No. 2, Decem- 
ber 9. 

Alice Perry, South Butte No. 226, Janu- 
ary 15. 

Leia Fox. San Gabriel Valley 281, Nov- 
ember 26. 

Leslie Hyde, Eschscholtzia No. 112. Janu- 
ary 14. 

Mariellen Alfonso, Tamelpa No. 231. 
September 13. 

Kathryn Hyde. Piedmont No. 87, Janu- 
ary 18. 

Clara Mathewson. Palo Alto No. 229, 
January 8. 

Idah M. Lvons, Vendome No. 100, Janu- 
ary 20. 

Mabelle McMasters. Sutter No. 11, Dec- 
ember 12. 

Kathryn Steven. Mary E. Bell No. 224. 
December 18. 

Lillian Psihopaidas. La Bandera No 110. 
January 23. 

Mary Strauch. Sutter No. 111. January 
25. 

Alta Davies. Aleli No. 102, January 29. 

Mae Adamino. Bahia Vista No. 167. Dec- 
ember 11. 

Emilia Barnhardt, Imogen No. 134. Janu- 
ary 9. 

Mary Beach, Marguerite No. 12, January 
30. 

Helen Tamagui, Calistoga No. 145. 
February 2. 

Margaret Boyle, Madera No. 244, Janu- 
ary 31. 

Margaret Austin, Joaquin No. 5, Febru- 
ary 5. 

Cora Welch. Piedmont No. 87, February 
6. 

Adclle Parncl!, loaquin No. 5, February 
8. 

PAGE 15 



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INFORMALS 

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and Parlor Name and Number 
printed in black ink on deluxe 
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24 sets $ 4.95* 

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able; please add $2.50 per 
order). The paper is personal- 
ized with your name and ad- 
dress or Parlor name and 
address. 

24 sets $ 5.95* 

48 sets $ 8.95* 

100 sets $18.95* 

PAD-0-NOTE 

Potpouri of papers and colors, 
imprinted with "From the Desk 
of (and your name). Hundreds 
of uses for this clever note. 
20 shets per pad in 4 x 6" size. 

5 sets $ 3.95* 

10 sets $ 7.50* 

* California residents please add 
5 % Ux. 

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Beautiful designed paper cover. $2.00 (plus 61 cents tax and mailing). 

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SPECfAL COLLECTIONS 




Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




API-IL. 1971 ->■ 40<t 



QUEEN ANNE COTTAGE AI IHI i i -, ANGtLtS bFATE AND COUNTY ARBORETUM 



.TCEit^tDE 



EIQG 



EIQE 



ekdef;. 



JR. UNIT NEWS 



'iSGE 



EIEIE 



3QE 



QBE 



=>k. 



IRl ITVAI.E J I MORS 

Fruitvale Junior Unit No. 22 en- 
joyed the official visit of State Chair- 
man Liia Hummel. The theme of the 
day was "Gold Discovery" with 
Sharon Landt Jr. State Secretary as 
the chairman. A delicious luncheon 
was served by the Unit with help of 
their advisors, to many guests, in- 
cluding state, grand officers and 
members of other units. 




Marilyn Baker 

Marilyn Baker gave a talk on 
"Discovery of Gold". The Ragon- 
ettes sang "Smiles" for Mrs. Hum- 
mel. 

Fruitvale Jr. Unit is now working 
on a Spring Fashion Show and Lun- 
cheon with chairman Marilyn Baker 
to be held in May. The models are to 
make their outfits which they will 
model. 

Lecalyn Baker, Jr. State Past Pre- 
sident. Anne Conway, Sharon Landt. 
Jr. State Secretary and Debbie Perry 
are working with the Retarded 
Children on Saturday mornings. 
f f f 

KSTRFI.LAS UE ORO 

Estrellas de Oro Junior Unit No. 

37 has been very busy. The girls 

went to the Long Beach Veterans" 

Hospital to entertain at a tea put on 

(Continued on Page 14) 

PAGE 2 



California Herald 

•PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 

Volume XVIII Aprii , 1971 Number 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Junior Unit News 

Why Do We Do It?, by Alice T. Smith 

San Francisco — Convention City, compiled by GT Helen C. McCarthy 

The Grand President's Corner 

Official NDGW Directory 

Parlor News I 

In Memoriam I 



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State .Arboretum. 




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to your way of life. 
So is a healthy 
environment. 
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bring you both. 




Southern California Edison 



J. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO J. PROS 
Editor 



J/VNE FRnSl 
PubUc RelatJ 



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CALIFORNIA HEKA 



hj Aliet T* SmltJk 



The English, although late in ad- 
opting the custom, arc credited with 
the most notorious joke in April 
Fool history. In 1860 many London- 
ers received a formal invitation to 
the Tower of London, which read 
in part: 



■'The first of April some do say 
Is set apart for All Fools' day 
But why the people want it so 
Nor I. nor they themselves do know 
But on this day are people sent 
On purposes of merriment." 



LOOKING FOR the reason for 
April Fools' Day can lead 
ou clear back to Noah. Some claim 
his was the date on which Noah 
cnt out the dove to discover land, 
nd it returned from its fool's er- 
and. The Hebrew date for this was 
quivalent to our April 1. The cor- 
cct title is "All Fools' Day", the 
all" being a contraction of the or- 
ginal "auld". 

A more cheerful explanation is 
hat celebrating the vernal equinox, 
)r the approach of spring is always 
I fun-time. Sometimes the celcbrat- 
ng continued until April 1. In 
ndia, the last day of the ''feast of 
-lulu", as it was called, was a time 
or sending unsuspecting persons on 
oolish errands. 

All Fools' Day had great popular- 
ity in France, dating back to the 
1 6th century, but the English and 
Americans were not familiar with 
it until the middle of the 18th cen- 
tury. The Scottish people are said to 
especially enjoy the day. labeling 
April Fools "April Gowk Gowks" 
or "Cuckoos'. 

APRIL. 1971 




"Admit bearer and friend to 
the yearly washini; of the White 
Lions. Admitted only at the 
White Gate. It is particidarly 
requested that no gratuities he 
given to the warders." 



Hundreds were thus duped to 
driving round and round looking for 
the ceremony. 

In the U. S. the telephone is one 
of the favorite means of perpetrating 
April Fool jokes. When a question 
such as, "Is this 1-9-7-1?" is asked, 
and the reply is negative, the prank- 
ster's answer is. "Look at your cal- 
endar. April Fool." 

It appears that this famous day 
is fast waning. The zoos are among 
the few victims of its humor. They 
are forced to answer frequent calls 
from jokers for "Mr. Bear", or "Mr. 
Lion." Card manufacturers have en- 
deavored to mark the day with such 
offerings as. "April Fool Day re- 
minds me of you," or cards that re- 
fuse to open, and such. Secretaries 
still like to play jokes on their bosses 
and small fry enjoy fooling teachers 
and parents. 

April Fool superstitions still re- 
main. Folklore says that if a bachelor 
is fooled by a pretty girl on April 
Fools' Day. he will marr\' her. Also, 
to lose your temper over an April 
Fool joke is to bring bad luck. And. 
the same source warns, "beware of 
marriage on this day or the hen will 
rule the roost." 

So whether or not Noah is to 
blame, this day remains on the cal- 
endar, and provides fun for the 
"foolers" if not for the "fooled". 




PAGE 3 



J^an ^^ 



tanctscc 



CONVENTION CITY 

In observance of our approaching 
Grand Parlor Convention to be held 
in San Francisco June 20 through 
24. following is a resume of some 
of the City's historical lore. The 
1971 Convention Committee hopes 
it may be of interest to the delegates 
and visitors planning to travel to 
San Francisco in June. 

CABLE CARS 

BBS HE CABLE CARS OF San Franc- 
^ isco have been in existence 
for nearly 98 years. 

In the 1870s, San Francisco was 
a town in ferment. Nourished by 
the wealth of the Mother Lode, it 
was alive with the quest for culture, 
excitement, and financial expansion. 




There were steam trains and horse- 
cars on Market Street, hut a Scots- 
man, Andrew S. Hallidie, with a 
prosperous wire cable business in 
the city, whose excellent product 
was widely used by mining interests 
in the constructit)n of aerial tram- 
ways to transport ore in the rugged 
country of the western Sierra 
Nevada, began to speculate on new- 
uses for his cable. He had been 
impressed by the elevators that were 
coming into use in the more elegant 
buildings across the country. Hallidie 
wondered if it would not be possible 
to adapt this idea to a railway cap- 
able of operating on San Francisco's 
steep hills. 

Not everyone thought his idea 
practicable but he did have a power- 
ful ally: the SiKiety for the Pre- 
vention of Cruelty to Animals who 

PAGE 4 



were mightily disturbed by the 
mortality of the shabby beasts pull- 
ing the city's horsecars. These poor 
animals didn't last long hauling 
heavily laden railroad cars along 
cobbled streets and the steep hills 
added a miserable burden to an al- 
ready perilous life. 

Hallidie and three other men 
formed the Clay Street Hill Railroad 
Company, obtaining a franchise to 
operate a "cable-powered railroad 
on Clay Street." A small San Franc- 
isco bank added a thirty thousand 
dollar loan to the capital they al- 
ready had and the project got under- 
way. 

After many trials, and just two 
days before the franchise was due 
to expire, the steam engine was 
started in the powerhouse at Clay 
and Leavenworth Streets. The 
rumble of a cable thrashing in its 
slot, a sound destined to become 
familiar to San Franciscans, was 
heard for the first time. 

At five o'clock on a cold and 
foggy morning. Andrew Hallidie and 
his associates man-handled the first 
Cable Car onto the rails at the top 
of the Clay Street hill. Hallidie was 
at the grip and when he caught the 
cable the car moved to the edge 
of the hill and nosed bravely into 
the fog. For a time, all was silent, 
then miraculously the fog cleared 
long enough to disclose the car and 
Hallidie. both safe and upright, 
arriving at the Kearnv Street Turn- 
table. 

By this time a huge crowd had 
gathered to cheer and witness this 
"miracle", another San Francisco 
tradition was born — that of "turn- 
ing the cable", and the San Franc- 
isco Cable Cars have been rising 
and plummeting majestically ever 
since that memorable day of August 
I, 1873, adding other lines and mak- 
ing a few route changes 

Conventioners, tourists, and San 
Franciscans alike, delight in using 
this unique transportation and to 
hear the cry of "look out for the 
curve" as a cable car laden with 



passengers rounds a sharp corner 
One may board a Powell Strec 
cable to ride to Fisherman's Wharf 
Aquatic Park and browse througl 
the Maritime .Museum, or to visi 
the many shops at the Cannery anc 
Ghiradelli Square, or board a Call 
fornia street cable to visit China 
town. North Beach and the man> 
points of interest along the way. 

A ride on a San Francisco Cable 
Car is a "Spirited Adventure." 

FISHERMAN'S WHARF AND 
NORTH BEACH 

•"BlSHERMAN'S WHARF AND ihi 

^ North Beach area of Sar 
Francisco have a unique and varico 
history. North Beach, in the IS.^Us 
was the shoreline of a lagoon sit- 
uated in a deep bay cove between 
Black Point and Telegraph Hill. In 
1853 a pier, extending some HM)r 
feet into the bay, was constructed 
there. It was called Meigg's Wharf 
In those carefree days. North 
Beach Cove was a center of the 
c i t y's recreational activities. San 
Franciscans swam there and held 



-^kk-k. 



boat races. By the middle of thei 
1860s, however, commercial fishi 
had taken over the cove, and Meigg's 
Wharf became known as Fisher 
man's Wharf. 

In 1880 the Fmbarcadero sea w 
was built, and commercial fishing ol 
Meigg's Wharf was no longer profit 
able. The cove was gradually filled 
in and various industries and com- 
mercial enterprises settled in the 
district. The fishermen were moved 
to the foot of I'nion Street, there to 
remain until 1900 when the present 
Fisherman's Wharf was reserved 
for the city's commercial fishermen 

During the 1880s. San Francisct> 
was home port for the Pacific 
whalers, and for a lime the city was 

CALIFORNIA HERALC 



;r- 
it-^ 



II 



e. 



onv*2ntton 



a 




ii 



H 



he whaling capital of the world. 
Salmon, too, were caught in \ast 
lumbers by the boats berthed on 
^cfferson Street. In 1888, San 
-rancisco handled more fresh fish 
,)f all kinds than the combined 
['acific ports from Mexico to Puget 
,>ound. 



^3 



Fisherman's Wharf, as we know 
It today, took shape gradually. In 
1917 the Coast Guard Office and 
L'ustoms House were erected. In 
'1918, the Booth Packing House was 
built in the area. During these years 
pf World War I, a breakwater was 
constructed at the Hyde Street Pier, 
and the Hyde Street Wharf was 



widened to handle an increased 
volume in lumber traffic. 

The last and largest of the Em- 
barcadero piers north of Market 
Street was Pier 24. This was built 
in 1924. In 1926 the Hyde Street 
Pier was improved to handle auto 
ferries. These picturesque vessels 
continued to operate between the 
city and Sausalito until the complet- 
ion of the Golden Gate Bridge. In 
1932 a bulkhead and wharf were 
constructed along Jefferson Street 
to permit the berthing of fishing 
craft. 

During the 1950's, when the 
sardines departed from the waters of 
the northern Pacific, Fisherman's 
Wharf became headquarters for the 
crab and salmon fleets. It remains 
so. Fish and shellfish have always 
been sold on the Wharf. From 




humble beginnings, a thriving restau- 
rant business developed over the 

years. 





Old wood cut showing San Francisco 
Bay in early days 

No visitor to San Francisco can 
say that he has sampled the color 
and flavor of the city without at 
least one visit to the Wharf and it 
take a dieter's courage to abstain 
from the many wonderful dishes 
available there in the numerous 
unique atmospheric restaurants. Or. 
one may just stroll the walkways 
and purchase walk-a-way seafood 
cocktails at the many sidewalk 
stands. San Francisco French Bread 
in various sizes and shapes enjoys 
a huge retail business, as well as the 
famous fresh crabs which are 
cleaned and cracked for the pur- 
chaser before wrapping, and other 
fresh fish. 

The Wharf, the fishing boats, the 
men who sail them, and the tangy 
scent of the sea are all a valuable 
part of the San Francisco tradition. 
Fisherman's Wharf is truly one of 
the fascinating places '^' ^ .; . 

(To be continue 



Coil Tower in San f- rancisco 



This interesting 
lion about San 1 
NDGW Convent i 
piled by GT H. 
the Public Rel: 



APRIL, 1971 



4GC i 



The Grand 
President's Corner 




GRANO FKI SIDIiNT 

Irene Bondanza (Mrs. Joseph) 
2328 Union Street 
San Francisco, California 94123 
Telephone: 931-0145 (Area 415) 



F.) 



IRENE BONDANZA 



PARLORS 

If your Parlor is presenting a mem- 
ber for Grand Parlor Office in ads in 
Mav and June issues, please contact 
California Herald. P.O. Drawer 4243. 
Anaheim. Calif. 92803 immediately. 



ALOHA 

Members of Alohu No. 106, 
celebrated their 72nd anniversary 
and retiring presidents' dinner at 
Vince's Restaurant. Tlie Parlor paid 
$3 toward each member's dinner. 
Hostesses for the dinner were Vivian 
Harris and Myrtle Degen. The tables 
were festive with red table cloths 
and napkins and lighted yellow can- 
dles. Pink and rose cyclamen plants 
on the tables were given as door 
prizes, won by DGP Dorothy Jor- 
dan, PP Martha Decker and Edith 
Pappas. At the head table was a 
large anniversary sheet cake, cut 
later by President Alma. There were 
many gaily wrapped gifts donated 
by Carl Lilienthal's drug store for 
the Pirate Bingo winners. During 
the evening the "Winiiini; licket" 
was drawn for the oil painting. The 
lucky winner was 1st VP Vivian 
Harris. An "Oscar of Pniise" for 
Trustee .Ann Ferreira who interested 
Artist Jack Galliano in the Child- 
rens Foundation Project. He painted 
the beautiful California Landscape 
and donated it to Aloha Parlor. Pre- 
sident Alma presented Elaine Van 
Buren her long awaited 25 year pin; 
Vivian Harris's pin was presented 
by Myrtle Degen. PP Charlotte Leo- 
pold. Alohas 63 )car member, had 
a wonderful time at the party. She 
will be 8 1 years o 1 d October 1 
1971. Also attending the dinner 
were Alalia's newest bride-: Jill Fer- 
reira Suico. Carol Resiagno Lehman. 
and Edith Swartz Pappas. 

PAGE 6 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. 

2271-32nci Avenue 

San Francisco, California 94116 

Office: 703 Market Street. Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



3tinerary^ 1971 



APRIL 

6 Veritas No. 75, Golden California No. 291 Merced* 

1 1 Easter 

13 Miocene No. 228, El Tejon No. 239, Alila No. 321 Bakersfield* 

15 Long Beach No. 154, Wilmington No. 278, 

Cien Aijos No. 303, Tierra del Rey No. 300 Norwalk* 

17 Santa Clara County — District 26 Luncheon Santa Clara 

18 Childrens Foundation Brunch Fresno 

18 Meet Your Neighbor Breakfast 

19 Eldora No. 248, Oakdale No. 125 Oakdale* 

20 Vacaville No. 293, Mary E. Bell No. 224 Vacaville* 

21 Marguerite No. 12 Placerville* 

23 Past Presidents Assembly San Francisco 

24 Past Presidents Assembly San Francisco 

26 Santa Ana No. 235, Grace No. 242 and 

Silver Sands No. 286 Santa Ana* 

27 Liigonia No. 241, Ontario No. 251, Jurupa No. 296 and 

Rancho San Jose No. 307 Pomona* 

MAY 

4 San Diego No. 208, Ilia M. Knox No. 320 El Cajon* 

7 Liberty No. 213 Elk Grove* 

8 El Dorado No. 186 (Afternoon) Georgetown* 

12 Las Lomas No. 72, Dolores No. 169 and 

Buena Vista No. 68 San Francisco* 

13 Forr Bragg No. 210 Fort Bragg* 

15 Sacramento District Luncheon 

17-20 NSGW Grand Parlor Sacramento 

19 San Francisco Womans Chamber of Commerce Luncheon 

22 Plumas Pioneer Ho. 219 (50th Anniversary) Quincy* 

29 San Francisco No. 261 (Homecoming) San Francisco 

30 Alameda County Memorial Services 

• Official visits are marked with astericks 



On February 26, Myrtle Degen. 
X'ivian Harris and Agnes Carpenter 
went to Vacaville to present 83 year 
old Freda Schirrmachcr her 50 year 
emblem. 

Aloha's Cheer Committee has giv- 
en many gifts lately to the elderly 
ladies of the St. Joseph Home. Oak- 
land. Asked if there was anything 
else they would like, they all replied. 
"LIPSl K KS"! Carl Lilienthal don- 
ated 40. 



Aloha had an attendance of 21 at 
the Alameda County Childrens 
Foundation Breakfast March 
7 at Goodman Hall. Jack London 
Square. Oakland. Donations were 
given in memory of Sallie R. Tha- 
ler. It has been the custom the past 
few years to present a toy with 
Alolut's donation. This year it was a 
beautiful blonde doll dressed in pink 
holding the $250.00 check in her 
hands. Jennie Peterson m;!de the 
presentation for the Parlor. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



H.d.G.W. d I RECTORY 



GRAND OFFICERS — 1970-1971 

Grand President 
ene Bondanza (Mrs. Joseph) San Francisco 
No. 261, 2328 Union St., San Francisco 
94123. 

Junior Past Grand President 
Nancy J. Conens (Mrs.) Piedmont No. 87, 4311 
Allendale Ave., Oakland 94619. 

Grand Vice President 
'irgilia McCombs (Mrs. C. F.) Morada No. 199, 
! 1241 Normandy Drive, Modesto 95351 

Grand Marshal 

Rae E. Rominger (Mrs.) La Bandera No. 110, 

2841 - 69th Ave., Sacramento 95822. 

Grand Secretary 

.ucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) Alta No. 3, 
2271-32nd Ave., San Francisco 94116. Office, 
703 Market St., Rm. 612, San Francisco 

1 94103. Telephone: (415) 362-4127. 

I Chairman, Board of Grand Trustees 

,3etty Read Curilich (Mrs.) Ursula No. 1, 41 
I Curilich Lane. Jackson 95642. 

Grand Trustees 
Lila S. Hummel (Mrs. Leonard) La Tijera No. 
' 282, 836 E. Grand Ave., El Segundo 90245. 
Marian E. McGuire (Mrs. Paul B.) Berkeley No. 
I 150. 652 Wildcat Road, Berkeley 94708. 
Helen C. McCarthy (Mrs. James P.) Utopia No. 

252. 4064 - 18th St., San Francisco 94114. 
Meredyth Burnette (Mrs. Paul B.) Dardanelle 

No. 66, P.O. Box 1124, Sonora 95370. 
Laura Blosdale (Mrs. Frank) Beverly Hills No. 

289. 1563 Brockton Ave., Los Angeles 90025. 
Ijune Painter (Mrs. Carl) Lomitas No. 255, 

22321 W. Sunset, Los Banos 93635. 



Grand Inside Sentinel 
loolores M. Ferenz (Mrs. James) Hayward No. 
I 122, 3306 Alton Ct., Fremont 94536. 

I Grand Outside Sentinel 

Icel Beers (Mrs. T.) Annie K. Bidwell No. 
' 168, Rt. 1, Box 286, Glenn 95943. 

Grand Organist 

Gracie Scott (Mrs. Robt.) San Juan No. 315, 
5021 Jackson St., N. Highlands 95660. 



PAST GRAND PRESIDENTS N.D.G.W. 

1931— Estelle M. Evans (Mrs. Ellis) Antioch 

No. 223, 314 West 5th Street, Antioch 

94509. 
1932— Evelyn I. Carlson (Mrs.) Dolores No. 169, 

1308 Hoover Street, Apt. 1, Menio Park 

94025 
1934— Irma W. Laird (Mrs. Ralph) Alturas No. 

159, Alturas 96101 
1937— Florence D. Boyle (Mrs.) Gold of Ophir 

Parlor No. 190, P.O. Box 1743, Oroville 

95965 
1938— Ethel Begley (Mrs.) Marinita No. 198 

233 Prospect Ave., San Francisco 94110 
1940 — Orinda G. Giannini (Mrs. Raymond) 

Orinda No. 56. 130 Larkspur Drive, 

Santa Rosa 95405. 
1941— Hazel B. Hansen (Mrs. Louis) Verdugo 

No. 240, 535 N. Howard Street. Glendale 

91206 
1942— Clarice E. Gilchrist (Mrs.) Caliz de Oro 

No. 206, 25 Seaview Ave., Piedmont 

94611. 
1943 — Claire Lindsey (Mrs.) Golden Gate No. 

158, 131 Larkspur Drive, Santa Rosa 

95405. 
1944 — Mary B. Barden (Mrs. Harold) Californ- 

iana No. 247, 320 22nd St., Santa Monica 

90402 
1945 — Emily E. Ryan (Mrs.) Las Lomas No. 72, 

1371 -48th Ave., Apt. 201, San Francisco 

94122 
1946— Ethel C. Enos (Mrs.) Morada No. 199. 

Box 174, Modesto 95353 
1947— Loretta M. Cameron (Mrs.) Twiin Peaks 

No. 185, 39 Chenery Street, San Fran- 
cisco 94131 
1948— Doris Treat Daley (Mrs.) San Andreas 
No. 113, 1342 No. Lincoln St., Stockton 

95203. 
1949 — Margaret M. Farnsworth (Mrs.) Vendome 

No. 100, Beverly Manor Convalescent 

Hospital, 2225 Dela Vina St., Santa Bar- 
bara 93101. 
1950— Henrietta Toothaker (Miss) Woodland No. 

90, 723 Gibson Road, Woodland 95695 
1951— Anna T. Schiebusch (Miss) Los Angeles 

No. 124, 320 W. Chestnut Avenue, San 

Gabriel 91776 

APRIL. 1971 



1952— JevKel McSvKeeney (Miss) El Vespero No. 

118, 2845 Van Ness Avenue. San Fran- 
cisco 94109 
1953 — Elmarie H. Dyke (Mrs.) Junipero No 

141, Box 300, Pacific Grove 93950 
1954 
1955— Doris M. Gerrish (Miss) Liberty No. 213, 

2709 7th Avenue Sacramen'o 95818 
1956— Norma Hodson (Mrs. Theron) Phoebe A. 

Hearst No. 214, 139 N. Sherman Street, 

Manteca 95336 
1957 — Audrey D. Brown (Mrs.) Su»'er No. HI. 

5608 Caleb, Sacramento 95819 
1958— Irma M. Caton (Mrs.) Argonaut No. 166. 

1166 Powell Street. Oakland 94608 
1959 — Eileen Dismuke (Mrs. Benjamin) Tierra 

de Oro No. 304, 1021 Dela Vina, Santa 

Barbara 93101 
1960 — Maxiene H. Porter (Mrs. Dale) La Tijera 

No. 282. 6436 Elmdale Rd.. Alexandria, 

Virginia 22312 
1961 — Edna C. Williams (Mrs. Don) Seouoia 

No. 272, 941 Norvell. El Cerrito 94530 
1962- Alice D. Shea (Mrs.) Minerva No. 2, 

941 Norvell St., El Cerrito 94530. 
1963 — Rhoda Roelling (Mrs. Elmer C.) Stirling 

No. 146, 2017 Chickie St., Antioch 94509 
1964 — Lee Brice (Mrs. W. Max) Marinita No. 

198, P.O. Box 41, Res. 66. San Quentin 

94964. 
1965— Fern E. Adams (Mrs. Emmett C.) Berry- 

essa No. 192, P.O. Box 387, Willows 95988 
1966— Katie G. Jewett (Mrs. A. L.) El Pinal No. 

163. P.O. Box 685, Cambria 93428 
1967 — Annette Caiocca (Mrs. Julius Jr.) La 

Junta No. 203. 1624 Main St., St. Helena 

94574. 
1968— June T. Goldie (Mrs. Wm. L.) San Gabriel 

Valley No. 281, 320 Rosemont Blvd., San 

Gabriel 91775. 
1969— Hazel T. Mallette (Mrs. Everal A.) Gold 

of Ophir No. 190, 45 Dunstone Drive, 

Oroville 95965. 



SUPERVISING D.D.G.P.S 1970-1971 
Appointed by Grand President Irene 



by Grand President 
Bondanza 



District 



1— Humboldt County: Mrs. Merlynn Henry, 

Aracata No. 325, Rt. 1. Box 246, Bayside 

95524. 
2 — Mendocino County: Mrs. Zita Patton, 

Fort Bragg No. 210, 111 So. McPherson, 

Fort Bragg 95437. 
3 — Siskiyou County: Mrs. Eleanor Henricks, 

Eschscholtzia No. 112, Etna 96027. 
4 — Trinity. Shasta and part Tehama 

Counties: Mrs. Doris Clark. Berendos No. 

23, P.O. Box 632, Red Bluff, 96080. 
5 — Modoc and part Lassen Counties: Ethel 

Dowell, Mt. Lassen No. 215, P.O. Box 245, 

Bieber 96009. 
6 — Part Lassen County: Mrs. Ida Evans, 

Susanville No. 243, 832 Mark St., Susan- 

ville 96130. 
7 — Butte, Glenn and part Tehama Counties: 

Mrs. Eloise Bettencourt. Berryessa No. 

192, 459 S. Shasta St., Willows 95988. 
8— Yuba, Colusa and Sutter Counties: 

Esther Fortna, Marysville No. 162, 1129 

N. Township Rd., Yuba City 95991. 
9 — Plumas and part Sierra Counties: Mrs. 

Lola O. Viera, Plumas Pioneer No. 219. 

Rt. 1, Box 689, Quincy 95971. 
10— Part Sierra County: Mrs. Abbie B. Borne, 

Naomi No. 36, P.O. Box 224, Sierra City 

96125. 
11 — Sonoma and part Mendocino Counties: 

Mrs. Marie Baranzini, Cotati No. 299. 

8107 El Rancho Dr., Cotati 94928. 
12— Napa, Lake and part Solano Counties: 

Mrs. Eileen Hanna, Eshcol No. 16, 796 

Lincoln Ave., Napa 94558. 
13 — Marin County: Mrs. Mary May, Marinita 

No. 198. 15 Glenwood Drive, San Rafael 

94901. 
14 — Nevada and part Placer Counties: Mrs. 

Gladys Blanchard, Laurel- No. 6, M.T.R. 

Box 13, Nevada City 95959. 
15 — El Dorado and part Placer Counties: 

Mrs. Mildred E. LaFevre, Marguerite No. 

12. P. O. Box 545, Placerville 95667. 
16 — Sacramento, Yolo and part Solano 

Counties: Mrs. Pamela Muller, Sutter 

No HI, P. O. Box 531, El Macero 

95618. 
17_Amador County: Mrs. Margaret Boitano, 

Ursula No. 1, 21 French Bar Rd., Jack- 
son 95642. 
18 — Calaveras County: Annie J. Voitich, Ruby 

No. 46. Murphys 95247. 
19 — Part Contra Costa County: Mrs. Eleanor 

Hogan. Stirling No. 146. 1337 Columbia 

St., Pittsburg 94565. 
20— Alameda and part Contra Costa Counties: 

Mrs. Ethel Murphy, Cerrito de Oro No. 

306, 1152 Portland Ave., Albany 94706. 



21 — San Francisco County: Mrs. Edna Gars- 
venta, San Francisco No. 261, 1377-21st 
Ave., San Francisco 94122. 

22— San Mateo County: Mrs. Nora Nesper. 
Bonita No. 10, 718 Hopkins St., Redwood 
City 94061. . ^ . 

23— San Joaquin County: Mrs. Lois Good- 
paster, El Pescadero No. 82, 229 W. 
Beverly Place, Tracy 95376. 

24 — Tuolumne County: Mrs. Lila Wulzen, Dar- 
danelle No. 66, Rt. 3, Box 317, Sonora 
95370. 

25— Merced. Stanislaus and Mariposa 
Counties: Mrs. Evelyn Holm, Lomitas 
No. 255, 950 J Street, Los Banos 93635. 

26— Santa Clara County: Mrs. Verona Goeh- 
ner, Los Gatos No. 317, 121 Loma Alta 
Ave., Los Gatos 95030. 

27 — Monterey, San Benito and Santa t,ruz 
Counties: Mrs. Esther Payton, Junipero 
No 141, 116 Fairground Rd., Monterey 

939''0- . .. > 

28 — San Luis Obispo County: Mrs. Mafy„A- 

Warren, El Pinal No. 163, P. O. Box 

636. Cambria 93428. 
29— Madera. Fresno, Tulare and King 

Counties: Mrs. Anna Mane Hagans, 

Madera No. 244, 401 North H. St., 

Madera 93637. ^.„ .... 

30— Kern County: Mrs. Elma Whitten. Alila 

No. 321. 1821 Inyo St., Delano 93215. 
31— Santa Barbara, Ventura Counties: Man' 

Louise Days, Reina del Mar No. 126. 

709 Moreno Rd., Santa Barbara 93103. 
32— Part Los Angeles (Valley Area): Mrs 

Evelyn Henry, Placenta No. 277, 135Z.! 

Leadwell St., Van Nuys 91405. ^^^,„,„ 
33— Part Los Angeles ((Central Western 

Area): Miss Thelma Eisen, Beverly Hills 

NO. 289, 917-6th St., #7, Santa Monica 

34— Part ■ LOS Angeles (Eastern Area): f^rs. 

Helen Lugo, San Gabriel Valley No. 281. 

11530 S. Mulhall, El Monte 91732. 
35-Part Los Angeles (Haib°^S^«^^,?|"? L^ 

Hawkins, Cien Anos No. 303, iji.;b lib 

eett St., Norwalk 90651. 
36-Riverside and San Bernandino Count^s: 

Mrs Elsie K. Buchko, Jurupa No. 296. 

20952 Highway No. 395, Pe'^'S 92370 
37— Orange County: Joanne D. Frey, Long 

Beach NO. 154, 236A Argonne. Long 

38-sln''''Dilgl°^County: Mrs. Joen Graves 
Ilia M. Knox No 320, 1196 Bostoma 
St., El Cajon 92021. 



STATE CHAIRMEN — 1970 - 1971 

Admission Day (to serve Oct. 1, 1970 to 
Oct 1, 1971 : Mrs. Kathleen I. Dom- 
brink, Piedmont No. 87, 1122-4th Ave.. 
Oakland 94606. .. ., c-i,:^^ 

Sub-Committee on Bowling: ^rs. Elame 
Barceloux. Berryessa No. 192, 639 SO. 
Merrill, Willows 95988. . 

Americanism and Civic Participation: Mrs. 
Nancy J. Conens, Jr. P.G.P., Piedmont 
No. 87, 4311 Allendale Ave., Oakland 

Appeal. Grievances and Pet't'ons: ui^Si 

"Norma Hodson. P.G P., Phoebe A. Hearst 

No. 214, 139 N. Sherman St., Manteca 

Board of Control: Mrs. Irene Bondanza G.P.. 

San Francisco No. 261, 2328 Union St.. 

San Francisco 94123. ^ . ,, ,,,„^ 
California History and Landmarks: Mrs. June 

T Goldie, P.G. P.. San Gabriel Valley No. 

281. 320 Rosemont Blvd., San Gabnci 

Sub-Committee-California History and Land- 
marks, Art Talent Contest: Mrs. Myrtle 
Degen. Aloha No. 106, 5550 Kales Ave.. 
Oakland 94618. _ . ,,..-., 

Sub-Committee on Brochure-State Historical 
Sites: Mrs. Loretta G. Trathen, Orinda 
No. 56. 140 Stacey Lane, Grass Valley 
95945 

Sub-Committee on N.D.G.WJ. Historical Room: 
Mrs. Evelyn I. Carlson, P.G.P., Dolores 
No. 169. 1308 Hoover St., Apt. 1, MenIo 
Park 94025 

Conservation and Safety: Mrs. Gertrude Doss 
Whittier No. 298, 308 So. Valencia St., 
La Habra 90631. „. ^. ,, ,. ^ 

Credentials: Mrs. Elenore Bianchi, El Ves- 
pero No. 118, 2715 Wawona St., San 
Francisco 94116. ..,,-„ 

Education and Scholarships: Mrs. N e 1 1 1 e 
Miller. Verdugo No. 240, 730 Patterson, 
Glendale 91202. . ,,„ 

Extension of the Order: Mrs. Annette 
Caiocca, P.G. P., La Junta N 
Main St., St. Helena 94? 

Finance: Mrs. Audrey D. 
Suiter No. Ill, 5608 C 
95819. 

Grand Parlor Sessions- 
Sweeney, P.G. P., f 
2845 Van Ness 
94109. 

Historian of the r .;■ - , w, 

Giannim. P.G • ''" 

Larkspur Dr. ,. ■■ t 

Insurance: M- . ,|;' 

Argonaut ' 
land 9460 



■AGE 7 



Junior ^/ative DauKhters: (Eff. Oct. 12, 1970) 

Mrs. Lila Hummel. G.T.. La Tijera No. 

