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Full text of "California recipe book"



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§ CALIFORNIA § 



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Bruce's Printing House, 535 Sacramento Street. 
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HAYITES ^ LAWTOIT, 



IMPORTERS or 



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CHINA 

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AKEBICAN 

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PEENOH 

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Table Cutlery 

ETC. 



MARKET STREET 

UNDER GRAND HOTEL. 



EDGAR BISHOP. 



A. S. PETERSON. 



L. W. PALMER. 



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Bruce's Printing House, 535 Sacramento Street. 
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The object in compiling this work, has been to 
obtain a collection of reliable recipes. The par- 
ties fronl whom they have been received, are per- 
sonally known to the compilers, and they vouch for 
their correctness and practicability. Appreciating 
the assistance rendered us by the ladies of the First 
Congregational Church, to them this work is re- 
spectfully dedicated. 




Dishes for Breakfast or Luncheon ! 




In order to secure good bread, the best of flour 
sliould be used, even at a greater cost. New flour 
or meal is best. To make good bread, it must be 
thoroughly kneaded. The oven must be hot when 
the bread is first put in and then tempered accord- 
ng to judgment. 



BREAKFAST DISHES 



MUFFINS ^ Mrs. C. 
1 cup of sugar, | do. butter, J do. yeast, 1 quart of 
milk, 4 eggs, flour sufficient to make a stiff batter. 
When risen lightly, bake in rings or gem pans. Bake 
quickly. 

QUICK MUFFINS— Mrs. C. 

1 quart of flour, 1 tablespoon, heaped of butter, 2 tea- 
spoons of yeast-powder, 2 tablespoons of sugar, 3 eggs, 
a little salt, sufficient milk to make a soft batter (nearly 
a pint). Bake the same as above. 



MUFFINS— Mrs. S. 

3 tea cups of flour, 1 teaspoon yeast powder, a little 
salt, 3 or 4 eggs, 1 tablespoon of melted butter — milk 
for a thick batter. 



BREAKFAST DISHES i 

BREAKFAST CREAM CAKES. 

1 pint of cream, 3 eggs, a little salt, flour (sufficient 
for a good batter), about 3 cups. Bake the same as the 
former, in a quick oven, 

BREAKFAST CAKE. 

2 cups of flour, 1 do. of milk, ^ do. of sugar, 2 eggf^^, 
1 teaspoon of soda, 2 do. of cream of tartar. 



FRENCH ROLLS. 

' 3 cups of flour, 1 of milk, 1 of water. Stir in the 
flour gradually, beat briskly about five minutes. Put a 
piece of butter, the size of a pea into each mold, fill f 
full. 

FRENCH ROLLS — Mrs. W. 

i| pints of raised bread, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon of white 
sugar, 1 teacup of flour, ^ teaspoon of soda. Let it stand 
in the pan till thoroughly risen. 

RYE BISCUIT— Mrs, C, 
A little more than a pint of rye; the remainder of the 
quart of flour; buiLer nearly as large as an egg; two 
teaspoons of cream of tartar; one of soda; mix with 
milk, quite soft, and bake immediately. 



CORN BREAD, 

{ FROM A COLORED COOK.) 

1 pint of meal, J do. of flour, 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons of 
cream of tartar, 1 of soda, (not heaped), 1 pint of milk, 
2 tablespoons of sugar. 

AUNTY'S BANNOCK. 
1 pint of meal, 1 pint of milk, 1 pint of water, 5 eggs, 
a little salt; 2 tablespoons of sugar, scald the meal 
with the water, and add the eggs while hot. Bake an 
hour. 



8 BREAKFAST DISHES 

WAFFLES— Mrs. H. 
1 pint of milk, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon of soda, a little 
salt, flour sufficient for a batter to pour. Bake in waffle- 
irons or on a griddle. 

POTATO CAKES — Mrs. S. 
Boil 12 potatoes, mash tliem, add salt, butter the size 
of an egg, well mixed; then add 1 pint of flour, roll thin 
and fry on a griddle; cut in small cakes. 

YEAL LOAF, FOR LUNCHEON.— Splendid. 
3 ibs veal cutlets and a small piece of salt pork, chopped 
together, very fine, (uncooked); 1 teacup of cracker 
crumbs, moistened with a little water, 1 egg, season with 
salt and pepper. Bake IJ hours, and slice when cold. 
Add savory or sage, if you like, when mixing. 

OMELET.— Mrs. C. Harrison St. 
4 eggs, beat the yolks and white separately; one table 
spoon of flour; one teaspoon of salt; one tablespoon of 
melted butter; add nearly a cup of milk; pour all, except 
the whites of the eggs, into a pail, stand it on the stove 
in a pot of boiling water; when it commences to thicken 
add the whites, stirring gradually; after a few moments 
pour in a dish, set it in the oven to brown. 

POP-OVEBS—Mrs. 0. Bush St. 
3 eggs, 3 cups of milk, 3 do. flour; bake in cups half 
filled, or gem pans, a little salt. 

GREEN CORN CAKES.— 76iV? 
1 pint of grated corn, 3 tea cups of milk, 1 do. of flour 
2 tablespoons of butter, 1 egg, a little salt and pepper. 
Fry in small cakes on a griddle. 



EGG OMELET — Mrs. S. 
4 eggs, 1 cup of milk, 1 tablespoon of flour, a little 



BREAKFAST DISHES ^ 

salt, a tablespoon of melted butter. Fry in hot butter. 
Turn only one-half on to the other. 

HAM TOAST — Nice. 
I ft) of lean ham, chopped fine; beat well the yokes of 
3 eggs, 1 tablespoon of melted butter, 2 tablespoons of 
cream, or good milk; stir over the fire till it thickens; 
spread on hot toast. 

BANNOCK — Mrs. H.C.M. Mason St. 
1 pint of meal, scalded, with nearly 3 pints of milk, a 
small cup of sugar, four eggs, a little salt; bake nearly 
two hours. 



BROWN BREAD — Mrs. C. 

3 cups of Indian meal, 3 of Graham flour or Rye, as 
you like best, 1 cup of molasses, a little salt, a small 
teaspoon of soda, 1 quart of boiling water. Mix and boil 
in a tin steamer four hours. 

RYE AND INDIAN LOAF. 

3J cups of Indian meal, 2 cups of Rye meal, 1 cup of 
molasses, 1 teaspoon of soda, a little salt; boil steadily 
and gently 4 hours in a steamer. 

CORN CAKE — Mrs. T. 

1 pint of corn meal, mixed with ^ pint of flour, 2 
teaspoons cream of tartar, 1 of soda, 1 tablespoon of 
sugar, 1 pint of milk, 2 eggs. 

HOT CAKES. 

4 cups of sour milk, J teaspoon of soda to each cup, 
a little salt, 1 tablespoonful of melted butter, sufficient 
flour to make a thin batter, (beat well). 

AUNTY'S BROWN BREAD — Splendid. 

2 cups of Indian or com meal (coff'ee cup), 3 do. of 
Graham flour, 1 do. of molasses, 1 teaspoon even-full of 



10 . BREAKFAST DISHES 

dry soda, dissolved in a cup of milk, add one quart 
(beer measure) of cold milk, a little salt. Pour into 
your steam kettle, and steam 2 J hours; then put in a 
moderately-heated oven and bake IJ hours. Then turn 
over the kettle and bake another 1| hours; follow close- 
ly the recipe, and you will have a nice loaf. 



STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE — Mrs. C. 

1 quart of flour, 2 teaspoons cream of tartar, 1 of soda, 
butter the size of an egg, mix Avith milk, soft, and bake 
quickly, split, butter and fill plentifully with berries and 
sugar. 

JUMP-UP — Mrs. C. Harrison St. 
1 cup of milk, 1 of flour, 1 egg. Bake in gem pans. 



PARKER-HOUSE ROLLS — Mrs. G. Mason St. 
Scald a little more than a pint of milk; let it stand 
till cold, 2 quarts of flour; make a hole in the middle of 
the flour. After rubbing into the flour a tablespoon of 
lard or butter, then add J teacup of yeast, a little sugar 
and salt and the milk cover with the flour. Let it stand 
until morning, then work until smooth. When it is light 
roll out and cut with a pint pail cover; rub it over with 
a little butter and cup-over like a turnover; then let 
them rise and bake 20 minutes. Splendid; never fail 
if the directions are followed. 



