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Full text of "The Californian"

CALIFORNIA 

STATE LIBRARY 

Accession No 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant 



http://www.archive.org/details/californian03losa 




jruary 1947 
ice 2 5 cents 




Cal if ornia-by-the-yard 

exclusive at one fine store 

in most cities . . . 

at about 5.00 the yard. 

Write for store name 

and folder showing 

patterns in full color. 

Hoffman California Woolens, 

Los Angeles 14, California. 

Vogue Pattern No. 5825 



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Destined for adventure — the complete costume for 
every moment — here or there! The suit's uncluttered 
lines take an array of accessories — the companion 
coat is casual but important over everything you own. 
Typically Rosenblum of California in an all-wool 
worsted glen plaid. Brown or gray. Sizes 10 to 20. 
-~„,V , Complete costume $89. 95. Suit Shop ( #36) Second Floor. 

ORDAN MARSH COMPANY • BOSTON 7, MASS. • NEW ENGLAND'S GREAT STORE 



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If HE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 




Sophie Original in 

Jardin aux Li las print 
by Waldo Pence 



Contemporary American Artists Prints 

Great Art transposed on pure silks. 

Styled by 7%^ tf ^t£«^s 

ONONDAGA s. LKC c™ 

1412 BROADWAY, NEW YORK • CHICAGO • LOS ANGELES • MILLS, EASTON, PA. 



The Artists* 

JULIEN BINFORO 
DORIS ROSENTHAL 
WALDO PEIRCE 
DONG KINGMAN 
WILLIAM PALMER 
GLADYS ROCKMORE DAVIS 



•Courtesy Midtown Galleries 








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Buffu 



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LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA 



MAIL ORDERS, BUFFUMS' YOUTH LTD. FOURTH FLOOR 



Young charmer trio by jean, dlOlOUV of Hope Skillman's 
Sanforized sheen striped cotton shirting, vat dyed in rose, yellow, 
or blue on white. 

Lace-frosted dress, sizes 3-6, $8.95; 7-14, $9.95 

Sun dress, 3-6, $6.95; 7-14 $8.95 

2-piece play suit, 3-6, $4.95; 7-14 . . . . $6.95 
Matching hanky pouch and sun halo, each $2.95 



VOL 3 THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly, 210 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles 14, California. Subscription price: $3.00 per year. One FEBRUARY 

dollar additional postage outside continental United States. 25 cents a copy. Entered as second class matter January 25, 1946, at the 



NO. i 



Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1879. Copyright 1947 The California!], Inc. Reproduction in whole or 
part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 



1947 







beautiful new backsweep ... in a Lastex swimsuit . . . 
from Cole's "Westward to the Sea" beachwear collection 



THE CALIFORNIAN, February, 194 




hand-tailored 
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Striking Dramatization of 1947 Fashion Elegance 

Perfect-Fit companion classic 

. . . suit or topcoat from $65.00 . . . superb 

Kanmak Worsted Gabardines 

of 100% virgin wool, in pastel shades 

with Celanese linings 



Series Two 



Perfect-Fit Tailleurs, Inc. • manufacturers of Men's & Women's Apparel • Los Angeles 14, Calif. • sold exclusively at fine stores everywhere • nationally advertised 



HE CALI FORN I AN, February, 1947 




Here are same deft new PLAY-TANO casuals being worn on pretty "dogs". . . with neatly 

turned ankles. Cleverly conceived to bring you California's idea of comfort . . . in choice of 
popular colors and leathers. Now featured at hundreds of better stores. 
Write for the name of your nearest dealer. 




-S&ttfr 



ORIGINALS 



CALIFORNIA SHOES, LTD. 2234 N. Figueroa St., Los Angeles 31, Calif. 





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HAT BY CASPAR-DAVIS 



MAKE-UP B" DOROTHY GRAY 



Travelin' the Santa Fe Trail in another Fashion Forecast by Dorothy O'Hara. Amusing 

California Authentics handscreened print, "Santa Fe Train Time" combines with a deftly draped 

skirt for daytime or datetime. On fine Enka rayon, woven by Stonecutter. 

Arnold Constable, Fifth Avenue, New York; Chas. A. Stevens & Co., Chicago; H. Liebes, San Francisco 



)OROTHY O'HARA 



FASHION FORECAST, Inc., 725 E. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles 





Aquatic is the word for it — the superbly-fitting 

swim suit in delustered elasticized satin Contro with elastic back- 
banding (patent pending), inner Miracle bra, and nary a zipper fastening 
to mar the beautiful back. At topflight stores in the U.S.A. and Canada. 

1035 SANTEE STREET, LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 



THE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 



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Portrait of Spring 

Lnterpreleo with 

consummate artistry 
ou Paramount JJress of 
Urwnoaqa's Lovely Snolcrepe, f 
a Jjemberq* rayon classic 



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B E M B E R G is the registered trade- mark of the 
G. U. S. PAT. OFF. 

: CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 



MERlWmbBEMBERG CORPORATION 



STERN -DEMARES 






Nylon Lace and 



for the 



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Quality 



IE IN AMERICA'S FINEST STORES 
FOR NAME OF NEAREST STORE 





*Reg. U. S. Pat. Off.. 



DAMSEL of HOLLY WOOD 




BY 



C OHAMA 



Sleek, water -loving fabric specially 

treated for action in the surf. Swashbuckling" 
design styled with bravado by 

Mary Ann DeWeese, Brilliant Stylist for 





Cohama Fabrics — a division of 

United Merchants and Manufacturers, Inc. 




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Whether you're tiny or regal, a Bramble Knit by Hollywood Knitting Mills is the smartest, easiest, most 
happily wearable suit we know to bridge the gap twixt town and country. All wool, soft and grand to feel — 
processed not to sag, shrink, stretch or wrinkle. Sizes all the way from a tiny 12 to a stately 42! $25.00 



MAIL ORDERS TO CASUAL COLONY . YOUNKERS • DES MOINES 6, IOWA 



JADE 

FROSTED RASPBERRY 

GREY- BLACK 

NAVY 



12 



THE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 




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Black on white ... or white on black if you'd rather! Crisp 
linen-like fabric to wear now and on into summer. Dress, 
slack suit, playsuit with matching skirt from Tabak's col- 
lection of interchangeable casuals. 



TABAK OF CALIFORNIA • 860 SO. LOS ANGELES STREET • LOS ANGELES 14, CALIFORNIA 

THE CALI FORN I AN, February, 1947 



13 



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Sun-beatable "players" 
excitingly colored from 
the sea and sky. Pat Premo's 
"briefs" for beauty in 
angles, stripes and spots . 



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OF ^AllFORNIA 



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BLOUSES OF CEIANESE CREPE TO MATCH COAT LININGS 




ironderful idea 



clothes you lore 




... interchangeable, coordinated 



in mis-matchable shades, 



seasonal for totrn or resort trear 



BRAND 




I F A B R. I C] 
TAILORED IN 



CALIFORNIA BY foakMuTtlaf. 



BARNEY MAX, 407 EAST PICO, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



J Sally Forth designs a dress like an inverted calla lily.. 
beautifully slim ... wonderfully flattering ... in Sheer Crepe. 
Roulette, an OSCAR HAYMAN fabric. Sizes 10 to 18 and 9 to 1 
in aqua, mint green, coral sun (rose), grey, navy, and black. 



RAAB-HARMELL 





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18 



THE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 




PETITE CASUALS are sold only in the foremost 
fashion stores and specialty shops of America. 
For name of store nearest you, write to: 

MITCHELL AND HOFFMAN 

208 WEST EIGHTH STREET 
LOS ANGELES 14, CALIFORNIA 



FOR THE PETITE FIGURE 
5 - F E E T - 5 OR UNDER 

The real beaut) of this definitely photogenic dress 
is in the wonderful things it does for the usually 
hard-to-fit petite figure. \o sculptor could take 
greater pains to make his work anatomically 
perfect It fits in all the difficult places, with seldom 
a fret about alterations. Golden-wafer buttons 
heighten the interest from the charming rounded 
neckline to the smartly buckled belt. Impeccably 
tailored in one of the choicest of fluid fabrics— 
Roulette Crepe, an Oscar Dayman fabric. 
Sizes 10 to 20 about $18.00 



"SOMETHING WONDERFUL HAPPENS WHEN YOU WEAR CLOTHES FROM CALIFORNIA" 

THE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 19 




California Fashions in 

*"Botany" Brand Fabrics 

Caltex bestows its superb tailoring 
on Botany's all worsted Marchan 

gabardine in a whole, congenial 

family of coordinates. Pictured... slim, 

long slacks that stem from a flattering 

waistband. They have interchangeable 

counterparts in shorts, short slacks, 

a casual jacket and skirt. Get them in 

dark or sunny pastels and wear 
them all with the Hess-Goldsmith 
"Seagarden" printed shirt blouse. 

The slacks, $22.95. The shirt blouse, $11.95. 




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CHERUB PINAFORE ... a lovable. 

ruffly, baby girl dress ... so very special for 
children from one to seven years old. Made 
of eyelet batiste in delicate colors with cherubs 
appliqued in contrast . . . and a big bow in 
the back. Just the gift for the little girl who 
should "have everything." Priced at $17.95. 
including tax and postage. (Indicate color 
and size.) Binnie Barnes' Tot-Of-The-Town. 
13503 Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks, Calif. 



GRACIOUS GIVING ... a luncheon 
set for important hostessing. Finely woven 
cotton in soft tones of green, yellow, blue, 
peach, mauve or white. Contrasting design 
hand-embroidered in "old world" charming 
Swedish darning ... all edges are hand 
fringed. The set of four place mats and four 
napkins, $13.95, postpaid. Specify color de- 
sired (better mention 2nd choice, too). From 
Handskills, 8118 W. Third Street, Los Angeles. 



CLOCKWISE ... a cuckoo clock pin 
with cuckoo bird and a little pendulum and 
weights that swing as you walk. It's a Corn 
piece in antiqued gold, jeweled with glitter 
ing simulated emeralds, turquoise, diamond.' 
and topaz. An extra strong double clip holds 
it safely to jacket lapel or blouse. Price, $7.20, 
tax and postage paid. Daniels of Beverly Hills. 
451 N. Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif. 

BUCKLE-TWO ... a black beauty of 
a sport belt in top grain cowhide with two 
gleaming silver buckles, one for tightening 
to the east, one to westward. For contrast from 
its all-over black are tiny white stitches all 
around the top and bottom edges. About $5 
at J. L. Hudson, Detroit; The Emporium, San 
Francisco; Bullock's, Los Angeles, and other 
fine stores. From Nelson Power, 728 S. Hill, 
Los Angeles. 

RENO RING ... the broken wedding 
band for the gay, or not so gay. A novelty 
ring . . . not to be taken too seriously. In- 
scribed with the all-revealing word "FINIS." 
In gold or silver for women or men. It's new 
and it's a smart way to face facts . . . wear, 
one on your little finger. At better stores 
throughout the country. Created by Bing 
Richey exclusively for Biltmore Accessories, 
846 S. Broadway, Los Angeles. 



20 



THE CALIFORNIAN, February, 19471 



CARRY KIT . . . holds quite a bit of 
overnight things of his or hers . . . like 
shave sets, toiletries, cosmetics and such. 
Smooth traveler" you'll be if you have one. 
Caramel brown and beige is the color combina- 
tion . . . embossed leather . . . water re- 
pellent lining. The extra heavy zipper and 
hand-grip will please the globe trotter if you 
give him one! Exactly $10, including tax 
and mailing. Hollywood Saddlery. Ltd.. 6309 
Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 



BELINDA PINK EARS ... the bunny 
who writes letters to children. An Easter or 
birthday gift to delight youngsters from two 
to ten years old ... a letter a week and 
a toy surprise! Put your little friends' names 
on Belinda's list and a gift card listing send- 
er's name goes with first letter. Eight letters, 
$1.95; sixteen letters, $3.75. Send order and 
check to Tiny-Tot Gifts, Dept. 2, 1834 W. 
11th Place, Los Angeles. 

SPEC CASE . . . made of lustrous Plasti- 
Glo ... in brown, black or gay shades of 
green, blue or red . . . edged with shiny 
brass studs. Fits snugly in your purse . . . 
a perfect complement for her harlequin-style 
or jeweled frames. 100% wool-felt lining pro- 
tects glasses. About $1.95. For the name of the 
store nearest you, write Phil Sockett Mfg. 
Co., 1240 S. Main, Los Angeles. Firm estab- 
lished in 1925. 



CALIFORNIA DINNERWARE . . . 

j Santa Anita Pottery . . . for interesting table 
I settings. This complete service includes 20 
j pieces — four each of large dinner plates, bread 
land butters, cups, saucers, fruit dishes. Lus- 
icious California pastel colors equally assorted 
I in set . . . powder blue, turquoise, desert sand, 
I buttercup yellow. Just $8.95. Mail order and 
(check to Walker's Department Store, San 

Diego, Calif. If you live east of the Mississippi, 

please add $1 for delivery. 



'IDEAL GIFT . . . Infanseat ... a won- 
jderfully handy and safe way to take baby 
j any place . . . designed by a prominent 
i pediatrician with particular thought to proper 
] support from one month on . . . perfect for 
j motoring, trains, planes and at home . . . 
j simply fastens to all types of furniture. At 
|Younkers in Des Moines, or order direct from 
Infanseat Co., Des Moines, Iowa. Complete 
Iwith cushioned pad, $6.50. postage paid. 




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California Fashions in 

*"Botany" Brand Fabrics 

Shining example of Caltex's 

distinguished tailoring . . . our new 
Caltex Coordinates, in Botany's 
Marchan all worsted gabardine. 
Besides the pleated shorts pictured, the 

group includes slacks, short slacks 

and a casual suit ... all interchangeable, 

all with a new waistband that's 

stitched to stay put and stay pretty. 

Their dark and sunny pastels are linked 

to the hues of Hess-Goldsmith s 

"Seagarden" printed shirt blouse. 

The shorts. $12.15. The shirt blouse, $11.95. 



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THE CAMFORNIAN, February, 1947 



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BARBARA JANE 

860 S. LOS ANGELES ST., I. A. 14, CALIF. 



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PEASANT PRETTY ... a dream of 

a blouse in multi-filament crepe. Round, deep 
collar trimmed with rows and rows of fine 
French val lace. Bare shoulders for flirtatious 
fancy, or draw the string at the neck if the 
occasion calls for being sedate. Sizes 32-38. 
white only. Custom-styled by King for Daniels. 
Priced at $16.50, including tax and postage. 
Daniels of Beverly Hills. 451 N. Beverly Drive, 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 

JEN-ETTE ORIGINALS . . . shoulder 

pads that give excellent lines and dressy dash 
to your set-in sleeves. Covered with black, 
white or nude taffeta. A specially tailored Map 
holds the pad in shape for ever and a day. 
Priced about S2 the pair at B. Altman, New 
York: Carson Pirie Scott, Chicago; J. L. 
Hudson, Detroit; May Co., Los Angeles, and 
other fine stores. From Jen-ette. 714 S. I.ia 
Angeles Street. Los Angeles. 

SMOKER-SMOOTHIE ... a spring 

top case of glossy plastic for your cigarettes; 
holds them snug, keeps them fresh, and keeps 
tobacco dust out of your purse or pockets. 
Colors are ruby, tortoise, amber or patent 
shiny black. Monogram or full name imprint- 
ed in gold lettering. Price, just a dollar in 
the mail to Weirick, 504 N. Verdugo Road. 
Glendale, Calif. Send initials or name with 
order and dollar, natch. 



EASTER LOVELY . . . Francisco Gon- 
zales, the candlemaker in Old Los Angeles, de- 
lights in special orders, and his prices range 
from 5c to S25. Any shape and size, matches 
colors exactly, choice of 19 different scents. 
His suggestion for Easter is this hand-woven 
basket holding eight different scented candles 
(each one burns "fifteen hours!) and a hand- 
painted Mexican pottery candle cup. Just 
$2.98, plus 38c for postage please, from Gon- 
zales at 13 Olvpra Street, Los Angeles. 



MARDI-GRAS PAK ... the tops in 

gifts to personalize . . . five dozen brilliant 
bookmatches, 50 gay cocktail napkins, 25 
coasters and 75 white, ribbon-tied luncheon 
napkins in a transparent gift box. Mono- 
grammed. $6.50: plain, $4.75. At leading 
stores, including Rich's. Inc., Atlanta, Georgia : 
The J. K. Gill Co., Portland, Oregon: City of 
Paris. San Francisco; Bullock's-Wilshire, Los 
Angeles. Created by Monogram Company of 
California, 1244 Larkin St., San Francisco. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 



GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

THE CALIFORNIAN presents for your convenience a current directory of the finest restaurants in Southern 
California, cultural events of interest and activities that make living in California or a visit to our state the 
most enjoyable for you and your family. Fine foods of many kinds are available, and whenever possible 
specialties of the house are listed, names of the maitres d'hotel and days the establishments are open. Have 
a good time! 

THE RESTAURANTS 



AMBASSADOR— 3400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. 
World-famous Cocoanut Grove open every night ex- 
cept Monday. Saturday afternoon tea dancing. Freddy 
Martin's Orchestra. Dinners from $3.25. Cover $1, 
Saturday $1.50. Rouben. Also French Room from noon 
till nine and Coffee Shop from 7 a.m. to midnight. 
Popular prices. 

ARMSTRONG SCHROEDER— 9765 Wilshire Blvd., 
Beverly Hills. Good familv-tvpe cuisine. Reasonable 
prices, with Pete Schroeder to greet you. 

BAR OF MUSIC— 7351 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Excellent double-piano on a stage back of the bar. 
Food. Good small band. Two-dollar minimum on 
Saturday and Sunday. 

DON THE BEACHCOMBER— 1727 North McCadden 
Place, Hollywood. Fried Shrimp, Rumak'i, Barbecued 
Spar cribs, Mandarin Duck, Chicken Almond and 
knovjn as originator of the Zombie. Dinners from $3. 
Usually crowded, but/good tourist spot. 

BEVERLY HILLS HOTEL— 9641 Sunset Blvd., Bev- 
erly Hills. Paim Room open Thursday, Friday and „ 
Saturday nights' with dancing. Thursday buffet, $3.75. 
Dinner a la carte, from $1.75. Good food and you 
might see a movie star. 

BEVERLY - WILSHIRE HOTEL— 9415 Wilshire 
Blvd., Beverly Hillst Tasty food in Copa d'Oro and 
Terrace Room, with mediutn prices. 

BILTMORE BOWL— 515 South Olive St., Los An- 
geles. Best place downtown for good food and good 
music, with Russ Morgan playing. Two-dollar din- 
ners, nominal cover charge and two floor shows. Nice 
for tourists. Closed Monday. 

BOB DALTON'S— 1056 South La Cienega Blvd., Los 
Angeles. On famous "Restaurant Row," with steaks 
ihe specialty. Reasonable prices. Closed Monday. 

BROWN DERBY— Four of 'em! 9537 Wilshire Blvd., 
Beverly Hills, where vou may see celebrities; 1628 
North Vine Street, Hollywood, where vou can catch 
many an autograph at "lunch; 3377 Wilshire Blvd., 
Los Augejes, where you can dine in "The Hat" 
with tourists; and 4500 Los Feliz Blvd., Los An- 
geles, where you can eat in your car. Food varies 
From good to excellent. Prices medium to high. 

BIT O' SWEDEN— 9051 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 
On the famous "Strip." Good food,, reasonable prices, 
sometimes smorgasbord. Fine for tourists. 

BUBL1CHKI— 8846 Sunset Blvd-., Los Angeles. A 
bit of Russia on the Strip. Cutlet a la Kiejf, Filet 
Mignon a la Stroganoff, Caucasian Shashlik, Rus- 
sian Blini. Dinners from $3;.. Host, Wallv ; hostess, 
Jasmina. Good music and rnmanticat. Closed Tuesdav, 

CAROLINA PINES— 7315. Melrose Ave., Los An- 
geles. Good familv-tvpe cuisine and very easv on 
the pocketbook. Prime Ribf di Beef, Fried Chicken, 
Roast Turkey, Baked Haiti. Conventional. 11:45 to 8 
p.m. Harriette Miller. 

CASA LA GOLONDRINA— 35 Olvera St., Los An- 
geles, "the first brick house in the city." Historic 
Mexican cafe. Arroz con Polio, Enchiladas, Tacos. 
Dinners from $2. Alfredo. Closed Sunday. 

CHAROUCHKA— 8524 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Another bite of Russia on the Strip. Mamma and 
Papa, "your hosts," excel with atmosphere, food 
and soothing music. You'll meet Tomrnv, too. Closed 
Monday, and prices fairly high. 

CHASEN'S-^9339 Beverly Blvd., Beverly Hills. One 
of the best in the West. Excellent cuisine and plentv 
of celebrities. Expensive. Closed Monday. 

CIRO'S— 8344 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. On the 
Strip and luxurious, with name bands for dancing. 
Expensive. Celebrities, sometimes. 



COCK 'N* BULL 9170 Sunset 

geles. Fine English food served 



Blvd., Los An- 
i chafing dishes 
on a Hunt Breakfast table. Cornish Pastry, Shep- 
herd's Pie, India Curry, Steak and Kidney Pudding. 
Lunch, $1.50 ; dinner, $3. Alma Lloyd. Open from 
noon, 5:30 on Sunday. Good for the discriminating. 

CRICKET ON THE HEARTH— 806 North La 
Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. New, attractive and 
excellent English food. Blintzes, too! Old English 
Bubble and Squeak, Hungarian Beef Paprikash. A la 
carte, reasonable. Go. 

THE GABLES— S462 W. Third St., Los Angeles. 
Vienna Schnitzel, Chicken Curry, Steaks. Dinners 
from $1.75. Henry E. Smith. Open 4 p.m. till mid- 
night every day except Monday. 

GOURMET— 6530 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. Broiled 
Steaks, Roast Turkey, Deep Dish Apple Pie. Dinners 
from $1. Frederick Werder. Lunch, 11:30-2:30; 
dinner, 5-S. Closed Monday. 

HAR-OMAR— 1605 North lvar, Hollywood. Syrian- 
Armenian cuisine. A step off Hollywood Boulevard 
for Shishkebab, Kazartma, Armenian Pizza, Paklava. 
Harout. Open every day. 

HENRI'S— 9236 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. Excellent 
French food served in the grand manner. A la carte 
and expensive, but for the discriminating. 

HOUSE OF MURPHY— La Cienega ."Restaurant 
Row" at Fourth Street, Los Angeles. Madame Beguc's 
Chicken Creole, Hamburger and Onion Rings, Million 
Dollar Hash. Your hqst, Bob Murphy. Wonderful 
Salads, Beautiful Steaks. A la carte, medium prices 
Open every day. 

KNOTT'S BERRY FARM— Buena Park. An hour's 
drive from Los Angeles, but a tourist's dream as 
reported in Reader's Digest. Good chicken and ham 
and hot biscuits. Reasonable prices. Gift shop. 

LA RUE— 8633 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, on the 
Strip. Tops in food and decor. Crepes Louise, Crepes 
a la Reine, Lasagne Pasticciate, Bref Bourguignonne. 
From noon till 3 for lunch except Sunday. From 6 to 
11 p.m. for dinner. Closed Mondav. Felix Cigolini. 
A la carte entrees from $2.25. 

LITTLE GYPSY— 8917 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Hungarian food. Kolozsvari Stuffed Cabbage, Szege- 
diner Paprika Chicken. Dinners from $2. Leno. 

LAWRY'S PRIME RIB— 150 North La Cienega Blvd., 
Beverly Hills. Continental service of roast beef. Won- 
derful for tourists, and prices are reasonable. 

LINDY'S— 3656 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. A good 
place to eat, with steaks a feature. Closed Monday. 

LUCEY'S— 5444 Melrose Avenue, Hollywood. Good 
food, medium prices and across the street from 
Paramount Studio. Movie stars abound at lunch. 

MARQUIS — On the Strip in Hollywood. Spaghetti 
Marinara, Veal Picata Marquis. Paul. From 5 to 9 
for dinner. Medium to high prices. Good food. 

MIKE LYMAN'S OR AL LEVY'S— When you're 
downtown in Los Angeles. Good food, same man- 
agement. Reasonable. 

MOCAMBO— 858S Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. One 
of the Strip's spots for movie stars. Colorful, crowd- 
ed and expensive. 

PEGGY CLEARY'S— "Talk of the Town" Restaurant 
at 1904 So. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles. New and 
attractive. Scallopim Piccate, Stuffed Squab, Breast 
of Guinea Hen. A la carte and prices fairly high, 
hut the food's delicious. Closed Tuesday. 

PERINO'S— 3027 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. In 
(Continued on page 25) 



Let's be practical! 




Lour newest gown is stun- 
ning... the accessories, exquisite. 
But how about your teeth? Are 
they dull and filmy, or have you 
already used your Dent-Aid? 

Be sure your smile is in tune 
with your chic. Dent -Aid Tooth- 
brushes are like a dental instru- 
ment -a scientific tooth cleaner 
that has no equal. There is no 
other "just as good." 

For a practical touch to your 
beauty, demand... 



DENT-AID 

TOOTH BRUSHES 

LeVant Brush Co. • Los Angeles 



rHE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 



23 




Marjorie Montgomery designs are exclusive with 



«*T. EATON Cfeft. 

j« Canada 



24 



THE CAUFORNIAN, February, 1947 



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gaily flower-strewn 
in a "party-pretty" frock. 
Aqua, pink, blue, maize. 
Sizes 7 to 16. 

Retail about $7. 



For the name of the shop 
nearest you, write to us. 






1108 So. Los Angeles Street 
Los Angeles 15, California 



GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

(Continued from page 23) 

the heart of the smart shopping area. Excellent food. 
A favorite luncheon rendezvous for society. 

PICCADILLY— 848 No. La Cienega Blvd., Los An- 
geles. Fairly new, but very good, with Ernest Vignati 
as your host. Steaks. 

PIERRE'S — 2295 Huntingdon Drive, San Marino. On 
yoor way to Santa Anita. A good crepes suzette 
and pleasant atmosphere. Charcoal-broiled filet mig- 
non, too. Pierre. From noon till 9. 

PIG'N WHISTLE — In Los Angeles, Hollywood, 
Pasadena and San Francisco. Also operate Melody 
Lane Cafes and the Chi Chi Restaurants in Long 
Beach, San Diego, Riverside and Palm Springs. 
Family fare at reasonable prices. 

PLAYERS — 8225 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. Good for 
tourists and you might see a movie star. Expensive. 

RICHLOR'S — 1?4 No. La Cienega Blvd., Los An- 
geles. Planked Hamburgers and Fried Shrimp. Walter 
Frank. Five till 10:36 p.m. Prices reasonable. Good 
for tourists. 

ROMANOFF'S — 326 No. Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills. 
Prince Mike caters to movie stars, writers and pro- 
ducers. Expensive. 

SARNEZ— 170 No. La Cienega Blvd., Beverly Hills. 
Lew Sailee and Harry Ringland have an attractive 
place, with good food and good music, reasonably 
priced. 

SOMERSET HOUSE— On Restaurant Row in Bev- 
erly Hills. Fine steaks, a la carte dinners, nice 
atmosphere and expensive. 

SPORTSMAN'S LODGE— 12833 Ventura Blvd., 
North Hollywood. An epicurean delight in San Fer- 
nando Vallev. Broiled Lobster, Chicken Saute a Sec, 
Charcoal-broiled Steaks in a gorgeous setting. One of 
the finest restaurants in California. Jack Spiros. From 
5 :30 p.m. Closed Monday. 

SUNSET HOUSE— 5539 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Steaks, Seafood, Salad Bozvl. Dinners from $1.50. 
S. F. Brown. Every day from five. 

TAIL O' THE COCK-^77 So. La Cienega Blvd., 
Los Angeles, on Restaurant Row. Mac McHenry pro- 
vides excellent food, good companions and a pleasing 
atmosphere. Hamburger Diable and Fried Shrimp are 
specialties. You'll want to go again and again, and 
it's reasonably priced. 

TOWN HOUSE— 2965 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, 
overlooking Lafayette Park. Three smart cafes to 
serve you . . . Garden Room, Cape Cod Grill 
and ihe Zebra Room. No cover or minimum for 
dancing in Zebra and Garden Rooms. Excellent food 
and a good spot for the tourist. 

VAGABOND HOUSE— 2505 Wilshire Blvd., in the 
heart of smart Los Angeles. New and with the Don 
Blanding touch. Curries their specialty. Dinners from 
4 on. George. Prices medium. Open every day. 

VILLA NOVA— 9015 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. A 
charming old world atmosphere on the Sfrip. Good 
Italian food and good service. 



THE THEATRE 

PLAYS 



BILTMORE— "The Story of Mary Surratt," starring 
Dorothy Gish and Kent Smith, ende Feb. 8. Every 
night at 8:30; matinees Wednesday, Saturday at 
2:30. 

PASADENA COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE— "Ten 
Little Indians," by Agatha Christie, ends Feb. 2; 
"The Late George Apley" runs Feb. 5 to 16 j and 
World Premiere of Tennessee Williams' "Stairs to 
the Roof" billed from Feb. 19 to Mar. 2. 

LAS PALMAS THEATRE OF ACTORS' LAB— 
Four one-act plays titled "An Evening at the Lab," 
three by Tennessee, Williams, one by Sean O'Casey. 
Vincent Price as star. Indefinite run into February. 
16+2 No. Las Palmas, Hollywood. 

MISSION PLAY— Until Feb. 26. First performance 

in 17 years of this famous pageant of early Cali- 

(Continued on next page) 



Fashion Your Body 





REDUCE Where You Want To -No Drugs 
Dangerous Diet or Tiring Exercise 




This is Ginny Symmes— one of Fashion's 
most perfect models — made so— and 
kept so— by the daily use of the 

HEALTHOLIZER 

HOME EXERCISER and REDUCER 

Miss Symmes says: 'Tour Healtholizer Home 
Exerciser has been useful fo me ever since 
my start as a fashion model. It has kepf my 
figure in the slender condition that is nec- 
essary for my position at all times. 

"I can certainly recommend its use to all 
women interested in reducing and stream- 
lining their figures, so that clothes will be 
more becoming. It will do all of this be- 
sides greatly improve one's health." 

And Miss Symmes is only one of thou- 
sands of women everywhere, whose use 
of this Scientific Healtholizer — just 10 
minutes a day in their own rooms— has 
helped them to reduce— to get rid of un- 
wanted fat — to SLENDERIZE — as you 
surely will too. 

ALSO— With your Healtholizer you get James G. Rol- 
ley's 3 famous courses: "Proper Diet", "Constructive 
Breathing", "Personality Development", as taught by 
him, so helpfully, to men and women everywhere. 

SEND NO MONEY-No risk involved. Just your name 
and address. When postman delivers Healtholizer, 
you deposit S6.98 (formerly $10.) plus a small charge 
for delivery. Start reducing at once. If after 5 days 
you are not wholly satisfied, return Healtholizer and 
your S6.98 (full cost) will be refunded immediately. 

RUSH THIS COUPON TODAY! 

,- 5 DAY TRIAL COUPON- 1 

Healtholizer Corp., Dept 30 

71-22 Ingram St., Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Rush my Healtholizer to me. I will pay postman on ar- 
rival. My money will be refunded if I am not satisfied. 



THE CAUFORNIAN, February, 1947 



25 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 



>utstanding because it's 

oned of ROULETTE CREPE 

and beautifully styled with 

ehise lace collar. White only. 

Sizes 32-38. About $8 

. Nome of Nearest Store 

.S OF CALIFORNIA . 

■ 

So. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles 14 





GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

(Continued from page 25) 

forma written by the late John Steven McGroarty, 
presented in newly decorated Mission Playhouse 
in San Gabriel. 



MUSICALS 

THEATRE MART— Continually playing "The Drunk- 
ard" every night at S. Famous old-time melodrama 
with beer and pretzels. Wonderful tourist enter- 
tainment and good for the entire family. 

EL CAPITAN— Ken Murray's "Blackouts of 1947," 
starring Marie Wilson and Ken, every night at 
8:30, with plenty of matinees. Variety entertain- 
ment that will please. Good for tourists. 

EL PATIO— Gilbert & Sullivan in high gear, with 
"Pinafore" closing Feb. 2, "The Pirates of Penz 
ance" billed for Feb. 4-9, "The Gondoliers" from 
Feb. 11-19, and "Patience" from Feb. 18-23, night- 
ly at S\ 

EARL CARROLL'S THEATRE RESTAURANT— 
I n Hol ly wood for the tourist. "The Vanities' ' in a 
new show, each night with two different perform- 
ances at 9:15 and midnight. Girls. Girls. Three- 
thirty with dinner, $1.65 without. 

VARIETY, 

TURNABOUT THEATRE— The Yale Puppeteers 
and Elsa Lanchester open a new show on Feb. 4. 
Good entertainment you'll want to enjov. 

BALLET 

ORIGINAL BALLET RUSSE— At the Philharmonic, 
giving 12 performances from Feb. 7 to 19. Nightly 
at 8. 



CONCERT 

GREGOR PIATIGORSKY— Cellist in concert at the 
Philharmonic Feb. 4 at 8. 

JAN PEERCE— Opera star in concert at Philhar- 
monic Feb. 5 at 8. 

RICHARD CASADESUS— In piano concert at Phil- 
harmonic Feb. 19 at 9. 

JANSSEN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA— In concert 
Feb. 26 at Wilshire-Ebell Theatre at 8. 



OPERA 

SAN CARLOS OPERA COMPANY— Opening Feb. 
26 at Philharmonic with "La Boheme," followed by 
"Rigoletto" on Feb. 27, "Cavalerra Rusticana" and 
"Pagliacci" Feb. 28, with "Madame Butterfly" and 
"Carmen*' on March 1. Nightly at 8. 



SPORTS 



ICE HOCKEY — At Pan Pacific Auditorium, 8 p.m. | 
Feb. 1, Hollywood vs San Diego; Feb. 5, Los An- I 
geles vs Hollywood; Feb. 7, Los Angeles vs San I 
Francisco; Feb. 8, Los Angeles vs Oakland; Feb. 12, 
Hollywood vs Los Angeles; Feb. 14, Los Angeles t 
vs Fresno; Feb. 15, Los Angeles vs Hollywood ; I 
Feb. 19, Hollywood vs New Westminster; Feb. 22, I 
Hollywood vs San Diego; Feb. 26, Los Angeles vs V 
Fresno; Feb. 28, Hollywood vs Fresno. 

TENNIS — La Jolla Beach and Tennis Club Tourna- I 
ment, including Davis Cup stars. Men's and worn- fci 
en's singles, doubles and mixed doubles. See papers I 
for date. 

COLLEGE BASKETBALL— UCLA: Carroll Sham- j 
rocks Feb. 7 at 8 in University gym. Twentieth I 
Century-Fox Feb. 8 in University gym. University 
of California Feb. 14-15 in University gym. USC I 
Feb. 28 in Shrine Auditorium. USC Mar. 1 in I 
University gym. 

USC : Carroll Shamrocks Feb. 1 at 8 in Long I 
Beach Municipal Auditorium. Stanford Feb. 7-8 in I 
Shrine Auditorium. University of California Feb. 21- | 
22 in Shrine Auditorium. UCLA Feb. 28 in Shrine j 
Auditorium and Mar. 1 in UCLA gym. 

PRO BASKETBALL— At Pan Pacific Auditorium: 
Feb. 2, Los Angeles-Oakland; Feb. 6, Los Angeles- [ 
Pocatello; Feb. 9, Hollywood-Pocatello; Feb. 12, Los 



26 



THE CALIF^RNIAN, February 



194 7 



iOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




OING PLACES 



Angeles-Phillips Oilers; Feb. 16, Los Angeles-Hollv- 
I'ood; Feb. 23, Hollywood-Phillips Oilers. 

IORSE RACING — At Santa Anita: Tuesdays 
irough Saturdays at 1 p.m. Feb. 8, San Antonio 
landicap, $50,000 added, for 3-vear-olds and up. 
eb. 22, Santa Marguerita Handicap, $50,000 added, 
or 3-year-olds and up, fillies and mares. Mar. 1, 
lama Anita Handicap . . . classic of the year . . . 
1100,000 added, for 3-year-olds and up. The big 
ace ! 

[ASEBALL — Spring training of Chicago Cubs be- 
;ins on or about Feb. 20 at Santa Catalina Island. 
)aily steamer and airplane service. 

tOWLING — Beginning of American Bowling Con- 
gress in Los Angeles. See papers for alleys and 
vents. 

tOXING — Every Friday night at 8:30 at Hollywood 
.egion Stadium ; every Tuesday night at 8 :30 at 
owntown Olympic Auditorium. 

tASSLING-^Every Monday night at Hollywood 
^gion Stadium; every Wednesday night at down- 
own Olympic Auditorium. 

OLO — Regular match games every Sunday at 2 at 
tiviera Country Club Polo Field, off Sunset Blvd. 
m the way to the beach. 



OF SPECIAL INTEREST 

JHERRY BLOSSOMS— Hundreds of ^ acres of bloom- 
ng orchards cover the San Gorgonio Pass area in 
he vicinity of Beaumont and Banning on your way 
o Palm Springs. 

4UNTINGTON GARDENS— Some part of the exten- 
ive 30-acre cactus and flower gardens of the Hunt- 
ngton Library and Art Gallery in Pasadena will be 
n bloom at all times. Among the most beautiful 
ire roses, fruit trees, magnolias, erythrinas. 

KLMOND BLOSSOMS— During the first three 
[weeks of this^ month more than 1000 acres of al- 
mond trees will be in bloom near Banning, with a 
snow-capped mountain background. You'll smell 'em 
For miles around. 

WILD LUPINE— Expected to be in full bloom in the 
Palos Verdes hills near San Pedro. Get wild 
mower details from Community Visitors Bureau, 517 
KV. Sixth St., Loi Angeles. 



CAMELLIA SHOW— Sponsored bv the Glendale 
Camellia Society Feb. 15-16 in the Glendale Civic 
\ Auditorium. A must to see. 

FAIR AND DATE FESTIVAL— Riverside County 
Fair and Date Festival, featuring displays of dates, 
citrus and other agricultural products, at Indio be- 
ginning about Feb. 20. 

KITE DERBY — First annual, sponsored by Youth 
Department of Moose Club, in City of Glendale. 
1000 contestant!. Late in February. 

CHINESE NEW YEAR— From Jan. 28 to Feb. 4 in 
Los Angeles and San Francisco. Colorful celebra- 
ion with noise and glamor. 



LOVE NOTE 

However pleased she may have been 
With her pigtails all the while. 

A girl will change to an up-sweep in 
The space of her dream-man's smile. 
— S. II. Dewhurst 

THE CAUPORNIAN, February, 1947 




I/out loveliest you. . . 

In an exquisitely fashioned 

Mam'zelle Bandeau . . . 

so superbly uplifting 

your figure attains 

all the graceful splendor of youth . 

so fresh . . . so young . . . 

so alluring . . . 




OOAV 



. . . itj a- L/ffa^nz 





Otck Aqtitnl 




CREPE RUBBER SOLE 
MOCCASIN OXFORD 

SMOOTH EtK tEATHER IN 

SHASTA WHITE, SEQUOIA RED, MISSION BROWN 

600 EAST TWELFTH STREET 
LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 

At leading stores throughout the west 



27- 



HOUSE OF MURPHY 



for gourmets only 




Fine food in an atmosphere 
of convivial friendliness! 



LOS ANGELES RESTAURANT ROW 
Where La Cienega Crosses Fourth 

CR 5-0191 
BR 2-3432 



Palo Alto, California 

Country Dinner in 
authentic Victorian 

surroundings 
Browse through our 
shops of yesteryear 

El Camino Real 
two miles south 
of Stanford 
University 




(Tucket 
On Ohe 
Hearth 



CONTINENTAL FAVORITES 

for your discerning taste 

FROM 11 A. M. TILL THE WEE HOURS 

806 N. LA CIENEGA BLVD. 
HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 




Sounds silly . . . but Grandma's idea of 
the Sunday parlor wasn't such a bad one. At 
least, when she needed a retreat ... a cool- 
ing off spot . . . she didn't have to hop a 
freight or move to the nearby dog house. All 
of which leads to the suggestion that, when- 
ever possible, it's a good plan to have a nook 
that's neat and clean, ready for anything 
. . . unexpected guests or simply an orderly 
haven for meditative moments. Try it . . . 
with an alcove, a bay window, a patio corner 
... a vine-covered porch. 

LEISURE DINING 

If there's just a touch of the "live-to-eat" 
attitude in your makeup, then dining is one 
of those joys you look forward to all day 
long, savor during the process and relax in 
comfort and well-being afterwards. Set the 
stage with an attractive table, candles flicker- 
ing merrily; start your dinner with a hot soup 
or a cold, cold appetizer. Such a preface puts 
you and your stomach into a happily recep- 
tive mood for what follows. You'H eat slowly 
. . . you'll converse pleasantly . . . and all 
the day's kinks will be absorbed come coffee 
and dessert time. 

HOUSEKEEPING CAN BE FUN 

But . . . not when it's a helter-skelter 
process. The happiest women we know have 
worked out a sort of organization plan which 
is firm enough to keep major operations un- 
der control, yet elastic enough to cover spon- 
taneous departures such as a day in town, a 
walk in the woods, or a whole day with a 
good book. Takes a little planning, of course. 
But . . . it's worth it because everyone needs 
to play hooky sometimes. 

SILENCE IS GOLDEN 

Haven't you noticed how sometimes your 
tongue seems to hinge from the middle and 
work from both ends? Such a gab-habit is 
a sure sign that poise is exhausted for the 
nonce. So, next time you catch yourself in 
tongue-twitch form, take a firm hold of your 
vocal chords . . . and be quiet. Some of the 
most companionable moments in the world are 
those in which nothing is said. And, ten to 
one if your companion is male, he'll pick 
your silent session to laud your conversational 
abilities. 

HANDY HINT 

It's a well-known fact that age first betrays 
itself in milady's hands. But, it need not be so 
... if you add your hands to your scheduled 
beauty routine. When you're working in wa- 
ter .. . scrubbing powders, ete., try wearing 
rubber gloves . . . first rubbing a good 
emollient into your hands. Another hint: Once 
weekly bathe hands in solution of warm water 
and juice of one-half a lemon. 



SUNSET 1-6609 
SUNSET 2-9326 



EXCELLENT CUISINE ^ 

COCKTAILS 

12833 VENTURA BOULEVARD 
AT COLOWATER CANYON 



<$3B£fr 




...where fhe smartest 
Angelenos get together 
for our famous luncheons 
and dinners . . . 
on Beverly Hills' 
"Restaurant Row" 





MISS AMf RICA 

MARILYN BUFERD 




WASHABLE 

lEveraUze 

F A B R I C F I N I S H 

*"Everglaze"is a trade-mark which signifies the 
fabric has been finished and tested according 
to processes and standards controlled and 
prescribed by Joseph Bancroft & Sons Co. 



28 



THE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 



0*~> 





'M ekcktf cut, <WX... 

your loveliness will be not only a gift of nature, but 
tbe fulfillment of your beauty babits practiced over 
the years through the faithful use of preparations by 



Wwdeft 



OF CALIFORNIA 



greets the spring 




~~$T5 at better stores 



MORRIS & FYNE CORP. 



with pure silk prints 




\or write for name of store in your city 



2100 So. Broadway, Los Angeles 




Harem Draped Patio Suit. . . designed by 

Irene Saltern in Yucca, a "Crown" Tested Hoffman 
California Fabric. Cbinese seal velembossed. 
At better stores everywhere. 



- 



ORIGINATOR OF OPTICAL 



32 



Los Angeles I <; 

X 



ILLUSION IN F A S H I O > 

THE C AL I FORN I AN, February, 1947 



fabric 




jLANKENAU COMPANY, INC. 
1 I 1450 Broadway, New York 18 



: 




Peggy Hunt deftly fashions a Star Poppy print to bare your back, the 
gold-belted waist enhanced by a peplum flowing to the hemline. 
A hand print on supple Enka rayon, woven by Stonecutter. Yours at 
B. Altman, New York; Neiman-Marcus, Dallas; Bullock's, Los Angeles. 

X ilfCrOl HUNT INC., 714 So. Los Angeles Street, Los Angeles. Calif. 



HAND PRINTS | 

■B if 



RTS SHOPS 





CO. 



LOS ANGELES 



^IhtotWhJ U^Mt,6L^U(f, 






, » An ' . t a i 



faA; ^ wiw.. /3|, 5 ° 




^JSSayUA" 



HE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 



35 




at bottttie best 

On top of the world are these sportswear originals by LOUELLA BALLERINO ... of 
the inspired Horse and Saddle handscreened print by California Authentics. Shirt and 
slacks, or sundress with bolero, in sizes 10-16. 



at both shops . . . SAN FERNANDO VALLEY and BEVERLY HILLS 



boivnle beat 



12668 Ventura Blvd. (San Fernando Valley) 
319 N. Beverly Drive (Beverly Hills) 



36 



THE CAIIFORNIAN, February, 1947 




t 1 



UidMJt 




UI^UMj 



ROLLEY, America's unique quality perfumer, captures 
the true tropical fragrances of these blossoms ... in 
perfumes acclaimed for their authenticity by native Hawaiians. 
Rich, alluring, exceptionally lasting in quality. . . also available 
in matching cologne, body talc, bath oil, and hand creme. 





±U)11 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Creator of the World's only True Daphne Fragrance 
BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA 



1 1 E CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 



37 




j 



An Irving Schechter hand-lined Flare-Away suit of 
hand-worsted, all-wool serge. Misses and Juniors. 
Hand-lined with SKINNER'S rayon satin . . . also 
with short peplums for dinner wear. About $60. 

May Co., Los Angeles; Jordan Marsh, Boston; Cricket West, Kansas City, Mo. 
Or write us for name of your nearest store. 




719 SOUTH LOS ANGELES ST. ■ LOS ANGELES 14, CALIFORNIA 

38 




JED TUCKER Sf 



on record 



J 



A he phpnograph record business is making far greater strides ii 
postwar progress than many another industry, mechanically as wel 
artistically speaking. And further spur to this encouraging condi 
is the influx of foreign pressings of such excellent quality as to cl 
lenge the best Made-in-the-U.S. brands ... a competition hithertj 
lacking, for prewar imports did not match in mechanical perfectift 
their musical quality. 

The foreign records, naturally enough, are entries in the seriousl 
symphonic division, as overseas jive has' yet to come close to horrtt 
grown products. Best of the new crop are the English Decca offering 
which are truly sensational in their magnificent tone and accuracy, I 
corded with a care that Decca in this country has yet to lavish 01 
either popular or symphonic music. Keep an ear out for them. 

A bit unexpected is the generally superb output of Italian records 
considering the economic condition of Italy. First to reach these shoffi 
are some very mellow and beautifully recorded arias by the celebrate 
new Italian tenor Tagliarini whose appearance at the Met is caged' 
awaited. 

For what can be done in these, our own United States, however, listei 
to Moussorgsky's "Pictures at an Exhibition" as recorded with th 
Ravel orchestration by Artur Rodzinsky and the New York Philharmoni 
for Columbia. This album takes a back seat to no other waxings eitffl 
technically or musically. 

And one more tip to lovers of fine chamber music . . . watch 
Victor's output of records by the Paganini String Quartet, a chambt 
group signed for top-spot recording before it was ever heard in concffl 
— as satisfying a group of string-players as you'll come across. 
NEW OPERA ALBUMS 

"Carmen," in which Bizet's heroine (?) is sung by Gladys Swarthou 
who is like olives (you like her or you don't). Chorus, orchestra an 
general production are outstanding. Victor. 

"Madame Butterfly" album including the best-known arias and di 
from Puccini's best-known work, very nicely sung by Lucia Alban' 
James Melton and Lucielle Browning. Victor. 
KID STUFF 

"Rusty in Orcliestraville," an educational and completely appe^ 
musical story really designed for the child audience. Capitol. 

"Rapunzel," first of a series of Grimm's fairy tales as related 
Dame May Whitly in a manner that is as grandmotherly as could 
and very likeable. Victor. 

" Erbert's 'Appy Birthday," a gay, amusing story of an En 
bulldog with chuckles for young listeners. 
SONG AND DANCE 

King Cole Trio's latest, and need we say more, is "But She's 
Buddy's Chick" and "That's The Beginning of the End." Capitol. 

Ivie Anderson, heard far too seldom, waxes "Mexico Joe" and 
Me The Blues" for her discriminating admirers. Exclusive. 

Spike Jones puts a new light on both Rimsky-Koraskorf and Fro 
Martin in his and the City Slickers' varsion of "Flight of the Bum! 
Bee.' Reverse side, "My Pretty Girl." Victor. 

Betty Hutton has a new and characteristic release. 'Don't Tell 1 
That Story," tailor-made to her talents, backed up by "On The 0th 1 
End of a Kiss." Victor. 

Margaret Whiting has another goodie after a few so-so platters 
"Oh But I Do," with "Guilty" on the other side if you ever get aroi 
to playing it. Capitol. 

Desi Arnaz plays a pair of Latin numbers in smooth night 
fashion. Better of the two is "I'll Never Love Again (La Borrachi 
in bolero rhvthm. "Tia Juana" on the reverse. Victor. 




th 



.... For living 

Californian ] 

Something New 

"THE STAR EAGLE TA 

All Aluminum — use it in your living rt 
the terrace, or in the patio. Beautifi 
made tray top, stain proof. Weight e 
pounds. (Heavy enough to stand f irr 
Aluminum base available in your cr 
colors — white, grey, green, or black 
Size: 18" wide, 35" long, and 16" hi 
Price: $29.50 

satisfaction guaranteed 
No C.O.D.'s, please. Express Col 
Booklet on request 

H. B. PRATT • 1021 PARK LANE • PLAINFIELD, N 



THE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 






h 



MADEA 



c^fr &? 



>s£&w> 



Cued to an active season ... a classic with a free 'n easy swing 
and a Midas touch in the gold buttons and buckle. Designed 
in Duplex Whippet, a rayon gabardine. To retail about $25. 




MADEA-JOY KINGSTON . 9 3 9 S. BROAD WAY . LOS ANGELES 1 5, C ALI FORN I A 



: 



HAT BY JOHN FREDERICS PHOTOGRAPHED ON THE LOT. SEL7N1CK INTERNATIONAL STUDIOS. CALIFORNIA 






1 i* -4^ 




HAM A 




HAND-SCREENED IN CALIFORNIA 



4C 



At your favorite store or write DeDe Johnson, Los Angeles 12, California 

THE CAUFORNIAN, February, 1 9 4 7|j 



mm 




,r 




'^^s 






Old World Charm in a Modern 



Fluefielman Plaid Gingham 





^ 







W^ 




v\ 






««* 






7 





TES -STORES OR WRITE DOME MfG. CO., 14*2 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIFORNIA 






-f^VMUQS /(Mlioufit^ut/^Si 





toair 



" tm/ <>^ 'VVUA^ y^ Irt^ 







offtjfviMijk.i^- 




Cover girls: Louise Currie, 
to be seen in "Backlash," 
Sol M. Wurtzel Production 
for 20th Century-Fox, with 
her real daughter, Sharon 
Whitney . . . right in the 
swim in alikeable suits of 
Bates poplin, from Cole of 
California. Mother's suit, 
about $11; child's, about $4, 
sunbonnet $3 ... at Buf- 
fums', Long Beach; Neiman 
Marcus, Dallas ; Burdine's, 
Miami. Lipstick, Revlon's 
Ultra Violet. Earl Scott photo. 



CO 



(AUFOINIAN 



VOL. Ill NO. 1 



FEBRUARY 1947 



Editor and Publisher 
J. R. Osherenko 

Vice President 
& Advertising Director 
Herman Sonnabend 

Managing Editor 
Donald A. Carlson 

Fashion Director 

Sally Dickason Carolin 

Art Director 

Charles Gruen 

Fashions 

Peggy Hippee 
Diana Stokes 
Jacquelin Lary 
Serene Rosenberg 

Art 

Andree Golbin 
Morris Ovsey . 
Bud Mozur 

Features 

Virginia Seal I o n 
Frances Anderson 

Merchandising 

Loise Abrahamson 

Food Stylist 

Helen Evans Brown 

Production 

Daniel Saxon 
-Robert Farnham 



CALIFORNIA FASHIONS 

Let's Have a Party 46 

One to Grow On 48 

Two to be Good 50 

Three to go Places 52 

And For Birthdays to Come 54 

Glory Story in Print 60 

Printed Invitations 62 

And Party Refreshments 64 

Suits: For Today's Show 66 

Suits: Current Favorites 68 

Paula Drew, Snow Queen 77 

Dressing by Design 84 

Courting the Sun , 86 

What to Wear in California in February 87 

New Ideas in Men's Fashions.. 90 

CALIFORNIA FEATURES 

"'San Fernando Valley is My Home" 56 

So You Want to be a Model, by Jane Newton 74 

In California It's 76 

A Young Man's Love 88 

In Early California, by Margaret Chamberlin 94 

CALIFORNIA FICTION 

Pearls Are Always Correct 82 

CALIFORNIA BEAUTY 

Relax . . . And Enjoy It! by Sharon Terrill 72 

CALIFORNIA LIVING 

An Interior Decorator Does Her Homework 78 

California Cooks, by Helen Evans Brown 80 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly, 210 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles 14, Cali- 
fornia, Michigan 8571. New York Office, Saul Silverman, Eastern Advertising Manager, 
1450 Broadway, LAckawanna 4-5659; San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph, 26 O'Farrell 
St., EXbrook 2704. Subscription price: $3.00 per year. One dollar additional postage out- 
side continental United States. 25c per copy. Entered as second class matter January 25, 
1946, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1S79. 
Copyright 1947 The California™, Inc. Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless 
specifically authorized. 



For That Sunny Feeling On Rainy Days 





Six colors: Natural, Air Force Blue, Dew Gray, Maize or Black. 
Available at: The Broadway Stores, California; J. L. Hudson, 
Detroit; Pogue's, Cincinnati; or write us for the name of your 
nearest store. 



VIOLA S. DIMMITT 



719 So. Los Angeles St. • Los Angeles 14 



/£. 



(AUFORNIAN 



is one year old. 



We on the staff feel that our First 
Birthday issue is more than just this month's maga- 
zine. It's a symbol of growth as significant 
as a child's birthday cake with its candles. 
Actually, preparing a magazine is some- 
thing like baking a cake: the publishers start it, 
the recipe's theirs . . . the fashion staff 
brings in new styles galore . . . the editors sift 
them, mix well with some features, add 
humor and leaven . . . the artists stir everything 
up, season with pictures and sketches . . . and we 
all stand around like kids in the kitchen ... on 
tiptoe, holding our breath in hopes that 
"what comes out" will be thoroughly good. 
Then the pages come off the presses, they're 
covered with colored confection . . . it's ready! 
. . . THE CALIFORNIAN is served on the news- 
stands or sent through the mails to a half 
million readers. You, and yours. 







lave a 




he californian's 



irsf birthday calls 



or a celebration . 



• First birthdays are most exciting of all, so 
we're in the mood to celebrate! And from 
our year-old point of view, we've chosen Cali- 
fornia clothes for your young fashion plates 
. . . gathered them round our birthday cake 
. . . just to let them show off. These are the 
things youngsters love, sprightly originals that 
encourage carefree play in the sunshine. Left 
to right, Picture Modes bloomer sunsuit with 
contrasting pinafore, a ruffled Susie Cutie in 
delightful pastels, sizes 2-6, about $11 at 
Stix, Baer & Fuller, St. Louis; Abraham & 
Strauss, Brooklyn. The demure little polka dot 
sun dress by Little Darling has bloomers be- 
neath, sanforized cotton, sizes 2-4-6, about $5 
at The Emporium, San Francisco; Carson 
Pirie Scott, Chicago. Jean Durain puts bows 
on pockets and bib of striped sun dress, sizes 
2-6, 7-14, about $7 (small), $8 (larger), at 
Buff urns', Long Beach; Maison Blanc, New 
Orleans; Bambergers, Newark. From Little 
and Martin, a rumba suit with ruffles galore, 
in Starspun cotton, sizes 1-6, about $4 at Saks 
Fifth Avenue, Beverly Hills; Mary Lewis, New 
York City. Bloomer suit with drop shoulder 
like mother's own, by Juniors Inc., easy-to^ron 
in Dan River Crosscord, sizes 7-14, about $4 
at J. W. Robinson, Los Angeles; Lord & 
Taylor, New York; Burdine's, Miami. Terrie 
Togs broadcloth pinafore, ruffled and em- 
broidered pastels, sizes 1-6, about $6 at May 
Company, Los Angeles; Daniels and Fisher, 
Denver; L. S. Ayres, Indianapolis. Left, this 
page, a dear, tiered skirt with panties to 
match, Sally 'n' Susan Togs sizes 2-6, about 
$3 at Fairchild's, Beverly Hills; Abraham & 
Strauss, Brooklyn. Right, Johnny Lee midriff 
playsuit with dirndl skirt, in Harlequin seer- 
sucker, sizes 7-12, about $8 at O'Connor, 
Moffatt & Co., San Francisco; Carson Pirie 
Scott, Chicago; Burdine's, Miami. 



party! 



i 




47 




ONE TO GRO 







ON 




PHOTOGRAPHED BY LARRY VERNON 



■ SHOES ALL POLISHED, VERY BEST BIB AND TUCKER, AND SO ... TO THE BARBER FOR A SURE- 
ENOUGH HAIRCUT. OPPOSITE PAGE, LEFT TO RIGHT: "FIRST VISITS" ARE FUN IN KNOX KNIT'S 
BROTHER-SISTER SUITS. LIKE SWEATERS TOP HIS SUSPENDER PANTS, HER SUSPENDER SKIRT. PASTEL COM- 
BINATIONS, ALL-WOOL. SWEATERS ABOUT $5; PANTS, $6; SKIRT, $6, AT COULTER'S, LOS ANGELES; 
NE1MAN MARCUS, DALLAS; DE PINNA'S, NEW YORK. B THIS PAGE: ONCE OVER LIGHTLY FOR 
THIS OLDTIMER IN A REAL WHITE SHIRT FROM METROPOLITAN SPORTSWEAR, TWILL SLACKS FROM 
DON RANCHO JR. SHIRT ABOUT $3.50; TROUSERS, $4, AT DESMOND'S, LOS ANGELES; 
J. L. HUDSON, DETROIT; EMERY-BIRD-THAYER, KANSAS CITY. 



49 



TWO TO BE MERRY, TWO TO HAVE FUN . . . DAD'S BEST GIRLS ON A HOLIDAY 



OVER SODAS SO-BIG AND SLIDES THAT SWOOP 'ROUND. AND MOTHER'S A GAL'S BEST PLAY- 



MATE WITH A WARDROBE THAT MATCHES A L'.TTLE GIRL'S EXCITEMENT. SKIRTS .ARE FULL, SLEEVES 



ARE PUFFED, COLLARS ARE CIRCULAR, FANCIFUL. THIS PAGE: ALIKABLES FROM SABA WITH 



RUFFLE-EDGED COLLARS, GIANT BOWS IN BACK, TISSUE GINGHAM BY EVERFAST. LITTLE ONE'S, 3-6, ABOUT $9; 



MOTHER'S, 9-15, .ABOUT $11, AT SHILLITO'S, CINCINNATI; H. P. WASSON, INDIANAPOLIS; GIMBEL'S, 



PHILADELPHIA. OPPOSITE PACE: CRISP LITTLE DRESSES OF WHITE WAFFLE PIQUE BY" LOUELLA BALLER1NO. 



DAUGHTER'S, 2-6, $15; MOTHER'S. 9-17, 10-18, $20, AT CARSON PIRIE SCOTT, CHICAGO; JOSEPH HORNE, PITTSBURGH. 





TWO 



50 




rO BE GOOD 



5,1 




THREE TO GO PLACES, TO HAVE A GOOD TIME, TO WEAR LOOK-ALIKE COLORS 



AND STYLES. YOU'LL KNOW MOTHER BY HER KNIT SUIT THAT MAKES 



UP WELL IN YOUNGER VERSIONS FOR SON AND DAUGHTER. YOU'LL KNOW BROTHER 



BY THE ROGUISH GLINTS, THE COCKY PLAID SHIRTS 



THIS PAGE: ALL-WOOL CARDIGAN SUITS BY HOLLYWOOD KNITTING MILLS: GIRL'S, 



•$15; MOTHER'S, $25; SON'S, $15; DAYTON CO., MINNEAPOLIS; L. S. AYRES, 



INDIANAPOLIS. OPPOSITE PAGE: PLAID SHIRTS BY DON RANCHO JR. IN BATES 



BROADCLOTH, 2 TO 12; ABOUT $3.50 Al DESMOND'S, LOS ANGELES; YOUNKERS. DES MOINES. 



THRE 



52 




PLACES 




for birthday^ 



p come 



A TOAST TO THE FUTURE ... TO THE 



TIMES WHEN SHE'LL WANT THE 



FLATTERY OF A SUBTLE DRAPE, A SOFT 



YOKE; THE TIMES WHEN SHE'LL 



GIVE IN TO TAILORED SIMPLICITY, TO 



FULL SKIRTS, FREE-FLOWING JACKETS. 





OPPOSITE PAGE, LEFT TO RIGHT: A DRAPED 



HOSTESS GOWN BY MARSHA; $75, AT ROY BJORKMAN, 



MINNEAPOLIS. EYELET-EMBROIDERED YOKE FROSTS 



NATALIE NOLDER'S CHAMBRAY STAND-BY, UNDER $20, 



AT J. W. ROBINSON, LOS ANGELES. THIS PAGE, 



LEFT: EDITH PHILLIPS' "FOR TOWN" DRESS IN TWO- 



TONED OSCAR HAYMAN CREPE, ABOUT $20, AT MAY 



COMPANY, LOS ANGELES. RIGHT: JR. MRS. CLASSIC 



IN HESS-GOLDSMITH PRINT, ABOUT $20, AT 



JOSKE'S, SAN ANTONIO. ABOVE: SUN ROSE SPORTS- 



WEAR'S SLACK SUIT WITH FREE-SWINGING JACKET, 



SHIRLEY'S STRUTTER CLOTH. .ABOUT $18, AT 



J. W. ROBINSON, LOS ANGELES. 




55 







-•f 




I 



ernando valley 

IS MY HOME" J 




Ohc HOME OF * * * * * 

WARN £Rn BROS. 

■ 



^—^ 



COLUMBIA 

HCTBKE3 C .■WI'itRATlOK 



Today, a magnifi- 
cent ten-lane 
highway of con- 
crete streams 
through a narrow 
pass in the Holly- 
wood Hills. . . . 
gateway from the 
city to the coun- 
t r y . . . from 
starry Hollywood 
to fabulous San 
Fernando Valley. 
Two centuries 
ago it was only a narrow footpath worn by 
sandaled monks and armor-clad Spanish war- 
riors. 

Today, this gateway opens upon a broad vista 
of green . . . sweeping west, north and east to 
the foothills; and spattering its surface are 
some half-score cities, orchards and groves, pas- 
turage for horses and cattle, factory acreage, 
thousands of smiling white houses large and 
small. 

What the Spaniards saw was quite different: 
an expanse virtually desert, sand tan and gray- 
green, checkered with patches of sage and scrub 
oak, and darker green marking the occasional 
passage of a sparse stream. 

And yet, with this striking contrast between 
then and now, what the Spaniards saw is almost 
what northbound travelers saw until less than 
50 years ago when irrigation began to work its 
magic. Currently, the Big Tujunga - Little 
Tujunga Dam controls the principal source of 
Valley water, the run-off from mountain snows 
and springs; and San Fernando Valley citizens 
are waging a determined struggle to secure for 
their farmlands some of the vast store of Colo- 
rado River water captured by Boulder Dam. 

Though the Valley was pioneered in modern 
times by ranchers who raise chickens, olives, 
walnuts, citrus fruits and live stock, its function 



as a country home for city folk really began 
with the motion picture industry and was 
propagated by far-sighted realtors. About 15 
years ago it became extremely fashionable to 
have a large Valley estate, especially among 
publicity-weary ... or publicity-minded . . . 
Hollywood stars who made of their ranchos 
the grand scale hideaways and profitless hob- 
bies. But as they became more practical about 
their farming, with the ensuing publicity, more 
prosaic city-dwellers began to discover the de- 
lights of carefree life in the Valley. 

Thanks to the efforts of Gordon Jenkins, com- 
poser, and Bing Crosby, singer, the whole coun- 
try' has of late been informed in catchy lyrics 
of the attractions of the San Fernando Valley. 
And the last to disagree with the Utopian picture 
painted by the song are the Valley residents 
themselves. 

We like the way we live in the Valley. Al- 
though there are an impressive number of lavish 
homes, most of us live in fairly small houses 
. . . five to eight rooms . . . but on fair-sized 
lots so that we have our gardens and patios 
and live a good deal of the time outdoors. Often 
we have barbecues, and summer backyard picnics 
are a popular form of entertaining. We pay a 
lot of attention to our gardens and support an 
amazing number of big nurseries where every- 
thing from rare plants and succulents to prac- 
tical information on spraying may be obtained. 

This attention to growing things develops on 
a larger scale in Van Nuys, for instance, where 
the egg industry is a big thing and trim white 
chicken runs are an adjunct to many of the 
homes. In San Fernando and Pacoima, acres 
and acres are given over to olives, with one of 
the largest olive-packing plants in the nation 
located nearby. 

Oranges and lemons are 
the principal crop around 
Canoga Park. Roscoe and 
Van Nuys, where the fruit at 
harvest time is picked by mi- 
gratory workers brought in 
through the United States 
Labor Service . . . many of 



IN SOUTHERN 

CALIFORNIA'S SONG-FAMED 

SETTLEMENT BIG INDUSTRY, 

SMALL FARMS 

AND IMPOSING RANCHES 

ARE COMPLEMENT 

TO CELEBRITIES AND 

THE OFFICE WORKERS WHO 

ALWAYS WANTED A 

COUNTRY HOME.. 



by trances anderson 




Astute real estate agents like Bob W hitworth 
of "Bob's Good Earth," who pioneered Encino, 
had much to do with settlement of the Valley. 



Handsome estates like these which border sivank 
Toluca Lake are found in impressive number. They 
house motion picture stars and wealthy socialites. 



Some parts of the Valley reflect midwestern 
origins, expressed in shopping districts that 
look like thousands of others all over the U. S. 




?y far the largest number of homes in the San 
'ernando Valley are small, well kept, fairly 
ew ranch - houses with beautiful gardens. 




Shop-ouners in the main, however, strive for 
picturesque distinction, adopting architectural 
styles ranging from gabled eaves to Spanish modern. 



Famous Valley landmark is this gas station, 
converted from "Royal Albatross," pioneer air 
cargo plane built and exploited back in 1927. 




luthern California's industrial boom sets 
ich mammoths as General Motors (above) and 
;rgens to building new factories in the Valley. 



Main highway from the north runs through the Val- 
ley, which sets up motels by the dozen to catch 
motorists on their way to overcrowded Los Angeles. 



Industrial strife is ever with the motion pic- 
lure business, and studio gates like Warner 
Brothers are seldom without quota of pickets. 




raplegic patients at Birmingham Veterans' 
ministration Hospital have their own flying 
b, special planes, talk shop by the hour. 



Stately reminder of the Valley's colorful past is 
San Fernando Mission, one of chain founded by Span- 
ish padres on their way up the coast 200 years ago. 



The horse is important in the Valley, where 
equestrian events and stud farms are common. 
This boy is son of coivboy star Monty Montana. 




Vast undeveloped sectors of Valley land have been 
given over to emergency housing like these rows 
of look-alikes for veterans priced at $13,500. 




Center of social activities, golf and gabbing for 
the Valley upper crust is Lakeside Country Club, 
whose membership includes Bing Crosby, Bob Hope. 




Recently a city of tvar-icorkers, home of the Lightning, 
the Constellation and the new Shooting Star is Lock- 
heed aircraft factory with its enormous landing field. 




them Mexican na- 
tionals who come to 
Southern California 
to make as much 
money in a few 
weeks as most of 
them see in a year. 




Celebrities as honorary mayors and community fiestas are 
part of Valley tradition. Andy Devine, Mayor of Van Nuys, 
is too big for jail door in a typical Kangaroo Court bastile. 



Even where we Valley-ites don't 
farm for a living, we're apt to keep a few chickens for 
fun . . . also eggs and good eating . . . and we often 
have a horse or two on the back lot. Horses are very 
important in the Valley. 

Some of the nation's finest horseflesh is bred and 
raised here, and the most beautiful is the pale golden 
palomino with silver mane and tail . . . California's 
own. Horse shows are mainstays on the calendar the 
year round, often three are scheduled during one 
week, principally in Canoga Park, Roscoe; Pacoima 
and Shadow Hills. Naturally, San Fernando Valley 
residents dominate these shows, exhibiting prize horses 
in a variety of classes, and junior Valley-ites start 
early. 

Then, of course, there is the San Fernando Valley 
Goat Society. While its primary purpose is specializ- 
ing in the raising of Nubian goats, both milk and 
bull, it also sponsors such diversified activities as goat 
racing and memorial services for Bikini victims. One 
of its members boasts of a goat so agile he prances 
around their $15,000 rosewood piano. 

Industrially, the Valley is undergoing a boom. Lock- 
heed-Vega started in Burbank before the war, and 
during the war years we all became accustomed to 
its incredible busyness, its veritable city of workers, 
the driving concentration of this big aircraft plant and 
the dozens of smaller parts plants clustered about it. 

The Valley is air-minded. Whitman Air Park at San 
Fernando is the home of a club of citizens, not pro- 
fessional pilots, who own their own planes. Van Nuys 
is yearly host to the Bendix Trophy race which ter- 
minates in Cleveland. Lockheed Air Terminal serves 
the world. Jets, transports, Piper Cubs and the special- 
ly constructed Ercoupes operated by paraplegic pa- 
tients at Birmingham Veterans Administration Hos- 
pital ... all keep the skies a'humming. 

But aircraft isn't the only industry. Jergens is 
producing its lotions and soaps and cosmetics at a 
vast new center. General Motors is opening a Cali- 
fornia branch, with an enormous acreage at Van Nuys 
given over to the assembly of new cars. Motion pic- 
tures are an exciting story and the big movie com- 
panies were among the first to take to the Valley . . . 
Warner Brothers, Walt Disney, Universal, Republic, 
and the location ranches of RKO and Columbia. 

(Continued on page 93) 



Heart of civic administration in the Valley is in 
Van Nuys, where subdivision of Los Angeles City 
Hall governs all communities except Burbank. 



59 



GLORY 




STORY IN PRINT 



If you've read your history books you know the glorious story of the 
opening of the West . . . how a few pioneers braved the dangers of a 
bright new land, explored the wonders of the Santa Fe Trail from the 
Missouri River to New Mexico, then on to California . . . trod paths 
along the Rio Grande, discovered gold, established missions, built railroads. 
Heretofore, the emphasis has been on the east-to-west influence, the changes 
wrought upon a rugged, malleable land. It is only now, in retrospect, that the blaz- 
ing glory of those days stands out in bold relief . . . and exerts a fashion influence 
to be felt the country over. Early Indian ceremony and tradition, the panoramic 
beauty of a new frontier, already have exerted a certain style inspiration ... in 
embroideries, in daring color combinations, in types of clothes. 

But now it is to become the very warp and weft of this summer's fashion . . . 
part of the dresses you wear, the playclothes you adore. For California Authentics 
has had master artists at work to interpret the drama of the Old West in a series of 
printed fabrics inspired by the Santa Fe Trail. They've printed these designs on 
material woven by famous mills . . . and more than twenty leading California 
designers have seized upon them to create playclothes, casual and formal wear, swim 
suits, blouses, slacks. 

Herewith we present a few from the collection which was previewed in kaleido- 
scopic fashion right on the rim of the Grand Canyon! History in print, fully illus- 
trated . . . here, in California styled fashions ... or by the yard in your favorite 
department store. 



DESIGN BY ACDIE MASTERS 



I nspiied designers dip into the history of the West to 



create panoramic patterns for California Authentics: 



ceremonial patterns, native lore, and riotous colors are 



warp and woof of a whole new fashion trend in fabrics 



for California-designed clothes 



►w*V 





DESIGN BY JOSEPH ZUKIN 

Addie Masters puts a ceremonial pattern on blouse worn with slacks. 
left, a California Authentics print that's full of fun; sizes 10-16. about 
at Carson Pirie Scott. Chicago; Neiman Marcus. Dallas. In the 
same "authentic" fabric collection. Joseph Zukin makes a playsuit 
and skirt, above, with a cross-wise shoulder strap, full free skirt. 
Sizes 10-18, it's about S30 at Desmond's. Los Angeles; O'Connor. 
Moffatt & Co.. San Francisco; D. H. Holmes, New Orleans. Below, 
F. B. Horgan's five-piecer makes dramatic use of the panoramic 
print in jacket, about 815. with bra and short set, about Sll (blouse 
and skirt not shown I . . . sizes 12-18, at Desmond's Los Angeles; 
Carson Pirie Scott. Chicago; H. Liebes. San Francisco. 




PRINTED INVITATIONS 



• SPRING BREAKS INTO PRINT ... IN 
VITING AND INTRIGUING, WITH 
PARTY-LIKE EXPECTANCY IN GAY, LEft 
HEARTED FASHIONS WORN AT THE 
BEVERLY-WILSHIRE HOTEL: PARASOLS 
CLOWNS AND FLOWERS TAKE TO PEPLlli 
FULL AND PLEATED ... TO SKIRTS, 
TAPERED, SLIM. 

• THIS PAGE, LEFT: AND CELEBRATING 
IS HELEN OF CALIFORNIA'S SPRING 
HIGHLIGHT OF CELANESE ALLURACBL 
WITH AN ALL 'ROUND PEPLUM. Affit 
$25 AT H. LIEBES CO., SAN FRANCISCO 
DE PINNA, NEW YORK CITY. STRAW 
DERBY BY LESLIE JAMES. BELOW: 
LUNCHEON DATE, MISS HOLLYWOOD JJ 
WITH LONG, PEGGED SLEEVES. ABOUT 
$25 AT JOSKE'S, SAN ANTONIO; 

H. P. WASSON, INDIANAPOLIS. 
KENETH HOPKINS HAT. 



62 





•SPRING COMES EARLY AND STIRS UP 
EXCITEMENT AT THE BEVERLY CLUB 
FOR THOSE SPECIAL OCCASIONS. 
THIS PAGE, ABOVE: STOPPING FOR 
COCKTAILS, GEORGIA BULLOCK'S FAVORITE 
HAS A CASUAL, POCKETED DRAPE IN 
DUBONNET ONONDAGA; ABOUT $35 AT 
J. W. ROBfNSON, LOS ANGELES. 
WITH IT SHE WEARS A STRAW BONNET BY 
KENETH HOPKINS AND A WILD 
MINK COAT. • RIGHT: DINNER DATE, 
MARBERT'S PURE SILK PRINT HAS A 
DANDY, STAND-UP COLLAR, ONE-SIDED 
DRAPE. ABOUT. $35 AT TITCHE-GOETTINGER, 
DALLAS; BLOOMINGDALE'S NEW YORK. 
BIG WHITE SAILOR BY LESLIE JAMES. 




63 




■ FIRST SIGNS OF SPRING. AND FRESH AS PAINT, PRINTS TAKE A SURPRISING 
NEW TURN: DIPPING PEPLUMS. OFF-THE-SHOULDER NECKLINES, DRAPED SKIRTS. 
THIS PAGE, FAR LEFT: SPECIALTY OF THE HOUSE, JACK HUSTON'S GEOMETRIC 
PRINT IN FOREMAN CREPE; ABOUT $35 AT J. W. ROBINSON, LOS ANGELES; 
SUZY LEE HAT. • ABOVE, LEFT: OVER COCKTAILS, DOROTHY O'HARA'S 
BLACK SKIRT PLAYS UP TO BLOUSE OF CALIFORNIA AUTHENTICS PRINT; 
ABOUT $40 AT H. LIEBES, SAN FRANCISCO; DEWEES, PHILADELPHIA. OPEN CROWN 
HAT BY SUZY LEE. • ABOVE, RIGHT: PEGGY HUNT DIPS A HEMLINE; ABOUT $45 AT 
MAY COMPANY WILSHIRE, LOS ANGELES; NEIMAN MARCUS, DALLAS; SHILLITO'S, 
CINCINNATI. KENETH HOPKINS HAT. • OPPOSITE PAGE, ABOVE: GOING PLACES, 
ELEANOR GREEN'S TUNIC; ABOUT $20 AT MAY COMPANY, LOS ANGELES; O'CONNOR 
MOFFATT & CO., SAN FRANCISCO; BURDINE'S, MIAMI BEACH. •BELOW: DEMOISELLE'S PURE 
SILK PRINT; ABOUT $85 AT NANCY'S, HOLLYWOOD; CHAS. STEVENS, CHICAGO. 



AND PARTY REFRESHMENTS 




PHOTOGRAPHED By LARRy VERNON 




SUITS: 




• FOYER FASHIONS, THESE . . . UNL1NED SPRING SUITS WITH GREAT SOCIAL ASSURANCE; FOR 
THEATER, CAFE, OR ABOUT TOWN. ABOVE, DAN GERTSMAN SOFTENS THE CLASSIC CARDIGAN WITH WAIST TUCKS. 
NECKLINE SCARF FOR THE FRESH AIR OF SPRING. IN RAYON SHANTUNG, SIZES 10-18, 

ABOUT $25 AT HECHT CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. : WM. H. BLOCK, INDIANAPOLIS. SUZY LEE HAT. 
• OPPOSITE PAGE, LEFT. KEN SUTHERLAND'S PEPLUM-POCKET SUIT IN COBRA, BY CALIFORNIA FABRIC CO., OF WOOL AND 

RAYON . . . SIZES .10-18, ABOUT $30 AT J. J. HAGGARTY, LOS ANGELES. CASPAR-DAVIS MILAN HAT. 
THE GLORIFIED CUTAWAY, RIGHT, IS A HOLLYWOOD PREMIERE INTERPRETATION IN AIR BRIGADE 
RAYON BY RELTEX, SIZES 10-1S, ABOUT $25 AT JORDAN MARSH, BOSTON: BON MARCHE, SEATTLE. A WEYMAN BAKU HAT. 



66 



FOR TODAY'S SHOW 





SUITS: CURRENT 



68 



• NIGHT AND DAY, A SUIT'S THE THING ... AS FILL OF DRAMA AS THE CURRENT SHOW, AS 
VERSATILE AS ITS STAR. GEORGIA BULLOCK'S SOPHISTICATED VERSION, LEFT, OF DUCHARNE WOOL, WITH NOTCHED 
STAND-UP COLLAR, PEPLUM ON THE SKIRT TO GIVE ILLUSION OF LONGER JACKET. NAVY 
BLUE OR CARAMEL, SIZES 10-16, ABOUT $50, AT CARSON PIRIE SCOTT, CHICAGO. SUGAR SCOOP STRAW WITH MATCH- 
ING GLOVES BY JOSEPHI. BEE NORTON PEARLS; BAUM MARTEN FURS. •RIGHT, JOY KINGSTON SUIT-TYPE DRESS 
WITH BUTTONS ON PARADE . . . DOUBLE-BREASTED, INGENIOUS YOKE SLEEVES. IN KINGSTRIPE, A COHAMA 
RAYON FABRIC, SIZES 10-16, ABOUT $30. PHOTOGRAPHED AT EARL CARROLL THEATRE IN HOLLYWOOD BY LARRY VERNON. 



FAVORITES 




GRAFFS CLASSIC TAILORED RLDUSE I1V A 




. . . a linen-type spun rayon of American Viscose staple 
fiber. Hand washable. Five California sun-drenched colors. 



Address inquiries to 

TEXTILE CONVERTING CO., 819 Santee Street, Los Angeles 14 



TO 



THE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 






OLD FASHIONED QUALITY with 





Through all the years, vanity has insisted that a good 
Hair Brush was an essential luxury; and when mother 
was a girl, quality usually just meant something durable. 
.. .Today, LeVant Brushes combine every advantage. 
Quality, enduring beauty, exquisite patterns. 



The Women's and Men's models have the finest 
of Nylon bristles, flared in wide angles, enabling 
the Nylon to reach your scalp gently. 

LeVant Quality is found only in LeVant Brushes. 
Brush your hair to modern beauty. 



CALIFORNIA-MADE BRUSHES BY 




fe. 



BRUSH CO. "since 1930" 
LOS ANGELES 



HE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 



71 





a peaceful mind, an 

intelligent diet and 

a good massage will 

work wonders with 

your health and 

your figure... 




• Probably more written words are devoted to the prob- 
lem of being figure perfect than to any other phase 
of woman's eternal search for dazzling perfection. And 
there's reason for it, since having a well-proportioned 
body takes more time, effort and concentration than any 
other job of self -improvement. 

The Utopian approach is to dwell on the high plane 
of balanced diet and conscientious and scientific exercise. 
But let's face it ... it takes more time and strength 
of character than most of us possess. At least, that's 
the practical viewpoint of such salons de beaute as that 
of Elizabeth Arden . . . for instance, the one on Sun- 
set Strip which keeps Los Angeles and Hollywood so- 
cialites and celebrities in trim. 

Arden offers, for a price, three principal methods of 
weight reduction, woman's most obvious figure flagrancy. 
There is the procedure of melting off pounds . . . with 
cooling ice packs at head and throat, you're gently en- 
cased in warm wax, then wrapped in sheets, blankets, 
and heat-retaining wax paper for an hour. 

Then there is the electric roller, a fascinating me- 
chanical exerciser that concentrates on fatty portions, 
is adjustable from ankles to neck. Banks of rollers 
literally rub away avoirdupois while you stand comfort- 
ably reading a magazine. Thirdly, there is the spot 
reducer which contracts congested flesh by electrodes, 
and is a concentrated treatment. All three methods are. 



72 




relax.. and enjoy 




of course, supervised by trained young women, and all 
three are accompanied by massage. 

Massage is not, as the consensus holds, a process of 
pounding and rubbing away unnecessary flesh. Its chief 
value is therapeutic, and this is the attitude of masseuses 
of integrity. Because of this, it really deserves thought- 
ful attention. 

Treatment by massage relaxes the nervous system, 
eases contracted flesh and lymphatic congestion . . . 
and it is these latter conditions that must be corrected 
for figure improvement. To lose weight, relax! And 
massage is the way to do it. 

One of the newcomers to the salon on the strip is a 
young French girl who ministered to war-weary Parisi- 
ennes. And her thoughtful comments on the damage 
that standing in line, walking miles, worrying inten- 
sively and eating improperly can do to body machinery 
offer convincing justification for the so-called luxury 
of massage. 

Perhaps many women would think twice before em- 
barking on painless, but rather expensive weight reduc- 
tion via wax or electricity. But there are few women 
who would not benefit by an occasional sojourn on the 
rubbing table under the hands of an expert masseuse. 

Almost any kind of worry . . . domestic, financial, 
emotional or career . . . can tie you up in knots. And 
unsightly bulges. And while some find the achievement 



of beautiful slimness an end in itself, there are more 
to whom the zestful well-being of a happy nervous sys- 
tem brings even greater rewards. 

Our moral for today: for the body beautiful and the 
face serene, relax. And if you can't manage that by 
yourself, treat yourself to a really good massage. Then 
whatever method of figure improvement you choose 
. . . diet and exercise, wax baths or electric gadgets 
. . . will have immeasurably more chance for success. 
Don't overlook the fact, too, that there are several 
things you can do for yourself . . . without benefit of 
professional or automatic reducers. Will power can 
take the place of money, and once you put your mind 
to it, it isn't as tough as you might think. 

Ask your doctor, for instance, about a diet high in 
proteins — lean meat, cottage cheese, etc. — certain green 
vegetables and fruits. It's an exploded theory that you 
have to be hungry in order to achieve slimness. Skip 
the fattening carbohydrates (starches) and sweets and 
gravies, of course. It still can be a pleasure to eat. 

As for exercise, make sure you're doing the proper 
things to keep your circulation stirred up. Then the 
blood stream can cart away burned up fatty tissue. Some 
ill-advised maneuvers can harden those bumps into a 
mass of muscular contraction ; exercise doesn't need to 
he strenuous to be effective. 

And don't forget . . . relax ! 

by sharon terrill 




w, 



THE "GLAMOROUS LIFE" ISNT 
AN EASY ONE . . . ITS HARD 
WORK. DEMANDING AND FRUS- 
TRATING . . . BET IT SPELLS 
SUCCESS FOR A LUCKY FEW. 



ould you like to be a model? 

You would? Good . . . that puts you 
right in there with thousands of other 
girls who haven't the vaguest idea what 
it entails, either! Because there is rarely 
a tender young thing past thirteen who 
hasn't seriouslv decided . . . with prac- 
tically no scrutiny of the subject whatever 
. . . that modeling would mean life's 
lulfillment for her come the time when 
she would have to earn her own pin 
money, mad money or mink coat money. 

Verily. Just as little boys pass 
through phases of wanting to become . 
cowboys, G-men or fighter pilots, little 
girls undergo a craving to become 
models. It is as inevitable as adolescence, 
only much more permanent, because 
very often big girls have that same 
feeling. However, many of them will 
follow through . . . the pretty, smart 
ones . . . and do become models. 

Thev are the ones who have the 
physical strength of Valkyries, the for- 
titude of medieval saints and complete 
dedication to an idea . . . that last 
quality above all . . . and. of course, 
a few other assets of varying im- 



And everyone knows . . . well, not ev- 
eryone . . . but I know, that at heart. 
I'm really a fatal charmer, with an 
exotic spirit crying for an outlet. I'm 
compelled to express this thing . . . 
give vent to it ... or it may atrophy 
. . . furthermore, modeling's lucrative." 

Well, how much of this is true? 

First of all, there are two large divi- 
sions of the profession: photographic 
modeling and live modeling . . . and 
these divide down to a hairline. 

Photographic modeling includes two 
divisions itself: fashion photography 
and product advertising which covers 
the field for any particular commodity. 
Style photography forks out into high 
fashion and plain fashion, depending 
upon the price of the garment and the 
type of publication in which the pic- 
ture is to appear. High fashion carries 
another implication, too . . . the age 
and sophistication of the model . . . 
and a junior or collegienne type is 
not usually branded as a high fashion 
model, no matter how expensive the 
clothing she wears may be. nor how 
plush the publication. 



SO YOU WANT TO BE 



portance that attribute to success. 

If vou're reallv considering model- 
ing, or are nigh on to being crushed be- 
cause vou've never considered it seri- 
ously, let's throw a little light on the 
subject and see what vou've missed so 
far. 

Why do you want to be a model ? 
"Oh, it's glamorous." you'll say. "And 
it has a minimum of inconveniences. 
Models get to go to such exciting places 
and wear such gorgeous clothes. Be- 
sides, they nearly always end up on 
the stage or in the movies, or like girls 
in toothpaste ads they marry million- 
aires! Modeling has a miraculous value 
of prestige ... an open-sesame quality 
. . . and it's easy work. 

'"And." . . . you'll remind yourself 
. . . "I'm really beautiful. Secretly 
beautiful. All I need is the right make- 
up, hairdo. foundation garments, 
clothes, lighting, setting, photography 
and retouching to bring it out . . . 
where it should be . . . right to the 
hungry eves of the public! 

"Really, vou don't have to be beau- 
tiful. I read that someplace. Beautiful 
women aren't really beautiful. Look at 
Cleopatra. It's their souls that does it. 



Live modeling can include any sort 
of personal appearance for the sake of 
advertisement or demonstration ; and 
posing for artists and would-be artists 
in art classes falls into this category. 
Then, of course, mannikins show 
clothes. 

There are three branches of the 
clothing industry from which a manni- 
kin may take her choice . . . whole- 
sale modeling, retail modeling, and 
showing clothes at openings for the 
press, for stylists, for buyers, for de- 
signers and for advertisers. 

Modeling is glamorous, you say? 

True, the finished product of model- 
ing is flamorous ... a photograph 
in a slick-paper magazine that dis- 
plays a luxurious product, or a fashion 
opening with crowds of spellbound 
spectators: or even a small, informal 
fashion showing in a tearoom filled with 
lunch-gulping patrons who punctuate 
their stares with forksfull of creamed 
chicken. These things are fun. and 
you're very proud of yourself when the\ 
turn out well. 

But each step is interpolated with ac- 
tivity that ends far short of high ad- 
venture. Each branch of modeling has 
its own peculiarly nightmarish aspects. 




k MODEL 



RY JANE NEWTON 



SUSAN HAYWARD, BORN edyth 

MARRENER, IS A STAR ... A STAR 
OF HOLLYWOOD AND HER NEW 
UNIVERSAL PICTURE, "SMASHUP— THE 
STORY OF A WOMAN." ANOTHER 
BROOKLYN LASS, THIS VIVACIOUS 
REDHEAD AT 18 DECIDED ON A 
STAGE CAREER, INVESTED IN A 
DRAMA COURSE WITH EARNINGS AS 
A PHOTOGRAPHIC MODEL. HER 
SUCCESS AS A MODEL, AND NOT AS AN 
INGENUE. CAUGHT THE HOLLYWOOD 
EY r E, WON HER A TRYOUT FOR 
SCARLETT O'HARA, AND EVENTUALLY 
A LONG-TERM CONTRACT. TODAY 
SHE'S MRS. IESS BARKER AND THE 
MOTHER OF TWIN SONS. 

KATHERINE CASSIDY, born marie 

ICIDE, IS A FAMOUS FASHION MODEL 
WHO WANTS TO BE A STAR. THE 
SULTRY HOLLYWOOD HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATE, SHOWN AT LOWER 
LEFT, IS UNDER PERSONAL CONTRACT 
TO DIRECTOR HOWARD HAWKS, IS 
COACHING CONSCIENTIOUSLY FOR A 
SCREEN AND STAGE CAREER, BUT 
LIKE SUSAN, MISS CASSIDY HAS 
FOUND THAT MODELING FOR THE 
CALIFORNIAN, VOGUE AND SIMILAR 
PUBLICATIONS KEEPS THE WOLF 
FROM THE DOOR. 



PHOTOGRAPHED By JOHN ENGSTEAO 



If you'd like to aid in a demonstra- 
tion you must have a penchant for be- 
ing gawked at. You will find yourself 
sitting before a gathering of the press, 
of students, of amalgamated something 
or other, or of just plain passersby . . . 
while someone who also enjoys being 
gawked at performs on you. Usually, 
the demonstrator will be doing your 
hair for a group of hair stylists at a 
convention, or your face for a class in 
color photography, or something of like 
nature. 

Hair and makeup demonstrations try 
one's real character. In the first place, 
a girl has to have a special brand of 
fortitude to want to be seen with her 
hair deranged and her face still in a 
series of boxes, bottles, jars and tubes. 
For here, all her secrets are out. They 
are first smeared on the deft fingers of 
the performing artist and then onto the 
waiting face of the model . . . there 
goes all her mysterious allure! 

Now, using her face or scalp as a 
topographic map, the virtuoso begins 
his lecture by drawing lines all over 



1 lis victim and blocking out little areas 
of her classical features. Then he really 
goes to work. With great flourish he 
massages goo all over her face, and she 
is either overcome with the desire to 
purr, bite his fingers or go to sleep, de- 
pending upon her mood that day. 

As for me, I have done all three at 
a sitting. 

An au naturelle model for art classes 
has her problems, too, but she'll tell 
you she likes her work. "Oh, the pay is 
pretty good, the hours are short. I'm 
in an intelligent atmosphere and ... I 
never have to buy work clothes!" 

Of course, the next best thing to not 
having to buy work clothes is to be able 
to buy some of them at wholesale prices 
. . . one of the redeeming features of 
wholesale modeling, which otherwise is 
a pretty dull grind. 

A job of this type is a straight forty- 
hours-a-week proposition. The pay is 
comparable to a secretarial position and 
the work is infinitely harder. A whole- 
sale model changes outfits in a dressing 
(Continued on page 92) 



75 




THE DARING OF A CITIZEN, THE DESIH4BIL1TY OF DESIGi\ 
AND THE DELIVERY OF A CHAMPION THAT LEAD THE NEWS . . 



TONY CORNERO, publicly named "admiral" 
of California's one-ship gambling fleet, has won 
many bouts with inadequate Federal and State 
laws, and still hopes to operate his luxurious 
floating casino. HENRY DREYFUSS, indus- 
trial designer, began his career with Norman 
Bel Geddes, fashioned stage settings, a new 
fly swatter, the Hoover vacuum cleaner, the 
Royal typewriter, General Electric refrigerator, 
a Sears Roebuck washing machine, bathrooms 
for Crane, pens and pencils for Eversharp, anti- 
aircraft guns and the new 204-passenger Con- 
solidated Vultee airliner. BEDA MATHEW 
holds the 1946 title of national field archery 
woman champion. Three years ago she bought 
a three-dollar bow and a handful of arrows . . . 
rifle shells were too expensive and gasoline 
scarce. She shot instinctively, using no sights 
nor point of aim. "I wanted to see whether I 
could outshoot the otbers." She did. HOWARD 
DARRIN, hero of World War I as a French 
and American flyer, probably is better known 
today as a designer of beautiful automobiles. 
Before he styled the Kaiser-Frazer line and his 
own fenderless. aluminum creation, Dutch Dar- 
rin achieved no little fame with his custom 
cars for Hollywood stars. King Alfonso of Spain, 



in California it's... 



!**»»•■ 



Howard Darrin 




Lord Louis Mountbatten and Queen Marie of 
Rumania. LILLIAN MAGIDOW, teen-ager, is 
destined for fame as a concert pianist. Winner 
of the KFI-Hollywood Bowl Young Artists' Com- 
petition, Lillian had her "unforgettable evening 
in the Bowl" when Leopold Stokowski directed 
the symphony orchestra for her solo perform- 
ance. PIERRE MONTEUX, in his twelfth sea- 
son as conductor of the noted San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, recently tiffed over his 
billing under the concert soloist. Currently- 
happy, the famous Frenchman is leading the 
San Franciscans in concert next month on a 
nation-wide tour. 



SNOW QUEEN of the An- 
nual Winter Sports Fiesta iii 
Southern California is Miss 
Paula Drew, young Holly- 
wood actress from Detroit. Se- 
lected by the Los Angeles 
Junior Chamber of Commerce, 
Miss Drew will reign over a 
series of sports events, cli- 
maxed by the Ski Carnival to 
be held at Big Pines Recrea- 
tion Park February 8-9. In 
reel life Paula Drew plays an 
important role in Walter Wan- 
ger's new Universal-Interna- 
tional production. "Washing- 
ton Flyer." In real life you 
see her wearing a figure-flat- 
tering afternoon dress fash- 
ioned by Max Kopp of Os- 
car Hayman Roulette crepe. 




PHOTOGRAPHED BY EDWARD H. REED 





AN INTERIOR DECORATOR DO! 



TRANSFORMING TWO ROOMS INTO HOME IS 



ALL IN THE DAYS WORK FOR ROBIN 



78 



MANSFIELD . . . BUT IT'S INSPIRATION FOR YOU 







I From doorway: the Ionic 
hall gains interest, turns 
junctional, merely by addi- 
tion of decorative credenza. 

L Comfort and charm in 
this downy davenport in 
moss green; favorite print 
is framed in glass, above. 

A Robin Mansfield finds 
many occasions to use desk 
for practical purposes: focal 
point of beauty in the room. 

4 A tiny bedroom can be 
most attractive: here is defi- 
nite color scheme, compact 
arrangement, personality. 

3 A kitchen . . . believe it! 
■ . . is just behind the 
screen in one corner of 
Miss Mansfield's living room. 




ER HOMEWORK 



by Virginia Scallon 



J\.obin Mansfield is a successful young careerist who takes 
her work home with her. An interior decorator for W. & J. 
Sloane, she found her most challenging assignment was to furnish 
her own minute apartment so that it would have the qualities 
of hospitable, comfortable California living. 

The apartment is a miniature pent house ... set atop a garage 
. . . and had several perplexing problems, all of them con- 
nected with space. 

For instance, a long narrow hall leads from the front door 
to the'living room ... a lavish waste of space until Miss Mans- 
field dreamed up the idea of placing a credenza midway, put 
colored glassware on top, records and hospitality properties in- 
side. Now the awkward hall performs graciously as another 
room! 

Then, "They gave me all this space whether I needed it 
or not." she laughed as she sidestepped into a tiny bed- 
room, probably a total of 8 x 1 ] feet small. But an over- 
all pattern of red and green ivy on white wallpaper sets 
a gay color scheme, the single bed with its tufted head- 
board and quilted covering in a new multicord fabric 
is a brilliant choice, the ruffled underskirt of allover 
pique embroidery is enchanting. Draperies are of the 
same red fabric, with tiny pleated ruffles of white 
gabardine. 

There is just enough room for a bedside table, a 
chest, a slipper chair . . . just room enough! 

But it is in the living room that Robin Mansfield 
has justified her training in interior decoration. A scant 
11 x 12 feet squarish, it is abrim with personality and has 
areas designated for study and reading, for relaxation, for 
entertaining: Decorator- wise, her first step was to paint the 
walls a soft gray ... in other words, causing them to re- 
cede and create an immediate illusion of space. Ceiling and 
molding is white, floor is covered wall-to-wall with soft rose 
carpeting. 

Focal point is a kidney-shaped kneehole desk, as colorful, 
with its red leather top, as it is practical. There is a touch 
of sophistication in the rose velvet tufted chair, and comfort 
galore in the deep-seated davenport in mossy green. Green 
ceramic lamps, nested end tables and an expandable coffee 
table, a radio for inspiration, a traditional wing chair for dignity 
and charm . . . and all arranged in a conversational group- 
ing. 

But there are more tricks of the trade than choosing the 
furnishings, and behind a folding louvre screen Miss Mans- 
field has concealed (1 ) a two-burner electric plate which sets 
conveniently atop (2) a miniature refrigerator. Here it's a 
simple matter to cook for one, even to whisk up a buffet supper 
. . . particularly when the tip-top table against the wall straight- 
ens up and comes out into the center of things when socially 
inclined! 



79 




lave those 



vegetables! 



-even 



children will 



California cooks 

by "helen evans'brown 



• The Califokman is growing up and having fun do- 
ing it! Growing up is fun for children, too. and one of 
the most exciting things about getting out of the nursery 
is the thrill of eating with the grown-ups. But it will be 
no thrill for the grown-ups if they have to sit through 
repeat performances of the "I-say-it's-spinach" routine, 
and why should they? I'm no child psychologist, but 
I can have my own ideas, can't I ? I believe that if a I 
child knows that his parents really relish their food ; 
that meal time is pleasure time: that a new dish is an I 
exciting adventure; then, I believe that that child will 
grow up with a keen interest in fine food and a certainty 
of getting much joy out of life. So when your pedia- 
trician gives you his approval, give the youngsters a I 
break. Let them taste of your delicious dishes. Just 
taste; and if the flavor's too new, too strange, skip it. I 
Switch back for the moment to the chopped carrots or I 
strained applesauce. Remember that you didn't like 
your first olive (or did you?). Soon those potential 
gourmets again will be evincing an interest in parental 
fare, and before you know it, they will be eating almost 
everything you eat and loving it. At least, that's myl 
theory, and I do so hope I'm right! 

But the best adjusted eaters, and I mean of all ages. 
sometimes balk at vegetables. Even Charles Lamb, who 
wrote of food with reverence, once said: "The whole 
vegetable tribe have lost their gust with me," and I 
know just what he meant, don't you? It's usually about 
this time of year that the feeling hits me, and I know 



80 



but one thing to do about it — find new ways of cooking 
the same old vegetables. And why not? There must be 
ten thousand ways to cook a piece of beef, but how many 
ways do we know of cooking carrots? Precious few. 
So here's to new ways of cooking vegetables — ways that 
will delight the children, and will dissuade your biggest 
baby from making cracks about moving to a hutch or 
changing the family name to Nebuchadnezzar. 

Before I launch into the recipes, may I make a strong 
plea for vegetables that are not overcooked? If you 
use frozen vegetables, follow the directions on the pack- 
age. If you use a pressure cooker, read the time table 
that came with it. If you drown your vegetables in water, 
cook them to a mush, then pour all the flavor and the 
nutrients down the sewer when you drain them, stop it! 
And if you don't believe I'm right, ask your favorite 
home economist. She'll tell you the nutritional advantages 
while I dwell on the gastronomical ones. It's a com- 
forting thought that the foods that taste best are usually 
best for us. 

Let's think of peas first, most people do. Me, I think 
they're overrated except when they're cooked this way: 



peas paisano 



Wash a bunch of green onions and remove roots. 

Cut them, green part and all, into slices about a quarter 

of an inch thick. Put in a heavy saucepan with four 

tablespoons of butter and cook until the onion becomes 

limp. Add two twelve-ounce packages of frozen peas 

(or a pound and a half of shelled fresh ones) and a 

half cup of water. Add an eighth teaspoonful of sugar 

and a half teaspoonful of salt. Then cover and cook 

very gently until the peas are tender. If they're frozen, 

this will take from five to seven minutes — if large and 
i ° 

fresh it may take as long as thirty minutes (unless you 
use a pressure cooker) . You'll just have to test as you 
go along, which will be no hardship at all. 
You've never liked cabbage, but then you've never had 



c arm e I cabbage 



And I said Carmel, not caramel. Chop a medium-sized 
Onion and a green pepper, and saute them in two table- 
spoons of shortening until soft. Add two tablespoons 
of flour, cook a minute, then add a cup of canned toma- 
:oes, a half teaspoonful of salt, and a quarter teaspoonful 
of chili powder. Simmer for three minutes, then pour 
aver a half cabbage which has been shredded and cooked 
for six minutes in a minimum of salted water, then 
drained. 

