(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Californian"

* 



D 2DD7 DS5b771 3 

California State Library 



Call No. 






B7517 B-63 5M SPO 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant 



http://www.archive.org/details/californian0809losa 



/M\* 



A MAGAZINE STYLED FOR COLORFUL LIVING 



CALIFORN 

PRICE 35 CENTS "V^oi 




X^>. 




7 '>» 








/ 




weaters . . . 



Made for each other! 
Catalina's Sweethearts in 
Sweaters* series . . . 
featuring spirited California 
styling, treasured 
California colors in 
kitten-soft, 
genuine Cashmeres. 

'registered 

for her: Cashmere short-sleeve 

slip-on, 13.00; 

shown with Cashmere Cardigan, 17.00 

for him: Cashmere slip-on, 18.00 

(Cashmere sleeveless, 13.00) 



a. C*^1h-» \jvv*> 





\ mm. 



as Scotch as Balmoral Castle 

is our all-wool Balmoral Plaid 
Calif-Fashion. A thrifty suit, . . . 
so fashion-rich. 

Combinations of tan or grey. 

Sizes 12 to 18. %25 
Sports Shop 





VOL. 8 
No. 1 



THE CALIFORNIAN i» published monthlv by The Californian, Inc., at 1020 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, Calif., printed in U. S. A. Yearly sub- AUGUST 
scription price $3.00. Entered as second class matter January 23, 1946. at the Post Office. Los Aneeles, Calif., under the act of March 3, 1879. 194 9 




'!$**£&• 










THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 












For store in your city write Adele . . . S. Hill St., Los Angeles. 




presents 



Hendan 






AT THESE STORES: 

Los Angeles, California 
DESMOND'S 

Torrance, California 
SAM LEVY 

Lakeview, Oregon 
LAKEVIEW MERC. CO. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 
PERKINS-SHEARER 

Eagle River, Wisconsin 
H. C. HEROLD, JR. 

Jefferson, Iowa 
WALTER S. DOWNES 

Sheboygan, Michigan 
BUERGER'S 

Palmdale, California 
LORNA WALLACE 

Riverside, California 
MOORE & DANIEL 

Ukiah, California 
PALACE DRESS SHOP 

Bloomington, Illinois 
C. W. KLEMM, INC. 

La Jolla, California 
ILLER'S 

Albuquerque, New Mexico 
GAGE'S 

Reno, Nevada 
VANITIE DRESS SHOP 

Eugene, Oregon 
MILLER MERC. CO. 

Alliance, Nebraska 
ALE'S 

Klamath Falls, Oregon 
LaPOINTE'S 



Z^r^ 



!%Ms 



a Jane Taylor selection 






Bold Plaid Shirts for the campus, dorm, stadium or square dances. 

Tailored by Hendan with trim, clean lines . . . made of Dan River 
Plaid Gingham, washable, Sanforized (less than 1% residual shrinkage) 
and Fast Color. Colors — Red, Green and Blue or Black, Red and Grey. 

His shirt has long sleeves, sizes S-M-L-XL, retails at $4.95; 
Her shirt has short sleeves, sizes 32 to 38, retails at $3.95. 



For further 
details write 

Hendan 

, 28 Sooth Son Jo«an, 
Lo s Angele 



".;5'i 




THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1945 




)ft 



Tara. . . the new, year , round cotton print walks into 
your fall living. Deeper, richer, more vivid tones emphasize 
silky texture. . . dramatically portray interpretive designs. Sanforized and guaranteed washable. 
In ready-to-wear or by the yard at your favorite store. 



N. Fluegelman & co., inc. 

1412 Broadway, New York 18, New York 









I OF CAUFOBNll 



proudly presents YOUNG COORDINATES 

Such fun and so practical are these 100% all wool menswear gray flannel 
separates, each highlighted by sheen braid. Sizes 10-18, 9-15. Priced for 
youthful budgeteers. 

Double breasted reefer, detachable back belt, satin lining $14.95. Weskit $4.95. 

Skirt, fly front style $5.95. Cardigan, man tailored $9.95. Pedal Pushers $6.95. 

Slacks (not shown) $7.95. 



For store nearest you write SPORT-LANE OF CALIFORNIA 224 East 11th Street, Los Angeles 15, California 



THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 194 







1. 

1 1 I 







/ 



THE SIZE OF FASH ION 



?»** 



of (aujptnfa 



Designs for the petite, 5'4" or under, a 



o r 

THE 



perfectly proportioned dress. In Burlington's 

Radiant Sanchilla, glowing with festive fall colors . . . 

emerald, russet, teal, taupe, red and black. The high-or-low 

neckline with multiple stitching is softly flattering. Sizes 10-20. 

^-~+*~'/«y/(»1_ says this is a real value! It retails under $20.00 

further details write SERGEE of California 660 Ea s t 22nd S t r e e t, Los A n g e les 

CALI FORN I AN, August, 1949 7 




7^e (fattittentat 
lUcvicOio&e . . . 

...designed by Irene Saltern, 

as coordinated separates to ensemble 

as you choose inexpensively into a 

"round-the-clock" woolen wardrobe.. . 

'THottte (fyutfo jacket, in an exclusive 

Ria Herlinger Woolen. Brown blended 

with gold or dark green with mauve pink. 

<fa£e *?iotten skirt in 
brown or green Hockanum wool flannel. 

l/entleal s4cce*tt pleated skirt and 

*P<Z4&C(M. "ponmuCei sweater-blouse, 

all wool heather jersey in gold 

or mauve pink. 

COORDINATED SEPARATES^ PLANNED WARDROBE' 

g THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 



le 



tal soft portrait collar, 



deftly draped peg skirt 



achieve drama in deep 



tones of plum, taupe, gray, 



emerald, raspberry, navy, 



brown and black 



Julius Werk's Fristel. 





375 SUTTER STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 8, CALIFORNIA 



THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 



f?vnm% 



MAC EC 



in ''Control-Lift" Brassieres 
for every age . . . every size 

To Cordelia, famous Hollywood designer, there is no 
such thing as a "problem bust". In the Cordelia line 
of surgical, corrective, and style brassieres, there are 
over 600 different fittings, along with regular sizes, 
and each one is designed to "do things" for you. 
In long-line styles (as illustrated below) sizes range 
from 32 to 56 plus. You'll like the exquisite fabrics 
Cordelia uses, too — nylons and satins with lace, fine 
broadcloths and jacquards ... all created to reveal 
new contour beauty for the lady with a figure problem. 



f 



Cordelia creates for the young woman too — recognizing that even young 
women frequently have brassiere fitting problems. Cordelia's 600-plus 
individual and regular fittings include all the youthful sizes, in all the 
newest and most delightful quick-drying fabrics, in the season's popular 
shades — nude, white, or black. Cordelia brassieres are always avail- 
able at all better department stores and specialty shops. If your dealer 
doesn't appear below — write for name of the store nearest you. 



NOW BEING FEATURED AT SUCH FINE STORES AS 



FREDERICK & NELSON, Seattle 
AUERBACH'S, Salt Lake City 
STIX, BAER, FULLER, St. Louis 
BULLOCK'S, LOS ANGELES 
GOLDWATER'S, Phoenix 
POPULAR DRY GOODS, El Paso 
GRACE CAMPBELL, Inc., San Francisco 
DENVER DRY GOODS, Denver 
BOSTON STORE INC., Milwaukee 
CRAEMERS, Cedar Rapids 



STRAWBRIDGE & CLOTHIER, Philadelphia 
ABRAHAM & STRAUSS, Brooklyn 
WM. H. BLOCK CO., Indianapolis 
THE MARSTON COMPANY, San Diego 
OLDS, WORTMAN & KING, Portland 
GEORGE PECK, Kansas City 
C. H. HITTENBERGER STORES, San Francisco 
THE FAIR, Fort Worth 
J. L. HUDSON, Detroit 
W. A. GREEN, Dallas 



. . . and at other leading department stores, specialty shops, and surgical supply houses 
all over America. Once you've worn a figure-flattering Cordelia Brassiere, you'll never be 
satisfied with anything else! 



^-^ OF HniiYU/nnn 



OF HOLLYWOOD 



CREATORS AND MANUFACTURERS OF SURGICAL, CORRECTIVE, 
AND STYLE BRASSIERES 

3107 BEVERLY BLVD., LOS ANGELES 4, CALIF. 



\jJkL*M'<a- \jwf<*J 



10 



THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 



Adeline Wed 



says 



TONE ON TONE 



Slick-as-a-whistle two piece jersey touched with 
velveteen on belt and standaway collar. Velveteen 
is an important style feature. Wear it for open 
house or shopping on Saturday. Designed by 
ADELINE WEST and adopted by !Z-V~t /aytot- 
in Lebanon jersey and Crompton-Richmond velve- 
teen. In teal, doeskin, toast, Indian rust, green, 
concord blue and black. Sizes 9-15, 10-18. Skirt, 
retail $8.95, blouse $7.95. 



AT THESE 


STORES: 


The Blouse 


The Skirt 


Santa Barbara, California 


Los Angeles, California 


THE HUGHES 


THE BROADWAY 


Stockton, California 


Sacramento, California 


BROWN HOUSE 


HALE BROS. 




For further details write ADELINE WEST 1013 South Los Angeles Street, Los Angeles 



THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 



11 



I 




AT THESE STORES: 

Centralia, Washington 
BABE'S 

Crestview, Florida 
CHILDREN'S SHOP 

Elgin, Oregon 
MILADY'S SHOP 

Ft. Pierce, Florida 
TINY TOTS TOGS 

Fullerton, California 
HAPPINESS TOYS SHOPPE 

Gainesville, Florida 
WILSON COMPANY 

Gilmer, Texas 

TOT TO TEEN SHOP 

Jacksonville, Florida 
FURCHGOTT'S 

Mt. Pleasant, Texas 
ROSE BITTING SHOPPE 

Mt. Vernon, Illinois 
SUSAN SHOP 

Nashville, Tennessee 
HILLSBORO-TOGGERY 

Ponca City, Oklahoma 
TYKE TOWN 

Rio Grande City, Texas 
GUEMAR SHOP 

San Bernardino, California 
WEE MODERN SHOP 

Seminole, Oklahoma 
LUCILLE'S CHILD AND 
GIFT SHOP 

Shreveport, Louisiana 
JUNIOR TOWN 

Sweetwater, Texas 
ONEITA'S TOT SHOP 

Stockton, California 
THE BROWN HOUSE 

Thomasville, Georgia 
LAD & LASSIE SHOP 

Ventura, California 
IRIS DRESS SHOP 



^Match-up Sets For Little Sis! 

The younger set takes to TRUDE OF CALIFORNIA'S gabardine "gaddies" for back-to-school. 
Neat rows of cording on the high riding waistband match the perky stand-up cuffs on 
the blouse. Skirt, slacks, pedal pushers, and blouse are $4.95 each in sizes 7-12, 
and $5.95 each in preteen sizes 10-14. And they're hand washable rayon 
gabardine in red or copen blue. A . — +*"«■/«« &rt__ coordinated choice from San Francisco. 

For further details write TRUDE OF CALIFORNIA 595 Mission St., San Francisco 5 



12 



THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 




^(Ulefwaad 'Ptemiene designs 

beautifully smart, endlessly 
functional campus separates. 



Skirt of Bond Street all-wool menswear 
grey flannel; sizes 10 to 18. 10.95 

Striped blouse of wool jersey; 
grey with red, kelly or royal; 
sizes 10 to 18. 10.95 

Stadium jacket, back belted, 
of all-wool suede fleece 
in red, royal, or kelly; 
sizes 10 to 16. 29.95 



Buff urns' 



LONG BEACH 2, CALIFORNIA 



MAIL ORDERS 

plus 3% slate sales lax 
uffums Sun-Charm Fashions* 
reg U S Pal Office 

I THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 



^•^ 




$ 





13" 




POLKA DOT SLEEPERS 

FOR NIGHT LIFE AT THE DORM .... 



EVER READY of s™ Fm„«,co „,,, SANFORIZED 

soft warm flannelette for, left, long full gown with brace- 
let length sleeves. At the bar, shortie coat twin. Both 
have eyelet frosting with ribbon drawstrings. $5.98 
each. Two-piece pajamas have warm kitten feet, button- 
up front. $4.98. Rose, copen, navy, or red dots on white 
background. Fast color. In sizes 32-38. 



(3"*"/" 



£ 



selection. 



Write to EVER READY, 90 Dorman Ave., San Francisco, Calif., and we will tell you where to buy it. 



14 



THE CAUFORNIAN, August, 1949 I 




the 
newest 



and 

most exciting 

label 



W*H# 



first retail collection . . . masterpieces of simple 

elegance. Her brilliant motion picture 

designing career backgrounds a special Fall 

Collection. Inspired color and texture 

treatment of superb Forstmann fabrics is 

designed into elegant lines 

of high style casual simplicity. 




For store nearest you write 

S. ROSENBLOOM 

315 E. 8th St., Los Angeles 14, Calif. 










THE CALIFORN1AN, August, 1949 



15 




First of all for fall . . . coordinates 



OF CALIFORNIA 



<&*— 



*ywt« says . . . start your fall wardrobe with 
coordinates, basic-best for town and country, campus 
or travel! Casual Time of California ensemble: 
box jacket and slim pocketed skirt in banker's-gray 
flannel; weskit of COBB-JENKINS imported British tweed, 
gray with terra cotta, gold or dusty rose. Security worsted 
jersey blouse to match your favorite color. Sizes 9-17, 
10-18. Jacket about $25, Blouse under $10, Weskit under $10, 
Skirt under $14. 



ZIPPER BY CONMAR 



AT THESE STORES: 



Olympia, Washington 
WILLIAMS WOMEN'S WEAR 



Stockton, California 
THE BROWN HOUSE 



Austin, Texas 
GOODFRIEND'S 



Fresno, California 

E. GOTTSCHALK & CO. 

Morgan Hills, California 
MARSHALL'S 



For further details write CASUAL TIME 407 East Pico Boulevard, Los Angeles 



Ca&Xfik 



sbirt about $10.95 
full skirt about $8.50 




+ L 



\w 



loves 
their tall, 
slim, 
fresh loveliness 
ana the way they look 
M%m^^ in Caltex's 

'• /^nv-^o back-to-school 

fllSr fashions 

' J weskit and skirt about $22 

'f- 






/ 



ao 



' ' 



♦ ,# .♦ 
•♦ # # 



« 



^ 



«— ■ 
TO*) 



'} 



■■-■;:;;■? S -' 



// 



'? 



These 

Surrey fabrics 

were 

especially woven 

for Caltex 

by Cohama; 

bicy 

may not be 

available 

in your 

city 

until 

September 1st. 



*JS&©' 



We've honored and obeyed 

the wishes or campus girls 

with our Campus Plaids 'N Plains 

— sparked the styles 

they wanted most 

with the features they vote 

most lilcely to succeed... 

fullness in the shirts, 

generous hems and shoulder pads 

with gripper fasteners 

for easy removal 

and replacement. 

We've priced these 

splendid wool blends 

to ease the strain 

on a campus girl's budget. 

Campus girls who love Caltex fashions 

can get them at selected stores; 

or write us, 

we'll tell you where. 



weskit and skirt 
about $20 






P O R T S W 



EAR, INC. 

2126 Beverly Boulevard 
Los Angeles, California 




RUSH WEEK TAFFETAS 

by 




OF HOLLYWOOD 



Left, Jacketed date dress with cutaway peplum for dinner 
and dancing. Shiny metal buttons. In cherry red, cop- 
per, green, legion blue, gunmetal, black, and crocus. 
$29.95. Charade Taffeta from AUBURN FABRICS. Right, 
gold stripes, full skirt. Pretty portrait neckline with cuffed 
bertha collar. Gray, green, red, indigo blue, and black. 
WINAY FABRIC. In sizes 9-17, 10-18. Retail $25.00. 



cf? 



/&*_ 



Selection 



For further details write FRANCINE OF HOLLYWOOD 9 1 South Los An gel es Street, Los Ang eles 



18 



THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 








Hi 



THREE CHEERS FDR VANGUARD S THREE-SDME 

Fine textured tweed and gabardine team up on cam- Juilliard gabardine in toast, red, gray, or green. Sizes 

pus. Double breasted suit has piping on pockets, buttons, 10-18. Suit about $70.00 and coat $65.00. Selected 

and belt. Shield pockets on shortie coat match pockets by L~ +•*«* /«y^l_ from VANGUARD FASHIONS 

on suit jacket. Available in Forstmann tweed or OF CALIFORNIA, a very important fashion resource. 



AT THESE 
FINE STORES 



DANIELS & FISHER, Denver, Colorado 

HENRY HAUE & BROTHER, Memphis, Tennessee 

THE BROWN HOUSE, Stockton, California 



MILLER BROTHERS, Chattanooga, Tennessee 
BAUER-McCANN, Waco, Texas 



For further details write VANGUARD OF CALIFORNIA 745 South Broadway, Los Angeles 



tyf <p|| <riL. 

makes our peter pan blouse her wardrobe standby 



We think you will love our Peter Pan blouse 

because it combines demure beauty with functional 
versatility. A blessing for day-in day-out 

wear. The luxurious rayon crepe fabric takes 
to suds so readily and always looks so sparkling 



fresh. A model of smart simplicity, it 

has pearl stud buttons and a row of precise 
stitching down the front. Comes in angelic 

white and a host of heavenly colors. 
At your favorite stores everywhere. 



ARIZONA 

Tucson, Jacome's 
Phoenix, Korrick's Inc. 

CALIFORNIA 

Alameda, Dorothy's 

Bakersfield, Weill's 

Berkeley, J. F. Hink & Sons 

Holtville, People's Department Store 

Los Angeles, Broadway Dept. Store 

North Hollywood, Rathbun's 

Oak/and, H. C. Capwell 

Pasadena, Bullock's; F. C. Nash Co. 

Richmond, Albert's 

Sacramento, Hale Bros. 

San Francisco, The Emporium 

San Jose, Colman's 

San Rafael, Albert's 

Stockton, Smith & Lang 

Westwood Village, Bullocks 

COLORADO 

Pueblo, Crew-Beggs Dry Goods Co. 



IDAHO 

Moscow, Creighton's 
ILLINOIS 

Rock Island, McCabe Dry Goods Co. 

INDIANA 

Frankfort, M. B. Thrasher Co. 
Hammond, Edward C. Minas Co. 
Indianapolis, Morrisons 

OREGON 

Klamath Falls, The Town Shop 
Medford, Mann's Dept. Store 
Portland, Bedell's 
Salem, Sally's 

WASHINGTON 

Bellingham, Jan & Fran 
Everett, C. C. Chaffee's 
Tacoma, Richardson's 

WYOMING 

Cheyenne, Jones Store for Women 

IOWA 

Keokuk, Sullivan & Auwerda 
Oskaloosa, Alsop's 



KANSAS 

Great Bend, Howards 

Kansas City, Young Dry Goods Co. 

Junction City, Cole's 

Topeka, Crosby Bros. Company 

Wichita, Walkers Bros. Dry Goods Co. 

MICHIGAN 

Ann Arbor, The Collins Shop 
Benton Harbor, Petite Shop Inc. 
Flint, Morrisons 

MONTANA 

Billings, D. J. Cole Co. 
Great Falls, Beckman's 
Missoula, Missoula Mercantile Co. 

NEBRASKA 

Omaha, Herzberg's 

NEVADA 

Las Vegas, Favinger's 

NEW YORK 

Buffalo, Wm. Hengerer Co. 
Rochester, E. W. Edwards & Sons 

OHIO 

Bluffton, The Lape Company 



Producers of 
world-famous 

Shirts 

Slacks 

Skirts 

Jackets 

Golfers 

Suits 

12U0 South Main Street, Los Angeles 15, California 



THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 



21 






smooth 



cool 




a 



hn 




CALIFORNIA 




shining 



A welcome refreshment to summer wardrobes . . a live spark 
to summer holidays. Ready now in a slim, figure flattering 
draped model in pre-autumn tones of Pewter-grey . . Blonde 
. . Black. JO to IS. In the Stores at . . 25.00 



DAYTIME DRESSES OF DISTINCTION. 



818 



TH BROADWAY LOS ANGELES 14, CALIFORNIA 



22 



THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 






- 



e 

85 



- 






ON THE COVER: 

TVte perennial sweater and sArirt 
. . . always lovely and particu- 
larly good this fall. Short-sleeved 
100% wool cashmere sweater 
about $13. Cable-knit blazer, 
about $14. Both are by Calalina. 
The Broadway, Los Angeles. 
Jordan, Marsh Co., Boston. 
Younkers, Des Moines. The slim 
skirt designed by Norman Baker 
about $15. Frank Stiffler photo. 




- 






as 
e 

b 

H 
- 

■ 
ss 

9 



EDITOR AND PUBLISHER J. R. Osherenko 

ASSISTANT PUBLISHER William J. Bowen 

FASHION DIRECTOR Sally Dickason 

FASHION EDITOR Virginia Scallon 

MANAGING EDITOR Alice Carey 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Philip Kuslner 

MEN'S FASHION EDITOR Malcolm Steinlauf 

FASHIONS Jacquelin Lory 

Margaret Paulson 
FEATURES _ Helen Ignatius 

Hazel Allen Pulling 
ART Morris Ovsey 

Anne Harris 

Jane Albrecht 

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Frank Stiffler 

SHOPPING ROUNDUP Hazel Stall 

FOOD STYLIST Helen Evans Brown 



California fashions 

You Can Listen To Fashion Talk - — 24 

Slim Silhouette Has Motion - 26 

Arrow-Narrow Is The Way - 28 

Don Loper Says: Colors Of Black - 30 

Suits In Two Tones - 36 

Picture In Jersey - 38 

Season For Sweaters And Skirts 42 

Stop and Look — 44 

Signs Of The Times - - 46 

Fashions For Fall — 50 

Blouses In Favored Fabrics 52 

Wardrobe Magic In Five Parts — 53 

A Charming Trio 57 

California features 

Riverside: Rediscovered For You 32 

Home Between Air And The Earth 40 

California Cooks 54 

Victorian Arrangement - 56 



THE CAUFORNIAN is published monthlv at 1020 So. Main St., Los Angeles 15, Cali- 
fornia, PRospect 6651. New York Office, Charles Thorp, eastern advertising manager, 
370 Lexington Ave., New York 17, LExington 2-9+70; San Francisco Office, Leonard 
Joseph, 26 O'Farrell St., DOuglas 2-1472; Chicago Office, H. Thorpe Covington, 21 West 
Huron St., Chicago 10, 111.. SUperior 7-5835; Detroit Office, Frank Holstein, 2970 West 
Grand Blvd., Detroit 2, Mich., MAdison 7026-7. Subscription price: $3.00 one year; 
$5.00 rwo years; $7.50 three years. One dollar additional postage per year outside con- 
tinental United States. 35c per copy. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations. Entered 
as second class matter Januarv 25, 1946, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, 
under act of March, 1S79. "Copyright 1949 The Californian, Inc. Printed in U.S.A. 
Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 



YOU CAN LISTEN TO FASHION TALK 



You really can hear the advancing sounds of fall fashions ... in fabrics 

that rustle with their own importance, skirts that whip the wind 

or whisper softly. We think you'll like California's idea 

about winter taffetas, jacquards, and richly beaded or embroidered 

clothes for those dress-up moments . . . the substantial feel 

of dresses made of velveteen or tweed, or maybe a combination of both; 

of jersey, and corduroy . . . California classics for now and forever! 

You'll love the season's new collars, great jutting affairs 

to flatter and frame your face, or the still-plunging neckline 

for sophisticated gowns. Collar or not, the neckline is 

the line of greatest interest this fall. Then, whether you choose 

the swirling soft silhouette which is so easy to wear, or new 

slimmer lines with maybe a hint of motion in tunic or peplum, 

you'll find this is a season of choice, fashionable variety 

to please you, individually. Colors are rich and right . . . 

favored are shades of brown, mocha to molasses . . . and gold! 

There's the brave flash of red, the deep greens of the forest, 

and teal . . . subtly soft in itself but taking wisely to accessories. 

Last but not least, watch for smoky tones of gray, 

chinchilla or powder. So choose the lines and colors 

you like . . . make this fall a season of personal triumph 



"Little dresses" that go on afternoon 
and night. Opposite, Max Kopp's yarn- 
dyed rayon taffeta with decisive revers; 
and pleated panel faille dress. 
Right, one of Viola Dimmitt's dresses 
in indestructible nylon seersucker. 




Slim Silhouette Has 



Motion 



If you like figure-molding lines, chances are 

you'll choose a slim little dress with a bit of 

motion ... in side-swept drapery or perhaps 

a peplum, or a hemline slit that gives freedom 

to the slenderest skirt. We quote you: 

Peggy Hunt's pure silk taffeta, this page, 

with important rounded shoulder and 

notched high neckline, with a great 

"swoosh" to one side. Opposite 

page left, Marbert's interpretation 

of the asymmetrical silhouette, 

collared neckline that goes off-shoulder 

on one side, the flyaway side sash . . . 

in striped rayon taffeta. Right, 

Addie Masters' suave slim lines 

in a crepe dinner dress, square decolletage 

tucked to match pencil-slim skirt 

which has deep slash center back. 




26 



Arrow-Narrow 



Is The Way 



Marusia bases her fall 



collection on a new arrow-narrow theme . 



opposite, standing: she wears her own 



dramatic contribution to tomorrow's silhouette, 



in pure silk moire. Here is the flare-high 



collar, the conical pocket. Left, for contrast, 



the soft sweep of silk repp plaid, the gentle 



slope of shoulder line. This page, Marusia 



uses an intricate cut velvet in this 



sophisticated Empress Josephine gown. 



Her collection at all Saks Fifth Avenue stores; 



Neiman-Marcus, Dallas; and 



Wm. H. Block, Indianapolis. 





EARL SCOTT 



DON LOPER SAYS: 



A master designer's subtle blend of blacks 

in luxurious fabrics . . . left, silk brocade suit richened by velvet outlines 
on longer jacket. Right, bold accent with velvet revers on subdued black and gray worsted wool. Hats by Rex. 



30 




COLORS OF BLACK 



Left, dark magic in two-tones ... a velvet 



mantle embraces this silk brocade dress. Right, sleek satin, soutash braid 
outlines diagonal closing. Collection shown at Charles A. Stevens, Chicago; Wm. H. Block, Indianapolis. 



31 




Entering Riverside, visitors are captivated by its pristine beauty and wide palm-lined streets . . by the old world touch of 
mission bell lamps, the unmistakable new world luxury of shops such as Kustner's Pharmacy, famed for exclusive cosmetics 

RIVERSIDE REDISCOVERED FOR YOU 

BY DAVID A. MUNRO 



My grandma didn't need to be told where Riverside 
was. She knew. The Middlewest, the Middle east, Wash- 
ington, New York and even the United Kingdom felt very 
close to Riverside during our late expansive, crinoline 
years. Presidents Benjamin Harrison, William McKin- 
ley, Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft were 
among the notables who retreated from the rigors of 
winter elsewhere to bask under the Riverside sun. With 
appropriate fanfare, Riverside reconstructed its Glenwood 
Tavern, converting it into the ornate Mission Inn, thereby 
giving a tremendous boost to "mission-style" architecture, 
and creating one of the great "tourist hotels" of the day. 
A stop at Riverside became a "must" for the curious; 
a stay at Mission Inn for "the season" was regarded as 
highly appropriate among the elite of Boston and New 
York. To Riverside's general social acceptability was add- 
ed the contemporary fame of the orange. The very 
thought of owning an orange grove, and of living in sub- 
tropical ease among its blooms, caused a dreamy look to 
come into the eyes of U. S. citizens everywhere. Paradise, 
as grandma saw it, was planted with orange trees. And 
the Mecca for those who worshipped the orange was River- 
side, California. 

But then something happened. People changed. The 
world moved. Riverside slipped out of sight and stayed 
out of sight for a generation. 

Possibly most credit for rediscovering Riverside be- 
longs to the nameless U. S. Army officer who won him- 
self a certain wide but anonymous unpopularity by first 
advancing the idea that the semi-arid California back- 



country was an ideal training ground for World War II 
troops. At March Field, at Camp Haan and at nearby 
San Bernardino ("San Berdoo" to the boys) some 250,000 
troops were in continuous training. Millions of young 
Americans lived in, went through and swore at baking 
hot Riverside county. The town became a major military 
establishment. Brass hats filled the Mission Inn. War 
factories sprung up. Industrial workers poured in. War 
had awakened sleeping Riverside. Today it's a different 
town than was thought possible in 1900. Today's River- 
siders are bustling merchants, full-throated real estate 
salesmen and pretty girl secretaries. They pay little at- 
tention to — and some of them know little about — the dead 
but unburied Riverside, the Riverside of fashionable ave- 
nues, citrus-worship and a social whirl that had an upper- 
class, very British, flavor. 

Of course not all the grandmothers who doted on the 
Riverside of Presidents Taft, et al, are out of the picture. 
A few months ago they closed their thinning ranks and 
went to bat on a typical issue of new versus old. A young 
man named Jack Buchanan, brand new manager of the 
Mission Inn, proposed to put a modern swimming pool 
in the central "Patio of the Birds." Worse, he proposed 
to tear down the original 'dobe structure that served as 
a part of an inn in the Seventies. To the Riversiders who 
cling to the past it seemed a wanton desecration. Nothing 
less. But the young manager did it, of course. The pool 
was built. The patio was relandscaped. The swimming 
club, formed by the management, quickly became popular 
with the town's busy people. The tone of the hotel itself 



32 



was changed. It has become dominated by young people, 
who wear very little but wear it very well. Old ladies 
were reduced to brooding in their rooms. 

But the old ladies have something very real to brood 
about. What they said and did in early Riverside was 
bruited about the world. And what the 50,000 modern 
Riversiders now say and do seldom makes a ripple that 
carries as far as Los Angeles. 

It took a mixture of "'refinement," as grandma knew 
it. the citrus madness and remittances from some of Eng- 
land's first families to bring into being the Riverside that 
meant something to America and to the world. 

Judge John Wesley North, first president of Riverside 
Colony, was the first to put Riverside's search for "refine- 
ment" into words. In a second call for colonists, issued 
in 1873, the Judge wrote: "We aim to make our colony 
especially desirable for families of intelligent, cultivated 
people. We have in view intellectual and moral culture 
as well as culture of the soil. Nearly all the religious 
denominations are represented here and a church lot is 
donated to each when they wish to build. All liberal mind- 
ed and charitable people of every denomination are cor- 
dially invited to join us in this good work . . ." At the 
time the outlook for "intellectual and moral culture" was 
bleak. The colony was short of money. The Judge was 
a better idealist than a financier. He was replaced in 
1875 by an able money man, Samuel Cary Evans, and 
things began to hum. However, the Judge had success- 
fully set the tone of the town before Evans took over. 
He started a migration of the well-fixed and well-favored 
that continued for forty years. 

Early Riverside was not exactly a Paris of the California 
hinterland, but it tried to be; that is, it tried to be the 
Paris of the Opera Comique without becoming the Paris 
of the Beaux Arts Ball. Churchy and righteous River- 
side, in common with the rest of upper-middleclass Amer- 
ica, deplored the scandalous new freedom that had broken 
out in Paris, but remained fascinated with Paris for its 
leadership in the arts. Riverside simultaneously opened 
its gates to the churchgoing and to the lovers of the arts. 
It saw no conflict between them. In fact there was no con- 
flict seen between them throughout moral America. Both 
kinds of people were called "refined." And this condition 
put a pale, sticky cast upon all the arts in America prior 
to World War I. Riverside suffered too from the sterility, 
the sentimental folly and the misplaced emphasis of the 
age. It was pretty poisonous stuff. Other towns which 
took strong doses of it were killed off. Riverside suffered 
only a slight case of sleeping sickness. 

Culture paid off in Riverside at the start. Judge North's 
call for "cultivated people" was widely heeded. A con- 
tingent of upperclass English, complete with remittances 
from home, added a certain very British suavetee to the 
mixture that's never been completely lost. Polo became 
a leading local sport, and anglophile Long Island polo- 
players came all the way to this then baking desert to 
compete with Riverside's Anglo-American stars. And the 
highly publicized royal personages whom Frank Augustus 
Miller, master of the Mission Inn, brought to Riverside, 
could usually find a cousin or a colleague living in one 
of the stately houses which frowned down upon Magnolia 
or Victoria Avenues. 

Riversiders were devotees of the legitimate theater dur- 
ing these early days. A high percent of the Broadway shows 
which toured the West stopped off at Riverside for one- 
night stands. During this period Riverside gave birth to 
its Community Players and to the Riverside Opera Asso- 
ciation, one of the few local groups in the country which 
regularly stages a season of grand opera with its own 
local talent. Almost from the start Riverside has been 



1. The fabulous Mission Inn, hub of the city, mecca of tourists. 

2. Parent navel orange tree, planted by Eliza Tibbets in 1873. 

3. Riverside area produced 2,250,000 boxes of oranges last year. 

4. Easter sunrise service at Mount Rubidoux, held first in 1909. 




RIVERSIDE REDISCOVERED FOR YOU 



a leader in education, too. It has long had its La Sierra 
College. In 1901 the U. S. Government opened the Sher- 
man Indian Institute in Riverside. In 1913 the Univer- 
sity of California located its Citrus Experiment Station 
in Riverside, and this year the University announced it 
would spend $25,000,000 to expand this plant into a four- 
year College of Liberal Arts. 

But it is to the follies and excesses of "culture" that 
Riverside owes its special fame. Two events in 1909 em- 
phasized that this was the year of Riverside's peak. The 
town in 1909 held its first Easter Sunrise Service on Mount 
Rubidoux (and was thereby able to start a fad, which 
is, after forty years, still on the increase) ; and Presi- 
dent Taft, then housed in the Mission Inn's "Presidential 
Suite," ascended Rubidoux on October 12 to dedicate a 
tablet to Father Junipero Serra, founder of so many of 
California's famed missions. 

These were both "stunts" originated by Frank Miller 
of the Mission Inn, who had his own ideas about culture 
and how to make it pay. Both were aimed at correcting 
deficiencies of which the innkeeper was peculiarly con- 
scious. The Easter service was pretty frankly designed 
to keep winter-time guests a few days or weeks longer at 
the Inn. And the appearance of the President was ac- 
curately planned to offer competition to famed millionaires 
then flocking to California in numbers. Nearby Redlands 
got the millionaires. So did Pasadena, Montecito and 
Santa Barbara. The society columns of the east gave flat- 
tering notices to the doings of the Vanderbilts and Chat- 
field-Taylors in these spots. It was Frank Miller's task 
to make up for the deficiency. He enabled Riverside to 
match the competition — pawn for pawn, knight for knight 
and king for king. 

Frank Miller rode so high and so well on the wave of 
Riverside's popularity that there were times when he was 
thought to have created that popularity. He was the dom- 
inant figure in affairs that were cultural, commercial and 
political. In his heyday the Southern Pacific "ran" Cali- 
fornia and Frank Miller was the local SP operative. The 
SP's Collis P. Huntington, and later his nephew, Henry 
Huntington, were Miller's backers. Besides political con- 
trol over the southern counties — which Miller gave them 
— they needed a tourist attraction on their lines. They 
enabled Miller to pour millions into Glenwood Tavern, 
remaking it into the Mission Inn. The Southern Pacific's 
— and Frank Miller's — politics were Republican. This 
may explain why his invitations to Taft and his Repub- 
lican predecessors (and later to President Hoover) were 
accepted. Miller's benevolent railroad friends also added 
a certain tone to the social whirl, however tainted with 
commerce their visits. Henry Huntington of the Southern 
Pacific and the Chesapeake & Ohio was a frequent visitor. 
And the private cars of President Edward P. Ripley of the 
Santa Fe and President Robert P. Lovett of the Union 
Pacific were occasionally dropped off at Riverside. Frank 
Miller also chose wisely among the semi-subsidized artists 
and writers of the period. The year after President Taft 
won a place for himself in the hearts of socialite River- 
side (though he lost the next election to a man named 
Woodrow Wilson) Carrie Jacobs Bond wrote "The End 
of a Perfect Day" in a Mission Inn room which now 
reverently bears her name, and John Steven McGroarty 
wrote the "Mission Play," thereby winning himself a Papal 
decoration. Today movie stars get married and remarried 
in its chapels. Famed flyers install gilt wings, with their 
signatures, on a wall in the corner of the "Atrio of St. 
Francis." There is a consistent effort to link the fact that 
the gentle St. Francis was the patron saint of the birds 
with the current popularity of aviation, especially aviation 
this close to famed March Field. 



Frank Miller took this kind of thing in dead earnest 
when he ran the town. His idea was that the city was a 
kind of outlying area or stage setting for the Mission Inn. 
This was the way with the huge tourist hotels in the 
fashionable new towns of Southern California. If Frank 
Miller went farther than some of the other inn-keepers 
of the times it was only because he was a more able poli- 
tician. At one point "the sixth member" of the county 
board of supervisors became a local joke. It was said 
the board would not dare come to order without the sixth 
member being president — and everyone knew the sixth 
member was the Miller operative who told the super- 
visors what to do. This may explain why, even today, 
the city appears to have been built around the Inn. The 
padres never set up a mission in Riverside, of course, or 
ever came that way; yet the mission bell motif has been 
made a structural part of every lamppost in the city. The 
Inn itself sits in the midst of a kind of civic center com- 
prising all the official and semi-official buildings. All 
reflect the conglomerate architecture of the Inn, which is 
a rambling concrete oddity covering three and a half 
acres under roofs and lines that are Spanish-Moorish- 
Italian. Under Miller's guiding hand a program of civic 
beautification was carried out, with emphasis on wide, palm- 
shaded, divided avenues — anticipating future auto highways 
by forty years. A resistance to any kind of industry was 
made a fixed civic policy. Miller was quoted as saying, 
"I never want to see the day when a workman carries a 
lunchbox on our streets." In an extravagant moment 
Miller asked the city officials to block off Orange Street 
where it bordered the hotel so that his guests could use 




Guests of the Inn, Gloria Swanson and Charles Walters, 
a screen director, relax on the patio after luncheon. 

the city pavement as a parking lot. This was denied. 

"Sentiment pays" was another favorite Miller state- 
ment. He followed the authentic millionaires, who brought 
back fortunes in art treasures, around the world and 
brought back tons of sentimental curiosa. He doted upon 
the trappings of churches, of whatever denomination. And 
the more ornate and absurd the pieces the better he liked 
them. He brought back hundreds of bells and a multitude 
of crosses. He brought suits of armor and tapestries. He 
struck bargains in the Orient and kept the crates coming 
to Riverside. He correctly figured that sheer volume would 
overwhelm the curious. And he correctly figured that the 
sometimes worthless "treasures" of the Inn would acquire 
meaning because of the traditional cultural associations 



34 



of the town and because of the Inn's vague devotion to the 
cause of the famed Franciscan missions. 

The fame of the Riverside orange is not complicated 
with rococo ceremonials. It is strictly "Amurrican." 

Early in the Seventies a Mr. and Mrs. Luther C. Tibbets 
took up some government land outside Judge North's 
colony, and therefore on the wrong side of the social 
tracks. Also, they had no water, since the benefits of the 
new canal were restricted to colony members. Certainly 
of all the new colonists the Tibbetses seemed least 
destined to fame. Yet in 1783 Eliza Tibbets planted three 
subsequently famous orange trees sent her by a friend in 
the Department of Agriculture in Washington and began 
watering them with her dishwater — so great was their 
water shortage. One tree died but the remaining two 
"Washington navels" were the parents of the millions of 
navel orange trees that remade the citrus economy of 
Southern California. Mrs. Tibbets won herself a secure 
place in American history. 

But Eliza Tibbets did not win her place in history with- 
out incident. 

When the Tibbets cult and the fame of the orange were 
rising to a peak of national popularity, a daughter of 
Luther C. ("Lawsuit") Tibbets, said to have been just as 
irascible and combative as the old man himself, appeared 
in town. She was the daughter of the second of two pre- 
vious Mrs. Tibbetses, who were sisters. She came to River- 
side with two fixed ideas: that Luther and not Eliza was 
the originator of the navel orange, and that Luther had 
never married Eliza anyway. The daughter was a very 
determined woman. She started a rival faction. Soon at 
Citrus Fairs it was Luther Tibbets who appeared under 
block-long banners inviting the curious to meet the founder 
of the navel orange industry. During this period he was 
deep in the profitable business of selling cuttings from the 
original trees to growers. He is reported to have been 
a magnificent sight, on or off a Citrus Fair platform. He 
wore a plug hat and a black veil. Eventually the daughter 
left town and the Luther Tibbets cult lapsed in favor of 
Eliza — who resembled Queen Victoria more and more as 
the years went on. And time did not mellow "Judge" 
Tibbets. He appeared as his own counsel in one lawsuit 
after another, and thus reduced himself to penury. He 
was buried at public expense. 

The ubiquitous Frank Miller sensed that citrus-worship 
attracted the same kind of wide-eyed suckers as did the 
missions and the Mission Inn. He did his best to get in 
on it. He bought one of the two surviving Tibbets trees 



and had his then visiting President. Theodore Roosevelt, 
plant it ceremoniously in the Patio of the Birds. It 
promptly died. 

Most of what made Riverside important to grandma has 
died, too. Citrus is today an unexciting big business and 
no longer a cult. Polo is no longer played in Riverside 
and an English accent is as rare in Riverside as in Dubuque. 
The cultural pursuits of the Riversiders who now follow the 
fine arts have taken on a metropolitan air; booming Los 
Angeles, with its self-sustaining theater, its galleries and 
music halls, is only an hour and a quarter away by auto- 
mobile. Even as a winter resort, Riverside began to lose 
out to Palm Springs early in the Twenties when resorters 
began to move more by car than by train. 

Frank Miller, inn-keeper to Riverside for sixty years, 
died in 1935 — long after the world he had created had 
begun to disintegrate. He did not live to see industrializa- 
tion come to Riverside. The last years found his hotel 
perilously near being forced to close for lack of funds. 
For the first time in history Riverside lost population. 
Despite these difficulties, Miller did not permit liquor 
to be sold in his hotel after repeal. When he died he 
turned the job over to his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. 
and Mrs. DeWitt V. Hutchings, who promptly changed 
the rule on liquor, who ultimately built the swimming 
pool and who were munificently ' "rescued" by the war 
boom. 

Today Riverside proceeds with a self-confidence that is 
like nothing since World War I rang down the curtain 
in 1914. Some of California's current influx, led by vet- 
erans, has come to Riverside. Some like it hot, it seems. 
Currently Riverside is boasting of being an hour or so 
from everything — from metropolitan Los Angeles, from 
the snow-capped San Bernardino and San Jacinto Moun- 
tains, from the Palm Springs desert and from the Pacific 
shore and "world's finest yacht harbor" at Newport Beach. 
It belongs to that complex of cities around greater Los 
Angeles all of which are growing mightily as a new 
concept of the area-city being developed by processes of 
natural growth. But because "cultivated people" responded 
to Judge North's invitation and because Frank Miller got 
his way, the city remains beautiful to this day in a stately 
high-lace collar way. Everyone in town is conscious of 
what's right for the city and what's wrong for the city. 
This odd fact gives the town a certain civic dignity. There's 
a widespread belief that Riverside has a special destiny 
and that the dreams of Judge North were not in vain, 
the efforts of Frank Miller were not merely commercial. 



March Field, Air Force Base, one of many Riverside coun- 
ty military installations housing World War II troops. 



"An hour from everywhere" Riverside citizens have ac- 
cess to desert, mountains, Palm Springs, or Los Angeles. 




•''-*l*"jlfil* - 


liS 


' -.'*-~s&? 


1 


— «H 







There's infinite variety to the suit story 
this fall, variety achieved in contrasting 
colors and patterns, in adroit use of 
plaid or stripe jacket with a plain skirt 
... or a solid color suit taking on a 
gay topper for that important two-tone 
look. Adele - California gives you 
outstanding trends of the season: 
On this page, a monotone tweed suit 
with short jacket hugging the figure, and 
its own plaid topper in blending colors 
for pure excitement. Each about $85. 
Opposite page, left, snug little jacket 
in British wool with soft shoulders, deep 
armholes and demure little collar; plain 
skirt. About $110. Right, ombre striped 
longer jacket with crisp cuffs, notched 
collar, over pencil-slim skirt of plain 
wool. About $110. Sizes 10-18. At all 
Milgrim stores. Henderson umbrella. 






•> 



mm. t i 




^p^fc 


% • .■ ■"■'■■■"' . ■■-* . 








i 


v 


£L 1 


1 

.3 >S: 


M 








» »«Ki» »Mi)l« l 




■ MM 




"V „ a .C~- ' 









v > . *v 



/ 



■ . *' r ."-ia-*; •*»--' -%T"*«w *--»' y.i -^.^'~"»:-,» -*«» 



1 '(• :*• 

? 5* * * 



^o^ 






-*« 




Pat Premo has a special talent for casual 
clothes that fit right into the landscape, be- 
come a part of your happiest days. She lives 
in a rambling California ranch setting, knows 
for a fact that fashion must be functional. 
Here, the eternal Tightness of her fall sports- 
wear. Jersey. It's a picture in jersey, plain 
with stripes, or woven dots; colorful dresses 
with modest little collars that snug the neck- 
line, and free swinging skirts. Far left, the 
all-round pleated skirt at long last, with 
striped shirt classic and jaunty string tie, 
sizes 10-18, about $45. Next, the sun-burst 
of pleats in plain worsted jersey, with striped 
blouse and long tie sash; sizes 10-16, about 
$45. Right, a specially woven dotted jersey 
with plain overskirt that floats on a breeze; 
sizes 10-16, about $45. Carson's, Chicago, 
also Lockhart's, St. Louis, and Best's, Seattle. 




HOME... BETWEEN 



AIR AND 



THE EARTH 



California Living 
on a minute scale . . . 
with the illusion of 
limitless space, and grace 




Benjamin Polk's house on-the-side-of-a-hill 




Jjenjamin p lk has an instinctive appreciation for pure 
form that has guided his whole life, made him one of 
America's leading young architects. You can trace this 
through his intense love for the land, probably stem- 
ming from his early life in the midwest when the plains 
and the sky inspired him by their strength and subtlety. 
As a boy he exhibited respect for the forms of nature . . . 
collected leaves, shells, fossils; he made archaeological 
trips to discover new beauty in nature. 

After taking liberal arts courses at Amherst College and 
University of Chicago, he studied structural engineering at 
Iowa State . . . and simultaneously began to paint water- 
colors, usually abstract but always based on the land and 
the interconnections of its forms. (In 1944 he won first 
award for woodcut blocks at Honolulu Academy of Fine 
Arts.) 

Then young Ben Polk spent three years in the field, 
working on a Des Moines project which was the largest 
office building then under construction in the United States. 
Then came army years, followed by an apprenticeship with 
an architectural firm in San Francisco. Finally, he was 
ready and qualified to open his own offices, to express his 
own talents. 

In one of his first houses Polk pioneered a new method 
of heating which since has been commonly used through- 
out the west and midwest, a system combining advantages 
of radiant and forced air. His love for pure form led 
him to develop garden structures, bare carpentered frames 
to outline and glorify outdoor planting. Here is aesthetic 
excitement, simply achieved. Practical or aesthetic, Polk's 

talents are endless . . . and 
his plan for the future de- 
fies "specialization." He in- 
tends to keep a balanced 
flow of all possible kinds of 
work in his office . . . the 
commercial job, furniture 
design, expositions, the 
dwelling, and always ... re- 
search! He is personally 
concerned with the challenge 
of each individual problem. 
This is the house that Polk 
built for the J. B. Wallace 





family. It was built after lengthy consultations, when 
Polk the realist considered the family needs of the anxious 
home owners, studied the advantages and limitations of 
their hillside site in Belvedere, California. 

Then Polk, the idealist, made sure that these material 
qualities were translated into something functionally and 
structurally beautiful. Needs, plus budget, plus site were 
considered in building a house designed for ''the fun of 
California living." 

The steep hillside site overlooking a lagoon of San Fran- 
cisco Bay was embellished, not defaced, by home construc- 
tion. No tearing out of the hillside here, the house took 
its place among the oaks as if that space in the air and 
earth had been waiting for it for centuries. 

The road at top and bottom of the lot encompasses a 
cascade of living . . . from the high road with the geranium 
flower box and retaining wall, to the automobile platform 
for two cars, down the steps to house and service yard, 
to the children's play yard, and to some future studio or 
workshop site, to the lower road. 

Enjoyment of space and the generous scale of rooms 
is part-and-parcel of this plan: high ceilings, glass walls en- 
hance the social areas of the house, while lower ceilings 
insure bedroom privacy. A clerestory window in the living 
room beneath the double shed roof adds interest (high 
point of living-dining room is 12 feet), and a forest fresco 
greets every visitor. 

Materials used throughout are standard and inexpensive, 
but elegance is achieved through arrangement, planning. 
Fine redwood bevel siding outside is in its natural state, 
only slightly bleached. The below-road-level roof has rich 
texture of expanded slag, orchid in color. No attempt has 
been made to raise a towering mass of masonry into the 
air as a chimney: a patent flue suits the purpose better. 
Sheet rock walls, exposed ceiling rafters, oak flooring make 
up the interiors . . . light tones of paint, modern light 
fixtures, and a crisp light touch increase the feeling of spa- 
ciousness and grace. 

This is a home its owners will understand, and love. 
The planting and terracing, the opportunity for adding new 
construction, will enable this house to grow with the fam- 
ily's growing interests ... it is a house that will never 
be "finished." Polk believes nothing ever should be com- 
pletely finished, for therein lies an end to ambition, plan- 
ning and life itself. 




Walls of windows and textured interest in beam ceiling appeals. Hillside plan calls for ''cascades" of living on terraced site. 



41 



You'll find this is the season for sweaters 
and skirts . . . sweaters with intricate de- 
signs and weaves that are just natural 
born show-offs. Catalina brings you left, 
the "rough neck" in a cable stitch that 
looks hand-knitted . . . with a wonder- 
ful new collar treatment; about $12. 
Far right, Catalina's famous jacquard 
weave, this time a tropical pattern to 
brighten the darkest winter day; snug 
little neckline and waist. In softest 
zephyr wool, about $11. Center, the car- 
digan vest in cable stitch, boon compan- 
ion for sportswear ensembles . . . bright 
color accent wherever it goes. About $6. 
The Catalina sweaters are available at 
The Broadway, Los Angeles; Younkers, 
Des Moines; Jordan Marsh, Boston. 
Skirts are classics by Norman Baker. 




_ >* '- - " 



THIS IS A SEASON FO'k 



42 












SWEATERS AND SKIRTS 



IF \ 



43 



Stop and Look 



then go into fall with a dress 



like this, easy to wear and to look at: 



Louella Ballerino's swashbuckling wool 



check, exaggerated collar to fold 



this way and that, dolman sleeves to push 



up, unpressed pleats to flare prettily. 



Sizes 10-16, about $25 at Bonnie Best, 



Los Angeles; Daniels & Fisher, Denver. 



Worn by Assistance League Mannequin, 



Shirley Faraco. Opposite page, 



basic classic by Rosenblum of California: 



stripe-n-plain worsted with an air 



of bravado; sizes 10-20, about $50 



at Bullock's Collegienne, Los Angeles; 



The Emporium, San Francisco; Carson's, Chicago. 





MIX, MATGH, AND SAVE: 



46 



._ 



It's money in the bank when 

you plan a versatile wardrobe. 
Opposite, Tabak of California's 
five pieces, Juilliard corduroy, 
jersey blouse. Sizes 10 to 20, 
about $55 for the entire set. 

Charles F. Berg, Portland. 
Worn by Harriet Woodward and 
Shirley Faraco, of Assistance 

League Mannequins appearing on 
these pages. This page, 
Barney Max uses Botany flannel 

in two-jacket separates. Eva 
Lopizich models slacks and lumber 
jacket. Alice Freeze wears the 
city-bound version, classic 

shirt with fly front. In sizes 
10 to 20, this complete 
wardrobe is about $80 at 

The Broadway, Los Angeles. 




SIGNS OF THE TIMES 



47 





DAILY AT YOUR DOOR 



* 





Food or fashion, you know the value of basics . . . opposite, Ken Sutherland blends solid and stripe in worsted jersey, 
inserts on bracelet length sleeves. Sizes 10 to 18, about $46. At Haggarty's, Los Angeles; Wm. H. Block, Indianapolis. 



-'"-' ■ I 1 I I 



\ i " Have enough 



SN CRACKERS 




Above, exaggerated pockets on wool plaid skirt by Joseph Zukin of California, wool jersey blouse. Sizes 1 to 18. 
Skirt about $22, blouse about $11, Younker's, Des Moines; Carson's, Chicago. Dolly McVey, Dr. Pepper contest winner. 



49 





I 



Above: Hollywood Sport Life's plaid blouse and jumper in Merrimack corduroy. Sizes 9-15, 10-20. Jumper about $11, 
blouse about $5. L. S. Ayres, Indianapolis. Striped blouse, corduroy shorts, jacket by Roberts Mfg. Co. Sizes 10-18, About 
$21 . Foley Bros., Houston. Adeline West's ensemble in Crompton Richmond velveteen. 1 0-18. About $28. The Fashion, Houston. 







<Vs 




\ 



Above.- California Girl's rayon gabardine dress, cardigan sweater. Sizes 10-18, about $20. J. W. Robinson, Los Angeles. 
Coat dress by Debby of California in Shirley Fabrics slipper satin. Sizes 9-17, about $20. Emporium, San Francisco. 
Casual Time's tone-on-tone blouse and skirt. Sizes 9-17. Blouse about $11. Skirt about $18. Neiman-Marcus, Dallas. 




(v> 



h 




Above: Jersey dress by Sergee of California. Sizes 10-20. About $25. Bullock's, Los Angeles. Lace 
party dress, created by Francine Frocks of Hollywood. Sizes 9-17. About $35. Sanger Bros., Dallas. 



Opposite page: Topcoat by Vanguard of California, unique contour belt. Sizes 8-18. About $75. Bullock's, Pasadena. 
Double-breasted shortie by Sport-Lane of California, a bright wool plaid. Sizes 10-1 8. About $18. Gude's, Los Angeles. 
Jerry Mann's tailored blouse, washable tissue faille; slim skirt, rayon sharkskin. Sizes 32-38. Blouse about $5. Skirt 
about $6. A. Harris Co., Dallas. 



51 





Above, jersey blouse and skirt, with sparkling 
bee-and-hive applique. About $23, Bullock's 
Pasadena. Left, the sheer loveliness of nylon, 
about $11, at City of Paris, San Francisco. 
Both by Deauville Models, sizes 32 to 38. 



Blouses In Favored Fabric! 



A 



Hollywood Premiere coordinates, jacket of 
Nottingham plaid wovenspun, flannel skirt, 
ayon surrah blouse . . jersey skirt, blouse. 
Sizes 10 to 18, about $80 for group. 
Clein's, St. Louis and Sakowitz, Houston. 





Wardrobe Magic In Five Parts 



53 



No Faster 
Train 
East 




EXTRA 
FARE 



Leaves Los Angeles 5:00 pm 

Arrives Chicago 10:45 am 

(second day) 

39% hours en route 

Reserved Coach Seats 
De luxe Pullman 
Accommodations 

Lounge car for pleasant re- 
laxation; delicious Dining Car 
meals. 

75 Union Pacific Ticket 
Offices in Southern 
California, including . . . 

Los Angeles: 434 W. 6th St. or 
Union Station ■ TRinity 9211 

Hollywood: 6702 Hollywood Blvd. 
Hillside 0221 



BIG BEAR LAKE 

San Bernardino Mts., Calif. 

SJagrmtta 

"On the Lake at Big Bear Lake" 

— FOR RESERVATIONS — 

See your favorite travel agent or write to 

P. O. Box 24, Big Bear Lake — Owned and 

Operated by Harry and Adelia Becker. 



Vi 




M^~~ 








r 


~ r --.-jtaissss** 





o 


t <* 




w. 




FING-O-TIP TOWEL HOLDER . . . 

handiest household utensil, the Fing-O-Tip's 
live rubber grippers attach instantly without 
tools, hold securely, can't mar walls. (Holds 
on tile, porcelain, metal, where other holders 
fail.) For use everywhere — on refrigerator 
or stove, in bath, workroom, office, trailer 
or boat — holding towels, stockings, aprons,! 
cloths, everything readily "at your fingertip," 
a one-hand operation. These clever rubber 
grippers, red, yellow, blue or green, are % 
for 81-00. Pick your colors and send your, 
dollars to A. J. Ganz Co., Dept. TC-8, 112 
N. Hayworth, Hollywood 48, Calif. 

ENCHANTING, LOVELY SALT AND 
PEPPER SHAKERS . . . miniature copies, 
of a sumptuous George III teapot, these 
silver plated salt and pepper shakers are] 
covered with intricate scrollwork and lac- 
quered to prevent tarnish. Height: 2%". Tops] 
unscrew for easy filling. Packaged in attrac- 
tive gift box. For the gift that's different, for 
your own table or collection, choose these 
thrilling "finds." S2.50 per pair, postpaid, 
federal tax included. C.O.D. charges extra. 
The Pig 'n Whistle Shop, 414 W. Michigan 
Avenue, East Lansing, Mich. 

DOG LEASH DELIGHT ... is this belt 
of braided leatherette, amazingly priced at 
■'ust $1.00. The ever popular Dog Leash Belt, 
so handy for wear with coats, dresses and all 
sportswear, this adaptation by United Belt 
of California features a gold-plated chain and 
metal disc. Sizes S-M-L, with handy ad-: 
justable fastener, this Dog Leash accessorizes 
every costume — in gold, brown, kelly, red, 
navy, black, white or luggage. Only $1.00 plus 
10c for postage. Send your orders to Rose- 
mary's Shop at 5611 Wilshire or 3995 S. 
Vermont, Los Angeles, Calif. 



PROVINCIAL SPOON HOLDERS . . . 

these colorful, decorative new products make 
housekeeping really fun ! These darling spoon 
holders are sized to fit cooking, stirring 
and barbecue spoons or forks. Just set them 
on your stove or table, and put the spoons 
on top ... so your working surfaces aren't 
soiled. When not in use, hang them as orna- 
ments on the wall. Handpainted ceramic 
holders, with amusing posies. Postpaid, kitch- 
en size, $1.25; barbecue size, $2.00. Sorry, 
no C.O.D.'s. W. C. Boles, 5478 Atlantic Ave- 
nue, Long Beach 5, Calif. (Dealers inquiries 
invited.) 

AQUA-EYEFULL . . . whether you're a I 
fish fancier or not, you'll want to own this 
eye-catching aquarium. Smoothly molded of 
lucite, this practical and attractive bra form 
is 8%" high, 11" long, 5" wide, with plenty 
of room for your pet fish. Here's something ,.| 
to figure on! Your bosom pal, as an enter- 
taining addition to your den, bar or play- 1 
room. Most unusual item we've seen, this I 
"perfect 34" is just $10.50 postpaid. ( Price I 
lists of tropical fish on request). An exclusive! 
original from Syd Jackman, 822 S. Los An<| 
geles St., Los Angeles 14, Calif. 



54 



THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 




v»* — 



GRANULAR CLEANSER ... a normal, 
gradual, effective "skin peel" at home. Grad- 
ually stuffs off old dead cells. This friction 
stimulates circulation, encourages growth of 
new cells. Contains honey, almond and bar- 
ley meal, plus ingredients which bleach and 
clarify skin. The pulling effect of the honey 
while scouring loosens blackheads and white- 
heads, and scrubbing effect removes. Also 
wonderful for hands. 2-ounce jars (federal 
tax included) SI. 50: 4-ounce jars, $2.40. Add 
2 1 / £% sales tax in Calif., 3% in Los Angeles. 
From DermaCulture, 1318 Fourth Avenue, 
Los Angeles 6, Calif. 

SILVYLOCKS POT CLEANER . . . this 
new cleaner for pots and pans is made of 
Monel metal. It cannot rust, won't splinter or 
get ragged or frayed. It will not stain or 
get soggy. Rinses sweet and clean. Never has 
an odor. You can use it over and over again. 
A whole year's supply — three pads for only 
$1.00 postpaid. Send your orders for Silvy- 
locks to National Products Company, 225 
East Broad Street, Westfield, New Jersey. 

INVISO-HOZE ... the newest sensation 
for sports and spectator wear. Inviso-Hoze 
can be worn for golf, tennis, bicycling, and 
all spectator sports. Here's barefoot-bare com- 
fort with foot protection . . . the way to 
tan your pretty legs without leaving anklet 
marks. Of 20-denier nylon, white or suntan, 
sizes 8 through 11. 79c a pair at Marshall 
Field, Chicago; Sage & Allen, Hartford; 
Joske's, San Antonio; May Company Wil- 
shire, Los Angeles. Or write Willys of Holly- 
wood, 1141 N. Highland, Hollywood 38, Calif. 

HOW TO TIGHTEN YOUR CLOTHES- 
LINE . . . simply and effectively. Linetite 
just slips onto the line, twists the line to 
desired tightness, then hooks across the line 
to hold tension. It takes the slack out of 
lines, eliminates heavy, cumbersome clothes- 
line props. Of strong nickel-plated metal 
with a gay red wooden handle, Linetite is 
unbelievably priced at 35c in stores, or 3 for 
$1.00 postpaid. Order for yourself and your 
friends from Stageberg Manufacturing Co. 
Inc., Box 95, St. Louis Park, Minn. 

CONVERSATION PIECES . . . real atten- 
tion getters for your home, or for gifts, these 
"cute-as-the-dickens" hand painted Smok- 
ing Figurines by Liz Luders. Practical, too, 
for the northern pine incense sweetens the air 
as colorful wooden figures "smoke." Illus- 
trated are Chief Wau-ke-sha and Horace the 
Hobo. Hunter, Fisherman, Negro Mammy, 
Snow Man also available. About 6" high; 
tops detach for replacing incense. Order by 
name at $2.25 each postpaid (incense includ- 
ed). Thirty extra incense cones 25c. Memory 
Mart, 331 West Main Street, Waukesha, Wis- 
consin. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 












l '«/.■«• -.-.it. «-\i. V— /„,rfwi : : ,f 






* from a new line of contemporary pieces by maurice marline' 

• 1035-W side choir • in walnut or maple clear lacquered 
woods • melal legs • plaslicized webbing in yellow, 
coral, lime green • 31.00 

• 1035-1 • same chair wilh saddle leolher webbed seat • 
41.00 

• price includes packing and shipping lo any point in the 
united slates • odd 2\% tax m California • no c.o.d.'s 

available direct only from: 

maurice marline' designs 

corona del mar * California 



Corde 

FINEST IN HANDBAGS 




$10.95 



Genuine " Corde exqui- 
sitely styled; distinctive metal 
clasp. The perfect comple- 
ment for your "after five" 
costumes. 

BROWN, BtUE, AND NAVY. ALSO HIGH STYLE 
COLORS ON REQUEST. 

If not at your favorite department store write 

CENTURY HAND BAG CO. 

1220 Maple, Suite 301 
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

When ordering by mail please enclose 20% 
Federal tax and 3% state tax. 



55 



VICTORIAN ARRANGEMENT 



We need a variety of small garden flowers for the arrangement we are to discuss this month, so while the late 
Spring flowers are still available, do try a Victorian bouquet. Several of the suggestions made last month for 
a profuse arrangement may be applied to the Victorian type of bouquet — careful combining of colors, complement- 
ing flowers and container, and adding a focal point. As the name implies, this Victorian must be old fashioned 
in feel. To develop this charming effect, choose a Victorian type of container such as the one pictured — and old 
fashioned flowers — dianthus, light colored stock, yellow and white marguerites, coral bells, English primroses, corn- 
flowers and columbine. Many other flowers are suitable, but they should be kept in pastel shades. However, if 
your container carries more vivid colors, flowers of similar colors may be used. Fuchsias, pansies, camellias, 
tulips and any other flowers which might have been found in a 19th century garden, may be selected. 

We are usually cautioned against ornamented containers, but vases of this period were hand painted and elaborate. 
They usually have a base, flare at the top, and have a handle on both sides. Because of this symmetry the bouquet 
is developed in a semi-formal fashion. 

Decide on your tallest point (about 1 and iy 2 the height of the container) and the width, which will establish 
the triangle. Don't be discouraged if the flowers will not stay where you want them. As other flowers are added, 
you can coax them back, and they will stay in place. As flowers are added, keep them within this frame or triangle. 
The painted flowers on the container are often light pink, yellow and blue, and if you can match these colors 
with flowers, you will unify the bouquet. 

It is not necessary to concentrate color in a Victorian arrangement, but if you will place a center of interest at 
the tip of the container, you will add "punch." This may be done with a full blown rose. Do not use much 
foliage for it detracts from the colors to be emphasized. Because one side of the vase is usually ornamented and 
the flowers are arranged to look well from only one side, place your completed picture against a plain wall. 
There are many pictures of Victorian arrangements in color, and you cannot go wrong if you will copy one. 
Don't feel that you are unethical in copying because they are all made on almost the same pattern. The center 
of interest should not be too conspicuous. Be careful not to use too strong a contrasting color. 

This particular type of arrangement incorporates the four most important principles involved in flower arranging: 

1. Composition. 

This means a careful placing of the flow- 
ers — not hit or miss. 

2. Harmony. 

Colors should be pleasingly combined, 
with care not to use any discordant note. 

3. Balance. 

Picture a line through the center from 
the top to the bottom of the arrange- 
ment. See that the flowers and colors are 
similar on either side of this line. 

4. Center of interest. 

An "eye-catching" flower which creates 
a focal point. 



BY LAURA E. McVAY 




56 




For informal television parties, for a stroll in the sun, for entrancing a beau . . . for all sorts of things, 
this charming trio of dresses, very sweet and frankly feminine, designed by Lil Alice of California. In 
sanforized, washable cotton flannel, a wonderful new Bates fabric. Sizes 7-15, about $9. H. C. Capwell 
Co., Oakland; Titche-Goettinger Co.. Dallas; The Paris Co., Salt Lake City; The May Company. Denver. 



57 



AUGUST CALENDAR OF EVENTS 



California offers 

exciting variety 
in entertainment 



HAND MADE PRINTS 

(Silk Screened) 

Produced and signed by 

George A. Beyer in his studio 

-=== 1 EACH 



— ^ 




framed in 1" nat- 
ural -wood cove 
design moulding. 
22x26 (outside) 

§15.00 



"Arcadia" 



OR 

mounted and dou- 
ble matted in 
ivory and ivarm 
gray mat board. 
20x24. 

$8.50 

Express prepaid. 
No C.O.D.'s 
"The River Flats" 
Write for further information on other subiects 
available. 
Send check or' money or to 




•BEYER^ 



726 South 10th Street, Minneapolis 4, Minn. 




CAST IRON 
FURNITURE 

or cast alum- 
inum at the 
same prices. 
All painted in long- 
lasting white. Grape 
design, graceful and 
strong. Strongly fash- 
ioned by skilled crafts- 
men. Authentically 
styled. 




ettee . . $25. 
32 ins. wide. 
Table . . $25 
28 inches di- 
ameter. 
Choirs, each 
$15. 16 ins. 
wide. 



AND 
CAST IRON 
FURNITURE 

Authentic reproduc- 
tion. Just the thing 
for your African 
violets or other 
hobby plants. 

11 movable arms 
ranging from 14" 
at base to 7" at 
top. Send $29.50. 
Specify freight or 
express. Flowers & 
pots not included. 

send for catalog of 
other items. 



J. F. DAY & CO. 

Dept. 70 
1901 Fourth Ave., S., Birmingham 3, Ala. 



A, 



.ugust is a month of excitement for tourist and native 
alike . . . and wonderful weather practically guaranteed! 
In addition to the "must" of surf swimming, plan to attend 
some of the following events which are certain to heighten 
the glamour of your visit here. 

FISHING: Until Sept. 5. The Yellowtail Fishing Derby off 
San Diego. Prizes for the largest catch now total $10,000. 
Until Oct. 16. Catalina Island Sea Academy Tournament. 
Prizes for the largest game fish caught in Southern Cali- 
fornia's waters, weighed in at village of Avalon. 

SAILING: Aug. 1-7, Southern California Yacht Regatta. 
Sailing schooners from all harbors meet for competition at 
Newport-Balboa Harbor. 

THEATRE: Until Aug. 21, Midsummer Drama Festival, at 
Pasadena Playhouse, state theatre of California. Series of 
plays written by Californians. Through August, Pilgrimage 
Play enacted in natural amphitheatre in the hills above Holly- 
wood. Until Sept. 5, La Jolla summer playhouse presents 
a series of plays featuring famous movie stars. 

MUSIC: Until Sept. 3, Symphonies Under The Stars, pre- 
sented at the famous Hollywood Bowl, conducted by Eugene 
Ormandy. Through August, Hollywood Drama Festival pre- 
sents motion picture personalities in popular light operas at 
the Greek Theatre in Griffith Park, above Hollywood. This 
outdoor theatre combines Greek beauty of architecture and 
modern lighting and equipment. Aug. 4 to 7, San Diego 
Starlight Operas staged in an outdoor bowl in Balboa Park. 
Program includes world-famed light operas. 

FLOWER SHOWS: Aug. 4 to 7, flowers from Long Beach 
area all-year gardens go on display at the city's Municipal 
Auditorium. Aug. 13 to 14, San Diego County Dahlia Show. 

FIESTA: Aug. 19 to 21, Yucaipa Valley Peach Festival. 
Residents wear western garb, stage parades, displays. Aug. 
4 to 6, Old Spanish Days Fiesta at seaside city of Santa 
Barbara recalls early days, citizens wear Spanish attire, stage 
pageants, cowboy parades, torchlight procession. 

FAIR: San Bernardino County Fair at Victorville in the 
Mojave Desert. Displays include metallic and gem rocks. 

RACING: Del Mar's beautiful horse-racing track beside the 
Pacific near San Diego. Season closes Sept. 10. 




RIC O BAC 

Protect Furniture Surfaces 

With RIC O BAC, the magic wool felt cush- 
ion. Just press it on with your fingers, it's 
self adhesive, no gluing, it's washable, 
will not come off, and conforms to any 
outline. End all scratches on your furniture 
by putting RIC O BAC on your lamp bases, 
ash trays, figurines and all bric-a-brac. 
RIC O BAC adheres to all surfaces, does not 
show. It cushions and silences, stops 
breokage and costly refinishing bills. 

Four packages postpaid in the 
U.S. — $1.00 

PAUL O'DEA & CO. 

Dept. A, 2904 So. 7th St., 
Terre Haute. Indiana 




\$>ealt2)ivefs 
S)leam! 



O outh Sea lagoons seldom give up hand- 
somer treasure than this silky-rich, softly 
glowing simulated pearl — diameter nearly 
three-eighths inch — set between sparkling 
chatons. Your choice of cast Sterling Sil- 
ver, or gold-filled ring. Real seashell 
packet. For size, send paper tape, marked 
with circumference of finger. Postpaid, 
tax included, on a "delight or your money 
back" guarantee— —only $4.00. 

THE WALES WORKSHOP 

103 Oak Hill Ave., Attleboro, Mass. 





PAMELA GAy! 



MINIMUM COVERAGE 

MAXIMUM EXPOSURE 
COMPLETE COMF 

ULTRA BRIEFS a m „d.,t mM J 



ffi 




BO-PEEP BARES 

Black or White WHISPI 



Sheer with wide 
lace trim and cute 
bows. 



Yellow 
Plain Shee 
slacks, shorts, 



$4.95 



$2.95 



BREATHLESS White Lace 

nirj Imported Nude Net 

Vi\ I J I Sorry, can't illustrate 



ULTRA NUES 



BEAUTY REVEALING SWIMWEAR YC 

SEEN FEATURED IN NATIONAL PIC 

MAGAZINES I 




1*1 
■'■: 



EBB-TIDE 
$12.95 



Daringly cut to be worn low only! 
reveal you beautifully! Black rayoil 
faced with satin. Reversible — wear ei 
out. 



Include all 


measurements. Send check 


H" :- 
J 


der. Sorry, 


we cannot accept C.O.D 


I" 


We prepay 


all shipments our expense. 

PAMELA GAY 


1 - 


BOX 23-C 


MELROSE 76, MASSACI 


1 



58 



THE CAUFORNI AN, August, 1949 



IK YOUNGER 

Tou Grow Older 




imdlihuM 



A PROVEN SCIENTIFIC 

FACIAL TREATMENT 

AND 

EASANT NON-SURGICAL 
VENATION and FACE LIFT 

ives blackheads, white heads, and 

debris. 

1ECTS enlarged, clogged pores, dry 
oily skin, sallowness, and blem- 

RS the skin of acne and pimples. 
OTHES wrinkles, and erases facial 

TENS sagging cheeks and double 

EASES circulation and tissue nutri- 

LIZES nerve, gland, muscle and 
structure. 
ORES natural, lovely skin. 

he DermaCulture Studio nearest 
you: 

i ATlantic 4-9551 

Shore 203 Glendora Ave. 

LAnd 6-3710 

3173 College Ave. 
.3097 Tulare Ave. 

d GRanite 2978 

_ 1123 N. Brand Blvd. 

ch 742 Pine Ave. 

les 3156 Wilshire Blvd. 

...900 S. Norton Ave. 
322 Burney St. 



Ilywood 12131 Riverside Dr. 

1225 Broadway 

258 S. Las Robles Ave. 

200 E. Center St. 

Cisco YUkon 6-6325 

..Suite 459, Porter Bldg. 
..318 B. Street 



|na 405V 2 N. Broadway 

onica 271 9-E Santa Monica Blvd. 



HOUSEHOLD HINTS 



SHAVING-BRUSH-DUSTER 

It is traditional that shaving brushes 
are an essential part of the equipment 
employed by modern man in his early 
morning grooming ritual. When new, 
the shaving brush holds a place of 
honor in the household. When old and 
limp, the shaving brush is usually 
transferred to the ash can, the waste- 
basket, sometimes the incinerator. This 
is a grave waste of old shaving brushes, 
because when washed thoroughly and 
dried, they can be used to dust the 
fragile articles in your house . . . silk 
lampshades, delicate figurines, small 
pottery knick-knacks, cut-glass per- 
fume bottles. Save old shave brushes. 
They dust well. 



HOW TO WASH BRUSHES 

To clean hair brushes, dip up and 
down in tepid water to which you 
have added 1 tablespoon of ammonia, 
or 1 teaspoonful of soda. Or you may 
use strong, hot borax water. To stiffen 
brushes after washing, dip in equal 
parts of water and milk and dry near 
heat. Always dry with bristles down. 
Be sure to wash plastic brushes with 
soap and water; do not use alcohol. 
To prevent harming the polished back 
of a brush, coat it with white vaseline 
before washing, then wipe off with a 
clean, dry cloth. 

TRAINING FOR TIDINESS 

Toys are okay in their place, but so 
often they aren't! In place, that is. 
One mother we know solved this prob- 
lem by installing three large chests in 
the playroom, one for each of the three 
children. The kids themselves took a 
hand in decorating. In the hall, she 
placed a fourth chest. This was the for- 
feit box. Everything found lying around 
the house, even her own things, and, 
just to keep things fair, Daddy's too, 
went into the forfeit box. And, to re- 
trieve the forfeit article, the offending 
member had to pay a forfeit to regain 
same. Forfeits can be anything from 
a certain sum of money to a hard-to- 
get-done task. Needless to say, the 
problem of endless picking up became 
resolved, and everybody had a good 
time accomplishing the solution. 



A'TURE HOLLYWOOD GLAMOUR 

I 

var 




only 



Order Today 




II uPont nylon. Fast drying, long wearing panty 
ir£. Unique bias construction for firm con- 
One seam for smooth lines. Detachable 



ORDER BY MAIL from HOLLYWOOD 



'A|USS OF HOLLYWOOD, 6411 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 

send me a GLYDON Panty-Girdle, which is sold on a money-back guarantee 
r« rned in 10 days. 
Enclose payment — saves postage □ Mail C.O.D. Circle your size — Small, 
2i Medium, 26-27 Large, 28-29. 

=1 color — White Pink 



Just $3.95 



Zone- 



State. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 



White Ceramic 

Doves 

Beautiful white ceramic dove 
in high lustre glaze. Ideal gift 
of friendship for patio, fence 
or roof, and as a centerpiece 
with flowers. 

JUST $2 EACH 

About 51/2" h/gh by 10" long. (PREPAID. NO C.O.D.'s) 

SLEEPY HOLLOW POTTERY 664 SOUTH COAST BLVD., LAGUNA BEACH CALIF. 





BUBBLES WITHIN BUB- 
BLES . . . this mystery bubble pipe 
produces smaller bubbles inside the 
giant ones ! Grownups and kiddies 
will be entranced . . . for the whole 
family, for your next party. 8" metal 
pipe with durable hardwood head, 
has outlets for different sized bubbles. 
Bubble powder is included, and any 
soap works. Just $1 per kit, includ- 
ing two pipes, bubble solution, in- 
structions; $5 for six. (No C.O.D.'s, 
please). Satisfaction guaranteed by 
Seltru Products Inc., Dept. Cl, 126 
Bedford St., Stamford, Conn. 




ROUND-THE-POLE . . . P* 1 ™ table 
cloth. A summery delight is this gay 
table cloth . . . just throw it 'round 
the pole and zip it up! Hand-printed 
in attractive basket weave of mercer- 
ized cotton, richly colored in red and 
white; blue and white; or green and 
white. It fits any garden table, round 
or square. Just $4.95 postpaid. Cali- 
fornians add 2*/ 2 % sales tax, 3 % 
in Los Angeles. Matching ready-hem- 
med napkins, IS" wide, just 40c 
each. Send your orders to The Mar- 
gorita Shop, 101S South Main St., 
Los Angeles 15, Calif*. 









*"S| 


Mgfj. *- 


\ a 


- / ■ / 

m 


,^ 1 




j .•>...' 


['-.. 


V**— - 


J 




V 



LURES 'EM . . . TRAPS 'EM . . . 
KILLS 'EM . . . tne new Newton In- 
sect Lamp fits and looks well in any 
floor or wall lamp or light fixture, 
yet is the deadly enemy of bugs and 
insects. It attracts, traps and kills these 
household pests. Just screw the Lamp 
in any standard socket, it lasts a life- 
time, and will catch all the insects 
around. You'll want one for every 
room. Small size $1.70; large size 
$3.50 postpaid. Send your orders to 
The Margorita Shop, 1018 South 
Main, Los Angeles 15, Calif. 




COPPER FRENCH DRIP 
COFFEE MAKER . . . designed 

for gracious living. Every morning is 
"beautiful" when flavorful coffee ar- 
rives made in this handsome gleam- 
ing solid copper coffee pot, tin lined. 
It makes two American cups, or you 
can make four demi-tasse cups after 
dinner. As a gift to the newlyweds, 
it's matchless. Priced at $5.50 post- 
paid. The Copper Mart, 162 East 86th 
Street, New York City 28, N. Y. 




EGG CRACKERS DELUXE 

. . . cracking eggs is a trick, and 
handling them after they're cracked 
offers complications, especially when 
they've just been removed from boil- 
ing water. That's the very problem 
these novel Crax-Ezys solve. Keeps 
your fingers cool and clean — so easy 
any member of the family can operate 
them. Stainless steel pinchers hold the 
egg securely as the cutters make a 
clean break. No shell fragments or 
messy tablecloths, with Crax-Ezys. 
Red, green, white or yellow,_two,pjyrs 
for $1.00 postpaid, $1.03 in Calif. No 
C.O.D.'s, please. Fred L. Seymour Co., 
Box 1176, Beverly Hills, Calif. 



59 











/ fiteccSeertwfotfJ--- 



&az^Je cZ~c#??ggS 'art 




M##4 &W-. 



CJ4 




60 



the new MAM'ZELLE is "precisely" for you 

Even if you're an "in-between" size, you can now find a Mam'zelle to fit you 
perfectly . . . give you perfect contour molding — without alterations. 
No custom made brassiere could fit you better. 

Mam'zelle incorporates the patented "Cross-Lift" construction and bias cup 
that make it the most beautiful, more flattering and best fitting brassiere . . . 
Mam'zelle's lovely fabrics are guaranteed pre-shrunk. You can't "wash out" 
the shape. In nylon satin and nylon lace .... S4.50 .... at your favorite store. 

Write for free booklet: "How to Fit Yourself with a Mam'zelle" 

MAM'ZELLE BRASSIERES, 6558 Santa Monica Boulevard, Hollywood 38, Californ 

THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 194^ 







IP^ 



BUDGET SUIT 
for CAMPUS '49 



Q&lAM Ma*Wl of California 
passes the test for value in this plaid 
1 and plain rayon suit. The jacket is 
jfully lined, and the solid color of the 
skirt matches the collar and pockets. 
I j — ^«*ty«yt<yi_ says buy it in grey, 
beige. In TEXCELAIRE by 



HARRY GOLDINGER. 



Bizes 10-18. Retails for only 



$1795 



AT THESE STORES: 

Grand Island, Nebraska 
THE VOGUE 

Bogalusa, Louisiana 
'STEPHENS' DRY GOODS 

Stockton, California 
THE BROWN HOUSE 

Phoenix, Arizona 
N. PORTER CO. 

Jackson, Miss. 

TOWN AND COUNTRY SHOP 




For further details write JERRY MANN OF CALIFORNIA 860 South Los Angeles Street, Los Angeles 



THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 



61 



e. 






orduroy classmates are the big news here . . . debonair reefer jacket, double-breasted; detachable back belt. With it, 
the slim skirt with front inverted pleat, or pedal pushers with back zipper, jaunty pockets. By SPORT-LANE of CALIFORNIA, 
in BERNSIDE TOGEROY. Chocolate, red, kelly, teal, royal. Sizes 10-18. Jacket, $10.95, skirt and pedal pushers, each $6.95. 











py^l^i 



t 



Selection 






AT THESE STORES: 

Klamath Falls, Oregon 
LaPOINTE'S 

Waco, Texas 

BAUER-McCANN 

Davenport, Iowa 
H. E. SCHARFF 

Grand Island, Nebraska 
THE VOGUE 

Bogalusa, Louisiana 

STEPHENS' DRY GOODS 

Freeport, Illinois 
F. A. READ CO. 

Stockton, California 
THE BROWN HOUSE 

Brownwood, Texas 
BETTIS & GIBBS 

Toppenish, Washington 
JUNE'S SPECIALTY 

San Francisco, California 
HALE'S 

Jackson, Mississippi 

TOWN & COUNTRY SHOP 



For further details write 




224 E. 11th Street, Los Angeles 



lolluuiood Premiere 

LOS ANGELES 



ON THE BULLETIN BOARD 

Jane Taylor likes the common- 
sensical idea of the Planned 
Wardrobe designed by Irene Sal- 
tern for HOLLYWOOD PREMIERE 
... in 100% wool Broadmore 
stripe and companion tweed "ex- 
clusives" woven for them by 
HOFFMAN OF CALIFORNIA. With 
it, vagabond sweater blouse of 
heather wool jersey . . . here is 
that suit-look without too much 
warmth, maximum freedom. Prac- 
tical to wear separately . . . muted 
taupe striped with green, gray 
with red. Sizes 10-18. Blazer and 
skirt each $12.95, blouse $10.95. 



L_ 




AT THESE STORES: 



Chattanooga, Tennessee 
MILLER BROS. CO. 

Waco, Texas 

BAUER-McCANN 



Houston, Texas 
SAKOWITZ BROS. 

San Jose, California 
HALE'S 



: or further details write HOLLYWOOD PREMIERE, 1240 South Main Street, Los Angeles 

HECALIFORNIAN, August, 1949 63 




MEET-YOUR-BEAU AFTER CLASS FAVORITE . . 



AT THESE STORES: 



Bogalusa, Louisiana 
STEPHEN'S DRY GOODS 

Davenport, Iowa 
H. E. SCHARFF 

Freeport, Illinois 
F. A. READ CO. 



Klamath Falls, Oregon 
LaPOINTE'S 

San Jose, California 
HALE'S 

Seymour, Indiana 
PARIS STYLE 



Go back to college in neat-as-a-pin COHAMA jersey by 
DEBBY OF CALIFORNIA. Push-up sleeves, little round collar. 
Six pearl buttons with rhinestone centers. Gathered skirt is 
full, graceful. Change the belt or add a scarf, just for fun. 
Comes in hunter green, copper brown, gray, beige, teal, and 
red. $17.95. In sizes 9-15. Chosen for Campus Everywhere 



by 



<^Tl a 



tloi— 






For further details write DEBBY OF CALIFORNIA 9 1 South Los Angeles Street, Los Angeles 



64 



THE CALIFORNIAN, August, 194< 





tosWons 



1% 



by 



3t, 3 






v her \uck\nherP b y 

^—"Zr--"" - -U" - 

1.95 

5.95 

4.95 



Skir* 
B\ouse 

Dress 

Juwp er 



AT FlW E STORES 



For further defai/s write JEAN DURAIN • 230 SO. LOS ANGELES ST., LOS ANGELES 12, CALIFORNIA 





3? 






♦-^■ar^ 



7 "^^^T. 









* ' 5 ' . ^^ 



>H»M«M A MafeblololokJ? 



■~- i 'G&>^*&&^>i"i, 



foMl»]^M»M.t.l»M»H 



M<to»M.T<&W 



I30DQ3QGG3GG 



E NOV 2 4 '43 
^■v.JBatfii brings cotton flannel out of the nursery and sends it off to an office, or 
anywhere, neatly printed in little calico patterns, vat-dyed in suave solid colors, 
and Sanforized so it can be washed repeatedly without matting or shrinking. Here, 
Bates bright new career cotton is worn by a bright young career girl, Katherine 
Cassidy, in a blouse and skirt to duplicate from Vogue Patterns 6837 and 6860. 



ff* 



B*» 



cs 



"Loomed to be Heirloomed' 



BATES FABRICS, INC., 80 WORTH STREET, NEW YORK '. 



A MAGAZINE STYLED FOR COLORFUL LIVING 



PRICE 35 CENTS 





1412 Broadway, New York 18, New Yor 



CALIFORNIA'S 

WN 
00k 
00K 




I f you like to eat . . and who 
doesn't . . you'll revel in Helen 
Evans Brown's special and famous 
recipes in 

CALIFORNIA COOKS 

Write for Your Copy Today! 

• More than 100 unusual Cali- 
fornia recipes are consolidated on 
40 beautifully printed pages . . 
appetizing dishes that make cook- 
ing a real pleasure . . a big event 
for you! Try Helen Brown's 
Brentwood Orange Pancakes, her 
piping hot Onion Bread, Ham- 
burgers En Brochette, Peas Pais- 
ano, Green Goddess Dressing. 

• Cooking is easy . . and fun . . 
when you have such wonderful 
recipes! Try them for your finest 
party . . serve them for your own 
family's taste treat. 

• CALIFORNIA COOKS is a 
treasure to keep in your kitchen 
. . it suggests the proper menu, 
the exciting dish . . at just the 
right time. It's a practical and 
appreciated gift. 

• A Two-Dollar Value in good 
eating for only $1.00! 

Write for Your Copy Today! 

Simply fill in the coupon and mail with 
$1.00 for each copy, postage paid by us, 

tAUroiNIAN 

1020 SOUTH MAIN STREET 
LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 



To: The Californian, 1020 S. Main 
Street, Los Angeles 15, California. 
Please mail my copies of CALI- 
FORNIA COOKS to: 



Address 
Name ... 
City 



Zone State 

Enclosed is payment for □ copies. 





Magnificent styling... 
fluid form. ..in 
Catalina's new collection 
of sweaters... 
featuring inspired 
California colors. 



ABOVE: Cable Slip-on, 7.00; 
shown with Cable 
Cardigan, 9.00 

BELOW: Cashmere Slip-on, 
13.00; shown with 
Cashmere Cardigan, 17.00 






Sweaters *t4..iC.&, 



LOOK FOR THE ^/fLYING FISH 



FOR COLOR FOLDER SHOWING OTHER CATALINA SWEATERS, WRITE DEPT. 803, 
CATALI NA, INC., 443 SOUTH SAN PEDRO STREET, LOS ANGELES 1 3, CA L I F R N I A 



E CALIFORNIAN, September, 1949 







fc\ 



■33 



B. 



7. Square vase 9", $4. 2. Covered jar $7.50. 3. Box with lid 4", $5. 4. Bud vase, $2.50. 5. Flare 
vase 9' wide, $4. 6. Small rectangular planter, $3.50. 7. Small square planter, $2.50. 8. Pansy 
Bowl, $3.50. 9. Tumbler, $2. 10. Water pitcher, $7 (also in photo at right.) II. Footed ash tray, $1. 
12. Footed cigarette box, $3. 73. Small ginger jar 5", $5. 



MING TREE 



OF CALIFORNIA 




Detail on Ming Tree Artware by Weil: hand-painted 
under glazed pottery with RAISED DESIGN, in 
muted Oriental tones of rare and blending charm. 



Like the old Chinese proverb, this original pottery defies 
description . . . you'll want to own these conversational 
pieces! Wonderful inspiration for flower arrangements, 
modern decor for any home. At better stores everywhere. 



For further details write > — ^~*t /«yt / »t_ 945 South Los Angeles Street, Los Angel' 



Or write direct to WEIL OF CALIFORNIA 

3160 SAN FERNANDO ROAD, LOS ANGFAES 41, CALIFORNIA 



THE CALIFORNIA N, September, 1 9 4< 1 | 




of 

California 

creates a 

"Hide-away belt" coat to 

wear straight or 

back-belted . . . 

fashions it in Dovedown 

suede cloth, in 

tawny beige, fire-wagon red, 

green, and yarn-dye gray 

Sizes 10 to 16. 

Full length, 49.95 

Three-quarter, 39.95 




L C 



Buff urns' 



LONG BEACH 2, CALIFORNIA 



MAIL ORDERS 

Plus 3% state soles lax 

BUFFUMS' BUDGET FASHIONS 





)L 8 
2 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly by The Californian, Inc., at 1020 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, Calif., printed in U.S.A. Yearly sub- 
scription price $3.00. Entered as second class matter January 23, 1946, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, Calif., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



SEPTEMBER 
1 949 



Max Kopp Daytime Dresses of Distinction, 818 South Broadway, Los Angeles 14, California 




1126 . . Miss - in- B-tween frock for the shorter young figure. Lustrous tissue faille, sprinkled 
with groups of tiny self buttons and a set- in sash that floats out from the slim skirt. Sizes 
10 to 18. 270 . . a pretty young daytime or date frock in a wonderful tissue faille with softly 
pleated front and a pleated panel that floats. Sizes 10 to 20. Both come in navy, seaside \ 
(carbon) blue . . cedar-green . . technicolor-red, blue-pine (teal) . . or coffee brown. 

Each O Q9 5: 






BULLOCK'S, 7th & BROADWAY, LOS ANGELES . . . SWELLDOM, BROADWAY AT 6th, LOS ANGELES ... THE MAY CO., BROADWAY AT 8th ST., LOS ANGELES 



THE CALIFORNIA N, September, 194 




IN SEPTEMBER 

(~^ oming to California this September? 
You'll find it a paradoxical month, 
really a second summer, with some 
days turning sharply cool in pure de- 
fiance. It's a busy month, too, so you'll 
have to plan your wardrobe with ex- 
tra care. 

Just consider that you can swim in 
the ocean, enjoy Indian summer in the 
mountains . . enjoy starlight operas 
and symphonies under the stars at 
Hollywood Bowl . . go to the races at 
Del Mar . . "take in" the numerous 
County Fairs, and the Fiestas. 

Then . . start out with a basic suit 
with a choice of blouses: tailored, 
dressy, and one just plain cool. Actual- 
ly, this changeabout can take you any- 
where in good style, but you'll have 
frequent use for a dark crepe or may- 
be a sheer wool as a mid-season choice. 
One of the new dark-hued cottons will 
prove both smart and comfortable for 
the dog days ahead. 

Bring swimsuits and playclothes if 
you're beachward bound; pedal pushers 
or slacks for the mountains . . and a 
coat for evenings wherever you go! 
Don't forget sturdy walking shoes for 
there are so many places to see . . add 
sun glasses so you'll look like a native. 
Just remember, anything can happen 
in California in September, so come 
prepared ! 



WEATHER DATA FOR SEPTEMBER 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LOS ANGELES 



Maximum 
Minimum 
Average 
% Sunshine 



68.5 
54.8 
61.6 
70 



80.5 
59. 
69.8 
77 



ANOTHER GIFT PROBLEM SOLVED 

TO;&ff « HP Xf tff*^$V f ^lt* v -^ itfc 




»•£%>? 



SET OF SIX original CLAYTOON place mats in the "Gay Nineties" mood 
. . . bright color photographs of miniature clay models and stage sets. All 
different. Size 10 x 16". All six sent postage paid for only.— $2.00 



PARTY AAAT package, six 
CLAYTOON pictures on min- 
iature mats. Perfect for the 
card table, tray ... or for 
wall decorations. Size 5x8" 




6 for $1.00 



FLOWER COASTERS from 
California . . . vivid jonquils 
and velvet-y gardenias on a 
green ground. Durable, 
glazed mats to protect table 
surfaces, pretty-fy a table. 
Size 3V2" square. 

8 for $1.00 



F 



or that hard-to-please friend 
. . . here is the gift that's sure 
to make a hit. Conversational 
and practical, too . . . water 
and alcohol resistant . . . 
beautifully packaged. Price in- 
cludes tax and shipping costs 
anywhere in America. 

MARGORITA SHOP 

1018 South Main St. 

Los Angeles 15, Calif. • PRospect 6651 



OnxLet *uuu . . . Utii. eaAtf. way! 

MARGORITA SHOP 

1018 S. Main St. Los Angeles 15, Calif. 
Please send me, postage paid, the following: 
Place mats, "Gay Nineties" series, $2.00 □ 
Party mats, "Gay Nineties," 6 for $1.00 □ 
Flower Coasters, set of 8, $1.00 □ 

Check for $ is enclosed. 



Name 



Address. 
City 



_Zone_ 



_State_ 



Add 3 1 / 2 % Sales Tax in Los Angeles. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, September, 1949 




the new MAM'ZELLE is "precisely" for you 

Even if you're an "in-between" size, you can now find a Mam'zelle to fit you 
perfectly . . . give you perfect contour molding — without alterations. 
No custom made brassiere could fit you better. 

Mam'zelle incorporates the patented "Cross-Lift" construction and bias cup 
that make it the most beautiful, more flattering and best fitting brassiere . . . 
Mam'zelle's lovely fabrics are guaranteed pre-shrunk. You can't "wash out" 
the shape. In nylon satin and nylon lace .... S4.50 .... at your favorite store. 

Write for free booklet: "How to Fit Yourself with a Mam'zelle" 

MAM'ZELLE BRASSIERES, 6558 Santa Monica Boulevard, Hollywood 38, California 




THE CALIFORNIA N, September, 1949 



m ■?'■ 





WtAIHtK rtKrtLI The indispensable coat for town and country . . . high-button front, deep 
collar and cuffs, wonderful new raglan type sleeves. A Gaylife California original by the 
Superior Cloak and Suit Mfg. Co. A nationally confined fabric, this waterproofed herringbone I 
by Kay's is one of Jane Taylor's outstanding selections for all wardrobes. In either gray or 
brown. Sizes 8-18. To retail under $55.00 



at better stores or write SUPERIOR CLOAK & SUIT MFG. CO. 324 1 3th St., Oakland, Calif., for name of your nearest store. 




*7un£ @lu& Ti/ancUo&e 



Wonderful separates that WIN compliments, PLACE you 
among "best- dressed" women and SHOW your good taste, 
whether you wear them singly or combined as your fancy dictates. 
Designed by Irene Saltern, in wonderful Tweeds . . . wonderful blended colors. 



II 





AT LEADING STORES * PRICED APPROXIMATELY 



:OORDINATED 



oiipoo 

LOS ANGELES 15 

SEPARATES z PLANNED 



Tweed Jacket, $25.00 • Tweed Skirt, $1 0.95 * 
Tweed Vest, $8.95 * Gabardine Skirt, $ 1 0.95 
*k Heather Jersey Blouse, $10.95 • Stadium 
Jacket in Suede Fleece, $29.95 * Sizes 1 to 1 8 



WARDROBES 



fjommJi 



NACIC 



in "Control -Lift" Brassieres 
for every age . . . every size 

To Cordelia, famous Hollywood designer, there is no 
such thing as a "problem bust". In the Cordelia line 
of surgical, corrective, and style brassieres, there are 
over 600 different fittings, along with regular sizes, 
and each one is designed to "do things" for you. 
In long-line styles (as illustrated below) sizes range 
from 32 to 56 plus. You'll like the exquisite fabrics 
Cordelia uses, too — nylons and satins with lace, fine 
broadcloths and jacquards ... all created to reveal 
new contour beauty for the lady with a figure problem. 





Cordelia creates for the young womari too — recognizing that even young 
women frequently have brassiere fitting problems. Cordelia's 600-plus 
individual and regular fittings include all the youthful sizes, in all the 
newest and most delightful quick-drying fabrics, in the season's popular 
shades — nude, white, or black. Cordelia brassieres are always avail- 
able at all better department stores and specialty shops. If your dealer 
doesn't appear below — write for name of the store nearest you. 



NOW BEING FEATURED AT SUCH FINE STORES AS 



FREDERICK & NELSON, Seattle 
AUERBACH'S, Salt Lake City 
STIX, BAER, FULLER, St. Louis 
BULLOCK'S, LOS ANGELES 
GOLDWATER'S, Phoenix 
POPULAR DRY GOODS, El Paso 
GRACE CAMPBELL, Inc., San Francisco 
DENVER DRY GOODS, Denver 
BOSTON STORE INC., Milwaukee 
CRAEMERS, Cedar Rapids 



STRAWBRIDGE & CLOTHIER, Philadelphia 
ABRAHAM & STRAUSS, Brooklyn 
WM. H. BLOCK CO., Indianapolis 
THE MARSTON COMPANY, San Diego 
OLDS, WORTMAN & KING, Portland 
GEORGE PECK, Kansas City 
C. H. HITTENBERGER STORES, San Francisco 
THE FAIR, Fort Worth 
J. L. HUDSON, Detroit 
W. A. GREEN, Dallas 



. . . and at other leading department stores, specialty shops, and surgical supply houses 
all over America. Once you've worn a figure-flattering Cordelia Brassiere, you'll never be 
satisfied with anything else! 



V->^ OF HOLLYWOOD 



CREATORS AND MANUFACTURERS OF SURGICAL, CORRECTIVE, 
AND STYLE BRASSIERES 

3107 BEVERLY BLVD., LOS ANGELES 4, CALIF. 




«, CufoU-w- CwtfeO 



THE C A L I F O ,1 N I A N, September, 194 




shows you the 



^fssssm 




At America's best stores, including: 



way to he 
a cover 

girl! 



Campus or career bound, you'll 
want COLOR WHEEL COORDINATES by 
Fleischman of California. These en- 
sembles give you only a glimpse of 
the wonderful ways you can mix 
and match feather-light corduroys, 
wool monotone tweeds, worsted 
wool jerseys. Sizes 10 to 18. 

Left: Sheercord corduroy jacket about 
$15; skirt about $11. Wool jersey blouse 
about $8. 

Right: Wool monotone tweed jacket about 
$15; skirt about $10. 



MARSTONS, San Diego 
BUFFUMS, Long Beach 
HAGGARTY'S, Los Angeles 
COLEMAN'S, San Jose 
CLOTHES CLOSET, Palo Alto 
H. LIEBES, San Francisco 
THE EMPORIUM, San Francisco 
J. F. HINK & SON, Berkeley 



SMITH & LANG, Stockton 
H. C. CAPWELL CO., Oakland 
OLDS & KING, Portland 
BON MARCHE, Seattle 
GOLDWATERS, Phoenix 
DUNLOP CO., New Mexico 
DANIELS & FISHER, Denver 
THE FAIR, Chicago 



STIX BAER & FULLER, St. Louis 
LORD & TAYLOR, New York 
JULIUS GARFINKLE, Washington, D.C. 
R. H. STEARNS, Boston 
JOSEPH HORNE, Pittsburgh 
MAAS BROS., St. Petersburg 
PALACE CLOTHIERS, Tulsa 
YOUNG QUINLAN, Minneapolis 



M. R. FLEISCHMAN COMPANY • 2285 PALOU • APPAREL CITY • SAN FRANCISCO 24 • CALIFORNIA 




dorfcurnij Cflartjman 



BEN D. LICHTIG & SON present their ELLEN DAYE COACHMAN COAT, a double-breasted 
robe with a beautifully flared skirt and a deep shawl collar. Another point of interest stressed by 
Jane Taylor . . . the hand-washable special robe corduroy! In American beauty, light blue, dusty 
rose, aqua, and royal. Sizes 10-20. To retail around $16.95. 
At leading stores in principal cities, or write BEN D. UCHTIG & SON, 1219 Sutter St., San Francisco, Calif, for name of nearest storeJ 

THE CALIFORNIA N, September, 194< 
14 



AT THESE STORES: 

The following is o list of fhe 

names of the towns and stores 

in which our style 1935 can be 

bought. 

CALIFORNIA 

Bakersfield 

OGLES DRESS SHOP 

Glen dale 

NANCY HAMILTON 

Fresno 

EASTERN OUTFITTING CO. 

lodi 

THE ELIZABETH 

Los Angeles 

BROADWAY DEPARTMENT 

STORE 
HOUSE OF BRIDES 
MILLIRON'S 
SWELLDOM INC. 
ARTHUR J. WOLFE CO. INC. 
Modesto 
HAMMETT'S 
Oakland 

CAPWELL SULLIVAN & FURTH 
H. C. CAPWELL 
GOLDMAN'S 
MARZEL'S 
Palo Alto 
SUEBERRY SALON 
Pasadena 

LILLIAN JOHNSON 
Richmond 
ALBERT'S INC. 
San Diego 

LION CLOTHING CO. 
WENMAN'S APPAREL 
San Francisco 
ALEXANDER'S 
EMPORIUM 
CITY OF PARIS 
LIEBES 

LIVINGSTON BROS. 
J. MAGNIN 
WHITE HOUSE 
San Luis Obispo 
RU MAE SHOP 
San Rafael 
ALBERTS INC. 
Santa Barbara 
GRACE PORTER 
Santa Monica 
ROSE GOLD 
Vallejo 

ROSE BONDEROW 
Woodland 
BREIT'S 

NEVADA 
{ Reno 

| ESTHER KANTERS 
i GRAY REID WRIGHT 

' OREGON 

Medford 
I CORONET FASHION SHOP 
i Portland 
! DENA MACK DRESS SHOP 

! WASHINGTON 
i Everett 

1 C. C. CHAFFEE 
I Seattle 

BON MARCHE 

Spokane 

SPOKANE DRYGOODS CO. 







VjrT ' (ICIOIIS l^jdCiy If YOU are 14^4 to 24^2 in size! ! This fragile lace swirled to the side and caught 

with a single full-blow rose. BY L. B. MORRIS AND COMPANY of San Francisco. Under 
the shimmering rayon lace, a full taffeta slip. The colors, pronounced pure magic, are copen, 
aqua, pink, black, coffee, royal white. Sizes I4yi -24y 2 . To retail about $39.95. 

for name of your nearest store, write L. B. MORRIS & COMPANY, 2160 Palou Avenue, Apparel City, San Francisco, Calif. 









' jiff' 5?- 




** 

^V'** 




l^<^ * » *▼* * 


H^Hf*<*V. jaa _ 



£, 



■k 




5*^ 



MADE 




>» 



CALIFORNIA 




YOUNG, BUT WORLDLY WISE ... this "JIMMY JUNIOR" coat 



An ingenious double-breasted coat with slot seam detail- 
ing, basically styled for day and night. From JIMMY 
THOMPSON CO., in either all wool broadcloth or all wool 



gabarsheen. The colors, sparkling Burgundy, Taupe, Sierra 
Green, Redwood Brown, Winter N 
Sizes 7-15. Retail about $59.00. 



Green, Redwood Brown, Winter Navy, and Mineral Black. 



AT THESE FINE STORES: LOVEMAN, BERGER & TEITLEBAUM, Nashville, Tenn.; BON MARCHE, Seattle, Wash.; OLDS, WORTMAN & KING, Portland, 
Oregon; KAHN'S, Oakland, Calif.; CLOTHES CLOSET, Palo Alto, Calif.; BULLOCK'S, Los Angeles, Calif.; GREY, REID & WRIGHT, Reno, Nevada; 
FAMOUS BARR, St. Louis, Mo.; WATT & SHAND, Lancaster, Pa.; CARSON PIRIE SCOTT, Chicago, III.; B. GERTZ, INC., Jamaica, N. Y.,- CALIFORNIA 
CLASSICS, Manhasset, Long Island, N. Y. ; JORDAN MARSH, Boston, Mass.; THE EMPORIUM, San Francisco, Calif.; THE STERLING, Stockton, California. 

or write JIMMY THOMPSON CO., 21 96 Palou Ave., Apparel City, San Francisco 24, Calif. 



t 





L 



AT THESE FINE STORES: 



She WaS SO beaUtiful Perfect choice for the distin- 
guished wedding . . . this fabulous bridal gown, the skirt a great swirl of 
satin with inserts of delicate lace. The subtly draped slipper satin of the brides- 
maid's dress comes in a veritable rainbow of colors. Both gowns created by the 
LENORA DRESS CO. in exquisite fabric by Bur-Mil. Sizes 8-18. The bridal 
gown, to retail about $45-00, the bridesmaid's dress, about $25.00. 
Or write to LENORA DRESS CO., 2176 PALOU AVENUE, APPAREL CITY, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



BROADWAY DEPARTMENT 
STORE 

Los Angeles 

H. C CAPWELL CO. 

Oakland, Calif. 

EMPORIUM 

San Francisco 

MACY'S 
I New York City 

FILENE'S 
I Boston 
' FOLEY BROS. 

Houston, Texas 
I MEIER & FRANK 
' Portland, Oregon 



MAY CO. 

Denver, Colorado 

McLEAN'S 

Binghampton, New York 

MILWAUKEE BOSTON STORE 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

YOUNKER'S DAVIDSON 

Sioux City, Iowa 

FROST BROS. 

San Antonio, Texas 

LA MODE 

Dallas, Texas 

THE WOODWARD STORES 

Vancouver, British Columbia 



for the name of the store carrying these dresses in your city. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, September, 1949 



17 





finds her world-famous graff jacket indispensable 



Here's the jacket that will take you back to school in great fashion ... to a football game, for weekends 
in the country, or even en route to the office! It's the highly functional all-wool plaid topper in rich glow- 
ing colors to match or harmonize with your new fall clothes. Note the big roomy pockets with plenty of 
stow-away space . . . the half-belt in back . . . the terse little collar that frames the face. Graff man- 
tailors it handsomely for casual smartness, for all-purpose use all through the season. To retail at $10.95. 



Available at these fine stores-. 

ARKANSAS 

Nashville, Belle Shop 

CALIFORNIA 

Bakersfield, Weill's, Inc. 
El Monte, Miss and Matron 
Eureka, McGaraghan's 
Fort Jones, Margaret Wallace 
Fresno, Eastern of Fresno 
Fullerton, Kingsbury's 
Greenville, M. D. Ayoob 
Hanford, Mirviss 
Mglewood, Boston Store 
Long Beach, Columbia 
Norfh Hollywood, Rathbun's 
Oakland, H. C Capwell; Capwell- 

Sullivan-Furth 
Pasadena, Elizabeth Frock Shop 



Pomona, Orange Belt Emporium 
Son Diego, Urquhart's; Walker's 
Sacramento, Enos Department Store; 

Mademoiselle Shop 
Son Francisco, Emporium; Rea Shops 
Sanger, Belle Quinn 
San Jose, Colman's 
San Rafael, Albert's 
Santa Ana, Knoll's 
Santa Maria, Mae Moore 
Santa Rosa, Rosenberg's 
Taff, Pruiett's 
Ventura, Grace Scott Shop 

KANSAS 

Praft, W. W. Virtue, Inc. 
OKLAHOMA 

Bartlesville, Barfield's Shop 



Hugo, Graham's Ready to Wear 
Ponco City, Lucerne's 

OREGON 

Ashland, Fortmiller's 
Eugene, Marley Sport Shop 
Gold Beach, Connie's Sportswear 
Hood River, Anderson's Apparel 
Klamath Falls, The Town Shop 
Medford, Mann's 
Portland, Bedell's 
Seaside, Margaret Graham 

WASHINGTON 
Bellevue, Taylor's 
Burton, Bell's, Inc. 
East Stanwood, Lassie Shop 
Ellensburg, Esther-Marion Shop 
Port Angeles, Nicholson's Apparel 
Tacoma, Richardson 's 



For further details, or if your favorite store is not listed, write direct to 



CALIFOINIAWEA* ST 

GRAFF 



PRODUCERS OF WORLD-FAMOUS 

SHIRTS * SLACKS . SKIRTS . JACKETS * GOLFERS • SUITS 

1240 SOUTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 



THE CALIFORNIAN, September, 1949 



1? 




