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Full text of "Campus communique: the official bulletin of UNCW"

ARCHIVE COLLECTION 




RANDALL LIBRARY 

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/campuscommuni198286univ 



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COMMUNIQUE Soo ^ 

090 J 3- IS 

U8RARy (ARCHIVES) 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFIUL 

VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 1 
JULY 7, 1983 

CASHIER During the registration period on Monday, July 11, the cashier's 
OPEN office will be open for normal operation in Hoggard, room 211. 

NEW A welcome is extended to the following new UNCW employees: 

EMPLOYEES Frank Sadlack, administrative o*^ficer for IMBR; Floyd Anglin, 

diver in the SURF department and Timothy Green, housekeeping 

assistant for the physical plant. 

OPENING The opening of the new snack bar located in the university 
DELAYED union has been delayed due to changes in the food services 

contract. UNCW would like to welcome the staff and management 

of ARA Services to the campus. 

HARPER Dr. Stephen C. Harper of the School of Business Administration 
INVITED was an invited lecturer for IBM's Middle Management School 
held June 16 in Bethesda, Maryland. 

HIATT AT Sue Hiatt, assistant reference/special collections librarian, 
MEETING attended the meeting of the 17th Annual Archives Institute 
held June 6-17 in Atlanta. The institute was jointly spon- 
sored by Emory University and the Georgia Department of 
Archives and History. 

SUMMER Season tickets for the Straw Hat Theatre summer productions 
PRODUCTIONS may be purchased in Kenan Auditorium. Season tickets $16; 

single $4. For additional information call Doug Swink at 

extension 2442. 

TUITION Permanent full-time employees are eligible for a tuition waiver 
WAIVER of one course per semester. The waiver forms should be proces- 
sed 30 days prior to the beginning of the semester. IMPORTANT! 
You must first go through the admissions process before tuition 
waiver approval. 



"N 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 




LIBRARY 
01 



(ARCHIVES) 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 2 
JULY 14, 1983 



SUMMER 
LECTURES 



POOL 
CLOSED 

NEW 
EMPLOYEES 



DR. LEWIS 
PUBLISHES 



TUITION 
WAIVER 



STUDENTS 
! ON PAYROLL 



Members of the national political science honor society. Pi 
Sigma Alpha, will present Charles T. Eyre, founder of the 
Nuclear Information Center in Wilmington, during their 
second summer lecture series entitled "Defense Issues: 1983.' 
The lecture, "Nuclear Holocaust: Reality or Myth," will be 
held July 20 at 7 p.m. in King Auditorium. Open to the pub- 
lic. 

The University Pool will be closed for repairs beginning 
July 19. It will reopen August 24. 

A UNCW welcome is extended to the following new employees: 
Ben A. Lassiter, adult education 4 training specialist for 
the department of special programs; and Patricia L. Leonard, 
associate dean of students in student affairs. 

Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of the department of health, 
physical education and recreation, has had his article, 
"Sabbatical Reflections: Physical Education and Sport in 
Israel," published in the July issue of the JOURNAL OF THE 
NEW YORK STATE RECREATION AND PARK SOCIETY. 

Permanent full-time employees are once again reminded that 
they are eligible for a tuition waiver of one course per 
semester. The forms should be processed 30 days prior to 
the beginning of the semester. One must first go through 
the admissions process before tuition waiver approval is 
granted. 

The personnel department will need two weeks notice prior to 
reporting date of students planning to be on summer payroll 
who are not taking courses through the summer. For addition- 
al information refer to the UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES MANUAL 
G.8-1 - G.8-4. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 




LiaRARY (ARCHlVtS) 
01 



TUITION 
WAIVER 



NEW 
STAFF 



THANKS 
EXTENDED 



IMBR 
SEMINAR 



SNACK 
BAR 



SEMINAR 
PLANNED 



FORT 
SELECTED 



FEATURED 
SPEAKER 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 3 
3uly 21, 1983 

Permanent full-time employees are reminded that they are 
eligible for a tuition waiver of one course per semester. 
The forms should be processed 30 days prior to the begin- 
ning of the semester. One must first go through the ad- 
missions process before tuition waiver approval is granted. 

Welcome to the following new UNCW employees: Jeffrey 
3. Verlotta, diver for the SURF program, and Daisy Mae 
Green, housekeeping assistant in the department of aux- 
iliary services. 

Mrs. Elnora Smith and family would like to thank the staff 
and faculty for the kindness shown to them during their time 
of bereavement. 

A seminar on "Brain Gangliosides and Thermal Adaptation 
of Vertebrates" by Dr. Hinrich Rahmann of the University 
of Hohenheim in Stuttgart Germany will be held TODAY 
at ^ p.m. at IMBR. Refreshments will be served. All staff 
and faculty are invited. 

The new University Union snack bar WILL OPEN Monday, 
3uly 25, at 7 ajn. The old snack bar located in the cafe- 
teria will be used to serve students on the board plan. 

Ron Copley of the department of economics and finance 
will present a 6-hour seminar August 2 & 'f on "Tax Planning 
for Real Estate Investors with Emphasis on Tax Shelters." 
Call the UNCW Office of Special Programs for details. 

Charles Fort, director of creative writing and assistant pro- 
fessor of English, has been selected for one of the 1983 Out- 
standing Young Men of America awards. The award recognizes 
outstanding professional achievement, superior leadership 
ability and exceptional service to the community. 

Dr. Stephen Harper of the Cameron School of Business Admin- 
istration - Department of Management and Marketing was the 
featured speaker at the annual meeting of the North Carolina 
Downtown Development Association held 3uly 7. He spoke on 
"Improving Productivity Through Time Management by Objec- 
tives." 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



^rl^M!^.^^^ 



UNC by the sea' 





GYM 
CLOSED 



PAYDAY 
TOMORROW 



PAYROLL 
DEADLINE 



NEW 
STAFF 



STATIONS 

FEATURE 

UNCW 



NAVAL 
GRANT 



'UaI^^J^ 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 4 
JULY 28, 1983 

The small gym in the back of Hanover Hall is closed for renova- 
tion. The women's dressing room on the south side of Hanover 
Hall IS also closed due to renovation. The women's dressing 
room located on the north side of Hanover Hall is open. 

The payroll checks for July 29 will reflect an increase in 
the take home pay due to the final phase of the Reagan tax cut 
program. Also, SPA employees will see a 5?o across the board 
cost-of-living increase which was recently approved by the 1983 
General Assembly. EPA employees will be notified by the ap- 
propriate university senior officials regarding salary increases, 

Supervisors are reminded that all temporary employee timesheets 
and all timesheets reflecting any type of premium pay MUST be in 
the personnel office no later than 10 a.m., Monday, August 1. 
The personnel staff will make one reminder call. 

Welcome to Willie Cardwell, grounds worker in the physical 
plant, and Joseph Thompson, research vessel captain in the SURF 
program. 

Dr. Betty Jo Welch, associate professor of speech communication, 
appeared on WWAY-TV's Segment 3, during the noon news July 25. 
Dr. Jim Edmundson, director of special programs, will be featur- 
ed on the program August 3 where he will discuss "Manaoement 
and the Computer." Also, Gary Olson of the writing center will 
appear on the show August 5 to discuss the writing center and 
his two-book contract he has with Random House. Dr. Gerald 
Shinn, professor of philosophy & religion, has begun monthly 
appearances on The Jim Burns Show, WECT-TV 6, to discuss a num- 
ber of topics relating to religion. His next appearance will be 
August 9 at 11:30 a.m. 

The Office of Naval Research has awarded a $60,000 grant to Dr. 
William H. Overman of the department of psychology to study the 
effects of high pressure environments (simulated deep sea div- 
ing) on memory and learning in squirrel monkeys. 



MEGJVERN 
PRESENTS 
COURSE 



NEW 
BABY 



EXTENSION 
CHANGES 



NCSEA 
TO MEET 



\CCFA 
SESSION 



Dr. James Megivern of the philosophy & religion department v 
one of three instructors to give a mini-course in the Honors 
Program at Weber State College in Ogden, Utah, July 11-15. 
course examined "Dimensions of Nuclear Arms." He also spoke 
Chowan College in Murfreesboro July 16 during the NC Friends 
Yearly Meeting on "The Biblical Basis of the Peace Witness.' 

Congratulations to Debra Robbins in the School of Education 
upon the birth of a son, Christopher Alan, July 12. Mother 
and baby are doing fine. 

Please make a note of the following telephone number changes 
in the library: 

Joyce Abernathy, acquisitions: 2199 

Sue Hiatt, special collections: 2276 

Deborah Price, acquisitions: 2199 

Alice Tiencken, acquisitions: 2199 

Catharine Walls, acquisitions: 2199 

The annual meeting of the Area 26 North Carolina State Emplc 
es Association will meet Tuesday, August 2, in room 100 of 1 
University Union. The social hour will begin at 6:30 p.m. v: 
the meeting starting at 7:30. The agenda will include the 
election of officers and the proposed resolutions to be pre-! 
sented to the State NCSEA Convention in September. All sta' 
and faculty are encouraged to attend. 

New members and prospective NCSEA members are encouraged tO; 
attend an information session Tuesday, August 2, at 9:30 a.i, 
in King Hall Auditorium. State Membership Chairman, Blanch( 
Critcher, and Regional Membership Chairman, Charlotte Rouse 
will be on campus to explain the association, answer questii: 
and discuss the benefits of NCSEA. 



SLIDE Dr. James Megivern of the P&R faculty will show slides and j 
PRESENTATION discuss his recent visit to Nicaragua Thursday, August 4, al 
7:30 p.m. in the Library Auditorium. 

TUITION Permanent full-time employees are eligible for a tuition wa' 
WAIVER on one course per semester. The waiver forms should be pro" 
sed 30 days prior to the beginning of the semester. One mu 
first go through the admissions process before tuition waiv ' 
approval is granted. 

SEAHAWK All faculty and staff are invited to the new 5EAHAWK GRILL 
GRILL located in the University Union. 





SEAHAWK GRILL 






COUPON 




With the 


purchase of any sandwich 


Ge 


a 12 oz. drink FREE 


Present this coupon to the 


cashier 


Offer 


expires August 5, 


1983 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the csea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 5 
AUGUST 4, 1983 



PARKING 
DECALS 



UNCW parking decals for 1983-84 may be purchased from Mrs. 
Cornelia Royal in Belk Hall. Cost for the first car will be 
$40. There will be a $10 charge for registering a second car. 

The University received notice on Tuesday, August 2, that the 
reimbursement rate for in-state and out-of-state travel has 
increased. Reimbursement for in-state travel has increased 
from $35 a day to $42; while out-of-state travel went from 
$45 a day to $54. The increase per day which became ef- 
fective July 1, 1983, is as follows: 



In-state 
Rates 



Breakfast 


$ 3.25 


Lunch 


4.00 


Dinner 


7.75 


Motel 


27.00 



Out- 


3f-state 




^ates 


$ 4 


.25 


5 


.00 


10 


75 


34 


.00 



TOTAL 



$ 42.00 



$ 54.00 



The "Silver Revue," a 25 year celebration of past musicals 
presented by the Straw Hat Theatre, will open TONIGHT in 
Kenan Auditorium and run through August 7. Curtain call is 
8:30 nightly. Tickets are $4 per person and may be purchased 
in Kenan Auditorium. 

A UNCW welcome is extended to Jean G. Joyner, clerk-stenog- 
rapher in the development office, and James L. McGuire, laborer 
in the physical plant. 

An exhibit featuring Contemporary Calligraphy and Paintings of 
the Republic of China will be on display August 5-31 in Ran- 
dall Library and the lobby of the behavioral sciences building. 
The exhibit is free and is sponsored by the UNCW Museum of 
World Cultures. 



MEGIVERN Dr. James J. Megivern of the P&R faculty will show slides ai 
TO SPEAK discuss his recent visit to Nicaragua TONIGHT at 7:30 in th( 
Library Auditorium. 

DEDICATION The Reverend Professor Hugh Anderson of Edinburgh University 
CEREMONY Scotland, chairman of the International Selection Council f( 
the Albert Schweitzer International Prizes, will speak durin; 
the dedication ceremony of a Schweitzer portrait August 10 
at 12 noon in room 106 of the University Union. 

MCGUIRE AT Dr. Phillip McGuire, associate professor of history, attendt 
MEETING the meeting of the Executive Council of the Association of 

Historians in Eastern North Carolina held July 29 in Fayett( 

ville. 

FACULTY AT Charles Fort, director of creative writing, and Dr. Jerry 
CONFERENCE Seiple of the English faculty attended the North Carolina 
Writer's Conference held July 29-30 at Atlantic Christian 
College in Wilson. j 

REVIEW Dr. Robert Byington, chairman of the English department, hai 
PUBLISHED had his review-essay of Richard M. Dorson's Land of the 
Mi 11 rats , the first full-length study of urban/industrial 
folklore, published in the most recent issue of the JOURNAL' 
OF AMERICAN FOLKLORE. i 



GUEST 
SPEAKER 



NEW 
BABY 



OFFICE 
MOVES 



Robert S. McCarn, customer service representative for CP&L, 
will discuss "Nuclear Power and the Defense of the US" dur- 
ing the Pi Sigma Alpha Summer Lecture series scheduled 
TONIGHT in King Auditorium at 7:30. The series, "Defense 
Issues: 1983," is sponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha, national 
political science honor society. 

Congratulations to Dr, Barbara Waxman of the English facult 
upon the birth of a son, Daniel Evan Waxman, July 27. Mom 
and son are doing fine. 

The Office of Federal Compliance has moved to room 111-A o1 
Alderman Hall. Mrs. Isabel] Foushee, federal compliance o1 
ficer, and Ms. Barbara Jones, secretary, may be reached at 
extension 2840. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 




") — ) 



UNC by the ^ea' 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 6 
AUGUST 11, 1983 



Faculty members are encouraged to prepare Reserve Reading 
Lists for the fall semester as soon as possible. Forms are 
available at the Library Reserve Desk or from departmental 
secretaries. The forms should be submitted to the Reserve 
Desk at least one week prior to class assignments. Materials 
on reserve for the second surmer session will be removed 
after exams -- to insure that these same items will be avail- 
able for the same course to be taught during the fall 
semester contact Mrs. Hilda Tyndall at extension 2790 by 
August 16. 

Any staff or faculty member who is an alumnus or alumna of 
UNCW is asked to call Jean Farmer, editor of UNCW today , 
at extension 2708, She is exploring the possibilities of an 
article in a future publication. 

UNCW parking decals for 1 983-84 may be purchased from Mrs, 
Cornelia Royal in Belk Hall. Cost for the first car will be 
$40. There will be a $10 charge for registering a second car. 

Central Stores is now stocking ribbons for Radio Shack DMP- 
200 printer, stock number 610-63604 and the Epson MS80 
printer, stock number 610-63604. 

Departments sending packages to the warehouse for shipping 
should indicate the departmental account number for which the 
charges will be billed. 

Two UNCW students, Alan Johnson and Kim Messick, members of 
the Wilmington Writer's Forum, will read their poetry at St. 
John's Museum of Art, August 11 at 8 p.m. 

Congratulations to Dianne Talley of the specieil programs of" 
fice upon the birth of a daughter on August 3; Dr. Kathy 
Berkeley of the history faculty on the birth of a son, David 
Aaron, August 2 and Ron Koeltzow of the office of information 
systems on the birth of his son, Michael Wayne, on August 2. 



OVER 



TELLER II 
IS HERE 



TASK 
FORCE 

EXHIBIT 
OPEN 



Wachovia's Teller II full-service banking machine will be op 
for business August 15. The machine is located in the first 
floor lobby of the University Union across from the post 
office. Beginning August 22, Wachovia will be using room 1( 
of the University Union to open accounts for faculty, staff 
and students. They will also offer this convenience for 
several weeks at the beginning of each semester. The Col lee 
Road Branch of Wachovia will also be accepting new applicat' 

The Science and Technology Task Force will meet August 12 a- 
7:30 a.m. in the university faculty dining room. 

An exhibit featuring Contemporary Calligraphy and Paintings 
the Republic of China will be on display through the month 
August in Randall Library and the lobby of the behavioral 
sciences building, The exhibit is free and is sponsored by 
the UNCW Museum of World Cultures. 



NEW Welcome to Marguerite Chance, clerk-stenographer in the de- 
EMPLOYEE partment of creative arts. 

REP. ON John Pezzoni, VALIC representative will be on campus August 

CAMPUS in the Board Room of Alderman Hall. For an appointment cal 

the personnel office at extension 2160, 



FOR 
RENT 



Garage apartment located in Forest Hills, 1 bedroom, some 
furniture, private -- $190 a month plus utilities - one mor' 
deposit required, Available August 20. Call Mrs. Schmid a 
762-7907 or Dr. Schmid at extension 2409. 



FOR 
RENT 



Five bedroom house on Bahama Drive, Wrightsville Beach, $7C 
per month. Call extension 2386. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQU 




UMC-WILMINGTOW 

Pfoipnnnp 



AUG 18 ^Si 



H 



EISIMITE 

OFFICE OF VICE-CHANCELLOR 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 7 
AUGUST IS, 1983 



HELMS ON 
CAMPUS 



EDS NUMBER 
CHANGES 



REPS ON 

CAMPUS 



IN-HOUSE 
TRANSFER 

NEW 
EMPLOYEES 



MEMBERSHIP 
DRIVE 



U.S. Senator Jesse Helms will conduct hearings on drug smuggling 
problems August 22 in the University Union. As chairman of 
the Foreign Relations Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere 
Affairs he plans to investigate the scope of drug smuggling pro- 
blems and will propose appropriate legislation to remedy same. 
The hearings entitled "Local Impact of the Border Interdiction 
Effort" will be held in the Seahawk Grill from 10:00 a.m. to 
12:30 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m. - 't:00 p.m. 

The out-of-state/Raleigh area telephone number for EDS has 
changed to (919) 851-9300. If you need to call EDS when 
traveling out-of-state call this number collect. EDS will accept 
only those calls made by the employee from out-of-state. Please 
note the new number in your Comprehensive Health Benefits 
Plan Booklet and your identification card. For questions call 
Dianne Smith at extension 2162. 

John Pezzoni, VALIC annuity representative, will be on campus 
August 30 in the Board Room of Alderman Hall. Also, Eric 
Johnson, Equivest annuity representative, will be on campus 
September 7 in room 208 of Alderman Hall. Call the personnel 
office at extension 2160 for an appointment. 

Polly Harris, clerk typist, has transferred from the department 
of purchasing services to the biological sciences department. 

A welcome is extended to Jackie Robinson, security officer, in 
the department of police services; Major David Felt, chairman 
of the military science department, and Master Sergeant 
Richard Copeland, NCOIC in the military science department. 

The UNCW Community Orchestra, featuring five concerts for 
the 1983-8^ season, is presently holding its membership drive. 
Tickets may be purchased from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday through 
Friday in the University Union Information Center. Season 
tickets for adults are $16, students $8 and UNCW students 
will be admitted free. Dr. Joe Hickman of the music faculty 
is the conductor and musical director. The concert dates are 
scheduled for October 11, December 6, December 12, February 
26, 198^1 and April 17, 19SI^, 



BRAUER IN Dr. Ralph Brauer, director of IMBR, will visit Australia where| 

AiJSTRALIA he will address the 29th Congress of the International Union 

of Physiological Scientists. His first stop will be in Port Stev| 
August 21-2<^ where he will present a paper on "Hydrostatic 
Pressure Effects, Sensory Perception of Temperature/Pressure! 
Relationships, and Deep Diving by Aquatic Organisms." Augusjj 
25-September 3 will find Dr. Brauer in Sydney where he will 
present another paper, "Comparative Physiology of Hydrostati 
Pressure on Central Nervous Systems." He will travel to Brisl 
to deliver a paper on "Thermodynamics of Temperature/Pressu|| 
Interaction in Relation to Temperature/Pressure Preference 
Behavior." Fromi Brisbane he will leave for 3apan where he 
has been invited by the Marine Science and Technology Centej 
at Tokyo and Yokosuta to be a visiting scientist. He will retui| 
home on September 20. 

PASKETROOMS A new system for controlling the basketrooms in Trask has be- 
REORGANIZED implemented. This reorganization requires all faculty and stal 
presently using baskets to do the following: (1) Remove all 
personal belongings from your current basket by August 26, 
(2) Return basket card to Polly McMillan or Ike Mitchell, 
in the basketrooms and (3) Have a new card and basket issued 
for the centralized faculty/staff area. 

LIBRARY Faculty members are encouraged to prepare Reserve Reading 

NOTES & Lists for fall semester as soon as possible. Forms are availabf 

SCHEDULE from Mrs. Hilda Tyndall at extension 2790 at the Reserve Desli 

or from departmental secretaries. The forms should be submit 

ted to Mrs. Tyndall at least one week prior to class assignmen 

The fall schedule for Randall Library is as follows: 



REGULAR HOURS: 



EXCEPTIONS: 



Monday-Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 

September 3-^- 
September 5 
October 15-16 
October 17-21 
October 22 
October 23 
November 23 
November 2^ 
November 25 
November 26 
November 27 



7:45 ajm. - midnight 

7'A5 ajn. - 9:00 p.m, 

10:00 ajn. - 6:00 p.m 

1:00 p.m. - midnight 

CLOSED 
6:00 p.m. - midnight 

CLOSED 
8:00 ajn. - 5:00 pjn, 

CLOSED 
6:00 p.m. - midnighl 
7:^5 ajn. - 6 p.m. 

CLOSED 
10:00 ajn. - 5 pjn. 

CLOSED 
6:00 p.m. - midnighl 



GRADUATE 
OFFICE 

ESSAY 
PUBLISHED 



PARKING 

DECALS 

APARTMENT 
FOR RENT 



The U^JCW Office of Graduate Studies is now located in room 
217 of Alderman HalL 

Gary Olson, director of the center for writing, has just publisi' 
ed an essay entitled "Responding to Student Writing With Tape; 
in the recent issue of IMPROVING COLLEGE AND UNIVERSllj 
TEACHING. The edition was a special issue on writing in all 
disciplines. 

A reminder that parking decals for 1983-8'^ are presently on 
sale in Belk Hall. The first car is $40 while the second car is| 

Garage apartment in Forest Hills - 1 bedroom - for rent. 
Call Catherine Schmid 762-7007 or Dr. Schmid at extension 24! 



CAMPUS 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 8 
AUGUST 25. 1983 



The development office staff would like to extend a warm "wel- 
come back" to all employees especially the new faculty and 
staff who have come aboard since the spring semester, Each 
member of the faculty and staff will receive a telephone in- 
formation card along with today's issue of the CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE. Please fill out the card and return to Patsy 
Larrick in the University Union, room 209, no later than 
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2. Only those cards received on or before 
that date will be included in the directory. The development 
office publishes the UNCW Faculty/Staff Telephone Directory 
as a service to the employees of the university. Distribu- 
tion is limited to UNCW faculty and staff. 

All items for inclusion in the 1983 September "Calendar of 
Events" should be sent to Jean Joyner in the development 
office no later than August 30. Please include time, date, 
fee etc. 

A Wilmington STAR-NEWS paper rack is located next to the 
Seahawk Grill in the University Union. 

Dr. George Bair, assistant to the chancellor, is now located 
in room 114-A of Alderman Hall. He can be reached at ext. 
2116. 

When requesting a state vehicle - a Travel Request and In- 
voice form should be filled out and submitted as soon as pos- 
sible prior to needing the vehicle. Blank forms consisting 
of three sheets may be picked up from the physical plant, 
and upon completion should be submitted in triplicate. Re- 
fer to the University Procedures Manual, pages F.l - 1 thru 
F.l - 4. No vehicle will be released if the Travel Request 
does not have the following information; 

Signature of authorizing individual 
Budget code 

Valid drivers license number 
Signature of operator 



PARKING 
DECALS 



PASSENGER 

VAN 

POLICY 



REPS ON 
CAMPUS 



INSURANCE 

NUMBER 

CHANGES 



PAYROLL 
DEADLINE 



Parking decals for 1983-84 are presently on sale in Belk Ha' 
The first car is $40 while the second car is $10, For infoi 
mation call Mrs. Cornelia Royal at ext. 2537. j 

Only persons holding a valid class "B" (chauffeur's) li- 
cense will be permitted to drive the university's 15 passen- 
ger van. However, a person with a class "C" license needing 
to use the van may do so providing he/she notifies the phys' 
cal plant one day prior to use of the vehicle so that a sea' 
may be removed. 

John Pezzoni , VALIC annuity representative, will be on campi 
August 30 in the Board Room of Alderman Hall. Also, Eric 
Johnson, Equivest annuity representative, will be on campus 
September 7 in room 208 of Alderman Hall. For an appoint- 
ment call the personnel office at ext. 2160. 

The out-of-state/Raleigh area telephone number for EDS has 
changed to (919) 851-9300. If you need to call EDS when 
traveling out-of-state call this number collect, EDS will 
accept only those calls made by the employee from out-of- 
state. Please note the new number in your Comprehensive 
Health Benefits Plan Booklet and your identification card. 
For questions call Dianne Smith at extension 2162. 

All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets reflec 
ing any type of premium pay must be in the personnel office 
before 10 a.m., Thursday, September 1. Supervisors who do 
not meet this deadline cannot expect their employees to be 
paid on September 15. One reminder call will be made. 



RANDALL 
LIBRARY 
SCHEDULE 



REGULAR HOURS: 



EXCEPTIONS; 



Monday-Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 



September 3 
September 5 
October 15 ■ 
October 17- 
October 22 
October 23 
November 23 
November 24 
November 25 
November 26 
November 27 



- 4 



16 
21 



7:45 a.m. - midnight 

7:45 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.: 

10:00 a.m. - 6;00 p.m,i 

1 :00 p.m, - midnight 



CLOSED 
00 p.m. - mi 

CLOSED 
00 a.m. - 5: 

CLOSED 
00 p.m, - mi 
45 a.m. - 6: 

CLOSED 
00 a.m. - 5: 

CLOSED 
00 p.m, - mi 



dnight 

00 p.m.: 

dnight i 
00 p.m, 

00 p.m.i 

dnight 



BASKETROOMS A new system for controlling 
REORGANIZED been implemented. This reorg 
and staff presently using bas 
Remove all personal belonging 
August 26, (2) Return basket 
Mitchell, in the basketrooms 
basket issued for the central 



the basketrooms in Trask has 
anization requires all faculty 
kets to do the following; {V 
s from your current basket by 
card to Polly McMillan or Ike 
and (3) Have a new card and 
ized faculty/staff area. 






New staff members include: Doris M. Moore, mail clerk, Joseph 
Hack, plant maintenance supervisor in the physical plant; 
Jeanette Parnell , clerk typist in the department of purchas- 
ing services and Michael Jordan, research associate for IMBR. 

New full-time faculty members are: 

Nursing Department 
Ms. Doretha M. Stone 

Soci ol ogy/Anthropol ogy 
Ms. Anita Veit and Dr. Randy L. La Grange 

Education, Design & Management 
Dr. Wade Cooper 

Chemical & Physical Sciences 
Mr. Jinks K. Whittington and Dr. James H. Reeves 

Economics & Finance 
Dr. Luther D. Lawson 

Management & Marketing 
Dr. Arvid A. Anderson and Dr. Jack T. Turner 

Engl ish 
Dr. John L. Schilb, Dr. Michael D. Wentworth, Dr. Jane B. 
Smith, Mr. Richard D. Long and Dr. Clark W. Holtzman 

Mathematical Sciences 
Dr. Kenneth W. Spackman, Mr. David M. Russell, Mr. Jeffrey 
L. Brown, Dr. Douglas D. Smith and Dr. Peter Mueller-Roemer 

Earth Sciences 
Dr. James A. Dockal 

Creative Arts 
Dr. Steven M. Weiss and Mr. Frank P. Trimble 

Philosophy & Religion 
Dr. John Buescher, Dr. Susan M. Isen and Dr. Ferenc Altrichter 

Biological Sciences 
Dr. Armando A. De La Cruz and Mrs. Anne F. Kendrick 

Health, Physical Education & Recreation 
Mr. Charles Weber', Mr, James A, Tribbett and Ms. Drema S. 
Greer 

Curricular Studies 
Dr. Carol C. Thomas and Dr. Mary L. Gendernalik 

History 
Dr. Mack P. Holt 



OEMS TO 

lE PUBLISHED 



The university pool will be closed for maintenance until mid 
September, 

Charles Fort, director of creative writing, has had two poems 
accepted for publication in the St. Andrews Review from St. 
Andrews College in Laurinburg. The first poem, Race War , 
will appear in the fall issue while the second poem. The Town 
Clock Burning , will appear in the spring issue. 

David Kechley, composer and member of the Creative Arts Departs 
ment - division of music, has received an award from the 
American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers for 1983- 
84. The awards are given to members of ASCAP in recognition 
of prestigious works and/or performances of work not licensed 
by the society. 



ATHLETICS The UNCW Athletic Department in conjunction with the New 
HOSTS Hanover County School system hosted a two-day clinic for 

CLINIC all county junior and senior high school coaches August t 

UNCW athletic coaches who participated in the seminar wei 
Jackie Bartlett (volleyball), Mel Gibson (men's basketba] 
Drema Greer (women's basketball assistant), Bobby Guthrit 
(baseball), Calvin Lane (soccer), Bobby Martin (men's ba£ 
ball assistant) and Jim Tribbett (men's basketball assist 
Larry Honeycutt of the HPER staff also conducted a sessic 
on football and basketball rules. Special guest lecture] 
from UNCW included Dr. Michael Bradley who spoke on "Coat 
as Role Models in Adolescents" and Dr. Charles Lewis, whc 
spoke on "Sanity in Youth Sports." 



DEGREE 
AWARDED 



Ms. Doretha Stone of the nursing department has received 
master of science degree in nursing from UNC-Greensboro j 
has returned to teach in the ADN program. 



PAPER Dr. Paul Jambor, associate professor of mathematical scii 

PRESENTED presented a paper, "Commutative rings with no superdecom) 
modules: A description," at the summer meeting of the 
American Mathematical Society held August 8-14 in Albany 



ARTICLE 
PUBLISHED 



GUEST 
INSTRUCTORS 



PORT 
PARTICIPATES 



Dr. Phill 
entitled 
Black Lea 
lication 

Mary M. W 
of specia 
Carolina 
Schools o 
Education 



ip McGuire of the history faculty has had an arj 
"Desegregation of the United States Armed Force 
dership Protest and World War II" accepted for 
in the J ournal of Negro History . 



asson of the English department and Marylil Hum; 
1 programs were guest instructors at the 1983 N? 
Summer Wellness Festival sponsored by the UNC-C 
f Medicine, Nursing, Public Health and Physical 
The conference was held August 4-7 at UNC-Ch 



Charles Fort, director of creative writing and assistant 
professor of English, will present a reading of his poet,' 
and speak on the Wilmington Writers Forum September 23-2' 
at Guilford College in Greensboro. The session will be t' 
first of three conferences entitled "Building Community 
Among North Carolina Writers" sponsored by Poetry Centei 
Southeast. The conferences will consist of readings anc 
seminars by award winning poets who have had items publ:i! 
in Portfolio 1983. 



SULLIVAN 
PUBLISHES 



Dr. Sally Sullivan, English faculty member, has signed ( 
tracts with Random House, Inc. to publish two compositu 

Helpbook For Student Writer: 



textbooks she has written. 



a workbook that uses Dr. Sullivan's method for helping 
students eliminate their problems with standard English ; 
while the other book. Writing For Life , is a compositioi: 
text for basic writers. Both books are to be available 31 
classroom use next fall, 



PARKING 
DECALS 



A reminder that 1983-84 parking decals for faculty and la 
are presently on sale in Belk Hall. The first car is 
while the second car is $10. 



JNIVERSITY 
JNION 



AGILITIES 



The University Union will close Friday, September 2, at 
5 p.m., and reopen September 6 at 7 a.m. The closing 
of the union is in conjunction with the Labor Day holiday. 

The following physical education facilities are available 
to faculty and staff. I.D.'s must be shown upon request. 



HANOVER 



WEIGHT ROOM 



RAGQUETBALL GOURTS 



8 


00 


a 


m. 


~ 9:00 


p.m. 


Mon-Thurs 


8 


00 


a 


m. 


- 5:45 


p.m. 


Friday 


9 


00 


a 


m. 


- 5:00 


p.m. 


Saturday 


1 


00 


P 


m. 


- 6:00 


p = m. 


Sunday 


8 


00 


a 


.m. 


- 9:00 


p.m. 


Mon-Thurs 


8 


00 


a 


.m. 


- 5:45 


p.m. 


Friday 


9 


00 


a 


m. 


- 5:00 


p.m. 


Saturday 


1 


00 


P 


m. 


- 6:00 


p.m. 


Sunday 


8 


00 


a 


.m. 


- 9:00 


p.m. 


Mon-Thurs 


8 


00 


a 


.m. 


- 5:45 


p.m. 


Friday 


9 


00 


a 


.m. 


- 5:00 


p.m. 


Saturday 


1 


00 


P 


m. 


- 6:00 


p.m. 


Sunday 



TENNIS COURTS 



8:00 a.m. - 11 :30 p.m. Daily 



3WIMMING POOL 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Mon. Wed. Thurs. 

& Fri. 
7:30 p.m. - 9:15 p.m. Mon. Wed. Thurs. 
& Fri. 
11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Tuesday 
12:00 noon - 3:00 p.m. Saturday 

The times may change due to scheduled athletic games and 
community events. Gall the HPER department to verify 
times. 



HAVE A SAFE LABOR DAY WEEKEND!! 



A REMINDER - ALL GARDS FOR INGLUSION IN THE UNGW 
FAGULTY/STAFF TELEPHONE DIRECTORY MUST BE IN THE 
DEVELOPMENT OFFICE BY TOMORROW. GARDS SHOULD BE 
DIRECTED TO PATSY LARRICK, ROOM 209 OF THE 
UNIVERSITY UNION. 



FACULTY Faculty members are asked to announce to their classes t^ 
ANNOUNCEMENT schedule for the center for writing. 



Monday - Friday 
Tuesday evenings 
Thursday evenings 



9 a.m. - 12 noon and 1 p.m. - 
5:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. 
5:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. 



PAPER 
DELIVERED 



DODSON 
APPOINTED 



PH.D 
EARNED 



REPS ON 
CAMPUS 



WRITER'S 
WORKSHOP 



INSURANCE 
PROGRAM 



William Woodhouse, associate professor of Spanish, delive; 
a paper, "Hacia una terminologia coherente para la poesis 
satirica del Siglo de Oro," during the Eight Congress of : 
Asociacion Internacional de Hispanistas held August 21-T,\ 
Brown University. Over 500 hispanists from 28 countries 
were in attendance. 

The Educational Testing Service has appointed Brooks Dodsi 
professor of English, as a Reader for the 1983 College Bc;: 
English Composition Essay Test. He along with other colli] 
and high school teachers of writing selected from across I' 
country will spend five days in Princeton this December 
where they will evaluate essays written as part of the 
College Board examination program. 

William David Webster of the biological sciences faculty 
successfully defended his Ph.D. dissertation in early 
August and graduated August 20 from Texas Tech University 
His dissertation, "Systematics and evolution of bats of t 
genus Glossophaga," will be published in the Special Pub- 
lication of the Museum, Texas Tech University . 

Eric Johnson, Equivest Annuity representative, will be onj 
campus September 7 in room 208 of Alderman Hall. Frank 
Cranor, NC Deferred Compensation Annuity representative, 
will be on campus September 19 in room 208 of Alderman Ha| 
For an appointment call the personnel office at ext. 2160! 

The Writer's Workshop of the Wilmington Writer's Forum re 
sumes Monday, September 12, in Morton Hall room 212 from p 
7-10 p.m. j 

Recent legislation has authorized an amendment to the Coirl 
prehensive Health Benefit Plan (GS-135) effective October'! 
The amendment allows for the state to deduct from each psj 
ticipating employee 250 each month to establish a Convers.; 
Reserve which will enable the state to provide conversion! 
coverage to employees and dependents leaving the group pli 
at reasonable premiums. UNCW will also be required to pa] 
250 for each enrolled employee. The schedule below shows' 
the monthly cost of coverage for medical insurance premiu: 
which will be reflected in the September paycheck. 



TYPE OF COVERAGE 

Employee only 
Employee/children 
Employee/family 
Split Contract 

Wife 

Husband/children 



TOTAL COST 


STATE PAYS 

$47.80 + .25=$48.05 




EMPLO 


YEE PAY 


$48.30 






87.18 


47.80 + .25= 48.05 


$38 


88 + 


.25=$39 


125.28 


47.80 + .25= 48.05 


76 


98 + 


.25= 77 


48.30 


47.80 + .25= 48.05 








72.12 


47.80 + .25= 48.05 


23 


82 + 


.25= 24 



UMHUUimUJIHIUIIIHIlIli 



■Bsn 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 10 
SEPTEMBER 8, 1983 

Governor James Hunt, Sara Hodgins, Secretary of the NC De- 
partment of Cultural Resources, and Edgar Peters Bowron, 
director of the NC Museum of Art, invites all State employe- 
es and their families to "State Employees' Family Day" 
scheduled for Saturday, September 24, from 1-5 p.m. at the 
"new" NC Museum of Art located on Blue Ridge Blvd. in 
Raleigh. Museum staff members have scheduled a variety of 
workshops, tours, talks and films for employees and their 
families. Arts on exhibit will include ancient, American, 
contemporary and Old Master paintings along with NC 
collections. 

Betsy Stallard, former employee in the purchasing department, 
has transferred to the mail center as a mail clerk. Sondra 
Roark has been promoted to clerk typist in the purchasing 
department. Nancy Hill, clerk typist for the office of 
institutional research, and Debbie Sewell, library assis- 
tant in Randall Library, have been upgraded from permanent 
part-time to permanent full-time positions. 

The deadline for purchasing 1983-84 parking decals for staff 
and faculty is Friday, September 30. Decals must be display- 
ed by 8 a.m., October 1 - otherwise, parking tickets will be 
issued. 

The UNCW Chapter of the American Association of University 
professors will host a reception for new faculty members 
and their spouses following the Faculty Meeting Thursday, 
September 15. The reception, scheduled to end at 8 p.m., 
will be held at the home of Dr. Thomas Moseley, 448 Robert 
E. Lee Dr. All faculty members are invited. 

Due to the automation of the university's new check writing 
system, same day response on check requests will no longer be 
available. Effective immediately, check requests received in 
the accounting office by 8:30 a.m. will be available by 12 
noon the following day. The accounting office regrets any 
inconvenience this may cause and requests that all depart- 
ments adjust their scheduling of requests to reflect the new 
procedure. For questions call Bob Walton or Timothy Jordan. 



CHECK Chancellor Wagoner has recently accepted a check in the amoui 

ACCEPTED of $1,000 from Will Kirk, director of the LaQue Center for 

Corrosion Technology Inc. The gift constitutes a scholarshi| 
in the chemistry department providing a stipend to a student 
as well as an amount to be applied to the department of the 
recipient's major area of study. This is the 15th year that 
the LaQue Center has made scholarship awards to UNCW. 

DR. MCGUIRE Dr. Phillip McGuire of the history department is the editor i 
IS EDITOR the Newsletter for the Association of Historians in Eastern 
North Carolina. 



SESSIONS 
CONDUCTED 



PAYNE TO 
SPEAK 



Drs. Richard Veit and Brooks Dodson of the English faculty 
conducted workshop sessions for teachers of various sub- 
jects in the Orange County public schools on the topic qf 
coping with the paper load. 

Rep. Harry E. Payne, Jr. will speak tonight at 8 in conjunc- 
tion with the Pi Sigma Alpha Fall Lecture Series entitled 
"State Politics: Conflict and Cooperation." Mr. Payne will 
discuss "Public Utilities in the State of North Carolina" inj 
Morton Hall Auditorium. 



DR. OLSON TO Gary Olson of the English department will participate in a 
PARTICIPATE panel discussion entitled "Empirical and Linguistic Analysis 
of Style in Business Messages" during the Conference on 
College Composition and Communication to be held next March. 

PLAY "The Contract," a play written and directed by Nathan Ross \ 

SCHEDULED Freeman, will be held September 16, 17 and 18 in Kenan Audi-| 

torium nightly at 8. General admission is $4; students $3. 

For tickets call Dr. Aisha Rush/Gilliam at ext. 2768. 



FINE 
ARTS 

SOCCER 
SCHEDULE 



NEW 
EMPLOYEES 



The Fine Arts Committee will present "Othello" September 12 
in Kenan Auditorium at 8 p.m. Adults $5; students $3. 

The UNCW Soccer team will host the fourth Port City Classic 
Friday and Saturday, September 9 and 10. Friday at 4 p.m. 
the Seahawks will take on Baptist of Charleston, SC, while 
the Saturday meet at 2 p.m. is scheduled with UNC-C. 

A welcome is extended to the following new employees: 

Glenda Bowen, clerk typist, in the psychology department 
Pamela Eason, clerk typist, in purchasing services 
Becky Fancher, clerk typist, in information systems 
Deborah Packer, clerk typist, in library services 
Alice Bollard, records clerk, in the registrar's office 
Dave Smith, housekeeping assistant, in the physical plant 
Marilyn Murray, housekeeping assistant, in the physical plar|' 
Brenda McGee, housekeeping assistant, in the physical plant 
Sylvia Jones, housekeeping assistant, in the physical plant 
Scott Register, security officer, in campus police services 
Kathy Dorsey, secretary, office of the chancellor 



J 



POLITICAL ACTIVITIES 



le to numerous questions regarding permissable political activities for NC 
:ate employees an opinion from the State Attorney General's Office has been 
isued. Below are the guidelines taken from the Attorney General's Opinion. 



STATE PERSONNEL ACT PROVISIONS 

All State employees covered by the State Personnel Act should 
become familiar with the part of this statute which relates to 
political activity. 



The State Personnel Act (N.C.G.S. 
Chapter 126) provides the following; 



he State Personnel Act does not 
libit all political activities by State 
iloyees. However, an employee 
' not engage in any political acti- 
is while on duty or during any 
od of time during which he or she 
xpected to perform services for 
:h he or she shall receive compen- 
)n from the State. Furthermore, 
mployee may not use the author- 
of the position, or use any State 
Is, supplies, materials, vehicles or 
)ertv in connection with campaign 
olitital activities. 

State employee mav take a leave 
bsence, without pay, to work full 
! for a candidate or party. During 
leave of absence, there are no 
ictions to his otherwise lawful 
tical activities. 

n employee may not use threats 
promises to encourage another 
e employee to support any poli- 
issue, candidate or partv. 

State employee who directiv or 
rectiv attempts to coerce or intim- 
2 any other employee to vote or 
to vote for a particular candidate 
public office by threatening that 
on's empiovment with State gov- 
lent is guilty of a misdemeanor 

.G.S. 163-271). 



"126-13. Appropriate Political Ac- 
tivity of State Employees Defined 

As an individual, each State employee retains all the rights and 
obligations of citizenship provided in the Constitution and laws of 
the State of North Carolina and the Constitution and laws of the 
United States of America; however, no State employee subject to 
the Personnel Act or temporary State employee shall: 

(1) take any active part in managing a campaign, or campaign for 
political office or otherwise engage in political activity while 
on duty or within any period of time during which he is 
expected to perform services for which he receives compensa- 
tion from the State. 

(2) otherwise use the authority of his position, or utilize State 
funds, supplies or vehicles to secure support for or oppose any 
candidate, party, or issue in a partisan election involving can- 
didates for office or party nominations, or affect the results 
thereof. 

"126-14. Promise or Threat to 
Obtain Political Contribution 
or Support 

No State employee or official shall use any promise of personal 
preferential treatment or threat of loss to encourage or coerce any 
State employee subject to the Personnel Act or temporary State 
employees to support or contribute to any political issue, candidate, 
or party. 



"126-15. Disciplinary Action for 
Violation of Article 



Failure to comply with this article ,s grounds tor disciplinary action 
which, in case of deliberate or repeated violation, mav include 
dismissal or removal from office. " 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



IINC b\' Ihe csca' 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 11 
SEPTEMBER 15, 1983 



Articles for inclusion in the October "Calendar of Events" 
should be sent to Jean Joyner in the development office by 
Wednesday, September 28. 

The Faculty Women's Network will meet Sunday, September 25, 
at 7:30 p.m. at the Canterbury Woods Apartments Clubhouse. 
All interested faculty are invited. For directions or in- 
formation call Maggie Parish in the English department or 
Kathleen Berkeley in the history department. 

Beginning Monday, September 19, the Charlotte Observer 
will be available in a newspaper rack near the Sea Hawk 
Grill in the University Union. 

The NC Association of Women Dean Administrators and Counse- 
lors will hold its fall conference entitled "Leadership 
and Power" September 22-23 in Wilmington. The guest speaker 
for the Thursday evening banquet to be held at the Halloway 
Inn (Holiday Inn) at Wrightsville Beach, will be Dr. 
Ernestine Copas. The Friday symposium will be held in the 
University Union. For additional information call Linda 
Moore at ext. 2285 or Margaret Taylor at ext. 2532. 

The Board of Governors approved revised University Patent and 
Copyright Policies on June 10, 1983. These policies, which 
are on the faculty reserve shelf in the library, apply to 
faculty, staff and students. Each institution is required to 
prepare a set of procedures for implementation before 
September 30, 1983. A draft of the UNCW procedures is on 
reserve in the library also. All suggested changes should be 
sent to Dr. Jack Levy in C-129 by September 20. 

Faculty and staff are asked to submit nominations for Who's 
Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities. Ap- 
plication forms for nominees are available in the dean of 
students office. Nominations will be accepted through 5 p.m. 
Thursday, October 6, in the dean of students office. For 
additional information call ext. 2119. 

THE POOL IS READY- AND OPERATING UNDER THE NORMAL FALL SCHEDULE, 
SOME RACQUETBALL COURTS ARE OPEN FOR LIMITED USE. 
WEIGHT ROOM IS STILL CLOSED. 



P4R 
LECTURES 



NSF 
FELLOWSHIP 



STUDENTS 
COMPLETE 
COURSE 



AAUP TO 
MEET 



MATH 
LECTURES 



CONCERT 
SCHEDULED 



GUEST 
SPEAKER 



WORKSHOP 
CONDUCTED 



The UNCW Philosophy & Religion Department will present a se^ 
of public lectures examining "The Faces of God in The Weste 
Tradition" beginning September 22 at 8 p.m. in King Hall At 
torium. Dr. James McGowan, professor of philosophy & relic 
and a specialist in medieval philosophy and existentralism, 
will focus on the topic, "Of Gods and Men: Who Created Whorr 
Open to the public - no charge. 

Information is available in the career planning and placeme 
office on National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowships 
for individuals intending to pursue graduate work leading t 
the master's or doctoral degree in the mathematical, physic 
biological, engineering and social sciences. Also availabl 
is information on Minority Graduate Fellowships available i 
the same fields. Qualified candidates interested in the Am| 
can Symphony Orchestra League Orchestra Management Fellowshj 
program are also invited to contact the CP&PO for details. I 
For additional information call ext. 2174 or go by the offil 
at its current location, 207 Alderman Hall, or, after Septal 
15, room 106 of the University Union. 

Twenty-six residence life staff (students) successfully com 
pleted a CPR-Modular course taught by Margaret Taylor of th 
residence life office and Jimmy Dillon of the physical plan 
staff. The course was taught in the University Union Augusl 
30, 31 and September 1. 

The UNCW Chapter of the American Association of University 
Professors will host a reception for new faculty members am 
their spouses following the Faculty Meeting TODAY. The rec; 
tion, scheduled to end at 8 p.m., will be held at the home 
of Dr. Thomas Moseley, 440 Robert E. Lee Dr . All faculty 
members are invited. \ 

The mathematical sciences department will host a number of 
mathematical physics lectures this semester » Thad Dankel w 
speak on Parabolic wave equation and stochastic mechanics u 
the "Topics in Underwater Acoustics" September 22 at 4 p.m. 
room 212 of Morton Hall. 

Dr. James Gardner, assistant professor of music, and Dr. 
Sherrill Martin, associate professor of music, will present 
a concert for violin and piano, respectively, Friday, Septei 
23 in Kenan Auditorium. The program will include the Sonat 
No. 4 for Violin and Piano ; Children's Day at the Camp Meet 



f 



by Charles Ives; Chaconne from D Minor Partita by Johann 
Sebastian Bach; C aprice No. 24 by Nicolo Paganini and Sonat 
for Violin and Piano by Cesar Franck. Open to the public - 
no charge. 

Sen. Joseph E. Thomas of the 3rd Senatorial District (Carte 
Craven and Pamlico Counties) will discuss "Wildlife Preserv. 
tion in NC" September 22 in Morton Hall Auditorium at 8 p.m 
His appearance is in conjunction with the Pi Sigma Alpha fa 
lecture series. 

Dr. Rodney Earle of the school of education recently conduc 
a workshop on performance appraisal for librarians/media co 
nators m Brunswick County. 



iBHn 



LAWSON 
NAMED 



NX 
SYMPHONY 



Dr. Luther D. Lawson has been named associate director of the 
Center for Economic Education in the Cameron School of Business 
Administration. He will be working with Dr. W. W, Hall, Jr., 
director, in planning, coordinating and delivering workshops 
and seminars sponsored by the center. 

The NC Symphony will perform in Kenan Auditorium September 19 
at 8 p.m. (Pops Concert) Admission is $8; students with valid 
I.D. free. 



PLAY TO BE "The Contract," presented by the Wilmington Actors Collective, 
PEREORMED will be held in Kenan Auditorium September 16-18 at 8 nightly. 
Admission is $4; students $3. 

FASHION The Belk Beery Fashion Show will be held in Kenan Auditorium 
SHOW September 21 at 8 p.m. Admission will be $6. 

DECAL The deadline for purchasing 1983-84 parking decals for staff 

DEADLINE and faculty is Friday, September 30. Decals must be display- 
ed by 8 a.m., October 1 - otherwise parking tickets will be 
issued. 



FAMILY 
I DAY 



A reminder that "State Employees' Family Day" celebrating the 
opening of the "new" NC Museum of Art is scheduled for Saturday, 
September 24, from 1-5 p.m. at the museum. A variety of work- 
shops, tours, talks and films will be available for employees 
and their families. 



CHAPTER 
CONTRIBUTED 



BROWN 

DELIVERS 

PAPER 



OLSON 
PUBLISHES 



REVIEW 
PUBLISHED 



Dr. Carole Fink, associate professor of history, wrote a chap- 
ter entitled "Stresemanns Minderheitenpolitik , 1924-29" for a 
book on Gustav Stresemann to be published in West Germany. 

Dr. Robert T. Brown of the department of psychology delivered 
a paper at the recent annual convention of the American 
Psychological Association held in Anaheim, CA. The paper, 
co-authored by Dr. Cecil R. Reynolds of Texas A&M University, 
is titled, " The Experimentum crucis in Psychology." Also, 
Dr. Brown has had a brief article, "Ever Since Hippocrates...," 
accepted for publication in The Behavioral and Brain Sciences . 

Dr. Gary Olson of the English department has had an article 
entitled "Teaching Readability in Technical Communications" 
accepted for publication in the next issue of the Journal of 
Technical Communication . 

The North Carolina Historical Review has published a review by 
Dr. Phillip McGuire of the history faculty on Black Leaders 
of the Twentieth Century . The review, edited by John Hope 
Franklin and August Meier, was featured in the July, 1983 
edition. 



SULLIVAN IN Dr. Sally Sullivan, English instructor, has been selected to 
MHO'S WHO appear in the 1984 edition of Who's Who in the South and 
Southwest. 



LEARNING 
SKILLS 



NEW STAFF 
MEMBERS 



MAILE 
PROMOTED 



Learning skills groups dealing with self-motivation, time , 
management and study techniques are being scheduled in the! 
counseling & testing center. Faculty are asked to encourai 
students needing this type of help to sign up by calling j 
ext. 2280 or stopping by the center in James Hall, room 1ol 

Welcome to the following new UNCW employees: 

John Lanier, housekeeping assistant in the physical plant 
Mark Baucom, housekeeping assistant in the physical plant 
Linda Stephens, housekeeping assistant in the university 

union 
Gloria Hamilton, computer operator I, for computing and 

information systems 
Rosie Parker, clerk in purchasing services 
Joan Kumpel, clerk-typist for systems accounting/auditing 

Alice Maile has been temporarily promoted to fringe benefi 
specialist in the personnel office. Questions regarding 
benefits should be directed to her at ext. 2162. 



ANNUITY REP Frank Cranor, NC Deferred Compensation Annuity representati 
ON CAMPUS will be in room 208 of Alderman Hall September 19. For ar 

appointment with Mr. Cranor — call the personnel office at 

ext. 2160. 



COURSE 
OFFERED 



SOCCER 
SCHEDULE 

VOLLEYBALL 
SCHEDULE 

WOMEN • S 
TENNIS 

CROSS 
COUNTRY 

WATER 
POLO 

GOLF 
MATCH 

BABY 
EARLE 



The Office Skills course, "Working & Thinking Smart," offe 
jointly by Cape Fear Technical Institute and UNCW will beci 
Tuesday, September 20. Classes will be held in room 223 
of the social 4 behavioral sciences building on Tuesdays fi 
2-5 p.m. for eleven weeks. Employees interested in enrc- 
ling must return the necessary form to the personnel offiti 
no later than September 19. 

A soccer game is scheduled for September 21 with NCSU in 
Raleigh. 

A game is scheduled for tomorrow at Coastal Carolina; Sepli 
20 at St. Andrews and September 22 at Wingate. 

The Shehawks will participate in a match at Campbell Uni- j 
versity September 19. 

The cross country team will participate in the Pembroke 
Invitational September 17. 

The water polo team will compete in the Washington & Lee 
Classic September 17- 18. 

The golf team will be hosted by St. Andrews September 20. I 



Dr. Rodney Earle, assistant professor in the school of edi 
tion, is pleased to announce the birth of his daughter, 
Rebecca Lynn. September 7, the same birthday as her twin 
brothers, Jason and Jonathan. 



CAMPUS 

COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the csca 




EVIEW 
ROCEDURE 



HIRT 
ALE 



IKE 



lACRAE 
PEAKS AT 
ANQUET 



DISTINGUISHED 
ROFESSOR 
SPEAK 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 12 
September 22, 1983 

Purchasing services is requesting that all departments 
review the procedure (A-6) on the use of "Check Re- 
quests." Unless guidelines are met - reimbursements 
will be denied. 

The university bookstore has a limited number of shirts 
and jerseys on sale for $4 each. Values up to $14.95, 

The UNCW Recreation Majors Club will sponsor a "Bike In" 
September 28 at noon in front of the University Union. 
Included in the event will be a bike ride around cam- 
pus (roped off area), bike inspections and the opportu- 
nity to register bikes with the campus police and city 
police. Also, individuals have an opportunity to win 
a Coastline Cruiser bicycle by purchasing $1 raffle 
tickets. All proceeds will go to the SGA to be used 
for bicycling projects, facilities and activities. 

Hugh MacRae, Wilmington businessman, will be the guest 
speaker at the Fall Awards Ceremony of the ROTC detach- 
ment September 28 at 3 p.m. in room 100 of the Univer- 
sity Union. 

Dr. Armando A. de la Cruz, the Foundation's Visiting 
Distinciuished Professor, will discuss 'Spoiled Land- 
scapes, Waning Wetlands, end Troubled Waters" in room 
100 of the University Union on September 26 at 8 p.m. 
All faculty and staff are invited. A reception will 
follow to allow individuals to meet the professor. 



HO'S 

HO 

EADLINE 



CTOBER 
ALFNDAR 



^TH 
\LK 



The deadline for submitting nomination for Who's Who 
in American Colleges and Universities is October 6. 
Forms may be picked up in the dean of students office 
in Alderman Hall. For information call ext. 2119. 

Articles for inclusion in the October "Calendar of 
Events" should be sent to Jean Joyner in the develop- 
ment office by Wednesday, September 28. 

Dr. Gabriel Lugo of the mathematical sciences department 
will discuss "The Twistor Programme" Sep. 26 at 4:15 p.m. 
in room 212 of Morton Hall. Everyone is invited. 



HPER The following HPER faculty members were in attendance at '; 

NEWS 1983 College Conference of Professional Preparation in 

Physical Education and Health held at the McKirmion Center 
for Continuing Education at North Carolina State UniversH 
recently: Dr. Earl Allen, Dr. Lucinda Hollifield, Dr. 
Charles Lewis, Ms. Judy Lewis, Dr. David Miller and Mr. 
Robert Weber. 

Charles Lewis, chairman of the department, has had his 
cle, "Observations of the Emerging Leisure Delivery Systen 
in Israel," published in the spring, 1983 issue of The 
North Carolina Journal, a publication of the North Carol ir 
Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and 
Dance, 

Lucinda Hollifield, assistant professor of HPER, has been \ 
elected to the Executive Committee of the North Carolina 
Conference of Health and Physical Education. 

DR. MCGUIRE Dr. Phillip McGuire, associate professor of history, has 
IN MOVIE appeared in six different scenes of the movie, Firestartei; 
Firestarter is presently on location here in Wilmington. 

DR. OLSON Dr. Gary A. Olson of the English department has recently 
APPOINTED been appointed associate editor of TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIO'j 
the journal of the Society for Technical Communication. 

FALL The Carolina Fall Festival, a celebration of "The Comic 

FESTIVAL Spirit in Literature," will be held October 14, 15 and 16, 
The event will focus on the works of prominent comic write 
like Woody Allen, Jane Austen, Noel Coward, Mark Twain anc 
Oscar Wilde. The festival is open to anyone to attend or 
perform. Registration begins at 1 p.m. October 14 in 
Kenan Hall. For additional information call Dr. Carole 
Tallant at ext. 2443 or ext. 2440. 



POEM TO BE Charles Fort, director of creative writing, has had a poeni 
PUBLISHED accepted for publication in the 1984 edition of Anthology 
of M agazine and Y earbook of American Poetry . The poem, 
Something Called a City (New Orleans) , also appeared in 
the spring, 1982 issue of The Georgia Review . 

125th As part of the celebration of Thalian Hall's 125th anniver 

BIRTHDAY sity, UNCW will present "Our American Cousin," a boisterou 
comedy that premiered October 1858 in New York. The play 
is scheduled for October 6, 7, and 8 in Kenan Auditorium 
at 8 nightly. Tickets are $3 for adults and $1 for childr 
For reservations call extension 2440. 

MATH The Mathematical Physics Seminar will feature Dr. Thad 

SEMINAR Dankel September 22, TODAY, discussing Parabolic wave 

equation and stochastic mechanics and again on September 2 
discussing Solutions to the parabolic wave equation and th 
Feynman-Kac formula. Both lectures will be held in MH-212 
at 4 p.m. Faculty and staff are invited to attend either 
lecture. 



CAMPUS 

PHONE 

DIRECTORIES 

OPEN 
FORUM 



SCHOOL OF THE 
ARTS FEATURED 



FACULTY 
WOMEN 
TO MEET 



The 1983-84 UNCW ^acuity/Staff Telephone Directories will 
be ready for distribution, hopefully, the first week in 
October. 

The department of nursing and AHEC will sponsor an open 
forum entitled "Nursing Education and Nursing Practice" 
October 7 ft"r>m 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in room 100 of the 
University Union. The program is designed for 
nurse educators^ high school counselors, health care 
teachers, nursing practice managers, health care agency 
educators, nursing students and other persons interested 
in nursing education and practice. 

"Where Dreams Debut: The North Carolina School of the 
Arts" will premier Monday, September 26, at 8 p.m. on 
channel 39, The show, produced by The Center for Public 
Television, will be shown nationwide. 

The Faculty Women's Network will meet Sunday, September 
25, at 7:30 p.m. at the Canterbury Woods Apartments Club- 
house, All interested faculty are invited. For direc- 
tions or information call Maggie Parish in the English 
department or Kathleen Berkeley in the history depart- 
ment. 



BLACK WATCH 
ON CAMPUS 



GUEST 
SPEAKER 



CONCERT ON 
FRIDAY 



P&R 
LECTURES 



GUESTS 
ON CAMPUS 



DECAL 
DEADLINE 



The "Black Watch," Her Majesty's Scots Guards, will 
present a musical program of pomp and ceremony at 8 p.m. 

Thursday, October 6 in Trask Coliseum. Tickets may be 
purchased in Trask Coliseum. 

Sen, Joseph E. Thomas of the 3rd Senatorial District 
will discuss "Pollution Prevention Pays" TONIGHT at 8 
in Bryan Auditorium located in Morton Hall. 

Dr. James Gardner, assistant professor of music, and Dr, 
Sherrill Martin, associate professor of music, will pre- 
sent a concert for violin and piano Friday, Seotember 23 
in Kenan Auditorium at 8 p.m. 

Dr, James McGowan, professor of philosophy & religion, 
will discuss "Of Gods and Men: Who Created Whom?" 
TONIGHT at 8 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium. Dr. Gerald 
Shinn, professor of P&R, will speak on "Yahweh and the 
Gods and Goddesses of the Hebrews" September 29 at 8 p.m. 
King Hall Auditorium. Both lectures are in conjunction 
with the public lectures dealing with "The Faces of God 
in the Western Tradition" sponsored by the UNCW P&R 
Department. 

Welcome to the members of the NC Association of Women 
Dean Administrators and Counselors, The group is hold- 
ing its fall conference entitled "Leadership and Power" 
today and tomorrow on our campus. 

The deadline for purchasing 1983-84 parking decals for 
faculty and staff is Friday, September 30. Decals must 
be displayed by 8 a.m. October 1. 



FASHION 
SHOW 

FAMILY 
DAY 



NEW 
STAFF 



The Male Fashion Society will host a fashion show in Kenan 
Auditorium September 24 at 8 p.m. Admission charge. 

"State Employees' Family Day" celebrating the opening of 
the new NC Museum of Art is scheduled for this Saturday 
from 1-5 p.m. at the museum. A variety of workshops, tour 
talks and films will be available for employees and their 
families. 

A welcome is extended to the following new employees: 

Antoinette Smith, housekeeping assistant in the physical 
plant 

Jean Stewart, clerk-typist in the Cameron School of Busine 
Administration 



Shelly Jones, clerk-typist for library services 



LIFE REP 
ON CAMPUS 



LEGAL REP 
ON CAMPUS 



Dewey Jordan, American Family Life Assurance agent, will 
on campus September 26 in Alderman Hall, room 208. For ar 
appointment call the personnel office at extension 2160 

The month of October is open enrollment for all permanent 
employees interested in the Prepaid Legal Services plan. 



Mr. Leo Wagoner, representative of Prepaid Legal Services, 
will hold an open session for all interested employees on 
Thursday, October 6, at 10t30 a m. in room 208 of Aldermat 
Hall. The session is expected to last approximately 45 
minutes. 



MEN'S 
TENNIS 



The Seahawks will host the UNCW Fall Invitational Septemb* 
23-24. 



VOLLEYBALL 
SCHEDULE 



CROSS 
COUNTRY 



The Volleyball Team will play Lenoir-Rhyne at UNC-AsheviV 
September 23; will play Pfeiffer at Catawba on September 
and will play Elon and St, Augustine September 28. 

The Cross Country Team will be at Campbell on September 2' 



WATER 
POLO 



The Water Polo Team will host the Seahawk Invitational 
September 24 and 25. 



HAM & Michael Titterton, project director of Friends of Public 
EGGHEADS Radio, will speak at the 12 noon luncheon meeting of the 

"Ham & Eggheads" September 23 in the faculty dining room 

of the cafeteria. 

MYERS Dr. John W. Myers of the Creative Arts Department - Art 
LECTURES Division lectured on "Nineteenth-Century American Land- 
TO GROUP scape Painting" September 6 to the Wilmington Art Associa 
tion. 



NEW 
BABY 



Dr. John Huntsman, assistant professor of earth sciences, 
and his wife Becky, announce the birth of their daughter, 
Lori Rebecca, September 8, at 1:56 p.m. 



UNC bv the .sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 13 
SEPTEMBER 29, 1983 



The month of October is open enrollment for all permanent em- 
ployees interested in the Prepaid Legal Services plan. Mr. 
Leo Wagoner, representative of Prepaid Legal Services, will 
conduct an open session Thursday, October 6, at 10:30 a.m., 
in room 208 of Alderman Hall. The session should last for 
approximately 45 minutes. 

All paperwork for EPA salary increases for returning staff 
members has been processed. Salary changes will be reflect- 
ed in the September 30 paychecks. The adjustments will be 
retroactive to July 1 for 12 months contract personnel and 
August 1 for 10 months contract personnel. 

The UNCW Office of Research Administration recently sent a 
Faculty Interest Profile to all full-time faculty via their 
newsletter. Research News . Faculty are asked to complete 
and return the profile as soon as possible so that the infor- 
mation can be put into a database system to match faculty 
members with possible sources of external funding. For in- 
formation call the ORA office at extension 2810. 

The State Employees Combined Campaign for United Way is 
underway on the campus. Envelopes are being distrib- 
uted to all members of the faculty and staff. The United 
Way Campaign is the only on-the-job charitable solicitation 
authorized for payroll deduction. ALL ENVELOPES AND PLEDGES 
WILL BE OPENED AND PROCESSED BY EMPLOYEES AT THE CAPE FEAR • 
AREA UNITED WAY OFFICE, NOT BY UNCW PERSONNEL. Regulations 
established to govern this campaign specify that each contri- 
butor shall designate how his/her contribution shall be 
distributed. No provision is made for an undesignated gift. 
Please indicate your preference by checking one of the 
squares on the payroll deduction form included in your 
envelope or by writing the name of the agency or agencies 
you wish to support. It is important to specify the amount 
you want to go to each one you list. Information about 
participating agencies can be found in the campaign brochure. 

Payroll checks may be picked up Friday, September 30, in the 
university cashier's office upstairs in Alderman Hall. 



AAUW HOLDS The .American Association of University Women will be holding 
RECEPTION a membership reception October 5 at 7:30 p.m. in room 100 

of the University Union. Any woman who holds a baccalaureat 
degree from a four-year college is eligible for membership. 
The purpose of AAUW is to promote lifelong learning for the 
advancement of women. Members receive the "Graduate Woman," 
NC Bulletin, and the opportunity to examine points of curren 
interest. AAUW also has an Education Foundation which 
offers research and fellowship grants to help members ad- 
vance in their academic and professional lives. Prospective 
members are invited to attend to learn more about the bene- 
fits of the group. For further information call Lynn Kozik 
at 791-0058. 

HAM & Linda Moore, director of the University Union, will speak 
EGGHEADS at the 12 noon luncheon meeting of the "Ham & Eggheads" 
SPEAKER September 30 in the snack bar located in the east wing of 

the University Union. She will discuss "The Union: What 

It Is and What It Isn't." 



EARTH 

SCIENCE 

LECTURE 



OUR 

/^■lERICAN 

COUSIN 



The Earth Sciences Club will sponsor a lecture by Dr. 
Eleanora Robbins, geologist for the US Geological Survey in 
Reston, VA. The lecture entitled "Rifts and their Economic 
Deposits" will be held October 3 at 3:00 p.m. in MS-252. 
Faculty and staff are invited. Refreshments will be served, 

The University Theatre will present the rollicking comedy 
hit of the 19th Century, Our American Cousin, directed by 
Dr. Terry Theodore, professor of drama in the Department of 
Creative Arts. The play is scheduled for October 6, 7 and 
in Kenan Auditorium at 8 nightly. The play is being pre- 
sented as part of the month-long celebration to honor the 
one hundred twenty-fifth anniversary of the opening of 
Thalian Hall. Our American Cousin was the play President 
Lincoln was watching the day he was assassinated. The play 
is suitable entertainment for the entire family. Tickets 
for the general public are $3; faculty and staff $2 and 
$1 for children and students. Call extension 2440 for 
ticket reservations. 



ROTC Junior ROTC units from seven area high sch 
ACTIVITIES campus October 6 for a day of special even 
DAY More than 500 cadets are expected to parti 

day's activities which begin at 9:30 a.m. 
with a special performance by the US Army 
chorus and a demonstration by a US Army Mi 
team. A parachute jump is scheduled for a 
with a number of displays of small weapons 
jeep and 155 mm howitzer. The displays wi 
ing around 10:45 a.m. on the soccer field, 
event is the UNCW Senior ROTC program. Al 
to the public at no charge. 

DIVING Dick Rutkowski, deputy diving coordinator for the National 
SAFETY Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, will present a talk 

on emergency management of diving accidents at 7:30 p.m. 

October 6 in Randall Library Auditorium. 



ools will be on 
ts and displays, 
cipate in the 
in Trask Coliseumi 
82nd Airborne 
litary Police Dogi 
round 1 p.m. alonj 
, helicopters, a j 
11 be open start-' 

Sponsoring the 
1 events are open 



Fred B. Davenport, Jr., assistant professor of business ad- 
ministration, will present an organ recital October 22 at 
5 p.m. at Grace United Methodist Church. The program will 
include selections by Bach, Handel, Pachelbel and Vaughan- 
Williams. The public is invited. 

The deadline for submitting nominations for Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities is October 6. Forms 
may be picked up in the dean of students office located in 
Alderman Hall. For information call extension 2119. 

Dr. Thad Dankel will be the speaker today during the 
Mathematical Physics Seminar scheduled for 4 p.m. in room 
212 of Morton Hall. He will discuss Solutions to the 
parabolic wave equatian and the Feynman-Kac formula. The 
next lecture is scheduled for October 6 with Dr. David 
Russell discussing Operator theory and quantum mechanics 
under the "Topics in Quantum Mechanics." 

The "Black Watch," Her Majesty's Scots Guards, will present 
a musical program of pomp and ceremony at 8 p.m. Thursday, 
October 6 in Trask Coliseum. Tickets may be purchased in 
Trask Coliseum. 

A reminder that the department of nursing and AHEC will 
sponsor an open forum entitled "Nursing Education and 
Nursing Practice" October 7 from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in 
room 100 of the University Union. 

Dr. Gerald Shinn, professor of philosophy & religion, will 
discuss "Yahweh and the Gods and Goddesses of the Hebrews" 
TONIGHT at 8 in King Hall Auditorium. Dr. Thomas Schmid 
also of the P&R faculty will be the next speaker October 6 
when he discusses "God, Justice and Tragedy in Ancient 
Greece." 

Professor Robert Y. George of IMBR and the department of 
biological sciences was the keynote speaker during the 
Fourth Antarctic Biology Symposium held at Wilderness, 
South Africa September 11-17. Dr. George presented a 
paper entitled "Krill Metabolism and its Trophodynamic 
Implications in the Antarctic Marine Ecosystem." In 
addition, he delivered an invited lecture on 'problems and 
perspectives in deep-sea biology' at the Institute of 
Oceanographic Sciences in Godalming, England on September 
19. 



Professor M.K. Chandrashekaran of Madurai University, 
India will be at UNCW as a Fulbright Visiting Professor 
for three months starting October 1. He is a world-re- 
nowned researcher on biological clock. He will collaborate 
with Dr. George at IMBR on a research project on circadian 
rhythms in marine animals from Wrightsville Beach. 



DECAL The deadline for purchasing 1983-84 parking decals for fac 
DEADLINE and staff is tomorrow, September 30. Decals MUST BE DISPL 
by 8 a.m. October 1 . 

PAPERS Dr. Brooks Dodson, professor of English, and Dr. Gary Olsorj 

PRESENTED director of the writing center, presented papers at the i 

North Carolina English Teachers Association conference i 

held this past week in Raleigh. NCETA is the largest pro-? 

fessional organization of English teachers in the state, i 

I 

PAPER Ron Copley of the economics and finance department has hac 
TO BE a paper, "So Short-Term Rates H?ve Dramatically Fallen, 
PUBLISHED What's the Problem with Home Mortgage Rates," accepted for 

publication in Real Estate Review . The paper is schedulec! 

to appear in the winter 1984 issue. 

ROSENKOETTER Dr. Marlene M. Rosenkoetter, chairman of the nursing 

PUBLISHES department, has had a "Code of Ethics for Nurse Educators'l 

published in the September/October issue of Nursing Outloc i 

SPORTS All fall sports for the week of September 29 through Octot| 
SCHEDULE 6 will find the teams playing away from home. 



GOLF UNCW at the James Madison Invitational September 29 

SCHEDULE UNCW at the James Madison Invitational September 30 
UNCW at the James Madison Invitational October 1 



VOLLEYBALL 
SCHEDULE 



UNCW at William & Mary Tourney October 1 

UNCW at Coastal Carolina with Benedict October 4 



WOMEN'S 
GOLF 



UNCW at Yale Invitational October 1 
UNCW at Yale Invitational October 2 



WATER UNCW at the Generals Invitational in Lexington, VA, Oct. I 

POLO UNCW at the Generals Invitational in Lexington, VA, Oct. J| 

SOCCER UNCW at Wake Forest October 2 

SCHEDULE UNCW at Pembroke October 5 



WOMEN'S 
TENNIS 



UNCW at St. Andrews October 6 



EMPLOYEE 
TRANSFER 

NEW 
STAFF 



OCTOBER 
CALENDAR 



Linda Huff is transferring from the Cameron School of 
Business Administration to the Office of Minority Affairs".; 

UNCW welcomes the following new employees: 

Carolyn Larkins, records clerk in the registrar's office, ' 
and Linda S. Kiger, clerk typist, in the Cameron School of 
Business Administration. 

The 1983 October "Calendar of Events" will be distributed 
today. For additional copies of the calendar, call Jean 
Joyner, in the development office, at extension 2751. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC by the esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 14 
OCTOBER 6, 1983 

Mimi Cunningham, public information officer, was elected 
president of the NC Division of the American Association 
of University Women at the annual state convention held 
September 30 - October 2 in Burlington. She is past 
president of the Wilmington branch and has been active 
in AAUW since the early 1970's. She takes office July 1, 
1984. Mrs. Cunningham is the first state president 
from the Wilmington branch in its 30 years of existence. 
The NC Division numbers 2,300 members in 36 branches 
across the state as well as some 200,000 members national- 
ly. AAUW's Educational Foundation last year awarded $1.1 
million in fellowship and grant funds to women. Dr. 
Carole Fink, associate professor of history, was among 
the recipients of an AAUW Fellowship. Women graduates 
of a four-year college or university are eligible to join. 

A workshop entitled Micro-computers for Mangers will be 
conducted October 13 at 2 p.m. in H-212. Discussions 
and demonstrations on various major software packages 
including word processing, electronic spread sheet and 
the database management system will be covered. All 
interested persons should contact Dr. Paul Hosier at 
ext. 2803 or Mr. Don Sloan at ext. 2800. 

Following the 8 p.m. performance by the Black Watch 
tonight in Trask Coliseum the campus ROTC will host a 
reception for the members of the touring group. The 
reception will be held in the University Union's snack 
bar. All faculty and staff are invited. 

"Our American Cousin" will be featured on channel 3 with 
Bob Waters TODAY at noon. The film crew was on campus 
this week to cover the rehearsal of the play. Film 
clips on the reenactment taking place on stage after 
President Lincoln was shot as well as an interview 
with the director. Dr. Terry Theodore, will be shown. 
Also, film clips will be shown on channel 6 during the 
11 p.m. news tonight. 

Betty Jo Welch of the Creative Arts Department will dis- 
cuss "Tracking in Curriculum Planning" during the 12 
noon luncheon meeting of "Ham & Eggheads" October 7 in 
the faculty dining room of the cafeteria. 



DR. MOUNT 
SERVES ON 
TEAM 



BOOK TO BE 
PUBLISHED 



FALL 
FESTIVAL 



DR. OLSON 
FEATURED IN 
DIRECTORY 



ORA 

NEEDS 

FORMS 



OPEN 
FORUM 



WHO'S 
WHO 

TELEPHONE 
DIRECTORY 



WRITER'S 
WORKSHOP 

RACQUETBALL 
CLUB 



DIVING 
SAFETY 



Dr. R. Terry Mount of the department of modern language: 
served on the visiting team for the Southern Associatioi 
of Colleges and Schools when Pender High School was 
evaluated for accreditation September 20-21. He did thi 
evaluation for the school's program in foreign language 

Charles Fort, director of creative writing and assistan 
professor of English, will have his first book. The 
Town Clock Burning , published under the Firstbooks 
Series which includes the recently released High 
Priestess of Change by Jean Morgan; the spring release 
a book by Denis Jacques-Jean and Forts, The Town Clock 
Burning . The book will be published in the fall of 198 
by St. Andrews Press. 

The Carolina Fall Festival, a celebration of the Comic 
Spirit in Literature focusing on the works of prominent 
comic writers, will be held October 14, 15 and 16. 
Registration begins at 1 p.m. October 14 in Kenan Hall 
for persons interested in participating. For additiona 
information call Dr. Carole Tallant at ext. 2443. 

Dr. Gary Olson of the English department has been selec 
to appear in the current Directory of American Scholars 
for his "significant scholarly accomplishments." j 



The office of research administration would like for a 
faculty members to return their completed Faculty Inte 
Profiles ASAP. The information will be put into a data 
base system to match faculty members with possible sou 
of external funding. Call ext. 2810 for information. 

The department of nursing and AHEC will sponsor an opef 
forum entitled "Nursing Education and Nursing Practice 
October 7 from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in room 100 of ts 
University Union. 

The deadline for submitting nominations for Who's Who 
American Colleges and Universities is TODAY. 

Any questions regarding the 1983-84 Faculty and Staff 
Telephone Directory should be directed to Patsy Larric 
ext. 2169. 

The Writer's Workshop of the Wilmington Writers' Forurr; 
will meet Monday, October 10, from 7-10 p.m. in MH-214 

The UNCW Racquetball Club held its organizational meet 
September 28. Interested faculty and staff, as well c 
students, are encouraged to join. Racquetball courts 
reserved for club members on Monday and Thursday night 
from 7-9:30. The club will sponsor tournaments with ( 
schools later this year. 

Dick Rutkowski , deputy diving coordinator for the Nat 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, will discuss 
emergency management of diving accidents TONIGHT at 7 
in Randall Library Auditorium. 



Jl 



DTC 
CTIVITIES 



30K 

i/AILABLE 



REPAID 

EGAL 

ERVICES 



Junior ROTC units from seven area high schools will be on 
campus TODAY for a day of special events and displays 
starting at 9:30 a.m. in Trask Coliseum with the US Army's 
82nd Airborne Chorus and a demonstration by a US Army 
Military Police Dog team. A parachute jump is scheduled 
for around 1 p.m. along with a number of displays of 
small weapons, helicopters, a TOW jeep and 155 mm 
howitzer. Displays will be open starting at 10:45 a.m. 
on the soccer field. The UNCW senior ROTC program is 
sponsoring the event. Open to the public - no charge. 

The Arts, the latest book by Dennis J. Sporre, chairman of 
the creative arts department, is presently available 
through Prentice-Hall, Inc. The book chronicles stylistic 
developments in visual art, theatre, music, dance, archi- 
tecture and, in the 20th century, film, within their 
historical contexts, from Periclean Athens to the present. 

October is open enrollment for all permanent employees 
interested in the Prepaid Legal Services plan. Mr. Leo 
Wagoner, representative of PLS, will conduct an open 
session TODAY at 10:30 a.m., in A-208. 



I RECTORY 
HANGES 



Please make the following changes in the new faculty/staff 

telephone directory: 

Mrs. Ginny Payne of the nursing department 
is now located in H-119. New ext. is 2802. 



On page 8 of the directory under the Student 
Government Office change ext. 2552 to 2553. 



ACULTY 
OTICE 



ATHEMATICAL 

CIENCES 

OLLOQUIUM 



&R 

ECTURE 



ECTURE 
CHEDULED 



Tom Fields - change ext. 2474 to ext. 2434. 

The office of special programs will receive continuing 
education spring 1984 course proposals through October 21. 
For proposal forms and/or information call ext. 2195. 

The next speaker in the Mathematical Sciences Colloquium 
will be Dr. David Berman, assistant professor of mathema- 
tical sciences, discussing Games on Graphs October 10 
at 4:15 p.m. in MH-212. Faculty and staff are invited. 
Coffee will be served at 4 p.m. 

Dr. Thomas Schmid of the P&R faculty will discuss "God, 
Justice and Tragedy in Ancient Greece" tonight at 8 in 
King Hall Auditorium. The next speaker will be Dr. 
Sandy Martin speaking on "Jesus: God as Human" October 13. 

Dr. Priscilla Wyrick, associate professor of medicine at 
UNC-CH, will lecture on Chlamydial infections primarily 
effecting women October 9 at 7:30 p.m. The lecture, 
sponsored by Grow, a community service corporation, will 
be held at the Cameron Educational Building Auditorium, 
AHEC, on South 17th Street. 



ATH 

HYSICS 

EMINAR 



Dr. David Russell will conduct a seminar on Operator 
theory and quantum mechanics TODAY at 4 p.m. MH-212. The 
seminar is in conjunction with the Mathematical Physics 
Seminar. 



PLAY 
OPENS 



ORCHESTRA 
TO PERFORM 

JAZZ 
ENSEMBLE 



Our American Cousin opens tonight at 8 in Kenan Auditor" 
The play, a comedy hit of the 19th Century, was the pic 
President Lincoln was watching the day he was assassinal 
Dr. Terry Theodore, professor of drama, is the director 
The play will run nightly at 8 in Kenan Auditorium throi 
Saturday. 

The UNCW Community Orchestra will perform in Kenan Audi- 
torium October 11 at 8 p.m. Adults $3; children $1.50. 

The Jazz Ensemble sponsored by the Creative Arts Depart- 
ment will perform October 12 in Kenan Auditorium at 8 p 
Admission is free. 



CLARIFICATION Beginning January 1, 1984, the deductible of $300 per 
OF DEDUCTIBLE family will be a distinct improvement over the current 
ON HEALTH deductible provisions. In the past, three individual 
INSURANCE members of a family had to meet the $100 deductible be- 
fore the other family members had this provision waived 
Effective January 1 the $300 will apply to the total 
family, however, NO MORE THAN $100 WILL EVER BE APPLIED 
AND CHARGED TO AN INDIVIDUAL FAMILY MEMBER. Examples o 
combinations that could happen were outlined in the 
memorandum from personnel which was included in the 
August payroll envelope. For information on the 
deductible call Alice Maile at ext. 2162. 

SUPPLEMENTAL As of October 31, 1983, employees who have reached the 
LIFE INSURANCE next age bracket for Safeco Life Insurance will see an 
increase in their monthly premiums beginning with the 
October paycheck. The cost of this program is always 
based on the employee's current age as of each October 
31 as outlined below: 



Age of 
Employee 

Under 40 
40 - 49 
50 - 59 
60 - 59 



$5,000 
Plan 

1.25 
1.75 
3.75 
6.25 



$10,000 
Plan 

2.50 

3.50 

7.50 

12.50 



$20,000 
Plan 

5.00 

7.00 
15.00 
25.00 



UNITED WAY 

PAYROLL 

DEDUCTIONS 



UNITED 
WAY 



Employees who are electing to use the payroll deduction 
option for their contributions to United Way need to 
know the following information: 

1. A new form needs to be completed for deductions 
in 1984. An automatic continuation of the pre- 
sent payroll deduction cannot be done. 

2. Employees electing to give any amount a month for 
a period shorter than one year should note across 
the top of their form - "PARTIAL DEDUCTION FOR 1984 
Cease my payments with (month) check. 

All United Way envelopes should be returned to the acco 
coordinator by 5 p.m. TODAY. All account coordinators 
must deliver their area envelopes to their respective 
division co-chairman, Mary Wasson or Judy Lassiter, by 
5 D.m.. Friday, October 7. 



Hk 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the ^ea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 15 
OCTOBER 13, 1983 



Faculty, staff and students bringing computers, calculators 
or other personal property to the campus are responsible 
for the equipment should it become damaged or stolen. The 
university provides no insurance coverage for personal 
items owned by faculty, staff or students. 

Open enrollment for Prepaid Legal Services will continue 
through October 28. Interested persons should contact the 
personnel office. 

Spring textbook requisitions are due in the university book- 
store Friday, October 14. 

The NC Wildlife Federation is seeking nominations for 1983 
Governor's Conservation Achievement Awards. The deadline 
for submitting nominations is December 31, 1983. Forms and 
information are available in Alderman Hall, room 114. 

A copy of P.L. 94-553, the Copyright Act, has been placed on 
the Faculty/Staff Reserve Shelf in Randall Library. 
Questions related to this law should be addressed to Isabel 1 
Foushee, federal compliance officer. 

The UNCW Office of Special Programs will receive continuing 
education spring 1984 course proposals through October 21. 
For proposal forms or information call extension 2195. 

Fred B. Davenport, Jr., assistant professor of business ad- 
ministration, will present an organ recital October 22 at 
5 p.m. at Grace United Methodist Church. The program will 
include selections by Bach, Handel, Pachelbel and Vaughan- 
Williams. Everyone is invited. 

Jane Mathew and Sherrill Martin of the music faculty will 
present a recital at the NC Music Teacher's Association con- 
vention October 15. The music will include a Bach cantata 
#202 for soprano, oboe and keyboard, featuring oboist, 
David Hawkins of East Carolina University. 



CENTRAL According to the central stores notice regarding ribbons foi 
STORES printers in the August 11 issue of the CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE - 
please make the following changes: Central Stores is now 
stocking ribbons for the Radio Shack DMP-200 printer, stocky 
number 610-63604 and the Epson MX80 printer, stock number 
610-63603. 



NEW 
STAFF 



SNACK 
BAR 




PROGRAM 
BOARD 



1 pi. 
ng a 
th 
rk- 
stra 
Ms. 



A welcome is extended to the following new employees: 
Donald W. Lanier, maintenance mechanic with the physica 
Ray Humphries, computer operations manager with computi 
information systems; Art Goodwin, analyst programmer wi 
computing and information systems; Estelle Wiggins, cle 
typist in the physical plant and Karen Monastra, admini 
tive assistant in the general college advising center. 
Monastra may be reached at extension 2245. 

Snack bar hours during fall break: 

Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. 

(Meal cards will not be accepted) 



Beginning Monday, October 24, the meal card hour for 
lunch will be 1-2:30 p.m. only 

Breakfast and dinner hours will remain the same 

The University Program Board and University Union will spon 
PIGMANIA: Fun and Games in the University Union October 24 
October 31. The schedule of events is as follows: 



Monday, October 24, C. Shaw Smith Magic Show - 12:30 p.m. i 
the Union Courtyard 

Tuesday, October 25, Ken Alcorn Mine - 12 noon - Union Coufj 
yard 

Wednesday, October 26, Caricatures Unlimited - Have your Cc 
cature drawn for SOi from 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

Thursday, October 27, Art Guild Reception - Meet the artisi 
and view their works in Union livingroom 12-2 p.r 

Sunday, October 30, The movie, Creepshow at 7:30 p.m. in Ui 
multipurpose room, $1 

Monday, October 31, UPB Special Events - Halloween Party -\ 

with costume; $1 without 
For additional information call Ellen Servetnick - ext. 221 



WORK Dancing, a work for five percussionists by David Kechley, i 

PERFORMED performed recently by the East Carolina Percussion Ensemb 
The work was written in 1982 and has previously been per- 
formed at Atlantic Christian College, University of Alabam 
and the NC Music Educators Convention in Winston-Salem 



1 



Ceramic works by Hiroshi Sueyoshi are being displayed in Kenan 
Hall during October. A reception for Hiroshi will be held 
TODAY from 3:30 - 4:30 p.m. in Kenan Hall lobby. 