282. 836 E. Grand Ave., El Segunda 90245. 
Laws and Supervision: Mrs. Virgilia Mc- 

Combs. G.V.P., Morada No. 199, 1241 

Normandy Dr., Modesto 95351. 
Legislation: Mrs. Eileen Oismuke. P.G.P. 

Tierra de Oro No. 304, 1021 Dela Vina. 

Santa Barbara 93101. 
Legislative Measures: Miss Marie Stebbins, 

La Bandera No. 110, 1188-14th Ave.. 

Sacrarrento 95818. 
Leslye A. Hicks Home Health Fund: Mrs. 

Myrtle Ritterbusti, Buena Vista No. 68, 

1277 Alemany Blvd., San Francisco 

94123. 
Mission Restoration: Mrs. Mary Mahoney, 

Golden Gate No. 158, 4125 Lincoln V>/ay, 

San Francisco 94122. 
Mission Soledad Restoration: Mrs. Mary 

Silva, Mission Bell No. 316, 312 Copley 

Ave., King City 93930. 
Music: Mrs. Frances A. Simas, Minerva 

No. 2, 1940-17th Ave., San Francisco 

94116. 
NOGW Cliildrens Foundation: Miss Jewel 

McSweeney, El Vespero No. 118, 2845 

Van Ness Ave., San Francisco 94109. 

Secretary: Miss Ethelwynne Fraisher, 

San Fernando Mission No. 280, 216 

Alexander St., San Fernando 91340. 
NDGW Home: 555 Baker St., San Francisco 

94117. Chm: Mrs. Hazel B. Hansen, 

P.G.P., 535 N. Howard St., Glendale 

91206. Secretary: Mrs. Lee Brice, P.G.P., 

Marinita No. 198, P.O. 41, Res. 66, San 

Quentin 94964. 
Official Publication: Miss Doris Jacobsen, 

Grace No. 242. 225 So. Bradford, 

Placentia 92670 Co-Chairman Clarisse 

Meyer, San Francisco 261, 3010 Webster 

St.. San Francisco 94123. 
Pioneer Roster: Mrs. Betty Read Curilich, 

Chm. Bd. of G.T., Ursula No. 1, 41 Curi- 
lich Lane. Jackson 95642. 
Printing and Supplies: Mrs. Alice D. Shea, 

P.G.P.. Minerva No. 2, 1850 V(/oodhaven 

Way. Oakland 94611. 
Public Relations: Mrs. Laura Blosdale. G.T., 

Beverly Hills No. 289. 1563 Brockton 

Ave.. Los Angeles 90025. 
Ritual and Manual of Instructions: Mrs. Rae 

E. Rominger, G.M., La Bandera No. 110. 

2841-69th Ave.. Sacramento 95822. 
Roll of Honor: Mrs. Lucille Kimbark, G.S.. 

Alta No. 3, 2271-32nd Ave., San Francisco 

9«16. _ ^ .^ 

State of the Order: Mrs. Fern E. Adams, 

P.G.P.. Berryessa No. 192, P. O. Box 

387. Willows 95988. 
Tournament of Roses Float: Mrs. Vera 

Popov. Grace No. 242. 16342 Skymeadow 

Dr.. Placentia 92670. 
Transportation: Miss Margaret Locatelli. 

Bonita No. 10, 1261 Jefterson, Redwood 

City 94061. „ . ^- ■ 

Veteran's Welfare: Mrs. Mane C. Landtni, 

San Jose No. 81, 860 Warren Way, Palo 

Alto 94303. . „ 

Welfare: Edrene Gardner, Lugonia No. 241. 

3721 Hemlock Dr., San Bernardino 92404. 
Young Women's Activities: Mrs. Barbara 

Upton. Tierra de Oro No. 304, 2330 Las 

Canoas Rd.. Santa Barbara 93103. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Angelita No. 32, Livermore — Meets 2nd Fri- 
day, Carnegie BIdg.. 2155 Third St.; Mrs. An- 
gle Marsh, Rec. Sec, 1587 - 2nd St., Liver- 
more 94550. 

Piedmont No. 87, Oakland— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Veterans BIdg., 200 Grand Ave., 
Oakland; Mrs. Elza Paul, Rec. Sec, 6017 Mon- 
roe Ave.. Oakland 94618. 

Aloha No. 10S, Oakland— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Tuesday. Montclair Women's Club. Mrs. 
Gladys I. Farley. Rec. Sec. 4623 Benevides 
Ave.. Oakland 94602. 

Hayward No. 122, Hayward— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. Veterans' Memorial BIdg.. 22737 
Main St.. Hayward; Mrs. Doris Perez. Rec. 
Sec, 21672 Knoll Way, Hayward 94546. 

Berkeley No. 150, Berkeley — Meets 2nd 
Monday. Berkeley City Club. 2315 Duranl; 
Mrs. Martha Fliegner. Rec Sec. 227 Wayne 
Ave.. Oakland 94606. 

Bear Flag No. 1S1. Albany— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday. Masonic Temple, Bancroft and Shat- 
luck; Mrs. Rhea Campbell, Rec. Sec. 2110 
Byron St., Berkeley 94706. 

Encinal No. 1S6. Alameda— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday. Improvement Club. 1407 • 9th St 
Alameda; Mrs. Ruth Schmidt, Rec. Sec, 623 
Taylor Ave., Alameda 94501. 

Brooklyn No. 1S7, Oakland— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. Danish Hall. 164 - 11th St.: Mrs. 
Oaveda Wmdfelt. Rec. Sec, 634 - 15th St., 
Oakland 94612. 

Argonaut No. 1SS, Emeryville — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday. 4321 Salem St., Mrs. Bev- 
erly La Violette, Rec. Sec. 2424 Erie Dr.. 
Concord 94520, 

Bahia Vista No. 167, Oakland— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. 410 11th Street Building; Mrs. 
Dorothy Jordan. Rec. Sec. 1614 101st Ave.. 
Oakland 94603. 

Fruitvale No. 177. Oakland— Meets 2nd and 
4th Fridays. Foothill Blvd. Women's Club Hall. 

PAGE 8 



2535 Mason St.. Oakland; Mrs. Gertrude Bor- 
man. Rec. Sec. 1915-108th Ave.. Oaklarfl 
94603. 

El Cereso No. 207, San Leandro — Meets 
2nd and 4lh Wednesday, Veterans Memorial 
BIdg., 110 Bancroft, San Leandro; Mrs. Julia 
C. King, Rec. Sec, 443 W. Juana, San 
Leandro 94577. 

Betsy Ross No. 238, Newark — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, Newark Pavilion, 6420 
Thornton Ave.; Mrs. Barbara Caminada. 38536 
Logan Dr., Fremont 94536. 

Albany No. 260. Albany— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday, Alban/ Temple, 533 San Pablo- 
Mrs. Delia Madding, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 6i02. 
Albany 94706. 

Sequoia No. 272, Berkeley — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Veterans BIdg.. 1931 
Center St.. Berkeley; Mrs. Edna Williams 
Rec. Sec, 941 Norvell St., El Cerrito 94530. 

Vallecito No. 308, Castro Valley— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday, 1109 "C" St.. Hayward; 
Mrs. Marie Messer, Rec Sec, 810 Barker 
Ave., Hayward 94541. 

AMADOR COUNTY 

Ursula No. 1. Jackson— Meets 2nd and 4fh 
Tuesday. Native Sons Hall, Court St. Mrs. 
Evelyn Garbarini, Rec Sec, P.O. Box 253, Jack- 
son 95642. 

Chispa No. 40, lone — Meets lit and 3rd 
Tuesday. N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Cynthia A. 
Phillips, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 293, lone 95640. 

Amapola No. 80, Sutter Creek— Meets 2nd 
Thursday. N.S.G.W. Hall, Main Sf. Mrs. Hazel 
Marre. Rec Sec, 15 Gopher Flat Road, Sutter 
Creek 95685 

Forrest No. 86, Plymouth — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Rosealice 
Mierkey. Rec Sec, Box 11, Fiddletown 95629. 

BUTTE COUNTY 

Annie K. Bidwell No. 168, Chico — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday. N.D. Hall. 316 W. 2nd St.; 
Mrs. Katherine LaBreacht, Rec. Sec. 383 East 
Sixth Ave.. Chico 95926. 

Gold of Ophir No. 190, Oroville— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, Monday Club. 2385 Mont- 
gomery St.; Mrs. Zada Harkcom. P.O. Box 252. 
Oroville 95965. 

Centennial No. 295, Paradise — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, lOOF Hall, 1010 Elliott Rd., Mrs. 
Lorraine Hubb. Rec Sec, 1551 Nunneley. 
Paradise 95969. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY 

Ruby No. 46, Murphys — Meets 1st Friday, 
N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Annie J. Voitich, Rec 
Sec, P.O. Box 152, Murphys 95247. 

Princess No. 84, Angels Camp— Meats 2nd 
Wednesday, I. OOF. Hall; Mrs. Celia Beltramo. 
Rec. Sec, Box 302, Angels Camp 95222. 

San Andreas No. 113, San Andreas — Meets 
3rd Friday, Fraternal Hall; Mrs. Mabel Lively, 
Rec. Sec, Box 26, San Andreas 95249. 

COLUSA COUNTY 

Colus No. 194, Colusa— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Monday, N.D.G.W. - N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Hazel 
Nordyke, Rec. Sec, 609 D Street, Colusa 95932, 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Stirling No. 146, Pittsburg— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday. St. David's Church, 12th and 
Harbor; Mrs. Eleanor Hogan. Rec. Sec, 
1337 Columbia St.. Pittsburg 94565. 

Richmond No. 147, Richmond— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday. Women's City Club. 2131 
Nevin Ave.; Mrs. Maud E. Alexander, Rec. 
Sec, 219 Nicholl Ave., Richmond 94801. 

Conner No. 193, Byron — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday 1.0. 0.F. Hall; Mrs. Catharine Arm- 
strong, Rec. Sec. P. O. Box 63, Byron 94514. 

Las Juntas No. 221, Martinez — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday. Kiwanis Youth Center. 
750 Allen St.; Mrs. Clarine Brusatory, Rec. 
Sec, 3510 Estudillo St., Martinez 94553. 

Antioch No. 223, Antioch — Meets 3rd Mon- 
day, lOOF Hall: Mrs. Ramona Ackerman. Rec. 
Sec. 202 West 6th St.. Antioch 94509. 

Cerrito de Oro No. 306, El Cerrito — Meets 
1st and 3rd Wednesday, 6712 Portola Drive, 
El Cerrito; Mrs. Ethel Murphy, Rec. Sec. 
1152 Portland Ave.. Albany 94706. 

Las Amigas No. 311, Walnut Creek— Meets 
2nd and 4th Wednesday. Women's Club. 
Lincoln Ave.. Mrs. Evelyn Larson. Rec. Sec. 
2449 Casa Way. Walnut CreeK 94596. 

Concord No. 323. Concord — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. Concord Farm Center; Mrs. 
Edith F. Ferriera. Rec Sec. 1497 Amador 
Ave.. Concord 94520. 

EL DORADO COUNTY 

Marguerite No. 12. Placerville— Meets Third 
Wednesday. Eagles Hall. 2810 Coloma St.; 
Mrs Mary L. Lyons. Rec Sec. 2876 Pleasant 
St.. Placerville 95667. 

El Dorado No. 186. Georgetown — Meets 2nd 
Saturday afternoon, Buckner Hall — Methodist 
Church, Georgetown: Mrs. Elsie M. Ford, Rec. 
Sec ; Cool 95614. 



FRESNO COUNTY 

Fresno No. 187, Fresno — Meets 1st and 3rtl 
Wednesday. Knights of Pythias Hall, 4867 E. 
Fillmore; Mrs. Molly Baker, Rec Sec, *att I 
E Iowa, Fresno 93702. 

Coalinga No. 270, Coalinga— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday, Eagle Hall, 156 W Durian; Mrs 
Dora C. Hhelps, Rec. Sec, 225 Pleasant St. 
Coalinga 93210. 

Wawona No. 271, Fresno — Meets 1st and 
3rd Friday. Knights of Columbia Hall. 2S40 
Flora Dora St.. Fresno; Miss Beth LaPelki, 
Rec. Sec. 2902 E. Weldon. Fresno 93703. 

Selma No. 313, Selma — Meets 2nd Wedna*. 
day. I.O.O.F. Hall. 1710 Tucker St.; Mrs. Alie«; 
Clapham. Rec. Sec. 1427 Pine St.. Selma 93662. 



GLENN COUNTY 






Berryessa No. 192, Willows — Meets 1st an_ 
3rd Monday. I.O.O.F. Hall, 213-A N. Tehami 
St.; Mrs. Elaine Barceloux, Rec. Sec, 639 Sk 
Merrill Ave., Willows 95988. 



HUMBOLDT COUNTY 

Occident No. 28, Eureka — Meets 1st and i 
3rd Wednesday. I.O.O.F. Hall. 239 Buhne SL;. 
Mrs. Marion Jurrens. Rec. Sec, 1461 Sum- 1 
mer St., Eureka 95501. 

Oneonta No. 71, Ferndale — Meets 2nd an 
4lh Thursdays. Danish Hall. Ocean Aven^a 
Miss Margaret M. Smith. Rec. Sec. P. O. 
635. Ferndale 95536. 

Reichling No. 97, Fortuna- Meets 2nd 
4th Tuesday. Rohner Grange Hall. Main 
Mrs. Frances S. Lentz. Rec. Sec, 237 Ne 
Dr.. Fortuna 95540. 

Areata No. 325. Areata — Meets 1st and 
Wednesday, Eagles Hall, 1005 11th St.; Mn 
Mary K. Foresti, Rec. Sec, 3446 Ribeiro Lani) 
Areata 95521. 






KERN COUNTY 



Miocene No. 223, Taft —Meets 1st and 
Monday, Veterans Memorial BIdg., Cedar and~~ 
Taylor Streets; Mrs. Bessie Davis, Rec. Sec. 
20OV2 Pierce St., Taft 93268. 

El Tejon No. 239 Bakerstield— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday. Druids Hall. 501 Sumner, 
Mrs. Grace Acheson. Rec. Sec, 1307 Baldwin 
Rd. Bakersfield 93304. 

Alila No. 321, Delano — Meets 2nd and 4th 
Monday. V.F.W. Hall. 4th and Lexington: 
Mrs. Ruth Brooding, Rec. Sec, 1709 
Kensington. Delano 93215. 

KINGS COUNTY 

Las Flores No. 262. Avenal— Meets 2nd and 
ilth Thursday. Redman Hall. Tulare St.; Mrs 
Jessie M. Measell. Rec Sec, 101 W. Stanis- 
laus St.. Avenal 93204. 

Ramona No. 283. Hanford — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thurs.. Hanford Frat. Hall. 1015M 10th Ave. 
G enda Velasquez. Rec. Sec. PO Box 1586. 
Visalia 93277. 



LAKE COUNTY 



i 



Clear Lake No. 135, Middletown— Meets 2nC 
and 4th Tuesday. Gibson Library, Mrs. Dor 
othy Baldwin. Rec Sec, P.O. Box 566, Middle 
town 95461. 

LASSEN COUNTY 

Nataqua No. 152, Standish— Meets 3rd Wed- 
nesday, Standish Hall; Mrs. Marilyn Blanken- 
snip. Rec, Sec, Star Rte. 2. Janesville 96114. 

Mount Lassen No. 215, Bieber— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday, Legion Hall; Mrs. Marie 
Walsh, Rec. Sec, Bieber 96009. 

Susanville No. 243, Susanville — Meets 3rd 
Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Melva Arnold. 
Rec. Sec, 625 Plum St.. Susanville 96130 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY 

Los Angeles No. 124, Los Angeles — Meet* 
1st and 3rd Wednesday. I. OOF. Temple, 1828 
S. Oak St.; Mrs. Pauline Brasher. Rec Sec 
2346 Portland St.. Los Angeles 90007. 

Long Beach No. 154, Long Beach — Meets 
1st and 3rd Thursday. Y.W.C.A., 550 Pacific 
Ave.; Mrs. Leola Temby, Rec. Sec. 540 E. 
7th St., Long Beach 90813. 

Verdugo No. 240, Glendale— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall. 520 E. Glenoaks 
Blvd ; Mrs. Phyllis V. Hirst. Rec. Sec, 1244 
N. Columbus Ave.. Apt. 8., Glendale 91202. 

Californiana No. 247, Los Angeles — Meets 
2nd Tuesday. Assistance League. 1370 No. 
St. Andrews PI.; Mrs. Anna Crawford. Rec. 
Sec. 958 Magnolia Ave.. Los Angeles 90006. 
Poppy Trail No. 2S6. Montebello— Meets 
1st and 3rd Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall. 124 N. 5th 
St.; Miss Adele Foumier. Rec. Sec. 5242 
Repefto Ave., Los Angeles 90022. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



Placenta No. 277, Van Nuys — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, 4924 Paso R o b I e s, 
Encino; Mrs. Lois Stevens, Rec. Sec, 6151 
Yarmouth Ave., Reseda 91335. 

WiUnington No. 278, Wilmington — Meets 2nd 
ind 4th Tuesday, Women's Club, Lakme and 
)enni Sts., Mrs. Ella Owens, Rec. Sec. 174 
;old Star Home, Long Beach 90810 

Toluca No. 279, Burbank— Meets 2nd and 
th Tuesday. Campo de Cahuenga; Mrs. Alice 
iiooney, Rec. Sec, 1549 Broadview, Glendale 
1208. 

San Fernando Mission No. 280, San Fern- 
ndo— Meets 1st and 3rd Wednesday, Wo- 
nens Club, 552 N. Maclay Ave.; Mrs. Carolyn 
(iggs, Rec. Sec, 1303 Glenoaks Blvd., San 
ernando 91340. 

San Gabriel Valley No. 281, San Gabriel— 
vieets 1st and 3rd Thursday, Adult Center- 
Mission Playhouse; Miss Lee Bollen, Rec. 
Sec, 3824 Clark Ave.. El Monte 91731. 

La Tijera No. 282, Inglewood— Meets 1st and 
Ird Tuesday, 820 Java St., Inglewood; Miss 
?uth Payne, Roc. Sec 230 E. Hyde Park 3!vd., 
ng'ewodd 90302. 

Rio Hondo No. 284, South Gate — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday. 10301 California Ave., 
South Gate; Mrs. Virginia Glendon, Rec. 
Sec, 9733 Guatemala. Downey 90240. 

Joshua Tree No. 288, Lancaster — Meets 1st 
ind 3rd Thursday, Fraternal Hall, Date and 
)ldfie!d; Mrs. Betty Ladd. Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 
:06. Lai<e Hughes 93532. 

Beverly Hills No. 289, Beverly Hillls — Meets 
St Wednesday. 9461 Wilshire Blvd.; Mrs. Olive 
3. Burke. Rec. Sec, 10507 Bradbury Rd., Los 
^neeles 90064. 

Pasadena No. 290, Pasadena — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, American Legion Hall, 
179 No. Vinedo; Mrs. Lilly Westover, Rec. 
Sec, 400 Merrimac Way, Costa Mesa 92626. 

Whittier No. 298, Whittier— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday. 12001 E. Beverly Blvd.. Miss 
rarlotta Funk. Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 15, Whittier 
SOfiOS. 

Tierra del Rev No. 300. Hermosa Beach — 
'nd and 4th Monday, Womens Club House, 
lOO S. Broadway. Redondo Beach; Mrs. Alma 
:;ompton. Rec Sec, 226 N. Catalina, Redondo 
'3each 90277. 

Cisn Anos No. 303, Norwalk— Meets 2nd and 
•■•h Wednesday. V.F.W. Hall 12634 Pioneer 
givd.; Mrs. Shirley Elofson. Rec. Sec, 12020 
S. Hebe Ave., Norwalk 90650. 

Rancho San Jose, No. 307, Pomona — Meets 
>nd and 4th Tuesday, Assistance League. 693 
N, Palomares; Mrs. Senaida Baiz, Rec. Sec, 
'14 S. Marywood Ave.. Claremont 31711. 

El Camino Real No. 324, Granada Hills — 
Meets 2nd and 4th Wednesday. Granada Hills 
Womens Club, 10666 Whiteoak; Mrs. Helen 
T r a m m e I I, Rec. Sec, 7901 Vantage, No. 
Hollywood 91605. 

MADERA COUNTY 
' Madera No. 244, Madera — Meets 2nd and 
4th Thursday. 5th and I St.; Mrs. Daphne 
Anne Real. Rec. Sec, 1924 West 5th St., 
Madera 93637. 



MARIN COUNTY 



Sea Point No. 196, Sausalito — Meets 1st and 
?rd Tuesday, I.D.E.S. Hall; Mrs. Hilda Surles 
=lec. Sec, 66 Shell Rd., Mill Valley 94941. 

Marinita No 198, San Rafael — Meets 2nd and 
ilth Monday, Marist Fathers Hall, 1675 Grand 
Ave., San Rafael; Mrs. Lee Brice, Rec. Sec, 
=.0. Box 41. Res 66. San Quentin 94964. 

Fairfax No. 225, Fairfax — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday. American Legion Hall, San 
Anselmo; Mrs. Doris J. Croker, Rec. Sec, 
212 Los Angeles Blvd.. San Anselmo 94960. 
^ Tamelpa No. 231, Mill Valley— Meets 1st 
pnd 3rd Monday, 1.0. 0.F. Hall; Mrs. Alva 
.Smith, Rec. Sec, 87 Elm Ave., Mill Valley 
•34941. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY 
Mariposa No. 63, Mariposa — Meets 1st 
fuesday. Odd Fellows Hall; Mrs. Mary Kay 
?ay, Rec. Sec, Box 318, Mariposa 95338. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY 

Fort Braee No. 210. Fort Bragg— Meets 2nd 
'■►'ursdav. I OOF. Hall. Main St.; Mrs. Glenise 
"^allory, Rec. Sec, 117 Lyta Way, Fort B'agg 
>5417 

imiah No. 263. Ukiah— Meets 1st Monday 
"a'urdav Afternoon Club. Church and Oak. 
,'^d Monday in Members Homes: Mrs. Dorothy 
Buchanan. Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 87, Talmage 
95481. 

MERCED COUNTY 

Veritas No. 75, Merced— Meets 1st Tuesday. 
Bear Creek Grange Hall, 3rd Tuesday. 
Homes; Miss Edith Dougherty Rec. Sec, 1198 
E. Bel Air Dr.. Merced 95340. 

Lomitas No. 255, Los Banos— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, D.E.S. Hall, "I" St.; Miss Mary 
iLouise Cotta. Rec. Sec. 13780 S. Volta Rd., 
Los Banos 93635. 

Golden California No. 291. Gustine — Meets 
ird Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 471 - 4th Ave.; Mrs. 
Evelyn Nunes. Rec. Sec. 29431 W. Sullivan 
'd.. Gustine 95322. 

lAPRIL, 1971 



MOOOC COUNTY 
Alturas No. 159, Alturas— Meets 1st Thurs- 
day. I.O.O.F. Hall, Main St.; Mrs. Patricia 
Turrell, Rec. Sec, Box 1873, Alturas 96101. 

MONTEREY COUNTY 
Aleli No. 102, Salinas— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Ella Fahey, Rec. 
Sec. 83 Clark St., Salinas 93901. 

Junipero No. 141, Monterey— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, House of Four Winds, Calle 
Principal; Mrs. Mae Layton, Rec. Sec, 344 
Clay St., Monterey 93940. 

Mission Bell No. 316, Soledad— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, Forester Hall, Front St.; 
Mrs. Anita Head, Rec. Sec, 563 Soledad St., 
Soledad 93960. 

NAPA COUNTY 
Eshcol No. 16, Napa— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Monday. N.S.G.W. Hall, Coombs St.; Mrs. 
Eileen Hanna, Rec. Sec, 796 Lincoln Ave., 
Napa 94558. 

Calistoga No. 145, Calistoga — Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday, St. Luke's Hall, Myrtle St.; Mrs. 
Ella Light. Rec. Sec, 1401 Washington St., 
Calistoga 94515 

La Junta No. 203, St. Helena— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, Spring St.; 
Mrs. Emma Parnisari, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 
345. St. Helena 94574. 

George C. Yount No. 322, Yountville — 
Meets 2nd and 4th Wednesday, Yountville 
City Hall, Yount St.; Mrs. Idell Crandall, Rec. 
Sec, 243 So. Franklin, Napa 94558. 

NEVADA COUNTY 

Laurel No. 6, Nevada City— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, Veterans Memorial Building, 
N. Pine and Cottage; Mrs Marille Hopkins. 
Rec. Sec. Rt. 1. Box B-290, Nevada City 95959. 

Manzanita No. 29, Grass Valley — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, St. Patricks Hall; Mrs. Elsie 
Peard, Rec. Sec, 120 High St., Grass Valley 
95945. 

Columbia No. 70, French Corral — Meets 1st 
Friday afternoon, Farrelley Hall; Mrs. Phyllis 
Butz. Rec. Sec, North San Juan 95960. 

ORANGE COUNTY 

Santa Ana No. 235, Santa Ana — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, 6th and Baker; Mrs. Marie 
Brewer, Rec. Sec, 2767 W. 1st Street, Sp. 31, 
Santa Ana 92703. 

Grace No. 242, Fullerton — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. I.O.O.F. Hall, Lemon and 
Amerige; Mrs. Betty Bennett. Corres. Sec, 
2127 Kathryn, Placentia 92670. 

Silver Sands No. 286, Huntington Beach- 
Meets 1st Tuesday, Lake Park Club House; 
Virginia Segelson, Rec. Sec, 303 13th St., 
Huntington Beach 92646. 

PLACER COUNTY 

Placer No. 138, Lincoln— Meets 2nd Wednes- 
day, The Womans Club, 499 E Street; Mrs. 
Margaret Schmidt, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 171, 
Lincoln 95648. 

Auburn No. 233, Auburn — Meets 3rd Mon- 
day, Veterans Memorial; Mrs Harriet Welk, 
Rec Sec, 271 Sutter St., Auburn 95603. 

Sierra Pines No. 275. Colfax — Meets Ist and 
3rd Thursday, Knights of Pythias Hall, Main 
St.; Mrs. Isabelle Eddy. Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 55. 
Colfax 95713. 

PLUMAS COUNTY 
Plumas Pioneer No. 2i9, Quincv — Meets 
1st and 3rd Monday. I. OOF. Hall. Main St.; 
Mrs. Lola O Viera. Rec Sec. R.F D. Box 689. 
Quincy 95971. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY 

Jurupa No. 296, Riverside — Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 3942 Jurupa 
Ave.; Mrs. Mary Lovell, Rec. Sec. Send mail 
to P. O. Box 1325. Riverside 92502. 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY 

Califia No. 22, Sacramento — Meets 4th 
Tuesday, Cabrillo Club House. 4705 Riverside 
Blvd.; Mrs. Lillian Blackwell Rec Sec, 3908- 
2nd Ave., Sacramento 95817. 

La Bandera No. 110, Sacramento — Meets 
1st and 3rd Thursday. N.S.G.W. Hall, 11th 
and J Sts.; Mrs. Fern J. Foster. Rec Sec, 
2444 - 39th Ave., Sacramento 95822. 

Sutter No. 111. Sacramento — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. N.S.G.W. Hall. Uth and J Streets; 
Mrs. Wilma Gulenber^er. Rec. Sec. 615 27th 
St.. Sacramento 95816. 

Fern No. 123, Folsom— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday, Community Club House; Mrs. Rose 
Marie Trammell. Rec Sec. 9424 Golden Dr.. 
Orangevaie. Send mail to P.O. Box 326. 
Fnisom 95630. 

Liberty No. 213, Elk Grove — Meets 2nd and 
4th Friday. I.O.O.F. Hall, Elk Grove; Mrs. Ger- 
trude E. Hogatioom, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 72, 
Elk Grove 95624. 



Rio Rito No. 253, Sacramento— Meets 2nd 

and 4th Thursday, Y.L.I. Club House, 1400 27th 
St.; Mrs. Catherine Bennett, Rec. Sec. 1299 
8th Ave.. Sacramento 95818. 

San Juan No. 315, Carmichael— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Veterans Memorial Hall, 
Carmichael Park; Mrs. Jean Gibbs. Rec. Sec, 
1331 Arroyo Grande Dr., Sacremento 95825. 

SAN BENITO COUNTY 

Copa de Oro No. 105, Hollister— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 362 Fourth 
St.; Mrs. Evelyn Pivetti, Rec. Sec, 1258 West 
St.. Hollister 95023. 

San Juan Bautisia No. 179, San Juan Bau- 
tista — Meets 1st Wednesday, NDGW Adobe, 
4th St., Mrs. Anna Baccala, Rec Sec, P.O. 
Box 33, San Juan Bautista 95045. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY 
Lugonia No. 241, San Bernardino— Meets 

2nd and 4th Thursday, Brazelton Hall, Date 

and Dei Rosa St.; Mrs. Sylvia Gregory, Rec. 

Sec, 1321 Lugo, San Bernardino 92404. 

Ontario No. 251, Ontario— Meets 1st and 

3rd Tuesday, Upland Library, C and Euclid; 

Mrs. Ruth C. Ruth, Rec. Sec, 1015 Fuchsia, 

Ontario 91762. 

SAN OIEGO COUNTY 

San Diego No. 208, San Diego— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, House of Hospitaltiy, Balboa 
Park; Mrs. Sarah Miller, Rec. Sec, 4117 
Georgia St., San Diego 92103. 

Ilia M. Knox No. 320, El Cajon— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, Veterans Hall. 136 Chambers 
St.; Mrs. Mabel E. Perrapato. Rec. Sec, 
7463 Eucalyptus Hill, La Mesa 92041. 

SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY 

Minerva No. 2, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, 414 Mason 
St.; Mrs. Mary Oertwig. Rec. Sec, 40 Pine- 
hurst Way, San Francisco 94127 

Alta No. 3, San Francisco — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday afternoon, N.S.G.W. BIdg. 414 
Mason St.; Mrs. Lucille Kimbark, Rec. Sec, 
2271 - 32nd Ave.. San Francisco 94116. 

Orinda No. 56, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday, St. Marks Square Urban Cen- 
ter. 1101 O'Farrell St.; Mrs. Irmgard Wala- 
schek, Rec. Sec, 447 Carl St., San Francisco 
94117. 

Buena Vista No. 68, San Francisco— Meets 
3rd Thursday, N.D.G.W. Home, 555 Baker St.; 
Miss Carolyn Daley, Rec. Sec, 3000-24th 
Ave., San Francisco 94127. 

Las Lomas No. 72. San Francisco— Meets let 
and 3rd Tuesday, N.D.G.W. Home, 555 Baker 
St.; Mrs. Emily E. Ryan. Rec. Sec. 1371 - 48th 
Ave., Apt. 201. San Francisco 94122 

Darina No. 114, San Francisco- Meet* 3rd 
Monday, Druids Hall. 44 Page St.; Mrs. Thelma 
Wilson, Rec. Sec, 21 Wabash Terrace, Ssn 
Francisco 94124. 

El Vespero No. 118, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd and 4th Tuesday. N.S.G.W. BIdg., 414 
Mason St.; Miss Ruth McAdam, Rec. Sec, 120 
Romney Drive, South San Francisco 94080. 

Genevieve No. 132, San Francisco — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday, NSGW Hall 414 Mason St.; 
Miss Elizabeth Brennan, Rec. Sec, 2066 Grove 
St., San Francisco 94117. 

'Guadalupe No. 153, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd and 4th Monday, Dovre Hall, 3543 18th St.; 
Ruth A. Stone, Rec. Sec, 270 Ellsworth St., 
San Francisco 94110. 

Golden Gate No. 1SS, San Francisco— Meets 
2nd and 4th Monday, N.S.G.W. BIdg., 414 
Mason St.; Mrs. Anne Plescia, Rec. Sec, 1378 
- 26th Ave., San Francisco 94122. 

Dolores No. 169, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, NDGW Home. 555 Baker 
St.; Mrs. Evelyn I. Carlson, Rec. Sec, 1308 
Hoover St., Apt. 1, Menio Park 94025. 

Portola No. 172, San Francisco — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, N.S.G.W. BIdg.. 414 Mason 
St.; Miss Theresa Galvin. Rec. Sec. 323 
Church St., San Francisco 94114. 

Twin Peaks No. liS, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd and 4th Tuesday, Dovre Hall. 3543 ISIh 
St.; Mrs. Irene Cashman, Rec. Sec. 125 Rus- 
sia Ave.. Apt. 2, San Francisco 94112. 

James Lick No 220, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd Wednesday afternoon, lOOF Hall. 26-7th 
St.; Mrs. Jaredna Johnson, Rec. Sec, 423 So. 
Van Ness Ave., San Francisco 94103. 

Mission No. 227, San Francisco— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday. N.S.G.W. Builcli'ijv 414 Mason 
St.; Mrs. Bernice Short, Rec Sec-.. 330 Foote 
Ave.. San Francisco 94112. 

Utopia No. 252, San FiK-is>-j— Meets 2nd 
Tuesday, Dovre Hall. 3543 - Sth St.; Mrs. Helen 
C Scannell. Rec. Sec, ;064 - 18th St.. San 
Francisco 94114. 

Sal Francisco N 'c:. San Francisco — 
1st an I 3rd Wet* .. n.S.G.W. BIdg., 414 

Mason St.; Mr' sse Meyer. Rec. Sec. 

3010 Webster "■ ^-.i Francisco 94123. 

Yerba Sue a No. 271, San Francisco — Meets 
1st Thursd^ afternoon, N.S.G.W. BIdg.. 414 
Mason St Mis? Alma Mullaney. Rec. Sec 
Pro Teir 1567-?!;;! Ave.. San Francisco 
94122. 

PAGE 9 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTV 

loaquin No. 5, Stocklon— Meets 2nd and 
4111 Tuesday. N.S.G W Hall. 809 N. Hunter; 
Mrs. Edna J. Williamson. Rec. Sec, 510 E. 
Mendocino Ave.. Stocl<ton 95204. 

El Pescadero No. 82, Tracy — Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, Muncy Hall, 234 E. 10th St<;. 
Mrs, Florence Tisher, Rec. Sec, 2800 Cabrillo 
Way, Tracy 95376. 

Caliz de Oro No. 206, Stockton— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday. Pyttiian Castle Hall. 134 W. 
Park St.; Mrs. Edith L. Foster. Rec. Sec, 657 
Lexington Ave., Stockton 95204. 

Phoebe A. Hearst No. 2t4, Manteca— Meets 
2nd and 4th Wednesday, M.R.P.S. Hall. N. 
Grant St.; Mrs. Norma Hodson. Rec. Sec, 139 
N. Sherman, Manteca 95336. 

Stockton No. 256, Stockton — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. N.S.G.W. Hall, 809 N. Hunter; 
Mrs. Eva Bisagno, Rec. Sec, 927 W. Acacia, 
Stockton 95203. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY 

San Miguel No. 94, San Miguel— Meets 2nd 
and 4lh Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, San Miguel; 
Mrs. Hortense Wright, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 96, 
San Miguel 93451. 

San Luisita No. 108, San Luis Obispo — 
Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 520 
Dana St.; Miss Mary Mello, Rec. Sec, 777 
Lincoln Ave., San Luis Obispo 93401. 