Carrots are considered pretty dull eating by most epi- 
cures, unless they're cooked with an extra little fillip. 
3ne easy way to do just that is to cook them (baby 
raes) until almost done, then put them in a casserole 
tfith a dollop of butter and a dash of brandy, and finish 
heir cooking in the oven. But that's not for the small 
ry. For them try 



carrots capistrano 



iVash and scrape two bunches of carrots, and put them 
nrough the food grinder, using the fine knife (or grate 
hem). Put them in your heaviest sauce pan with a 
lalf cup of water and two tablespoons of butter. Cook 
'owly, stirring now and then, until the carrots are 



tender. In the meantime make a Bechamel sauce — this 
streamlined version. Dissolve a teaspoonful of chicken 
concentrate or a chicken bouillon cube in a cup of hot, 
very rich milk. Melt two tablespoons of butter, add two 
tablespoons of flour, cook a minute, then add the hot 
milk mixture. Cook until thickened and smooth, then 
combine with the carrots. Season with a grating of nut- 
meg and a little more salt if needed. It will be needed 
unless the chicken flavoring is the salty kind. Taste 
and see. This vegetable dish is particularly good if 
served with broiled liver and crispy bacon. 

Here's a way to sneak a few extra vitamins into the 
meal without anyone's suspecting a thing. 



potatoes verdes 



Boil and mash six large potatoes. Then season with a 
quarter of a cupful of melted butter, a third of a cup 
of hot milk, a teaspoon of salt, a grinding of pepper, 
and a quarter cup each of finely-minced parsley and 
water cress. Beat well, pile lightly in a baking dish, and 
slip under the broiler to brown on top. 

The next recipe is typical of California cookery at 
its simplest and best. It's an almond sauce that may 
be used on a dozen different vegetables — vegetables 
cooked to your own measure in your pressure cooker, 
your waterless saucepan, or in that battered old pot 
that you almost gave to the aluminum drive. No matter 
how you cook your vegetable, it will be a glorious treat 
if you pour this sauce over it before serving. 



-*t*lifornia almond sauce 



Pour a cup of boiling water over a quarter cup of al- 
monds and let stand for five minutes. Slip off the 
skins, then cut the almonds in long slivers with a sharp 
vegetable knife. Now melt a half cup of butter (1/2 of 
a stick), add the almonds, and cook gently until the 
nuts just begin to take on color. Add a tablespoon of 
lemon juice, boil up once, and pour over the vegetable 
of your choice. Try it on asparagus, cauliflower, broc- 
coli, Brussels sprouts, tiny boiled onions, baked squash, 
string beans, boiled potatoes — I can't think what it 
wouldn't be good on. Try it on fish, too, and on veal 
cutlets, just in case you think I've turned vegetarian. 

There are so many ways of making vegetables more 
interesting . . . why don't you try some of them: why 
don't you dress lima beans with tiny sausages that have 
been cut in small pieces and cooked brown? Just add 
them to the cooked limas along with the hot fat which 
has cooked out of them? Why don't you grate raw beets 
and cook them in a tiny bit of water until just tender; 
then dress them with sour cream and season with salt 
and pepper? Why don't you parboil halved zucchini, 
then brown it, along with a bunch of chopped green 
onions, in olive oil? Why don't you season string beans 
with butter which has had finely-minced parsley and 
lemon juice added to it? Why don't you halve tiny 
crook neck squash and cook it, covered with cream, in 
a covered casserole; then when it's tender, sprinkle it 
with buttered crumbs and brown? Why don't you think 
up your own entrancing ways of cooking vegetables, 
so that you can boast that in your home even the chil- 
dren think it's fun to eat vegetables . . . and that in 
California there's never a dull meal! 



81 




a short 



story by 



John scott douglas 



€%p# mmi 




As Stephanie Nason regarded the two corsages 
on the dressing table, the mirror showed her that 
her smile held both resigned despair and tender 
compassion. She half-closed her eyes for a re- 
flective moment, observing how their heavy-lidded 
expression gave her face an almost oriental cast. 

Then she placed Steve's corsage of Talisman 
roses against the ice-blue of her evening gown, and 
the flame-and-gold rebellion of the roses was so 
startling that a rippling laugh escaped her. 

"Now I've seen everything," she murmured, her 
voice shaded with mockery. "Poor Steve, he'll 
never learn!" 

But as she studied her reflection, a shadow caught 
her eye and she gasped. Leaning forward, she 
peered at the glass anxiously and sighed with re- 
lief to find that no line marred the smooth per- 
fection of her face. Her skin was still clear and 
youthful. Only her eyes, she told herself, betrayed 
what worldly experience had taught her. 

Reluctantly returning the roses to their box. 
she laid the corsage of gardenias against her 
shoulder. They made her skin seem fairer, and 
emphasized the grayness of her eyes and the jet 
of her hair. 

Trust Bonsil Salisbury to send gardenias! They'd 
go with any dress and were always safe. He was 
what these modern youngsters, with their horrid 
slang, meant by an "eager beaver." Stephanie 
made a little moue of distaste at the term, but 
grudgingly admitted that it fitted Bonsil. A hard 
and serious worker, he was utterly devoted to her 
in his somewhat stiffly correct way. But he was a 
slave without spontaneity, without joie de vivre, 
and sometimes his very perfection was trying. Yet 
however unexciting he was, she at least always 
knew what to expect from him. 

About to pin on his gardenias, her attention was 
arrested by the note that had come with the roses, 
and now she reread it: 
Dear Stephanie — 

Break any other date you may have, 
for I'm taking you to the club dance to- 
night. Be ready at eight. 

Steve Haskell 

"Be ready at eight!" she repeated derisively. 

How like Steve to assume that she'd cast aside 
everyone else the moment he returned! And not 
a scratch of a pen from him in all these months — 



cew* 



#c/ 



except the photograph of him in his new uniform. 
The jaunty smile was there, the saint-and-sinner 
expression lurked in his bright eyes, and the pho- 
tograph was characteristically inscribed: "From the 
one you love, Steve." 

Why she'd kept it, she did not know. For she 
suspected that similarly autographed" photos had 
gone to others. Stephanie marveled that anyone 
with her experience could have an Achilles' heel 
like Steve. 

It annoyed her now that with his usual thought- 
lessness he had failed to call to inquire the color 
of her dress before sending anything as daring as 
those Talisman roses. She imagined that Steve had 
been thinking of the pale amber dress she'd worn to 
his farewell party, and he'd probably conspired 
with the florist to make up an imaginative corsage 
. . . for that dress she'd long ago discarded. 

Her hand touched the gardenias and then fal- 
tered. Steve rubbed her at times like sandpaper, 
but this was his homecoming. She remembered the 
undisguised admiration in his eyes when she'd 
descended the stairs in that amber dress, and his 
eager, "Now I never want to wake up." How 
feather-footed she'd felt that night in his arms! j 

She had been happy; she knew it now. And 
slowly she returned the gardenias also to their 
box. Her mind struggled with indecision. She 
couldn't wear the Talisman roses with her cool 
blue dress, and she was unwilling to resurrect the 
passe amber dress — even for Steve. Yet she felt 
it would be unfair to wear Bonsil's gardenias if 
she went to the dance with Steve. What could she 
wear? 

Momentary doubts chilled her until she re- 
called, suddenly, that pearls were correct with any 
gown. 

Selecting a necklace from the jewel box on the 
table and slipping the milky strands about her 
throat, she regarded her reflection with weary-ap- 
pearing, half-closed eyes. 

"Correct," she said. "And quite perfect with thisi 
dress." 

A figure came into her field of vision and a 
voice behind said in a shocked tone, "Stephanie — 
my pearls!" 

Stephanie whirled around with a start. "Oh, 
Mother, please let me wear them," she pleaded. 
"I'm sixteen now, and Steve's home from prep 
school!" 



82 



fef *- 




MOST LUXURIOUS OF FEMININE 
TREASURES-LINGERIE MADE/^/fefC 






blends your face powder 




Right before your eyes . . . this fascinating process takes 
place, as the delicately-tinted mounds are hand-blended 
into the one face powder that's perfect for your skintone 
. . . designed to a formula that's yours alone. 



NEW YORK . PARIS • LONDON • MONTREAL 



bi-symmetric balance 



a-symmetric balance 




o 



a 



simpli basic one idea 
dress unbalanced 



balanced 



balanced 



second in a series of 



articles on dressing 
by design 
by Florence Shuman 



When we see a beautiful design . . . whether a painting 
or a smartly dressed woman . . . we experience an elation 
and a satisfaction that is instinctive, Most of the things that 
give us this pleasure have elements in common. These ele- 
ments are balance, harmony, rhythm and unity. 

In this lesson we will discuss some of the ways to achieve 
balance in our clothes. Since we are seen most often without 
hat, coat, furs, etc., let's consider first the balancing of 
a dress. 

There are two kinds of balance: bi-symmetrical and a-sym- 
metrical. Bisymmetrical is the more easily recognized of the 
two. It implies an equilibrium obtained by equal weights on 
both sides of a center, or axis. A simple scale is the best 
example of such balance. 

Maybe the reason we like a feeling of balance is because' 

human beings are constructed on this plan, with two eyes, 

two ears, two leas, and so forth, on either side of a central 
y 

trunk. 

Here are sketches of two dresses, both bisymmetrically 
balanced. The first uses a seam as its central axis; in the 
second dress the center is felt, even though it isn't stressed. 




you balance this one 






n c e 



Balance is achieved by repeating the same ideas on each 
side of the center. 

Asymmetrical balance is more interesting because it can 
be composed of parts that are totally different in appear- 
ance, yet have equal weight. By weight I mean the impor- 
tance, or the amount of attraction, an idea or line or part 
has for .our eyes. Just as on a scale we can put apples on 
one side, potatoes and bananas on the other, and get a 
balance, so we can learn the trick of juggling our ideas to 
get balance in our fashions. 

Now you can begin to experiment with line, color, texture 
and ornament in your clothes. The principle of asymmetrical 
balance gives you wonderful freedom, so that planning an 
outfit can be a, very exciting experience! 

Here I have sketched a simple, basic dress. It is complete, 

sut rather dull, you will admit. In the second diagram I have 

added a pocket, which takes away from the dullness, but 
i i 
eaves it looking rather incomplete. In the following three 

diagrams I have balanced the pocket idea in three different 

vays in order to complete the design and make the dress 

nore interesting. 



The remaining diagram is waiting for you to finish it. Test 
your sense of balance by adding some line or shape to com- 
plement the pocket. 

It might be fun for you to trace the small figure on trans- 
parent paper. Sketch in the lines of a dress in your own 
wardrobe that has been bothering you. It may have a skirt 
draped to one side that is already busy with too many de- 
tails. Or it may be something quite different. Perhaps the 



i 5,ive a sense of balance and 

completeness. 

Don't stop with one idea. Make several tracings of the 
diagram. Start with the same unbalanced idea in each and 
try adding or omitting details. In that way you will have 
some basis on which to judge the one best suited to you. 
Don't limit yourself to one choice. Sketch as many ideas as 
you can think of. This is the method all professional designers 
use and you can't help but find an attractive solution. Good 
luckl 

In the next lesson we will discuss balancing the whole 
figure with accessories. 



#' ^^ . 




TING THE S 



and bright as all outdoors is Joseph Zukin's cabana skirt with bow-tied bra . . . 
as brief and bare as you dare! For the beach or for sunshine wherever you seek it ... in red. black. 
or toast, on Bates white cotton, sizes 10-20. About $20 at J. J. Haggarty, Los Angeles; L. Bam- 
berger, Newark: Bloomingdale's, New York. Dorothy Gray's Trans- World lipstick. 



86 




If your ticket, or even your hopes, are labelled "California- 
in-February," here are some travel data that may help you: 



TICKET TO CALIFORNIA 



Cosmopolitan San Francisco 

is synonymous with the dark tailored suit, gadabout furs, a knit dress 

for general impressiveness . . perhaps a sophisticated dinner dress 

. . with casual clothes for life down the peninsula, for motor trips. 

More informal, Los Angeles calls for a suit . . it may be bright or tweedy 

for the sunny south . . a topcoat or furs, more sports clothes . . slacks 

and pedal pushers . . maybe a soft bright wool dress and a print with a 

hint-of -spring! But no matter where you go in California, plan a 

coordinated wardrobe . . with blouses and sweaters that match or blend 

with suit, skirts, slacks . . with a long skirt for formal wear. Bring umbrella 

and rubbers, for February is one of our dampest months. Remember 

the races, concerts . . the desert, mountains . . so add to the basic minimum 

a dash of high fashion depending upon your plans and expectations! 




CANADIAN 
MOLNTIE 




ARAB LANCER 



IX nniGHT MMItPHY-S TACK MtOOM SEYE.XTEE.X 
BEAITIFIE Oils DEPICT THE MItSTOHY OF THE HORSE 

A YOUNG MAN'S LOVE... 




BENGAL LANCER 



RUSSIAN COSSACK 



J* 




U p Santa Barbara way ... on the golden shore of 
the blue Pacific . . . there are a heritage and an interest 
in art that for generations have attracted the finest of 
painters, sculptors and writers bent on an idyllic ren- 
dezvous for fine living and free expression. Today, much 
of that interest is centered on the strapping son of a 
Greek restaurant owner who is as photogenic as he is 
brimming with talent. 

Twenty-nine-year-old Nicholas S. Firfires . . . war 
hero, bronc buster, fencer and violinist ... is developing 
a reputation in the versatile school of oils, watercolor, 
pastels, blockprint, charcoal, dry point and pen. And 
his recent assignment for Dwight Murphy, wealthy ranch 
owner and breeder of the world's finest 
Palomino horses, has earned for Nick the 
admiration of fellow artists and all those 
who visit the beautiful new tack room of 
Mr. Murphy's San Fernando Rey Rancho 
in the Santa Ynez Valley. For there, on the walls above 
the silver-studded saddles, are seventeen different types 
of horses of the world. 

It wasn't an easy assignment. It required painstak- 
ing research to portray correctly the horse of each era, 
the habiliments of each rider . . . from the fierce Mon- 
golian Tartar of Ghengis Kahn to the modern day Irish 
Hunter and the five-gaited beauty of the show. 

But Nick comes by it naturally. Reared on a ranch 
near Santa Marguerita, he began riding, breaking and 
training horses when he was a sprig of eight. He loved 
them and relished the opportunity to meet the rangers 
and cowboys ... to be "one of the boys." Real cow- 
punchers are his favorite subject today in his direct, 
realistic, colorful approach on canvas to their lusty life. 
John Gamble, Santa Barbara's patriarch of the palette, 
says of Firfires, "he has considerable ability and should 
succeed." 

A sickly youth, Nicholas started drawing to his fancy 



when very young. His mother would give him a pencil 
and pad . . . and Nick would prop himself in bed to 
sketch and pass the time away. 

He flourished on the ranch, however, studied art in 
Santa Maria High School under Stanley Breneiser, played 
first violin in the school orchestra, and began a singing 
repertoire of his favorite cowboy songs. Later there 
were the Los Angeles Art Institute and the Art Center 
School for training, and William Spencer Bagdatopoulos 
of the Royal Academy took Nicholas under his wing 
... to teach him the technique of oils, water colors, 
pastels and etchings. 

In the fall of 1940 he enlisted in the Army's 308th 
Combat Engineers and participated in the invasion of 
France with the 83rd Infantry Division . . . The Thun- 
derbolts . . . first to reach the Rhine in the all-victori- 
ous drive . . . and as a sergeant was decorated with the 
Bronze Star and five battle star citations. Art wasn't 
a lost art for Nick during the war, however. He color- 
fully illustrated the division's historical battle brochure, 
"The Thunderbolt Across Europe," painted the portrait 
of his commanding general, Major General Robert C. 
Macon, while in Holland, and made many battle sketches 
for subsequent Army publication. In Holland, too, he 
was able to study briefly with Van Eyck and Jan Hal. 

In his picturesque studio in Santa Barbara, Nicholas 
Firfires is a cowboy at heart . . . blue denims, high-heeled 
boots and a wide-brimmed hat. He's tanned and husky 
... as handsome as Errol Flynn. But he's serious about 
his work, the heritage of Frederick Remington, Frank 
Tenney Johnson, Will James and Maynard Dixon burns 
bright in the hope and 
promise of this young 
Greek lad. 

His horses are somewhat 
like music ... a universal 
language . . . owned and 
loved by all nations of the 
world. 



XHIIOEAS FIRFIRES. WAR HERO 
AXIt (OHSOl SIXC.ER. IS OXE OF 
CALIFORNIA'S FIXEST VOVXG 
ARTISTS. 





. THE PERFECT COMPLIMENT TO MILADY'S 
NEW SPRING SUNNY CALIFORNIA WARDROBE ARE 
THESE NEW CALIFORNIA CLOTHES FOR MEN 
. . . SOFT, EASY-GOING, STYLED TO MATCH HER 
SPORTSWEAR LIKE THE PAGES IN A COLOR 
BOOK . . . YET DESIGNED WITH THAT MAS- 
CULINE FEEL. THEY ARE, LEFT TO RIGHT: 
• EXTRA COMFORTABLE JACKET WITH VARI- 
HUED PLAID ACCENTING CASUALNESS; 
• "BENGAL BEACHCOMBER" SHORT-SLEEVED SHIRT WITH TIGER 
MOTIF; . CARDIGAN WALKING OUTFIT OF CUSTOM JACKET, WALKING 
SHORTS AND SHIRT . . . ALL THREE TO MATCH; . LEATHER AND 
WOOL JACKET IN COMFORT COMBINATION; ABOVE, . THE 
"LAZY JACK" PUTS HANDS INTO MUFF POCKETS, OFFERS PLENTY OF 
ROOMINESS FOR THE MOVE-ABOUT MAN; . ALWAYS RIGHT 
SPORT JACKET WITH VERTICAL STRIPES; RIGHT, . CONVERTIBLE 
SOFT CASUAL SHIRT HAS BUTTONS ON TAPE FOR DAY, 
USES STUDS FOR EVENING . . . IT'S COMFORTABLE DURING LIGHT- 
TIME, IN CORRECT DINNER STYLE FOR NIGHT-TIME. 



SO YOU WANT TO BE A MODEL 



(Continued from page 75) 

room that fits like a glove, makes tracks across 
a small salon, and shows an audience of a 
few persons the complete line of apparel, be 
it French bathing suits, fur coats or gowns. 
She is supposed to capture the mood of each 
piece shown, which in itself is a problem. This 
happens an infinite number of times a day 
. . . the same clothes for a whole season, 
with a few additions from time to time. 

Dizziness and corns are the occupational 
diseases of wholesale modeling. But then, 
there is relief ... a model may be asked 
to pinch hit as a typist, receptionist or as 
a full-blown secretary. 

Retail modeling is much the same, except 
for a slight difference in technique. Then, too, 
there are no fittings, unless the clothes are 
custom-made. If her modeling takes less than 
a full day she may fill in as a salesgirl or 
secretary. 

But the darkest moments of all modeling 
come during a fashion opening. A fashion 
opening is first cousin to a nervous break- 
down . . . one is enough to scar your psyche 
forever. 

Fashion shows are fracases because of 
stylists. Stylists are shrewish women in the 
clothing business. They put on fashion shows. 
They wear important hats. They are nervous. 
Stylists hate fashion shows. They nearly al- 
ways have a mental and physical collapse 
while one is in progress. 

Let's peek backstage. A minute dressing 
room has been provided for you and some 
five, fifteen or thirty mannikins of assorted 
sizes, shapes and vintages. Great care has 
been taken to see that the room is snug 
and cozy . . . that it has been placed close 
to the audience so that one and all can hear 
each shouted invective, command and direc- 
tion. The audience also will be able to hear 



roll call . . . how else will they know that 
ten to twenty percent of the models didn't 
appear for the show? 

During the rehearsal, if there was one, each 
model had been shown where her clothes 
would be hung; each had been thoroughly 
acquainted with every dress she was to wear 
and all its accessories; each had been in- 
structed to bring both black and brown shoes 
and an extra pair of hose, in case of dis- 
aster; each knew her order in the program 
and all her cues: each knew exactly how 
much time she had to change costumes. 

Theoretically. 

Actually, as you enter the dressing room, 
you are a bit shaken to see someone else 
wriggling into your clothes. And no matter 
what the temperature is outside, the dressing 
room is always bristling with heat. Hair, being 
combed out of numerous scalps. Hies about 
the room . . . and the air hangs thick with 
powder. A patient makeup artist quietly re- 
does every face he does not like ... a 
patient model redoes her face if she does 
not like what the makeup artist did to it. 
The hairdressers stand by to rush you through 
their assembly line. 

Wrapping a bandanna or net over your 
hair, you make a dive for the costume from 
which you have just succeeded in extracting 
the other model. \o\\ discover that it is (a) 
not hanging in the right section, (b) not with 
your other things, (c) not one that you wore 
at rehearsal, and (d) really did belong to 
the other girl. 

Once you've assembled the correct en- 
sembles, you think of nothing except rushing 
. . . rushing like a rabid rabbit for the 
next hour. You begin to note a touch of 
indigestion. Someone walks up to you and 






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, Focus on the "Jacketier" suit.. . in fabrics 
l 
1 by Dun River. . . at Calijornia- 

l conscious stores everywhere. 




860 So. Los Angeles St.* Los Angeles 14 



pun 
by Jane Newton « 

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92 



asks you to please not perspire in the com 
pany's clothes. 

An assistant is lining up the models. She 
has a sheet of paper with a lot of names 
on it, and you are hurried into a queue 
just off the stage and told to please, for 
heaven's sake, be quiet. The stylist has 
chewed her nails off up beyond the elbow, 
just like Venus de Milo, but somehow she 
still carries on. Her important hat is on the' 
wrong part of her head and her hair is 
straggling down. She tells you that your 
coiffure is wrong for your chapeau. How could 
she remember that that was not the same 
hat you wore at rehearsal? 

The music starts, and an ever, ever so breezy 
female commentator floats up to the micro- 
phone, makes love to the audience, dien 
calls for the first costume to appear. SheJ 
never makes a mistake on the first costume. 
She has been looking right into the wings, 

The show goes smoothly until she announces 
a magenta formal, and out waltzes someone in 
a lime green sun dress. This has almost never 
failed to happen at a fashion opening. 

Just as you are about to step from the . 
wings, you notice that the stylist is giving |„ , 
you a signal ... a veritable goosing witht| f 
her eyes. The first act is lagging behind 
time. Hurry up! You wonder if the com-i| ( » 
mentator saw, too. 

No matter how grimly apprehensive you 
were up to then, you burst into a smile, then 
try to see where in tarnation you are, with , iB 
that spotlight blinding you. You are walkings 
on artificial grass, and it's pretty precarious 
stuff. You never can tell where the real edges 
of the steps are. You keep telling yourself 
to watch your balance, hold your tummy in, 
your head up. your seat under, do something 
nice with your hands, smile, walk forward, 
pivot, and get the dickens away from there, 
because the stylist is snarling at you again. 

This happens three or four times. In a 
state of joyous prostration, you get back 
into your own comfortable clothes, and with 
your other nearly neurotic playmates, con-i 
sume quarts of coffee which has mercifully! 
been rolled in. First aid is administered to 
the stylist and to her first and second as- 
sistants. The third assistant prepares to leave 
for the country. 

That is live modeling. But then, maybe it 
was a photographic model you wanted to be? 
That has its pitfalls, too. 

The first is climate. Magazine photography 
and showcards are always done three to six 
months before publication date, so models are 
always being shot out of season . . . and 
in photography, it's legal. 

Imagine yourself cozily installed in a fur 
coat, beamed upon by a battery of scorching 
lights. Your face, the only part of you that is 
exposed, is packed with sticky, oily makeup. 
You are acrobatically entangled with a chair, 
a perch, or a property of some sort, and your 
strained muscles are faithfully holding you 
there while the master gets his angle. There 
is no ventilation because there are no win- 
dows. 

The time of the year? August. 

Or better yet. Envision yourself knee deep 
in a foaming surf, clad in a strapless bath- 
ing suit, or suitless bathing strap, or what- 
ever those things are that they are showing 
this season. The sun is streaming down . . . 
in Australia . . . but certainly not here. That's 
why photographers have flashbulbs and re- 
flectors. Someone has obligingly pushed the 
ice out of camera range. You are bidden to 
throw your arms up, smile, and run to the 
camera, looking as healthy as a laxative ad- 
vertisement. 

The time of the year? January. 

Oh yes, modeling is glamorous. A few for- 



THE CAL1FORNIAN, February, 1947 



unate girls wear fashions to some of the most 
leralded events. And sometimes whole cata- 
ogues are shot in the desert or at the sea- 
hore, with all expenses paid, plus salary, 
/acation spots often make folders, which offer 
nodels the same advantages. But these plums 
re the exception rather than the rule. 
A fabulous future? True, many girls are re- 
ruited from modeling for the stage or for 
>ictures. But just as many are recruited 
rom the ranks of secretaries, manicurists, 
oeds, and a dozen other occupations. 

Remember . . . charm is always welcome. 
\.nd a really lovely person has a way of mak- 
ng her presence felt. Graceful females are 
are. Most women do not move nicely. They 
umber, expand and contract, lope or creep, 
ather than walk. When they sit, they feel 
or a chair with their lower regions, then 
)lop into it all at once. They do strange 
hings with their legs. In front of a camera 
heir stance resembles melted wax. So they 
lsually wind up in a posture class, charm 
chool or modeling school, either before they 
ittempt a career or after they realized they 
vere getting nowhere by leaps and bounds. 

Charm and modeling schools range from 
completely ineffective to splendidlv efficient 
irganizations, and their prices fall over as 
arge a range. However, a good course is a 
iriceless investment. A future model or a fu- 
ure wife emerges with a workable concept of 
lody mechanics and figure control, and has 
earned some clothes-showing technique, a lit- 
le about makeup, a lot about grooming, a 
ew pointers in clothes, voice and diction, and 
he importance of facial expression. 

In line with physical fitness, she will have 
earned a routine of exercises that are dead 
ure to improve even the silhouette of a bale 
f hay. 
Then there is diet. Most girls are a little 
j lefty for modeling. Most girls are a little hefty 
myway, and the camera adds ten or fifteen 
lounds. This means that a bit of abstinence 
s indicated ... no bread, desserts, cocktails 
. nothing between meals. 
Oh well," you'll say, "a model is well paid 
or all the bother. Just a few hours every 
veek, and all those dollars for one little hour." 
True, but for every hour of work there are 
mdless hours of preparation, not counting 
ransportation to and from fairly inaccessible 
tudios. There are hours spent meeting and 
'isiting prospective employers and leaving pic- 
ures with them; hours spent at fittings and 
•ehearsals and on going out on interviews in 
vhich someone else is chosen for the job. 

Many models belong to one organization or 
another besides their agency. This means dues 
. . small ones, but still dues. The agency 
lee is a nice, healthy ten per cent. Makeup, 
loo, is expensive, and beauty salons and mas- 
seuses, while unnecessary for some are con- 
sidered important to others. 
I But keeping wardrobed is the big item . . . 
k model has to dress the part. Of course 
clothes are one of the good things of life, 
put a model finds herself purchasing many 
things she would not need in other walks 
pf life. Oftentimes they find that they are 
Working so that they can keep themselves in 
clothes so that they can work so that they can 
keep themselves in clothes! 
I But modeling has one great advantage. It 
|s, if nothing else, ego-satisfying. That's good. 
Modeling is ego-satisfying because people 
pre under the impression that models are more 
attractive than the average female. People are 
right. And if models never had confidence 
before, this gives it to them. It's gratifying to 
know that promoters buy your face and figure 
because it attracts more customers for their 
jproducts. 

You may find it a delightful way to spend 
la few years of your young life, and as they 
bay in twenty-five-word essay contests, fame 
and fortune may be yours. Really, the good 
things in life have to happen to someone, and 
they may as well happen to you! 
Me? I'm now writing. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1947 



SAN FERNANDO VALLEY 



(Continued from page 59) 

you look you see small new enterprises, usual- 
ly headed by a veteran. The Valley is be- 
coming the home of Mr. Average Califor- 
nian, and this entails the most furious build- 
ing program on record. In one month Van 
Nuys and North Hollywood together issued 
more building permits than San Francisco, 
Oakland, Detroit and St. Louis combined. 
Kaiser is erecting 5,000 pre-cut homes, com- 
pleted in five days; other big contractors 
are sending new houses up in mushroom lots 
wherever there is available land. 

The result is that towns are merging, the 
open spaces are filling up. Before war indus- 
tries brought an inrush of population, San 
Fernando Valley's 400 square miles provided 
more than ample room for the 20,000 residents. 
No census has been taken recently, but the 
percentage of population gain is several hun- 
dred. 

San Fernando Valley is long on community 
spirit. Many of the towns hold their annual 
fiestas, with male members of the citizenry 
vieing in the beard-raising department and 
female members bedecking themselves in Span- 
ish or Western garb ... all entering into the 
Old California holiday fun. 

The "mayor" situation is another instance 
of civic light-heartedness. Many of the Valley 
communities elect through democratic proce- 
dure and exhuberant horseplay "honorary 
mayors" from among the ranks of the more 
illustrious citizens . . . usually prominent 
actors and entertainers. Incumbents in the 
honorary division include Edward Everett 
Horton, Andy Devine and Bob Burns. Others 



who have held the mayoral rank in recent 
years include Ginny Simms, Abbott and Cos- 
tello, Rosalind Russell and Wendell Niles. 

This gaiety springs naturally from the kind 
of life we lead in the Valley. We have more 
space around our homes and around our lives. 
We live more informally, we're more relaxed. 
We probably travel farther to the market or 
the shops or the movies . . . but we don't 
need to leave the Valley to find even the 
most urban and sophisticated of merchandise 
and entertainment. 

Take furniture, for instance. Many people 
in the Valley are amateur decorators, and we 
have dozens of smart shops in which to track 
down rare upholstery, antiques, the best mod- 
ern. It's the same with apparel shops. . . . 

Or night clubs . . . we can take our pick 
of big-name entertainers at the Valley night 
spots. We can dine de luxe, even to such a 
touch of the epicurean as is found at Sports- 
men's Headquarters where you catch your own 
mountain trout and then dine upon it. And 
we can find amusing local color at such road- 
side spots as the Hangman's Tree Inn where 
they advertise "lousy food and warm beer." 

It's a pretty lively place, the San Fernando 
Valley . . . and we can run the gamut in 
satisfying our tastes, whims and fancies. Best 
of all, we don't rush ... we take time to 
enjoy it . . . city pleasures in the country 
air; country pleasures with city convenience. 
Just a few minutes from your office in the 
Big City. 

It's our home . . . and we love it. 




93 





hoop hoop hooray 



1 1 



JL t was San Francisco . . . 186-1 . . . when the ladies were wearing 
those voluminous hoop skirts which caused traffic jams, overcrowded 
the shops and made travel by public vehicle almost intolerable to the 
irate men. But ruiladv loved her "obnoxious hoops." and continued 
to wear them, despite persistent masculine criticism. 

One such young ladv. charmingly be-hooped. was taking an after- 
noon stroll . . . her little spaniel puppy trotted happily beside her. 
with no leash to hinder his various small explorations. But San 
Francisco was waging war on unattached canines, and the carefree 
spaniel soon was spotted by a roving dogcatcher who traveled on foot. 
well equipped with nets, ropes and a following of small boys. 

The dogcatcher whistled to the puppv who trotted awav from his 
mistress. And just as the net was about to fall, the young lady thought 
of a way to save her pet from a "fate worse than death." She called 
him and he trotted back. Quickly, she spoke softly, tipped her hoop 
skirt to one side and the little dog disappeared under it. Milady 
dropped her skirt . . . her eves . . . blushed furiously, and defied 
the law. 

By this time a small crowd had gathered. The angry dogcatcher 
pleaded and threatened ... in vain. The hoop skirt stood its ground. 
Boos of the crowd increased to such volume that the dogcatcher 
finally retreated, nets, ropes and all. Whereupon the voung lady 
retrieved the puppy from his hiding place, clasped him safely in her 
arms and fled for home with maidenly speed. 

The hoop skirt had won another round ! 



A TRUE STOKYBYM.Mt. < HAMBEBI.I.X 



What's New! 

• a glimpse 
at gadgets 

WITH PEGGY HIPPEE 

\J ot those February doldrums? Then here's 
the remedy . . . simple, cheap and promising 
lasting effects on your disposition and kitchen 
efficiency, too! Just head for your favorite 
gadget departments and join us in going wild 
over what's new. 

EVR-SHARP SLICER ... for slicing every- 
thing except your thumb. This R & L Mfg. 
& Sales Co. invention takes hours off prepara- 
tion of vegetables for salads, soups, canning 
works miracles with cheese, hard-cookei 
eggs, luncheon meats: reduces potatoes ti 
chip or shoestring proportions . . . and 
with the twist of the wrist. Versatile gadge 
consists of razor-sharp blade on solid met; 
platform which slides on the frame into eig 
different notches to give thicknesses desire' 
Definitely a must for every kitchen at les: 
than S1.00. 



PERFECT-SEAL refrigerator jars . . . provid- 
ing safe storage for all types of foods. Manu 
factured by Perfect Seal Inc., of Los Angeles 
these handy jars are equipped with rubbe 
suction tops which actually seal jars, thu! 
eliminating all refrigerator odors. Easy to use 
if you follow simple directions: sterilize jar 
and lid (boiling water cannot injure sue 
tion top). Place food to be sealed in jar, 
either hot or cold. Wet flat lip of jar, place 
lid squarely on it. Press lightly with palm of 
hand with slight circular motion. Perfect seal 
is now perfect. To open, merely insert du 
knife allowing air to enter jar. Both jar an( 
lid may be used time and again. Pints, three 
for $1.40: quarts, three for $1.50. 

SPOON HOLDER . . . convenient kitchen timtj 
saver that keeps cooking spoon where you 
want it ... on the pan, not slithering into 
hot gravies, cream sauces, etc. Manufactured 
by Forbes Specialty Co., Pasadena, this little 
household help is a wire spoon holder mounted 
on a metal contrivance that slides over th< 
lip of any cooking utensil. Thus, you cook, stir, 
replace the spoon in holder and go on about 
your business. So handy for long sessions 
over the hot stove . . . puts an end to th 
old hunt -for -the -spoon -and -mop-up-the-dri] 
technique. Less than 30 cents in housewares de- 
partments the country over. 

PLUGMASTER ... an electric cord tha 
works miracles. Has an automatic adjuster 
plug which accommodates itself to all widths 
and sizes of appliance terminals, fits most 
any appliance, too. Thus, you have one con 
for iron, coffee-maker, toaster, etc. A Farra- 
day invention, here's a time saver for sure 
for less than $1.50 in electric specialty shops 

SILYERCRAFT ... an instant silver cleane 
that revolutionizes your home polishing jobs 
Made by Allen & Schuck of Los Angeles, this 
compact kit provides you with the wherewith- 
all for quicker, safer (no hot alkaline solu- 
tions to dim luster), easier (no heating, no 
rubbing), cheaper (serves a lifetime) silve 
polishing . . . Explicit directions show how 
to get best results from this hand-processed 
alloy metal instant silver cleaner. A good buy 
at less than SI. 75. 

KLIPPER . . . the revolutionary clothespin 
that won't: snag sheer nylons, stain vour best 
white slip, or give way just in time to let 
your fresh-laundered bath-mat hit the dirt. 
A Carvenite invention. Klipper is plastic, clean 
and crystal clear (bright shades if you're 
feeling giddy). It's smooth as glass over all, 
has a powerful rustproof spring that hangs on 
for dear life. Look for it this month in your 
favorite department, variety or hardware store. 




AN ORIGINAL BY ADEIE SIMPSON 



Illusion . . . in a Verney* fabric of Ylarco* rayon 



v € r n £ y 



F A B R 



C S 



' E R N E Y FABRICS CORPORATION 



1412 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 1 



N. Y, 




fi/l/l 



ymmSL SW* Ml mlmL i^ SWW w 



Ponemah • A California Authentic 



DAYTON CO. • MINNEAPOLIS 
KERR'S • OKLAHOMA CITY 
BULLOCK'S WILSHIRE • LOS ANGEL 




PHOTOGRAPHED AT THE GRAND CANYON BY ENGSTEAD 



Addie Masters' Sundown slack-costume. California Authentics Apache War Dance borde*- print. 

Marimba crepe is woven with Enka Rayon. B. Altman & Co., New York; Neiman Marcus, Dallas; Bonwit Teller, Philadelphia; 

Carson Pirie Scott, Chicago • Enka Rayon, 206 Madison Aye., New York 16, N. Y. 






■ 



■ 



■ 



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1 






-- 






Photographed at a cedar-shadowed doorway at "Hidden Court," home of Henry Robinson, Cape Elizabeth, Maine. 



Caught on the rocks: shining Rainbow Trout, 
by Tina Leser in Bates mermaid cotton 




IN CHAMIKIN, TREND-SETTING TEXTURE BY BATES 

i 



Poised on the threshold of a 
fashion future . . . Chamikin, 
Bates-blended acetate rayon. 
Ted Shore carves it into a 
frosty dinner dress that takes 
a circlet of brilliants, sweeps 
softly to the hem, then curves 
back to show a shining sandal. 




80 WORTH ST., N. Y. 13 



















'TL 



« -+*iM 



ff*. 






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i 



Price 25 cents ,. v* 




IN SUN MAGIC COLORS 






8JSSO& "-": - /.-..- 



Colifornio-by-the-yord . . . exclusive at one fine store in most cities . . . 

at about five dollars the yard. Write for store name and folder showing patterns in full color. 

Hoffman California Woolens, Los Angeles 14, California. 




Look for styles by Stephanie Koret in 
"Vacation Days." a Monogram Picture 



In a whirling pattern of pleats, your Tango Dress combines softly shirred torso 
blouse with Perma-Pleeted* skirt, wearable together or with separates; of Jersanese** 

by Celanese, sizes 12 to 18, about $15. At fashion stores wherever you are. 
Lookin g down the panel — Concertina Encore skirt, about $7; with Bracelet blouse, about $8; 
with Beau-Knot blouse, about $6; with Beau-Tie blouse, about $6. Blouses of rayon Trico Jersey. 
KORET OF CALIFORNIA • 611 MISSION STREET • SAN FRANCISCO 5 




fft 




\\\ 



.**' 



Kay Christopher 

to be seen in the 

RKO-Radio Picture 

"The Locket" 



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&*£&* 



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** 




Youth personified! That's lovely Kay Christopher... or you. ..in this carefree and 
cool creation by^OVtlof California in Rossman Spun Rayon, sizes 9-15 
in Natural, Gray, Navy Blue with Multi-colored stripes. 



OF CALIFORNIA 

... of better stores everywhere 

Boston . . . . . . Jordan Marsh Co. 

Chicago .... Marshall Field & Co. 

Indianapolis L. S. Ayers & Co. 



lot Angeles Bullock's 

New York . . Oppenheim Collins & Co. 

Oakland H. C. Capwell Co. 

Son Francisco The Emporium 

THE CALIFORNIAN, March, 1947 




s* 



t-*< ! 



t 



JOHN ENGSTEAD 






LONG BEACH. CALIFORNIA 
MAIL ORDERS, YOUNG CALIFORNIAN SHOP • THIRD FLOOR 

THE CALIFORNIAN, March, 1947 



ifeWllvUfUl ...a dawn-Jo-dusk dress of guileful 
simplicity that shifts from teatime to sports mood with 
a change of accessories . . . knowing College or Career 
Girls and Young Marrieds choose it in several of the 
meltingly lovely colors — aqua, gold, sand, green, navy 
— as the mainstay of a versatile spring wardrobe. Sizes 
9 to 17, $14.95 



f 




H!\(iEll!LE 

as the weather 



719 South Los Angeles St. 
Los Angeles, California 




Viola Dimmitt's rain or shine coat 
keeps pace with the seasons 

These smart stores from Coast to Coast feature Viola Dimmitt's originals . . . 
J. W. ROBINSON, Los Angeles • HESS BROS., Allentown • H. P. WASSON, Indianapolis 

THE CALIFORNIAN, March, 1947 




Marjorie Montgomery designs are exclusive with <*T. EATON C?mitcd 

in Canada 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly, 210 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles 14, California. Subscription price: $3.00 for one year; 
Vol.3 $5.00 for two years; $7.50 for three. One dollar additional postage per year outside continental United States. 25 cents a copy. Entered 

N. 2 as second class matter January 25, 1946, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1879. Copyright 1947 

The Californian, Inc. Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, Morch, 1947 



MARCH 
1947 



I 




Eager-to-Swim Water Fashions 

Ever-so versatile Caltex play- 
togethers. Naturally eager-to-swim, 
the bra and shorts can star in a tennis 
match, cycle cross-country, brighten 
the boardwalk. The doll-waisted coat 
will continue its gay career over 
countless casuals and date dresses. 
Famous Celanese Prospector in 
Regatta colors . . . sail white, noon 
blue, trophy gold, mist grey, buoy 
black, sizes 10 to 20. 
Bra and shorts $11.95 .. . Coat $14.95 

CALTEX OF CALIFORNIA 

2126 BEVERLY BLVD., LOS ANGELES 4 




|»to^-- 





YOUR ENGAGEMENT . . . announce 
it with these smart tinkling bells . . . bright 
silver tied with white satin bows printed in 
any color with the names of the bride-to-be 
and fiance. Tie to cocktail glass or teacup 
handle and add sparkle and gayety to your 
announcement party. Order one for each 
guest, $1.00 each or $10.00 a dozen. John 
Beistel, Weddings and Parties, 745 N. La 
Cienega, Los Angeles. 

CALI-POLO ... a belt, California polo 
style, for your riding clothes, slacks, suits. 
California saddle leather in natural color 
with twin sterling silver hand-engraved 
buckles . . , and the width (about 3") does 
smooth things to your waistline. Priced at 
$7.95. For the name of the store in your 
vicinity, write Phil Sockett Mfg. Co., 1240 
S. Main, Los Angeles. Established in 1925. 

LOVELY FOR EASTER . . orchids of 

unbelievable life-like delicacy and pastel tones 
in feather-light Celanese Lumarith. A "must' 
for your Easter gift list is this beautiful an( 
treasured flower . . . for corsages or table 
decorations that live forever and a day. Ask 
for Coreen Originals at your nearest gift shop 
or order direct, $10.95, postpaid, from Hob 
son and Schultz Sales Co., 1151 S. Broad- 
way, Los Angeles. 

GAG PAIv . . . forty-eight two-color spicy, 
gag cocktail napkins, 14 king-size mirthmaking 
matchbooks, 20 amusing coasters ... all 
different, and artistically packaged. $2.50 at 
gift and department stores, including Berg- 
dorf Goodman, New York City; Thalhimer 
Brothers, Inc., Richmond; Marshall Field & 
Co., Chicago; Chas. Brown & Sons, San Fran- 
cisco. Created by Monogram Co. of Cali- 
fornia, 1244 Larkin St., San Francisco. 

MILLINERY MODERN . . . this hat 

made entirely of Lucite is a "stopper" as well 
as a topper . . . for Easter you'll head the 
parade with this novel Jenne Creation in 
black and white, gold and white, red and 
white. Pleated ruffle simulates starched lace 
with three little tailored bows on a shiny 
black satin ribbon. Price is $12.95, postpaid, 
from House of Plastics, 3339 E St., San Ber- 
nardino, Calif. 



THE CAtlFORNIAN, March, 1947 




SHOULDER LOOPS ... in gold or 

silver, patterned after those worn by military 
aides. Double strand loop hangs 'most to your 
waist and the four chains spreading from 
the pin at your shoulder give a striking 
"epaulet" effect. Wear it on your smart tai- 
loreds or basic dresses. Top rank in modern 
costume jewelry. About $5.00. For the name 
of the store nearest you, write Biltmore Ac- 
cessories, 846 S. Broadway, Los Angeles. 

CO-ED ... a Starlet of Hollywood crea- 
tion ... a perfect campus all-year belt 
. . . two-tone contrasting shades to match 
your alma mater's colors ... set off with 
massive gold loops and buckle. A novel belt, 
true, but uniquely practical, too. About $5.95 
at leading stores throughout the U.S. For 
the store nearest you, write New Star Belt 
Mfg. Co., 407 E. Pico, Los Angeles. 

BELINDA PINK EARS ... the bunny 
who writes letters to children. An Easter or 
birthday gift to delight youngsters from two 
to ten years old ... a letter a week and a toy 
surprise! Put your little friends' names on 
Belinda's list and a gift card listing sender's 
name goes with first letter. Eight letters, 
$1.95; sixteen letters, $3.75. Send order and 
check to Tiny-Tot Gifts, Dept. 2, 1834 W. 
llth Place, Los Angeles. 

COPPER REPLICA . . . a diminutive 
of grandmother's old-fashioned wash boiler 
. . . every detail authentic, including little 
wooden handles. Honest-to-goodness solid cop- 
per . . . planted with your favorite greenery 
does wonders as a decorative for the mantel 
or focal point of your room. It's exactly 6V2" 
long and 3Y 2 " high, and exactly $7, by mail, 
from Savage-California, 2115 S. San Pedro, 
Los Angeles. 

BABY'S FIRST EASTER ... a gift 

suggestion far doting grandparents ... an 
adorable, exquisitely hand-made, silk taffeta 
infant's coat and bonnet . . . lace trimmed 
. . . darling little hand-painted rosebuds and 
satin bows . . . fine flannel lining for warmth. 
Blue for boy babies, pink for baby girls, or 
pure white. The set, $14.95, postage paid. 
When ordering, indicate color choice. Binnie 
Barnes' Tot-of-the-Town, 13503 Ventnra Blvd., 
Sherman Oaks, Calif. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, March, 1947 









Eager-to-Swim Water Fashions 

Another of the famous Caltex 
modern classics in our own 
"Sunfoam" . . . wonderful 
two-way-stretch water fabric 
developed by Caltex to mold 

your figure, yet give with every 
motion. It deftly blends "Botany" 
Brand worsted and Lastex. 
Inviting sun shades . . . foam white, 
sea aqua, shore pink, sunny yellow. 
Sizes 10 to 20... $12.95 



CALTEX OF CALIFORNIA 

2126 BEVERLY BLVD., LOS ANGELES 4 



/^^p^gTN 




...where the smartest 
Angelenos get together 
for our famous luncheons 
and dinners . . . 
on Beverly Hills' 
"Restaurant Row" 




Palo Alto, California 

Country Dinner in 
authentic Victorian 

surroundings 
Browse through our 
shops of yesteryear 
El Camino Real 
two miles south 
Jt \ of Stanford 
N*$4 '.f University 




Cricket 
On obe 
Meartb 



CONTINENTAL FAVORITES 

for your discerning taste 

From 11 A. M. Till the Wee Hours 

806 N. LA CIENEGA BLVD. 
HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 



THE CALIFORNIAN presents for your convenient* 
a current directory of thi finest restaurants in San 
Francisco and Los Angeles cultural events of interest 
and activities that make 'iving in California or a 
visit to our state the mjst enjoyable for you and 
your family. Fine foods of many kinds are avail- 
able, and vjhenever possible specialties of the house 
are listed, names of the mattres d' hotel and days 
the establishments are open. Have a good time! 

THE RESTAURANTS 

IN SAN FRANCISCO 

PALACE HOTEL— Market and New Montgomery 
Sts. World-famous Garden Court serving lunch, tea, 
and dinner. Leonard Auletti and his concert or- 
chestra. Ask for Joseph, maitre d'. Also Rose Room, 
open nightly except Monday, with Henry Busse's 
dance band. Changes March 20 to Jean Sablon and 
Eddy Oliver's orchestra. Cover $1 weekdays, $1.50 
Saturdays. Adolph. 

CATHAY HOUSE— 718 California St. In the heart 
of Chinatown, lunch 12 to 2, dinner S to 10, Sun- 
day dinner only. Pleasantly redecorated. Lunch 90c 
and $1.10, dinner $1.75 and $2. Ernest Tsang. Au- 
thentic Chinese food only, featuring Hung Ngon Gat 
Chovi Mein. 

OMAR KHAYYAM— 196 O'Farrell St. Dinner only, 
4 to 12, Sunday 2 to 12, $2.25 up. Bert Rustigian. 
Armenian Shish Kabab, Tchakhokhbelli and Kouzou 
Kzartma are specialties. 

ST. FRANCIS HOTEL— Powell and Geary. Mural 
Room open dally for lunch and dinner, with dancing 
from 8 :30 p.m. except Monday, and tea dancing 
Saturdays from 4- to 5:30. Hal Pruden's band. A 
la carte. Ernest. Order almost anything. 

LONGBARN— On El Camino Real, 2 miles south of 
Stanford University. Open for dinner only. Closed 
Thursdays. Ask for Willy or Eddy. Dinners $2.50 to 
$4. Plan to eat here when you visit the peninsula. 
Country farmhouse style with women chefs. 

RESTAURANTE LOMBARD— 1906 Van Ness Ave. 
Dinner only, from $2.50, or a la carte. Bill Lombard 
specializes in steaks and real thick roast beef. 

EL PRADO— Post and Stockton, in the Plaza Hotel. 

Lunch 11-2, dinner 6-9, closed Sundays and holidays. 
Walter is maitre d\ Service London style, with every- 
thing rolled in on a serving table. Chef Maurice 
specializes in French cuisine. Roast beef best item. 

STAR LITE ROOM, Hotel Sir Francis Drake— Sutter 
and Powell. Lunch only from 12 to 2, buffet style, 
for $1.50. Includes hot dishes. Al Field, host. You 
dine 22 floors up with a spectacular view from every 
table. 

HIGH BONNET— 20 p'Farrell. Closed Sundays. Din- 
ner from $2, which includes Smorgasbord. Ask for 
Henri. American cooking with French finesse. 

TONGA ROOM— In the Fairmont Hotel on Nob 
Hill, California and Mason Sts. Open 4:30 p.m. to 
1 ;3Q a.m. daily. Hawaiian band plays on a raft 
moving slowly up and down a swimming pool, with 
the^ dining tables surrounding. Dinners $3.50, Hi- 
waiian Ham and Eggs at $1.50, or a la carte. 
Henry Degorog, host. Specialties are Gold Braid 
Duck and Fresh Haicaiian Pineapple stuffed <with 
Ice Cream. 

TARANTINO'S— 206 Jefferson St. Open 11 a.m. to 



J $p0RT5m£riS 10D6E i 



SUNSET 1-8608 
SUNSET 2-9326 



* EXCELLENT CUISINE '^ 

COCKTAILS 

12833 VENTURA BOULEVARD 
AT COLOWATER CANYON 



HOUSE OF MURPHY 



for gourmets only 




Fine food in an atmosphere 
of convivial friendliness! 



Where La Cienega Crosses Fourth 

CR 5-0191 
BR 2-3432 



-^ Dinner At 

I ^^. nS el Strip 
-TTter*^^ Path- 
Mee" v* 

World's Finest Cuisine 
By Henri, creator of Crepes Suzette. 
• 
CocktatU 
EQVESTRIAN ROOM 
Ken Clarke's Sophhtl rated piano 

9236 Sunset Boulevard 
BRadshaw 2-2030 CRestview 5-9610 




U. S. CHOICE EASTMN 
STEAKS and CHOPS 



fc 



(fa&tCUUvH THE TAVERN Ml jl* 



345 No. la Ci.n.ga Blvd. 



C«.ilvi.w 5-9417 



^5 



THE CAM FORN I AN, March, 1947 



GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 



11 p.m. Dinners $2.50 and a la carte. Dan Sweeney, 
Jr. and Jack Adams. Seafood, steaks and chops. Food 
not outstanding, but try it because it's on Fisher- 
man's Wharf, looking directly down at the docked 
fishing fleet and overlooking Golden Gate bridge and 
the Marin hills. 

PARIS — 242 O'Farrell St. Lunch and dinner daily, 
but no lunch on Sunday. Dinner $1.50. Typical old 
San Francisco family-style French cuisine in plain 
surroundings. Lots of crusty French bread and de- 
licious soup. Excellent cooking. 

BLUE FOX — 659 Merchant St. Dinners only,, closed 
Mondays. Ask for Mario or Frank. Dinners from 
$2, French and Italian style. Frog Legs Doree, Bone- 
less Squab, Chicken stuffed with <wild rice, Rex Sole 
Marguerite. In an alley, not bright and shiny, but 
they know how to cook. The natives eat here. 

BERNSTEIN'S GROTTO— 123 Powell. Open daily 
for lunch and dinner. Lunch from 65c, dinner from 
$1.30. Exclusively sea food and good. Lobster Prin- 
cess, Deviled Crab in Shell, Eastern Oysters on Half 
Shell, Fried Prawns and Abalone served in rooms 
built like a ship's interior. 

CLIFF HOUSE — Point Lobos Avenue, overlooking 
Seal Rocks. Dinners daily from $1.50. Seafood, 
Steaks, Chicken and Roasts. Eat while looking 
through the oversize plateglass windows at the 
ocean, Seal Rocks and Golden Gate strait. 



IN LOS ANGELES 



AMBASSADOR— 3400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. 
World-famous Cocoanut Grove open every night ex- 
cept Monday. Saturday afternoon tea dancing. Freddy 
Martin's Orchestra. Dinners from $3.25. Cover $1, 
Saturday $1,50. Rouben. Also French Room from noon 
ti 1 nine and Coffee Shop from 7 a.m. to midnight. 
Popular prices. 

AKMSTRONG SCHROEDER— 9765 Wilshire Blvd., 
Beverly Hills. Good family-type cusine. Reasonable 
I prices, with Pete Schroeder to greet you. 

I BAR OF MUSIC— 7351 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Excellent double-piano on a stage back of the bar. 
Food Good small band. Two-dollar minimum on 
Saturday and Sunday. 

DON THE BEACHCOMBER— 1727 North McCadden 
Place, Hollywood. Fried Shrimp, Rumaki, Barbecued 
Spareribs, Mandarin Duck, Chicken Almond and 
known as originator of the Zombie. Dinners from $3. 
Usually crowded, but good tourist spot. 

BEVERLY HILLS HOTEL— 9641 Sunset Blvd., Bev- 
erly Hills. Palm Room open Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday nights with dancing. Thursday buffet, $3.75. 
Dinner a la carte from $1.75. Good food and you 
might see a movie star. 

II BEVERLY - WILSHIRE HOTEL— 9415 Wilshire 
b Blvd., Beverly Hills. Tasty food in Copa d'Oro and 
t\ Terrace Room, with medium prices. 

' IBIITMORE BOWL— 515 South Olive St., Los An- 
il geles. Best place downtown for good food and good 
II music, with Rum Morgan playing. Two-dollar din- 
. ners, nominal cover charge and two floor shows. Nice 
II for tourists. Closed Monday. 

, BOB DALTON'S— 1056 South La Cienega Blvd., Los 
| [ Angeles. On famous "Restaurant Row," with steaks 
| j the specialty. Reasonable prices. Closed Monday. 

' | BROWN DERBY— Four of 'em! 9537 Wilshire Blvd., 
j Beverly Hills, where you may see celebrities ; 1628 
j North Vine Street, Hollywood, where you can catch 
many an autograph at lunch; 3377 Wilshire Blvd., 
Los Angeles, where vou can dine in "The Hat" 
with tourists; and 4500 Los Feliz Blvd., Los An- 
geles, where you can eat in your car. Food varies 
from good to excellent. Prices medium to high. 

BIT O' SWEDEN— 9051 Sunset Blvd , Los Angeles. 
On the famous "Strip." Good food, reasonable prices, 
sometimes smorgasbord. Fine for tourists 

BUBLICHKI— 8846 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. A 
bit of Russia on the Strip. Cutlet a la Kirff, Filet 
Mignon a la Stroganoff, Caucasian Shashlik, Rus- 
sian Blini. Dinners from $3. Hust, Wally; hostess, 
Jasmina. Good music and romantical Closed Tuesday. 

CASA LA GOLONDR1NA— 3S Olvera St., Los An- 
geles, "the first brick house in the citv." Historic 
Mexican cafe. Arroz con P;llo Enchiladas, Taroi. 





THE CAL1FORNIAN, March, 1947 




CvW 



V^c^SvyOW 




Contour Styling . . . Dan 
Gertsman's magic way with 
skirts, that makes them 
really fit! You'll want them 
in fresh white and cool pas- 
tels like these. Skirt on the 
left is Botany Brand's wool 
gabardine, the others are 
wool flannel. About S10 
and SI 3. Write for name of 
nearest store. 



722 SOUTH LOS ANGELES STREET. LOS ANGELES M.CALIFORNIA 







With spongy crepe 
rubber soles! 
Smooth elk leather 
in Shasta White, 
Sequoia Red, Mis- 
sion Brown. About 
$7. Write for name 
of nearest store. 



DAVID FRANK'S OF CALIFORNIA INC., 600 e. 12th st., los angeles 15, California 



GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

(Continued from page 9) 

Dinners frosi $2. Alfredo. Closed Sunday. 

CHAROUCHKA— 8524- Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Another bit of Russia on the Strip. Marrrma and 
Papa, "your hosts," excel with atmosphere, food 
and soothing music. You'll meet Tommy, too. Closed 
Monday, and prices fairly high. 

CHASEN'S— 9339 Beverly Blvd., Beverly Hills. One 
of the best in the West. Excellent cuisine and plenty 
of celebrities. Expensive. Closed Monday. 

CIRO'S — 8344 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. On the 
Strip and luxurious, with name bands for dancing. 
Expensive. Celebrities, sometimes. 

COCK »N' BULL— 9170 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Fine English food served in chafing dishes on a 
Hunt Breakfast table. Cornish Pastry, Shepherd's Pie, 
India Curry, Steak and Kidney Pudding. Lunch, 
$1.50; dinner, $3. Alma Lloyd. Open from noon, 
5:30 on Sunday. Good for the discriminating. 

CRICKET ON THE HEARTH— 106 North La 
Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. New, attractive and 
excellent English food. Blintzes, too ! Old English 
Bubble and Squeak, Hungarian Beef Paprikas/:. A la 
carte, reasonable. Go. 

GOURMET— 6530 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. Broiled 
Steaks, Roast Turkey, Deep Dish Apple Pie. Dinners 
from $1. Frederick Werder. Lunch, 11:30-2:30; 
dinner, 5-8. Closed Monday. 

HENRI'S — 9236 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. Excellent 
French food served in the grand manner. A la carte 
and expensive, but for the discriminating. 

HOUSE OF MURPHY La Cienega "Restaurant 

Row" at Fourth Street, Los Angeles. Madame Gegue's 
Chicken Creole, Hamburger and Onion Rings, Million 
Dollar Hash. Your host, Bob Murphy. Wonderful 
Salads, Beautiful Steaks. A la carte, medium prices. 
Open every day. 

KNOTT'S BERRY FARM— Buena Park. An hour's 
drive from Los Angeles, but a tourist's dream 
reported in Reader's Digest. Good chicken and ham 
and hot biscuits. Reasonable prices. Gift shop. 

LA RUE— 8633 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, on the 
Strip. Tops in food and decor. Crepes Louise, Crepes 
a la Peine, Lasagne Pasticciate, Beef Bourguignonne. 
From noon till 3 for lunch except Sunday. From 6 to 
11 p.m. for dinner. Closed Monday. Felix Cigolini. 
A la carte entrees from $2.25. 

PERINO'S— 3027 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. In 
the heart of the smart shopping area. Excellent food. 
A favorite luncheon rendezvous for society. 

READY ROOM— Johnny Wilson's popular ren- 
dezvous for the younger set. Big fireplace, deli- 
cious steaks, informal atmosphere. At 365 No. La 
Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles, on Restaurant Row. 

ROMANOFF'S— 326 No. Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills. 
Prince Mike caters to movie stars, writers and pro- 
ducers. Expensive. 

SARNEZ— 170 No. La Cienega Blvd., Beverly Hills. 
Lew Sailee and Harry Ringland have an attractive 
place, with good food and good music, reasonably 
priced. 

SOMERSET HOUSE— On Restaurant Row in Bev- 
erly Hills. Fine steaks, a la carte dinners, nice 
atmosphere and expensive. 

SPORTSMAN'S LODGE— 12813 Ventura Blvd., 
North Hollywood. An epicurean delight in San Fer- 
nando Valley. Broiled Lobster, Chicken Saute a Sec, 
Charcoal-broiled Steaks in a gorgeous setting. One of 
the finest restaurants in California. Jack Spiros. From 
5 :30 p.m. Closed Monday. 

SUNSET HOUSE— 5539 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Steaks, Seafood, Salad Bowl. Dinners from $1.50. 
S. F. Brown. Every day from five. 

TAIL O* THE COCK — 1-77 So. La Cienega Blvd., 
Los Angeles, on Restaurant Row. Mac McHenry pro- 
vides excellent food, good companions and a pleasing 
atmosphere. Hamburger Diable and Fried Shrimp are 
specialties. You'll want to go again and again, and 
it's reasonably priced. 

TOWN HOUSE— 2965 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angles, 
overlooking Lafayette Park. Three smart cafes to 
serve you . . . Garden Room, Cape Cod Grill 
and the Zebra Room. No cover or minimum for 
dancing in Zebra and Garden Room. Excellent food 
and a good spot for the tourist. 

VAGABOND HOUSE— 2505 Wilshire Blvd., in the 
heart of smart Los Angeles. New and with the Don 
Blanding touch. Curries their specialty. Dinners from 
4 on. George. Prices medium. Open every day. 




Big bows are scoop inter' 
on cotton plaid by Louella 
Ballerino. Bodice is slim, skirt 
gathers to fullness. 

• Black with green, blue or 
peach. 10 to 16. 17.95 

bomb buX 

12668 VENTURA BLVD. (San Fernando Valley) 
319 N. BEVERLY DRIVE ! -VERLY HILLS).- 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

VILLA NOVA— 9015 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. A 
charming old world atmosphere on the Strip. Good 
Italian food and good service. 

THE THEATRE 

PLAYS 

BILTMORE — New York stage hit, "Anna Lucast-a," 
ends March 18. "Blackstone, the Magician" from 
March 19 to April 5. Every night at 8:30; matinees 



March 19 to April 5. Every ni 
Wednesday, Saturday at 2:30. 



PASADENA COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE— "Stairs 
io the Roof" ends March 9 ; "The Hasty Heart" 
from Mar. 12-23; and "State of the Union," Mar. 
26-April 6. Curtain at 8:15; prices 76c to $2. 

LAS PALMAS THEATRE OF ACTORS' LAB— 
Sean O'Casey's "Juno and the Paycock," directed by 
Whkford Kane. 

MUSICALS 

THEATRE MART— Continually playing "The Drunk- 
ard" every night at 8. Famous old-time melodrama 
with beer and pretzels. Wonderful tourist enter- 
tainment and good for the entire family. 

EL CAPITAN— Ken Murray's "Blackouts of 1947,''' 
starring Marie Wilson and Ken, every night at 
8:30, with plenty of matinees. Variety entertain- 
ment that will please. Good for tourists. 

EARL CARROLL'S THEATRE RESTAURANT— 
In Hollywood for the tourist. "The Vanities" in a 
new show, each night with two different perform- 
ances at 9:15 and midnight. Girls. Girls. Three- 
thirty with dinner, $1.65 without. 

VARIETY 

TURNABOUT THEATRE— The Yale Puppeteers, 
Elsa Lanchester and Lotte Goslar in good enter- 
tainment. Mar. 2-8 "Gullible's Travels" and "South- 
ern Exposure;" Mar. 9-15 "Mr. Noah" and "About 
Face;" Mar. 16-22 "Caesar Julius" and "Vice 
Versa;" Mar. 23-29 "Tom and Jerry" and "Turn- 
about Time." 

ELEANOR ROOSEVELT— Modern Forum presents 
the former first lady Mar. 17 at Shrine Auditorium, 
8 p.m. Prices 90 cents to $3.60. 

TRUDI SCHOOP— Famous comic dancer at Phil- 
harmonic Auditorium Mar. 5-6 at 8:30. 

PAUL DRAPER AND LARRY ADLER— Dance and 
harmonica duo Mar. 26 and Mar. 29 at Philharmonic 
Auditorium. 

GRAND OLD OPRY— Mar. 29 at Shrine Audi- 
torium at 8 p.m. $1-1.50. Family entertainment. 

CONCERT 

JUSSI BIOERLING — Metropolitan Opera Company 
tenor at Philharmonic Mar. 3 at 8 :30. 

PERCY GRAINGER — Concert pianist-composer at 
Philharmonic Mar. 7 at 8:30. 

BLANCI I E TH EBOM — Metropolitan mezzo-soprano 
at Philharmonic Mar. 11 at 8:30. 

PAUL ROBESON— Popular bass-baritone at Philhar- 
monic Mar. 15 at 8:30. 

TRAPP FAMILY— Singers at Philharmonic Mar. 23 
at 8:30. 

THOMAS L. THOMAS — Noted radio baritone at 
Philharmonic Mar. 25 at 8:30. 

PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA IN LOS AN- 
GELES — Mar. 6-7 Charles Muench, Director of 
Paris Conservatoire Orchestra, will conduct. Gilles 
Guilbert, piano soloist. Mar. 13-14 Raya Garbousova, 
woman cellist, will be soloist. Alfred Wallenstein, con- 
ducting. Mar. 27-28 Malcuzynski, Polish pianist, so- 
loist. Wallenstein conducting. 

PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA TOURING CALI- 
FORNIA — Mar. 2 in Long Beach, with Wallenstein 
conducting; Mar. 9 in Claremont, Charles Muench, 
conductor, Gilles Guilbert, piano soloist; Mar. 16 in 
Whittier, Raya Garbousova, cello soloist ; Mar. 1 8 
in Santa Barbara ; Mar. 20 in San Jose ; Mar. 21 
maiinee in San Francisco; Mar. 22 morning ma inee 
in San Francisco "Symphonies for Youth;" Mar. 22 

(Continued on page 12) 



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HOLLYWOOD 38, CALIFORNIA ( 




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MARILYN BUFERD 




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*"Everglaze"is a trade-mark which signifies the 
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THE CAUFORNIAN, March, 1947 



11 



On Record 



wi 



th f 



ranees anaerson 



nd« 



JVfl. arch is a rich month for record collec- 
tors, whatever your tastes may be. And all 
this pillar can hope to do is to cream the 
crop for you, listing a few of the best and 
most interesting. 

Speaking of connoisseurs . . . that's you 
. . . you might look into an idea that's 
fast developing in Hollywood, the Record-of- 
the-Month Club. It has a board of experts 
who choose the favored discs; started out 
picking the outstanding popular recording of 
the month to send to its members, and now 
has expanded to include classical and folk 
music. Operating much like book clubs and 
based on the same principle, it saves time 
in ferreting out worthy new waxings. So, 
for your consideration, here are some of the 
best of the newies: 
CLASSICAL MUSIC 

Symphony No. 4 in b-flat, Op. 60 by Lud- 
wig van Beethoven. One of the romantic mas- 
ter's least heard and least recorded sym- 
phonies, given an exhilarating and sweeping 
performance by Sir Thomas Beecham and 
the London Philharmonic Orchestra. This is 
a happy work, worth owning. Victor. 

Symphony No. 41 ("Jupiter") by Mozart. 
A completely satisfying symphony, serene and 
exultant, beautifully executed by Toscanini 
and the NBC Symphony. Mechanically one of 
the best recent releases. Victor. 
DEFIES CLASSIFICATION 

"Hexapoda: Five Studies in Jitteroptera," 
by Robert Russell Bennett, played by Jascha 
Heifetz and his magic violin. Hilarious satire 
on modern jive, serious music, low-down gut- 
bucket . . . you decide. Whatever it is, it's 
thoroughly amusing, fiendishly difficult music 
played by the master virtuoso. Decca. 

SHOW MUSIC: "Finian's Rainbow," new 
Broadway musical hit, yields an album of 



Kurt Weill music covering the field from lyric 
nostalgia for the Emerald Isle to some fine 
rhythm numbers. Several hits in this book 
("Old Devil Moon," "If This Isn't Love") also 
have been done by Charlie Spivak. Good 
soloists and the Deep River Boys. Victor. 
POPULAR MUSIC 

"New 52nd Street Jazz," a wonderful album 
of the best hot jazz, indispensable for those 
who take their modern jazz seriously. Top- 
notch instrumentalists led by Dizzy Gillespie 
and Coleman Hawkins include such stars as 
Don Byas, J. C. Heard, Charlie Shavers, 
Jimmy Jones . . . well, they're all terrific. 
The numbers are all fresh and new, all out- 
standing. Victor. 

"Misirlou" and "Far Away Island," the for- 
mer an imaginative new rendition of a popu- 
lar Latin American tune, the latter a bit 
dreamy . . . both highlighted by the piano 
work of Skitch Henderson and by his or- 
chestra. Capitol. "Blues at Sunrise," sad, sad 
song well sung by "Ivory" Joe Hunter with 
Johnny Moore's Three Blazers, with "You 
Taught Me To Love" on the reverse. Pretty 
subtle stuff, quiet and haunting. Exclusive. 

"What Am I Gonna Do About You?" and 
"Beware My Heart" provide a pair of goodies 
for Margaret Whiting. Both tunes from the 
picture "Carnegie Hall," both well designed 
for the Whiting nuances. Capitol. "Baker's 
Dozen" and "Be Fair With Me" are better- 
than-routine solid stuff by Buddy Baker and 
his orchestra with a good vocal on the latter 
by Emma Lou Welch. Exclusive. 

PERRY PALPITATES 

"I Gotta Gal I Love" is a rollicking vehicle 
for Perry Como and he more than does it 
justice. More enduring than some of his soul- 
ful numbers. Good backing on "What Am 
I Gonna Do About You?" Victor. 



GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 






WESTERN ALL -SPORT SHIRT 

. . . Happy is the man with this 
new freedom-cut, comfort-tested 
sport shirt. Present it to him in 
gabardine or poplin in beige, cream, 
blue, red, or green, 7.95 & 8.95 



At Better Stores, or Write 

I 

ROY 

OF CALIFORNIA 



783 Mission Street, San Francisco, California 






GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

(Continued from page 11) 

evening performance in San Francisco; Mar. 23 in 
Sacramento; Mar. 30 in Claremont, with Lee Pattison, 
piano soloist; and Mar. 31 in Santa Monica. 

SYMPHONIES FOR YOUTH— Los Angeles Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra each Saturday 10:30 a.m. until 
April 12. 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA— 
Mar. 20-21 at Los Angeles Philharmonic with Pierre 
Monteux conducting. 

OPERA 

SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY— Mar. 1 last two 
performances. Matinee "Madame Butterfly ; " eve- 
ning "Carmen." 

SPORTS 

ICE HOCKEY— At Pan Pacific Auditorium, 8 p.m. 
Mar. 1 Los Angeles vs San Diego ; Mar. 5 Los 
Angeles vs Oakland ; Mar. 7 Los Angeles vs San 
Francisco ; Mar. 8 Hollywood vs San Diego. 

HORSE RACING — At Santa Anita: Tuesdays through 
Saturdays at 1 p.m. Mar. 1 Santa Anita Handi- 
cap . . . classic of the year . . . $100,000 added, 
for 3-year-olds and up; Mar. 8 Santa Anita Derby, 
$100,000 added, for 3-year-olds. A natural fore- 
runner for the Kentucky Derby. 

BOWLING — National Bowling Congress begins 
tournament play Mar. 27 at National Guard Armory 
in Exposition Park. 

BOXING^ — Every Friday night at 8:30 at Holly- 
wood Legion Stadium ; exery Tueaday night at 
S:30 at downtown Olympic Stadium. 

WRESTLING — Every Monday night at Holtywood 
Legion Stadium ; every Wednesday night at down- 
town Olympic Auditorium. 

POLO — Regular match games every Sunday at 2 at 
Riviera Country Club Polo Field, off Sunset Blvd. 
on the way to the beach. 

BASEBALL — Daily exhibition games from Mar. 7 
to 30 in San Francisco, Sao Diego, Bakersfield, 
Ho'lywood, Los Angeles, Riverside, Anaheim, Fuller- 
ton and San Bernardino. Teams represented: Pacific 
Coast Clubs and Chicago Cubs, Chicago White Sox, 
New York Giants and Cleveland Indians. See your 
California daily paper for playing fields and time. 

OF SPECIAL INTEREST 

ACADEMY AWARDS PRESENTATION— Mar. 13 
at Shrine Auditorium. Balcony open to public 8 p.m., 
tickets $3.60-$4.80. Movie stars galore! 

WISTERIA FETE— In Sierra Madre, near Pasa- 
dena, in early March. Festival and queen crown- 
ing under 40,000-foot spread of vine planted in 
1893. Beautiful. 

CAMELLIA FESTIVAL— In Temple City, near Los 
Angeles, about March 8. 

DESERT CAVALCADE— In Calexico on Mexican 

Border Mar. 13-14-1 5. Big celebration and pageant 
commemorating ride of San Juan Bautista de Anza in 

1774. 

NATIONAL ORANGE SHOW— In San Bernardino 

Mar. 13-23. Thirty-second annual presentation in- 
volving agriculture, dancing, movie starSj orange 
packing, flowers, 4-H and government exhibits and 
the midway. 

SPRING FLOWER SHOW— At Fannie E. Morrison 
Horticultural Center in Pasadena's Brookside Park 
Mar. 13-16. Roses and daffodils and $2457 in prize 
money. 

GARDEN TOURS-^Girl Scouts in Pasadena sponsor 
tours through beautiful gardens. Beginning Mar. 14 
and each Friday thereafter until May 3 1 , the fa- 
mous Santa Barbara gardens will be open for tours, 
leaving Recreation Center, 100 E. Carrillo St., at 
2 p.m. 

CYMBIDIUM SHOW— Santa Barbara's second an- 
nual Cymbidium Orchid Show Mar. 27-30 in Na- 
tional Guard Armory. Gorgeous. 

PHILOSOPHY FORUM— At University of Southern 
California Mar. 4, 11 and 18. Contact Director of 
School of Philosophy. 



12 



THE CALIFORNIAN, March, 1947 




HP Ever" painted by Ben Stahl 



finest man-tailoring 

in America 

exclusive 

Crledhill split checks 

100 7° pure worsted 

Duchess acetate rayon 

lining 

marvelous colors 

39.95 at 

leading stores 
Rosenhlum, Los Angeles 



tailored in Lsalijornia 




REO. U. S. PAT. OFF. 



^Q!i'v 



i ■Jr* v 




>c? 




the patented, versatile, utterly wearable classic playsuit . . . with button-on top skirt . . . built for active sportswear ;l 
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Beg. U. S. Pat O: 





STORES EVERYWHERE, OR WHITE 



ffl. R fLEISCMIl COIHPflfiy 



50 VAN NESS AVENUE • SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIFORN) 



(Golden AnBiveisary Year} 




From fop fo bottom: 

San Jacinto, about $4.00. 
Caliente, about $5.00. 
Monterey, about $6.00. 



Genuine saddle leather belts— win kin', blinkin' with 
hand-crafted copper studs and buckle! Styled by Phil Sockett 

of California in lovely Palomino tan — a new spring color that 

takes beautifully to your navys, grays, whites and yellows. 
Designed with western ingenuity . . . with an exciting 

new fashion look that picks up any costume. 



:; :.l 1 



:..l~ ' 







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»*v 



J 



EXCLUSIVE AT THESE FINE STORES: 



Akron, Ohio Polsky's 

Boise, Idaho C. C. Anderson Co. 

Baltimore, Md O'Neill's 

Boston, Mass Jordan Marsh 

Boston, Mass Hovey's 

Butler, Pa. Troutman's 

Cincinnati, Ohio Rollman's 

Columbus, Ohio Morehouse-Martens 

Connellsville, Pa Troutman's 

Dallas, Texas Titche-Goettinger 



Everett, Wash Rumbaugh-Maclain 

Grand Rapids, Mich Herpolsheimer's 

Greensboro, N. C Meyer's 

Greensburg, Pa Troutman's 

Harrisburg, Pa Pomeroy's 

Jackson, Mich Field's 

Kansas City, Mo Peck's of Kansas City 

Lake Charles, La Muller's 

Latrobe, Pa Reed's 

Lebanon, Pa The Bon Ton 



Lynchburg, Va Guggenheimer's 

Maiden, Mass Joslin's 

Minneapolis, Minn Donaldson's 

New York City Gertz, Jamaica 

Paterson, N. J Quackenbush's 

Pontiac, Mich. Waite's 

Pottsville, Pa , Pomeroy's 

Reading, Pa Pomeroy's 

San Antonio Joske's of Texas 

Savannah, Ga B. H. Levy's 






THE CALIFORNIAN, March, 1947 



Seattle, Wash The Bon Marche 

Spokane, Wash Anderson's 

Springfield, Mo - Heer's 

St. Paul, Minn The Golden Rule 

Syracuse, N. Y Dey's 

Tacoma, Wash The Fisher Co. 

Tampa, Fla Maas Brothers 

Waterloo, Iowa Black's 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Pomeroy's 

Yakima, Wash Barnes -Woodirc, 



15 



GRkFFprl 

from 

laliio 



Wis?*-' 






%A 



■:/// 



m 



Yyto^Ev 



'■ ; 



SSy 




LONG LIVE VALUE! 

The man-tailored shirt that never heard of inflation . . . 

Expensive patternmaking, needlework and fabric 
at a modest tariff. Beautiful abstract print by Hess-Goldsmith 

— launders like a hankie. Pasadena Red, Palm 
Springs Green, Catalina Blue, Mojave Brown, Aqua. 32-40. 



FRANK & SEDER - PITTSBURGH THE PALACE- SPOKANE 

MORRISON'S - INDIANAPOLIS HINK'S - BERKELEY 

About $4 at Stores Above and Leading Stores Everywhere — Or Write: 



Graff 



MANUFACTURING CO. 

1240 S. MAIN, LOS ANGELES 15, CALIF. 



16 



THE CALIFORNIAN, March, 1947 



THE BON MAHCHE 

Seattle 11, Washington 

Name 

Address 

City 



Please send me_ 

Size Colo 

Charge \J Cash* Q C. O. D. □ 

♦ Registered mail if currency i- enclosed. 



Judy Juniors at 14.95. 

.Second Choice 




Soaltlc's own designer 

fancy with a new casual! 

... the detail, the long sleeves you love, 

the stripes at cross-purposes! Of Celanese*^ Westshire 

in sungold, lapis blue, bronco tan. 9-15. 14.95 

•Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



S2 

THE Bfll MARCHE . . . «,.,..■, ..„ 



Seattle shops • • 



THE CALIFORNIAN, March, 1947 



17 





EMILY WILKENS SETS THE STYLE 
Unbelievably bold stri]>es handled deftly, debonairly, 
with striking contrast — that's the sort of 
imaginative design you can expect from Emily^ ilkens. 
WALDES KOVER-ZIP SETS OFF THE STYLE 
And even the zipper becomes part of the design 
— because it's fabric-covered to blend discreetly or 
contrast smartly at fashion's whim, Look for it on 
the smartest styles — ask for it at notion counters now. 

WALDES KOVER-ZIP* ±3" 

WAI.DKS KOIILNOOK. IM:. LONG ISLAM) CITY 1, N.Y. 




you're a beauty 



and a more versatile beauty 



never trod the boardwalk! 



of course you're cut in fleecy, 



downy STROOCK at 49.95 




Junior sizes: nude, pink, aqua, red, green, blue, 
cockscomb, gold. Sizes 7 to 17 

Junior Haven, Third Floor 

Misses' sizes: nude, gold, palmetto green, pink, 

blue, red, kelly, black, navy, toast. Sizes 10 to 20 

Coat Department, Third Floor 



20 



THE CALIFORNIAN, March, 1947 



o* 






C*vJ 



cast 






Double emphasis on coor- 
dinates: Barney Max se- 
ries in Botany Brand fab- 
ric: jacket and skirt, in 
white or eggnog, about 
$40; brown or black-n- 
white checks, about $45 
. . . mix or match with 
slacks in white or eggnog, 
about $13; in checks, 
about $17. Celanese crepe 
blouse, about $10. Sizes 
10-20, The Broadway, Los 
Angeles; Carson Pirie 
Scott, Chicago; Jordan 
Marsh, Boston. "Bolero" 
shoes by llling of Califor- 
nia. Dorothy Gray's Trans- 
World makeup. An Earl 
Scott color photograph. 




iDITOR AND PUBLISHER. 
MCE PRESIDENT AND 
JVDVERTISING DIRECTOR- 
MANAGING EDITOR 

JASHION DIRECTOR 

Ut DIRECTOR 

jASHIONS 



|AERCHANDISING.. 

I00D STYLIST. 

i RODUCTION 






C_=> 



o=s 



J. R. Osherenko 

Herman Sonnabend 
Donald A. Carlson 
Sally Dickason Carolii 
Charles Gruen 
Diana Stokes 
Jacquelin Lary 
Peggy Hippee 
Serene Rosenberg 
Rosemary Seal 
Andree Golbin 
Morris Ovsey 
Bud Mozur 
Virginia Scallon 
Frances Anderson 
Loise Abrohamson 
Helen Evans Bros. ., 
Daniel Saxon 
Robert Farnham 



California fashions: 

Coordinated You 23 

Cut to the Pattern of Her Days 24 

Soft Lights for Nights 26 

Coordinates — Interchangeable 28 

Coordinates — Mixmatchable 30 

Accessories Plus 38 

Sum and Substance of the Hat 40 

Spring Calls for a New Suit 42 

Dressing by Design, by Florence Shuman 50 

Shining in the Rain 52 

What to Wear in California in March 53 

Men's Fashions in Color 60 

California features: 

And They Called it Oscar, by Virginia Teale 34 

California's Country Club of the Air 36 

"Look Pleasant, Please!" by Anne Anthony 44 

In California It's 48 

California beauty: 

Is Your Face Your Fortune? by Sharon Terrill 46 

California living: 

California Cooks, by Helen Evans Brown _ 54 

Divide and Multiply, by Virginia Scallon 56 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly, 210 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles 14, Cali- 
fornia, Michigan S571. New York Office, Saul Silverman, eastern advertising manager, 1450 
Broadway, LAckawanna 4-5659; San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph, 26 O'Farrell St., 
EXbrook 2704; Chicago Office, Nedom L. Angier, Jr.. Ill W. Jackson St. Subscription 
price: $3.00 one year, $5.00 two years, $7.50 three years. One dollar additional postage 
per year outside continental United States. 25 cents per copy. Entered as second class 
matter January 25, 1946, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of 
March 3, 1879. Copyright 1947 The California!!, Inc. Reproduction in whole or part 
forbidden unless specifically authorized. 




: y >;•..: .,¥:■■* %**■ 



;_:.: 




^ii\m VflOJUj (j^U7 with the 



'(1/ 



u(M 



big all-round luture... Carson s 25-inch box- 
tof)f>er sails straight through spring and summer, then heads, without a shiver, into fall. Calilornia-tailored 
of all-wool Venetian covert for you to wear with slacks, with suits, and with dresses — day and evening. 
Beige, kelly, red, white, bright navy. Sizes 10 to iS. 30.00 ■ women's moderately priced coats, fourth floor 



22 



THE CAIIFORNIAN, Mnrch, 194 71 



COORDINATED 
completely inte 
even in the wa. 












of saying that, ideally, you are a 
in your thinking, in the way you live, 
all adds up to . . . personality! 



I 



I ■■src- ■ I • ,>.;.* I 



YOU KNOW the kind of person you are or want to be . . . your clothes 
are cut to the pattern of your days, complimentary to you in line, 
in color, in type. You call this wardrobe coordination and divide it 
into three parts: 

easy-to-wear clothes, functionally right foi 
fashions picture-perfect "at home" or ir 
. . . clothes with multiple uses, versatili 



AND SO WE give you coordinated fashions ... seasonal spice for 
homebody or careerist, for city or country living. Here are fashions 
as individual as you yourself, and as changeable; fashions with 
definite color affinity that multiply two or three basic pieces into 
half a dozec ;fliix-matchable skirt-slacks-shorts-blouse- 

jacket Chan dramatically ) . . . spice, too, in accessories 

that inr rsatility of your basic dress. A multiplicity of 

Iriated way: to you, from California. 



coordinated you 



cut 




PHOTOGRAPHED By LA 



!! 



24 




THE LADY IS "AT HOME" . . . HER 



CLOTHES COORDINATED TO HER WAV OF LIFE, 



THE PICTURE-BACKGROUND OF HER OWN DOMAIN. 



LETT, A MORE-THAN-FUNCTIONAL 



SLACK ENSEMBLE WITH EASY LINES AND 



ORNAMENTAL QUALITY STARTS ANY DAY OFF 



RIGHT ... BY ROYAL OF CALIFORNIA, IN 



SHIRLEY STRUTTER CLOTH, SIZES 10-18; ABOUT 



the pattern of her days 



$30 AT THE BROADWAY, LOS ANGELES; HECHT 



CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. : NATHAN'S, GALVESTON. 




TO TOWN SHE GOES, ABOVE, PERFECTLY 



TAILORED IN A BREITMORE WORSTED TWILL 



SUIT WITH ITS IMPORTANT TWO-COLOR NOTE; 



SIZES 10-18, ABOUT $+0 AT KAUFMAN'S, 



PITTSBURGH; GIMBEL'S, PHILADELPHIA. 



LOWER LEFT, SHE'S A DECORATIVE 



HOSTESS, NOW, IN DEMOISELLE'S PURE SILK 



HESS-GOLDSMITH PRINT, SIZES S-16, ABOUT $55 



AT BONWIT TELLER, PHILADELPHIA; 



HECHT CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



25 



I 




soft 



m 



in 





lights for nights 




WISE THE WOMAN WHO KEYS HER 
WARDROBE TO HER HOME, 
WHERE SHE'S SURE TO BE 
COMPLIMENTED BY COLORS SHE LOVES. 

mmm left, zagri'S sophisticated, 

UNFETTERED BASQUE GOWN PLAYS UP, 
ANIMATION REFLECTED IN ITS 
FLOWERED PRINT, SUBTLE HAREM 
PEPLUM; A COVER-UP JACKET FOR LESS 
FORMAL OCCASIONS . . . SIZES 10-16, 
ABOUT $50 AT J. W. ROBINSON, LOS 
ANGELES; MABLEY & CAREW CO., 
CINCINNATI. 

j£ ABOVE, FIRESIDE CHARM IN 
FIA'S DEMURE DUTCH BOY HOSTESS 
PAJAMAS WITH TROUSERS-LI KE-A- 
SKIRT; PEG POCKETS, TOO. IN 
CELANESE JERSEY, SIZES 10-1S, ABOUT $30 
AT BONV.TF TELLER, NEW YORK. 
^^m BELOW, BLONDE FLATTERY IN FIA'S 
DREAMY SATIN PEIGNOIR WITH 
QUAINT PETER PAN COLLAR, TINY- 
LUCKED YOKE; ABOUT $29 AT 
IS. ALTMAN, NEW YORK. 1HLE 
CINDERELLA PLASTIC MULES. 



PHOTOGRAPHED By LARRY VERNON 



AS SPIRITED AS YOUR DAILY LIFE, 
THESE SPORTSWEAR COORDINATES 
FROM KORET OF CALIFORNIA ARE DAY- 
LONG FAVORITES . . . STEMMING FROM THE 
CANDY-STRIPED BLAZER JACKET, ABOUT 
$10, THAT GETS A THREE-WAY PLAY: 
Jn AT LEFT, FOR TOWN-TROTTING, 
WITH A PONY SKIRT OF SHETLAND 
WOOL, ABOUT $9. 

tmmm RIGHT, FOR SPECTATOR SPORTS- 
WEAR, WITH COBRA RAYON SLACKS, 
ABOUT $9; WOOL SWEATER, ABOUT $5. 

AND BELOW, . . . FOR ACTIVE PLAY, 
OVER RAYON GABARDINE HALTER-SHORTS 
"TRICOMBO," ABOUT $8. INTERCHANGE- 
ABLE IN RELATED COLORS, SIZES 12-18, AT 
O'CONNOR, MOFFATT & CO., SAN FRANCISCO; 
YOUNKERS, DES MOINES; HECHT CO., 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



interchangeable 




+ 






> : 



mix-matchable 



CLOTHE YOUR MOOD IN MIXABLE MATCHED 
FASHIONS, QUICK AS A WINK TO CHANGE 
FROM SUN-BRIGHT BREVITY TO ACTIVE 
SPORTSWEAR, TO CITY-SLICK DRESS ... A CON- 
CENTRATED WARDROBE FOR SUMMERS 
AT HOME OR ON-THE-GO. FROM TABAK OF 
CALIFORNIA PRINTED PASTELS WITH BLACK. 
■*■ FAR LEFT, MIDRIFF BLOUSE AND SKIRT, 
BLOOMER SHORTS, ABOUT $22; 

LEFT, TWO VIEWS OF THE 
HALTER BRA AND BLOOMERS, ABOUT $9. 
^^ THIS PAGE, BLOUSE AND PEDAL PUSHER 
ENSEMBLE, ABOUT $19. 

■ } BELOW, PROVIDES WHEREWITHAL FOR STILL 

ANOTHER TRADE-OFF; BRA AND PEDAL PUSHERS 
COMBINE. PRINT DRESS NOT SHOWN, ABOUT $19. 
EACH GROUP, SIZES 10-18, AT DESMOND'S, 
LOS ANGELES; F. & R. LAZARUS, COLUMBUS, O. 
VAN KEPPEL-GREEN PATIO FURNITURE. 



BLOOM EK : 






CHANGE OF PACE: MONROE LLOYD'S WARDROBE WITH INTERCHANGEABLE TENDENCIES, FOR ACTIVE SPORTSWEAR OR 

THE LAISSEZ-FAIRE ATTITUDE . . . EASY BASIC UNITS IN RAYON GABARDINE: JACKET WITH NEW BACK 

PLEATS (SKIRT NOT SHOWN), ABOUT $25; SLACKS, ABOUT $9; PEDAL PUSHERS, ABOUT $9; SHORTS, ABOUT $8; JERSEY 

BLOUSE, ABOUT $9. DRESS FROM THE SAME SERIES "TAKES TO" SAME ACCESSORIES, ABOUT $25. IN SHADES 

OF SPRING, SIZES 9 TO 15, AT A. HARRIS, DALLAS; MAY COMPANY, LOS ANGELES; STEWART & CO., BALTIMORE. 



32 



I 








J 
J 
J 




*- 







PHOTOGRAPHED BY LARRY VERNON 

CHANGE OF FACE: shepps-fabert takes a different view of coordinates . . . these two basic units 

FUNDAMENTAL TO YOUR CLASSIC WARDROBE, WITH MATCHING COAT ALSO AVAILABLE. THE SUIT, WITH FLY- 
FRONT SKIRT AND THREE-GORE BACK, PATCH-POCKETED JACKET WITH BANDED CUFFS, ABOUT $40 . . . THE DRESS, WITH 

SURPLICE ACCENT AND RAGLAN SLEEVES, ABOUT $35 . . . YOUR CHOICE OF SEVEN COLORS, IN BOTANY 
BRAND GABERTWILL WOOL WORSTED GABARDINE, SIZES 10-1S, AT MAY COMPANY, LOS ANGELES: YOUNKERS, DES MOINES. 



33 



For "Dangerous" in 1935 and "Jezebel" in 1938, the one 
and only Bette Davis won the Hollywood Oscar. Inset 
is Janet Gaynor, "America's Sweetheart," whose "Diane" 
in "Seventh Heaven" was tops in 1929. Remember? 



"It Happened One Night" captured the hearts of a nation in 
1934 and Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert took the trophies 
away from all competition. The beloved Marie Dressier, inset, 
toon her Oscar in 1930 for a memorable role in "Min and Bill." 




"The Champ" won the Hollyivood Oscar for Wallace 
Beery in 1931, shown here in a scene with a great child 
star, Jackie Cooper. The same year George Arliss was 
presented the richly deserved prize for his "Disraeli." 



For "Lost Weekend," Ray Milland carried off honors in 1945, 
but the work of Emil Jannings in "The Way of All Flesh" will 
be remembered as the pinnacle of thespian success. Jannings was 
honored at the first banquet in 1929. All pictures through 
courtesv of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. 



AND THEY CALLED IT | s \| f f [ § 



A 



rguments, suggestions and cigarette smoke 
rilled the air above a corner table in a famous 
Hollywood restaurant. It was the autumn of 
1928, and the men gathered around the board 
were founders of the Academy of Motion Pic- 
ture Arts and Sciences. Their discussion had 
centered around a proposed award for the 
best yearly performances by an actor and 
an actress. The problem was: What sort of 
award? They agreed it should be something 
of simple beauty, something symbolic of the 
achievements it commemorated, it should 
be . . .'. 

"Something like this?" asked Art Director 
Cedric Gibbons. He pointed with his pencil 
to a tablecloth sketch he had just completed. 
There, in bold black strokes, was trouble for 
the laundry and glory for the motion picture 
industry . . . there was "Oscar"! Oscar. 
. destined for immortality as the golden sym- 
bol of outstanding accomplishment in cinema 
arts and sciences, an enduring promise of 
fulfillment for those who would come to 
stand in the nimbus of greatness. 

Or at least that is what popular legend 
tells us. Tracking down popular legends 
makes a fine pastime for a rainy day. It 
was raining. The first step was to put in a 
call to Cedric Gibbons out at MGM studios . . . 

"Yes, I made a sketch of Oscar, but it 
was on paper, not on a tablecloth," averred 
Mr. Gibbons. 

"You mean to say you weren't sitting at 
a corner table in a famous Hollywood res- 
taurant? That you didn't dash off a little 
masterpiece on the table linen?" 

"Not that I remember. The sketch I made 
was during a meeting of the board members. 
We were sitting around a table all right, 
but it was a big polished table in the board 
room and I can assure you there was no 
tablecloth." said Mr. Gibbons positively. 

"But everyone insists there was a tablecloth. 
Maybe you went to a restaurant for a little 
snack after the meeting?" 

"No, the meetings were always long and 
exhausting in those days. We all went di- 
rectly home." 

"Maybe you did it at luncheon the next 
day? Maybe a few of you gathered . . . 
Douglas Fairbanks, Louis B. Mayer, Frank 
Lloyd, John Stahl . . ." 

"Well, we did gather often in those days 



. . ." Mr. Gibbons was commencing to sound 
uncertain. 

"Then there could possibly have been a 
tablecloth?" 

"We— ell . . ." 

"Everyone says there was a tablecloth. I 
like the idea of a tablecloth, it makes a good 
story." 

"Yes, I can appreciate that. Go ahead, 
then. Say I drew it on a tablecloth. I might 
have. It was so long ago I don't really re- 
member." 

"Fine. I'll just . . ." 

"But wait a minute ... If I drew it on a 
tablecloth I'd have had to take the whole table- 
cloth out and give it to George Stanley, the 
sculptor. Either that or cut a piece out of it. 
I don't remember ever carrying a tablecloth 
out of a restaurant. Or even a piece of one." 

"You could have made another sketch later 
for George Stanley . . ." 

Mr. Gibbons laughed. "Yes, I could have. 
Perhaps I did. And I see your point about 
its making a good story . . ." 

That was that. Mr. Gibbons made a table- 
cloth sketch of Oscar. Very dramatic. Very 
colorful stuff. Everyone likes the idea of an 
important personage dashing off something 
on a spanking-white tablecloth. Except the 
launderies. cf course. 

Anyhow, the Academy group gave Gibbons 
carte blanche in the selection of a sculptor. 
He contacted Arthur Millier, Los Angeles 
Times art critic, who was reputed to have a 
knowing finger in every local artistic pie. 

Millier's suggestion was George Stanley. 
Stanley had caught Millier's attention when 
he walked off with the coveted Huntingtcn 
prize for student sculpture at Otis Art Insti- 
tute. And the art critic was even more im- 
pressed with the young sculptor's work after 
viewing his one-man show at the Los Angeles 
Museum of Art. 

Stanley submitted two models to Gibbons. 
One of these became the fabulous Oscar, a 
masterpiece of stylized masculine symmetry 
standing ten inches high and weighing six 
and one-quarter pounds. The hands grasp 
a crusader's sword and the feet rest upon a 
reel of motion picture film. The figurine de- 
picts guardianship of the highest traditions 
of motion picture arts and sciences. 

(Continued on page 63) 




. . a little more 
than six pounds of 
glittering metal 
is a fortune of 
jewels in holly wood 
... the most 
coveted award of 
the year 



by Virginia teale 





CALIFORNIA'S 



. . . FLYING ENTHUSIASTS AND 
PRIVATE PLANES ARE CUTTING THE 
PATTERN FOR YOUR PLEASUR- 
ABLE WEEKEND SOME TIME SOON 



w w* 





At the luxurious desert oasis of La Quinta 
. . . out on the Mojave . . . the high-flying 
young members of the Aviation Country 
Club gather for one of their most memora- 
ble post-war rendezvous. At the top they 
enjoy the beautiful pool; in the center 
photo they find a little tinkering will do, 
and just above you can visualize the pic- 
turesque setting that attracted them. 




Saturday morning, 
bright and early, the 
planes began to appear 
above the San Jacinto 
Mountains . . . droning 
black specks on the hori- 
zon. They flew low over 
the red-roofed bunga- 
lows of the desert resort 
at La Quinta . . . out on 
the Mojave . . . and cir- 
cled for a landing on the 
hotel's private airport. 
The men and women 

who lay about the swimming pool. 

browning in the brilliant sun. watched 

the sky eagerly, listening for the sounds 

of approaching engines often before the 

planes were fully in sight. 

"'. . . here comes Wally in old Betsy! 

. . . that must be the Rhines . . . no. 

the Myers! . . . look at the new Fair- 



COUNTRY CLUB 



child . . . it's Willard, all right!" 

One by one the planes landed. The 
passengers climbed down . . . some 
wearing Hying or sport togs . . . others 
still dressed in their business clothes. 
These sportsmen . . . and women . . . 
pilots are members of the Aviation 
Country Club of California, a heter- 
ogeneous group of people whose sole 
bond is their enthusiasm for pleasure 
flying . . . just as you or I might want 
to do. From all over the Southwest 
they were coming in their own planes 
to spend a weekend at La Quinta. Twen- 
ty miles out in the desert from Palm 
Springs and almost surrounded by 
mountainous crags, the resort lies just 
off the highway ... a green, land- 
scaped oasis in the sandswept wilder- 
ness. Before the day was over, guests 
had flown from Los Angeles and Fresno. 
Carmel. Salinas. Santa Barbara and: 
Pebble Beach. One party came in from 
Phoenix and another landed in a plane 
which had left Dallas only a few hours 
before. 

These were ordinary people . . . busi- 
nessmen and housewives . . . with or- 
dinary jobs and families, and like thou-j 
sands of other Americans, they have the 
get-away-from-it-all fever from time to 
time. In their own way they have real- 
ized the dream of glamor-glutted copy- 
writers and bubbling promoters to live 
up to the twentieth century, speeding 
from work to play, geared to the world] 
they live in . . . dedicated to the Cali- 
fornia way of life. 

Back in 1936 this airborne club wasj 
formed by eleven men. owners of private 
pilot's licenses and small aircraft, who! 
wanted to see landing fields and avia-l 
tion facilities mushroom up in the wide-: 
ly separated regions of the \$ est. To- 
day, 190 members make up the Aviation' 
Country Club, a non-profit organization!] 
with a program of regular weekend' 



36 





junkets to interesting places. 

Over the years the group has down 
to Death Valley, north to Monterey and 
Manzanar, to Big Bear, and once . . . 
during its construction ... to Boulder 
Dam. They have flown across the Mexi- 
can border to Ensenada and to Corona- 
do, where special permission was grant- 
ed them to land at the Naval Air Sta- 
tion. Last year they journeyed into the 
Sierras to the Arcularis Ranch, 8000 
feet above sea level. But possibly their 
most memorable trip took place on De- 
cember 7, 1941, when all hands were 
grounded in the middle of the Mojave 
. Desert immediately after the attack on 
Pearl Harbor. 

On our particular weekend at La 
Quinta, excitement mounted with the 
arrival of each new plane. Members 
who had not seen each other all through 
the war were coming out of the sky to 
neet again in this isolated desert ren- 
dezvous. One of the first to land was 



past president Norman Larsen and his 
wife in a Beechcraft 18 ... an exact 
duplicate of the ship which Tyrone 
Power took to South America on his 
goodwill tour. 

There was Wally Timm, brother of 
the owner of Timm Aircraft; Willard 
E. Hagelin, owner of the Hagelin Air- 
craft and Motors Company; Ralph Car- 
ter of the Beverly-Wilshire Hotel in 
Beverly Hills, and John Rockwell, man- 
ager of the Adams Hotel in Phoenix. 

Attorney Bertrand Rhine and his wife 
flew in from Los Angeles, followed 
closely by Al Lary, nationally known 
stunt flyer, and blonde Tony Hagmann. 
girl pilot and correspondent for Avia- 
tion News and Western Flying. 

Johnny Myers, the "Legal Eagle," 
and his pretty wife, Lucia, were there, 
too. Myers, who at 30 is one of the 
"old men of aviation," has had a career 
rarely equalled for contrast. After at- 
tending several of the leading law 



schools of America, he developed an 
excellent practice, only to abandon it 
for the war job of test pilot for Lock- 
heed and Northrop. Johnny tested the 
famous "black widow" plane, whose 
night bombing missions became anath- 
ema to the enemy, but he left off testing 
to become vice-president in charge of 
sales for Northrop Aircraft. 

