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Full text of "Calyx"

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calyx • f 



fifty • five 



* an annual 

published by the 

students of Washington 
and Lee University in 
Lexington, Virginia. 



Washington & 1 



III! 






^tm. 



'■ ii^*f»« 




William dols 



editor 



sanford maslansky business manager 






MAY 4 '55 




LEE 



I V8 

f.2»5°P' ^^*3' AS AUCUSTA ACADEMY. 
NEAR GREENVILLE; REESTABLISHED AT 
TIMBER RIDGE, MAY. 1775, AS LIBERTY 
HALL ACADEMY: MOVED TO LEXINCTOH 
AND CHARTERED AS A COLLEGE, 1782? 
ENDOWED BY GEORGE WASHINGTON, 1796. 
AND NAMED FOR HIM. UNDER PRESIDENCY, 

IS^rHrSN.°V^ER^S^?^^CH^APE^^^S' 
%\"'Amf |tH W*S INCORPORATED 

IN THE OFFICIAL TTTLE.,^,, 






Each June the seniors at Washington and Lee come 
to the end of their undergraduate careers. Four years 
is a big investment when you're in your twenties. 
In the last hectic days, we realize that our short stay 
has ended and that life will soon take us to different 
places where new adjustments must be made. 
Washington and Lee will be a part of the past. We 
will never be able to relive or recall the whole of 
these four years. What we will remember will be 
fragments of our experiences here and their significance 
may not be the criteria lay which they are recalled. 





Education has been the reason for our being here. 
But even what we have learned and all that has 
stimulated our minds cannot be recalled in full. In 
the final analysis, it is only people that matter. And so 
what we take from this university will be in part the 
memory of a few men who helped us discover things 
of which we were unaware, and the contents of a 
few great books by men we may never know — men who 
spoke to us through the written word. A few men 
and a few books may seem a small return on a 
four year investment, but from men and books come 
ideas and it is only ideas that lead men to action. 



Otlier activities have played a part too, for education 
has not been our sole endeavor. Perhaps we have weighed 
in our minds those "extra" things. In retrospect, 
we may discover the reason why it was worthwhile to 
spend long hours helping to get out a school paper, 
or why it was important for the Executive Committee to 
work several days on some small problem, just to 
reach tlie best solution. 

And then there were the dances and the parties — those 
weekends when "the Hill" was pretty much out of 
the question. Even the good times will be 
remembered only as fragments. We may recall the 
people and the noise, or perhaps only one 
person and the still of a spring night. During these 
four years, some of us have met the girl who will be 
the Only One forever. Or perhaps she was the Only 
One for just a few weeks. In any case, there was 
love and laughter. 






The mind has struggled, but the 
muscles have labored also. Possibly 
we starred but more than likely, 
we were just another of those who 
shared the blood and sweat of being 
on the team. Funny how the 
practices always seemed much 
harder than the games. There was 
tired happiness when we won, and, 
occasionally, tears when we lost. 
A university is a community and the 
people that matter most are the 
ones with whom we lived and 
worked. Out of the hundreds of 
faces, the noisy meals, the beer and 
Glenn Miller records, will remain 
a handful of true friends. Odd, 
though, how easy it is to recall the 
terrible loneliness of the first 
freshman days. Strange, that on 
the eve of graduation that loneliness 
should be the same. 




e 



a 




For his devoted service to our University as Librarian . . . 
For his sincere interest in the lives of we the students . . . 
For his warm friendship we have been fortunate to share . . 
Realizing his presence has helped make us better men . . . 
We dedicate the 1955 Calyx to 

HENRY EDMUNDS COLEMAN, JR. 



o 



n 





the 
university 



I ^. I'l »||BBFlL»ltK.ei 




a message from the president 



To the Class of 1955: 

This book will excite you when it first appears, and I am sure that it will 
charm you. As the years hurry by, it will become more valuable. You will 
look upon faces that in the happy past you may have seen daily, but faces 
that are now far from you. You will look upon scenes, and as you look you 
will live again some lovely experiences. 

I have a strong confidence that in this Calyx you have something more than 
an exquisite scrap-book. In the total contribution of this volume there is a 
message which will remind you of your own best purposes and your own 
noblest aspirations. It is the hope of your Alma Mater that you go foith to 
fulfillment with all the rewards of those who achieve their own best and who 
sei-ve most devotedly. 

Francis P. Gaines, President. 



First Row: Williams, Adams, Leyburn, Gilliam, Mattingly, Howard, Farrar. Second Row: 
Twombly, Coleman, Latture, Smith, Sprunt, Varner, Brady, Lauck, Parsons. 



the deans 
and university 
administration 




James G. Leyburn Deaji of the University 

Lewis W. Adams Dean of the Commerce School 

Clayton E. Williams Dean of the Law School 

Frank J. Gilliam Dean of Students 

Earl S. Mattingly Treasurer 

Edwin H. Howard Registrar 

Henry E. Coleman Librarian 

Harry K. Young Alumni Secretary 

Edwin P. Twombly Director of Intercollegiate Athletics 

David W. Sprunt 



Frederick A. Feddeman University Physician 

Rupert N. Latture Director of Freshman Work 

James L. Howe University Historian 

Douglas E. Brady Superintendent of Buildings 

Frank A. Parsons Publicity Director 

Donald E. Smith Director of Development 

Charles H. Lauck Superintendent of Journalism Press 

James D. Farrar Assistant Dean of Students 

Henry L. Ravenhorst. Manager of Veterans Housing Project 
.Director of Religious Work 




the faculty 

ACCOUNTING 

RUSSELL L. BOWERS, Ph.D Visiting Professor 

JAY D. COOK, M.B.A Assistant Professor 

AMERICAN STUDIES 

MARSHALL W. FISHWICK, Ph.D 4ssociate Professor 

BIOLOGY 

JAMES H. STARLING, Ph.D Professor 

KENNETH P. STEVENS, Ph.D Professor 

JOHN E. DAVIS, M.A Instructor 

CHEMISTRY 

JAMES L. HOWE, Ph.D., Sc.D., M.D Professor Emeritus 

LUCIUS J. DESHA, Ph.D Professor 

ESMARCH S. GILREATH, Ph.D issociate Professor 

JOHN H. WISE, Ph.D Associate Professor 

JAMES K. SHILLINGTON, Ph.D. Assistant Professor 

COMMERCE 

LEWIS K. JOHNSON, Ph.D Professor 

BRANTSON B. HOLDER, Ph.D Associate Professor 

ROBERT F. GEM.MILL, Ph.D 4ssistant Professor 

DRAMATICS AND PUBLIC SPEAKING 

CARLSON R. THOMAS, .M.A Assistant Professor 

ECONOMICS 

GLOVER D. HANCOCK, Ph.D Professor Emeritus 

ROBERT H. TUCKER, A.M., LL.D Professor Emeritus 

LEWIS W. ADAMS, Ph.D Professor 

EDWIN C. GRIFFITH, Ph.D Professor 

MERTON 0. PHILLIPS, Ph.D Professor 

EDWARD C. ATWOOD, M.A Assistant Professor 

JACK N. BEHRMAN, Ph.D Associate Professor 

ENGINEERING 

HENRY L. RAVENHORST, B.S Assistant Professor 



ENGLISH 

FITZGERALD FLOURNOY, Ph.D Professor 

JAMES S. MOFFATT, Ph.D Professor 

GEORGE H. FOSTER, Ph.D Associate Professor 

ROWLAND W. NELSON. Ph.D Associate Professor 

.\IAR\TN B. PERRY. Ph.D Associate Professor 

ARTHUR R. BORDEN, Ph.D Assistant Professor 

FINE ARTS 

MARION M. JUNKIN, A.B„ Arts D Professor 

ROBERT STEWART, M.M Assistant Professor 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

ROBERT F. BRADLEY, Ph.D Professor 

WILLIAM W. PUSEY, Ph.D Professor 

HENRY V. SHELLEY, Ph.D Professor 

LINTON L. BARRETT, Ph.D Professor 

BOYD R. EWING, Ph.D Associate Professor 

GEORGE J. IRWIN, A.B Assistant Professor 

BUFORD S. STEPHENSON, .M.A Assistant Professor 

CLYDE W. BARRITT, Ph.D Assistant Professor 

ROBERT C. GOODELL, Ph.D Assistant Professor 

EDWARD B. HAMER, Ph.D Instructor 

HALLA-M WALKER, Ph.D Instructor 

GEOLOGY 

MARCELLUS H, STOW, Ph.D Professor 

TROY J. LASWELL, Ph.D issistant Professor 

HISTORY 

WILLIAM G. BEAN, Ph.D Professor 

OLLINGER CRENSHAW, Ph.D Professor 

ALLEN W. MOGER. Ph.D Professor 

CHARLES W. TURNER, Ph.D Associate Professor 

LAWRENCE H. PETERSON, Ph.D Assistant Professor 



in memoriain 

THOMAS E. LOTHERY 




HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

EDWIN P. TWOMBLY. B.P.E Professor 

NORMAN F. LORD, M.S Assistant Professor 

RICHARD MILLER, B.S Assistant Professor 

CHARLES-J. HERBERT, B.S Instructor 

JOURNALISM 

OSCAR W. RIEGEL, A.M Professor 

JAMES P. DAVIS. B.A Assistant Professor 

CHARLES H. LAUCK, A.B Instructor 

WILLIAM ATKINSON, B.S Visiting Lecturer 

WILLIAM G. LEVERTY, B.A Visiting Lecturer 

HERBERT PATCHIN , Instructor 

LAW 

CHARLES P. LIGHT, M.A., LL.B Professor 

CHARLES R. McDOWELL, M.A., LL.B Professor 

CLAYTON E. WILLIAMS, LL.D Professor 

CHARLES V. LAUGHLIN, A.B., LL.B., J.S.D Professor 

THEODORE A. SMEDLEY, A.B., J.D Professor 

HOWARD M. COLVIN, J.S.D Professor 

WILFRED J. RITZ, LL.M Associate Professor 

ESRON M. FARIS, LL.M Assistant Professor 

CARTER GLASS, LL.M Visiting Lecturer 

EDWARD S. GRAVES, A.M., LL.B Visiting Lecturer 

MATHEMATICS 

LIVINGSTON W. SMITH, Ph.D Professor Emeritus 

FELIX P. WELCH, Ph.D Professor 

CHARLES W. WILLIAMS, Ph.D Associate Professor 

ROBERT W. ROYSTON, Ph.D Associate Professor 

EDWARD E. ELLIS, B.A Lecturer 



in memoriam 

JOHN M. SISLEY 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

RICHARD W. JONES, B.S., LT. COL Professor 

THOMAS D. DINSMORE, B.A., CAPT Assistant Professor 

JAMES C. PURKS, B.S., CAPT Assistant Professor 

FRANK H. DWYER, M/SGT Instructor 

JOSEPH T. GURGANUS, M/SGT Instructor 

EDWARD L. NAGLE, M/SGT Instructor 

WILLIAM E. WATSON, M/SGT Instructor 

PHILOSOPHY 

WILLIAM W. MORTON, D.D Professor 

EDWARD D. MYERS, Ph.D Professor 

PHYSICS 

ROBERT W. DICKEY, Ph.D Professor 

SAMUEL L. DAVIDSON, B.S Instructor 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

RUPERT N. LATTURE, A.M Professor 

ALLEN E. RAGAN, Ph.D Associate Professor 

JOHN H. WHEELER, Ph.D Associate Professor 

PSYCHOLOGY 

WALTER A. FLICK, Ph.D Professor 

WILLIAM M. HINTON, Ph.D Professor 

RELIGION 

DAVID W. SPRUNT, Th.D Associate Professor 

SOCIOLOGY 

JAMES G. LEYBURN, Ph.D Professor 



CLAYTON E. WILLIAMS 

Dean of The School of Law 



^f>^% 






school of law 







Officers of the Student Bar Association 



officers 



Seniors 

John Faison President 

Dick Broudy Vice-President 

Bill Baggs Secretary 

Howie Davis Historian 

Jim Gabler Executive Committeeman 

Intermediates 

Pat Collins President 

Tom Turner Vice-President 

Larry Raymond Secretary 

Dave Guthrie Historian 

Ed Ellis Executive Committeeman 

Freshmen 

Noel Copen President 

Bob Kendall Vice-President 

Carl Swanson Secretary 

John Hincke Historian 

John Stump Executive Committeeman 

The Stuflent Bar Association 

Wally McGraw President 

Kent Rigg Vice-President 

Townsend Oast Secretary-Treasurer 



Left to right: Kendall, Swanson, Copen, Stump 



Left to right; Ellis, Turner. Guthrie, Collins 



Left to right: Faisnn. Gabler, Baggs, Davis. BrouHy 




LIBRARY OF 

WASHINGTON & LEE UNIVERSITY 



the law school 



seniors 



Top Row: 

• MARVIN HAUSER ANDERSON, Annapolis. Maryland; 
IIK*. Secretary. 3: Law Review, 5; Assistant Editor. 6; Omicron 
Delta Kappa. Vice-President. 6; Publications Board, 4. Vice- 
President. 5 : "Who's Who In American Universities and Col- 
leges"; Phi Delta Phi; Ring-turn Phi, News Editor. 2, Managing 
Editor, 3, Editor, 4, 5; Freshman Dormitory Counselor, 3; Mem- 
ber of Virginia Bar. 

• WILLIAM EGAN BAGGS, Martinsburg, West Virginia; 
Secretary of Senior Law Class. 

• WILLIAM MELVILLE BAILEY, Wilmington, Ohio; nK*. 
President. 3; Alpha Kappa Psi. President. 4; Scabbard and 
Blade. President, 4; Phi Eta Sigma; Phi Beta Kappa; Omicron 
Delta Kappa; Beta Gamma Sigma; Phi Delta Phi; President 
of Freshman Law Class; Vice-President of Spring Dances. 4; 
Assistant Head Dormitory Counselor. 4. Head Dormitory Coun- 
selor. 6; Freshman Camp Counselor. 4. 6; President of Student 
Body. 5; Law Review, 5, Assistant Editor. 6; R.O.T.C. Battalion 
Commander, 3.4; "Who's Who in American Universities and 
Colleges"; Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award. 4.6. 

• GLEN EUGENE BARE. Tiffin. Ohio; Phi Alpha Delta. 

• ARMOUR THOMAS BECKSTRAND, Rockford, Illinois; Phi 
Delta Phi; Executive Committeeman, Intermediate Law Class. 



Bottom Row: 

• RICHARD FALK BROUDY, Norfolk; ZBT, Vice-President; 
Phi Delta Phi; Law Review; Vice-President of Senior Law Class. 

• GRAY CHARLES CASTLE, Arlington; *rA; Phi Alpha 
Delta; Omicron Delta Kappa. Secretary. 6; "Who's Who In 
American Universities and Colleges"; Law Review, 5, 6; As- 
similation Committee, 3. Secretary, 4, Chairman, 5 ; Freshman 
Dormitory Counselor, 3, Assistant Head Dormitory Counselor. 4; 
Freshman Camp Counselor, 3,5; Vice-President of Spring 
Dances. 3; Student War Memorial Scholarship Fund Commit- 
tee, 3. Chairman, 4; Cheerleaders, 2. Head Cheerleader, 3; Presi- 
dent's Advisory Committee; "13" Club; Pi Alpha Nu; Member 
of Board of Governors, Law School. 

• HOWARD ASTON DAVIS, Wilkes-Barre. Pennsylvania; 
Wrestling. Southern Conference Champion. 1948; Sigma Delta 
Chi; Phi Alpha Delta; Senior Law Class Historian. 

• LEWIS DESCHLER. II. Bethesda. Maryland; -^y.^: Phi 
Alpha Delta. 

• JOHN MOORE FAISON. Lexington; University of Virginia. 
1949; President of Senior Law Class; The Washington and 
Lee Lawyer. 





Top Row: 

• JAMES MILLER GABLER. Baltimore, Maryland; Ben. 
President, 5; Scabbard and Blade; Southern Collegian; Com- 
merce Fraternity; Secretary of Intermediate Law Class; Board 
of Governors. Student Bar Association. 5.6; Executive Commit- 
teeman. Senior Law Class; Phi Delta Phi. Historian. 5. 6; The 
Washington and Lee Lawyer, 5, Editor, 6. 

• ANDREW BRUTTON GALLAGHER. Cincinnati. Ohio; 2N; 
Phi Delta Phi ; Member of the Virginia Bar. 

• HUGH SELWYN GLICKSTEIN. Jacksonville, Florida; ZBT; 
Law Review, 4; Omicron Delta Kappa; Phi Delta Phi. 

• CHARLES LEWIS HARRINGTON, Marion. 

• RICHARD WILSON HUDGINS, Warwick; *Ae; Student 
Bar Association; National Intercollegiate Moot Court Competi- 
tion. 



Bottom Row: 

• JAY WAYNE JACKSON. West Hartford, Connecticut; 2N, 
President, 4; Phi Alpha Delta; White Friars, President. 3; Vice- 
President of Freshman Law Class; President of Spring Dances, 
4; Dance Board; Interfraternity Council, 2.3,4; Cotillion Club, 
Co-President; Soccer; Golf; Ring-turn Phi. 

• JOHN RAYMOND KAISER, Wilmington. Delaware; Univer- 
sity of Delaware; Phi Alpha Delta. 

• JOHN FRANKLIN KAY, JR.. Charleston, West Virginia; 
HKA; Phi Deha Phi, President. 6; Sigma; "13" Club; Presi- 
dent of Finals, 4; Vice-President of Fancy Dress, 4; Interfrater- 
nity Council. 2, 3; Assimilation Committee. 3; Law Revieiv, 5. 
Editor, 6; Cotillion Club; Dance Board; "Who's Who In 
American Universities and Colleges"; Omicron Delta Kappa. 

• PETER JAMES KURAPKA, JR., Baltimore, Maryland; 
Phi Delta Phi; The Washington & Lee Lawyer; Law Review, 
Business Manager; Intercollegiate Moot Court Competition. 

• JOHN RYLE LAWSON, JR.. Tampa, Florida; KA, Secretary, 
6; "13" Club, Vice-President, 4; Calyx, 1; Cotillion Club; Phi 
Delta Phi. 



19 



the law school 



seniors an 



Top Row: 

• WALTER JOHN McGRAW, Richmond; University of Rich- 
mond; Phi Deha Phi; Student Bar Association. Secretary -Treas- 
urer, 5; Board of Governors. 3. 4; The Washington and Lee 
Lawyer, 4; Dance Board. 5. 6; Student Library Committee, 3, 4; 
Byron Ballard Scholarship. 

• JAMES EDWARD MOYLER. JR.. Franklin; 4>Iv2, President; 
Phi Delta Phi; Cotillion Club. 



Bottom, Row: 

• KENT RIGG, Wise; :SN; Cotillion Club; Phi Alpha Delta; 
Student Bar Association; Board of Governors. 

• REESE WINFIELD STIPES. Flint. Michigan; Alpha Tau 
Omega: Phi Alpha Delta. 





^ intermediates 




Top Row: 

• LEWIS PRESTON COLLINS, III, Marion; *K2; Phi Delta 
Phi; Sigma; Senior Football Manager. 4; "Who's Who In 
American Colleges and Universities"; White Friars. President, 
3; President of Intermediate Law Class; Christian Council. 

• WILLIAM HENRY DRAPER, JR., Wyoming. Delaware; 
Phi Alpha Delta ; Law Review. 

• EDWARD EVAN ELLIS. Miami Beach. Florida; K.\; Ex- 
ecutive Committeeman, 6; Student Library Committee. Chair- 
man, 5; Assistant Law Librarian, 6; Phi Delta Phi. Exchequer, 
6; Law Review, 6; Interfraternity Council. Vice-President, 4; 
Cotillion Club; "Who's Who In American Colleges and Univer- 

• RENO SHEFFER HARP, III, Richmond; AT, Secretary, 2, 
3, House Manager, 5; Senior Football Manager, 4. 

• JAMES LISLE HINKLE, RosweU, New Mexico; 2N; Phi 
Alpha Delta. 

Bottom Row: 

• NICHOLAS GREGORY MANDAK, Clifton, New Jersey; AT, 
President. 4. Treasurer, 5; Phi Eta Sigma; Law Review, 5. 



• WILLIAM BERNARD SMITH, Logan. West Virginia; 2AE, 
Marshall College; "Who's Who In American Colleges and Uni- 
versities"; Phi Alpha Delta. 

• BEVERLY GRAY STEPHENSON, Wakefield; nK*; Inter- 
fraternity Council ; Forensic Union ; Cotillion Club ; Trouba- 
dours. President. 4: Law Review. 

• CLIFFORD McFIELD SWAN, JR.. Cincinnati, Ohio; nKA; 
Phi Delta Phi. 

• GEORGE SIMPSON WILSON, III. Owensboro. Kentucky; 
ICA; Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Eta Sigma; Latin Department 
Scholarship; Elizabeth B. Garrett Scholarship in Economics; 
Executive Committeeman, 4; Shenandoah, 2. 3; Calyx, 2; 
The Washington and Lee Lawyer, Assistant Editor. 4; Crew. 
1; Swimming. 1; Forensic Union. 1. 2; Phi Delta Phi. 

• WILEY REED WRIGHT, JR., Arlington; *rA, President, 4; 
Pi Alpha Nu; President's Advisory Committee; Cotillion Club; 
Cheerleader, 2,3; Scabbard and Blade. President. 5; Commerce 
Fraternity; Dance Board, 5; Cold Check Committee, 4; Presi- 
dent of Openings, 5; Interfraternity Council, 2,3; "Who's Who 
In American Colleges and Universities". 



21 



the law school freshmen 



Top Row: 

• SANFORD ELIHU BARUCH. Brooklyn. New York. 

• NOEL PURINTON COPEN, Charleston, Was Virginia. 

• GEORGE WESLEY EASON, Summit, New Jersey; Alpha 
Delta Phi. 

• EUGENE BURDICK FORTSON, Homey. Louisiana: K2. 

• DOUGLAS KYLE FRITH. Bassett. 



Bottom Row: 

• CHARLES WILLIAM HIGGINS, JR.. Poquoson; University 
of North Carolina. 

• BURTON IRWIN KATZMAN. New Rochelle. New York. 

• LEWIS SWIFT LEE, Jacksonville, Florida; $^6; Phi Beta 
Kappa; Pi Gamma Mu; Sigma Upsilon. 

• ROBERT NEIL McLEAN. Cumberland. Maryland; Delta Phi 

Alpha. 

• JOHN SIMS MOREMEN, Frankfort, Kentucky; BOH; Uni- 
versity of Kentucky. 





Top Row: 

• OVERTON PRICE POLLARD. Ashland; *K2. Secretary. 3. 
President, 4; Vice-President of Openings, 4; Pi Alpha Nu: 
Sigma. 

• WILLIAM KENNETH SCHMID. JR.. Staunton. 

• PHILIP LEWIS STANLEY. Staunton. 



• CARL DAVID SWAN.SON. Kansas City, Missouri; 2N; Vice- 
President, 3, President, 4, 5; White Friars; "13" Club, President, 
4; Ring-turn Phi, 2.3, Copy Editor. 4, Managing Editor, ,5; 
Mongolian Minks; Cotillion Club; Assimilation Committee; 
Troubadours. 

• HUTTER WILLIAMS. Scarsdale. New York. 





JAMES G. LEYBUKN 

Dean of The University 



I- 



^ 




school of arts and sciences 




officers 



Left to right: Kops, Simkins, Alexander, Lipsett, Rogers, Abernathy, Reede 



MILLS ROGERS President 

BOB CULLERS Academic Vice-President 

KEN ABERNATHY Commerce Vice-President 

CHRIS ALEXANDER Science Vice-President 

AL LIPSETT Secretary 

DICK KOPS Historian 

JIM REEDER Executive Committeeman 

ROY SIMKINS Executive Committeeman 




the arts and sciences seniors 



Top Row: 

• KENNETH LEE ABERNATHY. Louisville. Kentucky: Ben. 
Treasurer. 3.4; Ring-turn Phi, 1.2. Circulation Manager. 2; 
Southern Collegian. 3.4. Copy Editor. 4: Costume Chairman. 
Fancy Dress. 3: Freshman Dormitory Counselor. 4; Commerce 
Fraternity. Treasurer. 3. President. 4: Vice-President. Senior 
Class of Commerce School. 

• WALTER WILLIAM ALBERS. Austinville: AT; Ring-turn 
Phi. 1: Wrestling Manager. 1.2.3.4. Senior Manager. 3.4. 

• HADDON CHRISTOPHER ALEXANDER. Farmville: •I'K^. 
Secretary. 4. President. 4; Vice-President. Senior Class of Science 
School; Graham-Lee Society. 3.4. President. 4; Freshman Camp 
Counselor. 4: Alpha Epsilon Delta. Vice-President. 4: Concert 
Guild, 3. 4; Cotillion Club; Interfraternity Council. 3. 

• THOMAS WILLIAMS ALEXANDER. Charleston. South 
Carolina; Ben. President. 4; Sigma Delta Chi; Ring-turn Phi, 3; 
Christian Council. 1. 

• IRVINE THOMAS BAKER. Lexington; DAE; Phi Alpha Nu; 
Sigma: Intramural Board. 3; Baseball. 1.3.4. 



Bbttom Roiv: 

• CHARLES JOHN BALDREE. Melber. Kentucky: AX A. Vice- 
President. 3.4; Cotillion Club; International Relations Club. 
Secretary-Treasurer. 3; Forensic Union. 1; R.O.T.C. Band. 1.2. 
3; Student Bar Association; Ring-turn Phi, Law School Editor, 
4; Pi Sigma Alpha. President. 3.4. 

• RICHARD WARREN BANK. Flushing. New York; *En, 
Pledgemaster. 4; Christian Council. 1; Psi Chi. Vice-President. 
3, Treasurer, 4: Graham-Lee Society. 4; Alpha Epsilon Delta, 

• JOSEPH KENTWORTH BANKS, JR.. Lynchburg; 2X. His- 
torian. 2. Treasurer. 3.4. Rush Chairman. 3; Ring-turn Phi, 1; 
Washington and Lee Band. 1.2: Pi Alpha Nu; "13" Club; Fra- 
ternity Managers Association. Treasurer. 3. 4. 

• DAVID DOSS BARE. Dalton. Georgia; HK*. Chaplain. 2. 
Intramural Manager. 2.3. President. 3.4; Pi Alpha Nu; Alpha 
Epsilon Delta: Ring-turn Phi, 2.3. 

• WILLIAM HENRY BARTSCH. Washington. D.C.: AT. Sec- 
retary, 4; International Relations Club. 3. 4: Ring-turn Phi, 1. 2, 
Assistant Sports Editor, 2. 




^^S^^ik. 




Top Row: 

• FRED BOWMAN BEAR. Montgomery. Alabama: r^A^-: 
Ring-turn Phi, 1; Golf Team. 3.4; "13" Club, President. 4. 

• DEAN BENDER. New York. New York; iV\: Wrestling. 3. 
4; Southern Collegian, 3; Glee Club, 1,2. Secretary, 3; Inter- 
national Relations Club, 4. 

• DAVID MILLER BERLINGHOF, Binghamton, New York: 
*r-i; White Friars: Soccer, 3; Glee Club. 2.3. Publicity Man- 
ager, 4; Commerce Fraternity, Secretary, 4; Vice-President of 
Openings, 4. 

• MARVIN LORD BISHOP. Casper. Wyoming; *rA; Glee 
Club. 3; R.O.T.C. Band. 1.2.3.4; Ring-turn Phi, 4; Southern 
Collegian, 4; Cotillion Club. 

• HAROLD JAY BLACKSIN, Brooklyn, New York; *En; 
Soccer, 1; Basketball, 1,2,3; Ring-turn Phi, 1. 



Bottom Row: 

• WATSON ALLEN BOWES, JR.. Denver. Colorado: ATA. 
Treasurer. 3; Phi Eta Sigma. Vice-President. 2.3; Omicron 
Delta Kappa; President of Student Body. 4; Executive Commit- 
tee, 3; Vice-President. Sophomore Class; Wrestling. 1; Cross 
Country, 3,4; Cotillion Club; Assimilation Committee, 2; Cold 
Check Committee, 2; "Who's Who In American Universities and 
Colleges." 

• ROBERT EDWARD BRADFORD. Blacksburg; AXA. Presi- 
dent. 3.4; Scabbard and Blade, Vice-President, 4; Sigma Delta 
Chi; Gaines Guard. Commander. 3. 4. 5; Forensic Llnion. 2; 
Interfraternity Council. 3. 4; "Who's Who In American Uni- 
versities and Colleges"; Home Edition, 1,2,3, Senior Editor, 2. 
3; Ring-turn Phi. 1.2. 

• JOHN SLADE CARTER. JR., Norristown, Pennsylvania; K2 ; 
Calyx, 1,2; Troubadours, 1,2; Band, 1.2,3.4; Cotillion Club. 

• ROBERT MOORE CARTER, JR., Charleston, West Virginia; 
nivA; International Relations Club, 1; Southern Collegian, 1. 

• MILSON KEEN AN CLARK, Port Chester, New York; Cam- 
pus Club, Treasurer, 4; Baseball, 1. 



the arts and sciences seniors 



Top Row: 

• SELDEN WHITE CLARK. Deerfield. Illinois; A'lU; Southern 
Collegian, Associate Editor. 3. Editor. 4; Troubadours. 1.2.3,4. 
Business Manager. 4; Christian Council. Chairman of University 
Religious Conference. 4; Student Library Committee. 3; Ring- 
turn Phi, 3; Publications Board, 4. 

• CHASE WERNER CLEMENTS. Toledo. Ohio; K2, Intra- 
mural Manager. 3. Assistant Treasurer. 4; Glee Club, 1; 
Troubadours. 1. 

• DAVID MANSEL CLINGER. Lewisburg. Pennsylvania; AXA, 
Secretary. 2; Ring-turn Phi. Editor. 4. Managing Editor. 3, News 
Editor. 2; Sigma Delta Chi. President, 4; Scabbard and Blade; 
"Who's Who In American Colleges and Universities"; Fresh- 
man Dormitory Counselor. 4; Freshman Camp Counselor. 4; 
White Friars; R.O.T.C. Band. 1. 2. 3; Secretary and Treasurer 
of Virginia Intercollegiate Press Association; President's Ad- 
visory Committee; Publications Board, 4; Christian Council, L 
2 : Troubadours, 1 ; Interfraternity Council, 3 ; Omicron Delta 
Kappa. 



• .SCOTT BLAKE CLINTON. Chevy Chase. Maryland; Ben, 
House Manager. 3; Christian Council, 1; Glee Club, 1. 

• HARRY KING COCHRAN. Little Rock. Arkansas; 2X; Con- 
cert Guild. 3.4; Christian Council, 1,2. 



Bottom Row: 

• EDWARD COHEN. Riverside. New Jersey; ZBT; Ring-turn 
Phi, 1; Glee Club. 1,4; R.O.T.C. Band, 1,2,3; Soccer, 1,2,3; 
Forensic Union. 3; International Relations Club, 3. 

• MILLARDLEWISCOPE. Marshall. Texas; HK*. Vice-Presi- 
dent. 4; Home Edition, 3.4. News Director. 4; Ring-turn Phi, 3, 
4, News Editor. Associate Editor, 3; White Friars. 

• WILLIAM ERMINE CORNELIUS, Blountsville, Alabama; 
Graham-Lee Society. 

• WILLIAM NEWTON CRAIG. Pittsburg. Pennsylvania; KA ; 
Christian Council. 1. 2. 3. 4; Glee Club. 1. 2.3; Freshman Dormi- 
tory Counselor. 3.4. Assistant Head Counselor. 4; Graham-Lee 
Society, 4. 

• LEWIS GERALD CRESKOFF, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
KS. 





Top Row: 

• ROBERT MILLER CULLERS. Front Royal; niv.i, Secretary, 
3; Sigma Delta Chi. Secretary, 4; Freshman Dormitory Coun- 
selor, 4; Baseball. 2,3.4; Vice-President. Senior Class of Arts 
and Sciences; Troubadours, 1.2.3,4; White Friars; "13" Club; 
Ring-turn Phi, 1, 2, 3. Sports Editor. 3; Home Edition, 2; Cotil- 
lion Club, 4. 

• FORNEY RUTLEDGE DAUGETTE, JR.. Jacksonville, Ala- 
bama; 2X, Corresponding Secretary, 2, Secretary. 3, Vice-Presi- 
dent, 4; Interfraternity Council, 2,3; R.O.T.C. Band, 1.2.3,4, 
Commander and Drum Major, 1, 3; Phi Eta Sigma. President. 4; 
Commerce Fraternity. Vice-President, 4; Pi Alpha Nu; Cotillion 
Club; Scabbard and Blade; "Who's Who In American Univer- 
sities and Colleges"; Omicron Delta Kappa. 

• ROLAND CROCKER DA VIES, JR., Wa.«hington, D.C.; ATA, 
Vice-President, 3; White Friars; Glee Club, 1; Washington 
Literary Society; Soccer, 1,2,3,4; Lacrosse, 1.2,3,4. 

• JOHN FRANKLIN DAVIS. Colinia, New Jersey. 