CORN MEAL CAKES. 

1 pint of corn meal, 1 quart of sour milk, 4 eggs, well 
beaten, two tablespoons of sugar and soda sufficient to 
sweeten the milk; mix all well together and bake in 
pans. The eggs must be well beaten. 



PASTRY AHD PIES 



Pastry should be used as soon as made, as it is better 
firesh than after being kept a day or two. 

For a good common pie-crusty allow half a pound of 
shortening to a pound of flour. Pie-crust looks nicer 
made of lard; but tastes better half butter. 

Rub one-half of your shortening, well, with two-thirds 
of your flour, adding a little salt; then add sufficient 
cold water to make it sufficiently moist to roll out; spread 
on the reserve shortening as you roll it out, sprinkling 
on the reserved flour. 



PIES 



GROUND RICE PIE. 



Soak 4 heaping teaspoonfuls of rice in milk, cook a 
few min¥ites in one quart of boiling water; cool, and 
then add 4 or 5 eggs; bake in a crust. The whites of 
3 eggs may be reserved for frosting, if desired. 



LEMON PIE. 

1 cup of milk, ^ cup of sugar, 1 teaspoon of corn-starch, 
heaped; 2 eggs, 1 lemon; squeeze the juice; grate a 
little of the lemon. Beat the yolks and whites sepa- 
rately, add the sugar, juice and grated peel, then the 
other ingredients, reserving the whites for frosting. 



LEMON PIE. 

1 lemon, grate the peel, squeeze the juice, 2 eggs, 
1 cup of sugar, one tablespoon of flour, beaten up in J 
tumbler of water. The whites for frosting. 



PIES 13 

LEMON TAHTS. 

1 large lemon, two eggs, butter, half an egg in size; 
1 coffee-cup of sugar. Squeeze the juice, grate a little 
of the peel; add the eggs and sugar, beat well. Cook it 
in a pail standing in boiling w^ater, letting it cook till it 
thickens, about twenty minutes, stirring it constantly. 
Let it cool a little before filling the tarts. If the lemon 
is very juicy, add a tablespoon of flour. 

CRACKER PIE —Mrs. H. 
3 Boston crackers, well broken; 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup 
of water; juice and grated peel of 1 lemon. Bake in a 
crust. 



SUMMER MINCE PIES, WITHOUT MEAT. 
4 pounded crackers, IJ cups sugar, 1 cup of molasses, 
1 cup of vinegar, 1 cup of chopped raisins, 1 cup water 
small piece of butter, spices without stint. 

LEMON PIE — Mrs. B., Van Mess Ave. 
Grate the rind of one lemon, and squeeze the juice in- 
to it. Pound 1 soda-cracker and mix with IJ cups of 
sugar, 1 cup of water and the yolks of two eggs. Beat 
the Avhites and eight or ten spoonfuls of sugar together. 
Bake without top crust, but spread the frosting over the 
top, and set in the oven to brown. 

APPLE TARTS — Mrs. F. Ellis St. 
Stew and strain the apples. Take eight tablespoon- 
fuls of the apple, eight of sugar, eight of beaten eggs, 
four of melted butter, two of milk, a little W'ine and 
nutmeg. Bake in tarts; no top crust. 

APPLE PIE. 
Peel the apples, slice them thin, sprinkle sugar over 
them, grate on lenjon peel or nutmeg, a small piece of 
butter on the top of each pie. 



14 PIES 

WHORTLEBERRY OR BLACKBERRY PIE. 

MR3. C, ELLIS ST. 

Fill the dish not quite even full, and to each pie of the 
size of a soup-plate, add four tablespoonfuls of sugar. 
Dredge a very little flour over the fruit, before you lay 
on the upper crust. 



RHUBARB PIE. 

Take the tender stalks of the rhubarb, strip off the 
skin and cut the stalks into thin slices; line the plates 
with pie-crust, then pour in the rhubarb with a thick 
layer of sugar to each layer of rhubarb. A little grated 
lemon-peel improves the pie. Cover the pie with a crust. 
Rhubarb pies should be baked about an hour in a slow 
oven. 



LEMON TARTS — Mrs. A.L.S. Bush St. 
Grated rind of two lemons, juice of one lemon, piece 
of butter size of an egg, one egg — sugar to taste. Sim- 
mer all together till thick. Bake puffs, and fill while 
hot. Makes 30 tarts. 



ORANGE PIES — Mrs. L. J. LarkinSt. 
The juice and grated rind of two oranges, six table- 
spoons of sugar, one-half cup of flour, IJ cups of milk, 
stir together with the yolks of six eggs. Mix the above 
and fill the plates, having a nice under-crust. Beat the 
whites of six eggs with three tablespoons of sugar, and 
after baking the pies pour the frosting over the top and 
set them again in the oven to brown. 



puDDmes M& 



Pudding Bags should be made of thick, close 
sheeting to exclude the air. Before using them, 
they should be wrung out in hot water, then thor- 
oughly floured on the inside. In tying, leave room 
to swell. A plate in the bottom of the pot pre- 
vents the bag from burning. Keep the pudding 
covered with water and do not let it stop boiling. 
If necessary, fill up the pot with hot, but never 
cold water. 



.^.^.^.^.^..^.^..^. 



BAKED INDIAN PUDDING — Mrs. T. Cal. St. 
2 quarts of milk, IJ tea cups of corn meal. Put | 
of the milk on to boil, when boiling stir in the corn 
meal, then take it from the fire^ and add the cold milk 
and 1 tablespoon of flour. Sweeten \vitli sugar and 
molasses to taste; add J teacup of chopped suet and 1 
teaspoon of ginger. Bake slowly, IJ hours. 



PLUM PUDDING — Mrs. H. 

1^ pints of powdered crackers, or bread crumbs; 6 
tablespoons of sugar, 3 pints of milk, ^Doured boiling on 
the bread; 3 eggs, J cup of butter, 1 lb of raisins, 1 
Avine-glass of wine or brandy. If you wish to serve 
with sauce, use less sugar and butter. 



PUDDING SAUCE. 
2 cups of sugar, i of butter, the yolk of one eggy all 
well beaten together, add 1 cup of boiling w^ater, stirr- 
ing gradually. When cool, add the whites beaten to a 
•froth. 



PUDDINGS 17 

THE QUEEN OF PUDDINGS~Mrs. S. Yernon Place. 
1 pint of bread crumbs, 1 quart of milk, 1 cup of 
sugar, yolks of 4 eggs, well beaten, grated rind of 1 lem- 
on, a piece of butter tlie size of an egg, bake until done 
but not watery, about | of an hour. When done, spread 
over the top jelly or preserve; beat the whites to 
a froth with 1 cup of sugar and the juice of the lemon ; 
set in the oven to brown. Pour the whites on the top 
before placing in the oven. 

TAPIOCA AND APPLE PUDDING. 

Take as many apples as will set in your dish, say 7 
good-sized ones; core them, boil 1 cup of tapioca in 1 
quart of water until thoroughly dissolved; about one 
hour, add ^ cup of sugar, 1 teaspoon of salt, a little 
butter and nutmeg. Pour over the apples when they 
are well cooked, set away to cool. Eat with sugar and 
cream or sugar and butter. 

SNOW PUDDING — Nice for Luncheon. 

Soak J box of gelatine in ^ pint of cold water, set it 
on the back of the stove till all dissolved, add J pint of 
boiling water and just before it hardens, beat well with 
the whites of 2 eggs, 1 J cups of sugar and a little lemon 
extract or juice. 

The custard for the same, is made : 1 pint of milk, 
yolks of 2 eggs, | of of a cup of sugar, 1 teaspoon of 
vanilla; mould the gelatin and pour the custard around 
it when ready for the table. 

TAPIOCA CREAM PUDDING— Mrs. C. Ellis St. 

Cover 3 tablespoons of tapioca with water, and let it 
stand over night. In the morning, boil it 15 or 20 
minutes in one quart of milk, with a little salt. Beat 
the yolks of three eggs, with one cup of sugar, ^nd add 
to the other; let it just boil, stirring all the time. When 



18 PUDDINGS 

cool, add the whites of the egg^, beaten to a froth, stirr- 
ed in and flavored. Eaten cold. 



CHOCOLATE PUDDING~Mrs. H. 