Dr. B. Frank Hall, professor of P&R, will examine "God as the 
Three-in-one: The Meaning of the Trinity" October 27 at 8 p.m. 
in King Hall Auditorium. Everyone is invited. 

Applications of the intermediate problem method to quantum 
mechanics will be discussed by Dr. David Russell October 27 
at 4 p.m. in MH-212. Faculty and staff are invited. 

The Carolina Fall Festival, a celebration of the Comic Spirit 
in Literature focusing on the works of prominent comic 
writers, will be held October 14, 15 and 16. For information 
call Carole Tallant at extension 2443. 

Or. Jim Megivern, chairman of the philosophy & religion de- 
partment, will speak on "A Peace Action in Nicaragua" dur- 
ing the 12 noon luncheon meeting of Ham & Eggheads October 
14 in the faculty dining room of the cafeteria. 

Dr. Geneva Smitherman, director of the center for black 
studies, will discuss The Ann Arbor Black English Case 
October 27 at 5 p.m. in King Auditorium. Dr. Smitherman, 
author of Talkin'and Testifying , is the linguist who presented 
the case for the black community in Ann Arbor. The forum, 
presented by the School of Education, is open to faculty and 
staff. 

Swami Dayananda Saraswati, Hindu scholar and holy man, will 
conduct a week-long series of lectures from 7-8 p.m. Monday, 
October 17, through Friday, October 21, at Bryan Auditorium 
located in Morton Hall. The philosophy & religion department 
will sponsor this free, non-credit course dealing with "Know 
Yourself." 

The UNCW Jazz Ensembles under the direction of Frank J. 
Bongiorno, assistant professor of music, will present an even- 
ing of Jazz-Fusion and Rock Friday, October 28, at 8 p.m. in 
King Auditorium. Selections by Spyro Gyra, Tom Scott and 
others will be performed. The UNCW Rock Ensemble will feature 
songs by artists like Pat Benatar. Both groups participated 
in Riverfest festivities recently and plan to perform with 
other jazz ensembles in a fall concert scheduled for November 
16. 

Dr. Grace Burton of curricular studies will speak on Teaching 
Concepts at the next Mathematical Sciences Colloquium Monday, 
October 24, at 4:15 p.m. in MH-212. Coffee will be served at 
4 p.m. In conjunction with the colloquium, a series of math 
problem sessions are being held. The next session is to be 
October 17 at 4 p.m. in MH-212. Interested persons are asked 
to bring a favorite mathematical problem to share with the 
group. Problems should be easily stated and of general 
interest. Faculty and staff are invited to participate in the 
colloquium or the problem session. 



EDMUNDSON Dr. Jim Edmundson, director of special programs, has been 
APPOINTED elected to the executive board of the NC Adult Education 

Association. The NCAEA is a professional association with ' 

approximately 300 members representing various public and i 

private institutions and agencies in NC. Dr. Edmundson 

attended their recent annual conference entitled "Forging ■ 

Our Future: Education and Industry." | 

! 

SHERMAN "Planning For Success," co-authored by Dr. Lee M. Sherman ofj 

PUBLISHES the Cameron School of Business Administration, was published: 

in the September/October, 1983 issue of MANAGERIAL PLANNING.! 

ARTICLE The Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society has j 
ACCEPTED accepted "Judge Hastie and Military Hemophobia, 1940-1943," < 
by Ph-illip McGuire of the the history faculty for publica- 
tion this spring. 

BOOK MANAGEMENT: WHO EVER SAID IT WOULD BE EASY? edited and co- 
AVAILABLE authored by Dr. Stephen C. Harper of the department of 
management and marketing is now available for sale. The 
book also contains articles by Thomas J. Watson, former 
president of IBM; John Gardner, former Secretary of Health 
Education, and Welfare and Mark Silber, international 
management consultant. The book is being advertised in 
BUSINESS WEEK, PACE, NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW AND TRAINING! 
AND DEVELOPMENT MAGAZINE. 



DIRECTORY 
CORRECTIONS 



HOURS FOR 
CENTER 



Please make the following corrections in the faculty/staff 
phone directory: 

Page 7 under ATLANTIS/FORUM - delete number 

(number to be assigned later) 
Page 8 under Student Government - Ext. 2552 
should be changed to 2553 

The Center for Writing is open during the following times: 



Monday - Friday 9 a.m. 
Tuesday evenings 5:30 - 
Thursday evenings 5:30 



12 noon and 1 - 3 p.m. 



AIDS 
LECTURE 



Dr. J. William Eakins and Dr. Gregory E. Steinkraus will 
speak on AIDS: A new disease for the '80's October 17 at 
7:30 p.m. in the AHEC Auditorium next to NHMH. The talk 
is part of a series of lectures entitled The Good Life and ' 
is sponsored by New Hanover Memorial Hospital and AHEC in 
cooperation with the Tri-County Medical Society and medical 
staff of NHMH. Talks are scheduled for the third Monday 
night of each month through May, with the exception of 
December. 



Yes, there will be a CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE next week during 
fall break:: 



:ampus 

:ommunique 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 16 
OCTOBER 20, 1983 



Continuing education course proposals for spring 1984 must 
be in the office of special programs by October 21. 
For information call the office of special programs at 
extension 2195. 

The Ham 'n Eggheads noon luncheon meeting on Friday, 
October 28, in the faculty dining room will feature Dr. 
Robert Toplin, professor of history, discussing his most 
recent grant to produce "U.S.A.: A Television History." 

The UNCW Community Orchestra has received a grant from the 
NC Arts Council with the aid of the National Endowment for 
the Arts. As a result of the grant, Mr. Tom McGuire, 
executive director of the NC Symphony, visited UNCW where 
he discussed management practices in orchestra administra- 
tion. 

Dr. Frank Hall, professor of philosophy & religion, will 
speak on "God as the Three-in-one: The Meaning of the 
Trinity" October 27 at 8 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium. 
The lecture is part of a series entitled "The Faces of 
God" sponsored by the UNCW Philosophy & Religion Depart- 
ment. Faculty and staff are welcome. No charge. 

Applications of the intermediate problem method to quantum 
mechanics will be discussed by Dr. David Russell, assistant 
professor of mathematical sciences, October 27 at 4 p.m. in 
MH-212. Faculty and staff are invited. 

The Wilmington Concert Association will present Andre Watts, 
pianist, October 25 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 

For a catered affair contact Beth Binner of ARA Services. 
Her office is located in the snack bar of the University 
Union and she may be reached at extension 2834. 

Open enrollment for Prepaid Legal Services will continue 
through October 28. Interested persons should contact the 
personnel office. 



MATHEMATICAL 

SCIENCES 

COLLOQUIUM 



GUEST 
SPEAKER 



NEW 
ITEM 



DR. FINK 
CONTRIBUTES 



DR. BRYAN 

AMONG 

SPEAKERS 



Dr. Grace Burton of curricular studies will speak on Teac 
ing Concepts at the next Mathematical Sciences Colloquium 
Monday, October 24, at 4:15 p.m. in MH-212. Coffee will 
be served at 4 p.m. Faculty and staff are invited. 

Dr. Geneva Smitherman, linguist, author and director of t 
Center for Black Studies at Wayne State University, will 
be featured in an education forum at 5 p.m. Thursday, 
October 27 in King Hall. She will talk on "The Ann Arbor 
Black English Case," a case which she organized and plan- 
ned for the black community of Ann Arbor in their suit 
against the school system. The forum is free and open to 
the public. 

Central Stores is now stocking A.B. Dick electronic 
stencils, model #2360. Ordering information is stock # 
600-69005 and will be sold by the box. 

Dr. Carole Fink, associate professor of history, has con- 
tributed eight biographies to BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF 
INTERNATIONALISTS. They include Erik Colban, Rachel 
Crowdy, Edward Cummings, Cecil Kisch, Walter Lippmann, 
Frank Walters, Sarah Wambaugh and Alfred Zimmern. a 

Dr. William Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs, \ 
discussed "Professional Organizations Make a Difference" j 
during the Massachusetts College Personnel Association I 
meeting held October 6 at Bentley College located near | 
Boston. 



RECITAL 
COMING UP 



JAZZ 
ENSEMBLES 



PROGRAM 
BOARD 



Fred B. Davenport, Jr., assistant professor of business 
administration, will present an organ recital October 22 
at 5 p.m. at Grace United Methodist Church. i 

The UNCW Jazz Ensembles under the direction of Frank J. : 
Bongiorno, assistant professor of music, will present anj 
evening of Jazz-Fusion and Rock October 28 at 8 p.m. in 
King Auditorium. Admission is $1. 

The schedule of events for PIGMANIA, fun and games, is a:i 
follows: 

October 24 - C. Shaw Smith Magic Show-12:30 p.m. 

Union Courtyard 
October 25 - Ken Alcorn Mime7l2 noon in Union 

Courtyard 
October 26 - Caricatures Unlimited-Have your cari 

cature drawn for 50(t - 11 a.m. -3 p. 
October 27 - Art Guild Reception-Meet artists an 

review works in Union livingroom-no 
October 30 - Movie, Creepshow, 7:30 p.m. in Unio 

multipurpose room - $1 
October 31 - Special Events - Halloween Party - 

Free with costume; $1 without 

For additional information call Ellen Servetnick at ext. 
2284. 



The office of special programs will offer the following 
courses: 

Functional French for Travelers - Tuesdays, November 1 - 
December 6 from 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. The course will cover 
common language phrases enabling the traveler to communi- 
cate as well as information on restaurants, lodging, modes 
of travel and tourist "traps." The fee is $25. 

A Workout/Aerobics program emphasizing muscle toning and 
endurance exercises will be taught Monday and Wednesday 
evenings or Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6:30 - 
7:15 through December 15. Fee is $18. Register by October 
27. Call the office of special programs at extension 2195 
for information on either of the courses offered. 



As of October 31, 1983, employees who have reached the 
next age bracket for Safeco Life Insurance will see an 
increase in premium payments. The increase will be re- 
flected in the October paycheck. 

The annual Service Awards ceremony will be held Thursday, 
October 27, at 2:30 p.m. in King Auditorium. Chancellor 
Wagoner will present service awards to all SPA employees 
who have reached 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 years of service 
as of June 30, 1983. 

A big welcome is sent to Nikki Howard, internal auditor, 
in the systems accounting department. 

Sister Sara de la Vega, Guatemalan religious leader, will 
speak TONIGHT at 8 in King Hall Auditorium. She will speak 
on the Guatemalan Army and the killing of more than 
10,000 of their own people over the past 18 months. 

Congratulations to Dianne Smith in the personnel depart- 
ment upon the birth of a son, Ashford Christian, October 
17. Ashford Christian weighed in at 9 lbs. 10 ozs. Mom 
and son are doing fine. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 17 
OCTOBER 27, 1983 

John Pezzoni , VALIC annuity representative, will be on cam- 
pus November 8 in the Board Room of Alderman Hall. Em- 
ployees interested in talking with him should call the 
personnel office at ext. 2160 to set up an appointment. 

All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets re- 
flecting any type of premium pay must be in the personnel 
office before 10 a.m., Tuesday, November 1. Supervisors 
who do not meet this deadline should not expect their em- 
ployees to be paid on November 15. The personnel office 
will make one reminder call. 

Monday, October 31, is the last day for enrolling in the 
Prepaid Legal Services program. 

A Wells Fargo jogging/fitness course will be officially 
opened in ceremonies at 12 noon, November 2 at the entrance 
to the jogging path near the UNCW tennis courts. The 20- 
station, 1.25 mile jogging and fitness course has been in- 
stalled through cooperative efforts by the Wells Fargo 
Gamefield Fitness Program, the HPER department, the 
athletic department and the HPER student majors' club. 
Designed to promote lifelong fitness, the course includes 
a variety of warm-up, conditioning, and cool-down exercises 
to be done in conjunction with jogging. 

As of October 14 approximately 35% of the UNCW faculty and 
staff (222 out of 649 employees) had made contributions to 
the United Way campaign. This represents a total of 
$8,581.04 for the campus giving campaign. Mary Wasson, 
campus EPA campaign director, and Judy Lassiter, campus 
SPA campaign director, would like to thank all employees 
who made contributions as well as remind those individu- 
als who have not yet given that checks and pledges are 
still being accepted. For information call Mary Wasson in 
the English department or Judy Lassiter in career planning 
& placement. "THE NEED IS GREATER THAN EVER, PLEASE GIVE." 

New employees on campus are Jean Mixon, clerk typist in the 
accounting department, and John Blume, drafting technician 
in the physical plant. 



MODERN wmiam Woodhouse, associate professor of Spanish, presentee 

LANGUAGE a paper, "La quijada que cuentan los morenos," during the fa 

NEWS meeting of the NC Chapter of the American Association of 

Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese held jointly with the 

Foreign Language Association of NC October 21-22 in Raleigh. 

Mary Bellamy, Joann McFerran Mount, Terry Mount, Inge Stites 
and Ken Stites attended the joint meeting of the Foreign 
Language Association of North Carolina (FLANC) and the state 
chapters of the American Association of Teachers of French, 
the American Association of Teachers of German and the 
American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese. 
Mrs. Bellamy, Mrs. Stites and Dr. Terry Mount served as 
presiders for three of the FLANC sessions. 

Dr. Joann McFerran Mount and Dr. Terry Mount chaired sessior 
on the Contemporary Spanish American Novel and on the 
Cancionero de Baena , respectively, at the 33rd annual 
Mountain Interstate Foreign Language Conference held Octobeij 
13-15 at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA. ] 

SPECIAL The office of special programs will offer Human Resource 
PROGRAMS Development: A Manager's Guide, a course designed to help 
managers fully utilize the time and potential of their humar 
resources. The course, part of the Management Development 
Program, will be taught November 15, 22, 29; December 1, 6, 
and 8 from 7-10 p.m. by Dr. Marjorie Mclnerney. The fee is 
$160. Call ext. 2195 for additional information. 

PHONE Please add the following changes to the faculty/staff phone 
CHANGES directory: 

DAVIS , Derick G.S. (Betty) 
Professor Emeritus/HPER Department 
601 Walnut St. (28401 
Home phone - 763-1910 
UNCW Ext. 2256 
Office number - G-146 



CENTER 

FOR 

WRITING 



CATERED 
AFFAIR 



JAZZ 
ENSEMBLES 



Under ELLINGTON , Marc - change extension 2237 to 21 

Hours for the Center for Writing are as follows: 

M-F 9 a.m. - 12 noon and 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. 
Tuesday evenings 5:30 - 9 
Thursday evenings 5:30 - 9 

For a catered affair contact Beth Binner of ARA Services, 
office is located in the snack bar of the University Union 
she may be reached at extension 2834. 

The UNCW Jazz Ensembles under the direction of Frank Bongio« 
assistant professor of music, will present an evening of Jai 
Fusion and Rock October 28 at 8 p.m. in King Auditorium. 
Admission is $1 . 






The noon luncheon meeting for Ham 'n Eggheads on Friday, 
October 28, in the faculty dining room will feature Dr. 
Robert Topi in, professor of history, speaking on his most 
recent grant to produce "U.S.A.: A Television History." 
The next guest speaker for the group will be Dr. Melton 
McLaurin of the history faculty speaking on "Change and 
Continuity in the American South" November 4. 

Dr. Frank Hall of the P&R department will discuss "God as 
the Three-in-One: The Meaning of the Trinity" TONIGHT at 
8 in King Hall Auditorium. The next lecture, featuring 
Dr. John Ahrens speaking on "Does God Exist? A Philosophical 
Perspective," will be held November 3. 

Applications of intermediate problems and group represen- 
tations to atoms will be discussed by Dr. David Russell 
November 3 at 4 p.m. in room 212 of Morton Hall. The 
lecture is in conjunction with the Mathematical Physics 
Seminar. 

The Mathematical Sciences Colloquium will present a problem 
session Monday, October 31, at 4:15 p.m. in MH-212. Bring 
your favorite mathematical problem and share it with the 
group. Coffee will be served at 4 p.m. 

Drs. Robert Miller and Kenneth Ferraro of the sociology 
faculty attended a workshop on LISREL: Linear Structural 
Relations held in Washington, D.C. LISREL is a computer 
program for developing structural equation models with 
latent variables. Workshop instructors were Drs. Karl 
Joreskog and Dag Sorbom of the University of Uppsala in 
Sweden . 



Dr. Bill Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs, was a 
keynote speaker during a conference sponsored by the 
American College Personnel Association held October 17 at 
the University of South Carolina in Columbia. He discussed 
"Managing the Environment for Student Development: Our Key 
Role." Also, Dr. Bryan spoke to the North Carolina Housing 
Officers during their annual meeting held in Wilmington 
October 19. The title of his talk was "Our Continuing 
Challenges as we Serve Students." 

Walser Allen, Carole Fink, Phillip McGuire, Melton McLaurin 
and Tom Moseley of the history faculty attended the fall 
meeting of the Association of Historians in Eastern North 
Carolina held at Pembroke State University October 14. 

Dr. Noel Jones of curricular studies presented a paper, 
"Curriculum Making in University Settings: Conceptual and 
Organizational Considerations," during the fifth annual 
conference on curriculum theory sponsored by the Journal 
of Curriculum Theorizing . The conference was held October 20 
in Ohio. 

Dr. Kenneth Ferraro, assistant professor of sociology, re- 
cently addressed the annual staff conference of the North 
Carolina Division of the American Cancer Society. He spoke 
on "Future Trends in American Society." 



AWARDS 
CEREMONY 



The annual Service Awards ceremony will be held TODAY at 
2:30 p.m. in King Auditorium. Chancellor Wagoner will press 
service awards to all SPA employees who have reached 5, 10, 
15, 20 and 25 years of service to the state as of June 30, 
1983. Employees to receive awards include: 



Five Years 

Joyce E. Abernathy 
Vivian Briggs 
S. Greg Carroll 
George C. Clark 
H. Talmadge Cowell 
Mimi Cunningham 
J. Greg Dal ton 
Gwendolyn S. Jackson 
Joseph M. Johnson 
Leroy W. McFadden 
Polly J. McMillan 
Nanette P. Manning 
G. Dianne Matthews 
Bobby E. Miller 
Eliza P. Miller 
Ike E. Mitchell 
Catherine F. Morris 
Amos G. Murray 
Sondra M. Roark 
Francis M. Roberts 
Willie J. Tart 
Ronald F. Walker 

Ten Years 



Eddie L. Gilchrist 
Carl G. Gore 
Bettye A. Green 
Polly B. Harris 
Ruth M. Lawrence 
Mike E. Sheehan 

Fifteen Years 

Marguerite V. Ainsworth 
Anne M. Col 1 ins 
Patricia H. Cochran 
Patricia A. Joseph 
Mildred Woodward 

Twenty-Five Years 

Norma P. Rutherford 




Library Services 

University Bookstore 

Registrar's Office 

Physical Plant 

University Bookstore 

Development Services 

Athletics 

Athletics 

Campus Police Services 

Physical Plant 

Athletics 

Institutional Research 

Counseling & Testing 

Computing & Information Systems 

University Residence Halls 

Athletics 

Earth Sciences 

Physical Plant 

Purchasing Services 

Physical Plant 

Athletics 

Physical Plant 



Physical Plant 
Financial Services 
School of Education 
Biological Sciences 
Political Science 
Academic Computing Services 



Chemical & Physical Sciences 
Admissions 
Financial Aid 
Mathematical Sciences 
Athletics 



Contracts & Grants 



Monday, October 31, is payday and Halloween. Happy Hallowee 



Ki 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by Lhe csea' 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 18 
NOVEMBER 3, 1983 



UNCW is going to have a landmark. And you can help de- 
cide what it will be. A special committee appointed by 
UNCW Board of Trustees Chairman John J. Burney, Jr., is 
seeking ideas from faculty, staff and students as well 
as the Wilmington community for a UNCW landmark. Sam 
Bissette, chairman of the landmark committee, invites 
ideas and suggestions for this special project from 
all members of the faculty and staff. The landmark will 
be the centerpiece for the University Commons, 15 acres 
adjacent to the University Union. When completed, the 
Commons will include extensive landscaping, brick walk- 
ways and an amphitheatre. Suggestions should be for- 
warded in writing to Dr. Jairy Hunter, vice chancellor 
for business affairs and development, by December 1. 

Wilmington Mayoral candidates Luther Jordan and Bill 
Schwartz will participate in a candidate forum at 8 p.m. 
Thursday, November 3, in Bryan Auditorium located in 
Morton Hall. The forum is sponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha, 
honorary political science fraternity, and will be 
moderated by Troy SitTHnons, Pi Sigma Alpha president and 
student. 

The Career Planning and Placement Center of UNCW cordial- 
ly invites all faculty and staff to attend an "Open House" 
Thursday, November 10, from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. in room 106 
of the University Union. The university has just recent- 
ly housed a branch office of the Employment Security 
Commission in the career planning and placement center. 
This new. job service will be the highlight of the "Open 
House" and ribbon cutting beginning at 10 a.m. Cutting 
the ribbon and giving opening remarks will be Glen 
Jernigan, chairman of the NC Employment Security Com- 
mission headquartered in Raleigh. Refreshments will be 
served. 

Don't forget to exercise your privilege to vote Tuesday, 
November 8. 

UNCW will observe World Hunger Week November 6-12. Staff, 
faculty and students are asked to get involved. For de- 
tails, look for posters around the campus. 



NETWORK 
TO MEET? 



DR. EATON 
TO SPEAK 



JOHN CHEEK 
IN CONCERT 



The Faculty Women's Network meeting originally scheduled 
Sunday, November 6, at 7:30 p.m. has been cancelled. The 
next meeting has been set tentatively for Sunday, Novembe 
20. Look for confirmation in the next issue of the 
CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE. If confused, please call Kathleen 
Berkeley at ext. 2309. 

Dr. Hubert A. Eaton, instrumental in promoting integratic 
in the public schools and former chairman of the UNCW Boa 
of Trustees, will speak at the Phi Delta Kappa meeting 
scheduled for November 9 at 4:30 p.m. in room 101 of Kinc 
Hall. He will reflect on the progress of education over 
the past 10-20 years as well as look at the future impli- 
cations. Light refreshments will be served at 4:15 p.m. 
Faculty and staff are invited. 

The Friends of Public Radio will present John Cheek in 
Concert November 10 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Admis- 
sion for Patrons will be $20; general admission $6 and 
students with ID $3. Tickets may be purchased from the 
box office of Kenan Auditorium. 



MEMORIAL 
SERVICE 



SPECIAL 

PROGRAMS 

NOTE 



The UNCW Army ROTC Department will present a Veterans Daj 
Memorial Service Friday, November 11, at 1:30 p.m. in fn 
of Alderman Hall. Several wreaths will be placed at thej 
flagpole by veterans of World War I, World War II, Korea 
Vietnam. Mayor Ben Halterman will be the honored guest. 
There will be a 21 -gun salute from the UNCW ROTC Honor G 

Effective today Mrs. Ashley Burcham will be filling in 
Nancy Maready, administrative secretary for special pro- 
grams, who is out on maternity leave. Mrs. Burcham can 
reached at ext. 2192. 



VALIC 
REP. 



JAZZ 
ENSEMBLES 



WOODWARD 
RECOGNIZED 



SALES 

TAX 

INCREASE 



John Pezzoni , VALIC annuity representative, will be on 
campus November 8 in the board room of Alderman Hall. 
Employees interested in seeing Mr. Pezzoni should call 
personnel office at ext. 2160 to set up an appointment. 

The UNCW Jazz Ensembles directed by Frank J. Bongiorno, 
assistant professor of music, will present a fall con- 
cert November 16 in Kenan Auditorium. Details in next 
week's CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE. 

Mildred Woodward, administrative assistant in the athlel 
department, received the first SPA Employee of the Year 
award during the annual service awards ceremony held 
October '27 in King Hall Auditorium. Mrs. Woodward was 1 
first to receive this award, which will be presented an- 
nually to an SPA employee of UNCW for outstanding servit 
to the university. 

Effective November 1, 1983, the State sales tax in NortI 
Carolina will be 4.5%. 



Mflb 



A series of workshops designed for basic introduction to com- 
puters is being offered by the office of information systems. 
All workshops will be held in H-212. Below is a schedule 
of when the workshops will be offered. Only one day out of 
each weekly session is necessary, however, you must attend 
all four sessions. For reservations call Sandy Rogers at 
ext. 2542. Module I: UnderstandinR Computers 

November 7 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

November 8 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

November 9 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

November 10 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

November 11 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 



Module II: The Micro Revolution 

November U 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

November 15 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

November 16 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

November 17 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 



Module III: Communicating with the Computer 

November 29 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

November 30 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

December 1 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

December 2 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 



Module IV: How the Computer Works 

December 5 9:00 - 10:30 a.m. or 2:30 - 'f:00 p.m. 

December 6 9:00 - 10:30 a.m. or 2:30 - 4:00 p.m. 

December 7 9:00 - 10:30 a.m. or 2:30 - ft:00 p.m. 

December 8 9:00 - 10:30 a.m. or 2:30 - '>:00 p.m. 

Dr. David G. Lindquist of the biological sciences faculty is 
presenting invited papers to the Third International Arti- 
ficial Reef Conference this week in Newport Beach, CA. His 
papers are entitled "Rubble-Mound Jetties as Effective Arti- 
ficial Reefs for Carolinian Fishes: Seasonality, Stratifica- 
tion and Feeding Ecology of Selected Species" and "Midwater 
Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) for Enhancement of Pier 
Fishing in North Carolina." 

Stephen LeQuire of the art division. Creative Arts Department 
has a sculpture included in the annual Tri-State Sculptors 
Guild Exhibition October 16-November 13. The exhibition is 
at the Green Hill Center for North Carolina Art in Greensboro. 



Charles Fort, director of creative writing, attended a 
writer's conference. Building a Community Among North Caro- 
lina Writers, at Guilford College in Greensboro October 
28-29. Fort was a member of a panel. Spreading the Printed 
Word: Publication and the Public. 



HAM 'N Melton McLaurin of the history faculty will discuss "Chan; 

EGGHEADS and Continuity in the American South" during the November 
luncheon meeting of Ham'n Eggheads upstairs in the faculty 
dining room of the cafeteria at 12 noon. Mrs. Linda Moon 
director of the University Union, will speak on "The 
Student Union: What It Is and Isn't" November 11. 



MATH 

PHYSICS 

SEMINAR 



PRINTSHOP 
NOTICE 



HOLIDAY 

SKIING 

COURSE 



Dr. David Russell will speak TODAY on "Applications of 
intermediate problems and group representations to atoms" 
during the Mathematical Physics Seminar at 4 p.m. in room 
212 of Morton Hall. The next scheduled speaker will be 
Dr. Gabriel Lugo November 10 speaking on Spinor represen- 
tation of the Lorentz group under the "Topics in General 
Relativity." 

Due to the amount of traffic in the university printshop, 
it is advisable to call ahead for an appointment when worl 
needs to be discussed with the manager. 

The HPER department is offering a five day snow skiing 
course January 1-5, 1984, for faculty, staff, students an^ 
friends. The $155.00 beginners package includes four day 
and one night of skiing at Appalachian Ski Mountain in 
Boone, unlimited instruction, equipment (skis, boots, 
poles), and lodging for four nights. The intermediate ] 
package provides for a full day's skiing at both Beech 1 
and Sugar Mountains, as well as two days and one night at 
Appalachian, equipment, instruction and lodging for 
$167.00. Participants must furnish transportation and i 
food. A registration and orientation meeting will be heV 
November 16 at 6:30 p.m. in room 119 of Trask Coliseum. 
A $50, non-refundable deposit, will be collected at that 11 
time. For information call Dr. Dean Allen at ext. 2767. j 



MATHEMATICAL 

SCIENCES 

COLLOQUIUM 



P&R 
LECTURE 



Dr. David Russell, assistant professor of mathematical 
sciences, will discuss What We Really Know About Atoms 
November 7 at 4:15 p.m. in room 212 of Morton Hall. The 
talk will be in conjunction with the Mathematical 
Sciences Colloquium. 

Dr. John Ahrens, assistant professor of P&R, will speak c 
"Does God Exist? A Philosophical Perspective" TONIGHT a 
8 in King Hall Auditorium. 



OLSON TO 
SEPAK 



COMPUTER 
COURSE 



Gary A. Olson of the English department will give a presej 
tation, "How to Teach Advanced Placement English," at 
an institute sponsored by College Boards to be held thiS' 
weekend in Jacksonville, FL. 

The office of special programs is offering an all-day 
seminar on BASIC computer langauge and problem solving 
November 18 from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. in room 202 of King Hall 
$75 includes all materials and lunch. Call ext. 2195. 



BASKETBALL The athletic department is offering 1983-84 basketball 
SEASON season tickets for faculty and staff at a reduced rate. 
TICKETS Adult season tickets will be $20 while minor season 

tickets are $10. Call the athletic department at ext. 

2230 for additional information. 






:ampus 
!ommunique 



UNC bv Lhe csca 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 19 
NOVEMBER 10. 1983 



Open House for the Career Planning and Placement Center will 
be held TODAY from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in room 106 of the 
University Union. All faculty and staff are cordially in- 
vited to attend. Refreshments will be served. 

The Museum of World Cultures is sponsoring a lecture by 
Dr. R. Tucker Abbott, former president of the American 
Malacological Union, TONIGHT at 8 in Bryan Auditorium lo- 
cated in Morton Hall. The lecture is in conjunction with 
the "Shells and Man" exhibit currently on display in 
Randall Library. A formal opening of the shell exhibit will 
be held in the upstairs foyer of Randall Library at 7 pre- 
ceding the lecture. Faculty and staff are invited. 

Dr. James Megivern, professor of philosophy & religion, 
will look at "Contemporary Christian Views of God" at 8 p.m. 
November 17 in King Hall Auditorium. The lecture, the 
last in a series on "The Faces of God in the Western World," 
is open to the public. 

Permanent full-time employees are eligible for a tuition 
waiver on one course per semester. The waiver forms 
should be processed 30 days prior to the beginning of the 
semester. Anyone interested must first go through the 
admissions process before tuition waiver approval is granted. 

The Mathematical Physics Seminar will feature Dr. Gabriel 
Lugo, assistant professor of mathematical sciences, discus^ 
sing Spinor representation of the Lorentz group TODAY at 
4 p.m. in room 212 of Morton Hall. The next seminar is 
scheduled for November 17. 

Linda Moore, director of the University Union, will speak 
on "The Student Union: What It Is and Isn't" November 11 
at 12 noon in the faculty dining room of the cafeteria. 
The next Ham 'n Eggheads speaker will be Sandra Harkin, 
director of the career planning and placement center, 
November 18 talking on "New Services Provided by Career 
Planning and Placement." 



MOSELEY 

DELIVERS 

SPEECH 



PROFESSORS 

PRESENT 

PAPER 



ENGLISH 
FACULTY 
ATTEND 
CONFERENCE 



DR. PARNELL 
AT MEETING 



LEQUIRE 

EXHIBITS 

SCULPTURE 



DR. FINK 
TO APPEAR 



Dr. Thomas V. Moseley, professor of history, delivered a spe 
on John Singleton Mosby "The Gray Ghost" during the November 
meeting of the Kiwanis Club. Also, he was in attendance dur 
the reenactment of the Battle of Bentonville held this past 
weekend at the battlefield site. 

W. Lee Johnston and Lloyd P. Jones, assistant professors of 
political science, presented a paper, "Who Runs North Caroli 
Institutional Elites and Public Policy," at the annual meeti 
of the Southern Political Science Association held November 
in Birmingham. 

Seven members of the English faculty participated in the Sou 
east Regional Conference of the National Council of Teachers 
of English held October 27-29 in Charleston, SC. Presenting 
papers in a panel for high school teachers entitled "Just Wa 
Till You Get to College: What the College-Bound Student 
Really Needs to Know" were John Clifford ("Literature: How 
Meaning Gets Made"), Jo Ann Seiple ("Composition: Processes 
and Projects"), Richard Veit ("Grammar: What Students Need 
and Don't Need"), and Sylvia Welborn ("Study Skills: Bringi 
It All Together"). Charles Brooks Dodson, Margaret Parish a 
David G. Seiple chaired sessions. 

j 
James F. Parnell, professor of biology, and Mark Shields, 
graduate student in marine biology, attended the annual cor! 
ference of the Colonial Waterbird Group held October 26-31 ' 
in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Dr. Parnell spoke on "Comparison! 
of hatching success of oiled and unoiled Brown Pelican eggs, 
while Mr. Shields gave a paper on "Survival of White Ibis 
eggs at Battery Island, NC." 

Stephen LeQuire, assistant professor of art, has recently i(| 
stalled a new large scale sculpture on the campus of Queens 
College in Charlotte. The installation, part of a month-loi; 
exhibition of large outdoor sculptures at Queens, is in con-; 

junction with their November 10 forum. Art In Public Places' 

1 

Dr. Carole Fink, associate professor of history, will appea:i 
the Armistice/Veteran's Day broadcast November 11 at 12:10 
p.m. on WWAY, channel 3. She will discuss her research on 
Marc Bloch (1886-1944). 



PAPER Dr. Ron Copley of the economic and finance department has 
ACCEPTED had a paper, "Autocorrelation in Sharpe's Market Model," 

accepted for publication in the Journal of Business Finance 
and Accounting . The Journal is published by University of 
Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom. 

ARTICLE Dr. Cecil L. Willis of the sociology department has had an j 
ACCEPTED article entitled "Perishing in Publishing: An Analysis of I 

Manuscript Rejection Letters" published in the fall, 1983 ' 

edition of the Wisconsin Sociologist . 

MATHEMATICAL A problem brainstorming session is scheduled for Monday, 
SCIENCES November 14, at 4 p.m. in MH-212. Faculty and staff are ei 
COLLOQUIUM couraged to come and bring a math problem" with them. 



A welcome is sent to the following new employees: Eileen M. 
Shober, analyst programmer II for computing and information 
systems; Marjorie D. Wright, clerk typist for maintenance 
and operations administration, and Brenda L. league, clerk 
typist in admissions. 

The Wilmington Branch of the American Association of Univer- 
sity Women will meet Wednesday, November 16, at Balentine's 
Cafeteria. Dinner through the line will begin at 6:30 p.m. 
The program, to begin at 7 p.m., will feature Dr. Paul 
Hosier, director of academic computing services, discussing 
the role and future of high technology in education. For 
more information on AAUW contact Lynn Kozik at 791-0058. 

Dr. Rob Miller, associate professor of sociology, Dr. 
Richard H. Wells, formerly of UNCW and currently chair of 
the department of sociology at the University of South 
Alabama, and Kemp S. DeVille, 1983 UNCW graduate, presented 
a paper entitled "Hunger as a Global Social Phenomenon: A 
Case of Sociological Neglect" at the 9th annual meeting of 
the Mid-South Sociological Association held October 26-29 
in Birmingham, Alabama. 

A two part convocation focusing on the threat of nuclear 
war will be held November 11 at noon in the courtyard of 
the University Union (room 100 in the event of rain) and 
at 7:30 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium. Retired Navy 
Commander W. H. (Bill) Wi throw will preside. 

Dr. Barbara Waxman, assistant professor of English, deliver- 
ed a paper during the annual convention of the South At- 
lantic Modern Language Association held October 28-30 in 
Atlanta. The paper was entitled "Not 'Attar From the 
Rose' But 'Turkey Vulture Vomit': Marge Piercy's Mode 
of Rebelliousness in Poems From Circles on the Water ." 

The school of education will host the appearance of Debby 
Casey, Miss Wheelchair North Carolina 1983-84, on November 
15. Miss Casey will speak to an education class on "In- 
troduction to Special Education" as well as meet with 
members of the Student NC Association of Educators. 

Auditions for solo roles for the December 12 production of 
"Walk-In Messiah" will be held Saturday, November 12, in 
room 114 of Kenan Hall from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. A pianist 
will be provided for auditions. For additional information 
call Dr. Joe Hickman at ext. 2394. 



Trask Coliseum (arena) will close TODAY at 12 noon in 
preparation of the Hagler-Duran fight TONIGHT. Racquet- 
ball courts will close at 5 p.m. (closed circuit TV) 

Tom Schmid of the philosophy & religion faculty and his wife. 
Cathy, announce the birth of their son, Leo Stockton, on 
October 30. Baby Schmid was 20" long at birth and weighed 
7 lbs. 7 oz. 



SNACK BAR Breakfast Special Every morning from 7:30 - 10:30 2 eggs, 
SPECIALS grits or toast, sausage or bacon 99t. 

Happy Hour 8 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. 10 oz. coffee and one 
doughnut 30t. 

Attitude Adjustment Hour 3:30 - 5:00 p.m. ice cream sund 
with one topping bOi. 

(Snack bar is located downstairs in the University Union.) 

WIN Luncheons for Women In Networking will be held the second 

LUNCHEON Monday of each month at Quincy's Steak House on Market 

Street at noon. The speaker for the November 14 luncheon/ 
meeting will be Miss Barbara Jo Lineberger, executive di- 
rector of the YWCA, discussing the purpose, history and 
services available at the Women's Resource Center. No 
reservations are needed to attend the dutch treat luncheon 
Guests are encouraged to come between noon and 1 p.m. as 
their schedules allow. For additional information call 
Susan Roscher at 392-2540. 

HEALTH A deductible of $300 per family regarding health insurance 
INSURANCE benefits will become effective January 1, 1984. At that 
DEDUCTIBLE time no more than $100 will ever be applied and charged to 
an individual family member . Presently, three individual 
members of a family have to meet the $100 deductible 
before other family members have this provision waived. 
For information call Alice Maile at ext. 2162. 



FALL 
CONCERT 



The UNCW Jazz Ensembl 
Bongiorno, assistant 
concert November 16 a 
gram includes the Roc 
forming compositions 
and the Jazz Combo do 
Corea and Charl ie Par 
forming Cool Blues by 
semble playing big ba 
Herman, Ray Brown and 



es under the direction of Frank 
professor of music, will present a fc 
t 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. The pr- 
k Ensemble, Jazz-Fusion Ensemble per- 
by the Brecker Brothers and Tom Scotli 
ing selections by Wayne Shorter, Chic 
ker. Also, the Supersax group per- ' 

Charlie Parker and the Large Jazz Ei 
nd compositions by Thad Jones, Woody 

Chick Corea. Admission is $2. 



CENTRAL Items now available in central stores are: 
STORES 5 1/4" diskettes-double sided, double density, soft secto' 
Stock # 250-11002 - sold by the box 



Qume 4 multi-strike ribbons 
the box 



Stock # 610-63605 - sold by 



PHONE 
DIRECTORY 



Diskette storage files, stock # 250-11000 

Lamps for microscopes - Lamp #15S11/102 (large base) Stoc 
§ 285-48243 

Lamp #15S11/14 (small base) Stock; 
# 285-48244 

In the faculty/staff telephone directory - Dr. Sylvia 
Polgar's extension is 2438. 



Wta 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC by Lhe esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 20 
NOVEMBER 17, 1983 




The UNCW Gospel Choir will perform November 19 and 20 at 
8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Admission charge. 

Tom Fields of the university career planning and placement 
center will speak on the center's "Job Location and 
Development Program" Friday, November 18, at 12 noon in the 
faculty dining room of the cafeteria. Gene Huguelet, 
director of library services, will be the next featured 
speaker for Ham 'N Eggheads on December 2. 

The new Emergency Operations Handbooks will be distributed 
to departments over the next two weeks. The safety office, 
publisher of the handbook, is asking that all old books be 
returned to that office. Offices not receiving the new 
handbooks by November 25 should call the safety office at 
extension 2108. 

All items for inclusion in the December 1983 Calendar of 
Events should be sent to Jean Joyner in the development 
office by noon on November 28. 

As of November 10 UNCW faculty and staff had contributed 
$9,507.04 to the 1983 United Way campaign. The amount was 
112% of the university's goal indicating an increase of 23% 
over last year's contribution of $7,715.68. Judy Lassiter, 
SPA division chairman, and Mary Wasson, EPA division chair- 
man, were recognized during the final United Way report 
luncheon November 10 for their efforts on behalf of the 
UW. 

"Small Craft Warnings," produced by the University Theatre, 
will be presented November 30 - December 4 in the SRO 
Theatre at 8 nightly. $3 adults. 

UNCW EMPLOYEES WILL OBSERVE THE THANKSGIVING HOLIDAYS ON 
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24 AND 25. HAVE A GOOD ONE! I 

IN VIEW OF THE THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY SCHEDULE THIS WILL BE 
THE LAST PUBLICATION OF THE CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE UNTIL 
DECEMBER 1 . 



CRIME & THE The UNCW Student Chapter of the Association for Computing 
COMPUTER Machinery along with the SGA will sponsor a lecture on 

"Crime and the Computer" featuring Dr. Michael C. Gemiqnani 
Tuesday, November 22, at 3:30 p.m. in Bryan Auditorium lo- 
cated in Morton Hall. Faculty and staff are invited. 

SOFTWARE The UNCW Student Chapter of the Association for Computing 
LECTURE Machinery will present Dr. Stan Siegel, co-author of the 

book. Software Configuration Management , speaking about the 
book Monday, November 28, in Randall Library Auditorium at 
3:30 p.m. Faculty and staff are invited to attend. 

FACULTY Dr. Aisha Rush-Gilliam of the HPER department attended the 
MEMBER AT annual conference of the American Association of Sex Educa- 
CONFERENCE tion. Counselors and Therapists held in Charleston, SC. 

DR. BURTON Dr. Grace Burton of the curricular studies department pre- 
AT MEETING sented a session for primary school teachers during the 
regional meeting of the National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics held November 10 in Philadelphia. Also, on 
October 8, she led a workshop for teachers at the annual 
meeting of the North Carolina Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics in Raleigh. 

PHONE Please add the following two names to the faculty/staff pho 
DIRECTORY directory: 



LEGRANGE, Dr. Randy (Cecilia) 

Assistant Professor 

4014 Peachtree Ave. (28403) 

WEBB , Ms. Lenora B. (Larry) 

Secretary 

1108 Whistler Ave. (28401) 



392-0292 - Sociology 
Ext. 2425 
S-214-H 



343-8498 



Sociology 
Ext. 2432 
S-208 



TRAVEL Faculty or staff interested in traveling to Europe this 
ANYONE? summer are asked to contact Dr. Aisha Rush-Gilliam at ext. 
2768 or 392-1991. 



UNION 
SCHEDULE 



TRIM 

THE 

TREE 



The University Union will close for the Thanksgiving holidat. 
at 5 p.m., Wednesday, November 23, and will resume its nonri i 
operating schedule at 12 noon on Sunday, November 27. 

All faculty and staff are invited to the University Union a 
12 noon on Wednesday, November 30, for a "Trim The Tree" pay 
The UNCW Chorus will sing from noon until 1 p.m. and the ■ 
Gospel Choir will perform from 2-3 p.m. Refreshments will ' 
served. 



FULLBRIGHT Dr. M. K. Chandrashekaran of Madurai Kamaraj University, Ir 
PROFESSOR visiting Fullbright professor at UNCW, will present a semir 
TO SPEAK on "Circadian Rhythm in Small Tropical Mammals" November Tc 
at 11:30 a.m. in room 151 of the Marine Science Building. 
Dr. Chandrashekaran will present another seminar on "Physic i 
gical Aspects of Biological Clock" December 2 at 4 p.m. in 
the conference room at IMBR. Faculty and staff are invited ' 
both sessions. 



WOMEN ' S 
NETWORK 

PAYROLL 
CHECKS 

MEN'S 
BASKETBALL 

WOMEN'S 
BASKETBALL 



MATH 

PHYSICS 

SEMINAR 



PLAY TO BE 
PRESENTED 



TRAVELOGUE 

FEATURES 

CALIFORNIA 

MATHEMATICAL 

SCIENCES 

COLLOQUIUM 

THE 

GOOD 

LIFE 



LIBRARY 
HOLIDAY 
SCHEDULE 



AY ROLL 
)EADLINE 



:OMPUTER 
lORKSHOPS 



FACULTY WOMEN'S NETWORK WILL NOT MEET SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 201: 



The November payroll checks may be picked up on Wednesday, 
November 30, in the cashier's office located in Alderman Hall. 

The Seahawks will host Louisiana State November 28 at 7:30 p.m. 
in Trask Coliseum. 

The UNCW Shehawks will host UNC-Greensboro November 22 
in Trask Coliseum at 7:30 p.m. and St. Augustine College 
November 30 at 7:30 p.m. in Trask. 

Dr. Gabriel Lugo of the mathematical sciences faculty will 
speak on Spinor formulation of general relativity TODAY at 
4 in room 212 of Morton Hall. The last session of the Mathe- 
matical Physics Seminar scheduled for December 1 at 4 p.m. 
will be Self-dual solutions to Einstein's equations by Dr. 
Lugo. 

"The Nutcracker," presented by the Wilmington Merchants Asso- 
ciation, will be held November 30 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 
No admission charge. 

The Azalea City Kiwanis Club Travelogue will feature "Surpris- 
ing Southern California" November 21 at 8 p.m. in Kenan 
Auditorium. 

Ken Spackman, associate professor of mathematical sciences, 
will discuss Visible Lattice Points Tuesday, November 29, 
at 4:15 p.m. in MH-212. Coffee will be served at 4. 

The Good Life series sponsored by NHMH and AHEC will present 
Dr. Joseph James speaking on "Here's looking at you through 
scans and X-rays" November 21 at 7:30 p.m. in the AHEC 
Auditorium. The lecture is free and open to the public. 



Wednesday, November 23 
Thursday, November 24 
Friday, November 25 
Saturday, November 26 
Sunday, November 27 



7:45 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

CLOSED 

10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

CLOSED 
6:00 p.m. - 12 midnight 



All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets reflect- 
ing any type of premium pay (shift, holiday or overtime) must 
be in the personnel office before 10 a.m., Thursday, December 
1. Supervisors who do not meet this deadline cannot expect 
their employees to be paid on December 15. The personnel 
office will make one reminder call. 

The Office of Information Systems will offer the following 
workshops: Introduction to WordStar and DataStar for the 
IBM-PC November 22 and 23 from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. 
Profile III PLUS for the TRS-80 Model III on November 18 
from 1:30 - 4:30 p.m. For additional information call Don 
Sloan at ext. 2800. 



CONNER Ann Conner, associate professor of art, presented a slide 
PRESENTS lecture on "The Business of Printmaking" to the Wilmington 
LECTURE Art Association November 10. 

PAPER IN A paper co-authored by Victor Zullo of the department of 
PUBLICATION earth sciences entitled "Spongeinhabi ting barnacles (Cirri 
dia: Archaeobalanidae) of the Carolinian Province, south- 
eastern United States, with the description of a new sped 
of Membrano balanus Pilsbry" appears in the October issue 
of the Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 

MYERS Dr. John W. Myers of the creative arts department presente 
PRESENTS a paper at the Southeastern College Art Conference held 
PAPER October 29 in Chattanooga, TN. The paper was entitled 

"Artist in Search of Subject: Aaron Draper Shattuck on th 

New England Coast." Also, Myers lectured on "Illumination; 

of Medieval Manuscripts" at the November 15 training sesst 

for docents at St. John's Museum of Art. 



WILLIS 
PUBLISHES 



DR. BROWN 

DELIVERS 

PAPER 



POEM 
ACCEPTED 



THEODORE 
CITED 



SPRING 

SEMESTER 

BILLS 



WEEKS 
MAKES 
PRESENTATION 



Dr. Cecil L. Willis of the sociology department has had an 
article entitled "Criminal Justice Theory: A Case of Trai 
Incapacity?" published in the Journal of Criminal Justice, 
Volume 11, 1983. 

Dr. Robert T. Brown, professor of psychology, delivered a 
paper on "Novelty-Induced Seizures in Gerbils" (co-authore 
by Vickie M. Pollock, '83 UNCW graduate,) during the annua 
meeting of the International Society for Developmental 
Psychobiology at Hyannis, MA. He was also named to the oir( 
ganization's Committee on Ethics in Animal Research. 

Dr. Clark Holtzman of the English faculty has had a poem 
cepted for publication in The Lyric of Blacksburg, VA. Th^ 
Cornerstone Press of St. Louis, MO, recently published a 
volume of Dr. Holtzman's poems titled The Sad Carnival . 

Dr. Terry Theodore, professor of drama, was among internal 
scholars cited for major contributions to the new Oxford 
Companion to the Theatre , fourth edition. He submitted a 
large number of new entries on the American theatre. The 
lication, considered the most authoritive and prestigious 
work on the theatre, is revised and published every 15-20 
years. 

Spring semester tuition bills for all currently enrolled s 
dents will be placed in campus mailboxes during the week ol 
November 28, 1983. Faculty are encouraged to remind stude 
that bills not paid by DECEMBER 16 will result in cancelli 
tion of pre-registration schedules. 

Dr. Gerald R. Weeks, associate professor of psychology, ma 
Ground Rounds as well as delivered a presentation on Parad 
ical Psychotherapy during a meeting at the Child Psychiatr 
Institute at Butner Center on November 10. 



PUBLIC The annual meeting of the New Hanover Friends of the Publi 
LIBRARY Library will be held November 29 at 7:30 p.m. in the secor 
FRIENDS floor meeting room of the public library. Nicholas Profft 
TO MEET will discuss "Gardens of Stone," a new book he has writter 
about the Vietnam War. Faculty and staff are invited. 



;ampus 
;ommunique 



UNC by the esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 21 
DECEMBER 1, 1983 

A campus-wide Christmas Candlelight Service sponsored by the 
United Christian Campus Ministry will be held Tuesday, 
December 6, at 11 p.m. at St. Matthews Lutheran Church loca- 
ted across the street from Trask Coliseum on College Road. 
Faculty and staff are invited. Faculty are asked to please 
announce this information to your classes. 

The Wilmington Merchants Association will present "The Nut- 
cracker" TONIGHT in Kenan Auditorium at 8. No charge. 

Dr. Gary MacEoin, guest, will discuss "Central American 
Refugees: Can We Control Our Borders?" Friday, December 2, 
at 12 noon in the faculty dining room of the cafeteria. 

Emergency Operations Handbooks have been distributed to all 
departments on campus. Any office who has not received one 
should call the safety office at extension 2108. 

"Small Craft Warnings," produced by the University Theatre, 
will continue nightly at 8 in the SRO Theatre through December 
4. $3 adults. 

A Student Honor Recital hosted by the Creative Arts Department- 
music division, will be held December 2 at 8 p.m. in Kenan 
Auditorium. No charge. 

Dr. Todd Savitt of the Medical School at East Carolina Univer- 
sity will speak on "Training Black NC Doctors, the Leonard 
Medical School of Shaw University" December 6 at 8 p.m. in 
Bryan Auditorium at Morton Hall. Following the presentation. 
Dr. Hubert Eaton, member of the UNCW Board of Trustees, will 
talk about the graduates of Leonard Medical School he h^.s known. 

Dr. Thad Dankel , assisted by Jean Kirby, applied mathematics 
student, will discuss ECONSETS Models December 5 at 4:15 p.m. 
in MH-212. The lecture, the last one until January, is in 
conjunction with the Mathematical Sciences Colloquium. 

A seminar on "Physiological Aspects of Biological Clock" by 
Fulbright Professor Chandrashekaran will be held at IMBR 
December 2 at 4 p.m. All faculty and staff are invited. 



ARTICLE An article, "Heart, Mind, Body, and Soul: George Eliot's 
PUBLISHED male Bil dungs roman ," by Dr. Barbara Waxman, assistant prof 

of English, has appeared in volume 11 (1982-83) of the Vic 

ans Institute Journal . 

SIZEMORE Dr. Ron Sizemore of the department of biological sciences 
PUBLISHES long with former graduate student. Dr. Howard Hada of the 
University of Maryland, and Dr. Micha Krichevsky of the 
National Institute of Health recently published a paper ir 
Journal of Microbiological Methods . The paper was entitle 
"The use of cluster analysis to help determine the functic 
of plasmids in marine Vibrio species. 

PAPER TO Dr. Patricia B. Lerch of the sociology/anthropology facull 
APPEAR IN has had a paper, "An explanation for the predominance of 
PUBLICATION women in the Umbanda cults of Porto Alegre, Brazil," acce; 
for publication in the journal. Urban Anthropology, Volume 
which will appear in the early part of 1984. 

i 

OVERTON Dr. William Overman of the psychology department presentetj 

PRESENTS research paper on the effects of limbic brain damage on p| 

RESEARCH ture recognition and picture discrimination in rhesus monlj 

at the 13th annual meeting of the Society for Neurosciencf! 

held in Boston November 6-11. The research was conducted | 

former UNCW student, Gail Ormsby and Dr. Mort Mishkin, chf 

of the Neuropsychology Laboratory at the National Institut 

of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD. I 



SNACK BAR 
SPECIALS 



LIBRARY 

EXAM 

SCHEDULE 



Monday, December 5 - Friday, December 9 from 9 a.m. - 11 .ji 
small coffee and doughnut 30(t. Monday, December 5 - Fridj 
December 9, 2:30 - 5 p.m., small soda and 1 package of Laij( 
crackers/cookies/or chips 40(t. 

The Randall Library exam schedule is as follows: 



December 7 

December 8 

December 9 

December 10 

December 1 1 

December 12-15 

December 16 

December 17-18 



7 


•45 a.m. 


- 2:00 a.m. 


7 


•45 a.m. 


- Midnight 


7 


45 a.m. 


- 9 p.m. 





00 a.m. 


- 6 p.m. 


1 


00 p.m. 


- Midnight 


7 


45 a.m. 


- Midnight 


7 


45 a.m. 


- 9 p.m. 



Closed 



NEW A UNCW welcome is extended to the following new employees 

STAFF Mary L. Patrick and Kenneth R. Nelson. Both are housekee n 
assistants for auxiliary services. 

CHRISTMAS The UNCW Community Orchestra will present "Walk-In" Messj 
CONCERT at 8 p.m., Monday, December 12 in Kenan Auditorium. AdmiM 

for the performance is by season membership or $4 for adi 

tickets; children $2. 

MACEOIN The departments of history and philosophy & religion will,""! 
TO SPEAK sent Dr. Gary MacEoin, guest, speaking on "Central Americ' 

Powderkeg" TONIGHT at 5 and 8 in room 100 of the Universi 

Union. Open to the public. 

ART An exhibit of student ceramic projects will be in Kenan f 

EXHIBIT lobby beginning today. 



MATH 

PHYSICS 

SEMINAR 



Dr. Gabriel Lugo of the mathematical sciences department will 
discuss Self-dual solutions to Einstein's equation during the 
last Mathematical Physics Seminar TODAY at 4 in room 212 of 
Morton Hall. 



FOUNDATION 

PROFESSOR 

SPEAKS 



COMMUNITY 
ORCHESTRA 



LANEY 
CONCERT 



Dr. Armando A. de la Cruz, UNCW Foundation Distinguished 
Visiting Professor, will present the first in a series of 
five public lectures on December 5 at 8 p.m. in Bryan Audi- 
torium. The first lecture is titled "The Ecology of the 
Tasadays: The Stone Age Tribe of the Philippines." All 
faculty and staff are invited. 

The UNCW Community Orchestra under the direction of Dr. Joe 
Hickman will present a concert December 6 at 8 p.m. in Kenan 
Auditorium. Admission for adults will be $4; students $2. 

A concert by .the Laney High School Symphonic & Stage Bands 
will be held December 7 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Fee. 



NHHS 
ORCHESTRA 

MANAGEMENT 

SKILLS 

SEMINAR 



WIN 
LUNCHEON 



The New Hanover High School Orchestra will perform in Kenan 
Auditorium December 8 at 8 p.m. Fee. 

"Developing Management Skills for Women," an all-day seminar, 
will be presented by Dr. Marjorie Mclnerney of the management 
and marketing department December 3 from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. in 
room 201 of the University Union. The cost will be $37.50 
for faculty, staff and students; $75 for others. Call the 
Office of Special Programs for additional information. 

Women in Networking (WIN) will have a luncheon/meeting at 
noon, Monday, December 12, at Quincy's Steak House located 
on Market Street. Dr. Marjorie L. Mclnerney, assistant 
professor of management and marketing, will discuss issues 
raised at the Governor's Conference on Women and the Economy 
which she attended in Raleigh last month. No reservations 
are needed to attend the Dutch treat luncheon. For more 
information call Susan Roscher at 392-2540. 



DODSON TO 
SERVE AGAIN 



DR. GEORGE 

LEADS 

CRUISE 



Brooks Dodson of the English department has been reelected to 
another two-year term on the Board of Directors of the NC 
English Teachers Association where, in this capacity, he 
represents members who teach English and language arts in the 
schools and colleges in New Hanover, Brunswick, Pender, Duplin, 
Sampson, Bladen and Columbus Counties. NCETA is the state 
affiliate of the National Council of Teachers of English. 

Dr. Robert George, professor of oceanography, led a research 
cruise aboard the R/V CAPE HATTERAS November 16-20 to re- 
trieve deep-sea eggs and embryos using a new device designed 
and built by Mr. Al Ballard of IMBR. They also studied 
animals living in the Gulf Stream cold and warm rings over the 
Blake Plateau in areas where oil drilling has been proposed 
off NC. Visiting Fulbriqht Professor Chandrashekaran inves- 
tigated rhythmic behavior of deep-living animals during the 
research cruise which was sponsored by the National Science 
Foundation. 



HPER FACULTY The following HPER Dept. members attended the meeting of the 
AT MEETING Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and 
Dance held November 17-19 in Winston-Salem: Dr. Charles 
Lewis, Dr. Earl Allen, Mr. Robert Weber and Mr. Larry Honey- 
cutt. Also, Dr. Lucinda Hollifield who served as president 
of the PEA Section and Mrs. Judith Lewis who chaired one of 
the presentations. Dr. David Miller, assistant to the dean 
of the college of arts and science, attended the meeting also. 

HPER FACULTY Drs. F. Dean Allen, Charles Lewis, Thomas Skalko and Robert 
& STUDENTS Wolff along with 36 recreation majors attended the NC Re- 
AT CONFERENCE creation and Parks Society Annual Conference held in Chariot' 
recently. Dr. Skalko presented a session on "Quality Assurai 
in Therapeutic Recreation" while Dr. Wolff was installed as 
the Chair-Elect of the Educator's Division. Leisa Brown won 
the Chair-Elect position and Michelle Wilkerson won the 
secretary position in the Student Division. The majors re- , 
ceived a plaque for having the greatest percentage of re- 
creation students from a four year institution to join the 
state society. 

CURRICULUM Dr. Charles Lewis and Dr. Robert Wolff attended the National! 
AWARDED Recreation and Park Association Annual Conference held in 
ACCREDITATION Kansas City where they met with the NRPA Accreditation Board! 
for the last phase of a year long accreditation process. Th 
UNCW recreation curriculum received accreditation following I 
the meeting and now joins approximately 10% of the recreatioj 
programs in the US that have been awarded this honor. j 

1 
KECHLEY AT David Kechley, assistant professor of music, recently attend: 
CONFERENCE ed the Regional IV Conference of the American Society of 
University Composers at the University of Miami at Coral 
Gables. He served as a panelist in a discussion of qualita- 
tive musical judgement. Kechley's Brass Quintet in Three 
Mo vements was one of approximately 30 works chosen for per- 
formance at the conference. 

GALIZIO Mark Galizio of the psychology department and Flo Stein, 
PUBLISHES executive director of the Cape Fear Substance Abuse Center, ; 
ARTICLE have published an article entitled "Sensation seeking, rein- 
forcement, and student drug use," in the journal, Addictive 
Behaviors , Vol. 8, 1983, pp. 243-252. 

SHEVACH Dr. David Shevach, assistant professor of sociology, preseni 

PRESENTS a paper on "Aesthetics and Social Welfare" at the National 

PAPER Asbociation of Social Workers Professional Symposium held 

November 19-22 in Washington, D.C. The NASW Symposium is 

the largest conference of professional social workers in th( 

world. 



DR. BRYAN Dr. Bill Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs, spoke 
SPEAKS TO at the luncheon/meeting of the NC College Personnel Associa- 
GROUP tion held November 17 at Peace College. His talk was en- 
titled "Professional Organizations Make a Difference." 

DR. MOSELEY Dr. Thomas V. Moseley, professor of history, spoke to the 
SPEAKS TO George Davis Chapter Five, Sons of Confederate Veterans on 
GROUP November 17. His talk was titled "George Armstrong Custer 
John Singleton Mosby or the Front Royal Hanging Incident." 



. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the ^ea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 22 
DECEMBER 8, 1983 



UNCW employees will observe the following holidays; 



Thursday, December 22 
Friday, December 23 
Monday, December 26 
Monday, January 2, 1984 



All employees are reminded that no more than 240 hours (30 
days) of vacation leave may be brought forth to the next 
calendar year. Employees should work with respective 
supervisors regarding time off - if their accounts exceed 
this amount. 

According to state policy, employees are not allowed to 
carry over negative balances to either the vacation or sick 
leave accounts on January 1. Any negative balances on the 
December 31 timesheets will automatically be deducted from 
the January paychecks. A zero balance will begin the 
January timesheet. (Please note, this only applies to 
employees with negative balances.) 

Pay checks for permanent employees will be distributed on 
Tuesday, December 20, in the cashier's office located in 
Alderman Hall. TEMPORARY EMPLOYEES WILL BE PAID ON 
DECEMBER 15. 

All lost and found items should be sent to the Information 
Center, room lOl-A of the University Union. 

Members of the Writer's Workshop of the Wilmington Writer's 
Forum will present readings from their own poetry, short 
stories, novels and plays Saturday, December 10 at 7 p.m. 
in the S.R.O. Theatre. Free and open to the public. 

The UNCW Community Orchestra will present "Walk-In" Messiah 
at 8 p.m., Monday, December 12, in Kenan Auditorium. Ad- 
mission is $4 for adults and $2 for children. 



AINSLEY Dr. W. Frank Ainsley of the earth sciences department pre- 
INVITED sented a paper, "Own a Home in North Carolina: Image and 
Reality in Ethnic European Colonies," at the annual meetinc 
of the Southeastern Division, Association of American 
Geographers held November 19-23 in Orlando, Florida. 

PERONE Michael Perone of the psychology department has had two 
HAS PAPERS papers published recently. "Reaction times of younger and i 
PUBLISHED older men and temporal contingencies of reinforcement," wri| 
ten in collaboration with Alan Baron and Stephen Menich of 
the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee was published in the; 
November issue of the Journal of The Experimental Analysis ; 
of Behavior . The other paper co-authored by Alan Baron, \ 
entitled "Reduced age differences in omission errors after 
prolonged exposure to response pacing contingencies" ap- 
peared in the November issue of Developmental Psychology . 

BOOK REVIEW Dr. Phillip McGuire, associate professor of history, has 
PUBLISHED had his book review of White Boy Singin' the Blues: The I 
Black Roots of White Rock published in the fall issue of 
Teaching History: A Journal of Methods. He also served as 
a judge for the "Junior Miss Seabreeze Pageant 1983" held 
December 3 at Williston Junior High School. 

FERRARO Dr. Kenneth Ferraro, assistant professor of sociology, at- 
AT MEETING tended the annual meeting of the Gerontological Society of 
America held in San Francisco where he presented a paper 
entitled "Differences in the Health Care Utilization of 
Older Men and Women" and chaired the session on Perspec- 
tives on Health and Social Behavior. 



DR. DIXON 
APPOINTED 



BOOK 
PUBLISHED 



ARTICLE 
PUBLISHED 



NEW 
BABY 



JUSTUS 
TO LEAVE 



Dr. James C. Dixon, chairman of the political science de- 
partment, has been appointed a Registration Commissioner b, 
the New Hanover County Board of Elections. Dr. Dixon has 
the authority to register any eligible resident of New 
Hanover County, as well as change addresses, names, and 
party affiliations of current registered voters. For an 
appointment, call him at extension 2223. 

Dr. David Miller, assistant to the dean of the college of 
arts and sciences, has had his book. The Well Being--Good 
Health Handbook, published by Leisure Press. 

Dr. W. Lee Johnston, assistant professor of political 
science, has had an article, "Balanced Growth Policy in 
North Carolina: A Case Study in Realities," published in 
the November issue of State Government , Vol. 56, No. 3. 

Captain Gordon Macrae of the military science faculty is 
pleased to announce the birth of his son, Matthew. Matthfj 
weighed 9 pounds and was 22 1/4" long. 

John Justus, sports information director, will be leaving 
UNCW to accept a similar position with Wake Forest Univer- 
sity. We'll miss you Johnl 



A seminar by Dr. Ralph W. Brauer, director of IMBR, ''Div- 
ing on Hydrogen Report on the First Deep-Diving Experiment 
Testing Hydrogen as a Breathing Gas for Men to Depths of 
1,000 Feet" will be held Friday, December 9, at 4 p.m. at 
the Institute for Marine Biomedical Research. Faculty and 
staff are invited. 

The R/V SEAHAWK recently returned from a mission to the ■ 
Florida Keys where scientists Dr. George Simmons and Dr. 
Mark Hay collected data to continue their respective re- 
search projects. Dr. Simmons, an aquatics biologist from 
Virginia Polytechnical Institute, is studying blue-green 
algae (stromalolite) while Dr. Hay's research is on the 
competitive interactions of herbivorous fishes and ur- 
chins. Hay works at the Institute of Marine Science in 
Morehead City. The missions were carried out as a part 
of NOAA's Undersea Research Program. 

Dr. Thomas Loftfield of the anthropology department has 
been awarded a $7,000 grant from the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers - Wilmington District to study Archaeological 
Study of Spoil Pond. 

Dr. Gerald Shinn, professor of philosophy & religion, has 
been given $300 from the North Carolina Humanities Cormiit- 
tee for his project, "Shells and Man." 

Dr. Mark Galizio, associate professor of psychology, was 
awarded $8,475 to study the possible reversal of some of 
the behavioral effects of alcohol. The grant was given 
by the N.C. Alcoholism Research Authority. 

Women in Networking (WIN) will have a luncheon/meeting at 
noon, Monday, December 12, at Quincy's Steak House located 
on Market Street. Dr. Marjorie Mclnerney of management and 
marketing will discuss issues raised at the Governor's 
Conference on Women and the Economy held last month in 
Raleigh. 

The newest employees on campus include Linda P. Shaddix, 
career development counselor, for counseling and testing and 
Nancy J. Moul , secretary, for the office of special pro- 
grams. 



Nightly Study Break Specials: 



8-10 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 8 

8-10 p.m. Monday, Dec. 12 

8-10 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 13 

8-10 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 14 



December 19 - 21 7:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. 

December 22 - 26 CLOSED 

December 27 - 30 7:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. 
January 2 CLOSED 

January 3-6 7:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. 



ARTICLE TO 
APPEAR IN 
PUBLICATION 



•DIRECTORY 
CHANGES 



WORK 
PERFORMED 



NHHS TO 
PERFORM 



BAND TO 
PERFORM 



HANOVER 
SINGERS 

HOGGARD 
BAND 



"Charles Kean's Antiquarianism: The Designs for Ri chare 
London, 1857," by Dennis J. Sporre, chairman of the depe 
ment of creative arts, will appear in Volume 8 of Theme; 
Drama , published by Cambridge University Press. 

Please make the following changes in the faculty and stc 
phone directory: 

On page 35 - change the name Moreay to MOREAU 
On page 8 - Veterans Affairs has a new number - 2177 
On page 8 -ROTC has an additional phone extension-pleas 
add 799-2719 

Dancing (for 5 percussionists) by David Kechley of the 
creative arts department was performed by the Eastman Scl 
of Music, University of Rochester on December 5. 

The New Hanover High School Orchestra under the directic 
Nancy McAllister will perform in Kenan Auditorium TONIG^ 
at 8. 

The New Hanover High School Band with Bill McAdams, cone 
tor, will hold a concert in Kenan Auditorium December K 
at 8 p.m. 

The Hanover Singers of New Hanover High School will per- 
form in Kenan Auditorium December 14 at 8 p.m. 

The Hoggard High School Band with director David McChesi 
will be featured in Kenan Auditorium December 15 at 8 p 



LIBRARY 

EXAM 

SCHEDULE 



December 7 
December 8 
December 9 
December 10 
December 11 
December 12-15 
December 16 
December 17-18 



7:45 a.m. - 2:00 a.m. 

7:45 a.m. - Midnight 

7:45 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. 

10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

1 :00 p.m. Midnight 

7:45 a.m. - Midnight 

7:45 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. 
CLOSED 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC by the ^ea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 23 
DECEMBER 15, 1983 




Articles for inclusion in the 1984 January "Calendar of 
Events" should be sent to Jean Joyner in UU-209 by noon, 
December 28. 

UNCW employees will observe the following holidays: 

Thursday, December 22 
Friday, December 23 
Monday, December 26 
Monday, January 2, 1984 

Pay checks for permanent employees will be distributed 
Tuesday, December 20, in the cashier's office. Tempo- 
rary employees will be paid TODAY. 

All employees are reminded that no more than 240 hours 
(30 days) of vacation leave may be brought forth to the 
next calendar year. Employees should work with respective 
supervisors regarding time off - if their accounts ex- 
ceed this amount. 

According to state policy, employees are not allowed to 
carry over negative balances to either the vacation or 
sick leave accounts on January 1. Any negative balances 
on the December timesheets will automatically be deduct- 
ed from the January paychecks. A zero balance will be- 
gin the January timesheet. (This applies to employees 
with negative balances only.) 



Due to the upcoming holidays, this will be the last 
edition of the CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE until January 5, 1984. 

HOLIDAY GREETINGS ARE EXTENDED TO ALL EMPLOYEES ON BEHALF 
OF THE DEVELOPMENT OFFICE STAFF. WE WISH YOU ALL A HAPPY, 
SAFE AND JOYOUS HOLIDAY SEASON. 



HPER 
SCHEDULE 



The holiday schedule for Hanover Hall and Trask Coliseum i 
as follows: 



December 19 - 


21 


8 a.m. 


- 6 p.m. 


December 27 - 


30 


8 a.m. 


- 6 p.m. 


January 3 - 


■ 6 


8 a.m. 


- 6 p.m. 


January 9 - 


- 10 


8 a.m. 


- 6 p.m. 



DR. FINK 

AWARDED 

GRANT 



DR. BRYAN 
CO-EDITS 



DR. WEEKS 

SIGNS 

CONTRACT 



SNACK BAR 

HOLIDAY 

SCHEDULE 



NOAA MAKES 
NAME CHANGES 



HOGGARD 
BAND 



RESERVE 

MATERIALS 



Facilities will be closed Saturdays, Sundays and holidays 
during the break period. 

Facilities will be open to faculty and staff only (no 
family members) during this break schedule. 

Dr. Carole Fink, associate professor of history, has been 
awarded a grant under the National Endowment for the 
Humanities, "Travel to Collections" program, to do re- 
search in the microfilm collection of the captured Nazi 
documents housed in the U.S. National Archives. The grant 
is given in conjunction with her research on the French 
Resistance during World War II. 

Dr. Bill Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs, is 
the co-editor of a book. The Eighties - Challenges for 
Fraternities and Sororities, published by the American 
College Personnel Association. 

Dr. Gerald R. Weeks, associate professor of psychology, 
has signed a contract for a German translation of his 
book. Paradoxical Psychotherapy , with Enke Publishers. 
The English translation was released two years ago and 
has now gone to the fifth edition. 



December 19 
December 22 
December 27 
January 2 
January 3 



21 7:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. 
26 CLOSED 
30 7:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. 
CLOSED 
6 7:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. 



Effective immediately All NOAA sponsored undersea pro- 
grams will be known as NOAA National Undersea Research 
Program at (name of institution). Hence, NOAA National 
Undersea Research Program at UNCW. The change, made at 
the recent NOAA conference held in St. Croix, was deemed 
necessary in order to eliminate confusion brought on by 
the wide use of acronyms such as HYDROLAB, HURL, SURF, 
etc. Obviously, acronyms will still be used during in- 
formal conversation, however, the short title for the 
program at UNCW will be NOAA Undersea Program. 

The Hoggard High School Band under the direction of 
David McChesney will perform in Kenan Auditorium at 8 
TONIGHT. 

Materials on reserve for fall semester 1983 will be re- 
moved after exams unless notification is made indicating 
the items will be needed for the same courses next se- 
mester. Call Mrs. Hilda Tyndall at extension 2790 BEFORf 
December 17. 



ik 






December 16 
December 17-18 
December 19-21 
December 22 - 26 



7:45 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. 

CLOSED 
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

CLOSED 



December 27 - 30 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

December 31 - January 2 CLOSED 

January 3-6 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

January 7-8 CLOSED 

January 9-10 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

January 11 Resume normal schedule 

Faculty members are encouraged to prepare Reserve Read- 
ing Lists for spring semester as soon as possible. Forms 
are available at the Library Reserve Desk or from de- 
partmental secretaries and should be submitted to the 
Reserve Desk at least one week prior to class assignments. 

The UNCW Seahawks will host Belmont Abbey December 19 at 
8 p.m. in Trask Coliseum. Adults $3; under 18 $1.50. 



Please make the following change on page 19 of the 
faculty/staff telephone directory: Under Dr. Deas, 
his telephone number from 686-0567 to 686-0527. 



change 



Dr. W. Frank Ainsley of the department of earth sciences 
has had an article entitled "Folk Architecture in Early 
Twentieth Century Ethnic Agricultural Colonies" published 
in SEASA 83: DESIGN, PATTERN, STYLE, the proceedings of 
the Southeastern American Studies Association. 

The Burroughs Wellcome Fund has presented a. $5,000 check to 
the North Carolina Educational, Historical and Scientific 
Foundation to be used in support of the 1985 Albert 
Schweitzer International Prize in Medicine. Dr. Gerald 
H. Shinn, professor of philosophy & religion and director 
emeritus of the Albert Schweitzer International Prizes, 
was in attendance for the check presentation December 6 
at Research Triangle Park. 

Employees who will be on leave December 28-30 should sub- 
mit December timesheets before leaving. 

All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets re- 
flecting holiday or shift premium MUST be in the personnel 
office before 10 a.m., January 3, 1984. Supervisors who do 
not meet this deadline should not expect their employees to 
be paid on January 16, 1984. The personnel office will 
make one reminder call. 



CENTRAL 
STORES 

NEW 

FORMS 

NEEDED 



NEW 
STAFF 



DR. WEEKS 

PRESENTS 

ADDRESS 



Central Stores will be closed on January 3 and 4 for semi- 
annual inventory. 

In the event of changes in marital status, dependent in- 
creases or decreases, you or your spouse becoming 65 
years of age or blind, new W-4 forms (withholding) should 
be completed as you may qualify for different deductions. 
The forms may be picked up from the personnel office. 

January is a good time to make sure the beneficiaries 
on retirement and insurance programs are current. These 
changes may be done in the personnel office. 

Welcome to Dr. John J. Manock, director of research ad- 
ministration. Dr. Manock can be reached at ext. 2810. 
He has already been awarded a $17,500 grant from the ; 
EXXON Educational Foundation to study "ForTnulating the 
Educational Uses of Computer-Based Communication Systems. 

Dr. Gerald R. Weeks, associate professor of psychology, 
presented the keynote address at the second annual Con- 
ference on Family Therapy in Toronto, Canada December 9, 
where he spoke on "Overview of Paradoxical Psychotherapy. 
He also presented a two-day workshop on "Making Paradoxi- 
cal Interventions." 



;ampus 



;OMMUNIQI^ 



UNC-WILMINGTON t^"^D3 



m 



JAH 5 1984 



OFFICE OF VICE-CHANCELLOR 
ACADEP^C AFFAIRS 

UNC bv the csea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 24 
JANUARY 5, 1984 

The remaining holiday schedule for Hanover Hall and Trask 
Coliseum is as follows: 



January 5-6 8 a.m. - 
January 9-10 8 



a.m. 



6 p.m. 
6 p.m. 



Schedule for Randall Library: 



January 5-6 
January 7-8 
January 9-10 
January 11 



8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

CLOSED 
8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
Resume normal schedule 



The snackbar located in the University Union will be open 
January 5-6 from 7:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. 

Dr. Thomas C. Loftfield, associate professor of anthropolo- 
gy, received a grant for $550.00 from the New Hanover 
County Engineering & Facilities Department to study Archaeo- 
logical/Historical Survey of Bradley Creek Sewer Line. 

A Harpsichord and Piano Benefit performance featuring con- 
cert pianist, Dorothy Lewis-Griffith, will be held January 
12 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Proceeds will be used to 
fund the third round of the Albert Schweitzer International 
Prizes schedaled for March 1985. The Schweitzer prizes are 
the only international prize of their kind in the world and 
they are the first and only international prizes given in 
NC, Tickets are on sale for a minimum donation of $5; UNCW 
students free. For additional information call ext. 2171. 

The UNCW Board of Trustees will meet January 11 at 12:30 p.m. 
in room 112 of the University Union. 

January 10 - Registration for spring semester 
January 11 - Classes for spring semester begin 



HAPPY NEW year::: 



INTRO TO The Office of Information Systems will offer a series of wo 

COMPUTERS shops designed for basic introduction to computers. The 

schedule for the workshops is listed below - only one day o 
of each weekly session is required, however, you must atten 
all four modules. All workshops will be held in H-212. Fo 
reservations call Sandy Rogers at ext. 2542. 



Module I: Understanding Computers 

January 10 9:30 - 10:30 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

January 11 9:30 - 10:30 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

January 12 9:30 - 10:30 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 



Module II: The Micro Revolution 



January 17 9:30 - 10:30 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

January 18 9:30 - 10:30 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

January 19 9:30 - 10:30 a.m. or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 



Module III: Communicating with the Computer 



January 24 
January 25 
January 26 



9:30 - 10:30 a.m. 
9:30 - 10:30 a.m. 
9:30 - 10:30 a.m. 



or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 
or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 
or 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. 



Module IV: How the Computer Works 



January 31 
February 1 
February 2 



9:30 
9:30 
9:30 



11:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 



or 2:30 - 4:00 p.m. 
or 2:30 - 4:00 p.m. 
or 2:30 - 4:00 p.m. 



I 



APPROVED 
LEAVE 



ADDRESS 
CORRECTION 



Employees scheduled to work on Friday, December 30, 1983, 
should record actual hours worked in Column 1 of their time! 
sheets and the remaining hours shown in Column 8 with the (j 
ment, "approved leave." 

Second shift employees who were notified by their supervise! 
not to report to work should indicate 8 hours approved ]ea\. 

There will be no change for permanent employees who were 
scheduled off with approved leave. 

Temporary employees who reported for scheduled work hours 
should indicate hours as worked on their timesheets. 

Employees receiving the memorandum regarding social securi 
changes should make the following change in the address of 
the local Social Security Office: 

272 North Front Street 
Wilmington, NC 28401 



:ampus 

:ommunique 



UNC by the esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 25 
JANUARY 12, 1984 

A Harpsicord and Piano Benefit performance featuring concert 
pianist, Dorothy Lewis-Griffith, will be held TONIGHT at 8 
in Kenan Auditorium, Proceeds will be used to fund the 
third round of the Albert Schweitzer International Prizes 
scheduled for March 1985. The Schweitzer prizes are the 
only international prize of their kind in the world. Tic- 
kets are on sale for a minimum donation of $5; UNCW students 
free. For additional information call ext, 2171. 

Friends of Public Radio will sponsor a piano recital on 
Monday, January 23, at 8 p.m., in King Hall Auditorium. 
Roya Weyerhaeuser will be the featured performer. Ms. 
Weyerhaeuser has performed in Iran, her native country, and 
in New York City prior to moving to Wilmington. The con- 
cert is a benefit for WHQR, the public radio station, soon 
to be on the air in Wilmington. Admission is $3. 

"The Late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Remembered" will be 
the theme of a special program sponsored by the Office of 
Minority Affairs January 16 at 3:30 p.m. in King Hall Audito- 
rium. Highlighting the program will be four short speeches 
by faculty members dealing with the various aspects of King's 
life. Dr. Philip McGuire, associate professor of history, 
will discuss King's legacy; Dr. Earl Sheridan, assistant 
professor of political science, will discuss his political 
impact^ Dr. James J. Megivern, professor and chairman of the 
department of philosophy and religion, will speak on King's 
religious impact and Dr, Joseph C. Awkard, professor of 
psychology, will emphasize how one person can make a diffe- 
rence. Musical selections will be presented by the UNCW 
Gospel Choir as well as an oratorical presentation of the "I 
Have a Dream" speech by Ronald Dortch, an actor from Golds- 
boro. Following the program, the UNCW Chapter of Alpha Phi 
Alpha fraternity will unveil a protrait of King that will 
hang in the lobby of the University Union. A reception will 
be held following the unveiling. All faculty and staff are 
cordially invited to attend. 



DISTINGUISHED 
PROFESSOR 
TO SPEAK 



ARTICLE TO 
APPEAR IN 
PUBLICATION 



Dr. Armando A. de la Cruz, UNCW Foundation distinguished vij 
ing professor, will present the second in his series of 
lectures dealing with "Ecology and Human Affairs" January 1 
at 8 p.m. in Bryan Auditorium in Morton Hall. The topic oi 
lecture is "The World's Wetlands: Their Natural Functions 
Heritage Values." 

Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of the health, physical educat" 
and recreation department, has been notified that his artic 
"Administrating The University HPER Department: A Contemp( 
rary Challenge," has been accepted for publication in the I 
1983 (Vol. 19, No. 2) issue of the Journal of the North 
Carolina Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreati( 
and Dance. 



AAUW TO The Wilmington Branch of the American Association of Univei 
MEET sity Women will meet January 18 at 7 p.m. in the meeting 

room of the New Hanover County Public Library, Speaker fc 
the evening will be Dr. James Megivern, professor and chai'i 
man of the P&R department, discussing peace and national 
security. All women with a four-year college degree are 
eligible to join AAUW and are invited to attend the meetim 
For information call Lynn Kozik, 791-0058. 

Bill Atwill, English faculty member, has been invited to 
judge the fiction contest sponsored by Campbell University; 
literary magazine, The Lyricist . 

A book, dated May, 1983, on statistical Profiles on NC Pub 
Schools, published by State Public Information and Publical 
tions is MISSINGI It is important that this book be sent 
Phyllis Snyder^ statistical assistant, for the office of 
institutional research. Or if you know the whereabouts of; 
this book, call Ms. Snyder at ext. 2520. 

"The Good Life" sponsored by NHMH and AHEC in conjucntion 
the New Hanover, Pender, Brunswick County Medical Society 
present "Lifetime sports activities don't have to mean lif 
pain" by James D. Hundley, M.D. and Murray K. Seidel, M.D. 
January 16 at 7i30 p.m., in the AHEC Auditorium, Faculty a 
staff are invited. (Use employee parking lot in front of 
AHEC.) 

SPECIAL The office of special programs has something of interest f 

PROGRAMS adults and children. Classes in everything from computer j 

know-how to improving your mind and body as well as businei 

skills are being offered. Call ext. 2195 to receive a cop; 

of the new spring brochure. 



ATWILL TO 
JUDGE 



MISSING 
BOOK 



"THE 

GOOD LIFE" 



FRIENDSHIP The Friendship Force of NC, a pri 
FORCE started in 1978 under the Carter 
peace and understanding, has open 
trips scheduled for this spring 
April 6-18 for $2,300 per perso 
Critz, 8 Ferncliff Dr., Asheville 
24 for $1,400 per person from NY, 
Compton Rd., Raleigh, NC, 27609. 
$1,227.00 per person, write Jane 
Rd. Chapel Hill, NC, 27514. For 
Barbara Gordon at (919) 549-8283 



vate organization which 
Administration to promote! 
ings on three statewide 

PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHI' 

n from Atlanta, write Geci 

NC, 28805; POLAND, May ' 

write Sue Yarger, 801 
INDIA, March 30-April 13, 
Benbow, 1360 Ephesus Chur| 
information on FFNC call 
(Research Triangle Park. 



The International All Star Circus is -coming to Wilmington 
Friday, March 23 at 7:30 p.m. in Hanover Hall. Sponsoring 
the performance is the Supper Optimist Club. 

Dr. Joan D. Willey of the division of chemistry and marine 
science program has had a paper accepted for publication in 
the journal, Marine Chemistry . The paper is entitled "The 
Effect of Seawater Magnesium on Natural Fluorescence During 
Estuarine Mixing, and Implications for Tracer Applications." 

Professors Carole Fink, John Haley, William Schneider and 
Robert Topi in of the history faculty attended the 98th 
annual meeting of the American Historical Association held 
December 27-30 in San Francisco. Carole Fink read a paper 
on Marc Bloch; William Schneider read a paper on French 
Eugenics in the Thirties and Robert Toplin chaired a ses- 
sion on Film Perspectives of the Cold War. 

The Azalea City Kiwanis Travelogue will present a film on 
"African Experience," January 16 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Audito- 
rium. $3 admission chage. 

Ken Gurganus, assistant professor of mathematical sciences, 
will discuss "Designing the Optimal Town" during the 
January 16 session of the Mathematical Sciences Colloquium 
scheduled at 4:15 p.m. in MH-212. Coffee will be served at 
4. Faculty and staff are invited. 

Charles Fort, director of creative writing and assistant 
professor of English, has had five poems accepted for pub- 
lication in the spring issue of the International Poetry 
Review, The title of the poems are A Prayer for Women, 
Articles of the Sea-Dog, Silk Knives, For Mailer and Jack 
and Anchor-City, a triptych poem. 

The Residence Life Office is now accepting applications for 
residence life staff members for 1984-85. If you know of 
a student who would be a good candidate for a position as a 
resident assistant, resident director or apartment manager, 
please refer them to the Office of Residence Life located 
in Hewlett Hall or the Dean of Students Office in A-110, 
For additional information, call Margaret Taylor at ext. 
2532. 

Don't forget'. The UNCW Basketball Show airs each Sunday at 
1 p.m. throughout the basketball season on WWAY-TV-3. Co- 
hosts of the show are Mel Gibson, head basketball coach, 
and WWAY Sports Director Gene Motley. 