• WILLIAM WOOTTON DAVIS. JR.. Lexington. Kentucky; 
ATA, Treasurer. 4. Rush Chairman. 3; Pi Alpha Nu; Assimila- 
tion Committee, 3.4, Secretary, 3; Fraternity Managers Asso- 
ciation; Ring-turn Phi, 1,2; Golf, 1. 



Bottom Row: 

• JAMES DOUGLAS DEACON. Hot Springs; Alpha Epsilon 
Delta, 3. 4. Historian, 4. 

• WALTER BERNARD DeGREE. JR.. Grosse He. Michigan; 
ATA; Football. 1.2.3,4, Assistant Coach. 4. 

• ROGER STOMNER DENU, Ridgewood, New Jersey; *rA. 
Vice-President, 4, House Manager; Basketball; Interfraternity 
Council: Freshman Camp Counselor, 4. 

• RAY BROWN DINKEL. Bridgewater; <i>KS ; Basketball. 1; 
Glee Club, 1. 

• MARVIN RICHARD DOERFLER. White Plains, New York; 
"fEII, House Manager, 3. 4. Corresponding Secretary, 3. Vice- 
President, 4; Interfraternity Council, 2,3; Freshman Soccer 
Manager, 1 ; Forensic Union, 1. 



29 



the arts and sciences seniors 



Top Row: 

• WILLIAM LUDWIG DOLS. JR.. Baltimore, Maryland; 2N, 
Secretary. 2, Rush Chairman, 3, Vice-President, 3; Vice-Presi- 
dent of Student Body, 4; Dormitory Counselor, 3,4; Freshman 
Camp Counselor, 4; Calyx, Managing Editor, 3, Editor, 4; 
Publications Board, Vice-President. 4; Vice-President of Junior 
Class; White Friars; Scabbard and Blade; Interfraternity Coun- 
cil, 2, Secretary. 3 ; President's Advisory Committee ; Mongolian 
Minks; Christian Council. 1. 2; Lacrosse. 1; Dean's List; "Who's 
Who In American Universities and Colleges"; Omicron Delta 
Kappa. 

• GUY DARBY DRAKE, Palm Beach. Florida; BBH; Mongo- 
lian Minks; Pi Alpha Nu; Lacrosse. 1, 2. 3, 4, Captain, 4. 

• WILLIAM KERFOOT DUNKER, Washington, D.C.; *KV; 
Pi Alpha Nu; Football, 1.2,3; Track, 1. 

• FRED KITTERMAN EASTER. JR.. Richmond; ATA. Presi- 
dent, 4; Troubadours. 1.2,3; Southern Collegian, 2,3,4; Cotil- 
lion Club; "13'' Club; Interfraternity Council; Vice-President of 
Spring Dances, 3; Dance Board; President of Fancy Dress, 4; 
"Who's Who In American Universities and Colleges"; Omicron 
Delta Kappa. 



• EMIL PETER ELSAESSER. Youngstown. Ohio; nKA; 
Alpha Nu; Calyx, 1. 



Pi 



Bottom Row: 

••JOHN WOSTBROCK ENGLISHMAN, Midland Park, New 
Jersey; Glee Club, 2,3; Band, 1,2.3.4; Scabbard and Blade. 

• GERARD WAYNE COWLE FEE. Shelby, Ohio; Phi Beta 
Kappa; Pi Sigma Alpha; Forensic Union, Secretary. 1; Inter- 
collegiate Debate Team; Troubadours; Washington Literary 
Society ; International Relations Club, President, 4. 

• ARTHUR LOUIS FERN, II, Bloomfield, Connecticut; *rA; 
Calyx, 1; Soccer. 1,2,3; International Relations Club, 3,4. 

• ROBERT NELSON FISHBURN, Roanoke; ^AO, Rush Chair- 
man, 3, President, 4; White Friars; Cotillion Club; Mongolian 
Minks; "13" Club; Secretary of Sophomore Class; Ring-turn 
Phi, 2; Business Manager, 3; Publications Board, 3; President 
of Finals, 4; Vice-President of Spring Dances, 3; Vice-President 
of Fancy Dress, 4; Executive Committeeman, 4; "Who's Who In 
American Universities and Colleges"; Dance Board; Omicron 
Delta Kappa. 

• HARRY McNAMARA FORD. JR.. Baltimore. Maryland; 
*Ae; Cotillion Club; White Friars; Mongolian Minks; Vice- 
President of Openings; Lacrosse. 1.2.3,4. 





mMik 





Top Row: 

• WILLIAM HAUGHWOUT FORREST. JR.. Warwick: K2. 
Rush Chairman. 3, Secretary. 3; Pi Alpha Nu; Calyx. 1. 

• DAVID LAWRENCE FOSTER, Sewickley, Pennsylvania; 
*Ae ; Glee Club. 1 ; Baseball, 1 ; Ring-turn Phi, 3. 

• WILLIAM BRUCE FRAY, Orange; *rA; Rifle Team. 3, 4. 5; 
Forensic Union, 1; Scabbard and Blade. 

• ANTHONY FRANK GERIKE, Haddonfield, New Jersey; 
■i-K^; Lacrosse, 1; Basketball, 1; "13" Club, Treasurer, 4. 

• FRANK GRANVILLE GIBSON, JR., Bedford; Forensic 
Union, 1, Speaker, 2; Christian Council, 3,4; Freshman Dormi- 
tory Counselor, 3,4; Freshman Camp Counselor, 4; President's 
Advisory Committee. 



Bottom Row: 

• FRANKLIN RICHARD GIDDON. Chestnut Hill. Massachu- 
setts; ZBT; Troubadours. 1.2.3; Christian CounciL 1.2,3. Co- 
Chairman of Boys" Club. 2. 3; Southern Collegian, 2. 3. 4. Editor. 
3; Ring-turn Phi, 3, 4; Calyx, 4; Publications Board, 3, 4, Presi- 
dent. 4; President's Advisory Committee; Freshman Camp Coun- 
selor, 4; Shenandoah, 3.4. Associate Editor. 4. 

• WILLIAM DOUGLAS GOODE, JR.. Newport News; Glee 
Club, 1,3; Concert Guild, 1,2,3,4. 

• JEAN-MARIE GABRIEL GRANDPIERRE. Nancy. France; 
International Relations C;ub. 

• WILLSON BROOKE GRAY. Elizabeth, New Jersey; nK*, 
Chaplain, 1,2; Ring-turn Phi, 1. 

• HAL ALLEN HAMILTON, Santa Fe, New Mexico; 2N, 
Treasurer, 2,3,4; Pi Alpha Nu, President, 3; Commerce Fra- 
ternity; Cotillion Club; Assimilation Committee, 4, Chairman, 4. 



31 



the arts and sciences seniors 



Top Roiv: 

• LOWELL DOW HAMRIC. Lexington; Phi Eta Sigma; 
BasebalL 1.2.3,4; Rifle Team. 2; Scabbard and Blade; Com- 
merce Fraternity; R.O.T.C. Battalion Commander, 4; President's 
Advisory Committee; "'Who's Who In American Colleges and 
Llniversities"; Omicron Delta Kappa. 

• FRANK TUCKER HARDWICK. LaFayette, Georgia; ATA; 
White Friars; Southern Collegian, Advertising Manager, 3. 

• ROBERT PEGRAM HARRISON. Lookout Mountain, Ten- 
nessee; 'i'AB. Secretary; Pi Alpha Nu. Treasurer. 3; Interfra- 
ternity Council. 1.2.3; Vice-President of Fancy Dress, 3; Vice- 
President of Finals. 4; Graham-Lee Society. 3.4; Concert Guild. 
3.4; Ring-turn Phi, 4: Tennis. 3.4. 

• GEORGE TOBIAS WHIPP HENDRIX. JR.. Olean. New 
York; *Ae; Baseball. 1. 

• ERWIN OLIN HENTZ. JR.. Anderson. South Carolina; K2. 
President, 4; Tennis, 1. 



Bottom Row: 

• HARRY MUTH HOLLINS, Lake Charles, Louisiana; S.iE, 



• JOHN WAYLAND HOWARD. Wethersfield. Connecticut; 
2.\E; Vice-President of Fancy Dress, 3; Vice-President of Open- 
ings. 4; Cotillion Club; White Friars. Vice-President, 4; South- 
ern Collegian, Art Editor, 4; Mongolian Minks. 



• JOHN THOMPSON HUDDLE, Lancaster, Ohio; ■i'Ae. Secre- 
tary; Pi Alpha Nu; Commerce Fraternity; Basketball. 1.2. 



• JOHN PRATT HUEBNER, Buck Hill Falls. Pennsylvania; 
<S>Iv^; R.O.T.C. Band; White Friars; Graham-Lee Society; Ten- 
nis Team. 1. 



• ROBERT HOLBROOK INGHAM, Maplewood. New Jersey; 
K2; Sigma Delta Chi; Pi Alpha Nu; Ring-turn Phi, 1, 3, 4, 
Copy Editor. 4; Home Edition, 3,4. 




32 



■■-.»«».■•. 




Top Ron': 

• LEWIS PHILLIP JACOBY, III. Moorestown, New Jersey; 
*K2, Rush Chairman. 3,4; Historian of Sophomore Class. 

• LAWRENCE A. G. JOHNSON, Sand Springs. Oklahoma; 
2X; Graham-Lee Society, 3,4, Secretary-Treasurer, 3,4; Foren- 
sic Union, 1 ; Lacrosse, 3, 4; Dean's List. 

• RICHARD ERNEST JOHNSON, Manhasset. New York; 
Ben; Soccer. 1,2.3,4; Lacrosse, 1,2,3,4. 

• DACE WILLETT JONES. JR., Winston-Salem, North Caro- 
lina; K2. 

• WALK CLARIDGE JONES, III, Memphis, Tennessee; 2AE, 
President, 4; Scabbard and Blade; President's Advisory Com- 
mittee ; Rifle Team, Captain, 3, 4 ; Ring-turn Phi, 1 ; Christian 
Council, 1. 



Bottom Row: 

• FREDERICK THOMAS KACKLEY. Indianapolis. Indiana; 
Troubadours; Campus Club. 2, Treasurer, 2; International Rela- 
tions Club. 

• HARRY GREENE KENNEDY, JR., Charleston, West Vir- 
ginia; 2X; Track, 1,2.3,4, Captain, 4; Swimming, 1; Concert 
Guild, 1,2,3,4, Secretary, 3; Graham-Lee Society, 3,4. 

• JAMES CLAYTON KINCANNON, Bethesda, Maryland; 
*K2, Secretary, 4. 

• JAY DRUMMOND KLINE, Frederick, Maryland; *K2; 
White Friars. 

• RICHARD KOPS, Greenvale, New York; *K2, House Man- 
ager, 3, 4; White Friars, President, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Wrest- 
ling, 1; Historian of Senior Class; Glee Club, 1. 



33 



the arts and sciences seniors 



Top Row: 



• JOSEPH SCOTT LAURENT, Louisville, Kentucky; Ben, 
Alumni Secretary, 2,3; Cotillion Club; Concert Guild; Inter- 
fraternity Council. 3. 4. 



• LARRY LEVITAN. Washington, D.C.; ZBT, President. 4; 
Outstanding Freshman Award; Soccer, 1; President of Sopho- 
more Class: Dance Board; Troubadours. 1,2,3, Business Man- 
ager; Cotillion Club; President of Spring Dances, 3; Com- 
merce Fraternity. 



• DAVID PAUL LINDECAMP, West Chester, Pennsylvania; 
AXA, Rush Chairman. 3; International Relations Club, 2,3,4, 
Secretary, 3, President, 4; Glee Club, 2,3,4; Pi Sigma Alpha, 
Treasurer, 3, Vice-President, 4; Christian Council, 3, 4; Graham- 
Lee Society, 3, 4. 



• JAMES CORNING LINDSAY. Baltimore, Maryland; K2 

Vice-President, 3; Phi Alpha Nu. 



• ALLEN LEE LIPSETT. Riverdale, New York; ZBT; Secre- 
tary of Senior Class; Calyx, Business Staff, 1,2,3; Cotillion 
Club; Concert Guild, 2,3,4. 



Bottom Row: 

• HUMBERTO JOSE LLORENS. San Juan, Puerto Rico; <I>K>^. 

• THOMAS EDWIN LOHREY, Bluefield, West Virginia; ATA. 

• TOMMY KING LOVING, Covington; Troubadours, 1, 3,4; 
Crew, 1; Debating Team, 1. 

• CHRISTIAN ALDREDGE LUHNOW, Gordonsville; 2N; Pi 
Alpha Nu; Ring-turn Phi, 1.2,3; Home Edition, 2,3,4, Senior 
Editor, 4; Gaines Guard, 3. 

• JOHN FREEMAN LYTTON, Nashville, Tennessee; 2AE; 
Sigma Delta Chi; Ring-tum Phi, 1,2, Circulation Manager, 2; 
Home Edition, 3, 4. 





Top Row: 

• NEIL McBRIEN, Port Jefferson. New York; *ri, Secretary 
3,4; Ring-turn Phi, 1; Glee Club, 2; Christian Council, 1; Inter- 
national Relations Club, 3, 4. 

• DAVID WARREN McCAIN, Snyder, New York; Ben; White 
Friars; Student War Memorial Scholarship Fund Committee, 2, 
3. 4, Chairman. 3. 

• ROBERT HOOD MANN. JR., Kansas Chy, Missouri: 2X. 
Vice-President. 4; Forensic Union. Speaker. 2; Christian Coun- 
cil. 1. 2. 3. 4; Commerce Fraternity. Treasurer. 4; Concert Guild. 
Treasurer. 4; Freshman Camp Counselor. 4; Track. 3. 

• JOHN HARDIN MARION, III, Bon Air; <l>rA, Secretary, 3. 
President, 4, Rush Chairman, 4; Ring-turn Phi, 1,2, Sports 
Editor, 2; Glee Club, 2; International Relations Club, 3. 4; 
President's Advisory Committee; Chairman of Independent 
Party. 4. 

• ROBERT LIVINGSTON MATTHEWS, Binghamton, New 
York; *K2. 



Bottom Roiv: 

• MARVIN PORTER MEADORS. JR., Greenville, Mississippi; 
2AE, Correspondent, 2; Christian Council, 1; White Friars; 
Cotillion Club; Alpha Epsilon Delta, President, 4. 

• WILLIAM SPEDDEN MERRICK, JR., Baltimore, Maryland: 
2N; Lacrosse, 1,2,4; Glee Club, 1; Troubadours, 1,4. 

• GUY PARKER METCALFE. JR.. Louisville. Kentucky; f^e. 
Vice-President, 4. 

• SLATOR GIGNOUX MILLER, Washington, D.C.; nivA, 
President, 4; Cotillion Club, Secretary-Treasurer, 3; President's 
Advisory Committee; Christian Council, \. 

• DOUGLAS DURRELL MONROE, Pelham, New York; 2N, 
Vice-President, 4; "13" Club; White Friars; Mongolian Minks; 
Golf, 3; Cotillion Club. 



35 



the arts and sciences seniors 



Top Row: 

• WILLIAM EDWARD MOORE. JR.. Waynesboro; KA. As- 
sistant House Manager. 3: Scabbard and Blade: Gaines Guard, 
3; Student Bar Association. 

• PAUL RICHARD MULLER. Bay Head. New Jersey: AT. Sec- 
retary. 2. House Manager. 3; Washington Literary Society. 1.2. 
3.4; Ring-turn Phi, 1; Forensic Union. 1. 

• SIDNEY STEVENS NEGUS. JR.. Richmond: <I>K2. Secretary. 
4: Cotillion Club: Lacrosse. L2; Basketball. 3. 

• CHARLES HENRY NOWLIN. Wilmington. Delaware; Phi 
Eta Sigma; Phi Beta Kappa; Shenandoah, 1,2.3: Washington 
Literary Society. 1. 2. 3. 4. 

• CHARLES MINTER PATRICK. JR.. Dallas. Texas; Ben, 
Recorder. 4; Swimming. L2. 3. 4; Ring-turn Phi, 3.4. 

Bottom Roir: 

• CHARLES FORREST PATTERSON. JR.. Westfield. New 
Jersey; AXA. Pledge Trainer; Scabbard and Blade. Vice-Presi- 
dent. 4: Pi Alpha Nu; Commerce Fraternity: Tennis. 2.3.4; 
Winner of Annual Tennis Tournament. 2; Gaines Guard, 3, 4. 



• FREDERIC MONTAGU PENLEY PEARSE. HI. Lexington; 
-^. President. 4. Vice-President. 3; Christian Council. 1.2.3.4, 
Chairman of Freshman Work. 2. 3. Vice-President. 4: Cotillion 
Club; Freshman Camp Counselor. 3; Freshman Dormitory 
Counselor, 4; Graham-Lee Society. 3.4; Calyx, 2.3.4. Art 
Editor. 2,3; Vice-President of Finals, 2.3: Vice-President of 
Fancy Dress. 3.4; Assimilation Committee. 2; President's Ad- 
visory Committee; Interfraternity Council. 2: Omicron Delta 
Kappa. 

• ROBERT ALLEN PFAFF, South Bend. Indiana; Ben, 
Alumni Secretary: Pi Alpha Nu; Basketball. 2; Glee Club, 1. 
2, 3, 4; Troubadours, 3, 4; Concert Guild. 1. 2. 3, 4. President. 3. 

• JOSEPH APPLE PONTIUS. Lancaster, Pennsylvania; *I«', 
President. 4; Student War Memorial Scholarship Fund Com- 
mittee. 2.3.4. Chairman. 4; Interfraternity Council. 1.2.3; 
Cotillion Club; "13" Club; President's Advisory Committee; 
Vice-President of Openings. 4; Cold Check Committee. 4; Fresh- 
man Camp Counselor. 4; Commerce Fraternity; "Who's Who In 
American Universities and Colleges." 

• ELWOOD STUART QUARNGESSER. Baltimore, Maryland; 
^K^. Vice-President; Lacrosse. 1.3.4: Interfraternity Council; 
Pi Alpha Nu. 





Top Row: 

• STEPHEN MARSHALL QUILLEN. Lebanon; Ki). House 
Manager. 4. 

• OGDEN BERTRAND RAMSAY. Baltimore. Maryland; niv*. 
House Manager. 3; Glee Club, 1,2,3. 

• BEAU ANDREW REDMOND, New Orleans, Louisiana; 
Ben; Omicron Delta Kappa, President, 4; President of Fancy 
Dress, 3; Executive Committeeman. 2; Calyx, L 2. Activities 
Editor, 2; Freshman Dormitory Counselor, 4; Dance Board; 
President's Advisory Committee; Scabbard and Board; Sigma; 
White Friars; Graham-Lee Society; "Who's Who In American 
Colleges and Universities"; Dean's List; Honor Roll. 

• JAMES ARTHUR REEDER, Shreveport, Louisiana; BOn, 
Rush Chairman, 3; Executive Committeeman, 4; R.O.T.C. Bat- 
talion Commander. 3 ; Scabbard and Blade, President, 3 ; Fresh- 
man Dormitory Counselor, 4, Assistant Head Counselor, 4; Dance 
Board, 3, 4, Assistant Business Manager, 3, President and Busi- 
ness Manager, 4; Vice-President of Fancy Dress, 3; Calyx, 2, 
Class Editor, 2; Cotillion Club; "13" Club; Commerce Frater- 
nity; "Who's Who In American Colleges and Universities"; 
Omicron Delta Kappa. 



• .lAMES CALDWELL REPASS, Lumberport, West Virginia ; 
2N; Glee Club, 1,2,3,4, Business Manager, 4; Concert Guild, 
1, 2, 3, 4, President, 4; Graham-Lee Society, 3, 4, Vice-President, 
4; Christian Council, 1,2. 

Bottom Row: 

• CHARLES LEE RICE, Alexandria; KA; Band, 1,2,3. 

• DAVID EUGENE RICE, Silver Spring, Maryland; AT, Vice- 
President, 4; Baseball Manager, 1,2,3,4, Senior Manager, 4; 
Ring-turn Phi, 1, 2, 3, 4, Sports Editor, 3, 4. 

• DOUGLAS EDWARD RITCHIE JR.. La Vale, Maryland; 
Alpha Epsilon Delta, Treasurer, 4; University and R.O.T.C. 
Bands, 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Club, Treasurer, 2, 3; Southern Col- 
legian Dance Band, 2, 3; President's Advisory Committee. 

• JAMES DARNALL RITTER, Cynthiana, Kentucky; 2N. 

• WILLIAM RANDOLPH RITTER, JR., Huntington, West 
Virginia, 2AE. 



the arts and sciences seniors 



Top Row: 

• THOMAS WATERS ROBBINS. JR.. Princeton. New Jersey: 
nK.\: Pi Alpha Nu; Alpha Epsilon Deha; Glee Club. 1. 2; Band. 
1. 2, 3: Lacross. 1, 2; Soccer. 2; Baseball, 3. 4; Interfraternity 
Council. 2. 3; President of Junior Class; Dance Board; Dean's 
List: Secretary of Student Body. 4; "Who's Who In American 
Colleges and Universities." 



• ARCH WATERS ROBERTS, Saint Petersburg. Florida; 
2AE, Vice-President, 4; Pi Alpha Nu; Commerce Fraternity. 



• JUDSON HOWARD RODMAN. Portsmouth; KA; White 
Friars. Secretary-Treasurer. 3. 



• SIDNEY MILLS ROGERS, JR., Danville; *K2. Vice-Presi- 
dent. 4; President of Senior Class; Pi Alpha Nu; Interfraternity 
Council; Dance Board; Football. 1. 



• JOHN ALBY RUTHERFORD. Radford; AXA, House Man- 
ager. 4 ; White Friars ; Gaines Guard. 3, 4. 



Bottom Row: 



• HAROLD DUANE ST. JOHN, JR„ Summit, New Jersey; 
'i'l'A; Cotillion Club; Troubadours, 4. 



• ANTHUNY HUNT SARGENT. Eastchester, New York; AT, 
President, 4; Home Edition, 3.4; Pi Alpha Nu; Cotillion Club. 



• MALCOLM STORER SAWTELLE, Freeport, Maine; 2AE; 
Glee Club, 1,2,3,4, Business Manager, 3, President, 4; Concert 
Guild. 



• FRANCIS OSBORNE SCHAEFER. JR.. Memphis. Tennes- 
see; ITKA, Treasurer. 2; Pi Alpha Nu; Vice-President, 3; Calyx, 
1.2. 3. FraternitvEditor. 3. 



• WERNERT JACQUES SCHULER, JR.. Erie, Pennsylvania, 
IlKA. Historian, 3; White Friars; Southern Collegian, 1; Trou- 
badours. 1. 





Top Row: 

• BRIAN HAMMOND SHANLEY, Morrison, Illinois; BOH; 
Leader of Southern Collegian Dance Orchestra, 1,2,3,4,5; 
Mongolian Minks; Ring-turn Phi, 4, 5; Southern Collegian, 4, 5. 

• JAMES IVAN SHAPERO, Cleveland Heights, Ohio; ZBT; 
White Friars; Scabbard and Blade; Christian Council, 3; Calyx, 
1 ; Southern Collegian, 3. 

• HARRY STANTON SHENDOW, Winchester; nKA; Track, 
1,2,3,4. 

• EUGENE BURTON SIEMINSKI. Englewood, New Jersey; 
2N; Football, 1,2. 

• LEROY HAMPTON SIMKINS, JR.. Augusta, Georgia; K.\; 
Executive Committeeman, 4; Cotillion Club; Secretary of Junior 
Class; Vice-President of Spring Dances, 3; Pi Alpha Nu; Sigma 
Delta Psi; Scabbard and Blade; "13" Club; Track, 3,4; Sigma. 



Bottom Row: 

• ELIAS NAUDAIN SIMONS. HI, Washington, D.C.; HK*, 
House Manager, 2, 3, Treasurer. 2; Pi Alpha Nu; Cotillion Club. 

• CHARLES KENNETH SLICK, Hagerstown, Maryland; UK*. 

• RAYMOND DUPUY SMITH, JR., New York, New York; 
Ben, Secretary. 4. President. 4; Ring-turn Phi, 3,4, Managing 
Editor. 3, Editorial Advisor. 4; Shenandoah, 1, 2. 3, Secretary, 1. 
Associate Editor, 2, Editor, 3; Southern Collegian, Managing 
Editor, 2; Washington Literary Society, 1.2; Calyx, 4; Fresh- 
man Dormitory Counselor, 3, 4; Christian Council. 1. 2, Co-Chair- 
man of Boy's Club Committee. 2; Cold Check Committee, Chair- 
man, 4; Friends of the Library. Chairman. 4; Phi Eta Sigma; 
"Who's Who In American Colleges and Universities" ; Omicron 
Delta Kappa. 

• HARRISON SOMERVILLE, JR.. Washington, D.C.; Ben; 
Commerce Fraternity. 

• JOHN WADE STACKHOUSE, Dillon, South Carolina; niv*; 
Shenandoah, 3.4; Cotillion Club; Interfraternity Council. 4; 
Washington Literary Society, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer, 4. 



39 



the arts and sciences seniors 



Top Roic. 



Bottom Row: 



• RICHARD FLOYD BURKE STEELE, JR.. Petersburg; 
AT; Cotillion Club: Friends of the Library, 1.2.3.4; Psi Chi; 
Washington Literary Society. L 2. 3. 4. 

• DONALD EDWARD JAMES STEWART. Mexico, D.F.; IC\; 
Sigma Delta Psi; Track. 2, 3. 4; Soccer. L 2. 3. 4; Gaines Guard; 
Senior Athletic Director. 

• WILLIAM JOHN STOBER. Newton Highlands. Massachu- 
setts; K.\; Pi Alpha Nu; Southern Collegian. 

• JERRY FARMER STONE. JR., Kingsport. Tennessee; K2, 
Vice-President. 3. Treasurer, 4; Troubadours, 1; Christian Coun- 
cil, 1; White Friars; "13" Club; Interfraternity Council, 2, 
Treasurer, 3, 4. 



. RUDOLPH JOHN STUTZMANN. Great Neck, New York; 
Ki:; Sigma Delta Psi: Psi Chi, Secretary, 4; Scabbard and 
Blade, Secretary, 3; Track, 1,2,3; Freshman Dormitory Coun- 
selor, 4. 



• DUDLEY BRECKINRIDGE THOMAS, New York, New 
York; *rA; Christian Council, 1; Glee Club, 2; International 
Relations Club, 3, 4. 



• WILLIAM MILAM TURNER. JR., Selma. Alabama; 'S-AG; 
Cotillion Club; Basketball. 1.2; Tennis. 2,3; Christian Council, 
1,3; Ring-turn Phi, 1,2,3; Troubadours, 3. 



• ANTHONY VALEN, Middletown. Ohio; AT; Soccer. 1; 
Forensic Union; Pi Alpha Nu; Cotillion Club. 



• JOHN ARTHUR VOEKEL. Dallas, Texas; BOH; Shenan- 
doah, 2, 3; Lacrosse Manager. 2, 3, 4. 



• JOHN MOTT WALBRIDGE. Toledo. Ohio: 2AE; Calyx, 1; 
Golf. 





Top Row: 



Bottom Row: 



• HARLEY DAVIS WARNER. Farmington, Michigan; *K^I'. 
Vice-President. 4. President. 4. 



• PAUL HAROLD WEINSTEIN, Washington. D.C.; Z1?T; 
BasebalL L2. 3.4; Football 1,2. 



• GEORGE BENSON WERTHAN. Palmerton, Pennsylvania. 

• ROBERT DALLAS WHITAKER. Tampa. Florida; KA. Vice- 
President, 4; Christian Council. 1.2,3,4; White Friars; Cotil- 
lion Club; Concert Guild, 3,4; Graham-Lee Society, 3,4; Phi 
Eta Sigma. 



• ROBERT NORFLEET WHITE, Memphis, Tennessee; K£; 
Grayson Scholarship; Hamilton Award, 2; Washington Literary 
Society. „ 



• MAHLON DRAKE WOODRING. Summit. New Jersey; Ben. 
Vice-President, 4; Lacrosse. 1.2.3; Christian Council. 1; Wrest- 
ling, 1. 



• DAVID ALAN WOUTERS. Maplewood, New Jersey; *En; 
R.O.T.C. Band. 1,2,3; BasebalL 2,3.4; White Friars. 



ISAAC LINDOW WHITE, Danville; *-i.O. 



FRANK J. GILLIAM 

Dean of Men 





the undergraduates 




officers 



Juniors 

Charles Drum President 

RuPE Chisholm Vice-President 

Mike Earp Secretary 

Butch Callaway Historian 

Dewey Oxner Executive Committeeman 

Sophomores 

John Arnold President 

Mike Chaney Vice-President 

Bob Hawkins Secretary 

Dick Crutchfield Historian 

Rob Peeples Executive Committeeman 

Freshman 
John Peale Executive Committeeman 



Left to right: Earp, Callaway, Drum, Oxner, Chis 
holm. 



Left to right: Chaney, Hawkins, Arnold, Crutch- 
field, Peeples. 






juniors 



ABOVE 
Top Row: 

• RL'DYARD CARL ABBOTT, Grand Rapids, Michigan; "f-K*. 

• FRANK RICHARD AHLGREN, JR., Memphis, Tennessee; HK*. 

• ARISTIDES CHRIST ALEVIZATOS, Baltimore, Maryland; Ben. 

Bottom Row: 

• LAWRENCE KENNETH ANTHONY. JR., Hartsville. South Carolii 



ARNOLD MICHAEL APPLEFELD, Baltin 
GEOFFREY TREVOR ARMBRISTER, Da 



re, Maryland; ZBT. 
en. Connecticut; --^. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• STUART WOODWARD ATKINSON, Warwick; *K*. 

• JOHN KARL AURELL, Washington, D.C.; AT 

• CARLOS THOMAS BAILEY. Washington, D.C.; ATA. 

• CHARLES RALPH BEALL. Martinshurg, West Virginia: ATA. 

• JASPER BENOIT BECKER, Brookhaven, Mississippi; SAE. 

• JOEL DAVID BENNETT, St. Joseph, Missouri; Ben. 

• BYRON BERMAN, Baltimore, Maryland; ZBT. 

Bottom Row: 

• SAM HAY BERRY, Fort Worth, Texas; <fA0 . 

• JAMES REYNOLDS BEST, Fort Lauderdale, Florida; ^X. 

• WILLIAM EDWARD BOGGIANO, JR., Long Island. New Y 

• VICTOR ROGER BOND. Elberton. Georgia; *K:;. 

• JIMMY DEEP BOWIE. Galax; I'K:''. 

• PHILIP HERMAN BRASFIELD. Woodville. Mississippi: K^. 

• JOHN MALCOLM BUCKEY. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania: *J"A. 





ABOVE 

Top Row: 

• RICHARD MASTEN BUDD, Jenkintown, Pennsylvania; *rA. 

• AUGUSTUS MOODY BURT, III, Greensboro, North Carolina. 

• WALTER WELDON BURTON, Princeton, West Virginia; Ben. 

• BRUCE EUGENE BUSSEN, St. Louis, Missouri; ITKA. 

• ROBERT GUY CALLAWAY, Westfield, New Jersey: Ben 

• LYNN MITCHELL CANE, Palisades Park, New Jersey: ZBT. 

• CLAY BRYAN CARR. JR., Winchester: ATA. 

Bottom Row: 

• SAMUEL BOOKER CARTER, Martinsville: KA. 

• RUPERT FITZALLEN CHISHOLM, JR.. Richmond: *KS. 

• ERNEST HOGE CLARKE, Louisville, Kentucky; i^X. 

• GLENN GRAY COLLINS, Lynchburg: nji*. 

• GILBERT DALE CORNELIUS, Charlotte, North Carolina: AT. 

• CHARLES PHILIP CRISTAL. Shaker Heights, Ohio: ZBT. 

• CALVIN HORACE CURRY, JR.. Quincy, Florida; Kl. 



BELOW 
Top Roll': 

• RALPH ALOYSIUS CUSICK, JR., Washington, D.C.; *Ae. 

• WILLIAM ANDREW RUSK DALTON, Jefferson City, Missouri; Ben. 

• CHARLES FAUST DAVIS, JR., New York, New York; <i>K2. 

• MARK BYRN DAVIS, JR., Louisville, Kentucky; niCA. 

• CHARLES OZORA DAWSON, II, Charleston, South Carolina; S.AE. 

• WILLIAM WALKER DIXON, Townsend: <i>Ae. 

• CHARLES EDWARD DOBBS, Charleston, West Virginia: -I>K*. 

Bottom Roiv: 

• BASIL DOERHOEFER, III, Louisville, Kentucky; HK*. 

• ELLIS BRANCH DREW, Anderson, South Carolina; KS. 

• CHARLES MONROE DRUM, Richmond; KA. 

• MICHAEL ROBERT DUBIN, Cedarhurst, New York; •f'En. 

• JOHN WILLIAM DUNCAN, Richmond. 

• ORSON KELLOGG EARP, JR., Memphis, Tennessee; lAE. 

• JOHN MITCHELL ELLIS, Leonia, New Jersey: ATA. 





#7iki 







juniors 



ABOVE 
Top Row: 

' JOHN STOKES FANGBONER, JR., Shake 

• RONALD WALTER FAST, Chandler, Ariz. 