Another test pilot in the party was 
Max Stanley, who holds the record of 
handling the heaviest craft ever to go 
in the air. Dr. Bartlett C. Shackelford, 
well-known Long Beach surgeon, flew 
over in his private plane, as did Ben 
McGlashen, owner of a ' Los Angeles 
radio station. 

Then there was Ross Hadley. Head 
of the Hadley Publishing Company, 
this famous sportsman pilot flew a plane 
around the world in 1929-30 . . . before 
Richard Halliburton's much-heralded 
trip. Hadley claims the record of not 
(Continued on page 62) 



37 







-^s 




; ^ 






; 






CALIFORNIA'S BASICALLY PERFECT SUIT IS YOUR 

TURNABOUT CHOICE FOR URBAN OR FOR RURAL JAUNTS. CITY VERSION 

. . . LEFT, SELF-BELTED SUIT FROM ADELE-CALIFORNIA 

IN AMERICAN WOOLEN CO. GABARDINE; ABOUT $70, AT JOSKE'S, SAN ANTONIO; 

THE BON MARCHE, SEATTLE; DONALDSON'S, MINNEAPOLIS. 

THIS TIME IT WEARS DEAUVILLE MODELS' PURE SILK BLOUSE 

$19.95 . . . PLUS SHINING HAND-WROUGHT SILVER FROM CALIFORNIA 

ACCESSORIES . . . NELSON POWER'S BELT, SMOOTH AND FLAT 

FOR SUAVE INTEREST WHEN THE JACKET COMES OFF. COUNTRY-WISE . . . WEYMAN'S HIGH, HIGH HAT OF 

MILAN AND RIBBON. SBICCA'S SLING PUMPS OF SMOOTH CALF, LUCIE LOWEN'S MATCHING BAG AND 

GLOVES OF SOFTEST CAPE . . . RIGHT, THE SAME SUIT CHANGES PACE WITH THE SOLID BRIGHT COLOR 

OF MAURICE HOLMAN'S SWEATER AND GAILY BLOCK-PRINTED SILK SCARF, CALIFORNIA ACCESSORIES; PLUS 

HANSI'S WHIMSICAL HAND-CROCHETED HAT, ILLING'S CASUAL WEDGE SHOE OF SADDLE WITH 

MATCHING OVER-SHOULDER BAG. SHORTIE STRING GLOVES. DOUBLE PLAY OF 



NELSON POWER'S TWO-IN-ONE BELT ADDS TO THE FUN. 
PHOTOGRAPHED By LARRY VERNON 



39 




SHAPES OF HATS TO COME WITH SPRING! 
BUMPER SAILORS, ROMANTIC 

MILANS SET SQUARE ON THE HEAD . . . PILLBOXES 
THAT STAND FLOWERS STRAIGHT UP FRONT 
. . . EXAGGERATED BERETS, SUBTLY- 
FORMED SHANTUNGS, FACE-FRAMING, LOVELY. 
VEILS, FLOWERS AND JERSEY DRAPINGS FOR 
THE FEMININE, PINK AND HONEY FOR 
ALL . . . THE TREND IS A PRETTY 
ONE, SLANTED TOWARD IN- 
DIVIDUALITY. 

1. MILAN TRI- 
CORN, WEYMAN. 

2. GROSGRA1N 
SWIRLS, DeVILLAR. 
S. PARASOL-WEARING 
STRAW, GRACE NUGENT. 
4. ROSES AND SHANTUNG STRAW 
YVONNE. 5. FINE JERSEY DRAPES THE 
HAIR, MONICA. 6. BONNET WITH BOWS, 
PHIL STRANN. 7. SHANTUNG STRAW, 
BILLY GORDON. 8. CLOCHE SAILOR, SUZY LEE. 

9. EXAGGERATED BERET, CASPAR-DAVIS. 

10. BLACK AND WHITE, MILAN AND TAFFETA 
JOSEPHI. 11. BUMPER SAILOR IN PINK PINE- 
APPLE STRAW, BROWN VEIL. LESLIE-JAMES. 
12. BEES ON HONEY-COLOR FELT, SOREL. 
JEWELRY BY BILTMORE ACCESSORIES. 



SUM 
AND 

SUBSTANCE 
OF THE 




FIRST TO ANSWER THE CALL OF SPRING 
FOR SOMETHING NEW, SOME- 
THING DIFFERENT . . . THIS YEAR YOUR SUIT 
HAS FREEDOM FLARING IN 
CUTAWAY AND PEPLUM, IN EASY FLOWING LINES. 
RIGHT, LILLI ANN'S DASHING CUTAWAY IN • 
MENSWEAR GRAY WORSTED MAKES A DRAMATIC 
ENTRANCE: SIZES 10-18, ABOUT $70 AT 
BEDELL'S, PORTLAND; 
CARSON PIRIE SCOTT, CHICAGO. 
OPPOSITE PAGE, LEFT, NATHALIE NICOLI USES • 
DRESSMAKER FINESSE IN A SOFT SUIT OF 
JOHN WALTHER WOOL CREPE, ROSETTE MOTIF, 
SIZES 10-18, ABOUT $85 AT J. J. HAGGARTY, LOS ANGELES. 
A. HARRIS, DALLAS. 
RIGHT, FONTANA PUTS LONG-AWAITED PLEATS • 
FRONT AND BACK IN SKIRT OF SUIT OF FINE GABAR- 
DINE; HAND-PICKED DETAILS, SIZES 10-1S, ABOUT $60 AT 

DEWEES, PHILADELPHIA. 



SPRING 



CALL 



: 0R A NEW 





When you have retouched as many portrait 
negatives as I have you come to one conclu- 
sion. More people than anybody have their 
pictures taken in Hollywood. The demand is 
so great that the photo retoucher is worth 
her weight in nylons. The whims of these glamor 
seekers, from the drive-in busboy to the society 
deb, are both astonishing and amusing. 

"Would you add a few wavy hairs to this one?" 
wrote one photographer to me. 

"A few hairs?" I said aloud as the light from 
my retouching desk illuminated the bald head on 
the negative. Across my mind skipped possibili- 
ties. Should I put those few hairs . . . wavy, if 
you please . . . over the man's right eye a la 
Veronica Lake, coy-like, or give him a few divided 
evenly on each ear? I did neither. Instead I 
telephoned the photographer. 

"Bill, where would you like those curly locks?" 

"Oh, that!" Bill laughed. "I thought I'd hear 
from you on that one. I couldn't talk the customer 
out of it. so do the best you can. He wants wavy 
hair." 

"Parted on which side?" I asked. 

"Oh, gosh. I'll have to call you back." 



hair and blemish is accurately recorded. Only the 
retoucher with pencils, dyes and knives, working 
on an emulsion a thousandth of an inch thick, can 
skillfully maintain the glamorized impression the 
public has of itself. 

Take the meek little girl who has her picture 
taken. She gets her proofs and picks the pose she 
likes the best. Then what happens? "Put this in, 
take that out." The order clerk marks up the 
proof so that it resembles a doodler's attempt on 
a billboard, and sends it to me. 

Now the fun begins. I etch in long, sweeping 
eyelashes, carve a full sensuous mouth from a tight 
prim one. and flick away the stray hairs. Then 
with a needle-sharp pencil a baby complexion is 
stippled and the bags come out from under the 
eyes. Presto! Miss America! And the little gal 
actually believes she resembles the finished photo- 
graph. 

Then there is friend, wife who views the proofs 
of her sparsely haired, bespectacled spouse with 
a critical eye. I don't know whether it's love that 
makes her see the opposing half as a cross between 
Adonis and the current male movie heart throb, but 
whatever it is, she insists that I shape his side- 



"LOOK PLEASANT, PLEASE!" 



A few minutes passed . . . then . . . "Hey, part it 
on the left." 

With my etching knife on a piece of flimsy film 
I carefully etched in the finest crop of wavy hair 
this side of a beauty shop. 

Truth is stranger than the movies. The parade 
of crosseyed children whose eyes need straighten- 
ing, buck-toothed he-men who need retouching den- 
tistry, and quadrupled-chinned matrons who could 
use a bit of face lifting, are mild compared to 
the "Brides in Season" shenanigans. Add a bust, 
shave off a bustle, add posies to the bridal bouquet, 
sponge and press the bridegroom's pants, button his 
coat, fix his tie, remove the candlesticks from be- 
hind the bride's shoulders, lengthen her train, give 
her more veil, and oh, brother, does the retoucher 
get a workout! 

Glamor with a capital "G" is the byword. If all 
negatives taken were printed exactly as the camera 
registered them, there certainly would be a howling, 
angry public. The camera doesn't lie, so each stray 



pity the poor retoucher ... she builds 

bodies . . . erases bags and 

wrinkles ... draws eye lashes and tries to make 

most everyone look like somebody else 



burns, strengthen the weak muscles under his eyes, 
give him a stronger chin and model a new nose. 
Does she want him as is? Of course not! 

Hollywood mothers with precious counterparts 
have a habit of throwing curves at the retoucher. 
A long winding curve came my way the other day 
bearing freckles, ears at a ninety-degree angle and 
a mouth minus two front teeth. Did mama choose 
the pose of the lad in the three-quarter front view 
with his mouth closed? No! She wanted the full- 
front grinning view and blithely asked that the 
freckles be removed, two new teeth put in and the 
ears pinned back. And the matronly dowager who 
sat for her portrait with her pet Pekinese. At the 
precise moment the Peke sideswiped her cheek with 
his tongue. From all the proofs she liked that one 
best, but "Please," said she. "remove the tongue 
from my cheek." 

There's never a dull moment. I really enjoy the 
work and when a photographer telephones and 
starts out. "Honey, how busy are you?" in a hope- 
ful voice, I know he isn't on the verge of asking 
for a date. Invariably I say, "Well, not too." Be- 
fore he says a word I know it will be a nose- 
shortening number or a plastic surgery job on a 
lopsided jaw. Recently a bride was dissatisfied 
with her newly acquired bridegroom. Severing re- 
lationships is a matter of course, so I obliterated 
him and the bride stood serenely alone. 

The photographically conscious Hollywood pub- 
lic becomes more demanding every day. Mrs. Jones 
sees pretty Barbara Stanwyck modeling a prim. 



44 




by ANNE J. ANTH ONY 

print dress in one of the fashion magazines. The 
shot is sharp, crisp and clearly shows the print of 
the dress to advantage. Next time Mrs. Jones has 
her picture taken she has that fashion picture in 
mind, only she doesn't tell the photographer until 
she sees her proofs. One such Mrs. Jones had me 
pencilling in sharp daisies on her print dress for 
almost two hours. 

Mr. Jones also is aware of advertisements. He 
feasts his eyes on one of the pipe ads showing a 
handsome, tanned outdoor type male model holding 
a pipe in his hand and leaning on his right elbow. 
Mr. Jones gets outdoors to go back and forth 
to work and his only exercise consists of push- 
ing a pencil in a bookkeeper' s cage. Still he 



wants to look rugged in a photograph. His sagging 
neck muscles and anaemic face really get a work- 
ing over. Of course he looks ten years younger, 
but you could never convince him of that. The 
finished photo makes him literally beam, and with 
sincerity he remarks, "It looks exactly like me!" 

So, as long as there are pugilists who want to lose 
their cauliflower ears, teen-agers who care not for 
their teeth braces, babies whose heat-rashed skins 
require retouching talc. Adam's apples begging for 
a return passage to the Garden of Eden, cords in 
necks that should be lost, and the hundred and one 
defects that flesh is heir to, photo retouching . . . 
the behind the scenes Miracles. Inc. ... is here to 
stay. And blessed are we. 



45 






* 
t 




I 




a coordinated makeup is one 

sure step to beauty 

by sharon terrill 



• To look beautiful this season . . . make up your 
mind to make up your face! This calls for a planned 
approach: make-up properly applied, harmonizing in 
color values, altering through pigmentary magic any 
facial faults, and the underlining of your good points, 
too. 

But before you begin these steps to beauty, check on 
two things. Do you have the proper tools? A good 
cleansing cream and tissues, make-up base, powder, 
rouge, mascara, eyebrow pencil, eye shadow, lipstick 
and complexion brushes. Sounds like quite an array, 
doesn't it? But the end more than justifies the means. 

The other consideration of paramount importance is 
the color selection of your cosmetics. Check your own 
coloring . . . nature does a pretty fair job of harmon- 
izing your skin, hair and eye tones, though she may 
not be emphatic enough to suit you. Then check your 
wardrobe. If your clothes colors lean to the tawny shades 
. . . golds, browns, clear reds, orange, yellow, and the 
complementary greens ... be sure your powder base. 



45 




powder, lipstick and rouge reflect the same spectrum. 
You need base and powder glowing with golden tones; 
a clear orange-red or red lipstick and rouge. If you 
lean to blues, to blued reds, purples, fuchsia, choose 
cosmetics with a bluish cast. And don't make the mis- 
take of trying to use a bluish red lipstick with a golden- 
toned foundation. It makes your skin look yellow, your 
lips unhealthily dark. To play it safe, you can stick 
to flesh tones of pink with a true rose-red lipstick for 
your make-up, harmonizing with almost any costume 
color. 

In short, remember your face, as well as your ac- 
cessories, must be coordinated. 

As to the arts and skills of putting your best face 
forward: Cameras, like mirrors, take a fairly accurate 
look at your face. It is reasonable that a specialist like 
Robert King, whose abilities as a make-up expert are 
utilized by famed Hollywood photographer Paul Hesse. 
knows as much as anybody about the basic architecture 
of the face and what can be done to improve it. 



The method he pursues in making up stellar screen 
personalities for close-up shots is precisely the system 
he advises you to use for the perfectly groomed, per- 
fectly natural, making-the-best-of-your-face appearance 
you desire. And here's the procedure: 

your eyes 

Start with your eyes . . . yes, before you put on a 
smidge of foundation or powder. Shape your brows, 
remembering to tweeze from underneath and brush up- 
ward for the most becoming arch. 

Next, spread a little vaseline on your eyelid and draw 
a line close to the lashes from the inner side to the 
outer corner. Then blend this color into the lashes so 
that there is no perceptable line or shadow. This line 
makes your lashes appear longer and heavier and dram- 
atizes the color of your eyes. 

Your eye-shadow is applied after the powder base 
has been applied and blended well over the lids. And 
here is where you can work wonders! Choose the color 
of the shadow to complement your eyes, and apply it 
only on the upper lid with outward strokes from the 
inner corner of the eye, blending imperceptibly. And 
if your eyes are too close together, darken the shadow 
tow r ard the outer corner for an illusion of greater width. 

your skin — the shape of your face 

Choose your powder base to suit your skin: pancake 
for oily skin, a good cream or liquid for dry and nor- 
mal complexion. We're taking it for granted that you 
started with a clean face . . . this is the first essential. 
Over this beautifully clean skin, blend your foundation 
carefully, taking care to spread it over eyelids and 
mouth, behind your ears and into the hairline and 
neck ... an abrupt break is never natural looking. 

Never leave hard edges of color . . . blend your 
rouge so that it looks like a natural flush. Powder pro- 
vides the final bloom. Pat it on gently, and when you 
powder around your eyes, look upward. The skin will 
be held taut so that powder doesn't lodge in fine wrinkles 
that age and harden your face. 

your mouth 

Outline your lips with a brush, then fill in. Extend 
the natural shape of your upper lip to balance your 
lower lip, which is naturally larger. Avoid exaggerated 
curves . . . never permit a pointed or sharp outline. 
The natural shape of your mouth harmonizes best with 
your general face structure, though it may be made 
smaller or larger for the best balance. Putting founda- 
tion and powder on your mouth before using lipstick 
makes for a cleaner outline and longer lasting effect. 

finishing touches 

Mascara your upper lashes only with a fairly moist 
brush so that you won't have unnatural globs of color 
framing your eyes. If your lashes are too straight to 
suit you, curl them before coloring them. Remove ex- 
cess powder and other loose particles around your eyes 
and nose with a cotton-tipped orange stick dipped in 
water. And moisten your eyebrows. Sweep a soft com- 
plexion brush over your face to whisk away loose powder 
and give the perfect, pearly finish to your best face. 

Result? A face worthy of your prettiest new clothes 
. . . coordinated . . . lovely! 



47 



ROBERT 
BAKER, PUPPETEER 





£■""-'-■■ — — - 








bNsb^ **%j 


M 


Htl ~ M 


i 4 




TYRUS 

WONG, ARTIST 




pH DICK FORDHAM, GROCERYMAN 



INGENUITY, 

YOUTH 

AND PERSEVERANCE 

STILL ARE 

PRIME QUALITIES 

THAT RECKON WITH 

SUCCESS 




ROBERT PRESCOTT, FLYING TIGER 



ROBERT BAKER has strings on more dolls than any 
man in Hollywood . . . he's a puppeteer, and despite 
his young 22 years, has successfully presented many 
spectacular shows. Currently working on splendorous 
mannikin revues a la Billy Rose for motion picture 
and television production. Gained most experience 
with George Pal and the Puppetoons. TYRUS WONG, 
born in Canton, China, is an American citizen with 
a family and a Los Angeles studio home. But more 
than that he's the artist who first achieved fame with 
his fairylike backgrounds for Disney's "Bambi." Ty's 
skill runs to water colors, pastels and oils, and he 
is readying a one-man show of his more serious 
works. DAVID R. DICK FORDHAM likes to be his 
own boss. So the Navy veteran bought a 1931 model 
city bus. painted it white, installed shelves and gro- 
ceries and today is the boon of the harried housewife. 
He delivers a full stock of reasonably priced goods 
to the door. ROBERT W. PRESCOTT was an air ace 
with Major General Chennault's Flying Tigers when 
he got an idea. Today, in Los Angeles, he and his 
associates operate the Flying Tiger Freight Line, fly 
"anything, anywhere, anytime." Elsie, the Borden 
Cow, took a ride. So do race horses, fresh fruit, 
vegetables and flowers destined for the East. Recent 
acquisition by the growing group is an Army Trans- 
port Command contract . . . two flights daily to 
Tokyo and Hawaii . . . with a fleet of 32 planes. 



in California it's... 



48 







MONTREAL 



MADE-TO-ORDER FACE POWDER 

by 



I 



DISTINGUISHED FOR HAND-BLENDED ■ POWD ER AND EXQU I SITE COSMETICS 



m 



accessory 



A 

v 5 \i 






these possibilities all balance the side interest. 



the third of a 
series of articles 
on dressing 



leans backward 



by design 

by florence shuman 



balances 



leans foi 



sketch an outfit from 
own wardrobe, front am 
and check for balance. 



balance 



which accessories would 
you select to balance this 
dress with side interest? 



i careless selection of ac- 
\ cessories cancels the ef- 
fectiveness of this dress. 




• When we are impressed with the smart appearance of a 
woman, our eyes are busy organizing her whole ensemble be- 
fore we are conscious of any one part of it. Why? 

Because we see things together. Some things because they 
are close together. Others because they are similar in shape, 
color and size . . . because they move in the same direction. 
The tendency for our eyes to organize is very fundamental. 
• and all tricks of optical illusion are based on understanding 
this. 

After our eyes have finished organizing, we experience a 
reaction to what we see. In the case of our smart woman we 
felt elated because of her selectivity and good taste. Lookin<* 
at another woman we feel disturbed because she looks over- 
dressed or incomplete. Somehow she looks unbalanced. Gen- 
eraly, it is because she has chosen her accessories at random 
without understanding what effect they will have on the over- 



ill picture she presents. 

Most of us are conscious of bags, gloves, jewelry, etc., and 
try to match or contrast them to the costume we select. But 
there is more to this business than merely seeing that our 
accessories do this. Suppose we start with a suit that has one 
dramatic idea, preferably off-center. Here is an illustration of 
such a suit surrounded with a variety of accessories that could 
be worn with it. Now, visualizing this suit in relation to the 
whole figure, we can balance the side interest by accessories 
that will complement the dramatic diagonal closing and not 
compete with it for attention. 

Directly below, the first two figures show different possibili- 
ties for balancing the ensemble — all good. The third illustra- 
tion shows how carelessly selected accessories, even when they 
are all in style and related colors, can set up so many con- 
flicting interests that they cancel the effectiveness of the orig- 
inal idea. Lack of balance, you see, has spoiled everything. 

The first and fourth of the next four figures show, from a 
side view, how it is possible to balance a silhouette that has 
definite interest toward the back or front, by adding an interest 
in the opposite direction. That side view is especially im- 
portant if your figure protrudes a little fore or aft! The two 
blank figures, one side and one front view, are for your ex- 
periment, using some item in your own wardrobe. Draw in 
your completed figure. ..,: 

Experimenting in this manner is a sure way to develop 
style-sense and self-confidence, because you will be dressing 
by design. And when you walk into a room, people will see 
a chic woman who makes a lovely picture from head to toe. 




«# * 



SHINING IN THE RAIN. . . viola dimmitt's elfin raincoat is smart cover-up for those april showers, and 

WITH ITS BUTTON-ON-HOOD REMOVED, IT'S RIGHT FOR REAL UTILITY WEAR. FULL AND FREE TO WEAR OVER BULKY CLOTHES, 
IT CAN BE CINCHED IN LIKE AN OFFICER'S GREATCOAT. WHEATLEY FABRIC IN GAY COLORS, SIZES 10-18, 
ABOUT $35 AT J. J. HAGGARTY, LOS ANGELES; W. FILENE'S SONS, CO., BOSTON; J. L. HUDSON CO., DETROIT. SHOES BY JOYCE. 




IRCH INTO SPRING! 



ornia invites you this month... bring interchangeable clothes for a changeable season 






9 Even if March should come to California 
like the proverbial lion, it's certain to be 
lamb-like a good part of the time ... so 
if you're coming west this month, come pre- 
pared for a number of things! 

And unless you want to bring an unprece- 
dented number of bags, calculate shrewdly. 
A co-ordinated and interchangeable wardrobe 
is definitely at a premium for a March visit, 
and not only because of the weather . . . 
the first month of spring brings a widely 
varied calendar of social and sports activi- 
ties. 

For instance, racing is still on at Santa 
Anita ; the desert season with its swimming 
and sun-lazing and tennis and golf is still 
in full swing; snow lurks in the Sierras and 
higher southern peaks; sailing is at its best. 

As the indispensable foundation for a 
wardrobe of versatility, we still come back 
to the suit-with-topcoat. Make it one of the 
suits you'll see featured in California shops 
throughout the country . . . the kind with 
matching slacks. This threesome with extra 
slacks and extra skirt will see you through 
travel, the races, and, with a sweater topping 
your slacks, a brisk sail on Newport Bay. 
Your topcoat might well be a bright one, 
suggesting spring, but warm . . . and of 
course, harmonizing with your suit. 

Slip in a lightweight raincoat while you're 
at it, especially if San Francisco-bound . . . 
one that goes on easily over a suit so that if 
the temperamental sun comes out, you can 
shed the rainwear. Bring some blouses, print 
or plain, to wear with the slacks or with sep- 



arate casual skirts . . . you may be one of 
the thousands expected in Los Angeles dur- 
ing March for the national bowling tourna- 
ment, either as participant or spectator. 

Remember that the weather sometimes 
waxes very warm. Investigate the new mul- 
tiple-unit sun costumes . . . shorts, bra, skirt, 
bolero or jacket. One of these would see 
you through a variety of occasions from ac- 
tual swimming to patio luncheons, on sunny 
days in the city and always on the desert. 
Make your extra dresses the casual type . . . 
beautifully simple prints, for instance, that 
you can dress up or down with the proper 
accessories as the occasion demands; or a 
pastel gabardine in the lighthearted manner 
California fashionists achieve so well. You 
might include one long dress, as formal dress 
is required often for dinner-dancing at pri- 
vate clubs. 

Above all, concentrate on the fact that it's 
spring in California ... let yourself go a 
bit on color, so long as it all ties together. 
Keep in mind that San Francisco is more 
conservative than Los Angeles in all matters 
of dress . . . but even here, on spring days, 
street corners blossom with flower stands and 
there's gaiety in the breeze. 

March demands more variety in clothes 
than many other months . . . but if you plan 
carefully, you can make the most of the suit- 
slacks combination with blouses, of the sim- 
ple dress with change of jewelry and hats 
. . . filling in with interchangeable sunwear 
and sweaters, scarves and gadgets. And 
you'll find it can be done in a small space. 



weather data 
ifor march 



san francisco 




highest 

lowest 


72 

43 


average 
average 
rainfall 


51.8 
4.15 


I 

los angeles 




highest 
lowest 
• . average 
average 
rainfall 


99 
31 
58.1 
2.76 



stag supper 



If you have clothes sense, chances are that you have food sense, too! 
And that's just because you're smart. Creating a good meal or a good 
costume takes a brain. It takes time, too. and imagination and orig- 
inality and study, but it doesn't take any more money than its ill- 
planned counterpart. Like clothes, food may be formal or informal, 
good or bad, light or heavy, fresh or tired. And like a costume, a 
meal must be consistent. Just as the well-dressed woman has basic 
costumes for various affairs ... an evening gown with a low decolletage 
for a ball, tweeds for travel, and a little black dress for those numer- 
ous affairs that call for a little black dress ... so the food-conscious 
woman has basic menus for various affairs: the late morning brunch, 
the formal dinner, the buffet supper. 

The basic rules of dress you know about. The basic rules of meal 
planning are even simpler. Both are coordinated. In a costume you 
may start with a particularly giddy hat that you want to be the focus 
of all eyes ... as if it could be anything 
else! What do you do? You play it up 
by playing down the rest of your costume 
... by making it so perfectly suited to 
the dizzy bonnet that it will be like a jewel 

in a perfect setting, a picture in a perfect frame. That was planned. 
And then they'll think of that beautifully cut gown, the simple clip, 
the gloves that match your handbag. And so it is with a meal. 
It will be built around the piece de resistance — the chief feature 
of the meal. That may be any dish. A divine lobster bisque, perhaps, 
or an almond souffle, a flaming shashlik, or perhaps it will be a chicken 
pie, as only you can prepare it, or a cheese fondue prepared in a 
chafing dish before the admiring guests. But the rest of the meal 
must harmonize with that featured food. It mus^ be subordinate 
to it, yet emphasize it. Each dish, each course, must be flawless, 
even though not spectacular. The meal itself will be a memorable 
one because everything will harmonize — and perfectly. 

You know, too, the basic rules for a coordinated menu: that flavor 
is of the utmost importance but that it must be varied; that color, tex- 
ture and form all enter into the composition of a perfect meal ; that 
tomato soup and tomato salad in the same meal is an error, as would 
he a meal that had a curried soup, a spiced rump of beef and ginger- 
bread. Spice may be the variety of life, but every dish highly spiced 
is not variety. Other common faults in menu planning are serving such 
things as a cream soup, a creamed vegetable, and sometimes even a 
creamy dessert ... all in the sv.me meal. Or in having everything 
starch . . . say potato soup, tamale pie, rice and lima beans, and cake 
. . . that one made me so heavy I can't move! A meal of cream of 
celery soup, baked white fish, mashed potatres. cauliflower and rice 
pudding would be deadly white, besides being deadly. Enough of this 
... it's unnerving me, too. 

This time of year, when spring is whispering a welcome, but winter 
is taking his time in saying goodbye, appetites seem to lag. It could 
be that a few new menus are in order: so here are some designed for 
entertaining! 



OYSTER STEW 

BRAISED TONGUE 

TOMATO ASPIC, SOUR CREAM DR' 

SPOONBREAD 

ROMAINE, BACON DRESSING 

COFFEE CAMEMBERT MJ 

This is a masculine meal in spite 
aspic. Try it on those men of y( 
you don't believe it. The Cami 
marinee is made by soaking a 
Camembert in white wine overnigh 
scraping it and mashing it and 
it with an equal quantity of butti 
form into its original shape, and 
with browned crumbs. But good! 



California cook 



buffet supper 



BAKED HAM 

BLACK BEANS COOKED WITH RUM 

MUSHROOM AND OYSTER PIE 

ASPARAGUS VINAIGRETTE 

CORNBREAD STICKS 

ROMAINE SALAD, WITH DICED CHEDDAR 

APPLE BROWN BETTY WITH PECANS 



Buffet suppers are the easiest .way for 
most of us to entertain. This one may 
be prepared entirely in advance, so you'll 
be a rested> hostess when your guests ar- 
rive. The black beans are cooked with 
onion and an herb bouquet, until tender, 
then flavored with Jamaica rum The pie 
is made by topping creamed oysters and 
mushrooms with a rich pastry. The salad 
is different only because it has tiny cubes 
of well-aged Cheddar lurking in its midst. 
And the apple Brown Betty has oodles of 
ground pecans mixed with its conventional 
crumbs. 



L 



\ 



Sunday breakfast party 



STRAWBERRIES AND CREAM 

THIN PANCAKES WITH CHICKEN FILLING 

CRISP BACON BROILED MUSHROOMS 

BROILED TOMATOES 

HOT MELBA TOAST CREAM CHEESE 

CHERRY PRESERVES 
PECAN COFFEE CAKE COFFEE 

Easter Sunday is in the offing, and what 
better way to celebrate it than by in- 
viting your friends for breakfast? This is 
a simple menu that anyone can reproduce. 
The chicken filling is made by mincing 
cooked chicken and binding it with sour 
cream seasoned with salt, fresh ground 
pepper, and a suspicion of onion juice 
or onion powder! A white wine punch or 
"oup" would make this affair a gala one. 



formal dinner 



STRAINED OXTAIL SOUP 
FILET OF SOLE, MARGUERY 
CHICKEN LAMAZE 
STRING BEANS WITH ALMONDS . f 

WILD RICE 
FRENCH ENDIVE, BASH. DRESSING 
CREME BRULEE DEMITASSE § 



Formal dinners are often dull, but not 
this one. Flavor your oxtail soup with 
claret — and be sure it's rich. The fish 
and the chicken recipes are classic ones 
that may be found in many good cook 
books. The string beans are dressed with 
butter and slivers of browned almonds, 
and the rice may be either the wild or 
brown variety. Make the salad dressing 
with basil wine vinegar, or use fresh 
basil leaves if you prefer. The dessert, 
another classic one, may be accompanied 
by fiambeed fruits, if you desire. 



y helen evans brown 



^u 



a well-planned cuisine, 

like a well-planned wardrobe, 
is coordinated. 



■ 






a ladies lunch 



MUSHROOM CONSOMME 
P A L' AMERICA] NE ASPARAGUS 
BAKING POWDER BISCUITS 
PINEAPPLE RUM ICE 

ushroom consomme is made by sim- 
ninced mushrooms in consomme 
i hour; serve it strained. Shrimp a 
icaine is fresh shrimp with a sauce 
ith white ■ wine, tomatoes and 
1; parsley. Serve the asparagus on 
loints with melted butter, and keep 
king powder biscuits tiny for those 
watchers. The dessert is pineapple 
rt served in. glasses and topped with 
mce and fresh pineapple. Lady fin- 
•vould be almost too appropriate! 



pot luck dinner 

POT ROAST 

POTATO PANCAKES 

RED CABBAGE, SOUR CREAM 

CUCUMBER AND ONION SALAD 

FRUIT COMPOTE CAKE 



This is the kind of family dinner you'd 
be proud to serve an unexpected guest — 
lucky family that has such daily fare! The 
pancakes are made with raw grated pota- 
toes (use the frozen mix if you wish). 
The red cabbage is cooked, Viennese 
style, with apple and onion, and the salad 
is just paper-thin slices of mild onion and 
cucumbers, marinated in French dressing. 



informal dinner 



CLAM AND TOMATO BOUILLON 

VEAL PAPRIKA 

NOODLES WITH BUTTERED CRUMBS 

SPINACH 

FRESH PINEAPPLE WITH RUM 

RICH COOKIES 



Informal dinners call for fewer courses, 
which means helpings must be more gen- 
erous. Make this soup by combining tomato 
juice and clam juice in equal parts. The 
veal paprika is made with sour cream, 
and the cooked noodles are sprinkled 
with coarse crumbs that have been 
browned in butter. The spinach is par- 
ticularly exciting if it's served in a mound 
surrounded by tiny whole beets. And do 
make an effort to find the fresh pineapple 
— it's so delicious! 




' Years ago, home decoration took its cue 
from the most luxurious hotels of the day. 
Those enviable people who could travel 
were, themselves, impressed by the lavish comforts of famous 
hostelries . . . came back home possessed by new decorative 
ideas which they promptly adopted to excite the envy of 
friends and relations. 

Today, after a period when home decoration far out-paced 
hotel innovations, comes a new inspirational cycle stemming 
from world-famous hotels. Coast to coast there is evidence 
of widespread hotel remodelling, a facelifting that is sig- 
nificant. Travel-anxious Americans once more will be flitting 
from dude ranch to gilded towers . . . and what they see is 
likely to give them ideas about how to live at home more 
graciously and easily ... in the carefree manner of the best 
hotels. 

So let's jump the gun. Let's go out to the Beverly Hills 
Hotel to preview the new trend. For here, in the gracious old- 
world atmosphere of one of California's most conservative 
and aristocratic hotels ... is a sudden flash of modern ! 

Paul Laszlo, noted modern designer and decorator, has been 
given a free hand. The way he has interpreted modern liv- 
ing is exciting. More than that, it is full of inspiration for you. 

For instance, take any tiny apartment, any single room that 
has to serve so many purposes these days . . . then look at 
the way Mr. Laszlo gives an average-sized hotel room spa- 
ciousness and clears the way for colorful, comfortable living! 
Take a typical American home, large or small, new or old 
. . . and you can visualize how some of the Laszlo "devices" 
can enhance its charm. 

Fundamental in his transformation of rooms at the Beverly 
Hills Hotel is the use of partitions which separate actual sleep- 
ing quarters. No matter how small the room, this simple trick 
immediately gives it dual purpose: achieves privacy for the 
bed area, and creates a nook for an easy chair or a desk. It 
increases the space available for this business of living. 

But a partition has many guises. It may be a completely 
open latticework clear to the ceiling . . . into which the wily 
Laszlo sometimes inserts a square of mirror or a picture. Or 
it may be a half wall with the upper half opened up. 

One particularly dramatic partition is a complete wall of 
mirrors which projects just far enough into the room to 
achieve the desired privacy . . . but reflects and increases the 
interest of the room. Another is a curved or wavy wall, with 
a series of small "windows." 

To illustrate, A and B show two views of an open frame 
"divider," the mirror insert has a picture on the other side 
and, presto, the sleeping unit is a room apart . . . there's 
space in which to move about. C and D show the effective use 
of curved walls to make a dramatic separation; the mirror 
panels over the bed give added illusion of size. E, a particu- 
larly effective curved wall with a flowered paper, sets a mod- 
ern tempo for living. 



by Virginia Scallon 








■ ■ I 



56 







Ufa 



■ 



■ 




T 



■ ■ i i 




tA*f-^ 



# 



k ■ ■ ■ ' ■» 



I 



for California living, a noted designer and 



decorator suggests a mathematical solution 



to your interior decoration problems; 



divide a room ... to increase its charm, 



!■ 



to create privacy and quiet areas, and 



clear the way for this business of living. 



afflp 



P i 




-n#o 



>t? 







nii 



A 




I 




IMHI 



I 




pr 





The utility of a serpentine screen has proved its effectiveness in color 
accent and cover-up qualities . . . now Laszlo makes it a permanent part 
of a room. You'll find it does more than achieve privacy and designate 
certain parts of a room for specific purposes ... it guides the person entering 
the room to the center of attraction . . . literally points the way to hospitality! 
The partition is interesting in itself, relieving the four-square monotony of 
plain walls, and introducing a color splash or an opportunity for decorative 
treatment on its shelf-like levels. 

With partitions as a beginning, then, Laszlo creates an atmosphere of friendli- 
ness in a hotel and then goes on to intensify it: 

The illusion of a room-within-a-room is maintained by such simple magic as 
lowering the ceiling level over a specific area, by extending a part of the wall 
so that built-in bookcases may be inserted, by rounding corners of a wall extension 
to give a streamlined effect. A separate color often is used to contrast sleeping 
quarters with the living-room ... or painted walls to contrast with papered ones. 

All this is the format for the transformation of an or- 
dinary room into something extraordinary . . . and it is a 
pattern you well may follow to make a single living-room 
provide space for reading, for entertaining, for an office or 
even for a sunroom or sleeping alcove! 

Once a room has received this basic treatment, the ar- 
rangement of furniture is easy . . . there is room for facing 
chairs or davenports, for a miniature study, a conversa- 
tional windowseat arrangement. Coffee tables and end tables 
are surprising assets to even a moderately sized room, 
while suites have endless charm up to and including built- 
in bars that put hospitality at a new level! 
Accent and actual grace note is the wondrous color to which Laszlo is addicted. 
Here is a room in soft haze blue, another in luminous gray . . . one with boldly 
striped wallpaper, another with a colorful print. But everywhere is an immediate 
sensation of color, a mass effect which is at once refreshing and interesting. 
To describe the colors would be to stress California's own lime and char- 
treuse, salmon pink, flaming lacquer and ruddy tile reds, bottle green, cocoa 
brown, rich burgundy. But color is the thing, and Laszlo gets a dramatic effect 
by developing a room in tones of a single color for stark simplicity ... or 
in daring contrast ... or in a bright combination of many harmonious hues. 

Simple modern furniture logically fits into this picture: built for comfort, it 
often is dramatic in size and always uncluttered in appearance. 

To sum it up, twin chests with a huge mirror reflect added interest in F; open 
latticework partition (note picture insert) ; G shows a wall of mirror; ingenious 
ceiling device and built-in wardrobe space are important modern notes. //, /, 
again prove the value of mirror for decor, to divide a room . . . with top area 
airily free. In /, beds are cornered against wall and partition to save space, 
add informality. Physical metamorphosis of rooms becomes obvious, K and L. 
with extended walls and dropped ceilings to delineate specific living-sleeping 
areas. Ceiling interest is pointed up once more, in M and N . . . device for indirect 
lighting as well as direct charm. 

So there it is, Paul Laszlo's way of putting modern spirit in a hotel. Divide- 
and-multiply is no longer just a mathematical principle: It may be the prac- 
tical solution to many of your home decorating problems. 




59 



Eye 




hat interesting transformation . . . from lion to lamb 
as sagely predicted by almanac advice about March . . . 
goes not unnoticed. As the vernal equinox approaches, 
the urge to add a few bright leaves takes a mighty grip 
on the man with a yen to sartorial accuracy. It is the 
season to watch the men go buy! Depending on his bent 
you can be sure that something new will find a warm 
haven somewhere in his wardrobe. The male of the 
family might be an adroit shopper; he'll do his own pick- 
ing and choosing and you'll have to wait to see what 
new item has snagged his fancy. But if he is a bit un- 
certain about "right" styles or "flattering" colors may- 
haps you'll make the spring trip with him. That will 
give you a chance to put in more than "a few cents 
worth" with his selections. You can be guided by these 
fashion trends: Sport jackets are tending toward fine, 
neat patterns of thinly spaced vertical stripes or small 
checks. Even the solid colors, the maroons and rich 
browns are back. Slacks will be best selected in gabar- 
dines, lightweight wools or flannels . . . and in plains 
or gray, brown, light blue or beige. Plaids or plains 
are equally flattering in sport shirts and are equally 
tops in style. The finest resorts have put their decorous 
stamp of approval on wedge-soled casual shoes for men. 
And like the pictures in a book, incidentals in the 
closet make for real attire-interest. These incidentals 
range from leather jackets to leisure luxury 
pullovers ... all colorful, relaxable, Cali- 
fornia clothes. 



i\ 







; 






of March 




^\ 



• (Left page) That may not be a meerschaum our 
friend is puffing but he most certainly is wearing a 
typically masculine, comfortably casual all-wool California 
leisure shirt in large bold plaid. 

• (Above) Fine glove suede combines with gabardine to 
make this attractive two-tone zipper-front jacket. Sleeves, back 
and collar are of light tan, all-wool gab; front is suede. 
It is completely rayon lined and features an 
elastic shirring waist-high in the back. 

(Top) Here is real freedom in a long-sleeved slipover of 
wool with overall small check. A fine semi-lining makes 
this "stroller" wearable with or without cotton "T" or 
basgue shirt. Two pockets are provided for the oft-sought pack. 

(Right) Just a sport shirtf Hardly! This California- 
made item is both sun-fast and crease-resistant . . . 
plus being tubbable. That's news! Neck hugging collar- 
line and plenty of active body room make this 
shirt a real fashion- feast. 




Calif 



ornia in 



Book: 



NEW DESIGNS FOR SPRING 

Dainty delicate bracelet-choker sets. 7" brace- 
let, 15" choker. Plated in Yellow, Pink, or 
Hamilton gold, also Silver. Stale color and 
design in ordering. A — $4.95 the set, B — 
$3.95 the set, C— $2.95 the set, D— $2.95 the 
set. Price includes tax, insured postage. 

BEAUTIFUL CREATIONS 

Designers and Creators of Distinctive 

Jewelry 

1 10 Dunedin Street 

Cranston 9, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 



Smithfield Hams, Stieber Style 




M;iryl:inH-rooker1 Smith6e)d hams; in- 
fumparuble rich brown, nut-sweet flavor. 

Stieber-cooked Smithfield hams are first 
cooked in the finest sherry wine, spiced, 
topped with brown sugar and cherries, 
then roasted to perfection. 
Price range (before cooking), 

13 to 14 lb. ham S17.75 

1+ to 15 lb. ham S19.2S 

IS to IS lb. ham S22.30 

post paid. No C.O.D.'s, please. 

CEO. H. STIEBER CO., INC. 
Towgnn 4, Maryland 



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Suite 394, 8 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 3 



Editor's Note: We're told that everyone does a certain amount of reuding 
. . . if it's interesting. Believing that our readers are interested in California 
end would like to learn more about the Golden State and its authors, The 
C.alijornian has requested Miss Hazel Pulling, pictured here, to write a series 
of reviews on ''California in Books." Miss Pulling, Assistant Professor, Gradu- 
ate School of Library Science, University of Southern California, ivill be happy 
in answer your queries and receive your suggestions. Write her, if you wish, in 
care of The Californian. 

BY HAZEL PULLING 

Heighten your enjoyment of California by delving into her colorful, turbulent, 
romantic past; sense the aura of mystery and significance that surrounds her 
cities, her roadways, her missions, plazas ami ranches; join to the full in the 
pleasures of California today by knowing her yesterday. 

All this may be yours in Robert Glass Cleland's California Pageant: the 
Story of Four Centuries (Knopf, 1946. 256p. $2.50). The drama of history 
is evident in this narrative of California since the days of the explorers. 
Padre, don and lady, bandit, herdsman, politician and promoter walk across 
its pages in dignity and grandeur or in downright chicanery and guilt. Vi- 
brant, direct in style, and written by one who knows and loves the land of 
which he writes, this word panorama carries you excitingly through changing 
scenes to deposit you, clear-eyed and knowing, in modern California. 

Reminder of the close relationship of California"s present with her past 
is The Dictionary of California Land Names by Phil Townsend Hanna. long 
a student of California lore. (Saunders Studio Press, 1916. 381p. $5.00). 
Ready reference to this handbook for the historical implications of thousands 
of its place names will enhance your delight in California. 

Facets of present-day California and its unique way-of-life are as intriguing 
as its past. At home, at work, at play, in serious or gay mood, California is 
revealed in books for all to read. Richly humorous, fresh and witty is the 
movie scriptwriter's view of Hollywood that awaits you in Margaret Wilder's 
Hurry Up and Wait (McGraw-Whittlesey House, 1946. 246p. S2.50). By the 
author of the wartime hit, Since You Went Away, this novel relates her ad- 
ventures while she worked on the script for the movie based on her first book. 
Her analysis of that center of enchantment is made the more revealing by 
the discovery that its apparent vagaries really have depth and meaning. 

Newest of the tales of those self-made outcasts earlier portrayed by John 
Steinbeck is the novel by Luther Wbiteman. The Face of the Clam (Random 
House, 1947. 248p. 82.50). This is a fictional sketch of the lives of three 
vagabonds of the dunes area of Pismo Beach. Amusing yet pathetic, Frenchy, 
one-legged Peg, and Dunker recall the characters of Tortilla Flat as they 
admit you with innocence and intimacy to their strange, sordid lives, their 
twisted dreams, ideals and beliefs. Set apart from others, they are, never- 
theless, an outgrowth of California's past and a real part of her present. 

Colorful California is nowhere more aptly portrayed than in two recent, de- 
cidedly different books, both of which depict the Californian's love for 
the out-of-doors. The beauty of its cities and countryside is portrayed in ex- 
quisite photographs with detailed captions in California Lure: the Golden State 
in Pictures by Evelyn Neuenburg (California Lure Publishers, 1947. 300p. 
S5.00). Genevieve Callahan's California Cook Book (Barrows, 1946. 381 p. 
$2.50), is a collection of recipes tested for backyard barbecue as well as for 
informal indoor living. 

California in books is well worth investigating! 



9 H you're 


ha 


ving difficu 


Ity 


obtaining 


a 


copy 


of 


Th 


e C 


a'ifo 


nian. 


please be 


patient 


wilh 


us 


. Good pr 


int 


ng paper 


is 


still 


cri 


ica 


My 


short 


Share a 


copy 


if you 


can. 


or 


assure dei 


ive 


ry by your 


subscr 


pti 


on. 


$3 


per 


year; 


two 


years 


for $5 


three 


for $7.50. 


























Pat. Appl. for 



PRAC-T-RACK 

NO MORE CREASES IN YOUR SKIRTS 

And no more o'd-fashioned skirt hangers to 
pinch your fingers with this practical skirt rack! 
Hangs flat against any wall or closet door. 
Accommodates six or more skirts without 
creasing. You c^n remove one or more with- 
out disturbing the oiher skirts. Adjustable to 
size. 

Sold in 40 slates, Alaskti, Canada, Mexico, 
Cuba, Hawaii, and South America. 

Each, prepaid 

83.45 
PRAC-T-RACK 

Stillwater 3, New Jersey 




Country Club of the A| 

(Continued from page 37) 

breaking a record has been (lying 
since. 

The club has other members. 
Rey Schauer, Justice of the Califj 
Supreme Court, and Edgar Bergei 
regularly on these weekend rendeS 
and Charles Correll ("Andy" of J 
and Andy) and Henry King, J 
Hollywood director, also attend. Bl 
the war, when the aircraft coma 
donated trophies, members ran a na 
tion contest for each trip. Often, 
ners would be only 20 seconds a 
on a 300-mile flight, and booby 
were elaborately bestowed upon 
who took the long way around. 

At La Quinta there were 
favorite pastimes but talk came! 
These men and women pilots had j 
in national air meets, tested son' 
the world's greatest planes and 
a life unhampered by timetablil 
earthly highways. Whether pilot,! 
yer, doctor or entertainer, each I 
own master in the air. And . . .]. 
is even more important . . . in tla 
years since they banded togetb! 
enjoy pleasure flying, not one has 
in a plane accident. The worst i 
in the club log is a forced la] 
. . . and this in more than one 
miles of passenger flying. 




PETITE ALARM CLO( 

Purse size, bell alarm. Lumhj 
dial. So small you'll want ii 
travel with you. Watch type 
ment will outlast ordinary al] 
many years. You'll want a nil 
for birthdays, weddings, and 
saries and graduation, at 
$6.65 prepaid. Musical alarms ] 
$19.95 prepaid. 
Write for clock and barometer 



THE CALIFORNIAN, March, 1947 



And They Called It Oscar 



(Continued from page 35) 

How such a transcendent object received 
its relatively prosaic name is a story thai 
should be told ... if only for the relief 
of persons whose esthetic sensibilities are 
offended by the anachronism. It seems that 
columnist Sidney Skolsky was waiting out- 
side an Academy biggie's office. Inside, a 
newly completed statuette was being viewed 
and admired. One of the viewers exclaimed : 
"Somehow, it reminds me of my Uncle Oscar 
. . ." As always, things that go in one 
Skolsky ear come out in his column. Oscar 
was unofficially christened. 

Or at least that's how popular legend has 
it. Dissenting voices have been raised. Screen 
Writer Arthur Jones swears that Bette Davis 
named the Oscar. 

"Bette was the first to call the statuette 
by that name," vows Jones. "She told me 
that she always had been intrigued by the 
name 'Oscar.' And the first time I heard the 
moniker used was when she was called upon 
to present it at one of the award banquets. 
I remember she said something about: ' . . . 
and so I present to you this — this Oscar'." 

No one ever suggested that the statuette 
be dubbed Mortimer or Chauncey. Oscar he 
was from the beginning and Oscar he doubt- 
less shall be until the end. 

The eighteen-year saga of the Oscar is one 
filled with color, romance, competition and 
. . . sometimes . . . bitter disappointment. 
Several artists who won the award in early 
years are still among the industry's top- 
notch players: Lionel Barrymore won his 
Oscar in 1930 for his role in "A Free Soul." 
Katherine Hepburn took hers in 1932 for a 
performance in "Morning Glory." Another 
fine actor who received the honor in 1932 
was Charles Laughton for his title role in 
"The Private Lives of Henry VIII." A few 
grand old troupers who were given the 
statuette are no longer living: Emil Jannings. 
who received' it in 1929; Marie Dressier, who 
received it in 1930, and George Arliss, who 
received it in 1931. 

Only three artists have twice received the 
award: Luise Rainer, for her roles in "The 
Great Ziegfeld" and "The Good Earth"; 
Bette Davis, for "Dangerous" and "Jezebel"': 
and Spencer Tracy for "Boys' Town" and 
"Captains Courageous." In 1931 there was 
an unprecedented tie for acting honors — 
voters could not decide between Frederic 
March (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde) and Wal- 
lace Beery (The Champ). Both stars were 
given Oscars. 

And now it is: Who will get the Oscars 
this year? Will a new stellar figure emerge 
and carry off the prize? It happened in 1939 
when Vivien Leigh was given the statuette 
for her role of Scarlett in "Gone With the 
Wind." And it happened again in 1943 when 
Jennifer Jones won top recognition for the 
title role in "Song of Bernadette." Or, per- 
haps 1947 will witness an ascent of the pin- 
nacle by some longtime favorite. That par- 
ticular occurence seems the most gratifying 
to all concerned. Movie-goers and the en- 
tire motion picture industry were in there 







cheering when Ginger Rogers and Joan 
Crawford were handed Oscars after many 
years of hard, conscientious endeavor. Gin- 
ger received hers in 1941 for "Kitty Foyle": 
Joan, in 1946, for "Mildred Pierce." 

The Oscar first was presented in 1929, and 
the awards were made retroactive to include 
1927. Receiving the trophies at the initial 
banquet were Emil Jannings for his portrayal 
of August Schilling in "The Way of All 
Flesh"; Janet Gaynor for her role of Diane 
in "Seventh Heaven": Warner Baxter for 
his Cisco Kid in "In Old Arizona," and Mary 
Pickford for Norma Besant in "Coquette." 

Originally the award was presented only 
to the actor and actress who had rendered 
outstanding performances during the preced- 
ing year, but the Academy later decided to 
extend the honor to producers, directors, musi- 
cians, artists, supporting players and techni- 
cians. 

Despite the glamorous company gathered 
for every presentation ceremony, the cyno- 
sure of eyes is the representative of the cer- 
tified public accountants' firm which handles 
the balloting. In his hands is the sealed en- 
velope with the answer to the big question. 
Voters mail their ballots direct to the ac- 
counting firm where they are tallied, checked 
and re-checked, and then placed in a vault 
until H-hour of N-night. At the banquet, the 
envelope is opened by the master of cere- 
monies who reads aloud the names of nomi- 
nees and winners. 

During the eighteen years in which the 
awards have been made, colorful and humor- 
ous incidents occasionally have been attendant 
upon the ceremony. In the I'll-never-live-it- 
down department, for example, is found 
suave producer Cecil B. DeMille, whose 
aplomb was shaken when he heard him=elf 
saying, "We're happy to have with us tonighi 
the Japanese Envoy . . ." The year was 1942, 
and the man to whom he referred was Dr. 
Hu Shih, Chinese diplomat. Another one- 
time sufferer of the slow-burn was Director 
Alfred Hitchcock, who fell resonantly asleep 
during an impressive speech by Walter 
Wanger. 

First Negro to receive the Oscar was HattiV 
McDaniel. Tears flowed down her dark 
cheeks as she accepted the statuette for her 
supporting role of Mammy in "Gone With the 
Wind." That was the year- "Gone With the 
Wind" made almost a clean sweep of the 
awards . . . Bob Hope, acting as M. C. 
quipped: "We're all very happy to be here 
at the benefit for Mr. Selznick . . ." 

Oscar has been known to appear in strange 
forms and sizes: Shirley Temple once re- 
ceived a miniature statuette; Charley Mc- 
Carthy once clasped to his splintery bosom 
a wooden Oscar with hinged jaws; Bob Hope 
cherishes a watch-charm model, presented 
with a magnifying glass, in recognition of 
his many turns as the A. A. banquet M. C. 

The manufacture of Oscar by the Southern 
California Trophy Company involves a pro- 
cedure of many phases: The figurine is first 
cast in metal alloy, then two copper coat- 
ings are applied. Next step is a plating of 
10K gold, and finally a plating of 24K gold. 
It would seem that the one person who might 
be in-the-know on "who will get the Oscars?" 
is the engraver at the trophy company. But 
even he is not entrusted with the knowledge. 
The Oscars must be returned for engraving 
after the Award banquet. 

The statuette has shed its golden light 
upon the path to greater success for many 
persons — one of whom is its creator, George 
Stanley. Oscar was Stanley's first commis- 
sion. Shortly thereafter, he was called upon 
to do the magnificent bas-relief on the build- 
ing that houses Bullock's-Wilshire. Then he 
received the notably important commission 
for the monumental granite sculptures at the 
entrance of world-famous Hollywood Bowl. 




Old brass and copper coffee urns and jugs 
lake on new life, new usefulness, too, when 
lurned into "garden" lamps for your living 
room. Have them wired for electricity, bur- 
nished to a high pitch. Then plant the open 
centers with shining, green philodendron, let- 
ting the leafy tendrils spill over the sides, 
wind upwards around the lamp shade at- 
tachments. 

GUSTATORIAL 

If the meat you're getting these days tastes 
iust a touch "wooly," try this: before broil- 
ing lamb or beef, tuck bits of garlic in the 
fatty tissues, marinate with a California dry 
red wine and allow to sit for fifteen minutes 
or so. Then broil. 'Nuff said. 

REVERSE ORDER 

Do you dodge falling hat boxes every time 
you open your closet door? Terrible, isn't it 
. . . but easily remedied. Instead of putting 
your hat boxes in their usual high and dan- 
gerous position, and placing your shoes on the 
floor to gather dust, simply reverse the order. 
Dust can't hurt the hat boxes, and if yo;i 
line your shoes up neatly . . . you'll be able 
to abandon the duck system for good and 
all. 



tfl£k .rf 




Ann Stuart of the Earl Carroll Theatre 
Restaurant, Hollywood 

the 

NU ADJUST 

way 

— makes this brassiere per- 
fect for full figures. By ad- 
justing the front straps of the 
Nu Adjust you obtain the 
right amount of 
lift at all times. 
Sizes 34 — 46. 




THE CALIFORNIAN, March, 1947 



63 




gm i^kd^^eMb SdmiL WiA wAtoi 



NANCY'S • HOLLYWOOD 
HIGBEE CO. • CLEVELAND, OHIO 



64 



THE CAL1FORNIAN, March, 1947 




THE PlI(ATE ... A swashbuckling original 
by Irene Saltern. Pedal pusber in Tegra, 
Labtex spun rayon 

At better stores everywhere. — 




R I G I N A T O R 



OPTICAL 



LOS ANGELES is 



FASHION 



Sbwm So^em® © o o 

starring 

Bates Big 'n 'MAttle 

prints 



Fresh from the sketchboard of Cole of California: 

sea suits gone bouffant, flaring as rompers. They're Bates 

Big 'n' Little prints, whitecap-cool . . . duo loomed 

for a mother and daughter because the little girl's print is as 

scaled to size as she is. The fabric: Bates crisply- woven 

broadcloth, with a beautiful affinity for sun and salt and suds. 

BATES FABRICS, INC., 80 WORTH STREET. NEW YORK 13 




I 



■3W5?^ 




* 





'■ !i' ! * 




** 




*'%p 






V* 



■•"""SI 







1 



m 




SUN LOVING... FUN LOVING FOURSOME 

This beach outfit is a real beauty . . . lets you take the 
sun as you choose. Its fabric, Dan River's Cordspun*, is cotton 

that's Sanforizedt, color-fast, equal to any occasion 
Dan River Mills, Inc., Danville, Va 



"Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



t Fabric shrinkage less than 1 % 



Beach dress about $15. Sun suit about $8. 
Sizes 10 to 18. At B. Altman & Co., 
New York; Carson, Pirie Scott & Co., 
Chicago; Charles F. Berg, Portland, Ore.; 
Desmond's, Los Angeles; and other fine 
stores across the country. 




Fornameof your nearest store write Junior Miss of California, 910 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles 14 
THE CAM FORN I AN, April, 1947 



A drop shoulder "Outlaw" midriff 

and skirt, in a printed Calcutta* on white 

grounds. Sizes 9-15. About $15.00 

*A MILTON C.BLUM FABRIC 

1 




Jiibflt ^"fitWO w Uwm^ 



ttffc \fju UiMJ $wf>\wM&L Im \YwW\Ms 




'*\yiwLtoj W |\VVOMMaJ. \)J(M)Uwv!«. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 




dVdUt 



Engstead 




on 



J J 



chalk-white sheath with frothy appliqued 
lace; also in black; $75; exclusively in Hollywood at 



NANCY • S 



Hollywoo, 
CalifonU 



THE CALTFORNIAN is published monthly, 210 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles 14, California. Subscription price $3.00 for one year; 

Vol.3 $5.00 for two years; $7.50 for three. One dollar additional postage per year outside continental United States. 25 cents a copy. 

f^ 3 Entered as second class matter January 25, 194-6, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Copyright 1947 The Calif ornian, Inc. Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 



APRIL 
1947 




$Wjo^ 



Marjorie Montgomery designs are exclusive with <*T. EATON C?.»itco 

in Canada 



CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 



"unrays" from California, where the sun plays too., 
elegant spectator play shoes that take their cue from your 
costume, whether it be dress, suit, or playclothes. 8.95 

White suede with black patent. White suede with brown 
pepper, foxglove blue, paprika red, and mint green calf. 



SHOE S 




CO. LOS ANGELE: 



THE CALIFORNIAN, April. 1' 



MKMJt 



itM,^kk ff 1 



dMl(M^ 



ROL LEY, America's unique quality perfumer, captures 
the true tropical fragrances of these blossoms ... in 
perfumes acclaimed for their authenticity by native Hawaiians. 
Rich, alluring, exceptionally lasting in quality. . . also available 
in matching cologne, body talc, bath oil, and hand creme. 






INTRODUCTORY DRAM FLACON 

Rolley Inc., 120 Geary Street • San Francisco 8, California 

Hawaiian Pikaki 1.55 

Hawaiian Ginger 1. 
True Daphne 1 .85 



'•-" / All taxes included \ 

I 85 I Mailed anywhere I 

\ in Ihe United States I 



ZONE, 



STATE, 



'H CALI 



±U) 

NCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

FORNIAN. April, 1947 



Creafor of the World's only True Daphne Fragrance 
BEVERLY HILLS, CAUFC 




s 



WVV 



from 
California 

for 

vela x i 
i n d o o 




U.S. Trade Mark Reg. 



Ad , / • , ,, I 

'IUA\_, for L t> i s mi r #> I. i r a It I <■ s 



Fluid drapery in a rayon jersey robe ablaze with Caribbean Colorama ....about $15. 

CA M PIS M OBES SI'OIITS WE A It • 1 126 Santee Street . Los Angeles 15, Califo a 



THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 19' 









*■ colorama 

READY-TO-WEAR FASHIONS AND BY THE YARD 



A romantic color ful panor ama of luxuriant 
foliage, jungle mystery and age old customs, interpreted in 
sparkling, vivid prints by 




A Caribbean Cruise on the Vaccaro Line's queen 
ship — Cefalu — is imagineered for you in print on supple, alluring 
CarAQ, an Aq Tricot Jersey. Your wardrobe will be a fashion -vista 
of voodoo magic, seductive dances, marauding pirates and exotic 
landscapes — styled by distinguished California designer-manufacturers 
for a select grotrp of stores. Caribbean Colorama brings the color 
and drama of the tropics to your everyday life wherever you live. 

Junior Dress hy Li'l Alice Blouse L y Patty Woodard 

Evening Dress l y Emma Domjb Street Dress by Raab^Harmell 

House Coat b y Campus Modes Casual Dress b y Western Fashion 

X^Haff-size Dress b y Caroline Carlson 
Bloomerang Play Suit b y Koret of California 
5' 5" (and under) Sport Dress b y Lordieigh of California 

Caribbean Colorama ready-to-wear Fashions are featured by leading 
stores — write us, we'll tell you where. CALIFORNIA FABRIC CO.— 



Colorama Print Division — 751 So. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles 14, Calif, 




/ \ 



*■« 



n %ct 



^STANDARD 

FRUITS STEAMSHIP CO. 



HE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 





KIVIETTE CREATES A "GREAT LADY" DESIGN 
done, frankly, in the elegant tradition of 
drawing room drama... done with calculated 

subtlety for an entrance, an effect, for all 
the enchantment that spells Kiviette! 
WALDES KOVER-ZIP PLAYS THE SUPPORTING R'f 
Here is a zipper that always- givesa well-bred 

performance... because it's fabric-covered tc 
blend discreetly or contrast dramatically. Look 
for it on the smartest designs created here a 
abroad. Ask for it at notion counters now. 

WALDES KOVER-ZIP 

WALDES KOHINOOR, INC., LOjNG ISLAND CITY 1, N.Y. 



'. 







jJCvMl Q>P(I)04WW by Cole of California ... a two-piece midriff dress 
of hand-woven Guatemalan cotton at 25.00, and a matching more-midriff bathing 
suit at ia.Q5...a perfect "dual in trie sun." Sea blue, earth brown, and sun gold. 
Small, medium, and large sizes. ■ RESORT CLOTHES, fourth floor 

E CALI FORNI AN, April, 1947 




tM 



11 



12 




THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 




^^^ 



Watch the birdie . . . if you can! 
But you're probably looking at 
our Cole Swimsuit Original with 
Matletex* (where it matters most). 
Fresh cotton print by Everfast. . . 



1947, COLE OF CALIFORNIA, INC., 
LOS ANGELES *REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 




V ;;,. 



^PtV 




THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 



".3 



Featured daily coast to coast on "Queen for a Day 



Miss Hollywood Jr. 

afternoon frock in light- 
hearted Mummer- Mask 
print, deftly accented 
with black rayon 
crepe. Sizes 9 to 15. 
About $22.00. 







Write to us for the name of 
your nearest store. 



MISS HOLLYWOOD JR. • MONROE LLOYD LTD. 

PRODUCED BY 

20th CENTURY FROCKS 

ORIGINATORS OF AIR-SPED FASHION DELIVERY 
719 South Los Angeles Street, Los Angeles 14, California 



14 



THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 




. . . perfect summer dress of wrinkle-free rayon jersey. Sergee of California designed 

this brilliant print dress, punctuated it with grosgrain, added a refreshing side- 
swept pocket. Red, yellow or grey ground print, sizes 10 to 18, $17.95. 

MAIL ORDERS 
THE CAU FORN I AN, April, 1947 15 





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16 



THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 




YOUR WEDDING . . . orange blossoms, 
the traditional flower for brides. These are spe- 
cially treated to hold their petal freshness and 
original delicate fragrance for several months. 
Rice-in-a-bag, a wonderful thing to give each 
wedding guest to add to the festivities. These 
two ideas are among limitless others to make 
your wedding memorable. Write to John Beisfel, 
Weddings and Parties, 745 N. La Cienega, Los 
Angefes. 

PRETTY PERFECT . . .for your hoir 
... a dare for bold simplicity . . . this barrette 
in plain gold or silver ... for your fussiest or 
most casual hair-do, a shimmering high-light 
patch it is. The size, about 1" x 1%", and price 
around $3 at The Broadway, Los Angeles; Gold- 
water's, Phoenix; Carson Pirie Scott, Chicago. 
For the name of the store in your vicinity, write 
Biltmore Accessories, 846 S. Broadway, Los An- 
geles. 



ALADDIN'S FLAME 



. is the per- 



fume, a whispering essence of the exotic mystery 
of the Orient; Aladdin's Lamp is the container . . . 
in hand-blown glass, gold flame applicator. The 
Genie sends you this unique lamp with a precious 
half-ounce of Aladdin's Flame perfume for $9.75, 
tax and postage included. Sample dram in plain 
bottle, $2. Send check with order to Aladdin's 
Lamp, 214 S. Coast Blvd., Laguna Beach, Calif. 



VIBRA-SHAV . . . electric safety razor 
Slick shave trick . . . once over does it. Slices 
whiskers away ... no scraping, no pulling . . . 
whips back and forth in a most effective manner. 
Plug it in, pick it up, shave, set it down . . . 
easy as that. A gift for him or a hint to la 
femme to use for smooth summer legs. Price is 
$12.50, including tax and postage. From Art 
Metal Appliance Co., 11806 Bellagio Rd., Los 
Angeles. 

CLEARLY PRETTY . . . is this novel hat 

... all lucite, even the gold frill and flower trim 
around the transparent crown. To be worn ap- 
propriately for daytime or dates. For travel, 
you'll find it so simple to keep fresh and new 
looking. Give it a whisk and a promise with a 
special cloth provided . . . it's sparkling clean 
again. Price, $12.95; postpaid. House of Plastics, 
3339 E. St., San Bernardino, Calif. 



ITHE CALIFOKNIAN, April, 1947 




_ Regan Callais - 

Patricia Stevens Graduait 

Now an R. K. O. Starlet 



BE A 




Pah'c/a Stevens 

MODEL 

Coast to coast, the largest finishing 
school for professional models 
and career girls. Training includes 
fashion and photographic modeling, 
styling, make-up, voice and diction, 
figure control and personality. You 
may make Regan Callais' success 
story your own with this training. 
Write, phone or call for copy of 
COVER GIRL BULLETIN "A" 

Pak/cm Sievens 

The Only National School Of Its Type 

Hours 10 A. M. to S P. M. Sat. 'til 4 P. M. 



HOLLYWOOD 

5515 Sunset Blvd. 
HEmpstead 6891 



SAN FRANCISCO 

149 Marker St. 
PRospect 5957 



CHICAGO • DETROIT • MILWAUKEE 
INDIANAPOLIS • KANSAS CITY 



._ 




MISS AMf RICA 

MARILYN BUFERD 




one 



WASHABLE 



F A B R I C F I N I S H 

*"Everglaze"is a trade-mark which signifies the 
fabric has been finished and tested according 
to processes and standards controlled and 
prescribed by Joseph Bancroft & Sons Co. 



17 



New Seamless Hose 
In Nylon Yarn 



Vogu6 in Fashion 

Califprnians. and those who cherish 
that carefree '"California look." are 
said to be creating a new vogue for 
seamless hose . . now available in nylon 
yarns. 

Gossamer-thin nylon, with its fine 
fitting qualities, is particularly adapted 
to the new hose, but it was only re- 
cently that machinery was perfected 
and made available to leading mills so 
that they could use it in the manufac- 
ture of seamless hosiery . . "Certified 
by the seal of the Dancing Twins." 

These newest nvlon hose give the en- 
viable bare-leg appearance which is so 
complimentary to summer fashions. 
With current popularity of barefoot 
sandals, too. the choice of hosiery be- 
comes even more important . . the girl 
wearing seamless stockings maintains 
the "bare" illusion most successfully. 

Aside from the appearance value of 
seamless hose, they have an advantage 
appreciated by women everywhere • • 
no seams to get crooked or to detract 
from the symmetry of a pair of pretty 
legs! 







* 



Ik 



in* 



There's a subtly controlling, new- 
found freedom in Mom'zelle's ex- 
clusive "Cross-lift" design. 




<5&$S* 




*'4 



4 




Stm**- 




TILE TREASURES 



• choker, ear- 



rings, bracelet ... in gleaming gold or silver 
finish . . . each little hexagonal tile with beveled 
edges that catch the light and reflect it. Smarter 
than smart . . . these novel pieces of costume 
jewelry add dash and sparkle to your spring 
wardrobe. The set, $7.20; choker alone, $2.40; 
bracelet, $2.40; earrings, $2.40. Order from 
Daniels of Beverly Hills, 451 N. Beverly Drive, 
Calif. 

CALIFORNIA FOURSOME . . . 

Sand ley's new four- way conversation piece . . . 
coin purse, billfold, checkbook, identification; in 
one pancake-thin fold of morocco leather, pig- 
skin lined. Burnished edges with gold tips on 
flaps of coin and bill compartments. Flip the 
flap and slip out the bill without unfolding the 
wallet. Cherry, clover, brown, navy, black. About 
$7.50 ot Dunn's English Leather Shop, Atlantic 
City, and Robbins, Ltd., Beverly Hills, Calif. 

LUCKY YOU . . with this western 

horseshoe-fab belt. The leather is saddle; the 
colors are stallion black, Sequoia tanbark and 
natural buff. The horseshoe and the smooth slim 
buckle are shining solid brass. Sizes, 24-32. 
About 1J4" wide and about $4 at better stores 
throughout the country. For the name of the 
store in your vicinity, write Phil Socket! Mfg. 
Co., 1240 S. Main, Los Angeles. Est. 1925. 

GARDENIAS . . . with the dainty waxen 
purity of living blossoms that will forever retain 
the crisp cool whiteness of their original love- 
liness . . . for the answer to your gift problems 
... a corsage or table decoration by Coreen 
Originals, created in featherlight Celanese Lum- 
arith. Ask for them at your nearest gift shop, or 
order direct, $5.50 each; with perfume, $7.50. 
Postpaid from Hobson and Schuttz Sates Co., 
1151 S. Broadway, Los Angeles. 

SPINNER ASH TRAY . . . just turn the 

knob and unsightly cigarette and cigar ends spin 
away. Wonderful for the executive's den, recrea- 
tion room or office. Man -size (about 7/2 in 
diameter), heavy-weight brass with bright chrome 
or bronze plate finish. Heavy felt covered plate 
at bottom protects table tops and prevents tip- 
ping. From Art Metal Appliance Co., 11806 Bel- 
lagio Rd... Los Angeles, $7.50, including tax and 
postage. 



18 



THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 



-*¥V$$ 




REAL TORTOISE . . . a beautiful 

bracelet from the Barbadoes, artfully carved 
from tortoise shell in its natural tones of delicate 
amber to deep, deep brown. It is %" wide and 
7 1 /4" around. A love of a bracelet and a jewelry 
piece to be treasured. Write to Susan Ranney, 
Distinctive Gifts, 507 Fifth Avenue, New York 
City. The price is $15.60 including tax and 
postage. 

PURSE PERFUMER . . . s i k k and 

streamlined, guaranteed leakproof forever. Holds 
one dram . . . works like a charm by merely 
pressing the button at the top. A lustrous new 
plated metal that neither scratches nor tarnishes 
. . . platinum-like finish, $3.50; gold finish, $5, 
postpaid. Order from Daniels of Beverly Hills, 
451 N. Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif., or for 
the store nearest you, write Funk Distributing, 
257 S. Spring, Los Angeles. 

HIS AND HERS . . . starbright 14K gold 
banded in midnight black suede ... an ex- 
quisite casing for the finest in 17 jeweled ac- 
curacy and quality. Ideal to glorify a wedding, 
anniversary or other dual gift occasion. Man's 
watch $175. Woman's watch $150. Federal tax 
included. The name is Post. Ask for them at your 
favorite store or write to the Post Watch Co. Inc., 
607 Fifth Avenue, New York 17. 

BABY ANNOUNCEMENT 

MATCHES ... a distinctive novelty to 
announce the arrival of a new baby. Ample 
room on the reverse side of the blue-boy and 
pink-girl bookmatches for vital statistics . . . 

i date, name, weight. $2.50 at gift and depart- 
ment stores including Auerbach Company, Salt 
Lake City; The Bon Marche, Seattle; Strong's 

[Book Store, Albuquerque; Weinstock-Lubin & Co., 
Sacramento. By Monogram Company of Calif., 
1244 Larkin St., San Francisco. 

I BOOKS . . . written and published in Cali- 

Inia . . . meaty, new creative writing. Kenneth 

|Patchen, "enfant terrible" of American letters, 

offers illustrated codes for living in "Panels For 

|The Walls Of Heaven," $4.50. Leonard Wolf, 

Berkeley poet, with "Hamadrad Hunted," treats 

human themes, $2.50. Love lyrics concern San 

Franciscan Phillip Lamantia's "Erotic Poems," $2. 

Order from Bern Porter, publisher, 2303 Durant, 

IBerkeley, Calif. Add 15c for tax and mailing. 



fa 



C-p^ 



DESIGNED IT 




TRI-COLOR ... to give you "That California 
Look." Fashioned of "Rumpus," an Ameritex 
gabardine, in luscious tri-color combinations. 
Sizes 10-18. About $11. 

Write for name of nearest store. 

DOLUS of CALIFORNIA 

812 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles 14 



THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 



19 



On Record 



WITH FRANCES ANDERSON 



X en years ago the only people who 
cared much about American folk music, 
with the exception of Negro spirituals, 
were for the most part the people still 
helping to create it, those to whom it 
had been handed down through the 
generations . . . and the handful of 
musicians and scholars who found it 
worthy of study. 

Just look at the situation today. 
Maxine Sullivan probably did a little 
ice-breaking with her sophisticated, but 
appealing, renditions of old English and 
American ballads. And gradually the 
public became sufficiently educated to 
take the stuff straight, instead of diluted 
with jive. So now we have Burl Ives, 
Josh White, Huddie Ledbetter (Lead- 
belly), Richard Dyer-Bennett . . . and 
Susan Reed. 

Susie is the gal who has been singing 
for some seasons now at Cafe Society 
in New York. She plays old instruments 
... a zither, a lute, an Irish harp, etc. 
She looks young and naive, like a hill 
girl, plainly dressed, with bare feet . . . 
and lacquered fingernails. And Susie 
it is whose folk music of this country, 
as well as of England, Ireland, Norway, 
is immortalized on the top-notch, grade 
A wax ordinarily reserved for the Tos- 
caninis, Heifetzes, Rubinsteins and Pin- 
zas. In short, Victor has put out a Red 
Seal album of Susie's songs. Folk music 
has arrived. 

You'll like the songs, too . . . familiar 
tunes and some not so well known . . . 
sung in a very sweet, unpracticed sound- 
ing voice, but rather too artfully for the 
true hill touch. 

April brings other interesting new 
records . . . f'rinstance: 

CLASSICAL GEMS 

"Bach Arias" sung by Marian Ander- 
son. Noble music from four cantatas 
and the St. Matthew's Passion, nobly 
interpreted by one of the world's great 
artists. Excellent orchestra work under 
the leadership of Robert Shaw. Victor. 

"Concerto for Piano and Orchestra," 
Khatchaturian. William Kapell, brilliant 
young pianist who has introduced the 
American public to this work by one of 
Russia's rising stars, records the com- 
position with which he is now primarily 
identified. Serge Koussevitzky and the 
Boston Symphony lend material aid in 
rendering this atmospheric music in 
which the modern idiom becomes com- 
pletely Slav. Interesting, well recorded. 
Victor. 

"Prelude to Die Meistersinger" has 
Toscanini and the NBC Symphony do- 
ing as well by Wagner as could be. 
Single record. Victor. "Saudades do 
Brasil" by Milhaud gives Artur Rubin- 
stein opportunity for pianistic fireworks. 
A lovable Gershwin prelude (No. 2) 
backs it up. Single record. Victor. "Ne- 
mico della Patria" from Giordano's 
"Andrea Chenier" and "Adamastor, Re 
dell' Acque Profonde" from Meyer- 
beer's "L'Africana" give the Met's fine 
young tenor, Robert Merrill, full scope 
for his voice and artistry. Single record. 
Victor. 

For Small Fry: "Lullabies," an album 
of familiar go-to-sleep songs sweetly 
played by Eddie Brown and his string 
ensemble, sung by Crys Holland and 
Jean Merrill. Nice stuff. Sonora. 



20 



GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

THE CALIFORNIAN presents for your convenience a current directory of the finest restaurants in Los Angeles 
and San Francisco, cultural events of interest and activities that make living in California or a visit to our 
state the most enjoyable for you and your family. Fine foods of many kinds are available, and whenever 
possible specialties of the house are listed, names of the maitres d'hotel and days the establishments are open. 
Have a good time ! 

THE RESTAURANTS 
IN LOS ANGELES 



AMBASSADOR— 3400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. 
World-famous Cocoanut Grove open every night ex- 
cept Monday. Saturday afternoon tea dancing. Freddy 
Martin's Orchestra. Dinners from $3.25. Cover $1, 
Saturday $1.50. Rouben. 

BAR OF MUSIC— 7351 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Excellent double-piano on a stage back of the bar. 
Food. Good small band. Two-dollar minimum on 
Saturday and Sunday. 

DON THE BEACHCOMBER— 1727 North McCadden 
Place, Hollywood. Fried Shrirnf), Rumaki, Barbecued 
Spareribs, Mandarin Duck, Chicken Almond and 
knoivn as originator of the Zombie. Dinners from $3. 
Usually crowded, but good tourist spot. 

BEVERLY HILLS HOTEL— 9641 Sunset Blvd., Bev- 
erly Hills. Palm Room open Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday nights with dancing. Thursday buffet, $3.75. 
Dinner a la carte from $1.75. Good food and you 
might see a movie star. 

BEVERLY - WILSHIRE HOTEL— 9415 Wilshire 
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Tasty food in Copa d'Oro and 
Terrace Room, with medium prices. 

BILTMORE BOWL— 515 South Olive St., Los An- 
geles. Best place downtown for good food and good 
music, with Russ Morgan playing. Two-dollar din- 
ners, nominal cover charge and two floor shows. Nice 
for tourists. Closed Monday. 

BIT O' SWEDEN— 9051 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 
On the famous "Strip." Good food, reasonable prices, 
sometimes smorgasbord. Fine for tourists. 

BUBLICHKI— 8846 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. A 
bit of Russia on the Strip. Cutlet a la Kieff, Filet 
Mignon a la Stroganoff, Caucasian ShashUk, Rus- 
sian Blini. Dinners from $3. Host, Wally; hostess, 
Jasmina. Good music and romantical. Closed Tuesday. 

CASA LA GOLONDRINA— 35 Olvera St., Los An- 
geles, "the first brick house in the citv." Historic 
Mexican cafe. Arroz con Polio, Enchiladas, Tacos. 
Dinners from $2. Alfredo. Closed Sunday. 

CHAROUCHKA— S524 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Another bite of Russia on the Strip. Mamma and 
Papa, "your hosts," excel with atmosphere, food 
and soothing music. Closed Monday, and prices 
fairly high. 

CHASEN'S— 9339 Beverly Blvd., Beverly Hills. One 
of the best in the West. Excellent cuisine and plenty 
of celebrities. Expensive. Closed Monday. 

CIRO'S— 8344 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. On the 
Strip and luxurious, with name bands for dancing. 
Expensive. Celebrities, sometimes. 

CRICKET ON THE HEARTH— 806 North La 
Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. New, attractive and 
excellent English food. Blintzes, too! Old English 
Bubble and Squeak, Hungarian Beef Paprikash. A la 
carte, reasonable. Go. 

HENRI'S— 9236 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. Excel'ent 
French food served in the grand manner. A la carte 
and expensive, but for the discriminating. 

HOUSE OF MURPHY— La Cienega "Restaurant 
Row" at Fourth Street, Los Angeles. Madame Begue's 
Chicken Creole, Hamburger and Onion Rings, Million 
Dollar Hash. Your host, Bob Murphy. Wonderful 
Salads, Beautiful Steaks. A la carte, medium prices. 
Open every day. 

KNOTT'S BERRY FARM— Buena Park. An hour's 
drive from Los Angeles, but a tourist's dream as 
reported in Reader's Digest. Good chicken and ham 
and hot biscuits. Reasonable prices. Gift shop. 

LA RUE— 8633 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, on the 
Strip. Tops in food and decor. Crepes Louise, Crepes 



a la Reine, Lasagne Pasticciate, Beef Bourguignonne. 
From noon till 3 for lunch except Sunday. From 6^ to 
11 p.m. for dinner. Closed Monday. Felix Cigolini. 
A la carte entrees from $2.25. 

LINDY'S— 3656 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. A good 
place to eat, with steaks a feature. Closed Monday. 

LUCEY'S — 5444 Melrose Avenue, Hollywood. Good 
food, medium prices and across the street from 
Paramount Studio. Movie stars abound at lunch. 

MIKE LYMAN'S OR AL LEVY'S— When you're 
downtown in Los Angeles. Good food, same man- 
agement. Reasonable. 

MOCAMBO— 8588 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. One 
of the Strip's spots for movie stars. Colorful, crowded 
and expensive. 

PEGGY CLEARY'S— "Talk of the Town" Restaurant 
at 1904 So. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles. New and 
attractive. Scalhpini Piccate, Stuffed Squab, Breast 
of Guinea Hen. A la carte and prices fairly high, 
but the food's delicious. Closed Tuesday. 

PERINO'S — 3027 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. In 
the heart of the smart shopping area. Excellent food. 
A favorite luncheon rendezvous for society. 

PICCADILLY— 848 No. La Cienega Blvd., Los An- 
geles. Fairly new, but very good, with Ernest Vignati 
as your host. Steaks. 

PIERRE'S— 2295 Huntington Drive, San Marino. A 
good cretes suzette and pleasant atmosphere. Char- 
coal-broiled filet mignon, too. Pierre. From noon 
till 9. 

PLAYERS— 8225 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. Good for 
tourists and you might see a movie star. Expensive. 

READY ROOM— Johnny Wilson's popular rendez- 
vous for the younger set. Big fireplace, delicious 
steaks, informal atmosphere. At 365 No. La Cienega 
Blvd., Los Angeles, on Restaurant Row. 

ROMANOFF'S— 326 No. Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills. 
Prince Mike caters to movie stars, writers and pro- 
ducers. Expensive. 

SARNEZ— 170 No. La Cienega Blvd., Beverly Hills. 
Lew Sailee and Harry Ringland have an attractive 
place, with good food and good music, reasonably 
priced. 

SOMERSET HOUSE— On Restaurant Row in Bev- 
erly Hills. Fine steaks, a la carte dinners, nice 
atmosphere and expensive. 

SPORTSMAN'S LODGE— 12833 Ventura Blvd., 
North Hollywood. An epicurean delight in San Fer- 
nando Valley. Broiled Lobster, Chicken Saute a Sec, 
Charcoal-broiled Steaks in a gorgeous setting. One of 
the finest restaurants in California. Jack Spiros. From 
5:30 p.m. Closed Monday. 

TAIL O' THE COCK— 477 So. La Cienega Blvd., 
Los Angeles, on Restaurant Row. Mac McHenry pro- 
vides excellent food, good companions and a pleasing 
atmosphere. Hamburger Diable and Fried Shrimp are 
specialties. You'll want to go again and again, and 
it's reasonably priced. 

TOWN HOUSE— 2965 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, 
overlooking Lafayette Park. Three smart cafes to 
serve you . . . Garden Room, Cape Cod Grill 
and the Zebra Room. No cover or minimum. Excellent 
food and a good spot for the tourist. 

VAGABOND HOUSE— 2505 Wilshire Blvd., in the 
heart of smart Los Angeles. New and with the Don 
Blanding touch. Curries their specialty. Dinners from 
4 on. George. Prices medium. Open every day. 

VILLA NOVA— 9015 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. A 



GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 



charming old world atmosphere on the Strip. Good 
Italian food and good service. 



THE THEATRE 

PLAYS 
MUSICALS 

BILTMORE — Popular operetta "Student Prince," 
starring Frank Hornaday, April 3-13; Theatre Guild 
production of "Magnificent Yankee" with Louis Cal- 
hern, April 14 to May 3. Every night at 8:30; 
matinees Wednesday, Saturday at 2:30. 

PASADENA COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE— "State 
of the Union" ends April 6; Shakespeare's "As You 
Like It" runs from April 9 to 20, and "Yankee 
Fable," a comedy by Guy Andros, plays April 23 to 
May 4-. Curtain at 8:15; prices 76c to $2. 

THEATRE MART— Continually playing "The 
Drunkard" every night at 8. Famous old-time melo- 
drama with beer and pretzels. Wonderful tourist en- 
tertainment and good for the entire family. 

EL CAPITAN— Ken Murray's "Blackouts of 19*7", 
starring Marie Wilson and Ken, every night at 8:30, 
with plenty of matinees. Variety entertainment that 
will please. Good for tourists. 

EARL CARROLL'S THEATRE RESTAURANT— In 
Hollywood for the tourist. "The Vanities" in a new 
show, each night with two different performances at 
9:15 and midnight. Girls. Girls. Three-thirty with 
dinner, $1.65 without. 

EL PATIO — All-colored revue, "Sumpin' Jumpin' ", 
featuring Wonderful Smith, Benny Carter and his 
band, every night at 8:30. Matinee Sunday at 2-30. 
From $1.80 evenings, $1.20 matinee. 

VARIETY 

TURNABOUT THEATRE— The Yale Puppeteers, 
Elsa Lanchester and Lotte Goslar in good entertain- 
ment. March 30-April 5, "Gullible's Travels" and 
Southern Exposure;" April 6-12, "Mr. Noah" and 
About Face;" April 13-19, "Caesar Julius" and 
Vice Versa;" April 20-26, "Tom and Jerry" and 
Turnabout Time." 

ICE-CAPADES OF 1947— Famous family-enjoyment 
ice extravaganza, featuring Donna Atwood, begins 
Pan Pacific Auditorium run on April 24. Colorful cos- 
tumes, beautiful girls. Every night at 8:30, Sunday 
matinee at 2:30. From $1.25 to $3.60. 

CONCERT 

SIGMUND ROMBERG— At Philharmonic Auditori- 
um April 4 and 5, conducting orchestra and soloists, 
at 8:30. First personal appearance in Los Angeles. 

BIDU SAYAO — Metropolitan soprano at Philharmonic 
April 8. 

JACOB GIMPEL— Concert pianist at Philharmonic 
April 9. 

GUISEPPE DI LUCCA— Noted baritone at Philhar- 
monic April 12. 

JASCHA HEIFETZ— World-famous violinist at Phil- 
harmonic April 16. 

JAMES MELTON— Radio and opera star at Philhar- 
monic Sunday matinee 2:30 on April 21. 

PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA IN LOS ANGE- 
LES— On April 10-11 at Philharmonic Alfred Wal- 
lenstein will conduct; David Frisina, concertmaster, 
soloist. On April 17-18 Wallenstein will conclude the 
home season by conducting an entire orchestral pro- 
gram. 



1 in Long Beach, April 2 in Pasadena, April 3 in 
San Diego, April 6 in Compton, with Malcuzynski, 
noted Polish pianist, as soloist at all but Long Beach 
engagement. Wallenstein will conduct the orchestra 
again on April 13 in Glendale, April 19 in Escon- 
dido and April 20 in Alhambra. 



OPERA 

LOS ANGELES CIVIC LIGHT OPERA— Season 
opens April 21 at Philharmonic with "Song of Nor- 



way. 



SPORTS 



HARNESS RACING— Grand _ Circuit Meeting of 
Western Harness Racing Association opens April 11 
at Hollywood Park, with races scheduled Tuesdays 
through Saturdays each week until May 17. 

BOWLING — American Bowling Congress in progress 
at National Guard Armory in Exposition Park. 

BOXING — Every Friday night at 8:30 at Hollywood 
Legion Stadium ; every Tuesday night at 8 :30 at 
downtown Olympic Stadium. 

WRESTLING — Every Monday night at Hollywood 
Legion Stadium ; every Wednesday night at down- 
town Olympic Auditorium. 

POLO — Regul ar match games every Sundav at 2 at 
Riviera Country Club Polo Field, off Sunset Blvd., 
on the way to the beach. 

SKIING AND SNOW SPORTS— Fourth Annual 
Snow and Spring Sports Meet at Sun Valley April 
12-13; weekly session of "Spring Learn to Ski Weeks" 
scheduled for April 13 and 20 under direction of 
Friedl Pfeifer at Sun Valley. 

TRACK — University of Southern California's dual 
meet April 26 with Stanford at Palo Alto; Santa 
Barbara Relays at Santa Barbara. 

BASEBALL — Pacific Coast League season opens April 
1. See daily paper for contestants and time. Games 
regularly in Los Angeles, Hollywood, San Francisco, 
Oakland, Sacramento, San Diego, Seattle, Portland. 

FISHING — Yellowtail Fishing Derby begins in San 
Diego April 1, finals August 30. Prizes offered. 

LAKESIDE RODEO— In San Diego County April 6, 
with bronc busting, bulldogging, trick riding and 
calf roping. 

EASTER EGG HUNT ON SKIS— At Mammoth 
Mountain in Inyo-Mono area on April 6. Prizes for 
all ages, slalom and downhill ski events. 

BADMINTON — National championships at Pan 
Pacific Auditorium April 9-13. 

GOLF — Twelfth Annual Bobby Jones Tournament 
April 11-13 at Catalina. 

DOG SHOW— Los Angeles Kennel Club's Forty-third 
Annual National All-Breed Show April 26-27 at Gil- 
more Stadium. 



THE RESTAURANTS 

IN SAN FRANCISCO 

PALACE HOTEL— Market and New Montgomery 
Sts. Garden Court serving lunch, tea, and dinner. 
Leonard Auletti and his concert orchestra. Ask lor 
Joseph, maitre d'. Also Rose Room, open nightly ex- 
cept Monday, with Jean Sablon and Eddy Oliver's 
orchestra. Cover $1 weekdays, $1.50 Saturdays. 
Adolph. 

CATHAY HOUSE— 718 California St. In the heart 
of Chinatown. Lunch 90c and $1.10, dinner $1.75 
and $2. Ernest Tsang. Authentic Chinese food only, 
featuring Hung Ngon Gai Choiv Mein. 



PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA ON TOUR— April OMAR KHAYYAM— 196 O'Farrell St. Dinner only, 



• California 
In Books 

BY HAZEL PULLING 



Kj ALIFORNIA beckons! Magic words 
when one has turned the keys that open 
wide the gates to this land of sunshine 
and color. To see California's unique 
and varied past shining through her 
daily fare . . to know the meaning be- 
hind her present way of life . . is to 
participate to the full in all that Cali- 
fornia has to offer. 

The keys to California are her books. 
No week passes that does not bring to 
light some new work that reveals Cali- 
fornia's many facets. Books of history, 
travel, fiction, biography . . these, and 
many others . . portray her character 
now and as it was in days long past. 
Bound within her place names lies 
the meaning of much of early California 
and the secret of some of the colorful 
tone that is hers today. Those names, 
some as old as California herself, have 
been retained decade after decade while 
scholar and interested layman have 
sought to unravel the history behind the 
wora. 

Latest of the searchers is Herbert In- 
gram Priestley who spent long years at 
this intriguing task. Now, in Franciscan 
Explorations in California (Arthur H. 
Clark, 1946. 189p. $5.00) we have the 
results of his studies. Sketched in pan- 
oramic survey are the travels of pious 
and adventurous Spaniards from 1769 
to 1823. From San Diego to some dis- 
tance north of San Francisco their geo- 
graphic tracings and namings are dis- 
closed. Detailed descriptions of sites, 
whether mountain passes or minor 
points, are given and the origins of 
names assigned are revealed. This is a 
trustworthy guide for the Californian 
who today, as Priestley says, "rejoices 
when he finds that his home lies on the 
pathway trod by the friars of a bygone 
day on their errands of faith." 

Another and quite a different view 
of California may be found in her 
sports. Southern California turf de- 
votees and those who only wonder what 
it's all about will find guidance and en- 
lightenment in Ernest E. Blanche's Off 
to the Races (Barnes, 1947. $2.50). Re- 
plete with illustration and anecdote re- 
flecting the atmosphere of the track, 
this account gives the terminology, his- 
tory, lives of famous characters both 
biped and quadruped, the mechanics of 
betting and percentages, and many 
other features of horse racing. This is 
a guide that will give one an under- 
standing, if not a lucky technique, of a 
sport that captures the heart of many 
a Californian. 

Interesting side lights of Californiana 
are portrayed in the delightfully humor- 
ous, but persistently pathetic Bring 
Along Laughter by journalist Milla 
Logan (Random, 1947. 250p. $2.50). 
This is the story of Milla Zenovich 
Logan's Serbian family with all its 
relatives that lived in a-nd around San 
Francisco. From grandmother to littlest 
cousin each plays a vital part in the 
family's destiny. Homesick, united, 
brave, and as lovingly "old country" as 
could be achieved, together they spin 
a saga that is part of California's lore. 



21 



HOUSE OF MURPHY 



for gourmets only 




Fine food in an atmosphere 
of convivial friendliness! 



Where la Cienega Crosses Fourth 

CR 5-0191 
BR 2-3432 




U.S. CHOICE EASTERN 
STEAKS and CHOPS 

@OC&tail-l IN THE TAVERN BAR 

365 No. La Cienega Blvd. 

I Slock NortK ol Btvtrly tewltvar* 



CReilvisw 5-9417 



h 




t Strip 
Meets the » 

World's Finest Cuisine 

By Henri, creator of Crepes Suzeite 

• 

Cocktails 

EQUESTRIAN ROOM 

Ray Rasch's Sophisticated piano 

• 

9236 Sunset Boulevard 

BRadshaw 2-2030 CRestview 5-9610 



GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 



go 

LfcJ 

&9 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

$2.25. up. Bert Rustigian. Armenian S Irish Kebab, 
Tchakhokhbelli and Kouzou Kzartma are specialties. 

ST. FRANCIS HOTEL— Powell and Geary. Mural 
Room open daily for lunch and dinner, with dancing 
from 8:30 p.m. except Monday, and tea dancing 
Saturdays from 4- to 5:30. Hal Pruden's band. A 
la carte. Ernest. Order almost anything. 

LONGBARN— On El Camino Real, 2 miles south of 
Stanford University. Open for dinner only. Closed 
Thursdays. Ask for Willy or Eddy. Dinners $2.50 to 
$4. Plan to eat here when you visit the peninsula. 
Country farmhouse style with women chefs. 

RESTAURANTE LOMBARD— 1906 Van Ness Ave. 
Dinner only, from $2.50, or a la carte. Bill Lombard 
specializes in steaks and real thick roast beef. 

EL PRADO — Post and Stockton, in the Plaza Hotel. 
Lunch 11-2, dinner 6-9, closed Sundays and holidays. 
Walter is maitre d'. Service London style, with every- 
thing rolled in on a serving table. Chef Maurice 
specializes in French cuisine. Roast beef best item. 

STAR LITE ROOM, Hotel Sir Francis Drake — Sutter 
and Powell. Lunch only from 12 to 2, buffet stvle, 
for $1.50. Includes hot dishes. Al Field, host. You 
dine 22 floors up with a spectacular view. 

HIGH BONNET— 20 O'Farrell. Closed Sundays. Din- 
ner from $2, which includes Smorgasbord. Ask for 
Henri. American cooking with French finesse. 

TONGA ROOM — In the Fairmont Hotel. Open 4:30 
p.m. to 1:30 a.m. daily. Hawaiian band plays on a 
raft in a swimming pool, with the dining tables 
surrounding. Dinners $3.50. Hawaiian Ham and 
Eggs at $1.50, or a la carte. Henry Degorog, host. 

TARANTINO'S— 206 Jefferson St. Open 11 a.m. to 
11 p.m. Dinners $2.50 and a la carte. Dan Sweeney, 
Jr. and Jack Adams. Seafood, steaks and chops. Food 
not outstanding, but try it because it's on Fisher- 
man's Wharf. 

PARIS — 242 O'Farrell St. Lunch and dinner dailv, 
but no lunch on Sundav. Dinner $1.50. Typical old 
San Francisco familv-style French cuisine in plain 
surroundings. Lots of crusty French bread and de- 
licious soup. Excellent cooking. 

BLUE FOX — 659 Merchant St. Dinners only, closed 
Mondays. Ask for Mario or Frank. Dinners from 
$2. French and Italian style. Frog Legs Doree, Bone- 
less Squab, Chicken stuffed tvith tvild rice, Rex Sole 
Marguerite. In an alley, not bright and shiny, but 
they know how to cook. The natives eat here. 

BERNSTEIN'S GROTTO— 123 Powell. Open daily 
for lunch and dinner. Lunch from 65c, dinner from 
$1.30. Exclusively sea food and good. Lobster Prin- 
cpss, Deviled Crab in Shell, Eastern Oysters on Half 
Shrll, Fried Prawns and Abalone served in rooms 
built like a ship's interior. 

CLIFF HOUSE— Point Lobos Avenue, overlooking 
Seal Rocks. Dinners daily from $1.50. Seafood, 
Steaks, Chicken and Roasts. Eat while looking 
through the oversize Dlateglass windows at the 
ocean, Seal Rocks and Golden Gate strait. 



THE THEATRE 

CONCERTS 

SIGMUND ROMBERG-;-Conducting orchestra at San 
Francisco Civic Auditorium April 9 at 8:30. 

1ASCHA HEIFETZ— Violinist in recital at Opera 
House April 14 at 8:30. 

WITOLD MALCUZYNSKI— In piano recital at 
Opera House April 17 at 8:30. 

IAMES MELTON — Opera and radio tenor at Opera 
House April 22 at 8:30. 

MARYLA IONAS— Pianist at Opera House April 
26 and 8:30. 



ART EXHIBITS 

MODERN TEWELRY— Collection from Museum of 
Modern Art in New York and west coast sources at 
Museum of Art from April 15 to Early May. 



S ^p^pN 




...where the smartest 
Angelenos get together 
for our famous luncheons 
and dinners . . . 
on Beverly Hills' 
"Restaurant Row" 






(Tricket 
On Ohe 
Kcartl) 



CONTINENTAL FAVORITES 

for your discerning taste 

From 11 A. M. Till the Wee Hours 

806 N. LA CIENEGA BLVD. 
HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



22 



THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 






GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

PHOTOGRAPHY— Museum of Art from April 22 
to May 11. 

TEMPTATIONS OF ST. ANTHONY— Drawings 
and paintings submitted for a contest in connection 
with a motion picture of the same name. At Museum 
of Art April 15-30. 

SPORTS 

BASEBALL — At Seals Stadium, San Francisco: Seat- 
tle, April 1 through 6; Hollywood, April 8 through 
13; Portland, April 29 through May 4. At Oakland: 
Sacramento, April 15 through 20; San Diego, April 
22 through 27. 

HORSE RACING — At Tanforan Tuesdays through 
Saturdays at 1 p.m. April 5, Vigilante Handicap; 
April 19, Mariposa; April 26, Pacific Handicap; 
May 3, Tanforan Handicap, $50,000 added, for 3- 
year-oids and up . . . the big race. 

BOWLING— April 12-May 17, Mission Bowl 
Doubles, $10,000 first place. Two top-flight women 
bowlers, holding national titles, challenge San Fran- 
cisco men. 

TRAVEL & SPORTS SHOW— At Pacific Auditorium 
April 25 to May 4, from 1 to 11:30 p.m., with floor 
shows at 3 :30 and 9:30. Boat exhibition, fly cast- 
ing and duck calling contests. 

OF SPECIAL INTEREST 

THROUGHOUT STATE 

INDIAN ARTISTS EXHIBITION— At Southwest 
Museum in Los Angeles all April, 1 to 5 p.m., daily 
except Monday. Specially featured will be paintings 
by Pueblo and Navajo tribes, their pottery, silver 
jewelry, baskets, blankets and kachina dolls. 

"THROUGH THE TELESCOPE"— Planetarium 
show at Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, Wednes- 
day through Sunday, 8:30 p.m., Friday through Sun- 
day 3 p.m., Sunday 4:15 p.m. 

FLOWERS IN BLOOM— Dogwood along Merced 
River in Yosemite Valley, the Wawona and Big Oak 
Flat roads. Two thousand acres of peach blossoms in 
Banning area of San Gorgonio Pass. White Cherokee 
roses along Chase River in Corona climb 30 feet to 
the tops of palm trees for a distance of a mi!e. 

BENEDICTION DE LOS AN I MALES— Blessing of 
the Animals April 5 in Los Angeles is perpetuation 
of Mexican custom in which domestic animals are 
blessed to insure fertility. 400 animals adorned with 
ribbons and flowers parade Olvera Street to Old 
Plaza Church and fiesta. 

DESERT CIRCUS — April 9-13 at Palm Springs. 
Costumes, parades, horse shows, carnival, rodeo, 
children's party and kangaroo court. 

NATIONAL BOAT SHOW— April 12—20 in Balboa 
Park, San Diego. 

RAMONA PAGEANT— Last two weekends in April, 
first week-end in May, Twentieth season of the out- 
door play presented by the people of Hemet and 
San Jacinto, based on Helen Hunt Jackson's "Ra- 
mona." 

IMPERIAL VALLEY ROUNDUP— At Imperial 
County Fairgrounds April 18-20 with frontier par- 
ade, western dances, queen contests, etc. 

SPRING GARDEN SHOW— "Fantasia" theme at 
huge showing at Exposition Building in Oakland 
April 29-May 4. 

SPRING FLOWER SHOW— In Santa Maria April 
19-20 at Veterans Memorial Building. Lovely flower 
arrangements. 

ANTIQUE SHOW— Second Annual Pacific Coast 
Antique Show April 9 — 13 at Pan Pacific Audi- 
torium in Los Angeles. Tickets $1. 