Monday, January 2, - New Year's Day 

Monday, April 23, - Easter Monday 

Wednesday, July 4, - Independence Day 

Monday, September 3, - Labor Day 

Thursday & Friday, November 22 & 23, - Thanksgiving 

Monday, Tuesday, & Wednesday. December 24, 25, & 26 - Christmas 
**Thursday, December 27, - Memorial Day 
**Friday, December 28, - Veterans Day 



**Redesignated by the Chancellor 



WELCOME NEW UNCW extends a warm welcome to the following new employees: 
EMPLOYEES Laura H. Shields, secretary, Special Programs 

Glenda E. Bowen, clerk-typist, School of Education 
Robert L. Roller, information & communications specialis 

Athletics 
Joanne H. Bordeaux, clerk-stenographer, Business Affairj 
Development 

PERSONNEL Employees who have temporary full-time periods of employmer 
ITEMS are now eligible to purchase that time toward retirement. 

You must have ten years of current service in the Retiremeri 
System to be eligible. Also, employees may repurchase any 
time they were out on weekly worker's compensation benefit;' 
The ten year requirement is not mandated for this purchase 
For additional information call Ms. Maile in the personnel 
office. 



HPER 

FACILITIES 

SCHEDULE 



* Hanover Hall 



8 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. M-Thurs 

8 a.m. - 5:45 p.m. Friday 

9 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 
1 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Sunday 



Weight Room 



8 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. M-Thurs. 

8 a.m. - 5:45 p.m. Friday 

9 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 
1 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Sunday 



* Racquetball Courts 



8 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Monday - 

8 a.m. - 5:45 p.m. Friday 

9 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 
1 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Sunday 



Ti 



* Tennis Courts 



8 a.m. -11:00 p.m. M-S 



* Pool 11:00 a.m. - 1 p.m. M-W-T-F 

7 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. M-W-T nighj 
11:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m. TuesdayS| 
12 noon - 3:00 p.m. Saturday 

All of the above listed facilities are available to facult' 
staff and students of UNCW. ID's must be available upon rj 
quest. The times may change due to scheduled athletic garr: 
and community events. 



•^Except during class use 
schedule of classes. 



call the HPER department for a 



I 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC hv the esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 26 
JANUARY 19, 1984 

In response to the national problem on family violence, a 
free workshop entitled "Violence in the Family" will be 
offered Saturday, January 21, from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. in the 
University Union, room 100. The workshop, offered by the 
New Hanover County Council on the Status of Women and the 
Task Force Against Family Violence, will cover topics on 
child abuse, spouse abuse, parent abuse and elderly abuse. 
The workshop will focus on the causes of abuse, as well 
as its psychological, physical and emotional effects. 
State Representative Harry E. Payne will give the keynote 
address. Faculty and staff are invited to attend. For 
additional information call Richelle Bragg at 762-8433 or 
791-2239. 

Faculty and staff interested in receiving a copy of the 
class schedule for the HPER department should call ext. 
2250. 

James Sabella, associate professor of anthropology and 
sociology, has received a research fellowship from the 
Organization of American States for the period May - 
August. Dr. Sabella will be working on the west coast 
of Panama where he will study problems in the development 
of small scale commercial fisheries. A colleague from 
ECU, Dr. John Bort, has received a grant also. The two 
will be working in conjunction on the project. 

The Lower Cape Fear Bird Club will host five programs dur- 
ing the spring semester. The first program, presented by 
Dr. James Parnell and Mark Shields of the biological 
sciences faculty, was held January 17. They presented a 
slide/lecture on the Identification of Gulls and Terns. 
The next club meeting, scheduled for February 21, will 
deal with Winter Ecology of the Snow Goose in NC. All 
meetings will be held in room 150 of the Marine Sciences 
Building at 7:30 p.m. Faculty and staff are invited. 

The Wilmington Concert Association will present Alan Titus, 
baritone, TONIGHT at 8 in Kenan Auditorium. Admission is 
by season membership. 



SPRING 

LIBRARY 

SCHEDULE 



Regular Hours 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



ACADEMY 
WORKSHOP 



DR. FINK 
PUBLISHES 



Exceptions 



Monday - Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

March 3-4 

March 5-9 

March 10 

March 11 

April 21 

April 22 

April 23 

May 2 



7:45 a. m. - Midnigh 

7:45 a.m. - 9-00 p.m 

10:00 a.m. - 6'00 p.m 

1 :00 p.m. - Midnight 

CLOSED 
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m 

CLOSED j 
6:00 p.m. - Midnight' 
Regular Sat. Hours 

CLOSED 
9'00 a.m. - Midnight! 
7:45 a.m. - 6:00 p. ml; 



Faculty, staff and students are reminded that all special ( 
programs courses are offered to them at half the regular 
price. Call extension 2195 for a copy of the new spring 
brochure. Two courses to be offered include: 

Workout/aerobics classes designed to tone muscles, burn up 
calories and build endurance. Levels for beginners and ad-j 
vanced. 12 sessions for faculty and staff and full-time 
UNCW students will cost $9. 

Common Sense Self-Defense, a martial arts course, offers 
quiet, graceful movements which can relieve stress and pro- 
vide first rate exercise as well as train for self-defense. i 
The course will include six sessions and will be held on 
Mondays at various beginning dates and times. For informat^ 
on any of the above courses, call the Office of Special 
Programs. 

UNCW will host a workshop for undergraduate students on hov 
to devise and perform a research project and analyze and 
report the results, Saturday. January 21, from 9i30 a.m. 
to 3:00 p.m. in room 151 of the Marine Sciences Building. 
The workshop, sponsored by the North Carolina Academy of 
Science, will be presented by UNCW faculty in the areas 
of biology and chemistry. For more information, contact 
Dr. Merritt in the biology department or Dr. Martin in the 
chemistry department. 

Dr. Carole Fink, associate professor of history, has had 
'Marc Bloch: The Life and Ideas of a French Patriot" pub- 
lished in the Fall 1983 issue of Canadian Review of Studie 
in Nationalism. 



Friends of Public Radio will sponsor a piano recital on Mon- 
day, January 23, at 8 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium. Roya 
Weyerhaeuser will be the featured performer. The concert is 
a benefit for WHQR, the public radio station, soon to be 
aired in Wilmington, Admission is $3. Call 343-1640. 

The Residence Life Office is now accepting applications for 
residence life staff members for 1984-85. If you know of a 
student who would be a good candidate for a position as a 
resident assistant, resident director or apartment manager, 
please refer them to the Office of Residence Life located 
in Hewlett Hall or the Dean of Students Office in A-110. 
For additional information, call Margaret Taylor at ext. 
2532. 

A problem brainstorming session, sponsored by the Mathema- 
tical Sciences Colloquium, will be held January 23 at 4 p.m. 
in MH-212. Faculty and staff are invited. Bring a math 
problem with you. 

The Miss Wilmington Pageant will be held January 21 at 8 p.m. 
in Kenan Auditorium. Admission is $5 per person. 

A paper, "Visual recognition memory in squirrel monkeys," 
by Dr. William Overman of the psychology department was pub- 
lished in the December issue of Animal Learning and Behavior . 
The paper was researched, written and published with three 
UNCW students, Carol McLain, Gail Ormsby and Ginger Brooks. 

Dr. Robert M. Wolff, recreation faculty member, along with 
16 recreation majors attended the Resort and Commercial 
Recreation Association National Conference January 8-11 
at the Wintergreen Resort in the mountains of Virginia, 

Fred B. Davenport, Jr., assistant professor of business 
administration, has had an article entitled "Redemption of 
Stock from Trusts after TEFRA" published in the December, 
1983 issue of Trusts & Estates . 

Dr. Courtney T. Hackney of the biological sciences depart- 
ment has had a paper published in the December issue of 
Gulf Research Reports . The paper is entitled "A Note on 
the Reproductive Season of the Carolina Marsh Clam, Poly- 
mesoda carol iniana (Bosc), in an Irregularly Flooded 
Mississippi Marsh." 

Dr. David M. Russell, assistant professor of mathematical 
sciences, has had a paper, 'Progress on the Estimation of 
Energy Levels for Multi-electron Atoms," to appear in 
Numerische Bebandlung von Eigenwertaufgaben , published by 
Birkhauser Verlag, Basel, 1983, The paper was done in 
collaboration with Dr. W. M. Greenlee of the University of 
Arizona. 



Please make the following changes in the faculty/staff 

phone directory: 

Paqe 7 - Health Services - delete 2386 & 
Page 7 - Infirmary -. delete 2386 & 
Page 45- Vangellow - delete 2386 X 






N 



PURCHASING Upon receipt of supplies and equipment, departments are 
NOTE reminded to call purchasing at ext. 2156 within three 

days of receipt if the order is incomplete or damaged. 
Unless this information is conveyed to the purchasing 
office, the receiving copy of the order will be sent 
to the accounts payable office authorizing them to pay 
for the complete order. 

SAFETY Contact lens wearers should not engage in any electrical 
NOTE work where there is the possibility of short term spark- 

ing or arcing. For information on this subject call Al 
Barry at Ext. 2108. 

REP. ON John Pezzoni , VALIC annuity representative, will be on 
CAMPUS campus January 31 in the Trustee Room of Alderman Hall. 
Employees interested in talking with Mr. Pezzoni are 
asked to call the personnel office at Ext. 2160 to set 
up an appointment. 

FRIENDSHIP The Friendship Force of North Carolina, a private organi- 
FORCE zation designed to promote peace and understanding, has 
openings on three statewide trips scheduled for this 
spring. For information on the trips to the People's Re- 
public of China, Poland or India, call Patsy Larrick at 
Ext. 2169. 



PERSONNEL A reminder: Employees who have temporary full-time period 
REMINDER of employment are now eligible to purchase that time towar 
retirement. You must have ten years of current service 
in the Retirement System to be eligible. Also, employees 
may repurchase any time they were out on weekly worker's 
compensation benefits. The ten year requirement is not 
mandated for this purchase. For additional information 
call Alice Maile in the personnel office. 

CALENDAR All items for inclusion in the UNCW "Calendar of Events" 
ITEMS for the month of February should be sent to Jean Joyner 
in room 209 of the University Union by January 27. 



slL 



:ampus 
:ommunique 

ibrary/Archives 1 



by the csea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 27 
JANUARY 26, 1984 



Dr. Jairy C. Hunter, Jr., vice chancellor for business 
affairs and development, reported recently to the Board 
of Trustees that the university has received a $68,312 
federal grant to be used for energy measures. Dr. 
Hunter commended Mr. Kenneth Phelps, assistant director 
of physical plant services, as well as the housing staff 
for their efforts in working through his office to 
secure the grant. 

Faculty and staff are invited to join "non-traditional" 
students for lunch each Wednesday from 12 noon - 1 p.m. 
in the University Union snack bar. 

The duo piano recital by Dr. Sherrill Martin and Dr. 
Richard Deas of the music division originally scheduled 
for January 27 has been re-scheduled for April 4. 

The first spring semester meeting of Ham 'n Eggheads is 
scheduled for January 27 (TOMORROW) at 12 noon in the 
faculty dining room of the cafeteria. Dr. Hathia Hayes 
of curricular studies will speak on "Outreach opportuni- 
ties in a professional school." The next luncheon/meet- 
ing will be on February 3 with Ben Lassiter discussing 
"Developments in Special Programs." 

The office of information systems will offer a workshop 
on the Introduction to WordStar and DataStar Monday, 
January 30, from 10 a.m. - 12 noon and 2-4 p.m. In- 
terested persons should call Don Sloan at ext. 2800. 

Michael Zenge, chairman of the piano department at UNC- 
CH, will present a piano recital Sunday, January 29, at 
3 p.m. in Thalian Hall, The event, sponsored by the 
Thai i an Hall Concert, is in commemoration of the 125th 
anniversary celebration of the opening of Thalian Hall. 
Admission is $5 for adults; senior citizens $3. Tickets 
may be purchased at the Thalian Hall box office. 



DE LA CRUZ 
TO SPEAK 



MATH SCI. 
COLLOQUIUM 



Dr. Armando de la Cruz, UNCW Foundation visiting professor, 
will discuss "The Aftermath: Ecological Consequences of 
Nuclear War" January 30 at 8 p.m. in Bryan Auditorium. 
Members of the faculty and staff are invited. No charge. 

Ken Spackman, associate professor of mathematical sciences, 
will discuss Visible Lattice Points during the Mathema- 
tical Sciences Colloquium January 30 at 4:15 p.m. in 
MH-212. Faculty and staff are invited to attend. Coffee 
will be served at 4. l 



PERSONNEL 
ITEMS 



VALIC REP 
ON CAMPUS 



NEWEST 
EMPLOYEE 

SALUTE TO 
WOMEN 



CONCERT ON 
SUNDAY 



All permanent employees will receive W-2 tax forms along 
with the January 31 pay checks. Checks may be picked up 
from the university cashier's office on that date. 

Temporary employees' W-2 tax forms will be available in 
the university cashier's office on January 31 also. 

Students will receive W-2 tax forms via their campus post 
office boxes. 



I 



All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets re- ■- 
fleeting holiday or shift premium must be in the personnel 
office before 10 a.m., February 1, in order for payroll 
computation to be completed. Supervisors who do not 
meet this deadline should not expect their employees to bej 
paid on February 15. The personnel office will make one 
reminder call . 

John Pezzoni , VALIC annuity representative, will be on 
the campus January 31 in the board room of Alderman Hall. 
Employees interested in speaking with Mr. Pezzoni should 
call the personnel office at ext. 2160 to set up an 
appointment. 

Welcome to Ernestine W. Hamilton, housekeeping assistant 
in the physical plant. 

Faculty and staff are invited to the annual meeting of th( 
YWCA Sunday, January 29, at 3:30 p.m. The theme, "A Salu1 
to Women: 125 Years," will feature Marjorie Megivern do- 
ing dramatizations of Phyllis Wheatley, poet; Mable Cratt, 
first director of National YWCA; Susan B. Anthony, suf- 
fragette; Lyda Penton Freeman, 1946 president of the 
Wilmington YWCA and Caronell Chestnut, 1975 president of 
the Wilmington YWCA. 

The Wilmington Choral Society, under the direction of 
Diane Gardner, will present a concert at 3 p.m., Sunday, 
January 29, at Grace United Methodist Church. Selections 
will include Benedicite by Vaughan Williams, Te Deum by 
Benjamin Britten and Ein feste Burg ist Unser Gott by G. 
P, Telemann. Also, a soprano solo by Jane Mathew of the 
music faculty. Faculty and staff are invited. Donation 
basis only. For additional information call Jeanne 
Etheridge at 791-8961 after 5 p.m. 



Robert Appleton, CPA and chairman of the department of ac- 
countancy, has been retained as a consultant by the World 
Bank in Washington, D.C. He spent two weeks in October 
analyzing the accounting systems of the public corpora- 
tions in Monrovia, Liberia in an attempt to improve their 
management evaluation and reporting systems. Mr. Apple- 
ton will be returning to Liberia for a follow-up study 
in February. 

Dr. Bill Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs, has 
had his article, "Precollege Characteristics and Early 
College Experiences as Predictors of Freshman Year Per- 
sistence," published in the January, 1984 "Silver 
Anniversary" issue of the Journal of College Student 
Personnel , Volume 25, Number 1. 

John Clifford of the English department was a panelist 
in a colloquy on literary theory & composition during 
the annual meeting of the Modern Language Association 
held December 27-30 in New York. 

Art article, by Dr. John J. Manock, director of research 
administration, entitled "Microcomputers: Assisting Re- 
search Administration Offices with Pre-Award Activities" 
appears in the current edition of the Journal of the 
Society of Research Administrators . The article deals 
with some of the capabilities of microcomputers for use by 
research administrators in the area of pre-award activities 
and information processing. 

Dr. Phillip McGuire of the history department has had his 
book review. War and Race: The Black Officer in the 
American Military, 1915-1941, by Gerald W. Patton, pub- 
lished in the 1983 winter issue of the Journal of Negro 
History . 

The North Carolina Humanities Committee has approved a 
$900 mini-grant proposal which was submitted by Dr. James 
Megivern, chairman of the department of philosophy and 
religion. The purpose of the grant is to bring Dr. 
Dietrich Ritschl to the campus to present two public lec- 
tures at the end of next month. Dr. Ritschl is the di- 
rector of the Ecumenical Institute of Heidelberg Univer- 
sity in West Germany and a member of the World Council 
of Churches Faith and Order Commission. Full details of 
the February 28-29 program will be forthcoming. 

The Randall Library is pleased to announce its newest mem- 
ber, Mary Ellen Lawrence, assistant catalog librarian. Ms. 
Lawrence received the MLS degree from the University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro. 



Dr. Joan D. Willey of the chemistry division and the 
marine science program has been invited to join the edi' 
torial board of the journal , Marine Chemistry . 



FEBRUARY 
ALL WRONG 



ATTENTION 

NEW 

FACULTY 



DODSON 

ATTENDS 

MEETING 



MOSELEY 

DELIVERS 

PRESENTATION 



PAPER 
PRESENTED 



FORT TO 

LEAD 

WORKSHOP 



PAPER TO BE 
PUBLISHED 



SYMPHONY 
COMING 



This year's Channel Marker activities calendar has the 
month c^ February printed incorrectly. To obtain a cop. 
of the correct February pages, stop by the Information 
Center at the University Union or call ext. 2841. 

New facjlty members who would like to be on the mailing 
list for Phi Kappa Phi chapter activities are asked to 
contact Dr. James Megivern, current president of the UN 
chapter. 

On Janjary 21, Brooks Dodson of the English department 
attended the semi-annual meeting of the Board of Direct 
of the North Carolina English Teacher's Association in 
Winstcn-Salem. Dr. Dodson represents English teachers 
from seven southeastern NC counties. 

Dr. Thomas V. Moseley, professor of history, delivered 
presentation to the Cape Fear and Blockade Runner Chapt 
of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Geor 
Davis Chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans for 
the Lee-Jackson Maury Event held January 18. His prese 
tation was entitled "Vignettes of Robert E. Lee: 
Appomattox Through 1870." During the event, Dr. Mosele 
received an award from the North Carolina Division of t 
United Daughters of the Confederacy. 

Dr. Patricia Rensma, assistant professor of philosophy,; 
presented a paper, "Ethical Decisions: Allowing the 
Death of A Defective Newborn," at the American Philoso- 
phical Association Convention held December 29 in BostOi 

Charles Fort, director of creative writing, has been in 
vited to lead a writing workshop and to speak at St. 
Andrews College in Laurinburg. He will read from his 
book. The Town Clock Burning , to be published in the faj 
by St. Andrews Press. 

Dr. Thomas Schmid of the philosophy and religion depart! 
has had his paper, "The Socratic Conception of Courage,! 
accepted for publication by the History of Philosophy 
Quarte*-! y . 

The UNCw Fine Arts Committee will host the North Carol •) 
Symphory February 10 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 
Season 'membership tickets are still available. Single; 
admission is $8. For tickets call Doug Swink at ext. 
2442. 



SPECIAL 

PROGRAMS 

REMINDER 

CALENDAR 
DEADLINE 



NEW 
BABY 



Facultv and staff are reminded that all special prograr! 
courses are offered to them at half the regular price. 
For additional information call ext. 2195. 

All ite-Tis for inclusion in the February "Calendar of ; 
Events" should be sent to Jean Joyner in room 209 of tl. 
University Union by January 27. (TOMORROW) 

Donna Ineatham of the department of creative arts is 
please: to announce the birth of her daughter, June Ca^ 
on January 13. Baby weighed 7 lbs. 4 ozs. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 

Drary/Archives 1 



IC by the esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 28 
FEBRUARY 2, 1984 



The departments o 
science wi 11 pres 
(USAR) February 8 
ing on the "World 
graduate of Princ 
is a 12-year vete 
veteran of the Un 
and is a national 
the Soviet Milita 
invited to attend 



f political science, history and military 
ent retired Colonel Robert L. Clifford 
at 7;30 p.m. in Bryan Auditorium speak- 
Security Situation." Col. Clifford, a 
eton University with an MBA from Harvard, 
ran of the Foreign Service, a 10-year 
ited Nations Developmental Program staff 
ly known expert on the third world and 
ry. All faculty and staff are cordially 



Are you about to begi 
partment or office? 
editing or designing 
letter, flyer, bookie 
procedures for off-c 
UNCW's publications o 
cedure for off-campus 
the design of a new p 
one. Even if you don 
bring your copy to he 
She is the responsibl 
publications, whether 
campus. Call Jean Fa 
serve you at the best 
FREE for all universi 



n writing a new brochure for your de- 
Do you need help with the writing, 
of a publication (brochure, news- 
t or handbook)? Do you not know the 
ampus printing? Call Jean Farmer, 
fficer. She can expedite the bid pro- 
printing or she can help you with 
ublication or a facelift for an old 
't need help in a specific area, 
r for a once-over-lightly editing, 
e person for approving all copy for 
printed in the print shop or off 
rmer at ext. 2708, she is there to 
possible price - her services are 
ty publ ications. 



The school of education and the department of health, 
physical education and recreation will present Edward 
Kiersh, author of Where Have You Gone, Vince Dima g gio? , 
February 9 at 4:30 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium. Kiersh 
will discuss the book and how it came to be written, 
sports literature and reading and the short, happy life of 
an athlete. Faculty and staff are invited. No charge. 



TODAY IS GROUNDHOG DAY 



SHOW IN 
KENAN 



METHODIST 
LAY RALLY 

TRAVELOGUE 
ON CHINA 

NC SYMPHONY 
TO PERFORM 

FILM 
AVAILABLE 



FELLOWSHIP 
TO MEET 

SWIMMING 
SCHEDULE 

WOMEN'S 
BASKETBALL 

MEN'S 
BASKETBALL 

BOOKS 
NEEDED 



ORDER 

REGALIA 

EARLY 



NEW 
EMPLOYEES 



FEBRUARY 
CALEIJDARS 



The Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity will host the Black & Gold 
Pageant & Step Show February 8 beginning at 8 p.m. in Kenc 
Auditorium. Admission charge. 

A Methodist District Lay Rally will be conducted in Kenan 
Auditorium February 5 from 5-9 p.m. No charge. 

"China Today" will be the theme of the Azalea City Kiwani; 
Club Travelogue February 6 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 

The UNCW Fine Arts Committee will host the North Carolina 
Symphony February 10 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 

The video presentation, "The Story of Ella Baker," will b( 
available for viewing February 6 - 10. Interested persons 
are asked to go by the Office of Minority Affairs located 
in room 205 of the University Union. 

The Campus Christian Fellowship will meet in room 100 of 
the University Union February 7 at 6:30 p.m. 

I 
UNCW vs. Richmond February 3 at 2 p.m. 



UNCW vs. Atlantic Christian February 6 at 5:30 p.m. 



The Seahawks will host George Mason February 6 at 7:30 p.: 
in Trask Col iseum. 

The Wilmington Branch of the American Association of Univ 
sity Women is requesting donations of books to sell at it 
annual used book sale scheduled for April 13 and 14 at Roi 
in Hanover Shopping Center. Any members of the universit 
community who wish to donate books should contact Mimi 
Cunningham at ext. 2171. Magazines such as National 
Geographic, Gourmet and Smithsonian are welcome. All 
donations are tax-deductible. 

Acadefnic regalia for the May 12 Commencement ceremony ma>h 
be rented through the university bookstore. All orders n I 
be in no later than March 2. Rental fees are listed belc 

Bachelor cap, gown, tassel $7.25 Bachelor hood $/ S 

Master cap, gown, tassel $7.95 Master hood $/ 5 

Doctor cap, gown, tassel $9.50 Doctor hood $fi'0 

Welcome to Lisa Troy, housekeeping assistant in the Univf i 
Union, and Solomon McCrary, housekeeping assistant for t( 
resiaence halls. 

The February sheets for the activities calendar, Channel 
Marker, may be picked up at the Information Center in thi 
University Union or call ext. 2841. 



M 



Sally Cameron, executive director of the North Carolina Psy- 
chological Association, will discuss "Psychology in North 
Carolina: Current Status and Future Prospects" February 9 
at 4 p.m. in room 108 of the Social and Behavioral Sciences 
Building. The lecture is sponsored by Psi Chi, the National 
Honorary Society in Psychology, and is open to all faculty, 
staff and students. 

The department of biological sciences will sponsor "Beyond 
UNCW and the M.S. Degree" February 8 at 5 p.m. in room 210 
of the University Union. W. W. Kirk, president of the 
LAQUE Center for Corrosion Technology, will discuss Select- 
ing a Placement: Academia, Industry, Government Agencies, & 
Opportunities Abroad. 

Ben Lassiter of the office of special programs will speak on 
"Developments in Special Programs" February 3 at 12 noon 
in the faculty dining room of the cafeteria. The next Ham 
'N Eggheads session will be February 10 featuring Sandra 
Harkin speaking on "New Services in Career Planning and 
Placement. " 

The Mathematical Sciences Colloquium will feature a "brain- 
storming session" Monday, February 6, at 4 p.m. in MH-212. 
Faculty and staff are invited to bring a math problem when 
they come. 

The B. Frank Hall Philosophy and Religion Society will 
offer a full-length feature film, "The Gospel According to 
St. Matthew," February 8 at 8 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium. 
The film, made as a tribute to Pope John XXIII, portrays 
Jesus as a gentle young man who is unglamorous and charis- 
matic, yet passionately angry on behalf of the afflicted 
people around him. $1 admission charge. Open to the public. 



The North Carolina Department of Admini 
business roundtable for corporate execu 
Wilmington area February 8 from 9 a.m. 
University Union. Rhone Sasser, chief 
with United Carolina Bank in Whiteville 
venor and host for the roundtable. The 
sion is to inform corporate executives 
management programs and to solicit sugg 
improve state programs and how to conti 
UNCW is pleased to welcome to our campu 
Patterson, secretary for the North Caro 
Administration, as well as our local bu 



stration wil 1 host a 
tives from the 
- 4 p.m. in the 
executive officer 
, will serve as con- 
purpose of the ses- 
of the state's 
estions on ways to 
nue support for them, 
s Jane Smith 
1 ina Department of 
siness leaders. 



All employees are encouraged to participate in the annual 
'"Governor's Award for Excellence," an award made in recog- 
nition of meritorious or distinguished accomplishments. 
Only permanent SPA employees may be nominated. Forms may 
be picked up from the personnel office and must be sent 
back to that office in a sealed envelope marked "GOVERNOR'S 
AWARD" no later than February 17. 



SPECIAL Faculty and staff are entitled to half-price off all cour 
•PROGRAMS offered by the Office of Special Programs. For informati 
REMINDER call ext. 2195. 

DANKEL Dr. Thad Dankel of the department of mathematical science 
VISITING has been granted a leave of absence for the spring semest 
PROFESSOR to accept a visiting research professorship in the depart 
ment of statistics at The University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. His research work will deal with wave pro- 
pagation in random media, with emphasis on sound propaga- 
tion in the ocean and computer assisted statistical 
analysis of underwater acoustic data sets. 

Dr. Phillip McGuire of the history faculty attended the m 
ing of the Executive Council of the Association of Histor 
ans in Eastern North Carolina Friday, January 27 at Metho 
College in Fayetteville. 

Professor Robert Y. George of IMBR and the department of 
biological sciences has been reelected to a second term o 
the Editorial Board of the Journal of Crustacean Biology . 
Also, Dr. George has recently participated in a research 
conference on the patterns and mechanisms of aging in Man^ 
Mammals, Fish and Crustaceans at the Medical School of th. 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. 

DR. MILLER Dr. David Miller, assistant to the dean of the college ofi 

TO AUTOGRAPH arts and sciences, will sign his new book, "The Well Beirj 

BOOKS Good Health Handbook" during an autograph party at the ? 

Bookery (Cotton Exchange) February 18 from 1 - 3 p.m. \ 



MCGUIRE AT 
MEETING 



DR. GEORGE 
REELECTED 



WEDNESDAY 
LUNCHES 



THALIAN 
PRODUCTIONS 



ALUMNI 
SOCIAL 



ART 
LECTURE 



ART 
EXHIBIT 



A reminder to faculty and staff -- you are invited to .io 
"non-traditional" students for lunch each Wednesday from 
noon - 1 p.m. in the University Union snack bar. 

"0, Mr. Faulkner, Do You Write?" will be presented in 
Thalian Hall February 2-5. 

"The Importance of Being Earnest" will be presented in 
Thalian Hall February 11 at 8 p.m. 

The UNCW Alumni Association will host a pre-game social 
February 6 beginning at 6 p.m. in room 100 of the Univer 
sity Union. Sandwich buffet at $2.50 for faculty and 
staff. Reservations required. 

Vernon Pratt of the art department at Duke University wi 
be the guest lecturer at St, John's Art Museum February 
at 8 p.m. Free, 

St. John's Museum of Art will host an exhibit which open 
February 4. 






DID YOU KNOW THAT FEBRUARY IS BLACK HISTORY MONTH? 
DID YOU KNOW THAT FEBRUARY IS PUBLIC RADIO MONTH? 



AMPUS 
OMMU] 



Library/Archives 1 



UNC by the .sea 



a 




¥ 



A GRANT 
EAKER 



RCHASING 
OCEDURE 



5 FORMS 
R SURPLUS 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 29 
FEBRUARY 9, \^%k 



¥ 



Dr. B. J. Copeland, director of the UNC Sea Grant program, will 
discuss 198^^-85 priorities during a seminar for faculty Tuesday, 
February I'f, at 2 p.m, iri conference room 202 of the Behavioral 
Sciences Building. This seminar is the firit of a colloquium 
series featuring representatives from a number of research fund- 
ing agencies. Faculty from other universities throughout eastern 
North Carolina will have the opportunity to participate. 

To prevent duplicate payments on university subscriptions, all 
departments are asked to include the beginning date and number 
of issues on all requisitions submitted for new or renewal sub- 
scriptions. For additional information call the purchasing office. 

Bid forms for surplus property are available through purchasing 
services or the warehouse. These forms are for personal bids 
and are submitted to the State Surplus Property Agency for 
awards. 



;n up 

R DEMO 



MPHONY 
KENAN 



Faculty members who have not signed up lor the SIGI demon- 
stration to be held February 13, 1^, 15 and 16 in room 106 of 
3ames Hall should call ext. 2280 by 3 pjn. Friday, February 10. 

The North Carolina Symphony will perform tomorrow night at 
8 in Kenan Auditorium. 



-M STILL 
AILABLE 



DER 
GALIA 



Anyone interested in viewing the video presentation of "The 
Story of Ella Baker" should go by the Office of Minority Affairs 
located in room 206 of the University Union. 

Academic regalia for the May 12 Commencement ceremony may 
be rented through the university bookstore. All orders must be 
in no later than March 2. 



•VERNOR'S 
'ARD 



Employees are reminded to participate in the annual "Governor's 
Award for Excellence," an award made in recognition of 
meritorious or distinguished accomplishments. Only permanent 
SPA employees may be nominated. Forms may be picked up 
from the personnel office and must be sent back to that office 
in a sealed envelope marked "Governor's Award" no later than 
February 17. 



GREAT 
DECISIONS 



HAM 'N 
EGGHEADS 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



Dr. Thomas Moseley of the history faculty presented the first 
Great Decisions lecture Tuesday, February 7, in Bryan Auditor!' 
urn located in Morton Hall. His lecture, the first of eight 
lectures scheduled weekly for the next two months, was en- 
titled "The Soviet Union: Hard Choices for Moscow and 
Washington." 

Sandra Harkin of the career planning and placement center 
will discuss New services in career planning and placement dur- 
ing the Ham 'n Eggheads 12 noon luncheon February 10 in the 
faculty dining room. Frank Trimble will be the February 17 
speaker. I 

Aerobics classes, Level II, for advanced beginners will be offer- 
ed February 15 - March 19 on Mondays and Wednesdays from 
6:30 - 7:15 p/n. Registration deadline is February 10. Faculty 
and staff $6. Call ext. 2195. 



MATH Tommy Brown, assistant professor of mathematical sciences, 

SCIENCES will speak on The High School Mathematics Contest during the 

COLLOQUIUM Mathematical Sciences Colloquium February 13 at U:15 pjn. in 

Morton Hall room 212. Faculty and staff are cordially invited 

to attend Coffee will be served at ^. 

CHAPTER Dr. Ron Sizemore, assistant professor of biological sciences, 

PUBLISHED has had a chapter entitled "Plasmids in marine Vibrio spp.: 

Incidence and determination of potential functions using nu- 
merical taxonomic methods" to appear in the recently released | 
book, VIBRIOS IN THE ENVIRONMENT, published by 3ohn 
Wiley and Sons. The article was co-authored v/ith H.S. Hada, 
former graduate student. 

OFFICER Campus police officer Elizabeth Reid has been awarded the 

AWARDED Intermediate Law Enforcement Certificate by the North 

Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards 

Commission. 



PROFESSOR 
APPOINTED 



MOVIE TO 
BE SHOWN 



Dr. Armando A. de la Cruz, foundation chair distinguished 
visiting professor, has been appointed to the editorial board 
of ESTUARIES, the quarterly journal of the Estuarine Researcli 
Federation. 

The student affairs staff development committee invites all 
faculty and staff to view the movie, "College can be Killing," 
Friday, Februar)' 10, at 8 ajn. in the west wing of the snack 
bar in the University Union. The movie deals with college 
suicides. 



PAPER 
PUBLISHED 



FINANCIAL 
AID CHANGE 



David Webster of the department of biological sciences has 
had a paper entitled "A new subspecies of Glossophaga mexi- 
cana (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) from southern Mexico" 
published in the OCCASIONAL PAPERS OF THE MUSEUM, 
TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY. The paper was co-authored by 
J. K. Jones, Jr., of Texas Tech. 

Congratulations to Henry Fuller of the student financial 
aid office. His data coordinator role has been expanded to 
include major program responsibilities under the new title 
of assistant director. 






SaJly Cameron, executive director of the North Carolina Psycho- 
logical Association, will discuss "Psychology in North Carolina: 
Current Status and Future Prospects" TODA^' at ^ pjn. in room 
108 of the Social and Behavioral Sciences Building. The lecture 
is sponsored by Psi Chi, the National Honorary Society in 
Psychology, and is open to all faculty, staff and students. 

The school of education and the department of health, physical 
education and recreation v»'ill present Edward Kiersh, author of 
WHERE HAVE YOU GONE, VINCE DIMAGGIO?, TODAY at 
'f:30 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium. Faculty and staff are 
invited. 

Welcome back Dianne Smith, personnel assistant. Dianne has 
been away on maternity leave for the past few months. A big 
thank you is extended to Alice Maile for keeping the university 
departments informed via the CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE on 
personnel items during Dianne's absence. 

Employees having temporary full-time periods of employment 
are now eligible to purchase that time towa^^d retirement. You 
must have ten years of current service in the Retirement 
System to be eligible. Also, employees may repurchase any 
time they were out on weekly worker's compensation benefits. 
The ten year requirement is not mandated for this purchase. 
For additional information call Dianne Smith in the personnel 
office. 

MEDICAL INSURANCE: 

*Newborns should be enrolled prior to birth or within 30 days 
of birth to avoid the 12 months waiting period for pre-existing 
conditions 

*A change request form should be filed for the following: 

/add or delete dependent coverage 

/have a dependent student who attains the age of 19 
or an incapacitated dependent 

/become eligible for Medicare or if a dependent be- 
comes eligible for Medicare 

/change name and/or address 

/change in your spouse's employment and/or 
employer-sponsored health insurance plan 



*NOTE 



Change requests need to be filed within thirty days 
of dependent status changes 



Medical enrollment and change request forms are available in 
the personnel office. Questions concerning health insurance 
should be directed to Dianne Smith at ext. 2162. 



Welcome to Bonnie V,, Howard, computer systems coordinator 
for the registrar's office. 

Dr. 3. C. Corbi. senior research engineer for Federal Paper 
Board, will discuss Staying on the 3ob: Professional Priorities, 
Time Management & Institutional Loyalty February 15 at 5 p.m. 
in room 210 of the University Union. The talk is in conjunction 
with "Beyond I'NCW and the M^. Degree" sponsored by the 
department of biological sciences. 



PIPER The Pied Piper Theatre will present "Cinderella!" at 3 pjn. in Kenan 

THEATRE Auditorium February 12. Admission is 50^, 

S.R.O The UNCW University Theatre will present Christopher Fry's, "The 

PLAY Lady's Not For Burning, "February 15 - 19 at 8 nightly in the SJR.O. 

Theatre. General admission $3. 

MINI The Creative Arts Department - division of music will present a 

CONCERT 3azz Combo Mini Concert February 16 at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. 

Admission $1. 



FILM TO The office of minority affairs will sponsor a video presentation of 

BE SHOWN "200 Years of Black Art" February 13 in room 206 of the University 
Union. Interested persons should call ext. 2^39. 

NET Dr. Betty Jo Welch will speak to the Women in Networking during 

LUNCH their luncheon meeting at Quincy's on Market Street February 13. 

ECOLOGY Dr. Armando de la Cruz will lecture on "The Ecology in War and 
LECTURE Peace: Defoliants, Pathogens and the Like" February 13 at 8 pjn. 
in Bryan Auditorium. 

AAUW The American Association of University Women will meet February 

MEETS 15 at 6:30 pjn. for dinner at Balentine's Cafeteria. 

GROUP The Campus Christian Fellowship will meet February l^ at 6:30 pjn. 

TO MEET in room 100 of the University Union. 

SEAHAWKS The men's basketball team will host Baptist College February 13 
TO PLAY in Trask Coliseum at 7:30 pjn. 

NCSEA All faculty and staff are invited to join the North Carolina State 

MEMBERS Employees Association. Dues are $18 a year and are payroll deducti- 
ble. Interested persons should call Charlie King at ext. 2166. Members 
of NCSEA are eligible for discounts at the following local businesses: 

Wells Port Products - Burgaw - 10% off all items 

Captain Lynn's Seafood Restaurant - Burgaw - 10% off on 
specials; 20% off regular priced meals 

Friendly Department Store - Wilmington 10% off all items 

AMOCO Transmissions - 10% off on all renairs & parts 

Alpha Products (Plum Tree Plaza) 33% and up off catalog 
prices 

Betty's County Kitchen - Mapel Hill - 10% off specials; 20% 
off regular priced meals 

Things Remembered - Call 392-2833 

Western Sizzlin Steak House - 10% discount at both locations 

Image Photography - 25% discount on photographs 

WORK Fanfares and Reflections for Winds and Percussion by David Kechley 

SELECTED was among eight works selected nationally for presentation at the 
Symposium IX for New Band Music to be held February 9-11 at 
Virginia Commonwealth University. Dr. Kechley of the department 
of creative arts - music will conduct the Virginia Intercollegiate 
Band for the rehearsals and performance of his work. 



M 



CAMPUS 



Library/Archives 1, 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 30 
FEBRUARY 16, 198^ 



The Mathematical Sciences Colloquium will present a brainstorm- 
ing session February 20 at ^f pjn. in MH-212. Everyone is invited. 

Frank Trimble of the Department of Creative Arts - speech com- 
munications division will discuss "The Role of Intercollegiate 
Forensics Competition of UNCW" during the February 17 
noon luncheon meeting in the faculty dining room of the 
cafeteria. The next speaker will be Susan Dankel February 
2it discussing "Wilmington City Government." 

Dr. Jack Turner, L.J. Buchan Distinguished Professor in the 
Cameron School of Business Administration, will discuss 
Developing a Career: Professionalism, Personal Goals February 
22 at 5 pjn. in room 210 of the University Union. The discus- 
sion is sponsored by the department of biological sciences in 
conjunction with Dr. de la Cruz's Dialogue Series on Graduate 
Students, "Beyond UNCW and the M.S. Degree." 

Dr. David Miller will sign his new book, "The Well Being-Good 
Health Handbook, Saturday, February 18, from 1 - 3 pjn. during 
an autograph party at the Bookery, located in the Cotton 
Exchange. 

The UNCW Swimhawks will host the Seahawk Invitational begin- 
ning today and ending Saturday, February 18. The Seahawks are 
coached by David Allen and Marc Ellington both of the HPER 
department. 

A play, "The Lady's Not for Burning," is being presented in the 
S.R.O. Theatre tonight through Sunday, February 19, at 8 nightly. 
Tickets may be purchased at the door. 

Ed Jones, auxiliary services co-ordinator, will be leaving UNCW 
to accept a similar position at Carolina Beach. A farewell recep- 
tion will be held Friday, February 2^, from i^- - 5 p,m. in the 
conference room of Belk Hall. All faculty and staff are welcome. 

The North Carolina Azalea Festival Teenage Princess Pageant 
will be held Saturday, February 18, at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditori- 
um. $'* advance tickets; $5 at the door. 



WORLD The Museum of World Cultures, directed by Dr. Gerald Shinn, 

CULTURES professor of philosophy & religion, will host the dedication of li 

Bernard Boyd's Collection of Mideastem Artifacts February 16| 
at 7 pjn. in the foyer of Randall Library. That night, in conju 
tion with the dedication, a lecture, funded by a grant from j 
the NC Humanities Committee, will be given by Dr. Joseph 
G. Waiser. Dr. Walser, biblical archaeologist, will present a 
slide/lecture on "The Northern Negev in Recent Archaeologi- 
cal and Biblical Investigations" in Bryan Auditorium at 8. 
Open to the public. 



GOSPEL 
CHOIR 



The UNCW Gospel Choir will present a concert February 16 
from 1 - 3 p.m. in room 100 of the University Union. Everyone 
invited. 



CHEMISTRY The department of chemical and physical sciences/division of 

SEMINAR chemistry began its spring 198^* seminar series last week with | 

Dr. Arthur Halpern of the department of chemistry at North- 
eastern University. This Friday, February 17, guest speaker j 
Dr. Edwin Vassian of the department of chemistry at Western I 
Carolina University will speak on "Transition Metal Chemistry.i 
The seminar, open to faculty and staff, will be held in C-ll'f ;| 
2:30 pjn. ! 



ALUMNI 
PIG PICKING 



FOLK 
CONCERT 



All members of the faculty and staff are invited to the annual 
alumni pig picking/casino night Saturday, March 17, from 7 - } 
midnight at Bob King Pontiac-Mercedes on New Centre Drive. ■ 
Call ext. 2616 or come by the alumni affairs office for tickets 

Friends of Public Radio and the UNCW Communications Club \ 
sponsor a folk concert Sunday, February 19, at 3 psn. in room 
of the University Union. Featured performers include John 
Golden, Rob Nathanson, Laura McLean and David Shucavage. 
Tickets for the event are $3 and may be purchased at the Reci 
Bar, School Kids Records, Thalian Hall, the Arts Council or a1 
the door. Proceeds will go the the Friends of Public Radio. 



JAZZ GROUPS The UNCW Jazz Combo and Jazz-Fusion Group under the dire^ 

TO PERFORM tion of Frank Bongiorno, assistant professor of music, will pre 

sent a Mini-Jazz Concert February 16 in Kenan Auditorium at 
8 p.m. The Jazz Combo will perform music by Duke Ellington, 
Phil Woods and Chick Corea. The Jazz-Fusion Group will do 
contemporary jazz by the Weather Report and Grover Washing i 
Jr. Admission is $1. Tickets may be purchased at the door. 

THE GOOD The Good Life series sponsored by New Hanover Memorial 1 los • 

LIFE SERIES tal, -Vilmington Area Health Education Center, the New Harx)\ 

Pender and Brunswick County Medical Society and the New 
Hanover Memorial Hospital Medical and Dental Staff will presf 
Dr. Robert Weinstein discussing "Answers to Questions About 
Depression" February 20 at 7:30 pjn. in the AHEC Auditorium. 
Facultv and staff are invited to attend. 



SUMMER The following dates have been established for Summer Freshm, 

ORIENTATION Orientation: 

June 1'4 - 15 

June 17 - IS 

June 21-22 
For additional intormation call the Dean of Students Office. 



The UNCW 3azz Ensembles, under the direction of Frank J. 
Bongiorno, will host The John McNeil Jazz Quartet in Kenan Hall 
on Wednesday, February 22, in clinic and performance. 

Please make the following change in the faculty and staff phone 
directory: 

Tom Fields, page 21 - delete 2'^7't and add 243^* 

Academic regalia for the May 12 Commencement ceremony may 
be rented through the university bookstore. All orders must be 
in no later than March 2. 

Dr. Ronald E. Copley of the economics and finance department 
has had a paper entitled "Interest Rate Expectation, Short- 
term Trading Strategies, and the Fed Action of 1979" accepted 
for publication in the referred section of the Midsouth Journal 
of Economics. 

Dr. W. Lee Johnston, assistant professor of political science, pre- 
sented a paper, "The North Carolina Rural Vote 1956-1980: 
From Wool Hats and Ledger Books to Brooks' Brothers Suits and 
Personal Computers," at the annual meeting of the Southern 
Association of Rural Sociology held in Nashville February 6-8. 

Marc Ellington, water polo and diving coach in the department 
of HPER, has been selected by the NCAA as the official diving 
referee at the Women's NCAA Division III National Swimming 
and Diving Championships to be held at Emory University 
March 7-10. 

Richard Long of the English faculty has had an article, "Struc- 
ture in Chaim Perelman's Theory of Argumentation," accepted 
for publication in the Journal of Advanced Composition. He 
has also had a poem, "The Trick Your Lover Plays Will Smother 
You," to appear in the latest issue of CCTE. Another poem, 
"Gifts," published in Negative Capability, received an honorable 
mention in the journal's Eve of St. Agnes Poetry Competition. 

Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of the HPER department, has been 
appointed Chairman of the Research and Planning Committee 
of the North Carolina Recreation and Park Society for [92>i4-S5. 
He has also been invited to contribute to the revision of the 
Goals for American Recreation, the update of the 196^ 
National Position Paper of the American Association for Leisure 
and Recreation and the National Recreation Foundation. 

The UNCW Jazz Combo, directed by Frank J. Bongiorno, has 
been invited to perform Friday, February 17, during the UNC-CH 
Jazz Festival. 



UNCw extends a welcome to the following new employees: 

Dr. David Allen, special assistant to the vice chancellor 
for student affairs 

Kristine Hartwell, lecturer in the department of 
accountancy 

Willie F. Lamb, housekeeping assistant for auxiliary 
services 



GUEST 
SPEAKER 



German theologian Dr. Dietrich Ritschl, director of the Ecumen 
Institute at Heidleberg, will discuss "The Challenge of Being 
Truly Ecumenical" February 28 at 8 pjn. in King Hall Auditoriur 
Dr. 3im Megivern, chairman of the philosophy and religion de- 
partment, will be the moderator. On Wednesday, February 29, 
Dr. Ritschl will speak on "Current Trends in Medical Ethics 
at 8 pjn. in King Hall Auditorium with Dr. Dan Gottovi moderat 
A member of the Faith and Order Commission of the World 
Council of Churches, Dr. Ritschl is a professor of Systematic 
Theology and has traveled extensively in Eastern Europe and 
the Soviet Union, researching the status of the Christian Churc 
The lectures, free and open to the public, are funded through 
a grant submitted by Dr. Megivern to the North Humanities Con 
mittee. 



PURCHASING To prevent duplicate payments on university subscriptions, all 

REMINDERS departments are asked to include the beginning date and numbei 

of issues on all requisitions submitted for new or renewal sub- 
scriptions. For additional information call the purchasing 
office. 

Bid forms for surplus property are available through purchasing 
services or the warehouse. These forms are for personal bids 
and are submitted to the State Surplus Property Agency for , 
awards. 

BRASS The Creative Arts Department - Music Division will host the i 

ENSEMBLE Brass Ensemble Sunday, February 19, at 3 pjn. in Kenan Audi- j 

torium. No charge. 

MIKE CROSS The University Program Board will present Mike Cross in Conct 

IN CONCERT Monday, February 20, at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. 

MAGICAL The Magical Mystery Revue will be conducted in in Kenan 

MYSTERY Auditorium February 21 at 7:30 pjn. Admission charge is 

REVUE $3.50. 

DISPLAY The Office of Minority Affairs will sponsor a display on "Agair 

IN UNION The Odds" in the University Union, second floor, 

MEN'S The UNCW Seahawks will host Campbell University February 2l! 

BASKETBALL at 7:30 pjn. in Trask Coliseum. 

WOMEN'S The Lady Seahawks will play Pembroke University February 201 

BASKETBALL at 5:30 pjn. 



FILM TO UNCW and the NAACP will present a film, "Birth of a Nation, 

BE SHOWN followed by a lecture by Ms. Delilah Blanks February 21 at 

6 pjn. in room 100 of the University Union. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 

Library/Archives 1 



/ the csca 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 31 
FEBRUARY 23, igg'f 

Ed Jones, auxiliary services coordinator, will be leaving UNCW 
to accept a position at Carolina Beach. A reception will be 
held Friday, February 2^, from ^ - 5 p.m. in the conference 
room of Belk Hall. Faculty and staff are welcome. 

All items for inclusion in the March UNCW Calendar of Events 
should be sent to Jean Joyner in UU-209 before noon, Friday, 
February 2^*. 

Bob Appleton of the Cameron School of Business Administration, 
just back from Monrovia, Liberia, will discuss LIBERIA: 
A Case Study in the Third World Political & Economic Structure 
at the next Business School Colloquium scheduled for February 
29 at 3:30 p.m. in B-112. Faculty and staff are invited. 

Faculty and staff are invited to the annual alumni pig-picking 
casino night Saturday, March 17, from 7 - midnight at Bob King 
Pontiac-Mercedes located on New Centre Dr. For tickets call 
ext. 2616 or come by the alumni office in room 209 of the 
University Union. 

Paul Jambor of the mathematical sciences department will be the 
next speaker in the Mathematical Sciences Colloquium February 
27 at Ii:l5 p.m. in MH-212. Dr. Jambor will discuss "Commutative 
Rings with no Superdecomposables." Coffee will be served at 
'f. Faculty and staff are invited. 

Susan Dankel will be the guest speaker for the upcoming Ham 
'N Eggheads luncheon scheduled for Friday, February 2^*, in the 
faculty dining room of the cafeteria. Mrs. Dankel will discuss 
"Wilmington City Government." (12 noon) 

Dr. Dee Andrews, psychologist with the human factors laboratory 
at the Navy Equipment Training Center in Orlando, will be the 
guest speaker for tlie School of Education February 23 at 
3:^5 pjn. in King Hall Auditorium. Dr. Andrews, the author of 
a recent article comparing i^O different models of instructional 
systems development, will discuss his research and how he 
evaluated the ^0 models to arrive at I'; basic points that he 
considers the most effective in teaching. For information call 
Dr. Wade Cooper at ext. 2369. 



PAPER TO BE Dr. Ravija Badarinathi of the management and marketing depart 

PRESENTED ment will present a paper, "Convergent and Discriminant Validi 

of the Students Ratings by Analysis of Covariance Structure," 
during the meeting of the South Eastern American Institute of 
Decision Sciences to be held February Z'f in Savannah. The pap 
is co-authored with Dr. U.5. Tate of Iowa State University. 

DE LA CRUZ Dr. Armando A. de la Cruz of the biology department will prese 

TO SPEAK the final lecture in his series dealing with "Ecology and Human 

Affairs" at 8 pjn^ Monday, February 27, in Bryan Auditorium. 

His topic will be "Scriptural Basis of Ecology: A Mandate for 

Environmental Stewardship." 

UNCW 3AZZ The UNCW 3azz Ensemble, directed by Frank 3. Bongiorno, assi: 

ENSEMBLE tant professor and assistant director of music, will present a Mi 

Concert of Big Band 3azz at 8 p.m., February 29 in Kenan 
Auditorium. Included will be several compositions by the late 
Stan Kenton; standards like Tangerine, Sweet Georgia Brown 
and A Child is Born. Also the jazz group, Eclipse, will perform 
featuring Frank Bongiorno, alto sax; Duke Ladd, piano; Greg 
Eavey, drums and Bill Dribben, bass. For additional informatior; 
call ext. 2390. 

KEYNOTE Dr. Robert H. Byington, chairman of the English department, ha 

SPEAKER been invited to give the main address at a conference entitled , 

"Mary Butts: Her Writings and Her World" February 23-25 j 
at the University of California, Davis, He will speak on "The j 
Quest for Mary Butts." His biography of the British author 
also has the same title. 



MCGUIRE 
REVIEWS 



ARTICLE 
PUBLISHED 



PAPER 
ACCEPTED 



ARTICLE IN 
JOURNAL 



Dr. Phillip McGuire of the history department presented a book 
review on Taps for a Jim Crow Army to the members and frien 
of the Ebenezer Baptist Church February 19. 

Timothy W. Haywood of the Department of Chemical and 
Physical Sciences, physics division has had an article entitled 
"Optical Properties of Tantalum Carbide from the Infrared to 
the Near Ultraviolet" published in The Physical Review as part: 
of his continuing collaboration with the high-temperature ceran 
group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dr. Haywood will als_. 
have an article, "A Model-T Disassembler," published in the 
July issue of 80-Micro. 

A paper, "Oligocene marine deposits in^-Aiken County, South 
Carolina," by Ralph Willougby of the SC Geological Survey, 
Victor ZuUo of the department of earth sciences, Lucy Edward, 
of the US Geological Survey, and others, has been accepted foi 
presentation at the 198'* annual meeting of the Southeastern 
Section, Geological Society of America. 

Dr. John Manock, director of research administration, has had 
an article, "Offering an Inservice Instructional Program Using 
a Computer-Based Communication System" to appear in the 
February, 198^* issue of T.H.E. Journal (Technological Horizons 
in Education). The article describes a pilot program using new 
technology to provide an interdisciplinary inservice chemistry 
and biology course to regional high school science teachers. 
The article was co-authored with Roger Lumb of Western 
Carolina University. 



The UNCW/Community Orchestra, conducted by Dr. 3oe Hickman 
assistant prolessor of music, will perform at 3 pjn., Sunday, 
February 26, in Kenan Auditorium. Dr. James Gardner, concert 
master of the orchestra and assistant professor of music, will per- 
form Beethoven's violin concerto. The program will also include 
the premiere performance of a work by Wilmington composer 
Laura Howell Norden Schorr, called The Sea King , as well as a 
piece by Paul Hindemith entitled "Symphonic Metamorphoses. 
Admission is $4 for adults and $2 for students. UNCW students 
free. 

In early March, UNCW will be the host site for the 198if Eastern 
Honors Orchestra featuring ninety of the most talented high 
school musicians from eastern NC. Housing for the students will 
be needed for the evenings of March 2 and 3. interested persons 
should contact Dr. Gardner at ext. 2395. A concert, conducted 
by 3ames Ogle, associate conductor of the NC Symphony, 
is scheduled for Sunday, March tt, at 3 pjn., in Kenan Auditorium. 

Stuart Stapleton of the department of chemical and physical 
sciences will speak on "Origin of Ferromanganese Nodules" at 
2:30 pjii. in C-ll't on February I^i. The talk is in conjunction 
with the Spring 198^ Seminar series sponsored by the Department 
of Chemical and Physical Sciences/division of chemistry. All 
faculty and staff are invited. 

The Minority Fine Arts Committee will present Josh White, folk 
singer, February 23 in Kenan Auditorium at 8 pjn. 

Dr. Stephen Harper, chairman of the department of management 
and Marketing, will present a seminar, "Effective Delegation," 
February 27 at 7 pjn. in King Hall, room 208. To register call 
Laura Shields at ext. 2195. Faculty, staff and students $10; 
all others $20. 

Dr. Earl Sheridan of the political science faculty will present 
a lecture on "South Africa: Can U.S. Policies Influence Change?" 
February 28 at 7:30 p.m. in Bryan Auditorium. The lecture is the 
fourth in the 198'f Great Decisions series. Admission for staff, 
faculty and students is $1.25 at the door. 

Dr. Arvid Anderson of the management and marketing department 
will present the first two programs in the Small Business Seminar 
Series for Spring 198^*. "Marketing Research for Small Business" 
will be presented Tuesday, February 28, at 7:30 pjn. in room 104 
of Hoggard Hall and the second seminar, "Retailing for Small 
Business," will be Wednesday, February 29, at 7:30 pjn. in room 
206 of King Hall. The registration fee for faculty, staff and 
students will be $5 per seminar; all others $10 per. Call Laura 
Shields at ext. 2195 to register. 

Dr. Robert Brown of the psychology faculty will present a seminar 
titled "Self-Motivation" February 29 at 7 pjn. in Hoggard Hall, 
room 212. Fee for faculty, staff and students will be $10; all 
others $20. To register call Laura Shields at ext. 2195. 

THE ABOVE LISTED SPECIAL PROGRAMS ARE SPONSORED BY 
THE UNCW OFFICE OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS. 



Academic regalia for the May 12 Commencement ceremony may 
be rented tnrough the university bookstore. All orders must 
be in no later than march 2. 



PERSONNEL All temporary employee timesheets and ail timesheets reflectin] 

NOTICES shift or overtime premium pay must be in the personnel office 

before 10 a.m. March I. Supervisors who do not meet this dead 
line cannot expect their employees to be paid on March 15. 

If an employee marries, has a child, or adopts a child, the deper 
dent must be enrolled within thirty (30) days of the marriage, 
birth, or adoption to avoid the waiting period. In these instanc 
please indicate on the change application, newly married or < 
adoption. i 

Norma Rutherford, secretary, is now working for the assistant 
to the chancellor. i 



MEMBER 
AWARDED 



ROSENKOETTER 
ADDRESSES 



LOGO 
CONTEST 



THEOLOGIAN 
ON CAMPUS 



A welcome is extended to Robert A. Warren, construction and 
renovation technician for the physical plant. 

A member of the UNCW Jazz Combo, Gary Lamb, received an 
Outstanding Soloist award February J 7 during the 7th annual 
UNC-Chapel Hill Jazz Festival. 

Dr. Marlene M. Rosenkoetter, chairman of the department of 
nursing, addressed the annual convention of the North Carolina 
Association of Nursing Students February 11 in Charlotte. 
Her address was entitled "Communicating with Your Profession 
Organizations." 

A Logo Contest for the University Union is presently underway 
The contest is open to faculty, staff and students. Entries mus 
be submitted on paper or poster board no larger than 8 ^" x 
IV and should be sent to UU-21'f no later than 5 pjn., Wednes 
day, March I'f. Call ext. 2811 for additional information. 

German theologian Dr. Dietrich Ritschl, director of the Ecumer 
cal Institute at Heidleberg, will discuss "The Challenge of Bein 
Truly Ecumenical" February 28 at 8 pjn. in King Hall Auditoriu 
Moderating the discussion will be Dr. Jim Megivern, chairman 
of the philosophy & religion department. On Wednesday, 
February 29, Dr. Ritschl will speak on "Current Trends in Medi: 
Ethics" at 8 pjn. in King Hall Auditorium with Dr. Dan Gottovi 
moderating. The lectures, free and open to the public, are 
funded through a grant submitted by Dr. Megivern to the North 
Carolina Humanities Committee. 



MEN'S The tennis Seahawks will host Mt. Olive February 29 at 2:30 pj 

TENNIS Campus tennis courts. 

MEN'S The Seahawks will host East Carolina University Saturday, 

BASKETBALL February 25, at 7:30 pjn. in Trask Coliseum. A pre-game mixeij 

with ECU alumni and UNCW alumni sponsored by the UNCW 
Alumni Association will be held in UU-100 prior to the game. 
Reservations are required. Call the alumni office at 2616. 



PAYDAY ON DON'T FORGET TO LEAP OVER TO THE CASHIER'S OFFICE' 

LEAP DAY WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 29. IT'S PAYDAY! 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 

.ibrary/Archi ves 1 



by the csea 




BABY 
GIRL 



THEODORE 
CONSULTS 



BADARINATHI 
INVITED 



NEW 
STAFF 

ECKLES 
TRANSFERS 

DIRECTORY 
CHANGES 



P. PLANT 
NOTICE 

ALUMNI 
SOCIAL 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 32 
MARCH 1, 198^ 

Suzanne Bulla, systems accountant, is pleased to announce the 
birth of her daughter, Lourisa, on February 15. Baby Bulla 
weighed 9 lbs. 11 ozs. Mother and daughter are doing fine. 

Dr. Terry Theodore, professor of drama, worked as a creative 
consultant with the New Hanover County Sheriff's Department 
during the recent production of a film on the new drunk 
driving laws. The film, reflecting what happens when a drunk 
driver is arrested, booked and tried, will be used for public 
relations and as an aid in instructing new deputies. 

Dr. William Friday has extended an invitation to Dr. Ravija 
Badarinathi of the Cameron School of Business Administration 
to attend the March 9 meeting of the Board of Governors to be 
held in Chapel Hill. A report on the Faculty Doctorial Study 
Assignment Program will be given during the meeting. Dr. 
Badarinathi was the recipient of the Board of Governors' 
Award last year. 

Welcome to Karen Powers, accountant for financial services, and 
Catherine Talent, clerk typist in the department of history. 

Kathy Eckles, former secretary in the office of special programs, 
has transferred to the office of minority affairs. 

Please make the following changes in the faculty/staff phone 
directory: 

Page 8 - Physical Plant - Plant Engineer - change 2100 to 2101 

Page 31 - 3oyce Lewis - change 2103 to 2100 

Add the following new physical plant employees: 

Robert Warren, maintenance planner, Ext. 2103 
John Blume - Ext. 2100 

Call Ext. 2101 regarding work orders and motor pool reserva- 
tions. 

Don't forget the annual alumni pig-picking on March 17 at Bob 
King Pontiac-Mercedes, Tickets are $12J0 per person and may 
be purchased from the alumni office in UU-209. 



CHEMISTRY 
SEMINAR 



HAM 'N 
EGGHEADS 



MATH 
SCIENCES 



Darryl McDougald of the Department of Chemical and Physical 
Sciences will speak on "The Chemistry of PCB's" along with Be 
Myers also of the Department of Chemical and Physical Science 
discussing "Dioxin: The Chemistry and Controversy" March 16 
at 2:30 p.m. in C-IU. 

Stephanie Young of the Department of Creative Arts - division 
drama will discuss "Scenic design as research" during the March 
noon luncheon meeting of Ham 'n Eggheads in the faculty dinin] 
room of the cafeteria. Chancellor Wagoner will be the speaker 
for the March 23 luncheon meeting. 

Dr. Sandra McLaurin, assistant professor of mathematical scien< 
will speak on "Placement Testing and Remediation" March 12 
at k:[5 p. m. in Morton Hall, room 212. The next mathematical 
sciences colloquium will feature Wyman Fair speaking on 
Pade Approximation March 19. 



GUEST 
PIANIST 



SPRING 
FILMS 



The Department of Creative Arts - music division will present 
Thomas Warburton, associate professor of musicology at UNC-C 
in a piano concert March 16 at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. Th 
recital will include sonatas by Haydn and Schubert, "Piano Van 
tions" by Michael Eckert of the UNC-CH faculty, and "Barcarcj 
and "Polonaise in A Flat Major" by Chopin. Free. 

The Cape Fear Foundation located at 9 S. Front Street is sponj 
ing a series of spring films. Sunday, March k, "The Red Shoes" 1 
will be shown at 8 pjn. Faculty and staff are invited. Bring I 
your own popcorn and drink. Free!! The foundation is in need I 
of volunteers to help staff various art shows. Interested facult 1 
or staff are asked to call Dr. Clark Holtzman at ext. 2383. I 



LOGO All logo contest entries for the University Union must be sent 

CONTEST to UU-214 no later than 5 pjn., Wednesday, March I'f. Call ex 

2811 for additional information. 



UNCW TO 
HOST 



OFFICERS 

ATTEND 

MEETING 

TAYLOR 
ELECTED 



UNCW will be the host site. for the 198if Eastern Honors Or- 
chestra March 2 - U. A concert, held in conjunction with the 
occasion, is scheduled for 3 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium March 
U. 3ames Ogle with the NC Symphony will conduct. 

Campus police officers Scott Register, Jackie Robinson and 
Elizabeth Reid recently attended the Campus Law Enforcemen 
Course held at the North Carolina Justice Academy in Salembi 

Margaret Taylor, coordinator of residence life, has been elect 
to the executive board of the NC College Personnel Associati. 
The association represents college and university professionals; 
the state and is a division of the American College Personnel 
Association. 



ARTICLE 

IN JOURNAL 



MOSELE^- 
LECTURES 



An article by William Woodhouse of the modem languages dep. 
ment entitled "La quijada que cuentan los morenos" has been 
published in Nueva Revisia de Filologia Hispanica, the scholai 
journal of linguistics and literature published by the Colegio t 
Mexico. 

Dr. Thomas Moseley, professor of history, presented a lecture 
"General Braxton Bragg's Two Pronged 1862 Invasion of Kenti ; 
Culminating with The battle of Perryville," February 16 tc t^ 
George Davis Chapter Number Five, Sons of Confederate Vet " 



The UNCW Board of Trustees, President William C. Friday, and 
the UNC Board of Governors have approved the following per- 
sonnel changes for the UNCW campus. 

PROMOTIONS OF TENURED FACULTY 

Dr. Courtney T. Hackney - department of biological sciences 
From assistant professor to associate professor 

Dr. W. Lee Johnston - department of political sciences 
From assistant professor to associate professor 

Dr. Sylvia K. Polgar - department of sociology & anthropology 
From assistant professor to associate professor 

Dr. James C. Sabella - department of sociology & anthropology 
From associate professor to professor 

Mr. Robert W. Appleton - department of accountancy 
From assistant professor to associate professor 

Dr. Hathia A. Hayes - curricular studies 

From assistant professor to associate professor 

PROMOTIONS GRANTING PERMANENT TENURE 

Dr. John P. Clifford - department of English 
From assistant professor to associate professor 

Dr. Diane E. Levy - department of sociology & anthropology 
From assistant professor to associate professor 

Dr. Walter Thomas Schmid - department of philosophy & religion 
From assistant professor to associate professor 

Dr. Ronald K. Sizemore - department of biological sciences 
From assistant professor to associate professor 

Dr. Lee M. Sherman - department of management and marketing 
From assistant professor to associate professor 

REAPPOINTMENTS WITH PERMANENT TENURE 

Dr. Carolyn S. Dunn - department of biological sciences 
Assistant professor with permanent tenure 

Dr. William L. Etheridge - department of mathematical sciences 
Assistant professor with permanent tenure 

Dr. John R. Huntsman - department of earth sciences 
Assistant professor with permanent tenure 

Dr. Joseph M. Kishton - department of psychology 
Assistant professor with permanent tenure 

Dr. Sandra C. McLaurin - department of mathematical sciences 
Assistant professor with permanent tenure 

Dr. Robert D. Roer - department of biological sciences 
Assistant professor with permanent tenure 

Dr. James H. Nelson - department of mathematical sciences 
Associate professor with permanent tenure 

Dr. John Lewis Walker, III - department of English 
Associate professor with permanent tenure 

(continued on next page) 



CONTINUED 
PERSONNEL 
CHANGES 



GYM 
SCHEDULE 



REAPPOINTMENTS WITH PERMANENT TENURE 

Mr. Dennis 3. Sporre - department of creative arts 
Associate professor with tenure 

Ms. Relsecca S. Sawyer - department of accountancy 
Assistant professor with permanent tenure 

Dr. Catherine C. Cleare - department of curricular studies 
Assistant professor with permanent tenure 

REAPPOINTMENTS TO THE RANK OF ASSISTANT PROFESSC 

Dr. Lawrence B. Cahoon - department of biological sciences 

Dr. Brian F. Davis - department of chemical & physical Science 

Mr. Charles Fort, 3r., - department of English 

Dr. 3ohn H. Haley - department of history 

Dr. Gabriel G. Lugo - department of mathematical sciences | 

Dr. Michael T. Perone - department of psychology 

Dr. Antonio E. Puente - department of psychology 

Dr. Llovd E. Rohler - department of creative arts , 

! 

Dr. Grace A. Rush-Gilliam - department of healtri, physical edi 

tion and recreation 

Dr. Thomas K. Skalko - department of health, physical educati(, 
and recreation 

Dr. Ronald E. Copley - department of economics and finance 

Mr. Fred B. Davenport, 3r. - department of management and 

marketing 

Mr. Charles L. Earney - department of accountancy 

Mr. David O. Lewis - department of management and marketing; 

Mr. Richard A. Roscher - department of accountancy 

Dr. Louis 3. LaNunziata, 3r. - department of curricular studies 

The gvm will be open from 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Monday - Friday anc' 
CLOSED SATURDAY AND SUNDAY during spring break. The, 
pool will be closed during break. 



BASKETBALL 
SCHEDULE 



GREAT 
DECISIONS 

BASEBALL 
SCHEDULE 



The Seahawks will host Youngstown State University TONIGH' 
7:30. A pre-game social sponsored by the alumni association v 
be held prior to the game ati6 p.m. in UU-100. Sandwich buff, 
$2 JO each. Advance reservations required. Call Ext. 2616. [ 

Michael Grimes will speak on "International Drug Traffic: Canj 
Be Stopped" March 6 at 7:30 pjn. in Bryan Auditorium. 

UNCW vs. UNC-CH March 1 (TODAY) & 2 
UNCW vs. W illiam i Mary March 3 & 4 
UNCW vs. Atlantic Christian March 5 4 6 

I. 







"v'i^'^^ 



HAVE A WONDERFUL SPRING BREAK!! 



LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 



.^ea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 33 
MARCH 8, 198^ 

The UNCW Alumni Association will sponsor its annual pig-picking 
on March 17 at Bob King Pontiac-Mercedes. Tickets are $12.50 
per person and may be purchased from the alumni office in 
room 209 of the University Union. 

Darryl McDougald of the Department of Chemical and Physical 
Sciences will speak on "The Chemistry of PCB's" along with Beth 
Myers also of the Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences 
discussing "Dioxin: The Chemistry and Controversy" March 16 
at 2:30 pjn. in C-lI'f. 

The Department of Creative Arts - music division will present 
Dr. Thomas Warburton, associate professor of musicology at 
UNC-CH, in a piano concert March 16 at 8 pjn. in Kenan Audi- 
torium. Free. 

The Supper Optimist Club of Wilmington will host the Interna- 
tional All Star Circus Friday, March 23 at 7:30 pjn. in Hanover 
Hall. For inquiries call the Trask Coliseum ticket office. 

The Retirement Systems Division of the NC Teachers and State 
Employees' Retirement System will conduct a conference March 
I'f at 9:30 a.m. in the New Building Auditorium of Cape Fear 
Technical Institute. The conference will deal with procedures 
in the retirement process; eligibility for retirement; calculation 
of benefits and other benefits available to members. Questions 
should be directed to Dianne Smith at ext. 2162. 



A Spring Reading Series of Poetry and Fiction Readings by 
members of the English faculty will be held Saturday, March 2^, 
at 7 p.m. in the SRO Theatre. 

Dr. Armando de la Cruz, distinguished visiting professor, has 
received a National Science Foundation grant to spend three 
weeks in Africa where he will attend an international symposi- 
um and study wetlands. 

Dr. Thomas V. Moseley of the department of history presented a 
lecture February 27 to Mrs, Ruth Doss's sixth grade class at 
Forest Hills Elementary School. The title of his lecture was 
"Modern Russia." 



FREE A free clinic on "Selecting an Appropriate Shoe for Running anc 

CLINIC Other Aerobic Activities" will be held March 22 at 7 pjn. in Tra 

Coliseum. Ms. Gail Courtney of NIKE, Inc. will conduct the clin 

POEMS Richard Long and Clark Holtzman of the English department ha^ 

ACCEPTED had poems accepted for publication in Portfolio. 198^. a collec- 

tion of writings by twenty North Carolina poets. They will 
attend a reading and workshop at Guilford College April 13-1^. 

HUGUELETAT Gene Huguelet, director of library services, attended the Fifth 

CONFERENCE International Conference on Contemporary Issues in Academic 

and Research Libraries February 28 - March 1 in Boulder, CO. 

HEALTH The HPER department in conjunction with the New Hanover 

SCREENING County Health Department, will sponsor a Health Fair March 31 

in Trask Coliseum from 10 a.m. - h pjn. Free screenings for 
those 18 and over will be given for height, weight, blood pressu 
anemia, hearing and vision. Faculty and staff are invited. 

TEACHING Faculty and staff are invited to submit nominations for the Boai 

EXCELLENCE of Trustees Teaching Excellence Award to be presented in July. 

The award, first presented in 1978 to Dr. B. Frank Hall, was 
established to exemplify UNCW's commitment to teaching excel-i 
lence. Nominees must be current members of the faculty who 
have been teaching at least half-time for five semesters or morj 
must have demonstrated a mastery of and enthusiasm for the j 
subject taught, resoluteness in maintaining high academic | 

standards, genuine interest in each student's intellectual and | 
creative development, and an ability to foster respect for diverj 
points of view and openness to learning. Other recipients of ! 
the award include Franklin Allen, 1979; Stephen Harper, 1980,> |j 
Gerald Shinn, 1981; William F. Adcock (posthumously), 1982; anc] 
Betty Jo Welch, 1983. Nominations will be accepted in the vic«j 
chancellor for academic affairs office until 5 p.m. March 30. 
For additional information call ext. 2137. 



SCHOLARSHIP 
APPLICATIONS 



CLINIC AT 
MALL 



HAM 'N 
EGGHEADS 



MATH 
SCIENCES 



LOGO 
CONTEST 



All active, honorary or associate members, including spouses 
or children of the North Carolina State Employees Association, 
Inc., are eligible to apply for a scholarship. Interested persons 
should contact Margaret Taylor at ext. 2178 or Toddy Fennell 
at Cape Fear Tech, 3't3-0'f81. 

The Hanover Lions Club will conduct a screening clinic for 
glaucoma, diabetes and hypertension Saturday, March 10, 
from 10 ajn. to 5 pjn. in Independence Mall. Nine students 
from the associate degree nursing program will be assisting 
during the clinic which is free and open to the public. 

Stephanie Young of the Department of Creative Arts-division 
of drama will discuss "Scenic design as research" during the 
March 16 noon luncheon meeting of Ham 'n Eggheads in the 
faculty dining room of the cafeteria. 

Dr. Sandra McLaurin, assistant professor of mathematical scien 
will ^eak on "Placement Testing and Remediation" March 12 
at 1^:15 p.m. in Morton Hall, room 212. 

All logo contest entries for the University Union must be sent 
to UU-21^ no later than 5 pjn,, Wednesday, March I'f. Call ex' 
2811 for additional information. 



Gerald R. Weeks, associate professor of psychology, presented a 
two-day workshop on paradoxical psychotherapy February 23 - 
2^* at 'Jtah State University. The workshop was sponsored by 
the Bear Lake Community Mental Health Center and the Utah 
State University Counseling Center. 

Dr. William Cleary^ professor of earth sciences, delivered a 
speech recently on "Geological Processes of North Carolina 
Barrier Islands" during a Marine Science Seminar held at 
Elizabeth City State University. 

Lt. Col. Michael Patterson from Fort Bragg will present the 
sixth lecture in the Great Decisions Series entitled "Saudi Arabia 
and Jordan" Tuesday, March 13, at 7:30 pjn. in Morton Hall, 
room 100. Admission for faculty and staff is $1.25 at the door. 

Dr. Stephen Harper, chairman of the department of management 
and marketing, will conduct a seminar, "Project Management," 
Monday, March 12, at 7 pjn. in King Hall, room 208. The regis- 
tration fee for faculty, staff and students will be $12J0; all 
others $25. 

"How to Prepare Your Income Tax Return" will be presented by 
Mr. Robert Appleton, CPA and chairman of the department of 
accountancy, on Tuesday and Wednesday, March 13 & I'f, 
at 7 p.m. in room 10^, of Hoggard Hall, The registration fee 
is $12J0 for faculty and staff; all others $25. 

Dr. Catherine Gallzio of the psychology faculty will present a 
workshop titled, "How to Overcome Shyness," Tuesday, March 
13, and Tuesday, March 20, at 7 pjn. in room 108 of the Social 
and Behavioral Sciences Building. Registration fee for faculty 
and staff is $10; all others $20. 

Dr. Marjorie Mclnerney of the department of management and 
marketing will present a seminar titled "Dealing with Problem 
Employees" Thursday night, March 15 at 7 in King Hall, room 208. 
Registration fee for faculty and staff is $10; all others $20. 

***NOTE: For information on any of the above listed special 
programs call Laura Shields at ext. 2195. 



St. John's Museum of Art will present its annual membership 
drive barbecue Saturday, March 2^, at 6:30 pjn. at The Cowan 
House Courtyard, 208 S. 2nd St. Tickets will cost $8 per 
person. Deadline for reservations is March 16. Call 763-0281 
for additional information. 

Mrs. Norma Rutherford, secretary for the chancellor's office, 
is now located in A-ll'f. Her new extension is 2115. 



UNCW vs. Virginia Wesleyan College March 1 1 at I pjn. 
UNCW women vs. Pembroke State March 13 at 2 pjn, 

Seahawks vs. Wake Forest March 12 at 3 pjn. 

Seahawks vs. Eastern Kentucky University March 13 & 1^ 

Jean-Michel Cousteau will present a lecture/slide presentation 
March 13 in Kenan Auditorium at 8 pjn. $6 at the door. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT UhhlCE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 3f 
MARCH 15, 198^ 



:iENCE 
BSTIVAL 



R. CARTER 
ECOGNIZED 



ISTORY 

ILMS 



E\V 
ROMOTIONS 



EW 

FAFF 

YI 



Area high school students from the Cape Fear Region will be on 
campus March 16-17 for the third annual science festival to be 
held in Hanover Hall and Trask Coliseum. Projects will be on ex- 
hibit Saturday from 9-11 ajn. Dr. Robert Hellwig, program mana- 
ger for the NC Biotechnology Center at Research Triangle Park, 
will discuss "Science and Technology in Our Future" at 11 a.m. 
Saturday in Kenan Auditorium. Awards will be presented following 
the address. 

Dr. Dennis Carter of the Cameron School of Business was recog- 
nized recently for his assistance in the National Security Manage- 
ment Course which has been taught in Wilmington over the 
last two vears. The co jrse, an extension of the National 
Defense ' 'niversity, is a seminar type program for field grade 
officers of the National Guard and the Army Reserve and deals 
with high level subjects involving National Security. 

The history department and the UNCW Historical Society will pre- 
sent three films this spring beginning with "Animal Farm," March 
29 at 7:30 pjn. in the second floor auditorium of Randall Library. 
Details on the other films will follow. 

Margaret Taylor has assumed new responsibilities in campus hous- 
ing operations. Her new title is coordinator of auxiliary services. 
Ms. Taylor can be reached at ext. 2178. 

Clarence Shavers is the auxiliary services facilities manager and 
can be reached at ext. 2405. Also, Eliza Miller has been promot- 
ed to housekeeping supervisor II and can be reached at ext. 2212. 

Welcome to Garye C. Callaway, diver in the NOAA Undersea Pro- 
gram, and Catherine F. Miller, clerk typist in special programs. 

Dot Roth, former employee at UNCW, is presently in a nursing 
home in Indiana recovering from a broken hip. Dot's husband 
was buried yesterday here in Wilmington. Due to her condition 
she could not attend the funeral. Friends may write her 

at* 

St. Anthony's Resthome Room 303 

Main Street & Franciscan 
Crown Point, IN 46307 



GUEST 
LECTURER 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



The Rev. W.W. Finlator will be the chief speaker at a pro- 
qram to be held in Kinq Auditorium Tuesday, March 20, at 
8 D.m. in observance of Central America Week. Dr. Finlator 
will speak on "The Tragedy of US Policy in Central America." 
The proqram is beinq sponsored by the UNCW P&R Department. 

The seventh lecture in the Great Decisions series will be 
presented by Dr. John Haley of the history faculty speakin 
on "China and the United States" March 20 at 7:30 p.m. in 
room 100 of Morton Hall. Admission for faculty and staff is 
$1.25. 



Ms. Sarah Sellers of the department of economics and finance 
will conduct a seminar on "Small Business Finance, Part I: 
Working Capital" March 21 at 7:30 p.m. in room 206 of King 
Hall. Registration fee for faculty and staff is $5. For ir 
formation on the above listed special programs call Laura 
Shields at ext. 2195. 

READING The 1984 Spring Reading Series featuring poetry and fictior 
SERIES by members of the English faculty and members of the Wilmir 

ton Writer's Forum will be held March 24 at 7 p.m. in the SF 

Theatre. 

CHEMISTRY Dr. Shigeko Yamazaki of the department of molecular genetic; 

SEMINAR at Hoffman LaRoache, Inc., will discuss "Selenium Containing 
Enzymes from Methane Producing Bacteria" March 23 at 2:30 
p.m. in C-114. The lecture, presented by the department of 
chemical and physical sciences, is open to faculty and staf- 

HAM 'N Chancellor Wagoner will speak on "Our roots and our future" 
EGGHEADS March 23 during the 12 noon luncheon meeting of Ham 'n Egg- 
heads in the faculty dining room of the cafeteria. 

COLLOQUIUM The mathematical sciences colloquium scheduled for Monday, 
CANCELLED March 19, has been cancelled. 



FILM TO 
BE SHOWN 



HEALTH 

FAIR 



ORA 
WORKSHOP 



The Cape Fear Foundation located at 9 S. Front Street will 
present a film, "Rules of the Game," Friday, March 23, at 
8 p.m. Faculty and staff are welcome. Bring your own drin 
and popcorn. No charge. 

The department of health, physical education and recreatior; 
along with the New Hanover County Health Department will 
sponsor a Health Fair in Trask Coliseum March 31 from 10 a. 
to 4 p.m. Free screenings for those IB and over will be 
given for heiaht, weioht, blood pressure, anemia, hearing e 
vision. Faculty and staff are welcome to participate. 

The UNCW Office of Research Administration is conducting a 
"Proposal Preparation/Grants Management Workshop" Saturday. 
March 17, from 9 a.m. - 12 noon in H-212. The program wil': 
emphasize identifying potential funding sources, developin(| 
successful proposals and managing programs funded by exterii 
aqencies. Faculty and staff interested in attending shouli 
call Annette Anderson at ext. 2810 to pre-reqister. 



A free clinic on "Selectinq an Appropriate Shoe for Running 
and Other Aerobic Activities" will be held March 22 at 7 p.m. 
in Trask Coliseum. Ms. Gail Courtney of NIKE will conduct 
the clinic. 

A newly formed group of Apple and other microcomputer users 
will meet in the west meeting room of the University Union 
snack bar at 1 p.m. TODAY. A demonstration of the new Macin- 
tosh computer will be featured. Faculty and staff welcome. 

Becky Cram, senior voice major, will give her senior recital 
Saturday, March 17, at 8 p.m. in King Hall. Ms. Cram is the 
recipient of the Scholarship for Academic Excellence in 
Creative Arts. Faculty and staff are invited. 

The YWCA will present a public forum on "euthanasia" March 20 
at 8 p.m. at the YWCA. A panel of speakers will discuss the 
topic from medical , legal, religious and philosophical points 
of view. 

"Living with Premenstrual Syndrome: A Family Challenge" will 
be discussed by Robert Creiqhton, M.D., and Ruth Creighton, 
M.P.H., March 19 at 7:30 p.m. at the AHEC Auditorium. Faculty 
and staff are invited. 

William Woodhouse, associate professor of Spanish, presented 
a paper, " El personal dentro y fuera del cheli," at the 
Southeast Conference on Romance Languages and Literatures 
held March 1-3 at Rollins College in Winter Haven, FL. 

Ginny Payne, lecturer in the nursing department, presented a 
workshop, '.riting Mental Health Treatment Plans: Making 
Them Specific and Measureable," March 7 in Falls Church, VA. 
The program, sponsored by the University of Virginia-Division 
of Continuing Education-Falls Church, was attended by nurses, 
social workers, psychologists, and other mental health pro- 
fessionals from northern VA, the District of Columbia and 
southern Maryland. 

Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of the health, physical education 
and recreation department, presented a narrative/slide pro- 
gram on "Careers in Health, Physical Education, and Recrea- 
tion" during the March 9 Public Services Occupations Career 
Awareness Seminar held at Pender County High School. 

A workshop on Curriculum Development for Associate Degree 
Nurse Educators was presented March 9 by Dr. Marlene 
Rosenkoetter, chairman of the nursinq department, and Ms. 
Carol Collado of the ECU School of Nursing. The program was 
sponsored by the UNCW Department of Nursinq and the NC League 
for Nursing. 

THE CIRCUS IS COMING 



The Supper Optimist Club of Wilmington will host an inter- 
national all star circus March 23 at 7:30 p.m. in Hanover 
Hall. For ticket information call the Trask Coliseum 
Ticket Office. 



VALIC REP 
ON CAMPUS 



ENGLISH 
FACULTY 



FIRST 
ANNIVERSARY 



HARPER 
TO SPEAK 



AWARENESS 
WEEK 



LERCH TO 
PARTICIPATE 



ALUMNI 
SOCIAL 



ROSSELOT 
READS 



BASEBALL 



John Pezzoni, VALIC representative, will be in the Board 
room of Alderman Hall March 28 from 8:30 ajn. - 5 pjn. For an 
appointment call ext. 2160. 

Three members of the English faculty read papers on "Writing 
in the Literature Class" at the Philological Association of the 
Carolinas held March 1-3 at Chapel Hill. John Clifford's paper 
was titled ''Reader Response Theory as a Basis for Writing," 
Michael Wentworth's paper was "Designing Writing Assignments 
for the Literature Class" and John Schilb's paper was on "Evalu; 
ting Written Responses to Literature." 

The University Union will celebrate its first anniversary of the 
opening of the union Wednesday, March 21, beginning at 11 ajn. 
The UNCW tent will be set up outside where hot dogs, popcorn, 
ice cream and drinks will be sold. At noon a portrait of Albert 
Schweitzer will be hung in the T.V. lounge for permanent displa 
The UNCW Jazz Ensemble will perform at 1 pjn. Simon Sez wil 
be on the side lawn from 1:30-3 pjn. A cake cutting will be he 
at 3 pjn. , 

Dr. Stephen Harper, chairman of the department of management 
and marketing, will be the featured speaker during the Cameror! 
School of Business Administration's Faculty Colloquium March 2 
in Bear Hall, room 112. His topic will be "Being Author, 
Editor, and Publisher of a Book." 

March 19-23 is Alcohol and Health Awareness Week. Events wil 

Monday - barbeque/'f:30 pjn. Galloway Hall (meal card! 
Tuesday - Aerobics classes with Studio 10/Hanover Hd 
7:30 pjn. (free) I 

Wednesday - Simon Sez 1:30-3:30 pjn. Union lawn 

Dinner in cafeteria featuring a non-alco-i 

holic bar and a film 
Thursday - films to be announced 

Dr. Patricia Lerch of the sociology/anthrop)ology faculty will 
participate in a workshop on Current Research on Indian Cultui" 
during the Ninth Annual NC Indian Unity Conference to be helii 
in Raleigh this weekend. 

The alumni social is scheduled for this Saturday night at Bob 
King Pontiac-Mercedes. Tickets are still available in the offic< 
of alumni affairs, UU-209. 