• WILLLAM HUNTER FISHBACK, JR., Sav 



Heights, Ohio; BGH. 
na; ASA. 
nnah, Georgia; HK*. 



Bottom Row: 

• WILLIAM FITZGERALD, III, Towanda, Pennsylvania; HK*. 

• WAYNE WILKINS FOWLER. Moorestown, New Jersey; *KS. 

• JACQUES OLDER FRIEDMAN, Charleston, West Virginia; : 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• WILLIAM CALHOUN FRUE, JR., Asheville, North Carolina: - 

• DON EL.MER FRYBURGER, Cincinnati, Ohio; IIK.\. 

• ROBERT BRUCE GAPP, Meadville. Pennsylvania; KS. 

• CHARLES SHERMAN GAY, Halesite, New York: 1-V. 

• EDGAR GILMORE GIVHAN, Montevallo, Alabama; SAE. 

• ROBERT GORDON GOOCH, Fort Worth, Texas; -frie. 

• LEONARD CHARLES GREENEBAUM, Richmond; ZBT. 

Bottom Row: 

• ANDREW BURT GREENMAN, Hollywood, Florida; *En. 

• WTLLIA.M THOMAS MAURICE GRIGG, Bethesda. Maryland: 

• EDGAR LEVAN GROVE, Lancaster, Pennsylvania; *K*. 

• FRANK MILLER GUENTHER. Grosse Pointe, Michigan; 'tri. 

• RONALD LOUIS GUTBERLET, Ruxton, Maryland; SN. 

• RICHARD BARBEE GWATHMEY, Baltimore, Maryland; BGn. 

• JA.MES ERNEST HAMBLEN. Big Stone Gap; AT. 




46 




ABOVE 
Top Row: 

• VICTOR HERRICK HANSON, Yorklyn, Delaware; SX. 

• JAMES HARVEY HARVELL, Warwick: *K1'. 

• CHARLES DERWARD HAWKINS, JR., Madison: *K+. 

• DAVID SIMMONS HENDERSON, New Bern, North Carolii 

• WILLIAM ARMSTRONG HENLEY, Williamsburg; ATA. 

• HENRY JAMES HEYMANN, New Orleans, Louisiana; ZBT. 

• JAMES DICKIE HILL, Vandergiit, Pennsylvania; BOn. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• WILLIAM CLARK JACKSON, New York, New York; *rA. 

• PETER JACK JACOBS, New York, New York; *En. 

• JOHN KELLEY JENNINGS, Fayetteville, Tennessee; HK*. 

• JAMES CLAY JETER, Cliarleston, West Virginia; KX. 

• PAYSON DICKEY JOHNSON, Gibson Island, Maryland; ■I'Ae. 

• RICHARD MARVIN JOHNSTON, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; HK*. 

• REUBEN BANE JONES, Clilton Forge; <f>K*. 



Bottom Row: 

• JOHN HOLDER, Mount Kisco. New York; AT. 

• EDWARD MANT HOOD, Birmingham, Alabama; *Ae. 

• RICHARD MAYFIELD HORNADAY, Washington, D.C.; *rA. 

• LEONARD BRAINARD HOUGH, JR., CoUinsville, Connecticut; i: 

• WILLIAM HENRY HOUSTON, III, Tunica, Mississippi; 2;aE. 

• CHARLES BROOMELL HU.MPTON ,JR., Haverlord, Pennsylvania 

• JA-MES HOLMAN JACKSON. Gainesville. Georgia; nK.\. 



Bottom Row: 

- JOHN KENT KANE, II, St, Davids, Pennsylvania; f>K*. 

• CHARLES CARTER KANNAPELL, Louisville, Kentucky; ^-O. 

• SIDMON JOEL KAPLAN, Los Angeles, California; ZBT. 

• EMMETT ROBERTSON KELLEY, Richmond; *I'A. 

• PAUL HAROLD JENNISON KROGH. Washington. D.C.; B(-in. 

• THOMAS OMAR LAWSON, Fairfax; KS. 

• JAMES WHITTIER LEWIS, Irvington-On-Hudson, New York; . 






juniors 



ABOVE 
Top Row: 

• JOSEPH SEARS LOVERING, JR., Islip, Long Island, New York; *ie. 

• JAMES BROWN LUNGER, Covington; AT. 

• DONALD BRUCE MrARTHUR, Warren, Ohio; AT, 



Bottom Row: 

• ARTHUR WILLIAMSON McCAIN, JR., Memphis, 1 

• EDWARD DUNCAN McCARTHY, Orlando, Florida, 

• ALBERT MURRAY McCLAIN. Coral Gables. Florids 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• DONALD GEORGE McKABA, Brooklyn, New York; AT. 

• JESSE NEWMAN McLANE, JR., Pensacola, Florida; KA. 

• RICHARD GREGORY McNEER, Huntington, West Virginia; -AE. 

• JOHN ALEXANDER McQUIGGAN, Xenia, Ohio: *rA. 

• GILBERT RUSSELL McSPADDEN. JR., Memphis, Tennessee: ATA. 

• CHARLES ARCHIBALD MacINTOSH, Haverford, Pennsylvania; 2:x. 

• HUBERT HUNDLEY MARLOW, JR., Front Royal: nK.\. 

Bottom Row: 

• DETLOW MAINCH MARTHINSON, Washington, D.C.; 2;AE. 

• GARRY PEPPER MARTIN, Charleston, West Virginia; fK*. 

• JAMES WHITNEY MARVIN, JR., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Kl. 

• SANFORD ROBERT MASLANSKY, New Orleans, Louisiana; 2BT. 

• ALAN CRAIG MAXWELL, Washington, D.C.; SX. 

• GEORGE CHAMBERS MILLER, JR., Manhasset, Long Island, Ne 
York; SAE. 

• GEORGE FRED MILLIGAN. Des Moines, Iowa; 2;X. 




48 




ABOVE 




BELOW 


Top Row: 




Top Row: 


• ALAN RODERICK MIXSON, Windsor Locks, Connecticut 


nK<l>. 


• JOHN KING OAST, Portsmouth; KA. 


• PHILIP DEML'TH MONGER, Bay Village, Ohio: AT. 




• JAMES RICHARD O'CONNELL, Baltimore, Maryland; BOn 


• SCOTT LOUIS MOORE, JR.. Fort Lauderdale, Florida; IX 




• GEORGE DEWEY OXNER, Greenville, South Carolina; *Ae 


• JON MARVIN MORELAND, Galveston, Texas; ^X. 




• JAMES DALE PERRYMAN, Dallas, Texas; :s:X. 


• JACK ARNOLD MORGENSTERN, University Heights, Ohio 


; ZBT. 


• FRANK SMITH PITTMAN, III, Prattville, Alabama; ^AE. 


• HUGH WARNOCK MORRELL, Plainfield, New Jersey: 2: 


X. 


• JAMES LOVING PULLEN, Lexington. 


• FORREST LEE MOSES, JR., Danville: Kl. 




• WILLIAM EDWARD REID, JR., Scarsdale, New York; KS 



Bottom Row: 

• RUSSELL BORDLEY MYERS, Bethesda, Maryland; i:x. 

• WILLIAM MILLS NEAL. JR., Birmingham, Alabama; ^iX. 

• THOMAS BARBEE NEBLETT, JR., Patuxent, Maryland; ♦.PA. 

• HENRY FRANK NEVIN, Pasadena, California; SX. 

• LOUIS ANTON NOLL, Belleville, New Jersey; HK*. 

• WILLIAM CLARENCE NORMAN, JR., Crossett, Arkansas; KA. 

• WILLIAM BELLINGER NORTHROP. Alexandria; <i>A(-i. 



Bottom Row: 

• FRANK PRATT REXFORD, Baltimore, Maryland; HK*. 

• DONALD WILLIAM ROCKEL, Cincinnati, Ohio; HKA. 

• CLYDE DUDLEY RODGERS, JR., Little Rock, Arkansas; ^AE. 

• RICHARD ALAN ROSENBERG, Jacksonville, Florida; ZBT. 

• RAYMOND DUDLEY ROSS. Fort Thomas, Kentucky; ATA. 

• THOMAS DAVIS SALE, JR., Panama City, Florida; KA. 

• THOMAS APPEL SALSBURY, Mystic, Connecticut; -tK*. 





i^jt^ 




49 




jun 



lors 



ABOVE 
Top Row: 

• DAVID GIBBONS SIMPSON, Harrods Creek, Kentucky: 'HB, 

• RICHARD ALLEN SKOLNIK, L.iurelton, Long Island, New York; *En. 

• DAVID WAYNE SLINGERLAND, DeWitt, New York: *K*. 

• GEORGE IGNATIUS SMITH. JR., Frederick, Maryland; ATA. ^ 

• ROBERT NOEL SPENCE, Hagerstown, Maryland; ATA. 

• KINGSWOOD SPROTT, Lake Wales, Florida; S.\. 

• FREDERICK PFARR STAMP, JR., Wheeling, West Virginia; *«*. 

Bottom Row: 

• HUGH WADDELL STEPHENS, Aslieville, North Carolina; Ben. 

• ROBERT CLARK STIVERS, Mt. Sidney; AXA. 

• EDWIN HARRISON STONE, Baltimore, Maryland: ATA. 

• ROBERT EDWARD STROUD. Columbus, Ohio; HK*. 

• PATRICK DONNELLY SULLIVAN, Lorton; SX. 

• SA.MUEL AUGUSTUS SYME, JR., Chevy Chase, Maryland: WA. 

• CHARLES LAWRENCE TALBOTT, JR., Waynesboro; HKL^i. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• STEPHEN EARNED THOMAS, Washington. D.C.; SN. 

• DANIEL BUSH THOMPSON, Washington, D.C.; SAE. 

• WILLIAM SAMS TUNNER, Wiesbaden, Germany; Ben. 

• ANDREW BROCKMAN VARNER, JR., Lexington; Kl. 

• THOMAS MORRELL WADE, Louisville, Kentucky; AT. 

• LEE CUENY WALTZ, Hinsdale. Illinois: *rA. 

• DEDERICK CONRAD WARD, Baltimore, Maryland; HK*. 

• CHARLES CALDWELL WATSON, Winchester; HKA. 

Bottom Row: 

• FREDERICK DOUGLAS WEAVER, Macon, Georgia; KA. 

• FREDERICK WILLIAM WEBBER, Kirkwood, Missouri; 2N. 

• DAVID HEROLD WENTHE, St. Louis, Missouri; £X. 

• HEADLEY STAPLER WHITE, JR., Langhorne, Pennsylvania; ATA. 

• WILLIAM HAYES WILLIAMS. Roanoke; AT. 

• THOMAS ALEXANDER SYMINGTON WILSON, Birmingham, Ala 
bama: *Ae. 

• ROBERT STAPLES WOOD, Richmond; HK*. 

• WILLIAM RAY YAGER, Portsmouth; 2:X. 



it 





sophomores 

ABOVE 

Top Row: 

• WILLIAM HOWARD ABELOFF, Petersburg; ZBT. 

• JOSEPH MARTIN ALANIS, Denver, Colorado; i:X. 

• JOHN RAY ALFORD. Glasgow; W-i. 

• LUCIO GIUSEPPE ALIOTTI, Izmir, Turkey; HKA. 

• GEORGE MORRISON ALLEN, JR., Swarthmore, Pennsylvanii 

• JOSEPH ALBERT AMATO, Manhasset, New York; *Ki. 

• JACK LAWRENCE ARMSTRONG, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; 



Bottom Row: 

• JOHN FLOYD ARNOLD, Winchester; nKA. 

• LAWRENCE ATLIVAICK ATLER. Denver, Colorado. 

• ROBERT DENNIS BALLANTINE, Mendham, New Jersey; HK*. 

• ROBERT GREER BANNON, Garden City, New York; ^r. 

• RONALD HERMAN BARKSDALE, Plainsboro, New Jersey; HKA. 

• CARL FRANKLIN BARNES, JR., Crozet; *rA. 

• ROSS HAWTHORNE BAYARD, Waynesburg, Pennsylvania; AXA. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• RICHARD CASE BELDEN, West Hartford, Connecticut; SX. 

• SAM BENDHEIM, III, Richmond; ZBT. 

• STEPHEN BERG, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 'tEH. 

• JOEL HERBERT BERNSTEIN, Baltimore, Maryland; ■I'En. 

• RICHARD HENRY BERRY, Huntington, West Virginia; ATA. 

• MILTON HARWELL BEVIS, JR., Jacksonville, Florida; *Ae. 

• THOMAS ROBERT BLAIR, Blacksburg; KZ. 

Bottom Row: 

• ROBERT CHARLES BOERNSTEIN, Washington, D.C.; *KZ. 

• JOHN TEMPLE BOONE, JR., Hamden, Connecticut; 'tK*. 

• WILLIAM JOSEPH BOWERS, Washington, D.C.; *ri. 

• WILLIAM ALEXANDER GRAHAM BOYLE, St. George's, 
da; ATA. 

• STUART JOHNSTON BRACKEN, Rosemont, Pennsylvania; : 

• LENOX BROWN BUCHANAN, JR., Chicago, Illinois; ATA. 

• JOHN STUART BUDD, Jenkintown, Pennsylvania; fTA. 






sophomores 



ABOVE 
Top Row: 

• WILLIAM GOODYKOONTZ BURNS, Vandalia, Illinois; WA. 

• RICHARD PORTER BUTRICK, Montreal, Canada; WA. 

• BELDON BUTTERFIELD, Montevideo, Uruguay; ■I'ie. 

Bottom Roiv: 

• ROBERT ANDREW CAIRNS, New Britain, Connecticut; SN. 

• JOHN COLIN CAMPBELL, Independence; *Kr. 

• PHILIP RALPH CAMPBELL, Tulsa, Oklahoma; IX. 



BELOW 

Top Roiv: 

' DALE LeMASTER CARTER, Tulsa, Oklahoma; 2X. 

• MICHAEL EUGENE CHANEY, Southport, Connecticut; SN. 

• JOE CHARLES CHATMAN, Western Springs, Illinois; SX. 

• LAWRENCE BEARDEN CLARK. Birmingham, Alabama. 

• ROGER GRANVILLE CLARK, Kingston, Pennsylvania; *K*. 

• JAMES FRANKLIN CLAY, JR.. Danville, Kentucky; <!>Ae. 

• PAUL EDWARD CLAYTON. Norrkoping, Sweden; AT. 

Bottom Row: 

• LOUIS GEORGE CLOSE, JR., Baltimore, Maryland; Ben. 

• JACKSON ROSSE COLLINS, JR., Montclair, New Jersey; AXA. 

• OLIVER CARRINGTON CONGER, JR., Pottstown, Pennsylvania 

• ROBERT PERCY COOKE, III, Hernando, Mississippi; SiAE. 

• WILLARD CHARLES COPP, South Bend, Indiana; Ben. 

• JOHN MARSHALL COSBY, Richmond; iX. 

• JAMES RANDALL CREEL, New York, New York; SX. 




Ai^Li^ 



52 





aflH^ Ihh. riMi 




ABOVE 
Top Row: 

• WALTER CALKINS CREMIN, JR., Midland, Texas; .iTA. 

• RICHARD DALE CRUTCHFIELD, Charlotte, North Carolina; BGIT. 

• HAROLD GREIG CUMMINGS, JR., Washington, D.C.; Ben. 

• ROBERT JOSEPH CURRAN. Chester. Pennsylvania. 

• DANA CARLTON CURTIS, JR., Forrest City, Arkansas; SAE. 

• CHARLES LOCKWOOD DANA, Parkersburg, West Virginia; SAK. 

• JAMES BENJAMIN DAVIS, JR.. Louisville, Kentucky; AT. 

Bottom Row: 

• JAMES HARRISON DAVIS, Houston, Texas; ^AE. 

• JOHN GUERRANT DICKENSON, Danville; -JKI:. 

• JOSEPH CRAIG DICKSON, JR., Upper Montclair, New Jersey; t>rA. 

• CHARLES JACK DOBBS, Candlewood Isle. Connecticut; l.U:. 

• LLOYD ALLEN DOBYNS, JR., Newport News; KS. 

• JAN DRABEK, Jackson Heights, New York: i:-V. 

• SAMUEL CALVERT DUDLEY, Martinsville; KA. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• EARL PROVOST DUNHAM, JR., Moylan, Pennsylvania: AXA. 

• DAVID HICKLEY DUNTON, Merion, Pennsylvania; KS. 

• CLINTON McKELLAR EARLY, Memphis, Tennessee; HKA. 

• STEPHEN MAYER EHUDIN, Baltimore, Maryland; ZBT. 

• JOHN LAW ELLIOTT, Berlin, Germany; *rA. 

• STANLEY MARX ERDREICH, JR., Birmingham, Alabama; ZBT. 

• DONALD VINSON FARRISS, Huntington, West Virginia; SAE. 

Bottom Row: 

• HARVEY ENLOE FISHER, Franklin, Georgia; HKA. 

• GEORGE EDWARD FORKIN, DePere, Wisconsin; *K2:. 

• JOHN JOSEPH FOX, Bluefield, West Virginia; ATA. 

• GEORGE HOWARD FRALIN, JR., Williamson, West Virginia; A' 

• JOSEPH WARREN FRAZIER, Tampa, Florida; KA. 

• FREDERICK HAROLD FRIBERG, Union, New Jersey; AXA. 

• JOHN MICHAEL GARNER, Miami, Florida; :;X. 






sophomores 



ABOVE 

Top Row: 

• JOHN DAVID GARSON, Shaker Heights, Oh: 

• GEORGE SIDNEY GEE, JR., Humboldt, X 

• EDWARD DAVID GIBSON, Columbus, Georgia; SX. 

Bottom Row: 

• DANIEL LEO GIGER, McKeesport. Pennsylvania; i;X. 

• JOHN ALAN GOLD, Richmond; ZBT. 

• LEONARD EMANUEL GOODMAN, Baltimore. Maryla 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• WARREN HUDSON GOODWYN, Montgomery, Alabama; 2AE. 

• RICHARD CHARLES GOWER, Rumford, Rhode Island; "SAG. 

• WILLIAM MORDOCK GREENE, Birmingham, Alabama; SN. 

• DALE FRANKLIN GUY, Kansas City, Missouri; SX. 

• ROBERT KALIS HALPER, Scarsdale, New York; ZBT. 

• JAMES WILLIAM HANSCOM, Arlington; AT. 

• DONALD WILLIAM HARPER, Kensington, Maryland; ATA. 



Bottom Row: 

• LEWIS EVANS HARTMAN, JR., Lancaster, Pennsylvania; 

• TIMOTHY DEXTER HAVEN, Charleston, South Carolina; 

• ROBERT PRESTON HAWKINS, Clifton Forge; ■i'KS. 

• WILLIAM PRESTON HAYNES, Washington, D.C., *A0. 

• STEPHEN KIRKBY HENKEL, Mansfield, Ohio; -l-AG. 

• TRAFFORD HILL, JR., Richmond; *K2. 

• WALTER RICHARD HOLMQUIST, Kansas City, Missouri. 



*Ae. 
Ben. 




^i'MsM 





ABOVE 

Top Row: 

• BENJAMIN NEFF HOOVER, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

• ELISHA GERALD HOPKINS, Haddon6eld, New Jersey; Kl. 

• JOHN BURNSIDE HOWARD, Towson, Maryland: BOH. 

• HERBERT JACKSON HUMMERS, Elmont, New York; AT. 

• MORTON PARK ILER, Vincennes, Indiana. 

• WARNER ALBERT ISAACS, St. Louis, Missouri; ZBT. 

• LAWRENCE JOSEPH ISRAEL, New Orleans, Louisiana; ZBT. 

Bottom Row: 

• ROBERT JOSEPH JABER, Matoaka, West Virginia; AXA. 

• GEORGE PERCIVAL JACKSON, Kansas City, Missouri; ZA£. 

• ELLIOTT NATHAN JOFFE, Baltimore, Maryland; >l>En. 

• MICHAEL SMYTH JOHNSON, Englewood, New Jersey; HKA. 

• JOSEPH MERRICK JONES, New Orleans, Louisiana; BGII. 

• KENDALL CLARK JONES, Williamsburg; +K'I'. 

• FRANCIS TERRELL KALMBACH, Shreveport, Louisiana; SN. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• WILLIAM LEE KAUFFMAN, Lima, Pennsylvania; ATA. 

• FRANCIS EUGENE KEITH, Little Falls, New Jersey, HKA. 

• WILLIAM ROBERT KELTING, III, Lebanon, New Jersey; Ben. 

• THEODORE MORRIS KERR, Midland, Texas; ATA. 

• JOSEPH CARL KNAKAL, JR., Culpeper; AXA. 

• JAN CHARLES KOONTZ, Washington, Pennsylvania; 'i'K*. 

• PHILIPPE CHRISTIAN LABRO, Paris, France. 

Bottom Row: 

• GILBERT RUSSELL LADD, Mobile, Alabama; Ben. 

• EDWARD LUDINGTON LAIRD, Waverly, Iowa; *K1'. 

• ROBERT HARRIS LARGE, Farmville; "KK*. 

• RICHARD PETER LASKEY, Far Hills, New Jersey; *KS. 

• JAMES EDWIN LAW, Breton Woods, New Jersey; HKA. 

• CHARLES PETER LEININGER, Shaker Heights, Ohio; SN. 

• WILLIAM JACOB LEMON, Covington; KS. 




• ■ 





( 



4^47b 



sophomores 



ABOVE 
Top Roiv: 

• EDWARD DOUGLAS LINE, Bronxville, New York: AT. 

• THOMAS VERNON LITZENBURG, Baltimore, Maryland; BOn. 

• GEORGE MORGAN LUPTON, Lynchburg; HKA. 



Bottom Row: 

' DONALD STEVEN LURIA. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; *En, 

• JOHN WILLIAM McCALLUM, JR., Richmond; *KX. 

• JOHN EARLY McDONALD, JR., Petershurg; *K2. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• ALFRED JOSEPH MAGOLINE, Akron. Ohio: IN. 

• THOMAS SKILES MARKHAM, Louisville, Kentucky; <i>A0. 

• ARTHUR COMPTON MARKS, Canton, Ohio; AT. 

• JOHN DUNCAN MARSH, Purcellville; HK*. 

• EDWARD KILGORE MARTIN. Frankfort, Kentucky; HKA. 

• ALFRED JACKSON MASON, Accomac; *K2. 

• RICHARD JOSEPH MAUTER. Lynbrook, New York; AT. 

Bottom Row: 

• JAMES CLARKE MAYOZA, Cockrum, Mississippi; -AE. 

• ROBERT DAY MILLER, Charlottesville; *K*. 

• LOREN ALEXANDER MINTZ, Shaker Heights, Ohio: ZBT. 

• CHARLES EDWARD MOCHWART. Washington, D.C.; *Ae. 

• HENRY COKE MORGAN, JR., Norfolk: IN. 

• PHILIP SIDNEY MORGAN. Ill, Washington. D.C.: ATA. 

• GERALD IRVING MOYER. Kansas City, Kansas; ::X. 





ABOVE 

Top Row: 

• WILLIAM ALLEN MYERS, Hagerstown, Maryland; *Kr. 

• STEPHEN JAY NACHMAN, Portsmouth; ■I'En. 

• EDWARD HATCHER OULD, Roanoke; <t>KS. 

• HARRY PRESTON PATE, Joplin, Missouri; IX. 

• ROBERT INABNIT PEEPLES, Houston, Texas; ^-^T^. 

• SOLON ARMOUR PERSON. JR., Memphis, Tennessee: AT. 

• GEORGE JAY RHEY PHILLIPPE, Morton, Pennsylvania; ATA. 

Bottom Row: 

• HARRIS MERRILL PLAISTED, Cape Elizabeth, Maine; ::AE. 

• ALEXANDER BRADFORD PLATT, Riverside, Connecticut; <fiAe. 

• PETER CHARLES POPE, Hudson, Ohio. 

• GERALD MARTIN PORTNER, Shaker Heights, Ohio; ZBT. 

• SAMUEL HENRY PRESTON, III, Tazewell; HKA. 

• ROBERT ALAN PRITCHARD, Morrislown, New Jersey; +Ki;. 

• BRENTON ROYCROFT RABE, Shaker Heights, Ohio. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• RICHARD BRODNAX RAINES, Memphis, Tennessee; 2.4E. 

• GEORGE STAEHLE REINER, South Orange, New Jersey; nK-\. 

• JAY WILLIAM REWALT, Paget, Bermuda; :;X. 

• CHARLES BAIN RICHARDSON. Urbanna; Kl, 

• JAMES EDWIN ROANE. Jacksonville, Florida; riK*. 

• JEB JOHN ROSEBROOK, Charlottesville; AT. 

• DONALD STANDFORD ROSENFELD, Ladue, Missouri: ZBT. 

Bottom Row: 

• BERNARD JOHN SCHAAF, JR., South Bend, Indiana. 

• MORGAN SCHAFER, New Canaan, Connecticut; ATA. 

• JAMES HUNTER SEABROOK, Memphis, Tennessee; UKA. 

• NICHOLAS JOHN SEIBEL. St. Louis, Missouri; ::X. 

• MORGAN LUNSFORD SHELOR, Alexandria; HK*. 

• CHARLES LESTER SHERMAN. Birmingham, Alabama: <I'K*. 

• WILLIA.M OGDEN SHROPSHIRE. Mobile, Alabama; *rA. 






sophomores 



ABOVE 

Top Row: 

• FRANK BRITTLEBANK SIMPSON, III, Smithfield. 

• JOHN WILLIAM SINWELL, Baltimore, Maryland ; *K*. 

• ENSOR BARCLAY SMITH, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 



Bottom Row: 

• ISAAC NOYES SMITH, Charleston, West Virginia: -I'Ae. 

• JOHN MADDOX SMITH, Fort Smith, Arkansas; 'I'Ae. 

• JORDAN MARSHALL SMITH, Chevy Chase, Maryland; *rA. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• MARQUIS McELROY SMITH, JR., Greensburg, Pennsylvania; *Ae. 

• THOMAS RANDOLPH SMITH, Perrysburg, Ohio; 2AE. 

• PAUL RICHARD SPECKMAN, JR., Flint, Michigan. 

• KENNETH ALLEN STARLING, Troy, Alabama; HK*. 

• LEONARD PINCKNEY STEUART, II, Chevy Chase, Maryland; WA. 

• JAMES ROOSEVELT STOCKTON, JR., Jacksonville, Florida; *A0. 

• BARRY MORTON STORICK, Brooklyn, New York; ^EH. 

Bottom Row: 

• JEROME ALEXANDER SUSSKIND, Jackson, Michigan; AT. 

• OLIVER GOULD SWAN, JR., Swarthmore, Pennsylvania; ATA. 

• CHARLES MASON SWEZEY, Waynesboro; HKA. 

• HAROLD ALFRED TARRANT, JR.. Wilmington, Delaware. 

• GEORGE SINKS TATMAN, JR., Connersville, Indiana; >i>A0. 

• EDWARD RANDALL THOMPSON, JR., Galveston, Texas; AXA. 

• SAMUEL JAMES THOMPSON, JR., Rustburg; *rA. 





ABOVE 
Top Row: 

• WILLIAM BELL TIPPETTS. St. Petersburg, Florida. 

• ROBERT CLYDE TOLLE, Canton, Ohio; 2:X. 

• GEORGE BARTHOLOMEW TOWSON, Baltimore, Maryland; SAE. 

• HARRY THIIRMAN TULLY, Louisville, Kentucky; ■i'Ae. . 

• JOHN ALBERT TURNER, Maplewood, New Jersey; AT. 

• GORDON BURT TYLER, Tulsa, Oklahoma; KS. 

• GEORGE GOODWIN WALSH, JR., Shaker Heights, Ohio. 

Bottom Row: 

• ROBERT JAMES WALTERS, Millburn, New Jersey; *KS. 

• HENRIK WANSCHER. Copenhagen, Denmark. 

• JOHN HOOPER WATERS. Baltimore, Maryland: SX. 

• WALTER TH ACKER WEBER, Cleveland, Ohio; -tri. 

• HUDSON DUNLAP WEICHSEL, Dallas, Texas; Ben. 

• JOHN LEAVITT WELLFORD, Memphis, Tennessee; KA. 

• WARREN REED WELSH, Grosse He, Michigan; ATA. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• RICHARD CHARLES WHITEFORD, Baltimore, Maryland; ATA. 

• WARREN EDWIN WILCOX, Tampa, Florida; KA. 

• WILLIAM KELLY WILEMON, JR., Booneville, Mississippi; 'I'K*. 

Bottom Row: 

• MILTON WINAWER, Brooklyn, New York; ■i'En. 

• RADER WILLIAM WINGET, Port Washington, New York; KS. 







ir^^H^i^ 




freshmen 



ABOVE 
Top Row: 

• JERRY LEWIS ABRAMSON, Dallas, Texas; ZBT, 

• FREDERICK AMBROSE ADAMS, White Plains. New York. 

• OSBORNE SANDERS AIKEN, JR., Florence, South Carolina; 

Bottom Row: 

• WILLIAM MICHAEL AKERS, West Palm Beach, Florida; AIU. 

• THOMAS NORWOOD AKIN, Decatur, Georgia; <I>Ki:. 

• ARTHUR LEWIS ALLEN, Hampton; HKA. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• RICHARD GARDINER ANDERSON, Gambrills, Maryland; HK*. 

• BURKE PATTERSON ARMSTRONG, Rochester, New York; HK*. 

• ROBERT CLARK ATHERHOLT, JR., Lynchburg; ■i'KZ. 
' JOHN WESLEY ATWELL, JR., Hampton, HKA. 

• ROBERT FREDERICK BANKS, Montclair, New Jersey; RKA. 

• PETER BAYNE BARKER. Lynchburg; "I'K:;;. 

• WILLIAM BION BARNETT, Jacksonville, Florida; *.ie. 

Bottom Row: 

• RALPH WILLARD BAUCUM, JR., Shreveport, Louisiana; Ben. 

• ISAAC CROOM BEATTY, IV, Birmingham, Alabama; *K2. 

• IRWIN RALPH BERMAN, Baltimore, Maryland; ZBT. 

• ANTHONY BIJOU, Brewster, New York; AT. 

• JOHN CURTIS BINFORD, Dallas, Texas: B0n. 

• NEIL CARLTON BLAND, Houston, Texas; SAE. 

• BERL DOUGLAS BOLT, Dublin; WA. 





ABOVE 
Top Row: 



THOMAS BROUGHTON BRANCH, HI, Atlanta, Georgia; £X. 
THOMAS MILLARD BRANNON, San Antonio, Texas; B0n. 
HOWARD CLAYTON BRANTS, JR., Fort Wortli, Texas; l-Ae. 
KAJ MICHAEL BRENT, Montclair, New Jersey; <l>ri. 
RICHARD MERRILL BRICKMAN, Shaker Heights, Ohio; ZBT. 
DONALD ALFRED BRIDEN. Mountain Lakes, New Jersey; AXA. 

Bottom Row: 

JAMES MILLER BROWN, Caldwell, New Jersey; ^X. 

PHILLIP NEAL BROWN, Euclid, Ohio; Ben. 

ROBERT FOSTER BROWN, Ridgway, Pennsylvania; KS. 

HARRY EDGAR BRUNETT, Baltimore, Maryland ; ATA. 

HERBERT CLINE CALDWELL, South Sudbury, Massachusetts; *K1. 

JOHN HOWARD CANDLER, Atlanta, Georgia; <1>A0. 

IRVIN NORMAN CAPLAN, Baltimore, Maryland: ZBT. 



BELOW 

Top Row: 

• ROBERT WALLACE CARNEY, JR., West Newton, Massachusetts; ^AE. 

• BARTON FRENCH CARTER, Arlington; *rA. 

• MARION MAXWELL CASKIE, III, Arlington; AT. 

• WILLIAM CASPARI. Ill, Baltimore, Maryland; *AH. 

• CHARLES JOSHUA CELLA, St. Louis, Missouri; 2:N'. 

• KENNETH WILLIAM CHANDLER, Memphis, Tennessee; SAE. 

• ROBERT KAY CHANDLER, Central Aguirre, Puerto Rico; KS. 

Bottom Roiv: 

• LEIGHTON DUKE CHAPMAN, Pelham, New York; AT. 

• GEORGE ROLAND CHARLES, JR., Baltimore, Maryland; 1'K+. 

• WILLIAM PRESCOTT CHILDS, New Canaan, Connecticut; SX. 

• SHELDON CLARK, II, Wynnewood, Pennsylvania; SX. 

• MALCOLM ANGSTADT CLINGER, JR., Lewisburg, Pennsylvania; WA. 

• HARRY SLADE COCKEY, Baltimore, Maryland; i'KZ. 

• WILSON ROBERT CORBIN, Wethersfield, Connecticut; TIKA. 






freshmen 



ABOVE 
Top Row: 

• CHARLES PHILIP CORN, Macon, Georgia; *i0. 

• CALVIN ROBERT COUCH, Richmond Hill, New York; ATi. 

• DANIEL STALLMAN COX, Ceredo, West Virginia; AT. 



Bottom Row: 

• PAGE de RONDE CRANFORD, Betliesda, Maryland. 

• JOHN FOSTER CRANZ, Fort Worth, Texas. 