SANTA BARBARA— Polo every Sunday 2:30 at 
Fleischmann Field. Free. Old Mission Santa Barbara, 
Museum of Natural History and Botanic Garden 
open to public daily and Sunday. 

EASTER SUNRISE SERVICES— Sunday, April 6, at 
Hollywood Bowl, Forest Lawn in Glendale, Mt. 
Rubidoux in Riverside, Catalina Island, San Diego, 
Redlands, Palm Springs, Yosemite and Sierra Madre. 




DOUBLE FEATURE 

for streamlined wardrobes. 
It's a blouse. ..it's a slip... 

It's a Blou Slip. Now 
available in a variety of 
interesting new necklines. 



BLOU-SLIP CO. 



341 Market Street 



San Francisco 5 




THE CAL1FORNIAN, April, 1947 



23 




ELEANOR GREEN... 



drapes pure sil\ with 

figure'glorifying 

flattery 

Gown Salon, third floor 



35 



00 



O'Connor, Moffatt ♦ San Francisco 



THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 







flH 



i>^ 




bold brush strokes of variegated color ... on 
a peak quality, washable rayon. We have this California 
beauty in predominant mint, copen, adobe brown or 
flagstone red. 32-40. Don't tarry — these shirts 
are rare. Come in or mail your order posthaste. 

JUST $3.95, 




A 







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1202 JAY STREET, MODESTO 



THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 



25 



Tn£ perfect style — classic 
\\\£ perfect fabric — gabardine 
The perfect colors — aqua, pink / 

beige, white 





four shops fashioned for you 
Pasadena . . . San Marino 
Glendale . . . Huntington Park 



Mail orders promptly filled . . . 444 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, Calif. 






26 



THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 



manuel felix 
creates... 




your dream blouse 



Embellished with pearls — elegant modern lines influenced 



by royal, mandarin robes. In superb white rayon 



Coronado crepe. Sizes 32 to 38 . . . $12.95 



2039 Broadway 
Oakland, California 



DEAUVILLE MODELS CALIFORNIA'S FINEST BLOUSES AT ALL YAGER'S STORES |# MAIL ORDERS ACCEPTED 




jy 



THE CALIFORNIAN, April, T947 



27 



r&iek caanw &**&%& 



1*602- in 



THEY'RE SEAM-FREE TO COMPLEMENT THE CALIFORNIA 



IDEA OF SIMPLICITY. ..SAYS 



QgU^ 



The casual lines of this 
DeDe Johnson costume 
dramatize the smart simplicity of 
seam -free nylons which bear the 
Seal of THE DiNCING TWINS . 
Sold under leading brand 
names, at better stores. 




Perfect Fit • Seam-Free Beauty 



PATENTED HEEL AND TOE 



28 



THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 



■'-■■'-'-' 



'«** 



■■^;->-S ■ 



■ : :-ji» | iijji : 






BLOOMERANG, Koret 
of California's famous 
sun-or-swim suit of *fer- 
sanese print, a Califor- 
nia Fabric Co. "Color- 
ama." Self - adjusting, 
lined; about $11 at 
The Hecht Co., Wash- 
ington, D. C; D. 11. 
Holmes, New Orleans; 
The Bon Marche, Seat- 
tle; Charles of the Ritz 
"Smooth Tan" oil. A 
Sam Hill color photo- 
graph. 




i | t 



CI-*:. 



-«C 



': <££>■ 



,-*e 




EDITOR AND PUBLISHER. 
i VICE PRESIDENT AND 

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR- 
IMANAGING EDITOR.... 

FASHION DIRECTOR 

ART DIRECTOR 

FASHIONS 



1 MERCHANDISING.. 
FOOD STYLIST., 
PRODUCTION 



... J. R. Osherenko 

... Herman Sonnobend 
... Donald A. Carlson 
... Sally Dickason Carotin 
... Charles Gruen 
.... Diana Stokes 

Jacquelin Lary 
^Peggy Hippee 
J*! Serene Rosenberg 

Malcolm Steinlauf 

Lanice Dana 
.« Morris Ovsey 

Bud Mozur 
... Virginia Scallon 

Frances Anderson 
... Loise Abrohamson 
... Helen Evans Brown 
„, Daniel Saxon 

Robert Fornham 



California fashions: 

Spring Is A Flower 32 

Spring Is A Color 34 

Spring Is A State of Mind 36 

Pacific Blue .....38 

Summer Perennials 42 

They Like Sun 44 

Easy To Care For ...46 

Signed by Adrian 54 

Dressing by Design, by Florence Shuman 56 

Society In Fashion ..58 

What to Wear in California in April 60 

Go For Pedal Pushers 61 

California features: 

California's Blooming! by Margaret H. Gibson 31 

Remembered Fragrance, by Dale H. Fife — 48 

The Young Artist and Saroyan 62 

Two Girls From California : 65 

Hollywood's Arch of Triumph 68 

The Newest Table Settings 70 

California beauty: 

The Shape You're In! by Edna Charlton 66 

California living: 

California Cooks, by Helen Evans Brown 40 

Take Color For a Change, by Virginia Scallon 50 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly, 210 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles 14, Cali- 
fornia, Michigan 8S71. New York Office, Saul Silverman, eastern advertising manager, 1450 
Broadway, LAckawanna 4-5659; Chicago Office, Nedom L. Angier, Jr., Ill W. Jackson 
Blvd., Room 415; San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph, 26 O'Farrell St., EXbrook 
2704. Subscription price: $3.00 one year, $5.00 two years, $7.50 three years. One 
dollar additional postage per year outside continental United States. 25 cents per copy. En- 
tered as second class matter January 25, 1946, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, 
under the act of March 3, 1879. Copyright 1947 The Californian, Inc. Reproduction in 
whole or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 



ormas 




| "A garden of the gods ... a veritable para- 
dise on earth" ... the explorers said of Cali- 
fornia more than a hundred years ago ... de- 
scribing fields of flowers which spread as far 
as the eyes could see ... of magnificent park- 
like expanses where native trees and shrubs 
graced the landscape with their inherent sym- 
metry. 

As it was then ... it ever shall be . . . and 
today it's spring . . . when plants and humans 
alike experience a quickening pulse and step 
forth in bright, brave new garments. Mother 
Earth shakes from her shoulders the last vestige 
of winter's rest, gray skies brighten to blue, 
and once again it's the annual miracle of re- 
newed life. Visitors have come from all over the 
world to see for themselves the wonder of wild 



ooming. 



flowers in the spring. Poets and painters have 
been enthralled, and photographers never weary 
of perpetuating this beauty on film. Textile 
and clothing designers have been inspired by 
the striking color combinations and delicate 
shadings of these lovely flowers, have carried 
their vivid influence to every portion of the 
globe. 

We are writing about California wild flow- 
ers, but California and Oregon are as the center 
of a picture framed on either side by Arizona 
and Washington. You must visualize . . . the 
great pageant of color, like a tonal poem, bursts 
forth each year in the Colorado Desert, moves 
rapidly onto the Mojave, to Southern Arizona, 
and then northward . . . onward and upward 
. . . through Arizona, along the California 
coast, inland over rolling hills and up the can- 
yons, finally ending in late summer in the 
highest mountain reaches. 

A never-to-be-forgotten treat comes to those 
who view the awakening of spring in the arid 
regions. It is here that the lovely Desert Lilies, 
Primrose, Verbena and Poppies flourish. One 
day the entire area is dressed as usual in soft 
brown and gray. Then suddenly it is meta- 
morphosed into a veritable fairyland of color. 
Fragile, delicate, exciting . . . their span of life 
is short . . . for three or four days of excessive 
heat will sear most of those lower-growing wild 
flowers, and once again the desert floor returns 
to its quieter, drabber tones. But this is not 
the end of spring on the desert, for down in 
Southern Arizona the Sahuaro, greatest of all 
succulents, will soon be wearing its creamy 
waxen crown of blossoms. The Ironwood will 
join it and shower the ground with pale pink. 
Here, too, and in far southerly inland valleys of 
California the golden flowers of the Palo Verde 
tree will light the landscape for miles about; 
rare glimpses will be caught of the purple-blue 
beauty of the Smoke Tree; large stands of the 
striking scarlet-tipped Ocotillo will be extending 
spiked branches toward the heavens; and the 
vivid brilliance of the Cacti blossoms is yet to 
come. 



Meanwhile, San Diego County hills are be- 
coming clothed with the blue and white of 
Lilac before it spreads northward. Here, too, 
we usually find early showings of Blue Dicks, 
Shooting Stars and Poppies. Death Valley will 
be looking to Grapevine Canyon for Phacelia, 
Poppy, Gilia and Primrose . . . and over in 
Jubilee Pass many another blossom will be 
found with the prevailing Primrose. Yucca, the 
Candle of Our Lord, will be blooming in lower 
dry washes of the southern portion of the state. 
It is a bit too early for the majestic white 
Matilija Poppy, but the bright orange of other 
California Poppies will be found with Lupine 
and Phlox along roadsides and joining Lilac in 
the canyons. The Los Padres National Forest, 
farther north, will be hailing Bush Poppy^ 
Phlox, Daisies, Buttercups, Johnny-Jump-Ups' 
Oxalis, Blue Dicks, Shooting Star, Lilac and 
Poppies. The marvelous Joshua Tree will start 
to blossom above a flowering Mojave Desert. 
Famed Kern County fields will shimmer with 
Poppies, Lupine, Owl's Clover, Popcorn, Baby 
Blue Eyes, Fiddleneck, Desert Asters, Desert 
Candles, Creamcups, Primrose, Larkspur, Co- 
reopsis and many, many more. 

In Central California spring will come first 
to the lower altitudes and then move toward 
the Mother Lode and the foothills of the Na- 
tional Parks. Bluebells, Poppies, Indian Paint 
Brush, Violets, Wild Rose, Shooting Stars, But- 
tercups and Chinese Houses soon will be re- 
placed by equally showy higher altitude dis- 
plays of Red-bud, Buck Brush, Fremontia and 
Dogwood. Northward from the San Francisco 
Bay district the unrivaled Redwood Empire will 
be heralding spring with the Lake County dis- 
play of Red-bud, Fawn Lilies and Poppies. There 
will be Trillium, Currants, Violets, Baby Blue 
Eyes and Syringa in the early stages of the Em- 
pire flowering. Lupine, Oxalis, Lilac, Iris, 
Solomon's Seal, Daisies, Bleeding Heart, Salal, 
Dogwood and Manzanita will usher in the great 
spectacle of mile upon mile of escaped Broom 
and the incomparable beauty of Azalea and 
Rhododendron in full flower. And as the blos- 
som season moves inland from Trinity County 
to the higher altitudes, so, too, will the peak of 
the spring festival pass from Mendocino, Hum- 
boldt and Del Norte Counties to the Oregon 
Coast and northward into Washington. By now, 
should it be an early spring, the flowers in 
the valleys of Sequoia and Yosemite National 
Parks may begin appearing. High areas on 
the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada and the 
Mt. Lassen district no doubt still will be covered 
with snow. It is usually late in the summer be- 
fore the true alpines can flower. 

A complete list of California 
wild flowers would fill a book, 
and to tell you of them in de- 
tail would fill many another. 
So, here we can give only a gen- 
eral idea of where they may be 
found and the common names 
of a few of the more widely 
known. If you seek closer ac- 
quaintance, consult your public 
librarian. She can recommend 
"Western Wild Flowers and 
Their Stories," by Charles Fran- 
cis Saunders . . . fascinating 
(Continued on page 72) 



t 



HE BREATHLESS BEAUTY 



OF WILD FLOWERS 



EACH NEW SPRING LURES 



THOUSANDS TO 



THE ROLLING GREEN FIELDS 



OF THE GOLDEN STATE 







BY MARGARET H. GIBSON ■ 






fl 



b U I I I I U I O U I 1 O W O I ... A NOSEGAY FOR THE YOUNG, FOR JUNIOR COTTONS 

AND A NEW SILHOUETTE. YOUR SKIRTS ARE FULLER, YOUR POCKETS DEEPER, YOUR BOWS TURN INTO BUSTLES. 
THIS PAGE, LEFT: MARJORIE MONTGOMERY'S SUNSUIT; ABOUT $15 AT B. ALTMAN, NEW YORK. 

CENTER, MIDRIFF BARES IN SABA'S THREE-PIECE GUATEMALAN SET, ABOUT $18 AT BLOOMINGDALE'S, NEW YORK; 
G1MBEL BROS., PHILADELPHIA; H. P. WASSON, INDIANAPOLIS. RIGHT, PLAY DRESS FROM SALLY 'N' SUSAN; 

ABOJT $7 AT HALLE BROS., CLEVELAND; J. GOLDSMITH & SONS, MEMPHIS. 





URE, A TIME TO DECIDE BETWEEN THE BARE AND THE 
P. IN CALIFORNIA JUNIORS SAY BOTH. THIS PAGE, LEFT. 
IRTED DIAMOND III FROM AllCE FROCKS IN FULLER SEERSUCKER, 
COMPANY, LOS ANGELES; KAHN'S, OAKLAND; 
:. RIGHT, TWO-PIECE PEASANTRY BY MADALYN MILLER, 
OUT $17 AT A. HARRIS, DALLAS, STEWART & CO., BALTIMORE 




Spring is a color 



THERE'S A NEW COLOR FOR SPRING ... AS FULL OF 



PROMISE AS APRIL SHOWERS THAT FRESHEN THE 



FLOWERS ... A WONDERFUL GREEN-BLUE HUE THAT IS A 



SYMBOLIC BLENDING OF TONES FROM THE GREEN- 



GROWING FIELDS AND THE BRIGHT BLUE SKIES . . . IT'S 



A COLOR YOU'LL LOVE ON SIGHT. CALL IT PACIFIC BLUE. 





IOUNGEWEAR, WITH OR WITHOUT THONG SANDALS. FOR 



THE STORES OFFERING THIS MERCHANDISE 



SEE PAGE 71. 






jf$&^ 





spring is 

a state of mind 



AN© YOU'LL BE JOYOUS WITH THE SEASON IN PACIFIC 
BLUE: a MARSHA'S FULL, FULL COAT ... A CUTAWAY 

£m*A FLYAWAY SHORTIE OF SUMMER- WEIGHT ALL-WOOL, 

$tfe, ABOUT $100; OFF-THE-BROW CROWNLESS 

HAT. {j SUMMER 

/ FRIVOLITIES, PLAID GLOVES AND CIRCLET 

i I'. 
S3r HOOD BY IRMA. C MARSHA'S 

FLOWER-LADEN BRIM, MATCHING BAG. d! IRMA'S 

EIGHT-BUTTON GAUNTLET AND e SHORTIE, 

SUEDE OR DOESKIN, f RUBY ROSS PUTS PUFFS OF 

SATIN ON TUSCAN STRAW AND 

ft PINS A ROSE ON A HUGE SHANTUNG STRAW. 



^WloO^j^, 



• 




FSOM THE WO«0 GO: THESE 
THAT Will 




ARE THE FASHIONS 

TAKE YOU PLACES. EXCITINGLY: 

a KEN SUTHERLAND BACK-BUTTON DRESS. SIZES 10-18. 
ABOUT $30. fc RAAB AND HARMELL ACHIEVES BACK 

INTEREST WITH CALIFORNIA FABRIC CO. 



"COLORAMA" PRINT, ABOUT $23. (J STRIPED, SWING-EASY 
CLASSIC BY LYNN LESTER, SIZES 10-18, ABOUT $30. 
4 JOY KINGSTON'S CHARBELLE CREPE, SIZES 10-16, 
ABOUT $25. 0. PHIL SOCKETT SUEDE BELT WITH LUCITE BUCKLE 

| GREEN-BLUE OF TURQUOISE JEWELRY, BY SANFORO. 

FOR STORES WHERE MERCHANDISE IS AVAILABLE 
SEE PAGE 71. 



pacific blue 



"•tiki 



CO 



if 



or n i a 



a cook's favorite 
nosegay \s a n 
herb bouquet 





California herbs, like California clothes, have 
come into their own. And the war did it. Until that time 
few dilletantes had grown culinary herbs for their own use 
. . . commercial herb farms were almost nonexistent. But 
when the shooting started and the imports of herbs and 
spices stopped, the wail set up by U. S. gastronomes was 
heard and heeded in California. We grew them! 

We use them, too. Not that there's anything new in 
herb cookery . . . Apicius, the Andre Simon of ancient Rome, 
gives a recipe for "IUS ALBUM IN ASSUM LEPOREM" 
(White sauce for hare) that goes: "... in a sauce pan 
boil broth, wine, oil, a little vinegar and chopped onions. 
While boiling add a paste of spices, stirring with a faggot 
of Origany . . . and when the work is done, bind it with 
a roux." If you'd like to do as the Romans do, that "faggot 
of Origany" was nothing but a twig of marjoram, and the 
"paste of spices" was pepper, lovage, cumin and celery seed, 
all available at your corner grocery store (Well, maybe 
not lovage!) Some centuries later along came Hannah 
Glasse, that English writer of recipes who is best known 
for a phrase she never wrote, "first catch your hare . . ." 
She did write recipes for hare, however, and one she titles 
"To Scare a Hare" goes this way: "Lard your hare and 
put a pudding in the belly; put it in a pot . . . then put 
to it two quarts of strong drawn gravy, one of red wine, 
a whole lemon cut, a faggot of sweet herbs (there we go 



again!) ... Set it before the first and baste it till it is 
fine light brown. Send it to the table hot" And I imag 
that by this time the hare was a little apprehensive. 

Good cooks still use faggots of herbs, though they 
them "herb bouquets" or "bouquets garnis." Three herb 
make an herb bouquet, with as many more as your tas 
buds dictate. A sprig of parsley, a sprig of thyme, a 
of bay leaf . . . those are classic Add some savory, i 
you wish, or some chives, or celery leaves, or marjora 
Bunch the herbs together, tucking the bay leaf in the mid 
die, and tie it all securely with white thread. If it r 
dried herbs you're using, tie them in little cheeseclotl 
bags, and dunk them as you would a tea bag. Herb bouque 
are a must for soups and gravies and many sauces, an 
they do kind things for roasts and stews and casserol 
dishes. Best add them the last half hour of cooking, thoug' 
lest they impart a bitterness to your masterpiece. 

"Season to taste" makes better sense than domestic 
ence text books will admit, particularly when it comes 
the use of herbs. Some are fresh, some dried ... the 
strength is vastly different. Some are old, some are new 

. . there, again, is flavor variation. Some are Cali- 
fornian, some are not . . . and what a difference there !l 
California herbs are extra potent, so when you use herb! 
recipes, even these, taste and let your palate be your guide. I 



40 



coo ks 




RAGOUT OF RABBIT 

Mince six slices of bacon and cook them just 
enough to make them transparent. Put them 
in an earthenware casserole with two thinly sliced 
onions, a quarter of a cup of oil, a sliced carrot, 
a sliced stalk of celery, and an herb bouquet (make this 
one with marjoram and rosemary, as well as the inevitable 
parsley and bay). Have your rabbit disjointed, put it 
in a paper bag with a half cup of flour, a half teaspoonful 
of salt, and a few twists of that pepper mill. Close the bag 
and shake energetically. Then put the well-floured rabbit 
in the casserole, add a cup of red wine, cover tightly, and 
cook until the meat is tender in a moderate oven (350°). 
Pour off the sauce, add to it a tablespoon of currant jelly, 
a speck of cayenne, a squeeze of lemon juice, and more 
salt if necessary. Fold in a half cup of sour cream, reheat, 
then pour the sauce back over the rabbit, and sprinkle it 
gaily with minced parsley. And did you notice that this 
recipe bears a startling resemblance to that one of Apicius? 

CALIFORNIA HERB OLIVES 

Buy a quart of green olives in bulk, you'll save 
your pennies that way. Cut each olive to the 
quick, then put them in a jar with a cup of oil 
(olive oil, please!), 3 cloves of garlic, peeled 
and gently crushed, a whole chili pepper, a sprig of rose- 
mary (or l/ 2 teaspoonful if you use the dried leaves), and 
the same amount of thyme. Let the olives stay in their 
unctuous bath for a week, then remove the garlic and keep 
them tightly covered until the time comes when you can 
bear sharing them. Or eat them all yourself and buy some 
for your friends at a fancy grocery store. They'll cost you 
more and won't be as good, but it will ease your conscience. 
Another thing: don't let any of that spiced oil get away. 
It's perfect for French dressing. Mix one part of vinegar 
with three parts of the oil, and add salt and a grinding or 
two of black pepper. Better share this one, too. 

GREEN GODDESS DRESSING 

To one cup of mayonnaise add a half cup of sour 
cream, a quarter cup of tarragon vinegar, a table- 
spoon of chopped chives, and a quarter cup of 
minced parsley. Now add a teaspoonful of fresh 
tarragon, or a half teaspoonful of the dried kind that has 
been rehydrated by putting it in a strainer and pouring hot 
water over it. Mix this well and put it in the refrigerator 
for a few hours so that the ingredients will exchange 
flavors. Serve it with greens, preferably romaine. This 
dressing was named after William Archer's play, "The 
Green Goddess," and was created in honor of George Arliss, 
by the chef of the famous Palace Hotel in San Francisco. 






The occasion was the opening night of the play in which 
Arliss starred. Since then the recipe has had many lib- 
erties taken with it, and it's quite possible that its creator 
might not recognize this version. But then it's a wise chef 
who knows his own child. 

HERB SAUCE FOR VEGETABLES 

Melt a quarter cup of butter and add to it two 
tablespoons of olive oil, the juice and grated rind 
of half a lemon, a tablespoon of minced chives 
and a tablespoonful each of minced thyme and 
parsley. Mix this well, heat, and dress your vegetables with 
it . . . lavishly. I like it best on tiny new potatoes, and 
it improves carrots . . . makes them actually exciting. As- 
paragus and string beans love it, too. 

CREAM OF HERB SOUP 

Save the outside leaves of any salad greens — 
lettuce, romaine, chicory, cress, spinach, endive 
or whatever. Wash them carefully, then 
shred them carefully (this is one time it's 
not a culinary crime to use a knife on greens!). Put 
two cups of the shredded greens in a covered pot along 
with the water that is still clinging to their leaves, 
and three tablespoons of butter. When they look very 
sad and wilted, add three cups of consomme (use 
bouillon cubes if you wish), a teaspoonful of sweet basil, 
ditto of savory, two teaspoons of parsley, all minced (if 
dried herbs are used, cut the amount in half). Add a small 
chopped onion or a half teaspoonful of onion powder, and 
let the whole simmer quietly for 15 minutes. Beat two egg 
yolks but slightly, and add to them a half cup of whipping 
cream. Add a little of the hot soup to the cream-egg mix- 
ture very gradually, then, in turn, add that cream-egg-soup 
mixture to the remainder of the soup, whisking away at it 
during the addition. Strain the soup ... or don't strain it 
if that's what you want . . . and serve it with crisp 
croutons. 

There are multitudinous rules for the use of herbs, many 
of them of no account. But some are useful. Basil, for in- 
stance, is particularly well suited to tomatoes, and a suspi- 
cion of it added to tomato juice or soup or sauce will give 
you real gastronomical pleasure. Marjoram is good in al- 
most anything, and if I could choose but one herb I think 
this would be it. Try it with roast pork or with sauteed 
mushrooms! Oregano . . . ah, there's an herb dear to the 
heart of the Californian. It's at its best with Mexican 
dishes, but try it, too, in spaghetti sauce, or in meat loaf. 
Rosemary and lamb mingle well, and few Frenchmen 
would think of cooking without a bit of this herb. Know 
these basic seasoning tricks and your meals will have p 
touch of genius. 

What's your culinary I. Q.? 



41 



IOTOGRAPHED BY LA 



DDV VFRNi 




FLOWER FRESH AND TUBBABLE, 



THESE ARE HARDY PERENNIALS 



OF SUMMER WARDROBE . . . NEW COTTON 



SUITS, T-TAILORED, WITH BULKY-BIG SLEEVES, 



GENEROUS CUFFS, DRESSMAKER DETAILS 



GALORE. LEFT, LYNN LESTER TREATS DAN 



RIVER" STRIPES LIKE WOOL; SIZES 10-18, 



ABOUT $30 AT HECHT CO., WASHINGTON; 



NANCY'S, HOLLYWOOD. LESLIE JAMES HAT. 





summer perennia s 



ABOVE, LOUELLA BALI.ERINO'S 



FISH-TAIL JACKET GIVES SEERSUCKER A 



NEW IMPORTANCE; SIZES 10-16, ABOUT $25 



AT L. S. AYRES, INDIANAPOLIS; B. ALTMAN, 



NEW YORK. WEYMAN HAT. SHOES BY SBICCA. 



43 




-'.ll 




STRAIGHT LINES, SHORTEST WAY 
BETWEEN NOW AND SUMMER'S 
DAY . . . STRIPES FLOURISH IN THE SUN. LEFT 
ABOVE, AGNES BARRETT'S TWO-PIECE SIMPLIC- 
ITY WITH GIANT POCKETS, SIZES 10-15, ABOUT 
$20 AT COULTER'S, LOS ANGELES; YOLK'S, DAL- 
LAS. WEYMAN HAT. RIGHT, BACK-BUTTONED 
CHAMBRAY BY HOLLIS OF CALIFORNIA, SIZES 
10-18, ABOUT $11 AT ADDIS CO., SYRACUSE. 
LESLIE JAMES HAT. 



they like the sun 




OPPOSITE PACE, IP, LOVES 
YOU IN JOSEPH ZUKIN'S TUNIC- 
LONG JACKET WITH LADY'-LIKE DETAILS; IN 
DAN RIVER CHAMBRAY', SIZES 10-20, ABOUT $25 
AT DESMOND'S, LOS ANGELES; BAMBERGER'S 
NEWARK; JOSKE'S, SAN ANTONIO. THIS IS THE 
LINE-UP FOR SPRING UNTO SUMMER . . . STRIPES 
AWAY! 



SUMMER SEERSUCKERS, LEFT BELOW, PETITE CASUALS CLASSIC, 
SIZES 10-16, ABOUT $20 AT DESMOND'S, LOS ANGELES; CARSON 
P1RIE SCOTT, CHICAGO. RIGHT, MEENA OF CALIFORNIA PEPLUM 
SUIT, SIZES 10-18, ABOUT $17 AT PHELPS-TERKEL, LOS ANGELES. 

easy to cat 

EASY TO LOVE AND SO EASY TO LAUNDER, COTTON SUITS ARE 
WORTH CULTIVATING. OPPOSITE PACE, DE DE JOHNSON'S 
LONGER JACKET WITH HUGE HIP POCKETS AND INCREASED 
BACK INTEREST, IN IRISH LINEN, SIZES 10-18, ABOUT $55. 



PHOTOGRAPHED By LARRy VERNON 




1 



OH 






f 



■>; 



o r 



\m* 






remembered 
fragrance 



..a californian pioneered 
and nurtured the gardenia 



.established a million- 



dollar industry . .for the beauty 

and glorification of 

today's smart woman 



by dale h. fife 



A he dramatic rise of the gardenia as the "Leading Lady of the Corsage'' 
is entirely logical. Her velvety moondream beauty has Old World lovesome- 
ness. Her tropical-night scent is the warm breath of romance. As the saying 
goes in Hollywood: "She's star material." 

Like many a movie queen, however, the gardenia had an unpretentious 
beginning. As a single-petaled native of the Orient it was her unforgettable 
fragrance that first encouraged floriculturists to develop her into the double- 
blossomed "Chinesque" beauty she is. Fifty years ago, with the exception of 
humid sections in the South, the gardenia was a rarity grown only in con- 1 
servatories. Her tremendous popularity today, her millions of fans over the ' 
world, are a typical American success story. 

It begins in 1851 when a young Scotchman, David McLellan, following] 
a dream of gold, left Massachusetts with his bride to travel by sailing ship i 
to California . . . there he hoped to "pick up a fortune on the fabulous 
streets of San Francisco." But San Francisco had outgrown the hurly-burly 
era of tents and packing boxes. It had become a prosperous and world- 
celebrated city with wood-paved streets and buildings of brick and stone, i 
After a disappointing trek to the Mother Lode country, David gave up the 
dream and faced reality. He opened a fruit and vegetable stand in what is 
now the heart of San Francisco. Later he went to ranching down the 
Peninsula. 

Of his twelve children, his son Edgar eventually reversed history. He, 
too, had a dream. His dream was not of a pot of gold at the end of a rain- 
bow. It was of flowers. And it is entirely conceivable that because an 
eleven-year-old farm boy wanted to grow flowers instead of milking cows, 
today San Francisco bows only to London's Covent Gardens for world leader- 
ship in cut flower production. Edgar McLellan experimented with hybrid 
plants. He visited with the gardeners on the great Peninsula estates and 
they told him their secrets. He built a small glass house to protect his choice 
blooms and his success with growing things was phenomenal. 

San Francisco was now in the plush era ... it was the day of the great 
bonanza kings. The belles and swells of the day demanded the luxury of 
flowers. Edgar saw opportunity and seized it. He gave up the dairy busi- 
ness and turned all his attention to flowers, specializing in roses and heather. 
He became a world figure in floriculture, and a warm friend of John 
McLaren who built the world-famous Golden Gate Park on shifting sand 
dunes. In 1895, when he took his bride to New York on their honeymoon, 
roses were selling for $18 a dozen, orchids for $10 apiece, violets for $2 a 
bunch, the gardenia was unknown in the shops. 

Edgar McLellan discovered the gardenia in an Eastern conservatory and 
was drawn to its cloud-wisp beauty, its sultry fragrance. He brought twenty- 
three cuttings with him to the Coast ... a modest enough beginning 
. . . for today one gardenia house at the McLellan Colma ranch covers four 
acres and is the largest single planting of gardenias in the world. And it 
was onlv natural that in San Francisco, gateway to the tropics and the Orient, 
the gardenia should thrive. The cool coastal fogs tempered the warm Cali- 
fornia sunshine to give the bloom stamina. Edgar astounded the flower world. 
He grew gardenias in mass quantity twelve months of the year. Semi- 
tropical, the gardenia is a temperamental beauty rating a nursemaid clad 
in shorts and rubber boots who gives the plant its bath by syringing its 
shiny green leaves. While the gardenia likes to keep a cool head, she 
insists her feet be warm. She shrinks from the touch of warm, dry hands, 
but blooms happily if her toes are imbedded in peat. An average cutting 
requires a bottom heat of from 65° to 70° and the atmosphere must be 
humid until the plant takes root. Greenhouses are shaded at the planting 
season, but the shade is gradually diminished. Under these ideal condi- 
tions the plant flowers in nine months and grows so tall that platforms are 
built up between the rows for the convenience of the workers. But the life 
of a bush is usually only three to four years, after which the plant is discarded 
and a steam hose used for sterilization of the soil. 

The gardenia is picked without leaves and carefully laid in moist flats; 
the shiny dark leaves are picked separately by the "strippers." All four 
grades of gardenia — small, medium, large and special — come from the same 
bush: the smaller ones grow at the bottom, the specials usually at the top. 
After being picked, they are sprayed generously with water and cooled in a 
refrigerator before being sent to the tailoring room. 

To" a visitor, the tailoring room, with its thousands of waxy blooms per- 



4S 



fuming the air, is a corner of heaven. The fact that a tailorette soon loses 
her sense of smell, insofar as the gardenia is concerned, seems regrettable 
indeed. The tailoring idea was born when Mrs. Wake McLellan sewed green 
leaves to the white blossoms. This eliminated the old-style metal staples, the 
fussiness of fern, tinfoil and ribbon ... it altered the gardenia's personality 
and popularized it. By intensifying the flower's classic simplicity, tailoring 
has enhanced its sophistication. On specially patented machines, the stiff, 
shiny leaves are sewn to a green cardboard collar, two operators at each 
machine turning out about nine thousand collars per hour. 

A tailorette requires tbout three months to become expert in the art. With 
quick, moist fingers, she removes the calyx from the gardenia, completes 
the opening of the bud, slips the necklace of green leaves about the flower's 
throat and inserts a rust-resisting wire stem, which she then deftly wraps 
with green paper. Meanwhile her eye has meas- 
ured the flower for grade. The entire operation 
has taken but half a minute. The flower now 
seems much larger. Its lambent beauty has been 
given a stage setting, and the perfection of its 
line has been dramatically highlighted. 

So there will be no touching of petals or leaves, 
each bloom is secured in her own private com- 
partment, a cotton muffler is cuddled about her 
throat and she is snugly strapped. The blooms 
then are given a strong spray of cold water and 
immediately the open-topped box is encased in 
cellophane and heat-sealed. Six dewey-eyed brides 
peeping through a picture window are about to 
set forth on their journey. 

If they travel deluxe, via air express or char- 
tered plane, it is possible that a gardenia picked 
in California early this morning will be at the 
Stork Club tonight for late supper. If they go 
via refrigerator car, it may be seven to nine days 
before some lucky bride walks in the aura of their romantic fragrance in 
Chicago, Boston or Philadelphia. But in either case, the gardenia will arrive 
fresh, bright, and with every petal in place. 

Two hundred and fifty thousand of them are shipped each month by the 
McLellans, but the atmosphere of the ranch is not one of impersonal, hurried 
business. Flowers are a friendly commodity. Rod McLellan, who tackles 
the scientific problems at the nursery while his brother, Wake, handles 
the business end from his office in San Francisco, tells you: 

"We have no employees. There are two hundred of us working together." 

This might easily explain why many a valuable idea regarding the cul- 
tivating, packing and handling of gardenias has come from workers on 
the ranch through the "Suggestion Box." One of the "McLellogang," as 
the workers call themselves, might be paid a bonus for selecting a perfect- 
growing ivy, or for the idea of an automatic counter on the collar machines. 
Every workable idea is given consideration and tried out. 

Wake McLellan dislikes the tag "Gardenia King of the World," but it 
sticks, no doubt due to the pioneer spirit of the McLellan clan. Forty gar- 
denia growers in the San Francisco Bay area last year cut millions of gar- 
denias . . . half came from the one hundred thousand plants on the McLellan 
ranches at Colma and Mt. Eden. 

One of San Francisco's colorful street-corner flower vendors says be sells 
ten gardenias to one corsage of any other type. A Grant Avenue florist 
believes his tremendous sale is due to the fact that the gardenia is informal 
enough to be worn any time of day; it is available the year round and it 
is priced within reason. To be on the safe side, a man often chooses . a 
gardenia corsage because the white blooms will complement whatever color 
the "object of his affections" might choose to wear. 

But whatever the reasons for the gardenia's immense popularity, it has 
been a tremendous factor in bringing the flower industry into the big 
business class in California. One wonders what Edgar McLellan would say 
if he could see the big airliners take off from San Francisco airport with 
their cargoes of flying flowers ... all because he followed a dream of fragrant 
beauty. 






Blooms are picked with careful hands. 




They're tailored, graded and packed. 




1 




Fresh, bright-eyed and ready to wear. 




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PHOTOGRAPHED By LARRy VERNON 



Mr. and Mrs. John Henry 



re-decorate a house and 



tak 



e co or 



3nPS 



' ■'•?■'.' ■ . 9 



for 



set a pattern for California living 



in a more colorful way 



50 





o:hange 




Yes, the John Henry 
house has had a 
change of face . . . 
a change so complete we might better describe it as re- 
creation . . . for it goes deeper than the new coat of paint 
on the outside ... it permeates the interior with vibrant, 
heart-warming colors and a decorative motif that sets the 
stage for an enviable program of California living. 

It isn't often that we can cite an example of renovation 
on such a magnificent scale, or one that is so full of decora- 
tive ideas we could utilize in bringing any modest home 
closer to our dream cf perfection. 

Like many others in this decade, the Henrys could not 
find just the house they wanted . . . but they found an 
ideal wooded hillside site looking down on the Univer- 
sity of California at Los Angeles, and they found a house 
of vast proportions which tempted them to "do things" 
about it. First off, they minimized the unwanted Mediter- 
ranean type of architecture by spreading a heavenly shade 
of azure blue right up to and including the tile roof . . . 
and immediately the house achieved a mystical Shangri-La 
beauty which gave it personality, suggested its colorful 
theme. 

"Then we set a color pattern for the interior," the lady 
of the house explained, and proceeded to show how she 
brought the colors of the garden inside. We had more 
than a suspicion that the clear yellow, the soft green, the 
bright red and chartreuse were chosen deliberately to pro- 
vide the most complimentary background for a clever hostess 
. . . really the first lesson in successful decoration. 

The inviting hall with its winding stairway is done in an 
exciting, but neutral tone of Williamsburg green, perfect 
basic shade for the cheery colors in rooms to which it 
leads. Straight ahead is a tremendous high-ceilinged liv- 
ing room with palest yellow walls and a white shag carpet 
. . . the background for the out-size custom-made furni- 
ture Martin Grass designed in proportion to the room. 
Stron<* tones of the red-green-chartreuse color scheme are 
used effectively, with flowered drapes to contrast with solid 
upholstery colors. Contrast is evident, too, in the use of 
massive Victorian heirlcoms in this modern setting, while 

the ingenious Mrs. Henry has add- 
ed personal decorative touches in 
amusing mantel figures which she 
unearthed in wayside shops . . . 
and for which she found dupli- 
cates for effective lamps. Framed 
plates are hung over a breakfront 
cabinet, carrying the household 
"motif." her favorite yellow rose. 
The room is colorful as all out- 
doors. Indeed, a fifteen-foot window (see photograph, left 
. . . so high it is almost square) frames a beautiful garden 
view, and has its own full-length copper plant container 
in which are exotic and seasonal blooms. Here. Mrs. Henry 
sets poinsettias for Christmas, lilies for Easter and other 
appropriate and conversational flowers. 



51 




~i - NTi™ 



a bright idea 




• SEAT REPLACES UNUSED BEDROOM BALCONY t SECOND BEDROOM ALL RUFFLES AND ROSES 



• DINING ROOM CHANGES TO STRIPES 



Opening from this room is a den with deep-piled rug of 
chartreuse, the red and green motif carried to new heights 
over the high, high windows ... a clever deception, in- 
cidentally, for the valance-length curtains conceal an unat- 
tractive arched window frame and also leave two-thirds of 
the window open to the view beyond. Mellow old pine fur- 
niture and a magnificent brick fireplace with newly raised 
hearth are Henry innovations. A similarly sized room ad- 
joining is library and bar all in one . . . books lining one 
wall next a deep-seated bav window, a decorative bar set 
up in the opposite corner. Here the important decorator 
feature is the wallpaper ... on the ceiling! 

Again taking its cue from the basic green hallway, the 
dining room makes real issue of the red-and-green color 
scheme with a gay floral pattern in primary shades, high- 
lights slip-on backs and seat covers for antique chairs in 
red and white stripe decorator satin. A modern touch, and 
practical. The same lighthearted feeling in color permeates 
the sunny breakfast room and the old-fashioned kitchen, 
made more interesting bv a cleverly constructed "apron" 
over the stove, by a folksy arrangement of a big pine table 
which usually is the magnet for midnight snack-seekers. 

Upstairs Mrs. Henry used pale yellow and gray in a mas- 
ter bedroom of dramatic proportions, with focal interest 
divided between the outsize bed ... set into a frame of 
cornice and casement curtains simulating a window (deco- 
rator note!) . . . and the recessed window which was ex- 
panded to utilize an impractical balcony. Another Martin 



Grass custom davenport, in gray corduroy, uses the space 
advantageously. Here. too. ceiling wallpaper is exciting, 
contrasting with the chaste gray tones of rug and quilted 
taffeta bed coverlet. Rare antiques are more noticeable 
against the modern look of this room. 

Going wholly feminine, the second bedroom has a cano- 
pied bed ... all ruffles and roses . . . yellow, again . . . 
while the third has been turned into an upstairs sitting room 
in softly muted shades. Analyzing the whole transforma- 
tion, it is evident that this house has become the perfect 
background for the kind of life the Henrys like to lead 
... it is a wonderful hospitality house, colorful and in- 
viting. Imagine it as background for holiday entertaining, the 
red and green so well adapted to Christmas, Valentine, 
patriotic motifs! 

Significant, too, are the many devices by which Mrs. 
Henry has minimized an outmoded or unrelated feature. 
For instance, the two student lamps she had wired into a 
double hanging fixture for the hall, one light to service the 
upstairs and the lower to brighten the entrance way . . . 
the swing doors that conceal the toilet in the downstairs 
powder room . . . the indoor planting, not only in the liv- 
ing room window, but cleverly placed copper planters and 
brackets around a hall mirror, and philodendra that trail 
from a second floor container into the same entry area. 

Throughout the accent is on personality and the spirit 
is Californian. You can adapt some of these ideas to your 
own setting, but remember to keep the emphasis on you! 






52 



edecorate 









Iou may be sure Adrian signed it sincerely yours, when 
he put his inimitable signature to a new spring-to-sum- 
mer collection of clothes as American as the flag over- 
head. 

At a time when so many designers are reaching out 
for more and more yardage, dropping skirts with en- 
thusiastic abandon, scurrying hither and there to achieve 
merely "change" . . . Adrian remains himself, thor- 
oughly American and sure of the inherent good taste 
of the women whose clothes he creates. 

In his many years of designing wardrobes for mo- 
tion picture stars and fashion-right women from all over 
the country, this authoritative couturier feels he has dis- 
covered certain inalienable truths about clothes, refuses 
to be diverted from proven fashion principles. 

And so in 1947 Adrian reaffirms his faith in the more 
flattering squared shoulder, not projected this year but 
still sharply Adrian . . . reaffirms his preference for the 
slim silhouette in street and afternoon clothes, even many 
suave evening gowns . . . shows clothes at no arbitrary 
length, his only rule being a by-eye 
guide to create a "pretty" appearance. 
Making a staunch stand for the right 
to be individual, free of dictatorial 
fashion mandates, this famous Ameri- 
can designer is convinced that women 
should wear what interests them, what 
is comfortable and right for the things 
they do. 

By helping American women main- 



signec 



tain and emphasize their own identity, Adrian does this 
country great credit. He refuses to be influenced by the 
superficial, to translate foreign dogmas into our free- 
dom fashions. 

"The only reason for drastic change in clothes is . . . 
change in the way of living. If suddenly we have rocket 
ships, we'll dress for them just as we have dressed for 



V 






horse-and-buggy travel, the train, motoring, trans- 
continental air travel." 

So says Adrian, and the conclusion is obvious: 
in this high-speed era we can expect anything! 
Unmotivated change implies insecurity, is not 
good theatre. But there is a real challenge in 
creating new fashions right for the times! 

True to his own edict, the new Adrian collection 
is noteworthy for its dateless perfection, its total 
lack of restraint . . . there is comfort in easy, flow- 
ing lines . . . grace in soft drapes, faint peplums, 
tiers . . . freedom in versatility. 

Sleeves are style notes of importance: lightweight wool 
suits have short capelet sleeves (concession to combina- 
tion of warm weather, insistence on wool) ... a full 
length cape sleeve is slashed from shoulder to wrist to 
reveal striped chiffon undersleeve . . . the broken-cuff 
treatment creates the clean cut and sharp silhouette 
Adrian loves, this time in a suave elbow flare . . . sleeves 
are easy, some brief ones falling free from the shoulder 
to a simulated cape effect, some kimono-like, long and 
neither cuffed nor fitted. 

Again pleading for individuality, Adrian stresses no 
seasonal color, although burned coffee, navy blue, black 
are popular ... a few prints for afternoon, and hand- 
painted crepes for evening. Here let it be said that 
Adrian refuses to admit certain colors are tabu for titian 
beauties, blondes, or brunettes. 

Perhaps the most exciting highlights of this early 
showing are . . . summer suit in creamy beige, upon 




skirt, reaching almost to your toes. 

With characteristic romanticism, Adrian introduces 
the whispering taffeta-with-crepe gown sketched on 
the opposite page, its stiff folds sweeping to one side 
and framing a decor of dusty pink cabbage roses, 
buds. Third from the collection to be presented on 
these pages is the Adrian suit, its original broken-cuff 
treatment a style note of importance. Of deepest 
navy doeskin, it is pencil-slim and dashing, with the 
modified-but-square shoulder. 

In final analysis, this new collection marks a decisive 
stand for the "American look" in designing: Adrian has 
underscored the classic, the casual, the individual. He 
has dared to stand on his own two feet in defense of 
American originality, rather than revert to a pattern or 
dogma of any other day, any other land. 

Drawing his inspiration from people, travel, research, 
fabric, color, pure design or whatever . . . Adrian always 
has foremost in his mind, the woman. How will she look 
in a gown, how will she enjoy it, how will it help her 
to fulfill her proper role in life today? 



Dy 



Qd 



r i a 



which star-shaped patches of brown-white-black checks 
are appliqued; quilted evening gown (both of early 
Colonial inspiration). Another masterpiece of old 
Americana is sketched above, right: "George Washing- 
ton Reviews his Troops" ... a delightful and con- 
versational gray crepe evening gown with hand-painted 
motif in glowing color. Note long torso, extremely slim 




sin*, <Uu*XT 



shortens height 



adds height 



...•mlllK 



Mill, 



^ # 



% # 



||l) ""' ■"""Mil 

' HIJI ' 



Equal-division lends 
shorten. Domi- 
nating interest hori- 
zontal. 



Shortens more forci- 
bly because interest 
is riveted to the cen- 
ter. 



Adds height because 
dominant space is 
vertical. Eyes go up 
and down instead 
of across. 



-- uiiiiji 



orizonta 



H 

i if . ' 



the fourth in 



series 



of articles 



on dressing by design 
by florence shuman 



# Ordinarily, most of us think of horizontal lines as cut- 
ting the figure and, therefore, shortening it. Sometimes 
they do. But properly placed, they can lengthen and slim 
the figure, too! 

In the accompanying diagrams I have taken six rec- 
tangles, all of the same size, and have divided them 
horizontally in different ways. Below each rectangle is 
a figure showing the same horizontal divisions applied to 
fashions. Despite any optical illusion, the figures are all 
the same height and the dresses are all the same length. 

The first shows the jacket dividing the figure in half, 
just as the line in the diagram. This carries our eyes across 
the center and tends to shorten the figure. The second 
rectangle rivets attention on the middle. In this figure the 
concentration of attention has been created by the use 
of fur, again tending to shorten the figure. The third 
diagram creates an illusion of length, because the un- 







adds height 




vj despite optical illusion 
same size rectangles 
used in all examples 



orders ac- 


Adds height because 


Adds height be- 


h. Tends to 


gradual change in 


cause i ncreasec 


because it 


weight of the lines 


spacing between 


carries our 


going across sets up 


horizontal lines sets 


oss but re- 


a rhythm which leads 


up a rhythm tha 


lem to the 


us to the borders and 


carries our eyes up 




beyond into space. 


and down. 



equal division carries the eyes down before carrying them 
across. Two outfits illustrate this principle, in reverse order, 
first up, then down. The heavy borders in the fourth rec- 
tangle accentuate the width. In the illustration this empha- 
sis tends to bring the shoulders and hem closer together, 
thus cutting the figure's height. In the fifth rectangle, the 
gradual change in the weight of the lines at both ends 
sets up a rhythm which leads our eyes to the borders of 
the rectangle and beyond into space. This trick when 
applied to the figure, adds height. In spite of the fact 
that the lines in the sixth rectangle are horizontal, the 
increased spacing between them sets up a rhythm that 
tends to increase the feeling of height. The colored bands 
on the figure, spaced increasingly far apart, carry our 
eyes up and down in spite of the obvious horizontal 
interest. 

The clothes in the examples may go out of fashion, but 



the principles for dividing space horizontally always will 
be the same. Thus, what you must consider always when 
deciding whether to wear a contrasting belt, or change 
the length of a peplum is: What will it do in relation to 
my figure? What will the change do in relation to the 
other lines in this outfit that already go across? Will it 
make me look taller or shorter, broader or slimmer? Con- 
trasts of texture, such as shiny satin on dull-surfaced wool, 
or contrasts of color, will increase the weight of a hori- 
zontal interest still further. 

If you are trying to add height, diagrams 3, 5 and 6 
can be the cue to the most flattering divisions, either on 
your entire figure, your blouse if you are short-waisted, 
or your skirt if you are long-waisted. The other examples 
can be used to shorten or broaden a tall, lanky figure. 
It would be wise, also, to think about accessories in rela- 
tion to your figure. You may discover that your hat or 
handbag is cancelling the effectiveness of your outfit by 
adding strong horizontals that send the eyes across in 
the wrong places. 

Now, let's apply this knowledge. Take a dress from 
your own wardrobe that has been troubling you. Draw 
in the main lines, shading any contrast in texture or color 
so that the emphasis is the same in your sketch as on the 
dress. On tracings of the same dress, you might change 
the belt from a wide contrasting one, to a narrow match- 
ing one, shorten a jacket, set up a contrasting border, 
and so on. 

Don't stop with one dress! Go right through your ward- 
robe with these principles in mind. This new awareness 
will make you surer of your decisions, and what's more, 
you will have fun. 




mrS. eMGen de I CI VegQ is a member of one of California's oldest 

FAMILIES, IS ACTIVE IN THE LOS ANGELES SOCIAL SERVICE AUXILIARY, LIKES 
SWIMMING AND MUSIC, HERE SHE WEARS A HOWARD GREER GOWN 
IN HIS OWN -ISLAND WARRIORS" BLACK AND WHITE SILK PRINT. 

mrs. bernard giannini right, is the former colleen sword . . . 

PHOTOGRAPHED IN THE SUN-SPLASHED PATIO OF HER HOME IN BEVERLY HILLS. AN 
ACTIVE YOUNG MATRON, SHE CONFESSES THAT MAGIC HOLDS AN IRRESISTIBLE 
FASCINATION FOR HER . . . TENNIS, TOO. HER GOWN BY BILLY GORDON HAS A 
WIDE, SWEEPING SKIRT, AND MATCHING FABRIC STOLE TO ACCENT HER BEAUTY. 
PHOTOGRAPHED By LARRy VERNON 








<'/•* t"'~ 






















California 
nvites you 



XVpril is the month of flowers in California . . . from the 
massed elegance of lilies at Easter services to the blazing 
blue and gold fields of poppies and lupines and the desert's 
magic carpet of blossoming cacti. It's a wonderful month in 
which to visit the Coast, and you'll want to dress in keeping 
with the spring-in-the-air brilliance of the season. 

Of course you never travel without a suit . . . but make it 
a lightweight wool. Gabardine or flannel in a spring gray, 
beige or navy will give you something to dress up or down. 
Perhaps you'll wear it Easter morning when you stroll with 
other paraders down Wilshire Boulevard, and if you haven't 
a perfectly dazzling, utterly feminine new hat for the occa- 
sion, plan on getting one in California. 

On the other hand, if you're starting Easter at a Sunrise 
Service in any one of a dozen or more California hillside 
amphitheatres, you'll put on that suit over a sweater and a 
topcoat on top of that ... or better yet, slacks for scrambling 
up steps in semi-darkness. Pre-dawn can be plenty cool. And 
while you're here, you'll certainly put in at least one day 
motoring to *he fields of wild flowers near Bakersfield or on 
the desert. If it's the former, your ride and picnic call for 



what you'd expect . . . sweater and skirt or slacks. If you 
prefer inspecting the flaming spears of ocotillo, the shining 
open faces of desert primroses, the galaxy of gold and red 
and purple exotic blooms near Palm Springs, keep in mind 
that summer comes early to the desert and you'll want to be 
able to bare your arms, legs and possibly your back in a 
new sundress. A playsuit with detachable skirt is a good 
choice for this kind of outing . . . and a light wrap for your 
return to the city in the coolness after the sun goes down. 

So far . . . this wardrobe . . . suit, topcoat, slacks, 
sweaters, blouses and at least one play ensemble ... so good, 
It will see you through the other activities you'll find under 
the California sun: tennis, golf, sun-bathing and perhaps even 
swimming ... in Southern California collegians spend Easter 
vacations by the beautiful sea. Add breeches, jeans or jodhpur 
if you're planning to ride . . . nothing formal. 

California's cities burst into a swirl of social activity in 
the post-Lenten season, so if you're visiting friends, be sun 
to come prepared for gaiety. Bring the accessories that maki 
festive your suits and dresses . . . flowering hats, bright 
scarves, the feminine touch in jewelry. 

For city sightseeing, to augment that indispensable suit, 
tuck in a lightweight wool or rayon gabardine. And spring 



WEATHER 


DATA FOR 


APRIL 




Los Angeles 


San Francisc 


highest 




81 


82 


lowest 




43 


40 


cverage 




60.2 


55.7 


average 








total rair 


fall 


1.05 


1.55 




AND YOUR SPRINGTIME 



TRAVEL WARDROBE 



BLOSSOMS WITH NEW IDEAS 




being the season of prints, you'll want to bring a couple o: 
these to cover a multitude of social occasions from fashioi 
show-luncheons to informal dining and dancing. You probably 
can get by without evening clothes unless you have son* 
specific and dressy occasion in mind ... if you do, choosi 
a print, or a clean, clear spring color. Leave home you: 
velvets and satins and sequins. 

For that matter, leave winter behind. Emphasize spring 
colors and spring gaiety in your wardrobe. Find April at its 
flowering best in California . . . and you ... at your loveliest 



I 



GO FOR PEDAL PUSHERS 

PEDAL PUSHERS, YOUNG DARLING OF THE SEASON, RATE COMPLIMENTS ON ALL HANDS . . . 

AS HERE, GABARDINE VERSION WITH LARGE FLANGE POCKETS, PRINT JERSEY TOP WITH EXTENDED 

CAP SLEEVES. AN AGNES BARRETT DESIGN IN BRILLIANT JERRY ROSSMAN FABRIC. 



PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTA STERN 






the young artist 



MANUEL TOLEGIAN'S "NUDE" 




THE PROVOCATIVE "NOSTALGIA" 




"STREET IN LOD1," AND BELOW, 

"GOIN' HOME," OWNED BY GEORGE MARD1KIAN 



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• It was a fall evening in San Francisco . . . brisk and 
starlit . . . typical . . . when Paul Michelson wan- 
dered into Gump's Gallery where an author and artist 
were unpacking paintings for an exhibition. Fresno- 
born William Saroyan was the author, Fresno-born Man- 
uel Tolegian the artist. As they talked of many things, 
Michelson listened and took note: 

They'd had a couple of drinks at the party George 
Mardikian had thrown in honor of the opening of Tole- 
gian's exhibition and a couple of more drinks at a place 
that Saroyan knew on Turk Street, and when they got 
to Gump's they felt all right, all right. They went up- 
stairs and Tolegian led the way into the hidden gallery 
where they took the hot prospects to show them the pic- 
tures for private previews. 

Saroyan sat down on the couch facing the easel and 
said, "How long has it been since your last show, 
Manuel?" 

Tolegian took off his coat and started bringing the 
pictures out of the packing cases and setting them around 
the room with their faces to the wall. 




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and saroyan 



"It's been five years, Bill. I'm excited, man. Wait 
until you see this stuff." 

He set one of the pictures up on an easel and Saroyan 
said immediately, "I know that place, Manuel. It's over 
near Chico. Right?" 

"That's right, Bill. How do you like it?" He wiped 
a little dust off the picture with his handkerchief. "Do 
you get that green, man? That isn't green, it's yellow, 
but that little spot of red on the roof makes the yellow 
look green. Hell, the light is lousy here for tempera!" 

"No, it isn't a bad light, Manuel. We can make al- 
lowances for the light. That's a fine picture. It looks 
like a water-color. What's tempera?" 

Manuel Tolegian was walking around the room in 
his shirt sleeves and couldn't sit still while Saroyan 
looked at his work. "Tempera is when you mix trans- 
parent colors, like water color, with gum, making the 
colors opaque. The French call it gouache, Bill. I say 
gouache tempera most of the time so they won't think 
I've gon« artistic." 

"It's a very good picture, Manuel. Show us some 
more." 

Manuel brought out a picture with a circular, red 
farm storage tank set against the green hills ... or 
yellow hills that looked green next to the red storage 
tank. "See this one, Bill? My father used to build 
tanks like that over near Fresno. I like this picture, 
Bill. What do you think?" 

"I like it very much, Manuel. How much is that pic- 
ture?" 

"Three hundred and fifty dollars for the temperas. 
I've got to get that, man. I did eight temperas over 
a year and a half. That means I'll get about a hundred 
and fifty a month for that time. Not counting expenses 
. . . they're awfully high now . . ." He put the tempera 
paintings away. "Now I'll show you the oils. Tempera's 
nice, but the oils are richer. Tempera's like playing 
the piano all in one octave, while with oil you've got 
all shadings from the deepest to the lightest. But there 
are some things you've got to do with tempera." 

He brought out a painting of a bar interior. The bar 
had rough hand-hewn lumber supports holding up the 
ceiling and plain board tables with workmen sitting at 
the tables and leaning against the bar. 

"It looks like you really enjoyed working on this 
one, Manuel," Saroyan said. "Maybe the others were 
work but this one looks like you enjoyed it." 

"It's a bar on Main Street in L. A. I did enjoy work- 
ing on it. I painted it in the early morning when the 
customers were nice and tired. It took a long time to 



finish, but I liked working on it because it was a quiet, 
tough place. Not fighting tough, but tough like a work- 
ing man is tough." 

"Sure, Manuel. You can see that." 

Tolegian brought out several landscapes, finally a 
seascape. "I don't know about the sea," he said. "I'm not 
sure of it. After I did this one, I went back to look at 
the spot again to make sure." He looked at the picture 
moodily for a moment. "Nobody sees those gulls in 
there," he added, angrily. 

"There are three of them," Saroyan said. "I saw the 
gulls right away." 

"Man, you've really got good eyes. Most people 
think the damn clouds are dirty," Tolegian said, molli- 
fied. "Now, Bill, I'm going to show you a picture that 
I really love. It's the picture of the girl playing the 
lute that I told you about. I really love the lute and 
this girl plays it beautifully . . . and sings beautifully, 
too." 

He brought out the picture . . . shown on these pages. 
It was an oil of a girl dressed in Armenian costume 
and playing the lute with a man sitting on the bed and 
listening to her. "That man, Bill, on the bed." Tolegian 
said. "Lots of people say isn't that your friend Saroyan 
sitting on the bed, listening? Others say isn't that you, 
Tolegian, sitting on the bed and listening? I don't say 
anything when they say that, Bill. Not a damn word. 
Let them figure out who it is if they want to. But that 
girl playing the lute, she's beautiful and the way she 
plays . . . arid sings." 

Saroyan looked at the picture quietly for a while, 
then said, "Mardikian will buy that one on sight." He 
looked at the picture a little longer. "How much is 
that one, Manuel?" 

"Twelve hundred dollars, Bill." 

"Is that a solid price, Manuel?" 

"That's the most solid price there is, man." 

"It sounded kind of unsolid. Just a little unsolid." 

"You'd better grab that one, Bill. Before Mardikian 
sees it." 

"Mardikian will take it right away, Manuel. I know 
he will." 

"I love this picture, Bill. You'd better take it before 
Mardikian sees it." 

Manuel sat down on a coffee table beside the couch. 
"You know, Bill, I've had a few drinks now, so I feel 
good. It's funny how I can look at these pictures now. 

(Continued on page 71) 



MANUEL 



TOLEGIAN'S 



INTERPRETATION OF 



CALIFORNIA 



IS DOWN-TO-EARTH 



THE BEAUTY 



OF NATURE . 



THE PROSAIC LIFE OF 



THE COMMON MAN 




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DISTINGUISHED FOR HAND BLENDED I POWDER AND EXQUISITE COSMETICS 



64 



THE C All FORN I AN, April, 1947 



DONNA ATWOOD is one of 25.000 good figure 
skaters in the United States . . . good enough 
to be crowned National Queen of the figure 
skaters and to have held, at age 16, the United 
States Junior Women's Single Championships 
. . . titles never before won by a Californian. 
Now a beauteous 21, the Hollywood girl stars 
in Ice-Capades of 1947, the lavish, family- 
enjoyment show on country-wide tour. Donna 
could be called a native Californian ... as na- 
tives go . . . having moved from Newton, Kan- 
sas, when only three. But she didn't put down 
her pencil box for a pair of double-runners at 
the age of five or six as children from the colder 
climes do. Her first pair of skates and her first 
experience on ice came at 13 . . . just two years 
before she captured her first Pacific Coast 
award. Three years later she won the junior 
national and the same year shared 
with Gene Turner the title 



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of United States Senior 
Pair Champion. Folks are wondering . . . 
just how much gooder can she get? 



two girls from California 




JEANNE GODSHALL . . . California's outdoor 
girl ... is a rodeo trick rider, leading an excit- 
ing, barnstorming life that was a prosaic one 
just a few years ago . . . when she moved her 
books from Ramona Convent to a sorority 
house at USC. The first white child born in 
Death Valley, California, started to ride at four 
. . . preferred to be a saddle girl rather than 
a sweater girl . . . has won many horsemanship 
contests, beauty contests, and has learned to fly. 




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you can cut a pretty figure 

with a nutritious diet 

that will slim your silhouette 




Q Comes Spring to California . . . you're figure- 
conscious . . . and without a backward glance at 
the full-length mirror, you know whether you 
have that prerequisite to the fullest enjoyment 
of California living ... a figure that shapes as 
well in peek-a-boo play clothes as it does with 
opera fare. 

In this modern age of beauty and body care, 
there's rarely an excuse for flabbiness or retort 
for obesity. If you're getting more than your 
penny's worth every time you step on the scales, 
plan a good figure control program that will 
trim your lines down to smooth, firm curves and, 
incidentally, also do more for your morale than 
you'd ever believe. Extra weight adds years to 
a woman's appearance, and after forty, unneces- 
sary avoirdupois is considered dangerous to 
health. Why wait until you're in danger before 
going to work on the waistlands? If, at about 
twenty-five years, you are the correct weight for 
your height, then that's the poundage you should 
carry proudly through the years. Your figure may 
change a little, but a buoyant, well-balanced car- 
riage is a joy forever. 



But before you start any plan designed to slice 
off poundage, be sure to talk it over with your 
family physician. He will tell you that weight is 
determined by your work and relaxation, the 
amount you exercise, and the food you consume. 
Knowing your special problems will permit him 
to answer your individual need. If it's your thy- 
roid or pituitary glands refusing to do their 
normally intended work, then a starvation diet 
won't make you lose one ounce . . . and exercise 
won't help. If you are a perfectly healthy indi- 
vidual with an inclination to specialized areas of 
overweight, such as the hips or a tummy-roll, 
then procure exercises designed for slimming 
down these spots. You can do a very neat job 
at home with a little persistence. 
The simplest and best exercise known is still 
done with the 520 muscles used in human loco- 
motion. And since forty-three percent of the 
weight of the body is muscle, you can do a lot of 
shaking down and tightening up in a few brisk 
turns around the block after dinner. It gets to be 
a wonderful habit. 

If it's easier for you to keep appointments at 



by Edna Charlton 



count your calories • count your calories • count your calories • n 



THE SEVEN-DAY DIET 



HAVE 

A GOOD 

BREAKFAST 

Fruit 



and 



with 

BREEZE 

THROUGH 

LUNCH 



CHOOSE ONE FROM EACH GROUP 

Medium orange, '/ 2 grapefruit 
Cup tomato juice, fresh peach 
'/ 2 cup strawberries, '/ 2 cantaloupe 
2 large fresh eggs 

1 egg, poached 

2 slices crisp bacon 

2 thin slices buttered toast 

Or 
1 cup cooked oatmeal, or cornflakes 
'/ 2 cup whole milk, 1 teaspoon sugar 

Or 
I plain waffle 
1 tablespoon maple syrup 
Cup of black coffee 
Second cup of black coffee 



CALORIES 



50 



300 



250 



250 



9 
9 
300 to 370 Calories 



/Fresh tomato on lettuce 100 

1 slice whole wheat toast 

Or 

[1 cup of canned boullion 100 

\3 soda crackers 

Or 

''/ 2 fresh peach with cottage cheese 100 

\1 slice Zweibach 

Or 

iraw carrot and apple salad 100 

I 1 slice Zweibach 

Or 
| 5 stalks canned asparagus on 100 

\\ slice whole wheat toast 



with { ' 9' ass skimmed milk 



85 
185 Calories 



Soup 



Salad 



ENJOY 
YOUR ( Fruit CU P 
DINNER J Vegetable soup, cup 

J Chicken noodle soup, cup 
Momoto soup, cup 
1 Carrot with raisin 

Orange with thin slice avocado 
} Cabbage slaw with pineapple 
i Lettuce with French dressing 

Tomato with cottage cheese 

Plain gelatin 
/Chicken, small slice 
I Turkey, small slice 
I Halibut, small slice, broiled 
'Hamburger steak, medium size 
I Beef roast, small slice 
' Lamb roast or chop, broiled 
[Veal chop, broiled 
(Potato, small white, mashed or baked 
) 1 slice bread and butter 
' Vegetables, average servings 
, Asparagus or broccoli 
■ Cauliflower, spinach, tomatoes 
/Summer squash 

VCarrots, artichokes, string beans 
(Beets, brussels sprouts 
[ Cabbage, Hubbard squash 
I Corn, one ear fresh 
J Peach, fresh sliced 
. Pears, 2 halves, canned 
(Pineapple, 1 slice 
Dessert /Dates, 2 large dried 
I Berries, '/j cup 
[ Strawberries, blackberries 
\ Cookies — 1 macaroon or oatmeal 

! Coffee, black 
Tea, black, plain 



100 



100 



100 



Entree 



with 



and 



100 



20 



30 
45 

50 
50 



and 



9 

500 Calories 



TOTAL: Approximately 1050 Calories per day 
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the masseurs than to do serious home exercises, 
find a good professional shop and take a regular 
course. Particularly, if you work and need to get 
the kinks out of an aching back or tense shoul- 
ders, a good massage followed by a salt rub-down 
and fresh shower will send you home glowing 
and completely revitalized. Exercise is a true ally 
to beauty through health, but often it requires both 
exercise and careful diet to reach a streamlined 
contour. The average woman needs from 2000 to 
3000 calories each day. What is an adequate 
amount of food for one person might be very 
skimpy for another, but the average body re- 
quires and burns up just so many units of heat. 
A calorie is a unit of measure of heat, just as a 
pound is a unit of measure for solids. When the 
normal caloric intake is reduced to 1000 units 
daily, it forces the body to use up fat energy that 
the body has previously stored. So, you lose weight. 

You might begin by dieting one week of every 
month, checking your weight and measurements 
carefully before you start and again at the end 
of each week. 

The Seven-Day Diet given here is different from 
most diets because it permits you to eat almost 
anything you wish. And, as you mould your figure 
into shape you'll find a growing sense of well- 
being ... a quickening personal pride in your 
appearance. It's a mental astringent . . . you want 
everyone to notice how superbly sleek you are. 
So, get busy on a body-beautifying program before 
Spring gives way to Summer need. Pull yourself 
together . . . you can do it! 



count your calories • count your calories • count -< 



o 



1. Fats, such as fat on meat, bacon, 
sausages, olives, cream, gravy, 
cream sauces and soups, oil dress- 
ings, fried food, and potato chips. 

2. Concentrated sweets and starches 
... ice cream, sherbets, gelatin, 
candy, pastries, macaroni, dump- 
lings, soda fountain drinks, alco- 
holic beverages and dried fruits. 



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RUTH 




CHARLES BOYER 



THE CALIFORNIAN SE- 
LECTS "ARCH OF TRIUMPH" 
AS THE PICTURE OF 
THE MONTH FOR A 
DISCRIMINATING PUBLIC 




OLLYWOOD 5624? Roll em! 

In the vernacular of the motion picture industry, production of 

the new super drama, "Arch of Triumph." is underway . . . 



tone of the speaking voice, each lote of Louis Grue nb 
jf writing b^Snc* Maria RemWfue jJroduOed the ston^^\ . 



the sound track, three miles from the studio by priv te telephone line, is busi y 
recording each tone of the_speaking voice, each pote of Louis Grue nber: 
musical score. 

Three years of writing bv^E^cli Mlria ReTrlHtfue jlrodu<!ed the stor^^\ lat%r 
to be adapted for the screen by Director Lewis Milestone and Harry Brown. Four 
months of shooting before 112 major sets at Enterprise Studios produced the 
dynamic film that this month will begin its road show tour of America . . . starring 
the incomparable Ingrid Bergman and the romantic Charles Boyer. 

It's a gripping story . . . with an un-Hollywood. realistic ending. 

Naturally, it happens in Paris. On a rainy night in 1938, Ravic (Charles Boyer 1 ) . 
an Austrian surgeon in France without a passport, is walking the Pont-Neuf. a 
bridge across the Seine. Ahead of him a woman walks unsteadily as if numbed. 
Fearing she is bent on suicide, he stops her and takes her to a bistro for a drink. 
This is Joan Madou (Ingrid Bergman). The man she loved, she tells him, died 
the night before ... a fact she has reported neither to the hotel's patron nor the 
police. Ravic straightens matters out with the authorities, installs Joan in the Hotel 
de Milan and tells her he will look her up soon. He returns to his friendship with 
Morosow (Louis Calhernl. an ex-Czarist lieutenant colonel who is doorman of the 
Scherezade Cafe, and his brooding search for Haake (Charles Laughton) . . . the 
Gestapo agent who tortured him and killed his comrades. 

After a message of distress from Joan, Ravic takes her to dinner, and on learn- 
ing that she is an actress and singer, agrees to ask Morosow to get her a job at 
the Scherezade. He takes her home but she refuses to go upstairs alone because 
she cannot stand the solitude. Ravic sleeps on the couch. Joan is beginning to fall 
in love with the only friend she has in the world. Another woman is in love with 
the handsome surgeon, too ... a wealthy American, Kate Hegstroem (Ruth 
Warrick), who has come to Paris from Vienna to be operated on by Ravic. in 
whose skill she trusts, even though she fears the impending ordeal. 

That sets the scene for a thoughtful drama that moviegoers may select as one 
of the best of the new year ... a nomination for the Academy award ... a force- 
ful opus augmented with such near-greats as Roman Bohnen, J. Edward Bromberg, 

(Continued on page 72) 



68 




THE LOVELY INGRID BERGMAN ... THE STAR 




LIME-YELLOW THEME WITH JONQUILS, TULIPS AND POLISHED CITRUS FRUITS 



a ttenti o n 
h ostess 



FLOWER STYLIST 



NEW DRAMA AND 



ELEGANCE FOR 



YOUR TABLE 



SETTINGS 



Table settings follow a definite 

fashion cycle. And, according 

to Flower Stylist John Beistel, 

today's hostess will be wise to 

set a more elaborate table in 

tune with the current vogue 

for elegance and post-war 

famous exuberance. This expert, who stages parties for some 

of California's most famous hosts, believes that the table 

settings which are most successful have a drama and 

flair to outrival the guests' most beflowered bonnets or 

suggests richest gowns . . . and therein lies their success. 

Current suggestions for the woman who dares to be 
different include the two exciting table settings on this 
page, created by Beistel for The Californian. Both il- 
lustrate the new trend toward an extremely decorative 
quality . . . using fruits, flowers, ribbon& . . . and even 
feathers ... to glorify a table. 

Above, yellow tulips and jonquils top a colorful dis- 
play of oranges, lemons and tangerines . . . with wild 
lemon leaves and a glossy satin bow of lime and tur- 
quoise. At each plate is a jonquil corsage tied with 
the same gay ribbon. For more formal occasions, the 
delectable combination of rosy-red grapes, below, with 
pink camellias and violet bouquets is arranged in a 
two-tiered effect . . . two cut glass pedestal bowls made 
into a picturesque centerpiece. Here again, ribbons 
are used for the "extra" touch, this time in tones 
of violet and turquoise. 
And small sprays repeat- 
ing this same motif may 
be used effectively on a 
larger table, too. 

Originality is your 
watchword, and don't be 
afraid to be dramatic . . . 
that's the trend for '47! 



RICHLY DECORATIVE MOTIF 
THAT COMBINES FRUIT AND 
FLOWERS FOR TABLE EX- 
CITEMENT: GRAPES, PINK 
CAMELLIAS AND VIOLET 
BOUQUETS ARE FEATURE. 



PHOTOGRAPHED By ANNE ANTHONY 




New For You: 

• a glimpse 
at gadgets 

WITH PEGGY HIPPEE 

J_y rop me a line if you'd like to know where 
you can buy any of these: 

SERVE-A-SALAD ... gay colored Flex-o-j 
ware fork and spoon combine manufactured | 
in Los Angeles, destined for salad service! 
the country over. Carefully balanced, easily | 
detachable with no extra screws, bolts or! 
bands to lose in the wash ... or in the salad! 
. . . this scissor-like device assures easyl 
hospitality for years to come. A twist ofj 
the wrist and the single utensil becomes sep- 1 
arate fork and spoon, perfect for salad toss- I 
ing. Another twist and presto, you've a I 
fine scoop-and-spoon server that guarantees ] 
neatness and dispatch with every salad plate, j 
Under $2 and available in clear bright red, i 
green and ivory. 

FEATHERWEIGHT PASTRY ROLLER . . 
Grandma would have burst her buttons at || 
the sight of this newest Lewis specialty I 
... a stainless Dural roller which weighs 
only 14 ounces, chills as it rolls, lasts a life- '' 
time. Simply unscrew the handle, fill tht 
hollow cylinder with ice water or chipped | 
ice, replace handle and wipe roller with damp 
cloth. There you are . . . ready to roll and 
chill pastry of all sorts in one simple opera- 
tion. For the woman who likes to bake, a I 
bargain buy at less than $3. 

MAYNARD MIXER . . . another California- 1 
made gadget that Grandma would go for I 
... a super beater equipped with a side >il 
handle for steadiness and two definite speeds. I 
Slow gear is for beating a better batter; I 
high gear whips up eggs, cream, etc. This I 
wonderful beater, which actually made its | 
debut just before the war, is now being man- 
ufactured in quantity and sells for about $3. 

CAP-OFF ... an Eagle Lock Co. device 
that removes any and every bottle cap easily, 
surely, safely . . . and with no effort on your 
part. All you do is place the bell-shaped 
opener on the bottle top, gently squeeze the 
"metal ears" together . . . and the cap lifts 
off the bottle with no fuss, no muss, no dis- 
concerting cuts, bruises or shower baths. 
About $2.50 in better stores everywhere. 

MR. BARTENDER . . . "designed for liv- 
ing" by the Modern Engineering and Develop- 
ment Co. of Los Angeles. Here's an auto- 
matic spirits dispenser that replaces the cork 1 
in any bottle, solves all bartending . . . with- 'j 
out raiding the stock. Just place securely 
into the bottle and it's ready to pour. It will 
release at each tip the proper portion . . . 
one jigger, no less, no more. And when you're 
through serving, set the bottle down until 
you need it again. Comes in shining chrome 
for about $3; in 18K goldplate, $10, plus 
Federal tax. 

BUNSIZER . . . answer to Dagwood's (or 
anyone's) prayer; this handy metal ham- 
burger mold (also good for fish cakes, po- 
tato cakes, etc.) manufactured in Sierra 
Madre, Calif. To use, place two ounces of 
meat on five-inch square of waxed paper and 
lay over center depression ; cover with sec- 
ond sheet of waxed paper and press top of 
mold down firmly. Open lid, lift perfect pattie 
out by edges of bottom paper. If you're an 
onion addict, mold pattie as directed, then 
raise top of "Bunsize" and sprinkle pattie 
with chopped onion and press down again. 
The onion will permeate and stay put. Avail- 
able for under $3 in housewares departments 
everywhere. 



The Young Artist and Saroyan 



j [Continued from page 31) 

Most of the time while I'm painting, I'm 
I Tiean as hell." 

"Sure, Manuel, I know," Saroyan said. 
'You can ask Carol if I'm not the same way. 
When she comes into the room and I'm work- 
ling there's just no answer." 

"When I look at these pictures now, Bill, 
t's like the first time I've ever seen them. 
As though I had nothing to do with them. 
I'm completely outside them." 

"Of course, Manuel. It's that way with 
every artist, every writer. When the work is 
nished, it all goes away from them. That's 
fine, because it leaves you fresh and ready 
for the next thing." 

"The way you put it into words, man. The 
things I feel." 

"Let's see some more of the pictures, Man- 
jel. I like this show. You'll sell them all this 
:ime." 

"Sure, Bill. Here's one that you'll have to 
tudy for a while. I did it over in Lodi." 
It was a small oil of a night street scene 
. . also shown here . . . with a yellow win- 
dow shining out on the street corner and a 
few people standing around or leaning against 
i the wall of the corner bar. "You'll have to 
look at this one for a while, man. It takes 
time to get it," Manuel said. 

He brought out another oil of about the 
bame size with a girl in a bright yellow dress 
Kinder a bright light singing in a crowded 
bar. "I did this one at Billy Berg's place 
pown on Vine Street. It's the only thing that 
a did in Hollywood. Except the portrait." 
"What portrait, Manuel?" 
"Here it is, man, and I don't like this guy 
any more at all now." 

"What went wrong, why don't you like 
uiim, Manuel?" 

"Well, we're sitting there and I'm painting 
and I ask him how he likes Bill's last book. 
He acts like he's never heard of you at first, 
and then when he's heard of you, he says he 
didn't much care for the book. Something 
labout how he didn't agree with all your 
ideas." Manuel walked up and down in front 
;of the portrait, his shoulders angrily hunched 
up in his white shirt. "So then I say 'did 



Where To Buy It 

9 Merchandise shown on pages 34-35 
may be purchased as follows: Fay Fos- 
ter's at Bonnie Best, Beverly Hills, Calif.; 
Halle Bros., Cleveland. De De Johnson's 
at Carson Pirie Scott, Chicago; Scruggs- 
Vandervoort - Barney, St. touis. Ritter 
Sportswear at Coulter's, Los Angeles; 
Hartley's, Miami. 

9 Merchandise shown on pages 38-39 
may be purchased as follows: Ken Suther- 
land's at J. J. Haggarty Co., Los Angeles 
Raab and Harmell at Emery, Bird, Thayer, 
Kansas City. Lynn Lester at J. J. Haggarty 
Co., Los Angeles; Peck & Peck, New York. 
City. Joy Kingston at Nancy's, Hollywood; 
Kaufmann's, Pittsburgh. 



you read the book?' and he sort of hems and 
haws and I say it again, loud, 'did you read 
the book?' but I can see he hasn't read it. 
He just got his ideas from the reviews." 

"Well, Manuel," Saroyan said. "Maybe he 
hadn't read the book and didn't want to say 
so." 

"Well, the hell with his portrait. I think I'll 
tear it up." 

"You don't want to do that, Manuel. It's 
a good portrait. Not like the rest of the paint- 
ings, but a good portrait." 

Manuel took down the portrait and brought 
out some more of his paintings. He placed 
one of them on the easel. "This is the only 
painting I've had returned to me since I 
started selling them." 

It was a painting of a flower pot with a 
white flower on a window sill. "Why did the 
fellow return it?" Saroyan asked. 

"He claimed that in the window-space, out- 
side the window in the picture, he could see 
a coffin. I don't see any coffin, no one else 
sees a coffin, but this fellow claims he sees 
a coffin plain as day. Even his own wife 
doesn't see a coffin, he admits, but he sees 
one there so he returned the painting." 

Saroyan looked at the painting closely. 
"There's no coffin in the picture, Manuel, 
but he'd see one in any painting he bought. 
Maybe it's the white flower in the pot that 
made him think of a funeral, but more likely 
he's just thinking along the lines of coffins 
inside himself. How old was he?" 

"About forty-five. He's a nice guy, a grain 
and feed man up near Chico." 

"He's young to be seeing coffins. It re- 
minds you of Lawrence, who wrote the 'Seven 
Pillars of Wisdom.' A bird used to come and 
sit on his window sill every day and finally 
he decided that the bird was death waiting 
for him. So he killed himself. Me, I wouldn't 
have killed myself, I'd have pulled the bird 
in and made him sing. If the damn thing 
couldn't sing, I'd have eaten him." 

Tolegian stood in front of his painting 
and examined it. "Maybe," he said, "this 
fellow had heard the story and kept waiting 
for that bird to come and sit on the window 
sill." 

"It could be, Manuel. There's no death 
anywhere in your pictures. There's growth 
and life all through them, but no death any- 
where. Don't give it another thought. Let me 
see the picture of the girl playing the lute, 
again. I like that painting. Mardikian will 
buy it on sight." 

Tolegian found the picture of the girl play- 
ing the lute and they set it up and stood 
looking at it. 

"Who was the girl in the picture, Manuel? 
Is she an Armenian girl?" 

"Yes, she's a girl who lives down in the 
valley . . . her husband died not long ago. 
She plays the lute like heaven and how I 
love that music. The dress is her mother's 
wedding dress. Brought it from the old coun- 
try." 

"I like that picture very much, Manuel." 

"You'd better buy it, Bill. If you don't, 



Mardikian will." 

Mardikian . . . one of San Francisco's 
famed restauranteurs . . . never did buy the 
picture and eventually it was sold to someone 
else. 

But what about Tolegian? 

He started painting as a boy in Fresno, 
studied in New York under Thomas Benton, 
George Grosz and John Sloan . . . then joined 
the WPA artists' project and vagabonded 
about the country some twenty-five times. 

Critics in those days raved that his paint- 
ing had the strength of a candid camera. He 
turned out pictures of industrial workers, 
of bread lines and tenement districts, rapid- 
ly establishing his reputation as one of the 
arch-realists of the thirties. Returning to Cali- 
fornia, he married his boyhood sweetheart 
and went to live in Chico, a small community 
in the northern part of the state. There it 
was that Tolegian worked out his pattern for 
the artist in our society. He discovered that 
the local citizens of any town can become in- 
terested in art, providing it used a language 
they know. So the artist painted the stores 
and farms and schools ... all the familiari- 
ties of the surrounding countryside . . . and 
Chico welcomed Tolegian and bought his pic- 
tures to hang in its homes. 

It was during those years that the artist 
developed an all-consuming interest in the 
California landscape. He still painted people 
at their work, but his pictures were gentler, 
less turbulent, never disturbing in their ulti- 
mate message. 

After the war Tolegian moved to Los 
Angeles where he already is painting the 
city's colorful Plaza and the polyglot char- 
acters of Main Street and Skid Row. Southern 
California has become his home and a house 
on the very top of a mountain in suburban 
Sherman Oaks is the crucible for his crea- 
tiveness. 

For an artist who makes his living from 
his work, Tolegian is remarkably lacking in 
eccentricities. His routine is almost as dis- 
ciplined as his canvasses. As one San Fran- 
cisco critic said of his gouache paintings: 
"They are bright in color and pleasant in 
design, but they point up the fact that at 
times Tolegian can edge a bit too near the 
pictorial and the academic." 

Whatever his style, Tolegian's love of Cali- 
fornia and his feeling for the people and the 
land is clearly evident in his work . . . and 
these things he shares with his friend of boy- 
hood years, William Saroyan. 




THE CALIFORNIAN, April, 1947 



71 




Crisp jabot blouse in embroid- 
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ruffle lace yoke and sleeves. 

Launders like a hankie. 

White only. Sizes 34-36. $9.95 

• • 

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1521 S. Troost Tulsa, Oklahoma 

Custom Made Sandals 



GREEK 

Classic Greek 
sandal with 
natural thong. 
$8.-00 




ROMAN 

Coloured straps 
tie around an- 
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black or blue. 
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JAVANESE 

Ornamental 
knob, straps and 
edge of sole col- 
oured in green, 
black, blue or t 
fuchsia. 
$7.00 

Draw accurate outline of foot for all 
models and indicate point between 
large and second toes. • Prices 
are prepaid and cover postage. 

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Box 1226 • Carmel •' Calif. 



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Thrill fami'v anH friends with won- 
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Deluxe gift box contains one lb. (about 
20) guest-sizepralines, individually 
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ORDER BY THE BOX, $1 50 
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California's Blooming 

(Continued from page 31) 

from cover to cover. For the scientifically minded, Willis Linn Jepson's 
"A Manual of the Flowering Plants of California" will constitute a 
most complete botanical reference. And those who are interested in the 
cultivation and propagation of wild flowers will wish to read Lester 
Rowntree's "Hardy Californians." 

Where great industrial cities now stand, the wild flowers of California 
once grew unimpeded from the mountains to the sea. But what man- 
kind has left unmolested of Nature's largesse is still ours to be enjoyed 
and cherished. The exigencies of war caused many a wild flower en- 
thusiast to temporarily abandon his annual hegira to the untrammeled 
areas where he invariably could witness the dramatic unveiling of 
spring. During the last winter we have been waiting breathlessly some 
portent of the magnitude of the displays we may expect this year. 
No one can predict in advance just what week the wild flowers will 
bloom in any specific area, or how profusely they will blossom . . . 
so much depends upon rainfall and temperature. But for those planning 
special trips to view the flowers, last minute information is available 
over the radio and from the press. 

And we cannot plot in advance the exact sequence in which recog- 
nized display areas will reach the peak of their blossoming season, as 
some local quirk of weather will cause a reversal. Generally speaking, 
however, flowers begin to blossom in the south during the month of 
February. The main body of these early forerunners will have started 
early in March, reaching the peak from mid-March to early April, and 
then rapidly disappear. Contradicting this will be the effect of late 
rains that may carry over Mojave blooms far into April. At this time, 
too. Palo Verde is likely to be at its peak further south, while Rhodo- 
dendron is highlighting Mendocino County. In Northern California the 
flowers usually open in mid-March, the Red-bud takes honors the 
latter part of March, and the Azalea and Rhododendron festivals cele- 
brated by many communities will be held in May. At the same time 
the Cacti of the Colorado Desert area may be attracting an equal num- 
ber of visitors with its prodigious display. 

Most states throughout the West prohibit by law the picking of wild 
flowers or molestation of native plants, which is as it should be if we 
are to know at first hand the great natural beauty of the country. 
No law protects the plants against the onward march of population, 
however, and it is here that those who appreciate the flowers must 
do all within their power to preserve them. We await with anxiety 
the return of native blossoms to great desert wastes unavoidably 
tramelled during war maneuvers. We know of thousands of acres put 
to the plow and cultivated crops in recent years . . . the flowers cannot 
come back. We know of new subdivisions where for centuries the foot 
of man had not disturbed the wild growth. In the great Federal hold- 
ings where sheep and cattle were permitted to graze in the past, many 
of the wild flowers will never be seen again. So ... if all the natural 
beauty is not to disappear in the years ahead ... if we shall protect 
that which gives a great enjoyment . . . we must awake to the im- 
mediate necessity for cherishing that which we hold in trust . . . the 
wild flowers of the West. 



Hollywood's Arch of Triumph 

(Continued from page 69) 

Ruth Nelson, Stephen Bekassy, Curt Beis, Art Smith and the notorious 
international, "Prince" Michael Romanoff. 

'Arch of Triumph" sets a record, too, in its consistent off-nationality 
type casting. Swedish Ingrid plays an Anglo-Rumanian-Italian. Boyer, 
the Frenchman, portrays an Austrian. Charles Laughton enacts the 
first Nazi in his long career. Louis Calhern, from Brooklyn, plays the 
Russian. In all, forty-two different nationalities are represented in the 
cast. Bergman, who wears no makeup and needs none, creates a new 
hair style, with shorn locks and bangs . . . the Arch of Triumph hair-do. 
She sings two songs . . . one in Russian, one Italian. Actual speeches 
of Chamberlain and Daladier have been dubbed into the sound track. 
The prop department handled more than 163,000 separate items during 
filming ef the picture. Nate Watt traveled 18,000 miles and shot 25,000 
feet of background material in France. Eight technical advisers worked 
on the production. Russell Metty's low-key photography, in some in- 
stances, innovates a new technique in picture making. 

But what you, mother and Mrs. O'Toole will find most intriguing 
. . . Ingrid Bergman and Charles Boyer clinch twenty-one times! 
A far cry from "Gaslight," their last celluloid test together. 



MEXICALI SANDALS 




From South-of-the-Border 

Style RS. Alpargata or espadrille 
with heavy cloth uppers and rope 
sole. No heel. Colors: Red, white, 
dark blue, brown and green. Sizes 
for women and men. 
Send shoe size, outline of foot, and 
S2.25 Postpaid. Add 2y 2 % in Calif. 

THE MEXICO COMPANY 



Dept. CA 



Calexico, California 



(Send for folder showing other 
styles in leather sandals, espadrilles, 
and cowboy boots for women, men, 
and children. 5c will bring folder 
by airmail.) 



Illustration 
Actual Size 





Mtmon Bldg 



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210 W. 7lh St., Los Angeles 14, Cal. 

Please enter my subscription today 
to The Californian for the period 
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PETITE ALARM CLOCK 

Purse size, bell alarm. Luminous 
dial. So small you'll want it to 
travel with you. Watch type move- 
ment will outlast ordinary alarm 
many years. You'll want a number 
for birthdays, weddings, anniver- 
saries and graduation, at only 
$6.65 prepaid. Musical alarms too, 
S19.95 prepaid. 
Write for cluck and barometer catalog. 



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71 



SU/VlfclHIIMlj JM^W-BY TH| &|SIGNER WHO REVOLUTIONISED RAINWEAR 




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as singing star on "The Bates Magazine of the Air.' 



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Two celebrities take the air at the corner of Sunset 

and Vine. One you've heard: sunny-haired, satin-voiced 

Jeannie McKeon, featured vocalist on a coast-to-coast network. 

One you've heard about : Bates batiste, thin and 

drifting, printed with cool pink hearts in a Pat Premo dress 

that positively calls for autograph-hunters. 

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Tailored in California from the world's finest and most 
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See the sun glance from your ruffled Dirndl- Combo -bright stripes 
in washable Ameritex chintz -elasticized bands for skirt and midriff fit. S, M, L; about $9. 

In the panel— Short skirted Ballet Trio -multi- convertible midriff plus brief panties. 
Washable striped cotton. S, M, L; about $11. At stores across the country, or write 

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VOL 3 
NO. 4 



THE CALIFORMAN 

S5.00 for two years : 
Entered as second .-I, 
Copyright 1947 The California!), 



published monthly. 210 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles 14, California. Subscription price: S3.00 for one year; 
ST. 50 for three. One dollar additional postage per year outside continental United States. 25 cents a copy, 
atter January 25. 1946, at the Post Office at Los Angeles. California, under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 



MAY 
1947 



ItfN 



THE HECHT CO. ^ 

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THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 




Mail or Phone 
Orders Invited. 



California Combination 

SKIRT pencil slim lines with man-tailored detail, 
created by OHREN OF CALIFORNIA. True- 
fly zipper front with draped pleats. Part 
wool gabardine in black, brown, gray or 
beige. Sizes 10-18. $8.95 

BLOUSE center-inverted pleat front with jewel 
neckline, short sleeves. Fine Oxford crepe in 
white, beige, lime, eggshell, pink or powder. 
Sizes 10-18. $6.95 

BELT highly polished top grain saddle leather. 
Sizes 32-40. $2.50 

Californians add 2Yz% Sales Tax. 



th 



e missy shop 

404 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles 14 

TUcker 2602 






SUITS HIM . . . this cunning two-piecer . . . 
100% wool, hand-loomed knit, for the little 
man . . . sizes 1-2-3. An original Knox Knit 
creation. Order from Margaret of California, 
3335 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles 26, Calif. Specify 
the design you wish . . . striped top with ship 
appliqued on sweater; two-tone with anchor 
trim; plain top with animal motif. Colors are 
maize, red, copen, blue and white. $8.95, post- 
paid, anywhere in the U. S., $9.50 elsewhere. 

BEACH BAG ... as big as all outdoors (18" 
diam.) ... as colorful and important, too. 
In natural canvas lined with Waterseal . . . 
opens with a 14" zipper . . . over-shoulder 
rope cord handle. A sea horse, hand-painted in 
reef red, sea green, Pacific blue or driftwood 
brown. A Gloria George Original, about $5.95 
at Marshall Field & Co., and the best stores 
across the country. From American Multi-Craft, 
179 S. Formosa, Los Angeles. 

NAME FLAMES . . . take your pick of three 
merry messages stamped with your name in 
gold on giant matchbooks. You may have "Get 
Lit Up On The Browns" or "Stolen From Tom 
Brown" or "These Did Belong To The Browns." 
Choice of green, blue, red or assorted match- 
books. Only one message to the (asbestos-lined) 
mailable gift box with 25 matchbooks, $1.45, 
postpaid. From Miles Kimball Company, 225 
Bond Street, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 

SEED BEADS . . . strands and strands of tiny 
beads artfully braided into a choker and brace- 
let set by Sandley. Tone up your summer cottons 
or date dresses with this unique collar of beads. 
White combined with moss green, sky blue, 
sand tan, coral or yellow. For the set, $6.50; 
the choker, $4.95; the bracelet, $1.95. Order 
from Beverly Hills Gift Shop, 453 N. Beverly 
Drive, Beverly Hills, California. 

WEAR-A-PAIR ... or two ... to glamorize 
your hairdo, casual or dressy. These gold or 
silver-plated barrettes (about 3%" long) are 
truly smart in their simple smoothness. Priced 
about $1 each ... in sterling silver, about 
$2 each. At The Broadway-Hollywood, Holly- 
wood; Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., Chicago; Kauf- 
mann's, Pittsburgh. For the name of the store 
nearest you, write Bi It more Accessories, 846 S. 
Broadway, Los Angeles. 




TEA TIME . . . "Little Patch" is this ceramic cup 
and saucer . . . a dainty ceramic blossom 
adorning handle and fluted saucer. A delightful 
gift for the collector ... to highlight a what- 
not shelf ... or use it for tiny cut flowers. 
Choice of chartreuse, blue, pink, brown or white. 
An exclusive California ceramic offered by Po- 
desta and Baldocchi, 224 Grant Avenue, San 
Francisco, California. Send exactly $4, postage 
included. 

PRECIOUS PINAFORE ... for your demi-debbie. 
Ruffly and crisp . . . white dotted swiss com- 
bined with fine pastel cotton stripes. Perky 
little skirt with generous hem . . . appliqued 
heart on waist spells her name in hand em- 
broidery. A "Sunday Best" dress, indeed. Sizes 
1-6; $10.95, postage paid. From LUCILLE, Box 
1194, Beverly Hills, California. Be sure to send 
her name with order, and allow two weeks for 
delivery. No C.O.D.'s, please. 

FUN SOAP . . . Walt Disney Characters on 
finest French-milled soap designed especially 
to make baths and washups playtime. Six 
different colorful characters packed to the box, 
to charm little boys and girls . . . these whim- 
sical pictures do not wash off. If your favorite 
toiletries counter is temporarily out of this item, 
write Monogram Soap Company, 1401 N. Ca- 
huenga Blvd., Hollywood 28, California. Each 
box, $1.50, postpaid. 



MAKE IT YOURSELF . . . have plenty of fun and 
satisfaction assembling this authentic old-time 
red lacquer coffee grinder (17" high) that grinds 
coffee ... of all thingsl As a decorative antique, 
plant it with your favorite greenery, or if you are 
just a little "I made-it-myself" inclined, follow the 
simple instructions furnished for making it into a 
lovely lamp. $32.50, express collect, Savage-Cali- 
fornia, 2115 S. San Pedro, Los Angeles 11. 



SPINNER ASH TRAY . . . just turn the knob and 
unsightly cigarette and cigar ends spin away. 
Wonderful for the executive's den, recreation 
room or office. Man-size {about 7y 2 " in diame- 
ter) heavy-weight brass with bright chrome or 
bronze plate finish. Heavy felt covered plate 
at bottom protects table tops and prevents tip- 
ping. From Art Metal Appliance Co., 11805 
Bel lag io Rd., Los Angeles, $7.50, including tax 
and postage. 






Rest assured. 




The inimitable Mam'zelle 
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YOU l °°*>^ 






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MAM7CLLE BRASSIERES 

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• California 
In Books 

Br HAZEL ALLEN PULLING 

V^ialifornia . . . the royal road to many satis- 
factions in this land of homesites and holi- 
days! For dilettante or specialist in Cali- 
fornia lore, for visitor vacation-bound or deep- 
dyed native son, the literature of California 
holds fun and fascination as well as profit and 
adventure. 

Not all the best is new. California's cen- 
tennial coming on apace has turned the spot- 
light of attention upon numerous century-old 
tales. In modern dress or old, in bright new 
format or dusty, time-worn covers, these books 
take one back through decades to the days 
when California was young. 

Delightfully fresh and lovely is the reprint 
of J. Ross Brown's The Indians of California. 
first published in 1864. but now reissued by 
The Colt Press in its usual fine design (San 
Francisco. 1944. 73p. S3). J. Ross Brown. 
Irish, fearless, and a friend of the mistreated 
Indian, was Inspector of Indian Affairs on the 
Pacific Coast in the 1850s. This small bro- 
chure, a copy of his report to the govern- 
ment and illustrated with three of his original 
drawings, is a first-hand analysis of conditions 
that prevailed among the Indians of Cali- 
fornia when they were first brought under 
government tutelage. Forthright in tone, even 
verging on sarcasm, this word-picture of our 
first California residents is a classic in Cali- 
forniana and basic reading for a true picture 
of California's beginnings. 

CENTENNIAL SERIES 

Rare opportunity to add to one's private 
collection of early Californiana is afforded 
by the California Centennial Series currently 
being published by N. A. Kovach of Los An- 
geles (712 South Hoover Street). To date 
three titles, all collector's items, have been 
reissued in pleasing format, complete with 
maps and illustrations. 

Among the reprints in this series is a noted 
guide book to California's gold fields. It was 
first published in 1852 when a now unknown 
Andrew Child released for popular use his 
Overland Route to California (Kovach, 1946. 
60p. S3). Used by many of the emigrants, 
this guide directed the traveler from Council 
Bluffs, Iowa, to California bv way of the 
Platte River. South Pass. Sublette's' Cut-Off. 
and the Humboldt and Truckee River roads. It 
was almost a step-by-step directive, marking 
points, giving distances, indicating climatic 
and other pertinent characteristics of the 
trail. By this guide the wayfarer could an- 
ticipate his needs and in part circumvent 
his hardships: by it. too, we may retrace his 
steps and in imagination walk with those 
hardy men and women of Gold Rush davs. 

Leonard Kip's California Sketches With 
Recollections of the Gold Mines (Kovach. 
1946. 58p. S2.75) is another title in the Cen- 
tennial Series. This is a record of the ob- 
servations and experiences of a young New 
\orker who visited California's cities and gold 
mines in 1849. Keen and witty, the accounts 
here given are unrivaled for their rebability 
and their readability among the records of 
California of a hundred years ago. 

EMIGRANT TRAIL 

Third volume in the series is a reprint of 
John Udell's famous Journal (Kovach. 1946. 
87p. S3). This is a daily record kept by the 
California-bound emigrant on the overland 
trip in 1858-59. And it is especially valued for 
its full descriptions of the hardships of the 
journey which included attack and massacre 
of some of the party by a band of Mojave 
Indians One of the best of early accounts 
of the making of California, this attractive 
reprint is a worthy addition to your own pri- 
vate library. 




MRP**- 






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base is a heavy old copper jug, antiquated 
with an English brass finish. The Marshall shade, 
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antiqued parchment with hand-oppliqued design. 
Stands a proud 23"%" high for desk or end 
table . . . tasteful touch in living room decor. 
Order from Eldora Mills, Eldora, Iowa; $29.75 
including shade; $55 a pair. Postpaid. 

BRUNCH COAT . . . this little dream of lac* 
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up sleeves, fitted bodice with flared peplum . . . 
pastel pink or mist blue. Matching nightie in 
same fitted lines with full swing skirt, crepe or 
satin. Available at Modelon, 10556 Riverside 
Drive, North Hollywood; Gloria's Exclusive Gowns, 
San Jose; Silver Thimble, Carmel by The Sea; 
all in Calif. Designs by Dora I Originals, 639 
S. Carondelet, Los Angeles. 

BUTTON-BUTTON ... the two outsize sunny- 
copper buttons on this chalk- white, soft elks kin 
belt do bright things to your summer fun clothes. 
Trimly girdles your waistline . . . with its new 
smart 3 Y2' width. In desert colors . . . cactus, 
palomino, chest n jt, sunset red. Sizes, 24-32. 
Price, about S6.95 at most fine stores throughout 
the country, or write Phil Sockett Mfg. (Est. 
1925), 1240 S. Main, Los Angeles 15. 

BEE JEWELS . . . a pin and earring set by 
Coro . . . generously be jeweled with glisten- 
ing rhinestones against painted enamel; green, 
gold and shiny black predominating. Duette 
comes apart to make two separate clips, if 
that's your wish. The pin, $6.25; earrings, $3.50 
a pair. Complete set, $9.50, including federal 
tax and postage. Order by mail from Daniels 
of Beverly Hills, 451 N. Beverly Drive, Beverly 
Hills, California. 

GUIDE TO BEAUTY . . . "Face and Figure Fas- 
cination," a book abojt charm of face and form 
. . . completely illustrated instructions on the 
art of achieving modern beauty by expert Edyth 
Thornton McLeod. Twelve revealing chapters, 127 
pages on proper diet, exercise, makeup, hairdo, 
personality, color, wardrobe . . . for beauty 
and charm at all ages. Order by mail, $1.25 
includes postage, The Dales, Booksellers to Smart 
Women, 3066-Z W. Seventh, Los Angeles. 



GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

THE CALIFORN1AN presents for your convenience a current directory of the finest restaurants in Los Angeles 
and San Francisco, cultural events of interest and activities that make living in California or a visit to our 
state the most enjoyable for you and your family. Fine foods of many kinds are available, and whenever 
possible specialties of the house are listed, names of the maitres d'hotel and days the establishments are open. 
Have a good time ! 