El Pinal No. 163, Cambria— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. Masonic Temple; Mrs. Katie G. 
Jeu/ett. Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 685, Cambria 
93428. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY 

Bonita No. 10, Redwood City — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday. Veterans Memorial Building. 
1455 Madison Ave.: Mrs. Louise Gibsen. Rec. 
Sec. 1558 Lago Street. San Mateo 94403. 

Vista del Mar No. 155, Half Moon Bay- 
Meets 3rd Tuesday, I.D.E.S. Hall, Main St., 
Mrs. Marion Miramontes, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 
496 Half Moon Bay 94019. 

Ano Nuevo No. 180, Pescadero — Meets 3rd 
Wednesday. N.S.G.W. and N.D.G.W. Hall; Mrs. 
Evelyn C a b r a I, Rec Sec, P. O. Box 27, 
Pescadero 94060. 

El Carmelo No. 181, San Mateo — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday. 722 Hillcrest Dr., Daly 
City; Mrs. Christine E. Hulme, Rec. Sec, 305 
Hillcres; Blvd., Milbrae 94030. 

Menlo No. 211, Menio Park — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. Recreation Bidg., Civic Center; 
Mrs. Lillian King, Rec. Sec, 1303 Fernside St., 
Redwood Cit\' 94061. 

San Bruno No. 246, San Bruno — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday. Fireman's Hall, 618 San 
Mateo Ave., San Bruno; Mrs. Edith Hunting- 
ton. Rec. Sec, 951 Lome Way, Sunnyvale 
94087. 

La Paz No. 326, Pacifica — Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday, Nick's Restaurant. 100 Rock- 
away Beach Ave.; Mrs. Mary Nash, Rec. Sec. 
1176 Crespi Drive, Pacifica 94044. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY 

Reina del Mar No. 126, Santa Barbara- 
Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesday, K. C. Hall, 925 
Oe La Vina St.; Mrs. Mamie Miller. Rec. Sec. 
3131 Calle Mariposa. Santa Barbara 93105. 

Santa Maria No. 276, Santa Maria — Meets 
1st and 3rd Tuesday. D.E.S. Club. 615 W. 
Chapel: Mrs. Blanche F. Powell. Rec. Sec, 
508- So. Lincoln St., Santa Maria 93454. 

Tierra de Oro No. 304, Santa Barbara — 
Meets 1st and 3rd Thursday: Miss Edith 
Webster, Rec. Sec, 185 San Ysidro Rd., Santa 
Barbara 93103. 

La Purisima No. 327, Lompoc— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, Alpha Clubhouse. Corner 
B and Ocean Ave,; Mrs. Mary Rule. Rec. Sec, 
1401 E. Maple Ave.. Lompoc 93436. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

San Jos<> No. 81, San Jose — Meets Ist and 
3rd Thursday Eagles' Hall. 148 N 3rd St.; Mrs 
Mane C. Landini. Rec. Sec. 860 Warren Way. 
Palo Alto 94103 

Vendome No. 100, San Jose— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall. 122 Race St.; Mrs. 
Susie T. EnRfer, Rec. Sec, 1301 Glen Eyrie, 
San Jose 95125. 

El Monte No. 205, Mountain View— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday, Masonic Temple, Church and 
Franklin; Mrs. Mary Ausano, Rec. Sec, 1112 
Phvllis Ave.. Mountain View 94040. 

Palo Alto No. 229, Palo Alto— Meets 3rd 
Wednesday, Palo Alto Savings BIdg. 1st 
Wednesday-social at members homes; Mrs 
Mary Bennett. Rec. Sec, 821 No. Delaware 
St.. San Mateo 94401. 

Gilroy No. 312, Gilroy— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thursday, Salinas Valley Community Room. 
Monterey St.: Miss Kathleen Holzhauer. Rec 
Ser,. PO Box 71. Gilrov 95020. 

Los Gatos No. 317, Los Gatos— Meets 4th 
Wednesday, Colonial Savings Bide.; Mrs, 
Eola A. Howe. Rec. Sec. 2325 Winchester 
Blvd.. Campbell 95008. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 

Santa Cruz No. 26, Santa Cruz — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday. B.P.W.C. Clubhouse, 240 Ply 
mouth Ave.; Mrs. Rosaline C. Ollveria, Rec. 
Sec, 446 May Ave., Santa Cruz 95060. 

PAGE 10 



El Pajaro No. 35, Watsonvi lie— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 17A E. Third 
St.; Mrs. Grace Locatelli. Rec. Sec, 623 East 
5th, Watsonville 95076. 

SHASTA COUNTY 

Camellia No. 41, Anderson— Meets 1st Tues- 
day. Masonic Hall, Center and Howard; Mrs. 
Rosemary McCabe, Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 104, 
Cottonwood 96022. 

Lassen View No. 98, Shasta— Meets 2nd Fri- 
day. Masonic Hall; Jeanette Hall, Rec. Sec, 
P. O. Box 434, Redding 96001. 

Hiawatha No. 140, Redding— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, N.D.G.W. Hall 2322 California 
St,; Mrs, Flora E. Jordan, Rec. Sec, 1604 Verda 
St.. Redding 96001. 

SIERRA COUNTY 
Naomi No. 36, Downieville — Meets 2nd 
Wednesday, N.D.G.W. Hall, Commercial St.; 
Mrs. Margaret Elaine Lambert, Rec Sec, Box 
224, Downieville 95936 

Imogen No. 134, Sierraville — Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, Copren's Hall; Mrs. Mar- 
garet A. Burrelle. Rec, Sec. Sierraville 96126. 
SISKIYOU COUNTY 

Eschscholtzia No. 112, Etna— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. Masonic Hall. Main St.: Mrs. Ka'e 
Berthelsen, Rec Sec, Star Route, Etna 96027. 

SOLANO COUNTY 

Valleio No. 195, Valleio— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday, Veterans Bldg., 444 Alabama St., 
Mrs. Layol Welter, Rec. Sec, 521 Acorn St.. 
Valleio 94590. 

Mary E. Bell No. 224, Dixon — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Reola 
Mudgett, Rec Sec, P. O. Box 233, Dixon 
95620. 

Vacaville No 293, Vacaville — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. Saturday Club House: Mrs. Vera 
Fadley, Rec. Sec. Rt. 1, Box 3432, Vacaville 
95633. 

West Wind No. 328, Fairfield— Meets 2nd 
and 4th M o n d a ys, Fairfield Presbyterian 
Church. 2100 Pennsylvania Ave., Miss Ellen 
Starmer, Rec. Sec, 905 Garfield, Fairfield 
94533. 

SONOMA COUNTY 

Sonoma No. 209. Sonoma — Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday. 1.0 n F. Hall. Broadway St.; Mrs, 
Clare Geisnpr. Rec. Sec. 575 Studley St.. 
Sonoma 9S476. 

Santa Rosa No. 217, Santa Rosa— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, N.S.G.W. Hall. 404 Men- 
docino Ave.; Mrs. Gladys Wing, Rec. Sec, 
1204 Stewart St.. Santa Rosa 95404. 

Pe'a'uma Nn. 222. Pe'aluma- Mee's 2nd and 
4th Ti'osdav Herman Sons Hall. 860 Western 
Ave.: Mrs. Olga Manni, Rec Sec, 4990 D St.. 
Pp'3'ii"'a q.io';'' 

SebastnnnI No 265. Sehastonol — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Frirtav. I O OF. Hall. McKinley Street: 
Mrs. Mah Thoro Rec. Sec. 436 Parauet St.. 
Seha<;'Aool 95477 

Cotati No. 299, Cotati— Meets 2nd and 4lh 
Thursdav. Women's Club HaM; Mrs. Marie 
Baranzini. Rec. Sec. 8107 El Rancho Dr.. 
Cotati 94928. 

STANISLAUS COUNTY 

OaVdale No. 12S. Oakdale— Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday. Grange HaM. F and Lambuth; 
Mrs. Daisv Ulrich. Rec. Sec. 414 West G St.. 
Oakdale 95361. 

Morada No. 199. Modesto — Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday. Senior Citizens Center. 211 
Bodem St.; Mrs Mary E. Clay. Rec. Sec. 225 
Sunset Blvd.. Modes'o 95351. 

Eldora No. 248, Turlock— Meets Isf and 
3rd Thursday, American Legion Hall: Miss 
Alice Radford, Rec. Sec, 475 Syracuse, Tur- 
lock 95380. 

SUTTER COUNTY 

South Butte No. 226. Sutter— Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday. N.D.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Carolyn 
Childers. Rec. Sec. 1650 Villa Ave., Yuba 
City 95991 

Oak Leaf No. 285, Live Oak— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, Women's Clubhouse, "P" St.; Mrs. 
Maxine Dodge. Rec. Sec. 8991 S. Larkin Road. 
Live Oak 95953. 

TEHAMA COUNTY 

Berendos No. 23. Red Bluff— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. N DGW. Hall. 1439 Lincoln St.; 
Mrs. Verona DeWitt. Rec. Sec. 90 Gurnsey 
Ave Red Bluff 96080 

Olivia No. 309, Corning — Meets 2nd and 4th 
Wednesday, I. OOF. Hall, Solano St.; Mrs. 
Catherine Richardson, Rec. Sec. Rt. 1. Box 
580 Corning 96021. 

TRINITY COUNTY 

Eltapoma No. 55, Weavervi lie— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday. N.SGW. Hall: Mrs. Mar 
gsret J. Brown. Rec Sec. P.O. Box 224. 
Weavervil'e 96093. 

TULARE COUNTY 

Charter Oak No 292. Visalia— Meets 2nd ano 
4th Wednesday. Visaha Women's Civic Club 
House, Johnson and Center: Mrs Lois Edwards. 
Rec. Sec, 2840 Canary. Visalia 93277. 



Tule Vista No. 305, Porterville— Meets 2nc 
and 4th Thursday, Porterville Women's Clut 
265 North "E" St.; Mrs, Ruth Olsen, Rec. Sec. 
681 W. Belleview, Porterville 93257. 
TUOLUMNE COUNTY 

Dardanelle No. 66, Sonora— Meets Isi 
Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Sonora; Mrs. Lucr 
Valerdi. Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 17, Sonora 
93570. 

Golden Era No. 99, Columbia— Meets 1st 
3rd Thursday. N.S.G.W. Hall; Miss Irene Ponoti 
Rec. Sec. Rt. 3, Box 644. Sonora 95370. 

Anona No. 164, Jamestown — Meets 2nd : 
4lh Tuesday. Rebekah Hall: Mrs Celia C■^ 
boni, Rec. Sec. Box 123. Jamestown 95327. 
VENTURA COUNTY 

El Aliso No 314, Santa Paula— Meets M 
and 3rd Monday. Moose Lodge Hall, 700 
Santa Barbara St.; Mrs. Helena R. KeeM^ 
Rec Sec. 545 Oiai Rd.. Santa Paula 93060. 

Poinsettia No. 318, Ventura— Meets 2nd i 
4th Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall 516 E. Main 
Mrs. Ethel Kelly, Rec. Sec, 591 Frances 
Ventura 93003. 

YOLO COUNTY 

Woodland No. 90, Woodland— Meets 2nd 
4th Tuesday, 547 First Street; Mrs. Elizabeth E 
Elston, Rec. Sec, 920 Cross St., Woodia 
95695. 

YUBA COUNTY 

Marysville No. 162, Marysville— Meets 
and 4th Wednesday. Jewish Center. 10th an 
Rameriz St.: Mrs. Evelyn D. Eden. Rec. 
669 Chestnut St.. Yuba City 95991. 

Camp Far West No. 218, Wheatland— Me 
3rd Tuesday. Masonic Temple. 4th & 
Mrs. Shirley Ross. Rec Sec. Rt. 1. Box 
Wheatland 95692. 



so: 



JUNIOR NATIVE DAUGHTERS 
State Officers — 1970-1971 

President: Kathy Koch. Sequoia Unit No ' 

27, 1223 Dewey Street, Redwood Cit. 

94061. 
Past President: Leealyn Baker, Fruitval" 

Unit No. 22. 3530, 66th Avenue, Oaklam 

94605. 
Vice President: Jean Tullius. Argonaut Uni 

No. 3. 2478-47th Avenue. San Francisc 

94116. 
Secretary: Sharon Landt, Fruitvale Unit No 

22, 344-65th Avenue. Apt. »3, Oaklanc 

94605. 
Treasurer; Linda Porterfield. Shasta Dais> 

Unit No. 39. 1438 Oregon Street. Reddini 

96001. 
Marshal: Renee Cook. Menlo Unit No. 10 

869 Comet Drive. Foster City 94404. 
Trustees: Laurie Cane. Menlo Unit No. 10 

3814 Jefferson. Redwood City 94062. 

Margaret Deto. Sequoia Unit No. 27. 127i 

Dewey Avenue. Redwood City 94061 

Cvn'hia Allen. Estrellas de Oro Unit No 

37. 12704 Home Park Drive. Whittier 90606 
Senrine': Barbara Kaiser. Princesa del Ma 

Un't No. 40. 296 Lexington Avenue. Golel. 

9?"17. 
Organist: Kathy Solie. Shasta Daisy Uni 

No. 39. 834 Yuba Street. Redding 96001 

JUNIOR NATIVE DAUGHTERS UNITS 

Argonaut Unit No. 3. Berkeley — Advisor: Mrs 
Helen Tullius. 2478-47th Avenue San FrancisC' 
04116. 

Menlo Unit No. 10, Menlo Park — Advisor Mrs 
Evelvn I. Carlson. PGP. 1308 Hoover Street 
Menlo Park 94025. 

Camellia Unit No. 15, Anderson— Advisor 
Mrs Lois Isley, 1887-3rd Street, Andersor 
ofi007. 

Fruitvale Unit No. 22. Napa— Advisor: Mrs 
Esnier Ragon. 3479 Davis Street. Oaklan< 
94601. 

Eshcolita Unit No. 26, Napa— Advisor; Mrs 
Barbara Bentley, 2715 Soscol Avenue. Nap; 
94558. 

Sequoia Unit No. 27, Redwood City— Advisor 
Mrs Barbara Koch, 1223 Dewey Street, Red 
wood City 94061 

Las Amiguitas Unit No. 33, Walnut Creek- 
Advisor: Mrs. Marge Woodward, -'464 Can 
Way. walnut Creek 94596. 
Estrellas de Oro Unit No. 37, Norwalk— Ad 
visor: Mrs. Danella Hawkins, 13128 Liyget 
Street. Norwalk 90650. 

Golden Poppy Unit No. 38, San Francisco- 
Advisor; Mrs Helen McCarthy, GT, 4064181' 
Street. San Francisco 94114. 
Shasta Daisy Unit No. 39, Redding— Advisor 
Mrs Catherine T. Porterfield, 1438 Oregor 
Street, Redding 96001. 

Princesa del Mar Unit No. 40, Santa Barbara 
—Advisor: Mrs, Nancy Wells. 1829 Sai 
Pascual Street. Santa Barbara 93103. 
Golden Green Valley Unit No. 41, Salinas- 
Advisor: Mrs. Lee Vaughn. 653 N, Madeira 
Salinas 93901, 



CALIFORNIA HERALt 



^irrER 

' •'Camellias" was the theme and 
pink and green the color scheme, 
when Grand President Irene Bond- 
anza made her official visit to Siiiier 
No. 1 1 in the Native Sons' Hall. 
Sacramento. A dinner at Sam's 
Ranch Wagon preceded the meet- 
ling. 

Over seventy persons from 
throughout the district were present 
to welcome GP Irene at the formal 
jneeting which was presided over by 
Sutler Parlor's President, Melanie 
bonover. 

I Among those present were: GM 
Rae L. Rominger; GT Betty Read 
turilich; COS Icel Beers; PGP Aud- 
rey D. Brown; SDDGP Pamela Mul- 
iler and DGP Iris Stahl to Sutter Par- 
lor. 

I Five visiting Deputy Grand Presi- 
Jents were in attendance as well as 
representatives from the follov/ing 
Iparlor^: CciUjia No. 22, La Bandera 
No. 110. Fern No. 123, Liberty No. 
213, Rio Rito No. 253, San Juan No. 
'315, James Lick No. 220. Annie K. 
\BidwcH No. 168 and San Jose No. 

r- 

• The officers did an outstanding 
job of performing the exemplification 
of the ritual during the initiation of 
fine new member, Juanita (Penny) 
Critton. 

' The sum of $20.40 was collected 
h the coin march and given to the 
JGrar.d President for a project of her 
"■jhoice. The project she chose was 
ihc Childrens Foundation. 




Parlor Neu/s 

PGP Audrey D. Brown, was gen- 
eral chairman of the evening. She 
extended greetings to all assembled, 
thanked the members of her com- 
mitttee for their assistance and then 
made the presentation to Grand 
President Irene of the gift of tlie 
evening. The gift was decorated wit'i 
camellias, carrying out the theme 
of the meeting. 

Called upon for her message. 
Grand President Irene gave an inter- 
esting account of the preparation 
of the float in the Tournament of 
Roses parade. She also told about 
some of her other official visits 
since January 1st. She concluded by 
urging everyone to make a renewed 
effort to increase membership. 

At the conclusion of the meeting, 
everyone gathered in the banquet 
room for refreshments of sand- 
wiches, brownies, coffee and tea. 
The tables were beautifuUv dec- 
or-ted with camellias on tablecloths 
of 2 r e e n, carrying out the color 
s'-heme of pink and green. 
*■ / *■ 

RF.ICHLING 

The Past Presidents of Reichling 
No. 97 were honored March 23 at 
the Rohner Grange Hall with a party 
given bv the officers and members. 
The Tami-Ka-Ha-Wee Campfirc 
group, which is sponsored by the 
Parlor, gave a most interesting fash- 
ion show presenting the mode of 
dress from 1900 to l971. A Scottish 
dance by Julie Simmons was en- 
joyed. The campfire leaders, Mmes. 
Jackie Strehl and Wilma Simmons 
were in charge. Mrs. Mona Detlefsen 
accompaniied at the piano. The Co- 
ppini sisters, Kay, Cindy and Barbie 
played the guitar and sang several 
songs. 

Distinguished guests SDDGP Mer- 
lynn Henry, DGPs Mary Simmons, 
Areata and Pauline Cote, Reichlini;. 
Presidents Marv Machado, Areata 



and Mildred Johnson, Occident also 
Ethel McKay were welcomed. 

The beautifully decorated tables, 
centerpiece and place cards were ar- 
ranged in the Easter motif. Delicious 
refreshments were served. 

First Vice President Beulah Still- 
ings presided in the absence of the 
President, Lucy Loika who is all. 
The committee in charge were 
Mmes. Caroling Weed, Dorothy 
Fielder and Rhoda Hooper. The Past 
Presidents in attendance included 
Ella Glines, a 63 year member; Ger- 
trude Wahl, a 50 year member and 
Mmes. Sesna, S t i 1 1 i n g s, Perry, 
B a i r d Nicholson Johnson Mathe, 
Haywood, Dunning, Cooke Lufkin. 
Thomson, Cote and Twaddell. 

» r < 
SAN JUAN BAUTISTA 

Luiza Dumans, A.F.S. student 
from Victoria, Brazil, who makes 
her home with Mr. and Mrs. Gor- 
dan Byers and family in Hollistcr, 
was at San Juan Bautista Parlor's 





1liillil lllliilliillll[liiiil !il!Hil'ii!ll!i'l'llll'l 

San Juan Ihiulista Adobe 

meeting at its Adobe. She showed 
colored slides of her country and 
told the members of her way of life. 
She is a very charming young lady 
and everyone enjoyed her. She was 
asked many questions and was able 
to answer them in a very capable 
manner. 

The business meeting followed 
with Mrs. A r n a I d o Andreazzi, 
president, presiding. Four applica- 
tions for membership and cards of 
thanks from members who had been 
ill were read. 



Audrey 1). Iir,>wn. I'GP 
I^PRIL, 1971 



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tia 524-1321 



PAGE H 



CHII.DKFN'S FOUNDATION 

"Children arc the Future" wav 
ihe theme chosen by Native Daugh- 
ters of the Golden West for their 
Southern Counties Children's Foun- 
dation IJruneheon held March 2S in 
the International Room of the Uev- 
crly Hilton Hotel. Dr. William S 
Banowsky. Chancellor of Malibu 
Pcppcrdine L'ni\ersity, was the guest 
speaker. Entertainment was provid- 
ed by the International Childrens 
Choir of America. 

Tables were spread with jonquil 
yellow programs. Tables were cen- 
tered with multi-hued spring flowers 
in gold containers resting atop col- 
umns of white wrought iron. Decor 
atcd containers, toys, holding con- 
tributions from the various parlors 
will go to the Fairvicw State Hospital 
in Costa Mesa. 

Pledge of allegiance was given by 
GT Lila Hummel, La Tijerci No. 
282; the Star Spangled Banner, play- 
ed by Peggy Brandenburg. Phicerita 






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Peggy Brandenburg 

No. 277: invocation by PGP Mary 
Barden, Calijorniana No. 247; mes- 
sage on Childrens Foundation by 
PGP Jewel McSweeney. El Vespero 



Jewel 

McSweeney. 

Past 

Grand 

President 




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Irene Bondanza. San Francisco No 
2(SI extended her greetings. 

Bruncheon Chairmen: Chairman, 
Dolores Zetwo, La J ijera No. 282; 
Co-chairman, Katherine Smith, Pla- 
I erita No. 277; Recording Secrctaiy 
rilen Guthrie, LI Aliso No. 314; 
1 reasurer, Pauline Brasher, Los Atk- 
geles No. 124; bulletin, Irene Bei- 
denbach. San Gabriel yalley No. 
281; decorations, Peggy Branden- 



Carolyn Riggs. 

San Fernando 

Mission No. 280 

Chairman of 

Programs 




I 



hurg. Placerita No. 277; invitatiooi 
and tickets. Ida Grossi, El Camiito 
Real No. 324; programs, Carolya 
Riggs, San Fernando Mission Na 
280; chairman of hostesses, V'crn' 
Popov, Grace No. 242: co-chairman 
Thelma Bownds, Lugonia No. 241 
publicity, Lee Bollen, San Gahrii 
Valley No. 281; co-chairman, Man 
lyn Ehlers, Placerita No. 277; speak 
er chairman, PGP Hazel Hansen 
Verdiigo No. 240; co-chairma: 
PGP June T. Goldie. San Gabrit 
I alley No. 28 1 ; entertainment chair 
man, Theresa .Antrim, La Tijer<, "^ 
282; reservation chairman, Ni 
Barrett. La Tijera No. 282; co 
chairman. Thelma Eisen. Beverly^ 
Hills No. 289. 




PAGE 12 



PGP Hazel Hansen 

CALIFORNIA HE 



RALoi 



IHK SHAMROCKS 

' A delicious St. Patrick's luncheon 
jvas held at the home of GT Helen 
vlcCarthy attended by 14 members. 
Jfficers are GT Helen McCarthy, 




GT Helen McCarthy 

jresident; V'erna Cummings, secre- 
ary; Elsie O'Connor, treasurer. SD- 
^GP Constance Warshaw was elect- 
■d into membership. 




Constance Warshaw. Stale President. 
Past Presidents Assembly. NDGW. 

PAST PRESIDENTS ASSEMBLY 

Association No. 1 meeting of Past 
Presidents' Assembly was designated 
IS a "Tribute to State President Con- 
stance Warshaw" with PGP Evelyn 
Carlson as chairman. The decor of 
Ihe lodge room and at the refresh- 
rnent tables was carried out in Con- 
fiie's favorite pink roses and heart- 
t^haped stands. The napkins dis- 
played the imprint of a rose. One 
pndidate. Rose Sarouhan, Past Pre- 
sident of Minerva No 2, was initiated 
nto the Association. 

When Connie was escorted to the 
laltar DGP Hazel Adams greeted her 

Upril, 1971 



with a song— "You'll Never Know," 
accompanied by PGO Lucile Kaull 
of Mission Parlor. Grand Officers 
paying homage to Connie were State 
Secretary, Madeline King; GS Luc- 
ille Kimbark; PGPs Evelyn Carlson, 
Emily Ryan and Loretta Cameron. 
A group from Connie's own Par- 
lor, Mission No. 227, were on hand 
to greet her too. 



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OFFICIAL VISIT 

Grand President Irene Bondanza 
was honored on April 15. A sun- 
dial was rededicated at Cerritos 
Jiancho, 46 Virginia Road. The sun- 
dial was originally dedicated by 
Native Daughters when it sat in front 
of the Long Beach auditorium. A 
7 p.m. dinner at Rochelles in Long 
Beach preceded the evening's cere- 
monies. 



FORREST 

Forrest No. 86 greeted Parlors of 
Amador County for the installation 
of new officers. Introduced were 
Chm. of Bd. of GTs Betty Read 
Curilich, SDDGP Margaret Boitano, 
DGP Mary Louise Stewart. There 




From Left: Forrest Parlor's n e w 

President Kathleen Mierkey a n d 

Betty Read Curilich, Chm. of Board 

of Grand Trustees. 

were 10 members from ilrsida No. 
1, 20 members from Chispa No. 40 
and 5 from Amapola No. 80. 

The new president Kathleen Mier- 
key was given an album of photos 
taken at Forrest Parlor's 7.'>th anni- 
\ersary by Doris Helms. Outgoing 
president Eva Vaira was given a 
lovely crystal decanter for her past 
work for Forrest Parlor. 



Lady driver to officer arresting her: 
"But officer. I couldn't slow down while 
you were going so fa--' othind nie." 

Easy street '■ .i blind end. 

.-• . i 

The grc itest friend of truth is lime: 
her great t enemy is pi'-judice; and her 
constant .impanion is 'lumility. — Collon 

PAGE 13 



IN MEMBRiAM 




iniiii;it>ii Parlor No. 278. The girls 
carried yellow and blue umbrellas 
made by President and Junior ad- 
visor Catherine Erven to carry out 
the centennial theme of the evening. 



Not lost to those that love them 
Not dead, just gone before; 

They still live in our memory. 
And they will forever more. 

Gwendolyn Fisher, CaJiz de Oro No. 

206. February 6. 
Leona Hoffman, Brooklyn No. 157. Feb- 
ruary 10. 
Hazel Bean. Grace No. 242, February 

10. 
Audelle Clark, Vallejo No. 195, Feb. 

ruary 13. 
Myrtle K. F. Otto, San Diego No. 208, 

February 12. 
Tillie Johnson, Poppy Trail No. 266, 

February 6. 
Alice Creighton, Buena Vista No. 68, 

February 9. 
Henrietta Cobain, Verba Buena No. 273, 

February 1 6. 
Mae Miller, Stockton No. 256, February 

19. 
Miriam McMahon, Las Juntas No. 221, 

February 18. 
Bernadetle Conlon, Verba Buena No. 

273, February 17. 
Anis Kohns, Alturas No. 159, February 

6. 
Margaret Matson, Guadalupe No. 153, 

January 27. 
Dorothy Curtis, Long Beach No. 154, 

February 25. 
Elsie Sheehan, Orinda No. 56. February 

25. 
Hattie Johnson, Portola No 172, Febru- 
ary 20. 
Alia Yager, Pluma.s Pioneer No. 219. 

February 20. 
Anita Martin, Liberty No. 213. Februarv 

24. 

Lena Gill. Fruitvale No. 177, March 2. 
Alice Lange, Orinda No. 56, March 4 
Blanche Foppiano. Orinda No. 56, March 

4. 
Oveline Penrose, Laurel No. 6, March 5. 
Antoinette Simonclli, Laurel No. 6. 

March 8. 

JUNIOR NEWS . . . 
(Continued from Page 2) 

by the VFW Au.xiliaries. Their skit, 
"The Lamp Went Out" was ver\ 
well received. Narrator for the skit 
was chairman advisor Danella Haw- 
kins from Cicn Anos No. 303, Nor- 
walk. Si.x girls led by Junior Presi- 
dent Lenc LeFever were on the es- 
cort team for the installation of IVil- 

PAGE 14 




For the official visit of district 33 
the girls were again an escort team, 
and carried red and gold hearts and 
this time for Grand President Irene 
Bondanza. They wore pastel formals 
gold keys in keeping with the theme 
for the evening "Key to my Heart". 
* * t 

SHAMROCKS & DAFFODII-S 

St. Patrick arrived a wee bit early 
to the city of Hay ward as Angelita 
No. 32 and Hayward No. 122 wel- 
comed Grand President Irene Bon- 
danza for her last official visit in 
Alameda County. The Deputy 
Grand Presidents of Alameda 
County carrying large shamrocks and 
golden dnflbdils formed the escort 
team as the Grand President was in- 
troduced at the altar. A corsage of 
green orchids gaily decorated with 
shamrocks was presented to the GP 
by GIS Dolores M. Ferenz. "Sham- 
rocks and DalTodil" Parlor also wel- 
comed their visiting dignitaries: 
Chm. of the Bd. of GTs BeV Read 
Curilich, GT Marian McGuire, GIS 
Dolores Ferenz, GOS Icel Beers, 
PGPs Jewel McSweeney, Irma M. 
Caton, Edna Williams and Lee 
Brice. SDDGP Ethel Murphv. and 
DGPs Ann Snvdcr and Dora Phil- 



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Telephone 535-7221 

INSURANCE — SURETY BONDS 

M E. BEEBE & CO. 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim, California 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln Anatieim &33-3107 



lips. A bouquet of green carnations 
from Eden Parlor No. 113, NSGW 
was presented by PGPs Larry I c- 
fleur and Joe Perez. 

Two members were honored with 
the presentation of their service a- 
wards: 50 year pin to Myrtle John- 
son of Angelita and 25 year pin to 
Irma Machado of Hayward. 

President Ruth Bovard of Angel-' 
ita and the ritualistic team presided i 
over the Opening and Closing cere- 
monies and President Camille Cue- 
vas of Hayward assumed the gavel 
to initiated six new members into the 
Order. Pianist Ida Cambise and ac- " 
cordianist Emily Spracklin entertain- 
ed. Helen Chrestenson, chairman of 
the evening, invited the members to « 
the refreshment tables which were de- 1 
corated with bouquets of daffodils, 1 
Irish Lyres and green top hats. a1 
giant "key" depicting our Grand 
President's theme had been covered 
with shamro;;ks and glittered from 
the stage. 

ill 

EL CA\tINO REAL 

An impressive group of grand 
officers and past grand president^ 
gathered at San Fernando Mission 
on March 27 to honor GP I r e n i. 
Bondanza at the annual Grand Pre- 
sident's Tea. This annual affair is 
sponsored by the history and land 
mark committee of El Camino Ren 
No. 324 and on hand to greet the 
visitors were Edie Bartlett, president 
and Marie Harrington, tea chairman. < 



Marie 

Harrington. 

Chairman 

at the 

A nnual 

Grand 

President's 

Tea 



Arrangements were made to show 
the grand officers through the ruin 
due to the earthquake and to a>. 
quaint them with the widespread 
damage. . 

Among those attending were GVP 
\ irgilia McCombs, GM Rae Rom 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




I 



inger, GTs Betty Read Curilich. 
Marian E. McGuire, Laura Blosdale 
and June Painter, COS Icel Beers 
and PGPs Mary B. Barden. Ethel 
Enos, Jewel McSweeney, Audrey D. 
Brown, Eileen Dismuke with a San- 
ta Barbara delegation, Lee Brice 
who was accompanying the Grand 
President on her Southland official 
visits and Hazel T. Mallette. PGPs 
of the NSGW Joe Perez and Andy 
Stodel were present as well at GT 
Jack Henry and Haig Kehaiyan, pre- 
sident of the Mission Hills Chamber 
of Commerce. 

French lilac and California pop- 
pies decorated the rooms and tea 
table and presiding over the coffee 
and tea were Ruby Garcia, DGP to 
El Camino Real and Evelyn Henry, 
SDDGP of District 32. 

Members of El Camino Real ap- 
peared in Spanish-California cos- 
tumes and music at the grand piano 
was furnished bv PP Ida Grossi. 



.Actively assisting in the gala formal 
affair were Helen Trammell who 
headed the "commissary detail" and 
Mmcs. Haselbusch, Lennox, Norris, 
Entin MacFarlane, Leroux, Connor. 
Reber and Hodnett. 

El Ccmi'ino Real is now turning its 
efforts to the "Nothin's New" Fas- 
hion Show to be held on May 15 at 
the historic Andres Pico Adobe, also 
in Mission Hills. Gloria Mellon is 
in charge of the annual fashion show 
which will be modeled by parlor 
members at the dessert and cham- 
pagne affair. 

f -f Y 

GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY 

Plumas Pioneer No. 219 of Quin- 
cy will celebrate their fiftieth anni- 
versary on Saturday evening. May 
22, 1971. The meeting will be held 
in the Odd Fellow's Hall on Main 
Street in Quincy. Grand President 
Irene Bondanza and eight charter 



members who will receive their 
"Golden Anniversary Jewels" will 
be honored. The meeting will be pre- 
ceded by a 6:30 dinner and will be 
an open meeting. 

Y * f 
ORIM>A 




President Esther Bio o m Jennings 

Willi large fortune cookie wliich she 

presented to GP Irene Bondanza. 




Mision San hemando. Rcy de Epana, scene oj tlie Grand President' 



APRIL, 1971 



PAGE 15 



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VOLUME THREE 

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Authors isclude; Will McPherson, Terry 
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Yorba, Fern Hill Colman, W. M. 
McFadden, E. M. Sunquist ajid many 
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by 
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Winner of several awards. 



Illustrated, Annotated. Index. No. 
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quarter, irrigation ditches and wineries. 

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SPECIAL e^LLfCTIONS 




Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




MAN . 1971 + 10«? 



OIL FIti. JO 



-, F£ SPRINGS IN 1927 



JC=±£i^E][= 



JR. UNIT NEWS 



EltDC^l 



=1C 



MENLO JUNIORS 

Mciilo Junior Unit has adopted 
a World War Veteran at Lynwood, 
California. They sent gifts to him 
for Valentine's Day and Easter; 
and are now planning on mailing a 
box of home-made cookies for his 
birthday. 

At the recent meeting of the Unit 
Kathleen Ferenz, daughter of GOS 
Dolores Ferenz was initiated, mak- 
ing a membership of 23. 

The Menlo Juniors enjoyed a 
public and formal installation at the 
Menlo Recreation Center on May 
14, when Miss Renee Cook became 
the President. Miss Cook's mother. 
Lois Cook, PP of Menlo was a for- 
mer Junior member of the Menlo 
Unit. Mrs. Ferenz also was a former 
member of the San Francisco Unit 
— a nice combination of mothers 
and daughters. 



I.AS AMIGIITAS JR. I'NIT 

The Official Visit of Las Amigui- 
tas Unit No. 33 was held with the 
theme of the evening "Sing and 
Dance It's Spring" and decorations 
of flowers, posters, and blooming 
trees. Two new members were in- 
itiated into the unit. State Chairman 
Mrs. Lila S. Hummel, Grand Trus- 
tee, was the honored guest of the 
evening and presented with a lovely 
camellia corsage. 

Other guests of the evening were 
Junior State Officers Kathy Koch, 
Leealyn Baker. Sharon Landt, Mar- 
garet Dcto, Jr. and Kathy Slater. 
Also Grand Parlor officers — GTs 
Laura Blosdalc and Marian Mc- 
Guirc. GOS Icel Ikcrs. DGPs Mil- 
dred Higgins and Beth Wing and a 
representative from Lcit Arnicas No. 
311. the Mother Parlor. Mrs. Doro- 
thy Beckemeycr were alsti present. 