Boil 1 quart of milk. While boiling add 2 ounces of 
chocolate, scraped fine and then remove from the fire. 
While cooling, beat six eg^s, reserving the whites of 3. 
Stir the eggs into the milk, add butter, the size of a 
nutmeg and sugar to the taste. When baked, beat the 
3 whites to a froth with a little sugar. Pour over for 
frosting and brown slightly in the oven. 



CUSTARDS, TO TURN OUT— Mrs. S. 
Mix with the yolks of 4 eggs, well beaten, 1 pint of 
new milk, J ounce of dissolved isinglass, sweeten with 
sugar and boil over the fire till it thickens. Pour into 
a dish and stir it till a little cooler, then pour it into 
cups, to turn out when cold. Add flavor as you like to 
the eggs. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

IJ cups of sour milk, I spoonful of soda, 1 of molass- 
es, 1 cup of sugar, suet, raisins, spices and flour to make 
a stiff" batter. Steam 3 hours. 



BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

2 quarts of milk, 1 pint of meal. Boil the milk, stir 
in the meal gradually. Take it from the fire, add 2 or 
3 eggs, sugar and syrup to the taste, pretty sweet. If 
whey is desired, reserve a part of the milk and add it 
cold. Bake in a well-buttered dish 2 or 3 hours. 



BOILED INDIAN PUDDING. 
Take one pint of milk less than above, and use 4 or 
6 eggs. Boil in a cloth 2 or 3 hours. To be eaten with 
butter. 



PUDDINGS 19 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING — Mrs. P. 

3 tablespoons of Indian meal to 1 quart of milk, sweet- 
en well with molasses, mix the meal and molasses 
together and stir it into the boiling milk, add 1 cup of 
cold milk for whey. 

PUFF PUDDING — Mrs B. Cal. St. 
1 quart of milk, 1 pint of sifted flour, 4 eggs. Bake 20 
minutes. To be eaten immediately with cold sauce. 

POOR-MAN'S PUDDING— Mrs. B. Cal. St. 

4 cups of flour, 1 do of milk, 1 do of chopped suet, 1 
do of molasses, 1 do of raisins, citron and currants. If 
you wish, J teaspoon of soda, dissolved in a little water; 
boil 3 hours. To be eaten with hot sauce. 



BOILED-EGG PUDDING. 
8 eggs, 1 quart of milk, 1 pint of flour. Boil 1 hour. 

A NICE RICE PUDDING — Mrs. S. 
1 quart of milk, 1 cup of rice, a little salt. Let them 
boil until soft. Take it from the fire, stir in the yolks 
of 3 eggs, a small piece of butter; sweeten to the taste. 
Put it into a dish, take the whites and 1 cup of sugar; 
beat well. Pour over the top, and brown in the oven; 
flavor as you like. 

AMHERST PUDDING — Mrs. T. 
4 cups of 'flour, I of molasses, 1 cup of milk (sour 
preferable), 1 cup of chopped raisins, 1 do of chopped 
suet, 1 teaspoon of soda; spice to the taste. Steam 3 
hours. 

PLAIN, BUT NICE PUDDING. 
1 eg^, 1 cup of sugar, 2i tablespoons of melted but- 
ter, 1 cup of sweet milk, 1 pint of flour, 2 teaspoons of 
cream of tartar, 1 of soda. Bake 30 minutes. Eaten 
with sauce. 



20 PUDDINGS 

SPONGE PUDDING— Mrs. D. 

1 cup of sifted flour, | cup of sugar, J cup of butter, 
6 eggs, 1 pint of milk; wet the flour with a little of the 
milk, add the remainder of the milk, cooking a little. 
Then add the butter and sugar. When cool add the 
eggs, beaten separately. Set the dish in scalding water 
and bake an hour. Serve with a cold or hot sauce. I 
prefer cold. 

NEW-ENGLAND CORN PUDDING- Mrs. C. 

Take 2 dozen ears of green corn, well filled, but 
young. Grate or pound the corn, add 2 pounded crack- 
ers, 1 quart of milk, 4 eggs, 4 tablespoons of sugar, a 
little salt. Bake two hours in a moderately heated oven. 
Serve with butter. 

' BERRY PUDDING — Ibid, 
Make a paste as for pies, but not as short. Roll it out 
on a floured cloth, lay it in a large bowl and pour in the 
berries. Close it up carefully, tie it up and boil it two 
hours. (A saucer in the bottom of the pot prevents 
burning). Serve with a hot sauce. Very nice; try it 
with blackberries. 

GELATINE PUDDING — Mrs. W. 

One-third of a box of gelatine, J pint of cold water, 
let it stand an hour, add one-half pint of boiling water. 
When dissolved, add three lemons and two cups of sugar, 
the juice of three lemons and the grated rind of only 
one. Strain into a dish to cool. The custard from the 
same is made from the yolks of three eggs, 1 pint of 
milk, one cup of sugar; make a soft custard and flavor 
with vanilla. Just before using, cut the jelly into squares 
and place in a glass dish. Pour over the custard, beat 
the whites to a froth, with a little sugar, and pour over 
the top. 



PUDDINGS 21 

PUFFS — Mrs. W. O'Farrell St. 
Three tablespoonfuls of flour, three eggs, a little salt, 
one tumbler of milk, bake three-quarters of an hour. 
To be eaten with sauce. 

SUET PUDDING- Mrs. B. Van Ness Ave. 
2 cups of suet, 3 cups of flour, 5 eggs, 2 teaspoonfuls 
of yeast powder, milk enough to make a stiff batter; a 
little sugar, spice and fruit. To be eaten with a sauce. 
Boil three hours. 

TROY PUDDING — Mrs. F. Ellis St. 

One cup of suet, one of molasses, one of milk, one of 
raisins, three of flour, yeast powder. Boil three hours. 




GAKEIS 



In making cake, accuracy in proportioning the 
ingredients is necessary. The cake should be put 
into the oven as soon as made. The oven being 
already hot, and ready for it. The eggs must be 
fresh and the butter good. 

Do not beat the eggs or butter in tin, as the cold- 
ness of the latter prevents the lightness of the cake. 
To ascertain if the cake is sufficiently done, use a 
straw, if it comes out the least moist, let the cake 
remain in the oven longer. 



0-A.ece:h 



POUND CAKE — Mrs. H. 

1 ft) of sugar, J ft) of butter, 10 ounces of flour, 8 eggs. 
Beat the butter and sugar to a cream, add the eggs, well 
beaten, then sift in the flour. Bake in a quick oven. 



SPONGE CAKE. 
1 ft) of sugar, I ft) ^of flour, 8 eggs. Beat the yolks 
very light, add the sugar and beat well together. Then 
add the well-beaten whites and the other ingredients. 

PLUM CAKE. 
1 ft) of flour, I ft) of butter, | ft) currants, | ft) of 
sugar, 1 ft) of raisins, 2 ounces of citron, 6 eggs, 1 gill 
of brandy, 1 nutmeg; cloves, if you like. 



BLACK CAKE. 

IJ cups of sugar, 1} do. of molasses. 1 large cup of 
butter, 5 cups of flour, 4 eggs, 2 nutmegs, 1 teaspoon of 
cinnamon, 1 do. of mace, 1 do. of cloves, 1 do. of soda, 
2 ft) of raisins. 



24 PUDDINGS 

COOKIES— Mrs. C. Ellis St. 
3 cups of sugar, 1 of butter, § cup of water, 3 eggs, 
2 teaspoons of yeast powder. Flour sufficient to roll 
out, quite soft. 

SUGAR AND MOLASSES COOKY. 

1 cup of sugar, | of molasses, 1 cup of sour milk, 2 
large spoons of lard, 1 egg, salt and nutmeg, 1 large 
spoon of dissolved soda. 

HUCKLEBERRY CAKE (Good). 
1 cup of sugar, ^ cup of butter, 2 quarts of flour, 
with 4 teaspoons of yeast powder, a little salt, one quart 
of berries. Mix with cold milk about as stiff as pound 
cake, and bake quickly in square tins. 

- CRULLERS — Mrs. C. 

5 eggs, ten spoons of sugar, (tablespoons), 7 of melted 
butter, 1 teaspoon even-full of dry soda, dissolved in 1 
cup nearly, full of milk. 

CRULLERS — Mrs. C. Ellis St. 
5 eggs, 5 spoons of melted butter, 8 of sugar, 2 of 
water, 1 small teaspoon of soda, a little nutmeg; fry 
in hot lard. 