ON THE COVER: 

Brilliant splash of color for the exciting autumn season . . . 
M. R. Fleischman's beautifully tailored ensembles for town 
or country wear! Left: Merrimack Sheercord corduroy 
half-belt jacket, about §15. Skirt about $11. The jersey 
blouse dyed to match, about $8. Right: Tweed jacket, 
about $15. Skirt, about $10. Sizes 10-18. /. /. Haggartys, 
Los Angeles; Lord & Taylor, N. Y.; The Emporium, S. F. 



yA 



CALIFORNIAN 



VOL. VIII NO. 2 



SEPT., 1949 



California fashions 

Color Is Fashion's Foil 20 

Second Look At A Second Color 22 

It's Satin 26 

Rustle Of Taffeta, Faille 28 

For Fall, Jersey And Cotton Suede. 30 

With That California Air 32 

To Top It Off 34 

Perfection In Suit And Blouse 38 

California features 

Your Castle In Carolands 40 

California Cooks 42 

La Jolla, Jewel Of The Pacific 44 

Foliage For Fall Arrangements 48 

Keep Your Lingerie Lovely 54 

Book Treasures Enrich Your Walls 55 



EDITOR AND PUBLISHER, J. R. Osherenko; ASSISTANT PUBLISHER, 
William J. Bowen; FASHION DIRECTOR, Sally Dickason; FASHION 
EDITOR, Virginia Scallon; MANAGING EDITOR, Alice Carey; ASSO- 
CIATE EDITOR, Philip Kustner; MEN'S FASHION EDITOR, Malcolm 
Steinlauf; FASHIONS, Jacquelin Lary, Margaret Paulson; FEATURES, 
Helen Ignatius, Hazel Allen Pulling; ART, Morris Ovsey, Anne Harris, 
Jane Albrechl; STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER, Frank Stiffler; SHOPPING 
ROUNDUP, Joyce Olsen; FOOD STYLIST, Helen Evans Brown. 

THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly at 1020 So. Main St., Los 
Angeles 15, California, PRospect 665,1. New York Office, Charles Thorpe, 
eastern advertising manager, 370 Lexington Ave., New York 17, LExington 
2-9470; San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph, 26 O'Farrell St., DOuglas 
2-1472. Subscription price: $3.00 one year; $5.00 two years; $7.50 three years. 
One dollar additional postage per year outside continental United States. 35c 
per copy. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations. Entered as second class 
matter January 25, 1946, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, 
under act of March, 1879. Copyright The Californian, Inc. Printed in 
U.S.A. Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless specifically au- 
thorized. 








■sSm* 




M 



1)j4 



0Xv 




COLOR ... IS I 

FASHION'S FOIL I 

Underscoring tones of color, or color in contrast . . . newest trick of j 

the season, to-you-with-love from California! You'll be doubly fond >, 

I 
of fashion's newest darlings, a tone-on-tone effect achieved by I 

shadowing a shade, by ombre effects, or by subtle combination of i 

unusual colors. Or maybe by the combination of plain-and-textured i 

fabrics, of sheer-and-substance . . . like velveteen-with-tweed, or ) 

chiffon-with-taffeta. Here is the something new you'll want to spark I 

your fall wardrobe . . . flattering, significant trend we expect to 

persist because it is purely irresistible! Make color fashion's foil 

■ 
{anything that enhances by contrast), and accept the challenge to, 

dramatize your wardrobe with color, and more color! 



20 



THE CALIFORNIAN, September, 1949 



- 









&»fl*+~ 



Flattering proof that the significant sign of the season is a combination 
of colors, of tone-on-tone . . . Above, Barney Max harmonizes three shades 
in this suit with fully lined box jacket. In Botany Marchan gabardine, 
matching Celanese crepe blouse. Sizes 7 to 20, suit about $55, blouse 

about $10, at Meier & Frank, Portland; Kerrs, Oklahoma City; The Broadway, 
Los Angeles. Left, a sophisticate in sheer wool by Marbert, the ombre 

stripes in soft tones of gray or beige. In sizes 1 to 18, about $50. 



21 











Take a second look at a second color! Above, pure 
elegance in Charmeen gabardine, a Kay Nelson Original, 
at Neiman-Marcus, Dallas; Kay Nelson Inc., Lido Isle; 
Center, Palmdayl's turnabout jersey; right, woven ombre 
stripes, by Casual Time, about $30 at Neiman-Marcus, 
Dallas; Bullock's, Pasadena. Right, fireside jersey, about 
$25 at Petite Ville, Corona del Mar. By Madalyn Miller 



22 





Staunch advocates of the vogue for two colors 

and tone-on-tone . . . Joy Kingston uses velveteen on 

Miron woolen, taupe-with-brown or blue-with-black, 

about $65 at J. W. Robinson, Los Angeles; 

Carson's, Chicago; left, Suedecraft fashions 

supple suede in contrasting colors; about $150. 





Whatever ffie interplay of color or tone, the result is excitement! Opposite left, Adeline West two piece jersey, velveteen collar 
and weskit. Sizes 10 to 7 8, about $23 for all. Broadway, Los Angeles; White House, San Francisco; Vandever's, Tulsa. Right, 
Connie Foster uses subtle tone-on-tone in sheer wool bolero dress. Sizes 10 to 20, about $70 at J. W. Robinson, Los Angeles; 
H. Liebes & Co., San Francisco,- Leon Froshin, Atlanta. Above left, Louella Ballerina gives you shades of brown or gray, unpressed 
pleats. Sizes 70 to 16, about $40 at Pool & Patio Shop, Beverly Hills Hotel; Neiman-Marcus, Dallas. Right, California Girl's 
rayon gabardine, sweater (not shown), sizes 7 to 7 8, about $18: The Dayton Co., M/nneapo//S; ■!■ J- Haggarty's, Los Angeles. 



25 



IT'S SATIN 



Pink Lady, Stinger, Bluemoon . . . these 
ore the electrifying colors of Pat Premo's 
trio of shimmering slipper satin dresses, 
notable for the look of unclutter, the 
beautiful simplicity of line. This page-. 
Small round collar and ample cuffs, side 
fullness in skirt. About $40. Opposite 
left: Full skirt with sunburst pleats, the 
tailored top a series of reverse tucks. 
About $60. Opposite right: Flared skirt, 
the curving scroll of the portrait neck- 
line echoed in the wide belt. About $40. 
In sizes 10-18. All at Sakowitz Bros., 
Houston; Best's Apparel, Inc., Seattle. 




IRRESISTIBLE RUSTLE 
OF TAFFETA, FAILLE 








Whispering of fall . . . taffeta and faille! 

Above, Peggy Hunt's pure silk taffeta with j 

side swish, shadow lace bodice; sizes 10-16, I 

about $50 at /. Magnin, Los Angeles; Ranso- I 

I 

hoff's, San Francisco. Left, faille coachman \ 

I 

coat dress, Sergee of California. Sizes 10-20, 1 

obouf $25. For your afternoon in town. 



28 




You'll be in a whirl in ihis Celanese taffeta 



dress with its shadowing bands of chiffon: 



Francine Frocks. Sizes 9-18, about $30 at 



J. W. Robinson, Los Angeles. Right, Max 



Kopp's tissue faille . . . important side drape, 



lace contrast. Sizes 10-18, about $30. 



Please see page 50 for list of stores. 




FOR FALL: JERSEY, COTTON SUEDE! 




Opposite: Slim sheath of jersey with poke pockets 
and a neckline that can button high or plunge 
low. Western Fashions. Sizes 10-18. About $30. 
This page: Ken Sutherland's beautifully tai- 
lored skirt and topper, hand-finished dress in 




Egyptian cotton suede cloth. Sizes 10-20. 
Topper about $45; skirt about $ 1 7; dress about 
$40. All at Burnett's, New York; J. J. Hag- 
garty's, Los Angeles. Photographed at Leo 
Selditch showplace of modern furnishings. 



I 




t's a coat and suit year . . . basis of every good wardrobe, the suit . . . 
topping it off, the coat! This year California is bringing back two old favorites, 
the cardigan and the famous California wrap coat, then adds infinite variety 
to the picture from fabric to finish! Suits cling to the narrow lines, with 
shoulders most often squared off just a trifle (pads smaller and inset to main- 
tain a natural shoulder line). Coats, contrariwise, are predominantly soft . . . 
here the dolman vogue remains a high point of perfection. Deep armholed, 
voluminous and wrapped . . . this is really the spirit of '49; the steamer 
coat, the officer's coat, and the dressy coat with semi-fitted and swinging 
skirt also are favored. TEXTURE AND COtOR is important in both suit and 
coat lines . . . tweed being the favorite, imported and domestic. We found 
tone-on-tone in many of the finest lines, ombre striped fabrics especially 
woven. Flannels, sharkskins, menswear worsteds and gabardines still abound 
but the underline is tweed. Coats, too, make much of bold plaid tweeds, textured 
weaves of any description, and rich broadcloths are hits. Colors begin with 
deepest brown, reach a crescendo of excitement in a ruddy gold you should 
watch. Forest greens are good, there's a dash of burgundy . . . and the 
frequent appearance of teal, and a new winter navy. DETAILS are telling in 
the new season's suits and coats. Pockets galore, mammoth affairs or tiny 
slot contrivances . . . singly or in groups, latticed or cuffed or jewelled for 
high drama. These are the devices that keep eye at waist or hip length, for 
collars this year are minimized. They're usually tiny, throat-snugging, chin- 
jutting ... to give a neat silhouette from neckline to waist. Cardigan lines 
make a bid for attention. Buttons to match or contrast are good; belts are 
predominant in both suits and coats. VERSATILITY, in the final analysis, is the 
style story . . . for this is a season when each woman may find what she 
wants . . . in length, which is not arbitrarily defined in inches, but rather in 
becoming levels a trifle shorter than before . . . in style, with the shorter suit 
jacket for tiny women and a longer version for the taller ones; simplicity-plus 
for the fastidious, or a wealth of beading, trapunto and scalloped detail for 
the feminine types. AND FINALLY, combining the appeal of California suits and 
coats, we herald the three-piece ensemble . . . with the short-shortie, the 
new three-quarter length, and the longer-than-your-suit coat often teamed 
with a suit in contrasting fabric, or sometimes to match. Watch out for these 
travel trios . . . they're timely! 



With That California Air 



Gene Shelly glorifies the California wrap coat, in Forstmann Chulana; sj 
intricate diamond details on yoke and dolman sleeves. Two I 
views, this page and opposite. And his masterful suit in A 
Forstmann wool, side-pleated. Each about $195, at Joseph Magnin, 

San Francisco; Kaufman's, Pittsburgh; Lockhart's, St. Louis, .1 







Left: Your suit, in worsted menswear, 
by Gaines & Company. Sizes 7 0-? 8, 
about $60. Emporium, San Francisco; 
Lansburg Bros., Washington, D. C. 



T9*ws?-i ■ 



Jl 



Right: Choice of gabardine or shark-i 
skin suit, Manasse & Gersh. Sizes' 
70-78. Under $50. The Broadway* 
Los Angeles; Bon Marche, Seattle I 



Below: Rabbit hair wool cut like a 
monk's robe. Phillippe. About $90. 
Neiman-Marcus Co., Dallas. J. W. Rob- 
inson Co., Los Angeles. In sizes 7 0-18. 





Above.- A coat with perfectly wonderful lines by Smart Set. With 
self-belt, free and easy sleeves, shoulder-yoke flange. About $50. 
J. J. Haggarty, Los Angeles; Olds, Wortman & King, Portland. 




Above-. Phil of Hollywood suit, beautiful yoke inserts. In sizes 10-18. 
About $90. Bullock's, Los Angeles; Emporium, San Francisco. 
Photographs taken at the beautiful Franciscan Hotel, Hollywood. 



Right: Westcote of California's luxuri- 
ous fleece wrap-around. About $50. 
Harris & Frank, Los Angeles; Macy's 
San Francisco. Available in sizes 8-18. 




^ Jack L. Goldberg's "Career Girl" suit with two beautiful pockets de- 
signed in triple tiers. The skirt, perfectly straight and very slim. 
Sizes 10-40. About $70. Leslie James hat. Dicker & Dicker 
furs. Bullock's, Los Angeles; The Bon Marche, Seattle; City of Paris, San 
Francisco; Perkins Bros., Corpus Christi; L. Hart & Son, San Jose. 





Above: Country Club's long classic wrap and double- 



breasted shortie in gay woolen plaids by Hoffman. The 



shortie, sizes 10-16, about $59. The full-length 



wrap-around, sizes 8-18, about $79. Agnes Originals 



hats. Both at Rodder's Mademoiselle, Fresno. 



Left: Hand-appliqued leaf motif on Forstmann 



Milateen. Designed by Nathalie Nicoli. Sizes 10-20. 



About $110. W. C. Stripling Co., Fort Worth; 



John Gerber Co., Memphis. Hat by Agnes Originals. 



Emmet bag. Photographed at the fabulous home of 



Harry Stebbins, high in the Hollywood hills. 



The suit to 

key your 

wardrobe . . . 



Choose that first fall suit 

with care tor with appropriate 

change of blouse and accessories 

it can be a veritable "wardrobe." 

Perfect with furs, this 

menswear wool worsted with 

jaunty collar, flared cuffs . . . 

by Adele-California. 

Sizes 10-18, under $100 at The 

Bon Marche, Seattle; Neiman Marcus, 

Dallas; Bonwit Teller, New York. 









SIR JAMES 



MODE DE PARIS 



PALMDAYL 

Fash/on nods emphatic approval to the new importance of blouses . . . 
Koret of California presents jersey Trikabout to wear four ways; 

radiated tucking enhances Sir James pure silk crepe blouse; 
Mode de Paris blends tone on tone in faggoting,- "pigskin" cotton 
blouse by Hendan, classic cut; intriguing use of two tones, high 
neckline, by Palmdayl; Charm of Hollywood adds gold thread to applique. 



*■" '-''' •"■ rri i riyM ii 




The 99-room Carolands Mansion surveys hundreds of woodland acres, once part of its exclusive estate now being subdivided for exclusive community. 






YOUR HOME IS YOUR CASTLE AT 




Angus McSweeney's modem "castle" on Carolands estates; butterfly roof 
to let in sunshine. Below, the irregularly shaped pool by Landon Blue 
Lake Swimming Pool Co., landscaping by Eckbro, Royston & Williams. 




When the Carolands mansion was finished shortly I 
before the first World War, it towered four stories high, 
contained 99 rooms, and was surrounded by 550 acres of 
rolling tree-studded hills. Such little niceties as gold 
bathroom fixtures, bathtubs hewn out of solid marble, 
silk-lined walls, and a huge, circular, mirror-encased 
dressing room added to the decor of this American-born 
castle. And nearly every foot of the surrounding area 
was landscaped by an imported planner — 30,000 trees | 
and acres of terraces were included in the scheme. 

Located in the ultra-exclusive residential area of Hills- i 
borough, 18 miles down the peninsula from San Fran- 
cisco, the Carolands, though impressive, rubs boundaries 
with other luxurious estates. It has been said that no 
man could give a Hillsborough address unless he made 
at least $50,000 a year. 

But last year, the Carolands estate was subdivided, 
and lots are now obtainable from a half acre up. T. I. 
Moseley, president of the Carolands Company estimates 
that a $10,000-a-year-man can now buy and build and 
enjoy what nature and money have joined to create. 

Despite the fact that more people are now moving to 
Hillsborough, the quiet, rural, countryside atmosphere 
is retained. Restrictions exclude highways, telephone 
poles and multiple dwellings. And a more practical 
restriction is the exclusion of city taxes. 

Recently a nine-room contemporary castle was com-'c 
pleted on a neat half-acre of the old Carolands estate. i 
Designed by Angus McSweeney, San Francisco architect, » 
it is indeed McSweeney's castle. 

Marble, gold and crystal doo-dads look singularly 
unimportant when compared to the expansive "glass 
walls" of this modern one-story structure which brings 
the timeless beauty of the gardens and surrounding 
countryside right into the rooms. 

Called the Horizon House, no expense has been spared 
in making it the ultimate in convenient and pleasanl 
living. Total cost, including the- lot, the radiant heated' 
swimming pool, landscaping (by Eckbro, Royston anc 



40 




lAROLANDS 



BY MAGGIE PAULSON 



Williams), orchid greenhouse is estimated at $75,000. 

The Horizon House is built roughly in a U shape with 
every important room looking out through huge windows 
onto the patio and pool. Even the kitchen is arranged 
in such a manner that meals can be served from it to 
the patio as easily as to the dining room. 

But despite the openness of the house, privacy is main- 
tained through careful planning. A driveway and a 
2500 square foot parking area that curves up to the 
front door is blocked from living room view by a high 
stake fence that also doubles as a back-drop for an 
intimate little garden on the living room side. 

Although the house is entirely radiant heated, a 
maximum of natural heat and light is achieved through 
the use of butterfly roofs, which slant up on the hill 
|and pool side to catch as much sunshine as possible. 

The floors of the Horizon House are all covered in 
an attractive asphalt tile, with the exception of the 
Ikitchen. which is floored in rubber tiling. Walls are 
vermiculite plaster. Louvres over the windows in every 
'room provide controlled ventilation. 

Much is done with lighting, as troughs or lowered 
iceilings, jutting from the higher slanted ceilings emit 
Isoft, indirect illumination. Built-in spots cast specific 
'light on doorways and other strategic points. Even the 
i swimming pool is equipped with special lighting — of 
(the under water type. 

Though the Horizon House runs far beyond a $10,000- 
la-year-man's budget, it points up numerous ideas for 
pleasant indoor-outdoor living that can be incorporated 
singly or in a less expensive way into a more modest 
dwelling. And more specifically, it demonstrates the 
kind of living that can be enjoyed in the Carolands, for 
half acre sites can be acquired there, complete with trees, 
view and privacy, for about $4500. And though tight 
restrictions are maintained to preserve the rural atmos- 
phere of the wooded acres, restrictions on minimum 
building costs have been completely lifted. Only re- 
quirement is an aesthetic one — a house in good taste. 



_ 




Comprehensive plan for living by architect McSweeney. 
Master bedroom, decorating and furniture by Frank Newman. 
Modern fireplace, six and a half feet long; exotic planting. 
Living room with viewful window; poolside. Decor by Newman. 
General Electric kitchen with time-and-money-saving devices. 




w< 



ebster says an aspic is a "savory meat jelly used to 
mold meat, fish, and vegetables." An old cook book says to 
make it with "different sortes of fleshe according to your 
fancy." In California our fancy, at least in warm weather, turns 
to cool aspic made from all the foods that are so Californian. 
We make aspics rich with meat, fish, or fowl. We give them 
flavor with our own lemons, herbs, and wine. In this savory 
jelly we embed all manner of California delicacies: avocado 
rings, artichoke bottoms, pink crescents of shrimp, fat but- 
tons of mushrooms, creamy wedges of Jack cheese. We gar- 
nish these with California olives and almonds, wafers of 
lemon and ribbons of pimiento. We love our aspics and we 
know how to make them — not with sweetened, fruit-flavored 
gelatine mixes, but with plain gelatine, enriched and seasoned 
and spiced "according to our fancy." 

There is nothing new about gelatines. As long as meat 
and bones have been cooked into a stock rich enough to stand, 
when cooled, alone, gelatines have been the favorites of cooks. 
Taillevant, who was cook to Charles V, made "la gelatine 
sauce" for pike, and much earlier, at the end of the 14th 
Century, "galantines" were mentioned in old manuscripts. 
There is reason to believe, however, that they were something 
quite different then — a dish seasoned with galyngale, which 
was a kind of ginger. Be that as it may, and it may not be for 
all the proof anyone has, galantines today are often mis- 
named. Actually the dish is an elaborate one of boned meat 
or fowl or fish, stuffed with forcemeat, poached for long 
hours in rich stock, pressed and garnished with truffles, pis- 
tachio nuts, or even with cock's combs if they are at hand, 
then glazed, usually with an aspic. All this is a task for a 
master chef, such as one M. Dumas, who, in the 1870's spe- 
cialized in galantines and who "made romance of a breast 
of turkey, put wit into a pistachio, and endued a truffle with 
the soul of poetry." In California we settle happily for these 
lesser but still worthy creations. 




California 



TARRAGON EGGS IN ASPIC 
Make an aspic in the usual manner by softening one en- 
velope of plain gelatine in a quarter-cup of cold water. Use 
a pyrex measuring cup so that you can put it, cup and all, 
into a sauce pan of boiling water, allowing the water to 
come half way up the outside of the cup. When the gelatine 
is clear and melted it is ready to add to one and three-quarters 
cups of rich, well-seasoned stock, in this case chicken which 
has been seasoned with a teaspoon of dried tarragon orl 
better yet, tarragon seasoning powder which contains mono- 
sodium glutamate. The stock may be either hot or cold, if 
the latter it will take less time to set. Make sure that the 
aspic has plenty of salt. Set this mixture in the refrigerator 
to become partially set. In the meantime, hard poach six 
very fresh eggs, using either a poacher or muffin rings so 
that they will be symmetrical. Cool these in cold water. When 
the gelatine is semi-jellied, pour a tablespoon in each of six 
round molds, and on top of this cross leaves of tarragon 
in a tit-tat-toe design. Return to the refrigerator to set, then 
turn the eggs, top side down, into the molds and fill with 
the remaining aspic. When set, unmold on individual plates 
and garnish with water cress that has been dusted with 
paprika. Pipe a little mayonnaise around each mold. This is 
a superb dish for a first course at dinner or as a main course 
at lunch, and a platter full of these aspic eggs would be 
delightful at a summer buffet supper. 

A tomato aspic, which, I suppose, isn't actually an aspic 
according to Webster, is one of the most savory late summer 
dishes. It's colorful, flavorful, and low in calories, and it is 
as versatile as an aspic can be. Break it up and serve it as a 
jellied soup, serve it as a salad, or serve it at a buffet. 
Use it as a base, too, for fish or vegetables or meat. Here 
is an easy way to make it, using canned tomato sauce. 
TOMATO ASPIC TALMADGE 
Soak an envelope of gelatine in a quarter-cup of cold water 
and dissolve over hot water as above. Add one 8-ounce can 
of tomato sauce, one cup of water, a quarter-teaspoon of 
salt, and one teaspoon of lemon juice or vinegar, preferably 
basil flavored. If you wish, you may also add a teaspoon 
of sugar. Turn into a mold that has been rinsed with cold 
water and allow to set. This makes a little over a pint. Double 
it for larger molds. This may be varied in innumerable ways. 
One is to half fill the mold, allow it to set, spread with a 
quarter-inch of cream cheese that has been creamed with an- 
chovy paste (one teaspoon to a package), then filled with the 
remaining aspic. Another way is to fill with wedges of avocado 
or split shrimps or diced cucumbers and green onions. This 
is done by allowing the jelly to become half set, then pour- 
ing a half-inch into the mold, dipping whatever you are 
using in more of it and placing some symmetrically on the 
bottom, "glueing" the rest to the sides and allowing that to 
set before filling the mold. Hard boiled egg slices, sliced 
stuffed olives, and other garnishes may be arranged in the 



by helen evans brown 



Cooks 




COOL SAVORY ASPICS PERFECT FOR SEPTEMBER APPETITES 



same way. Another way with aspic is to pour it into the mold 
and allow it to set completely, then scoop out the middle 
leaving a uniform layer of aspic on the sides and bottom. 
This middle part is beaten smooth and mixed with left-over 
cold fish or any vegetable, then returned to the hole in the 
mold. When set and cut, it is a pretty sight. 

A more unusual tomato aspic, and one that has more food 
value, is 

TOMATO MOUSSE 
Make the tomato aspic as in the recipe above, but cut the 
water to three-quarters of a cup. When it is partially set, 
fold into it three-quarters of a cup of cream that has been 
whipped not quite stiff. Pour into molds and allow to set. 
This is also wonderful as a jellied soup — break it lightly 
with a fork and serve in glass soup cups, garnished with 
chopped chives. It's good too, in a ring mold, the center 
filled with chopped cucumbers and green onions, dressed with 
a tart French dressing. 

As many of you have discovered by now, I have a weakness 
for sour cream and for mushrooms, particularly when they are 
combined. I tried them with gelatine and was delighted 
with the result. 

MUSHROOM AND SOUR CREAM ASPIC 
Clean a pound of mushrooms and remove stems. Cook the 
stems in a cup of rich stock, either beef or chicken, for ten 
minutes, then drain, pressing all the juice from the stems 
and discarding them. Add the mushroom caps to the stock, 
either whole or sliced, and also add a teaspoon of lemon juice. 

! Simmer gently for ten minutes if sliced, fifteen if whole. 

! Remove mushrooms and reserve. To the stock add enough 

: water to again make a cup, and an envelope of gelatine that 
has been softened in cold water and melted, as above. Divide 

(this mixture in half. To one half add another half cup 
of seasoned stock, pour in the mold, and allow to set. To 
the other half add a cup of sour cream and a quarter-teaspoon 
of salt. When the mushroom aspic has set, arrange the mush- 
rooms on it, and add the other mixture. (This can be even 
more glamorous if you stuff the mushroom caps with deviled 
Smithfield ham!) Set and unmold. This you'll like! 
Another aspic that I've found to be delghtful is 

SOUR CREAM ASPIC 
Soak the inevitable envelope of plain gelatine in a quarter- 
cup of cold water, then melt as above. To this add one cup 
of well-seasoned stock, two cups of thick sour cream, and 
one-half teaspoon of salt. Mold and garnish as desired — 
pickled beets are good with it, and so are cucumbers and/or 
radishes. 

Another aspic that is colorful and good is quickly made 
from canned beets. Use the diced ones or the tiny whole baby 
ones. For each cup and three-quarters of juice add two table- 
spoons of tarragon vinegar, and an envelope of gelatine 
that has been softened in a quarter-cup of cold water and 
melted. As in the other recipes, arrange the beets when 



a layer of the gelatine has set in the mold, then pour on 
the remainder which is, by now, partially set. Serve this 
with sour cream that has been seasoned with whole caraway 
seeds and salt. 

Still another aspic that is hearty enough for a meal is 
FISH ASPIC, SONOMA 

Poach a pound of filet of sole in three cups of water and 
one of white wine, to which a sliced onion, a carrot, a half 
bay leaf, and a teaspoon of tarragon have been added. When 
the fish loses its transparent look, remove carefully and 
set aside. Add fish bones or trimmings to the stock and 
cook gently for half an hour. Strain, put on to boil again, 
add two raw egg whites, stir for two minutes, then strain 
through cheese cloth. Taste for seasoning, and add salt, lemon 
juice and tarragon seasoning powder to season highly. Measure 
out three and a half cups of stock and add two envelopes 
of gelatine that has been softened in l/o cup of water, and 
melted. Pour a layer of this in a fish mold, and allow to set. 
Then arrange the thinnest possible slices of lemon and cucum- 
ber (so thin you can see through them, that is) in an 
overlapping row down the entire length of the mold and on 
the sides. (Put a slice of stuffed olive where the eye is, 
if you want to be realistic!) Pour on a very little aspic and 
allow to set, then place the poached fish on top and fill up 
with the remaining mixture. Serve this with mayonnaise to 
which chopped cucumber has been added. 

An aspic like this fish one may be made with chicken, 
veal, tongue, or beef, substituting their own stock for the 
fish stock, and garnishing in a tasteful manner. An aspic, 
when made well, is delicious eating. 

There's no better way to use that last bit of ham that's left 
on the bone than by making 

HAM AND EGG ASPIC 

Soften an envelope of gelatine in a quarter-cup of cold 
water and melt. Add one and a half cups of stock or bouillon. 
When partially congealed, add one cup of chopped ham, one 
quarter-cup of finely sliced celery, a half cup of mayonnaise, 
and a half-cup of chopped hard boiled egg. Pour in a fancy 
mold and allow to set. Then turn out on a bed of water 
cress. Serve with more mayonnaise. 

As Californian as an avocado is this 
AVOCADO MOUSSE 

Soak an envelope of gelatine in a quarter-cup of cold water 
and dissolve over boiling water. Cool, add four cups of 
pureed avocado, three-fourths of a cup of mayonnaise, one 
tablespoon of lemon juice, one tablespoon of grated onion, 
two teaspoons of salt, a little fresh pepper, and a cup of 
rich chicken stock. Pour into a large mold to set. Serve 
with mayonnaise that has been flavored with chili powder. 

You take it from there, using any one of these basic recipes, 
and give them your own touch of originality. And don't forget 
to make it so beautiful to look upon that even the most jaded 
appetite will find it irresistible. An aspic should be a pretty 
dish to set before your guests. 



For your copy of "California Cooks," send $1.00 to THE CALIFORNIAN, 1020 So. Main St., Los Angeles 15, California. 



Mrs. C. Boettingen Rear Admiral Kellogg 




Alfred Hottes Mrs. Henry M. Rollins 




LA J O L L A: 



BY LUCILE L. HUNTINGTON 

If you have motored South on the Pacific Coast road to 
San Diego, you may have seen La Jolla, California — but 
chances are you didn't. La Jolla (pronounced La Hoy-yah) 
prefers it that way. Unless you are madly in love with 
scrambling over a rough mountain, you reach La Jolla by one 
of two ways: as you go towards San Diego you round a bluff, 
go up a hill around Torrey Pines Park, come to La Jolla 
junction, with a Marine camp to your left, and there is the 
La Jolla road. You may take it through a canyon, or along 
steep bluffs and by famous Scripps Institute of Oceanography. 

The other way, still harder to find, is enroute from San 
Diego on highway 101, and before you turn into Rose Canyon. 
The sign points you to La Jolla on your left. 

Suppose you do get into La Jolla and drive through. You 
will see six miles of water front jutting out into the ocean 
like a hairpin, with eight hundred and twenty-two foot high 
Mount Soledad filling the center. You may tell your friends 
you have seen lovely La Jolla, "the jewel of the Pacific," with 
its oh so beautiful homes — when actually you haven't. 

La Jolla, that is the real La Jolla, makes little bid for 
passing pleasure seekers. The real La Jolla is the WAY OF 
LIVING. 

The old La Jollans, those who have owned their homes 
since before the first World War, you can always be sure 
are against every new change. Whatever the change, they're 
agin' it. 

Take Al Iller who owns Iller's Department Store, (and a 
branch in Pacific Beach ! ) . He's been active in La Jolla for 
years, taking part in the deep water swim in his early days 
and in local theatricals. When transportation for scenery is 
needed by The La Jolla Players, nobody thinks anything of 
borrowing the Iller station wagon, the delivery of packages: 
to be carried on in whatever way can be devised! And if I 
there are tickets to be sold for a civic cause, Iller's of coursed 
is headquarters, with the selling of merchandise as just in-" J 
cidental. 

Since Mr. Iller's financial growth is closely tied up with I 
the growth of La Jolla, one might expect him to spark wannlyil 
at the mention of the fact that in the last seven years La Jolla 
has more than doubled its population. He only shakes his 
head and says he hopes La Jolla keeps going in the "right | 
direction," does not get "too beachy," "too commercial," "too 
merry-go-roundish." 

Way back when the first La Jollans were viewing with I 
alarm the growth of the locality, Miss Ellen Scripps put a 
pink sidewalk in front of her place, and a gas light out in: I 
front. Sibley Sellew, now President of the locally owned La, 



The Bishop's School 



A charmingly landscaped La Jolla home., 



Above: These majestic palm trees 
are one of the outstanding land- 
marks of beautiful La Jolla. 




1 



EWEL OF THE PACIFIC 



Jolla Federal Savings and Loan Association, remembers that 
he and his friends thought the idea wonderful, for the pink 
sidewalk was the only good place in town for roller skating. 
But the town shook its collective head dolefully. At that 
time people went out at night carrying "La Jolla Lanterns," 
tall, iron lanterns with candles in them. That was plenty 
good enough for everybody. Besides, good citizens should be 
in bed at night and not running the streets. 

The La Jolla police still maintain that thought, according 
to the able young composer, John Wesnay Ward, whose Ode 
to Aphrodite was recently received with enthusiasm when 
introduced by the Sinfonietta Orchestra of San Diego. Re- 
cently, when John Ward could not get a composition to click, 
he rousted up his studio-mate, Paul, and they started for a 
walk at one in the morning. A few blocks down Girard the 

! (police prowl car drove up and stopped them. They had to 
(identify themselves, and explain why they were out of their 
good warm beds at such an unreasonable hour. Even when 
convinced of the identity of La Jolla's young musician- 
composer, the police reluctantly drove off with a puzzled 

lllook. La Jollans just don't do such things. 

In 1908, when the Cabrillo Hotel was built and wired for 
electricity, the La Jollans expressed disapproval of "buying 
light in a bottle." In 1909, however, electricity was installed, 
and all La Jollan homes, notably that of former Chrysler 
Engineer, Hughes, not only enjoyed electric lights, but an 
amazing number of modern electrical conveniences, to the 
delight of the local hardware dealers and the utility company. 

Although the La Jolla police force is not excessively large, 
it seems all over La Jolla at once — and no wonder, for its 
prowl cars each cover 360 miles a day. Police Captain H. 
Bruce Weston points with pride to the lack of crime, or even 
small law infractions in La Jolla. He comes from a family 
of five brothers, all of them ministers excepting him, and he 
expresses his missionary zeal by talking to clubs and churches 
on the evils of liquor. Traffic, he claims, is their biggest 
"headache," and that due mainly to visitors. 

What rejoices the captain does not rejoice the young men 

on his force, who complain bitterly that there has been no 

I murder in La Jolla since 1936! Their most exciting duty is 

I hunting lost children, and as the La Jolla children are un- 

! usually precocious, they are constantly on the lookout for 

very young men who have taken to the open road. 

The Fire Department, housed in spotlessly clean quarters 
that are scrubbed every day, has a complaint similar to that 
of the young police. There aren't any big fires and not likely 
to be any; so they expend their energy keeping everything in 



readiness and hurrying to investigate the slightest suspicion 
of a fire. Captain Milton Hall states that there has been no 
important fire worthy of the name since the Wind and Sea 
Hotel burned in 1943. 

The peaceful and law abiding activities of La Jollans make 
plenty of work for the post office. According to Postmaster 
Nathan L. Rannells, forty years a La Jollan, the yearly stamp 
sale for the post office is $140,000, a high for 16,000 popu- 
lation. 

When Mr. Rannells came to La Jolla the postoffice was in 
the back of the one store in town. Today it has its own 
beautiful building. Although La Jolla is not a separate town, 
but part of San Diego, in the postoffice you find a mail slot 
marked for La Jolla mail, and another slot for "out of town 
mail," which includes San Diego. 

La Jolla has often toyed with the idea of separating itself 
from San Diego, but the cost would be tremendous. La Jolla 
would have to pay its share of the San Diego bonded indebted- 
ness, and also install its own sewage system and water works, 
just for the sake of having a mayor and town council of its 
own. 

During the last war La Jolla became concerned over plans 
for building a two story, cheap, Navy housing in the Bird 
Rock section along the ocean. After sufficient protests, this 
was abandoned, and La Jolla tightened its city planning 
organization. Today the City Planning Council, under the 
leadership of Armin Richter, prominent interior decorator, 
is an important community force. Every section of La Jolla 
is represented on it: Hillside, Country Club Heights, Muir- 
lands on Mount Soledad, Hermosa, flermosa Terrace, Bird 
Rock, and La Jolla Shores, the Beach Club locality. Although 
the Council has no legal powers, it maintains the architectural 
beauty of La Jolla with a firm hand. Buildings must be in 
harmony with the exact locality where they are to be placed. 
Plans for building in La Jolla are submitted to the La Jolla 
Planning Council before going to San Diego for final, legal 
approval ; and never are approved in San Diego unless they 
carry the La Jolla stamp with the formal signature of Fred 
K. Schutte, Manager of the La Jolla Chamber of Commerce. 

Although no factory chimneys belch soot within the confines 
of La Jolla (nor ever will), there is considerable business 
activity to serve the residents. At Morgan-Thornton, Tweeds 
and Weeds, and elsewhere may be found some of the loveliest 
fabrics produced in this country or overseas. At Cole's of La 
Jolla, Desmonds, and elsewhere may be found lovely imported 
chinaware and charming things for the home. Sessions fur- 
nishes gardens with completeness. Sandersons has late, high- 



A life class at the Art Academy. 



The popular and well-attended Art Center. Post office, yearly stamp sale $140,000. 






ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL SEASIDE RESORTS ON THE WEST COAST, LA JOLLA 
IS ALSO AN IMPORTANT CULTURAL CENTER WITH ITS ENTHUSIASTIC SUPPORT 
OF THE ARTS . . . WITH ITS BELIEF THAT LIFE MEANS MORE THAN BEACHCOMBING 



Gen. Holland Smith. Postmaster Rannells 



style fashions. Miss Whitsitt at the Green Dragon Colony 
has a famous hat shop which caters to patrons all over the 
United States. Dutch Smith. Olympic Diving Champion, runs 
La Jolla's only exclusive Men's Shop. 

Part of La Jolla's sophisticated business activities are at The 
Green Dragon Colony. Some fifty years ago Miss Anna Held, 
(not she of the stage I built a small home on the bluffs north 
of the main part of La Jolla. She started with a hearth, and 
with her own hands gathered rocks for her fireplace. 

In those days none of the houses in La Jolla were numbered, 
but were known by their picturesque names. Miss Held called 
her home The Green Dragon. Miss Held had traveled widely, 
and had many notable friends who eventually came visiting. 
To accommodate an ever growing "family," including Ellen 
Terry. Madame Helena Modjeska and her husband, Count 
Bozenta, Godowsky, Charles Wakefield Cadman, the Green 
Dragon grew by artistic and informal additions. 

The Green Dragon Colony is now a tiny town within itself, 
the property in the hands of Jack Mosher, and is noted 
for an important restaurant — the Holiday House. 

A stranger trotting about La Jolla would, without realizing 
it, rub elbows with many millionaire families and famous 
persons. La Jollans dress informally, quietly, and with the 
dignified conservatism of New 7 England school teachers. Ex- 
tremes, even in beach and play clothes, are not smiled upon 
in La Jolla. As for jewels, many La Jollans lock up their 
more important jewels and wear good imitations. 

Fifty millionares call La Jolla "home," this according to 
a report not by the Chamber of Commerce, which might 
likely suppress the fact lest it attract some undesirables, but 
by a famous Wall Street investment house. Twelve La Jollans, 
including Sibley Sellew, who is in Who's Who in Commerce 
and Industry, are "Who's Whoers." 

The navy is especially well represented by officers, both 
active and retired, with the army a close second. A glance 
through the La Jolla register discloses many famous names, 
among them; Rear Admiral Wm. Chambers, M.C. U.S.N. 
retired; Col. Wm. H. Mitchell; Rear Admiral B. C. Allen and 
Commander Allen, Jr.; General Holland M. Smith whose new 
book. "Coral and Brass." is disturbing the Navy no end; Rear 
Admiral retired Martin K. Metcalf who was in charge of all 
convoy of United States troops to Europe during World War 
II. Admiral Metcalf and General Smith are prominent La 
Jolla Kiwanians. 

Represented, too. are influential families who gained their 
fortunes in Sears Roebuck. General Electric, the oil, cattle, 
automotive, and other big industries: Mr. and Mrs. John F. 
Considine ; the Bradley Geists who are in the New York Blue 
Book; Hugh Bailie. President of United Press; the Ord Pres- 
tons, both senior and junior; Mrs. Sybil H. Darlington; 
Josephine G. Seaman, educator and ex-president of the Feder- 
ation of Women's Clubs; Augustus Searle, the noted philan- 
thropist; the Child family of Yellowstone Park fame; the 
Rollinses of Des Moines hosiery; Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Boettingen. noted for their parties. 

Mrs. I. M. Hopkins, in 1924 built and furnished the Casa 
de Manana, and with absolutely no previous business ex- 
perience ran the Casa for years in the informal, gracious 
manner of a big family mansion, famous throughout the 
world. Mrs. Hopkins has sold the Casa and is living "quietly" 



while carrying on the Chairmanship of the La Jolla group of 
the Womens' Auxiliary of the Los Angeles Philharmonic 
Association, membership on the Women's Committee of the 
Musical Arts Society, on the Board of The Art Center, former 
President of the La Jolla Conservation Society, former Wo- 
men's Club President, and President of the Social Service 
League and ardently promoting its new plan for a grouping 
of resident homes for elderly people. 

Civic concern has been a mark of La Jollans starting way 
back in the golden days when Miss Ellen Scripps shared her 
fortune with numerous civic projects. The beautiful Women's 
Club building is but one of the many monuments to the 
generosity of Miss Scripps. When she broke her hip in 1922, 
and was confined to the local sanitarium, she realized that 
La Jolla needed a suitable hospital. Two years later the 
Scripps Memorial Hospital in memory of Miss Annie Scripps, 
opened its doors. A year later came the Scripps Metabolic 
Clinic, followed by the Nurses Home. 

The Samuel T. Gillespie Welfare Cottage, both day and 
resident, under the presidency of Mrs. Ira B. Riford. offers 
understanding shelter for twenty-two children that need this 
type of service. The War Memorial Building, which cost the 
United States Government $65,000 as a U.S.O., and was bought 
by La Jolla for $35,000, is a civic center where public classes 
are offered for adults and where teen age groups may gather 
and romp. 

La Jollans support ten churches. The organ in the Christian 
Science Church was given by Augustus Searle. At the Epis- 
copal Church, St. James by the Sea, is a magnificent organ 
played by the noted composer and writer, Charles Marsh. At 
Mary, Star of the Sea, Father Joseph V. Clarkin has built up 
within recent years a rectory and Stella Maris Academy, now 
crowded to capacity. Over the door of his Spanish type church 
is a beautifully painted "true fresco" by the Mexican painter, 
Alfredo Ramos Martinez. 

An unusual country club type of residence is The Beach 
and Tennis Club, under the management of William Bond. 
Here are delightful though expensive resident apartments, 
and the advantages of a big, turquoise, glass-enclosed, gas- 
heated pool, as well as open ocean swimming. 

Years ago, in the Beach Club locality, "Long Beach," which 
is in the depression between Alligator Head and the Scripps 
Institute of Oceanography, the tribe of La Jolla Indians would 
come each year to camp and fish. Some say La Jolla gained 
its name from the Indians whose word for hole (the Caves) 
sounded close to Jolla. Indian heads and bits of Indian pottery 
may still be found. Smugglers also once used this beach, often 
in broad daylight. Today William S. Kellogg owns much of 
this land and is promoting a Beach Club real estate project. 

Many interesting folks go to make up La Jolla. There is 
wealthy John Zenos for one. Every month, regularly, a local 
jeweler chugs up to Muirlands Drive, enters the always un- 
locked door of John Zenos's big home, and winds and services 
the many clocks which are one of his hobbies. John Zenos 
made a fortune buying El Centro Valley land, some of it as 
low as one dollar an acre. Many prominent writers, too, have 
chosen this locale. Representative are Howard S. Randolph, 
historian; Martha Munk, novelist; and Alfred Hottes, former 
garden editor. 



46 




A La Jolla cultural center, School of Arts and Crafts. La Jolla bank, landscaped with palm trees 



Majestic Catholic Church 




of the many captivating and unforgettable La Jolla coves. A quaint and charming gift shop. 



Ride the waves! 



Yes, many movie people come. Joan Blondell had a cottage 
:or years, and yearly Bing Crosby has come to the Casa around 
racing season. There is one movie person to whom all La 
folia homes are open — Gregory Peck. But then Gregory is a 
La Jollan. His father organized the first La Jolla basketball 
:eam, and Gregory grew up in town. Each year he comes 
'back home" to take part in and direct the summer theatricals, 
award cups to winners of the rough water swim, and perform 
other civic duties. 

The fine arts are very important to La Jollans, and accord- 
ingly are lavishly supported. The Art Center in La Jolla, with 
Freda Leslie Klapp as curator, regularly holds scheduled art 
exhibits that represent the best in American art. Saturdays 
an unusual project under Pauline DeVol Rae develops art 
appreciation and talent in children from eight years and up. 
Soon a small recently aquired house adjacent to the Art Center 
Building, will be devoted exclusively to the Children's Art 
Center. 

Musically La Jolla is fast outgrowing its auditorium facili- 
ties, and progressive La Jollans are giving thought to a really 
fine auditorium. February of this year, at the High School 
Auditorium marked the start of the La Jolla Community Con- 
cert Association's Columbia Concert Series. Paul D. Spillane, 
jpresident, was for many years manager of the Boston Sym- 
phony. 

Theatricals are well supported in La Jolla. The La Jolla 
iPlayers, Inc. attract the envy of professional producers. The 
[directors, Albert and Bertha Johnson, are noted for their voice 
training. 

In summer The Actors Company takes over the High School 



Auditorium, which is then called the Playhouse. This com- 
pany consists of Gregory Peck, Dorothy McGuire, Mel Ferrer, 
Joseph Cotton, and Jennifer Jones who put on new plays or 
successful Broadway hits. Other organizations and individuals 
within the La Jolla group are noted for their theatrical con- 
tributions, notably Dorothy Haven, a La Jolla Player mem- 
ber, in charge of the Junior Players, and also much in demand 
for her own, one-woman shows. 

Every town has a personality all its own, and La Jolla's 
is distinctly feminine. Some of the top business and profes- 
sional activities are in the hands of women. Frances S. Cum- 
mings is head mistress of the famous Bishop's School which 
educates young girls from leading families all over the world. 

Mrs. J. P. Balmer has organized and developed the quite 
sizeable and well equipped Balmer School for Little Chil- 
dren. Hilda C. Barrington, head of her large Realtor or- 
ganization, has ably promoted some of the big real estate 
transactions in the locality. Dr. Elizabeth A. Pelsma, osteo- 
path, holds important offices in Soroptimist, the Business and 
Professional Women, V.F.W. Auxiliary, Eastern Star, Hillside 
Hospital. Dr. Lillian Noble was one of the first women doc- 
tors in the San Diego region. Mrs. Brodie Jones was organizer 
and first president of Optimisses. 

Yes, La Jolla is growing, in spite of time and change, it 
still remains la jolla. 

Photographs released through the courtesy of the Union Title 
Insurance and Trust Company Historical Association, the La 
Jolla Light, Hundley Photo by Schneider, Edward Sievers. 
Pacific Camera Stores. 



47 



FOLIAGE 



COOL AND 



REFRESHING 



FOR FALL 




BY LAURA E. McVAY 



VV hile the warm days are still with us, an all foliage 
arrangement is cool and refreshing. Between seasons when 
the flowers are scarce, if we will become aware of over- 
looked shrubs and vines in our gardens, a whole new field 
of arrangement material will open up. 

When bright and conspicuous flowers grace the living 
room, foliage takes second place and often is used just to 
fill in. But when flowers are omitted, foliage takes on a 
new meaning. Various colors of green, decorative leaf 
patterns, graceful veins and velvety textures all become the 
objects of interest. If you have never tried using just foliage 
you have a pleasant experience ahead of you. 

In combining green material, select different shades of 
green and contrasting sizes and shapes. If you will take 
time to slightly oil the leaves, lights and shadows will be 
accentuated and the arrangement will become more gay 
and dramatic at night. 

The phrase "studied carelessness" could be applied to 
a bouquet of foliage. So often lemon leaves bought from 



the florist are thrust into a tall vase without varying the 
length of the stems or giving any thought to the curving 
stems. The result is just a cluttered mass of leaves instead 
of a pattern of graceful stems, thoughtfully placed leaves. 

There are two styles of foliage arrangements, one with 
emphasis on rhythm and line, and the other on balance 
and form. For both types a flat container and a large spike 
frog are most satisfactory. Pittosporum with its compact 
rosettes makes ideal material for a simple "line" arrange- 
ment. If you prefer a formal design for a modern home, se- 
lect a large leaf for a background and place other leaf forms 
symmetrically on either side. Use this against a wall for it 
is difficult to make both sides attractive, (see illustration) 

Test foliage overnight in water to be sure it will hold up, 
before making your arrangement. The following foliage 
will last a long while: pittosporum, clivia, aurelia, aspi- 
distra, iris, saxifrage, watsonia, calla lily, and any type of 
grasses. 

Go into your garden with an eye only for foliage and 
discover new beauty! 



48 




FING-O-TIP 4SOM TOWEL HOLDER 

. . . the handiest household utensil, draping 
towels neatly while enhancing the appear- 
ance of the room. 4 live rubber grippers, set 
in baked enamel metal base. A one-hand 
operation for placing towels, stockings, 
aprons, cloths securely and releasing them 
readily at your "fingertip." Eliminates pick- 
ing up fallen towels. For use everywhere — 
kitchen, bath, workroom, office, photo-dark 
room, trailer, or boat. Harmonizing colors 
of red, yellow, green, or blue. Gift-boxed with 
instructions. Complete $1.00. A. J. Ganz Co., 
Dept. TC-9, 112 N. Hayworth, Hollywood 
36, Calif. 

GRANULAR CLEANSER ... a normal, 
gradual, effective "skin peel" at home. Grad- 
ually sluffs off old dead cells. This friction 
stimulates circulation, encourages growth of 
new cells. Contains honey, almond and bar- 
ley meal, plus ingredients which bleach and 
clarify skin. The pulling effect of the honey 
while scouring loosens blackheads and white- 
heads, and scrubbing effect removes. Also 
wonderful for hands. 2-ounce jars (federal 
tax included) $1.50; 4-ounce jars, $2.40. Add 
2y 2 % sales tax in Calif., 3 l / 2 % in Los An- 
geles. From DermaCulture, 1318 Fourth Ave- 
nue, Los Angeles 6, Calif. 

NEW CHEFSAW MEAT SAVER . . . 

a hundred uses for this handy, all-purpose, 
aluminum kitchen saw. Buy meat at quan- 
tity prices — cut in kitchen to serving portions 
desired. Hardened steel saw blade severs 
meat bones and joints smoothly and quickly. 
Grooved handle tenderizes tough cuts. Ideal 
in preparing frozen foods. Useful in dressing 
game and fish "on the spot." Cuts steel and 
brass. Regular price, $1.50. Introductory 
offer $1.00 postpaid. Limit two to a customer. 
Extra blades 3 for 40c. No C.O.D.'s. Money 
back guarantee. The Margorita shop, 1018 
IS. Main, Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

•SAVES CLEANING RILLS . . . Protex-A- 
Dress Dressing Mask slips over your head 
,like a hood. Wear it while slipping your 
■dress on and off . . . gives complete protec- 
'tion from rouge, powder, lipstick, or perspira- 
tion stains. Protex-A-Dress will quickly pay 
for itself in reduced cleaning bills. Made of 
import net with solid protection for lips. 
Snug-fitting, cool, easily washable. Send for 
yours today . . . only $1.00 postpaid. The 
Hawleys, Kerrville, Texas. 

SPATTER SHIELD . . . here's a wonderful 
innovation for cooking pleasure. An enter- 
prising housewife designed this Spatter Shield 
to keep her stove and walls clean by shielding 
them from cooking grease and splatters. Now 
it's available to all of us. A "kitchen must" 
to enjoy spotless kitchens and yet fry chicken, 
steaks, chops and fish crisply in the open 
... it fits neatly around the sides and back of 
any skillet, folds into a small flat package 
for easy storage. A real buy at $1.00 post- 
paid. Fred L. Seymour Co., Box 1176, Bev- 
erly Hills, Calif. 



THE CALI FORN I AN, September, 1949 





THE 150th ANNIVERSARY OF THE 
HOUSE OF ATKINSON 

is celebrated with pride in 1949 — 

pride in their privilege of supplying colognes 

to people of taste and culture 

through eight English reigns — 

and pride in their own superb skill 

in the perfumer's art. 

EAU DE COLOGNE 

Wju/SjA 3m?endef° 



EAU DE COLOGNE 

Made in England by 

ATKINSONS 

24 OLD BOND STREET. LONDON. W.I 

IMPORTED BY 



Corde 

FINEST IN HANDBAGS 




STYLE 7507 
ABOUT 

$10.95 

Genuine " Corde exqui- 
sitely styled; distinctive metal 
clasp. The perfect comple- 
ment for your "after five" 
costumes. 

BROWN, BLUE, AND NAVY. ALSO HIGH STYLE 
COLORS ON REQUEST. 

If not at your favorite department store write 

CENTURY HAND BAG CO. 

1220 Maple, Suite 301 
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

When ordering by mail please enclose 20% 
Federal tax and 3% state tax. 



49 



PAMELA GAY ULTRA BRIEFS 



ARE LOWER 

in style and price ! 

A modest minimum for you and your 
budget. 

BO-PEEP $2.95 

Black or white sheer, wide lace and 
bows. 

BAREST WHISPER $1.95 

Plain blue sheer. 

'• 

BREATHLESS $2.45 

White all-over lace. 

Include hip measure and color choice. 
Send check with order; sorry, no C. 0. 
D. We prepay 1st class mail. 



Pamela Gay 

Box 23C, Melrose 76, Massachusetts 





•' MlcUuXfltt MacLteii. 



Only Phosphorescence 6n the waters of a 
tropical lagoon at Midnight can equal the 
matchless sparkle of this large oval, man- 
made BLACK OPAL. This beautiful ring comes 
in the distinctive Wanderlust sea shell. 
Heavy, tailored bezel setting in Sterling or 
l/20th 12k gold filled. Order today. "Delight 
or your money back." State size and setting 
Only $4.00. 

THE WALES WORKSHOP 
109 OAK HILL AVE., ATTLEBORO, MASS. 




DOG LEASH BELT $1.50 

Here is the ever-popular Dog Leash 
Belt at the new low price of $1.50. 
An adjustable braided belt — sturdy 
enough for coats; wonderful on 
skirts, dresses, and slacks; practical 
for all sportswear outfits. Ideal for 
gifts — attractively boxed at your re- 
quest. Colors — red, green, luggage, 
navy, white, and black. Sizes — small, 
medium, and large. 

Add 15c for postage 
(3% tax in California) 

CATALINA CASUALS 

BOX 325 — AVALON, CALIFORNIA 




&®VS 




ARE YOU DRESSING 
CORRECTLY? 

You can play up your good points, play 
down your figure faults, accent your posi- 
tive, appear constantly as a well-dressed 
woman if you follow the simple rules in 
Dressing by Design, a collection of 10 im- 
portant fashion articles from The Califor- 
nian Magazine. 

Correct Accessories 

You'll learn to achieve proper acces- 
sory balance with each ensemble you 
wear, acquiring that symmetry of line 
necessary to good grooming. 

Harmony In Design 

Do you know how to select fabrics and 
styles that become you? Dressing by 
Design does these things for you . . . 
in an easy-to-read, easy-to-understand 
booklet . . . with each subject graphical- 
ly illustrated for your reference. 

• It's a two-dollar value in a book you'll 
want to keep ... for only 50 cents. It 
will be invaluable to you, and a wonder- 
ful gift for others as well. 

Write today for your 

copy . . . only 



50c 



THE CALIFORNIAN MAGAZINE 

1020 So. Main St., Los Angeles 15, California 



ORIGINAL HAND MADE PRINTS 

(Silk Screened) 




Mare and Colt Running Colt 

(Lt. Ultra Blue) (Cerulean Blue) 

You'll like these original hand made ani- 
mal prints each with a different color back- 
ground. 

In paper mats for your own framing, each 
$3.00. Set of four $10.00 postpaid. 
Framed in specially designed natural wood 
wiped moulding, overall t5 3 /.t" square. Each 
$10.00; two, $19.00. Set of four $36.00. 
Express Prepaid. No C.O.D.'s. 
Send check or money order to 



„% 






726 South 10th St., Minneopolis 4, Minn. 




BIG KITCH! 

Dress up your kitchen match boxes 
with colorful, polished aluminum hold- 
ers in jewelry colors — ruby, sapphire, 
silver, gold. Bring them into the liv- 
ing-room, library and bar. Use on 
porches, around fireplaces and swim- 
ming-pools. A "must" for pipe smokers. 
$1.10 each includes parcel post. 
Little Kitch — smaller edition for safety 
matches, identical colors. Three, for 
$1.15. Check or money order. No 
C.O.D.'s, please. 

Colorifics Corporation 
BANTAM, CONNECTICUT 



IRONON 



no more 
sewing 



o worm Iron 
quickly and easily 
makes Presto-name tape 
with YOUR NAME on i^ 
part of the fabric 
for the life of the 
garment or linen 

LABORATORY TESTED 

Resists laundering 
and dry cleaning 

Red or black on 
white tape. Individ- 
ually cut and boxed 



SO EASY 
TO APPLY 

AVOID LAUNDRY 
MIXUP 
save time 
and 
effort 




75 for $1.25 
150 for $2.00 
300 for $3.00 



PROMPT 

DELIVERY 

Sorry no C.O.D.'s 

ORDER NOW 
for boy or girl going to school 

Print name and color clearly and mail to 

MARCH PRODUCTS BTpS.Uy.7 



WHERE TO BUY YOUI 
MAX KOPP DRESS 

The lovely dress of tissue ill 
pictured on page 29 may b<pu. 
chased at the following st0 3:* 

ARIZONA 

Douglas, Normans 

Flagstaff, Carters 

Safford, People's Dept. Store 1 

Yuma, E. M. Sanquinette 

ARKANSAS 

Fort Smith, Watkins 
Nashville, Belle Shop 

CALIFORNIA 

Beverly Hills, Towne Shop 
Alhambra, Faye's 
Anaheim, Gaye Suzanne 
Costa Mesa, Gayla's 
El Centra, Johnson's 
Fresno, Roddess Mademoisel 
Hollywood, Ann's 
Huntington Park, Leona's 
Los Angeles, The May Co., 
Bullocks, Browns, Jay Lanej 
Eisen Wynne 
Merced, Selbs 
Monterey, Collegiate Dress 
Oakland, Miss Alameda 
Pasadena, Bess Briggs 
Oceans'tde, Gaylo-Recker 
Pomona, Ora Addies 
Sacramento, Kneelond's 
San Diego, Adorable Shop 
Son Pedro, Dean's 
Sanfa Ana, Mattingsly's 
Santa Monica, H. E. Schubb 
Stockton, Donovan's Smart 

LOUISIANA 

Baton Rouge, Corrinne's 

MONTANA 

Great Falls, Beckman's 

OREGON 

Albany, McDevitt's 
CorvalUs, Tracewell's 
Medford, Hadley's 
Portland, Myrtle Vaughn 

TEXAS 

Abilene, Minter, D. G. 

UTAH 

Ogden, Belle Monde 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle, Myrtle Vaughn 



Real Ice Ball 
Out One at ; 




Patented ICEiUK 
rubber tray set eese 
18 Ice BALL an 
time (ea. 1 _ *"" 
dia. ). Gives rinfc. 
the new look r » 
original host — also, freezes frui ui» 
for salads & drinks. Trays last fo-ea» 
Order now for holiday gifts. TW Wt- 
in beautiful box with color t;|els? 
$3.95 postpaid to you. No C.Cf 



ICE CUBOCOj! 




DEALERS' Inquiries Invited 



1 



50 



THE CALIFORNIAN, September, 1949 



— *w 




FEATHERSTITCH . . . exquisite sheer 
hosiery designed by Willys of Hollywood for 
streetwear, cocktail hour, and evening wear. 
DuPoint nylon beautifully accentuated with 
appliqued "featherstitch" up back, front, or 
side of ankle. Seamed or seamfree. Regula- 
tion toe or sandalfoot. Your choice of exciting 
"state fair" colors — maple syrup, wheat tan, 
state brown, and mare gray. Size 8 to 11. 
$1.50 a pair at May Co. Wilshire, Los An- 
geles; B. Altman, New York; Carson, Pirie, 
Scott, Chicago: or write Willys of Holly- 
wood, 1141 N. Highland, Hollywood 38, Calif. 

AJAX TURNABOUT BARBECUE . . . 

with the exclusive sliding hand spit arrange- 
ment, designed and built by Seabreeze En- 
gineering Co., Inc. Everything in one bar- 
becue — it barbecues, cooks, and broils! Ideal 
for your backyard, front porch, and fire- 
place — and you can take it with you to the 
seashore and mountains. This portable bar- 
becue is sturdy and compact — will not tip! 
Excellent for holiday entertaining, vacations, 
or the ideal gift for your "one and only." 
Send check or money order. Westward-Ho 
Ranch House, 790 S. Arroyo Parkway, Pasa- 
dena 2, 



Calif. 



RAZORBANK . . . make a hit with your 
hubby, uncle, or the boy friend by surprising 
him with this adorable gift. He'll be de- 
lighted with this clever, ceramic container 
ingeniously contrived to hold dozens of used 
razor blades. He'll like the amusing face and 
the cute verse inside, too. 4" high, compactly 
designed to fit on the bathroom shelf, and 
arranged for re-fills. Razorbank makes an ap- 
pealing and practical gift for the men in 
your life. Just S1.50 postpaid. Order several 
from The Margorita Shop, 1018 South Main 
St., Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

"GAY NINETIES" MOOD carried out in 
original Claytoon illustrations in durable, 
glazed place mats. Bright, gay-colored pho- 
tographs of miniature clay models and stage 
sets. You and your friends will love these 
adorable mats. Water and alcohol resistant. 
Protect table finishes while adding merriment 
to your place setting. Get several for gifts. 
Beautifully packaged. Set of 6, size 10x16", 
only S2.50. Also Party Mat package on minia- 
ture mats, size 5x8", set of 8, S1.00. Price 
includes tax and shipping charges in America. 
The Margorita Shop, 1018 S. Main St., Los 
Angeles 15, Calif. 





RARE PAIR 

Charming and unusual, Ren- 
oir's "Little Girl with Wa- 
tering Can" and Gova's "Don 
Manuel," in exquisite full 
color, framed in antique 
pickled gold or white, or 
ordered to your individual 
taste. 

Framed, 12" x 14" 
$5.75 each, ppd. 

No C.O.D. please. 

Catalog on request. 

LEXINGTON ART 

960 Lexington Ave., New York 21 




• Wand-looted in GUATEMALA 



IMPORTED COWHIDE 

SHOULDER BAG 




Siie8"xl0'/2" 

$2.00 Dep. on C.O.D.s 



Pm SI. 93 Fed. Ti, 



• Designed for Beauty ond Long Service! 

• Also Avoiloble .n CHILD'S SIZE, 

5Vi xVA at $4.75, plus .95 Federal Tax 



Sold By Mail Only 

BROPAR 



Order Today! 

BOX 1997 — DEPT. 989 
SAN ANTONIO 6. TEXAS 



Pauii jbuch ftield, 



RESTAURANT 

Steaks, chops, duck, 
steamed clams, lob- 
ster, venison steaks, 
fiheasant, veal scal- 
opini, chicken saute 
sec. Romaine a la 
Paul & other entrees. 




Your Host: Paul Maggiora 

• PHONE MADISON 9-8336 * 

Olympic at Santa Fe, Los Angeles n 



BIG BEAR LAKE 

CALIFORNIA'S ALL-YEAR PLAYGROUND 

Home of Beautiful 

SHANGRI-LA VILLAGE 

Deluxe Housekeeping Cottages to serve 
all possible groupsl G.E. Refrigerator, 
Modern Stove, Fireplace, Floor Furnace, 
Linens, Silverware, Rockwool Insulation! 

Rates from $8 Daily for 2 

Write for Free Folder! Beautifully Illus- 
trated. P. O. Box 83 Big Bear Lake, Calif. 
GERALD and MARION LIBERTY 
— Owners, Mgrs. 

- -- B ■**" 



BIG BEAR LAKE 

San Bernardino Mts., Calif. 

£anontta 

"On the Lake at Big Bear Lake" 

— FOR RESERVATIONS — 

See your favorite travel agent or write to 

P. O. Box 24, Big Bear Lake — Owned and 

Operated by Harry and Adelia Becker. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, September, 1949 



51 



ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 

p uifts in the 
\jalifornia manner 




GAY '90 JIGGER: Amusing bar accessory, this corseted 
torso in ceramic. The bust holds a 1-oz. jigger, the 
base a double jigger. Attractively gift-boxed. $1 .00 
postpaid. 




TINY TEPS: Step-up for the youngsters, and very handy 
for bathroom use. Aluminum frame, pointed plywood 
steps, non-skid rubber feet. Shipped flat, easily as- 
sembled. $4.50 (add 25c for postage). 




MEASURING SPOONS: Here's a colorful, decorative 
touch for your kitchen . . . and useful, too. Four 
plastic measuring spoons, that fit in a floral arrange- 
ment with this bright ceramic flower pot. Gadgets like 
this moke housekeeping twice the fun. $1.50, post- 
paid. 

No. C.O.D. — please. Send check or money order. 
(Residents of California, please add 3% sales tax.) 



Send for illustrated catalog of 
other delightful California 
gift items. 




THE COIimSHOP 

RANCHO SANTA FE • CALIFORNIA 



— *°m<& 




,%«**- 




B/BIG TABLE TRAY . . . ideal for the 
kiddies — makes eating fun! A big help for 
mother too — eliminates work caused by soil- 
ed linens and spilling accidents. A twist of 
knob securely clamps B/Big to all tables 
forming individual eating space at the right 
level for tots. The ideal travelling companion 
for eating out. So light and compact — of 
sturdy, sanitary, satin-finish aluminum. Rub- 
ber coated clamp protects table finishes. Per- 
fect for Xmas gifts. Only $4.95 postpaid (15c 
tax in Calif.) Refund made immediately if 
not satisfied. Kite & Koch Co., Dept. C-9, 15 
N. Euclid Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 



HOW TO TIGHTEN YOUR CLOTHES-) 
LINE . . . simply and effectively. Linetite" 
just slips onto the line, twists the line to 1 1 
desired tightness, then hooks across the line 
to hold tension. It takes the slack out of 
lines, eliminates heavy, cumbersome clothes- 
line props. Of strong nickel-plated metal 
with a gay red wooden handle, Linetite is 
unbelievably priced at 35c in stores, or 3 for;! 
81.00 postpaid. Order for yourself and your 
friends from Stageberg Manufacturing Co.* 
Inc., Box 95, St. Louis Park, Minn. 



CALIFORNIA COOKS ... the second en-i I 
larged edition of our recipe book "California o 
Cooks," by Helen Evans Brown, is available 
now. You and your friends will be delighted 
with the selections — over 100 delicious and 
easy recipes, from abalone to zucchini; from 
oriental to occidental; from wine to herbs toj 
spices. And all planned with that special Call-' 
fornia-flair-for-flavor and originality. For good- 1 I 
ness sakes, order yours now — and your friends, 
too. Just one dollar each, postpaid. Address 
California Cooks, c/o The Californian, 1020 S., 
Main, Los Angeles 15, Calif. 



ROUND-THE-POLE . . . patio table cloth, i 
A summery delight is this gay table cloth 
. . . just throw it 'round the pole and zip it 
up! Hand-printed in attractive basket weave 
of mercerized cotton, richly colored in red 
and white; blue and white; or green and 
white. It fits any garden table, round or 
square. Just $4.95 postpaid. Californians add 
2]/ 2 % sales tax, 3]/ 2 % in Los Angeles. Match-' I 
ing ready-hemmed napkins, 18" wide, just 
40c each. Send your orders to The Mar-: 
gorita Shop, 1018 South Main St., Los An-! 
geles 15, Calif. 

SHADOW BOXES ... so attractive and 
picturesque — made of Ponderosa pine. You'll 
want to be your own interior decorator with 
these lovely shadow boxes, the very answer; ^ 
to "where to keep it." For knick-knacks,i , 
photos, plants, perfumes, miniatures, toys,r 
spices, or what have you. 12" square, 3 l /z' • 
deep. Leave them natural, paint, or stain any 
color. Give several as gifts. Set of two in- 
terlocked boxes, $1.75; two sets $3.25. Post-N 
age paid, add 2 1 / £% sales tax in California 
(3V£% in Los Angeles). Fred L. Seymour Co- 
Box 1176, Beverly Hills, Calif. 



52 



THE CALIFORNIAN, September, 1945 




ay I 



,YS 



HECK IN FOR 
rUDY TIME . . 



I rmer warmers for lounging by 
^SON-HALL Left, zip-up style 

\ h little string belt. Collar and 
cTs are quilted. Right, wrap- 
>und housecoat with two but- 
t| closing. Circular skirt has 
fr and a half yard sweep. 
Crton flannel men's shirting is 
forized and color fast in 
ck combinations of red, 
Ben, white and yellow with 
b ck. Quilted trim on both 
iilsolid color. 
Ses 10-20. Retail <JjO QC 



1ESE STORES: 

CALIFORNIA: 

Bullock's, Los Angeles 
Hale Bros., San Francisco 
Albert's, Inc., Richmond 
W. R. Carithers, Santa Rosa 
W. R. Carithers, Napa 
McBratney's, Monrovia 

WASHINGTON 

Ruson's, Spokane 

IDAHO 

Modin's, Boise 

TEXAS 

Bauer-McCann, Waco 



■ F' 

p 7 
5 L< 



further details 



RLSON-HALL 

E. Washington Blvd., 
Angeles 




« » * * * M 




/ 



' 



Larolands 

offers you the charm 

of suburban living . . . 

with the utmost 

in urban convenience. 




Whether you prefer a marine view of San Francisco 
Bay or a land view of deep-wooded canyon or distant 
mountains, you'll find it in Carolands . . . located one- 
quarter mile west of Burlingame in picturesque Hills- 
borough. 

INVESTIGATE 

YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO LIVE IN CAROLANDS 




The natural beauty of this magnificent tract has been 
preserved; while at the same time the moderately 
priced homesites afford utmost urban conveniences. 
Visit Carolands . . . stop by at the tract office. A rep- 
resentative will show you about as you desire or will 
answer any questions. 

THE MOST NATURALLY 

BEAUTIFUL RESIDENTIAL AREA 

ON THE PENINSULA 





LAUNDRY TIPS HELP KEEP 
YOUR LINGERIE LOVELY 



The correct care of foundation 
garments is as vitally important 
as the correct fit . . . and there 
is a good deal more to washing 
and ironing than meets the eye. 

It is a common misconception 
that frequent washing shortens 
the life of a garment. When dirt 
becomes embedded in a fabric, it 
cuts into the threads and wears 
them away. And the perspiration 
and oils of the body soften elas- 
tic, stain and weaken the fabric 
in general. Frequent laundering, 
therefore, actually prolongs the 
life of the garment. 

Before washing brassieres, re- 
sew loose straps and hooks and 
mend all rips and tears. If the 
water is hard, use a good soften- 
ing agent, and be sure that all soap is thoroughly dissolved 
in lukewarm water. Don't soak the garments. Wash them 
quickly but thoroughly with a gentle squeezing motion. Rinse 
several times in cool, clear water. Never wring or twist. Hang 
the garments over a line, or shape them on a dry flat towel. 

Correct methods of ironing, like proper washing techniques, 
preserve the life and attractive appearance of the fabric. 
A well-padded ironing board is important, since ironing on 
a thinly padded board flattens out the surface of the fabric 
and creates an ugly shine. "Iron shine" is also caused by 
using too hot an iron, ironing on the right side, and leaving 
soap in the fabric after washing (this can also create grease 
spots) . 

Before ironing a garment it is very important to know what 
the fabric is. Nylon, for instance, is non-inflammable but 
will melt in contact with an open flame or even extreme heat. 
Therefore it should be ironed while slightly damp with a 
very cool iron. Rayon fabrics should be pressed on the 
wrong side when almost dry. A moderately hot iron should 
be used, since too hot an iron will cause rayon to melt or 
burn to an ash. Pure silk and cotton, if dampened, may be 
ironed safely with a fairly hot iron, but too hot an iron 
will scorch the fabric. Lace or net always should be ironed 
while quite damp and carefully stretched back into shape. 

Elastic, of course, should not be 

ironed at all. 

Tak: good care of your bras 
and they will take good care of 
you. 




54 



THE CALIFORNIA N, September, 1949 



BOOK TREASURES CAN 
ENRICH YOUR WALLS 

by kitte turmell 



WHETHER they're best-beloved or seldom read, books 
can enrich the walls at your house. Particularly if 
you show their multiple-colored jackets to advantage 
in inbuilt cases designed to fit or improve the con- 
tours of whatever wall they ornament . . . and warm. It's the 
good-living touch which good reading, well arranged, imparts 
to any setting. 

Dinky, and cumbersome, portable bookcases which were 



Shelves around a 
big window give 
bedroom feeling 
of casual living 




standard equipment in yesterday's homes are being supplanted 
with the inbuilt cases, "custom designed," to fit the architectural 
features of a new home. Or to give the new look of outstanding 
wall treatment to an old one. Book-wall designs as multiple 
and colorful as the latest best-seller jackets have been created 
for the California Way of Life. Today, book-browsing takes 
place in rooms far brighter than the dim, musty nooks once 
associated with libraries and nooks for home storage. 

For example, there is the Los Angeles girl's bedroom which 
Decorator Lorenz A. Hansen converted into a combination sit- 
ting and sleeping room with studio furnishings which include 
comfortable lounge chairs and a love seat which opens into a 
bed. Book shelves were added, all around a tall wide window, 
to give the effect of a library wall. The love seat which centers 
the book-window wall is plaided in book-cover colors of leather- 
red, yellow and green. Primary colors are repeated in solid- 
color chairs, carpeting and in the bric-a-brac interspaced with 

books to relieve the mon- 
otony of line. 

Inbuilt book-shelves also 
provide display and stor- 
age space for art as well 
as literary treasures in the 
stately English living 
room at the home of J. 
Edward Eberle. In order 
to add interest to a large 
plain wall, broken by two 
small high "postage 
stamp-size windows," he 
added center paneling to 
display a handsome huge 
Chinese tapestry, and used 
book shelves, built around 
the two small windows, to 
flank each side of the cen- 
ter panel. As skillful win- 
dow-and-wall treatment it 
is an idea adaptable to 

Inbuilt shelves provide display for art anv n0 me 



THE CALIFORNIAN, September, 1949 




CJor jorty-three years 

the standards oj cjuahty 
governing the production 

oj cJ cully cJucdes 
nave made it impossible 
to produce enough oj 
these remarkable garments 
to sattsjy the demand. 



You'll find them 

only at the 
finest stores; we' 
tell you where 




LOS ANGELES 21 
CALIFORNIA 



\ 




55 




Paris Oiiginal Model by Laniin, to duplicate from Vogue Pattern 1052 in moonstone Chamoire or other jewel colors. 

;-iv DEC j :_■ 

CHAMOIRE . . . First of Bates new career cottons for fall, worn by. New York model 
Betty Bridges on the job and after. Chamoire is a fine all-combed cotton marked after the 
manner of watered silk ... a completely new cotton that achieves ultimate elegance in a 
permanent (and washable) moire pattern exclusive with Bates. 



BATES FABRICS, INC., 80 WORTH ST., NEW YORK : 



A MAGAZINE STYLED FOR COLORFUL LIVING 





fluted, pleated skirt made in 
Cohama's 5 P.M. 

What's more, you're the vortex 
of the merry whirl, day or night, 
n this versatile flatterer that 
compliments a tailored blouse at 
the office, just as it does 



; 



bejeweled cocktail sweater. 

"MIDNIGHT WHIRL" was 

an exclusive 1949 

winner of the "First , 

Premium Award" 

at the California 

State Fair. I 



"Midnight Whirl" is yours for 
about $11.00 at these and 
other fine stores. Write. We'll 
tell you where. 

Swelldom's Los Angeles 

Kahn's Oakland 

Marshall Field's Chicago 

The Vogue San Antonio 

Diamond's Phoenix 

Buff urn's Long Beach 

Cunningham's St. Louis 

Frank & Seder's . Pittsburgh 

860 S. Los Angeles Street 
Los Angeles 14, Calif. 




r 

deftly molds rich 
rayon gabardine into 
slim-line beauty. 
Wonderful shades of 
dusty jade, terra cotta 
and beige. Sizes 10 to 18. 



M 



CASUAL COLONT 



S J .,: 






Des Moines 6 



VOL. 8 
No. 3 



THE CALIFORNTAN is published by The Californian, Inc., at 1020 S. Main St.. Los Angeles 15, Calif., printed in U.S.A. Yearly sub- 
scription price $3.00. Entered as second class matter January 23, 1946, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, Calif., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



OCTOBER 
1949 





what a world of difference a few minutes make . . . 

The next time you select a brassiere, buy it in the fitting room, not over 
the counter. Those few extra minutes in the fitting room mean months 
of extra comfort. 

The next time you buy a brassiere, select from Mam'zelle's famous line 
of "Seven Precision Fittings." Even if you're an "in-between" size, you 
can now find a Mam'zelle to fit you perfectly . . . give you perfect 
contour molding without alterations. No custom made brassiere could 
fit you better. 

Mam'zelle's patented "cross-lift" construction and bias cup make it the 
most beautiful, most flattering, best fitting brassiere. The lovely fabrics 
are guaranteed pre-shrunk. You can't wash out the shape of a Mam'zelle! 
From $2.50 at your favorite store. 



IN TEXAS: AT TH 
ABILENE Sturgess-Rudd 

AMARIUO 

White Kirk Company 
AUSTIN 

E. AA. Scarbrough & Sons 
T. H. Williams Company 
BEAUMONT Rosenthal's 

CORPUS CHRISTI Randall's 
DALLAS Volk Bros. 

EL PASO 

Popular Dry Goods 

Company 

Small's 

FORT WORTH The Fair 

GREENVILLE 

Field's Gift Shop 



ESE FINE STORES 
GROVES 

Grove's Dry Goods 

HOUSTON Sakowitz Bros. 

Ralph Rupley 

LONGVIEW Martin's 

LUBBOCK 

Hemphill-Wells Company 
ODESSA Searl's 

SAN ANGELO 

Cox Rushing Greer 

SAN ANTONIO Frost Bros. 

The Vogue 

Sommers 

WACO Bauer McCann 

WICHITA FALLS 

W. B. McClurken & Co. 



MAM'ZELLE BRASSIERES 

65 58 SANTA MONICA BLVD., HOLLYWOOD 38, CAL 



THE CAUFORNIAN, October, 1949 




Another Touchdown by SPORT-LANE of California 




The Stadium topper, perfect companion for fall wardrobes. Made of 100% wool shag, loomed 
by TALBOT MILLS. Leather buttons mark the front of this shortie, smart 30" length, and fully 
lined. Sizes 10-18. ... ^77 Q C 



Stadium colors: 



OF CAUFOINU 



For name of store nearest you, write us at 
SPORT-LANE of California, 224 East 11th Street, Los Angeles 15, California 



U. S. C. maroon 
Stanford red 
California blue 
Pigskin tan 
Field green 
Sideline beige 
Army gray 
Annapolis navy 
Notre Dame green 



THE CALIFORNIAN, October, 1949 




..command attention with the gentle 
beauty of a smarter Max Kopp dress. 
Lustrous tissue faille with a touch of 
holiday gaiety in the sparkling bead trim. 
Black, navy, rich-green, coffee-brown, 
copper, Christmas red, teal -blue, 
Sizes 10 to 20. Style No. 287. Retail IV 




\ 



M 



m\ 



\ (:■' 



i 



■u 



iMax Kopp Dresses of Distinction. 818 S. Bdwy.. Los Angeles 14, California 




Bullock's, Los Angeles ... The May Co. Los Angeles, Wilshire, Crenshaw . . . Mullen & Bluett, Los Angeles ... The Peggy Shop, San Francisco . . . 
Joyce's, Huntington Park . . . Marbo Shop, Santa Monica . . . Ann's, Hollywood. And leading stores and shops all over America. 

A THE CALIFORNIAN, October, 1949! 



*7<M<M> and 7*&vct 

Wonderfully wearable separates in 100% 
wool diamond weave Sussex Tweed to be 
worn individually or combined in countless 
ways for 'round the clock or "'round the 
world!" Designed by Irene Saltern. 



Tweed Norfolk Jacket — Tweed Balmacaan Jacket, each $25.00. 
Gabardine Skirt — Gabardine Slacks, each $10.95 * Tweed 
Skirt— Tweed Sleeveless Jacket, each $10.95 * Heather Jersey 
Blouse— Surah Blouse, each $10.95 * Fitted tweed Vest, $8.95. 
Sizes 10-18 




LOS ANGELES 15 



lOORDINATED SEPARATES: PLANNED WARDROBES 



THE CALI FORN I AN, October, 1949 




A THE SOFT TOUCH OF VELVETEEN Romantic holiday colors in a dress for festive days 
i<*.0\w ahead . . . superbly simple and so elegant . . . retail about $55.00. 

Available at: Neiman Marcus • Carson-Pirie-Scott • Haggarty's • Bullock's — Downtown • Bullock's — Pasadena • H. Liebes — San Francisco 




Style #939 



an exquisite 
Deauville blouse 
hand beaded 

a 
Manuel Felix 
original in 
tissue faille 

in all colors . . . $12.95 



d 



eauville 
odds 




California's Finest 
and Most 
Imitated Blouses 
407 East Pico 
Boulevard 
Los Angeles 15 



Write us for the name of 
the store nearest you 






Coteectlv 1 




70 Simple Rules 

Play up your good points, play 
down your figure faults, accent 
your positive, appear constantly 
well-dressed by following the 10 
simple rules in Dressing by De- 
sign. 

Correct Accessories 
Learn to achieve proper accessory 
balance with each ensemble you 
wear, acquiring that symmetry of 
line necessary to good grooming. 

Harmony in Design 
Know how to select fabrics and 
styles that become you in an easy- 
to-read, easy-to-understand book- 
let .. . with each subject graph- 
ically illustrated. 

Invaluable to you. 

A wonderful gift for others, too. 



Write today for your 
copy . . . only 



50c 



THE CALIFORNIAN MAGAZINE 

1020 So. Main St., Los Angeles 15, California 






PFAFF ... is the only sewing machine 
that will do all of the stitches shown, with- 
out any attachments whatsoever, as illustrated: 
(1) Overlock edging; (2) Sew on any size 
button: (3) Any size buttonhole; (4) Orna- 
mental sewing; (5) Embroidery and mono- 
gramming; (6) Rick-Rack embroidery; (7) 
Sew backward and forward. Yes, all these 
without attachments, without broken thread — 
and for LESS MONEY! Pfaff machines 
are available in desks, portables, consoles, 
and commercials — in your choice of finish. 
Phone Richmond 6881 for your free demon- 
stration, or write for further information to: 
Pico Inc., 1800 S. Main St., Los Angeles 
15, Calif. 



FLEX-TRAY . . . will go to any length to 
accommodate any size bowl or dish, standing 
Y2" above table top on ten sturdy legs. 
Flex-Tray, in beautiful chrome finish, har- 
monizes with the smartest or simplest table 
setting. Used for hot casseroles, teapots, or 
other hot plate dishes in protecting table 
finishes. An excellent gift item for the person 
who has everything. The large size, meas- 
uring 7"xl0" when closed, extends to 22" 
when open, just S3. 95 postpaid. Also avail- 
able in smaller size for only SI. 98. Fred 
S. Meyer Co., Box 1176, Beverly Hills, Calif. 




contour $[ a gicl 



There's exciting new figure beauty for 
you — and comfort you never dreamed possible — 
in every CORDELIA brassiere... created in Hollywood 
...and recommended by physicians and surgeons 
everywhere. Even a troublesome "problem bust" achieves 

glamorous contours when you're wearing one of 
CORDELIA'S 600 special custom fittings in sizes up to 56! 



CORDELIA creates for the youthful 
figure too... high style brassieres 

in regular sizes. ..in the 
season's most exquisite fabrics. 




You'll find CORDELIA bras 
in better department stores, 
specialty shops, and 

surgical supply houses 
from coast to coast. For 
name of the store nearest 

you featuring the famous 

CORDELIA line — please write to 



cgcwUfa 




»Cty«.»Cwik, 



OF HOLLYWOOD 

Creators and manufacturers 
of surgical, corrective, and high style brassieres 

3107 BEVERLY BLVD. • LOS ANGELES 4, CALIFORNIA, 




10 



THE CALIFORNIAN, October, 194' 







PERSONALIZED STATIONERY AND IN- 
FORMALS . . . Surprise your friends and 
relatives by having their signatures stylized 
on this beautiful stationery. Artistically in- 
terpreted in your choice of colors — pristine 
white, ivory-cream, silver-grey, black velvet, 
mariner blue, dubonnet, or bottle-green — on 
finest quality paper. Informals . . . 100 sheets 
and 100 envelopes S3.25. Stationery . . . 
200 sheets and 100 envelopes S4.25. Beauti- 
fully gift boxed. Special combination offer, 
both §6.75. Add 3% sales tax in California, 
354% in Los Angeles. No C.O.D.'s please. 
Send signature examples with colors desired 
to Chelley Creations, Box 355. Pacific Pali- 
sades, Calif. 

"SUZETTE" ... a beautiful, versatile cop- 
per and brass chafing dish for smart enter- 
taining in the casual manner at buffet suppers 
and barbecues — indoors and outdoors. Enjoy 
the luxury and utility of this beautiful table 
server. Prepare your favorite gourmet recipe 
at the table and keep it hot while serving. 
10 in. stainless steel skillet, heavy polished 
copper stand and cover, cast brass legs and 
burner attachment, with an adjustable Sterno 
heat regular. A quality gift modestly priced 
at S16.95 (comparative value $39.95). Order 
for yourself and friends from Fred S. Meyer 
Co., 'Box 1176, Beverly Hills, Calif. 




Second Edition of 



California Cooks 

By Helen Evans Brown 

A prize collection of Helen Evans Brown's 
brilliant articles on cookery appearing ex- 
clusively in THE CALIFORNIAN. 

Recipes. Menus. Articles on cookery. But NOT a 
cook book. Rather a book on California cuisine. 
A distinguished cuisine influenced by the Mission!, 
by Chinatown, by Hollywood, by California vino- 
yards and citrus groves, by the desert, by the 
Spanish fiesta days, by patio living and barbecues, 
by picnicking in California, by the seashore and by 
the lavish days of old San Francisco. 
Kumquat Marmalade . . Napa Kidney Saute . . 
Spaghetti Ventura . . Patio Salad . . Barracuda San 
Pedro . . Carmel Cabbage . . California Almond 
Sauce . . Fresno Fritters . . Ojai Orange Sauce 
for Duckl 

It's a kitchen literary classic in Helen Evans 
Brown's sprightly, friendly style. GOOD READING 
— GOOD COOKINGI 

SEND FOR YOUR COPIES TODAY 



$1.00 



POSTPAID 



The first edition sold out completely. This one is 
greatly enlarged. Has a new cover — in color. Makes 
a smart giftl 



To: THE CALIFORNIAN 

1020 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

Please mail my copies of C 3 I j f T fl 1 3 COOKS 

to: 



(Name) 



(Address) 



(City, State and Zone) 
Enclosed is payment for □ copies at $1 each. 




THE CALIFORNIAN, October, 1949 



11 



ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 



c 



c 



hristmas gifts 
in the 
alifornia manner 




Vj 




m^-~ 



GAY BLADE RAZOR BANK: Dad will love this Cali- 
fornia ceramic razor bank. Measures 4 inches high. 
White, with brown hair. $1 .25, postpaid. 




DARNING DODO: Gaily colored, California ceramic 
darning egg. Words "Darn it" on bottom. Measures 
5 inches high. $1.50, postpaid. 




CHILD'S TRAY: Lovely western styled tray to protect 
your table, fashioned in light blonde wood. Has glass 
top, under which are six nursery rhymes illustrated 
with cute western kiddie characters. Measures 1 21/2x1 S'/j 
inches. $3.95, postpaid. 

No C. O. D. — please. Send check, cash, or money or- 
der. (Residents of California — please add 3% sales tax.) 



Send for illustrated catalog 
of other delightful California 
gift items. 




TEE CORRAL SHOP 



>OI fit IANCHO SANTA Ft . CALIFORNIA 





CANASTA-OKLAHOMA-GIN RUMMY . . . 

here's the new NO-PEEK-0 smart, stream- 
lined aluminum set that keeps cards in per- 
fect order in Canasta, Oklahoma, Gin Rummy 
and other card games. Eliminates peeking. 
The cleverly designed, felt base protects table 
top and prevents slipping. You'll want sev- 
eral for yourself and for unusual gifts. They're 
attractively packaged and available in beau- 
tiful shades of green, blue, or red. Postpaid, 
only $1.00. Sorry — no C.O.D.'s. Send orders 
to the Balas Manufacturing Company, 1550 
East 27th Street, Cleveland 14, Ohio. 

SAVES CLEANING BILLS . . . Protex-A- 
Dress Dressing Mask slips over your head 
like a hood. Wear it while slipping your 
dress on and off . . . gives complete protec- 
tion from rouge, powder, lipstick, or perspira- 
tion stains. Protex-A-Dress will quickly pay 
for itself in reduced cleaning bills. Made of 
import net with solid protection for lips. 
Snug-fitting, cool, easily washable. Send for 
yours today . . . only $1.00 postpaid. The 
Hawleys, Kerrville, Texas. 

SIGNATURED GLASSES ... The exact 
reproduction of the person's signature — hand 
screened and fired on the glasses in colors 
of red, green, black, blue, or brown. A 
clever idea for holiday entertaining. Give 
that "personal touch" with your Christmas 
gift. Clear glass — $12.50 per dozen; frosted j 
glass — $14.50 per dozen. Signature must ac- j 
company orders. Allow three weeks for de- 
livery. Price includes packing and postage. I 
No C.O.D.'s. The Selden Cooper Shop, George 
Vanderbilt Hotel, Asheville, North Carolina. 

DOLLS BY DAPHNE . . . "personality! 
cuties" are these perfectly adorable dolls 
dressed in gaily-colored clothes specially ere- j 
ated to delight boys and girls alike. The \ 
saucy little girl in plaid and plain gingham 
with a pert straw hat will be her everlasting m 
"pet." The laughing clown in the cheery 1 
seersucker suit will make his ideal "play- I 
mate." Dolls are all hand-finished and hand- 
painted on fast color prints — easily remov- 
able and washable. $3.50 each (tax included). 
Sorry, no C.O.D.'s. Order several from 
Daphne, 5972 W. 2nd, Los Angeles 36, Calif. 

AUTHENTIC COOLIE PAJAMAS . . 

for lounging, gardening, and housework — i 
especially designed for fashionable freedom. 
Here's smart daytime comfort, oriental style. 
Beautifully fashioned in durable, washable 
butcher linen. Authentic mandarin collar. 
Handmade frogs for closing. A perfect selec- 
tion you can give with pride . . . the very I 
gift you'll choose for your own. Your choice 
in fast pastel colors of pink, blue, tobacco, 
and mauve. Black trousers for contrast if ' 
you wish. Sizes to 40. $9.95 (plus 25c post- 1 
age). Exclusive only with Fuerst. Order by< 
mail from R. L. Fuerst, 21 Grant Ave., San| 
Francisco, Calif. 



12 



THE CALIFORN1AN, October, 1949 




SHIMMERING SHOWERS . . . NEW 

3-Way Lighting controlled by one switch. As 
old as yesterday, as new as tomorrow. These 
lamps capture the tradition and charm of 
Yesteryear. The luminous clarity of these 
new electrified shower lamps will lend a note 
of grace and brilliance to your room. Each 
sparkling lamp displays 54 starlike glass crys- 
tal pendants cascading over a lovely frosted 
bowl base, its beauty enhanced with a hand- 
cut floral design. Ideal for the credenza, con- 
sole, mantlepiece, etc. Top and bottom light 
independently or together. S22.50 postpaid. 
Mark Stier, 277 E. Fordham Rd., New York 
58, N. Y. 

"PUDDLES", THE WALKING CLOWN 

. . . imagine the childish delight when your 
youngster, niece, or nephew receives this 
clever push-or-pull cart made of white pine 
and techwood. "Puddles" with his cheerful 
tinkling bells will produce the biggest smile 
ever since the circus came to town. The flat 
cart in middle carries baby's dolls, blocks, or 
other playthings. 15%" high, 6 1 / 4" wide. 
Sturdily built and time-tested to last! The 
kiddies' favorite at a new low price. S3.50 
postpaid. Sorry, no C.O.D.'s. Send orders to 
Roby Toys, 2293 Earl St., Los Angeles 26, 
Calif. 

NEW CHEFSAW MEAT SAVER . . . 

a hundred uses for this handy, all-purpose, 
aluminum kitchen saw. Buy meat at quan- 
tity prices — cut in kitchen to serving portions 
desired. Hardened steel saw blade severs 
meat bones and joints smoothly and quickly. 
Grooved handle tenderizes tough cuts. Ideal 
in preparing frozen foods. Useful in dressing 
game and fish "on the spot." Cuts steel and 
brass. Regular price, $1.50. Introductory 
offer S1.10 postpaid. Limit two to a customer. 
Extra blades 3 for 40c. No C.O.D.'s. Money 
back guarantee. The Margorita shop, 1018 
S. Main, Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

UNUSUAL . . . TRIO of the WORLD'S 
FINEST PERFUMES . . . created in and 
by San Francisco's famous custom perfumer. 
Each in gold plated purse flacon ... in itself 
a gift of permancy. True Daphne . . . Cen- 
tral California early spring flower . . . $2.25. 
Barbary Coast, warm, dry, sophisticated . . . 
S2.50. Hawaiian Pikaki . . . fresh, gay, love- 
ly .. . $2.00. ALL THREE beautifully gift 
wrapped . . . Special $6.00, including all 
taxes and postage. Empty flacons 75c each. 
Mail orders sent anywhere. In San Francisco 
visit our exquisite shop . . . one of America's 
most beautiful . . . ROLLEY PERFUMES, 182 
Geary St., San Francisco 8, Calif. 

ROUND-THE-POLE . . . patio table cloth. 
A summery delight is this gay table cloth 
. . . just throw it 'round the pole and zip it 
up! Hand-printed in attractive basket weave 
of mercerized cotton, richly colored in red 
and white; blue and white; or green and 
white. It fits any garden table, round or 
square. Just $4.95 postpaid. Californians add 
2 l / 2 % sales tax, 3%% in Los Angeles. Match- 
ing ready-hemmed napkins, 18" wide, just 
40c each. Send your orders to the Margorita 
Shop, 1018 South Main St., Los Angeles 15, 
Calif. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, October, 1949 





THE 150th ANNIVERSARY OF THE 
HOUSE OF ATKINSON 

is celebrated with pride in 1949 — 

pride in their privilege of supplying colognes 

to people of taste and culture 

through eight English reigns — 

and pride in their own superb skill 

in the perfumer's art. 

EAU DE COLOGNE 
-ae. 



EAU DE COLOGNE 

Made in England by 

ATKINSONS 

24 OLD BOND STREET, LONDON. W.I 

IMPORTED 6T 
PAUL K . RANDALL 

2M MADISON AVE., NEW YORK 17. N.Y. 



Corde 

FINEST IN HANDBAGS 




$10.95 

Genuine ' Corde exqui- 
sitely styled; distinctive metal 
clasp. The perfect comple- 
ment for your "after five" 
costumes. 

BROWN, BLACK, AND NAVY. ALSO HIGH 
STYLE COLORS ON REQUEST. 

If not at your favoriie department store write 

CENTURY HAND BAG CO. 

1220 Maple, Suile 301 
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

When ordering by mail please enclose 20% 
Federal lax and 3% stale tax. 



13 



AT THESE FINE STORES: 

ARIZONA 

Phoenix, Goldwater's 

ARKANSAS 

Magnolia, Carter's 
Texarkana, McCoy's 

CALIFORNIA 

Carmel, Harriet Duncan 

El Centra, M. O. King Co. 

Kenlfield, Ross Valley Shop 

Los Angeles, Desmond's 

Ontario, Musette's 

Riverside, Rouse's 

Fullerton, Edna McMaster 

Sacramento, Weinstock Lubin Co. 

San Diego, Marston's 

San Francisco — Livingston Bros. 

San Mateo — Pfister's 

Santa Ana — Patricia's 

Santa Barbara — Lou Rose 

Whitiier — Edna McMaster 

Woodland — Breit's 

IOWA 

Cedar Rapids — The Killian Co. 
Mason City — Damon's 
Des Moines — Younker's 

KANSAS 

Wichita — Spine's Clothing 

LOUISIANA 

Lafayette — La Parisienne 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Springfield — Forbes & Wallace 

MISSOURI 

Kansas City — Woolf Bros. 

OHIO 

Cleveland— Wm. Kitt 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma City — Kerr's 
Oklahoma City — Rothschild's 
Enid — Garfield's 
Ponca City — Lucerne's 
Tulsa — Brown-Dun kin 



jmM^/" 



OREGON 
Portland- 



-Meier and Frank 



TEXAS 

Abilene — Casual Clothes 

Amarillo — Kline's 

A ustin — Scarbroug h 's 

Borger — Alix House of Fashion 

Brownfield — Gore Fashion Shop 

Ft. Worth — Leonard's 

Harlinger — The Diana Shop 

Dallas — Howard Jordan 

Houston — The Mirror 

La Mesa — The Vogue 

Long View — The Palais Royal 

Lubbock — Hackel's 

Odessa — Gibb's Exclusive 

Style Shop 
Pampa — Behrman's 
San Angela — Maurice's 
San Antonio — The Vogue 
Sherman — Elinor's 
Tyler — La Mode 

UTAH 

Salt Lake City — Makoff's 

WASHINGTON 

Be//evue — Four Seasons 
Seattle — Frederick & Nelson 
Tacoma — Helen Davis 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington, D. C. — Schwab's Inc. 
Washington, D. C. — The Hecht Co. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Vancouver — Woodward Stores, Ltd. 



14 





m 



4 r 





and You 11 look your smartest 
in Nylon fashions by VIOLA DIMMITT 



Gadabout dress in Mallison's "Klokanyl," 
a Dupont 100% Nylon yarn . . . washes 
without ironing, dries in a jiffy. Bold 
cavalier collar, puff pockets. Perfect for 



traveller, stay-at-home, careerist or cam- 
pus queen. Sizes 10-20 in black, cedar 
green, brown, taupe, carbon blue. 

Under $40 



VIDLA DIMMITT OF COURSE — 719 South Los Angeles Street, Los Angeles 
Or write for store nearest you 



THE CALIFORNIAN, October, 19 



" 






H 

e 






■J 

e 




ON THE COVER: 

Holiday angel in Emma 
Domb's dreamy evening gown 
for the most festive occasion 
. . . Ann Miller, appearing 
soon in Metro-Goldwyn-May- 
er's "On the Town." Black 
lace streamers sewn on bil- 
lowing skirt of "Celebrity" 
satin; sizes 9-15 and 10-20, 
about $30 at Hale Bros., Mar- 
ket Street, San Francisco; 
Younker's, Des Moines ; Halle 
Bros., Cleveland. "Red-Red" 
lipstick by Guitare, romantic 
fragrance of Atkinson's co- 
logne. Photo by Frank Stiffler 




California fashions 

Inspired Casting of Fabrics 20 

For Opening Night 22 

Dramatic Entrance 24 

Moonlit Scenes 26 

Encore! 28 | 

Command Performance of Velveteen 30 

Suit Sensation of the Season 32 

I 

Choose Something Sweet . 38 

Designed for Social Triumphs 40 

Star Your Accessories.. 42 

The Feminine Flair 44 



EDITOR AND PUBLISHER J. R. Osherenko 

ASSISTANT PUBLISHER William J. Bowen 

FASHION DIRECTOR Sally Dickason 

FASHION EDITOR Virginia Scallon 

MANAGING EDITOR Alice Carey 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Philip Kustner 

MEN'S FASHION EDITOR Malcolm Steinlauf 

FASHIONS Jacquelin Lory 

Margaret Paulson 
FEATURES Helen Ignatius 

Hazel Allen Pulling 
ART. Morris Ovsey 

Jane Albrecht 

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Frank Stiffler 

SHOPPING ROUNDUP Joyce Olsen 

FOOD STYLIST... Helen Evans Brown 



California features 

With Our Editors 16-19 

California Cooks 34 

Good Theatre Themes Your Furnishings 36 

Torch Arrangement 45 

Music Notes: Lillian Steuber 48 

Accent on Fragrance 48 

Art Moves Out of the Ivory Tower 49 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly at 1020 So. Main St., Los Angeles 15, Cali- 
fornia, PRospect 6651. San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph, 26 O'Farrell St., DOuglas 
2-1472. Subscription price: $3.00 one year; $5.00 two years; $7.50 three years. One 
dollar additional postage per year outside continental United States. 35c per copy. Member 
Audit Bureau of Circulations. Entered as second class matter January 25, 1946, at the 
Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under act of March, 1S79. Copyright 1949 The 
Californian, Inc. Printed in U.S.A. Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless 
specifically authorized. 



, : ■ " .. ' - ' 



" .. '; ■ 



I 






— t' 




— i M 



i*fri 



Jj! 

to 



i -I. 




■PC 



bto » 



■I IWU 'ff 





BEHIND THE SCENES 

BY VIRGINIA SCALLON, FASHION EDITOR 

Here we are in the bright summer sun, romantic evening 
clothes swaying (on their hangers) beneath a tall palm 
tree, editors and artists and models previewing new fall 
fashions while MGM star Ann Miller tries on a shimmer- 
ing satin gown for her new role as our cover girl. 

For this is the way a magazine is born, this is the plan- 
ning board of our magazine conducting an informal confer- 
ence at the home of Editor Joe Osherenko. 

No long lingering looks at the bright blue skies, thinking 
enviable thoughts about sunclothes and play . . . thoughts 
which may be translated into our picture-book story of 
fashions. We are thinking beyond the summer, of clothes 
that will have appeal to women in the brilliant holiday 
season ahead . . . maybe even anticipating the gay cruise 
season that tops off the year. 

For fashion is made up of futures. Editors and artists 
continually project their thoughts into tomorrow, analyzing 
trends and selecting fashions most-likely-to-succeed from the 
salons and even the drawing boards of famous California 
designers. 

This day our thoughts are dreamy . . . confronted by 
the elegant fabrics and delicate drapings we have selected 
from artists like Irene, Adrian, Edna Vilm, Louella Bal- 



\ 




m ._:___ 

Editor Joe Osherenko and planning board of magazine conduct informal editorial conference in gardens of his Beverly Hills home. 



uoe Osherenko greets Alice Wallace, 
Ueft, and Rosalee Calvert, fashion 
models who are called in for fittings. 







AU1U 




11* ^IIIIlP""* 1 









By </ie poo/, ^/i'ce wears lovely Athena taffeta gown while photographer Earl Scott 
and art director Anne Harris decide whether it should be photographed or sketched. 



WITH OUR EDITORS 



(lerino, Marbert, Peggy Hunt, Gene Shelly and numerous 
others whose names are known all over the world. 
I Comments like these are warmed by the brilliant gold 
pun . . . "clothes have such a dramatic feeling this season 
L . . such elegance . . . enough to make any woman feel 
uike an actress, a star." 

Two of our favorite models, Rosalee Calvert and Alice 
Wallace, arrive in the midst of the hubbub and as they, 
too, try on clothes to decide who-will-wear-what-and-when 
I . . they strike dramatic poses that seem to "go with" the 
clothes. 

Then as we watch Ann Miller trying on Emma Domb's 
icy blue satin ball gown, our thoughts begin to crystallize. 
I "LET'S CALL THIS A GOOD THEATRE ISSUE," comes 
jthe explosive thought voiced almost simultaneously by 
,two or three headline hunters. "Because these clothes im- 
part their own sense of drama . . . they're so exciting, so 
stimulating . . ." 

So now we have it. The theme. This is the big thought 
lour conference has been looking for, a colorful and ex- 
citing idea to express the mood of new fashion. From 
how on the conversation rises to a new crescendo, as the 
(Continued on the following pages) 



What goes on when editors get together: Ann Miller tries 
on Emma Domb gown while Osherenko and fashion direc- 
tor Sally Dickason approve; Morri Ovsey, art director, and 
fashion artist Jane Albrecht sketch Rosalie in still life. 
Osherenko casts critical eye on new fashion pictures, and 
Sally Dickason puts finishing touches to Alice's coiffure. 
Staff photographer Frank Stiffler shows Rosalie how he 
sets his camera; Osherenko stage-manages the show! 









A MAGAZINE COMES TO LIFE 
AS EDITORS AND ARTISTS PLAN- 
HOW TO PRESENT NEWEST 
CALIFORNIA FASHIONS IN THE 
MOST DRAMATIC WAY 

Helen Evans Brown, out writing gourmet, stirs up a tasty dish. 



Ann Miller is served by Osherenko as staff gathers 
for lunch; Ann and Rosalee forget calories, while 
editors worry about waistlines instead of headlines. 
Sally Dickason takes it easy after all's said and done. 











A 








Laura Mcl'ay. floiver stylist, shows new arrangement to Virginia Scallon, Osherenko. executive secretary Lou Farnham. 



planning baard finds more ways such a theme can help 
them present a different fashion "feel" to the women of 
the world. 

Editors flash out their notebooks, joyously come up with 
reports on clothes from this designer or that, clothes to 
fit into the theme song we're singing. Color? What color 
is winter? What is the feel of new fabric? Do we like 
the new winter taffetas that rustle with their own importance 
. . . the richly brocaded fabrics . . . the new versatility 
of tweed, of suede and knits? 

While stylists confer and compare, artists make quick 
sketches to illustrate a point, or point up a story. They 
suggest whether a dress will show up better in photograph. 
or should be sketched to reveal pure line. They decide 
upon page layouts and the type of printing that will best 
"carry" the mood. 

It seems to us a quite logical conclusion that many of 
our new glamour fashions should be photographed in 
their natural habitat, the theatre . . . and that real pic- 
ture stars should model at least a few. You see, Good 
Theatre is a versatile theme. 

In a trice we're on the phone, calling picture studios 
to arrange for "shootings." We've the promise that stars 



will cooperate, stars famous for their good taste in fashion 
as well as their talent. Joan Leslie. Lizabeth Scott. Ava 
Gardner. Jeanne Cagney, Cyd Charisse . . . and our own 
models Rosalee and Alice who have been Goldwyn Girls 
(and Rosalee is now working at MGM). 

If you ever thought how a magazine came to be. you 
probably visualized some mastermind who thought in 
fashion-wise beauty, who created new trends out of pure 
air. Then this revealing story may be a shock to you. For 
obviously, the "mind" is really many minds, and the ideas 
are born of spirited debates and careful analvsis of the 
fashion trends this collective individualist has assembled! 

With important decisions out of the way. the confer- 
ence begins to relax. Like a producing director. Joe 
Osherenko stage-manages the rest of the activity . . . cook- 
ing up a favorite barbecue sauce that even has our own 
writing gourmet. Helen Evans Brown, nodding approval. 

Time out for a swim, then Laura E. McVay happens 
by to set up new flower arrangements for our staff pho- 
tographer to picture for some future issue. Future, and 
fashion, and flowers . . . for you! For tomorrow! 

[See subsequent pages to see how these ideas all worked 
out. The Editors.] 




Looking not at all like editors but very much in the 
swim are, left to right, Virginia Scallon, fashion 
editor; Alice Carey, managing editor: Anne Harris, 
fashion art director: Jane Albrecht, fashion artist. 
Standing is Sally Dickason, fashion director: swim- 
ming is Helen Ignatius, feature editor. Jacquelin 
Lary, stylist, just swam out of range of the camera! 















r ? 




i^Hwt 



*, «* - ■ ■ 

trim,, r , » ._. 









■..::, ; f ■ : ■ - 



vrnm^ 





arbara Barondess MacLeans 



favorite of the season, opposite, 

is photographed at our conference. 
Wool jersey, sunburst pleats and 

small waist swathed in velvet. 




This page, Ruth V ^ \^/ hades' 

dramatic casting of suede with knit . . . 

newest co-stars of the winter season. 
No wonder we were inspired to 

think in theatrical terms! 



■Ji 





rene creates the perfect gown for opening nights, for the opera . . . and ava Gardner, 

appearing in MGM's "The Great Sinner" wears it with great distinction. Shimmering opalescent 
beading on briefest bolero, over daringly simple crepe gown that bares the shoulder. 