The evening was concluded with 
entertainment and refreshments. 



California Herald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 

Volume XVIll May, 1971 Number ^ 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Junior Unit News 2 

San Francisco, Convention City {Part 11) 3 

The Grand President's Corner 6 

Parlor News 7 

Candidate Biographies 8 

In Mcmoriam II 

Mother's Day. 1971 13 

Santa Ana Sells First Lot in 1887 14 

Remember When?, by Dr. Leo J. Friis 15 



PHOTO CRHDITS — Chinese miners, Friis collection; Yoiinpslcr casting in Clolden 
Gate Park: courtesy. San Francisco Recreation and Park Department. 



We're splitting the atom for you. 



Chances are some of the 
electricity you now use is 
generated at the San 
Onof re Nuclear Plant near 
San Clemente. 

Edison plans to add 
additional nuclear units at 
this site. One reason: in a 
nuclear reactor there is no 



combustion, so there are 
no by-products of combus- 
tion. Electricity from clean 
nuclear plants is one of the 
ways Eclison is working to- 
day for a better tomorrow. 



Southern California Edison 



\ 




J. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JANE FRIIS 
Public Reladoni 



(Coiitintu'd on I'a^e III 



PAGE 2 



Published Monthly by J J Friis and Leo J. Friis. owners and publishers. Anihaim, ' 
Cllilornia. All RighU Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim. California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243. Anaheim. California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: 301 
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printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



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tanctsco 



onv<2ntton 



a 



e 



'i 



y 



CHINATOWN 



^ AN FRANCISCO'S CHINATOWN is 

^ a world out of time. A walk 
down Grant Avenue north of Bush 
Street is an adventure in a strange 
and wonderful land where the 
Twentieth Century lives side by side 
with the past. 

It is in this remarkable district, 
where more Orientals live than any- 
where else in the Occidental world, 
that San Francisco began. On Grant 
near Clay Street stands a column 
bearing a plaque that reads: "The 
birthplace of a Great City. Here, 
.lune 25, 1835, William A. Richard- 
son, founder of Verba Buena (later 
San Francisco) erected its first 
habitation, a tent dwelling, replacing 
it in October 1835 with the first 
wooden house, and on this ground, 
in 1836, he erected the large adobe 
building known as 'Casa Grande.' " 

Legends state that the Chinese 
visited the Pacific Coast of the 
American Continent many times in 
the dawn of their history. This is 
highly probable, for the Chinese 
have always been daring mariners, 
and oriental artifacts have been 
found in many places along the 
western shores of the United States 
and Mexico. 

But recent history records the 
fact that before 1849 there were but 
seven Chinese in San Francisco. One 
of these seven, a merchant named 
Chum Ming, caught the gold fever 
and made for the hills. Being fortun- 
ate and diligent he made a strike 
and reported his good luck to a 
relative back in his native Kwang- 
tung. This gentleman, being talka- 
tive and peripatetic, spread the 
news throughout the province. There 

MAY, 1971 




Chinese in ilw mines 



was gold in -America, he declared, 
and not only that, but high wages 
were to be had by Chinese who were 
willing to travel across the ocean 
to San Francisco. By 1851 there 
were 12,000 Chinese men in Cali- 
fornia and seven women. The steam- 
ship lines plied the Pacific between 
Hong Kong and America with their 
holds and decks filled with Chinese 
seeking the promised land of gold. 



This interesting historical informa- 
tion about San Francisco, the 1971 
NDGW Convention City, was com- 
piled by GT Helen C. McCarthy of 
the Public Relations Committee. 



The railroad builders soon rec- 
ognized a great source of labor for 
their construction gangs and pressed 
for more and more immigration. 
But very soon the frugality and 
diligence of the Chinese had ihem 
in trouble with the rowdier elements 
among the miners and the railroad 
workers. The Chinese reaction to 
the difficulty was typically polite. 
They grew even more reserved ' ' 
worked even harder to (."•■ 
themselves in the new Ian ' 

Resentment grew ste:"' 
the new arrivals and 
pressivc laws were 
State Legislature. 

(Cr^ 



SAN FRANCISCO . . . 
(Continued from Page 3) 

deny California the benefit of the 
new arrivals. By the year 1882 there 
already 75,000 Orientals in our 
State. One out of seven were 
Chinese. One out of ten lived in the 
area we know today as San Franc- 
isco's Chinatown. 

But the Chinatown of today is a 
far different place from the China- 
town of yesterday with its internal 
struggle for control of Chinese 
society, the so-called Tong Wars 
continued for many years. The last 
of these disputes was not settled 
until 1926. and hair-raising talcs of 
hatchct-men and highbinders pop- 
ularized by mystery writers can still 
chill a reader on a foggy San Franc- 
isco night. But the aura of the 
mysterious still lingers on. 

Chinatown is actually two cities, 
one built above the other. In the 
upper stories of Chinatown's build- 
ings exists the "Gee Gah," a place 
of residences, serenity, family affect- 
ion and privacy. Below, on the 
street level lies the "San Yee Gah," 
the place of shops, offices, and the 
booming commercial life of San 
Francisco's Chinese. 

Conventioners, tourists, and resid- 
ents of San Francisco, when walking 
through Chinatown find it a place 
of bustling commercial activity, fine 
shops of all descriptions, stores con- 
taining curios, exotic foodstuffs, 
hand-painted scrolls, silks, wind- 
chimes tinkling delicately in the 
breeze, where one can visit a modern 
western night club, enjoy authentic 
Chinese cuisine, or pause for a cup 
of tea. When leaving this quaint 
town within a city, one feels they 
have truly visited the Orient. 



GOLDEN GATE PARK 

In San Francisco, in the year 
1868, the process of building one 
of the world's great parks out of a 
wilderness of sand dunes was begun. 
A progressive Mayor decided to take 
action on the many requests coming 
from citizens of the city and ordered 
a survey of sites available for a city 
park. 

Certain lands west of Divisadero 
Street: a links-land of sand dunes 
;md scrubby brush was recommend- 
ed. It did not seem a very encourag- 

PAGE 4 



ing choice. Furthermore, there exist- 
ed a considerable controversy con- 
cerning the ownership of the acre- 
age, for it was populated by do/ens 
of squatters who disputed the old 
Mexican land grants and the city's 
claims to ownership. Pcrserverance 
conquered however and a com- 
mittee of citizens appraised the land 
and was able to negotiate its pur- 
chase for $810,595. 

The '"wasteland" quickly became 
the butt of many jokes — for who 
could believe that a green parkland 
could be created out of salty, wind- 
swept dunes? The gardeners, un- 
daunted, set to work. 



willows, Australian eucalyptus, pines 
all could and did take root in the 
tons of fill and loam and manure- 
that were mixed with the sand of the 
sand of the dunes. Wild lupine and 
Kentucky bluegrass took hold and 
became meadows. In that first year, 
acres and acres of grass were planted 
and more than twenty-one thou- 
sand trees. The soil was built up 
and enriched by endless wagonloads 
of peat and straw, humus and grass 
cuttings, and even sweeping from 
ihc city streets. 

Year after year this laborious 
process was continued, until at last 
there came a day when San Franc- 




From Left: Leo Halley. Mrs. Henry (Ann) Dipfwl ana I.<hiis Smin \^auli 
youni>ster try skill at casting. 



From the v e r y beginning, the 
people in c h a r g e of the Park's 
development sought to conform to 
nature, rather than fight against it. 
The natural contours of the land 
were utilized in the landscaping plan, 
and the serpentine drives and walks 
were all devised to blend gracefully 
into an informal and pleasing design. 

The beech and sugar maple trees 
many citizens remembered from 
their eastern days would not grow 
in the San Francisco climate. Even 
today, these trees, of all the trees 
of the temperate zone, have resisted 
acclimatization to Golden Gate Park. 
But the native trees and shrubs and 
flowers provided excellent substit- 
utes. Cypress madrona, oaks and 



iscans realized that they had, in fact, 
a park — hundreds of acres of lush 
green land sparkling in the Cali- 
fornia sun. 

1 wenty years passed with the 
park flourishing when John McLar- 
en, a Scot, became its most famous 
Superintendent. McLaren's genius 
was that of a de\eloper. It was he 
who devoted half a century to mak- 
ing a fine park into a magnificent 
one. He planted more than two 
million trees. .M o s t of them arc 
growing still, giving endless pleasure 
to the citizens of the city he adopted 
as his home. He accumulated a vast 
store of knowledge concerning the 
native plants of California as well as 

CALIFORNIA HERALt 



'exotic plants that would survive in 
■our climate. His surpassing love was 
for the great redwoods of California, 
the stately Sequoia sempervirens, the 
oldest living things on earth. When 
he told his friends that he would one 
day grow redwoods, they smiled and 
told him to stick to his gardens, as 
it took thousands of years to grow 
.redwoods. 

j Yet when McLaren died in 1943 
,at the age of ninety-seven, the red- 
,wood gro\e in Golden Gate Park, 
sempervirens grown from seeds 
planted when he became Superinten- 
,dent of the Park almost six decades 
earlier, towered to a height of thirty 
feet. And a thousand years from 
today, his trees will still be there, a 
monument to the love and dedication 
of one man's lifetime. 







- s^- ^ ^s^ ^ 



' jj^ 




Gathering eggs on the Farallone Islands in the Fijties. 



Sequoia Sempervirens 



Because of McLaren's deep love 
for Redwood trees, the Native Sons 
and Native Daughters Grove of 
Memory Association have a living 
memorial to the Native Sons of the 
Golden West of San Francisco who 
sacrificed their lives on foreign soil 
during World War \, as in this Red- 
wood Grove, in 1927. thirty nine 
Redwood trees were dedicated to 
the memory of those thirty nine 
Gold Star members. The following 
year, a twenty ton boulder and a 
five foot bronze plaque bearing the 
names of the 39 members was 
dedicated. The final completion of 
this memorial was accomplished 
with the unveiling of the Gold Star 
Dough Boy Monument June I, 
1930. 

It is at this beautiful shrine that 
the Native Sons and Native Daugh- 
ters of the Golden West gather on 
the first Sunday of June of each 
year to honor their fraternal dead 
heroes. In addition to memorializ- 
ing those Gold Star members, spec- 
ial reference is made of the mem- 
bers of both Orders deceased during 
the year and the families of all 



MAY, 1971 



deceased members are invited to 
attend the annual exercises. 

Golden Gate Park was created to 
be enjoyed. There have never been 
■"Keep Off the Grass" signs in the 
park. Every meadow, every glade is 
intended to be used and enjoyed by 
the people who come to spend a 
pleasant hour or two in the park. 

Visitors to Golden Gate Park find 
much to enjoy. The park is three 
and a half miles long and one mile 
wide. A pleasant drive begins at 
Stanyan Street and winds through 
the many drives to the Pacific ocean 
with a return trip using different 
routes, or stop for a visit at the 
Conservatory of Flowers, t h e Ar- 
boretum and Botanical Gardens, the 
Aquarium, Japanese Tea Garden. 
go boating on Stow Lake or feed 
the ducks, see buffalo, elks, and 
many other ;mimals roaming the 
pastures. These are but a few of the 
places one can enjoy while riding, 
strolling, or lingering in San Franc- 
isco's Golden Gate Park, and that 
this 'beaut} ' arose from sand dunes, 
is a 'marvel' to behold. 

{To he continued next month) 

PAGE s 



The Grand 
President's Corner 




(iRAND PRHSIOFNT 

Irene Bondanza (Mrs. Joseph) 
2328 Union Street 
San Francisco, California 94123 
Telephone; 931-0145 (Area 415) 



IRENE BONDANZA 



WEST WINDS PARLOR NO. 328 

A most impressive ceremony was 
the institution of West Winds Parlor 
No. 328 at Fairfield on March 20. 
1971. The name, W est Winds. 
which in Indian is Suisun, was cho- 
sen by the sixty-three charter mem- 
bers during the organization by 
PGP Fern E. Adams of Berryessa 
No. 192. 

Grand President Irene Bondanza, 
assisted by her entire corps of 
Grand Officers: GVP Virgilia Mc- 
Combs. GM Rac Romingcr, GS 
Lucille Kimbark, GT Betty Read 
Curilich, Chairman of the Board of 
Grand Trustees, and GTs L i I a 
Hummel, Marian McGuire. Helen 
C. McCarthy, Meredyth Burnctte. 
Laura Blosdalc, and June Painter, 
GIS Dolores F e r e n z. GOS Icel 
Beers, GO Gracie Scott were as- 
sisted by an initiatory team from 
District 16, Sacramento. 

Marie Landini of San Jose No. 
SI, Edna Garaventa of San Francis- 
co No. 261 and Eloise Bettencourl 
of Berryessa No. 192, were assist- 
ant Marshals to installing GM Rae 
Rominger. PGP Nancy Conens was 
the soloist 

The following ollicers were in- 
stalled: President. Marie Dc Laney; 
Charter Past President. Agnes Jac- 
obson: First Vice-President, Edith 
Lamiranda; Second Vice-President. 
Gertrude Wallace: Third Vice-Pre- 
sident, Josephine McCook: Mar- 
shal. Melvina Vollmcr; Recording 
Secretary, Ellen Starmcr; Financial 
Secretary. Marjoric Wildman: Trea- 

PAGE 6 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 

2271-32nd Avenue 

San Francisco, California 94116 

Office: 703 Market Street, Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



Stinerary^ 1971 



MAY 

4 San Diego No. 208, lUa M. Knox No. 320 El Cajon* 

7 Liberty No. 213 Elk Grove* 

8 El Dorado No. 186 (Afternoon) Georgetown* 

12 Las Lomas No. 72, Dolores No, 169 and 

Buena Vista No. 68 San Francisco* 

13 For/ Bra^g No. 210 Fort Bragg* 

15 Sacramento District Luncheon 

17-20 NSGW Grand Parlor Sacramento 

19 San Francisco Womans Chamber of Commerce Luncheon 

22 Plumas Pioneer No. 219 (50th Anniversary) Quincy* 

29 San Francisco No. 261 (Homecoming) San Francisco 

30 Alameda County Memorial Services 

JUNE 

5 San Francisco County Luncheon 

6 Grove of Memory Memorial Services 
19-24 Convention San Francisco 

* Official visits are marked with astericks 



surer, Elsie Turri; Trustees: Nadine 
Miller, Ina Nelson, Minnie Rast- 
over. Inside Sentinel, Martha 
Moore; Oustide Sentinel Madeline 
Sharp: Organist. Colleen Barker. 

Catherine Kelly of Califia No. 
22, was appointed by Grand Presi- 
dent Bondanza as DGP to West 
Winds No. 328. 

Past Grand Presidents attending 
the ceremony were: Evelyn I. Carl- 
son, Florence Boyle, Jewel Mc- 
Sweeney. Norma Hodson, Audrey 
Brown, Eileen Dismuke, Edna Wil- 
liams. Lee Brice, Fern Adams and 
Ha/el Mallette. 

Congratulations were extended to 
the newly instituted Parlor by GP 
Irene Bondanza. GM Rae L. Romin- 
ger spoke, representing t h e other 
Grand Officers and PGP Evelyn I 
Carlson spoke on behalf of the 
PGPs in attendance. SDDGP Pam- 
ela Muller, DGP Catherine Kelly and 
Orcanizer PGP Fern Adams also 



spoke. GP John H. Kurtz, NSGW^ 
extended congratulatory greetings 
and introduced his Grand Officer 
in attendance as well as other Na-^ 
live Sons. 

Newly installed president of Wes 
Winds Parlor, Marie De Lancy, ad-] 
dressed the assembly and in thef 
closing said "that by the end of the 
year West Winds would probablyl 
have a membership of one hun- 
dred". 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln , Anaheim S33-3107| 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



.ANNIE K. BIDWELL 

i The meeting of Annie K. BUhvell 
No. 168 was^held at NDGW Hall 
'on March 25 with Jessie Stearns 
presiding. Leona Gerholdt was the 
.opening chairman. 
' The reports were given by the 
jpresident and other members on the 
official visit of Grand President 1- 
renc Bondan7a to OrovilJe. This was 
a joint meeting of Annie K. Bidwell 
No. 168. Gold of Ophir No. 190 
!and Centennial No. 295. 

Seventy-two members enjoyed a 
dinner at Table Mountain Tavern 
preceding the meeting, where tables 
were decorated in the St. Patrick's 
iDay motif. There were ninety-two 
ipresent at the meeting at the Monday 
Club, with twenty-six traveling to 
Oroville from Chico. PGP Hazel 
Mallette was the opening chairman. 
, The opening ceremonies were con- 
iducted by President Duane Evans 
|of Gold of Ophir: the initiation cere- 
mony. President Kay Bailey of Cen- 
tennial Parlor and the closing, by 
Jessie Stearns of Annie K. Bidwell 
iThe ritualistic team was comprised 
iof officers from the three participat- 
|ing Parlors, with Flora Detrick of 
Chico as marshal for the evening. 
j Two new members were initiated 
I into Annie K. Bidwell: four were 
[added to Gold of Ophir and three to 
j Centennial. 

I Escorted to the altar for intro- 
duction were the Grand President. 
iGM Rae Rominger, GTs Betty Read 
;Curilich and Marian McGuire, GIS 
I Dolores Ferenz. GOS Icel Beers. 
;PGPs Florence Boyle, Hazel Mall- 
jette and Fern Adams. Also presented 
I were SDDGP Eloise Bettencourt 
land DGPs Clara Staheli, Ethel 0.s- 
borne and Nancy Hanson. 

Grace Wade of Annie K. Bidwell 

j was presented at the altar as the only 

permanent member present. Also 

given recognition as officers of the 

Past Presidents Association were 

Katherinc LaBreacht. Lillian Simp- 

j son and Florence Morris. 

j At the altar the Grand President 

j presented 25 year emblems to Mmes. 

Bearse. Hesse, Moller. Murray and 

Appelman from Chico and Biirkard 

from Paradise. Margaret Spangler 

of Annie K. Bidwell is also a 25 year 

member. 

In honor ol the Grand President 

the drill team performed and sang 

two songs of welcome with appro- 

I priate words. The team members 

i MAY, 1971 



Parlor hJeu/s 

wore vari-colored f o r m a 1 s, head 
bands depicting green stovepipe hats 
and carried shamrocks spelling out 
the Grand President's name. The 
team was under the direction of GOS 
Icel Beers. 

During presentations of gifts to 
the Grand President, PGP Florence 
Boyle added a bit of comedy by 
dragging in a large package wrapped 
in green paper, which she said was a 
piece of the Blarney Stone and ac- 
companied her presentation with a 
comic speech. 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

GP Irene Bondanza made her offi- 
cial visit to San Migitel No. 94, £' 
Pinal No. 163 and San Luisita No. 
108. A delicious dinner at .Madonna 
Inn preceded the meeting which was 
held at the lOOF Hall which was 
decorated with baskets of pink lilies, 
daffodils and smilax. The name 
"Irene" with four gold keys hung 
from the stage. 

The opening ceremonies were by 
San Luisita, the initiation by LI I'inal 
and the closing ceremonies by San 
Miguel. S. Righetta, K. Washburn, J. 
Fry and L. Harris were initiated. 
Roberta Sutherland sang "Hymn to 




NDGW Home prior to 1924. 



The Grand President gave an in- 
teresting message of the evening. She 
asked that the coin march monies he 
designated for the NDGW Home in 
San Francisco. She paid an especial 
tribute to Florence Boyle for her 34 
years of service to the Order. Fern 
Adams. PGP. was recognized as the 
organizer of the new West Wind 
Parlor No. 328 of Fairfield. 

GIS Dolores Ferenz spoke for the 
Grand Officers, Florence Boyle for 
the Past Grand Presidents. Eloise 
Bettencourt as District Deputy 
Grand President and Clara Staheli 
for the Deputy Grand Presidents. 
Refreshments were served which 
completed the evening. 



California." A very interesting mes- 
sage was given by the Grand Presi- 
dent. 

Introduced were: Chairman ol 
the Board of Grand Trustees Betty 
Curilich, PGP Katie G. Jewett, Ma- 
rie Landini State Chairman of Veter- 
ans Welfare. SDDGP Mary A. Wnr- 
ren and DGPs Mary Negranti, Vada 
Bashmam and Filomena \:il' ■••! 

The Grand President 
a 25 year pin to Hazel I 
Pinal. Reports and y 
by each Parlor to ' 
dent. 

Elsie Loose, ^' 
of San Mii'tu'l ■' '' 

a birthday '''•- 

lowed. 



MORADA Parlor No. 199 

N. D. G. W. 
Modesto 

proudly presents 

VIRGILIA 
McCOMBS 

for election 

to the office of 

Grand President 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




LA BANDERA Parlor No. 110 

N. D. G. W. 
Sacramento 

Droudly presents 

RAE L 
ROMINGER 

for election 
o thie office of 

Grand 
Vice-President 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




SAN JOSE Parlor No. 81 

N. D. G. W. 
San Jose 

proudly presents 

MARIE C. 
LANDINI 

for election 
to the office of 

Grand Marshal 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




RAE L ROMINGER 

Candidate for the office of 
Grand Vice President 

At L. Rominger, Grand Mar- 
shal, is a native of Chico, 
C'alifornia and has been a member 
of La Bandera Parlor No. 110, Na- 
tive Daughters of the Golden West 
since 1949. She has served faith- 
fully and with intense interest as 
Deputy Grand President. Supervis- 
ing District Deputy Grand President 
six years as a Grand OfTicer and has 
served as State Chairman of numer- 
ous Grand Parlor Committees, as 
well as lx:ing a member of many 
Committees. This experience on the 
Grand Parlor Committees and her 
vast traveling from the very North- 
ern part of our State to the South- 
ern counties offers Rac the know- 
ledge of our Order in a more thor- 
ough manner. 

La Bandera Parlor is extremely 
grateful to the support offered Rae 
who this year will be a candidate 
for Grand Vice President at the 
Grand Parlor Session in San Fran- 
cisco. It is her sincere desire to ofTcr 
the leadership we have been privi- 
leged to experience through the past 
85 years. 



MARIE C. LANDINI 

Candidate for the office of 
Grand Marshal 

ARii; has been a continuously 
active member of the Order 
during the entire thirty years of her 
membership. Has served as Grand 

PAGt 8 



Outside Sentinel, Grand Inside Sen- 
tinel and three years as Grand Trus- 
tee and as Clerk of the Board of two 
consecutive years. 

In addition, Marie has served as 
State Chairman of the Committees 
on Legislation, Public Speaking, 
Art Talent, Junior Native Daugh- 
ters and Young Womcns Activities, 
twice. This year, she is the State 
Chairman of Veterans Welfare. 

Over the years, she has served on 
numerous State Committees includ- 
ing three years on the Board of the 
Home Committee and last Novem- 
ber was reappointed to fill the un- 
expired term of the late Past Grand 
Secretary Irma Murray. 

Marie's diversified activities also 
include serving as Recording Secre- 
tary of San Jose Parlor for the past 
eight years. Deputy Grand Presi- 
dent five times. Supervising District 
Deputy Grand President twice and 
organized Gilroy Parlor in \95y. 



BETTY READ CURILICH 

Candidate of the office of 
Grand Marshal 

Rsui A Parlor No. 1, is pre- 
senting Betty Read Curilich 
as a candidate for Grand Marshal 
at the 1971 Grand Parlor. 

Parlor President three term s. 
Betty served as Supervising Deputy 
Grand President innumerable times 
and every Parlor in the District as 
Deputy more than once. 

She has furthered the projects of 
our Order as State Chairman of 
History and Landmarks, Legisla- 
tive Measures and Pioneer Roster. 



She has earned the title of Mrs. 
Amador County for her civic parti- | 
pation, having been named Ama- 
dor County Woman of the Yeari 
and Amador County Citizen of the] 
Year. 

A successful business woman, \ 
former editor-publisher of an Ama- 
dor County newspaper 15 years, re- 
tiring as head of an Amador County , 
Department, March, 1970. she is | 
able to give full time to her duties as , 
a Grand Officer and Chairman of , 
the Board. 

A member of Ursula Parlor over i 
40 years; former Grand Trustee ; 
under four Grand Presidents; now 
icomplcting her fifth term, brings I 
Betty's years of service as a Grand 
Trustee to nine. 



LILA S. HUMMEL 

Candidate of the office of 
Grand Trustee 

t EMBER of La Tijera Parlorl 
,No. 282, 26 years. Charter! 
Past President, President, and chair- 
man of many committees within the 
Parlor. 

Cirand Officer for five years. Scr-1 
vcd on the following Grand Parlor] 
Committees — Laws and Supcni- 
sion. F.ducation and Scholarships, 
Roll of Honor, Legislation. 1970- 
71 State Chairman of Junior Na- 
tive Daughters. Deputy Grand Pres- 
ident to: Los Angeles, Whitticr,| 
Santa Ana, and Verdugo. 

Community organiz.ations — Girij 
Scouts. PTA. Woman's Club, Busi- 
ness and Professional W o m c n'ij 
Club, VMCA Board of Directors, 

CALIFORNIA HERALOJ 



URSULA Parlor No. 1 

N. D. G. W. 
Jackson 

proudly presents 

BETTY READ 
CURILICH 

for election 
to the office of 

Grand Marshal 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




LA TIJERA Parlor No. 282 

1 N. D. G. W. 

Inglewood 

(proudly presents 

LILA S. 
HUMMEL 

for re-election 
to ttie office of 




MA 

1971 Grand Parlor 



Grand Trustee 

San Francisco 



BERKELEY Parlor No. 150 

N. D. G. W. 
Berkeley 

|proudly presents 

MARIAN E. 
McGUIRE 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




National Association of Parliamen- 
arians (Registered Parliamen- 
arian), a n d in September, 1970 
lecanie a member of the Distin- 
luished Delegation of American 
Vomen to the Soviet Union to visit 
■vith the women of Hungary, 
Romania, and Russia. 
j Church — Active member serv- 
ng as Sunday School teacher and 
Superintendent, on the Board of 
directors as President and Treasu- 
"er. 



Family 



Married to Leonard 



J. Hummel, four children and 15 
'irandchildren. 

[ Employment — Former secre- 
tary to Superintendent of Schools 
n Culver City, and now as secre- 
tary in the Division of Research 
ind Pupil Personnel Services of the 
'Los Angeles County Superinden- 
□ent of Schools. 



HELEN c. McCarthy 

Candidate of the office of 
Grand Trustee 

F.LEN C. McCarthy, born 
and raised in San Francis- 
co. Parents — her dad, Edward, 
member NSGW, is deceased, her 
mother Helen Scannell is a Past 
(President and presently Recording 
■Secretary of Utopia Parlor. One of 
four children, sister and two bro- 
thers deceased. Attended elementary, 
high school and business college in 
•San Francisco. Married July, 1943 
ito Jim McCarthy, a member and 
Past President, NSGW. Employed 
jby Bethlehem Steel Corporation 

'may, 1971 



since April, 1942, is Secretary in 
their San Francisco Sales Office. 
Joined Utopia Parlor, April, 1938; 
was Parlor President, 1942. Deputy 
Grand President ten various years. 
State Committee appointments — 
Chairman Drill Teams and Drum 
Corps 3 years; committee member 
Jr. Native Daughters one year and 
State Chairman, 1968-1969; com- 
mittee member Laws and Supervi- 
sion 1969-70; committee member 
Leslye A. Hicks Home Health Fund 
also Public Relations 1970-71. Has 
been a Grand Officer past four 
years, is aspiring for a fifth term as 
a candidate for re-election to the 
office of Grand Trustee. 



LAURA BLOSDALE 

Candidate for the office of 
Grand Trustee 

AURA Blosdale: Native of Los 
Angeles; schooled at St. 
Mary's Academy and UCLA. Busi- 
ness career of 30 years with well- 
known pharmaceutical firms; ex- 
perienced in management, person- 
nel, purchasing, display, merchan- 
dising and cost control. Being 
bi-lingual and having college back- 
ground have enabled her to hold 
key positions. Married to Frank 
Blosdale. 

Active in church, political aflilia- 
tions, St. John's Hospital Guild. 
Los Fiesteros, civic and historical 
groups. 

Charter member of Beverly Hills 
Parior No. 289; has been a loyal 
and dedicated member for 24 years. 



The Order is an integral part of her 
life. Served in all subordinate offi- 
ces, Deputy Grand President and 
Supervising District Deputy Grand 
President. 

Has served as State Co-chairman 
and also State Chairman of Calijor- 
nia Herald Magazine. Seven times 
State Chairman of Public Relations. 
Has served as Grand Outside Senti- 
-tteI, Grand Inside Sentinel and one 
year on Board of Grand Trustees. 
She is again aspiring to the office of 
Grand Trustee. 



ICEL BEERS 

Candidate for the office of 
Grand Inside Sentinel 

5?»CEL is a third generation Native 
^ Daughter and has been an ac- 
tive and dedicated member of An- 
nie K. Bidwell Parior for the past 
eighteen years. A Past President of 
her Parior and has served faithfully 
and well in various other officers' 
posts including that of Deputy 
Grand President. Presently, Finan- 
cial Secretary, which office she has 
filled for the past six years. 

ICEL has served diligently this 
past year, attending many Native 
Daughters' functions in her official 
capacity as Grand Outside Sertinel, 
also active in assisting wit.'i the Jun- 
ior Units in Northern "^ . 

Annie K. BidweV '68 



is proud and h 
ICEL for the o 
Sentinel and 



■cnsor 

"d Inside 

' ?! that she 

(■>^ Pace 10) 

PAG£ 9 



UTOPIA Parhr No. 252 

N. D. G. W. 
San Francisco 

proudly presents 
HELEN C. 

McCarthy 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




DARDANELLE Parlor No. 66 

^^^^ N. D. G. W 

^^^^^^^^ Sonora 

^^^^^^k proudly presents 
1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 



MEREDYTH 
BURNETTE 

for re-election 
I to the office of 

Grand Trustee 



BEVERLY HILLS Parlor No. 289 

N. D. G. W. 
Beverly Hills 

oroudly presents 

LAURA 
BLOSDALE 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 




1971 Grand Parlor 



San Francisco 



BIOGRAPHIES . . . 
(Continued from Page 9) 

is well qualified for the office. With 
her leadership ability and her know- 
ledge of the aims and purposes of 
NDGW she is serving Grand Parlor 
with the same devotion and dedica- 
tion with which she has served her 
Parlor and the Order through the 
vears. 



URSULA LUCCHESI 

Candidate for the office of 
Grand Outside Sentinel 

RsuiA Lucchcsi has been a 
member of Cotaii Parlor 
No. 299 since 1951. She has filled 
all the offices of her Parlor and has 
been President numerous times and 
at present is serving as Marshal. 
She has been a Deputy Grand Pre- 
sident and Supervising Dis- 
trict Deputy Grand President. 

Has se r V e d on the following 
Grand Parlor Committees — Grand 
Parlor Sessions, Extension of the 
Order. .Americanism and Civic Par- 
ticipation. Roll of Honor. History 
and Landmarks and Art Talent 
Contest. In own area she has been 
responsible for the dedication of 
school and presentation of flags 
to many public buildings. 

Employed by Bank of America 
for twelve years and is now alliliat- 
ed with her husband ■"Babe" in the 
accounting business. Ursula was de- 
feated for Grand Office in 1970 and 
is now aspiring for the ollice of 
Grand Outside Sentinel. 

PAGE 10 



LA VERNE STEVENSON 

Candidate for the office of 
Grand Outside Sentinel 

■sp A Vi;rne Stevenson, Charter 
^\Ji member of Raniomt Parlor 
No. 283, Native Daughters of the 
Golden West, received her 25-year 
pin last year, 1970. Has held the 
following offices in Ranwna Parlor: 
Recording Secretary, 5 years; Fin- 
ancial Secretary, 2 years; Third 
Vice Pre^^ident: First Vice Presi- 
dent; President. 2 terms; Past Pre- 
sident. Is now serving in her second 
term as General Chairman to the 
San Joaquin Valley Childrens 
Foundation Luncheon Committee; 
has served Grand Parlor at the last 
three sessions as stenographer to the 
Grand Secretary. Served on the fol- 
lowing State Committees: American- 
ism and Civic Participation, Art 
Talent Contest and Pioneer Roster. 



• KDITOK'S NOTE — Please keep IhLs 

i.ssuc of biucr;iphiv.s. TliiTc will he no 
l>iocriiphii's prink'd in the .liinv issue. 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

Lon^ Beach No. 154. President 
Lois Horton; H'ilmini>ion No. 278. 
president Catherine Erven; Tierra 
del Rey No. 300, president Vera 
Mcintosh and Cien Anus No. 303, 
jircsidcnt Danella Hawkins hostessed 
the event and served on the ritualis- 
tic teams. Theme of the evening was 
".April in Paris." 

Junior Native Daughters Unit No. 
37 of Norwalk was the escort team 
for the evening. This group has just 
completed a layette valued a< over 
$100 and presented it to the Red 
Cross and have now adopted a war 



orphan and arc currently involved 
in an Easter Egg sale to support the 
monthly cost of this worthy project 
Lene LeFever is president of the 
group and Catherine Erven of W/7- 
mintiioii Parlor is sponsor. 

As the Grand President travels 
throughout the state visiting 195 
parlors, she is constantly alerting 
citi7ens to the importance of preser- 
ving our statewide historical sites 
and landmarks that are being threat- 
ened by the march of progress. 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

San Juan Baiirisia and Copa de 
Oro Parlors were hosts at a joint 
meeting when Grand President Irene 
Bondanza paid them an official visit 
held at the Adobe in San Juan Bau- 
tista. The evening began with a din- 
ner at Cademartoris where about 90 
persons enjoyed a delicious repast at 
tables decorated with flowers and 
mission bells. Among the distinguis- 
ed guests were Marie Landini of 
San Jose. State Chairman of Veter- 
ans Welfare, who travels with Mrs. 
Bondan/a. GTs Betty Read Curilich 
and June Painter PGP E I m a r i e 
Dyke. DGPs Genevieve Patterson 
and Helen Lyons and SDDGP Es- 
ther Payton. 

As the members entered the 
Adobe they were greeted by mem- 
bers dressed as sciioritas on the bal- 
cony with Spanish music in the back- 
ground. .Mrs. Milton Harrcll as hos- 
pitality chairman greeted everyone. 

Mrs. Tom Candlen. President of 
Copa de Oro presided for the Hol- 
lister Parlor and Mrs. .Xrnaldo An- 
dreaz/i. presided for the San Juan 
Parlor. Four candidates were initt 
iated for San Juan Baiitisia and one 
for Mission Hell 

The money collected in the coin 
collection was given to The NDGW 

CALIFORNIA HERALO 



LOMITAS Parlor No. 255 

N. D. G. W. 
Los Banos 

proudly presents 

JUNE 
PAINTER 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




HAYWARD Parlor No. 122 

N. 0. G. W. 
Hayward 

"J proudly presents 

DOLORES 
FERENZ 

for election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




PLACERITA Parlor No. 277 

N D. G. W. 
Van Nuys 

proudly presents 

PEGGY L. 
BRANDENBURG 

for election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




l^ome in San Francisco. Anna Bac- 
Cala, San Juan Baiitista, presented 
■he report covering the year's work 

the Grand President. Secretary 
I\clyn Pivetti, Copa de Oro. pre- 
kente'd her Parlor report. Rosalie 
pfalzgraf, Past President of Copa de 
\)ro presented Mrs. Bondanza with 
|i money tree, a gift from her Parlor 
ind Mrs. Hiram Riphenburg. Past 
President of San Juan Bautista pre- 
sented a monetary gift to Mrs. Bon- 
Janza hidden at the base of a Mis- 
sion Bell among popies. 