JUMBLES. 
1 cup of butter, 5 cups of flour, 2 of sugar, 4 eggs, 
J cup of milk, 1 teaspoon of soda. 

TIPSEY CAKE. (Prime) 
Cut in halves 1 loaf of sponge cake; place in two 
glass dishes, stick it full of blanched raisins, quartered. 
Wet the cake with wine, drop jelly about it, then have 
ready a nice custard and pour over it. 

DOUGHNUTS — Mrs. C. Harrison St. 
1 quart of flour, 1 tea-cup of sugar, 2 teaspoons of 



PUDDINGS 25 

cream of tartar, 1 of soda, a piece of butter, the size of 
a walnut; wet up with sweet milk; put the butter into 
the warm milk, 

COOKIES— Mrs. 0. Bush St. 
2 cups of sugar, 5 do. of fl:)ur, 4 tablespoons of milk, 
2 eggs, 1 cup of butter, caraway seed. 

OINGER BREA.D — Mrs. 0, 

- i quart of flour, 1 pint of molasses, 1 cup of butter, 
1 do. of milk, 2 eggs, one teaspoon of soda. 

ELEGANT PLAIN CAKE — Mrs. W.B.S.Bush St. 
Four eggs, three cups (not heaped), of sugar, half cup 
milk, filled with watar, and a little soda (not a quarter 
of a teaspoonfal), and a fall tea spoonful of yeast powder; 
four level cups of sifted flour, 

PINT CAKE. — Mrs. 0. 

1 pint of raised dough, 2 tei-cups of sugar, 1 do. of 
butter, 3 eggs, 1 teispoon of soda, 1 tablespoonful of 
mace and cinnamon mixed, 1 ft) of raisins. 



MOUNTAIN CAKE — Mrs, B. Cal. St 
1 lb of sugar, 1 lb of flour, J lb of butter, 6 eggs, 1 
teacup of sweet milk, 3 teaspoons of yeast powder. 
Flavor with lemon or vanilla. 

MOLASSES CAKE — Mrs. E. Mason St. 

Two cups of dried apples, soaked over night, 
chopped and boiled an hour in two cups of New 
O. molasses ; when cool, add a cup of butter, two 
eggs, two teaspoonfuls of allspice and nutmeg, and 
two teaspoonfuls of soda. 



26 C A K E & 

PLAIN DOUGHNUTS — Mrs. B. Cal. St, 
1 cup sugar, 1 cup milk, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon 
melted butter. Allspice for flavoring. 



BELMONT CAKE — Mrs, P. Bush Sf . 
4 eggs, 3 cups of sugar, 1 cup of sweet milk^ 1 do, of 
butter, 5 cups of floury 1 ib of raisins, boiled 5 minutes 
and used cold; two teaspoons of yeast powder, 1 of cin- 
namon, 1 of cloves, one nutmeg. Baked m two loaves.* 

JELLY CAKE — Mrs. J. 2nd. St. 
1 cup of sugar, 2 cups flour, J cup butter, 3 eggs, f 
cup milky J teaspoonful saleratus dissolved in the milk; 
1 teaspoonful cream tartar mixed in the flour, a little 
nutmeg. Bake in shallow jelly-cake tins and spread 
with jelly. This makes one large cake, 

CUSTARD CAKE — Mrs. S, Yernon Place, 

1 heaped cup of flour, 1 of sugar, 3. eggs, 1 table 
spoon of milk, IJ teaspoon of yeast powder, a little salt. 
Filling for the same ; 1 cup of sugar, | cup of flour, 2 
eggs, a pint of milk — ^boil the milk as for custards, then 
add the other ingredients, well beaten; while hot, add a 
piece of butter, the size of a walnut. Flavor with va- 
nilla. Make two cakes, split them, to fill. 

BLACK CAKE — Good. 

2 cups of sugar, 1 cup of molasses^ 5 cups of flour, 1 
do. of butter, 1 of milk or cream, 1 lb of raisins, 5 eggs, 1 
teaspoon of soda, J pound of citron, all kinds of spices. 

COCOANUT CAKE — Mrs. C. 
1 ib of grated cocoanut, 1 pound of sugar, J Sb of but- 
ter, 6 eggs, J ft) of flour. 



CAKES 27 

LEMON CAKE. 

2 cups of sugar, | do of butter, 3 eggs, beat the yolks 
separately, 1 cup of milk, 1 teaspoon of soda, 2 of cream 
tartar, grated rind of lemon. 

BLACK CAKE — Mrs. T. 
IJ cups of sugar, 1 J cups of molasses, 1 of Butter, 5 of 
flour, 4 eggs,. 2 nutmegs, 1 teaspoon of mace, IJ of cloves, 
1 of soda, 2 R) of raisins. (Very nice) 



MOLASSES POUND CAKE — Mrs. T. 
1 cup of sugar, | of butter, 4 eggs, 2 cups of molasses, 
1 do. of milk, 1 teaspoon of soda, in a little water, 1 glass 
of wine or brandy, 1 nutmeg, 5 cups of flour, well 
beaten. Good. 

FRUIT CAKE — Mrs. T. 
3 cups damp brown sugar, 4 eggs, the white and yolks 
beaten separately, 2 cups of butter, beat to a cream, 1 lb 
of raisins, J pound of currants, J do. citron, i tumbler of 
whisky, 1 large spoon of soda, 4 cups of flour. Bake 
slowly and well, and plenty of spice. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

1 cup of sugar, 1 of molasses, J cup of butter, 1 cup of 
coffee, 1 cup of raisins, 1 teaspoon of dry saleratus, dis- 
solved. Spice as you like. 

QUEENS' CAKE— Mrs. T. California St. 
3 cups of sugar, 4 cups of flour, 1 cup of butter, 1 cup 
of milk, 5 eggs, 3 teaspoons of yeast powder. 

FROSTING FOR CAKES— Mrs. C. 
Allow for the white of 1 egg, 9 heaping teaspoons of 
refined sugar and 1 of nice Poland starch, both powdered 
and sifted through a fine sieve. Beat the white to a stiff 



28 CAKES 

froth, tlien stir in the sugar, gradually, stirring constant- 
ly 5 minutes, add a teaspoon of lemon juice. Before icing, 
dredge the cake with flour, and then wipe it ojff. Lay 
the frosting on the cake with a knife; after it is drawn 
from the oven, smooth it over and set in a cool place to 
dry; allow the whites of 3 eggs, for two common-sized 
loaves. The cake will look better to be iced twice. 
Put on the first soon after the cake is taken from the 
oven. The second, put on the next day. Before cut- 
ting an iced cake, cut the frosting first by itself, by press- 
ing the back of the knife across the cake, to prevent the 
breaking of the icing. 

GOLD CAKE — Mrs. W. O'Farrell St. 
IJ cups of sugar, J cup of butter, 2J flour, J of milk, 
yolks of 4 eggs and one whole egg, ^ teaspoon cream 
tartar, J teaspoon of soda. 



SILVER CAK'E: — Ibid. 
The same as the Gold Cake, only using the whites of 
4 eggs, instead of the yolks. 

COOKIES — Mrs. T. 2nd. St. 

1 cup of butter, 2 cups of sugar, 1 cup of milk, 1 egg, 

1 teaspoonfal of soda, 2 teaspoonfuls of tartar; or, 2 
teaspoonfuls of yeast powder, if the milk is sweet. 
Spices to taste. 

CORNSTARCH CAKE — Mrs. W. of Alameda. 

2 cups of sugar, | of a cup of butter, the whites of 7 
eggs, 2 cups of flour, 1 cup of corn-starch, 1 cup of milk, 

2 spoonfuls of cream of tartar, 1 of soda, flavoring. 

PLUM CAKE— Good. 
^2 cups of brown sugar, | cup of butter, J cup of milk, 



CAKES 29 

3 eggs, 3 cups of flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of yeast powder, 
cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, 3 cups of raisins, piece of cit- 
ron and a little brandy. 

CAKE — Mrs. B. Van Ness Avenue. 
1 coffee cup of sugar, 1 cup of flour, | cup of butter, 
5 eggs, a little sour milk and soda. 

BRIDE'S CAKE. 