THE RESTAURANTS 

IN LOS ANGELES 



AMBASSADOR— 3400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. 
World-famous Cocoanut Grove open every night ex- 
cept Monday. Saturday afternoon tea dancing. Freddy 
Martin's Orchestra. Dinners from $3.25. Cover $1, 
Saturday $1.50. Rouben. 

BAR OF MUSIC— 7351 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Excellent double-piano on a stage back of the bar. 
Food. Good small band. Two-dollar minimum on 
Saturday and Sunday. 

DON THE BEACHCOMBER— 1727 North McCadden 
Place, Hollywood. Fried Shrimp, Rumaki, Barbecued 
Spareribs, Mandarin Duck, Chicken Almond and 
known as originator of the Zombie. Dinners from $3. 
Usually crowded, but good tourist spot. 

BEVERLY HILLS HOTEL— 964-1 Sunset Blvd., Bev- 
erly Hills. Palm room open Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday nights with dancing. Thursday buffet, $3.75. 
Dinner a la carte from $1.75. Good food and you 
might see a movie star. 

BEVERLY - WILSHIRE HOTEL— 9415 Wilshire 
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Tasty food in Copa d'Oro and 
Terrace Room, with medium prices. 

BILTMORE BOWL— 515 South Olive St., Los An- 
geles. Best place downtown for good food and good 
music, with Russ Morgan playing. Two-dollar din- 
ners, nominal cover charge and two floor shows. Nice 
for tourists. Closed Monday. 

BUBLICHKI— 8846 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. A 
bit of Russia on the Strip. Cutlet a la Kieff, Filet 
Mignon a la Stroganoff, Caucasian Shashlik, Rus- 
sian Blini. Dinners from $3. Host, Wally; hostess, 
Jasmina. Good music and romantical. Closed Tuesday. 

CASA LA GOLONDRINA— 3 5 Olvera St., Los An- 
geles, "the first brick house in the city." Historic 
Mexican cafe. Arroz con Polio, Enchiladas, Tacos. 
Dinners from $2. Alfredo. Closed Sunday. 

CHAROUCHKA— 8524 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Another bite of Russia on the Strip. Mamma and 
Papa, "your hosts," excel with atmosphere, food and 
soothing music. Closed Monday, and prices fairly 
high. 

CHASEN'S— 9339 Beverly Blvd., Beverly Hills. One 
of the best in the West. Excellent cuisine and plenty 
of celebrities. Expensive. Closed Monday. 

CIRO'S— 3344 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. On the 
Strip and luxurious, with name bands for dancing. 
Expensive. Celebrities, sometimes. 

HENRI'S— 9236 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, "where 
the Sunset Strip meets the Bridle Path." The leisurely 
glamor of Southern California as the visitor hopes 
to find it. Society, celebrities, tops in cuisine. A la 
carte from $2. 

HOUSE OF MURPHY— La Cienega "Restaurant 
Row" at Fourth Street, Los Angeles. Madame Begue's 
Chicken Creole, Hamburger and Onion Rings, Million 
Dollar Hash. Your host, Bob Murphy. Wonderful 
Salads, Beautiful Steaks. A la carte, medium prices. 
Open every day. 

LA RUE— 8633 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, on the 
Strip. Tops in food and decor. Crepes Louise, Crepes 
a la Reine, Lasagne Pasticciate, Beef Bourguignonne. 
From noon till 3 for lunch except Sunday. From 6 to 
11 p.m. for dinner. Closed Monday. Felix Cigolini. 
A la carte entrees from $2.25. 

LINDY'S— 3656 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. A good 
place to eat, with steaks a feature. Closed Monday. 

LUCEY'S-— 5444 Melrose Avenue, Hollywood. Good 
food, medium prices and across the street from Par- 
amount Studio. Movie stars abound at lunch. 



MIKE LYMAN'S OR AL LEVY'S— When you're 
downtown in Los Angeles. Good food, same man- 
agement. Reasonable. 

MOCAMBO— 8588 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. One 
of the Strip's spots for movie stars. Colorful, crowded 
and expensive. 

PERINO'S— 3027 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. In 
the heart of the smart shopping area. Excellent food. 
A favorite luncheon rendezvous for society. 

PLAYERS — 8225 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. Good for 
tourists and you might see a movie star. Expensive. 

READY ROOM — Johnny Wilson's popular rendez- 
voui for the younger set. Big fireplace, delicious 
steaks, informal atmosphere. At 365 No. La Cienega 
Blvd., Los Angeles, on Restaurant Row. 

ROMANOFF'S— 326 No. Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills. 
Prince Mike caters to movie stars, writers and pro- 
ducers. Expensive. 

SARNEZ— 170 No. La Cienega Blvd., Beverly Hills. 
Lew Sailee and Harry Ringland have > an attractive 
place, with good food and good music, reasonably 
priced. 

SOMERSET HOUSE— On Restaurant Row in Bev- 
erly Hills. Fine steaks, a la carte dinners, nice 
atmosphere and expensive. 

SPORTSMAN'S LODGE— 12833 Ventura Blvd., 
North Hollywood. An epicurean delight in San Fer- 
nando Valley. Broiled Lobster, Chicken Saute a Sec, 
Charcoal-broiled Steaks in a gorgeous setting. One of 
the finest restaurants in California. Jack Spiros. From 
5:30 p.m. Closed Monday. 

TAIL O' THE COCK— 477 So. La Cienega Blvd., 
Los Angeles, on Restaurant Row. Mac McHenry pro- 
vides excellent food, good companions and a pleasing 
atmosphere. Hamburger Diable and Fried Shrimp are 
specialties. You'll want to go again and again, and 
it's reasonably priced. 

TOWN HOUSE— 2965 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, 
overlooking Lafayette Park. Three smart cafes to 
serve you . . . Garden Room, Cape Cod Grill and 
the Zebra Room. No cover or minimum. Excellent 
food and a good spot for the tourist. 

VILLA NOVA— 9015 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. A 
charming old world atmosphere on the Strip. Good 
Italian food and good service. 



THE THEATRE 

PLAYS 
MUSICALS 

BILTMORE— April 14 through May 3, Theatre 
Guild production of "Magnificent Yankee" with 
Louis Calhern ; May 5-17 "Accidentally Yours," 
starring Billie Burke and Grant Mitchell; May 26- 
June 7 "Barretts of Wimpole Street," srarring Cath- 
erine Cornell. Nightly at 8:30; matinees Wednesday, 
Saturday at 2:30. 

PASADENA COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE — April 
30-May 11 "The Yankee Fable," bv Guy Andros ; 
May 14-25 "Oh Susanna," musical depicting life 
of Stephen Foster. World premiere. Curtain at 8:15; 
prices 76c to $2. 

THEATRE MART — Continually playing "The 
Drunkard" every night at 8. Famous old-time melo- 
drama with beer and pretzels. Wonderful tourist 
entertainment and good for the entire family. 

EL CAPITAN— Ken Murray's "Blackouts of 1947," 




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THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 



ORDER BY MAIL FROM CALIFORNIA 




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The Ghillie by David Frank with open heel and toe 
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GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




starring Marie Wilson and Ken, every night at 
S :30, with plenty of matinees. Variety entertainment 
that will please. Good for tourists. 

EARL CARROLL'S THEATRE RESTAURANT— In 
Hollywood for the tourist. "The Vanities" in a new 
show, each night with two different performances 
at 9:15 and midnight. Girls. Girls. Three-thirty with 
dinner, $1.65 without. 

VARIETY 

TURNABOUT THEATRE— The Yale Puppeteers, 
Elsa Lanchester and Lotte Goslar in good entertain- 
ment. May 4-10, "Gullible's Travels" and "Southern 
Exposure ;" May 11-17 "Mr. Noah" and "About 
Face ;" May 18-24 "Caesar Julius" and "Vice 
Versa ;" Mav 25-31 "Tom and Jerry" and "Turn- 
about Time." 

ICE-CAPADES OF 1947— Famous family-enjoyment 
ice extravaganza, featuring Donna Atwood, at Pan 
Pacific Auditorium all month. Colorful costumes, 
beautiful girls. Everv night at 8:30, Sunday matinee 
at 2:30. From $1.25 to $3.60. 

CONCERT 

MUSIC FESTIVAL — Los Angeles Philharmonic 
Orchestra in concert for school children May 2, 8 
p.m., at Shrine Auditorium. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS ORCHESTRA— In con- 
cert May 23, 8 p.m., at Shrine Auditorium. 

ARTUR RUBINSTEIN— Noted pianist in afternoon 
concert May 4 at Philharmonic. 

OPERA 

LOS ANGELES CIVIC LIGHT OPERA— "Song of 
Norwav" runs until May 10 at Philharmonic; 
"Rosalinda" opens May 19. 



SPORTS 



HARNESS RACING— Grand Circuit Meeting of 
Western Harness Racing Association at Hollywood 
Park until May 17. Tuesdays through Saturdays 
at 1 p.m. 

BOWLING — American Bowling Congress in progress 
at National Guard Armory in Exposition Park. 

TRACK — Invitational Coliseum Relays May 23 un- 
der the new arcs at 8 p.m. Los Angeles Memorial 
Coliseum. 

BASEBALL — Pacific Coast League games every day 
except Monday; double-headers on Sunday. See 
daily paper for contestants and time in Los Angeles, 
San Francisco, Hollywood, Oakland, Sacramento, San 
Diego, Seattle, Portland. 

(Continued on page 10) 



WEAR A 

BUDDY 
POPPY 




• The Californion is proud to present Miss Mar- 
garet O'Brien, young screen star of MGM, who 
has been chosen as National Buddy Poppy Girl 
by the Veterans of Foreign Wars for the annual 
Memorial Day observance. Proceeds from the sale 
of their poppies will aid needy veterans. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 




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By Henri, creator of Crepes Suzette. 

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Cocktails 

EQUESTRIAN ROOM 

Ray Rasch's Sophisticated piano 

• 

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GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

(Continued from page 8) 

WOMEN'S INVITATIONAL GOLF— ISth Annual 
Catalina Women's Tournament May 18-20. 

HORSE RACING — Hollywood Park season opens 
May 24 with Premiere " Handicap, $25,000 added, 
for 3-year-olds and up. 

HORSE SHOW — Assistance League Charity Show at 
La Carrera Field, Redlands, May 25. 

NATIONAL BOAT SHOW— In Los Angeles Coli- 
seum May 30-June 8 includes fashions, radio and 
movie stars. 

THE RESTAURANTS 

IN SAN FRANCISCO 

PALACE HOTEL — Market and New Montgomery 
Sts. Garden Court serving lunch, tea, and dinner. 
Leonard Auletti and his concert orchestra. Ask for 
Joseph, maitre d'. Also Rose Room, open nightly ex- 
cept Monday, with Jean Sablon and Eddie Oliver's 
orchestra. Cover $1 weekdays, $1.50 Saturdays. 
Adolph. 

CATHAY HOUSE— 718 California St. In the heart 
of Chinatown. Lunch 90c and $1.10, dinner $1.75 
and $2. Ernest Tsang. Authentic Chinese food only, 
featuring Hung Ngon Gai Chow Mein. 

OMAR KHAYYAM— 196 O'Farrell St. Dinner only, 
$2.25 up. George Mardikian. Armenian Shish Kebab, 
Tchakhokhbelli and Kouzou Kzartma are special, irs. 

ST. FRANCIS HOTEL— Powell and Geary. Mural 
Room open daily for lunch and dinner, with dancing 
from 8:30 p.m. except Monday, and tea dancing 
Saturdays from 4 to 5:30. Hal Pruden's hand. A 
la carte. Ernest. Order almost anything. 

LONGBARN— On El Camino Real, 2 miles south of 
Stanford University. Open for dinner only. Closed 
Thursdays. Ask for Willy or Eddy. Dinners $2.50 to 
$4. Plan to eat here when you visit the peninsula. 
Country farmhouse style with women chefs. 

RESTAURANT LOMBARD— 1906 Van _ Ness Ave. 
Dinner only, from $2.50, or a la carte. Bill Lombard 
specializes in steaks and real thick roast beef. 

EL PRADA — Post and Stockton, in the Plaza Hotel. 
Lunch 11-2, dinner 6-9, closed Sundays and holidays. 
Walter is maitre d'. Service London style, with every- 
thing rolled in on a serving table. Chef Maurice 
specializes in French cuisine. Roast beef best item. 

STAR LITE ROOM, Hotel Sir Francis Drake— Sutter 
and Powell. Lunch only from 12 to 2, buffet style, 
for $1.50. Includes hot dishes. Al Field, host. You 
dine 22 floors up with a spectacular view. 

TONGA ROOM— In the Fairmont Hotel. Open 4:30 
p.m. to 1:30 a.m. daily. Hawaiian band plays on a 
raft in a swimming pool, with the dining tables 
surrounding. Dinners $3.50. Hawaiian Ham and 
Eggs at $1.50, or a la carte. Henry Degorog, host. 

TARANTINO'S— 206 Jefferson St. Open 11 a.m. to 
11 p.m. Dinners $2.50 and a la carte. Dan Sweeney, 
Jr. and Jack Adams. Seafood, steaks and chops. Food 
not outstanding, but try it because it's on Fisher- 
man's Wharf. 

PARIS — 242 O'Farrell St. Lunch and dinner daily, 
but no lunch on Sunday. Dinner $1.50. Typical old 
San Francisco family-style French cuisine in plain 
surroundings. Lots of crusty French bread and de- 
licious soup. Excellent cooking. 

BLUE FOX — 659 Merchant St. Dinners only, closed 
Mondays. Ask for Mario or Frank. Dinners from 
$2. French and Italian style. Frog Legs Doree, Bone- 
less Squab, Chicken stuffed with wild rice, Rex Sole 
Marguerite. In an alley, not bright and shiny, but 
they know how to cook. The natives eat here. 

BERNSTEIN'S GROTTO— 123 Powell. Open daily 
for lunch and dinner. Lunch from 65c, dinner from 
$1.30. Exclusive sea food and good. Lobster Prin- 
cess, Deviled Crab in Shell, Eastern Oysters en Half 
Shell, Fried Prawns and Abalone served in rooms 
built like a ship's interior. 

CLIFF HOUSE— Point Lobos Avenue, overlooking 
Seal Rocks. Dinners daily from $1.50. Seafood, 
Steaks, Chicken and Roasts. Eat while looking 
through the oversize plateglass windows at the 
ocean, Seal Rocks and Golden Gate strait. 

THE PLANTATION— At 349 Sutter St. in the de- 
lightful new Pavilion at tiffin time. A la .carte, with 
English and French delicacies the feature. Reason- 
ably priced. 



/* tiftp^^v 




w 



here the smartest 



Angelenos get together 
for our famous luncheons 
and dinners . . . 
on Beverly Hills' 
"Restaurant Row" 





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THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 




fiM Wl^HW^A wiimlL W(A m&fcbi 



BULLOCK'S • LOS ANGELES 
BONWIT TELLER • PHILADELPHIA 
A. HARRIS • DALLAS 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 



11 



REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 




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12 



THE CAL I FO RN I AN , May, 1947 



On Record 



W' ith summer just around the corner, new 
record releases follow the general trend set 
by new books, movies, plays . . pleasant en- 
tertainment, easy-to-take hot weather fun. 
You'll have to wait until fall, though, to get 
your important listening. 

But that doesn't entail any loss of variety 
. . or quality. New offerings bow to the 
widest possible range of taste. And who cares 
about being serious? Sheer enjoyment fits 
into the California mood whether you're in 
San Diego or Bar Harbor, Sea Island or Lake 
Louise. 

NEW CLASSICALS 

Chopin — Concerto No. 2 in f minor, Op. 21. 
Elegantly lyric music, full of romantic poetry 
played by the established Chopin master, 
Artur Rubinstein, and the NBC Symphony 
conducted by William Steinberg. Victor. De 
Falla — "El Amor Brujo." All the fiery color 
and moodiness traditional to Spain, upon 
which Leopold Stokowski, conducting the 
Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, exerts all his 
famed control of musical dynamics to good 
effect. Victor. 

"Lullaby," by Cyril Scott. A lovely, familiar 
melody sung as well as could be by Marian 
Anderson. A single record, with "Hear The 
Wind Whispering" by Frida Sarsen Bucky 
getting equally velvety treatment on the re- 
verse. Victor. "Sit Down, Servant" and "Soon 
— A Will Be Done," a pair of spirituals mag- 
nificently recorded and flawlessly sung by the 
Collegiate Chorale under the direction of the 
gifted Robert Shaw. Victor. 

STRICTLY FOR DANCING 

"Square Dances," an exuberant collection 
of Americana amusingly called, bouncily 
played, by Cliffie Stone's Band, with instruc- 
tions for dancing. Capitol. "Manhattan Moods," 



with frances anderson 



played by Eddie LeMar, his piano and his 
orchestra. A collection of old favorites ("Any- 
thing Goes," "You Do Something To Me," "I 
Married An Angel" and others) emphasizing 
a steady beat excellent for dancing, with a 
few tricks to distract the attention. Capitol. 

"Jerome Kern Songs" and Fred Waring 
music . . a lush combination in any league. 
Few surprises in the typical Waring treat- 
ment, but very, very pleasant. Decca. "Jeal- 
ous" as intoned by the Deep River Boys, 
backed by the contrastingly lively "Charge It 
To Daddy." The first is smooth, the latter 
amusing. Victor. 

"Moon-Faced, Starry-Eyed," hit tune from 
Kurt Weill's score for "Street Scene," is 
wonderfully packaged by Benny Goodman. 
Johnny Mercer does the vocal so that you 
hardly miss Art Lund. (Freddy Martin has 
a good but commercial disc on this tune) 
Reverse is "It Takes Time," also fine, with 
a good Mercer vocal. Capitol. 

POPULAR STUFF 

"Lonely Moments" once again proves that 
when Benny is really hot, you can't do bettei 
than Goodman. Topnotch stuff. "Whistle 
Blues" on the back is a cutie. Capitol. 
"Hoodie Addle" is just right for Tex Beneke 
and the Miller orchestra. The boys do only 
a fair job on "Anniversary Song" on the re- 
verse. Victor. "Free Eats" and "Bill's Mill," 
a sizzling pair by Count Basie. Loud but 
good, with some free-wheeling effects. Victor. 

"Le Fiacre" is Jean Sablon's best in a long 
time, witty and gay. Even though we don't 
know our French like a native . . the effect 
comes through. Reverse is on the dreamy side, 
"J'Attendrai." Victor. "I'll Get Along Some- 
how" and "Young Girl's Blues" . . latest 
productions of Julia Lee. Capitol. 




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completely disappear. Now . . . hang it in the 
fresh air, letting the wind whip it into those 
dry, crisp lines you love. 

TIME SAVER 

Have those ironing day blues? Then why 
not chinch a bit on the labor? Let the wind 
do your press-job, whipping the sheets to 
sun-dried freshness. If you wish, you can 
smooth up the hemlines with a medium hot 
iron before putting them away. When you 
use them next, you'll revel in the wonderful 
feeling of all that sunshine they've soaked 
up. And . . . you won't be muttering, "Oh 
— my aching back!" 

HOSTESS HINT 

The nicest hostess in the world is she who 
always has a new toothbrush on hand for un- 
expected guests. Pick up a flock at the dime 
store next time you're on a shopping binge 
and put them on your bathroom emergency 
shelf. That is, do it if you want your guests 
to get that overnight habit! 




by 
HOLLYWOOD 




Crisp as Mojave air in the early mornin 
> are both the styling and the fabric of 
these famed Rogue shirts. ..From 
I California for your casual comfort 
\ anywhere . . ."Desert Frost" is a 
beautifully textured cloth tai 



\>K 



lored in the Palm Springs 

Shirt (left) and the Rogue 

(right).Colors:golrl,sage 

green, sand and mi- 

\ rage blue. % 10.00. 

V. At better stores-. 




ItlormaDons 



If your dealer can't supply you, write 
HOLLYWOOD ROGUE SPORTSWEAR CORP. Hollywood 38, California 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 



13 




Modestly priced long sleeve shirts of this 
exceptional quality have been a rarity for what 
seems like ages. Ours makes its triumpha 
return in Glo-Ray ... a luxurious fluid-draping 
rayon with silken white-on-white brocading. 
We've lavished tailoring artistry on it that 
borders on the extravagant. The pearl studs, the 
delicate shirring which is repeated on 
the back yoke, are typical. 32 —40 



about $5.95 at discriminating stores 
everywhere— write for one nearest you. 



Trade Mark F 



Mark Reg. 



Graff 



CALIFORNIAWEAR 

1240 S. MAIN • LOS ANGELES 15, CALIF. 



14 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 



WSe/fla/ue Ket 




Lazy Daisy- scattered in a delustered print on 



Lastex fabric in the classic, smooth-back, one-piece 



champion and the two-piece, wired-bra darling of the 



beaches. At topflight stores. 



1035 SANTEE STREET, LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 
In Conoda-1 2 5 5 PENDER STREET, VANCOUVER B.C. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 



15 



• . 












hearts go overboard 

when you wear our Cole swimsuit Original. . . 

with Matletex* to make you perceptibly lovelier. 

In a variety of swift-drying cotton prints. 



COPn. 19-17, COLE OF CALIFORNIA, 
INC., LOS ANGELES 11. CALIFORNIA 







*COLE*S Or.IGIN'AL METHOD OF ELASTI- 
CIZING FOR PERFECT FIT. *T.M.REC. 



16 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 




Buff urns 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA 



Buff urns 



LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA 




Virginia Country 



Jackman Custom Originals: Cardigan jacket of doeskin flannel in gray, tan or 

gold. Sizes 36 to 46, regulars or longs, $35. Hand-tailored wool gabardine 
slacks in tan, blue, gray or brown. Sizes 30 to 44, $25. Thomas white shirt with 

button-down collar, sizes 1 4V6 to 17 — washable! $10. Buff urns' Store for Men 






Alamifos Bay 




. U. S. Pol. O: 



l 



•doll waisted coat. In famous Celaneset 

Prospector, Sail white , . . sizes 10 to 16. 

Bra and shorts, $10.95, Coat, $14.95. 

1 M 

Itfs a Buffums' Sun-Charm Fashion* 





J^| \ 





LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA 




The Hosiery — Dexdale nylon; 
54-gauge, 15 denier; new shades 



5600 WIISHIBE itvo. 



22 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 



"SWING TIME" 
by Lil' Alice 

Two hearts in swing with 
Spring! Lil' Alice print of 
parasols and posies on a 
pastel-cool washable seer- 
sucker... with yards and yards 
of flouncing skirt. Very Cali- 
fornia—and very young. 

About $12 




FR£ Mo Nt streE t 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 



23 



tesn as a 



One of those "wonderful" dresses by Saba of California 
. . . that "goes everywhere, does everything". The 
perky white embroidered lace trim can be 
removed for laundering to keep it spanking 
clean . In "Koolmist" by Duplex... Black 
and Jewel Pastels ... 9- 15. 



Joan Lorring 

Featured in 
Erich Maria Remarque'j 

"The Other Love" 




24 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May , 1947 



pure allure . . . 
in a gala new 

short 
long dress! 



MOFFATT 



MACY 

ASSOCIATE 




Daring, baring sheer black veils your midriff 
with misty lace . . . flaunts a full, 
full ballet skirt. Sizes to to 16. 39.95 



O'Connor, Moffatt • Stockton at O'Farrell • San Francisco 8, Californi 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 



25 




va 




TOU JOURS TRIGERE! For the deft way she 

combines American spontaneity and Parisien 
chic... for her exquisite detailing and vivid 
styling, long live Pauline Trigere! 

ET VIVE LE ZIPPER COUVERT! That's what 

they're saying both here and abroad- 
long live the fabric-covered zipper for its discreet 

blending, its imaginative contrasts! Look for 
Waldes Kover-Zip on finer fashions. 

Ask for it at notion counters. 

WALDES KOVER-ZIP 4 

REG U S.PAT OFF fj3H ^,-J 

WALDES KO'HXNOOR, IMC, LONG ISLAND CITY 1,N.Y. 





THE SLIT to costume almost anj 
Yshifw^V^ceasion. Rauiblon* fahpubhyy,' 

tailored in mannered perfection, f/iffi 
V^yeaeh, Lemon, Aqua, or Whyft&flyj 

"'$'?&,ffl<v ; fy--,M-&WtW.Z '<?' ■r : 'i.'. : -k,,--' ; ' .■ ■■ '■ : V: : ' J^..'' ■■;:; ■* ;' : ' "" * . '■ ;: ',, : ' ■. "' ■:.;■:■ ' ::::S:;: #-- **' * ■ 4 : , " 

'£& if B LQUSE I o matclV®^5»/* '/5 
.Surplice with cap sleeves^ White with 
Peach, Lemon, or Aqua, or all While. 
Sizes 10 to 18 $8.95 



^\ 




?*%. 



■■■■ . ■<$■■■■ SP 



MAIL ORDERS TO COLLEGE SHOP 



tan . • • 



i ■ : 



.MW 



Des Moines 6, 



HE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 



27 




***** J0^ : 





\ 





/ 



,aMf>t 



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WTs-w 



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than meets the eye . . . (u„ c 



lot much more) to this rhumba dress by Cole c 
Calilornia. Underneath its well-placed rurlles there hides a hint oi a bathing suit — built mini 
mum for maximum maneuvers. In black with acjua or chartreuse. Small, medium, and lar* 
sizes. The dress, 17.Q5. The swim suit, 11.Q5. ■ casual clothes, fourth flooi 



28 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 19471 



CO 






■~4 






STRIPES AWAY! 
On the sands of Long 
Beach she wears Pat 
Premo's sun-dress , . . 
its peplum is really an 
overskirt, its lines are 
purely functional. In 
Dan River Cordspun, 
sizes 10-14, about $25 
at Buff urns', Long 
Beach; Younkers, Des 
Moines; The Hecht 
Co., Washington, D. C. 
Capezio cutaway san- 
dals, "Smooth Tan" by 
Charles of the Ritz. 



MUiMVMm 




i > § 



mil 



l§ip 

'es* 



aOiSS 






■.«*£.■ 





■ t..l. rM rMrI 




■ 


PITOR AND PUBLISHER 


J. R. Osherenko 


Ice president and 




WERTISING DIRECTOR 




^NAGING EDITOR 




SHION DIRECTOR 


.._ Sally Dickason Carolin 


T DIRECTOR 


.- Charles Gruen 


5HIONS 






Jacquelin Lary 




Peggy Hippee 




Serene Rosenberg 




Malcolm Steinlauf 




Lanice Dana 


T. 






Bud Mozur 


ATURES 






Frances Anderson 


::rchand:s!NG 




POD STYLIST. 




lODUCTION 









California fashions: 

In Bathing Suits 34 

In Play Clothes 38 

In Romantic Mood 44 

Here Comes a Bride! 46 

Bike Pushers 48 

What to Wear to California in May —54 

Men's Fashions in Color 58 

Society in Fashion 60 

Dressing by Design 62 

Heralding the Sailor Dress 67 

California features: 

Long Beach . . Willmore's Dream Come True 30 

A Woman Speaks Her Mind, by Bette Davis 42 

The People's Prodigy 69 

California beauty: 

Aglow with Glamor, by Edna Charlton 56 

California living: 

This House Is For You, by Virginia Scallon 50 

California Cooks, by Helen Evans Brown 64 



THE CALIFORN1AN is published monthly, 210 W. Seventh St., Ijjs Angeles 14, Cali- 
fornia. Michigan 8571. New York Office, Saul Silverman, eastern advertising maDager, 
1450 Broadwav, LAckawanna 4-5659; San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph. 26 O'Farrell St., 
EXbrook 2704"; Chicago Office, Nedom L. Angier, Jr., Ill W. Jackson St.; Detroit Office, 
Charles H. Cowling, 633 Book Bldg., CHerry 6881; Cleveland Office, William E. Coates 
2200 Lakeland, LAkeland 1479. Subscription price: $3.00 one year, $5.00 two years, $7.50 
three vears. One dollar additional postage per year outside continental United States 
25 cents per copy. Entered as second class matter January 25, 1946, at the Post Office at 
Los Angeles, California, under act of March 3, 1879. Copyright 1947 The Californian, Int 
Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 



By WILLIAM J. COWEN 



X here's no telling how many lazy centuries ago 
the Puvu and Suango Indians began setting their 
smoke fiirs along its palisades, hunted rabbits across 
its grassy plains, or first traded with the island tribes 
on its sandy shores. 

Cabrillo was the first European to set eyes on its 
naked, semi-tropical beauty. Manuel Nieto grazed his 
cattle there; and John Temple and Abel Stearns 
raced their horses from its hillocks to the water's 
edge. Then the Bixbys. who once owned the whole of 
it. pastuied their sheep over its two sprawling ranches 
. . . the same Bixbys who today, in their third and 
fourth generations, are still the city's First Family. 
The establishment of a seaside city really was the 
dream of an English bachelor and school teacher, 
one William Willmore. Willmore City, however, was 
all but a total failure, and twenty years later its 
founder died within its bounds ... a broken, penni- 
less man. But Willmore's Dream persisted none the 
less, and flowered. Even during his life he watched. 
from the shadows of its street corners, other men 
shape a great city . . . shaped from the plans he 
WHERE ' ia d penned . . . and built upon the broad streets he 
had staked out. He was not even spared the ignom- 
iny of seeing its name changed from prosaic Willmore 
City to prosaic Long Beach. He died at 56 . . . but 
had lived too long. 

Willmore's Dream come true is today California's 
fifth city. From a statistician's eye-view it has had 
an exciting, throbbing record. It has an estimated 
population in excess of 300,000. It was once 
(1900-1910) the fastest growing community in the 

nation, and always a 
close contender for that 
title. Presently its citizens 
have the highest per capita 
buying power of any met- 
ropolitan area of its class 
. . . anywhere. 

It is a slumless city of 
upper middle classes sea- 
soned with a handsome 
sprinkling of unknown 
but well - to - do coupon 
clippers. And while the 
nation's attention has 
been focused upon the 
leaps-and-bounds expan- 
sion of Los Angeles. Long Beach 
outdid its giant neighbor . . . ac- 
quired a headache for its pains. 
For as Los Angeles chalked up a 







and something for adjacent Los Angeles Harbor to 
reckon with. It is home anchorage to the greatest 
flotilla in history . . the United States Pacific Fleet. 
But more than that . . across its docks, lining 28 
miles of man-made port frontage, pass hundreds of 
millions of dollars worth of cargo in world com- 
merce every year. Willmore's Dream today is an 
adolescent industrial giant, already with hair on its 
chest and flexing its muscles proudly. Some 400 in- 
dustries have a S150.000.000 investment there. Signal 
Hill, bristling with a forest of 2.100 oil derricks, is I 
visual evidence of the most fabulous oil strike in I 
history . . while the newer Wilmington Field pumps I 
$5,000,000 into the city coffers each year. 

But \S illmore had dreamed more particularly, and 
less statistically, of a pleasant seaside resort. And that 
. . with all its oil derricks and shipyards . . Long 
Beach is, too. Its eight miles of wide pleasure beach 
is one of California's best. Its neat and orderly 
Pike with its roller coaster, penny arcades and tattoo 
parlors is for the gay and light of heart. The parks 
are devoted to lawn bowling, horseshoes, roque and 
card clubs. For the sportsman there are fishing, yacht- 
ing, boat racing on bay or ocean. The mean annual 
temperature of from 55 to 65 degrees and the 12-inch 
annual rainfall are as ordered by the Chamber of 
Commerce. Willmore's Dream is a civic center where 
people from seventy-two surrounding communities 
come to shop. Its neat, white limit-height buildings 
line wide streets and boulevards that are exactly as 
William Willmore had planned them. 

But the many-faced city of Willmore's Dream has 
another facet. Some would call it a folksy, neigh- 
borly side. Others, less kind, simply call it "corny" 
and let it go at that. But be that as it may, the pass- 
ing phase of its gallused days . . when Long Beach 
was known everywhere as "Towa By the Sea" . . will 
be lamented by many Californians when the last per- 
nicious relics of this era, the Spit 'n' Argue Club, 
the horseshoe tournaments, the Curb Market, the elec- 
tric wheelchair "Autoettes" are finally absorbed and 
dissipated. Yes, Willmore's Dream, as it has come 
true in 1947. is a long journey from that day in 1870 
when the little English school teacher landed at 
Wilmington and set off across the fields and mud 
flats for Anaheim . . that day when he paused to 
rest, at what is now the intersection of American 
Avenue and Anaheim Street, looked about him, 
breathed in the good air and said to himself. "Ah, 
here, what a glorious spot for an American colony!" 

The story of the Citv of Long Beach springs from 



LONG BEACH. .Willmore' 



15 per cent permanent population increase . . . during 
and since the war . . . Long Beach tripled that record, 
percentagewise, with a mark of 47. Consequently, 
25,000 new houses are desperately needed. 

Willmore's Dream today has become a port city 



that moment. But the story of its shores is much 
older and is mellow with the lore of the conquista- 
dores. the dons and the Yankees. Let's examine this 
history in old-fashioned chronological order. 
THE BAY OF SMOKES: Long Beach, and for that 



30 




I bam come tr 



HE SHADOW OF THE LONG BEACH CITY HALL, 




ERY TUESDAY, THURSDAY AND SATURDAY MORNING 

FROM HER STALL AT THE CURB MARKET FOR 25 YEARS. 
"ALWAYS," SHE SAYS, "THERE ARE CABBAGES." SHE AND 

HER HUSBAND THEODORE AND SON BUSTER TILL A 40-ACRE 
FARM SEVEN MILES NORTH OF TOWN BEFORE COMING TO 

LONG BEACH THEY WERE NORTH DAKOTA FARMERS. 



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LL PRESS SERVICE 



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Long Beach 

is California's 

Fifth City 



Retired engineer Charles Lapions drives his wife across 
Long Beach's Lincoln Park in one of the hundreds of 
electric perambulators in use. They require no license. 

A mechanical, kicking Missouri mule grinds, and at same 
time helps to sell Missouri horse radish from this Long 
Beach farmer's Curb Market stall. "Big kick" guaranteed. 




it LA' ' i*j' ■ . * ■"»'' ?'< ■ 



ShufDeboard is one of the park activities that i 
Long Beach a neighborly, folksy community . , 
paradoxical disregard for high-geared industrial 

"No one who keeps kicking you in the pants car 
get ahead of you," is the title of this Spit 'r 
Club speaker's harangue. Club is maintained by 





(I was this Liberty type freighter . . . significantly named 

I for Council Bluffs, Iowa ... a waterfront town. 

I The last of Cal Ship's 467 vessels built during the war 

I A sailor and his girl "doing the Pike" are usually sus- 

j ceptible to having their picture taken . . with a phony 

j jail as prop. It's good business, too, at two dollars a copy. 





Bathing queen contests are conducted in Long Beach at 
the drop of a hat . . resulting in a never-ending flow of 
"leg art" publicity for the resort city. Meet the queenl 



matter the Pa- 
cific Coast, nod- 
ded dozily at 
history in mid- 
siesta 400 years 
ago. From ship- 
board Juan Rod- 
riguez Cabrillo 
looked across the amber kelp beds and watched the sparkling 
foam of the breakers gently lick a ten-mile strip of wide, white 
sandy beach. Seaward and over his shoulder lay Santa Catalina 
Island, which only a few days before he had discovered and 
explored. Before him and to either side lay the wide arc of an 
open bay. Although the shore formed a part of the western 
frontier of this unknown continent, at this point the grassy 
plains and the low bluffs looked south, not west, across the 
Pacific.'"' The promontory of the Palos Verdes Hills, jutting 
seaward to form the western arm of the bay, gave protection 
to the waters from the storms beyond whose waves mercilessly 
pummeled the Redondo shores. 

Here, truly, the Pacific was pacific. And before the adventure- 
some craft slipped across the great bay for its historic landing 
at San Pedro, Cabrillo watched. He watched and saw smoke 
fires dotting the coastal plain . . . fires set and tended by 
Indians readying for a great rabbit drive. Smoke curled sky- 
ward from the spring among the little cottonwoods along the 
muddy margins of the San Gabriel River to the east. Smoke 
surged along the parched mouth of the Los Angeles River to 
the west. Atop the palisades, whose bluffs were yellow with 
sand verbena and purple with ice plant, smoke sent the rabbits 
scurrying across the grassy fields. And four miles inland, from 
the highest knoll which commanded a view of the plain, the 
surf and the island beyond, smoke rose in busy support of the 
earnest matter of the rabbit drive. 
Or so, at least, it may have been. 

At any rate, before sailing northward along the Pacific shores 
and on into the darkness of history, Cabrillo, the explorer, paused 
a moment to give the bay a picturesque, but now forgotten name: 
Bahia de los Fumos — The Bay of Smokes. Unimpressed, the 
Puvu and Suango Indians went on about their Indian ways and 
smoke fires without further intrusion for another hundred and 
fifty years. 

RANCH OF THE LITTLE HILLS: Nieto to Temple to Bixby: 
Through these three family names alone title to some Long 
Beach property has been passed from its very beginnings to 
the present day. 

But these beginnings were not hatched until more than two 
hundred years after Cabrillo had sailed away and the conquista- 
dores and the padres had come to occupy the land of the Cali- 
fornias in the name of the King of Spain. They set up presidios, 
established missions and founded pueblos. Then, in what was 
the second of the California land grants ceded in the name of 
the Spanish crown, a two hundred thousand-acre plot of land 

(Continued on page 66) 

•California's coastline here is such that from Los Angeles one may travel either 
due west 18 miles to the ocean at Santa Monica or 22 miles due south to it at San 
Pedro or Long Beach. 



uU! 




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• 





DOWN TO THE SEA IN PRINTS . . . GIDDY SHOW-OFFS THAT ARE RIGHT IN THE SWIM, 
TOO . . . LEFT, CATALINA'S BREEZY AZTEC TRICO, FROM CALIFORNIA FABRIC CO. ; SKIN-TIGHT SHORTS WITH 
SWIM-EASY SKIRT . . . REVERSIBLE BRA; PLUS LONG SLEEVED BLOUSE (NOT SHOWN). A PRACTICAL PLAY TRIO, 
SIZES 32-38, ABOUT $20 AT THE MAY CO., LOS ANGELES; THE HECHT CO., WASHINGTON. D. C. ABOVE, CALTEX PUTS 
ROWS ON A BRIEF-AS-YOU DARE SUIT OF SANFORIZED COTTON; SINGLE SHOULDER STRAP. BACK ZIPPER IN SLIM-FIT- 
TING SHORTS. SIZES 10-16, ABOUT $15 AT BUFFUMS' LONG BEACH: HUDSON'S, DETROIT; DAYTON CO., MINNEAPOLIS. 




SUMMER SEAS, A SHINING INVITATION 
TO DEB AND MATRON, TOO ... A COME-ON 
TO THOSE WHO'RE DRESSED FOR WATER 
SPORTS. THIS PACE, TWO 
| GANTNER OF CALI- 
FORNIA SWIMSUITS FOR 

WOMEN: LEFT, 

I 

DRESSMAKER VERSION 

WITH ELASTICIZED 
SHIRRING . . . 

RAYON JERSEY, SIZES 36-44, ABOUT $15 
AT LIVINGSTON BROS., SAN FRAN- 
CISCO; Z. C. M. I., SALT LAKE CITY. 

RIGHT, SLEEK-AND-SIMPLE WOOL 
JERSEY, SPECIAL BRA SUPPORT; 
SIZES 38-48, ABOUT $18. 

OPPOSITE PACE, LEFT, COLE OF 
CALIFORNIA'S SHIRRED MATLETEX 
SUIT . . . MOONBEARER PRINT; 
ABOUT $15 AT COULTER'S, LOS 
ANGELES; CARSON, P1RIE, SCOTT £ 
CO., CHICAGO; YOUNKERS, 
DES MOINES. 

RIGHT, MAB'S CLASSIC ELASTICIZED 
SATIN, SIZES 32-38, ABOUT $14 AT 
BUFFUMS', LONG BEACH ; THE HECHT 
CO., WASHINGTON, D. C. ; BEST'S, 
SEATTLE; THE MAY CO., LOS ANGELES. 
AFOOT, GAY COTTON TABBIES. 




DASH TAYLOR 



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YOU'RE BARED FOR FUN: MIDRIFF BY TABAK, THIS PAGE, OF DAN RIVER 

COTTON WITH HUGE WHITE SQUARES BORDERING SKIRT. ABOUT $16 AT 

B. ALTMAN, NEW YORK; F. S: R. LAZARUS, COLUMBUS. 

YOU'RE BRIEFED FOR SUN: OPPOSITE PAGE, LEFT: SKIMP SET BY F. B. MORGAN; 

SHORTS, BRA, $9; COAT, $12; SKIMP, $15: AT BUFFUMS', LONG BEACH; 

CROWLEY, MILNER, DETROIT. RIGHT: SCALLOP-EDGED 

CORLISS ARCHER BY JR. MISS OF CALIFORNIA IN MILTON BLUM'S 

COTTON CALCUTTA: ABOUT $15 AT BUFFUMS', LONG BEACH; A. HARRIS. 

DALLAS; MABLEY & CAREW CO., CINCINNATI. 







YOU LIKE THE OLD-FASHIONED. LOIS-PAUL'S SET IS LIGHTLY TRIMMED WITH LACE 



BIT PRACTICALLY YOURS IN DENIM. FOUR PIECES ABOUT $60, OR HAVE THEM 



YOU PREFER TO BE MODERN. SLIM-BODICED PLAYSUIT FROM MARJORIE MONTGOMERY IN 



GALEY AND LORD PLAID HAS POCKETED DIRNDL THAT BUTTONS DOWN FRONT 



ABOUT $IS. AT BUFFUMS'. LONG BEACH; Hl'DSON'S. DETROIT; B. ALTMAN, NEW YORK 



DASH TAYLOR 




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Q woman 
speaks 
ner 



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ind 



by bette davis 



HTwo years ago we were still at war. On fighting 
fronts all over the world our men were giving up 
their lives that we might live in a free and decent 
world. Here at home the women of America, in their 
own way, were fighting too. Some became WACS, 
some WAVES, some worked in factories, some rolled 
bandages, some worked in hospitals. The list was 
long ... the occupations varied. But the important 
thing was that women were helping. 

Today we have a so-called peace. It takes no oracle 
to tell us that unless we are willing to fight for that 
peace we will not have it long. Once again the Ameri- 
can women must help, not by physical action, but by 
mental doing. Yet, for the most part we women are 
shrugging our shoulders, saying "It's none of my 
business," or "What can I do?" To put it bluntly, 
the average American woman has stopped thinking 
. . . and unfortunately at a time when it is most 
dangerous. 

Most of us have never really grown up. Super- 
ficially we appear mature. We dress well and eat 
well. We have a patter of talk that would make a 
circus spieler jealous. We appear to know what is 
going on in the world because we can say, "Oh, yes,. 
I saw something about that in a picture magazine." 
But if pressed for an opinion we are at a loss, be- 
cause we don't really know the difference between 
Trieste and Tel Aviv, between Bretton Woods and 
the Redwood Forest. Our world is a smart, slick- 
papered, sugar-coated one, and any resemblance to- 
the "one world" in which we live is purely coinci- 
dental. 

The biggest stumbling block is that women do not 
understand how much they can accomplish. 

"What good can / do?" wails the American woman. 

The answer is "Plenty!" 

Alone, it's true, she can do little; working with 
millions of other women she can do a great deal. 
During the war almost every housewife saved fat 
because it was needed in the manufacturing of ex- 
plosives. The results of this campaign were stagger- 
ing. When draft boards and canteens needed to be 
staffed, when towns and cities needed air raid ward- 
ens, it was the women who found time to give their 
services. Because of the war, people became con- 
scious of themselves as citizens ; communities dis- 
covered they were a part of an even larger com- 
munity. Today there is another need. The need for 
peace. The women of America must have a mind 
in this. By acting individually, as in the wartime 
saving of fat, they can produce a collective result 
that will have tremendous influence and power. 

Each year we all give money to the March of 
Dimes for the fight against infantile paralysis. No 
one of us raises all the money . . . each of us gives 
a little. Now, today, before it is too late, let every 



42 






woman of us begin our fight against mental paralysis 
in our homes. Let us call ours The March of Thoughts. 
If we can give a thought each day for better living 
and thinking, our results will be staggering, too! 

How is this to be accomplished? First and foremost 
we must begin with ourselves. We must learn to 
think. We must accept the responsibility of stimu- 
lating thought in our homes. And by each of us 
working as individuals we soon will discover that, 
as a community, a state, and finally, a nation, we 
will have made real progress in the fight for a better 
world. As individuals we must become aware of 
what is going on in the world. We must look beyond 
the headlines of the newspapers. We must read, not 
only one columnist's opinion, but several . . . not 
only one book, but many. We must become informed. 

There is more to the newspaper than the weather 
report, more to the radio than the funny comedian, 
and more to day-by-day thinking than: "What shall 
we have for dinner?" Today many women say they 
are too busy keeping up their homes to keep up with 
the world. I believe it is better to have a little more 
dust on the furniture and a little less dust on the 
brain. 

To do these things we must re-educate ourselves. 
If we break an arm we must re-train the muscles be- 
fore we can use it again. It is the same with our 
minds. We must learn to use them . . . this we can 
do only by continuous concentration. We cannot go 
to bed filled with high ideals and wake up in the 
morning "a new woman." We will agree that toler- 
ance is a good thing. But this is not something we 
can buy at the comer drugstore. We must work for 
it. We must read and hear all sides of all questions. 
We must learn about the peoples of the world and 
try to understand them. 

This done, dinner-table conversations can become 
meaningful and purposeful, instead of dealing with 
''what Mrs. Smith said about Mrs. Jones" or "how 
the refrigerator broke down." Children should grow 
up believing that minds as well as mouths can move. 

We should realize that children are not born with 
prejudices. They acquire them from their parents 
and their environment. For example, the seemingly 
innocent "Eenie. Meenie, Minie, Mo, Catch a Nigger 
By The Toe" is a basic breeder of intolerance. A 
child who uses this rhyme unconsciously builds with- 
in himself a prejudice. This may be a small thing, 
but oak trees are still growing from acorns, and white 
children are still stoning negro children in the state of 
Georgia. Whether it be the Russians or the English, the 
Jews or the Catholics, we must be careful of illogical 
thinking. We are too tempted to, without thought 
behind it, pass off another's inadequacies by saying, 



"Oh. he's just a ." 

When children come home parroting 
something they have heard in school, 
it is not enough to say, "You shouldn't 
talk like that." We must take the time 
to explain that there are two sides to 
any fence. We must make them reason 
and think for themselves. Children can 
think . . . they do think. And we can- 
not begin too early, for intolerance is 
as habit-forming as smoking cigarettes and as diffi- 
cult to swear off. 

It is not enough for American women to be expert 
at a series of superficial things: tennis to thimbles: 
rug beating to rug cutting. We must have true ma- 
turity and the ability to think about and face the 
problems of the world. We must start thinking about 
the home as a place from which we can send in- 
telligent citizens into the world. 

Instead of dismissing the education of our chil- 
dren to the school and church, we at home should 
have an important part in this. Teaching is not only 
a teacher's duty. It is ours, too, because it is in the 
home that the child looks by instinct for his path 
of living, his way of thinking. If parents do not 
encourage thinking in their children, this ability can 
grow stagnant. Children hear too many stock phrases 
. . . are whispered in front of. In many homes 
children are ignored. Yes, they are fed and clothed 
and given baseball bats. 

Children should be encouraged to read certain 
books, to listen to particular radio programs, to 
see certain movies. But this must not be the end. We 
must discuss with them what they have read and 
heard. When they hear a news broadcast we must 
learn with them about the people and the places in 
the news. When they hear symphonic music we must 
learn with them about the composer and the land 
in which he lived. Learning cannot be confined to 
the classroom. We must grow with our children and 
stimulate their imagination. 

Today the world has new horizons. We must learn 
about them if we are to live in "one world." With 
the speed of air travel we can no longer remain in 
secure isolation from the rest of the world. There 
must be many reforms and women can help to bring 
them about. If our standard of thinking is to be as 
good as our standard of living then there is much to 
be done. But the evils of the world cannot be wiped 
away with a cure-all. There is no magic formula. 
There is no mathematical equation. Only a human 
equation . . . the solution of which lies in intelli- 
gent thinking. 

The common denominator is the American Woman. 



the women who 
helped win the war 
are responsible for 
keeping the peace 
• • that means YOU! 



43 



-<- LOVELY MARIAN CARR, FAIR- 
HAIRED STARLET, WEARS PEGGY HUNT'S 
DELIGHTFUL DANCE FROCK, 
OPPOSITE, WITH YARDS 'N YARDS 
OF NYLON, FRENCH LACE BODICE 
OVER NUDE MARQUISETTE, SIZES 8-16, 
ABOUT $110 AT NEIMAN-MARCUS, DALLAS. 




in romantic moo 



d 



ABOVE, RIGHT, DEMOISELLE'S SOPHISTI- 
CATED DINNER GOWN WITH BACK 
MIDRIFF, SIZES 8-16, ABOUT $+5 AT 
NANCY'S, LOS ANGELES; A. HARRIS, DALLAS. 

BELOW, NATHALIE NICOLI'S LONGER 
TORSO ACCENTED WITH SELF- 
PASSEMENTERIE, SIZES 10-18, ABOUT $55 
AT DEWEES, PHILADELPHIA; 
BUFFUMS', LONG BEACH. 

KENETH HOPKINS HAT, THEODOR'S 

SILVER KID POUCH; ACCESSORIES BY BEE 

NORTON. PHOTOGRAPHED IN SKY 

ROOM OF HOTEL HILTON, LONG BEACH. 




HARRIET ARNOLD 







5&y "-^--'S&i 







sr 



SHE LOOKS, RIGHT . . . THERE'S 



SENTIMENTAL ELEGANCE IN MARBERT'S 



WHITE SATIN, SIZES 10-16. ABOUT $85 AT THE MAY CO., 



fcOS ANGELES; MAISON BLANCHE, NEW ORLEANS; 



DEWEES. PHILADELPHIA. MARSHA'S BRIDAL VEIL. NET. 




§»*'S£*~S&-*«-. 



j/ih 




it 




AND ANOTHER. ANOTHER' 



ROMANCE IS IN THE ASCENDANT, EACH BRIDE MORE LOVELY THAN THE LAST. 



ON THE OPPOSITE PACE SHE'S BEWITCHING IN DELICATE LACE OF PRISTINE 



LOVELINESS. FROM LENORA DRESS CO., SIZES 10-1 S 



ABOUT $55 AT BUFFUMS', LONG BEACH. 



47 




48 




D 




E 



pushers 



ii 



• WE BELIEVE IN BIKE 
PUSHERS . . . ABBREVIATED SLACKS 
AND DIVIDED SKIRTS, AND 
IN THE APACHE PULLOVERS, GIB- 
SON GIRL BLOUSES AND MATCH- 
ING TOPS THAT GO WITH THEM. 
WE DUB THIS THEIR SEASON, 
A -BIME FOR HIKES, FOR FASHION 
ROOTED IN FUNCTIONALISM. 

A. PUSHERS BY M. JACKMAN HAVE 
MAURICE HOLMAN APACHE 
TOPPER. 

B. HIP POCKETED PUSHER SET 
BY HOLLIS OF CALIFORNIA. 

C. GAY NINETIES DEAUVILLE BLOUSE 
TOPS, OHREN & SON PUSHERS. 



r 



% 




D. DEEP TAB POCKETS ON CALI- 
FORNIA SPORTSWEAR'S COTTON SUIT. 

E. LEFT, ADDIE MASTERS' DIVIDED 
SKIRT HAS BOLERO JACKET, DE DE 
JOHNSON DIVIDED SKIRT CON- 
CEALED BY FLY FRONT. 

F. CUFFED BIKE SUIT FROM 
SUN ROSE. 

C. ALMOST ANKLE LONG LOUELLA 
BALLERINO'S GUATEMALAN 
PUSHERS 

H. KEN SUTHERLAND SET 
HAS PEPLUMED JACKET. 

I. DOUBLE-BREASTED JACKET 
ATOP ROYAL PUSHERS. 






■M ** 




Td I 


£ 






-CONTEMPORARY CAIIFORNIAN" 



IS A DREAM COME TRUE . . . A TWO 



BEDROOM-AND-DEN HOUSE THAT COSTS 



LESS THAN $10,000 INCLUDING LOT 



.AND YOU CAN BUILD IT NOW 





^J Today's house is small but not cramped, eco- 
nomical but not cheap ... it embodies many post- 
war features in a plan that accommodates a family 
comfortably, or provides an extra room to rent for 
the budget-minded. 

Maybe that's why. out of thousands submitted, 
the "Contemporary Californian" shown on these 
pages is one of the feyv to be approved by FHA 
for maximum financing . . . which means that 
veterans can build this house with scarcely any 
out-of-pocket cost, merely by using their govern- 






50 




merit guarantee to supplement the very liberal loan 
allowance. 

John Lindsay and Associates worked a year to 
develop a basic plan that would (1) satisfy their 
own ideal of a small home worthy of veterans, and 
(2) qualify for this substantial financial support 
from FHA. As we go to press, some seventeen 
Southern California builders are using the "Con- 
temporary Californian" floor plan for private home 
construction, while several have visioned it as the 
basis for GI housing projects. Reason: This little 
house has so many variations it lends itself to many 



interpretations to fit the individual need. 

The "Contemporary Californian" plan is such 
that the house may face in any direction, giving it 
four distinct appearances. When the floor plan is 
reversed an additional four views are created. You 
see eight varying views sketched on these pages. 
But further than that, by changing superficial de- 
sign elements on front facade, the house has limit- 
less new appearances . . . the garage may be placed 
fore or aft. or attached to the house to multi- 
ply even further the possibilities for changes in 
John Lindsay's "Contemporary Californian" plan. 




this h 



ouse is for you 



51 




compact, 
contemporary 
plan for carefree californic 



52 



I The "Contemporary Californian" just had to be modern. Its 
clean, uncluttered lines are purely classic . . . great wide windows 
to let in the sunshine, a gentle loft to the severely simple roof, 
an interesting L-shape to vary its symmetry.. 

Constructed with wood siding and plaster exterior, with many 
variations possible in both outer and inside finishing, this house 
fundamentally is economical to build. It contains many luxury 
features usually not found in small houses: steel-sashed windows 
with ceiling-high louvres that tip inward to permit a healthful 
circulation of air . . . forced air ventilators in kitchen and bath 
. . built-in cupboards and wardrobes galore. 

But it is in the integrated floor plan that John Lindsay and 
Associates really hit their stride. Condensed into some 945 square 
feet, it miraculously provides spacious living-dining area, with 
the alcove treatment seeming to increase size of the room. Corner 
windows encourage unique furniture arrangement, capture any 
available view. 

The artist's rendering, herewith, shows the inspirational ar- 
rangement possible, with a conversational grouping around the 
generous window area. The lower sketch shows just one of the 
possibilities for the den, which makes room for a built-in bed and 
other convenient appertenances . . . radio, etc. The master bed- 
room has generous 16-foot proportions, two way ventilation. And 
please note: There is room for beds against any of three walls! 

Reasoned Lindsay: As veterans return to civilian life and have 
to buy a home they probably want something that will accom- 
modate a growing family. They conceivably also would want 
to cut down living expenses ... at least in the beginning . . . 
hence the third bedroom has convenient outside entrance ... a 
room-for-rent if desired! This careful analysis of prospective 
owner's welfare is typical of the whole plan of the "Contemporary 
Californian." It is a livable, practical arrangement that is bound 
to appeal to GI and civilian alike . . . and it is most desirable 
because it need not be a financial burden. 

At this writing, it is planned to use the "Contemporary Cali- 
fornian" in a housing project near Palos Verdes (right) where 
219 houses will be variations on this theme. And a unique land- 
scaping is proposed to create a well-coordinated unit. Mass pro- 
duction methods make financial savings possible . . . while the in- 
dividual treatment of each house will range from a beamed ceiling 
in one to a decorative grill at the entranceway next door. Funda- 
mentally Californian . . . basically yours. 



by Virginia Scallon 



ing...with "extras 



// 




WEATHER DATA FOR MAY 

Los San 

Angeles Francisco 

Highest temperature 87 97 

Lowest temperature 49 42 

Average 61.3 57.1 

Percent sunshine 71 71 



YOUR BAGGAGE CAN BE AS LIGHT AS YOUR SPIRITS ... IF YOU PLAN 
YOUR TRAVEL WARDROBE FOR THE AIRLINE LIMIT OF FORTY POUNDS. 

• Vacations are in the air, literally and figuratively. But whether 
you 'plan to travel the skyways or the more mundane trails, it's a 
wise idea to plan an air-weight wardrobe for the sake of space, 
economy and convenience. 

step lightly to California in may 

More and more people are planning early vacations, to avoid 
crowded seasonal treks . . . and those early birds find California-in- 
May an ideal mecca. Mild climate is a real come-on, the desert lands 
are still inviting, the mountains are glorious . . . and there's the 
regular summer routine of sunning and swimming within easy miles 
of big city life! So let's take a look at the wardrobe situation, com- 
pactly speaking. 

Why not invest first of all in one of those coordinated ensembles 
which literally has everything for daytime wear in one convenient 
package? A suit with mix-matchable slacks, shorts-n-bra combina- 
tion ... in gabardine, it makes an ideal traveler. In dark colors it 
would be more appropriate for metropolitan San Francisco . . . gray 
or beige is a practical favorite for southern travel . . . bright colors 
only if you plan to take more changes. 

With this lightweight beginning, actually you've only to add a 
tailored blouse for days and a frilly one for evenings . . . invest in a 
long skirt for evening wear with the frilly one . . . add one of those 
wonderful pure-silk packables for special daytime occasions or 
afterdark wear . . . and you're prepared for anything. 

Now, just for fun, bring a bathing suit, for whether you visit 
the desert or the beach you'll find time for a refreshing dip in the 
blue. And add a light-hearted cotton, possibly a sunback dress with 
a cover-up jacket, as a concession to summer days ahead. An extra 
after-dark wear . . . and you're prepared for anything. 

While we're being so specific we might as well include: street 
shoes, play scuffs, dressy slippers . . . beauty aids prescribed to keep 
skin and hair in good condition ... a travel hat, and possibly a 
flower halo or small cocktail hat, gloves . . . and enough fresh 
lingerie for the extent of your visit. Don't plan on getting much 
laundry done en route! 

Top this off with a coat and you're ready . . . the coat well may 
be semi-tailored, but you'll be wise to choose one that can go sophis- 
ticated with you. A coat to match your suit, for instance, but with 
braid or special elegance in detail. Hint: if you're taking only one 
coat, consider the advantages of a dress-length type, particularly if 
you have one of the new full-skirted dresses or a print in your 
wardrobe to wear. 

All ready? 






d. 





WWOTHER HATS 

OTHER DRESSES 

OTHER ACCESSORIES THAT LOOK AS SMART ON ME 



UuXj vdLto&o & £«/& /bcwtfiw 







0& C/mjhM£ (AffiJC V(£, OvUU 

blended exclusively for me...to my own 
skin tone ... right before my eyes by 



DISTINGUISHED FOR HAND-BIENDED POWDER AND EXQUISITE COSMETICS 



r H E CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 



55 



w 



ith 



agiow 
glamor 





SO YOU'RE OFF on that long-anticipated holiday! Mentally, you've checked off 
DV 6cJnQ chorlfon things t0 ta ke along . . . bathing suit . . . shorts . . . golf clothes . . . playshoes . . 

sun-back dresses . . . and a dozen other ""musts." 

But what about a our good looks? 

^ ou'll want to come home with an enviable sun tan ... a "vacation glow" . . 
so give more than a passing thought to problems of beauty. The same sun. wind 
and water that are such a pleasing part of the summer scene are notoriously hard 
on skin and hair. Go prepared with a few basic beauty-buys that will be your pro- 
tection against the elements . . . assurance that you'll be even more attractive when 
the vacation's done. So few things are necessary that even the most modest budget 
won't squirm: a sun tan helper-out. rich night cream, body lotion and a good hair 
dressing. Of course you already have your brush. And just tucking these items in a 
corner of your bag won't do the trick. Use them! They are your insurance . . 



* 



for beautiful appearance. 



SUNTANNING: Keep in mind that all of us don*t have the same type skins . . . 
naturally we won't tan alike. If you are a redhead, resign yourself to the inevitable 
. . . your color will be a bit on the pinkish side and no amount of wishful thinking 
will give you cafe au lait tone. But on you it looks good ... or it can! Take 
your first sun in small doses . . . fifteen minutes, then twenty, and on and on. 
always using first the sun tan product of your choice which might be oil. cream or 
lotion. And don't skip your arms, legs and shoulders. Even after your skin lias 
become acclimated, keep using it for the soothing and softening effect. 

^AYOUR EYES : won't be sparkling come-ons if they're framed in tiny wrinkles etched 

' by squinting at the sun. Under your dark glasses . . . you wear them, of course 

... a light covering of eye cream or night cream, smoothed on ever so lightly. 

will never be seen. Hint: after a day of golfing or sailing, a soothing eye lotion 

will pay dividends, too. 

JaARMS AND LEGS: All body areas suffer from exposuie to wind as well as sun and 
are apt to become dry and painful, so frequent slalherings of a body emollient 
are in order. A hand lotion is excellent as a quick softener, but you would better 
benefit by one of the light body oils used before your shower or bath. Just enough 
will cling to your skin to give that velvety feeling. And while we are on the 
subject of legs, don't have a blind spot about that unsightly hair that shows up a 



56 




■mndred fold in the bright light. Smooth on a depilatory or wield the razor. 
Ms you will, but do something. 

X j 

'•BE : ^ hen you come in from playing, never, never put water on your face 

until after you have patted on a layer of good rich night cream, because water 

prives in a burn and helps aid dryness. If you are in a rush . . . and you 

•usually are . . . cream your face, lotion your body and then shower. The 

ilvarmth of the water will help the cream in its beneficial work and your 

nake-up will smooth on like a dream. 

IMt: All too many of us pamper our faces but give a fast brush-off to our 
locks. Don't forget that while the sun is darkening our skins it is, at the same 
rime, bleaching our hair and having the same coarsening effect. So, a few 
tlrops of a lanolin-based cream hair dressing rubbed between the palms are 
hen patted on the tresses. Now grasp the hair brush firmly in the right hand 
. . need we say more? 

MEUP: \\ hen Old Sol is in his glory, discard your heavy make-up bases. 

:po in for one of the light creamy ones that gives a young, dewy look so 
perfect for off-the-shoulder fashions. Save your purple-red rouge and lipstick 
for after dark . . . it's strictly taboo for sun. And while perfumes and 
bolognes don't usually come under the heading of make-up, they should, for 
their use is the finishing touch to the well-groomed woman. Cologne is best 

. :or summer days, and make it a gay sort of fragrance, lightly used. You 

- ban wait until night to be frankly seductive! 

Does this all sound like hard work for crammed-to-the-hilt vacation days? 

Hit isn't. It can be done in less time than it takes you to read about it. 



57 










JUST OFF the drawing boards in time for an exciting Father 
Day gift . . . something for Dad to wear with comfort . . 
to receive with delight is this new summer-white leisure outf 
designed by master crafisman M. Jackman, who introduced th 
cardigan and other fashionable men's sportswear. Ask for fi 
at any fine men's store: see how Jackman takes this soft woe 
herringbone and subtly tailors it into a flattering broac 
shouldered, slim-hipped man's outfit; just the thing to wear c| 
the country club, racquet club, or in the confines of your privatt 
patio. While you are getting this Father's Day gift for himl 
get yourself a matching suit . . . it's three piece: jacket, sk : 
and matching slack. 

For his wardrobe the white jacket goes well against a re 
wool gabardine shirt, also inimitably tailored by Jackma 
The solid colors blend beautifully: especially with a blu> 




r \w 



feather-weight balibuntal straw hat, by Bailey of Hollywoo> 
And an important part of the outfit could be a tie in brigr 
western patterns, like those below. Rich warm reds, browns 
yellows ... all California colors . . . are in exclusive origina 
Holly vogue tie designs. 



I 




I 



.+**"•* 



father's day 



Be sure to ask at stores listed below, or at your local 
fine men's shop, for these perfect summer-wear items: 
Man's Jacket and Slacks by M. Jackman & Sons, $85, 
at Godchaux, New Orleans; Hastings, San Francisco; 
Sak's Fifth Avenue, Los Angeles, New York; Buff urns'. 
Long Beach. 

Women's Jacket and Slacks by M. Jackman & Sons, 
$100, at I. Magnin, Los Angeles and San Francisco,- 
Best's, Seattle; Desmond's, Los Angeles; Buffums', 
Long Beach. 

Man's Feather-Weight Strew in solid tones by Bailey of 
Hollywood, $20, at F. R. Tripler's, New York; The Hecht 
Co., Washington, D. C; Carson, Pirie Scott & Co., 
Chicago. 

Summer foulards by Hollyvogue Ties at Emporium, San 
Francisco; Shillito's, Cincinnati; Stix-Baer-Fuller, St. Louis; 
Buffums', Long Beach. 

Zipper-front Shirt by Barry of Hollywood, $10, at 
Bjff urns', Long Beach; Godchaux, New Orleans; 
Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., Chicago. 

Utility Jacket, Slacks and Ascot by Dorsen of Calif., 
at Buffums', Long Beach; Carson, Pirie Scott & Co.. 
Chicago; Shillito's, Cincinnati; Lord & Taylor, 
New York. 





lifornia way 

e California gift items, too, will make his Father's Day 
best holiday he can remember. First, a sport shirt with 
re's gift to the relaxed man: a zipper. The sport shirt 

on like a coat, and zip, it's a sport shirt; the zipper is 
en down the front. A concealed button closes the collar, 
with a tie this leisure shirt becomes a perfect part of any 
t outfit; by Barry of Hollywood. 

le utility jacket in pastel plaids, at right, is exactly right 
it's California's colorful answer to the old, somber smoking 
et. The wool is soft and rich and good looking: slip into 
or an evening's relaxation, for informal entertaining at 
e or in the patio next Sunday afternoon. The perfectly 
dinated wardrobe shown features both slacks and ascot 
)f wool gabardine. Even the tops of the shoes are covered 

the same blue gabardine. The clothing is by Dorsen of 
Fornia. The shoes by Casuals Inc. 




*>"* 




HARRIET ARNOLD 



mrs. charles van de water native daughter of long beach, is photographed in the 

BEAUTIFUL GARDENS OF THE LLEWELYN BIXBY HACIENDA, WEARING 
AN ARNELLE ORIGINAL SUIT WITH TYPICAL CALIFORNIA FLAIR. 

MRS. VAN DE WATER, MOTHER OF TWO YOUNG 
CHILDREN, IS A MEMBER OF THE JUNIOR CHARITY LEAGUE AND IS ACTIVE 
IN THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THE COAST CITY. 



60 



/" 



mrs. William graham is another long beach native 

DAUGHTER WHO'S ACTIVE IN THE JUNIOR CHARITY LEAGUE . . . 
f-~ PICTURED WEARING A SWEDISH PRINT GOWN WITH GRAPE MOTIF 
REPEATED ON HER HAT; JbOTH BY MARSHA OF CALIFORNIA. 
MRS. GRAHAM'S BABY DAUGHTER HAS INSPIRED HER TO DEVOTE HER 
ARTISTIC TALENTS TO NURSERY 'PICTURES. 




* I 



vertica 



: 



Same Divisions . . . Changing Tones Changes the lllusil 



<lll 


• mill IWiii, 


^«ru 


ilium- 


■Pffil III!" 


r ....iii iiti -| 


••■■■■lllllli 111 " .mi. 


P""" 


l||l 

'■••imi ' 



Slenderizes Slenderizes 




Center division carries eyes up and 
down . . adding length . . slen- 
derizing 




Broadens 



Most Slenderizing 
of three 



Broadens 




Lines close Jo Dramatizing cen- Emphasizing thel 

sides. We are ter is most slen- sides adds width [ 

made consciojs derizing of three 
of width 






is made important 



n a series 



Will stripes make me look thinner? Can I wear a skirt 
that is pleated all around? Will I look wider in a five- 
gore skirt, or will I appear thinner with a single seam 
down the center? How about a colored panel? Should it 
be wide or narrow, in the center or at the side? 

' These are questions involving vertical divisions that 
many of us wonder about when we select our clothes. 
There are no stock answers. The answer depends on 
understanding the tricks of grouping and dividing a space 
with verticals to get the effect we want. In order to make 
this principle clear, I have divided the same sized rec- 
tangles to illustrate how you can give the illusion of more 
length or more width, by guiding the eyes with various 
groupings and change of tone. 

The center division in the first rectangle carries your 
eyes up and down, adding length. This is emphasized in 
the dress below by the path made by the little bows. In 
the second rectangle the dominating interest is still ver- 
tical. The center panel in the dress illustrating this example 
sends attention up and down, again adding length. 

There are three variations of the third division. Chang- 
ing the tone changes the illusion in each example. 3a 
adds width because the lines are so close to the outside 
edges that we are made conscious of the sides instead of 
the length. This is clearly seen in the dress below. 3b 
shows how the same basic division, dramatized by chang- 
ing the tone through the center, has a slenderizing effect. 
In 3c we have deliberately made the sides more attrac- 
tive. This definitely adds width. Thus you can readily see 
that a dress with the same basic lines can be changed 
from a slenderizing to a broadening model. 

In the last four examples I have applied the principles 
in the rectangles to parts of the figure, rather than to 
the whole, because, in many instances, we are concerned 
only with improving the blouse or the skirt. Number four 
shows divisions regularly repeated, sufficiently close to- 
gether so that our eyes travel across instead of down. 
This tends to broaden. Such a skirt might be box-pleated, 
or perhaps a wide chalk-stripe. In figure five, where the 
vertical lines are so close together, their effect is neu- 
tralized. You are conscious of texture, rather than line. 
The closely-striped or knife-pleated skirt in the illustration 
tends to slenderize. You see the silhouette, rather than 
the inner divisions. And you can, of course, apply these 



peated twice. The rectangles are divided in arithmetically 
decreasing proportions. This rhythm carries our eyes 
across and increases the width. In the first blouse the 

O 
mm . ■ l ■ !_*..__« «L _ » il 



tions change. Emphasizing the middle panel in the second 
blouse sends our eyes up and down. This, therefore, is 



orence shuman 



When you shop for new clothes keep these principles 
in mind. By matching or changing buttons down the per- 
ennial shirtmaker dress, you may detract from a line that 
is forcing attention to your length or width. Try on a prob- 
lem dress. If you look too wide, pin all the extra flare out 
of the skirt. Add some interest to make the eyes travel 
down the center. A colored band, applique embroidery 
or contrasting buttons are some of the things you can use. 
Remember, you can subdue or accent the vertical lines 
at will. It's all in knowing howl 




LONG BEACH MAY BE A HAVEN FOR RETIRECK MIDDLE 

WESTERNERS, BUT IT CERTAINLY ISN'T ONE\ FOR 

THE POOR FISHI THEY'RE NOT ONLY PULLED OUT OF ITS WATERS 

FOR THE GUSTATORY PLEASURES OF THE RESIDENTS, THEY'RE 

SENT, VIA TIN CANS, TO ALL PARTS OF 

THE WORLD. SO . . WITH PLENTY OF FISH AND PLENTY OF COOKS 

WHO KNOW BEST HOW TO PREPARE THEM, 

SOME MIGHTY GOOD RECIPES SHOULD COME OUT 

OF THIS CITY . . AND THEY DO . . 




! J| The Nav\ is everywhere in Long Beach . . . ,af\e 
reason the cuisine is so cosmopolitan. Navy-wives 
get around, an<J on their rounds they colleefrecipes. 
Here is one thay might have picked/up in India 
or in England, But more likely in^The Islands." 
I won't call this an Hawaiian oorry. though, there 
are too many connoisseurs jtfno would scream be 
cause it contains no opcoamut milk. 
mariner's curry AriprosBifleshed fish will do for 
this, but halibuf?>*tfhich is plentrTilT~a«iund Long 
Beach, is specially good. Have two and a 
pounds of it boned and skinned, but be sure you 
get those trimmings. Cut it in medium pieces. 
Cover the trimmings with two cups of water and 
simmer for a half hour. Melt a quarter of a cup of 
butter, and in it saute a medium onion, well minced, 



64 



/ 



and a squashed clove of garlic. When the onion 
is a delicate brown, remove the garlic, then add 
two tablespoons of fresh curry powder and a quar- 
ter of a cup of flour to the onion, and cook slowly 
for four minutes, not allowing it to brown. Now 
pour in two cups of fish stock (that's what you 
made with the trimmings). Stir till smooth, then 
add an apple which has been chopped. This is 
allowed to simmer for five minutes, then the fish 
and a cup of milk are tossed in. (If you really 
want to go native, add cocoanut milk instead of the 
milk. Make it this way: grate a fresh cocoanut, 
cover it with the liquid which is inside it plus 
enough boiling water to make one cup, then let it 
stand for fifteen minutes. Now squeeze it through 
a cheesecloth, extracting every bit of cocoanut 
milk). Cook until the fish is done, which is as 
soon as it has lost all its transparent look, and 
serve with flaky boiled rice and chutney and/or 
baked bananas. And if you want to make a luau 
oirj of it, add other condiments to your feast. 
Fresh cocoanut, crisp fried bacon, chopped nuts 
. . . any kind . . . almonds, peanuts, cashews, 
macadamia nuts . . . chopped hard boiled eggs, 
minced green onions, dried shrimp>-or Bombay 
duck. Bombay duck is a dried L^fsjr called the 
Bummalo and is more apt tojQJfe found with an 
Indian curry than with an Hawaiian one. A good 
substitute for it is made/by toasting long shreds 
of salted codfish. TlnVis less odorous . . . shall I 
say . . . and perkaps more acceptable to those 
whose noses weren't educated in India. 

All the fiire cooks in Long Beach aren't Navy 
wives. Tkere are, for instance, the good wives of 
the Mradle West. True, they didn't bring many 
sea-food recipes with them when they came to the 
romised Land, but it didn't take them long to 
learn how best to prepare their new-found food. 
It was just doin' what comes natcherly. Simplicity 
is the keynote of the cooking of Kansas and Iowa, 
Missouri and Minnesota, so it was foreordained 
that they should choose unpretentious recipes as 
their own. Take filet of sole . . . there are hun- 
dreds of recipes for its preparation . . . some so 
elaborate with sauce and garnishes that one is 
barely aware that the dish contains anything so 
lowly as fish. And yet one of the most wonderful 
ways to cook it is the simplest . . . it's cooked 
with almonds, California almonds, of course, and if 
you had it in France you would be having Sole 
Amandine. Not so in Long Beach, they call it 
filet of sole with almonds Pour boiling wa- 
ter over a quarter of a cup of shelled almonds 
and let stand seven or eight minutes. Slip off the 
skins, and while the nuts are still hot cut them 
into thin slivers, then spread them out on a cookie 
sheet and dry them in a medium oven for about 
ten minutes. Select four small filets of sole and 
saute them gently over a low flame, using a quar- 
ter of a cup of butter. When they are the color 
irnia gold, remove them to a hot platter, 
then toss uie~""s"rrvese4__almonds into the hot butter 
in the pan. Add anomeT~qtM«tercup of butter, 



and allow the almonds to brown very lightly. 
Squeeze the juice of a half lemon into the sauce, 
then pour over the plattered fish. Garnish with 
lemon and parsley, of all things! 

No part of California cuisine can escape the 
Spanish influence, least of all Long Beach. Bar- 
racuda, an all-year favorite in Southern California, 
will have an al sur de la frontera flavor if you pre- 
pare it this way: 

barracuda san pedro style Place a 6-pound 
barracuda in a shallow baking dish and sprinkle 
with a mixture of two teaspoons salt, one tea- 
spoon chili powder and a quarter teaspoon of 
oregano. Mix together a quarter cup each of minced 
green pepper, onion and parsley, and spread over 
the fish, then lay thick slices of fresh tomato on 
top. Sprinkle the whole with two tablespoons of 
olive oil and bake for an hour at 425°, basting 
several times during the cooking. Who says that 
Mexicans live on tamales? 

Abalone is California's own — a law prohibits its 
being shipped from the state, except for a few cans 
of trimmings. These abalone trimmings make a 
divine chowder, though, so if you're away from 
your favorite state you can still have your favorite 
shellfish, in one form anyway. An abalone chow- 
der came to Long Beach by way of New England. 
Indeed, it wouldn't be stretching things too far to 
guess that those one-time owners of Long Beach, 
Yankees John Temple and Abel Stearns, first had 
the idea of making chowder with the huge mollusks 
they found so plentiful in their new home. Cer- 
tainly abalone chowder is where that Yankee in- 
fluence comes in. 

abalone chowder If you are using fresh aba- 
lone, purchase a pound of it and have it cut in 
steaks and pound it. Cook it in three cups of salted 
water, which has had a sprig of thyme added, for 
an hour and a quarter, or until tender. When 
done, put through the food grinder, using the me- 
dium knife. Return to the liquid. (If you are using 
canned minced abalone, use four ^-lb. tins or two 
l^>-lb. tins, and cover with three cups of boiling 
water. From here on the procedure is the same) . 
Dice a quarter of a pound of salt pork and fry to 
a beautiful amber crispness. Remove pork and save, 
then add a large onion, sliced thin, and cook it in 
the pork fat until it, too, is a lovely brown. Two 
cups of raw diced potatoes are now added to the 
abalone and liquid, along with the onions and fat 
in the pan. When the potatoes are tender, add 
the cubes of crispy pork, a tablespoon of butter, 
and two cups of very rich milk. As soon as it is 
again hot, serve with pilot biscuits. This same 
recipe may be used for a New England clam or 
fish chowder by merely substituting clams or fish 
for the abalone. Mmm! Good. 



(j&Skk rnf 




Ann Stuart of the Earl Carroll Theatre 
Restaurant, Hollywood 

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way 

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right amount of 
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Sizes 34 — 46. 





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CHICAGO • DETROIT • MILWAUKEE 
INDIANAPOLIS • KANSAS CITY 



Long Beach . . . Willmore's Dream 



(Continued from page 33) 
was given to one Manuel Nieto, a soldier. 
Its southern edge embraced the present city 
of Long Beach. That was in 1784. 

By the time California had become Mexi- 
can territory, Rancho Los Nietos had been 
"sub-divided" into five ranches. One, Rancho 
Los Cerritos, or Ranch of the Little Hills, 
had fallen to a daughter of Manuel Nieto. 
Another, Rancho Los Alamitos, was in the 
hands of a son. Each had nearly thirty thou- 
sand acres, and the boundary line between 
them ran down from Signal Hill, along Ala- 
mitos Avenue, to the ocean front. Los Cerritos, 
containing most of Long Beach, was to the 
west, Los Alamitos to the east. 

Enter now two Yankee adventurers . . both 
of whom came to the pueblo of Los Angeles 
and eventually sought Mexican citizenship: 
John Temple, who married an heir to Los 
Cerritos, and Abel Stearns. 

Temple purchased the "Farm of the Cerritos, 
which contains five leagues for neat cattle, a 
little more or less," as the deed read. Stearns 
bought Los Alamitos for $500. Governor Jose 
Figueroa had held it briefly meanwhile, but 
never lived on it. Thus Stearns and Temple 
became neighbors and the sole inhabitants 
of Long Beach. Here, a century before the 
horseshoe pitchers pitched their derndest at 
the Iowa picnics . . Stearns and Temple con- 
cocted a little sport of their own. 

Once a year vaqueros, friends and servants 
of the friendly rivals would gather at a point 
on Signal Hill to watch and bet. John 
Temple and Abel Stearns would mount their 
horses and race the four miles down Alamitos 
Avenue, along their property line to the surf, 
and four miles back. The winner then would 
invite all to his hacienda. An ox would be 
barbecued and a cask of wine opened : there 
would be an impromptu bullfight in the barn- 
yard and a fandango in the courtyard. 

When Commodore Stockton marched on 
Los Angeles and raised the American flag one 
hundred and one years ago, it was John 
"Don Juan" Temple, the Yankee-Mexican, 
whom he installed as first alcade or mayor of 
the city. But the victory was short lived and 
when the Los Angelenos ran him out of town 
Temple returned to Los Cerritos. Misfortune 
of a more grievous kind, however, overtook 
both Temple and Stearns. The terrible drought 
of the sixties wiped out thousands of their 
cattle and left both men virtually bankrupt. 

In the meantime eight sons and two daugh- 
ters of Puritan settlers Amasa and Fanny 
Bixbv had, one by one, drifted from Maine 
and Massachusetts to California . . along with 
a few cousins and other kin, including the 
Flint family. Unsuccessful gold rushers, they 
turned to ranching. Thus, eventually it came 
about that the Bixbys and the Flints, or cer- 
tain of them, came into possession of both the 
Los Cerritos and Los Alamitos Ranchos. There 
were Llewellyn, Jotham and John W. Bixbv 
and Benjamin and Thomas Flint. They stocked 
the ranches with sheep and started a familv 
dynasty that has left their descendants still 
the landed gentrv of Lone Bearb. 
THE BOOM: William Erwin Willmnre had 
acquired the right from the Bixbys in 1882 
to subdivide the magnificent shores of Los 
Cerritos. And he persuaded sixty families of 
prospective colonizers to come out from Kan- 
sas City to look over his little seaside resort. 
All but a few visionaries like himself turned 
back, and within two years the unhappy man's 
bubble had burst. 

But the boom of the middle eighties soon 
swept over Southern California in the first 
great westward migration since the Gold Rush. 
Not even the mud flats of floundering Will- 
more City escaped. In new hands, Long Beach 
caught on. By 1888 the city was incorporated 
and the first Chautauqua Assembly on the 
Pacific Coast . . granddaddy of the spirit that 
fosters the Spit V Argue Club and the I"wa 
picnics . . was held there that year. Two 



years later the Chamber of Commerce wasl 
formed. Long Beach had arrived. 

Long Beach was then, as it remained until 
recent years, a "blue nose" town. The first 
official act of the first city council was to 
pass an ordinance prohibiting saloons. Indeed,! 
before that the very sale of subdivided lots 
contained reversion clauses in the event of 
the sale of liquor on the premises. 

The beach, until the roaring twenties, was 
more beautiful than its bathers. As recently 
as 1921 the city fined would-be bathing 
beauties $300 if their costumes did not ". . . 
completely conceal all that portion of the 
body from a line even with the upper part 
of the arm pits to a line around the leg one- 
third of the way to the knee joint . . . and 
a skirt of opaque material hanging loosely 
to the bottom of the suit." It is different to- 
day and more than one movie star has first 
exposed all that is exposable of her natural 
talents in a Long Beach bathing beauty con- 
test. In fact the extraordinary physical prog- 
ress and cultural transition of the last decade 
may be said to have been accomplished by 
leaps and blondes. 

SPEED BOATS AND HORSE SHOES: Long 
Beach originally was almost purely a resort 
city. A paternal city government always has 
provided for the recreation of, first, its resi- 
dents, and, second, its visitors. Thus it is not 
surprising that the first Long Beach bond issue 
was for construction of the first municipally 
owned pier in California. This soon was fol- 
lowed by a pavilion, which was built despite 
the necessity of doing some fancy circumvent- 
ing of the state laws. The present magnificent 
civic auditorium, resting on a spit of filled 
land jutting into a lagoon encircled by scenic 
Rainbow Pier, was built in 1928. 

Shrewdly, the civic auditorium is also well- 
designed, as is the city's hospitality and play- 
time facilities, for housing conventions. This 
summer the United States Junior Chamber of 
Commerce will hold its first western conven- 
tion there, and fourteen other national and 
international gatherings have been booked. 

On an open-air platform adjoining one end 
of Rainbow Pier the Recreation Commission 
maintains and supervises what it chooses to 
call the "University By the Sea" . . for the 
free exercise of the prerogative to speak one's 
mind. The "University" has been more af- 
fectionately known for many years as The 
Spit 'n' Argue Club. Organized on a self-gov- 
erning basis, soap box orating is not only legal 
without license, but encouraged. Here old 
duffers, crackpots, religious fanatics or whom 
you will may shout their pieces to the open 
seas over the heads of those hundreds who 
daily lounge in the benches to listen and 
enjoy the salt air. Such virile, calamitous, 
crack-of-doom speechifying and fist-shaking 
oratory has not been heard elsewhere since the 
davs of the Chautauquas. 

Long Beach provides twenty-seven major 
recreation centers, including thirteen parks. 
Under slat-roofed pergolas along the beach 
front or in Lincoln Park in the shadow of 
the City Hall oldsters gather at their card 
clubs (city dues: $1 per year), horseshoes, 
shuffleboard, lawn bowling, roque (a profes- 
sionalized, hard court version of croquet), fly 
casting, handicraft, chess and checkers, com- 
munity sings, old-time dancing and picnick- 
ing. 

But Long Beach is also a virile playground 
and sporting center for the fast moving, fash- 
ionable California youth of today. Southern 
exposure windows in the handsome, height- 
limit office buildings and hotels along Ocean 
Boulevard look straight down upon a patch- 
work of gailv colored beach umbrellas and 
milling crowds on the sand. All along the 
eight miles of beach, mostly city owned, it 
is the same. At the east end a one-time swamp 
land and lagoon area is now a fashionable, 
(Continued on page 68) 



66 



THE CAUFORNIAN, May, 1947 



jKALDING THE SAILOR DRESS . . .with its full, pleated skirt, its long torso blouse and roll-back collar. 

An appealing new silhouette with sea-going flair. Designed by Hollywood Premiere in Reltex Air Brigade 
fabric, and yours in copen blue, coral or aqua, with black, navy or white tie. About $23 
at The Broadway, Hollywood. Leslie-James hat. 



PHIL MARCH 



Long Beach . . . Willmore's Dream 



(Continued from page 66) 
sporty resort. There, Belmont Shores, All- 
mitos Bay, Naples and the Marine Stadium 
exist in the name of fun and outdoor living. 
Here are speed boats, outboard motorboat 
racing, a sea scout encampment, college row- 
ing races, sailing, fishing, swimming, sunning 
and homes with private pier landings. 
THE VANISHING IOWAN: Long Beach as 
"Iowa by the Sea" has been a national joke 
for decades, and until lately very nearly a 
truth. And, until lately. Long Beach relished 
and fostered the spreading of this reputa- 
tion. But the Iowa legend, and the larger 
mid-westernism which it symbolized, is slow- 
ly passing from the scene. It is not yet gone. 
Fifteen years ago nearly one of ten of its 
citizens actually had his roots in Iowa. To- 
day there is only one of thirty. 

When Walter H. Case, editor of the Long 
Beach Press-Telegram (and himself an 
Iowan), compiled his "History of Long Beach" 
he included biographical sketches of the 207 
leading citizens in the city's history. Ninety- 
nine were midwesterners. and Iowans lead 
them all. 

Long Beach Iowans still meet monthly for 
"covered dish dinners." And they are the most 
potent chapter of the Southern California 
Iowa association which has lured turnouts 
of 100,000 to its big Iowa Picnics . . . regu- 
larly attended by the governors of Iowa. Hor- 
ace Boise, governor of Iowa in 1876, retired 
to Long Beach and died there. Others, like 
eighty-six-year-old John G. Spielman. long- 
time manager of the Long Beach Iowa Asso- 
ciation, "came out here to die and made a 
damned bad job of it."' California's Governor 
Frank F. Merriam (1934-1938) served in the 
Iowa state legislature and was Iowa state 



auditor before moving to Long Beach. 

Most of the midwesterners who came to 
Long Beach until the mid twenties came to 
retire. They had become modestly wealthy 
and were ready to sit down on the beach and 
clip coupons. They were good citizens and 
an asset to the California community. They 
brought with them and transplanted a middle- 
western, rural way of life, which, in its new 
and strange habitat, has made a permanent 
contribution to American folklore. 

When depression hit, Long Beach was a 
fertile seeding ground and the natural birth- 
place for the Townsend Old Age Pension 
Plan. For Long Beach was still, like Pasa- 
dena, a city of retired oldsters dependent 
upon invested income. 

The rural folksy charm of Long Beach 
is threatened, but it is not dead. Unlike Los 
Angeles, the city is still too young to have 
lost or absorbed the elements of its origin. 
Civic factions are divided between those who 
would slip a coat over grandpa's shoulders 
to hide his suspenders, and those who would 
snap them defiantly and unashamedly. A 
Curb Market is still operated as a division 
of the city government every Tuesday, Thurs- 
day and Saturday morning until noon at the 
side of Lincoln Park, a block from the city- 
hall. The scene is like market day in any 
small midwestern town. And it is still legal 
in Long Beach to drive your two-seated elec- 
tric perambulator on the downtown sidewalks 
. . park it in Buffums' entrance way, if you 
wish, while vou go shopping. 
PRUNING THE TREE: At 5:54 p.m., March 
10, 1933. without warning, it struck. It hit 
nearly all of Los Angeles and Orange coun- 
ties. But it hit Long Beach hardest. When 
the city's tally was finally up there were 




OF CALIFORNIA 



783 Mission Street, San Francisco, Californ 



68 



i a 




• And he sells plenty of 'em 

fifty-two dead and nearly a thousand injurec 
in the worst earthquake catastrophe in South 
ern California history. And within the nex 
three weeks there were seventy lesser shocks 
People camped in the parks, on the beach 
in their yards, or slept in their cars for mam 
nights. 

Thousands left the city . . but most of then 
returned later and helped rebuild. Properh 
values slumped, but soon recovered to recorc 
highs. Some stores closed, but a month latei 
reported the biggest sales volume of the de- 
pression period. The United States Senate 
voted five million dollars to aid the Strieker 
city. But Long Beach refused "Federal char 
ity": asked for and got a loan instead. The 
entire system of forty schools had to be re- 
built, as well as scores of public and privates 
buildings. 

Thus, in retrospect, the tragic earthquake 
had merely pruned the tree. It accelerated the 
modernization of Long Beach and may be 
pointed to as the turning point in the transi 
tion from a seaside resort for retired Iowans 
to its full maturity as a western playground, 
a great industrial city, an important port 

Today stock broker Ralph Murray's petite 
wife no longer has to go to Los Angeles to 
buy a smart outfit in size 9. She can get it 
at Buffums". or she can shop along the 
smart row of new specialty stores on Ocean 
Boulevard. A housewife in Huntington Park 
shops in Long Beach because she can find 
what she wants: go about it leisurely and in 
comfort : avoid the traffic crush : and the ex- 
tra miles be hanged. 

Thus Long Beach today has become the 
shopping center for seventy-two neighboring 
communities, totalling three-quarters of a 
million people. Nearly one-fourth of the 
charge customers in Lone Beach stores reside 
outside the city. In 1945 retail sales hit a 
gigantic 8237,500,000. Aside from the swank 
new shops, like Irene Berke's. facing the 
ocean front, an imitation of Los Angeles 
"Miracle Mile" is well along as a new de- 
velopment in the Bixby Knolls section. There, 
on Atlantic Avenue, with the modernistic 
shops and elaborate eateries, is located the 
first pre-fabricated motion picture theater in 
the world. 

But while Long Beach discards its calico 
for the smart fashions of a California resort 
city, it also must begin to suffer the under- 
current of disturbances inevitable to any giant, 
thriving metropolis. 

RECOVERING THE BALL: The two greatestl 
things in the industrial life and progress of 
Long Beach are its oil and its port. Their 
success stories are inseparable. 

Long Beach chuckles smugly over its 
shrewd achievement and financial stability in 
the operation of its oil business and the de- 
velopment of its harbor. It may be justly U 
proud. But it wasn't always so. For Long I 
Beach fumbled the ball on Signal Hill and ; ,] 
recovered it. twelve years later, on Terminal 
Island. 

The retired residents of the seaside resort 
of Long Beach had their eyes on the garden- 
covered Signal Hill back of the city. It would 
make one of the finest residential subdivi- 
sions in Southern California, in time. So the 
city resisted, unsuccessfully, the efforts to 
drill there for oil . . fighting it with pro- 
hibitive taxes. 

(Continued on page 70) 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1947 



I>«'i-:nis«' (he citizens of Long Beach felt 

that il was just as necessary to subsidize art as to 

underwrite picnic grounds, Camilla Wicks is a concert 

violinist . . . the world acclaims her music 

and the vision of her townspeople . . . 



the peoples prodigy 








Fifteen years ago in Long Beach, California. 

little tow-headed girl, age three, stood on the 
plain rug in the parlor of a modest bungalow, 
ingering a half-size violin. It wasn't a toy that 
)apa Ingold had just given her with loving 
lands . . it was real . . with real strings . . 
ind a real horsehair bow . . mama LaNora 
was poised at the piano to accompany her . . 
little Camilla Wicks was to have her first violin 
Jesson . . 

Today the world praises her artistry. 



The road was spectacular, but not easy. Ingold 
Wicks, the composer, had played the violin in 
his native Norway. In his daughter he visual- 
ized the medium for the finest exemplification 
of his art. Camilla worked . . hard . . gave up 
fun at the beach to practice . . practice . . each 
day . . month . . year . . successfully carried 
a full program of school work and enjoyed, too, 
the active sports and entertainments of other 
normal girls her age. 

At eight the young violinist had memorized 
seven standard concertos and numerous other 
compositions, played solos with the Long Beach 
Federal Orchestra and the local Chamber Music 
Society. One year later, after her return from 
New York where she studied with Louis Per- 
singer, Camilla was scheduled to play the diffi- 
cult Bruch Concerto with the Los Angeles Fed- 
eral Symphony. After the first rehearsal, as the 
young musician laid down her bow. the ninety- 
four men in the organization rose to their feet 
in spontaneous tribute to her unusual playing. 

Long Beach was proud of Camilla Wicks. 
Recognizing that local talent is as deserving 
of support as local parks or recreation cen- 
ters, the people of Camilla's town got together 
to establish a trust fund for her musical edu- 
cation. In a city-wide movement, backed by 
music and service clubs, by men's organizations 



and countless civic groups, enough money was 
raised to start the young violinist, both literally 
and figuratively, on the road to fame. 

Camilla did not disappoint her supporters. In 
New York she won a four-year scholarship to 
Juilliard School of Music, the youngest person 
to receive this honor. On February 25, 1942. 
when she was 13, she made her debut in Town 
Hall. Critics and public alike received her 
playing with unqualified admiration and the 
long-awaited performance was a success. 

In 1943 the California girl won an award 
of $500 and an opportunity to appear as solo- 
ist with Alfred Wallenstein and his Los An- 
geles Philharmonic Orchestra. Still later that 
year she broadcast with the New York Philhar- 
monic Symphony in Carnegie Hall, under the 
direction of Artur Rodzinski. 

Miss Wicks' greatest triumph came one moon- 
lit evening last July when she thrilled thou- 
sands of Southern Californians in the famous 
Hollywood Bowl. She played, superbly, Wieni- 
awski's Second Violin Concerto under the baton 
of Leopold Stokowski. 

This summer her music will have an even 
wider audience. With father and mother, the 
young violinist will sail for Norway on a com- 
bination concert and pleasure tour. After vaca- 
tioning on an island near Molde, where her 
father lived before coming to America, Camilla 
plans to concertize in several Scandinavian 
countries where her reputation already has 
spread. 

But her musical education ie by no means 
complete. For several years she has studied 
with Louis Persinger in New York, received 
coaching from Henri Temianka while she is 
home in California. Each day, each concert, may 
find her technique nearer to perfection. 

Long Beach, her California home, is very 
proud. 



69 



Long Beach . . 

(Continued from page 68) 

Hence, when the greatest strike in history 
was made on the hill in 1921, Signal Hill be- 
came a separate city and remains so today, 
although it is an island city entirely sur- 
rounded by Long Beach. Long Beach picked 
up the loose ends from its muff as best it 
could, and in fifteen years profited directly to 
the tune of a paltry ten million dollars from 
the black gold bonanza. 

The discovery in the thirties of the Wil- 
mington Field on Terminal Island, along the 
shore to either side of the Los Angeles River 



Willmore's Dream Come True 



Y 



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mouth and under the sea. was somewhat less 
spectacular than Signal Hill. But today it is 
California's most productive field. Long Beach 
did not fumble the ball here. Today there 
are 1,500 wells on the Long Beach side, and at 
last count the city owned 315 of them, mak- 
ing it the fifth largest independent oil opera- 
tor in the state. 

The city's wells are operated by the harbor 
department and the proceeds of all but 58 
of them go into the port development pro- 
gram. 

Long Beach was smart again. When it gave 
up a large part of its harbor area to the 
United States Navy under a one dollar con- 
demnation sale, it retained the right to take 
the oil, by slant drilling, from under the 
Navy's waters. But what tickles gloating Long 
Beachers is the coincidence of the fault line. 
It corresponds almost exactly with the Los 
Angeles-Long Beach boundary line, with vir- 
tually all the oil lying on the Long Beach 
side. 

Most cities, when they develop or expand 
their harbors, float a bond issue. In Long 
Beach they just drill another well. 

But Willmore's seaside resort is not for- 
gotten. Neither the oil drilling nor the har- 
bor development are permitted to spoil the 
city's attractiveness. To Los Angelenos their 
bond-built harbor is merely a vague but pleas- 
ant statistic. Long Beach's smaller harbor, on 
the other hand, is a throbbing, exciting part of 
every citizen's daily life. More shipping 
left from its Victory Pier during World War 
II than crossed all American docks combined 
in World War I. 

Los Angeles has long urged that the two 
harbors be operated by a single, joint au- 
thority. But oil rich Long Beach can afford 
to be independent. It already is smarting under 
one piece of political sculduggery administered 
by the hand of its neighbor. The Terminal 
Island Naval shipyards and the home port 
of the Pacific Fleet are in Long Beach. But Los 
Angeles wangled the post office location for 
the Navy in nearby San Pedro. Hence, the 
Pacific Fleet's post office address is Los An- 
geles, and graciously Los Angeles accepts all 
national publicity and notice as the home of 
the fleet. 




THAT CONTINENTAL TOUCH 

Three Individual heavy cast brass ash trays 
or candy dishes which will lend an air of 
distinction to your home. Each embell shed 
with the beautifully modeled crest of one of 
three world-famous European Hotels: 
Hotel Bristol (Vienna), illustrated. 
Hotel Elsenhut ( Rothenburg) , 
Hotel Villa D'Este (Lake Como). 

Please specify name when ordering. 

$4.25 each, or S12.00 for set of three. 
Postpaid No C.O.D.'s please 

Add lOc a tray postage west of the Rockies. 

CRAFTSMEN, INC. 

BOX 58. R.F.D. 2. ROCHESTER. MICHIGAN 



But big industry has come to the very edge 
of Long Beach port facilities. Henry Ford as- 
sembles cars there, Proctor and Gamble makes 
soaps there. Kaiser-Frazer. Douglas Aviation 
and North American Aviation . . all have Long 
Beach operations. Home industries such as 
fishing thrive there. Long Beach has put on 
long pants. 

In 66 years Willmore's disappointing "Amer- 
ican Colony" of half a dozen Kansas fam- 
ilies has mushroomed from utter failure to a 
magnificent city of 300.000 persons. It stands 
today, a sparkling, energetic monument to the 
dream of a forgotten little English school 
teacher. 




f rosty white blouse to add a crisp look 
to your suit. Washable, of embroidered 
Swiss eyelet batiste, featuring "Snap-Me 
On" shoulder pads. 

SIZES 34 AND 36, WHITE ONLY 
Send $9.95, check or money order, to 

BERTHA STEPHENSON 

1521 South Troost • Tulsa 5, Oklahoma 




Famous New Orleans 

PECAN 
PRALINES 

I Thrill familv arrl friends with won- 
derful tasty New Orleans candies. Made 
from treasured old Creole recipe. Pure 
sugar, sweet dairy cream, lavishly filled 
with choice pecans. 

jte gift box contains one lb. ( about 
20) guest-size pralines, individually 

I wrapped. 
ORDER BY THE BOX. $1 SO 

j We will enclose your gift 
card. Sorry no C.O.D.'s. Postpaid 

| LOUISIANA DELICACIES CO., INC. 
3520 Frenchmen St., New Orleans 19 



70 



THE CAL1FORNIAN, May, 1947 



v —yrA-Pwis (_^ixJ^&4<><sc<Zs 




'<- ^z^~ay ; c^W^ /5^y 




conspicuously Colifornian 



Here, for your good appearance and enjoyment, is 
neckwear that sings a song of sunny living . . . 
in 24 real Fiesta Colors of world-famous Hoffman 
California Woolens ... wonderful lightweight 
woolens loomed exclusively for Hollyvogue . . . 
fancies or plains ... 1 .50 






AT LEADING 5T6R.ES" NOW, OR WRITE US (P.O. BOX 
jj&j'O. [OS ANGELES 55), FOR YOUR NEAREST DEALER" 




BUE JUN 2-r^ 







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**%-»£>• 



***** 
HA* 5 ' 



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June 1947 
Price 25 ceits 




MELO POLO 



new 



?<awm 



VAT DYED . . . color fast in suds and sun 
SANFORSET. . . controls shrinking and stretching 
* 100% Pure Viscose Process Rayon for easy ironing 

Melo Polo is a soft, smooth textured fabric — ideal for all your active and 
spectator sports clothes. It's simple to care for . . . guaranteed washable 
and available now in misty summer colors. 

•Une ■^■((■a/iiriien 6/e/inant Si/iiny^i ^Jfte tA)ebt i?i ^Tai/iwn and &2«alitu 




National Mallinso~n Fabrics Corporation 

1071 Avenue of the Americas, New York 18 • Chicago- Los Angeles -San Francisco -Seattle 



I 





'guT'toi C^<&IhMV 






1 



Bright tropical fish float lazily on a Sanforized* cotton sunsuit— yours for taking on 
a healthy summer tan. Two-piece Cruiser Combo, about $8, plus matching Jackshirt, about $6; 
sizes 10-16. For a cover-up, add rayon Fairway blouse, 32-38, about $4. 