• CHARLES GANTZ CRAWFORD, Baltimore, Maryland; ATi. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• JAMES JAMISON CRAWFORD, JR., Strasburg; HKA. 

• ROBERT HOWARD CRAWFORD, Wakefield, Massachusetts; KS. 

• JOHN HANSON CROKER, JR., Ruxton, Maryland; BGH. 

• ALLEN BLANCHARD DAKIN. JR., Trenton, New Jersey. 

• CARLILE BENJAMIN DAVIS, Hampton; *K-I'. 

• LeROY GRAHAME DAVIS, Ridgewood, New Jersey; <i>rA. 

• RICHARD AKIN DAVIS, Arlington; *rA. 

Bottom Row: 

• DAVID MONROE DAWSON, Xenia, Ohio; 'trA. 

• ROBERT PHILIP De GRAAF, Glen Rock, New Jersey; HK*. 

• HOWARD RAYMOND DeMOTT, JR., Mamaroneck. New York; AXA. 

• WILLIAM ROWLAND DENMAN, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; *rA. 

• DAVID TODD DEWEY, Hockessin, Delaware; BGII. 

• RODGER PIRNIE DOYLE, Pensacola, Florida; BGH. 

• BURRELL THOMAS DRISCOLL, Brooklyn, New York; AT. 





mii^^jl 





A ^.H^lfiw ^HJH 




t^iMmM 



ABOVE 
Top Row: 

• JOHN THOMAS EARLEY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; KZ. 

• JEROME MICHAEL EPSTEIN, Plainfield, New Jersey; <I>En. 

• GILL COFER EVANS. Washington. D.C.; AT. 

• GLENN RICHERT FAHRENTHOLD. University Heights, Ohio; 

• HERMAN JOHN FENSTERM.'VCHER, Tamaqua, Pennsylvania; 

• STERLING STUART FLANAGAN, Roanoke; •*rA. 

• DOMINICK ANTHONY FLORA, Jersey City, New Jersey; AT. 

Bottom Row: 

• ROBERT CHARLES FONDA, Charleston, Mississippi; KA. 

• DONALD RICHARD FOWLER, Parkersburg, West Virginia; K 

• WILLIAM MERVIN FRANCE, Shaker Heights, Ohio; *-ie. 

• THOMAS CAMPEN FRIEDMAN, Shaker Heights, Ohio; ZBT. 

• THOMAS LINKESCH GATES, Washington, D.C.; iT. 

• EDWARD METCALF GEORGE, Wellsburg, West Virginia; KA. 

• JOHN SEARS GIBBS, Baltimore, Maryland; IX. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• ALLAN REINHOLD GITTER, Winston-Salem, North Carolina; AXA. 

• BARRY RICHARD GOLDSMITH, Cedarhurst, New York; *En. 

• BRADFORD GUSHING GOOCH, Worcester, Massachusetts; *K+. 

• WILLIAM RICHARD GOODMAN, Lexington. 

• JOHN ARNOLD GROOBEY. Norfolk; ATi. 

• JOHN GILKESON GUTHRIE, Washington. D.C.; KS. 

• CLAYBORNE BEATTIE GWYN, Marion; KA. 

Bottom Row: 

• EDWARD LEE HASENOUR, Louisville, Kentucky; SN. 

• SARGENT HEATH, III, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts; l-ri 

• FRED LEE HEINA, Louisville, Kentucky; ^'TA. 

• CHARLES MILTON HELZBERG, Kansas City, Missouri; ZBT, 

• EDWARD BLACKBURN HEMPSTEAD, JR., Washington, D.C. TTKA, 

• FREDERICK MARTIN HENSCHEL, Bethesda, Maryland; 'I'K::. 

• GEORGE CARROLL HERTZFELD, Toledo, Ohio; *ri. 




63 




freshmen 



ABOVE 

Top Row: 

• CABELL CARRINGTON HEYWARD, Memphis, Tenness,ee; K2: 

• EDWIN WORTH HIGGINS. JR., Richmond; <i>rA. 

• GEORGE DOUGHTY HIGGS, Milford, Connecticut; K2. 

• CHARLES DAVID HILDRETH, Covington, Kentucky. 

• CATON NELSON HILL, JR., Charleston, West Virginia; KS. 

• JEROME HILL, IV, Mayfield Heights, Ohio: KS. 

• DONALD LEE HOLCOMBE, Shreveport, Louisiana; Ben. 



BELOW 

Top Row: 

' JOHN CLOYD HUFFARD, Plandome, Long Island, New York; 

• CAMPBELL CUMMINGS HUTCHINSON, Shreveport, Louisian: 

• EUGENE WILLARD HYDE, JR., Kensington, Maryland; KS. 

• PAUL ALLAN IRONSIDE, Haddonfield, New Jersey; ATA. 

• WHITFIELD JACK, JR., Shreveport, Louisiana; SAE. 

• HOWARD ERNEST JACOBS, Freeport, New York; *En. 

• ARCHIE OLIVER JENKINS, Jacksonville, Florida; BGH. 



Bottom Row: 

• JOHN GILL HOLLAND, JR., Lynchhurg; J:AE. 

• VERNON WILSON HOLLEMAN, JR., Washington, D.C.: 

• JOHN CAMERON HOLLISTER, Charleston, West Virgii 

• FRANK MARSHALL HOOPES, JR., Wilmington, Delawa 

• FRANK ALFRED HOSS, JR., Manassas: ATA. 

• FARRIS PIERSON HOTCHKISS, Richmond; BGH. 

• PAXTON HOPE HOWARD. JR.. Midland. Texas: ::X. 



Bottom Row: 

• LEWIS GEORGE JOHN, Olean, New York; AT. 

• DAVID VOSS JOHNSON, JR., Memphis, Tennessee; HKA. 

• FREDERICK KENNEDY JOHNSON, Louisville, Kentucky; Ben. 

• AVERY BROOKS JUHRING, Ardsley-on-Hudson: New York. 

• BRUCE HARRISON KEELING, Louisville, Kentucky; ATA. 

• WILLIAM HENRY KEIDEL, III, Baltimore, Maryland; WA. 

• WESLEY LINTON KEITH, Winston-Salem, North Carolina; HK-I.. 








^mI^j 




ABOVE 

Top Row: 

• JOHN WILLIAM KENDIG, JR., Fairborn, Ohio; KS. 

• GEORGE HIDDLESTON KIM, Elizabeth, New Jersey; 

• THOMAS FITCH KING, JR., Jacl<sonville, Florida. 

• JOHN HUNTER KRAMER, St. Louis, Missouri; 2;X. 

• JAMES VINCENT KRESSLER, Brooklandville, Maryla 

• WILFRED MOHR KULLMAN, JR., Metairie, Louisiana 

• JOHN LYNCH LANCASTER, III, Dallas, Texas; Ben. 




id: nK<1'. 
ZBT. 



Bottom Row: 

• JOHN MONK LARSON, Washington, D.C.; Ben. 

• WILLIAM PHILIP LAUGHLIN, Wheeling, West Virginia: HKA. 

• HENRY FRANCIES LeBRUN, JR., Lutherville, Maryland; ATJ. 

• RICHARD HARDING LEEP, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; fK*. 

• DANIEL BOONE LEONARD, Darien, Connecticut; *K*. 

• AINSLEY JACKSON LESTER, III, Martinsville: K.A. 

• EARL JAMES LEWIS, Baltimore. Maryland: ATA. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• JOSEPH STUART LEWIS, Oak Hill, West Virginia: ^K>^. 

• JAMES EDWARD LIPSCOMB, III, Greenville, South Carolin 

• ROBERT BARRY LURATE, East Orange, New Jersey: nK.A. 

• JOSEPH LAWRENCE LYLE, Virginia Beach; *K2. 

• WILLIAM WILLIS LYNN, III, Lynchburg; KS. 

• GEORGE SAGE LYONS, Mobile, Alabama; ■J'Ae. 

• SAMUEL ADAMS McCAIN, New York, New York; 'I'K::. 

Bottom Row: 

• CHARLES LUCAS McCORMICK. Ill, Halifax; "S-Kl. 

• EDWARD AUGUSTUS McCORMICK, Baltimore, Maryland; 

• TERENCE TAYLOR McGREEVY, Toledo, Ohio; 2:a. 

• GARY DAN McPHERSON, Cass. West Virginia; "I'KI'. 

• ANDREW WOLFE McTHENIA, JR., Alderson, West Virginia 

• EDGAR HAROLD MacKINLAY, McConnellsburg, Pennsylvani 

• CALDWELL PATTON MANLEY, Palm Beach, Florida; AXA. 



ATA. 

,. Ben. 





iiii^iii4ili 



freshmen 

ABOVE 
Top Row: 

• EDMUND THOMAS MANLEY. JR.. Longmeadow, Massachusetts; A.\A. 

• TOMMY WAYNE MARTIN. Baltimore, Maryland: -frK*. 

• EDW IN MICHAEL MASINTER. Roanoke: •I'En. 

• JOSEPH A\ ERY MAYFIELD, Wichita Falls, Texas; AXA. 

• CHARLES PARKHILL MAYS, Monticello, Florida; KA. 

• ALLAN JOHN MEAD, Baltimore, Maryland; E.AE. 

• ISAAC MELSON MEEKINS, Asheville, North Carolina. 

Bottom Row: 

• GEORGE MERCKE, Louisville, Kentucky; BGH. 

• RUSSELL JACOB MICKLER, Jacksonville, Florida; ATA. 

• CHARLES PAUL MIDGLEY, Bennettsville, South Carolina: XAE. 

• CHARLES HENRY MILLER, JR., Wheeling, West Virginia; *K*. 

• DONALD ANTHONY MILLER, Webster Groves, Missouri; SN. 

• WILLIAM CHARLES MILLER, Jacksonville, Florida; Kl. 

• SAMUEL EDWARD MONROE, Pelham Manor, New York, SX. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• PETER TERRILL MONTGOMERY. Garden City. N 

• JAMES MADISON MORTON. Westport Point, Mass 

• HARRY MOSES. Neiv York. New York; *En. 

• FRANK EDWIN MOWER. Charleston, West Virgini; 

• JOHN PETER .MOYER, Youngstown, Ohio; ZBT. 

• KEVIN EUGENE MOYLES, Brooklyn, New York 

• HOUSTON COTTON MUNSON, San Antonio, Te: 



w York; ATA. 
chuselts; IIK*. 



Ben. 

s; *rA. 



Bottom Row: 

• WELLES MURPHEY, JR.. New Canaan. Connecticut; :;N. 

• JOHN MARFIELD NASH, Wayzata. Minnesota: *K*. 

• ROBERT LYLE NEUNREITER, Glendale, Missouri: ■f'TA. 

• FREDERICK HARRY NEWTON, Stamford, Connecticut: AT. 

• DAVID MONROE NICHOLS, Baltimore, Maryland: ATA. 

• DAVID GREGG NOBLE, Baltimore, Maryland; Ben. 

• ARTHUR CARLTON NODINE, Port Washington, New York: AT. 





ABOVE 

Top Row: 

• BENJAMIN LAILNOEL, Lewistown, Montana; SX. 

• EDWARD WARREN NOEL, Hinsdale, Illinois; Kl. 

• CHARLES ELMER NOLTE, III, Baltimore, Maryland; HK*. 

• WARREN NUESSLE, Chevy Chase, Maryland; •i'K::. 

• THOMAS PATRICK O'BRIEN, IV, Wheeling, West Virginia; 

• DAVID ALLEN OWEN, Toledo, Ohio; BGn. 

• FRANK PAYNE, II, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; *K*. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• ROBERT ARTHUR PHELON, Wethersfield, Connecticut; 

• ROSS GARY PICKUS, Stratford, Connecticut; ZBT. 

• ORTHELLO BROOKS POLLOCK, JR., Richmond; KS. 

• LeROY ALGERNON POOLE, Washington, D.C. 

• HARRY LEE PRESSLEY, Coral Gables, Florida; <l'rA. 

• NORMAN PHILLIP PROULX, St. Petersburg, Florida; HI 

• DICK JAMES RALPH. Fort Worth Texas; SX. 



Bottom Row: 

- WILLIAM SAMUEL PEACHY, Williamsburg; *K*. 

• JOHN STAFFORD PEALE, New York, New York; <1'K1'. 

• ROBERT CLARENCE PEARSON, Louisville, Kentucky: HKA. 

• PROSPER WHITNEY PEDEN, Los Angeles, California; ATA. 

• EDMUND STEELE PENDLETON, Cambridge, Maryland; <I'K+, 

• CHARLES SHERMAN PERRY, Newark, Delaware: iN. 

• PETER WILLIAM PERRY, Ladue, Missouri, IX. 



Bottom Row: 

• FREDERICK JEFFRESS RAMSAY, Baltimore, Maryland: nK1>. 

• ROBERT GEORGE RAPPEL, Worcester, Massachusetts; ITK<I>. 

• WILLIAM JOHNSTON RICE, Ruxton, Maryland; BGn. 

• THEODORE GOTTLIEB RICH, JR., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 

• RICHARD SUTTON RIDENOUR, Baltimore, Maryland; 2:X. 

• JOSEPH MILLS RIPLEY, JR., Jacksonville, Florida, AXA. 

• WILLIAM ARCHIBALD ROBERTS, Eufaula, Alabama; :i:AE. 










freshmen 

ABOVE 
Top Row: 

• ARTHUR BREWSTER ROCKE, Rye, New York; AT. 

• LAMAR DOUGLAS ROY, Louisville, Kentucky; KA. 

• KENT ALBRITTON RUSSELL, New Orleans, Louisiana; ::aE. 

• WILLIAM SCOTT RUSSELL, JR., Roanoke; *Ki:. 

• JAMES KENNETH SADLER, New Orleans, Louisiana; SAE. 

• RUFUS LASHER SAFFORD, Wyoming, Ohio; SX. 

• IRA HERBERT SAMELSON, JR., Memphis, Tennessee; ZBT. 

Bottom Row: 

• MICHAEL ALBAN SANDERSON, Tacoma, Washington; AT. 

• ARTHUR BURGESS SEEGER, JR., Glenside. Pennsylvania; *K-I'. 

• BALFORD FRANK SHULICK, Ceredo, West Virginia; AT. 

• CHARLES HORTON SMITH, HI, New Orleans, Louisiana; Ben. 

• CLIFFORD EDWIN SMITH, Frankfort, Kentucky; KA. 

• ROBERT LAWRENCE SMITH, Richmond; 1>KZ. 

• MARK ELLIOT SMULSON, Baltimore, Maryland; ZBT. 



BELOW 
Top Roiv: 

• WILMER LATIMER SNOWDON. JR.. Wilmington, Delawa 

• CHARLES ROBERT SPENCER. JR.. Lynchburg: HKA. 

• MATTHEW FLOYD SPRAGUE. JR.. Rye, New York: ::>". 

• HUGH BELLSPROUL. Staunton: <I'rA. 

• HARRY GILES STECHER. Wilmington, Delaware: AT. 

• JOHN ROBERT CHILTON STEPHENS. JR.. Wicomico Chi 

• ALBERT STEVES. IV. San Antonio. Texas: KA. 

Bottom Roiv: 

• JAMES ROBERT STONE. Lawrenceburg. Tennessee: lAE. 

• STEPHEN PENLEY STOUT. Los Angeles. California: 'I'Ki: 

• GERALD SUSSMAN, New Rochelle, New York: *Kn. 

• FREDERICK HAMILTON TARR. III. Rockport. Massachui 

• GEORGE SPROWLS THOMPSON, Marion: KA. 

• KENNETH HELMER THYGESEN, Cossayuna. New York: 

• WALLACE NEWTON TIFFANY, JR., Warrenton: nKA. 




68 




ABOVE 
Top Row: 

• CHARLES EDWARD TOOMEY, Elkridge, Maryland; *KS. 

• WILLIAM ALBERT TOWLER, III, Halifax; ATA. 

• JOHN LAYTON TUCKER, Allendale, New Jersey; 2AE. 

• PHILIP WILLIAMS TURNER, Washington, D.C. 

• JAMES WALTER VAN CLEAVE, Western Springs, Illinois: 

• LAWRENCE KING WAGNER. Baltimore, Maryland; 2:X. 

• EDGAR ALBERT WALLACE, Louisville, Kentucky; HK*. 



BELOW 
Top Row: 

• JAMES ALEXANDER WELHAM, JR., Merchantville, New Jersey; KS. 

• LEWIS POPE WEXLER. Johnson City, Tennessee; KX. 

• SIDNEY SCOTT WHIPPLE, West Hartford, Connecticut; SX. 

• HAL CUMMINGS WHITAKER, Baltimore, Maryland; 2;AE. 

• ALLEN HARRY WHITE, Summit, New Jersey. 

• GARDINER WESTON WHITE, South Dartmouth, Massachusetts; *K<I'. 

• JAMES LINWOOD WHITLOCK, Farmville. 



Bottom Row: 

• GEORGE PAINTER WALTERS, III, West Hempstead, New York; AXA. 

• WARREN DANIEL WARD, Upper Montclair, New Jersey: *I"A. 

• ARTHUR SAYE WARNER, Washington, D.C; AXA. 

• KURT REINHOLD WATERVAL, Alexandria. 

• WATSON GLENN WATRING. Beverly, West Virginia; SX. 

• PHILIP HENRY WEEKS, Jr., Sea Cliff, New York; i-KS. 

• BENJAMIN ALEXANDER WEIMER, JR., Chagrin Falls, Ohio; 'I'K::. 



Bottom Row: 

• RICHARD EGGLESTON WILBOURN, II, Meridian, Mississippi; 

• WILLIAM IRVINE WINCHESTER, Bardstown, Kentucky. 

• WILLIAM HENRY WINSTEAD, III, WaldorL Maryland; UK*. 

• WILLIAM BELL WISDOM, JR., New Orleans, Louisiana; Ben. 

• WALLACE VAN WITMER, JR., Memphis, Tennessee; 2;AE. 

• GEORGE EVERETT WOOD, North Haven. Connecticut; Ben. 

• KINGSLEY WOOD, Scarsdale, New York: *K+. 

• MADISON BROWN WRIGHT, JR.. Beaumont, Texas. 




iL /:/ 



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t h e 
features 



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^ 



M^ .ci^j, 




mr. groucho marx 

selects the 
c a 1 yx beauties 



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Jio .sMa^" 






l6, T-95^ 






,^ regard ^^"^^^ v^'^^'^.Z. 
nappy ^° Sincerely. 



the ivinner 




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t (Jenwit (ojimwr \Qoikge 



^x^iZ>?<^^ 



Miss Catherine Meacham 

Siveel Briar College 



runners up 










■13-. 



Miss Dede Crater 

Sweet Briar College 






Miss Ann Chapman 

Troy. Alabama 









TJu- whisth /»/c:'s 
tin iul race hci^m' 



nth a Freshman jor the prize 



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Now u'hal\ lh,n u'^nut Uyhumnm ',:^'^';.^: 



\ 






% Unsuspecting Freshmen 







Chan man Hamilton looks askmice 






V« v« 



iiw^/j J-V'ec'/f tt)«i so Lirine. the ho\i 



7me unassimilated Freshmen 





We're agreed— on an amateur basis 




Col. Jones and S/ajj nuiiit jxitivnti', , L)t";,iiii.i lln ,'!thi<-\ oi nnhtausm hiwi -dicdd) hdm piorrn to llir xinilli ol Ana-ii' 





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————— ^^^ . — -■ n m^^^^^^amm^^^^^^^mmmmmmmmmt mw n>,a. 




Preparing for a Wahoo week 



/'f- 





the 
activities 



executive 
committee 



FmsT Row: Peeples, Stump, Fishburn, Recder, Gabler. Second Row: Dols 
Ellis Simkins P,.:il... 



Robbins. Standing: Oxner, 




OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 





Watty Bowes President 

Bill Dols Vice-President 

Tom Robbins Secretary 

Ed Ellis Dewey Oxner Jim Reeder 

Bob Fishburn John Peale Roy Simkins 

Jim Gabler Rob Peeples John Stump 

The Executive Committee is a representative group made up of the Presi- 
dent, Vice-President, and Secretary of the student body and an elected mem- 
ber from each of the classes in the academic and law schools and from the 
Publications Board. As the main agency of student self-government, it ex- 
ercises control and supei-vision over all campus activities, its most important 
function jjeing the interpretation of the Washington and Lee Honor System. 



WATTY BOWES 
President 



publications 
board 




Frank Giddon President 

Bill Dols Vice-President 

Sandy Maslansky Secretary 

Bob Fishburn Executive Committeeman 

Bill Dols Calyx 

Sandy Maslansky Calyx 

Dave Clinger Ring-turn Phi 

Sam Syme Ring-turn Phi 

Marv Moreland Ring-turn Phi 

Mike Clark Southern Collegian 

Buzz Hanson Southern Collegian 

Dr. Borden Faculty Member 

Mr. Cook Alumni Member 

Mr. Rayder Treasurer 

89 



OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 




EDITORIAL STAFF 

Murray McClain Managing Editor 

Dana Curtis Activities Editor 

Russell Ladd Class Co-Editor 

Rob Peeples Class Co-Editor 

Buck Buchanan Fraternity Co-Editor 

John McDonald Fraternity Co-Editor 

Fred Macoline Sports Co-Editor 

Henry Morgan Sports Co-Editor 

Henry Heymann Features Co-Editor 

Frank Giddon Features Co-Editor 

Greg Cummings Special Features Editor 



the c a 1 y 



La.hl. Curtis. MrCIain. 




Lkft to right: M 




of nineteen fifty-five 



Left to right: Earp, Mover. Witmer. Duntnn. Portner. Atle 



Left TO rh.iu : ll.l/.bint:. Isaacs. Halper. Bi-ndheim. Plaisted, Kullman. Abr 




BUSINESS STAFF 

Mike Earp Assistant Business Manager 

Bob Halper Office Manager 

Dick Brickman Assistant Office Manager 

Sid Kaplan Town Ad Manager 

Jerry Portner Out of Town Ad Manager 

Merrill Plaisted Activities Manager 

Dave Dunton Activities Manager 

Phil Cristal Business Staff 

Jim Lipscomb Business Staff 

Wallace Witmer Business Staff 

Bill Barnett Business Staff 

John Moyer Business Staff 



SANDY MASLANSKY 

Business MnnagPT 





ring-tum phi 



DAVE CLINGKR and SAM SYME 
Co-Editors 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Tuesday Edition 

SAM SYME Editor 

BILL WILLIAMS Managing Editor 

JERRY HOPKINS News Editor 

DAVE RICE Sports Editor 

BILL FISHBACK Copy Editor 

TOM LITZENBURG Copy Editor 

RAY SMITH Editorial Advisor 

JIM THOMPSON Assistant Editor 



Friday Edition 

DAVE CLINGER Editor 

ANDY GREENMAN Managing Editor 

FRED TARRANT News Editor 

BILL NORTHROP Sports Editor 

NED GROVE Sports Editor 

JOHN JENNINGS Copy Editor 

BOB INGHAM Copy Editor 

BILL GRIGG Assistant Editor 



Left to right: G 



IS 161718 1920 
222324- »27 
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n, Grigg, Ingha 




Jennings. Pe 




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■.-^^««>^:-,. 



in nineteen fifty-five 



Left to right : Early. Campbell, Null, Ruy. 



Left t.. ri-ht: Pn.uU, C.ld-milli. Cre,-I. 




BUSINESS STAFF 

MARV MORELAND Business Manager 

PHIL CAMPBELL Advertising Manager 

CLINT EARLY Advertising Manager 

FRED FRIBERG Circulation Manager 

DOUG ROY Circulation Manager 

LOU NOLL Office Manager 

BARRY GOLDSMITH Business Staff 

RANDY CREEL Business Staff 

NORM PROULX Business Staff 



MARV MORELAND 

Business Mnnneer 





southern collegian 



Campus Humor Magazine 



BUZZ HANSON and SELDEN CLARK 




Stamp. Ca 



Jcnes. Jacobs. Kalinbarh. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



BUSINESS STAFF 



Selden Clark Editor 

Trev Armbrister Managing Editor 

Clay Carr Associate Editor 

Fred Easter Associate Editor 

John Howard Art Editor 

Gerry Portner Copy Editor 

Ken Abernathy Copy Editor 

Frank Giddon Consulting Editor 

George Millican Exchange Editor 

Arthur Marks Contributor 

Cecil Edmunds Contributor 

Pete Cook Contributor 

Buzz Hanson Business Manager 

Lynn Cane Advertising Manager 

Bane Jones Circulation Manager 

Fred Stamp Publicity Manager 

Pete Jacobs Office Manager 

John Buckey Subscription Manager 

94 



henandoah 



Quarterly Literary Review 




ED HOOD and JERRY HOPKINS 




, (,ulp, Stackhou 



Ed Hood Editor 

Frank Giddon Assistant Editor 

Jack Stackhouse Editorial Staff 

Bill Williams Editorial Staff 

Charles Gulp Editorial Staff 

Bill Wilson Editorial Staff 

Marshall Fishwick Faculty Advisor 

James Farrar Faculty Advisor 

Marvin Perry Faculty Advisor 

Jerry Hopkins Business Manager 

Bruce Gapp Business Staff 

Cal Conger Business Staff 

Lou Noll Business Staff 

Bill Boggiano Business Staff 

Dale Cornelius Business Staff 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



BUSINESS STAFF 



95 



la w^ 
review 



Seated: Anderson, PoS, Kay, Bailey. Smedlev. Second Row: Broudy, Mandak, Wilson, Ellis, Draper, Castle. 
Third Row:.,Chumbley, Herndon, Kurapka, Stephenson, Cogar. 




John Kay Editor: First Semester Bill Bailey Assistant Editor 

EDITORIAL STAFF Bill Poff Editor: Second Semester Jim Kurapka Business Manager 

Marv Anderson' 4ssistant Editor Dr. Smedley Faculty Editor 



CONTRIBUTORS 



Dick Broudy 


Bill Draper 


Nick Mandak 


Joe Chumbley 


Ed Ellis 


Bill Smith 


Gray Castle 


Milton Herndon 


Bev Stephenson 


Bill Cogar 


Dick Hill 
96 


George Wilson 



phi beta 
kappa 



National Honorary Scholastic Fraternity 

First Row: Smith, Bowes, Hamric, White, Stackhouse, Herndon, Nowlin, Bartsch, Fee, Poff, Bailey, Wilson, 

Drum. Second Row: Bean, Bradley, Leyburn, Gaines, Gilreath, Moger, Pusey, Fishwick, Barritt, Smedley, 

Dickey, Phillips. Third Row: Desha, Morton, Stevens, Barrett, Stow, Perry, Ritz. 




Allen W. Moger President 

William W. Pusey Vice-President 

EsMARCH S. Gilreath Secretary 

G. M. Brooke. Jr. S. Moore J. M. Peyton 

L. L. Campbell M. W. Paxton C. C. Tutwiler 

G. H. Denny M. W. Paxton, Jr. H. Waddell 
C. E. Kilboume 

L. L. Barrett F. P. Gaines M. B. Perry, Jr. 

C. W. Barritt G. D. Hancock M. O. Phillips 

W. G. Bean E. H. Howard 0. W. Reigel 

R. F. Bradley J. L. Howe W. J. Ritz 

O. Crenshaw W. A. Jenks T. A. Smedley 

L. J. Desha R. N. Latture L. W. Smith 

R. W. Dickey J. G. Leyburn B. S. Stephenson 

M. M. Fishwick C. P. Light K. P. Stevens 

F. Flournoy W. W. Morton M. H. Stow 

G. H. Foster F. A. Parsons F. P. Welch 

W. M. Bailey L. D. Hamric R. D. Smith, Jr. 

W. H. Bartsch R. C. Herndon J. W. Stackhouse 

W. A. Bowes, Jr. J. F. Kay R. D. Whitaker 

W. R. Cogar C. H. Nowlin R. N. White 

C. M. Drum W. B. Poff G. S. Wilson, HI 
G. W. Fee 



OFFICERS 



FRATRES IN URBE 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



FRATRES IN 
UNIVERSITATE 



97 



omicron delta 
kappa 



National Honorary Leadership Fraternity 




Beau Redmond President 

OFFICERS Marvin Anderson Vice-President 

Gray Castle Secretary 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



W. M. Bailey 
W. A. Bowes 
D. M. dinger 
W. R. Cogar 
F. R. Daiigette 
W. L. Dols 



E. B. Drew 

F. K. Easter 

R. N. Fishburn 
H. S. Glickstein 
L. D. Hamric 



J. F. Kay 
W. L. Osborne 
F. M. P. Pearse 
J. A. Reeder 
R. D. Smith 
S. A. Syme 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



L. W. Adams 
L. J. Desha 
R. W. Dickey 
M. W. Fishwick 
F. Flournoy 

E. P. Gaines 

F. J. Gilliam 
E. C. Griffith 
J. L. Howe 



M. W. Junkin 
R. N. Latture 
C. H. Lauck 
J. G. Leyburn 
C. R. Light 
W. T. McCann 
E. S. Mattingly 
A. W. Moger 



M. B. Perry 
W. W. Pusey 
0. W. Riegel 
T. A. Smedley 
R. A. Smith 
C. R. Thomas 
E. P. Twombly 
C. E. Williams 
H. K. Young 



98 



National Honorary Commerce Fraternity 



beta gamma 
sigma 



First Row: Daugette, Hamric, Mann, Stackhouse, Stober. Second Row: Griffith, Johnson, Ragan, Howard. 
Third Row: Adams, Holder, Phillips, Lature. 




^abaAuOUMa 



Allen Edgar Ragan President 

Lewis Kerr Johnson Secretary 



OFFICERS 



Lewis Whitaker Adams Brantson Beeson Holder Rupert Nelson Latture 



Edwin Claybrook Griffith Edwin Henry Howard Merton Ogden Phillips 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



Glover Dunn Hancock Lewis Kerr Johnson 



Allen Edgar Ragan 



William Melville Bailey Lowell Dow Hamric John Wade Stackhouse 

Forney Rutledge Daugette Robert Hood Mann William John Stober 

99 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



phi eta 
sigma 



National Honorary Freshman Scholastic Fraternity 



Seated: Drum, Gilliam. Daugette. Gooch. Ladd, Shelnr. Standinc: Norman, .\pplefeld. Belden. Carr, Schaaf, 
Stroud, Givhan, Arnold. 




OFFICERS 



Forney Daugette President 

Gordon Gooch Vice-President 

Russell Ladd Secretary 

Ed Givhan Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Arnie Applefeld 
John Arnold 
Dick Belden 
Dick Berry 
Watty Bowes 
Clay Carr 
Dale Cornelius 
Sam Davidson 



Charley Drum 
Don Fryburger 
Lowell Hamric 
Dick Holmquist 
Nick Mandak 
Phil Monger 
Bill Norman 
Charles Nowlin 
Frank Pittman 



Bernie Schaaf 
Morgan Shelor 
Ray Smith 
Bob Stroud 
Fred Tarrant 
Bob Whitaker 
George Wilson 
Andy Varner 



100 



cominerce 
fraternity 



First Row: Greenebaum, Berlinghof, Daugette, Abernathy, Mann, Applefeld, Norman. Second Row: Hamric 
McCIain, Patterson, Somerville, Atwood, Levitan, Milligan, Burton, Henley, Moreland. 




Ken Abernathy President 

Forney Daugette Vice-President 

Dave Berlinghof Secretary OFFICERS 

Bob Mann Treasurer 

Arch Roberts Sergeant-at-Arms 



Arnie Applefeld 
Walter Burton 
Dale Cornelius 
Don Fryburger 
Curly Greenebaum 
Hal Hamilton 



Lowell Hamric 
Bill Henley 
John Huddle 
Bane Jones 
Murray McClain 
George Milligan 
Marv Moreland 



Bill Norman 
Pat Patterson 
Joe Pontius 
Jim Reeder 
Buddy Somerville 
Fred Webber 



MEMBERS 



101 



alpha epsilon 



delta 



National Honorary Pre-Medical Fraternity 



Seated: Ritchie. Deacnn. Meadors, Alexander, Givhan, Stevens. Standing: Dubin, Starling. White, Tunner, 
^•Bones'\ McKaba, Pittman, Dobbs, Bank, Gilreath. 




Marvin Meadors President 

OFFICERS ^^ Givhan Vice-President 

Doug Ritchie Treasurer 

Chris Alexander Charley Dobbs Tom Robbins 

Dick Bank Mike Dubin Bill Tunner 

MEMBERS 

Jim Deacon Don McKaba Lee White 

Frank Pittman 

HONORARY MEMBERS Dr. Desha Dr. Gilreath Dr. Starling 

102 



National Honorary Society in Psychology 



Seated: Flick, Stutzmann, Benham, Bank, Abou-El-Haj. Standing: Berman, Rice. Holder, Lunger. Cobba 
Morgenstern, Bing, Hinton. 



psi 
chi 




Fred Benh.wi President 

RiFAAT Abou-El-Haj Vice-President OFFICERS 

Rudy Stutzmann Secretary 



Dick Bank 
Byron Berman 
Oscar Bing 
Dick Cobban 



John Holder 
Mel Humphries 
Jim Lunger 
Jack Morgenstern 
Jerry Murphy 



Dave Rice 

Burke Steele 

Dr. Walter A. Flick 

Dr. William M. Hinton 



MEMBERS 



103 



Sigma 
delta chi 



National Honorary Journalism Fraternity 



Kneeling: Cullers, Cope, dinger, Martin. Second Row: Grove, Skolnik, Ingham, Grigg, Greenman, Syme. 
Third Row: PuUen, Luhnow, Jennings, Lytton, Fishback. 