Gerald Rosselot of the department of English read a paper en- 
titled "Erskine Caldwell's Men of Feeling" during the Eight An- 
nual Meeting of the Philological Association held March 2 in 
Chapel HiU. 

UNCW vs George Mason U. TODAY at 3 pjn. 
UNCW vs. Northwestern U. March 17-18 at 1 pjn. 
UNCW vs. Ohio University March 20 at 3 pjn. 
UNCW vs. Ohio University March 21 at 3 pjn. 



CHEMISTRY Darrvi McDougald will discuss "The Chemistry of PCB's" and B 

SEMINAR Myers will speak on "Dioxin: The Chemistry and Controversy" 

during tne March 16 Chemical and Physical Sciences Spring Ser 

nar in C-U^f at 2:30 pjn. 



Library/Archives 1 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 35 
MARCH 22, 198^ 



ONE 
RVEY 



EMIERE 
RFORMANCE 



)VIE 
ATURED 

HOLARSHIP 
PLICATIONS 



lEST 

UCATION 

EAKER 



A telephone survey by students from Political Science 292 will be 
done Tuesday, March 21. Faculty and staff will be selected at 
random and questioned regarding their feelings on the overall 
operation of the University Union. Survey results will be 
given ASAP, 

Faculty guitarist Rob Nathanson will perform at St. John's 
Museum of Art, Sunday, March 25, at 3 pjn. The concert will 
feature the world premiere of Strumming ; A Sonata for solo 
guitar by David Kechley. The program will include works 
by Antonio Ruiz, Pipo, Erick Satie, Sylvius Leopold Weiss 
and Issac Albeniz. Nathanson and Kechley are members of 
the Creative Arts Depertment/division of music. Free, 

A movie, "Hester Street," presented by the Feminist Film Festi- 
val will be shown in Morton Hall March 28 at 7:30 pjn. 

All active, honorary or associate members, including spouses and 
children of the North Carolina State Employees Association, are 
eligible to apply for a NCSEA scholarship. Interested persons 
should contact Margaret Taylor at ext. 2178. 

Dr. Dorothy Sisk, nationally known educator on Exceptional child- 
ren, will speak in the School of Education March 29 at k p.m., 
room lO';. Her topic will be "Education of the Gifted in These 
Times." 



EMS TO BE 
BLISHED 



EN 
ROLLMENT 



Dr. Sally Sullivan of the English department will have two of 
her poems, "Chiaroscuro" and "Summer Baths," published in the 
spring issue of The Lyricist. 

April is open enrollment month for all permanent employees in- 
terested in the Prepaid Legal Services plan. Leo Wagoner, 
representative for Prepaid Legal Services, will hold an open 
session Wednesday, April ^, at 11 ajn. in the Board Room of 
Alderman Hall. 



RMAN 

LIVERS 

LK 



Dr. David Berman of the mathematical sciences department de- 
livered a talk, "Number of generators of ideals in local rings, 
current status," during the Algebra and Combinatorics Seminar 
held March 7 at Northeastern University. 



FACULTY ON Three faculty members are scheduled to be on the program of t 

PROGRAM regional meeting of the American Academy of Religion to be h( 

March 2^^ at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg. Dr. 
Aisha Rush-Gilliam of the HPER department will present a 
paper on "African-American Religious Identity Crisis: Crisis In 
tervention;" Dr. Sandy Martin of the P&R department will speak 
on "The Concept of Chosen People in the Social Thought of 
Martin Luther King" and Dr. James Megivem of the P&R depart 
ment will read a paper on "Early Christianity and Military Ser- 
vice." 



SENIOR 
RECITAL 



Janet Blake Hewett, music composition major, will present her 
senior recital Sunday, April 1 at 3 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium, fl 
are invited. 



PUBLIC 
RADIO 



READING 
SERIES 



The Friends of Public Radio will present the Waterfront Jazz 
Concert featuring the Rudy and Cynthia Tyson Trio Sunday, Ma 
25, at 3 pjn. at the Wilmington Hilton Ballroom. Guest artists \ 
include Gary Lamb, Horace Pearsal, Vince Winnies and Ducy 
Thomas. Admission is $7J0. Tickets are available at Thalian F 
the Arts Council, Record Bar and School Kids Records. 

A Spring Reading Series of Poetry and Fiction Readings by merj 
bers of the English faculty will be held Saturday, March 2^^, at i 
7 pjn. in the SRO Theatre. ; 



FREE 
CLINIC 



JAZZ 
CONCERT 



A free clinic on "Selecting an Appropriate Shoe for Running ar 
Other Aerobic Activities" will be held TONIGHT at 7 in 
Trask Coliseum. Presented by NIKE. 



James Riggs, saxophonist, will be featured in UNCW's Second /i 
nual Guest Artist Spring Jazz Concert April 1, at 7 pjn. in Ket 
Auditorium. Also performing will be the UNCW Jazz Combo ar 
Jazz Ensemble under the direction of Frank Bongiorno. 



J 



HAM & Chancellor Wagoner will speak on "Our roots and our future" 

EGGHEADS March 23 during the 12 noon luncheon meeting of Ham & Egg- 

heads in the faculty dining room of the cafeteria. 

THEODORE Dr. Terry Theodore, professor of drama in the Creative Arts 

APPOINTED Department, has recently been appointed Food and Film Critic 

for WAAV Radio. He will discuss on a weekly basis, new 
film releases as well as make dining observations on area 
restaurants. 



GALIZIO Dr. Mark Galizio of the psychology department and Flo Stein 

PUBLISHES of the Cape Fear Substance Abuse Center have had a paper, 

sation seeking and drug choice, published in The Internationa.! ' 

Journal of the Addictions, Volume 18. 



PAPER TO 

BE DELIVERED 



HARPER 
TO SPEAK 



Dr. T. W. Haywood of the Department of Chemical and Physic; 
Sciences/physics division is co-author of a paper entitled 
"Optical and Electrical Properties of Zirconium Carbide" to b( 
delivered at the March meeting of the American Physical Soci 
in Chicago this week. 

Dr. Stephen C. Harper will discuss "Being Author, Editor and 
Publisher of a Book" during the Cameron School of Business 
Administration's Faculty Colloquium March 28 in B-112. 



MGLISH 
RTICLE 
UBLISHED 

AXMAN & 

:hilb at 
onference 



CGUIRE 
ECEIVES 
WARD 



OODHOUSE 

ELIVERS 

\PER 



ftXMAN AT 
EETING 



John Clifford, associate professor of English, has had his article, 
"Cognitive Psychology & Writing Theory: A Critique," published 
in the Spring, 198* issue of Freshman English News. 

Dr. Barbara Waxman and Dr. John Schilb of the English department 
attended the Twentieth Century Literature Conference held 
February 22-2* at the University of Louisville. Dr. Waxman read 
a paper on "Distopias For the Aged: Four Fictional Diatribes 
against Nursing Homes" and Dr. Schilb read a paper entitled 
" 'Tony's Story' and Leslie Silko's Readers: The Politics of In- 
terpreting." 

Dr. Phillip McGuire of the history department has received a 
National Endowment for the Humanities Project '87 Summer Semi- 
nar Award to study "Women and the Constitution," He will 
be working with Professor Joan Hoff-Wilson of Indiana University. 

William Woodhouse of the department of modern languages de- 
livered a paper, "The Interaction of Foreign Language Personnel 
with Writing Across the Curriculum Programs," during the spring 
meeting of the North Carolina Chapter of the American Associa- 
tion of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese March 17 at High 
Point College. He was also elected secretary-treasurer of the 
chapter. 

Dr. Barbara Waxman of the English faculty delivered a paper, 
"Doris Lessing's Aging Heroines: New Directions For the Bil_ 
dungs roman ," at the 198* meeting of the Georgia-South 
Carolina College English Association held March 9-10 at 
Clemson University. 



REAT 
ECISIONS 



Dr. Denir Carter of the Cameron School of Business Administra- 
tion will ^iscuss "International Debt Crisis: Borrowers, Banks & 
the International Monetary Fund" at the March 27 Great Decisions 
lecture in Bryan Auditorium at 7:30 pjn. 



DNCERT 
HOIR 

\ND TO 
LRFORM 

RTS 
DALITION 



The UNCW Concert Choir will perform in Kenan Auditorium 
March 23 at 8 pjn. 

The Creative Arts Department Band will perform in Kenan Audi- 
torium at 8 pjn. March 26. 

The Southeastern Cultural Arts Coalition will host the Albert 
McNeil Jubilee Singers March 27 in Kenan Auditorium at 8 pjn. 



^PERS IN 

TERNATIONAL 
)URNALS 



WIS 
LECTED 



Dr. Nagendra Bhardwaj of the University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, 
India, currently at UNCW doing post-doctoral work with Dr. de la 
Cruz, has had two papers published in international scientific 
journals. Published in the Japanese Journal of Ecology was his 
paper, "Effect of Temperature and Photoperiod on Growth and 
Reproduction of Tephrosia apollinea," and published in Aquatic 
Botany was "Temperature regulated seed germination in Neptunia 
oleracea and its ecological significance." 

Derick G.S. Davis of the HPER Department has 'been selected by 
the Mayor of Wilmington to help gather nominations for the 
Earl of Wilmington Society. The society is set up to recognize 
individuals who have served the community. Mr. Davis has also 
been elected to the Thalian Hall Commission and to the Board 
of Directors of the Community Boys Club. 



CHEMISTRY 
SEMINARS 



VALIC REP 
ON CAMPUS 



SPRING 
FILM 



WOMEN'S 
BASKETBALL 



MEN'S SWIM 
TEAM 



LADY 
SWIMMERS 



LANUNZIATA 

DELIVERS 

WORKSHOP 



TEACHING 
EXCELLENCE 



HISTORY 

FILM 



BASEBALL 



SOFTBALL 

W. TENNIS 
M. TENNIS 



Dr. Shjgeko Yamazaki of the department of molecular genetics 
at Hoffman LaRoache will discuss "Selenium Containing Enzyme 
from Methane Producing Bacteria" March 23 at 2:30 pjn. in C-1] 
The March 30 seminar will feature Dr. Anthony F. Schreiner 
of NCSU at 2:30 pjn. in C-Il^t. 

John Pezzoni, VALIC representative, will be on campus March 2 
from 8:30 ajn. - 5 pjn. in the Board Room of Alderman HalL 
For an appointment call the personnel office at ext. 2160. 

The Cape Fear Foindation located at 9 S. Front Street will pre-i 
sent its second film, "Rules of the Game," March 23 at 8 pjn. 
Free. Bring your own popcorn and drink. | 

The UNCW Women's Basketball team has ended its season with j 
a school record of 22 wins, and six losses. Congratulations 
ladies. I 

The men's swim team, coached by Dave Allen, finished fifth dur 
jng the Easterns Championship held at East Carolina University 
March 1-3. Congratulations guys!! 

The lady Seahawks finished 9th nationally during the NAIA 
Nationals held in Arkansas recently. Also, seven of the lady 
swimmers were selected NAIA All-Americas. They include: Tris 
Baker, Chrissie Cecil, Lani Driscoli, Denise Hamilton, Evelyn 
3ohnson, 3anet Johnson and Colleen Lawrence. 

Dr. Louis LaNunziata, assistant professor of curricular studies, 
presented a workshop entitled "Meeting the Cognitive, Affectiv(| 
and Behavioral Needs of the Emotionally Handicapped Learner" 
February 10 in New Bern. The program, sponsored by the NC 
Department of Public education, was attended by psychologists, 
administrators and teachers of Willie M. and emotionally handica 
ped students. 

Faculty and staff are invited to submit nominations for the Boa| 
of Trustees Teaching Excellence Award to be presented in July, 
Nominees must be current members of the faculty who have bee 
teaching at least half-time for five semesters or more, must ha\ 
demonstrated a mastery of and enthusiasm for the subject taugh 
resoluteness in maintaining high academic standards, genuine 
interest in each student's intellectual and creative development, 
and an ability to foster respect for diverse points of view and 
openness to learning. Nominations will be accepted in the vice 
chancellor for academic affairs office until 5 pjn. March 30. 



A film, "Animal Farm," will be presented by the history depart- 
ment and the UNCW Historical Society March 29 upstairs in the 
Randall Library auditorium at 7:30 pjn. 

UNCW vs. Salisbury State College March 2k at 2 pjn, 
UNCW vs, Pembroke State University March 26 at 7:30 pjii. 
UNCW vs NCSU March 27 at 1 p.m. (doubleheader) 

UNCW Shehawks vs Methodist College March 27 at 3:30 p/n. 

UNCW Shehawks vs St. Andrews College March 27 at 2:30 pjn. 
UNCW vs Salisbury State College March 27 at 2:30 pjn. 



) 



:ampus 
:ommunioitf 



,brary/ft>-cMves 1 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 36 
MARCH 29, 1984 



Health Fair 84 will be held in Trask Coliseum on Saturday, 
March 31, 10 a.m. -4p.m. Participants can be screened in a 
variety of tests for free. Faculty, staff, students and the 
general public are invited. 

The Office of Minority Affairs and the Housing Authority of 
Wilmington are sponsoring a series of workshops for junior 
high and high school students and their parents. Topics will 
include opportunities for minorities at UNCW, choosing a 
curriculum, financial aid, and applying to UNCW. Workshops 
will be held throughout the city. Dates will be announced. 

Dr. William Woodhouse, associate professor of modern 
languages, has been invited to participate in a National 
Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar, "Semiotic 
Perspectives on Linguistics and Verbal Art," at Princeton 
University June 25-August 17. 

Thanks from the University Union staff to all who helped 
make their first birthday party a huge success. Extra 
special thanks to Mickey Raynor, who used 13 pound-cake 
recipes to make that magnificent cake! 

The Faculty Women's Network and the Dean of Students 
Office are sponsoring the film "College Can Be Killing" 
April 3 and 4 at 8 p.m. in the auditorium in King Hall. 
The film comes just before finals and explains and deals 
with pressures students experience in college. It is re- 
commended for both students and their parents. Free 
and open to the public. 

Due to Azalea Festival events on Thursday, April 5, 
special traffic patterns and parking restrictions will 
be in effect. Riegel Road by Trask will be CLOSED to all 
but emergency vehicles and shuttle buses from 6:15 p.m. 
to 11:30 p.m. Students with Thursday evening classes 
should arrive early and park in Lots "D" and "G". Resident 
students should not drive to classes Thursday evening. 
Everyone should be prepared to use Rose Avenue and Wood 
Dale Drive going to and from campus. Faculty should 
announce these restrictions to their classes. 



MORE 

AZALEA 

FESTIVAL 

HAYWOOD 
PUBLISHES 



SPECIAL 
OLYMPICS 



JOHNSTON'S 
ENIGMA 



POETRY 
PUBLISHED 



TIME5HEETS 
DUE MONDAY 



OPEN 
ENROLLMENT 



Trask will be closed April 4, 5, 6 and 7 for Azalea 
Festival activities. Racquetball courts in Hanover Hall 
will also be closed during this period. 

Dr. T. W. Haywood, associate professor of physics, has 
article, "Screen Dump for Model III Graphics," in the 
March issue of Computer User magazine. 

New Hanover County Special Olympics will hold their 
annual spring games Thursday, April 5, 1984, near Brook 
Field beginning at 10 a.m. 

Dr. W. Lee Johnston, assistant professor of political 
science, will present a paper entitled "Key's Progressi; 
Plutocracy: The Enigma of North Carolina, 1949-1984," t 
the Annual Citadel Symposium on Southern Politics, 
Charleston, S. C, March 29-31. 

Richard Long, lecturer in the English department, will ! 
have his poem, "A Matter of Poultry," published in the i 
spring issue of Southern Poetry Review . I 

All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets 
reflecting shift or overtime premium pay must be in the 
personnel office before 10 a.m. April 2. Supervisors wt 
do not meet this deadline cannot expect their employee; 
to be paid on April 13. 

April is open enrollment for all permanent employees 
interested in the Prepaid Legal Services plan. Mr. Leo 
Wagoner, representative of PLS, will conduct an open 
session in room 215 (board room) of Alderman Hall, 
Wednesday, April 4 at 11 a.m. 



WELCOME TO UNCW welcomes the following new employees: Barbara 
NEW EMPLOYEES H. Christmas, clerk typist in the history department; 

Keith W. Ogborn, administrative officer for IMBR; Lydiij 
Rector, clerk typist in the psychology department; 
Albert S. Ellerbee, housekeeping assistant for auxilia: 
services; Charles Miller, research technician for IMBR, 
William R. Callaway, personnel officer in department 
personnel services; and Kristian Cauffman, diver at thij 
NOAA Undersea Research Program. 



TIME CAPSULE 
TO BE BURIED 



GUEST 

EDUCATION 

SPEAKER 



The University Un 
articles commemor 
operation. Items 
be taken to room 
Friday, April 6. 
50th anniversary 

Dr. Dorothy Sisk, 
tional children, 
in room 104. Her 
in These Times." 



ion will bury a time capsule with 
ating the building's first year of 
to be placed in the capsule should 
214 of the Union no later that 5 p.m.' 
It will be opened March 21, 2033, the 
of the Union's opening. 

nationally known educator on excep- 
will speak in King Hall TODAY at 4 p, 
topic will be "Education of the Gifte| 



MOUNTS AT 
MEETING 



Dr. Joann McFerran Mount and Dr. R. Terry Mount, of th 
department of modern languages, attended the annual 
meeting of the Philological Association of the Caro- 
linas March 1-3 in Chapel Hill. 



1CGUIRE 
iONORED 



Dr. Phillip McGuire, associate professor of history, 
was honored for his book, Taps for a Jim Crow Army , 
at the 49th Annual Meeting of the Association of 
Social and Behavioral Scientists. Taps has gone into 
its second printing. 



tOTC 

iPONSORS 
"lELD DAY 



HOMAS IN 
EXTBOOK 



WN BOOK 
IISCUSSION 



EWIS, WOLFF 
UBLISH 



The UNCW Army ROTC program will conduct its 3rd annual 
JROTC Track and Field Day, Saturday, March 31, 9:30 a.m.- 
1 p.m. Six area high schools will compete: Hoggard, Laney, 
New Hanover, Pender, North Brunswick, and South Brunswick. 
Open to the public; free. 

Carol Chase Thomas, assistant professor of curricular 
studies, coauthored a chapter on "Comparative Interven- 
tion Designs" in a textbook entitled Single Subject 
Research in Special Education . 

All colleagues are invited to join the Faculty Women's 
Network discussion of Carol Gilligan's book, In a 
Different Voice , Sunday, April 29, at 7 p.m. in the 
Canterbury Woods clubhouse. If you need a copy of the 
book, please call Maggie Parish (ext. 2328). 

Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of HPER, wrote an article, 
"Pig Pickin 's-Coastal North Carolina Style," in the 
winter 1984 issue of The North Carolina Recreation and 
Park Review . Dr. Robert Wolff, coordinator of the 
parks and recreation management curriculum in HPER, 
wrote an "Education Division UNCW Activities Report" 
in the same issue. 



"ILM SHOWS 
lUCLEAR AGE 
lEGINNINGS 



The history department and the UNCW Historical Society 
will present "Day After Trinity," a film which traces 
the birth of the nuclear age through the life and work 
of J. Robert Oppenheimer. The film will be shown at 
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, April 4, in Randall Library 
auditorium. Free and open to all. 



ECHLEY AT 

lAM N 

:ggheads 



David Kechley will talk about "Research and the creative 
process" at the Ham 'n Eggheads noon luncheon on Friday, 
March 30 in the faculty dining room. Next week Roger 
Lowery and Rick Dixon will discuss "Public opinion 
polling." 



;UE5T 
iPEAKER 



Dr. Louis LaNunziata, assistant professor of curricular 
studies, presented a lecture, "Operant Theory: Managing 
Disruptive Behavior in the Home and School by Manipulating 
Contingencies," to the Lower Cape Fear Association for 
Children and Adults with Learning Disabilities on March 
5 in Wilmington. 



lAZZ 
:ONCERT 



James Riggs, saxophonist, will be featured in UNCW's 
Second Annual Guest Artist Spring Jazz Concert April 1, 
at 7 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Also performing will be 
the UNCW Jazz Combo and Jazz Ensemble under the direction 
of Frank Bongiorno. Tickets are $4, general admission, 
$2, UNCW students. 



5ENI0R 
?ECITAL 



Janet Blake Hewett, music composition major, will pre- 
sent her senior recital Sunday, April 1 at 3 p.m. in 
Kenan Auditorium. All are invited. 



SPRING 
FILM 



SPRING 
SEMINAR 



PROSE AND 

POETRY 

READINGS 



The Cape Fear Foundation, 9 5. Front St., will present 
animated and short films April 1 at 8 p.m. Free. Bring 
your own popcorn and drink. 

Dr. Anthony F. Schreiner from NC State will speak at ths 
spring seminar of the department of chemical and physicc 
sciences at 2:30 p.m. on Friday, March 30, in room 114 
of the chemistry/physics building. 

Students from basic and advanced courses in oral inter- 
pretation will perform short selections of contemporary 
prose and poetry Thursday, April 5, at 8 p.m. in room 
121 of Kenan Hall. Free. All are invited. 



MARTIN AND 
DEAS PERFORM 



PLANT SALE 



FRATERNITY 
INSTALLED 



SOPHOMORES 



BONGIORNO 
CHOSEN 



BASEBALL 



Sherrill V. Martin and Richard R. Deas, duo-pianists an( 
professors of music, will present a one-piano, four-hanc 
concert featuring music of Faure, Schubert and Dvorak, 
on Monday, April 9 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Free. 
Everyone is invited. 

The Biology Club will hold its annual spring plant sale 
April 6, 8 a.m. -4 p.m. in the UNCW greenhouse. 

Delta Tau Delta will be formally installed at UNCW in 
black-tie ceremonies on Saturday, March 31, at 7:30 
in the dining room of the Union. It becomes the sixth 
national fraternity at UNCW. 

Preregistration for summer and fall 1984 takes place 
for sophomores on March 29 and 30. 

Frank J. Bongiorno, assistant professor of music, has 
been chosen as a final contestant in the 3rd Annual 
Young Performers Competition held by the National 
Association of Composers U.S.A. 

UNCW vs Campbell. 7:30 p.m., March 30. 

UNCW vs Campbell. 1 p.m., March 31. Doubleheader . 



SOFTBALL 



UNCW vs Wingate. 2 p.m., March 31. 



I 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 




^esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 37 
APRIL 5, 198'f 




The Safety Office requests that all faculty, staff, students and 
visitors on campus respond to smoke and/or fire alarms when they 
are sounded. Everyone must evacuate the building when an 
alarm goes off — regardless of whether an emergency exists or 
the alarm has sounded because of a malfunction. 

April is open enrollment for permanent employees interested in 
the Prepaid Legal Services plan. Application and payroll deduc- 
tible forms are available in the personnel office. 

Well Baby Care in the hospital which includes well baby pedia- 
trician, well baby nursery charges and circumcision, are consider- 
ed maternity benefits and are only available to enrolled female 
employees or enrolled female spouses. Well Baby Care in the 
ho^ital is not provided for male employees with an Employee 
only, or Employee and Child(ren) contract. 

Sick Baby Care for a newborn in the hospital is not considered 
a maternity benefit, therefore, it would be available to male em- 
ployees with an Employee and Child{ren) contract. 

Faculty and staff are invited to the ribbon cutting ceremony for 
the Art Gallery Space in the living room of the University Union 
at 3 pjn. on Wednesday, April 11. The space was made possible 
by a gift from the Friends of UNCW. Seven original works by 
special guest Claude Howell will inaugurate the gallery. 

Student prints, sculptures and pottery will be on exhibit in the 
lobby and courtyard of Kenan Hall through the month of April. 
The Art Division, Creative Arts Department invites all faculty 
and staff to the Opening Reception April 9, from 3-5 p.m. 

The American Association of University Women will sponsor a 
^- Dutch treat noon luncheon April 9 at Quincy's Steak House on 
^^ Market Street. A panel of four women, members of the Council 
on the Status, will discuss "Women in Poverty." 

AZALEA FESTIVAL WEEKEND IS THIS THURSDAY, FRIDAY, 
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY — HAVE A GOOD ONE!! 



AZALEA 

FESTIVAL 

PARKING 



Due to Azalea Festival events TODAY, APRIL 5, special traffi 
patterns and parking restrictions will be in effect. Riegel Roac 
by Trask will be CLOSED to all but emergency vehicles and shi 
tie buses from 6:15 - 11:30 pjn. It is suggested that students 
with Thursday evening classes arrive early and park in Lots "D* 
and "G". Resident students should not drive to classes TONIGF 
Everyone should be prepared to use Rose Avenue and Wood Dal 
Drive going to and from campus. Faculty are asked to announc 
this information to their classes. 



TRASK TO Trask will be closed TODAY, Friday and Saturday for various 

CLOSE FOR Azalea Festival events. Racquetball courts will be closed durir 

FESTIVAL this period also. _ 

I 

The pool will be closed TONIGHT in preparation of the Barbari 

Mandrell Concert in Trask Coliseum. 



CAPSULE TO 
BE BURIED 



STUDENT 
READINGS 



A time capsule with articles commemorating the University Uni| 
first year of operation is scheduled to be buried. Items to j 
be placed in the capsule should be taken to room 21^* of the 
Union no later than 5 psn. tomorrow. 

Students from basic and advanced courses in oral interpretatiorj 
will perform short selections of contemporary prose and poetry! 
TONIGHT at 8 in room 121 of Kenan HalL Free. 



JAZZ 

FUSION 

GROUP 



The UNCW Jazz-Fusion group under the direction of Frank 
Bongiorno of the Creative Arts Department will present a cone 
April 11 in Kenan Auditorium at 8 pjn. Pop jazz tunes, "Easy 
Lovin' You," "Hanky Panky," and "I'll Be Here For You," will bj 
performed. Admission is $1. 



PUBLIC 
FORUMS 



A public awareness forum featuring three separate programs er! 
titled "The Challenges of Growth in the Cape Fear Region" wi| 
begin April 10 at 7:30 pjn. in Bryan Auditorium. Keynote 
speaker for the evening will be Secretary James A. Summers 
of the NC Department of Natural Resources and Community 
Development. Also featured will be Dr. Frank Ainsley of 
the earth sciences faculty discussing "Past/Present Living Off 
the Land." 



PLAY IN 
5JR.O. 



The UNCW University Theatre will present John Osborne's drai 
"Look Back in Anger," April 11-15. Curtain time is 8 nightly i 
the S.R.O. Theatre. General admission is $3. For reservations 
call Ext 2^^0. 



PLANT 
SALE 



The Biology Club will hold its annual spring plant sale beginnir! 
at 8 tomorrow morning in the university greenhouse. 



MARTIN & Sherrill Martin and Richard Deas, duo-pianists and members of 

DEAS TO the music faculty, will present a one-piano, four-hand concert 

PERFORM featuring music of Faure, Schubert and Dvorak, April 9 at 8 p. 

in Kenan Auditorium. Free. 

HOUSING The philosophy & religion department is interested in locating 

FOR FACULTY housing for a single male during the first summer school sessio 

NEEDED and for a single female during the second summer school sessic 

Anyone with possible accomondations is asked to call the depa 

ment at Ext. 2^06. 



55 AY 
ONTEST 



Chancellor Wagoner will present the awards for the 198^ Shannon 
Morton Essay Contest, The Future of the World; Megatrends 
or Big Brother? The event will take place in King Auditorium 
at 11 this morning. Miss Morton, first chairperson of the English 
department, will be present for the awards ceremony and recep- 
tion. 



DOK 

^LE 



NGLI5H 
^CULTY ON 
ROGRAM 



R. LEVY 
AMED 



ENSMA 

ELIVERS 

'XPER 



3HN5TON 
3 SPEAK 



OSENKOETTER 
DDRE55E5 



RTICLE 
JBLISHED 



AAUW will conduct its annual used book sale Friday and Saturday, 
April 13 and 1^, just outside Rose's Store at Hanover Center. 
Books, which have been donated for the sale include current 
paperiDacks, hardback fictions, biographies, religious works, 
reference works and some textbooks. Some magazines will be 
available. Proceeds will go toward scholarships for women and 
community service. All are invited. 

Three members of the English department were on the program of 
the national meeting of the Conference on College Compositon 
and Communication held March 29-31 in New York. Richard Veit 
presented a paper, "198'f Visited: English Debased? Students 
Illiterate?" John Clifford presented a paper on "A Critique of 
Reading/Writing Theories." Gary Olson was a respondent. 

Dr. Jack Levy, professor and chairman of the Department of 
Chemical and Physical Sciences, was elected to the Board of 
Directors of the North Carolina Academy of Science during 
their annual meeting at Wake Forest on March 31. Dr. Sybil K. 
Miller, assistant professor of chemistry, was also in attendance. 

Patricia Rensma, assistant professor of P&R, delivered a paper, 
"Ethical Decisions: Allowing The Death of A Defective Newborn," 
during the December meeting of the American Philosophical Asso- 
ciation held in Boston, She also gave four public talks last 
month, centering upon applied ethics in general. Euthanasia and 
allowing (or causing) the death of defective infants. 

Dr. W. Lee Johnston of the political science faculty will present 
a paper, "Old South (Helm) vs New South (Hunt)," at the annual 
meeting of the NC Political Science Association to be held this 
weekend at Wake Forest University. 

Dr. Marlene Rosenkoetter, chairman of the department of nursing 
addressed the UNC-CH School of Public Health, Department of 
Nursing Alumnae Association on the topic, "Trends and Priorities 
for Nursing in the 1980's," on March 29. 

Dr. Lewis E. Nance of the Department of Chemical and Physical 
Sciences has had an article, "Electronic Structure Prediction for 
Transition Metal Ions," accepted for publication in the April issue 
of Journal of Chemical Education. 



ZRCH 

ELIVERS 

^PER 



Dr. Patricia B. Lerch of the sociology & anthropology department 
delivered a paper, "Federal Acknowledgement: a stimulant for 
development among the Waccamaw Sioux of North Carolina," dur- 
ing the 198^ annual meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropo- 
logy held March 1^-18 in Toronto, Canada. 



SPECIAL 
OLYMPICS 

TENNIS 
TOURNAMENT 



HAM 'N 
EGGHEADS 



HISTORY 
FILM 



CHEMISTRY 
SEMINAR 



The New Hanover County Special Olympics will hold their annua 
spring games TODAY beginning at 10 ajn. on Brooks Field. 

The State Employees of North Carolina will sponsor a statewide 
tennis tournament 3une 8-10 in Southern Pines. For information 
call Al Barry at Ext. 2108. 

Roger Lowery of the political science faculty and Rick Dixon 
of sociology & anthropology will discuss "Public Opinion Polling" 
during the April 6 noon luncheon meeting of Ham 'N Eggheads 
upstairs in the cafeteria. 

The history department and the UNCW Historical Society will 
present the film, "Night and Fog," April 12 at 7:30 pjn. in 
Randall Library Auditorium. 



Paula Schmidt of the Department of Chemical and Physical Sci- 
ences will discuss "Theory and Use of Induct vely Coupled Argo; 
Plasma Spectrophotometry" during the Chemistry Seminar sponso 
ed by the Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences 
April 6 at 2:30 pjn. in C-U'f. 



\ 



FACULTY 
REMINDER 

AINSLEY 
PARTICIPATES 



PAYNE 
PRESENTS 



All fall textbook requisitions are due in the university bookstore 
by Friday, April 13. 

Dr. W. Frank Ainsley of the earth sciences faculty was a partici 
pant in a "Successful Rehabilitation Workshop" sponsored by the 
National Trust for Historic Preservation and the Association fori 
Preservation Technology February 25 in Savannah, GA. 

Ginny Payne of the nursing faculty presented a workshop on 
"Writing Mental Health Treatment Plans" March 22 in Greensborj 
The workshop was attended by nurses from psychiatric hospitals! 
in-patient units in general hospitals and community mental healti 
centers in the Triad area. 



PAPER Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of the HPER Department, presente 

PRESENTED a paper, "Infusing Commercial Recreation Into Professional Prep 

ration Programs," during the ^mh annual conference of the New; 

York State Recreation and Park Society March 27 in NY. 

SULLIVAN Dr. Sally Sullivan of the English department will read her paper 

TO READ "Making Mistakes on Purpose: A Way to Get Rid of Usage Erro 

at the annual conference of The Southeastern Writing Center A 
sociation held April 12-14 at the University of South Carolina. 

WORKSHOPS Dr. Louis LaNunziata, assistant professor of curricular studies, 

TO BE is completing a five week series of three-hour workshops entitle 

COMPLETED "Strategies and Considerations for Working with Disruptive Chili 

ren and Youth in the Classroom." The last series of workshops, 
attended by special and regular education teachers and staff of 
Columbus County Schools, will be held through April 9 in 
Whiteville. 

DINNERS St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church invites all faculty and staf 

OFFERED to a Greek dinner and pastry sale during Azalea Festival weeke 

CONCERT Roya Weyerhaeuser in concert, April 6 at 8 pjn. at St. Mary's. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 

Library/Archives 1 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 38 
APRIL 12, 198^ 



CEPTION 
iR CREWS 



ECIAL 
OGRAMS 



UDENT 

'ARDED 

LLOW5HIP 



.GONERS 
.ANDPARENTS 



INNINGHAM 
RTICIPATES 



»WELL 
YNOTE 
= AKER 

>TC 
'ARDS 



CULTY 
MINDER 

'NCERT 
RIL 19 



AH faculty and staff are cordially invited to a reception honoring 
Dr. Marshall Crews on the publication of his book, From These 
Beginnings: WilminRton College 19^6-1969. The reception will be 
held in the University Union courtyard Wednesday, April 25, from 
2 p. m. - 3:30 pjn. 

All faculty members who instructed a special programs activity 
during the 19S3-M year are invited to a reception on April 19 at 
2 pjn. in room 100 of the University Union. 

Eugene Williams, graduate student in marine biology, has been 
awarded a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship of 
$2'f,300 plus tuition for three years at a graduate school of his 
choice. This is the first NSF graduate fellowship ever awarded 
at UNCW. Williams, son of Dorothy and Carl Dempsey, is a 1983 
summa cum laud graduate of UNCW. 

Dr. and Mrs. William Wagoner are pleased to announce the birth 
of their granddaughter, Dessica Ann, on Sunday, April 8, at 
i4:53 a.m. Jessica is the "first" grandchild. 

Mimi Cunningham, public information officer, participated in the 
Economic Development Conference, the last in a series of forums 
sponsored by the Governor, April 10 at Coastal Carolina Commu- 
nity College in Jacksonville. She spoke on "Economic Development 
and Opportunities for Women." 

Ty Rowell, director of development services, discussed "The 
University's Growth and Plans for the Future" during the April 
10 meeting of the Downtown Rotary Club. 

The UNCW ROTC will hold its third annua] Spring Awards Cere- 
mony Friday, April 13, at 2 pjn. in room 100 of the University 
Union. A wine and cheese reception will follow the ceremony. 
Faculty and staff are invited. 

Faculty are reminded that fall textbook requisitions are due in 
the Bookstore Friday, April 13. 

Alexander and The Windup Mouse to be presented April 19 at 
8 pjr\. in Kenan Auditorium. Call Ext. 2390. 



k 



CHEMISTRY Kathleen Conner of the department of chemical and physical 

SEMINAR sciences will discuss "Ethylene Dibromide: Chemistry and Clea 

up" April 13 at 2:30 pjn. in C-U^f. 

AAUW TO The Wilmington Branch of the American Association of Universi 

MEET Women will meet at 7 pjn. April 18 at Balentine's Cafeteria. Th 

meeting will feature either Marty Pridgen or Marjorie Megivern 
Congressman Charlie Rose's Wilmington office speaking on the 
legislative process. Officers for 198^^-85 will also be elected. 

MEET THE Faculty and staff are encouraged to "Come Meet the Candidate 

CANDIDATES TONIGHT at 7 in Bryan Auditorium. Local candidates running 

the state senate and house of representatives will be here. Th' 

public is invited to attend, 

SPECIAL The NC Biotechnology Center along with UNCW will present a 

PROGRAMS lecture on "What is Biotechnology and how is Dow Chemical Cc 

pany Involved? April 16 at 8 pjn. in room 100 of the Union. Di 
Peter Calcott of Dow Chemical Company will speak. Receptio 
follow. Also, on April 17 Dr. Calcott will discuss "Discovery o 
Novel Animal Growth Promoter at 11:30 ajn. in MS-i20. 



SCIENCE 
WORKSHOP 



RECITALS 
SCHEDULED 



HOUSING 
NEEDED 



GOOD 
LIFE 



HISTORIANS 
MEET 



WEEKS 
PUBLISHES 



LERCH 
SPEAKS 



The NSF will present a workshop for members of the statewide 
Cooperative Planning Consortium for Special Education Traininj 
Programs entitled "Science Education for the Handicapped" 
TODAY and tomorrow in King Hall Auditorium. 

Barbara McClure will present an organ recital April 1^ at 3 p/j 
at Grace United Methodist Church. An organ/piano recital by 
Gina Lee Webb will be held April I'f at 8 pjn. in Kenan Audito 
um. Both recitals are free and open to the public. 

Dr. Thomas Seism, former UNCW faculty member now with the; 
political science department at UNC-Asheville, would like to ri 
an apartment or house from mid-May to mid-August. Call Tom 
Moseley at Ext. 2312 or contact Dr. Seism at UNC-A. 

The Good Life series co-sponsored by NHMH will present "Bre; 
ing and Living" with W. Giles Allen, M.D. April 16 at 7:30 pjm. \ 
the AHEC Auditorium. Faculty and staff are invited. j 

The tenth anniversary meeting of the Association of Historian; 
Eastern NC was held March 30 at Methodist College in Fayetti 
ville. Among papers presented were "The Changing Image of t| 
South in Country Music" by Dr. Melton McLaurin and "AHENC 
Review: The Origins of the Association" by Professor Walser 
H. Allen, Jr., first president of AHENC. McLaurin was electee 
a three-year term on the Program Committee and Allen to a 
three-year term on the Constitution and By-Laws Committee. 
Other history faculty members in attendance included Doctors 
Fink, Haley, McGuire and Moseley. 

Gerald R. Weeks, associate professor of psychology, has had hi 
article, Dialectical Metatheory in Family Therapy, published ir 
Family Process. 1924, 23, 'f9-6Z 

Dr. Patricia Lerch was guest speaker at the March meeting of 
Wilmington chapter of AAUW. Her address was entitled "The 
Status of Third World Women: how do we compare it with the 
status of American women?" 



HI KAPPA PHI 
JDUCTION 



The Fifth Annual Initiation Ceremony of the National Honor Soci- 
ety of Phi Kappa Phi will be held April 17 at 4 pjn. in room 100 
of the University Union. The program will be dedicated to the 
memory of Dr. Fred Toney, charter member, with Dr. 3. Paul 
Reynolds, former vice chancellor, paying tribute. Dr. William W. 
Smith, professor of mathematics at UNC-CH, will discuss "Univer- 
sity Involvement in Public Education." Faculty and staff are in- 
vited. Refreshments will be offered during a reception following 
the ceremonies. 



ANEL 
ISCUSSION 



Faculty and staff are invited to a panel discussion sponsored by 
the League of Women Voters of New Hanover County entitled 
"Where do we go from here? A Forum on the Future of New 
Hanover County" April 17 at 7:30 pjn. in the County Commis- 
sioners' Chamber at 320 Chestnut Street. Members of the panel 
include Dr. William H. Wagoner, chancellor; Jacqueline Morris- 
Goodson, district court judge; Karen Gottovi, chairman of the New 
Hanover County Board of Commissioners; Felix Cooper, New 
Hanover County manager; Dave Hilliard, president of the 
Wilmington Board of Realtors and James Long, president of the 
Greater Chamber of Commerce, 



A.STER 
[BRARY 

:hedule 



ILITARY 
fi^LL 



EGIVERN 
D SPEAK 



RA OFFERS 
iMINAR FOR 
^CULTY 



UBLIC 
ECTURE 



Friday, April 20 
Saturday, April 21 
Sunday, April 22 
Monday, April 23 
Tuesday, April 2^ 



7-A5 a.m. - 9:00 pjn. 
10:00 ajn. - 6:00 pjn. 

CLOSED 
9:00 ajT\. - 12 Midnight 
Resume Regular Schedule 



JESTS ON 
^MPUS 



UNCW's ROTC Program will present its first Military Ball at 
6 pjn. Saturday, April 14, at the Blockade Runner Hotel at 
Wrightsville Beach. The guest of honor will be Lt. Gen. Bennett L. 
Lewis, deputy assistant secretary of defense. Cocktails will be 
served from 6-7 pjn. with dinner scheduled for 7:15 . 

Dr. 3im Megivern of the P&R faculty will present his paper, "Early 
Christianity and Military Service," April 19 at 3:30 pjn. in room 
107 of the Behavioral Sciences Building. Open. 

Dr. Edd Hauser, director for the Institute for Transporation Re- 
search and Education will present a seminar for faculty April 17 
at 2 pjn. in room 215 of Alderman Hall. Dr. Hauser will discuss 
funding opportunities related to transportation issues and his views 
of future research initiatives. Under his direction, ITRE has been 
a catalyst for transportation research, training and extension 
programs throughout the 16 institutions of the UNC system. 
During the 1982-83 year, more than 30 faculty, staff and graduate 
students from six different campuses were directly involved in 
these institute-sponsored projects. 

Dr. Merle Rousey, professor Emeritus at California State Univer- 
sity-Sacramento and SUNY College at Cortland, will present a 
public lecture, "The Aesthetics of Sport and Recreation," April 18 
at 8 p.m. in King Auditorium. His presentation will include a col- 
lection of photographic slides depicting works of art in the general 
categories of sports, athletics, games, dance, play and recreation. 
Co-sponsored by the HPER Department and the UNCW Recreation 
Student Majors' Club, the lecture is free and open to the public. 

UNCW is the host site for the NC Student Legislature meeting of 
the Interim Council April 12 - Ik. 



BOOK TO BE 
DISCUSSED " 



TEMPORARY 
STUDENTS ON 
PAYROLL 



PERSONNEL 
ITEMS 



LEGAL 
SERVICES 



AAUW BOOK 
SALE 

TENNIS 
TOURNAMENT 



The Faculty Women's Network will discuss Carol Gilligan's book, 
In a Di fferent Voice » April 29 at 7 pjn. in the Canterbury Woods 
Club Mouse. For information call Maggie Parish at Ext. 2328. 

Please refer to the UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES MANUAL ' 

number G, 8-1 through G, S-^f if your department plans to have 
a student on the payroll who will not be taking courses this 
summer but plans to continue their employment during the summt 
sessions. The personnel office will need two weeks notice prior 
to the employee's reporting date along with the following infor- 
mation: 

a. NC State application, completed and signed 

b. Listing of five major tasks in the temporary position 

c. W-if form, completed and signed 

d. Account number from which salary will be paid 

Brenda McGhee, former housekeeping assistant, is now a clerk 
in the office of purchasing services. 

Welcome to Jonathan Peterson, housekeeping assistant in the 
department of physical plant services. 

April is open enrollment for permanent employees interested in 
the Prepaid Legal Services plan. Application and payroll deduc- 
tion forms are available in the personnel office. 

AAUW will conduct its annual used book sale Friday and Saturda] 
April 13 and I'f, just outside Rose's Store at Hanover Center. i 

The State Employees of NC will sponsor a statewide tennis tourr 
ament June 8-10 in Southern Pines. Call Al Barry at Ext. 2108. 



HISTORY 
FILM 



The history department and the UNCW Historical Society will 
present "Night and Fog" TONIGHT at 7:30 in Randall Library 
Auditorium. 



PLAY IN 
S.R.O. 



The UNCW University Theatre will present "Look Back In Anger' 
April 12-15 at 8 nightly in the S.R.O. Theatre. General admissioi 
is $3. For reservations call Ext. lif-W. 



PUBLIC 
FORUM 



BASKETROOM 
CLEANUP 



The second Public Awareness Forum, "The Challenges of Growth 
in the Cape Fear Region," will be held April 18 at 7:30 pjn. in 
Bryan Auditorium. Speakers include Wallace Kaufman, author, 
speaking on "Is Man's House Everyone's Castle?"; John Costlow c 
the Duke Marine Laboratory discussing "Public Trust: Where do 
you fit?" and Earl MacCormac of Davidson College speaking on 
"A Corporate Outlook Toward the Environment." Open to the 
public 

Due to an inventory of baskets and clothing scheduled for May 7 
May 11 in the locker rooms it is requested that all basket holder 
return baskets and issued clothing to the equipment room atten- 
dants by Friday, May ^. During this time you will be able to 
get a daily issue of clothing which must be returned after each 
use. Routine procedures will resume May I'f. Faculty and 
staff are reminded that the University is not responsible for per 
sonal items that have not been removed by Friday, May 'f. 



:OMMUNIQUE 



ibrary/Archives 1 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 39 
APRIL 19, 198*^ 

April is open enrollment for permanent employees interested in 
the Prepaid Legal Services plan. Application and payroll deduc- 
tion forms are available in the personnel office. 

All faculty and staff are invited to a reception honoring Dr. 
Marshall Crews on the publication of his book, F'rom These 
Beginnings; Wilmington College 1946-1969, April 25 from 
2 - 3:30 pjn. in the union courtyard. 

Faculty members who would like to make changes regarding either 
the 10 or 12 month salary plan options have until July 2, 198*^. 
Appropriate forms may be picked up from the personnel office. 
No form is necessary for those who opt to continue on the same 
payment plan. 

Directed Independent Study Seminars will be presented April 20 
at 2:30 pjn. in C-U'f. 

May 6 has been designated as National Recognition Day for 
Nurses while the week of May 1-8 has been proclaimed "Nurses 
Week" in North Carolina. 

The mathematical sciences colloquium series sponsored by the 
mathematical sciences department will resume again in the fall. 
The problem solving sessions will continue to be held each Monday 
until the end of the semester. Call Ext. 2290 for more informa- 
tion. 

Welcome to Dianna E. Massingale, secretary in the NOAA-Under- 
Sea Research Program. She can be reached at 762-7615. 

All faculty members who instructed a special programs activity 
during the 1983-8'* year are invited to a reception TODAY at 
2 pjn. in room 100 of the university union. 

UNCW vs NC Wesieyan April 19 at 3 pjn. 



Faculty and staff will observe the Easter Monday holiday on 
Monday, April 23. 



SCHOLARSHIPS Two and three year scholarships are available including tuition 
AVAILABLE laboratory fees, books, supplies, and other student fees. Also, 

included will be a subsistence allowance of up to $1,000 
per year for each year the scholarship is in effect. For more 
information call the UNCW ROTC office at 791-1133. 



SPEAKER 
AT UNC-G 



ACADEMIC 

COMPUTING 

SERVICES 



Dr. 3ane Goodall will discuss her 23 years of pioneering researc 
among wild chimpanzees in Tanzania April 26 at 8 pjn. in Ayco< 
Auditorium on the UNC-Greensboro campus. $5 for students; $) 
general admission. Call the NC Zoo in Asheboro (919) 879- 
5606 or Aycock Auditorium (919) 379-55'f6. 

Departments not receiving sufficient copies of INTERFACE or 
memos regarding short courses sponsored by academic computinj 
services are asked to call Ext. 2805. 



LERCH TO 
CHAIR SESSION 



GOOD 

FRIDAY 

EVENT 



JOHNSTON 
& JONES 
RECOGNIZED 



Dr. Patricia Lerch of the sociology and anthropology faculty wi 
chair a session entitled "Traditional Healing Beliefs and Practic 
at the annual meetings of the Southern Anthropological Society 
to be held in Atlanta April 18-21. She will also deliver a paper 
"Symbolism and Practice of Spiritist Therapy in Urban Brazil: 
Umbanda and Pentocoastalism Compared." 

The United Campus Christian Ministry invites all faculty and st 
to participate in "The Way of the Cross," an ecumenical worshi| 
event which includes a ff stage processional around campus to 
commemorate the ordeal and suffering of Jesus Christ. The "Wi 
begins at 12 noon on Good Friday, April 20, and will last 1 hou; 

Drs. Lloyd Jones and Lee Johnston of the political science depj 
ment have been recognized by the NC Political Science Associ- 
ation for their research on elites in NC. Their paper, "Who Rul 
North Carolina: Institution Elites and Public Policy," was citecj 
for the Oral Parks Award as a significant research contribution 
in the area of elite research. I 



SENIOR 
RECITAL 



SPORRE 
ADVISES 



BOOK 
DISCUSSION 



BASKETROOM 
CLEANUP 



ACF 
SCHEDULE 



Julia Walker, pianist, will present her senior recital April 20 alj 
8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Admission is free and open to the 
public. 

Dennis J. Sporre, chairman of the Creative Arts Department, 
was part of a three-member team appointed to advise the UNC 
Charlotte administration concerning programs, operations, 
expectations, and organization of the UNC-Charlotte Creative 
Arts programs. The session held April 15-17 included Andrew 
Broekema, dean of the college of fine arts at Ohio State Univej 
sity, and Eugene Wicks, director of the school of art and desigil 
the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, 

The Faculty Women's Network will discuss Carol Gilligan's boo! 
In a Different Voice, April 29 at 7 pjn. in the Canterbury Woe 
Club House. Call Maggie Parish at Ext. 2328 for information. 

Due to an inventory of baskets and clothing scheduled for May 

II in the locker rooms, it is requested that all basket holders 
turn baskets and issuea clothing to the equipment room attend; 
by Friday, May 4. During this period of time clothing will be 
issued on a daily basis, however, the clothing must be returnee 
after each use. Routine procedures will resume May l^t. 

The academic computing facility located in S-221 will close at 
5 p.m. April 20 and reopen at 8 ajn. April 2'f. Regular scheduk 
will resume from April 2<t through May 2. 



HPER will continue to use the spring semester facilities 
schedule throughout the exam period. 

The last in a series of public forums on The Challenges of Growth 
in the Cape Fear Region entitled "A Look at Environmental 
Ethics" will be held April Z'f at 7:30 pjn, in Bryan Auditorium. 

To avoid filing errors with EDS forms, please do the following: 

* Make sure information on form is legible 

* Provide certificate // (SS) of policy holder 

* Give patient's relationship to policy holder 

* Use separate claim form for each member of family 

* Limit each claim to ten items: Example, 3 office visits; 

'f lab charges and 3 X-ray charges 

* Itemize charges. Include diagnosis, dates of service with 

description and charge for each procedure 

* When filing for treatment as a result of an accident, check 

Block B in Sec. k marked Accidental Injury and give date 
of accident beside Accidental Injury 

* In most cases - the back of the claim form does not have 

to be completed. You may attach itemized receipts and 
diagnosis to the claim and leave the back blank 

^Claims must be submitted within 18 months of date of service 
otherwise, they will not be paid 

Dr. Thomas V. Moseley of the history faculty attended the Con- 
federate Historian Institute Conference held April 12-15 at 
Fredericksburg, VA. The study and battlefield visit was the Bat- 
tle of Chancellorsville April 30, 1863 - May 6, 1863. 

Ivey H. James will present a senior recital Thursday, April 26 
at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. Free and open to the public. 

Irene Powell of the biological sciences department extends an in- 
vitation to friends to attend her wedding this Saturday, April 21, 
at 2:30 pjn. at Sunset Park Baptist Church. Reception will follow. 



>■'; 



Friday, April 20 
Saturday, April 21 
Sunday, April 22 
Monday, April 23 
Tuesday, April 2k 



7-A5 ajn. - 9:00 pjn. 
10:00 ajn. - 6:00 pjn. 

CLOSED 
9:00 ajn. - 12 midnight 
Resume Regular Schedule 



Starting THIS AFTERNOON the new dialing system, Direct In- 
ward Dialing, will be in effect. There will be a minimun amount 
of problems including loss of phone service at times. The new 
system will give off campus callers direct access to individuals 
without having to go through the switchboard. The old main 
university number of 79 1-^^330 will no longer be used. The new 
main university number will be 395-3000. OLD WAY - an off 
campus caller trying to reach Ext. 2151 would dial 791-^330 and 
ask for Ext. 2151; NEW WAY - the off campus caller will dial 
395-3151. To determine your new number add 395-3 before the 
last 3 digits of your current extension. EXCEPTION: NEW 
NUMBER FOR THE CHANCELLOR'S OFFICE WILL BE 395-3030. 



I 



SCHILB READS John Schilb, assistant professor of English, read a paper, "The 
PAPER Belatedness of Reading: Contemporary Theory and Baldwin's G» 

Tell It On The Mountain, " during the annual meeting of the 
Northeast Modern Language Association held March 30 in 
Philadelphia. Also, his syllabus and writing assignments for 
an American Literature survey, detailing ways of incorporating 
into traditional courses previously untaught works by women, 
blacks and other minorities, appeared recently in Reconstructin) 
American Literature. 



LANUNZIATA 
PUBLISHES 



ROSSELOT 
PARTICIPATES 



HARRIS 

PRESENTS 
RESULTS 



ARTICLE IN 
JOURNAL 



POEMS IN 
ISSUE 



BRAUER 
CHAIRS 



NURSING 
FACULTY 
PARTICIPATE 



Dr. Louis LaNunziata, assistant professor of curricular studies, 
has had an article entitled "D'Nealian and Zaner-Bloser Manu- 
script Alphabets and Initial Transition to Cursive Writing" ac- 
cepted for publication in the May/June issue of the Journal of 
Educational Research. He is also completing his series of work- 
shops for teachers and staff of Bladen County Schools in the 
area of Behavior Management Techniques in Education and Teac 
ing the Emotionally Disturbed Learner in Special and Regular- 
Education Settings. 

Gerald S. Rosselot of the department of English was a participa 
during the annual conference of the Southeastern Nineteenth 
Century Studies Association at VMI in Lexington, VA, April 5-7. 
He read a paper entitled "the Attack on Propriety in The 
Rise of Silas Lapham." 

William B. Harris of the earth sciences faculty presented re'suitJ 
of his studies on Correlation of the North Carolina, South 
Carolina, and Gulf Coast Eocene to the Isle of Wight, England c 
the joint North Central-Southeastern Section Meeting of the 
Geological Society of America April 'f-S in Lexington, KY. Thej 
work was co-authored by Paul Fullagar of UNC-CH. 

Charles Lewis, chairman of HPER, has had an article, "Administ<| 
ing The University HPER Department: A Contemporary Chal- 
lenge," published in the fall, 1983 issue of The North Carolina 
Journal, a publication of the NC Association for HPER. 

Richard Long of the English department will have two poems, 
"And I Held Mountains" and "Pitch," to appear in the spring 
issue of Clay and Pine: A Magazine of Literary and Visual Art. 



HUNTSMAN 
PUBLISHES 



Dr. Ralph Brauer, director of the institute for marine biomedice 
research and professor of biology, chaired a conference on 
scientific diving April 5-6 at the Smithsonian Institute. Ap- 
proximatley 50 diving physicians and diving supervisors attendee 
the conference which was designed to develop a model program 
for diving in support of science. 

Dr. Marlene Rosenkoetter of the department of nursing presided 
during the annual meeting of the North Carolina League for 
Nursing entitled "Computers in Nursing Education and Nursing 
Practice" held April 5-6 in Charlotte. Mrs. Ginny Payne, 
lecturer in nursing, was the chairman, program and arrangement 
committee while Mrs. Jeanne Kemppainen also of the nursing 
faculty participated in a panel presentation on "How Computer 
Use Has Affected My Practice-Education-Research in Nursing." 

Dr. John Huntsman, assistant professor of geology, has had his 
article dealing with the geology of the Cape Fear area publish- 
ed in the April issue of Cape Fear Tidewater. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER W 
APRIL 26, l9Stt 



ATUS OF 
3MEN 



:gal 

RVICES 



)WER 
JTAGE 



lACK BAR 
) CLOSE 



JCW GOLF 
>URNAMENT 



.YROLL 
•TIONS 



YROLL 
ADLINE 



Y DAY 
MONDAY 



The New Hanover Council on the Status of Women will sponsor a 
regional Governor's Leadership Conference entitled "Women 
and the Economy" May 18 and 19. A reception will be held 
Friday, May 18, from 6-9 pjn. with a full day scheduled for 
Saturday beginning at 8:30 ajn. For additional information call 
Deloris James at 762-8^^33 between 10 ajn. and 2 pjn. 

A reminder that this is the last week to apply for Prepaid Legal 
Services through open enrollment. Forms are available in the 
personnel office. 

There will be a power outage from 8 a.m. - 5 pjn, on Saturday, 
May 5, in all areas of the campus except the apartments. 
For assistance with equipment and apparatus that cannot be 
without power for this period of time call the physical plant 
at Ext. 3101. 

Effective Thursday, May 3, through Monda^y, May 28, the snack 
bar located in the University Union will be closed. It will re- 
open on Tuesday, May 29. Summer hours will be Monday through 
Friday from 7:30 a.m. - 2:30 pjn. 

The sixteenth annual Faculty/Staff Golf Tournament will be 
held Thursday, May 3, at Echo Farms Country Club. Interested 
staff and faculty should contact Judy Lewis by Friday, April 27. 

Faculty members who would like to make changes regarding 
the 10 or 12 month salary plan options have until July 2. 
Appropriate forms may be picked up from the personnel office. 

All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets reflecting 
any type of premium pay, shift, holiday or overtime must be in 
the personnel office before 10 a.m., Tuesday, May 1. Supervisors 
who do not meet this deadline cannot expect their employees 
to be paid on May 15. The personnel office will make one re- 
minder call. 

Pay day is Monday, April 30. Checks may be picked up from 
the cashier's office in Alderman Hall. 



Don't forget to move your clock ahead 1 hour on Sunday, 
April 29, at 2 ajn. IT'S DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME. 



AAUP 
PICNIC 



ON STATE 
CONTRACT 



NCSEA 
DINNER 



HOUSING 
NEEDED 



NEW 
STAFF 



UNCW faculty and their families are invited to the spring picn 
sponsored by the UNCW Chapter of the American Association 
of University Professors on Friday, May II, at 'f pjn. at Hugh 
McRae Park, Shelter #1. Bring food for your family, soft drinli 
and ice will be provided. 

The following 15" dual pitch, correcting electric typewriters 
have been added to the State Contract: BSl - $600.00 

IBM - $792.00 

The North Carolina State Employees Association will host a di 
ner/"Meet the Legislators" night. May 22 at the Boucon Room ! 
beginning with cocktails at 6:30 pjn. Dinner, featuring a choi< 
of prime rib or seafood, will cost $15 per person. Senators \ 
Robert Soles and ]. A. Wright and Representatives Harry Paynij 
David Redwine, Tommy Rhodes and Richard Wright have been i 
invited to attend. For information or tickets call Patsy LarriCj 
at 395-0^74. j 

i 
Dr. Thomas Seism, former faculty member now with UNC-A, 
would like to rent an apartment or house from mid-May to mid 
August. Call Dr. Moseley at Ext. 3312 or Dr. Seism at UNC-A. 

Welcome to Marguerite Demby and Geraldine Teachery, housek 
ing assistants in the physical plant. They can be reached at 
Ext. 3109. 



FILMS 
OFFERED 



Films entitled "The Elusive Geisha" and "The Spring and Fall o 
of Nina Polanski" will be shown at the Cape Fear Foundation 
9 S. Front St. April 29 beginning at 8 pjn. Bring your own pop 
corn. 



ENGLISH 

FACULTY 

WINS 

WOMEN 
OF UNCW 



LIBRARY 
NOTICES 



IMBR GETS 
GRANT 



The English faculty, winner of last year's annual Morton Hall 
Softball Challenge Match with the modern languages faculty, 
played the English Club on April 15 and won 26-1^. 

The Univeristy Women of UNCW extends an invitation to all ml 
bers and their families to an end of the year picnic at Wrights] 
ville Beach Park Sunday, April 29, from 3-6 pjn. Bring your 
own food. Soda will be provided. NOTE~The time of '^:30 - 
7:30 printed in The Sandpiper is incorrect, the correct time is 
3-6 pjn. 

Faculty members are encouraged to prepare Reserve Reading 1 
for summer school as soon as possible. Forms, available at the 
Library Reserve Desk or from departmental secretaries, shouldi 
be submitted to the Reserve Desk at least one week prior to 
class assignments. 

Materials on reserve for spring semester 198'f will be removed 
after exams unless Mrs. Hilda Tyndall is notified by May 3 that 
the same items will be needed for the same courses to be taug 
during the first summer school session. Mrs. Tyndall may be 
reached at Ext. 3790. 

The Institute for Marine Biomedical Research has received a 
$10,000 grant from the Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation t( 
study the genetic effects of altitude and temperature. 



»^- ^- 



HOMAS 
.UTHORS 

:hapter 



ISTORY 
RTICLE 



APER 
.CCEPTED 



AVIS AT 
EETING 



Carol Chase Thomas, assistant professor of curricular studies, 
has co-authored a chapter on "Modifying the Classroom Program 
in Language" in a textbook. Teaching Special Needs Students 
in Regular Classrooms. 

Dr. Carole Fink, associate professor of history, is the author of 
The Genoa Conference; European Diplomacy 1921-1922 which 
has just been published by the University of North Carolina Press. 

Dr. John R. Huntsman, assistant professor of geology, has had 
a paper, "Caribou Mountain: A prophyry copper deposit in south- 
eastern Idaho," accepted for publication in the August issue of 
Economic Geology. 

Derick Davis of the HPER Department attended the semi-annual 
meeting of the North Carolina Recreators Foundation held April 
16 in Raleigh. He is a member of the Board of Directors of 
the Foundation. 



HERIDAN 
N PANEL 



ITTMAN 
JDUCTED 



ARPER 
JVITED 
PEAKER 



R. REEVES 
O RESEARCH 



Earl Sheridan, assistant professor of political science, was a dis- 
cussant on a panel entitled "The Foundations of American Political 
Thought" during the annual Midwest Political Science Association 
meeting held April ll-l'f in Chicago. 

Cathy Pittman of the nursing department was inducted April 7 
into the Beta Nu Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, the national 
honor society of nursing. 

Dr. Stephen C. Harper, chairman of the department of manage- 
ment and marketing, discussed "Management: Who Ever Said It 
Would Be Easy?" at the annual meeting of the International 
Personnel Managers Association held April 9 in Charleston. 

During May and June Dr. James Reeves of the Department of 
Chemical and Physical Sciences will be working in the research 
laboratory of Dr. Fred Hawkridge of Virginia Commonwealth 
University. The research project, funded through a supplemental 
grant from the National Science Foundation, will involve the 
spectroelectrochemical investigation of heme protein heterogenous 
electron transfer reactions. 



R. BRYAN 
JSTALLED 



R. JAMBOR 
SPEAK 



RTICLE TO 
I INCLUDED 



Dr. Bill Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs, attended the 
convention of the American College Personnel Association held 
April 10 in Baltimore. While there he was installed as president 
of the association and delivered the presidents message. 

Dr. Paul Jambor of the department of mathematical sciences has 
been invited to speak next month at the University of Essen 
and the University of Tubingen, Germany. His topic will be 
'decomposability of modules over associative rings.' 

Dr. Louis LaNunziata, assistant professor of curricular studies, 
has had a research article entitled "Suggestions for phasing out 
token economy systems in primary and intermediate grades" 
accepted for publication in the July/August issue of Techniques; 
A Journal For Counseling and Remedial Education. 



JAZZ 
BAND 

DANCE 
COMPANY 

OPERA 
COMPANY 

ART 
LECTURE 

GUITAR 
CONCERT 



The Emanon 3azz Band will perform at Riverfront Park April 2 
at 7 pjn. Free. 

The Frank Holder Dance Company will be featured in Thalian 
Hall April 28. For information call Thalian Hall. 

The National Opera Company will present "Cosi Fan Tutte" in 
Thalian Hall April 29 at 2 pjn. 

The Art in American Life: A Personal History by Hilton Kramt 
will be conducted at St. John's Museum of Art April 29 . 

The Wilmington Parks and Recreation Department will sponsor 
classical guitar and dance concert with Rob Nathanson and Dor 
Oberstein at Thalian Hail on April 29. The above listed per- 
formances are in conjunction with the St. Thomas Celebration 
of the Arts. 



TEMPORARY 
STUDENTS ON 
PAYROLL 



BIOLOGY 
PAPERS 



Please refer to the UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES MANUAL 
number G, 8-1 through G, Z-k if your department plans to have 
a student on the payroll who will not be taking courses this 
summer but plans to continue their employment during the sum- 
mer sessions. The personnel office will need two weeks notice 
prior to the employee's reporting date along with the following \ 
information: 



a. 
b. 

c. 
d. 



NC State application, completed and signed 
Listing of five major tasks in the temporary 

position I 

W-'t form, completed and signed | 

Account number from which salary will be paid 

The following papers by members of the biological sciences fact 
and students were delivered during the ^5th annual meeting of r 
Association of Southeastern Biologists held this month in Memph 
"The role of aquatic weeds in maintaining surface water quality 
by A.A. de la Cruz and A.A. Mamaril; "Notes on the life history 
of the Funnel Web Spider, Agelenopsis barrowsi (Gertsch) in a 
Mississippi brackish water marsh" by M.W. laSalle and A.A. de la 
Cruz; "Variations of shell morphology in the Carolina marsh clai 
(Bosc) related to environmental factors" by C.T. Hackney and C, 
Moorse; "Export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the sub 
strate of a North Carolina salt marsh" by G.F. Yelverton and 
C.T. Hackney; "Utilization of rubblemound jetties by fishes" by 
D.G. Lindquist, M.V. Ogburn, W.B. Stanley, H.L. Troutman, and 
SM. Pereira and "Population dynamics and feeding ecology of th 
sheepshead, Archosargus probatocephalus" by M.V. Ogburn and 
D.G. Lindquist. Also, Hackney was elected to a three-year ternr 
on the associations executive board. Yelverton, UNCW student, 
won the best student paper award. 



OMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER ^tl 
MAY 3, 198^^ 



ACK BAR 

.OSES 

IDAY 

:gional 
)nference 



•URNAMENT 
(DAY 



:nic 



iRARY 
)TICE5 



:ech on 

:ORD 




The snack bar in the University Union will close TODAY and 
reopen on Tuesday, May 29, with summer operating hours of 
7:30 ajT). - 2:30 pjn. 

The New Hanover Council on the Status of Women will sponsor 
a regional Governor's Leadership Conference on "Women and the 
Bx)nomy" May 18 and 19. For additional information call 
Deloris James at 762-8^*33. 

The sixteenth annual Faculty/Staff Golf Tournament will be held 
TODAY at Echo Farms Country Club. 

UNCW faculty and their families are invited to the spring picnic 
sponsored by the UNCW Chapter of the American Association of 
University Professors on Friday, May 11, at 't pjn., at Hugh McRae 
Park, Shelter //I. Bring food for your family - soft drinks and ice 
will be provided. 

Faculty members are encouraged to prepare Reserve Reading 
lists for summer school ASAP, Forms, available at the Library Re- 
serve Desk or from departmental secretaries, should be submitted 
to the Reserve Desk at least one week prior to class assignments. 

Materials on reserve for spring semester 198^* will be removed 
after exams unless Mrs. Hilda Tyndall is notified by TODAY that 
the same items will be needed for the same courses to be taught 
during the first summer school session. Mrs. Tyndall may be reach- 
ed at Ext. 3790. 

A speech last August to the school of education faculty and 
students by Dr. Donald Senese, assistant secretary for educational 
research and improvement for the U.S. Department of Education, 
entitled "Educating for Excellence" has been entered by U.S. 
Senator Jesse Helms in the Congressional Record. 



Due to scheduling conflicts - the power outage scheduled for the 
campus on Saturday, May 5, has been changed to Sunday, May 6. 
from 8 ajn. to 5 pjn. For additional information call the physical 
plant at Ext. 3101. 



FILM TO The last in a series of spring films sponsored by the Cape Fear 

BE SHOWN Foundation will be shown May 6 at 8 p.m. The film, entitled 

The Emperor 3ones, will be shown at the foundation located 
at 9 South Front Street. Free, but bring your own popcorn 
and drink. 



FORT TO 
READ 



GEORGE 

RECEIVES 

GRANT 



MUSIC TO 
PREMIERE 



FACILITY 
SCHEDULE 



IMBR 

RESEARCH 

SEMINAR 



MCGOWAN ON 
COMMITTEE 



PARKER 

PRESENTS 

WORKSHOPS 



AINSLEY 

PRESENTS 

PAPER 



Charles Fort, poet and director of the creative writing program, 
will read from his book, The Town Clock Burning, during the St. 
Thomas Arts Festival Sunday, May 6, at 1 p.m., at the Riverfron 
During a reading of poetry, Fort will be accompanied by dance 
performances with the Contemporary Dance Theatre of Wilmingt 

Dr. Robert George of the biological sciences department and IMI 
has been awarded a $10,000 grant from the National Science 
Foundation for the publication of a book on the "Biology of the 
Antarctic Krill." The book, edited by Dr. George, is based on tl" 
First International Krill Symposium held at UNCW in October 19 

Concerto for Alto Saxophone by David Kechley of the Creative I 
Arts Department - music will premiere May 13 with Frank 
Bongiorno, saxophonist, and the Shreveport Symphony. The 
premiere is in connection with the Festival of American Contem 
porary Music presented by the Shreveport Symphony. Both Kech 
and Bongiorno will travel to Shreveport as guests of the festivaJi 

I 
The Academic Computing Facility located in the social and beha 
ioral sciences building will be open next week, Monday through 
Friday from 8 a.m. - 5 pjn. 

A Research Seminar and Round-table Discussion by Dr. Gundu H 
Rao, associate professor of the department of medicine and path 
ology at the medical school of the University of Minnesota, will 
be held May 10 at 11 a.m. at IMBR. He will discuss "Physiology 
and Ultra Structure of Blood Platelets: Role of Heme in 
Prostaglandin Synthesis. " 

Dr. James McGowan, assistant to the vice chancellor for academ 
affairs, has recently been appointed to serve on the NC Humani 
ties Committee. 



Ralph Parker, director of minority affairs, has participated in 
a series of workshops for junior high and high school students on 
opportunities for minorities at UNCW which includes choosing 
a curriculum, financial aid, and applying for admission. Worksho| 
locations and dates were as follows: 

March 16 Taylor Homes 

April 2^ Creekwood 

April 26 Nesbitt Court/Vesta 

April 27 Hillcrest 

W. Frank Ainsley of the earth sciences department presented a 
paper entitled "Settlement Landscapes of European Farm Colonie 
in North Carolina" during a special session on Material Culture 
at the annual meeting of the Association of American Geographe 
held April 21 - 25 in Washington, D.C. 



Mrs. Delilah B, Blanks of the department of sociology /anthro- 
pology will deliver the commencement address for Clarkton High 
School during graduation ceremonies on June 8. 

Alan Johnson, senior English major, has been accepted into the 
graduate program at Bowling Green University in Ohio. He was 
one of two writers selected into the master of fine arts creative 
writing program. Last year, former student Beri Marshall Moore, 
was also accepted into the program. Both students studied under 
Charles Fort, director of UNCW's creative writing program. 

Mr. Frimitaka Maruyama of Takeda Chemical discussed "Takeda 
Chemical and its new Wilmington Facility" during the April 27 
meeting of the Eastern NC Section of the American Chemical 
Society. 

The NC Bicycle Committee has selected the UNCW Recreation 
Majors' Association to receive the Outstanding School Award for 
198^^. The selection was made due to the group's promotion of 
quality bicycle activities and for their support of bicycle program 
and facility development in the Wilmington area. The award will 
be presented tomorrow in Raleigh. 

Dr. Carol Chase Thomas, assistant professor of curricular studies, 
co-authored chapters in two recently published textbooks, "Com- 
parative Intervention Designs" in Single Subject Research 
in Special Education and "Modifying tne Classroom Program in 
Language" in Teaching Special Needs Students in Regular Class- 
rooms. 



Strumming; A Sonata for Solo Guitar, a new work by David 
Kechley, was performed by Rob Nathanson at the Eighth Annual 
North Carolina Composer's Symposium at Salem College in Winston- 
Salem on April 27. Both Kechley and Nathanson teach in the 
Department of Creative Arts - music. The piece written for 
Nathanson was premiered at St. John's Museum of Art on March 
25 as well as performed in area schools and as part of Finger's 
and Toes during the St. Thomas Festival. 

Dr. Stephen C. Harper, chairman of the department of management 
and marketing, will discuss "Goodness of Fit: Every College and 
Corporation Offers a Steak. . .How Do You Accentuate the 
Sizzle?" to the North Carolina Placement Association Annual 
Conference to be held today in Raleigh. 

The NC State Employees Association will host a dinner/Meet the 
Legislators night, May 22 at the Boucon Room starting at 6:30 
with cocktails. Dinner, featuring a choice of prime rib or seafood, 
will cost $15 per person. Senators Robert Soles and J.A. Wright 
and Representatives Harry Payne, David Redwine, Tommy Rhodes 
and Richard Wright have been invited to attend. For information 
call Patsy Larrick at 395-0't7't. 

Dr. Thomas Seism, former faculty member now with UNC-A, 
would like to rent an apartment or house from mid-May to mid- 
August. Call Dr. Moseley at Ext. 3312. 



ROTC The ROTC program will ODnduct its commissioning ceremonies o 

CEREMONY Saturday, May 12, at 2 pjn. in room 100 of the University Unior 

Once commissioned, the 27 cadets will hold the rank of second 

lieutenant in the US Army, 

TEMPORARY Refer to the UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES MANUAL number G, 

STUDENTS ON through G, S-^ if your department plans to have a student on tf 

PAYROLL payroll who will not be taking courses this summer but plans to 

continue their employement during the summer sessions. The 
personnel office will need two weeks notice prior to the em- 
ployee's reporting date along with the following information: 

a. NC State application, completed and signed 

b. Listing of five major tasks in the temporary position 

c. W-^ form, completed and signed 

d. Account number from which salary will be paid 

MEDICAL Newborns should be enrolled prior to birth or within 30 days of 

INSURANCE birth to avoid the 12 months waiting period for pre-existing con 

ditions. 

A change request form should be filed for the following: 

~ add or delete dependent coverage 

- have a dependent student who attains age of 19 or an 

incapacitated dependent 

- become eligible for Medicare or if a dependent becomes 

eligible for Medicare 

- change name and/or address 

- change in your spouse's employment and/or employer- 

sponsored health insurance plan 

Change requests need to be filed within thirty days of dependen' 
status changes 

Medical enrollment and change request forms are available in 
the personnel office. Questions regarding health insurance shoul( 
be directed to Dianne Smith at Ext. 3162. 



PAYROLL 
OPTIONS 



CONTINUATION 
OF FRINGE 
BENEFITS 



FRIENDS 
OF PUBLIC 
RADIO 



THANK 
YOU 



Faculty members who would like to make changes regarding the 
10 or 12 month salary plan options have until July 2. Forms may 
be picked up from the personnel office. 

Employees on ten month pay options are asked to make arrange- « 
ments for payments on fringe benefits for 3uly by 3une 21 and 
for the month of August by July 23. Those employees leaving foi 
the summer are asked to make payments prior to their leaving. 

Sam Ragan, poet laureate of North Carolina, will discuss "Writing 
in North Carolina" May 11 at 8 p.m. during the spring meeting of 
the New Hanover County Friends of the Public Library. Faculty 
and staff are invited. The meeting will be held in the meeting 
room of the library. 

Dear Friends, 

Thanks to everyone at UNCW for their many expressions 
of sympathy and encouragement in the loss of my husband 
and my accident. It means a lot to know one is not for- 
gotten. 

Dot Roth 



OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER ^2 
MAY 10, ISil* 



NACK BAR 
XOSED 

>AUP 
ICNIC 

:OUNCIL 
lONFERENCE 



;raduation 
.ehearsal 



RADUATION 
AY 12 



ommissioning 
;eremonies 

INNING 
EREMONIES 

PER 
CHEDULE 



CSEA 
INNER 

lOMEN IN 
ETWORKING 

JANDS TO 

ERFORM 

N KENAN 

I 

|C THIS 

UMMER 



A reminder that the snack bar in the University Union will be 
closed until Tuesday, May 29. 

The AAUP picnic is Friday, May 11, at ^ pjn, at Hugh McRae 
Park, Shelter #1. Faculty and their families are invited. 

The regional Governor's Leadership Conference on "Women and 
the Economy" sponsored by the New Hanover Council on the 
Status of Women will be held May 18 - 19. Call 762-8f33. 

Commencement rehearsal will be held Friday, May 11, at 10 a.m. 
in Hanover Hall. A reception sponsored by the alumni association 
will be held immediately following rehearsal outside James Hall. 

Commencement is scheduled for Saturday, May 12, at 10 ajn. in 
Trask Coliseum. The commencement address will be delivered by 
Robert L. Strickland, chairman of the board of Lowe's. 

ROTC Commissioning ceremonies will be held May 12 at 2 pjn. 
in room 100 of the University Union. 

The nursing department will hold its Pinning ceremony May 12 at 
7 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 

Both Trask and Hanover Hall will close at 3 pjn. Friday, May 11, 
in preparation for commencement on Saturday. The racquetball 
courts will close at 2 on that day. 

For tickets to the NCSEA dinner/Meet the Legislators night, on 
May 22 call Patsy Larrick at 395-0'f7^. 

Women in Networking will meet May I'f at noon at Quincy's. 
Cindy Lane will discuss "Dual Career Marriages." 

The NHHS Band will perform May 15 at 8 psn. Admission 
charge. The Hoggard Band will perform May 17 at 8 p.m. 
Admission charge. 

The CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE will continue through the summer 
months. A limited number of copies will be sent to each depart- 
ment due to many employees being away during this time. Normal 
distribution will resume in the fall. 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAM 



CHORAL 
SOCIETY 



STUDENT 
NAMED 



ROSSELOT 
ELECTED 



MOSELEY 
DELIVERS 
INVOCATION 



RECIPIENT 
ANNOUNCED 



LANUNZIATA 
TO SPEAK 



POET TO 
SPEAK 



PARKER AT 
MEETING 



The Office of Special Programs will offer a course in microcorrl 
puters and programming for the hearing impaired. The course, 
"Introduction to Computers and the B.A.S.I.C. Programming Lan-J 
guage for Hearing Impaired Adults," will be offered from 6-9 
pjTi. on Friday, 3une 8, and 8:30 ajn. - 5:30 pjn., Saturday, Junej 
9, in Hoggard Hall, room 212. Cost is $65; register by June 7. 
For more information call 3195. 

The Wilmington Choral Society, under the direction of Diane 
Gardner, will perform Sunday, May 13, at 3 pjrt., at Grace Unit 
Methodist Church. The group will perform Sacred Service by 
Ernest Bloch. The guest cantor will be Dr. Eric Myers of Duke 
University accompanied by Greg Bell. Faculty and staff are in- 
vited. Donation basis only. For more information call Jeanne 
Etheridge at 791-8961. 

Sara Brown (Kathy) Kellogg has been named in recent ceremonl 
as the first Fred Toney Jr. Scholar. The scholarship was set up 
by friends, colleagues and family to honor the memory of Dr. 
Fred Toney, former chairman of the mathematical sciences de- 
partment who died this past January. 

Gerald S. Rosselot of the department of English has recently 
been elected to a two-year term on the board of the Friends oJ 
the University. 

Dr. Thomas Moseley, professor of history, delivered the invoca- 
tion at Oakdale Cemetery during the Sunday observance of 
Confederate Memorial Day on May 6. The service, a continuous 
event since 1867, is sponsored by the Cape Fear Chapter of thi 
United Daughters of the Confederacy, George Davis Camp, SonJ 
of Confederate Veterans and the George Davis Chapter, childre 
of the Confederacy. 

Linda Carpenter Bennie is the 198'f-85 recipient of the William 
F. Adcock, Jr. Memorial Scholarship. The scholarship, based on 
academic achievement, general excellence in music, and perfor- 
mance ability, is awarded by the Department of Creative Arts 
division of music, to the most outstanding rising senior music 
major. Ms. Bennie is a student of Dr. Sherrill Martin, associate | 
professor of music. 



Dr. Louis J. LaNunziata, assistant professor of curricular studie 
has been invited to speak at the Special Education Institute to 
be held in August at Southern Pines. His topic will be "Instruc-| 
tional and Behavioral Strategies for the Emotionally Handicapp« 
in Regular and Special Education Classrooms." 

Sam Ragan, poet laureate of NC and editor and publisher of tht 
Southern Pines Pilot, will speak at 8 pjn., Friday, May 11, at 
the New Hanover County Public Library. "Writing in North Car 
Una" will be the topic of his talk to be accompanied by reading|i 
Admission is free to the event which is sponsored by the New 
Hanover Friends of the Public Library. 

Ralph Parker, director of minority affairs, attended the third 
annual conference of Black Students on White Campuses entitle*! 
"Survival" April 5 - 7 at the Urban Life Center at Georgia 
State University in Atlanta. 



AMPUS 



UNC b)' the .^ea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 43 
MAY 17, 1984 



The regional Governor's Leadership Conference on "Women and 
the Economy" sponsored by the New Hanover Council on the 
Status of Women will be held May 18 - 19. Call 762-8433. 

The NCSEA dinner/"Meet the Legislators" night will be held 
May 22 at the Boucan Room. For ticket information call 
Patsy Larrick at 395-0474. 

The New Hanover Friends of the Public Library will feature 
a spring book sale May 18 - 19 at the library. Hours 
include: 

May 18-9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 

May 19-9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Dr. Bill Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs, 
delivered two speeches recently during the West Virginia 
College Personnel Association meeting. 

The snack bar in the University Union will be closed until 
Tuesday, May 29. 

A slide discussion on "China Today" will be presented by 
Joan Partrick of Duke University TONIGHT at 7:30 at New 
Hanover County Library. Free. 

The Research Vessel Seahawk left May 11 on a five-week 
expedition to the Chesapeake Bay and the Gulf of Maine 
where undersea operations will be conducted. 

The Good Life series will feature "Oh My Aching Back" 
May 21 at 7i30 p.m. in the AHEC Auditorium. James 
Markworth, M. D. , will be the guest speaker. 

The New Hanover High School Orchestra under the direction 
of Nancy McAllister will perform May 22 at 8 p.m. in 
Kenan Auditorium. 



Cape Fear Technical Institute will conduct its graduation 
exercises May 24 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 



STUDENT TO 
PERFORM 



BYINGTON 
TO SPEAK 



CRATER ON 
PANEL 



U UNION 
HOURS 



lyey James, former student of Dr. Richard Deas, is this yea 
winner of the Young Artist Award sponsored by the Greensbor 
Music Teachers. He will present a recital in Curry Auditor 
May 20 on the UNC-Greensboro campus, 

Dr, Robert Byington, chairman of the English department, wi 
deliver the commencement address May 18 at Keystone State 
College, La Plume, Pennsylvania. 

Lynne Crater, contracts and grants officer in the Office ofl 
Research Administration, will participate on a panel, "Work 
with Faculty on Fiscal Matters In a Small University Settin 
at the Region III meeting of the National Council of Univer 
sity Research Administrators May 18 in Clearwater, FL. She 
will discuss UNCW's level of research activity, the concept 
of a consolidated research office including its advantages 
and disadvantages, and a brief overview of the ORA's role i 
assisting faculty with research projects. 

Operating hours for the University Union beginning with 
Summer Session I are: 



Monday - Friday 
Saturday & Sunday 



7 a.m. - 10:30 p.m. 
3:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. 



Information Center hours are: 



2ND FLOOR 
WINNERS 



FIRE 

DESTROYS 

HOME 



NEW 
STAFF 



Monday - Friday 
Saturday & Sunday 



8 a.m. - 10 p.m. 
3:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. 



The history and mathematical sciences departments beat the 
modern languages and English departments 17 - 9 in their 
annual Softball game held recently. Who's next??? 

Willie James, Sr., father of Grace Corbett in accounting an 
Willie James in the physical plant, lost his home in a fire 
last Thursday. Anyone who would like to help Mr. James in 
any way, please call Naomi Irvin at Ext. 3808 or 3541 by 
Wednesday, May 23. 



Welcome to the following new employees: 

Marguerite Demby and Geraldine Teachery, housekeeping assis 
tants, for maintenance and operations, Ext. 3109 

Delores M. Francis, housekeeping assistant for auxiliary 
services, Ext. 3405 

Joan Bass, clerk typist, General College Advising Center, 
Ext. 3245 

Valerie Baucom, clerk typist for financial aid, Ext, 3773 

Teresa Watson, duplicating equipment operator in central 

duplicating, Ext. 3183 

Gary Beane, analyst programmer, off. of info, systems, 3427 

Erica McCarty, secretary in nursing, Ext. 3784 

Kurt Beach, research vessel captain, NOAA, 343-4463 

Shirley Yarborough, secretary, career planning & placement, 

Ext. 3174 



I 



i 



CAMPUS 



1 b rary/ Archives 1 



Lhe sea 




VOLUME XIII, NUMBER ^^ 
MAY 21^, I9itt 



EVELOPMENT OFFICE 



SYMPHONY 
TICKETS 



PRINT SHOP TO 
3E RENOVATED 



5NACK BAR 
TO OPEN UP 

MCSEA 
TENNIS 



THALIAN 
^LAY 



ilX POETS 
READING 



JNCW TO 
lOST GROUP 



Season tickets for the 198'f-85 North Carolina Symphony series 
are on sale. Tickets, $20 for adults; $15 for senior citizens; and 
$10 for students, may be purchased from Doug Swink. Call Ext. 
34^2. 

Due to renovations in the print shop over the next four to five 
weeks "While you wait Service" will be disrupted occasionally. 
The print shop will also experience interruption to electrical 
services for as long as eight hours a day on some days through- 
out this period. Rush jobs will be done on a first come first 
serve basis. PLEASE PLAN AHEAD. 

The snack bar in the University Union will reopen Tuesday, 
May 29. 

Al Barry, safety officer, and Norm Ellis, chairman of the educa- 
tion, design and management department, in the School of 
Education, will compete in the NC State Employees Association 
Tennis Tournament to be held June 8 - 9 in Southern Pines. Good 
luck!! 

The Thalian Association will be performing the Broadway musical, 
Cabaret, at Thalian Hall on May 2^*, 25, 26, 27, 28 and June 1 
and 2 at 8 nightly. Frank Trimble of the creative arts department 
and Bev Cobb of the Union staff are performing. Tickets are 
$5 and $6»50 and can be purchased at the box office of Thalian 
Hall from 10 a.m. - 5 pjn. daily. For additional information 
call 763-9328. 

The department of English and the Cape Fear Foundation will 
present a poetry reading at the Foundation on Saturday, May 26, 
from 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. In addition to visiting poets Charles Fort 
and Richard Long of the English department will participate. 
Tickets are $2 and may be purchased on the second floor, alley 
entrance of the CFF Galleries. A reception will follow. 