22 





**• 



FRANK ST1FFLER 




drians taper-slim gown with cascades of taffeta ruffles worn by LIZABETH SCOTT 

soon to appear in Hal Wallis production, "Bitter Victory." The deceptively demure bodice 
of lace contrasts starkly with the sheathlike skirt. Diamond and pearl earrings, candelabra by Brock. 



23 



r- v 



/ 








at Premo's moire and velvet theatre 
dress, opposite . . . when it's 
curtain time for shows like "Finians 
Rainbow," opened recently in Los Angeles, 
you 11 find it's a star in it's own right! 
Worn by MRS. DAVID NIVEN. Hat by Rex. 
Photograph by Engstead. 




athalie Nicoli makes a dramatic 
entrance . . . soft flattery of draped 
neckline, gracefully full skirt in 
Julius Werk's Tableau. Suzy Lee hat. 

rosalee calvert, above, will soon be 
seen in mgm's "East Side West Side." 

25 






.,,:■:,::,, ,::i::|: : .,-- pi; "" . 



ftwwifl 



* 



^**%-%irt;'*-%% 



*- 



Strapless gown by Edith Small in 
the creamy quality of Slipper satin. 
Winged bodice cuff, jutting folds 
to hint at a train. Sizes 10 to 18. 
About $55; Neiman Marcus, 
Dallas; Bonwit Teller. Philadelphia. 

■H 




OONLIT 
SCENES 



Your own sophisticated rhyme of late 

hours and lovely gowns . . . 

Dorothy O'Hara interprets star-time 

in velvet, taffeta-lined flange. 

Sizes 10 to 16, under $90. 

At Bullock's Wilshire, Los Angeles; 

Mildred Moore's, Beverly Hills. 







NCORE! 



Cole of California gives you shadow 
shades of chiffon, billowing from a snug 
matletex waistline . . . demure puff sleeves, 

L 

or off-shoulder for pure drama. About $40.1 



Helen of California dance frock of 
sleek Slipper satin, soft pleats beneath 
great pockets. About $40 at The Fair, 
Fort Worth; Spokane Dry Goods, Spokane. 



28 



Jourdelle of Hollywood goivn for a siren: 

boned bodice, taffeta with woven velvet 

stripes. About $35 at May Company 

Oval Room. Los Angeles; CapwelVs. Oakland. 

Below, Andree Gays dual role costume of 

tissue faille . . . boned bodice, draped 

gown is basic: removable butterfly-bolero 

embroidered brightly. It's about 







1 



,■.:■■"■.-■■■,>•■'.. 



«.,■- 



SSSP- 

"•'■ :■ 





Ken ^ ^ Sutherland doubles in 



velveteen, command performance of 



swashbuckling suit, opposite page. About $75. 



The dress, with tiny collar, is more 



demure. About $50. Both in sizes 10 to 18 



at Haggarty's, Los Angeles; Bullock's, 



Pasadena: and Neiman Marcus. Dallas. 



Louella 




allerino 



an overture to autumn in rich tones of 
velveteen, this page, accompanied by 

jewel-studded belt, boat-neck blouse 
not shown. Sizes 10 to 16, about $80 
for all. At A. Harris, Dallas; May Co., 

Los Angeles; and Joske's, San Antonio. 






dele-California's sensation -^ 
of the season, daring decolletage in 

a jewel-toned suit of Forstmann Marlaine. 
Bold interpretation of details, wide-winging 

lapels. Sizes 10 to 16, about $120. 
Bon Marche, Seattle; Dana, New York. 




ax Kopp heralds the 
triumphant return of pleats to the fashion 
scene, this page. Swirling beauty of the 

butterfly skirt, plunging neckline, contour 
belt. In tissue faille. Sizes 10 to 20. 
About $30. At the May Co., Los Angeles. 



32 




■ '.";, 




■■■ 














CALIFORNIA 
COOKS 



BY HELEN EVANS BROWN 



One thing that China and Italy have in common, gastro- 
nomically. is that the Chinese invented "pastas," those flour 
pastes such as spaghetti and macaroni, that have become 
synonymous with Italian cuisine. Some say that Marco Polo 
brought the first macaroni from China on one of his famous 
journeys, but as the early Romans had a kind of spaghetti, 
the secret must have leaked out long before that. The fact 
remains that though the Chinese may have dreamed it up, 
the Italians knew a good thing when they found it. Another 
thing these two nations have in common is their great contri- 
bution to California cuisine. Of course, the Spaniards and 
the English, the French, the Mexicans, the Portuguese, and the 
Russians all had a cook's hand in this, too, but today, at least 
in California's restaurants. Chinese and Italian dishes are 
among the favorites. Here are a few of the best. 

ITALIAN SUPPER 
Crosrini of Chicken Livers Melon with Prosciutto 

Provolone and Salami Sticks Iced Raw Vegetables 

Vitella Tonnata 

La Sagna Piedmont Green Bean Salad 

Chianti Italian Bread. Chive Butter 

Stuffed Peaches and Pears or Fruits and Cheese 

Coffee 

The hors d'oeuvre, simple but delectable, may be prepared 
well in advance except for a final toasting of the one hot one: 
CROSTINI OF CHICKEN LIVERS 

Cut hard rolls in slices and toast on one side. On the other 
side spread the following mixture and, just before serving, 
slip under the broiler to heat and brown. Mince three shallots 
of green onions and brown them, along with six cleaned 
chicken livers, in three tablespoons of butter. When done, 
mash them well, add salt and fresh ground pepper and a 
pinch of basil, then moisten with a little sherry, marsala, 
or brandy. A tiny bit of lemon juice is added last, to 
point up the flavor. 

The other appetizers are child's play. Prepare sticks of 
celery, carrots, finnochio (the Italian celery-like, anise-flavor- 
ed vegetable), green and sweet red peppers, flowerets of 
cauliflower, and radishes. Add artichoke hearts and peeled 
cherry tomatoes, if you wish. Do all this in advance and 
keep in your vegetable crisper. Serve on a bed of crushed 
ice with 

SALSA VERDE 

Mix together one cup of mayonnaise, a quarter-cup of 
finely minced capers, a half-cup of finely minced parsley, 
three tablespoons of ditto onions, and two tablespoons of 
minced tarragon. Thin, but not too much, with some red 
wine vinegar. 

The other two hors d'oeuvre are simple enough, too. For 
one, cut Provolone (Italian cheese) and salami in half- 
inch cubes, and string alternating on toothpicks. The other 
is made by wrapping cubes of ripe cantaloupe in thin slices 
of Prosciutto (Italian ham) or regular ham and pinning 




with a toothpick. These tidbits may both be stuck into an 
eggplant or cabbage for easy serving. 

VITELLA TONNATA, or VEAL WITH TUNA SAUCCE 
Here's a dish to surprise and enchant everyone. It is 
made several days before it is served, which adds to its en- 
chantment. Select a four-pound shoulder of veal and have the 
bones removed. Lay it out flat, space six or eight filets of 
anchovies across it, then roll and tie. Put it in a deep pan, just 
large enough to hold it, add a sliced onion, a carrot, and an 
herb bouquet made with celery leaves, parsley, bay, and rose- 
mary. Add stock enough to come to the top of the meat (make 
it with those bones you paid for), cover, and simmer slowly 
for an hour and a half or two hours, or until the meat is ten- 
der. Cool, cut in slices, and arrange in a symmetrical man- 
ner on a deep dish. (An oblong Pyrex baking dish is perfect.) 
Reduce the stock to one cup, cool, add a seven-ounce tin of 
grated tuna, six chopped anchovies, a very finely minced clove 
of garlic, a half-cup of olive oil, a half-cup of lemon juice, 
and a quarter-cup of chopped ripe olives. Pour this over the 
veal and let stand in the refrigerator for from two to five 
days. Before serving sprinkle with parsley. (Writing this 
recipe makes me realize that Californians have a real claim 
upon it: olives, olive oil, lemons, tuna fish, even garlic and 
parsley and veal ! ) 

La Sagna is a favorite in California and is sauced in a 
variety of ways, just as spaghetti is. Actually it is a wide 
noodle, sometimes flat like a ribbon, sometimes with a wavy 
edge. Boil it as you would spaghetti, alia dente (that is so 
that you can feel it "under the teeth" — never mushy.) Here is 
enough sauce for a pound of the paste: cook a crushed clove 
of garlic, a minced onion and a small green pepper, chopped, 
in two tablespoons each of butter and olive oil. (If you think 
I'm being extravagant, you're right. Use your pet shortening, 
if you prefer, but don't expect it to be quite as good ! ) When 
the onions are wilted, add a quarter-pound of fresh mushrooms, 
sliced. Cook another two minutes and add a Number Two 
tin of tomato puree, salt, fresh ground pepper, and a goodly 
pinch of oregano. (A half-teaspoon or more, depending on 
how well you love it.) The surprise element in this dish is 
pine nuts. After the sauce has been simmering, ever so gently, 
for an hour, add a half-cup of pine nuts (pignolias). This 
sauce may be made two or three days ahead — indeed it tastes 
better that way, as the various flavors have time to become 
acquainted. Reheat it and serve with the freshly boiled la 
sagna, and pass grated cheese. If even the boiling of the paste 
is more than you want to do at the last minute, make a 
casserole ahead of time: a layer of la sagna, a layer of sauce, 
some thin slices of Mozzarella, and so on to the top. Just 
slip this into the oven before serving. 

GREEN BEAN SALAD 
For a combination vegetable salad I can't think of anything 
better than this. Select one and a half pounds of young and 



34 



tender, string them, but cook them whole and not too long. 
In the water in which they cook toss a clove of garlic for extra 
flavor. While still crisp and green, drain them and set to 
marinate in a sauce made with a half-cup of olive oil, three 
tablespoons of wine vinegar, salt and pepper to taste, and a 
bay leaf. Serve on crisp leaves of romaine. 

Serve Italian bread, sliced but not buttered, and have at 
hand a roll of seasoned butter. Using a butter paddle and a 
board, roll a cube of sweet butter into a long roll, then roll it 
in minced chives. The guests will cut their own butter and 
allow its goodness to melt on the warm crunchy bread. 

STUFFED PEARS OR PEACHES 

Either of these fruits is delicious prepared this way — so 
good that its hard to make a choice. So you might serve both 
and let your guests make the choice. Select ripe but firm 
peaches and/or pears. Remove the skins by blanching quickly 
in boiling water and easing them off. Cut neatly in halves, 
remove pit or core as the case may be. and fill the cavity 
with the following mixture: grind a half-pound of toasted 
almonds and mix with a cup of confectioner's sugar, a quarter- 
teaspoon of salt, a quarter-cup of softened butter, a half-cup 
of Marsala or Sherry, (or orange juice) one tablespoon of 
grated orange rind, and a half-cup of crushed macaroons or 
cake crumbs. After filling, put matching halves together and 
bake in a 350° oven for fifteen minutes, basting with the same 
wine you used in the filling. Serve warm or cold. If all this 
seems to require more energy than you want to expend, serve 
a simple basket of the wonderful ripe fruits that are now in 
season and some cheeses — say a Bel Paese. a Gorgonzola. and 
a Mozzarella. You'll need fruit knives with this, and if you 
don't have them you can make some charming ones by paint- 
ing the handles of five-and-dime vegetable knives with a gay 
lacquer, or by winding their handles with raffia and brushing 
them with a clear plastic coating. 

CHINESE SUPPER 
Charcoal Broiled Spareribs 

Beef Ginger Rice Shrimp Balls with Chinese Peas 

Cold Cucumbers, Chinese Style 

Ice Cream. Oriental 

Chinese Almond Cakes 

This meal, unlike the many-coursed Chinese banquet, is 
easy to prepare beforehand — or at least most of it. It is an 
informal one. planned to be eaten outdoors, near a charcoal 
grill. 

CHARCOAL BROILED SPARERIBS 

These are to be eaten as hors d'oeuvre, with fingers, so be 
sure to supply plenty of large paper napkins. Mix together 
a half-cup of soy sauce, three crushed cloves of garlic, a quar- 
ter-cup of orange marmalade, two tablespoons of cider vine- 
gar, and a quarter-cup of stock. Marinate the spareribs (each 
rib cut apart but left full length) in this mixture for at least 
overnight, preferably for a couple of days, turning occasion- 
ally. Drain and broil over the charcoal, turning with tongs 
as they brown. This will take from forty-five minutes to an 
hour and a quarter, depending on the heat of the bed of 
coals. The guests will love them, so have plenty — besides, 
it's part of your meal. 

BEEF GINGER RICE 
This is delicious and unusual, though not so exotic that it 
won't appeal to everyone. It may be made the day before, 
then steamed hot the last hour before serving. Boil a pound 
of well-washed rice, and be sure it's dry and fluffy. If you 
are not sure of your skill as a rice cooker, use converted 
rice — nothing will phase it. If you can find fresh ginger 
for this, use it, but candied or preserved ginger may be 
used — simply rinse it in water to remove the outside sweet- 
ness. Cut the ginger into slivers, and I mean slivers — no 
bigger than the flat end of a toothpick and about an inch 
long. For a pound of rice use two tablespoons of slivers if 
fresh, three if preserved. Now cut cooked beef into long 
thin strips — these 2 x I/4 x 14 inches (approximately). 
You'll want two cups of this. Mince two bunches of green 
onions, including the tender green part. Measure out a half- 

For your copy of CALIFORNIA COOKS, send $1.00 to The 



cup, and put the rest aside for manana. or whatever tomorrow 
is in Chinese. Heat a quarter-cup of cooking oil, add the 
slivers of beef, the onion, and the ginger. Cook for two 
minutes, stirring constantly. Now add a tablespoon of soy 
sauce (or a teaspoon of salt and a half-teaspoon of mono- 
sodium glutamate), then the rice. Mix so that all the in- 
gredients are well distributed through the dish. To reheat, 
put in a large, rather shallow bowl (a Chinese one if you 
have it!) and place on a rack in a large pan. Pour water 
in the pan. cover tightly, and steam until hot. Before serving 
sprinkle the top with the remainder of the onions and on top 
of that put. of all things, a soft-poached egg! Mix at the 
table, as you would a salad, and if you want to be dramatic 
about it. use chop sticks — it is just as easy as doing the 
job with the more conventional fork and spoon. 

SHRIMP BALLS WITH CHINESE PEAS 
Make these balls in advance. Grind together a pound of 
pork and a pound of raw shrimps, peeled and cleaned. Add 
eight minced water chestnuts (fresh or canned), a half- 
teaspoon of monosodium glutamate, an egg, a teaspoon of 
salt, and a tablespoon of cornstarch. Make into a long roll, 
an inch in diameter, and cut into inch lengths. (This makes 
it easy to have balls of uniform size.) Roll each piece into 
a ball, then roll in sesame seeds, and fry in shortening, 
turning so that they will be brown all over. Set aside and 
prepare a half-pound of Chinese peas by removing their tips 
and strings. Now cut four celery stalks (the outside ones 
do nicely) in very diagonal quarter-inch slices. This may 
all be done the day before. The day of the party heat two 
tablespoons of oil in a heavy saucepan, add the celery, and 
cook, stirring, for two minutes. Remove from the fire, add 
the peas (don't cook them!). Stir again and set aside. Now 
make a sauce with two cups of rich, well seasoned chicken 
stock, and two tablespoons of corn starch dissolved in two 
tablespoons of cold water. Cook until clear. (If you prefer 
a sweet and sour sauce, make it with one and a quarter cups 
of pineapple juice, a third-cup of vinegar, a quarter-cup of 
sugar, a quarter-teaspoon of salt, and" two tablespoons of 
corn starch dissolved in a quarter-cup of water. In this case 
also add thin slices of pineapple, cut in wedges.) Keep 
either sauce hot in a double boiler, covered. When serving 
time comes, pop in the meat balls, and when they are hot 
add the vegetables. Leave over the fire just long enough for 
the peas to heat — ■ don't let them lose their crispness or 
their bright green color. This shouldn't take more than a 
minute in the hot sauce. Serve this with the rice and with 
the nearest thing the Chinese have to a salad: 

COLD CUCUMBERS, CHINESE STYLE 
Slice unpeeled cucumbers fairly thin, and marinate in a 
mixture of equal parts of soy sauce, vinegar, and vegetable 
oil. (Never olive oil, preferable sesame oil.) 

Chinese almond cakes are strangely like Scotch shortbread, 
though fond as I am of Chinese food. I think the Scottish 
version is the best. This is because the Chinese use oil, or 
lard, instead of butter, and seem to have a taste for sweets 
that are unsalted. And so, with apologies to no one, I give 
my version of 

CHINESE ALMOND CAKES 
Using your hands, work together two cups of flour, a 
half-pound of butter, a quarter-teaspoon of salt, a half-tea- 
spoon of almond extract, and a half-cup of powdered sugar. 
Now roll in balls, using the same technique suggested for 
the meat balls, and arrange the balls well apart on a 
cookie sheet. Put a half a blanched almond on each roll and, 
using the bottom of an ordinary water tumbler, press each 
cake flat. This makes them a nice uniform shape and also 
makes the almond stay put. Bake at 350° until just barely 
colored. 

The ice cream is Occidental as is rum. but the kumquats 
give it an Oriental air. If you are a purist, serve the preserved 
kumquats alone, but I think you'll like them sliced very thin 
and ladled over the vanilla ice cream, along with some of 
the syrup and a blessing of rum. That does it. 

CALIFORNIAN, 1020 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, California 



35 




Below: "Carolina" Cantilever Chair 



s you like it" . . . you can live "the California 
way" wherever you are, for the carefree color- 
ful mode of life identified with California im- 
plies not only the clothes you wear but a 
joyous new informality in the very furnishing 
of your home ... to set a new tempo to your 
days. Not since Puritan days has there been any new de- 
velopment in American furniture, and then the adventurous 
pioneers were satisfied with stern and stark lines that had 
neither charm nor comfort. 

It took Californians to bring you a completely new era in 
home furniture . . . born of a leisured way of living comfort- 
ably, graciously. Sherman/Bertram of California highlight 
this new feeling for furniture which they describe as "neither 
light nor heavy, large enough for comfort and to be pleasing 
to the eye." 

Chairs and sofas created by these young-thinking designers 
are made to 'be sat into, not on. Every piece is engineered 
so that the body has proper organic support for complete 
relaxation ; the angle of the seat, its height from the floor, the 
pitch of the back, all have been scientifically tested for 
physical comfort. What's more, even chairs are made large 
enough so that a person can move around while seated. 

More obvious in the Sherman/Bertram line, however, is 
the dramatic perfection of every detail . . . luxurious fabrics 
in typical California colors for the perfect "staging" of care- 







Right: "Georgia" for deep comfort 



free living in your home! There's pure design and sim- 
plicity far removed from the cumbersome "moderne" of a 
decade ago; there's originality and functional Tightness de- 
signed for contemporary living. 

Newest Sherman/Bertram development is the Television 
Ottoman, revolutionary piece (or pieces) designed for the 
current age of home television parties. Here is a basic 
circular ottoman of generous size and great comfort; under- 
neath are nested four little "ottoboys" which may be pulled 
out in a jiffy to seat four more people. 

This is a wonderful example of functional design for the 
T-V Ottoman may be used for cocktail table, to seat one or 
two people ... or expanded to accommodate extra "sitters." 
Despite its size, the piece is easy to move into the center of 
the room, the little concealed seats are light and portable. 

The Constellation sofa is one of the most popular pieces by 
Sherman/Bertram, its massive nine-and-a-half foot size con- 
ducive to real comfort, its lines and luxurious fabric scaled 
and proportioned for beauty. Pictured above is the Carolina 
chair with cantilever arms of unbelievable strength despite 
their slim loveliness; and the Georgia chair, typical of Cali- 
fornia. The Host chair initialed on this page will give a 
decorator flair to your dining room. It's a pull-up chair of 
varied uses. 

Yes, this is California living . . . and it's yours, wherever 
you live. 



36 






''■■• s 



_____ 

B_____i 

I 






.<«- 






!*:.'■'•■— 



M 







Boon fo a nosJ u'no likes to entertain graciously, Sherman/Bertram Television Ottoman with concealed "ottoboys" for expandable seating capacity. 

"GOOD THEATRE" THEMES 

THE FURNISHING OF YOUR HOME, TOO 

The Constellation sofa extends comfort to new lengths: nine-and-a-halj-jeet scaled for comfort, proportioned for eye-appeal . . . and instant hospitality! 




. 






The young woman who plays the hostess at home thinks only in terms of perfection . . . and taffeta whispers 
it's so. Above left, a pert apron tops this confection by Lanz of California, velvet-edge neckline. 
Sizes 9 to 17, about $25 at all Lanz stores in California. Right, the contrast of ivindow plaid and 
plain bodice, portrait neckline. By Carl Anne, Jr. in sizes 9 to 17, under $18. Black only. 
^ Choose something sweet . . . and perfect for dinner at home. Ethel Joseph combines a lovely Crompton twill 

back velveteen skirt with the important jersey blouse, smocking at shoulder. Sizes 32 to 38. 
About $24 for both at Lucy's, Hollywood. Our model hostesses were invited to visit Helms Bakeries for party tips. 



39 




mams 



ma 




Ideal for the bridge game or tea party . . . left, Dale Hunter 
combines stripes and plain in a two-piece dress, rayon 

gabardine by California Fabric Co. In sizes 10 to 20, it's under 
$20. At Stephens, Riverside; Emporium, San Francisco; 
the Princess Shop, Daytona Beach. Right, Caltex 
uses Egyptian cotton suede cloth for dress suit, slim skirt, 

stole. About $35. Toast, green, sapphire, gold. 



40 




Delectable . . . and designed for social triumphs at home. 
This velveteen skirt and high-necked jersey blouse 

are a striking blend of the demure and suave in design. 
You'll want this full skirt with huge embroidered pockets. 

Designed for you by Louella Ballerino. Sizes 10 to 16. 

Both about $40. Available at Neiman Marcus, Dallas; 
Bonnie Best, Beverly Hills; and The May Co. Wilshire. 



41 



Star 




Your Accessories 









6 



Though cast in minor roles, accessories have been 
known to steal the show. Take, for example, the 
hats, bags, gloves, and shoes presented on these 
pages . . . destined, quite obviously, to have a 
timeless appeal. We have photographed them in 
the most appropriate setting hereabouts . . . Grau- 
mans Chinese Theatre in Hollywood, where the 
stars leave their foot and handprints in the blocks 
of cement in the patio (rather than in the shift- 
ing sands of time.) I. Velvet, that most luxurious 
of fabrics is now used by Ted Saval in an ankle- 
strap low-heeled party shoe. 2. Sbicca of Cali- 
fornia's "Pixie" shoe, in suede and other leathers, 
and in almost every color imaginable. 3. "Informal 
Fashions" pump-tab shoes by Wolock, Ltd., en- 
livened by a single shining button. 4. Ted Saval's 
ankle-strap shoe with a curved, slender wedge. 
The highlights, glowing gunmetal kid. 5. Ankle- 
strap sandal in all leathers, with sparkling lam- 
inated beadwork. By Wolock, Ltd. 6. Six hands, 
beautifully gloved by Ailuj. 7. Corde handbag, 
notable for classic simplicity of line. By Century 
Handbag Co. 8. The "Commuter" bag in cowhide 
with a calf finish. By Emmet of California. 9. A 
unique bag with a practical diagonal opening by 
Sydney of California. In calfskin, suede, lizard, 
alligator, and even cobra, it's accessory news. 






THE FEMININE FLAIR 



CORDELIA OF HOLLYWOOD 



This year, designers have made good use of the scissor. 

There is more fabric on the cutting room floor than 
on the bra. Underthings are definitely brief. 

And very definitely pretty. Fabrics are lighter, finer. Nylon, 
the star of the season, plays a magical number of roles: 

marquisette, net, lace, satin, taffeta. The color range 
extends far beyond the boundaries of traditional white and pink . . . 
subtle pale pastels, blue, yellow, mauve; gay red and white or blue and white 
check; tiny prints, a scattering of rosebuds or forget- 
me-nots. Complete femininity is the rule with the return 
of laces, ribbons, bows, faggotting, rosettes. 
This year, women can discover again the pleasure 

of wearing bras which not only create a lovely bustline but 
satisfy the totally feminine urge for real beauty of design 




HOLLYWOOD-MAXWELL CO. 




(CALIFORNIA IN BOOKS 

| Fabulous Boulevard, by Ralpb 
Hancock, Funk & Wagnalls, 
$3.50, 311 p. 

As fantastic as any fable, this story of a 
Los Angeles thoroughfare is, in reality, a 
Isprightly history of the city itself. Hancock, 
who describes himself as a "native Califor- 
nian" from the middlewest, writes of the 
growth of the sprawling metropolis sometimes 
with awe, always with tongue-in-cheek. 

The longest and widest boulevard in the 
world. Wilshire, is his device for interpreting 
the phenomenon that is Los Angeles and, 
while highly informative, it is a gay recital 
about sleek-fronted exclusive shops, flamboy- 
ant hamburger stands, the finest hotels, park- 
ing lots, business districts with world head- 
quarters of huge firms, vacant lots, world-fa- 
mous night clubs, drive-ins, the unbelievable 
Miracle Mile. 

Hancock reviews the history that belongs 
to the boulevard . . . Wilshire quaked be- 
neath prehistoric monsters who were trapped 
in the tar pits of La Brea, it was an Indian 
trail, path of explorers, El Camino Real of 
the padres, and eventually, a horse-and-buggy 
picnic route to the beach. The boulevard's 
architecture reflects the stream of humanity 
that has poured into the city, and throughout 
is the touch of the movie-lot and the romantic 
remnants of the Spanish occupation in gleam- 
ing white walls and an occasional pastel side- 
walk. 

Delightful reading and of particular interest 
to the transplanted "natives" who have made 
Los Angeles their home. 



ALL THIS -AND NO ATTACHMENTS 



The ONLY Sewing Machine 
that does everything without 
fussing with clumsy, old- 
fashioned attachments. 
And for 




Available in 

DESKS • PORTABLES 
CONSOLES • COMMERCIALS 

Choice of finishes: 

BLOND, WALNUT, MAHOGANY, 

MAPLE, SILVER FOX 



FREE HOME DEMONSTRATION 

PICO, INC. 



FACTORY PARTS 



1800 S. MAIN ST., LOS ANGELES 15 
Richmond 6881 — JEfferson 6670 sales and service 





today's 
fashion... 

Save a trip 

to the store 
Just walk 

to your door 




8800 VENICE BOULEVARD 



1949 



47 




THIS HANDBAG 
IS A JEWEL! 

Large, spacious, different . . . definite- 
ly! Made in old Mexico. Handtooled 
Aztec Rose design on soft, beautiful 
leather . . . Natural, black, dark brown, 
Painted Desert red, or Aztec red. Has 
glove compartment on back . . . two 
zippers reveal roomy inside pockets . . . 
coin purse, snap-fastened bill fold, 
mirror-and-identification case. Adjust- 
able strap. 
Postpaid, tax included, $23.50 

TEEPEE TRADERS 

Gallup New Mexico 

egseesssssssessseesssssg 



CALIFORNIAN 

CHIRSTMAS 
GIFT ORDER... 

One year subscription $3.00 

Each additional $2.00 

Canadian and foreign add $1.00 



The CALIFORNIAN Way of GIVING 

starts with the first copy 

and keeps on all the year 

when you give THE CALIFORNIAN 

Fashion Magazine for more 

colorful LIVING . . . 

Please send THE CALIFORNIAN with 
special Christmas greeting card . . 




Make Your 

Own 

Dress Form 

at Home 



Materials and complete instruc- 
tions. Patent method. Fast, ac- 
curate, successful. Used for 
teaching. Practical gift. Pre- 
paid in U. S. $2.25 each. 

ECONOMY DRESS FORM 

4009 Arcade Building 
Seattle 1, Washington 



TO: 

ADDRESS: 



CITY ZONE.. 

STATE...: 



GIFT CARD TO READ:. 
FROM 



I inclose $ Bill me □ 



Name 

Address.. 



City... 

Zone.. 




From husky St. Bernard to playful 
Cocker, this sturdy stake-tether will 
keep 'em home. Free-swinging, non- 
tangling Swivel allows dog full 360- 
degree range. Keeps dog contented, 
yet confined. Simply drive 16-inch 
all-steel rust-resistant stake into the 
ground. Postpaid for $1.75. 1 0-f t. 
Chain, snaps at both ends, $1.25. 
Both stake and chain only $2.75 com- 
plete. Ten-day money-back guarantee. 
Order yours today. 

MODEL PATENT MFG. CO. 

1019 Cook Street 
Denver 6, Colorado 





Compact Travel KIT 



Sectional kit with quality beauty necessities 
Lipstick-Rouge; Mirror, Powder and Puff; Cleansing 
Cream; Night Cream ... combined in light-weight, 
handsome, black and white plastic, 4-section case. 

Ample supply for traveling, vacations, etc. Stands 
5 inches tall, 2V2 inches diameter. Each section a 
standard size package. . . Easily tucked in hand- 
bag, overnight case or car compartment. 

Marvelous Gilt 
Complete with 
Cosmetics .... 
Fed. Tax Incl. 



Specify: Light, Medi 
um or Dark Lipstick 
Rouge: Nos. 1 or S 
Rachel, Beiffe or Nat 
ural Face Powder. 



$3-75 



KIT ONLY ' 



ith 



Irrror & Puff, $1.75, Postpaid U.S.A. 



(^oionial L^oimetic Lo. 

Since 1929 
Norwood, S.E. — Grand Rapids 6, Mich. 



MUSIC NOTES: LILLIAN STEUB; 



Lillian Steuber, the distinguish- 
ed California pianist, will appear 
in recital at the Wilshire Ebell 
Theatre in Los Angeles on Sun- 
day, October 9th. Her program is 
a well-balanced one, including se- 
lections from the works of Mozart, 
Brahms, Schumann, Debussy, Cho- 
pin, and Harrison Kerr. 

Miss Steuber's rare musical per- 
ception and brilliant technique 
have won for her the highest criti- 
cal acclaim. When she played in 
Mexico City by invitation of the 
Department of Fine Arts, the re- 
viewer of "El Nacional" wrote that 
"her performance was that of a 
great pianist in the most extensive 
meaning of the term." Her con- 
certs in eastern cities have been 
equally well-received. The New 
York Times lauded her "singular- 
ly clear and spirited playing" and 
the Boston American praised her 
for catching "the essential spirit of 
the composer as few young artists 
do." Miss Steuber is as noted for 
her remarkably comprehensive 
repetoire as for her great skill as 
a performer. She has played as 
many as twenty recitals in various 
cities without the repetition of a 
single work. 

After intensive training with 
Julian Pascal, Josef Lhevinne, 



HOW 



ill 
■ ill 



Harold Bauer, and Egon 
Miss Steuber made her ore! 
debut with the Los Angeles 
harmonic Orchestra under t 
rection of Rodzinski. She 
quently performed a Beel 
Cycle under Klemperer am 
tinued her orchestral appea 
with Barrere, Janssen, Lert, 
milovich, Sokoloff, Usigli 
others. 

In Southern California, s' 
given numerous "first pe 
ances" of solo and chamber 
by many of the leading cont 
rary composers. Guest 
ances with organizations si 
the London String Quartet a 
Weiss Woodwind Ensemr 
well as sonata and trio cc 
with eminent instrumentalist 
established Miss Steuber's 
tion as a topranking er 
player. 

Perhaps it should be 
briefly here that Lillian S! — 
seems to thrive on an ext: 
crowded schedule of musii 
tivities. Besides her many c< 
each season, she has an ex 
teaching program. And as 
ber of the Artist Faculty 
University of Southern Cali 
she is heard in frequent 
casts over the FM station 



<!:■ 



th; 



IV 



ACCENT ON FRAGRAN 



ENGLISH COLOGNE: A WONDERFUL BLEN 



With designers stressing femi- 
ninity in their newest creations . . . 
with fashion bowing to romance, 
it is wise for every woman to ac- 
centuate her loveliness with the 
one added touch that makes her 
remembered as well as admired. 
A soft fragrance to whisper of her 
entrance ... a touch of "good 
theatre" in the most subtle way. 

Since elegance is the keynote 
for the season in luxurious fabrics, 
cavalier collars, and regal treat- 
ment of details, we checked with 
an authority on that cologne of 
royalty, Atkinsons. Paul Randall, 
New York importer of Gold 
Medal, English Lavender, and 
Royal Briar, flew into town for a 
day and during his visit told us 
that more of these delicate English 
colognes are being made available 
to American women. Famous for 
more than a century in England 
we discovered that Atkinson's Eau 
De-Cologne has long been a favor 
ite among South American women 
a Latin confirmation of our 



manticism" theory. 

Our own local checkup 
that many socialites and 
picture stars also underli: 
charm with these fragrance 

Mr. Randall revealed hig 
in the history of this 
house, perfumers to kin; 
queens by Royal Warrant, 
ably the oldest firm of its 
the world, it was founded i 
by James Atkinson, who 
modestly with a single pi 
His descendants and theij 
ciates built the business 
industry that attracted thi 
tion of nineteenteh centur 
and of royal families, wl 
enchanted by the scents, 

In these early days, all A 
experts had their own sec 
mulae, and as the years 
only the most wonderful 
were preserved. And tod; 
years later — these are the c 
that appear on the dressin :aM 
of royal princesses, senori 
lovely American women. 



its 



III! 









RUNNING COLT 




|d colt doe and fawn 

CHRISTMAS orders in NOW1 
I original handmade Animal 
|ilk screened. Can be paired in 
ind colors of Rose Pink, Tur- 
Slue, Medium Green, etc. Outer 
x 16" in light natural wood 
mats for your own framing, 
ed $3.00 each, 4 for $10.00 
re J6.50 eoch, 2 for $12, 4 for $23 
ristmos Orders to Dec. 1 , Please! 
»r further information and photos 
sent to you of other pictures 



ress Prepaid, No C. O. D.'s. 
id Check or Money Order to 




BIG KITCH! 

) your kitchen match boxes 
irful, polished aluminum hold- 
>welry colors — ruby, sapphire, 
ild. Bring them into the liv- 
library and bar. Use on 

around fireplaces and swim- 
Is. A "must"' for pipe smokers. 

h includes parcel post. 

tch — smaller edition for safety 

identical colors. Three for 

heck or money order. No 

please. 

irifics Corporation 
iTAM, CONNECTICUT 




fidni^Ai Mad+ieiA 

I »>sphorescence on the waters of a 

'uf a9 ° 0n at M'd n '9 nt can equal the 
:hll. sparkle of this large oval, man- 
e IjXCK OPAL. This beautiful ring comes 
IMdistinctive Wanderlust sea shell, 
'y.ailored bezel setting m Sterling or 
"" '* gold filled. Order today. "Delight 
ounoney back." State size and setting 
'5)0. 

IHE WALES WORKSHOP 

9 \K HILL AVE., ATTLEBORO, MASS. 



Art Moves Out Of The Ivory Tower 

Edward A. Adams, head of The Art Center School in Los An- 
geles, has no patience with the idea that artists in the modern 
world must perforce starve, live in garrets, and develop an ad- 
vanced state of bitterness because they find it impossible to earn 
a living with their art. 

Mr. Adams recognizes the fact that today's art patrons are busi- 
ness and industry, and the 1,000 students at the Center are re- 
ceiving fine technical training in Advertising Design, Industrial 
Design. Photography, Painting and Illustration. The school is 
run like a workshop with no clocks, grades, or diplomas. Fifty- 
eight outstanding professional designers, photographers, and artists 
comprise the teaching staff. After receiving expert instruction in 
the basic fundamentals of art, each student specializes in his chosen 
field. Adams refuses to waste time with students who regard art 
only as a pleasant way to spend their Sunday afternoons. The 
strictest professional standards are enforced and during the average 
year, 20% of the student body is "fired." 

Adams expects his students to work and to work hard. "They 
may not love me," he states, "but I think they know I will fight 
for them." Adams works overtime placing students in top-ranking 
jobs and has gained a reputation for complete honesty and good 
judgment in his evaluation of a student's work. Many firms have 
hired young men and women simply on Adams' recommendation. 
Art Center alumni are doing outstanding work in every field de- 
manding first-rate talent in the arts. 

W hile carefully fostering artistic growth and maturity. Adams 
does not allow the personal, emotional side of the students' na- 
tures to wither and die. He gives them praise when they deserve it 
and advice when they need it. One of the school's policies, as a 
matter of fact, is to aid students in any sort of difficulty, and Adams 
will do anything to help them. He once paid for a set of false 
teeth so that one of his students could smile again. 



Handmade Leather Pouch Bag 




HANDBAGS by Patricia 



A casual leather creation — the perfect com- 
plement to any outfit. Deep and roomy, all 
leather lined with adjustable shoulder straps, 
inside zipper pocket, safety catch fastener. 
An exquisile, handmade pouch bag you'll be 
proud to own or give. Your choice of seven 
luscious shades — honey, luggage, chocolate, 
turf green, cherry red, navy blue, or black. 

Sorry no CO. D.'s 

<jl»l O CO (plus 20% luxury tax, 
<S>14.&\J 2% soles tax in Calif., 

3'/2% sales tax in 

Los Angeles) 

2815 S. Robertson Blvd. 
Los Angeles 34, California 



7HU 

TIDIES UP YOUR 
TIES! 




For easy tie selection 
ties hang on indi- 
vidual clear plastic 

hangers that slide freely on 15" chrome 
bar. Rich mahogany plastic back. Gilt 
boxed! 

BELDING NOVELTIES CO. 

1895 Reyborn Ave., Cleveland 12, Ohio 
Dept. 6 



(Capacity) 

30 TIES 83.50 postpaid 

40 TIES $3.75 postpaid 

50 TIES $4.00 postpaid 

(No CO. D.'s, please) 




LOOK YOONGER 

as You Grow Older 




DeMldCultUM 

nun* **ex ok; u s. w? oct 

A PROVEN SCIENTIFIC 

FACIAt TREATMENT 

AND 

PIEASANT NON-SURGICAL 

REJUVENATION and FACE LIFT 

(1) Removes blackheads, white heads, ond 
tissue debris. 

(2) CORRECTS enlarged, clogged pores, dry 
skin, oily skin, sallowness, and blem- 
ishes 

(3) CLEARS the skin of acne and pimples. 

(4) SMOOTHES wrinkles, and erases facial 

lines. 

(5) TIGHTENS sagging cheeks and double 
chins. 

(6) 'NCREASES circulation and tissue nutri- 
tion. 

(7] VITALIZES nerve, gland, muscle and 

skin structure. 
(8| RESTORES natural, lovely skin. 

Visit the DermaCulture Studio nearest 
you: 

Alhambra ATlantic 4-9551 

Belmont Shore 203 Glendora Ave. 

Berkeley LAnd 6-3710 

3179 College Ave. 

Fresno 3097 Tulare Ave. 

Hollywood GRanite 2978 

Glendole 1123 N. Brand Blvd. 

Long Beach 742 Pine Ave. 

Los Angeles 3156 Wilshire Blvd. 

900 S. Norton Ave. 

Modesto 100 S. Burney St. 

North Hollywood 12131 Riverside Dr. 

Oakland 1225 Broadway 

Pasodena 258 S. Las Robles Ave. 

Pomona 200 E. Center St. 

San Francisco YUkon 6-6325 

San Jose Suite 459, Porter Bldg. 

San Mateo 318 B. Street 

Santa Ana 405V2 N. Broadway 

Santa Monica 271 9-E Santa Monica Blvd. 



MIRAGE 



AN ILLUSION IN 

BLACK SHEER 

NYLON 

A mere shadow for 
that modest minimum 
you want under all 
your casual and for- 
mal clothes! Elim- 
inates all waist-line 
bulk. 

BLACK NYLON 

SHEER 

Only S2.95 

Include hip measure. 
Send check with order. 
Sorry, no C.O.D. We 
prepay 1st class mail. 



h 




Pamela Qay 

Box 23-C • Melrose 76, Massachusetts 



|r H E CALIFORNIAN, October, 1949 



49 



* i 

I CARDS & FREDERIKSEN g 

I g 

| Gmistmas g 

* s 

g at better stores | 

* 1 

I 8 



BIG BEAR LAKE 

San Bernardino Mts., Calif. 

ICagmtfta 

"On the Lake at Big Bear Lake" 

— FOR RESERVATIONS — 

See your favorite travel agent or write to 

P. O. Box 24, Big Bear Lake — Owned and 

Operated by Harry and Adelia Becker. 



New Aids To Beauty 

For quite some time now (one might 
even venture to say for centuries), 
poets have immortalized among other 
things the glowing, radiant, magnificent 
skin of beautiful women. Formerly, 
the privilege of having one's skin re- 
corded for all time in a sonnet, ode, or 
some such thing, was restricted to a 



PauMi ^buck P>ve4A 



RESTAURANT 

Steaks, chops, duck, 
steamed clams, lob- 
ster, venison steaks, 
pheasant, veal scal- 
lopini, chicken saute 
sec. Romaine a la 
Paul & other entrees. 




Your Host: Paul Maggiora 
* PHONE MADISON 9-8336 * 



Olympic at Santa Fe, Los Angeles n 



C/ or jorty-tliree years 

the standards of cfuality 
Governing the production 

oj GJ cully O/uedes 
have made it impossible 
to produce enough oj 
ihese remarkable garments 
to satisfy the demand. 



You'll find them 
only at the 
* * finest stores; we'll 
tell you where. 




LOS ANGELES 21X CALIFORNIA 



few young ladies who had come into 
the world with perfect complexions 
and, occasionally, to a few older 
ladies who somehow had managed to 
hang onto their youthful glitter. 

Today, with the advent of Derma 
Culture, it is not rash to predict that 
there are bound to be a greater num- 
ber of poems devoted to the charms 
of a greater number of complexions. 
For DermaCulture recognizes one of 
the basic urges of all womankind . . . 
as they say. "Every woman covets a 
complexion which can defy bright day- 
light without flinching." And what's 
more, they have developed a method of 
electro-chemical therapy aimed at cre- 
ating a clean, glowing, youthful com- 
plexion for women of every age group. 

This method creates a healthy, fine- 
textured skin through deep pore cleans- 
ing and the regrowing of new tissue. 

The first step in the treatment is to 
thoroughly cleanse the face with a gen- 
tle vacuum process which normalizes 
enlarged pores by removing all toxic 
and waste materials. The second step 
is a process which regrows the con- 
nective tissue and stimulates the oil 
glands so that they function normally. 
When the underlying structure of the 1 
skin is rebuilt, the sagging lines and 
wrinkles are eliminated. 

In addition to this electro-chemical 
therapy, DermaCulture has developed 
a series of skin correctives for further 
beautification and cleansing. A clean 
skin is always a beautiful skin regard- 
less of age. Once women realize this 
there will be much more attention paid 
to this phase of their beauty routine. 



50 



THE CALIFORNIAN, October, 1949 



\biSl J dfj 



I 



You can't miss in a Catalina. Daring . . . original . 
California inspired styling. Beautifully created in California's 
own action-packed colors. 




ABOVE: 

DuPont Crimp-set 

Nylon Cardigan, 

9.00 

Shown with DuPont Crimp-set 

Nylon Slip-on, 

7.00 

BELOW: 

Cable Blazer, 

14.00 




. vulLw Vjtfa&lf 



Sweaters 

LOOK FOR THE \/ FLYING FISH 



FOR COLOR FOLDER SHOWING OTHER CATALINA SWEATERS, WRITE DEPT. 820, 
CATALINA, INC.. 443 SOUTH SAN PEDRO STREET, LOS ANGELES 13, CALIFORNIA 



M 



\fff 



% 




Paris Original Model by Lai via, to duplicate from Vogue Pattern 1052 in moonstone Clmmoire or other jewel colors, 

SUE DEC 15 '49 

CHAMOIRE . . . First oi Bates new career cottons for fall, worn by New York model 
Betty Bridges on the jcb and after. Chamoire is a fine all-combed cotton marked after the 
manner of watered silk ... a completely new cotton that achieves ultimate elegance in a 
permanent (and washable) moire pattern exclusive with Bates. 




m 



f A 



bR» 



es 



"LOOMED TO BE HE1RLOOMED" 



BATES FABRICS, INC., 80 WORTH ST., NEW YORK 13 



A MAGAZINE STYLED FOR COLORFUL LIVING 



ALIFOR 

CE 35 CENTS 





.*' ■&''"' 



4fv_ •— A 



£»• 






19 4 9 



id — * 

4-- O 

to CJ 



O co o 

en t-i +* 

l c c 

•"3 tt <B 

C* O S 

O «-■ 1< 






1 E 



B 



*.'. 




y 







moub iailoM 



w- 




precious taili 
is Ixosenblum tailo 
is tailoring by rnasn. 
craftsmen who for decai 
nave been mak\ 
the finest ready-to- 
man-tailored suits, the Ju\ 
suit values in Amermhy 

this Jxosenolum two-shim 
with easy young lit | 
perfect drape, hand-pic 



edges, meticulous Jm 

in superb homes} 

overplaids, checks, stnj 

has extra skirt in monot 

tweed or covert... s 

10 to 20... 49. 95 jot 

three pieces .. .at fine sto\ 
Rosenblum, Lios An t 



MAN -•tailored in C alijornia 





filter 






**■ 






w 



i.-a?5f 






Av, 




i 



THE SOFT TOUCH 3F VELVETEEN Romantic holiday colors in a dress for festive days 
G/**ff\^ ahead . . . superbly simple and so elegant . . . retail about $55.00. 



Available at: Neiman Marcus • Carson-Pirie-Scott • Haggarty's • Bullock's — Downtown • Bullock's — Pasadena • H. Liebes — San Francisco 




THE CALIFORNIAN is published by The Californian, Inc., at 1020 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, Calif., printed in U.S.A. Yearly sub- NOVEMBER 
scription price $3.00. Entered as second class matter January 23, 1946, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, Calif., under the act of March 3, 1879. 19 4 9 







i 



/ 




For store in your city write ADELE-CALIFORNIA, 2615 South Hill Street, Los Angeles 7, Calif. 



ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 



c 



c 



hristmas gifts 
in the 
alifornia manner 




CIRCUS EATING SET: Three delightful pieces to en- 
trance any tot. Dinner dish is hand-painted with 
clown and dog inside; cover is shaped like a circus 
tent. Measures 8 inches across. Matching cereal bowl 
measures 4'/; inches across. Mug, shaped like clown 
face, with lid for hat, measures 8 inches high, and 
holds 8 ounces of milk. Gay white, green, red, 
blue and brown colors. $7.50 for complete set. Mug 
alone, $2.50. (Add 25c for postage). 




TIMOTHY TIMER: IV; minute timer in California 
ceramic for brushing teeth, phone calls, timing cook- 
ing, etc. White, blue and brown color combination. 
Measures 3 V2 inches high. Comes gift boxed. $1 .25, 
postpaid. 



4^2 jfljl 3* 



CHINESE SPRINKLE BOY: Cute California ceramic 
sprinkle boy to make short work of sprinkling clothes. 
Measures 8V2 inches high. White, black and blue 
trim. $1.95, postpaid. 

No. C.O.D. — please. Send check, cash or money order. 
(Residents of California — please add 3% sales tax.) 




Send for illustrated catalog 
of other delightful California 
gift items. 



TEE CORRAL SHOP 



• ANCHO SANTA F! • CALIFORNIA 



«w$$8 




/W*—f; 






LUVRE-LITE . . . Pat. pend. TURN THE 
DIAL, DIRECT THE LIGHT TO ANY AN- 
GLE! Make light BRIGHT or SOFT! Thil 
ideal all-purpose home lamp of durable steel 
is the smartest ever. Use it ON THE DESK 
(bracket detaches, lamp stands upright on 
rubber legs). ON THE WALL (as a pin-up), 
ON THE BED (bracket fits any headboard) 
USED ANYWHERE. Portable and intelli 
gently engineered for better lighting. Com 
plete with standard globe. Underwriters lab, 
approved. Will not mar surfaces. Finest qual- 
ity. Ivory, pearl grey, shell pink, mahogany, 
blond, lite-blue. $4.95 prepaid. COURTLEY'S, 
Box 326, Dept. 44, San Francisco, Calif. 

GIFT FOR CANASTA FIENDS! . 

Unique, this tidbit Server and Scoop of 
Formed Glenwood Ware in birchwood, de- 
signed by Paul R. Williams. Choose the rich 
Natural finish, or a lovely Hand-painted pat- 
tern. Richness of texture and color will last, 
new plastic finish makes surface impervious 
to food or liquids! Use it for candy, nuts* 
popcorn, potato chips, pickles ... no odors 
or flavors retained. Guaranteed against split- 
ting, cracking or warping. Super gift for 
Xmas, for yourself! Gift Boxed. Postpaid 
Natural, $2.75; Hand-painted, $3.65. Posti 
card brings free booklet. Dept L., Alvin En- 
terprises, 509 N. Fairfax Ave., Hollywood 
36, Calif. 

PFAFF ... is the only sewing machine 
that will do all of the stitches shown, with- 
out any attachments whatsoever, as illustrated:; 
(1) Overlook edging; (2) Sew on any sizes 
button; (3) Any size buttonhole; (4) Orna- 
mental sewing; (5) Embroidery and mono- 
gramming; (6) Rick-Rack embroidery; (7)' 
Sew backward and forward. Yes, all these- 
without attachments, without broken thread — 
and for LESS MONEY! Pfaff machines arl 
available in desks, portables, consoles, and) 
commercials — in your choice of finish. Phone 
Richmond 6881 for your free demonstration, 
or write for further information to: Pico' 
Inc., 1800 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, 
Calif. 

AUTHENTIC COOLIE PAJAMAS . . . 

for lounging, gardening, and housework — 
especially designed for fashionable freedom. 
Here's smart daytime comfort, oriental style. 
Beautifully fashioned in durable, washable 
butcher linen. Authentic mandarin collar. 
Handmade frogs for closing. A perfect selec- 
tion you can give with pride . . . the very 
gift you'll choose for your own. Your choice 
in fast pastel colors of pink, blue, tobacco, 
and mauve. Black trousers for contrast if 
you wish. Sizes to 40. $4.95 (plus 25c post- 
age). Exclusive only with Fuerst. Order by 
mail from R. L. Fuerst, 21 Grant Ave., San 
Francisco, Calif. 






ROUND-THE-POLE . . . patio table cloth. 
A summery delight is this gay table cloth 
. . . just throw it 'round the pole and zip it 
up! Hand-printed in attractive basket weave 
of mercerized cotton, richly colored in red 
and white; blue and white; or green and 
white. It fits any garden table, round or 
square. Just $4.95 postpaid. Californians add 
3% sales tax, 3 l / 2 % in Los Angeles. Match- 
ing ready-hemmed napkins, 18" wide, just 
40c each. Send your orders to the Margorita 
Shop, 1018 South Main St., Los Angeles 15, 
Calif. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1949 




SANTA COMES 26 WEEKS a year . . 
for LETTER-FOR-YOU CLUB members. 
Each week the postman will deliver your 
favorite 8 to 12-year-old youngster a per- 
sonally addressed letter brimful of wholesome, 
fascinating reading matter for children; pack- 
ed with contests, prizes and extra surprises 
directly from THE LETTER PAL. Member- 
ship includes: 26 jumbo weekly letters in 4 
colors; birthday gift; membership card; and 
personalized gift card from donor. Only §1-75 
postpaid. First letter and gift card arrive 
just in time for Christmas. Junior Features, 
Box 45-C, Scarsdale, New York. 

BON APPETIT ... a collection of de- 
lectable recipes compiled and time-tested 
through generations of colorful Louisiana his- 
tory. Rare dishes from the South's tradi- 
tional colored mammies and famous chefs. A 
blending of the Creole, Napoleonic French, 
Old World Spanish and Italian — flavored with 
their rich, spicy seasonings and tangs. Bon 
Appetit, with its mouth-watering concoc- 
tions such as Yankee Noodles, Plum Duff 
Pudding, Southern Spoon Bread, and Chicken 
Louisianne, is an exciting gift for adven- 
turers in good cooking. Spiral binding lies 
flat when opened. $2.00 postpaid. Bon Appetit, 
2413 Horace St., Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 

TWINKLE TIP CIGARETTE LIGHTER 

... an enchanting cigarette lighter in a 
beautiful gold-plated case with a deep-cut 
colored stone at the tip. The case is daintily 
shaped like that of a lipstick ... for only 
$2.40. A lovely lipstick holder with its match- 
ing jewelled top is available to complete this 
delightful set . . . only $1.20. May be pur- 
chased individually or attractively gift-boxed 
as a set . . . just $3.60. All prices include 
20% federal tax. Postpaid. A charming gift 
you'll love to give or own. Order from R. H. 
Carlson Co., Dept. 6, Box 102, Mount Vernon, 
New York. 

DELICIOUS FRUIT PACK . . . contains 
5 lbs. of select California fruits: Jumbo Cali- 
myrna figs, Deglet Noor dates, Jumbo stuffed 
prunes and assorted glazed delicacies; date 
rolls stuffed with cocoanut and almonds. 
White, simulated bone fork. In rich, natural 
finish redwood box with decorative redwood 
ene . . . Each box personalized with hand- 
burnt name; shipped postpaid. Only $6.95 
(In Calif, add 21c tax). No C.O.D.'s. Print 
or type names and addresses; California Cup- 
board, Town and Country Market, 3rd and 
Fairfax, Los Angeles, Calif. 

SHEEREST STOLE . . . luxurious 100% 
Virgin Wool, 30 inches by 72 inches, beau- 
tifully handwoven in the finest tradition of 
the Southern Appalachian Mountains. Gossa- 
mer-sheer black yarn with deep-hued rainbow 
stripes for a breath-taking touch of glamour. 
Attractive triple fringe at ends. Also avail- 
able in pale blue with pastel-striped border. 
Gift-wrapped with our hand-blocked label for 
Christmas. A wonderful buy at S9.95 post- 
paid. Order from THE CAROLINA MOUN- 
TAIN SHOP, CASHIERS, NORTH CARO- 
LINA. 





THE 150th ANNIVERSARY OF THE 
HOUSE OF ATKINSON 

is celebrated with pride in tg49 — 

pride in their privilege of supplying colognes 

to people of taste and culture 

through eight English reigns — 

and pride in their own superb skill 

in the perfumer's art. 

EAU DE COLOGNE 



EAU DE COLOGNE 

Made in England by 

ATKINSONS 

24 OLD BOND STREET. LONDON. W.I 

IMPORTED BY 




SizeS" 1 10W 

$2.00 Dep. on C.O.D.S 



Plu* $1.93 Fad. T« 



• Designed for Beauty and Long Service! 

• Also Available in CHILD'S SIZE, 
5'/2x7'/4 at $4.75, plus .95 Federal Tax 
Sold By Mail Only — Order Today! 

Ot\\3rf\u\ SAN i, TEXAS 



fj f Write for FREE Color Folder on 

» fft&Ct fully Styled Domestic and Imported 



NEXT ISSUE OUT DECEMBER 20TH 

The Californian Magazine is published 
monthly except July and December. 
The January issue will bring you the 
advance spring fashions and introduce 
the two new exciting colors for spring 
— flame and smoke. Subscription sub- 
scribers will receive 12 complete issues. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1949 







w* 




s 



AStfER OF LONDON FABRIC 






arabian nights print 
designed exclusively for 
us in the united states 







your first spring print style Jl6 . .for north . . south . . east . . west, in luxurious tissue faille sprinkled 
with tiny, decorative camels and f uttering multi-colored confetti. Navy with pink . . red pepper with 
sandy beige . . black with light beige and soft blue. 10 to l8 . . at smart stores and shops 25.OO 

MAX KOPP DAYTIME DRESSES OF DISTINCTION . . 818 SOUTH BROADWAY, LOS ANGELES 14, CALIFORNIA 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1949 



California's 

OWN 

rook 

BOOK 




I f you like to eat . . and who 
doesn't . . you'll revel in Helen 
Evans Brown's special and famous 
recipes in 

CALIFORNIA COOKS 

Write for Your Copy Today! 

• More than 100 unusual Cali- 
fornia recipes are consolidated on 
40 beautifully printed pages . . 
appetizing dishes that make cook- 
ing a real pleasure . . a big event 
for you! Try Helen Brown's 
Brentwood Orange Pancakes, her 
piping hot Onion Bread, Ham- 
burgers En Brochette, Peas Pais- 
ano. Green Goddess Dressing. 

• Cooking is easy . . and fun . . 
when you have such wonderful 
recipes! Try them for your finest 
party . . serve them for your own 
family's taste treat. 

• CALIFORNIA COOKS is a 
treasure to keep in your kitchen 
. . it suggests the proper menu, 
the exciting dish . . at just the 
right time. It's i practical and 
appreciated gift. 

• A Two-Dollar Value in good 
eating for only $1.00! 

Write for Your Copy Today! 

Simply fill in the coupon and mail with 
$1.00 for each copy, postage paid by us, 

tAUFORNIAN 

1020 SOUTH MAIN STREET 
LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 



To: The Californian, 1020 S. Main 
Street, Los Angeles 15, California 
Please mail my copies of CALI- 
FORNIA COOKS to: 

Name _ 

Address 

City 

Zone „ State 

Enclosed is payment for □ copies. 




\f0m^^~ 





MAGIC COIN PURSE ... The ideal stock- 
ing stuffer for Dad and Mother ... Sis or 
Brother. The perfect little extra surprise. 
Just squeeze in palm of hand and it opens, 
release and it closes . . . automatically. Al- 
ligator grained genuine leather in styled-right 
colors . . . red, green, brown, or black. Good 
as new for many years. Pockets and purses 
wear much longer when you use a Magic 
Coin Purse. Gift Boxed. 81.65 postpaid (Fed. 
Tax Included). Add 3% sales tax in Calif., 
3 1 / 4% in Los Angeles. Chelley Creations. 
Box 355, Pacific Palisades, California. 

FABULOUS BOULEVARD ... by Ralph 
Hancock, published by Funk & Wagnalls 
Company. As fantastic as any fable, this 
story of a Los Angeles thoroughfare is, in 
reality, a sprightly history of the city itself. 
The longest and widest boulevard in the 
world, Wilshire — the unbelievable Miracle 
Mile — is Hancock's device for interpreting 
the phenomenon that is Los Angeles. 311 
pages of delightful reading ... of particu- 
lar interest to the transplanted "natives" who 
have made Los Angeles their home. S3. 50 at 
better book and department stores throughout 
the country. 

CLAM SHELL SALAD TONGS ... an 

ideal household utensil . . . made of durable 
plastic . . . easily washable — and so versa- 
tile, too. A tiny steel spring provides self- 
opening jaws. Easily separated for individual 
use as fork and spoon. A useful — just right — 
gift for that hard-to-please housewife who 
has everything. These handy salad tongs are 
available in transparent green and transparent 
red. Attractively boxed. No C.O.D.'s please. 
Only SLOO postpaid. Order several for your- 
self and your friends from Fedan Distributors, 
2970 E. Colorado, suite 7, Pasadena, Calif. 

NEW CHEFSAW MEAT SAVER . . . 

a hundred uses for this handy, all-purpose, 
aluminum kitchen saw. Buy meat at quan- 
tity prices — cut in kitchen to serving portions 
desired. Hardened steel saw blade severs 
meat bones and joints smoothly and quickly. 
Grooved handle tenderizes tough cuts. Ideal 
in preparing frozen foods. Useful in dressing 
game and fish "on the spot." Cuts steel and 
brass. Regular price, {1.50. Introductory 
offer $1.00 postpaid. Limit two to a customer. 
Extra blades 3 for 40c. No C.O.D.'s. Money 
back guarantee. The Margorita Shop, 1018 
S. Main, Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

ORIGINAL GERANIUM LEAVES . . . 

are used to create a lovely pin and earring 
set. Handmade and hand-dipped in a special 
process of copper solution to retain the last- 
ing loveliness of a true Geranium. Beautiful 
and artistic ... a delightful, authentic crea- 
tion to compliment your afternoon or evening 
outfit. A distinctive gift . . . exquisite and 
real. Also available in leaves of Moon Vine, 
Hibiscus, and Oak Leaf. Earrings, 81.95; 
Pin, 81-95. Complete set 83.85. Add 20% 
federal tax (3% in California; 3*4% in Los 
Angeles). Order for your friends and your- 
self from Talent Inc., 3923 Wilshire Blvd., 
Los Angeles 5, Calif. 



10 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 194 



". 




SEE BETTER, for years to come . . . says 
the gift of a Longview magnifier for Christ- 
mas. Magnifies a full column width of news- 
print at a glance, gives years of added see- 
ing comfort. The precision ground lense pro- 
Tides a wide, sharp field of vision — enlarges 
type 2V2 times. Folds into handsome walnut- 
colored plastic handle. A pleasure to give — 
or get! Money refunded after 10-day trial 
if not satisfied. Gift packed. Immediate de- 
livery. $6.50 postpaid. Edroy Products Co., 
Dept. A, 480 Lexington Avenue, New York 
1 17. New York. 

SHIMMERING SHOWERS ... NEW 

3-Way Lighting controlled by one switch. As 
old as yesterday, as new as tomorrow. These 
lamps capture the tradition and charm of 
Yesteryear. The luminous clarity of these 
new electrified shower lamps will lend a note 
of grace and brilliance to your room. Each 
sparkling lamp displays 54 starlike glass crys- 
tal pendants cascading over a lovely frosted 
bowl vase, its beauty enhanced with a hand- 
cut floral design. Ideal for the credenza, con- 
sole, mantlepiece, etc. Top and bottom light 
independently or together. $22.50 postpaid. 
Mark Stier, 277 E. Fordham Rd., New York 
58, N. Y. 

PERSONALIZED STATIONERY AND IN- 
, FORMALS . . . Surprise your friends and 
I relatives by having their signatures stylized 
Ion this beautiful stationery. Artistically in- 
terpreted in your choice of colors — Paper: 
(pristine white, ivory-cream, silver-grey . . . 
(Signature: black velvet, mariner blue, du- 
| bonnet, or bottle-green — on finest quality pa- 
[per. Informals . . . 100 sheets and 1O0 en- 
velopes $3.25. Stationery . . . 200 sheets and 
j 100 envelopes $4.25. Beautifully gift boxed, 
(Special combination offer, both $6.75. Add 
1 3% sales tax in California, Z l /o% in Los An- 
Igeles. No C.O.D.'s please. Send signature 
examples with colors desired to Chelley Cre- 
ations, Box 355, Pacific Palisades, California. 

THE WORLD OVER, NO FINER CO- 
LOGNE . . . double richness, exclusive, in- 
dividual, created by Rolley . . . America's 
finest. True Daphne, San Francisco's famous 
early spring flower ... no other fragrance 
like it, fresh, exquisite . . . $1.50. Barbary 
Coast, sophisticated, warm, so very lasting 
. . . S1.50. Hewaiian Pikaki, replica of 
famed island flower, fresh, warm, gay . . . 
$1.35. Above prices plus 20% tax. Each 2 oz. 
Special: All three beautifully gift wrapped, 
$4.00, plus 80c tax. We pay postage. Mail 
orders sent anywhere. Created in and by Rol, 
ley, 182 Geary St., San Francisco. (When 
in San Francisco, visit our truly beautiful 
salon. 

PERSONALIZED PAPERWEIGHT . . . 

made of solid brass, lacquered to preserve 
its beautifully polished finish. Measuring 
2 1 /2" x 3%"x 1 4", this attractive piece is an 
ideal gift remembrance for any occasion. %" 
hand-engraved initial in your choice of Old 
English or Block style. A useful, personalized 
gift with dignity and character at the low 
price of $1.25 postpaid. Business firms who 
wish to order in quantities of 100 or more 
may have a three-line advertising message 
die stamped into the back and filled in with 
] black at 20c each. T. Sidney Harley, Alt- 
man Bldg., Kansas City 6, Mo. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1949 




ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 





c 



c 



hristmas gifts 
in the 
alifornia manner 



FOR A , 

QDEM 





EGG CUP: "For a good egg" reads one side of this 
cheery California ceramic egg cup. Very colorful with 
green, black, red and brown colors. Measures 4 inches 
high, with two different size cups on top and bottom. 
$1.50, postpaid. 




PUPPET TOOTHBRU5H HOLDER: What tot won't brush 
his teeth each day with this cute holder for his brush. 
California ceramic, and measures 9 inches high. Blue, 
white and brown color combination; and attractively 
gift boxed. $1.25, postpaid. 




WESTERN BRAND FEED BOX: For bread, cookies, can- 
dies, fruits, etc. Blonde wood, natural finish, with 
western brands inscribed on sides and inside. Has 
wooden horse shoe handles. Measures 9x1 2 inches. 
$4.95, postpaid. 

No. C.O.D. — phase. Send check, cash or money order. 
(Residents of California — please add 3% sales tax.} 



Send for illustrated catalog of 
other delightful California 
gift items. 




THE CORRAL SHOP 

RANCHO SANTA FE • CAtlFORNIA 




% 






J 




miCimjl) cftL. 



Let's start with the premise that a classic shirt is basic to your wardrobe success. Let's start with a Graff 
shirt in NYLONAIRE ... a COHAMA fabric discovery that ranks with that of Nylon itself. Best qualities 
of Nylon with those of acetate rayon . . . shrinkproof, suds-loving, quick-drying, and breathing fabric! 
Graff tailors it sharply. Luxurious simplicity at its classic basic best ... in Elizabeth blue, Moonbeam 
beige, Platina gray, Cinderella Aqua, Camellia rose, White. About $4.95 at stores listed below: 



Available at these fine stores: 
ARIZONA 

Tucson, Jacome's 

Phoenix, Korrick's, Inc. 

CALIFORNIA 

Alameda, Dorothy's 

Bakersfteld, Weill's 

Berkeley, J. F. Hink & Sons 

Holtville, People's Department Store 

Los Angeles, Broadway Department Store 

North Hollywood, Rathbun's 

Oakland, H. C. Capwell 

Pasadena, Bullock's; F. C Nash Co. 

Richmond, Albert's 

Sacramento, Hale Bros. 

San Francisco, The Emporium 

Son Jose, Colman's 

San Rafael, Albert's 

Stockton, Smith & Lang 

Westwood Village, Bullock's 

COLORADO 

Pueblo, Crew-Beggs Dry Goods Co. 

IDAHO 

Moscow, Creigh ton's 



ILLINOIS 

Rode Island, McCabe Dry Goods Co. 

INDIANA 

Frankfort, M. B. Thrasher Co. 
Hammond, Edward C Minas Co. 
Indianapolis, Morrison's 

IOWA 

Keokuk, Sullivan & Auwerda 
Oskaloosa, Alsop's 

KANSAS 

Great Bend, Howards 

Kansas City, Young Dry Goods Co. 

Junction City, Cole's 

Topeka, Crosby Bros. Company 

Wichita, Walkers Bros. Dry Goods Co. 

MICHIGAN 

Ann Arbor, The Collins Shop 
Benton Harbor, Petite Shop, Inc. 
Flint, Morrison's 

MONTANA 

Billings, D. J. Cole Co. 
Great Falls, Beckman's 
Missoula, Missoula Mercantile Co. 



NEBRASKA 

Omaha, Herzberg's 

NEVADA 

Las Vegas, Favinger's 

NEW YORK 

Buffalo, Wm. Hengerer Co. 
Rochester, E. W. Edwards & Sons 

OHIO 

Bluffton, The Lape Company 

OREGON 

Klamath Falls, The Town Shop 
Medford, Mann's Dept. Store 
Portland, Bedell's 
Salem, Sally's 

WASHINGTON 

Bellingham, Jan & Fran 
Everett, C. C. Chaffee's 
Tacoma, Richardson's 

WYOMING 

Cheyenne, Jones Store for Women 



For further details, or if your favorite store is not listed, write direct to 



CAUFOBNIAWEAI BY 

GRAFF 



PRODUCERS OF WORLD-FAMOUS 

SHIRTS « SLACKS . SKIRTS . JACKETS * GOLFERS * SUITS 

1240 SOUTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1949 



13 




SIZES: 
AAAA(S) 6-9 
AA (N) 5-9 
B (M) 4-9 



for you . . . 
...for her! 

Exquisitely styled 
foot flattery. Black, 
Brown, Navy, Mex- 
ican Multi. Colors 
match Corde hand- 
bag shown below, 
only S12.95. 



ORDER BY MAIL — MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

r"fown"S Desert, "2U w7 17th~Stree7 ■ 

Los Angeles 15, California 



| COLOR 



I 



QUAN. 



PRIC 



CE TOTAL PRICE | 



$12.95 



12.95 



12.95 



Total $_ 



Address^ 



Zone- 



Stale- 



. City 

I Check End. Q Money Order Q C.O.D. D 
Postage prepaid except C.O.D.'s. Add 3% Sales 
| Tax if Colif. order. 



Corde 

FINEST IN HANDBAGS 




STYLE 7507 
ABOUT 

$10.95 

Genuine " Corde exqui- 
sitely styled; distinctive metal 
clasp. The perfect comple- 
ment for your "after five" 
costumes. 

Black, Brown, Navy, and Multi-colors Mexican. 
Bags match Sbicca shoes above, 
/f not at your favorite department store write 

CENTURY HAND BAG CO. 

1220 Maple, Suite 301 
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

When ordering by mail please enclose 20% 
Federal tax and 3% state lax. 




,VWrVW*— 




14 



MINIATURE WASH BOWL AND 
PITCHER in white crackle ware . . . this 
adorable, versatile item has so many ideal uses 
. . . for cream and sugar, cigarettes, or use 
for a planter. The pitcher measures 3'/2 inches 
high, and the bowl is 4 inches across. A clever 
gift for that hard-to-please person who has 
everything. Only SI. 75 postpaid. Order for 
yourself and your friends from The Corral 
Shop, Box 918, Rancho Santa Fe, California. 

SMALL FRY . . . the cooking sensation 
designed for today's up-to-the-minute home- 
maker. Delight your family with wonderful 
egg dishes and omelets of all kinds, impart- 
ing taste appeal as well as eye appeal. Un- 
excelled for hamburgers, hash-browned pota- 
toes, and many other fine dishes. Small Fry 
prepares eggs in much less time — uses less 
than one-half the normal amount of shorten- 
ing. A set consists of two rings, two covers 
and an Ail-Purpose Lifter with complete di- 
rections for preparing all dishes. An ideal 
gift. Only $1.00 postpaid. Small Fry, P.O. 
Box 81, Vernon Branch, Los Angeles 58, 
Calif. 

SILVERPLATED BUTTER DISH ... a 

lovely, versatile item with individuality and 
character. Beautifully designed silver piece — 
complete with attractive cut-glass liner. Dis- 
play good taste on your dining or coffee table. 
Use as a butter dish ... or as a cigarette 
box without glass liner — use liner as a relish 
dish. A distinctive gift you can give with 
pride. Long-lasting, yet inexpensive. $5.85 
plus 20% federal tax. Send check or money 
order to Plattwood Gifts, 509 Fifth Ave., 
New York 17, New York. 

FRY-GUARD . . . here's a wonderful way 
to protect your stove and walls against frying 
splatter. It enables you to enjoy spotless 
kitchens and yet fry bacon, chicken, etc., 
in the open. Exellent camping and trailer 
utensil. Good protection around electric mix- 
ers. Folds flat for easy storing. Made of fine 
quality aluminum, it can also be used as a 
cookie sheet. A most practical gift — a real 
buy at $1.00 postpaid. Sorry no C.O.D.'s. 
Fred S. Meyer Co., Box 1176, Beverly Hills, 
California. 

SPACE SAVER . . . Six blouses on one 
hanger that takes no more space than the 
ordinary kind. Blouse Rack is a nickel-plated, 
lightweight metal hanger with six separate 
shoulder arms. Slip blouses easily in place, 
and remove them one at a time, without 
disturbing others. A wonderfully useful gift 
for yourself and your friends. Order #H3342 
only $1.95 postpaid. Send check or money 
order to Miles Kimball Company, 225 Bond 
Street, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 



CALIFORNIA STYLIST, November, 1949 



e 



9 



1 
















1 




K<r 




■P *^^Sftfe^iC 


[f i 






P^JMWb 








' / ^^O Ifct '- 








rtC^g^^^L 




^ 1 




^%HH ^^ 









ON THE COVER: 

Casual Time t}f California 
gives you separates, insepar- 
able part of your wardrobe 
for sun country resorts note, 
vacations later. Strapless bra 
and whirlaway skirt in jersey, 
as shoicn or in aqua, lilac 
and white, and red, white 
and blue. About $17. Little 
boy shorts and plunge-neck 
jacket in Crompton-Rich- 
mond velveteen, about $25. 
In sizes 10-16, at Desmond's, 
Los Angeles; The Fashion, 
Houston. "Red-Red" lipstick 
by Guitare, and Atkinson's 
refreshing cologne. Garden 
furniture (yacht cord on a 
steel frame), Van Keppel- 
Green. Frank Stiffler photo. 




- 

m 



> 
*? 

s 



a 

9 

a. 

m 
- 

a 

H 
H 

e 



EDITOR AND PUBLISHER J. R. Osherenko 

ASSISTANT PUBLISHER. William J. Bowen 

FASHION DIRECTOR Sally Dickason 

FASHION EDITOR Virginia Scallon 

MANAGING EDITOR Helen Ignatius 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR. _ Philip Kustner 

MEN'S FASHION EDITOR Malcolm Steinlauf 

FASHIONS _ Jacquelin Lary 

Margaret Paulson 
ART — _ Morris Ovsey 

Jane Albrecht 

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER. Frank Stiffler 

SHOPPING ROUNDUP.. Joyce Olsen 

FOOD STYLIST _ _ Helen Evans Brown 



California fashions 

Springboard for 1950 Fashions 16 

The Deep Plunge 17 

Two-Tones for Glamour 18 

For the Swim: Velvet Striped Taffeta 19 

Crisp Look for Cruisewear 20 

Short-Shorts & Longer-Shorts 22 

Shirred-Shorts & Lacy-Shorts 23 

Short and Sweet 24 

Pool Side 25 

Keep Your Eye Shoulder High 26 

Super-Dramatics .' 27 

After Five, After Dark 28 

California features 

California Cooks 30 

Those Old Pueblo Ghosts 32 

Thanksgiving Arrangement 34 

The Return of The Parasol 35 

California Living 36 

The Maidless Household 42 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly at 1020 So. Main St., Los Angeles 15. Cali- 
fornia, PRospect 6651. San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph, 26 O'Farrell St., DOuglas 
2-1472. Subscription price: $3.00 one year; $5.00 rwo vears; $7.50 three years. One 
dollar additional postage per year outside continental United States. 35c per copy. Member 
Audit Bureau of Circulations. Entered as second class matter Januarv 25, 1946, at the 
Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under act of March, 1S79. Copyright 1949 The 
Californian, Inc. t Printed in U.S.A. Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless 
specifically authorized. 



/0f^Mf 



'r, 



m 








SAM OPPEE 




Catdlina'S deep plunge! In nylon taffeta lastex with adjustable zipper-front for maximum sunshine. Sizes 32-38. About $18. 
"LOle 01 California innovation ... the "sock suit," wool-knitted rolled to new silhouette. Small, medium, large. About $15. 



17 




CdlteX suit with new fashion importance in two-color treatment, in scroll motif at bosom and hip . . . flattering to any 
figure! Sizes 10-16. About $17. At Dayton Co., Minneapolis; J. W. Robinson Co., Los Angeles; Neiman-Marcus Co., Dallas. 




Rose Marie Reid introduces the pocketed swim suit! News, too, in velvet striped taffeta and boned bodice which enhances its 
glamour. Sizes 10-20. About $25. J. W. Robinson Co., Los Angeles; Carson, Pirie Scott & Co., Chicago; Lord & Taylor, N. Y. 



19 



IN BRIEF, WE BELIEVE IN SHORTS 



20 




*"*^*> 




&£& 










POOL SIDE... Terry coat on princess lines, to barely cover your shorts. "Showerobe" fashion, about $10. 
Center, the news of the season in colorful printed drapery fabric ... a doublet to wear over swimsuit or shorts, by Holly- 
wood Premiere. About $13. Right, Georgia Bullock's interpretation of pool dress with shorts and bra, batik print. About $30. 



21 



> d) cr 



ckjvJL^ 



s 











Vivttw * ' «» * 



<$ 








, ■. . < -' 




V* 




^f 



/«•, 






. . ■ I .; 



Tabak Or California gives you pique, for the crispy cotton look you love. Great surface interest in a fabric meant for fun; 
in white or pastels, it's about $20. MiSS Hollywood Jr. suggests a soft touch ... in tissue faille, whirling pinwheel 
design in softly draped dress with easy side draping. About $25. Basics for cruise now, for summer ... far ahead! 




Madalyn Miller introduces the cape-bolero, snugged at the waist and cleverly cut for shoulder fit . . . this time over a 
wide wale pique sun dress in delectable shades of yellow, turquoise or coral. The capelet is perfect little cover-up for all 
your bare cottons! About $20. From the same designer, dotted Swiss gingham casual with cotton lace. About $17. 



*NK STIFFLER 







Sunshine COttonS, barely beautiful . . . F. B. Horgan's glazed chintz halter midriff with flower-pot pockets and jutting 
high collar for interest; left. About $13. Pat Premo uses crispy brush-printed Picolay for a sundress and jacket two-some, 
dress with new wider straps, bolero with largest sailor collar yet . . . ice cream shades, under $30. Meier & Frank, Portland. 



26 




Shorter shorts, tailored or feminine. 
Short one piece play-shorts. 
Short part of a set . . . bra, blouse, 
skirt and jacket in playful mood. 
Shorts in velveteen, linen, pique or a 
wide choice. We believe in these. 



Below, Georgia Kay's one-piece play-short 
with laced bodice; skirt to match ... in 
multi-color paintbox print on cotton. 

Left, Ken Sutherland's super-dramatics 
in windowpaned linen . . . tiniest pants of 
the season, cuffed for emphasis. Part of 
a set that combines with dark linen. 




AFTER FIVE, 
AFTER DARK 



ITS A SHORT STORY 



With each new season, there comes fashion newness . . . something 

different, something exciting. While we never advocate 

change-for-the-sake-of change in basics . . . we do like 

the dramatic touch of, for instance, 

the shorter evening gown for now. After five o'clock 

is the time when women appreciate the provocative 

look of fashion at its most flirtatious. So here 

we give you Marbert's picture-pretty cocktail dress 

for day-after-dusk . . . wide sweep of the collar, 

crisp jutting pockets, on a satin dotted brocade taffeta 

that is just right for so many important occasions. 

In iridescent shades of copper and black, royal and red; about $40 









28 




- 



<fl# 



. 



*^fc 




Peggy Hunt combines a disarmingly low-cut halter bodice, perfectly plain, with intricate ruffled . . . shorter . . . skirt, above. 
In rustling taffeta, about $55 at Bullock's, Pasadena; Joske's, San Antonio; Bonwit Teller, Philadelphia. 

Robert Gould makes good use of the pleat in this very imaginative dress with new lampshade silhouette. At the cuffed 
neckline, a pleated ruffle; and underneath the full peplum, a slim underskirt, knife-narrow. In taffeta, it's about $25. 



29 




CALIFORNIA OYSTERS: 
RECOMMENDED FOR YOUR 
SPECIAL HOLIDAY MENUS 

By Helen Evans Brown 







CALIFORNIA 



COOKS 



Californians have always loved their oysters — indeed they 
loved them so unwisely that they all but eliminated the tiny 
ones that are native to their shores. Now we have these 
miniatures — these "Olympias" or "Yaquinas" — sent down 
from Oregon and Washington, or we use the larger "Pacific" 
or "Willapoint" oysters that have been planted up and down 
the entire Pacific Coast as far south as Monterey. Today 
California oysters are a favorite food, when in season, and 
we use them for hors d'oeuvre, soups, main dishes, and even 
salads! With the holidays coming up, we'd be smart to keep 
this recipe in mind. It's perfect for that Thanksgiving bird. 

Oyster Stuffing 

Toast two large loaves of sliced bread and cut into tiny 
cubes. Cook a large minced onion in a half-pound of butter, 
then add a quart of oysters (Leave the small ones whole; 
the large ones should be cut in four or six pieces). Cook 
two minutes, then mix with the bread cubes. Season with 
salt, fresh ground pepper, and, if you wish an interesting 
touch, some tarragon. Diced celery may also be added, or I 
chopped almonds. This recipe is sufficient for a twenty-pound 
turkey. 

A true gourmet knows the oyster at its best — unadorned. 
Perhaps he uses a little lemon, some salt and fresh ground 
pepper, but more probably he enjoys "gulping him in his 
own juice." The famed Dr. Kitchener gives these directions: 
"The true lover of an oyster will have some regard for the I 
feelings of his little favorite, and will never abandon it to 
the mercy of the bungling operator, but will open it himself, 
and contrive to detach the fish from the shell so dexterously 
that the oyster is hardly conscious he has been ejected from 
his lodging, till he feels the teeth of the piscivorous gourmand I 
tickling him to death." The modern, and inevitable, oyster 
cracker was then unknown, and the oyster's partner, if indeed j 
he had one, was brown bread. Try it — the dark moist kind | 
— sliced thin as a knife blade and spread with sweet butter. 
Try crisp celery, too; its crunchiness is somehow just right r 
with this succulent shellfish. And the accompanying bev- 
erage — a pale dry ale or beer is preferred by some, a Chablisi 
or a Graves or a Rhine wine by others. The choice is yours. I 



30 



If, however, you agree that brown bread is perfect with oys- 
ters, you'll like this sandwich, too. 

Chicken and Oyster Sandwich 

Poach a dozen small oysters in their own liquor until 
their edges scallop, then drain them and mince them fine. 
Now add a half-pound (one and a half cups, diced) of cold 
cooked chicken. Cut in rather small pieces and bind to- 
gether with a quarter of a cup of softened butter, and season 
with salt and pepper to suit your palate. Butter a thin slice 
of dark brown bread, lay on a leaf of lettuce, spread with 
the filling and top with another slice of buttered bread. Even 
if you abhor picnics, these taste pretty wonderful when 
served al fresco, with cold beer and ham rolls but they 
are just as good in front of an open fire. The ham rolls are 
thin slices of Virginia ham, spread with a mixture of chopped 
sauteed mushrooms and sour cream, then rolled and fastened 
with a toothpick. Finish off with crisp red apples and an 
aged cheddar cheese. So you don't like picnics, even when 
they are at the ski lodge? 

If you have an unlimited supply of oysters and butter at 
hand, as well as great patience, an open fire, and a consum- 
ing culinary curiosity, you might like to try Hannah Glasse's 
recipe for what might have been the forerunner of the scal- 
loped oyster. This recipe come from "The Art of Cookery 
Made Plain and Easy: by a Lady" (1765), and it's the title 
that's particularly entrancing. 

"To Roast a Pound of Butter" 

"Lay it in salt and water two or three hours, then split it, 
and rub it all over with crumbs of bread, with a little grated 
nutmeg, lay it to the fire, and as it roasts, baste it with the 
yolks of two eggs, and then with the crumbs of bread all 
the time it is a-roasting; but have ready a pint of oysters 
stewed in their own liquor, and lay it on the dish under the 
butter; when the bread has soaked up all the butter, brown 
the outside, and lay it on your oysters. Your fire must be 
very slow." 

Plainer and easier is this recipe; one that is sure to cap- 
ture the male vote. 

Carpet Bag Steak 

Have tenderloin steaks cut two and a half inches thick — 
or two inches if you consider that ostentatious. With a sharp 
knife split the steak lengthwise, making a capacious pocket 
in the center of the steak. Now for each serving, cook four 
medium sized oysters in a teaspoonful of butter until they're 
just warmed through. Put the oysters in the "pocket" and 
sew up the opening. Brush well with melted butter and broil 
to the degree of rareness that is your choice. This is fare for 
hearty eaters so, unless your guests have Gargantuan appe- 
tites, serve little else — a salad, say, and a fresh fruit compote 
for dessert. 

If you are a hostess with sufficient daring, you might try 
serving oysters to your guests of a Sunday morning. It 
wouldn't be a new idea, just one long forgotten. In 1803, 
Grimod de la Reyniere said, "Oysters are the usual opening 
to a Winter breakfast, indeed they are almost indispensable." 
Was it during prohibition that that delightful custom gave 
way to the Prairie Oyster? If serving raw oysters for break- 
fast is too startling an idea, why not have an oyster omelette 
for that Sunday brunch? Start your meal with great glasses 
of chilled orange juice, or with a champagne cocktail if it 
is to be a gala affair. Then that omelette: make your usual 
French type omelette, but before folding it add oysters that 
have been poached in heavy cream, and seasoned with salt 
and pepper. The poaching liquor that remains may be bound 
with an egg yolk and poured around the omelette. Sur- 
round the dish with curls of crisp bacon, grilled mushrooms, 
and broiled tomatoes. Serve popovers and wild strawberry 
preserves. 



Here's another nice dish, and a very simple one: 
Breakfast Oysters 

Dry the required number of oysters (six to a serving should 
be right), then dip them in flour and saute in butter until 
they are the color of amber. Serve them with parsley and 
lemon wedges. Easy as that! 

Here's still another: 

Panned Oysters 

Chop three large shallots and cook them for three minutes 
in a quarter of a cup of butter. Add a dozen oysters and 
cook them ever so gently until their edges curl. Season them 
with salt and freshly ground pepper and serve them on toast. 
. . . Enough of breakfast dishes. 

It would seem a pity to neglect recipes for oyster stew 
and oyster bisque: they are both popular at holiday time. 

Oyster Stew 

Heat a cup of rich milk and add eight oysters, a tablespoon 
of butter, a dash of salt, and a grinding of pepper. Allow 
the milk to just come to the boil, then serve with pilot 
biscuit. Don't overcook — it will toughen the oysters. This 
is one serving, and of course the richer the milk, the more 
caloric the stew. Let your vanity be your guide. 

Oyster Bisque 

Mince a small onion and put it in a double boiler with 
a small piece of whole mace and a quart of half-and-half. 
Add two tablespoons of butter and a dozen oysters and cook 
for twenty minutes. Strain, mashing the oysters through 
the sieve, then return to the double boiler and add another 
dozen oysters. Cook just until the edges begin to curl, then 
serve with hot Melba toast. 

Oyster loaf is another dish worthy of mention, though 
there are various regional opinions as to the right way to 
prepare it. Start with a loaf of bread, a French loaf, says 
one, a baker's loaf, another, small rolls, says the individualist. 
But they all agree that the top must be removed, the crumbs 
scooped out, the insides laved with butter, and the whole 
returned to the oven to become a crisp and golden receptacle 
for oysters that have been crumbed and fried, or for oysters 
cooked in cream, or for oysters merely "panned" in butter. 
Even those who agree on the crumbing and frying process 
find further cause for variance. Some just serve the loaf 
as is, some add thick cream or the oyster liquid, or both, 
and return it to the oven for a further heating. In California 
we do it in all these ways. 

Oysters en brochette are nice. String oysters and mush- 
rooms alternately on skewers, dip them in melted butter, 
then broil and serve them. Even if you have a horror of 
oyster patties, you'll have to like oyster and mushroom pie. 
A rich cream sauce, made with the oyster liquor and heavy 
cream, oysters and mushrooms in equal proportions, and a top 
crust of your best pastry. There you have it. Feature this 
at a buffet supper by adding generous cubes of baked ham 
to the filling, and serve it with asparagus. Serve thin hot 
cornbread, too, and a galantine of chicken and a huge bowl 
of crisp undressed watercress. . . . And if you want dessert, 
have something fruity; apples, perhaps, poached in white 
wine, then masked in apricot preserves flavored with rum — all 
this topped with sour cream. You name it. 

Sidney Smith, in his oft-quoted "Ode to Salad." claimed 
that " 'twould tempt a dying anchorite to eat." An unnamed 
writer of epitaphs holds still greater the power of the oyster. 
His hint to the angel Gabriel goes: 

"Tom whom today no noise stirs, 
Lies beneath these cloisters. 
If at the last trump 
He does not quickly jump. 
Only cry 'Oysters'." 



31 



Ill 




tooms axe l°ag lW -^ ed re d^e 8 

«*** i0 Vsee'^ ^T^ * *» ^ A ' 

7 ou ^ a ^^^^T 






by gay o'burk 



He is a handsome man. of medium height, dark com- 
plexioned. His eyes are intensely expressive; his nose, 
being extra large, only serves to give the impression of 
great strength, while his mouth curves in a wide, slightly 
sensuous line. In this face you see all the determination 
and adventure and courage that made of Thomas Larkin 
a man of history. 

Thomas Larkin was leading an ordinary life in New 
England when poor health and poorer fortune quite 
abruptly decided him to try the fair land of California; 
the sunny, abundant land about which he had heard so 
much from returning seamen. The boat he chose for 
the journey was sailing to the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii ) 
before reaching California, and Thomas, being in no 
hurry and enjoying the sea air. liked the idea of the ex- 
tra voyage. 

The fact that he learned of a charming woman's de- 
cision to sail on the same boat might also have added 
to his sudden zest for travel. 

He found later that the captivator was a Mrs. Rachel 
Hobson Holmes, who was on her way to the Sandwich 
Islands to join her sea captain husband. But this fact 
daunted him very little. They talked a great deal, lean- 
ing over the ship's rail, and laughed together and sat on 
deck in the sun. 

When they reached the beautiful islands. Thomas 
missed her gay companionship, but he was on his way 
to conquer a new world and there was no place in his 
determined heart for tears. 

He landed in Santa Barbara, a low squat town near 
the ocean, guarded by deep green mountains. Adobe 
ranchos lay in the fertile valley, and far up the path 
the Mission could be seen ; toward the south stood the 
white-washed adobe presidio where soldiers lolled in 
the sun or raced in and out on sleek horses. 

It was only a matter of days and Thomas convinced 
Captain Cooper that he was exactly the clerk the Captain 
needed to help out in the trading business. And it took 
only the length of time necessary to save $500 for Thomas 
to open a trading center of his own. He sold general 
merchandise, shoes, yardage, silks, ornaments, flour, 



ILLUSTRATIONS BY HALPER HOUSE 




"Sometimes when the sun streams through the pepper trees you feel she is still there" 



sugar, kitchen supplies, chests, and various other sup- 
plies from the Boston ships. In return the Californians 
paid hides and tallow, the only commodities they had 
serving as money. 

But that was only a beginning for adventurous Lar- 
kin. He built a double-geared flour mill, the first of its 
kind in California. He started the industry of shingle 
making, something entirely new for this land which had 
known only red tile. He introduced the use of lumber 
in building, replacing the usual adobe brick. He added 
building contracting to his various other enterprises and 
added a touch of New England in his new dwellings. 

Later, he extended his trade to other California coastal 
towns, to the Sandwich Islands and Mexico, exporting 
flour and lumber, coal, otter and beaver skins, tallow and 
horses. 

While all this empire building was in progress, 
Thomas Larkin was not neglecting his personal charms. 
In fact, there was never a time when Larkin didn't feel 
he was entitled to the combination of beauty, character 
and fortune in the girl he might marry. He had not for- 
gotten Rachel Holmes entirely, for he spoke of her 
often to close friends, but she was believed lost to him. 

So he attended fiestas, meriendas (picnics) and wed- 
dings, flirting here a little, considering there a little. He 
learned the language and traditions of old California, the 
Spanish dances and how to sit a horse like a Spanish 
caballero. He attended the great spring roundup when 
all the rancheros gathered to help each other brand their 
cattle . . and, incidentally, to attend the dark-eyed daugh- 
ters of the rancheros. 

It seemed the wealthier rancheros occupied him most. 
In a letter to his brother at this time, he says, "All love 
and no capital" would never do for him. "If I can make 
a fortune by marriage, I will do it, providing I can find 
on being acquainted with the lady any small love for 
her." And in addition he was convinced he and his chosen 
lady, whoever she may be, could be happy only if the 
lady would study his disposition and "adapt herself to 
it." There were a few more requirements . . just a few 
. . expanding the letter to a small volume. 

But quite suddenly, Rachel Holmes of the shipboard 
acquaintance landed in California with the news that 
her husband had died of a fever, leaving her no alter- 
native but to return to her people in New England. She 
stayed in the home of Captain Cooper while waiting for 
a ship, and it was only natural that Thomas Larkin and 
Rachel Holmes should renew their friendship. 

Often they would ride together, California fashion, 
Rachel sitting sideways in the saddle before him. On 
one such occasion he led the horse to a wide stretch of 
beach just out from the town. He dismounted and held 
his hands up to catch her. They stood for a moment 
while Thomas drank in the loveliness of this slender, 
fair-haired, fine-featured woman. Then he took her hand 
and they walked silently. 

"Here," he said at last, waving his arm to include 
the whole stretch of beach, "someplace along here pirates' 
treasures are buried." 

"Pirates' treasures!" Rachel cried. "How exciting! 
Tell me of it." 

Thomas laughed at her enthusiasm. "Notorious buc- 
caneers used to stalk any ship (Continued on page 41) 



33 



HOLIDAY 



MOTIFS FOR 



YOUR TABLE 



BY LAURA E. McVAY 




F 



or several months we have talked about 
types of flower arrangements but for 
Thanksgiving let's throw the spotlight on 
fruit. It is almost traditional that a por- 
tion of the fall harvest, in the form of 
fruit, be displayed on our Thanksgiving 
tables. Perhaps the "horn of plenty" has 
been overdone but there are many other 
ways of making attractive fruit arrange- 
ments: Baskets, compotes, a hollowed-out 
water melon or pumpkin, all make inter- 
esting containers. 

The two most important factors in se- 
lecting fruit are color and form. If you 
will go to the market with an eye to 
blending colors and for a variety of shapes 
you can hardly go wrong. If your table 
appointments lend themselves to purples 
and pinks, select a dark purple egg plant, 
dark grapes, apples with high color and 
any other fruit which blend in color. Al- 
ready you have a variety of forms. Using 
the same size fruit only is uninteresting. 
Dark greens and a touch of chartreuse 
with this purple theme will add life. 
Green bananas, lemons and limes will 
provide this secondary color and give ad- 
ditional attractive forms. There are just 
as many effective fruits in shades of yel- 
low, if you prefer those colors. A pine- 
apple serves as a large center shape and 
there are many vegetables which will add 
color and interesting shapes, such as sum- 
mer squash, red onions and gourds. 

Because grapes are so graceful when 
hanging we have chosen a compote for 



our picture. It is eleven inches in diameter 
and dark blue glass- — both size and color 
inviting an eggplant to be the center 
around which to build the fruit. Often a 
spiked frog will hold the large form firm 
and make it easier to place the smaller 
fruit. The bunches of grapes were tied 
together at the center, so they will balance 
each other as they hang over the edge, 
preventing any slipping. Leaves are often 
used to make the transition from the larger 
to the smaller shapes but should not be 
too conspicuous. Usually you want a strong 
color feel and too much green detracts. 
Grape leaves have an attractive pattern 
and will be improved with a slight oiling. 
A small cluster of chrysanthemums tucked 
in between the fruit in several places gives 
contrast of form and an appealing deli- 
cacy. 

As with flowers, it is preferable to keep 
the fruit arrangement the same shape 
as the table — round if the table is round 
and elongated if the table is rectangular. 
If the fruit is placed directly on the 
table a colored mat, blending with the 
color of the fruit will protect the table 
and give a completeness to your arrange- 
ment. Keep the large forms in the center. 
Create a mound effect by placing a small 
box or anything else which will raise the 
fruit, under the center portion. Of course 
this will be entirely hidden when the 
fruit has all been placed. Graduate the 
size of the fruit allowing it to taper 
toward the end of the table. 






34 



The Return Of The Parasol 

By Alice Carey 

No one will be surprised if Grandma's girlhood man- 
nerisms come back to life . . . the gentle blush, the But- 
tering eyelashes, the flirtatious peek over the shoulder. 
For femininity is holding sway in the fashion world, 
and final proof is in the revival of grandma's prettiest 
bit of vanity, the parasol. 

The parasol's sweeping popularity is responsible. 
bowever, for more than the resurrection of the forgotten 
djectives "coy" and "'winsome". It's had a concrete 
iSecl upon the generally calm business routine of Glenn 
Henderson, pioneer custom umbrella maker, who sud- 
enly found himself "'in fashion" and caught up by 
he surge toward ruffles and reminiscence. 

Cast in the anachronistic role of mediator between 
he "old world" and the "new look," Henderson keeps 
lis small capable staff busy in the second oldest shop 
)f its kind in the country, where parasols are made to 
>rder. and customers wait in line. One gentle old lady 
>rought what was obviously a treasure to Henderson, 
rusting him to return it to remembered beauty. It was 
i tiny 8V2 inch parsolette made in China more than a 
tundred years ago, with a spidery thin silk stretched 
bove the carved ivory handle. He keeps a dwindling 
upply of precious China silk, and soon she had her 
)riental treasure, and memories, intact. 

\^ hile most men may sigh over the vagaries of women's 
ashion and view with alarm the possibility of thousands 
f twirling parasols on the streets, to Henderson this 
jackward glance into the mode of another day causes 
lim also to cast a wistful eye back to his early years 
n Los Angeles. 

His dad moved to the city in 1886, bent upon making 
vagon unbrellas . . . but Indians and Mexicans, accus- 
omed to the heat, had no use for this protection. The 
leavy rains of that year concluded the conversion of 
ather and the business. Result, rain umbrellas. Eventu- 
lly. Henderson's talented mother took a hand in de- 
igning sun parasols, delightful concoctions of taffeta 
and silk, mounted upon fine wood and sleek tortoise 
phell. Elegant carriage shades and pint-sized baby buggy 
Shades followed. 

■ Glamorous stars of the silent movies, like Ruth Roland 
md Betty Compton, turned to Henderson's father for 
his craftsmanship . . . today such famous entertainers 
is Betty Grable, the Andrew Sisters. Irene Dunne, and 
Such perfectionists as motion picture wardrobe designers 
look to the son for the same art. 

I The history of the beguiling parasol can be traced 
^hrough this man via his collection of old and fragile 
A'halebone ribs, slender wire springs dating to the turn 
f)f the century, intricately carved ebony from the know- 
ing hands of the Viennese . . . and through the fact that 
'Queen Mary" is the accepted title for the sedate curved 
landle inherited from the English. 

In the midst of these remnants of the gentle past. 
jlenn Henderson has watched his unique trade project 
tself into the fashionable present . . . and right now 
lies a bit perturbed about keeping pace with a hectic 
uture full of bobbing parasols. 



HE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1949 




Catalina Island "DUCKIES" 

A must on her Christmas list 
from Catalina Island. The slipper 
that has poise . . . made of tufted 
chenille.^ It is comfortable, dur- 
able, noiseless . . . the only slipper 
of its kind that is washable. Re- 
peated washings, fluffing the 
chenil!e_ yarn, will actually im- 
prove its appearance! Available 
in white, blue, gold, and cherry. 
Exciting Christmas news at just 

"7C Add 15c for postage 

./ +J (3o/ o , ax in California) 

CATALINA CASUALS 

Box 325 • Avalon, California 



$3 




PERSONALIZED 

RIPPLE BOND STATIONERY 

100 single sheets. 5V2x7 or 50 folded sheets 
and 50 envelopes — Ivory-Pink-Grey-Blue or 
White with choice of Brown, Garnet-Blue or 
Black Printing. Boxed $1.79 postpaid. 6 boxes 
any imprint for $10.00. With such a wide va- 
riety of shades available, you will be able to 
take care of all the favorites on your gift list. 
PRINT PLAINLY— ORDER EARLY. 

PLEASE, NO C. O. D.'s 

SILHOUETTES 



P. O. BOX 1827 



Boston 5, Massachusetts 



THE WAY TO A HAPPIER "DOG'S LIFE"- 




* DOG DUSTER: Eliminates parasites with proper 
dusting. Distributes powder through hollow teeth. 
Saves time and powder. Handy for chalking and all 
dry cleansers. Colorful plastic. Red and Blue. 

Price S2.00 postpaid 

* DOG MANGER: Portable anodized spun alu- 
minum 1 1/ 4 qt. dish. Does not corrode or turn black. 
Attach anywhere. Remove easily. Cannot loosen, move 
or turn. No spilling. Sterilize or heat directly. The 
only wall bracket dish. 

Price S2.75 postpaid 

* BOTH FOR $4.45 postpaid 

SATISFACTION OR REFUND 

KENWAR-WILLIAMS, INC. 

P. O. Box 121 -C Stratford, Conn. 



SAVORY CHICKEN SOUP ... and yours 

in a jiffy! Simply add % teaspoon of Sey-Co 
Chicken Soup Base Seasoning to each cup 
of boiling water — and you have a soup worthy 
of a sonnet. You'll sing its praises when you 
try this wondrous, tasty soup. Excellent for 
improving other soup stocks and gravies . . . 
ideal for casserole dishes. So thrifty, too — 
costs less than 4c a serving. $2.50 a jar post- 
paid. 

SEY-CO PRODUCTS COMPANY, INC. 

300 So. Oakhurst Dr., Beverly Hills, Calif., or 724 N. Milwaukee St., Milwaukee, Wise. 




Handmade Leather Pouch Bag 




HANDBAGS by Patricia 



A casual leather creation — the perfect com- 
plement to any outfit. Deep and roomy, al! 
leather lined with adjustable shoulder straps, 
inside zipper pocket, safety catch fastener. 
An exquisite, handmade pouch bag you'll be 
proud to own or give. Your choice of seven 
luscious shades — honey, luggage, chocolate, 
turf green, cherry red, navy blue, or black. 
Sorry no CO. D.'s 

•fill O ^O 1p |us 20 % luxury tax, 
<D>J.^««JU 3% sales tax in Calif., 

3'/2% sales tax in 

Los Angeles) 

2815 S. Robertson Blvd. 

Los Angeles 34, California 



35 




HERE'S CASUAL SUBURBAN 
LIVING TAILORED FOR A BUSY 
URBAN FAMILY; AND PLANNED 
FOR A BOY AND GIRL'S 
GROWING-UP YEARS AHEAD. 



RSEL'S THEME 



The further one winds his way seaward along 
magnificent Sunset Boulevard — through Bever- 
ly Hills, Westwood, Bel Aire, Brentwood and 
the Riviera estates — the more exciting becomes 
the rolling land, and the more inviting to the 
urbanite who would turn country squire. 

One who succumbed to the invitation is Mr. 
Jack Leavitt, squire of 1675 Old Oak Road. 
The transformation of exciting opportunity into 
exciting reality on the Riviera Rancho was per- 
formed by tbe distinguished California born 
architect, Louis Pursel. Nestling comfortably 
and unobtrusively on a leveled shelf with a 
mountain backdrop, the Leavitt estate dom- 
inates Cliff May's planned rancho community. 

Primary consideration in design was given 

to the family life of Mr. and Mrs. Leavitt and 

their growing children Baron and Brenda. Thus 
rursel is a native Latitornian. a. i. • u -n j *u 1 • t 

' the house is built around the play area in front, 

with the swimming pool at the end. The walls of the house itself and garage pro- 
vide privacy with a breeze-way planned to finish off the enclosure and do double duty 
as an outdoor sheltered living and dining area with pass-shelf to the kitchen. Baron's 
and Brenda's bedrooms provide area for separate overnight entertaining as they 
grow older. And the den by the simple manipulation of shutters and a door becomes 
either a cozy alcove off the living room or a private area for separate entertaining. 

Architect Pursel has taken the rough hewn massiveness of an Old-World inn 
and the intimate, friendly lines of early California rancho, blended them together 
and interpreted them with the very modern touch for which he is noted in both 
residential and commercial work. Brick of the adobe type is of rough texture and 
jumbo proportions. Ceiling beams are 10''"xl2" members burned to bring out the 
grain. The living room walk-in fireplace is 14 feet wide. And heavy redwood shakes 
on the roof gives the whole an appropriately rustic look. The low roof line with 
ample eaves supported by heavy beams introduces the California rancho motif, 
carried out by the ground level entrances and sprawling arrangement of the exterior 
lines. The modern elements fit comfortably in this picture of warm, casual living 
Ceiling-to-floor sliding glass doors form the whole outer wall of the living room 
The modern country kitchen, lighted indirectly from behind beams, is planned foi 
efficiency and finished in copper, wrought iron and used brick. The outdoor pla) 
area from swimming pool to breeze-way is as modern as California itself. The 
whole is warm, hospitable, liveable. 

Squire Leavitt has a design for family living — in the modern California way 



Draiving reveals functional flow of plan. Dining room (right) is example of intimate, fresh treatment of space and materialsM 




FDR RANCHO LIVING 





Exterior view shows master bedroom (with fire- 
place) overlooking swimming pool at near end. 
Extensive sliding glass doors across front exemplify 
graceful blending of modern with rustic. Massive 
walk-in fireplace is 14 feet wide, topped by 
10"xl2" suspended ceiling beams. The modern 
country kitchen features brick, wrought iron and 
copper with indirect lighting from behind beams. 



PETER OSTER PHOTOS 





Salt & Pepper Katchina Dolls 

All the drama of age-old Indian ceremony 
is captured in these authentic ceramic replicas 
of Hopi Tribe katchina dolls. Handmade and 
handpainted, the vivid colors are protected with 
permanent kiln glazing. Truly unusual salt and 
pepper shakers sure to lend a festive touch to 
any table. You'll want several for gifts — and 
remember to save a pair for yourself. 

SET $2.00 POSTPAID 

Immediate Delivery 

DESERT HOUSE CRAFTS 

2841 N. Campbell 



Tucson, Arizona 




SCROLL FOOTSTOOL 

Charming, quaint, copied from original 
made in Boston about 1S25. Solid ma- 
hogany, hand made, beautiful finish — size 
at base 12 by 14- inches, 9 inches high, 
upholstered in antique velvet in green, 
gold, wine and blue. Your own needle- 
point or other material used at no extra 
cost (size 12 by 27 inches). Price $33.50, 
shipping charges paid in USA. Send 
check or money order. 

Halsey H. Hendricks 

501 Fifth Street 
Bristol, Tennessee 



IDEAL 
XMAS 
GIFT 




Holds 

towels, 

stockings, 

aprons, rags 

at your 

linger tips 



No CO.D. s 
No Stomps 



TOWEL HOLDER 



For cupboards, walls, doors. 4 live rubber 
"grippers" in baked enamel metal base, 
hold securely, yet gently, re- gM 
lease instantly. Pastel colors: $ B 
red, yellow, green, blue. A. J. p|i 
Ganz Co., 112 N. Hayworth - . ■ jj 
Ave., Hollywood 36, California, postpaid 



A. J. Ganz Co., I I2-T N. Hayworth Ave. 
Hollywood 36, California 

Please send Fing-O Tip 4sm Towel 

Holders, postpaid, @ $1.00 each, 3 for $2.75. 
Cash, check or money order is enclosed. Color 

choice 

Name 

Address 

City State 



38 




LINENS AND FESTIVITY TIME 

Guest Towels, Tea and Dinner Napkins. Hand 
Embroidered in Madeira on Lyntex material, 
which looks like and launders like linen. 
These are welcome gifts for all occasions, as 
well as a necessity for visiting guests and im- 
portant dinners during this coming holiday sea- 
son. 

Tea Napkins size 12"xl2" $4.00 box of 6 

Dinner Napkins size 17"xl7" 8.00 box of 6 

Guest Towels size 22"x14" 2.25 boxed pr. 

No COD's please 

HANDKERCHIEF AND LINEN GUILD 
470 West 24th St. New York 11, N. Y. 



Westward Ho Ranch House 

gifts and accessories de- 
signed for easy living 




Authentically styled maple fiddle-back 
spoon holder. From our large selection 
of creations in maple. 

A show piece in any home 
$5.95 

Add 3% sales tax in California. 

Mail orders promptly filled 

• 

Westward Ho Ranch House 

790 S. Arroyo Parkway, Pasadena, Cailf. 



PENNY-SAVING FOOD TIPS 
AND HOUSEHOLD HINTS 

For a delectable and beautiful salad, peel 
small tomatoes and cut three deep slits in j 
each. Insert marinated slices of cucumber 
and pieces of crisp bacon; add French dress- 
ing. 

Try using carbonated water in lemonade; 
the kiddies will love it. 

Try equal parts of grated orange rind and 
tea leaves, in making tea. 

If you are preparing scrambled eggs, re- 
duce the cost and the number of eggs by 
adding one cup of toasted or oven-dried 
bread cubes. This adds a new zestful flavor 
to the dish. 

Don't toss that sweetened vinegar from your 
beets and pickles away. Strain the vinegar, 
bring it to a boil, and re-can. If put in 
pints, it can be used as needed for Harvard 
beets, salads and salad dressings all through 
the year. 