Dave Clinger President 

Lew Cope Vice-President 

OFFICERS Bob Cullers Secretary 

Roy Martin Treasurer 

Paxton Davis Faculty Advisor 



MEMBERS 



Tom Alexander 
Bill Boggiano 
Bill Fishback 
Andy Greenman 
Bill Grigg 



Ned Grove 
Charles Hawkins 
John Hughes 
Bob Ingham 
John Jennings 
Chris Luhnow 
104 



John Lytton 
Jim Ferryman 
Jim Pullen 
Dick Skolnick 

Sam Syme 



c h r i s t i an 
council 




Joe Gardiner President 

Monte Pearse Vice-President 

Mark Davis Secretary 

Dick Rosenberg Treasurer 

Bob Whitaker Chairman of General Programs 

Bob Miller Chairman of Church Relations 

Frank Gibson Chairman of Community Program 

Charles Drum Chairman of University Religious Program 

Clay Carr Chairman of Publicity 

Dr. David Sprunt Director of Religious Activities 



EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE 



Mike Clark 
Cal Conger 
Bill Craig 
Dick Crutchfield 



Andy Dalton 
Ellis Drew 
Bob Mann 
Alex Piatt 
Gerry Portner 
105 



Charlie Richardson 
Jim Roane 
Bob Whitaker 
Bill Winget 



COMMITTEE 
CHAIRMEN 



dance 
board 



Seated: Farrar, Henley, Reeder, Levitan, Alwood. Standing: Wright, Arnold, Bowes, Redmond, Fishburn, 
Easter, Rogers, Milligan. 









e ; r 




OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 



Jim Reeder President and Business Manager 

Bill Henley Vice-President 

Charles Drum Secretary 

Mr. Rayder Treasurer 

John Arnold Jay Jackson Mills Rogers 

Watty Bowes Larry Levitan Wiley Wright 

Fred Easter George Milligan Mr. Atwood 

Bob Fishburn Jack Osborne Mr. Farrar 

Beau Redmond 
106 



cotillion club 



OFFICERS 

Wiley Wright Co-President 

George Milligan Co-President 

Bill Grigg Secretary 




Beta Theta Pi 

Butch Callaway 
Dick Crutchfield 
John Howard 
Scott Laurent 
Dick O'Connell 

Delta Tau Delta 

Watty Bowes 
Buck Buchanan 
Fred Easter 
Ted Kerr 
Jim Lewis 
Lee White 

Delta Upsilon 

Dale Cornelius 
George Fralin 
Don McKaba 
Tony Sargent 
Burke Steele 
Tony Valen 

Kappa Alpha 

Ed Ellis 
Arnold Gwinn 
John Lawson 
Bill Norman 
Roy Simkins 
Bob Whitaker 
Warren Wilcox 

Kappa Sigma 

Slade Carter 
Ellis Drew 
Charles Humpton 
Jake Lemon 
Skip Reid 
Charles Richardson 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

Chuck Baldree 
Rosse Collins 
Mike Davis 



Earle Dunham 
Bert Griffith 
Bill Grigg 

Phi Delta Theta 

Bob Fishburn 
Harry Ford 
Alex Piatt 
Dave Simpson 
John Smith 
Milam Turner 

Phi Epsilon Pi 

Stephen Berg 
Andy Greenman 
Pete Jacobs 
Elliott JofFe 

Phi Gamma Delta 

Marvin Bishop 
Dick Hornaday 
Duane St. John 
Emmett Kelley 
Bill Shropshire 
Jim Thompson 
Wiley Wright 

Phi Kappa Psi 

John Boone 
Gary Martin 
Art McCain 
Joe Pontius 
John Sinwell 

Phi Kappa Sigma 

Chris Alexander 
Joe Amato 
Bob Boernstein 



Jim Bowie 
Chuck Davis 
Ed Moyler 
Sid Negus 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

John Arnold 
Joe Crute 
Bob Cullers 
Jim Jackson 
Jack Kay 
George Lupton 
Slator Miller 
Chuck Watson 

Pi Kappa Phi 

Bill Fishback 
John Jennings 
John Marsh 
Nick Simons 
Charlie Slick 
Jack Stackhouse 
Ken Starling 
Bev Stephenson 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Jap Becker 
Bill Houston 
John Howard 
Marv Meadors 
Rob Peeples 
Merrill Plaisted 



Sigma Chi 

Dick Belden 
Phil Campbell 
Forney Daugette 
George Milligan 
Monte Pearse 
Jim Ferryman 



Sigma Nu 

Mike Chaney 
Hal Hamilton 
Len Hough 
Jay Jackson 
Fred Magoline 
Doug Monroe 
Steve Thomas 
Fred Webber 



Zeta Beta Tau 

Henry Heymann 
Sid Kaplan 
Larry Levitan 
Al Lipsett 
Loren Mintz 
Gerry Portner 



107 



forensic 
union 



Seated: Smith, Barney, McCormick, Wright, Masinter, Candler, Seibel, HoUister, Goldsmith, Tilley, Winchester, 
Dalzell. Standing: Aukschun. DeGraaf, Morton, Sanders, Garner, Marsh, Tarr, Gibson. 




OFFICERS 



Mike Garner President 

Brian Sanders Vice-President 

John Candler Secretary 

Nick Seibel Treasurer 

Cliff Smith Party Leader 

Bill Dalzell Party Leader 



MEMBERS 



Rudy Aukschun 
Keith Barney 
Neil Bland 
Bob DeGraaf 
Dave Gibson 
Barry Goldsmith 
John Hollister 
Farris Hotchkiss 



John Lancaster 
John Larson 
Charles McCormick 
Ed MacKinlay 
John Masinter 
Bill Miller 
John Marsh 



Jim Morton 
Brooks Pollack 
Bob Rappel 
Fred Tarr 
Rice Tilley 
Hutter Williams 
Bill Winchester 
Madison Wright 



I 



fraternity house managers 

association 



First Row: Quillen, Harp, Denu, Banks, Abernathy, Stroud, Marsh, Bear, Doerfler. Second Row: Watson, 
Stober, Oxner, Davis, McCain, Amato, Rutherford, Morgenstern. 




Ken Abernathy President 

Hal Hamilton Vice-President 

Joe Banks Secretary 

Mr. Farrar Faculty Advisor 



OFFICERS 



Jim Clay 


Dick Kops 


Jack Morgenstern 




Bill Davis 


Nick Mandak 


John Rutherford 


MEMBERS 


Lucky Denu 


Art McCain 


Bill Stober 




Marv Doerfler 


Murray McClain 


Jerry Stone 




Jim Jackson 




Bob Stroud 





109 



assimilation 
committee 



Seated: Davis, Hamilton, Gooch, Swanson. Standing: McClain, Belden, Dubin, Roane. 




OFFICERS 



Hal Hamilton Chairman 



Gordon Gooch Secretary- 



Dick Belden 



Murray McClain 



MEMBERS 



Joel Bennett 



Mike Dubin 



Jim Roane 



Noel Spence 



Leonard Greenebaum 



Carl Swanson 



student war memorial scholarship 

fund committee 



Seated: Milligan, Pontius, Gooch, Henley. Standing: Magoline, Smith, Peeples, Buchanan, Armbrister. 




Joe Pontius Chair 



Gordon Gooch Secretary 



OFFICERS 



Trev Armbrister 



Fred Magoline 



Buck Buchanan 



Bill Henley 



George Milligan 



Rob Peeples 



MEMBERS 



Dave McCain 



John Smith 



Washington 
literary society 



Seated: Dunton, Stroud, Kerr, McCain. Daupctte. Ciilp. Tippetts. Standing: Joffe, Jacobs. Conger. Schaaf, 
I.uria. Fi-luvirk. Walsh. 




Art McCain President 

OFFICERS Forney Daugette Vice-President 

Jack Stackhouse Secretary-Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Dick Berry 
Bill Bowers 
Bill Boyle 
Larry Clark 
Glenn Collins 
Cal Conger 
Dale Cornelius 
Charles Gulp 
Cal Curry 
Rody Davies 
Jim Davis 
Dave Dunton 
Bill Fitzgerald 
George Fralin 



Roy Herndon 
Henry Heymann 
Pete Jacobs 
Elliott Joffe 
Ted Kerr 
Jim Lewis 
George Lupton 
Don Luria 
Sandy Maslansky 
George Milligan 
Phil Monger 
Phil Morgan 
Paul MuUer 



Remley Meyers 
Dick Rosenberg 
Bernie Schaaf 
Bill Schropshire 
John Sinwell 
Dave Slingerland 
Fred Stamp 
Burke Steele 
Bob Stroud 
Bill Tippetts 
George Walsh 
Bob White 
Lee White 
Bill Williams 



cold check 
committee 



Left to right: Pontius. Henlrv. R. Smith, J. Smith, Syme. Norman, Givh 




Ray Smith Cha 



Sam Syme Secretary 



OFFICERS 



John Arnold 



Paul Krogh 



Ed Givhan 
Bill Henley 
John Smith 



Bill Norman 



Joe Pontius 



MEMBERS 



troubadours 



The cast of the spring success, Mr. Roberts. 




OFFICERS 



RuDD Abbott President 

Dale Cornelilis Vice-President 

John Duncan Secretary 

Mike Clark Business Manager 

Andy Greenman Publicity Manager 

Carlson Thomas Director 

A scene from the hit thriller bv Agatha Christie. Ten Little Indians. 





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glee 
club 




Mal Sawtelle President 

Jim Repass Business Manager 

Hugh Morrell Secretary 

Dick Raines Librarian 

Bill Shropshire Librarian 

Bill Grigg Publicity Director 

Dr. Rorert Stewart Director 



OFFICERS 



Ralph Baucum 
Ross Bayard 
Dave Berlinghof 
Tom Branch 
Herb Caldwell 
John Candler 
Mike Chaney 
Leighton Chapman 
Bill Copp 
Page Cranford 
Buzz Dakin 
Carlile Davis 
Jim Davis 
Dave Dewey 
John Dickenson 
Bill Fishback 
Brad Gooch 



Bill Greene 
Bill Grigg 
Bill Hise 
Don Holcombe 
Morton Her 
Lewis John 
Mike Johnson 
John Larson 
Bill Laughlin 
Dave Lindecamp 
Tom Litzenburg 
Sage Lyons 
Don McArthur 
Terry McGreevy 
Tom Manley 
Ed Martin 



Mike Masinter 
Don Miller 
Phil Monger 
Kev Moyles 
Dave Owen 
Bert Ramsay 
Ken Sadler 
Mike Sanderson 
Bernie Schaaf 
John Smith 
Charles Toomey 
Ed Wallace 
Art Warner 
Hal Whitaker 
Allen White 
Jim Whitlock 
George Wood 



MEMBERS 



band 




FoRMEY Dahgette President 

Don Sti?(e Secretary 

OFFICERS Don McArthur Treasurer 

Lee Waltz Publicity Manager 

Russ Myers Drum Major 



MEMBERS 



Fred Adams 
Marv Bishop 
Bob Brown 
Clay Carr 
Slade Carter 
Mai dinger 
Buzz Dakin 
Andy Dalton 
George Fralir 



Frank Guenther 
Bob Hanson 
Frank Hoopes 
Ben Hoover 
Lewis John 
John Kendig 
Will Kullman 
Joe Lewis 
Phil Monger 



Ross Pickus 
Pete Pope 
Bob Pritchard 
Charlie Richardson 
Mike Sanderson 
Todd Terres 
Ken Thygesen 
Ben Werthan 
Sid Whipple 



monogram 
club 




Ned Grove President 

Alex Platt Vice-President 

Tom Robbins Treasurer OFFICERS 

Dick O'Connell Secretary 



John Arnold 


Lucky Denu 


Bill Kauffman 




Keith Belch 


Guy Drake 


Eugene Keith 




Dean Bender 


Art Fern 


Harry Kennedy 




Joel Bernstein 


Pat Flanagan 


Dick Kops 




Bill Boyle 
John Buckey 


Bill Frue 

Dick Gwathmey 


Pat Patrick 
Pat Patterson 


MEMBERS 


Butch Callaway 


Jim Harvell 


Dick Raines 




Dick Crutchfield 


Bill Haynes 


Charles Richardson 




Dana Curtis 


John Huebner 


Harry Tully 




Walt DeGree 




Ding Woodring 





Sigma 

Senior Secret Society 




OFFICERS 



Jack Osborne President 



Walter Burton Secretary 





Tom Baker 


Charlie Dawson 


0. P. Pollard 


MEMBERS 


Butch Callaway 


Ed Ellis 


Beau Redmond 




Pat Collins 


Charley Kannapell 


Arch Roberts 




Bill Dixon 


Jack Kay 
Ed Moyler 
118 


Roy Simkins 



"13" 
club 



Honorary Junior Society 



First Row: Earp, Buckey, Berry, Webber, Henderson, Davis, Sullivan, Maslansky, Henley, O'Connell. Second 
Row: Denu, Hough, Stone, Gerike, Bear, Fishburn, Banks, Reeder, Easter, Rockel, Cullers. 




Fred Bear . . . 
Tony Gerike 



.President 



. Secretary-Treasurer 



OFFICERS 



Joe Banks 
Sam Berry 
John Buckey 
Bob Cullers 
Bill Davis 
Lucky Denu 
Mike Earp 
Fred Easter 
Bob Fishburn 



Dave Henderson 
Bill Henley 
Len Hough 
Sonny Gwin 
Jack Lawson 
Sandy Maslansky 
Doug Monroe 
Dick O'Connell 
Jack Osborne 



Joe Pontius 
Jim Reeder 
Don Rockel 
Roy Simkins 
Fred Stamp 
Jerry Stone 
Pat Sullivan 
Carl Swanson 
Fred Webber 



MEMBERS 



pi alpha 
nu 



Honorary Sophomore Society 



mn 




OFFICERS 



RuPE Chisholm President 

Dick Johnson Vice-President 

Charles Dawson Secretary 



MEMBERS 



Bill Adams 
Stu Atkinson 
Smith Bagley 
Denny Ballentine 
Jo Banks 
Sam Bendheim 
Bill Boyle 
John Budd 
Brure Bussen 
Gray Castle 
Ruoe Chisholm 
Paul Clayton 
Bill Copp 
Dale Cornelius 
Phil Cristal 
Cal Curry 
Charles Dana 
Andy Dalton 
Fornev Daugette 
Bill Davis 
Charlie Dawson 
Lurky Denu 
Basil Doerhoefer 



Guy Drake 
Earle Dunham 
BiU Dunker 
Dave Dunton 
Pete Elsaesser 
John Ferguson 
Herk Fisher 
Bill Forrest 
Wayne Fowler 
Jack Friedman 
John Garson 
Curley Greenebaum 
Bill Grigg 
Sonny Gwyn 
John Ham 
Hal Hamilton 
Jim Hanscom 
Pegram Harrison 
Bob Hawkins 
Bill Henley 
John Huddle 
Bob Ingham 
Bob Jaber 



Dick Johnson 
Bill Kelting 
Jan Koontz 
Frank Kozare 
Paul Krogh 
Bob Large 
Pete Leininger 
Jim Lindsay 
Scooter McClain 
Jack McQuiggan 
Gibby McSpadden 
Fred Magoline 
John Marsh 
Remley Meyers 
Phil Morgan 
Jerry Murphy 
Barb Neblett' 
Dewey Oxner 
Bob Pfaff 
Pat Patterson 
Rob Peeples 
Overton Pollard 
Scooter Pruitt 



Tom Robbins 
Arch Roberts 
Don Rockel 
Mills Rogers 
Tom Salisbury 
Tony Sargent 
Ozzie Schaffer 
Bill Shropshire 
Roy Simkins 
Nick Simons 
Charlie Slick 
Jim Stockton 
Barry Storick 
Pat Sullivan 
Charles Swezey 
Tonv Valen 
Bob Wakers 
Fred Webber 
Paul Weinstein 
John Wellford 
Bill Williams 
John Williamson 
Milt Winawer 



120 



white 
friars 



Honorary Sophomore Society 




Trev Armbrister President 

John Howard Vice-President 

Mark Davis Secretary-Treasurer 



OFFICERS 



Frank Ahlgren 
Mick Alanis 
George Allen 
Carl Bailey 
Joel Bennett 
Dave Berlinghof 
Joel Bernstein 
Bill Bowers 
Bob Bradford 
John Buckey 
Bill Burns 
Bob Cairns 
Mike Chaney 
Roger Clark 
Lou Close 
Rosse Collins 
Pete Cook 
Bob Cullers 
John Daniel 



Rody Davies 
Charles Davis 
Bill Dols 
Charles Drum 
Sam Dudley 
Clint Early 
Steve Ehudin 
Ronnie Fast 
Bob Fishburn 
Harry Ford 
George Fralin 
Dick Gwathmey 
Frank Hardwick 
Pete Hartman 
Jim Harvell 
Dave Henderson 
Jerry Hopkins 
Dick Hornaday 



Warner Isaacs 
Ken Jones 
Jay Kline 
Joe Knakal 
Dick Kops 
Dick Laskey 
Jim Lunger 
Bob McCallum 
Murray McClain 
Don McKaba 
Sandy Maslansky 
Henry Meador 
Marv Meadors 
Doug Monroe 
Tom Moore 
Marv Moreland 
Jack Morgenstern 
Steve Nachman 



Preston Pate 
Richard Raines 
Beau Redmond 
Jim Roane 
Jud Rodman 
Jim Schuler 
Jim Seabrook 
Jim Shapero 
Morgan Shelor 
Ike Smith 
Tom Smith 
Noel Spence 
Fred Stamp 
Bob Stivers 
Carl Swanson 
Steve Thomas 
Bert Tyler 
Dunlap Weichsel 
Bob Whitaker 



MEMBERS 



mongolian 
minks 



Honorary Social Organization 



Kneeling: Simpson, Reeder, Israel, Kalmbach, Weichsel, Butterfield, Magoline, Henkel, Gower. Standing: 

Shanley. Maslansky, Cristal, Chaney, Oul.d, O'G.nnell, J. B. H.mard. Fi-hburn, Ford. Cusick, Miller, McNeer, 

Becker, J. W. Houard, Plaisted, Callaua,, Baker, Dawson. 




OFFICERS 



Grec McNf.er . . . 
Dick O'Connell 



. President 
.Secretary 



MEMBERS 



Tom Baker 
Jap Becker 
Beldon Butterfield 
Butch Callaway 
Mike Chaney 
Lou Close 
Phil Cristal 
Ralph Cusick 
Charles Dawson 
Bill Dels 
Guy Drake 
Bob Fishburn 
Andy Gallagher 



Dick Gower 
Ronnie Gutberlet 
Steve Henkel 
John B. Howard 
John W. Howard 
Larry Israel 
Jay Jackson 
Frank Kalmbach 
Sid Kaplan 
Jay Kline 
Fred Magoline 
Sandy Maslansky 
Jack Mason 
122 



George Miller 
Doug Monroe 
Ted Ould 
Merrill Plaisted 
0. P. Pollard 
Bob Pritchard 
Jim Reeder 
Brian Shanley 
Dave Simpson 
Carl Swanson 
Steve Thomas 
Fred Webber 
Dunlap Weichel 



graham-lee 
society 



Seated: Wanscher, Starling, Johnson, Alexander, Repass, Whitaker, Fonda. Standing: HoUister, Alevizatos, 
Ramsay, Tunner, Givhan, Dobbs, Mann, Robbins. 




Chris Alexander President 

Jim Repass Vice-President 

Larry Johnson Secretary-Treasurer 

Mr. B. S. Stephenson Advisor 



OFFICERS 



Bill Adams 
Tom Akin 
Mickey Alanis 
Ted Alevizatos 
Dick Bank 
Tom Branch 
Moody Burt 
Irvin Caplan 
Glenn Collins 
Bill Cornelius 
Bill Craig 
Jim Deacon 
Charles Dobbs 
Mike Dubin 
Bob Fonda 



Ed Givhan 
Doug Goode 
Bill Greene 
Pegram Harrison 
Jerry Hill 
John Hollister 
John Huebner 
John HufFard 
Harry Kennedy 
Dave Lindecamp 
Bob Mann 
Ed Martin 
Don Miller 
Ed Moore 
Philip Morgan 
John Peale 



Jim Perryman 

Steve Quillen 

Fred Ramsay 

Beau Redmond 

Tom Robbins 

Ken Saddler 

Tom Sale 

Ken Starling 

Bill Tunner 

Henrick Wanscher 

Bob Whitaker 

Dave Willard 

Dr.&Mrs. Marion Junkin 

Dean Leyburn 

Dr. Shillington 



MEMBERS 



123 



scabbard 
and blade 



Honorary Military Society 



First Row: Redmond, Jones, Patterson, Wright. Second Row: dinger. Englishman, Davis, Fray, Macintosh, 
Murphy, Woodring, PfaS, Benham, Stewart, Hamric. Third Row: Jacoby, Lytton, Dunker, Gooch. 




OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 



Wiley Wright Captain 

Charles Patterson First Lieutenant 

Beau Redmond Second Lieutenant 

Walk Jones First Sergeant 

Tom Baker Bill Fray Gibby McSpadden 

Fred Benham Gordon Gooch Jerry Murphy 

Dave Clinger Hal Hamilton Bob PfafE 

John Davis Lowell Hamric Tom Bobbins 

Bill Dols Bill Houston Roy Simkins 

Bill Dunker Lewis Jacoby Don Stewart 

John Englishman John Lytton Ding Woodring 

Charles Macintosh 
124 



Precision Drill Team 



games 
guard 




Bob Bradford Guard Commander 

Emmett Kelley Executive Officer 

Joe Knakal Guidon Bearer 



OFFICERS 



Bob Blair 
Neil Bland 
Stu Bracken 
Howard Brants 
Don Briden 
Manley Caldwell 
Bob Chandler 
Rosse Collins 
Cal Conger 
John Cranz 
Walt Cremin 
Greig Cummings 
Jim Davis 
Charles Dobbs 



Earl Dunham 
Cabell Heyward 
Dick Hornaday 
Willard Hyde 
Morton Her 
Ted Kerr 
Russell Ladd 
John Lancaster 
Jim Lewis 
Tom Martin 
Pete Montgomery 
Tom Moore 
Jim Morton 
Ben Noel 
Ed Noel 



Brooks Pollock 
Harry Pressley 
Dick Ralph 
Chuck Sherman 
Bob Smith 
Jim Stone 
Stephen Stout 
Rice Tilley 
Charles Toomey 
Kurt Waterval 
Bill Wilemon 
Bill Winchester 
Bill Winstead 
Madison Wright 



MEMBERS 




LIEUTENANT COLONEL RICHARD W. JONES 



This has been a noteworthy year for the ROTC detach- 
ment for many reasons. June of 1955 will, for the first time, 
find the graduating seniors receiving commissions upon com- 
pletion of their entire four years of military training at Wash- 
ington & Lee. This year also marks the first step in a process of 
integration from specialized Transportation Corps studies to 
Branch General. The Administration contracted to make the 
change in hopes that it would give the student in Military 
Science a better chance to obtain the service of his choice and 
at the same time, offer a more firm basis in every field of mili- 
tary training. 

Under the guiding hand of Lieutenant Colonel Richard W. 
Jones, the PMS&T who has fostered ROTC on our campus, 
the detachment enjoyed one of its most successful years. The 
members of the graduating class who attended Fort Eustis 
Summer Camp emerged with flying colors and added prestige 
to what has already been recognized as one of the outstanding 
ROTC groups in the South. The Gaines Guard was selected 
for first place in the Armistice Day Parade in Harrisonburg. 
The Rifle Team scheduled twenty matches during the year 
and ended with a very respectable record. 

The Band, under the able direction of Sergeant Dwyer. 
has succeeded in keeping up the fine standards set by Lieu- 
tenant Colonel John G. Bowes, who left Lexington in the 
spring of 1954. The loss of Sergeant Watson in February of 
1955 was deeply felt by the entire Battalion, and his job has 
fallen to the capable hands of Sergeant Gurganis. The addi- 
tion of several members to the teaching staff has brought the 
detachment up to full strength and has led to the proficiency 
for which it has always been known. After four hard years 
the ROTC has achieved a position of respect at Washington 
and Lee where it has become an integral part of the life of 
every student. 



reserve officers 
training corps 



Top : Captains Dinsmore and Purks 
Bottom: Cadre Sergeants at a coffee break 





THE BATTALION STAFF 

Lowell Hamric Battalion Commander Beau Redmond S-2 

Wiley Wright Executive Officer Bill Fray S-3 

Fred Benham Adjutant John Davis S-4 

COMPANY COMMANDERS 

Bob Pfaff A Company Hal Hamilton D Company 

Charles Patterson B Company Jerry Murphy E Company 

Don Stewart C Company Harry Ford Officers Company 

Walk Jones Band Company 



The Battalion Staff 



Inspection Day at Drill 




V f 






interfraternity 
council 



Kneeling: Hawkins, Mayoza, Piatt, Norman, Reiner, Early, Barnes, Chaney. Seated: Amato, Earp, Porter, 

Sprott, Cornelius, Kaplan, Laurent, Dunham. Standing: Farrar, Simpson, Stackhouse, Ward, Gold, MuUer, 

While, Milligan, Luria, Large. 




Dale Cornelius President 

King Sprott Vice-President 

Siu Kaplan Secretary 

Jerry Stone Treasurer 

Jim Farrar Faculty Advisor 



OFFICERS 



Joe Amato 
Stu Atkinson 
Carl Barnes 
Dick Belden 
Bob Bradford 
Mike Chaney 
Marv Doerfler 
Earl Dunham 
Clinton Early 
Mike Earp 



Warren Frazier 
John Gold 
Bob Hawkins 
Charles Humpton 
Scott Laurent 
Tom Litzenburg 
Don Luria 
Jack McQuiggan 
Jim Mayoza 
George Milligan 



Tom Moore 
Paul Muller 
Bill Norman 
Al Piatt 

Stu Quarngesser 
George Reiner 
Dave Simpson 
Jack Stackhouse 
Dedy Ward 
Lee White 



MEMBERS 



131 




beta theta pi 



OFFICERS 

Ding Woodring President 

Jim Reeder Vice-President 

Andy Dalton Secretary 

Walter Burton Treasurer 

Dick Gwathmey House Manager 

Mrs. Davis Martin House Mother 

Rho Chapter of Beta Theta Pi was founded at Washington 
College in 1856. Inactive during the Civil War, the Chapter 
was revived in 1876 and again in 1917, when it became Alpha 
Rho. 

The Betas have always been known as a diversified group 
which is evidenced by the participation of its members in 
a wide variety of activities and the numerous honors they 
have earned individually and as a group. Ably directed by 
Bob Pfaff, the Beta group won the first prize cup in the 
Interfraternity Song Fest. Four Betas, Jack Osborne. Beau 




Redmond, Jim Reeder, and Ray Smith are members of O.D.K. 
of which Beau is President. Five of the sixteen Counselor- 
ships in the Freshman Dormitory are held by Betas Ken 
Abernathy, Pat Patrick, Redmond, Smith and Reeder, who 
is Assistant Head Counselor. Ken is also President of the 
House Managers Association and of the Commerce Fra- 
ternity; Jim is President of the Dance Board. Greig Cum- 
mings is Editor of the Beauty Section and Russell Ladd is 
Editor of the Class Section of the Calyx. Jim Gabler is a 
member of the Executive Committee and Editor of The W&L 
Lawyer. Editor of the Freshman Handbook is Tom Litzen- 
burg. John Larson and Farris Hotchkiss made Phi Eta Sigma, 
the freshmen honor society. 

Athletically, Alpha Rho was represented in football by Phil 
Brown, Bob Callaway, Don Holcombe, Ken Johnson and 
Hugh Stephens. On the Cross Country Team are Dick Crutch- 
field and Hutch Hutchinson. Patrick captained the Swim- 
ming Team with Joel Bennett as Manager and Hugh Stephens 
also wrestled. Dick Johnson was named last year to the All- 
Southern Conference Soccer Team, as well as wrestling in 
the 177 pound class. In Lacrosse, Alpha Rho claims Captain 
Guy Drake and two honorable mention AU-Americans, Dick 
O'Connell and Dick Johnson, the latter of whom was selected 
last year for the team's Most Valuable Player Award. There 
are eight other Betas on the Lacrosse Team. 

Despite diverse interests, Alpha Rho is nonetheless a unit. 
Probably most significant in making it so is our House Moth- 
er, Mrs. Martin, whose interest in all our many activities is 
always an inspiration. 





132 



alpha rho chapter 




First Row: A. 0. Jenkins, Holcombe, D. A. Owen, F. 
K. Johnson, Hutchinson, P. N. Brown, Moyles, Croker, 
Binfoid, Hotchkiss, W. J. Rice, Brannon, Wisdom, 
Dewey. 

Second Row: Moremen, Somerville, Redmond, R. D. 
Smith, R. E. Johnson, T. W. Alexander, Mrs. D. Mar- 
tin, Woodring, Pfaff, Voekel, Clinton, Patrick, Gabler, 
Reeder. 



Third Row: Lancaster, Abernathy, Larson, Litzen- 
burg, Shanley, Stevens, Close, Fangboner, Dalton, 
Bennett, Krough, Burton, Copp, Doyle, G. E. Wood, 
D. G. Noble. 

Fourth Row: Tunner, MacKinlay, C. H. Smith, Kelt- 
ing, Weichsel, J. M. Jones, J. B. Howard, Crutchfield, 
AiTnstrong, Haven, Cummings, Ladd, Alevizatos, 
Gwathmey, J. Hill, Mercke, Laurent, Baucum. 



133 




delta tau delta 



OFFICERS 

Fred Easter President 

Bill Henley Vice-President 

Carl Bailey Secretary 

Bill Davis Treasurer 

Morgan Schafer House Manager 

Mrs. J.ouise Faulkner House Mother 



In 1859, Delta Tau Delta was founded at Bethany College 
in what is now West Virginia. It spread from that beginning 
to become outstanding nationally, and now has 84 chapters 
in the U.S. and Canada. Phi Chapter was established at Wash- 
ington and Lee in 1896. Ever since that time it has had an 
outstanding reputation for leadership. Character, excellence, 
and versatility have produced this. 

These qualities have been well demonstrated during the 
past year. Watty Bowes was elected President of the Student 




Body and Fred Easter was elected as President of Fancy 
Dress. Both were chosen for membership in Omicron Delta 
Kappa. 

Mike Clark was the Editor of the Southern Collegian. Fred 
Easter and Clay Carr were Associate Editors on his staff. Buck 
Buchanan was Fraternity Editor of the Calyx. 

In other activities. Bill Henley was Vice-President of the 
Dance Board and was on the Student War Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund Committee. Mike Clark was Chairman of Religious 
Emphasis Week. Clay Carr was Co-Chairman of the Charity 
Chest and a member of the Christian Council Executive Com- 
mittee. Noel Spence was a Dorm Counselor. 

Rich Berry. Clay Carr. and Watty Bowes were members 
of Phi Eta Sigma, the National Freshman Honor Society. All 
three, and Mike Clark, were on the Honor Roll. 

Jim Lewis was Captain of the Soccer Team for the second 
year. Keith Belch captained the Cross Country Team. John 
Ellis was Captain of the Wrestling Team and Bob McHenry 
was Co-Captain of the Basketball Team. Over thirty members 
of the House participated in varsity sports, including Gibby 
McSpadden. the Southern Conference Outstanding Wrestler 
of 1954. 

Besides these many campus leaders. Phi Chapter has in its 
sixteen freshmen one of the most promising classes to appear 
in years. All have been very active in campus life, and 
promise to further enhance the excellent reputation of the 
Delts on the W&L campus. 

But these achievements would have been impossible with- 
out the encouragement and help of two people. The first of 
these was Mrs. Louise Faulkner, our housemother. The other 
was Jim Farrar. Assistant Dean of Students, and our Faculty 
Advisor. He was a Delt at W&L not so long ago. and has been 
able to look at our problems both from the point of view of 
the University and of the Fraternity. 




phi chapter 




First Row: Akers, Peden, Groobey, Hoss, Heina, 
Towler, Crawfoi'd, J. E. Chapoton, 0. D. Chapoton, 
Couch, Brunett, McThenia, LeBrun, Montgomei'y. 

Second Row: G. M. Allen, J. M. Ellis, Stine, Farrar, 
DeGree, J. C. Murphy, W. W. Davis, Mrs. Louise 
Faulkner, Easter, Schafer, Bowes, Lohrey, Hardwick, 
Davies, S. W. Clark, E. H. Stone. 



Third Row: Keeling, R. A. Moore, P. S. Morgan, R. 
H. Berry, G. I. Smith, Harper, Fox, C. P. Flanagan, 
C. T. Bailey, Bell, Phillippe, Whiteford, Boyle, 
McSpadden, J. W. Lewis, Cremin, Mickler. 