1 The Mission theme was carried 
)Ut in the decorations in the Adobe 
vvith four large figures of Padres 
each carrying a banner with the 
President's watch words of Live, Un- 
iJerstanding, Knowledge and Friend- 
fihip. Mrs. Bondanza stayed over- 
night at the Mission Motel and on 
Thursday she was escorted by Mmes. 
Freitas and Joseph on a tour of the 
Mission and the historical buildings. 

The committee in charge of ar- 
jrangements were Mmes. Farney, 
[Ikuttler, Botelho, Guera Freitas and 
\ndreazzi. 



(JUNIOR UNIT NEWS . . . 

^Continued from Page 2) 

MKNLO JUNIORS 

GT Lila Hummel, State Chairman 

't Juniors paid an official visit to 

Mcnlo Junior Unit No. 10. To greet 

I the official visitor were 60 guests. 

Since Mrs. Hummel is interested in 

ailing, a nautical theme was used. 




Before the Junior President's station 
was a captain's wheel flanked by a 
gold anchor with Mrs. Hummel's 
picture in the center. Junior officers 
wore red, white and blue corsages 
and carried Captain Wheels". 




The gift to Mrs. Hummel was a 
wooden Captain's Wheel accompan- 
ied by a monetary gift. The Unit also 
presented $5 to the Junior Scholar- 
ship Fund. Units from Oakland and 
Redwood City, six Junior State 
officers, also GIS Dolores Ferenz, 
PGP Evelyn Carson, Lillian Stetson 
and Pat LeMetre were present. Cere- 
monies were conducted by Junior 
President Chris McAniff. 



the 



SOU 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



Fine Cosmetics 

DRUG CENTER 




. . . Our Specio/fy 

KE 5-1115 

201 West Lincoln 

Anaheim. California 

S & H Green Stamps 




MAY, 1971 



Not lost to those that love them 
Not dead, just gone before; 

They still live in our memory. 
And they will forever more. 



Nell Zook, San Juan Bautista No. 179. 
February 2. 

Mae Toombs, San Juan Bautista No. 
179. March 2. 

Elvera Woodland, El Pinal No. 163, 
March 10. 

Florence Belt. Reina del Mar No. 126. 
March 8. 

Edythe Passerino, Wilmington No. 27S, 
March 9. 

Catherine Conterno. Beverlv Hills No. 
289, September 4. 1970. 

l-sther McCluskey. Laurel No. 6. March 

17. 
Clora DeMaria. Woodland No. 90, 

March 21. 

Mae A. Bass, Los Angeles No. 124. 
March 11. 

Mary La Poinie, Santa Rosa No. 217, 
March 19. 

Alice Stahl, James Lick No. 220, March 

24. 

Laura Fisher, Encinal No. 156. March 
27. 

Mary Mabel Wright. Camellia No. 41. 

February 28. 
Clara Williams. Chispa No. 40, .April 1. 

Evelyn Paul>, Cerrito de Oro No. 306, 
April 5. 

Adclc Kriihn, Junipero No. 141, March. 

PAGE 11 



ANNIE K BIDWELL Parhr 

•:o, 168, N. D. C. W. 
Chico 

proudly presents 

ICEL 
BEERS 

for election 

to the office of 

Grand Inside 

Sentinel 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




COTATI Parlor No. 299 

N, D. G. W 

Cotati 

proudly presents 

URSULA 
LUCCHESI 

for election 

to the office of 

Grand Outside 

Sentinel 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




RAMONA Parlor No. 283 

N D G. W. 
Hanford 

jroudly presents 

LA VERNE 

STEVENSON 

for election 

to the office of 

Grand Outside 

Sentinel 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




EI, CA.MINO REAL BELLS 

The El Camino Real bell, a nostal- 
gic remnant of California's colorful 
past, marked the arrival of its "third 
generation" on the King's Highway 
and the unlikely birthplace was the 
courtyard of an Encino bank. 

When United California Bank 
dedicated the new home of its En- 
cino branch ofice and San Fernando 
Valley regional headquarterse at 
16633 Ventura Boulevard, it was 
also dedicating itself to the perpetua- 
tion of a bit of early California. PP 
Corinne Brandenburg, History and 
landmarks chairman, representing 
Placcriia Parlor No. 277, presented 
the bank with a replica of the bells 
which line the famous King's High- 
way from San Francisco dc Solano 
at Sonoma to Mission San Diego de 
Alcala at San Diego. The bell will 
remain on the site as a permanent 
symbol of the bank's desire to re- 
cognize California's rich historical 
heritage. 

Also taking part in the bell cere- 
mony, which was hosted by Henry 
C. Carlson, vice president and man- 
ager of the Encino office, were PGP 
June T. Goldie, State chairman of 
History and Landmarks: Ralph Buf- 
fon, manager of the California Mis- 
■sion Country Visitors Association 
Ltd.; PGP Eileen Dismuke. Also 
attending the ceremony from Placer- 
ita Parlor were past presidents Peg- 
gy Brandenburg, Rose Rumsey and 
Evelyn Henry. 

The bell dedication was the first 
in a series of similar ceremonies to 
be held at virtually all United Cali- 
fornia Bank branch offices located 
on or near El Camino Real during 
the next two years. When the project 
is completed in 1972, every branch 
on the highway is expected to have 
a bell. 

PAGE 12 




PGP Lileen Dismuke 

The "first generation" bells made 
their appearance on the celebrated 
highway in 1906 when a state his- 
torical association determined that 
the path followed by Father Junipero 
Serra and his Franciscan associates 
should be marked with distinctive 
and appropriate guideposts. A bell 
designed by Mrs. A. S. C. Forbes, 
author of a book on the history of 
the missions and later president of 
the El Camino Real Association, was 
selected as the prototype. The cast 
iron bells for which she secured a 
design patent and copyright weighed 
100 pounds and were placed on iron 
pipes 1 1 feet above the ground. 

Interest in the project grew pro- 
gressively greater until 1913 when 
there were about 450 Ik-Hs enhanc- 
ing the 700 miles of Royal Road. 
Maintenance of the bells was contin- 
ued regularly until 1933 when de- 
terioration began to set in and they 



started to disappear. A great numbei 
were lost with the large scale widen- 
ing and relocation of state roads, 
while vandals and souvenir hunters 
removed many others. In 1959. a 
survey revealed that only 17 of the 
original 1 10 bells were left standing 
in Los Angeles County, and other 
counties reported even fewer survi- 
vors. 

That same year, a second genera- 
tion of bells had its inception when 
a California law was passed through 
the efforts of various historical 
groups requiring the Division o( 
Highways to re-erect all El Camino 
Real Bells made available to them. 
More than 30 bells were recovered 
and placed along Highway 101 
There are now several hundred bells 
and staffs, many supporting "El Ca- 
mino Real" signs, extending from 
the Mexican border to San Francis- 
co. So. the bells that first appeared 
at the turn of the century, only to 
fall into oblivion during the Great 
Depression and World War II eras, 
made a triumphant return during the 
"New Frontier of the 1960s." 

The significance of United Cali- 
foria Bank's i n t r o d u c I i on of 
a "third generation " of bells is best 
summed up by UCB President Nor- 
man Barker, Jr., himself a native of 
San Diego where, ironically, the first 
new bell of the mcxlem era was 
erected on July 24, 1959, when he 
said, "The erection of these bells at 
our branch offices on El Camino 
Real epitomizes a new era in bank- 
ing in which bankers arc constantly 
becoming more community con- 
scious. The first step toward genuine 
interest in one's community is pride 
in its history and these bells typify 
that feeling." 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 







SAN JUAN Parlor No. 315 

N. D. G. W. 
Carmichael 

proudly presents 

GRACIE 
SCOTT 

for re-election 

to the office of 

Grand 

Organist 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




\I — is for the million things she gave 

me 
5 — is only that she's growing old 
r — is for the tears she spent to save 

me 
rt — is for her heart of purest gold 
E — is for her eyes with lovelight 

shining 
R — means right and right she'll always 

be. 

Put them all together they spell 
MOrHF.R! The word that means the 
world to me! 



[OPEN AIR THEATRE 

The first open air Greek theatre 
to be constructed in California was 

.erected at Point Lorn a by Mrs. 

i Katherine T i n g I e y, head of the 
Theosophical Society. 



CARRIER PIGEON SERVICE 

Baci< in the Nineties business 
men could vacation at Catalina Is- 
land and at the same time keep con- 
tact with affairs in Los Angeles. 
In Rand, McNaliy's 1896 Guide to 
the Pacific Coast, it is noted, "Car- 
rier pigeon service between Avalon 




and the mainland has recently been 
instituted, for the convenience of 
men who desire to retain prompt 
business communication with the 
outside world while stopping on the 
island." 




Arches leading inin ilu- i^rtmnds <>l ilie Tlwosopiucal Temple, Point Loma, 

in 1906. 



Defense Attorney "What was the time 
when you were attacked?" 

Complaining Witness: "I don't know; 
ask your client — he stole my watch." 









The LatnpWghter 

Come in and linnvM' 

Highway 138 and 

Mountain Road 

Box 106 



Val Bray, owner Pinon Hills, Calif. 



LUdlow 8-1753 

BELL HAVEN GUEST HOME 

For Ambulatory Senior Citizens 

4726 Clara Street, Cudahy 

GUSSIE J. GUIDOTTI 

Member, Sea Point Parlor 196 
Sausalito 



UILGENFELn 

n MORTUARY U 

Faithful. Courteous. Service 
120 E. Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5-4I05 



HOLflnDlREVnOLDS 

GRflDING(M)cONTRHCTOR 

BRIDGES ■ HIGHWAYS - DAMS - RAILROADS 
• Heavy •Equipment 

For Rent 



Hauling 



535-4233 
505 S. Sunkist Ave. 



Anaheim 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 535-7221 

INSURANCE — SURETY BONDS 

M E. BEEBE & CO. 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim, California 




lower' J>Kop 
1215 W. Lincoln, Anaheim 



535-4997 



MULTI-LISTING SERVICE 

LEATHERBY REALTY 

NORA GRANGETTO 
772-1552 or 533-3632 



702 W. LINCOLN 
Estate - Home 



ANAHEIM 
Income Property 



MAY. 1971 



PAGE 13 




dntCL 



L 



y^^^na 




Ms 



-^-itsi l^oi in 1887 



l ^l^ l Hfc FiRSi lot sale in Snnta nishcd excursionists visiting newly the Los Angeles depots, newly af 
J^ Ana, in June 1887, yielded platted subdivisions where persua- rived tourists were greeted will 
over $80,000. Free meals were fur- jive salesmen made quick sales. At handbills proclaiming. 



Santa Ana 

The Metropolis of Southern California's Fairest Valley! 

Chief Among Ten Thousand, or the One 

Altogether Lovely! 

Beautiful! Busy! Bustling! Booming! It 

Can't be Beat! 

The town now has the biggest kind 

of a big, big boom. 

A Great Big Boom! And you 

Can Accumulate Ducats b\ Investing! 




Spi'iial train arriviiif; iii Southern I'acifU dcptH on Fruit Street. Suniu Ann. hriiigin); prospective land 
buyers to an auction Jurinf' tlie Hooni of the liiglities. 



PAGE 14 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



' Not to be outdone, Tustin adver- 
ted its virtues in doggerel verse, a 
ivorite medium of the time: 

I "When the Angel of Peace first deecended. 

To bless with his presence the children of men, 
"Mid the fairest of scenes his pathway e'er tended. 
And unto his smile the glad earth smiled again. 
■He joyed in the fragrance of oranges and roses. 
And loved 'mid their glances to linger or roam. 
And he said: 'Here in Tustin, where Beauty reposes, 
1 will linger or build me a home!' " 



As you drove slowly down the 
street you strained your eyes peering 
through the windshield, which was 
usually of two panes of glass, one 
above the other. The lower pane 
could open up and if a rubber strap 
at its base became worn or broken, 
tiny rivulets of water ran down 
across the face of the instrument 
board. 

This archaic condition was grad- 
ually improved. First, we were pro- 
vided with a windshield wiper that 
was operated manually. Then cars 
came equipped with the "automatic" 
type that moved by the pressure of 
air forced through a rubber tube. 
When the tube plugged up or broke 
the wiper refused to operate. 

Then car manufacturers installed 
two wipers on the more ritzy models. 



Well, you know the kind we have 
today. 

Don't be impatient when the rub- 
ber blade of your wiper gets frayed 
or breaks. Remember the old days! 



MELROSE 



ilie 



MEMORIAL PARK • MAUSOLEUM 
CREMATORIUM • COLUMBARIUM 
Orangewood Street at Santa Ana Freeway 
' 538-3583 




THE BASLER HOME 



CONVALESCENT & ELDERLY 

24.Haur Nursing Service 

Excellent Meals ■ Tray Service 

LARGE CHEERFUL ROOMS 
ADJOINING BATHS i SUNDECKS 

Life Membership or Monthly Rates 



542-3514 



1015 N. Broadway 



; In the days of plentiful rain no 
loubt some of you have been caught 
n a shower and found that your 
■vindshield wiper wouldn't work. It 
rked you, didn't it? 

How many of you will admit 
;.hat you drove a car back in the 
';ra B.W.W. (Before Windshield 
iVipers)? It was quite an experience. 



EL TOBRITO 

TACOS and BURRITOS 

5th and Bristol 
Santa Ana, California 



Patronize Our Advertisers 

and tell them you saw their ad 

in the California Herald 




ALLEN E. 


SEYLER 


l®ri OIL DEALER 

Santa Ana 
• Phone 54 J -3 166 

ic Tune Up • Air Conditioning 

• Wheel Alignment • Brake Service 


■ 


^ 


■un 


617 
Free 


East 
Pick 


77//! Street, 
■ & Delivery 

Electror 
76 Auto Care 



Of course, when it started to 
sprinkle, you hurried to get up the 
'top of your car. Then you hastened 
to snap on the side curtains, those 
icioths affairs with isinglass windows 
(some of which were usually crack- 
led or broken). If the rain was pclt- 
jing down briskly, you tried to fasten 
|the curtains while remaining in the 
car, something of a back-breaking 
experience. 



Oiul Drug Store 

1002 E. 17th Street, Santa Ana / Phone 547-6655 




Sam and Jim Calabrese 

Prescriptions and Sundries Servinf; Orange County Since 1959 

MASTERCHARGE and BANKAMERICARD • FREE DELtVERY 



MAY, 1971 



PAGE 15 



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and Parlor Name and Number 
printed in black ink on deluxe 
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24 sets $ 4.95* 

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PERSONALIZED NOTE 
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24 sets $ 5.95* 

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ANAHELM 

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PRopect 2-1532 



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refinancing t collections 



HUNTI.NGTON BEACH 

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Ph. S2S-4S71 





PIONEER PRESS 

Antiquarian & Out-of-print 

Book Division 

presents 

VOLUME THREE 

Orange County Historical 

Society Publication (now 

out-of-print) 

Authors include: Will McPherson, Terry 
E. Stephenson, Leo J. Friis, Alfonso 
Yorba, Fern Hill Colman, W. M. 
McFadden, E. M. Sunquist and many 
others. 

$20.00 

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARTER. 
PIONEER EDITOR 

by 

Dr. Leo J. Friis 

No. 1 of Orange County Pioneer 
Series, now out of print. Life and 
events in Anaheim from October 1870 
to 1871. 

$7.50 

Make check payable to 
PIONEER PRESS 



Send to 
301 North Parton 
Santa Ana, California 
92701 






"This is an 
American" 

by 

Merthyne Ada 

Killion 



Limited Edition; exquisite blue parch- 
ment with paper cover. In these trying 
times the author tells wbat it means to 
her to be an American. 

$2.00 (plus 57 cents tax and mailing) 




"WHEN ANAHEIM 
WAS 21" 

by 

Dr. Leo J. Friis 

Winner of several awards. 



Illustrated, Annotated. Index. No. 2 
of Orange County Pioneer Series. The 
author descril>es Anaheim as it ap- 
peared in 1878 with its Chinese 
quarter, irrigation ditches and wineries. 

$7.50 (plus 99 cents tax and mailing) 

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Wt^iAi Vni I rpTirSrJ^ 




Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




JUMC, 1971 + 4CC 



JAPANESE TEA GARDEN, GOLDEN GATE PARK 



Parlor Neu/s California Herald 



Ull.MINGTON 

Colorful golden California poppies 
surrounding a blue and gold theme 
emblem inscribed "Unity Is the Key 
to Success," provided pretty back- 
ground decor for recent ceremonies 
of induction which seated Catherine 
Erven as 1971 president of Wil- 
mington Parlor No. 278. 

Other 1971 officers installed with 
Mrs. Er^■en were: Mmes. Schmidt, 
Aspittle, Miller. Anthony, Owens, 
Seja, Scheppmann, Menconi, Pansier. 
Hernandez, Griffith, Heath, Rus- 
sell, Swope, and Grafton. 

Mrs. Erven, who succeeded 
Maude Swope as president is a past 
president and charter member of the 
Parlor. Her gavel, guest book and 
record book were made by her hus- 
band Clifford, for her first presi- 
dential installation in 1961. Hand 
carved covered wagons and horses, 
presented to her in 1961, were a 
part of the 1971 background decor. 
Her corsage contained a blossom 
from a Bird of Paradise plant given 
her ten years ago at the installation, 
and which had been growing in the 
Erven home garden since that time. 
Sara South, one of the 1971 flag 
bearers, had served as Bible Bearer 
in 1961. 

Officer inductees wore gowns 
fashionable in the mid and late 
1800s with wrist corsages of golden 
poppies. 

Installing officers from La Tijera 
were DGP Lucia Bartholio and GT 
Lila Hummell, escort marshal. Nor- 
walk Estrellas de Oro Unit 37, served 
as escort team and flag bearers. 
Organist was Gertrude Doss of 
Whiilier No. 29,S. Bible Bearer was 
Leslie Sue Miller, four-year old 
grand-daughter of Mrs. Erven. Les- 
lie Sue's gown was a replica of that 
worn by her grandmother. 

Special guests in attendance in- 
cluded SDDGP Dannella Hawkins 
of Cien Anos: Mrs. Fred Lorenzen, 
president of the Society for the 
Preservation of Wilmington Dnmi 
Barracks, and representatives from 

PAGE 2 



-PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 

Volume XVI II June, 1971 Number 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Parlor News 

San Francisco — Convention City (Part III) 

The Grand President's Corner 

In Memoriam 

There Were 21, by JJ Friis 



I 



Los Angeles 124; La I ijera. 282; day cclcbrali(.)n and pariidc, W isi 

Estrellas de Oro Unit; Rio Hondo Festival at Banning Manor. Chi 

284; Long Beach 154 and San rens Foundation Brunchcon. Gran] 

Gabriel 281. President visit . . . Wilmington Di 

Future activities for Wilmington barracks activities, 
include: City of Carson's third birth- i i i 







Electricity is vital 
to your way of life. 
So is a healthy 
environment. 
We're working to 
bring you botti. 




Southern California Edison 



i. J. FRns 

PubUsbcr 



LEO J. FRns 
Editor 



JANE FRns 
PubUc RcUdow 



Published Monthly by J. J. Frlis and Leo J. Fnis, owneri and publiahars, Anah«ir 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim. California 
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CALIFORNIA HERALD 



an 




STREET NAMES 



HE NAMES THAT THE citizcns 

of San Francisco gave their 
istreets and boulevards became the 
landmarks of the city's most cher- 
ished traditions. Many of the names 
I that are familiar give evidence of the 
jcity's Spanish-California past. Em- 
barcadero, for example, is the Span- 
ish word for "place of embarkation." 
\Di\isadero is a point from which 
ion may look a long distance in two 
directions, and Potrero is a pasture. 
Spanish surnames, those of fam- 
ous families holding grants of land 
from the Spanish Crown, are also 
common in the City. Vallejo Street 
bears the name of General Mariano 
G. Vallejo, an early Califomiano 
who befriended many of the Amer- 
icans who came to California in the 
days before the establishment of the 
Bear Flag Republic. 

Commandante Jose Arguello, for 
whom Arguello Street was named, 
was the Spanish commander of the 
Presidio from 1787 to 1806. He 
later became the Governor of all 
Spanish California. His brother Luis 
ArgucUo was the owner of the fam- 
ous Rancho de las Pulgas, the Ranch 
of the Fleas, that covered much of 
southern San Mateo County. 

Alemany Boulevard was originally 
the exclusive property of Archbishop 
Joseph S. Alemany. This distinguish- 
ed churchman was a native of 
Valencia, Spain who became an 
American citizen after ten years of 
missionary work in Kentucky and 
Ohio. From 1850 to 1853 he served 
as the Roman Catholic Bishop of 

JUNE, 1971 



tancLSco 
otiv&tziion 

Part III 



e 



■t 



H 




Monterey and later became the first 
Archbishop of the city of San Franc- 
isco. 

But not all the names borne by 
San Francisco streets are Spanish. 
In the booming times of the 1840's 
and 1850's many men were honored 
by having thoroughfares named for 
them. Montgomery Street was named 
for Captain J. B. Montgomery, USN. 



This interesting historical informa- 
tion about San Francisco, the 1971 
NDGW Convention City, was com- 
piled by GT Helen C. McCarthy of 
the Public Relations Committee. 



This officer was the commander of 
the USS Portsmouth, the war vessel 
under the jurisdiction of Commodore 
John P. Sloat, which occupied the 
Spanish settlement of Verba Buena 
(San Francisco). 

Bartlett Street carries the name 
of an officer of the USS Portsmouth, 
Lieutenant Washington A. Bartlett, 
USN. This officer became the first 
American Alcalde, or Mayor-Milit- 
ary Commander, of Verba Buena. It 
was Lieutenant Bartlett who official- 
ly changed the name of the city to 
San Francisco with an ordinance 
published on January 30, 1847. 

Other military men also were 
among those who gained a measure 
of immortality through the good of- 
fices of the town surveyors and the 
city council. Bryant Street is named 
for Edwin Bryant, a soldier in John 
Fremont's battalion. An author and 
adventurer turned politician, Bryant 
became Alcalde of San Franc- 
isco next after Bartlett. General Step- 
hen Watts Kearny of Kearny Street 
fame was first known as the com- 




Ji^m C- •eniont 



PAGE 3 



mandcr of an American expedition 
intended to conquer New Mexico 
and California. The expedition was 
defeated at the Battle of San Pascual 
in 1846 and the conquest of Cali- 
fornia was accomplished by others. 
He served as Military Governor of 
the state in 1847 and testified against 
John C. Fremont in the Washington 
inquiry investigating Fremont's rath- 
er cavalier annexation of territories 
here in the West. Perhaps his own 
failure to accomplish what Fremont 
did was the cause of his disaffection. 
In any case. Kearny and Fremont 
feuded for the rest of their lives, 
though both are represented among 
San Francisco's street names. 




Henry Clay, who introduced in the 
Senate a series of resohilions which 
became the basis of the famous com- 
promise of 1850. A m o n g these 
resohitions was one declaring that 
California ought to be admitted to 
the Union without regard to what 
her decision on slavery might be. 
San Francisco honored Henry Clay 
by naming one of its streets for him. 



Grant Avenue was named for 
Ulysses Simpson Grant, who resided 
in the city for several years before 
returning to military service during 
the Civil War, and Van Ness Avenue 
bears the name of James Van Ness. 
who was elected Mayor in 1956. 




Sutler's Mill where gold was discovered as told about in Sam 
Brannan's paper the "California Star". 



Ellis Street and Geary Street were 
named for Alfred J. Ellis and John 
W. Geary, both were members of 
the California State Constitutional 
Convention in 1849. Geary's career 
was particularly distinguished, for 
he was the last alcalde and the First 
Mayor of S a n Francisco, elected 



under the new City Charter in lS5(i 
He also served as a General Ofticei 
in the Civil War and later as gover- 
nor of Kansas and Pennsylvania. 

OFarrell Street bears the name 
of Jasper O'Farrell, a surveyor who 
was employed to map San Francisco 
in 1847. The origin of Bush Street's 




First home of the .Sun Francisco Mint. 



PAGE 4 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



lanie is slightly more ambiguous. It 
lias been suggested that J. P. Bush 
Aas one of OTarrell's assistants, 
laving joined his surveying crew 
ifter jumping ship in 1845. 

William M. Eddy for whom Eddy 
Street was named, was San Franc- 
isco's City Surveyor in 1849. He 
.ontinued the work begun by Jasper 
O'Farrell and eventually became 
Surveyor General of California. 

Samuel Brannan, for whom Bran- 
nan Street was named, is famous in 
the City's past. A leader of Mor- 
mons, he was also the printer of 
the first newspaper in the City, the 
California Star. It was Brannan's 
paper that published John Marshall's 
discovery of gold at Sutter's Mill 
and actually precipitated the Gold 
Rush of 1849. 





St. Marx's, well-known San Francisco landmark 




Early fire Fighting equipment 



Capt. John A. Sutter 



John A. Sutter, the man who gave 
his name to Sutter Street, was the 
Swiss settler who came to California 
in 1839 to found a settlement 
known as New Helvetia. It was Sut- 
ter who owned the land where John 
Marshall discovered gold, and this 
stroke of fortune actually ruined 
him. Squatters and claim jumpers 
preempted his legal claims to the 
land and left him a poor man in 
the midst of riches. 

Post Street is named for Gabriel 

B. Post, who came to the city in 

1849 and became one of the most 

(Continued on Page 8) 

JUNE, 1971 




Disasterous San Francisco Fire of Mav 4. 



PAGE S 



The Grand 
President's Corner 




IRENE BONDANZA 



^( 



Ax 



The Lamp/ighter 

Highway 138 and 

Mountain Road 

Box 106 



Val Bray, owner Pinon Hills, Calif. 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 



the 



SOU 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



GRAND I'RHSIDENT 

Irene Bondanza (Mrs. Joseph) 
2328 Union Street 
San Francisco, California 94123 
Telephone: 931-0145 (Area 415) 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 
227 1 -32nd Avenue 
San Francisco, California 94116 
Office: 703 Market Street, Room 612 
San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



3ttnerar^ 1971 



JUNE 

5 San Francisco County Luncheon 

6 Grove of Memory Memorial Services 
19-24 Convention 



Official visits are marked with astericks 



San Francisv 



IN MEMBRIAM 




Not lost to those that love them 
Not dead, just gone before; 

They still live in our memory. 
And they will forever more. 

Rose Freitas. Lomitas No. 255. .April 1 1 . 

Gcraldinc Silva. Golden California No. 
291, April. 

Myrtle Tonzi, Chispa No. 40, April 1-J. 

Faye Schimang, Petaluma No. 222. April 
6. 

lla Cole, Annie K. Bidwell No. I6«. April 
16. 

I orraine Harsch. Fruitvale No. 177. 
April 16. 

Helen Bulls. Copa de Oro No 10.':. April 
IS 



HIGHEST INTEREST ON INSURED SAVINGS 
Payable Quartfrly • Compounded Daily 



Accounts 

Now Insured 

up to 

$20,000.00 



FULLERTON 
SAVINGS 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 



200 W. Commonwealth, FuUcrton 
1203 E. Yorba Linda Blvd., Placcntia 



871-4244 
524-1321 



PAGE 6 



Vera Braunschwicg, Twin Peaks No. V 

April 18. 
Lillian Smith. Twin Peaks No. 1((5. Ap 

19. 

Juanita Barnhari. V e n d o m c No I' 

April 19. 
Vincenia Sorcnson, Sania Ana No. 2? 

April 19. 

Doris Hoffner. San Diego No. 208, Ap 
20. 

Alice Parmenler. Kancho San Jose N 

307, April 20. 
f Ihyl Sheehy, Piedmont No. 87, April : 

.•\nnc Cosgrovc, Ycrba Buena No 2" 

April 23. 
Beatrice Luce. El Dorado No. 186, Api 

25. 
Rulh Gomes Larawav, Chispa No. * 

April 25. 
Emily O'Kane, Buena Vista No. 68. Ap: 

7. 
Florence Irish, Californiana No 2'i 

April 13. 
Irene McNiece, Brooklyn No. 157. \p: 

23. 
Jessie Weslon, Califia No. 22, April 2 

Josephine Franklin. San Jose No. K 
April 26. 

.Amelia Giacomaz/.i. Vcndome No |l> 
April 26. 

Theresia Kckki. Sequoia No. 272, May 

Kdilh Brown. Anona No. 164. April 2' i 

Alice Bvme, Gold of Ophir No I* 
April 29. 

Marian Fragulia, Angelila No. 32. \pi 

.\nnie Dormodv. Chispa No. 40. \pi 

27. 

Emma Schwarz,. El Carmelo No 18 
May I. 

Romilda Ralph. Orinda No 56. April 2 

Rulh Bagala. Alia No 3. April 10 

Eunice Ripple, El Pescadcro No. 82, Mii 
1. 

Marybcllc Lindgrcn. .\nnie K Bidwel 
No. 168, May 2. 

Fli/aheth \iiiovich. Poinscttia No '!> 
March 21. 

CALIFORNIA HERAL: 



MORADA Parlor No. 199 

N. D. G. W. 
Modesto 

proudly presents 

VIRGILIA 
McCOMBS 

for election 
»' ■ to the office of 

Grand President 

71 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




LA BANDERA Parlor No. 110 

N. D. G. W. 
Sacramento 

proudly presents 

RAE L 
ROMINGER 

for election 
:o the office of 

Grand 
Vice-President 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




URSULA Parlor No. 1 

N. D. G. W. 
Jackson 

proudly presents 

BETTY READ 
CURILICH 

for election 
CO the office of 

'!s Grand Marshal 




1971 Grand Parlor 



San Francisco 




Follou/Ing the August issue. The 
CALIFORNIA HERALD Will appear in 
a new/ format. 

It wfll be profusely illustrated 
OiW6 devoted entirely to California 
history articles. 

Everq Nativ/e (l<:x\\iov\\\(:xw steep- 
ed \x\ the traditions of our golden 
state will enjoq everq page of it. 



PAGE 7 



SAN JOSE Parlor No. 81 

N. D. G. W 
San Jose 

oroudly presents 

MARIE C. 
LANDINI 

tor election 
jto the office of 

Grand Marshal 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




SAN FRANCISCO . . . 
(Continued Ironi Page 5) 




Joshua N or I o n. \clf anloiineJ 
"Xiirion I. lunperor of the United 
Slates and Protector of Mexico." 
He is shown here with his sword of 
''late. Ntirton was a cohtrtul jigure 
in San l-ranci\co in die IK60\. 



LA TIJERA Parlor No. 282 

N. D. G. W 
Inglewood 

Iproudly presents 

LILA S. 
HUMMEL 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 




971 Grand Parlor 



San Francisco 



BERKELEY Parlor No. 150 

N D. G. W. 
Berkeley 

I oroudly presents 

MARIAN E. 
McGUIRE 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 




1971 Grand Parlor 



San Francisco 



prominent merchants of Sun Franc- 
isco. He was a member of the City 
Council in 1849 and 1850 and soon 
after that became a State Senator. 



Mission Street is so named be- 
cause it began as the trail to Mission 
Dolores, while Battery Street bears 
its military name due to the emplace- 



.^y^^^,,^^^ /^^ •'^^^^^ h<^^. "^-w J 
,^ V ^C »:■> &* .. ^ / 



^ 







n^ 










(IXt,^ ^^ '^^ — / 



^1 aA, '^' 



^ ^ / A^ M:^£r^^^ 












COURTFSV, M W MARTENE 

Proclamation by Norton I. Emperor 



PAGL B 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



UTOPIA Parlor No. 252 

N. D. G. W. 
San Franc. SCO 

proudly presents 
HELEN C. 

McCarthy 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

1971 Grand Parlcr San Francisco 




DARDANELLE Parlor No. 66 

N. D. G. W. 
Sonora 

proudly presents 

MEREDYTH 
BURNETTE 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




BEVERLY HILLS Parlor No. 289 

N. D. G. W. 
Beverly Hills 

proudly presents 

LAURA 
BLOSDALE 

for re-election 

to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




ment there of a battery of five field 
guns to dominate the inner harbor 
in 1846. 

(Continued on Page 10) 



(Translation of Norton's Proclamation on 
Page 8) 

^ PROCLAMATION 

Whereas on the 10th day of April, 
1856, the Representatives of Great 
Britain, Austria, France, Prussia, 
Russia, Sardinia & Turkey Estab- 



lished as a Fixed Principle of Inter- 
national Law, That Privateering was 
and should remain abolished & 
whereas deeming in consequence 
that the U. S. of A. shall not remain 
the Is[h]maelites of the world. 
Now Therefore We Norton I, by the 
Grace of God & the National Will, 
Emperor of the U. S. of A. do here- 
by Establish the same principle of 
the International Law, on behalf of 
the U. S. of A. And We hereby 



Command our Navies to Capture 
and deal out the most prompt & 
effective Punishment to all & every 
persons found engaged in such 
Piratical Pursuits whether between 
the Different portions of our Com- 
mon Country or a Foreign Foe. 

Given under our hand & seal at 
San Francisco Cala 10th June 1861. 
Norton I 
Emperor 




JUNE. 1971 



PAGE 9 



N 



LOMITAS Parlor No. 255 

N. D. G. W. 
Los Banos 

proudly presents 

JUNE 
PAINTER 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




SAN FRANCISCO . . . 

(Coniinued from Page 9) 

Some of the c i t y's streets arc 
named for famous streets in other 
cities. Market Street was named 
after Market Street in Philadelphia 



PLACERITA Parlor No. 277 

N. D. G. W. 
Van Nuys 

proudly presents 

PEGGY L. 
3RANDENBURG 

for election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 




1971 Grand Parlor 



San Francisco 



liy George Hyde, an early settler 
and city official, who also has a 
street named for him. 

The romance of San Francisco 
tradition greets the historian from 
every street-sign. Generals. Spanish 
Grandees, city officials, sailors, ad- 
venturers — and even a milkman 



ANNIE K. BIDWELL Parlor 

No. US. N. O. G. W. 
Chico 

proudly presents 

ICEL 
BEERS 

for election 

J the office of 

Grand Inside 

Sentinel 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




who sold milk in San Francisco 
from diH)r to door before becoming 
one of the city's first alderman in 
I X.-^O — Charles H. Cough, for 
whom Gough Street was named, 
have been honored. 

The C a b I e Cars. Fisherman's 
Wharf. Chinatown. Golden Gate 







Popular many, many years a\;o was the "A" Train to San Francisco 



PAGE 10 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



COTATI Parlor No. 299 



^ 



if. 