Here's a way to use that leftover dressing 
from turkey or chicken to good advantage. 
Roll into balls, wrap bacon around it, at- 
taching to a toothpick. Bake or fry and you 
have a good dish for luncheon or light supper. 

To clean alabaster: Dampen a piece of 
flannel with turpentine and rub article gently, 
then wash with warm mild soapsuds. Polish 
when dry with a soft brush which has been 
dopped in plaster of paris. 

Body lotion or rubbing alcohol is more con- 
venient to use if the bottle is fitted with a 
sprinkler top. 

Black bottoms on aluminum or other cook- 
ing ware help conserve fuel by keeping the 
heat concentrated under the utensil, so don't 
scour too diligently. 

Remove paint spots from windows and 
floors with a soft rag moistened with house- 
hold ammonia. 

Peeled and cored apples can be stored in 
refrigerator without discoloring if tossed first 
in lemon juice. 

To sweeten applesauce, try honey instead 
of sugar. 

Pencil and dust marks on painted papered 
walls can be erased with art gum. 

An asbestos mat for your electric iron 
saves energy. Slide the iron on and off mat 
without lifting. 

Handy ash trays for patio or terraces are 
small bowls partly filled with sand . . , 
prevents ashes from blowing around on a 
breezy day. 

A tall coffee pot makes a fine asparagus 
cooker. Bind asparagus stalks together and 
stand them on end in about three inches of 
water. Cover pot and steam stalks until tender. 

Tar or asphalt stains can be removed from 
most fabrics by rubbing spot first with lard 
or vaseline, then sponging with carbon tetra- 
chloride. 

To reduce cooking odors from cauliflower, 
onions and cabbage, cook in half water and 
half milk. The stock can be used for soup 
or gravy. 

To brighten colored oilcloth or plastic- 
coated cloth, sponge with mild borax and 
water solution. Wipe with soft cloth which 
has been slightly dampened with milk. 

To remove oil stains on non-washable 
fabric, dust generously with talcum powder 
or french chalk and brush off. Repeat until 
spot disappears. 

To prevent olive oil from becoming rancid, 
add two lumps of sugar to each quart. 

Add California flavor to olives by mari- 
nating in olive oil to which several slices 
of garlic have been added. 

Pink onion rings for garnish can be made 
by letting rings stand for 15 minutes in hot 
beet juice. 

To perk up limp organdy, dip in gum arabic 
solution. 

To prevent rust inside oven, always lei 
cool with door open. 

To restore fluffiness in wool blankets, add 
a tablespoon of glycerine to the last rins« 
water. 

For sewing up stuffed poultry or fish, use 
a sewing bodkin. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1 94* 






CALIFORNIA VIGNETTES . . . One of 

the treasures among recent books on California 
is a collection of sketches drawn from the 
memory of Rockwell D. Hunt, dean emeritus 
of the University of Southern California's 
Graduate School. California Vignettes (The 
Exposition Press. 60p. $2.50) is a series of 
brief glimpses back to a childhood spent on 
the banks of the Sacramento River, to mem- 
ories of family ties long since broken, and to 
recollections of some of California's pioneers 
John Bidwell, Dana Bartlett. and others — 
who left their mark on a new and developing 
country. Intimate, personal, and filled with 
a warm love for a native state, these sketches 
permit the modern newcomer to glimpse for 
a moment the meaning of California to those 
who know her best. 



PaulX 2>ucA Ptedd 



RESTAURANT 

Steaks, chops, duck, 
steamed clams, lob- 
ster, venison steaks, 
f>heasant, _ veal scal- 
opini, chicken saute 
sec. Romaine a la 
Paul & other 




Your Host: Paul Maggiora 
• PHONE MADISON 9-8336 * 
Olympic at Santa Fe, Los Angeles n 



Itiafaita 

Parisian Glt*im<u> 





DEMI-BRA. 

This dainty open-center 
bro gives you buoyant up- 
lift and moulded separa- 
tion. Of imported sheer 
lace, ribbed with heavy 
satin; in Pink, White, or 
Black. Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 
38-A or B Cup. 

$3.50 Each 

PARISIAN PANTIES 

Gossamer-light satin 
briefs, bewitchingly ac- 
cented- with imported 
lace inserts end a con- 
cealed zipper in the back 
to keep it snug. Pink, 
White, or Black. 
Waist sizes: 24, 25, 26, 
27, 28, 29. 

$3.95 Each 

Enclose Check or Money 



Orde 



No CO. D. 



Petite Paris Lingerie 



Petite Paris L 
DEMI-BRA 
at $3.50 
PARISIAN 
PANTIES 
at $3.95 

Add 


SANFORD, FLORIDA 

"HIS COUPON TO ORDER 

ngerre, Sanford, Fla. Please Send 










Size 
10c Postage for each 


tern 


NAME 


ADDRESS 


CITY 


ZONE 


STATE 



ALL THIS --AND NO ATTACHMENTS 



The ONLY Sewing Machine 
that does everything without 
fussing with clumsy, old- 
fashioned attachments. 
And for 




Available in 

DESKS • PORTABLES 

CONSOLES • COMMERCIALS 

Choice of finishes: 

BLOND, WALNUT, MAHOGANY, 

MAPLE, SILVER FOX 



FREE HOME DEMONSTRATION 

PICO, INC. 



FACTORY PARTS 



1800 S. MAIN ST., LOS ANGELES 15 
Richmond 6881 — JEfferson 6670 sales and service 



SPECIAL CHRISTMAS 
GIFT ORDER 

The CALIFORNIAN will bring your 
friends new delight each month with 
trend-setting fashions — intriguing reci- 
pes — exciting features — pictures and 
sketches — all keyed to the colorful Cali- 
fornia way of life. 

Please send THE CALIFORNIAN with special Christmas 
greeting card announcing the gift subscription to . . . 




NAME 

ADDRESS. 
CITY 



NAME. 



STATE_ 



ADDRESS. 
CITY 



STATE. 



NAME 



ADDRESS. 
CITY 



STATE. 



NAME 

ADDRESS. 
CITY 



STATE. 



Enter my own subscription order for one year 

Send bill for all special NAME 

Christmas gift orders to CITY 



ADDRESS. 
STATE 



Mail this order today to The CALIFORNIAN, 1020 South Main Street, Los Angeles 15, California. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1949 



39 



LOOK YOUNGER 

as You Grow Older 




U&vndCultiiM 

rwx ntat k&u&mi of*. 

A PROVEN SCIENTIFIC 

FACIAL TREATMENT 

AND 

PLEASANT NON-SURGICAL 

REJUVENATION and FACE LIFT 

(1) Removes blackheads, white heads, and 
tissue debris. 

(2) CORRECTS enlarged, clogged pores, dry 
skin, oily skin, sallowness, and blem- 
ishes. 

(3) CLEARS the skin of acne and pimples. 

(4) SMOOTHES wrinkles, and erases facial 

lines. 
(5} TIGHTENS sagging cheeks and double 
chins. 

(6) INCREASES circulation and tissue nutri- 
tion. 

(7) VITALIZES nerve, gland, muscle and 
skin structure. 

(8) RESTORES natural, lovely skin. 

Visit the DermaCulture Studio nearest 
you. 

Aihambra ATlantic 4-9551 

Belmont Shore 203 Glendora Ave. 

Berkeley LAnd 6-3710 

3179 College Ave. 

Fresno 3097 Tulare Ave. 

Hollywood GRanlte 2978 

Glendale 1123 N. Brand Blvd. 

Long Beach 742 Pine Ave. 

Los Angeles 3156 Wilshire Blvd. 

900 S. Norton Ave. 

Modesto 100 S. Burney St. 

North Hollywood 12131 Riverside Dr. 

Oakland .._ 1225 Broadway 

Pasadena 258 S. Las Robles Ave. 

Pomona 200 E. Center St. 

San Francisco YUkon 6-6325 

San Jose Suite 459, Porter Bldg. 

San Mateo 318 B. Street 

Santa Ana 405'/2 N. Broadway 

Santa Monica 2719-E Santa Monica Blvd. 



IQmitlk/H, 



THE __. FAMOUS 

sweeTwodd 

CIGARETTE HOLDERS 

Now available by mail 

Natural, pleasant wood mouth piece . . . 
not perfumed. Attractive! Inexpensive! 

Why use a strong holder? 

Keep a supply of low priced Sweetwoods 
on hand and discard while still odorless. 
REGULAR HOLDERS, 100 for$5.00 prepaid 
STUB EJECTORS, 50 for$5.00 prepaid 

CHICK POWELL COMPANY, Dept.C 
44 N. W. 22nd Avenue . . . Miami, Florida 



SAMPLE OFFER . . Send 25 cents | 

I (No stamps please) for three regular hold- 
I ers and one stub ejector. Postage prepaid. 




Adah Margaret Handley: Art 
Galleries For Covered Wagons 

By ALICE CAREY 

At one time or another, every woman has dipped into the vivid 
history of American pioneers and wondered, doubtfully, if she 
could have "kept up with Grandma." Her uncertainty would double 
if all the grandmas were to turn in their shawls for a new lease on 
living as did Mrs. Adah Margaret Handley of Los Angeles. This 
85 year-old woman was not content to be a pioneer, mother, and 
grandmother so she set out for commercial and artistic success. 
And got it. 

Of course, it's not very unusual when a woman decides to study- 
painting and eventually becomes an accomplished artist. It is re- 
markable, however, when she makes this decision at ... 76! And 
that is when Mrs. Handley. mother of six children, decided she 
"had the time" to indulge in her life-time dream. 

Thus it is that a snowy-haired matron, who once was perfectly 
at home in the hubbub of covered wagon trains, has now become 
equally at ease in the hush of art galleries. But it was more than the 
urge for beauty that kept Mrs. Handley out of the rocking chair 
brfgade and stood her before an easel. It was her horror of "sitting 
out" old age. 

Sallying forth into the dangers of Los Angeles traffic is a trifle 
to one who has by-passed hostile Indians when a. child, so Mrs. 
Handley travels by bus or car to visit points that interest her in an 
artistic sense. She is fascinated by the richly beautiful structures 
of missions, and has worked with loving care on her oil painting 
of San Juan Capistrano. With true "pro" form, the 85-year-old 
artist cannily photographs the scene she wishes to paint (oh, yes, 
she's a photographer, too!) ... this gives her added opportunity 
to study details. 

Born in Kansas, young Adah Margaret began her trek to the 
west at the age of six months when her family popped her into 
a covered wagon as they hurried to join a group heading for Colo- 
rado. They lived there for some time, but were driven out by the 
terrible grasshopper plague in 1875. They clambered into the 
wagons again, and the settlers started for the state of Washington. 
The train split up en route . . . and then, one terrible night in 
the Rockies, the Handleys heard that the foremost group had been 
massacred by Indians. Plans changed hastily and the families de- 
toured into Utah and finally to Dakota's Bad Lands. In later years, 
Adah Margaret continued west until she finally settled down in her 
chosen state of California. 

Now she's off on her new adventure of conquering the art world 
. . . one more challenge to modern women who wonder whether 
or not they could "keep up with grandma." 



a piece of rare distinction 




WINE STAND 

Copy of original — Circa 1780 
Made in beautiful English Yew Wood 
Exquisite finish — Finest Cabinet work. 
Top 14% x 14 1 /, inches— Height 22% 
inches. 

express prepaid 3>o5.UU securely packed 
No. C.O.D.'s pleose 

MARY GLENNON f £JV?A c 




NO MORE BROKEN 

OR 

MISPLACED GLASSES 

Here's something that is 

New! Attractive! Useful! 

You can't appreciate its use, con- 
venience and value until you have 
used one. 

Attach to tile, Mirror or Wall 

When washing, shaving or retiring insert 
eye-glasses. 

$1.00 

™ postpaid 

SPEC-HOLDER CO. i 1 *^; 



CANASTA PLAYER 




THE FINEST PORTABLE GAME TABLE 
of leg and elbow rooml Plenty of fell 
surface! Ash trays and cut-outs for 
Plenty of chip room for POKERI Sturd 
leg hardware insuring a firm table « 
up . . . Easily stored — light or do 
48 inch diameter. 

No C.O.D.'s please 
$31.50 Express collect 

MARY GLENNON G ° n X' 



STUDENTS! ! 

Study more comfortably an< 
effectively with a STUDY B 




Invented by a college professoi 
prove concentration and relievi 
strain, it is ideal for thinkers, 
held in proper reading position; 
both hands for taking notes, 
from kindergarten to college. 

Send $2.50 to Prof. C. W 

St. Olaf College 

Northfield, Minn. 




Versatile Commode 

Solid Honduras Mahoi 

adds beauty to any nil 

Here is the answer to your sear 
an all-purpose utility table t 
perfect for any room, every 
Use it as a card or end tabl 
telephone, lamp, radio, sewing 
net. or other occasional table 
Made of solid Honduras mat. 
with rich, lasting hand-rubbed 
Each of the four spacious, dust 
drawers equipped with antique 
finish reproduction pull. 30" hig 
is 17"xl5". Only $34.95 deliven 
anywhere in U.S.A. Pr. S67. 
CQDs. Send check or money or 

THE FURNITURE SI- 

P. O. Box 188, Jonestown, 



1/ 
si 



• 



HELEN BROWN REVIEWS: 

MACARONI MANUAL, by Crosby Gaige. 
J Barrows, $2. 

I Crosby Gaige is interested in all the arts, 
and for Mr. Gaige to have an interest in a 

I subject is for him to know it thoroughly. 
How many months he spent in his experi- 
mental kitchen working out new and exciting 
recipes for the preparation of spaghetti I 
can only guess, but I know the results are 
most gratifying. Macaroni, the general term 
Ifor pastes, includes spaghetti, noodles, tufini, 
Ishells, vermicelli, assabesi, laSagne, tubet- 
Itini and a score of others. For several thou- 
Isand years before the birth of Christ cooks 
lhave been preparing macaroni and its kin. I 
I do not claim that Mr. Gaige has included 
jail the best of these culinary creations, but 
Ihe certainly has given many of them, and he 
lhas also contributed several of his own note- 
Iworthy compositions. 

The book has recipes for soups, sauces, and 
Isalads, as well as numerous ways of using 
Ithe pastes in combination with meat, fish, 
Icheese and eggs. The fact that the recipes 
are thrifty does not lessen my enthusiasm, nor 
will it deter any other budget-beaten home- 
maker from adding this book to her library. 
Even the price is economical, for it sells for 
2, which is considerably below most of the 
current cook books. 

A touch of whimsey is apparent in the sec- 
tion called "Meals for Children," but I sus- 
pect that the children will be as enchanted 
with such names as "The Cat's Meow Pud- 
ding" and "Jack Be Nimble Noodles" as I 
know they will be with the dishes themselves. 
I recommend the book for everyone, but par- 
ticularly for the woman whose husband 
thinks he's the only character for miles 'round 
who is capable of cooking spaghetti. With a 
copy of Macaroni Manual she can beat him 
at his own game, and decisively! 



PUEBLO GHOSTS 

(Continued from page 33) they could spy 
between Hawaii and the coast. But just too 
often they preyed upon a ship in the Santa 
Barbara channel and the Californians just 
didn't approve. They gave chase and the 
pirates made for this shore, their cutlasses 
drooping behind them. They buried their 
treasure and escaped across the hills." 

"Ah," Rachel replied, "that makes a lovely 
tale. But, truly, now, is there truth in it?" 

"It is true," he answered quite seriously. 
"Human eyes witnessed the raid and the ac- 
tions of the buccaneers. People of all ages 
have attempted to find the treasure, and gen- 
eration to generation will keep on trying, I 
presume. Because for some reason no one 
has ever unearthed one doubloon of all the 
treasure that is supposed to be buried here." 

They fell silent again, sitting quietly side 
by side. It was late afternoon, and they 
watched the magnificent colors arise on the 
sea in that short space of time that seems to 
halt the sun's journeying. Breakers came in 
on a crest of turquoise, splashing into irides- 
cent foam. The sea was a haunting mesh of 
tints, changing from blue to lavender, from 
lavender to turquoise and back again to blue. 

The Channel Islands seemed to be suspend- 
ed, without anchorage, in an aura of ghostly 
pale violet. Far out in the channel, a sea 
lion jumped in a startling arc. Sea gulls 
spread pallid wings and dipped in and out 
of the wisps of trailing color. 

Rachel whispered, softly, as if fearing to 
break a spell. "This . . this is more than 
enough treasure for me." 

Thomas reached for her hand. "No," he 
said in a hushed voice. "There is one thing 
more for me, Rachel. One thing more — ." 

She turned to him and knew, suddenly, 
that she would never return to New England. 

On June 10, 1833, Thomas Larkin and 
Rachel Holmes were married on board the 
"Volunteer," anchored in Santa Barbara har- 
bor. (History doesn't reveal how many halos 
she wore in appropriate award for meeting 
those Larkin requirements!) 



They celebrated the wedding at one of the 
famous homes of Santa Barbara, these two 
people from the strange United States, sur- 
rounded by caballeros and senoritas in silver- 
decorated sombreros, carmine ribbons, velvets 
and satins, ruffles and pantaloons, pearls and 
tortoise-shell combs. Rachel stood, serenely, 
in her richest New England finery, a fragile 
pink brocade with a square-cut neck edged 
in a wine ruffling, the skirt caught in folds 
of deep drapes. 

Indian servants watched over the barbecue 
pit where venison, beef and quail were brown- 
ing to a golden crisp. The host brought out 
his treasure of rare champagne which had 
reached California shores by a visiting French 
ship. Violins and guitars began their rythmic 
tunes . . Madre de Dios! . . what music! 
And Thomas Larkin went through the steps 
of the fandango, slowly, so as to teach his 
lovely bride. Then this New England lass was 
initiated into the tradition of the ca.scarones, 
egg shells filled with cologne, tossed at her 
pretty head. 

Larkin and Rachel went to live in the home 
which today is called the Carrillo Casa (the 
Carrillo family later came into possession of 
it) and it was here that Isabel Larkin was 
born, the first American white child to be 
born in California. She lived only a year, 
but other children came to Rachel and Thomas 
Larkin, to romp through the lovely old adobe 
on Carrillo Street. 

They lived through many years of changes 
in the history of old California, and more 
than that, you often feel they are still there. 
Sometimes when the sun streams through the 
pepper trees and the mountains just beyond 
are covered with mist, you can see Rachel 
and Thomas and the children mounting their 
horses to follow you along the road winding 
across the rim of the mountains . . the road 
known as El Sielo Camino, The Sky Road. 
It does lead to unearthly beauty. 

They are still, there, hovering over Santa 
Barbara, that old Spanish pueblo that spills 
out a ghostly perfume of lace mantillas and 
scarlet sashes . . and the road that winds 
around the very tip of the sky. 




I vSt 



contour M_ a gic! 



There's exciting new figure beauty for 
you — and comfort you never dreamed possible — 
in every CORDELIA brassiere... created in Hollywood 
...and recommended by physicians and surgeons 
everywhere. Even a troublesome "problem bust" achieves 

glamorous contours when you're wearing one of 
CORDELIA'S 600 special custom fittings in sizes up to 56! 



CORDELIA creates for the youthful 
figure too... high style brassieres 

in regular sizes. ..in the 
season's most exquisite fabrics. 



You'll find CORDELIA bras 
in better department stores, 
specialty shops, and 

surgical supply houses 
from coast to coast. For 
name of the store nearest 

you featuring the famous 
CORDELIA line 



(gotddte 



C«ty*.>» o*^ 



3107 BEVERLY BLVD. 




OF HOLLYWOOD 

Creators and manufacturers 
of surgical, corrective, and high style brassieres 

LOS ANGELES 4, CALI 



FO RN I A. 



CALIFORN1AN, November, 1949 



41 




"Autumn Landscape," Original Watercolor 
Framed 32" x 28" as desired — $50.00 











RUNNING FAWN RUNNING COLT 

Send your CHRISTMAS orders in NOWI 
Beautifu} original handmade Animal 
Prints silk screened. Can be paired in 
background colors of Rose Pink, Tur- 

?uoise Blue, Medium Green, etc. Outer 
rame 16" x 16" in light natural wood 
or in ivory mats for your own framing. 

Matted $3.00 each, 4 for $10.00 
Framed $6.50 each, 2 for $12, 4 for $23 
Limit Christmas Orders to Dec. 1 , Pleasel 
Write for further information and photos 
will be sent to you of other pictures 
available. 

Express Prepaid, No C. O. D.'s. 
Send Check or Money Order to 

-% BEYER ^cuctto- 

726 South 10th St., Minneapolis 4, Minn. 




DOG LEASH BELT $1.50 

Here is the ever-popular Dog Leash 
Belt at the new low price of $1.50. 
An adjustable braided belt — sturdy 
enough for coats; wonderful on 
skirts, dresses, and slacks; practical 
for all sportswear outfits. Ideal for 
gifts — attractively boxed at your re- 
quest. Colors — red, green, gold, lug- 
gage, navy, white, and black. Sizes — 
small, medium, and large. 

Add 15c for postage 
(3% tax in California) 

CATALINA CASUALS 

BOX 325 — AVALON, CALIFORNIA 



MIRAGE 



Pamela Qau, 



AN ILLUSION IN 

BLACK SHEER 

NYLON 

A mere shadow for 
that modest minimum 
you want under all 
your casual and for- 
mal clothes! Elim- 
inates all waist-line 
bulk. 

BLACK NYLON 

SHEER 

Only S2.95 

Include hip measure. 
Send check with order. 
Sorry, no C.O.D. We 
prepay 1st class mail. 




Pamela Qay 

Box 23-C • Melrose 76, Massachusetts 




smart 
practical 

LETTER 
RACK 



Highly convenient and so decorative, 
too . . . wonderfully useful. Hand- 
some accessory to hang above a 
desk ... in an entrance hall to 
keep mail, memos and telephone 
messages. Correct in both contem- 
porary and traditional settings. . . . 
A charming display rack for Christmas 
cards! Chinese red, bottle green or 
black in a fine satin lacquer finish. 
25 T / 2 inches long. 
$7.50 each postpaid in U.S.A. 

No C.O.D. 's please 

MARY GLENNON ££AM- eh c 



Problems of Modern Woman 
In The Maidless Household 

If yours is a maidless household . . . and whose isn't 
these days? . . . organize, madame! 

When you've kissed your breadwinner goodbye and 
bundled him out to earn another slice of same, take a 
twenty-minute breather with the paper. Now, steeped in 
the day's scandal, you're all set to tackle your daily 
housework according to your own schedule which prob- 
ably runs something like this: 

1. Predictables: bed making, general policing, refrigera- 
tor inventory with an eye toward lunch for yourself 
and young. 

2. Major chores: allocate these to mesh conveniently 
with your extracurricular activities. For example: 

Monday, wash. (Get soaking underway before tak- 
ing on group 1.) 

Tuesday, iron ; list tentative menus for rest of week. 

Wednesday, extended session with grocer; closet, 
drawer detail ; baking. 

Thursday, kitchen and bathroom scour jobs; re- 
frigerator refurbishing. 

Friday, thorough cleaning; over-all polish job 
Saturday, extended session with grocer. 

3. Unpredictables : The vacuum goes on the fritz, you 
blow a fuse (electrical, not mental), Junior's trike 
wheel comes loose from its moorings, the back door 
sticks, the rodent population descends en masse, the 
baby next door swallows a safety pin. Maybe you'll 
lose a whole morning now and then! Because you 
work on an organized plan, regularly, you simply 
juggle the missed major chores into minor chore 
time the next day, and let it go at that. 

4. Lunchtime: around noon you involve yourself with 
your own sandwich board technique, making quite 
sure it's not arsenic you're spreading on Junior's 
bread. Then you send him back to school or polish 
him off and put him down for a nap. 

5. Loose-end detail : complete kitchen details, prepare 
vegetables for dinner, leaving them to crisp in the re- 
frigerator. Now punch the clock. Here's your time 
for a luxury-scented bath, a nap, a good book, a 
bridge game ... or you can simply settle down 
and brush your hair. 

And there you have it ... a composite picture of 
organization at home. You can take it from here, re-tool 
it to fit your own needs . . . and a very good leisure 
to you! 




Soft, genuine leather is used in 
this lovely handmade bag. It's 
arge and spacious with roomy 
pockets. All leather-lined bag 
with safety catch fastener 
adjustable shoulder straps, 
ideal gift for your friends 
yourself. Your choice of 
green, navy blue, natural, saddle, 
black, and dark brown. 



(plus 20% luxury tax, 

3% sales tax in California 

3'/!% sales tax in Los Angeles.) 



and 

An 

and 

red. 



Biaqiliart, SUop, 



FARMERS MARKET 



THIRD AND FAIRFAX 



LOS ANGELES 36, CALIFORNIA 



42 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1949 




■'■■j weethearts 

Weaters*. . . 



Made for each other! 
Catalina's Sweethearts in 
Sweaters* series . . . 
featuring spirited California 
styling, treasured 
California colors in 
kitten-soft, 
genuine Cashmeres. 

•registered 

for her: Cashmere short-sleeve 

slip-on, 13.00; 

shown with Cashmere Cardigan, 17.00 

for him: Cashmere slip-on, 18.00 

(Cashmere sleeveless, 13.00) 



FOR COLOR FOLDER SHOWING OTHER CATALINA SWEATERS, WRITE DEPT. 817, 

CATAIINA, INC., 443 SOUTH SAN PEDRO STREET, LOS ANGELES 13, CALIFORNIA 




j0f* 






H ft 



"^^SS 






t**^& - 



X^S 







: S i ~ i '$>&*^.*s@£^-&i .:; 






f^il 



">33333333 



FUSE 



i 4 * 



Bates brings cotton flannel out of the nursery and sends it off to an office, or 
anywhere, neatly printed in little calico patterns, vat-dyed in suave solid colors, 
and Sanforized so it can be washed repeatedly without matting or shrinking. Here, 
Bates bright new career cotton is worn by a bright young career girl, Katherine 
Cassidy, in a blouse and skirt to duplicate from Vogue Patterns 6837 and 6860. 




■*»••"-!, 



'Loomed to be Heirloomed" 



BATES FABRICS, INC., 80 WORTH STREET, NEW YORK 13 



A MAGAZINE STYLED FOR COLORFUL LIVING 




PRICE 35 CENTS 



J A NO A R Y , 19 5 



F^— 




Illusion 

IN NYLON 

a new swimsuit by Cole of California 

There's lovely illusion in the 
enticing Deep See Bra... 
secret support for 
an alluring figure. More 
loveliness in a fabulous, 
quick-drying, nylon-laton fabric 
... a new, textured illusion of 
Fishscale . . . exclusively Cole, in 
six rich water colors. And like all 
creations by Cole designer Margit 
Fellegi, the suit has originality 
...beauty... con tours to mold a 
smooth, desirable illusion 
...a luscious figure... for you. s 
At fine stores . . . 17.95 







Copyright, 1949 
Cole of California, Inc., Los Angeles 11, California 







SPRING and a young woman 's fancy ... a ^LOwt/ suit, a iabd 

of distinction by Superior Cloak and Suit Mfg's. Curvaceous jacket with butterfly pleats each side of slim 
skirt; fashioned in Superateen, Superior's 100% worsted wool, and lined with Celanese satin. Divine 
colors: red, nude, pink, gold, kelly, grey, navy and black. Sizes 8-18. To retail under $55.00. 

For the name of your nearest store, write Dept. C 

SUPERIOR CLOAK AND SUIT MFG'S. 



324 13th STREET, OAKLAND 12, CALIFORNIA 



THE CALIFORNIAN, January, 1950 




Write for folder of other Cotalina styles and name of nearest stor* 




Look-alikes to suit the whole 
family! Play, swim, have fun to- 
gether in Catalina's "Underseas" 
family ensemble. Indian Head cotton 
print, exclusive pattern with 
Catalina. Cruise blue and white, 
red and white, green and white, 
brown and white. 



Women's set, sizes 32 to 38, $11.95. 
Mens Cabana set, sizes 28 to 40, $9.95 
Boys' set, sizes 6 to 12, $5.95. 
Girls' suit, sizes 7 to 14, $4.95 
Tots' suit, sizes 2 to 6X, $2.95. 




LOOK FOR THE 



FLYING FISH 



ttalina, Inc., Dept. 622, Los Angeles 13, California 



a vttupv«u- VAtafaj 





y* 




&^ 



FASHIONS 




"HOLLYWOOD INSPIRED.. 
FOR THE AMERICAN GIRL 



EVENING SARONG . . . strapless dress 
in pineapple-gold tissue faille, 
dramatically highlighted with stylized 
pineapple print. The scarf to drape 
the shoulders as a stole or cover 
the head in sari fashion. 

Colors: 

Gold and Brown, Black and White, 
Poppy and Black, Royal and White. 
In sizes 9 to 15. To retail about $29.95. 



SEE PAGE 50 FOR STORES IN YOUR CITY. 



CAjfit^A^C^^ 



Dorothy Lamour Fashions Feature the new Kee Zipper. 



CUrnHvu FASHIONS ADiWsionof TWENTIETH CENTURY FROCKS 

71 9 S. Los Angeles Street, las Angeles, California 



THE CALIFORNIAN, January, 1950J 



' 




<&^" 



FAS H I O N 




"HOLLYWOOD INSPIRED... 
FOR THE AMERICAN GIRL" 



STAR GAZER. .. shimmering white 
stars on a solid background with pert bow 
on left shoulder. Clever off-center 
neckline. Side drape blends subtlly into 
shirring above waist. In rayon crepe. 

Colors: 

Screen print on Royal, Black or Grey 

background. In sizes 9 to 15. 

To retail about $24.95. 



SEE PAGE 50 FOR STORES IN YOUR CITY. 



C\J^V<9<Am 0)Cu 



Dorothy Lamour Fashions Feature rhe new Kee Zipper. 



Gs*uHvo FASHIONS ADivMonoi TWENTIETH CENTURY FROCKS 

719 S. Los Angeles Street, Los Angeles, California 



THE CALIFORNIAN, January, 1950 



f 




fr*" 



FASHION 




"HOL1YWOOD INSPIRED.. 
FOR THE AMERICAN GIRL 



TROPICAL LEAF. .. exaggerated 
dolman three-quarter sleeves highlight the 
costume look in this rayon crepe 
wrap-around dress with tropical leaf 
print. Cleverly concealed belt 
allows for a variety of interesting drape 
effects. Plunging neckline, dainty 
rolled collar. 

Colors: 

Poppy and Black, White and Black, 

White and Royal, Brown and Gold. 

In sizes 9 to 15. To retail about $22.95. 



SEE PAGE 50 FOR STORES IN YOUR CITY. 



G\J&t0WS CfyZ, 



Dorothy Lamour Fashions Feature the new Kee Zipper. 



G**4tvu FASHIONS ADMsicof TWENTIETH CENTURY FROCKS 

71 9 S. los Angeles Street, Las Angeles, California 



THE CALIFORNIAN, January, 1950 




rfo^ 



FAS H I O N 




••HOLLYWOOD INSPIRED . . 
FOR THE AMERICAN GIRL 



FLOWER PRINT.. .Tropical flowers, 
sunsplashed with gaiety, keynotes 
this fine rayon crepe afternoon dress. 
Smart cape effect attaches to waist 
n back. Sweetheart neckline, 
crisscross motif on shoulders, self 
belt, four-gored skirt. 

Colors: 

Screen print on black, Navy or White 

background. In sizes 9 to 15. 

To retail about $24.95. 



SEE PAGE 50 FOR STORES IN YOUR CITY. 



oOW^c^ 



Dorothy Lamour Fashions Feature the new Kee Zipper. 



a*n*Hvo FASHIONS AD/vWonof TWENTIETH CENTURY FROCKS 

719 S. Los Angeles Street. Las Angeles, Cali!:rn!a 



THE CALIFORNIAN, January, 1950 




mm 




w jean, duftauv 



OF CALIFORNIA 



It's tulip-time in California. Young designer Jean Durain has done a 
group of Spring fashions in tulip shades— tulip shapes. She's used the 
new, brilliant Indian Head, which has all the sturdy washable and 
long-wearable qualities of its ancestors, plus a soft, feminine, linen- 
like drapability, vat-dyed and Sanforized of course, and touched 
lightly with embroidered organdie. In Delft blue with light blue, Tulip 
Pink with light pink, Dutch yellow with Aqua. 



Dress- 
Sundress— 
Bloomer 
sunsuit— 



Sizes 3 - 6X 
$5.95 
4.95 

3.95 



Los Angeles: Bullock's 



Sizes 7-12 
$7.95 
5.95 

4.95 

Downtown 



JEAN DURAIN • 230 SO. LOS ANGELES ST., LOS ANGELES 12, CALIFORNIA 



THE CALIFORNIAN, January, 1950 



II 



s 



mart Set Wardrobe 



*-^&t 



-9 



\\ 




X 



'■%■ 



K 



,© 



\g> 



12 



1 J 






it 


* 




«P« 






■ 










* 


T~~U 






1 








\ l\ 














THE CALIFORNIAN, 


January 


, 1 9 5 : 1 












1 



Impeccably tailored co-ordinated separates for 
a planned wardrobe of distinction. Introducing 
Wesley Simpson's Toile de lin . ...crease resistant 
rayon... Exclusive with Hollywood Premiere . . . 
Designed by Irene Saltern in White, Lime, Navy, 
Red. . "South Hampton Jacket". . . about $17.95 
"Newport Skirt". . . about $8.95 . . . Rayon boucle' 
"Wimbledon Sweater". . . about $10.95 . . ."Malibu 
Blouse". . . about $10.95 . . ."Cape Cod Shorts". . . 
about $7.95. Sizes 10-18 




THE CALIFORNIAN, January, 1950 



13 



ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA ! 



G 



C 



ifts 
in the 
alifornia manner 





#**— - 



WASH BOWL AND PITCHER: Miniature white crackle 
ware for cream and sugar, cigarettes, or use for planter. 
Pitcher measures 3 T /2 inches high; 4 inches across. $1.75, 
postpaid. 





TORSO GLASS: Ceramic torso glass for highballs, beer. 
Use this well -developed accessory for flowers, plants, 
too. Colors: green or black. $1.00 (add 25c for post- 
age). 




GAY '90 JIGGER: Amusing bar accessory, this corseted 

torso in ceramic. The bust holds a 1-oz. jigger; the 

base a double jigger. Attractively gift-boxed. $1.00, 

postpaid. 

No. C.O.D. — p'ease. Send check, cash or money order. 

Residents of California, please add 3% sales tax.) 

Send for illustrated catalog of 
other delightful California gift 
items. 












TEE CORRAL SHOP 

RANCHO SANTA FE • CALIFORNIA 




14 



GRANULAR CLEANSER ... a normal, 
gradual, effective "skin peel" at home. Grad- 
ually sluffs off old dead cells. This friction 
stimulates circulation, encourages growth of 
new cells. Contains honey, almond and bar- 
ley meal, plus ingredients which bleach and 
clarify skin. The pulling effect of the honey 
while scouring loosens blackheads and white- 
heads, and scrubbing effect removes. Also 
wonderful for hands. 2-ounce jars (federal 
tax included) $1.50; 4-ounce jars, $2.40. Add 
3% sales tax in Calif., Z l / 2 % in Los Angeles. 
From DermaCulture, 1318 Fourth Avenue, 
Los Angeles 6, Calif. 



SERV-ALL ARM CHAIR TRAY . . . 

a useful, inviting item made of a thermo- 
setting plastic material ... a must for the 
perfect hostess. So new, novel and appeal- 
ing ... the very answer to your search for 
an attractice tray that "stays where you put 
it." Serv-All makes an ideal gift for all oc- 
casions. Available in your choice of five beau- 
tiful fiesta colors — red, blue, ivory, green and 
yellow. Only $1.95 postpaid (add 6c tax in 
California). Order from Fred S. Meyer Co., 
Box 1176, Beverly Hills, California. 

SHINE-BOY SHOE HOLDER . . . this 
practical, time-saving shoe holder shines shoes 
at home quickly and e-asily. Fits all sizes 
of shoes — children's (six-year-old and up), 
men's, and women's. Shine-Boy Shoe Holder, 
made of sturdy steel construction, grasps 
shoes firmly, is easily removable from wall 
bracket when not in use. A practical useful 
gift that will last a lifetime. Only $2.75 post- 
paid, in California, add 8c sales tax. Sorry 
no C.O.D.'s. Order several for your friends 
and yourself from Fred S. Meyer Co., Box 
1176, Beverly Hills, Calif. 



NEW CHEFSAW MEAT SAVER . . . 

a hundred uses for this handy, all-purpose, 
aluminum kitchen saw. Buy meat at quan- 
tity prices — cut in kitchen to serving portions 
desired. Hardened steel saw blade severs 
meat bones and joints smoothly and quickly. 
Grooved handle tenderizes tough cuts. Ideal 
in preparing frozen foods. Useful in dressing 
game and fish "on the spot." Cuts steel and 
brass. Regular price, $1.50. Introductory 
offer $1.00 postpaid. Limit two to a customer. 
Extra blades 3 for 40c. No C.O.D.'s. Money 
back guarantee. The Margorita Shop, 1018 
S. Main, Los Angeles 15, Calif. 



"GAY NINETIES" MOOD . . . carried out 
in original Claytoon illustrations in durable, 
glazed place mats. Bright, gay-colored photo- 
graphs of miniature clay models and stage 
sets. You and your friends will love these - 
adorable mats. Water and alcohol resistant. 
Protect table finishes while adding merriment 
to your place setting. The perfect hostess or 
anniversary gift. Size 10"xl6". Set of 6, only 
$2.00. Price includes tax and shipping charges 
in America. Order from The Margorita Shop, 
1018 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, Calif. 



THE CAL1FORNIAN, January, 1950 




(%*»*— 



iSHIMMERING SHOWERS . . . NEW 

!3-Way Lighting controlled by one switch. As 
old as yesterday, as new as tomorrow. These 
lamps capture the tradition and charm of 
Yesteryear. The luminous clarity of these 
new electrified shower lamps will lend a note 
of grace and brilliance to your room. Each 
sparkling lamp displays 54 starlike glass crys- 
tal pendants cascading over a lovely frosted 
bowl vase, its beauty enhanced with a hand- 
cut floral design. Ideal for the credenza, con- 
sole, mantlepiece, etc. Top and bottom light 
independently or together. S22.50 postpaid. 
Mark Stier, 277 E. Fordham Rd., New York 
58. N. Y. 

PERSONALIZED STATIONERY AND IN- 

FORMALS . . . Surprise your friends and 
relatives by having their signatures stylized 
on this beautiful stationery. Artistically in- 
terpreted in your choice of colors — Paper: 
pristine white, ivory-cream, silver-grey . . . 
Signature: black velvet, mariner blue, du- 
bonnet, or bottle green — on finest quality pa- 
per. Informals . . . 100 sheets and 100 en- 
velopes $3.25. Stationery . . . 200 sheets and 
100 envelopes S4.25. Beautifully gift boxed. 
Special combination offer, both S6.75. Add 
3% sales tax in California, 3'/2% in Los An- 
geles. No. C.O.D.'s please. Send signature 
examples with colors desired to Chelly Cre- 
ations. Box 355, Pacific Palisades. California. 




4. 




^ Old-fashioned Hospitality 
zzm! ...New-fashioned Comfort! 




"CITY OF LOS ANGELES" 

39% HOURS TO CHICAGO-NO FASTER TRAIN EAST! 

Private rooms and berths in Pullmans. Chair Cars with individual 
reclining seats— reserved. Club Lounge and new Dining Cars. 
Also new Cafe Lounge for Chair Car patrons. 

15 Union Pacific Ticket Offices in Southern California to serve you, including . . . 
Los Angeles: 434 West Sixth St. or Union Station • Phone TRinity 9211 

UNION PAC I FIC 




. SlC -; 




THE 150th ANNIVERSARY OF THE 
HOUSE OF ATKINSON 

is celebrated with pride in ig4g — 

pride in their privilege of supplying colognes 

to people of taste and culture 

through eight English reigns — 

and pride in their own superb skill 

in the perfumer's art. 

EAU DE COLOGNE 



EAU DE COLOGNE 

Made in England by 

ATKINSONS 

24 OLD BOND STREET. LONDON. W.I 

IMPORTED BY 
PAUL K. RANDALL 
2M MADISON AVE.. NEW YORK 17. N.Y. 



Corde 

FINEST IN HANDBAGS 




STYLE 7507 
ABOUT 

$10.95 

Genuine "Corde' exqui- 
sitely styled; distinctive metal 
clasp. The perfect comple- 
ment for your "after five" 
costumes. 

Black, Brown, Navy, and Multi-colors Mexican. 
If not at your favorite department store write 

CENTURY HAND BAG CO. 

1220 Maple, Suite 301 

LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 

When ordering by mail please enclose 20% 
Federal tax and 3% state tax. 



1950 



15 




CHOSEN FOR THIS MONTH'S COVER BY THE EDITORS OF THE CALIFORNIAN! 



"BOTANY" 



■ 



iKJ&£ 



bL Qji 



#USv*A/*J 



CALIFORNIA 



Sure fashion: versatile separates. And never more so than in this 
combination. The graceful jacket of featherweight wool tweed accented 
by the flattering collar, front demi-belt, and new pocket treatment. 
The pared-down skirt of Botany wool flannel is a fresh variation of 
the classic with its new double fly front. 

The tweed jacket in natural, gold, pink, and aqua about $25.00. 

The Botany Flannel skirt in ivory, cream yellow, mellow aqua, 
peppermint, beige, coral, pistachio, emerald, red, men's wear grey, 
navy, brown, and black about $12.00. Sizes 10 to 18. Also, matching 
tweed skirt, double fly front, about $10. Sizes 10 to 18. 

Dan Gertsman — California, 2202 Broadway, Santa Monica 

J. W. Robinson Company Viola Marsha 

Los Angeles, California Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

and other fine stores everywhere 



16 



THE CALIFORNIAN, January, 1950 





precious tailoring 

is Rosenblum tailoring, 

is tailoring by master 

craftsmen who for decades 

have been making 

the finest ready-to-wear 

an-tailored suits, the finest 

suit values in America. 

this new Rosenblum suit 

practically made to order 

for girls five feet four and 

under . . . in superb quality 

menswear worsteds or 

Rosenblum-exclusive 

all-wool worsted 

all-year-weight shantung 

. . . sizes 10 to 20... 49.95. 

Other Rosenblum suits 
for average and tall figures 

35.00 and 39. 95... 

at fine stores. 
Rosenblum, Los Angeles 



MAN-tailored in California 





' 4 0tM.' 



"My Graff shirt is 
worth singing about", 



// 



,w 



^■y fi 



a 






XT 



m 






LH 



m 



L*c 



?V 



& 



-^ 



<X* V re 



■JkA 



I 



f \v 






^1$3* 



V 






^ ft 4 



R 



'0. 



^ 



^fr* 



<^'^ 



■J^\ 



K\ d 



■I 



X' 






~#^ 



«fe_ 



i& 



You've never seen such delicate beauty and color harmony as in our original exclusive 
"Colonial Garden" print. Made in 100 denier crepe in Grey, Brown, Green, Blue, 
and Red. Sizes 32-40. Only $6.95. 

FOR STORE IN YOUR CITY, WRITE 1240 SOUTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 



CAUFORNIAWEAI BY 

GRAFF 



c 

T. 



85 
•9 










ON THE COVER: 

For Spring, tweed . . . in the 
most beautiful shades of 
gold, pink, blue, or natural! 
Dan Gertsman's belted 
jacket about $25. Shown 
with Botany flannel skirt in 
blending colors, about $12. 
Matching tweed skirt, about 
$10. Sizes 10-18. 
J. W . Robinson Co., Los 
Angeles. Gray felt hat by 
Suzy Lee. Red Red lipstick 
by Guitare . . . and Evyan"s 
exciting perfume christened 
Gay Diversion. The color 
photo, by Frank Stiffler. 




California fashions 






- 

a 
a 

es 
e 



The Ensemble: A Resort Favorite 20 

Palm Springs Fashion Fiesta - 21 

Jester Mood - 22 

The Daring Blazer - 23 

Flowers and Dressed-Up Denim 24 

Color and More Color 25 

Classic Separates 26 

Nylon Crinkle ! - 27 

Glamour Touch - 28 

Shorts, Shorter - 29 

Carnival Colors 30 

Summer Playshoes - 31 

Velveteen With Linen 32 

Nylon For Playtime 33 

A Good Look At The Seashore 34-37 

Here Comes The Navy 38 

Coats and Suits For Spring 39 

White Gabardine Out In Front! 40 

Three On A Match 41 

The Lady Likes Half Sizes 43 

Prettiest Wedding Of The Season 44 



California features 



EDITOR AND PUBtlSHER J. R. Osherenko 

ASSISTANT PUBLISHER William J. Bowen 

FASHION DIRECTOR Sally Dickason 

FASHION EDITOR Virginia Scallon 

MANAGING EDITOR Helen Ignatius 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Philip Kustner 

MEN'S FASHION EDITOR Malcolm Steinlauf 

FASHIONS Jacquelin Lary 

ART. Morris Ovsey 

Jane Albrecht 

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Frank Stiffler 

SHOPPING ROUNDUP Joyce Olsen 

FOOD STYLIST Helen Evans Brown 



Driftwood: Decor For The Modern Home 42 

Enchanting Eucalyptus 43 

California Living 46 

California Cooks - 48 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly except July and December at 1020 South Main 
St., Los Angeles 15, California, PRospect '6651. San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph, 833 
Market St., Room 705, DOuglas 2-1+72. Subscription price: $3.00 one year; $5.00 two 
years; $7.50 three vears. One dollar additional postage per year outside continental United 
States. 35c per copy. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations. Entered as second class 
matter January 25, 1946, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under act of March, 
1879. Copyright 19+9 The Californian, Inc. Printed in U.S.A. Reproduction in whole 
or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 



He rmquetcl 




Perfect for resort wear, wonderful at Palm Springs ... the very important ensemble look in De De Johnson's glove suede pedal 
pushers and monogrammed jacket, Celanese crepe blouse. In sizes 10-18. about $60 for the three pieces. J. W. Robinson Co., L. A. 



20 




UR SUN-COUNTRY SELECTIONS 
ON PARADE AT PALM SPRINGS 



We invited forty-eight of California's most 
glamorous fashion designers to participate in 
our First Annual Fashion Fiesta at Palm Springs . . . mecca 
of fun and of fashion! 

Editors spent hundreds of hours "looking" at collections 
from each famous creator, chose the clothes they felt would 
look best on you as you follow the sun from winter desert 
resorts to summer's yacht clubs, country clubs, beaches. 

We had 482 ensembles in all, selected for fabric and theme 
and good lines . . . these we previewed in the sunshine of 
America's foremost desert resort before store owners and 
buyers from all the nation (and insistent winter residents of 
the fashion-wise spa) . 

Palm Springs was the logical place to preview our fashions. 
for it's a fabulous place where the sun shines like summer 
... all winter! Discriminating visitors traditionally are 
best judges of fashions, and ours are the clothes they'll be ■, 
wearing. 

Staged with all the glamour of a Hollywood premiere, 
thirty-five Californian magazine cover girls modelled the 
clothes we voted most-likely-to-please-you in 1950 ... at two 
luncheon and one dinner shows presented on table-high run- 
ways in the patio of the Desert Inn's 35-acre estate. Bob 
Hope was there, ad-libbing and admiring; Joan Davis and 
Eddie Bracken were among the movie contingent who cast 
approving glances. 



These are trends we pointed up for them, and for you: 

THE CIRCUS MOTIF . . . you'll love the lighthearted 
clothes in carnival mood . . . merry-go-round pleats, balloon 
polka dots, the new jester collar, bold harlequin colors (or 
cotton candy pastels), bareback leotard swimsuits. 

FLOWER GARDEN . . . you'll be wearing a garden of 
flowers this spring. Hand-made flower appliques, petal bod- 
ices, posy prints, hand screen patterns. 

"COSTUMES" . . . we favor the ensemble look, mix-match- 
ables in every category from playclothes to glamour switch- 
abouts for even the most important occasions. 

SWIMSUITS . . . more intricate and lovely than ever before. 

Flame-and-smoke we stress because we feel it sparks a new 
season. Yellow we like, citron to sunlight; and red-white- 
and-blue forever more. Lilac, a new sophisticate. 

What news about fabric? We think you'll want sheers and 
more sheers, combinations of organdie-over-linen or linen 
alone, velveteen, nylon, and dutiful denims . . . among the 
wealth of line cottons, silks, rayons and such. 

This is the first flash of summer as it applies to your play- 
time . . . not the sophisticated daytime clothes. Good begin- 
ning for the year 1950, which we think will place all empha- 
sis on the truly American type, rejecting the flapper look 
of the twenties, adapting fashions that fit a cherished and 
proud way of life. 

On the following pages a few of our sun-country selections. 



• 



Bold And Bright 



■■ . ■ ■ 





It's the bold bright (out)look for 1950! 
Start the New Year wearing joyous 
strong colors for your fun-time . . . 
at smartest resorts now, and wherever 
you go all summer long. 
Most exciting novelty of the season 
. . . the jester collar by Louella Ballerino. 
It's a long pointed tab that ties this 
way or that above a waist-plunging neck- 
line designed to reveal a fancy 
bra-made-to-show! In a whole series 
of related fashions, dresses to two- 
piecers like the ones we show, right. 
Blouse, about $11, harlequin checked 
skirt of imported cotton, about $18, 
at J. W. Robinson, Los Angeles; 
B. Altman, New York. Staccato black 
and white westy terrier, Missy-Spice, 
color accents of flame and smoke. 
Black champion Scotty, Glenby-Bonnie 
and white westy terrier, Missy-Spice. 
Opposite, eye catching blazer with red 
■or green stripes as foil for blazing 
-white . . . worn over embossed cotton 
tennis dress, shorts or slacks, by 
Graff of California. 




For Your Merry - Go- Rounds 





1 









Hit-Of-Show Selections 
From Fashion Fiesta 





We say denims . . . and flowers! These 
trends we see starting from California, 
you'll be first-with-the-latest if you wear 
dressed up denim, left, by Agnes Barrett 
embroidered scallops at hem and bodice; a 
$25, at I. Magnin, Los Angeles; Mandel I 
Chicago. Above, crisp cotton with app 
flower, Ardan of California. About $30 
at Desmond's, Los Angeles. 







Now you have a ringside seat at our Fashion Fiesta, for we bring you right here 

runway fashions that have great style importance, chosen for their fresh and unusual treatment of classic ideas. 
See, left, how Addie Masters, California's own colorist, sets fire to the old idea of a jumper . . . hers is voluminous 
dotted swiss in flame-red, a foamy organdie blouse. Center, Connie Foster's way with sun-yellow linen, 
sashed with flame and yellow polka dots ... so simple it makes a quick claim for fashion significance. 
Right, Ruth Rhodes goes patriotic, setting giant emblems on the jersey dress you'll wear to a yacht club or beach. 
You'll recognize basic fashions, glamorized as only Californians can do it . . . with color, fabric, "ideas." 
. . . and you'll wear them for their fundamental charm and Tightness, as well as their conversational newness. 



25 




Classic as the Day 




Classics and California are practically synonymous ... so we selected a few ward- 
robe fundamentals for our Fashion Fiesta. Above, Sir James two-piece simplicities, 
-0 but with an added detailing that puts them in a class by themselves. Here are your 
much-loved jersey stand-bys with intricate beading, monograms and yoke treatment 
... in dreamy colors that go under fur coats now, shine under the sun any time! 
We like these soft easy shoulders, gently full skirts. It's this kind of dress that 
restores your faith in sound fashion built upon utility, need . . . with a touch of 
glamour to satisfy your ego! 



26 




Viola Dimmitt's multitudinous uses for nylon . . . include capelet fashion (strapped sundress beneath), about $40, 
and the starkly simple dash-about with flaunting revers and cavalier collar, about $35. For travel or town wear. 



27 





•j i Runway fashions, preview of spring . . . selected because we believe 
such elegant fabrics and such wonderfully blending colors 
rate a rave. Top left, Maurice Everett introduces a new color 
combination in pure silk shantung . . . it's lilac and brown 
(we showed it and loved it with blood-red fresh roses), with tucks 
here and there, and charm everywhere! For your inspired moments 
at club or resort, or all summer through. Right, Jeri Holmes 
tells a glamour story with velveteen coordinates . . . mix-matchers 
in oddly exciting colors, with crepe or sheer wool fabric accents. 



28 





We picked flowers . . . and Pat 
Premo "grew" them on garden 
dresses of organdie-over-linen (new- 
est fabric combination) ... or in 
metallic-with-cotton, as above. Fresh 
and sweet as the flowers that in- 
spired them! Junior Miss of Cali- 
fornia shorts introduce new colors 
like lime and lilac in denim, present 
striped jersey matched to striped 
denim in play-sets . . . they are such 
fun to wear! Koret of California 
pastel cottons for active wear, right. 





: 



Blocks, squares, merry-go-stripes . . . 
They're all part of the Fashion 
Fiesta feeling for the circus mood. 
Above, lots of fun when little girls in 
Deauville Models "shirttails" 
present newest two-piecers . . . the 
wrap-skirt effect, crisp blouse with 
unpressed pleats and the combina- 
tion of big-n-little checks. 
Right, whirling multi-color stripes, 
carnival colors on white pique . . . 
skirt, shorts and pushers with neat 
little blouse, or striking sundress. 
Tabak of California. 




30 



Newest Joyce shoes with South Sea motif: pagan bare or foot snugging, in b> 
or new pastel hues, suede or leather . . . world-premiered at the Fashion FieiB 
This is how they were "modelled" by cover girl in flower-laden wheelbarro] 




ft V *P <* 










Fabric 
Makes 

News 



Linen with velveteen ... we starred it 
at Fashion Fiesta, you'll love it 
all year round. Fashion's newest 
go-togethers in a wide assortment of 
colors or as we presented it, 
flame weskit in glowing velveteen, 
about $15, blacks shorts in linen that 
takes a knife pleat, about $18, 
at J. J. Haggarty, Los Angeles. 
Note the longer look to the shorts, 
the versatility of the little coatlet 
that may be worn with a blouse, 
modestly ... or baring your skin to 
the sun, boldly! Needless to say, each 
piece is basis for still another 
costume . . . it's a wardrobe-stretching 
fashion born and tested in the west. 
By Casual Time of California. 




£r ' 









I-*** 




je 



Nylon! Magical masterful fabric that defies hard wear, loves washing and is a natural born traveller. Barney Max 
designs the perfect pedal pusher and battle jacket ensemble, about $30. Featured at The Broadway, all stores. 



33 




Pretty cover girls wearing newest swimsuits from the glamorous Cole of California collection in wonderful nylon laton 
taffeta . . . one piece or two, with the new "illusion" deep see bra, the flirty skirt, colors that stamp them truly Cali- 
fornian. Two-piece suit, sizes 32-38, about $15. One-piece, sizes 32-40, about $20. Coulter's, L. A.; B. Altman & Co. N. Y. 



34 






Pretty cover-ups for beachwear, by Normandin Bros. 



Spongy absorbent terry, flattering in stark white or 



pastels, sophisticated in our smoke shade 



here in a four-pocketed jacket to wear over swimsuit 



or shorts, and the paper doll poncho with a hole for a head! 



Plain or with side panels of color, it's a novelty 



seaside rage in many colors and combinations. 



The shirt, about $10; shorts, about $5; poncho, about 



At Dayton Co., Minneapolis; Bullock's, Los Angeles. 



Matching terry scuffs by Stylemaster. 






ok- a gain Fashions for the Swim, the Sun 







1'fli Backing it up with figures, lovely models 



prove contour fit of Rose Marie Reid's classic 



suits in elasticized satin, delustered or shining in 



foreground ; and new tucked panel strapless suit with glamorous 



metallic thread adding interest. Below, wonderful washable 



Sandeze in chalky pastels that combine so dramatically: 



mix-matchables of endless variety by Roberts Mfg. Co. 



We Suggest . . . a Good Look at the Seashore 




36 







Sensation of the show, Catalina's new taro vine suit . . . this time in flame red on white, the pattern hand-printed on front; 
nylon yarn woven with Celanese and lastex for two-way stretch; adjustable "contour" bra. Terry coat a showpiece! 



37 




Here comes the navy, our patriotic feelings are showing ... in Dan Gertsman's duo based on the true blue. 
Left, Botany flannel double-breasted jacket, about $30, Botany worsted skirt, about $15. Sizes 10-20. At Bullock's 
Pasadena. Tattersall check wool skirt with soft pleat, vest, sizes 10-18, about $22. Bullock's, Los Angeles. 



38 



Hooray for the red-white-and-blue! 
The forever-wearable colors used 
by Adele California in this 
stunning lineup of coats and suits. 
At Robinson's, Palm Springs. 




The linen suit will be a leader! This one by Ken Sutherland 
has vast distinction. So has the magnificent afghan, 
Sabu of Suntan! The suit is in sizes 10-18. about 
Carson's, Chicago; May Co. Wilshire Designer's Shop. 





White gabardine out in front! Country Club's classic suits win plaudits for their pure lines, intricate details . . . 
soft collars, tiny cuffs, pocket flanges accentuating a feminine waist. About $80. The Town Shop, Beverly Hills. 



40 







Three on a match . . . Preview Sportswear skirts in woven saddle-stitch plaid wool ; sunburst pleats, soft flare, box 
pleats. A bright spot in any wardrobe, lovely with white sweaters, or quick-changeable with a dark shirt! 



41 




BY LAURA E. McVAY 



Modern homes, with their invitation 
to the out-of-doors to come inside, have 
made popular unusual pieces of drift- 
wood. These strange, rhythmic shapes 
embody the same spirit as our modern 
houses, and can be used successfully 
alone as an art object or combined with 
flowers in an arrangement. When hol- 
lowed out by the constant washing on 
mountain streams or ocean waves theyj 
become a charming container for a color-i 
ful fruit arrangement. Almost any de-J 
serted coastline, dry desert wash or high 
mountain lake will reward the searcher.) 
In the High Sierras where sun, snow] 
and water have washed and bleached] 
roots or stumps of birch or quaking 
aspen, especially beautiful pieces maw 
be found. The satin finish, the twisted] 
shapes and fascinating grain combine to] 
make such a piece the focal point in any] 
modern room. A large piece standing 
near a fireplace recalls a trout stream] 
or bleak mountain lake. 

If a piece displays its graceful lines 
to better advantage in an upright posiJ 
tion, anchor it in plaster of Paris whicn 
will give it a firm base. Use a cardboard] 
box the size of the base desired (usually 
4 inches square and an inch deep), filD 
it with soft plaster of Paris, sink tha 
driftwood in the center and hold it jusn 
a minute until the plaster has set. After 
allowing it to stand an hour, the boxj 
can be easily pulled away, leaving a 
clean white base. If you prefer a colored| 
base, paint it with quick drying enamel. 

When a piece of driftwood is used; 
with flowers, the wood is featured ana 
the flowers become secondary. Few 
should be used. Be careful not to spoil; 
the rhythm of the wood by allowing the| 
flowers to break its graceful line. (Sea 
illustration.) The wood in the picture; 
so much resembles a tongue of fire that 
red flowers could be selected as its com- 
plement. 

The plaster of Paris base does not dis> 
solve in water and may be placed in the 
flower container beside the frog. Flowers 
or leaves can be made to cover the base, 
If you do not care to anchor the drift- 
wood permanently in the plaster, it is 
quite easy to force it on to a heavy 
spiked frog. 

When flowers are not available, try 
using a figure of an animal beside the 
driftwood, being careful to select the 
kind of animal which might be found 
in the driftwood locale. With a little 
imagination, endless pictures may be 
created with this recently appreciated 
sift of Nature. 



Driftwood: Decor For The Modern Home 






42 




For the lady who wears half-sizes, Superior Cloak & Suit Co. create this slimming straight coat with 
unusual shoulder tucks, loose-fitting sleeves. In a worsted wool, it's a "Gaylife" California original. 



43 



■n 




4 Y 




%«#>-v 








t 






Peggy Hunt created these diaphanous evening gowns for our Fashion Fiesta ... in silvery gray or white or toasty brown, 
they're tauntingly lovely for your most romantic moments. This talented designer takes inspiration from the glamorous life 
of the southland. Dreamy fashions, fit for a star, all three at the Mildred Moore Shop, Beverly Hills: Sakowitz, Houston. 



White -with -brown, toast for the Bride 



-^— For the prettiest wedding of the season . . . brown with white organdie 
gowns by Emma Domb. Embossed with velvety-white roses, with 
taffeta skirts rustling beneath, perfect for the bride to wear 
when she says "I do" . . . and for garden parties, summer dances ever after! 
In our newest bridal hues or pastels, the bride's gown and matching 
dresses are about $30 at the Bridal and Gown Shop, Bullock's, Los Angeles. 
Hats by Alexander & Baum. The flowers, by Biltmore Florists. 
The perfume, of course, is Evyan's lovely White Shoulders. 



45 



DOWN TO EARTH LIVING 
IN A NEW MODERN MOOD 




/3e, 



ere is the house that friendship built. Paul Laszlo 
designed it for his long-time friends, the Hans Springers 
. . . and he built it only after long study of their par- 
ticular wants and needs in a home. The Springers are busy 
careerists (both of Cobbler shoe fame), they are ardent 
sports people, they had a yearning for a warm California 
home after apartment confinement. 

So here is the sprawling simple plan, built around a 
patio for outdoor living, the chaste redwood entrance 
closing off the street. Activity gravitates toward this inner 
circle where the hospitable Springers entertain in real 
privacy. 

The interior combines stark simplicity with California 
color to create the perfect background for its vivacious 
hostess. Plenty of closets (a "must" for ex-apartment 



dwellers), plenty of built-ins to make life a bit simph 
and a wide expanse of rooms that seem to blend into o: 
another and then open up onto the porch. 

The living room has biege gray carpets, rose tint 
walls, huge inviting sofa and leather chair of salmon shadi 
The long table of the adjoining dining alcove is a shinil 
black accent; a built-in buffet is beneath a handpaint 
scene of Hans Springer's home town. At the other end 
the living room, the game table is a permanent fixture, wi 
bright colored linen printed drapes framing the view i 
the well-landscaped patio. 

Here is a combination of pale and riotous color, of si 
pie design and a complexity of enjoyable features ... he 
is California living as you like it. 



* 



A gleaming dining 
table with black top 
is decorator's dream 
and housewife's 
pride : handpainted 
wall shows a scene 
of Hans Springer's 
home town. To the 
right, original 
"modern" lamp and 
streamlined desk 
created by Laszlo 
for the Springers 20 
years ago when they 
lived in Vienna. 
Designer and home 
owner had modern 
ideas even then ! 




Paul Laszlo interprets the modern mood 

m a house huilt to make a pleasant adventure, a joy 

to his long-time friends, the Hans Springers 




ista from dining area showing wide entertaining space: conversational centers of interest closely related by pale carpet cool walls 




Two views of the 
patio, artistically 
and irregularly 
paved to permit out- 
door entertaining 
and ingenious plant- 
ing; the modern 
barbecue pit is focal 
point of every sum- 
mer's program, 
used on warm days 
throughout the year. 



47 



CALIFORNIA 




whether 




by~ helen evans brown 



STEW 



U/5JT 



MORRI 



January is a comfortable month. The Christmas baubles have 
been packed safely away, the giddy parties have been added to 
our store of pleasant memories, and the only apparent damage 
done by all the festivities is a temporary pain in the budget. 
Even that has its comforting aspect — it means we'll have to 
give up entertaining for a few weeks and have some good plain 
family meals. Like stew. It's easy and we're feeling lazy. It's 
inexpensive and that's what the bank balance ordered. It's well 
liked and we want to please the family. As we ponder which of 
the many delicious stews we'll have we think of the French, who 
do them to perfection, but who have a strange aversion to calling 
them by their right name of stew {etuvee, to them) . In France, 
if it's made from mutton or lamb it's a navarin or an haricot, 
when fish is the ingredient, it's a matelote, stewed hare is a . 
civit, gibelotte means it is rabbit, when it's game it is a salmis, 
and stewed poultry becomes a fricassee. They go even further 
than that — a white stew of veal or sweetbreads or chicken, is 
known as a blanquette. Most Californians will go along with 
them on the fricassee, but only because that word has become 
a part of the English language. The others, well as we cook 
them and much as we like them, are best known as stews. 

The French peasants of Burgundy do a superb beef stew 
which they call Bourguignone. after their own rich red wine 
that is the soul of the dish. In California we have a similar 
rich wine which we call California Burgundy or Pinot Noir, so 
I have named our version of this stew after a spot where they 
make the wine so beautifully. 

ST. HELENA BEEF STEW 
Brown two pounds of lean "stewing" beef in three tablespoons 
of butter, turning it so that it will be well colored on all sides. 
Remove the meat to a casserole. To the juices in the pan add 
two tablespoons of flour and allow it to brown, cooking slowly 
and stirring carefully. Pour in a cup of California Burgundy 
or Pinot Noir and a cup of water or stock. (A cup of water plus 
a bouillon cube is a good speedy solution of the stock problem.) 
Stir until smooth then pour over the meat. In the same pan 
brown a cup of sliced onions, a finely minced clove of garlic 
and two sliced carrots in two tablespoons of beef drippings or 
other shortening. Add to the meat along with salt and pepper 
and an herb bouquet made by tying together a sprig of thyme, 
two sprigs of parsley, and a half a leaf of bay. (If you don't 



48 



I have fresh thyme use a pinch of the dried variety and put the 
i ! herbs in a little cheese cloth bag or a tea ball.) If the liquid 
i does not come to the top of the meat, add some water, then 
i cover and cook very slowly, either on top of the stove if your 
I casserole can take it. or in the oven. After about two hours, test 
I for tenderness and for seasoning. It will probablv need more 

cooking but you won't want to cook it until it's dry. (At this 
i |point a jigger of brandy may be added if you are feeling extrava- 
I gant, but it is not necessary, nor is the wine if that is too much 
I for your pocket book. Cider, tomato juice or even water may 

be substituted, but then we ought to change the name. I When 
I the meat is tender remove the herb bouquet and sprinkle the 
I stew with minced parsley. Serve with mashed potatoes or rice 
! land don't forget that a glass of the same red wine will turn the 
J meal into feast. (Mavbe we'd better ask someone in to share it, 
I after all.) 

HBeer cookery, in case you haven't discovered the fact, is 
I becoming very popular. This recipe has a Flemish background 
[but as we make fine beer in California it is quite natural that 
we have taken it for our own. 

VEAL STEW WITH BEER 

[ Brown a dozen small peeled onions in a quarter of a cup 
of butter or shortening, then add two pounds of boneless 

■veal, cut into pieces about the size of the onions. When 

| the meat is lightly browned push it and the onions to one 
side of the pan (I hope you're using a big one) and smooth 

I three tablespoons of flour to the fat, stirring out any lumps 
before pouring in a (12 oz.) bottle of beer. The follow- 
ing seasonings, all cozily tied together in a cheesecloth, are 
added: a blade of mace, a crushed clove of garlic, a small 

! piece of bay leaf, two cloves, a good big sprig of crushed 
parsley and a pinch of thyme. Pepper and salt are added to 

I taste and the whole is covered and simmered until tender, with 
additional water or stock being added if needed. Serve with 

Icrusty chunks of warmed bread and don't hesitate to dunk up 

■every last drop of the precious sauce. (That's good enough for 

Iguests, don"t you think?) 

In the deep south they make a wonderful stew with squirrels 
or sometimes with chicken. It's called Brunswick Stew and it's 
a mighty fine meal in itself. In California we make it with rabbit 
and we call it good. 

RABBIT STEW, BRUNSWICK STYLE 

I Have a large rabbit cut in serving pieces and dredge them 
with flour that has been seasoned with salt, freshly ground 
pepper and a little powdered thyme. Brown the meat in a half 
cup of bacon fat, along with two cups of coarsely cut onions. 

(then pour in two cans of lima beans and two cans of whole 

jkernel golden corn, juices and all, and a large can of tomatoes. 

I Next comes two cups of white or sweet potato dice and enough 
water to just cover the meat (if necessary). Simmer until the 
rabbit is tender, correct the seasonings and serve from a soup 

jtureen with plenty of hot corn bread sticks. All you'll need to 

1 finish off a perfect meal is some fruit and cheese — perhaps one 
of those heavenly camemberts from Petaluma and some crisp 

'red apples from up Washington way. (And perhaps a guest 
or two, to enjoy it with us.) 

If you have a fisherman in the family you may often wish 
that there were different ways of cooking it besides the inevitable 
fry. There are, of course, hundreds of them. A matelote, as the 

' French call this stew made with red wine, is an especially good 
one because it can use up an assortment of fish that vary in size 

1 and variety. 

FISH STEW WITH RED WINE 

\ Cut two pounds of fish in medium sized pieces, removing the 
skin if you wish, and the larger of the bones. Brown it lightly 

! in a quarter of a cup of butter, then remove it carefully from 
the pan. Chop a large onion and saute it in the butter remain- 
ing in the pan, pour in two cups of red wine and simmer with 
an herb bouquet for a few minutes. Peel a dozen very small 
boiling onions and brown them in butter in another pan. After 
they are golden toss in a dozen mushrooms (This is optional, 
but good.) and cook slowly for another five minutes. Combine 
fish, sauce, onions and mushrooms, correct seasoning and 
simmer tenderly until the fish is done. It shouldn't take long 



and if the onions were small enough and browned enough they 
should reach the done stage at the same time. I hope. Serve 
this with heart shaped pieces of toast for a classic and charming 
touch. (So charming, in fact, that it would be a pity not to ask 
some friends to try it, too. I 

While stewing away at the stove I can't overlook one of the 
best of them all — kidney stew. In California we have our own 
special way of doing this homely dish: we use not Champagne, 
as the French do. but one of our own nice white wines, a Pinot 
Blanc. 

SONOMA KIDNEY STEW 
Remove the skin from six lamb kidneys and cut them in quar- 
ters. Cook them quickly in one third cup of butter for three 
minutes. Sprinkle on a tablespoon of flour, stir smooth, then 
pour on one and a half cups of Pinot Blanc or other dry white 
wine. Season with salt, pepper and a grating of nutmeg, and one 
tablespoon each of minced parsley and chives. Cook just long 
enough for the kidneys to lose their bloody look and serve at 
once with triangles of buttered toast. (Good enough for guests!) 

Fricassee is a French cooking term well understood in Eng- 
lish. It originally meant to fry: an old cook book has it "your 
fricasys are dishes of many compositions and ingredients as 
Flesh, Eggs, Fish, Herbs and many things, all prepared in a 
Frying-pan." But though a fricassee has become as American 
as pumpkin pie our English forefadiers didn't always go for it. 
William King wrote contemptuously of French cuisine "Their 
stinking cheese and fricasy of frogs" but by the time Hannah 
Glasse wrote her famous "Art of Cookery" she included more 
than a dozen recipes (I mean receipts) for "fricassy." And so 
fricassee came to America and eventually to California. Being 
Californians we naturally improved upon the original. 

CALIFORNIAN FRICASSEE OF CHICKEN 

Have a good fat hen disjointed and cut in serving pieces, saving 
the fine yellow fat. Heat it (the fat) very slowly in the oven 
until there is nothing left but some golden oil and a bit of brown 
crackling. Dredge the chicken with seasoned flour and brown 
it lightly in a half cup of the chicken fat, taking care not to 
burn it. Remove the browned chicken to a casserole or Dutch 
oven and in the fat remaining in the pan wilt a bunch of green 
onions that have been minced fine. Add to the chicken along 
with an herb bouquet and enough liquid to come to the top of 
the chicken. (The liquid may be stock made from chicken feet, 
wing tips and neck, or it may be veal stock or water. Also part 
of it, say a half cup, may be white wine.) Simmer gently until 
the chicken is just done. Don't let it get dry and stringy. Add a 
can of pitted ripe olives, drained, and correct the seasoning. If 
too thin put in a little flour and butter that have been kneaded 
together and cook a few minutes longer. Serve with parsley 
dumplings made by adding a half cup of that herb, minced, to 
your favorite dumpling recipe. (This is party fare in anybody's 
language. ) 

A blanquette of veal is a fancy dish made from an humble cut 
of meat — the breast. It may also be made of lamb, poultry or 
sweetbreads, as I guess I've already said. But did I say it was 
delectable? And don't you think that blanquette sounds more 
appetizing than white stew, even in California? 

BLANQUETTE OF VEAL 

Have three pounds of breast of veal cut in neat pieces, cover 
them with water, add a stalk of celery, a half an onion and an 
herb bouquet, and simmer gently for thirty minutes. Remove 
the meat, slip out the bones, strain the sauce, season it with salt 
and white pepper, and in it cook a dozen small peeled white 
onions. When the onions are all but done return the meat to 
the sauce along with a dozen white mushrooms or a cup of 
diced and parboiled celery root. Rub together three tablespoons 
each of flour and butter and cook it in the sauce. Simmer until 
the meat is tender. Now beat the yolks of two eggs very slightly, 
dribbling into them a half cup of the hot sauce. Add this to the 
remaining sauce and heat but do not boil. Serve it with noodles 
and a bright green vegetable — maybe asparagus. (Of course 
nothing's too good for the family but every one of these stews 
are good enough for your very favorite friends. Besides, who 
wants to give up entertaining?) 



49 





GENUINE 
MEXICAN 
SERAPES 

Backgrounds bright blue, bright 
red, or bright green . . . designs 
in rainbow hues. 

Approx. 31"x62"- 
Postpaid, each 



$695 



Write for our free Cata- 
log of Southwest Gifts. 

TEEPEE 
TRADERS 



NEW MEXICO 



it's the BABV 
of the NO YEAR 

custom- made 



*o» 



4 



comfortable, flattering 
precisely tailored 
for figure smartness 




All-stretch NYLON GIRDLE (even 
sewed with nylon thread), 'specially 
designed for eye appeal as well as 
PERFECT CONTROL. 

NO ROLL or slide, SMOOTHS HIPS 
and thighs, controls tummy. Fast- 
drying, detachable nylon garter. 

Available in brief, step-in (as shown), 
and long-leg pantie. 

Send measurements of waist, tummy, 
hips, thigh, weight, and height. 

In white, $10.95 postpaid. 



P 



t 



2920 W. Vernon 

Ave. 

Los Angeles 8, 

Calif. 




The spice you want — when you want it — ot 
your finger tips. Rotary Spice Wheel holds 
ten (1 0) standard size spice cans, yet re- 
quires no extra spacel Easily attached to the 
underside of any cupboard shelf — space 
normally never utilized. Made of glistening, 
easy to clean plastic in lovely Red, White or 
Yellow. Practical for you and an ideal gift 
for brides, showers, house-warmings, etc. 
If your dealer can not supply, send $1.95 
each plus 6c sales tax in Calif. Post Paid. 

°SPOTTS MFG. CO. 

722 No. Los Angeles St. 
Anaheim, California 



MOTHERS! ! 

Have you children at school? Give 
them a STUDY-BOARD to improve 
concentration ! 




Invented by a college professor to im- 
prove concentration and relieve study- 
strain, it is ideal for thinkers. Book is 
held in proper reading position, freeing 
both hands for taking notes. Use it 
from kindergarten to college. 

Send $2.50 to Prof. C. Weisheit, 
St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minn. 

"Study Better with a Study Board!" 



Where to Buy Dorothy Lamour fashions 



ARIZONA: Korricks, Phoenix; Gus Tay- 
lor, Tucson. 

ALABAMA: Kesslers, Birmingham; Mary 
Louise Shop, Sylacauga. 
CALIFORNIA: Bragg's, Alhambra; Hiatt's, 
Arcadia; Weill's, Bakersfield; Town Shop, 
Beverly Hills; Chandler's, Boston; Gayla's, 
Costa Mesa; Cooper's, Fresno; Bowne's, 
Fullerton; Harris & Frank, Glendale; 
Nancy's, Hollywood; Hunter's, Huntington 
Park; Columbia, Long Beach; The May 
Co., Los Angeles; Cinderella Shop, Oil- 
dale; Dorothy Gray, Inc., Palm Springs; 
Hiatt's, Pomona; Goodman's, Salinas; 
Deni Taylor, San Gabriel; Pickwick Sports- 
wear, Santa Ana; Gladys Tevis, Santa 
Barbara; Lion Clothing Co., San Diego; 
K. Sportshop, San Fernando; Bragg's, San 
Marino; Pfister & McCarthy, San Mateo; 
Columbia, San Pedro; Katten & Marengo, 
Stockton; Lerrain's, Taft; Bragg's, Temple 
City; Gay Shop, Torrance; Gladys Tevis, 
Ventura; Nancy's, Westwood; The Fash- 
ion, Woodland. 

COLORADO: Cates Smart Shop, Aurora; 
Brooks Fauber, Boulder; Amter's, Denver; 
Dickey's, Englewood. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: L. Frank, Wash- 
ington. 

FLORIDA: Cohen Bros., Jacksonville; Ru- 
bin Appel's, Key West; Lind's, Lakeland; 




Ceeee ^,^ 




An original 
I. Davis design 
yellow, beige, green, 
dusty rose, blue an 
while ... all with brown 
or self trim. Specify color. 

Single Size $12.50 

Double Size 13.50 

Draperies (pr.) 10.95 

check or M.O. I DAVIS 

sorry no C.O.D.S ■• iT#»Wl» 

Miracle Mile Coral Gables, Flo 




FOR AH UP-TO-DATE ffiW YEAR 

PAMELA GAY NYLON ULTRA 

BRIEFS ARE THE MODEST 
MINIMUM FOR THE MAXIMUM 
' COMFORT! 

LESS THAN AN OUNCE OF BAREST 
BEAUTY for 'round-the-clock comfort un- 
der all her casual and formal clothes. 

MIRAGE $2.95 

A dusky shadow of black nylon sheer. 

$2.95 




version. 



ILLUSION 

White nylon net in a briefer, misty 

Include hip measurements. Send check with order. 
Sorry, no C.O.D.'s accepted. 
We prepay 1st class mail. 

Pamela Gay 

Box 23 C Melrose 76, Massachusetts 



Burdine's, Miami; Guarantee ^ 
Shoe Co., Ocala; Bertha Cook> 
hassee; Haber's Dept. Store. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA: Hudson Bay Co, 
couver. 

COLOMBIA: Elisa G. Rubio, Barran 
GEORGIA: Franklin Simon, Atlanta; 
man's, Macon; L. S. Robinson, Valdo 
HAWAII: M. Mclnerny, Honolulu 
E. N. Holmes, Hilo, Hawaii. 
HONDURAS: Tegucigalpa, Santos So 
KANSAS: Greenwald's, Inc., Hutch 
The Vogue Shop, Manhattan; Harry 
lich, Topeka; Spine's Clothing, Wicr 
KENTUCKY: Normans, Bowling Gree 
IDAHO: Folk Mercantile Co., Boise. 
ILLINOIS: Mandel Bros., Chicago; S' 
Elgin; Alden Stores, Inc., Kankakee 
INDIANA: Hudson's, Gary; Wm. H. 
Indianapolis; The Boston Store, La 
Milady Shop, South Bend. 
LOUISIANA: Ellzey's, Baton Rouge 
verstein's, Monroe; D. H. Holmes 
Ltd., New Orleans; Palais Royal, S 
port. 

MARYLAND: Sara Edwards Apparel 
Annapolis; Hutzler's, Baltimore. 
MICHIGAN: J. L. Hudson, Detroit; I 
LeBaron, Grand Rapids. 
MINNESOTA: The Avenue Shop, R. 
ter. 

MISSISSIPPI: The Madeira Shop, C 
dale; Town & Country, Jackson; The 
Shop, Vicksburg. 

MISSOURI: Chenault's, Joplin; Chas 
Kansas City. 

MONTANA: Hart Albin, Billings. 
NEBRASKA: Hovland-Swanson, Lined 
L. Brandeis, Omaha. 
NEVADA: Fanny's, Las Vegas; W< 
Reno. 

NEW JERSEY: Winfield's Store, A 
City; Bamberger's, Newark; Town 
New Brunswick. 
NEW MEXICO: El Encanto, Las Croc 
NEW YORK: J. N. Adam & Co., I 
Franklin Simon, New York; Jere 
Niagara Falls. 

NORTH CAROLINA: Jean's, Inc., Re] 
NORTH DAKOTA: O. J. OeLen 
Fargo; Bray's, Grand Forks; Ell 
Minot. 

OHIO: Mabley & Carew, Cincinnati, 
ert's, Columbus; Madison's, Inc., 
William S. Frankel Co., Sandusky; 
er's, Youngstown. 
OKLAHOMA: John A. Brown, Okl> 
City; Clarke's, Tulsa. 
OREGON: Helen Davis, Astoria; Fi 
Apparel, Dallas; Meier & Frank, Po 
The Paris Shop, The Dalles. 
PENNSYLVANIA: Abramson's, < 
nia; Gilbert's, Charleroi; Erie Dry 
Co., Erie; Bowman & Co., Harri 
Ladies' Bazaar, Lewiston; Lit Bros., 
delphia; Kaufman's, Pittsburgh. 
PERU: Casa Glamour, Lima. 
PUERTO RICO: Hollywood Shop, San 
SOUTH CAROLINA: The Fashion 
Camden; Allan's, Columbia. 
TENNESSEE: Loveman's, Chattanoot] 
Goldsmith & Sons, Memphis. 
TEXAS: Patten's Dress Shop, Alice; 
burn Bros., Amarillo; Buttrey's, > 
Bettis & Gibbs, Brownwood, Bui 
Sorpus Christi; A. Harris & Co., I 
Roache's, Del Rio,- Popular Dry Goo* 
El Paso; W. C. Stripling, Ft. 1 
Levy Bros., Houston; Martin's, Lon' 
Economy Dept. Store, Lubbock; 
Mercantile Co., McAllen; Addin 
Raymond ville; The Vogue, San At 
T. W. Marse Co., Taylor; Buttrey's, 
pie. 

UTAH: The Paris Co., Salt Lake Cit 
VIRGINIA: La Vogue Shoppe, Inc., 
port News; Ames & Brownley, N 
Joseph Spigel, Inc., Roanoke. 
VENEZUELA: Hollywood Modes, Marc 
WASHINGTON: Helen Davis, Bren 
Helen Davis, Everett; Helen Davis, 
view; Helen Davis, Olympia; Rhoi 
Seattle, Seattle; Bon Marche, Sp> 
Helen Davis, Tacoma. 
WEST VIRGINIA: Belle's, Huntingtc 
WISCONSIN: Wassersteen's, Greer 
Woldenberg's, Madison; Gimbel 
Milwaukee; Grace's, Appelton. 
WYOMING: The Smart Shop, Worla 




Two if by Sea : Two beautiful covers for every contingency from beach 

to bathhouse. Both in Bates lavender blue and bright coral impressionistic print on 

jewel-smooth broadcloth, all-combed and Sanforized, made to move fresh and 

unfaded into summer. Both magnificently cut and molded by Cole of California. 

Bates Fabrics, Inc., 80 Worth Street, New York 13. 



LOOMED TO BE IV HEIRLOOMED" 




Mlf MAY 9" i'50 




MASTERPIECES 



Nylon, plus Nylon-covered Lastex with Talon 

zippered back beautifully molds your figure. 
Styled for action in California. 

For him: Bali Isle tropic Cabana set. 



FOR NAME OF NEAREST STORE, WRITE CATALINA. INC. • DEPT. 604 • LOS ANGELES 13, CALIFOH 



Hl A MAGAZINE STYLED FOR COLORFUL LIVING 

CALIFOR 



PRICE 35 CENTS 







\ 



DISTINCTIVE CHARACTER IN COTTON 



In a year when fashion depends on fabric texture quite as 
much as on cut, Bates sculptured PICOLAY* fabric stands alone, 
without precedent, without peer. Bates marks a century of 
progressively finer fabrics with this permanently embossed cotton 
in magnificent new prints and glorious jewel tones ... as in 
this dress designed by Pat Premo. 'Trademark Reg. U.S. Put. Off. : 











/(?-c^??j&cci ^<y ~c& 




j» 



BATES FABRICS, INC., 80 WORTH STREET, NEW YORK 13 



The "^BOULEVARD" TOPPER by SPORT-LANE of California 




About $17.95 



At these fine stores: 

CALIFORNIA: 

The Broadway, Los Angeles 

Livingston's, San Francisco 

Bufrums", Long Beach 

Coleman's, San Jose 

Levy Bros., San Mateo 

H. C. Capwell, Oakland 

Rankins Dry Goods, Santa Ana 

Lieberg's, Pasadena 

Lieberg's, Alhambra 

Martha's, Rosemead 

J. J. O'Rourke, Colusa 

Lucy's, Hollywood 

Gladys Tevis, Santa Barbara 
LLINOIS: 

Chas. A. Stevens, Chicago 
INDIANA: 

Steiger Co., Lafayette 
KANSAS: 

George Innes Co., Wichita 

MASSACHUSETTS: 

Wm. Filene's & Sons, Boston 
NEW YORK: 

Abraham Strauss, Brooklyn 
OKLAHOMA: 

Kerr's, Oklahoma City 
OREGON: 

Lipman Wolfe, Portland 

Kaufman Bros., Eugene 
TEXAS: 

W. C. Stripling Co., Fort Worth 

Palais Royal, Longview 

Popular Dry Goods, EI Paso 

Battelstein's, Houston 

OR FOR STORE NEAREST YOU WRITE 



hit of the spring season. 



California loomed of 100% basket weave 



fully lined with quality rayon satin. Sizes 10 - 18. 



Boulevard colors: 

Sunset Red 
Hollywood Gofd 
Wilshire Blue 
La Cienega Gray 



SPORT-LANE of CALIFORNIA 2 24 , 



llth ST., LOS ANGELES 15, CALIF. 




VOL. 9 
No. 1 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly except July and December by The Californian, Inc., «^ 20 J ih ^" S }^^^"l^ Calif'.', 
printed in U.S.A. Yearly subscription price $1.00. Entered as second class matter January 23, 1946, at the Post Otnce, u>s Angeles, <_a.ir.. 
under the act of March 3, 1879. 



FEBRUARY 
1950 





Giddy Gal 



See page 50 for list of stores where these fashions are available. 



ALICE OF CALIFORNIA • 75 FREMONT STREET • SAN FRANCISCO 5 • CALIFORNIA 



COTTONS 




* 



■p 



Lil' Miss Ringlin^ 



The most popular show in town! 

Merry as a clown! Bright as a balloon! Big top gaiety 

. . . eye-stopping style . . . beautirully, brightly 
right lor spring-time. Love 'em ana tub 'em in tire new 
William Simpson rabric . . ."Seeress" 
seersucker. Red, navy or turquoise. Sizes 7 to 15. 

about $7.95 

As seen on cover: Circus Belle 




Phots by Earl Scott 

6 



THE CAUFORNIAN, February, 1950 



4 




P^ 



a Meinig glove suede cloth 

As previewed at the Palm Springs 
Fashion Fiesta . . . sold in fine 
stores everywhere 

NEW ADDRESS 

722 South Los Angeles St. 
Los Angeles 14, California 



• 



You'll want this 






plaid! 




At better stores 
everywhere 



For a list of 
those stores 
nearest you, 
turn to page 50 



*8 






*£ 

ij" 






<<* 



Colors: White background with lug- 
gage, kelly or navy saddle stitching. 
Also aqua background with luggage 
saddle stitching. 

Sizes: 10-18 

To retail at about $10.95 

Hi-rise waist. Button closing 4 gore 
skirt. Slender-smooth at hips-flatter- 
ing full at hem. 



860 SOUTH LOS ANGELES STREET • LOS ANGELES 14, CALIFORNIA 



THE CAUFORN1AN, February, 1950 






(Plaids a-plenty! 




For store nearest you, write direct to: 

GRAFF MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 1240 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, California 




10 



THE CAMFORNIAN, February, 1950 





precious tailoring 

is Rosenblum tailoring, 

is tailoring by master 

craftsmen who for decades 

have been making 

the finest ready-to-wear 

man-tailored suits, the finest 

suit values in America. 

this new Rosenblum suit 

practically made to order 

for girls five feet four and 

under . . . in superb quality 

menswear worsteds or 

Rosenblum-exclusive 

all-wool worsted 

all-year-weight shantung 

...sizes 10 to 20... 49.95. 

Other Rosenblum suits 
for average and tall figures 

35.00 and 39.95 .. . 

at fine stores. 
Rosenblum, Los Angeles 



MAN ^-tailored in California 









< y.-fi 




RUTH HAROLDSON, CONDUCTOR OF CALIFORNIA WOMEN'S SYMPHONY, HEADS OLDEST GROUP OF YOUNGEST WOMEN 
SYMPHONIC ARTISTS . . . INSPIRED US TO DEDICATE THIS ISSUE TO FASHION IN TUNE WITH MODERN LIVING. 
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD YOU'LL BE WEARING CLOTHES LIKE THESE, RHYTHMIC AND LOVELY. EDITH SMALL BALL GOWN. 



12 




ON THE COVER: 

"Big Top" inspired LiV Alice 
dress . . . balloon dots ac- 
centuate the crisp importance 
of this two-piece dress 
with pert peplum over slim 
skirt. Fashioned for 
juniors by Alice of California 
of William Simpson's Seeress 
in gay circus colors; navy, 
red, turquoise with white 
dots. Sizes 7-17, about $9. 
Red Red lipstick by 
Guitare and Atkinson's 
dashing cologne. The 
photograph, by Frank 
Stiffler. 



- 

9 



© 



B 
H 

PS 




California fashions 

Portrait of an Artist 12 

Sheer Delight 16 

Nostalgic Organdies 17 

"Rage" Dress! 18 

Magical Formal Gowns 19 

Cocktail Coat of the Season 20 

Evening Fashions for Springtime 21 

Sarong for Glamour 22 

The Three-Piece Costume Suit 23 

Suit in Two Tones 25 

Very New, The Cape Suit 26 

True Distinction 27 

Young at Heart 28 

Accent on Femininity 29 

Smooth Certain Lines! 30 

Spring Blouses 31 

Summer Sheers 34 

For a Playtime Wardrobe 42 



California features 



EDITOR AND PUBLISHER J. R. Osherenko 

ASSISTANT PUBLISHER William J. Bowen 

FASHION DIRECTOR.. Sally Dickason 

FASHION EDITOR. Virginia Scallon 

MANAGING EDITOR. Helen Ignatius 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR- Philip Kustner 

MEN'S FASHION EDITOR Malcolm Steinlauf 

FASHIONS Jacquelin Lary 

ART _ Morris Ovsey 

Jane Albrecht 

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Frank Stiffler 

SHOPPING ROUNDUP _ Joyce Olsen 

FOOD STYLIST „ _ -..Helen Evans Brown 



Musical Whirlwind 14 

California Living 36 

California Cooks 38 

The Lady Butcher 40 

Dried Arrangements: Subtle Color and Beauty of Form 41 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly except July and December at 1020 South Main 
St., Los Angeles 15, California, PRospect 6651. San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph, 833 
Market St., Room 705, DOuglas 2-1+72. Subscription price: $3.00 one year; $5.00 two 
years; $7.50 three years. One dollar additional postage per year outside continental United 
States. 35c per copy. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations. Entered as second dast 
matter January 25, 1946, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under act of March, 
1S79. Copyright 1950 The Californian, Inc. Printed in U.S.A. Reproduction in whole 
or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 





Starting out in 1893 as a small group of twenty-five performers, the California Women's Symphony today is a full-size or- 
chestra with ambitious plans for the future. Talented Ruth Haroldson, who has conducted the Women's Symphony for the 
past ten years, has the strictest musical standards and insists the orchestra be judged "not merely as women but as musicians." 



Musical Whirlwind 

Women in Symphony: A Biological Difference Only 



BY HELEN IGNATIUS 



The California Women's Symphony holds the rather unique 
position of being one of the oldest and yet the youngest all- 
female orchestras in the entire world. Though it has been 
in continuous existence for fifty-seven years, the average age 
of current members is a scant twenty-four. 

Of course the fact that the symphony includes not a single 
male among its ranks is considerably more than just unique. 

It is not definitely known just who instituted the theory 
that symphony orchestras absolutely must be composed of 
members of the male sex, but nonetheless the fact remains 
that most symphony orchestras insist that women seat them- 
selves in the audience rather than on the stage. Now to any- 
one who has devoted any time to the matter, this is a most 
strange and interesting state of affairs. And to our knowledge 
just why this state of affairs exists has not been accorded the 
proper amount of serious thought. 

To Ruth Haroldson, conductor of the California Women's 
Symphony, this fact long has been regarded as one of life's 
most annoying problems. In defense of all-female symphony 
orchestras she once wrote that "present day philosophers and 




The group of young ladies above, clustered around conductor 
Harley Hamilton, presented the first concert of the Califor- 
nia Women's Symphony 57 years ago in downtown Los Angeles. 

educators believe that the difference between men and women 
is biological only and not a psychological and temperamental 
problem. . . . Music is an expression that rises above the 
barriers of color, creed, age, or sex. It is immaterial whether 



14 



a man or a woman is the physical medium through which the 
finest of symphonic literature is presented. Undergirded by 
a certain amount of technical proficiency, the artist is no 
longer a man or woman, but a human soul lifted into the 
realm of understanding, expression, and appreciation in the 
presence of great music." 

We cannot delve into the metaphysical and philosophical 

implications of this theory, 
but offhand we can think of 
no sensible reasons why a 
trombone, for example, or 
a cornet for that matter, 
should not be played by 
women as well as by men. 
However, it is our consid- 
ered opinion that a women's 
symphony does present cer- 
tain problems which a male 
symphony never has to face. 
After the rehearsals are 
over, all that a man-in- 




Haroldson, conductor of 
fornia Women s Symphony. 



symphony must do in preparation for a concert is to insist 
that his wife put his cufflinks and black bowtie someplace 
where the human eye can view them without benefit of binocu- 
lars. A woman-in-symphony, on the other hand, must have 
her hair set, "do" (as the expression goes) her nails, attend 
to the pressing of a formal gown, choose the correct color 
of lipstick, and so on almost ad infinitum. Just getting to 
a concert on time, therefore, is a problem in itself. 

Then again, rehearsals and concert schedules are often 
disrupted when a woman decides, for a brief period of time. 
to sacrifice music for a family. This brings about yet another 
provoking situation. Husbands must become baby-sitters. 
And even if they are not baby-sitters, they are instrument- 
carriers. Either state of affairs seems to annoy at least four 
out of five husbands. Consequently, women in symphony 
orchestras have conflicts in realms other than the purely mu- 
sical. 

To further complicate matters the California Women's 



Symphony has geographical difficulties to combat. So great 
are the distances separating one community from another 
that merely trying to assemble the orchestra for rehearsal is a 
major undertaking. Auditions and rehearsals are held at Bel- 
mont High School in downtown Los Angeles, and the mem- 
bers of the symphony reside in such far flung areas as Santa 
Monica, Bell, Whittier, San Gabriel, North Hollywood, Ingle- 
wood, Westwood, Pasadena, Burbank. Baldwin Park, Orange, 
and even North Redondo Beach. 

That many of the girls have absorbing jobs and interests 
outside of the symphony is yet another major problem. For 
example, trumpet player Orrel Johnson works in the Cos- 
tume Department at Warner Bros. Bass violin player Ethel 
Seigfried is a secretary in Los Angeles. Flutist Elise Baxter 
Moenning raises German shepherds. Bass player Marilyn May- 
land trains and grooms her three Palomino horses. First cellist 
Anita Lhoest is a movie actress at Columbia and recently 
starred opposite Johnny Weissmuller in the Captive Girl. 
Even assistant-conductor La Ruth Anderson does not devote 
full-time to the symphony. In addition to swimming, garden- 
ing, and playing tournament tennis, she teaches bassoon, violin, 
viola, flute, clarinet, trumpet and just about everything else 
with the possible exception of the organ. 

Because of all these various distractions, Miss Haroldson 
has made an iron-clad rule that the girls must send a substi- 
tute whenever they are unable to attend rehearsals. One eve- 
ning the flutist was absent and to make amends she sent a 
young man gigantic enough to play tackle on the Notre Dame 
football team. He managed to perform the flute with no ap- 
parent discomfort, but unfortunately the young ladies seated 
behind him had considerable difficulty peering around his 
shoulders to catch cues from the conductor up in front. Despite 
this and other unnerving experiences, Miss Haroldson has 
managed to transform the Symphony from a sort of women's 
musical society to an outstanding group of top-notch union 
musicians. 

The orchestra was founded in 1893 by Mrs. M. Larrabee 
and Mrs. L. Loeb with Professor Harley Hamilton as con- 

(Continued on page 46) 



15 




SHEER DELIGHT . . . BARBARA BARONDESS MACLEAN'S IMPORTED ORGANDIES WITH A LIGHT AND FRAGILE AIR, WORN BY 
MARILYN MAYLAND, BETH HOLT, AND LA RUTH ANDERSON OF THE CALIFORNIA WOMEN'S SYMPHONY. YOUNGER THAN 
SPRINGTIME IS THE WHITE WITH CAMELLIAS APPLIQUED ON SKIRT, THE SWEET SHIRTWAIST DRESS, LEAF-PRINTED SKIRT. 



16 




MUSIC HATH CHARMS . . . AND SO DO NOSTALGIC ORGANDIES. HERALDING A NEW ERA OF AFTER-DARK FASHIONS, MARIANNE 
CLAPEL WEARS EDNA VILM'S EMBROIDERED FROCK WITH CAMISOLE BODICE; MARILYN TILLEMA CHOOSES PASTEL NET WITH 
MATCHING CAPELET, BY FRANCINE FROCKS; SALLY ROLLENS MODELS HOWARD SHOVP'S ORGANDIE, EMBROIDERED APRON. 



17 





PEGGY HUNT'S POSITIVELY 
MAGICAL MARQUISETTE 
GOWN, OPPOSITE LEFT, 
WITH A FLOATING HALF 
SKIRT, FLOWERS AT THE 
BOSOM. OPPOSITE RIGHT, 
HOWARD GREER'S INSPIRED I 
TREATMENT OF PURE SILK 
BIANCHINI GRAY AND 
LILAC TAFFETA, WORN BY 
VIRGINIA EVANS, LEFT, 
AND LA RUTH ANDERSON. 



ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING GOWNS OF THE SEASON . . . FROM THE DON LOPER COLLECTION OF "RAGE" DRESSES. COLOR 
SUPREME, THE IRIDESCENT DARK GREEN TAFFETA SHADING INTO CREAM-YELLOW NET SCALLOPS ON THE SKIRT. BUT 
MOST INTRIGUING OF ALL, THE COMPLETELY BARE SHOULDER! WORN BY INESITA, ARTIST OF THE SPANISH DANCE. 



18 




19 



SIMPLICITY IS THE KEYNOTE 



OF EVENING FASHIONS FOR THE 



SPRINGTIME . . . LIKE EMMA BOMB'S 



DELECTABLE ORGANDIE WITH 



HUGE CIRCLE COLLAR OF EYELET 



ORGANDIE OVER PASTEL 



TAFFETA SLIP, RIGHT. 




BELOW, FANEETS COTTONLACE. 



AND ORGANDIE COMBINATIONS . 



SCOOP NECK OR BRA-TOP, FLIRTY 




PEPLUM FOR SAKE OF FRIVOLITY. 



■ IMPORTED PURE SILK TAFFETA 
DRESS WITH DEEP SQUARE 
DECOLLETAGE, BENEATH COCKTAIL 
COAT OF THE SEASON IN IRIDESCENT 
GOLD TAFFETA WITH FLOWING LINES 
AND BACK FULLNESS. BY MARUSIA, 
WORN BY MARIANNE CHAPEL. 





DOROTHY LAMOUR DRESS THAT COMBINES EXCITING STYLE NOTES WITH WONDERFUL COLOR . . . BRILLIANT SHADES 
OF CREPE, HAWAIIAN MOTIF. SARONG EFFECT AND HALF-STOLE FOR GLAMOUR. BY TWENTIETH CENTURY FROCKS. 



22 



IT WILL BE 




A SUIT SEASON 



ADELE-CALIFORNIA PACES THE NEW 
YEAR WITH THREE-PIECE COSTUME SUIT 
OF FLANNEL WITH TATTERSAL CHECKED 
VEST, DETACHABLE COLLAR. THE 
BLOUSE TO VARY ITS MOOD . . . TISSUE 
FAILLE WITH DIAGONAL POCKETS, 
NEAT CUFFS: DEAUVILLE MODELS. 







'LIMMING LINES IN FINE WOOL: J AC-LANE DRAPES 
A SHAWL COLLAR TO LOW CLOSING. FASHIONED OF 
PACIFIC RAVONA, IN HALF SIZES! YVONNE HAT AND 
SCARF. ABOVE: THE BLOUSE WITH A DELICATE AIR, 
BY MODE DE PARIS IN TISSUE FAILLE . . . THE TINY 
NECKLACE EFFECT ACHIEVED BY SELF CORDING . . . 
MINUTE TUCKS, AND VERY SUIT-ABLE BACK BUTTON. 



AT LEAST ONE SUIT IN TWO TONES 



WILL ADD ZEST TO THE WARDROBE. 



HERE'S YOUR NEW SUIT 



THIS ONE BY COUNTRY CLUB WITH 



SCALLOP BUTTON DETAILING, SHOULDER 



BOW TO MATCH THE SECOND 



COLOR OF THE SKIRT. 





VERY NEW, THE CAPE SUIT . . . GABARDINE LINED IN 
RED: BY LOOM ARC. LESLIE JAMES QUAKER BONNET. RIGHT, 
CHARLES OF CALIFORNIA FLARED GABARDINE SHORTIE 
FOR THE SMALL WOMAN: SECOND COLOR ACCENT. 



T, 



RUE DISTINCTION . . . BUTTERFLY 
FAGGOTTING ON LONGER JACKET 
TORSO SUIT BY NATHALIE NICOLI. 





YOUNG AT HEART, THE BOXY JACKET WITH DETACHABLE 

COLLAR AND POCKET TABS IN CONTRASTING 

COLOR . . . STYLED BY ERIC. ABOVE, CALIF SHIRT 

IN FAILLE REPEATS LINES OF SNUG LITTLE 

COLLAR IN A STYLE MADE FOR SUIT COMFORT: EASY 

SLEEVES, SADDLE-STITCHING IN WESTERN STYLE! 



s 




EASY TO "LOOK PRETTY, PLEASE" . . . EASTER 
PARADE SUIT BY LILLY OF CALIFORNIA PUTS ALL 
ACCENT ON FEMININITY. NOVEL SLOT SEAMS WITH 
INSERTED POCKETS AND A FLIRTATIOUS COLLAR THAT 
FRAMES FACE IN GABARDINE, SPRING'S OWN FABRIC! 



c 



ALIFORNIA FINESSE IN THIS SUIT BY DORS THAL . . 
SMOOTH CERTAIN LINES WITH COLLAR AND YOKE 
MARKED IN SHARP CONTRAST, SUBTLE FIGURE 
ACCENT WITH MOLDED WAISTLINE, HIGH POCKETS 
THE SAME DISTINCTION IN A BLOUSE BY STELLA, 
EMBROIDERED MADEIRA LINEN TO MAKE A 
PRETTY "SHOW" BENEATH ANY SUIT . . . 
OR CREATE A BLOUSE-SKIRT COSTUME! 









LIFE IS IN TUNE FOR MEMBERS OF THE 
CALIFORNIA WOMEN'S SYMPHONY ... ACCUS- 
TOMED TO FIT MOOD TO TEMPO, THEY'RE 
EQUALLY SMART IN CHOOSING CLOTHES SUITED 
TO ACTIVITIES OF THE DAY. FOR REHEARSAL, 
DIMINUTIVE VIRGINIA EVANS CHOOSES 
CHECKS-N-PLAIN DRESS WITH BRIEF BOLERO, 
STYLED FOR TINY WOMEN BY SERGEE OF 
CALIFORNIA; MARILYN ADAMS REPORTS IN 
KEN SUTHERLAND'S LINEN VEST AND 
SKIRT . . . GRACE NOTE IN COLORED BLOUSE! 




PRACTICE SESSIONS AT THE HOME OF THEIR CONDUCTOR MIGHT FIND ANN COOLIDGE, LEFT, AND 
ROSE KAY CHECKING THE SCORE IN MAX KOPFS VERSATILE VARIATIONS ON A THEME! 



33 




BEAUTIFUL SHEERS 

FOR SPRING AMD SUMMER 

DON'T UNDERESTIMATE APPEAL OF SHEERS FOR 
SPRING TEMPTATIONS . . . FOR EVENING, DAYTIME, 
ACTIVE PLAYCLOTHES! LEFT, COORDINATES BASED ON 
A SHEER PREMISE: DOTTED SWISS OVERSKIRT, BATTLE 
JACKET OVER SHEER SHEATH SUNNER: CASUAL TIME. 
BELOW: SHEER COTTON SHEATH . . . REDINGOTE, 
PLEATED SKIRT, DOTTED SWISS STRIPE BLOUSE. 
TABAK OF CALIFORNIA. 
HOUSE OF MUSIC PIANO STOOLS. 






- ■.- : _ - 






LOUELLA BALLERINO PUTS HER OWN ORIGINAL TOUCHES TO DOTTED SWISS FROCK! IONIC COLUMN POCKET OF PIQUE! 



35 



Right, steep hill leading to 
Stebbins' home is banked with 
pink and white geraniums, and 
decorative lemon trees. Ter- 
race is bordered with white 
daisy plants. White wrought- 
iron garden, furniture uphol- 
stered in a bright green is 
placed along entire length of 
terrace. Below, Stebbins' home, 
painted dark green, is curved 
around mountain bluff in Hol- 
lywood Hills high above the 
glamorous Sunset Strip. Before 
Stebbins could begin construc- 
tion on their dream house it 
was necessary to blast tons of 
solid rock from mountain wall. 





LIFE IN THE HOLLYWOOD HILLS: 
SWIMMING ON THE ROOF 



BY HELEN IGNATIUS 



A mountain in the living 

room, a pool on the roof, 

a cobra skin bar, a 

sunken bath . . . all this 

and a stupendous view 

too at the home of Harry 

and Evelyn Stebbins. 



Life in the Hollywood Hills — at the fabulous nine-room two-story home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stebbins high above the fabulous Sunset Strip- 
includes a number of fascinating possibilities, not the least of which is 
swimming on the roof. There is, for example, the prospect of watching 
underwater swimmers through the glass portholes in the entrance loggia; 
taking a steam bath or, if one prefers, a bubble bath in the luxurious 
sunken bathtub ; viewing a motion picture in the projection room ; chatting 
with someone three or four rooms away, not by undue stretching of the 
vocal cords, but through the use of the handy intercommunication system; 
mixing a martini or whipping up a quick batch of coco at the cobra 
skin bar; or, simply, stretching out on a terrace chaise longue and re- 
garding, by day, the pale mauve hills and. by night, the seemingly end- 
less stretches of lights in Hollywood and Los Angeles. 




Designed by Harry Stebbins and decorated by charming titian-haired 
Evelyn Stebbins, the house fulfills in every conceivable way the Cali- 
fornia tradition of indoor-outdoor living. In one respect, it even goes 
beyond this tradition: a great slab of mountain actually forms the east 
wall of the spectacular living-dining room. The mountain, gunited and 
painted pale green, is planted with over 100 varieties of indoor plants 
and a massive fireplace with a 34-foot mantle has been carved into the 
center of the hill wall. The semi-circular fan-shaped roof is plastic glass 
webbed with narrow steel beams painted bright green. Green and mauve 
Vermont slate slabs seamed with white cement form the 20 by 25-foot 
triangular floor space in front of the hill wall. 

The predominant color scheme in the living-dining area is green, white, 
and black with accents of red. On the highly polished black asphalt 
floor are pure white rugs of Mexican hand-loomed wool. The natural 
pine beams and natural white pine panels of the ceiling repeat the fan- 
shaped design of the glass and steel ceiling above the hill wall. The 
dining area is furnished with a tremendous bleached oak table, white 
leather chairs and sideboard. Focal point of interest in the living room 
area is a 100-year-old black Chinese tapestry embroidered in pastel birds, 
flowers, and figures. The Stebbins' collection of Chinese art objects is 
placed in the red and black breakfront cabinets of primavera wood on 
either side of the tapestry. 

This is Harry and Evelyn Stebbins' interpretation of California Living 
. . . unorthodox, imaginative, and with a pronounced flair for flair. 