Fourth Row: Ironsides, Mahoney, Swan, T. 0. 
Moore, Nichols, W. J. Russell, Schoen, Kauffman, 
Welsh, Belch, Buchanan, Ross, Frue, Spence, H. S. 
White, Carr, J. E. Lewis, Kerr. 




delta upsilon 



OFFICERS 

Tony Sargent President 

Dave Rice Vice-President 

Bill Bartch Secretary 

Nick Mandak Treasurer 

Reno Harp House Manager 

Mrs. Virginia McWhorter House Mother 

Delta Upsilon was founded at Williams College in 1834 
and has prospered with the passing years under the banner 
of nonsecrecy. The Washington and Lee Chapter was char- 
tered in 1930 from an organization known as the Arcades 
Club, and has played an active part in campus activities ever 
since. 

Constantly emphasizing leadership, character and versatil- 
ity, Delta Upsilon's membership includes the following men 




who have found positions as campus leaders: John Pipkin, 
stalwart tackle for the Football Team. Dom Flora. Buck 
Shulik and John Turner of the Basketball Team. Herb Hum- 
mers of the Tennis Team, Mike Barry in cross country and 
track. Jerry Susskind of the Wrestling and Cross Country 
Teams. Dale Cornelius, President of the IFC and Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Troubadors as well as a member of Phi Eta 
Sigma, Bill Williams, Managing Editor of the Ring-turn Phi, 
Publicity Director of the Troubadors and member of the 
Editorial Board of Shenandoah, Dave Rice, Sports Editor of 
the Tuesday Ring-turn Phi. 

Occupying one of the finest houses on campus, the W&L 
Chapter prides itself on close co-operation with its alumni. 
Dr. Allen E. Ragan, Chapter Adviser, has greatly aided this 
work in his many years of devoted assistance. Other DUs 
on the Faculty include Mr. R. N. Lature, Mr. Edwin Howard, 
Dr. G. H. Foster and Coaches Twombly and Miller. 

Achieving distinction in all phases of campus life, DU is 
holder of the 1953-54 Intramural Championship Trophy, 
winning firsts in wrestling and track. With several men on 
the academic Honor Roll, DU also boasts 14 men on the 
Dean's List. The three big social events of the year are the 
Christmas Formal House Party, the Spring Costume, and 
the May Open House. 

With the addition of our very capable and charming 
House Mother, Mrs. Virginia McWhorter. whose ready wit 
and humor contribute greatly to our fraternal spirit. DU 
looks forward to a future of success as it continues to fill 
the needs for a spirit of brotherhood. 




13« 



w. and 1. chapter 




First Row: Cox, Stecher, DriscoU, Bijou, Thygesen, 
Caskie, Nodine, Flora, Sanderson, John, Evans, 
Hoopes, O'Brien, Gates. 



Third Row: Labro, Cornelius, McArthur, Lunger, 
Wade, Williams, Boggiano, McKaba, Aurell, Holder, 
Monger, Person, Bannon, Chapman. 



Second Row: Conger, Hamblen, Valen, Albers, Man- Fourth Row: Shulick, Cook, Line, Fralin, Hummers, 

dak, Steele, Sargent, Mrs. Virginia McWhoiter, Harp, Marks, Rosebrook, Clayton, Mauter, J. A. Turner, 

Bartsch, D. E. Rice, Mailer, Pipkin, Rocke. Hanscom, J. B. Davis, Susskind. 

137 




kappa alpha 



OFFICERS 

Ray Piland President 

Bob Whitaker Vice-President 

John Lawson Secretary 

Bill Stober House Manager 

Mrs. J. M. Lewis House Mother 

Alpha Chapter of Kappa Alpha Order was founded in 
December of 1865 at Washington and Lee by four students. 
Our chapter has the special distinction of being the first chap- 
ter of the Order. The four student founders met in the room 
of William Walsh in the South Dormitory of the College, 
which is now Robinson Hall. In 1868 the Beta Chapter of 
the Order was founded at V.M.I. As the Fraternity expanded, 
Alpha found she could not control all of the new chapters, 
so a national headquarters was established at Louisville. Ken- 
tucky. Under the influence of Robert E. Lee. who was then 




President of Washington College, the Order developed and 
expanded throughout the South. Kappa Alpha owes much 
of its tradition and idealism to Lee, who is considered our 
spiritual founder. 

KAs play important parts in many features of extracur- 
ricular life at Washington and Lee. On the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Student Body are Ed Ellis and Roy Simkins. 
Charlie Drum is also President of the Junior Class; Bill 
Norman and Doug Roy are on the Ring-turn Phi staff. Dorm 
Counselors are Bill Craig and Charlie Drum. In scholarship, 
the Chapter as a whole excels, having won the Scholarship 
Cup for three semesters in a row. Five brothers are in Phi Eta 
Sigma, and George Wilson is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. 
Several brothers are on the Christian Council, with Bill Craig 
and Bob Whitaker serving as committee chairmen. 

In the field of athletics, KA has won second place for two 
vears in Intramurals. The best teams were in handball, volley- 
ball, basketball and softball. Don Stewart, who is also Senior 
IM Manager, and Roy Simkins are varsity lettermen; in 
addition, these two are members of Sigma Delta Psi. Johnny 
Ferguson is a manager with the Varsity Basketball Team. 

With Dr. W. M. Hinton as Faculty Advisor, and Mrs. J. 
M. Lewis as our fine House Mother. Alpha Chapter has main- 
tained an excellent record. It is even more significant, how- 
ever, that the members find the Fraternity a source of last- 
ing friendships, which are the basis of a wholesome social 
life. 




alpha chapter 




-.-.s^ 



First Row: Steves, Lester, Wexler, Richards, Gwyn, 
G. S. Thompson, Mays, Teague, Fonda, George, Roy. 

Second Row: Simkins, G. S. Wilson, C. L. Rice, 
Whitaker, Piland, Mrs. Lewis, J. R. Lawson, E. E. 
Ellis, Craig, W. E. Moore, Stuart. 



Third Row: L. C. Gwin, Weaver, Stober, Sale, Nor- 
man, D. B. Thompson, Ferguson, S. B. Carter, D. F. 
Gutherie, McLean. 

Fourth Row: Langhammer, Oast, Drum, Wellford, 
Dudley, A. F. Gwin, Wilcox, McLane, Frazier, Draper, 
Stump, Copin, Frith. 



139 




kappa sigma 



OFFICERS 

Dace Jones Grand Master 

Bill Reid Grand Procurator 

Jerry Hopkins Grand Master of Ceremony 

Dave Henderson House Manager 

Phil Brasfield Treasurer 

Mrs. W. J. Jordan House Mother 



Kappa Sigma was founded at the University of Virginia 
in 1869: Mu Chapter was established at W&L as the third 
organized chapter in 1873. Kappa Sigma has 127 chapters 
throughout the nation boasting 65,000 members. We started 
one of our most successful years by pledging twenty-three 
freshmen, giving us the largest Pledge Class on campus and 
tying the record set in 1953. 

Ellis Drew was Vice-President of Openings, elected to ODK 




and was a Freshman Dorm Counselor. Jerry Hopkins was 
News Editor for the Ring-turn Phi, Business Manager for the 
Shenandoah, and announcer for Home Edition. Bill Miller 
was a member of the Varsity Debate Team, the Christian 
Council, the Forensic Union, and the Varsity Cross Country 
and Wrestling Teams. Lloyd Dobyns was Assistant News 
Editor of the Ring-turn Phi, a member of the Troubadours 
and Gaines Guard, and announcer for Home Edition. Elected 
to Psi Chi and Sigma Delta Psi was Rudy Stutzman, who was 
also a Freshman Dorm Counselor. Burt Tyler and Willard 
Hyde were members of the Varsity Soccer Team. Don Fowler 
was a varsity wrestler and member of the Gaines Guard. 
Charlie Richardson and Bill Winget were on the Varsity 
Swimming Team while Jim Marvin and Glenn Fahrenthold 
were found on the Track Team. 

Socially this past year was one of the most prominent 
in Mu Chapter's history. Mu's annual Black and White Ball 
to honor the Chapter Sweetheart was the most successful in 
many years. The Kappa Sigs made more than the usual num- 
ber of spring outings to Cave Mountain Lake and Goshen 
Pass, and spontaneous weekend parties were frequent and 
enjoyable. 

Our House Mother, Mrs. Jordan, helped us through our 
social and everyday House life with grace and charm. Mrs. 
"J" has been an integral part of our lives here at the House 
for seven years and has been the perfect hostess for these 
many years. 

With the passing of the year we look back with pride and 
pleasure, knowing that the Chapter has once again fulfilled 
its purpose as a fraternity in the truest sense of the word. 
Above all else, we have always nourished the strong ties of 
friendship that have always been emblematic of the brothers 
of Kappa Sigma Fraternity. 




mu chapter 




IBI U 



KI 




First Row: R. K. Chandler, Aikin, R. F. Brown, Wel- 
ham, J. T. Earley, Kendig, Hyde, H. Williams, R. H. 
Crawford, Lynn, Higgs, J. G. Guthrie, D. R. Fowler, 
C. N. Hill. 

Second Row: Hey ward, Hughes, Drew, Barrett, D. 
W. Jones, Quillen, Humpton, Hentz, Gapp, Pruitt, 
Stutzmann, R. N. White, Lindsay, Loving, E. A. Mc- 
Cormick. 



Third Row: Cobb, J. S. Carter, Reid, Henderson, 
Mai-vin, Anthony, F. L. Moses, T. 0. Lawson, Jeter, 
Forrest, J. F. Stone, Clements, Ingham, Curry, Bras- 
field. 

Fourth Row: Fahrenthold, Pollock, Creskoff, Hop- 
kins, Dobyns, Claunch, Blair, Winget, C. B. Richard- 
son, Tyler, W. C. Miller, Varner, Dunton. 
Fifth Row: Fortson, J. Hill, Burt, Ham, Holbrook, 
Lemon, Williamson, E. W. Noel. 




lambda chi alpha 



OFFICERS 

Bob Bradford President 

C. J. Baldree Vice-President 

Bill Grigg Secretary 

John Rutherford Treasurer 

Mrs. Bess Smith House Mother 



In 1909, Lambda Chi Alpha was founded at Boston Uni- 
versity by three law students who had become good friends. 
Today, after a short 46 years, this young fraternity has grown 
into the largest fraternity in the world. Also relatively young 
on campus. Lambda Chi Alpha owns the newest and most 
modern chapter house, which boasts a sun porch and the 
largest house lot and recreation area of any W&L fraternity. 
The local Chapter this year improved its home by completely 




repainting its interior and exterior, and by buying a twelve- 
foot-long deep freeze and modernistic bar and lounge furni- 
ture. 

Social chairmen. Bob Stivers and Pat Patterson, brought 
excellent dance bands to the Chapter for private and campus 
parties. Members and dates particularly enjoyed the Apache, 
Lost Lagoon, and Pajama Parties. 

Outstanding on campus this year were Lambda Chi's Pat 
Patterson, Varsity Tennis player and winner of the campus 
championship; Al White, Soccer; George Walters and Bob 
Jaber. Track: Joe Knakal, Baseball; Al Gitter, Football. Dave 
Clinger brought the Virginia Intercollegiate Press Associa- 
tion's 1955 Convention to the W&L campus. Dave is Secre- 
tary of the VIPA. Editor-in-Chief of the Ring-turn Phi, Dorm 
and Freshman Camp Counselor, member of the Publications 
Board and ODK, and is listed in "Who's Who In American 
Colleges and Llniversities ". Another "Who's Who" listee. Bob 
Bradford, organized and commands the Gaines Guard. Bob, 
who broadcasts locally for 15 hours a week, has received an 
Associated Press Award for state newscoverage. He is Vice- 
President of Scabbard and Blade. 

"C. J." Baldree is the organizer and President of Pi Sigma 
Alpha. He is also Law School Editor and Copy Editor of the 
Ring-Tuni Phi. Fred Friberg is Circulation Manager of the 
University paper, and Tim Thompson, who acted in "Detec- 
tive Story" and "Mister Roberts ", is a campus columnist of 
the publication. Bill Grigg. Special Events Editor, cartoonist, 
and columnist for the Ring-turn Phi, is a member of the 
Calyx staff, was nominated by the Independent Party, and 
elected Secretarv-Treasurer of the Cotillion Club. Joe Ripley, 
W&L's leading debater, represented the L^niversity in national 
competition. 

With much achievement to look back on, Lambda Chi looks 
forward to future years of success on the W&L campus. 




142 



amma phi chapter 




First Row: Baldiee, Bradford, Mrs. B. Smith, Grigg, Fourth Row: Knakal, M. P. Caldwell, A. S. Warner, 

Rutherford. J. R. Collins, Demott, E. R. Thompson. 

Second Row: Stivers, Lindecamp, Patterson, Fast, D. Fifth Row: Mayfield, Ripley, G. P. Walters, Gitter, 

M. Clinger. F. D. Griffith. 



Third Row: Bayard, Dunham, Jaber, Friberg, Funk- 
houser. 



143 




phi delta theta 

OFFICERS 

Bob Fishburn President 

Buddy Metcalfe Vice-President 

Gordon Gooch Secretary 

Bill Dixon House Manager 

Mrs. L. B. Burlingame House Mother 



Founded at Miami University at Oxford, Ohio in 1848, 
Phi Delta Theta was established at Washington and Lee as 
Virginia Zeta in 1887. In 1929 the present house was built 
with Brother Earl S. Mattingly. Treasurer and Secretary of 
the Board of Trustees of the University, giving invaluable 
assistance. Mrs. Lucy Booker Burlingame, or Mrs. "B", as 
she is affectionately called, has been the Phi House Mother 
since 1942. She has always given her untiring aid and sym- 
pathetic assistance to every member of the House. Mrs. "B" 
has been instrumental in the past successes of Virginia Zeta. 




This year, as in the past, the Phis have played a prominent 
role in campus activities, from sports to publications. Bob 
Fishburn, our President, is the Executive Committeeman rep- 
resenting the Publications Board and also president of Finals 
Dances. He was selected for "Who's Who in American Col- 
leges and Universities" and this fall was also tapped for 
Omicron Delta Kappa. Gordon Gooch. in addition to being 
President of the Forensic Union, is Chairman of the Student 
War Memorial Scholarship Fund Committee and Secretary 
of the Assimilation Committee. Ed Hood is the Editor of the 
literary magazine Shenandoah. Al Piatt has been active on 
the Christian Council as Chairman of the Boy's Club, while 
also helping W&L athletics by being a prominent member of 
the Football Team. Bill Northrop is Sports Editor of the 
Ring-turn Phi. Dewey Oxner is Executive Committeeman 
from the Junior Class and is on the University Committee on 
Athletics. Harry Ford was Director of the Minstrel Show, 
and played Lacrosse. 

The Phis have also been well represented with participants 
in every major varsity sport. Our many and varied activities 
include some of the finer and memorable social affairs of the 
season. like the Miami Triad Party and numerous others. The 
successful year with its wide range of interest can only be 
attributed to the full and willing cooperation of all the broth- 
ers. 




Virginia zeta chapter 







First Row: Brants, Caspari, France, Com. 

Second Row: J. M. Smith, W. M. Turner, Huddle, 
Harrison, Fishbum, Mrs. Burlingame, Metcalfe, Hen- 
drix, D. L. Foster, Hudgins, Mochwart. 



Third Row: Bevis, I. L. White, Ford, Oxner, North- 
rop, Tatman, Hartman, Clay, Butterfield, Hood, M. 
M. Smith, Haynes, Stockton. 

Fourth Row: D. J. Simpson, Dixon, Kannapell, S. H. 
Ben-y, T. A. S. Wilson, Cower, Markham. 



Fifth Row: Lee, Piatt, Tully, Pruitt, P. D. Johnson, 
Lovering, Cusick, I. N. Smith. 
145 



^•jf 




phi epsilon pi 

OFFICERS 

Mike Dubin President 

Pete Jacobs Vice-President 

Don Luria Recording Secretary 

Marv Doerfler House Manager 

Mrs. C. Flournoy House Mother 

Phi Epsilon Pi has had one of the finest years in the history 
of the Chapter. With the addition of a fine Pledge Class, plus 
the contributions of the fratres, the House has been even 
more active than usual in campus affairs and activities. 

Three members of the Fraternity, Sophomores Milt Win- 
awer, Barry Storick, and Junior Dick Skolnik, are likely 
starters on Washington and Lee's Basketball Squad. Sopho- 
more Joel Bernstein played first string on the General's 
Soccer Team and was an important factor contributing to 
the team's highly successful season. Joel will also play Varsity 
Lacrosse as will Sophomore Elliot Joffe. In addition, Steve 




Berg, Milt Winawer. Mike Dubin, and Dick Skolnik will 
play Varsity Baseball. Also, quite busy with college activities 
is Junior Andy Greenman. who is Managing Editor of the 
Ring-turn Phi. 

Among the new pledges are Howard Jacobs, Freeport, Long 
Island; Harry Moses, New York City; Jerry Sussman, New 
Rochelle, N.Y.; Mike Masinter, Roanoke, Va.; Mike Epstein, 
Plainfield, N.J.; and Barry Goldsmith, Cedarhurst, Long 
Island. 

Jacobs is on the Varsity Swimming Squad, while Epstein 
played Junior Varsity Football. Moses, along with Pete 
Jacobs, is active on the student operated radio program, 
Home Edition. Mike Masinter is a member of W&L's fine 
Glee Club and a member of the Forensic Union, W&L's debat- 
ing society, as is Barry Goldsmith. 

In the Intramural competition. Phi Epsilon Pi has put up 
a strong showing. In the fall Tennis Tournament the Frater- 
nity won the majority of its matches and placed fifth among 
the seventeen fraternities on campus. In interfraternity bowl- 
ing. Phi Ep is tied for first place in its division. Senior Keg- 
gler Dick Bank and Junior Pete Jacobs have bowled con- 
sistently high scores. In volleyball we narrowly missed enter- 
ing the finals but placed a strong second. 

Phi Epsilon Pi had its opening house party on October 16, 
and it was acknowledged to be one of the best in years. The 
theme was that of an Alpine Ski Lodge and the fraternity was 
decorated accordingly. 

Yes, 1955 has promised to be a year which will bring 
great recognition to the Delta Chapter of Phi Epsilon Pi. 




delta chapter 




First Row: H. Moses, Goldsmith, Epstein, Masinter, 
H. E. Jacobs. 

Second Row: Bank, Doerfler, Mrs. W. C. Flournoy, 
Blacksin, Dubin. 



Third Row: Luria, Joffe, Winawer, Berg, Storick. 

Fourth Row: P. J. Jacobs, Greenman, Skolnik, Bern- 
stein, Nachman. 




phi gamma delta 

OFFICERS 

Hardin Marion President 

Lucky Denu Vice-President 

DuANE St. John Secretary 

Dick Hornaday Historian 

Mrs. C. S. Langhorne House Mother 



Established on the Washington and Lee campus in 1867, 
the Zeta Deuteron Chapter of Phi Gamma Delta was the first 
local fraternity to own its own home. The present house which 
was bought in 1921 and completely remodeled in 1936 to in- 
clude many specific fraternity needs, has since remained one 
of the most beautiful on campus. 

Phi Gamma Delta was founded at Washington and Jeffer- 
son College one hundred and seven years ago. In over a cen- 
tury of progress, the fraternity has grown to be a mainstay 




in the American fraternity system . . . eighty-two chapters, 
eighty graduate chapters, and over 57.000 members give 
proof to her position. 

New to the Chapter this year, the Phi Gam House Mother, 
Mrs. Caryetta Langhorne, has won a spot in the hearts of 
every Fiji brother. Through her thoughtfulness and skill, the 
Chapter has continued in the ways of hospitality and efficient 
management. 

Phi Gamma Delta has contributed its brothers to nearly 
every phase of campus life. In scholarship as in athletics Fiji 
names are sure to be found among those represented. This 
year found Wally Wright as President of the Opening Dance 
Set and President of Scabbard and Blade. Sam Syme was 
Editor of the Ring-turn Phi, a Freshman Dorm Counselor, and 
was elected to ODK. Marv Bishop again was active with the 
ever popular Southern Collegians and Carl Barnes and Jack 
McQuiggan took roles in Troubadour plays. In Intramurals 
the House was again among the leaders and found many of 
the members gaining individual honors for their athletic 
prowess. These are only a few of the brothers who have 
brought honor and prestige to the fraternity. Then too, may 
the Chapter be proud of its members in the Administration 
and on the Faculty . . . Dr. Francis P. Gaines, Dr. William 
G. Bean, Dr. Ollinger J. Crenshaw, Dr. Marvin Perry, Mr. 
George Irwin, and Mr. "Mac" Farris. 

Out of the long and full history of Phi Gamma Delta have 
come many of America's leaders . . . authors . . . states- 
men . . . educators . . . clergymen . . . scientists. These 
men, somewhere in their lives, have acquired the traits of 
leadership. Thus it is for four years that Phi Gamma Delta 
tries to encourage and cultivate this quality. 




148 



zeta deuteron chapter 




First Row: Sproul, Pressley, L. G. Davis, Heath, 
Brent, W. D. Ward, Keidel, Van Cleave, Denman, E. 
W. Higgins, Fenstermacher, Curran. 

Second Row: Bender, D. B. Thomas, Berlinhof, Fern, 
Honiaday, J. H. Marion, Mrs. Langhome, Denu, N. 
McBrien, Bishop, St. John, Werthan. 



Third Row: Hertzfeld, R. A. Davis, Neunreiter, 
Waltz, Syme, J. S. Budd, Bowers, Guenther, Butrick, 
Kelley, Shropshire, McQuiggan, Barnes, Buckey, B. F. 
Carter, S. S. Flanagan, Munson. 

Fourth Row: Kim, Bolt, D. M. Dawson, Alford, 
Bums, R. M. Budd, Elliott, Weber, S. J. Thompson, 
Fray, W. C. Jackson, Dickson, Steuart, Clinger. 



149 




phi kappa psi 

OFFICERS 

Joe Pontius President 

Stu Quarngesser Vice-President 

Garry Martin Recording Secretary 

Art McCain House Manager 

Mrs. Carroll Evans House Mother 

The Virginia Beta Chapter of Phi Kappa Psi celebrated 
its Centennial Anniversary during the past year. The Chap- 
ter was founded in February, 1855, as the first fraternity 
on the Washington and Lee campus. During the weekend 
many graduate brothers returned to Lexington for the oc- 
casion. The celebration included a full weekend of activities 
with a campus beer party, a dinner and dance at the Natural 
Bridge Hotel, and a cocktail party. The chapter welcomed 
W. Lyle Jones, national fraternity president, who spoke at 
the banquet. 

Phi Psi began the school year with an exceptionally fine 
Rush Week which produced 18 pledges. In preparation for 
the 1954-55 term many internal improvements were made 



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upon the house. Members of the House have been very active 
in extracurricular activities on the campus. Joe Pontius 
served as President of the Student War Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund Committee, Vice-President of Openings Dances, 
and member of the Cold Check Committee, and his name 
appears in "Who's Who in American Colleges and Univer- 
sities." Art McCain was President of the Washington Literary 
Society, and Ned Grove was Sports Editor of the Ring-tutu 
Phi. 

Phi Kappa Psi has enjoyed a varied and successful sociai 
year. The chapter centennial celebration was, of course, oui 
biggest social event, but house parties and informal spring 
weekends will long be remembered. In Intramural Athletics 
the Phi Psis got off to a fast start by taking the Tennis 
Crown. In all the other events the House has managed to 
finish near the top. In Intercollegiate Athletics Phi Psi again 
has proven to be one of the leaders. The House was repre- 
sented on the Football, Soccer, Wrestling, Basketball, Track, 
Tennis, and Lacrosse Teams. 

With such a well-rounded program and a closely knit 
House, Phi Psi can examine the past with pride and look to 
the future confident of success. For the success of the Chap- 
ter, socially and otherwise, we owe much to our House Moth- 
er, Mrs. Carroll Evans who has been with us for the past four 
years. Through her quiet graciousness, our chapter house has 
acquired its homelike atmosphere. 




Virginia beta chapter 








First Row: Charles, T. W. Martin, Nash, 0. S. White, 
Peale, K. Wood, Leap, B. C. Gooch, Payne, Leonard, 
Seeger, C. H. Miller. 

Second Row: A. W. McCain, G. P. Martin, Llorens, 
Huebner, Quamgesser, Mrs. Evans, Pontius, H. D. 
Wanier, Grove, R. B. Jones, Kane. 



Third Row: C. B. Davis, Salsbury, Abbott, C. D. 
Hawkins, Slingerland, Hai-vell, Atkinson, C. E. Dobbs, 
Stamp, R. G. Clark. 

Fourth Row: Peachy, McPherson, Wilemon, Sin- 
well, Large, Laird, K. C. Jones, Sherman, R. D. Miller, 
Koontz, Boone. 



151 




phi kappa sigma 



OFFICERS 

Mills Rogers President 

Chris Alexander Vice-President 

Jake Jacoby Vice-President 

Jim Kincannon Recording Secretary 

Bill McCallum House Manager 

Mrs. John Cogbill House Mother 

Phi Kappa Sigma was founded at the University of Penn- 
sylvania in 1850, and was introduced to Washington and Lee 
University in 1894. Throughout its sixty years of existence 
on the W&L campus. Phi Kappa Sigma has produced an 
amazing number of campus leaders. It has earned a strong 
reputation for fraternity and chapter spirit, and has con- 
standy contributed outstanding members to the various inter- 
collegiate athletic teams. Six Phi Kaps held class offices this 
year. Dick Kops, Historian of the Senior Class: Rupe Chis- 




holm, Vice-president of the Junior Class; and Bob Hawkins, 
Secretary of the Sophomore Class. 

Phi Kaps have distinguished themselves in every activity 
on the campus, as well as in Intercollegiate and Intramural 
Athletics, and in the past year they attained several major 
honors in extra-curricular fields: Pat Collins was among 
the W&L students selected for Who's Who in American Col- 
leges and Universities. In the literary field, Chris Alexander 
was elected President of the Graham-Lee society. Rupe Chis- 
holni was chosen as President of Pi Alpha Nu, and Dick 
Kops was selected Captain of the Baseball Team. In the past 
six years. Phi Kap has not finished lower than third in In- 
tramurals. 

Most students on the campus will remember the traditional 
Battle of the Bulge and the Fall and Christmas house parties, 
even though it has been observed that their spontaneous "Ed 
Moyler" parties have attained the proportions of any full- 
fledged house party. Phi Kappa Sigma has always recognized 
its social obligations to its members and to the campus. 

If dedications were in order, they would be to the 21 
promising members of the Freshman Class and to our House 
Mother, Mrs. John Cogbill, whose poise and charming per- 
sonality have added an element of cheerfulness and a home- 
like atmosphere to the house. 

The chapter has proved to be an organization in which 
the individual can realize self-expression and full, unbiased 
development of his personality. The Phi Kaps are a group 
of boys from diverse sections of the United States who have 
come to know and understand each other. They have tried 
to maintain an air of congeniality among themselves and, 
collectively, towards the entire campus, and in so doing, they 
have developed a sense of unity and mutual respect which 
can be rivaled by none. 




alpha alpha chapter 




First Row: S. A. McCain, Atherholt, J. R. C. Stephens, 
R. L. Smith, Toomey, Lyle, Henschel, Cockey, W. S. 
Russell, Barker, Weimar, C. L. McCormick, Beatty, 
Stout, Nuessle, Weeks, H. C. Caldwell. 

Second Row: Boemstein, Bracher, Pollard, L. P. 
Collins, Negas, Matthews, Dickenson, W. W. Fowler, 



Forkin, Laskey, Akin, Kops, Kincannon, Bond, C. F. 
Davis. 

Third Row: McCallum, Pritchard, Kline, Bowie, Chis- 
holm, Rogers, Dinkel, Dunker, Jacoby, Moyler, Ould, 
H. C. Alexander, McDonald, W. A. Myers, J. C. Camp- 
bell. 

Fourth Row: T. Hill, Sturgill, Amato. 




pi kappa alpha 



OFFICERS 

Tito Miller President 

Tom Robbins Vice-President 

Don Fryburger Secretary 

Jim Jackson Treasurer 

Chuck Watson House Manager 

Mrs. Earl Foster House Mother 

Founded in 1868 at the University of Virginia, Pi Kappa 
Alpha today looks back on a dignified past record, and for- 
ward to a confident future. In 109 chapters throughout the 
nation, PiKA has produced, and is producing, outstanding 
and respected men. Pi Chapter of PIKA was founded here 
in 1892. and has grown and prospered both in numbers and 
spirit from that day to this. During Pi's early years the Chap- 
ter became too large for its original house, and moved to its 
present one in Red Square. Pi's respected position on cam- 



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pus has been earned through the combined efforts and quality 
of the Chapter's members and loyal alumni. Three of PiKA's 
alumni are members of the W&L Faculty: Mr. Almand Cole- 
man, Dr. Marshall Fishwick, and Dean Clayton Williams. The 
Fraternity owes a special debt to Dean Williams for serving 
as Alumni Counselor for more than thirty years. 

This year, as always. Pi can be justly proud of its mem- 
bers who continued its tradition of leadership in every field 
of campus endeavor: Tom Robbins. Secretary of the Student 
Body; John Arnold. President of the Sophomore Class: Jack 
Kay, member of ODK and Editor of the Law Review; Bar- 
clay Smith, starting forward on the Mink's Basketball Team: 
Bob Cullers, member of the Troubadors — the list is long and 
diversity is great. The men of Pi filled honored positions in 
both scholastic and extracurricular activities. 

The Chapter as a whole continued its envied position as 
one of the leading fraternities on campus: fourth in scholar- 
ship . . . Intramural success ... a strong and active Pledge 
Class. Socially, Pi's tradition of fine parties continued — the 
French Party . . . the 49'er Party . . . the Christmas Party 
. . . the dance set parties . . . the many informal get-to- 
gethers . . . the PiKA Ball in Richmond, where Miss Betty 
York of Randolph-Macon, representing Pi, was chosen re- 
gional Dreamgirl. 

Our most gracious House Mother, Mrs. Foster, has added 
much to our fraternity scene. To her, we express our utmost 
gratitude and admiration. Pi Chapter looks forward to the 
coming year with its traditions of friendship, service, success, 
and prominence. 




pi chapter 




First Row: Tiffany, J. J. Crawford, Hempstead, D. V. 

Johnson, Corbin, Atwell, A. L. Allen, Pearson, R. F. 

Banks. 

Second Row: Marlow, Cullers, Fryburger, Bussen, 

Robbins, Mrs. Foster, S. G. Miller, Talbott, Rockel, 

Schuler, Schaefer. 



Third Row: Spencer, J. F. Arnold, E. K. Martin, 

Barksdale, Swezey, E. B. Smith, Keith, Preston, M. S. 

Johnson, Early. 

Fourth Row: Law, M. B. Davis, J. H. Jackson, Reiner, 

Gee, R. Anderson, Lupton, H. E. Fisher, Aliotti, 

Lurate. 




pi kappa phi 

OFFICERS 

Bill Fishback President 

Morgan Shelor Treasurer 

Ken Starling Secretary 

Al Mixson Warden 

Mrs. H. W. McConnell House Mother 

Rho Chapter of Pi Kappa Phi was established at Wash- 
ington and Lee in February of 1920. Lawrence W. Davis, 
Shirley J. Robbins, Wells H. Rutherford, James R. Sims, and 
Louis W. Milbourne were the Charter Members. During the 
early years of Rho. Earl K. Paxton, a professor at W&L and 
VMI served as the Faculty Advisor, being replaced after more 
than thirty years of service by Herbert N. Hamric. 

From a small beginning the Chapter has attained eminence 
envied by many "large" fraternities. During the war the 
Chapter was forced into an inactive status. In 1946 a small 
but extremely active and adept nucleus of old members re- 
turned and reactivated the fraternity. At that time it was 




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one of the smallest Houses on campus. Today, a few years 
later, it is numbered among the largest, having accomplished 
such feats as winning the Scholastic Trophy twice in a single 
year, having a brother, Richard Vogler, teaching in Germany 
on a Fulbright Grant, and pledging sixteen freshmen with 
interests in both scholarship and extracurricular activities. 

The 1954-55 year has seen Rho Chapter represented in 
every field of college life. Bill Bailey led the Washington 
and Lee Moot Court Team to national recognition this year 
. . . Bailey has also served as President of the Student Body, 
a member of the Washington and Lee Laiv Revieiv, was for 
two years a Dormitory Counselor and last j'ear was Head 
Counselor. Marv Anderson has likewise served on the Law 
Revieiv and has been Editor of the Ring-turn Phi . . . Jack 
Stackhouse was chosen as an alternate for the W&L 1954 
"Quiz Bowl Team" and has served on the Editorial Board 
of the Shenandoah . . . Lew Cope is the Editorial Advisor 
of the Ring-turn Phi as well as News Director of Home Edi- 
tion, the University's evening news program . . . Bill Fish- 
back is the Assistant Managing Editor of the Ring-turn Phi 
. . . Lou Noll was the Financial Manager of the Shenandoah 
and has served for three years as a cheerleader . . . Bob 
Wood captained the 1954 Cross Country Team and fresh- 
man Burke Armstrong received his letter for making the 
same team. 