1 Jb of sugar, 6 ounces of butter, | of a pound of flour 
whites of 16 eggs, well beaten. 



GINGER SNAPS— Mrs. S. of Watsonville. 
J cup of brown sugar, | cup of molasses, not quite J 
cup of Avater,! ^^p of shortening, 1 teaspoonful saleratus, 
dissolved in the water, cinnamon, a very little ginger. 



MOLASSES GINGERBREAD— Mrs. W. Alameda. 

1 cup of brown sugar, 1 cup of butter, 1 cup of mo- 
lasses, 1 cup of sour milk, 3 eggs. 4 cups of flour, 1 
teaspoon of cream of tartar, 1 tablespoon of soda. 



FRUIT CAKE— Splendid. 
Take one and a half pounds of butter; wash, if salt, 
and work to a cream. Then work with one and a half 
pounds of brown sugar, add fourteen eggs, two at a time, 
a wine glass of good brandy, mace, nutmeg, cloves, all- 
spice and cinnamon. Then work IJ pounds of flour in 
as light as possible, and then fruit. Two pounds of cur- 
rants, one pound of citron, three pounds of seeded rais- 
ins. Bake three or four hours, in a moderately hot 
oven. 

RAILROAD CAKE. 

IJ cups of flour, 1 cup of sugar, J cup of sour-milk, 
2 eggs, small piece of butter, 1 teaspoonful cream of 
tartar, and J of soda, lemon. 



30 CAKES 

QUEENS' CAKE— Mrs. M. Mason St. 
One pound of sugar, one pound of flour, scant; one- 
half pound of butter, four eggs, two tea-spoons of yeast 
powder, one-half cup of milk, spice as you please. 

BARNARD CAKE— Mrs. F. Ellis St. 
One cup of butter, two and a half of sugar, four of 
flour, one of milk, four eggs, yeast powder. 



CREAM CAKES— Mrs. F. Ellis St. 
1 cup sugar, 1| cups flour, 3 eggs, 2 spoonfuls cold 
water, 1 spoonful yeast powder. 

CREAM. 

1 pt. milk, 2 spoonfuls corn starch, 2 eggs, 1 cup of 
sugar, flavoring. 

CUP CAKE. 

1 cup of butter, 2 cups of sugar, 3 cups of flour, 4 eggs 
i cup of milk, a little soda. 



SPONGE CAKE. 
4 eggs, 2 cups of flour, 2 cups of sugar, even full ; 
beat separately the whites and the yolks, then beat 
together, then stir in the flour and without delay put it 
into the oven; well beaten before adding the flour 

CALICO CAKE — Mrs. O. 
3 cups of sugar, IJ butter, 6 eggs, | of milk, J tea- 
spoon of soda, 1 of cream of tartar, 4 cups of flour. 
Make the dark part Avitli brown sugar. 1 teaspoon each 
of cloves, cinnamon, mace and 1 nutmeg, J fb of currants . 
Make the light part with white sugar and the whites of 
the eggs. When put into the pans, put 1 spoonful of 
the dark, and 1 of light, alternately. 



'^1 € A K E S 

MOLASSES CAKE, 
3 cups of molasses., 2 teaspoons of soda, 1 cup of 
butter, 1 do. of water, 4 eggs, 6 eups of flour. 

SALT-PORK CAKE— Mrs. H. 

1 pound of pork, chopped very fine, 1 cup of warm 
i:v^ater, 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of molasses, 1 teaspoon of 
soda, 4 eggs, spice, raisins and citron. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE— Mrs. A.L,S. Busli St, 

CAKE. 

3 cups of flour, 2 of sugar, | eup of T3utter, IJ cups 
of milk, 3 eggs, I teaspoon cream of tartar, J of soda, 

CREAM FOR THE ABOVE. 

Orate 3 bars of chocolate, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon of corn- 
starcli or floui*, 1 eup of milk, sweeten to taste; set it 
on the stove and stir till thick, and spread between the 
cake. Bake the cake in thin cake pans. 

CRULLERS— Mrs. S. Nantucket. 
3 eggs, 6 spoonfuls of sugar, 3 of melted butter, 2 of 
milk, yeast powder. 



FLUHMEEY AND PEESEEVES 



Porcelain Kettles should be used for preserves, 
to the exclusion of ail others, and always a wooden 
spoon- It is not economy to use too sparingly of 
sugar, as jellies will not congeal without sufficient 
<sugar, and also when preserves commence to spoil 
they cannot be rendered eatable. Small jars are 
better than large ones, as frequent exposure to the 
air will spoil the fruit. After pouring your pre 
serves into your jars, put several layers of paper 
over the top, pouring over a little brandy. 



32 PLUMMERY AND PRESERVES. 

CURRANT JELLY. 

Pick and wash the currants, drain on a sieve; squeeze 

out the juice and strain it. To a quart of juice, add a 

good qiiart of sugar; boil smartly 20 minutes, skimming 

carefully. Let the juice boil before adding the sugar. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

Boil the fruit to a perfect jam; take an eqrcul weight 
of sugar, boil down thick, add cassia buds, pepper, cloves 
and allspice; 1 teaspoonful to every pound and boil a 
few minutes longer. 

TIN COOKED CURRANT JELLY— Mrs. S. 

Squeeze the currants through a linen bag. To a pint 
of juice, add 1 pound of white crushed sugar. Beat it 
half-an-hour with a wooden spoon, until no grains of 
sugar are found in the bottom of the dish. Skim and 
put into glasses. 

PINE-APPLE MARMALADE. 

Pare the fruit and grate fine. To 1 pound of fruit put 
1 pound of sugar. Let it stand a night. Boil 20 min- 
utes, skimming carefully. 

APPLE JELLY. 

Core and quarter (not pare) tart apples. Cook in a 
little more water than will cover them till well reduced. 
Strain, acid 1 pound of sugar to 1 pint of juice, bail 20 
minutes or half-an-hour, straining carefully. Slices of 
lemon and a little Jamaica ginger may be cooked with 

the apples. 

WINE JELLY. 

1 package of gelatine, dissolved in a } pint of cold 
water, the juice of 1 lemon, 10 large spoons of sugar, 
1 coffee-cup of wnne, then pour three pints of boiling 
water to it; strain through a cloth and let it cool. To 
be made the day before you wish to use it. 

SPANISH CREAM— Mrs. P. New Bedford. 

Dissolve 1 box of gelatine in water, sufficient to cover 
it; boil 3 pints of milk; take it from the fire and add the 



FLUMMERY AND PRESERVES. 33 

gelatine, the yolks of 6 eggs and 9 tablespoons of sugar, 
beaten together, 3 wine-glasses of wine and a little 
vanilla and the whites of the eggs, beaten to a froth; 
stir well and put in mould. Put the gelatine in a pan 
on the stove and let it dissolve slowly. 

LEMON CUSTARD — Mrs. A.L.S. Bush St. 

5 eggs, yolks, beaten with 1 large cup of sugar and 
juice and rind of 2 lemons. Set your tin pail, in which 
is the above mixture, into a kettle of hot water on the 
stove and stir till it bubbles; then beat the whites of 
the eggs to a stiff froth, and stir into the mass and dip 
into custard cups. This Avill make 16 custards. 
ORANGE CUSTARD— Mrs. A.L.S. Bush St. 

5 eggs beaten with 2 cups of sugar, juice of 2 oranges 
rind of 1 orange, 2 cups of milk, fill the cups; set in a 
pan of water and bake half-an-hour. 

BOILED CUP CUSTARD — Mrs. S. 

1 qaurt of milk; when boiling, add the yolks of 6 eggs, 
whites of four with 6 spoons of sugar. Scald together, 
then beat the whites of 2 eggs until very light; pour 
boiling water over them to cook them, and then cover 

the custard. 

FLOATING ISLANDS. 
The whites of four eggs, (5 tablespoonfuls of fruit jelly, 
beaten to a froth. Boil the yolks in one quart of milk, 
sweeten to the taste, thicken with a teaspoonful of flour 
in J teacup of boiling water. Let it boil up and pour 
into cups. Drop on each a little of the froth. 
ICE CREAM. 
1 quart of milk, 4 eggs, J pound of sugar, 1 table- 
spoonful of corn-starch. Mix the starch with a little 
milk, boil the quart and while boiling stir in the starch, 
eggs and sugar, well beaten together. Cool before freez- 
ing. 

ITALIAN CREAM. 