Left: tremendous plate glass 
windows and two sliding glass 
doors provide a magnificent 
view of Hollywood and Los 
Angeles. Glass portholes in the 
entrance loggia provide view 
of underwater swimmers in 
the large pool built on the 
second-story level of house. 
Above: curving indoor stair- 
way leads to pool and sunny 
roof terrace. An artificial wa- 
terfall emptying directly into 
the pool has been built into 
the rocky mountain to the right. 
Between cabanas opposite pool 
is a bar finished in cobra skin. 



- Opposite page: complex system of fine copper tubing with perforations 
at planter boxes provides water for indoor plants on the striking mountain 
wall of the Harry Stebbins' home. Opposite page right: the living-dining 
room area is lighted by lamps, white plaster candelabra, and an indirect 
lighting soffit of birch placed four feet below the glass ceiling and sup- 
ported by a trio of tall steel columns painted glistening coal black. 



PHOTOGRAPHS BY DERYL DAVIS 



37 




WHEN CALIFORNIA COOKS WANT 
THEIR FOOD TO GO FARTHER, 
TASTE BETTER AND LOOK LOVELII 
THEY STUFF IT 



By Helen Evans Brown 



The man who first discovered that a goat tasted better when 
roasted over a fire, than when devoured raw, was on the way 
to becoming civilized, but it was the man — or was it his 
woman — who thought of substituting fragrant herbs and berries 
for the animals innards who really started the business of 
living to eat. And a good thing, too. Cooks have been stuffing 
things ever since, from the fig-filled sow's bellies of Ancient 
Rome to tomatoes filled with who-knows-what and coyly 
presented as a "Tomato Surprise". In California we stuff 
many things and for many reasons. We stuff a pitted ripe 
olive with smoked salmon because we think it makes a good 
and easy appetizer; we stuff cabbage with left-over meat 
because we are trying to make a dab feed a mob — and it 
does; we stuff a zucchini with a savory filling of garlic and 
cheese and tomatoes just because we can't bear them plain; 
and we stuff a pear with marrons either because we like 
it that way or because we feel like putting on a little dog. 
Stuffing can be as simple as putting pieces of celery, onion 
and apple in a wild duck or as elaborate as making a farce 
(And I don't mean what you do — farce means stuffing, farci 
means stuffed.) of pate de foie gras and truffles and filling a 
capon with it. In California we stick to the simpler kinds — 
at least sometimes. 

A dish brought to California by the Mexicans and adopted 
as one of our favorites, is Chiles Rellenos con Queso, or 
chiles stuffed with cheese. There are many recipes for them 
but the very best ones I have ever tasted are those made by 
California's famous blind cook, Elena Zelayeta. The recipe 
is in her book, Elena's Famous Mexican and Spanish 
Recipes, but because she is such a generous person she gave 
me permission to give it to you. 



Elena's Chiles Rellenos 

Cut Monterey Jack cheese into oblongs about 1x2x1/2 inches. 
Around each piece wrap a strip of canned green chile. For 
each two whole peppers allow one egg and a tablespoon of 
flour. Beat the egg yolks until thick, add the flour then gently 
fold in the egg whites which have also been beaten stiff. 
Have a frying pan filled with hot oil to about the depth of 
one and a half inches. Dip the wrapped cheese into the bat- 
ter one at a time, lift carefully with a spoon and put in the 
hot fat. Fry on one side until a lovely amber, then turn and 
color the other side in the same way. Drain on paper and let 
stand. And there's the wonderful thing about this recipe . . . 
you can let them stand and reheat just before serving time. 
This is the way: Make a sauce by mincing a half an onion 
and a clove of garlic very fine and cooking in a little oil (I'd 
say two tablespoons.) Strain two cups of solid pack tomatoes 
into the mixture, forcing the puree through the sieve, then 
add two cups of any kind of stock, preferably chicken (I'd 
use Sey-Co or some other chicken concentrate if I had no 
stock on hand. It is easy and very good.) When the sauce 
is boiling merrily season with one and a half teaspoons of 
salt, a half teaspoon of pepper and a teaspoon of oregano 
which is rubbed between the palms of the hands into the 
sauce. When serving time comes put the fried peppers into 
the hot sauce just long enough to heat them well — about five 
minutes. They puff with pride when heated this way and no 
wonder, they are a dream of culinary perfection. Serve them 
with Elena's refried beans (Frijoles Refritos), tortillas and 
a Mexican salad, say one made with avocados winth a tarter- 
than-usual dressing. 



38 



Calif ornians love hamburgers and prepare them in all 
manners of skillful ways. One is 

Montrose Stuffed Hamburgers 

Make hamburg patties as thin as you can pat them 1 1 won- 
der if that's how they got that name? Now slice red onions 
that are a little smaller in diameter than the hamburg pat- 
ties, or tailor them to fit by removing a ring or two. Dip 
the slices in melted butter. Cut some nice creamy Monterey 
Jack cheese (Isn't it all?) in slices about a quarter of an 
inch thick, then cut in rounds the same size as the onion. 
If you don't eat the trimmings as you go. save them for melt- 
ing purposes. Now sandwich the cheese and the onion be- 
tween two hamburg patties, sprinkle with salt and pepper and 
broil either over charcoal or in your kitchen oven. Serve 
either with buns, picnic style, or as a main dish with a tomato 
sauce, but for goodness sake don't drown them with a so- 
called barbecue sauce — the kind that is so hot and spicy that 
you couldn't possibly taste the meat, let alone the wonderful 
melted cheese. 

I hate to admit that Californians aren't always right about 
their eating habits. They usually are but once in a while 
they turn thumbs down on really good food — like mutton. 
In England and in many parts of this country it is con- 
sidered a luxury, and indeed it is. Expensive restaurants in 
New York feature it yet here in California you practically 
need a Geiger counter to find it. The fancy meat markets 
won't touch it but you can sometimes find it in the "economy" 
stores. Of course this makes it worth hunting for because 
it is very inexpensive as well as very good. 

Braised Stuffed Leg of Mutton 

Have the butcher remove the skin, the gland in the lower 
muscle and the bone. Make an oyster stuffing by chopping a 
jpint of oysters (those oversize Pacific oysters are ideal for 
this and less expensive than their baby siblings, the Olympias, 
or their snobbish Eastern cousins). Mix the chopped oysters 
with a cup of fairly dry bread crumbs, a quarter cup of 
melted butter, two tablespoons of minced parsley and two 
tablespoons of minced onions that have been "melted" in the 
butter. Season with salt and pepper and a very little lemon 
juice. Stuff into the cavity where the bone once was and sew 
securely. Now brown the mutton in butter or shortening (a 
quarter of a cup should be enough). Put the meat in a Dutch 
oven or a deep casserole with a tight fitting top and with it 
put two crushed cloves of garlic and either two cups of Cal- 
ifornia dry white wine or the same amount of water. Toss in 
an herb bouquet, cover closely and cook in a 275 degree oven 
for two and a half to three hours, uncovering for the last 
few minutes. Make a gravy with the juices in the pan and 
serve with a puree of dried white beans or with lima beans. 

The next recipe is frankly extravagant but so many of you 
readers think that's just what I am I hate to let you down — 
besides it's perfect for a party. 

Stuffed Lamb Chops, Richmond 

Have double rib lamb chops slit from the inside (or bone 
side), making the pocket a capacious one. For each four 
double chops use a quarter of a cup of fresh mushrooms, a 
three to four ounce tin of pate de foie gras and one green 
onion. Mince the onion and the mushrooms, cook them for 
three minutes in a tablespoon of butter then add your pate. 
Season with a little salt and a tiny bit of dried tarragon and 
if it seems too runny sprinkle in a few dried crumbs. Stuff 
the chops with the mixture. It is not necessary to secure the 
opening as the bones make a good closure. Broil the chops 
and serve them with broiled tomatoes and baked hominy. And 
at the risk of ruining my reputation I will confess that this 
very same dish can be made with mutton chops and Sell's 
Liver Pate for a fraction of the cost, but with glorious results! 

Stuffed ham is not what you think: the stuffing is not put 
where the bone once was because the bone is still there. Here's 
how : 



Herb Stuffed Ham 

Make a dressing by combining a cup of minced parsley, a 
cup of minced onion, two tablespoons of minced marjoram 
and a clove of garlic that has been rubbed to a nothingness 
with a tablespoon of sugar. Now comes a half teaspoon of 
black pepper, a quarter teaspoon of ground cloves and a half 
cup of cracker crumbs. Moisten with just enough sherry to 
hold it together but don't let it be soggy. Now take a knife — 
preferably a boning knife or a strong paring knife — and 
make deep incisions in a whole ham weighing from twelve 
to fifteen pounds. Make the cuts clear to the bone, then press 
the knife back and push some of the stuffing into the resultant 
hole. Repeat this until the dressing is all used and the ham 
is enormous with its added bulk. Wrap closely in aluminum 
foil and bake according to the packer's directions. (I should 
tell you how when I don't know whether it's "tenderized." 
"tendered," or "Old fashioned.") Remove the foil towards 
the end of the baking, brush the ham with sherry and sprinkle 
with crumbs. Return to the oven to brown. When this ham is 
carved it will be gay with polka dots of savory green. 

A recipe that has long been a favorite up and down the 
west coast is 

Clam-Stuffed Eggplant 

Select a large eggplant, cut the top off and scoop out the 
insides as carefully as possible so as not to hurt the beautiful 
purple skin. Chop the insides coarsely. Now cook a small 
onion, minced, in two tablespoons of butter, add the chopped 
eggplant, and cover. Cook very slowly until the eggplant gets 
a translucent look. Now cut four slices of buttered toast into 
tiny dice and toss them in. along with two cans of minced 
razor clams, juice and all, and two tablespoons of finely 
chopped parsley. Fill the eggplant with this mixture (which 
you've seasoned, incidentally), and cover the top with crumbs 
and dabs of butter. Place in a casserole small enough to 
hold it upright and pour a couple of tablespoons of water 
in the bottom to keep it from sticking. Bake in a 400 degree 
oven for thirty minutes. 

Perhaps the lowliest and the best of all stuffed things is 
the cabbage, and there are as many ways to do it as there are 
cooks. I'll not give you an exact recipe because stuffed cab- 
bage should be an economical dish, one that is made with 
what is left in the refrigerator. Maybe you have some scraps 
of ham, or a bit of veal. It could be pork, or liver, or tongue, 
or you could start at scratch with ground beef. The cab- 
bage may either be scooped out from the stem end, stuffed 
and braised or steamed, or it may have its filling put be- 
tween each leaf. This is done by steaming the whole head 
until it is pliable, then peeling it back, leaf by leaf, until 
the heart is reached. A spoonful of filling is spread between 
each leaf and they are put back into their original form. 
When finished you have a whole and rather obese cabbage 
which is, like the other, either braised or steamed. The fill- 
ing? Your leftover meat, as much as you can wheedle off 
the bones, is chopped and mixed with a stretcher — usually 
rice. If there is any gravy around, toss that in too, and some 
chopped onion and an herb or two. (You'll want about two 
cups of filling for a small cabbage.) Taste it and be sure it is 
well seasoned, the cabbage will absorb a lot of salt. Moisten 
with stock or tomato juice if you have no gravy. When the 
cabbage is stuffed put it in a Dutch oven or a deep casserole 
with a couple of cups of liquid — tomato juice or stock or 
water or, best of all, wine. An herb bouquet would be a 
good addition. Cover and cook slowly, either on top of the 
stove or in the oven, until the cabbage is tender but not 
until it gets that boarding house smell. And if you think 
that's the vaguest recipe you've ever read listen to this one 
from an old cook book: "To force a cabbage take veale and 
porke until you have enuff and bray it, and put it into a 
cabbage. This makes a very fine side dish." Thought you'd like 
to know. 



39 




The Lady Butcher Shows The Fashion Editor 

The Best Dressed Meat in Town 




Virginia Davidson 



IRGINIA DAVIDSON has the distinction of being 
Los Angeles' only lady butcher, certainly the most 
fashionable . . . and her meats are dressed to a gour- 
met's taste. 

One minute you read about Mrs. Davidson attend- 
ing an outstanding social event; see her pictured at some 
swank affair. Next, you meet her behind the shining glass 
cases of her own immaculate shop in the Farmer's Market. 

We sought her out among the well-dressed beeves hung 
neatly, all in a row, in the glass cooler she herself devised. 
It takes a woman to know how to glamorize food . . . and 
this completely open refrigerator display has the carniverous 
customers gaping. 

"\^ hen Davidson-in-the-Farmers'-Market opened, I had no 
qualms about knowing fine meat, or running a market," the 
lady explained. "We've wholesaled Davidson meats to Amer- 
ica's leading hotels and restaurants for years. The only 
problem was to let people know that, at last, they could get 
choice. Eastern corn-fed beef, retail, in Los Angeles. 

"There is absolutely no substitute for corn," she quipped, 
"when it comes to providing a steak with flavor, juiciness and a 
certain crunchiness. 

"May I help you, sir?" she interrupted herself, and put 
a well-manicured hand into a picturesque display of rare 
collector's item meats. 

Only the finest eastern corn-fed beef, carefully aged, is 
handled at Virginia Davidson's meatery, and this same dis- 
crimination is extended in the selection of other meats and 
specialties. 

In spite of a demoniacal insistence on quality and honesty, 
Virginia Davidson is light-hearted and a bit pixie-ish. This 
is reflected in the chatty, informal way the lady butcher ad- 
vertises. Her trademark and brand name is "Topper," an 
elegant, triumphant steer ... a juicy cutie from the corn belt. 
She informs you that custom cutting is the rule, not the ex- 
ception, and that you can get steaks a foot thick and star- 
shaped, if you like. "Topper" is a beefy bon vivant who 
carries his weight well and tenderly! 

When the Davidson beef -trust opened in the Farmer's Mar- 
ket in February. 1947, it looked more like a flower shop than 
a butchery, with hygenic walls of pale green, and glistening 
glass cases ... a perfect foil for ruddy red ribs and beau- 
tiful steaks . . . and blooming flowers that represented good 
wishes of friends and well-wishers on the "lot." 

Leave it to a lady butcher to dream up something like 
this! She packaged sirloin steaks in heart-shaped cellophane 
boxes last February — tucked them into a frame of parsley, 
tied 'em up with satin ribbon and fresh gardenias, and sold 
them for Valentines to thrill the heart of a gourmet. 

It's all a friendly, wonderful thing and while Virginia 
Davidson seems to take it humorously in stride . . . actually 
she is continually searching for new ideas (like the bacon- 
slicing machine that fascinates customers). She's a demon on 
personalized salesmanship, has a real feeling that the people 
of this world should eat well. During the disastrous freight 
embargo in Hawaii . . . where she had lived for many years 
. . . the lady butcher worried so much about hungry Islanders 
that she sold meat at cost, plus the airfreight charge of flying 
sustenance to Honolulu. 
{Continued on page 50) 




Sirloin steak in cellophane box, gourmet gift for a Valent„.„<> 




'Davidson-in-the-F armer s-Market." where meat is custom cum 



BY VIRGINIA SCALLON 



40 



A. 



.WARENESS can bring you unexpected joy if you do not already possess 
k. Many people ride along the highway or walk in the country or hills without 
seeing the many fascinating materials which can be used as decorations or flower 
arrangements. Imagination must also be called upon but if you combine these two 
faculties, you will find hours of pleasure. 

There are unbelievably beautiful seed pods, graceful grasses, cattails, dried 
leaves which all take on a variety of shades of delightful browns. Stroll along 
a dried-up stream bed and discover the grasses and reeds which develop most in- 




fried Arrangements: 
Subtle Colors And 
eauty Of Form 

BY LAURA E. McVAY 



teresting seeds in the fall. If you will make a collection to take home and ar- 
range in a brown piece of earthenware or a wooden chopping bowl, you will have 
a symphony in brown, and a bouquet which will last for weeks. Some of the 
smaller pods or grasses will have to be tied in small bunches to become effective 
in an arrangement. They are too small to be interesting and they lose their identity 
unless concentrated in a group. 

Cattails are large enough to give character to a dried arrangement. Keep the 
larger ones well toward the bottom and the smaller, slender ones at the top. The 
leaf of the cattail grows in the most willowy and graceful curves, and should be 
used to give lightness and airiness to the heavier material. 

The seed pods from the jacaranda, pods from the many flowering eucalyptus 
and magnolia offer useful material to those who live in Southern California. If 
you are fortunate enough to have the wood roses from Honolulu, you have the ideal 
material for the center of interest or focal point of the arrangement. 

Another charming seed pattern coming in the late Spring or early Summer is 
the Silver puff (see illustration). This grows in the foothills and must be gathered 
before the seed pod opens. It belongs to the composite family and looks like a 
dandelion with a long stem. When the stem turns brown, these pods are ready to 
pick. Place them on a frog or in a container so they will not touch each other, 
and then enjoy watching them unfold. If not disturbed they will last months. The 
drier ones will open over night, but if picked too green they will not puff for 
several days. 

If the arrangement has been made on a frog and without a container, place rocks 
or a piece of driftwood at the base to cover the frog. 

Put into practice the slogan: "The great joy of finding hidden beauty in common 
things." 



41 



* 



SELECTED BECAUSE .. . 



^ 




42 



sual Time, 
coordinates 



Itex, 
flirty skirt 



Hex, 

jeweled suit 



hsual Time, 
co//ar accent 



tuntry Club, 
forever classic 



sorgia Kay, 
gingham applique 



eauville Models, 
two tones 



■eorgia Kay, 
midriff 



•raff Californiawear, 
stripes 'n slacks 




\ddie Masters, 
glorified jumper 



\ddie Masters, 
dotted Swiss 



^gnes Barrett, 

I pocketed pushers 




BARE YOUR SHOULDERS 




i3> 




FASHION DOES TRICKS TO 
BARE SHOULDERS TO SUN . . . T-SQUARE 
NECKLINE FLOWER DRESS, MATCHING 
BOLERO; HOLLYWOOD PREMIERE. 
CENTER, SEERSUCKER PIQUE HALTER 
DRESS, ROYAL OF CALIFORNIA. 
MATCHING JACKET TO GO-WITH! 
RIGHT, NEW HALTER TECHNIQUE IN 
SEERSUCKER PIQUE: GEORGIA KAY. 



44 



Iget out and SHINE IN THE SUN! 




SUNSHINE CLOTHES IN THE MOST FABULOUS COMBINATION OF COLORS . . . SILK SHANTUNG IN PURE BLACK AND BURNISHED 
COPPER WITH BLACK STARS! A WONDERFUL COORDINATED GROUP OF MIX-MATCHABLES BY BARNEY MAX. THE FOUR 
SEPARATE PIECES: BACK-WRAP OVER BLOUSE, SKIRT WITH UNPRESSED PLEATS, SLEEVELESS BLOUSE, VERY TRIM SHORTS. 



45 



(Continued from page 15) 

ductor. A symphony of twenty-five young women performed 
the first concert in the Congregational Church on the corner 
of Sixth and Hill Streets in downtown Los Angeles. Listed 
on the program were no less than eight composers: Tobain. 
Donizetti. Flowtow, Strauss, Clinton, Moses, Haydn, Bevan, 
and Rossini. Highpoint of the program was a cornet obligato 
by Miss Matilee Loeb. 

Today the California Women's Symphony is very flexible 
as to size and can be expanded to an orchestra of 100 per- 
formers. Their repertoire is extensive. During the 1948-1949 
season, for example, the orchestra performed twelve major 
concerts, most ambitious of which was a three-day Bach 
festival at the Wilshire Ebell Theatre. Twenty different solo- 
ists, both vocal and instrumental, were presented and Miss 
Haroldson handled with skill the full orchestral transcrip- 
tions as well as works for chamber orchestra and choral 
groups. 

Commenting on Miss Haroldson's performance at the Bach 
Festival Margaret Harford in the Hollywood Citizen News 
wrote: "In short, the lady on the podium did a superb job 
reflecting what her large following already knows — her ap- 
proach to the music of Bach is sound as granite and thor- 
oughly seasoned." Albert Goldberg on the Los Angeles Times 
(who never has been known to use anything but the toughest 
standards for musical performance) wrote: ". . . the women, 
with the assistance of three men among the soloists but with 
none in the ranks, gave conscientious and enjoyable readings 
to a variety of Bach both in original and arranged forms." 

The three-day Bach festival represented months of what Miss 
Haroldson described as "gruelling work." Preparing a three- 
day Bach festival is somewhat akin to being sentenced to 
three years of hard labor. Miss Haroldson, however, managed 
to telescope the necessary planning, rehearsing, and whatnot 
into three months. To plan the three one-and-a-half hour 
concerts, she went to the Olympic Peninsula where apparently, 
according to Miss Haroldson, there is "nothing but Indians, 
bears and solitude." She left the Peninsula with three well- 
planned Bach concerts as well as enough energy and inspira- 
tion to carry on through the long hours of rehearsal. 

On the podium during a concert, the conductor (flawlessly 
dressed) appears to be doing very little except "stick- waving" 
as Miss Haroldson puts it. As a matter of fact, Miss Harold- 
son states that to conductors the question-most-asked is "What 
is all that hand- waving about anyway?" Actually the right 
hand attends to rhythmical demands and the left hand con- 
trols interpretation and blending. But the very least of a 
conductor's duties, in the opinion of Miss Haroldson, is to 
beat time. In other words, with a professional orchestra, a 
conductor is never obliged to function purely as a metronome. 
But neither is a conductor merely a sort of walking library 
of the world's great musical literature. He (or she) must have 
intimate knowledge of all instruments and should be able 
to play at least one effectively; know all branches of music 



46 



theory; be able to read four clefs at one time and to trans- 
pose for all instruments; have lightning technique in the art of 
sight-reading. 

Of the utmost importance, however, is the conductor's in- 
dividual interpretation of a composer's style and essential 
aim. And finally, his (or her) greatest responsibility is to 
inspire the orchestra. It is impossible to catalogue the quail 
ties which enable a conductor to inspire an orchestra, but 
certainly they include in addition to superior musicianship 
great diplomatic and social ability and a strong intellectual 
and emotional drive. 

Most conductors seem to be of the opinion that conducting 
one orchestra is a more-than-full-time job. Miss Haroldson, 
however, has taken on a number of other responsibilities. Ag 
a professor at Whittier College she teaches violin, string 
ensemble, chamber orchestra, conducting, and orchestral in 
struments. In her spare time Miss Haroldson takes color 
movies, goes ice-skating (her father was one of Norway's 
champions), plays her 145-year-old Gagliano violin, takes 
care of her new Whittier home which she describes as a 
"steel-reinforced pored pumice house with a great deal of 
glass." 

Miss Haroldson is an attractive blue-eyed woman with a 
great deal of energy and talent. Her hands are expressive 
and she uses them frequently to punctuate her conversation. 
She is simple and completely unassuming with none of the 
super-dramatics often associated with "artists." 

And yet she is an artist of the first calibre. At the age 
of eighteen, after studying with Jacques Gordon and Leo 
Sowerby, Miss Haroldson was graduated from the Post-Grad- 
uate Department of the American Conservatory of Music. She 
won the highest honors in her class as well as the Full Scholar- 
ship Prize. During the next four years, after highly com- 
petitive examinations, she won scholarship awards at Juil- 
Hard's. Her career as a solo violinist includes an engage- 1 
ment with the Chicago Symphony, an extensive tour of theB 
Middle West, a series of thirty concerts on the Pacific Coast, I 
and a concert at the Century of Progress Exposition. For m 
two seasons she appeared as a staff violinist at the Goodman I 
Theatre of the Chicago Art Institute. And in the meanwhile, I 
she was associated with the teaching staff of the American ■ 
Conservatory of Music and directed the Stringed Instrumental 
Department at North Central College in Illinois. She has ■" 
held her current post as conductor of the California Women's ■ 
Symphony for the past ten years. 

Miss Haroldson's plans for the future continue to be a 
veritable musical whirlwind. She looks forward to the day I 
when the California Women's Symphony (with the aid of the ■ 
Women's Symphony Association headed by high-powered Mrs. B 
Leiland Atherton Irish) can tour the entire state, present a |> 
series of concerts for young people, perform over the air, and I> 
perhaps some day become one of the leading lights of tele- j 
vision. 



Elinor Remick Warren: 

Marriage, Music, Magnetism 




BY B. J. NORCOTT 



I* ccording to legend, musicians and composers are all 

/% supposed to have been born in a garret and in spite 
y"% of starvation and frightful obstacles to have played 
or written their way to fame. The legend follows 
that their genius is undiscovered until after death. Elinor 
Remick Warren reverses this process and in spite of social 
position, marriage, three children and many other distrac- 
tions, has found time to gain fame. 

Knowing that Elinor Remick Warren has published 
more than 150 musical works and has toured the country 
many times as a concert pianist one might expect to meet 
a little old lady. Instead, she is a chic, lovely young 
matron with an enormous twinkle in her blue eyes. 

"No, I'm not so terribly old, I'm not tottering yet and 
I am a woman." She explains this last by telling how often 
well-intentioned people, thinking to pay her a compliment 
would say, after hearing her play or hearing one of her 
orchestral works, "Why it sounds just like a man." 

It is generally agreed that more world-famous musicians 
live in Southern California than in any other locale but 
it is hard to find one who actually was born here. Elinor 
Remick Warren was born in California. In fact, her fam- 
ily record dates back to the Gold Rush Days and her grand- 
father General David Remick helped write pages of his- 
tory in California's early development. 

California's own composer went to the Westlake School 
for Girls in Los Angeles and while there had her first songs 
published. Her own mother had early recognized the talent 
in her child and when Elinor at the age of five started 
picking out her own melodies had written them down. One 
year of college at Mills and then she couldn't wait any 
longer to devote her full time to music so she went to New 
York to study. 

Success came rapidly to this child of music and soon 
she was touring the concert stages of the country with such 
artists as Florence Easton, Lawrence Tibbett, Lucretia 
Rori and Richard Crooks. 

Her particular niche in the Hall of Musical Fame was 
won in the composing field. Her songs are included in 
the repertoire of such artists as Kirsten Flagstad, James 
Melton, Igor Gorin. Nadine Conner, Jeannette MacDonald 
and many others. Miss Warren says that Richard Crooks, 
Nelson Eddy, Lawrence Tibbett and John Charles Thomas 
have introduced more of her songs than any others. 

Her lovely "Christmas Candle," originally written for 
children, is an annual feature on John Charles Thomas' 
program. Recordings of that song have been made by Mr. 
Thomas and in the popular field by Tony Martin. Her 
"Sweetgrass Range" was especially written for Nelson 
Eddy and has been sung by him from coast to coast. 
"White Horses of The Sea" is a favorite for Madame 
Kirsten Flagstad. 

Miss Warren has now discontinued lengthy concert tours, 
first because she feels one cannot truly be creative and 
also be a full-time performer. She believes she cannot 
do full justice to both careers but for a woman, anything 
creative, be it in music or any other of the arts, is more 
satisfying than being a performer. It may be slower to 



Elinor Remick Warren, famed Califor- 
nia composer, combines career with 
marriage, hag three lovely children. 




Seated at the piano is Elinor Remick 
Warren with her husband Z. Wayne 
Griffin and three children: Elayne, 
James, and young, Wayne Griffin, Jr. 



accomplish but it can 
be done. 

Her main reason for 
ending those long con- 
cert tours, however, is 
her devotion to her 
family and her accept- 
ance of the responsi- 
bility to them. "While 
the children are in 
the play-pen stage, it 
may be all right to be 
off touring, but later, 
no. My husband keeps 
telling me to take 
plenty of time for my 
work and not to fuss 
about household du- 
ties but . . . even with 
the wonderful coopera- 
tion I have, there are 
some things I simply 
must do myself. How 
can I just walk into 
my studio and lock 
the door, ignoring the 
world outside? One of 
the children may have to be taken to the doctor because 
of a sore toe . . . the laundry man is here and I really 
must tell him again not to put so much starch in my hus- 
band's shirt, or, one pet has suddenly developed some ail- 
ment and so I must gather them all up, dogs, cats, birds, 
pigeons, turtles, guinea pigs, alligators and even a pet 
skunk and cart them to the vet. It's all fun, mind you, but 
there just aren't enough hours in the day." 

It is difficult to get Miss Warren to talk about herself 
as she much prefers to tell about her attractive husband 
and three wonderful children. She is married to Z. Wayne 
Griffin, the well-known motion picture producer, who con- 
stantly encourages her and takes enormous pride in her 
talent. 

Her oldest son, Jim, is a student at Pomona and at 
home are Wayne Jr. aged eleven and little Elayne, eight 
years old. Elayne's name is a contraction of Elinor and 
Wayne. All three children love and have an active interest 
in music. They like to listen as well as perform. Mr. 
Griffin has a fine tenor voice and a favorite family recrea- 
tion is to gather in the music room following dinner to 
make music for each other. When Elinor was a child she 
accompanied her father on the piano. And now little 
Elayne plays for her daddy. Miss Warren is particularly 
pleased over Jim's increasing enthusiasm for Rach, Bee- 
thoven and Brahms. 

The Griffins' beautiful home is filled with rare paint- 
ings and one of Mrs. Griffin's most highly prized posses- 
sions is a picture by famed Grandma Moses. She is in- 
tensely interested in her husband's work with motion pic- 
(Continued on page 48) 



47 



ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 



c 



G 



ifts in the 
alifornia manner 




EGG CUP: "For a good egg" reads one side of this 
cheery California ceramic egg cup. Green, black, red 
and brown colors. 4" high. Two different size cups 
on top and bottom. $1 .50, postpaid. 






CHINESE SPRINKLE BOY: Cute California ceramic 
sprinkle boy to make short work of sprinkling clothes. 
Stands 8 1 /; inches high. White, black and blue trim. 
$1.95, postpaid. 




CALIFORNIA CLUTTER BOXES: Exquisite hand-painted 
California ceramic dresser boxes to hold your every 
accessory. Seven different ones bear whimsical illus- 
trations and these hand-lettered names on I ids: Bobby 
Pins; Needle 'n Pins; Safety Pins; Odds 'n Ends; Look 
in Here; Buttons "n Bows; Button Box. Box measures 
Zy%" across x 2" deep. $1.25 each, postpaid. 

No C.O.D. — phase. Send check or money order. (Resi- 
dents of California, please add 3% sales tax). 

Send for illustrated catalog of 
other delightful California gift 
items. 




TBE CORRAL SBOF 



• OX ?l» iANCHO JANTA U • CAUFOINIA 



Marriage, Music, 
Magnetism 

{Continued from page 17) 
tures. There is a recording machine in 
the music room and she says she uses 
it constantly for critical appraisal of 
her new compositions and it has also 
been used to make a musical file for 
the family, starting with Elayne's first 
cry after she was born. 

The Griffin family vacations each sum- 
mer in the High Sierras. In fact, these 
mountains have been the inspiration for 
a number of Miss Warren's works; in 
1947 Alfred Wallenstein conducted the 
Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra 
playing her mountain-inspired number 
"The Crystal Lake". 

Musically she may compete with men 
but in looks and interests she is com- 
pletely feminine. She is tiny, just five 
feet two inches tall, weighs 110 pounds, 
has large deep blue eyes and softly 
curling reddish brown hair. Elinor 
Remick Warren is a staunch supporter 
and admirer of California Designers. 
Jewelry she likes in moderation and 
her main consideration in selecting her 
clothes is to buy good things that will 
wear a long time, and gowns that will 
make her appear taller. 

Her work as a composer follows a 
definite pattern as all her songs are writ- 
ten around fine poetry. She believes 
music enhances and glorifies the spoken 
word. She is constantly searching for 
poetry to be set to music and owns one 
of the largest private collections in the 
United States. Two of her most loved 
works for orchestra and chorus are set 
to Edna St. Vincent Millay's "The Harp 
Weaver" and Tennyson's "The Passing 
of King Arthur." This latter work re- 
quires more than an hour for perform- 
ance, and was introduced first by the 
Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, 
mixed chorus and soloist, conducted by 
Albert Coates. She has written and 
published for most musical fields, ex- 
cept opera, but for the last few years 
has concentrated on orchestra and 
choral numbers. Her pieces are favor- 
ites in the repertoire of college choruses. 



ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 



G 



C 



ifts 
in the 
alifornia manner 




WASH BOWL AND PITCHER: Miniature white crackle 
ware for cream and sugar, cigarettes, or use for planter. 
Pitcher measures 3'/2 inches high; 4 inches across. $1.75, 
postpaid. 




TORSO GLASS: Ceramic torso glass" for highballs, beer. ■ 
Use this well-developed accessory for flowers, plants, | 
too. Colors: green or black. $1.00 (add 25c for post- 
age}. 




GAY '90 JIGGER: Amusing bar accessory, this corseted 
torso in ceramic. The bust holds a 1-oz. jigger; the 
base a double jigger. Attractively gift-boxed. $1 .00, 
postpaid. 

No. C.O.D. — please. Send checfr, cash or money order. 

Residents of California, please add 3% sales fax. J 

Send for illustrated catalog of 
other delightful California gift 
items. 




Box 918 



THE CORRAL SHOP 

RANCH© SANTA n • CALIFORNIA I 



48 



THE CAUFORNI AN, February, 1950 






- ttttttt 




.WW** 



AN AUTHENTIC SNOWFLAKE DESIGN 

I. . . is used to create a beautiful and ar- 
Itistic necklace . . . you'll be proud to own 
lor pre. The original snowflake design is 
lhand-cast in bronze by the famous La Jolla 
I Handmade Craftsman. A distinctive and de- 
lightful item to enhance the beauty of your 
afternoon or evening outfit. So appealing 
I. . . yet so attractively priced — S5.95 plus 
20 r r federal tax. Order direct from The Corral 
Shop, Box 918, Rancho Santa Fe, California. 

(GRANULAR CLEANSER ... a normal, 
gradual, effective "skin peel" at home. Grad- 
ually sluffs old dead cells. This friction 
stimulates circulation, encourages growth ol 
new cells. Contains honey, almond and bar- 
ley meal. The pulling effect of the honey- 
while scouring loosens blackheads and white- 
heads, and scrubbing effect removes. Also 
wonderful for hands. 2-ounce jars (federal 
tax included) $1.50; 4-ounce jars, $2.40. Add 
3% sales tax in Calif., 3'/2% in Los Angeles. 
From DermaCulture, 1318 Fouth Avenue, Los 
Angeles 6, Calif. 

FOR A REFRESHING RATH . . . Laven- 
sage soap by d'ormel . . . The delightful 
fragrance of sage and lavender in a hot bath 
will soothe and relax the most fatigued . . . 
its smooth lather . . . even in hardest water 
. . . will soften and freshen the skin. Box 
of 3 cakes . . . regular price $1.50 ... in- 
troductory offer to readers of Californian 
. . . now only $1.00 a box. Mail your orders 
to d'ormel, Dept. CA, P.O. Box 2516, Reno. 
Nevada. All orders postpaid. Agents' queries 
solicited. 

FRY-GUARD ... a handy kitchen utensil 
with so many valuable uses. The perfect way 
to protect your stove and walls against frying 
splatter — enables you to enjoy spotless kitchens 
and yet fry bacon, chicken, etc., in the open. 
An excellent camping and trailer utensil . . . 
wonderful, useful protection around electric 
mixers . . . ideal for use as a cookie sheet. 
Fry-guard, so practical in every way, folds 
flat for easy storing. It's a "must" in your 
kitchen . . . and only $1.00 postpaid. Sorry, 
no C.O.D.'s. The Margorita Shop, 1018 S. 
Main, Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

"SUZETTE" ... a beautiful, versatile cop- 
per and brass chafing dish for smart enter- 
taining in the casual manner at buffet suppers 
and barbecues — indoors and outdoors. Enjoy 
the luxury and utility of this beautiful table 
server. Prepare your favorite gourmet recipe 
at the table and keep it hot while serving. 
10 in. stainless steel skillet, heavy polished 
copper stand and cover, cast brass legs and 
burner attachment, with an adjustable Sterno 
heat regulator. A quality item modestly priced 
at $16.95 (comparative value $39.95). Sorry, 
no C.O.D.'s. Order from Fred S. Meyer Co., 
Box 1176, Beverly Hills, Calif. 





THE 150th ANNIVERSARY OF THE 
HOUSE OF ATKINSON 

is celebrated with pride in 1949 — 

pride in their privilege of supplying colognes 

to people of taste and culture 

through eight English reigns — 

and pride in their own superb skill 

in the perfumer's art. 



EAU DE COLOGNE 
•as 

EAU DE COLOGNE 

Made in England by 

ATKINSONS 

24 OLD BOND STREET. LONDON. W.I 

IMPORTED BY 
PAUL K. RANDALL 

299 MADISON AVE., NEW YORK 17. N.Y. 



Corde 

FINEST IN HANDBAGS 




$10.95 

Genuine " Corde exqui- 
sitely styled; distinctive metal 
clasp. The perfect comple- 
ment for your "after five" 
costumes. 

Black, Brown, Navy, and Multi-colors Mexican. 
If not at your favorite department store write 

CENTURY HAND BAG CO. 

1220 Maple, Suite 301 

LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 

When ordering by mail please enclose 20% 
Federal lax and 3% state tax. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1950 



49 



Where To Buy Alice 
of California Fashions 
shown on pages 4 and 5, 
and on the front cover: 

ALABAMA: Alabama City, Barton's; Alex- 
ander City, The Fair Store; Decatur, 



GRIND YOUR OWN 

COFFEE 

FOR 
FLAVOR AND ECONOMY 




Less coffee is required to at- 
tain perfect flavor when 
freshly ground. There is only 
one way to capture true cof- 
fee flavor — grind immedi- 
ately before using. Adjust- 
able to any grind — avail- 
able in Natural Wood lac- 
quered, Blue and Red — 

$595 

Postpaid. 

i£agle products 

BOX 84A 
MERIDEN, CONN. 



t n$e COLD m $itf 



gently . quickly . pleasantly . . . 

K f WITH ^m 

ONDON'Q 



AT YOUR DRUGGIST S SINCE '889 



SNIFFLES says to send for a sample at 
2G08 Nicollet Ave.. Minneapolis, Minn. 




HOLLYWOOD 

"SCANTIES" 

HERE is the sheerest 
thing in smooth, com- 
fortable, glamour 
panties I Made of won- 
derful Nylon Net, with 
Diamond Pattern. Two 
Bar Tricot that is RUN- 
PROOF. 
Wash — dry: 10 min. 
Size 4 — 20-24 waist 
Sire 5 -24-26 waist , 
Size 6 -26-28 waist 
Size 7 — 28-30 waist 

Black & Nude (Tea Rose) 

Order 3 pair 
for only 

$5.95 ■ , •« i> 




2 



25 



FASH ION -Of -The -MONTH 

6509 De Longpre Ave., Hollywood 28, Calif. 

Dept. C 



Belk-Hudson; Fair hope, The Style Shop; 
Mobile, Josephine's; Opelika, Vickery & 
Odom; Tuscumbia, Buffing ton & Pruitt. 

ARKANSAS: Pine Bluff, May Baker Style 
Shop. 

CALIFORNIA: Colusa, J. J. O'Rourke Dept. 
Store; Dixon, Fink's; Fullerton, Esther's; 
Los Angeles, The May Company; Oakland, 
H. C. Capwell's; Oroville, M & M Dept. 
Store; Pasadena, The Toggery; San Diego, 
Walker's; San Francisco, The Emporium; 
San Jose, Hart's. 

COLORADO: Aurora, Uthagen Fashions; 
Boulder, Brooks Fauber Inc.; Monte Vista, 
Fassett's; Sterling, Garfield's; Walsenburg, 
Unfug Apparel. 

CONNECTICUT: Bridgeport, Elm Fashions. 
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Washington, 
The Hecht Company. 

HAWAII: Honolulu, Yat Loy Company. 

IDAHO: Burley, The Mode; Lewiston, Art- 
craft Shop; Malad City, Evan's Co-op. Co.; 
Pocatello, People's Store; Rexburg, Bar- 
rett's & Co. 

IOWA: Sibley, Smart Shop. 

KANSAS: Great Bend, Howard's; Greens- 
burg, Model Style Shop; Liberal, Grisier's; 
Ness City, Satterfield's. 

LOUISIANA: Hammond, The Vogue; Spring 
Hill, Willie-Mac. 

MINNESOTA: Northfield, Helen's Town & 
Country Shop; St. Paul, Florence; Spring 
Grove, M. L. Fladager. 

MISSISSIPPI: Tupelo, Joe F. Pryor; Vicks- 
burg, Marie Dress Shop. 

MONTANA: Bozeman, Campus Shop; Dil- 
lon, Hazel's Style Shop. 

NEVADA: Elko, Reinhart Co.; Fallon, Mar 
Jae. 

NEW JERSEY: Glassboro, Mildred's. 

NEW MEXICO: Lordsburg, Lehman's. 

OHIO: Akron, A. Polsky Co.; Ashland, The 
Adrienne. 

OKLAHOMA: Stigler, Charm Shop; Tulsa, 
Morris Poplinger Sons, Shepard's; Vinita, 
Rudy's. 

OREGON: Burns, The Vogue; Eugene, 
Williams Stores, Inc.; John Day, Milady's; 
Lakeview, Fashion Shop; Lebanon, Smart 
Shoppe; Pendleton, Frazier Ellis; Port- 
lang, Bonham & Currier; Springfield, Lady 
Fair Shop. 

PENNSYLVANIA: Ambler, Betty Jenkins 
Shop; Bloomsburg, Betty Ann Shop. 

TENNESSEE: Fountain City, Fountain City 
Apparel; Knoxville, S. H. George & Sons; 
Memphis, Bi Die's House of Charm,- Nash- 
ville, Katherine Adams. 

TEXAS: Anson, The Fashion Shop; Breck- 
enridge, The Glamour Shop; Electra, The 
Smart Shop; Ft. Worth, Leonard's; Gran- 
bury, Viola & Berta; Longview, Town & 
Country; Nacogdoches, Lila's Fashions; 
New Braunfels, E. O^ Krause; Palacios, 
Muriel's; Port Arthur, Plettman's; Rankin, 
Edna Mayes Dress Shop; Sherman, Elinor's; 
Sweetwater, Dunlap's; Temple, Style 
Shoppe; Van Alystine, Van Dress Shop. 

UTAH: Bingham Canyon, Bingham Mercan- 
tile Co., Ogden, The Vagabond Shop; 
Salina, Peterson's Style Shop. 

WASHINGTON: Bellevue, Four Seasons; 
Chehalis, Femme Shop,- Dayton, The New 
Moon; Grandview, Elizabeth Shop; Oka- 
nagen, C. E. Blackwell, Inc., Parkland, 
College Dress Shop; Pasco, Cottage Shop; 
Shelton, Rho-Mar Apparel; Yakima, Miller 
Mercantile Co. 

WEST VIRGINIA: Huntington, Wender's; 
Madison, Haddad & Co. 

WYOMING: Cheyenne, Hollywood Shop; 
Worland, The Smart Shop. 



Virginia Davidson: Lady Butchel 

(Continued from page 40) 

Virginia Davidson has gone into a foreign field of el 
deavor. foreign for a woman, and given it flair and finessl 
But she always has managed to live an extraordinary li: 
in an ordinary way. 

For several years before she moved to the mainland as til 
bride of Virgil Davidson (Los Angeles meat tycoon) sll 
ran a brokerage business in Honolulu. One of her large! 
accounts was the Davidson Meat Co. and she still looks wis! 
ful when she remembers the shiploads of beef she'd brir| 
in at a time. 

"I used to talk about a half million pounds at a cracM 
now I sell a half pound of bacon. Wonderful bacon, though.| 
she added brightly. 

Before this pint-sized woman took on the big job of ir 
porting millions of pounds of meat, selling it, supervising 
its unloading, transferring, storing and collecting for sam<| 
she was in public relations work in Honolulu. For many yeail 
she made friends with the high, the low, the talented, tfcl 
learned and the mighty. Of them all, she liked Charley Mil 
Carthy the best. 

She says she'll always remember the luau they both a ! 
tended. Charley came in after the feast, looked at the tabl| 
and said. "My God, Bergen, what happened? A wreck?" 

"No." said Bergen, "It's a luau ; you know, a pig feast. | 

"Oh," replied Charley, "You mean, the pigs ate here." 

On the hobby side of life, the lady butcher can get alor 
just fine without a lifesaver in a big ocean ; she can mak 
horses do things they didn't know they could do themselveij 
and she's a flying enthusiast. She was the second woman 
learn to fly in Hawaii, and way back in the thirties, she ani 
another girl set an altitude record for light planes that existel 
for many years. 

Proving that her hobbies are not all sports-minded ones, il 
collaboration with a friend she whipped out a Who-dun-i| 
that featured a Chinese girl detective. 

Now her favorite fictional character is "Topper." 

Where To Buy Preview Sportswear Fashion] 
shown on page 8: 



ALASKA: Carol's, Anchorage. 
ARIZONA: Vernon's, Douglas; Dia- 
mond's, Phoenix; Penrod's, Pinetap; 
Albert Steinfleld, Tucson. 
CALIFORNIA: Liebergs, Alhambra; 
Clarice's, Anaheim; Merry's, Arcadia; 
Arnold's, Bakersfield; El Rancho Gift 
& Gown Shop, Barstow; Bobbie Lynn, 
Bellflower; Jerry Lieban, Beverly 
Hills; Burcal's, Burbank; Town & 
Country, Claremont; Dolly Petite 
Shop, Coalinga; Junior Deb, Comp- 
ton; J. J. O'Rourke, Colusa; Twist's, 
Culver City; Miss & Matron Shop, 
El Monte; Kingsburg's, Fullerton; 
Sporty Knit Shop, Hollywood; Campus 
Togs, Huntington Park; Irwin's, Long 
Beach; SWELLDOM, Los Angeles; Al- 
bert's, Napa; Sporty Knit Shop, 
North Hollywood; KAHN'S, Oakland; 
F. C. Nash, Pasadena; Lerraine's, Pis- 
mo Beach; Orange Belt Emporium, 
Pomona; Harris Co., Redlands; Kris- 
ty's. Riverside; Ella's, Sacramento; 
Stept's, San Bernardino; HAFTER'S, 
San Diego; HALE BROS., San Fran- 
cisco; Hale Bros., San Jose; Gladys 
Fowler, San Pedro; Andrea's, Santa 
Barbara; Nu Modes, Santa Monica; 
Ballard & Brocket!, Whittier. 
COLORADO: Perkins-Shearer, Colo- 
rado Springs; Joslin's, Denver. 



HAWAII: C & D Dress, Honolulu 

IDAHO: C. C. Anderson, Boise; C. C 1 

Anderson, Caldwell; C. C. Anderson 

Emmet; C. C. Anderson, Napa; Fargc 

Wilson-Wells, Pocatello; Liberty Dep 

Store, Rexburg; Paris Style Shoe 

Twin Falls. 

ILLINOIS: MARSHALL FIELD & CO 

Chicago; Lynn & Scruggs, Decatur. 

IOWA: White's Dress Shop, Boone. 

KANSAS: Stevenson's, Manhattan. 

MISSOURI: Virgil Francis, Jefferson. 

NEBRASKA: Herzberg's, Omaha; Bei 

& Beryl, Scottsbluff. 

NEW MEXICO: R & R Dress Shop 

Gallup; Irma's, Santa Fe. 

OKLAHOMA: Brown Dunkin, Tulsa 

OREGON: Tioga, Coos Bay; Had 

ley's, Eugene; C. C. Anderson, On 

tario; Simon's Ready To Wear, Ore 

gon City. 

SOUTH DAKOTA: Fred's, Aberdeen 

TEXAS: Philipson's, Dallas; Byrd's 

Houston. 

UTAH: The Nadine, Ogden; Lewi: 

Ladies, Provo; Salt Lake Knit, Sal 

Lake City. 

WASHINGTON: Pink Cameo Shop 

Kennewick; L. J. Rundstrom, Yakima 

WYOMING: Stuart Shop, Casper 

The Hollywood, Cheyenne. 



50 



THE CALIFORNIAN, February, 1950 






***** 








ffijtnAtitedf 




100% NYLON PLISSE — in 10 attractive colors, including 

lovely pastels. Sizes 10-18. 

Exquisitely styled — Selected for preview by Palm Springs Fashion 

Fiesta. 

about $35 at better stores everywhere 



For store nearest you write 




719 SOUTH LOS ANGELES STREET, LOS ANGELES 14, CALIF. 




Softly shirred princess panel suit with plunging 

Talon-zippered front— styled in California. 
For him: Hawaiian fish print Cabana set. 



FOR NAME OF NEAREST STORE, WRITE CATALINA. INC. • DEPT. 605 • LOS ANGELES 13, CALIFOR 



A MAGAZINE STYLED FOR COLORFUL LIVING 



& 







A 



PRICE 35 CENTS 



MARCH, 1950 




A^La. \wu-Jl-- Cocoes*, \\cu^.Ji.- g*w (svoldQ ^a£.<$. -Wfe.< 




^ 



* • 



if the right fabric is stylishly cut, colorfully contrasted and embroidered and skillfull) 



lored with expansion features, Cohama's "Featherlin" is the right fabric ... a lightweight, crease- 



dstant linen weave rayon, completely washable (no special washing required!) and even the embroidery 



guaranteed washable ! Sizes 8 to 20 in White, Coral Sea, Julep, Seaspray, Club Grey, Skipper and Cornsilk. 



PEARL-ART, STORKWISE & COHAMA 




mMO/teGa/fr 




Fast Fade Proof 



Light Weight 



Seam Tested 



mtrolled Shrinkage 




COHAMA 




tea 



DIVISION OF UNITED MERCHANTS & MANUFACTURERS, INC 




\~ - '' . - -- 4 

/ 



860 S. LOS ANGELES STREET LOS ANGELES 




wears our jewel neckline blouse 
...greatest success of the season 



It's a love story for spring ... a love of a blouse 
in the most coveted 100-denier rayon crepe 
softly printed with an idyllic scene . . . "Colonial 
Garden." This is the blouse that goes under 
your softest most feminine suit... it's a blouse 
you'll wear gladly as the better half of a skirt- 
costume ... you'll even find it adaptable for 
playtime ensembles. Start off your vacation 
wardrobe with a blouse-basic like this, and 
you're off for your prettiest season ! 



In blue, green, brown, grey, red backgrounds 

Short sleeve, about $4.95 
Long sleeve, about $6.95 




w 



orld-famous 




FF 



iliffo 



californiawear 



1240 SO. MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 



VOL. 9 
No. 2 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly except July and December, by The Californian, Inc., at 1020 S. Main St., Los Angeles IS, Calif., MARCH 

printed in U.S.A. Yearly subscription price $3.00. Entered as second class matter January 23, 1946, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, Calif., 

under the act of March 3, 1S79. 19 5 




As Welcome as the First Robin 

MANUEL FELLX'S CHARMING BLOUSE and its companion skirt 
heralds the spring. In Lonsdale's pima type cotton broadcloth . . . colors to 
rival the early season's flowers — red, yellow, pink, rose, lilac, kelly, white, 
brown and navy. Blouse $5.95 Skirt $8.95 

Mail Orders filled by 
NANCY'S, 6340 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 



d 



eauvuu 



illt 




odd: 



THE CAUFORNIAN, MARCH, 1950 



9 
W 

® 






9 



- 

9 
> 




ON THE COVER: 

Bright flash of California color 
. . . deep and light aqua, pink 
and grape, green and lime, 
white and red . . . Birds Eye 
pique separates and a dress 
by Ken Sutherland. 
Beautifully clear and simple 
lines with the focal point of 
interest a California lily flower 
belt. Sizes 10-18. Chemise, 
about SS. Skirt, about $15. 
Dress, about S30. At Bullock's 
Downtown Coordination Shop, 
Los Angeles; Wm. H. Block, 
Indianapolis; Carson, Pirie, 
Scott & Co., Chicago; 
Scruggs-Vandervoort-Barney, 
St. Louis; Carol Antell, Inc., 
l\ew York. 
Frank Stiffler photograph. 




- 
- 



9 



es 

9 
- 

M 
- 

U 

= 
es 

9 



California fashions 

Sheer Magic From California - - 8 

Polka Dot Rage - - 10 

Black Linen, White Pique - 11 

The Sheer's the Thing... 12 

Basic Dress. Trick Collar 14 

Day-To-Date Lines 15 

The Jacket Dress: Fashion News for Spring 16 

Versatile Prints 17 

Sunbeams and Stripes! 18 

Tiny Boleros. Halter Weskits 19 

Low Necklines 20 

And Flaring Skirts... 21 

Separates for the Summer Scene 26 

Quick-Changeables 27 

Pretty Playclothes 29 

Summertime Cottons 30 

Classic Swimsuit 31 

Denim and Diamonds 32 

Ensemble for Summer Sunning 33 

The Indispensable Shortie 38 



EDITOR AND PUBLISHER _J. R. Osherenko 

ASSISTANT PUBLISHER William J. Bowen 

FASHION DIRECTOR Sally Dickason 

FASHION EDITOR Virginia Scallon 

MANAGING EDITOR Helen Ignatius 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Philip Kustner 

MEN'S FASHION EDITOR Malcolm Sleinlauf 

FASHIONS Jacquelin Lary 

ART ...Morris Ovsey 

Jane Albrecht 

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Frank SlifRer 

SHOPPING ROUNDUP Joyce Olsen 

FOOD STYLIST Helen Evans Brown 



California features 

Apple Valley 22 

California Cooks 24 

Great Explorations 34-36 

A Pillow of Flowers 37 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthlv except lulv and December at 1020 South Main 
St., Los Angeles 15, California, PRospect 6651. San Francisco Office. Leonard Joseph, 833 
Market St., Room 705, DOuglas 2-1+72. Subscription price: $3.00 one year; $5.00 two 
years; $7.50 three vears. One dollar additional postage per year outside continental Lnited 
States. 35c per copv. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations. Entered as second class 
matter January 25, 1946, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under act of March, 
1879. Copyright 1950 The Californian. Inc. Printed in I". S. A. Reproduction in whole 
or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 



SHEER MAGIC FROM CALIFORNIA 




t a glance, we sum up the most 
exciting news of California's spring market week, we'd say . . . sheer. 
For this is a season when sheer fabric makes headlines . . . organdies, 
dotted swiss, voile, chiffon and tissue-thin material we love. 
It's a season when sheer over-fashions have set a new rage . . . 
over-blouses, over-jackets, over-skirts, aprons or boleros or redingotes 
that shadow a slim little sheath . . . sheers for playclothes, too! 
And if sheer doesn't apply actually to the fabrics of spring, well it's 
sheeer magic . . . the way convertible, adjustable, reversible fashions have 
taken the spotlight. We have convertible necklines that unfold or unbutton 
clear to the shoulder-tip to give a variety of silhouettes . . . shoulders that may 
be shirred up to shorten a sleeve. There's magic in the sleeveless vogue, 
over-skirts or under-slips that come off to change the mood of a dress. 
The halter weskit, patent leather accents in 

belts or piping . . . ruffles, and ruffles in tiers . . . square dance fancies . . . 
playclothes that range from sturdy little sailor suits to voiles 
and sheer frivolities. Pure magic, too, imported shantungs, fine linens, 
silk organdies, cotton satin, cotton tweed, new textures of pique. 
But the biggest trick of the season . . . coordinates! Mixmatchables are found 
in the glamour category these days ; stores are opening new departments for 
California's after-five switcheroos! 
On the following pages we preview a few for you. 



Premo's new dress, typical of the new season 
because it's dotted swiss, because it's a bolero 

er-up fashion with the new narrow straps on a 

lisole-top dress, open lattice work for emphasis. 

s sheer beauty of a dress in sizes 10-18. J. W. 

ainson's, Los Angeles; Franklin Simon. Atlanta. 




Polka dots . . . kelly, red or blue ... on a great drift of sheer white organdy. Three flounces for a skirt, a very simple, ;| 
very charming bodice. The belt, a fluttering velvet ribbon. By Jeannette Alexander . . . for spring and summertime parties, ij 



10 



il 




One of the prettiest necklines of the season, lace in a pattern of grapes and delicate leaves over pure black linen. Peggy Hunt 
creation in dazzling white Birds Eye pique. About $50. The City of Paris, San Francisco; Emery, Bird, Thayer, Kansas City. 



n 




12 





heers. fragile as butterfly wings and 
as diversely patterned: on these pages, the sheer 
beauty of polka dots, bands of flowers, pale shadow plaid, 
or pure white over a floral print. Left: 
Dark shades of organdy with wide bands of white flowers 
and leaves delicately traced on the full puffed sleeves 
and skirt. By Francine Frocks. Below: Rainbow of 
colors criss-crossing in a shadow plaid . . . iridescent 
silk organdy, with a sash of dark velvet 
around the waist. By Marjorie Michael. 



1 Glazed chintz, with an overdress of fragile white 
organdy, a tight cummerbund, opposite page. And 
polka dots in confetti colors . . . red, royal, or 
green ... on white organdy. A pleated cape, 
pleated underskirt, velvet sash. Both by Emma 
Dcmb, both perfect for any enchanted evening. 








p to the neck in fashion: 



Dorothy Lamour's basic tissue faille dress 
with pique collar that does a dozen tricks . . 
worn primly as you see it, or high to 
frame the face, or removed entirely for a 
two-color impression, red on navy or black! 
Sizes 10-18, 9-17. About $23. At 
Nancy's, Hollywood; Mandel Bros., 
Chicago; Kaufman's, Pittsburgh. 




ay-to-date lines, by Dorothy O'Hara. 



This is the new convertible neckline on a 



rayon linen dress with crisp, sure styling. 



Like a flower, the petal revers open up toward 



evening ... a three-way neckline which 



translates a simple dress from a town-dutiful 



to the gown-beautiful for special occasions! 



Change of accessories, hat to shoes, 



makes the transition complete! 




* 




r 




Max Kopp "Coffee Bean" Tissue Faille 






Max Kopp Faille, Taffeta Blouse, for small women 



The Jacket Dress Is 
Fashion News for Spring 




ake the out-and-out beauty of 



a soft little dress, add the practical charm 



of a cover-up jacket and you have an irresistible 



fashion for social-city-sun wear. Versatility 



is your greatest value today, and the ensemble with 



multiple uses makes good sense of fashion dollars. 



You'll find the vogue of dress-n-jacket 





Nathalie Nicoli combines silk, pleats 



Mancini's Print Dress, Jersey jacket 



throughout the fashion picture . . . from active play 
clothes to barest formal with a tiny jacket to toss 
over shoulders. Here we emphasize prints, show 
the complete change of air they take on with a jacket 
. . . also, basic faille suit-dress with gay blouse. 





un beams and stripes! . . . vertical shadows of 
woven stripes on pastel chambray, 
"that" cover-up jacket to increase its versatility. 
Right, horizontal stripes on another dress-n-coat 
combination. Both from Linsk of California. 



Linsk of California, shadow chambrays 





iny boleros, halter weskits . . . two 
of the most important fashion notes of spring! 
At left, Joy Kingston's cotton tweeds in a 
mix-matchable group of coordinates based on the 
brief bolero, the halter weskit to match 
or contrast (in pique). Sophisticated ombre stripes. 
Below, Dee-On's brightly contrasting bolero 
ensemble in three shades of cotton, a wide wide 
belt to cinch the tiny waistline. 
• Joy Kingston, cotton tweeds 





Dee-On, bolero fashion in cotton 



. 



For The Summer Season . 



Low Necklinesi 







And Flaring; Skirts 



w< 




utterflies. red red butterflies on the wine 



around a full-flared white waffle pique skirt. The bodice 



black linen, fitted over the waist and hips and 



slashed low for pretty shoulders. By 



Georgia Bullock. Below: Tropical print dress by 



Addie Masters, very full skirt to swine wide 



in a walk or dance, very low scoop neckline 



banded in black, very fitted (skintight) waist 




I Two excellent ways to sally forth under the summer sun ... a sundress with camisole top and capacious kangeroo-in- 

' spired pocket . . . and for those who want to tan a bit more, brief -brief shorts and a wonderful absolutely casual shirt 

to wear tucked in or hanging out quite loose and nonconstricting. Cocoa and white Wesley Simpson cotton. By Georgia Kay. 



21 




CALIFORNIA 
COOKS 



Cheese is right 

From morning till night. 



By Helen Evans Brown 



In California we find cheese the most versatile of foods, 
and use it lavishly. The habit of serving cream cheese, for 
breakfast, with hot buttered toast and jelly or preserves, is 
becoming more popular every day, and cottage cheese, with a 
salad, is almost synonymous with lunch around Hollywood 
way. As for dessert, the really smart hostess is eschewing 
fancy sweets and pastries and serving fruit and cheese in the 
Continental manner. 

Californians are particularly proud of their own Jack 
Cheese, originally made in Monterey County, and often called 
Monterey Jack. Until 1912 or so this wonderful cheese was 
little known outside of the region in which it was made, but 
you can't keep a good cheese secret and soon its fame was 
reaching gourmets all over the country. One type of Jack 
cheese, the Teleme, is particularly sought after. Made in the 
Tomales Bay region, it is a square cheese, thinner than its 
rotund brother Jack, and it is softer, almost runny in its prime. 
Then there's Californian Camembert, made mostly in the Peta- 
luma area. It is a cheese that must cause apprehension among 
the cheese makers of France. We make a good cheddar in 
California, too, though we still bow in the direction of Oregon, 
our northern neighbor, on that score. We eat quantities of 
these fine cheeses but it pains me to admit that we also eat 
prodigious amounts of a thing that bears little resemblance to 
cheese — much of it tastes like soap and not a particularly good 
soap at that. One "cheese" I had the misfortune to taste the 
other day was labeled "blend of cheese, cream, non-fat milk, 
solids, vegetable gum, citrate and salt." With all that stuff 
mixed in it would be hard for even the best cheese to retain 
its personality. So, before I go on with this cheese talk, let me 
emphasize that when I say cheese I mean a natural cheese, and 
I won't insist that it be made in California. That "cheese" I 
mentioned above wasn't made in California, but then neither 
is the wonderful cheddar produced in New York State, or the 
fine Swiss type and other cheeses of Wisconsin, or the delect- 
able blue made in Langlois, Oregon. 

Cheese, like wine, is a requisite at a really fine meal, but 
the two have more than that in common: they do wonderful 
things for each other. Drink a glass of red wine next time you 
have a bit of cheese and notice how much better they both 
taste! In France, where they produce quantities of both cheese 
and wine, they are so conscious of this need, one for the other, 
that they have an elaborate yearly wedding ceremony, priest, 
marriage license and all, where they "marry" a bottle of wine 
to a piece of cheese. The guests are probably mostly pub- 
licists, but why not? 

Hollywood does not have the corner on the cheesecake 
market, rumor notwithstanding. They do, however, make it 
with considerable skill. 

HOLLYWOOD CHEESE CAKE 
Make a crumb crust by mixing one and a quarter cups 
of zwieback crumbs with one-third cup of melted butter. Sea- 
son with a little ground cinnamon if you wish. Grease the 
sides and bottom of a pie pan with cold, not melted butter, 
and press the mixture in it, as a crust. Chill while making 



22 



the filling. Beat three eggs very light, add a half cup of sugar, 
a pound of cream cheese, a half cup of rich milk or half-and- 
half, a quarter of a teaspoon of salt, a half teaspoon of vanilla 
or lemon juice and, if you wish, a dash of cinnamon. Pour 
into the chilled shell and bake at 350 degrees for thirty min- 
utes. Cool, sprinkle the top with grated almonds, and spread 
with one and a half cups of sour cream that has been mixed 
with three tablespoons of sugar, a pinch of salt and a half 
teaspoon of vanilla which have been beaten together. Return 
to the oven, now set at 425 degrees, and bake for ten minutes. 
Serve cold. 

Another legend about Hollywood is that there is a cheese- 
burger stand on every corner — weird and strangely shaped 
buildings catering to weird and wonderful people . . . But we 
do know how to make a very good cheeseburger! Season lean 
ground beef with salt and fresh ground pepper and with a 
touch of scraped onion if you want it specially good. Handle 
it tenderly and pat it into cakes. Cook it on one side in shorten- 
ing. (There's no doubt that butter will give it an extra nice 
flavor.) then turn it and put a generously thick slice of good 
cheddar or brick cheese on top. Continue cooking until the 
cheese is melted, then put between halves of toasted and but- 
tered buns. Another version, and a remarkably good one, is to 
spread the hamburger with blue cheese that has been creamed 
with butter and then slipped under the broiler to melt. 

Cheese fondue was first made famous by Brillat Savarin 
and it is still made in essentially the same manner. Classically, 
it is made with Swiss or Swiss type cheese — the kind with the 
eyes. (Did you know that when a Swiss cheese has no holes 
it is called blind?) This dish is perfect for your chafing dish, 
though it can be made over a low fire in an earthenware cas- 
serole. 

CHEESE FONDUE 

Rub a chafing dish or a casserole well with garlic. Chop 
or grate a pound of Swiss cheese and mix it with three table- 
spoons of flour, a grinding or two of pepper and a little salt. 
Put two cups of dry white wine in the garlic perfumed dish 
and as it begins to heat (Did I say that it was to be put over 
a low flame?) add the cheese, a little at a time. As it melts 
add more, until it is all in. Don't cook too quickly or allow 
the mixture to boil or it will become as tough as "an old 
motor tyre" as one Englishman expressed it. When all is 
smooth add a jigger of brandy or light rum. or the classic 
Kirsch. If you wish, that is. Now set the chafing dish in the 
middle of the table and provide your guests with cubes of sour 
dough French bread and forks. Let each man dip for him- 
self. The bread cube has to be impaled securely on the fork 
so that when it is twisted in the thick salubrious concoction it 
will not slip off and be lost. The art of getting the dribbly 
food to the mouth is a bit of a feat. too. As you have probably 
guessed, this dish is not for formal entertaining, but follow it 
with a good green salad and some fruit and there is a Sunday 
supper at its best. 

A good cheese or Mornay sauce is a necessary part of any 
[cook's repertoire. Here's a simple one. 

CHEESE SAUCE 

Melt a quarter of a cup (half a cube) of butter in the top 

of a double boiler, then stir in a quarter of a cup of flour. 

Cook very slowly for two or three minutes, but don't brown. 

[Now add two (2) cups of milk and cook until thick and 

smooth. This may be done over the direct heat or over the hot 

water in the bottom of the boiler. The first is quicker, the 

jsecond safer. Now add the cheese and stir until smooth and 

thick. (If too thick thin with a little milk.) Season with salt 

jand a speck of cayenne: you should have a gorgeous smooth 

•pot of gold. This is not a Mornay sauce — the difference being 

jthat a Mornay is made with chicken or white stock and cream. 

| 'If you like the idea, and you should, this cheese sauce may be 

I made with wine. Simply substitute white wine or dry sherry 

I for a half cup of the milk. Good. A cheese sauce has dozens 

I 'of uses: Serve it with vegetables, croquettes, fish, with dozens 

of other things. Try, for instance, rolling cooked asparagus 

tips in thin slices of ham. securing with toothpicks and grill- 

[ ;ing in the broiler until brown, then smothering with the sauce. 

1 ,0r make pancakes — thin ones — spread with the sauce, roll. 



spread with more sauce, sprinkle with grated cheese and brown 
under the broiler. These same pancakes may be filled with 
minced chicken that has been mixed with the sauce, or with 
minced tongue or ham. for that matter. A very fine soup may 
be made by diluting the sauce with stock or milk until it's 
thick as you please. A quick potato-cheese soup is made by 
adding a few leftover mashed potatoes to this mixture, and 
whipping smooth. String beans, cauliflower and eggplant are 
particularly suited to a cheese sauce and a poached egg on 
corned beef hash becomes a rare treat when blessed with it. 
Then there's a toasted English muflin topped with a thick slice 
of fried tomato that has been sprinkled with minced green 
pepper and onion, and doused with cheese sauce. This will 
wow the men. 

A cheese souffle is as easy to make as most people think 
it isn't, if you get what I mean. The only ingredient that many 
people forget is a big black whip to snap when any member of 
the family shows signs of being late to table. 

CALIFORNIA CHEESE SOUFFLE 

Melt a quarter of a cup of butter, add a quarter of a cup 
of flour, a teaspoon of salt, a half teaspoon of chili powder and 
a quarter of a teaspoon of oregano, and cook until smooth and 
thick. Now add a half pound of grated cheddar cheese 
and cook until it melts, then pour in the yolks of six eggs 
that have been beaten thick and light. Cool slightly, then 
add the whites of the six eggs which have been beaten 
stiff. Pour into an ungreased baking dish and bake at 300 
degrees for an hour and a quarter. (If you wish it to have that 
high hatted appearance draw the tip of a spoon around it 
about an inch from the edge. This before baking.) 

That cheese is a favorite ingredient for hors d'oeuvre is 
obvious. It is used simply — a cube speared on a toothpick or a 
cheese dunk for potato chips, or it is made into elaborate 
quelquechoses. Usually the simpler the presentation, the better, 
though there are some hot cheese tidbits that are always popu- 
lar. "Toasted cheese hath no master" is an old saw. but still 
true. A version of toasted cheese, popular in California, is 
the cheese puff. 

CHEESE PUFFS 

Mix a cup of grated cheddar cheese — a well-aged one. 
please — with 3 egg whites beaten stiff, Yi teaspoon of baking 
powder, ditto of salt, and a dash of cayenne. Toast rounds 
or squares of bread on one side. Put the mixture on the other 
side in generous amounts and put under the broiler, turned 
low, until the cheese is puffy and brown. This may be varied 
by putting numerous other things on the half-toasted bread 
before adding the cheese. A slice of dill pickle, for instance, 
or a piece of cooked bacon, or a spreading of deviled ham. 
Think up your own touches. 

Here's another hors d'oeuvre that is easy to make, and 
very, very good. Like the dough for refrigerator cookies, it 
may be kept for weeks in the refrigerator; for months in the 
freezer. 

SPICED CHEESE SHORT BREADS 

Mix a quarter of a pound of butter with a cup of flour 
and a half pound of soft sharp cheddar cheese. Season with 
14 teaspoon of salt and a teaspoonful of chili powder, and 
form into rolls as big around as a broomstick. Wrap in alu- 
minum foil and chill. When ready to use, slice thin and bake 
at 350° until lightly browned. Tbese don't stay around long, 
I warn you, so make plenty. 

Chances are that when you order something from a menu 
that is designated "au gratin" that it will mean with cheese, 
but 'taint necessarily so. Au gratin means with a browned 
crust on top — it may be just plain bread crumbs. Anyway, to 
sprinkle a casserole with grated cheese as well as with bread 
crumbs, is a very fine idea, as is the passing of grated cheese 
with soup. Cubes of cheese, any kind, are a happy addition to 
the so-called "chefs salad" so popular in California. Grated 
cheese added to pie crust or to biscuit dough, or cubed cheese 
added to muflin batter are good ideas, and a yeast cheese 
bread, with cheese added, is a present rage. And so it goes, 
in California. We use every type of cheese, in every way, at 
every meal, and we love them all. 



23 




A 



pple Valley is a man-planned paradise just 93 miles 
northeast of Los Angeles, a year 'round desert resort with un- 
cluttered horizon, clear pure air, and a program of zestful 
living to challenge your fondest dreams. 

Once called Happy Valley by its Indian inhabitants, this pro- 
tected expanse of land encouraged even hostile tribes to live 
peacefully as they enjoyed the curative powers which they be- 
lieved came from the rays of the sun and the waters of Deep 
Creek. Wise old medicine men and tribal chiefs held pow-wows 
and guided their people in healthful living long before the advent 
of the white man. 

Then into the desert rode explorer and prospector, settler and 
priest intent on finding the gateway through the San Bernardino 
mountains and into the coastal area beyond. Kit Carson was 
one of the first scouts to accompany a wagon train into the 
valley on the long trek to the west coast. 

So intent were these people on finding the last frontier, 
the Pacific, that they did not recognize the possibilities of this 
land marked by the merging of the Santa Fe Trail with the 
Mormon, the Mojave and the famous old Spanish Trails of yore. 

Then gold prospectors raised clouds of dust along the old 
government trails a hundred years ago; mines sprouted out of 
the gilded sands. The nearby gold town of Holcome easily 
might have become the county seat except for two votes which 
gave the title to San Bernardino. Holcome, in time, became 
a ghost town. 

Not so Apple Valley. 

It wasn't until 1946 that men had the foresight to recognize 
that this sun-blessed valley provided the perfect setting for a 
year-round playground, a residential community for the discrim- 
inating. Then Newton T. Bass and B. J. Westlund, realizing 
man's increasing need to get back to a simpler mode of life, 
took first steps toward building a whole Village according to a 
plan of efficiency and beauty. 

Today, forty-five miles of streets lie like black ribbons across 
its 22,000 acres; approximately 300 brick and adobe houses 
have been built; a "secondary" business section already serves 
the shopping needs of the community . . . there is a public school, 
library, airport with 5000-foot runways, 70 miles of bridle 
trails, a 9-hole green golf course and a million dollar dude 
ranch, the Apple Valley Inn. 

Nor is that all. Early this year construction will start on the 
real shopping center of Apple Valley, with streets radiating 
from this nucleus like spokes from a wagon wheel . . . toward 
the airport at the north, the Inn at the south, the thriving 



Rattling along the road singing "If you knew Sally of 
Apple Valley" . . . desert visitors take a scenic tour. 



Up and away! In western garb, outdoor enthusiasts pile 
on the hay wagon for a few hours of carefree fun. 



1 m 



UjSfStlBJ*. 




The caravan pauses by the pool at Apple Valley Inn, 
Newton Bass "escorting" the gang across desert trails. 




Square dancing is favorite pastime at the Inn and in 
the rollicking little township . . . so partners promenade! 





SHANGRI-LA AT APPLE VALLEY 



Newton T. Bass in western regalia, 
two staff members Apple Valley Inn. 



El Pueblo, secondary shopping cen- 
ter of Apple Valley, boasts ranch 
style buildings, western hospitality 
too! Below, community center being 
built by civic-minded people whose 
names are inscribed in the wall. 





- ■ \ 




r^WITH EVERY PURC 




Picturesque pool at the Inn overlooks the Valley once trod by intrepid explorers. 



community all around. Shortly, a racetrack and rodeo ground 
will take their designated place in the plan of things. 

The Apple Valley Inn circles its own swimming pool, over- 
looks the panoramic sweep of the valley which once was the 
passageway of early settlers who came this way to Cajon Pass, 
only wagon-way through the San Bernardino mountains. Now 
the massive Joshua trees are monuments to their passage, and 
modern construction marks a new era of progress. 

It was at this famous resort that carrier pigeons once were 
used instead of telephones to connect the main building with 
de luxe cottages clustered about it ... an outmoded but effec- 
tive device that amused famous visitors when the Inn was 
opened just about one year ago. 

Square dancing and hay rides are favorite events at Apple 
Valley, while ambitious horsemen find unending challenge to 
ride across the dunes. The modern and western-type homes and 
the fabulous Inn comprise a colorful community for year-round 
living, inviting pleasure-seekers from all over the world. 

Apple Valley was the Shangri-La setting for "Lost Horizon", 
its unbelievable beauty and cloudless skies matching James Hil- 
ton's fictional valley of eternal peace and beauty. 



APPLE VALLEY 
CALIFORNIA 





Separates for the summer scene . . . pique banded with petite point embroidery (San Diego navy splashed with western play- 
land colors). About 813, sundress; 89, weskit, beachcoat; 84 bra, shorts. Koret of California. Mullen & Bluett, Los Angeles. 






26 



The quick change, vital throughout the year, 
becomes an absolute necessity during 
the summertime. And we therefore present 
some of the nicest separates and coordinates 
hereabouts: right, Carole Chris denims. 
About S4. jacket, shorts; $5, slacks; $6, 
loafer jacket. Harris & Frank, Los Angeles. 
Below, Adeline West's ensembles in 
imported pongee and linen, wonderful colors. 
About 811, skirt; 88, shorts; 89, blouse. 
At The Broadway, all stores. 



Ay 




California Separates . . . 
Inseparable From 



rummer oun 



; 



27 



Detted Swiss, cut very nicely for spring and summer . . . full fhred skirt, shirred fitted bodice, tiny puffed sleeves. Around '' 
the low neckline, a band of white dotted swiss. Designed by Cole of California for young ladies off to a picnic or informal dance. 












. r *■ i 







The F. B. Horgan Co. this year takes exception 

to the conventions in playclothes . . . 

in the plaid duo at left, a cuffed bra with a very 

strategically placed halter, a little pleated 

skirt ... in the rayon jersey bloomers 

and halter top, the brief dotted Swiss apron. 

Below: All-around pleated 

skirt, spare sleeveless top, long-sleeved jacket 

(not shown). In pastel Weyner jerseys. Designed 

by Casual Time of California. 




29 



Right: Plaid denim in blue. red. and 
green . . . big pockets on the plain shorts, 
standup collar on the midriff 
blouse. By Normandin. 





Left: For square-dancing, Mexican 
Holiday skirt of Fuller Fabrics 
hand screened unbleached muslin patterned 
in the Tree of Life. Worn with a 
Tamale blouse. And for just plain 
dancing, or tanning, a plaid sundress 
of Bates Woven Gingham, Eton jacket 
in white waffle pique. Both by 
Alice of California. 



The classic swimsuit, notable because of the unclutter, the total lack of trickery . . 
shimmering fabric, sunflash colors to streak through pale seas. By Catalina. 




From California . . . Suncountry Clothes 



3, 





Left, Denim sprinkled with diamonds . . . 
the shorts and bra part of a coordinate set 
by Marty Cobin. This is the newest rage 
from California, destined to glitter 
around the world's resorts! Right, 
Geometric design splashed boldly on cotton . 
swimsuit and beach coat by Modern Aire, 
dramatic ensemble for summer sunning. 




^£g£t 




Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La 
Jolla, one of the world's few institutions 
devoted solely to study of the ocean. 



Dr. N orris Rakestraw, 
Head of Chemistry Dept. 



Dr. Dayton Carritt, Assistant 
Head, Chemical Laboratory Work 



Dr. Claude E. Zo Bell, 

Ocean Bacteriologist at Scripps 




GREAT 



Scripps Institution of Oceanography at La Jolla 



BY LUCILE L. HUNTINGTON 



To explore one of the last great frontiers on the Earth 
today, the University of California has placed a part of its 
campus in a quiet, out of the way place to carry on a little 
known type of research. This part of the university campus 
is the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Explorations are 
in the little understood Pacific Ocean. Daily the ocean's 
strange byways, currents, and canyons are being studied by 
world renowned scientists and their students, and some of 
the ocean's strange inhabitants are brought into laboratories 
for close scrutiny. 

Although elementary instruction is not available at Scripps, 
graduate students are offered opportunities for advanced work 
pertaining to oceanography and its allied fields. So fascinating 
and important is oceanography proving to be that the student 
group has grown until now it numbers fifty-four students — 
among them one woman. 

That the coastal waters off the shore of the Institution be as 
little contaminated as possible by sewage and shipping, it has 
been located in an out of the way place two miles north 
of La Jolla. To get there you take either the "Old Road" 
that leads from La Jolla Junction straight to the cliffs and 
down a precipitous, winding way along the coast, or the 
Torrey Pines Road north out of La Jolla — but don't go into 
Lost Canyon. You dip into a valley at the foot of Mount 
Soledad where the La Jolla Indians once camped, and you 
take a sharp turn towards the ocean that lands you right 
into the campus grounds. 

This once barren location has been turned into a lovely 
garden spot. Snuggled just below the cliffs and beside the 
Pacific Ocean are a few scattered homes, some temporary 
"additions," and the main buildings which consist of Ritter 




34 



EXPLORATIONS 



Studies Currents, Marine Life of Pacific Ocean 



Hall, Scripps Laboratory, the museum and library, and the 
Aquarium. Extending far out into the ocean and on great, 
high piles, is Scripps Pier, where the majority of the sea 
going explorations start. Sometimes you might be fortunate 
enough to see one of the four exploration boats that frequently 
carry scientists hundreds of miles out to study the ocean, 
its bottom, currents, inhabitants, or other changing ways. The 
ships — E. W. Scripps, Horizon, Crest, and Paolina T. — are 
equipped with many amazing gadgets for scientific ocean 
exploration. 

Men who go under the sea with diving gear are fas- 
cinated by under-water life. Once under the water and cau- 
tiously travelling along the bottom they are in a new world. 
A soft, greenish light surrounds them and seems to come from 
nowhere in particular. Beautiful, flower like animals are 
brilliantly colored, and attached to rocks. Little fish bump 
inquisitively into the glass of the diving helmet, and some- 
times beautifully colored coral and rock give the effect of a 
colorful garden. At the first plunge under there are few crea- 
tures to be seen. Everything closes up or runs away to hide. 
Any unknown and moving thing spells danger under the sea 
where "kill or be killed" is the rule. By standing quietly 
and letting the natural movement of the water sway him. the 
diver becomes an accepted part of the under-water world. 
Then sea anemones open up, crabs scurry out of hiding, bril- 
liant little fishes in schools float by, and the under-sea world 
can be observed and even photographed in all its unusual 
and colorful beauty. 

Undersea creatures and plants are most difficult to study. 
To dredge down and bring up specimens can only give slight 
indication of the size and shape of plants and animals below. 



As they come to the top they quickly die, losing color and 
sometimes shape. The Scripps Aquarium does an excellent 
job of keeping certain shallow water specimens on exhibition. 
The keeping alive of most animals from considerable depths 
is difficult, since they must remain under what to them is 
natural pressure or they will distend and sometimes explode. 

Every ocean exploration is the combining of many talents. 
The work divides into four major divisions. Physics of the 
ocean and marine meteorology involve the types of currents 
and their changes, and the interaction between the atmosphere 
and the ocean — "weather changes" to a layman. Chemistry 
comes into play in the study of the sea water, the amount 
of very important plant nutrient salts such as phosphates 
and nitrates it contains. In marine biology a study is made 
of the minute floating plants, phytoplankton, and zooplankton 
composed of tiny animals — for the plankton in the sea forms 
the great grazing pastures of hundreds of animals from sar- 
dines and anchovies to some great whales. Marine bacteriology 
delves into important problems which extend as far afield 
as increasing the flow of oil wells on land. The geologically 
inclined scientist studies the ocean bottom, its topography, 
sediments, and processes of sedimentation. Although when 
listed it would seem that the work divides into four, widely 
separated fields, all combine in casting light on any problem 
in oceanography. An oceanographer must be a thoroughly 
well-rounded scientist in many lines before he can branch 
out into one specialty. 

Because of the unusual and thorough scientific knowledge 
required for sea exploration. Scripps Institution of Ocean- 
ography was begun as a marine biological association in 1891, 

(Continued on page 36) 




Left to right: A diver pre- 
pares to go down under for 
one of Scripps' experiments. 
The "E. W. Scripps" used by 
institution for deep sea ex- 
ploration. A group of bac- 
teriologists and biologists 
sort a seine haul of seaweed 
and tiny fish. Dr. Carl L. 
Hubbs. famous Ichthyolo- 
gist ; Sam Hinton, Curator of 
Scripps' Museum; George 
T. W ernham, amateur fish 
collector who found rare 
blue sea perch. 



35 



GREAT EXPLORATIONS 

(Continued from Page 34) 

under the direction of Dr. W. E. Ritter. Much collection of 
specimens was conducted in the regions of San Francisco Bay 
and up and down the coast, north to Alaska and south to 
San Diego. This showed that San Pedro was a favorable 
location for marine investigation. A temporary seaside labora- 
tory was placed there. In 1903 better accommodations were 
found at Coronado because a local organization was formed 
to make a biological and hydrographic survey of the waters 
adjacent to the coast of southern California. Under the leader- 
ship of Dr. Fred Baker of San Diego, one thousand dollars 
was raised for erecting a laboratory in La Jolla. A 170-acre 
"pueblo" was selected two miles north of La Jolla as the most 
satisfactory place for the work involving the sea, weather, and 
an abundance of uncontaminated water. Here, in 1910, with 
the aid of Miss Ellen B. Scripps and Mr. E. W. Scripps (who 
furnished the entire financial support from 1905 to 1912) the 
work was established and housed. Serious research began 
immediately in its first permanent building. George H. Scripps 
Memorial Laboratory. In 1912 the local organization was 
turned over to the University of California and the name 
changed. 

In the Aquarium the visitor may see fascinating creatures — 
several types of fish, some brilliantly colored, a small octapus 
or two. sharks that look like sea roaming ghouls, shark's eggs, 
star fish, a big. parrot-beaked turtle. Across the road, in the 
museum are "pickled" specimens of various kinds, explanations 
of the ocean bottoms, and numerous interesting, dry-land 
exhibits. Both the Aquarium and the museum exhibits are 
changed from time to time by the curator, Sam Hinton, whose 
office-laboratory is in the basement below the museum. 

At the foot of the stairs leading down to Sam Hinton's 
sanctuary one may hear at times a strange rattle from boxes 
standing about, very similiar to the rattle of the rattlesnake. 
For that matter it is the rattle of rattlesnakes. These small 
rattlers have been picked up on the grounds, and are proudly 
exhibited by Mr. Hinton as part of the amazing plant and 
animal collection with which he surrounds himself. He is also 
an expert on birds, and frequently is called upon to identify 
some unfamiliar bird seen in the region. Between preparing 
American folklore song programs, which he sings over radio 
station KCBQ. and making water color sketches of interesting 
ocean creatures. Sam Hinton also pickles in formaldehyde 
unusual specimens. His office-consulting room-laboratory has 
a strange, mixed odor of chloroform, formaldehyde, the apple 
odor of rattlesnakes, and good strong navy coffee which is 
frequently made and hospitably served to all comers. 

Everybody around San Diego who has an interest in sea 
creatures knows Sam Hinton. Frequently someone trudges 
down to his office with new specimens picked up on the beach. 
One ardent collector of La Jolla. who makes plaster of paris 
models of fish for a hobby, Mr. George T. Wernham, recently 
picked up and brought in a specimen of the rare blue sea 
perch. These fish, according to Dr. Carl L. Hubbs. ichthyolo- 
gist, frequent the region around the North Channel Islands and 
in 1853 were abundant around San Diego, indicating that the 
climate was then somewhat more tropical in San Diego than 
it is at present. 

Recently Dr. Hubbs took a trip to Baja California with 
Errol Flynn, the actor, and the actor's father. Dr. T. Thomp- 
son Flynn, noted zoologist of the University of Belfast, North 
Ireland. They operated from the Flynn yacht. Zaca, and with 
the aid of a helicopter studied and photographed the gray 
whales in a way never before possible. Between December 
1 and February 15 of every year these whales come down 
from the Arctic and to Baja California. On the way they go 
through a series of strange "dances" round and round — for 
what reason nobody knows. In the warm, Mexican lagoons 
the baby whales are born. Since most other species of whales 
give birth to their young in open ocean, this was a rare op- 
portunity to study the mothers and their calves at close range. 
While the scientists carried on their investigations, Errol Flynn 
was producing a motion picture dramatizing exploration of 
the sea which will soon be released to local movie theatres. 



Whales have been important to man for centuries for bone, 
oil, pancreas, and other parts, and the gray whales, which 
are extremely ferocious when attacked, were hunted until 
almost extinct. At present this species is protected by inter- 
national treaty, and the herds are coming back rapidly. The 
scientific studies made of these whales are of great importance 
to all industries dependent upon whale products. 

In the sea, populations of sea creatures are found to be 
entirely different as one goes from place to place. As an 
example, along the California coast are populations of sar- 
dines, and further south into Mexica are an entirely different 
species of sardines. These two kinds do not mix or over- 
lap. At times these valuable food fishes become scarce, and 
then there will be a year showing a bumper crop of sardines. 
Why these conditions exist no one knows. Every year millions 
of sardine eggs are laid by parent fish, for one sardine alone 
will lay about 50,000 eggs at one time. These float about 
sixty to 100 feet below the surface of the ocean and almost 
all are eaten, only one or two living through to reproduction 
age. A "Sardine Research" is now under way headed by Dr. 
Roger Revelle. He is assisted by John Lawrence McHugh 
with cooperation from the United States Fish and Wild Life 
Service, State Fish and Game Commission, and the sardine 
industry at San Francisco, Monterey, San Pedro, and San 
Diego. Upon the Sardine Research findings may very likely 
depend the quality and price of your canned sardines for 
some years to come. 

During the war Scripps scientists cooperated with the United 
States Navy in a way that undoubtedly saved many lives. One 
of the most important services was the getting out of charts 
of ocean currents, which started when Eddie Rickenbacker 
and his crew were downed in the Pacific. For days a search 
for them went on. At that time Dr. Harald U. Sverdrup, 
then of Scripps, estimated, by studying charts of ocean cur- 
rents in the locality where they were downed, the probable 
place where the survivors would be found. His calculations 
proved to be correct. Encouraged by that he prepared wind 
and current charts that could be used by air crews and rescue 
teams. These helped aviators to avoid currents that might 
carry them, when downed, onto enemy shores, and guided 
the flying searchers to the floating men. As ocean streams 
are constantly changing, because of the changes in wind, 
temperature, density, and the motion of the Earth, only very 
exact knowledge of all factors made possible accurate predic- 
tions. In 1943, when charts were finally completed, the air 
corps distributed copies on silk to all aviators flying over the 
Pacific. 

An early test of the value of the charts came when an Army 
pilot flying over the Jap-held island of Pagan in the Marianas 
was forced to "ditch". A life raft was dropped to him 
and his fellow fliers watched him until dark. Then Lt. Bill 
Troutman, a former student of Dr. Sverdrup, was given his 
location, and by consulting the new charts he predicted where 
the pilot could be found next morning. The pilot was found 
within five miles of the spot designated. Lt. Troutman could 
not figure how he had missed by even five miles until it was 
learned that the downed aviator, daringly inquisitive about 
the Japanese, had rowed to shore in the dark, roamed about 
the Japanese emplacements, and then rowed out to sea. 

When the Allies gained their first hold on Europe by the 
invasion of Sicily, a gale swept over the troop ships while 
on their way to the invasion. Aerologist R. C. Steere urged 
against postponing the invasion, and for a while was the only 
man against hundreds of seasick soldiers who wanted to stay 
on their course. He predicted there would be a moderate wind 
and surf at H-hour — and he proved correct. 

Accurate weather predictions are of great importance in 
peace time as well as war. Dr. Dale Leipper, Oceanographer 
in the Marine Life Research program, is now investigating 
fogs and the weather. As seventy percent of the Earth's sur- 
face is water, the oceans cause the weather over land, and 
knowledge of ocean currents is vital in weather research. By 

(Continued on Page 42) 



36 



J A PILLOW OF GREEN FOLIAGE 


' jfclfe: 












BY LAURA E. McVAY 



If it were suggested that you select a "pillow" for an 
arrangement of flowers, you might have to ask a few 
questions. This is the term used for a tall, rectangular 
shaped container with rather a narrow mouth. Flowers 
or foliage can look dejected when crowded into this stiff 
vase, but with a few props and a little imagination, you 
will soon find it pleasant to use. Flowers can be devel- 
oped into graceful lines, and foliage be made to take on 
character. Because foliage is always available we have 
selected it for our illustration. 

Pittosporum or mock orange is one of our most com- 
mon shrubs. Because it has become so familiar we fail 
to see the graceful curves of its stems and the beauty of 
its rosettes. 

If we are to follow the lines of the illustration we must 
select the curves as we are cutting. Visualize the height 
of the longest stem you will need. (One and a half times 
the height of the container — sometimes a little more), 
and find one with a graceful curve. If you will look with 
a discriminating eye, you will experience great satisfac- 
tion when you have found just the right line. The only 
other piece which should be selected from the bush be- 
fore cutting is one which will take the opposite curve 
downward. These will become your primary and sec- 
ondary lines, and the filling in will not be difficult. 

Use a pin frog to help hold the longest stem in place. 
Another prop you will find most useful is called a flower 
wedge. This can be found in some stores but you can 
easily make one from a cutting from any bush. It is a 
wedge or a sling-shot crutch piece which can be cut to 
hold a stem just where you want it to stay. Using this 
wedge, it is interesting to keep the flowers all to one side 
of a pillow container. Often these pillows are clear glass 
and the stems are very conspicuous. If the flowers are 
kept to one side, the stems do not form an unpleasant 
network in the water but leave at least a portion of the 
clear glass and water to form a part of the picture. 

With a little practice you will enjoy using a pillow 
with sprays of flowering fruit trees. A dark blue pillow 
with graceful sprays of pink peach will lend charm to 
any room. 



37 





:..' ''... , 



Sport-Lane's indispensable fleece shortie in luscious pastels. About $17. J. L. Hudson, Detroit; The Broadway, Los Angeles. 



38 



ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 

\3ifts in the 
\jalifornia manner. 




CALIFORNIA CLUTTER BOXES: Exquisite hond-painted 
California ceramic dresser boxes to hold your every 
accessory. Seven different ones bear whimsical illustra- 
tions and these hand- lettered names on lids: Bobby 
Pins; Needles 'n Pins; Safety Pins; Odds 'n Ends; Look 
in Here; Buttons 'n Bows; Button Box. Box measures 
3V2" across x 2" deep. $1 .25 each, postpaid. 




MEASURING SPOONS: Here's a colorful, decorative 
touch for your kitchen . . . and useful, too. Four 
plastic measuring spoons that fit in a floral arrangement 
with this bright ceramic flowerpot. Gadgets like this 
make housekeping twice the fun. $1.50, postpaid. 




TIMOTHY TIMER: Turn this cute ceramic character upside 
down — and his impish face turns red in exactly 1 Vj 
minutes. He'll time your cooking, phone calls, teeth 
brushing chores, etc. Measures 3V2 inches high; white, 
blue and brown combination. $1.25, postpaid. 
No C.O.D., please. Send check, cash or money order. 
(Residents of California, please add 3% sales fax.} 



Send for illustrated catalog of 
other delightful California gift 




TEE CORRAL SEOF 



FANCMO SANTA FE • CALIFORNIA 



WHAT TO DO 
IN CALIFORNIA 
IN MARCH . . . 

In the city and in the country ... in 
March in California . . . the flowers and 
blossoms are magnificent. In March, ap- 
proximately 1,000 acres of almond and 
cherry trees bloom near the towns of 
Beaumont and Banning beneath the 
snow-capped two-mile high mountains 
of Son Gorgonio Pass. March is also 
wildflower time with purple, yellow and 
pink blossoms carpeting the fields and 
the desert sand. In late March and 
April, the orange trees blossom and the 
air is filled with the perfume of the 
waxy white blossoms. 

From March 9-12 is the Camelia Fes- 
tival in Temple City, near Los Angeles. 
The pink, white and yellow camelias 
are displayed in store windows and in 
many private gardens. Highlight of the 
festival is a parade of children's minia- 
ture floats festooned with camelia 
blooms. 

March 25-26 are the dates of the San 
Diego County Orchid Show. In the dry 
subtropical climate of this area, the 
blooms flourish out-of-doors, and many 
choice blooms are displayed in the city's 
Balboa Park. 

During late March is the Peach Blos- 
som Festival in Arcadia, near Pasadena. 
The fiesta includes a parade of chil- 
dren's bikes, decorated like floats, a 
"sheriff's posse," and old cars and horse- 
drawn rigs. The theme of the festival 
this year is "Gay '90's." 

During late March and early April 
the Wistaria Festival is held in the ar- 
tists' colony of Sierra Madre near Pasa- 
dena. The world's largest wistaria vine, 
a 40,000 foot giant, bursts into lavender 
bloom and flowers as well as artists' dis- 
plays are exhibited beneath the blos- 
soms. Fifty years ago the vine was plant- 
ed from a gallon can and its rapid 
growth is considered nothing short of 
phenomenal. Sierra Madre is located 
beneath the mile-high San Gabriel 
Mountains, a beautiful background for 
the world's oldest Wistaria Vine. 



ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 

[Jifts in the 
\jalifornia manner. 




EGG CUP: "For a good egg" reads one side of this 
cheery California ceramic egg cup. Green, black, red 
and brown colors. 4" high. Two different size cups on 
top and bottom. $1 .50, postpaid. 




CHINESE SPRINKLE BOY: Cute California ceramic sprin- 
kle boy to make short work of sprinkling clothes. 
Stands 8V2 inches high. White, black ond blue trim. 
$1 .95, postpaid. 




PUPPET TOOTHBRUSH HOLDER: What tot won't brush 
his teeth each day with this cute holder for his brush. 
California ceramic, and measures 9 inches high. Blue, 
white and brown color combination. Attractively gift 
boxed. $1.25, postpaid. 



No C.O.D., please. Send check, cash or money order. 
(Residents of California, please add 3% sales tax.) 




Send for illustrated catalog of 
other delightful California gift 
items. 



TEE CORRAL SBOP 



■ OX 919 I KANCHO SANTA FE • CAUFOtNIA 



THE CALIFORNIAN, MARCH, 1950 



39 



"GAY NINETIES" Hostess Gift.. 







"Gay Nineties" mood carried out in original Claytoon illustrations in 
durable, glazed place mats. Bright, gay-colored photographs of minia- 
ture clay models and stage sets. Water and alcohol resistant. Protect 
table finishes while adding merriment to your place setting. Size 
10" x 16". Set of 6, only $2.00. 

BELOW . . . matching Party Mat package, six Claytoon pictures on 
miniature mats. Perfect for the card table, tray ... or for wall 
decorations. Size 5" x 8". Perfect for Hostess or Anniversary 
Gift. 6 for $1.00. 




ABOVE . . . Flower Coasters from California . . . vivid jonquils and vel- 
vet-y gardenias on a green ground. Durable, glazed mats to pro- 
tect table surfaces, pretty-fy a table. Size 3V4" square. 8 for $1.00. 



MARGORITA SHOP 

PRospect 6651 
1018 S. MAIN ST. • LOS ANGELES 15, CALIF. 

Please send me, postage paid, the following: 

Place mats, "Gay Nineties" series — $2.00 

Party mats, "Gay Nineties" series — set of 6, $1.00 

Coasters, "California Flowers" — set of 8, $1.00 

Check for $ is enclosed. 



Nome- 



Address.. 
City 



-Zone State.. 



Great Explorations 

(Continued from page 36) 

throwing into the ocean at various places a number of sealed 
bottles donated by the Owens-Illinois Glass Company, the 
flow of ocean currents were charted. The currents, winds, 
and the water temperature, together with a number of other 
changing factors, form fogs, cloud formations, and account 
for the ever changing weather. To be able to predict ahead of 
time any radical weather change can often save thousands 
of dollars and even, in case of violent storms, many lives. 

Events beneath the surface of the sea are also of importance. 
A deep sea phenomenon that has been detected by sonic 
apparatus is being investigated by Dr. Martin W. Johnson, 
Professor of Marine Biology. Sound beams sent out by this 
kind of apparatus indicates that there is a layer in the water, 
at depths varying from the surface to 1,000 feet, which scatters 
the sound, or reflects part of it in the form of an echo. This 
echo may at times closely resemble the echo from the bottom 
of the sea, and cause the water at that point to appear much 
shallower than it actually is. The layer rises, sometimes to the 
surface, during the hours of darkness, and sinks again in the 
daytime. This habit is shared by most of the countless millions 
of minute sea creatures, and it is probable that this layer con- 
sists of a crowd of them. Exactly what kind of animals they 
are, and their reasons for sticking together in such a compact 
mass remain to be determined. 

Dr. Francis Parker Shepard, in his studies of the ocean 
bottom off the California coast has learned that it contains 
submarine canyons similar to those found on land, and prob- 
ably formed on land when that part of the ocean bottom was 
above the sea. Harbours, frequently built at the head of sub- 
marine canyons, are greatly affected by sand shifting and 
blocking the harbour. Learning just how this is done, and 
how harbours can be protected from such action can be a 
great saving for harbor cities and greatly aid in the move- 
ment of shipping. 

Every now and then, in off shore, undersea explorations, 
Scripps scientists come upon silver bubbles of methane gas 
escaping from the sea bottom, indicating the possibilities of 
rich oil wells to be tapped when an economical method can be 
perfected for working oil wells way out at sea. 

New oil wells are not nearly so interesting to the Scripps 
scientists as are old oil wells, especially those that seem to 
have quit producing oil. Dr. Claude E. Zo Bell, under the 
auspices of the American Petroleum Institute, in 1940, began 
a fascinating study of how tiny bacteria found in the sea 
can be released into seemingly dry oil wells and start the 
flow of oil again. Once this method is perfected it is hoped that 
millions of dollars worth of oil can be captured from oil 
wells that have ceased to produce. 

In Dr. Zo Bell's laboratory are cores of rock taken from 
oil wells that seem absolutely solid and hard. When certain 
types of bacteria are introduced to these rock specimens under 
the right laboratory temperatures and pressures, the bacteria 
pass right through this seemingly impassable rock, and in time 
the oil locked in the rock is released. Different bacteria act 
in different ways according to their specie. Some of the bac- 
teria dissolve the rock encasing the droplets of oil, others 
act to release the oil clinging to tiny hollows in the rock and 
start the oil flowing. The decomposing action makes gas 
which also helps push the oil out. Carbon dioxide produced 
by the breathing of bacteria also tends to dilute oil and make 
it more movable. Various types of bacteria, operating in 
different ways and under certain conditions, bring about a 
flow of oil by unlocking the oil from seemingly dry rock. 

These are but a few of the many important researches being 
carried on by quiet and world-famous scientists in the informal, 
coffee drinking atmosphere of Scripps Institution of Ocean- 
ography. The greatest work still lies ahead, for the oceans 
are wide and deep, and only a very small part of them have 
been explored. Unlimited opportunities for adventure and 
discoveries are awaiting those who dare to take up the chal- 
lenge of Oceanography and explore the unknown oceans. 



40 



THE CALIFORNIAN, MARCH, 1950 



ielen Evans Brown Reviews 

nes In the Sun, by Idwal Jones, Morrow, $3.50 

Anyone interested in California and its early history will 
fascinated by this book whether or not he is interested in 
Jifornia wines. — He will be by the time he has finished 
idin^ it. Mr. Jones has a remarkable memory — his mind 
crammed with all manner of information on all manner 
subjects. It is fortunate for historian and oenophilist alike 
it he chose to write his most recent book about California 
d her wines. The book is a storehouse of anecdotes about 
? pioneers in the wine industry — anecdotes that Idwal Jones 
s heard and remembered. He has heard them, of course, 
cause he has asked for them. He is as good a listener as he 
a raconteur, and there's no doubt, after reading his book, 
at he is a lover of fine wines. 



lie Soup Book, by 

mis de Gouy, Greenberg. 

Master Chef. Louis P. de Gouy. 
ust have spent all his time, not 
ient in the kitchen, at the study 
gastronomy. His latest post- 
lmous book. The Soup Book, 
)t only has recipes for more 
an 800 soups, it gives exacting 
structions for the preparation of 
e various types of soup, their 
irnishes, and accompaniments. 
here are soups of every kind — 
eat. fish, fruit, nut and wine, 
here are consommes and purees, 
lowders and broths. All this and 
tarming gastronomical gossip- 
ig as well. The book is enough 
i make even the most adept quick- 
leal-artist toss out the canopener. 

unt Ella's Cook Book by 
Marguerite Gilbert McCar- 
thy. Little, Brown & Co. 
$2.75. 

This is as charming a cook book 
we have read for some time, 
erhaps because we, too, remem- 
er a country kitchen — our grand- 
lother's. We remember how 
■•onderful everything that came 
rom that wood heated oven 
isted. and how our first love of 
ooking and of eating, was born 
here. Mrs. McCarthy, already fa- 
mous not only as a fabulous Hol- 
ywood hostess, but for her first 
ook book, the tremendously pop- 
lar "The Cook is in the Parlor," 
las not only captured all the 
harm of an old time kitchen. 
>ut has found and modernized 
cores of wonderful country 
ecipes. Just to read about them 
nakes you hungry, to try them 
nakes you give up any such silly 
dea as dieting! Her dishes taste 
ust as good as those remembered 
>nes of Grandmother's, and her 
lescription of life on the farm 
nakes us weep for those who have 
lever experienced it. 



A STYLE SENSATION FOR THE NATIONI 
HAND MADE ORIGINALS BY 
GUILD CRAFT 
FOR SPRING AND SUMMER 

This special priced introductory offer made only 
to the readers of The Californianl For a limited 
lime only with each purchase of our Monogram- 
med Handbag, we offer free of cost, an Umbrella 
Carrying Case. 

HANDBAG, nine inches in diameter and two 
inches wide, has a zippered opening and is 
lined with genuine leather, complete with mirror 
and change purse. 



UMBRELLA 
CARRYING 
CASE hold- 
i n g any 
standard 
size u m - 
brella, folds 
compactly 
when not in 
use, and 
features a 
con ven ient 
shoulder 
strap for 
fash i o n able 
carrying. 

Both bag and case handlaced and mono- 
grammed in your choice of red, green, 
black, blue, or brown. Just $20.00 (plus 
20% federal tax). 

Send color choice and initials to 

GUILD CRAFTSMEN 

887 Woolfolk St. Macon, Georgia 





DAMPENS CLOTHES 
WITHOUT SPRINKLING 

Put clothes in; pour in water. In a few 
hours clothes are evenly dampened ready 
for perfect ironing; stay damp for days. 
Strong vinyl plastic. Won't stain, fade, 
stiffen or crack. Welded seams. Lasts for 
years. 18 by 36 inch. Blue, Green $495 
or Stainless Steel color. Postpaid. X 

Made, Sold and Guaranteed by 

HUMPHREY-CALLANDER, INC. 

618-42 West Adams Street • Clinton, Illinois 



■■-' 



A reproduction of a beautiful Early Ameri- 
can hanging cupboard. Carefully made 
of New England knotty white pine. Fin- 
ished in a mellow honey brown shade of 
old pine, hand rubbed and waxed. 
Shelves grooved for holding displays. 
27" high; 18" wide; 5V2" deep. Price 
$24.75. Shipped express collect. Write 
for illustrations of other quaint pine 
pieces. 

The Old Pine Shop 

Hillsboro, N. H. 



3-Piece 

CONVERTIBLE 
BIKINI 

Hand blocked 
designs on a 
new, exciting, 
washable crepe. 
Wear the 
Bikini for sun- 
ing . . . cover 
It with the 
saucy swing 
skirt for your 
more modest 
moments. 

Individually 
blocked by is- 
land craftsmen 
for your sophis- 
ticated swim- 
ing. Beige only. 
. . . sizes 12-16 
Add 3% sales 
tax in Cali- 
fornia. Sorry, 
no C.O.D.'s. 

We also feature custom made blouses and skirts 
hand blocked to your own specifications. Write 
for information. 

Lynn Logan 

Mainland office 881A 30th Avenue 
San Francisco 21, California 





New Big Catalogue of 
hundreds of exciting, 
useful gifts you've 
never seen before. 
Latest gifts for men, 
women, kiddies, home, 
kitchen, toys, etc. It's 
a great catalog, and 
you'll enjoy thumbing 
through its many 
pages. 



SURPRISING DISCOVERIES 
FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD 
Don't let buying chores frazzle your 
nerves. Buy at home the easy- 
economical BANCROFT way. We 
pay postage. 
Write today for Big Free Catalog 

BANCROFT'S 



MIRAGE 




Patnela Qcuf 

AN ILLUSION IN 

BLACK SHEER 

NYLON 



A mere shadow for 
that modest minimum 
you want under all j 
your casual and for- 1 
mal clothes! Elim- 
inates all waist-lint 
bulk. 

BLACK NYLON I 
SHEER 
Only $2.95 

Include hip measure 
Send check with order 
Sorry, no C.O.D. W. 
prepay 1st class mail 



Pamela Qcuf, 

Box 23-C • Melrose 76, Massachusetts 



Grind Your Own 

COFFEE 

For Flavor and Economy 




Less coffee is required to attain perfect 
flavor when freshly ground. There Is 
only one way to capture true coffee 
flavor — grind immediately before 
using. Adjustable to any grind — avail- 
able in Natural Wood lacquered. Blue 
and Red — 



$5.95 

Postpaid. 



lEagle prnnitttB 



BOX 84A 
MERIDEN, CONN. 




IhSt COLD Ml $l*\ 

gently, quickly. . pleasantly. . 

K f WITH M % 

ONDON'S 



AT VOUR DRUGGISFS SINCE IBS* 



SNIFFLES says to send for a sample at 
3608 Nicollet Ave.. Minneapolis, Ml no. 




Exquisite Tier-Type Chandelier 

Room Size (approx. 14" diam. x 16" depth) 
Scintillating, Imported Czecho-Slovakian Prisms 

Unbelievably yours for $58.50 

matching hall size $35.00 . . . both express collect 

special purchase — one to a customer 

Prompt Shipment — Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Please send check or money order to 

Penthouse Studios 

509 FIFTH AVE. NEW YORK CITY 



YOU'LL LOVE THIS! 