The Pi Kapp brotherhood has always been a closely knit 
group . . . one which seeks fraternal spirit, intellectual emi- 
nence and social prominence . . . and it has lived through 
the years, expanding and accumulating vitality. 




156 



rho chapter 




First Row: F. J. Ramsay, DeGraaf, Morton, King, 
Wallace, R. G. Anderson, B. P. Armstrong, W. L. 
Keith, Tarr, Proulx. 

Second Row: W. M. Baile)-, 0. B. Ramsay, Gray, 
Fishback, Bare, Mrs. McConnel, Stroud, Simons, Cope, 
Stackhouse, Slick. 



Third Row: Kressler, Jennings, J. W. Duncan, Fitz- 
gerald, Noll, Collins, Johnston, Rexford, P. S. Wood, 
J. S. Lewis, Ahlgren, Doerhoefer, Mixon. 

Fourth Row: Nolte, Rappel, Roane, Gillespie, M. H. 
Anderson, Stephenson, Marsh, Ballantine, D. C. Ward, 
Snowdon, Shelor, Starling. 




sigma alpha epsilon 

OFFICERS 

Walk Jones President 

Arch Roberts Vice-President 

Murray McClain Secretary-Treasurer 

Mrs. F. L. Wagner House Mother 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon was founded at the University of 
Alabama in March, 1856, by eight students who had become 
hard and fast friends. Through the energies of its outstand- 
ing leaders, the Fraternity has expanded in all directions, and 
its members have taken high and respected positions in so- 
ciety. SAE has over 130 collegiate chapters. 

Since its founding in 1867 by Frank Bell Webb, Virginia 
Sigma Chapter at W&L has grown and prospered on campus. 
Today its members have gained distinction in every phase 
of campus activities — scholastic, social, athletic, and extra- 
curricular leadership. 




Over the years the Sig Alphs have always held a high posi- 
tion in publications. This year Virginia Sigma has served 
men in important posts on all the leading campus publica- 
tions. 

In sports, the chapter claims Jim Mayoza, Don Farris, 
George Jackson, Kent Russell, and Neil Bland in football. 
Dana Curtis runs Cross Country; Jack Dobbs and Richard 
Raines are on the Swimming Team; Wally Witmer and Gill 
Holland wrestle; Dan Thompson, Doc Towson and Hal 
Wbitaker play Lacrosse; Fred Bear. Tom Smith and Don 
Farris are varsity golfers; Dan Thompson is on the Soccer 
Team; and Tom Baker plays baseball. In Intramurals, SAE 
is, as always, outstanding. 

Sophomore Rob Peeples is serving his second year on the 
Executive Committee and Mike Earp holds the secretary 
post of the Junior Class. Murray McClain is a member of the 
Assimilation Committee and Ed Givhan is again on the Cold 
Check Committee. Walk Jones and Jim Davis are on the 
Rifle Team; Walk serving as Captain. 

In scholarship and general activities, Virginia Sigma also 
more than holds its own. Many men are on the Dean's List 
and in a wide variety of honor societies. In addition Virginia 
Sigma has always been well represented in the Christian 
Council, Glee Club, Troubadors and other organizations. 

The year 1954-55 has been a sparkling social season for 
SAE. Particularly notable was the Pajama Game Party in 
November which was followed by a party for the under- 
privileged children of Rockbridge County. 

Finishing her fifth year as House Mother, Mrs. Felde 
Wagner has been a gracious and capable hostess. Dean Gil- 
liam, Dr. Starling, and Mr. Cook have served ably as Faculty 
Advisors, contributing immeasurably toward an excellent 
year for Virginia Sigma. 




158 



Virginia sigma chapter 




First Row: McClain, W. C. Jones, Mrs. Wagner, A. 

W. Roberts, Earp. 

Second Row: Pittman, J. W. Howard, Sawtelle, 

Hollins, Lytton, Baker, Bear. 

Third Row: Givhan, McNeer, Houston, Rodgers, D. B. 

Thompson H, Becker. 

Fourth Row: Peeples, Raines, Bracken, J. H. Davis, 
C. J. Dobbs, C. 0. Dawson. 



Fifth Row: Mayoza, Cooke, Curtis, T. R. Smith, Jack, 

G. P. Jackson, Farriss. 

Sixth Row: Towson, H. C. Whitaker, Lyons, Good- 

wyn, Marthinson, W. A. Roljerts. 

Seventh Row: T. F. King, Barnett, Holloman, Wit- 

mer, Wilboume, K. W. Chandler. 

Eighth Row: Midgley, Plaisted, Sadler, Lipscomb, 

Tucker, Bland, Carney, K. A. Russell, Mead, Ritter, 

Holland. 



159 




K^l^mi 



1 g m a 



h 



OFFICERS 

Forney Daugette President 

Harry Kennedy Vice-President 

Jack Friedman Secretary 

Joe Banks Treasurer 

Mrs. G. C. Nielsen House Mother 

Alpha Chapter of Sigma Chi was established on June 28, 
1855, at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, and the Frater- 
nity has grown and multiplied until it now embraces 134 
active chapters. Of these, Zeta is a very prominent member 
which appeared on the Washington and Lee campus on De- 
cember 10, 1866. Due to the character and spirit of its mem- 
bers, Zeta has played an active role in campus activities. 
Along with Beta Theta Pi and Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Chi 
forms the famed Miami Triad. 

During the past year, the men of Sigma Chi have met with 
added success and good fortune. This can be attributed in 
part to a very gracious and charming addition in the person 




of Mrs. G. C. Nielsen, the new House Mother and to Dr. Ken- 
neth P. Stevens, Faculty Advisor and friend. 

Sig representatives can be found in almost every varsity 
sport. Pres Pate, Jim Perryman and Marv Moreland lent their 
talents to the Football Squad. Dale Carter and Bill Dalzell 
made their mark as varsity swimmers. Harry Kennedy, a four 
year letterman, captained the Track Squad, while Dick 
Belden and Bob Phelon garnered laurels on the baseball 
diamond. Freshman participation in athletics, especially in 
basketball, wrestling, and golf, also proved encouraging and 
should further the success of W&L teams in the future. 

Many Zeta Sigs have taken active parts in the leadership 
phases of campus life. George Milligan reigned as President 
of Spring Dances, while Forney Daugette distinguished him- 
self and Zeta by being tapped Omicron Delta Kappa, being 
listed in "Who's Who in American College and Universities" 
and serving a successful term as President of the House. 
Monte Pearse has compiled an outstanding record as Presi- 
dent of Zeta Chapter, Vice-President of the Christian Coun- 
cil, winner of the ODK Key and Vice-President of Fancy 
Dress. Monte has also served in the capacity of Dorm Coun- 
selor and on the President's Student Advisory Council. 

The outstanding quality in which the Zeta Sigma Chis 
pride themselves is the true feeling of brotherhood. Men of 
many different localities and aspirations find their common 
interest invested in the life and fraternal spirit of Sigma Chi. 
Young in her ambitions and steady in her actions, Sigma Chi 
will always be active on the W&L campus. It will long be 
remembered by its Sweethearts and members. 




zeta chapter 




VI immi I 




First Row: C. R. Thompson, G. I. Moyer, Mower, J. 
M. Brown, P. H. Howard, Branch, Whipple, Watring, 
Hollister, Phelon. 

Seconq Row: R. B. Myers, Belden, Daugette, P. R. 
Camphell, J. K. Banks, Mrs. Nielson, Pearse, J. 0. 
Friedman, Alanis, Chatman, Pate. 



Third Row: A. C. Maxwell, L. A. G. Johnson, Garner, 
Nevin, Wenthe, Best, Kennedy, Ferryman, Dalzell, S. 
Clark. 

Fourth Row: Milligan, Sullivan, E. D. Gibson, W. M. 
Adams, Bagley, Seible, Moreland, Willard, D. L. 
Carter, Guy, Mann. 



^^"/^-^ 




Sigma n u 

OFFICERS 

Len Hough President 

Bill Merrick Vice-President 

Fred Magoline Secretary 

Bill Yager House Manager 

Hal Hamilton Treasurer 

Mrs. C. E. Spence House Mother 



Sigma Nu was founded in 1869 at VMI. and has since 
grown to be one of the largest national Greek-letter frater- 
nities in the United States. Lambda, one of the oldest active 
chapter of Sigma Nu still in existence, was founded at W&L 
in 1882. 

Lambda members are fortunate to have Mrs. C. A. Spence 
as their House Mother. She has been with the chapter for 
9 years and has been an integral part of all our activities 
during this time. Sigma Nu stands among the top fraternities 




at W&L in all phases of campus activity. The local Chapter 
is well above the all-men's average scholastically, and stands 
high in varsity and intramural sports participation. 

Among campus leaders from Lambda Chapter were Bill 
Dols. Editor of the Calyx, Vice-President of the Student 
body. Dormitory and Freshman Camp counselor, and mem- 
ber of ODK; Hal Hamilton, chairman of the Assimilation 
Committee, and past President of Pi Alpha Nu: Trev Arm- 
brister. President of White Friars, and a member of 
SWMSFC and the Tennis and Wrestling Teams; Buzz Han- 
son, Business Manager of the Southern Collegian; Carl Swan- 
son, Secretary of the Freshman Law Class and member of 
the Assimilation Committee; Jim Repass, Chairman of the 
Concert Guild, and Business Manager and accompanist for 
the Glee Club; King Sprott, Vice-President of the IFC; Mike 
Chaney, Vice-President of the Sophomore Class; Henry 
Morgan, Assistant Sports Editor of the Ring-turn Phi and 
Sports Editor with Fred Magoline, of the Calyx. 

Gridiron representatives of Lambda include: Jay Heck- 
mann, an Assistant Coach, half-back Ruff Safford, and line- 
man Charlie Perry. Len Hough is Assistant Soccer Coach; 
Trev Armbrister finished his third season on the Wrestling 
Team ; Frank Kahnbach, Bill Childs, and John Gibbs starred 
in Swimming. Bill, a Freshman, also swept through the fall 
Tennis Tournament without a single loss to cop the Univer- 
sity championship honors. Ben Noel. Welles Murphy, and Bob 
Neunreiter are starring on this year's Varsity and Freshmen 
Wrestling Teams and Charlie Cella on the Basketball Team. 

Socially, Sigma Nu's annual White Rose Formal was out- 
standing, and Cave Mountain Lake proved a perfect setting 
for the Spring House Party. The fall costume affair featur- 
ing Shanley's Collegians and taking for its theme "Song 
Titles" was a great success. But of primary importance at 
Lambda, Sigma Nu, is a feeling of friendship and unity. 




lambda chapter 





First Row: Safford, McGieevy, B. L. Noel, D. A. 
Miller, Gibbs, Ridenour. 

Second Row: D. Monroe, Hamilton, Mrs. C. A. 
Spence, Swanson, Dols. 

Third Row: E. H. Clarke, Childs, Sprague, Hassen- 
our. Yager, Wagner, S. L. Thomas, C. S. Peri-y, 
Greene, Kramer, Webber, P. W. Perry, Morrell, 
Murphey, Huffard. 



Fourth Row: Sieminski, Hinkle, H. C. Morgan, Re- 
pass, Heckmann, Geiger, Macintosh, Hough, S. E. 
Monroe, Gay, Neal, Cochran, Cella. 

Fifth Row: Waters, Annbrister, S. L. Moore, Cairns, 
Cosby, J. W. Jackson, Chaney, Gutberlet, Gallagher, 
Kalmbach, Drabek, Tolle, Leininger, Magoline, V. H. 
Hanson, Rewalt, Luhnow, Merrick, Ritter. 




z e t a 



bet 



a t a u 



OFFICERS 

Larry Levitan President 

Dick Broudy Vice-President 

Jack Morcenstern House Manager 

Byron Berman Secretary 

Mrs. Inez Foster House Mother 

Zeta Beta Tau had its beginnings on the Washington and 
Lee campus in 1920 as an outgrowth of the Gamma Gamma 
Club which was formed in 1919 by six students. Granted 
a charter by the National Fraternity, it became the Alpha 
Epsilon Chapter. From this humble beginning the Chapter 
has expanded notably in size and prestige. 

Once again, thirteen freshmen were pledged, bringing the 
membership to forty-four. For the past few years. Zeta Beta 
Tau pledges have been required, as one of their duties, to 




participate in at least two campus activities in the hope that 
they would become interested in University activities and 
continue to work in them. The Zebes are now represented in 
almost every phase of University life. 

Among the active Zebe workers is Henry Heymann. whose 
art work is well respected on campus, and who has been Vice- 
President of Fancy Dress. Finals, and numerous other dance 
sets in the past two years and is Art Editor of the Calyx. 
Other outstanding Zebes include Frank Giddon. President of 
the Publications Board; Sid Kaplan. Secretary of the Inter- 
fraternity Council; Curley Greenebaum, Chaimian of the 
Library Committee and Vice-President of Fancy Dress; 
Sandy Maslansky, Business Manager of the Calyx; Dick 
Rosenberg, Treasurer of the Christian Council; and Al Lip- 
sett, Secretary of the Senior Class. 

In athletic circles, Paul Weinstein, the only returning 
letterman in the House, filled in the baseball picture; sopho- 
mores Bill AbelofI, John Gold and Stan Erdrich were on the 
Swimming Team; and Don Rosenfeld returned to the golf 
links. For the past few years the Zebes have been respected 
for their scholastic achievements, ranking fifth and second 
last year among the top laurels. 

With the acquisition of the Most Outstanding Chapter 
Award, presented to the Chapter only two years ago by the 
National Fraternity, brothers representing fourteen different 
states have amalgamated this year to keep the Chapter at 
this high level. This outstanding year, we feel, could not 
have come about without the patience and fidelity of Mrs. 
Inez Foster, our new and devoted House Mother. 




alpha epsilon chapter 




First Row: J. P. Moyer, Brickman, Pickus, Rich, Third Row: Atler, Applefeld, B. Bermaii, Cristal, 

Samelson, Kullman, Abramson, Helzberg, I. B. Ber- Cane, Greenebaum, Heymann, Ehudin, Rosenberg, 
man, Caplan, T. C. Friedman. Erdreich. 



Second Row: Kaplan, Lipsett, Maslansky, Weinstein, Fourth Row: Mintz, Rosenfeld, Isaacs, Gold, L. E. 

Levitan, Mrs. I. Foster, Broudy, Morgansteni, Shape- Goodman, Bendheim, Portner, Garson, Halper, Israel. 

ro, Giddon, Abeloff. 

165 




, ,**^^'^* 



university 

committee 

on athletics 




Seated: Stow, Foster, Hinton, Twomb- 

ly, Cook. Standing: Oxner, Dunker, 

Griffith. 



William M. Hinton Chairman 

Jay D. Cook Secretary 

George H. Foster Faculty Member 

Edwin C. Griffith Faculty Member 

Marcellus H. Stow Faculty Member 

Edwin P. Twombly Faculty Member 

James Izard Alumnus Member 

William E. Tilson Alumnus Member 

William K. Dunker Student Member 

George D. Oxner Student Member 

168 



a 



nd we did have football • . 



In the pages which have preceded this section we 
have collected pictures of familiar places and faces 
that will always sei-ve to remind us of Washington 
and Lee. However, those of us who have been a part 
of W&L during this 1954-55 year have been con- 
stantly reminded of an event that those outside our 
confines will not soon let us forset. 



On August 5th, 1954, a letter was mailed to the 
alumni and students, by the President of this institu- 
tion, officially confirming many rumors regarding a 
drastic change in Washington and Lee's athletic 
policy. The Board of Trustees had taken their stand 
and we were to return to an ideal amateur status, 
the nature of which few of us had ever had the oppor- 
tunity to experience. 



1— SafEord, 2— Keidel. 3— Hertzfeld. 4— Poole, 5— 
Ferryman, 6 — Gitter. 7 — Keith, 8 — Holcombe, 9 — Brown, 
10— Callaway, 11— Doyle, 12— Stine, 13— Perry, 14— 
HoUand, 15— Russell, 16— Piatt, 17— Pate, 18— Craw- 
ford, 19— Jackson. 20— Peden, 21— McThenia, 22— Chis- 
holm, 23— Campbell. 24— Laskey. 25— Pipkin, 26— 
Mayoza. 27 — Kauffman, 28 — Johnson, 29 — Salsbury, 
30 — Mahoney, 31 — Heina. 





Williams and assistant Jay Heckmann 



to expose themselves to the criticisms of those who 
refused to face reality. 

The 1954 football season opened with neither 
team nor schedule, but with a coach by the name of 
Boyd Williams, who was determined that those who 
wanted to play football would have their chance. 
The University gave its whole-hearted support and 
the destiny of football at Washington and Lee was 
left solely in the hands of the students. With the 
aid of student coaches and the full confidence of the 
Athletic Department, the students who desired to 
work hard and to play the game, without subsidiza- 
tion, turned out to practice for an unknown sched- 
ule. It was not until several weeks following the 
opening of classes that Williams had moulded a 
group of athletes together who were deteiTnined that 
football would remain on our campus. 



Those of us who were close to the school and were 
willing to look open-eyed at an unhealthy situation, 
with its vast impending ramifications, saw that there 
was no alternative. The decision was made and ath- 
letic subsidization at Washington and Lee was a 
thing of the past. In President Gaines' letter it was 
clearly pointed out that the University had suffered 
innumerable financial setbacks which arose due 
to our competition with large, highly subsidized, 
colleges. And there was no relief in sight. Coupled 
with the fact that a program of such intensity as we 
had been sponsoring was producing too great a 
strain upon the athlete, who was forced to maintain 
an academic standing parallel to that of other stu- 
dents, it seemed unfair to the individual player. 

Many of us who are leaving Lexington as seniors 
this June will remember the days when the Big Blue 
was an imposing power in the Southern Conference. 
Some of us enjoyed the thrill of going to Washing- 
ton and Lee's first bowl game or, more than likely, 
we have lived with its memories. However, we shall 
never forget the play of such all time greats as "Glit- 
tering" Gil Bocetti, Rolo Thompson, Bill McHenry, 
Jack Delahunty, Wes Abrams, and many others who 
made the sacrifices to play, not only for pay, but 
for the school that they had come to love. Few of 
us will ever forget our 42 to 14 win over The Uni- 
versity of Virginia in the fall of 1951, for the first 
such victory since 1937. Also we will recall the last 
game of that great rivalry that saw a powerful 
Wahoo team fall victim to a spirited General team, 
27-13. 

As we remember these games, we must likewise 
try and wipe away the pangs of defeat and humilia- 
tion we were to suffer at the hands of such top teams 
in the nation as Maryland, Tennessee, and West Vir- 
ginia. If we were not willing to open our school to 
the big football market, was it fair to continue such 
competition? Something had to be done and it was 
up to a small group of men to make the decision and 






Student coaches Benham, DeGree, Sturgill, and Flanders 



After several small scrimmages with local schools 
the team, made up of mostly sophomores and fresh- 
men, opened its makeshift schedule with Hargrave 
Militaiy Academy, only to suffer a 7-0 setback. Still 
green and only beginning to take the shape of the 
team that Boyd Williams knew he had, they enter- 
tained Emory and Henry at Wilson Field next, but 
were able only to salvage a 6-6 tie. 

The Generals finally hit their winning stride 
against the undersquadmen of Hampden-Sydney 
College as they won the contest, 13-0. The short 



lived schedule came to a close early in the season 
when the Blue and White romped to their most im- 
pressive victory over Bridgewater College, 24-6. 

Many names could be mentioned in regards to 
each of the games mentioned above, but the stars 
were not only those who scored the touchdowns, but 
the men who might never have played a single game 
and only sat on the bench. Those men who continue 
to play football on this amateur basis will have their 
names bright with glory in other Calyxes in years 
to come. These men, by most of us, will never be 
remembered for the touchdowns that they may or 
may not have scored or for the games that they were 
able to win. They will be remembered for the mere 
fact that they played the game. They had won the 
biggest game of all and, as the winners, insured that 
the sport will not die here at Washington and Lee. 

If it were possible to dedicate each section of a 
yearbook to the outstanding contributor in each ac- 
tivity, we should like this section to be given to these 
men. However, along with these players, we would 
dedicate it to those individuals who, early last sum- 
mer, saw the need for a change in our athletic policy 
and were prepared to make it, despite the many 
sacrifices that it might entail. These are the men who 
have suffered most for what they had the foresight 
to see: the foresight to see what we are beginning 
to realize was the most feasible move that could 
have been made in the best interests of Washington 
and Lee. 





u, McHenry, Mockwart, Sullivan. Standing : Salsbury, Wii 
Smith, B., Marshall, Hoss, Nichols, Flora, McCann. 



er. Storick. Smith. I.. 



basketball 



The Washington and Lee courtnien finished the 1954-55 season with a 16-13 
record, including a win over Furman and a loss to West Virginia in the semi- 
finals of the Southern Conference Basketball Tourney. Such a campaign marks the 
first winning 3'ear for the Cagers since 1947. 

The Generals opened the season on a very bright note by overwhelming Bridge- 
water College 119-72. Six Generals hit in double figures as they were led by Lee 
Marshall and Dom Flora, both of whom registered 18. The Cagers then hit the 
skids as they lost four in a row to Tennessee, Vanderbilt. Richmond, and West 
Virginia. 

The courtmen regained their stride in smashing Hampden-Sidney 99-62. fol- 
lowed by their trip to Montgomery, Alabama for the Montgomery Tournament. 
There they displayed a creditable brand of ball, but in the end dropped two close 
games; the first to Auburn 91-81. and then to Miami in a heartbreaker, 80-75. 
The Auburn game was not all dark spots, however, as Lee Marshall, star sopho- 
more pivotman. poured through 37 points. 

Moving into their second holiday tournament, this one at Fayetteville. West 
Virginia, the Generals defeated Carnegie Tech 90-79. to gain the final round. 
Dom Flora hit for 34 points to top the scoring for the Blue, while Barry Storick 
followed with 21. The Cagers were not as successful the next night as the L ni- 
versity of Virginia, led by Buzzy Wilkinson and his 43 markers, edged the Gen- 
erals 96-90. Lee Marshall tallied 35 in this game, and again Barry Storick was 
second with 18. The courtmen then moved into Huntington on New Year's Day. 
only to drop a close encounter to Marshall College. Marshall, working again from 
the center.post, burnt the nets for 37 points to lead the Blue and White. 




Coach McCann talks with returning lettermen Denu and 
McHenry 



Washington and Lee then celebrated its return to Vir- 
ginia with a resounding 84-72 win over Roanoke College, 
the leading team in the Mason-Dixon Conference. Dom 
Flora paced the offense with 28 points, 17 of them com- 
ing in the Generals' strong second half surge. The cagers' 
new year debut at home was marred by a narrow 78-73 
loss to William and Mary, which found Marshall with 28 
points and Flora with 22 keeping the game close all the 
way, until the Indians pulled it out in the closing seconds 
on a series of foul shots. 

The Generals returned to the winning trail by smashing 
hapless VPI 88-63 in a strictly no-contest affair at Dore- 
mus gym. Flora and Marshall again led the attack as Dom 
dropped in 31 and Lee 24. The cagers then moved to 
Charlottesville where they lost a high scoring fray to the 
Wahoos, 104-91. 

The hard-wooders then went on the rampage, winning 
four in a row including victories over Davidson, the Cita- 
del, Roanoke, and VPI. The Generals had their second 



night of the season in three figures as they raked up 100 
points in the Roanoke victory. However, the cagers could 
not cope with "Hot Rod" Hundley and his West Virginia 
mates as the Mountaineers ended the streak with a 96-85 
victory. 

Coach Billy McCann's charges then moved to the VMI 
fieldhouse to meet the George Washington Colonials, who 
were ranked fifth in the nation. The Generals, displaying 
superb form, played the highly touted Colonials off of 
their feet in the first half and took the floor for the second 
half with a seven point lead. Then disaster struck. With 
Corky Devlin putting on a phenomenal shooting show, the 
men from the Capitol City scored twenty points before the 
Blue and Wliite registered their first marker of the half. 
The Generals narrowed the gap toward the end of the 
game, but their early famine cost them what would have 
been one of the biggest upsets of the year. 

After that near miss the cagers came up with their most 
outstanding win of the season up to that time, a stunning 
91-86 victory over Richmond. The loss was the first for 
the Spiders in 28 consecutive Big Six games. Their pre- 
vious loss came at the hands of Jay Handlan and the Gen- 
erals in 1952. Flora and Marshall again led the unusually 
potent attack for the Blue and White with 28 and 26 points 
respectively. 

A tense moment under the Richmond boards 





Barry Storick in action against the Spiders 

But the best was yet to come. The cagers followed up this win with consecutive triumphs over 
William and Mary, the Citadel, Davidson, East Tennessee State, Virginia and Furman, to run 
their unbeaten skein to seven in a row. The William and Mary win was particularly gratifying 
to the Generals, both through revenge motive for the earlier loss and by the resoundingly wide 
margin of victory. 

The wins over the Citadel and Davidson came as a surprise to no one, but the victory in the 
East Tennessee State game was one of the team's top performances of the year. Trailing by the 
tune of sixteen points at halftime, the Generals began dominating the backboards and grabbed 
the lead with about eight minutes to go. The work of Marshall and Storick under the boards 
was again the deciding factor in the win. 

Milt Winawer up for a jump shot 




Bridgewater ..72; W&L.119 
Tennessee .... 82; W&L. 66 
Vanderbilt ...104; W&L. 88 
Richmond .... 9.5; W&L. 78 
West Virginia . 96; W&L. 86 
Hampd.-Sydney 62; W&L. 99 

Auburn 91; W&L. 81 

Miami (Fla.) . 80; W&L. 75 



Barclay Smith 




Carnegie Tech . 79; W&L. 90 

Virginia 96; W&L. 90 

Marshall 89; W&L. 79 

Roanoke 72; W&L. 84 

William & Mary 78; W&L. 73 

V.P.I 63; W&L. 88 

Virginia 104; W&L. 91 

Davidson 56; W&L. 83 



Citadel 53; W&L. 70 

Roanoke 65; W&L. 100 

V.P.1 67; W&L. 82 

West Virginia. 96; W&L. 85 

G. Washington 69; W&L. 62 

Richmond 86; W&L. 91 

William & 

Mary 67; W&L. 86 

Citadel 50; W&L. 89 



There couldn't have been a more fitting climax to regular season play than the win over the 
Wahoos. The clincher was put on in the closing minutes of the game when the Cavaliers' ace 
scorer, Buzz Wilkinson, fouled out after tallying 40 of Virginia's 89 points. Lee Marshall played 
a brilliant game in leading the Generals' scoring with 30 points; Dom Flora, as always, was the 
playmaker, besides tossing in quite a few points; Barry Storick got the lion's share of the re- 
bounds as usual; Milt Winawer, with his brilliant passing, set up numerous scoring plays; and 
Barclay Smith did a fine job in putting the stopper on Wilkinson in the second half when "the 
Buzzer" could do no better than a dozen points. 

With six straight victories under their belt the courtmen moved into the Southern Confer- 
ence Tournament with a confidence that foresaw success. Their first game was with the Fur- 
man Paladins, the nation's record-breaking, highest scoring outfit, which boasted All- American 
Barrel Floyd, the nation's individual high point maker. After the fray was over Washington and 
Lee had won by the overwhelming total of 97-63. Furman and Floyd had been held to one of 
their lowest point totals of the season, and the Generals had set a new tourney scoring record. 
All five of the starters for the Blue and White hit in double figures, and Barry Storick grabbed 
23 rebounds, while Dom Flora was sinking 13 out of 13 from the foul line as the Generals made 
the Richmond fans stand up and take notice. 

The next night things were just reversed. The cagers were as far ofF their game against West 
Virginia as they were on it against Furman. The Mountaineers jumped to a 13-2 lead at the 
outset; stretched it to 42-29 at the half and after "Hot Rod" Hundley sank three goals in a 



Barry Storick 




Davidson 52; W&L. 63 

East Tennessee. 70; W&L. 79 
Virginia 89; W&L. 98 

Southern Conference 
Tournament 

Furman 63; W&L. 97 

West Virginia . 89; W&L. 74 



row at the outset of the second half the Generals were never able to cut the lead to under a dozen 
points. 

The final statistics for the team go a long way in showing just how good and how well bal- 
anced the team was. Lee Marshall made 621 points over the season for an average of 21.4 per 
game, while Flora dropped through a total of 553 for an average of 19.1. Barry Storick and 
Marshall both averaged almost 10 rebounds a game. Marshall had a remarkable 51.3% shoot- 
ing percentage from the floor, while he and Flora both hit more than 75% of their foul shots. 
On the whole the team averaged 42.0%) from the floor and 68.7% from the foul line, and the 84.3 
point average per game was among the top 15 in the nation. 

Statistics cannot measure such things as how Storick always seemed to come up with jump 
balls, how Winawer could look at the scorers' table and flip a pass behind him to set up a score, 
how Marshall and Flora always took up the slack for each other on ofF nights, and how Barclay 
Smith was able to hold some of the top scorers in the nation to half their usual total. Coach 
McCann had done a brilliant job in coming up with this great winning combination, consid- 
ered by many as "the Cinderella team of the South" and one, if it is intact next fall, which 
should be a potential threat to all oncomers. 




wrestling 



Coach Miller with Captain John Elli- 



The 1954-55 Wrestling Team, made up entirely of under- 
classmen, showed a potential power which should manifest 
itself in winning ways in the future for Coach Dick Miller. 
This year, however, the Generals were successful in com- 
piling a 4-5 won and lost record. 

Going down to defeat in the first three encounters, the 
Washington and Lee grapplers were hampered by the 
early loss of 162 lb. Southern Conference Champion, Gibby 
McSpadden. The season's opener found the home team on 
the short end of a 38-0 score against VPl, as Captain John 
Ellis was the lone man who escaped a pinning. Little im- 
provement was noticed during the opening weeks, as the 
Blue and White dropped matches to Franklin and Marshall 
and Millersville by scores of 33-3 and 22-6 respectively. 

The matmen, however, were soon to catch fire. In Lex- 
ington a partisan crowd watched individual victories by 
Dick Whiteford, Don Fowler, Bob Miller. McSpadden. and 
Ellis give rise to a team win over the Duke Blue Devils. 
The following week Coach Miller's charges journeyed to 
Chapel Hill where they trimmed the University of North 
Carolina, 22-8. It was three in a row when the Blue and 
White were able to score four pins over the Citadel and 
take the match, 26-10. 

It was the defending Southern Conference Champions, 
West Virginia, which ended the Generals' winning streak. 
Bill Northrop, McSpadden, and Ellis had the task of garner- 
ing all of the home team's points, as a hard pressed Moun- 
taineer squad squeezed by, 21-13. Undaunted, they re- 
turned to Lexington to entertain, and defeat, Davidson 
24-10. Featured in this event was a series of three pins by 
Holland, Fowler, and McSpadden, the last coming after 
only 1:49 minutes of the first period. 

In the final match of the regular season the Generals 
played host to the University of Virginia. In a thriller 
which went right down to the wire, it was only a pin by 
Cavalier Henry Jordon which inade it a Wahoo victory in 
the final event and the loss of the match. 16-14. 



Top : Bob Miller against Duke heavyweight 
Bottom: Malthus Award Winner Ellis in action 




VPI 38; W&L 

Franklin and Marshall 33; W&L 3 

Millersville 22; W&L 6 

Duke 13; W&L 18 

North Carolina 8; W&L 8 

Citadel 10; W&L 26 

West Virginia 21; W&L 13 

Davidson 10; W&L 24 

Virginia 16; W&L 14 

During early March all eyes turned to Doremus Gymnasium, where Washington and 
Lee played host to the annual Southern Conference Wrestling Tournament. The Generals 
were forced to settle with fourth place, behind VPI, the winners, West Virginia, and 
VMI, although gaining the 167 lb. crown for Gibby McSpadden, his second such honor. 



First Row: Whiteford, Northrop, Fowler, Ellis, Neunreiter. Second Row: Hollister, Safford, Holland, McSpadden, Miller, B., Witmer. Third Row: Mille 
Susskind, Noel, Thygesen, Murphy, Fralin, Arrabrister, Lunger, Moyer, Abramson, Van Cleave. 



R., 




Other entries in the meet found Ellis in second place, as he was stopped for only the 
second time of the season. Northrop and Neunreiter performed admirably as they both 
took strong thirds in their respective classes. The remaining entries of Fowler in the 
147 lb. class and Holland in the 172 lb. class ended up with fourth place merits. 

At the season's close it was voted that team captain John Ellis should be this year's 
recipient of the Malthus War Memorial Trophy for his outstanding contribution to the 
squad. The most successful wrestler of the year by his merits was acknowledged to be 
Gibby McSpadden, whose record was unblemished and who retained his reputation as 
a champion in the truest sense of the word. 



For the second year in a row Washington and Lee"s baseball fortunes were at low ebb. 
Coach McCann's squad, hampered b) weak hitting and lack of pitching depth, posted 
a 4-15 won-lost record. On their annual southern tour during Spring Vacation the 
Generals dropped all five of their games to powerful foes, losing twice to both Clem- 
son and Davidson and once to Furman. 