1971 Grand Parlor 



N. D. G. W. 
Cotati 

proudly presents 

URSULA 
LUCCHESI 

for election 

to the office of 

Grand Outside 

Sentinel 

San Francisco 



Park, are but a few of the fascinating 
places and sights to visit in San 
Francisco. Some others that deUght 



SAN JUAN Parlor No. 315 

N. D. G. W. 
Carmichael 

proudly presents 

GRACIE 
SCOTT 

for re-election 

to the office of 

Grand 

Organist 

1971 Grand Parlor San Francisco 




visitors are: walking or riding on 
the part of Lombard Street known 
as the "crookest street in the world"; 



driving across the San Francisco- 
Oakland Bay Bridge, one of the 
engineering and architectural won- 
ders of modern times, a double 
decked part suspension span at one 
end, and a cantilever bridge on the 
other end; riding or walking on "the 
bridge that couldn't be built", that 
majestic span across the Golden 
Gate at the entrance from the Pacific 
Ocean to San Francisco Bay; visiting 
Mission San Francisco de Asis, or 
as it is better known. Mission 
Dolores, a small adobe church and 
tiny cemetery packed with historic 
headstones; the Palace of Fine Arts, 
a majestic classic beauty remaining 




Japanese Tea Cicirden in (ioldcn Gate Park. San Francisco 



JUNE. 1971 



PAGE 11 



LUdlow B-1753 
BELL HAVEN GUEST HOME 

For Ambulatory Senior Citizens 

4726 Clara Street, Cudahy 

GUSSIE J. GUIDOTTI 

Member, Sea Point Parlor 196 
Sausalito 



MELROSE 



ilie 



MEMORIAL PARK • MAUSOLEUM 

CREMATORIUM • COLUMBARIUM 

Orangewood Street at Santa Ana Freeway 

538-3583 



SAN FRANCISCO . . . 
iConlinued from Page 11) 

Iroin the 1915 Panama Pacific Ex- 
pDsition on the Marina shore: the 
Zoo with its \ast animal kingdom; 
the many shopping centers, especial- 
ly Ghiradelii's Square and The 
Cannery both located in the vicinity 
of Fisherman's Wharf; the many fine 
and unequalled restaurants; and so 
many other traditional historical 
landmarks. 

SAN FRANCISCO — a city with 
something for everyone, where visi- 
tors always return. 



There Were 21 

).l. Priis 

yipui: CHAIN OF twenty-one Franc- 
^ iscan missions extending from 
San Diego to Sonoma has been aptly 
called "Father Serra's Rosary." Its 
creation was part of Spain's colonial 
pattern in settling a new land. 

Missions were not intended to be 
permanent institutions in a country. 
1 hey were the forerunners of 
churches planned to be built later. 
Their purpose was to convert the 
Indians to Christianity and thereby 



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TACOS and BURRITOS 

5th and Bristol 
Santa Ana, California 



Patronize Our Advertisers 

and tell iheni you saw their ad 

in the California Herald 



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677 East 17th Street, Santa Ana 

Free Pick & Delivery • Phone 541-3166 

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Sam and Jim Calabrese 

Prescriptions and Sundries Serving Orange COunty Since /V.^V 

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PAGE 12 



R u i n s of church at Mission San 

Juan Capislrano where legend tell'' 

that tlie Swallows come each year 

on St. Joseph's Day. 



establish them into civilized com 
munities. 

Many Spanish people contributed 
generously to the Mission cause, 
their donations being placed in what 
was called the Pious Fund. Inciden- 
tally, the long standing dispute bet- 
ween the Roman Catholic Hierarchy 
of California and the government of 
Mexico over a share of this Fund 
has been settled only recently. 

Father Junipero Serra founded the 
first mission of California at San 
niego on July I ft. 1769. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



1/47" RIGHT: Mision San Luis 
^ Rey de Francia 



Father F i r m i n Lasuen 
successor of Father Serra, as 
Father Presidente of the 
California missions, estab- 
lished Mision San Luis Rey 
de Francia on June 13, 
1798. A branch of this mis- 
sion, called Asistencia de 
Antonio de Pala. was found- 
ed in 1816. 

After a delay, caused 
by an Indian revolt at San 
D i e e o, Mision San Juan 





{^"-^ 



Misidn San Gabriel An angel 



JUNE, 1971 



PAGE 13 




ABOVE — Mission San Luis Ot>isp(> de Tolosa. 



THERE WERE 21 . . . 
(Continued from Page 13} 

Capistrano was formerly estuhlished 
hy Father Serra on November I. 

1776. 

A site on the Santa Ana River, 
cast of Anaheim, was once con- 
sidered as the location for the Mis- 
inn San Gabriel An angel. The mis- 
sion was founded on September 8, 
1771, on a bluff overlooking the 
Rio Hondo, not far from Montebcllo. 
From there it was moved to pre- 
sent San Gabriel. 

Father Lasuen formally estab- 
lished Mision San Fernando Rey de 
Espafia on September S, 1797. In 
later years its buildings became the 
home of Gen. Andres Pico. 



BELOW — Mision la Exaltacion de la Santa Cruz 




CALIFORNIA HERALD 




Mision San Fernando, Rey de Espana, before restoration. Here 

once hung the hell from Kodiack Island. Alaska, which was later 

removed to Camidos Rancho. 




Asistencia dc Sun Antonio de Fala showing campanile 



jOFFICIAL VISIT 

I "It's a Child's World" was the 
itheme of the evening when Grand 
'President Bondanza made her 
official visit to District 39. The 
participating parlors were Santa 
Ana No. 235, Santa Ana; Grace 
I No. 242, Fullerton, and Silver Sands 
}No. 286, Huntington Beach. A din- 
!ner preceded the formal meeting 
; which was held at the Elks Club 

JUNE, 1971 



in Fullerton. More than sixty at- 
tended. Dining tables and the meet- 
ing hall were decorated appropriate- 
ly with dolls and toys and an abun- 
dance of red. white a n d yellow 
flowers. 

Among those present were GTs, 
Lila Hummel and Laura Blosdale; 
PGPs Mary Barden and Lee Brice 
and PGTs Gertrude Doss and Marie 
Landini. .Also in attendance were 



DGPs Doris Lounsbury, Lois Liglit- 
hall, Mary Velarde and SDDGP 
Joanne Frey. 

Six members dressed as little girls 
carrying giant lollypops formed the 
escort team. A monetary gift adorn- 
ing a toy duck was presented the 
Grand President from the three par- 
lors. A check of $23.00, proceeds 
from the coin march was presented 
the Grand President who designated 
the sum to go to the mission restor- 
ation fund to be used for the bene- 
fit of San Fernando Mission which 
had suffered extensive damage dur- 
ing the recent earthquake. 

(To be continued next month) 
*■ / f 

St. Peter: "Where are you from?" 
Applicant: "California." 
St. Peter: "Come on in. but I don't think 
you'll like it." 



MULTI-LISTING SERVICE 

LEATHERBY REALTY 

NORA GRANGETTO 
772-1552 or 533-3632 



702 W. LINCOLN 
Estate - Home 



ANAHEIM 
Income Property 



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Faithful. Courteous. Service 
120 E. Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5-4I05 



HoLflnDlREvnoiDS 

GRnDING(^CONTRnCTOR 

BRIDGES - HIGHWAYS - DAMS - RAILROADS 

• Heavy •Equipmant 

Haulins For Rent 



535-4233 
505 S. Sunkist Ave. 



Anaheim 



RAY 0. LINK 

relephone 535-7221 
INSURANCE — SURETY BONDS 
M. E. BEEBE & CO. 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 
Anaheim, California 




Flows/ 31^^P 
1215 W. Lincoln, Anaheim 



535-4997 

PAGE 15 



RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 
P. 0. Drawer 4243 
Anaheim, California 92803 



PJl^LIC LIHRA3Y 

' :{ 



•2fa 



CALL 
DC? I 



PIONEER PRESS presents its latest book . 



M 



^ama 




Gm<2 



to 




otntct 



(>t/ Cy/G):huh<? y^afj^f. 



ABOUT THE BOOK 



ABOUT THE AUTHOR 




Mama Came to Calijornia is a 
sprightly styled history of pioneer 
Yuba County, California. 

With a gold mine of anecdotal 
nuggets the author skillfully fashions 
a series of swift moving composite 
pictures of frontier life as her mother 
and other pioneers saw it. 

Her mother, Sarah Jane McElroy, 
best known as "Sadie" to her relatives 
and friends, moves easily and 
naturally through a period of thirty- 
five eventful years commencing with 
the exciting Fifties. 

Here is a factual story of pioneer 
life with its bad men, its stalwart law 
men like Sheriff Hank McCoy, its 
schot)ls, its churches, its towns, and 
best of all its resourceful, hard-work- 
ing people who built the County. 




Gertrude Cable was Ixirn in Marys- 
ville. Yuba County, California, the 
daughter of Peter James Finnegan 
and Sarah Jane McFlroy Hnnegan. 

After being graduated from Notre 
Dame High School in Marysville. 
she matriculated at San Jose State 
when it was still a normal schtxil. 
I'pon her graduation there she entered 
Chico State where she received her 
A.B. and Administration credential. 



For thirty-nine years she was 
Principal and Superintendent of thci 
.Arboga Elementary school (now parti 
of the Unified District) in Yubi 
County. 

She is a member of Marys- 
ville Parlor, Native Daughters of thcj 
Golden West, as well as of the Marys- 
ville-Yuba City branch of University 
Women. She is a past president <rf 
Beta Omega Chapter, Delta Kappa 
Gamma. 

Mrs. Cable is listed in "Who's 
Who of American Women," "Who's i 
Who in the West," "Personalities of 
the West and Midwest", "Who's Who 
in California, 1969," "The Royal 
Blue Book of Leaders of the English 
Speaking World," and "Two Thou- 
sand Women of Achievement." 

Gerinide Cable has a real sense 
of loyalty to her native land, which 
has prompted her to write of it fre- 
quently. She has one other published 
book. Three Summers With I'op, 
written in memorv of her father. 



(^^^^ 



To order the book, send $5.95 
plus 93 cents tax and mailing per 
book) to DEPT. CH, Pioneer Press, 
301 N. Parton St., Santa Ana, Cali- 
fornia 92701 or order through your 
favorite book store. 



SPEC/AL COLLECTIONS 




Mii^^iyD 



Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




JULN. 1971 + 40<t 



SANTA BARBARA'S PICTURESQUE COASTLINE 



J5a>2rc2S2S2SZS2S2S2S2SZ52S2S25ZSESZS2S2SZS(52SiS?I 

JUNIOR NDGW 




ACTIVITIES 



s 



I RinvAi.E JR. i;mt 

Swing into Spring" was Fruitvalc 
Junior Unit's Fashion Show and Tea. 
The fashions were all handmade and 
modeled by the girls and their 
mothers. The show was a financial 
success, as well as an enjoyable 
afternoon. Many I o c a 1 businesses 
donated door prizes. General ("hair- 
man was: Marilyn Ann Haker, 




Marilyn Ann Baker 

Model Chairman Sharon Landt. 
Reservations and Tickets Karen 
Winnie, Refreshments Joanie Perry. 
Decorations Lcealyn Marie IJaker. 



I'RINCKSA DHL M.VR 

President Lisalotte MacFarlanc. 
member of Junior Unit No. 40 and 
three advisors attended the La Puri- 
sima Mission Festival. It was a da\ 
well spent. 

i i 1 

"Adam and Eve niiist surely have been 
Soviet citizens — they were naked, the 
fruit they ate was forbidden hut never- 
theless they thought they were in par;i- 
disc." — Arthur Korcslcr. 

/ r < 

I'm a man of few words." 

"Shake. I'm married too." 

°AGE 2 



California Herald 



'PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 



VOLUMt XVIII 



July. 1971 Number II 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Junior Unit Activities .'. 2 

Carpinteria Pioneer Tea ....;. "S 

The Grand President's Comer 6 

In Memoriam 6 

Parlor News 6 

Now Grand Officers. NDGW for 1971-1972 8 

Grand Presidents. NDGW — Past and Present 12 

Notice 13 



We're splitting the atom for you. 



Chances are some of the 
electricity you now use is 
generated at the San 
Onof re Nuclear Plant near 
San Clemente. 

Edison plans to add 
additional nuclear units at 
this site. One reason: in a 
nuclear reactor there is no 



combustion, so there are 
no by-products of combus- 
tion. Electricity from clean 
nuclear plants is one of the 
ways Edison is working to- 
day for a better tomorrow. 



Southern California Edison 




i. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JANE FRnS 
Public Reladons 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim. California 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim. California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: i»\ 
N. Parton St., Santa Ana, Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mail 
correspondence to CALIFORNIA HERALD. Circulation Department, P.O. Drawer 4243. Anaheim, 
Calif. 92803. When ordering change of address please allow six weeks: please furnish 
old and new addresses including zip code NDGW MEMBERS: please send Parlor Number also. 
POST OFFICE: RETURN POSTACE GUARANTEED. Please send magazine with address chaiga 
to Califarnia Herald, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 9IIU. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
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Other countries: Please apply for rates. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at 
Anaheim, California, under the Act of March 3. 1879. No part of this magazine may t>e re 
printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



:^ 



[tii^ti 



CLtn:fLntQtLQ, 



L *ion<^&t l^QCL 



^^HE 16th annual Carpinteria 
^ Pioneer Tea honoring early 
residents of Carpinteria and natives 
of that community, located twelve 
miles south of Santa Barbara, at the 
Carpinteria Veterans Memorial Hall 
was held by Tierra de Oro No. 304. 
The large audience of oldtimers 
of the Carpinteria Valley and mem- 
bers of the Parlors of the area were 
entertained by a group of dancers 
known as the Lively Ladies, under 
the direction of Glover Whittaker, 
who performed delightful folk dances 
in which the audience was invited 
to join. 




PGP Eileen Dismiike 

Mrs. Ben C. Dismuke, Past Grand 

President, extended greetings on be- 
half of President Mary Weathcrbec 
who was unable to be present, and 
introduced distinguished guests, in- 

JULY, 1971 




Santa Barbara Presidio drawn hy Eileen Gray from a water color 
by Russell Ruiz. 



eluding Mayor Ernest Wullbrandt, 
Councilwoman Margaret Mills, 
SDDGP Mary Louise Days, of Reina 
del Mar No. 126, Mrs. Richard 
Wells, President of Reina del Mar 
No. 126, Mrs. Gladys Rios and Mrs. 
Carmelita Flores, past presidents of 
Poinsettia No. 318, also Miss Lisa- 
lotte MacFarlane, President of 
Princesa del Mar Junior Unit No. 
40, Santa Barbara, and her mother 
Mrs. Wm. MacFarlane. 

Mrs. Dismuke gave an interesting 
talk on the early homes of the South 
Coast area, including the area bet- 
ween Santa Barbara and Car- 
pinteria, beginning with the adobe 
known as El Cuartel which is the 
only remaining original part of Santa 
Barbara's Presidio, built in 1782 
under the direction of Jose Fran- 
cisco de Ortega, and founded by 
Father Presidente Junipero Serra. 
This adobe, which later became 
known as the Valenzuela Adobe be- 
cause of its occupancy by that family 
tor manv vears. later was sold to the 



Boy Scouts of America and used as 
the main headquarters for the Santa 
Barbara Boy Scouts Council until 
it was necessary for them to find 
larger quarters. The property was 
acquired from the Boy Scouts by the 
Santa Barbara Trust for Historic 
Preservation, a privately organized 
group interested in restoration of the 
Santa Barbara Presidio area. It was 
deeded to the State of California 
and is now a State Historical Monu- 
ment, open to the public. The site 
of El Cuartel was marked with a 
State Historical Landmark Plaque in 
June 1958 during the Grand Par- 
lor of the Native Daughters of the 
Golden West in Santa Barbara, at 
outstanding ceremonies participated 
in by the City of Santa. Barbara, the 
Grand Parlor of the Native Sons of 
the Golden West, the Boy Scouts of 
America and the Grand Parlor of 
the Native Daughters of the Golden 
West, who had sponsored the mark- 

(Continued Next Page) 

PAGE 3 




( a.sa Jh'lu (iuerra, whkit was cumpletcd in 
1827. 



ing under the guidance of PGP Eileen 
Disniukc, then Grand Vice Presi- 
dent of the statewide order. 

Other homes mentioned in Mrs. 
Dismuke's talk were the well known 
Dela Guerra Adobe, famous in 
Richard Henry Dana's "Two Years 
Before the Mast", and the center of 
social activity in Old Spanish Days; 
the Carrillo Adobe, noted as the 
birthplace of the first while child, 
Isabel Larkin. to be born in this 
home, where she died just a year 
later; and many other adobes built 
in and around Santa Barbara in the 
early nineteenth century during the 
halcyon days of the dons, including 






^-*««^ 







liniillier Adobe 

the Botillicr .Adobe, located at 1025 
Bath Street in Santa Barbara, which 
Native Daughter were successful in 
saving from the bulldo/er when they 
secured its preservation through a 
special Santa Barbara City ordinance 
known as the F.I Pueblo Vicjo Ordi- 
ance. The Native F:)aughters had 
hoped to purchase this adobe as 
their own, but the tremendous ex- 
pense of restoring it for public use 
defeated their plans. The adobe has 

PAGE 4 




Sherman Patterson Stow House in Cjoleta. hiiili in IH72. 



since been purchased by an enter- 
prising architect and his wife who 
are restoring the adobe to its orig- 
inal stature, and Tierra tie Oro Par- 
lor will mark it as a historic land- 
mark this \car in the fall. 

Other famous homes which were 
built with the New England influence 
of the Yankee influx were the Stow 
House, the Hope House, the Trus- 
sell-Winchester Adobe, which com- 
bined the Spanish and New England 
architecture, t h e Hunt-Stambach 
House, the Bailard Home in ("ar- 
pinteria, and others which stand to- 
day as landmarks of a bygone day. 

Honored as the eldest C'arpintcria 
natiNe-b<irn man and woman attend- 




Thomas Hope House designed hy 

itrcluieii Peter Barber, was built in 

IH75. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



ing the tea w ere Mrs. Carmelita 
Hill Rhodes, 84, who is the daugh- 
ter of an early day physician, and 
Randall Curtis, who attended with 
Mrs. Curtis. 

General Chairman of the tea this 



of years, was Mrs. C I y d e Wull- 
brandt, also a native Carpinterian 
;md mother of Carpinteria's mayor, 
Ernest WuUbrandt. Mrs. Wullbrandt 
was assisted by Mmes. Cardona, 
Dismuke, Ames, Wegener, and 



^ear. as she has been for a number Reed, and Miss Edith Webster. 



Pouring at the tea tables and punch 
table were: Miss Mary Louise Days 
and .Mmes. Wells, Rios and Flores. 
.Mrs. Wullbrandfs famous doll col- 
lection and old doll buggies were on 
display on the platform for all guests 
to enjoy during the tea hour. 




Veranda of Ramirez Adobe in Santa Barbara. 



JULY. 1971 



PAGE : 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



(.RANI) I'RISIDI NT 

Virgilia McCombs (Mrs. C". 
1241 Normandy Drive 
MlKlc^to, California 95351 




VIRGILIA McCOMBS 



iL 



The Lamplighter 

^ ttitw in and Broww 

Highway 138 and 

Mountain Road 

Box 106 



Val Bray, owner Piiion Hills, Calif. 




the 




store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



F.) 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 

2271-32nd Avenue 

San Francisco. California 94116 

Office: 703 Market Street. Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 



IK MEMBRIAM 




Not lost to those that love them 
Not dead, just gone before; 

They still live in our memory. 
And they will forever more. 



( onstancc Schlcif. Gnklcn Gate No. 158 

May 7. 
Maiion Ingwell. Hshcol No. 16. Ma\ 2 
Geraldine Klebcr. Placerila No. 277 

April 30. 
Hmma Pierson. Sutler No. III. May 10 
Tilania Underwood. Californiana. No 

247, May 14. 
l.ela Kctcham. Naomi No. 36. January 8 
Lydia Parrot. Morada No. 199. Febru 

ary 9. 
Jessie Hart, Charier Oak No. 292. Fcbni 

ary 10. 
Fvelyn Guidici. Sequoia No. 272. May 

18. 
Lulu Bolton. Marinita No. 198. May 18 
Fthcl ninelli. Sequoia No. 272. May 19 
Rose Medford, Morada No. 199. May 21 
Henrietta Lopez. San Jose No. 81. May 

14. 
Kathr\n Kavanaiigh. Buena Vista No. 68 

May 21. 
kale Klynn. Angelita No. 32. May 29 
FIsie Van Hall, La Bandera No. 110 

May 30. 
Hellc Cademartori, Oardanelle No. 66 

May 29. 
Delia Mading. Albanv No. 260, April 12 





ANAHEIM 


SAVINGS 


AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 


Dorothy Y. Ulvestad. Preiidem J. Bernird Soto. Exec. Vice Prei | 


construction loans 


' escrow < refinancing i collections 


(Main Office) 




ANAHEIM 


mi.NTINGTON BEACH nREA 


187 W. Lincoln Avenu< 


411 Miin SIrtit 770 South Bre* Blvd. 


PRopect 2 1532 


LEhifh C-«S9I Ph. S2«-4I71 



PAGE 6 



(iertrude Hoy. Herendos No. 23. June 2. 
Barbara Pedrick. Mary F. Bell No. 224. 

May 29. 
Violet Fcinandcs. F.ldora No. 248, June 

2. 
Adcle Slubbleficld. Santa Rosa No. 217. 

June 3. 
Lucretia C oatcs. Long Beach No .154. 

Jime 7. 



SAN JOSE 

President Hetty Yakobovich's 
personel project for her term of of- 
fice was a delicious enchilada lunch- 
eon served at the Santa Clara Wo- 
men's Club. With the raffle of a 
lovely afghan donated by Mary Big- 
ley and donations to games played 
after luncheon. The affair was very 
successful, netting S300 which was 
donated to the San Jose Police 
Athcltic League Fund. The afghan 
was won by Sally Bcrryessa of San 
Jose No. 81. 

The Nimble Fingers Sewing Club 
met in the beautiful new apartment 
of Jennie Catania, who served a 
bountiful luncheon to 34 members 
in attendance. The convalescents of 
two rest homes were delighted to 
receive gifts of hand cream from the 
parlor at Easter time. 



Refreshment Chairman Violet 
Misakian surprised members in at- 
tendance at the regular business 
meeting on May 4 by honoring all 
those having birthdays from Janu- 
ary through May with a large birth- 
day cake and all the trimmings. 

First VP Emily Falbo, Organi.sl 
Catherine Cooper, and Velma Gar- 
don represented the Parlor as dele- 
gates to Grand Parlor in San Franc- 
isco. 

Ihc afghan criKhcted by Trustee 
I d a Honilo for the benefit of the 
Native Daughters Home. San Franc- 
isco, netted SI 01 and was won by 
Hernadetlc Sullivan. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



I 




Following the August issue. The 
CALIFORNIA HERALD will appear In 
a new format. 

It will be profuselif illustrated 
ar^d devoted entirely to California 
history articles. 

Everq Nativ/e CaWforn'ion steep- 
ed in the traditions of our golden 
state will er\joi{ everij page of it. 



EL CAMINO REAL 

To prove that "Nothin's New" El 
Camino Real Parlor chose that pro- 
vocative title for their 12th annual 
fashion show held on May 15 at the 
historic Andres Pico Adobe in Mis- 
sion Hills. Fashions from 1870 to 
1970 were highlighted by parlor 
members following a champagne and 
dessert period in the patio of the 
beautiful adobe. Special permission 
had to be obtained to use the locale 

JULY. 1971 



due to the damage suffered in the 
February earthquake. 

Edie Barllett, president introduced 
Gloria Mellon, overall chairman and 
her committee chairmen who were 
responsible for the show. These in- 
cluded Mmes. O'Hanlon, Leroux, 
Grossi, Reber, Hodnett, Lennox, 
Norris and Harrington. A group of 
junior hostesses in old fashioned 
costumes lent color to the scene. 
This group of daughters of members 



and friends has "grown up"" in par- 
lor functions. 

Modeling the old and new fash- 
ions were Ida Grossi Yvonne Ler- 
oux, Ginny McLoud, Kathy Tram- 
mell and Linda Vestal. From San 
Fenuindo M i s s i o n Parlor came 
Carolyn Riggs and Idabelle Griffin; 
Carolyn modeling an 1830 gown be- 
longing to the pioneer Dohs family 

(Continued on Page 9) 

PAGE 7 




NEW 

GRAND 

OFFICERS 

of 
Native 

Daughters 

of the 

Golden 

West 






VIRGILIA McCOMBS 

GRAND 

PRESIDENT 



IRENE BONDANZA 

JR. PAST GRAND 

PRESIDENT 



RAE L. ROMINGER 
GRAND VICE- 
PRESIDENT 





MARIE C. LANOINI 

GRAND 

MARSHAL 



LILA S. HUMMEL 

CHM. BD. GRAND 

TRUSTEES 






Installed at 
Grand 
Parlor 

Oakland 

Serving the term 
1971-1972 








ICEL BEERS 

GRAND INSIDE 

SENTINEL 



URSULA LUCCHESI 

GRAND OUTSIDE 

SENTINEL 





i'ACt 3 



GRACIE SCOTT 

GRAND 

ORGANIST 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



:l camino real . . . 

(Continued from Page 7 ) 
)f San Fernando and a collection of 
>ld fashioned lingerie. Idabelie did 
lapper number in a I920"s beaded 
:own. A wedding gown belonging 
Beverly S w a n e r, also of San 
'^ernando Mission Parlor was worn 
^y Linda Vestal. Many laughs came 
rem the audience when the 1930 
ind 1940 styles were modeled. Com- 
nentator for the novel show was 
■lei en Trammell. Nellie Miller of 
Verdugo Parlor was the gracious 
jianiste and gave a large selection 
jf old and new tunes. 

Among the honored guests was 
jT Laura Blosdale and DGP Ruby 
Garcia. Delegations from Los 
Angeles. Beverly Hills and San 
Fernando Mission Parlors were pre- 
sent also a delegation from the San 
Fernando Valley Historical Society. 
This group, which administers the 
:idobe for the City of Los Angeles, 
loaned a 1890 costume and parasol 
modeled by Wilda O'Hanlon. 

A boutique and a cooked food 
booth along the shaded corridor 
drew much business. Many of El 
Camino members are docents at the 
adobe and had not been near the 
famous building since the earth- 
quake; it is still closed to visitors 
but it is hoped repairs will soon be 
underway to restore it to its usual 
attractive state. 

Ill 
SAiN JLAN B.Al TISTA 

San Juan Bautista Parlor had a 
luncheon at Cademartori's C a s a 
Maria on June 28 at noon. It was 
put on by the Ladies Luncheon 
League to raise money for the Par- 
lor.' 

Linda Vaccorezza has been 
awarded a $300 scholarship from 
the Blake Taix scholarship fund. 
August T a i .X has just presented 
another $2000 to the fund. Leonor 
Joseph, chairman of the scholarship 
committee presented the award to 
Linda. 

Mrs. Arnold .Andreazzi, president 
represented the Parlor at the Grand 
Parlor in San Francisco. 

Refreshments were served by 
Mmes. Day, Perry. Baccala, Buck- 

JULY, 1971 



ingham and Miss Sharon Johnson. 
The committee for Flag Day in 
charge of the program are Mmcs. 
Righenburg. Harrell. Krug, Kurtyak. 
Ladd. and Perry. 

f f * 
PAST PRESIDENTS' ASSEMBLY 

The 49th session of Past Presi- 
dents' .Assembly was held in San 
Francisco at the Bellevue Hotel, 
presided over by Mrs. Constance 




The dinner was a feast, and course 
after course was served, climaxing 
with either chicken or veal scallopini 
for the entree. Many doggie bags 
were in view holding the remains of 
the gigantic dinner ... to be en- 
joyed by "Rover" the next day. 

Eleanor Begovich, President of 
Orinda Parlor, presented each per- 
son with a beautiful orange carnation 
corsage as she entered the dining 
room. 

In charge of the Mother's Day 
Banquet was Madeline King — a 
one-man committee. Haroldine Van- 
Winkle, Madeline's daughter, served 
as hostess for the evening, collect- 
ing the money and passing out the 
dinner tickets. 

The entertainment was hilarious 
. . . when the laughter subsided, the 
group had community sing. Some- 
where in the room was a "tweeting" 
bird who "tweeted"; a tambourine 
which "thumped and jingled" and a 
bubble whistle "bubbled" — all in 
the right places. Entertainment was 
furnished by the team of Klahn- 
Simas. 



Constance Warshaw, State Presi- 
dent. Past Presidents Assembly. 
NDGW. 

Warshaw, State President, Associa- 
tion No. 1. All but three of the 
Associations throughout the State 
were represented, there being approx- 
imately 150 delegates, together with 
visitors, makmg a total of around 
200. 

As there was no opposition for 
the office of State Director, Doris 
Stidham of Association No. 1, was 
elected to this office. The installa- 
tion for the newly elected officers 
was held with Past State President. 
Elfreda Robinson, doing the install- 
ing. 

til 

ORINDA 

Orinda Parlor's annual Mother's 
Day Banquet was held at Maconi's 
Restaurant in San Francisco. A 
group, numbering approximately .'>0. 
consisting of members, their mothers 
and guests, attended one of the very 
gayest evenings so far this year. 



MORTUARY 

Faithful . Courteous. Service 

120 E.Broadwag. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5-4I05 



dOLflnDlREVnOLDS 

GRHDING(W)CaNTRflCTOR 

BRIDGES - HIGHWAYS - DAMS - RAILROADS 

• Heavy •Equipment 

Haulins For Rent 

535-4233 
505 S. Sunkist Ave. Anaheim 



Fine Cosmetics 

DRUG CENTER 




. . . Our SpmciaUy 

KE 5-1115 

201 West Lincoln 

Anaheim. California 

S Si H Green Stamps 



PAGE 9 



(OPA UK OK() 

At a recent meeting of Copa tie 
Oro No. 105, Alice I'wedt. 3rd Vice 
Pre^idcnt. was introduced as the 
winner of the IcKal Junior Miss Con- 
test; received a $600 scholarship and 
plans to attend Woodbury College 
in Los Angeles where she will major 
in Fashion Merchandising. 

With the admission of Karole 
Candlen, four generations of Presi- 
dent N'ivian's family arc represented 
in the Order. 



LAUREL 

Nearly 100 members and guests 
of Laurel No. 6 NDGW and Hv- 



MULTI-LISTING SERVICE 

LEATHERBY REALTY 

NORA GRANGETTO 
772-1552 or 533-3632 



702 W. LINCOLN 
Estate - Home 



ANAHEIM 
Income Property 



LUdlow 8-1753 
BELL HAVEN GUEST HOME 

For Ambulatory Senior Citizens 

4726 Clara Street, Cudahy 

GUSSIE J. GUIDOTTI 

Member, Sea Point Parlor 196 
Sausalito 



MELROSE 



ilie 



MEMORIAL PARK • MAUSOLEUM 

CREMATORIUM . COLUMBARIUM 

I Orangewood Street at Santa Ana Freeway 

538-3583 



THE BASLER HOME 



CONVALESCENT & ELDERLY 

24-Hour Nursing Service 

Eicellent Meals - Tray Service 

LARGE CHEERFUL ROOMS 
ADJOINING BATHS 4 SUNDECKS 

Life Membership or Monthly Rates 

542-3514 



lOlS N. Broadway 



Santa Ana 



EL TOBRITO 

TACOS and BURRITOS 

5th and Bristol 
Santa Ana, California 



draulic Parlor No. 56 NSGW met 
at the Nevada City Red Castle, to 
place a bronze plaque on the 101 
year old building. CiP Irene Rond- 
anza and several of her t)tliccrs were 
present to help G rand President 
David S. Mason III and his odicers 
unveil the plaque. The incripiion 
reads; 

THK RHD C ASTl.E '• 
Nevada City's Earliest Surviving Brick 
House built in 1860 by Judge John Wil- 
liams. Mine Owner. Businessman, and 
Civic- Leader. Who With His Famil> 
Crossed the Plains in 1«49. 
Near ruin, this house was restored by 
James Wade Schaar in 1963. The Red 
Castle stands today as a proud reminder 
of the part the Argonauts played in the 
Heritage of California. Registered point 
of interest No. 002-Laurel Parlor No. 6 
Native Daughters of the Golden West. 
Hydraulic Parlor No. 56 Native Sons of 
ihe Golden West Placed May 2.'!. 1971." 

Mr. and Mrs. James Schaar have 
restored the early day home for over 
night accommodations. They ex- 
pressed their gratitude to the Native 
Daughters and Sons for the plaque, 
opened the house for a tour, then 
served refreshments. 

< y r 
OFFICIAL VISIT 

The otlicial visit to district 36 by 
Grand President, Irene Bondanza 




Mission Inn, Riverside 

was held in Riverside's Histtirica 
Mis; ion Inn. The visit started witi 
a luncheon held at Chaunccy' 
Restaurant in the New Tyler .Mall 
where delegations from all four par 
lors in the district were represented 
A social hour with dinner follow 
ing was held in the Spanish Ar 
Gallery in the Mission Inn. Follow 
ing dinner a meeting was held ii 
the Music room with participatin 
parlors, consisting of Lugonia No 
24 1 , Oniurio No. 25 I . Ranclu) Sai 
Jose No. 307. and Jurupa No. 296 
District 36 chose as their theme 
"Open the Golden Gate." which w;i 
carried out with a miniature replic. 
of Sun Francisco's Golden Gali 
Bridge, made hv Ontario Parlor ani 




PAGE 10 



Historic A^itu Man.sa i.luai.li hell imirkiJ t>\ Jurupa I'arlor So. 2V6. Ar/>(»H 
on July 24. 1^57 at the Mission Inn at Riverside. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



sed by the escort team. California 
'oppy corsages were made and worn 
•\ ollicers of participating parlors 
lid their deputies. 

Opening ceremony was by Jiirupa: 
ntroductions and escort work by 
Jnkirio; initiation by Lugoiuo Presi- 
Icnt and officers from all four par- 
u\. closing by Ranc/io San Jose. 
)iiring the meeting three new mem- 
'crs were initiated into the Order. 
wo from Lugonia. and one from 
iaiulh) San Jose. One of Lugonia 
'arlor's new members is the third 
enjration of women from her fam- 
ly to join their parlor. 

A report book, its cover designed 
vith a pressed poppy made by 
sunclio San Jose, contained reports 
rom all four Parlors. 

Monetary gifts to the Grand Presi- 
Icnt were presented in theme ar- 
jangements. Lugonia members pre- 
sented theirs in a miniature ship in 
!i sea of green; Ontario, theirs in a 
arge key, made by members; Jiinipa. 
I'cd one of green sea water under 
I miniature Golden Gate Bridge; 
'Uuwho San Jose theirs in a Key of 
iilogne. Grand President Bond- 
in/a's project for the year is restor- 
ilion of California Missions. The 
;oin march was presented to her for 
hut purpose. 





The evening was under the super- 
vision of SDDGP Elsie Buchko, 
from Jiiriipa Parlor, and DGPs 
Mary Foster, Lillian Piatt, Senaida 
Biaz, Inez Cisneros. 

The Grand President congratu- 
lated the new members and thanked 
the parlors for the courtesies extend- 
ed to her. 