At stores across the country, or write 
KORET OF CALIFORNIA . 6.11 MISSION STREET . SAN FRANCISCO 5 



.... MAHtt 






by Kay Daumit . . . 

"Amber" planned her costumes and 

toilette months in advance . . . You 

achieve the same calculated effect 

in a matter of seconds . . . Forever 

Amber Cologne— 2.50*, 5.00* 

and Perfume— 2.75*, 4.50* 

*Plus 20% Federal Excise Tax 




CO. LOS ANGELES-PERFUMES-STREET FLOO 



THE CALIFORNTAN Is published monthly by The Californian, Inc., at 210 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles, 14. Calif., printed In U.S.A. Yearly subscription price June 

S3. CO. Entered as second class matter January 25. 1946 at the Post Office. Los Angeles, Calif. , under the Act of March 3, 1879. 1»4T I 






THE HECHT CO. 




WASHINGTON, D. C. 



A Great Store in the Nation s Capital 




j^un-fun swim suits by 




OF CALIFORNIA 



The trunks balloon out like old-fashioned rompers . . . the tops fit flatteringly thanks to 
strategic shirring. And little lambs cavort and caper all over the fine Bates cotton. Pink, 
blue or yellow. Mother, small, medium or large, $10.95. Daughter, sizes 3 to 6x, $4.99. 



IE HECHT CO 



Mail orders promptly filled. Please add 12<f. for postage. 
BEACH SHOP, THIRD FLOOR • TOTS' SHOP. SECOND FLOOR 



IE CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 



m 




jj. 



\rl\es California plays double peplums 'gainst a tiny waist for greater hip 
interest. Debonairly styled of heavenly cool butcher rayon in aqua, gold, rose 
or black. Sizes 10 to 20, $17.95. Second Floor. MAIL ORDERS. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, June, 194 



California In Books 



BY HAZEL ALLEN PULLING 

June in California . . . vacation days when thoughts turn eagerly 
toward highway and byway or wistfully toward sundrenched patio and 
beach. Whichever wins, vacation time in California is made the more 
enchanting if previews precede and overviews accompany her long, de- 
lightful days. Books on California will reveal and interpret her many 
offerings; read, and make California truly yours. 

If it's highways and byways that win, take along H. Cyril Johnson's 
compact pamphlet, "Scenic Guide to Southern California" (Susanville, 
California, Scenic Guides, 1946. 103p. SI), and its twin on Northern 
California. These are alphabetical listings of points of interest with 
brief descriptions of locale and accounts of the significance of each 
historic spot. Illustrated with photographs and sketch maps, these 
booklets are convenient and authoritative guides to California. 

Before you go, browse through the colorful, panoramic views of Cali- 
fornia in Pacific Pathways: the West in Color and Story, now published 
in one volume from its former periodical form. (Long Beach, B. and N. 
Publishing Co., 1947. May-October issues 1946. $2.50). Its enticing 
pictures will lure you to California's beauty spots, and its articles 
on her past and present will inform and entertain you. 

But if patio and beach claim your vacation days, you will find re- 
laxation and a wealth of California lore in two recent novels. "Lillian 
Janet's" Touchstone (Rinehart, 1947. 346 p. $3), and Idwal Jones' 
Vermilion (Prentice-Hall, 1947. 495p. S3), both family sagas, con- 
vincingly infuse life-blood into California's many-sided past. 

Touchstone, by Lillian Ressler and Janet Cicchetti, is a skillfully woven 
tale of Gold Rush days whose main theme lies not in the mines but in 
the political, financial, and emotional backdrop of the fervid search for 
gold. Real estate and the sale of mining supplies provide the wealth 
sought by capable, self-centered, sensual King Delaney and his sister-in- 
law, Agnes; the mines give only disillusion and heartbreak to John, 
Agnes' husband. The children of the two Delaney families, each in 
his own way, fight politics, intrigues and disaster to win personal 
happiness whch is lost to Agnes when she loses King's love. Through 
a nice blending of historical fact with fictional theme, the authors have 
revealed with truth and sincerity the period of California's flamboyant 
youth. 

Vermilion is the story of three generations of a family, part Cornish, 
part Spanish, whose saga begins in California in the days of hide 
droghing and quicksilver mining. It carries us through the San Fran- 
cisco earthquake of 1906, and back again to the worn-out mines. Cali- 
fornia's independence in 1846, her annexation by the United States, 
the Civil War, and her agricultural and mining developments are traced 
through the activities of the Cope family, descendants of rough, old 
Pablo. This is a lusty tale written in prose of such sensitive, rich 
imagery that its ruggedness is belied. Deftly, by word and story, the 
spirit, the flavor, even the taste and color of California are caught. It 
is a tale that will fill vacation days with adventure and steep you in 
beauty of word, sound, and picture. 

And if your reading taste and curiosity run to other phases of Cali- 
forniana. let me know your desire. Write to me at The Californian. 



• Penny-Saving Food Tips 



lut sugar into the water in which you are cooking cereal. It eliminates 
that second trip to the sugar bowl. 

Leave a little of the flesh with the skin of an apple when paring: 
the peel and cores of two apples will make one glass of delicious jelly. 

Toasted brown bread makes a wonderful foundation for Canadian- 
style bacon and hot applesauce. 

After the gingerbread batter is in the pan, put in overlapping peeled 
apple slices: bake, serve with orange pudding sauce. 

Serve canned sweet potatoes baked with orange sections in a casserole. 

Here's a new muffin tip: lightly add cubes of canned strained cran- 
berry sauce to the batter of plain muffins at the very last minute before 
you pour into baking tins. 

Radish tops are delicious greens. Cook the same as beet greens, either 
alone or with beet greens. Spinach also is a good blend with them. 

For a tasty ice, save juice from canned fruits, mix, and pour into 
freezing trays. Refreshing and inexpensive. 

] Leftover potatoes may be mashed with melted cheese, formed into 
• small loaves about three inches long and rolled in crushed corn flakes. 
I Either fry them or heat in oven. 

I Or alternate layers of leftover mashed potatoes with sliced hard- 
looked eggs, topped with white sauce, heated in oven. 

Use stale bread for French toast. Beat two eggs, add 1/3 cup milk, 
1 tsp. sugar and 1/4 tsp. salt. Dip four slices of bread in this mixture. 
! Brown very slowly in butter or margarine and you'll have French toast 
fit for a king. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 




%mM$ m ^ 



Beach coats ore essential — and this one has 
matching shorts, bra, and pedal pushers, all made 
of Sanforized cotton twill printed on aqua, rose, 

or powder blue. Sizes 10-20. Sold 
separately or the complete ensemble, under $25. 
Write us for name of store nearest you. 

W. R. DARLING & SON • 127 E. NINTH STREET, LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 

5 











MISS AMf RICA 

MARILYN BUFERD 




i^£g«*// I 



am/j^sS-on^^//£ 



WASHABLE 



£veraUze 

F A B R I C 

*"£vergloze"is a trade-mart which signifies the 
fabric has been finished and rested according 
to processes and standards controlled and 
prescribed by Joseph Bancroft & Sons Co. 









RIGHTEOUS RING ... for a perfect per- 
son . . . based on the four points of right- 
eousness in Confucianism: right living, think- 
ign, speaking, and doing. The ring, like life 
itself, is a puzzle that can be solved only 
by knowing its secret. Hand-made to order 
... 14k gold, S75; sterling silver §18 (tax 
and secret included ! ) Send size to "The Idea 
Factory," 837 W. 36th Place, Los Angeles 7, 
Calif. ... or to Blumberg's, Atlanta, Georgia. 



CATALINA MEMORY FOB . . . reminis- 
cent of your island vacation fun. On the fob 
of gold or silver finish, a map of the island 
with significant inscriptions around its rim. 
The matching chain is a handsome large link 
affair . . . with the look of the sea about 
it About SI at May Co., Los Angeles, and 
other fine stores. This jewelry charm from 
Biltmore Accessories, 846 S. Broadway, Los 
Angeles. 



CHOKER-EARRING SET . . . summer 
cloud white and just as soft and fleecy look- 
ing is the Lillian Barkow design of very tiny 
seed beads. Strand upon strand intertwine 
to make the rope-like choker about half an 
inch thick. A striking combination . . . white 
against your summer tan. Order from Dan- 
iels of Beverly Hills, 451 N. Beverly Drive, 
Beverly Hills, California. The choker, §4.75; 
earrings, S2.40; or have the set, S7.15 com- 
plete. 



BELT BEAUTY . . . this belt with huge 
dressmaker hooks to cinch in your waistline 
is smart indeed ... its three-inch width and 
simple lines dramatize your summer favorites. 
Comes in luxurious gold kidskin, about §10.00. 
Same style in buck-beige, chestnut, and shiny 
black cowhide, about §5.00. Sizes 24-32. At 
most fine stores throughout the country, or 
write Phil Sockett Mfg. Co. (Est. 1925), 1240 
S. Main, Los Angeles 15. 



SHOULDER PADS . . . Jen-Ette now fea- 
tures snaps on all pads. Simply snap and un- 
snap them each time the garment goes to 
the cleaners. Illustrated, the new blouse pad 
. . . thin enough to fit under a padded suit 
. . has just enough shape to give one's 
blouse a smart shoulder line. About §1.75 at 
Wannamakers, New York and Philadelphia; 
J. L. Hudson, Detroit; May Co., Los Angeles. 
Or write Jen-Ette Shoulder Pad Co., 714 S. 
Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, California. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 







CARDMASTER . . . deals one at a time, 
has tray for discards, a pull-drawer for stor- 
age. Gin rummy fans especially will like this 
unique card dealer. Made of plastic in rich 
walnut color and gay Chinese red. Perfect 
for games outdoors ... a special feature 
of its design keeps cards from blowing away. 
Priced at $1.59, postpaid, from Novelty Sales 
Co., 1209 N. Western Avenue, Hollywood 29, 
California. 



TO SUIT . . . your little man . . . this 
precious two-piecer . . . 100% wool, hand- 
loomed knit. Choice of three designs . . . 
solid top with animal motif; two-tone with 
anchor trim; striped sweater with ship ap- 
pliqued. Sizes 1-2-3. Delightful colors . . . 
maize, red, copen, blue and white. An orig- 
inal Knox Knit. Clearly specify designs and 
colors desired. $8.95, postpaid in the U. S., 
$9.50 elsewhere. Address: Margaret of Cali- 
fornia, 3335 Sunset, Los Angeles. 



SUN SHINERS ... new sun glasses, 
goggle-big (almost) and very wide rimmed for 
striking effect in the new bright gold or 
Rhodium (silver). Zephyr-light for your com- 
fort. Special anti-infra lenses with a soft green 
cast. An important accessory to your outdoor 
summer fun days. At your favorite store or 
. . . write Gloria of Hollywood, 142 N. Larch- 
mont, Hollywood, California. $10, including 
leather case, postpaid. 



jEASY DOES IT . . . this Artbeck Baster, 
ingenious kitchen tool . . . for basting meat 
and fowl . . . separating grease from gravy, 
soup or stew . . . skimming cream from milk. 
For the pastry faneier, it's a great gadget 
for trimmings and fillings. Suggest you buy 
two, one for your own home and one for a 
bridge party gift. Order from Robert Miller, 
Box 1176, Beverly Hills, California. Just 79c, 
postpaid. 



JTHE CASE FOR MONEY ... a four way 
•affair of California saddle leather in natural 
color . . . finely burnished edges. Billfold, 
icheckbook, coin purse and identification card 
j compartment. With all this . . . still a thinly 
meat wallet. For money in a hurry, just flip 
the flap and slip out a bill ... no unfold- 
ing, no fumbling. About $8.50 plus tax. 
If not available at your favorite store, write 
Sandley, 629 S. Hill, Los Angeles. 









*7<4*ee Jlau&L Jicute 9 



1 . Lightweight wool and rayon 
gabardine slim skirt, tailored 
by OHREN in black, brown, 
navy, cocoa, gray, beige, blue. 
Sizes 10-18 88.95 

2. Gibson Girl shirt in white crepe 
only. 

Sizes 32-38 $7.95 

3. Saddle leather belt with white 
stitching. Colors: kelly, red, 
black, brown, russet. 

Sizes 24-30 $3.95 



Mail and phone 
orders invited. 




422 W. SEVENTH ST. 
LOS ANGELES 14 



(THE CAUFORNIAN, June, 1947 



Illustration 

Actual Size 



$6.65 




PETITE ALARM CLOCK 

Purse size, bell alarm. Luminous 
dial. So small you'll want it to 
travel with you. Watch type move- 
ment will outlast ordinary alarm 
many years. You'll want a number 
for birthdays, weddings, anniver- 
saries and graduation, at only 
$6.65 prepaid. Musical alarms too, 
S19.95 prepaid. 

Write for clock and barometer catalog. 



2^ 




4llman Bldg. 



_^P1 KansasCity 6, Wo 



dgmk ran 

A * FAST AS YOUR MACHINf CAN Slw 



GREATEST INVENTION 
SEWING MACHINE 

■ 




WITH THE MAGIC FINGER 
MAKES YOUR SEWING MACHINE TWICE AS 
VALUABLE-SO SIMPLE A CHILD CAN USE IT! 

Say goodbye to costly alterations . . . and 
forget the nuisance of trying to keep Wind 
stitches from showing. It's easy with Miracle 
STITCH MASTER, the amazing invention that 
doubles the value of your sewing machine 
by enabling it to do the entire sewing job — 
from Wind collar seams to blind skirt hems 
—as well as any other sewing job that calls 
for hidden or invisible stitching. Comes to 
you completely assembled ... all ready to 
use! Eliminates hours of tedious handwork 
. . . Miracle STITCH MASTER gives you trim, 
tailored hems, professional-looking cuffs and 
edges in a matter of minutes. See it — try it 
— buy it — today. At 
your favorite depart- *#%?„ 

ment store \JEA. 

included . . . 
isk,"BOW TO SEW S© EASV 

48 pages of sewing short cuts. 
If STITCH MASTER is not 
yet in your favorite de- 
partment store, write to: 



STITCH MASTER CO. 114 S. Loorais SI. Chicago 7 





| QH f~ 







A LIGHT NUMBER . . . your house num-l 
ber, illuminated, doubles as a porch light. 
Easily put up by the man of the house . . .1 
just plug it into a convenient electrical out- 1 
let. Tailored metal frames in green, blue or: 
silver to blend with framework . . . complete 
with sufficient assortment of numerals. If not! 
available in your city, write direct to Bar- 
Tan Products, 1652 S. La Cienega, Los An- 1 
geles. $3.95, postpaid; C.O.D. if you wish. 



IMPERIAL CANDLEWICK . . . crystal- J 
clear glassware for the prideful hostess. Three-I 
piece nest of ashtrays 4", 5", 6" diameter] 
. . . the two larger ones ideal for coaster! 
and snack dish ... at the bridge table or J 
bar. Two or three sets will come in handy I 
at home ... a gift suggestion for the] 
friend who "has everything." Mail order to] 
Robert Miller, Box 1176, Beverly Hills, Cali 
fornia. Exactly §1 a set, postpaid. 



COOKIES AND STUFF. . . for party and 
barbecue fluff . . . these giant-size, colorful 
service jars add a festive touch to your in- 
formal entertaining. Typical bearded Scotch- 
man is a favorite . . . other choice carica- 
tures: chefs, clowns, cops, pirates, Mexicans 
. . . top off the jar to make them real stand 
outs. Designs, by hand, in gay washable 
paints. Order from Emme-Lou Novelty Prod- 
ucts, 8631 W. Third, Los Angeles. $8.50 post- 
paid. Illustrated folder on request. 



i 



BYE BYE BUGS . . . with D.D.T. LITEM 
... to destroy them currently as they're ■- 
drawn to the light. Safe, effective means of I 
ridding your house of the nasty little pests M 
all summer long. Hang the light in a strategic B 
spot, and soon all the ill-mannered little fel-i 
lows will be turning up their toes. Order from if 
F. Frees Giftwares, 6246 Santa Monica Blvd., \ 
Hollywood 38, California. $2.95, postpaid. Nop 
C. O. D.'s, please. 



i 
I 

f 



WHITE CARGO ... an adventure in vani-» 
ties . . . pure white with two shining, round 
brass clasps. Equipped with built-in com- 
pact and comb . . . nooks for lipstick, money, 
hankie and all such cargo milady carries. 
This Rex creation available in ebony-black 
and tortoise, too! $10, including tax and 
postage, from Daniels of Beverly Hills, 451 
N. Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, California. 



■;; 

■.. 

i, 

fti 

- 
1 



THE CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 






GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

THE CALIFORNIAN presents for your convenience a current directory of the finest restaurants in Los 
Angeles and San Francisco, cultural events of interest and activities that make living in California or a 
visit to our state the most enjoyable for you and your family. Fine foods of many kinds are available and 
wherever possible specialties of the house are listed, names of the maitres d'hotel and days the establish- 
ments are open. Have a good time! 

THE RESTAURANTS 

IN LOS ANGELES 



AMBASSADOR— 3400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angelea. 
World-famous Cocoanut Grove open every night ex- 
cept Monday. Saturday afternoon tea dancing. Freddy 
Martin's Orchestra. Dinners from $3.25. Cover $1, 
Saturday $1.50. Rouben. 

DON THE BEACHCOMBER— 1727 North McCadden 
[Place, Hollywood. Fried Shrimp, Rumaki, Barbecued 

: | Sparerib s, Mandarin Duck, Chicken Almond and 
I known as originator of the Zombie. Dinners from $3. 

II Usually crowded, but good tourist spot. 

| BEVERLY HILLS HOTEL— 9641 Sunset Blvd., Bev- 
erly Hills. Palm room open Thursday, Friday and 
1 1 Saturday nights with dancing. Thursday buffet, $3.75. 
'(Dinner a la carte from $1.75. Good food and you 

I might see a movie star. 

IIbEVERLY - WILSHIRE HOTEL— 9415 Wilshire 
jJBlvd., Beverly Hills. Tasty food in Copa d'Oro and 
(Terrace Room, with medium prices. 

,j BILTMORE BOWL— 515 South Olive St., Los An- 
llgeles. Best place downtown for good food and good 
If music, with Russ Morgan playing. Two-dollar din- 
liners, nominal cover charge and two floor shows. Nice 
I for tourists. Closed Monday. 

i||BIT O' SWEDEN— 9051 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 
On the famous "Strip." Good food, reasonable prices, 
smorgasbord. Fine for tourists. 

;| BUBLICHKI— 8846 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. A 
libit of Russia on the Strip. Cutlet a la Kieff, Filet 
Mignon a la Stroganoff, Caucasian Shashlik, Rus- 
sian Blini. Dinners from $3. Host, Wally ; hostess, 
Jasmina. Good music and romantical. Closed Tuesday. 

|CASA LA GOLONDRINA— 35 Olvera St., Los An- 
geles, "the first brick house in the city." Historic 
) Mexican cafe. Arroz con Polio, Enchiladas, Tacos. 
|l Dinners from $2. Alfredo. Closed Sunday. 

CHAROUCHKA— 8524 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 

Another bite of Russia on the Strip. Mamma and 
||Papa, "your hosts," excel with atmosphere, food and 

, soothing music. Closed Monday, and prices fairly 
I, high. 

CHASEN'S^9339 Beverly Blvd., Beverly Hills. One 
Ijo/ the best in the West. Excellent cuisine and plenty 
(of celebrities. Expensive. Closed Monday. 

GIRO'S— 8344 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. On the 
;Strip and luxurious, with name bands for dancing. 
■ i Expensive. Celebrities, sometimes. 

,EL PASEO— 51 Olvera St., Los Angeles, and especial- 

II ly fine for tourists. Typical Mexican food, nice sur- 
roundings, dinners from $1.25. Open 12 to 12, ex- 
cept Wednesday. 

'HENRI'S— 9236 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, "where 
the Sunset Strip meets the Bridal Path." The leisurely 
glamor of Southern California as the visitor hopes 

I] to find it. Society, celebrities, tops in cuisine. A la 

I carte from $2. 

HOUSE OF MURPHY — La Cienega "Restaurant 
Row" at Fourth Street, Los Angeles. Madame Begue's 
\Chicken Creole, Hamburger and Onion Rings, Million 
Dollar Hash. Your host, Bob Murphy. Wonderful 
\Salads, Beautiful Steaks. A la carte, medium prices. 
1 ■ Open every day. 

; KNOTT'S BERRY FARM— Buena Park. An hour's 
drive from Los Angeles, but a tourist's dream as 
i reported in Reader's Digest. Good chicken and ham 
Sand hot biscuits. Reasonable prices. Gift shop. 



LA RUE— 8633 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, on the 
Strip. Tops in food and decor. Crepes Louise, Crepes 
a la Reine, Lasagne Pasticciate, Beef Bourguignonne. 
From noon till 3 for lunch except Sunday. From 6 to 
11 p.m. for dinner. Closed Monday. Felix Cigolini. 
A la carte entrees from $2.25. 

LUCEY'S— 5444 Melrose Avenue, Hollywood. Good 
food, medium prices and across the street from Par- 
amount Studio. Movie stars abound at lunch. 

MIKE LYMAN'S OR AL LEVY'S— When you're 
downtown in Los Angeles. Good food, same man- 
agement. Reasonable. 

MOCAMBO— S588 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. One 
of the Strip's spots for movie stars. Colorful, crowded 
and expensive. 



BEA ( 



B* 




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Patricia Stevens Gradual* 

Now an R. K. O. Starlet 



BE A 



Pakick Stevens 

MO DEL 

Coast to coast, the largest finishing 
school for professional models 
and career girls. Training includes 
fashion and photographic modeling, 
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figure control and personality. You 
may make Regan Callais' success 
story your own with this training. 
Write, phone or call [or copy of 
COVER GIRL BULLETIN "A" 

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The Only National School Of Its Type 

Hours 10 A. M. to 8 P. M. Sat. 'til 4 P. M. 






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PRospect 5957 



CHICAGO • DETROIT • MILWAUKEE 
INDIANAPOLIS • KANSAS CITY 




AMERICA'S BEST DRESSED WOMEN WEAR CORO JEWELRY 



ITHE CALIFORNIAN, June, 194/ 



HOUSE OF MURPHY 



for gourmets only 




Fine food in an atmosphere 
of convivial friendliness! 



Where La Cienega Crosses Fourth 

CR 5-0191 
BR 2-3432 




Umomt. 
OOfTL 



U.I CHOICE EASTERN 



STEAKS end CHOPS 

(ZoC&btiU IN THE TAVERN M 
965 No. La Cl.n.ga Blvd. 

I MMk H«rtfc ol S..-.H, iMlw i 

fJUm 

CK.itvl.w 5-9417 



At 




" ^^ c met Strip 
Meets the d 

World's Finest Cuisine 

By Henri, creator of Crepes Suzette. 

• 

Cocktails 

EQUESTRIAN ROOM 

Ray Rasch's Sophisticated piano 



9236 Sunset Boulevard 
BRadshaw 2-2030 CRestview 5-9610 



GOING PLACES AND EATIN6 OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 



PEGGY CLEARY'S— "Talk of the Town" Restaurant 
at 190+ S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles. New and 
attractive. Scallopini Piccate, Stuffed Squab, Breast 
of Guinea Hen. A la carte and prices fairly high, 
but the food's delicious. Closed Tuesday. 

PERINO'S— 3027 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. In 
the heart of the smart shopping area. Excellent 
food. A favorite luncheon rendezvous for society. 

PICCADILLY — S48 No. La Cienega Blvd., Los An : 
geles. Fairly new, but very good, with Ernest Vignati 
as your host. Steaks. 

PIERRE'S — 2295 Huntington Drive, San Marino. A 
good crepes suzette and pleasant atmosphere. Char- 
coal-broiled filet mignon, too. Pierre. From noon 
till 9. 

PLAYERS — 8225 Sunset Blvd., LosAngeles. Good for 
tourists and you might see a movie star. Expensive. 

READY ROOM — Johnny Wilson's popular rendez- 
vous for the younger set. Big fireplace, delicious 
steaks, informal atmosphere. At 365 No. La Cienega 
Blvd., Los Angeles, on Restaurant Row. 

ROMANOFF'S— 326 No. Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills. 
Prince Mike caters to movie stars, writers and pro- 
ducers. Expensive. 

SARNEZ— 170 No. La Cienega Blvd., Beverly Hills. 
Lew Sailee and Harry Ringland have an attractive 
place, with good food and good music, reasonably 
priced. 

SOMERSET HOUSE — On Restaurant Row in Bev- 
erly Hills. Fine steaks, a la carte dinners, nice 
atmosphere and expensive. 

SPORTSMAN'S LODGE— 12833 _ Ventura Blvd., 
North Hollywood. An epicurean delight in San Fer- 
nando Valley. Broiled Lobster, Chicken Saute a Sec, 
Charcoal-broiled Steaks in a gorgeous setting. One of 
the finest restaurants in California. Jack Spiros. From 
5:30 p.m. Closed Monday. 

TAIL O' THE COCK — 4-77 So. La Cienega Blvd., 
Los Angeles, on Restaurant Row. Mac McHenry pro- 
vides excellent f9od, good companions and a pleasing 
atmosphere. Hamburger Diable and Fried Shrimp are 
specialties. You'll want to go again and again, and 
it's reasonably priced. 

TOWN HOUSE— 2965 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, 
overlooking Lafavette Park. Three smart cafes to 
serye you . . . Garden Room, Cape Cod Grill and 
the Zebra Room. No cover or minimum. Excellent 
food and a good spot for the tourist. 

VILLA NOVA— 9015 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. A 
charming old world atmosphere on the Strip. Good 
Italian food and good service. 



THE THEATRE 

PLAYS 

MUSICALS 

BILTMORE— "Barretts of Wimpole Street." co- 
starring Katharine Cornell and Brian Aherne. 
Nightly at S :30 ; prices $1.20 to $3.60. Matinee 
Wednesday and Saturday. 

THEATRE MART — Continually playing "The 
Drunkard" every night at S. Famous old-time melo- 
drama with beer and pretzels. Wonderful tourist 
entertainment and good for the entire family. 

EL CAPITAN — Ken Murray's "Blackouts of 
1947," starring Marie Wilson and Ken, every night 
at S :30, with plenty of matinees. Variety entertain- 
ment that will please. Good for tourists. 

EARL CARROLL'S THEATRE RESTAURANT 
— In Hollywood for the tourist. "The Vanities" in 
a good show each night with two different perform- 
ances at 9 :15 and midnight. Girls. Girls. Three- 
thirty with dinner, $1.65 without. 



VARIETY 

HOME SHOW — Southern California Construction In- 
dustries and Home Show at Pan-Pacific Audi- 
torium June 12 through June 22. More than 200 
exhibits: Architecture, interior decoration, land- 
scaping and home appliances. Adults, SOc; chil- 
dren 30c 



s ^^p^rx 




...where the smartest 
Angelenos get together 
for our famous luncheons 
and dinners . . . 
on Beverly Hills' 
"Restaurant Row" 





I 



Subscribe Today 

TO THE CALIFORNIAN 

210 W. 7th St., Loi Ang«].» 14, Cal. 

Please enter my subscription today 
to The Californian for the period 
indicated below: 



Name 

Address 
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10 



THE CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 



GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

POLICE SHOW— Motion picture and radio stars; 
vaudeville, starring Canadian and Mexican enter- 
tainers. At Shrine Auditorium, June 12 through 
June 25 every night at 8:30. General admission $1. 
Reserved section, $2 and $3. 

TURNABOUT THEATRE — The Yale Puppeteers, 
Elsa Lanchester and Lotte Goslar in good enter- 
tainment. June 1-7, "Mr. Noah" and "About Face" ; 
June 8-14, "Caesar Julius" and "Vice Versa"; June 
15-21, "Tom and Jerry" and "Turnabout Time" ; 
June 22-28, "Gullible's Travels" and "Southern 
Exposure." 

OPERA 

LOS ANGELES CIVIC LIGHT OPERA— "The 
Three Musketeers" opens June 16 at Philharmonic 
Auditorium. Curtain at 8:30; prices $1.20 to $4.20. 
Wednesday and Saturday matinee at 2:30, $1.20 to 
$3.60. 



SPORTS 



POLO — Regular match games every Sunday at 2 
at Riviera Country Club Polo Field, off Sunset Blvd., 
on the way to the beach. 

BASEBALL — Pacific Coast League games every day 
except Monday; double-headers on Sunday. See 
daily paper for contestants and time in Los Angeles, 
San Francisco, Hollywood, Oakland, Sacramento, San 
Diego, Seattle, Portland. 

NATIONAL BOAT SHOW— In Los Angeles Coli- 
seum May 30-June 8 includes fashions, radio and 
movie stars. 

LOS ANGELES HORSE SHOW— June 3 to 8 at 
Horse Palace, Riverside Drive. General admission 

$1.20. Reserved, $2.40. Every night at 8:15. Matinee 
Saturday and Sunday at 1. 

NATIONAL INTERCOLLEGIATE TENNIS 
TOURNAMENT— Slated June 23 through 28 at 
UCLA. 



THE RESTAURANTS 

IN SAN FRANCISCO 

PALACE HOTEL— Market and New Montgomery 
Sts. Garden Court serving lunch, tea, and dinner. 
Leonard Auletti and his concert orchestra. Ask for 
Joseph, maitre d'. Also Rose Room, open nightly ex- 
cept Monday. Cover $1 weekdays, $1.50 Saturdays. 
Adolph. 

OMAR KHAYYAM— 196 O'Farrell St. Dinner only, 
$2.25 up. George Mardikian. Armenian Shish Kebab, 
Tchakhokhbelli and Kouzou Kzartma are specialties. 

ST. FRANCIS HOTEL— Powell and Geary. Mural 
Room open daily for lunch and dinner, with dancing 
from 8:30 p.m. except Monday, and tea dancing 
Saturdays from + to 5:30. Hal Pruden's band. A 
la carte. Ernest. Order almost anything. 

LONGBARN— On El Camino Real, 2 miles south of 
Stanford University. Open for dinner only. Closed 
Thursdays. Ask for Willy or Eddy. Dinners $2.50 to 
$4. Plan to eat here when you visit the peninsula. 
Country farmhouse style with women chefs. 

RESTAURANT LOMBARD— 1906 Van Ness Ave. 
Dinner only, from $2.50, or a la carte. Bill Lombard 
specializes in steaks and real thick roast beef. 

EL PRADA — Post and Stockton, in the Plaza Hotel. 
Lunch 11-2, dinner 6-9, closed Sundays and holidays. 
Walter is maitre d'. Service London style, with every- 
thing rolled in on a serving table. Chef Maurice 
specializes in French cuisine. Roast beef best item. 

STAR LITE ROOM, Hotel Sir Francis Drake— Sutter 
and Powell. Lunch only from 12 to 2, buffet style, 
for $1.50. Includes hot dishes. Al Field, host. You 
dine 22 floors up with a spectacular view. 

TONGA ROOM— In the Fairmont Hotel. Open +:30 
p.m. to 1:30 a.m. daily. Hawaiian band plays on a 
raft in a swimming pool, with the dining tables 
surrounding. Dinners $3.50. Hawaiian Ham and 
Eggs at $1.50, or a la carte. Henry Degorog, host. 

TARANTINO'S— 206 Jefferson St. Open 11 a.m. to 
11 p.m. Dinners $2.50 and a la carte. Dan Sweenev, 
Jr. and Jack Adams. Seafood, steaks and chops. Food 
not outstanding, but try it because it's on Fisher- 
man's Wharf. 

PARIS— 242 O'Farrell St. Lunch and dinner dailv, 
but no lunch on Sunday. Dinner $1.50. Typical old 
San Francisco family-style French cuisine in plain 
surroundings. Lots of crusty French bread and de- 
| licious soup. Excellent cooking. 





"The Valley of Gardens" 
in reality is the beautiful 
city of Santa Maria 




Flower time is all the time in the Poppy 
State . . . and each locality contributes its 
share in the never-ending campaign for 
beautification of the California landscape. 
Outstanding example of this zeal for grace and 
color is evidenced by the citizens of Santa Maria, a 
small coastal community located approximately half- 
way between Los Angeles and San Francisco on High- 
way 101. Every house has a garden . . . and even 
vacant lots are ablaze with brilliant blooms. 

Much of the credit for this civic decoration is given 
to the Minerva Library Club, an organization of 
public-spirited women who have cajoled and pushed 
their way past all barriers to city-wide planting. And 
one of their proj'ects is the annual spring flower show 
every April ... a come-one-come-all for the garden 
enthusiasts of Santa Maria and the surrounding valley 
. . . even the children are enthusiastic contributors. 
Latest activity of the club is an ambitious plant- 
ing campaign which will take in every vacant lot 
along the highway, every parkway within the town- 
ship. A remarkable memorial to the industry of 
women is Buena Vista Park which faces Santa 
Maria County Hospital. Glowing with bright 
flowers and shrubbery, the park originally was 
planted priod to the establishment of the city 
water works ... a situation which necessitated an 
appalling amount of work on the part of the 
planters. They drove their carriages to and from 
their home wells, carrying buckets of water for 
the seedlings. 

Santa Maria, designated as "The Valley of 
Gardens," also is a center for the raising of 
commercial flower seeds. The vast acreages of 
blossoms, such as die Fred Filliponi fields of 
sweet-scented stock pictured above, add spectacu- 
lar beauty to the local landscape. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 



It 




GOING PLACES 




Evelyn Evans Boqua has a flair for things artistic . . . indi- 
vidually styles her home for the "California way of life" . . . 

there's art in living 

TAKE l.\SI»l It A TIO\ I IU»I THIS CALIFORNIA MATRON 

AND DRESS IP YOUR HOME 



Jt takes but a small spark to fire the imagina- 
tion of Evelyn Evans Boqua who uses her 
artistic talent to create beauty wherever she 
goes . . . 

^ hile she has sold much of her work . . . 
water colors which were exhibited national- 
ly; hand-painted guest books, leather-tooled 
specialties, and even gay hand-painted nur- 
sery furniture ... it is in creating things 
that contribute to a more spirited California 
living that she truly delights. 

"Why, I could do many of those things!" 
But do you? 

A glimpse into the Boquas' charming home 
in Westwood Hills will convince you that 
you should. Here you'll find evidence of pro- 
fessional artistic talent ... in framed "Boqua 
originals," in illuminated niches above a great 
fireplace, in hand-painted tiles inset in stair 
risers. 

But you'll also find a dozen-and-one things 
you can do . . . like treating your closet 
to a lining of exciting gold paper, using 
great mirror panels everywhere to reflect 
bright ideas, painting inside of kitchen draw- 
ers and cupboards in unusual and refreshing 
colors, and spotlighting a little reed organ 
or an amusing cuckoo clock as conversation 
pieces. 

You'd get ideas of things to make just 
by watching Mrs. Boqua set up her work 
table in a shady patio, deftly translate a small 
fragment of leather into cleverly tooled cuffs 
for a tweed dress, a neatly fitted bag to hang 
at the waist, or thongs for a pair of wooden 
clogs. She has itchy fingers when it comes 
to texture, or sparkle, or pure singing colors. 

Nor are these the only inspiration you 
might get at this hospitable home. In the 
breakfast room Mrs. Boqua likes to use a cir- 
cular cloth of checked cotton . . . floor length 
. . . and finds it fun to be dramatic in so 
simple a way. 






GOING PLACES 



BLUE FOX— 6S9 Merchant St. Dinners only, closed 
Mondays. Ask for Mario or Frank. Dinners from 
$2. French and Italian style. Frog legs Dorce, Bone- 
less Squab, Chicken stuffed with wild rice, Rex Sole 
Marguerite. In an alley, not bright and shiny, but 
they know how to cook. The natives eat here. 

CLIFF HOUSE — Point Lobos Avenue, overlooking 
Seal Rocks. Dinners daily from $1.50. Seafood, 
Steaks, Chicken and Roasts. Eat while looking 
through the oversize plateglass windows at the 
ocean, Seal Rocks and Golden Gate strait. 

THE PLANTATION— At 349 Sutter St. in the de- 
lightful new Pavilion at tiffin time. A la carte, with 
English and French delicacies the feature. Reason- 
ably priced. 

SOLARI'S— 19 Maiden Lane and 29 Kearny. Closed 
Sundays. Fine continental food and atmosphere. Ask 
for Max David or Peter Wolf. A la carte. Special- 
ties include crab legs or sweetbreads. 

DOMINO CLUB— 25 Trinity Place (opposite 111 
Sutter). Dinners from $2.50, with emphasis on 
steaks and roast beef. On the walls an impressive col- 
lection of paintings of nudes. Cheery for tourists. 

SCHROEDER'S— 111 Front St. Closed Saturday and 
Sunday. Definitely not a tourist spot, this 54-year- 
old restaurant offers superb German style cooking 
and wonderful dark draught beer. Men only at lunch 
time, but the ladies can come to dinner. Lunches 
from 65 cents and dinners average $1. 

VENETO'S^Bay at Mason St. A corner of old Italy 
with authentic decor, and a fascinating Cave Room 
that has stalactites overhead. Exceptional Italian 
cuisine features Omozzolo tossed salad and chicken 
a la sec. Dinners start at $1.75. 

GRISON'S — Van Ness and Pacific. Two restaurants 
under same management on opposite corners. At the 
STEAK HOUSE, Kansas City steaks a la carte only 
from $1.25. Other specialties are soft shell crabs, 
eastern prawns, planked steak. At the CHICKEN 
HOUSE, Southern style chicken dinner at $1.S5 and 
prime roast beef dinner at $2. 1 5. Ask for Robert 
Grison or Charles Morosin. 

ALFRED'S— SS6 Broadway (near Mason). Dinners 
from $2 and a la carte specialties. Charcoal-broiled 
steak, sq^uab en casserole, jumbo frogs legs, chicken 
saute with mushrooms. Ask for Alfred. 

THREE LITTLE SWISS— 530 Broadway. Pleasant 
decor and good food. Lunch from 8 5c, dinner from 
$2.25, including Cliff steak with mustard sauce, veal 
scallopint, brook trout, Chicken St. Moritz. Ask for 
Louis. 

OF SPECIAL INTEREST 

THROUGHOUT STATE 

COSTA MESA— Carnival and fish-fry_ June 7-8. 
Music, rural costumes, prizes. Admission includes 
fish-fry dinner. 

CORONA— Circle City Roundup June 7-8. Barbecue, 
street dancing, teen-age parade, and rodeo on final 
afternoon. Western costumes worn by townspeople. 

SAN FERNANDO — Fiesta and pageant at Mission 
San Fernando, June 8-14. Parade depicting early 
day activities, street dancing, mounted posses, bar- 
becues. Colorful Spanish costumes. 

SAN DIEGO— National water ski meet June 13-15 

in San Diego Bay. Highlight will he 45-mile ski 

race around Coronado Islands, starting and finish- 
ing in the Bay. 

LOMPOC— Flower show, June 14-15, held in con- 
junction with the blooming of the commercial flower 
fields. 

SAN DIEGO— Father O'Donohue's horse show at 
Mission Rancho, Lemon Grove, June 16. Includes 
showing of Palomino horses, rodeo events, jumpers 
and horse show events. 

PALA — Mission Day June 23, marking the birth- 
day of the mission with special ceremonies. 

SAN DIEGO— County fair opens June 27 at Del Mar 
Race Track. Includes agricultural exhibits, harness 
racing, air shows, art exhibits, flower show, county 
dog snow and handicraft. 

SAN DIEGO— Third annual hobbv show June 27-29, 
at Balboa Park. 270 exhibits and $1,500 in prizes. 



I'i 



12 



THE CAtlFORNIAN, June, 1947 




A typical California Swagger Hat 
in "Sun-Lite" Fur Felt or Velour 

AT BETTER STORES EVERYWHERE 



IWEYMAN BROTHERS 718 SOUTH BROADWAY LOS ANGELES 



HE CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 



13 



5-feet-5 



p? . — 









«o- 



i 





mu' 



especially designed for YOU 

— if you are 5-feet-5 or under. There'sj 

flattery plus in the multi-gored jacket 

of this perfect suit for summer 

. ... of colorful butcher linen in aqua. 

luggage, grey, or dusty pink. 
Correctly proportioned sizes 10 to 20 



— About $78.00 at better stores 
everywhere. For name of store 
nearest you . . . write direct to: 




McAe&t 



a*uC { 



208 WEST EIGHTH STREET LOS At 



ANGELES 14, CALIFORNIA I 



SOMETHING WONDERFUL HAPPENS WHEN YOU WEAR CLOTHES FROM CALIFORNIA 



u 



THE CALIFORNIAN, June, 



"' 




fii: 





Score . . . for the GRAFF CALIFORNIA GOLFER 

THE DRESS for the game . . . wonderful for suburban 
and home wear, too. The Graff California golfer has spread-eagle 

sleeves that open freely when arm is in motion, close neatly . . . 
sturdy dot fasteners in concealed fly front . . . tee-totin' 
belt . . . slit under the pocket for a pencil. In Michael Ross fabrics. 
Shown in seersucker, available in fine combed cottons. 




iraff 



About $13 at your favorite store. 



CALIFORNIA GOLFER • 1240 S. MAIN • LOS ANGELES 15, CALIF. 



E CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 



15 



GIVE DAD 






hostemaster set 
by 

something wonderful happens when father dons 

this loungewear ... as comfortable and jaunty 

as fine sportswear . . . padded shoulders, 

a dorsen original . . . sportcoat cut 

and fabrics . . . full harmony — 

trim linings. ..at all fine stores. 




hostemaster set: 

hostejackets in soft Shetland, 
gabardine, cashmere. 22.50 up~ 
wards, matching hostecotes. 35.00 
upwards, gabardine slacks in 
harmonizing tones. 25.00 upwards. 



On Record 



with frances anderson 



bo prolific has been the record output this month that we shall 
spend no space on introductory comment but plunge into the shiny 
black pile. And at that, we can remark about only a few among many. 

Cantata No. 4— "Christ Lay In The Bonds of Death"— J. S. Bach. 
This is a must for Bach-lovers and no better introduction to the master 
for those who don't know him. Robert Shaw, rapidly assuming impres- 
sive proportions as a Bach conductor, and the RCA Victor Chorale and 
Orchestra do a magnificent job on one of the loveliest, most deeply emo- 
tional and stirring of Bach's works. Victor. Beethoven's "Moonlight 
Sonata" and "Pathetique Sonata" . . Vladimir Horowitz records the 
sonata in an intellectual style that is not quite appropriate to the 
sonata's poetry. But the passionate "Pathetique" is given a most ex- 
cellent rendition by Artur Rubinstein. Victor. 

"The Great Elopement" — Handel-Beecham. Sir Thomas Beecham has 
arranged a thoroughly delightful suite from little-known Handel music, 
basing upon it a ballet which makes it program music for concert pur- 
poses. Sir Thomas and the London Philharmonic Orchestra combine in 
this highly enjoyable album. Victor. Symphony No. 5 — Prokofieff. Under 
the baton of Serge Koussevitzky, the Boston Symphony Orchestra give6 a 
glowing performance of this colorful and important work . . a sym- 
phony of varied and intense emotional content by one of Russia's and 
the world's most gifted contemporary composers. Victor. 

SEMI-CLASSICAL 

"Music By Candlelight" — dinner music recorded by the Hollywood 
Studio Orchestra. Tried and true old tunes pleasantly played to comprise a 
surprisingly likable album of records you'll put on and cherish as a] 
background to conversation. Capitol. "Eileen" and "Sweethearts" by 
Victor Herbert. Two nicely done albums of selections from a pair of 
well-loved operettas, featuring Al Goodman and his orchestra and ade- 
quate vocalists. The first is more elaborately done up and perhaps a 
shade better performed. Victor. 

CHILDREN'S ALBUMS: "Fun With Shakespeare" isn't quite that.! 
Charles Coburn narrates "The Comedy of Errors," a suitable subject'! 
for high school students, in a manner more fitting for 9-year-olds. Not 
a good mating of subject and audience. Victor. "Cinderella" is charm- 
ingly told and sung by Jeanette MacDonald to an engaging musical 
score by William Provost. Unfortunately, the album could have been 
better mechanically. Victor. 

POPULAR 

"Blues of the Record Man," an amusing novelty, and "Why Don't We 
Say We're Sorry," a ballad that changes tempo interestingly, employ 
the talents of Tex Beneke and the Miller Orchestra. Not bad. Victor. 
"The Frog Song" and "What's The Matter With The Stove," both 
funny, both solid, with a good beat. Geechie Smith sings with his 
orchestra. Capitol. "Mam'selle" is pretty, plaintive and typical of the 
Pied Pipers. On the back, "It's The Same Old Dream" is more senti- 
mental stuff. Capitol. 

"Piano Portrait" is the best Freddy Martin platter in some time, and 
that's very good indeed. "I Can't Get Up The Nerve To Kiss You" on 
the reverse is pretty heavy on the glee club stuff. Victor. "My Adobe 
Hacienda" and "If I Had My Life To Live Over" feature the special 
brand of close harmony distinctive of the Dinning Sisters, the former 
with some cute changes on Latin rhythms. Capitol. "You »Can't Take 
It With You" is fine shouting and even finer instrumental work by 
Jesse Price. "Big Town Blues" on the back is ditto. Capitol. 

"Ivy" and "A Sunday Kind of Love" feature a "new" style on the 
part of Jo Stafford which seems mainly to be a subdued and wistful 
manner. Hoagy Carmichael wrote "Ivy" and it's a nice tune. Capitol. 
"Meet Me At No Special Place" presents King Cole and his Trio in a I 
familiar, but nonetheless fine style. "You Don't Learn That In School" 
is on 'tother side, a mitt faster and a lot funnier. Capitol. 

"Jenny Kissed Me," as sung by the Delta Rhythm Boys has better 
lyrics and performance than tune. "Bye, Bye, Alibi Baby" on the re- 
verse is good enough. Victor. "I Had A Good Cry" and "Hawk's Boogie' 
are a pair of first-class Erskine Hawkins, which is good enough for a 
lot of people. Victor. "Mama Blues" is a very funny novelty in which 
Alvino Rey's guitar talks. The reverse, "Midnight Masquerade," is ! 
conventional and capably performed. Capitol. 

SOMETHING'S WRONG 

Perry Como gets slower by the record . . too bad, for even a voice 
as smooth as his is monotonous when dragged through "Little Man, 
You've Had a Busy Day" and "Kentucky Babe," lullabies certain to 
put you to sleep. T. Dorsey hasn't come through with a real humdinger 
in a long time. Even his superlative trombone can't save "Spring Isnt 
Everything," as routine a ballad as could be, and "Bingo, Bango, Boffo' 
isn't up to snuff, either. Too bad. 

"Waltzes," a whole album of saccharine three-four numbers, played 
by Guy Lombardo. Oh, well, there must be some people who like Lom- 
bardo. The guy keeps busy, doesn't he? 



\ 



CALIFORNIA 227 S. Los Angeles St Los Angeles 12, California 




And COLE of California 
whisks up two bathing suits 
for Sea Nymphs! 

Matletex Magic, one-piece 
with bare midriff; Everfast 
striped pique, shirred 
with lastex. Pink, lime, or 
. stone blue on misty grey. 
10 to 18 ... . $9.95 

Chrysalis, two-piece Matletex 
tie-bra with drape-front trunks 
in a color-splashed Pueblo 
cotton print. Red and brown, 
or blue and blue on white. 
10 to 18 $9.95 

Its matching 
dirndl skirt $5.95 



Mail orders to Sports Shop 




THE CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 



17 



/ 



GAY FASHION INGENUITY WINS 
AWARDS FOR CLAIRE McCARDELL 
All her designs look young, debonair, 
original... like this pique bathing-suit costume 
with its inseparable sunbonnet. 

WALDES KOVER-ZIP WINS 
ACCLAIM FROM CLEVER DESIGNERS 
This is the fabric-covered zipper that 
blends adroitly or adds the zest of contrast 
to the gay new fashions von buy 
or make yourself. Ask for it at better notion 
counters now. 



WALDES KOVER-ZIP 



WJ$ WALDES KOHI.NOOR, INC. LONG ISLAND CITY 1, N.Y. 



RES. U.S. PAT. OFF 




Look to 



Lynn Lester for Authentic California Fashions 



Celanese Beach Breeze* dress. Button front to waist, short 
sleeves, cape yoke collar, contrasting applique and embroidery 
on flared bias skirt. White, aqua, maize and pink. Sizes 10-18. 
About $25. Ask for Lynn Lester dress #604 at stores listed 
on page 72. 




WESTERN FASHIONS, Los Angeles 14 

* Superb rayon. 



20 



THE CAIIFORNIAN, June, 1947 



Look to 



Lynn Lester 



for Authentic California Fashions 




Three-piece button-together play suit; blouse, shorts and skirt. 
Dan River Cordspun Chambray in pink and white, blue and 
white, and grey and white stripes. Sizes 10-18. About $25. Ask 
for Lynn Lester play suit #900 at stores listed on page 72. 



WESTERN FASHIONS, Los Angeles 14 



THE CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 



21 



Look to Lynn Lester 





for 



Authentic California Fashions 



^tj-y.^^. « J .£i** ' **' 



Cape sleeve two-piece dress of SnoSilk*. Straight skirt with 
gold-plated buckle at belt. White, aqua, beige, kelly, maize and 
cocoa. Sizes 10-18. About $30. Ask for Lynn Lester dress 
#412 at stores listed on page 72. 




WESTERN FASHIONS, Los Angeles 14 

*<S2% pure silk, 38% rayon acelole. 



22 



THE CAUFORNI AN, June, 1947 



Look to Lynn Lester for 



Authentic 



~^ey£^Xi. 




Two-piece summer suit dress of Dan River Coolstripe*. Short 
cuffed sleeves, gold ball buttons, straight skirt slit front and back. 
Black on white — brown on white. Sizes 10-18. About $25. 
Ask for Lynn Lester suit dress #413 at stores listed on page 72. 



California Fashions 




WESTERN FASHIONS, Los Angeles 14 



'Sanforized cotton, rayon stripe. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 



23 



Look to Lynn Lester for Authentic 



California 



-CsvC-A. 



Button front dress of Sno-Silk*. Saucy peplum, phlange cap 
sleeves, gold-plated circle buckle on self belt. White, aqua, beige, 
kelly, maize and cocoa. Sizes 10-18. About $30. Ask for Lynn 
Lester drees #616 at stores listed on page 72. 



Fashions 





WESTERN FASHIONS, Los Angeles 14 



*<52% pure n'/Jc, 38% rayon ocelafe. 



24 



THE CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 



Look to Lynn Lester for Authentic California 



Fashions 




Left: Cut-out embroidery collar blouse 
of Mallinson Crepe.* Cap sleeves, button 
I front. Aqua, white, pink and maize. Sizes 
10-18. About $9. Ask for Lynn Lester 
blouse #319. 

* Superb rayon. 



Center: Blouse of Renoir Rayon Jersey, 
under water pattern. Gathered inset ex- 
tends shoulder to shoulder. Jewelry neck- 
line, cap sleeves, button back. Green, 
chamois, pink and aqua backgrounds. 
Sizes 10-18. About $9. Ask for Lynn 
Lester blouse #323. 



Right: Casaba Crepe* blouse with short 
sleeves, jewelry neckline, gold fob to be 
monogrammed, button back. Maize, aqua, 
white, pink and grey. Sizes 10-18. About 
$8. Ask for Lynn Lester blouse #318. 

'Bates rayon. 



WESTERN FASHIONS, Los Angeles 14 Store's featuring these Lynn Lester Blouses listed on page 72. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 



25 




H miM, vtrntokMb mwuL 




NANCY'S, HOLLYWOOD 
THE MANNEQUIN, LAS VEGAS 



26 



THE CALIFORNIAN, June, 1947 



■■«£*•> 











3*~ 



■«ae 

SB 






OeS 



EDITOR AND PUBLISHER.. 
VICE PRESIDENT AND 
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR.. 

MANAGING EDITOR 

FASHION DIRECTOR 

FASHION EDITOR 

FASHIONS 



STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER- 
MERCHANDISING 



FOOD STYLIST.. 
PRODUCTION.... 



J. R. Osherenko 

Herman Sonnabend 
• Donald A. Carlson 

■ Solly Dickason Carolin 
Virginia Scallon 

- Diana Stokes 
Jacqueline Lary 
Edie Jones 
Lanice Dana 
Alice Stiffler 
Malcolm Steinlauf 

- Frances Anderson 
Virginia Teale 
Hazel Allen Pulling 

. Morris Ovsey 
Dorothy Marootian 
John Grandjean 

. Frank Stiffler 

■ Loise Abrahamson 
Hazel Stall 

. Helen Evans Brown 
.. Daniel Saxon 
Robert Farnham 



ALLURING simplicity 
of checks in a dress 
for you by Alice oj 
California . . demure 
back-bow ribbon ac- 
cents . . sizes 9-15, in 
red, green, blue, brown 
Ameritex seersucker, 
about $11 at Sibley, 
Lindsay & Curr Co., 
Rochester; O'Connor, 
Moffatt & Co., San 
Francisco; The May 
Company, Los Angeles. 
Weymaris specially de- 
signed halo of pique. 
Photographed in color 
by Dash Taylor at San 
Gabriel Mission. 




California fashions: 

It's a Mission Motif 30 

Hushed Tones of Color 36 

Fashion Goes on Record 40 

Clothes Help Make the Star .41 

Fashion with Forethought 42 

What to Wear to California in June 55 

Travelin' the Mission Trail 56 

Sightseeing Too 58 

Shining Example of Leisurely Grace 60 

Society in Fashion 61 

For Your Masculine Moment 64 

Dressing by Design, by Florence Shuman 66 

California features: 

The Mission Story 28 

Miracle of Capistrano, by Ramon Romero 34 

Romance Around the World 44 

"Mother, Who Was Valentino?" -.52 

In California It's - 54 

Flowers Fit for a Bride 68 

California beauty: 

Look At Your Legs! by Edna Charlton -62 

California living: 

They're Swimming in the Parlor 46 

A Man-Size House, by Virginia Scallon 48 

California Cooks with Wine 50 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly, 210 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles 14, Cali- 
fornia. Michigan 8571. New York Office, Saul Silverman, eastern advertising manager, 
1450 Broadway, LAckawanna 4-5659; San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph, 26 O'Farrell St., 
EXbrook 2704; Chicago Office, Nedom L. Angier, Jr., Ill W. Jackson St.; Detroit Office, 
Charles H. Cowling, 633 Book Bldg., CHerry 6881; Cleveland Office, William E. Coates, 
2200 Lakeland, LAkeland 1479. Subscription price: $3.00 one year, $5.00 two years, $7.50 
three years. One dollar additional postage per year outside continental United States. 
25 cents per copy. Entered as second class matter January 25, 1946, at the Post Office at 
Los Angeles, California, under act of March 3, 1879. Copyright 1947 The Californian, Inc. 
Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 




Along 

the path iff 
padres a 
golden empire 



took firm root 



and flourished 



by Virginia mcintire 



9AN DIEGO DE 
ALCALA 



THE HEALTHFUL, fun-loving fine living that you en- 
joy today as a resident or a visitor in Golden California 
is the result of an evolution . . of a pattern brilliantly, 
painstakingly created 175 years ago by Franciscan Fa- 
thers Junipero Serra and Juan Crespi. The influence of 
their Missions on industry, fashion, housing and our 
California Way of Life has not only left its mark . . it 
has grown with a surging American empire. 

Coming north from Mexico with Gasper de Portola's 
first expedition in 1769. the padres carried only the sym- 
bols of their way of life . . the cross and the bell. But 



SAN BUENAVENTURA 



in their hearts was a dream 




. in their minds resolute 
vision, resourceful cour- 
age. With masterful 
foresight. Serra and his 
followers in this wilder- 
ness established our 
most important cities, 
selected major seaports, 
mapped a vital high- 




way . . . tied them 
uniquely together with 
extravagant Spanish 
names . . along El Cam- 
ino Real. 

The Trail of the Mis- 
sions was. flung seven 
hundred miles up the 
coastline, like a rosary of faith beaded with the twenty- 
one establishments from San Diego to Sonoma. Today 
you travel El Camino Real as paved U. S. Highway 101. 
The month's traveling time on horseback has been sliced 
to one day by automobile . . three hours by air. 

California sightseers . . stopping at one or several 
missions this year . . may use considerable imagina- 
tion in believing the tight little cells with rough cots 
and permeating dark dankness once could have seemed 
like heaven to an early traveler along the trail. Yet, 
a horseman, coming at nightfall out of the lonely wilder- 
ness into the protection of the adobe-walled mission 



28 




t garden, felt very near 

paradise. For here was 
food and shelter, a fresh 
horse for the morrow, 
security from hostile In- 
dians. Sometimes, more 
important, he found 
spiritual communion 
with men of learning, heard news that filtered in with 
the other travelers. 

At the missions you will recognize the typical archi- 
tecture of this sun-drenched country as a combination 
of Spanish, Mexican, an occasional Moorish touch . . 
four to eight-foot-thick walls and wide doorways . . hand- 
hewn, massive beams for ceilings. White stucco first was 
used at the missions, and the tile roof was made by the 
Indians when padres became impatient with being con- 
tinually burned out of their grass roof shelters. The 
tile proved safer as well as cooler and dryer for the warm 
climate. And modern California patios owe their origin 
to the basic idea of walled protection from wild animals 
and hostile redskins. 

Wise Fra Serra knew 
his "pagan children" 
were hungry too often. 
Reasoning that food 
would convert them 
faster than any sermon, 
each new mission site 
was judiciously selected 
for fertility, fresh water supply and good grazing land 
for cattle. Reservoirs were built and irrigation systems 
laid out; productive methods of cultivation reached a 
h : gh degree of efficiency under the expanding, well- 
organized mission system. 

So the Indians came . . attracted by the assurance of 
enough to eat. They learned more than fifty trades, be- 
coming carpenters, silversmiths, millers, tanners, weavers, 
painters, farmers. The mission records show a total of 
88,976 baptisms, 24,692 marriages, and thousands of 
them were buried in the little cemeteries beyond the 
garden walls. The Indians came . . fascinated by the 
bells that tolled through the virgin country. If you have 
felt impelled to follow in the direction of the sound of 
chimes, you know the appeal their music made to the 
Indian . . perhaps hearing them for the first time as he 
stood on the rim of a canyon at sundown. 

More bells came . . from all over the world . . Spain, 

Peru. .Mexico. Alaska. 
even Massachusetts. The 
story of each mission's 
bells is a story in itself. 
The only two wooden 
bells known to have 
been used now hang in 
the Buenaventura Mis- 






sion museum in Ventura. They are crudely made, raw- 
hide wrapped. No mission has less than two bells and 
Santa Barbara boasts eleven, some of which ring out ev- 
ery day in the year, except Good Friday and Maundy 
Thursday. As late as 1926 Santa Clara Mission received 
a new bell from King Alfonso of Spain after a fire oc- 
curred at Santa Clara 
University, the former 
mission center. In 1777, 
King Carlos of Spain 
had presented the new 
mission with two bells 
. . on condition that 
they be rung every eve- 
ning at 8:30. When the 

fire destroyed one, college students quickly built a 
scaffolding in order that the old pledge could be kept. 
Hearing this story, Alfonso ordered the new bell for 
Santa Clara University. 

Now you see the mission bell guide-posts preserving 
this symbol along the Trail of the Missions, indicating 
distances and road directions. The first was swung from 
its standard in front of the little Los Angeles Plaza 
Church in 1906 by the El Camino Real Association, 
originator of the idea to mark the historic route. The 
California Mission Trails Association, Ltd., California 
Native Sons and Daughters organizations, and the auto- 
mobile clubs . . all have contributed to the maintenance 
and preservation of El Camino Real. 

The twenty-one missions were well established when 
Jedediah Smith, the first white man over the impassable 
Sierras in 1826, came upon the fortressed walls of San 
Gabriel Mission. Gaining admission by sign language with 
the padres, he discovered a flourishing new Spanish world. 
Your trip to the missions this year will contrast sharply 
with Smith's pioneering, for without exception, every 
one has been reconstructed three or four times since its 

original dedication. 
Some have been moved 
several miles from the 
first site. And every 
conceivable disaster has 
befallen them . . fire, 
flood, the ravages of 
long neglect and abuse 
by the unappreciative. 
Earthquakes have damaged several missions at one time; 
six being rocked by the quake of 1812. But the worst 
tragedy to befall them was the Act of Secularization in 
1832, when all the missions and lands were taken from 
the Franciscans and sold, or given away. Consequently, 
most missions were in a wretched state of neglect when 
California entered the Union and they were returned to 
the church. 

As you travel from mission to mission . . described 
here in the order they lay from San Diego to Sonoma 

(Continued on page 68) 




i< 



-,3 s 
M 



SAN FRANCISCO 
DE ASIS 



SAN CARLOS DEL 
RIO CARMELO 
DE MONTEREY 



SANTA CLARA 
DE ASIS 



SAN ANTONIO DE 
PADUA 



SAN LUIS OBISPO r 
TOLOSO 



V* 







s a tnissum 




* 





motif 



/ 



/ 



...x. 



*m 



, / 



"V, 

■y 



-...^ ••aBr 







MONTY SHERMAN 




TRAIGHT FROM THE CALIFORNIA MISSIONS COMES FRESH FASHION 
INSPIRATION . . . LIKE THE PADRE HAT, OPPOSITE PAGE, FAITHFULLY INTER- 
PRETED IN BLACK TAFFETA WITH ORGANDY BOW; CASPAR-DAVIS, 
ABOUT $25 AT YOUNKERS, DES MOINES; CARSON, PIRIE, SCOTT & CO., 
CHICAGO; D. H. HOLMES, NEW ORLEANS. 



ISSION BELLS PORTEND ANOTHER ORIGINAL SILHOUETTE: 
COUNTRY CLUB COAT WITH SOFTLY ROUNDED LINES, FULL CAPE-LIKE 
SLEEVES OF WHITE SHAG OVER BLACK STRIPED SKIRT; SIZES 10-18, 
$49.50 FROM THE DESIGNERS' SHOP, MAY COMPANY, LOS ANGELES, 
AND MAY CO. WILSHIRE IN LOS ANGELES. 



31 







I THE MISSION MOTIF 

HAS MANY VARIANCES: IT'S THB 
SOFT FULL DRAPERY OF A MONK'S 
ROBE. OPPOSITE PAGE, VIOLA 
DIMMITT'S EVENING RAINCOAT IN 
SATIN-BACK TWILL, SIZES 
10-18, ABOUT $30 AT JACK ROSE, 
SANTA BARBARA; FREDERICK 
A- NELSON, SEATTLE. 



| IT'S THE PURITY OF WHITE: 
TOP RJGHT, MARION McCOY'S 
SEQUIN TUNIC DRESS, SIZES 9-15, 
ABOUT $30 AT ADDIS & CO., 
SYRACUSE. IT'S A DON'S BOLERO: 
LEFT, BARBARA CLAIRE VERSION, 
SIZES 10-16, ABOUT $20. 



| IT'S A DANCER'S CHOICE: FAR LEFT, 
A RUFFLED MIDRIFF BY PICTURE 
MODES, SIZES 10-16. ABOUT $12 
AT BLOOMINGDALE'S, NEW YORK. 
IT'S A BROOMSTICK SKIRT, PEASANT 
BLOUSE: AT RIGHT, ETHELLE'S 
CREATION SIZES 10-18, ABOUT $10 
AT J. N. ADAM, BUFFALO. 
BACKGROUND IS THE HOOD AGAIN 
. . . TERRY CLOTH ROBE BY 
SEQUOIA KNITTING MILLS, ABOUT 
$10 AT KAUFMANN'S, PITTSBURGH. 



32 






■7* *r ^ V ^ ^^ 



v" *'*'*'-* s*? -s* -t 3 ? 
7-T^ ^f '3**" ""- 



*< ., "J» _ « ^ - - 



/■s. /-■*. ^ -■* 






Sal 



r?: 



miracle of 




{jipistrano 



"Nothing so reaffirms man's 

faith in some omnipotent power 

as something* beyond 

his understanding" 



H/very St. Joseph's Day for a hundred and sixty- 
eight years . . the Indians say . . the swallows have 
returned to Capistrano. 

Every March 19 . . when the smell of spring is in 
the air . . they've come, almost with the certainty 
of day that follows night, to oust the angry swifts and 
reclaim their nests in the crumbling adobe walls of 
the historic stone church . . this jewel of all the mis- 
sions in California. No one has been able to explain 
the birds' periodic and faithful return . . no one knows 
for sure where they go when they soar away come 
San Juan's Day in October. 

But generations of people have witnessed this mass 
migration . . and call it a miracle. 

This season, for the first time in all recorded his- 
tory, the birds arrived four days early. Mission fa- 
thers are wont to credit California's "unusual" warm 
weather for this slight deviation, and allow it to de- 
tract not one whit from the significance of a con- 
stantly recurring phenomenon. The believers and the 
skeptics, the humble and the smug . . all of them have 
seen . . and most of them believe in the miracle of 
the swallows. 

Nothing so reaffirms man's faith in some omnipotent 
power as something beyond his understanding, and 
when that same occurrence repeats itself again and 
again it is truly inspirational. From time immemorial, 
the burdened, troubled and afflicted have found solace 
in these manifestations of the unseen. The Maid of 
Orleans who obeyed her voices, Bernadette of the 
healing waters of the grotto of Massabielle at 
Lourdes, and only recently, Mother Cabrini, acclaimed 
as America's first saint ... all have achieved their 
niche in men's hearts for services performed. In teach- 
ing lessons of faith by the reflection of their own simple 
goodness, they have done much to make man realize 
that through such faith untouched by worldly law lies 
the key to the mystery of life. 

But the miracle of the swallows at San Juan Capi- 
strano is like no other miracle in the darkly clouded 
history of recorded civilization. It is the only known 
miracle that repeats itself at a given season . . year 
after year. By now the swallows' uninterrupted migra- 
tions across land and sea have taken on the symbol 
of legend as beautiful and enduring as the story of the 
shepherds who followed the star to Bethlehem. Like the 
legend of biblical days, this one, too, will be passed 
on to the children of still unborn centuries. 

What sort of miracle is this that does not pretend 
to heal the sick or the crippled, or make the blind 
to see? 

Time has brought many changes to the Mission 
San Juan Capistrano. The inhabitants who worked and 
prayed within the shadows of the arched arcades have 



gone . . the swallows, too, have been succeeded by 
flocks of new-born generations. The mission is not 
the same as in the days of Father Josef Barona and 
the portly padre, Geronimo Boscana, who were its cus- 
todians long before the devastating earthquake of 1812. 
Then there were glorious years of plenty, the In- 
dians manufactured tiles, made candles and raised cat- 
tle. Skippers and merchants came by water and land 
to bargain and exchange their wares for skins, can- 
dles and wine. Wealth poured in, making it possible 
for the padres to give homes and employment to thou- 
sands of the Indian converts. 

But with the inevitable destiny came debt, followed 
by hunger and famine. The Indians who had found 
refuge deserted in self preservation. The land barons 
brought about the final ruin as they auctioned off the 
mission lands to the highest bidder. Finally . . restora- 
tion and preservation by the United States govern- 
ment. Only one thing has not changed . . the miracle 
itself. 

In the early days the arrival of the swallows was 
heralded with reverent services in the mission chapel, 
but in later years the event was made the occasion for 
festive celebration. The town was decorated to take 
on the spirit of fiesta. The local merchants, with the 
aid of the chamber of commerce, arranged an annual 
parade that would wind through the streets of little 
San Juan Capistrano and circle the mission to the 
bluster of a band. Sightseers and tourists came in 
throngs as though to see the main event of a big tent 
show. Spielers would keep the spectators informed 
over loudspeakers, even as they were broadcasting over 
a national network a sky-to-nest description of the 
battle between the swallows and the swifts. 

But when the clouds of war began to shroud the 
world, Father Arthur J. Hutchinson, the 80-year-old 
pastor, at last found an opportunity to call a halt to 
the commercialism that had been imposed upon the 
miracle of the swallows. In deference to his wishes, 
the parades, the bands and the broadcasts were elim- 
inated . . although visitors are still welcome. 

No story of San Juan Capistrano would be com- 
plete without mention of the much-loved Juan Yorba. 
mission sexton, whose 87 years have covered almost 
half that of the mission. As a child of eight he and 
his Mexican parents came to live within its walls. 

Today there are only a few Indians left, but the 
youngest of them knows there is an old legend: "And 
when as their wont the swallows wing to Capistrano 
promptly at time of the budding of the flowers, then, 
be it known that eagles are clearing the sky of carrion 
birds and that days of peace, fruitfulness and happi- 
ness are nigh." 



BY RAMON ROMERO 





MONTY SHERMAN 



usbed tones of coCor 



LONG MISSION TRAILS WE FIND THE QUIET ASSURANCE OF MUTED TONES . . . ADOBE, SAND, SUNLIGHT FIL- 
TERING THROUGH STAINED GLASS WINDOW ... SO NEW FOR YEAR-ROUND BASIC CREPE DRESSES . . . LEFT, 
DOROTHY O'HARA'S SIDE-DRAPE, SIZES 10-18, ABOUT $40 AT BUFFUMS', LONG BEACH; YOUNKERS, DES MOINES; 
GOLDWATER'S, PHOENIX. RIGHT, DEMOISELLE'S CLASSIC WRAP-AROUND, SIZES 8-18, ABOUT $40 AT BONWIT 
TELLER, PHILADELPHIA; DIAMOND'S, PHOENIX. WEYMAN HATS. ALL FASHIONS ON THESE PAGES PHOTOGRAPHED 
AT MISSION SAN FERNANDO REY DE ESPANO IN BEAUTIFUL SAN FERNANDO VALLEY. 



36 






ICHT, GEORGIA BULLOCK'S ELE- 
GANT AND SOFT SUIT, ACCESSORY- 
MINDED, TOO . . . SIZES 10-16, 
ABOUT $55 AT H. LIEBES, SAN 
FRANCISCO; NEIMAN - MARCUS, 
DALLAS; B. ALTMAN, NEW YORK. 




ADIANT ASSURANCE OF MUTED TONES, CLASSIC LINES . . . RIGHT, 
MARBERT'S GOOD DRESS, SOFTLY DRAPED, IN SUMMER WHEAT, 
SMOKE GRAY, ANTIQUE GOLD; SIZES 10-18, ABOUT $30 AT NANCY'S, 
HOLLYWOOD; CARSON, PIRIE, SCOTT k CO., CHICAGO; DEWEES, 
PHILADELPHIA. TAFFETA HAT BY WEYMAN. 



OCIAL GRACE OF IRENE BURY'S SASH-TIED DRESS IN DUSTY ROSE 
OR MONO-CHROMATIC SHADES; FUNDAMENTALLY RIGHT FOR 
THE VERY SPECIAL OCCASION; SIZES 10-20, ABOUT $30 AT SIBLEY, 
LINDSAY k CURR, ROCHESTER. LESLIE TAMES HAT. 




DASH TAYLOR 




HE IMPRESSIVE ENTRANCE, FOSTERED BY NAN PARKER'S FULL-PLEATED SKIRT, DRAPED 
WAIST, IN DUPLEX SANCHILLA CREPE; SIZES 9-15, ABOUT $25. AT THE MAY CO., LOS ANGELES: 
BEST'S, SEATTLE; F. & R. LAZARUS, COLUMBUS . . . ANOTHER OF CALIFORNIA'S WONDERFUL 
BASICS THAT INVITE NEW ACCESSORIES, CHANGE THEIR MOODS WITH A HAT! 




*in 



■ ■ : :'■■ 












HnP!xS 



Ml 



^■i 



im 







I 






¥^ 










Clothes Help Make 
The Star 



BY CONSTANCE BENNETT 



"Good Theater" . . a popular phrase in theatrical parlance . . really means a method 
of presentation, a stepping up of values. It's frequently the difference between a good 
and bad stage play or motion picture. You have seen screen plays which amused and 
entertained you, but, on trying to analyze their drawing power, you found yourself 
with a handful of mist. The story had no outstanding plot, no strong story line, no 
message, but you liked it and recommended it to your friends. You were impressed 
by "good theater." Any wise actor knows its value. It's a method of entering a room, 
of lighting a cigarette, of pouring tea. It's any situation taken directly from life and 
hypoed to the point where it is attention compelling. 

A wise actress employs "good theater" in her clothes . . using them to accentuate 
her beauty, to best present her personality. Wardrobe is part of her professional equip- 
ment and definitely is one of her negotiable assets. 

Of course, the motion picture stars have at their disposal the world's cleverest 
designers . . not only do these wizards of shears and cloth bring forth exquisite clothes, 
but they evolve lines and styles calculated to present the actress to her best possible 
advantage. The designers must have an acute awareness of the American scene, inas- 
much as the pictures they design for are shown in every crossroads hamlet in the coun- 
try. Then, too, they must see that the costumes are plot-right . . completely in charac- 
ter for the wardrobe of the woman the actress is portraying, and accurately reflect- 
ing the income, position in life, background, the town and the time in which the 
character lives. 

Vast research and huge sums of money are employed to make sure everything about 
a costume is correct. Let's figuratively lift the petticoat of an actress wearing a 
period costume: She is garbed in the lingerie of the era . . heavily stayed corset, 
starched petticoat, pantaloons, cotton stockings and authentic shoes. Though this as- 
siduous attention to detail may seem unnecessary, it has a marked psychological ef- 
fect on the actress . . she's at home in her gown, she's a Colonial Lady, and she can 
easily convince her audience they're seeing the real thing. 

Designers for motion picture stars must be fashion seers and prophets, for their 
clothes must be styled anywhere from six to eighteen months ahead of the mode 
of the moment. Motion pictures often are made and held for that length of time 
before their release. A recent film was held for three years before its release. But 
the costumes still were competely in vogue. All this, notwithstanding, the clothes mustn't 
be so exaggerated, so advanced that they're outre. And, in addition to everything 
else, the designer must dress the star so that the audience is aware of a beautiful 
woman, rather than a beautiful dress. 

Motion pictures are becoming the style setters of America. Women go home from the 
theater to sit down at their sewing machines. There they strive to whip up a little 
number which will be at least a reasonable facsimile of what their favorite star has 
worn. Sometimes the home-styled gown doesn't come up to expectations. For the dis- 
appointed ones, let me point out that the clothes worn by the star are created expressly 
for the personality she portrayed. And unless the home-stylist is drawn from a similar 
type pattern, the effect of the clothes will not be the same. 

The glamor star, who owes at least part of her fame to her clothes-wearing pro- 
clivities, keeps her extensive personal wardrobe as a portable showcase . . bearing in 
mind that diamonds are displayed to far greater advantage on black velvet than on 
tan oilcloth. But the American standard of dress has risen so high that a business girl on 
a modest salary or a young matron on a small budget usually contrives ways and means 
of being well groomed and well dressed. 



FASHION GOES ON RECORD as Hillary Brooke, star of Howard Hughes productions, in- 
vites friends to share in the fun of a Packard-Bell PhonOcord . . . Miss Brooke 
lovely in Edna Vilm's tunic gown of Bianchini crepe. Her guests wear, center, Casa- 
nova's simple gown in silk faille and, right. Athena's frock in Cohama crepe. 

DAVID KOVAR 



41 




ashion 

with 
forethought 



Fashion is soft . . . flattering 
. . . precision minded and specially 
designed for you if you're diminu- 
tive . . . five feet four and under. 
This page, above: Ken Sutherland 
gives illusion of height in striped Dan 
River cotton dress; about $20 at 
Nancy's. Hollywood. Below: Pin stripes 
and peplum interest, Petite Casual's suit of 
Avondale chambray; under $20 at 
Sanger Bros., Dallas. Weyman hat. 
Wittman bag. 



42 






Pleated yoke, shoulder accent: Sergee's dress of Duplex Sanchilla; about $18 at Buffums', Long Beach; J. N. 
Adam, Buffalo; Dewees, Philadelphia. Caspar-Davis hat; Ailuj gloves. 



43 



IF JUNE RHYMES WITH MOON 



YOU'RE IN LOVE ... IN 



AMERICA, JAVA OR TIMBUCTOO 



^^ 



romance around th 



• The American girl who excitedly faces her wed- 
ding day is a busy girl . . she leads a complex life. 
There are the gown, the church, the flowers, the cere- 
mony, the relatives . . perhaps even cooking school . . 
notes to be answered . . calls to make . . and the 
thousand and one details that brides are heir to. Not 
so with our cousins from afar. 

On the Island of Samoa a native wedding consists 
largely of a bride and bridegroom eating their wed- 
ding cake together. Guests at the wedding feast are 
given small baskets in which to carry to tbeir homes 
the food they are unable to consume. And among the 
aboriginal native tribes of the Philippines the mar- 
riage ceremony is extremely simple. A native priest 
or medicine man breaks a loaf of "blessed bread" over 
the bowed heads of the kneeling couple and . . 
presto . . they are man and wife. Much tribal feast- 
ing is indulged in, however, after the bread-breaking 
ceremony and the happy twosome munch the blessed 
bread together as a symbol of their oneness. 

On many of the Philippine Islands the native gir 
beauties are chosen as brides according to the quality 
of their cooking and the length and beauty of their 





world 



hair. The better a girl's cookery, and the lovelier her 
tresses, the better chance she has to acquire a wealthy 
husband. Girls often are seen with heads thrust out 
windows, brushing their hair to attract the admiration 
of passing bachelors. In Java, as an important part 
of a wedding ceremony, the bride places a dainty foot 
firmly on a fresh egg and crushes it. Then she ap- 
plies the egg yolk to the groom's bare feet. This 
signifies, according to tradition, that the bride will 
always "love and cherish" her husband until death. 
In Java the egg is a symbol of "life, love and ever- 
lasting devotion." 

In Korea the groom furnishes the wedding cake 
for the nuptial feast. The cake resembles a large 
stack of thick, white pancakes, and on each layer 
is inscribed a phrase in sugary icing which, trans- 
lated from Korean, means "Health, wealth, and many 
male children." In the mountain villages of Tibet, 
when a girl and boy fall in love, the engagement is 
arranged by their parents. The young man's father 
presents the girl's father with what is known as "beg- 
ging beer." and gifts of fresh meat. If her father 
accepts the "begging beer." a bitter, potent concoc- 



tion, and downs it heartily that means he accepts 
the young man's suit for his daughter's hand. If he 
refuses, the suitor must find himself another girl. 

On the Vanikoro Islands in the South Seas, when 
a romantic swain chooses a prospective bride, he sets 
to work catching a tropical bird with brilliant plumage. 
It takes many days' stalking to capture one of these 
elusive birds . . he must produce the feathers for the 
bride to wear at their wedding. No feathers . . no 
bride. If a native girl in Siam reaches the age of 
thirty without finding a husband she can demand 
that the government provide her with a helpmate. 
And the government is required to do just that by 
law. But there's a catch in this queer legality. The 
government is not at all choosey in selecting a hubby 
for the girl. An unmarried man is released from one 
of the Siamese prisons and it's up to the spouse- 
seeking maiden to marry him. 

Husband-seeking girls of Timor-Laut, East Indies, 
are obligated by an ancient tribal law to keep one 
eye closed in the presence of wooing suitors. . . never 
open both until the engagement has been officially 
announced! In Ceylon, a solemn part of the wedding 
ritual has to do with the thumbs of the bride and 
groom. After the ceremony the bride's left thumb 
is tied to the groom's right thumb, and thus lashed 
together the loving twosome eat together from the 
same plate at the wedding feast . . the bride feeding 
the groom and vice versa, with their free hands. 

It's up to the Papuan brides of New Guinea to 
provide the family food after the wedding ... as a rule 
the men are inordinately lazy. A Papuan belle, there- 
fore, is reluctant to choose a fat man for her hus- 
band, believing he eats too much. "Nobody loves a 
fat man" is particularly true in New Guinea. Native 
grooms of Atchin Island, New Hebrides, reside only 
transiently with their beauteous brides, and never 
eat with them. The men reside in native huts of their 
own and do their own cooking. But they do drop in 
for "visits" with their brides at infrequent intervals 
. . thus asserting their independence of nuptial ties. 
On some South Seas islands, when a baby girl is born 
her parents go down to the water's edge and catch 
a baby turtle, which becomes baby's playmate and a 
household pet. When the child reaches womanhood, 
falls in love, and the wedding date is set, the turtle, 
now full grown, fat and hefty, is killed and converted 
into a huge pot of delectable turtle soup for the 
feast. The bride, sometimes tearful over the loss of 
her beloved pet, and the groom, who wastes no grief 
over the late lamented, eat the soup with their guests 
and plan to have a baby girl of their own . . and a 
baby turtle to grow up with her and provide more 
soup. 

The Brahmans of India hurl rice at the bride and 
groom after the wedding . . but it's a special sort of 
rice . . soaked in pungent, delightfully aromatic per- 
fume. And no Brahman marriage is considered quite 
legal if perfumed rice is not tossed generously at 
the newly wedded pair. Strange world. 




by James Edward Hunj§erford 



45 



THEY'RE SWIMMING IN THE PARLOR 




Here is the most talked about suimming pool of the year . . . 
and the girls who played Alice in Wonderland . . . modern scene. 
Babs Neel, left, and Wanda Allis spent an exciting day in the 
fabulous resort house built by Raymond Loeivy . . climaxed it by 
taking a dive into the living room and suimming out into the sun! 



46 



It's not unusual in California for someone to build 
a house that is vastly different from its neighbor. But 
when Raymond Loewy, noted industrial designer, de- 
cided upon a resort home in Palm Springs, even the 
spectacular was surpassed. Who'd ever dream of a 
swimming pool in the living room? Who else would 
plan artificial rain on the roof? A wonderful blend- 
ing of antique with modern furniture, and . . 

But that's where Babs Neel and Wanda Allis come 
in. 

These two Palm Springs girls heard about the fan- 
tastic new house right in their own desert country . . 
couldn't believe what they heard. So they picked 
their way through picturesque boulders, saw the sharp, 
clean lines of a really modern house . . differentiated 
by one corrugated aluminum wall in combination 
with chocolate brown plaster. 

Inside, they took a quick dive into the living room 
. . into a pool which extends right into the house! 
The pattering sound of rain was a mechanical illusion 
for conversational use. But they found more ex- 
clamation points in this unusual room: pecky-cypress 
walls . . Louisiana swampwood, bleached and sand- 
blasted to a wondrous texture . . contrasting with two 
panels painted brown. An entire wall of windows 
where Dorothy Liebes' handwoven draperies are an 
explosion of color . . Sixteenth Century hand-carved 
Mexican antiques blending perfectly with sleek lines 
of modern furniture . . in brown and yellow color 
scheme and an off-white rug. 

Glass walls disappear and presto! The patio and 
living room are as one. Once outside, the L-shape 
construction of the house is revealed, with a pergola 
trellis creating partial shade effect, a perforated semi- 
circular metal screen securing the privacy . . and 
completing the square. 

It's a two bedroom house with maid's quarters . . 
designed for resort life and planned by architects Bob 
Clark and Albert Frey. It's the way life is lived in 
sunny California . . yes, but only once in a blue moon. 




DONALD HIGGINS 




Looking into patio, note interesting construction design. 



there's rain 

on the roof . . 

a swimming pool 

in the living room 

. . this palm springs 

house is unbelievably 

modern . . 



Time out to rest . . note 16th century antiques overhead. 



Louvre rails protect lanai 




a 



man 

size 
house 






When George Badger was overseas he dreamed of a home, 
and when he came back to America he made it his business to 
build it. 

Architect Theodore Pletsch blue-printed the nucleus of his idea, 
then Loren B. Weaver started to build the house for him on a 
small lot in Manhattan Beach. It was scarcely begun before 
Badger started working with the builder to speed the day of 
moving in . . . and soon this building business got under his skin. 
Today Badger and Weaver are a busi- 
ness team . . . building other small homes. 
Encompassing a neat 596 square feet, 
the original house includes a generous 
living room with a really practical sleep- 
ing alcove tucked in a deep recess by the 
fireplace ... a kitchen alcove, tiny bed- 
room and bath . . . and a wonderful 
lanai. Bachelor heaven is the kitchen-bar 
arrangement, with all the comforts of the 
old-fashioned variety, plus some wrinkles 
mother never dreamed. A low bamboo bar is the only separation 
between kitchen and living room, so the host, too, can enjoy the 
company of his cronies while "sweating over a hot stove." 

The house has ample storage space: a huge drawer under the 
recessed bed, a whole wall of closet space backing up the fire- 
place, and the panel separating kitchen and bedroom is a closet 
from floor to ceiling. The bedroom is in miniature, completely 
compact: double closets . . . one for hanging clothes, another 
neatly shelved ... a built-in chest for tidiness . . . room for 
a good, big bed. 

However, it is in color that the house makes a really big 
splash. The bedroom is battleship gray with lime, and just 
a touch of tobacco-brown. Living room walls are honey-colored, 
placing due emphasis on the "combed" wood; a deep bright 
blue and lime tropical floral pattern covers sleek rattan fur- 
niture. A plain chartreuse couch is spread with plump blue 
pillows . . . indirect lighting in golden tones, plus a blue- 
tinted lamp that intensifies the sea-blue tones at night. Won- 
derful adjunct to the small house is the lanai, which opens 
directly off the living room. In fact, double glass doors slide 
back to make the two areas as one ... a great help during en- 
tertaining ... a wonderful way to encourage indoor-outdoor 
living at all times. Louvre-type rails deflect the wind, secure 
ample privacy as well. 

"The one thing I wanted but couldn't have was a hanging 
fireplace," Badger said, but admits satisfaction with the anchored 
variety which boasts an elevated hearth to keep embers at eye- 
level. You see . . . having had no previous building experi- 
ence, this householder claims he didn't realize that certain things 
just couldn't be done ... so he did them. At any rate, he brought 
many ideas into the realm of practicality ... his little house 
is full of many things . . . but all of one peace. 

596 SQUARE FEET OF 

FLOOR SPACE 

ENCOMPASSES A WHALE OF A LOT 

OF CALIFORNIA LIVING 

FOR GEORGE BADGER 

BY VIRGINIA SCALLON 




California 

COOKS... 




Do you know your wine? 

The story of California's wine industry 
and the story of her missions, too. had their 
beginnings at San Diego . . the city Fra Junipero 
Serra founded in 1769 by the sea. It was there, 
at his first mission, that Father Serra planted the 
first grapevine cutting to take root in Cali- 
fornia soil. Wine was important to the Fran- 
ciscan Fathers, for they needed it for the Sacra- 
ment as well as for a healthful beverage. The 
California climate was perfect for the propaga- 
tion of the grape . . indeed a blessing. And so 
a vineyard became an important part of each 
new mission as it was established, and it was 
at the second one. Mission San Gabriel, that 
the Vina Madre. or Mother Vineyard, was be- 
gun. Still there today is the Trinity Vine . . 
the oldest grapevine in California. 

Although the only grape planted by Father 
Serra was a sturdy member of the genus Vitis 
vinifera (The Mission Grape), we now have 
more than a hundred varieties in California. 
Indeed. California wines need not masquerade 
as French w-ines. nor borrow their names. In- 
stead, they bear with pride the names of the 
grapes from which they're pressed. Varietal 
wines, we call them, and the best come from 
the Napa. Sonoma and Livermore valleys, and 
from the mountains of Santa Cruz. But it takes 
more than fine grapes to produce the best wines 
. . it takes the skill and knowledge of experi- 



with 



wine 





enced vintners . . and it takes a perfect climate 
California has both . . but naturally. 

Wine has two places in our cuisine . . at the 
table and in the kitchen. Even the dullest meal 
brightens considerably if it's accompanied by a 
fine wine, and many a dish becomes an epi- 
curean treat when wine is included in its 
preparation. 

So if it's a red wine you're wanting, choose 
a Cabernet, a Pinot Noir, a Camay, or a Zin- 
fandel or Mourestal. For white wine, a Pinot 
Blanc, a Sauvignon Blanc, a Semillon, a Syl- 
vaner or a Reisling will give you of the finest. 
Try them all, the best wine is the one that tastes 
the best to you. And it's the best wine that 
should find its way into your food. The term 
"cooking wine" is a vicious one ; it's been batted 
about so long that many cooks, even good ones, 
think that it's synonymous with "cheap 
wine." So cook with the best wine 
that your budget can bear, and remem- 
ber that a little goes a long way. 

Eldorado, the Land of Gold . . that's Cali- 
fornia, and that's what I have named one of 
my favorite one-dish meals: 

ELDORADO CHICKEN CASSEROLE 

Have two frying chickens disjointed and cut in 
serving-si-ze pieces, then roll in flour that has 
been seasoned with salt and pepper, and brown 
lightly in olive oil. Into your largest earthen- 
ware casserole put a chopped onion, one table- 
spoon of minced parsley and an herb bouquet 
which has had a clove of garlic tied in with it. 
Leave the string of the bouquet hanging over 
the edge of the casserole so that you can re- 
move it later in the game. Pour on a quarter 
cup of olive oil and the same amount of butter. 
Dispose your chicken on this bed of herbs and 
add two cups of white wine. Cover and pop 
into your oven which you have set at 350°. 
During the cooking turn the chicken occasional- 
ly, so that it will be well anointed with its 
salubrious sauce. And while the chicken is 
cooking, or beforehand if you're not the speedy 
type, cut some potatoes into balls with a French 
vegetable cutter. If you're not adept at this. 
I'll reluctantly settle for potatoes cut in large 
dice. 

Parboil these potato balls until just under 
done, and do likewise with some small boiling 
onions, having approximately two dozen of each. 
Saute a half pound of mushroom caps very 
lightly; and cook some peas . . either fresh or 
frozen . . these also not quite done. There's a 
reason and this is it: when the chicken is all 
but done . . and you're a good enough cook 
to know when that is by the feel of the fork 
. . you add the vegetables. But not all in a 
heap. First, pour off a cupful of the juice and 
save it, but taste it first, and if necessary im- 
prove the seasoning. Put a circle of the potato 




balls around the outer edge of the 
casserole, then a row of mushrooms. 
Next a row of the onions, and then, in the 
middle, the peas. Pretty, isn't it? Pour over 
it the juice you've saved, making sure that all 
the vegetables are coated. Now back into the 
oven until everything is all of a doneness. (I 
forgot to remove the herb bouquet, but I'm sure 
you didn't.) When done, this dreamy dish 
should have a lovely brown glaze with savory 
juices bubbling up through the vegetables. It's 
wine cookery at its best, and you're very wel- 
come. 

But wine is a beverage first of all, and it 
may be imbibed as is, or as any one of a num- 
ber of wine punches or cups. One such punch 
is made with a white wine base, and is a fa- 
vorite wherever a large number of peo- 
ple need liquid refreshment. Is there a 
wedding in your offing? It may be as 
potent or as innocuous as you wish, de- 
pending on how heavy-handed you are 
with the spirits . . or the water. But 
this is the general idea: 



THE MISSION FATHERS 



VINTED THE FIRST WINE 



OF CALIFORNIA . . TODAY 



CALIFORNIAN PUNCH 



IT ADDS ZEST AND FLAVOR 



TO THE WORLD'S CUISINE 



First make yourself some simple syrup 
by boiling together two cups of sugar 
with one cup of water. If you're very by Helen Evans Brown 
meticulous you'll clarify it with a 
beaten white of egg . . the way you 
would consomme. Cool this. Now chill your 
punch bowl, put a big hunk of ice in it and 
pour in one bottle (4/5 of a quart) of the white 
wine of your choice . . maybe a Semillon or a 
Pinot Blanc. Add an equal amount of charged 
water, a jigger, or two or three, of California 
Brandy, the same amount of rum as of brandy, 
and some of your cool-by-now simple syrup. 
Garnish this with chunks of fresh pineapple and 
a few thin slices of oranges and lemons. Or you 
could use white seedless grapes, or fresh ripe 
peaches. With those quantities you've made ap- 
proximately two quarts or twenty punch cupfuls. 
so figure it out for yourself. You know, better 
than I, the capacity of your friends. But don't 
say I didn't warn you! 

Of all the foods cooked with wine, perhaps 
fish gains most in its use. So do make fish day 
wine day too. Then thank your California vint- 
ners for some really fine fare. 

I've not intentionally slighted the red wines 
of California, I just got going on the whites and 
couldn't stop. Red are the wines you'll want 
with beef and with game . . and sometimes with 
fish and chicken, too. Try soaking some plump, 
tender California prunes in red wine overnight, 
and serving them as something pretty special 
with roast pork or goose. And red wine added 
to a strained beef broth is a superb beginning 
for a formal dinner. 



51 





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LOUIS JOURDAN . 
SELZNICK'S FIND 



MOTHER, 



WHO WAS \ 



ARTURO DE CORDOVA . . 
.ATIN LOVER 



SERGIO DE KARLO 
ROMANTIC HOPE 








NOT LONG AGO a teen-age girl in Wash- 
ington wrote a letter to Edward Small, Holly- 
wood producer. "All my life," she penned, "I 
have heard about Rudolph Valentino. Will you 
please send me a photograph of him and tell 
me about him. I have never seen any of his 
movies, but my mother and many other older 
people here talk about him with such enthusiam. 
He must have been a very remarkable man to 
fee so vividly remembered after all these years." 

Rudolph Valentino was indeed a "very re- 
markable man," but even more remarkable is the 
enduring remembrance of him . . both in and 
out of the motion picture realm where he was 
king . . that has defied death and the passing 
of more than twenty-one years. 

In 1938 Edward Small announced that he was 
preparing to film "The Life of Rudolph Valen- 
tino." Time passed . . delays heaped upon dis- 
appointments. The death of Jack Dunn, hand- 
some ice skater Small had selected for the role, 
was followed by the war, which may have been 
a contributing factor. Small had scored many 
movie hits, so his plans were not to be cate- 
goried with the wishful thinking in which some 
producers indulge. Today, at last, the filming 
of the story of the great star seems to be on 
the definite agenda. 

And an astonishing aspect of the project is 
that it has not suffered during these nine years 
of postponement . . not from popular interest. 
Small's office is continually flooded with letters 
and snapshots from aspirants to the Valentino 
role. Wives and kinfolk have deluged him with 

IL^LENTINO? 

written pleas and pictures of men whom they 
visualize as portrayers of Valentino. 

No one can explain this phenomenon. Living, 
Valentino was traduced by savage jealousies as 
often as he was eulogized by his admirers. Only 
a few days before he died, he was columniated 
by a Chicago newspaperman who questioned his 
manhood. This so enraged Valentino that he 
challenged the scribe to fight. 

Someone has suggested that Valentino's en- 



99 



during hold on the memories of those who knew 
him personally, and those who knew him only 
on the screen, is that his career was cut short 
in the flower of his life . . that such tragic 
deaths always capture our sentimentalities. That 
may be true, but other screen stars, such as the 
immensely popular Wallace Reid, Robert Har- 
ron and Harold Lockwood . . to mention three 
favorites of early-day movies . . died in the 
bloom of their careers and when they were still 
young. None is remembered so ardently as 
Valentino is remembered. Will Rogers' death, 
for example, evoked frenzied grief for a time, 
but even he has not been so tenaciously recalled. 
The death of Valentino had the overtones of a 
Greek tragedy, but it is the fullness of his liv- 
ing, both on and off the screen, that has en- 
shrined him in our memories. 

The editor of The Californian has asked me 
to write about Valentino as I remember him. 
I was not his close friend, but I did get to know 
him fairly well during the years from 1922 to 
1926. Often I was on movie sets where he 
was working and I had frequent conversations 
with him. Valentino was a man of great per- 
sonal magnetism, and, like almost everybody 
who met him, I was enchanted by his courteous 
consideration for co-workers, his engaging sense 
of humor. The adulation heaped upon him 
would have made a conceited ass of a lesser 
man, but Valentino was the closest thing to a 
Hollywood idol without feet of clay. 

There were and are many screen heroes more 
handsome than he, but their Adonis-like beauty 
only accentuates their shortcomings in contrast 
to his vibrant individuality. His olive com- 
plexion, magnificent physique and sleek patent- 
leather hair were highlighted by the expressive 
sensitivity of his features. Valentino's early 
years were filled with tribulations, and there 
was always a brooding sadness in his dark eyes. 
He had the Latins' love of bright colors in 
clothes and automobiles, yet he was always well 
groomed and faultlessly tailored. He would 
have been attractive in a gunnysack. 

Born in Castellaneta, Italy, May 6, 1895, his 
real name was Rodolfo Alfonzo Raffaelo Pierre 
Filibert Guglielmi di Valentina d'Antonguolla . . 

(Continued on page 70) 



FOR MORE THAN 

TWENTY YEARS 

HOLLYWOOD 

UNSUCCESSFULLY 

HAS SOUGHT A 

SUCCESSOR 

TO THE SHEIK . . 

STILL THE IDOL 

OF MILLIONS 

OF INFATUATED FANS 




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JUVENILE H&AV1ES 



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BY FRED W. FOX 



53 




in 

California 

it's... 



THE PEOPLE WHO EXCEL AND 

' DO IT DIFFERENT" THAN THE REST 



HELEN GRAHAM . . THE BODY 




OTTO K. OLESENis a Danish-bom pioneer 
of Hollywood . . specializes in search- 
light advertising and decorative stunts 
. . thrusts his ordinary or garden-variety 
beams skyward for supermarket grand 
openings and motion picture premieres. 
For special events out come light-and- 
color tricks that make the crowds go 
"Ah!" Two used Army searchlights 
purchased after World War I are the venerable ancestors of his new 
models. "Tugboat Annie" is THELMA RANKIN SCHADEK who operates a profit- 
able garbage scow enterprise in the harbor of San Diego. Chief customers 
. . government ships, luxury liners, private pleasure craft. Seagoers hoist 
the blue and yellow flag . . the "come and get it" sign . . and Thelma's 
busy barges chug alongside to load. Death of her husband in 1943 left 
Mrs. Schadek with the odd occupation as "Queen of the Honey Barge.'" 
EMILIE ROMAINE is a San Francisco commercial photographer, fencing 
champ and enthusiastic sailor . . was a circus aerialist and trapeze artist. 
She and husband Karl became a professional dancing duo . . then tackled 
photography and their thriving studio in the big city. JEANNIE McKEON 
started out on a path blazed by Mme. Curie . . switched to music and now 
vocals for top radio shows. Outstanding equestrienne and swimmer, she 
records, entertains hospitalized vets and did a singing stint as feature at 
the famous Slapsy Maxie's. HELEN GRAHAM is the twinkling Star of Santa 
Cruz . . wonder girl at College of the Pacific . . yell-leader and vice- 
president of student body . . member of All-American Swim Team for 
1945 . . now in Wh°' s Who of U. S. and Canadian college folk. 



\ 




YOU 

VACATIONISTS 
EN ROUTE 
TO 



CALI FORN IA 




r ic/es a r e n 't 



WANT 



the o n/ Y 



o n © s 



TO PLAN A 



CONCENTRATED 



WARDROB E 



TOO 

Jje you bride, matron, or yet unwed . . every woman faces 
the same problem of what-to-wear for a trip to California. 
While the new "Mrs." is traditionally concerned with clothes 
to make her exceptionally beautiful, every traveler takes in- 
ordinate pride in the way she looks. 

So let's take a look at the map . . at the weather chart 
. . and make a few suggestions as to the clothes you'll need 
in California in the bride's own month of June: 

It's a balmy season, warm-to-hot all day along the coast 
. . with providentially cool nights . . maybe an occasional 
coolish day, too. So let your travel suit be dark in color, 
light in weight . . one of the spice box browns or new gray 
tones is a wonderful choice. A light-colored, lightweight 
tweed is a good traveler, but not as versatile as the smooth 
fabric type, which may be dressed up or be-calmed with ac- 
cessory magic. 

Today, you can buy the perfect travel duo: suit with match- 
ing or contrasting topper . . or you may prefer to assemble 
your own. And if you want to bring only one coat, choose a 
color that will blend with the rest of your wardrobe, a type that 
will look right with your skirts. A long coat is appropriate 
with anything, a shortie looks best with the slim silhouette. 
If you have room, a short pastel coat or even light furs will 
come in handy for evening or late afternoon wear. 

The blouse situation is easily solved today. Be thankful for 
the feminine batiste and organdies and pure silk prints back 
on the market . . sweet freshening touches, to vary your usual 
choice of soft-tailored crepes, crisp cottons, light sweaters. 



Actually, a suit can be varied to take you anywhere in really 
fine style, but you'll find it nice to have a few- extras . . such 
as a cotton suit . . maybe with matching shorts, bra and similar 
mix-matchables . . a soft little print or pastel crepe for dress- 
up occasions . . and a wonderful long-skirted gown only if 
you plan an extra-formal program. 

But remember always that June is plavtime in California, 
so make sure you have proper things to wear: swim suits and 
sun suits, a golf dress, if you're so inclined, riding clothes if 
you ride (bring informal habits, even blue jeans, to Southern 
California . . a more tailored interpretation for the north. ) 
You may expect to spend lazy hours on the beach . . close by 
or at an adjacent resort: you'll probably drive like crazy 
up and down the coast to sight-see. picnic and visit : you may 
take a boat trip to Santa Catalina. or a drive up the scenic. 
wide highways to mile-high Lake Arrowhead . . you'll enjoy 
outdoor concerts, theatre and informal barbecue parties under 
the summer stars. 