Approximately 250 ornithologists will attend the 65th annual meet- 
ing of the Wilson Ornithological Society May 31 - June 2 on 
the UNCW campus. Dr. James Parnell, professor of biological 
sciences and co-author of "Birds of the Carolinas," is the local 
contact person. 



SEAHAWK TO 
DEMONSTRATE 



DR. MANOCK 
SPEAKS 



MUSIC 
FESTIVAL 



BRAUER 
APPOINTED 



NEW 
STAFF 



TIME 
SHEETS 



TUITION 
WAIVER 



A national undersea research conference sponsored by the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is being 
held this week at the University of Connecticut. The Research 
Vessel Seahawk will demonstrate her undersea research capabili- 
ties during the conference. Attending the conference from UNC 
will be Dr. Charles Cahill, vice chancellor for academic affairs; 
Dr. Allan Hulbert, director of science; Frank Chapman, director 
of operations and James K. Clark, assistant to the vice chancell 
for academic affairs. 

"The Use of Microcomputers in the Office of Research Adminis- 
tration at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington" was 
explained by ORA director, Dr. John J. Manock, at the recent 
joint Midwest/Southern Sections Meeting of the Society of 
Research Administrators in Cincinnati. He discussed word 
processing, database management, electronic spreadsheets, 
terminal emulation, data entry, graphics, potential problems 
and future trends. 

Frank Bongiorno was guest saxophonist during the Shreveport 
Symphony's "A Festival of American Contemporary Music" this 
past weekend in Shreveport. Bongiorno preformed David 
Kechley's Concerto for Alto Saxophone. Both Bongiorno and 
Kechley are on the music faculty. 

Dr. Ralph Brauer, director of the institute of marine biomedical 
research, has recently been appointed to the editorial board of 
the Journal of Applied Physiology. Respiratory. Environmental 
and Exercise Physiology. 

Welcome to the following new employees: 

Diane B. Talley, continuing education staff assistant 
in the office of special programs - Ext. 3798 

Inez S. Parker, clerk typist in the office of special 
programs - Ext. 319'f 

When completing time sheets, remember that SICK LEAVE 
can only be taken in hour units while VACATION LEAVE 
can be taken in increments of fifteen minutes. 

Employees not currently enrolled but interested in taking a 
course this fall should pick up an application for admission 
form from the admissions office - or call Ext. 32't3. Appli- 
cation for tuition waiver is available through the personnel 
office or by calling Ext. 3160. 



IC 



w 



I 



CAMPUS 

COMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 1^5 
MAY 31, 198if 



ERSONNEL 
NOTICES 



MPLOYEE 
EEK 



YMPHONY 
ICKETS 



ODSON 
JDGES 



R. LEWIS 
T MEETING 



Faculty members who would like to make changes regarding the 10 
or 12 month pay options must do so by July 1. Forms are avail- 
able in the personnel office. 

All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets reflecting 
any type of premium pay or overtime pay must be in the person- 
nel office before 10 a.m., Friday, June 1, Supervisors who do not 
meet this deadline cannot expect their employees to be paid on 
June 15. The personnel office will make one reminder call. 

Employees not currently enrolled but interested in taking a course 
this fail should pick up application forms from the admissions 
office or call Ext. 32'*3. Application for tuition waiver is 
available through the personnel office or by calling Ext. 3160. 

Brenda Dineen, administrative secretary to the vice chancellor 
for business affairs and development, is now working in the 
personnel office. She can be reached at Ext. 327^*. 

The week of June 18-22 has been proclaimed by Governor Jim 
Hunt as "Employee Appreciation Week," a time set aside to give 
special recognition to all state employees for the contributions 
they make on a daily basis toward providing needed services to 
the citizens of North Carolina. The administration of UNCW ex- 
tends special thanks to all employees for the dedicated and con- 
scientious manner in which they serve to further the objectives 
of the university. 

Season tickets for the 198't-85 NC Symphony series are presently 
on sale. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for senior citizens. 
For more information call Doug Swink at Ext. 3^^2, 

Brooks Dodson of the English department served as a judge for 
the eastern region finals of the 198'l NC Optimists state 
oratorical contest held May 19 at the Blockade Runner Hotel. 

Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of the HPER department, participat- 
ed in the 198'f annual board meeting of The Camp Safety Insti- 
tute in New York City. He serves as a safety eva!uator/site 
inspector for the institute, a national cooperative effort 
between insurance companies and organized camps to promote 
safety in the operation of youth camps. 



SKALKO AT 
SYMPOSIUM 



PAPER 
PRESENTED 



FACULTY 
CO-AUTHOR 



PAY DAY 
TODAY 



Dr. Thomas Skalko, professor of therapeutic recreation, will be 
presenting a session on "Leisure Education/Counseling for the 
Disabled" at the Southeast SymfKJsium on Therapeutic Recrea- 
tion June 3 - 5 in Greensboro. 

3ohn E. Morgan of the department of economics and finance 
presented a paper entitled "The Quantity Line Method of Teach 
Microeconomics" at the annual meeting of the Eastern Economii 
Association held March H - 17 in New York City. He has also 
had a paper selected for presentation at the 3une Z'f - 28 annu 
meeting of the Western Economic Association in Las Vegas. 
The title of his paper will be "Antitrust Prescription - See 
Your Economist First." 

Dr. Claude Farrell and Dr. W.W. Hall of the department of 
economics and finance have jointly authored a number of articl 
as well as presented papers dealing with regional economics 
over the past year. Their work has been cited by others in pro 
fessional writings as well as in publications such as Pace 
Magazine. Dr. Farrell has also served as a discussant at meet- 
ings of the Southern Economic Association, the Southern 
Finance Association and the Eastern Finance Association. Dr. 
Hall has participated at meetings of the Southern Economic 
Association and the Southern Regional Science Association. 

Pay day is today - checks may be picked up from the cashier's 
office in Alderman Hall. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



^JJi,,. 



D5 




U[*C-WlLMi 

V the ^ea 



JUH 




OFFICE OF VICE-CHANCELLOR 
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER (i6 
3UNE 7, 198'^ 



:;a office 
o close 



RT EXHIBIT 
N DISPLAY 



^ACKBAR TO 
LOSE ON 
RIDAY ONLY 



R. MORGAN 
iLECTED 



\CKSON & 

ROWN 

UBLISH 



HANKS 
KTENDED 

r'MPHONY 
CKETS 

pRSONNEL 
ioTICE 



The Student Government Office will be closed 3une 11-30. All 
inquiries and messages should be directed to the Information 
Center located in the University Union. 

The Montessori Children's Art Show is currently on display in the 
University Union's art gallery space located in the living room 
and adjoining study room. The works, by four and five year olds, 
will be on exhibit through Thursday, June 28. 

The snackbar located in the University Union will be closed 
FRIDAY due to the Board of Governor's meeting. AH snack bar 
operations will be conducted downstairs in the cafeteria for 
Friday only. 

Dr. 3ohn E. Morgan of the department of economics and finance 
has been selected to attend a conference concerning "Recent 
Developments In Applied Economics" at the Graduate School of 
the University of Chicago 3uly 29 - August 16. He was one of 
forty economics professors selected from across the US to at- 
tend the conference. 

Robert T. Brown and Lee A. 3ackson of the psychology depart- 
ment have had two articles, "Crucial Experiments in Psychology" 
and "Group Problem Solving," published in the new four-volume 
Encyclopedia of PsycholoRy published by Wiley-Interscience. 

Willie A. James and Grace Corbett wish to thank those people 
who helped their father after he lost his home last month. 

Season tickets for the 198't-85 NC Symphony are still available. 
Call Doug Swink at Ext. 3'f'f2. 

Faculty members who would like to make changes regarding the 
10 or 12 month pay options must do so by July 1. Forms are 
available in the personnel office. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, Number ^7 
JUNE lit, iSStt 

The Montessori Children's Art Show is presently on exhibit in the 
University Union. 

The week of June 18 - 22 has been proclaimed by Governor Jim 
Hunt as "Employee Appreciation Week," a time set aside to give 
special recognition to all State employees for the contributions 
they make on a daily basis toward providing needed services to 
the citizens of North Carolina. The administration of UNCW ex- 
tends special thanks to all employees for the dedicated and con- 
scientious manner in which they serve to further the objectives 
of the University. 

The P&R department is sponsoring a bake sale in the University 
Union Thursday and Friday, June I'f and 15, to help raise travel 
funds for Bob Haywood, campus minister, who is going to Nicaragua 
with the national Witness for Peace program June 26 - July 'f. Any- 
one interested in helping sell baked goods should call Ext. 3W7. 

A class "B" drivers license is required in order to drive one of the 
university's 15 passenger vans — even if seats have been removed. 
A normal drivers license is considered a class "C" license. Staff 
and faculty interested in obtaining a class "B" license should con- 
tact the motor pool at Ext. 3101 for information. 

The TUCC HP2000 Computer known as HP//1 will shutdown on June 
30. During this time all ACTIVE HP//1 accounts and files will be 
moved to HP/'/2 on a permanent basis. For information concerning 
this change call Academic Computing Services at Ext. 3805. 

Employees on ten month pay options are asked to make arrange- 
ments for payments on fringe benefits for July by June 21 and for 
the month of August by July 23. Those employees leaving for the 
summer are asked to make payments prior to their leaving. 

Faculty members who would like to make changes regarding the 10 
or 12 months salary plan options have until July 2. Forms may be 
picked up from the personnel office. 

Art Goodwin, formerly with the business affairs and development 
office staff, has been promoted to analyst programmer in the 
office of information systems. 



DR. GEORGE 
SELECTED 



Dr. Robert Y. George, professor of oceanography, has been 
selected by the US and Romanian Academy of Sciences to 
conduct a research project in the Black Sea June I'^-July li 
He will study the hypoxic adaptations of fishes and shrimps 
living in extremely low oxygen waters. While there. Dr. 
George will be based at the Romanian Marine Research In- 
stitute at Constanza. 



PAPER 
PUBLISHED 



ACS USER ROOM 
SCHEDULE 



STUDENTS ON 
PAYROLL 



HEALTH 
INSURANCE 



Shiva Saksena of the department of mathematical sciences 
and Alan Johnson of the department of mathematics and cc 
puter science at the University of Arkansas, Little Rock, h 
had a paper, "Best Unbiased Estimators for the Parameters 
of a Two-Parameter Pareto Distribution ," published in 
Metrika - International Journal for Theoretical and Applied 
Statistics, Volume 31. 

The Academic Computing Services User Room in room 221 
of the Social and Behavioral Sciences Building will be open 
during the following hours: 



Monday - Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 



8 a.m. - midnight 
8 ajn. - 5 pjn. 
10 ajn. - 2 p.m, 
tt pjn. - midnight 



Refer to the UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES MANUAL numbe 
G, 8-1 through G, S-'f if your department plans to have a 
student on the payroll who will not be taking courses this ■ 
summer but plans to continue their employment during the 
summer sessions. The personnel office will need two week:| 
notice prior to the employee's reporting date along with th 
following information: 

a. NC State application, completed and signed 

b. Listing of five major tasks in the temporary position 

c. W-^t form, completed and signed 

d. Account number from which salary will be paid 

Services listed below are the most commonly used services 
that require documentation from a physician attesting to tlj 
medical necessity of the proposed care. 

Home Health Agency Services 

Inpatient Psychiatric Care (after first 30 days of treatm* 

Private Duty Nursing 

Ambulance Services (more than 50 miles) 

Specific Operations (such as morbid obesity or orthognatl 

surgery) 
Skilled Nursing Facilities 
Durable Medical Equipment (wheel chairs) 

Prior approval for the above listed services must be given 
by EDS. All prior approval documentation should be sent tc' 

EDS Federal Corporation, Plan Administrator 

P. O. Box 30050 

Raleigh, NC 27622 (MEDICAL DEPARTMENT) 

Questions regarding coverage should be directed to 
1-800-662-8868 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 1^2, 
JUNE 21, 198f 



FORT 
INVITED 



PAPERS 
PRESENTED 



HEALTH 
SERVICES 

FACULTY 
PAYCHECKS 

INSURANCE 
NOTICE 



FACULTY 
OPTIONS 



NEW 
STAFF 



SYMPATHY 
EXTENDED 



Charles Fort of the English faculty has been invited to participate 
in a Writers and Readers Series of workshops sponsored by the 
Friends of Weymouth, Inc. to be held this fall in Southern Pines. 
Also, Mr. Fort's first book of poetry, The Town Clock Burning, 
will be published this fall by St. Andrews Press. 

Two faculty members from the department of mathematical 
sciences participated in the Thirteenth International Colloquium 
in Theoretical Physics held in May at the University of Maryland. 
Dr. David M. Russell, assistant professor, presented a paper 
entitled "Determination of the Physically Realizable Spectra 
of Intermediate Atomic Hamiltonians" and Dr. Gabriel G. Lugo, 
assistant professor, presented a paper, "The Twistor Cartan 
Connection." 

All calls to student health services should be directed to Linda 
Smith at Ext. 3533. 

First session summer school paychecks for faculty may be pick- 
ed up June 29 in Alderman Hall at the cashiers office. 

All members of the medical health insurance plan have 18 
months from date of services or date of purchases (prescriptions) 
to file a claim. Claims received after this period of time will 
be denied. 

Faculty members who would like to make changes regarding the 
10 or 12 months salary plan options have until July 2. Forms may 
be picked up from the personnel office. 

Welcome to Michael Highsmith, housekeeping assistant for the 
physical plant, ext. 3109; Richard King, grounds supervisor for 
the physical plant, ext. 3107 and Patricia A. Nelson, housekeeping 
assistant for housing. Also, Helen Washington has been promoted 
to housekeeping team leader in auxiliary services for the 
residence halls. She can be reached at ext. 3212. 

Condolences are extended to Catherine and Mark Galizio upon 
the recent death of their daughter, Rachel Catherine. 



STUDENTS ON 
PAYROLL 



Refer to the UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES MANUAL numbel 
G, 8-1 through G, S-'f if your department plans to have a 
student on the payroll who will not be taking courses this j 
summer but plans to continue their employment during the j 
summer sessions. The personnel office will need two week! 
notice prior to the employee's reporting date along with j 
the following information: 

A. NC State application, completed and signed 

B. Listing of five major tasks in the temporary position 

C. W-'f form, completed and signed 

D. Account number from which salary will be paid 



ATTENTION ALL 
DEPARTMENTS 



All invoices received on or before June 30 should be for- 
warded to the accounts payable department no later than 
5 p.m. on 3uly 2. 



All receiving copies of purchase orders received on or be- 
fore June 30 must be sent to purchasing services no later 
than 5 p.m. on July 2. For additional information call 
Janice Whitten at ext. 31'f8. 



TOWNHOUSE 
FOR RENT 



New townhouse at "Lions Gate" for rent on an annual basi 
Prefer faculty and staff. Call Catherine Vangellow at 
256-3213. 



HOUSE SITTER 
NEEDED 



Dr. Grace Burton of the department of curricular studies 
will need a house sitter during the latter part of August. 
For more information call ext. 3363. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 




: ^ea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER ^9 
JUNE 28, \32.t* 



1AINTENANCE 
:ONTRACTS 



TME 
HEETS 



;ONCERT 
CHEDULED 



NACKBAR 
O CLOSE 



,RT CLASSES 
•FFERED 



All renewal maintenance contracts and all new contracts for 
198'f-85 with the exception of typewriters should be submitted 
in the form of requisitions to purchasing services. Requisitions 
should be dated July 1, 198^*, and must reflect description of 
item, serial number, model number and UNCW property tag 
number. Call Sondra Roark at ext. 3153 for further information. 

All June time sheets for permanent employees must be in the 
personnel office before 5 p.m. July 2 to insure proper computa- 
tion of vacation and sici< leave balances as of June 30, 198'f. 
Employees planning vacation on July 2 should forward their time 
sheets to the personnel office on June 29 to meet the July 2 
deadline. Any questions should be directed to Alice Maile at 
ext. 3392. 

Judy Cole-Shannon, associate professor of voice at the University 
of Nebraska - Lincoln, will conduct a concert Tuesday, July 2i4, 
at 8 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium. The program will feature songs 
by Brahms, Faure, Vivaldi and Ives. Cole-Shannon, mezzosoprano, 
will be accompanied by Richard Deas and Jane Mathew of 
the music faculty. 

The University Union Snackbar will be closed July 2 - July 6 and 
will re-open Monday, July 9, at 9 a.m. Operating schedule for 
second session summer school is a follows: 

Monday through Friday - 9 a.m. - 2 pjn. 

Breakfast will be served from 7 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. in 
the university cafeteria, first floor 

The Office of Special Programs will offer art classes for child- 
ren ages 5-6 and 7-8. Classes will be held the week of July 9. 
Cost for the series is $25. Call 3195 for more information. 




All faculty and staff are invited to a going away reception for 
Dr. Jairy Hunter Thursday, July 12, from 3-5 p.m. in room 100 
of the University Union. Dr. Hunter, vice chancellor for business 
affairs and development, will be leaving UNCW to accept the 
presidency of the Baptist College of Charleston. 



TEMPORARY All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets reflectin| 

TIMESHEETS shift or overtime pay must be in the personnel office by 8:30 a. 

July 2 so that payroll computation may be completed. Super- 
visors who do not meet this deadline should not expect their err 
ployees to be paid on July 13. Personnel will make one reminde 
call. 

WEEKS Dr. Gerald R. Weeks, associate professor of psychology, has bee 

SELECTED selected to serve as secretary of the American Board of Family 

Psychology. The board confers diplomate status to psychologist 
with advanced competence in the clinical practice of marital,, 
sex, and marital therapy. 



STRAW HAT 
THEATRE 



FACULTY 
OPTIONS 

PAYCHECKS 

ON FRIDAY 



CONDOLENCES 
EXTENDED 



THANK YOU 
EXPRESSED 



UNION 
HOURS 



Season tickets for the 'S'f Straw Hat Theatre are now on sale. 
Plays scheduled for the summer include "Annie," July 12-15; 
"Crimes of the Heart," July 19-25; "See the USA," July 26-29; | 
"Equus," August 2-5 and "Camelot," August 9-12. Season J 

tickets are $16 with all plays being held at 8:30 p.m. in Kenan 
Auditorium. Individual tickets are $'f. Call ext. 3218. ! 

i 
Faculty members who would like to make changes regarding the! 
10 or 12 months salary plan options have until Monday, July 2. j 

Paychecks may be picked up Friday, June 29 from the cashiers 
office located in Alderman Hall. Faculty are reminded that thd 
may also pick up paychecks for the first session of summer sch( ; 
on that day. 

Condolences are extended to Chancellor and Mrs. Wagoner upon 
the recent death of her brother, Oscar Hodges. 

Also, sympathies are sent to Inge Stites upon the loss of her 
husband, Kenneth, formerly of the modern languages faculty. 

Ruth Dorsey of the housekeeping staff would like to thank eve 
one for their expressions of sympathy due to the loss of her so 
Dwayne Dorsey. 



Friday, June 29 
Saturday, June 30 
Sunday, July 1 
Monday, July 2 
Tuesday, July 3 
Wednesday, July tt 
Thursday, July 5 
Friday, July 6 
Saturday, July 7 
Sunday, July 8 
Monday, July 9 



7 a.m. - 5 pjn. 

CLOSED 

CLOSED 
7 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
7 a.m. - 5 pjn. 

CLOSED 
7 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
7 a.m. - 5 pjn. 

CLOSED 
3:30 p.m. - 10:30 pjn. 
RESUME REGULAR SCHEDLl 
7 a.m. - 10:30 p.m. 



NEW 
STAFF 

HOLIDAY 

COMING UP 



Welcome to Linda M. Helms, accounting clerk at IMBR. She cai 
be reached at 256-3721, ext. ^'f. 

Due to the upcoming holiday on Wednesday, July if, the CAMPV 
COMMUNIQUE will not be printed next week. HAVE A SAFE 
AND HAPPY ifTH!! 



sd^ 



:ampus 



UNC-WILMINGTON 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 50 
JULY 12, 1984 

The Division of Student Affairs announces a name change for the 
Counseling and Testing Center. Effective July 1, it became the 
Student Development Center. The Center will continue to provide 
counseling services, learning services, disabled student services, 
career development and testing. 

All faculty and staff are invited to a going away reception for 
Dr. Jairy Hunter Thursday, July 12, from 3-5 p.m. in the snack 
bar of the University Union. Dr. Hunter, vice chancellor for 
business affairs and development, is leaving UNCW to accept the 
presidency of the Baptist College at Charleston. BEST WISHESI 

The Wilmington Parks and Recreation Department is sponsoring a 
series of morning art courses weekdays at Greenfield Lake from 
July 9-August 3 for children aged 6-15. Donzella Johnson is the 
instructor. For information, call 762-1198. 

The Student Development Center will hold a workshop on "Career 
Exploration For Women" from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday July 19. 
Cost is $5 which includes lunch. Register by July 16. For more 
information, call Linda Shaddix 3280. 

The dean of students office is starting a host family program 
for UNCW's international students. Host families will have an 
opportunity to offer friendship and assistance to a student in 
getting settled and feeling welcome in a strange environment. 
Those interested should contact Deborah Haywood at 3119. 

Lead by Major David Felt, chairman of the department of military 
science, a group of UNCW representatives attended an orientation 
of ROTC advanced camp at Fort Bragg on July 4. Attending were 
Vice Chancellors Charles Cahill and William Bryan, Deans Daniel 
Plylerand Norman Kaylor, and PIO Mimi Cunningham. Following 
the orientation, the group toured various training areas, 
participated in firing mortars and missiles, and met with 6 of 
UNCW's 20 cadets at camp. 

Also that day. Chancellor William H. Wagoner met with Brig. Gen. 
Curtis F. Hoaglan, First ROTC Regional commander. 



ANNIE 
PLAYS 
JULY 12-15 



PERSONNEL 



FRINGE 
BENEFITS 

HPER 
AWARD 

NAUTILUS 
ROOM 



POETRY 
PUBLISHED 



WORDS ON 
EXHIBIT 



WELCOME 



FORT AT 
BOWLING 
GREEN 



WAXMAN 

PRESENTS 

PAPER 



RESEARCH 



DANCE 
CLASSES 



UNCW Straw Hat Theater will open its 26th Suimier Season with the 
family musical "Annie" on Thursday July 12 and run through Sunda 
July 15. The rest of the season will be "Crimes of the Heart" Ju 
19--22; "See the USA" July 26-29; "Equus" Aug 2-5; and "Camelot" 
Aug 9-12. Season tickets are $16 and will be on sale through Jul 
15. Individual tickets are $4 per show. Box office hours are 2-5 
p.m. Mon-Fri in Kenan Aud. 395-3218. All shows begin at 8:30 p.m 

A UNCW welcome is extended to the following employees; 

Dr. Alan W. Hulbert, Associate Professor and Director of Science 

of the NOAA Undersea Research Program. His telephone number is 

762-7615. 

Ms. Anne L. Buchanan, Assistant Reference Librarian and Lecturer 

in the Department of Library Services. Her extension is 3760. 

Employees on ten month pay options are asked to make arrnagement; 

for payments on fringe benefits for August coverage by July 23. 

HPER received a certificate of appreciation in recognition of 
support of the 1984 WRAL - Winn Dixie Health Fair. 

Athletic Dept has set the following summer hours for the new 
Nautilus Weight Room in Trask. Available to UNCW students, facul 
and staff. Hon, Wed, Fri.l2 noon - 2 p.m.,Mon.- Fri .4:30-6:30 p. 

Clark Holtzman of the English Dept. has had a poem, "The Wreck c 
the Ice Cream Truck," accepted for publication in Negative 
Capability, for Spring '85. His chapbook of poems, The King of i 
Spain, will be published in September by Peloria Press. | 



The public is invited to "Noisy Alley," a one-time exhibition o1i 
onomatopoeic words, Saturday, July 14 at The Cape Fear Foundatid 
9 South Front Street, 8:30 p.m. 

Dr. Catherine Cleare of the department of curricular studies is 
pleased to announce the arrival of her adopted daughter, 
Clara Luz, from El Salvador, on June 24. 



Charles Fort, director of creative writing, has been invited 
participate in the 1984 Alumni/Faculty Day Program at Bowlin 
Green State University in Ohio. An alumnus of Bowling Green, 
will teach regularly scheduled classes at Bowling Green in c 
writing and composition and advise students on career opport 
Fort will be a guest of the university's alumni association. 



1 
to 

g 

he 
rea 
uni 



Dr. Barbara Waxman of the English Dept. delivered a paper title 
"Remembrances of Sex Past: How Women Cope With Aging in Fiction 
by M.F.K. Fisher, Alice Monro, and Gail Godwin" at the National 
Women's Studies Association Conference, held at Douglass Colleg 
New Brunswick, N.J., June 24-28. 

Dr. William H. Overman, Jr. of the psychology department gave a,' 
invited presentation July 6 of his recent research on memory 
disorders in primates to the pharmacology group of Hoffmann 
La-Roche Drugs, Nutley, N.J. 

! 

The Wilmington Civic Ballet in co-operation with the Wilmington 
Parks and Recreation Department is offering "SUMMERDANCE '84 , | 
a series of Dance Classes from July 9th through August 16th at 
the Community Arts Center. 



:OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 1 



AUGUST 19, 1982 



SVELOPMENT 
\S NEW 

x:ation 



The UNCW Development Office originally housed in Al- 
derman Hall is now located in Kenan Auditorium. In- 
formation regarding Development, UNCW Foundation, 
public relations, CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE, UNCW Faculty/ 
Staff Telephone Directories, UNCW TODAY, (originally 
the DEVELOPMENT BULLETIN) , News Bureau, information 
services. Publications, Alumni Affairs and the UNCW 
Calendar of Events may be obtained from this depart- 
ment. Staff members include Ty Rowell, director of 
development services, (ext. 2170) Patsy Larrick, 
public information assistant, (ext. 2169) Mimi 
Cunningham, public information officer, (ext. 2171) 
Jean Farmer, publications officer, (ext. 2708) and 
Frank Bowen, alumni affairs officer, (ext. 2615). 



SLEPHONE 

^FORMATION 

\RDS 



The Development Office personnel extends a UNCW 
welcome back to all faculty and staff, it's time 
once again to fill out information cards for the 
UNCW Faculty /Staff Telephone Directory. Each em- 
ployee will receive an information card today 
along with a copy of the CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE. Please 
fill out the card and return to Patsy Larrick in 
Kenan Auditorium, room 201 no later than Friday, 
September 3. Only those cards received on or before 
that date will be included in the directory. The 
Development Office publishes the UNCW Telephone 
Directory as a service to the employees of the uni- 
versity. Distribution is limited to UNCW faculty 
and staff ONLY. 



'JCW 
DDAY 



The deadline for submitting material for inclusion 
in the next issue of UNCW TODAY (formerly called 
the DEVELOPMENT BULLETIN) is August 25. Any ma- 
terial should be sent to Jean Farmer, publications 
officer, Kisnan Auditorium, room 206. For addition- 
al information call ext. 2708. 



SYMPHONY The NC Syinphony is conducting its membership drivi 
TICKETS for the 1982-83 season. Adult season tickets are| 
students and senior citizens season tickets are $| 
The first concert scheduled for September 17 in Kj 
Auditorium will be in celebration of the 50th ann| 
versary of the NC Symphony. For additional inforl 
tion call Doug Swink at ext. 2442. 

FIRST Any department in need of upgrading first aid kitj 
AID should contact Al Barry, safety officer, at ext. 

NE'W The following new chairmen have been announced fo 

CHAIRMEN the 19 82-83 academic year: Dr. Charles Lewis, ch! 
man of the department of health, physical educati 
and recreation; Dr. Victor Zullo, acting chairman 
the department of earth sciences and Dr. Dargan 
Frierson, acting chairman of the department of ma 
matical sciences. Also, Ms. Nancy Haddock will t 
director of the associate degree program in nursi 

DEPARTMENT The Department of Biology has been renamed the Del 

CHANGES raent of Biological Sciences and the departments c 

Chemistry and Physics have been combined into the] 

Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences wittj 

Jack Levy as chairman. 

NEW CAMPUS All university checks will be disbursed from the 
PROCEDURE Cashier's Office rather than the Accounting Of fie 
Check requests will continue to be processed thrc^ 
the Accounting Office. Any questions regarding 
check distribution should be directed to Grace 
Rhodes at ext. 2164. 



NEW ACCT 
EXTENSIONS 



Charlotte Meyer 
Tammy Blizzard 
Grace Rhodes 



old ext. 2149 new 2147 
old ext. 2147 new 2146 
old ext. 2146 new 2164 



DR. FINK The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundatioi 
NAMED has named Dr. Carole Fink, associate professor oil 
history, as their UNCW campus representative. Tl 
WWNFF administers the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowshi] 
in the Humanities. The Mellon Fellowships are p; 
of a new program designed to encourage students 
unusual promise to pursue graduate training in hi 
manities and careers in higher education. Candii 
will be nominated by the campus representative a; 
sent to one of seven regional committees throughi 
the US. For further information call Carole Fia 
in the history department. 

WEEKS Dr. Gerald R. Weeks of the psychology faculty ha 
SELECTED been selected for inclusion in the 12th edition 
PERSONALITIES OF THE SOUTH. 



SENIOR A Senior Recital by David Bass will be held Augu 
RECITAL 22 at 3 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 

PAGEANT The Wilmington Jaycettes will host the Little Mi 
TO BE HELD Wilmington Pageant August 21 at 8 p.m. in Kenan 
Auditorium. Adults $3; children under 12 $2. 



The UNCW University Theatre will conduct auditions 
for George Farquhar's "The Beaux Stratagem," August 
24-25 at 7:30 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. The play, 
directed by Doug Swink, calls for 15 males and 10 
females. Production dates are scheduled for October 
1-3. 

UNCW parking decals for 1982-83 may be purchased from 
Mrs. Cornelia Royal in Belk Hall. Cost for the first 
car will be $40. A second car decal will be $10. 
Employees electing to purchase decals on August 31 
may purchase a one-week temporary parking decal for 
$2. 1982-83 decals, temporary and/or permanent, MUST 
BE DISPLAYED BY AUGUST 25. 

Faculty members are encouraged to prepare Reserve Read- 
ing Lists for the fall semester as soon as possible. 
Lists are processed in order of receipt and should be 
submitted to the Library at least one week prior to 
class assignments. Reserve Lists should be submitted 
on forms available at the Reserve Desk or from de- 
partmental secretaries. 

UNCW Freshmen Orientation will be conducted in Kenan 
Auditorium TODAY beginning at 7:30 a.m. 

Registration for graduate students will be held TODAY 
from 4:30-5:30 p.m. in Hanover Hall. 

Monday Night in the Park will present Jim Ritchey & 
Bejae Fleming August 23 at 8 p.m. in the Greenfield 
Amphitheatre. 

An Interfaith Unity Gospel Concert will be held 
August 28 at 7 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. $2.50 for 
advance tickets (call Bettye Greene at ext. 2369); 
$3 at the door and $1.50 for children under 12. 

A welcome is extended to Alice Penland, library 
technical assistant in the Library Services Depart- 
ment. 

The Personnel Department has a supply of Physician 
Statements for Disability Due to or Contributed to 
by Pregnancy. It is the employee's responsibility to 
have this form completed in duplicate and forwarded 
through supervisory channels then to Personnel. 

Mrs. Joyce Jackson of the Financial Aid Office has 
successfully completed the CPR Training Course which 
was recently conducted by the American Red Cross. 



Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscita 
the American Red Cross wil 
faculty and staff. Intere 
tact Al Barry at ext. 210 8 
vance to indicate which cl 
attend. All books and ins 
provided at no cost. All 
at the American Red Cross 
Front Street. For class s 



tion classes conducted by 
1 once again be offered to 
sted persons should con- 

at least one week in ad- 
ass he/she would like to 
tructional material will be 
classes will be conducted 
Building located at 411 S. 
chedules see next page. 



CPR CLASS 
SCHEDULE 



September 11 
September 14 
September 14 
October 9 
October 12 
October 12 & 
October 26 & 
November 9 
November 9 i 
November 13 
December 14 { 
December 14 
December 18 





8 


30 


a.m. 


to 


5 


00 


p.m 




8 


30 


a.m. 


to 


5 


00 


p.m 


& 16 


6 


30 


p.m. 


to 


10 


30 


p.m 




8 


30 


a.m. 


to 


5 


00 


p.m 




8 


30 


a.m. 


to 


5 


00 


p.m 


14 


6 


30 


p.m. 


to 


10 


30 


p.m 


28 


6 


30 


p.m. 


to 


5 


00 


p.m 




8 


30 


a.m. 


to 


5 


00 


p.m 


11 


6 


30 


p.m. 


to 


10 


30 


p.m 




8 


30 


a.m. 


to 


5 


00 


p.m 


16 


6 


30 


p.m. 


to 


10 


30 


p.m 




8 


30 


a.m. 


to 


5 


00 


p.m 




8 


30 


a.m. 


to 


5 


00 


p.m 



HPER All of the below listed facilities are available 
SCHEDULE to faculty, staff and students of UNCW. ID must 
FOR FALL available upon request. 



HANOVER HALL 


*8 


a.m. 


- 


9:00 p.m. MTWT 




8 


a.m. 


- 


5: 45 p.m. F 




9 


a.m. 


- 


4:30 p.m. Saturd 


WEIGHT ROOM 


*8 


a.m. 


_ 


9:00 p.m. MTWT 




8 


a.m. 


- 


5:45 p.m. F 




9 


a.m. 


- 


4:30 p.m. Saturd 


RACQUETBALL COURTS 


*8 


a.m. 


- 


9:00 p.m. MTWT 




8 


a.m. 


- 


5: 45 p.m. F 




8 


a.m. 


- 


4:30 p.m. Saturd 


TENNIS COURTS 


*8 


30 a 


.m 


- 9:00 p.m. MTW 




8 


30 a 


.m 


- 5:30 p.m. F 




9 


00 a 


.m 


- 4:30 p.m. Sat 


SWIMMING POOL 










(free swim) 


11 


a.m. 


- 


1:00 p.m. MWThu 




11 


a.m. 


- 


12:30 p.m. Tuesd 




12 


noon 


- 


3:00 p.m. Satur 




Nic 


ihts M&W only 7:30 - 9:] 



♦Except during class and athletic 



CLASS TIMES; 
RACQUETBALL 



M-W 9 a.m. - 10:15 a.m. 
M-W 1 p.m. - 2:15 p.m. 
T-T 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. 



TENNIS 



T-T 8 a.m. - 9:15 a.m. 
T-T 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. 
T-T 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. 



:ampus 



UNC by the csca 




■VELOPMENT 
KENAN 



iONE 
FO 



PUBLISHED BY THE DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIII, NUMBER 2 



AUGUST 26, 1982 



This is a reminder that the UNCV/ Development Office originally 
housed in Alderman Hall is now located in Kenan Auditorium. 
Anyore needing to contact any of the foUcv/ing staff members 
of the Development Office may do so in Kenan Auditorium: 
Ty Rowell, director of development services, ext. 2170 
Patsy Larrick, public information assistant, ext. 2169 
Mimi Cunningham, public information officer, ext. 2171 
Jean Farmer, publications officer, ext. 2708 
Frank Bowen, alumni affairs officer, ext, 2616 

Faculty and staff who wish to be included in the 1982-83 UNCW 
Faculty/Staff Telephone Directory must turn their information 
cards in by September 3, Ail cards should be directed to Patsy 
Larrick in Kenan Auditorium. 



MPHONY 



:DICAL 
SURANCE 



=NTAL 
PDATE 



cP ON 
^MPUS 



Season tickets for the NC Symphony are presently on sale in 
Kenan Auditorium. Adult season tickets are $2'f| students and 
senior citizens season tickets are $18, For ackfitional information 
contact Doug Swink at ext. 2^42, 

Employees who were on the Blue Cross-Blue Shield Plan, as of 
June 30, 1982, should have by this time received a completed 
computer information form for the new insurance claims processor, 
EDS FederaL It is inrperative that the form be returned to the 
Personnel Office NO LATER THAN AUGUST 31, 1982, to insure 
continuance of tT>edicai insurance. Anyone who did not receive a 
form should contact the Personnel Office TODAY. (Persons 
hired since 3une 30 will not receive this form as the necessary 
information has already been submitted.) 

A dental insurance program with Compredent, a prepaid dental 
company, was under consideration by UNCW, however, area den- 
tists are not willing to be providers under a prepaid plan. There- 
fore, negotiations for dental insuremce are "on hold." In the 
event of a change in status, employees will be notified. 

John Pezzonia, VALIC representative, (Variable Annuity Life 
Insurance Company) will be on campusThursday, September 9, 
and Friday, September 10, in room 208 of Aldern'an Hall. 
Appointments may be made by contacting Alice Maile in the 
Personnel Office at ext. 2392. 



NEW A UNCW welcome is extended to Cleta Mosiey and Alice PenU 

EMPLOYEES in the Library Services Department, 

PLAY The University Readers Theatre will hold auditions for Shirley 

AUDITIONS 3ackson's We Have Always Lived in the Castle Wednesday and 

Thursday, August 25 and 26, at 7 pjn. and Friday, August 27, e 
^:30 pjn. in the lobby of Kenan Kail. Roles for 7 men and 8 
women are available. For information call Carole Tallant at 
ext. 2t^lt3. 

MOVIE The UNCW Fine Arts Committee will present "Dont Raise the 

SCHEDULED Bridge-Lower the River" September 2 at 8 pjn. in Kenan 

Auditorium. UNCW students with ID $1; non-students $2. 

GOSPEL A Gospel Sing will be conducted in Kenan Auditorium August 

SING 27 at 7 pjn. 

GOSPEL The Faith Temple Church of God in Christ will host a gospel 

PROGRAM sing in Kenan Auditorium August 28 at 7 pjn. Admission for 

adults will be $2J0; children under 12 will be $1.50. 

PROGRAMS The Office of Special Programs is sponsoring a variety of pro- 

OFFERED grams designed especially for faculty eind staff. Aerobics, fasi 

walkers, running for fitness and beginning tennis for older adu. 

will be offered from 12 noon to 1 pjn. and IpjT), to 2 pjn. 

Registration will end September 1. For additional informatior 

call Diane Talley at ext. 2798. 

MCGUIRE Dr. Phillip McGuire of the history faculty has recently been a{ 

APPOINTED pointed to the Board of Directors for DARE, Inc. 

HOLLIFIELD Dr. Lucinda HoUifield of the Department of HPER spoke on 

SPEAKS Physical Fitness during the August meeting of the Greenville, 

SC, Civitan Club. 

NEW New gym basket assignment hours have been assigned for stafij 

HOURS faculty and students. The hours are 8 ajn. - k pjn, Monday - 

Friday. 

ATHLETIC Faculty, staff and students using equipment from the athletic 

REMINDER basketroom are responsible for returning items at the end of t 

same day of use. 

DR. GEORGE Dr. Robert George, professor of biological sciences, delivered 

LECTURES series of 'RACOVITZA Memorial lectures' in Antarctic Biology 

in the Romanian Academy of Sciences at Bucharest July 10-15 
In collaboration with Dr. James Oliver of UNC-Charlotte and 
Romanian oceanographers, Dr. George conducted an expedition 
3uly 18-28 to study adaptations of animal life in the hypoxic 
zone of extremely low oxygen conditions that are found only i 
the Black Sea. 



PFERRER Suzanne Pferrer, instructor of writing in the English departme 

EARNS PHD. has completed requirements for her PhJ). in English at Vander 

University. Faculty members from various departments at UNi 
served as subjects for her dissertation study, "The Composing/, 
Revising Processes of Experienced Adult Writers and the Effei 
of Editing Intervention." 



lARTIN 
,UTHORS 



APER 
(ELIVERED 



:CMPUTING 
lOTICE 



ORCHESTRA 
kUDlTlONS 



:ONCERT 



SSOCIATION 



EW 

XTENSION 



Dr. Ned H. Martin of the Department of Chemical and Physical 
Sciences has co-authored a paper entitled "Synthesis and Photc- 
oxygenation of Some Substituted l-Benzyl-3, 'j-dlhydroisoquino- 
lines, Mecharism of Enamine Photo-oxygenation" with Dr. 
Charles W, 3efford of the University of Geneva, The paper 
appeared recently in HELVETICA CHIMICA ACTA, the journal 
of the Swiss Chemical Society. 

David Webster of the Biological Sciences Department recently 
gave a paper entitled "Systerr-atics and evolution of bats of 
the genus Glosscphaga" during the 62nd annual meeting of the 
American Society of Mammalogists held at Snowbird, Utah. 
He also published three papers this sutrnser in the Mammalian 
Species series published by the ASM. The papers were about the 
western harvest mouse, Aztec fruit-eating bat and Toltec 
fruit-eating bat. In addition, "Comments on the status of 
Musonycteris harrisoni (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)" was pub- 
lished in the Occasional Papers of The Museum, Texas Tech 
University. 

Dr. Paul E. Hosier has been appointed the Coordinator for 
Academic Computing Services. Mr. Michael E. Sheehan is the 
analyst/programmer and Mrs. Jane Zirkle is the data entry 
operator. Dr. Hosier is in the new Academic Computing 
Center located in rooms 221 and 222 of the Social and Beha- 
vioral Sciences Building. Dr. Hosier may be reached at ext. 
2803, Mr. Sheehan at ext. 2804 and Mrs, Zirkle at ext. 2805. 

The UNCW/Community Orchestra wjll hold supplemental au- 
ditions next Tuesday, August 31, at 7 pjn. in room 114 of Kenan 
Hall. Interested persons should contact Dr. Joe Hickman at 
ext. 2394, (All sections have potential openings.) Performance 
dates are scheduled for October 12; December 5 & 12; February 
22, 1983, and April 26, 1983. 

Season tickets (no single admission tickets) are still available 
for the Wilmington Concert Association series. Regular member- 
ship is $25 for five concerts; student membership is $15. 
The concerts include San Francisco Opera with Rigoletto, 
October 20; Panyris Lyras, pianist and 1981 Van Cliburn com- 
petition winner, November 29; The New American Ragtime En- 
semble, January 9, 1983; The Hartford Ballet, February 23, 1983, 
and The Smithsonian Chamber Orchestra, April 5, 1983. Ticket 
information may be obtained from Dr. Deas at ext. 2390. 

Mr. Ed Jones of the housing office has a new telephone ex- 
tension. He can now be reached at 2405. 



ONDAY 
IChT 



OPIES 

VAILABLE 



Monday Night in the Park will present its last performance for 
this year with Larry Lanier and his Band of Ccld Monday, 
August 30 at 8 pjn. in the Greenfield Amphitheatre, 

Copies of Volunteer Opportunities are available through the 
Student Union/Activities Office (ext, 2285) for faculty memoers 
who would like to encourage their students to do community 
volunteer work 



COMPUTING The Academic CompMJting Facility, S-22i, will be open during 

SCHEDULE the following hours, beginning Thursday, August 26: 



Monday ■ 


. Thursday 8 ajn. - midnight 


Friday 


8 ajn. - 5 pjn. 


Sunday 


It pjn. - midnight 



An operator /consultant will be available to assist users in 
operation of the terminal and to answer programming questions 
during these hours. 



NEW 
FACULTY 



A welcome is extended to the following new full-time faculty 
members: ' 

Dr. Wyman G. Fair - mathematical sciences 

Dr. Harold W. Keller - biology 

Mr. A. Carl Nelson - mathematical sciences 

Ms. Marjorie L. Mclnerney - management & marketing 

Dr. Gary A. Olson - English j 

Mr. Richard A. Roscher - accountancy I 

Mr. Marc R. Ellington - health, physical education & recreation; 

W.r. Richard P. Tollo - earth sciences j 

Dr. Ronald E. Copley - economics & finance 

Dr. Charles A. Lewis - health, physical education & recreation 

Ms. 3ean M. Ketchur - nursing 

Dr. Michael T. Perone - psychology 

Dr. Mary E, Lindemann - history j 

Dr. Barthel W, Huff - mathematical sciences 1 

Ms. Jean Muir - creative arts 

Mr. Charles Fort, 3r. - English 

Dr. Louis 3. LaNunziata, 3r. - curricular studies 

Mr. Fred B. Davenport - management & marketing 

Mr. Richard A. Laws - earth sciences 

Ms. Carol B. Rogers - nursing 

Mr. Brian F. Davis - physics 

Dr. Sybil K. Miller - chemistry 

Mr. Charles L. Earney - accountancy 

Dr. Lawrence B. Cahoon - biology 

Dr. Gabriel G. Lugo - mathematical sciences 

Dr. Lloyd E. Rohler - creative arts 

Ms. Grace A. Rush - health, physical education & recreation 

Mr. William 3. Olejniczak - history 

Ms. Barbara F. Waxman - English 

Dr. 3oann M. Mount - modern languages 

Ms. Inge B. Stites - modern languages 

Mr. William D. Webster - biology 

Mr. William M. Wadman - economics & finance 

Ms. Anne Russell - English 

Mr. Bobby Martin - athletics 

Ms. Leslie Davis - marketing & management 



^i 



:OMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv the .sci 




PUBLISHED BY THE DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 3 



SEPTEMBER 2, 1982 



lOVIE 
SCHEDULED 



The UNCW Fine Arts Conunittee will present "Let's Do It 
Again" September 9 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Admis- 
sion is $1 for students with ID and $2 for non students. 



^ALIC REP 
)N CAMPUS 



John Pezzoni, VALIC representative, will be on campus 
September 9 and September 10 in room 208 of Alderman 
Hall. Appointments may be made by calling Alice Maile 
at extension 2392. 



SUPPLEMENTAL 
[NSURANCE 



Brochures were issued recently to full-time faculty members 
regarding Travelers Supplemental Liability Insurance. Ad- 
ditional copies may be obtained by calling Dianne Smith at 
extension 2162. 



ffiDICAL 
[NSURANCE 



The Personnel Office anticipates receiving medical insur- 
ance membership cards and information regarding benefits pro- 
vided by the State plan around the last week in this month. 
The information will be forwarded to all faculty and staff 
ASAP. 



:OPIES 
WAILABLE 



3UEST 
2DIT0R 



Copies of VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES are available through the 
Student Union/Activities Office (extension 2285) for faculty 
members who would like to encourage their students to do 
community volunteer work. 

Dr. Gary A. Olson, new Director of the Center for Writing, 
(formerly the Writing Center) has recently been selected 
guest editor of the 1984 winter issue of TEACHING ENGLISH 
IN THE TWO-YEAR COLLEGE, a journal dealing with scholarly 
and pedagogical concern in English. His issue will be 
called "Readability: Theory and Practice" and will be de- 
voted to the topic of readability in Business, Technical and 
Humanistic Communications. 



:enter for 

(WRITING 



The Center for Writing will be open from 9 a.m. to 12 noon 
and from 1-3 p.m. Monday through Friday. Also, Monday 
and Tuesday nights from 6 - 9 p.m. 



ARTICLE 
PUBLISHED 



TALLEY 
EARNS DEGREE 



MCGUIRE 
ELECTED 



KECHLEY 
AWARDED 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



CENTRAL 
STORES 



Dr. Cecil L. Willis of the department of sociology/anthro- 
pology has had an article entitled "Durlcheim' s Concept of 
Anomie: Some Observations" published in the spring, 1982 
issue of SOCIOLOGICAL INQUIRY. 

Diane Talley of the Office of Special Programs has recently 
received her Masters of Science degree from UNC-CH. While 
at Chapel Hill Mrs. Talley assisted faculty in the departme 
of recreation administration by teaching three undergraduat 
courses. She was also invited to judge the 1982 North 
Carolina State Class III Gymnastics Championships for both 
Optional and Compulsory competition. 

Dr. Phillip McGuire, member of the history faculty, was iu£ 
elected honorary member of the Hattie M. Strong Foundatioi 
of Washington, D.C., an interest-free loan agency for 
graduate education. 

David Kechley, composer and member of the Creative Arts 
Music Division faculty, has received an award from the 
American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers for 
1982-83. Such awards are given to members of ASCAP 
in recognition of prestigious works and/or performances 
of work not licensed by the society. 

Registration is presently underway for the following progr 
being offered by the Office of Special Programs: Aerobics; 
(session 2) , Fast Walkers (session 2) , Beginning Tennis 
(session 2), Adult Karate, Running for Fitness, Autobio- 
graphical Writing, Mysteries of the Human Brain, Individua 
Weight Control, Communication Skills for Managers, Self 
Motivation, Self Management Techniques, Classroom Discipli 
and Management for Teachers. Courses for children includo 
Creative Movement, Karate, Karate for Teenagers and Gym- 
nastics, all session 2. 

The following data processing items may now be purchased 
from Central Stores . The items should be added to your Ce 
tral Stores price list. They include: 



250-10001 Cards, Data, Natural, Green OMR Ink. 

250-10002 Cards, Data, Natural, Blue, OMR Ink. 

250-10003 Cards, Data, White, no print 

250-10004 Cards, Data, Red, Black Ink 



2000/box 



7 



2000A>ox 6 

2000/box 

2000/box 



250-10005 Cards, Data, Natural, Black Ink 2000/box 

250-12011 Labels, Continuous, Form, 1x5, White 5000/box 

250-12010 Labels, Continuous, Form, 2x5, White 5000/box 

250-57301 Paper, Continuous Form, 9>5xll, White, 20# 2500/box 

250-57302 Paper, Continuous, Form, 14 7/8x8S, Green 

Bar, 15# 3500/box 

485-12010 Cleaner, Anti-static for CRT Terminal Screen Can 



2. L] 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv the »ea 




PUBLISHED BY THE DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 4 



SEPTEMBER 9, 1982 



The personnel office anticipates receiving medical insurance 
membership cards and information regarding benefits under the 
new State insured plan around the last week in this month. 
The information will be forwarded to all faculty and staff 
ASAP. 

Anyone who has a major medical claim that has not been filed 
with Blue Cross Blue Shield is asked to file the claim as 
soon as possible after September 30, 1982. It is necessary 
to close out all claims with BCBS before the change-over to 
the self-insured medical insureuice program beginning October 1, 
1982. BCBS claim forms may be obtained from the UNCW Personnel 
Office. 

Faculty and staff using the IBM copiers located in the library 
must enter the correct departmental accounting number on the 
form provided by the library. Failure to use the correct 
account number results in billing difficulties for the library. 
Account nuirtoers are available from departmental secretaries. 

The NC Symphony is conducting its membership drive for the 
1982-83 season. Tickets may be purchased from Doug Swink 
in Kenan Auditorium or by calling extension 2442. The first 
concert will be in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the 
NC Symphony and is scheduled for September 17 at 8 p.m. in 
Kenan Auditorium. Adult season tickets are $24; students and 
senior citizens season tickets are $18. 

The UNCW Fine Arts Committee will present "The Creature from 
the Black Lagoon" September 16 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 
UNCW students with ID $1; non-students $2^ 

A welcome is extended to the following new full-time faculty 
members: Ms. Virginia C. Payne in the nursing department, Mr. 
Ray Funderburk, III, in the English department and Mr. Frank J. 
Bongiorno in the creative arts department. Other new employees 
include Bobby Meyers, housekeeping assistant in the auxiliary 
services department; Lisa Rogers, clerk-steno in the biological 
sciences department and Kimberly Stowell, computer operator in 
the office of information systems. 



CAR 
WASHES 



The PI KAPPA PHI Fraternity will sponsor a car wash for FACU 
ONLY Friday, September 10 from 1 - 5:30 p.m. behind the Pub. 
FREE! ! 



The UNCW Chapter of the Student North Carolina Association o 
Educators (SNCAE) will sponsor a car wash this Saturday at 
Wendy's located on S. College Road from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Th 
cost will be $1.50 per car. 

FACULTY The first meeting of the Faculty Senate for this academic ye 
SENATE will be held at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, September 14, in room 218 
of the Chemistry Physics Building. 

AAUW Mary Beth Dail, 1982 UNCW graduate now enrolled in the marin 
MEETING biology graduate program, will speak to the Wilmington Brand 
of the American Association of University Women September 15 
7:15 p.m. at Balentine's Cafeteria. She will show slides an 
discuss her trip to Lake Baikal in the U.S.S.R. this summer 
with Dr. Ralph Brauer and the UNCW research team. Faculty a 
staff women are invited to attend the dutch dinner meeting. 
Membership in AAUW is open to any woman college graduate; ho| 
ever, you do not have to be a member to attend the meeting. 
For further information contact Mimi Cunningham at ext. 2171, 

I 
BOOK Randall Library is planning an exhibit of books by UNCW fact! 

EXHIBIT in the lobby display case to run between September 24 and > 

October 12. Anyone who has had a book published in the pastj 

five years is asked to notify the library (ext. 2271) by j 

September 22. A book should be made available for use in th 

display. All authors are invited to gather in the Rare Book 

Room of Randall Library with copies of their books on Octdbe 

12 between 10 a.m. and noon to meet with area media and dist 

their books. 



ROWELL Tyrone Rowell, director of development services, will be a 
GUEST featured guest on the Jim Burns Show Friday, September 10. 

Rowell is a member of the Board of Directors of the Cape Fe« 
Area United Way and vice chairman for support services for i 
United Way campaign. He will be discussing the support act: 
ties involved in the upcoming United Way campaign as well a: 
the Day in the Park scheduled for September 11 and the Oak 
Ridge Boys Benefit Concert for October 17. The university 
community and their families are invited to attend the free 
in the Park scheduled for Hugh MacRae Park from 10 a.m. to 
this Saturday. 

iMUSICAL "Little Chicago," touring broadway musical, will be present 
PRODUCTION September 14 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Students with 
$2; non-students $5, 



HOLLIFIELD 

CONDUCTS 

WORKSHOP 



TOPLIN 
FEATURED 



Dr. Lucinda Hollifield of the Department of HPER conducted 
Movement Education Workshop for physical education teachers 
in Pickens County, S.C., home of the National Football 
Champions, the Clemson Tigers!! 

Dr. Robert Toplin of the history faculty had his historical 
docu-drama for TV featured in the Sunday, September 5 issue 
the New York Times, "News of the Week in Review." 



RATORIO 
3C1ETY 



The Wilmington Oratorio Society will be rehearsing this year 
in Kenan 121 on Tuesday evenings from 7:30 - 9 p.m. The group 
is preparing a program of Christmas music for December, a sacred 
music program for Jarsuary 16 and a program of American music 
for April 24. The conductor is Diane Gardner. New members 
will be accepted through September. 



3. LEVY 
3 SERVE 



Ms. Doris Levy, part-time lecturer in the creative arts depart- 
ment, has been asked to serve as a charter member on the board 
of the North Carolina Dance Alliance, a newly formed state-wide 
organization to foster dance. The Alliance will serve as a re- 
source for dancers, dance companies, teachers and dance-related 
personnel in NC. Ms. Levy is director of the Wilmington Civic 
Ballet and its affiliate school. 



XTICLE 
JBLISHED 



An article, "The Arts in Education: The Problem with Success," 
by Dennis J. Sporre, chairman of the department of creative 
arts, appeared in the September/October 1982 issue of THE 
AMERICAN MUSIC TEACHER, the official journal of the Music 
Teachers National Association. Also, Mr. Sporre presented a 
paper entitled "Some Legal Conclusions Regarding Non-Renewal 
and Dismissal" at the national convention of the American 
Theatre Association in New York City. 



JLLIVAN 
JBLISHES 



Dr. Sally Sullivan of the English department has had her essay, 
"From Thought To Word: Learning to Trust Images," accepted 
for publication in the winter issue of THE WRITING CENTER 
JOURNAL . 



I^CULTY 
ELECTED 



Dr. Charles Lewis and Dr. Tom Skalko of the Department of HPER 
have been selected to serve on the Advisory Board of the New 
Hanover County Special Olympics . 



:OMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv the .^scii 




PUBLISHED BY THE DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 5 



SEPTEMBER 16, 1982 



The NC Symphony will perform in Kenan Auditoriiim Friday, 
September 17, at 8 p.m. Tickets are still available from Doug 
Swink in Kenan Auditorium. 



The Faculty Meeting will be held TODAY at 4 p.m. 
Auditoriiam. 



in Morton Hall 



October is open enrollment for Prepaid Legal Services. Mr. 
Leo Wagoner, PLS representative, will be on campus October 7 
at 10:30 a.m. in A-215 to present a slide show and talk with 
present participants and employees interested in enrolling in 
the program. 

The Wilmington Parks and Recreation Department will host Rob 
Nathanson in four upcoming concerts to be held at Waterfront 
Park. The first concert is scheduled for Saturday, September 
18, at 5 p.m. with the Concordia Strings in a program that will 
feature baroque music. Open to the public. No charge. 

Information regarding insurance benefits under the new state 
insured plan will be forwarded to all employees as soon as it 
is received by the personnel office. 

Any major medical claims for Blue Cross Blue Shield must be 
filed as soon as possible after September 30, 1982. These 
claims neea to be closed out before changing to the new self- 
insured medical insurance program which will begin October 1. 
For additional information or medical forms contact the UNCW 
Personnel Office. 



The personnel office will offer a speedwriting course begin- 
ning October 5. The course will be taught each Tuesday from 
2-5 p.m. for 11 weeks. For additional information contact the 
personnel office. The course is in conjunction with the Office 
Skills Program sponsored by UNCW and Cape Fear Technical In- 
stitute. 



BRADLEY Dr. Michael Bradley, associate professor in the department oi 
CHOSEN psychology, has been chosen for inclusion in the 18th editior 
of Who's Who in the South and Southwest. 

ARTICLE Sandy D. Martin of the philosophy & religion faculty has had 
PUBLISHED article, "Black Baptists, Foreign Missions, and African Colot 
zation, 1814-1882," published in Sylvia Jacobs', BLACK AMERK 
AND THE MISSIONARY MOVEMENT IN AFRICA {Westport, Conn.: Greer 
wood Press, 1982). He also delivered a paper, "Black Baptir.t 
and Foreign Missions: A Case Study of Black Religious Separe 
tism in the New Nation, 1814-1850," at the annual meeting of 
the Society of Historians of the Early American Republic hel< 
in Memphis, Tennessee, in July. 

WELLS An article by Richard Wells, assistant professor of sociolo- 
ARTICLE gy, was published recently in RESEARCH IN HIGHER EDUCATION 
(Vol. 17 No. 1). The article is entitled "The Becoming 
Place: A Study of Education Change in a Small College." 



GUEST Vernon F. Bellecourt, member of the Central Council of the i 
LECTURER American Indian Movement (A.I.M.) will speak September 22 at 
4 p.m. in Morton Hall, room 100. He will discuss the organi 
tion and goals of the American Indian movement and the growi 
phenomena of Pan-American indigenous movements. Also he wil 
give his personal views on recent developments in Nicaragua 
where he was an invited delegate at a United Nations confere 
on racism and racial discrimination. The event is sponsored 
the departments of history, philosophy & religion, political! 
science, sociology/anthropology cuid the campus ministry. Al 
faculty and staff are invited. No admission charge. 

ESSAY Dr. Thomas Schmid of the philosophy & religion department ha 

PUBLISHED had his essay ," So cratic Moderation and Se If -Knowledge, " acce 

ed for publication by the JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOF 



FINK A review by Dr. Carole Fink, associate professor of history 

REVIEWS of German Minorities and the Third Reich: Ethnic Germans of 
East Central Europe between the Wars by Anthony Komjathy anc 
Rebecca Stockwell (New York and London: 19 80) has appeared i 
Fast Euror)P = n Quarterly, Vol. XVI, No. 8 (September, 1982) 



GALIZIO Dr. Mark Galizio of the psychology department preserited a 
PAPER paper at the annual meeting of the American Psychological A£ 
sociation in Washington, DC, August 23. The paper, co-authc 
ed by Flo Stein, executive director of the Cape Fear Substai 
Abuse Center, was entitled "Sensation seeking, reinforcement 
and drug use." 



PLANT 
SALE 



The UNCW Biology Club will hold its annual fall plant sale 
TOMORROW from 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. at the greenhouse. Many typej 
of tropical plants will be for sale. 



LERCH 
ESSAY 



Patricia Lerch of the anthropology faculty has had an essay 
"American Indian Identity and Federal Recognitiorv" pufclishei 
in the Septenfcer issue of THE HUMANIST SOCIOLOGIST. 



Mr. Dewey Jordan, American Family Life Assurance representative, 
will be on campus October 13 from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. in A-208 to 
discuss the revised Cancer Plan Program. The benefits under 
the new plan have increased. The plan is optional for present 
members. New members may enroll at tliis time also. 

The Delta Zeta Sorority is sponsoring a car wash for faculty, 
staff and students TODAY from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. behind the Pub. 
Cars will be washed and vacuumed for $2. 

The Red Cross is sponsoring a blood drive September 21 from 
8:30 a.m - 2:30 p.m. and September 22 from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. at 
James Hall. Faculty and staff are encouraged to "give the gift 
of life." 

Mimi Cunningham, public information officer, has been appointed 
by the New Hanover County Commissioners to a three-year term on 
the Library Advisory Board for the New Hanover County Public 
Library. She was a charter member of the Friends of the Public 
Library, served two terms as treasurer and is currently ser- 
ving as vice president. 

Randall Library will host an exhibit of books by UNCW faculty 
in the library lobby display case to run between September 24 
and October 12. Anyone who has had a book published in the past 
five years is asked to notify the library at extension 2271. A 
book should be made available for use in the display. All 
authors are invited to gather in the Rare Book Room on October 12 
with copies of their books where they will meet with area media. 

Miss Jean Muir, UNCW Foundation Distinguished Professor, was a 
guest on the TV program, Calendar, (WWAY) Sunday, September 12. 
She was interviewed regarding her acting and teaching careers. 
Portions of her Acting I class were filmed in progress. 

The quick copy press in the UNCW Copy Center will not be operat- 
ing on Monday , September 20 . Due to a maintenance check on the 
machine, "while you wait service" will not be available on that 
day, however, the print shop will be open as usual. 

The Jim Burns Show has featured several members of the UNCW 
faculty and staff this past week. Associate Dean of Students 
Abby Hastiiigb and Campus Police Chief Win Norman discussed 
UNCW's rape prevention and awareness programs on September 14; 
Dr. Catherine Galizio, instructor for the Office of Special 
Programs, appeared September 15 to discuss a program she is con- 
ducting on individual weight control; and Charles Fort, director 
of the creative writing program, read some poems and discussed 
the writing program September 16. Also, Joe Hickman appeared 
on the show to speak about the NC Symphony. 



Jean Farmer, publications officer, has been appointed to the 
board of directors of the Friends for Public Radio. She will 
be helping FPR in their public relations efforts to get a 
public radio station in Wilmington. 



HUMANIST THE fHUMANIST SOCIOLOGIST is a quarterly publication edited 
SOCIOLOGIST by Richard Wells of the sociology department, printed by 

Brenda Nelson and Laura Warren of the UNCW Print Shop with 
editorial assistance from Vernetta Brightmon of the sociology 
department. Thirteen hundred copies are sent across the 
nation and to several other countries. The publication is 
sponsored by the Association for Humanist Sociology and has 
been prepared on the UNCW campus for the past three years. 
Anyone interested in obtaining back issues may do so by 
contacting the department of sociology /anthropology . 

FACULTY Several members of the sociology/anthropology faculty will bi 
PARTICIPATE participating in the national meetings of The Association 

for Humanist Sociology to be held in Washington, DC, October 
21-24. Cecil Willis, David Shevach and Richard Wells will 
give presentations in a session entitled "Applied Social 
Research and the United Way." Gary Faulkner will chair a 
session entitled "Issues on Humanism and Militarism." 
Patricia Lerch will give a presentation on the role of the 
anthropologist in working with the Waccajnaw-Siouan Develop- 
ment Association. James Sabella will give a presentation on 
"Carolina Crude: The Ins and Outs of Fighting an Oil Refine 
Diane Miller will present a paper entitled "Stresses on Over 
seas Military Families." Richard Wells will chair a session 
entitled "Hunger and Humanist Sociologists" and give a pre- ; 
sentation on the teaching of the sociology of hunger. 



HISTORY The UMCW Historical Society will present two films, "Force c 
FILMS Character " and "Repxiblican Monarch," TONIGHT at 7 p.m. in 
Morton Hall Auditorium. The films, dealing with Charles 
DeGaulle, are open to the public at no charge. 



CENTRAL 
STORES 



The following 
Stock # 



is a list of new items in the UNCW Central Stc 
Description Unit 



285-48234 Lamp, projector, DFK 

285-48235 Lamp, projector, EFM Chinon 

285-48236 Lamp, projector, DYP 

285-48237 Lamp, projector, EHA 

485-12010 Cleaner, "Screen Clean," Anti-Static 

for Terminal Screens 

618-49730 Markers, Transparency (8/set) 

618-49801 Mats, Office chair, Masonite, 48"x54' 

618-49850 Microfiche file pockets #F1146 

618-57861 Punch, 2-hole, adjustable 



each 
each 
each 
each 

can 

set 

each 

sheet 

each 



i 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



IJNC by the ^sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 6 



SEPTEMBER 23, 1982 



i 



Attached to today's issue of the CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE is a bio- 
graphical information form from the UNCW News Bureau. All 
faculty and administrative personnel are encouraged to com- 
plete this form and return it along with a current curriculum 
vita to the news bureau located in Kenan Auditorium. For 
additional information call Mimi Cunningham at ext. 2171. 

All items for inclusion in the October UNCW Calendar of 
Events should be sent to Mimi Cunningham in Kenan Auditorium, 
or call ext. 2171 before September 27. 

Copies of the 1982-83 Channel Marker, UNCW's activities calen- 
dar, are availcible to faculty and staff by calling ext. 2285. 

State officials and representatives of Electronics Data 
Systems will be on campus TODAY at 3il5 p.m. in King Hall 
Auditorium to discuss the new health benefits plan. The ses- 
sion is expected to last approximately two hours. 

UNCW and Cape Fear Tech will offer a speedwriting course in 
conjunction with the "Office Skills Program." The course will 
be taught each Tuesday from 2-5 p.m. for 11 weeks in C-217 
beginning October 5. For additional information contact Alice 
Maile in tne personnel office at ext. 2392. 

October is open enrollment for Prepaid Legal Services. Mr. 
Leo Wagoner, PLS representative, will be on campus October 7 
at 10:30 a.m. in A-215 to present a slide show and talk with 
present participants cind employees interested in enrolling. 

Dr. Patricia Rensma will speak on "Abortion: Defining the 
Issues" at the first meeting of the Philosophy & Religion Lecture 
Series September 30 at 8 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium. No charge. 



THE 1982-83 UNCW FACULTY/STAFF TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES 
ARE EXPECTED TO BE READY FOR DISTRIBUTION THE FIRST 
WEEK OF OCTOBER. 



INSURANCE Any major medical claims for Blue Cross Blue Shield must be 
REMINDER filed as soon as possible after September 30, 1982. These 

claims need to be closed out before changing to the new self' 
insured medical insurance program which will begin October 1 
For medical forms or information contact the personnel offic( 



REP. ON 
CAMPUS 



CANCER 
INSURANCE 



John Pezzoni, VALIC representative, will be on caimpus Friday 
October 8, in A-208. Appointments may be made by calling 
Alice Maile at ext. 2392. 

Mr. Dewey Jordan, American Family Life Assurance representa- 
tive, will be on campus October 13 in A-208 from 10 a.m. to 
2 p.m. to talk with present participants about the revised 
Cancer Care program. New members may enroll at this time all 

CONCERT The UNCW Creative Arts Department will present Jane K. Mathei 

SCHEDULED soprano, assisted by Sherrill V. Martin, pianist, in concert 

September 24 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditoriiim. Miss Mathew wil 

sing works of Mozart, Wolf, Purcell, Faure , Rorem and Puccin 

No charge . 

NEW New employees on campus include: Richard Haley, student ceni 

EMPLOYEES program director in student activities; Fermond Parson and 

Michael Hasty, housekeeping assistants in the physical plant! 

Eugene Jones, diving tender in biological sciences and Rober 

Hines, laborer in the physical plant. 

'i 
SULLIVAN Dr. Sally Sullivan of the English department will have one c 
POEM her poems, "D & C," published in the winter issue of THE I; 

LAUREL REVIEW. ! 

WORKSHOP Joan Marie Ketchur of the nursing department conducted a onei 
CONDUCTED day workshop on Performance Evaluatj.on and Counseling at 

Vanderbilt University September 14. The workshop was part c 
a five day series of programs for nurse managers sponsored I 
Vanderbilt University's Continuing Education Department in 
their School of Nursing. 



SWIM Adult swimming lessons will be offered Tuesday evenings froi 

LESSONS 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. beginning October 5 and ending November 9 

in the university pool. For additional information call ex 

2237 or 2232. 

FINK Dr. Carole Fink, associate professor of history, served as i: 

SERVES of six nationally selected panelists for the Basic Researchj 

Grants Program awarded by the National Endowment for the | 

Humanities September 17-18. i 

WARNER David E. Warner, retired & part-time lecturer in the HPER 
LECTURES department, conducted a lecture/demonstration on "Relaxatio 
Thru Exercise" to The Women of the Church meeting of the 
Community Presbyterian Church in Pinehurst. 

PAPER Dr. Kenneth F. Ferraro, assistant professor of sociology, h 
PRESENTED a paper presented at the 77th annual meeting of The Americc 
Sociological Association held in San Francisco. The paper 
entitled "Widowhood, Health and Social Support in Later Lil 
was presented by co-author, Elizabeth Mutran. 



Dr. Kishor S. Trivedi , associate professor of computer science 
and electrical engineering at Duke University, will speak on 
"Optimum Computer Configuration Design" Septentoer 27 at 7 p.m. 
in MH-100. The UNCW Student Chapter of the Association for 
Computing Machinery will host Dr. Trivedi 's lecture. Open to 
the public. 

The UNCW University Theatre will present "The Beaux' Strata- 
gem" by George Farquhar October 1-3 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Audi- 
torium. Admission will be $1 for UNCW students; $3 for non- 
students. For reservations call ext. 2440. 

The Wilmington Pro Musica will present Sondra Harnes , soprano, 
in a recital Septen±ier 26 at 2 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium. 
The program will include music by Handel, Debussy, Tchaikovsky 
and Hugo Wolf. Ms. Harnes is the winner of numerous scholar- 
ships and awards, has performed with the St. Louis and 
Cincinnati Symphonies, the St. Paul Opera and was the Artist- 
in-Residence for the St. Paul Pviblic High Schools. 

Dr. Charles Lewis, Dr. Earl Allen, Dr. Lea Larson, Mrs. Judy 
Lewis and Dr. Aisha Rush recently attended the 1982 NC 
Conference on Professional Preparation in Health & Physical 
Education Job Market held at NCSU. The theme of the con- 
ference was "The Job Market: Myth or Reality?" Health educa- 
tors from all over the state examined present and future 
strategies for preparing students for the job market. 

A number of items are available for bid on surplus property. 
Bid forms may be picked up from the UNCW Purchasing Department. 
Items may be seen in the warehouse. All bids must be re- 
ceived in Raleigh prior to October 12 as bids will be open on 
that date. 

MaLou Stokes formerly of the UNCW Special Programs has trans- 
ferred to the HPER department. She may be reached at ext. 2263. 

Registration for the following recreational programs is present- 
ly underway in H-225: 

Ages 4 & 5/ Creative Movement with instructor Vikki Wagnor, 
2:45 - 3:25 p.m. Tuesdays, October 26 - November 30. Fee $13. 

Ages 6 - 9/ Gymnastics with instructor Diane Talley, 3:30 - 
4:30 p.m. Wednesdays, October 27 - December 8. Fee $27. 

Ages 13 - 17/ Karate (Beg.) with instructor Vikki Wagnor, 6:45- 
8:30 p.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays, October 26 - December 16. $56. 

Ages 18 & up/ Exercise; Jane Fonda Work-Out with Dr. Lucinda 
Hollifield, 12-12:45 p.m. Mondays & Wednesdays October 25 - 
December 15. Same course with instructor Debbie Davis, 7:30- 
8:15 p.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays October 26 - December 16. $32. 

Ages 18 & up/Karate (Beg.) with instructor Vikki Wagnor, 6:45 - 
8:30 p.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays, October 26 - December 16. $63. 



All lost and found items should be sent to Chyrl Ferguson in 
room 101 of James Hall. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC hv the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 7 
SEPTEMBER 30, 1982 



The 1982-83 Faculty/Staff Telephone Directories 
will be delivered to each department around the 
first of next week. 

All 1982 graduates of the UNCW nursing degree 
program have, for the second year in a row, 
successfully passed the state board licensure 
examination for registered nurses. Nancy B. 
Haddock, R.N., is director of the program. 

The AAUP will host a cocktail party and recep- 
tion at the home of Betsy Pearsall located at 
1205 Airlie Road, Friday, October 1 from 5-8 p.m. 
Mors d'oeuvres and soft drinks will be provided 
as well as mixers and ice for those bringing 
their own provisions. All faculty are invited. 

Mel Gibson, UNCW basketball coach, spoke on the 
U.S. Basketball Team's trip to China during the 
first "Ham & Egghead" luncheon held last week. 
Gibson accompanied the U.S. college team as as- 
sistant coach and business manager. The next 
"Ham & Egghead" luncheon is scheduled for Friday, 
October 1, at 12:30 p.m. in the faculty dining 
area of the cafeteria with Dr. Robert Toplin, 
professor of history, speaking on the making of a 
television docu-drama. 

The UNCW University Theatre will present "The 
Beaux' Stratagem" in Kenan Auditorium October 1-3 
at 8 nightly. UNCW students $1; non-students $3. 

The UNCW Fine Arts Committee will present the 
movie, "Classic Comedy Shorts," October 7 at 8 p.m. 
in Kenan Auditorium. UNCW students $1; others $2. 

Dr. Patricia Rensma will speak on "Abortion: De- 
fining the Issues" TONIGHT at 8 p.m. in King Hall 
Auditorium. 



REP ON 
CAMPUS 



John Pezzoni, VALIC rep, will be on campus tomorrow 
For information call Alice Maile at Ext. 2392. 



PAYROLL All temporary time sheets and holiday or shift pre- 
DEADLINE mium for September must be in the personnel office 
10 a.m. October 1. 



BOOK 
SALE 



AUDITIONS 
TO START 



PAPER 
IN ISSUE 



WELLS 
SELECTED 



The UNCW Historical Society is sponsoring a used bo 
sale today and Friday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the 
main lobby of Morton Hall. Proceeds will be used t 
sponsor events of interest to students, faculty and 
the community. In addition, the society is sponsor 
ing Jean-Jacques Annaud ' s Academy Award-winning fil 
Black and White in Color , October 14 at 7 p.m. in 
room 100 of Morton Hall. Everyone is invited. 
No charge . 

The University Theatre will hold auditions for its 
second production, "Hot L Baltimore," October 5 and 
beginning at 7:30 p.m. in K-202. Anne Fitzgibbon c 
the Creative Arts Department will direct the play. 
Production dates are November 17-21. 



A paper by Victor Zullo of the department of earth 
sciences on a new fossil barnacle from the Chickas 
hay Formation of Mississippi and Alabama has been 
published in the September issue of Mississippi 
Geology . 

The Nominations Committee of the national Associate 
for Humanist Sociology (AHS) recently selected Dr. 
Richard W. Wells of the sociology faculty as one oi 
two nominees for president-elect of their associat; 
If elected. Dr. Wells would be the youngest person 
serve as an AHS president. 

NEVJ UNCW welcomes new employees Aline S. Beck, clerk- 
MEMBERS typist in the earth sciences department, Gaynell S 
Moore, clerk-typist in the nursing department, and 
Mary B. Spencer, clerk-typist in the school of 
education. 



GUILD The tri-state Sculptor's Guild members exhibition 
EXHIBIT will open this weekend at East Carolina Universityl 
during the annual conference of the Guild and will; 
continue through the month of October. Stephen 
LeQuire, assistant professor of art, will have two 
pieces of sculpture included in the exhibit. 

SHINN Dr. Gerald H. Shinn, professor of philosophy & re-; 

TO SPEAK ligion, will discuss "Creation Stories in the Old j 
Testament" during the October 7 Philosophy & Re- ;' 
ligion Lecture Series scheduled for 8 p.m. in Kinc; 
Hall Auditorium. 



URANCE 
ES 



The Board of Trustees for the Teachers' and State Em- 
ployees' Comprehensive Major Medical Plan has adopted 
new rates for dependent coverage effective October 1. 
In view of the fact that notice was not received in 
time to withhold premium increases from the September 
check, increases will be reflected in the October 
check for October and November premiums. Types of 
coverage and cost is listed below. 



TYPE 


Total 


overage 


Costs 


mployee 






nly 


47, 


.80 


mployee/ 






hildren 


90. 


.60 




86, 


.68 


mployee/ 






amily 


132, 


.54 




124, 


.78 


it Contract 






ife 


47. 


,80 


usband/ 






hildren 


74, 


.02 




71, 


.62 



Employer 
Contribution 



47.80 



47.80 
47.80 



47.80 
47.80 



47.80 

47.80 
47.80 



Employee 
Contribution 



-0- 



4 2.80 (Oct. check ONLY) 
38.88 (monthly deduction) 



84.74 (Oct. check ONLY) 
76.9 8 (monthly deduction) 



-0- 

26.22 (Oct. check ONLY) 
23.82 (monthly deduction) 



Rates will vary slightly for Medicare coverage. Con- 
tact Dianne Smith at Ext. 2162 for information on 
Medicare rates . 



CER 
URANCE 



Mr. Dewey Jordan, American Family Life Assurance 
representative, will be on campus October 13 in room 
A-208 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to talk with present 
participants regarding the revised Cancer Care pro- 
gram. New members may enroll at this time. 



RSE 
ERED 



UNCW and Cape Fear Tech are offering a speedwritina 
course scheduled to begin October 5 from 2-5 p.m. 
each Tuesday until December 14. The course will be 
held in C-217. For information call Alice Maile at 
Ext. 2392. 



PAID 
AL 



October is open enrollment for Prepaid Legal Ser- 
vices. Leo Wagoner, PLS representative, will be 
on campus October 7 at 10:30 a.m. in A-215 to talk 
with interested employees . 



URANCE 
INDER 



Any major medical claims for BCBS must be filed as 
soon as possible after TODAY. These claims need to 
be closed out before changing to the new self-insur- 
ed medical insurance program which will begin 
October 1. For medical forms or information contact 
the personnel office. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC bv the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 8 
OCTOBER 7, 1982 

Due to some computer programming difficulties, ID 
cards for the new medical insurance plan will not 
be available until mid-October. Once the cards 
are received, they will be mailed along with an 
information booklet describing the plan. Several 
information sessions will be held to answer 
questions on the program. 

In the event that medical attention is needed 
prior to receipt of ID cards, please do the fol- 
lowing: (a) notify doctor & hospital that you/ 
your family are now on this plan which was ef- 
fective October 1,1982. (b) your ID number will 
be your social security number (c) in the event 
of questions regarding coverage, have doctor or 
hospital call EDS Federal at 1-800-662-6661 or 
1-919-782-2097, (employees may also call these 
numbers in the event of questions) . For insur- 
ance rates see back sheet. 

Leo Wagoner, PLS rep, will be on campus TODAY 

in A-215 at 10:30 a.m. October is open enrollment, 

John Pezzoni, VALIC rep, will be on campus October 
8, in A-215. Appointments may be made by calling 
Alice Maile at ext. 2391. 

Mr. Dewey Jordan, American Family Life Assurance 
representative, will be on campus October 13 in 
A-208 from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. to talk with employees. 

Dr. Gerald Shinn, professor of philosophy & re- 
ligior^, will discuss Creation Stories in the Old 
Testament TONIGHT at 8 in King Auditorium. Dr. 
Carl Lee will discuss Economic Influences on the 
Black Church in the 19 80 's at the next lecture 
scheduled for October 14. The lectures are in 
conjunction with the P&R Lecture Series held on 
Thursday nights in King Auditorium. 



NSF Dr. Richard T. Louttit, director of the Divisic 

SPEAKER Behavioral and Neural Sciences for the National 
Science Foundation, will be on campus Friday, Oc 
15, at 2 p.m. in the Library Auditorium. The 
Division of Behavioral and Neural Sciences is r 
sponsible for the support of research on nervou 
systems and human and animal behavior. Discipl 
include linguistics, psychology and the neuro- \ 
sciences. All faculty and interested persons ai 
invited. For additional information call Dr. 
Harold Keller at ext. 2810. 



HAM & 
EGGHEADS 



VA 

OFFICE 



Charles Fort, director of the creative writing 
gram at UNCW, will discuss the creative writinc 
program at the Ham & Egghead luncheon scheduled' 
for October 8 at 12:30 p.m. in the faculty dini 
room located in the cafeteria. 

The UNCW Financial Aid Office will assume admii 
trative responsibility' for the Veterans Affair 
Office effective November 1, 1982. 



SAILING 
CLUB 



The UNCW Student Sailing Club is in need of a 
faculty/advisor to assist with the 1982-83 sch( 
year. Interested individuals are asked to con' 
club president, Andy Gates, Dorm apt. D203 or 
392-2885. 



DR. FINK 
TO SPEAK 



MOVIES 
SCHEDULED 



Dr. Carole Fink, associate professor of histor; 
will speak on "Israel and the Search for Peace 
the Middle East" at the Temple of Israel (4th 
Market Street) October 14, at 8 p.m. Open to 
public at no charge. 

The UNCW Fine Arts Committee will present "Clai 
Comedy Shorts" TONIGHT at 8 p.m. in Kenan Audi 
and "Texas Chain Saw Massacre" October 14 at 8 
in Kenan Auditorium. Admission for each movie 
will be $1 for UNCW students with ID and $2 no 
students. 



KIWANIS The Azalea City Kiwanis Club will present "Yos 

TRAVELOG & The High Sierras" October 13 at 8 p.m. in Ke 

Auditorium. Season tickets may be purchased f 

$12. Individual tickets are $3. 



ORCHESTRA 
PERFORMS 



DIRECTORY 
CORRECTION 



The UNCW Community Orchestra under the direct! 
Joe Hickman will perform in Kenan Auditorium 
October 12 at 8 p.m. Adults $3; children $1.5 

On page 7 of the new faculty/staff telephone c 
rectory under mathematical sciences, change e> 
2298 to 2290. 



DODSON 
REVIEW 



A review of Unity in Hardy 's Novels by Brooks 
Dodson of the English department has been incj 
in the September 1982 number of Choice. 



A paper, "Construct Validity of Student Evaluations 
Via Causal Modeling Methodology," by Uday Tate, 
Thomas Burke and Terry Ball of the department of 
management & marketing has been accepted for pre- 
sentation and publication at the 1983 American 
Marketing Association's Winter Educators' Con- 
ference in Sarasota. Another paper co-authored by 
Dr. Tate entitled "Construct Validity of the 
Functional Theory of Attitude: A Structural Equa- 
tion Approach" has also been accepted for presen- 
tation and publication at the same conference. 

UNCW will be the host site for the UNCW Zone III 
Tournament of the Southern Water Polo League 
scheduled for this weekend. Participating schools 
include Duke, UNC-CH (A team), UNC-CH (B team), 
Georgia Southern and UNCW. The tournament begins 
at 9 a.m. October 9 in the pool with the last 
match scheduled for 7 p.m. UNCW will be participa- 
ting in the 12 noon match, 3 p.m. match and 6 p.m. 
match. 

Brooks Dodson, professor of English, has recently 
completed histories of two nineteenth-century 
literary magazines, to be part of a multi-volume 
study of 18th-20th century British periodicals 
to be published by Greenwood Press. 

The Wilmington Branch of the American Association 
of University Women will host its annual fall mem- 
bership brunch October 16 from 10 a.m. to 12 noon 
at the Carriage House on Cottage Lane located 
near the First Presbyterian Church. All women 
graduates of a four-year college or university are 
eligible for membership. For information call 
Margie Rice at 343-1544. 

Copies of the FLEDGLING are available to faculty 
for $10, if purchased now. The cost will be $12 
in the spring. For information call Susan 
Goodrum at ext. 2553 or Beth Kallenborn at ext. 
2548. 

Group photographs of faculty members are needed 
for the FLEDGLING. Photos can be taken at faculty 
meetings. Call Beth Kallenborn, editor, at ext. 
2548 to notify her when departmental faculty will 
be meeting. 

The UNCW Historical Society would like to say 
"thank you" to the faculty, staff and students 
for their cooperation in the Voter Registration 
Drive held October 1 in Morton Hall. Approxi- 
mately forty students registered. 



UNCW will host Wake Forest University October 10 
at 2 p.m. on campus. 



WOMEN'S The Women's Volleyball Team will host UNC-Ashev 
VOLLEYBALL and Catawba College October 9 beginning at 11 a 

COMPUTING Academic Computing Services is sponsoring a sei 
WORKSHOPS of workshops for interested faculty and staff. 
The workshops are listed as follows: 

Oct. 11^ 12-1 p.m. Introduction to IBM-JCL with 
Oct. 13, 12-2 p.m. instructor Lloyd Jones in t 
Faculty Dining Room 



October 27, 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 



WYLBUR with S< 



Scott from NC Education Computing Services in 1, 
Faculty Dining Room 

November 8, 12-5 p.m. Introduction to Microcompi ' 
with Margaret Hazen of UNC-CH Institute for Re£ 
in the Social Sciences to be held in the Facull 
Dining Room 

November 18, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Introduction to Ri 
with Michael Sheehan in Faculty Dining Room 






December 2, 9 a.m. - 12 noon - Introduction to ; 
2000 with Richard Veit in the Faculty Dining R<i 

INSURANCE Premiums for dependent coverage have been incr<i 
RATES In view of the fact that notice was not receiv<' 

in time to withhold premium increases from the 
September check, increases will be reflected ii 
October check for October and November premiums) 
See types of coverage below: 



TOPE 
OC^'ERAGE 


TOTAL 
COS'iy 


EMPLOYER 
CCNTRIBUnCN 


EMPLOYEE 
CCNTRIBUTICN 


Qrployee 
Only 


47.80 


47.80 


-0- 


Btplcyee/ 
Children 


90.60 
86.68 


47.80 
47.80 


42.80 (Octcber check CNLY) 
38.88 (monthly deduction) 


Eliplcyee/ 
Family 


132.54 
124.78 


47.80 
47.80 


84.74 (October check CNLY) 
76.98 (monthly deduction) 


^lit Contract 
Wife 
Husband/ 
Children 


47.80 

74.02 
71.62 


47.80 

47.80 
47.80 


-0- 

26.22 (October check ONLY) 
23.82 (monthly deduction) 



Rates will vary sli^tly for Medicare coverage. Contact 
Dianne Smith at ext. 2162 for information on Medicare rat 



PLAY We Have Always Lived in the Castle will be heldjl 

SCHEDULED the S.R.O. Theatre October 12, 13, and 14 at 8 
nightly. No admission charge, however, reserva 
must be made by calling ext. 2 4 40. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 


UNC by 


Lhe 




PUBLISHED BY THE DEVELOPMEN 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 9 
OCTOBER 14, 19 82 


T OFFICE 



UNITED 
WAY 



UNCW is among the first organizations to exceed 
its 19 82 United Way goal. The campus raised 
106.4% of its goal. A special "thank you" is 
extended to all UNCW employees who contributed 
in the campaign. 