Before garnering their first victory the diamond men dropped two more close con- 
tests to VPI and Delaware. Paul Weinstein. who hurled two of the Generals' four vic- 
tories, was the winning pitcher in their encounter with Southern Conference foe, George 
Washington University. Weinstein scattered eight hits and struck out ten, while hold- 
ing the Colonials to five runs. Second baseman Joe Lindsey and outfielder Tom Baker, 
with two hits each, were instrumental in leading the Generals to their 7-5 conquest. 



Standing: Coach McCann, Cullers, Dubin, Drum, Skolnik, Chisholm, Lohrey, Taylor, Benham, Wouters, Lindsey. Seated: Weinstein, Kops, Baker, Moody, Schlo 

man, Hamric, Salsbury, Freeman. 




* . ? f f f *? f ^ # f ? 

ikf. \*E^. -> _ t*EM, _„. ,>^ri>. ^^cu .fo, .fire ifHj, s^^^-^. 



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SCORES 



Clemson 19; W&L 

Clemson 22; W&L 

Furman 9; W&L 

Davidson 7; W&L 

Davidson 14: W&L 

V.P.I 11; W&L 

Delaware 6: W&L 

George Washington ... 5; W&L 

William and Mary .... 7; W&L 

Virginia 18; W&L 



.10 

. 2 



West Virginia 2 

West Virginia 11 

George Washington ... 5 

Maryland 15 

William and Mary ... 5 

Richmond 3 

V.P.I 9 

Citadel 4 

West Virginia 2 



W&L 1 

W&L 6 

W&L 3 

W&L 8 

W&L 9 

W&L 2 

W&L 5 

W&L 7 

W&L 1 



baseball 



Top : Another tally for the Generals 
Bottom : A late throw to Hamric at third 






Coach McCann lays plans for charges 

Steve Schlossman, playing his last season for the W&L 
nine, led the baseballers to their second straight victory 
by hurling a hard-fought 10-7 win over William and Mary. 
The General's nine hit attack was led by third baseman 
Lowell Hamric with two singles and Lindsey with a triple. 

Following these two wins the Generals abruptly returned 
to their losing ways and dropped their next five encounters, 
one of which was a heart-breaking 2-1 loss to West Vir- 
ginia. Though they outhit the Mountaineers 5-4, the dia- 
mond crew could score only once, on catcher Warren 
Moody's triple, followed by a squeeze bunt by first base- 
man Tom Lohrey. 

Snapping back from these demoralizing defeats, the Gen- 
ers found they were still able to master William and Mary, 
and measured the Indians for the second time. The Gen- 
erals amassed nine runs on twelve hits, while winning 
pitcher Weinstein limited W&M to five runs on eight hits 
and fanned seven. 

To conclude the season the Generals lost three of their 
four remaining games, but the narrow margins of victory 
posted by their foes shows how greatly improved the squad 
was at the campaign's end. Schlossman, hurling five hit 
ball, was the loser in a tightly fought game with Richmond. 
Outfielder Fred Benham, who led the team in hitting with 
a .280 average, collected two hits in this losing effort. A 
9-5 loss to V.P.I, followed this game and saw the Generals 
leave nine men stranded on the bases as V.P.I.'s King 
limited them to three hits. 

W&L leveled an eight hit barrage at the Citadel in the 
Generals' last winning effort as Schlossman hurled the 
victory, his second of the season. Outfielder Dave Wouters 
and shortstop John Freeman contributed to a big five run 
inning by walloping homeruns. 

West Virginia maintained its jinx over W&L by again 
eking out a 2-1 victory and eliminating the Generals from 
the Southern Conference Tournament in the final game of 
the season. 




soccer 



Coach Herbert chats with Captain Lewis and assistant Hough 



Top: Heads up. Belden! 
Bottom: Don Stewart lets loose! 



The 1954 edition of the Washington and Lee Soccer 
Team wound up its season with a 5 won, 3 lost, and 2 tied 
record. One of the two highlights of the season was the 
two victories over the University of Virginia by scores of 
3-1 and 4-1. The second was the season finale against the 
University of Maryland, when the Generals held the At- 
lantic Coast Conference Champions to a 0-0 tie on the 
Terrapin's home field. 

The season's opener was a 7-0 win over the Lynchburg 
eleven as Don Stewart led the Generals with three goals. 
The following week the Blue ran into their most formidable 
competition, Roanoke College, which topped them 3-2. 
Back again on the winning path, the home team defeated 
North Carolina and then took to the road. 

In Charlottesville, led by the season's top scorer, Bill 
Boyles' three goals, W&L toppled Virginia 3-0, a team that 
had earlier defeated both Roanoke and Duke. Returning 
to Lexington, the Generals were held to a 2-2 tie by power- 
ful North Carolina State in a rainy overtime period. The 
next contest was a road affair in Roanoke with the only 
team that had yet stopped the Blue and White. With the 
score 3-0 at halftime. the Maroon team was held at bay 
during the remaining period, but still enjoyed a 3-2 win. 

Before some 500 spectators at Wilson Field. W&L's 
hooters defeated the University of Virginia once more 
4-1. Led by the play of Bel Butterfield and Boyle, the squad 
produced one of its outstanding efforts of the season as 
they completely governed play in the final half. 

Traveling to Durham to face the Duke Blue Devils with 
only one loss marked against them, Coach Herberts 
charges were held scoreless for the first time in the season. 
Through a steady downpower the visitors were held in tow 
as Duke posted a 2-0 victory. 





As the season came to a close, the Georgetown Hoyas played tiost to the W&L 
team. Boyle and Butterfield, supported by Rhody Davies and Dick Belden, led the Gen- 
erals to a 4-0 victory, as the entire team saw action. A hard fought contest with two 
over time periods ended in a scoreless tie against the team that the week before had 
defeated Virginia 7-0 for the Atlantic Coast Conference Championship. 

Boyle and Butterfield led the General scoring throughout the season, aided by the 
aggressive play of Davies, Stewart, and Lucky Denu. Much credit must also be given 
to the play of Brayton Campbell, Gene Keith, Dick Johnson, John Buckey, and Joel 
Bernstein. Under the able hand of Herbert and his assistant Len Hough, the hooters 
ended one of the finest seasons that any team was to enjoy throughout the fall season. 



First Row: Davies, Amato, Kramer, Butrick, Denu, Sproul, Lewis, Schaefer, Stewart, Boyle, Aliotti, Bernstein Johnson, Hill. Second Row: Hough, Walsh, Miller, 
White, Hyde, G. White, Tyler, Campbell, Stockton, Butterfield, Drabek, Ramsay, Keith, Rich, Buckey, Nash, Herbert. 




SCORES 



Lynchburg 

Roanoke 3 

North Carolina 

Virginia 1 

North Carolina State 2 

Roanoke 3 

Virginia 1 

Duke 2 

Georgetown 1 

Maryland 

181 



W&L 
W&L 
W&L 
W&L 
W&L 
W&L 
W&L 
W&L 
W&L 
W&L 



7 
2 
4 
3 
2 
2 
4 

5 





Coach Twombly with Captain Patrick 



swimming 



First Ron: Aliniti. Chapman, Fnx, Sproul, Gibbs. Second Row: Richardson, Erdrich, Howard, Childs, 

\therh,ilt. Third Ron : Harper, Branch. Ramsay, Jacobs, Patrick, Guenther, Twombly, Bennett, Gold, 

Dalzcll. Foi RTH Ron : Raines, Pressley, Newton, Hoover. 




Catholic University ..36: W&L. .48 

Virginia .52; W&L. .32 

Lynchburg College ,.14; W&L. .69 

Randolph-Macon ....22; W&L. .62 

V.P.I 47; W&L.. 37 

William and Marv . . .32; W&L. ..52 

Davidson 53; W&L. .31 

Big Six Tournament 

V.M.I 112 

Virginia 60 

V.P.I 45 

W&L 36 

Southern Confereince 
Tournament 

V.M.I 169 

V.P.I 69 

W&L .36 

Davidson 36 

West Virginia 10 



With a promising aggregation of sophomores to depend upon, Coach Twombly 
and his Blue and White Tankmen initiated the 1954-55 season by defeating Catholic 
LTniversity 48-36. Though deficient in first places, the Generals made up the difference 
by strength in the relays and in depth. After brushing aside waterlogged Lynchburg 
College 69-14 and hapless Randolph-Macon 62-22. the swimmers were halted by a 
potent Virginia squad. W&L's closest meet stemmed from a 37-47 loss to V.P.I. The 
Techmen supported a scant three point lead until the last race which they were lucky 
to capture. By vanquishing William and Mary and succumbing to a mediocre David- 
son team, the Generals culminated the season with better than a .500 mark. 

At the Southern Conference Tournament the Blue and White added more laurels 
by finishing third, behind champion V.M.I, and V.P.I., thanks to victories by Jay 
Fox in the 100-yard breast stroke, and Kalmbach. Childs, and Fox, again, in the 
300-yard medley relay. The surprising success of Aliotti and Childs, combined with 
potential sophomore strength, make the tankmen a threat in future competition. 




Iiii-T Rc.n : Applefeld, Johnson, Ford, Drake, Quarngesser, Lowe, Fellows, Willard, Ferryman, Ryer. Second 

Hmv: \..ckcl. Woodring, Conner, Myers, Kenney, Flanagan, O'Connell, McHenry, Davies, Gwathmey, Leggelt, 

Trim, Coach Herbert. 



Washington and Lee's Lacrosse Team made a fine showing in the 1954 season by 
coming up with a record of 4 victories against 7 defeats in a schedule which included 
such national powers as Maryland, Duke, and the University of Virginia. Coach Her- 
bert did an outstanding job in his first year as Head Coach. The team was handicapped 
at the beginning of the season by a lack of experienced men, but under Herbert's tutelage 
improved greatly as the season progressed. 

The defense was led by goalie Fletcher Lowe and defensemen Tom Kenney and Dick 
Johnson. Bill McHenry and Harry Ford were outstanding at mid-field, while Dick 
O'Connell and Mike Ryer, at attack, were the leading scorers with 24 and 13 goals re- 
spectively. 

Lowe was picked as third string Ail-American goalie while Johnson and O'Connell 
were both honorable mention. Lowe and Kenney were chosen to play in the North- 
South All-Star Game where Herbert served as an assistant coach. 

With many lettermen returning for the 1955 season and several promising men 
coming up from the freshman team, Coach Herbert is looking forward to another 
fine year. 



SCORES 

Maryland 9; W&L 2 

Dartmouth 5 ; W&L 8 

Richmond Club 8; W&L 4 

BaltimoreU 5; W&L 11 

Wash. College ..10; W&L 4 

Virginia 11; W&L 8 

Duke 13; W&L 3 

North Carolina . . 4; W&L 14 

Richmond Club . 7; W&L 14 

W. Maryland ... 0; W&L 13 

Drexel 5 ; W&L 3 



Coach Herbert with seniors Fellows, 
McHenry, and Kenney 



lacrosse 





tennis 



Coach Farrar with INIurphey 
and Barbe. 



First Row: Maslansky, Patterson, Waltz, Harrison. Second Row: Coach Farrar, McCain, Barbe, Cobba 

Murphey. 






SCORES 


Hampden 


Sydney 


4 


W&L 


Colgate . 




8 


W&L 


West Virg 


inia . . . 





W&L 


Hampden 


Sydney 


2 


W&L 


Richmonc 







W&L 


Georgetown .... 


8 


W&L 


Maryland 




3 


W&L 


V.P.I . . 




2 
8 


W&L 


Virginia . 




W&L 


William and Mary .3 


W&L 


V.P.I. . .. 




2 


W&L 



5 
1 
9 
7 
9 
1 
6 
7 
1 
6 
7 



With a strong group of experienced men returning, the 1954 Tennis Team compiled 
its best record in many years. Coach Farrar's netters were victorious in eight of eleven 
matches and took second place in the Southern Conference. The Generals edged Hamp- 
den-Sydney in their first match of the season, but were downed decisively by un- 
defeated Colgate in their second attempt. The team got back on the winning path with 
successive wins over West Virginia, Hampden-Sydney, and Richmond. 

A strong Georgetown team halted their winning streak, but the Generals bounced 
back to upset powerful Maryland 6-3. The Blue continued their winning ways by 
trouncing V.P.L: however the potent Wahoo outfit took eight of nine matches from 
the Generals in their next outing. The season finished with W. & L. stopping always 
strong William and Mary as well as V.P.I, in their last two matches. 

The team was sparked by the play of Captain Don Barbe and Dave Murphey, both 
seniors, along with Pat Patterson, Dick Cobban, Art McCain and Chuck Waltz while 
John Huebner and Milam Turner supplied much needed reserve strength. 



golf 



Washington and Lee's golfers turned in another fine record during the 
1954 season. In their 5 dual matches the Generals won 3, while losing 1 and 
tying 1. The linksmen opened the season by losing to a powerful Virginia 
Tech outfit, but bounced back to deadlock a strong West Virginia team, 41/2- 
4^. In the next two matches the Blue and White came up to their potential by 
downing George Washington and Randolph-Macon S^^-Sl/o and 6-3 re- 
spectively. 

The Generals made a fine showing in a triangular event with U. Va. and 
V.P.I. The heavily favored Cavaliers only edged out the Generals 9-71/2, 
while the Gobblers, who had previously beaten W&L in a dual meet, only 

captured fl/o points. In the state tournament the Blue and White lived up V.P.I 6^/2 

to their advance billing by taking third place among the Big Six. The season West Virginia .41/2 
closed on a victorious note with a 6-3 decision over William and Mary. ^'^o- Wash 31/2 

The fine season and winning record were a tribute to Coach Cy Twombly Randolph-Mac. 3 
who had lost four key men. The outstanding play of Captain Dick Sherrill, William&Mary 3 

Fred Bear, Bill Clem, Doug Monroe, Ernie Eanes, and Bob Broudy led the Virginia 9 

golfers to compiling one of the best records of all varsity teams. 




Coach Twombly and Captain 
Dick Sherrill 



V.P.I. 



SCORES 

W&L . 
W&L . 
W&L . 
W&L . 
W&L . 

W&L 

11/2 



.21/2 

.41/2 

.51/2 

.6 

.6 




oudy, Monroe, Coach Twombly, Clem, Bear. 



'-'-%-, 



'li^-« 



w 




SCORES 

Bridgewater ... .23: W&L 33 

Hampden-Sydney 39 ; W&L 16 

V P T 37 • 

T ■;, ^'' W&L 36 

Lynchburg 56 



V.M.I 24; 



W&L 



60 



Davidson 54; 

Roanoke 27; W&L 28 

William & Mary 33; W&L 33 

Richmond 54; W&L 33 

Virginia 31; W&L 24 

Big Six Meet 

V.M.I 27; ^„. -f, 

V.P.I 70; ^^L ^" 

Southern Conference Meet 

V.M.1 27; „,„, 7, 

„r ^ IT- ■ ■ nc, W&L (i 

West Virgmia . .76; 



With the graduation of Walt Diggs, the Big Six Champion, and the loss of Captain 
Keith Belch, Coach Dick Miller turned to his talented freshmen and sophomores for 
a winning season. After losing their opener to Bridgewater, the thinclads routed Hamp- 
den-Sydney and then took a triangular meet from Lynchburg College and V.P.I. Follow- 
ing a loss to V.M.I, and Davidson, the thinclads defeated the University of Richmond 
by a 54-33 margin. The Generals had to settle for a tie against William and Mary, but 
finished their regular season with a close win over U. Va. The Blue and White faired 
well in both Big Six and Southern Conference competition finishing second behind 
V.M.I, in both meets. ' 

Freshman Mike Barry finished second and fifth respectively in the Big Six and 
Southern Conference meets and gained a post on the Conference All-Star Team. Burke 
Armstrong. Bob Wood, John Arnold, Chuck Duffy, Watty Bowes, Dick Crutchfield, and 
Dana Curtis also turned in outstanding performances. 




First Row: Crutchfield, Bowes, Arnold, Barry, Armstrong, Curtis, Wood, Duffy, Coach Miller. Second Row: 
Walters, Jaber, Miller, Hutchinson, King, Auicschun, Abratnson, Susskind, Cremin, Caskie. 



Coach Miller briefing Wood 




cross country 



track 




Coach Miller sizes up hurdler Kennedy 



The 1954 Track Season, although appearing unsuccessful in the won 
and lost column, attracted some top perfomiers to the cinder path. Led by 
Captain Walt Diggs, the team ended their spring activities without posting 
a single win, but were able to nominate some of the team members for top 
honors in the Southern Conference. 

Diggs set a new university record for the pole vault event with a jump 
of 13 feet 3-^ inches and with this feat was able to cop the laurels at the 
Southern Conference Track Meet. Those who had the opportunity to see 
him perform in that meet held at Blacksburg, saw the lithe Washington and 
Lee trackman equal a mark that had not been reached since 1928 in this 
conference. 

Coach Dick Miller featured such standouts as Harry Kennedy, Captain- 
elect of the 1955 team, on the high and low hurdles. Other leading per- 
formers were Harry Shendow with the discus, Roy Simkins in the hurdles, 
javelin, and pole vault events. Bob Wood in the distance events, and Bol) 
Mann, who participated in the gruelling two mile run. 

At the Big Six Meet, held this past year in Charlottesville, the Generals 
took fourth place behind the winners, VMI, who were to go on and capture 
the honors in the Southern Conference. In a triangular meet with VPI and 
Roanoke College, the team took second place behind a powerful VPI ag- 
gregation. 



SCORES 




Richmond . . 791/2 ; 


W&L . 


. .501/2 


Lynchburg . . 75 


W&L. 


. .47 


Virginia .... 10.5 ; 


W&L . 


..26 


Davidson ... 83 ; 


W&L . 


..47 


Roanoke .... 91 


W&L. 


. .31 


V.P.I 107 ; 






William & 


W&L . 


...35 


Mary 20 







First Row: Chapman, Kennedy, Stewart, Shendow, Fieldson, Grove, Mann, Landis, Stutzmann. Second Row: 
Miller, Wood, Henes, Littlejohn, Slingleland, Somerville, Simkins, Stein, Cobb, Pratt, Diggs. 




SCORES 

V.P.I 0: W&L 12 

Virginia 10: W&L .5 

S.M.A 0; W&L 17 



The Freshmen Lacrosse Team, under the direction of student Coach John McDowell, 
chalked up a record of two wins and one loss for the 1954 season. 

In their first encounter the Freshmen routed the V.P.L "rats" by a score of 12-0. 
However, they were not as successful in their next outing, losing to the LIniversity of 
Virginia Freshmen. 10-5, in a hard fought game. The Baby Generals rebounded strongly 
in their following contest to smash Staunton Military Academy by the tune of 17-0. 

Many of the Freshmen will be counted on heavily in the 1955 varsity picture. Co- 
captains Tom and Dick Moore along with George Towson. Bill Wilemon, Dick White- 
ford, Joel Bernstein, and George Allen are all strong contenders for key positions on 
next year's varsity. 




First Row: Bernstein, Whiteford, T. Moore, R. Moore, Allen, Howard, Susskind. Second Row: Coach McDowell, 
Cremin, Wilemon, Close, Line, Schoen, Hartman, JofEe, Conger. 



Whiteford, Moore, Wilemon, Coach 
Herbert, Allen. 




freshman lacrosse 




Left to right; Armstrong, Carter, Hummers, Pate, Butrick, Boyle, PeepL 



A promising group of freshmen tennis players led by Dick Butrick went through a 
brief schedule unbeaten in three matches. The season opened with two easy wins over 
Roanoke High School, both by the identical score of 7-2. The next match was with the 
yearling's arch rival, the University of Virginia. The contest turned out to be a real 
thriller in which the freshmen netters came from behind to top the stubborn Wahoos. 
The victory was highlighted by the fine doubles play of Butrick and team-mate Jim 
Carter. Down match point, this duo fought back to take the deciding match and gain 
the win for the Baby Generals. 

Led by Coach Jim Farrar, the undersquadmen thus concluded their short season, 
undefeated. To Farrar may be attributed much of the spark and enthusiasm that has 
been viewed each spring in this squad and the highly successful varsity team. 

TTie singles and doubles play was dominated by Butrick, Carter. Pres Pate, Herb 
Hummers, Bill Boyle, Rob Peeples, and Jack Armstrong. They had a very successful 
season and developed several good doubles combinations which proved to be the strong 
point of the team. With the addition of these men the outlook is bright for the 1955 
varsity. 



freshman tennis 



SCORES 

Roanoke H.S 2; W&L 7 

Roanoke H.S. .. . 2; W&L 7 

Virginia 4; W&L 5 



Coach Farrar talks with 
Butrick and Carter 





freshman golf 



Coach Twombly and the linksmen 



Left to right: Smith, Cach Twombly, Wellford, Rosenfeld, Farriss, Scales, Ke 




SCORES 

V.P.I 2; W&L 7 

S.M.A 2; W&L 7 

V.P.I 2; W&L 7 

S.M.A 4; W&L 5 

Virginia 1: W&L 5 



Washington and Lee's Freshmen Golf Team, coached by Cv Twombly. rolled through 
their five game 1954 schedule undefeated. Team Captain Joe Scales and Ted Kerr were 
the top performers, ably backed up by Tom Smith. John Wellford. Dick Rosenfeld. and 
Don Farriss. 

In their first encounter, the Freshmen defeated VPI 7-2. and then took the measure 
of Staunton Military Academy by the same score. The Baby Generals defeated VPI 
easily in a return match, but they had a fight on their second encounter with Staunton. 
At the end of regular play the score was deadlocked and the match went three extra 
holes before the Blue & White eked out a 5-4 win. 

In their final match of the year the Generals routed the University of Virginia 5-1 to 
close out an undefeated season. Coach Twombly was very pleased with the team's 
showing and is looking forward to the addition of these men to the 1955 varsity. 




Left to right: Ferryman, Noll, Gibson, R..senberg, Pliillippe, Weinier, Kerr, Caldwell, Abramson, Ellis. 



It has not been too long ago that the students of Washington and Lee would, on 
frequent afternoons during the fall of the year, be found assembled in the stands of 
Wilson Field, cheering the old favorite, "Come on Blue, Come on White!" One of the 
highlights of the afternoon would always be the roar of the loyal crowd as they rose 
to their feet and the band struck up with "The Washington and Lee Swing." For many 
years we were shy of a band to play the song; we never failed to have the support of 
the cheerleaders. This year we found ourselves with both stalwart band and enthusiastic 
cheerleaders, but no football team. 

A football team gives the students something to cheer about during the season, but 
there is more than a single sport to the spirit that must flow through the veins of a uni- 
versity. Those boys who, despite the absence of gridiron activities, devoted their time 
and effort to be cheerleaders, tried to put this idea into practice. As the emphasis was 
shifted from major sports to a fair distribution of interest in all phases of our athletic 
program, so the cheerleaders sought to follow this lead. They have taken an active part 
in the spectator participation of such sports as wrestling, basketball, and baseball. Led 
by Captain Jim Ferryman, the group took positive steps this past year to spread itself 
throughout the entire athletic program. 



cheerleaders 



Captain Jim Ferryman 






i n t r a m u r a 1 s 



Manager Norm Lord and Don Stewart 



The Champion Sigma Nu Football Team 




With the de-emphasis of Intercollegiate Athletics. Intramurals found new glory and 
added prestige in the athletic program at Washington and Lee during the 1954-55 
season. This new founded prominence acted as a tonic for the program which experienced 
one of the finest years in its long existence. The percentage of the students participating 
increased, as did the interest of the entire student body in supporting this, one of the 
finest intramural programs in the country. 

After all the points were in, and the final tabulations had been made. Delta Tau Delta 
reigned supreme for the 1953-54 season, and was presented with the over-all Intramural 
Trophy. This trophy represents excellence in the combined realms of Intercollegiate 
and Intramural Athletics, the two fields in which the current point system is in effect. 
It was awarded to the Delts on the basis of their fine showing in Intramurals and also 
their winning of the special Intercollegiate Trophy, given to the fraternity with the 




best turn-out in that department. The award for the top house in Intramurals alone 
went to Delta llpsilon. 

The Intramural program at Washington and Lee is set up in the following manner. 
At the beginning of the year, each organization participating is given one hundred base 
points; then all penalty points lost by that group are subtracted from these base points. 
The program of events consists of twelve sports, the Corn Bowl football game, the Sigma 
Delta Psi tests, and the Sports Carnival. The last named is an unique feature of the full 
year that includes every possible sport. One of the fall attractions is the "Turkey Trot" 
which finds each fraternity entering freshmen to run a prescribed course through the 
town of Lexington. To the winner goes Intramural points plus a fat turkey. Each organ- 
ization receives a determined number of points for participation in each event and addi- 
tional points, in regards to how they rank in the final standings for that sport. 

The miles of paper work and hours of organizational time required for such a 
smooth running Intramural program are expended by two people, the first being the 
Senior Student Manager, a post held this past year by Don Stewart. It is his job to 
make out the schedules, assign the officials, and in general, wet-nurse the entire system. 
He is very ably assisted in all these matters by Norm Lord, of the Athletic Department, 
Faculty Advisor to Intramurals. 

The participating groups also have their say in the running of the program. They 
are represented and their opinions are expressed by their Fraternity Athletic Director. 



The Intramural Board 



Fraternity footballers in action 



Tankmen off in annual Swim Meet 





Some like the indoor sports 



Tlie ZBTs take on the Faculty 



In the 1954 edition of the Corn Bowl game, played annually as a benefit for the 
Student War Memorial Scholarship Fund Committee, the team representing Red Square 
was again triumphant. With the tons of brawn supplied by the Phi Delt and Sigma 
Nu Houses, they overpowered the light but speedy White Cobs by a score of 14-6. 

The Intramural Football League of 1954 was one of the best that has been seen 
in a number of years. The winners of the four divisions were the Phi Delts. D.U.s, Sigma 
Nus, and the Phi Gams. In the semi-finals, the Phi Delts defeated the D.U.s and the 
Sigma Nus toppled the Phi Gams. The final game to decide the champions was a thriller 
in which the Sigma Nu team came out the victors by a 19-7 score. 

Other sports completed by mid-year were Tennis, w^on by the Phi Psis and Swimming, 
won by the Sigma Chis. Basketball was moving into its final stages and a real battle 
was expected between the Delts and the Sigma Chis for the championship. Ping Pong 
had just begun, but the perennial favorite. ZBT. was again picked to win. 

The Washington and Lee Intramural program is thus one of many and varied inter- 
ests. Its main purpose has always been to offer to each and every student the oppor- 
tunity to participate in the sport of his choosing and, at the same time, to have his 
talents contribute to the group of which he is a representative. It is felt that the added 




A trophy to tennis champ, Bill Childs 



The Delts drive in for two points 





Sigma Chi s winning Swim Team 



stimulus to Intramurals, apparent this past year, will continue to foster, what has be- 
come to us, an integral part of our extracurricular activities. We add our congratula- 
tions to those who have worked to make the past year so successful and to all who took 
an active part and shared in the spirit of true sportsmanship. 



Entertainment for the keglers 



Another phase of the Sports Carnival 




yUaSninaton CT^ <=JLee ^tudent6: 



'9 



Support K^ui' ^^^duertiderd 



ipp 




ROBERT E. LEE HOTEL 

AND 

COFFEE SHOP 

Air Conditioned 

Garage Service 

Free Parking Banquet- Facilities 

S. D. GARDNER, Manager 





There's no better place — no better time, to 
thank you each and all for your many past cour- 
tesies. We sincerely appreciate your valuable 
patronage and hope that we may have the 
pleasure of serving you many more times. 
To those returning next fall, we'll be glad to see 
you back — to those leaving us for another life, 
best wishes and good luck! 

Sincerely 

PRES BROWN'S SPORT SHOP 

LEXINGTON, VA. 

P.S. Remember to write us for college novelties 
and gifts, mail orders are filled promptly. 





THDRNE BDRTHWICK 

STumo 

vJjr^iciat /-"^liotoarapner 
for Ike 

1955 CALYX 



THE HOTEL ASSOCIATION OF ROANOKE, VA. 

^ne S^tar K^iiii oj- the S^outn 

WELCOMES YOU 

and invites you +o use to the fullest the varied 
facilities placed at your disposal 

HOTEL ROANOKE 

425 Rooms 

"A Modern Air-Condi+ioned Version 
of an Old English Inn" 

Garage connecting with lobby 
Annple outside parking 

KENNETH R. HYDE GEO. L DENISON 

Associate Managers 

HOTEL PATRICK HENRY HOTEL PONCE DE LEON 

300 Rooms 200 Rooms 

All Public Space and 100 COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 

Located in the heart of Downtown Roanoke 

AIR CONDITIONED Free Parking Lot Adjoining Hotel 

Garage Connecting with Lobby Garage Facilities 

JOHN A. SHIRES, General Manager GARLAND W. MILLER, Manager 

FAMILY RATES— CHILDREN UNDER 14 FREE 



ORCHARDSIDE COURT 

MODERN COTTAGES FOR W&L PARENTS. ADJOINED BY NEW, 
FINER RESTAURANT AND GIFT SHOP 

Route 1 1 

FAIRFIELD. VIRGINIA 







@^ — '^- — Igl 




li^teaclow|if 

Uv^tJce cream ^n] 


THANKS FOR YOUR 
PATRONAGE 




AND 


MEADOW GOLD 
Is 


BEST WISHES FOR 


Mighty Good 


YOUR FUTURE 


Ice Cream 


THE LAUNDRO-MATIC 


Meadow Gold Products Co. 


LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 


WASHINGTON, D. C. 





FOR A SANDWICH 



OR 



FOR A DINNER 



IT'S 



THE SOUTHERN INN 



COSTUMES TO RENT 

COSTUMES SUPPLIED FOR THE FANCY 
DRESS BALL FOR OVER 30 YEARS 
School Plays, Pageants, Operettas, Etc. 

VAN HORN AND SON, 

Incorporated 

811-13 Chestnut Street 
PHILADELPHIA 7, PENNA. 

Est. 1852 

WIGS, MASKS AND MAKEUP SUPPLIES 
Our 103rd Year 



ADAIR-HUTTDN, INC. 

Lexington's Shopping Center 

SERVING THE PUBLIC OVER THREE QUARTERS OF A 
CENTURY 

Make this Store Your 

SHOPPING HEADQUARTERS 

Men's furnishings, ready-to-wear, dry goods, notions, shoes, floor cover- 
ings, home furnishings, and electrical appliances. 



Phones: 2, 58, 258, 868, 878 



Lexington, Va. 



(^ompllmentd of 

NATURAL BRIDGE OF 
VIRGINIA, INC. 



Lyur ZJnankd for ^^ii f-^ast /-^ati 



ronuae 



r 



Visit our new Rockbridge Center with year 'round swimming pool, game 
rooms and air-conditioned cafeteria. 



At the 

UNIVERSITY SUPPLY STORE 

Jackets 

Sweat Shirts 
Laundry Bags 
Sportswear 
with 

Washington & Lee designs 
from 

CHAMPION KNITWEAR CO. 

ROCHESTER 4, N. Y. 



"We need a 
telephone 
traffic cop!" 



Check any family. Eventually 
someone will say. "We need a 
telephone traffic cop!" 

That's because the telephone 
serves the interests and activities 
of all ages. 

So for the best service in your 
own home, treat your telephone as 
if it were a "family party-line" — use 
it sharingly! 




LEXINGTON 
TELEPHONE COMPANY 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



OAK HALL 



M. ROSENBERG & 
SONS. INC. 

ROANOKE'S PIONEER CLOTHIERS 
Est. 1899 

Fine Clothing and Furnishings for Men 
and Boys 

Formal Wear and Fancy Dress 

Costumes for Rent 

Academic Caps and Gowns 

CAMPBELL AND JEFFERSON 

"Center of Roanoke" 

Phone 8837 



HUGER DAVIDSON 
SALE CO., INC. 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 
STAUNTON, VIRGINIA 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



We Specialize in instiufiona! distribution 

to schools, hotels, restaurants, 

clubs, and hospitals. 



SHIRTS LAUNDERED AS YOU LIKE, 

AND THE FINEST IN DRY CLEANING 

See "Bob & Al" at 

UNIVERSITY CLEANERS 

Right off campus 7 N. Jefferson St. 



JABO'S 

'The best hamburgers in town' 



GIFT AND ART SHOP 

Robert E. Lee Hotel 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 
FRANCIS H. HOPKINS, Gift Consultant 



9 miles south of Lexington, Va. 

TINY TOWN RESTAURANT 

Route II 

Home cooked meals 

steaks — chops — country ham 

southern fried chicken 



You will find it Worthwhile to Wait and Buy 

all Your Clothing, Shoes and Formal Wear 

at "EARL N'S" in Lexington 




^Jri/u tuxedo 



with natural shoulders, flap pockets, center vent 
and plain front trousers 

... we will be happy to open a charge account 
for you 



Earin,lj5vitl 



Cf esL. f-^arentd wilt uke: 

DIXIE TDURIST COURT 



on route I I north of Fairfield 



W. & L. Students will like 

the Dixie Tourist Court restaurant 

for that Sunday night supper. 



csLexinaton 3 f lew ^Department S^tote 

LEGGETT'S 
DEPARTMENT STDRE 

South Main Street 
Entrances on Main and Randolph 

17.000 SQUARE FEET OF EXCELLENT VALUES 
AND FRIENDLY SERVICE 



COUNTY 
SUPER MARKET 



Lexington's Most Complete 
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