1 i 1 

ALOHA 

Fifteen members of Aloha Parlor 
attended the "Brides' Night Party", 
for Jill Suico, Carole Lehman and 



PGP Williams 



PGP Bnce 





PGP Goldie GT Blosdale 

In attendance were PGPs Edna 

( Williams, Lee Bricc and June T. 

Cioldic. and GT Laura Blosdale. 



Jennie Peterson presented Carole's, 
and Jill Suico's gift was presented by 
her aunt. President Alma Lilienthal. 
"with much love and happiness". 
The Brides also received many gifts 
from friends. Alice Abernethy won 
the prize, a bo,\ of Coty's Dusting 
Powder, for being married the long- 
est. She and her husband, Chester 
will celebrate their 50th Anniversary 
October 1, 1971. 

Gladys L Farley and Jennie Peter- 
son were on the escort team, when 
DGP Dorothy Jordan of Association 
(Continued on Page 12) 




Edith Pappas, The tables were dec- 
orated with bridal table cloths and 
napkins, large white candles, sitting 
in a garland of white roses and a 
brass bowl of artificial lillies of the 
valley. In front of each bride was a 
white cake with her name on it in 
green, with lily of the valley stuck 
in the top of the cake. Each bride 
cut her cake and passed slices to 
members in her section. Aloha's 
gifts to the brides were small Paul 
Revere bowls. Gladys Farley repre- 
sented Aloha's gift to Edith Pappas. 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 535-7221 

INSURANCE — SURETY BONDS 

M. E. BEEBE & CO. 

132 Norlh Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim, California 




1215 W. Lincoln, Anaheim 



5 35-4997 



Oiul Drug Store 




1002 E. 17th Street, Santa Ana / Phone 547-6655 

Sam and Jim Calabrese 

Prescriptions and Sundries Serving Orange County itf 1959 

MASTERCHARGE and BANKAMERICARD • FREE DEL'.ERY 



JULY. 1971 



ALOHA BRIDES PARTY . . . 
(Continued from Page 11) 

No. 2 of Ouklund, was insta 
State President of the Past 



led as 
Presi- 



dents Assembly at the Bellevue 
Hotel. San Francisco. 

PP Martha Decker and her sister 
Helen C'arrington, former member 
of Aloha, gave a donation to PGP 
Hvelyn I. Carlson for the Historical 
Room in memory of their Aunt, PP 
Myrtle Tonzi, a member of Chispu 
No. 40, who passed way April 14. 
1971. She was a very devoted Native 
Daughter and used to travel all over 
California to the different Historical 
Dedications. Veterans Chairman. 
Alice Aberncthy and her husband 
Chet, delivered a load of magazines 
and books to the Boys at Oak Knoll 
Naval Hospital. President Alma 
Lilienthal was Delegate to the Grand 
Parlor Convention in June in San 
Francisco. 




GRAND PRESIDENTS 

NDGW PAST AND PRESENT 




Dr. Louise C. Heilbron. PCil' 
Presided at the 43rd 
Clrand Parlor. 
June. J 929 at Santa Cruz 




PGP Farnworth, right is shown hei 
with PGP Hazel Mallette. 

Margaret M. Farnsworth. PGP 

Presided at the 63rd 

Grand Parlor. 

June, 1949 al San Jose 



ANNIE K. BIDWEI.I. 

The Native Daughters Home in 
San Francisco was the destination 
for 21 Chico members of Annie K. 
Ridwell No. 168, Native Daughters 
of the Golden We.st. recently, and a 
chartered bus carried the Chico wd- 
men plus others from Corning and 
Orovillc. there to enjoy a ham and 
turkey bullet luncheon with the resid- 
ents in the home there. 

Following the luncheon, the wo- 
men viewed relics in the Historical 
Room at the home, and it was noted 
that most of the many articles of 
historical signlicance were donated by 
members. The special case reserved 
for past grand otliccrs was of parti- 
cular interest of the women, it was 
mentioned, as well as the records of 
pioneer families of California which 
are preserved in files, numbered and 
indexed for easy access. 

PAGE 12 




Jewel McSwt'cnt} . I'GP 

Presided at the 66th 

Grand Parlor. 

June. 1952 at Sacramento 





Z;^ W 


fr^A 



Florence D. Boyle. PGP 

Presided at the 51st 

Grand Parlor. 

June, 1937 at San Jose 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 





Rhoda Roelling, PGP 

Presided at the 77th 

Grand Parlor, 

June, 1963 at Sacramento 



^ Alice D. Shea. PGP 

Presided at the 76th 
Grand Parlor. 
June. 1962 at Orovillc 



] 



####<#<^##<######ci>#########'##########^##<#####><^ 



X 



"^ "^ "^ "■^ "^ i 



I 



After serving the Native Daughters of the Golden West for 15 years 
as its official publication, the California Herald will resume its former status 
of a strictly California history journal. 

It will retain its present name, but will publish only Caliornia history 
articles under a new format. 

Items of an historical nature will be welcomed. Accounts of Native 
Daughters markings of historical buildings and similar material will be 
cordially received. Such articles when printed, will carry the name of the 
author. 



JULY. 1971 



PAGE 13 




Fern E. Adams, FGI' 

Presided at the 79t/i 

Grand Parlor. 

June. 1965 at Santa Cruz 




Hazel I. Mallette. PC^' 

Presided at the 83rd 

Grand Parlor. 

June. I9M at Riverside 




Edna C. lyUliains. PGP 

Presided at the 75th 

Grana Parh>r. 

June. 1961 at Oakland 




'•> 



Lee Brice, PGP 

Presided at the 78th 

Grand Parlor. 

June. 1964 at Stockton 



y\ 



PAGE 14 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



^SG^^ — ndgw 

DAYS \l I)E1. MAR 

Tickets (500 complimentary) 
have been secured from the Del Mar 
Turf Cliih by the Native Sons for 
September 3 and September 10 as 
NSGW-NDGW Days at the track. 
Chartered air conditioned buses will 
leave 5719 N. Sepulveda, Van Nuys, 
10 a.m., 3rd and Detroit, 10:30 a.m. 
and 950 Washintgon Blvd.. 1 a.m. — 
bus cost: S4 for round trip. 

For those who wish to drive down, 
free tickets may be obtained by call- 
ing Doc Donahue (SY 21356) or 
calling or writing Jack B. Curran. 
5201 Wilshire Blvd.. Los Angeles 
(WE 74444 or WE 66766). 



INTERESTINq OLD BUILDINQS 




ABOVE — Kaweah Post Office huilt in 1910. 

BELOW — Knox Hotel huilt in 1H76. The original structure is the huildini; 
adjoining on the right. 




JULY, 1971 



PAGE 15 



RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED 
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PIONEER PRESS presents its latest book 



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yfyjamo (^amo io (^oAljjOttda 



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Mama Came to California is a 
sprightly styled history of pioneer 
Yuba County, California. 

With a gold mine of anecdotal 
nuggets the author skillfully fashions 
a series of swift moving composite 
pictures of frontier life as her mother 
and other pioneers saw it. 

Her mother, Sarah Jane McElroy. 
best known as "Sadie" to her relatives 
and friends, moves easily and 
naturally through a period of thirty- 
five eventful years commencing with 
the exciting Fifties. 

Here is a factual story of pioneer 
life with its bad men, its stalwart law 
men like Sheriff Hank McCoy, its 

schools, its churches, its towns, and 
best of all its resourceful, hard- 

k working people who built the 
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Gertrude Cable was born in Marys- 
ville. Yuba County. California, the 
daughter of Peter James Finncgan 
and Sarah Jane McElroy Finncgan. 

After being graduated from Notre 
Dame High School in Marysville. 
she matriculated at San Jose State 
when it was still a normal school. 
Upon her graduation there she entered 
Chico State where she received her 
AH. and .Administration credential 



For thirty-nine years she ' 
Principal and Superintendent of di 
Arboga Elementary school (now pai 
of the Unified District) in Yub 
County. 

She is a member of Maryi 
villc Parlor, Native Daughters of tfa 
Golden West, as well as of the Maryi 
ville-Yuba City branch of Universil 
Women. She is a past president 
IJcta Omega Chapter, Delta Kapp 
Gamma. 

Mrs, Cable is listed in "Who 
Who of American Women," "Who 
Who in the West," "Personalities 
the West and Midwest", "Who's Wh' 
ill California, 1969," "The Royt 
lilue Book of Leaders of the Englit 
Speaking World," and "Two Thoil 
sand Women of Achievement." 

Gertrude Cable has a real seitt 
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book. Tlirce Summers With Pop 
written in mcniorv of her father. 



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plus 93 cents tax and mailing pe 
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301 N. Parton St., Santa Ana, 
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through your favorite book 
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SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



(g^MIF®!!^™^ 





OM 




NANCY WELLS AS SAINT BARBARA 



August / September, 1971 



California Herald 

•PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 



VoLUMr. XVIIl 



Ak.isi. 1971 



No. 12 



History of Santa Barbara's Fiestas, by Courtenay Monsen 3 

Prc-Ficsta Tea. by Mary Louise Days 9 



PHOTO CREDITS — Nancy WclN. coiirlesy. Santa Barbara News-Press. 



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Anaheim. California. All Right Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES. 
Anaheim. California. Maihnii Address: P. O. Drawer 4243. Anaheim, Ca 92803. 
ADVERTISING OFFICE: 301 N Parton St.. Santa Ana. Ca 9?701. CHANGE OF 
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part of this magazine may be reprinted without specific permission. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



THE HISTORY OF 

SANTA BARBARA'S FIESTAS 

bq Courtenaq Monsen 



^T IS A PLEASURE and a privilege to talk for the Native Daugh- 
y^ ters of the Golden West, because, as a native son, I feel that 
the perpetuation of the glorious traditions of California are being 
carried on, year after year, by your orgainzation. 

It behooves all of us who truly love California to "get in the 
act" as the saying goes, to acquaint the newcomer and the general 
public with our state's history, which is one of the most colorful 
and illustrious of all the fifty states. 

We must not forget, however, that some of the greatest work 
of preserving California's past has been done by newcomers, not 
the least of whom has been the great writer and enthusiast. 
Charles F. Lummis who was so anxious to become a Californian 
tatt he walked from Cincinnati more thran 2507 miles by a circu- 
tous route, across prairies, deserts and mountains in 1884s to 
get here. 

He was met, on arrival, by General Harrison Gray Otis, 
onetime Santa Barbara newspaperman but then proprietor of 
the Los Angeles Times, who offered Lummis the position as the 
first City Editor of his paper. 

Lummis' involvement in California affairs was very rapid. 
He became chief librarian of the Los Angeles Public Library, 
editor of a delightful magazine called "The Land of Sunhine". 
and later of "Out West"". He was assigned by Otis to accompany 
General Crook in his pursuit and eventual capture of the illusive 
renegade Apache chief Gerranimo, the epic story of which he 
wrote for the Times. 

He organized and founded the "California Landmarks Club'" 
and took upon himself the task of restoring some of the California 
Missions, actually completing the rebuilding San Diego, Pala, 
San Juan Capistrano, and San Fernando before he left the task 
to others, including the Native Sons and Native Daughters to 
finish. 

AUGUST 1971 3 



Ihrough his influence hundreds ot the important landmarks 
of California were marked with plaques, a labor of love that has 
been perpetuated by the Native Daughters for many years. 

He was a prolific writer about Calilornia, and among his 
most important pieces to us was an article which first appeared 
in the Press, antecedent of the News Press, in 1923, entiUed 
"Stand Fast, Simta biu'bara", which article was reprinted periodi- 
cally in that paper for many years. It admonished Santa Barbar- 
ans to cherish the history and romance of our city as a sacred 
heritage for our children and our children's children. 

Lunimis was the male counterpart ol our greatest defender 
of this history and romance, a defender-in-residence, for more 
than half a century. Pearl Chase! 

As early as lb72, just yy years ago, that magical year in our 
history just three years after the transcontinental railroad was 
completed, the charms of Santa Barbara were being sung. 
Charles Nordhott, a writer from the £ast Coast, visited Santa 
Barbara and returned to write a best seller called "Calilorma 
for Health, Pleasure and Residence", m which be so eulogized 
Santa Barbara that easterners in droves began arrivmg by ever> 
ship. 

in that same year the local businessmen organized the first 
Chamber ot Commerce in the name of the "Imniigration Bureau" 
and planned our first tourist hotel, the Arlington, which was 
completed in lb75, the same year as the Palace in San hranciico. 

John P. Stearns helped matters greatly by building the whart 
that carries his name to this da>, thus enuing, in eltect, the isola- 
tion of Santa Barbara. 

Jose Lobero built his theatre to add a touch of culture, and 
the city was provided with street lamps lueied by a patent gas 
shipped in from San Prancisco. Board walks were auded. State 
street was graded, and soon after, churches, banks, and other 
signs of a modern civilization began to spring up in the town. 

Iraditionally, the Native Daughters ha\e held a Piesta pro- 
gram at Rockwood as one of the many parts they play in com- 
memoration of Old Spanish Days, and it may not be amiss for 
me to briefly recall how this peculiarly Santa Barbara celebration 
started. It is an old story to many of you here, for in the phrase 
of the old radio program, "You Were There!" 

But each year there arc young people growing up. and new- 
comers as guests, who do not personally remember back 47 years. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



Santa Barbara has periodically put on festivals and parades. 
This is a heritage from our Spanish forebears. 

One of the first notable celebrations of record was the wed- 
ding of Anita de la Guerra to the American shipping agent, 
Alfred Robinson, in 1836, as told in Richard Henry Dana's 
classic book, "Two Years Before the Mast." 

This event, by the way, is being re-enacted in pageant form 
next Sunday, August first, for the members of the Santa Barbara 
Historical Society, after which there will be a special showing of 
Anita's jewelry, including her lovely engagement ring, her beau- 
tiful wedding gown, and the letter that Robinson wrote to Jose 
de la Guerra y Noriega, her father, asking for her hand in mar- 
riage. There are many other mementoes of that time in the muse- 
um, including portraits of the members of the de la Guerra 
family. Some of these effects have been loaned to the museum by 




Mission Santa Ihirluira. "Queen ni the Missions" 

AUGUST. 1971 




Casa (le la (liierrii wiiich was completed in IH27 



members of the dc la Gueira and Dibblee families, all deccndants 
of Jose, who are here with us this afternoon. 

Another important celebration marked the visit of Bishop 
Garcia Diego, California's first Bishop, in 1842. 

In 1S86 a great flower festival was held to celebrate the 
founding of the Santa Barbara Mission in 1786. Many said this 
was the inspiration for the famous Tournament of Roses in Pasa- 
dena, which started seven >ears later. 

The arrival of the first railroad train from Los /Nngclcs in 
1887 brought out more than 5,000 celebrants and was cnc ol 
the notable events of that decade. 

President Benjamin Harrison's visit in 1891 was the occa- 
sion of another beautiful flower festival, and this was followed in 
1901 by a spectacular parade to mark the visit of President 
Mckinley shortly before his assasination in ButTalo. 

When Teddy Roosevelt sent the Great White fleet around 
the world to impress foreign nations, notably Japan and Germany. 
the fleet stopped here in the open roadstead, and this called fcr 
another outstanding parade uhich included the white— clad sailors 
from the sixteen battleships, including their bands and marines. 
This was in 1 90S. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



La Primavera, the "Masque of Santa Barbara" being a cele- 
bration of Springtime, was put on with pomp and circumstance 
in 1920, a year after World War I, under the leadership of James 
B. Rickard, with Hobart Chatfield-Taylor and a host of other 
dedicated citizens, including the descendants of the De la Guerras 
and the Dibblees, all of whom took a very prominent part in the 
celebration. 

In 1924 the Community Arts Association, which continues 
today in the name of one of its most active committees, ""Plans 
and Planting", with its chairman the unsinkable Pearl Chase, 
planned a great celebration to commemorate the opening of the 
new Lobero Theatre on the site of the old one. That event, which 
included an elaborate historical parade, proved to be the fore- 
runner of our Old Spanish Days Fiesta parade, now in its forty- 
seventy year! 

Because of the earthquake of 1925 the parade that year was 
omitted, but an organization bearing the name of ""Old Spanish 
Days" was incorporated in .August and a pageant was produced 
called, "'A Night in Spain", in the Peabody Stadium. 

(Continued on Ptii;e 26) 




PGP Eileen Dismuke with Flower Girls from J ierra de 
Oro who rcike part in the Fiesta activities. 



AUGUST, 1971 



(This letter was sent to the Grand Parlor officers, NDGW, by the 
California Herald owners in April, 1971 stating that continuing on 
the present basis was not fwssible. The Grand Officers made no 
reply nor was there any suggestions made of any possible plan 
for continuance.) 

dalifornia a^erald 

"the m,\Ci.\z«ne ih»t ppeseRves the pAst fon the futuBC" 

301 North Parton Street 

Santa Ana. California 92701 

MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Drawer 4243 

Anaheim. Calif or nia 92 803 

Telephone S35-34S6 (area 714) 



Lucille F. Kimbark 

Grand Secretary 

Native Daughters of the Golden West 

704 Market Street. Room 602 

San Francisco, California 94103 

Dear Mrs. Kimbark: 

Will you please refer this letter to the Grand Officers 
and Grand Trustees of the Native Daughters of the Golden 
West? 

After furnishing the Calfioriiiu Herald to meml->ers and 
others, as the official publication of the Native Daughters 
of the Golden West, for the past fifteen years we find we 
can no longer do so. 

Steadily mounting production and mailing costs com- 
bined with decrease in subscriptions have made this decision 
mandatory. 

The Herald is running at a loss and while wc will per- 
sonally absorb the same and will continue to publish as 
your official publication to the end of this subscription year, 
to wit: August, 1971, we have no proposal? to make for its 
further continuance on the present ha.sis. 

During these many years we have made lasting friend- 
ships with many of your members. These friendships, which 
wc greatly cherish, wc expect to continue. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



No one can work as closely as we have with your 
Order for these many years without becoming embued with 
the spirit which has carried it onward during these eventful 
times. 

Our sincerest wish is that the Native Daughters of the 
Golden West will continue to prosper in the future. 

Sincerely, 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 
By 

Leo J. Friis 

J. J. Friis 

Jane Friis 

For those NDGW members and Parlors who have al- 
ready paid subscription to December, 1971, the new Cali- 
fornia Herald will continue to be sent. If others desire copies 
for the balance of 1971 year, please send ONE DOLLAR. 



ESCHSCHOLTZIA 

GP Virgilia McCombs paid her official visit to Eschscholtzia 
No. 112 on August 3. A monetary gift hidden in a basket of fruit 
was presented to the Grand President. 

Honored also were Agnes Calloway, a member for 64 years, 
.\nna Calloway, 67 years, Bernie Smith, 50 years and 25 year 
members. President Dorice Young, Eleanor Hendricks. Anita 
Tucker and Barbara Cross. 



EL DORADO 

One of the last official visits made by GP Irene Bondanza 
was to Eldorado No. 186. A delicious luncheon was served as the 
Georgetown Hotel to 75 members and guests. 

Mary De Vore received her 50 year pin. Charter member 
Louise Schmeder was given honors. Charter members Elizabeth 
Murdock and Mary Revlas were unable to attend. The officers 
were presented corsages of carnations. 

AUGUST. 1971 9 



oif yiCjotif f^^xiijic<2 >iry<^yj 



my HE TRADITIONAL first major social event of the Santa Barbara 
Ji Fiesta season, the Pre-Fiesta lea held by Rema del Mar 
No. 126, took place at Rockwood in Mission Canyon, Santa 
Barbara. This festive event honored descendants of early Santa 
Barbara and California families and the Fiesta El Presidente and 
members of the board of directors. 

Rockwood, home of the Santa Barbara Woman's Club, is 
a charming Spanish-style building set among the oak trees, native 
shrubs, and boulders of Mission Canyon behind Mission Santa 
Barbara. Its interior had been beautifully decorated with flowers, 
Spanish shawls and Mexican art objects. The formal program 
was held in the main salon and the gathering for refreshments 
took place on the delightful garden terrace. 




10 



Las Fiesleras in one ol iheir jiunoiu dances 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



Reina del Mar Parlor's Pre-Fiesta Tea has been held since 
the first community Fiesta observance in 1924. The teas have 
been held at the De la Guerra Adobe, at Restaurante Del Paseo, 
the El Mirasol Hotel, and Rockwood. They have served as happy 
occasions for members of old families, and newer Californians as 
well, to meet and exchange news and reminiscences of early days. 
Approximately 350 yearsons were present. Hostesses and guests 
alike were dressed in Spanish-California and Mexican costumes 
with heirloom accessories. To accompany the tea and punch, par- 
lor members served traditional California delicacies — panecitos, 
empanadas, panoche. 





^Hpi^^i: ^^^^^^^^^1 


^^H' '^jfl 


^^B^B*- ^flta^'^^^^l 




^^H ^H 




I ^ 




V 1 


H^^^ 


^ M 



I' r i s ci U a Kyte, right, with Mary 

Louise Days, left. Both dressed in 

earlv-dav attire. 



Priscilla Kyte, a parlor past president and former St. Bar- 
bara, was chairman for the event and mistress of ceremonies. 
She was gowned in a full length white and pink costume with a 
white mantilla. Members of her committee were PP Ambeit Phil- 
lips, PP Amelia Acres, Janelle Bell, Emma Davies, PP Virginia 
Days Margaret Graham PP Anita Joyal PP Mamie Miller, Betty 

AUGUST, 1971 11 



Miller, PP Mariana Schmiller, Mary Sourmay, PP Mary Louise 
Days and Sylvia Ferrario. Mrs. Schmitter designed the invitation 
cover. Decorations were by Amelia Acres and Lydia Ross, and 
the yellow and white flower arrangements were by Sylvia Fer- 
rario. Mmes. Days, Joyal, Graham, Kyte and Miss Days greeted 
guests at the door. 

Honored guests included GT Laura Blosdale, PGPs Mary 
Barden and Eileen Dismuke, GT Jack Henry NSGW , and his wife 
Evelyn, Capt. Harold Barden, J. J. Friis, Assistant Grand Or- 
ganist, NSGW and Dr. and Mrs. Leo J. Friis; Fiesta El Presidente 
Arthur Locker, Mayor Gcridd Firestone, several Fiesta directors 
and city councilmen, and Rev. Virgil Cordano, OM, of the Old 




Some of the Las Fiesteras Dance Group from left — Mrs. John 
Stupak, Mrs. Wm. Macf'arlanc. Mi.ss Patricia Joyal. Mi\s Mary 
Louise Days. Mrs. Armund .Schmitter . Mrs. Manuel D>: Vito. 
Mrs Raymond Smith, Mrs. Sarah Dias and Mrs. Richard C. 

Wells. 



12 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



Mission Miss Lise MacFarlane president of Princesa del Mar Unit 
No. 40. Jr. NDGW, attended with several unit members. Another 
honored guest was Miss Pearl Chase, NDGW honor roll member. 
SDDGP Edith Webster was present, as was former Grand Organ- 
ist Peggy Brandenbury and representatives of Califortiiana No. 
247, Placerita No. 277, San Fernando Mission No. 280, Tierra 
de Oro No. 304, El Aliso No. 314 and Poinsettia No. 318. 

Mr. Courtenay Monsen, public relations director of Old 
Spanish Days and host of a local radio program, spoke during 
the program. His topic was Santa Barbara, its attractions and 
traditions, and the history of its fiestas. 

Entertainment was provided by young ladies from Lillian's 
School of Dance performing Spanish Dances, by Sefior Celestino 
Romero, classical guitarist from Los Angeles and member of a 
famed musical family, by Serior Oscar Sepulveda, Chilean guitar- 
ist-singer, and by a group of Santa Barbara musicians who played 
Latin-American favorites before the program and during the 
refreshment period. Las Fiesteras, Reina del Mar Parlor's dance 
group, performed "La Varsoviana" and their popular "Shawl 



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MASTERCHARGE and BANKAMERICARD • FREE DELIVERY 



AUGUST, 1971 13 



Dance. The "Varsoviennc" or "La Varsoviana" is a traditional 
dance brought to California by the first Europeans. It is per- 
formed in a variety of tempos and was popular in Europe, the 
United States and Mexico. The name is assumed to be derived 
from the word "varsovian" meaning a resident of Warsaw, Po- 
land. "The Shawl Dance" which is Las Fiesteras' most famous 
dance was created for them between 35 and 40 years ago by the 
late Theresa Janssens Lane. It is not seen anywhere else in the 
world, and is performed with heirloom shawls. 




\ancy tt'elh pnrirayini; Saint Barhara 



14 



CALIFOnrilA HERALD 



Dancing with the group were Mary Louise Days, Nancy 
Wells, Mariana Schmitter, Sarah Diaz, Barbara Diaz and Patricia 
Joyal. 

(Cniuimied on Pcii;e 18) 




Some 

Portrayers 

of 

Saint 

Barbara 

in 
former 
years 



TOP — 

Miss Sue 
Harrison 

BELOW — 

Mrs. Bernicc 
Hogg 




AUGUST, 1971 



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16 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



California Herald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 



Volume XIX 



September, 1971 



No. 1 



f kt l®tllll®t Ai@fe< 

by Eileen Dismuke, P.G.P. 




lipijARLY IN 1970 the Parlor members of 1 terra de Oro No. 304 
■ i" ^ took action to bring the Pascual Botillier Adobe under the 
aegis of the El Pueblo Viejo Ordinance of the City of Santa Bar- 
bara, by petitioning the Santa Barbara City Council to cover the 
adobe with the protection of this special ordinance. The adobe, 
which had been occupied continuously from 1843 until April of 
1969 by descendants of the builder, had to be placed on the mar- 
ket for sale to settle the estate of Gerard Grand, deceased grand- 
son of the builder of the adobe, who had left a life estate in his 
historic edifice to his wife, and provided that, on her death, the 
property on which the adobe stood would go in equal shares to 
seven surviving daughters. There was no meeting of the minds 
among the seven survivors as to preservation of the adobe, and 
it was in danger of demolition to make way for multiple develop- 
ment. The action of the Native Daughters of the Golden West and 
the City of Santa Barbara prevented the adobe's destruction, but 

(Continued on Pa^e 22) 



SEPTEMBER. 1971 



17 




LEFT — Patricia Ann Joyal. RKJHi — Diana Duruihy Russell, 
both former Saint Barbaras. 



PRE-FIESTA TEA / from Page 15 

A special feature of this annual tea is the first public pre- 
sentation of the parlor member who has been chosen by the parlor 
to portray St. Barbara the city's patron saint, during Old Spanish 
Days. Members of Rcina del Mar parlor have been pri\ileged to 
portray St. Barbara during the 47 years of the celebration's his- 
tory. This year's choice is the parlor president, Nancy Wells 
(Nancy Perez Flukcr), a native Santa Barbaran and parlor mem- 
ber for five years. Nancy is chairman-advisor of Princesa del Mar 
Junior I'nit No. 40 and a member of Las Fiesteras dance group. 
Her mother and stepfather. Mr. and Mrs. Edwin D. Field, attend- 
ed the tea, as did her son Rolvrt Fluker. her mother-in-law, Mrs. 
Fugene King, and her sister. C\insuelo Cronin, a member of 
Ptacvrita Parlor. Nancy became the bride of Richard C. Wells. 
The new St. Barbara has chosen three former St. Barbaras to 
be her attendants during her reign. They are Lorraine Aceves. 



18 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



Helen Cornell and Mary Louise Days, who are also advisors to 
Princesa del Mar unit. 

St. Barbara was presented wearing a white robe, scarlet 
cape and golden crown and carrying the symbols of the saint — 
a palm frond and a chalice. For her appearances at social func- 
tions she will wear a formal white Fiesta costume of lace over 
satin and a Spanish comb and mantilla. St Barbara will ride on a 




TOP LEFT — Picturesque arena where Channel City Horse 
Show and the Annual National House Show are held in the social 
season. TOP RIGHT — El Presidio Restaurant next to the site 
of original Santa Barbara Presidio. LOWER LEFT — Casa de 
la Guerra. LOWER RIGHT — Santa Barbara Court House 
where "Noches de Ronda" performances are held in its sunken 

garden. 



SEPTEMBER. 1971 



19 




Mrs. John E. 

Stiipak, Jr. 

portraying 
Saint Barbara 



Mi.'!s Mary Louise 

Days 

portraying 

Saint Barbara 




20 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



float in El Desfile Historico (historical parade), which is spon- 
sored and decorated by parlor members. She will also appear 
on the steps of the Old Mission on Fiesta's opening night, at 
several parties, and each night of Noches de Ronda performances 
in the sunken garden of the famed courthouse. 

St. Barbara, a young girl living in Asia Minor at the end of 
the third century, was converted to Christianity and refused to 
renounce her faith when her father demanded it of her. He impri- 
soned her in a tower and later beheaded her. For this act he was 
struck dead by lightning. The tower is one of the saint's symbols 
and appears on St. Barbara's float in the parade and in our city's 
flag. St. Barbara is revered by Christians of many lands and ap- 
pears with her symbols in numerous works of art. The Santa 
Barbara Channel was named for the saint by Sebastian Viscaino 
in 1602 when he sailed into it on December 4, her feast day. In 
the following century the Presidio, Mission and pueblo were 
named in honor of St. Barbara, who is the patroness of sailors, 
artillerymen and architects. Old Spanish Days in Santa Barbara 
was held on August 11 to 15. '^- 



We're splitting the atom for you. 



Chances are some of the 
electricity you now use is 
generated at the San 
Onof re Nuclear Plant near 
San Clemente. 

Edison plans to add 
additional nuclear units at 
this site. One reason: in a 
nuclear reactor there is no 



combustion, so there are 
no by-products of combus- 
tion. Electricity from clean 
nuclear plants is one of the 
ways Edison is working to- 
day for a better tomorrow. 



Southern California Edison 




SEPTEMBER, 1971 



21 



80TILIER ADOBE . . . 
(Continued from Page 17) 

made it difficult to sell the property. J ierra de Oro attempted to 
purchase the property for its own uses, but found that the cost 
of repair and restoration were too great for the Parlor to handle, 
and so the project had to be abandoned. However, with the pub- 
licity attendant on the saving of the adobe, it came to the atten- 
tion of an artist, architect and builder by the name of Harry Per- 
kins and his wife, and in late 1970 or early 1971 the Perkins 
purchased this famous little adobe for purposes ot their home- 
place. They have done extensive restoration. On Saturday, Aug- 
ust 14, 1971, Tierra de Oro placed a bronze marker on the adobe, 
and the Perkins family allowed the invited guests and the public 
to view the house, and to have tea as the' guests of the Parlor. 
This event was planned in connection with this year's Old Span- 
ish Days Fiesta, which began this year on August 1 1 and con- 
tinued through the 14th. The marking took place at 3:00 p.m., 
followed by a reception and open house. The Perkins have also 
given the Parlor permission annually to have an open house and 
reception at this famous home that will on one day each \ear be 
opened for the public view. 



FRUITVALE JUNIORS 

Lcalyn Marie Baker. Junior State Past President, has the 
honor of being the student speaker at her graduation, the class of 
1971 ceremonies. Holy Names High School. Oakland, held at 
the Oakland auditorium on June 10. 



Oiuf Druq Store 

1002 E. 17th Street, Santa Ana / Phone S47-MSS 

Sam and Jim Calsbresc 



'M 



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CALIFORNIA HERALD 



rOUND . . . OjN^E CiiftStT G;Ri;Z,Z|Lf B;E« R 



by Edrene Garner 



l^j tCENTLV Bueim Ventura Parlor No. 95, Ventura came to 
JTw ''ght in Carson City, Nevada, in the form of a cast iron, 
gold painted Grizzly Bear with the initials N.D.G.W. on the 
bottom and the number 95 on the bear. Attached was a card 
which read, "Jim Hanford molded and gave this to us when 
electricity was first used in Sacramento." 

Where in Carson City did this little Grizzly Bear appear? 
Hanging on a nail on an overhead beam in an Antique Shop. How 
the Bear arrived there is a mystery. The owner did not remember 
where or from whom he had acquired it. Further research and 
with the help of NDGW Grand Historian Orinda Giannini, some 
of the history of Buena Ventura Parlor No. 95, Ventura, was 
found. 




On February 16, 1897, Buena Ventura No. 95, was institut- 
ed with Grand President Mary E. Tillman of Minerva No. 2, San 
Francisco, presiding. The Charter President was Miss Edith H. 
Bonestel and the Charter Past President, Cora Sifiord. Presum- 
ably she was also the organizer as she had been very active and 
influential in the organization of Buena Ventura Parlor. Unfor- 
tunately, the proceedings do not state the name of the organizer. 



SEPTEMBER, 1971 



23 



There were 33 charter members, and they participated in th^r 
first Grand Parlor held at Sonora in June. 1897, with Grand Pres- 
ident Mary E. Tillman, Minerva Parlor presiding. 

Biiena Ventura Parlor was noted for its many civic activities 
and musicals as they were endowed with a number of talented 
musicians. They prided themselves on the perfection of their 
ritualistic work. In this PGP Cora SifTord was their inspiration 
and guiding light. (She was Chairman of Ritual for Grand Par- 
lor, introduced legislation for a full music program in the Order 
IS well as setting up the History and Landmarks Committee. She 
also made a vital contribution to the expansion of the Order in 
Southern California. Mrs. Sifford was Grand President in 1899- 
1900 presiding at Grand Parlor in Jackson in June 1900.) 

Later with 54 members, Biiena Ventura Parlor celebrated 
Washington's birthday with a ball. They also celebrated Flag Day 
and held joint installations with Ventura Native Sons on numer- 
ous occasions. They held a high place in the community due to 
their outstanding programs. Their elegant meetings were held in 
the finest locations in the City. Then, on August 13. 1919 Buena 
Ventura Parlor surrendered their Charter. Why such an active 
Parlor with such talented and active members dropped out, we 
can only guess. All that is mentioned in the statement, "lack of 
interest of members". An effort at reorganization failed. 

Now, almost 52 years later, their 'little Grizzly Bear Em- 
blem' has returned home and will be residing in the Historical 
Room at the Native Datighter Home, a memory and a reminder 
that tolerance, understanding, sisterly love and devotion to our 
Order is still very important in keeping the Native Daughters of 
the Golden West the great organization it is. 

"WELCOME HOME GRIZZLY BEAR NO. 95. NDGW." 



ANAHEIM 

SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Larry Ulvestad, Pcebideiit J Bernard Soto. Exec. VicePres. 

nmstruction loans < escrow < refmancinii i collections 

(Main Office) 

ANVIIFfM inVriNGTON BEACH IIRE V 

187 W. Lincoln Avenue 411 Main Street 770 South Brea Blvd. 

PRopccI 2-1532 LEhigh 6-«591 Ph. 529-4971 



M CALIFORNIA HERALD 



^assett Station 

(tS7t - 1906) 



I HIS WORLD-FAMOUS early day California Inn was owned and 

operated by Jacob H. and Mary Bassett and their family, 
for over a quarter of a century. The property was known as 
Howard Ranch, named for the first owner, Howard Chris Teger- 
man. According to the Mountain Messenger of May 6, 1865, he 
acquired the property at that time. The Inn was a large log cabin 
which was soon replaced, by the Bassetts with a two story frame 
building called BASSETT HOUSE. 