Blouse-Skirt' 
and'Slach Tender 

As new as anything can be 
— keeps your blouse inside 
your skirt. It won't let the 
skirt turn or "walk around" 

— and for sport wear 
(blouses and slacks) it's 
worth its weight in gold. 
Construction is such that 
it does all these things per- 
fectly. You can reach — 
dance — hang by your hands 

— bowl — play golf, etc., 
and your blouse stays put. 



PLUS FEATURES 

Washable — as comfortable to wear as any 
undergarment. Off and on in a jiffy — so 
you can wear with all your outfits. In- 
visible when being worn. Does not create 
heat — improves posture — slenderizes waist- 
line. Don't worry about size — you cut it to 
fit you. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Your money back if not fully satisfied. 

Only $1.50 postpaid -No C.OJVs 

Makes an appreciated and practical gift. 

SHRELL PRODUCTS 

608 So. Deorborn St., Depl. TC-1, 
Chicago 5, III. 




£ * HOLLYWOOD - 

"Seanties" 

HERE is the sheerest thing in smooth, 
comfortable, glamour panties! Made 
of wonderful Nylon Net, with Diamond 
Pattern. Two Bar Tricot that is RUN- 
PROOF. Wash— dry: 15 min. 
BLACK OR NUDE— SEND WAIST MEASURE 

Order 3 pair for only Only A25 
$5.95— Mail Coupon 4l each 

CA 



FASHION-Of-The-MONTH 
6509 De Longpre Avenue 
Hollywood 28, California 

□ Rush pairs of Hollywood "SCANTIES" 

Waist measure Color 

I enclose $ in full payment. 

NAME 

Address 

City Zone State 




m^-~ 




GRANULAR CLEANSER ... a normal, 
gradual, effective "skin peel" at home. Grad- 
ually sluffs old dead cells. This friction 
stimulates circulation, encourages growth of 
new cells. Contains honey, almond and barley 
meal. The pulling effect of the honey while 
scouring loosens blackheads and whiteheads, 
and scrubbing effect removes. Also wonderful 
for hands. 2-ounce jars (federal tax included) 
$1.50; 4-ounce jars, $2.40. Add 3% sales tax 
in Calif., 3%% in Los Angeles .From Derma- 
Culture, 1318 Fourth Avenue, Los Angeles 6, 
California. 



TIDY "T" SHELF . . . just the "lift" your 
bathroom needs for that neat and tidy look. 
A new, attractive hand-decorated shelf with 
two spacious shelves for all your bathroom 
supplies. Plexiglass towel bar affords extra 
utility. Tidy "T", of colorful baked enamel 
and sturdily constructed in metal is 20" wide, 
11" high, 5" deep . . . easily attached to any 
wall. Ideal for nursery, too. Arrow on photo 
indicates complete tissue box dispenser. Just 
$3.49 postpaid (plus 25c West of Mississippi). 
Postage free if prepaid. Send 1st and 2nd 
color choice . . . white, blue, green, yellow, 
maroon, rose, black. Rinda Co., 304 Glen St., 
Dept. C, Brooklyn 8, New York. 



MONOGRAMMED "KANGAROO 
POUCH" . . . Distinctively styled for your 
afternoon or evening wear. Finest 16 oz. all 
wool felt with a beautiful one or two initial 
custom chenille monogram in contrasting color. 
Available in black, navy blue, royal blue, 
red, pearl grey, dark brown, kelly green and 
white. Practical. Useful. Measures 16 in. x 
16 in. with four inch monogram. When order- 
ing, specify color of pouch and initials desired. 
Introductory price $5.95 postpaid, (add 3% 
sales tax in Calif.) Available only through 
MONOGRAMMED PRODUCTS CO., 5445 
Sorrento Dr., Long Beach 3, Calif. 

SERV-ALL ARM CHAIR TRAY . . . 

a useful, inviting item made of a thermo- 
setting plastic material ... a must for the 
perfect hostess . . . equally ideal for sewing. 
So new, novel and appealing . . . the very 
answer to your search for an attractive tray 
that "stays where you put it." Serv-all makes 
the perfect gift for all occasions. Available in 
your choice of three beautiful colors — red, 
ivory, and green. Only $1.95 postpaid (add 
6c tax in California). Sorry, no C.O.D.'s. 
Order from Fred S. Meyer Co., Box 1176, 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 

NEW CHEFSAW MEAT SAVER . . . 

a hundred uses for this hand, all-purpose, 
aluminum kitchen saw. Buy meat at quantity 
prices — cut in kitchen to serving portions 
desired. Hardened steel saw blade severs 
meat bones and joints smoothly and quickly. 
Grooved handle tenderizes tough cuts. Ideal 
in preparing frozen foods. Useful in dressing 
game and fish "on the spot." Cuts steel and 
brass. Regular price, $1.50. Introductory offer 
$1.00 postpaid. Limit two to a customer. 
Extra blades 3 for 40c. No C. 0. D.'s. Money 
back guarantee. The Margorita Shop, 1018 
S. Main, Los Angeles 15, Calif. 



42 



THE CALIFORNIAN, MARCH, 1950 










\ •■ ;- ! .'■'■■'■"-.■.-. ■'.>-■■■.•.■■ ... 



HhHEHH 



:■'■■.'•.■"'''■''-■.■' 



ffi^s^n^^' Mm. 

l - ■■'■'*■'■■.-■.■.■-; ■ 

..:-,♦■..-: -■■■..■■•.-.■■.,:;. -• 



; L J ';V' ;: 

.-..■.-■■■,-•■■. 





jrtt-MAY-a^SO 





MASTERPIECES 



Nylon, plus Nylon-covered Lastex with Talon 

zippered back beautifully molds your figure. 
Styled for action in California. 

For him: Bali Isle tropic Cabana set. 



FOR NAME OF NEAREST STORE, WR , E CATALINA, INC.'DEPT. 607* LOS ANGELES 13, CALIFORN 



A MAUA2IUL S IV L t U I- U K L U L U I F U^^I^WW 







^ 't: 



•N 



Because you know Galey and 
Lord checked gingham is a cool 
summer flatterer . . . 

Because you love the luxurious ladylike 
touch of pure linen collar and cuffs . . . 

Marion McCoy 

designs for you this smart little dress ' 
combining the features you love, with t 
her own particular flair for the 
unusual. . . two flying panels that lend 
swish and grace to your every movement. 

Navy and white or black and white. 

Sizes 9 to 15 

39.95 

College and Career Shop 



m 



.'V. 






\ OF IOWA. 



Des Moines 6 • Sioux City 2 




Skirts as light and graceful as the blossoms that dance upon them . . . 

Fashioned in a romantic mood by Dan Gertsman — California of our own exclusive hand-screened 

air-cooled cotton. Wonderfully washable! In vivacious red or sun yellow tulips. 

Or in heavenly blue or golden yellow begonias. Sizes 10 to 16, about $11. 

At Haggarty's — Los Angeles, Marshall Field & Co. — Chicago, and fine stores everywhere; 

or write: Dan Gertsman — California, 722 S. Los Angeles St., L. A. 14. 



Q 



A*V V^tMStoAtoJ^ CALIFORNIA 



THE CALIFORNIAN, APRIL, 1950 




THE GRAFF GOLFER FOR 1950 



Here is the new look to America's most functional 
fashion. New jogaway neckline, new accordion sleeves 
that open and close with each arm movement. New button- 
closing shirtwaist top for smartness, gripper closing skirt 
for practicality. If your favorite store doesn't have the 
Graff Golfer, write and we'll tell you where to buy it. 
Retails $12.95. 



Graff Calif orniawear 

1240 South Main Street, Los Angeles 15, California 





ON THE COVER: 
Hollywood Premiere's 
Smart Set Wardrobe in 
Toile de Lin, Wesley 
Simpson's crease 
resistant rayon linen, 
a Brighton Fabric. 
Fresh clear summer 
colors . . . lime, navy, 
red, white . . . the 
sweater, white striped 
with red and navy or 
lime and navy. Jacket, 
about $18. Skirt, 
pedal pushers, sweater, 
each about $9. Blouse 
about $11. Shorts, 
about $8. Bullock's 
Coordination Shop, 
Los Angeles. For other 
stores see page 45. 
Photographed by Frank 
Stiffler at Ocean House. 




- 
- 



California fashions 



- 

e 



55 
S 

e 

b 

< 
W 

B 

SS 

© 



CALIFORNIA FASHIONS 6 

PLAYTIME CLOTHES 8 

GARDEN BRIGADE 10 

BIG SPLASH INTO SUMMER 12 

SHEER DELIGHT 14 

CHECKED FOR IMPORTANCE 16 

ALL OUT FOR STRIPES 18 

BIG AND LITTLE SIZES 21 

IT'S STRIPED CHEERSUCKER 22 

PARTY AND PICNIC COTTONS 23 

CHILDREN'S PLAYCLOTHES 24 

PARTY OR GRADUATION DRESSES 26 

DRESSED FOR FUN 27 

NOT MERELY A MINIATURE MIRROR 29 

REFLECTED LIGHT 31 

THE CALIFORNIA LOOK 34 

PRETTY MAIDS ALL IN A ROW 36 



EDITOR AND PUBLISHER J. R. Osherenko 

ASSISTANT PUBLISHER William J. Bowen 

FASHION DIRECTOR Sally Dickoson 

FASHION EDITOR Virginia Scallon 

MANAGING EDITOR Helen Ignatius 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Philip Kustner 

MEN'S FASHION EDITOR Malcolm Steinlauf 

FASHIONS Jacquelin Lary 

ART Morris Ovsey 

Jane Albrecht 

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Frank Stiffier 

SHOPPING ROUNDUP Joyce Olsen 

FOOD STYLIST Helen Evans Brown 



California features 

FLORAL PICTURES WITH DAFFODILS 20 

TOUCH OF GLAMOUR 32 

CALIFORNIA COOKS 38 

CALIFORNIA LIVING 40 

THE WEAVERVILLE WAR 42 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published monthly except July and December at 1020 South Main 
St., Los Angeles 15, California, PRospect 6651. San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph, 833 
Market St., Room 705, DOuglas 2-1472. Subscription price: $3.00 one year; $5.00 two 
vears; $7.50 three years. One dollar additional postage per year outside continental United 
States. 35c per copy. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations. Entered as second class 
matter January 25, 1946, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under act of March, 
1879. Copyright 1950 The Californian, Inc. Printed in U.S.A. Reproduction in whole 
or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 



Mm 



' '* 





♦» 



L-*£ 




,*ȣ^ 




% 
% 



***** 









* J^ 





r-p- 




You might know 
California has ideas 
gardens, and clothes that you 
wear therein! It's true. We've 
reconnoitred and found fash- 
ion originals made to wear . [!> 
while you work, or look as 
pretty as flowers that bloom 
in the spring. Our designers 
take sturdy strong cloth, cut 
it crisp and sure, insert pock- 
ets, add easy-on features 
and make clothes style-worthy 
and practical. Koret of Cali- 
fornia, for instance, gives you 
the denim coat dress, left, 
capacious pockets, a trim and 
outdoorsy look just for fun. 
Opposite page, "Frescos" 
garden skirt with bodice bra, 
in indigo blue denim . . 
pockets big enough to hold 
garden paraphernalia. 



The Koret of California denim ensembles are in sizes 10-18. Coat dress, about $9; pedal pushers, 
about $5; seersucker blouse, about $4. At Mullen & Bluett, Los Angeles; Saks 34th, New York; 
Opposite page: Garden ensemble in sizes 10-20. The skirt, about $7; the bodice bra, about $4. 
Bullock's Wilshire, Los Angeles. 



PICK OF 



THE CROP 



FOR YOUR 



GARDEN 





More fun to work outside when you look like a 

rose yourself! Above, both by W. R. Darling . . . 

"Round the Clock" denim coat introduced 

by Joan Leslie in RKO's "Bed of Roses," 

about $8; "Gardenetta" denims with stepladder 

pockets, about $6 ... at The Broadway, all 

Los Angeles stores; Carson's, Chicago. 

Left, playtimers in Sandeze, clattering colors 

and flattering ease . . . clamdiggers, 

romper suit and brief skirt (not shown). 

Each set about $9 at Younkers, Des Moines. 

Opposite page, Louella Ballerino's pique 

sundress piped in raging red to match 

the luscious watermelon; about $23 

at Bonnie Best, Beverly Hills; 

May Company Wilshire, Los Angeles. 



► 




Garden Brigade, dig-dig-dig ! Ready for work or to supervise the job, this "functional fashion" 

by Taylored Slacks of Hollywood: pants of tattersall checked wool, slim and nicely tapered, left. Sizes 8-20, about $15. 

At Yorkshire, Beverly Hills. Catalina's cashmere cardigan, a bit dudish but delightful! Right, two Franklyn Phillips 

Fashions; linen or flannel pedal pushers that buckle into knickers, "teaser" cotton jersey blouse in gay colors. 

Pedal-knicks, about $8; blouse about $3. At Harris & Frank, North Hollywood. 



10 







**» 




V 



V'6 



//, 







Make Short Work of garden chores . . . and here is where the one-piece playsuit comes into its 
own. This one by Tabak of California in striped and plain madras has nothing to pull out, 
nothing to bind; leaves arms and legs free for active movement, and boasts 
a trim little skirt that transforms it into a dress for shopping or even vacctions. About $1 8. 
Desmond's, Los Angeles. 



Sun Rose slack suit of a linen texture, saddlestitched; 
about $17 or with matching skirt (not shown) about $25 set. 




Gingham plaid "chester" sliced clear to waist, about $5; 
matching bra about $3; twill shorts, about $4 at Bullock's, 
Los Angeles. 



12 




It's a short story and a gay one 



when you consider the brief attire 



for summertime play clothes! 



Left, Joseph Zukin of California 



gives you horizontal stripes in the 



important one-piece playsuit with 



matching skirt, a stripe-tease 



at about $20 the set, at Bullock's, 



Los Angeles; Desmond's, Los 



Angeles. 



Right, Palmdayl cotton twill 



shorts, about $4, 



are topped by cable-printed 





pique blouse with sharp little 



white collar accent; about $3 



at H. C. Capwell, Oakland; 



Scruggs-Vandervoort- 



Barney, Inc., St. Louis. 














De De Johnson scores another fashion-first with all nylon tricot knit, a sheer delight! 



14 




Open Season 
On California 



Color! 



Left: Lil' Alice's summer dresses 
for juniors in D. B. Fuller's 
Pukkersheer . . . the "Sidewalk Cafe" 
in polka-dots, a few as big as 
balloons, and the "Samba Sweetheart" 
in stripes hot as the noon sun. 

■ 

Below: Coordinated group by the 
M. R. Fleischman Co. in Celanese 
Wing Strut. Uncluttered lines, 
wonderful colors . . . Indigo, Glimmer 
Glass, White, Sundew, and Yellow. 




Checked for seasonal importance, left, Agnes Barrett's Salyna dress 



ON THE SQUARE 



of giant squares, about $30; right, Casual Craft of California boucle 



skirt, linen blouse with yoke, about $24 at Rathbun's, No. Hollywood. 



16 




Checked are bold lines of Murray Goldstein's coat dress in Surrah fabric, huge shawl collar; about $30 at May Co., 
Los Angeles; The Broadway, Los Angeles. Right, Ken Sutherland contrasts blocks of sheer nylon with dramatic 
effect; about $30 at better stores. It's your move on the checkerboard of fashion and the strategy is easy! 



17 







STRIPE 




Stripes underscore many a good fashion these days, 

crisp sure lines that give emphasis to a slim silhouette or 

add flair to a skirt. Above.- horizontal panels go all out 

for youth . . . terse little collar standing up primly: 

Linsk of California. 

In sizes 9-15, about $9. Bullock's, Los Angeles. 

Right: Stripes of Cloquadot on dotted Swiss, 
day-n-night favorite by Dale Hunter. Sizes 10-20, 
about $15. Wilson's, Glendale. Opposite page: The 
overblouse and striped skirt by Sport-Lane of California 
are in sizes 10-18, about $10 for the ensemble. 



13 





Full of rhythm, foil of morion . . . this over-blouse and 



skirt of Indianhead cotton are the practical choice 



for summertime. Fashioned by Sport-Lane of California, 



it's a wardrobe basic for daytime wear . . . and it's 



slick-as-a-whistle all fancied up with white gloves, 




CREATE LOVELY 



FLORAL PICTURES 



WITH DAFFODILS 



BY LAURA E. McVAY 




We know Spring has arrived when daffodils or jonquils 
appear in our gardens. Their cup and saucer design, their 
airy erectness, delicate odor and sunny color all contribute 
toward making them a real favorite. 

There are many ways of creating lovely floral pictures 
with daffodils. Perhaps you enjoy daffodils without com- 
bining them with other flowers. If so, you would have an 
opportunity to feature their unusually graceful leaves. Each 
leaf takes a different twist and should play an important part 
in the arrangement. When used alone these flowers can best 
be displayed in a flat container. Place the frog toward the 
back end and to one side so the water becomes a part of 
the picture. Placing the flowers on this one frog creates a 
center of growth or a feeling of natural growth. 

If you have difficulty covering the frog, buy a bag of small 
pebbles or shells and scatter them over the frog. They are 
perfectly clean and may be purchased at any store which 
carries flower arranging materials. If you are fortunate to 
cut daffodils from your garden, make use of a bud for the 
tallest point of the arrangement. 



Sb many other Spring flowers combine beautifully with 
daffodils, one hardly knows which material to select. Even 
a variety of styles of containers lend themselves as a com- 
plement to these appealing flowers. They will look well in a 
flat, soft yellow pottery container, in glass and in copper 
or brass. 

If you live where acacia grows, a few graceful sprays 
will combine nicely with daffodils, adding daintiness and in- 
formality to a rather stiff flower. Instead of acacia, forsythia 
could be used with the same effect. Sprays of white flowering 
fruit trees will lend grace and contrasting color. For the 
illustration we chose sweet scented yellow narcissuses, giving 
them importance by concentrating them in a line up through 
the center of the daffodils. 

If you prefer color contrasts instead of repeating the same 
color, try blue Dutch iris or bronze or reddish-brown tulips. 

Daffodils have an Oriental feel and so a Chinese figurine 
may help you complete an arrangement. You will enjoy com- 
bining fruit, oranges, lemons, and limes with daffodils for a 
luncheon table. Don't let Spring go by without the pleasure 
of just playing with daffodils! 



20 









Fashion goes to pieces, big and little sizes! 

Poplin and cotton print, so gay with ruffles, 

both dresses by Cinema Modes. 



M 



other, daughter and baby doll . . 



all dressed alike in gay striped 
'cheersucker," by Little & Martin. 





c 



cottons that are fun for a picnic or pretty enough for a party: left, sundress in 
border-printed waffle pique, by Little Women. Center, sweetheart dress in em- 
broidered gingham, a heart for a pocket. Right, Trade's "Swiss Miss" plaid that 
comes in mother and daughter sizes. 



CALIFORNIA KNOWS HOW 

from the land of sunshine where kiddies 
play outdoors all year 'round, there's extra 
know-how in designing play togs of spirit! 
Lurrie Pizer's plaid shirt-n-shorts, 
Jolanna's dear little dancer's play set, 
Trade's ya-hoo culotte in fringed denim. 




TO MAKE PRETTY PLAYCLOTHES 

VJhilclren have more fun when they're dressed for the occasion, too . . . 
whether it be teetering like the youngsters in season's cutest sailor suits 
by Juniors Inc., or tittering and gay in Helen Fenton's party-going organdy. 




Foaming white dotted Swiss, delectable party or graduation dresses 
by Jean Durain. Miles of ruffles and lace, a tiny nosegay, floating collar; 
or deceptively demure with soft satin tabs for that California glamour. 










GRADUATE OR 










\ 



V 



^ 




PARTY PET 



Younger sisters catch the dress-up mood, too! Above, left,. California 
Miniatures styles "Bo-peep" finery; right, clotted Swiss laced satin rib- 
bon, by Sunny Togs. Below, getting ready for a party, youngsters 
wear lacey undies by Little Miss Fanci Pants. And stay-at-home feels 
just as happy, all dressed up in striped seersucker gown and shortie 
robe with tiny kitty pocket. By Hollywood Needlecraft. 



r rom the heart of the motion picture country, growing-up fashions 

pretty enough for a starlet . . . prim little sailor dress with extra bib-collar, 
by Johny Lee. Hand-painted cotton skirt with flirtatious blouse in 

desert cloth to match any of its vivid colors. Miss Pat. 





MOTHER AND 

DAUGHTER 

ENSEMBLES 



Hollywood Knitting Mills mother and 
daughter ensembles, variations 
of the jacket-skirt theme. 
The little girl's jumper skirt is 
pleated; the coat has a line 
of glittering gold buttons. The 
mother's skirt is softly flared; the 
jacket has French cuffs and a 
hint-of-a-collar and great dash. 
Ensembles similar only . . . the 
little girl not merely a 
miniature mirror of her mother. 



29 



Little Girls . . 



Little Reflections 



Of Their Mothers 











6 „>* r r 




^ 




Above.- Catalina presents cotton 
swimsuits banded in pique and webbed 
with a catch of lobsters, crabs, and fish, 
/.eft: Nathalie Nicoli's plain cotton 
blouses, cotton skirts drenched with 
the color of giant poppies. The very young 
models are Miss Laurie Graham Stratford 
and Miss Lynn Laraine Stratford, twin 
daughters of Mrs. Lewanna M. Stratford. 



30 




BERYL AND RENE 




Above.- Betty Lou's reflected light . . 



white organdy, iced with cpplique 



'i*- 







reminiscent of snowflakes, over pastel 



or boldbright cotton sundresses. 

Imaginative interpretation of the sheer 

overdress, hit of the season in California. 

Right: Linsk of California ensembles, 

sundresses and little jackets in waffle 

pique sprinkled with tiny stars. 




31 






; xV' ■* . . 





/ 




i 



IRENE 



Keyed to fashion and styled for 
the Metro - Goldwyn - Mayer pro- 
duction "Key to the City," Irene's 
wardrobe for the glamorous Lo- 
retta Young is another masterly in- 
terpretation of both mood and 
glamour. Business-like-yet-alluring 
is the character Miss Young por- 
trays as the successful convention- 
going woman mayor . . . and the 



^J* 



* 



W- 





The soft compliment of lace, filmy and lovely jacket worn with a flowing satin gown 
\ . . Irene dresses the star Loretta Young for an effective at-home sequence in the im- 
portant Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer feature, "Key to the City." 



cleverly coordinated costume suits 
will make every woman yearn for 
a career! The campaigning mayor 
gets votes from all constituents for 
her persuasive fashions, which 
range from the convertible suit to 
evening clothes and at-home 
glamour. Famous as one of the 
best dressed stars of the cinema, 
Miss Young upholds her reputation 
for wardrobe finesse in the en- 
grossing picture "Key to the City." 



32 



)ESIGNS FOR LORETTA YOUNG 




Left, vote-winning cocktail suit of navy 
blue faille combines with dusty pink alix 
jersey blouse. The slim skirt has a great 
swoosh which slips through the slotted 
jacket to give a sophisticated new sil- 
houette. 



Right, Loretta Young settles the polka 
dot issue . . . her brown crepe blouse 
with over-size dots has ascot looped at 
neck and draped diagonally across 
blouse, slipped through buttonholes of 
smooth shantung suit. 



Below, dozens of tiny buttons parade 
the front of Miss Young's green-brown- 
and-beige striped dressing gown which 
is tucked at the waist to give a solid 
band of color, and mitred to give skirt 
interest. 




This is the way we look at spring 

and summer in California . . . 

separates and dresses in everything from chiffon 

to denim, styles to glamorize every figure. 

And nothing short of a carload of color: pale lemon 

and apricot to red, turquoise to royal blue, 

and the most exciting combinations of 

pure black and white seen in many seasons. 

We present on these pages a dozen dresses 

from California, twelve distinctive styles as 

evidence of the versatility of California fashions. 



THE CALIFORNIA LOOK... WONDERFUL 



COLOR AND DECISIVE LINE 



1. Nan Parker, about $30. Nancy's, Hollywood. 

2. Casual Time of California, blouse and skirt, each about 
$10; underskirt, about $6. The Fashion, Houston. 

3. Nathalie Nicoli, about $55. 

4. Stoll, Inc., about $40. Neusteter Co., Denver. 

5. Saba of California, about $11. Bullock's, Los Angeles. 

6. Barbro of California, about $13. Nobby Knit Shop, 
Beverly Hills. 

7. Natalie Jrs. of California, about $11. The J. W. Robin- 
son Co., Los Angeles. 

8. Carl Naftal Originals, about $25. Kerr's, Inc., Oklahoma 
City. 

9. Palm Skirts, Inc., skirt about $5. Roos Bros., Inc., San 
Francisco. Middy Midriff, about $4. Mademoiselle, San 
Francisco. 

10. Dan Gertsman-California, skirt about $9; blouse about 
$6. J. J. Haggarty, Los Angeles. 

11. Graff Californiawear, skirt, about $8; blouse, about $6; 
jacket, about $9. Harris & Frank, North Hollywood. 

12. Ivan-Frederics of California, skirt, about $6; blouse, about 
$5. 



<$» 



1-2-3-4 




5-6-7-8 




9-10-11-12 





4** 

M B 







■■:■:■ ■ ■ ■ , : 



HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW? 




Symbolic of spring, the flowers that bloom on a cotton field! Left, Deauville Models use of reverse prints of a confined print 
by Elza doubles the interest of this simple two-piece dress, about $15 at Haggarty's, Los Angeles; right, Royal Crest printed 
camisole and skirt, bold and beautiful , about $8. These are your resort and summertime favorites . . . California flowers! 



36 



PRETTY MAIDS ALL IN A ROW 




Madalyn Miller's signature print on cotton, a riotous bouquet of flowers swinging full and free, about $13; scoopneck blouse 
with pert shirred sleeves, about $6; both at Bullock's, Los Angeles. Right, Viola Dimmitt's gracious off-shoulder flower 
dress in gaily printed sateen, black or white background; about $25 at Harris Co., San Bernardino; Carson's, Chicago. 



37 



CALIFORNIA 
COOKS 



BY 

HELEN 
EVANS 
BROWN 




"Dinner may be pleasant, 

So may social tea; 
And yet I think that breakfast 

Is best of all the three." 



The person who wrote that cheery little bit preferred to 
remain anonymous, probably to avoid the wrath of early morn- 
ing grumblers. Certainly everyone doesn't like breakfast. Mor- 
ton Shand wasn't kidding when he said that the meal was "an 
appropriate time to choose for disinheriting one's heirs." 
Reginald Hargreave was a bit milder about it when he re- 
marked that "Breakfast is, of course, a time for reticence." 
If breakfast means the first morning cup of coffee, I'll go along 
with the latter statement. If I can manage a reasonable fac- 
simile of a smile before a sip of that sleep-banishing beverage, 
I think the day is well begun. And that cup of coffee, with 
fruit perhaps, and maybe a piece of toast and an egg, is 
breakfast as most of us know it. 

A matutinal meal indulged in on a day when leisure lies 
ahead is something else again. There is nothing more relax- 
ing, more congenial, more fun than a breakfast shared with 
friends. The meal may be as simple as scrambled eggs and 
bacon — providing both are perfectly cooked — or as elaborate 
as a Champagne breakfast with a dozen dishes. The only im- 
portant thing is that it be done in an informal and unpreten- 
tious manner. Don't try to make it, as a book written in the 
early part of the century suggested, "a swell repast for the 
swagger set." 

Californians, with their love of eating outdoors, are apt to 
serve a guest breakfast in the patio or in the garden, but if 
their memories are good, they will provide an alternate 
arrangement indoors. We always act surprised and a bit abused 
when a Spring morning is foggy and chilly, just as if it had 
never happened before. 

These breakasts-to-be-shared should begin with that good 
old cup of coffee — preferably partaken before the guests as- 
semble. Just in case anyone should be so sure of his sweet tem- 
per that he arrives without that eye-opener, do have a big pot 
of it steaming close to the entrance. A huge pitcher of cold 
orange juice is not amiss, either. The hardier souls will go for a 
silver fizz or a glass of Champagne, and many people think 
that a light beer with a late breakfast is a just-about-perfect 
beverage. A Johannisberg Riesling, served cold, is delightful, 
and so is a light wine punch if the party is a large one. 



As in all meals, hot food must be hot, cold food cold. If you 
have a battery of chafing dishes, electric casseroles and bains 
maries, and one of those new electrically heated tables on 
wheels, you are luckier than I, and have little to worry about. 
Even if you have an adequate outdoor grill you are fortunate, 
as many delicious dishes may be grilled over coals of wood or 
charcoal. Broiled fish, for instance, or thick slices of liver, or 
mutton chops are wondrous for that late breakfast. If you have 
none of these appurtenances, you still have a stove and a few 
pots and pans, so the first of these menus will be concocted 
for you. 

Strawberries with sour cream 
Scrambled eggs Sausages in white wine 

Potatoes in cream with walnuts 
Orange rolls or toasted raisin bread Coffee 

The strawberries should be plump ones, with stems and 
leaves intact, if possible. Wash them by floating them, a few 
at a time, in a large bowl filled with water. Swish them around 
a bit, but do it tenderly. (If you use berries that have to be 
hulled, wash them first, then prepare them.) Arrange the 
berries in a circle around a mound of sour cream that has 
been whipped till fluffy. Provide a shaker of powdered sugar 
for those who wish. 

The scrambled eggs. Everyone thinks she can scramble an 
egg, but few can — at least perfectly. I think the trick is to do 
them very, very slowly, and without added milk or cream. 
A chafing dish, with the flame turned low, is a fine way to do it. 
The guests can watch, and nibble at their strawberries or sip 
their fizzes while the rite is being performed. Break the number 
of eggs needed — at least two to a person — in a bowl and mix 
lightly with a fork — just enough to mingle whites and yolks. 
Season with salt and pepper. Put a good big dollop of butter — 
a tablespoon for each two eggs — in skillet, saucepan, or chafing 
dish. When it melts, add the eggs and cook very sloiuly, draw- 
ing your spoon across the entire length of the pan as the egg 
begins to set. This makes long creamv curds. Vigorous stirring 
will produce an entirely different kind of scrambled egg — not 
my kind. Slow and gentle is the entire trick. When the eggs 
are done to your liking, add another dollop of butter and 



38 



serve. Of course there are numerous variations: serve the eggs 
on toast that has been spread with anchovy paste I that's 
"Scotch Woodcock." if you care I. or fold in little curies of 
cheese, or minced parsley and chives, or bits of cooked shrimps 
or mushrooms as the eggs are cooking. Or crumbled crisp 
bacon, or frizzled chipped beef, or tiny croutons may be added 
after the cooking is complete. And on and on . . . They're best 
plain, though. 

The sausages in white ivine. The sausages may be partially 
cooked ahead of time — a good idea if you dwell in a small 
apartment. Buy the best little pork sausages that you can find, 
and brown them slowly on all sides in a skillet. Don't cook 
them so quickly or so thoroughly that they will frizzle to a 
mere nothing. Drain them of their drippings and set aside 
until breakfast time. Now heat, again in a chafing dish, sauce- 
pan or skillet, some -white table wine — about a cup to a pound 
of sausages. w hen the wine is hot. pop in the sausages and 
heat thoroughly. (Save the wine for basting a chicken or a 
pork roast.) 

The potatoes are made by dicing not-too-thoroughly-cooked 
potatoes, preferably baked ones, and browning them in butter 
in which some chopped walnuts have also been cooked. (One 
large potato, a tablespoon of nuts, and two tablespoons of but- 
ter is about right.) ^ hen the potatoes are a delicate gold, add 
a tablespoon of heavy cream and season with salt and a 
little pepper. These may be reheated, but don't let them stand 
around uncovered in an iron skillet — they will turn a horrid 
black. 

The rolls, if you don't want to do your own, are from your 
favorite bakery. Or make these Orange Rolls: 

Scald a half-cup of milk, add four tablespoons of butter, 
three tablespoons of sugar, and ll/o teaspoons of salt. Add a 
half-cup of water, cooling to lukewarm. Now crumble in a 
cake of yeast, and add a beaten egg. Mix well, then stir in 4 
cups of flour, thoroughly mixing once more. Brush the top of 
the dough with oil or melted shortening and chill until ready 
to bake. Roll out on a floured board about 1/3 of an inch 
thick, then spread with orange marmalade (or with 14 pound 
of softened butter that has been mixed with 1 tablespoon of 
grated orange rind and 1 cup of sugar) . Roll as for a jelly 
roll, cut in one-inch slices, and place, cut side down, in well 
greased muffin pans. Allow to rise for about an hour, or until 
double in size, in a warm place without drafts. A warming 
oven, or the regular oven with just the pilot light on, is usually 
right. Or a spot near your water heater. Bake at 375° until 
done — about 20 minutes. 

The coffee. As for the coffee, all I beg is that you make it 
strong. Use twice as much as the average rule calls for, and 
make sure it's freshly ground — fresh roasted, too. Just in case 
it's too strong for some, provide a pitcher of hot water as 
well as cream. 

A more elaborate breakfast, one that would really be party 
fare, is this: 

Fresh pineapple in shell 

Shad or barracuda roe, with bacon Cucumbers 

Mushroom pancake pie 

Shirred eggs with chives 

French bread Panela Strawberry preserves 

This menu will probably start something. There was once a 
belief that the combination of pineapple and fish was as 
deadly as a dose of ant poison, and cucumber for breakfast 
may be too unorthodox for some. If you just can't bear the 
idea, serve grilled or fried tomatoes instead. They too, are 
good with roe. 

Pineapple in shell. Select a pineapple that is ripe; the old 
time way of plucking a leaf from the top has some merit I if 
it plucks easily it's ripe), but I believe in the nose test. If it 
smells wonderfully ripe and fragrant, it is. Cut the top off 
carefully, leaving its beautiful plumage intact. With a long 
sharp narrow knife cut carefully down into the fruit, keeping 
close to the edge, but not so close that you cut through the 
eyes — they should remain with the skin. Now cut out the 
core and. working from both the middle and the sides, try to 
get all the insides of the pineapple out in one piece. Do this 
on a plate so you won't miss any of the precious juices. Now 
cut the fruit in long sticks, sugar them lightlv if the fruit isn't 



overly sweet, and replace them in the shell. Put the top back 
on and keep cool until serving time. This is finger food, but 
provide plates and forks for the fastidious. 

As for the roe. I say shad or barracuda roe. but I have yet 
to taste a fish roe that I don't like. True, I've never tasted that 
of salmon, except in the form of red caviar, but I guess I'd 
like it, too. (It might remind some of you of fish bait.) So 
anyway, use any roe that you can get your hands on, even if 
you've always thought roe was only from a shad. 

Wash roe gently in salt water and pat dry on a cloth or 
paper towel. Brush it well with bacon fat and broil in the 
kitchen broiler or on your outdoor grill. Be sure that the 
fire is hot and take great care in turning — a broiler with 
closely spaced wires is a great help. Serve with wedges of 
lemon, melted butter, and parsley, or with maitre d'hotel butter 
which is butter creamed with lemon juice and minced parsley. 
The bacon may be baked, fried (start it in a cold skillet so it 
won't curl), or grilled over the charcoal. The latter will pro- 
duce plenty of smoke, so do it last. 

The cucumbers are thinly sliced, and dressed with salt and 
pepper. 

Mushroom Pancake Pie. Make your mushroom filling first. 
Clean 2 pounds of fresh mushrooms, but don't peel them. Just 
remove a tiny sliver from the bottom of the stem if it is 
gritty. Chop them rather coarsely with a knife. Melt a quarter- 
pound of butter in a heavy pan, add the mushrooms, and cook 
gently until they have a juicy-all-through look. Sprinkle with 
a teaspoon of salt, a pinch of monosodium glutamate, a grind- 
ing of pepper, and six tablespoons of flour. Cook a couple of 
minutes, then pour on three cups of milk or thin cream (or 
part heavy cream and part chicken stock). Correct seasoning, 
adding tarragon if you like it. When thick and creamy, set 
over hot water until ready to use. Now make your pancakes. 
Big thin ones, the size of a salad plate. Use a mix or do them 
this way: beat 4 egg yolks and combine with 3 cups of milk. 
Sift together 3 cups of flour, 2l/> teaspoons of baking powder, 
a tablespoon of sugar, and li/o teaspoons of salt. Beat this 
with the egg-milk mixture, along with 1/3 cup of melted 
butter, then fold in beaten egg whites. More milk should be 
added if the batter isn't thin enough. (Test a little on your 
griddle to see if the cakes are right. Pour from a pitcher in 
good generous amounts, or better yet. from a half-cup measure 
so that the cakes will be all of a size. As they bubble, turn 
them to brown on the other side. The finished pancakes are 
spread with the hot mushroom mixture and stacked one upon 
the other until all are done. They are cut in wedge-shaped 
pieces, like a pie, for serving. The remaining mushroom sauce 
should be thinned with a little cream and passed separately. 

Shirred eggs with chives. Cream a half-pound of butter with 
a quarter-cup of minced chives. Spread the mixture on the 
bottoms of individual egg "shirrers" or ramekins. Break one 
or two eggs on top. (In this menu I should think one. con- 
sidering the heartiness of the other dishes.) Salt the whites, 
dribble a little more melted butter on top, and bake in 3 
moderate oven until firm as you please — usually about six 
or seven minutes. 

The French bread may seem strange for breakfast, but it's 
really good with the cheese — for that's what panela is, a 
cheese which is molded in a panela, or basket. If there is no 
Mexican market near you, you can make a reasonably good 
substitute by mixing a pound of cream cheese, or sieved 
cottage cheese, with a cup of sour cream and a cup of milk, 
seasoning it with a pinch of salt and a teaspoon of sugar, and 
putting it to drain in a small wicker bread basket that has been 
neatly lined with wet cheese cloth. Let it drain at least over- 
night, then turn out on a plate and decorate with flowers. The 
cheese should show the woven pattern of the basket. 

Perhaps I've sold you on a party breakfast, but I'd rather 
convince you that you should have a good one every day. 
I wish you'd listen when I say that the morning meal is the 
most important of the day, that a third of your daily food 
should be partaken then, and that your health and spirits 
and even your brain, will be better for a good breakfast. 
All this I know well, and I also know that, except for late 
Sunday breakfasts, all I. myself, indulge in is coffee, with 
more coffee on the side. 



39 



THE RANCH HOUSE 



MID-CENTURY 



INTERPRETATION 



FRANK STIFFLER 



BY HELEN IGNATIUS 




The Peterson s ranch house is pale green on 
the outside, pale coral on the inside walls 
curving around the spacious patio and lanai. 



The modern California ranch house designed by Cliff 
May for Mr. and Mrs. Austin Peterson possesses two 
of the most sought-after qualities in this discordant 
atomic age of tense nerves and maddening crowds: serenity 
and privacy. Serenity . . . through fluid lines, subtle colors, 
forceful simplicity in decor. Privacy . . . through a discrim- 
inating use of glass which does away with all confusion or 
combat as to whether a house is a house or a fishbowl. 

Built around a spacious patio on a 165-by-200 foot lot. the 
seven-room house encompasses 2.750 square feet. The com- 
bination concrete and wooden walls facing the street pre- 
vent people on the outside from looking in. The high glass 
panels on the inside of the house facing the patio enable people 
on the inside to look out ... on the completely private patio, 
lanai. and walled-in garden. 

The patio floor . . . which is bordered with tropical plants, 
pink and white primroses, and ferns ... is a checkerboard 
of large squares of concrete banded with narrow strips of wood. 
A lanai at the outer edge of the patio forms the connecting 
link between the garden and the two wings of the house. 
Uncluttered lines and continuity of color in the interior 
of the house create an illusion of great space. The ceilings 
and walls are pale green and the floor is carpeted with pale 
beige wool shag rugs. The predominant green and beige color 
scheme is accented with chocolate brown, coral, and straw 
yellow. The living room, for example, is furnished with a 
massive brown couch, coral and pale green chairs, and bleached 



wood tables. The drapes are patterned in brown, coral and 
yellow leaves. 

Perfectly integrated with the mountainous and heavily 
wooded Brentwood countryside, the Peterson's modern ranch 
house has a brown shingled roof, smoky green walls, and a 
rail fence in unfinished wood. The only brilliant color on the 
entire property is a barrage of yellow and orange marigolds 
planted beneath the great fan-shaped leaves of the tropical 
trees surrounding the house. 

This is Cliff May's interpretation of California living . . . 
ranch house informality, with the rugged ragged edges filed 
down with a modern sweep of color and a modern swing 
of line. 





Above: Series of glass panels form inside wall of living 
room, provide beautiful view of patio, lanai, and garden. 



Left: Directly behind coral bookcases and magazine rack is 
a small projection room with outlet on shelf to the right. 
On opposite side of room, screen drops down from ceiling. 



* ■.-. TZT V? 









.■ . . 



><Jiir T 









Above: The lanai connecting the two wings of the house is painted pale green with lemon yellow posts. Living and dining rooms 
as well as master bedroom, bathroom, and kitchen open out into patio. A full-grown olive tree dominates the center of the area. 



Cliff May's California Ranch House Designed 

For Mr. And Mrs. Austin Peterson : Modern Architectural Magic 

And Old Western Charm 



Below left: The series of shutters which form one-half of the wall separating dining room from kitchen may be opened when 
service-bar is used in entertaining. Center: Pale yellow and blue kitchen has built-in refrigerator, range, thermador oven, 
and dishwasher. Right: The breakfast bar, with an excellent vie.v of the patio, constitutes the outer end of the long sideboard. 



/ 




THE WEAVERVILLE WAR 



When The Code Of Confucius Was Invoked In Weaverville, 



California, A War Of Unexampled Ferocity Broke Out In Five-Cent Gulch 



BY JOHN WELD 






Weaverville, in northern California, now seat of Trinity 
County, in the year 1854 was an up-and-coming community 
of 2,000-odd Christian souls and almost as many heathen 
Chinese. Young as the town was culturally, already some of 
the roughness of the days of '49 had been polished off by the 
civilizing effect of some recently-arrived ladies and by the 
presence of a minister of the Gospel who had come, surpris- 
ingly enough for those days, not to mine for gold but to 
preach the word of God. A church had been built the year 
before with funds raised in the town's saloons, gambling ex- 
changes and fandangos, the last amusement halls where the 
entertainment included music and dancing and the company 
of females as differentiated from ladies. There was even some 
talk that year of building a school, though that may have 
been pure wishfulness. because there probably weren't more 
than half a dozen children of school age in the town. But 
indisputable proof that Weaverville was on its wav to becom- 
ing a respectable community was in the fact that $73 was 
raised in one evening that summer by a lady temperance lec- 
turer, the famous Miss Sarah Pellet. 

However, as good as Weaverville was to become, it had, it 
seemed, first to go on a foray into wickedness which made 
all its previous wickedness seem by comparison to have been 
only the natural, innocent skylarking of mischievous school- 
boys. Weaverville's new wickedness began naturally, but its 
progress was not a consequence of spontaneity, and its climax 
certainly was not innocent. It was called the Chinese War, and 



the deplorable end of that, on July 14, 1854, was a battle 
so bizarre that even though it has been verified time and 
asain it still seems hardly credible. 

The Town Chinese, as differentiated from the Chinese 
miners who lived in a camp out of town, numbered about five 
hundred. They were gamblers, shopkeepers, cooks, servants 
and laundrymen who had given up the uncertainties of gold 
mining for the surer remuneration of their trades. They ran 
the spacious Golden Gale Saloon in which were 17 gambling 
tables: they owned three other gambling saloons, four stores 
and a restaurant, and their newly-built joss-house was far 
more elaborate than the aforementioned Christian church. 

The Chinese miners numbered perhaps 1,500, take or give 
a few. The reason there were so many Chinese in this locality, 
according to Josph Henry Jackson in "Anybody's Gold," was 
because they "were tolerated and treated far better than in 
San Francisco, where there was agitation against them." Per- 
haps the fact that each Chinaman was taxed four dollars per 
month for the privilege of mining may have had something 
to do with the toleration. Jackson points out that a tax 
revenue of eight thousand dollars a month is not to be 
sneezed at. 

Six days a week, from sunup to sundown the Chinese 
miners labored over their long-Toms and sluices, but Saturday 
nights they flocked in to Weaverville to spend thirty-six hours 
drinking and gambling. During these weekly sprees they 
stuck close to their own places of amusement and rarely dis- 



42 



turbed the peace, such as it was; but there were mysterious 
differences between the two groups, differences which appar- 
ently the white men never understood. Some ascribed them 
to politics and sectionalism imported from China; some to 
religion, and some to "six bits worth of gold dust" lost at 
a gaming table. Whatever the cause, evidence of a rift came 
early one Monday morning about the middle of June. The 
(saloon at the tail end of Court Street burned to the ground 
and one of the Chinese miners w ; as found dead in the street. 
A dead Chinese in W eaverville was as unimportant to the 
white men as a live Chinese, but to the Chinese that corpse 
spelled trouble. Confucius taught: "The murderer of your 
father ought not to remain under the sky with you ; you must 
not lay down your arms as long as the murderer of your 
brother lives; and you cannot live in the same kingdom with 
the murderer of your friend." The Code of Confucius, it was 
soon to he learned, was about to be invoked in Weaverville. 

The town faction named themselves the Hongkong Company, 
although some historians have given their organization other 
names. Alexander McLeod. in "Chinese in California," and 
several other writers, called it the Yangwa Company; Isaac 
Cox. in "The Annals of Trinity County." called it the Ah Yous. 
The Chinese Miners named themselves the Canton City Com- 
pany, which however, in "California, a Guide to the Golden 
State" is called the \ oung Wos. 

"The first I knew r of impending war." John Carr, Weaver- 
ville blacksmith of that day. recalled in his book, "Pioneer 
Days in California," "came from one of the Chinese (mining) 
bosses who came into the shop with a pattern similar to the 
iron of a pike pole, and wanted to know how much I would 
charge to make one hundred like the pattern out of steel. I 
told him $1.50 each. He told me to go ahead. About an hour 
later the boss of the Hongkongs came into the shop and asked, 
'How much one hundred?' I told him $1.50. He told me if 
I would quit making them for the Cantons he would give me 
two hundred for his company." 

John Carr says he replied, "All right. John." 

"In a short time," the blacksmith continues in his memoires. 
"the boss of the Cantons made his appearance and told me if 
I would quit the Hongkongs' work he would give me $2.50 and 
I could make three hundred more." 

John Carr says he replied, "All right, John." 

Obviously the barbaric Chinese had learned how to get the 
cooperation of the civilized white man. 

For three weeks, Carr reports, he worked "day and night" 
making Chinese instruments of war. Apparently only the 
Sheriff. William L. Lowe, did not want to see blood shed ; at 
any rate, Carr tells in the same account that the sheriff for- 
bade him making any more weapons for the Chinese, "or de 
livering any I had on hand." 

"I tried to reason with him," Carr says, "but it was 'no go'." 
Finally the blacksmith asked what the penalty would be if he 
disobeyed and the Sheriff told him he would be fined $500. 

"All right, Mr. Lowe," Carr says he replied. "I can afford 
to pay $500 and then come out winner in the game." 

And Carr went on making the weapons; nor was he ever 
fined. 

Some believe the fact the sheriff's salary came from the 







taxes levied upon the Chinese occasioned his pacifism, but 
surely there must have been one amongst the town's popula- 
tion, one God-fearing soul, who, without ulterior motive, 
raised his hand against the impending slaughter. Granted 
those were cockeyed-drunken, lusty, lawless times, there is in 
every man the spark of decency and the urge to promote fair 
play. And yet there is no evidence that anyone else, other 
than the sheriff, not even the preacher, whose name is lost to 
us. tried to stop the war. History is oftentimes so fragmen- 
tary, but the attitude of the white population of Weaverville 
seems to be summed up by an anonymous writer in the Shasta 
Courier who had this to say of the imminent battle: "If the 
Chinese wish to fight among themselves and kill each other, 
the people here are perfectly willing."' 

The mining faction (estimated by eyewitnesses at from 350 
to 500 in number, while the Town Chinese are said to have 
numbered about 150) was for settling the town faction's hash 
as soon as possible, but on the advice of certain Americans 
the engagement was put off for a month to give everyone, and 
especially the white tradesmen, a chance to make preparations. 
Bar owners, gamblers and fandango operators wanted to- 
spread the news that those for miles around might come to 
see and spend their dust. The Chinese wanted to start the battle 
romantically at dawn, but the white men changed that, too, 
making the hour two post meridian, probably on the plea 
that such an early hour was unfair to the spectators. There 
is some hint that promoters might have tried to get the two 
armies to stage the war within an enclosure, with admission 
at so much a head, but nothing came of it. A clearing about 
a mile east of town, known as Five-Cent-Gulch, was selected 
for the field of battle, and a fund was donated for clearing 
it of chaparral and deer bushes. 

During the intervening days both sides, to solicit the sym- 
pathy of the Occidentals, paraded up and down the streets of 
Weaverville in full costume, beating tin pans and brandish- 
ing their arms, and the clashing and shouting, the yelling 
and stomping were din enough to awaken the dead drunk. 
Two distinguishing features made it possible to tell the fac- 
tions apart. The town boys carried white banners inscribed 
ideographically in black HONGKONG COMPANY and the 
miners red banners ideographically inscribed also in black 
CANTON CITY COMPANY, and the town warriors wrapped 
their heads in red cloths while the latter sported sheet-iron 
helmets. Dressed in their short, shank-length trousers and 
weighed with all the weapons they could carry, they must 
have been a colorful and ridiculous spectacle as they executed 
their complicated military routines. 

Despite the efforts of the mining faction to win over popu- 
lar opinion to its side, the sympathies of the townsfolk went 
to the Town Chinese, first because they were better known to 
them. and. second, because their forces were fewer. Even in 
that day evidently Americans were sentimental about under- 
dogs. Firearms were forbidden the Chinese and there is some 
evidence that they did not know how to use them, but both 
sides were loaded with other weapons — spears as long as five 
feet; sabres, daggers and shields, squirt guns (filled with kero- 
sene for the emission of liquid fire), hatchets and hammers. 
Corrugated iron had been sold from the roofs of houses to 
make shields and helmets. 

Because of their deficiency in numbers the Town Chinese 
apparently endeavored unsuccessfully to enlist a number of 
Occidentals to augment their ranks. Their leaders probably 
figured, and quite rightly, too, that one white man at their 
head would go farther toward insuring victory than a battery 
of cannon — not that the white man could fight any better 
than the yellow, but the latter evidently held the theory that 
the opposing side would not dare kill the white man. and in 
avoiding doing so would be fair game. 

On Friday the thirteenth, the day before the appointed time 
of battle, the two armies encamped within sight of each other 
at either end of Five-cent Gulch. And that evening and Satur- 
day morning miners from miles around came flocking to Weav- 
erville to watch the grand spectacle, came bringing with them 
their baritone and tenor throats and their jugs of O-be-joyful. 
The setting might have been a picnic, with the Celestials fur- 

\Continued on page 44) 



43 



THE WEAVERVILLE WAR 



(Continued from Page 43) 
nishing the athletic contest for the occasion. Enterprising 
merchants set up bars and sandwich stands within a stone's 
throw of where the favored red-caps were encamped. There 
were wheels of chance, dice and poker games under almost 
every tree. Wagering was heavy, with the odds favoring the 
small force. It must have been like a bull-and-bear-fight, like 
a camp meeting, like a political convention. Even the women 
and children came out, the mothers doubtless thinking, and 
rightly, the battle would be something their young ones would 
remember all their lives. 

And while the children ran and played and the women 
sewed and gossiped and the men gambled and drank, there 
was great activity in the camps of the two armies. Swords 
were being sharpened, handles wrapped, shield-grips made 
more comfortable, perhaps a few Buddhist prayers said. De- 
tachments of the Canton City Company, their iron helmets 
and tin shields and collection of arms glittering in the mid- 
summer sun, marched up and down and back and forth to 
the shrill commands of their corporals, paced by the clanging 
of gongs and the blowing of sour-sounding horns. With ban- 
ners flying, oriental costumes flapping about their stubby 
legs, their ordinarily bland, ortive faces contorted, they would 
rush forward, uttering blood-curdling yells, their spears low- 
ered to rip out their adversaries' intestines, the while on- 
lookers shouted blasphemous encouragement ; and then, with 
surprising precision, they would halt, drop to their knees, and 
perform such miraculous and spine-chilling gyrations that 
those on the sidelines sometimes were convulsed with that 
laughter which comes out in sobs. 

This terrible demonstration must have weakened the town 
army's determination. And as time for the engagement drew 
near both" sides found their anger diminishing, their ardor 
cooling. Faced with the very real and gut-wrenching prospect 
of killing their brothers or being killed, the two captains 
called a conference with the view of finding a possible peace- 
ful solution to their differences. The powwow was still in 
session when the hour for the battle arrived. Meanwhile the 
spectators grew impatient. Their jugs of whiskey had been 
the rounds many times; the picnic lunches had been consumed; 
and now, with boredom about to descend upon them, the 
Americans set up a howl for action. 

Even at that late hour good man Sheriff Lowe was still 
endeavoring to head off the impending carnage by trying to 
organize a posse. But those he tried to deputize, Carr reports, 
answered him thusly: "Go to hell, Lowe. We came here to 
see a fight and we're going to see one." 

The Chinamen might have recognized in this clamor for 
action the true state of affairs; that their battle now was with 
the white men and not each other. But they had brought the 
idea too far; there was no turning back. The Conference 
was still in progress when a group of the rougher Occidental 
element of Weaverville decided to take matters into its own 
hands. It disbanded the peace conference by giving the leaders 
to understand that either they proceed with the battle at once 
or be run out of Weaverville and the State of California — 
those that could run, that is. 

"Charlie" Yung, leader of the Hongkongs, was a favorite 
with the white men. He was also a good general. In his ac- 
count of the battle Jackson writes: "Charlie had drawn up 
his little army of one hundred and fifty men so that his flank 
was protected on one side by a sharp rise of ground . . . Clearly 
Charlie's other flank was his weakness. It was concerning this 
matter that Charlie made his deal. The agreement was simply 
that, when fighting finally Commenced, his white friends would 
see to it that the spectators crowded in on that side ... It 
happened exactly as Charlie had planned." 

Having arranged his forces, Charlie, urged on by his good 
wishers, seized also the advantage of surprise. Suddenly with 
wild and heinous shouts he and his boys went tearing hell- 
bent across the gulch toward the Cantonese. As one newspaper 
account put it, they charged with "unexampled ferocity." 

The Chinese miners, who had been sitting in three groups, 
(placed for flanking the Town Chinese in the event of attack) 



were caught off-guard and leapt up terrified. There ensued 
a wild scramble to seize their weapons, which lay about them 
in confusion, and to close their ranks; and some of them fled 
the field at once, bent on saving their necks. Others rallied, 
however, and braced themselves against the onslaught. 

The spectators' throats swelled with cheering. To them it 
was all make-believe, like the theatre. The men who fell could 
not be dying; they were merely playing 'possum. The clash 
and clatter of weapons, the whooping and screaming of de- 
fiant and terrified Chinamen, the groans and grunts of the 
struggling, the pitiful wails of the wounded made of the 
whole an unholy uproar. 

The Town Chinese were wonderful, fighting with the rhythm 
of oiled windmills in a hurricane. But what they had feared 
came to pass: the Chinese miners, recovering from their sur- 
prise and the first onslaught, began maneuvers to flank the 
Town Chinese on both sides. And in spite of the white men 
and the gulch bank it began to look as if the smaller army 
would be surrounded and overcome. It was at this juncture 
that certain of the Americans, on the pretext of keeping the 
fight fair, entered the fray. To stay the movements of the 
Cantonese right flank, which was nearest them, the white men 
loosed a barrage of stones at the mining faction and succeeded 
in putting this wing to flight. One drunken onlooker (some 
records refer to him as a Dutchman, others as a Swede. Cox 
says his name was John Malmberg) made the mistake of firing 
into the ranks of the Cantonese. His pistol was still smoking 
when he fell, shot through the head. Nor was there evidence 
he was killed by a Chinaman. After all, bets had been laid 
on both sides. 

McLeod says it was marvelous to see the savagery with 
which the warriors would leap upon a fallen foe and hack 
him into doomsday. So furious was the fight of the Town 
Chinese, so thwarted the hemmed-in Chinese miners, that the 
latter soon were put to rout. And away the last remnant of 
them flew, leaving their weapons and their dead and wounded 
behind. 

The engagement lasted but a few minutes, and when at last 
the fury was spent, the dust had settled, and the yelling had 
died, seven Chinamen, one Red Cap and six Cantonese, lay 
dead and a number of other Chinamen lay wounded, some 
fatally. Smashed shields, broken spears and abandoned swords 
lay strewn over the battlefield. 

The Town Chinese, of course, were jubilant. Theirs was 
the victory, and this in spite of the fact they had been out- 
numbered more than two to one. They ran about waving 
the enemy's captured flag exultantly. The dead and wounded 
were taken to that section of Weaverville occupied by the 
Chinese, and the two American Doctors of the community 
were engaged to patch up the wounded. The funeral proces- 
sion was lengthened by mourners from the ranks of the fan- 
dangos. The one grave was large enough to contain the 
seven pine-board coffins; and at the foot of each rough box 
were placed jars of meat and rice and tea, together with a 
bowl and chopsticks, to feed their departing souls on the way 
to the hereafter. And when the coffins had been covered with 
dirt the white men deigned to give three cheers to the fallen 
heroes, after which the mourning Celestials marched around 
the grave with sprigs of green, that being part of their 
burial ritual. Then the entire assembly repaired to the Hong- 
kong headquarters on Court Street where the victorious China- 
men played hosts at a well-attended wake, serving liquor and 
cigars. 

The Shasta Courier observed in a follow-up editorial that 
the war settled nothing, and in that it was no different than 
larger subsequent wars between nations. "Their (the Chinese) 
differences are no further composed now than they were in the 
beginning," the editorial states. Nevertheless, the trouble died 
and the Chinese remained in and near Weaverville until 1880. 
when, the gold having petered out, they left the town, many 
to return to China. 

Thus was peace restored to Weaverville. And now, with 
this black mark behind it, the town could struggle on up to 
that polite civilization which takes pride in its past. 



44 



J 



ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 

yifts in the 
Xjalifornia manner. 




HURRICANE LAMP: Western-styled in metal. Back fe 
lures silhouette metal cut-out of cowboy twirliri 
copper rope. Very nice for the patio, den, sum me 
house. Measures 8V2 inches high. S3. 50, postpaid. 


1- 

9 

r 










CHINESE SPRINKLE BOY: Cute California ceramic 
sprinkle boy to make short work of sprinkling clothes. 
Stands 8 1 /; inches high. White, black and blue trim. 
$1.95, postpaid. 




GAY BLADE RAZOR BANK: Dad will love this Cali- 
fornia ceramic razor bank. Measures 4 inches high. 
White, with brown hair. $1.25, postpaid. 

No C.O.D., please. Send check, cash or money order. 
(Residents of California, please add 3% sates tax.) 



Send for illustrated catalog of 
other delightful California gift 
items. 




TEE CORRAL SHOP 



• OX 911 I 1ANCHO 5ANTA FE • CHIFOINU 



Where to buy the Hollywood 
Premiere fashions shown 011 
the front cover of this issue: 

ALABAMA: Mobile, L. Hammel Dry 
Goods Co. 

ARIZONA: Phoenix, Diamond's. 

CALIFORNIA: Alhambra, Bragg's; 
Hermosa Beach. Jean's; Huntington 
Park. Tate's; Inglewood, Marbro's; 
Long Beach, Buffums; Los Angeles. 
Bullock's; North Hollywood, Rath- 
bun's ; Oakland, Joseph Magnin Co. ; 
Palo Alto, Joseph Magnin Co.; Pasa- 
dena, F. C. Nash Company; Pomona. 
Orange Belt Emporium; Sacramento. 
Joseph Magnin Co. ; San Bernardino. 
Devenot's; San Diego, The Marston 
Co. ; San Francisco, Joseph Magnin 
Co.: Santa Ana. Rankin's; Santa Bar- 
bara. Jack Rose : San Mateo, Joseph 
Magnin Co.; Stockton. Knobby Shop; 
Whittier. Tibbetts. 

FLORIDA: Jacksonville, Cohen Broth- 
ers; Miami, Hartley's. 

ILLINOIS: Chicago. Carson-Pirie-Scott 
Co.; Marshall Field & Co.: Evanston. 
Marshall Field & Co.: River Forest. 
Marshall Field & Co. 

INDIANA: Indianapolis, Wm. H. Block 
Co. 

KENTUCKY: Lexington. Purcell's. 

LOUISIANA: Baton^Rouge, The Dalton 
Co., Inc. 

MICHIGAN: Detroit. Russeks; Grand 
Rapids. The \^ urzburg Co. 

MINNESOTA: Minneapolis. Jackson- 
Graves; St. Paul. Field-Schlick. Inc. 

MISSISSIPPI: Jackson, R. E. Kenning- 
ton. 

NEVADA : Las Vegas. Ronzones ; Reno. 
Joseph Magnin Co. 

NEW JERSEY: Atlantic City, M. E. 
Blatt Dept. Store. 

OHIO: Akron. M. O'Neil Company; 
Cleveland. Wm. Kitt, Inc.; Salem. 
Strauss - Hirshberg's: Youngstown. 
The G. M. McKelvey Co. 

OKLAHOMA: Oklahoma City. John A. 
Brown Co.; Tulsa. Field's. Inc. 

OREGON: Eugene. Hermanek's; Port- 
land, Olds and King. 

TEXAS: Amarillo. Marizon's; Austin. 
Buttrey's: Corpus Christi, Perkins 
Bros. Co.: Dallas. Sanger Bros.: Fort 
Worth. Stripling's: Houston. Sako- 
witz Bros. 

WASHINGTON: Olympia. Millers: 
Seattle. Rhodes Department Store. 

WISCONSIN: Madison. Harry S. Man- 
chester. Inc. 



CALIFORNIA COOKS 

A collection of articles on cookery 
reprinted from the Californian 
Magazine. A practical and appre- 
ciated gift for bride, for friend and 
for yourself. Send $1.00 for your 
copy today. 
1020 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, Calif. 



LOVEBUG, * 

Pamela Gay 




WHILE NOTHING 




MAY BE NICER 




THAN OUR ULTRA 




BRIEFS THEY DO 




PROVIDE THE 




BAREST ESSENTIAL 




UNDER ALL 




YOUR CLOTHESI 




LOVE BUG 




A French triple sheer 
silk chiffon in black 
with red love bug print. 

$3.95 




Send check with order. 
Sorry, no C.O.D. In- 
clude hip measure. We 
prepay 1st class mail. 


.fcfer 


Pamela Qcuf 

Box 23-C 

Melrose 76 
Massachusetts 




BIG PIK-NIK ICE BOX 

New Dasign means amazingly low-priced port- 
able ice-box. 4 gals, capacity; Fiberglass in- 
sulation keeps food and drinks hot or cold for 
hours. Perfect for picnics, parties, trips, gifts. 

Only $5.95, including separate ice -chamber. 

Sorry, no COD's 

Oasu L.ioiu,G 

BOX 182, MADISON SQ. STA. N.Y.C 




INGRID'S CHARMER 

Your choice of Bright Tulip Colors artistically blended 
in a lovely custom-made design, hand-embroidered on 
white sheer nylon or crepe slat ... to coordinate 
your new spring suit. Adjustable drawstring neckline. 



Sizes 32 to 40 

$1095 



12' 



postpaid 



(tax included) 
No C.O.D.'s No Stomps 



Indicate fabric, size & color preference 
CREPE SLAT □ 32 D 

NYLON SHEER □ 34 Q 

Color combinations or shades: 36 l] 

38 a 

40 □ 

INGRID'S CUSTOM HOUSE 



P.O. Box 81 -C 



Pasadena, Calif. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, APRIL, 1950 



45 



ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 

\}ifts in the 

\jalifornia manner. 



— wtW$ 





SMOKING SET: This exotic Chinese slipper is both a 
cigarette container and an ash tray. In brilliant turquoise 
ceramic, with gold ornamentation. Lovely home acces- 
sory, novel and useful. $5.00, postpaid. 




PUPPET TOOTHBRUSH HOLDER: What tot won't brush 
his teeth each day with this cute holder for his brush. 
California ceramic, and measures 9 inches high. Blue, 
white and brown color combination. Attractively gift 
boxed. $1.25, postpaid. 




DARNING DODO: Gaily colored, California ceramic 
darning egg. Words "Darn it" on bottom. Measures 5 
inches high. $1 .50, postpaid. 

No C.O.D., please. Send check, cash or money order. 
(Residents of California, please add 3% sales tax.) 



Send for illustrated catalog of 
other delightful California gift 
items. 




THE CORRAL SHOP 



EANCMO SANTA FE • CAIIFOINIA 




12 OZ. HIGH-BALL or BEVERAGE 

GLASSES • . . with "Action Shot" decora- 
tions permanently baked in frosty white on 
crystal clear glass . . . heavy base for long- 
lasting beauty and practicality. The gay ten- 
nis, water, golf, and skiing sports designs — 
so different and distinctive — will not rub or 
wash off . . . make ideal drink identifiers. 
Standard packing is two each of four dif- 
ferent designs of one sport (golf and tennis 
designs shown in photo). Set of 8, only $5.00 
postpaid. Sorry, no C.O.D.'s. Abbott Smith, 
31 High St., Dept. Cal., South Dartmouth, 
Mass. 

MOULI GRATER . . . this new rotary grater 3 
is economical — grates every bit, no left-overs; 
sanitary — drum is removable for easy clean- 
ing; safe — can't cut or scratch you; quick — 
crank does the work, no attaching to table- 
tops. Sturdily made of high-grade rustproof 
steel, for left- or right-handed use. Grates 
everything — vegetables, cheese, cocoanut, 
breadcrumbs, crackers, chocolate, nuts, hard- 
boiled eggs, dry soap ends, etc. — coarse or 
fine, as you prefer. This ingenious French 
import, yours for only $1.00 postpaid. Fred 
S. Meyer Co., Box 1176, Beverly Hills, Calif. ' 

ROUND-THE-POLE . . . patio table cloth. 
A summery delight is this gay table cloth 
. . . just throw it 'round the pole and zip it 
up ! Hand-printed in attractive basket weave 
of mercerized cotton, richly colored in red 
and white; blue and white; or green and 
white. It fits any garden table, round or 
square. Just $4.95 postpaid. Californians add 
2 l A% sales tax, 3 I ,4% in Los Angeles. Match- 
ing ready-hemmed napkins, 18" wide, just 
40c each. Send your orders to the Margorita 
Shop, 1018 South Main St., Los Angeles 15, 
Calif. 

FRY-GUARD ... a handy kitchen utensil 
with so many valuable uses. The perfect way 
to protect your stove and walls against frying 
splatter — enables you to enjoy spotless kitchens 
and yet fry bacon, chicken, etc., in the open. 
An excellent camping and trailer utensil . . . I 
wonderful, useful protection around electric 
mixers . . . ideal for use as a cookie sheet. 
Fry-guard, so practical in every way, folds 
flat for easy storing. It's a "must" in your 
kitchen . . . and only $1.00 postpaid. Sorry, 
no C.O.D.'s. The Margorita Shop, 1018 S. 
Main, Los Angeles 15, Calif. 



MONOGRAMMED "KANGAROO 
POUCH" . . . Distinctively styled for your 
afternoon or evening wear. Finest 16 oz. all 
wool felt with a beautiful one or two initial 
custom chenille monogram in contrasting color. 
Available in black, navy blue, royal blue, red, 
pearl grey, dark brown, kelly green and 
white. Practical. Useful. Measures 16 in. x 
16 in. with four inch monogram. When order- 
ing specify color of pouch and initials desired. 
Introductory price $5.95 postpaid (add 3% 
sales tax in Calif. Available only through 
MONOGRAMMED PRODUCTS CO., 5445 
Sorrento Dr., Long Beach 3, Calif. 



46 



THE CALIFORNIAN, APRIL, 1950 



Hand-printed in California on Nylo-nit, 
knitted two-way stretch Lastex, Acetate and Nylon for light weight, 
fast drying, long wear. $14.95. 
For him: Semi-brief trunk in Nylon. $4.95. 




Write for folder of other Catalina styles, and name of nearest store. Catalina, Inc., Dept. 606, Los Angeles 13, Calif. 




6 * 




California State Library IX 

Sacramento 1 California ^ £>. 



Have a delicious topping of Big V Little strawberries on Bates PICOLAY* 
fabric... cool, all-combed cotton with a permanently embossed texture ... and 
have the most refreshing dresses that ever went out in the mid-day snn! 

Mother's dress by Bob-Low, Inc., in sizes 9 to 15. under $15.00. Children's dresses by Fine 
Children's Dress Company: petiteen sizes 10 to 14, under $11.00; children's sizes 7 to 14, 
under $8.00; sizes 3 to 6, under $6.00. At fine stores across the country. 

BATES FABRICS, INC., 80 WORTH STREET, NEW YORK 13 




'Trademark Reg. U. S. Pal. Off. 



PRICE 35 CENTS 



MAY, I ~9"5 J 




Hand-printed in California on Nylo-nit, 
knitted two-way stretch Lastex, Acetate and Nylon for light weight, 
fast drying, long wear. $14.95. 
For him: Semi-brief trunk in Nylon. $4.95. 







Write for folder of other Catalina styles, and name of nearest store. Catalina, Inc., Dept. 619, Los Angeles 13, California 




graphed at the A. A. A. Galleries by EARL SCOTT 
■HE CALIFORNIAN, MAY, 1950 



. . ■ ' 



«',!' -V."- ■■' ' '-' v : . ' ' ' ; '-A 

■ ■ ■,'..: 




vu*v 



b* 



j^tJaA 



t3»o 



IF YOU HAVE a love for luxury, a feel for fine 
fabrics and an appreciation of the art of 
hand-tailoring— then jackman custom 
originals are for you ~k into each 
,#• Custom Original goes the creative 

ability of Jackman, his discriminating 
choice of unusual fabrics from the 
world's most distinguished weavers 



JACKMAN CUSTOM ORIGINALS ARE SOLD ONLY IN QUALITY RETAIL ESTABLISHMI 




and his masterful talent for tailoi 
* and, into each garment, too, goei 
jackman label— your guarantee of 
ting America's Finest Luxury Clot 

CALIFORNIA CLUB SPORT COATS FROM $55 1j 

SUITS FROM $110 TO $150 

DEL MAR SHIRTS, $27.50 AND $32.50 

SLACKS FROM $25 TO $40 

CALIENTE CASUAL JACKETS $30 TO $55 



^'^■■•v-;-';-- 







FOR FATHER'S DAY, "FASHION FIRSTS" FROM THE HAND OF JACKMAN 



Our Newest "Fashion First"— beautifully 
tailored robes of Forstmann Charmeen, Cashmeres 
and other superlative fabrics from $75 




BECAUSE . . . 




<nows 



in its two variations, is in demand by smart women everywhere . . . 
it is an exquisite new strap- less that hugs and moulds you gently 
and compellingly . . .all Nylon elastic with Nylon marquisette — 
featherboned -without wires, an outstanding example of brassiere 
craftsmanship for comfort, beauty and fashion. 



Trade-mark* 



by CHARMFIT of HOLLYWOOD 

939 So. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. 



THE CAL I FO RN I AN, MAY, 1950 




THE CALIFORNIAN, MAY, 1950 



— *^v 




PERFECT GROOMING . . . achieved with 
the NICA CAP, a feather-light, crystal-clear 
plastic hood which slips over your head while 
you're dressing or showering. Now you can 
avoid lipstick and powder-stained dresses, 
mussed coiffures and smudged makeup Un- 
like a tight, binding shower cap, the roomy 
NICA CAP is easy to slip on and off. It 
snaps under the chin and has tiny perfora- 
tions for comfortable breathing. It's wonder- 
fully comfortable at a wonderful price . . . 
three of these patented, magic NICA CAPS 
. . . one for dressing, one for showering and 
one for spare . . . attractively packaged for as 
little as S1.00 postpaid. Nica Products, 2706 
Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles 5, Calif. 

SWEATER GIRL NEWS!! . . . MAKE IT 
YOURSELF! Charming hand knit sweater... 
with an alluring motif . . .long white, red tipped 
cigarette with gray smoke drifting upward on 
your choice of background . . . hunter green, 
flame red, navy blue, or jet black. Finest qual- 
ity yarn with complete, EASY-TO-FOLLOW 
INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTIONS including 
needles. Just $10.95 postpaid. Fill in: Bust 

; Waist : Length (shoulder to waist) 

Or Custom Made to your own measure- 
ments, $35.00 postpaid (add 3% tax in Cali- 
fornia, 3'/2% in L.A.). Sorry, no C.O.D.'s; 
Natali, 2984 Wilshire Blvd. (across from the 
Town House), Los Angeles 5, Calif. 

"SUZETTE" ... a beautiful, versatile cop- 
per and brass chafing dish for smart enter- 
taining in the casual manner at buffet suppers 
and barbecues — indoors and outdoors. Enjoy 
the luxury and utility of this beautiful table 
server. Prefare your favorite gourmet recipe 
at the table and keep it hot while serving. 
10 in. stainless steel skillet, heavy polished 
copper stand and cover, cast brass legs and 
burner attachment, with an adjustable Sterno 
heat regulator. A quality item modestly priced 
at $16.95 (comparative value $39.95). An 
ideal gift for the bride that has everything. 
Sorry, no C.O.D.'s. Fred S. Meyer Co., Box 
1176, Beverly Hills, Calif. 

TIDY TOES ... the California Tabbies 
with two-button back closing. These adorable 
foot-mittens are so comfy you'll forget you 
have them on . . . until you hear the compli- 
ments they rate! For lounging, dorm, patio 
and pool. Tabbies are styled for wearability. 
Softest satin in black, white or pink; and 
quilted chintz in red, yellow, green or blue. 
Sizes S-M-L. Send check or money order 
for $3.95 (plus 10c tax in California, 12c 
in Los Angeles) to The Margorita Shop, 1018 
South Main St., Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

CALIFORNIA COOKS ... the second en- 
larged edition of our recipe book "California 
Cooks," by Helen Evans Brown, is available 
now. You and your friends will be delighted 
with the selections — over 100 delicious and 
easy recipes, from abalone to zucchini; from 
oriental to occidental; from wine to herbs to 
spices. And all planned with that special Cali- 
fornia-flair-for-flavor and originality. For good- 
ness sakes, order yours now — and your friends, 
too. Just $1.00 each, postpaid. Address 
California Cooks, c/o The Californian, 1020 S. 
Main, Los Angeles 15, Calif. 





Ki 




ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 

vifts in the 
\jalifornia manner. 



w 








." 


1 


P\ 




1 






■ IB 


vv 


L ''*■[ 






■ 


fw yJ-'^'K 






■ ■'■■' 








: •■' v. 









HURRICANE LAMP: Western-styled in metal. Back fea- 
tures silhouette metal cut-out of cowboy twirling copper 
rope. Very nice for the patio, den, summer house. 
Measures 8V2 inches high. $3.50, postpaid. 



■ft (HI 



q/fo djg <5^> 






CHINESE SPRINKLE BOY: Cute California ceramic 
sprinkle boy to make short work of sprinkling clothes. 
Stands 8'/: inches high. White, black and blue trim. 
$1.95, postpaid. 




CALIFORNIA CLUTTER BOXES: Exquisite hand-painted 
California ceramic dresser boxes to hold your every 
accessory. Seven different ones bear whimsical illus- 
trations and these hand-lettered names on lids: Bobby 
Pins; Needles 'n Pins; Safety Pins; Odds "n Ends; 
Look in Here; Buttons 'n Bows; Button Box. Box meas- 
ures 3V2" across x 2" deep. $1.25 each, postpaid. 

No C.O.D. — pJease. Send check, cash, or money orders. 
(Residents of California — piease add 3% sales tax.) 

Send for illustrated catalog 
of other delightful California 
gift items. 




THE CORRAL SHOP 



•ANCHO SANTA FE • CALIFOINIA 






THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1950 




FRYING PAN CLOCK ... so ideal for 
gift and decorative purposes ... to lend a 
touch of the Old West to kitchens, living 
rooms, dens, and patios. This charming time- 
piece makes a beautiful indoor or outdoor 
fireplace decoration. Fine electric clock move- 
ment with quiet synchronous movement built 
to last a lifetime. S15.00 postpaid, including 
Federal tax. Order for yourself and your 
friends from The Corral Shop. P.O. Box 918, 
Rancho Santa Fe, California. 

"GAY NINETIES" MOOD . . . carried out 
in original Claytoon illustrations in durable, 
glazed place mats. Bright, gay-colored photo- 
graphs of miniature clay models and stage 
sets. You and your friends will love these 
adorable mats. Water and alcohol resistant. 
Protect table finishes while adding merriment 
to your place setting. The perfect hostess or 
anniversary gift. Size 10"xl6". Set of 6, only 
S2.00. Price includes tax and shipping charges 
in America. Order from The Margorita Shop, 
1018 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

SERV-ALL ARM CHAIR TRAY ... A 

useful, inviting item made of a thermo-set- 
ting plastic material ... a must for the per- 
fect hostess. So new, novel and appealing 
. . . the very answer to your search for an 
attractive tray that "stays where you put it." 
Perfect for patio and garden entertaining, 
Serv-All makes an ideal gift for all occasions. 
Available in your choice of three beautiful 
fiesta colors — red, ivory, green. Only S1.98 
postpaid (add 6c tax in California). Order 
from Fred S. Meyer Co., Box 1176, Beverly 
Hills, California. 

ROUND-THE-POLE . . . patio table cloth. 
A summery delight is this gay table cloth 
. . . just throw it 'round the pole and zip it 
up! Hand-printed in attractive basket weave 
of mercerized cotton, richly colored in red 
and white. It fits any garden table, round or 
square. Just S4.95 postpaid. Californians add 
2Y 2 % sales tax, 3V 2 % in Los Angeles. Match- 
ing ready-hemmed napkins, 18" wide, just 
40c each. Send your orders to the Margorita 
Shop, 1018 South Main St., Los Angeles 15, 
Calif. 

FOR FATHER'S DAY . . . hell be de 
lighted with this Razorbank, ingeniously con- 
trived to hold dozens of used razor blades. 
He"ll like the amusing face, and the cute 
verse inside, too. 4" high, compactly de- 
signed to fit on the bathroom shelf, and ar- 
ranged for re-fills. This clever ceramic con- 
tainer makes an appealing and practical gift 
for the men in your family. Razorbank is 
just §1.50 postpaid, from The Margorita 
Shop, 1018 South Main Street, Los Angeles 15, 
Calif. 




ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 



c 



Ui'fts in the 
alifornia manner. 




MEASURING SPOONS: Here's a colorful, decorative 
touch for your kitchen . . . and useful, too. Four 
plastic measuring spoons that fit in a floral arrange- 
ment with this bright ceramic flowerpot. Gadgets like 
this make housekeeping twice the fun. $1.50, postpaid. 




PUPPET TOOTHBRUSH HOLDER: What tot won't brush 
his teeth each doy with this cute holder for his brush. 
California ceramic, and measures 9 inches high. Blue, 
white and brown color combination. Attractively gift 
boxed. $1.25, postpaid. 




DARNING DODO: Gaily colored, California ceramic 
darning egg. Words "Darn it" on bottom. Measures 
5 inches high. SI. 50, postpaid. 

No C.O.D. — phase. Send checfc, cash, or money orders. 
(Residents of California — please add 3% sales tax.) 

Send for illustrated catalog 
of other delightful California 
gift items. 




THE CORRAL SHOP 



1ANCHO SANTA H • CAUFOINIA 



CALIFORNIA STYLIST, April 



1950 



PRIZE WINNING WATCHES 




f^ 



M*m 



^ 



r ^m ,.,-„ 



HY0 











^M«^^^ 



era 






The world's most honored watch is Longines, the only watch 
in history to win 10 world's fair grand prizes, 28 gold medals, 
innumerable honors for accuracy, fl Companion to the world- 
honored Longines is the Wittnauer watch, long -lasting, 
dependable and elegant. \ Both are the quintessence of 
style and precision-watches to own and to wear with pride. 



LONGINES WATCHES FROM $71.50 TO $2500.00 F.T.I. 



F ijDNGINGs i 







,41*110,^ 





Illusion 

from the South lUtific 

Sweep that man right 
ft into your life in this pro- 
Ik vocative pareo swim- 
suit or pareo dress— both 
sirened with Matletex* 
shirring. Romance from 
the South Seas created for 
you by Cole designer Margit 
Fellegi. Exclusive Tillets 
cotton in island colors. At 
fine stores . . . swimsuit 14.95; 
dress with scarf 19.95. 



<3&- 



Of CALIFORNIA 

ORIGINAL 



Copr. 19.50, Cole of California, Inc. 

Los Angeles 58, California 

*Cole's patented process of elasticizing 






THE CALIFORNIAN, MAY, 1950 



in 











7" 2 2 S O U T H L O S ANGELES 



E E T,. LOS A N G E L-E. ..S :1£ 




designed by - 
maurice handler 

of California 
woven of nylon* 
by hafner 

The suit that wins the blue ribbon . . . 
for its ribbon weave, its gorgeous 
blue hues ... so light, so figure-hugging, 
it's like a second skin. 
Sizes 9 to 17, about $13 

; maurice handler 



CALlfOOniA 



(tyugina£ 



At better stores, or write 

maurice handler of California, inc. 

846 So. Broadway, Los Angeles, California 



' Nylon, lalonj and cation 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1950 



13 





'.v 




is so versatile in her six Graff Team-Mates" 



A whole wardrobe of glorious matching separates 
. . . so perfect for sunning, lounging, around-the- 
towning — weekday or weekend. Done in world- 
famous Graff fashion, in wonderful, washable 
Serrano by Shirley Fabrics ... a rich, full-bodied 
rayon that looks and behaves like expensive linen. 
Permanently crease-resistant and pre-shrunk. 

Beautifully cut skirt, slacks and pedal pushers 
retail at $7.95. Debonair leisure jacket at $8.95. 
Bra and short set — $7.95. All in "Old Glory" 
colors: red, white and blue. 10-20. Worn under 
jacket; sensational Graff "Teaser" shirt. White and 
colors. S-M-L. Retails for $1.95 

At your favorite store, or write direct to WOrlQ-iamOUS 





FF 



californiawear 



1240 SO. MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES 15. CALIFORNIA 



THE CALIFORNIAN, MAY, 1950 



15 




IN BETTER STORES 
EVERYWHERE 



FALL '49 




THE STADIUM 
TOPPER . 



SPRING, '50 








THE BOULEVARD ^/ 
TOPPER 



!* 




/e^^ ^ fop $&t*t -aj% / 



FALL 




1950 



Shhhl TOP SECRET 

Watch for it in this magazine for 
August. It's incubating now, and 
it's being designed most particu- 
larly for YOU! 

Write for Advance Scoop to: 

SPORT-LANE of California 

224 EAST 11th STREET, LOS ANGELES 15 




From the very beginning of May, 
Californians begin to act as though sum- 
mer was here to stay ... so if you're 
planning an early vacation out west, 
travel light-n-airy. This season, the de- 
signers have simplified your what-to- 
wear problem, for they've come up with 
silk tweed shantung suits, lightweight 
rayons and wools that are comfortable 
to wear and darkly easy on the eye. 
What's more, they're simple to trans- 
form from daytime sightseeing and trav- 
elling to the little suit that goes to sup- 
per! Accessories do the trick, so bring 
plenty of fresh touches ... in beads, 
flowers, scarfs, and some of those soft 
packable hats that add their own bit of 



For daytime wear, we recommend the 
silk pongees, which are so light and 
take well to tailoring . . . and hand-wash 
like a dream! Other fabrics in this same 
category, including silks and the lovely 
sheers which combine travel attributes 
of practical dark colors, comfortable 
light weight. 

Be sure to include at least one sun 
dress, and with today's emphasis on 
sheath-and-bolero combinations, you'll 
find this prerequisite easy to fulfill. 
Many of these are simple enough to 
wear to town, while the underneath 
sheath may be glorified with elegant 
beads or accessories . . . and worn to din- 
ner, or for dancing! A long skirt to 
trade off with one of your frothy 
blouses is another suggestion for eve- 
ning wear. 

Bring a warm coat, for contrary to 
popular beliefs . . . California nights 
sometimes are coolish. If you plan to go 
to some of the outdoor events like Hol- 
lywood Bowl concerts under the stars, 
this is an important "remember"! Ob- 
viously, the clothes you bring are deter- 
mined by the things you plan to do, and 
with all the outdoors to invite you, you 
should include swimsuit and play 
clothes if you feel like playing. Some 
of those light little play shoes to sup- 
plement your wardrobe of suit, shoes 
and slippers, will add to your comfort. 



CALIFORNIA'S OWN COOK BOOK 

WRITE FOR YOUR COPY TODAY! 
$1.00 postpaid 

More than 100 unusual California recipes are con- 
solidated on 40 beautifully printed pages . . . 
appetizing dishes that make cooking a real pleasure 
... a big event for you. Try Helen Brown's 
Brentwood Pancakes, her piping hot Onion Bread, 
Peas Paisano, Hamburgers En Brochette, Green 
Goddess Dressing. 

Barbecue Specialties and Sauces 

Gazpacho, with Barbecued Lamb Steaks, Fried 
Beans; or Spitted Lamb; and Coachella Albondigo 
Soup. 

For Yourself, or a Practical Gift 

To: The Calif ornian, 1020 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, Calif. 
Please mail my copies of CALIFORNIA COOKS (postpaid) to: 




NAME- 



NAME. 



ADDRESS- 
CITY 



ADDRESS- 
CITY 



ZONE- 



STATE- 



ZONE- 



STATE. 



Enclosed is payment for | | copies. 



16 



THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1950 




<u^ 



I 



Summertime and the living is lovely . . . carefree and so easy, too . . . with 
our own 100% NYLON TRICOT* "Sissy" shirtmaker. Cool pastels and 
cooler darks with a sprinkling of white sherbet dots. To retail at only $35.00. 
* one of a group of sheer nylons done for us only; in sherbet dots, confetti 
dots and candy stripes. 



a \su!d*t*iUi \yu?**Vo 



1013 SOUTH tOS ANGELES STREET, LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 




THE CALIFORNIAN, May, 1950 



17. 



e 

T. 






9 



- 

e 




ON THE COVER: 

Janet Gaynor, beloved screen 
star and wife of Adrian, wears 
one of her famous hus- 
band's hostess ensembles for 
this lovely at-home picture. 
Adrian, outstanding American 
designer of our day, is in the 
background. Color photo- 
graph by Frank Stiffler. 




PUBLISHED QUARTERLY 

IN 
FEBRUARY- MAY- AUGUST- NOVEMBER 






California fashions 



- 

e 



z 

es 
o 

i- 
- 
U 

= 





American Fashions For Our Day... 24 

Peonies In Abandon 26 

Wind On Sand 27 

Brightest Of Atomic Pink 28 

Living Flowers 30 

Summer Dream Bouquets 31 

For The Flirtatious Hours 32 

Essence Of Movement And Beauty: Chiffon 33 

Sleek As A Big City 34 

Fashion In The Grand Manner 35 

Magic By Adrian 38 

The Light Coat: Thoughts For 1950 50 

Essence Of Simplicity 44 

Geometry In Lamb's Wool 46 

Taffeta Waterwear 56 

Suited For Swimming 57 

Cut To Catch A Sunbeam 64 



EDITOR AND PUBLISHER _J. R. Osherenko 

ASSISTANT PUBLISHER William J. Bowen 

FASHION DIRECTOR- Sally Dickason Martin 

FASHION EDITOR _ Virginia Scallon 

MANAGING EDITOR Helen Ignatius 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR- Philip Kustner 

MEN'S FASHION EDITOR Malcolm Steinlauf 

FASHIONS Jacquelin Lary 

ART _ Morris Ovsey 

Jane Albrecht 

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Frank StifRer 

SHOPPING ROUNDUP loyce Olsen 

FOOD STYLIST Helen Evans Brown 



California features 

The Story of Adrian 20 

Fashion Is Timeless 22 

Let's Ask The Husbands 36 

The Show Is On 42 

Capture A Bouquet Of Wildflowers 51 

California Cooks 52 

Tony Duquette: 1950 Baroque 58 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published quarterly at 1020 South Main St., Los Angeles 15, 
California, PRospect 6651. San Francisco Office, Leonard Toseph, 833 Market St., Room 
70S, DOuglas 2-1472. Subscription price: $3.00 one year $5.00 two years; $7.50 three 
years. One dollar additional postage per year outside continental United States. 35c per 
copy. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations. Entered as second class matter January 194-9 
The Californian, Inc. Printed in U.S.A. Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless 
specifically authorized. » 










//flam 

yfffF 



American Fashions For Our D 



a y 



By VIRGINIA SCALLON 



We believe in Adrian because he has both de- 
signing genius and fashion integrity. Because 
he can be depended upon to create seasonal 
freshness and excitement with each new collec- 
tion, leaving for others the grotesque, the 
bizarre, the change-for-change-sake. Because 
when all the world played a childish game of 
follow-the-leader in a costly fashion revolt . . . 
he alone had the courage of his convictions and 



maintained the coveted American look in clothes 
for freedom-loving women everywhere. Adrian 
believes, as we do, that clothes should be func- 
tional, right for our time, with a flattering 
grace that makes them un-dated and timeless in 
their charm. As we do, he believes that your 
mirror and your own eye are the only infallible 
guides of good fashion. For these reasons, we 
present the first fashion ontology ... of Adrian. 



THE ADRIAN STORY 




drian, California's famous couturier and 
standard-bearer of fashion, told me it is "easy for a de- 
signer to create unusual and amusing new clothes with 
a certain shock value . . . the difficulty is in restraint." 

And thereupon Adrian went on explain why he has 
taken the hard way to achieve fashion supremacy, hold- 
ing fast to his belief that daytime fashions should not 
change with every season. 

We were chatting in the peaceful quiet of his gardens 
overlooking the whole San Fernando Valley, and this 
new concept of fashion seemed fundamentally sound 
and right. Why, I wondered, did we spend so much time 
chasing the different when life and its demands remain 
much the same . . . and will until some new rocket era. 

The American who I think has contributed more to 
world fashion than any one designer, spoke with a mod- 
esty and calm assurance that is born of his own convic- 
tions. He is confident that the basic daytime silhouette 
is set for the next fifty years, that the slim uncluttered 
lines and the cleancut shoulders are right for our times 
. . . and until our mode of life changes. 

"Have you ever heard a woman describe a new dress 
as amusing . . . startling . . . out of this world?" Adrian 
asked, and then his tan face creased in a knowing smile. 
"The next minute she'll admit she wouldn't own it under 
any circumstances, that she doesn't dress to amuse, or 
frighten . . . and definitely, her wardrobe must be very 
much of this world!" 



ADRIAN'S BASIC BELIEF: 

Adrian, with his background of the arts and theatre, 
must find it ridiculously easy to dream up new fan- 
tasies for evening wear and what he calls fun clothes, 
or after-five fashions. He is a master at such bewitching 
drama. But it takes real restraint to create daytime fash- 
ions based on a provenly functional silhouette . . . with 
details that mark it "new this season" and an inherent 
charm that identifies it as good for next year, and next. 

Fashion should serve the woman, not enslave her! Good 
fashion is becoming and functional and right for our way 
of living. That's what Adrian believes. 

It took some courage to live up to those beliefs during 
the post-war era when the world's fashionists were going 
to all lengths to achieve novelty, change. Fashion edi- 
tors found new tag-lines in soft shoulders and padded 
hips and billowing skirts that swept the floor. 

"We still rode in cars, in trains and in airplanes," 
Adrian said of this era. "Industry and the arts went 
ahead, the tempo of life was speeded . . . yet some de- 
signers tried to enslave women, tried to force them to 
buy things that were bulky and not even comfortable. 
Pure extravagance! 

"I didn't think it was a good look, because it was 
ugly. American women, particularly, are used to look- 



ing attractive; they like to think for themselves and 
look like themselves . . . not like some quaint old da- 
guerreotype that was, also, framed." 



FOUGHT FOR AMERICAN LOOK 

As Adrian explained his "fashion ostracism" during 
the time when he and only he among leading designers 
dared to stand out against a super-imposed and arti- 
ficial way of dress, I pointed out that The Californian 
was the one national fashion magazine that came out 
boldly against the new look. 

So our interview progressed on a new level: we 
thought alike about the function of fashion! 

Conversation took on a more personal character. Janet 
Gaynor joined us, her . . . was it Adrian? . . . gingham 
dress had a simple bodice of soft pink and white checks, 
the skirt of a matching check in lavender and white . . . 
with a narrow red belt to match her tiny red sandals. 
Over this she had flung on a chartreuse smock, for my 
visit had interrupted a session of painting. 

Adrian wore a soft blue-gray tweed jacket over smokey 
blue slacks, his blue-and-white shirt had a bow-tie of the 
same material, his feet were encased in leopard-skin 
scuffs that immediately called up visions of the Adrians' 
recent African trek. 

With animated interruptions of "Remember this . . . 
or that?" I learned a bit more about the trip this intrepid 
couple took into darkest Africa, and marvelled anew at 
the fate that would lead two such cultured and artistic 
people into the wonderful wilds of the Congo. 

I kept remembering Janet Gaynor as the little waif 
of "Seventh Heaven" or the glamorous heroine of "A 
Star is Born," and tried to picture her as adventurer in 
the primitive wilds. 

"I wake up dreaming of Africa," Janet confided with 
a nostalgic yearning in her voice that attested the genuine 
interest she shared with Adrian in this globe-trotting. 
Adrian, too, must "dream" of this vast country . . . but 
with him, memories take a tangible form and his draw- 
ing board is the means of its re-creation. 



AFRICA INSPIRES THE ARTIST 

The artist-designer admitted he'd had an irresistible 
urge to capture African scenes on canvas, and then just 
out of curiosity took his pictures to one of New York's 
finest art galleries for an opinion. When they gave him 
a one-man show and sold out his entire "first edition" 
he had his answer! Today his studio is filled with more 
of these vivid mind pictures. 

The paintings have a strange intensity, with native 
figures etched with cleancut clarity against the cloudless 
skies or haunting jungles. There is a Dali-esque qual- 
ity about some of these interpretations that gives sym- 



bolic importance to a lone figure standing out boldly 
against the vastness of space. A thundering herd of 
elephants, a man's gun and hat in the sands . . . mute 
testimony to Adrian's story-telling ability in this new 
medium of oil. 

Actually, Adrian's interest in art showed up early 
in his life. Back in Connecticut where he was born in 
1903, he began drawing when he was three years old 
. . . most of it on the fly leaves of all the books that 
found their way into the Adrian household. His father, 
who had a millinery shop, and his mother both were 
artists, so his may be considered an inherited talent. 

At 17 he entered the Parsons School of Design in New 
York, transferring later to the Paris branch of the school. 
How strange that this staunch advocate of American 
freedom fashions was subjected to French influence early 
in his life, but rejected it to interpret clothes for a 
newer and more glamorous way of life! 

The studio where both Adrian and Janet Gaynor work 
today is in the north wing of their rambling Colonial 
farmhouse. White-washed brick, a corner fireplace, dark 
floors and (probably Janet's touch) raspberry pink cot- 
ton pull-drapes form a background for a miscellany of 
tusks and spears and mounted trophies of the hunt; for 
a chattering monkey and scampering puppies that inter- 
pret or inspire the day's work. 

Adrian pointed with pride to his wife's artistry, lovely 
water colors where the petite actress had caught the 
fragrance of a bouquet of flowers and the luscious beauty 
of fruit. I particularly liked two still life studies, of her 
"Taffeta Cabbage" and composition of a shining red 
apple, books, and Adrian's own favorite porcelain rooster. 



the center planter are heaps of multi-color rocks and 
mica, with primroses and ferns and a dozen Chinese 
bisques on the miniature mountain. On its top the day 
I was there was the beautifully carved torso of a young 
boy . . . other days it might be Adrian's much-loved 
porcelain rooster. 

A great bowl of geraniums splashed color at one 
corner of the table, and I marvelled again at the in- 
stinctive artistry of the Adrians, who could transport 
such ordinary flowers to such inordinate heights of 
beauty. 

Throughout the rest of the room are many other sou- 
venirs and rare objects of art, but clustered or grouped 
so that you have no feeling of crowding ... six or 
eight fat Buddhas crouch at the foot of the winding 
stairway; pull-out tables hold collections of tiny fig- 
urines, lovely hands. Adrian loves pure art, finds beauty 
in form and texture as well as in intricate sculpture or 
paintings. 

Considering Adrian's modern feeling toward clothes, 
you're almost gratified to find sentimentality expressed 
in these collections. There's warmth and individuality 
evident here, and its diversified interests spread from the 
tiniest bit of cloisonne or ivory ... to a living plant that 
climbs exotically toward the ceiling. 

Inevitably, in this home setting, I discovered more 
of the rich background for Adrian's creative life. I 
wondered again and again why he chose to fight so 
strongly, why he became such a "fashion ostrich" . . . 
the expression is his! . . . when the worldly designers 
took away the easy way to win headlines. He dug out 
an old scrapbook for his answer. 



HOUSE ON THE HILL 

What a peaceful life these two live with their 10- 
year-old son Robin. It's a wonderful house on the hill. 
Adrian works like a demon at his Beverly Hills salon 
before each new showing, keeps his finger on the pulse 
of the business ever after . . . but except when his 
presence is demanded, delights to dream up new ideas 
in the serenity of his own home. During the ten years 
they've lived in the Valley, the Adrians have spent little 
time in the city. They come in to see their friends, attend 
a few shows; seasonally, they go to New York to see the 
latest stage hits and "get tired enough to appreciate their 
home all over again!" 

From the studio we traced our way back through the 
gardens into the tranquil living room. There is an im- 
mediate feeling of peace and personality when you enter 
this great raftered room with its pale green walls and 
dark planked floors. Cool green rugs give the room 
a one-ness of tone value, and it isn't until after you're 
seated on one of the quilted chintz sofas in front of 
-the fire that you realize the quantity of priceless art 
objects here . . . reflecting a lifetime of Adrian's favorite 
hobby . . . collecting. 



TREASURE TROVE AT HOME 

Over the hearth hangs a great Grinling Gibbons carv- 
ing, intricately lovely and old, its mellowed wood warm 
reminder of a great era in art. To one side hangs a 
matador's coat, treasure trove from a visit to Madrid; 
on the floor are two sprawling wooden cherubs from 
Italy, beloved for their rich old heritage. 

Between the two sofas is a nine-foot-square coffee 
table, upholstered around its margin in pale green. In 



WHY ADRIAN REBELLED 

Adrian is an idealist. Under no circumstances would 
he have sacrificed his principles of good fashion, but 
there were certain things that goaded him into a fighting 
mood. 

"This is what caused me to rebel and decide then 
and there that the new look would never do for our busy 
active American lives," Adrian said savagely, and point- 
ed to a full page from a trade paper which showed 
Paris coats cut for longer dresses . . . and cutting the 
heart out of American concepts of freedom fashions. 
There were voluminous tents destined to sweep the floor 
of motor and train ; there were barrel silhouettes and 
worse . . . long sheaths with hemline swathed in heavy 
fur dust-mops! 

Adrian's personal convictions then became a matter 
of prideful Americanism, and from then on his stand 
made headlines . . . not always favorable. Newspapers 
wrote "Adrian, who stands Alone, Dislikes the Rounded 
Look," "Adrian derisive of hysterical New Look," 
"Adrian Rejects Dictatorship," "Fashion Chief Hits Re- 
turn of Gay '90's styles." 

From that time, Adrian was standard-bearer for Amer- 
ica's place in the fashion world. "And," says he, "since 
California living has exerted the greatest single influ- 
ence on the world's living habits . . . made a vogue of 
California or modern architecture ... it is only natural 
that California clothes are becoming the epitome of in- 
ternational styling. Paris will copy America ('Paris 
mast start over — at scratch — as fashion center,' Adrian 
said during his bitter crusade) . . . and it is inevitable 
that it will be influenced by California's feeling for ease 
and elegance in dress." — [Continued on page 62.) 




GOOD FASHION 
IS TIMELESS - J< 



*i* C/\**^ 



Here is graphic proof of Adrian's fashion integrity and style leadership through 
the years ... a series of pictures we've taken from our files to show highlights from 
seasonal showings back as far as 1942 when he introduced his first retail collection. 
At a glance, you'll be able to identify the famous "Adrian look" ... in the well- 
defined shoulders and uncluttered lines of his suits, in the fluid grace of his fabulous 
evening gowns. These clothes are as pretty now as they were then! All of which 
goes to prove Adrian's credo, that fashion is forever. Called a "fashion ostrich" 
because he refused to follow, almost pushed from his throne in the crowding rush 
for something — anything different when war was done, Adrian never once lost his 
perspective. He perpetuated the coveted American silhouette in the face of revolt, 
and today he is vindicated again and again. See how many trend-setting ideas you can 
find on these pages, ideas that have been repeated or interpreted, in the years since. 



1942 




lp*rm> * 










Where does a famous designer like Adrian find his fashion inspiration? 

From a whisper of fabric, a soft cloud of color . . . from a nostalgic glimpse into the past, 

or a wondering about the future . . . but mostly, from a knowledge of our times, 

and the needs thereof. Adrian has told us that he anticipates no 

drastic change in our daytime silhouette for the next fifty years, or until ive plan 

to rocket to the moon and our mode of life requires a new manner of dress. 

For the rest, for evening . . . he believes in sentiment and excitement and fun and romance. 

Every season he brings out a series of clothes reminiscent of America's great 

heritage. Now and this year, he introduced the quilted prints, below . . . to the music of 

"Turkey in the Straw." As American as Thanksgiving dinner, these lovely gowns have 

beauty and charm plus great style . . . in green and red and grey and white. 

On the opposite page, Bianchini wove a dream into a reality . . . for Adrian, after his own 

designs inspired by early American quilts and samplers. Adrian repeatedly has gone to 

American quilts for inspiration. Here, chiffon was printed to look quilted . . . 

counting gamboling sheep, on a dream dress. 



PHOTOGRAPHS IN ADRIAN SECTION BY ENGSTEAD 





. ■■■ . 










"You'll find her in the garden." That's Adrian s name for this dress. 
If you do find her in your garden, she will be in this printed organdy 
with great pink peonies falling with abandon all over it. 



Wine color whirls on white, "wind on the sand." 

Adrian seems to have blown this like a glass blower . . . a fragile thing 

made for all the wonderful summer nights we hope the moon will shine on. 




The brightest of atomic pink 

with periwinkle lining 

the flying wings, lilacs at 

the bodice . . . and all the world 

to charm. Adrian calls this 

"lights on." Opposite page, 

left, shantung in more colors 

than the rainbow ever had . . . 

starting with vibrant pink 

through greens, oranges 

and grey, to cold steel 

at the bottom; and at right, 

periwinkle blue with a dash 

of lilacs tucked in, 

gives flattery to Adrian s 

cascade which tumbles 

like a blue brook down 

the back of this dinner dress. 




$K* 






wmp-\*~?::- - 



/ 





*<■&..'*■* 



r 



) 






^ 



%rc 



^y*xr* 




I 



I. 












!3St 



;■■;■ 



t 



•: mi 



FROM SWITZERLAND 



jSIks 




m 



. . . these frail and lovely organdies, captured like living flowers by Adrian 
and made into bouquets to be worn as a dress — the summer dream come true. 




For the flirtatious hours . . . Adrian introduces 

great whirls of black taffeta which encircle the figure, above left, 

in unexpected patterns. His continuous emphasis on above-table interest 

always has been important to him. Right, slim . . . and floating . . . 

polka dots . . . huge ones . . . all make a summer night a fun night 

and a becoming night as well. Opposite page, 

the essence of movement and beauty . . . black chiffon and its magic* 

Adrian s model reaches out to 1950 with grace. 




Sleek as a big city, black as a moonless night, breathtaking 

as your favorite lady should look. Adrian gives you smooth net, 

falling like liquid down to an uneven hemline. 








Here organdy is treated with great sophis- 
tication, here is fashion in "grand manner.' 



Olive green and steel grey shirred organza, 
as subtle as mist in a forest: it's Adrian! 



.. 



LET'S ASK THE HUSBANDS' 




So 



many husbands had asked Ad- 
rian why he never had an evening 
showing that this year he and his 
wife, Janet Gaynor, asked 100 per- 
sonal friends to a private showing of 
this 1950 collection — motion picture 
celebrities, mixed with doctors, law- 
yers and perhaps some Indian chiefs 
— because the Adrians enjoy a variety 
of friends. 

However, they had wondered about 
the success of asking a group of men who never go to fashion 
shows. They must have been very amused to find men like 
Clark Gable, Darryl Zanuck. Charles Boyer, Robert Gross 
who heads Lockhead Aircraft, sitting around after the show- 
ing to chat in the circular pink room where champagne and 
other refreshments appeared as if by magic along with charm- 
ing little tables for intimate groups and conversation. The 
famous Mike Romanoff catered for the evening, and the gen- 
tlemen seemed to be able to take the fashion showing as easily 
as though they had been fashion reporters. 

At the beginning of the showing, Adrian spoke a few words 
of encouragement to them, saying he knew that next to going 
to the dentist, most men found fashion shows just about as 
trying, and he hoped that this one would prove as painless 
as possible. 

The mannequins themselves were keyed to a high degree 
of excitement and perhaps the presence of so many interested 
males put them on their toes, for they showed the large 



collection with a spirit and zest that made it move like a well 
rehearsed pageant. 

In the audience one noticed authoress Ayn Rand and her 
husband, also Dr. John Sharpe and Dr. John Lordon and his 
charming wife; Joan Fontaine, Charles Feldman; Clifton 
Webb the playwright; Luther Davis and the Ingle Barrs; the 
Darryl Zanucks; the Louis Jourdans; the James Pendletons; 
Loretta Young; lawyer Neil McCarthy; Irene Dunne; social- 
ite Charles Ducommon and his charming wife; the Toni 
Duquettes; Director Delmer Daves; Count Maxmillian de 
Henkle; Hedda Hopper; and Louella Parsons. 

A show stopper was the entrance of handorgan man and 
his talented monkey Josephine. She was told to do only a 
trick or two and held up the showing when her master became 
so enchanted with the response of his audience that he stayed 
out on the floor for the next five minutes putting Josephine 
through all of her tricks and antics — while Adrian could be 
seen frantically trying to get his eye so he could get on with 
the collection. The audience wouldn't let Josephine go and 
at last the monkey grabbed Mrs. Reginald Gardiner by her 
wrist with its tail and refused to leave the floor. Screams of 
laughter finally succeeded in bewildering the overly energetic 
monkey, to allow the performance to continue. 

If the success of an adventure is to be judged by the late 
hours of the party, this one carried on until very late and 
we are sure that tbe Adrians will again ask their friends to a 
showing of the next collection — and we wonder if a trained 
elephant will be included, in what Adrian considers part of 
the fun of showing a collection. 




Charles Boyer and his wife photographed in a gala mood Clark Gable and Mrs. Gable (the former Lady Ashley) chat with Adrian 
as they arrive at Adrian's lovely Beverly Hills salon. after elaborate supper party following the exciting summer showing. 




Michael Romanoff and Adrian talk shop and supper with Mrs. Darryl Zanuck. Mrs. 
Adrian (the former Janet Gaynor) chats with Reginald Gardner and Clifton Webb. 



Loretta Young is photographed with her 
husband, Tom Lewis, and Irene Dunne. 




Joan Fontaine is escorted by Charles Feldman to the Adrian showing. During dinner, 
Loretta Young table-hops to visit with Producer Arthur Hornblow and Janet Gaynor. 



Mrs. W. L. Pereira, Edward Valentine, 
Mrs. Virginia Robinson discuss showing 




With the unbuttoning of a glittering diamond button 



one changes from cover-up to uncover 



and a very undressed dinner suit. Magic as Adrian 



performs it, with not rabbits out of hats, 

but just as much fun. 

Variations on a theme, dreamed up out of a whisper 

of pure silk taffeta . . . call it a theatre suit 



for most dramatic moments. 