In fact, your hobbies and your destination determine the 
things you'll need to bring with you . . so check your route, 
consult your hosts, then plan accordingly. Don't forget such 
California-extras as . . sun glasses, play shoes, a scarf or 
two, maybe a sun tan lo- 



tion. Or maybe you'll 
want to buy these and a 
few other bits of Califor- 



mana r:? 



ht he 



WEATHER DATA FOR 

Los Angeles San Francisco 
Average 66.4 58.9 

Highest 105 97 

Lowest 46 46 




5AN FRA"CISC° 



Travelin' the 



MISSION 
TRAIL 



Summer suits incline to travel, light- 
weight dresses show the way. And 
you'll find the surplice yoke, the 
fuller sleeves, the bigger pockets. 
This page, left: going places, pockets 
come high on unlined suit by John- 
ston's Sportswear. Center: stop-over. 
Joy Kingston's striped seersucker 
suit. Right: mission note, caped 
sleeve dress by Joseph Zukin of 
California. Opposite page, left 
above: new places, skirt slims, shoul- 
ders are wide in Keel's two-piecer: 
Weyman hat. Left, below: fashion 
guide, collar, cuff interest by Joy 
Kingston. Center: vacation imprints, 
petticoat dress by Linsk. Right: at- 
tention getter is Koret of California's 
unlined suit with belted back. Leslie- 
James hat. For the stores offering 
this merchandise see page 68. 



56 




SAN U 

OBIS 



O 



t 





4« 



4 ■ 



SIGHTSEEING 



58 




TOO 



Summer sportswear inclines to fun, 
to fuller skirts, to sunbacks. Oppo- 
site page, left: pushers go every- 
where, tailored with inner-outer boy 
shirt by Stuart. Center: young is the 
swimmer, junior sized by Maurice 
Handler; halter ties or goes strap- 
less. Right: tailored man's shirt 
matches little girl dirndl by James 
Frederick; Weyman hat. This page, 
left: Lynn Lester's dress of the big 
pockets; Leslie James hat. Center: 
Jean Durain matches sunbacks in big 
and little sizes; jackets not shown. 
Right: halter top suns shoulders in 
dress with jacket by Lawson. For 
the stores offering this merchandise 
see page 68. 



Shining Example of Leisurely Grace 



SPOTLIGHT ON YOU, IN A PRACTICAL-BUT-PERFECT HOUSECOAT OF AMERITEX FABRIC WITH LUSTROUS FINISH, 

MADE BY CAMPUS MODES TO DRAMATIZE YOUR LEISURE MOMENTS. WASHABLE, WEARABLE ... IN YELLOW, ROSE OR BLUE WITH 

COLOR CONTRAST; SIZES 10-20, ABOUT $15 AT BULLOCK'S COLLEGIENNE SHOP, LOS ANGELES; THE EMPORIUM, SAN FRANCISCO. 








san francisco 



women interpret 



California 




BARBARA BELL, ABOVE, IN THE 
PATIO OF MISSION SAN JOSE, 
WEARS SOFT CREPE DRESS BY 
NATHALIE NICOL1. A BUSY WAR 
WORKER, SHE NOW DEVOTES 
MUCH TIME TO THE RED 
CROSS, AND HORSEBACK RIDING 
IS HER HOBBY. 
MRS. JOHN McWHORTER, RIGHT, 
(JANE SPIEKER) OF SAN 
FRANCISCO'S PIONEER WARREN 
IPIEKER FAMILY, IS A POPULAR JUN- 
IOR LEAGUER. HERE SHE'S PHOTO- 
GRAPHED IN ELEANOR GREEN'S 
GRACEFUL TIER-TUNIC DRESS. 



61 




at your 



J n spite of fashion's periodic threat to drop the curtain on 
legs with longer skirts, usually it is only temporarily suc- 
cessful in stopping the show. Somehow . . . legs are here 
to stay! 

News photographers say "cheesecake" when they ' refer 
to the aesthetic beauty of a neatly turned ankle, a well- 
formed calf. A city editor might call it plain "leg art." But 
regardless of how you describe it, there's always a great 
deal of interest in the prettiest legs . . . amateur judges 
from the sunny beaches of California to the stormy Atlantic 
pay due and proper attention to the shapely things. 

So ... do you likewise. 

Your legs are particularly important in summertime when 
you'll be wearing revealing swim suits, shorts, pedal pushers 
and brief play dresses so many hours each day. And so, 
in considering your own legs, let's say at the very beginning 
that you don't have to be satisfied with the shape they're 
in. There are dozens of good exercises you can pursue to 
reduce oversize legs and to develop the spindly variety. 

// your legs are too fat: use a mixture of one pint 
rubbing alcohol with two ounces shaved camphor gum 
and massage fatty portions regularly, using a twisting- 
wringing-kneading action; then try a good cell-breaking 



SHOES BY SO-BEL 
SEAM-FREE HOSE CERTIFIED 
BY DANCING TWINS 




THEY'RE SHAPELY 



THEY'RE L 




THE PROVED PATH 



TO SUMMER BEAUTY 



exercise. Pat them briskly with a paddle, or sit on the floor, 
draw your knees up and drop your legs so that thigh and 
calf smack the hard surface smartly. If your ankles are 
thick, use the massage treatment, or exercise by rising slowly 
from a flat-footed position to strain at tiptoe; try picking 
up marbles with your toes. And remember: any massage 
or exercise must be done regularly for increasing periods 
of time. 

// your legs are too thin: try exercises to stimulate 
muscular development. Stand erect, heels together, hands 
on hips . . . then rise slowly on toes and bend knees until 
you are almost sitting on heels. Do not do this exercise 
quickly. To develop thighs, lie flat on your back and raise 
one leg at a time, keeping knee straight, and make a large 
circle slowly, clock-wise and counter-clock-wise. Naturally, 
a doctor or qualified beautician should be consulted for any 
stringent program of development. And correct diet, like- 
wise, is important for the woman who would gain or lose 
weight. 

Too, there are some basic steps you can take to make 
your legs look sleek and lovely. First, remove any excess 
hair, either with a good depilatory or a razor . . . but one 
or the other, please! And before you go to bed, try using 



a fine body oil to keep your legs soft and smooth. This is 
particularly important in summer when you're bare-legged 
so much of the time, and skin tends to dry and crack. 

Sun tan? Maybe you're a girl who covets a deep tan, or 
maybe you shun the sun. Either way, wonderful cosmetic 
oils and lotions make it easier . . . sometimes safer . . . 
for you to achieve your goal. There are fragrant body oils 
and sun tan creams that help you tan in a hurry, smoothly 
... or protect your skin against painful burn. 

In the beauty care of your legs, a good pedicure is 
important. Whether you go so far as to use matching nail 
polish on toes and fingers, or merely want to put your 
best foot forward, you'll need to spend an occasional few 
minutes caring for your feet. A hand massage with simple 
cream or oil will work miracles . . . besides relaxing and 
refreshing you. And if you have unsighty callouses or worse, 
see a chiropodist if you can't handle the situation yourself. 
But do something! 

So now you're ready. Carefully you'll put your nice new 
legs into filmy hose, possibly those very sheer seamless 
ones that have a carefree look . . . and no seams to get 
out of line, either. Next, sandals or slippers that compliment 
your summer frock . . . and there you go. 

Lady, your legs are showing! 



by Edna Charlton 



63 




Masculine Moment 



NOT THE SAME OLD STORY ARE THESE GIFT ITEMS 



FOR YOUR MAN . . . WHETHER HE BE THE INDOOR 



OR OUTDOOR TYPE ... THE SERIOUS MAN-IN- 



EXECUTIVE-POSITION. TOUCHED WITH THE CHARM OF 



THE WEST AND THE NEW FUNCTIONAL APPROACH 



THAT ABOUNDS HERE, THIS IS A DENARY OF "MADE 



IN CALIFORNIA" ITEMS THAT ARE SURE TO PLEASE 



COME FATHER'S DAY. SHOP FOR THEM . . . THEY'RE 



AVAILABLE AT FINE MEN'S STORES EVERYWHERE 



THEY'LL GLADDEN THE HEART AND WHET THE 



APPRECIATION OF THE STERNEST CYNIC. 



J 




• Easy on the court and easy on the 
eyes is the tennis classic shown at 
left . . . wool cable-knit sweater 
with contrasting red and blue stripes. 
Towne and King. 

• Honduras mahogany . . . rubbed 
and polished to a gleaming satin fin- 
ish to highlight its fine grain and 
natural coloring . . . this masculine 
cigarette box. Lemurian Crafts. 

• Matching leather accessories for 
men . . . keep keys, coins and notes 
in the right place. The threesome, 
shown above, is of glazed cowhide, 
with hand-turned edges and silk 
stitching. Emmet of California. 

• Aptly termed the "airliner," the 
business man's modern, compact 
brief case and wallet combination 
has double zipper, spacious pockets, 
leather address book, memo pad. 
Also by Emmet of California. 

• Far-and-away the right thing for 
the fairway is this imported South 
African capeskin golf glove that pre- 
vents "letting go." Parker Glove 
Company. 

• Important accessory items for any 
man's wardrobe are the right ties 



and belts. The ties shown are 100 
percent California, loomed in the 
golden state of native fleece. In as- 
sorted checks and plaids. Wool by 
Hoffman California Woolens. Ties 
by Hollyvogue. Belts are typical 
western style with silver buckle. 
Keyston Bros. 

© Imported ebony with either ster- 
ling or gold fittings makes an out- 
standing watch band for a man. And 
made to fit any watch. Allan Adler. 
© Whisk brooms with the novelty 
touch come with colored corn bristles 
and unusual tops. For instance . . . 
bell hop, raggedy ann, Mexican joe 
and top hatter. In reds and green. 
Hal Rose. 

• A collector's item or for the fire- 
place is this horse figurine. The series 
of five figures, of which this is one, 
was designed by Virginia Orison, 
cowgirl artist. Beth Marlow. 
© Non-spillable . . . this is the ink- 
well of the future. Non-breakable, 
non-corrosive and of varied colors, 
it actually holds a year's supply of 
ink, has a small drawer to hold extra 
pen points. Weaver Associates. 








65 



jA W 

w 



It""" 
Illllllll 


'Mm 

"IM||I *■ 

llllllllllllllllllll 


llllllllllllllllllll 



rd 



Up to this lesson we have thought about directing the eyes either up and down, 
across or diagonally on the whole figure. Now we are going to consider the possi- 
bility of making a part of the figure look as if it were closer to us than the other parts. 
This sensation of depth, or advance and recession, is referred to as "third dimension." 

The most obvious way to give a third dimensional feeling to a costume is to add 
something to it which will extend out from the body ... a rippling peplum or a bow 
on the chest. This way of adding to a dress is very much like sculpturing . . . the 
sculptor adds pieces of clay to "build out" his figure. When we want to sculpture 
our own figures we add to our clothes in the form of drapery, pleats, or bows. We 
do this to make the dress more beautiful, to build up or tone down a figure deficiency. 

You can see easily that third dimensional devices can be another way of direct- 
ing eyes where we want them to go and of creating certain flattering illusions. To 
understand better how we can use these tricks for our own purposes, let us first look 
at the accompanying sets of diagrams. In the first rectangle I have purposely used 
irregular lines to show that overlapping of any shape gives the illusion of depth, even 
on a flat area. In the second rectangle there is no forceful movement in any direction, 
and all of the squares are on the same plane . . . that is, one does not seem any closer 
than the others. The third brings the center definitely toward us, since the illusion 
created by the division of lines makes the middle oblong look as if it were on top of 
the others. In the next example, the upper left hand square looks closest to us, and 
the others seem to be progressively further away. 

A quick glance at the dresses shows how we can make an area advance or 
recede at will. 

The first two indicate how the bust line can be made to advance. In the first dress 
the top shapes that come toward us can be made of the same or contrasting material 
. . . outlined in binding or stitching; but if you want it to be equally effective from 
the side, better set the pieces on as pockets. The second illustration indicates how flat 
seaming can make the center of the chest come toward you. In the next two examples, 
the breasts are made to look less important by first building up the shoulders and then 
the center of the blouse. 

Remember, too, that you can do a more effective job if you enhance the top 
shapes with embroidery, lace, pleating, jewelry, color contrasts, etc. Sometimes, in 
order to do the most for your figure, you have to remove details present and build 
up elsewhere. Figure faults at the waist or below also can be helped with third 
dimensional devices. A protruding tummy can be made less obvious by building up 
part of the bodice and skirt, as a front and side view of the next design illustrates. A 
thick waist will look more slender by contrast with built-up sleeves and pockets. Large 
hips, for instance, are sometimes better fitted with a little ease in the skirt, and the 
attention deliberately concentrated at the shoulders to detract from the too-obvious 
attention getter. 

When you shop for new clothes, think of these examples. It is just this attention 
to detail that makes the difference between being looked over with approval, or 
being overlooked. 




Overlapping of any shapes even on o 
flat area gives the illusion of depth. 
Decoration on the top shape is effec- 
tive in making the area advance. 





f % 



By building up the blouse over the 
breasts or the center of blouse a flat 
chest can be given more contour. 



By making the* center of the blouse and 
the shoulders advance the interest is 
guided away from a large bosom. 






A protruding tummy can be made to 
recede by building up the areas di- 
rectly above and below it. 



A wide waist, /eff, will appear slender 
in contrast to built-up shoulders and 
pockets. Building up the shoulders, right, 
will detract from wide hips. 



THE SIXTH 



SERIES OF 
ARTICLES 
ON DRESSING 
BY DESIGN 
BY FLORENCE 
SHUMAN 




All of the rectangles 
are on the same plane. 



The upper left shape 
appears to be closer. 



The center definitely 
seems to be on top and 
therefore closer to ls. 



I 



mi 



■ 



Uridal flowers suggest 
all-white accent for 
your summer entertaining 




John Patrick Burke's traditional arrangement in bridal all-white: Wax-white roses, 
creamy calla lilies and soft snapdragons in a high compote with garlands of 
white sweetpeas. Bride's own corsage of gardenias is part of centerpiece . . . 
the individual guest corsages are shown at base of candles. 



| You may not have a wedding on your agenda for the month of 
June, but it's not at all improbable that your thoughts are turning to 
romance . . and flowers. 

John Patrick Burke of Beverly Hills has these thoughts all year 
long. As official florist for ABC's "Bride and Groom" radio pro- 
gram every weekday, he has provided bouquets for some 400 brides. 
The lucky couple to be married every morning in the romantic setting 
of the Chapman Park Hotel Chapel are interviewed by jovial 
John Nelson and literally deluged with gifts. No wonder the wait- 
ing list is augmented by fifty 
applications a day! 

But Mr. Burke's ideas about 
bridal flowers extend to decora- 
tions for the wedding breakfast, 
reception, weddings at home . . 
and just social occasions. The 
simple but effective arrange- 
ment shown on this page is 
created particularly for a bridal 
party, and its interesting use 
of various intensities of white 
is a refresher for any enter- 
taining you may do. Try it! 




THE MISSION I 

(Continued from page 29) 

. . the beautifully scenic El Camino Real 
will wind along the ocean, through quiet can- 
yons; stretch out between golden groves ol 
oranges, lemons, apricots; pass avocado, olive 
and walnut ranches: dip into valleys of mil- 
lions of grape vines. Bright flowering trees 
and giant eucalypti, royal palms resembling 
gargantuan pineapples, march along the high- 
way. You will be transplanted quickly to the 
era of the Spanish dons and the brown-robed 
monks as you walk within the quiet mission 
gardens and pause at the circular fountains. 
The simple chapels, the cloistered walks, have, 
for the most part been retained. Each chapel 
shares some of the beautiful hand-carved 
altar figures . . priceless treasures laboriously 
transplanted to the New World. 

After you have enjoyed the missions you 
will follow El Camino Real with a richer 
understanding of the romantic heritage in- 
troduced into this rough country by the Span- 
ish Serra. The Royal Highway is more than 
a life-linking legacy between California's past 
and her future . . it is lined with proud 
and provocative names that travelers from 
east of the Rockies can seldom pronounce. 

1. San Diego de Alcala — dedicated July 16, 
1769. "Mother of All Missions," the first 
settlement in California established by 
Fra Serra. Present reconstruction used as 
a parish church. First olive trees grown 
here. Beginning of El Camino Real. 

2. San Luis Rey de Francia — June 13, 1798. 
The eighteenth mission founded by Fra 
Lasuen and Peyri. Called "King of the 
Missions" for its considerable wealth and 
six assisting churches. Now a major sem- 
inary for students studying Franciscan 
priesthood. Well worth visiting now, San 
Luis Rey has a great number of Old 
World treasures sent to California. 

3. San Juan Capistrano — November 1, 1776. 
Seventh in the order of dedication by 
Fra Serra, this "Jewel of the Missions," 
once the most architecturally pretentious, 
is now mainly in ruins. Aged, peaceful, 
it is a tourist mecca — world famous 
through the legend of the swallows. 

4. San Gabriel Arcangel — September 8, 1771. 
Extremely wealthy, this fourth mission, 
a half hour's drive from Los Angeles, 



Mr. and Mrs. Gene Curtsinger were the first couple to 
be married on ABC's romantic "Bride and Groom" pro 
gram. John Nelson is the program master of ceremonies 



WHERE TO BUY IT 

For merchandise shown on pages 56-57: 
Johnston Sportswear — Emporium, San 
Francisco; Chas. Stevens, Chicago. 
Joy Kingston — May Company, Los Angeles; 
The Fair, Fort Worth; Bonwit Teller, Phila- 
delphia. 

Joseph Zukin of California — Bullock's, Los 
Angeles. 

Keel of California — Gold & Co., Lincoln. 
Joy Kingston — J. L. Brandeis, Omaha; The 
Fair, Fort Worth. 

Linsk of California — The Broadway, Los 
Angeles> Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., Chi- 
cago. 

Koret of California — O'Connor, Moffatt & 
Co., San Francisco; Sanger Bros., Dallas; 
The Hecht Co., Washington, D. C. 

For merchandise shown on pages 58-59: 
Stuart — Nancy's, Hollywood. 
Maurice Handler — Stewart & Co., Balti- 
more. 

James Frederick — Korricks, Phoenix. 
Lynn Lester — Amelia Gray, Beverly Hills. 
Jean Durain — Abraham & Strauss, Brook- 
lyn. 



68 



STORY 



supplied much of the foodstuff, soap, 
leather, to less fortunate missions. Only 
partially restored, it draws thousands of 
spectators for the annual Mission Play 
which depicts the story of the missions 
in Spanish, using local talent as at 
Oberammergau. 

5. San Fernando Rey de Espana — September 
8, 1797. Originally planned to be half 
way between Ventura and San Gabriel, 
the fertile San Fernando Valley became 
the site for this seventeenth mission. 
Gold was first discovered near here. Pub- 
lic gardens add interest to the partially 
restored ruins. 

6. San Buenaventura — March 31, 1782. Fra 
Serra's ninth and last dedication for "The 
Saint of Good Fortune." Hemmed in by 
the city of Ventura, this charming small 
parish church was once visited by Capt. 
George Vancouver on his trip around the 
world. 

7. Santa Barbara — December 4, 1786. Tenth 
mission in the chain, dedicated by Presi- 
dente Lasuen. Home of the first Bishop 
of California, it is the only mission con- 
tinuously held by the Franciscan Order 
through the period of secularization and 
today is a theological seminary for young 
priests. This imposing structure, with 
commanding air and mood of by-gone 
days, is a tourist must. 

8. Santa Inez Virgen y Martir — September 
17, 1804. Across the Ynez Valley and 
off El Camino Real, this nineteenth mis- 
sion is a peacefully situated parish 
church. 

9. La Purisima Concepcion — December 8, 
1787. The strangest history of all per- 
haps belongs to this eleventh mission, 
which is not on El Camino Real. Having 
fallen into the usual state of ruin, it was 
perfectly restored at a cost of $2,000,000 
through the C.C.C. program and today 
is a State Park and Museum open to 
the public. 

10. San Luis Obispo de Tolosa — September 
1, 1772. Fra Serra's fifth mission, located 
in "The Valley of the Bears." California's 
now-typical tile roofing was developed 
here by Padre Palou, who wearied of 
putting out fires on the grass roof of his 
mission. Now a parish church. 

11. San Miguel Arcangel— July 25, 1787. This 
sixteenth mission, dedicated by Lasuen, 
had a most unholy history. Racked by 
fire, it housed a family who were slain 
by thieves, then became a saloon and 
brothel. Restored and rededicated in 
1939, it is now a novitiate house for stu- 
dents of the priesthood. 

12. San Antonio de Padua— July 14, 1771. 
Fra Serra dedicated this mission as his 
third and it lays now in the sun-kissed 
Salinas Valley only partly restored by the 
San Miguel Franciscans. 

13. Nuestra Senora de la Soledad — October 
9, 1791. Fra Lasuen's mission number 
thirteen in the chain is completely in 
ruins. Poorly located, it was ever lonely, 
"in solitude." 

14. San Carlos del Rio Carmelo de Monterey 
— June 3, 1770. Fra Serra's second mis- 
sion and headquarters for his presidency 
until his death in 1784. Both he and Fra 
Crespi are buried here. Always his favor- 
ite mission, it was moved from Monterey 
to "Carmel by the Sea" and is one of most 
beautiful reconstruction plans. Choice to 
visit. 



HERE'S A QUIZ! 

How much do you know about the famous missions in California? 

California-bound travelers often read numerous books about the California missions before their 
trek west . . so that they may better enjoy the romance and thrilling history of these old churches. 
Many Californians know their story, tool So if you can answer twenty-five of the following thirty 
questions correctly you can earn an "A." Any less and it would be wise to lose yourself in a little 
Fascinating history. Don't peekl 

I 

1. What country was responsible for the founding of the California missions? 

2. What religion was taught to the Indians? 

3. Who was the President of the Missions to be founded when the expedition left Baja 
California? 

4. Where was the first mission founded and in what year? 

5. What country caused such great fear to Spain that the King decided to send expeditions to 
stop the other country's encroachment? 

6. What other country also claimed the California territory? 

7. Which was the last mission to be founded and in what year? 

8. In which mission did Father Junipero Serra spend most of his California life? 

9. How many missions are there? 

10. How many missions have you visited? 

II 
TRUE AND FALSE 

1. The King of Spain had a three-fold purpose in mind when he decided to send an expedition 
to California: to extend the dominion of Spain, to protect California from encroachments, and 
to establish the Catholic religion among the heathen people. 

2. Father Serra already was lame when he began his long journey from Baja California to 
Alta California. 

3. Father Serra was a Jesuit. 

4. The founders of the missions encountered no hostile Indians. 

5. At first, until the Indians could be taught to help erect buildings, chapels often were made of 
brushwood. 

6. Father Serra did not like working with the Indians. 

7. The missions are often called "Father Serra's Rosary." 

8. The missions of today are famous for their shingled roofs. 

9. The fathers planted and grew food for their Indian followers. 

10. Many of the missions were used as stables and barns after the fathers had left. 

Ill 

Match the Missions with the nearest cities: 

1. San Buenaventura Paso Robles 

2. San Carlos (Carmel) Los Angeles 

3. San Miguel Arcangel Ventura 

4. La Purisima Concepcion Oceanside 

5. San Gabriel Arcangel San Diego 

6. San Luis Rey Lompoc 

7. San Juan Capistrano Santa Barbara 

8. San Diego de Alcala Buellton or Santa Barbara 

9. Santa Inez Santa Ana 
10. Santa Barbara Monterey 

ANSWERS: I — 1, Spain; 2, Roman Catholic; 3, Father Junipero Serra; 4, San Diego 1769; 5, Russia; 
6, England; 7, San Francisco Solano 1823; 8, Carmel; 9, Twenty-one; 10, all of them, I hope. II — 

1, true; 2, true; 3, false; 4, false; 5, true; 6, false; 7, true; 8, false; 9, true; 10, true. Ill — 1, 3; 

2, 5; 3, 1; 4, 6; 5, 8; 6, 4; 7, 10; 8, 9; 9, 7; 10, 2. 



15. San Juan Bautista— June 24, 1797. Best 
preserved of all the memorials, this fif- 
teenth mission, dedicated by Lasuen, was 
well equipped and most successful. Lar- 
gest of the missions, it was once saved 
from destruction by hostile Tulare In- 
dians when they heard a small barrel 19. 
organ playing . . and came in to hear 

more. The former bull ring is now a 
formal garden, visited by the public. 

16. Santa Cruz— August 28, 1791. Here Fra 
Crespi first saw and named the redwood 

tree. Today the twelfth mission in the 20. 

chain is remembered only by a miniature 
replica, donated by a pious woman wish- 
ing to establish a memorial. 

17. Santa Clara de Asis — January 12, 1777. 
This eighth mission under Serra's pro- 
gram suffered all the ravages of fire, 21. 
flood, earthquake and neglect to emerge 

today as the beautiful University of Santa 
Clara. Quicksilver was discovered near 
Santa Clara in 1845. 

18. San Jose de la Guadalupe — June 11, 
1797. The fourteenth mission, dedicated 
by Fra Lasuen, is located near the south 



end of San Francisco Bay. Claims the 
first all-white settlement in California. 
Visited in 1806 by the Russian Count 
Nicolas Rezanov. Present parish church 
is all that remains today. 

San Francisco de Asis (Delores) — June 
29, 1776. The only church in San Fran- 
cisco for 75 years, the sixth in Fra Serra's 
chain, now stands in the heart of a thick- 
ly populated city. A museum and memo- 
rial of the Mission Era. 

San Rafael Arcangel — December 14, 1827. 
Across the Golden Gate Bridge to the 
twentieth mission, dedicated by Vincente 
Francisco de Sarria, and primarily estab- 
lished to assist Mission Delores as a sani- 
tarium for sick neophytes. 

San Francisco Solano de Sonoma — July 
4, 1823. Last of the twenty-one missions 
to be founded, without church authority 
by an impetuous Fra Altimira, who 
hoped to take over the work of Delores 
and San Rafael in the event they were 
abandoned, as planned. It was never im- 
portant and is today a State Historic 
Monument. 



69 




'MOTHER, 



• A star of yesterday, Agnes Ayres, teamed with Valentino in "The Sheik" . . to enchant the world 



(Continued from page 53) 
son of a former cavalry officer who had be- 
come a veterinarian. Arriving in New York 
in December 1913, he procured a job as a 
gardener on the Long Island estate of Cor- 
nelius Bliss, Jr. Later he worked as a gardener 
in New York's Central Park. 

But after Rudolph had become orientated 
in his new surroundings, he made use of bis 
natural dancing talent. He became a partner 
for Bonnie Glass, and later Joan Sawyer, in 
Manhattan cabarets. Next he was engaged for 
a musical comedy roadshow company, but 
became dissatisfied, left the troupe in Utah 
and headed for San Francisco. Then war 
broke out and he called upon the Italian 
consul, attempting to enlist in his homeland's 
army or navy. He was rejected because of 
faulty vision. 

Norman Kerry, an Olympian figure among 
Hollywood's early-day stars, is generally cred- 
ited with being the first to urge Valentino 
to seek a screen career. Kerry had met Valen- 
tino when his fortunes were at low ebb. He 
liked the young Italian and helped him. Com- 
ing to Los Angeles, Valentino obtained book- 
ings as a dancer in Los Angeles and Pasa- 
dena hotels and then cast about to get work 
in the movies. In those days of the movies' 
infancy, Latins usually were cast in villain 
roles and Valentino's first part of any con- 



sequence was in a William Desmond picture 
at Universal City. He wore a derby . . in 
that era the hallmark of a movie scoundrel . . 
and mugged wickedly for the camera in con- 
trast to Desmond's noble and upright hero. 

It was not until the old Metro company 
filmed Blasco Ibanez' somber and stirring 
best-seller, "The Four Horsemen of the 
Apocalypse," that Valentino burst into the 
limelight that he was to hold until the day 
of his death . . and in fact during all the 
years since then. June Mathis, the brilliant 
scenarist who was responsible for his his- 
toric "break," told me about it at Lakeside 
Country Club a few days after Valentino 
died. 

According to Miss Mathis, the head men 
of Metro wanted Carlyle Blackwell, then a 
famous star, to play the role of Julio in the 
big film they were preparing. Rex Ingram, 
the director who had been chosen to bring 
Ibanez' story to the screen, considered the 
feminine lead the focal point of interest in 
the movie adaptation. His viewpoint was un- 
derstandable because beautiful Alice Terry, 
later Mrs. Ingram, had been chosen for that 
role. It seemed unlikely that an obscure actor 
like Valentino would get much attention as a 
candidate for the coveted part of Julio. 

But June Mathis' interest had been drawn 
by the young Italian who had been playing 



bit parts . . usually as a villain. When she 
saw him in person for the first time, she was 
convinced that he was the only actor who 
could play Julio. And she battled all the 
way to the highest executive sanctums of the 
Metro company in New York to have him 
cast in the role. Her faith was superbly re- 
warded when Rudolph Valentino became a 
sensational new star in "The Four Horsemen," 
a role that many deem the finest acting he 
ever did. A large measure of credit must go 
too, to Rex Ingram, who quickly realized the 
potentialities of the unknown actor and gave 
him the benefit of inspired direction. 

Another fine picture that Valentino made 
under the Metro banner was "The Conquering 
Power," but it was not until he signed with 
Paramount and starred in "The Sheik" that 
he soared to the top of the movie galaxy. 
Valentino's portrayal of the lusty desert lover 
is the best-remembered part he played, but 
by no means the best exposition of his act- 
ing talent It caught the public fancy and 
won him the unrestrained worship of women 
of all ages. He gave to the word "sheik" a 
new meaning that soon was adopted by lexi- 
cologists and is to be found in dictionaries 
today. 

At the apex of his career, Valentino had 
a falling out with Paramount. The issues have 
never been clearly defined, but it seems that 
his rebellion was based on the claim that 
Paramount was not handling his publicity to 
his satisfaction. The general opinion is that 
he struck for higher pay, believing that the 
phenomenal success of his films entitled him 
to a readjusted contract. Paramount won an 
injunction against Valentino that kept him off 
the screen for two years. During that time 
he made personal appearances in key cities 
and in Chicago he caused near-riots at the 
Trianon Ballroom where he filled a dancing 
engagement. Hundreds of infatuated women 
hurled their jewelry at him in wild demon- 
strations of hero-worship . . some of them 
swooned at his feet. It was a greater spectacle 
than any ever inspired by Sinatra . . Valen- 
tino's worshippers were women of all ages. 

The day of peace came at last for embat- 
tled Valentino and Paramount He returned 
to make "Monsieur Beaucaire" and "The 
Sainted Devil" at their New York studios. 
"Beaucaire" was a beautifully staged and 
acted photoplay in which Valention's acting 
ability was not even outshone by Lowell Sher- 
man, that master strategist of thespian art, 
but it aroused considerable jeering on the 
part of masculine theatergoers . . Valentino 
was attired in lace cuffs and powdered wig. 
Returning to Hollywood under contract to 
J. D. Williams, head of Ritz-Carlton Pic- 
tures, he then made "Cobra." But it was not 
a picture worthy of the Valentino personality. 
With Joseph M. Schenck, production head of 
United Artists, he made bis last two pictures, 
"The Eagle" and "Son of the Sheik." 

Permit me to interject here an episode 
in which I had a small part It had no sig- 
nificant bearing on Valentino's career, but 
it serves to illustrate how carefully his pro- 
ducers were mapping his course after the two- 
year hiatus. At that time I was associated 
with Director Clarence Brown, who was com- 
pleting his contract with Universal Pictures 
prior to joining United Artists. 

"Try to locate a virile story for Valentino," 
Brown told me one day after a luncheon con- 
ference with Schenck. "One of the first pic- 
tures I'm going to direct for United Artists 
will star him. We want to dig up something 
that will appeal to men moviegoers as well as 
women . . something that will offset the un- 
favorable male reaction to 'Beaucaire'." 

It so happened that I had only recently 
finished reading Howden Smith's "Porto Bello 
Gold," a roaring tale of the Spanish Main and 
a dashing pirate. I got a copy of the book 
and gave it to Brown. He thought the pirate 
character might be suitable for Valentino and 



70 



WHO WAS VALENTINO?" ****.?„ 



mentioned it at a conference of United Artists 
production leaders that included Douglas 
Fairbanks Sr. But it seems that Fairbanks long 
had wanted to do a pirate film, so the idea 
was ruled out for Valentino. And subsequent- 
ly Fairbanks made "The Black Pirate," one 
of his most colorful pictures. The idea of 
doing a virile picture with Valentino, however, 
won indorsement and finally a work by Alex- 
ander Pushkin, the Russian author and dra- 
matist, was chosen. This became "The Eagle." 

Valentino's next and last film, "Son of the 
Sheik," was a sequel to the film that had 
won him widest popularity. It was not an ex- 
ceptional picture, but his magical appeal drew 
audiences. After the picture was finished, 
Valentino went to New York to attend its 
premiere and to enjoy an extended vacation. 
It was in New York on August 15, 1926, that 
he was stricken. He underwent surgery and 
for eight days fought a valiant but losing bat- 
tle, dying at 12:10 p.m., August 23 in Poly- 
clinic Hospital. 

The sun was shining brightly that morn- 
ing in Hollywood when word was flashed that 
filmdom's greatest star had gone. As people 
crowded around newsstands to grab copies of 
the black-bannered extras, they moved as 
though they had been stunned. Valentino's 
courageous struggle for life had evoked the 
prayers of millions, and none were more sad- 
dened than the people of Hollywood who had 
worked with him. 

While riotous crowds stormed the Frank 
Campbell funeral parlors in New York, crash- 
ing the windows in their fanatical crush to 
see the mortal remains of the Latin actor, the 
Hollywood film colony prepared for the last 
rites to be held in Beverly Hills. Solemn 
requiem high mass was celebrated Septem- 
ber 7 in the Church of the Good Shepherd 
. . admittance to the funeral being by card 
only. The streets outside were thronged by a 
sobbing multitude who had come to pay their 
tribute. 

Valentino's body was entombed in Holly- 
wood Cemetery mausoleum, just a few steps 
from one of the movie lots where he had 
fashioned some of his most memorable roles. 
Visitations of mourning "women in black" to 
his tomb on anniversaries of his death pro- 
vided exciting copy for newspaper stories. 
But they also provided an almost farcical note 
as newspaper readers began to wonder whether 
their homage was the handiwork of press 
agents. 

Many admirers of Valentino have been baf- 
fled in their search of his last resting place 
. . evidently they have not inquired at the 
cemetery office. His is no imposing tomb. 
Crypt No. 1205 in the southeast corridor of 
Hollywood Cemetery mausoleum is one of hun- 
dreds that are alike. It bears a simple in- 
scription : 



Rodolfo Guglielmi Valentino 
1895 1926 

Alongside is the tomb of June Mathis Bal- 
boni, the kindly and visionary woman who 
brought Valentino to fame because she fought 
to get him the role in "The Four Horsemen." 
The truest remembrance of Valentino, in 
the form of a memorial, is found in "Aspira- 
tion," a sculpture by Roger Noble Burnham 
that stands in Hollywood's DeLongpre Park, 
in the shade of a desert willow and in the 
midst of a clover-shaped pool. This is the 
only monument Hollywood has erected to any 
of its illustrious movie-makers: 

Erected in memory of 
RUDOLPH VALENTINO 
1895-1926 
Presented by his friends and admirers 
from every walk of life — in all parts of 
the world in appreciation of the happi- 
ness brought to them by his cinema 
portrayals. 



Many of Valentino's movies were reshown 
after his death and to capacity audiences 
wherever they played. There was an eager 
outpouring of his millions of admirers to be- 
hold again the spirited personality that had 
enchanted them. These films are still being 
shown somewhere as you read these lines. 
American servicemen saw some of them over- 
seas during the war and the postmaster at 
Los Angeles reported that numerous letters 
had been addressed to Valentino by warrior 
fans who did not know he is dead. 

Yet persons who view the Valentino movies 
today are being cheated somewhat. The acting 
and production techniques of 20 years ago 
have become antiquated. That is especially 
true when old-time films are not projected at 
the speeds which prevailed for silent films. 
Faster projection today makes the ancient 
movies caricatures. Actors move spasmodical- 
ly; they flit and dash around like the old 
Keystone Kops did when Mack Sennett was 
slowing down the cameras to get those jerky, 
breakneck-paced chase sequences. Small won- 
der then that many young persons seeing 
Valentino on the screen for the first time are 
disappointed. His tenderest love scenes become 
travesties. 

Ever since Valentino's first triumph in "The 
Four Horsemen," both during his lifetime and 
up to the present day. screen producers have 
unsuccessfully sought "another Valentino." 
The futile search began after Valentino left 
Metro to join Paramount. He had so roman- 
ticized Latins that actors of Italian, Spanish 
and French extraction began to hog the spot- 
light as leading men and stars instead of be- 
ing relegated to "heavy" roles. The Latin 
vogue still lingers in Hollywood, but it reached 
its zenith during the lifetime of its progeni- 
tor. 

After losing Valentino, Metro signed a young 
Mexican, Ramon Samoniegos, renamed him 
Ramon Novarro, and made a strong attempt 
to eclipse Valentino. It was impossible. No- 
varro enjoyed a stellar career in his own 
right, but not successfully as "a successor to 
Valentino." When Valentino went on strike 
against Paramount, that company tried to re- 
place him with a "successor," Ricardo Cor- 
tez. A competent actor and well-liked person, 
Cortez nonetheless was no second Valentino. 
The public always was looking for the original. 
Paramount also imported a French actor, 
Charles de Roche, and tried to interest their 
customers in him, but the Frenchman turned 
out to be de Roche. 

Scores of handsome Mexican youths, includ- 
ing Don Alvarado and Gilbert Roland, were 
heralded as new Valentinos but they carved 
out their own careers. The quest continued 
after Valentino's death. Paramount introduced 
George Raft, who bears a certain facial re- 
semblance but otherwise resembles him not 
at all. Then there was the great Rod La 
Rocque, who today is a successful real estate 
salesman in Beverly Hills. Present-day actors 
who may give new impetus to the Latin vogue 
are Arturo de Cordova and the Mexican 
youth, Ricardo Montalban; the Frenchman, 
Louis Jourdan, and the romantic Sergio De 
Karlo. 

How Valentino might have fared in talking 
pictures has been a matter of conjecture, but 
it is not likely that he would have met the 
unhappy screen fate of John Gilbert. 

Valentino's magnetism never knew dimin- 
ishment during his lifetime, and we remem- 
ber him as eternally young, romantic and 
pulsating with life. For him there were no 
balding nor graying ravages of time; neither 
the stealth of obesity. Hollywood old-timers 
remember him, for instance, as he rode horse- 
back with two or three companions along 
Melrose Avenue out west of Seward Street, 
where in those days there were only open 
prairies with narrow trails and tall waving 
grasses. We remember the summer noontimes 




• Valentino . . the love of a million hearts 

when Valentino used to whizz by in his yel- 
low roadster, down from his home in Whitley 
Heights to Armstrong-Carlton's restaurant . . 
one of the town's popular luncheon spots . . 
park at the curb and enter the cafe with 
the zestful flourish of an Oriental potentate. 

We remember our glimpses of him between 
scenes on movie sets as he paced to and fro, 
usually accompanied by one of the large dogs 
he loved so much . . his face an inscrutable 
mask of concentration that quickly could 
break into a friendly smile. However, an air 
of mysticism seemed to hover over him in 
those later years, and we often wondered if 
he had had any premonitions of early death. 

Ironically, Valentino, beloved of millions of 
women, most of whom never saw him in the 
flesh, found heartache, turmoil and only brief 
exaltation in his own love life. He commanded 
the adulafion of womanhood that millions of 
men could never know, but most of those 
millions of men knew the inspiring love of 
wives and sweethearts that seemed beyond 
Valentino's reach. His first marriage to a 
dancing partner, Jean Acker, did not last 
long, but they did not part in bitterness. She 
was much in his thoughts in the days preced- 
ing his death. If he had lived, they may have 
become reconciled and perhaps rewed, al- 
though Valentino's romance with Pola Negri, 
the tempestuous screen star, was mor« in the 
limelight in those last days. 

Valentino's second marriage, to Winifred 
Hudnut, the adopted daughter of Richard! 
Hudnut, the perfume king, was widely pub- 
licized. Under the professional name of Na- 
tacha Rambova, she was active in production 
of "Cobra" and her influence over Valentinc- 
and his career was acidly commented upon by 
many Hollywood critics. 

Valentino's hilltop castle, Falcon's Lair, in. 
Beverly Hills, was richly ornamented and 
lavishly furnished. There, too, were the ken- 
nels and stables that housed the horses anc? 
dogs of which he was so fond. It was a prince- 
ly estate befitting the high station attained 
by the immigrant boy from Italy who had 
become king of the screen. Yet it is doubtful 
if Falcon's Lair was as significant to Valen- 
tino as that first house in Whitley Heights 
he had occupied during the years of his- 
burgeoning fame. 

The girl from Washington who thinks that 
Rudolph Valentino was a "very remarkable 
man" is right . . and so are the millions 
throughout the world who have accorded him 
everlasting fame. 



7? 



3T MAIL. 





THE SEYMOUR 



Here Is authen- 
tlc Duncan 
Phyfe.wtth rich 
brass rods, 
fluted front rail 
and carved Lyre 
Motif — so taste- 
sr for new graciousness in 
Crafted in American hard- 
rood with a soft 18th Century mahogany fin- 
ish. Height 33". In muslin S12.75. In either 

machine needlepoint or our tasteful fabrics — 
S13.75. Send check or money order. Express 
Collect. Sorry, no C.O.D.'s. Reference: First 
Nat'l Bank, Hickory, N. C. Also, send 10c 
for a copy of "A Selection of Chairs." 



Box 220 Hickory, N. C. J 




"The Bag that 

Fits Your Coat 

LIKE YOUR COAT 

FITS YOU!" 

Store your fur coat AT HOME in this translucent 
plastic zipper Tuc-Ker-Wav Fur Coat Bag . . . water- 
proof, crack-proof, peel-proof, weather-proof! Bag 
contains our exclusive moth preventive, odorized 
metal hanger thai protects your precious furs. Use 
it, too, for cloth coats — and for traveling in trains, 
planes and autos for dust-proof, crush and wrinkle 
resistant protection. Satisfaction Guaran- JE.95 
teed. At better stores or by mail. Only . » 
Mail Orders Accepted, Add 25c for Postage. 
TUC-KER-WAY BAG CO. 
6981 N. Clark Street Chicago 26, III. 



• WHERE TO BUY IT 

Stores offering the Lynn Lester garments featured on pages 20-25 are as 
follows: 

CALIFORNIA — Dorothy Beal, Hollywood and Studio City; Nancy's, Hollywood 
and Westwood Hills; Moore & Daniels, Riverside; Tops 'n Togs, Long Beach; 
J. J. Haggarty, Los Angeles and Beverly Hills; Bobbie's, Temple City; Stept's, 
San Bernardino; Phelps-Terkel, Palo Alto; Roos Bros., San Francisco; China 
Lady, San Francisco; Maxine's, Carmel; Bentley's, Santa Monica; Adeline- 
Marie, Visalia; Myers Dept. Store, Whittier; Lion Clothing Co., San Diego; 
The White House, Eureka; Roma's, Palm Springs, 
NEBRASKA — J. L. Brandeis Co., Omaha. 
MASSACHUSETTS— Neal's, Boston. 

TEXAS — The White House, El Paso; Hutchins Bros., San Antonio; The Fashion, 
Houston; Ring Brewer, Dallas. 

WASHINGTON — Rhodes Bros., Tacoma; The Bon Marche, Seattle. 
OKLAHOMA — John A. Brown, Oklahoma City; Brown & Dunkin, Tulsa. 
OREGON — Olds-Wortman-King, Portland. 
ILLINOIS — Chas. A. Stevens, Chicago. 

Or for store nearest you, write direct to Western Fashions, 722 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, California. 



Household Hints 



Smoothest cotton dispenser we've ever 
seen was made from an empty adhesive 
tape spool. Spool can be either one- 
inch or two-inch width. Clip desired 
width of absorbent cotton from usual 
six-inch wide roll. Wind the resultant 
long narrow strip snugly around the 
tape spool. Cotton then can be pulled 
off as desired. 

HAIR HINT 

They swear it's true. To make blonde 
hair lighter rinse periodically in ale 
or beer. For our favorite brunettes: 
dark hair may be darkened a shade by 
working a bit of olive oil into the 
scalp each night. 

PAINT POINTERS 

When whipping up a little home paint 
job, the odor may be kept under con- 
trol by placing a bucket of cold water 
in the room. Change the water four or 
five times a day. To avoid splatters 



on windows, dampen newspapers and 
stick to glass while painting is in proc- 
ess. 

SUMMER WASSAIL 

For a cool punch bowl use a hol- 
lowed-out watermelon rind. Either half 
or three-quarters of the melon cut 
lengthwise makes an attractive con- 
tainer for fruit punches. A bit of swish 
can be added by decorating the edges 
with maraschino cherries or citrus cuts 
secured by toothpicks. 

ONCE AGAIN 

Have you forgotten that marvelous 
method of removing white heat stains 
from your mahogany? Here it is again: 
Lightly cover spot with warm cam- 
phorated oil, rub in gently with soft 
cloth. After oil has been wiped off, 
give surface a vigorous massage to 
bring up the original lustre. 



1 here yfre 



l\o lA$ly Women 

1 here are only women who q 

not know how to look pretlj 

— LaRu 




To the busy woman: Alma Raye brin 
you an easy, expertly planned, scj 
entific beauty schedule. 

SEND FOR FREE SAMPLE AND 
BOOKLET 
Alma Raye SATIN TONE, a perfe 
foundation for your powder an 
make-up. 

/\lma Kaye (^.osmetic Company 

5422 Fountain Avenue 

Hollywood 27, California 



MEXICALI 

SANDALS 




HANDMADE 

From south of the border 

Style E. All leather in natural tan wil 
open or closed toe and 1% inch wedg 
heel. Send shoe size including widtl 
outline of foot, and $4.50. 

(Add 2y 2 % in California) 
Postpaid 

THE MEXICO CO. 

Dept. CJ Calexico, Californi 

(Send for folder showing other styles i 
leather sandals and espadrilles for womei 
men and children. 5c will bring foldi 
by airmail.) 




| Famous New Orleans I 

PECAN I 
!PRALINES| 

j Thrill family and friends with won- ft 
; derful tasty New Orleans candies. Made p 
I from treasured old Creole recipe. Pure E 
! sugar, sweet dairy cream, lavishly filled Y{ 
! with choice pecans. > 

i Deluxe gift box contains one lb. (about h 
: 20) guest-size pralines, individually ft 
' wrapped. p 

! ORDER BY THE BOX, $150 fc 
■ We will enclose your gift *- \n 

; card. Sorry no CO.D.'s. Postpaid S 

j LOUISIANA DELICACIES CO., INC. \/ 

I 3520 Frenchmen St., New Orleans 19 U 



CREATIONS 

Oesigners and Cre- 
ators of distinctive 
Jewelry 



110 Dunedin Street 
Cranston 9, 
Rhode Island 
U.S.A. 




Apbrodite-The Pearl of Beauly 



For the discriminating woman. Inde- 
structible pearls which will not dis- 
color or peel, guaranteed perfect. 
Beautiful leather case included. 
Postpaid. 



Rosaries of Distinction 

Beautifully boxed, postpaid rosaries. 



No. 20 — Single 
strand, knotted, 
with rhinestone 

clasp -4.00 

No. 21 Double 

strand, sterling 
clasp 5.00 



No. 22 

Choker S.00 

No. 23 Match- 
ing bracelet 3.00 

No. ZA Single 



strand with rhine- 
stone clasp 3.50 
No. 25 — Single 
strand with ster- 
ling clasp . 3.00 

No. 26— Sterling 
silver with Im- 
ported cocotine 

beads 6.00 

No. 27 — All ster- 
ling 6.00 

No. 28 — Lifetime 
rosary with 1/20- 



12kt. gold-filled 
chain and cross. 
Large indestructi- 
ble pears.. ..12. 00 

No. 29 — Sterling 
silver with fine- 
cut imported 
beads 7.00 

No. 30 — Sterling 
silver or gold 
plated with small 
indestructible 
pearls 5.00 



1 he Jacqueline Design 



This season's newest and smartest design, 
displayed by fashion models in Life Mag- 
azine. New patented spring clasp prevents 
loss. Gold or silver plating. Postpaid. 
NO. 15 NO. 16 

Pendant 3.50 V- 2 " Bracelet ..2.00 

No. 17 NO. 18 

l" Bracelet 2. SO IVz" Bracelet 3.00 

No. 19 Matching earr.ngs 

Choker 3.00 (not shown)....!. 50 





OLD WITCH FOOT SCRAPIE 



SOLID 
BRONZE 

Quaint 
Practical 
Durable 

$7.85 
POSTPAID 



No C.O.D.'s Approximate Weight 3 

Ideal as gift or a novel home touch, i 
available in Swedish Iron finish on cast i 
at S4.50, postpaid. 



ANDIROr 

(Patent Pendi 

Your own 
tials in hig 
polished so 
brass. 

$29.95 
(Third initial $1 
Express coll 



PERSONALIZED 




Gives distinction to tout fireplace. Fu 
alphabet, including "Mc," available. 
inches wide, 17 inches tall. 
Also available in chrome plated finisl 
S3. 50 extra per letter. 

Specify initials when ordering. 

REHFUSS COMPANY 

1040 Washington Ave., Albany 3, N 



Styled hy HOWARD SHOUP 
Famed Hollywood Couturier 




One of Seven rV arid-Famous Hollywood Studio Designers* Creating for Catalina 




* Catalina's 1947 Collection 
designed by Travis Banton, 
Universal International 
Studios; Milo Anderson, 
vvarner Brothers Pictures, 
Inc.; Edith Head, Para- 
mount Pictures, Inc.; 
Howard Shoup, who has 
designed for stars of M.etro- 
Goldwyn-M. ayer; vera 
wVe s t, JJn i v ersal In ter- 
national Studios; Rente, 
RKO Radio Pictures,Inc; 
Edward Stevenson, RKO 
Radio Pictures, Inc. — all 
designing in collaboration 
with Mary Ann DeTi^eese, 
Catalina s Head Designer. 






California in a swim suit 



t^oloriul! Opirited! 1 li.it s the way lun-loving Ualilornians like their swim suits. 
L^atalma s new suits, styled by lamed Hollywood otudio .Designers have all 
ol l^alilornia s playlul spirit. Above: Howard ijhoup, talented .Hollywood 
Couturier, selects ijeeress, a Oimpson seersucker fabric lor his 
saucy one-piece checked suit. $6. W rite lor name ol nearest store. 



:atalina swim SUITS • SWIM TRUNKS • SWEATERS 
Catalina, Inc., Dept. 252, 443 So. San Pedro St., Los Angeles 13, California, U.S.A. 





LOOK FOR THE 
FLYING FISH 





'«€ AU6T2 '4t 



Springtime texture. 



woven with 




This is May: a drifting of petals, the brush of 

a bird's wing, the Spring-again fabrics 

that wrap you in gaiety. Bates looms a rayon 

blended gently as blossoms for a 

bow-flickered blouse by Morgan Fauth, designed 

for the Haymaker division of David Crystal. 

BATES FABRICS INC., 80 WORTH STREET. NEW YORK 13 



\&. 




Ik 111 

3iv is vftaoirLa 



Z9 9-898S 3 



1 





The Malibu 
Fashions 
California Living 
California Cooks 

July 1947 
25 cents 




The H olman " Calif ornia ' Jacket . . . a must for every sportswear minded man whether he lives i: 
Hollywood or anywhere in America! Maurice Holman tailors it in luxurious woolens, rich gabardines, soft flannel 
. . . in Lush California Colors. Available now at your favorite Men's Shop in both Cardigan and collared styles 
Flannels at about $25.00, all-wool gabardines about $30.00. . . . Write for the name of your nearest stort 

MAURICE HOLMAN 925 South Maple Avenue, Los An«eles,LCaHforni 







push-up balloon sleeves ... double breasted with flippant hip pockets and a 

full swirling skirt. Sizes 9-15. Price about $15. Available at Charles F. Berg, Portland; 

Z. C. M. I., Salt Lake City; and Saks, 34th St., New York City 

JUNIOR MISS OF CALIFORNIA, 910 S. LOS ANGELES ST., LOS ANGELES 15 



[THE CALIFORNIAN, July, 1947 




Graff 



For the active golfer ... or just a wonderful dress for suburban 
and home wear, see the Graff Golfer at your favorite store. 

Comes in a variety of fine Michael Ross fabrics. About $13.00. 

Available at the May Co., Los Angele: 



CALIFORNIA GOLFER 



1240 S. MAIN 



LOS ANGELES 15, CALIF. 



THE Californian is published monthly by The Callfornian, Inc., at 210 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles 14, Calif., printed in U.S.A. Yearly subscription 
price $3.00. Entered as second class matter January 25, 1946 at the Post Office, Los Angeles, Calif., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 




Addie Master's version of the long torso look in a two- 
piece buttoned back dress, with jeweled heart 






trim of JULES FOREMAN CEZANO CREPE 



in black, white, or powder blue. 





i 




in a Tebilized 
crease-resistant 

Gabardine. To 
retail about $12. 9 i 

RTSWEAi 

THE GERRY BUILDING 
91C SOUTH LOS ANGELES STREET LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



THE CALIFORNIAN, July, 1947 . ; 




distinctive! 
dramatic! 
dashing! 



$35.00 at all 



leading fine stores or 
write to BEN R. BRODY 

3908 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, California 
New York Showroom - 347 5th Avenue, N. Y. C. 

THE C AU FORM I AN, July, 1947 



original Ba&4 




modern CALIFORNIA 





w 




fJt 





Imfci^Jemm... 




Coro, Inc., New York 1, N. Y. 



ff 



tf 



Seven Fittings 

Exclusive with 

^ L new Seven Basic F«- 

rr^tneUei-c-s- 

lm3i - Uft" construction .cot 

wit n custom-maae p«- 

cision...i"^ neW r 
f a Ucs- a nJ still at our 

(amiliar prewar prices. 

Seven Fittings 32 to 46 
At all fine stores & shops 





Write fo f na 



I WmW *56 ! SANTA »ON,CA .IV* 
\ ) HOUVWO°0 3B.CAU^ 






BEAUTIFUL BARK . . . outcropping of 
giant California Redwoods. Place Burl in a 
tray of water . . . graceful deep-green shoots 
will grow and grow up to two feet. A deco- 
rative plant adding warmth to your room . . . 
lasts about two years. Two sizes: $2.00 and 
$5.00, postpaid. Novel pottery planting bowl, 
only $1.00 extra. Money-order or check to 
California Art Rancho, Dept. 6, 2005 Cowper 
Street, Palo Alto, California. 

IT'S A RING . . . it's a puzzle . . . it's 
wonderful! Based on the four points of right- 
eousness in Confucianism: right living, think- 
ing, speaking, and doing. The ring, like life it- 
self, is a puzzle that can be solved only by 
knowing its secret. Handmade to order. . . 14K 
gold, $75; sterling silver, $18 (tax and secret 
included ! ) Send size to The Idea Factory, 
837 W. 36th Place, Los Angeles 7, Calif. 
... or to Blumberg's, Atlanta, Ga. 

BREEZIES . . . all-leather barefoot sandals 
for your play hours . . . and feather-light 
for dancing. A gold-buckled sliding adjust- 
able strap. 'Most any color . . red, green, 
navy, turftan, black, white or natural. These 
quality sandals in sizes 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Just $7.50, 
postpaid. At your favorite shoe salon, or 
mail your check with order to Style-Master 
Shoes of Hollywood, 8243 Lankershim Blvd., 
N. Hollywood, California. 

ANIMAL DOLLS . . . toys with personality. 
These saucy boy and girl elephants stand 12" 
high. Soft and cuddly, a delight to the most 
pampered youngsters. Colorfully dressed in 
red and white checked gingham . . . and 
personalized with the child's name hand- 
embroidered. The pair, $3.50, postpaid. Order 
from Eddy Berkeley, 1539 N. McCadden 
Place, Hollywood, California. Be sure to send 
child's name with order. 

CUFF BRACELET ... a sparkly bit of 
costume jewelry in hand-wrought copper or 
hand-hammered aluminum. Spring type, ad- 
justable to any wrist size . . in two widths, 
iy 2 " at $1.50, 2" at $2.00 (plus tax.) Or for 
a very special gift to a very special friend, 
order the V/o" width in sterling silver at 
$4.00. The address is Benton Handcrafts, 
1241 East 18th Street, Brooklyn, New York. | 



:: 






' 



THE CALIFORN I AN, July, 1947 




CONTINENTAL PURSE ... a handsome 
little "carry-all" to go with you everywhere. 
Kidskin-lined compartments for everything . . . 
no more hide 'n seek for makeup, change, 
bills, combs and the like. Made of the softest 
baby calfskin in midnight brown, bridle tan, 
shamrock, pimpernel red, navy, black. At 
Dunn's English Leather Shop in Atlantic City 
and Robbins Ltd., Beverly Hills, California. 
$15, plus tax. From Sandley, 629 S. Hill, 
Los Angeles, California. 

GREENLEAF RUBBER COASTERS . . . 

purposeful and pretty for occasional tables or 
] your festive board. Made of the finest quality 
synthetic rubber, impervious to heat, cold, al- 
cohol . . . washable and fade proof. A prac- 
tical, permanent and gay decoration for your 
home. The set of eight, attractively boxed, 
$3.00 postpaid. Orders are filled promptly by 
John P. Gleason, Manufacturer, 627 North 
LaPeer Drive, Los Angeles 46, California. 

LADY CHIEF . . . this hand-tooled, hand- 
laced, natural saddle leather bag. A lifetime 
pleasure to own! Created by master crafts- 
men and perfect in every detail ... all leather 
lined . . . zippered inside and out. Nicely 
priced at $17.70. including tax and post- 
age. Tex West is the designer and will fill 
your order promptly. Write him at 112 W. 
Ninth Street, Los Angeles 15, California. Send 
for illustrated folder. 

BEAUTY BRIGHT . . . this new barrette 
is something to talk about ... its gracefully 
curved 5 inches, a smart accent to your hair- 
do. Comes in shiny silver or gold finish. 
About S3.00 at John Wanamaker, New York 
and Philadelphia; Coulter's, Los Angeles, and 
other fine stores across the country. For the 
name of the store in your vicinity, write the 
maker, Biltmore Accessories, 846 S. Broad- 
way, Los Angeles, California. 

GLAMOR KIT . . . never one to be kept 
in the dark. Fashion-wise gadabouts carry 
their own light . . . thanks to Revell's new 
five-in-one Glamor Kit. A self-contained en- 
semble with flashlight, lip brush, compact, 
cigarette case and lighter. Available in Chinese 
red, black, or two-tone black and yellow at 
only S4.95. Revell of Hollywood, 210 N. West- 
ern Ave., Los Angeles 4, California. 






that moke 
£mo/d H/amesi LOOK 






DESIGNS BY 



THE CAL1FORNIAN, July, 1947 




MISS AMERICA 

MARILYN BUFERD 




WASHABLE 

lEveroUze 

F A B R I C 

*"Everglaze"is a trade-mark which signifies the 
fabric has been finished and tested according 
to processes and standards controlled and 
prescribed by Joseph Bancroft & Sons Co. 



Subscribe Today 

TO THE CALIFORNIAN 

210 W. 7th St., Los Angeles 14, Cal. 



Please enter my subscription today 
to the Californian for the period 
indicated below: 



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Address 



1 Year: $3.00 2 Years: $5.00 



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Check or money order enclosed. 




%gm*-~ 






SUN CHEATERS ... for the shady side of 
your summer play days. Look beautiful and 
smart through these specially polarized lenses, 
widely rimmed in 24-karat gold plate by 
Suray Process. It's fun to wear them! They're 
big and bold! Order by mail, or stop in at 
Daniels of Beverly Hills, 451 N. Beverly 
Drive, Beverly Hills, California. Price, $16.95, 
including tax and postage. 

CALI-STUD . . . this belt gives a merry 
swing to your summer casuals. It's brass 
studded and it's made of California saddle 
leather in a variety of colors . . . golden 
west, sunset red, tanbark, field green, Pacific 
blue. About $3.95 at The Broadway Stores in 
Los Angeles, Hollywood and Pasadena, and 
other fine stores throughout the country. From 
Phil Sockett Mfg. Co, Est. 1925, 1240 S. 
Main, Los Angeles, California. 

CALIFORNIA PLATERY ... for gay 

table settings. Santa Anita pottery in luscious 
pastel colors . . . powder blue, turquoise, desert 
sand, buttercup yellow . . . equally assorted 
in each set. Service for four (20 pieces) $8.95; 
service for six (32 pieces) $14.95; or have 
complete dinner service for eight (45 pieces) 
$23.50. Shipped anywhere in the U. S., tax 
and postage included. No C. O. D.'s, please. 
Order from Roy Miller, Box 1176, Beverly 
Hills, California. 

AMUSING HOURS ... for children. Edu- 
cational, too, are these well-known stories on 
record (unbreakable 12" discs.) A wonderful 
gift, or for your own child's record library. 
Choice of five: The Laughing Jack O'Lantern, 
Johnny Cake, Three Little Pigs, The Little 
Engine That Could, The Shoemaker and the 
Elves. $2.10 each, postpaid. Order one or a 
complete set from: Roy Miller, Box 1176 Bev- 
erly Hills, California. 



YOGURT FOR YOUTH ... a famous 
Bulgarian cultured milk-food, wonderful as a 
general health conditioner and aid to skin 
beauty. Send for diet lists and Yogurt recipes. 
Yami Yogurt is available in leading food 
stores in California. If not in your vicinity, 
write for home preparation instructions and 
supply, (1-oz. bottle Yogurt culture, $1.80; 
Thermo-Cult automatic incubator, $15.50.) 
From International Yogurt Company, Dept. 
CN, Beverly Hills, California. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, July, 1947 



Fall makes a date with Fashion . . . Reversible leather belt, 
Removable button-in vest add interest to this Norfolk Suit 
of KJOhfUOOf fabric. Available at fine stores everywhere. 
DeDe Johnson, 333 West 2nd St., Los Angeles 12, California 




$45. 

Address Mail Orders to | 

The Fair 






HOUSE OF MURPHY 



for gourmets only 




Fine food in an atmosphere 
of convivial friendliness! 

Closed Tuesday 



Where La Cienega Crosses Fourth 

CR 5-0191 
BR 2-3432 



jA J\eaaqjr\0om. ft 



Ml «. S. CHOICI linUX 

$<y STEAKS end CHOPS 

@6C&teUU IN THE TAVTt « I 

Ml N*. la Oaiwfa Nvd. 



ei«it»itw s-«4ir 




Meets trie » 

World's Finest Cuisine 

By Henri, creator of Crepes Suzette. 

• 

Cocktails 

EQUESTRIAN ROOM 

Ray Rasch's Sophisticated piano 

• 

9236 Sunset Boulevard 

BRadshaw 2-2030 CResWiew 5-9610 



GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 

THE CALIFORNIAN presents for your convenient"*- a current directory of the finest restaurants in Los 
Angeles and San Francisco, cultural events of interest and activities that make living in California or a visit 
to our state the most enjoyable f oi vou and your family. Fine foods of many kinds are available, and 
whenever possible specialties of the house are listed and names of the maitres d'hotel. Have a good time! 

THE RESTAURANTS 

IN LOS ANGELES 



AMBASSADOR— 3400 Wil shire Blvd., Los Angeles. 
World-famous Cocoanut Grove open every night ex- 
cept Monday. Saturday afternoon tea dancing. Freddy 
Martin's Orchestra. Dinners from $3.25. Cover $1, 
Saturday $1.50. Rouben. 

DON THE BEACHCOMBER— 1727 North McCadden 
Place, Hollywood. Fried Shrimp, Rubaki, Barbecued 
Spareribs, Mandarin Duck, Chicken Almond and 
known as originator of the Zombie. Dinners from $3. 
Usually crowded, but good tourist spot. 

BEVERLY HILLS HOTEL— 96+1 Sunset Blvd., Bev- 
erly Hills. Palm room open Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday nights with dancing. Thursday buffet, $3.75. 
Dinner a la carte from $1.75. Good food and you 
might see a movie star. 

BEVERLY - WILSHIRE HOTEL — 9415 Wilshire 
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Tasty food in Copa d'Ora and 
Terrace Room, with medium prices. 

BILTMORE BOWL— 515 South Olive St., Los An- 
geles. Best place downtown for good food and good 
music, with Russ Morgan playing. Two-dollar din- 
ners, nominal cover charge and two floor shows. Nice 
for tourists. Closed Monday. 

BUBLICHKI— SS46 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. A 
bit of Russia on the Strip. Cutlet a la Kieff, Filet 
Mignon^ a la Stroganeff, Caucasian Shashlik, Rus- 
sian BUni. Dinners from $3. Host, Wally; hostess, 
Jasmina. Good music and romantical, Closed Tuesday. 

CASA LA GOLONDRINA— 35 Olvera St., Los An- 
geles, "the first brick house in the city." Historic 
Mexican cafe. Arroz con Polio, Enchiladas, Tacos. 
Dinners from $2. Alfredo. Closed Sunday. 

CHAROUCHKA— 8524 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 
Another bite of Russia on the Strip. Mamma and 
Papa, "your hosts," excel with atmosphere, food and 
soothing music. Closed Monday, and prices fairlv 
high. 

CHASEN'S— 9339 Beverly Blvd., Beverly Hills. One 
of the best in the West. Excellent cuisine and plenty 
of celebrities. Expensive. Closed Monday. 

CIRO'S— S344 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. On the 
Strip and luxurious, with name bands for dancing. 
Expensive. Celebrities, sometimes. 

HENRI'S— 9236 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, "where 
the Sunset Strip meets the Bridal Path." The leisurely 
glamor of Southern California as the visitor hope's 
to find it. Society, celebrities, tops in cuisine. A la 
carte from $2. 

HOUSE OF MURPHY — La Cienega "Restaurant 
Row" at Fourth Street, Los Angeles. Madame Begue's 
Chicken Creole, Hamburger and Onion Rings, Million 
Dollar Hash. Your host, Bob Murphy. Wonderful 
Salads, Beautiful Steaks. A la carte, medium prices. 
Open every day. 

LA RUE— 8633 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, on the 
Strip. Tops in food and decor. Crepes Louise, Crepes 
a la Reine, Lasagne Pasticciate, Beef Bourguignonne. 
From noon till 3 for lunch except Sunday. From 6 to 
11 p.m. for dinner. Closed Monday. Felix Cigolini. 
A la carte entrees from $2.25. 

PERINO'S— 3027 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. In 
the heart of the smart shopping area. Excellent food. 
A favorite luncheon rendezvous for society. 

READY ROOM— Johnny Wilson's popular rendez- 
vous for the younger set. Big fireplace, delicious 
steaks, informal atmosphere. At 365 No. La Cienega 
Blvd., Los Angeles, on Restaurant Row. 

ROMANOFF'S— 326 No. Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills. 
Prince Mike caters to movie stars, writers and pro- 
ducers. Expensive. 

SARNEZ— 170 No. La Cienega Blvd., Beverly Hills. 



Lew Sailee and Harry Ringland have an attractive 
place, with good food and good music, reasonably 
priced. 

SOMERSET HOUSE— On Restaurant Row in Bev- 
erly Hills. Fine steaks, a la carte dinners, nice 
atmosphere and expensive. 

SPORTSMAN'S LODGE— 12S33 Ventura Blvd., 
North Hollywood. An epicurean delight in San Fer- 
nando Valley. Broiled Lobster, Chicken Saute a Sec, 
Charcoal-broiled Steaks in a gorgeous setting. Jack 
Spiros. From 5:30 p.m. Closed Monday. 

TAIL O* THE COCK — 1-77 So. La Cienega Blvd.. 
Los Angeles, on Restaurant Row. Mac McHenry pro- 
vides excellent food y good companions and a pleasing 
atmosphere. Hamburger Diable and Fried Shrimp are 
specialties. You'll want to go again and again, and 
it's reasonably priced. 

TOWN HOUSE— 2965 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, 
overlooking Lafayette Park. Three smart cafes to 
serve you . . . Garden Room, Cape Cod Grill and 
the Zebra Room. No cover or minimum. Excellent 
food and a good spot for the tourist. 

THE THEATRE 

PASADENA COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE— Mid- 
summer drama festival during July and August. 
Plays for July include "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cab- 
bage Patch," "Midsummer Night's Dream" and 
"Melloney Holtsbur." Curtain at 8:15 ; prices 76c 
to $2. 

PILGRIMAGE PLAY— Pilgrimage Play dramatiz- 
ing the Life of Christ, every night but Monday. 
This 20th annual open-air presentation of the drama 
opens July 11. $1.20 to $2.40. 

THEATRE MART— Continually playing "The 
Drunkard" every night at 8. Famous old-time melo- 
drama with beer and pretzels. Wonderful tourist 
entertainment and good for the entire family. 

EL CAPITAN— Ken Murray's "Blackouts of 1947," 
starring Marie Wilson and Ken, every night at 8:30, 
with plenty of matinees. Variety entertainment that 
will please. Good for tourists. 

EARL CARROLL'S THEATRE RESTAURANT— 
In Hollywood for the tourist. "The Vanities" in 
a good show each night with two different per- 
formances at 9:15 and midnight. Girls. Girls. Three- 
thirty with dinner, $1.65 without. 

SAN GABRIEL MISSION BOWL— "Bells of San 
Gabriel," outdoor play depicting early day Cali- 
fornia life opens July 2. Presented in conjunction 
with dancing, fiesta and barbecue. 

GRIFFITH PARK GREEK BOWL— Hollywood 
Starlight Theatre Association opens summer season 
July 7. 

CONCERT 
HOLLYWOOD BOWL— "Symphonies Under the 
Stars," 36th season begins July S, presenting an 
eight- week series of performances featuring world- 
famous soloists and orchestras with varied added 
features. 

SANTA MONICA MEMORIAL THEATRE — 
"Sym phonies by the Sea," July performance dates 
to be announced. 

MUSICALS 

"LOUISIANA PURCHASE*'— At Philharmonic Au- 
ditorium starting July 14, starring William Gaxton, 
Vera Zorina, Victor Moore. Curtain at 8:30; prices 
$1.20 to $4.80. Wednesday and Saturday matinee 
at 2:30, $1.20 to $3.60. 



10 



THE CALIFORNIAN, July, 1947 



GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 




GOING PLACES AND EATING OUT 



VARIETY 

TURNAB0UT THEATRE— The Yale Puppeteers, 
Elsa Lanchester and Lotte Goslar in good enter- 
tainment. "Mr. Noah" and "About Face" through 
July 5; "Caesar Julius" and "Vice Versa" July 6-12; 
"Tom and Jerry" and "Turnabout Time" July 13- 
19; "Gullible's Travels" and "Southern Exposure" 
July 20-27. 

WORLD INVENTORS EXPOSITION— July 11 to 

20 at Pan Pacific Auditorium. Doors open at noon, 
close at 11 p.m. Adults 80c, children 50c. 



SPORTS 

GRUNION DERBY— Catch a grunion at Hunting- 
ton Beach July 3 to 6, evenings from 8:45 to 10:15. 
Another run expected July 18 to 21, 9 p.m. to 11:30 
p.m. 

MARINE WEEK— At Santa Barbara July g 4-6, 
water sports and contests. Swimming and diving 
championship competitions. 

TENNIS — La Jolla will hold 31st annual tennis tour- 
nament July 16 at La Jolla Playgrounds Tennis 
Courts. 

HORSE RACING— Gold Cup Race at Hollywood 
Park Track July 26. $100,000 purse. 

BOXING — Every Friday night at 8 :30 at Holly- 
wood Legion Stadium; every Tuesday night at 8:30 
at downtown Olympic Auditorium. 

WRESTLING — Every Monday night at Hollywood 
Legion Stadium; every Wednesday night at down- 
town Olympic Auditorium. 

POLO — Regular match games every Sunday at 2 at 
Riviera Country Club Polo Field, off Sunset Blvd., 
on the way to the beach. 

BASEBALL — Pacific Coast League season underway. 
See daily paper for contestants and time. Games 
regularly in Los Angeles, Hollywood, San Francisco, 
Oakland, Sacramento, San Diego, Seattle, Portland. 



OF SPECIAL INTEREST 

THROUGHOUT STATE 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY FAIR AND HORSE 
SHOW— At Santa Maria July 23-27. 

LAGUNA BEACH FESTIVAL OF ARTS— At La- 
guna Beach July 26-August 6. Displays of pottery, 
paintings and handcrafts. Puppet shews ana other 
entertainment. "Pageant of the Masters," living re- 
productions of famous paintings presented each eve- 
ning in Irvine Bowl. 

SAN DIEGO MISSION DAY— Celebration of the an- 
niversary of the founding of the Mission, July 20. 
Fiesta at the Mission. 



THE RESTAURANTS 

IN SAN FRANCISCO 

PALACE HOTEL— Market and New Montgomery 
Sts. Garden Court serving lunch, tea, and dinner. 
Leonard Auletti and his concert orchestra. Ask for 
Joseph, maitre d'. Also Rose Room, open nightly ex- 
cept Monday. Cover $1 weekdays, $1.50 Saturdays. 
Adolph. 

OMAR KHAYYAM— 196 O'Farrell St. Dinner only, 
$2.25 up. George Mardikian. Armenian Shish Kebab, 
Tchahhokhbelli and Kouzou Kzartma are specialties. 

ST. FRANCIS HOTEL — Powell and Geary. Mural 
Room open daily for lunch and dinner, with dancing 
from 8 :30 p.m. except Mondav, and tea dancing 
Saturdays from 4 to 5 :30. A la carte. Ernest. 
Order almost anything. 



LONGBARN— On El Camino Real, 2 miles south of 
Stanford University. Open for dinner only. Closed 
Thursdays. Ask for Willy or Eddy. Dinners $2.50 to 
$4. Plan to eat here when you visit the peninsula. 
Country farmhouse style with women chefs. 

RESTAURANT LOMBARD— 1906 Van Ness Ave. 
Dinner from $2. 50, or a la carte. Bill Lombard 
specializes in steaks and real thick roast beef. 

EL PRADO — Post and Stockton, in the Plaza Hotel. 
Lunch 11-2, dinner 6-9, closed Sundays and holidays. 
Walter is maitre d'. Service London style, with every- 
thing rolled in on a serving table. Chef Maurice 
specializes in French cuisine. Roast beef best item. 

STAR LITE ROOM, Hotel Sir Francis Drake — Sutter 
and Powell. Lunch onlv from 12 to 2, buffet style, 
for $1.50. Includes hot dishes. Al Field, host. You 
dine 22 floors up with a spectacular view. 

TONGA ROOM— In the Fairmont Hotel. Open 4:30 
p.m. to 1:30 a.m. daily. Hawaiian band plays on a 
raft in a swimming pool, with the dining tables 
surrounding. Dinners $3.50. Hawaiian Ham and 
Eggs at $1.50, or a la carte. Henry Degorog, host. 

PARIS— 242 O'Farrell St. Lunch and dinner daily, 
but no lunch on Sunday. Dinner $1.50. Typical old 
San Francisco family-style French cuisine in plain 
surroundings. Lots of crusty French bread and de- 
licious soup. Excellent cooking. 

BLUE FOX— 659 Merchant St. Dinners only, closed 
Mondays. Ask for Mario or Frank. Dinners from 
$2. French and Italian style. Fr*g legs Doree, Bone- 
less Squab, Chicken stuffed with wild rice, Rex Sole 
Marguerite. In an alley, not bright and shiny, but 
they know how to cook. The natives eat here. 

CLIFF HOUSE — Point Lobos Avenue, overlooking 
Seal Rocks. Dinners daily from $1.50. Seafood, 
Steaks, Chicken and Roasts. Eat while looking 
through the oversize plateglass windows at the ocean, 
Seal Rocks and Golden Gate strait. 

THE PLANTATION— At 349 Sutter St. in the de- 
lightful new Pavilion at tiffin time. A la carte, with 
English and French delicacies the feature. Reason- 
ably priced. 

SOLARI'S-^9 Maiden Lane and 29 Kearny. Closed 
Sundays. Fine continental food and atmosphere. Ask 
for Max David or Peter Wolf. A la carte. Special- 
ties include crab legs or sweetbreads. 

DOMINO CLUB— 25 Trinity Place (opposite 111 
Sutter) . Dinners from $2. 50, with emphasis on 
steaks and roast beef. On the walls an impressive col- 
lection of paintings of nudes. Cheery for tourists. 

SCHROEDER'S— 111 Front St. Closed Saturday and 
Sunday. Definitely not a tourist spot, this 54- year- 
old restaurant offers superb German style cooking 
and wonderful dark draught beer. Men only at lunch 
time, but the ladies can come to dinner. Lunches 
from 65 cents and dinners average $1. 

VENETO'S-^ay at Mason St. A corner of old Italy 
with authentic decor, and a fascinating Cave Room 
that has stalactites overhead. Exceptional Italian 
cuisine features Omozzolo tossed salad and chicken 
a la sec. Dinners start at $1.75. 

GRI SON'S — Van Ness and Pacific. Two restaurants 
under same management on opposite corners. At the 
STEAK HOUSE, Kansas City steaks a la carte only 
from $1.25. Other specialties are soft shell crabs, 
eastern prawns, planked steak. At the CHICKEN 
HOUSE, Southern style chicken dinner at $1.85 and 
prime roast beef dinner at $2.15. Ask for Robert 
Grison or Charles Morosin. 

ALFRED'S — 886 Broadway (near Mason). Dinners 
from $2 and a la carte specialties. Charcoal-broiled 
steak, squab en casserole, jumbo frogs legs, chicken 
saute with mushrooms. Ask for Alfred. 

THREE LITTLE SWISS— 530 Broadway. Pleasant 
decor and good food. Lunch from 85c, dinner from 
$2.25, including Cliff steak with mustard sauce, veal 
scallopini, brook trout, Chicken St. Hi > r 'itz. Ask for 
Louis. 




...where the smartest 
Angelenos get together 
for our famous luncheons 
and dinners . . . 
on Beverly Hills' 
"Restaurant Row" 





Subscribe Today 

TO THE CALIFORNIAN 

210 W. 7th St., Loi An|«l*t 14, Cal. 

Please enter my subscription today 
to The Californian for the period 
indicated below: 



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THE CALIFORNIAN, July, 1947 



II 



costume jewelry 
needs your care 




borne of the marvelous artistry in modern 
costume jewelry is worthy of a Cellini . 
it's semi-precious stuff . . . with accent on 
the precious. And, as such, it is worth 
taking care of. 

Primarily, let's get a sectioned jewel case 
. . . there's nothing more destructive to 
bangles and baubles than becoming part of 
an indiscriminate tangle in a catch-all box. 
Padded hosiery boxes lend themselves well 
to jewelry storage . . . another convenient 
receptacle is the compartmented sewing box. 
Or you can make your own gem casket out 
of an egg box: Buy a small bottle of silicate 
of soda . . . water glass . . . from the phar- 
macy and brush it on all surfaces of the sec- 
tioned lining. This will stiffen the cardboard 
so that it will hold its shape. A bit of swish 
can be added if the lining is first painted 
with pastel water color, but test for .thorough 
dryness before applying the water glass. The 
outside of the egg box can be prettied up the 
same way. 

CLEANING THE CROWN JEWELS . . . 
Costume gems, except pearls, can be cleaned 
by dipping in alcohol and then shaking in 
jeweler's sawdust. Soap and warm water, fol- 
lowed by an alcohol rinse, is efficacious ex- 
cept with pieces where glue is incorporated. 
Never use soap on pearls . . . either real or 
synthetic . . . best way to preserve their luster 
is by frequent wearing next to the skin, and 
by polishing with chamois. Coral can be 
cleaned by boiling in soapy water to which 
a pinch of soda has been added. 

SLICK UP YOUR CHAINS . . . gold or 
silver chains are best cleaned by dropping 
into a jar half-filled with gentle soap flakes 
to which has been added a teaspoon of am- 
monia and two teaspoons of whiting. Rinse 
in clear water and dry with jeweler's saw- 
dust or tissue paper. 

BANGLE LORE . . . Your silver bracelets, 
earrings and etceteras are a bit too delicate 
in design for handling with commercial silver 
polish ... so here's the next best thing: 
Rub with art gum eraser, rinse in warm wa- 
ter and polish with soft cloth. For the larger 
pieces, polish with toothpaste and an eye- 
brow brush. 

BUCKLED IN BRASS . . . Those big brass 
belt buckles and the buttons on your sports 
jackets and dresses can be polished to a 
gleam by rubbing with a piece of salted 
lemon. To keep fit for inspection, polish be- 
tween times with a soft cloth dipped in sew- 
ing machine oil. 

COMBS IN YOUR HAIR ... or frames 
on your handbags are apt to be tortoise- 
shell. This can be cleaned and renewed by 
rubbing with powdered rottenstone and jewel- 
er's rouge, followed by a vigorous polish 
with a chamois. 



CALIFORNIA IN BOOKS 



by hazel alien pulling 

lerennial interest in the lore and the lure of California is reflected in the wide 
and varied range of her current publications. 

And vieing for first place in appeal for readers are two books with new-found 
subjects: one, an illuminating panorama of Chinese life in California in the days 
of the Gold Rush era, Pigtails and Gold Dust, by Alexander McLeod (Caxton, 1947. 
326p. $5.00) ; the other, a dramatic portrayal of the fabulous life of California's 
financial wizard, A. P. Giannini; Giant in the West, by Julian Dana (Prentice-Hall, 
1947. 345p. $4.50). Another recent book that may well supplant both of these in 
the interest of many readers is Parker Tyler's Magic and Myth of the Movies, an 
evaluation of the sociological, psychological, and artistic qualities of California's 
best-known product — the motion picture (Holt, 1947. 283p. $3.50). 

Pigtails and Gold Dust is a sympathy-begetting account of the vicissitudes suffered 
by the Chinese, when, a pigtailed, blue-jacketed horde, they settled quietly upon 
gold-bedazzled California to do her menial tasks and to become one of her dis- 
tressing, long unsolved problems. From 1848 to the demolition of San Francisco's 
Chinatown by the earthquake and fire of 1906 the course of the Oriental in his new- 
found home is traced. Customs and beliefs, slave markets and opium dens, weird 
superstitions and Tong wars are displayed against a background of old-world 
influences and new-world necessities. Many a myth is exploded in this brocaded 
panorama of one phase of California life. 

A. P. Giannini is a hope-inspiring account of a man who rose from meager be- 
ginnings to a life of riches and fulfillment. It also is the story of a region whose 
history paralleled, sometimes intertwined that of the man. Amadeo Peter Giannini, 
born in 1870, was the son of Luigo, grape-growing immigrant from Italy who 
sought, but failed to find, wealth from the gumbo flats of Alviso. From the poverty 
of his youth "A. P." became one of the nation's ten top financiers. His dramatic 
life, his spectacular success, the loves and the hates he engendered, are indissolubly 
part of the life of the land and its people. Dana, adept student of California's past, 
has added one more worthy title to his list of California interpretations. 

Southern California's motion picture industry has found a staunch supporter 
and effective interpreter in Parker Tyler, native of Louisiana who surprisingly has 
never visited Hollywood. His Magic and Myth of the Movies is an answer to the 
query, "What's in a movie?" Seeking a broad understanding of man through an 
analysis of his pleasure in motion pictures, Tyler explains the psychological and 
emotional impact of the movies and recounts their value in revealing life's mo- 
tives and in satisfying its hungers. From his analysis of specific pictures one learns 
to evaluate the art of the cinema and to enjoy its offerings. Entertaining and 
enlightening, this book is as much a view of a region as it is of the product of 
an industry. 

One last book, in the event you have not yet planned that vacation trip. Have 
you seen Carl Parcher Russell's One Hundred Years in Yosemite: the Story of a 
Great Park and Its Friends? (University of California, 1947. 226p. $3.75). This 
revised edition will acquaint you with the park as it was known by explorers and 
early visitors, and will enhance your own enjoyment of its scenic splendors. 

Write to me in care of The Californian if you are interested in any particular 
phase of Californiana . . any book you wish reviewed. 



household hints 



New flavor for boiled artichokes: Add two tablespoons of salad oil and a clove of garlic to the 
cooking water. 

Handy applicators for silver polish: Old powderpuffs which have been washed thoroughly 
and dried. 

Soiled tapestry hangings: Clean by rubbing with dry bran, then brushing thoroughly. 

To freshen dried nutmeats: Soak for several hours in a half-and-half solution of milk and water. 

Clogged holes in gas stove burners can be cleaned with pipe cleaners 

Don't pour cold water into hot kettles, it may warp the metal. 

Revive artificial flowers made of fabric by placing them over steam for a few minutes. 

To clean feathers or plumes: Place them in a paper bag with one cup flour and one-half 
cup powdered borax; shahe gently. 

Match-scratches on painted surfaces: Remove by rubbing with cut lemon. 

Perfume stains on white garments: Remove by sponging with a half-and-half solution of 
hydrogen peroxide and water. 

Shoe stains on your nylon hosiery: Remove by adding one tablespoon of borax to the soap 
and water. 

Uneven, ragged ends on your scrub mop result in splash marks on the baseboards; keep mop 
trimmed neatly. 

"Essence of Garlic" will tone up gravies and soups, also can be used to baste roasts. Make 
it by muddling two cloves of garlic, adding water and letting mixture stand for a half hour. 



12 



ON RECORD 



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ith 



ranees anderson 



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1 he postwar world is beginning to fulfill some of its promises so far as the field 
of recorded music is concerned. Discs of lighter, more enduring materials yielding 
more accurate reproduction; phonographs of greater range and depth of tone; 
and, on the intangible side, a more adventurous spirit in seeking out new talents 
and seldom-heard but very fine music. 

In the serious music department, the trend can be illustrated by two somewhat 
disparate enterprises: the English Decca Full Frequency Range Recording, which 
combines the most excellent, impeccable and noteworthy mechanical reproduction 
to be heard today, with an interesting choice of subjects and fine musicianship; 
and the RCA Victor Heritage Series . . . re-pressings of out-of-print masterpieces 
by artists for the most part already departed for a musical Valhalla, issued on the 
shiniest vinylite which seems to eradicate a lot of the scratchiness and unevenness 
that was unavoidable in early recording. 

In both popular and serious music categories, today's output covers a sur- 
prisingly wide range . . . for instance: 

SERIOUS RECORDINGS 

Brahms, Sonata in f minor, Op. 120, No. 1, for viola and piano. We lead off 
with this because the artistry of William Primrose, probably the world's foremost 
violist, and William Kapell do full justice to a very beautiful sonata. Victor. 
Mendelssohn, "Reformation Symphony," No. 5 in d minor, recorded by Sir Thomas 
Beecham and the London Philharmonic Orchestra. Beecham extracts all possible 
color and dynamics from a work that is sometimes dull, sometimes attractive, often 
fine. Victor. "Poor Me" and "Hold On," negro spirituals sung by Marian Anderson. 
The first is sombre, its depths explored with a wonderful cello-like tone: the latter 
exuberant. Victor. 

NOTE: Jascha Heifetz has a whole batch of new single records out, all of them 
played with dazzling virtuosity. The maestro's choice of compositions ranges from 
solid to mediocre. Miklos Rozsa, "The Red House," a suite of four parts arranged 
from the motion picture score. Well, it's supposed to be "serious" music. Capitol. 

POPULAR ALRUMS 

"Music Out of the Moon." This hodge-podge of jive and theremin (the thing 
! that evokes sounds from the atmosphere when you wave your hands over it, and 
sounds like a vibrato off-key soprano voice) isn't bad if you can survive the sexiest 
album-cover that ever got past the censors. Capitol. 

"Somebody Loves Me," a collection of songs by Buddy de Sylva, sung by Capitol's 
leading artists. Best: Peggy Lee (ahh!) doing "Somebody Loves Me," and the 
King Cole Trio on "You're The Cream in My Coffee." Nice to have. Capitol. 
"Rodgers and Hart Songs" sung by Milton Berle, Betty Garrett and others. Good 
tunes, fair performance by Berle, extremely funny rendition by Betty Garrett in her 
flat, down-to-earth voice. Victor. 

JUKE ROX FODDER 

"A Little Too Fer" and "The Covered Wagon Rolled Right Along." Don't miss 
these. Johnny Mercer goes hill-billy with wonderful results, aided and abetted 
by Merle Travis. Wes Tuttle and the Coon Hunters. Capitol. "It Takes Time." 
and "I Wonder, I Wonder." Old Satchmo does right well . . . it's Armstrong all 
the way ... on the lyrics and of course on the incomparable horn. Victor. 

"Old Devil Moon" finds Margaret Whiting at her best on a good tune. Backed 
by the dreamy "Ask Anyone Who Knows." Capitol. "I Wish I Didn't Love You 
So." Betty Hutton does a torch song . . . but good! The reverse, "The Sewing 
Machine," is in her more characteristic or cement-mixer style. Capitol. "I Sold 
My Heart to the Junkman" and "My Sleepy Head." We're getting awfully fond of 
Etta Jones . . . rhythm, personality and mood. Victor. 

"There's Them That Do" is real cute, that's what, with lyrics by Bobby Sherwood 
and Lynn Stevens. Sherwood and his band do nicely on the back, too, with "We 
Knew It All The Time." Capitol. "I Never Knew" . . . that Sam Donahue 
could carry off a blue mood in this chromatic manner. Swell vocal by Bill Lock- 
wood. Reverse is usual bounce, "Why Did It Have To End So Soon." Capitol. 
"Bo Bo Baila," and "Mi Corazon" . . . really good Latin rhythm by Rafael Mendez 
and his orchestra. Exclusive. 

"New Orleans Blues" and "I Surrender, Dear" by Johnny Moore's Three Blazers, 
one of the best small combos going. Good mellow vocals by Charles Brown. Ex- 
clusive. "Shorty's Got To Go" sez Bill Johnson and the Musical Notes . . . this 
is very funny, with some good licks on the side. Backing is "Don't You Think I 
Oughta Know." Also okay, but "Shorty" gets the nod on lyrics. Victor. 



shadow-boxing 
for your home 




IN ot all of us can own a genuine Cezanne 
or Gaugin . . but what we can do is con- 
struct a shadow-box arrangement of actual 
still-life models such as might have been 
used by the great painters. Shadow-box 
art can be adapted to the mood of any 
room . . will provide endless variety in 
decorative accent. 

To make one of these magical gadgets, 
buy a piece of half-inch thick plywood 
and have it cut into four sections . . two 
of them 24 inches by six inches, another 
two, 18 by six, and the fifth piece, 18 by 
24. Use shingle nails to fasten together 
into a shallow box, the open side of which 
is then glued or nailed to the back sur- 
faces of an old picture frame. All sorts of 
intriguing frames can be found in second- 
hand stores, and one type that lends itself 
to multi-various treatment is the ornate 
gay-nineties gilt frame. Keep in mind, 
however, that the frame must be light in 
weight or it cannot be attached securely 
to the edges of the plywood box. 

For the wall of an informal dining room 
or dinette, you might try one of the baroque 
frames around a whimsical grouping of 
loaf-of-bread and jug-of-wine. Suggested for 
this is a raffia-wrapped wine bottle and 
a loaf of French bread (coated with egg- 
white or water-glass to preserve the color 
and shape.) If the addition of a "book 
of verse" seems overwhelming, the fore- 
ground could be comprised of a few pieces 
of fruit or colorful vegetables. A more 
formal shadow-box, featuring perhaps a 
Dresden grouping or a Chinese arrange- 
ment of figurine, vase and floral, would 
call for a lighter frame of delicate design. 

Several different "backdrops" should be 
made so that they may be interchanged. 
Suggested are unusual textured fabrics in 
neutral colors or half-tones which may be 
stretched and glued on cardboard or thin 
plywood and tacked to the back of the 
shadow-box. Equally good are cut-to-fit 
pieces of woven bamboo or wood-grained 
veneer stripping. 

So, round up all your precious objets 
d'art. look through your kitchen cup- 
boards for colorful bottles and jars, inves- 
tigate the attic and basement catch-alls 
for possible component parts of still-life 
displays and put your imagination and in- 
genuity to work. Every room in the house 
can have a shadow-box, and, depending 
upon your decor and mood, they can serve 
as a setting for everything from patri- 
cian Wedgewood to plebian bottle glass. 



13 



D4SICNCD BY 



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WRITE FOR NAME OF NEAREST STORE 



THE CAIIFOINIAN, July, 1947 



IS 




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SPLENDOR 



New free-swing coat 
with flared back... 
matching pencil-slim skirt. 
Exquisitely designed 
in whisper-soft suede, 
expertly tailored 
throughout. 
Sizes 10 to 18... 
in lush California colors. 

Sold together 
or separately. 






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TAYtORS ' or C ALIFORNIA 

FOREMOST CRAFTSMEN IN SUEDE ANDJ 

LEADERS IN WESTERN FRINGE WEAhI 



TAYLOR'S OF CALIFORNIA 83 4 south broadway 






LOS ANGELES 14, CALIFORNIA 



16 



THE CALIFORNIAN, July, 1947 




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VV ith exotic ocheherazade 
.Marty Cotin brings to reality a 

lifelong dream — custom 
originals at ready-to-wear prices, 

so that trie many may 

now enjoy what has been reserved 

for the privileged tew. 

Executed in costly, fluid 
crepe, Estelle Jjoube s creation is 

notable lor its cascading 
elegance, its lavish sleeve drape, 

its embroidered belt 
ncrusted with sparkling jewels. 



WRITE FOR NAME OF 
NEAREST STORE 



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3 4 SO U T H BR O A D W A Y, L OS AN G E L E S 14, C A I I F O R N I 



Buff urns 



LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA 







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your whirlwind of summer activities. Prize its comfort 
...applaud its sleek good looks... cherish it in several colors and two leath- 
ers: Suede in white, black, brown or green.. Calf in red, sizes 4V* to 9. $8.95 



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MAIL ORDERS 



18 



THE CALIFORNIAN, July, 1947 



era 



' i i n i 

S2> 



{JO 

TSSZ 



-OC 



<S» 



CJS 



IjEDITOR AND PUBLISHER- 
VICE PRESIDENT AND 
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR- 
MANAGING EDITOR 

FASHION DIRECTOR 

[fashion EDITOR 

FASHIONS 



i FEATURES- 



STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER- 
MERCHANDISING 

FOOD STYLIST 

PRODUCTION 



. J. R. Osherenko 

- Herman Sonnabend 

■ Donald A. Carlson 

■ Sally Dickason Carolin 

- Virginia Scallon 

- Diana Stokes 
Jacqueline Lary 
Edie Jones 
Lanice Dana 
Alice Stiffler 
Malcolm Steinlauf 

. Virginia Teale 
Frances Anderson 
Hazel Allen Pulling 

. Morris Ovsey 
Dorothy Marootian 
John Grandjean 
Martin Mandelblatt 
Ann Harris 

. Frank Stiffler 

. Loise Abrahamson 
Hazel Stall 

. Helen Evans Brown 

. Daniel Saxon 
Robert Farnham 



ON THE COVER and 
ready for your most 
glamorous day at the 
beach is Rose Marie 
Reid's copper classic 
sivimsuit of Dobeck- 
man non-tarnishin g. 
elasticized "Lurex" 
with inner Miracle-bra 
and zip perle ss back. 
About $25 at May Co. 
Wilshire. Los Angeles: 
Wm. H. Block, In- 
dianapolis; Chas. A. 
Stevens, Chicago. Liq- 
uid Sun Bronze by 
Charles ol the Ri':. 
Photo by Dash Taylor. 



TAUFORNIAN 





The Ma!ii)!j 
j Fashions 
California Li^mg 



California fashions 

Beauty on the Beach 24 

Pull for the Shore .....26 

Fairway Fashion 30 

A Strike for Style 31 

Accessories That Look Toward Fall 32 

Simply Perfect 34 

Perfectly Simple 35 

In the Mood for Fall .38 

What to Wear to California in July 42 

A Suit for Now . . and Then! .: 43 

Dressing by Design, by Florence Shuman 44 

In Fashion for Men ...56 

California features 

Queen of the Malibu. by William J. Bowen 20 

Sails Set for Hawaii, by Virginia Teale 28 

Hollywood Bowl and the Summer Program 36 

In California It's 47 

Sigh When You Say "Sablon". 55 

The Nightingale and the Crow 58 

Cameras Click for Housewives 60 

California beauty 

Stand Up! by Edna Charlton 54 

California living 

This Is the House to Build ..48 

California Cooks, by Helen Evans Brown ..52 



California fiction 

A Visit to James, by Levitt and Mitchell 



.46 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly at 210 W. Seventh St., Los Angeles 14, Cali- 
fornia. Michigan S571. New York Office, Saul Silverman, eastern advertising manager, 
1450 Broadway, LAckawanna 4-5659; San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph, 26 O'Farrell St., 
EXbrook 2704; Chicago Office, Nedom L. Angier, Jr., Ill W. Jackson St.; Detroit Office, 
Charles H. Cowling, 633 Book Bldg., CHerrv 68S1; Cleveland Office, William E. Coates, 
2200 Lakeland, LAkeland 1479. Subscription 'p"": $3.00 one year, $5.00 two vears, $7.50 
three years. One dollar additional postage per year outside continental United States. 
25 cents per copy. Entered as second class matter January 25, 1946, at the Post Office at 
Los Angeles, California, under act of March 3, 1S79 Copvright 1947 The Californian, Inc. 
Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 



1' II 



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■ ■ *v. 





BOB 



nraB^BH^H 




THE MALIBU 




MANY and mellow are the tales of 
old castles, fabulous feudal estates 
and the legendary characters who 
ruled over them. But this is the story 
of a modern castle . . where only 
this year the last mosaic was laid in 
a fantastic $200,000 pattern of tile 
. . the story of a 24,000-acre Cali- 
fornia estate, which, despite having 
had its heart sliced out to create a 
beautiful motion picture colony, still 
remains largely intact as the last 
of the great Spanish land grants to 
be dispersed. That is the story of 
Mrs. May K. Rindge, Queen of The 
Malibu, who, though not yet seven 
years dead, already is a legendary 
figure to the residents of the West. 

The lowest and the highest courts of the land record her 17- 
year losing battle against encroachment upon her domain by 
county and state highways. Many a Los Angeles businessman 
can recall his own encounter with her rough, gruff fence 
riders when, in the spirit of boyish adventure, he sought to 
slip through her fence and locked gates to enjoy or explore 
the unknown beaches beyond Castle Rock. Sadly he may re- 
call the efficiency of the armed riders who were charged with 
protecting, inviolate against all comers and trespassers, her 
late husband's dreamy ideal of an American Riviera . . a 
Riviera they hoped would one day stretch along the 22 miles 
of virgin shores they owned with a lifelong passion of pos- 

by William J. Bowen 



The Queen: Mrs. May K. 
Rindge, whose 20-year de- 
fense of her Malibu domain 
left her bankrupt. Today the 
last of the famous Spanish 
land grants is in liquidation. 




session. The hard fighting, embit- 
tered and persecuted Mrs. Rindge, 
Queen of The Malibu, remains to- 
day, as during her life, a legend. 

Like those other mellower, older 
tales, this one is lean of facts . . 
rich in dubious fable. And one can- 
not be certain which is which. This 
has been so since the days of the 
phantom shipwreck on Point Dume, 
and persists so through the events of 
the last decade. Anyone can visit 
the Rindge Castle on a weekday . . 
but few know it or do so . . and see 
for himself that the gold plumbing 
fixtures he has heard about are not 
there. The Father Superior will tell 
vou that none were in evidence when the Franciscans bought 
the unfinished castle at a bankruptcy sale six years ago. But 
the story of The Malibu does not suffer from these deletions 
. . the truth is fabulous enough. 

The Malibu had been cloaked in mystery and isolation 
since the beginning of its known history. The Rindge fam- 
ily merely perpetuated its lonely mood through its last period 
as a modern frontier. Thousands of motorists who daily 
speed along the intruding ribbon of concrete that is the coast 
highway now can enjoy the scenic splendor of the shore- 
line that once was reserved for the eyes of the Queen alone. 
They can imagine the glamorous way of life that breathes 
within the privacy of the colony of cliffside estates. But 



The Queen's husband: Fred- 
erick Hastings Rindge, who 
in 1890 dreamed of an 
American Riviera on his 24,- 
000-acre Rancho Topanga- 
Malibu-Sequit by the sea. 



20 



Perched regally upon a promontory overlooking Malibu Greek, the fashionable 
motion picture colony and the Pacific Ocean beyond, the Queen's fabulous castle, 
opposite pa^e and below, today is used as a Catholic retreat. Almost as legendary 
as the Queen herself, it took years to lay its tons of mosaic and roofing' tile. 

From a catwalk set in the gable of the Rindge castle roof. Father Superior 
Augustin surveys the estates of the Serra Retreat. The spending of half a 
million dollars on the home that May Rindge never completed kept a death-bed 
promise to her husband . . . the last grand stroke before her own demise. 




This oriental "throw rug" 
. . . complete with fringe 
. . . actually is a mosaic of 
glazed tile. It is the smallest 
of three intricate rug copies 
in the castle. Laundry chutes 
and cupboards are of tile, 
too. The story of an upstairs 
swimming pool is a myth. 



few are aware of the charm of the hills and canyons and 
streams . . or of the romance and mystery and secrets locked 
in the rocks and the sand and the waters of this, the last of 
the great ranches. And few are they who, noting the grand 
castle perched regally on its mesa top, pause to think of it 
as a bitter monument to the woman who fought doggedly for 
an ideal, only to die bankrupt, still clinging to the last rem- 
nants of her crumbling empire. 

The scant recorded history between the landing of Juan 
Rodriguez Cabrillo in 1542 and the beginning of the Rindge 
dynasty in 1890 is highly colored with uncorroborated tales 
of pirates and thieves and adventurers. Let us look back upon 
some of this early romance and mystery without prejudice 
as to which is fancy, which fact. 