1 pint of cream well whipped, 6 ounces of powdered 



34 FLTJMMEIIY AND PRESERVES 

sugar, juices of 2 lemons, two glasses of wine, mix, add 
another pint of cream, stir thoroughly. Boil 2 ounces 
of isinglass with 4 cups of water, till reduced one-half. 
When luke-warm, stir it into the other ingredients, and 
put into a glass dish to harden. Flavoring may be 

used for wine. 

SUGAR CANDY. 

1 quart of sugar, J pint of water. When boiling add 
1 teaspoonful of cream of tartar; boil till a piece rattles 
when droj)ped into cold water. Flavor and pour into 
pans to cool, before pulling. 

CAROMELS. 

1 cup of sugar, 1 of molasses, | pound of chocolate, 
butter the size of a. nutmeg, a little milk. Boil 20 min- 
utes. Pour into pans and cut in squares. 

CHOCOLATE BLANC MANGE. 

One-half an ounce of gelatine, dissolved in half a 
pint of water. One-fourth of a pound of chocolate dis- 
solved in hot water; three pints of milk, three eggs, 
Boil the milk and chocolate together, stir in the gelatine- 
cook a little while; cool some little time, add the eggs, 

and mould. 

PLUM BROTH. 

Boil one pound of raisins gently in plenty of water, 
(about four quarts), for two hours, with one great spoon- 
ful of Indian meal, stirred in when it begins to boil. 
Make a thickening of flour and water, grate in part of a 
nutmeg, and sweeten to taste. Add a small piece of but- 
ter, and a little wine, if preferred. 

Mrs. D's TAPIOCA CREAM. 

One cup of tapioca, soaked over night in cold water. 
Boil one quart of milk in a pail set in hot water. Beat 
the yolks of three eggs, one cup of sugar, and a little 
salt into the tapioca, and stir into the milk and boil un- 
til it thickens. Turn it into a dish and stir into it the 



FLUMMERY AND PRESERVES 35 

whites of three eggs, and a little flavoring. Set it away 
to cool and then it is ready for the table. 

CORN STARCH MERINGUES— Mrs. T. Cal. St. 
Three pints of milk, four eggs, three heaping table- 
spoonfuls of corn-starch. Put the milk on to boil, re- 
serving a little cold to wet up the corn-starch with. Beat 
the yolks and a coffee cap of sugar together, and when 
the milk boils, stir in the corn-starch and eggs. Let it 
boil a few minutes, then pour it into a dish; flavor with 
vanilla. Beat the whites to a stiff froth, add a heaping 
teaspoonful of pulverized sugar, spread it on the top 
and set it in the oven to brown. 

ISINGLASS BLANC MANGE. 

Two ounces of isinglass, three pints of milk, one-half 
pound sugar, lemon. Boil five minutes. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Dissolve one ounce Russian isinglass in a cup of new 
milk. Beat the yolks of twelve eggs and one pound 
sugar together; whip to a froth one pint of cream; beat 
whites of twelve eggs; strain isinglass into yolks, add 
cream, then whites; beat all together. Flavor with va- 
nilla; set to cool. Line dish with sponge cake; put in 
the cream; set to cool six hours. 

SUGAR KISSES — Mrs. C. Ellis St. 

The whites of two eggs, one-half pound of sugar, 

lemon or vanilla. Drop on buttered Paper, and bake a 

lio-ht brown. 

COCOANUT KISSES. 

One cup of sugar to two of grated cocoanut; one 

tablespoon of corn-starch, moisten with enough white of 

egg to make it stiff. Bake in a very hot oven. 

ORANGE MARMALADE — Mrs. T. Second St. 
Wash the fruit very clean; weigh. Take half the 
fruit and grate, the other half, peel. Put the parings 



36 FLUMMERY AND PEESERVES 

into boiling water and cook till tender. In the mena- 
time prepare the oranges. All you want is tke pulp and 
juice; the cores, seeds and all skinny parts must be re- 
moved. Make a syrup, (a pound of sugar to each pound 
of fruit); clarify with white of an egg. Into this put 
the parings, which, meanwliile, with scissors you have 
cut in narrow strips, and boil ten minutes. Add the 
grated rind, pulp and juice and cook twenty minutes. 



Valuable Miscellaneous Recipes 

These have been given to ns by our friends, with 
the request that we insert them; as they are origin- 
al and good, we do so with much pleasure. 



TEA. 

Be sure that the water boils. Scald the pot, and put in 
a tea-spoonful for each person. Upon green tea, pour a 
little water, and allow it to stand two or three minutes 
where it will keep hot; then fill the pot from the tea- 
kettle. Green tea should never be boiled, and it is 
rendered dead by being steeped long. 

Of black tea the same measure is used; the pot being 
filled up at first, and set immediately upon coals or a 
stove, just long enough to boil it. Water should be 
added to the tea-pot from the tea-kettle; never fi-om 
the water-pot, as in that case it cannot be boiling hot. 
Black and green tea are good mixed. 
COFFEE. 

Put a large coffee-cupful into a pot that will hold three 
pints of water; add the white of an egg, or a few shav- 
ings of isinglasS; or a well cleansed and ^ried bit of fi^h 



VALUABLE MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES. 37 

skin of the size of a ten cent piece. Pour upon it boil- 
ing water, and boil it five or six minutes. Then pour a 
gill from the spout, in order to remove it, and pour it 
back into the pot. Let it stand eight or ten minutes, 
where it will keep hot, but not boil; boiling coffee a 
great while makes it strong, but not so lively or agreea- 
ble. If you have no cream, boil a sauce-pan of milk, 
and after pouring it into the pitcher, stir it now and 
then, till the breakfast is ready, that the cream may not 
separate from the milk. Make coffee stronger or weak- 
er, as you prefer, by using a larger or smaller measure 

of ground coffee. 

COFFEE MILK. 

Put a dessert-spoonful of ground coffee into a pint of 
milk; boil it a quarter of an hour with a shaving or two 
of isinglass; then let it stand ten minutes and pour it 
off. 

COMMON MODE OF MAKING CHOCOLATE. 

Shave fine an inch of a cake of chocolate; pour on it a 
quart of boiling water; boil it twenty minutes, add milk 
in such proportion as you like, and boil it up again. 

COCOA. 

Boil two large spoonfuls of ground cocoa in a quart of 
water half an hour; skim off the oil, pour in three gills 
of milk, and boil it up again. It is the best way to 
make it the day before it is used, as the oily substance 
can be more perfectly removed when the cocoa is cold. 

SHELLS. 
Put a heaping teacupful to a quart of boiling water. 
Boil them a great while. Half an hour will do, but two 
or three hours is far better. Scald milk as for coffee. 
If there is not time to boil shells long enough before 
breakfast, it is well to soak them over night and boil 
them in the same water in the morning. 



(MRS. RS. DIRECTIONS.) 

Three pounds of bass, or any white fish; boil till 
tender; then remove the bones; mince it fine; 
season with pepper, salt, juice and part of the rind 
of a lemon, and a little wine^ if you choose. Take 
nearly one quart of milk and slice two onions into 
it, let it boil until the onions are quite soft. Eub 
to a cream two large spoonfuls of flour and nearly 
one- half pound of butter, turn the boiling milk 
through a sieve upon it ; boil again, taking care to 
stir it so that it will not get into lumps. Grate a 
loaf of bread (small baker's loaf). Take the plat- 
ter, it is to be sent to the table on, and put first a 
layer of dressing upon the dish, then fish, repeating 
until the dish is filled as full as you wish, making 
the top dressing. Then put the crumbs of bread 
smoothly on the top, forming an oval in the center- 

Wipe the edge of the platter so that nothing 
shall brown or discolor it. Fill a bread pan with 
water, put the platter on two or three muffin rings. 
Set it into the oven, and let it remain until it is a 
nice brown color, say three quarters of an hour. 
Then place the platter on another and send it to 
the table, garnished with lemon and parsley around 
the dish. 

FISH CHOWDER. 

Cut into little piece3,4 or 5 slices of fat salt pork; fry 
out the fat; put in 1 or 2 onions, chopiDed fine, and fry 
with the pork till done brown. Cut up the fish in small 
pieces, put into the boiler with considerable water aii4 



VALUABLE MISCELLANEOUS IlECIPES 39 

boil about twenty miimtes. Thicken with flour and 
Avater, add a teacup of milk; season with salt and pep- 
per to the taste, 

CHICKEN CHOWDER. 
Boil the chickens till tender, then put in the pork 
and onions, thickening and seasoning as above. 