NEW 
STAFF 



A special welcome is extended to the following 
new employees: Kathrine G. Butler, clerk-ste- 
nographer in the development office; Henry M. 
Fuller, data processing coordinator in the of- 
fice of financial aid; Betty S. Mills, payroll 
clerk in the accounting department and Cassandra 
L. Ward-Freeman, clerk-typist in the creative 
arts department. 



OPEN 
ENROLLMENT 



FACULTY 
REMINDER 

SCHOOL 

BOARD 

FORUM 



Open enrollment for Prepaid Legal Services will 
continue through October 29. For information 
call the personnel office. 

Spring text book requisitions are due in the 
university bookstore Friday, October 15. 

Candidates for the New Hanover County School 
Board will face a set of prepared questions as 
well as questions from the audience, at a forum 
to be held October 21 at 7:30 p.m. in Morton 
Hall. The forum is sponsored by the New Hanover 
County PTA. The public is invited. 



ADVISOR 
NEEDED 



P&R 

LECTURES 



The UNCW Student Sailing Club is still looking 
for a faculty /staff advisor for the 1982-83 
school year. Anyone interested should contact 
Andy Gates at 392-2885. 

Dr. Carl Lee will discuss "Economic Influences 
on the Black Church in the 19 80 's" TONIGHT in 
King Auditorium at 8 p.m. The next P&R lecture 
is scheduled for October 28 with Dr. B. Frank 
Hall speaking on "Authority: Faith and Reason.' 



NSF 
SPEAKER 



Dr. Richard T. Louttit, director of the Divisici 
of Behavioral and Neural Sciences for the 
National Science Foundation, will be on campus | 
to speak, Friday, October 15, at 2 p.m. in the i 
Library Auditorium. All faculty and interested) 
persons are invited. For additional informatid 
call Dr. Harold Keller at ext. 2810. 



MEGIVERN Dr. Megivern of the philosophy & religion facuj 
TO READ ty will read a paper entitled "The Purposes of ' 
Punishment in the Ethics of Aquinas" during the! 
annual meeting of the Southern Medieval Associc 
tion to be held today and tomorrow at Southern 
Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. 



HAM £i Dr. Lea Larson, intramural director in HPER, 

EGGHEADS will discuss the road to the national champion 
ship at the October 15 "Ham & Egghead" luncheoi< 
in the faculty dining room at 12:30 p.m. 



HEALTH 
NOTE 



A reminder that the Student Health Service is 
for students only and that samples of medicine 
are given only to students. 



USER 
ROOM 



The Academic Computer User Room located in the 
Social/Behaviorial Sciences Building, room 221 
will be open during fall break, October 18-22 
from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. 



ANGELOU 
LECTURE 



Tickets to the Maya Angelou lecture scheduled 
for 8 p.m. Friday, October 22, in Kenan Audi- 
torium may be purchased from Maggie Parish. A' 
covered dish dinner will be held prior to the 
lecture at the home of Dr. Parish. For inform' 
tion call her at ext. 2328. 



MOVIE 
SCHEDULED 



The "Texas Chain Saw Massacre" will be shown i: 
Kenan Auditorium TONIGHT at 8. Admission charl 



UNITED 

WAY 

CONCERT 



PEACEWORKS 

TO MEET 



ESSAYS 
ACCEPTED 



The United Way will present the Oak Ridge Boys 
in concert Sunday, October 17 at 4 p.m. and 
8 p.m. in Trask Coliseum. Tickets may be pur- 
chased from the coliseum box office. 

A Peaceworks meeting will be held in the Socia 
and Behavioral Science Building, room 107 at 
7:30 p.m. October 21. 

Dr. Gary A. Olson, director of the center for 

writing, has had a collection of essays he 

edited accepted by The Educational Resources ] 

formation Center. The volume. Proceedings of 



the Southeastern Writing Center Conference: ] 



is the second annual proceedings to be edited 
by Olson and the second to be accepted by ERIC 



The Institute for Marine Bio-Medical Research will 
be the site of the First International Symposium 
on Antarctic Krill October 16-19. Dr. Robert 
Goorge, professor of oceanography, will host foity 
krill and Antarctic scientists from at least eight 
countries when they gather to initiate a better 
understanding of the biology of the Antarctic 
krill, a two-inch shrimp like creature that makes 
up 40% of the protein in the v;orld's oceans. The 
krill live only in the Antarctica waters. All 
faculty and staff are invited to hear Sir George 
Deacon discuss the "History of Antarctic Research" 
and Dr. Francis Williamson report on "Present 
Studies in Antarctica" at 8 p.m. October 18 in 
Morton Hall Auditorium. 

Dr. Jim Edmundson, director of special programs, 
was invited to speak at the Adult and Community 
College Education Forum held at North Carolina 
State University on October 1. The topic of 
his presentation was "The Public Service Profes- 
sional in Universities." 

Cecil L. Willis and Richard Wells of the sociology 
faculty have recently finished the second phase of 
a study of the human service demand/delivery gaps 
in the Cape Fear area. The final report is 
titled Prevalence of Human Service Needs and was 
sponsored by a grant from the United Way. 

JoAnn Seiple and John Clifford of the English 
department have published a review of Lanham's 
Revising Business Prose in The Journal of Tech- 
nical Communication . 

Dr. Michael Bradley, associate professor in the 
department of psychology, has had a research 
article, "Emotional Stability of Intellectually 
Superior Children Versus Nongifted Peers As 
Estimated by Chronic Anxiety Levels," accepted 
for publication in School Psychology Review . 
The article was co-authored by Cecil R. Reynolds 
of Texas AS.M University, a 19 75 graduate of UNCW. 



Registration for Beginning and Advanced Beginning 
Tennis for Older Adults is now taking place in 
the Office of Special Programs, H-225. The les- 
sons are open to all faculty and staff, 30 and 
older. Lessons are being offered November 9- 
December 9 on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12 noon 
to 12:45 p.m. at the UNCW tennis courts. Fee is 
$16,00 for one lesson per week; and $32.00 for 
two lessons per week. 



COUMCIL 
MEET 



PAYNE 
INVITED 



Thad Dankel, professor of mathematical sciences 
will present an address entitled "Some Barriers 
to Intelligent Mathematical Skillfullness" at ■ 
Region "0" Council for the Advancement of Mino; 
ties in Engineering. Sandra Harkin, director < 
the UNCW Career Planning and Placement Office, 
will be a member of a panel which will include 
representatives from NCA&T, ECU and NCSU. The 
panel will discuss "Locating and Using Univers, 
Resources." The workshop will be held in Wilm 
ton today and tomorrow. 

The American Journal of Nursing has requested 
that Ginny Payne, lecture in the department of 
nursing, write an article on "Writing Mental 
Health Treatment Plans." 



BOOK AMERICAN SOCIOLOGY: THEORETICAL AND METHODOLO 

RECOMMENDED CAL STRUCTURE, a book by Dr. Richard H. Wells 
Steven Picou, has been endorsed by consultants 
CHOICE, a major librarian's book selection jou 
This endorsement is a recommendation that libr 
ries nationwide stock the book, I 

PAPER Dr. Ron Sizemore of the department of biologic 

PUBLISHED sciences has had a paper, "Competitive Dominan 
by a Bacteriocin-Producing Vibrio harveyi stra 
published in the May issue of APPLIED AND EN- 
VIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 



SCHMID 
TO READ 



CONCERT 
SCHEDULED 



HPER 
SCHEDULE 



Dr. Thomas Schmid of the P&R faculty will read 
paper, "Simone Weil on Violence," at the Confe 
ence on the Religious and Philosophical Aspect 
of Violence presently being held at the Univer 
sity of Southern Mississippi. Publication is 
planned for papers selected for the program. 

The Wilmington Concert Association will presen 
the San Francisco Opera performing "Rigoletto" 
October 20 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 

The physical education facility schedule durir 
fall break is as follows: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Monday through Friday and includes the weight 
room and racquetball courts. Facilities close 
on Saturdays and Sundays. Pool closed throug 
out break. 



MEN'S 
GOLF 



The men's golf team will be participating in 
the Campbell University Invitational to be he] 
October 19 and 20 at the Keith Hills Country 
Club at Buies Creek. 



DR. FINK 
TO SPEAK 



Dr. Carole Fink, associate professor of histoi 
will address the American Association of Unive 
sity Women at Balentine's Cafeteria October 2( 
at 7 p.m. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



LiNC bv the ,^ca 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 10 
OCTOBER 21, 19 8 2 

All items for inclusion in the November Calendar 
of Events should be sent to Mimi Cunningham in 
Kenan Auditorium before Tuesday, October 26. 
Or call the UNCW News Bureau at ext. 2171. 

Fourteen UNCW authors attended the Authors Showcase 
held Tuesday, October 12, in Randall Library. The 
showcase, held in connection with the recent dis- 
play of faculty books in the lobby of Randall 
Library, gave the authors an opportunity to meet 
with representatives from various libraries and 
media. 

Norfolk area residents had the opportunity to tour 
the Research Vessel SEAHAWK during its open house 
at Gloucester Point, VA, October 11 following mis- 
sions off Cape Henry, VA, and Duck, NC . The open 
house, held in conjunction with Virginia Institute 
for Marine Science, gave the crew an opportunity 
to explain equipment, diving gear and the vessel's 
research support capabilities. The SEAHAWK, en- 
route to another mission off Onslow Bay, NC , dock- 
ed at the Duke Marine Laboratory station located 
on Fiver's Island at Beaufort for another open 
house held October 13. 

The UNCW Creative Arts Department will sponsor 
Judy Cole-Shannon, mezzo-soprano, in concert at 
8 p.m., Friday, October 29, in King Hall Auditorium, 
The program will feature songs by Vivaldi, Poulenc, 
Brahms and Ives. She will be accompanied by Jane 
Mathew and Sherrill Martin, both creative arts 
faculty members. Admission is free. 

Open enrollment for Prepaid Legal Services will 
continue through October 29. Interested persons 
should contact the UNCW Personnel Office. 



P&R Dr. B. Frank Hall will discuss "Authority: Fait 

LECTURE and Reason" at the P&R Lecture Series scheduled 
October 28 in King Auditorium at 8 p.m. Rev. LI 
W. Fonvielle will speak on "Religion, Psychiatry 
Cure of Souls" at the November 4 lecture. 

WIN Kaye Panicke, psychological associate, will disc 

MEETING "Psychology and Women's Issues" during the Noverr 
1 luncheon meeting of Women in Networking. The 
luncheon will be held at the Seahawk Restaurant 
11:30 a.m. Reservations are required and can b( 
made by calling 762-7886 prior to October 29. 

ROSENTHAL Dr. Robert Rosenthal, assistant professor of spc 
ELECTED communication, has been elected vice-president 

by the membership of the Carolinas Speech Commur 

tion Association. 



MOUNTS AT Dr. Joann M. Mount and Dr. Terry Mount of the de 
MEETING ment of modern languages attended the Mountain 

terstate Foreign Language Conference held at Wa]< 
Forest University October 7-9. Terry Mount pre 
ed a paper entitled "The Virgin Mary and Fulfil 
of Prophecy in Berceo" in the medieval Spanish 
literature section. 



KING Charles VJ . King, director of auxiliary services 
PRESENTS sented a program entitled "Increasing Housing Re 
PROGRAM nues from Auxiliary Income-Producing Contracts" 

the NC Housing Officers Conference held in Char 

recently. 



UNCW The UNCW campus will be the host site for the IS 
TO HOST NC Housing Officers Conference. Gary Juhan and 
Charles King will serve as co-hosts for the con- 
ference. 



CROSS 
COUNTRY 



WATER 
POLO 



WOMEN'S 
VOLLEYBALL 



The women's Cross Country team will host Lynchbi 
College October 25 at 3 p.m. 

The Water Polo team will be in Lexington, VA, wl 
they will be participating in the Washington & 
University Tournament scheduled for this weeken< 
Other teams participating in the event include 
Richmond, George Washington University, Hampden- 
Sydney College, Virginia Commonwealth University 
and Washington & Lee. 

The UNCW Women's Volleyball Team will host East 
Carolina University October 28 at 6:30 p.m. 



SOCCER Methodist College will be on campus October 27 
SCHEDULE a 3 p.m. soccer match with the Seahawks. 



DO YOU HAVE QUESTIONS REGARDING THE NEW MEDICAL 
INSURANCE PLAN? If so, please plan to attend one 
of the information sessions scheduled for Tuesday, 
October 26, and Wednesday, October 27. Both ses- 
sions will be held from 2-3:30 p.m. in room 114 
of the chemistry/physics building. 

A UNCW v/elcorae is sent to Sharon N. Wright, clerk 
typist in the office of the vice chancellor for 
academic affairs. 

Candidates for the New Hanover County School 
Board will be on campus October 21 at 7:30 p.m. in 
Morton Hall to answer questions at a forum being 
sponsored by the New Hanover County PTA. The pub- 
lic is invited to attend. 

Tickets to the Maya Angelou lecture scheduled for 
8 p.m. Friday, October 22, in Kenan Auditorium may 
be purchased from Maggie Parish. A covered dish 
dinner will be held prior to the lecture at the 
home of Dr. Parish. For information regarding 
tickets to the lecture or the dinner call her at 
ext. 2328, 

Mimi Cunningham, public information officer, was 
among several members of the Wilmington branch of 
AAU^V -who attended the annual convention of the 
NC State Division of the American Association of 
University Women held October 8-10 at Sacred 
Heart College in Belmont. Mrs. Cunningham pre- 
sented the 19 82-1992 Long Range Plan for the 
Division. 

A Peaceworks meeting will be held in the social 
and behavioral science building, room 107 at 7:30 
TONIGHT. 



The NC Humani 
grant of $900 
department an 
observance of 
month. The g 
Megivern, wil 
a leading Spi 
where he will 
version of th 
ing week Popk 
celebration i 
v;ell as in Te 



ties Committee has appr 
to help the philosophy 
d the Temple of Israel 

Baruch Spinoza's 350th 
rant proposal, prepared 
1 enable Professor Rich 
noza scholar, to visit 
speak on "Spinoza and 
e Jews" on November 18. 
in will deliver his add 
n Spinoza's hometown of 
1 Aviv. 



oved a mini- 
Si religion 

prepare an 
birthday next 
by Dr. Jim 

ard H. Popkin, 

in Wilmington 

the Con- 
The follow- 

ress at the 
Amsterdam as 



Charles Fort, director of the creative writing pro- 
gram, has been included in a grant from the National 
Endowment for the Arts to participate in presenta- 
tions by members of the New Orleans Poetry Forum. 



FUN 
RUN 



It's UNCW Fun Run time again! The fun run is set 
for Monday, November 15, at 3 p.m. A non-refundi 
fee of $4 is required for participation and is 
open to students, faculty and staff. For additic^ 
information contact the HPER Department. 



PRODUCTION The Delta Sigma Theta Sorority's production of 
CANCELLED Radio Man" scheduled for October 25 in Kenan Aud: 
torium has been cancelled. 

MOVIE The UNCW Fine Arts Committee will present "The B: 
SCHEDULED October 28 in Kenan Auditorium at 8 p.m. Admissj 
for UNCW students will be $1; non students $2. 

ENGLISH John Clifford, Brooks Dodson and Jo Ann Seiple oi 
FACULTY the English faculty gave a joint presentation on 
"Strategies for Coping with the Paper Load" duriri 
the annual convention of the North Carolina Englj 
Teachers ' Association held in Greensboro October 

BURTON Grace Burton of the department of curricular 
ADDRESSES studies gave a presentation entitled "Beans, Butf 
and Beads: Teaching Concepts Meaningfully" to tl", 
joint National School of Science and Mathematics/ 
Illinois Science Teachers Association held in 
Dekalb, Illinois, October 15. 

WELCH TO Dr. Betty Jo Welch, associate professor of speech 

PRESENT communication, will present a paper, "Interdisci- 

PAPER plinary Speech Communication: A Small College A] 

ternative," at the National Convention of the 

Speech Communication Association to be held in 

Louisville, KY , November 6. 



JOURNAL 

AWARDED 



HAI-1 & 
EGGHEADS 



ROSENTHAL 

PRESENTS 

PAPERS 



^ 



Xavier Review, a literary journal founded by Char 
Fort, director of the creative writing program he 
on campus, has been awarded a $2,000 grant from t 
Louisiana Division for the Arts. The grant was 
prepared by Mr. Fort when he was a member of the 
English faculty at Xavier University of Louisiana 

Eugene Huguelet, director of library services, wi 
discuss British academic libraries during the 
October 29 "Ham & Egghead" luncheon in the facult 
dining room at 12:30 p.m. 

Rita Rosenthal, part-time instructor of speech cc 
munication, presented two papers during the Care 
linas Speech Communication Association convention 
held in Raleigh recently. One paper, "The Role c 
Experimental Research in the Communication Theory 
Course," dealt with an analysis of behavioral 
methodologies. The other paper, delivered jointl 
with her husband, Robert Rosenthal, presented a 
judging paradigm for forensic competition. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv Lhe sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 11 
OCTOBER 28, 19 82 



Sarah Graham Kenan Memorial Auditorium celebra- 
ted its 12th birthday on October 27. The 
auditorium opened on October 27, 19 70, with a 
performance by Joyce Grenfeld, English actress, 
sponsored by the UNCW Fine Arts Committee. 

"The Birds" will be shown in Kenan Auditorium 
tonight at 8. Admission will be $1 for UNCW 
students and $2 for non students, 

Eugene Huguelet, director of library services, 
will discuss British academic libraries during 
the October 29 "Ham & Egghead" luncheon in the 
faculty dining room at 12:30 p.m. 

Dr. B. Frank Hall will discuss "Authority: 
Faith and Reason" at the Philosophy & Religion 
lecture scheduled at 8 TONIGHT in King Audi- 
torium. Rev. Lloyd W. Fonvielle will speak on 
"Religion, Psychiatry & Cure of Souls" at the 
November 4 P&R lecture. 

A final effort is underway this week to collect 
contributions from individuals who have not yet 
participated in the United Way campaign. All 
contributions will be delivered in time for the 
final UNCW tally which will be announced at the 
November 3 United Way luncheon at the Hilton. 
For information call Sandra Harkin at extension 
2174 or Jim Megivern at extension 2407. 



Payday is Friday, October 29. Checks may be 
picked up from the University Cashier's Office 
located in Alderman Hall. 

UNCVJ vs. South Carolina University October 31 
at 2 p.m. 



ARTICLE An essay by Gary Olson, director of the center 
ACCEPTED writing, entitled "Averting Negative Attitudes 
the Students We Refer to the Writing Center" h< 
been accepted for publication in the journal, ' 
ING ENGLISH IN THE TWO-YEAR COLLEGE. The essay 
amines how certain attitudinal problems affect 
student performance in the writing center. 



NEV; A UNCW welcome is extended to Annette M. 

EMPLOYEE secretary in the registrars office. 



Ander! 



CONCERT 
SCHEDULED 



FUN 
RUN 



CHOWDER 
CONTEST 



The UNCW Creative Arts Department will sponsor 
Judy Cole-Shannon, mezzo-soprano, in concert a- 
8 p.m., Friday, October 29, in King Hall Auditi 
um. Ms. Cole-Shannon will be accompanied by J, 
Mathew and Sherrill Martin, both creative arts 
faculty members. Admission is free. 

The UNCW Fun Run is scheduled for Monday, Noveii 
15, at 3 p.m. A non-refundable fee of $4 will; 
required for participation. The Fun Run is op< 
faculty and staff. Call the HPER department. 

WAAV Radio is sponsoring the "Azalea Coast Cho 
Contest" November 6 from 1-4 p.m. at Greenfiel 
Park. Chefs from local restaurants will prepa 
seafood chowders while the public does the eat! 
and judging. Admission for the public is $2 pi 
person; and $1.50 for members of the "Music of 
Your Life" club. Proceeds from the contest wi! 
be given to the air conditioning fund for TRAs! 
COLISEUM. (In the event of rain, the chowder q 
test will be held at the Community Arts Center 
Second and Orange Streets.) 



CENTRAL 
STORES 



The items listed below are now available throu 
central stores : 



Stock # Description Uni 
600-19101 Stencils, spirit dup. master. 

Legal size bo> 

645-74501 Thermal masters, Legal size bo> 



TATE 
PUBLISHES 



WOMEN • S 
VOLLEYBALL 



Two articles co-authored by Uday Tate, lecture 
in the department of management & marketing, c 
Ladd Kochman of Nicholls State University hav« 
been accepted for publication. The first art.' 
"Buying on Margin: Some Consequences and Str; 
gies , " will appear in the May, 1983, issue of 
SOUTHWEST BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC REVIEW. The 
other article entitled "Meaningf ulness of a M: 
priced Option: Some Empirical Evidence" will! 
included in the Fall, 1983, issue of the SOUTI 
BUSINESS REVIEW. 



The volleyball team will host ECU TONIGHT at 
UNCW vs. Methodist College & NC A&T November 
6 : 30 cm. 



The Faculty Women's Network meeting originally 
scheduled for Friday, October 29, has been changed 
to Friday, November 5 at 3:30 p.m. in MS-132. For 
further information call Kathleen Berkeley at 
extension 2307 or 2309. 

Gerald R. Weeks of the psychology department pre- 
sented a two-day workshop on Paradoxical Psycho- 
therapy at the semi-annual meeting of the North 
Carolina Association of Marital and Family Thera- 
pists held October 22-23. 

Open enrollment for Prepaid Legal Services will 
continue through October 29. For information call 
the personnel office. 

All temporary employee timesheets and all time- 
sheets reflecting shift premium pay MUST be in the 
personnel office before 10 a.m. November 1 so that 
payroll computation may be completed. Supervisors 
who do not meet this deadline should not expect 
their employees to be paid on November 15. The 
personnel office will make one reminder call. 

ID cards for the new Comprehensive Health Benefits 
plan have been distributed. Any errors should be 
noted on the green change form and sent to the 
personnel office. For those employees who did not 
receive a card and who were enrolled in the plan 
on September 30, 1982, call Dianne Smith at ext. 
2162. For those employees enrolled in the plan 
after September 30, ID cards will be forwarded as 
soon as they are received in the personnel office. 

Victor A. Zullo, professor of earth sciences, to- 
gether with Ralph H. Willoughby and Paul G. Nystrom, 
Jr., of the South Carolina Geological Survey, have 
had a paper on the fossils and age of the Dry 
Branch Formation, Aiken County, South Carolina 
published in the 19 82 CAROLINA GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY 
FIELD TRIP GUIDEBOOK. 



Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of the HPER department, 
has been appointed to the Editorial Advisory Board 
of Corporate Fitness and Recreation , a new journal 
designed for employee health and services programs. 
The journal has a subscription membership of over 
15,000 corporate businesses in the US. 

A paper, "Application of Causal Modeling Methodolo- 
gy to Sex Appeal Effectiveness," will be presented 
and published at the 19 83 Southeastern AIDS Confer- 
ence to be held in Williamsburg, VA, February 9-11, 
19 83. The paper, co-authored by Uday Tate, John 
Morgan and Terry Ball, will be presented by Mr. Tate. 
In addition, Tate will present, at the same meeting, 
another paper, "Validity of Students' Ratings of 
Teaching Effectiveness: A Structural Equation 
Approach." The paper, co-authored by Tate and 
Thomas Burke, will be published also. 



STATE 
SERVICE 



The following employees were recognized during 
ceremonies held October 20 in conjunction with 
the state service awards program. 

Recognized for five years service were: 



Dorothy R. Beatty 
Jeffrey S. Brown 
Joseph V. Capell 
Helen A. Cignotti 
Carol V. Davis 
James H. Dillon 
Ruth H. Dorsey 
Fred W. Green 
Sandra A. Harkin 
Linda H. Huntley 
Don W. Norris 
Audrey S. Porter 
Deborah W. Price 
Sandra R. Rogers 
Joseph Siegel 
Arnold A. Siko 
Earl Simmons 
Mildred P. Simon 
Betsy P. Stallard 



Security Services 
Physical Plant 
Student Affairs 
Auxiliary Services 
Student Affairs 
Physical Plant 
Physical Plant 
Security Services 
Student Affairs 
Student Affairs 
Physical Plant 
Registrar & Records 
Library Services 
Information Systems 
Auxiliary Services 
Auxiliary Services 
Physical Plant 
Library Services 
Purchasing Services 



Recognized for ten years service were; 



Sharon Brewington 
Wallace 0. Bryant 
Lynda F. Davis 
Dolores E. Harvey 
George W. James 
Douglas L. Johnson 
Sandra D. Ostrand 
Carolyn K. Sharpe 



H.P.E.R. 
Physical Plant 
I.M.B.R. 

Purchasing Services 
Purchasing Services 
Admissions Office 
School of Education 
College of Arts & 

Sciences 
Physical Plant 



Elnora H. Smith 
Recognized for fifteen years service were 



Murrie L. Lee 
Elizabeth T. Malik 

Eleanor R. Poole 
Grace W. Rhodes 
Furman Wilder 



Registrar & Records 
Chemical & Physical 

Sciences 
Personnel Services 
Financial Services 
Physical Plant 



Recognized for twenty years service were 
J. Carl Dempsey 



Irene T. Powell 
Opal B. Price 



Business Affairs & 

Development 
Biological Sciences 
School of Business 



:OMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv Ihe .sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 12 
NOVEMBER 4, 19 82 



URST 
WARD 



R. JAMES 
ETIRES 

ONGRATS TO 
R. MARTIN 



RO 
USICA 



Mr. Adrian D. Hurst, associate professor emeritus 
of mathematics (1947-1968), has recently estab- 
lished "The Adrian D. Hurst" award. The award, 
in the form of a plaque, will be given each 
spring to a UNCW junior or senior math major 
who has achieved the highest overall academic 
average. The first plaque will be awarded next 
year. 

Mr. George James, former warehouse manager, has 
retired recently due to illness. 

Congratulations to Sandy Martin, assistant pro- 
fessor of philosophy & religion, upon his 
election to the New Hanover County School Board. 

The Wilmington Pro Musica presentation of Igor 
Stravinsky's "The Soldier's Tale," directed by 
Jean Muir and conducted by Joe Hickman will be 
held November 12 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 
Admission is $3 for adults; and $1.50 for students 
with id's and children. 



MERGENCY 
ROCEDURES 



Handbooks on emergency operations outlining pro- 
cedures that the university should follow in the 
event of an emergency are available from the cam- 
pus police office. Each department should have 
at least one copy of the booklet and all depart- 
mental heads should be familiar with its contents. 
Included are such emergencies as bomb threats, 
tropical storms and hurricanes, snow and ice 
storms. FYI the CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE will excerpt 
safety messages periodically. If you do not have 
one of these handbooks , contact Chief Win Norman 
at ext. 2185. 



ETWORK 
EETING 



A meeting of the Faculty Women's Network is 
scheduled for Friday, November 5, from 3:30 - 
5 p.m. in MS-132. For further information call 
Kathleen Berkeley at extensions 2307 and 2309. 



P&R Reverend Lloyd W. Fonvielle will discuss "Reli< 

LECTURES Psychiatry & Cure of Souls" TONIGHT at 8 in Kij 

Auditorium. The next P&R lecture will feature 

Jim Megivern speaking on "The Nuclear Arms Raci 

Convocation" on November 11. 

HAM & Dr. David Shevach , assistant professor of soci' 

EGGHEADS gy and anthropology, will discuss the social p! 

sophy of social work during the November 5, Haj 

Eggheads luncheon meeting in the faculty dinin 

room upstairs in the cafeteria at 12:30. 



HANK 
WILLIAMS 



The Hank Williams, Jr., Concert will be held i 
Trask Coliseum November 10, at 8 p.m. All cla 
rooms and racquetball courts will be closed af 
5 p.m., however, the arena will be closed all , 



JAZZ The UNCW Jazz Ensemble under the direction of j 

ENSEMBLE Frank Bongiorno will present a fall concert at 

p.m. November 10 in Kenan Auditorium. The proi 

will include big band jazz and small combo jazj 

fusion. No admission charge. 



CHAMBER 
SINGERS 



The UNCW Chamber Singers will perform November 
in Kenan Auditorium at 8 p.m. Admission charg 
will be $3 for adults and $1.50 for children. 



RED 
SKELTON 



Red Skelton will perform in Trask Coliseum thil 
Saturday night, November 6 , at 8 p.m. Tickets; 
may be purchased through the Trask box office. 



CHOWDER 
CONTEST 



WAAV is sponsoring the 
test November 6 from 1- 
Park Amphitheatre. The 
public a chance to samp 
aurants throughout the 
Proceeds will go to the 
Trask Coliseum. In the 
the contest will be hel 
Center. 



Azalea Coast Chowder Cc 
4 p.m. at the Greenfie] 

contest will give the 
le chowders made by res- 
area. Admission is $2, 

air-conditioning fund 
event of inclement weat 
d at the Community Arts 



VETERANS 
DAY 



A memorial service will be conducted at the f] 
pole on the quadrangle Thursday, November 11, 
at 7:30 a.m. Mayor Ben Halterman will place c 
wreath at the flagpole. A 21 gun salute by tl? 
UNCW ROTC will follow. 



NUCLEAR 
ARMS 



Day-long discussions on "Solutions to the Nuc' 
Arms Race" will be held November 11 beginning: 
8:30 a.m. and ending at midnight. Films, slic 
shows and panel discussions will be included, 
For information call Dr. Megivern at ext. 240' 



FISH 
SPECIAL 



PFM will host a special luncheon TODAY in the^ 
snack bar of the cafeteria. The special willl 
cost $2.50 and will include fried fish, frenci; 
fries, slaw and cornbread. 



Dr. Lucinda Hollifield, assistant professor of 
HPER, presented a "Games Workshop" October 15 at 
North Greenville College located in Tigersville, 
SC. 



Mary Bellamy, Inge Stites, Kenne 
Mount and Terry Mount of the dep 
languages chaired sessions durin 
ference of the Foreign Language 
North Carolina held October 22-2 
Mrs. Bellamy organized the sessi 
chaired on "Graduate Degrees in 
Where They Are; How to Get Them. 
ate past president of the associ 
Bellamy also served on the Advis 
Conference. 



th Stites, Joann 
artment of modern 
g the 19 8 2 Con- 
Association of 
3 in Raleigh, 
on which she 
North Carolina; 
" As the immedi- 
ation, Mrs. 
ory Board for the 



Stephen LeQuire, assistant professor of art, had 
a walnut sculpture, "W-15," accepted for exhibi- 
tion during the 7th Annual American National 
Miniature Show held in Laramie, Wyoming, during 
the month of October. 

Stephanie Young, designer/technical director of 
the Creative Arts Department, drama division, 
will conduct a workshop at the North Carolina 
Theatre Conference to be held in Winston-Salem 
on November 6. The workshop will focus on scenic 
painting and texturing techniques. 

Members of the Wilmington Writers' Forum will 
read poems and stories November 13 from 7:00 p.m. 
to 12 midnight at Cape Fear Foundation located 
at 9 South Front Street. 

Dr. Carole Fink of the history faculty spoke to 
the Hillel Foundation at The University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill on October 31. 
She spoke on contemporary Israeli-Arab Relations. 

The Department of HPER will offer a snow skiing 
class for students and non-students January 2-6, 
19 83, in Boone, NC. Lodging, ski equipment, lift 
and area passes for the five days along with 
lessons (beginning and intermediate) will cost 
$150.00. Non-students will be required to pay an 
additional fee of $5 to the Office of Special 
Programs. A registration meeting will be held 
TONIGHT at 6:30 in Trask-119. Call Dr. Dean 
Allen at ext. 2260 for additional information. 



Mr. Al Barry, radiation, safety and health officer, 
has moved to Alderman Hall, room 201. Mr. Barry 
can be reached at ext. 2761. 



Ill 



CLE ARE 
PRESENTS 



MCGUIRE 
REPRESENTS 



Catherine Cleare of the Department of Curricul 
Studies gave an invited presentation, "Teachin 
Energy Concepts to Elementary Students," at th 
National Science Teacher's Association Area Cc 
vention held in Knoxville, TN, October 21. 

Dr. Phillip McGuire, assistant professor of hi 
tory , represented UNCW during a College Day re 
cruitment visit at the North Carolina School c 
Science and Mathematics on October 30. Also, 
he attended the 6 7th Annual Meeting of the Ass 
ation for the Study of Afro-American Life and 
History held in Baltimore October 21-24. Whill 
at the meeting, he chaired a session entitled ; 
Race Relations and Culture. 



HOLLIFIELD Dr. Lucinda Hollifield, assistant professor ir 
FEATURED the department of health, physical education a 

recreation, will be featured on WWAY-TV 3's 

CALENDAR, November 7 at 6 p.m. 



NEW 
EMPLOYEES 



Welcome to the following new employees: 

Kenneth M. Phelps, plant maintenance supervise 
in the physical plant; Mary Frances Carr, seci 
tary in career planning and placement and 
H. Jack Fancher, warehouse manager in the deps 
ment of purchasing services. Also, Bev Cobb, 
scheduling coordinator for the university unic 
Ms. Cobb may be reached at ext. 2285. In last 
week's CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE, Annette Anderson was 
listed as working in the registrar's office. 
This information is incorrect, she is in fact 
working in the office of research. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the csea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 13 
NOVEMBER 11, 1982 



Eleanor Poole, director of personnel services, 
will discuss the new health benefits program at 
the November 12 "Ham & Egghead" luncheon meet- 
ing in the faculty dining room upstairs in the 
cafeteria at 12:30. 

Dr. James Megivern will speak on "The Nuclear 
Arms Race Convocation" TONIGHT at 8 p.m. in King 
Auditorium. The next P&R lecture will feature 
Dr. Richard H. Popkin November 18. The lectures 
are sponsored by the UNCW Philosophy & Religion 
Department and are open to the university com- 
munity at no charge. 

All faculty and staff are invited to visit the 
newly established Office of Research Administra- 
tion located in Hoggard Hall, room 216. The 
office has been established as a service support 
unit that will assist the university community 
in creative, scholarly and research endeavors. 
The office will provide assistance in the prepa- 
ration of research proposals submitted to federal, 
state or local agencies. For additional infor- 
mation call Dr. Harold W. Keller, director of 
research, at extension 2810. 

The R/V SEAHAWK departed November 7 for Frying 
Pan Shoals Light Tower where the diving crew will 
be working with Randy Lennon who is evaluating 
fish populations using photographic techniques. 
The SEAHAWK will return to its home berth at the 
NC State Ports on November 11. 

The Wilmington Pro Musica presentation of Igor 
Stravinsky's "The Soldier's Tale," directed by 
Jean Muir and conducted by Joe Hickman will be 
held November 12 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 
Admission is $3 for adults; $1.50 for UNCW stu- 
dents and $1.50 for children. 



NEW A UNCW welcome is extended to Vincent P. Robert: 

EMPLOYEE captain of the Research Vessel SEAHAWK. 



CAHOON 
PUBLISHES 



HPER 
FACULTY 



PRODUCTION 
SCHEDULED 



Dr. Lawrence Cahoon , assistant professor of bio 
has had an article entitled "The Use of Mucus ii 
Feeding by the Copepod Euchirella venusta Giesb: 
accepted for publication in Crustaceana. 

HPER faculty members who attended the 35th Annu 
North Carolina Alliance for HPERD Convention he 
in Greensboro recently include: Dr. Charles Lei 
and Dr. Lea Larson who made program presentatio;! 
on "The Professional Preparation of Physical Ed! 
tors in Israel" and "Lead-Up Games With A Foam 
Training Ball." Mrs. Judy Lewis, Dr. Grace Rus 
Dr. Earl Allen and Dr. David Miller served as s; 
sion presiding officers. Also participating wej 
Dr. Lucinda Hollifield, president-elect of the j 
Physical Education Association, who was responsj 
for co-ordinating all program sessions for that 
association, and Larry Honeycutt. 

The UNCW University Theatre will present Langfo 
Wilson's "The Hot L Baltimore" Wednesday, Noveml 
17, through Sunday, November 21, at 8 each 
evening in the S. R.O. Theatre. Admission will be 
$3 for non-students and $1 for UNCW students, 
servations may be made by calling ext. 2440 be 
2 and 5 p.m. THIS PLAY IS RECOMMENDED FOR MATt 
AUDIENCES. 



PAPER Lloyd Jones of the department of political scie 
PRESENTED presented a paper, "The Impact of Specializatic 
at the annual meeting of the Southern Politica 
Science Association held in Atlanta October 28 



HIATT 
SPEAKS 



Sue Ann Hiatt, ass 
tions librarian, s 
the Southeast and 
Librarians Society 
Humanities Center 
presentation conce 
Collection which i 
tions Area of Rand 



istant reference/special col] 
poke to the Joint Conference 
D.C.-MD -VA Chapters of the ; 
held November 6 at the Natic 
at Research Triangle Park, 
rned the NC Visual Art and A3 
s housed in the Special Colle 
all Library. 



SHERIDAN Earl Sheridan, assistant professor of politicaj 
CHOSEN science, has been chosen by the Jaycees for in- 
clusion in their annual listing of "Outstandinc 
Young Men of America." 



GIVING 
UP 60% 



As of November 3 UNCW employees had contributet 
a total of $7,450 toward the United Way campai( 
This amount shows an increase of 60% over last 
year. For those who have not given and would 
like to do so - contact Jim Megivern or Sandra i 
Harkin. 



I 



^FETY 

mcE 



)NCERT 

WERN 
CLEB RATES 



A reminder that Mr. Al Barry, radiation, safety 
and health officer, has moved to Alderman Hall, 
room 201. Mr. Barry can be reached at ext. 2108. 

The UNCW Fun Run will be held November 15 begin- 
ning at 3 p.m. For information on participating 
call the HPER department. 

The Symphonic Band will conduct a concert in 
Kenan Auditorium November 15 at 8 p.m. Free. 

The Good Wood Tavern will celebrate its seventh 
anniversary beginning November 11 at 9 p.m. in 
the Pub with "Cynthia Tyson Jazz Fantasy." 
November 12 at 9:30 p.m. "Hot Shandy" will be 
playing traditional Irish and American songs 
spiced with humor. The "Local Yokel Open Mike 
Talent Show" will be held at 9 p.m. in the Pub 
on the 13th. All events are free. 



)SSELOT 
) SPEAK 



The Student Women's Organization will present 
Dr. Gerald Rosselot of the English faculty 
speaking on "Female Characters in Classic Ameri- 
can Novels" November 17 at 7:30 p.m. in Morton 
Hall Auditorium. All faculty are invited to 
attend. 



^UW TO 
SET 



The American Association of University Women 
will meet November 17 at 6:30 p.m. at Balen- 
tine's Cafeteria. The work of the Legal Access 
for Women Committee will be the topic of dis- 
cussion. 



^V SEAHAWK 
[SSIONS 



November 1-5 the R/V SEAHAWK conducted missions 
on the Meares Harris Artificial Reef located 2.8 
miles off Wrightsville Beach. In addition to 
visiting scientists from the NC Division of Ma- 
rine Fisheries, a number of media representatives 
were involved in the project. Among those par- 
ticipating were Bernadette Hearne , reporter, and 
Wayne Upchurch, photographer, from the STAR NEWS; 
Debbie Dubach from the COASTAL CAROLINIAN; Jim 
Dumbell, reporter for the CHARLOTTE OBSERVER; 
John Wilford, science writer for the NEW YORK 
TIMES; Jeff Augustine from WMFD Radio; Tim Crid- 
land, reporter, and Robert Diab, cameraman from 
WWAY-TV3; Phil Wells, reporter, and Doug Norment , 
cameraman for WECT-TV6 and Bob Waters, host of 
"Carolina In The Morning," and Bobby Long, camera- 
man from WECT-TV6. The "Carolina In The Morning" 
segment was featured November 9. Alan Moore and 
Steve Murphey of the UNCW SEAHAWK also partici- 
pated along with Dr. Harold Keller, director of 
research at UNCW. 



DIXON 
ON PANEL 



STUDENT 
NAMED 



WORKSHOP 
ON CAMPUS 



BASKETBALL 
GAME 



CAFETERIA 
SPECIALS 



Dr. Jim Dixon, chairman of the political scienc 
department, participated in a panel discussion 
on "Faculty Governance" at a meeting held in 
Fayetteville on October 10. The event was spor 
sored by the FSU Chapter of the AAUP. 

Jo Ann Kirkman, senior majoring in outdoor re- 
creation, was named president of the Student 
Division of the NC Parks and Recreation Society 
during the state conference meeting held in 
Asheville November 7-10. 

A Transparency Preparation Workshop will be hel 
November 18 at 1:30 p.m. in Hoggard Hall. The 
workshop will show how to prepare colorful 
visuals for overhead projection. Kits for the 
workshop must be purchased ($50.00). For infor- 
mation call Alice at 762-1784. 

An exhibition game with the Seahawks and Marath 
Oil will be played Sunday, November 14, at 7 p.n 
in Trask Coliseum. Adults $3; children $1.50 

This week's Snack Bar Specials include the 
following: 

Thursday, November 11 Roast Pork with dressing 

vegetable & roll $1.98 



Friday, November 12 

Monday, November 15 

Tuesday, November 16 
Wed., November 17 



Liver & onions, potatoes 
with gravy, vegetable & 
roll $1.79 

Hot roast beef sandwich 
potatoes with gravy & 
vegetable $1.79 

Baked ocean perch, potat 
vegetable & roll $1.79 

Spaghetti with meat sauc 
tossed salad & garlic 
bread $1.79 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 14 
NOVEMBER 18, 1982 



The local chapter of AAUP will meet Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 23, at 3 p.m. in the Library Auditorium. 

Dr. Eugene Royster of the University of Rochester 
will be the guest speaker at the Fall Educational 
Forum to be held Monday, November 22, at 4 p.m., 
in King Auditorium. Dr. Royster is known for his 
research in school integration programs and will 
discuss his recent findings on the magnet school 
and quality education concept. 

Dr. Richard H. Popkin, professor of philosophy at 
Washington University in St. Louis^ will be the 
guest lecturer at TONIGHT'S Philosophy & Religion 
Lecture scheduled at 8 in King Auditorium. Dr. 
Popkin will discuss "Spinoza and the Conversion 
of the Jews," a lecture in observance of the 
350th anniversary of Spinoza's birth. Open to the 
public at no charge. 

Nancy Fogarty, chair of the Senate Budget Commit- 
tee at UNC-Greensboro, will discuss "Managing The 
Budget Crunch at UNC-G" November 23, at 4 p.m., in 
the Library Auditorium. Faculty & staff are invi- 
ted. 

Dr. Dale McCall , assistant professor of anthropolo- 
gy and research geneticist at IMBR, will discuss 
North Carolina's first citizens, Pre-Contact Algon- 
kians, at the November 19 "Ham & Egghead" luncheon 
in the faculty dining room of the cafeteria at 
12:30 p.m. 

A tour of Kenan House will be featured on "The Jim 
Burns Show" Friday, November 19, at 10 a.m. on 
Channel 6. Dr. and Mrs. Wagoner will host the T.V. 
tour which will show the downstairs area and the 
master suite upstairs. 



COMPUTING Academic Computing Services will conduct a works 

WORKSHOP entitled INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS FOR THE COMPI 

IDIOT on Tuesday, November 23, in the Social & E 

Sciences Building, room 215. To reserve a space 

call ext. 2805 by noon on November 22. 

REFUELING Effective Monday, November 15, refueling of all 
CAMPUS campus vehicles will be done only during the fo! 
VEHICLES ing hours : 

7:00 a.m. until 8:00 a.m. 
12:00 noon until 1:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. 
This schedule will remain in effect until furth( 
notice. 

FORENSIC The UNCW Forensic Team has captured seven award; 

TEAM two tournaments as of this date. Included is aj 
third place award given at the prestigious Suff(| 
Universitv Forensic Tournament in Boston. The ;! 
time defending N. C. State Champions are coachecj 
by Bob and Rita Rosenthal of the speech communiij 
tion faculty and volunteer coaches, Ray Blackbuj 
and Scott Burton. 

BOOK John Clifford, assistant professor of English, j 
PUBLISHED had a book published by Random House. The book- 
MODERN AMERICAN PROSE: A READER FOR WRITERS, i' 
a college text for writing students and includej 
nonfiction selections from writers such as Mail] 
Baldwin, Eiseley, Didion and E.B. White. 

MCGUIRE Dr. Phillip McGuire of the history department dj 
LECTURES livered the premier lecture during the 19 82-83 
Campbell University S&H Foundation Lectureship 
gram: The Black Community: Dependence or Depej 
bility? held on November 10. His lecture was e 
titled "Black Participation in the Market Place 
Socio-Economic and Historical Synthesis." 

WORK Dancing for five percussionists, a composition 
PREMIERES David Kechley of the creative arts department -; 
division of music, was given its world premiere 
on November 9 at the NC Music Educators Associa! 
Convention held in Winston-Salem. Dr. Kechley 
attended the performance which was given by the 
Atlantic Christian College Percussion Ensemble. 



CHARTERING On Friday, November 5, 
CEREMONY tical sciences sponsore 
Upsilon Pi Epsilon, the 
honorary society. The 
one to be chartered in 
nationally. Nineteen s 
members were initiated, 
dent president and Dr. 
faculty advisor. 



the department of matheir 
d a chartering ceremony 

national computer scien 
UNCW Chapter is the secc 
the state and the 41st 
tudents and four faculty 
Diane Walsh is the sti 
Fletcher Norris is the 



"The Hot L Baltimore" presented by the University 
Theatre opened with its first performance Wednesday 
night. The play, depicting the bittersweet portrait 
of the last residents in a hotel about to be demo- 
lished, will run each night at 8 in the S.R.O. 
Theatre until Sunday, November 21. For reservations 
call ext. 2440. 

Two performances of Gian-Carlo Menotti's Christmas 
opera, "Amahl and the Night Visitors," will be pre- 
sented at 4 and 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 30, in 
Kenan Auditorium. For information regarding tickets 
call 791-4330, ext. 2390. 

The Wilmington Concert Association will present 
Panyris Lyras, pianist, at 8 p.m. in Kenan Audito- 
rium on November 29. 

An Organ and Brass Concert will be held in Kenan 
Auditorium at 3 p.m. on November 21. Free. 

The Azalea City Kiwanis Travelogue will feature 
"Images of Portugal" November 22 at 8 p.m. in 
Kenan Auditorium. 

A play, "The 19 40s Radio Hour," will be held in 
Kenan Auditorium November 23 at 8 p.m. Admission 
for non-students will be $5; UNCW students $2. 

Only 2 40 hours of annual leave can be brought 
forward on January 1, 19 83. Unused petty leave is 
lost as of December 31. For information concern- 
ing leave, refer to the UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES 
MANUAL, page G. 7-3. 

All November time sheets should be in the personnel 
office by 10 a.m. on December 1. This is necessary 
due to an early December payroll deadline. 

The UNCW Shehawks vs. Fayetteville State TONIGHT 
at 7 in Trask Coliseum. The UNCW Shehawks will 
host Radford University on November 22 at 7 p.m. 
in Trask. Adults $2; children $1. 

The Red Cross Bloodmobile will be at the Pub on 
November 18 & 19. 

The Seahawks will host Pembroke State University 
December 1 in Trask Coliseum at 7:30 p.m. 

The Randall Library schedule during the Thanks- 
giving holidays is as follows: 



Wed. 

Thurs 

Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 



November 2 4 
November 2 5 
November 26 
November 27 
November 2 8 



7:45 a.m. 

CLOSED 
10:00 a.m. 

CLOSED 
4:00 p.m. 



- 6 p.m. 
- 5 p.m. 

- Midnight 



ESSAY Gary A. Olson, director of the center for writing 

PUBLISHED has had an essay entitled "Incorporating Sentence 

Combining into the Advanced Composition Class" pii 

lished in the most recent issue of the JOURNAL 01 

ADVANCED COMPOSITION. ; 

DR. SLAGER Dr. James Slager, former counselor and assistant I 

AT OHIO professor of psychology at UNCW, has been hired cj 

associate director of the Student Counseling Ser-j 

vice at Miami of Ohio. He is presently serving ej 

acting director. j 



FINK 
LECTURES 



HPER 
FACULTY 



Dr. Carole Fink of the history faculty lectured c 
"Marc Bloch's Patriotism" at New York University 
on November 9 . Her appearance was sponsored by t 
NYU History Department, the Graduate History 
Society and the Institute of French Studies. 



Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of the Department of 
HPER, Derick Davis, Dr. Thomas Skalko and Dr. 
Robert Wolff, faculty members, attended the annus 
conference of the NC Recreation and Park Society 
held in Asheville November 7-10. Mr. Davis was 
presented a certificate for thirty years service 
to the society and the Presidential Citation for 
service to the board of directors. In addition, 
19 UNCW recreation majors were in attendance. 



PAPERS Dr. Bob Rosenthal, assistant professor of speech 
PRESENTED communication, presented two papers, "Rhetorical 
Criticism: Theoretical Probes" and "Forensics as 
Career Training: A Critique," at the national 
convention of the Speech Communication AssociatiC| 
held in Louisville, KY , November 4-7. During thej 
convention. Dr. Rosenthal was nominated for the 
post of vice president of the National Forensic 
Association. 

NEWSPAPER Be on the lookout for copies of the COASTAL CARO- 
COPIES LINIAN NEWSPAPER to be distributed to faculty anc; 
staff. Complimentary copies are being provided 
due to the amount of UNCW news coverage in this j 
particular issue. In particular is an article orj 
the R/V SEAHAWK. 

DECEMBER All items for inclusion in the December "Calendai, 
CALENDAR of Events" should be in the Development Office b^j 

noon on November 29. For information call Mimi 

Cunningham at ext. 2171. 



NEW Welcome to the following new employees: Daryl A 

EMPLOYEES Bowden , diver for SURF; Henry W. Phillips, mechar; 
in maintenance & operations, and Joanne M. Keene, 
clerk-stenographer in the biology /anthropology de 
partments . 

THE NEXT ISSUE OF THE CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE WILL BE DISTRIBUTEE 
HOLIDAYS DECENBER 2, DUE TO THE THANKSGIVING HOLIDAYS ON THURSDAY, 
NOVE^BER 25, AND FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26. HAVE A GOOD OC! 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC hv the sea 




ASH 
ONIGHT 



RCHESTRA 
PERFORM 



LAY IS 
CHEDULED 



UDITIONS 
OR PLAY 



EITS 

SPEAK 



REATIVE 
RITING 



YINGTON 
LECTED 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 15 
DECEMBER 2, 19 82 

The movie, M*A*S*H, will be shown tonight in Kenan 
Auditorium at 8 p.m. Adults $2; students $1. 

The UNCW Community Orchestra under the direction of 
Dr. Joe Hickman, assistant professor of music, will 
perform in Kenan Auditorium December 5 at 3 p.m. 
Adults $3; students $1.50. 

The Wilmington Merchants Association will present 
"The Nutcracker" December 7Si8 in Kenan Auditorium 
at 7:30 p.m. No admission charge. 

Auditions for Bell, Book and Candle, a romantic 
comedy spoofing witches and witchcraft, will be 
held December 13S.14 at 7:30 p.m. in King Hall. The 
comedy, a long running T.V. production better known 
as Bewitched, will be directed by Dr. Terry Theo- 
dore, professor of drama. Production dates are 
scheduled for February 3-6 in Thalian Hall. 

Anita Veit of the anthropology department and 
Richard Veit of the English department have been 
invited to speak December 5 at a "Forum on Pro- 
fanity" for the teenage Sunday school students of 
Grace Methodist Church. Richard Veit will discuss 
the history of vulgar and profane words in English 
and Anita Veit will discuss language taboos in other 
cultures . 

The creative writing classes of Charles Fort, 
director of the creative writing program, will pre- 
sent readings from their final manuscripts on Fri- 
day, December 10, at 6 p.m. in the P'ob . Book awards 
will be presented for tlie best poem and the best 
short story written during the semester. Open to 
all at no charge. Refreshments will be served. 

Dr. Robert Byington, chairman of the English depart- 
ment, was elected president of the NC Folklore 
Society at the society's 51st annual meeting held in 
Chapel Hill on November 20. 



*l 



TOPLIN 

SPEAKS 



MCCALL 
APPOINTED 



DR. FINK 

GUEST 

SPEAKER 



DR. MCGUIRE 
ELECTED 



DECEMBER 
PAYDAY 



Dr. Robert Toplin, professor of history, gave a 

sentation to faculty and students of the history 
department at The University of North Carolina a 
Chapel Hill recently. Dr. Toplin spoke on "The 
Making of the Film, 'Denmark Vesey's Rebellion'" 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE NOTES, a journal published by t 
University of Colorado, has appointed Thomas C. 
McCall, assistant professor of English, to its ?. 
visory Board. He will be reading submitted arti^ 
cles on the English Novel and on Shakespeare. 

i 

Dr. Carole Fink, associate professor of history, 
spoke on "Marc Bloch and the Problem of Identity, 
November 22 at Brandeis University. The lecturej 
sponsored by the Tauber Institute and the Brandej 
History Department. Also, on November 23 she spl 
on "Marc Bloch: A New Look at his Legacy" at th: 
Center for European Studies of Harvard Universiti 

Dr. Phillip McGuire of the history faculty has tj 
elected to the Board of Directors of the New Harl 
over County Branch of the National Association it 
the Advancement of Colored People. ' 

December payroll checks for permanent employees t 
be distributed on Monday, December 20. Tempora]' 
employees will receive checks on December 15. | 



NCSEA 
MEETING 



Mr. Ivan Hill, 
ident , and Mr. 
rector, will be 
to discuss the 
employees which 
benefit proposa 
meet with area 
of reinstating 
employees. All 
afternoon meeti 
Library Auditor 



NC State Employees Association pv. 
Emmett Burden, NCSEA executive d: 

on campus Wednesday, December 8 
19 83 Legislative Program for stai 

will include NCSEA salary and f-Ji 
Is. Later in the evening they w; ] 
legislators to stress the imports 
cost-of-living and merit increast 

employees are invited to attend I; 
ng which will be held at 3:30 in h 
ium. 



NEW 
EMPLOYEES 



STAFF 
PROMOTIONS 



A welcome is extended to the following new empli« 
Randall McAlexander, diving tender in the SURF ] C 
gram; Dianne Stroud, records clerk in the regis 3 
office and Marcia James, clerk typist in the fi J 
al services department. 

Congratulations to James Brooks on his promotio t 
general utility worker in student activities ant 
Paula Greene on her promotion to records clerk 
registrar's office. 



LEAVE Only 2 40 hours (30 days) of annual leave may be 
REMINDER brought forward on the January 1 time sheets, 
petty leave not taken by December 31 cannot be 
brought forward to the next calendar year. 



Drs . Diane Miller, Gary Faulkner and Rick Dixon of 
the sociology and anthropology faculty will have an 
article, "Work and Family Interaction: The Dual 
Career Family of the Flight Attendant," published in 
a forthcoming issue of the HUMBOLDT JOURNAL OF 
SOCIAL RELATION. 

David Kechley, assistant professor of music, has had 
two of his works. Fantasies and Reflections for Winds 
and Percussion and Dancing for five percussionists, 
performed during the American Society of University 
Composers, Region IV conference held at the Univer- 
sity of Alabama. Dr. Kechley attended the confer- 
ence which was held November 18-21. 

Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of the department of 
health, physical education and recreation, presented 
a program on "Physical Education and Fitness in 
Modern Israel" at a recent meeting of the Wilmington 
East Rotary Club. 

John Clifford of the English department delivered 
a paper entitled "Is More Less? A Perspective on Ad- 
vanced Com.position" at the annual meeting of the 
South Atlantic Modern Language Association held in 
Atlanta November 11-13. 

Dr. Grace Burton of the Department of Curricular 
Studies presented a session entitled "Seeing with 
the Mind's Eye" during the regional meeting of the 
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics held in 
Charlotte November 12. 

Dr. Gary A. Olson, director of the center for writ- 
ing, has had an essay, "Invention and Writing about 
Literature," published in the most recent edition 
of TEACHING ENGLISH. 



Carol Rogers, Cynthia Luke and Nancy Haddock of the 
nursing department attended the third semi-annual 
meeting of the Coastal Area Perinatal Association 
in Emerald Isle November 12 - 13. A discussion of 
"Interpersonal Relationships in the Neonatal Unit" 
was presented by a panel which included Nancy 
Haddock and Cynthia Luke. 

Drs. Hill, Wadman, Copley and Morgan of the depart- 
ment of economics and finance in the school of 
business administration attended the Southern Eco- 
nomic and Southern Finance Association Annual Meet- 
ing in Atlanta. Dr. Copley presented a paper, 
"Autocorrelation in Sharp's Market Model." 

A book, CAPE FEAR ADVENTURE: AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY 
OF WILMINGTON, by Diane Cobb Cashman is being of- 
fered to university employees at an introductory 
rate of $18.35 per copy. For more information call 
Patsy Larrick at ext . 2169. 



PLANT 
SALE 

THANK 
YOU 



DIRECTORY 
CHANGES 



BOMB 
THREAT 



WOMEN ' S 
BASKETBALL 

R/V 
SEAHAWK 



A Christmas Plant Sale will be conducted in the 
house Friday, December 3, from 8 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Ms. Eleanor Martin of the psychology department 
presses her appreciation to those who have shown 
concern during her recent illness. 

Please make the following additions and/or chang; 
in the faculty/staff telephone directory: 

Jackie Bartlett, acting assistant director of 
athletics, may be reached at ext. 2824. 

Paula Greene of the registrar's office may be 
reached at ext. 2129 and Diane Stroud of the 
registrar's office can be reached at ext. 212 

Bomb threats are usually made by a telephone cal 
who states that an explosive device has been or 
be placed on campus and detonated. All such thr 
are presumed serious until investigated and prov 
otherwise by the proper authorities. If you re- 
ceive such a call, notify the campus police imme 
ately . They in turn will dispatch a mobile patr 
unit to the site and establish a security perime 
to control access to the building or area. Camp 
police will notify the Wilmington Police Departm 
and determine whether to order evacuation of the 
building or campus. Following appropriate searc 
or other action, an announcement will be made to 
sume normal activities. The most important thin' 
to remember is to alert the campus police and tr 
the matter as real unless proven otherwise. 

The Shehawks will host Shaw University December 
at 7 p.m. and N.C. Wesleyan December 7 at 7 p.m. 

The R/V Seahawk visited Duck, NC , and a spoils a: 

off Cape Henry, VA, during the week of November 

21. The vessel is now at its home berth, the St; 
Ports . 



WOODHOUSE 
TO BE 
FEATURED 



'83 DESK 
CALENDAR 



CANDLELIGHT 
SERVICE 



Dr. William Woodhouse, associate professor of Sp; 
ish, will be featured on "Calendar," a public af- 
fairs program of WWAY-TV 3, at 6 p.m., Sunday, 
December 5. He will discuss his recent trip to 
Spain where he observed the Spanish elections. 

1983 8^x11 desk calendars are now available in 

Central Duplicating. The calendars are .70 each 

may be ordered by using a requisition for duplicej 
ting services form. 

A campus-wide Christmas Candelight Service sponsc 
by the United Christian Campus Ministry will be i 
Tuesday, December 7, at 11 p.m. at St. Matthew's 
Lutheran Church, located across College Road from 
Trask Coliseum. Faculty and staff are invited. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv the .^ca 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 16 
DECEMBER 9, 1982 



Departments are asked to send extra inter-office envelopes 
to the campus post office. 

All items for inclusion in the January '83 Calendar of 
Events should be sent to Kathy Butler in Kenan Auditorium 
before Thursday , December 16. Or call the UNCW News 
Bureau at extension 2751. 

Additional 1982 Fun Run T-shirts are available to all 
faculty and staff who participated in the event. The 
shirts may be purchased for $4 each. Call extension 2263. 

The UNCW Alumni Association will host five pre-game basket- 
ball socials to be held in James Hall beginning in January. 
The socials will include cold cut sandwiches , potato chips, 
pickles, soft drinks and beer. Faculty, staff, and their 
famililes are invited to participate at a cost of $7 for 
all five socials. Single tickets may be purchased for $2 
each. The socials will be held on the following game 
nights : 

January 6 James Madison 

January 10 Baptist College 

January 24 East Carolina University 

February 3 George Mason 

February 23 Campbell University 

Tickets may be purchased through the UNCW Alumni Office or 
by calling extension 2616 before December 20. 

The Office of Special Programs will host a Christmas Open 
House on December 20 from 3:00 - 5:00 p.m. All faculty and 
staff are invited to attend. 

Any questions regarding vehicle parking on campus should be 
directed to Cornelia Royal in the UNCW Parking Office 
located in Belk Hall. Or call extension 2537. 



CHRISTMAS All faculty and staff are invited to the P.F.M. (Proft 

BUFFET sional Food Management) "Christmas Buffet" (luncheon) 

day, December 13, in the UNCW Cafeteria . The menu wij 
include assorted salads, vegetables and steamship rout 
Cost is $3 per person. 

LONG DISTANCE Effective December 18 all long distance dialing (DAIN 

DIALING will change. When making a call on the DAIN LINE plea 

CHANGE the following: 

1. Dial 8 

2. Dial the area code (this includes the 919 

3. Dial the seven-digit number you wish to ca 

SEE EXAMPLES BELOW: 

/When making a call to the Chapel Hill area 

dial 8 (919) Plus the seven-digit number 

/When making a call to the Charlotte area 

dial 8 (704) Plus the seven-digit number 



BOOKSTORE 
TO CLOSE 



The UNCW Bookstore will close Wednesday , December 22, 
4 p.m. and will reopen at 8 a.m. on Monday, January 3. 



PERSONNEL* 
ITEMS 



December payroll checks for permanent employees will I 
distributed on Monday, December 20. Temporary employe 
will receive checks on December 15 



* Only 240 hours (30 days) of annual leave may be brougl 
forward on the January 1, 1983, time sheets. Any peti 
leave not taken by December 31, 1982, cannot be brougl 
forward to the next calendar year. 

* Effective January 1, 1983, the base wages on which soc 
security is to be paid will increase from $32,400 to 
$35,700. The tax rate, 6.7%, remains the same. 

* In the event of changes in marital status, dependent i 
creases or decreases, you or your spouse becoming 65 i 
of age or blind, new W-4 forms (withholding '83) shoul 
completed as you may qualify for different deductions. 
These forms may be picked up from the personnel offici 

* January 1 is also a good time to make sure the benefic 
aries on your retirement and insurance programs are ci 
rent. These changes may be done in the personnel offx 



AUDITIONS 
FOR PLAY 



Auditions for Bell, Book and Candle, a romantic comedi 
spoofing witches and witchcraft , will be held Decembei] 
13 & 14 at 7:30 p.m. in King Hall. The comedy, a lonc\ 
running T.V. production better known as Bewitched , wi. 
directed by Dr. Terry Theodore, professor of drama. i\ 
duction dates are scheduled for February 3-6. 



CONCERT 
SCHEDULED 



"Walk-In-Messiah" featuring the UNCW Community Orchesi 
and the UNCW Concert Choir will be held in Kenan Audit 
um December 12 at 3 p.m. Non-students $3; UNCW stude 
wi th ID' s free . 



The Shehawks will host NC AST University at 7 p.m. in 
Trask Coliseum on December 10. Adults $2; children $1 
and UNCW students with ID' s free. 

The UNCW men and women vs. NC State University December 11 
in the pool beginning at 1 p.m. with the women and 3:30 p.m. 
with the men. No admission charge. 

Laney High School will present their symphonic concert and 
jazz bands in a performance to be held in Kenan Auditorium 
at 8 p.m. December 13. Adults $2; students $1. 

The New Hanover High School Orchestra will perform in 
Kenan Auditorium December 14 at 8 p.m. Adults $2; students 
$1.50 

The Hanover Singers of New Hanover High School will host 
a concert in Kenan Auditorium December 15 at 8 p.m. Adults 
$2; students $1.50. 

The New Hanover High School Band will perform in Kenan 
Auditorium December 16 at 8 p.m. Adults $2; students $1. 

Dr. James Parnell of the biological sciences faculty and 
Dr. Anne Russell of the English faculty will be autograph- 
ing books on December 13 from 6-8 p.m. during the "Author' s 
Open House" sponsored by THE BOOKERY in the Cotton Exchange. 
Dr. Parnell will be signing his book, "Birds of the 
Carolinas ," and Dr. Russell will be signing her book, 
"Wilmington: A Pictorial History ." 

Frank Bongiorno, lecturer in the Department of Creative 
Arts - music division, presented a full recital during the 
meeting of the North American Saxophone Alliance held at 
East Carolina University on December 4. He will perform 
a concerto, Concertante by Clare Grundman, with the South 
Brunswick High School Band on December 16. 

Please make the following change in the faculty/staff phone 

directory : 

The Office of Research Administration is 
located in room 216 of Hoggard Hall. 

The Academic Computing Center located in room 221 of the 
Social/ Behavioral Sciences Building will be operating 
on the following schedule: 

Thursday, Dec. 9 0800-2400 

Friday, Dec. 10 0800-1700 

Saturday, Dec. 11 CLOSED 

Sunday, Dec. 12 1600-2400 

Monday-Thursday, Dec. 13-16 0800-2000 

Friday, Dec. 17 0800-1700 



Beginning Monday, Dec. 20, the Academic Computing Center 
will be open from 0800-1700 daily. The center will be 
closed on the scheduled university holidays of December 
23, 24, 27 and 31. 



LIBRARY 
SCHEDULE 



The Randall Library exam schedule is as follows: 



LIBRARY 
NOTICES 



Wednesday , Dec. 8 
Thursday , Dec. 9 
Friday, Dec. 10 
Saturday , Dec. 11 
Sunday, Dec. 12 
Monday-Thursday , Dec. 13-16 
Friday, Dec. 17 



7:45 a.m. - 2:00 a.m. 

7:45 a.m. - Midnight 

7:45 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

Noon - Midnight 

7:45 a.m. - Midnight 

7:45 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 



Faculty and staff are reminded to return all library mate 
due on or before December 17 by the end of the fall semes' 
Items which will be needed during the spring semester sho\ 
be renewed by bringing them to the Circulation Desk. Not, 
will be mailed after the first of the year to those who s 
have materials checked out. 



Faculty members are encouraged to prepare reserve reading 
for the spring semester as soon as possible. Lists are p 
sed in order of receipt and should be submitted to the Li. 
at least one week prior to class assignments . Reserve li. 
should be submitted on forms available at the Reserve Des. 
from departmental secretaries . Materials on reserve for 
fall semester will be removed shortly after the conclusio. 
exams unless the Library is notified that the same items v, 
be needed for spring semester reserve lists. 

FACULTY AT F. Dean Allen, Derick Davis, Charles Lewis and Robert Wol. 

CONFERENCE the HPER Department attended the Oceanfront Development O 

ference held downtown at the Hilton. 

DR. RENSMA Dr. Patricia Rensma of the philosophy S religion departme. 

HOLDS been meeting with nurses in the tri-county area for regult 

WORKSHOPS monthly workshops on "Ethical Decision Making in Nursing. '\ 

Study Workbook for Introductory Logic was published this 

fall by Burgess Publishing Company. 



ALLEN AT 
MEETING 



Walser H. Allen, Jr., associate professor of history, attii 
the Constitution and By-Laws Committee meeting of the Ass< 
tion of Historians in Eastern NC on December 3. The comm: 
convened in Raleigh and completed the revision of the Conii 
tion and By-Laws for AHENC . 



CLIFFORD John Clifford of the English department read a paper, "Re. 

READS Response Theory: An Update" at the annual meeting of the 

National Council of Teachers of English held November 20-} 

Washington, DC. 

WORKSHOPS Charles Earney and Rebecca Sawyer of the Department of AC( 

CONDUCTED tancy conducted workshops for the Cape Fear Area Chapter 

NC Association of CPA's on November 23. Earney's workshop 
entitled Detection of Errors and Fraudulent Acts. Mrs. S<: 
workshop was on Accounting for Business Combinations and 
vestments . 



KEYNOTE 
ADDRESS 



Robert Toplin of the history faculty delivered the keynote 
dress during the annual convention of the Federation of NC 
Historical Societies held in Raleigh recently . His talk i 
entitled "Competing With Rocky and Star Wars: The Use of 
for Public Programs ." 



UNC bv the .^ca 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 17 
DECEMBER 16, 1982 



Pay checks for permanent employees will be dis- 
pensed on Monday, December 20, in the University 
Cashier's Office located in Alderman Hall. 

UNCW employees will observe the following holi- 
days : 

Thursday, December 23, 

Friday, December 24, 

Monday, December 27, 

Friday, December 31, 

Season tickets for UNCW basketball games are 
still available at a reduced price to faculty 
and staff. Tickets for the remaining ten home 
games are $12 for adults; and $6 for children. 
Contact the athletic department. 

The UNCW Office of Special Programs will host a 
Christmas Open House on December 20 from 3-5 
p.m. All faculty and staff are invited. 

The bookstore will close Wednesday, December 22, 
at 4 p.m. and will reopen at 8 a.m. on Monday, 
January 3. 




The New Hanover High School Band will perform in 
Kenan Auditorium TONIGHT at 8. Adults $2; stu- 
dents $1. 



This will be the last issue of the CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE for 19 82. The next edition will 
be distributed on Thursday, January 6, 1983. 
The Development Office staff wishes all 
faculty and staff a very happy, safe and 
joyous holiday season. 



PERSONNEL *Only 240 hours (30 days) of annual leave may j 

REMINDERS brought forward on the January 1, 1983, time-l 

sheets. Any petty leave not taken by Decembd 

31, 1982, cannot be brought forward to the m 

calendar year. 

♦Effective January 1, 1983, the base wages on 
which social security is to be paid will in- 
crease from $32,400 to $35,700. The tax rat< 
6.7%, remains the same. 

*In the event of changes in marital status, d«j 
pendent increases or decreases, you or your 
spouse becoming 65 years of age or blind, ne\i 
W-4 forms (withholding '83) should be complel 
as you may qualify for different deductions 
These forms may be picked up from the personi 
office. 



NEW CAMPUS 
EMPLOYEES 



SPECIAL 
OFFER 



PROGRAM 
TO AIR 



♦January 1 is a good time to make sure the be: 
ficiaries on your retirement and ins-urance p: 
grams are current. These changes may be doni 
in the personnel office. 

♦Employees taking leave on December 28-30 shoij 
submit timesheets before leaving. 

*A11 temporary employee timesheets and all til 
sheets reflecting holiday or shift premium M'' 
be in the personnel office before 10 a.m. on 
January 3, 1983. This will insure that the 
payroll computation will be completed. Supe^ 
visors who do not meet this deadline should 
expect their employees to be paid on January'^ 
The personnel office will make one reminder 

A UNCW welcome is extended to William H. Chi' 
security officer, and James J. Riddle, lead 
in the SURF program. 

(SPECIAL FOR Children grades 4 - 6) 
The Office of Special Programs «^ill offer Beii 
ning Computer Instruction for children of fai 
staff at a special rate. This offer is limi 
to seven children and seven parents (one par' 
per child) on a first come, first serve regif 
tration basis. The fee is $39.50 and registi 
tion will be held in room 225 of Hoggard Hal 
until December 22. The course will be taugh' 
by Dr. Richard Satava and will meet December; 
30 from 9:30 a.m. to 12 noon in room 218 of 
Hoggard Hall. For additional information ca! 
the Office of Special Programs at extension 

WWAY-TV3 will televise highlights from the u 
"Walk-In-Messiah" on Christmas Eve, Decemberi 
at 7 p.m. At 7:30 that evening, the product! 
will be aired statewide by the UNC Center foi 
Public Television. 



The Office of 
sor a worksho 
on how to wri 
NC Humanities 
co-director o 
conduct the w 
in the Randal 
the presentat 
board members 
will respond 
elude Dr. Wil 
Megivern, Dr. 
McGowan. 



Research Administra 
p for interested fac 
te a proposal for fu 

Committee. Alice B 
f the NC Humanities 
orkshop on January 1 
1 Library Auditorium, 
ion, a panel made up 
, grantees or projec 
to questions. Panel 
liam H. Wagoner, Dr. 

Melton A. McLaurin 



tion will spon- 
ulty and staff 
nding by the 
arkley, acting 
Committee, will 
4 at 3:30 p.m. 
Following 

of former 
t participants 
ists will in- 

James J. 
and Dr. Jim 



Dr. Stephen C. Harper, associate professor and 
chairman of the department of management and 
marketing, will have his article on "Manage- 
ment: Who Ever Said It Would Be Easy?" fea- 
tured in the ten-year anniversary issue (Jan- 
Feb 19 83) of PACE MAGAZINE. 

Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of the HPER depart- 
ment, has been selected for the nineteenth 
edition of WHO'S WHO IN THE EAST. He is the past 
president of the American Association for Lei- 
sure and Recreation. 

Frank Kauder, Richard Roscher and Rebecca Saw- 
yer of the accounting faculty attended a semi- 
nar on Trends in Accounting Education November 
4-5 at Virginia Polytechnical Institute. 

A paper entitled "A Simple Test of the Black- 
Scholes Option Pricing Model" has been accepted 
for publication and presentation at the South- 
west American Institute for Decision Sciences 
Conference to be held in Houston next March. 
The paper was co-authored with Professor Ladd 
Kochman of Nicholls State University. In ad- 
dition, Tate and Kochman have had an article, 
"Marketing Decision-Making Framework for Edu- 
cators," published in the November 19 82 issue 
of JOURNAL OF BUSINESS EDUCATION. 

The Human Relations Commission and the Greater 
Wilmington Chamber of Commerce invite all staff, 
faculty, and their families to participate in 
the Human Relations Month Contests now in pro- 
gress. All entries must relate to the theme of 
"Involvement Opens Minds." For details call 
Dianne Avery at 763-5431 or Sally Myers at 
763-5153 or 395-5190. 



The Seahawks will host St. Xavier (Chicago) 
January 3 at 7:30 p.m. in Trask Coliseum. 



CONNER 
LECTURES 



PRE-GAME 
SOCIALS 



Ann Connor, assistant professor of art, preser 
a slide lecture entitled "Christian Symbolism 
In Italian Art" to the Wilmington Art Associat 
on December 7. 



The UNCVJ Alumni Associati 
will host five pre-game s 
basketball games in James 
include cold cut sandwich 
drinks, pickles and beer 
their families are invite 
cost of $7 for all five s 
may be purchased for $2 e 
be held on the following 



on and the Seahawk C] 
ocials prior to selec 

Hall. The socials 
es, potato chips, sof 
Faculty, staff and 
d to participate at a 
ocials. Single ticke 
ach . The socials wi] 
game nights: 



January 6 
January 10 
January 24 
February 3 
February 23 



James Madison 
Baptist College 
East Carolina Universit 
George Mason 
Campbell University 



Tickets may be purchased through the UNCW Alun 
Office or by calling extension 2616 before Dec 
ber 20. 



CENTRAL 
STORES 



JAZZ 
ENSEMBLES 



NCSEA 
DIRECTOR 
ON CAMPUS 



The following item is now available in centra] 
stores : 

Stock # 250-11001 
Description: Diskettes, S^s" single sidec 
double density soft sector 
Selling Unit: 10/box 

The UNCW Jazz Ensembles will be performing on 
WLCF, FM 10 7 at 7 p.m. on December 2 4 and at 5 
p.m. on December 25. The ensembles under the 
direction of Frank Bongiorno, lecturer in the 
Department of Creative Arts - music division, 
will perform Silent Night, Big Dipper and We 
Three Kings. 

Mr. Emmett Burden, North Carolina State Employ 
es Association executive director, spoke to 
university employees last week regarding the 
19 83 Legislative Program for state employees. 
All fulHiime and permanent part-time state em- 
ployees are invited to join the NCSEA, a volur 
tary, non-profit group of state employees 
working to improve State Government and com- 
pensatory programs for all state employees. 
Membership forms are available in the UNCW 
Personnel Office. 



SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL FACULTY AND STAFF 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC bv the =sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUht XII, NUMBER 18 
JANUARY 6 1 1983 



December time sheets for SPA employees reflecting a nega- 
tive balance (minus figure) in the annual or sick leave 
column will automatically show a deduction in the January 
pay check. 

Employees have been notified via memorandum of the re- 
visions in sick and vacation policies. When filling out 
the January time sheet Please refer to this memo. 

No more than 240 hours (30 days) of annual leave may be 
forwarded to the January time sheet. 

Any EPA administrative employee on 12 month contract 
who has not forwarded the December time sheet to the per- 
sonnel office is asked to do so immediately. 

In mid-January and uPon completion of Posting and auditing 
of December leave? all EPA administrative employees will 
receive a status report which will enable them to begin 
their 1983 sick and vacation leave accounts. 

Only 240 hours (30 days) of annual leave can be carried 
forth to the 1983 calendar year. 

Beginning January 1» 1983» eligible Permanent* full-time 
employees will be granted eight hours sick leave per month. 
Eligible permanent, part-time employees earn sick leave at a 
rate Proportional to that of a permanent, full-time employee. 
Sick leave, by policy, is non-transferable, however, per- 
sonnel will transfer the odd minutes which some employees 
may have at the end of December, to the vacation leave ac- 
count. If this applies to you, Ms. Maile of the Personnel 
office will forward a Leave Correction Sheet to you by 
January 17 with the correct balances brought forward to 
January. 



HAPPY NEW year:: 



PAY DAY 
CHANGED 




BASKETBALL 
GAMES 



Temporary and premium Pay will be Paid on January 14- rati 
than the original date of January 17. For additional m 
mation contact the personnel office. 

Effective February li 1983f VALIC will have a new fixed 
deferred annuity Plan for university employees. The Plaij 
docs not make any front-end-sales or administrative char, 
on contributions. John Pezzoni» VALIC rep» will be on c 
Friday? January 14» in Alderman Hall» room 208* to talk 
interested employees. Appointments may be made through 
personnel office at ext. 2160. 

The first pre-fiame social for this year* sponsored by thij 
UNCW Alumni Association and the Seahawk Club* will be he' 
tonight at 6:15 in the Goodwood Tavern. The next social 
scheduled for Monday? January 10. Tickets are available 
the alumni office or by calling ext. 2616. 

UNCW vs. James Madison University at 7:30 in Trask 
Coliseum TONIGHT. 



UNCW vs. Baptist College of Charleston at 7:30 P.m. in T 
Coliseum January 10. 



UNCW vs. Boston University at 7:30 P.m. 
January 12. 



in Trask Col iseui 



EVANGELIST 
SERVICE 



Jim Whittington will conduct an evangelistic service in 
Kenan Auditorium January 7 at 7:30 p.m. Free. 



MODERN 
DANCE 



The UNCW Office of Special Programs in conjunction with 
Wilmington Civic Ballet will offer Modern Dance for Begii 
ners. Classes for adults and youth (ages 12 and up) wil 
begin January 13-May 19 from 7-8 P.m. Thursdays in Hanov' 
Hall Gymnasium. Registration deadline is Tuesday« Janua 
Call 762-6137 to register. Fee $60. 



CRATER 
MOVES 



r BERMAN TO 
f SPEAK 



Lynne Crater formerly of the Contracts and Grants Office, 
moved to the Office of Research Administration central iz 
the pre-award and Post-award research activities. The o 
located in Hoggard Ha I I « room 216 is under the directors^ 
of Dr. Harold W. Keller with additional staff support fr 
Annette M. Anderson. Questions dealing with any Phase o 
research should be directed to this office. 

David Berman of the mathematical sciences department wil 
present a talk entitled "The Division Algorithm" m the 
Mathematical Wednesdays Series January 12i at 3 P.m. in 
Morton Hall, room 212. 



PAPER TO BE Gary Olson? director of the center for writing? will Pre- 
PRESENTED sent a Paper entitled //Teaching Readability in Tcchnirai: 
Communications'/ at the March conference of the Philologi 
Association of the Carolinas to be held in Charleston? S' 



NANCES 
ORDER 



The yearly financial audit is over and according to the state 
auditor's office al I accounting practices on campus are in 
good order. UNCW has received excellent audit reports and 
letters of cotmiendation regarding good financial controls 
and accounting procedures over the years. Congratulations 
are in order for those responsible: Dr. Jairy Hunter» vice 
chancellor for business affairs and development; Robert 
Walton» director of financial services? Tim Jordan» assistant 
director of financial scrvices» and their staff. 



CEPTION FOR 
. BRYAN 



Faculty and staff arc cordially invited to a reception on 
Tuesday? January 18» from 3:30-5:00 p.m. in James Hal!> 
room 100 to welcome Dr. William (Bill) Bryant vice chancellor 
for student affairs. 



DITIONS 
HEDULED 



The UNCW University Theatre will hold open auditions for 
" Round and Round the Garden" in the S.R.O. Theatre January 
10 & 11 from 6-8:30 p.m. The Play is about a family's des- 
perate attempt to have a nice» civilized weekend together 
in the country. The play» scheduled for February 16-21» 
will be directed by Dr. Terry Rogers. 



ftNTS 
CEIVED 



Dr. Robert ToPlin of the history faculty has received Grants 
from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Pew 
Foundation for the production of a television docu-drama 
and completion of two scripts for additional programs. The 
production is to be the second in Toplin's film series on 
slavery in America. 



TICLE 
CEPTED 



Dr. Stephen C. Harper» chairman of the Department of Manage- 
ment and Marketine» has had his artic!e»"A Developmental 
Approach To Performance Appraisal*" accepted for Publica- 
tion in the September 1983» issue of BUSINESS HORIZONS. 



LLIS 
BLISHES 



Dr. Cecil L. Willis of the sociology and anthropology de- 
partment has had an article entitled "Population Size? 
Density! Urbanization and the Division of Labor" published 
in the CALIFORNIA SOCIOLOGIST (winter. 1982 edition.) 



The UNCW Men's Swim Team will host William & Mary College 
January 13. 



LIDAYS 
BE 
BLISHED 



THE 1983 HOLIDAY SCHEDULE WILL BE PUBLISHED IN THE 
JANUARY 13 EDITION OF THE CAMPUS COWIUNIfiUE, 



;OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the csca 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 19 
JANUARY 13, 1983 



A seminar, "Physiological Studies on the Antarc- 
tic Crustacean, Euphausia Superba," conducted by 
Dr. Robert George, professor of oceanography, 
will be held Friday, January 14, at 3 p.m. at 
the Institute for Marine Biomedical Research. 
All faculty and staff are invited to attend. Re- 
freshments will be served prior to the seminar. 
A movie, "Research in the Last Frontier Antarcti- 
ca," will follow the seminar. 

The first "Ham & Egghead" presentation for the 
spring semester is scheduled for Friday, January 
14, at 12 noon in the faculty dining room of the 
cafeteria. Dr. Ed Olszewski of the department 
of chemical and physical sciences will discuss 
"How Can Teaching Be Evaluated?" 

Faculty and staff are cordially invited to a re- 
ception on Tuesday, January 18, from 3:30-5 p.m. 
in James Hall, room 10 0, to welcome Dr. William 
(Bill) Bryan, our new vice chancellor for student 
affairs . 

The Faculty Women's Network will hold a meeting 
Sunday, January 16, at the Canterbury Woods Club- 
house at 7:30 p.m. For more information call 
Kathy Berkeley at extension 2309. 

The Azalea City Kiwanis Club will feature "Gates 
of Jerusalem" January 14 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Audi- 
torium. Individual tickets $3. 



The Wilmington Oratorio Society will host a con- 
cert January 16 at 3 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 
Adults $3; students $1.50 



PRO The Wilmington Pro Musica and St. John's Museum 

MUSICA Art will co-sponsor a concert featuring Judith 
Nelson, violist, and Samuel Viviano, pianist, a 
3 p.m. January 16 at St. John's Museum of Art. 
Free. 

RAG TIME A concert by the Wilmington Concert Association 
ENSEMBLE "New American Rag Time Ensemble," will be held 

Kenan Auditorium January 19 at 8 p.m. Season 

membership only. 

WOMEN'S UNCW Shehawks vs. Gardner Webb College January 
BASKETBALL at 8 p.m. in Trask Coliseum. 

UNCW Shehawks vs. Campbell University January 1 
at 7 p.m. in Trask Coliseum. 

SWIM TEAM UNCW men and women to host UNC-Chapel Hill Jand 
SCHEDULE 18 at 4 p.m. Free. 

MCCALL The second edition of Houghton-Mifflin's Strud 
RECOGNIZED ture and Meaning-An Introduction to Literature , i 

published January, 1983 recognizes Thomas C. 

McCall of the English faculty for his editorial 

assistance. 

DOCTORATE James Gardner of the Department of Creative Arl 
RECEIVED division of music, received his Doctor of Music; 
Arts degree from Southwestern Baptist Theologicj 
Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, on December 17. 
His dissertation was "An Examination of Select?; 
Aspects of Marxist and Christian Musical Aesth«| 
tics." Dr. Gardner also received the Academic I 
Achievement Award from the School of Church MuM 



REVIEW 
PUBLISHED 



PROPOSAL 
WORKSHOP 



SAFETY 
NOTES 



A book review by Dr. Phillip McGuire of the his 
tory faculty has been published in the latest 
issue of the JOURNAL OF NEGRO HISTORY. The bO( 
A SEARCH FOR EQUALITY: THE NATIONAL URBAN LEA( 
1910-1961, was written by Jesse T. Moore, Jr 

The Office of Research Administration will hos 
workshop for faculty and staff on how to write 
proposal for funding by the NC Humanities Commi 
Alice Barkley, acting co-director of the NC Hui 
ties Committee, will conduct the workshop on J 
uary 14, at 3:30 p.m. in the Randall Library A^ 
torium. A panel made up of Dr. Wagoner, Dr. Me; 
givern. Dr. McLaurin and Dr. McGowan will resp; 
to questions following the presentation. 

"Drive safely on your way to work and avoid th, 
mourning after!!" 

Ira Lipman, author of How to Protect Yourself 
From Crime , says that screaming "fire" often 
brings help faster than screaming "help." 



Applications for residence life staff positions for 
1983-84 are currently being accepted through Jan- 
uary 21. There are 25 openings available. Appli- 
cation fonas may be picked up from the dean of 
students office, housing office or any residence 
hall. 

"Some Legal Conclusions Regarding Non-Renewal and 
Dismissal," an article by Dennis J. Sporre, chair- 
man of the department of creative arts, has been 
published in the January 19 83 issue of the Associa - 
tion for Communication Administration Bulletin . 