The Daily stage, freight teams and other weary travelers 
made it a regular stop for meals and overnight accomodations. 
Everyone was received in the same cordial manner, for nobody, 
rich or poor ever left Mary Bassett's house hungry. 

In the 1880's and '90's it was the headquarters for the manv 
miners who overran the area. Later it became a popular resort 
for fishermen and hunters who had discovered the abundance of 
fish and game to be found there. It was said that Mary Bassett 
"grubstaked" more miners than any other individual in the 
Sierra-Nevada mountains. 

John, only son in a family of five children, was a famous 
guide and for many years carried the ULSL Mail C40 lbs. on his 
back) from Sattley to Sierra City, on skiis, over the rugged Yuba 
Pass, making the round trip of 40 miles in two days. He did this 
in the winter, alone and regardless of snow and blizzard. He was 
totally deaf. It was impossible to lose him in the rugged moun- 
tains. 

.At the height of its dnv there were, besides the hotel, two 
large barns, one for horses and one for oxen, a saw mill, black- 
smith shop and a boardine house for the mill workers. The hotel 
houses one of the first telegraph instruments in this part of the 
mountains and was operated by members of the family. 

Jacob Bassett died in the middle '80's and Mary died July 1 1, 
1893. The hotel was operated for two years by the two youngest 
daughters, then by other members of the family until it was sold 



SEPTEMBER. 1971 



to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lowden in the early 1900's. It was 
operated by this family until 1937 when the old hotel was torn 
down. 

This historic spot has been known as Bassctts for almost 
100 years and is so marked on most California maps. The location 
is five miles beyond Sierra City on State Highway 49. at the 
intersection of the Gold Lake Road. 

Jacob Bassett came from Wayne County, Pennsylvania, 
across the Isthmus, in the early 1850's. He settled in Downie- 
ville. Two years later he sent for Mary Hagerty who came 
around the Horn. It took three months and she was ill 
every minute of the long journey. They were married and all of 
the children but one were born in Downieville. Maude the young- 
est was born at Bassett's. 

This historic spot was marked by the dedication of a bronze 
plaque by NDGW Parlors, Naomi No. 36 and Aiihiirn No. 233 
with Presidents Rose Eames and Anna Brown unveiling the 
plaque and PP Stella Weaver reading a history of the Bassett 
family and the Bassettt Station. ^• 



HISTORY OF FIESTAS / from Page 7 

In a little over two weeks. Fiesta will begin again with the 
ringing of the venerable Mission bells, and the tradilionril Fiesta 
Pequena, "(little Fiesta") will herald four days of celebration. 

Many of the people in this room will have major parts to 
play in this 47th annual Fiesta, and with your help and the in- 
dominablc spirit thnt has marked this community for 200 years, 
I think it will be one of the finest Fiestas ever. 

(Editor's Note: Mr. Monscn, public relations director of Old 

Spanish Days and host of a local radio program spoke at this 

year's Pre-Fiesta Tea on Santa Barbara, its traditions and 
fiestas. ) ^»> 



To receive the California Herald magazine for the balance 
of 1971, send ONE DOLLAR ($1.00), your name and address, 
to California Herald, P. 0. Drawer 4243, Anaheim. Ca. 9?803. 

26 CALIFORNIA HERALD 



PIONEER QUILT 

Toluca No. 279 was hostess for GP Irene Bondanza's offi- 
cial visit to San Fernando Valley; participating were Placerita No. 
277, San Fernando Mission No. 280, El Camino Real No. 324 
and Joshua Tree No. 288. 

Highlighting the evening was the presentation to Mrs. Bon- 
danza of a "■pioneer quilt" by Mrs. Harry James of Toliira. The 
patchwork quilt was started in 1900 by Mrs. Howatt. It was fin- 
ally completed in 1950 with all ofhe original pieces being used. 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

The meeting was opened by Santa Ana Parlor President. 
Virginia Cilley. Grace Parlor President. Ethelyn Furman, pre- 
sided at the exemplification of the ritual when three new members 
were initiated: the daughter of Betty Bennett was initiated into 
Grace No. 242; Dorothy Tomlinson and Elaine Albright, daugh- 
ter of Ruth Roberts, were initiated into Santa Ana No. 235. The 
Grand President presented twenty-five year membership pins to 
Grace Moore of Grace and charter members Minnie Higgins. 
Mattie Attington. Maude Brown and .Margaret Pontius of Silver 
Sands. 

Grand President Irene commended the officers on their 
ritualistic work and stressed the necessity to make even,' effort to 
increase membership. 



Doctor: "Did you follow my advice and drink hut water one 
hour before breakfast?" 

Patient: I did my best, hut I couldn't keep it up more than 
ten minutes." 



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SEPTEMBER. 1971 



27 



ORINOA 

Orinda Parlor is famous for its 50year members and the 
Parlor wishes to honor them for their faithfulness and devotion 
to the Native Daughters of the Golden West for all of these years. 
Verena Friede a 58-year member joined Orinda Parlor April 28, 
1913. She became a second-generation Native Daughter since 
her mother, Mrs. Katharine Britscgi, was a charter member of the 
Parlor. Joining the parlor in 1890, she was a 55-ycar member 
when she passed away. 

Serving as Organist for Orinda Parlor for over 50 years. 
Verena was President in 1922. When the ceremony was held 
honoring her for her fifty years, she asked to be presented with 
her mother's 50-year membership pin. A widow, she is an avid 
theatregoer and enjoys immensely the San Francisco Light Opera 
Season, the Pop Concerts and television. She is a lovely and 
gracious person, with a delightful sense of humor and a sweet 
smile — always on her face. She's "real hep" and '^^ith it" as a 
great favorite of the Orinda Sisters — Our Verene! 



BEVERLY HILLS 

Beverly Hills held its installation of officers for its 25th 
anniversary year on August 4.Bea Sully, of La Tijcra No. 282 
and her corps of officers installed. The Parlor unanimously elected 
its Charter member. Grand Trustee Laura Blosdale as its presi- 
dent for its silver anniversary year. The theme of the year is 
"Silver Circle of Fnthusiasm". 



Grand Trustee 

I.aiira Rlosdalc, 

Sew President of 

Beverly Hills Parlor 

No. 289. NDGW 



Grand President \ irgilia .VIcCombs has set her official visit 
to Beverly Hills on January 28, 1972. PGP Loretta Cameron. 
"Mother of the Parlor" will attend. 

28 CALIFORNIA HERALD 




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FAMOUS 
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30 



Ruel Gridley monument at Stockton 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




m££: 



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James Marshall monument at Coloma 



31 



CALIFORNIA HERALD, P.O. Drawer 4243 / Anaheim, Ca. 92803 



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YORBA LINDA'S FIRST LIBRARIAN AT OSTRICH FARM 



October / November / December, 1971 



California Herald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE' 



Volume XIX 



October, 1971 



No. 2 



The Night Henry Kuchcl Lost His Hat, By Leo J. Friis 3 

Sienkiewicz Learns English, by Leo J. Friis 7 



PHOTO CREDITS 



Picture on cover, courtesy, March BuXz. 



PICTURE ON COVER — Miss Gertrude Welsh. Yorba Lindas first 
Librarian. When she celebrated Christmas with her Uncle on December 25. 
1910. they visited an ostrich farm in South Pasadena. Miss Welsh is 
seated on the main attraction, an ostrich by the name of President Taft. 
Miss Welsh later became Mrs. Charles Selover. 




My cousin is Woodsy the Owl. 

Woodsy says: 

"Give a Hoot; 
Don't Pollute". 

Why not get on the ecology 
bandwagon and heed my cousin 
Woodsv's admonition. 



J. J. FRIIS 
PnblbbcT 



LEO J. FRIIS 
EiUlor 



JANE FRnS 
Pabllc Rtladow 



Published Monthly by JJ Friis and Leo J. Fnis. owners tnd publishers. 
Aniheim. California. All Right Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES. 
Anaheim. California. Mailing Address: P. O. Drawer 4243. Anaheim. Ca. 92S03 
ADVERTISING OFFICE: 301 N Parton St.. Santa Ana. Ca. 92'01 CHANGE OF 
ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mail to CALIFORNIA HERALD. P. Drawer 4243. 
Anaheim. Ca. 92803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN USA ISO statea). Mc a copy, $3.00 
a year. Other countries. Please apply for rate*. Entered at second<laM matter 
at the Pott Office at Anaheim. California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. No 
part of this magazine may t>e reprinted without specific permission. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



l^h.<2 yUiaM r-yt^entt^ JJ^U-ckeQ. 
h^osi nis <:y\jai 

by Leo J. Friis 



There are those of our older generation who see nothing 
particularly wrong in stealing watermelons. To them, this story is 
dedicated. 

The principal character of this tale is youthful Henry Kiicliel 
who in later years became the dignified and well-respected pub- 
lisher of the Anaheim Gazette. 

A GROUP OF POLISH emigres resided on a small ranch east of 
Anaheim in 1876, among whom were Karol Bozenta 
Chlapowski, veteran of the Polish Uprising in 1863, his beautiful 
and talented actress wife, Helena Modjeska, and young Henryk 
Sienkiewicz, destined to become an internationallv known novelist. 



Electricity is vital 
to your way of life. 
So is a healthy 
environment. 
We're working to 
bring you both. 





Southern California Edison 



OCTOBER. 1971 



Unfortunately, these idealists had had no experience in 
agriculture and their idyllic dreams were shattered in the face 
of rude realism. Incredible as it may seem, they were victimized 
by people brazenly entering their vineyard and stealing large 
quantities of grapes. 

Their protests were met by the explanation that "such was 
the custom of the country." 'We were too courteous to con- 
tradict them," explained Mme. Modjeska, "and we smilingly 
consented to be robbed, respecting the practice." 

Near the Chlapowski residence "grew the largest and finest 
pear tree in the valley." whose luscious fruit was well known 
throughout the vicinity. Of course, the local boys were inti- 
mately acquainted with this tree and one evening several of them 
paid it a visit. Among them was young Henry Kuchel, who was 
wearing his new black Stetson hat of which he was very proud. 
It was not only a handsome hat. but it was the only one of its 
kind in Anaheim. 

Assisted by an overcast sky which darkened the night. 
Henry and his friends climbed the tree and commenced picking 
pears, some of which they ate and others they stuffed into their 
jackets for future consumption. In the midst of their plundering 
the back door of the Chlapowski house opened. From the 
kitchen a flood of light shot outward toward the tree. 

Fearing a charge of birdshot, the boys dropped to the 
ground. " 'Dropped' is the word," recalled Kuchel fifty years 
later. "We did not climb down the tree, but absolutely dropped 
to the ground like so many pebbles. My new black Stetson hat 
was lost in the downward descent!" 

The boys fled through the willows, crossed an irrigation 
ditch, which fortunately was dry. and sped toward town. Henry 
\vent home bareheaded. On the next morning he appeared at 
school wearing an old hat. Everyone asked him the whereabouts 
of his new Stetson. He lamely explained that he was saving it 
for Sunday. 

On the following day, Chtapowski, usually called Count 
Bozcnta. appeared at the newspaper office where Henn, worked 
as a "printer's devil." He was carrying the Stetson which he 
presented to the editor with the request that he return it to the 
person to whom it belonged. He explained that he seriously 
objected to boys climbing the tree to steal the fruit and requested 
him to tell the owner of the hat that he had only to ask for some 
pears and he would be amply supplied. Henry's cherished head- 
gear was restored to him with a severe admonition to forever 
stay away from the tree. 

4 CALIFORNIA HERALD 



"I met Count Bozenta and Madame Modjeska many times 
on the streets in those days," recalled Kuchel, "and every time 
their sight was fastened on that Stetson they seemingly said, 
"There is the boy who got away with the pears." 

Some years later Kuchel became well acquainted with these 
delightful people and he remembers gratefully that "the pear 
episode was never brought up." 




Karal i hlapuwski ojtcn called Count Bozenta 

OCTOBER. 1971 




Helena Mudjeska in her role as Mary Queen ol Scots 



CALIFORNrA HERALD 






■"'^SSLlsa*! 



by 
Dr. Leo J. Friis 



Of the Polish colony which settled in Anaheim in 1876, 
the actress Helena Modjeska is best remembered, probably 
because she made Orange County her home until her death in 
1909. 

However, her compatriot , Henryk Sienkiewicz, who left 
Anaheim after a two year residence, gained greater world stature. 
He freely acknowledged that his experience in California served 
as a catalyst to transform him from a journalist to a novelist. 

Sienkiewicz was a writer with an international reputation 
even before he was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 
1905. 



WHEN THIRTY YEAR OLD Henryk Sienkiewicz arrived in 
Anaheim he was totally unfamiliar with the English lan- 
guage. No doubt he had a smattering of German which enabled 
him to converse haltingly with local residents, many of which 
were from the Fatherland. He also enjoyed visits with a few 
Polish townsmen which eased the frustrations of the language 
barrier. 

It was young Burton A. Edwards, who lived on a neighbor- 
ing ranch, who was his first and best English teacher. Some 
twenty years later, Edwards recalled the details of the friendship 
which sprang up between him and Sienkiewicz. 

"I was an amateur fisherman," said Edwards, "and we be- 
came great friends because of our common fondness for angling 
in the mountain trout streams. Neither of us could communicate 
with the other except by monosyllables and signs and motions, 
but as we became acquainted we had a fondness for each other 
and a heap of fun at our clumsy mode of communication. Young 
Sienkiewicz soon learned to speak so as to be understood in 
English and I helped him learn several hundred words. 

OCTOBER, 1971 7 



"Was he a writer then? The most patient and painstaking 
I can imagine. 1 have seen him sitting at a wooden table (which 
he constructed himself) writing day after day. There were three 
pepper trees away out at the north end of the colony ranch and 
there Sienkiewicz would sit and write. He had three or four 
books in French and Polish on the table, and a stack of blue 
paper. Occasionally he would roll a cigarette, and, tipping his 




Henrvk Sienkiewicz 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 




Pico House in Los Angeles 



chair back, would blow smoke out of his mouth and look up at 
the trees as if in a trance. Then he would furiously resume writing 
again." 

The pleasant association between Edwards and Sicnkicwicz 
ended in 1878 when the latter moved to Los Angeles. Edwards 
paid him a visit and found him "living in cheap rooms on the 
upper floor of the old Pico House, not far from the Chinatown 
there. He looked seedy and bore the marks of several months 
of hard mental labor." 

Sienkiewicz had obtained a job with Nathan Jacoby, a 
local merchant, and his English had greatly improved. He was 
earning some money from articles sent to the Gazeia Polska. 
the newspaper which paid his expenses to America. In addition 
he wrote four of his famous Hania stories while residing at the 
Pico House. 

Edwards states that Sienkiewicz went to San Francisco "in 
March or April, 1879, and from there went to New York, thence 
to Poland. He wrote several letters to Mme. Modjeska and Count 
Bozenta when he reached Krakow, but we never heard of him 
until he burst into world-wide fame as the author of Quo Vadis." 



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AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 


200 W. Commonwe 
1203 E. Yorba Lind 


alth, Fullci 
a Blvd.. PI 


ton 871-4244 
acentia 524-1321 



Oiuf Drug Store 

INI E. nth Streat, SanU Ana / Phont M7-M55 

Sam and Jim Calabresp 



M 



Prescriptions and Sundries Serving Orange County Since 1959 

MASTERCHARGE and BANKAMERICARD • FREE DELIVERY 



XQ CALIFORNIA HERALD 



HOLflnDlREVnOLDS 

6RRDING(M)C0NTRnCT0R 

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- RAILROADS - 
• Heavy • Equipment 

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535-4233 
505 S. Sunkist Ave. Anaheim 



the 



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lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



HILGENFELTI 
MORTUARY U 

Faithful . Courteous . Service 

120 E. Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5-4I05 



THE BASLER HOME. 



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24-Hour Nursing Service 
Excellent Meals - Tray Service 

LARGE CHEERFUL ROOMS 
ADJOINING BATHS & SUNDECKS 

Life Membership or Monthly Rates 

542-3514 



1015 N. Broadway 



Santa Ana 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 535-7221 

INSURANCE— SURETY BONDS 

M. E. BEEBE & CO. 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim, California 



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Highway 138 and 

Mountain Road 

Box 106 



Val Bray, owner Pinon Hills, Calif. 



JEWELERS 




OCTOBER. 1971 



Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 

11 



California Herald 

'•PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE' 

VoLUMF. XIX November, 1971 No. 3 

znyoc atih Itis f^^atiac^a 

by Leo J. Friis 



7/1/5 reminiscence appeared in the August 23, 1882 edition 
of the Anaheim Gazette. Fortunately, the medical profession has 
greatly advanced since the days when anyone could prescribe 
for the sick. 

AWAY BACK IN THE sixtics, whcii thc colony of Anaheim was 
in its infancy, and when it was about the only settled part 
of the county between Los Angeles and San Juan, the colonists 
were plagued by myriads of [ground] squirrels who found the 
succulent vines more toothsome than the wild grasses of thc 
plains. 

Individual efforts at extermination proving inadequate, a 
Mexican was employed whose sole duty it was to wander about 
thc vineyards and drop poison into the holes made by the squirrels. 
The poison he concocted himself and mixed with corn, making 
it into little balls, which rolled so far into the holes that the 
squirrels were sure to find it. 

He became so skillful and expert at his calling that he was 
dubbed "Doctor" by his employers. After a while his country- 
men supposing from his title that he had in some mysterious way 
acquired a knowledge of medicine, began to consult him when 
suffering from any of the ailments which erring humanity is heir 
to. 

Finding that the credulous paisanos had faith in him, and 
not being overwhelmed with an excess of conscientiousness, the 
"Doctor" prescribed for every form of sickness, looked wise as 
he felt the pulse of his patients — about which he knew as much 
as he did of mnemonics — and generally comported himself as if 

12 CALIFORNIA HERALD 






he had a diploma which had cost him a hundred dollars. Had 
his patrons been more acute and less credulous, they would 
have discerned a suspicious sameness about the remedies which 
he furnished. 

Did one have the cholera morbus, the result of a surfeit of 
of watermelon, a dose of laudanum was promptly administered. 
Did another get to the verge of deUrium by the free imbibition 
of aguardiente, a few grains of opium never failed to kill or 
cure. In fact, for all the singular hereditaments and appurtenances 
belonging to violations of the laws of health, he prescribed 
opium in some form, probably for the reason that the drug was 
a favorite beverage with himself, and he was unselfish enough 
to share with his fellow-citizens the bliss which results from its 
use. 

It is true, it sometimes happened that the indiscriminate 
use of the poison had fatal results, and the unfortunate patient 
was effectively cured of disease by being killed outright, but 
these little incidents did not seem to disturb the "Doctor's" 
equanimity or diminish his popularity until the episode which 
we will now relate caused him to retire from the profession. 

There was, at the time which I write, a family living in a 
tent about where the Washington Meat Market now stands on 



^\fe'^e splitting the atom for you. 



Chances are some of the 
electricity you now use is 
generated at the San 
Onof re Nuclear Plant near 
San Clemente. 

Edison plans to add 
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this site. One reason: in a 
nuclear reactor there is no 



combustion, so there are 
no by-products of combus- 
tion. Electricity from clean 
nuclear plants is one of the 
ways Edison is working to- 
day for a better tomorrow. 



Southern California Edison 




NOVEMBER, 1971 



13 




// was easy for the "Doctor" to prescribe for 
patients. After all he used opium himself, why 
not share it with the paisanos for their ailments. 



Center Street. [The Market was situated on the north side of pre- 
sent named Lincoln Avenue, about 150 feet west of Anaheim 
Boulevard.) The wife, a most estimable woman, had been ailing 
for a long time, and was under the "Doctor's" care. The most in- 
evitable results followed, and the unconsolable husband was com- 
forted with the belief that all had been done for her which it 
was possible to do. 

A handsome coflin was made and brought into the tent, the 
body was dressed, candles were lighted and every preparation 
made for the last sad rites. At this juncture a gentleman (who 
had been out of town when the event occurred) entered the tent 
and proferred his services as a watcher, which were accepted. 

As he sat looking at the form of the woman he detected a 
slight motion of the enveloping shroud, and a hasty investigation 
showed that the woman was alive. Amid the suppressed excite- 
ment of the attendants and the friends who had quickly gathered, 
restoratives were applied, and the woman recovered conscious- 
ness; not. however, before the candles had been extinguished, the 
colTin removed, and a more worldly garment substituted for the 
shroud. 

The "resurrection," as it may be termed, brought nearly 
the entire camp to the spot — but the "Doctor" remained at 



A 


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A H 


E 1 M 




SAVINGS 


AND LOAN ASSOCIATION | 


Larry Ulvestad, Pres.O 


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J Bernard Soto. 


Encc. Vice-Pres 


construction loans * 


escrow i 


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(Main Office) 

ANAireiM HI NTTNGTON BF.ACH BREA 

187 W. Lincoln Avenue 411 Mam Street 770 South Brea Blvd. 
PRopcct 2-1532 LEhigh 6.«S91 Ph. 52S-4971 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



his office. He had pronounced the woman dead, and if she was 
not dead it was not his fault. He had done the best he could. 
He would stake his professional reputation that she would live 
but a short time — and his prophecy proved true, for the woman 
died sure enough in a few days after her escape from premature 
burial. [She probably died from the ailment from which she had 
been suffering.] 

The gentlemen alluded to [who had served as a watcher] had 
an impressive conversation with the "Doctor" in which that 
individual did all the listening. The conversation was to the 
effect that if ever the "Doctor" was detected again practicing 
the medical profession, he would either be turned over to the 
lawful authorities as an imposter, or dealt with according to 
local law — which at that time consisted of a vigorous application 
of cat-o-nine tails. 



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CALIFORNIA HERALD 



JDuellinq in 

pioneer L^naljcint 



h\j JLeo J, ^riis 



IN THE PIONEER YEARS OF Anaheim it was customary for towns- 
men to visit a local hotel in the evening, play a few games 
of cards, discuss the affairs of the day and enjoy a glass or two 
of beer. 

During the cold winter of 1877, Tom Stagg, clerk at the 
Planters Hotel, kept a roaring fire in the lobby of the hostelry. 
With tightly closed doors and windows, the room became an 
almost impenetrable haze of stale air and acrid tobacco smoke. 

Red Rogers, a local negro, enjoyed being in the crowd. 
He would grab a chair near the stove, sit down, stretch out his 
long legs and toast his toes near the fire. In a few minutes he 
would be fast asleep. His loud snoring was distracting enough, but 
sometimes in his relaxed condition, nauseous odors slipped from 
his body. 

On these occasions other guests in the room protested 
violently and Stagg would be obliged to awaken Red and quietly 
ask him to leave the hotel. Red always complied uncomplainingly. 
Night after night he visited the hotel and often his stay ended 
in the same unceremonious manner. 

One evening Red's unconscious behavior was more obnoxious 
than usual. In desperation Stagg soaked a sponge in ice water, 
removed sleeping Red's hat and clamped the freezing object on 
his head. Red leaped to his feet. Stagg eyed him stonily. Red 
returned his stare and said quietly, "I've been insulted." and left 
the room. 

A conference of the hotel habitues followed. Subject: how 
to get rid of Red. 

NOVEMBER, 1971 V 




IS 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



On the next day, as Red was passing Charlie Leonard's meat 
market. Charlie beckoned him to come in. 

"Red," he said. "1 saw what happened last night. It was an 
outrage, a downright insult! It was not only an insult to you; 
it was an insult to the whole colored race. Certainly, you can't let 
this pass by without doing something about it! 

"What can I do?" asked Red. 

"There's only one thing to do," replied Leonard, "You 
must have satisfaction. You must challenge him to a duel!" 

Rogers was starded. "I'm not a duelling man," he protested. 

"Nothing to be scared of," assured Leonard soothingly. 
"Stagg is a coward. He won't fight. And when he doesn't accept 
your challenge, he'll have to leave town in disgrace. Then you 
won't have any trouble visiting at the hotel again." 

Red hesitated. He just wasn't a lighting man, he explained. 

"Don't worry," said Leonard, "you won't have to fight. I 
tell you Stagg is a coward and he won't fight." 

After more persuasive talk, Red agreed. 

"I'll fix up the challenge," volunteered Leonard. Taking a 
pencil he commenced writing on a piece of wrapping paper. 

"Here it is." he said, "Let me read it and see how it 
sounds." 

To Tom Stagg, Esq. 

Because of your conduct toward me last night. I have been 
insulted. I must have satisfaction. 

I hereby challenge you to a duel, to be fought in the near 
future on the slaughter house grounds, south of Anaheim. 

Weapons are to be double-barreled shotguns with buckshot. 
I remain, your obedient servant. 

Red pondered the letter. "I think birdshot would be better 
than buckshot,"" he observed. 

'"All right, I'll change that." 

After again being assured that Stagg would not accept the 
challenge. Red signed the letter. Leonard obligingly volunteered 
to deliver it. 

Later in the day, Red returned to the meat market. 

"I gave him the letter," said Leonard gleefully. "'I tell you 
he's a coward. He won't fight. He asked for 24 hours to think 
over the challenge." 

Early the next morning Leonard received Stagg's reply. 
He not only accepted the challenge, but also demanded that 
charges of buckshot rather than birdshot be used and that the 
duel be fought at twenty paces. 

NOVEMBER. 1971 19 



Leonard professed great surprise. "I still think he's blufting." 
he said to Red. The latter was appalled at this unexpected turn 
of events. 

He went over to Joe Bennerscheidt's tin shop where he 
ordered a vest of sheet iron extending from his neck to his hips. 
It was best to be prepared, he said to himself. 




Joseph Bennerschcidt in foreground of /us I in Sliofi in J 670s 



After a short, anxious waiting period, the day for the duel 
arri\cd. Red donned his armor beneath his shirt and proceeded 
slowly to the field of honor. Tom Stagg had obtained a bladder 
filled with cow's blood, which he secreted under his vest. 

The dueling principals were greeted by a large crowd of 
spectators. A young man named W. W. Smith, who had recently 
arrived to work on the local newspaper, had been chosen master 
of ceremonies. He wore a long, black coat, sported a "plug" 
hat, and comported himself with great dignity. 



20 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



He made a great show of examining Stagg and pronounced 
him fit to fight a duel. He then approached Rogers, who every- 
one present knew was wearing an armored vest. 

"Don't touch me," he shouted, "I'm fighting for my life!" 

Smith calmly explained that he had examined Stagg's wear- 
ing apparel and he must do likewise with Red. After some 
hesitation, Red consented. Smith forthwith removed the armor 
amid roars of laughter from the crowd. 

"Don't worry," whispered Smith to Red. "Stagg is awful 
nervous: he won't be able to shoot straight." 

The participants were placed back to back. Smith then 
instructed them that he would provide each with a double- 
barreled shotgun loaded with buckshot and at the sound of a 
pistol shot each man was to step oflf ten paces, wheel and fire both 
barrels of his gun. If neither fell, they would resume their original 
positions, surrender their guns, which would then be loaded 
with double charges of buckshot. Upon the sound of the pistol 
shot they would each step olT three paces, wheel and fire. 

Each party was then handed a shotgun loaded with blank 
cartridges. The pistol barked and each man stepped forward ten 
paces, turned and fired. Stagg dropped his gun, stumbled and fell 
to the ground. With a small knife he had concealed in his hand, 
he cut open the bladder of blood, and apparently in great agony, 
weltered in the gore. 

Red threw down his gun and ran toward the slaughter 
house, the crowd pursuing him, shouting, "Get him! Hang him! 
Kill him!" In desperation Red vaulted the fence and landed in 
the midst of a herd of long horned steers. He made his way 
through the startled animals, flung open the slaughter house door 
and fell into an uncovered cesspool. 

The crowd followed, but all pretended not to see him. After 
some milling around the spectators returned to town, Stagg carry- 
ing Red's armored vest which he placed on display at the 
Planters Hotel. 

Red remained in the cesspool until he was fished out by his 
brother, Jim. That night Red left town. 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 535-7221 

INSURANCE— SURETY BONDS 

M. E. BEEBE & CO. 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim, California 



UILGENFELn 

n MORTUARY 1/ 

Faithful . Courteous. Service 

120 E. Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5-4I05 



NOVEMBER. 1971 



21 



California Herald 

■PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 



VoLUMi; XIX 



DichMUiR, 1971 



No. 4 



Famous People. Towns and Monuments, by J. J. Friis 22 

Rudolf Bohn, by Henry Kuchel 23 



FAMOUS 
PEOPLE 

TOWNS and 

MONUMENTS 

by J. J. frui 




Susanvillt m'/iv"'"/! > nimd Rooptown) in ISf)4 

(Continued on Poi;e 26) 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



EOlOIiPK l©Kl! 



gjffl, s rioa@@r 



This article written by Henry Kuchel. appeared in the Sept- 
ember 30, 1926 issue of the Anaheim Gazette. Additions and 
explanations are enclosed in brackets. 



AMONG THE OLD-TIMERS WHO lived, and had their being here 
in early days, who does not recall Constable Bohn? Who 
could ever forget this plain-clothed minion of the law, this up- 
holder of the peace and dignity of this State, this be-lanterned 
guardian of the night? 

[Rudolf Bohn commenced his Anaheim career as night 
watchman for which the town council paid him ten dollars per 
month, the rest of his compensation being contributed by local 
merchants. Suffice to say, he was never over paid.] 

He was on duty at all hours, and once he laid hands on an 
offending culprit, that individual was marched straightaway to 
the calaboose. [On his nightly rounds, he was accompanied by 
his faithful dog and followed by a host of mangy mongrels which 




Electricity is vital 
to your way of life. 
So is a healthy 
environment. 
We're working to 
bring you both. 




Southern California Edison 



DECEMBER. 1971 



23 



frequented the streets. One evening the dignity of law was rudely 
flouted by some unknown scoundrels, who tied a can to his dog's 
tail. In the next issue of the Gazette he announced he was on the 
trail of the criminals, but apparently he never caught them.] 

He was invincible in a political fight, could not be beaten 
at the polls and only laid down the dignity and emoluments of 
his office when he was called into another and better world. 

When periods of frost were threatened, his trusty ther- 
mometer, carried securely in his hip pocket — his "usual" pack- 
age removed to make room therefor — he observed on his 
numerous inspections of the device that the weather continued 
to be singularly warm during the night, and when the morning 
hours brought a killing frost and he was snugly tucked away in 
his little bed, he explained that the temperature must have sud- 
denly fallen in the after part of the night. Of course, he denied 
the details of this wicked story, declaring it was merely prop- 
aganda to defeat him at election and adding that if a frost were 
to come, how the devil could he stop it anyway? 






X 




One evening at the West Anaheim depot (of the Southern 
Pacific) he sustained an olf-tackle buck by the pilot of the 
engine, which was slo\sing down for a stop at the station. He 
was thrown several feet off the track, but sustained no injury. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



and claimed that stories current, that he wished to arrest the 
engine, were false and malicious. [One wonders what he was 
doing on the track. Perhaps there had been too many nips from 
the package which he ■"usually" carried in his hip pocket.] 

When men were kept at work until late at night, he offered 
to see them safely home for a stipend of 50 cents per week. 
When fires occurred late at night, and he was home sound 
asleep, he declared that he could not be expected to be on duty 
the entire day and night. [Following the fire of 1877, which 
destroyed several business buildings, there was much criticism 
of the ineffectiveness of the local fire department. The Gazette 
editor suggested rather pointedly, that if the night watchman 
had been "on the job", the fire could have been brought under 
control before it had gained so much headway.] 

It was said of him that when rains were falling he would 
find a convenient haven of refuge at sundry places down the 
street where he could toss off a beaker of gambrinus with more 
grace than any man in town excepting Dr. Ellis. [Gambrinus was 
a beer made by the Gambrinus Brewery in Los Angeles. There 
were two Ellis brothers in Anaheim, both physicians. No attempts 
will be made to suggest which one is referred to.] 

[Bohn's greatest problems arose during the grape har\est. 
Indian pickers got drunk on illegally purchased fire water. 
Somehow their skulls were impervious to the lusty blows which 
Bohn rained down upon them with his locust wood billy club.] 

Who can ever forget this old-time defender of the faith, now 
gone to his eternal reward in the skies?. Take him, for all in 
all, perhaps we shall not look upon his likes again. 



Dr. John A. F. Heyermann was Orange County's first 
physician coming to Anaheim in 1862. He moved to San Fran- 
cisco in 1873, and opened a drug store. 



Owl Drug Store 

1002 E. 17th Street, Santa Ana / Phone 547-6655 

Sam and Jim Calabrese 




Prescriptions and Sundries Serving Orange County Since J 959 

MASTERCHARGE and BANKAMERICARD • FREE DELIVERY 



DECEMBER, 1971 25 



FAMOUS PEOPLE, TOWNS — from page 22 




James Irvine. Jr.. son of the original owner of the Irvine Ranch 



HlGHLSl IMPREST ON INSURLD SAVINGS 
Payable Quarterly • Compounded Daily 



Accounts 

Now Insured 

up to 

$20,000.00 

200 W. Commonwealth, Fullcrton 
1203 E. Yorba Linda Blvd., Placcntia 




FULLERTON 
SAVINGS 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 



871-4244 
524-1321 



26 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 










t- 
■< 
CQ 



i 

o 

a 



DECEMBER. 1971 



27 







i 



lames M. Guinn. Principal of Anaheim School, 1878. This school 
was built with a bond issue 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 




Statue of Fr. Francisco Garces at Bakersfield. 



It perpetuates the memory of the great Franciscan mission- 
ary who explored southern San Joaquin Valley in 1776. Five 
years later he was killed by Indians on the Colorado River. 



DECEMBER. 1971 



29 





®®lg 



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CALIFORNIA HEPALD 



"D©\V aTi3 aiAvav^ 




DECEMBER, 1971 



31 



HoLflnDlREvnoLos 

GRRDING(?ra)C0NTRRCT0R 

BRIDGES • HIGHWAYS - DAMS 
- RAILROADS ■ 
• Heavy • Lquipment 

Hauling For Rent 

535-4233 
505 S. Sunkist Ave. Anaheim 



the 



SOU 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



UILGENFEin 

n MORTUARY U 

Faithful . Courteous. Service 

120 E. Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5-4105 



THE BASLER HOME. 



CONVALESCENT & ELDERLY 

24-Hour Nursing Service 
Excellent Meals - Tray Service 

LARGE CHEERFUL ROOMS 
ADJOINING BATHS & SUNDECKS 

Lite Membership or Monthly Rates 
542-3514 

1D15 N Broadway Santa Ana 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 5?5-7;:i 

INSURANCE— SURETY BONDS 

M. E. BEEBE & CO. 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim. CtJifomia 



Let PIONEER PRESS 

Print Your 

Rosters - Stationery 

Business Cards - Tickets 

Reaonable Prices 

PIONEER PRESS 

301 N. Parton 

Santa Ana, Calif. 92701 

(714) 835-3456 




rlawer' j>Kop 
i:i4 \V. Lincoln. Anaheim .^35-4997 



* 



L 



The Lamplighter 

Come in and Browie 



Highway 138 and 

Mountain Road 

Box 106 



Val Bray, owner Pinon Hills, Calif. 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / &33-3107 



4357 



485