STRIPED BASS, 

Disliked by many, as usually cooked, would be more 
generally approved, if cooked long enough. Three 
hours are required to boil or bake a large bass. 



^' 



'WcOOKlQAlif^^^^^ 



^( FROM NANTUCKET ) 

Tie up the brains in muslin, with sweet herbs ; 
put them into the pot with the head and the haslet, 
without the liver, and boil two hours, keeping it 
more than covered with water. Put in the liver 
for the last hour. When nearly done, take up the 
brains and part of the lights, chop them up with a 
hard-boiled egg, add a little butter, season with 
pepper and salt, add a Uttle of the broth, strew in a 
little flour and stew it up a little to make a nice 
sauce. Take up the rest of the meat, clean it from 
bones, lay it on a dish and spread over the sauce. 
Thicken and season the water for broth, in which 
an onion and a little rice have been boiled. 
CHICKEN SALAD — Mrs. K. 

Boil the chicken until it will drop to pieces. Tear it 
up into little pieces. Chop some lettuce and celery 
together, and mix with the chicken. Boil the water 
until it is thick, and pour it over the whole. Use salad 
dressing and pour over it. 



40 VALUABLE MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES 

CHICKEN SALAD —Mrs. E. Mason St. 
Prepare two chickens with salad and celery to taste, 
and cover with sliced boiled eggs. Take a cup of vin- 
egar (not too strong), a tablespoonful of butter, and a 
teaspoonful of salt; mix and heat, boiling hot. Beat four 
eggs, add half a cup of cream or milk, two teaspoonfuls 
of mustard, add the boiling vinegar, etc. and mix, and 
pour over the chicken while warm. 

ITALIAN CHICKEN SALAD — Mrs. H. 

Make a dressing in the proportion of the yolks of 
three liard-boiled eggs, rubbed fine, one saltspoonful of 
salt, one of mustard seed, one of Cayenne pepper, one 
of white sugar, four tablespoonfuls of salad oil, and two 
tablespooufuls of vinegar. Simmer this dressing over 
the fire, but don't let it boil. Stir constantly while over 
the fire. Then take a sufficient quantity of the white 
meat of cold chicken for this quantity of dressing. Pull 
the white meat into small flakes, pile it up in a dish, 
and pour the dressing on it. Take two heads of lettuce, 
cut them up and arrange in a heap around the chicken, 
heaped in the middle of the dish, and on the top of 
this ridge, place the whites of eggs, cut in rings and 
laid in the form of a chain. A portion of the lettuce 
to be helped with each plate of chicken. 

TOMATO CATSUP — Mrs. E. Mason St. 

Two gallons of tomatoes, skinned, boiled and strained. 
One quart of vinegar, seven tablespoonfuls of salt, IJ 
tablespoonfuls of red pepper, 2J tablespoonfuls of black 
pepper, IJ tablespoonfuls of allspice, 1 tablespoonful 
of cloves, 3 tablespoonfuls of mustard. Boil 4 hours. 

PICKLED QUINCE. 

Halve, core and pare the fruit; add water enough to 
cook them; when soft, take out with a fork and drain. 
Take half the weight of sugar, put into the water and 



VALUABLE MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES 41 

boil for syrup. Scald one quart of vinegar Avitli two 
ounces of cloves, add the s^^rup and pour all, hot, over 
the quinces. 

PRESERVED GREEN TOMATOES. 

Wash and weigh the tomatoes, cover >Yith water and 
boil until broken. Turn away the water. To every 
pound of fruit, take three-fourths of a pound of sugar; 
add a very little water and boil until very thick. Squeeze 
the juice of lemons into it, boil the peel till soft, and 
slice that in; add preserved ginger root, or a little gin- 
ger tied in muslin. 

PICKLED TOMATOES. 

Slice a peck of green tomatoes, sprinkle over them 
a cup of salt and let them stand over night. Drain off 
the liquid, add two cups of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of 
cloves, whole; two of allspice, two of cinnamon, eight 
green peppers, chopped fine; and, if you like, two dozen 
onions, and chopped cabbage. Cover with strong vin- 
egar; boil fifteen minutes, cover tightly to put away. 



^^©§ To Kemove Skins from Pea^^^^^ g)@^ 

FOR PRESErtVING OR CANNIXG. 

To two quarts of wood ashes, add fi^ur quarts of 
soft water, place in an iron pot. When boiling 
throw in a dozen peaches ; take them out immedi- 
ately and put them into cold water, when the skin 
will slip oflf without any trouble. Put the peaches 
into another pan of cold water, remove any bits of 
skin from the ends with a silver knife. Split the 
peaches, remove the pit, and they are ready for the 
kettle. 



42 VALUABLE MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES 

CHILE SAUCE — Mrs. A.L.S. Bush St. 
12 large tomatoes, pared, 2 large onions, 4 long green 
peppers, 1 tablespoon of salt, 4 tablespoons of sugar, 
2 cups vinegar. The tomatoes should be ripe. Chop 
onions and peppers fine and put all together in a kettle, 
and let them simmer about two hours. 

DEVILLED CRAB — Mrs. E. Geary St. 
Take two large-sized crabs, boil them about twenty 
minutes, remove the shell, add two tablespoonfuls of 
powdered cracker, | of a teaspoon of Cayenne pepper, 
J tablespoon of butter, a little salt, a little mustard, J of 
an onion, mince very fine, add milk to make it very 
moist. Put it in earthen dishes, sift over the top pow- 
dered cracker, and bake twenty minutes. Some prefer 
to bake it in the shell. They must be scraped before 
using. 

SCOLLOPED OYSTERS — J&id 

Lay oysters on the bottom of your dish, cover them 
with powdered and sifted cracker, a little pepper, salt, 
and a piece of butter, a little milk, also a little of the 
liquid of the oysters; another layer of the oysters, and 
so alternating, until you have used all your oysters, 
covering the whole by sifting on the powdered cracker. 
Bake twenty minutes. 

A LEG OF LAMB, FOR LUNCHEON. 

MRS. W. PACIFIC ST. 

Boil a leg of lamb in a very little water; with salt and 
pepper. When well cooked, make a dressing of one egg, 
sifted cracker,'a small piece of butter, spread it over the 
meat and brown it in the oven. 



ITK AST 



( MRS. S. BOSTON ) 

Boil five or six potatoes, and mash; mix one cof- 
fee-cup of flour, a teacup of sugar, little salt, to a 



VALUABLE MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES 43 

thick batter, with cold water ; mix in potatoes, and 
add kike-warm water enough to make the right con- 
sistency. Rub the whole through the sieve. When 
hike-warm, add one-half teacup of yeast. 

SALAD DRESSING — Mrs. A.W. New York. 

Rub the bottom of the plate with garlic; yolks of two 
raw eggs, stir stiff with mustard; one teaspoonful of 
salt, two tablespooiifuls of vinegar, oil to taste; stir the 
whole, alternating with the oil and vinegar for about 
fifteen minutes. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 

Two gTeat spoonfuls of milk, put into a stew-pan. 
When ready to boil, add six eggs, well-beaten. When 
nearly done, add a piece of butter, and a little salt. 
Stir quickly all the time. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Beat 2 eggs, and put into them a pounded cracker. 
Dip into the eggs the oysters, separately, and then fry 
them until they are brown. 



m^FM WMM,^ 

( MRS. C. LAGUNA ST.) 



To every gallon of juice, two pounds of white 
sugar and one quart of water ; strain, and put in 
demi-john or keg ; fill up every morning, as it fer- 
ments and runs out, and in the course of ten days, 
or two weeks, cork tight and cement. Place in a 
cool cellar, and in the course of ten or twelve 
months will be fit for use. 



^ K@li MOCSG 



-( MRS. T. 2ud. ST.)- 



Six eggs to a quart of milk, ^ pint brandy, six 
tablespoonfuls sugar, (use judgment however); beat 



44 VALUABLE MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES 

the yolks and whites separately, and beat the sugar 
into the yolks. Beat all very light. 



^^ CUM FO?- ?OISC)]Srj)AK 

( MRS, A.L.S. BUSH ST.) 