Dr. Kenneth F. Ferraro, assistant professor of 
sociology, has had an article entitled "The Health 
Consequences of Relocation Among the Aged in the 
Community" published in the January, 19 83 issue 
of the JOURNAL OF GERONTOLOGY. 

Dr. Charles Ward, assistant professor of chemistry, 
will present a program entitled "From Abacus to 
Z80: Understanding Microcomputers" January 20 at 
7:30 p.m. at the New Hanover County Public Library. 
The program, the first in a series of computer 
awareness programs , is being sponsored by the 
Library and the New Hanover Friends of the Public 
Library. The second program scheduled for Satur- 
day, January 22, will feature US Representative 
Charlie Rose discussing how he computerized his 
office on Capitol Hill. 

Barbara Frey Waxman, lecturer in the English de- 
partment, delivered a paper, "Mothers and the 
Genesis of the Jewish American Princess in Good- 
bye, Columbus and "Tell Me a Riddle,' " during 
the annual conference of the Association for 
Jewish Studies held December 19-21 in Boston. 

In the event of changes in marital status, de- 
pendent increases or decreases, you or your 
spouse becoming 65 years of age or blind, new 
W-4 forms (withholding '83) should be completed 
as you may qualify for different deductions. 
These forms may be picked up from the personnel 
office. 

All permanent employees will receive W-2 tax forms 
along with the January 31 pay checks. Checks are 
to be picked up from the University Cashier's Of- 
fice on that date. 

Temporary employees' W-2 tax forms will be avail- 
able in the University Cashier's Office on Jan- 
uary 31. 



(Personnel items continued on next page) 



PERSONNEL Effective January 1, the base wages on which soi 
ITEMS cial security is to be paid have increased from' 

$32,400 to $35,700. i'he tax rate of 6.7% remai' 

the same. 

January is a good time to make sure the beneficj 
aries on your retirement and insurance programs] 
are current. These changes may be done in the 
personnel office. 

Effective February 1, VALIC will have a new fi> 
tax-deferred annuity plan for university emploi| 
John Pezzoni, VALIC rep, will be on campus Fric| 
January 14, in Alderman Hall, room 215, to tal)<, 
with interested employees. Appointments may be 
made by calling the personnel office at ext. 2] 



19 83 *Memorial Day 

HOLIDAY Easter Monday 
SCHEDULE Independence Day 
Labor Day 
Thanksgiving 
*Veteran's Day 
Christmas 



April 1, Friday 
April 4, Monday 
July 4, Monday 
September 5/ Monday 
November 24 & 25, Thurs . 
December 22, Thursday 
December 23 & 26, Fri . & 



Mc 



*Redesignated by Chancellor 



P.E. 

FACILITIES 

SCHEDULE 



The schedule for physical education facilities 
the spring semester is as follows: 



Hanover Hall 



*8:00 a.m. 
8:00 a.m. 
9:00 a.m. 



- 9 :00 p.m. 

- 5:45 p.m. 

- 4:30 p.m. 



Monday-Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Weight Room 
*8:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Monday-Thursday 
8:00 a.m. - 5:45 p.m. Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Saturday 

(Class schedule for weight room MWF 10-10:50 
and MWF 11-11:50 a.m.) 

Racquetball Courts 
*8:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Monday-Thursday 
8:00 a.m. - 5:45 p.m. Friday 
8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Saturday 

(Class schedule for racquetball is M-W 10-11 
a.m.; T-T 8-9:15 a.m.; MWF 9-9:50 a.m. and 
8-8:50 a.m.) 
♦Except during class schedule 

The above listed facilities are available to f 
staff and students of LTMCW. ID's must be aval, 
upon request. The pool schedule and tennis co 
schedule will be printed in next week's CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE. 



11 . 1 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 20 
JANUARY 20, 1983 



All items for inclusion in the February Calendar of 
Events should be sent to Kathy Butler in Kenan Audito- 
rium before Wednesday, January 26. Mrs. Butler may be 
reached at extension 2751. 

The hours for The Center for Writing during the spring 
semester will be from 9 a.m. - 12 noon and 1 p.m. - 
3 p.m., Monday - Friday. Also, The Center will be open 
on Monday and Tuesday nights from 6-9. The Center for 
Writing is located in Morton Hall, room 203. The exten- 
sion is 2549. 

The Miss Wilmington Pageant sponsored by the Wilmington 
Jaycees will be held in Kenan Auditorium Saturday, 
January 22, at 8 p.m. Admission is $5. 

The Amazing Jonathan, comedian and magician, will per- 
form Friday night, January 21, at 8 in the Pub. The 
event open to faculty and staff is in conjunction with 
homecoming. 

Faculty, staff, Seahawk Club and alumni will enjoy 
another pre-game social Monday, January 24, at 6:15 p.m. 
in the Goodwood Tavern. The social sponsored by the 
UNCW Alumni Association and the Seahawk Club will be 
held prior to the Seahawk/East Carolina University 
basketball game scheduled for 7:30 that night. 

The Shehawks will host Wake Forest University January 22 
at 7 p.m. in Trask Coliseum. 

UNCW women and men vs. Old Dominion University and The 
College of Charleston January 22 at 2 p.m. in the pool. 



IMBR 
SEMINAR 



A seminar, "The Large Volunme High Pressure Aquarium: Re-\ 
cent Design Concepts & Research Potential ," by Michael | 
Jordan, IMBR research associate, will be held January 21 \ 
at 4 p.m. at IMBR. Faculty and staff are invited to at- 
tend. Refreshments will be served. 



RESERVING Due to numerous misunderstandings concerning procedures 

FACILITIES for reserving campus facilities, it is requested that 

prior to requesting a facility , read pages C. 4-1 - 4-2 
of the UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES MANUAL. Facilities Use 
Forms may be obtained from Nancy Maready at extension 
2192. 



AEROBIC 
.PROGRAMS 



Classes for the Jane Fonda/Exercise programs being offer- 
ed by the Office of Special Programs will be held January 
31-March 16; March 21~April 27 and May 2-25 on Mondays 
and Wednesdays from 6-6:45 p.m. in the back of Hanover Gy\ 
Registration is being held in Haggard Hall, room 225, or 
by calling extension 2194. Fee is $18. 



ACADEMIC Academic Computing Services has temporarily moved from 

COMPUTING room 222 of the Social & Behavioral Sciences Bldg. Paul I 

SERVICES Hosier and Jane Zirkle are presently located in room 200 

of Hoggard Hall and can be reached at extension 2805 or 
2541. Michael Sheehan is located in room 219 of the 
Social S Behavioral Sciences Bldg. and can be reached at 
extension 2709. The Academic Computing Services User 
Room in room 221 of the Social & Behavioral Science Bldg. 
will remain open Monday - Thursday from 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. 
and on Friday from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Beginning Sunday, 
January 23, the Academic Computing Services User Room wil 
be open from 4 p.m. - midnight. 



THALIAN 
PLAY 



"Bell, Book and Candle" will be presented by The Thalian 
Association February 3-6 in Thalian Hall. The play, di- 
rected by Dr. Terry Theodore of the Creative Arts Depart-^ 
ment , division of drama, is a romantic comedy about a 
contemporary witch who casts a spell on a publisher 
causing him to fall in love with her. Ticket informatioi 
may be obtained by calling 763-3398 . 



HOLLIFIELD 
NAMED 



PIANO 
CONCERT 



Dr. Lucinda Holli field, assistant prqfessor of HPER, has 
been named an Outstanding Young Woman of America for 198. 

The Creative Arts Department, music division, will prese: 
Dr. Sherrill Martin and Dr. Richard Deas of the music 
faculty in concert Friday, January 21, at 8 p.m. in Kena.^ 
Auditorium. Free . 



COLLOQUIUM 
PRESENTED 



EDITORIAL 
PUBLISHED 



Dr. Michael Perone , assistant professor of psychology , 
recently presented an invited colloquium entitled "Behav) 
ral Gerontology : An Operant Psychologist Looks at Old 
Age" to the UNC-Greensboro Department of Psychology . 

"The Spillover Effect," an editorial by Dr. Charles Lewi 
chairman of the HPER department, appeared in the Decembe 
January 1983 issue of CORPORATE FITNESS AND RECREATION , 
the journal for employee health and services programs. 



Derick G.S. Davis, assistant professor in the department 
of HPER, will have the following committee responsibili- 
ties for 1983: member of the nominating committee and 
arts & humanities workshop committee for the NC Recrea- 
tion and Park Society and a member of the planning com- 
mittee for the senior Olympics for the Wilmington Parks 
& Recreation Department. 

Gene Huguelet, director of library services , represented 
the North Carolina Chapter of the Association of College 
and Research Libraries at the mid-winter meeting of The 
American Library Association held in San Antonio, TX , 
January 9-11. 

Dr. Ronald Copley, assistant professor in the department 
of economics/ finance in the School of Business Adminis- 
tration, has had a paper, "Leveraged Leasing - for Pro- 
fessionals and Small Business ," published in the summer, 
1982 journal of FINANCIAL PLANNING TODAY. 

Gerald R. Weeks of the psychology department has been 
appointed to the Editorial Board of the American Journal 
of Family Therapy. 

All permanent employees will receive W-2 tax forms along 
with the January 31 pay checks. Checks may be picked up 
from the University Cashier' s Office on that date. 

Temporary employees' W-2 tax forms will be available in 
the University Cashier' s Office on January 31. 

Barbara Waxman of the English department has had an 
article entitled "Ethnic Heroism: Matthew Arnold's and 
George Eliot's Gypsies" appear in a book of collected 
essays entitled PERSPECTIVES ON NINETEENTH-CENTURY HEROISM. 

Dr. Jim Sabella , associate professor of sociology /anthro- 
pology , presented a paper, "Snags in the Line: Methodo- 
logical and Evaluational Problems in the South Atlantic 
Snapper-Grouper Fishery ," as well as co-organized two 
sessions entitled "Anthropology in the Coastal Zone" 
during the 81st annual meeting of the American Anthropo- 
logical Association held in Washington, DC, last month. 

Dr. Gary A. Olson, director of The Center for Writing, 
delivered a talk on establishing writing centers at the 
pre-college level and how UNCW's Center can be of help to 
local educators. The presentation, held at the UNCW's 
Center on January 17, was addressed to a group of teach- 
ers from various New Hanover County schools. 



John Clifford of the English faculty has won the Cape 
Fear Chess Club Tournament, finishing with 4h points for 
5 rounds. The club meets in the Community Arts Center 
on Wednesday nights from 7-9:45. Chess players of all 
abilities are welcome. 



FORM A Moveable Equipment Change in Location Form must he com- 

NECESSARY pleted and forwarded to purchasing/property control to 

cover all transfers of equipment whether it be to 

another department, location or to surplus property . 



WARRANTY 
CARDS 



All warranty information on new equipment is maintained 
in the purchasing department . Please forward all war- 
ranty cards received with new equipment to Sondra Roark 
in the purchasing department. 



STOREROOM When ordering items from central stores please type the 

FORMS information on the storeroom order form. This will in- 

sure that numbers or descriptions are not misread. Also, 
the last page (packing slip) is not legible on handwritte 
orders . 



HOMECOMING The Homecoming Committee will present a banner contest 

CONTEST during half-time of the UNCW/East Carolina University 

basketball game on Monday night, January 24. 



TASK 
FORCE 



A meeting of the UNCW Alcohol Awareness Task Force will 
be held January 25 in room 215 of Alderman Hall. 



POOL 
SCHEDULE 



Mon-Wed-Thurs-Fri 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 

Tuesday 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m 

Saturday 12:00 noon - 3:00 p.m. 

Mon-Tues-Wed (nights) 7:30 p.m. - 9:15 p.m. 



(Free Swim'. 
(Free Swim, 
(Free Swim] 
(Free Swim 



For faculty, staff and students, 
available upon request. 



id's must be 



Saturday free swim will not be held when home swim meets 
are scheduled. The pool is closed during breaks and 
holidays. 



TENNIS 
COURTS 
SCHEDULE 



*8:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Monday-Thursday 
8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Saturday 



*Except during class and athletic use. 



SAFETY 
NOTES 



What is "Safety?" Safety is simply preventing an acciderA 
Did you know there is an injury-producing accident every \ 
three seconds? 



What is an "Accident?" An accident is an unplanned event} 
that hurts, injures or kills somebody. Accidents are the] 
chief cause of death among age groups 1 to 38. To preverX 
accidents , be aware of your surroundings , try to exercise\ 
good judgment and be an example for others. 

\ 



AMPUS 
lOMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 21 
JANUARY 27, 1983 



AM S 
GGHEADS 



Ms. Jean Muir, foundation distinguished visiting professor , 
spoke on "Age Discrimination" during the "Ham & Eggheads" 
luncheon held Friday, January 21. The next "Ham & Eggheads" 
program will feature Richard Dixon of the sociology s anthro- 
pology department and Roger Lowery of the political science 
department discussing the WWAY-TV3 STAR NEWS Telephone In- 
terview Public Opinion Survey. The luncheon program will 
be held January 28 at 12:15 p.m. in the faculty dining room 
of the cafeteria. 



ARKER AT 
EW LOCATION 



Ralph Parker, director of minority affairs, is located in 
room 201-B of Alderman Hall. He may be reached at exten- 
sion 2439. 



MBR 
EMINAR 



Dr. Robert D. Roer , associate research physiologist for 
IMBR, will speak on "Short and Long Term Effects of Hydro- 
static Pressure on Crayfish" January 28 at 4 p.m. at IMBR. 
Faculty and staff are invited to attend. Refreshments will 
be served. 



NCW ON 
XHIBIT 



A display featuring UNCW is presently on exhibit in the lob- 
by at UNC General Administration. The exhibit will be 
featured through March 24. 



HELBURNE 
SPEAK 



Dr. Walter Shelburne, assistant professor of philosophy S 
religion, will discuss Carlos Castaneda during the monthly 
academic meeting of the PSR faculty January 28 at 2:45 p.m. 
in the Social s Behavioral Sciences Building, room 102. 
Faculty members from other departments are invited. 



R. HUNTER 
RESIDENT 



Dr. Jairy C. Hunter, Jr., vice chancellor for business 
affairs and development, was elected president of the Lower 
Cape Fear Hospice for 1983 during their recent meeting held 
at the Cameron Education Center Auditorium. HOSPICE is an 
organization designed to provide in-home-care to terminally 
ill patients as well as give support to family prior to and 
after the death of a loved one. 



HEALTH The staff of the student health services would like to rend 

SERVICES faculty members that they do not write excuses for students 

NOTE who have missed classes due to illness. If a student is se 

in the health center, the visit is documented on his/her ch 
Faculty members may verify this information by calling ex- 
tension 2533. 

PAPER Dr. Cecil Willis, Dr. Rob Miller and Dr. Diane Miller of th 

ACCEPTED sociology department have had a paper entitled "Social and 

Economic Structural Antecedents of Fertility" accepted for 
publication in the journal, SOCIOLOGICAL INQUIRY. 

SKATE-A- The Wilmington Jaycettes will sponsor a Skate-A-Thon for Cy 

THON tic Fibrosis Saturday , February 5, from 1-5 p.m. at Sports 

World. Faculty and staff are encouraged to participate. F 
specific information call Sondra Roark at 799-8445 after 6: 

POEM TO "Going for Mail After Rain," a poem by Sally Sullivan of ttl 

APPEAR English faculty, will appear in the April 1983 annual issue 

of THE LYRICIST. \ 

INFORMATION All members of Phi Kappa Phi (faculty and students) are asi\ 

NEEDED to give spring schedules as well as preferred meeting timei 

Carol Ellis in the English department or call extension 23: 

PIG Phi Beta Lambda, business fraternity , will host a pig pick:, 

PICKING February 7 from 5-8 p.m. at James Hall. The pig picking, Jj 

in conjunction with the observance of Business Week 1983 bu 
the Cameron School of Business , will cost $5.50 at the doo:\ 
Advance tickets may be purchased in Bear Hall, room 220, 
January 31-February 4 from 3:30-6 p.m. 



NEW 
STAFF 



A welcome is extended to the following new employees: Col. 
M. Nay lor, secretary in the SURF program; Jody L. Connor, 
secretary in the department of special programs; Linda L. 
Mitchell , clerk typist in the admissions department, and 
Freedia P. Coston, housekeeping assistant in the auxiliary^ 
services department. 



HISTORY Dr. Thomas V. Moseley , Dr. Phillip McGuire and Professor 

FACULTY Walser H. Allen, Jr. of the history faculty attended the 

ing of the Executive Council of the Association of Histori^ 
in Eastern North Carolina held January 20 in Raleigh. Pla\ 
for the spring meeting of the association were completed al 
the final draft of a new constitution and by-laws was appi^ 



COMPUTER "The Electronic Workplace: INPUT/OUTPUT," will be the toi 

AWARENESS of discussion TONIGHT at 7:30 at the New Hanover Public Li 

brary. The program is in conjunction with the library' s 
emphasis on computer awareness . Faculty and staff are invi 
ted. No charge. 

COMPUTER The New Hanover Public Library will host a computer fair i 

FAIR 9 a.m. -5 p.m. Saturday, January 29, at the library. The j 

will include discussions and an exhibition of various comn 
ter products. Dr. Richard Veit of the English department] 
and Dr. Mark Galizio of the psychology department will be j 
among those participating in the event. 



An article by Dr. Lucinda Hollifield of the HPER department en- 
titled "Effect of Prior Performance Experience Before Audiences 
on a Dominant and Nondominant Motor Response" was published in 
the December 1982 issue of the JOURNAL OF SPORT PSYCHOLOGY . 

David Kechley , assistant professor of music in the Creative 
Arts Department, will be in Shreveport January 30 to hear the 
Shreveport Symphony perform his work. Five Ancient Lyrics on 
Poems by Sappho , for soprano, harp and strings. 

Dr. Gerald R. Weeks of the psychology department has become a 
Diplomate of the American Board of Family Psychology in Mari- 
tal and Family Therapy. The Diplomate is issued to psycholo- 
gists possessing advanced competence in clinical practice. 
Dr. Weeks is the only psychologist in NC to hold this diploma. 

The Pied Piper Theatre will present "Pac Man! Here We Go!" 
January 31-February 4 in Kenan Auditorium at 10:30 a.m. 
daily. The performances will be open to New Hanover County 
first and second graders. "Pac Man! Here We Go!" will be 
open to the public Sunday, February 6, at 3 p.m. in Kenan 
Auditorium. Admission children 8-80 will be 50C. 

The UNCW Art Guild will sponsor a trip to Washington, DC, 
February 11, 12, S 13. The trip, open to students, faculty 
and staff will cost approximately $32 plus meals. 



Round trip bus 

Two nights lodging (Ramada Inn) 
(4 person room occupancy) 



$10.00 
22.00 

$32.00 



A $22 deposit made payable to the Art Guild is due February 
1, in the Creative Arts Office located in K-107 . For ad- 
ditional information call J. Myers, extension 2401. 

All permanent employees will receive W-2 tax forms along 
with the January 31 pay checks. Checks may be picked up 
from the University Cashier's Office on that date. 

Temporary employees ' W-2 tax forms will be available in the 
University Cashier's Office on that day also. 

All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets reflect- 
ing shift premium MUST be in the personnel office before 
10 a.m. February 1 so that payroll computation may be com- 
pleted. Supervisors who do not meet this deadline should 
not expect their employees to be paid. Personnel will make 
one reminder call. 



Dr. Gary A. Olson, director of the center for writing, and 
Mrs. Lillian Turner, assistant to the director of special pro- 
grams, attended an Advanced Placement Program Seminar held 
January 20 in Florence, SC . The UNCW Office of Special Pro- 
grams is presently making plans to sponsor an Advanced Place- 
ment Summer Institute for high school teachers. 



THALIAN "Bell, Book and Candle," a play directed by Dr. Terry TheodC 

PLAY of the drama faculty, will be presented February 3-6 in Thai 

Hall. Ticket information may be obtained by calling 763-33S 



LANEY 
CONCERT 



The Laney High School Choral Department will perform Januari, 
28 in Kenan Auditorium at 8 p.m. Admission is $3. 



HOMECOMING The Homecoming Dance featuring Threshold, a top- 40 , beach ai 

DANCE disco dance band, will be held January 28 beginning at 8 p.i 

in Hanover Hall. Admission $3 per couple or $2 per person. 

RECITAL A faculty chamber recital by Jane Mathew, soprano, and guesi 

SCHEDULED artist David Hawkins on the oboe will be held in Kenan Audi- 

torium January 29 at 8 p.m. Free. 

GRANT Dr. James Sabella, associate professor in the sociology S 

RECEIVED anthropology department, has received an $18,740 grant from 

the NC Sea Grant program, for the third year of his researcl 
project, titled "Recreational Fishing in the Sounds of Nortl 
Carolina: A Socioeconomic Analysis ." 

SYMPHONY TO David Kechley of the music faculty will have his work, Funki 
PERFORM Chicken For String Orchestra , performed by the Winston-Saleil 

KECHLEY WORK Symphony during 20 of their upcoming concerts scheduled for 
young people throughout the Winston-Salem area. Since its 
creation in 1976 the Funky Chicken For String Orchestra has 
been performed by the symphony approximately 90 times. 



MEN'S 
BASKETBALL 



The UNCW Seahawks will host the University of Wisconsin-Grei 
Bay January 29 at 7:30 p.m. in Trask Coliseum. 



WOMEN'S 
BASKETBALL 



The women's basketball team will host Pembroke State Univer 
sity at 7 p.m. January 31 in Trask Coliseum. 



SWIM 
MEET 



UNCW men and women vs. 
in the pool . 



Furman University January 29 at 1 p. 



MAGICAL The Wilmington Youth Council will present a Magical Mystery 

REVIEW Review January 29 at 7:30 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Admis- 

sion $2.50. 



HARPER 
FULL-TIME 



Mendall Harper, housekeeping assistant in auxiliary s'ervice 
has been given permanent full-time status. 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



The following is a list of upcoming programs sponsored by t 
UNCW Office of Special Programs beginning in February : 



ADVERTISING STRATEGY AND DESIGN 

TIME MANAGEMENT 

SELF MOTIVATION 

GRAMMAR REVIEW FOR SECRETARIES 

HEALTH EDUCATION ACTIVITIES 

ART FOR THE K-6 TEACHER 

MINI-READING CONFERENCE 

Information regarding dates, times and fees may be obtained 
by calling extension 2194. 



OMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv Lhe sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUI'ffi XII, NUxMBER 2 2 
FEBRUARY 3, 19 8 3 



CRASK 
PLAQUE 



? RE- GAME 
SOCIAL 



A private plaque unveiling/reception honoring 
all contributors to the Trask air-conditioning 
campaign will be held TONIGHT at 5:15 in the 
lobby of Trask Coliseum, 

The UNCW Alumni Association and the Seahawk 
Club will host a pre-game social TONIGHT be- 
ginning at 6:15 in the Goodwood Tavern. 
Tickets are available in the Alumni Affairs 
Office located in Kenan Auditorium. 



\RT 
3XHIBIT 



iC 
SYMPHONY 



jasketball 
;ame 

pied piper 

[■HEATRE 



••ORMS 
MAILABLE 



FORT TO 

LECTURE 



Wilmington's first annual Black Art Exhibition 
honoring Minnie Evans will be held February 
3-6 at 1502 Market Street. A reception will be 
held on the 6th at 3 p.m. 

The UNCW Fine Arts Committee will sponsor the 
NC Symphony in Kenan Auditorium February 4 at 
8 p.m. Season membership. General Admission 
$8. 

The UNCW Seahawks will host George Mason TONIGHT 
at 7:30 in Trask Coliseum. 

"Pac Man! Here We Go" will be held in Kenan 
Auditorium Sunday, February 6 , at 3 p.m. Ad- 
mission is 50<:. Open to the public. 

Reproducible federal tax forms from the IRS are 
available at the Reserve Desk in Randall Library. 
The forms, acceptable for submission of tax re- 
turns, may be photocopied in the library at 
your own expense. 

Charles Fort, assistant professor of English, 
will read poetry and lecture to creative writ- 
ing and college prep classes at Shallotte High 
School on February 8. The presentation is part 
of the school's Black History Month program. 




IMBR 
COLLOQUIUM 



A panel colloquium on "Lake Baikal Expedition: P 
and Future Planning I" will be held February 4 
at 4 p.m. at IMBR. Participants will include Ma 
Beth Dail, Richard' Dillaman , Michael Jordan, Robj 
Roer, Margaret Shelton, Eugene Williams and Dr, 
Ralph Brauer. Refreshments will be served. 



GREAT Great Decisions ' 83 
DECISIONS on important foreig 
will begin February 
Auditorium with Dr. 
chairman of the his 
"US and Soviet Rela 
istence." The eigh 
the UNCW Office of 
is required for the 
extension 2194. 



designed to in 
n policy issues 

9 at 7:30 p.m. 

Melton McLaurin 
tory department, 
tions - The Arms 
t-v/eek series is 
Special Programs 

series. For in 



form the publ 

facing the US 

in King Hall 

, professor s 

speaking on 

Race and Coe 

sponsored b^i 

. A fee of $] 

formation ca] 



PIG 
PICKING 



WOMEN ' S 
BASKETBALL 



Phi Beta Lambda will host a pig picking February 
from 5-8 p.m. at James Hall. Advance tickets me 
be purchased in Bear Hall, room 220, TODAY and 
tomorrow from 3:30-6 p.m. 

UNCW Shehawks vs. St. Augustine College February 
at 7 p.m. in Trask Coliseum. 



VARIETY The Heart Fund Variety Show will be held in Ken; 
SHOW Auditorium February 5 at 7:30 p.m. Admission $! 

BUSINESS Approximately 30 area business and industrial r( 
WEEK resentatives will be on campus February 7 - 8 ii 

observance of 19 83 Business Week. The reps wii; 

be speaking concurrently at the Cameron School < 

Business from 9-10:30 a.m.; 11-12 noon and 2-3 ] 

on both days . 

KELLER Governor Jim Hunt has appointed Dr. Harold W. 

APPOINTED Keller, associate professor of biological scientj 
to the Marine Resources Administrative Board, 
board oversees the operation of the three Marine 
Resources Centers in the state and reports on tJ; 
work to the Marine Science Council and the Seen 
tary of Administration. Dr. Keller will serve 'i 
til June 15, 19 85. 

L. Willis, associate professor in the^ 
of sociology & anthropology, will di 
and Foibles of Criminal Justice" dur 

:15 p.m. luncheon meeting of the "Ham 

Friday, February 4. 

is extended to the following new UNCW 
Beverly S. Dixon, duplicating equipme 
n purchasing services; Jody L. Connor 
in special programs and Jacqueline D. 
erk typist in campus police services. 



FACULTY 


Dr. Cecil 


LUNCHEON 


department 




cuss "Fads 




ing the 12 




Eggheads" 


NEW 


A welcome 


STAFF 


ployees : 




operator i 




secretary 




Murray, cl 



l:tl 



The UNCW Department of Nursing and AKEC will host a 
"Nursing Forum" February 23 from 3:30-5:30 p.m. in 
the Cameron Education Center on 17th St. Ms. Anna 
Kuba, executive director of the NC Board of Nursing, 
will be the guest speaker. Dr. Marlene Rosenkoetter , 
chairm.an of the nursing department will be the modera- 
tor. 

Victor A. Zullo of the department of earth sciences 
has been appointed by the North Carolina Department 
of Natural Resources and Community Development to a 
committee that will produce a new state geologic 
map. 

Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of the HPER department, 
presented a reaction paper entitled "Technology and 
The Leisure Professional: Friends or Foe" during 
the January 26-27 symposium on Electronic Leisure: 
Impacts and Implications held at UNC-CH. 

An article by Ron Copley of the economics & finance 
department entitled "Impact of the Economic Recove- 
ry Tax Act of 1981 on Real Estate Tax Shelters" was 
published in the spring/summer 19 82 issue of REAL 
ESTATE ISSUES. 

Dr. William Woodhouse of the modern languages facul- 
ty has had his review of A GUIDEBOOK FOR TEACHING 
FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN 
authored by Beverly Wattenmaker and Virginia Wilson 
published in the December issue of HISPANIA, the 
journal of the American Association of Teachers of 
Spanish and Portuguese. Several photographs by Dr. 
Woodhouse of Spanish cultural and political persona- 
lities appear on the cover of ESPANA 1975-80: CON- 
FLICTOS Y LOGROS DE LA DEMOCRACIA published in 
Madrid earlier in the fall. 



All males interes 
formed barbershop 
men, are invited 
meetings at 8 at 
Women are invited 
the Coastalina Ch 
on Tuesday nights 
For additional in 
extension 2500. 



ted in singing with the recently 
harmony group, the Cape Fear Chords- 

to attend one of their Monday night 

Roland Grise Junior High School, 
to attend the weekly meetings of 

orus of Sweet Adelines, Inc. at 7 
at Solomon Towers on Front Street. 

formation call John Huntsman at 



The UNCW Office of Special Programs will offer the 
following programs starting this month. Informa- 
tion regarding dates, times and fees may be obtained 
by calling extension 2194. 

ESTATE PLANNING & ADMINISTRATION 
JANE FONDA/AEROBIC EXERCISE 
FAST WALKERS 

SELF-MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES 
xMANAGEMENT BY OBJECTIVES 
CONDUCTING PERFORMANCE APPRAISALS 



FACULTY The UNCW English Department will host a two-da^j 
SEMINAR faculty writing seminar February 24 & 25 in Moi 
Hall. The seminar will focus on writing as a 
means of fixing and reinforcing learning in ai; 
disciplines to help students learn and to help 
college graduates who cannot write. The sympos 
um will teach faculty members to use writing as 
signments for students to help them develop a 
richer understanding of subjects by writing ab<' 
them. The first day, two specialists will dem< 
strate how writing can be incorporated into tht 
classroom in all content areas. UNCW faculty 
members from various departments will lead worl 
shops on the second day with the afternoon set 
aside to develop a proposal for a campus-wide 
program. 



MCGUIRE AT Dr. Phillip McGuire, assistant professor of his, 

MEETINGS tory, attended the meetings of the Boards of 

Directors for DARE, Inc. and the New Hanover 

County NAACP on January 26 and 2 7 respectively. 



TAX 
NOTE 



HINDU 
LECTURE 



Please note on your W-2 forms (19 8 2 Wage and 
Tax Statement) that items 2 and 9 reflect the 
ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME after your tax shelter 
(retirement or annuity) has been credited. 

You should report the amounts in section 2 as 
your wages on federal tax forms and section 9 
as your wages on state tax forms. 

Dr. Doris Srinivasan of the National Gallery oi! 
Art in Washington, D.C., will speak on "The 
Hindu Ritual Samdhya" in Morton Hall auditoriun; 
Friday, February 4 at 3 p.m. The presentation 
will include a documentary she made in India. 
Faculty and students are invited. 




CONFUCIUS 
SAY? 



CHEMISTRY 
SEMINARS 



Dr. M. Theresa Kelleher of Columbia University 
will speak on "Neo-Confucian Spirituality" on 
February 10 at 3 p.m. in room 212 of the Socia] 
& Behavioral Sciences Building. Faculty and 
students are invited. 



Dr. Robert S. Dordick of the University of Mian 
will be in room 114 of the Chemistry/Physics 
Building on February 11 at 2:30 to speak about 
"Effects of Micellar Environments on the Prop- 
erties of Aromatic Carboxylic Acids." Dr. Kath-i 
leen D. Knierim of Brown University will be in 
room 114 of the Chemistry/Physics Building on 
February 14 at 2 p.m. to talk about "Kinetic 
Theory of Hot Atom Reactions." 



;OMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv the csca 




lEAT 
3CISI0NS 



;gheads 



3NTRAL 
IPLICATING 



to 

[SICA 



IVERSITY 
ARD 



W 
PLOYEE 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 23 
FEBRUARY 10, 19 8 3 

William J. Coughlin, managing editor of the 
Wilmington Star News , will discuss LEBANON - 
Shattered State in the Middle East February 16 
at 7:30 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium. The pro- 
gram, "Great Decisions 1983," is sponsored by 
the UNCW Office of Special Programs. 

Dr. James C. Edmundson, director of special pro- 
grams, will discuss "Special Programs and the 
Public Service Mission" during the 12:15 p.m. 
luncheon meeting of the "Ham & Eggheads" Fri- 
day, February 11. 

Central Duplicating will be printing fall sche- 
dules February 25-March 11. Due to the heavy 
work-load involved, printing jobs involving 
carbonless forms, letterhead and envelopes will 
not be printed during this time. Print orders 
for any of the above mentioned items received 
in the print shop prior to February 21 will be 
delivered by February 25. Orders received after 
February 21 will be delivered ASAP after March 11, 
QUICK COPY AND OTHER PRINTING WILL REMAIN UN- 
CHANGED DURING THIS TIME. 

The UNCW Creative Arts Department, division of 

music, will host the Wilmington Pro Musica at 

3 p.m. February 13 in Kenan Auditorium. Adults $3, 

The University Program Board will present Willie 
Tyler, ventriloquist, in Kenan Auditorium Feb- 
ruary 15 at 8 p.m. Admission $3.50. 

A UNCW welcome is extended to Betty J. O'Steen, 
accounting clerk in the athletics department. 




Don't forget your sweetheart on Monday, February 14 
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY!! 



SPECIAL The Office of Special Programs will offer the f 
PROGRAMS lowing list of programs during the month of Feb 

ry . For information and registration procedure 

call extension 2194. 



THEATRE 
PRODUCTION 



EQUIPMENT 
AVAILABLE 



PRO 
MUSICA 



CREATIVE MOVEMENT FOR AGES 3-5 

BEGINNER COMPUTER INSTRUCTION FOR GRADES 7 - 

SELF MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES 

FAST WALKERS 

MANAGEMENT BY OBJECTIVES 

CHILDREN'S ART - GRADES 3-5 

BASIC COMPUTER PROGRAMMING FOR TEACHERS 

The University Readers Theatre and the Departmei 
of Creative Arts will present a Chamber Theatre 
production of Kenneth Grahame's classic childre 
tale, The Wind in the Willows, March 2, 3, 4 at 
8 p.m. in the S.R.O. Theatre. Admission is fre, 
however, reservations must be made by calling 
extension 2440. Tickets should be picked up by 
7:50 on the night of the performance. 

Video cassette equipment (3/4 inch) has been mci 
available for faculty use by the local AHEC Off' 
and East Carolina University, in their efforts 
offer a graduate MSN extension program through 
ECU on the UNCW campus. 

The 3 p.m., February 13 performance of the Wil- 
mington Pro Musica will feature the world pre- 
miere performance of a new work by David Kechlej 
assistant professor of music, entitled "Ritual I 
Songs and Dances: Free Variations for Flute ar 
Percussion." The work, featuring Susan Stone c 
alto flute, piccolo and flute, and Christopher 
Deane on percussion, was commissioned by and wij 
be performed by the Penillion Contemporary Con 
sort in Kenan Auditorium. 



PAPER 
ACCEPTED 



SAFETY 
REMINDER 



A paper by Victor Zullo, professor of earth scil 
ences , on barnacles as depth/distance from shoi 
indicators has been accepted for presentation 
at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Sec- 
tion, Geological Society of America to be held 
in Tallahassee, FL, March 16-18. 

The next time you walk to your office, classroc 
or restroom, take the time to see if you can Ic 
cate the fire protection equipment available fc 
your section of the building. Make a mental nc 
of where you can find the red fire alarm box, 1 
fire exits and the fire hose locations. When v 
see things every day, they tend to blend into 1 
background. Refresh your memory and stay alert 

regarding fire protection devices be preparec 

just in case 



Constance Hobbs , art instructor, has a drawing en- 
tered in the Interment National 1983 competition 
which will be held February 21 - March 21 at 
Virginia Interment College. Arturo Sandoval, 
nationally recognized artist, was the juror for 
the show. She has also had a drawing accepted 
for the Fourth Biennial Paper and Clay Exhibi- 
tion at Memphis State University. The juror for 
the competition was Janet Kutner, art critic for 
THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS and contributing author of 
ART IN AMERICA. The competition will run from 
February 6 - March 27. 

The University-sponsored UNCW Faculty Writing Sym- 
posium scheduled for February 24 & 25 on the cam- 
pus will feature two nationally recognized specia- 
lists in Writing Across the Curriculum programs. 
They include Dr. Gerald L. Belcher, associate pro- 
fessor of history at Beaver College in Glenside, PA, 
He is the author of several books and articles in- 
cluding co-authorship of WRITING IN THE ARTS AND 
SCIENCES. He is a past consultant to various 
federal agencies as well as being a curriculum 
consultant to the London College of Business Stu- 
dies. Dr. Belcher has led many WAC workshops on 
campuses throughout the US and abroad. Dr. Gail 
Hearn, associate professor of biology at Beaver 
College, is involved in animal behavior with her 
teaching career focused on improving the ability 
of students to formulate research strategies and 
improving their abilities to write effectively. 
She> too, is a co-author of WRITING IN THE ARTS 
AND SCIENCES, and has led many WAC workshops on 
American campuses. 

Mr. Patrick J.F. Gratton, petroleum geologist, 
will visit with the earth sciences department Feb- 
ruary 15 - 17 presenting seminars and workshops. 
He will address geology majors February 15 at 
7 p.m. in MS-252. His topic will be on "Employ- 
ment factors for geologists in the petroleum in- 
dustry. " 

All employees are encouraged to participate in 
the "Governor's Award For Excellence," an award 
made in recognition of meritorious or distinguish- 
ed accomplishments. Nomination forms may be pick- 
ed up from the personnel office. Only permanent 
SPA employees may be nominated. Completed forms 
should be sent to the director of personnel in a 
sealed envelope no later than February 15. 



The UNCW Jazz Ensembles, under the direction of 
Frank Bongiorno, will present a mini-jazz con- 
cert February 17 in King Auditorium at 8 p.m. 
Band sounds will include big band, fusion and 
mainstream jazz. Harry McLamb will be featured 
on the flugelhorn. Free. 



GUEST 
SPEAKERS 



SWIMMING 
SEAHAWKS 



COMPUTER 
AWARENESS 



SLIDE 
LECTURE 



SOCIOLOGY 
NOTICE 



CONNER 
CRITIQUES 



MUSIC 
ARTICLE 



Dr. Ferenc Altrichter, formerly of The Universi 
of Budapest, will speak on "The Causal Relatior 
Friday, February 11 in C-218 at 3:30 p.m. 

James L. McCall will speak on "Kant and Wave 
Mechanics: Toward A General Theory of Under- 
standing' February 14 in S-207 at 3 p.m. Both 
programs are open to the public. 

The Men & Women Seahawk Invitational will be 
held February 17-19 IN THE POOL. Preliminaries 
for Thursday and Friday will begin at 12 noon 
with the finals starting at 7:30 p.m. Saturday 
preliminaries will start at 10 a.m. with the 
finals starting at 4 p.m. 

The UNCW Center for Business and Economic Ser- 
vices of the Cameron School of Business Adminis 
tration is co-sponsoring a program entitled: 
"It's Your Business: Understanding Microcompul 
and Small Business Applications" at 7:30 p.m. 
February 10. James M. Arnett, CPA and special 
consultant with Lowrimore , Warwick & Company, wi 
be the speaker for the evening. Also, on Satui 
day, February 12, at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., a sci€ 
fiction film festival will be held in the secor 
floor meeting room of the public library. Both 
programs are being held in conjunction with thej 
Understanding Microcomputers Program currently 
underway at the New Hanover County Public Libre 

The UNCW Historical Society will sponsor a slic 
lecture presentation by Dr. William Woodhouse, 
associate prof cesser of modern languages, entit] 
"Politics and Elections in Spain" TONIGHT at 7 
the Library Auditorium. With the assistance oi 
grant from the UNCW Research and Development Fv 
Dr. Woodhouse was able to spend several weeks i 
Spain following the campaign that led to the 
socialist victory on October 28. 

Sociology faculty members are asked to notify s 
dents that Circle K Week is scheduled for Febri 
14-20. Dr. Ken Ferraro, assistant professor ol 
sociology, will speak on poverty, the poor and 
clubs can help deal with these problems Februai 
at 3:30 p.m. in S-106. Open to the public. 

Ann Conner of The Creative Arts Department, di\ 
sion of art, conducted a critique for the Wilmi 
ton Art Association during their monthly meetir 
held February 1. 

"Dixie: A Song of Controversy," an article by 
Dr. Sherrill Martin, assistant professor of mus 
has been published in the January, 1983 issue c 
AMERICAN MUSIC TEACHER, the official publicatic 
of the Music Teachers National Association. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC by the csea 




R. EATON 
SPEAK 



ORD 

ROCESSING 

EMONSTRATION 



RITISH 
FFICER 
SPEAK 



RITISH 
HIPS 



LUMNI 
OCIAL 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 2 4 
FEBRUARY 17, 19 8 3 

Members of the university community are invited 
to attend a talk by Dr. Hubert Eaton, chairman 
of the UNCW Board of Trustees, on the research 
and writing of his autobiography, EVERY MAN 
SHOULD TRY, scheduled to be released this 
spring. Dr. Eaton will speak in the Library 
Auditorium at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, March 15. 

Dr. Richard Veit, associate professor of English, 
will present a demonstration on word processing 
for the uninitiated TODAY at 2 p.m. and TONIGHT 
at 7 in S-213. Computer illiterates are es- 
pecially welcome. 

"The Sea in History," a class taught by Dr. Tom 
Moseley of the history faculty, will welcome a 
special guest February 21 at 10 a.m. A British 
naval officer assigned to H.M.S. BRISTOL will 
give an hour lecture and respond to questions 
regarding the ship's involvement in the Falk- 
lands conflict. To accommodate all interested 
persons, the class, normally taught in Morton 
Hall, has been moved to room 100 of James Hall. 

The H.M.S. BRISTOL and H.M.S. ARETHUSA will be 

in Wilmington February 18-22 docked at the north 

end of the State Ports Authority. Everyone is 

invited to participate in open houses aboard 

both ships from 1:30 - 4:30 p.m. February 19 & 20 

Visitors are requested to enter the Ports at the 
north gate. 

The UNCW Alumni Association will sponsor a pig 
picking/Las Vegas night Saturday, March 26, at 
Bob King Pontiac-Mercedes . Tickets are $12.50 
per person (includes food, drinks and gaming 
chips) and may be purchased from the Alumni Of- 
fice located in Kenan Auditorium, room 200. 



HAM 5. Dr. Richard Dixon and Dr. Roger Lowery will dis 
EGGHEADS "The WWAY-TV 3 Star-News Public Opinion Poll: 

suits" during the 12:15 p.m. luncheon meeting o 
the Ham & Eggheads Friday, February 18, in the 
faculty dining area of the university cafeteria 

NEW CENTER The new information center at the University Un 
NEEDS INFO is in the process of compiling a list of baby s 
ters, typists and tutors to keep on file. To b 
included on the list call Bev Cobb at extension 
2283. Names and numbers will be given out upon 
quest of various services. 

BLACK The Black Student Union in observance of Black 
HISTORY tory Month will present Dr. Benjamin Quarles, n; 
MONTH American historian, speaking on "The American D\ 
The Black Interpretation" February 28 at 7 p.m. 
King Hall. Also, Dr. Phillip McGuire of the hij 
tory faculty will speak on "Black Participation 
the Market Place: The Socio-Economic and His to 
cal Prodigality of American Racism" February 26 
7 p.m. in King Hall. Receptions will follow bo 
presentations . 

CHEMISTRY Dr. James H. Reeves from the University of Guel 
SEMINAR Ontario, will present a seminar entitled "Elec- 
tricity from the sun: the cadmium sulphide stor 
February 21 at 2 p.m. in C-114. 

JAZZ A mini-jazz concert by the UNCW Jazz Ensembles 

ENSEMBLES will be held TONIGHT at 8 in King Auditorium. F 

AUDITIONS The University Theatre will conduct auditions f 
FOR PLAY the musical, "Babes in Arms," February 21 & 2 2 
7:30 nightly in the S.R.O. Theatre. Call Jean 
Muir at extension 2440 for additional details. 



PLAY BEING 
HELD IN SRO 



FACULTY 
WRITING 
SYMPOSIUM 



"Round and Round the Garden," a musical present 
by the University Theatre, is presently being 
held in the S.R.O. Theatre. The play will run 
through February 20 with curtain call at 8 nigh 
Admission is $3 for adults. Reservations may b' 
made by calling extension 2440 between 2-5 p.m. 

The second day of the university-sponsored Facui 
Writing Symposium scheduled for February 24 & 2 
in Morton Hall will feature faculty-led worksho] 
geared specifically to courses taught on campus 
Three workshops will be held concurrently betwe^ 
9-10:15 a.m. and repeated between 10:45 a.m. an> 
noon. Refreshments will be served during the 
break. The practical hands-on workshops and thi 
leaders will be: "Using Writing: Ways To Incor^ 
porate Writing in Your Classes" led by John Cli 
ford, Bill Atwill and Hathia Hayes in MH-20 7; 
"Evaluation: Ways to Respond to and Assess You: 
Students' Writing" led by Dick Veit, Brooks Dod; 
and Bob Brown in MH-20 3 and "Reading: Ways to 
Make the Students in Your Class Better Readers" 
led by Jo Ann Seiple, Sylvia Welborn and Noel 
Jones in MH-206. 



BR 
MINAR 



Dr. Richard M. Dillaman, research associate at 
IMBR, will discuss "Calcification in Mollusks 
and Crustaceans" Friday, February 18, at 4 p.m. 
at IMBR. Refreshments will be served- 



XMAN TO 
RTICIPATE 



Dr. Barbara Frey Waxman of the English faculty 
will present a paper entitled "Women and Aging 
in Fiction and Poetry" at the Roanoke College 
women's studies conference on "Teaching/Learning 
About Women" scheduled March 12 in Salem, VA. 



uw 

ONSORS 
RKSHOP 



MAN 
LATIONS 



The Wilmington branch of the American Associa- 
tion of University Women will present a work- 
shop on "Strategies: Advocacy and Lobbying" 
March 5 from 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. at Cape Fear Tech. 

Rabbi Mordecai M. Thurman extends a special in- 
vitation to all UNCW faculty to attend the annu- 
al Brotherhood Week/Human Relations Month Ser- 
vice Friday, February 18, at 8 p.m. in the 
Temple of Israel located at 4th and Market. 
Speakers will be James MacRae , chairman of the 
Human Relations Committee; Rev. Robert L. Bald- 
ridge, pastor of Grace United Methodist Church 
and Dr. James Megivern, chairman of the UNCW 
P&R Department. A social hour will be held in 
Rosenthal Hall following the service. 



YNOTE 
EAKER 



W. Frank Ainsley of the earth sciences depart- 
ment gave the keynote address at the Greater 
Chadbourn Chamber of Commerce annual meeting 
held February 8. Dr. Ainsley spoke on Cul- 
tural-Historical Geography and the Vernacular 
Architecture of Chadbourn, NC. 



NCERT 
SOCIATION 



MEN'S 
SKETBALL 

N'S 
SKETBALL 



The Wilmington Concert Association will pre- 
sent the Hartford Ballet in Kenan Auditorium 
February 23 at 8 p.m. Season membership. 

The Lady Seahawks vs. East Carolina University 
February 23 at 5:30 p.m. in Trask Coliseum. 

The Seahawks will host North Carolina A&T in 
a 7:30 p.m. contest in Trask Coliseum February 
18. The Campbell Camels will invade Trask 
Coliseum February 23 at 7:30 p.m. Come out 
and support the SEAHAWKS!! 



SAT 
:iSIONS 



CIAL 
)GRAMS 



Dr. Denis Carter, associate professor of eco- 
nomics, will speak on Trade and Unemployment 
during the next Great Decisions '83 lecture 
series scheduled for February 23 at 7:30 p.m. 
in King Hall Auditorium. 

The UNCW Office of Special Programs will offer 
Ah-SO .. .Quality Circles February 24 and Manage- 
ment By Objectives February 28. For information 
on registration and costs call extension 2194. 



OLSON & 

SULLIVAN 

OFFICERS 



DR. WILLEY 

DOES 

RESEARCH 



Dr. Gary A. Olson and Dr. Sally Sullivan wert 
elected vice-president and secretary respect: 
vely at the February 4 annual meeting of the 
Southeastern Writing Center Association held 
Columbia, SC. Olson is the director of the 
center for writing while Dr. Sullivan is an 
instructor of English. 

Dr. Joan D. Willey, associate professor of cl 
istry, participated in the Gordon Research d 
ference on Chemical Oceanography January 30- 
February 4 in Ventura, CA. She discussed re- 
search results obtained from two recent cruiii 
on the RV CAPE HATTERAS. 



GEOLOGY 
PAPER TO BE 
PRESENTED 



COMPUTER 
AWARENESS 



STATE 
VEHICLES 



Dr. John R. Huntsman, assistant profess 
geology will present a paper, "Deforma 
fabrica and their interpretation in the 
Zone in the Eastern Piedmont of North C 
A Preliminary Report," during the annua 
of the Southeastern Section, Geological 
ciety of America to be held March 16-18 
Tallahassee, FL. In addition he serves 
committees of the Section which will be 
ing at that time. 



or of; 
tionai 

Maco:J 
aroli. 
1 mee 

So- 

in 

on t 

meet 



Leslie Davis, data management instructor in 
Cameron School of Business, will be the fea- 
tured speaker along with Charles Montouri , 
reference supervisor at the county public li' 
brary, beginning at 7:30 tonight. The topic, 
"Information at Your Fingertips - the Tele- 
communications Industry," is in conjunction 
with the public library's computer awareness 
project presently underway. In addition the 
will be a demonstration of the UNCW computei 
zed Bulletin Board. Donald Beilman, preside 
of the NC Microelectronics Center at Researc 
Triangle Park will discuss the impact of ad 
vances in microelectronics technology on the 
Tar Heel state and potential spinoffs for 
Southeastern NC February 19 at 10 a.m. at ti 
public library. 

In order to serve the operators of state own 
vehicles in a more efficient manner, Motor 
Fleet Management is providing all units with 
National Account Purchase (NAP) credit card. 
These credit cards, located in the glove com 
partment of the vehicle, may be used at many 
nationally recognized auto service centers. 
Use of the credit card requires prior approv 
by the Motor Fleet Management Division. Als; 
State Telephone Network credit cards are pre 
vided for ease of dialing from most cities i 
NC. Detailed instructions for using both ty 
of credit cards are provided and should be i 
viewed before any purchase is effected. Foi 
further information call Vickey Marshall at 
extension 2100. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC bv the csea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 25 
FEBRUARY 24, 1983 

An open discussion on the movie, Gandhi, will be held dur- 
ing the February 25th luncheon meeting of the "Ham & Egg- 
heads" at 12:15 p.m. in the faculty dining room of the 
cafeteria . All interested persons are invited. 

All items for inclusion in the March Calendar of Events 
should be sent to Kathy Butler in Kenan Auditorium, room 
200 prior to Friday, February 25. 

Phi Kappa Phi, scholastic honor society, will host a panel 
discussion on student preparedness and admissions poli- 
cies at UNCW March 1 at 4 p.m. in Morton Hall Auditorium. 
Panelists will include Dr. Charles Cahill, Dr. Dargan 
Frierson , Dr. Jo Ann Seiple and Dr. Bill Bryan. 

Dr. Susan Isen will lecture on "Is Evolutionary Theory 
Testable" March 2 at 3:30 p.m. in the library auditorium. 
All faculty are invited to attend. 

All employees are encouraged to participate in the "Gover- 
nor's Award for Excellence ," an award made in recognition 
of meritorious or distinguished accomplishments . Forms 
may be picked up from the personnel office. Completed 
forms must be sent to the director of personnel in a seal- 
ed envelope no later than February 28. Only permanent SPA 
employees may be nominated. 

All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets re- 
flecting shift premium must be in the personnel office 
before 10 a.m. March 1. Supervisors who do not meet this 
deadline should not expect their employees to be paid. The 
personnel office will make one reminder call. 

Monday, February 28, payroll checks may be picked up from 
the university cashier ' s office located in Alderman Hall, 
room 211. 



IMBR 

SEMINAR 



Dr. Ralph Brauer, director of IMBR, will host a seminar 
titled Pinnipeds of Ano Nuevo Island (motion pictures ) 
February 25 at 4 p.m. at the marine lab seminar room. J 
culty and staff are invited. Refreshments will be servt 



BLACK 

HISTORY 

MONTH 



JOHNSTON 
SELECTED 



In observance of Black History Month Dr. Benjamin Quarh 
noted American historian , will discuss "The American Drt 
The Black Interpretation" February 28 at 7 p.m. in King 
Hall. Dr. Phillip McGuire of the history faculty will 
speak on "Black Participation in the Market Place: The 
Socio-Economic and Historical Prodigality of American R. 
cism" February 26 at 7 p.m. in King Hall. Receptions w. 
follow both presentations . i 

The US Department of State has selected Dr. W. Lee John 
ton, assistant professor of political science , to atten 
a Special Foreign Affairs Conference on Nuclear Arms an 
the Western Alliance to be held April 6-7 in Washington 



WELCH Betty Jo Welch, associate professor of speech communica\ 

PARTICIPATES tion, reviewed competitive papers and acted as responde] 

for the Division of Academic Affairs and Nonprofit/Pabl\ 
Administration of the Southeast American Institute for 
Decision Sciences meeting held in Williamsburg , VA, 
February 9-11, 



BOOK ON 
SHELVES 



TAPS FOR A JIM CROW ARMY, a book by Dr. Phillip McGuire 
of the history faculty, has been published by ABC-Clio 
Press and is available in the UNCW Bookstore. 



RUSSELL 

SELECTED 

SCHOLAR 



Dr. Anne Russell of the English department has been seJ 
ed by Duke University to be a 1983-84 National Endowmer', 
for the Humanities scholar in the public libraries of 
eastern NC. In addition to per diem and travel Dr. Rui 
sell received a $5,000 award. 



WORK 
SELECTED 



Sonata for Viola and Piano by David Kechley of the musJ 
faculty has been selected for inclusion in a new serie: 
professional recordings being produced by the Eastman 
School of Music. The work will be published by Sonati, 
Music (USA) and Sonoton Musik Verlag (Munich Germany) 
The record will be distributed by the recording compan 
PRO-VIVA. 



NEW 
STAFF 



A welcome is extended to Phyllis O. Adams, clerk-typis 
in the department of purchasing services . 



PAPERS 
PRESENTED 



Uday Tate and Terry Ball of the management and marketi 
faculty presented a paper entitled "Application of Cau 
Modeling Methodology to Sex Appeal Effectiveness" duri 
the 13th annual meeting of the Southeast American Inst 
of Decision Sciences held February 9-11 in williamsbu 
At the same meeting, Tate and Thomas Burke, assistant 
professor of management S marketing , presented a paper 
"Validity of Students' Ratings of Teaching Effectivene 
A Structural Equation Approach." Both papers were put 
lished during the proceedings of the conference. 



A book, RESEARCH IN OUTDOOR EDUCATION , by Dr. Charles Lewis, 
chairman of the HPER department , was published January 1983 
by The American Alliance for Health, Physical Education , 
Recreation and Dance. The book was done in cooperation with 
colleagues at Northern Illinois University . 

Ron Copley of the economics and finance department presented 
a paper, "The Effect of Varying Marginal Tax Brackets on 
the Choice of Depreciation Methods for Commercial Realty 
Investors ," during the Southeast American Institute of De- 
cision Sciences meeting held in Williamsburg , VA, February 10. 

Dr. Walter Shelburne of the P&R faculty has had a paper, 
"The Wholistic Attitude in Philosophy ," accepted to be read 
at Bowling Green State University April 22-23 during the 
fifth annual conference in Applied Philosophy . The paper 
will be published in Volume V of the BOWLING GREEN STUDIES 
IN APPLIED PHILOSOPHY. 

The UNCW Office of Special Programs will offer the following 
list of programs starting in March: Computer Instruction for 
Adults; Office Organization and Management for Executive 
Secretaries; So You're Going to Europe; Planning Cash Flow; 
Modern Dance; Jane Fonda/Exercise Aerobics ; Long Range 
Strategic Planning; Tennis for Older Adults and Computer 
Instruction for Beginners . For information regarding regis- 
tration and fees call extension 2798. 

An article co-authored by Uday Tate of the management & 
marketing department entitled "The Dividend Effect; New 
Evidence" was published in the spring-summer 1982 issue of 
BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVE. 

The North Carolina Azalea Festival will conduct its 1983 
Azalea Festival Princess Pageant Saturday , February 26, in 
Kenan Auditorium at 8 p.m. 

The UNCW Fine Arts Committee will present The Heath Brothers 
performing jazz in Kenan Auditorium February 24 at 8 p.m. 
General admission is $6. 

The Lady Seahawks will host UNC-Charlotte February 25 at 7 
p.m. in Trask Coliseum. 

Dr. Robert Byington , chairman of the English department, 
delivered a paper, "The ' Liminality' of Certain Maritime 
Occupations ," during the Special Lecture Series held Feb- 
ruary 17 at the Hampton Mariners Museum in Beaufort. 



A program on Black Women as Educators and Community Leaders 
is scheduled for March 1 at 7 p.m. in the library auditorium 
with Dr. Marie Hart and Dr. Gayle Wulk . The program will 
deal with discussions on the lives and work of Nannie 
Burroughs , Mary McLeod Bethune and Charlotte Hawkins Brown. 
A video program on "Palmer Memorial Institute: the Mission 
and the Legacy" as well as a video entitled "Reflections ! 
three Black Women of Greensboro" will be shown. 



THEATRE The University Readers Theatre and the Department of Cre 

PRODUCTION Arts will present a chamber theatre production of "The h 

in the Willows," March 2, 3, & 4 at 8 p.m. in the S.R.O. 

Theatre. Reservations may be made by calling extension 

Admission is free. 



FACULTY 
NOTE 



The deadline for ordering academic regalia through the 
university bookstore is March 15. 



SENIOR 
RECITAL 



A senior recital by Dan Sonnenberg will be held in Kenai 
Auditorium February 28 at 8 p.m. Free. 



DANCE 
ENSEMBLE 



A dance ensemble by the Southeastern Cultural Arts Coali, 
tion Association will be conducted in Kenan Auditorium 
February 27 at 8 p.m. Admission is $8. 



GREAT 
DECISIONS 



COMPUTER 
AWARENESS 



Dr. William Schneider of the history faculty will discui 
"Africa's Economic Squeeze: Poverty, Hunger Refugees" 
March 2 at 7:30 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium. 

Dr. Paul Hosier, coordinator of academic computing , wil. 
be a featured panelist in the February 24 computer awart 
ness program at the New Hanover County Public Library 
dealing with how the computer is changing all levels of 
education. Other panelists will be Dr. W. B. McGough , 
head librarian at Cape Fear Tech, John Bryan, audio vis^ 
director for New Hanover County Public Schools, and Dr. 
Richard Satava , physician who also is an instructor of 
computer courses for children for the UNCW Office of 
Special Programs . The program is free and begins at 7: 
p.m. 



WRITING 
SYMPOSIUM 



The University-sponsored faculty writing sumposium got 
underway this morning in Morton Hall, featuring two na- 
tionally recognized specialists in Writing Across the C 
riculum programs from Beaver College at Glenside PA. Th 
afternoon sessions continue from 2-5 p.m. in Morton Hal 
Auditorium with Dr. Gerald L. Belcher discussing "The 
Uses of Writing in Teaching Humanities Courses" and in 
Hall Auditorium with Dr. Gail Hearn discussing "The Use 
of Writing in Teaching Science." Events on February 25 
include UNCW faculty-led workshops geared to applying 
Writing Across the Curriculum programs specifically to 
our campus. The concurrent workshops begin at 9 a.m. 
and 10:45 a.m. with refreshments served in between. Th 
afternoon session on Friday will examine what specific 
things can be done campus-wide to improve writing , in- 
cluding such alternatives as developing a university-wi 
plan to submit to the administration or establishing 
university committee composed of representatives of all 
departments to set up specific courses on writing. The 
"Summation and Planning For The Future" session will ri 
from 1:30 - 3 p.m. in Morton Hall. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the iica 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII , NUMBER 26 
MARCH 3, 1983 



Gene Williams and Gregg Miller of IMBR will discuss "Pres- 
sure Effects on Temperature Preference Behavior in Crusta- 
ceans" during a seminar to be held at the Institute for 
Marine Biomedical Research in the seminar room Friday, 
March 4 , at 4 p.m. Faculty and staff are invited. Re- 
freshments will be served. 

Dr. Sandy D. Martin of the philosophy and religion faculty 
will discuss "Launching Into the Deep: Reflections of a 
New School Board Member" during the 12 noon luncheon meet- 
ing of the "Ham & Eggheads" Friday, March 4. 

"Nuclear Proliferation" will be the next topic for the 
Great Decisions '83 discussion March 9 in King Hall Audi- 
torium at 7:30 p.m. For information on cost call exten- 
sion 2798. 

The UNCW Office of Special Programs will offer "How to 
Prepare for the S.A.T." (grades 10-12) Saturdays, March 26- 
April 30 from 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. in Morton Hall, room 
204. Cost is $89. Registration must be completed by 
March 23. Call extension 2798 for further details. 

The last basketball game of the 1982-83 season is scheduled 
for Saturday, March 5, with East Tennessee State University. 
Tip-off is at 7:30 p.m. in Trask Coliseum. 

The personnel office has received brochures and payroll de- 
duction forms for U.S. Savings Bonds. Bonds held for five 
years or more are guaranteed to earn no less than 7.5% from 
date of issue and compounded semi-annually until maturity , 
even if market rates are lower. For more information re- 
garding savings bonds call the personnel office at extension 
2162. 

MARK YOUR CALENDARS NOW FOR "UNIVERSITY DAY" SCHEDULED FOR 
SATURDAY, MARCH 26. WATCH THE CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE FOR ALL 
DETAILS . 



DISABILITY The deadline for accepting enrollment cards for TIAA disil 

PLAN bility benefits insurance is March 11. ONLY THOSE EMPLO]\ 

WHO ARE MEMBERS OF THE TIAA/CREF RETIREMENT SYSTEM ARE 
ELIGIBLE TO ENROLL IN THIS DISABILITY PLAN. Any questioi 
should be directed to Dianne Smith at extension 2162. 

REVIEW John Clifford of the English department has had his revii 

PUBLISHED of Cognitive Processes in Writing published in the Febru. 

issue of COLLEGE COMPOSITION & COMMUNICATION . 



RECEPTION 
TODAY 



Faculty and staff are invited to a reception TODAY, Marc, 
from 7-9 p.m. in the Goodwood Tavern to meet Mrs. Mehri 
Mavaddatt, an Iranian Baha'i whose husband was executed 
Iran. Mrs. Mavaddatt spoke on campus this morning to Dr 
Sandy Martin's "Introduction to Religion" classes and to 
two classes at South Brunswick High School on "The Baha' 
in Iran: A Personal Report on the Persecution of a Reli 
ious Minority ." 



BASEBALL 
SCHEDULE 



UNCW vs Chapel Hill TODAY at 3 p.m. at Brooks Field. 
UNCW vs Chapel Hill March 4 at 2 p.m. at Brooks Field. 
UNCW vs Robert Morris College in a doubleheader Saturday 
March 5, beginning at 1 p.m. The Seahawks will host Robe' 
Morris again on Sunday, March 6, at 2 p.m. 



COMPUTER "Introduction to Computers Workshops" will be given by D[ 

WORKSHOPS Sloan, administrative services coordinator, starting TOD 

The workshops will cover basic computer concepts and tei 
nology and are designed for individuals with little or n\ 
computer experience. The workshops will cover the same 
material each session with classes being held every Thuz 
day through April 28 from 2-4 p.m. in Haggard Hall, roon 
212. All interested faculty and staff should call Don 
Sloan at extension 2800 and indicate which Thursday thet, 
would prefer. 



HACKNEY 
INVITED 
SPEAKER 



COMPUTER 

AWARENESS 

PROGRAM 



Courtney T. Hackney of the biological sciences faculty i 
cently presented an invited seminar to the Department oi 
Biology at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ , titj 
"Plant Community Succession in Brackish Marshes of the 
Northern Gulf of Mexico." In addition, he presented a 
seminar at the Camden campus of the University titled | 
"Genetic Variations in Estuarine Populations : Adaptatic 
for Survival." 

The first programmable and computerized home robot. Here 
will be at the New Hanover County Public Library TODAY i 
3-6 p.m. to meet with children and adults. Hero I is bt 
sponsored in conjunction with the county library' s compx 
awareness project currently underway at the library. A 
demonstration of the 21-inch "hearing" and "speaking" r 
capabilities will be held at 7 p.m. preceding the 7:30 \ 
session on "The Thief in the Night, or Who's Minding thi 
Computer." Also, Dr. Robert Herbst, visiting mathematic. 
fessor , and Bill Herman, retired from HEW, will discuss 
ethical aspects of computerization following a Nova fil. 
"Computers , Spies & Private Lives" upstairs in the meet. 
room of the library. Admission is free. 



:* 



A discussion on "Are video Cajoes Hazardous to your Health?" 
featuring a panel made up of Scotty Williams , Hoggard stu- 
dent and record-breaking video game player; Dr. Bruce Bald- 
win, practicing psychologist, and Garland Garrett, Jr., vice 
president of Cape Fear Music Company, Inc., will be held 
Saturday, March 5, at 10 a.m. in the New Hanover County 
Public Library. A film, "Computers and the Future," will be 
shown at 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Two video games furnished 
by Cape Fear Music Company, Inc. will be available for free 
play between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. The above events are in con- 
junction with the county library's computer awareness pro- 
grams. 

The staff of the university union has provided the following 
information about the new facility scheduled to open Monday, 
March 21: 

Si ze : 52,586 square feet 

Cos t ■• $3.5 million 

Hours : M~F 7 a.m. -11 p.m. /Saturdays & Sundays 12 noon-11 p.m. 

Number of reservable rooms : 9+ 

Servi ces : Information Center/in addition to being a ticket 
outlet for any area event, complete information for the 
campus and community will be available. Also included will be 
bus and airline schedules ; state, county and city maps for 
visitors; list of tutors, typists and baby sitters as well as 
directions on campus and off campus. 

Post Office - to open April 5/student mailboxes will be assig- 
ned beginning first summer session. 
Food Services/ to begin first summer session 
Banking Machine/to be installed at a later date 
Lockers for commuting students 
Closets for club and organization use 
Closed circuit TV capability 
Video and/or radio production studio 



Administrative Offices: Development Services; Union staff and 



Minority Affairs. 
July 1. 



Career Planning S Placement to move over 



Student Offices : SEAHAWK; FLEDGLING; ATLANTIS; FORAM; Univer- 
sity Program Board; Inter-Greek Council; SGA and campus radio 
station. 

Lounge areas : Main living room, study room, video game room, 
billiard/ping pong area and T.V. viewing area. 

For information regarding the new university union call Linda 
Moore, director of the university union, at extension 2283. 

Dr. Stephen C. Harper of the department of management and 
marketing has had his article entitled "Management: By Ex- 
ample or Hypocrisy?" accepted for publication in t^e October 
1983 issue of BUSINESS Magazine. 



An article entitled "Controlled Drinking: Where Do We Go 
From Here?" written by Robert Brown, Lee Jackson and Mark 
Galizio of the psychology faculty has been accepted for pub- 
lication in the BULLETIN OF THE SOCIETY OF PSYCHOLOGISTS IN 
SUBSTANCE ABUSE. 



WAXMAN Dr. Barbara Waxman, lecturer in the English department, at 

ATTENDS tended the 11th annual Twentieth-Century Literature Confer 

CONFERENCE ence held February 23-25 at the University of Louisville. 

Waxman delivered a paper entitled "Medusa-Mothers: From - 
Rage to Order in D.M. Thomas's The White Hotel and Sylvia 
Plath's 'Medusa. '" 



JAMBOR In the recent publication of the book, RINGS, MODULES, AND 

RECOGNIZED PRERADICALS , special recognition was given to Dr. Paul E. 

Jambor, associate professor of mathematical sciences , for 
his contribution in the joint research with authors L. Sic 
T. Kepka and P. Nemec. 



HPER FACULTY Dr. Charles Lewis and Derick Davis of the HPER Department 

AT MEETING attended the 35th annual Parks and Recreation Directors 

Conference held February 23 in Chapel Hill. Davis also at\ 
tended a meeting of the Board of Trustees of the North 
Carolina Recreators Foundation. 



WILLEY 
TO GIVE 
SEMINAR 



Dr. Joan D. Willey of the division of chemistry and marine 
sciences program has been invited to give a seminar to the 
Department of Oceanography at Dalhousie University in Hali 
fax. Nova Scotia, on March 8. She will discttss "The Effect 
of Seawater Magnesium on Natural Fluorescence During 
Estuarine Mixing, and Implications for Tracer Applications 



ARTICLE An article by Dr. Michael Perone, assistant professor of 

PUBLISHED psychology , entitled "The Place of the Human Subject in 

the Operant Laboratory" has been published in the latest 
issue of THE BEHAVIOR ANALYST. The article was written ir.\ 
collaboration with Dr. Alan Baron of the University of 
Wisconsin-Milwaukee. 

THANK YOU A thank you is extended to Dr. William Woodhouse of the 

EXTENDED modern languages department by the UNCW Historical So- 

ciety for his February 10 slide/lecture on Spanish elec- 
tions and politics . 



FACULTY 
REMINDER 



The deadline for ordering academic regalia through the 
university bookstore is March 15. 



SPRING 
BREAK 



Spring break for UNCW students will start Saturday , March 
and end Sunday, March 13. 



CONCERT 
SCHEDULED 



READERS 
THEATRE 



SPIRITUAL 
CONCERT 



A concert by Richard Deas and Sherrill Martin of the music 
faculty featuring piano music will be held March 6 at 3 p. 
at St. Johns Museum of Art. 

The University Readers Theatre will host a student pro- 
duction in the S.R.O. Theatre TONIGHT and tomorrow night. 
Curtain call will be 8 each evening. Free. 

A spiritual concert by Boanergies and Daniel Amos will be 
conducted in Kenan Auditorium TONIGHT at 7. Admission 
charge will be $4.50 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC hv the osea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 2 7 
MARCH 10, 19 83 

Dr. Hubert Eaton, chairman of the UNCW Board 
of Trustees, will discuss the research and 
writing of his autobiography, EVERY MAN SHOULD 
TRY, March 15 in the Library Auditorium at 
2 p.m. The book is scheduled for release this 
spring. 

The UNCW Alumni Association will present its 
annual social on Saturday, March 26, beginning 
at 7 p.m. at Bob King Pontiac-Mercedes located 
on New Centre Drive. The pig picking/Las 
Vegas night will include cocktails, beer, soft- 
drinks, bar-be-que and gaming chips. Tickets 
are $12.50 per person and may be purchased 
from the alumni office located in Kenan Audi- 
torium. For additional information call ext. 
2616. 

The annual U.S. Savings Bond Drive is currently 
underway at UNCW. Brochures and payroll deduc- 
tion forms are available in the personnel of- 
fice. For additional information call ext. 2162. 

Information regarding enrollment in the Disa- 
bility Plan for TIAA/CREF retirement participants 
has been sent to all members. The deadline for 
completing the necessary forms in order to in- 
sure coverage by this plan is March 11, 19 83. 
This is Open Enrollment time meaning no medical 
information will have to be furnished. If any- 
one has a question regarding this plan call 
Dianne Smith at extension 2162. 

The Wilmington Writers Forum along with the UNCW 
English Department will sponsor the Spring Read- 
ing Series 1983, a program featuring writers read- 
ing their own poems and stories. The first program 
will be held March 26 in conference room 201 of 
the university union with Peggy Ryan reading fic- 
tion and Beri Marshall reading poetry. The read- 
ings will begin at 8 p.m. with refreshments being 
served at 9. Open to the public at no charge. 



DR. MCGUIRE 
ON WWAY-TV 3 



CONTRACT 
SIGNED 



GALIZIO 

DELIVERS 

PAPER 



Dr. Phillip McGuire, assistant professor of h 
tory, will appear on "Calendar," the public a 
fairs program of WWAY-TV 3 at 6:30 p.m., Marcl 
John Randt, "Calendar" host and news director 
WWAY, will interview Dr. McGuire about his ne' 
released book, TAPS FOR A JIM CROW ARMY. 

Dr. Gerald R. Weeks, assistant professor of 
psychology and senior author of PARADOXICAL 
PSYCHOTHERAPY, has signed a contract for a 
Japanese edition of the book. Also, Weeks pre 
sented an Advanced Workshop on Family Therapy 
the NC Psychological Association meeting held 
February 24-25. 

Mark Galizio of the psychology faculty delive 
a paper, "Can Opiate Antagonists Reverse the 
Effects of Ethanol," during the annual meetin 
of the NC Alcohol Research Authority. The 
paper was co-authored by Barbara Spencer and 
Stacy Smaltz, UNCW students. 



TATE 

DELIVERS 

PAPERS 



BROWN & 
JACKSON 
PUBLISH 



COMPUTER 
WORKSHOPS 



Uday Tate of the management and marketing de- 
partment presented a paper, "Construct Valid! 
of the Functional Theory of Attitude: A 
Structural Equation Approach," at the America 
Marketing Association's 19 83 Winter Educators 
Conference on "Research Methods and Causal 
Modeling in Marketing" held in Sarasota, FL, 
February 27 - March 2. The paper was co- 
authored with Professor Woodruff of the Univ€ 
sity of Tennessee. Tate, at the same meeting, 
delivered another paper entitled "Construct 
Validity of Student Evaluations Via Causal 
Modeling Methodology" co-authored by Terry B 
and Tom Burke of the management and marketinc 
department. Both papers were published in ti 
proceedings of the conference. 

Two articles by members of the psychology de- 
partment have been accepted for publication 
the WILEY ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PSYCHOLOGY. Rober 
Brown's article is titled "Crucial Experimen- 
in Psychology" while Lee Jackson's article 
is entitled "Group Problem Solving." Both 
articles were co-authored by Cecil Reynolds ( 
Texas A&M University. A modified version of 
both articles has also been accepted for pre- 
sentation at the annual convention of the 
American Psychological Association to be heli 
in August. 



Don Sloan, admi 
is presenting a 
Computers Works 
with little or 
shops will cove 
with classes be 
April 2 8 from 2 
Interested pers 
extension 2800 



nistrative services coordinat 

series of "Introduction to 
hops" designed for individual 
no computer experience. The w 
r the same material each sess 
ing held every Thursday throu 
-4 p.m. in Hoggard Hall, room 
ons should call Don Sloan at 
for additional details. 



The deadline for ordering academic regalia through 
the university bookstore is Tuesday, March 15. 

In observance of National Women's History Week, the 
UNCW Faculty Women's Network is sponsoring a 
forum on "Women and Power" March 2 3 from 1:00 - 
5:15 p.m. and 7:30 - 9:00 p.m. in Morton Hall 
Auditorium. Five panels scheduled during the 
afternoon will examine various aspects of women 
and power. The panels include Women and the Pub- 
lic Sphere: the Quest for a Voice; Women and 
Health: the Quest for Autonomy; Women and the 
Law: the Quest for Equality; Women and Technolo- 
gy: the Quest for New Roles and Men and Women: 
the Quest for Understanding. The evening ses- 
sion will feature Women and the Arts: the Quest 
for Expression. Tillie Olsen's "I Stand Here 
Ironing" will be presented by the UNCW Readers' 
Theatre. The program, co-sponsored by the UNCW 
Student Women's Organization and the YWCA, is 
open to the public at no charge. 

The New Hanover County Public Schools will con- 
duct a Science Fair March 11 from 8:30 - 10:30 
a.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 



UNCW vs. Wake Forest March 12 at 2 p.m. Brooks 

Field. 

UNCW vs. 

2 p.m. 
UNCW vs. 
UNCW vs. 
UNCW vs. 
UNCW vs. 

3 p.m. 



West Liberty State College March 13 at 
Brooks Field. 

Clemson University March 14 at 3 p.m. 

Clemson University March 15 at 3 p.m. 

Clemson University March 16 at 3 p.m. 

George Mason University March 17 at 
Brooks Field. 



Men's tennis team vs. Pembroke State University 

March 14 at 2:30 p.m. UNCW courts. 

Men's tennis team vs. Campbell University March 

16 at 2:30 p.m. UNCW courts. 

The UNCW Tennis team will host East Carolina 
University in a 2 p.m. match March 15 at the 
UNCW courts. 

UNCW women vs. St. Andrews College March 15 
at 3:30 p.m. Brooks Field. 

The Lower Cape Fear Bird Club will present Dr. 
Dick Brown of the UNC-Charlotte Biology Depart- 
ment discussing the research and rehabilita- 
tion work conducted with hawks and owls at the 
Raptor Research and Rehabilitation Center in 
Charlotte March 15. The discussion will be 
held in MS-150 at 7:30 p.m. 



INFORMATION ON UNIVERSITY DAY, MARCH 26, WILL 
BE DISTRIBUTED WITHIN THE NEXT WEEK OR SO. 
WATCH FOR DETAILS IN THE CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE. 



UNC hv the 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 28 
MARCH 17, 1983 

Dr. Earl Sheridan, assistant professor of political science, 
will speak on "The Academic Columnist" Friday, March 18, 
during the weekly meeting of "Ham & Eggheads." The luncheon 
meeting scheduled for 12:15 p.m. in the faculty dining room 
of the cafeteria, is open to faculty and staff. 

Dr. Daniel Gold, guest lecturer , will discuss "The Indian 
Guru at Home and Abroad" March 18 at 3 p.m. in the Library 
Auditorium. Faculty and students are invited. 

The Biology Club will present Part I of its spring plant 
sale March 25 from 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. at the UNCW Greenhouse . 
A variety of vegetables and flowers will be available . 

The UNCW Educational Forum will present Dr. Charlotte Rentz, 
director of the southern regional office of educational test- 
ing services , March 24 at 5 p.m. in King Auditorium. She 
will speak on "Current Issues in Testing. " 

The UNCW Concert Choir will perform in Kenan Auditorium March 
20 at 3 p.m. 

The annual savings bond drive is currently underway at UNCW. 
Brochures and payroll deduction forms are available in the 
personnel office. For information call ext. 2162. 

Chancellor Wagoner will present the awards to recipients of 
the annual Shannon Morton Essay Contest March 24 in Morton 
Hall Auditorium at 11 a.m. Ms. Morton will be in attendance. 

"Return of the Pink Panther" will be shown in Kenan Auditori- 
um March 24 at 8 p.m. Admission is $2. UNCW students with 
ID will be admitted for $1. 

The annual NC Association of Teacher Educators will be held 
in King Hall March 24-25. 



The first Spring Reading Series 1983 program will be held 
March 26 in conference room 201 of the University Union with 
Peggy Ryan reading fiction and Beri Marshall reading poetry. 
The readings will begin at 8 p.m. with refreshments being 
served at 9. All faculty and staff are invited. 



BURTON HAS 

CHAPTER 

PUBLISHED 



WILLEY 
TO GIVE 
PAPER 



Dr. Grace Burton of the department of curricular studies: 
had a chapter entitled "Problem-Solving: It's Never Too 
Early to Start" published in the 1983 yearbook of the Na 
Council of Teachers of Mathematics , THE AGENDA IN ACTION 
Her chapter deals with solving activities for primary-ag, 
children. 

Dr. Joan D. Willey of the division of chemistry and mari 
science program has been invited to give a paper and to 
chair the symposium on river transport at the 32nd annua 
meeting of the Southeastern Section of the Geological 
Society ^hf America. The paper, to be given March 18 in 
Tallahassee , FL, is entitled "Natural Fluorescence of 
Southeastern U.S. Rivers." 



PAPER 
PRESENTED 



AINSLEY 

PAPER 

ACCEPTED 



Dr. Ron Sizemore , assistant professor of biological scie 
and graduate student, Philip Welsh, recently presented a 
paper entitled "Incidence of bacteremia in stressed and 
unstressed population of the blue crab, Callinectes sapi \ 
during the annual national meeting of the American Socie 
for Microbiology held in New Orleans. 

A paper by Dr. W. Frank Ainsley of the earth sciences de 
partment entitled "Folk Architecture in Early Twentieth 
Ethnic Agricultural Colonies" has been accepted for pre- 
sentation during the annual conference of the Southeaste] 
American Studies Association to be held April 7-9 in 
Charleston, SC . Also, Dr. Ainsley was a judge for the 
regional Quiz Bowl for high school students held at 
Thalian Hall March 5. 



WEBSTER David Webster of the department of biological sciences h] 

PAPERS had two papers published in the JOURNAL OF MAMMALOGY. 

PUBLISHED "Morphological variation in the Ipanema bat, Pygoderma 

bilabiatum , with description of a new subspecies" was 
co-authored with R.D. Owen of the University of Oklahoma] 
and the "First record of Glossophaga commissarisi 
(Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) from South America" was cc] 
authored with J.K. Jones, Jr., of Texas Tech University.] 

BONGIORNO Frank J. Bongiorno, music lecturer , has been elected a 

IN HONOR member of the North Texas State University Chapter of t?j 

sdciETY honor society of Phi Kappa Phi . Membership is earned 

through scholastic achievement in all academic discipliT.\ 



MINERAL 
EXHIBIT 



GUEST 
LECTURER 



An exhibit featuring ore minerals from around the world 
on display in Randall Library, second floor. The displc 
featuring a wide selection of copper ores and artifacts, 
prehistoric tools fashioned from quartz and a rare, nati 
slate painting, is part of a collection belonging to Bi2 
and Zida Kibler of Shallotte. Dr. Barbara Karfunkel, 
associate professor of earth sciences , is responsible fc 
the exhibit being on the UNCW campus. 

Dr. Leighton Whi taker , director of counseling services a 
professor of psychology at Swarthmore College, will speak 
"Measuring Functional Den^ntia in Schizophrenia" March J 
at 3 p.m. in room 201 of the Social and Behavioral Scier 
Building. Everyone is invited. 



The month of April is open enrollment for all permanent employees 
interested in the Prepaid Legal Services plan. Enrollment applica- 
tions will be included in the March payroll checks. Employees 
presently on the plan will have $9.50 deducted from their March 
checks constituting a rate increase of 90 C. 

EDS, administrator for health insurance , has a new phone line for 
questions pertaining to second surgical opinions , pre-admission 
testing, ambulatory surgery and optional newborn care benefits. 
The new phone is to be used for the exclusive purpose of answer- 
ing questions involving the cost containment programs outlined in 
the Health Benefits Plan Booklet. The new number, 1-800-662-8868, 
may be called between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. For all 
other inquiries about the plan call 1-800-662-6661 between 8 a.m. 
and 8 p.m. 

John Pezzoni , VALIC representative, will be on campus March 22 in 
Alderman Hall, room 208 where he will discuss Annuities . Appoint- 
ments may be made by calling ext. 2160. 

The Southeastern Drama Festival will be held in Kenan Auditorium 
?AL March 21-22. The event is open to the public at no charge. The 

following schools will be represented: 

21 at 9 a.m. "Not My Cup of Tea" (Lake Forest Jr. High School) 

"Once Upon A Playground" (Roland Grise Jr. High School) 

"The Turret Rose" (Sunset Park Jr. High School) 

"One Day In The Life Of Ivy Dennison" (E.B. Trask Jr. High) 

1 p.m. "Sure As You're Born" (D.C. Virgo Jr. High) 
"All in Disguise" (Williston Jr. High) 
"The Miner's Daughter" (Lake Forest Jr. High) 
"Alias Smedly Pewtree" (Roland Grise Jr. High) 

7 p.m. "Not Enough Rope" (New Hanover High School) 
"The Puppet Master" (Hoggard High) 
"Some of My Best Friends are Smith's" (Laney High School) 

22 at 9 a.m. "The Other Side" (New Hanover High School) 

"A Mad Breakfast" (Hoggard High School) 
"Schubert's Last Serenade" (Laney High School) 
1 p.m. "Almost the Bride of Dracula" (Sunset Park Jr. High) 
"One Happy Family" (E.B. Trask Jr. High) 
"The Cop and the Anthem" (Williston High School) 



UNCW vs. 
Field. 



Salisbury State College March 19 at 2 p.m. Brooks 



UNCW Toen vs. Amherst College March 20 at 9 a.m. and Salisbury 

State College at 3 p.m. UNCW courts. 
UNCW men vs. Christopher Newport College March 21 at 2:30 p.m. 

UNCW courts. 
UNCW women vs. Campbell University March 22 at 2:30 p.m. 
UNCW men and women vs. Francis Marion College March 23 at 2:30 p.m. 

UNCW women vs. Atlantic Christian College at 3 p.m. March 21. 
Brooks Field. 



Dr. Marlene Rosenkcetter , chairman of the nursing department, has 
been named president of the NC League for Nursing. Joan Ketchur , 
assistant professor of nursing, is the new state program chairman. 



TO 



t 



ALL FACULTY AND STAFF, THEIR FAMILIES AND FRIENDS 
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED 

TO THE 

GRAND OPENING CELEBRATION 

FOR THE 

UNCW UNIVERSITY UNION 

BEGINNING 

MONDAY, MARCH 21 



The schedule of events are listed below: (all events free) 



Monday, March 21 



*Tuesday , March 22* 



12:30 - 2 p.m. 

2:00 - 4 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
All day 

12:30 - 2 p.m. 

*4:00 - 8 p.m. 



Wednesday , March 23 

12:30 - 2 p.m. 



Thursday, March 24 



8:00 p.m. 

} 
12:30 - 2 p.m. 

7:30 p.m. 



Friday, March 25 

12:30 - 2 p.m. 

Saturday, March 26, 12:45 p.m. 



Welcome, Students!! 

Preview of "Babes in Arms" musical in 

the courtyard 
Deli sandwiches available 
Student body reception - TV lounge - 

light refreshments 
"Blues Brothers" movie - room 100 - 

free popcorn and drinks 
Video Game Tournament 

Welcome , faculty S staff ! 

Rob Nathanson, classical guitarist - 

courtyard 
Deli sandwiches available 
Faculty S staff reception - hors d'oe 

and beverages - TV lounge-enter ta 

ment: 

4:30 UNCW Chamber Singers 

5:00 Leila, "The Mad Flatterer," 

5:30 Leila Henderson 

6:00 Joyce Greer, children' s story 

teller 
6:30 UNCW Jazz Ensemble 

Entertainment - courtyard 
Deli sandwiches available 
Michael Spiro, folk guitarist , room 1 



UNCW's Jazz Fusion - courtyard 

Deli sandwiches available 

"Blues Brothers" movie - room 100- 

free popcorn 
Final night for video Game Tournament 

Entertainment - courtyard 
Deli sandwiches aval lable 

UNIVERSITY DAY 



\MPUS 
3MMUNIQUE 



UNC bv the sea 




^ 



f 



7JW 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 29 
MARCH 24, 1983 

Dr. James Megivern, chairman of the department of philosophy & 
religion, will discuss "A Look at the Osborne I Portable Com- 
puter" during the March 25 luncheon meeting of the "Ham & 
Eggheads" upstairs in the cafeteria. The luncheon, scheduled 
for 12:15 p.m., is open to faculty and staff. 