£a@ 



w 





I 





Opposite page left: Dusty pink coat of taffeta worn with a 

dash of gallantry over the softest of prints. The solving of every 

woman's problem — what to wear when a light coat is needed. Opposite right: 

white pique like a sail from a sailboat. Part of summer — the essence 

of summer — pique! Above left: Thoughts for 1950. Adrian has thought 

this way for years. Watch for it to set a precedent. American creativeness in 

full bloom swing. Center: "Jungle hangover," the continuation of Adrian's 

African hunt. Right: The mob cap showers from this delicate 

lady's head — -and makes Adrian's favorite polka dot brown 

silk suit new all over again. 



ADRIAN'S SPRING-SUMMER PREVIEW 



EACH SEASONAL SHOW A BREATH-TAKING SPECTACLE, LONG-AWAITED BY THE NATIONS' SMARTEST WOMEN 



An Adrian fashion premiere is staged with all the flair 
and fire of a studio preview, long-awaited by gown shop 
buyers from some of America's finest stores . . . and by 
the select invitational list of customers and friends who 
attend each seasonal showing. 

For Adrian is a showman.' 

There is traditional fan-fare and excitement attendant 
upon each opening: guests arrive promptly, take their 
designated places . . . usually clad in their latest Adrian 
creations . . . listen while Adrian himself expresses 
his idealistic credo of fashion. Then lights dim, music 
swells, and a spotlight picks up the first glamorous 
model. 

Adrian personally supervises every detail of the show, 
like a magician with a wand he speeds up the tempo 
... or stops action for a dramatic close-up. In every 
show there always are dramatic devices to emphasize 



his most outstanding groups: this season a real organ 
grinder brought out a skittering monkey to introduce 
a series of monkey print dresses; a pale blue mist flooded 
an organdy tree and the hoarse croaking of frogs her- 
alded romantic summer formals, named "Frog Song 
in an Organdy Garden." 

Adrian suits always highlight each collection, and 
this time (see picture) he dramatized a group of fine 
woolens by "staging" a pastoral scene, complete with 
woolly lambs. This fun-making is done seriously, to 
put due emphasis on the important fact. 

This exciting treatment of fashion brings out oh's and 
ah's of delight from distin- 
guished guests, all anxious 
to see "What's Next" with 
their favorite American de- 
signer . . . and they're never 
disappointed. 



Adrian s favorite look — 
the American look — trim 
square shoulders, slim 
silhouette — pride of every 
woman and destined, says 
Adrian, to be here for the 
next fifty years! 



1950 spring-summer previewed in pastoral scene, woolly lambs and all. Look closely and you'll 

see Clark Gable, interested front-row spectator. 





X 



%, «* 



-n 



* 



- 








Tm 




The tails of this short jacketed suit fly behind as this 
lady walks. Black with dull grey and gold stripes make 
excitement. The long tailed jacket is sleeveless — when 
it is removed the excitement becomes practical as well. 



More of Pola Stout's 
complicated weaving and 
Adrian s complicated cutting 
into simplicity itself . . . 
America's gesture to fashion. 





\ ^ 







^^^8PS'i> 



^ 



,i 






Geometry in lambs wool! 
Opposite page: Woolens — woven 
as if by magic — looking like inserts — 
a great deal actually woven especially 
for Adrian in a most complicated 



manner, to arrive at a simple 



effect. The woolens are by Pola Stout. 
This page: Various greys and oyster 



white and blacks. Not easy to copy 



but something very special to 



own. This can be studied, 



in years to come, as an example 
of woolen magic in 1950. 




These suits . . . classical in feeling but with the ever refreshing touches that make them as welcome as 
the new rose, are made of the beautiful British Samek materials, some of which have been exclusive 
with Adrian for years. He has believed these classical materials should be used in the most 
lasting fashions and as he feels a good suit should "be good until it falls apart," 
the British Samek materials make a very "lasting impression." 





1. JOAN CRAW FORD'S 

shimmering satin, designed 
by Adrian in the '30s, shows 
prophetic pleats fanning 
about an open shoulder . . . 
now new again. 

2. GRETA GARBO, languid 
and lovely in Adrians gla- 
mour gown . . . beads and 
gauntlets that could pattern 
the most dramatic costume 
today. 

3. Sheer lace coat which might 
have come out of fashion 
pages for 1950, designed by 
Adrian some twenty years 
ago during studio career. 






Adrian and Norma Shearer, once a famous star and wife of 
beloved Irving Thalberg, wearing a dress prophetic of the '50s 
but designed by Adrian some twenty years ago. 



ADRIAN'S CAREER AS STUDIO DESIGNER 

BACKGROUND FOR TODAYS SUCCESS 



California's motion picture indus- 
try . . . glamorous, exciting, always a 
step ahead and always with an eye 
to the photogenic qualities of women 
and their wearing apparel . . . has 
been a fashion inspiration since its 
very beginning. 

It was here that the young Adrian 
first began creating the spirited 
clothes for which he was to become 
world-famous, a career he began 
after designing first for Rudolph 
Valentino's "The Sainted Devil," way 
back in the early twenties. 

He created exciting costumes for 
Hollywood premiere prologues and 
then for three years was with Cecil 
B. DeMille, whose spectacular ex- 
travaganzas are history. Adrian was 
with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios 
for about twelve years prior to his 
debut as a couturier in 1941. 

During these years his ideas about 
fashion crystallized. Always an advo- 
cate of luxurious fabrics and dra- 
matics, he began to appreciate the 
sensitive demands of the camera's 
eye . . . with its demand for a lovely 
look. 



Motion pictures, wanting to show 
stars at their most glamorous best, 
face the additional hazard of timing 
in the fashions they portray. (During 
war years, the exaggerated silhou- 
ettes adopted by some designers 
caused pictures to be described as 
"costume" productions just a few 
months later!) 

Adrian was not swayed even then 
by vacillating whims or whimsies. 
Clothes he created for such famous 
stars as Greta Garbo, Norma Shearer, 
Joan Crawford and Katharine Hep- 
burn ... to name just a few . . . are 
timeless in their beauty. Maybe the 
hemlines vary an inch or two, but the 
same slim uncluttered lines prevail, 
the same wedge shoulder identifies 
each suit . . . and the evening gowns 
have unmistakable Adrian touches. 

This prophetic feeling, this instinc- 
tive good taste, was responsible for 
making Adrian one of the screen's 
most popular costume designers . . . 
a background for his later life of 
dressing women for their most im- 
portant roles in real life. 




CAPTURE 



A BOUQUET OF 



WILDFLOWERS 



BY LAURA E. McVAY 



ill tiring the spring and summer months even apart- 
ment dwellers may have flower arrangements at no 
cost! That is, provided they have an automobile or a 
friend with one to take them to open country. Wild 
flowers are everywhere! In some sections of the 
country picking flowers are prohibited, but where 
they grow in profusion, enough for one bouquet 
surely will be permitted. Leave the flowers growing 
along the highway for other passers-by to enjoy, and 
seek yours in the back country. 

One of the easiest wild flowers to find and ar- 
range is the lupin. The most common variety grows 
on hillsides or in grassy fields, and is a lovely shade 
of blue. There is a lavender, bush variety, and one 
called prickly lupin, which is just what its name 
implies. The stem of the blue type used for the pic- 
ture, is very succulent, drawing water freely, and 
therefore it will last for days. The foliage is un- 
usually pretty. If you are fortunate enough to gather 
lupin just after a rain, you will find the tiny hairs 
on the leaves are holding a thousand diamonds. 



While you are in the fields or hills, gather wild 
oats or any grasses to use with the lupin. Keep the feel 
of the wide open spaces by bringing home a rock 
or two to help cover the frog. You will probably 
find brodea (wild onion), yellow tidy tips or yellow 
buttercups (the simplest form of flower life and 
from which all flowers have been developed) to com- 
bine with the lupin. The blue of the lupin fades in 
artificial light, and the yellow flowers will keep the 
arrangement bright. 

Some wild flowers will keep longer in deep water, 
but the ones mentioned like shallow water just as 
well. For that reason, select a flat container. Place 
a spiked frog to the side and toward the back, leav- 
ing room for the rock and the refreshing water to 
form a part of your picture. Any arrangement of 
wild flowers should be kept simple and informal. 

This is only one suggestion for a wild flower ar- 
rangement. There are hundreds of fascinating wild 
flowers and flowering shrubs. If you will only take 
the trouble to learn their names, they will become 
your friends and return to greet you each spring. 



5\ 




CALIFORNIA COOKS 



BY HELEN EVANS BROWN 



Spanish Dons And A Heap 
Of Gold Coins 

California hospitality has been famous since the very earliest 
days of the Missions. The good fathers always welcomed 
travellers and saw them on their way with fresh horses and 
food enough for several days — usually a chicken or two, a 
boiled tongue, some eggs, hard boiled of course, and a bottle 
each of wine and brandy! Spanish Dons were even more 
generous. They would urge strangers to visit them for weeks 
at a time, and supplied them with fresh horses as they left. 
They also had a pleasant little custom of leaving a heap of 
gold coins in the guest room for the use of anyone who oc- 
cupied the room! Today we still love to play host, and we 
think we do it rather well. Some of us make a business 
of it. Take Trader Vic, in Oakland. His restaurant, though 
not a very old one, is famous throughout the country. That's 
because Trader Vic himself is such a good host — which means 
not only that he is always there to greet his patrons, but 
he serves good drinks and good food. He specializes in rum 
drinks, and he probably knows more about them than any- 
one else in the country. With them he serves a special hors 
d'oeuvre or two. A favorite is his chicken livers, dipped in 
batter and fried. His food is of the Pacific — Hawaiian. 
Chinese, Polynesian, Tahitian. Javanese. He is famous for his 
Javanese sate and for his barbecue dishes, and there's nothing 
phony about the latter. Try his barbecued squab. You won't 
find Vic swabbing a hunk of meat with "liquid smoke" or 
overseasoned barbecue sauce and baking it in the oven. He 



has a genuine Chinese barbecue pit at his restaurant, and 
when he claims something is "barbecued," you can be sure 
of it. He, too, is a great believer in soy, as an ingredient 
of a basting sauce, and I'll bet he wouldn't be caught dead 
using most of the concoctions that are crowding the shelves 
of grocers' sauce departments. Trader Vic's restaurant is 
chuck full of atmosphere, meaning that it is garlanded with 
fish nets and shells and blow fish and such — so much so that 
you can believe that you are actually vacationing on some 
South Sea Island — at least you can after two of Vic's Pondo 
Punches. 

If you like really good Chinese food — and who doesn't — 
try the New Grand East when in Los Angeles. Allan Lum 
is the proprietor and host, and you'll be smart to ask him 
to order for you if you want the specialties of the house. 
Allan has been in the business for a long time, but it was 
only recently that he opened this new and much larger spot 
in New Chinatown. It's already popular among those who 
know their Chinese cuisine, and the prices are not high. You'll 
be particularly lucky if you hit an evening when he is having 
his Sang Chow Lung Ha, which is lobster with egg sauce, 
or his Hon Gum Now Yok Fan, red ginger beef rice. Of 
course he has all the favorites, too. Gee Bow Gai (chicken 
in paper), Fried Wun Tun, Garlic Spareribs, and on and on. 

Spring cleaning, this year, turned up a conglomeration of 
notes that I've been hoarding for California Cooks, awaiting 
just that perfect moment when they would be right. Now I 
wonder if that moment will ever come, and for fear it won't, 
I've decided to throw them at you all at once — Notes From a 
Cook's Book: 



52 



Recipes, a Review or Two, Various Comments by Various Gourmets, Here and There an Anecdote 
. . . Presented With Reason and Bit of Rhyme from the TSotehook of Helen Evans Brown 



Are You III Tempered? 

COOKS' TEMPERS. Really expert cooks don't hold their 
tempers. At least that's what one famous host believed so 
thoroughly that his first question, when interviewing a pros- 
pective chef, was "Are you ever ill-tempered?" The applicant 
who answered "no" was quickly disposed of, for his potential 
employer was convinced that the truly great cook, like any 
great artist, was temperamental — and proud of it! So don't 
hesitate to throw your weight around the kitchen. 

GAMAY. A soft light wine, made from the same Gamay 
grape that has gained such fame in the Beaujolais area of 
Burgundy. Destined to become better known, this inexpensive 
red table wine is one of California's noteworthy contribu- 
tions to the cellar. And try a Gamay Rose for a lovely sum- 
mer wine. 

Fish And Smiles 

APPLAUSE FROM THE SKILLET. There was once a chef 
who cooked fish so exquisitely — with such skill — that it is 
said that the fish themselves gave him glances of admiration 
and approval from the frying pan. 

SWEET BASIL. The "Royal Herb" is the darling of the 
Italians, perhaps because it so perfectly complements their 
beloved tomato. A little of it steeped in tomato juice, while 
chilling, or minced and sprinkled on a dish of quartered 
tomatoes, makes these ordinary foods bonissimo. It does pleas- 
ant things for tomato soup, tomato sauce, tomato aspic, but 
it is not only the tomato that it glorifies. Scrambled eggs, 
venison, liver, eggplant, all deserve top billing when sweet 
basil is used in their preparation. The wise cook adds a little, 
tasting as he goes, for as in any seasoning, it is easier to 
add than to subtract. 

FILING SPICES. No need to pick up several jars of herbs 
or spices before hitting on the one you seek. Emulate your 
grocer and arrange them on your shelf in alphabetical progres- 
sion ; allspice, anise, bay, caraway, cardamom, and so on to 
thyme and turmeric. 

Demise Of The Soggy Canape 

COCKTAIL NOTES. Happily the days of serving soggy 
canapes are in the past. Hot savory tidbits, or suave cold 
spreads to which guests help themselves, are the choice of 
contemporary cooks. Shad roe and bacon make two contribu- 
tions to the pre-prandial hour. In the first, gobbets of shad 
roe are dipped in lemon juice, then wrapped securely in a 
half-slice of bacon which is pinned in place with a toothpick. 
Come cocktail time, they are placed on a cake rack in a baking 
pan, and baked in a medium hot oven until the bacon is 
pleasantly crisp. Make plenty! Even more exciting is this 
Shad Roe Sacramento: remove membranes from a pair of 
shad's roes and saute them in three tablespoons of butter in 
which a tablespoon of minced shallots or green onion has 
been wilted. Mash during the process, and when lightly 
cooked, cool, mix with a cup of mayonnaise, a tablespoon of 
lemon juice, salt and fresh ground pepper, and a teaspoon 
of minced parsley. Add one tablespoon of gelatine dissolved 
in a quarter cup of cold water and a half-cup of hot chicken 
stock. Chill, and unmold. Serve with mayonnaise which has 
had crisp crumbled bacon mixed in at the last minute. Melba 
toast with this — preferably hot! 

The Glutton In Spite Of Himself 

A TONGUE GLOVE. Phithyllus, an ancient glutton, was so 
anxious to swallow his food in a hurry, so anxious to stuff 



his paunch, that he invented a sheath that he wore on his 
tongue. Thus clad he could eat the hottest foods ahead of 
others at the table. A tongue glove! Or so said Dr. Doran, 
90 years ago. 

COOK'S GADGET. A baster. A giant medicine dropper, 
to be exact. Sucks up juices from under the roast; removes 
the just-right amount of cream from the top of a bottle of 
milk; skims every vestige of fat from a pot of stock; even 
serves as an emergency pastry tube — at least well enough to 
squiggle "Happy Birthday" on the top of a cake. 

TO MAKE BODY SMALL. G. Markham, in "The English 
Housewife" (1683), notes: "Water of Fennel is good to make 
a fat body small." If it were so, there'd be a run on chocolate 
bon bons. 

BUTTERED SALAD. Browned butter and lemon juice. 
A surprising and pleasing dressing for a salad of young greens. 

SPAGHETTI. Every amateur chef (M. gender) has the 
recipe for spaghetti sauce. It's the slow cooking, or the mys- 
terious ingredient "X", or the long table of contents, that gives 
each one its superiority. And yet spaghetti at its very best 
is at its simplest: cooked alia denti (cooked not too much, so 
that it still has some resistance under the teeth), then simply 
dressed with sweet butter and freshly grated parmesan. Saute 
chicken livers, tossed in, and mixed with the pasta is good. 
Good? The very thought makes me drool! For a meal that 
may be served with pride, start with wedges of every variety 
of melon that the season offers: cantaloupes, honeydews, Per- 
sians, Catawbas, or whatever. Arrange them on a bed of 
crushed ice, with quarters of limes for those guests who wish 
a drizzle of that lovely juice on the melons of their choice. 
Serve prosciutto (Italian ham) too, sliced paper thin. There's 
a first course that is so charming that it would be a pity to 
have the melon season pass without enjoying it. (For Winter 
and Spring months an antipasto will make a pleasant substi- 
tute.) The spaghetti, then, with stuffed mushrooms, and either 
asparagus or artichokes in the salad spot. For dessert a Zuppa 
Inglese, which is Italian for "English Soup" but which is 
actually a rum cake — sweet, rich, delectable. Rather like an 
English trifle, as a matter of fact — a fact that is probably 
responsible for its name. 

STUFFED PEACHES. Halves of ripe but firm peaches are 
stuffed with ground almonds and candied orange peel — four 
parts of the first to one of the second. Bake at 350° for 12 
minutes, basting with Sherry several times during the cook- 
ing. Serve warm, with cold sour cream. 

TANGELOS. A cross between a tangerine and a grapefruit 
(pomelo), it has the best characteristics of both parents. 
Superb for marmalade. And not that they are in season, but 
did you ever taste poached tangerines, cooked in simple syrup 
(1 cup water, 2 cups sugar) that is, and served chilled for 
dessert? A sprig of rosemary will add extra charm. But even 
if they're not in season, they come in tins. Mandarin oranges, 
they're called, and they're packed in Japan — Occupied, that is. 

Mary And Her Miseries 

MARMALADE. Far-fetched is this story of its christening. 
Mary, Queen of Scots, was poorly, her spirits low, her strength 
failing. Nothing could tempt her appetite until some genius 
stewed some oranges in syrup. This she liked, and ate, and 
soon recovered. And so, the story goes, this sweet was named 
marmalade for Mary Malade. ... A more likely story is that 
the original marmalade was made from the quince, which in 
Portugal is called marmelo. And that for Mary and her 
miseries. 

COOK'S OPINION. "This is every cook's opinion, No 
savoury dish without an onion." At least no savory stew 
or ragout or soup. No need to come to tears when there 
are dozens of tiny onions to be peeled. Pour boiling water 



53 



Cookery In A California Kitchen 



over them and allow them to stand for five minutes before 
draining and peeling. To keep these little onions intact 
while cooking, stab each one through the heart with a tooth- 
pick. Takes but a few seconds. 

GOOD READING. Pepys: "...all the way reading in a 
book of receipts of making fine meats and sweet meats . . . 
which made us good sport." 

Thackeray: "Next to eating good dinners, a healthy man 
with a benevolent turn of mind must like. I think, to read 
about them." 

One Good Recipe Deserves Another 

SMILE WHEN YOU SAY THAT. STRANGER. I read a 
new cook book the other day called "A Taste of Texas." It 
was one of those books wherein the ingredients are listed 
methodically at the left, the directions given precisely on 
the right. The recipes were good ones, but there wasn't any 
fun in reading them — not for me anyway. I was just be- 
ginning to pat myself on the back for never never writing a 
recipe that dull way, when what to my wondering eyes should 
appear but a recipe, in the very same format, by "Helen 
Evans Brown." That stopped me, until I found another, and 
another. They were mine, all right, or had been before some 
pedantic person got ahold of them. Then I remembered that 
a couple of years ago I had contributed some recipes for a 
proposed cook book, but that was the last I ever heard of it. 
The other recipes were all contributed, too, and I can't help 
wondering if the rest of the cooks were as amazed as I. Some 
of the recipes are excellent, and the book is well worth own- 
ing, and I am probably an ungrateful wretch for not ap- 
preciating the fact that I am under the same covers with Dior, 
Edna Woolman Chase, Lilly Dache. Louella Parsons, Robert 
Taylor, and other notables, who, though not Texans, were 
giving us a taste of it. As for me, I guess I prefer a taste 
of California. 

Whale Meat: Sheer Humbug 

WHALE MEAT. In England they are now eating whale 
meat, which, according to M. Andre Simon, they "are grate- 
ful for but it would be sheer humbug to pretend that we 
like (it)." One wonders if M. Simon has partaken of the 
whale's tongue, considered a great delicacy in 11th Century 
England. It would be interesting to compare his expert opinion 
with that of connoisseurs of an earlier day. 

GASTEREA. According to an old rule for dining, the 
perfect dinner should have "no more guests than the number 
of muses, no fewer than the number of graces," which seems 
to leave Brillat-Savarin's tenth muse, Gasterea, out in the 
cold. 

Utopia For Gourmets: The Geese 
Are All Born With A Liver Complaint 

ORANGES AND SARDINES. Orange rind, grated lightly 
over grilled sardines, is a startling idea, but there are those 
who relish it. Dr. Johnson was said to enjoy oyster sauce 
on his plum pudding. Ho hum! 

COCAGNE. There is a lovely myth about a Utopia for 
gourmets, a land where the birds and beasts are born — and 
grow — perfectly cooked. Its name, Cocagne, comes from the 
Latin "coquere," "to Cook." This old rhyme describes it: 

"Where so ready all nature its cookery yields, 
Maccaroni au Parmesan grows in the fields; 
Little birds fly about with a true pheasant taint. 
And the geese are all born with a liver complaint." 

Which brings us to pate de fois gras, quite naturally. Ex- 
pensive, but a very superior substitute can be made with 
chicken livers. 



Chicken Liver Pate 
Saute 6 minced green onions in a quarter-cup of butter 
until wilted. Add a pound of chicken livers, cut in pieces, and 
cook very gently for about five minutes, or until no red shows. 
No longer, please. Force through a sieve and add 3 egg yolks, 
beaten just enough to mix with 1/3 cup of cream, and a half- 
teaspoon of salt. Add y 2 teaspoon of ground coriander and 
14 teaspoon of M.S.G. Also more salt if needed. Put it in 
a small crock, cover with buttered paper, tied down well, set 
the crock in a pan of water and bake at 300° for one hour. 
Cool and serve with cocktails, as a first course, or with salad. 

AVOCADOS. Avocados on the half-shell are avocados at 
their best, but often their price prohibits such generous service. 
Try dicing them, mixing them ever so gently with diced celery, 
and serving them with French dressing as a cocktail. In this 
way one medium avocado will serve four instead of two, 
and appetites will still be keen for what is to follow. Dill 
and coriander are two spices that go well with avocado, 
but not at the same time. Dill is well known, but only be- 
cause of its connection with the pickle; coriander is a com- 
parative stranger, which is a pity, for it's a fragrant spice 
that lends charm to many foods including roast pork, almond 
soup, apple sauce, and ginger bread. Versatile, isn't it? 



The Male Animal Is In The Kitchen 

MEN AND COOK BOOKS. More and more men are writ- 
ing cook books, but there's nothing new about that. One of the 
most famous ones of all times, Hannah Glasse's "The Art 
of Cookery Made Plain and Easy," was supposedly written by 
a man — Jeaffreson says it was one John Hill ; Hayward de- 
clares it was a Dr. Hunter. They agree however, that the 
pseudonym which was used was suggested by the fact that the 
book was sold at Mrs. Ashburn's Glass and China Shop. A 
new, and excellent cook book written by a man is "With a Jug 
of Wine" by Morrison Wood. 

Romans And Roses 

ON THE Q. T. The term "sub rosa" has a gastronomical 
significance. The bang-up banquets of the Romans were served 
in a bower of roses. Tables, walls, even ceilings, were be- 
decked with blossoms. Because the wine had a loosening 
effect on tongues, and because state secrets were apt to be 
divulged, it became an unwritten law that no gossip heard 
"under the rose" could be repeated. There's a new ceiling 
paper on the market — gay with roses. 

When A Brook Trout Comes Of Age 

A NOTE FROM MEMORY. A May breakfast in New 
Hampshire: fragrant wild strawberries — sweet yellow cream 
ladled over them. Brook trout, having barely attained a 
lawful age, dipped in corn meal and crisped in butter. Bacon, 
country cured and smoked over apple wood. Popovers, crusty 
outside, moist within, so light that they had to be eaten with 
bated breath lest they blew away. Coffee, ground but a few 
minutes before, boiled in a huge grey enameled pot with an 
egg to add richness and clarity. But, California could do 
it, too. 

WINE. "God made Man 
Frail as a Bubble. 
God made Love, 
Love made Trouble. 
God made the Vine; 
Was it a Sin 
That Man made Wine 
To drown Trouble in?" 

— Oliver Herford. 



54 



MAURICE HANDLER'S nylon velvet swimsuit, below, scalloped, shirred, and splashed with Pacific waves. On the tan 
shoulders, the fragrance, of course, is White Shoulders' new essence, "Splash," by Evyan. 




CATALINA'S one-piece swimsuits, with more than just one touch of genius. Right, Laton taffeta lastex 
with button-away straps ... the shirred bra has over-bust boning and side stays. Left, Celanese 
Prospector front, splashed with hand-printed ginger grass. Nylon-filled lastex back, hook-away straps. 





COLE OF CALIFORNIA'S swimsuit, skirt, and bolero intertwined with a colony of starfish. Right, 

the swimsuit for deep sea swims has a matletex back, a deep-see front. Left: The bolero is sleeveless, slashed 

low, and cut short for more sun on more skin. The skirt is as wide and full as a wind-filled sail. 



To 



n 



J 



D 



u 



u e 1 1 e 



AGIC REMEMBEREE 







By MARJORIE KESSLER 



In the garden outside his studio, 
Tony Duquette works on one of his 
Madonna-like figures ... a fantastic 
jewel and plastic-impregnated Baroque. 



HE virtuosity which defined Baroque art in the late 17th 
century finds a rebirth in the artistry of Tony Duquette. His 
art, a Neo-Baroque style of pure and rimple fantasy, combines 
the antique flotsam and jetsarn gathered from the palaces of 
Venetian Doges and French Bourbons with the media of today 
(paint, plastic, wire, pins, staples, glue) into a purely evoca- 
tive decor. 

Some adjudge his work as decadent, a return to over- 
ornamentation ; others, more sensitive, find in Duquette's work 
a timelessness, and an ever present reiteration: art can exist 
for itself alone; to excuse it, is to deny it. 

Within today's vocabulary for decor, while we are practical- 
ly limited to such words as clean-lined, functional, it is nearly 
a major task to describe Duquette's work. It covers almost 
every bit of decor for the home (lamps, tables, chairs, paint- 
ings, spreads, beds). Yet Duquette is not an interior deco- 
rator. He is a fine artist who has applied his talents elsewhere 
than the canvas. 

Duquette is a master-craftsman, an artisan, a designer, an 
architect, an antiquary, a sculptor, or more cogently — a 
creator. 

A young man, in his early thirties, Duquette is a tall, lean 
fellow, a soft voice, and an easy, yet elegant manner. He is 
married to fellow artist, Elizabeth (Beagle), a Botticelli- 
like creature who helps him in his work. 

Born in Los Angeles, Tony lived most of his life on the 
west coast, with the exception of a few summers in the east. 




the army, and a recent trip to Europe. His father's people 
came from France to this country several generations ago; 
his maternal background is Scotch, Irish and Austrian. 

Tony trained in Los Angeles at the Chouinard Art Institute, 
won plaudits there and thence became a special decorator for 
Bullock's Department Store. Interior displays, gift wrappings, 
packaging, thematic designs for holidays — these were his forte. 

From Bullock's to the United States Army, and after three 
years, in business for himself. 

His work at Chouinard's was primarily for the theatre, stage 
and set design, and, per force, the theatre and theatrical effects 



58 



J 




Prize-winning "fire-bird^ costume designed for Mrs. Arturo Rubinstein by Tony Duquette. 



play a great role in his creations. Tony was the winner of a 
scholarship to the Yale School for the Theatre, but since the 
"theatre" at the time was in the doldrums, he betook himself 
to Bullock's, for a more immediate and necessary remunera- 
tion. 

How does an artist grow? From his own designed puppet 
theatre, to the rigors of store decorations and promotion dead- 
lines, to the final plunge — in business for himself. 

In business, yet no compromise with fads and fashions! 

In business in a field so overworked in the Hollywood- 



Beverly Hills community, flying into the face of the snow- 
balling tendency in home decor, and in all art, to utter simpli- 
fication, to the subordination of art to function. 

His work to many was a step back into the era of Victorian 
gingerbread, to a few, a remarkable vision, that there is some- 
thing more in life than the automatic dishwasher. 

Beauty and the sense of owning beauty; the possession of 
something that has no set material value, but intrinsically 
stands for a way of life, an attitude, a gesture, this Duquette 
feels mankind craves. 



59 



Duquette's New Approach 



In his own words: "I crave for myself, the Baroque, the 
stimulating, the enormous importance of magic and evocative 
things . . . things that move . . . have an inner vitality." 

In business and with luck: A few freethinkers in the Holly- 
wood community saw in Duquette's art a liberation from the 
slick, sleek, streamlined, neon-functional, kleig light art. And 
these Hollywood freethinkers had "cosmopolitan tastes," were 
leaders in the international world of fashion and art. They 
had connections: Lady Mendl. Cobina Wright. St., Adrian 
(for whom Tony has done window displays for many years), 
Elizabeth Arden. Irene Dunne. Ina Claire. John Frederick. 

\^ hat they saw was this: A completely new approach to 
media — a combination of antique pieces with the "real" thing 
— pressed leaves (real) below the glass top of a low coffee 
table. But transposed into fancy by blossomings of sequinned 
flowers. Low-low chairs upholstered in "beetle wings." a 
shimmering emerald fabric quilted into the shape of the wings 
of a thousand insects. Modern bas-reliefs set deep in shadow 
box frames — faces of fairy tale princesses glowing with re- 
flecting bits of glass; fantastic costumings made of real lace, 
plastic impregnated, like chalky Dresden. Tall screens of lacy 
wire upon which were mounted rare abstractions of "the sun" 
(Duquette's immediate theme) made of pearly abalone shells 
with rays of copper and brass, dotted with sun-spots of 
pearls. 

Vertical is Duquette's line, an opposition to the recurring 
horizontal of modern. Vaulting ceilings, long narrow screens, 
tall secretaries, spiring lamps, stylized slender statues — the 
long, flowing line of heavily valanced drapes. 

Most accurately, one can describe Duquette's talents by 
describing the Beverly Hills home in which he and Beegle 



dwell, for it is a showplace. designed by Tony both as a home 
and as a model showcase for his extraordinary collection of 
antiques, his own water color paintings, his idea of the "right" 
life, and his credo in decoration ... the blending of antique 
with modern media, so that these bits of antique carvings, 
fabrics, paintings, statues, urns, live again in a new era. 

A smallish hillside house, Duquette's home gives the feeling 
of supreme elegance. It is constructed around a huge salon 
or drawing room of double story height, made even taller by 
ceiling to floor draperies and by a magnificent chandelier of 
pastel beads handworked in Venice to Duquette's floral de- 
signs. The chandelier drops from a chalky pastel relief of the 
sun surrounded by blossomings and wreaths, the entire ceiling 
a fanciful interpretation of spring. A soft French green on 
the walls produces a sonambulant formal atmosphere, and 
provides the perfect color-ground for the antiques which Tony 
collected on his recent European tour visiting the Mendls in 
Versailles, Princess Aspasie in Venice, and the Yugoslavian 
ex-king and queen in St. Moritz. 

Old carvings, bleached and hand rubbed, surround the door, 
jambs and are mounted along the banister of the stairway ' 
leading up to the narrow balcony above the salon. Upon enter- 
ing the room, one sees immediately ahead a narrow ceiling 
to floor antique mirror on which hangs an ancient, ornamental 
clock. On the parquet floor is not a carpet, but a tapestry 
circa 1800, still in excellent condition and so well constructed 
that it can bear the ravages of many high-heels. 

In contrast to the pastel magnificence of the ceiling are dark 
woods of the French-Chinese coffee tables, the sombre Acal 
demic French paintings, the deep raspberry hued drapes. 

(Continued on Page 66) 




Salon of Duquette home: rare antiques combine with fantasy of 
his own designs. Baroque chairs, table: 18th Century tapestry. 



Ornate medallion with convex mirror reflecting ornate carv- 
ing of staircase, opposite, which leads to entrancing gallery. 



60 



J. 



*^vS 




Mood painting oj highly stylized Frenchman, 

<( on back of entry. Sceptre conceals peep-hole, 

marble white tile of floor repeated in picture. 




Spectacular chandelier in salon in printemps 
pattern according to Duquette's design: floral 
paintings, plastic flowers and Venetian beads. 



Dimensional reliefs of myth- 
ical faces, done in Neo- 
Baroque manner . . . sparked 
with bits of jewelry. Fun 
and fantasy for Duquette 
devotees. 






BY ALICE CAREY 

| Either gold or love can create more than enough madness 
in a man. but in Joaquin, a young vaquero of Hermosillo, the 
desire for both pounded ceaselessly in his veins. Unable to 
resist the lure of the gold fields, he finally persuaded his be- 
loved Rosita to run away with him to northern California! . . . 
there they would find their treasure! And so it happened that 
in 1849 these two wide-eyed young adventurers landed at the 
reckless port of San Francisco, that melting pot of races and 
creeds, intoxicated city of gold and gambling. They wandered 
about, drinking in the colorful sights of this bold frontier. 
eager to strike it rich themselves so they could join the swag- 
gering throngs of the lucky. Joaquin hurried Rosita aboard a 
river boat — she was the only woman on the trip — and they 
sailed for Sacramento. Here they purchased a mule. food, and 
tools. Eventually they reached their destined spot on the 
Calaveras bank of the Stanislaus river, and they carefully 
staked out their claim to fortune . . . and to fame in one of 
the bloodiest chapters in California history. Long days went 
by in the rough little camp by the river, and Joaquin worked 
tirelessly panning for gold in the watery dark sands. Once in a 
while, hysterical cries of "Gold!" would ring from neigh- 
boring camps and this spurred him on. Finally one day the 
shout of joy was his own, and he and Rosita danced and sang 
in triumph. The pile of nuggets grew steadily until their luck 
drew the attention of American miners camped across the river. 
Jealous of the youth's fortune, these hardened men ordered the 
pair to leave their claim, but Joaquin stood firm. The miners 
responded with a vicious attack, and when the smoke of 
violence had cleared from Joaquin's brain, he found the 
attackers had fled and that his Rosita lay dying on the ground. 
He cradled her in his arms through the night and then, in 
the early morning, he buried his love in the gold-crusted 
ground ... his two treasures lost to him forever. For it was 
Joaquin, the tender lover, 
who sank to his knees be- 
side the pitiful grave . . . 
but it was Joaquin, The 
Terrible, who rose to his 
feet swearing vengeance! 
And the first to read the 
sudden death that 
gleamed thereafter in 
those famous "velvety" 
eyes" were the eight min- 
ers whose greed had 
turned this boy into the 
murderous bandit . . . 
Joaquin Murietta. terror 
of California! 



THE ADRIAN STORY 

{Continued from page 21) 
PLEADS FOR FASHION FREEDOM 










Adrian spoke over Town Hall of the Air in Augusl 
1948, and expressed these convictions strongly. "Fashion 
Take it or leave it." The reaction was immediate anc 
not always sympathetic, for as one dyed-in-the-Pari: 
editor put it, "You were wonderful on the radio. I did 
admire your delivery, even while I disagreed with your 
reasoning!" 

But time has proved Adrian right, and once again 
he is accorded his rightful honors as one of the world's 
top designers. 

Adrian is used to success. From the day of the '20'i 
when he with Norman Norell and Natasha Rambova de- 
signed costumes for Rudolph Valentino's film, "The 
"Sainted Devil." ... he has been successful. 

He moved west with the movie industry and up until 
1941 was associated exclusively with it. He created 
spectacular costumes for Hollywood premiere prologues 
and then was for three years with Cecil B. De Mille. He 
was head designer with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer for the 
next twelve years, when he did screen wardrobes for such 
luminaries as Joan Crawford, Norma Shearer, Greta 
Garbo, Katherine Hepburn. 

Starting into business for himself in the treacherous 
year of '41, Adrian faced problems which were an im- 
mediate challenge. But he was determined to help show 
what American designers could do even when the odds 
were against them, and so went ahead with his plans. 
The rest is history, right up until this day when he is 
winning the peace by earning recognition for American 
fashion. 

During his motion picture career, he won many ac- 
colades for his fanciful costumes and decisive daytime 
fashions; as a couturier with over thirty franchise stores 
all over America, he earned numerous awards for dis- 
tinguished service. 

But the most indicative, I think, is a letter he received 
from the Encyclopedia Brittanica which said: 

"The article Dress in the Encyclopaedia Brittanica, i 
covering the subject from the earliest times to the present, 
occupies some eighteen pages. The section on Modern j 
Dress should, I think, be revised entirely, and I should 
be very glad if you would write a new article for us on 
the subject . . . some 2000 words ... at regular Brittanica 
rate of 2c a word. I sincerely hope that you will be able 
to write this article for us, for it is a subject on which 
you are the highest authority" VIRGINIA SCALLON 



The Calif ornian Becomes A Quarterly Publication 

Four big. big issues a year — keyed to the four great fashion 
seasons — that is the exciting new plan of The CALIFORNIAN 
Magazine. Now in its fifth year, The CALIFORNIAN is as 
unfettered by tradition, as young and as progressive as Cali- 
fornia itself. So, when the editors felt the pulse of their 
readers and discovered they would like four big fashion re- 
ports a year, the change was made without hesitation. 

Here is the plan: (1) FALL EDITION, issued in August. 
Back-to-School and Fall Fashions: (2) HOLIDAY EDITION, 
issued in November, holiday fashions and gift ideas: (3) 
SPRING EDITION, issued in February, cruise and spring 
fashions; (4) SUMMER EDITION, issued in May, swim and 
sun fashions. 

Subscriptions now in force will be extended to provide as 
many quarterly issues as the reader was entitled to on a 
monthly basis. New subscription rates are $1.00 per year 
(four issues). $2.50 for three years (12 issues), 35 cents per 
single copy, 50 cents per year additional on foreign sub- 
scriptions. 



62 







DE DE JOHNSON'S masterful interpretation of pongee . . . above left, pleated skirt, plain little 
bodice with sleeves slices of a rippling ruffle. Right, Skirt with a flare, indented with inverted 
pleats: bodice very simple, very correct. Both dresses notable additions to the traditions 
in sportswear by De De Johnson, winner of numerous fashion awards for her California sportswear. 



63 



PEGGY HUNT'S dotted swiss dress cut to match a sunbeam or the light of the moon. 

Very full flared skirt, fitted bodice with sleeves curved and fluted 

like the petals of a giant flower. And like all Peggy Hunt dresses, all charm. 

JEANETTE ALEXANDER'S embossed organdy dress with a full skirt to float on a 
summer breeze. For ornamentation on the simple bodice . . . four pleated ruffles. 
And definitely in the air, Atkinson's delightful Cologne. 




FRANK STIFFLER 



***■■ 



xi*lfc 






LY APPOlNnOTTT 

n&rnVKBd to h m kino oeoeoe vt 

111 ATKINSON LTD. 




OLOGNES with the traditional 
English bouquet, created exquisitely 
by Atkinsons of Bond Street, 
can now be bought at the finer shops. 



GOLD MEDAL 
EAU DE COLOGNE 




ENGLISH 
LAVENDER 



ATKINSONS 

IMPOtlED IT 

PAUL K. RANDALL 
299 MADISON AVE., NEW YORK 17, N. V. 




Louise Salinger 
Schools of Dress Design 

SAN FRANCISCO & PITTSBURGH 

Pattern Designing, Pattern Drafting, 
Millinery, Tailoring, Sketching, 
Modeling. Day and Evening Classes. 
Catalogue B. 

47 Kearny St. I Wood & Oliver Ave. 
at Maiden Lane I Entrance— 

San Francisco, I 230 Oliver Ave. 
Calif. } Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Do. 2-8059 < Atlantic 1-3S5S 



1950 
BAROQUE 

(Continued from Page 61) 



One enters the Duquette home into a 
small foyer leading through door on the 
right to the kitchen, left to the powder 
room and ahead to the salon. These four 
doors are paintings depicting persons in 
French Baroque dress entering the re- 
spective rooms. Flooring in the foyer is 
black and white marbled rubber tile, 
and walls are covered with gold-hued 
French brocade. 

Greatest thematic contrast to the salon 
is the bedroom done in Sahara tones of 
sand, tan, orange, cordovan and grey. 
A bed of immense proportions is cov- 
ered by a light fur spread, the colors of 
which are picked up by the burlap cov- 
ered walls and furniture. Drapes are 
woven of grey, orange and tan leather 
strips interspersed by a warp of cotton 
string. Lamp bases are old bleached 
teak camels. 

The exterior of the Duquette home is 
severe, practically windowless, nearly 
mausoleum-like in its proportions. 
Above the green hammered copper door 
is again his Baroque sunburst, while on 
each side of the front steps are obelisks 
(another Baroque symbol) of wire mesh. 



This then is Duquette's display — the 
warehouse of his creations — a graceful, 
formal, echo of an era of emotional, 
fluent art, and a direct contradiction to 
sloppy casualness. 

Out in his garden enmeshed studio, 
where he works, Duquette lives in a 
world of productive fantasy, interpret- 
ing a rare imaginative drive into reality. 

Who then can say that we have for- 
gotten magic? 




Designed for 



Gracious Living 



This Copper drinking set is artistic, distinc- 
tive and really practical. The Aristocrat of 
sets is tin lined for that cleaner, cooler taste. 
Pitcher holds over 2 quarts liquid. Each Mug 
holds 16 oz. Copper tray is 14 in. wide. This 
set is ideal as a wedding gift. Send for book- 
let on many more beautiful copper items. 

Complete for only $27.95 
No C.O.D.'s please. 
Send check or money order to: 

RAYMOND H. PALUCH 

505 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Healthy Eyes 

Without Glasses, 

Drugs, or Surgery 
Are Possible 

Many eye defects such as near or far- 
sightedness, astigmatism, eye-strain, cross- 
eyes, failing vision, or middle-age and 
other eye defects respond to our natural 
but harmless methods of eye correction. 

Most people Look More Beautiful and 
Younger Without Glasses! 

Call or Write 

Dr. T. H. David, D.C. 

301 S. Harvard Blvd. 
Los Angeles 5, California 

Phone DUnkirk 3-2248 for appointment at 
the Eye-Training Center and Clinic. 



YOUR COMFORT MEMS ALMOST IWTHlMn IIS 




when you wear 

PAMELA GAY ULTRA BRIEFS 

A modest minimum 
under all your clothes. 



MIRAGE 

A shadow of black nylon sheer. 

$2.95 
ILLUSION 

A briefer brief of white nylon 

net. 

(not illustrated) 

$2.95 

• 

SEND CHECK WITH ORDER. 
SORRY, NO C.O.D. 




Trim your hip-line. 
Eliminate waist-line bulk 



LOVE BUG 

Black French silk chiffon. 

$3.95 
SASHAY 

White nylon net with lace — 
trimmed pink satin heart. 

$3.95 

• 

INCLUDE HIP MEASUREMENT 
WE PREPAY 1st CLASS MAIL 



PAMELA GAY 

BOX 23-C MELROSE 76, MASSACHUSETTS 




66 



THE CALIFORNIAN, MAY, 1950 




Skirts as light and graceful as the blossoms that dance upon them . . . 

Fashioned in a romantic mood by Dan Gertsman — California of our own exclusive hand-screened 

air-cooled cotton. Wonderfully washable! In vivacious red or sun yellow tulips. 

Or in heavenly blue or golden yellow begonias. Sizes 10 to 16, about $11. 

At Haggarty , s — Los Angeles, Marshall Field & Co. — Chicago, and fine stores everywhere; 

or write: Dan Gertsman — California, 722 S. Los Angeles St., L. A. 14. 




rFFORNTA 



0«t JUL? lift 







<9 «* 








The coolest shadow on a summer afternoon, Bates newest and 
loveliest ombre woven plaid frosted with silvery chambray, the 
great squares shading from cream to coffee and meeting most 
marvelously in this dress designed by Henry Rosenfeld. All-combed, vat- 
dyed, Rigmel Sanforized, this is cotton carried to the finest possible point. 

BATES FABRICS, INC., 80 WORTH STREET, NEW YORK 13 




FABRICS 



/ A MAGAZINE STYLED FOR COLORFUL LIVING 



CALI FO 



PRICE 35 CENTS 





you ve got a date with 



JERSEY JAMBOREE . . . three worsted wool jersey dresses making a bid for first place in your 
college wardrobe. Left: Study in contrasts . . . one piecer with solid top of tangerine, emerald or black 
and contrasting tweedy checked jersey skirt. Center: Velvet touched . . . softly draped with 
gathered skirt and novelty buttons. In heather gray or tan. Right: Tucked yoke . . . gathered skirt . . . all-in-one cap sleeves. 
In high shades of red, royal or emerald. All in sizes 9 to 17. All about S15.00 
At leading stores throughout the country. For store nearest you 

icrite: Linsk oj California, 2100 South Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. -m- -m~ Hm~r £ — H ~m- ^~ 

Philadelphia • California 



VOL. 9 
No. 6 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published quarterly by The Californian, Inc., at 1020 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, Calif., printed in USA. Yearly sub- 
scription price $1.00. Entered as second class matter January 23, 1946, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, Calif., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



FALL 
1 950 



^fuated ' fffatcwdoMci 



ROSENBLUM'S casually simple 10W< camel's hair jacket gives you an 
air of "just-rightness" — the carelessly elegant air that appears to be utterly 
nonclialant, but is never arrived at by accident. 
Its natural camel color complements practically everything in your wardrobe. 



Sizes 10 to 20 

29 95 

Sports Shop 




xc^lj 



y/ 







/ 




YOUNKERS, Des Moines 6, Iowa 










• 


Please send me Rosenblum's Camels 


Hair Jacket © 29.95 




Sl7P 




• 












• 












• 
• 


<"oty 




Statp 






• 
• 


Check ( ) 


Money Order ( ) 






C. 0. D. ( 


• 

> : 



THE CAL I FORN I AN, AUGUST, 1950 




S ADIUM STRIPES 

The inspiration : bright brilliance of school pennants . . . the fabric : exclusive caress-soft 100% fine wool worsted . . . 

the tailoring: Dan Gertsman's renowned custom-quality . . . sizes 10 to 18. WRAP-AROUND: slimming button-on with 

jester's pocket, about $15. GLOBETROTTER: flatteringly flared with two big bucket pockets, about $15. 

the "in-or-out" blouses: color-related 100% wool jersey with fine sweater touches of ribbing at the neck, sleeves 

and waist, 10 to 18, about $8. In Gold, Scarlet, Campus Green, Men's wear Grey, Pigskin Tan, Black. 

RESULT: Boon to the girl who's going places— whether college or career! 

John Shilhto Co., Cincinnati; Bullock's, Los Angeles; 

Olds, Wortman & King, Portland; Daniels & Fisher, Denver; 

and fine stores everywhere. 



IX 



722 S. Los Angeles Street, Los Angeles 14. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, AUGUST, 1950 



c^fi l* s b0 * **■ A% 



Witk Tfcmw's «m <^**2* 



with the ge«M |tla | 
Persona" zea 




Borrowed from the best beau in your life — and what an idea ! 
I t's the big news on campus— and it's spelled out with Preview's 
Hrt new Beltogram Skirts. Not just a monogram, but a handsome ,i.^\ 

big, clear-cut gold-tone buckle that is an initial, topping a ^}?^«rSp«tp«^U 

l|;rsmooth skirt and calling all eyes to your hand-span waist. 
It you want to be first with the newest, it's easy, with Preview's 
smart new Beltogram Skirts. Waist sizes 22-30. 






MAILABLE AT: 



ALHAMBRA Lieberg's 

ANAHEIM Clarice 

BOULDER CITY Maryemma's 

BROOKLYN Rainbow Shops 

BURBANK Barry's Sporiswt 

CHICAGO The Fair 

CORPUS CHRISTI Kay's 

DOUGLAS Vernon's 

EUGENE Kaufman's 

EVANSVILLE Saler's 

FT. WORTH Meacham's 

FRESNO Cottschalk's 

FULLERTOy Kingsbury 

GL'ENDALE Webb's 

HOLLYWOOD Sporty Knit 

HONOLULU C & D Dress Cc 

HOT SPRINGS Pfeifer's 

HUNTINGTON PARK Lee's Depl. Stor 

HUTCHINSON Wiley Dry Good 

JOHNSTOWN Penn Traffic 

LAS VEGAS Ranzone's 

LITTLE ROCK Pfeijer's 

LONG BEACH Buff urn's 

LONG ISLAND Rainbow Shops 

LOS ANGELES May Co. 

NEW YORK CITY Carol Anlell 

NORTH HOLLYWOOD Sporty Knit 

OAKLAND Hale Bros. 

OCEAy BEACH ....Veda Moss 

ONTARIO Margaret's 

OXNARD Charlotte Shop 

PASADENA Nash's 

PHOENIX. Diamond's 

PITTSBURGH Frank & Seder 

PORTERVILLE Bullard's 

RIVERSIDE Rouse's 

SACRAMENTO Hale Bros. 

SALT LAKE CITY Wolfe's 

SAN ANTONIO Vogue 

SAN DIEGO lion's 

SAN JOSE Hale Bros. 

SANTA Ay A Matlingly's 

SEATTLE Frederick & Nei 

TUCSOy Albert Stein/eld 

TULSA Brown-Dunkin 

VEyTURA Jack Rose 

WH1TT1ER Tibbelt's 

and other fine stores 

If not available in your city 

write directly to Preview Sportswear 



860 South Los Angeles Street 
Los A n g eles 15, California 





makes a pretty picture in her Graff blouse 
of COHAMA'S exciting "Firefly" 



It's tailored in world-famous Graff 



fashion ... in the newest development in tissue 



faille, Cohama's "Firefly" ... a silky-sheen 



highlighted fabric with a myriad of shimmering pin-dots. 



In breath-taking jewel tones for fall suit sparkle. 



Sizes 32 to 38. To Retail about $4.00. 



At fine stores everywhere, or write to 



w 



orld-famous 



,/^M 




FF 



californiawear 



1240 SO. MAIN STREET. LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 



THE CAUFOPNIAN, AUGUST, 1950 



Available At These Fine Stores 



TEXAS 

BARNES & CO. 
SANGER BROS. 
BLACKBURN BROS. 



San Angela 

Dallas 

Amarillo 



NEW MEXICO 
MOLLIE'S STYLE SHOP Albuquerque 



IDAHO 



BROOKOVER'S 



Boise 



ARIZONA 

WALTER SWITZER, INC. Phoenix 

ALBERT STEINFELD & CO. Tucson 



LOUISIANA 
THE FASHION Shreveport 



CALIFORNIA 

J. W. ROBINSON CO. 

SCHICK'S 

WEILL'S 

KAHN'S 



Los Angeles 

Long Beach 

Bakersfield 

Oakland 




Now In Our 24th Yearl 



half size 

youthful slender silhouette, 
especially designed for the \ 

"A vei "age American Cady* 

of Forstmann's i 
100% virgin wool Milateen 



sizes 12V2 to 24 1 / 2 
to retail at about $80 




2 1 7 



CALIFORNIA 



8TH STREET, LOS'ANGELES 14, CALIFORNIA 

THE CALIFORNIAN, AUGUST, 1950 




LOUnp l)r SI66D HlCflr Y djSINllS Washable, Fast Color, Sanforized Flannel, in Fireman's Red only. Jacket with 

white rickrack trim and side pocket. White knit cuffs at wrist and ankle. 



Sizes 32 to 38. About 
nearest store to: 



1.95. At better stores, or write for name of your 



EVER READY PRODUCTS 

APPAREL CITY 
90 Dorman Avenue, San Francisco 24, California 



£VER READY 

PRODUCTS s 



THE CALIFORNIAN, AUGUST, 1950 




Fall Semester Wardrobe 



Wonderful collegiate separates skillfully 
coordinated to pass the stiffest wardrobe 
requirement. Checked flannel with wool 
gabardine. Combinations of Navy with Gray 
or Brown with Beige. Styled by Lyn Davis. 

..."Campus Jacket"— about $25 .. ."Lecture Hall 
Skirt"— of plain gabardine— about $13.00... 
Quadrangle Skirt"— about $13.00 . . ."Sorority 
Shirt" of nylon and rayon suede— about $13.00 
..."Field Trip Slacks"— about $13.00... "Co-Ed 
Vest"— about $9.00. Not Shown: "Pledge Pants" 
—about $13.00. Sizes 10-18 



LOS ANGELE S , l^ 



CREATORS 



O F 



PLANNED 



WARDROBES 



10 



THE CALIFORNIAN, AUGUST, 1950 




&uu 




■Qs& does "the smoker 




• imported wool check, 

exclusive colors: gold with 
gray, russet with navy, 
red with beige. 

• flannel, velvet-tiimmed: 
yarn-dyed gray or navy. 

• fabulous fake fur: 

black, navy, beige, red. 

$39.95 

matching or contrasting 
skirt... $10. 95 to $14.95 

junior and misses sizes. 

At Bullock's, LOS ANGELES; Bon Marche', SACRAMENTO; The Fashion, HOUSTON; John A. Brown, OKLAHOMA CITY; Bests 

Apparel, SEATTLE 

n 



Ll 



Jj 



J of California ■ 846 so. broadway • los angeles 14, California 



THE CALIFORNIAN, AUGUST, 1950 



11 



ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 



G 



C 



ifts in the 
alifornia manner. 




SMOKING SET: This exotic Chinese slipper is 
both a cigarette container and an ash tray. In 
brilliant turquoise ceramic, with gold ornamenta- 
tion. Lovely home accessory, novel and useful. 
$5.00, postpaid. 




PUPPET TOOTHBRUSH HOLDER: What tot won't 
brush his teeth each day with this cute holder 
for his brush. California ceramic, and measures 
9 inches high. Blue, white and brown color com- 
bination. Attractively gift boxed. $1.25, postpaid. 




DARNING DODO: Gaily colored, California cer- 
amic darning egg. Words "Darn it" on bottom. 
Measures 5 inches high. $1.50, postpaid. 

No C.O.O. — please. Send check, cash, or money orders. 
(Residents of California — please add 3% sales tax.) 



Send for free illustrated gadget 
and gift guide. 




THE CORRAL SHOP 



• OX til IANCHO SANTA FE • CAUFOINIA 



~~ wm% 




(W**— 






GRANULAR CLEANSER ... a normal, 
gradual, effective "skin peel" at home. 
Gradually sluffs off old dead skin. This 
friction stimulates circulation, encour- 
ages growth of new cells. Contains 
honey, almond and barley meal, plus in- 
gredients which bleach and clarify skin. 
The pulling effect of the honey while 
scouring loosens blackheads and white 
heads, and scrubbing effect removes. Also 
wonderful for hands. 2-ounce jars (fed- 
eral tax included) $1.50; 4-ounce jars, 
$2.40. Add 3% sales tax in Calif., 3%% 
in Los Angeles. Prom DermaCulture, 
Inc., 270 South Robertson Blvd., Beverly 
Hills, California. 



LAMRO HOT TRAY . . . "Just what I've 
wanted," say thousands of housewives, 
cooks and campers about this handy tray 
which snaps on the side of the skillet . . . 
self-adjusting for any skillet thickness. 
Keeps bacon warm, while grease drains 
back into frying pan as you prepare 
eggs, liver, ham, etc. The hot tray takes 
the place of extra skillet, plate or ab- 
sorbent paper . . . keeping food piping 
hot while remainer portion is cooking. 
Perfect for indoor or outdoor use. Order 
today. 60c each (tax included and post- 
paid). The Margorita Shop, 1018 South 
Main St., Los Angeles 15, Calif 



"GAY NINETIES" MOOD . . . carried 
out in original Claytoon illustrations in 
durable, glazed place mats. Bright, gay- 
colored photographs of miniature clay 
models and stage sets. You and your 
friends will love these adorable mats. 
Water and alcohol resistant. Protect 
table finishes while adding merriment to 
your place setting. The perfect hostess 
or anniversary gift. Size 10"xl6". Set of 
6, only $2.00. Price includes tax and ship- 
ping charges in America. Order from 
The Margorita Shop, 1018 S. Main St., 
Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

"SNO-MITTS" . . . finally, the perfect 
insulating coaster! And you'll be the 
perfect hostess when you serve this cool, 
tantalizing-looking drink. Keeps your 
drink cold twice as long ... ice never 
seems to melt. Durable, washable, attrac- 
tive and stain proof . . . does not sweat . . . 
will not mar furniture. Comfortable and 
convenient to hold. Beautifully gift- 
boxed. Set of four white "Sno-Mitts", 
complete with glasses, only $3.00 post- 
paid (add 9e tax in California). Order 
for yourself and your friends from Fred 
S. Meyer Co., Box 1176, Beverly Hills, 
California. 



MOULI GRATER . . . this new rotary 
g-rater is economical — grates every bit, 
no left-overs ; sanitary — drum is remov- 
able for easy cleaning; safe — can't cut 
or scratch you; quick — crank does the 
work, no attaching to tabletops. Sturdily 
made of high-grade rustproof steel, for 
left- or right-handed use. Grates every- 
thing — vegetables, cheese, cocoanut, 
breadcrumbs, crackers, nuts, hard-boiled 
eggs, dry soap ends, etc. — coarse or fine. 
This ingenious French import, yours for 
only $1.00 postpaid. Fred S. Meyer Co., 
Box 1176, Beverly Hills, Calif. 



12 



THE CALIFORNIAN, AUGUST, 1950 



~*fttttt$ 




Mw*^ 



YOUR FAVORITE FRENCH PURSE 

. . . made of beautiful leather. This 
practical, distinctive purse holds change 
as easily as bills . . . has a special pocket 
for cards and a holder for passes and 
pictures . . . lined and on a sturdy frame. 
Yes, even a secret pocket for those vital 
papers and bills! Available in red or 
green ... a quality item — perfect for 
both everyday and special occasions . . . 
yet phenomenally priced at $2.50 post- 
paid (including federal and state tax). 
Order direct from The Sandley Co., 815 
N. Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood 38, Calif. 



BLOUSE— SKIRT AND SLACK TEN- 
DER . . . the perfect answer to a neat, 
trim "slenderized" waist line. Keeps your 
blouse firmly inside your skirt and your 
skirt seams straight. And for sports- 
wear, it's worth its weight in gold . . . 
you can reach, stoop, kneel or bend and 
your blouse stays put! Washable . . . 
comfortable to wear . . . improves pos- 
ture ... off and on in a jiffy . . . safe 
and invisible when worn. Don't worry 
about size — you cut it to fit you. Amber, 
white, navy blue and black. Only $1.50 
postpaid. Money-back guarantee . . . No 
C.O.D.'s. Shrell Products, 608 S. Dear- 
born St., Dept. TC-1, Chicago 5, Illinois. 

DRESSING BY DESIGN ... a newsy, 
informative booklet with ten funda- 
mental rules on how to dress according 
to a design of perfection. These "tricks 
of the trade" are well-tested methods 
by which you can achieve individuality, 
figure flattery, and a well groomed look. 
Invaluable information helpful in de- 
termining the type of clothes best suited 
to your figure . . . many practical hints 
on how to accessorize your clothes 
properly . . . and how to coordinate 
your wardrobe successfully. Order Dress- 
ing by Design . . . only 50c. The Cali- 
fornian Magazine, 1020 S. Main St., Los 
Angeles 15, California. 

NEW CHEFSAW MEAT SAVER ... a 

hundred uses for this hand, all-purpose, 
aluminum kitchen saw. Buy meat at 
quantity prices — cut in kitchen to serv- 
ing portions desired. Hardened steel saw 
blade severs meat bones smoothly. 
Grooved handle tenderizes tough cuts. 
Ideal in preparing frozen foods. Useful 
in dressing game and fish "on the spot." 
Cuts steel and brass. Regular price, 
$1.50. Introductory offer $1.00 postpaid. 
Limit two to a customer. Extra blades 
3 for 40c. No C.O.D.'s. Money back guar- 
antee. The Margorita Shop, 1018 S. 
Main, Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

TIDY TOES ... the California Tabbies 
with two-button back closing. These 
adorable foot-mittens are so comfy you'll 
forget you have them on . . . until you 
hear the compliments they rate! For 
lounging, dorm, patio and pool. Tabbies 
are styled for wearability. Softest satin 
in black, white or pink; and quilted 
chintz in red, yellow, green or blue. 
Sizes S-M-L. Send check or money or- 
der for $3.95 (plus 10c tax in California, 
12c in Los Angeles) to The Margorita 
Shop, 1018 South Main St., Los Angeles 
15, Calif. 





^Jjreddlnq Dm ^JJ: 



iq 



'eiiqn 



r 




ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 

\3tfts in the 
Xjalifornia manner. 




TINY TEPS: Step-up for the youngsters, and very handy 
for bathroom use. Aluminum frame, painted plywood 
steps, nonskid rubber feet. Shipped flat, easily assem- 
bled. $3.95 (add 25c per postage). 





MEASURING SPOONS: Here's a colorful, decorative 
touch for your kitchen . . . and useful, too. Four 
plastic measuring spoons, that fit in a floral arrangement 
with this bright ceramic flowerpot. Gadgets like this 
make housekeeping twice the fun. $1.50, postpaid. 




MINIATURE GAS STOVE: Another California gift to 
add a touch of sunshine to any kitchen. Gaily colored 
red, green, and yellow miniature stove for kitchen 
matches ... or use for cigarettes. Measures 4 x 3 'A 
inches. $1 .75, postpaid. 



No C.O.D. — please. Send check, cash or money order, 
(residents of California — please add 3% safes tax.) 




Send for free illustrated 
gadget and gift guide. 



TEE CORRAL SBOP 



• ANCHO SANTA U . CAIIFOINIA 



THE CAM FORNI AN, AUGUST, 1950 



13 




TEE-TOPS 



i 



RIGOLO 



Interlock long staple dyed yarn 

cotton, suede finish, 

ribbed collar and waistband. 



Colors: Stripes — Red &. White, Navy & White, Kelly & White 
Solids — Navy, White, Red, Kelly, Candy Pink, Maize, 
Sunburst, Cocoa Brown, Black, Coral, Char- 
treuse 

Sizes: Small, Medium and Large 



J^awrence J\obert£ & Co. 



742 S. HILL ST. • LOS ANGELES 14 



TUcker 9676 




CAPER 




BANSHEE 



14 



THE CALIFORNIAN, AUGUST, 1950 



TUBBABLE ALL WOOL FLANNELS 




FMIESCOS for Fall in, tubbable 100% wool SAN FORL AN flannel. Couturier styled in Palo Alto, California, the home 
of Stanford University where Co-eds are style conscious and critical. Wear them — wash them — with no thought of cleaning 
expense. SANFORLAN wool is as revolutionary today as was Nylon 8 years ago. 

FRESCOS of Flannel range in price from $13.95 to $22.50. During the month of August, you may order them from; 
Abercrombie and Fitch, New York; James McCutcheon and Co., New York; Van Lengerke & Antoine, Chicago; 
Best's Apparel, Seattle; The May Co., Los Angeles; Roos Bros. 7 California stores; and you'll find them at 



many other fine stores from September forward. 



a/MfM 



» 1 i f o r a i 



* 



113 STEUART STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



sciu|m4 hradifvwhi 



THE CALIFORNIAN. AUGUST, 1950 



15 





ROMPTON 




WRITE TO CALIFORNIA CLASSICS, 4 7 E . PICO, LOS ANGELES, FOR STORE IN YOUR CITY 



At these fine stores: 

Best & Co Seattle, Washington 

Cergs Portland, Oregon 

Bullock's Los Angeles, Calif. 

Carl's San Antonio, Texas 

Clarke's Tulsa, Okla. 

Coopers Fresno, Calif. 

Henshey's Santa Monica, Calif. 

Rankins Santa Ana, Calif. 

Samuel Leask Santa Cruz, Calif. 

Walkers Long Beach, Calif. 

Whytals Klamath Falls, Oregon 




\ 



B6 WIS© • • • IVIcIJOr 111 solids with stripe trim or choose stripes with solid accent. Fully faced cuff 

permits the sleeves to be worn either three-quarter or full length, both have zipper 
front closing and generous pockets. Combinations of sanforized cotton flannel 
men's shirting; choice of aqua, brown, beige stripe with aqua; or, navy, powder, 
grey with navy . . . $8.95 

UfinLuUli'llllLL 725 EAST WASHINGTON BLVD., LOS ANGELES 21, CALIFORNIA 



THE CALIFORNIA*. AUGUST, 1950 



17 



e 



- 

- 
< 



e 



- 




ON THE COVER: 

Jaclane of California's slim sun 
in beautiful vineyard colors: 
jug brown, tokay, concord blue.X 
sand beige, black, nickel, putty\ 
vineyard green. Designed for (/i.T 
woman ivho wears half sizes 
( 12 l /2-24 l /2) but available in 
regular sizes (10-44). About $50 ! \ 
Leslie James hat. Photographed '[ 
by Frank Stiffller at the world's^ 
largest vineyard (The Garret 
Co.), in Guasti, California. 




PUBLISHED QUARTERLY 



IN 






FEBRUARY- MAY- AUGUST- NOVEMBER 



- 



e 



ts 

e 
fa 

M 
- 

u 

fa 
H 

s 

9 



California fashions 



EDITOR AND PUBLISHER J. R. Osherenko 

ASSISTANT PUBLISHER William J. Bowen 

FASHION EDITOR Virginia Scallon 

MANAGING EDITOR Helen Ignatius 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR. Philip Kustner 

MEN'S FASHION EDITOR Malcolm Steinlauf 

FASHIONS Jacquelin Lary 

Joan Ahern 
ART Morris Ovsey 

Jane Albrecht 

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Frank Stiffier 

SHOPPING ROUNDUP Joyce Olsen 

FOOD STYLIST Helen Evans Brown 



California Fashions Round The World 1 

Indispensable Autumn Suit 20; 

Classic Suit and Topcoat 2 

Fabulous Tweed 2, 

All-Purpose Duster 23 

Pattern of Star Points 24 

For A Very Feminine Lady 25 

Slim Suit, Swirling Cape 26 

High-Style Lines 32 

The Bat Wing Sleeve 33 

Return of the Jumper 34 

Challis, The Wonder Wool 3§f 

Fun Things 36 

Horse Blanket Pants 38 

Fabricated Fur 39 

Hi-Water Pants - 40 

Pattern of Stripes 41 

School Days ..: 42 

Sweaters and Skirts Dyed To Match 

Casual Woolens 46] 

Lounging Robes 50 

Men's Fashions 60; 



California features 



An Interview With James Hilton 27 

Central Staging 28 

Elsa Lanchester and Forman Brown 30 

Bird of Paradise: Modern Arrangement for Modern Homes 51 

California Cooks —.52 

California Living 56 

Facade For a Fortune in Beauty 62 

THE CALIFORNIAN is published quarterly at 1020 South Main St., Los Angeles IS, 
California, PRospect 6651. San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph, 833 Market St., Room 
705,- DOuglas 2-1472. Subscription price: $1.00 one year, $2.50 three years. Fifty cents . 
additional postage per year outside continental United States. 35c per copy. Member Audit j 
Bureau of Circulations. Entered as second class matter January 1949, The Californian, Inc. J 
Printed in U.S.A. Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. j 




Los Angeles, San francisco, 

Dallas. London. Paris, or almost 

any place you dream about going . . . there 

you can go in style, wearing a California suit or 

coin! This is rather a grandiose statement, but it is backed 

up in grandiose fashion. In wonderful wearable colors that somehow bear 

the stamp of California . . . in crisp sure styling that can be identified all over the 

world as "from California." Here where we're a tradition 

of trend-setting fashion . . . here where we embark on 

round-the-globe tours . . . here we instincively seem to 





know the kind of good travelers women like. 7 he kind 

of town suits and coats, too . . . that are unmistakably the 

sign of a well-groomed woman. II omen attired in coats 

and suits from 1950 fall anil winter collections from California will feel ver} 

much admired, very much in the swing of things . . . wherever they go . 

/'rice rangi'. a thing of infinite variety so that women 

anywhere can near California clothes almost 

everywhere. And so here we shon you 

California at its best. 








Your indispensable suit for autumn ... the striped jacket beautifully tailored, cut like a shirt . . . full sleeves gathered at 
the wrist, very neat trim collars and cuffs, tab with three buttons at the neckline. Solid-color slim straight skirt. By Irving 
Schechter in Botany sheen gabardine. This very versatile suit . . . casual, comfortable, colorful ... is in sizes 10-18, about $70. 



20 




Rosenblum of California's flannel suit, topcoat in sizes 8-20, about $40 each. J. J. Haggarty, 
Los Angeles ; The Emporium, San Francisco, Arnold Constable, New York. The classic lines 
and meticulous tailoring, the polished simplicity are perfect for your imaginative accessories. 



21 






Opposite page left: A beautiful 






double-breasted suit by Gaines & Co. in 



worsted waxloom or 



sheen gabardine. Slash pockets, small 



cuffs, and a cleft shawl collar. 



Opposite right: Fabulous tweed coat with 



the big collar and cuffs in sheared 



beaver. Exciting colors . . . gold, copper. 



deep heather. The silhouette, lovely 



from all angles. By Charles of 



California, about S155. 



Dayton Co., Minneapolis; 



Joseph Home, Pittsburgh. This page: 



Rain or shine, the perfect all-purpose 



duster by Sport-Lane of California in 



waterproof corduroy. About $17, at 



The Emporium, San Francisco; 



Russan's, Spokane. 






The perfect and very beautiful 

silhouette for the fall season, interpreted here 

by Gene Shelly in imported sharkskin. The 

lines are as smooth and sleek as a streak of 

light, the details sparkling, cut along 

the sharp zigzag pattern of star points. And 

on the collar and under the pockets, tiny 

bound buttonholes . . . new idea in suit ornamentation. 

Sizes 10-18, about $175. 

Neiman-Marcus Co.. Dallas. 





Left: For a very feminine lady, Loumarc creates this 

lovely fall and winter coat in velour or 

gabardine, with four tiers of cross-cut fabric. 

Sizes 10-18, about $90. Lansburgh & Bro., Washington, D.C. 

Above: Sophisticated and beautifully slim, a suit 

with stripes on the jacket on the horizontal, the slant, 

the square . . . and a straight solid-color skirt. 

A California Traveler Original. 

Sizes 8-20, about $75. Frost Bros., San Antonio. 



For your most dramatic moments 



B. M. Michel's very slim suit and 



very full swirling cape. In blue or green 



wool with the rich embellishment of grey 



Persian lamb on the pockets and the long 



scarf of the cape. J. J. Haggarty, 



Los Angeles; The White House, San Francisco. 






26 




Noted English author James Hilton works 
in the study of his Hollywood apartment. 



READY TO WRITE 

An Interview With James Hilton 

BY JANE BELL BISHOP 



The real Shangri-la is four or five miles up in the hills 
above Santa Barbara, according to James Hilton, author 
of such beloved books as '"Lost Horizon." "Goodbye, Mr. 
Chips." "Random Harvest" and many others. "When I 
reach the point where I don't have to be in Hollywood most 
of the time. I'd like to buy a small house up there, for it's 
the most beautiful spot I know," he said smiling in his 
warm, friendly way. 

James Hilton has been living in California since 1937 
and claims that as long as he stays here he is never troubled 
with the asthma which used to plague him in England and 
New York. "California is not enervating for me," he 
laughed, his ruddy English complexion turning a shade 
redder. "I'm just a bit lazy, as most people are. and Cal- 
ifornia is a wonderful place to be lazy in." 

Sitting in the control booth of the radio studio during 
a lull in the rehearsal of the dramatic show on which he 
is host and narrator, he confessed with his pleasant laugh 
that his greatest affliction is the procrastination which 
makes him put off until another time the writing he should 
do today. "I work best under pressure," he said, shifting 
his long legs in his rather loose-fitting trousers. "Having 
to meet a deadline for any reason, whether it be a need 
for money, or a publisher who is insisting upon the com- 
pletion of a piece of work really gets me down to business." 

This personal insight into the business of professional 
writing stemmed from a query as to what Mr. Hilton was 
currently working on. He had said he was getting ready 
to write a new book and was at the moment trying to make 
himself get down to it. Frankly, I was excited. Here was 
an opportunity to find out how an eminently successful 
author sets about the preparation of a novel. I asked then 
what came to him first when he began planning a book — 
the characters, plot or setting. The answer was unexpected — 
"It all seems to unfold to me at once as a complete whole." 
Then I remembered reading the story of how in 1934 when 
he was commissioned to write a story for the Christmas 
supplement of the British Weekly with a two-week deadline, 
he struggled through the first week without getting a single 
idea. The second week, at his wit's end, he went for a 
bicycle ride to clear his mind, and pedaling along, the 
whole story of "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" came to him in a 
flash. Mr. Hilton went on to say in his light. British accented 
voice that as far as character development is concerned 
his heroes and heroines are often composites of people he 
has known. This is true, for example, in the case of the 
fascinating and devilish wife in "So Well Remembered." 

Being in the radio studio on show day, it was natural 
that our conversation should turn to this current phase of 
his career. It seems that in all his work on the Hallmark 
Playhouse, Mr. Hilton is approaching from a new angle a 
field in which he has long been interested, namely that of 



the theatre. Mr. Hilton does not do the adaptations, but 
chooses well-known works of fiction to be written for radio 
presentation, while he assumes the role of host and narrator. 
He sometimes becomes a part of the cast, as he did in a 
recent adaptation of his own fine work. "Random Harvest" 
in which he unfolded the story as though the characters 
were his personal friends. His enthusiasm for the theatre 
goes back to the days when he was often at the famous 
Abbey Theatre in Dublin and the Old Vic in London. I 
asked if he thought there would ever be a National Theatre 
in America such as the Abbey Theatre in Ireland or the 
Moscow Art Theatre in Russia, and Mr. Hilton laughed 
and said, "Give it a thousand years." Then more seriously 
he said he wouldn't like or expect to see a National Theatre 
as such in America, for there is no one nationality in this 
country, and that is part of its greatness. "As long as 
even one such fine play as "Death of a Salesman" (current 
Broadway hit) can be produced in America, that is enough," 
Mr. Hilton stated. 

Asked if he had ever considered writing a play, he 
answered with an enthusiastic "Yes," but added, "The only 
trouble is I'm afraid if I did think of a good play, it would 
come out as a novel." His interest in the theatre is surely 
evident in his novels where dramatic values and human 
understanding are so well met and blended. 




James Hilton, Master of Ceremonies for CBS Hallmark 
Playhouse, discusses highpoints of script with George Brent. 



n 



Right and below: Painted on the four 
walls of the Players' Ring Theatre, 
Sydney Rushakoff's forceful murals of a 
New York tenement district strengthened 
the illusion of reality in the central 
staging production of "Street Scene." 





HH 



CENTRAL 



Central staging establishes an incredible and sometimes un- 
comfortable intimacy between audience and actors. At the tiny 
Players' Ring Theatre and the Circle Theatre in Hollywood, the 
audience is seated around the main acting area in the center 
of the room. With four possible entrances and exits for actors, 
the staging of plays is very much like a lightning-fast series 
of scenes in a motion picture. The result: a sustained quick- 
ness and lightness of movement and a binding illusion of 
reality. 

During the past year in Southern California, the two plays 
which best illustrated the vast possibilities of central staging 
were a new Saroyan and an old Rice. William Saroyan's The 
Son, world premiered at The Circle Theatre, was a kaleidoscope 
of different scenes: a bar, an operating room, a dressing 




Flexible and fast-moving, the central staging of Saroyan s "The Son" was a rapid round of scenes, sets stripped to bare essentials. 



STAGING 



room backstage, a street, a living room, an opera box and a 
stage, a park, a dugout overseas. Sets were slashed to absolute 
essentials ... a chair, a piano, a table . . . and the scenes 
flashed by, momentary blackouts the only break in the fast 
tempo. Playwright William Saroyan presented a tangle of 
lives without any well-defined "beginning, middle, and end," 
aimed at showing life as it is lived unornamented and un- 
pruned by the rules of art. 

The revival of Elmer Rice's Street Scene at the Players' 
Ring Theatre was a swift crossing and recrossing of actors 
on a single setting. Sydney Rushakoff's murals of a sordid 
tenement district in New York were painted on the walls 
inside the theatre, and the entranceway to an old "walk-up" 
apartment house was constructed in one corner of the room. 



Sometimes only one or two feet away from the audience, the 
actors (with remarkable unconcern) maintained a rapid flow 
of dialogue, draped themselves casually on the steps between 

the rows of seats, at times peered intently into the faces of the 

- 

spectators. 

Rivalling the swift round of scenes in the Elizabethan play- 
house, central staging may mean an untimely death of elabo- 
rate settings and a rebirth of a more imaginative intimate 
theatre with high flights of dialogue the element of prime 
importance. Central staging is interesting for another reason. 
Members of the audience can watch other members of the 
audience. Incidentally, during the performances of Rice and 
Saroyan at the Ring and the Circle, an average of two out of 
four ladies resorted to kleenex to block the flow of tears. 



29 



T. 



he lady on the piano is Elsa Lanchester. 
The gentleman playing the piano is Forman 
Brown. Miss Lanchester sings the witty 
songs of Mr. Brown nightly except Sunday 
and Monday at the little Turnabout Theatre 
in Hollywood. Her voice is not coated with 
the thick syrup required by the loping lines 
of sweet saxophonic jazz. Her voice is, 
rather, a remarkable blend of a cello and 
a hacksaw required by the sharp twists 
and turns of Forman Brown's razor-edged 
melodies. This inimitable pair has been 
photographed in the midst of their rendi- 
tion of "I'm Glad To See Your Back Hel- 
ene." Miss Lanchester's beautiful Victorian 
gown of pale beige and blue satin, sprin- 
kled with roses and slashed as low as the 
unwritten law allows, is (for the purposes 
of Mr. Brown's play on words) unlaced, in 
a most Unvictorian manner, halfway down 
Miss Lanchester's excellent back. When not 
settled comfortably on the lid of the piano, 
Miss Lanchester revolves with fluid grace 
about the tiny stage of the Turnabout 
Theatre, her mass of red hair and white, 
very white, skin glittering in the footlights. 




FORMAN BROWN 



EISA 




FRANK STIFFLER 



LAMCHESTER 



31 



-vjVe^ 5 ' 



^ ^ 



As, ^ 



" . W** 



,vs# e 




(TOT* £ 



.vet 



f e^ 



s?' 



ec^ a 



\ s 1 



OtV' 



Aitve' 



, v etv 



\vetO 



i\\tves. 






t* 



$.Vft& 



\vete-> 



attf 



^ete- 



Vres 1 



tee&> 



d ^ 



vo 



t\ve 



Aot*^' 



a^ 1 



we^ 



As- 



left> 



tluw^ ! 



\gW- 



at5» 



o* 



b\& cV " 



iKV 



\* 



\>\aC 



at ^ 



oi» 



fteta- 



v\ve 



\\Vp 



sasv 



S& 



.A^rf 



SftW 



da *» 



W 



cvi 



ito¥ 



0*^' 



A\jo° 



,\» 



Vyeet, 



aovew 



Aotte 



A. 



*> ^ 



itd 



,A <*&' 



t A * e 



4 -t\ve 



, Axess, a 
rth ° l ' at0^ u 



Bes vi 



M>? 



av 



e\- 



Seav 





#^ 



y 



/ 



sj§ip^ 



The bat wing sleeve is first in fashion 
this fall . . . here it is, carried to its logical 
conclusion, and forming a giant triangle from 
wrist to waist to shoulder. The silhouette, 
intriguing, the spreading tent of the coat 
supported by the narrow pole of the skirt. 
By Zagri. At Mildred Moore, Beverly Hills. 





* 







Jumpers . . . definitely a fashion factor to 

consider and re-evaluate. High style jumpers in 

wools or silks, fired with jet, beads, braid, or bits 

of strong color ... or just plain jumpers, unadorned. The 

skirts, very straight, or flowing and flared. The 

necklines, slashed to the waist, or cut in a 

wide horseshoe curve. Pointing the way to autumn, a black 

Wyner jersey jumper, a chartreuse blouse ringed with 

jet and fringe. By Louella Ballerino in sizes 10-16. 

Blouse, about $18; jumper, about $23. 

Neiman-Marcus Co., Dallas; Marshall Field & Co., 

Chicago; B. Altaian & Co., New York. 




<■•■ 



watch for 
new jumpers, 
wool challis 





Challis . . . the wonder wool, sheer, soft, synchronized 

this season to the right color and the 

right line. Challis draped subtly, shaped 

perfectly to the figure or challis strictly tailored, 

with a touch or two of whimsy such as the 

little pockets just a little bit 

above the natural waistline. Photographed here in a 

solid color, but available in a brilliant 

print, exact reproductions of glimmering stained glass 

windows. By Ken Sutherland in sizes 10-18. 

About $50. At J. J. Haggarty, Los Angeles; 

Carson, Pirie Scott & Co., Chicago. 




A. far 

m 



This is why you'll love 
California ... for the fun things, 
sometimes a bit ridiculous, zany, 
but always wonderful to wear! 
For the hot colors and the new 
twists and turns in line. Presented 
here: a letterman's jacket in 
water-repellent Strutter cloth and 
pedal knicks in bright Cohama plaid. 
By Franklyn Phillips Fashions, in sizes 
10-18, about $8 each. At 
Harris and Frank, Glendale. 
Right: Traveler's jacket and vagabond 
pants in the new Winter Denim, navy 
blue with white stitching winding in 
slow curves. By Carole Chris of 
California, in sizes 10-20. Pants, about 
$4, jacket about $5. The May Co., 
Los Angeles. The wonderful little red 
suede shoes are by Sbicca of California. 





^■ w^ 1 " 




I 



Horse blanket pants, fastened with a huge safety pin! Pants fitted and narrow, highpocketed, and wonderful with the perfectly 
llain and simple blouse. By Joseph Zukin of California in sizes 10-18, Scotch plaid woolen pants, about $15; blouse, about $11. 





I FRANK STIFFLER 



■eri Holmes frankly fabricated fur jackets in red, beige, black, navy blue . . . above, a stop-short windbreaker, about $30, a flyaway 
town jacket, $35. Sizes 10-18. 9-17. Best's Apparel, Seattle; Joseph Magnin, San Francisco; and Bullock's, Los Angeles. 



39 



Square of hot red over midnight black . . . 
hi-water pants, very fitted, very slim, worn 
with "El Ocho" coat, a big 
box of wool ("Ocho" is eight, 
for the four double pockets). In 
Sanforlan, all-wool washable 
flannel . . . many beautiful 
colors. By Frescos in sizes 10-20, 
jacket about $20; pants, about $15. 
At May Co. Wilshire, Los Angeles. 





The color for fall is bright, the line lean, the pattern 
striped . . . pen line stripes or giant stripes splashed 
on wide at dizzy angles. Left: Hollywood Premiere's 
jumper suit with a simple skirt in gray menswear flannel, 
a simple sleeveless jacket blazing with narrow stripes. In 
sizes 10-20, about $22. At Burdine's, Miami; Battlestein's, 
Houston. Below: Slim skirt and a blouse with deep-down 
dolman sleeves, wide-laned chevron stripes ... a knitted 
ensemble by Caltex in sizes 10-16, about $50, at 
Marshall Field & Co., Chicago; A. Harris & Co., Dallas. 



mix well and often 



lots of color. 



wonderful fabrics 



Texture and color in fabric are getting 

the lion's share of attention in back-to-school 

clothes. You'll be enchanted 

with the possibilities of mixing 

smooth velveteens with crispy tweeds, your 

stand-by flannels with jersey . . . and jersey itself 

is very important in fun clothes, in classroom 

glamour combinations! This page, a 

flannel skirt with a series of box pleats in 

back, worn with a navy jersey roll-collar 

blouse, by M. R. Fleischman, sizes 10-18. 

Blouse, about $8, skirt about $11, 

at Lord & Taylor, New York. 




42 



Boucle tweed in chalky winter pastels, accented 

with velveteen by Casual Time of California, below. 

Peg-pocketed skirt, weskit. tuck-in jersey blouse 

complete the ensemble. In sizes 10-18, the 

jacket about $45, skirt about $15, weskit 

about $10. blouse about $10. at Bullock's Pasadena. 





Above, coordinates by Adeline West, with 

great dash. Dolman-sleeved jersey blouse . . . checked 

woolen skirt with stitched pleats 

and a self-belt. Sizes 9-17, blouse about $8, 

skirt about $15. at The Broadway, Los Angeles. 




sweaters and skirts • • . dyed to match! 




A brilliant idea on any campus . . . Maurice Holman's 
sweater set, about $8, and a skirt by Norman Baker, wool 
plaid in the subtlest color criss-cross in many seasons. Two 
pockets. In sizes 10-16, about $25, at Halle Bros., Cleveland. 



The "in or outer" by Lawrence Roberts, in a solid-color 
cotton jersey with a striped French sailor dickey. A neces- 
sity for back-to-school. In sizes S-M-L, about $5 at 
Frederick & Nelson, Seattle; Marshall Field & Co., Chicago. 




Matching, coordinating sweaters and skirts are the news . . . above, sweaters by Catalina, in sizes 32-40, cardigan about $6, 
about $5. Flannel skirts are by Barney Max, sizes 10-18, each about $9, The Broadway, Los Angeles, A. Harris & Co., 



<Wk&3 



slip-on 
Dallas. 



45 



Betty Barclay's woolen casual for the fall and winter season . . . smooth shoulders and an easy skirt create figure flattery. Tin* 
tucks in a chevron pattern and a stand-up turn-over collar dramatize the bodice, a leather belt cinches the waist. Mink hairsj 
are woven in the woolen. In sizes 9-15. about $15 at Bullock's. Los Angeles and also at Marshall Field & Co., Chicago! 




Opposite page, left, vivid wool lines the deep hip pockets, 
accents the belt of a tried and true classic. Right, wool 
jersey in a basic blouse stitched to a boldly checked plaid 
skirt . . . big squared-off pockets. Both by Betty Barclay, in 
sizes 9-15. about $15 at Marshall Field & Co., Chicago. 



46 




-■\ f 



ft 







Giddy plaid for a fringed and pocketed scarf to wear many different ways with this slim, woolen skirt by Preview Sportswear. 
About $9 at Carol Antell, New York. Blouses tailored like your best beau's, left, long sleeved broadcloth, right, Celanese Piquette. 
By Hendan, left, about $4; right, about $5, at Buffum's, Santa Ana. With cardigan, practically inseparable classmates. 



48 




Panther black velveteen, the jacket with lithe lines in a roll collar, curved peplum. Glinting colors, many pleats in 
the wool jersey skirt. Easy curves, soft skirt fullness make a neat jumper over a soft fuji silk shirt. By Tabak of 
California, jacket about $23, skirt about $15. jumper about $25, shirt about $13, at Bullock's, Los Angeles. Hats by Suzy Lee. 



49 



at ease! 




1. By "Linda," a capacious coat of saddle-stitch 
Cohama plaid worn over slim wool flannel slacks. 

2. Ever-Ready's fitted trousers and a wonderful 
flared tunic, both in a printed cotton flannel. 

3. Carlson-Hall's boldly striped cotton flannel 
robe, up-or-down cuffs, paraphernalia pockets. 




BIRD OF PARADISE: Modern Arrangement For Modern Homes 



BY LAURA E. McVAY 



Since the new type of architecture has become so popular, 
we must give thought to flower arrangements which will be 
most harmonious in these modern homes. Surely, of all the 
kinds of arrangements we have been discussing for the past 
months, the stylized arrangement would best reflect the tempo 
of a streamlined interior. The plain panels and unornamented 
walls are a perfect background for a decorative design in 
flowers or leaves. Flowering fruit tree sprays may be used 
successfully if in moderation and with a keen eye to line. 

However, there are a few flowers which have the form and 
distinction which fit ideally in the more angular home. The 
picture illustrates one suggestion. The Strelitzia or Bird of 
Paradise has a style all its own and necessitates a stiff design. 
Because these flowers resemble so much the crested head of a 
bird, it is suggested that the heads, at least in part, face in 
the same direction, as if in flight. Each flower is a picture in 
itself, and care should be taken not to allow one head to 
become confused with another. 

For those who do not know the Bird of Paradise, the color- 
ing is almost unbelievable. The crest of the bird is a brilliant 
orange, and the projection which stands between the "bill" 
and the crest is royal blue. As the gray-green beak joins the 



stem, it changes into a bright rose. The heavy center vein of 
the leaf has the same rosy pink. Each bloom has two and often 
three sets of crests, the second and third emerging from the 
beak as the first crest fades. This double flowering makes the 
lasting quality of this stately flower most satisfactory. They 
require very little water and so can be arranged in a flat con- 
tainer, thus dramatizing the stiff stem. Because of the several 
distinct colors, it is not difficult to select a container which will 
pick up one of the colors. Be sure to anchor the frog with 
plastacine for the flower heads are heavy and can easily tip 
the frog. 

A formal, fan-shaped arrangement, made with gladioli and 
in a flat container, is attractive in a contemporary room. 
Large, bold leaves, such as an aurelia leaf, combined with 
slender Australian flax or iris leaves will make a dashing, 
decorative composition. Often such a bold arrangement may 
become the focal spot in the room. Try making such a leaf 
arrangement, adding a large clivia head near the container. 
It will make a startling center of interest among the green 
foliage. Calla lillies and anthurium are most acceptable in a 
house with the new look. If your home is modern, strive to 
make your flower arrangements carry the same feel, smart 
and decorative! 



51 




CALIFORNIA 



From the notebooks of Helen Evans Brown, a parcel of 
culinery delights. Plus a handful of comments on 



GRILLS, BRAZIERS, and BARBECUES. 

California cooks outdoors during the summer and autumn 
months — we eat there, too. Everyone who has a yard as big 
as a pot holder has some kind of a "barbecue" for the grilling 
of a meal. The term "barbecue" has been kicked around a lot 
of late, and so can mean almost anything: A pit dug deep in 
the ground, and brick lined, for burying whole lambs or quar- 
ters of beef ; a huge spit, suspended over a fere pit, for roasting 
large pieces of meat ; an elaborate strusture of brick or stone, 
with grills, ovens, sometimes with electrically-operated spits 
and built-in bellows; or a simple grate propped on a couple 
of bricks. One easy and inexpensive device, growing increas- 
ingly popular, is a Chinese "Wok," or frying pan — a round 
shallow bowl-shaped pan, made of steel, with handles at either 
side, and which makes an ideal charcoal brazier. (Put some 
sand in the bottom, build your fire above it, put a grill across 
the top, and there you are!) The wok should be propped 
with a brick on either side to keep it from webbling. There 
you have an attractive and efficient charcoal brazier for under 
ten dollars. It's not only ideal for broiling, it is perfect to sit 
around when the nights get cool — filled with charcoal it throws 
out a comforting and cheering warmth. 

"GOOD FOOD FROM THE NEAR EAST," by Jean Row- 
land was recently published by Barrows. It covers a cuisine 
that has been a bit neglected by the energetic hoards of recipe 
writers, and covers it well. Albania, Armenia, Egypt, Greece, 
Israel, and Turkey are some of the countries whose recipes 
appear — an interesting collection in all. At first glance the 
recipes may seem a touch exotic, but then we see such familiar 
things as shish kebab, sauerbraten, and pilaff. And the others, 
upon reading, turn out to be very adaptable to our American 
way of eating. Yogurt appears in many recipes and so, sur- 
prisingly, does Shredded Wheat. Some recipes sound so fasci- 
nating that it's a temptation to rush right out to the kitchen 
and make like a Turk. 



A FLY FOR A FIG. 

Speaking of Turks. . . . The story is that we Californians 
once pulled a fast one on them. They wouldn't give us a fig, 
and when you hear the story you'll see they had a point. 
Once upon a time, back in the '80s, an ambitious Californian 
fruit grower decided that he wanted to grow the big white 
Smyrna figs like those that were imported from Turkey — 
the kind that were dried and packed in layers, and always 
showed up at Christmas time. So he got himself some cuttings 
and grew himself some beautiful fig trees. The trees bore fruit, 
but it always dropped before maturing. It was obvious that 
the sex life of the fig had something to do with the calamity, 
so no one was surprised to learn that a wild fig. the Capri by 
name, was always close to the fig trees in Turkey — the trees 
that bore the figs, that is. So cuttings from the Capri figs 
were acquired — just how is another question — and planted near 
the Smyrna trees, but still no figs grew up. Finally Uncle 
Sam's experts discovered that a tiny wasp, Blastophaga by 
name, so minute that it could barely be seen, was the agent that 
carried pollen from the Capri to the Smyrna. But there were 
none of those fig wasps in California, and by that time the 
Turks, well aware that their fig monopoly was threatened, 



COOKS 



Bv Helen Evans Brown 



suggestions on exotic fare . . . how to cook it and ivhere. Plus notes, historical, on certain rare 
everything from Buffalo Bill's Indian breakfast to French vs. California Wines. 



became quite firm in their refusal to give up even one tiny 
insect. So then, or so the story goes, an American disguised 
himself as a Turk and crept into a Smyrna orchard in the 
dead of night, emerging with a single Smyrna fig. A single 
fig, but one filled with the needed wasps. So now we grow 
Smyrna figs in California, great big luscious ones that prove 
the Turks were right in holding out on us. Lest anyone think 
for a minute that we were trying to compete with the Near 
Eastern variety, we have renamed them: Calimyrna. 

Figs — some say should be split with a knife (out in half). 
and the sweet juicy pulp spooned from the skin. That, they 
say. is the only way to eat a fig. But then up comes another 
opinion. Theodore Child, who says. "Who would be bold 
enough to peel a fresh fig. or even to touch such a delicate 
fruit with even the purest silver instruments?" 

"WITH A JUG OF WINE" is another man's idea of how 
to cook. The man, one Morrison Wood, does a better job than 
most of the males who have decided to share their culinary 
secrets with a breathless world. Mr. Wood, as is quite obvious 
from the title of the book, uses wine in all but everything. 
and uses it well. He makes no pretense of having written a 
complete cook book, or of the recipes being original with him. 
He gives credit where it is due. along with amusing — and 
masculine — comments and stories. The book is good reading 
as well as good cooking, and we think a worthy addition to 
any collection of culinariana. We don't even think that our 
opinion was influenced by the fact that Mr. Wood thinks that 
one or two women can cook as well, or — almost as well as men. 

LOQUATS. how do they taste to you? Some say they have 
the flavor of pineapple, or of pear, or of a blending of the 
two. More say they taste of cherries, with perhaps a whisper 
of apple in their tang. But all who taste of them, plucked 
ripe from their ornamental tree, pronounce them good. 

FIRST TASTE THRILL. How many gastronomes remem- 
ber their very first childhood delight in some food — their first 
I realization that there were things good to eat besides sweets? 
iMine I will never forget, or the place where it occurred. A 
I huge weeping willow tree, and under it a marble carriage 
Iblock partly overgrown with woodbine. It served as a "tea 
Itable" for three very young children, whose hostess, not ex- 
Ipecting infant callers, was unhappy because there were no 
■cookies in the house. W'hat she produced was better. Crack- 
lers — they were Uneeda Biscuits, I well remember — sweet 
Icountry butter, and slabs of the most beautiful soft yellow 
I stuff that I had ever seen or tasted. It was Cheddar cheese! 
I All this, and crisp red apples, too. with cambric tea to flush 
lour eager throats so that we could eat more cheese. Ah sweet 
igluttony! 

A GOOD ROAST has seven chances to be good. According 
llto Thomas Love Peacock, a century or so ago. there are seven 
(strikes against you before you start: 

1. The meat must be good. 

2. It must have been kept a good time. 

3. It must be roasted at a good fire. 

4. By a good cook 

5. Who must be in a good temper 

6. You must have good luck 

7. And a good appetite. 



BRUSHES FOR COOKS. Three or four rather stiff pastry 
brushes are the handiest of kitchen gadgets. One for greasing 
pie. cake, and muffin tins, or for the griddle; one for cleaning 
tender vegetables, such as mushrooms (Dip mushroom in water, 
brush away all grit, dip again to rinse. Mushrooms should 
be done one at a time — never soaked ! ) : use another brush 
for getting the last bit of cheese or orange rind or whatever 
you are using, from the grater. Use still another for 
the purpose for which it was made: to brush egg white or 
other glaze on baked goods! 

FRANCE vs. CALIFORNIA — FASHIONS AND WINES. 
Who says French fashions and French wines are better than 
ours? The French, of course. We say something quite differ- 
ent: that clothes designed in France may be better for women 
bom in France, but not for American women — to compare 
them is ridiculous. We say the same of French and Californian 
wines — to compare them is ridiculous. There are superior 
wines from each place, as there are inferior ones. To com- 
pare a great wine of the Cote d'Or, a wine of which there are 
perhaps but a few dozen cases, with a wine from an enormous 
Californian vineyard, is as stupid as to compare a vin or- 
dinaire of France — an ordinary table wine — with a fine varietal 
wine of, say, the Napa Valley. None of us can have the very 
best wines every day, either French or Californian. but we 
can have good Californian wines with every dinner. Our food 
will taste better for them, our meal be more enjoyable in 
every way. Good food needs good wine, and Californian 
wine is good! 

HANDY HANGERS. The rings made for shower curtains 
are useful in the kitchen. A set of measuring spoons, fastened 
together with such instead of with the usual too-small and 
flimsy ring, is much easier to use and to hang. The rings are 
also good for hanging pot holders, measuring cups, and other 
such items that are often hard to store. Another simple gadget, 
a spring-type paper clip, is perfect for hanging recipe cards 
while they are in use. 

BUFFALO BILL. In the days when Buffalo Bill was staging 
his Wild West Shows, he invited a number of his friends to 
an "Indian breakfast." Everyone sat around a huge fire of 
glowing coals over which pieces of beef were grilled. The 
plates, or rather the substitutes for them, were sticks sharpened 
at both ends. One end was stuck in the ground, the other used 
for impaling the broiled meat between bites! The Indians 
used their hair for finger wiping, but the other guests were 
provided — elegantly — with napkins! They all agreed that 
never was meat so fine. Californians, loyal to their charcoal 
grills, agree. 

GAME COOKERY. The Autumn game season is not far 
off, and some food lockers are still crammed with game from 
last year's hunt. Let's use it. Venison probably predominates, 
and though most sportsmen know how to prepare the choicer 
cuts, some of them are baffled when it comes to cooking any- 
thing but steaks and roasts. Practically every part of the deer 
should be used. The liver should be eaten when fresh, and is 
a rare delicacy. Either cut it rather thick, brush it with olive 
oil and charcoal grill it, or pan fry it. In either case do it 
quickly, and keep it rare. Like calves' liver, it will toughen 
if cooked to a frazzle. 



53 



The venison steaks are usually considered the choicest cuts, 
though they, too, can be ruined with overcooking. A good 
tender steak, cut medium thick, is superlative if charcoal 
broiled until rare or medium rare. Of course, if you dislike 
rare meat, you'll have to risk the venison's becoming tough, 
or learn to like it not quite so well done. It is necessary 
to marinate the steaks for long hours unless you want to dis- 
guise the game flavor. A short sojourn in a mixture of half 
red wine and half oil is usually sufficient, and even the wine 
should be omitted if you want the full flavor. 

Venison bones make wonderful soup, and the scraps, trim- 
med of fat, are perfect for hamburgers or meat loaf. Venison 
mince meat, an old pioneer's standby, is really something. 
Use any good mince meat recipe, substituting ground venison 
for the ground beef. 

Saddle of Venison, cut exactly from where the saddle would 
be if the deer were a horse, and the rack, a strip of the ribs 
or ribs and loin cooked as a roast, are both popular cuts, and 
so, quite naturally, is the leg. Here's my prized recipe for 

ROAST LEG OF VENISON 

Prepare a marinade with 3 cups of California Burgundy 
or Pinot Noir, l/o cup of olive oil, a large onion sliced thin, 
a large clove of garlic, crushed to a nothing in a teaspoon of 
coarse salt, y 2 teaspoon of rosemary, and a piece of bay. 
Remove the shank bone from a leg of venison, and allow it 
to stand in this marinade for 12 hours or so. turning it a few 
times so that it will be well impregnated with the sapid 
sauce. Come roasting time, put the meat, salted, in a 450° 
oven for 15 minutes, then reduce heat to 325° and cook until 
your meat thermometer has reached 140°. 

SAUCE FOR THE ROAST 

Make a roux with 3 tablespoons of butter and 3 of flour, 
cooking and stirring for 3 or 4 minutes, so that the flour will 
lose its raw taste. Add U/^ cups of the marinade, and cook 
until thickened, then fold in 1 cup of sour cream, add salt 
and pepper to taste, reheat gently, and serve with the roast. 
A cup of pitted ripe olives may be added to the sauce. Wine 
is a must with venison — try a robust one, perhaps the same 
that you used in the marinade. 

WINE GLASSES. Some people are afraid to serve wine 
because they haven't the "right glasses." This is silly, and 
anyone who tells you differently is a snob. Of course it is 
nice to have a collection of stemware, but many a fine wine 
has been enjoyed from a water tumbler. There is one rule, 
though, don't use colored glasses. Part of the pleasure of wine 
drinking comes from holding the glass to the light and seeing 
its brilliant color, its jewel-like clearness. Wine from a red 
glass looks like water, from a green glass it might as well be 
tea, and from a blue glass it's positively revolting — looking, 
that is. So if you've no wine glasses, use anything — jelly 
glasses even, anything as long as it's clear! 

WINE REFRESHERS. Summer punches are cooling and 
refreshing when made with California wines. A simple and 
nice way to quench a dozen thirsts. This one uses California 
white table wine. 

WHITE WINE PUNCH 

To one quart of California white table wine add two jiggers 
of rum, two jiggers of brandy, and charged water to suit your 
taste. (Some omit the water altogether, others use it with a 
generous hand.) Again your taste must be the judge of 
whether or not you want sweetening. If you do, make a 
simple syrup by boiling together 2 cups of sugar and 2 cups 
of water for five minutes, cool, and use as desired. Garnish 
this punch with chunks of fresh pineapple and sections of 
grapefruit. A few thin slices of cucumber rind will help to 
smooth and blend it, too. 

PICNICS will always be fun, even if they're in the back 
yard. One picnic food that has become tremendously popular 
in recent years is food cooked era brochette, and over an open 
fire. Call it kebabs, call it shasslik or shish kebab, call it 
Boy Scouts meat-on-a-stick — it's all the same idea with dozens 
of variations. 

Use lamb and/or beef, and have it cut in one-and-a-half inch 
cubes. Have slices of small onions, too, and cubes of egg- 
plant . . . small tomatoes or quarters of larger ones. Have 



bacon and, if you're not a stickler for culinary conventions, 
have stuffed olives and mushrooms. Have squares of liver, 
if you wish, and kidneys, and chicken livers. Even cubes of 
cheese are in order — why not? The meats, and perhaps the 
onions and eggplant, should be marinated ahead of time. Try 
a mixture of olive oil and red wine, seasoned with rosemary 
and bay. The other ingredients may be used without a 
marinade, but it is well to brush them with oil before grilling. 
Provide each guest with a large sharpened stick of green wood, 
or with a specially made long metal skewer, and let him as- 
semble his own combinations. Dagwoods-on-a-stick. 

SANDWICHES, indoors or out, are certainly summer fare. 
Here are a few a little out of the ordinary — sandwiches that 
will appeal particularly to men. Add them to your repertory. 
LIEDERKRANZ AND BACON SANDWICH 

This is a honey — especially with beer. Scrape a soft Leider- 
kranz cheese, mash, and mix with crumbled crisp bacon. 
Spread on buttered toast. 

BEEF AND CURRY SANDWICH 

Rare roast beef, sliced and put between slices of bread that 
have been spread with butter into which a little curry powder 
has been worked — say a teaspoonful to a quarter-pound of 
butter. Water cress is nice in this sandwich. 

CHICKEN LIVER SANDWICH 

Saute chicken livers in butter until they are just tender. 
Mash well and mix with enough mayonnaise to make spreading 
easy. Season with salt and pepper, and add chopped almonds 
or crisp bacon, if desired. 

ROQUEFORT-TOMATO SANDWICH 

Cream equal parts (14 pound) of Roquefort or Bleu cheese 
and butter, and mix in a tablespoon of minced chives. Spread 
thickly on one piece of bread, top with slices of drained 
tomato, and cover with bread which has been spread with 
mayonnaise. 

MUSHROOM AND CREAM CHEESE SANDWICH 

Saute a half-pound of chopped fresh or canned mushrooms 
in 3 tablespoons of butter until tender. Mix with two cream 
cheese, and add salt to taste. Spread on thin slices of wheat 
bread. 

CHARCOAL BROILING, TO YOU. "Charbonadoes, or 
carbonados, which is meat broyled upon the coals, are of 
divers kinds according to men's pleasures." That, in a book 
called The English House-wife, published in 1683. So you 
think this business of charcoal broiling is new? It is becoming 
more and more popular, however, and good cooks are dis- 
covering that it's not only steaks, chops, and hamburg that 
takes to this treatment. Broiled liver, sliced rather thick, is 
superlative, as are spare ribs, whole fish, ham steaks, squabs, 
oysters, lobster, kidneys — everything that can be broiled in- 
doors — takes to charcoal. Good news is that too-highly 
seasoned, too-hot barbecue sauces are falling into disrepute, 
and light marinades of wine and oil, delicately herbed, are 
taking their place. For fowl or fish, try equal parts of white 
table wine and oil or melted butter, with tarragon or marjoram 
for seasoning. For meat or game, use red wine and olive oil 
in equal parts, oregano or basil as the herb. These marinades 
are bastes as well, and sauces. Salting is usually done after 
the meat is grilled, though that's a matter of opinion, as is 
how high above the fire the meat should be, how large, how 
hot the fire. That's usually a matter that has to be learned 
by watching an expert, or learning the hard way, with a failure 
or two on your own. 

STEAKS FOR A MULTITUDE. Let's face it, even though 
all foods seem to taste better when charcoal broiled, steaks 
are still the overwhelming favorite. This is tough on the budget 
when the party is a large one, particularly when individual 
steaks are provided. Try large steaks instead, and slicing them 
as you would at the table. The dainty feeders will not waste, 
the frenchmen will not want. 

"One morning in the garden bed 

The onion and the carrot said 

Unto the parsley group: 

'Oh, when shall we three meet again, 

In thunder, lightning, hail or rain?' 

'Alas,' replied, in tones of pain 

The parsley, 'in the soup'." — C. S. Calverley 



54 




ENCHANTING 
EUCALYPTUS 



BY RUTH DUDLEY 



■'■H \ 


"WflML w j ■ 


Hi* 


E^w* /$* 


UL Vvfclt t*M 




HOl 


ft ^V ffn ' A 


VsH 


Hi ^E ~^H E^k \ * * JH 




»;1 I 4 




Sw%H ■' <^H 



The eucalyptus seems as much a part of California 
as does the desert or ocean. It's entirely at home lining 
beckoning roadways in graceful, shade-patterned beauty; 
shielding benignly the more fragile citrus: or stand- 
ing in lone, glorious beauty against the skyline. 

Yet no one of the hundred or more species is a Cali- 
fornia native — all are from Australia and its near-by 
islands. Introduced in the early '50s and grown first 
in San Francisco and the Santa Clara valley, they soon 
were adopted quite extensively through central and 
southern California. 

They're interesting trees — these eucalypti — each with 
its evergreen leaves, gay flowers and its own peculiar- 
shaped seed vessels. 

These woody seed vessels, by the way, offer a fasci- 
nating field for the collector. Some smooth, some rough: 
wrinkled, ribbed and curved in amazingly diverse shapes 
and contours, they vary in size from tiny ones to the 
sturdy inch-and-one-half-diameter bowls that appear to 
have fallen from someone's pipe. Often painted or gilded 
they make interesting decorations, and are strung some- 
times into necklaces or other articles of adornment. 

The flowering of the eucalyptus is fascinating, too. 
The bud is tightly covered in a lidded case. You'd never 
dream there was a bud there at all until blossoming time 
when presto! off comes the lid and out, quite magically, 
slips the delicate flower. In fact, so curious is this 
process that the naming of the tree stems from it. 
Eucalyptus, meaning "well-concealed" refers to this 
strange little case where the bud is so artfully hidden. 

The Gum tree is another, more common, name for 
the eucalyptus — because of the resinous gum it secretes. 
They are fast growing trees and have solved many a 
householder's fuel problem. Ready to be cut after only 
five years, they immediately send up. from the stump, 
strong shoots which in turn soon develop into tall, sturdy 
saplings. 