Dissolve 1 ounce of gum-shellac in 6 ounces of 
sulphuric ether; cork tightly in a bottle. Bathe 
the surface, where the irritation or eruption appears, 
with cold water and wipe dry, then apply the above 
solution. The ether will evaporate in one minute, 
leaving an elastic coating of gum, completely im- 
pervious to the air. In about two minutes the most 
distressing case of oak poison can be relieved entire- 
ly of all unpleasant sensations. As the coating 
cracks or peels off, apply more of the solution, and 
in twenty-four hours the case of indescribable suf- 
fering is completely healed. 



TERRAFIM 



( MliS. T. SECOND ST.) 

Three or four are plenty for eight or ten persons. 
Have ready a pot of boiling water, into which you 
have put a teaspoonful of salt for each terrapin. 
Wash the live terrapin in two or three waters, till 
they are perfectly clean. Throw in the boiling water 
and cook till so tender that you can easily pull off 
a leg. Take them out; pull off the top shell, remove 
the sand bag and gall (very carefully). Cut up all 
the rest into small pieces, keeping all to cook except 
the skinny portions and the intestines. Put in a stew 
pan, with cooking sherry (a small tumbler full to each 



VALUABLE MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES 45 

terrapin). To every terrapin, allow two ounces of 

butter cut in pieces, and rolled in flour. Season 

with salt, cayenne pepper, and black pepper. Let 

this all come to a boil, then just before serving? 

beat up the yolks of as many eggs as you have 

terrapin, and stir in. 

♦-•-• — . 

5 PRESERVE SEA^^ 

The color of dried sea- weeds may be preserved by 
brushing them carefully with the following solution. 
In two-thirds of a small phial of turpentine, dissolve 
two or three small lumps of Gum Mastic. 

sPRiisra _A.]srD sxjm:m:er 



KEANE, O'CONNOR & 00. 

Have just received a complete assortment of 

HEW my 0005$, 

Specially imported for this season's trade. 

IN THE 

Silk & Fancy Dress Departments, 

"Will be found a very elegant assortment of entirely 

NEW MATERIALS. 

A VISIT IS RESPECTFULLY INVITED. 

107, 109 & III KEARNY STREET. 



BRUCE S PRINT. 



yVlAR^ StACOM, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

No. 8 Montgomery Street, ZM MMCISM. 

Always on hand, the latest Style of 

Hats, !Boia.nets and. Flo-vs^ers. 

All Kmm OP FEATHERa, IAGE0, $:iK, $ATm AND VEIVET RtBBON0. 

Latest Style of Goods received by every Steamer. 
Straw Bonnets Cleaned and Pressed. Bonnet Frames of the Latest Shape. 



Shii*te Made to Oi?de2»ji 

AT 15 NEW MONTG-OMERY STREET 

Grand Hotel Building, - ©^K) [^BAKl©]©©©^ 

Is prepared to make Ge^itletnen and Boys' Shirts, Collars and Flannels 
to order at Fair living prices. 

Her xoork is a better recommendation than words; she tcould therefore 
invite heads of families atid all tvho wish to loear well-made and good 
fitting shirts, etc., to call and examine samples and prices before pur- 
chasing elseichere. 

All work tnade to give satisfactioti before leaving the store. Repairitig 
done. 
No -work done for other establishments. 

The attention of gentlemen is iavited to the new style of evening 
dress shirts. 
An assortment of Gentlemen-s Imported Furnishing Goods, the 
best in market. 

15 NEW MONTG-OMERY STREET. 



Ijiadies'' Depository^ 

Nc. 15 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. 

Grand Hotel, - - ©z^KI [F[^;^KI©[]©©©p 

lAOmS' AND CHtlOREN'S UNDERCARMENTS 

Constantly on Hand and Made to Order. 

J^LAIN AND j^ANCY j^EEDLEWORK AND ^MBROIDERY, 

Done with Neatness and Dispatch, at Reasonable Rates. 
je®*"Wedding Trosseaus and Infants' V^ardrobes got up in elegant Designs. -"©gl 
The Patronage of the benevolent is solicited. 

Bruce's Printing House, Sac. below Montgomery. 



FOR THE VERY BEST 

C3V-0 "I"0 

BEADLET & EULOFSON. 

Gallery with an ELEVATOR. 

429 Montgomery St. - iAA IFlBzSiKl©llS©©= 

PIRST PREMIUM AND SIL- 

1} ver Medal awarded at Mechanics' and State 
Fairs, 1871, for best Wax Work. Lessons given 
in the above in all its branches. Also, natural 
flowers perfectly preserved by 
MRS. A. O. COOK, 304 Mason Bt n'r OTarrell 



f I 



ats, 



jftRCHITECT, 
315 MONTGOMERY STREET, 
Room No. I. Second Floor, 
San Francisco. 



TrrcoMB St, Williams, 

i 

DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, 
StUVEB A«0 SltVEn-PlATEO WARE, 

240 Montgomery, S. E. Cor. Pine, Up Stairs. 

tV^A,. SAH FRAHCJSCO. 

Agents for the HOWARD, ELGIN and WALTHAM Watches. 




Brace's Printing House, Sacramento Street, 
below Montgomery. 



iSOLOMON TESMORE,! 

DEALER IN 

Af^O ALL KiSyOS OF SHELLFISH, 

Stalls Nos. 57, 58 and 59 Oalifornia Market, 

fl@-ENTRANCE ON PINE STREET, - ©Z^[it][?K^K]©a©©@a 

rublic or Private Parties. Families, Hotels and Restaurants supplied 

at SHORT NOTICE. Fresh Baltimore and i rauspLvnted Oysters and 

Salad Dressmg. the finest in the Market. Oysters cooked and 

served to order. LA-DIKS' and OENTLG.\IE\''S Oyster 

Room open from 6 a. m. until Midnight. 




T. H. HATCH & GO. 

<3-:EixrE::E?.-A-Xji 

COMMISSION MEHCHilNTS 

FOR THE SALE OF 

320 FRONT STREET, 

Fresh Butter in Rolls and Firkins, Cheese from the best Dairies, 

Bacon and Hams, Lard, Cranberries, Eastern Butter 

cheese, Eggs and Honey. 



For Finely Flavored Sausages, Hams, 
Bacon, etc.. all made of the best grain fed 
pork, go to K F. Bunker's Stall, 74 and 75 
California Market. Mr. Bunker's club 
sausages, for flavor and delicacy, equal 
any ever made east of the Sierras, and he 
cuts up nothing but first-class meats. 

bruck's print 



SEWING MACHINE SALES for 1870. 



THE SINGER STILL TRIUMPHANT ! 



Ill 1869 we sold, as our readers will remember, 
86,781 Machines; but we sold last year (1870), 
127,833 (one hundred and twenty-seven thou- 
sand, eight hundred and thirty -three) machines I 
showing an excess beyond the sales of 1869, of 
over forty thousand, and, as shown by the table 
below, over forty-four thousand machines more 
than any other company. 

The reader may naturally ask whether this is 
mere boasting; in answer to which we have to 
say, that those figures, and the ones given below, 
are from sworn returns made by licensees to the 
receiver appointed by the owners of the most 
valuable sewing machine patents, who license 
the companies of lesser importance. 

In 1870 we 

Sold over the Parham Sewing Machine Co. 126.067 Machines. 

Sold over the Finkle & Lyon Manufacr'g <' 125,413 *« 

Sold over the Empire Sewing Machine " 124r,273 <« 

Sold over the ^^TNA Sewing Machine " 122,027 " 

Sold over the Gold Medal S. M. " 118,921 " 

Sold over the American Button-Hole " 113,260 " 

Sold over the Florence Sewing Ma. " 110,173 " 

Sold over the Willcox & Girbs S. M. " 98,943 " 

Sold over the Weed Sewing Machine '« 92,831 «' 

bold over the Grover & Baker S. M. " 70,431 '* 

Sold over the Howe Machin Company, 52,677 " 

So:d over the Wheeler & Wilson Mfg. Co. 44.625 •' 

139 Montgomery otreet, 

Agents for the Pacific Ccast. 



BRTJCE'S PRrNT. 



LIBRftRY OF CONGRESS 



Bowen E 




014 487 717 2 # 








M 




^-. 



\ i:^>^ 




BRUCE'S PEINT. 



Bowen's Cream Tarter. 



Glenfield's Eng. Starch. 



Bowen's Liquid Blueing. 



Procter & Gamble's Extra Family Soap 
Full Weight 



Bowen's Assorted Spices. 



Brace's Printing House, 535 Sac.