There are tales of Spanish galleons and American vessels 
manned by pirates that used to put in safely along the shores 
of The Malibu. As long ago as 1819, two Yankee smugglers' 
ships landed at Point Dume and it is recorded that the leaders 
were caught and put in chains by the Mexican bandits who 
had lured them ashore. A tunnel, probably man-made, through 
the rocks on the point is supposed to have been used by the 
pirates and smugglers; and it is said that they landed their 
loot in the cove to its north. Remnants of a deserted well 
and ancient shack are discoverable to the keen-eyed explorer 
of magnificent lonely Dume. 

Old-timers from the Zuma Canyon and Boney Mountain 
regions tell of the "phantom" ship that was wrecked on Point 
Dume 60 years ago. Nobody ever knew who had been aboard, 
but apparently the ship's complement had gotten away safely 
across the Santa Monica Mountains. At any rate, the old- 
timers swear, an empty treasure chest was found aboard the 
vessel. If one stands today on the rugged, windy point of 
Dume . . which forms the northern arm of vast Santa Monica 
Bay . . and listens to the moaning of the offshore buoy, he 
will be inclined to give full credence to those yarns. Waves 
crash upon the rocks just seaward from the point where, 
twice a year, sea lions come by the hundreds to have their 
pups and school them in the ways of sea lion living. On the 
bluffs commanding one of the coast's most inspiring sights, 
northward to Point Mugu and southward across the arc of 
beach cities to Palos Verdes, the subdivider's markers pressage 
the imminent intrusion, at last, of a civilization which had 



until now by-passed it on the Roosevelt Highway only one 
mile away. 

But smuggling of a different kind has colored the history of 
The Malibu as lately as the twenties. Rum runners landed 
along its deserted shores during prohibition, and on at least 
one occasion there was a running battle lasting several hours 
between the bootleggers and the Federals. And then, as re- 




Today The Malibu has achieved something of the American Riviera flavor 
... is a playground for movie folk and others who can afffford swank 
estates along its shores. And surf boarding is one of a dozen sports en- 
joyed. An expensive restaurant and sport shop repose at the end of The 
Malibu pier . . . once the landing spot for a variety of smugglers. 



21 




FRANK STIFFLER 



cently as 1930 it was suspected that Chinese and other aliens 
were being smuggled ashore on The Malibu. 

Mountain settlers in the canyons around the fringe of The 
Malibu still dig for buried treasure. Diggers with "authentic" 
maps periodically show up in search of the loot of three 
Mexican bandits. They had robbed a church in Mexico and 
were supposed to have buried their treasure after a feud re- 
sulting in a gun battle among themselves. 

Even Tiburcio Tapia. son of the original owner of The 
Malibu and one-time alcalde or mayor of Los Angeles, was 
said to have buried two chests of silver and gold before he 
died. And then there are the stories of a bandit who used 
to take an ox cart laden with treasure boxes up the coast and 
cache them in the canyons; and of California's famed Robin 
Hood. Joaquin Murrieta. who is supposed to have buried chests 
in Topanga Canyon. Within ten years ten men were murdered 
in an abandoned mine in Temescal Canyon, and 40 vears 
ago the Santa Monica Outlook reported that at least one of 
them involved an incident over an old treasure chest. Sam 
Carson, who boasted dubiously of being the illegitimate son 
of Kit Carson, is thought by many Santa Monica Mountain 
dwellers to have died carrying with him the secrets to much 
of the buried and hidden loot. 

Until recently it had been said that the first industry of 
the Santa Monica Mountains . . including The Malibu . . 
was cattle raising . . and second was cattle stealing. Most 
famous tale concerning the latter enterprise involves one 
Lechuza. "The Night Owl." Lechuza was a woman bandit and 
cattle rustler who lived with her gang in the mountains back 
of The Malibu. A tumble-down shack, said to be hers, may 
be seen today by the curious. Her habit was to drive cattle 
from the San Fernando and Santa Clara Valleys into the isola- 
tion of her craggy Malibu mountain retreat. Finally, pur- 
sued by a sheriff's posse, she ran her horses into the ocean 
off the end of Point Dume. deceiving the law into believing 
she had reached a sad end. Lechuza, however, escaped over 
Triunfo Pass to be heard of again in the Imperial Valley. 

When Cabrillo put ashore on The Malibu 405 years ago 
there were only peaceable Chumash and Digger Indians. The 



B Virgin shores like these still re- 
main along the 22-mile Rancho 
Malibu coastline . . the last fron- 
tier . . although the subdividers' 
stakes pressage the final breakup 
of the last of the old Spanish land 
grants into smaller estates. Point 
Dume, from where this picture was 
taken, holds the secret to many 
tales of cattle rustlers, smugglers 
and early-day phantom ships. 



Still unfamiliar with the private H 
seclusions of The Malibu are near- 
by Angelenos. Consequently, its 
streams remain a fishin' and swim- 
min' paradise to the few adven- 
turesome kids who explore the 
sylvan canyons and mountains. 




word Malibu itself is a corruption of Maliwu, the name of a 
Chumash village that stood to the east of the Malibu Creek 
mouth. Cabrillo had stopped there to fill his water casks 
from the Arroyo Malibu but. like many a visitor of today, 
tarried nearly a month. This summer a two-million dollar 
yacht harbor to house the Malibu Quarterdeck Club is being 
dredged out of the creek's delta where he landed. On a 
promontory in the creek's canyon a mile inland stands the 
fabulous Rindge Castle, now the Serra Retreat for the use 
of Catholic laymen. The Queen of the Malibu never quite 
completed it and never lived in it. On the sand spit by the 

(.Continued on page 62) 



22 



Living On The Malibu... 







Home on weekends from Marymount School where she boards, fourteen- 
year-old Jane Garland spends her time with her palomino and colt. Pretty 
canyons and rugged hills offer good riding. Best of the lookouts to the sea 
is Horse Heaven where the freely ranging Rrndge horses used to gather. 



Poachers have an easier lime of it than they did in the old days of the tough 
Rindge fence riders. These ex-G.I.'s from Santa Monica have built a lean-to 
of palm fronds on the private beach and are expert surf riders. They 
practically live here . . between the Adam son estate and The Malibu pier. 




June Havoc, on a day off from shooting MGM's "Intrigue," drops in on 
Dorothy Morris . . gossip columnist on the weekly Malibu Star . . at her 
ocean front home in The Malibu movie colony. Finds her well-clothed sister, 
Gypsy Rose Lee, and her son, already visiting in the beachy tea house. 



Ion McCallister of Twentieth Century-Fox is doing what a lot of people are 
doing these days . . his own decorating and repairs . . in the little Malibu 
cottage he calls his own. Fish nets hung on the walls and a new coat of 
paint help to make ready for the summer season of colony entertaining. 




Ocean swimming and sunning remain the most popular of The Malibu 's 
pastimes. Here's a group near Point Dume . . see picture at top of oppo- 
site page . . which forms the northern arm of vast Santa Monica Bay. Sea 
lions congregate here twice a year to bear their young and school them. 



Living is casual but smart along The Malibu . . the California way of life . . 
meet two attractive young women appropriately dressed for the beach 
. . having lunch in a restaurant on The Malibu pier. Outside, a young 
fisherman patiently waits for nibbles . . can enjoy the scenery on every side. 



Snow-sculptured suit, left above, in elasticized 

sharkskin . . . wonderful accent to sun tan; Mabs 
of California. $11.95 at Franklin Simon, New York. 
Collapsible sunshade of Bates fabric. 




on the beach 



You take your sun brightly, left below, in 
Tahitian boxer shorts, matching bra, coat (not 

shown) ; Gantner of California, the set 
about $20 at Livingston Bros., San Francisco; 
Frank Bros., San Antonio. 

Wanda Walco's boy-shorts, right, with adjustable 
bra in denims, about $5 at F. & R. Lazarus, 

Columbus; The Bon Marche, 
Seattle; Desmond's, Los Angeles. And it's a dust cap 
with fashion aspirations by Marea: 

Callico cotton with lace ruffles! 




25 




U 





-i 




pull for the shore 



26 



,'f you're going to sea or mountains 
for summer's vacation, here are some 
)laytime go-togethers . . . they make 
fun of leisure hours at home, too! 




You'll look nautical but nice in Graff's tailored striped blouse, 
above right, of Everfast Mistysheer, with sleek-as-a-whistle 
gabardine shorts, about $8 at Hale Bros., San Francisco ; 
Loeser's, Brooklyn. Above, left, Paramount Hollywood Fash- 
ion's striped shorts in J. P. Stevens cotton twill, about $3. 



Left, Sun Rose slack suit (matching skirt not shown) for real 
sailors, landlubbers, too ... in Reltex Airbrigade, about $15 
at May Co.. Los Angeles; Stern Bros., New York; Sibley 
Lindsay & Curr, Rochester. 



Wondrous cover-up for a dozen summer uses, capacious pockets 
a favorite carry-all: it's W. R. Darling washable box jacket in 
Pacific Mills Duretta cloth, opposite page, about $10. 




FNk 




i 





The beautiful 
Stella Maris II, 
pictured here, 
and her skipper, 
Dr. A. A. Steele, 
will be winging 
again from San 
Pedro Light on 
the big race. 
The Stella was 
constructed back 
of Doc's office. 



W. C. SAWYER 



Sails set for Hawaii 



more than thirty yachtsmen 
with a big pocketbook and an 

all-consuming love of the sea 
are sailing with the wind in the 
renewal of the famous race to hawaii 




W. L. Stewart, Jr., affectionately known as 
Bill, skippers the Chubasco, and is commo- 
dore oj the exclusive Transpacific Yacht Club. 




Fourth of July flags are aflutter from every building in the vicinity of 
Los Angeles Harbor. The wharves are swarming with friends and well- 
wishers, and out on the gray-green waters around San Pedro Light are 
poised the sleek sailing yachts that will make the 2,225-mile dash for Diamond 
Head off the Island of Oahu. 

Such was the picture this July 4 for the start of the first of the famous 
Honolulu Races to be held since war's end. It is the 14th contest since the in- 
augural in 1906, and every Corinthian with salt in his blood either has par- 
ticipated or has dreams of someday doing so. 

Spectators gathered to watch the start strain their eyes to catch sight of 
their favorite boats. They enthusiastically point out the Dragoon, the Medley 
and the Lady Jo; the Emerald, the Magic Carpet and the Ecstasy, and after the 
sounding of the preparatory gun, the onlookers watch for the blue signal 
pennant to give place to the red, indicating that the starting gun has been fired 
and the big race is on. 

For the men who wait expectantly on the decks, this hour is the fulfillment of 
weeks of planning and anticipation. The boats, depending upon their size, 
carry a complement of from four to twelve . . selected from scores of applica- 
tions filed months before. Most skippers will agree that congeniality plays a 
vital part in the appointment of crew as it is of utmost importance that there 
is no jarring note in the camaraderie. Between turns at the tiller, compass and 
halyards, the men read, sleep, play cards and swap yarns, and the enforced in- 
timacy of the daily routine easily can make or break friendships. 

But the traditional welcoming phrase, "Glad to have you aboard!" is most 
heartfelt when addressed to a crewman who can cook. There's no appetite more 
prodigious than that induced by salt air, and contrary to the general assumption, 
the crew does not exist on a diet of canned beans and sardines. For the first 
few days there are plenty of fresh fruits, vegetables and milk. Later, there is a 
store of frozen items. And one enterprising frozen food company recently has 
marketed complete frozen meals for such jaunts. Attractively arranged upon 
plates and needing only to be thawed and warmed, they consist of meat, vege- 
tables and garnishes. But in spite of these conveniences, skippers regard the man 
who presides over the stove as equal in importance to the man at the sextant, 
and zealously hunt out good cooks for the cruise. 

Many a Corinthian's wife has shrugged unsympathetically about this problem, 
maintaining that if women were allowed aboard, the crew would be royally fed. 
They point to the gastronomic well-being of the crew of the White Cloud, whose 
collective stomachs will be treated to the superb cookery of Mrs. Frank Kent, 
wife of the skipper. But, according to Mrs. Kent, all is not always duck soup 
on the briny: 

"One day the stove turned over and the ham came bouncing around the corner 
headed for New York, slithered down the main salon followed by all its glorious 
gravy and nice little potatoes and a flood of coffee . . ." 

This year marks the third time the lady Kent has sailed in the Honolulu Race, 
and if the White Cloud does not capture the cup, the crew can console themselves 
with the memory of incomparable hot biscuits. 

There is no official ruling against the feminine contingent, but they seldom are 
included in the crew. In the '47 race, however, the Teton carries two teen-age 
girls, daughters of Dr. Paul D. Van Degrift, the skipper. Both girls are expert 
sailors. Mary Jean, 19, has signed on as cook, and Joanne, 16, will function as 

(Continued on page 61) 



by Virginia teale 




Dr. Tweedy . . oops . . Frank Morgan . . 
ivill sail his Dolphin II. One of Morgan's 
jaunts took him and his family to Alaska. 




Movie star George Brent will try for the cup 
with the South Wind. Below you see Hum- 
phrey Bogart with wife on the Santana. 











fairway fashion 



EARL SCOTT 



Specially designed for the active sportswoman, this Graff of California 
Golfer is practical for suburban or home wear, too ! Wonderful spread- 
eagle sleeves that allow complete freedom for arms in motion . . . belt 
with real tee-trim . . . sturdy dot fasteners in concealed fly front. In wash- 
able Michael Ross fabrics, seersucker or fine combed cottons, sizes 10-20, 
about $13 at Weill's, Bakersfield; Dorothy's Sport Shop, Alameda; 
Gold & Co., Lincoln. 



30 



a strike for style 



Fashion-right for bowling with its skirt that unbuttons to make a culotte . . . city- 
smart at all times . . . Royal of California makes this bowling dress in Duplex 
Whippet gabardine, sizes 10-20. under S20 at The Broadway. Los Angeles. 




O'UJLirvG 



t 




, 


) 


'•-.'••"'■ 1 

.- ~-_: mm ^ ij A _ 


i, 







-■ :• ' ft 


mm 












i 




1339 


' 


1 
















f\ 








h 


. 




« — i 




V- 


1 









mid-season 



a 



1 >\A 









accessories that look 
toward fall 




WE BELIEVE IN accessories that 
help you bridge the seasons . . . 
wonderful ingrained pigskin with 
its carry-over flavor for fall . . . 
smoky suede, dramatic now with 
summer lights, perfect later. Hints 
of things to come: left to right 
Parker's little pig shorties. • A 
touch of luxury in a pigskin wallet 
lined in white calf, by Sandley. 

• Vic Colton's "Impromptu" 
wedgie slip-on, the color of pig- 
skin. • Ben Brody makes the 
matching pigskin handbag and 
contour belt, saddle stitched and 
so impressive. • Sandley sports- 
man's seat-stick has real aplomb. 

• Ailuj slip-on glove, 6-button 
length, of soot-black suede. • Phil 
Sockett's soft wide belt with self- 
covered buckle is suede, too. 

• Wittman's meticulously styled 
handbag and Illing's "Serenade" 
latticed sling pump are wonderful 
black suede go-togethers for now, 
and to take you into early fall. 




FRANK STIFFLER 



Olimply rGrtGCt: Only gingham gives this fresh new look, only Marjorie Montgomery would 
use it so perfectly ... in a dress that is country-casual. Sizes 10-16, about $15 at B. Altman, New 



\ork; Bamberger's, Newark. 



34 




iGrtGCtly OIITipl©: Connie Foster takes cool corded menswear stripe to fashion a summer 
gadabout suit with the sophisticated perfection of long straight lines. Twin rows of pearl buttons 
put accent on the new length of jacket. Sizes 10-20, about $30 at The Bon Marche, Seattle. 



35 




■"•as 




ollywoodl 



"THERE ARE more things in heaven 
and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of 
in our philosophy . . ." 

"That's fine, Dad. I can hear you 
plain as anything." 

A boy and his father, standing on 
opposite slopes of a vast, natural dell 
in the Hollywood hills, were delighted 
and awed to find that this interchange 
of words, spoken in ordinary conver- 
sational tones, was clearly audible 
across thousands of feet of sage-covered 
ground. And thus . . in the year 1922 
. . were the remarkable accoustic quali- 
ties of Hollywood Bowl discovered by 
a pair of Sunday strollers. 

This month, as they have done for 
many years, music lovers will converge 
upon the internationally famous site 
from all parts of the United States to 
witness the 26th season of "Symphonies 
Under the Stars." And once again thou- 
sands of spectators will experience the 
feeling of wonder and humility inspired 
by the heroic beauty of the Bowl, and 
by the strains of the world's great mu- 
sic as it rises upward to the sky. The 
eight-week series of presentations ap- 
peals to fanciers of classic and popular 



OTTO ROTHSCHILD 



for bach, boogie woogie and 
ballet six million music 
loving americans have trod 
pepper tree lane to nature's 
most famed amphitheatre 




A monument to music is the cornerstone 



36 



Bowl 



music, to devotees of the dance. On 
the current schedule are such contrast- 
ing performers as Artur Rubinstein 
and Larry Adler; Paul Draper and 
Alexandra Danilova. 

After the discovery of the natural 
bowl, theatrical groups and early movie 
makers were quick to visualize its pos- 
sibilities . . and within a short time 
a crude amphitheatre was constructed. 
The performers held forth on a canvas- 
sheltered wooden platform and the au- 
dience attended on rickety plank 
benches. But as more and more peo- 
ple were drawn to these outdoor pro- 
ductions, there began a movement to 
construct a spacious and enduring thea- 
ter. The Hollywood Bowl Association, 
a non-profit civic organization, was 
formed and its members set machinery 
in motion which even- 
tually produced the 
Bowl as it is today: 
Lining the great hol- 
low are tier upon tier 
of steel and concrete 
benches with a seating 
capacity of 20,000. 
(Continued on page 59) 




Nadine Conner 




PROGRAM 

TUESDAY JULY 8 

Music of Wagner conducted by 
Bruno Walter. Helen Traubel 
soprano soloist. 
THURSDAY JULY 10 

Symphonic music conducted by 
Bruno Walter 
SUNDAY JULY 13 

Concert of lighter classics con- 
ducted by Bruno Walter. Solo- 
ists: Winners of 1947 KFl-Hol- 
lywood Bowl Young Artist series. 
TUESDAY JULY 15 

Symphonic music conducted by 
Antal Dorati. Mischa Elman vio- 
lin soloist. 
THURSDAY JULY 17 

Symphonic music conducted by 
Antal Dorati. 
SATURDAY JULY 19 

Viennese music conducted by 
Robert Stolr. Virginia McWaters 
coloratura soprano soloist. John 
Carter Metropolitan tenor solo- 
ist. 
SUNDAY JULY 20 

Symphonic music conducted by 
Antal Dorati. Arnold Eidue vio- 
lin soloist. 
TUESDAY JULY 22 

Symphonic music conducted by 
Vladimir Golschmann. 
THURSd'aY JULY 24 

Symphonic music conducted by, 
Vladimir Golschmann. 
SATURDAY JULY 26 

Paul Draper dancer, and Larry 
Adler harmonicist. Orchestra 
conducted by Victor Young. 
SUNDAY JULY 27 

Symphonic music conducted by 
Vladimir Golschmann. 
Florence Quarteraro Metropoli- 
tan soprano soloist. 
JULY 29, 31 -AUGUST 1 

Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. 
SATURDAY AUGUST 2 

Symphonic music conducted b) 
Sigmund Romberg. Soloists tc 
be announced. 
SUNDAY AUGUST 3 

Sylvia Zaremba piano soloist 
James Sample conductor 
TUESDAY AUGUST 5 

Symphonic music Jose Iturb 
conductor and piano soloist. 
AUGUST 7-8-9 

Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. 
SUNDAY AUGUST 10 

Symphonic music conducted b 

Izler Solomon. Stephan Hen 

violin soloist. 

* THURSDAY AUGUST 14 

Artur Rubinstein piano soloist 
Izler Solomon conductor. 
SATURDAY AUGUST 16 

Symphonic music conducted b 
Izler Solomon. Latin-America 
music conducted by Xavie 
Cugat. 
SUNDAY AUGUST 17 

Symphonic music conducted b 
Jose Iturbi. Amparo Iturbi plan 
soloist. 
TUESDAY AUGUST 19 

Zino Francescatti violin solois 
William Steinberg conductor. 
THURSDAY AUGUST 21 

Nadine Conner, Metropolita 
soprano soloist. William Steir 
berg conductor. 
SATURDAY AUGUST 23 

Symphonic music conducted b 
William Steinberg. 
AUGUST 24 and 26 

Symphonic music conducted b 
Eugene Ormandy. 
THURSDAY AUGUST 28 

Mario Lanza, tenor soloi: 
Frances Yeend, soprano solois 
Eugene Ormandy, conductor. 
SATURDAY AUGUST 30 

Symphonic music conducted t 
Eugene Ormandy. 




n the Mood for Fa 



'| The cocktail suit, left: Nathalie Nicoli's 
afternoon-till-evening costume in Hafner 

bengaline: welt seam curves to form pocket. 
| Opposite page, left, Monroe Lloyd 
puts personality in shirt-collar dress of St. 
George wool ... a perfect knock-about. 
| Opposite page, right, overblouse with 
saddle stitching tops a matching jersey skirt, blouse 
of Duplex San Chu . . . Joy Kingston's 
good news for fall. 



All merchandise shown on these pages will 

be available at your favorite store after 

August 1 



i —^ 



w. 






39 




£? 



J 



You're asking for compliments when you wear 



Marjorie Montgomery's gay little dress, opposite page, left 



with a bright combination of plain-and-fancy. 



Opposite page, right, Louella Ballerino puts Bates 



1 cotton calico atop a full skirt of Concordia-Gallia- gabardine 



for a fresh new look you'll love. 



Right, Joseph Zukin of California uses a fanfare of 



fine panel pleats . . . it's a classic with fine dressmaker 



details, in Duplex Town crepe. 





W 








v v \ v x %,- .• '. -,'.;, 

v \ \ \ sV*-*.v •;. 

v V V * *■*'•• i •' ■ 

v VV \ ;^-*.' . • • 




Be a FASHION-FIRST 






for the FOURTH 




Travel light to California 



add 




veather 



Los 



color . . for rest or ramble your 
wardrobe should be versatile 



his month of the Glorious Fourth is the time you will most appre- 
ciate being in California . . the time of year you will most enjoy its 
breeze-cooled beaches, pine-shaded mountains and crisp, starlit nights. 
\ou who are planning a trek west in July will do well to travel light. 
Leave your pyrotechnics at home . . for in California you will find: 

Firecracker red in the hibiscus blossoms glowing against adobe walls 
. . and you. in a deep chair on the veranda, cool in a sun dress of soft 
linen. 

Skyrocket blues and greens in the rolling waters of the Pacific . . 
and you. under the shade of your beach umbrella, relaxed in the cotton 
comfort of your shorts and bra. 

Pinwheel pastels in lamps around a dance floor . . and you. gliding 
to music, gowned in a street-length dinner dress of black sheer or glow- 
ing print. 

Sparkler iridescence of the lights around the podium at Hollywood 
Bowl . . and you. listening to violins, just warm enough in your light 
suit and bright topper. 

And for vour incidental itinerary, bring along pedal pushers and 

cotton T-shirts for bicycling and walking; a couple of gay scarves to 

hold down your hair when you drive the broad coast highways: at 

least two swim suits, one for try and one for dry. Then a 

Son 



data for juiy Angeles Fmncisco spectator sports dress for the turf club and shoes . . a pair of 

average maximum 76.1 61.5 ] iee ]J ess tOeleSS and sideleSS Sandals, a pair Of dark for after- 

average minimum 57.2 53.1 * 



highest 
lowest 

percentage of 
sunshine 



84 

55 



67 
50 



noon and evening, and a pair each of spectator and low-heeled 
comfortable walking shoes. Accessories? All you can tuck in 
. . and a couple of light sweaters for wear with slacks or pedal 

•pushers . . on early morning jaunts or moonlight beach picnics. 
Rest or" ramble as you choose . . both can be pleasant in July . . in 

California! 



47 



EARL SCOTT 




a 



suit f 



or now 



an 



d th 



en 



Here is your perfect suit dress for travel, town or visitin' ... so lightweight you'll wear it now 

for comfort, so fashion-right it will be your choice far into fall: by Petite Casuals, in fine 

rayon crepe, the ever-flattering bolero. Sizes 10-20, about $25 at May Co.. Los Angeles; Halle Bros.. Cleveland. 



43 



HARMONIOUS MONOGRAMS 



limn 

,1111111 


llll 
lllll 


IIIIIIIIIP 
lllllilllllll 


mini 

i 

nun. 


"nun 


lllllllllllllllllllll 


mi"' 


WZ^*S 


'•mill 


IIP"'.. .....inii 



<lllll '■• 



...■llllllllhl 



illlin ■"■■"•uiihi 

V iiiiin "I 



•■■■■■miliij 




harmony 



seventh in a series of 






articles on dressing 



by design 






by Florence Shuman 






■ 

■ 




INHARMONIOUS MONOGRAMS 



w 



Sf 



The initials that were designed to compliment the 
outside shape are more pleasing 




H a r m o n i - 
ous lines com- 
plimentary to 
the silhouette 



It isn't always possible to put your finger on what makes 
the perfect ensemble, but when we begin to analyze the 
perfect costume we find that it is well-balanced, rhyth- 
mical, and above all, harmonious. 

Everyone uses the word "harmony," but I want to define 
it in relationship to clothes. In thinking about clothes, there 
are three basic harmonies to consider: First, the design of 
the garment should be in harmony with the structural shape 
of the body and its movements. Wherever possible, the 
garment should be in harmony with the structural shape 
natural shapes of the body should be stressed and en- 
hanced. Second, the outfit should be suited to the function 
for which it is worn. A girl who works in an office or factory 
requires a very different costume than the clubwoman. Har- 
mony between her work and her clothes must be main- 
tained. And finally, we must consider creating a harmonious 
relationship between our clothes and our accessories. 

Sometimes to illustrate a point it is best to think of its 
opposite. Discord is inharmonious. Two people who have 
little in common in education and interests rarely get along 
well together. Elements in design which have little in com- 
mon also can create a jarring note. When you set your table 
you arrange the settings and decorations quite differently 
on a round table than you would on either a square or oval 
table. When an artist paints a portrait he arranges it in re- 
lationship to the shape of the canvas. To illustrate this point 
I have taken my own initials, F. S. and designed a simple 
monogram for a rectangle and an oval. The initials in the 
first two monograms were designed to compliment the out- 
side shape. They are more pleasing than the second two 



where the outside shape was disregarded. This same prin- 
ciple of relating the detail to the whole picture should be 
used in every costume. All trimmings, jewelry and other ac- 
cessories should be related in this manner to each other and 
to the costume. 

Look at the first two dresses. The silhouette is the same, 
but in the first example the angles of the belt and the drap- 
ing and the shape of the neckline are all in harmony with 
the silhouette. The second example clearly shows that it is 
possible to destroy the pleasing effect of the silhouette by 
cutting it up with totally unrelated ideas. Harmonious 
shapes are especially pleasing when repeated in accesso- 
ries. You will note that the next two dresses are identical. 
Only the accessories have been changed. The first is more 
pleasing than the second because a harmony has been 
maintained by repeating similar shapes in the hat, bag and 
gloves. Accessories that have little in common with the 
dress or with each other lack harmony. 

Try on one of your dresses without accessories. Check to 
see if the lines are in harmony with its silhouette. Now try 
on a hct you wear with it. Is the shape and color in har- 
mony? If you are doubtful, make a rough sketch of the 
outfit. Make several tracings, changing the lines and shapes 
in the outfit and accessories until you find a harmonious 
answer. You know what you are looking for and that is 
more than half the battle. You will avoid the confusion of 
considering everything the same color a possibility. 

Remember! The outside shape of a silhouette in a dress 
should control the lines used within the dress. 

Remember! Accessories should harmonize in shape and 
detail with the costume. 




Repeating similar shapes in 
your accessories compliments 
the dress and mokes for har- 
mony 



Sketch an outfit from your own 
wardrobe . . front and side. 
Check for harmony of line . . 
shape and function 




A SHORT STORY BY GENE LEVITT AND ROBERT MITCHELL 



visit to iames 



x\ FAT woman was sitting in the far corner picking 
her teeth and reading a foreign language newspaper. 
Opposite her, an unshaven man was asleep. Catherine 
shifted her gaze to the book in her lap. The night was 
damp and she felt uncomfortable in the drafty street- 
car. It would have been more sensible to have worn a 
full-length coat. But James always said she looked smart 
in a fur jacket. 

A small man walked the length of the car, then tried 
to open the end door. It stuck and he was not very strong. 
He managed to budge it several inches and then could 
neither open nor close it. 

The chilling evening air swept about her feet and bil- 
lowed her skirt. Catherine tucked the folds of her dress 
beneath her and glared angrily at the small man. Em- 
barrassed, he avoided her gaze and sat down. 

How inconsiderate, Catherine thought. How selfish. 
How like James. The thought association startled her 
for a moment. But, she reflected, the comparison was 
valid. At that, she forgot about the cold wind and the 
small man and thought only of James. She closed the 
book in her lap, set it beneath her purse, and stared 
straight ahead through the opposite window at the lighted 
store windows on Seventh street and beyond. 

Catherine was forty. Her skin was like alabaster and 
her hair a lustrous black. James said her beauty would 
grow with the years. A small, lightly rouged mouth ac- 
counted for her mien of serenity. The narrow lips almost 
formed a natural smile, but yielded more to an expres- 
sion of patience. 

Catherine had not seen James in five years. Not since 
the night they had parted at Albert's place. The edges 
of her mouth turned up momentarily as she recalled 
Albert's. It was a French restaurant on La Brea. half a 
block south of Sunset. It was middle class. Posters of 
French spas and railroad and steamship advertisements 
covered the whitewashed brick wall. The onion soup 
was good and Albert was a fine man. James said he had 
character. 

Catherine and James dined there often. They liked 
the atmosphere and needed the privacy Their story was 
old. even trite, she mused. James was married to a selfish, 
doting woman. His wife would never give him his free- 
dom. There were children. And James loved Catherine 
and Catherine him. 

Suddenly. Catherine realized that il was her stop. She 
got up and exited hastily: the small man laughed at her 
confusion. Outside, it was warmer than she had antici- 
pated. She hesitated a moment to get her bearings, then 
crossed Seventh and walked north on Flower. It was 
only a matter of blocks and minutes now. Just blocks 
and minutes until she would see James. 

She had refused to believe her ears that night at Al- 
bert's. It was a crude joke he was playing. He was 
teasing. Oh, if he would only stop talking. Relax and 
laugh. James. Please, God, make him stop. I know 
he's fooling. 

Catherine's gaze was fixed, her steps deliberate as the 
words he used five years ago came rushing back at her. 

"Cathy, darling, I'll be abrupt," He paused. "We must 
stop. Stop at once. Helen will never give me my freedom 
and that's final." 

She searched his face, anticipating a smile, a break 
in his countenance, some inkling of laughter in his eyes. 
His expression remained fixed. 



"We can't live like hunted animals. I love you, Cathy. 
I'll always love you and that's why I can't drag you 
down. I won't drag you down . . ." 

She heard no more. His few phrases were rushing 
through her head. They were to remain to haunt her, 
to make her miserable. It had been a coarse shock, a 
slamming of brakes. An abrupt halt to everything that 
meant anything. 

Catherine was unconscious of traffic lights and people 
and automobiles. At the corners, she stopped and started 
mechanically. She was so close to James now. So close. 

James had been wrong. She would tell him that. Tell 
him that five years had been spent stupidly. Each day 
apart had been a day of hell. Tell him that any mani- 
festation of Helen's hate and meanness would have been 
bearable compared to this absolute isolation . . . this 
foolish display of will power. 

Catherine had never questioned James, never doubted 
the wisdom of his decisions. But he had made a mistake 
that night. In a few minutes she would be able to tell 
him that. 

She stopped in front of the brown building, dabbed 
the tears from the corner of her eyes, and slowly mounted 
the steps. A tall man opened the door as she reached for 
the handle. 

"Good evening," he said. 

She nodded in reply and he looked at her question- 
ingly. 

"Mr. Allen, please. Mr. James Allen." 

"This way, please." 

Catherine followed him down a long, elegantly fur- 
nished corridor into a large, dimly lighted room. James 
was in the center of the room. His angular features 
were still prominent but the face was fuller, the hair 
more gray throughout. Otherwise, he was the same man 
who had escorted her to Albert's countless times. 

"James, it's Cathy." 

He did not reply. 

"I know, I promised never to return, didn't I?" 

She paused a moment, then continued. "But that was 
a long time ago, James. You were wrong, my dear. So 
very wrong. It wasn't easy to shut you out of my life. 
The wound didn't heal, James. It never will." 

Still James said nothing. 

"It didn't have to be a Back Street affair. If I'd been 
able to see you once a week, talk to you over a telephone 
now and again, it'd have been enough. But, to leave you 
to a hateful, scheming woman was wrong." 

She hesitated. Tears flooded her eyes and she swayed 
momentarily. 

"James, my darling, I had to tell you. Tell you how 
cruel it was to leave so suddenly. To leave at once 
and forever. James, it was cruel." 

Catherine stared at him as she spoke. Suddenly, she 
regained her composure. She turned without another 
word and left the room. 

In the corridor, the tall man was waiting. He escorted 
her the length of the thickly carpeted hall to the exit. 

"Good night," he said. 

"Good night." 

She descended the steps to the street. The tall man 
looked after her a moment. Then he closed the mortuary 
doors against the damp evening air. 



46 



in California 

it s 



• • • 



the knack of being an individua 

in thought and creation 

that makes for successful living 



EARL "MADMAN" MUNTZ, onetime smalltime Glen- 
dale automobile dealer, tells you on big billboards that 
"You Look Terrible Behind That Wheel." Professed in- 
sanity in advertising has built a $5,000,000 a year volume 
for the immigrant from Illinois. And the public shortly 
will be submitted to a new sales barrage . . this time tout- 
ing the Muntz Home, a prefabricated house of aluminum 
built to sell around 85,000. ADELLIA McCABE, slender 
and cameo-faced, holds office in Sacramento as United 
States Commissioner. Criminals before her bar range from 
white slavers to those who have unlawfully cut trees in the 
national forests. At home she pours tea for Zonta Club 
members and pursues her passion for knitting. EDYTH 
GENEE, poetess, whose initial book, "Brief Aprils," is 
just off the press, exchanges metrical talk with DON 
BLANDING. Critics say her style is rhe feminine counter- 
part of the famous Don. RICHARD LOEDERER, artist 
and author whose specialty is animating inanimate ob- 
jects, also had a go at exploring . . Haiti was his husk . . 
and he came back with material for the provocative "Voodoo 
Fires in Haiti." CATHERINE STUBERCH, sculptress 
and designer, has a knack with whimsical display manni- 
kins that is equalled only by her talent for serious sculp- 
ture. Here she's shown with the late John Barrymore who 
posed for his portrait in wax. The Stubergh Studio in Los 
Angeles, reminiscent of the Mme. Tussaud salons in Lon- 
don, teems with full-size models of famous and infamous 
characters of public life, who, at Stubergh's, mingle mer- 
rily with puiple cows, pink ostriches, clowns, ballerinas 
and cherubs. 




y 




NOW IS THE TIME 

AND THIS IS THE HOUSE . . TO BUILD 



"WHEN I can build the home I want . . ." 

How many times have you heard your friends 
preface their wishful talk about homes with just 
these words? Feeling that the time has come when 
many people will be able to dust off their dreams 
of a new home and translate them into plans for 
building, The Californian presents Whitney Smith's 
exciting ideas for the post-war home. 

In this delightfully modern house, a prominent 
young architect combines enthusiasm with a very 
special talent and produces a plan-for-living which 
is truly Californian ... a plan which develops 
many ideas heretofore labelled "no-you-can't." And 
from the standpoint of architectural charm, the ren- 
dering shown above will illustrate the modern in- 
terpretation of California comfort. Clinging close 
to the earth, but with a slight loft to the roof to 
give it airiness . . . with huge windows and slid- 
ing glass panels to let the outdoors in . . . with 
unique combination of masonry and waterproof 
redwood plywood exterior ... it represents some- 
thing freshly different in construction ... a com- 
pletely integrated scheme for indoor-outdoor liv- 



ing . . . California style! 

We are happy to be able to project this plan 
even further, to present a comprehensive plan for 
outdoor planting, made exclusively for The Cali- 
fornian by Garrett Eckbo, landscape architect. The 
logic he uses in creating the perfect setting for this 
particular house makes good sense for your home- 
site planting, too. 

"The garden," he says, "is not much different from 
the house. People don't change out of doors. They 
take their furniture, papers, food and toys out with 
them." 

Take this as a starting point, then further agree 
with Mr. Eckbo that a house is superimposed upon 
a natural setting . . . that it requires some blending 
qualities in planting that will make it fit into its 
site. This nationally famed expert visions shrubs, 
trees and flowers as architectural components in 
shaping outdoor space, likes the contrast of unplant- 
ed areas for contrast pattern. 

He coordinates the setting to the physical pro- 
portions of the house ... to the living habits of 
a family. 



48 



f^ 







Artist's rendering of to- 
morrow's house for to- 
day . . . masonry, red- 
wood and glass in a 
spirited plan for Califor- 
nia living. Note intrigu- 
ing balcony for outdoor 
dining . . . sunbathing! 




Northern exposure 




Eastern 




Western 





GARRETT ECKBO'S isometric plan for planting to enhance the beauty and livability of the house 
shown on the opposite page. Note contrasting patterns of dark and light foliage, the obvious 
picture-quality through a view window. At top right, the gray-green of slender Melalucca Leuca- 
dendron ... top left, the orange of persimmons against a graveled site . . . the lawn enclosure 
within the L-shape of the house . . . the wide expanse of lawn at right with a separate drying 
room concealed from the house, dark green magnolia bordering. Just below the house and down 
the sloping terrains are irregular areas for lawn, gravel, rough deep grass . . . the shadowed 
tracery of thin eucalyptus at left and extreme lower right corner contrast with sturdy fig trees, 
salvia and tamarisk. Bright splashes of color are in many of the flowering trees and shrubs. 



49 



j | Open the door and walk in! 

The impression of freedom and "rightness" that you get 
from the exterior is heightened on the inside of this wonder- 
fully modern house. Focal point is the tremendous fireplace 
which dominates one end of the room, its unusual . . . and 
unusually economical . . . effect achieved by alternate courses 
of brick and concrete blocks. The textured feeling and the 
brick-red tones on gray keynote the decor of the whole room. 

As illustrated in the artist's rendering, below, Whitney 
Smith's idea of California living brings the outdoors in . . . 
through use of the great sliding glass panels, huge windows, 
and the interesting clere story ventilation-and-view windows 
. . . through indoor planting which adds interest and color 
to the stark simplicity of modern architecture. 

An additional accent to the picturesque fireplace is the stone 




The interior of this freshly modern house has the freedom and color of all 
outdoors . . . large sliding glass panels, generous windows including the 
clere story type which gives extra height and airiness to room. Tremendous 
fireplace of alternating courses of brick and concrete blocks, with extended 
hearth . . . built-in planters for tropical display. Modern furniture for comfort. 



BY VIRGINIA SCALLON 



50 



A compact house to provide carefree California 
brand of living . . . actual floor space just over 
1600 square feet, but careful arrangement and 
the in-and-outdoor feeling gives it spaciousness. 




hearth, which extends far out into the room, making it even 
more dramatic. The open plan favored by the architect brings 
the dining alcove into the living area, with luxurious tropical 
planting giving variation. Bedrooms show the same careful 
planning for comfort, for view, for accessibility. 

But let's put another accent mark on the unique plan of this 
adaptable house . . . the guest room which is connected to 
the house merely by the covered car port. Here a small bath 
boasts an outside door, too, so that the family need not go 
into the house when they want to shower after work in the 
garden or in the garage. And there's an outside sink for ar- 
ranging flowers, too! 

One good look will show how carefully the outdoor living 
areas have been correlated to the plan of the house . . . 
with a protected garden-patio entranceway, and a covered 
porch, with sliding glass panels, for outdoor dining. 

Many areas in the extensive gardens may be designated 
for different purposes. The actual floor space of the house 
is 1857 square feet, including half the area of the carport, 
which actually can be converted to outdoor living. Net floor 
space is some 1600 square feet. 



IBS 



Separate guest or mother-in-law's apartment, 
with bath that opens outside, too. Covered car- 
port connecting apartment may be converted 
to outdoor living, hobby or work-shop. 



51 




THERE'S DRAMA 



IN COSMOPOLITAN FOODS 



AND HOLLYWOOD IS SETTING 



A NEW STYLE IN DINING 



| Hollywood has a strong influence on today's clothes, 
manners, and cookery . . . and here in California we are 
quick to adopt its latest fashions in foods. Californian 
cuisine is as cosmopolitan as any in the world . . . the 
Spaniards brought dishes from Europe and South 
America; the Indians contributed their native lore; 
the '49ers, who came from everywhere, brought recipes 
from everywhere. The Chinese gave of their best, and 
the early wine growers brought not only their knowl- 
edge of viticulture, but that of gastronomy, for those 
who have an appreciation of fine wines invariably know 
their foods. But it is the movies, "The Industry," as 
it's called in Hollywood, that is setting a new style 
in dining. 

Fortunately, for cookery, the average motion picture 
star today has more than a gorgeous figure, a sultry 
voice, or a disarming smile . . . she has a brain. And 
in Hollywood there are many who are not only con- 
noisseurs of food and wine, they can don an apron 
and turn out epicurean dishes with the best of them. 
These gourmets and gourmettes know there's drama in 
food as well as in the theater . . . they not only serve 
dramatic foods in their own homes, they flock to the 



52 






By Helen Evans Browi 



restaurants that serve the most spectacular meals. One 
of these restaurants, on the famous "Strip," is Bub- 
lichki, and its food is as Russian and entrancing as 
its name. The Zakuska (hors d'oeuvre) is delectable, 
as is the Borsht, Shaslick (marinated lamb broiled on 
skewers) Mushrooms a la Russe (in sour cream, won- 
derful!), and the Blinchiki (delicate rich pancakes 
folded envelope fashion around cottage cheese, and 
sizzled to a beautiful topaz in butter). But most dra- 
matic of all is the Cutlet a la Kiev. It's a breast of 
chicken with a crispy crust of minutely-diced bread, 
and right in the middle of its tender heart is a pool 
of molten butter. Alex Danaroff, the owner, and George 
Stronin, the chef, graciously share their recipe with 
readers of "California Cooks." 

CUTLETS A LA KIEV 

"From a three-pound roasting hen carefully remove the 
breast portion. A very sharp knife must be used for 
the operation which begins by making incisions between 
the body and the drumsticks so that the lower portion 
may be separated from the upper. Remove the skin 
from the breast half. Now, cut off the first joints of 
the wings, leaving the wing bone attached to the breast. 
Cut away the meat of the breast in one piece, holding 
to the wing bone as you cut. Flatten out the piece of 
breast meat, and lift up the small tenderloin which 
lies inside. When this is lifted, note the string of 
gristle that must be cut at either end to prevent buck- 
ling of the chicken while frying. After removing the 
gristle, pat the flat tenderloin as wide as it will go, 
and put a piece of butter (size of walnut) and a few 
mushrooms in the center and fold into the form of a 
cone. Roll into egg and flour and tiny squares of stale 
bread (made by mincing a slice or two of hard, crust- 
less, stale bread) and fry in butter until golden brown. 
The fried bread gives a butter-toasty crust to the chicken 
which bursts with the delicious juice of butter and 
mushrooms when it is cut piping hot. And dress the 
wing bones with paper crowns." 

Do you follow? Use a narrow, thin-bladed boning 
knife, if you have one, otherwise your sharpest paring 
knife. And get in there with your hands, too. Keep the 
knife as close as possible to the bone and you shouldn't 
have any trouble. The filet under the breast is easy 
to find as it's in a separate layer . . . the tendon is 
a silvery-looking cord. The amount of butter I use 
is one tablespoonful, or if the breast is extra large, 
four teaspoonfuls. A teaspoonful of the minced mush- 
rooms is enough and they may be skipped entirely. 
The important thing is to have the butter cold and to 
seal it well inside the meat ... so fold it carefully . . . 
and, because you're not a chef, cheat a little and fasten 
it securely with toothpicks. Another trick for the not-too 
professional is to roll the folded breasts into seasoned 
flour, then in bread crumbs or the minced bread that the 
recipe calls for. Repeat the egging and crumbing to 
assure a good crust, then put the cutlets in the refriger- 
ator until so thoroughly chilled that the butter won't 
leak out in the cooking. This recipe you will like. 

Though it's dramatic food that Hollywood sets before 
its guests, it's not necessarily elaborate. Simple fare, 
prepared with skill and imagination, is most apt to 
win a culinary Oscar. For instance, take a toasted sand- 
wich . . . but such a toasted sandwich! Pain Repasse, 
they call it in France, but here it's ironed bread. That's 
what I said. 



IRONED BREAD 

Purchase a loaf of fresh thin sliced sandwich bread, 
trim the crusts, put two slices together, and cut in 
circles or oblongs. Heat your iron very hot . . . yes, 
the one you use for your clothes . . . and iron one 
side of your unfilled sandwich, exerting enough pressure 
to flatten it. When it is brown and shiny, turn it over 
and press the other side. Now slip a very sharp knife 
between the two slices, being careful to keep the opening 
not much wider than the knife blade. Work the blade 
tip back and forth, making a pocket. Now fill your 
bread pocket with any meat, fish, or cheese spread that 
suits your fancy, and seal the opening and edges with 
your hot iron. When you are ready to serve these 
tricky sandwiches with cocktails, soup, or salad, be sure 
to reheat them in the oven. Everyone will have a differ- 
ent theory as to how the filling appeared so mirac- 
ulously between the two thin pieces of toast. 

Another Hollywood favorite is sauteed chicken with 
a dreamy sauce. 

HOLLYWOOD CHICKEN SAUTE 

Have broilers cut in four pieces each and dredge them 
with flour. (Allow one chicken to two persons.) Now 
brown the chickens in butter, allowing a quarter of a 
cup, or a little less, for each chicken. When the pieces 
are nicely browned, season them with salt and fresh 
ground pepper, and reduce the heat, allowing them 
to cook slowly until they are tender. In the meantime 
make a cream sauce by cooking together one table 
spoon each of butter and flour until they are bubbly, 
but not brown, then whisking in a cup of thin cream. 
Cook over hot water ten minutes, and season with a 
quarter teaspoonful of salt and a grinding of pepper 
Now add a two or three-ounce tin of puree de fois 
gras or goose liver paste, and stir until smooth. Place 
the chicken on a heat-proof platter, pour over it a 
jigger of brandy, and set it alight. When the flames die 
down pour over the sauce and serve it forth in all its 
glory. 

Just to prove that all Hollywood dishes are neither 
elaborate nor expensive I'll give you one of the simplest 
. . . and best . . . recipes for spaghetti that I've ever 
had. 

SPAGHETTI OLIO E AGLIO 

Boil a pound of long Italian style spaghetti until done. 
It should be tender, yet firm, never mushy. In other 
words when you bite into it it should still have a 
little resistance in its middle! Crush six cloves of garlic 
and put them to cook in a quarter of a cup of olive 
oil until the garlic is a light brown. Remove the garlic, 
add a quarter of a cup of finely-minced parsley, a half 
teaspoonful of salt and a few grindings of pepper. 
Mix and cook two minutes, then add a quarter cup of 
butter. As soon as the butter melts pour this sauce over 
the hot spaghetti and mix well. Pass grated parmesan 
cheese with this, and serve with a sharper-than-usual 
dressing . . . two parts of olive oil to one part of 
red wine vinegar. 

It's certainly a sense of the dramatic that makes 
Hollywood go for foods like these, but there may be 
another reason, too. I think it was Brillat Savarin who 
claimed that those who know how to eat are com- 
paratively ten years younger than those to whom the 
art is unknown. And even the most glamorous of the 
movie stars might be willing to drop ten years. How 
about you? 



53 




edna charlton 



! 

I 



nr nn 





THINK TALL! Don't let that summer sun sag you. Think tall . . . 
for there is nothing like good posture to make you look attractive and 
feel on top of the world! 

A sideways glance into the mirror will reveal whether you are stand- 
ing straight as a stick ... or like a lazy "S." Clear, flawless skin and 
the feeling of good health are a result of proper digestion and elim- 
ination. \ou won't have that midsummer droop, feel sluggish or run- 
down if you give yourself a chance to breathe. 

You'll be amazed to see how much better your clothes fit . . . and 
look . . . when you hold your head high, your shoulders back, and your 
chest up. It's not what you wear but how you wear it that can make 
an inexpensive garment look like an exclusive gown. Models wear their 
clothes well . . . and why? Because they know how to stand, and 
display the best features of each garment. The exercises, below, sug- 
gested by Patricia Stevens, a teacher of models, will help you, too, 
attain better posture. 

Aside from gaining a graceful walk, you'll want to learn how to go 
up and down stairs smoothly, erect. Consider your shoes. Your footwear 
can make the difference between a good walk and a bad one. If you 
wear too low a heel you will find your body off balance, toppling 
backwards. The too-high heel has the opposite effect. Tall or short, 
remember that slumped, rounded shoulders only bring attention to 
your height instead of hiding it. It is the tall girl who is envied for 
her ability to wear clothes. 

And remember . . . pull in your tummy, tuck in your derriere . . . 
and you'll have the enviable walk of a professional model ! 

1. Let's face it! As you stand facing the wall make your toes and chest touch 
If your nose touches the wall you are leaning forward. If your abdomen 
touches you are standing with your tummy out and you might be swayback. 
Pull in your nose and tummy and you can have perfect posture. 

2. Straighten up! With back to wall let your head, shoulders and derriere touch, 
your heels two inches from the wall. A slight push with your head and you 
will be standing straight as a stiff. . . . without looking stiff. 

3. Loosen up! Stretch your arms high above your head, then drop them to the 
sides. By stretching and relaxing you can gain grace and poise. 

4. Glide along! Instead of the old book-on-head method, try this one. Have 
someone place two glasses half-filled with water on the backs of your out- 
stretched hands. By walking around for ten minutes each day you will have 
perfected an effortless, graceful stride. 



here are exercises designed to 
improve your posture . . . make 
you feel like a million . . . look 
smarter in vour clothes 




YOU MAY NOT UNDERSTAND IT 



BUT YOU LIKE IT 



WHEN JEAN SABLON SINGS 



SO INTIMATELY AND "JUST FOR YOU" 



by Virginia teale 



Sigh 




THERE we sat, Jean Sablon and I, com- 
fortable in a pair of wing chairs. Cock- 
tails were on the table before us, the 
special Beverly Hills variety of sun 
slanted through the blinds, and, in case 
one were intersted, there was a view 
of the lovely hotel gardens. 

Sablon, the Frenchman . . the sen- 
sational singer and current throb for 
the feminine heart of America . . was 
wearing a black-and-white checked 
flannel sports shirt, beige gabardine 
trousers and jacket and brown suede 
shoes. 

"Uh, do you have any hobbies, Mon- 
sieur Sablon?" Silly question. 

His eyebrows went up quizzically. 
"Hobbies? I'm sorry, my knowledge of English is not too 
good . . ." 

"Well, you know, things you like to do . . things of 
interest for your spare time . . . ' 

"Oh, I understand." Then Sablon smiled. "But, of course. 
Wait." 

He zipped into the next room. I waited impatiently. 
What would he come out with? Or without? Whatever 
it was, I was ready . . all in the line of duty, of course. 
Perhaps he collected miniature jade Buddhas. Or Pygmy 
poison darts. Or . . . 

You Say w SABLON" 



"Look at these . ." He reverently extended two small 
paper packets. 

I took them and held them to the light. They couldn't 
be what they seemed to be, but they were: Flower seeds. 
Poppies, to be exact. Plain California poppies. Smooth 
suave Sablon, with the milk-and-honey voice, turned out 
to be a thwarted farmer. He told me then about his farm 
in Sao Paulo, Brazil. He raises oranges, and bananas, 
lemons, nuts and coffee, and flowers by the hundreds 
of varieties. Nothing makes him happier, he claims, than 
early to bed, early to rise, and good hard work on his 
farm. These poppy seeds . . they were one of many things 
he was finding in California to take back to his Brazilian 
acres. 

"I don't like night life and such at all," confessed Sablon 
apologetically. 

Wondering what else he might and might not like, a 

(Continued on page 60) 



55 



|_ aking the overall view of what makes a good 
wearable for a man during midsummer days when 
the sun is only 92 million miles away, you come 
up with this thought: It has to be cool, it has to be 
comfortable, and if he's an enthusiast for the 
leisure way of life, he'll want it casual, too! 

Starched white shirts and tightly tied cravats 
might be his week-long fare, but here is your chance 
to put him in something new for those Saturdav 
mornings astride the swivel chair . . . and what's 
more, casual-wear is highly acceptable among the 
typewriters and file cabinets during Saturn's day. 

Utilitarian-wise is the sweater. It fits under the 
sport jacket or suit on cool days, can add a dressy 
touch for the outdoor man who likes to hide his 
shirt sleeves. And the sweater provides that extra 
warmth when the sun dips out of sight early on 
fall evenings. The coat-style sweater pictured on 
the opposite page is easy to slip-in-and-out-of. lends 
attractiveness to any summer outfit. 

Freedom-wise. too. is the leisure jacket below 
that has all of the comforts of a regular sport coat, 
yet is in good company in town or in the coun- 
try. A one-tone effect makes him dressy even when 
sitting on your porch rail. Here's an opportunity 
. . . you can use the "good old summer time" to 
bring him up to date on a loafable life. 



UNDER THE SUN THERE'S ALWAYS 

SOMETHING NEW . . TO CAPTURE LEISURE 
AND GOOD LIVING FOR "THAT MAN" 





Deft application of the traditional English-style knitted waist to T 
a fine multi-cable knitted sweater makes this coat-style sweater by 
Catalina Inc. a definite must for autumn wardrobes. It comes in four 
rich colors: powder blue, desert sand, California gold and burgundy. 
Approximately $13.50. 



Soft and mellow is the feel of this solid-toned wool casual jacket styled 
by Hollywood Sportwear. Cut in the full drape style that makes Cali- 
fornia mens sportswear the world's favorite, this casual coat has fine 
harmonizing hand-picking on the collar edges. Approximately $25. 



A SIMPLE SUMMARY OF SUMMER WEAR 



57 



it took a wrestling match and 
a home-made airplane to 
determine two famous 
men's careers 

# When Lawrence Tibbett was a stu- 
dent at Manual Arts High School in 
Los Angeles thirty years ago ... a tall, 
shy boy eager to overcome the effects 
of a frail childhood . . . his campus 
hero was a young man his own age 
named Jimmy Doolittle. 

Tibbett, determined to build up his 
own physique, put up a horzontal bar in 
his backyard and spent hours every day 
exercising. He had his eye on the 
wrestling team . . . and on the enviable 
Jimmy, who was the star of the wrestling 
squad, one of the school's best boxers, 
and who later became the amateur mid- 
dleweight boxing champion of Southern 
California. 

It was the policy of the school in 
those days to organize classes in any 
specialty in which faculty members 
showed amateur skill. Manual's art 
teacher, the late Rob Wagner, also had 
the wrestling class. 

NIGHTINGALE 



by Marion Simms 




Lawrence Tibbett as Rigoletto 



One day Tibbett told Wagner he 
would like to try out for the team. 
Jimmy Doolittle was in the gym at the 
time and Wagner suggested he take on 
the newcomer. 

"Hi, Crow!" was Tibbett's greeting 
to his classmate. 

"Hel-lo Nightingale!" replied Doo- 
little with a friendly grin. The gangling 
Tibbett was getting a reputation around 
school as quite a singer. 

The boys faced each other. There 
was the slight sound of a current of air 
being stirred up. Next a bump, then 
silence. 

"Stick to singing," was Doolittle's 
parting advice. 

So, while Lawrence pursued his 
career in singing and play acting, 
Jimmy was busy with blacksmithing, 
woodworking, the foundry, the auto and 
machine shops . . . wrestling and box- 
ing, too. Nevertheless, the two boys 
whose birth dates were the same year 
and just a month apart . . . natives of 
the California towns of Alameda and 
Bakersfield . . . became good friends. 

The whole school had become inter- 
ested in aviation at the time. The 
grounds were filled with airplane 
models of all sizes. There were tourna- 
ments, competitions and prizes, and al- 
ways one of the participants was James 
Doolittle. Later, a full-sized single- 
seater plane was constructed in the 
school shops. In high excitement, the 
student body turned out to see their 
ship . . . carrying Manual's colors of 
purple and gray . . . take to the air 
with a tremendous roar. 

Dr. Albert E. Wilson, retired prin- 
cipal, reports that while Jimmy Doo- 
little "lived up to his name pretty 
well" during the beginning of his high 
school days, he buckled down to hard 
study in advanced mathematics, chem- 
istry, physics and English history, once 
he realized the stiff requirements ahead 
of him in college work. 

In a number of Jimmy's classes was 
a girl named Josephine Daniels, a tal- 
ented young woman who won the high- 
est school office a girl could have — sec- 
retary of the student body. Jimmy 
spotted her early and concentrated his 
interests. She stood beside him when 
he received the Congressional Medal of 
Honor for his leadership in the United 
States' first air attack on Tokyo. 

Many years after high school days 
were over, when Lawrence Tibbett's 
concert work foreshadowed his stardom 
at the Metropolitan Opera, curiosity 
led Jimmy Doolittle to buy a ticket to 
a Tibbett concert. 

"I wanted to see if it was the same 








Lieutenant General James H. Doolittle, USA Reserve 



AND THE CROW 

Tibbett kid who was always squawking 
those deep notes around school," Doo- 
little told Tibbett when they met later 
at a Lambs Club gambol in New York. 
"Boy, you have turned out better than 
I expected!" 

There were many meetings of the old 
school friends after that. Doolittle had 
become famous as a flier . . . winner 
of many aviation records and prizes. 
The work of both men took them all 
over the country and their paths fre- 
quently crossed. 

Once, when it appeared that Tibbett 
would have to cancel a concert after he 
had missed a train connection, Doolittle 
flew him in record time from Dallas to 
St. Louis. 

Talent appears to have been sprinkled 
heavily among the classroom contem- 
poraries of the Doolittle-Tibbett era. 

Phyllis Haver became a silent film 
star . . . Helen Jerome Eddy a stage 
actress . . . Fred Horowitz an Assist- 
ant Attorney General of the United 
States . . . Bobby (Irish) Meusel a 
baseball headliner . . . Paul Williams a 
colonel in the Army Air Corps . . . 
Marshall McComb an appellate judge 
. . . Goodwin Knight a superior judge, 
and now Lieutenant Governor of Cali- 
fornia. 

And Frank Capra became a film di- 
rector of considerable distinction. One 
of his pictures was "Lost Horizon," a 
title which came to have special sig- 
nificance during the mystery days of 
the Doolittle Tokyo raid from "Shan- 
gri-La." 



58 



"f s 



The Bowl 

(Continued from page 37) 

Rising from the 90-foot stage is the $50,000 
classic white proscenium . . a gift from Allan 
C. Balch. 

During the Bowl's existence an estimated six 
million persons have witnessed the "Sym- 
phonies Under the Stars." And almost every 
contemporary artist of note has appeared 
there. A bid to grace the famous outdoor 
stage is an honor which few artists would 
refuse. The lovely Lily Pons holds the record 
for attracting the largest paid admission and 
close behind are the box office receipts from 
a Paul Robeson performance. World-famous 
personalities have addressed audiences in the 
Bowl . . Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roose- 
velt, Wendell Willkie, Thomas E. Dewey and 
Mme. Chiang Kai-shek. 

Owned by Los Angeles County and rented 
on a 99-year lease to the Bowl Association, the 
vast amphitheatre opens its gates to all 
creeds and colors, and the inter-denominational 
Easter sunrise services held annually have 
become a California tradition. 

During the early days of the Bowl's con- 
struction, workers planted fence posts along 
the main entrance, and oddly, the posts took 
root in the fertile soil and grew into a neat 
row of pepper trees. The now famous Pepper 
Tree Lane is a picturesque avenue leading to 
the amphitheatre. Within its shaded confines 
have been built a tea room with flagstone 
terrace and several gift shops. 

And in addition to its musical agenda, the 
Bowl has been the background for spectacles 
and gatherings of wide variance. In 1940, the 
Gideons used the area for a religious meet- 
ing . . handed out 15,000 bibles. Commence- 
ment exercises, political rallies and even a 
wedding have taken place there. The nuptial 
event was held in 1928 when Composer Percy 
Grainger was married before an audience of 
15,000 . . then took his place on the podium 
and conducted a symphony concert. 

There is something about Hollywood Bowl 
that fires the most jaded imagination. Located 
high above the city of Los Angeles and sur- 
rounded by the yucca-dotted hills of Holly- 
woodland, its heart-warming magnificence 
gives the lie to the oft-repeated rumor that 
Southern California is all publicity and no 
heart. During the war, audiences gathered 
to hear artists from all nations while bombers 
droned overhead toward the Pacific and 
civilian watchers in their nearby outposts were 
on the qui vive for approaching enemy planes. 
One clear evening in 1941 the audience was 
requested to light matches at a given signal, 
and 20.000 tiny flames flared out of the dark- 
ness to illuminate the Bowl in a poignant 
ceremony of hope and courage. 

But perhaps the most remarkable feature 
of Hollywood Bowl is that multitudes of music 
lovers can see and hear the world's greatest 
artists for slightly more than a half-dollar. 
Mme. Schumann-Heink, Marian Anderson, 
Gladys Swarthout, Tibbett, Heifetz, Szigeti, 
Menuhin, Rachmaninoff, Rubinstein, Alicia 
Markova, Agnes de Mille, Sir Thomas Beecham 
from England and Carlos Chavez from Mex- 
ico . . all have entertained at the Bowl. 

The All Nations Festival took place in the 
Bowl, as did an Indian ceremonial program. 
There have been a Negro pageant, a Tribute 
to China Day and a Tribute to Russia Day. 
The Bowl's keynote of universality, now well 
known, is set by the imposing fountain which 
stands at its entrance. Designed by sculptor 
George Stanley, it is constructed of white 
granite and is flanked by three statues rep- 
resenting the Muses. 

It symbolizes the need of modern man for 
spiritual fulfillment and respite from the tur- 
moil of his daily problems. 



A speck of Cali- 
fornia in 01' Vir- 
ginny. Daven- 
ports are blue, 
draperies red and 
chartreuse . . . 
raffia-trimmed ta- 
ble is soft gray. 
Mrs. Neil Naiden, 
the author's wife, 
used many tricks 
of interior deco- 
ration for effect. 




alif 



C. 



'alifornia is more than just a state. It's a kind of living. And if 
you want to take a run out where the West begins you'll discover 
you're going east, not west. You'll go as far east as Arlington, Vir- 
ginia, where my wife and I have pulled the four walls of our Arling- 
ton apartment right in after us. The Old South, with its lacy 
tradition, is out the window, and in its place are a couple of hundred 
square feet of ersatz California. We have no "period" furniture, no 
pictures of southern patriots, no albums of yellowed newspaper 
clips about the Civil War. Instead, we've resurrected a speck of 
the Golden West. 

Nice as it is, the cotton and tobacco country is not for us. 
Thank you, no! We wanted California modern, and after alien- 
ating half the furniture men in town we finally got it. If you think 
it was easy you're a little mad! In the first place we had to find 
an apartment, and there isn't a single California modern house 
in the District of Columbia or its lichened suburbs ... no bay win- 
dows, no pastel-colored cottages, no tremendous floor-to-ceiling win- 
dows. Out this way we have half a hundred places called General 
Washington's Headquarters, 150 million acres of battlefields, the Lee 
Mansion, the Lee Highway, Lee Boulevard, statues of General Lee. 
Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, the Smithsonian, and 
of course, the White House. And we'll trade them all for a shack 
on Telegraph Hill. 

As soon as my wife finishes medical school here we intend to. 
In the meantime we're marooned, a stone's throw from the Potomac. 
After a six months' horror of hotels and rooms we finally found 
our modern apartment in Arlington, and forthwith draped the walls 
in chartreuse and red, acquired two ocean blue love-seats, and latched 
on to a soft gray, raffia-trimmed set of tables which you probably 
can find in any one of a dozen places in Los Angeles. My wife rigged 
up a white plaster lamp, I knocked up an end table, and we sewed 
sixteen small white string rugs together, spread out the result and 
the place finally began to take shape. Our handmade California 
pottery, which my wife bought from Mary Erckenbrack, our Tele- 
graph Hill neighbor during the war, is liberally spotted around the 
living room, along with several bright-colored Diego Rivera prints. 

Yes. the West begins in Arlington, and there's a mighty good 
reason for it. To us, California is a kind of never-never land. We 
met there in 1941, honeymooned for 48 hours at Stinson Beach in 
the summer of 1944 ... we both were in the service at the time. 
Some day we'll be back, and it won't be long. In the meantime 
we live right smack in the middle of this tiny spec of the West, 
waiting for the day. 



a 
ornia 
home 
away 
from 
home 



by Neil D. Naiden 



59 



cameras click 
for housewives 



more than one thousand 
compete in California contest 




"Any Room For Me?" is the title for this 
pensive pup which won honorable mention 
for Mrs. Rose Tucker of Beverly Hills. 



California's lady-lensers portrayed a range 
of subjects covering every phase of daily 
living: A romance shot of dewy gardenias 
divided honors with a wistful mongrel pup; 
a Dresden doll moppet vied with a Tom 
Sawyer urchin; the sun was portrayed ris- 
ing, setting and at midday over ocean, desert 
and field. 

Of this varied collection, a portrait of a 
girl at the beach won the grand prize for 
Eleanor Bowman. Another Bowman photo 
captured first in the housewives' group. 
Runners-up were Mrs. R. A. Greene, Laguna 
Beach; Grace Silvius, Glendale; and Mrs. 
0. G. Oberg. Los Angeles. 

In the business and professional wom- 
en's group, first prize was taken by Lucille 
Stewart, Los Angeles. Placing were Elaine 
Draper of Beverly Hills; Mickey Wakefield, 
Glendale; and Glee Donnelly, San Francisco. 
Ruth Bouton received first and second prizes 
in the student class: third place was given 
to Jean Levy, Los Angeles; and fourth to 
Hazel E. Anderson. 




Judges awarded honorable mention to Mar- 
guerite Draper-Ecker of Beverly Hills for 
this fine photo portrait of a little girl. 



Wi 



hen is a dishpan full of dishes interest- 
ing? When is there glamor in a child's face 
smeared with strawberry jam? When you 
have your camera handy and can give the 
Arcadian picture to posterity. 

Kitchen closets are evolving into dark 
rooms, chit-chat and bridge are taking back 
seats for a new distaff hobby . . photography! 
Starting in the backyard, with a pocket 
camera and Junior or Jill or Towser as 
models, the California housewife is intrigued 
with her film accomplishments . . has begun 
to invest the egg money in filters, tripods 
and projectors. 

In the contest for California women pho- 
tographers sponsored by Kalart, 1082 note- 
worthy entries were submitted by housewives, 
business and professional women and stu- 
dents. Children seemed to be the favorite 
subjects, with landscapes and animals close 
behind. Judges were impressed with the ex- 
cellent composition and originality, point- 
ed out the near-professional technique and 
marked artistry in entries such as those 
shown here. 

Shown below is Elaine Drapers appealing 
"Boy" second prize winner in the contest 
class for business and professional women. 




SABLON 

(Continued from page 55) 

series of questions was posed. It turned out 
that he was fascinated by jitterbugging . . 
as a spectator only, he hurried to add. 

"Jitterbugs, they get wonderful exercise. It 
looks like a fine sport." 

He likes sports of all kinds, and particu- 
larly a new game from Brazil which he is 
introducing to his friends here. It is played 
like badminton, but with the bare hands in- 
stead of racquets, and the bird has a leather- 
covered base with a flat palm-fitting surface. 

"I love this California," volunteered Jean, 
"especially the south. I love the way every- 
body seems so lazy and casual, the way they 
ride around on bicycles with no clothes on. 
I'd like to get myself a job and an old Ford 
and stay here." 

That called for explanation. "What kind 
of job do you mean?" 

"Oh. just some kind of work. Then I 
could wear old clothes and ride around in 
my old Ford and be peaceful and happy." 

"What could you do besides sing?" 

"Lots of things. I am very talented. I can 
cook." 

That seemed comical. "What would you do, 
open a hamburger stand?" 

"Sure, I could do that." 

"How would you go about making the 
hamburgers?" 

"Well, first I would grind up the meat . . 
a filet, of course. Then I would add some 
herbs and a touch of garlic, and I would 
pat it out. Then I would put it on a broiler 
over a bed of hot coals and I would cook 
it so that it was burned outside and raw 
inside." 

His eyes searched my face, "You don't say 
anything. Does that not sound good?" 

It seemed politic to change the subject. Had 
he ever been married? He had not. Why? 

He grinned: "Because I am too young." 

We were interrupted by a messenger with a 
script for Sablon's radio show. As he scanned 
it, his attention was tripped by one of his 
lines: "Look at this. Here I say, 'One if by 
land, two if by sea.' How is the meaning of 
these words?" 

"Well." I explained, "that's the historic 
slogan credited to an American patriot dur- 
ing the Revolution. Paul Revere was to watch 
for the number of lanterns and then warn 
the colonists of the approach of the British." 

With brow wrinkled, he pondered this, then 
a grin of comprehension lighted his face. "I 
understand. It is something like, Lafayette, 
here we are?" 

Sablon was born in Paris. He learned to 
sing and dance at an early age and his out- 
standing talent was carefully nourished by 
his family . . all of whom were active in 
the theater. He formed his own orchestra and 
made his debut as maestro at the Cafe de 
Paris. There he was heard by one of the 
ubiquitous fraternity of American soap com- 
pany representatives. And it was decided that 
the Sablon talent would give "John's Other 
Wife" a run for its money as a soap seller. 
Two radio shows were organized in Paris and 
were broadcast to the U. S. Subsequently, 
the singer received so many flattering Ameri- 
can bids that he decided it would be profitable 
to embark for New York, and his first stage 
appearance in the Broadway musical, "Streets 
of Paris." Then he began a tour of principal 
cities to occupy the star spot in plush night- 
clubs . . to collect an ever-increasing number 
of admirers. 

Sablon frequently apologizes for his inade- 
quate English. But looking at him, and hear- 
ing his provocative voice, one can only com- 
ment: ". . pas de quois. C'est Sablon." Or 
to be more specific, "Who cares?" 



60 



SAILS SET FOR HAWAI 



{Continued from page 29) 



assistant navigator. Carl M. Heintz, of the 
Four Winds, also will challenge nautical su- 
perstition: His crew includes his wife, daughter 
and daughter-in-law. 

But old salts who watch the start of this 
race with sharp, practiced eyes, will recall 
other times and other races. They will rem- 
inisce on the first Honolulu Race in 1906, a 
hard-fought contest between three expert skip- 
pers and their poetically beautiful craft. 
There was the La Paloma, sailed by her mas- 
ter, Clarence MacFarlane of Hawaii. And 
there was the Lurline, winner of that first 
match, with her owner, H. H Sinclair, at the 
wheel. Third boat was the Anemone, sailed 
by her owner, Charles L. Tutt. 

The now internationally famous Honolulu 
Races evolved from a discussion 42 years 
ago between Sinclair and MacFarlane, both 
of whom were eager to test their boats over 
a long-distance course. Sinclair volunteered to 
try to interest several San Francisco yachtsmen 
in a race to Honolulu. Their reply, which he 
relayed to MacFarlane, was that if "Mac" 
could sail the La Paloma to San Francisco, 
they would race him back to his home islands. 
Also promised by the San Franciscans was 
a welcoming party in the bay city the like of 
which MacFarlane had never seen . . even 
in his most sumptuous luaus. The Island skip- 
per forthwith took up the gauntlet and set 
sail for the California coast. Arriving even- 
tually in San Francisco Bay, he tied up at 
Sausilito, but there was no welcoming com- 
mittee, no flowers and no music. A solitary 
friend finally made his appearance. 
"Isn't it awful, Mac?" 

"Certainly is," replied the disappointed 
MacFarlane. "It's the worst frost I ever saw." 
But the two men were conversing at cross 
purposes. Unknown to MacFarlane, the de- 
vastating San Francisco earthquake and fire 
had taken place several days before. 

MacFarlane subsequently sailed down to 
San Pedro where he looked up his friend, Sin- 
clair. Still race minded, the two sailors per- 
suaded Charles L. Tutt, who had tied up in 
San Pedro while on a round-the-world cruise, 
to join them. 

Two years later the second Honolulu Race 
took place. The plan was to hold the dashes 
every second year, but the schedule was in- 
terrupted by World War I, and the races did 
not resume until 1923. An increasing number 
of yachtsmen, however, became interested, and 
in 1939, there was the biggest turnout in the 
race history when 26 boats hove to at the 
starting line. The last race was held in 1941, 
and then the meets were discontinued because 
of the second world conflict. 

1926 stands out as an unlucky year for 
the skippers. Mishap skulked across their 
decks like an unlucky black cat. The Molli- 
lou, a 56-foot yawl that has raced to Honolulu 
more times than any other boat, was forced 
to turn back because of a crew member's at- 
tack of appendicitis. The crew of the Invader 
battled a fire which broke out on the boat's 
afterdeck . . but the flames were extinguished 
before they had disabled the vessel and the 
Invader sailed over the finish line in first 
place. Unhappy were the master and men of 
the Poinsettia: Leading the sea pack by many 
miles, she dropped anchor in what appeared 
to be the waters off Diamond Head. Those 
on board relaxed and drank a few toasts to 
their victory. Eventually, someone remarked 
the absence of the buoy light and someone else 



thought to question the absence of the official 
boat. Maps were consulted and it was found 
that the Poinsettia had anchored off Koko 
Head, a promontory similar in appearance to 
Diamond Head, but about 10 miles east. There 
was a frantic scramble to get up sail, but five 
hours had been wasted and when the chagrined 
Poinsettia reached a point only 100 yards 
from the finish line her allotted time ran out. 
Each Honolulu Race is sponsored by the 
Transpacific Yacht Club, comprised of mem- 
bers who have sailed as Corinthians in any 
Transpacific race of a distance of not less 
than 2,000 miles. Present Commodore of TYC 
is W. L. Stewart, Jr. and first man to fly the 
pennant with the three blue stars was Clar- 
ence MacFarlane, who has continued to serve 
in the capacity of Honorary Commodore. 

Sailing yacht enthusiasts can be found in all 
businesses and professions. Looking at ran- 
dom among the men who have entered their 
boats in the 1947 race, we find Dr. A. A. 
Steele, endocrinologist, who is skipper of the 
Stella Maris II. Dr. Steele designed and 
built the Stella in a shed back of his office. 
"I would sneak out between patients and do 
a little work on her," he confided. Commo- 
dore Stewart, skipper of the Chubasco, is 
vice-president of Union Oil Company. He 
learned to sail when he was nine years old 
and lived only for the day when he could 
buy his own boat. Robert S. Miller, skipper 
of the Westward, admires a streamlined bow 
. . he's president of Helene of Hollywood 
brassiere company. Frank Kent, skipper of 
the White Cloud, is proprietor of a very plush 
nightclub in Oakland. J. L. Munson. skin- 
per of the Cheerio, is a poultry raiser. E. 
G. Gould, skipper of the Brilliant, heads a 
hardware company. Donald B. Ayres, Com- 
modore of the Los Angeles Yacht Club and 
master of the Skylark, is in the real estate 
business. Charles D. Wiman, skipper of the 
Patolita, is president of John Deere Plow 
Company. Dr. Paul D. Van Degrift, Commo- 
dore of the Voyagers Yacht Club, is a gyn- 
ecologist, and Carl M. Heintz, skipper of the 
Four Winds, is president of an advertising 
company. 

The only entrants whose businesses are con- 
cerned with the sea are Thomas A. Short, 
skipper of the Tasco, who heads a marine 
equipment house in San Francisco, and Sam 
H. Emmes of the Rendezvous, who formerly 
was editor of Sea Magazine. 

The motion picture colony always has had 
its share of men who find surcease from the 
camera in going down to the sea in ships. 
John Barrymore skippered the Enchantress 
and claimed fourth place in the 1926 Honolulu 
Race. Buck Jones sailed his Sartartia in the 
1936 contest, and Lee Tracy competed twice in 
the Adore, 1936 and 1939. 

This year Frank "Dr. Tweedy" Morgan 
will bound over the main in a try for the 
cup with his Dolphin II. George Brent will 
exchange his pinstripe for dungarees and 
guide the course of his schooner, South Wind. 

Average time for the race is 13 days. The 
record is 11 days, 14 hours, and was set in 
1923 by L. A. Norris aboard his 106-foot 
schooner, Mariner. Contrary winds blew no 
one good in the 1939 contest . . the winner 
logged the longest time on record: 23 days. 

Hawaiian hospitality will begin for the 
participants as soori 1 as the first boat crosses 
the finish line. 

Families and friends of the racers have 
booked all available passage on commercial 
boats and planes. They'D all be on hand at 
Diamond Head when the sea birds skim into 
Molokai Channel with the trade winds full 
in their sails. 



how does your 
garden grow? 




Ll ow does your indoor garden grow? Do 
you have good luck with your house plants? 
Or do they drop their glory and begin 
moulting like a seven-week pullet? 

Primary items on the care-of-plants pro- 
gram, as you know, are sufficient light 
and water. Flowering plants thrive in ful' 
sunlight, and foliage plants . . ferns, philo- 
dendron and rubber plants . . do well in 
bright light such as is provided by a north 
window. Earthenware pots are the best 
containers, except for plants that satis- 
factorily will grow in water, such as ivy 
or plilodendron. Best watering technique 
is to immerse the earthenware pot in a pan 
or bucket of water, letting it stand for 30 
minutes to an hour, depending upon the 
soil's degree of dryness. A good moisture 
gauge is a slender stick left buried at the 
far side of the pot . . this can be removed 
and checked frequently. 

House plants should be fed regularly 
if the utmost in blossoms and foliage is to 
be attained. Several good commercial 
preparations are available and should be 
used according to directions, usually three 
or four times a year for full-grown plants 
and at more frequent intervals during the 
flowering season. 

AZALEAS: Partial shade is preferable. 
They thrive best in acid, fibrous soil . . 
peat moss and leaf mold are good, and 
soil may be kept acid by application of 
a teaspoon of aluminum sulphate about 
once each month. Azaleas enjoy a warm, 
fine spray in the mornings . . use a rubber 
syringe. 

BEGONIAS: Like coolness and moisture. 
Put them in your north window. Never 
spray from the top. Keep old leaves picked 
off. 

CACTI: Good drainage is important. In 
planting, a base of leaf-mold or peat moss 
and a top layer of sand will provide an 
aerated soil. Irrigate more freely during 
summer months than in winter, and give 
occasional light feedings of commercial 
preparation. Cacti thrive best in partial 
sun. 

FERNS: Keep away from sunlight. 
Again, the north window is good. They like 
air, and dislike being handled or moved. 
Pour water into pot from top . no pro- 
longed soaking for ferns! A gentle shower 
once each week is beneficial. Feed occa- 
sionally with a weak solution of sodium 
nitrate. 

IVY: Decorative and dependable. Will 
grow in almost any location but enjoys 
an occasional sun bath. Likes a weekly 
shower or, if you have the patience, sponge 
the leaves by hand. Keep soil moist and 
repot each year. 

PHILODENDRON: Grows satisfactorily 
in water, too. Plant food should be added 
and water changed weekly. Plants can be 
trained into almost any decorative pattern. 

RUBBER PLANT: Likes light but not 
direct sun. Keep soil moist and sponge 
leaves often with slightly soapy water, fol- 
lowed by a rinse of equal parts of milk 
and water. 

Good growing! 



61 



QUEEN OF THE MALIBU 



by William J. Bowen 



(Continued from page 23) 

inlet where the Maliwu village once stood, 
the Queen's daughter, Rhoda, resides today. 
(Adohr Milk Farms was named for her by 
her husband, Merritt H. Adamson, by spell- 
ing her name backwards.) With her mother's 
spirit she lives protected from prying eyes 
and inquiring reporters in an estate behind 
the high brick walls that the Queen had 
built for the privacy of her holdings. On the 
other side of the creek's mouth the equally 
private and protected motion picture colony 
stretches along a mile of fine wide sandy 
beach. 

But except for these things, The Malibu 
looked much the same to Cabrillo as it does 
to the Roosevelt Highway motorists of to- 
day. There were mountains rising straight 
from the ocean's edge to a height of 3.000 
feet at jagged-toothed Boney Mountain. Here 
and there were a narrow shelf of flat shore 
land, rolling hills, barren mesas, sand dunes, 
wooden canyons, with flowing arroyos and 
waterfalls and narrow barrancas where creeks 
made their way through the gored rocks. 
There were inaccessible canyons, rocky crags 
and caves. There were sycamores, live oaks 
and willows, wild flowers and dry grass and 
brush. Out to sea Santa Catalina and other 
channel islands stood in crisp silhouette on 
a clear day. 

But visitors to The Malibu remained few 
and far between until the late twenties. 
Perhaps Sir Francis Drake stopped off . . 
perhaps not. The Franciscan padres of the 
eighteenth century avoided its difficult coast- 
line and impassable mountains. Travel along 
the El Camino Real between San Buenaven- 
tura and San Fernando was inland. 

And although it has the peculiar distinc- 
tion of being the last of the Spanish land 
grants to remain largely intact, the Rancho 
Topanga-Malibu-Sequit has had a brief suc- 
cession of ownership . . increasing from its 
original 13,000 acres to an ultimate 24.000. 
For valiant military service to the crown it 
was granted by the King of Spain to Jose 
Bartolome Tapia in 1804. His heirs later 
sold it for S400 . . half in cash, half in 
groceries and wine . . to one Leon Victor 
Prudhomme. He, in turn, let it go for an 
unpaid grocery bill to Mathew "Don Mateo" 
Keller. His son, Henry W. Keller . . long- 
time president of the Automobile Club of 
Southern California . . sold it in 1890 to 
the Rindges for S10 per acre. And there 
begins one of the most fantastic dramas in 
annals of California land laws. 

Frederick Hastings Rindge, son of a weal- 
thy Massachusetts woolen merchant, came to 
California with his 22-year-old bride. May. 
in 1887. He had seen Sorrento and Amalfi 
on the Italian Riviera, and Nice and Monte 
Carlo on the French Riviera. He saw in 
the Topanga-Malibu-Seqnit's coastline the 
vision of an American Riviera that would one 
day rival or surpass those of Europe. So 
he bought it. 

This was California in the frontier days 
of the nineties and any visions of a Riviera 
development must have been projected far 
into the future. But Rindge found time 
away from planting and watering the avenues 
of palm trees, leading to the canyon promon- 
tory' where he hoped to build his own home, 
to dabble in business ventures. He founded 
the Conservative Life Insurance Co.. fore- 
runner of the Pacific Mutual, co-founded the 
Union Oil Co. and the Southern California 
Edison Co. 

The Rindges were troubled with trespass- 
ers almost at once. Their fences and locked 
gates had barred the settlers of Yerba Buena 
Canyon, just north of The Malibu, from any 
route to Santa Monica. John Fitzpatrick and 
his neighbors expressed their resentment by 
shooting the locks off the gates. 

In those early days there was some water 
and road development begun on The Malibu 



with the grand plan in view, but it didn't 
get very far. The ranch house burned down 
in 1903, and although it was maintained as 
a working cattle ranch, neither Mr. nor Mrs. 
Rindge ever truly resided on their vast feudal 
estate. 

But on his death bed in 1905, Frederick 
Hastings Rindge exhorted his wife to protect 
their lands from intrusion and to carry forth 
the ideal of a great American Riviera. This 
she did for the next 35 years with a singular 
devotion and persistence that only the com- 
bined forces of the United States Supreme 
Court and financial collapse could bring to 
bay. As the Queen of The Malibu she be- 
came admired, respected; hated by the many; 
honored if not loved by the few who knew 
her. But actually, even though she was in 
and out of the courts and newspapers for 
three decades, no one ever came to really 
know her. The shroud of mystery that lay 
about her, the rumors, libels, legends, contra- 
dictions, still go unanswered and unsolved. 
Her sons. Samuel K. and Frederick, have re- 
tired into relative obscurity. Frederick lives 
modestly in Latigo Canyon on the Malibu. 
Her daughter, Mrs. Rhoda Adamson, as 
close-lipped and resentful of intrusion into 
her mother's affairs as the Queen was her- 
self, leaves the many riddles unsolved. So 
do the nine grandchildren and several great- 
grandchildren. 

'". . . A young man, Fred H. Rindge, ap- 
peared and started to kick dirt into the 
trench. Then his mother, Mrs. May K. 
Rindge, and her daughter appeared, and 




• Commuters to The Malibu's beautiful estates 
have the advantage of a streamlined transporta- 
tion service . . when not chaufTeuring the car. 



they, too, started to kick dirt back into 
the excavation. We were helpless. Mrs. 
Rindge had 10 Mexicans with her . . . some 
of the party carried fire arms." This recital 
in a court, many years after it had happened 
in 1908, by a homesteader who had sought 
to drain a slough by digging a trench a few 
hundred yards across the Queen's domain, set 
the tenure for the fierce protection of her 
estate that characterized the whole story of 
the Rindge Ranch. The stately, embittered 
Queen would fight all comers at all odds, 
with her own hands or with the army of 
armed Mexican fence riders that she em- 
ployed. Such passionate devotion to the 
execution of her husband's injunction could 
but command respect, even from her per- 
secutors. And, indeed, she even had her sym- 
pathizers, although they were not to be found 
among those who had been blocked by her 
fences from enjoying the 22 miles of Califor- 
nia coastline that she hoarded. 

The first big battle, and one of the few 
in which the Rindges emerged the eventual 
victors, began before Mr. Rindge had died. 
The Southern Pacific Railroad sought to 
establish its Los Angeles to San Francisco 
route along the coastline, traversing the 
shores of The Malibu. In fact it acquired 
the rights of way from Santa Monica to the 
very fences of The Malibu and actually 
laid tracks there. But this intrusion the 
Rindges successfully thwarted by the simple 
expedient of establishing their own 20-mile 
private, narrow gauge railroad along their 
own coastline . . thus driving the S. P. to its 
present valley route as far as Ventura. They 
called it the Hueneme and Malibu and Port 
Los Angeles Railroad, as Los Angeles Harbor 
came very near to being located at Long 
Wharf, just south of The Malibu, instead 
of at San Pedro. But it did not connect 
with any other common carrier . . onh 
produce and livestock from the ranch were 
shuttled along its rails to waiting ships at 
the old pier. As late as 1930 rusting flat 
cars could be seen half burried in the 
shifting sands along The Malibu. 

The 17-year fight that the Queen of The 
Malibu waged against public county roads 
and state highways across her domain was 
more hitter and considerably less successful 
than the railroad coup. She sank a fortune 
in attorneys' fees that contributed materially 
to her ultimate bankruptcy. When at last 
she had failed and the first version of 
Highway 101, the Roosevelt Highway, was 
completed and opened to traffic in 1928, 
the sympathetic Santa Monica Outlook of 
December 9 of that year said: "Mrs. May K. 
Rindge ... is silent . . . For 30 years she 
has attempted to keep that great land grant 
as it was in the beginning. It was her prop- 
erty . . . and if she chose to let it lie idle 
while the rest of Southern California became 
annexed to Iowa, that's her business . . ." 

Even after the courts had established the 
state's right to eminent domain across The 
Malibu in 1923, state engineers were blocked 
by the drawn pistols of the indomitable 
Queen's army of fence riders. In order to 
avoid shooting, the engineers and their escort 
of sheriffs officers retreated . . temporarily. 
The Queen had lost the war and won a 
scrimmage. But she had not lost it until 
legal actions begun in 1908 had included four 
that had gone to the State Supreme Court 
and two that had reached the United States 
Supreme Court. 

The completion of the highway brought 
new troubles to the now aging but still 
spirited and determined Queen of The 
Malibu. Some 132 misguided ex-servicemen 
scaled her fences and posted squatters claims 
upon her domain under a homesteading law 
which gave certain rights to veterans on un- 
appropriated lands. But this time the high 
courts were swift in upholding the legality 



62 



of Spanish land grant titles . . and hence 
ordered the eviction of the poachers. 

The troubles of the harrassed Queen were 
not all her own doings. There were bitterness 
and selfish interests and antagonism even 
from high official quarters. Irate judges, dur- 
ing heated court sessions, sometimes threat- 
ened her with jail for contempt. Many felt 
that the $100,000 or so that she received for 
the main highway condemnation was further 
from the true value than her own million 
dollar claim. And by the time the state 
had finally won its condemnation suit for 
the Roosevelt Highway it had changed its 
planned route and had to begin legal pro- 
ceedings all over again! Mrs. Rindge had 
to swallow bitter pills concerning lands other 
than those of The Malibu. An oil company 
had paid her an option of $75,000 for her 
Robertson Blvd. and National Blvd. holdings. 
Not only did it never consummate the pur- 
chase, but the company got its option money 
back in a court action after the city had 
zoned the area against drilling. 

Litigation and the slow but certain dis- 
sipation of her personal fortune were not 
permitted to completely submerge the Queen's 
active plans for the development of an Ameri- 
can Riviera. In 1926 the now world-famous 
Malibu motion picture colony had its humble 
beginning when Mrs. Rindge leased a plot 
of land on the sand to old time movie star 
Anna Q. Nilsson. Soon others followed, pay- 
ing $75 a month for leases that had reversion 
clauses in the event that liquor was consumed 
in ths houses that the lessees would build 
upon her property. Access to the Colony was 
by a six-mile private sand road starting from 
locked gates at The Malibu's southern edge. 
And although she began to sell the leased 
land in the thirties, the spirit of "Private 
Road, Keep Out" still prevails. Today, to 
enter the Colony from the highway's edge 
one must satisfy a private guard of the 
legitimacy of one's business before he will 
raise the gate arm to let you pass. Highway 
travelers are affronted on their left and right 
throughout The Malibu by warnings of 
"Private Road, Keep Out". The last of the 
private ranchos is being broken up, rather 
than opened up. 

However, the roster of the hundred or so 
residents of the movie colony of today and 
of the 4,000 inhabitants of the rest of The 
Malibu area does indeed read like a Holly- 
wood Who's Who. It includes such names 
as Paulette Goddard, Merle Oberon, Warner 
Baxter, Robert Young, Irene (MGM design- 
er) Gibbons, Sir Charles and Lady Mendl, 
Clifton Webb, John Considine, Arthur Horn- 
blow Jr., Lillian Gish, Conrad Nagel, Joe E. 
Brown, Dennis O'Keefe, Gregory Ratoff, 
Max Factor, Jr., Brian Donlevy, Joan Davis, 
Pete Smith, Buddy De Sylva and Frank 
Capra. 

Surely this is a handsome nucleus for 
some sort of an American Riviera, though 





• Construction already has begun on the beautiful Malibu Quarterdeck Club and the yacht harbor 
that will boom Malibu as the American Riviera. Here is architect Cliff May's interpretation of the 
playground that will cater to movie stars and others with a two-thousand dollar membership fee. 



perhaps it is not being executed just as 
the Queen and her husband would have done 
it. Development has been accelerated since 
war's end and new subdivisions, reminiscent 
of the twenties, are opening up one after 
another in the final liquidation of the Rindge 
estate. 

Life on The Malibu has a Riviera flavor, 
too. There are swimming and sunning at 
the head of the list. At the Colony's edge 
sporty residents dive for abalone, spear fish, 
catch lobsters, hold elaborate grunion parties 
in season. There is trout fishing in Malibu 
Creek; or ocean fishing from The Malibu's 
sleek pier which boasts a first-rate restaurant 
and swank sport shop. There are stables 
and thoroughbred horses and beautiful can- 
yons to ride in . . mesas to explore like 
Horse Heaven on the knolls back of The 
Colony which was once a rendezvous for 
freely ranging Rindge horses. There is surf 
board riding by the pier and a private air 
field is in the planning. 

Although hunting is not allowed, the deer 
are a threat to the lush gardens, even down 
to the highway's edge. One garden has 3,000 
camelia bushes. There are ducks, quail, 
doves, foxes, rabbits, coyotes, rattlesnakes 
and, occasionally, mountain lions. Fifteen 
miles up in the mountains is sporty, fashion- 
able Malibu Lake, but it is not an integral 
part of The Malibu. 

And then, in the making is the ultimate in 
yacht harbors. 

Twice before, yacht harbors along The 
Malibu have been planned. The Queen her- 
self, when she first opened the Malibu La 
Costa area for sale in 1928, included a 
yacht harbor as a part of her elaborate blue- 
print for what amounted to the second real 
step toward her Riviera. But depression and 
the jailing of promoter Harold G. Ferguson 
left the plan to fade on the blueprints. 

The other plan was reported the year 
before by the Los Angeles Times. One Hiram 
H. Helm had bought the Miller Ranch, just 
north of The Malibu across the Ventura 
County line, and announced his own Riviera 
scheme to be called Malibu Palisades. In 
addition to hotels and golf clubs and homes, 
there were to be "fresh water lagoons, a 
breakwater and yacht harbor." Nothing more 
tangible than the Times story remains today 
in evidence of this man's bursted bubble. 

But Cabrillo and the Los Angeles Examin- 
er both picked the actual spot that will 



accommodate The Malibu's Quarterdeck Club 
and yacht harbor, already under construction. 
Cabrillo selected it for his own landing place. 
And the Examiner, just 20 years ago, on 
one of the plush, puffy automobile pages 
of the era, reported an exploration by the 
Locomobile Co. of the soon-to-be-opened Coast 
Highway. Flatly it reported, "A new bridge 
stretches across Malibu Creek, an inlet that 
will someday be a beautiful yacht harbor." 

Within a year it is hoped that this pre- 
diction will have become a reality. Motor 
boats and yachts of club members should, 
by then, be able to anchor in the dredged- 
out creek delta. And in another year the 
ultra-modern Quarterdeck Club, designed by 
Cliff May, should be abuzz with its 1000 
members bent upon getting their two thous- 
and dollars worth of pleasure. Plenty of 
opportunity will be offered them. Aside 
from the luxurious club, its shielded swim- 
ming pool, sand areas and guest rooms, 
there will be the feature attraction : South- 
ern California's only harbor owned by a pri- 
vate club. It will accommodate 750 small 
craft in the inner harbor and larger vessels 
along the outer breakwater. Extra fancy 
is a planned two-story boat garage equipped 
with boat elevators and providing "valet" 
service for parking all kinds of pleasure craft 
up to thirty-footers. This is a Riviera develop- 
ment of no mean sort. 

The Queen is dead, but a Riviera molded 
by the hands of others will rebound to the 
benefit of her creditors, with perhaps some- 
thing left over for her heirs. 

She might have saved her already tottering 
personal fortune in 1928 or 1929 when the 
Topanga-Malibu-Sequit was valued up to 
$100,000,000 . . some 500 times what her 
husband paid for it. But sentiment and a 
stubborn will spelled her downfall. She 
was persuaded, however, to take one small 
step to save her empire . . ironically it only 
brought her more misfortune. Harold G. 
Ferguson had talked her into putting the 
southwestern corner of her lands on the 
market. Thus it came about that the Malibu 
La Costa sector was sub-divided and develop- 
ment was planned in accordance with her 
own elaborate scheme. She floated an $8 
million bond issue and plans were drawn 
for lush clubs, yacht harbor and other ac- 
coutrements of a proper Riviera. Lots fan- 
tastically priced at $20,000 later sold for 
(Continued on page 64) 



63 



Y BY MAIL. A 
The 
Martha 
Dunham 




Truly does the sewing: rocker of our grand- 
mothers come to lovely and restful life 
again — to go so contentedly with your Co- 
lonial, 18th Century or Victorian setting. 
The Martha Dunham is proverbially com- 
fortable and form fitting — carefully con- 
structed in Mahogany-finished, American 
Hardwood. Your choice of an authentic Co- 
lonial tapestry cover — either blue, beige, 
black or wine. Height 34", Width 21", 
Depth 17". Order one for your own and 

one for "the" newlywed couple at $27.95 

each. Express collect. Send your check or 
money order. (No C.O.D.'s). Ref. First 



ior your copy oi Aucnenuc ijnairs . 

o7ne %&at^ o&ofi, 




Box 220 




5t; lined ceramic wall ornaments which can be used 
is plant growers or wired for lighting. Surrealistic 
luted shell, 8V2" high and 11" long. 

Red & White Brown & Chartreuse 

Black & White Green & White 

State if hole is desired for lighting 
Each, $7.50 plus 3 lbs postage 
$13.50 plus 6 lbs postage 



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Angeles 16, Calif. 




BREEZY BRIDGE 

CARD ANCHORS 

"Play Bridge With Ease 
In the Stiff ist Breeze" 

Enjoy your bridge game on the patio, 
beach, boat or under the electric fan. 
Facilitates the game indoors or out. 
Holds the "dummy" hand and each player's 
tricks in full view. 

A practical, beautiful new gift in heavy 
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$5.95 postpaid. 

Check orMoney Order Sorry— no C. O. D 's. 

CREATIONS BY BETH 

P. O. Box 1035 St. Petersburg, Florida 

*Pat. No. 1781859 



QUbbN Oh I hit MALIBU 



(Continued from page 63) 

S2,000 and have not again approached 

that figure even in these inflated days. 

Then Ferguson went to San Quentin 
for some shaky manipulations. Depres- 
sion hit and the bondholders foreclosed. 
Ferguson, of course, had defaulted on 
his payments and Mrs. Rindge was 
saddled with a S30,000 a month interest 
payment on the bonds. These she met 
as best she could, eventually dissipating 
all her remaining holdings at sacrificial 
prices. Inevitably, in 1936, the Queen 
of The Malibu was bankrupt. 

Once again, however, the last of the 
Spanish Ranchos was saved momen- 
tarily from complete disintegration. 
And the Queen could thank the law. 
Under bankruptcy legislation passed by 
the New Dealers, reorganization of the 
estate was made possible, thus avoid- 
ing forced distribution of the property 
among the creditors. The Queen was 
allowed a hand in managing it. 

But in December, 1940, came the end 
of an era in California's romantic land 
history. The whole of the remaining 
17,000 acres that had first belonged to 
lose Bartolome Tapia was up for sale, 
acre by acre, lot by lot. 

Three months later, on February 8, 
1941, at the age of 75, Mrs. May K. 
Rindge died. Hers was a life that had 
been dedicated to an ideal, bull-head- 



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edly and energetically devoted to a 
deathbed wish of 36 years before; a 
moral responsibility executed with 
close-mouthed dignity; a readiness to 
fight all comers who challenged her 
right of privacy as she saw it. Jealously 
hated by many, persecuted by others, 
but respected by all, this life, great in 
the annals of California, passed from 
the scene. 

As if in desperate haste before it 
would be too late, she had begun the 
mansion in 1932 . . at a time when her 
personal fortune already was in a threat- 
ened condition. And she continued to 
pour money and marble and tile and 
hand-carved Philippine mahogany into 
it for four years . . a half-million dol- 
lars worth . . right up to the moment 
of her final bankruptcy. 

Then, unfinished and never lived in, 
the 50-room mansion stood idle and neg- 
lected for more than five years, still 
needing another $100,000 to complete 
it. Not until Pearl Harbor time was it 
finally sold for a paltry §50,000 to the 
Franciscan Order to become today the 
Serra Retreat for Catholic laymen. 

The legends of the Queen persist. 
Like the fable of the gold plumbing 
fixtures, a monstrous belief has sprung 
from her intention of installing a. six- 
by-eight-foot Roman tile bathtub. The 
Los Angeles Times in 1941 reported it 
as a 13-by-17 foot tile swimming pool 
adjacent to what was to have been 
"Prince" Frederick's suite. And all 
along The Malibu one can learn that 
there is a tremendous upstairs swim- 
ming pool in the castle on the hill. Ac- 
tually, not even the Roman bath ever 
was installed. But the tight-lipped May 
K. Rindge, resentful of all intrusions 
into her personal affairs, neither fos- 
tered nor scotched tales such as these. 

Indeed, the long suffering Queen of 
The Malibu who sought desperately to 
be left alone, but never was, would 
hardly agree with the motto that 
adorns the wastebaskets in the sleeping 
rooms of her onetime castle. Bitterly, 
and from a long distraught experience, 
she could roundly deny the legend, 
which reads: "Even a fish wouldn't 
get into trouble if he kept his mouth 
shut." 



A GIFT LONG REMEMBERED 




INDIVIDUAL TABLE HOT PADS 

Made of beautiful Philippine mahogany and 
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Please print names clearly on orders. 

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341 Third Street Watsonville, Calif. 




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teRIFF COMPANY 
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Washable! Wearable! Wonderfu 
This cool blouse of imported dott 
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White only. Sizes 32-34-36. §8.5 
Send check or money order to 

BERTHA STEPHENSON 



1521 S. Troost 



Tulsa, Okl 



64 



THE C ALIFORN I AN, July, 1947 



,-.. 



'ndian Basketry design .. .hand 
printed on California Authentics' 
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. . . prooides saloos of color 
in this drape-sleeoe original 
by Violet latum. 

MARSHALL FIELD 6 CO. • CHICAGO 
I. MAGNIN % CO. • LOS ANGELES 



fat 









VERONICA LAKE. 

starring in "Ramrod". 

an Enterprise Production 



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SHEETS AND PILLOWCASES 



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