They make delightful street trees, firm windbreaks, 
and beautiful ornamentals for the small lawn or garden 
as well as for spacious estates — if species are selected 
appropriately. 

The Blue Gum (E. globulus) is probably the 
best known in California and the fastest grower. It's 
extremely hardy, too, withstanding frost or heat, thriv- 
ing in either dry or moist soil. But it's a tall tree — 
growing to 150 feet in California (300 in Australia) — 
with strong, wide-spreading, inquisitive roots. In a proper 
setting it is handsome, indeed, with its blue-green leaves, 
gay white flowers and colorful trunk done in patterns 
of gray, yellow and brown where the bark has stripped 
off. 

But it's not for the small plot. For this you have 
plenty of other beauties from which to choose. If it's 
gay scarlet flowers you want Eucalyptus ficifolia should 
please you. It's a beautiful tree, small (to fifteen feet) 
with graceful branches and long, wavy-margined leaves. 
E. tetragonus and E. Landsdowniana are two more very 
lovely flowering dwarf growers. 

If yellow or pink blossoms fit in better with your 
color scheme, then E. cornuta or E. pyriformis. respec- 
tively, will be more appropriate. Both are small trees, 
both most attractive. 

The Lemon-scented gum (E. citriodora) with its nar- 
row, ivory-white, lemon-scented leaves, silken smooth 
trunk and gracefully drooping branches makes a delight- 
ful ornamental for warmer sections. 

If you've room for a larger tree, the fast growing 
and hardy Red gum (E. rostrata) is always good. E. 
saligna, the softly drooping, willow-like tree is outstand- 
ing and the delicately graceful E. piperita makes any 
spot glamorous. 

And so we could go, on and on . . . glorious, each 
one, completely enchanting. Beloved native of Australia 
— as familiar to the Californian as his breakfast orange. 



55 



ARCHITECT J. R. DAVIDSON: 



NO MUSEUMS, MONUMENTS, MAZES. 



BY HELEN IGNATIUS 



For several years the Californian Magazine has featured a series 
of modern California homes in order to define and illustrate the 
real meaning of California Living. We herewith present one of 
Califorids foremost architects, J. R. Davidson, and the outstand- 
ing California house which he designed for Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
L. Taylor of Los Angeles. 

One of the leading exponents of modern architecture, J. R. 
Davidson has designed residential as well as commercial build- 
ings in California since 1926 and has won numerous honor awards 
for his work. He opened offices on the West Coast after intensive 
study in Germany, England, and France. 

During his stay in London, he designed ocean liners and 
yachts . . . and today his modern homes are planned with the 
space economy so essential in marine architecture. Famous for 
his economical and sensible use of space, Davidson is also noted 
for his straightforward approach, for the clarity and strength of 
his designs, and for his artistry in handling natural woods and 
stones. 



CALIFORNIA LIVING 



PHOTOGRAPHS BY FRANK STIFFLER 




1. Living and dining room of home form one continuous area. 

2. Ivy, ferns, tropical plants border the entrance to house. 

3. Swimming pool is located on garden level below terrace. 



Modern architect J. R. Davidson has no patience with curli- 
ques, clutter, or congestion. A house is a house, not a catch-all 
for tricks and fantasies in color; not a repository for complex 
scrolls or ins-and-outs in line demanded by this, that or the 
other theory of design; not, emphatically not, a tribute to a 
list of rules and regulations. 

It is quite true that many of the structures carelessly labeled 
houses really are not houses at all but museums, or monu- 
ments, or mazes. Mr. Davidson avoids all this confusion by 
designing houses which are very private, very pleasant, very 
comfortable . . . and incidentally, very beautiful . . . places in 
which to live. 

Lots of drawers for storing linens or gloves, or handker- 
chiefs, or collections of things ... all the things that people 
invariably do collect. Lots of closets, big closets, for coats and 
suits and dresses. Lots of cupboards for dishes and silver, and 
brooms and vacuum cleaners and mops. Lots and lots of things, 
in short, which make life easy. Bedrooms with private dress- 
ing rooms and baths. Kitchens leading into pantries or utility 
rooms with built-in refrigerators and stoves, and built-in laun- 
dry bins, tubs, and washing machines. Living and dining rooms 
opening directly onto a spacious terrace, a beautiful patio or 
a garden. 

For a modern house ... a J. R. Davidson house ... is essen- 
tially a functional house with a scientifically planned use of 
space. The room as a separate entity, with a single purpose, is 
as outmoded as the old gingerbread moldering on a Victorian 
piazza. For example, the music room, the library, the study, 
the dining room, in the typical modern house, often are in- 
corporated into the flow of line in the living room area. Many 
of the walls of the old-fashioned house have fallen and the 
windows have melted into great panels of glass so that the 
continual flow of space extends even into the out-of-doors. 

Living is no longer a matter of existing in little boxes . . . 
one for dining, one for reading, and so on. Living, if it's 
modern, means a greater freedom of movement and a marked 
reduction of the claustrophic tendency. Living, if it's modern, 
means more light, more air, more space. And it means less, 
much less, work for the housewife. The fluid lines of the mod- 
ern house, and the many built-in pieces of furniture or built-in 
cupboards and drawers, have engulfed all the unnecessary 
ornamentation, the unnecessary corners and crevices ... in 
short, the dust-catchers and back-breakers which tended to 
make a woman a slave in her own house. 

Now whereas Mr. Davidson never loses sight of the fact 
that a house is, above all, a place in which to live, he doesn't 
assume that everyone likes to live in quite the same way. 
Members of the literati might, conceivably, wish three-fourths 
of the square footage deyoted to libraries. Those dabbling, se- 
riously or otherwise, with the pen, the brush, or the musical 



56 



« 



"*£>: 



HE - 



• H .^ 










'j**-Vj 



V 



7 -- 



■. _%.. -*..,» - . -v. r.* v 



-£JF 






aapHH 



Through a series of sliding glass panels, living and dining rooms open onto the terrace floor of green and white blocks of cement. 



instrument might, conceivably, wish 90 percent of the square 
footage devoted to work rooms or studios. People with very 
young, active children might require (in some cases insist 
upon) private play-areas or playrooms separated from the 
main area of the house or garden. 

There are all sorts of possible plans for living, and each 
individual usually has his own ideas on what he wants in a 
house and where he wants it, and (often) why. And so, when 
Mr. Davidson starts to design a house, he doesn't begin with 
a variation on a theme of some architectural ism. He doesn't 
shut himself off from his clients to inaugurate a mass-produc- 
tion line of houses representing generalized schemes for living. 
He begins with an informal conference or two with the people 



who wish to build the house . . . and in a few hours he under- 
stands their way of life, their basic needs, their preferences in 
color and line. Everything is planned for the utmost efficiency 
in use and each house is custom-built to fill the needs of liv- 
ing. Design, a purely secondary element, is the organic result 
of those needs. 

On the surface, this scheme of architecture is deceptively 
simple ... a matter of discovering the client's way of life and 
then custom-building the house to fit all the varied needs of 
that life. It is true that each Davidson house is endowed with 
a fine spirit of freedom and individuality. But whereas each 
structure is distinctly different . . . just as each individual is 
distinctly different . . . every house by Davidson represents a 





Davidsons brilliant use of space is evident in floor plan. Master bedroom opens onto terrace as well as a small patio. 



57 



CALIFORNIA LIVING: J. R. DAVIDSON'S HOUSE FOR MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL TAYLOR 




5. The Taylor s light, airy, and very beautiful kitchen has 
long sideboards, a veritable battery of cupboards and drawers. 

6. A small built-in workdesk with a telephone, scratch pads, 
cook books, and so on is placed at the end of the sideboard. 

7. A breakfast nook is included in the Taylor s spacious kitch- 
en. Glass wall to the right provides view of dining room. 

8. Storage room has deep wooden bins for fruit and vegetables, 
special racks for bottles, many deep shelves for canned goods. 



great simplicity and purity of design, a sensitive subtle use of 
color, and a masterful integration of pattern and materials 
with the basic needs of living. Actually each house is a double 
reflection, mirroring both the client and the architect . . . each 
house is a totally individual plan for living sparkling with 
Davidson's beautifully designed details and bound together 
into a coherent whole through Davidson's remarkable talents 
for planning. 

The eight-room house designed by J. R. Davidson for Mr. 
and Mrs. Samuel L. Taylor of Los Angeles fills the complex 
needs of people who are active in both business and society. 
Located high in the hills and curved gently around the heavily 
wooded promontory, the house is planned for entertaining 
with complete ease and for relaxing in complete privacy. 

The house is so beautifully placed on the lot that it com- 
mands a magnificent view of the towering mountains and the 
cities spread across the flat valley. During the day, the Taylors' 
property is a beautiful garden in space ... at night, part of 
the brilliant fairyland of sparkling city lights. This is almost 
a matter of living out of this world. But directly below the 
steep incline is a right-angle meeting of arterial highways 
bordered with bridle paths. The heavy Los Angeles traffic of 
trucks and cars and an occasional runaway horse injects the 
necessary air du monde in the otherwise idyllic setting. 

The great glass panels sweeping across the front of the 
Taylors' house open onto a spacious terrace bordered with 
flowers and shrubs. On a lower level is an oblong swimming 
pool, a garden with a solid circle of grass bordered with 
flowers, and a badminton court. The sloping hill below this 
area is planted with shrubs, trailing vines, berry plants, 
flowers and a family orchard of persimmon, quince, cherry, 
nectarine, peach, and walnut trees. The landscaping is an 
integral part of the house and the carefully lighted flowers 
and shrubs outside the windows are as important as the leaf 
and flower arrangements under the lamps in the living room. 

On the entire property, landscape artists Eckbo, Royston, 
and Williams have achieved great richness through an imagina- 
tive use of foliage in a series of different textures, colors, and 
structures. The Arizona flagstone path leading to the entrance 
of the house is bordered with Algerian ivy, Hahns ivy, red 
horse chestnuts, huge elephant ears, cycads . . . and on the left 
of the path is a small lily pond ringed with ferns. 

Built on a 190x200 foot lot, the house itself comprises 3,050 
square feet of enclosed space, the three-car garage 600 square 
feet. Every room has a full or partial wall of glass, every 
room opens directly out-of-doors, and each bedroom has cross 




58 



ventilation, so vital to a California house. At the center of the 
house, the spacious living room and dining room open onto 
the terrace through the sliding glass panels. Bedrooms, 
dressing rooms, and baths form the right wing. The private 
dressing rooms connected to the master bedroom include 
built-in compartments for shoes or bags; shelves for hats; 
special drawers for gloves, handkerchiefs, scarves, and so on; 
spacious closets for suits and coats. Mrs. Taylor even has a 
separate closet for storing furs. 

Besides being assured cif the utmost convenience, the Taylors 
also are assured of the utmost privacy. The master bedroom 
leads into a small private patio walled off from the rest of the 
garden. And another smaller patio, just as private, forms the 
link between the two smaller bedrooms. Kitchen, pantry, util- 
ity room, store room, and servants' quarters complete the left 
wing of the house. Every inch of space is utilized. Between the 
kitchen and the dining room is a small glass wall with three 
shelves for Mrs. Taylor's collection of brass bowls filled with 
tropical plants. The butler's pantry opening into the kitchen 
and the utility room is a battery of shelves and cupboards. The 
utility room has a built-in ironing board, sewing machine, wash 
tub, three separate bins for sorting laundry, broom closets, 
shelves, sideboards. 

Custom-building houses to accommodate the occupants' 
way of life and relating house to property so as to provide the 
utmost privacy and gain the most beautiful view do not con- 

(Continued on Page 66) 





Above left: Utility room of 
Taylors' home has built-in 
laundry bins with wide metal 
screening at bottom for fresh 
current of air. Above right: 
Broom closet with racks for 
dustrags, brushes and so on. 
Right: The ironing board is 
placed next to shelves with 
sewing machine compart- 
ment and spacious drawers. 





9. Architect J. R. Davidson never 

sacrifices beauty for function . . . 
in one of the hallways, this long 
row of cupboards for the storage 
of linens and household supplies 
forms a striking abstract design. 

10. Mr. Taylor's dressing room 
and closet has a wall of drawers 
and shelves specially designed for 
each item of a man's wardrobe . . . 
shown here are shirt drawers, very 
deep and quick and easy to open. 

11. Another of J. R. Davidsons 
ingenious plans for saving space: 
six shelves for shoes which pro- 
vide enough space for the stor- 
age of at least twelve pairs. Mr. 
Taylor also has special racks for 
ties, belts, brushes, and so on. 

12. Mrs. Taylor's dressing room 
has spacious closets with sliding 
mirror-panelled doors, in addition 
to shelves and drawers for every 
item in her wardrobe. This narrow 
cupboard has shoe racks lined in 
black velvet, compartments on the 
door for a collection of handbags. 

13. Mrs. Taylor keeps her hats in 
the top section of this commodious 
cupboard. The bottom section is a 
series of drawers in a variety of 
widths: narrow drawers for gloves, 
handkerchiefs, and scarves . . . wide 
drawers for sweaters and so on. 




After A Fashion 



BY MALCOLM STEINLAUF 



'When a man knows what he's do- 
ing, and knows where lie's going his 
self-confidence sticks out all over 
him. There's something about him. 
something about the way he talk-, 
something about the way he acts, 
something in the way he looks at you 
that tells you here's a Real Man. 

If he discusses yachting hell 
know the rig and performance of 
every sailing class, or the draft. 
beam and motor-drive of power 
launches. If he's a sportsman he'll 
talk calibre, range, rifling of his 
favorite gun. or tensile strength and 
durability of his best fishing line. 

If you've ever seen this man select 
his own clothes you've seen inherent 
good taste in action. He picks 
clothes that he knows will look well 
on him — and in which he feels right. 

For such men land for the women 
who often guide their thinking I the 
Califomian Magazine has selected 
a series of sportswear items — all in 
good taste, all tailored with a Real 
Man in mind. 

Beginning, left foreground, and 
reading clockwise: Tartan sport 
coat is fashioned from imported 
Scotch unfinished worsted woven in 
an authentic clan plaid. It has single 
breasted styling, is finished with 
smoke pearl buttons. To retail about 
$75. Solid tone leisure coat is de- 
tailed with sewn down pointed flaps, 
outline hand stitching, soft roll col- 
lar. Of Charmeen. it's designed to 
retail from $37.50. A worsted wool 
sport shirt has a fine vertical weave 
in its Graniteen fabric. To retail at 
$32.50. The leisure suit of fine 
worsted gabardine with highlight 
vertical weave retails at $39.50. A 
small brown check weave with a fine 
diamond pattern running through it 
characterizes one of California's 
finest sport coats. It is pure cash- 
mere in a classic three-button single 
breasted style. To retail from $100. 
Imported Shetland sport coat, right 
foreground, retails at $75. 

The entire grouping comes from 
the custom shops of one of Califor- 
nia's most eminent sportswear crea- 
tors, M. Jackman & Sons. 



61 



FACADE FOR A FORTUNE IN BEAUTY 




Louis M. Boyle 



NoTiS, 

Vtaka UtiijmhfS toe Ham! 4»9S mlTeo 
Abfcyal-Brz Ott/lj 



i 



At the recent National Flower Show in Los Angeles, a tiny replica of a "ghost 
town" in the orchid display class won widespread attention and, incidentally, a 
first prize. And it's reasonable to assume that if the judges were impressed with 
this pint-sized village, they would indeed be speechless at the real "ghost town" 
maintained on the famous El Rancho Rinconada in the Ojai Valley. 

Here, on one of the largest orchid-raising ranches in the country, Louis M. 
Boyle, owner, has combined his two hobbies of flowers and old-west architecture. 
The street-long facade of typical frontier buildings is really a series of entrances 
to the wealth of orchids hidden behind them. 

This 77 acre farm actually is the outgrowth of a hobby. Boyle, a former sheet- 
metal worker, visited the Pasadena flower show in 1937, promptly lost his heart 
to the cymbidium orchids on display there, and wished that he could raise some 
of his own. 

So he did. 

Now operating a wholesale orchid business that is a resounding commercial 
success, Boyle has never lost track of his original premise that flowers must be 
loved and cared for ... as a matter of fact, he is reluctant to sell his plants to 
anyone unless their attitude is the same. He strongly suspects that some pro- 
fessional gardeners are a trifle cold-blooded about the art of "the green thumb." 

As Boyle's hobby of orchid-raising outgrew the part-time phase and became a 
thriving trade, he had time at last to devote himself to his other love, the Old West. 
A typical American businessman, with the average male's nostalgia for the ad- 
venturous past, Boyle is more fortunate than the surreptitious pulp-readers, for 
he has brought back this era ... in a completely authentic reconstruction of a 
pioneer town on his ranch. 

In a masterful blend of his two preoccupations. Boyle designed his "Orchid 
Town" to recreate the colorful atmosphere of a gaudy western village. An entire 
street is laid out in the fashion of these towns, with narrow walks leading the 
visitor past the town hall, the general store, the saloon with its swinging doors, and 
— in understandable sequence — the jail. There's a hotel, an opera house, barber- 
shop — every type of storefront that a cowboy ever swaggered past. In window- 
boxes, antique pieces representing each of these enterprises are grouped on dis- 
play . . . the old school-house even exhibits a time-worn desk. 

The picture gallery is the only building that is not used simply as a facade 
for lath or glass house, and it is a triumph over space. Only 20 feet deep, the 
one-story framework encompasses a labyrinth of walls that afford 400 square feet 
of space for the exhibit of 1.000 color prints of orchids. 






By ALICE CAREY 



Standing on the silent Main Street of this century-late town, one entertains the 
disquieting thought that Time may have stood still in this little valley . . . and yet 
beyond the doors of this rough-and-ready lost world is the multiple symbol of 
modern luxury — the orchid. 

Definitely not for tourists. El Rancho Rinconada is open only to wholesalers 
and growers. A wise restriction, since the delicate task of raising orchids would 
be considerably hampered by an onslaught of visitors. 

Eight acres of the ranch are converted to the growing of plants. There are 
seven large lath houses and ten glass houses. The cymbidiums growing under 
laths are protected from the burning rays of the sun by a plastic screen. 875 
varieties of orchids are counted in the total of 50,000 plants grown here. 

The variety in cymbidiums seen today is the result of painstaking cross-pollina- 
tion, and the resulting hybrids contribute new color and beauty to the family 
of orchids. This cross-pollination is done by hand and results in a seed pod on 
the bloom. The pods require a year or more to develop and ripen and are left on 
the spike. 

The ripe seeds are then sprinkled over prepared agar moss jelly in germinating 
flasks. The flasks, sealed against air, are placed in a special glass house for nine 
months to a year. After this period, the germinated seeds are planted, first in 
groups, then in individual planting areas. 

And now the process calls for plenty of patience. It is six to eight years before 
bloom spikes appear, but after that, the plants or clumps expand more rapidly. 

The perseverance and knowledge necessary to coax even one plant into bloom 
is indicative of Boyle's overwhelming task to cultivate them by the thousands. But 
he's happy doing it — and successful. However, his business-like attitude is ever 
tempered by his honest sentimentalism toward the flower ... he follows up his 
sales of the plants with letters to the purchasers, reminding them of weather 
changes and the resultant effect on their new young plants. 

A family man, Boyle has imbued his wife and children with his own enthusiasm 
for cymbidiums. Since it is no back-breaking chore to interest women in orchids 
(ask any man!) it is understandable that Mrs. Boyle and daughter, Beverly, are 
heartily in favor of "talking shop." In the case of son, Lew, however, his Dad's 
true devotion to the cultivation of flowers has inspired the young man to concentrate 
on botanical studies to prepare himself for eventual management of this fabulous 
farm. And that's just what El Rancho Rinconada is. 

More significantly, this ranch is a hobby that brought contentment as reward 
... it is a wish that turned to wealth, and a facade for a fortune in beauty. 









Ca&AffUt&i taa£ a*u{ ^u^ u&&s£*7cg 



silhouette 

We found no drastic changes in the daytime silhouette of suits for the fall and winter 
season. Merely a refinement of the line defined last year and the year before. And a polish, 
a subtlety, a sudden flight of imagination in the all-important details. We noted military 
braid, silk cord, faille, soutache shining on the outlines of seams, pockets, collars. Many 
little silk-embroidered arrows, pointing out important lines on jackets and skirts. Many 
ornamental buttons, glimmering on jacket fronts. And in some collections, small strips of 
fur ornamenting pockets or collars. 

Jackets are a bit shorter, as short as twenty-six inches, and shoulderlines are rounder, 
smoother, neater. Many designers favor raglan sleeves and yokes, or the out-and-out 
rounded look in a drop shoulder. And perhaps a new trend: soft rounded capes over 
slim little suits. 

Collars this season are one of the major focal points of interest. We saw shawl collars 
in all lengths and gradations, very small and some very long, cut straight down to the 
waistline or flowing into a scarf free and flying. There are many small bobby and johnny 
collars, mannish collars with notched revers, a few shirtwaist collars. 

Skirts stop short at mid-calf, are very slim and straight, very tight, with pleats and 
vents to accommodate a long stride, a quick walk. Particularly effective, and beautiful in 
motion, the fitted skirt with inverted kick pleats breaking just below the knee. 

The daytime silhouette in coats reflects the outlines and proportions established two 
seasons ago, but we noted a greater restraint, an understatement in detailing and the 
dominant line. The categories are many: officer's coats, reefers, the famous California 
wrap coat, little boy Chesterfields, fitted Princess coats, raglan-sleeved steamers, tuxedo 
travel coats. Very much in demand: the coats with the three-quarter length, the little 
boy coats with detachable velvet collars, the coats glistening with touches of fur. 

fabric 

In every collection, almost without exception, the trend toward understatement in line 
is the plain perfect framework for the season's exquisite fabrics, notable for quality, 
color, texture and pattern. In coats, wonderful tweeds, wool gabardines, worsted wool 
gabardines, suede cloth, wool broadcloth, velour woolens, needlepoint, shag . . . and 
particularly exciting . . . cashmere and wool combinations in a number of different 
percentages. In suits, many beautiful imported woolens . . . tweeds, sharkskins, gabardines, 
menswear worsteds . . . and beautiful domestic woolens including gabardines, sharkskins, 
menswear worsteds (herringbones, birdseyes, and other fine woven patterns). And just 
beginning to initiate a new trend: worsted wool crepe utilized in soft dressmaker styling. 
Another trend, already on the way: checked, striped, or plaid jackets with straight-line 
straight-color skirts. 

color 

The half-dozen colors seen most frequently are brown (in all gradations: beige, sand, 
copper, chocolate), black, wine, green, navy, and grey. Rather startling in California 
fashion, this preponderance of black and brown, but very much in order with the season's 
sophisticated, slightly more formal styling. More in line with California traditions, the 
clarity and brilliance of even the darkest colors. 



64 



August Fun Clothes 

Coming to California in August? Make your lug- 
gage space really count by planning your wardrobe 
for the things you'll be doing. 

California in August means lazy days at the beach, 
horse races at world-famous tracks, sight-seeing in 
the mountains, and of course . . . the little theater, 
dinner and dancing in the glamour spots along Sunset 
Strip. Perhaps you're planning to go northward too. 
along the coast to San Francisco. 

Pack several dark little cottons, suit dresses and 
simple sheaths ... to wear on the street in the city 
. . . for though August is one of California's warmest 
months it's the month that signals the beginning of 
the sophisticated fall season. 

Don't confine dark to just black and blue . . . try 
rusty browns and cool-as-a-forest greens, apricot tones 
and vineyard colors . . . for California is an imagina- 
tive place. 

You'll want plav dresses and sun dresses, maybe 
strapless with cover-ups. boleros or stoles . . . bath- 
ing suits or shorts with sunning tops for the beaches. 
And pack vour sun tan oil and sun glasses too . . . 
California sunshine is very intense. 

For slightly formal parties and evenings bring a 
dark sheer . . . the shadow-plaids in both cotton and 
silk organza are exquisite and made in many different 
ways. They'll be wonderful for cocktail parties, din- 
ners, and the theatre. 

Visiting further north implies more formal cloth- 
ing. For city wear in San Francisco bring a dark 
faille or silk suit, and furs for evening if you wish. 

All over California you'll need a little coat or wrap 
for evening, something to combine especially well 
with your evening clothes. Woolen greatcoats or velve- 
teen dusters lend a true-California glamour. 

Consider your shoes . . . walking shoes for the 
climbs and hikes, mad little colored shoes for evening 
... a criss-cross of strips or scoop shell pump . . . 
play shoes for the beach and patio. 




Louise Salinger 
Schools of Dress Design 

SAN FRANCISCO & PITTSBURGH 

Partem Designing, Pattern Drafting, 
Millinery, Tailoring, Sketching, 
Modeling. Day and Evening Classes. 
Catalogue B. 



47 Kearny St. 

at Maiden Lane 

San Francisco, 

Calif. 

Da, 2-0-059 



Wood & Oliver Ave. 

Entrance— 

230 Oliver Ave. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Atlantic 1-3855 



CALIFORNIA'S 
OWN COOK BOOK 

4, 




-M-f you like to eat . . and who 
doesn't . . you'll revel in Helen 
Evans Brown's special and famous 
recipes in 

CALIFORNIA COOKS 

Write for Your Copy Today! 

• More than 100 unusual California 
recipes are consolidated on 40 beauti- 
fully printed pages . . appetizing dishes 
that make cooking a real pleasure . . a 
big event for you! Try Helen Brown's 
Brentwood Orange Pancakes, her piping 
hot Onion Bread, Hamburgers En 
Brochette, Peas Paisano, Green God- 
dess Dressing. 

• Cooking is easy . . and fun . . when 
you have such wonderful recipes! Try 
them for your finest party . . serve them 
for your own family's taste treat. 

• CALIFORNIA COOKS is a treasure 
to keep in your kitchen . . it suggests 
the proper menu, the exciting dish . . at 
just the right time. It's a practical 
and appreciated gift. 

• A Two-Dollar Value in good eating 
for only Sl.OO! 

Write for Your Copy Today! 
THE CALIFORNiAN MAGAZINE 

1020 So. Main St., Los Angeles 15, California 




We furnish everything 
— sparkling imported 
rhinestones in brilliant 
Emerald, Sapphire, 
Ruby, Aqua and soft 
lustrous Oriental Pearl. 
Set them in 2+ Kt. 
gold plated mounts to 
make gorgeous ear- 
rings, pins, brooches, 

etc. No tools needed. Complete instructions 
with every kit make work simple, quick, 
easv. "Trv-Out" Kits (6 piece kit only $1.50 
postage prepaid or C.O.D. plus postage). 
Wonderful hobby or sell at up to 300% 
profit. SEND NAME FOR CATALOG that 
explains everything. Will appreciate you en- 
closing 10c to help cover postage and han- 
dling. Write todav to HOBBYCRAFT SUP- 
PLY, Dept. C-l, 208 N. Wells St., Chicago, 
III. 




Fing-O-Tip "4som" 
Towel Holder 

Modern towel holder for home, office, or shop. 
+ live rubber "grippers" make towel hanging 
a one-finger operation, hold towels, stockings, 
aprons, etc. "at your finger tips," keep 
towels, etc. off floor, will not snag; permit 
instant removal. Ideal hostess gift! Grippers 
are removable for easy cleaning, replace- 
ment. Baked enamel metal base; quickly 
fastened to wall or door with 2 screws. Pastel 
colors: red, green, yellow, blue. Boxed. 

$1 each. 3 for $2.75, postpaid 

Dept. C-8 
A. J. GANZ CO. 112 North Hayworth 
Hollywood 48, Calif. 



BRIEFLY WHAT MORE DO 




PAMELA GAY ULTRA BRIEFS 
ARE YOUR MODEST MIN- 
IMUM FOR MAXIMUM COM- 
FORT UNDER ALL YOUR 
CLOTHES 

MIRAGE 

A dusky shadow of black 
nylon 
$2.95 

LOVE BUG 

Black French silk chiffon 
$3.95 

Send check with order; sorry, 
no C.O.D. Include hip 
measure. We prepay by first 
class mail. 

Pameta Gay 

Box 23-C 

Melrose 76 

Massachusetts 




THE CALIFORNIAN, AUGUST. 1950 



65 




Mrs. Louise Salinger, founder and director of the Louise 
Salinger School of Dress Design and Academy of Fashion, has 
been training dress designers for twenty-five years. She has 
traveled extensively, both in the United States and abroad, 
to acquire the technical information of industry and fashion. 

PATTERN FOR A CAREER: 
CREATING NEW FASHIONS 

A clear-cut pattern for a fashion career is the offer of 
the Louise Salinger School of Dress Design, in San Francisco. 
It is a career school of intensive training, making it possible 
for men and women to acquire professional artistic skill. 

Mrs. Salinger points out that an understanding of dress 
designing and its governing principles is interesting to every 
person whether he or she wishes to develop his talents for a 
professional career or to use it solely for personal improvement. 

To aid in gaining this understanding, the school teaches 
tailoring, millinery, pattern drafting and making, cutting and 
sewing, modeling and history of costume, line and color. The 
time allotted for the full course is nine school months of full- 
time day classes, but persons wishing specialized instruction 
can also register for evening, Saturday, or part-time day classes. 

The theory underlying the teaching of dress design at the 
school is the use of artistically designed clothes to satisfy the 
basic urge to feminine perfection. Mrs. Salinger also says that 
a dress should act as a background for personality, making 
one look more beautiful. 

Graduates of the school are working as stylists, buyers, 
consultants in department stores, instructors in sewing and 
dress designing, designers for dress manufacturers and smart 
shops, and designers for theaters and the movie industry; 
still others have their own shops. 

One of the basic courses is tailoring. The school believes 
that attractive tailored clothes are vital in every American 
woman's wardrobe, and that the secret of smart looking 
tailored clothes lies in good lines and expert workmanship. 
Pattern drafting, and the fundamental of taking accurate 
measurements to make the patterns is the first step in original 
dress designing. After this knowledge is acquired the student 
is introduced to the intricacies of pattern making, working 
with paper and material to develop and prove design and 
technique. 

Cutting and sewing, as the tools with which designs are 
brought to life, is a carefully outlined part of the curricu- 
lum . . . and the display of the finished garment, modeling, is 
the final step in completing this education. 

With the principles of line and color, and the wide back- 
ground knowledge 
of the history of 
costume, the student 
begins creating her 
own designs, and 
following through 
until she sees them 
in the finished form. 




w/vpffpimhthsw. 

SELL WESTERN ART CHRISTMAS CARDS 

No experience needed. Friends buy new 21-Card I 

51 Assortment fast from samples we send you on I 

approval. You make up to 100% cash profit: $SO I 

on 100 boxes! Amazing value Name-Imprinted 1 

Christmas Cards SELL ON SIGHT from Free ] 

Samples. Extra money from Gift Wraps, Metallics, 

Stationery, Everyday, many more. Send for Samples. 

WESTERN ART STUDIOS, 257 S. Spring St. 

DEPT. 6 ZT - LOS ANGELES 12. CALIF._ 



J. R. DAVIDSON DESIGNS 
FOR CALIFORNIA LIVING 



(Continued from Page 59) 

stitute J. R. Davidson's total number of aims in the field of 
modern architecture. Color as an emotional factor and material 
in its natural state as an integral force in the beauty of a 
house are also among his prime considerations. 

Davidson's color schemes often mirror the colors of nature 
. . . and always mirror the color preferences of the people who 
live in the house. In the Taylors' home, the pale gray-mauve 
walls of the entrance hall are a direct reflection of the mauve 
Arizona flagstone which paves the floor. The dominant colors 
used in the living room and dining room reflect the subtle 
pale greens of olive leaves and the light grays and beiges of 
natural wood and stone. Polished oak panels form the wall 
opposite the panels of glass, and natural French limestone is 
used for the fireplace. Effective color continuity is achieved 
through pale green ceilings, gray-green rugs, and silver-gray 
raw silk drapes. Continuity of spatial relations between the 
living room and the terrace is achieved through the use of great 
blocks of grey-green and white cement on the terrace floor ... a 
reflection out-of-doors of the rough textured carpeting on the 
interior of the house. 

Though the living and dining room form one continuous 
area, the heavy multi-colored striped drape hung between the 
two rooms almost has the solidity of a wall. Designed by 
Dorothy Leibes, the drape in gold, green, purple, and mul- 
berry is the only brilliant color accent in the center area of 
the house. Both living and dining rooms are furnished in 18th 
century French provincial furniture upholstered in green. Mul- 
berry and gray upholstery, also by Dorothy Leibes, is used 
for the modern couches and chairs in the living room area. 
Miss Leibes had all yarns dyed to echo the muted colors in 
the Taylors' collection of 18th century Russian enamel. 

House and furnishings are a study in contrasts, a dynamic 
interplay of two distinctly different concepts of design. The 
hush of delicate color and the powerful simplicity of the 
entire house unmarked by the twists and turns of any ism form 
a perfect backdrop for furniture and art objects intricately 
scrolled and curved in design purely for the sake of design. 
And very nice, the occasional flash of elaborate 18th century 
ornamentation against uncluttered 20th century line. 



Davidsons econom- 
ical use of space is 
one of the most out- 
standing features of 
the house. Below: 
Large built-in work 
desk in the master 
bedroom commands 
a magnificent view 
of the house, the 
terrace and garden. 





Above: The polish- 
ed oak panels of 
living room wall 
conceal shelves for 
built ■ in television 
set, radio, record 
player. Pale beige 
tone of the wooden 
wall is repeated in 
the large French 
limestone fireplace. 



66 




u&- 



Left: 100% Du Pont Virgin crimpset Nylon full 
fashioned cardigan, $9. Slipon, $7. 
Right : 100% Zephyr wool fitted cardigan, $6. 
Scalloped neckline slipon, $5. 




Look For The y Flying Fish 

For coloi fold Br showing other Catalina sweaters, write D bp t. 102, Catalina, Inc., los Angeles 13, Califorr,a 



litian 
colors 



Mallinson brings you 7 luminous new 
colors . . . the same subtle, sensuous shades 
that Titian used when he painted the famous 
Venetian Beauties of the 16th Century! 

All available in the 7 new rayon fabrics 
shown ... in either fine ready-to-wear or 
fabric by the yard. 

1. Riquette Texture Crepe (Titian) 

2. Molly-0 Tissue Faille (Vatican) 

3. Candlelight Satin (Rimini) 

4. Hurricane Gabardine (Venezia) 

5. Intaglio Satin Check (Cadore) 

6. Charmova . . . new, crisp and soft (Medici) 

7. Pall Mall Crepe (Genova) 



VATICAN 




The Mallinson elephant 

assures the best in fashion and quality 



National Mallinson Fabrics Corp. 

1071 Avenue of the Americas, New York 18 

Chicago ■ Seattle • Los Angeles • San Francisco 






MAGAZINE STYLED FOR COLORFUL LIVING 



, A MAGAZINE STYLED FOR COI 

CALIFOR 




PRICE 35 CENTS 



WINTER, 1950 




H^H&m 




UJtjr mnfit prrriottfi nf all prrfumra "Uljtte ^nulorrH" and "dag Shirraum"- ano an rxqmaiir Ammrat 
Harp 8?anflkrrrljtrf nf % rarlg 1 Btlj (Urnturg from % IGarr (EnUrrtton (1 fitij 10 1 atry (Erntnry) nnmrfl bu. iEugat 




. . . achieves the suaveness 
of perfect tailoring in this 

new California Casual. . . 
underscores classic design 

with precise detailing of 
sleeve, Moused back, and 

trouser-pleated skirt. 

Lush, wool-like rayon in the sought- 
after pastels for midseason wear: 

• Seafoam 

• Pink 

• Maize 

• Winter white 
Sizes 10 to 18 

2995 

Casual Colony 




J* M 




YOUNKERS, Des Moines, 6, Iowa 

Please send me De De Johnson's Casual Dress, style #109 (5, 29.95 




• 
• 
• 
• 
• 






• 






• 


rify 7!nne Srare 
Check ( ) Money Order ( ) 


C. O. D. ( ; 


• 
• 
• 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1950 



* 




the cream of the cottons 
belong to 




Truly a "find" 

in a wonderful fabric ! 

This frosty bit of flattery in a fine 

Sanforized * broadcloth 

by Fuller Fabrics. 

Crisp and gay in these 

attractive color combinations. 

Gray with black and white ; 

turquoise with brown and white ; 

old gold with turquoise and white 

Sizes 9 to 15, about $9.00. 



Philadelphia • California 

For store nearest you write: 

Linsk of California, 2100 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cat. 

*Reaidual shrinkage not more than 1% 




VOL IX 

No. 6 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published quarterly by The Californian, Inc., at 1020 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, Calif., printed in U.S.A. Yearly 
subscription price $1.00. Entered as second class matter January 23, 1946, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, Calif., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



WINTER 
1950 



fashion forecasts 



ii&itf-jgV 



0^^ 



'^^ 



OBj 



FASHION FORECAST, INC., 725 E. WASHINGTON BLVD. 
LOS ANGELES 21, CALIFORNIA 




Posed by Dorothy O'Hara 





S A H O L I DAY GIRL 
in her "Qa f flinetie/ print blouse 




ABOUT 



$4.95 



A cheery ornament for you, as warm and bright as 
Christmas morning; and as feminine as the yester- 
years it portrays. 

Graff's world-famous tailoring in a jewel neckline 
blouse of Cohama's Swanback Crepe, with a fly closing 
button back. The waist is tucked to give a flat- 
tering taper. Colors: Blue, Brown, Green, Red, Gray. 
Sizes 32-40. 



If not in stock at your favorite stores, WRITE DIRECT TO 



world-famous 




^ 




californiawear 



1240 SO. MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1950 



ORDER DIRECT FROM 
CALIFORNIA! 



c 



c 



hristmas gifts 
in the 
alifornia manner 




MIXING BOWL: Beautiful polished hardwood bowl and 
muddler for salad dressings. Ideal for making a well- 
blended salad dressing, preparing garlic butter or 
sauce. Basic ingredients with "zest touch" suggestions 
are burned around the outside. A perfect gift for 
host or hostess. $3.25 — postpaid. 







WESTERN PEPPER MILL: This unusual pepper mill is 
made in the shape of a miniature Coffee Grinder. 
Colorfully decorated with Western brands and motifs, 
in light birch finish. Has fine black steel grinding 
mechanism. Individually packed with whole black 
pepper at only $4.25 — postpaid. 




^^JmmtK^J 



PETITE LIGHTER: Imagine — it measures only one- inch 
square, yet performs like the largest, most expensive 
precision mode lighters. Any man or woman will love 
this charming tiny midget lighter. Has a small ring 
on end to hang to bracelet or belt — If desired. Comes 
in choice of gold or silver finish. $2.50 — postpaid. 

No C. O. D. — piease. Send check, cash, or money orders. 
(Residents of California — please add 3% sales lax) 



Send for free illustroted 
gadget and gift guide. 





THE CORRAL SHOP 



918 Las Planideras Road 
Rancho Santa Fe, California 




BOULEVARDIER ... the perfect com- 
plement for casual wear. A lovely bag 
in elk-tan cowhide with calf finish, 
chamois suede lining, zippered inside 
pocket and handy gusseted front pocket 
. . . shoulder straps adjustable to hand 
length for whatever your mood. A hand- 
some creation available in your choice 
of color — black, red, green, smoke, lug- 
gage, tan, camel, navy, and brown. 
Model 6020 . . . large and roomy bag, 
about $11.95 (plus tax) at leading stores 
everywhere. Emmet Corporation, 2837 
Pico Blvd., Los Angeles 6, Calif. 

THE WITTNAUER DUET ... a hand- 
some set of two matching watches . . . 
for her and for him. Each watch in 14 
karat gold will make a treasured, last- 
ing gift . . . can be purchased separately 
or as a set. The man's model is called 
Gold Medal Roy; the woman's model is 
the Gold Medal Regina . . . truly a watch 
duet of elegance made by Longines- 
Wittnauer Watch Company Inc. Both 
watches come with an attractive alli- 
gator leather band. $71.50 each (federal 
tax included) at better dealers every- 
where. 



FRY-GUARD ... a handy kitchen uten- 
sil with so many valuable uses. The per- 
fect way to protect your stove and walls 
against frying splatter — enables you to 
enjoy spotless kitchens and yet fry ba- 
con, chicken, etc., in the open. An ex- 
cellent camping and trailer utensil . . . 
wonderful, useful protection around elec- 
tric mixers . . . ideal for use as a cookie 
sheet. Fry-guard, so practical in every 
way, folds flat for easy storing. An ex- 
cellent gift . . . and only $1.00 postpaid. 
Sorry, no C.O.D.'s. Fred Meyer & Co., 
Box 1176, Beverly Hills, Calif. 

DELLA ROBBIA CHRISTMAS 
WREATHS ... the "gift within a gift" 
. . . not only a grand gift of unusual 
beauty and value but a direct and impor- 
tant support in helping to build fine 
youngsters. At this non-profit home for 
boys, taken from broken homes, are 
created these wreaths of rare beauty 
and excellence. A hand-finished creation 
of fifteen to twenty varieties of growth 
typical of California in her abundance 
and beauty. Delia Robbia's beauty will 
adi to your Yuletide happiness . . . 20" 
wreaths $6.00 each. 30" wreaths $9.50 
each. Express postpaid. California Jun- 
ior Republic. Chino, California. 

CLOTHES DAMPENER ... the ironing 
bag that dampens clothes more evenly 
and without sprinkling for faster, 
smoother ironing. (1) Put clothes in 
bag; (2) Pour in water; (3) Iron when 
you please. Keeps clothes damp for 
days . . . airtight and waterproof. Holds 
full washing machine load. Brighten up 
your household chores with this wonder- 
ful, time-saving Clothes-Dampener. $1.00 
postpaid. $1.03 for sales in California. 
Sorry, no C.O.D.'s. Order direct from 
Fred Meyer & Co., Box 1176, Beverly 
Hills, California. 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1950 



— *mft 





WORLD'S SMALLEST PLAYING 
CARDS ... 52 cards and a joker, authen- 
tically scaled to 1/12 actual size. Printed 
in red and black with back design in 
blue, these skillfully reproduced cards 
are ideal prizes and favors for card par- 
ties . . . perfect Christmas stocking stuf- 
f ers and greeting card enclosures ... so 
appreciated by shut-ins . . . little girls 
love them for doll houses ... a must for 
miniature collectors . . . their novelty 
appeals to men and boys. Fascinating 
miniatures at a miniature price . . . 50c. 
Order catalog of 450 microscopic items 
— 25c. Grandmother Stover's Inc., 4416 
N. High St., Columbus 2, Ohio. 

HANDBAG— MOCCASIN ENSEMBLE 

. . . attractive, quality sportswear acces- 
sories of top-grain cowhide, soft, creamy 
texture . . . lovely square pouch hand- 
bag, rayon cord draw-string and inner 
pocket with matching hand-made leather 
moccasins . . . air-foam insole, such com- 
fort you've never known. Cream, saddle 
tan, white, black, red, green, or choco- 
late brown. Handbag, $7.95. Ladies' moc- 
casins, sizes 4 thru 11 including half 
sizes, $6.95; men's, sizes 5 up, $7.45. 
Complete ensemble, $12.90. Tax included. 
Mardean Leather Goods Co., 1386 West 
26th Place, San Pedro, California. 

DELICIOUS DEGLET NOOR DATES 

... in a colorful, imported Mexican 
basket woven of cactus fibre . . . packed 
full of choice natural premium dates . . . 
two pounds of these luscious tree-ripen- 
ed dates from sunny California's fab- 
ulous Mojave Desert. The unique color- 
ful basket is just the answer for an over- 
night cosmetic bag, sewing kit, or what- 
ever your fancy. Can be shipped direct 
with gift card. Order these tasty bits of 
California sunshine for yourself and 
your friends — $2.95. Also available in 
extra large 5 pound size, $5.95. Desert 
Fiesta, Thermal, California. 

HANDPAINTED EVENING BLOUSE 

. . . custom designed by Marsha of Cali- 
fornia . . . handpainted by the famous 
California artist, Rick Berquist. Made of 
rayon crepe with velvet applique . . . 
ornamented in multi-colored Paisley ef- 
fect, banded with sequins. Beautiful and 
provocative portrait neckline, lovely 
capped sleeves. Perfect for holiday wear 
... a truly exquisite gift. Order by 
color preference in background of pink, 
blue, green or white. Sizes 12 to 18. 
About $25. Matching belt, $5.00. Marsha 
of California, 3349 Wilshire Blvd., Los 
Angeles, California. 

"COMPANY COMES" is the name of 
this dainty custom-made hostess apron 
of crisp organdy . . . finest grade . . . 
permanent finish. Generously trimmed 
with red rick-rack (or name your color 
choice). Cutest ruffled pocket you ever 
saw! Delivery in time to be a perfect 
hostess when "company comes" on 
Christmas Day — and then, after the 
compliments, surprise them with aprons 
for their very own, too. $3.95 prepaid. 
California Ella-Gance, 210 - 15th Street, 
Santa Monica, California, or phone 
EXbrook 5-4380. 



For The One Man in 10 

Who Matches 

His Tie To His Suit 




Separate 30 to 50 ties for correct coior ana 
«cslcn selection at ft Klance. Keep tics tidy 
lunwrlnkled-aiways In full view ^l-RWc. 
the modern, new. miracle H** 01 ^'*"*** 
the •■huntlm:" out of tie scloctlon-toU you 
always sec the tie that mutches your suit. De- 
" t mcd byVrcUn for a man. Beautifully made 
It rich L.hocny pla-tlc with Bleamlntf. 
crystal clear, Individual plastic nance™ that 
slide freely on 15" chrome bar. Ilandsorne y 
irlft boxed. Money back euarantoe. JU tie 
capacity S3. 50; 40 tlf capacity $3.7->: jO tie 
capacity S<i.OO. For Immediate shipment post- 
paid send check, cash or money order to. 

BELDING NOVELTIES CO. 

Oept. D, 1372 W. 111th St.. Cleveland. Oh.o 




Are You Dressing Correctly? 

You can play up your good points, play 
down your figure faults, accent your posi- 
tive, appear constantly as a well-dressed 
woman if you follow the simple rules in 
Dressing by Design, a collection of 10 im- 
portant fashion articles from The Califor- 
nian Magazine. 

50c 



Write today for your 
copy . . . only 



THE CALIFORNIAN MAGAZINE 

1020 So. Main St., Los Angeles 15, California 




PEEL PAINT TO BARE WOOD 
WITH OISE EASY STROKE 

NEW ELECTRICAL TOOL removes any number of 
coats of paint from any wood surface with little 
effort. The new "Lectro Paint Peeler" instantly 
softens paint electrically and peels it off the sur- 
face clean to the bare wood with one easy stroke. 
No danger of fire — if used according to instructions 
will not scorch or burn delicate wood surfaces. No 
mess — no smell— even fun to usel Removes paint, 
enamel quickly and easily. Sturdily constructed to 
last for years. Sent complete with extra long, 
quality electrical cord and automatic safety attached 
for use in rest position. Simply plug Into an A.C. 
or D.C. outlet — let heat for several minutes and 
remove paint to the bare wood on exterior or 
interior painted surfaces, boats, window-sills, screens, 
doors — a hundred other uses. Nothing else to buy. 
Complete tool approved by Underwriters' Laboratories. 
Full money back guarantee. 

If your dealer cannot supply you, en- 
close $4.95 in check, cash or money order, 
and order directly from: 
LECTRO WELD, INC. Dept. C-ll 
2189 W. 26th St., Cleveland 13, Ohio 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1950 




you 9 11 be in the best of "cycles" 

'Bicycle Built for Two 




See page 32 for a list 
of fine stores where 
this dress may be pur- 
chased. 







7Jr 



EDITOR AND PUBLISHER J. R. Osherenko 

ASSISTANT PUBLISHER William J. Bowen 

FASHION EDITOR Virginia Scallon 

MANAGING EDITOR Helen Ignatius 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR .-. Philip Kustner 

MEN'S FASHION EDITOR Malcolm Sleinlauf 

FASHIONS _ Jacquelin Lary 

Joan Ahern 
ART Morris Ovsey 

Jane Albrecht 

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Frank Stiffler 

SHOPPING ROUNDUP Joyce Olsen 

FOOD STYLIST Helen Evans Brown 



w 



S 
- 

> 








- 





CALIFORNIA^ 





ON THE COVER: 

For cruise and resort, 
for happy times, 
Betty Barclay features 
cotton gingham in 
crisp plaids, navy, 
green or brown . . . the 
skirt is softly flared, 
the three-quarter 
sleeves very full. Sizes 
9-15, about $9. 
See page 32 for stores. 
Suzy Lee hat. 
Photograph by 
Frank Stiffler. 



PUBLISHED QUARTERLY IN FEBRUARY, MAY, AUGUST, NOVEMBER 



From the Hand of Adrian 12 R 

Spanish Gypsy . 13 ^ 

The Foil 14 J 

- 
Moire Moonlight 15 q 

Holiday Mood 16 * 

Flashing Rhinestones ..17 £ 

Julius Shulman Pictures California Living.. 18 *! 

M 

Chalk White 22 Z 

BS 

Pure Sophistication 23 © 

b 

Cotton Lace 24 j 

Long-stemmed Look ..25 w 

California Cooks 26 *■ 

fl 

The Museum: No Sinister Chandeliers 28 & 

•» 
Patterns in Fruit and Driftwood ..31 

In Defense of Pullets 33 



NOW IS THE TIME 

when you make last minute plans for the holidays, hide 
away gifts, search out new recipes with a gourmet's eye ... or 
maybe anticipate a mid-winter vacation at some sun-filled 
resort. Fall fashions likewise are chameleons, changing with 
the way you look at your life, or the days in your life. 
And so with this issue we bring you a few ideas for holiday 
and gifts, of clothes you will wear when you entertain at 
home or fete your friends . . . and then, just a small hint of 
sunshine fashions to come . . . the swimwear and play clothes 
you'll take to resorts like Palm Springs, or on that long- 
promised winter cruise. 



THE CALIFORNIAN is published quarterly at 1020 South Main St., Los Angeles 15, California, PRospect 6651. San Francisco Office, Leonard Joseph, 833 Market St., 
DOuglas 2-1472._ New York Office, Daniel Saxon, Eastern Advertising Manager, 550 Fifth Ave., PLaza 7-3989. Subscription price: $1.00 one year, $2.50 three years. 
Fifty cents additional postage per year outside continental LTnited States. 35c per copy. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations. Entered as second class matter Januarv, 
19+9, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under act of March, 1S79. Copyright 1950, The Californian, Inc. Printed by Fashion Press, Inc., Los Angeles. 
Reproduction in whole or part forbidden unless specifically authorized. 



Four Fall Fashions from the Creative Hand of ADRIAN 

One: Slim and staccato, Adrian"* vivacious little dress with its rings of tufted fringe ... excla- 
mation point of your daytime wardrobe, to be cherished like the compliments it brings you. 
"Spain in Miniature." J. W. Robinson Co., Beverly Hills; City of Paris, San Francisco. 



Tuo: A gleaming gypsy gown of plum colored satin, a cloud of periwinkle blue jutting out be- 
neath the chin, a circlet of fringe at the waist. Adrian catches the mood of Spain, adds a stole 
to increase its romantic mood. At J. W. Robinson Co., Beverly Hills; Best & Co., Seattle. 





1 hree : "The Foil," fanciful as handwrought gold on an old-world scroll, Adrian's elegant gold brocade on 
white, metallic foil for a lady's loveliness. J. W. Robinson, Beverly Hills; D. H. Holmes, New Orleans. 



14 





Four: "Moire Moonlight" . . .black magic streaked with lighten-ing blue to give a midnight tone, Adrian's 
dinner dress with serpentine peplum is dreams-come-true for romance. Garfinckel's, Washington, D. C. 



15 




In a holiday mood for your special holiday parties, above, Dorothy O'Hara's beautiful black silhouette dress in tissue faille. On 
either side of the provocative net insert, flanges to fold up or down. Slim torso line, pockets accent the molded hip. Sizes 10-18, 
about $49. You'll find it at Charles Berg, Portland: Arnold Constable, New York; and The Broadway, Southern California. 



Opposite page, Marjorie Michael . . . woven-dotted satin damask buttoned with clusters of flashing rhinestones. The shoulder curve 
repeated in rounded hipline, pockets and panels cut on the bias assure perfect fit. In royal blue, almond green and black, sizes 
816, about $70. At Nan Gray, Palm Springs; May Co. Wilshire, Los Angeles. To complete the mood, Evyan's "Gay Diversion." 



16 




f 










1 












JULIUS SHULMAN, ace architectural photographer, began his 
career not through carefully calculated schemes for 
success but through a totally gratifying blend of chance 
anil luck. In 1936 he took a few snapshots with a 
Vest Pocket Kodak of a house by Richard Neutra. Mr. Neutra 
liked the pictures. Mr. Shulman liked architectural 
photography . . . and since 1936 he has photographed over 
1000 examples of the best contemporary architecture in 
the United States. Shulman uses a camera with a wide 
angle lens to achieve the necessary quality of movement 
and dynamics, and his sensitive, subtle pictures have 
appeared in every architectural magazine throughout the 
world. Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1910, Shulman moved 
to California in 1921 and now lives with his wife and 
six-year-old daughter in a beautiful modern house by 
Raphael Soriano high in the Hollywood Hills. 



Julius Shulman Pictures California Living 



BY HELEN IGNATIUS 



A fine photograph of a fine house involves more, 
much more, than the quick click of a shutter. The 
basic necessities: balancing the extreme range in light 
values from indoors to outdoors to prevent a disturbing 
glare in the finished picture . . . creating a three-dimen- 
sional quality to achieve the illusion of reality . . . pro- 
ducing an element of drama and movement in the line of 
the composition and the pattern of light and shade . . . 
recording with understanding and imagination not only 
the plan of the house, the basic structure, but the spirit 
of the house, the mood and the meaning. 

These basic necessities . . . easy to list, hard to perform 
. . . are the distinguishing and distinguished characteristics 
in the work of famed architectural photographer Julius 



Shulman. Plus, of course, that elusive quality . . . im- 
possible to describe, impossible to imitate . . . which gives 
a fine photograph (or a painting, a statue, a poem, a house) 
a powerful mood and dynamic life. 

Presented here: Shulman' s photographs of the Kenneth 
Schmidt residence designed by outstanding modern archi- 
tect Burton Schutt. Each picture represents a subtle in- 
terpretation of Schutt's architectural style. The basic ele- 
ments: an economical but never a miserly use of space. 
("It is not necessary to strip a house to its skeleton to 
achieve economy," states Schutt. "It is always possible to 
create a functional house without sacrificing beauty, grace, 
charm, and comfort.") ... an easy flow of space from 

room to room, and from house to garden, which creates 

(Continued on next page) 



One of the finest qualities in the work of modern architect Burton Schutt is the completely natural integration of house and 
property. Schutt designs both house and garden, and all planting areas provide for privacy as well as a beautiful view. 





JS SHULMAN 



Believing that the mood and spirit of a house depend upon the manner in which the light is controlled, modern architect Burton 
Schutt creates dynamic patterns of light and shade with dramatic overhangs and oriental patterns of latticework across the large 
panels of glass. Schutt never designs overhangs purely for the sake of design. The shape of the roof is determined by the size 
and position of panels of glass which require protection from the glare of sunlight. The translucent glass across the front of the 
Kenneth Schmidt residence in Pasadena, above, admits light but obscures vision, provides for the complete privacy of occupants. 



19 



Tp 




I 



*] 1 i ti j 



■ 



JULIUS 5HULMAN 



Above: The spacious living room at the center of the Schmidt residence opens directly into the sunny recreation room. 
Below: The recreation room has a brick fireplace in the center of the room, cork flooring, and wrought iron furniture. 




20 




Above: The clear glass panels across the back of the Schmidt resi- 
dence provide a fine view of the beautifully landscaped garden. 



(Continued from Page 19) 

rather than destroys the complete privacy of each living 

area ... a natural and never a forced integration of 
house and garden which provides for a beautiful view 
from every door and window ... a perfectly wonderful 
quality of filtered light and a mood of mystery created 
through the use of draperies or oriental patterns of lattice- 
work across large panels of glass ... a preference for wood, 
stone, and brick, for an elegant use of natural materials 
. . . the use of plants and sculptural wood forms within the 
house ("Sometimes you can do more with a $50 plant," 
states Schutt, "than with a thousand dollar piece of furni- 
ture.") 

Shulman's photographs of the Kenneth Schmidt resi- 
dence in Pasadena clearly illustrate how the camera can 
record the basic plan as well as the prevailing spirit and 
mood. The house is completely flexible, designed for a 
small family living in a conservative neighborhood. Every 
area can be opened to the garden through sliding panels, 
and every room has a beautiful view. The interior has a 
continuous flow of space from room to room, a continuous 
play of light through the translucent glass across the front 
of the house and the clear glass across the back of the 
house. 

Schutt possesses a deep understanding not only of the 
necessities of living, but far more important, of the art of 
living. His houses incorporate all the comforts and con- 
veniences which make life easy without sacrificing the 
vitality and charm which make life beautiful. The typical 
Schutt house is alive with constantly changing patterns of 
light and shade, exciting with a spirit and mood as imme- 
diately apparent as the subtle distribution of space and 
the discriminating use of materials. "A house isn't worth 
a nickel," states Schutt, "if it doesn't have a great gesture." 



Below: To the left of the large airy Schmidt kitchen is a 
service area . . . to the right, a bar, a pantry, a storage area. 




Below: Beautiful filtered light in master bedroom is created 
with a wall of glass panels veiled with transparent draperies. 




21 




Chalk white . . . sign of a new season, 
sure to make a good mark wherever 
you wear it. Classic coordinates that 
wear well together or brighten your 
wardrobe. By Preview Sportswear, 
shown and successful at Fashion 
Fiesta, weskit about $8, skirt about 
$9, in sizes 10-18, at The May Co., 
Los Angeles; Goldwater's, Phoenix; 
Brown Dunkin, Tulsa. Here, with 
Catalina's cashmere sweater, $13. 




Start your spring wardrobe with dresses like these . . . pure sophistication in fine imported linen, tai- 
lored and right wherever you travel, where the sun is brightest. Perfect resorters, by Ken Sutherland, left, 
about $40, right, about $50. Sizes 10-20, Peck & Peck, New York; the May Co. Wilshire, Los Angeles. 



23 



£ s a. 
§ .a « 

bo 53 .5 
03 - a. 
g"gcrt 



O n) 



•5-£ ft 

*-. o O 

P .5 -a 



o ■; 



ft 3 ,. • 

1) CI >—> 

c 13 • - 

.13 ca in 

J3 1) 

-Si «•> ^ 

-a £ c 

a " § 

c ° ■ 



0) , 



a 



bc£ -H 

° s s 

T)D3 O 

£ | s? 

•P BIN 
? q3 CO 



- * l 






\ 



.2 a 



Ol <J 13 



& 



It 



T3 C 


to 


ii O 


u 


CD <fi 




•— - 


u 


£ « 


tfl 


o-cj 


c 




< 


-T -* 


(ii 


• fc-i 

01 o 


o 

r-1 


CO - 


en* 


N cU 


^ 


'"Z 





>— 


5 3 

= 03 




CD 




"-1 


> 


.»» 


w <^ 


£ 


fc*^ 


cd 


en 








A fc 












CO 


CO 


'> _* 'to 


S J5 


e 


a 




s* 


cd 


3 


o 


uPQ 




o 






CUD 


(0 


> 


cd 
o 


^ 




5 


5 


s 


J 








~. 


2 




c 


CO 


6 


CD 


— 


^ 




"o 




B 


L3°3 









CJ 




*-* 


s 


iri 


o 




i— i 


o 


e 


^cn 




— 




^ 


=3 


4) 




o 


*Im 


Ed 


pA 

cd 


£ 


S*» 


fn 


6B 


CD 

s 

ex 


a 
S 


C 

"S 

o 
eu 




CD 
CU 


X 


' — 


-o 


CD 

13 


1 


cd 


to 


CO 


WO 


.-^ 


^ 


c 


p 


Cfj 


o 


CO 


15 


"3 


bC 


r- 


cu 


C 






3 


>> 

3 

CD 


— 


cd 


o 

— 


.S 


^q 


e 






o 


CD 


a) 
u 


6 






CU 


cu 


— 




— 


S 




z 


5 


o 


-3 


< 




rm 




-L 


CO 


fH 


C 




3 




g 


O 


'3- 


~7 


8 § 




a 
-= 


2 


o 


u 




z 


c 


^^ 








~ 


cd 


aj 


CD 




CO 




3 


cd 


5 


— 


CU 











'— 


to 

c 


(/: 


M 


o 


ioU 




c 


-— 


cd 


o 


o 












d: 


<u 


cu 


~ 


c 


h 


■_ 


cd 
CU 




California Cooks 



WINTER 1950 



by 

Helen Evans Brown 



I am practically purring about a new cook book that has 
just been published ... it proves, once more, that Californians 
know how to cook, and exquisitely. The Perfect Hostess Cook 
Book, by Mildred 0. Knopf, is its name, and it is published 
by Alfred A. Knopf. It is a compendium of superlative recipes. 
Mrs. Knopf, who is the wife of M.G.M. producer Edwin H. 
Knopf, is as gracious a hostess as it has been my good luck 
to know, but she is more, much more, than that. She is also 
a talented cook — one who not only knows how to supervise 
her kitchen help, but one who can, and frequently does, cook 
an entire meal without any help whatsoever. Mildred Knopf's 
recipes are, for the most part, luxurious ones, and many of 
them have a definite Continental flavor about them. They 
reflect her own versatility as a cook, for she is as adept at 
elaborate aspics as she is at a simple field salad, and her 
mushroom soup is as perfect as her Linzer Torte. The recipes 
are so concisely explained that a complete novice should have 
no difficulty in turning out a dish that would do credit to an 
experienced chef. To eat Mildred Knopf's food is a delight, 
to own her book a joy. 

The chafing dish, darling of the '90s, has staged a come- 
back. Modern Californians love it. We love it not, as our 
grandparents did, for after-theater supper parties or for in- 
timate little twosomes, but because it fits so beautifully into 
our easy way of life. At the turn of the century, when every 
bride had to have a chafing dish and every groom had to 
learn to make a Welsh Rabbit (called by that fastidious 
generation a Welsh Rarebit), the chafing dish was a party 
requisite, and as necessary a one as an ice bucket is today. 



Now that we have rediscovered the chafing . dish we find it 
quite as useful at the breakfast table as at the supper table, 
and quite as suitable on the patio, at cocktail time, as for 
a cozy little snack a deux. Bachelors, gourmets, career girls, 
potential chefs, and lazy characters have all decided that this 
is the thing for them, and how right they all are, for it suits 
their every need. The breakfast eggs can be scrambling or 
the kidneys sauteeing while the fruit course is eaten, or drunk. 
Little hot cocktail snivvies can be kept coming while the 
enchanted guests kibitz. Glamorous and flaming desserts can 
lift a mundane meal to ethereal heights, and the simplest kind 
of a soup can be heated for a hurried lunch. Here are a few 
chafing dish recipes — simple ones that anyone can use. Now 
all you need is a chafing dish! 

LOBSTER NEWBURG 

Any chafing dish chatter is bound to include a discussion 
of the old favorite, Lobster a la Newburg. The recipe, created 
at Delmonico's when that New York restaurant was at the 
height of its glory, is still a gourmet's favorite. As with all 
dishes that have become classics, there is some difference of 
opinion as to exactly how it should be prepared. I'll settle 
for this version, which is the epitome of simplicity. 

Remove the meat from a two-and-a-half-pound cooked 
lobster, and cut it, across the grain, into rather sizeable 
chunks. Put it in the top of the chafing dish, over hot water, 
and with it a third-cup of butter. Cook until the butter begins 
to bubble, then pour on two tablespoons of brandy and set 
alight. When the flames have died down, add a tablespoon 
of sherry, a half-cup of heavy cream, and three slightly beaten 



26 



egg yolks. Season with salt, a touch of cayenne, and a grating 
of nutmeg. Cook gently, stirring the while, until the sauce 
thickens, then serve at once with toast. 

CHAFING DISH CHICKEN LIVERS 

Chicken livers at their best — and that is very good indeed — 
is when they are cooked this way. Clean a pound of them, 
being careful to remove the gall, then dust lightly with flour 
and sprinkle with salt and pepper. In the meantime clean a 
half-pound of mushrooms and slice them quite thin. Melt a 
half-cup of butter (that's a quarter of a pound) in the chafing 
dish and toss in a couple of tablespoons of minced green 
onions. Cook a minute, then add the mushrooms and cook 
for another two minutes. Now come the chicken livers and 
enough slow cooking to allow them to lose their bloody look. 
Pour on a cup of white wine and sprinkle a tablespoon of 
minced tarragon over all. (If using dried tarragon, cut the 
amount in half and soak in the wine before adding.) Put the 
cover on the chafing dish and cook gently for three minutes, 
then serve with toast or pastry points. Or with rice. Which 
reminds me of the fine ditty in Andre Simon's book, Food: 

How Nice 

Is Rice! 
How gentle, how very free from vice 
Are those whose fodder is mainly rice! 

Rice! Rice! 

Succulent Rice! 
Really it doesn't want thinking of twice. 
The gambler would quickly abandon his dice, 
The criminal classes be quiet as mice, 
If carefully fed upon nothing but rice. 

Yes. Rice! Rice! 

Beautiful Rice! 
All the wrong in the world would be right in a trice 
If everyone fed upon nothing but rice. 

Anyone who is really interested in some fine reading, all 
about the world's most important subject, should find a copy 
of this book. The author, who probably knows more about 
food and certainly more about wine, than any living person, 
is the founder of the famed Wine and Food Society. 
MUSSELS IN WHITE WINE 

Mussels, which cluster thick on the rocks up and down 
the California Coast, are delicious eating — when, and only 
when, they are in a friendly mood. Here in California they 
are moody creatures — at certain times of year they are down- 
right poisonous. So, when you eat these succulent little 
mollusks, be sure that it is when they are not quarantined. 
(If in doubt, call your local Health Department.) When the 
quarantine is lifted, as it is for several months each year, the 
mussels are perfectly safe. They are always perfectly delicious. 
For this simple recipe scrub a couple of dozen mussels very 
well — a wire brush is a good scrubber — then put them in a 
heavy pot with a half-cup of water, and cover. Cook for a very 
short time — just enough to make them open up. Here's a pot 
you'll have to watch. Cool enough to remove them from their 
shells, and pluck off their beards. That appendage is well 
named, so you'll have no trouble in identifying it. Put the 
cleaned mussels in your chafing dish with a quarter of a cup 
of butter, a half-cup of white wine, a large clove of garlic, 
crushed, and a little salt and pepper. Cook gently until the 
mussels are plump and well heated, but no more. This should 
take only a minute or three. Remove garlic, sprinkle with a 
quarter-cup of finely minced parsley, and serve at once, with 
plenty of hot crusty French bread. 

WELSH RABBIT 

Welsh rabbit, taken at midnight as was the custom at the 
turn of the century, must have required considerable courage 
or the digestion of a dinosaur. Today we still relish it. but 
we're more apt to serve it as a luncheon dish or at an earlier 
supper. Rich as it is, it needs little as an accompaniment 
except hot toast or crisp crackers and beer. And perhaps a 
green salad . . . 

The whole trick of a good rabbit is to take it easy! Shred 



a pound of good rich Cheddar cheese. (Poor cheese never 
made good rabbit!) Melt two tablespoons of butter in the 
top of your chafing dish (over hot water), add the cheese, a 
teaspoon of salt, a speck of cayenne, and a half-teaspoon of 
dried mustard (or a teaspoon of prepared). Stir constantly 
and conscientiously, and, as the cheese begins to melt, gradual- 
ly add a cup of beer. Keep on stirring and cooking slowly. 
If desired one or two beaten eggs may be added when the 
cheese is melted. Serve at once. Bacon is very good with 
Welsh rabbit. 

\^ atch beer cookery! It is the latest trick in the kitchen. 
Men, particularly, go for it because they know that it is a 
beverage that is still more masculine than feminine — they 
hope, perhaps, that they can keep it their special secret in- 
gredient — a flavor that no mere woman will ever be able to 
identify. They start out with 

BEER PANCAKES 

There are two ways to make these pancakes. One, the speed 
method, is to add beer instead of milk or water to your 
favorite pancake mix. The other way, and a better one I 
must confess, is to beat two eggs well, add a quarter-cup of 
olive oil, a cup and a half of flour, a teaspoon and a half of 
baking powder, a teaspoon of salt, and enough beer (three- 
quarters of a cup or more) to make a thin batter. Do not 
overheat, but have the batter smooth. Bake on a hot griddle 
in small cakes, and serve with sausages and apple sauce. And 
while linking sausages with beer, let's not forget 

SAUSAGES BAKED IN BEER 

Prick a pound of little pork sausages with a sharp fork, 
and brown them quickly in a very little butter, turning so 
that they will be beautifully colored all the way around. Pour 
off the fat, add three-quarters of a cup of beer, cover, and 
simmer ever so gently for a half-hour. Serve with potatoes 
that have been mashed with sour cream, and with red cabbage. 

BEEF STEW WITH BEER 

Here's an economy dish that depends on beer for flavor. 
Dust a 21/o-pound piece of round steak heavily with seasoned 
flour (1 teaspoon of salt, t/ 2 teaspoon of pepper, l/o teaspoon 
of thyme seasoning powder, to a cup of flour). Using the 
edge of a heavy plate, beat the flour into the meat on both 
sides. Cut the meat into serving-sized pieces and brown them 
in bacon fat, along with a crushed clove of garlic. Remove 
garlic, add a cup of chopped onions, and cook until they are 
lightly browned. Pour on a cup and a half of beer, cover, 
and cook in the oven for U/2 to 2 hours, or until the meat is 
tender. Turn a few times during the cooking, and add more 
beer if necessary. Serve with string beans and noodles. 

BEER GLAZE FOR ROASTS 

This is more of a trick than a recipe, but it's wonderfully 
good with beef, mutton or pork. All you do is to baste your 
roast with beer — the heavier the better. It will form a beauti- 
ful shiny glaze that will make it the best looking piece of 
meat ever to appear at table. 

BEER ASPIC 

Don't scream until you've finished reading. This is a really 
delicious base for meat or fish aspics; one that is vastly 
superior to the usual run of gelatines. Soak two envelopes 
of plain gelatine in a half-cup of cold water. Add one-and- 
one-half cups of well seasoned hot bouillon (canned may be 
used), a half -teaspoon of sugar, a cup and a half of beer. 
When the gelatine has been chilled until it is of the consistency 
of an unbeaten egg white, add slices or dice of tongue, corned 
beef, lobster meat, or any other cold meat or fish. Chill and 
unmold on lettuce, and serve with a garnish of pickled beets 
and a sour cream dressing. 

Don't think for a minute that I have gone back on my first 
love, wine cookery. But beer has a place in the kitchen. 
Certainly not as important a place as has wine, but a modest 
little corner near the gourmet's throne — 

"He who drinks good ale, goes to bed mellow. 
Lives as he ought to live, and dies a jolly fellow." 
— or so an old drinking song said. 



27 



The Museum: No Sinister Chandeliers 



A Few Notes and Comments on James Henry Breasted, Jr., and The Los Angeles County Museum 



BY HELEN IGNATIUS 



In 1946 when 38-year-old James Henry Breasted. Jr., 
became director of the Los Angeles County Museum, the 
spacious rooms of the museum building ( a phenomenon which 
was half attic, half mausoleum) were dank, dark, and over- 
crowded w r ith exhibits exhibiting more quantity than quality, 
more sweetness than light. Saving the L. A. County Museum 
from a fate which though not worse than death nevertheless 
was death itself required a man who combined the instincts 
of the soldier, the priest, the teacher, and, finally (a somewhat 
more recent sociological development) the publicity man. 

The museum itself needed a new spirit, a new heart, a new 
set of nerve centers (and, incidentally, several new coats of 
paint). The community serviced by the museum . . . while 
amply supplied with fish-tail Cadillacs, night clubs, drive-in 
movies, rodeos, tennis courts, open-air markets, date palm 
groves, and such . . . needed, to put it quite simply, Culture. 
For the Southern California community is paradoxically more 
wealthy and more lacking in the cultural amenities than any 
other community in the world. It is not excessive to estimate 
that swimming pools outnumber Rembrandts almost twenty 
to one. 

Remodelling the public myth concerning the function of 
museums was, assuredly, as difficult a task as revamping the 
museum itself. For the modern museum, whatever else it is or 
can be, is not an attic designed to house a helter skelter col- 
lection of pictures, sculpture, furniture, fossils, and so on 
arranged with no perspective, no point of view, and indeed 
no apparent purpose save the collection of dust and cobwebs. 
Neither is the modern museum a mausoleum where the world's 
objets d'art are interred within sepulchral halls lighted with 
somewhat sinister chandeliers. 

From the modern point of view, the museum is an organic 
and vitally important influence in the life of a community and 
cannot exist without that much-discussed great backbone of 
a nation referred to as "the people." And. assuming that the 
soul and mind of man are as much in need of nourishment 
and stimulus as the body of man, the reverse is true: "the 
people" cannot exist without museums. Ideally, then, the 
modern-day visitors to the modern-day museum are, or certainly 
should be, not just those select bands of artists, poets, et al 
wearing the traditional vine leaves in their hair . . . not just 
the scions of high society with the tiara and the top hat atop 
the coiffure . . . but, again, the people. Any and all kinds of 
people of any race, creed, color, and economic status. 

One word, formidable, describes the job which Breasted 
took over in 1946. And, as might be expected, he works at a 
pace which at least three out of four men would label impos- 



sible. One of his assistants states that he worries about every- 
thing . . . not just the exhibits and the educational projects, but 
whether or not the museum roof needs mending, the light bulbs 
need changing, the floor needs waxing, the lawn needs mowing, 
and so on. He worries a lot about museum employees too, 
whether or not they have a place to park their cars, whether 
or not they're consuming the right kind of lunches. (To ease 
his mind on the latter two problems, Breasted installed a small 
cafeteria in the basement and had the ground cleared for a 
parking lot directly behind the museum.) 

Breasted moves about the tremendous L. A. County Museum 
building much as a good racing car barrels around a sharp 
turn. Breasted's height is medium, his figure pared-down and 
wiry, his hands very large and strong. His hair is the color 
of a straw basket, his eyes blue and unusually bright. When he 
came to the museum four years ago he was the youngest 
director in any major museum in the entire United States, 
and despite the tremendous amount of energy expended during 
the past four years (a tour de force which would leave most 
men with white hair and cadaverous cheeks) he still looks much 
too young to be seated behind the massive desk in the Office 
of the Director. 

It is true that Breasted, when viewed for the first time for a 
period of no longer than five or ten minutes, gives most people 
the impression of a quiet scholar: serene, sedate, reflective, 
non-inflammable, non-explosive. And of course Breasted is a 
first-rate scholar. After obtaining a B.A. from Princeton Uni- 
versity in 1932, he did one year of intensive graduate study 
at Heidelberg University, two years at Oxford University. In 
1937 he obtained an M.A. from the University of Chicago. A 
first-rate teacher as well as a scholar, he was a member of the 
Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, New Jersey; an 
instructor in art and archaeology at Colorado College, Colorado 
Springs; a visiting lecturer in art history at Hunter College, 
New York; and an assistant professor of art history at the 
University of California at Los Angeles. During World War II 
he went to Washington, D.C., from 1942-1944, first as chief 
of the desert troop with the research and development branch, 
Q.M. Corps, later as head of the near eastern desk, X-2 branch, 
in the office of Strategic Services. 

Breasted, then, is one of those unique men who is a brilliant 
scholar but who looks and acts like one only at certain rare 
and rarefied moments. His personality is not cluttered and 
clogged with the dust of libraries and the dry bones of tech- 
nical research. As soon as he blasts into a conversation, he is 
inflammable, explosive, vehement, and volcanic. He has a 
boisterous sense of humor, a tremendous loud laugh. He moves 



28 



Mr. James Henry Breasted, Jr., 
Director of the Los Angeles 
County Museum, photographed 
with the black basalt Squatting 
Scribe Wertehuti, XXVI Dynasty 
(633-525 B.C.) in the Egyptian 
section of the extensive Ancient 
Art collection. Breasted's main 
training is in archaeology and 
the history of art, but his point 
of view is not anchored to cen- 
turies past. During his four years 
as director, the dynamic 42-year- 
old Breasted has obtained nu- 
merous new acquisitions for the 
museum including an impressive 
variety of art works from ancient 
to modern times. 




quickly, walks rather like tennis-star Ted Schroeder, shoulders 
slightly forward. His manner of dress still bears the influence 
of Princeton undergraduate days ... a sort of casual elegance 
with trousers just the least bit out of press. Breasted is an 
easterner by birth (Chicago, Illinois, September 20, 1908), the 
second son of Frances Hart and famed Egyptologist James 
Henry Breasted, but he feels very much at home on the West 
coast and recalls with pride that his mother was a native 
Californian. Although he lives a very quiet and peaceful life 
in sedate tree-encrusted Pasadena with his wife, Helen Culver 
Ewing, and five children (James Henry, Barbara, Mary Ewing, 
John Pitney and Helen Garrison), Breasted shows not the 
slightest sign of settling down as far as his jet-propelled career 
is concerned. 

Not attired in steel armor but in a simple sack suit, Breasted 
began the battle of bringing culture to the people by strengthen- 
ing his position with a brilliant staff of experts in every field 
of the arts, the natural sciences, and the earth sciences. He 
established a direct supply line between the museum and the 
great storehouses of art, the private collections and the wares 
of the dealers. During his brief four years as director of the 
museum, the list of important acquisitions in the art division 
alone is almost as long as the listings in the Greater Los 
Angeles phone book, long by any standards. It includes ex- 
amples of early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic 
art; 15th Century Italian art; Egyptian, Greek and Roman, 
Persian and Far Eastern art; Renaissance and Baroque art; 



Eighteenth Century English and French art; and Nineteenth 
and Twentieth Century art. 

Breasted not only obtained new art treasures for the museum. 
Perhaps even more important, he managed to eliminate cer- 
tain paintings, statues, and so on which were doing nothing 
more than consuming space, collecting dust, and offending the 
discerning eye. With a stringent insistence on quality, he then 
inaugurated new methods of display which further dispelled 
the gloom of unselectivity and overcrowding. Chosen with 
discrimination and taste, objects are exhibited according to 
the logic of sound organization and painstaking research. 
Purely esthetic elements such as the lighting, the color of the 
walls and showcases, the pattern of each individual grouping 
contribute to rather than blur the spirit and mood, the purpose 
and point of each exhibit, whether it is a group of paintings 
from the Italian Renaissance or a collection of bones from the 
remains of some tall and infinitely graceful prehistoric bird. 

"This is not just an art museum but a university of the 
people." Breasted states. "We have no entrance requirements 
other than decent behaviour. We have no prerequisites in 
courses. And we give no degrees. But we offer a cultural service 
to the community and try to do for everyone what the liberal 
arts schools do for a comparative few. We do it not by talking 
down but by assuming two things. People are eager to learn. 
And people are intelligent." Just as most liberal arts univer- 
sities have three fundamental divisions . . . the natural sciences, 
the social sciences, and the humanities . . . the L. A. County 

(Continued on next page) 



29 



The Museum: No Sinister Chandeliers 



(Continued from preceding page) 

Museum, unlike most other museums, has the corresponding 
divisions of the Earth Sciences, the Natural Sciences, and Art 
in order to supply the broadest possible educational background. 

In the art division, exhibits on sculpture and the decorative 
arts are included not only to place the history of art on a 
wider framework but (a purely practical consideration) to 
compensate for the relatively small collection of great master- 
pieces in painting. In an article published in the museum's 
Bulletin, W. R. Valentiner. Acting Chief Curator of Art and 
Consultant in Art, stated: "Many visitors, and even some critics, 
limit their interest in museums to the display of paintings, as 
though the long history of art had nothing else to offer but 
works in this field which, since the great and overwhelming 
productivity of the Renaissance has become overemphasized 
in the last century and a half. It is true that without the rich 
imaginative content of painting a spiritual conception of art 
during the last centuries would be impossible: yet it is a 
narrow point of view which leaves out completely the achieve- 
ment of expressions not created through the brush, such as in 
architecture, sculpture and the wide range of decorative arts. 

"In our part of the country especially, which is relatively 
unfamiliar with art historically considered, or, in some cases, 
with art works not in the popular mainstream, sufficient stress 
cannot be laid in our public collections upon the representation 
of good examples of the decorative arts such as furniture, 
tapestries or rugs, gold and silverwork, glass, enamel, pottery 
and porcelain — nor upon the graphic arts as seen in prints 
and drawings — in order to stimulate and develop art and 
culture on as broad a foundation as possible . . . 

"We have taken care . . . not to neglect the other arts in 
order that sculptural and decorative arts expression may also 
be a source of knowledge and pleasure to those who, in injus- 
tice to our effort toward a wider representation of all phases 
of art, criticize our comparatively small number of master- 
pieces of painting — a situation due solely to lack of funds." 

The L. A. County Museum, then, possesses great if not infinite 
variety. When the visitor tires of viewing fossils and micro- 
fauna, Ice Age marine deposits, or minerals, he can make a 
swift transfer to birds or mammals, fishes and insects, corals, 
shells, and such. Or, he can ignore all of this for the William 
Randolph Hearst Collection of Ancient Art and journey through 
the Egyptian, Greek, Etruscan, Roman, Near and Far Eastern 
exhibits. 

Should things of ancient times fail to intrigue the visitor, 
he can view 14th and 15th century Gothic art, 16th century 
Renaissance, 17th century Southern Baroque (Italy and Spain), 
17th century Northern Baroque (Dutch and Flemish), 17th 
and 19th century English and American Decorative art, 19th 
and 20th century American paintings (the Preston Harrison 
Collection), and 19th and 20th century Impressionist French 
Modern paintings (the G. G. De Sylva Collection). 

Exhibitions of paintings also include an annual showing of 
the work of outstanding living artists in the Southern California 
area. Breasted believes that art, like life, is organic, always 
subject to change. His viewpoint is not tied down in the shad- 
owy recesses of centuries past. He has no objection to new 
forms in art. His sole insistance is upon quality, whether the 
work is a Gothic statue serene and gentle or a modern painting 
violent as the usual atomic explosion. 

It was stated earlier in the course of this narrative that the 
L. A. County Museum needed a man who had the instincts of 
the soldier, the priest, the teacher, and the publicity man. To 
anchor these sweeping generalizations to one or two more 
hard rocks of fact and example, it should be stated here without 
further delay that Breasted, first of all, is vitally concerned 



with the inner life of the people whom he serves. Art . . . good 
art . . . can do things . . . good things . . . for the soul and 
spirit. It can elevate and inspire, strengthen and purify. It can 
blast the ceilings off cramped perspectives and let in light and 
air. It can give a man a meaningful place in his world by 
rocketing his gaze down centuries past and circling his imagi- 
nation high in the future. By holding his gaze, too, on those 
purely contemporary things which mirror the world he lives in. 

For these reasons, Breasted wanted to put art where it 
belonged . . .-head-on with the public gaze. "Most people," 
he explains, "live without any first-hand contact with quality. 
Something of quality is unique . . . the product of a spiritual 
element in the artist . . . and must be judged purely for itself 
and in comparison to nothing else. A work of art, if it's 
important, contains an element which makes it entirely dif- 
ferent from anything in the physical world. Good art in any 
period . . . whether it's Egyptian, Renaissance, Modern . . . 
has the same incommensurate but very real element." 

Although Breasted takes a decidedly dim view of the prin- 
ciples of mass production in the world of art, he has no 
objection to the schemes generally employed in selling most 
mass-produced products. In convincing the community that 
the L. A. County Museum was well worth visiting, Breasted 
resorted to methods more commonly associated with the selling 
of breakfast food than fine art. The musical jingle, the rhyming 
motto and such were, of course, ignored. But publicity was 
used, with discrimination and great skill, in drawing the 
Southern California populace into the L. A. County Museum. 
Breasted hired a first-rate public relations man to keep the 
public informed through television and radio, the newspapers 
and magazines, of all important exhibits and projects in the 
museum. The notable success of this scheme was evident dur- 
ing the showings of the Berlin masterpieces in 1948. In addi- 
tion to the already extensive publicity program, Breasted 
carried out a whirlwind campaign of his own. He gave up 
lunch hours, evenings, Saturdays and Sundays to visit all the 
women's clubs and men's associations. By attending in- 
numerable Parents and Teachers Association meetings and 
arranging for the financing of tours, he also brought thousands 
of children into the museum. He further advertised the event 
by having posters placed in factory cafeterias and student 
lounges, car cards in buses and street cars. 

The results of the campaign bore a rather striking resem- 
blance to the usual publicity man's most grandiose dreams. 
Attendance records in Los Angeles surpassed those of any 
other city in the United States, including New York, Chicago, 
and Washington. It was not uncommon, almost every after- 
noon during the exhibit, to see people standing eight deep in 
seemingly endless lines winding around the museum building, 
patiently waiting to view the great European art treasures. 

Breasted's battle to bring the cultural amenities to the com- 
munity did not cease merely with high power publicity cam- 
paigns, numerous new acquisitions, and drastic remodeling 
of the methods of display. He instituted Sunday afternoon 
concerts, film programs on Friday evenings, lectures by 
museum instructors, radio and television programs, and peri- 
odicals including booklets on the paintings, catalogues on the 
exhibits, and a Bulletin of the Art Division. At the present, 
there are four new major plans in progress ... a UNESCO 
exhibit aimed at combating racial intolerance, a Hall of Evolv- 
ing Life, a Hall of Early Sculpture, and an Indian exhibit. 

It does not seem at all possible that somewhere in the vast 
expanses of Southern California there exists a person who 
couldn't find something of interest in the L. A. County Museum. 
But if there is such a person, Breasted is ready for him. 



30 




Patterns In Fruit And Driftwood 



BY LAURA E. MCVAY 



An ample and colorful display of fruit on the dining room 
table or side cupboard makes an inviting picture for the 
Thanksgiving holidays. The picture can be enhanced by 
giving some thought to an unusual container. The gray 
or white of driftwood accentuates the various colors of the 
fruit and adds interest. A hollowed out piece of wood 
makes a more natural container, but fruit grouped around 
the driftwood of any shape, is attractive. 

We have suggested before, that a more pleasing arrange- 
ment of fruit can be created if you will use colors that will 
harmonize and vary the shapes. For example, pink peaches, 
purple grapes and plums will be less attractive if oranges 
are added. If yellows predominate in your dining room, 
select oranges, limes, bananas, lemons, green grapes, and 
a few red apples. Notice the variety of forms in this group- 
ing. Build the fruit around a large central form such as a 
small squash, melon or pineapple, tapering to the sides 
with smaller forms and ending with grapes. We have tried 
to emphasize these points in the illustration. Grape leaves 
or any small leafed greenery will soften the arrangement 



and make the transition from the larger to the smaller 
forms. 

If you have found a suitable hollowed piece of wood for 
fruit, use it again for an assortment of Christmas balls at 
Christmas time. For a modern home, the shocking pink, 
purple lavendar and chartreuse balls will add a note of 
gaiety. The wood is just as lovely with the red, silver, gold 
and green balls for those who prefer the traditional colors. 
A few small pieces of pine needles will add to the Christmas 
note. Vary the size of the balls as you did with the fruit. 

If you cannot find a whitish piece of driftwood, you can 
bleach a darker piece without much trouble and without destroy- 
ing its naturalness. Hardware stores carry a regular wood 
bleach. The whiter the wood, the more effective it is with 
either fruit or balls. We urge you to acquire the taste for 
driftwood. There are so many beautiful and fantastic shapes, 
and it can be used most effectively with flowers, as a container, 
or just as Nature's objet d'art. And best of all, you will enjoy 
searching for it on the desert, in the mountains or along the 
unfrequented beaches. You will be rewarded with a great 
thrill when you discover an exceptional piece. 



Laura McVay's monthly feature in The Californian magazine has aroused such national interest 
in flower arrangements for the home . . . that we reprint it here for your personal pleasure, and 
as a suggestion for effective store displays in the season ahead. 



31 



IN DEFENSE OF PULLETS 



BY RICHARD MOHR 



Scorn not the humble hen! Deride not the complacent, lay- 
ing fowl! If you're a rancher with a few spare hectares of 
land, a little initiative, a modicum of intelligence, and a pass- 
ing acquaintance with the hammer and the nail, poultry ranch- 
ing today is a profitable, honorable and happy side-line. It 
can also be a profession, for poultry is not for the paltry. 

Probably there is nothing quite so interesting to the rancher 
as his poultry, if he happens to be a poultry rancher. Usually 
the chicks concerned have a certain reciprocal interest, too — ■ 
and there is the equation making poultry production the grow- 
ing business it is today. True, it lacks the excitement of gazelle- 
farming in the Rockies, or the thrill of gnu-nurturing in 
Norway, but there is more profit in poultry, and the work 
not so demanding. There is practically no current gazelle or 
gnu market, either. Chicks, too, are tamer. 

Properly speaking, poultry embraces all the groundbound 
fowls: turkeys, chickens, ducks, gamecocks and other domestics 
including the peacock, although peacock eggs have a peculiar 
gamey flavor about them and are not very popular. We are 
concerned now with the "chick," or small-time fowl, the Jabber- 
wock with eyes of flame which eventually captures the heart 
of almost every farmer. Every poultry-farmer, that is. Chicks 
supposedly exercise such an appeal because they are helpless. 
They also represent an excellent investment. 

Poultry husbandry is one of the largest food enterprises in 
the country today; it is also one of the most popular. Ninety 
out of every one hundred farms has a chick roost and many 
city yards include flocks, perhaps in case of famine. More 
city farmers are interested in the egg than in the roasted form 
of the bird. The popularity of the chick business is easily 
seen: in almost no other industry is the product so readily 
edible — a chicken can be eaten in its early egg form or in its 
adult transformation. This depends on the degree of hunger 
in the eater. 

It is agreed the egg is quite a popular food. The egg market, 
we know, is cornered largely by chickens. The wise chick 
knows this, and if coddled at all, can hit a production figure 
to dazzle a lightning calculator. It is not unusual for a hen 
to lay 250 eggs a year, and at a good-sized hatchery turning 
out around 20,000 each hatching day, a round million chicks 
will crack shells in a single season. Chickens are no longer 
a small-time industry. It is estimated that every year each 
normal adult in the country consumes, whether disguised as 
the esoteric Poitrine de poulet en cocotte a la Forestiere or 
served as the simple fried fowl, about 15 pounds of dressed 
poultry. And eggs, the most popular food in the world, are 
also the most widely used of any animal product except milk. 
Normal consumption per human per year is about 20 dozen 
eggs, and people would eat still more were it not that poultry 
and eggs are rather expensive compared to other foods. 

But the outlook is bright. Nature's original plan for the 
propagation of the species, having been found considerably 
slower than the demand of the massed maws of the nation, 
has been accelerated, with no visible discomfiture to the hen. 
Modern science and research have converged on the matter, 
and the result bas been a scientific approach to every phase 
of poultry husbandry. A happier hen, for instance, lays more 
frequently than a morose one. A hen fed on a recipe blend 
of wheat, cornmeal, bran, ground oats and milk produces more 
than one fed on sawdust and barnyard scraps. Poultry pro- 
duction is now high-pressure. 

A poultry farm is not the best means of getting rich quickly, 

(Continued on Page 34) 



32 




< /^T 



Mir2<% 




RIGHT Oft LEFT HAND 

Short •Medium»Uonq 
36° 37* 38"^ 

ORDER J&121&- 
YOURS „ XV* 



Write for details today . 

MIRACLE OF CALIFORNL! 

205 Mastick Avenue 
San Bruno California 



For the Liffle Athlete 



A REAL LETTERMAN SWEATER! 

And it comes complete with his own name 
embroidered on the genuine chenille varsity 
letter. Sweater is durably made of 100:% 
wool — just like his big brother's. The ideal 
fall or Christmas gift. Choose from kelly 
green with white stripes, scarlet with black 
stripes, or royal blue with gold. Sizes 2, 4, 
6. Give size, color, letter desired and name 
to be embroidered. 

Only $8.95 
FOX DEPARTMENT STORE 

593 Third St., San Bernardino, Calif. 

Residents of California please enclose 27c 
sales lax. 




Send for the . . . 

DOLL with 'SWALLOW Eyebrows 



WASHABLE 
14" TAIX 



COLORFUL Soft Dolls with an All-Soft 
CRUSHPROOF Body and 
MASKLESS FACE 



Write for 
free circular 
other dolls 






20571 CANYON ACRES ROAD 
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA 




THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1950 



Where to Buy Betty 
Barclay Fashions 
Shown on our Cover. 



ARIZONA: Bt'sbee — Phelps Dodge Mer- 
cantile Co.; Yuma — E. F. Sanguinetti 

CALIFORNIA: A/hambro — Lieberg's; Belt- 
flower — Bobbi Lynn; Downey — Peoples' 
Dept. Store; Inglewood — Marbro's; Los An- 
geles — J. W. Robinson Co.; May Co.; Oak- 
land — Hale's H. C. Capwell; Oxnard — 
Lehman Bros.; Richmond — Moss Apparel 
Shops; Sacramento — Mademoiselle; San 
Jose — Louanna Shop; Son Mateo — Ha- 
gen's Inc.; Santa Ana — Mattingly's; Santa 
Barbara — Wendel's; Whittier — Myer's 
Dept. Store. 

IOWA: Cedar Rapids — Craemer's Dept. 
Store, Killian Co. 

ILLINOIS: Edwardsville — Kiem's; Jacfe- 
sonville — Emporium; Maffoon ■ — Young 
Dept. Store; Peoria — Szold's; Qu'tncy — 
Halbach Schroeder; Springfield — John 
Bressmer Co. 

KANSAS: Wichita— Croney's. 

LOUISIANA: New Orleans — D. H. 
Holmes. 

MINNESOTA: 
Johnson Dept. 
Dept. Store. 

MISSOURI: St. Joseph— The Paris. 

NEVADA: Las Vegas — Johnson's. 

NEW MEXICO: Albuquerque — Kistler 
Coflister. 

TEXAS: Amarillo — Kline's of Amarillo; 
Dallas — Sanger Bros.; El Paso — White 
House; Ft. Worth — W. C. Stripling; Hous- 
ton — Foley Bros.; Little field — Ware's Inc.; 
Lubbock — Hemphill Wells; San Antonio — 
Frost Bros.; Waco — R. E. Cox Dry Goods. 

WISCONSIN: Madison— W. J. Ren- 
doll's; Milwaukee — Milwaukee Boston 
Store. 

WASHINGTON: Seattle — Best's Apparel. 



Minneapolis — 
Store; St. Paul- 



Misses 
-Midway 




Louise Salinger 
Schools of Dress Design 

SAN FRANCISCO & PITTSBURGH 

Pattern Designing, Pattern Drafting, 
Millinery, Tailoring, Sketching, 
Modeling. Day and Evening Classes. 
Catalogue B. 

47 Kearny St. I Wood & Oliver Ave. 
at Maiden Lane I Entrance- 

San Francisco, [ 230 Oliver Ave. 
Calif. i Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Do. 2-8059 | Atlantic 1-3855 



ULTRA BRIEFS * 




Pamela Gay 

FOR YOUR 
CHRISTMAS 
BELLE 
AND 

NEW YEAR'S EVE 
• 

LOVE BUG 

A French triple sheer 
silk chiffon in black 
with red love bug print. 



$3.95 



Send check with order. 
Sorry, no C.O.D. In- 
clude hip measure. We 
prepay 1st class mail. 

Pamela Qatf 

Box 23-C 

Melrose 76 
Massachusetts 



Where to Buy Preview Sportswear Fashions 
Shown on Page 22 . . . 



ARIZONA: Tucson — Albert Steinfeld. 

ARKANSAS: Hot Springs — Pfiefer's. 

CALIFORNIA; Alfiombro — Bragg 's; Ba- 
kersfield — Malcolm Brock; Belmont Shore 
— Greta's; Beverly Hills — Nobby Knit; 
Bueno Park — Knott's Berry Farm; Burbank 
—Berry Sportswear; El Centre — Hazel 
Bersch; Fontana — MacDougall's Dept. 
Store; Glendale — Webb's; Hollywood — 
Sporty Knit; Holtville — Swanson's; Indio — 
Hazel Bersch; long Beach — Bobby Sport 
Shop; Los Angeles — Eastern Columbia; 
North Hollywood — Sporty Knit; Oxnard — 
— Charlotte Shop; Palm Springs — Nobby 
Knit; Pasadena — Nash's; Pomona — Hiatt's; 
Riverside — Rouse's; Sacramento — Wein- 
stock-Lubin; San Bernardino — Davenot's; 
San Diego — Lion's; San Fernando — Scott 
Apparel; San Francisco — Hale's; Son Jose 
— Hale's; Santa Barbara — Mitzi's; Santa 
Monica — Henshey's; Santa Paula — Rose 
Gussin; Stockton — Katten & Marengo. 

COLORADO: Denver — Amter's. 



CUBA: Havana — Solis Antrialgo & Co. 

FLORIDA: Jocfcsonvi7/e — Furchgott's. 

GEORGIA: Athens — Bradley's 

HAWAII: Honolulu— C & D Dress 

ILLINOIS: Chicago — Marshall Field 

INDIANA: Fvansville — Sater's 

LOUISIANA: Shreveport — Palais Royal 

NEVADA: Los Vegas — Ronzone's. 

NEW YORK: Long Island— Roinbow 
Shops; New York City — Carol Anted. 

OREGON: Colorado Springs — Perkins- 
Shearer,- Med ford — Shaw's. 

PENNSYLVANIA: Johnstown — Penn Traf- 
fic Co.; Pittsburgh — Frank & Seder. 

TEXAS: Beaumont — Worths; Dallas — 
Phillipson's; Fort Worth — Meacham's; Port 
Arthur- — Worth's; San Antonio — Carl's. 

UTAH: Salt Lake City — The Paris. 

WASHINGTON, D. C: Washington— 
Hecht Co. 

WASHINGTON: Everett — Miller's; Olym- 
pia — Miller's Dept. Store; Seattle — Mac- 
Do uga 1 1 Southwick; Tacoma — Rhodes 



She'll WEAR Your 



Merry Christmas v and a Happy flew year 





,/<"«"* «S5w»Ar#w£* 



next to her heart! 

504 Air Mailed 
Anywhere in U.S. 



*For those folks who should have "more 
than a card" — let us send a fresh 
Holly Corsage in your name 
Every gal will love it and what raves 
you'll get for your originality! 
Attached to an attractive greeting card, 
personalized with your name in gold. 
50c each, Air Mailed Anywhere in U S 
Mail coupon below with check, 
enclose list (minimum 6 names) — 
we'll mail direct to them. 




BILTMORE FLOWERS & GIFTS 

Billmore Hotel, Los Angeles, Calif. 

What an original ideal Enclosed is my check 



for covering Holly Corsages to be 

air mailed to the names on the list attached. 
I want my own name to appear on card as 
follows: 



Sender's Name- 
Address 



City_ 



-Zone 



-State 



(If ordering from California, include sales tax) 



THE CALIFORNIAN, November, 1950 



33 



Defense of Pullets 

(Continued from page 32) 

despite seed catalogues to the contrary. There is a belief that 
a chicken farm is a shady path of ease and luxury to an 
astronomical bank account, and that chicks, given the least 
encouragement, will multiply ad nauseam until the old dresser- 
drawers around the house are bulging with the profits for the 
year. Every farmer knows that sometimes farm life turns into 
a nightmare of off-season growths, and mismated breeds, and 
seed packets will oft flutter wanly over a windy mesa with no 
response from the soil. Droughts, scourges of diptera and 
lepidoptera, storms, and the wayward Reynard are all to be 
reckoned with before the illusion of bucolic tranquility be- 
comes more than just a figment. 

But we will presume the rancher knows this, and is estab- 
lished, and wants chicks as a sideline. Work, diligence and 
care are the cardinal watchwords of the successful poultry- 
rancher, and a blend of these will inevitably lead to success. 
The husbandry of chicks is a logical and natural occupation 
for those who like living things, and have initiative and the 
ability to work. But a good chick-rancher must love his 
charges, for they are susceptible to the feelings of their care- 
taker. This is not to imply that a chick will look obliquely 
and with some question at a rancher careless enough to mis- 
take the crematory for the incubator; but a rancher just 
listlessly interested will communicate that apathy. The result 
is a brood of sullen fowl, and moody chicks are always unco- 
operative. 

There are any number of appealing angles for the rancher 
who wishes to add a poultry department, large or small, to 
his acreage. For a relatively small investment on an area of 
the same size, he can produce an appetizing food which he 
can sell to an always ready market or eat himself. Poultry 
besides being a fascinating and entertaining hobby is one of 
the few food-producing enterprises which nets returns almost 
immediately. Nine weeks from the time a baby chick project 
is started there can be fried Plymouth Rock on the table. 
Healthy, happy pullets begin to lay at about 7 months, so 
that within a single year of disease-free operation without 
earthquake or tornado, there will be a return in profits as well 
as food. 

The only business with a smaller per-unit investment is the 
minting industry, and the government has cornered the manu- 
facture of the penny for all time. But a baby chick usually 
costs about a dime, and an egg can be had for a nickel. A 
pedigree heifer, on the other hand, costs over $100, and 
breeders in other species are equally expensive. The advantage 
in a poultry project is that it may be initiated on an original 
outlay of almost any size, from several dollars to thousands. 
The return from the investment naturally varies with its size. 

Most chicks seem to get a great deal of enjoyment out of 
just being together, whether they're milling about or just 
jostling. This flocking instinct is of great value: it enables 
the rancher to house, breed, and feed large amounts of the 
birds together. And even for a really large flock, a surprisingly 
small area is required. An outdoor brooder is easily built — 
most of them are about five by ten feet, with both a shelter 
and a runway in the sunlight, to accommodate about 100 
chicks. The enterprising rancher, however, will build a "bat- 
tery brooder," merely a system of stacking the shelters and 
runways, to house up to half a thousand chicks. Science has 
shown us it is not necessary for a brood to have an expanse 
of yard; they can be kept off the ground all their lives and 
their worth and production remains static. 

Once the brood is established, more time can be devoted 
to a survey of the chick's habits. And they are certainly 




worth the trouble. The chick has perhaps the most aimless 
life possible, but essentially a happy one. It scrapes around 
the yard to while the time away, has no idea of what is going 
on, and doesn't care. It lives without complications. The 
society of the chick brood is a relatively simple one, as hens 
are seldom vociferous or gymnastic, and the sanity of their 
keeper is never threatened. Chicks are never bothersome, jazz- 
conscious, money-mad or filled with a wanderlust, nor do they 
ever vote. They do not object to stale pancakes, put gum under 
the seat, or bark at the postman. Usually the only thing more 
harmless than a brood of chicks is their keeper. Chicks hardly 
ever turn upon their master. They seldom have fits and never 
get train-sick. If the Chick has an instinct it is remarkably 
well-concealed. Its two more obvious aims in life are to fall 
into holes and get strangled in fences. All chicks have a fear 
of thunderstorms, and a cold doorknob in a warm nest will 
delude the wiliest Leghorn. 

But let's sum up. Certain skills and common abilities are 
necessary to manage poultry, and the art of poultry husbandry 
is simply the application of those skills. 

STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, AND CIR- 
CULATION REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF CONGRESS OF AUGUST 
24, 1912, AS AMENDED BY THE ACTS OF MARCH 3, 1933, AND 
JULY 2, 1946 (Title 39, United States Code, Section 233) 
Of the CALIFORNIAN published Quarterly — February, May, August, 
November, at Los Angeles, California for September 28, 1950. 

1. The names and addresses of the publisher, editor, managing editor 
and business managers are: Publisher, Joe R. Osherenko, 1020 S. Main 
Stt., Los Angeles 15, Calif.; Editor, Joe R. Osherenko, 1020 S. Main St., 
Los Angeles 15, Calif.; Managing Editor, Virginia Scallon, 1020 S. Main 
St., Los Angeles 15, Calif.; Advertising Manager, William J. Bowen, 
1020 S. Main St., Los Angeles 15, Calif. 

2. The owner is: Margo K. Frankel, 301 Tonawanda Drive, Des Moines, 
Iowa; Babette Frankel, 301 Tonawanda Drive, Des Moines, Iowa; Philip 
Kustner, 3815 Main St., Riverside, California; Sylvan Mendelsohn, 1139 
Alvira St., Los Angeles, Calif. ; Carol Osherenko, 1005 N. Alpine Dr., 
Beverly Hills, Calif.; Joe R. Osherenko, 1005 N. Alpine Dr., Beverly 
Hills, Calif.; Louis Osherenko, 711 Ellery Dr., San Pedro, Calif.; I. H. 
Prinzmetal, 9441 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills, Calif. ; Herman Sonnabend, 
7004 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif.; Lucille & Robert Farnham, 
1120% Hacienda PI., Los Angeles, Calif. 

3. The known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders 
owning or holding 1 percent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, 
or other securities are: None. 

4. Paragraphs 2 and 3 include, in cases where the stockholder or 
security holder appears upon the books of the company as trustee or in 
any other fiduciary relation, the name of the person or corporation for 
whom such trustee is acting; also the statements in the two paragraphs 
show the affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the circumstances and 
conditions under which stockholders and security holders who do not 
appear upon the books of the company as trustees, hold stock and 
securities in a capacity other than that of a bona fide owner. 

(Signed) JOE R. OSHERENKO, Owner 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 28th day of September, 1950. 
(Signed) EVELYN M. WOODRUFF, Notary Public 
(My commission expires Oct. 31, 1951) 



34 




CALIFORNIA COOKS 

A Wonderful Gift from California 



SPECIAL CHRISTMAS OFFER 

6 for $5 (or $1 each) 



64 Pages of Recipes and Articles on 
Fine Cookery in the California Manner 




IT'S GOOD EATING 
AND GOOD READING 

It's a kitchen literary classic, a prize col- 
lection of Helen Evans Brown's brilliant 
and sprightly articles on cookery, oppear- 
ing exclusively in The CALIFORNIAN. 
Recipes. Menus. Articles. NOT just a 
cook book. Rather a book on California 
cuisine. A distinguished cuisine influenced 
by the Missions, by Chinatown, by Holly- 
wood, by California vineyards and citrus 
groves, by the Desert and by the old 
Spanish Fiesta days. 

Kumquat Marmalade . . . Napa Kidney 
Saute . . . Spaghetti Ventura . . . Patio 



By Helen Evans Brown 

A COLLECTION OF ILLUSTRATED ARTICLES RE- 
PRINTED FROM THE CALIFORNIAN — BOUND IN 
AN ATTRACTIVE, COLORFUL HEAVY PAPER COVER. 

Now In Its Second, Enlarged Edition 



"CALIFORNIA COOKS" 
IS AS JOLLY AND 
FESTIVE AS CHRISTMAS 
<= . a r a < d a DAY ITSELF^ 

5a lad . . . Barracuda San Pedro . . . 
Carmel Cabbage . . . California Almond 
Sauce . . . Fresno Fritters . . . Ojai Orange 
Sauce . . . Onion Bread . . . Brentwood 
Orange Pancakes . . . Hamburgers en 
Brochette . . . Green Goddess Dressing. 
A truly marvelous gift, and so reason- 
able. A treasure for any kitchen and a 
touch of California the year-round for 
those far away. Get off your list to us 
TODAY so your friends will have this 
practical and appreciated gift in plenty 
of time for Christmas morning. 



JUST SEND US $5.00 FOR SIX COPIES (OR $1.00 FOR ONE). IF YOU WISH, SEND 
JS YOUR CHRISTMAS MAILING LIST ALONG WITH YOUR OWN GIFT CARDS AND 
/ELL MAIL THEM FOR YOU — AND DON'T FORGET YOUR OWN COPY. 



WRITE TODAY TO: THE CALIFORNIAN, 1020 SO. MAIN ST., LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 






'UmJuAuj 




Catalinds exciting new Carribean* Collection features fabric 
designs by Jim Tillett of Mexico City. Exotic, exclusive 
hand-screened patterns in glorious sun-ripened colors, 
all imaginatively created. 

"Rhumba Ruffles," 100% Nylon Laton taffeta 

princess front suit in gay Caribbean colors. 






V* 



Write for folder of other Cataltna styles and name of nearest store. Carolina, Inc., Dept. 200, Los Angeles 13, Calif