A memorial service for El Salvador's Archbishop Oscar Romero 
will be conducted TODAY from 1:30-2 p.m. in room 201 of the 
new university union. The service, "Remembering a Man of 
Peace," is being sponsored by the United Christian Campus 
Ministry. Participants include Dr. James Megivern, Dr. Charles 
Fugler and Rev. Bob Haywood. 

On page 310-1 of the new Central Stores Catalog under Envelopes, 
Kraft, 310-22525, change the size to reflect 12" x 15 1/2". 

All departments should be aware that all university internal 
billing must be handled in accordance with the procedures out- 
lined in Section A. 3 of the University Procedures Manual. The 
manual should be used as a guideline for processing bills to 
other campus departments. 

All faculty members are reminded that summer text book requisi- 
tions are due Friday, March 25, in the university bookstore. 

All items for inclusion in the April Calendar of Events should 
be sent to Kathy Butler in Kenan Auditorium before 5 p.m. 
March 28. 

A senior recital by Karen Nelson will be held March 26 at 8 p.m. 
in Kenan Auditorium. 

All faculty and staff are invited to attend and participate in 
University Day, UNCW's open house, this Saturday, March 26, from 
1 - 5 p.m. The celebration will include the ribbon cutting for 
the new university union, departmental demonstrations and ex- 
hibits throughout the campus. Who's Who ceremony, dedication of 
the auditorium in Morton Hall as well as many other events. 
Refreshments will be served. Bring the whole family and see 
what everyone else is doing. Come out and help us celebrate 
UNIVERSITY DAY. 



PREPAID Mr. Leo Wagoner, representative of Prepaid Legal Services, \ 

LEGAL be on campus in room 215 of Alderman Hall April 7 at 10 a.m 

The session is scheduled to last for approximately 30 to 45 

minutes. THE MONTH OF APRIL IS OPEN ENROLLMENT FOR PREPAID 

LEGAL SERVICES. 

COMPUTER Don Sloan, administrative services coordinator, is presenti 
WORKSHOPS a series of "Introduction to Computers Workshops" designed I 
individuals with little or no computer experience. The worj 
shops will cover the same material each session with classel 
being held every Thursday through April 28 from 2-4 p.m. inl 
Hoggard Hall, room 212. Call Don Sloan at extension 2800. ' 

WEEKS Dr. Gerald Weeks, assistant professor of psychology, presen| 

■PRESENTS a paper, "Dialectic Metatheory in Family Therapy," March Hi 

PAPER the Family Study Center, Hudson River Psychiatric Center in' 

Poughkeepsie, NY. 

PAPER A paper by Uday Tate and Terry Ball of the management & mar 
ACCEPTED ing department has been accepted for publication and presen 
tion in the Consumer Behavior Track of the American Marketi 
Association Educator's Conference to be held August 14-17 i; 
Dearborn, Michigan. The paper is entitled "Attitude-Inten- 
tion-Behavior Relations: An Examination of the Theory of 
Reasoned Action." 

PLANT The Biology Club will present Part I of its spring plant sa 
SALE March 25 from 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. at the UNCW Greenhouse. 

DR. HARPER Dr. Stephen C. Harper, associate professor and chairman of 
IS SPEAKER department of management & marketing, spoke to the NC ChaptI 
of the International Personnel Management Association March* 
Dr. Harper discussed the "Emerging Techniques For Improving 
Organizational Productivity." 

P&R Two P&R faculty members presented papers at the Southern 

PAPERS Christian Leadership Conference held in Atlanta March 18-lS 
Dr. Sandy Martin's paper was entitled "Black Baptist Women, 
African Missions and Black Educational Institutions, with t 
Focus on Emma B. De Laney, 1880-1920." Dr. Aisha Rush-Gill! 
presented her paper on "Religion and Stress: Its African! 
Roots. " 



JAZZ Jack Pindell, trombonist, will be featured in UNCW's first 
CONCERT nual guest artist Spring Jazz Concert March 30 at 8 p.m. irj 
Kenan Auditorium. The event, sponsored by the music divisi 
of the department of creative arts, will include jazz grouf 
under the direction of Frank Bongiorno, music lecturer. 

NEW A UNCW welcome is extended to the following new employees: 

EMPLOYEES Linda H. Joyce, secretary in career planning and placement: 
Kenneth L. Hamilton, housekeeping assistant in the physical 
plant; William H. Loughlin, security officer in the campus 
police department and George L. Laughlin, housekeeping 
assistant in the student union. 

GREAT "West Germany and the US" will be the next topic for the 
DECISIONS 1983 Great Decisions program in King Hall Auditorium March 
at 7:30 p.m. 



Ann Conner, assistant professor of art, has been invited to serve 
on a panel sponsored by the Southern Graphics Council. The coun- 
cil will meet in Washington, D.C. March 24-27 to discuss the 
future trends in woodcut prints and the influence on the art 
community. The panelists will discuss their views and the di- 
rection of their printmaking. 

The UNCW Wind Ensemble and Concert Band under the direction of 
Harry McLamb will present a joint concert March 28 at 8 p.m. in 
Kenan Auditorium. Among the works on the program will be Aaron 
Copland's Lincoln Portrait, narrated by Dennis J. Sporre, chair- 
man of the department of creative arts; guest conductor. Dr. Joe 
Hickman, will conduct Leroy Anderson's Bugler's Holiday with Bill 
McAdams, David McChesney and Harry McLamb as solo trumpeters. 
The concert is free and open to the public. 

The following English department faculty members presented 
papers at the national meeting of the Conference on College 
Composition and Communication held March 17-19 in Detroit, MI: 

"The Impact of Cognitive Psychology: A Critique" by John 
Clifford; "Teaching Readability in Business Communication 
Courses" by Gary Olson; "Integrating Private Writing in 
the Writing Center" by Richard Veit and "Canning the 
Canned Lecture: A Group Approach to Research Basics" 
presented jointly by Sylvia Welborn of the English 
faculty and Deborah Sommer of the library. 

UNCW vs. Ohio University March 25 at 3 p.m. Brooks Field 

UNCW vs. Ohio University in a doubleheader March 25 starting 

at 1 p.m. Brooks field 

UNCW vs. Ohio University March 27 at 2 p.m. Brooks Field 

UNCW vs. East Carolina University March 30 at 3 p.m. 

UNCW vs. Mt. Olive College March 28 at 3 p.m. Brooks Field 



UNCW women vs. UNC-Greensboro March 26 at 2 p.m. 
Courts. 



UNCW tennis 



The Red Cross Bloodmobile will be on campus Tuesday, April 12, 
in the university union from 9:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

The week of May 1-7, 1983, has been proclaimed as "Nurses' 
Week" by Governor Jim Hunt. 

EDS, administrator for health insurance, has a new phone line 
for questions pertaining to second surgical opinions, pre-admis- 
sion testing, ambulatory surgery and optional newborn care bene- 
fits. The new phone number is to be used for the purpose of 
answering questions involving the cost containment programs as 
outlined in the Health Benefits Plan Booklet. The new number, 
1-800-662-8868, may be called between the hours of 8 a.m. and 
4:30 p.m. For all other inquiries about the plan call 
1-800-662-6661 between 8 a.m. and 8 p,m. 



UNIVERSITY DAY, MARCH 26, 1983 



COLLOQUIUM A colloquium on "CNS Effects of High Pressure -II -- Acclim. 
AT IMBR tion and Metabolism" presented by William Hinson, Spencer 

Arthur and Dr. Ralph Brauer will be held March 25 at 4 p.m. 

at IMBR. Faculty and staff are invited. 

UNIVLRSITY Distinguished visiting professor Jean Muir of the departmen- 
DAY EVENTS creative arts will conduct a rehearsal of the play, 'Babes ] 
Arms," Saturday, March 26, from 2-4 p.m. in the S.R.O Theatn 
Also, a table containing brochures on classes offered by th(| 
P&R department and publications by P&R faculty members will 
set up in the reception area of the P&R department, room 101 
Visitors to University Day, March 26, are welcome at both 
events. 



PROPOSAL 
WORKSHOP 



GUEST 
LECTURER 



PRO 
MUSICA 



UNIVERSITY 
DAY EVENTS 



WORK 
FEATURED 



US STEEL 
REP TO SPEAK 



The Eighth annual Workshop on Proposal Development and Soun 
of Support will be held April 13-14 at the McKimmon Center ' 
Raleigh. The workshop is designed to improve the preparati( 
of proposals submitted to funding agencies by faculty of foi 
year institutions of higher education. Registration fee is 
$35. Also, a one-day seminar on Fundamentals of Proposal 
Development will be offered April 12 from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. ai 
the center. The seminar, geared toward the novice who has 
never written a proposal, will cost $50. For additional in- 
formation call the UNCW Office of Research Administration al 
extension 2810. 



Dr. John Buescher of the University of Virginia will discus; 
"The Diamond Net: Reflections on Ancient Indian Language ai 
Religion" March 28 at 3:30 p.m. in the Randall Library Audi- 
torium. Open to the public. 

The Wilmington Pro Musica will present The Percussion Group 
on March 27 at 3 p.m. in the university union. The group iJ 
a three member ensemble in residence at the College Conserve 
tory of Music, University of Cincinnati. Admission is $3 fo» 
adults; $1.50 for students and free to UNCW students with H 

The first Spring Reading Series 1983 program will be held 
March 26 in conference room 201 of the university union witf 
Peggy Ryan reading fiction and Beri Marshall reading poetry, . 
The readings will begin at 8 p.m. Refreshments will be sen, 
ed. Also, the School of Education will receive visitors fron 
1:30-3 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium where they will be she 
ing slide presentations. All University Day visitors are ir 
vited to drop in for either of these events. 

I 
DANCING, a work for five percussionists by Dr. David Kechley 

the department of creative arts, will be featured in a conce 

by the University of Alabama Percussion Ensemble. The concf 

to be held TONIGHT on the Alabama campus will be conducted t 

Larry Mathis, faculty percussionist. 

Lee Hipps of U.S. Steel will visit the Cameron School of Bus 
ness Administration on March 30. Mr. Hipps will speak on "1 
Computer In Business: A "Users" Perspective" at 2 p.m. in 
King Auditorium. All faculty and staff are invited. 



AMPUS 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 30 
MARCH 31, 1983 

The UNCW Fine Arts Committee will present the Chinese Magic 
Circus of Taiwan April 6 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. The 
program will include acrobats, dancers and magicians. Gen- 
eral admission $5; UNCW students $3 and children under 12 
$1.50. 

Trask Coliseum will close Friday, April 8, at 4:00 p.m. in 
preparation for various Azalea Festival events. Racquetball 
courts will not be open on Saturday, April 9. 

Employees interested in purchasing U.S. Savings Bonds may do 
so by contacting the personnel office at extension 2162. 

The month of April is open enrollment for all permanent em- 
ployees interested in participating in the Prepaid Legal 
Services plan. Leo Wagoner, representative of Prepaid 
Legal Services, will be discussing the program Thursday, 
April 7, at 10 a.m., in Alderman Hall, room 208. Enrollment 
applications will be included in the March 31 payroll checks. 

The Wilmington Concert Association will present the Smithso- 
nian Chamber Orchestra April 5 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 

UNCW vs. NCSU TODAY at 3 p.m. Brooks Field 

UNCW vs. the University of South Carolina April 5 at 7:30 p.m. 

UNCW vs. Pembroke State University April 6 at 2 p.m. UNCW 
Tennis Courts. 

UNCW vs. NCSU April 5 at 3:30 p.m. 



Payroll checks may be picked up TODAY from the university 
cashier's office located in Alderman Hall, room 211. 



'^^.^ 



The scheduled Easter holidays for university employees are 
Friday, April 1, and Monday, April 4. 



GUEST The Guest Editorial in this month's ARITHMETIC TEACHER wa 

EDITORIAL written by Grace Burton of the department of curricular s 
ies. The editorial entitled "Being a Real Teacher" focus 
dialogue within the mathematics classroom. 



OLSON 
REPRESENTS 



MCGUIRE 
ELECTED 



BACHNER 

CONDUCTS 

SESSION 



FAST 
WALKERS 



Gary Olson of the English department will participate in 
forum with editors from four major composition journals c 
ing the National Council of Teachers of English Conferenc 
scheduled for this fall. Olson will represent the journa 
TEACHING ENGLISH. The forum is designed to help provide 
direction to the type of research being conducted nationa 
in the field of rhetoric and composition. 

Dr. Phillip McGuire, assistant professor of history, was 
elected to a three-year term as historian of the Associat 
of Historians in Eastern North Carolina during their anni 
spring meeting held March 25 in Raleigh. 

Dr. Saul Bachner, professor of education, discussed "Hisl 
Lives: Five Books That Bring the 30's to Life" during a 
session of the Southeast Regional Conference of the Natic 
Council of the Social Studies held in Jacksonville, FL. 

The Office of Special Programs will offer Fast Walkers 
April 12 - May 19 on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1 p.m. F(j 
additional information call extension 2194. 



SPORRE Dennis J. Sporre, chairman of the creative arts departmei 

SELECTED has been selected for inclusion in the latest edition of 

INTERNATIONAL WHO'S WHO IN MUSIC. 

CARTER Denis G. Carter of the Cameron School of Business Admini 
INVITED tration attended a meeting on U.S. Foreign Policy with t 
GUEST Honorable George P. Shultz, Secretary of State. Dr. 

Carter was an invited guest of the President of the Sout; 

Center for International Studies, Atlanta, GA. 

PAPER Sandy D. Martin of the philosophy & religion department 

PRESENTED sented a paper, "Black Baptist Women, African Missions, 
Black Educational Institutions, with a Focus on Emma B. 
DeLaney and Spelman College, 1880-1920" at the American 
Academy of Religion (Southeastern Region) meeting held 
March 17-19 in Atlanta. I 

DR. WELCH Dr. Betty Jo Welch, associate professor of speech commur 
ADDRESSES cation, addressed the annual convention of the N.C. Chap 
GROUP of the International Personnel Management Association he 

March 22 at the Blockade Runner where she discussed "Hir 

on Public Speaking." 

DR. ALLEN Dr. Earl Allen, professor in the HP'R department, spoke 

SPEAKS the Winter Park Optimist Club March 15 regarding "Physic 

gical Aspects of Training Young Athletes." 

BLOODMOBILE The Red Cross Bloodmobile will be on campus Tuesday, Apij 
ON CAMPUS in the University Union from 9:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 



An temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets reflect- 
ing shift premium MUST BE IN THE PERSONNEL OFFICE BEFORE 
10 a.m. APRIL 5 so that payroll computation may be completed. 
Supervisors who do not meet this deadline should not expect 
their employees to be paid. The personnel office will make 
one reminder cal 1 . 



Gary Olson of the English department presented a paper en- 
titled "Teaching Readability in Technical Communications" at 
the annual Conference on College Composition and Communica- 
tion held this year in Detroit. 

Don Sloan, administrative services coordinator, is presenting 
a series of "Introduction to Computers Workshops" designed 
for individuals with little or no computer experience. The 
workshops will cover the same material each session with 
classes being held every Thursday through April 28 from 2-4 
p.m. in Hoggard Hall, room 212. Call Don Sloan at ext. 2800. 



The eighth annual Worksh 
Sources of Support will 
Center in Raleigh. The 
preparation of proposals 
faculty of four-year ins 
gistration fee is $35. 
mentals of Proposal Deve 
from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. at 
toward the novice who ha 
cost $50. For additiona 
of Research Admini strati 



op on Proposal Development and 

be held April 13-14 at the McKimmon 

workshop is designed to provide the 

submitted to funding agencies by 
titutions of higher education. Re- 
Also, a one-day seminar on Funda- 
lopment will be offered April 12 
the center. The seminar, geared 
s never written a proposal, will 
1 information call the UNCW Office 
on at extension 2810. 



The following School of Education faculty members presented 
papers during the March 24-25 annual conference of the NC 
Association of Teacher Educators held on the UNCW campus: 

Patricia Medlin - "Field Experiences in Special Educa- 
tion," Grace Burton - "Using Values Clarification: How 
& Why," Hathia Hayes - "Mainstreaming at the College 
or University Level," James Applefield - "A Meaningful 
Organization for an Introduction to Education," Rodney 
Earle - "Teachers as Instructional Developers," Polly 
Applefield - "Contributions of Neuropsychology to the 
Education of Tomorrow's Teachers" and Calvin Doss - 
"A Prototype of a Locally-Planned Staff Development 
Model . " 



The UNCW Development Office has moved from Kenan Auditorium to 
the new University Union. Information regarding Development, 
UNCW Foundation, public relations, CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE, UNCW 
Faculty/Staff Telephone Directories, UNCW TODAY, News Bureau, 
publications, Alumni Affairs and UNCW Calendar of Events may 
be obtained from this department. Staff members include Ty 
Rowell, director of development services at ext. 2170; Patsy 
Larrick, public information assistant at ext. 2169; Joan 
Fanner, publications officer at ext. 2708; Mimi Cunningham, 
public information officer at 2171; Frank Bowen, alumni 
affairs officer at ext. 2616 and Kathy Butler, clerk stenogra- 
pher at ext. 2751 . 



UNC bv the csca 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 31 
APRIL 7, 1983 



Dr. Bill Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs, will 
discuss "Meeting Students' Potentials" during the 12:15 
p.m. Ham & Eggheads luncheon Friday, April 8, in the 
faculty dining room of the cafeteria. 

The Hanover Singers from New Hanover High School will pre- 
sent "Oklahoma" April 15-17 at 8 nightly in Kenan Audi- 
torium. 



Trask Coliseum will close Friday, April 8, at 4 p.m. in 
preparation for various Azalea Festival events scheduled 
for this weekend. Racquetball courts will not be open 
on Saturday, April 9. 

Dr. James Parnell, professor of biological sciences, will 
present a slide presentation on the Birds of the Cape 
Fear Area April 13 at the monthly meeting of the American 
Association of Retired Persons. 

Eleanor Poole, director of personnel services, was elected 
the 1983-84 president of the Higher Education Personnel 
Association during their annual conference held recently 
at Wrightsville Beach. 

The university has received notice from EDS Federal Cor- 
poration that conversion privileges will no longer be avail- 
able under the present health benefits plan. While the 
state is looking into other insurance programs for conver- 
sion privileges, terminated employees who are not eligible 
for other employer sponsored group insurance may continue 
under the present group plan by paying the total premium. 
Please note appropriate changes on page 30 of the Compre- 
hensive Health Benefit Plan booklet. For additional 
questions or information call Dianne Smith at ext. 2162. 

UNCW extends a welcome to Tracie L. Edge, records clerk, in 
the registrar's office. 



BLOODMOBILE 
ON CAMPUS 



POEM 
PUBLISHED 



AST 
CHOIR 



PROPOSAL 
ACCEPTED 



COUNSELING 
& TESTING 

COMMUNITY 
ORCHESTRA 



PAPERS 
PRESENTED 



GUEST 
SPEAKER 



NC 
SYMPHONY 



The Red Cross Bloodmobile will be on campus Tuesday, Ap 
12, in the University Union from 9:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. ! 
All faculty and staff are encouraged to participate. i 

Charles Fort, director of Creative Writing, has publish 
a poem. The Worker (We Own Two Houses), in the spring i 
of the Crucible , a literary journal from Atlantic Chris ' 
College. 

The Black Student Union will present the North Carolina 
State University Choir in concert April 19 at 8 p.m. inj 
Kenan Auditorium. Admission charge is $2 per person, 

Mary Kay Dodson of the English department has had her p 
posal accepted for presentation at the Southeast Region 
English Teachers Conference to be held in Charleston in) 
October. The theme of the conference is "Learning Thro 
Language." Ms. Dodson 's topic will be "Creative Writin 
for Young Children." 

The Counseling and Testing Center is still located in t| 
Hinton James Building, room 106. I 

The UNCW Community Orchestra will perform April 26 at 8|; 
p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. The program will include Yo 
Artist Competition winners playing concerto movements w 
the orchestra. Featured will be Karen Stern playing 
Mendelssohn Violin Concerto and John Noble playing 
MacDowell Second Piano Concerto. Admission for adults 
be $3; students $1.50. All proceeds will go to the 
William F. Adcock Scholarship Fund. 

Gary Olson, director of The Center for Writing, and Kar! 
Canine, English lecturer, presented papers during the P' 
logical Association of the Carolina Conference held Mar! 
25 in Charleston, SC. Dr. Olson's paper was entitled 
"Teaching Readability in Business and Technical Cormuni 
tions" while Ms. Canine's paper was titled "Hansel and 
Gretel in Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon ." 

Guest speaker, Richard Jackson of the U.S. Corps of Eng 
will be on campus April 12 to discuss U.S. Army Corps cj 
Engineers contracting and procurement procedures. The 
sentation is part of a course MBY 585 entitled "Fundame 
tals of Grantsmanship" sponsored by the UNCW Office of 
Research Administration. Faculty and staff interested 
attending the 5:30 p.m. presentation in Hoggard Hall, r 
216 should call Annette Anderson at 2810. Refreshments 
be served. 

The UNCW Fine Arts Committee will host the North Carol i| 
Symphony Tuesday, April 12, at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorlj 



state employees in New Hanover, Brunswick and Pender coun- 
ties have met requirements to start a new local area of the 
North Carolina State Employees Association. The request 
will go to the NCSEA Board of Governors on April 15 and if 
approved, an organizational meeting to elect officers and 
start AREA 26 will be held in May. Employees will be noti- 
fied of all details as they become available. 

The Wilmington Branch of the American Association of 
University Women is planning its annual used book sale April 
22-23 near Rose's at Hanover Center. Anyone wishing to 
donate used books to be sold should contact Mimi Cunningham 
at ext. 2171. Donations are tax-deductible. Proceeds will 
go to the educational foundation and community projects. 

The Biology Club will present its spring plant sale. Part II, 
April 15 from 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. at the greenhouse. Plants 
available include house plants, hanging baskets, ferns, 
cacti, succulents and herbs. 

The open session on the Prepaid Legal Services plan scheduled 
for THIS MORNING AT 10 has been cancelled. The session will 
be re-scheduled for a later date. Employees will be noti- 
fied via the CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE. Faculty and staff interest- 
ed in pre-paid legal coverage effective May 1, 1983, should 
forward the application form (forms were enclosed in March 
payroll envelope) to the personnel office no later than 
April 12. If June coverage is preferable the application 
form should be sent to personnel by April 29. 

UNCW vs. Baptist College of Charleston April 8 at 7:30 p.m. 
UNCW vs. Baptist College of Charleston April 9 at 2:00 p.m. 

UNCW vs. Elon College at 9:30 a.m. and Mars Hill College at 
3 p.m. April 9. 

UNCW vs. Pembroke State University March 14 at 2:30 p.m. 



UNCW vs. Mars Hill College April 9 at 10:00 a.m. 



The following is a list of programs being offered by the 
UNCW Office of Special Programs: 

Fast Walkers - Tuesdays & Thursdays, April 12 - May 19. 

Work-Out/Aerobics - Tuesdays & Thursdays, April 12 - May 19. 

Computer Instruction Part 2 - Tuesdays, April 12 - May 17. 

Creative Movement - Tuesdays & Thursdays, April 12 - May 19. 
Registration for the above listed courses should be done 
in the Office of Special Programs before April 8. 

Total Approach to Stress Management for Teachers - April 14, 
21, 29, and May 5. Register by April 12. 

Flora of Coastal NC - Thursdays, April 14 - May 12. Register 
by April 10. For information on any of the special programs 
call Diane Talley at extension 2798. 



AZALEA 

FESTIVAL 

ACTIVITIES 



Thursday - 6:30 p.m 
Friday 



AZALEA 
CLASSIC 



DEVELOPMENT 
OFFICE NOW 
LOCATED IN 
UNIVERSITY 
UNION 



WORKSHOP 
REMINDER 



EXAM 
SCHEDULE 



10:00 a.m. 
8:00 p.m. 



Saturday - 



Sunday 



9:30 a.m. 
1 :00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. 
8:00 p.m. 



Free Variety Show at Legion Stadiur 

Garden tours, $5 per ticket 

Larry Gatlin & the Gatlin Brothers 

concert at Trask Coliseum. $12 

Parade, downtown 

Horse show, Hugh MacRae Park 

Tour - Wilmington Historic Distric 

Coronation & Andy Williams show in 

Trask Coliseum. $15 



1:00 p.m. Horse Show, Hugh MacRae Park 

2:00 p.m. Air show - including the Thunderbi: 

and the Golden Knights. New Hanovi 

County Airnort. Free 



The Azalea Classic Tennis Tournament will be held this W( 

end on the UNCW campus. Participating in this year's evi 

will be Campbell & Citadel, Friday, April 8, at 10 a.m.; 

UNCW & UNC-Charlotte, Friday, April 8, at 2:30 p.m.; 

Campbell & UNC-Charlotte, Saturday, April 9, at 10 a.m. 

UNCW & Citadel Saturday, April 9, at 3:30 p.m. 

A reminder that the UNCW Development Office has moved to 
the new University Union. Information regarding developr 
UNCW Foundation, public relations, CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE, UNi 
Faculty/Staff Telephone Directory, UNCW TODAY, News Bure. 
publications, Alumni Affairs and UNCW Calendar of Events 
may be obtained from this department. 

Anyone interested in taking the "Introduction to Compute 

Workshops" held on Thursdays through April 28 from 2-4 

p.m. in Hoggard Hall, room 212 may sign up by calling Doi 
Sloan at extension 2800. 

The following is the listing of the revised exam schedul( 
for spring 1983: 

9-12 2-5 7-10 

Thursday 
April 28 0800 M-W-F 1100 T-T 1830 T-T 

Friday 

April 29 1100 M-W-F 1400 M-W-F 1700 M-W-F 



Monday 
May 2 


1200 M-W-F 


0800 T-T 


1830 M-W 


Tuesday 
May 3 


0900 M-W-F 


1300 M-W-F 


2000 T-T 


Wednesday 
May 4 


1230 T-T 


0930 T-T 


2000 M-W 


Thursday 
May 5 


1000 M-W-F 


1400 T-T 


1700 T-T 


Friday 
May 6 


1500 M-W-F 


1530 T-T 


1600 M-W 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 32 
APRIL 14, 1983 



Please refer to the UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES MANUAL number G-8-1 
through G.8-4 if your department plans to have a student on 
the payroll who will not be taking courses this summer but 
plans to continue their employment during the summer sessions. 
The personnel office will need two weeks notice prior to the 
employee's reporting date along with the following informa- 
tion: 

a. NC state application, completed and signed 

b. listing of five major tasks in the temporary 
position 

c. W-4 form, completed and signed 

d. account number from which salary will be paid 

Faculty members wishing to make changes regarding the 10 or 
12 month salary plan options have until July 1, 1983. Ap- 
propriate forms may be picked up from the personnel office. 
Forms are not necessary for those electing to continue on 
the same salary plan. 

The month of April is open enrollment for all permanent em- 
ployees interested in participating in the Prepaid Legal 
Services plan. Mr. Leo Wagoner of PLS will be available to 
discuss the program April 20 at 2:30 p.m. in Alderman Hall 
room 215. 

The university bookstore is having a T-shirt sale on selected 
groups of shirts. Shirts are $2, all sales final. 

The 1983 FLEDGLINGS are here. Yearbooks may be purchased for 
$12 in the new University Union, room 205-A Monday - Friday 
from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

Faculty are reminded that fall text book requisitions are due 
in the bookstore by April 22. 

The Hoggard High School Band conducted by David McChesney will 
hold a concert in Kenan Auditorium April 21 at 8 p.m. 

The faculty meeting will be held in Bryan Auditorium located 
in Morton Hall April 21 at 4 p.m. 



DR. MCGUIRE 

DELIVERS 

PAPER 



FERRARO 

PRESENTS 

PAPER 



Dr. Phillip McGuire, assistant professor of history, deliv 
a paper, "Desegregation of the Armed Forces: Black Leader 
ship Protest and World War II," at the Seventy-Sixth annua 
meeting of the Organization of American Historians held 
April 6-9 at Stouffer's Towers and Cincinnati Convention E 
position Center. 

Dr. Kenneth F. Ferraro, assistant professor of sociology, 
presented a paper at the annual meeting of the Southern Sc; 
logical Society in Atlanta April 6-9. The paper, "The Ef- 
fect of Widowhood on the Health Status of Older Persons," 
also been accepted for publication in a future issue of th 
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AGING & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT. 



BOOK 
PUBLISHED 



POEMS 
PUBLISHED 



STUDENT 

WINS 

AWARD 



CLIFFORD 

WRITES 

TEXTBOOK 



SCULPTURES 
ACCEPTED 



KECHLEY 
WORK TO BE 
PERFORMED 



W. Frank Ainsley of the earth sciences department has pub- 
lished a book entitled THE HISTORIC ARCHITECTURE OF WARSAW 
NORTH CAROLINA. The book was sponsored by the Warsaw Garc 
Club and written under the auspices of the NC Division of 
Archives and History. 

Charles Fort, director of creative writing, has had two 
poems. Thunder for the Lady's Sake, and How Old Are the 
People of the World, published in PORTFOLIO 1983. PORTFOl 
is a collection of award-winning poems by 15 NC poets cho! 
to represent the quality and imagination of the best contc 
porary NC writing. The publication is sponsored by Poetry 
Center Southeast and a grant from the NC Arts Council. F( 
has been invited along with the other PORTFOLIO poets to 
read his poetry this fall at arts centers in Greensboro, 
Winston-Salem, Carrboro and Southern Pines. 

Lawrence P. Rozas, marine science student in the departmer 
biological sciences, has won the Pat Adams Memorial Award 
the best student paper at the spring meeting of the South- 
eastern Estuarine Research Society meeting held April 1-3 
in Savannah, GA. His paper, "Use of low salinity marshes 
marine and estuarine fishes and macrofaunal crustaceans ii 
North Carolina," was based upon his thesis work directed I 
Dr. Courtney T. Hackney. 



John Clifford of the English department has written a tex' 
book for college composition courses entitled SENTENCE COI 
BINING: SHAPING IDEAS FOR BETTER STYLE. The book was pul 
lished by Bobbs-Merrill last month. He also wrote an 
accompanying instructor's guide with teaching suggestions! 
and answers. 






Stephen LeQuire of the Department of Creative Art - divis 
of art has had two sculptures accepted for exhibition at 
Out of the Woods Gallery in Asheville, NC. 

"Ritual Songs and Dances: Free Variations for Flute and 
Percussion" by David Kechley of the Department of CreatiV' 
Arts - division of music will be performed during the 1983 
North Carolina Composers Symposium April 15 in Winston-Sa 
at Salem College. The performance will feature the Penil 
Contemporary Consort, the group that originally commissio 
the work. 



The Black Student Union will present the North Carolina A&T 
State University Choir in concert April 19 at 8 p.m. in Kenan 
Auditorium. Admission charge is $2 per person. 

Lee Canfield, nature lecturer and photographer, will present 
a series of slide shows featuring birds and animals during 
the meeting of The Lower Cape Fear Bird Club. The meeting is 
scheduled for April 19 at 7:30 p.m. in MS-150. 

The University Women of UNCW will host a family picnic at 
Hugh MacRae Park Sunday, April 17, at 3 p.m. All are invited 
and asked to bring a dish to share. Beverages will be pro- 
vided and charcoal will be burning for those who wish to 
bring hotdogs, hamburgers, etc. 

The Biology Club plant sale gets underway tomorrow, April 15, 
at the Greenhouse. Cash only - no checks please. 

The Clamtones concert will be held in the University Union 
multi-purpose room April 15 beginning at 9 p.m. 

Paul Watson will discuss his adventures on the high seas 
regarding pirate whalers April 19 at 8 p.m. in the University 
Union multipurpose room. Admission charge. 

Ivey James will perform his Senior Recital at 8 p.m. April 
20 in Kenan Auditorium. Free. 

Curator Paul Clifford will lecture on Pre-Columbian Art 
April 21 at 7:30 p.m. in the Randall Library Auditorium. 

The UNCW Wind Ensemble and Oratorio Society will perform in 
concert April 22 at 3 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Admission 
charge for adults $3; UNCW students $1.50. 

Dr. William A. Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs, 
was selected president-elect of the 7,000-member American 
College Personnel Association during their annual meeting 
held in Houston last month. His tenure will be for one 
year before he assumes the presidency in the spring of 1984. 
The ACPA is a division of the American Personnel and Gui- 
dance Association dedicated to promoting student development 
in higher education. 

Mrs. Betty Stike of the department of curricular studies has 
been named the 1983 recipient of the Higher Education Award 
of the Division of Support and Post Secondary Personnel of 
the North Carolina Association of Educators. Mrs. Stike will 
receive the award at the annual meeting of the association 
April 15 in Raleigh. 

The Wilmington Pro Musica and St. John's Museum of Art will 
present the Atlantic Brass in concert April 17 at 3 p.m. 
at St. John's Museum of Art. Free. 



Dr. James Megivern, chairman of the philosophy & religion de- 
partment, was the featured speaker April 13 at Pembroke 
State University during a program entitled "The Challenge of 
Peace" sponsored by the PSU P&R Department. 



dl 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



WOODHOUSE 

CHAIRS 

SESSION 



The following is a list of courses being offered by the UN' 
Office of Special Programs: 

Computer Instruction For Beginners - Tuesdays and Thursday 
April 19 - May 19. Register by April 15. 

Tennis for Older Adults - Tuesdays and/or Thursdays, April 
May 12. Register by April 15. 

Utilizing Japanese Management Techniques - Thursdays April 
Register by April 15. 

Beginning Drawing and Painting (ages 9-12) - Saturdays, Ap 
23-May 28. Register by April 20. 

For additional information call Diane Talley at Ext. 2798. j 

William Woodhouse of the modern languages department chair 
session on Irony in Hispanic Literature at the Georgia Col 
loquium on Modern Literature held April 7-9 at the Univers 
of Georgia. He also attended the spring meeting of the NC 
Chapter of the American Association of Teachers of Spanish 
Portuguese held March 19 at Peace College. 



PLAY IN 

S.R.O 

THEATRE 



BASEBALL 
SCHEDULE 



WOMEN'S 
TENNIS 

MEN ' S 
TENNIS 

WOMEN'S 
SOFTBALL 

EXAM 

SCHEDULE 
SPRING '83 



HAM & 
EGGHEADS 



MATH 

PAPER 

PRESENTED 



Jean Muir, distinguished visiting professor and director c 
play, "Babes in Arms," extends an invitation to all facultji 
staff to attend the play scheduled for April 20-24 in the 
S.R.O. Theatre. For additional information call ext. 244C 

UNCW vs. Appalachian State University April 16 at 7:30 p.n 
UNCW vs. Campbell University (doubleheader) April 18 at 6 
UNCW vs. East Carolina University April 19 at 7:30 p.m. 

UNCW vs. UNC-Charlotte April 18 at 2 p.m. 

UNCW vs. Atlantic Christian College April 19 at 2 p.m. 

UNCW vs. Belmont Abbey College April 15 at 2:30 p.m. 
UNCW vs. High Point College April 16 at 1 p.m. 

UNCW vs. NC Wesleyan College April 18 at 3:30 p.m. 

9-12 2-5 7-10 



Thurs./4-28 
Fri./ 4-29 
Mon./ 5-2 
Tues./ 5-3 
Wed. / 5-4 
Thurs./5-5 
Fri./ 5-6 



0800 M-W-F 

1100 M-W-F 

1200 M-W-F 

0900 M-W-F 

1230 T-T 

1000 M-W-F 

1500 M-W-F 



1100 T-T 
1400 M-W-F 
0800 T-T 
1300 M-W-F 
0930 T-T 
1400 T-T 
1530 T-T 



1830 T-T 

1700 M-W-F 

1830 M-W 

2000 T-T 

2000 M-W 

1700 T-T 

1600 M-W-F 



Dr. Ronald Copley of the Cameron School of Business will ( 
cuss "Tax Planning Through Real Estate Investing" at the I 
Eggheads luncheon April 15 at 12:15 p.m. in the cafeteria 

Dr. Paul Jambor, associate professor of mathematical sciei 
presented a paper, "Rings with no Superdecomposable Moduli 
at the Elisha Mitchell Centennial meeting of the NC Acader 
of Sciences held April 8-9 in Chapel Hill. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC bv the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 33 
APRIL 21, 1983 

Faculty are reminded that fall text book requisitions are due 
in the bookstore by April 22. 

The month of April is open enrollment for all permanent em- 
ployees interested in the Prepaid Legal Services plan. The 
personnel department will accept enrollment applications 
through April 29. 

Ralph Parker, director of the office for minority affairs, 
will speak on "Activities of the New Office of Minority Af- 
fairs" during this year's final luncheon meeting of the Ham & 
Eggheads. The meeting is scheduled for 12 noon upstairs in 
the cafeteria Friday, April 22. 

All items for inclusion in the May "Calendar of Events" 
should be sent to Kathy Butler, room 209 of the new univer- 
sity union before Tuesday, April 26. 

Phi Kappa Phi, scholastic honorary society, will hold its 
annual initiation ceremony April 21 at 7:30 p.m. in the new 
university union. Dr. George Bair, assistant to the chancel- 
lor, will speak. 

The Wilmington Branch of the AAUW will hold its annual used 
book sale from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday, April 22, and Satur- 
day, April 23, at Hanover Center near Rose's. 

A collection of taped speeches by the late Dr. Martin Luther 
King, Jr., and taped speeches of Dr. Joseph Lowery, president 
of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, will be pre- 
sented to Randall Library April 26 at 11 a.m. in the Rare 
Book Room. The tapes will be available for use by students, 
faculty, staff and the community. Faculty and staff are in- 
vited to the presentation. 

Young Artist Competition winners will be playing concerto 
movements with the UNCW Community Orchestra April 26 at 8 p.m. 
in Kenan Auditorium. Karen Stern will be playing Mendelssohn 
Violin Concerto and John Noble will be playing MacDowell 
Second Piano Concerto. Admission charge. Proceeds will go 
to the William F. Adcock Scholarship Fund. 



AINSLEY Dr. W. Frank Ainsley of the department of earth sciences p 
PRESENTS sented a paper, "Folk Architecture in Early Twentieth Cent 
PAPER Ethnic Agricultural Colonies," during the annual meeting c 

the Southeastern American Studies Association held April / 

in Charleston, SC. 

DR. NORRIS Dr. Fletcher Norris, professor of mathematical sciences, f 
AT SEMINAR ticipated in a Chautauqua for college teachers entitled 

"Combinatorial Problem-Solving in the Mathematical Science 
March 22-25 at the University of Iowa. The Chautauqua, a 
short course for college teachers, was sponsored by the 
National Science Foundation. 



PLAY TO BE 
PERFORMED 



BURTON 

DELIVERS 

PAPER 



REPS ON 
CAMPUS 



BOOK 
DISCUSSION 



RECREATION 
CONFERENCES 



BURTON 
CHAIRS 



The Porch , a one-act play written by Dr. Anne Russell of 1 
English department and directed by Marjorie Megivern, will 
performed by Centerstage at the Community Arts Center May I 
at 7 p.m. The family drama is set in Wilmington in the 
summer of 1946. All faculty and staff are invited to attt 

Dr. Grace Burton of the department of curricular studies ( 
livered a paper on assessing student self-concept and pre; 
over two sessions of the tenth annual meeting of the Rese<' 
Council for Diagnostic and Prescriptive Mathematics. Dr. 
Burton was also one of three copy editors of the council'; 
1983 research monograph which was distributed during the 
three-day meeting. 

John Pezzoni, VALIC representative, will be on campus May 
in room 215 of Alderman Hall. Also, Frank Cranor, NC Def< 
red Compensation representative, will be on campus May 9 
in room 208 of Alderman Hall. Both reps will be discussiil 
tax sheltered annunities. Appointments may be made for 
either session by calling extension 2160. 

A discussion of the book, THE HUNDREDTH MONKEY, sponsored 
the Unitarian Fellowship and Peaceworks will be held Fridi 
April 22, at 7:30 p.m. in the new Unitarian Fellowship 
Building located on Lake Avenue. For a copy of the book 
contact Maggie Parish at extension 2328. 

The fifth annual NC Outdoor Education Conference will be 
held April 22-24 at Fort Caswell. The conference is co-s 
sored by the parks and recreation management degree progr 
at UNCW and the UNCW Recreation Majors Club. Organizer 
of the event is Dr. Robert Wolff of the HPER department. 
The recreation majors club is also sponsoring this year's 
student mini-conference for the NC Recreation and Park 
Society scheduled for April 22 at Fort Caswell. 

Dr. Grace Burton of the department of curricular studies 
chaired a three-hour session on sex-related differences i 
mathematics during the mathematics education research spe 
al interest group of the American Education Research Assoi 
ation meeting. The meeting was held April 11 - 12 in 
Detroit. In addition she presented a paper on meeting thj 
needs of gifted children in mathematics as part of the an j 
conference of the National Council of Teachers of Mathemaj 
held April 15. 



Dr. Anne Russell of the department of English has had her pro- 
ject, "One of the Family," accepted as an exhibit for the 
Woman's Building of the 1992 Chicago World's Fair. In words 
and pictures, the study will portray the lives of black fe- 
male domestic workers. 

Ed Reilly of the counseling and testing center has completed 
all requirements for his docterate and will receive his Ph.D. 
from the University of Florida in August. UNCW students 
from six sections of Psychology 105 served as subjects for 
his dissertation study, "Self-Modification of College Students 
Study Behavior Via a 'Learning Acceleration' Tape Treatment 
Program. " 

ATLANTIS, the UNCW Literary-Art Magazine, is asking for book 
donations from faculty and staff interested in discarding 
books that are in reasonably good condition. Sizeable con- 
tributions will be acknowledged in the next ATLANTIS edition. 
Contact Dan Headrick at 343-1151 or Berwyn Moore at 392-3742. 

Dr. Lee Johnston, assistant professor of political science, 
has been chosen to be a participant at the National Endowment 
for the Humanities seminar on Southern Culture to be held 
June 13-August 5 at UNC-Chapel Hill. Also, Dr. Johnston 
along with Lloyd Jones of the political science faculty pre- 
sented "Researching Institutional Elites in N.C.: Complexi- 
ties of Identification and Analysis," during the annual 
conference of the Southern Association for Public Opinion 
Research held at Research Triangle Institute. 

Margaret Amsler will conduct a seminar on "The Effect of 
Temperature on the Embryonic Development of the Blue Crab 
Callinectes Sapidus" Friday, April 22, at 3:30 p.m. at IMBR. 
The seminar is based upon the results of studies conducted 
by Ms. Amsler toward her M.S. thesis. All faculty and staff 
are invited to attend. Refreshments will be served. 

Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of HPER, has been selected to 
receive the 1983 American Association for Leisure and Re- 
creation Honor Award. The award is the highest recognition 
given by the AALR with only one award given annually. 

Dr. Ned H. Martin of the Department of Chemical and Physical 
Sciences - chemistry division will present a seminar today 
to the faculty and graduate students of chemistry at Duke 
University. His presentation concerns his research on re- 
actions of photo-excited states of molecular oxygen. 

Dr. Cecil L. Willis of the sociology department presented 
a paper entitled "The Pricking of A Sacred Cow: A Sugges- 
tion for Reform of the Manuscript Review Process and the 
Gatekeepers' Response" at the annual meeting of the Southern 
Sociology Society held April 6-9 in Atlanta. Co-authors of 
the paper with Dr. Willis were Dr. Richard H. Wells of UNCW 
and Dr. J. Steven Picou of Texas A&M. Dr. Willis was also 
Convener for a Roundtable Discussion on Theory and Research 
on Criminal Justice. 



BENEFIT 
CONCERT 



FACULTY 
NOTICE 



SKALKO 
TO SPEAK 



INITIAL 
MEETING 



MUSEUM OF 
CULTURES 



The UNCW Jazz Combo will perform a benefit concert Wednesd 
April 27, in King Auditorium at 8 p.m. The group will per 
jazz standards and mainstream jazz. Tickets $2 general ad 
sion and $1 for UNCW students. All proceeds will go to su 
the UNCW Jazz Ensembles. 

Faculty members wishing to make changes regarding the 10 c] 
month salary plan options have until July 1. Appropriate , 
may be picked up from the personnel office. Forms are notj 
sary for those electing to continue on the same salary pi a! 

Dr. Thomas Skalko, assistant professor in therapeutic recrj 

tion, will present a session on "Leisure Skills Developmer 

Mentally Handicapped Adults" at the annual conference of t| 

Community Living Association to be held at Atlantic Beach 
May 12-13. 

The first meeting of the Cape Fear Chapter of the Americar 
Society for Training and Development will be held at 6 p. it 
April 28 at the Heart of Wilmington. A social hour begins 
6 p.m. followed by a dutch treat dinner. The purpose of 1| 
meeting will be to learn about ASTD and discuss the future 
training in all aspects of career development. For additi 
information call Dr. Wade Cooper at extension 2354. 

The dedication and ribbon cutting of the Museum of World ( 
tures, a new joint venture between UNCW and the NC Educati 
Historical and Scientific Foundation, will be held April 
in Randall Library Auditorium. Mrs. William Wagoner will 
the ribbon following a lecture/slide program on Pre-Columt 
Cultures at 7:30 p.m. by Paul Clifford. Clifford is the 1 
mer curator and director of the Duke University Museum of 
Display cases featuring pre-Columbian South American artil 
will be on exhibit on the second floor of Randall Library, 



EXAM 
SCHEDULE 



Thurs, 
Fri., 
Mon. , 
Tues. , 
Wed. , 
Thurs, 
Fri . , 



, 4-28 

4-29 

5-2 

5-3 
5-4 
, 5-5 
5-6 



9-12 
0800 M-W-F 
1100 M-W-F 
1200 M-W-F 
0900 M-W-F 
1230 T-T 
1000 M-W-F 
1500 M-W-F 



2-5 

1100 T-T 

1400 M-W-F 

0800 T-T 

1300 M-W-F 

0930 T-T 

1400 T-T 

1530 T-T 



7-10 
1830 T-T 
1700 M-W-F 
1830 M-W 
2000 T-T 
2000 M-W 
1700 T-T 
1600 M-W-F- 



TWO 

WORKSHOPS 

LEFT 



ROTC 
CEREMONY 

WRITERS 
FORUM 



TRUSTEES 
MEET 



Faculty and staff have only TODAY and April 28 to particii' 
in the workshop," Introduction to Computers," conducted 
2-4 p.m. in Hoggard Hall, room 212. Reservations may be r 
by calling Don Sloan at extension 2800. 

The Army ROTC Awards Ceremony will be held Friday, April ', 
at 3 p.m. in King Hall, room 100. 

The Writers Forum will feature Alan Johnson reading fictii 
Judy Rogers reading poetry in the university union confen 
room April 23 at 8 p.m. 

The UNCW Board of Trustees will meet April 27 in the new i 
versity union at 12:30 p.m. 



•:t: 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv Lhe sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 34 
APRIL 28, 1983 

John Clifford and Richard Veil of the English department have 
signed a contract with Bobbs-Merrill to publish their text- 
book, WRITING, READING AND RESEARCH. The book will appear 
in the fall of 1984. 

Representatives of Perkin-Elmer and AIMS will be on campus 
Thursday, May 5, to discuss Perkin-Elmer computers and 
AIMS software for higher education. A slide presentation 
covering the features of the AIMS software will begin at 
9:30 a.m. in H-212. Topics to be covered and times will be 
published separately on Monday, May 2. All persons in- 
terested in administrative software for higher education are 
invited to attend. For additional information call the 
information systems office at extension 2540. 

All faculty and staff are invited to attend the spring meet- 
ing of the New Hanover Friends of the Public Library at 
7:30 p.m., Thursday, April 28, (TONIGHT) in the meeting room 
of the public library downtown. Featured speaker will be 
Dr. Hubert Eaton, physician and chairman of the UNCW Board 
of Trustees, who will speak on his forthcoming autobiography 
"Every Man Should Try." 

The Porch, a one-act play written by Dr. Anne Russell of the 
English department and directed by Marjorie Megivern, will 
be performed by Centerstage at the Community Arts Center 
May 1 at 7 p.m. The family drama is set in Wilmington in the 
summer of 1946. All faculty and staff are invited to attend. 

Gerald R. Weeks of the psychology faculty has been selected 
for biographical inclusion in Edition One of 5,000 Personali- 
ties of the World published by the American Biographical 
Institute. 

A farewell reception for Win Norman, director of campus police 
services, will be held Friday, April 29, from 3-5 p.m. in the 
Trustee Room. Chief Norman has accepted a position as train- 
ing instructor in the behavioral science unit at the FBI 
National Academy in Quantico, VA. Faculty and staff are 
invited to drop in and say goodbye to a "peach of a fuzzi" 



RENSMA TO Dr. Patricia Rensma of the philosophy and religion departmei 

CONDUCT will be at Emerald Isle May 6-7 to give several workshops fi 

WORKSHOPS the Coastal Area Perinatal Association. The subject of her 

workshops will be ethical considerations involved with alio' 

the death of severely handicapped newborns. 

INSURANCE John Pezzoni , VALIC representative, will be on campus May 3 
REPS ON room 215 of Alderman Hall. Also, Frank Cranor, NC Deferred 
CAMPUS Compensation representative, will be on campus May 9 in roa 
208 of Alderman Hall. Both representatives will be discus- 
sing tax sheltered annuities. Appointments may be made fo 
either session by calling extension 2160. 

SHERIDAN TO Dr. Earl Sheridan of the political science department has b 
PARTICIPATE selected to participate in a National Endowment for the Hum 
ties seminar on Individualism and Republicanism in Eighteen 
Century Social and Political Thought. The seminar will be 
held at Cornell University June 20 - August 12. 

DR. MILLER Dr. Sybil K. Miller of the department of chemical and physi 
TO PRESENT sciences will present a seminar on her research entitled 
SEMINAR "Comparison of Horse Serum Butyrylchol inesterase (EC3. 1.1.8 

and Rabbit Liver Carboxyl esterase (EC 3.1.1.1)" Thursday, 

May 5, at 2:30 p.m. in 0-114. 

GOLF The fifteenth annual Faculty/Staff Golf Tournament is schec 

TOURNAMENT for 9 a.m., Friday, May 6, at Echo Farms Country Club. All 

faculty and staff are invited to participate . For registr 

tion and information call Judy Lewis at extension 2254 bef( 

Friday, April 29. Green fees are $6. 

FILM Robert Topi in, professor of history, has had an article, 
WINS "The Making of Denmark Vesey's Rebellion," published in FIl 
AWARD AND HISTORY. Also, his film, "Denmark Vesey's Rebellion," 
has won the Freedoms Foundation, George Washington Award o1 
Honor, for the outstanding historical film of 1982. Dr. 
Topi in will be on location May 16 - June 7 to film the nex1 
episode in his series on slavery, "Solomon Northup's Odyssf). 

PAPER Ron Copley of the economics and finance department presents 

PRESENTED a paper entitled "Interest Rate Expectations, Short-term i 

Trading Strategies, and the Fed Action of 1979" at the Apr^ii 

21 meeting of the Eastern Finance Association in New York. ' 

STUDENT Lawrence P. Rozas, graduate student in the marine biology p 
WINS gram, received an award during the annual meeting of the A; 
AWARD sociation of Southeastern Biologists held April 13-15 in 

Lafayette, LA. The award, given on the basis of his masteis 
thesis and co-authored by Dr. Courtney T. Hackney of the 
biological sciences faculty, was titled "Utilization of 
Oligohaline rivulets by fishes and macrofaunal crustaceans i 
the Cape Fear Estuary, North Carolina." Also, Dr. Hackney! 
presented a paper co-authored by A. A. de la Cruz of Missis:}. 
State University entitled "Effects of winter fire on the p'j 
ductivity and species composition of two brackish marsh coi 
munities (1976-1980)." 



April is Open Enrollment Month for Prepaid Legal Services. The 
cost is $9.50 per month and is open to permanent employees. 
FRIDAY, APRIL 29, is the last day that enrollment applications 
will be accepted in the personnel office. The next open en- 
rollment period will be in October. 

The personnel office staff has recently compiled a comparison 
of the four tax-sheltered annuity programs offered to UNCW 
employees through payroll deduction. Copies are available by 
calling Ms. Maile at extension 2392. If you paid any addition- 
al federal or state income tax this year - maybe you should 
consider these tax shelter options. Pay yourself, not the 
government! 1 

Faculty members wishing to make changes regarding the 10 or 

12 month pay options must do so by July 1. The necessary forms 

may be picked up from the personnel office. 

All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets reflect- 
ing any type of premium pay (shift, holiday or overtime) must 
be in the personnel office no later than 10 a.m., Monday, May 2, 
Supervisors who do not meet this deadline cannot expect their 
employees to be paid on May 13. The personnel office will 
make one reminder call. 

Approval of a new area for the NC State Employees Association 
has been received for the three-county-area of New Hanover, 
Brunswick and Pender. The organizational meeting to elect 
officers and begin the new Area 26 will be held Wednesday, 
May n, at 7 p.m. in King Hall Auditorium. All NCSEA members 
are encouraged to attend and vote. All non-members are in- 
vited to attend and consider membership in the NCSEA. 

A welcome is extended to the newest SURF team employees, 
Todd Smith and Arthur (Pat) Webster, diving tenders. 

"Coastal Wetlands and Coastal Waters: Some Reflections on 
Twenty Years of Ecological Study" will be the topic of a 
seminar to be presented at noon, Monday, May 2, in MS-151. 
Guest speaker for the occasion is Dr. A. A. del la Cruz, wet- 
lands ecologist and professor of biological sciences at 
Mississippi State University. Faculty and staff are invited. 

Mrs. Delilah B. Blanks of the sociology faculty presented a 
paper, "Economic Development, What Role Can Social Organiza- 
tions and Churches Play?," at the annual Southeast Regional 
Urban Universities Urban Studies Conference held April 14-16 
in Charlotte. 



Professor Robert George will present a seminar, "Pressure- 
Temperature Acclimation Phenomena Versus Deep Sea Adaptations: 
A look at my old data & some new findings," Friday, April 29 
at 3:30 p.m. at the Institute for Marine Biomedical Research 
Seminar Room. The seminar will be followed by a 15 minute 
slide presentation entitled "1983 IMBR Antarctic Expedition - 
In the Midst of Whales, Seals, Penguins and Cormorants." 



LIBRARY 

EXAM 

SCHEDULE 



LIBRARY 
NOTES 



PAPER 
DELIVERED 



PREVIEW 
TOUR 



Thursday, April 28 

Friday, April 29 

Saturday, April 30 

Sunday, May 1 

Monday, May 2 - Thursday, May 5 

Friday, May 6 



The University Union will be open until midnight April 28 
May 4, Four study areas are available for student use. 



7:45 a.m. 


- mii 


7:45 a.m. 


- 6 1 


10 a.m. - 


6 p.i 


12 noon - 


midn 


7:45 a.m. 


- mil 


7:45 a.m. 


- 6 



Is due 
ng semes 
ons shou! 
k. Noti 
r to tho 
ty are e 
summer 

in orde 
Desk at 
e lists 
rve Desk 
serve fo 
lusion 

items . 



Faculty are reminded to return all library materia 
before May 6 to the library by the end of the spri 
Items which will be needed during the summer sessi 
be renewed by bringing them to the Circulation Des 
will be mailed after the end of the spring semeste 
who still have materials checked out. Also, facul 
couraged to prepare Reserve Reading Lists for the 
sessions as soon as possible. Lists are processed 
of receipt and should be submitted to the Reserve 
least one week prior to class assignments. Reserv 
should be submitted on forms available at the Rese 
or from departmental secretaries. Materials on re 
the spring semester will be removed after the cone 
exams unless the library is notified that the same 
will be needed for summer session reserve lists. 



D«. Lee Johnston and Lloyd Jones of the political science i 
faculty delivered a paper, "Institutional Leadership in No I 
Carolina" to the NC Political Science Association at UNC-G 
April 22. 

The Historic Foundation will host a House Beautiful Previe 
Tour May 8 from 2 - 5:30 p.m. The seven houses on tour wij 
appear in the June 1983 issue of HOUSE BEAUTIFUL and will '■ 
include Bellamy Mansion, Larkins House, Burgwin Wright Hou;, 
Clark House, Andrew Smith House, Honnet House and Governor 
Dudley Mansion. Advance tickets may be purchased at The 
Brass Lantern, Chandlers Wharf or No. 211 Antiques at 211 
Princess St. Admission charge is $7. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 35 
MAY 5, 1983 

An organizational and informational meeting of the N.C. State 
Employees Association will be held Wednesday, May 11, at 7:00 
p.m. in King Auditorium. All faculty and staff are welcome. 
NCSEA may be of interest to employees concerned with salary 
issues. 

Dr. Gary A. Olson, director of the Center for Writing in the 
English Department, has signed contracts with Random House 
publishers for two major, upper-level textbooks, one in busi- 
ness communications, one in technical writing. These will be 
Olson's fourth and fifth books. 

The Personnel Office staff has recently compiled a comparison 
of the four tax-sheltered annuity programs offered on the UNCW 
campus through payroll deduction. Copies are available from 
Ms. Maile at extension 2392. 

Faculty members who want to make changes regarding the 10- or 
12-month pay option must do so by July 1. Appropriate forms 
are available in the Personnel Office. Forms are not necessary 
for those continuing on the same pay option. 

Frank Cranor, a representative of the N.C. State Deferred Com- 
pensation Program, will be on campus Monday, May 9, in 208 
Alderman. For appointments, call extension 2160. 

All departments who want material in the Freshman Seahawk must 
submit articles to Alison Bartel, 202B in the University Union, 
no later than May 10, 1983. 

Gov. Hunt will be the featured speaker at the Southeastern 
North Carolina Regional Forum on Science and Technology to be 
held Tuesday, May 24, in the University Union on campus. With 
the theme "Passport to the Future through Science and Tech- 
nology: Mobilizing our Resources," the forum will include dis- 
cussions and exhibits to show how North Carolina's citizens can 
benefit from new technologies and scientific innovation. The 
forum will begin at 1 p.m. with a talk by Dr. Quentin Lindsey, 
executive director of the N.C. Board of Science and Technology. 
Three concurrent sessions will run from 3-4:15 p.m. Exhibits 
will be on display from 11 a.m. -6 p.m. in room 106 of the Uni- 
versity Union. All are welcome. More details later. 



HARKIN Sandra Harkin, director of the Career Planning and Placemen' 
PRESIDES Office, will be presiding at the annual meeting of the N,C.! 
Placement Association May 4-6, 1983, at the Wilmington Hiltj 
The association is comprised of individuals from business, 
dustry, and governmental and post-secondary institutions wh 
are involved in recruitment and placement in North Carolinai 

WILMINGTON The next meeting of the Wilmington Writers Forum Spring Rea 
WRITERS ing Series is Friday, May 6, at 8:00 p.m., room 201 in the 
FORUM University Union. Vern Moore will read poetry and Jerry Sei] 

will read fiction. Refreshments will be served at 9:00 p.m.' 
All are welcome. For more information, contact Charles Fortj 
director of UNCW's Creative Writing Program, at ext. 2329 c: 
392-3100. 



AAUP 
PICNIC 



The AAUP spring picnic will be held Friday, May 13, in the 
University Union courtyard and room 100, from 3:30-6:00 p.n! 
A special feature will be a presentation of Anne Russell's 
play. The Front Porch, in the courtyard. 



"RIBBON 

EDUCATION 

DAY" 



KEMPPAINEN, 

ROSENKOETTER 

HONORED 



Richard Cantwell, a representative of Carolina Ribbon, will 
conduct a workshop Tuesday, May 10, from 9-11 a.m. in room 
215 (Board Room) of Alderman Hall. The workshop will be cor 
cerned primarily with ribbons for electric and electronic 
typewriters, word processors and computers. All campus sec-i 
retaries are urged to attend. The second hour is reserved i 
problems, questions and answers. 

I 
Mrs. Jeanne Kemppainen and Dr. Marlene Rosenkoetter , of thff 
department of nursing, were inducted into the Beta Nu Chapl 
Sigma Theta Tau, on April 23. This is a national honor socij 
which recognizes excellence and leadership in nursing. ( 



WELCOME TO A warm UNCW welcome is extended to Elizabeth Reed, security 
EMPLOYEES officer in Campus Police Services; William Robinson and Ma: 

Covington, housekeeping assistants in the Physical Plant; 

Pamela Whitlock, administrative assistant in the Departmeni 

of Admissions. 



PROMOTIONS 



Teresa Harper and Ronetta Simpson are the new housekeeping 
team leaders in the Auxiliary Services Department. 



LASSITER 
TRANSFERS 



Judy Lassiter has transferred from library assistant in Li- 
brary Services to secretary in Career Planning and Placemei 



MEGIVERN Dr. James Megivern, chairman of the department of philosop] 

MODERATES and religion, was moderator of a program on Kierkegaard on 

April 23 in Winston-Salem, as part of the annual meeting o: 

the Society for the Philosophy of Religion. 



LINDQUIST A book entitled PREDATORS AND PREY IN FISHES, co-edited by 
BOOK David G. Lindquist, associate professor of biological sci- ; 

PUBLISHED ences, has been published by Dr. W. Junk Publishers, The | 
Hague. As the second in a series, the book contains the Pni 
ceedings of the 3rd Biennial Conference on the Ethology am! 
Behavioral Ecology of Fishes, held in May, 1981. The other 
co-editors are D.L.G. Noakes, University of Guelph, Canada 
and G.S. Helfman, University of Georgia. 



UNCW Students will make the 600-mile Mountains to the Sea 
Bicycle Tour starting at Murphy, N.C., Saturday, May 7. The 
ride is scheduled to last until Sunday, May 22. For infor- 
mation, call Dr. Robert Wolff, assistant professor of HPER, 
at ext. 2767. 



The North Carolina Symphony is now conducting its membership 
drive for the 1983-84 season. The following three concerts 
will be presented in Kenan Auditorium: 



Mon. 
Fri. 



Wed, 



Sept. 19 Pops Concert with G. Zimmerman, conductor 
Feb. 10 Showcase of N.C. Symphony players with 

James Ogle, conductor 
Mar. 21 Conductor Zimmerman with Gregory Fulkerson 

as guest violinist 



Please turn in any lost-and-found items to the Information 
Center in the University Union as soon as possible, so they 
may be claimed by their rightful owners. 

Please make the following two corrections on page 600-1 of 
your copy of the Central Stores Catalog: 

600-13011 should read — Transparencies, 8^ x 11, Clear, Type 

686, for Savin Copiers, 100/pkg 
600-13014 should read — Transparencies, Thermafax, Type 137, 

Blackline, Clear, #MP-34, 100/pkg 

Commencement practice for all UNCW graduates is scheduled 
for 10 a.m. Friday, May 13, in the gym in Hanover Hall. 

UNCW commencement exercises will take place at 10 a.m. Sat- 
urday, May 14, in Trask Coliseum. The public is invited. 

The first UNCW ROTC Commissioning Ceremonies will take place 
at 12:30 p.m. Saturday, May 14, in the University Union. 

Pinning ceremonies for all nursing graduates will take place 
at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 14, in room 100 of the University 
Union. 



Dr. Thomas V. Moseley, professor of history, delivered the 
Confederate Memorial Day address at Oakdale Cemetery May 1, 
to the Cape Fear Chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy; 
George Davis Camp, Sons of Confederate Veterans; and the 
George Davis Chapter, Children of the Confederacy. The sub- 
ject of Moseley 's address was "John Taylor Wood, Fighter." 

Sandy Rogers, secretary in the Office of Information Systems, 
would like to thank everyone who sent cards and flowers to 
her family last week after the death of her father. 



^t 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 36 
MAY 12, 1983 



'ARKER AT 
ISSFNS SESSION 



iOLISEUM 
lOSES 



iniversity 
;ets new 

,DDRESS 



ATE 

:ECEIVES 

IQCTGRATE 



A Student College Interview Session sponsored by the 
National Scholarship Service and Fund for Negro Students 
was held May 6 at the Philadelphia Center Hotel. Ralph 
H. Parker, director of the office of minority affairs, 
participated in the session which was designed to re- 
cruit students. Approximately 3,500 black students from 
Delaware, New Jersey and the Philadelphia area attended. 

Trask Coliseum will close at 4 p.m., Friday, May 13, 
in preparation for coiraiencement activities on Saturday 
morning. 

Effective immediately - all university mail should be 
addressed to 601 S. College Road. The Post Office Box 
3725 and zip of 28406 IS NO LONGER IN EFFECT. All mail 
will be delivered to the university on a truck or van 
directly from the main post office located downtown. All 
university departments are asked to inform their regular 
correspondents of the new UNCW mailing address which is 
as follows: 

(Department Name) 

UNCW 

601 S. College Road 

Wilmington, NC 28403-3297 

Student mail should be addressed in the following manner: 

(Student's name) 
UNCW 

P. 0. Box (individual box #) 
UNCW Station 

Wilmington, NC (new zip code/box #) 
A separate zip will be assigned for student boxed mail only. 

Uday S. Tate of the department of management and marketing 
has been awarded the degree of Doctor of Business Adminis- 
tration in Marketing at the University of Tennessee. His 
dissertation was entitled "Construct Validity of the Ex- 
pectancy-Value Model of the Functional Theory of Attitude." 
Congratulations Dr. Tatel 



DR. GEORGE AT 
INTERNATIONAL 
SYMPOSIUM 



WALKER TO 
PARTICIPATE 
IN SEMINAR 



GALIZIO 

PAPER 

PUBLISHED 



CONTRACT 
SIGNED 



PAPER 
ACCEPTED 



DR. CAHOON 
SPEAKS ON 
SURF 



REGIONAL 

FORUM 



Dr. Robert Y. George, professor of biological sciences 
IMBR, will give the opening lecture during the Second 
national Krill Symposium at Bremerhaven, West Germany, 
May 16. He will also serve as session chairman during 
conference. In addition he will be a guest professor . 
Cambridge University in England the last week of this i 

Lewis Walker of the English department will parti ci pat 
an NEH Summer Seminar directed by Marjorie Garber of 
Harvard University entitled "Shakespeare and the Probl 
of Genre." 

Mark Galizio of the psychology department has had a pa 
"Effects of naloxone on acquisition and extinction of 
up avoidance behavior in rats," published in LEARNING 
MOTIVATION, Vol. 14, 1983. The paper was co-authored j 
two former students, Susan Gore and Polly Sanderson, j 

Gerald R. Weeks, assistant professor of psychology, ha 
signed a contract for second translation of his book, , 
Paradoxical Psychotherapy , in Italian. I 

Dr. Walter Shelburne of the philosophy & religion facu! 
has had a paper accepted for publication in The Journa j 
Analytical Psychology . The paper is entitled "A Critiq 
of James Hillman's Approach to the Dream." 

Dr. Lawrence Cahoon, assistant professor of biologicalj 
sciences, delivered a presentation entitled "SURF - | 
North Carolina's Research Diving Facility during the [{ 
University Alumni Weekend April 28-30 at the Duke Univ 
sity Marine Laboratory in Beaufort, NC. In addition l| 
being involved in five missions with SURF this year, [ 
Cahoon will be teaching a course. Introduction to Biol| 
gical Oceanography, at the Duke Marine Lab this summer} 
Also, he will be a guest investigator at the Woods Holf 
Oceanographic Institution for the summer. I 

t 
Governor Hunt will be the featured speaker at the Sou1j< 

eastern North Carolina Regional Forum on Science and | 
Technology to be held Tuesday, May 24, in the Univers-j( 
Union. With the theme, "Passport to the Future throutf; 
Science and Technology: Mobilizing our Resources," til 
forum will include discussions and exhibits to show h(|, 
citizens of NC can benefit from new technologies and |i 
scientific innovation. The forum will begin at 2 p.m: 
with a talk by Dr. Quentin Lindsey, executive director) 
the NC Board of Science and Technology. Three concur';! 
sessions will run from 3:00 - 4:15 p.m. Exhibits wil b 
on display from 11:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. in room 106 of i 
University Union. Open to the public. 



SCHOONER 
IN TOWN 



The STAR GATE, tall ship, two masted 95 year old Afrii 
schooner will be docked at Water Front Park TODAY thn 3 
Tuesday, May 17. The Wilmington Department of Parks : 
Recreation invites all faculty and staff to come aboa 
for a visit. 



Employees on ten month pay option who received notification 
April 26 regarding payment on July and August premiums 
need to send their personal checks for premiums to the 
personnal office by June 24 for July coverage and July 22 
for August coverage. 

Governor Jim Hunt has proclaimed May 16-20 as "Employee 
Appreciation Week," All university employees are sent a 
"big thank you" for their continuous efforts on behalf 
of UNCW. 

Mr. Frank Cranor will be on campus May 23 in Alderman Hall 
room 208 to discuss tax sheltered annuities. Call ext. 
2160 for an appointment. 

Faculty members wishing to make changes regarding the 10 
or 12 month pay option must do so by July 1. Appropriate 
forms may be picked up from the personnel office. Forms 
are not necessary for those electing to continue on the 
same pay option. 

A UNCW welcome is extended to Linda C. Woodcock, clerk 
typist, in the department of athletics. 



MEDICAL INSURANCE FACTS EVERYONE NEEDS TO KNOW 



If you have a dependent who has reached age 19 and is 
continuing his/her education - please complete a change 
form to indicate this change. 

Please do not forget to complete a change form adding 
NEW BORN and the EXPECTED DELIVERY DATE prior to the 
8th month of pregnancy. After the delivery you will 
need to complete another change form showing child's 
full name, sex, birthday, etc. 

To continue a handicapped child on your insurance after 
the age of 19 you will need to complete a change form 
and attach a letter from the child's physician. 

When completing claim forms fill in all information 
requested and write or print legibly. 

In order for continued coverage and prompt processing 
of claims, do not forget to inform EDS of changes con- 
cerning you or your dependents coverage. You may pick 
up the appropriate forms at the personnel office. In 
the event of questions call Dianne Smith at extension 
2162. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC by the esea' 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 37 
MAY 19, 1983 



The CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE will continue to be published through- 
out the summer months. Since many of our employees will be 
away during this time — a limited number of CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE copies will be sent to each department. Normal 
distribution will resume in the fall. All items for the 
CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE should be sent to Patsy Larrick in the 
University Union. 

Movie tickets are on sale at the Information Center in the 
University Union during normal operating hours. Tickets 
are $2 and available to any student, faculty or staff mem- 
ber with a valid I.D. Tickets will be accepted at all 
Stewart & Everett Theatres throughout NC. 

Mr. Frank Cranor, representative of the NC State Deferred 
Compensation Program, will be on campus May 23 in Alderman 
Hall, room 208 to discuss tax sheltered annuities. For 
additional information or an appointment call ext. 2160. 

The Southeastern North Carolina Regional Forum on Science 
and Technology will meet Tuesday, May 24, in the Univer- 
sity Union. Exhibits featuring high technology applica- 
tions will be open from 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Dr. Quentin 
Lindsey of the NC Board of Science and Technology will give 
opening remarks at 2 p.m. followed by three concurrent 
sessions dealing with Mobilizing Community Resources to Im- 
prove Science and Mathematics Education; A Cooperative 
Effort to Improve Research and Higher Education; and the 
Challenge of Technological Innovation: Planning for Change. 
Governor James B. Hunt will present the keynote address at 
4:45 p.m. followed by a reception in the exhibit area. 
Dr. Harold Keller, chairman of the event, and Dr. Jim 
Edmundson, co-chairman, encourage all faculty and staff 
to attend. For additional information call ext. 2810. 



EMPLOYEE 
WEEK 



DR. FRIDAY 
ON CAMPUS 



CONSULTANT 
TO SPEAK 



TRASK 

CLOSES 

EARLY 

DR. MOSELEY 
SPEAKS 



FACULTY TO 
PARTICIPATE 
IN DEBATE 



OFFICERS 
ELECTED 



Governor James Hunt has proclaimed May 16-20 as "Employe^ 
Appreciation Week." All university employees are extendi 
a "Thank you" for their continuous efforts on behalf of 

Dr. William C. Friday will bring to UNCW and Southeaster 
NC a multi-media presentation and discussion of the NC 2; 
report Wednesday, June 8, at 7:30 p.m., in Kenan Auditor 
Part of the evening will include a 20-minute computerize! 
multi-media slide/sound presentation. Narrated by Presi 
Friday, the show presents in pictures a brief descriptio; 
of the NC 2000 process and recommendations for North Car 
lina's future. 

Juan Gutierrez, international training consultant, will | 
cuss "Human Resource Development in the 1980'^' at the Ma' 
meeting of The Cape Fear Chapter of The American Society 
Training and Development May 26 at the Heart of Wilmingtj 
Faculty and staff are invited. For additional informatij 
call Dr. Wade Cooper at ext. 2369. 

Physical education facilities will close at 2 p.m. TODAY; 
preparation for the appearance of the Rev. Jesse Jacksonj 
TONIGHT in Trask Coliseum. \ 

Dr. Thomas V. Moseley of the history faculty presented a: 
lecture, "Life in the Soviet Union," to Mrs. Kay Williamj 
G-T class at Topsail Middle School May 16. Also, Dr. i 
Moseley presented a paper on "Civil War Infantry Tactics^; 
Assault of a Fortified Position" during the Confederate i 
Historical Institute meeting held May 5-9 in Murfreesbor| 
TN. 

Dr. Melton McLaurin, chairman of the history department, 
and Dr. James Megivern, chairman of the philosophy and 
religion department, will participate in a debate on nu- 
clear weapons May 22 at 6 p.m. on Channel 6. Drs. McLau 
and Megivern will be speaking in favor of a freeze on 
nuclear weapons while "Red" McDaniel and Victor Sizemore 
will speak against the freeze. 

The following members of Phi Kappa Phi, the university-w 
scholastic honor society, have been elected officers for 
the 1983-84 academic year: 



President : 
Vice-President: 
Sec-Treasurer: 
Public Relations: 



Dr. James J. Megivern 

Or. Thaddeus G. Dankel 

Dr. W. Lee Johnston 

Dr. Charles W. West 



POET WINS 
AWARD 



WELCOME 

BABY 

KECHLEY 



Charles Fort, assistant professor of English, has won Th 
Place in the Charlotte Writer's Club Awards for his poen 
The Poet Burning. Mr. Fort will read the poem at the Ch 
lotte Writers Conference scheduled for May 21 at Queens 
College. 

David and Jerilee Kechley of the Creative Arts Departmer 
music division are pleased to announce the birth of thei 
daughter, Anthea Gabrielle, May 10. Ms. Kechley arrivec 
11:58 p.m. and weighed in at 8 lbs. 11 ozs. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv the csea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 38 
MAY 26, 1983 



Dr. William C. Friday will bring to UNCW and Southeastern NC 
a multi -media presentation and discussion of the NC 2000 re- 
port Wednesday, June 8, at 7:30 p.m., in Kenan Auditorium. 
Part of the evening will include a 20-minute computerized 
multi-media slide/sound presentation. Narrated by President 
Friday, the show presents in pictures a brief description 
of the North Carolina 2000 process and recommendations for 
North Carolina's future. All faculty and staff along with 
their families are encouraged to participate. 

Faculty, staff and student identification cards and I.D. 
validation stickers are now being issued in the University 
Union. See Chyrl Ferguson in room 214 or call at extension 
2285 for additional information. 

A welcome is extended to Marshall Humphrey, duplicating 
equipment operator in the department of purchasing services, 
and Vernetta Brightmon, clerk stenographer III in the General 
College Advising Center. 

Operating hours for the University Union during summer school 
sessions are listed as follows: 

Monday - Friday 7 a.m. - 10 p.m. 
Saturday and Sunday 12 noon to 10 p.m. 

The following programs will be held in Kenan Auditorium: 

Cape Fear Technical Institute Commencement exercises at 8 p.m. 
TONIGHT. 

Becky's Dancing School recital at 7:30 p.m. May 28. 

YWCA Dance recital 7:30 p.m. nightly May 30 and 31. 

New Hanover High School band concert 3 p.m. May 29. Admis- 
sion charge. 

Summer school registration for the first summer session will 
be May 31 in Trask Coliseum. 



GRADUATION Elder Hostel Graduation will be held May 27 at 8 p.m. in thi 
IN UNION University Union, room 201. 

PAPER TO BE Dr. David Shevach, assistant professor of social work, has 
PRESENTED a paper entitled "Aesthetics and Social Welfare" accepted 
for presentation at the National Association of Social Work 
Professional Symposium to be held in Washington, D.C. in 
November. The NASW Professional Symposium is the largest 
social work conference in the world. 



OUTDOOR The Wilmington Parks and Recreation Dept. will host a serie 
CONCERTS of summer concerts at the Greenfield Park Amphitheatre. Th 
first concert scheduled for May 28 will feature the beach 
sounds of Buddy Skipper and the Jetty Jumpers along with a 
variety of tunes from Reggae to Beach from the Bon Voyage 
Band. The concert begins at 3 p.m. and will end at 8:30 p. 
Advance tickets are $6 and may be purchased from School Kid 
the Record Bar and the Community Arts Center. Tickets at 
the door will be $8. For information on the other concerts 
call 763-9871. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the esea' 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 39 
JUNE 2, 1983 



FRIDAY ON Dr. William C. Friday will bring to UNCW and Southeastern NC 
CAMPUS a multi-media presentation and discussion of the NC 2000 re- 

FOR NC port Wednesday, June 8, at 7:30 p.m., in Kenan Auditorium. 

2000 Part of the evening will include a 20-minute computerized 

multi-media slide/sound presentation. Narrated by President 
Friday, the show presents in pictures a brief description of 
the North Carolina 2000 process and recommendations for 
North Carolina's future. All faculty and staff along with their 
families are encouraged to participate. 



TRAVEL When requesting a state vehicle - completely fill out and submit 

REQUEST the Travel Request and Invoice form as soon as possible prior 
to needing the vehicle. The forms, available from the physical 
plant, should be submitted in triplicate. Refer to the UNIVERSITY 
PROCEDURES MANUAL, pages F.I - 1 through F. 1 - ^ for 
for instructions. The following Information must be included on 
the Travel Request - otherwise, vehicles will not be released: 

Signature of authorizing individual 
Budget code 

Valid drivers license number 
Signature of operator 



STAFF Margaret G. Shelton is the new IMBR research assistant for 

MEMBERS nervous systems. Ellis Mitchell, general utility worker, and 

Roland Simmons, housekeeping supervisor, are new staff 

members in the physical plant. 

KELLER Dr. Harold W. Keller, chairman of the planning team for the 

EXPRESSES Southeastern Regional Forum on Science and Technology, 
THANKS would like to thank the entire university community for its 

cooperation and support of the successful forum held in the 

University Union on May Zk. 



KENAN The NHHS High School {Hanover Singers) will perform TONIGHT 

EVENTS at 8. Admission charge. 

The Laney High School Choral Department will host a spring 
concert June 3 at 8 p.m. Admission charge. 

Dance Recital - Arleen and Donna's School of Dance June 4 
at 3:30 & 7:30 p.m. Free, 

Dance Recital - Dian's Dance World June 6 at 7:30 p.m. Free. 

Dance Recital - Joanne Burnett School of Dance June 7 at 
7:30 p.m. Free. 

UNION Operating hours for the University Union during summer school 

HOURS sessions are listed as follows: 

Monday - Friday 7 a.m. - 10 p.m. 

Saturday and Sunday 12 noon to 10 p.m. 



I.D.'S Faculty, staff and student identification cards and I.D. valida- 

ISSUED tion stickers are presently being issued in the University Union. 

IN UNION See ChyrI Ferguson in room 2H or call at extension 2285 for 

additional information. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the csea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 40 
JUNE 9, 1983 



Congratulations to the following employees who have been 
promoted. Margaret Shelton, research assistant - Nervous 
Systems at IMBR; Ellis Mitchell, general utility worker, 
and Roland Simmons, housekeeping supervisor in the physi- 
cal plant. 

Faculty members who would like to make changes regarding 
the 10 or 12 month pay options must do so by July 1. The 
necessary forms may be picked up from the personnel office. 

A welcome is extended to John B. Ragins, housekeeping 
assistant in the physical plant and Joseph Johnson, direc- 
tor of security and traffic, in the department of (jolicc 
services. 

The Wilmington City Council has appointed Dr. Phillip 
McGuire, assistant professor of history, an Alternate on 
the Zoning Board of Adjustment. 

The summer concert series hosted by the Wilmington Parks 
and Recreation Department will present Shady Grove, a 
band from Chapel Hill, June 11 from 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. at 
the Greenfield Park Amphitheatre. Admission is $1. For 
further information call 762-1198. 

Atlantic Coast Physique Championship Show June 11 at 8 p.m. 
Auditions for UNCW Straw-Hat Theatre June 13 & 14 7:30 p.m. 
UNCW Freshman Orientation begins June 16 at 12:30 p.m. 

Dr. Gary Olson, director of the center for writing, has 
had a paper accepted for the Second Annual Conference on 
Sentence Combining to be held this fall at Miami Univer- 
sity of Ohio. Olson's paper is one of ten from a field 
of 99 submissions accepted. All ten papers will be pub- 
lished in ANTHOLOGY by Illinois University Press. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC by the esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 41 
JUNE 23, 1983 



All June time sheets for permanent employees should be in the 
personnel office before 5 p.m. July 1 to insure proper compu- 
tation of vacation and sick leave balances as of June 30, 1983. 
Those planning vacation for the week of June 27 - July 1 
should forward time sheets to the personnel office on June 24 
to meet the July 1 deadline. Any questions should be direct- 
ed to Dianne Smith at extension 2162. 

The campus police requests that any department hosting out- 
side groups notify, the campus police office prior to the func- 
tion. This information will help find the participants, in 
the event of an emergency. Desk officers handle all switch- 
board calls after 5 p.m. each weekday and throughout the 
weekends. 

Professional Food Management would like to announce the 
opening of the new dining facility July 11 located in the 
University Union. 

Derick G.S. Davis, retired assistant professor in the depart- 
ment of health, physical education and recreation, waR voted 
Emeritus status by the university's board of trustees at their 
spring meeting. 

New employees at UNCW include Mary Raymer, library assistant 
in Randall Library; Wayne D. Peterson, general utility worker 
and Vincent 5. Tryer, HVAC mechanic in the physical plant; 
Barbara L. Troy and James N. Pollock, locker room attendants 
in the department of athletics. 

Faculty members who would like to make changes regarding the 
10 or 12 month pay options must do so by July 1, 1983. The 
forms may be picked up from the personnel office, 

Gary Olson, director of the Center for Writing, will discuss 
"Teaching Language and Composition" at the North Carolina 
English Teachers Association Conference to be held in 
September. 



ROSENKOETTER Dr. Marlene M. Rosenkoetter, chairman of the department ol 
ADDRESSES nursing and president of the NC League for Nursing, dis- 
GROUP cussed "New Avenues for Programming" at the Southern Regi( 

Assembly of Constituent Leagues during the National Leagui 
for Nursing Annual Convention held recently in Philadelph: 
Also, Dr. Rosenkoetter has had her research article, "Per- 
ceptions of Nurse Educators Regarding ADN and BSN General 
Education," published in the WESTERN JOURNAL OF NURSING 
RESEARCH. The article was co-authored by Maryellen McSwei 
professor of research methodology, at St. Louis Universit 

STUDENTS Please refer to the UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES MANUAL number 
ON SUMMER G.8-1 through G.8-4 if your department plans to have a st 
PAYROLL dent on the payroll who will not be taking courses this 
summer but plans to continue their employment during the 
summer session. The personnel office will need two weeks 
notice prior to the employee's reporting date along with 
following information: 



a. 
b. 



c. 

d. 



NC State application, completed and signed 

listing of five major tasks in the temporar 

position 

W-4 form, completed and signed 

account number from which salary will be 

paid 



DR. KOCHHAR 

RECEIVES 

AWARD 



GRANTS 

AWARDED 

UNCW 



Dr. Medha Kochhar, computer instructor for the office of 
special programs, was awarded the North Carolina Associa- 
tion of Educators Distinguished Service Award during a 
ceremony at Gregory School recently. The award was pre- 
sented in recognition of her efforts in recruiting parent 
volunteers at Gregory School for the 1982-83 school year. 
The award was one of seven NCAE distinguished service 
awards presented this year throughout the state. 

UNCW has been awarded the following grants for research: 

$10,400 by the Griffis Foundation, Inc., for 
continued support of research underway at IMBR. The re- 
search, "Physiological Basis of Acclimation of Aquatic 
Animals to High Pressures," is under the direction of Dr. 
Ralph Brauer, IMBR director. 

$16,308 by the US Army Corps of Engineers for 
study of "Colonial Waterbird Habitats and Nesting Pop- 
ulations in NC Estuaries" with Dr. James F. Parnell as 
principal investigator. 

$20,783 by the National Science Foundation to 
be used to purchase a microcomputer controlled system for 
use in behavioral research projects aimed at better undei' 
standing how endorphins work and how they affect behavioi 
Principal investigators of the project are Dr. J. Mark 
Galizio and Dr. Michael Perone. j 



BOOKSTORE 
CLOSES FOR 
INVENTORY 



The University Bookstore will be closed Wednesday, June 
for inventory. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XII, NUMBER 42 
JUNE 30, 1983 



Professional Food Management would like to announce the 
July 11 opening of the new dinina facility in the 
University Union. 

SPA employees and EPA-Administrative employees planning 
to take leave in June should have their timesheets in 
the personnel office by 5 p.m. July 1. This is neces- 
sary to meet special fiscal year-end requirements of 
the state accounting system. 

IT IS MOST IMPORTANT THAT NO ONE LEAVE CAMPUS 
THIS WEEK WITHOUT SIGNING AND FORWARDING TIME- 
SHEETS TO THE PERSONNEL OFFICE. 

Timesheets for temporary or permanent employees who are 
due shift premium, overtime or extra hours of pay are 
due at 10 a.m., July 1. The personnel staff will give 
supervisors one courtesy phone call regarding the dead- 
line. 

Permanent full-time employees are eligible for a tuition 
waiver of one course per semester. The waiver forms 
should be processed 30 days prior to the beginning of the 
semester. IMPORTANT--You must first go through the Ad- 
missions process before tuition waiver approval. 

New employees at UNCW include: Ellen P. Servetnick, stu- 
dent center program director in the University Union; and 
William L. Robinson, housekeeping assistant in the depart- 
ment of auxiliary services. 

Faculty members who would like to make changes regarding 
the 10 or 12 month pay options must do so by July 1. 
The necessary forms may be picked up from the personnel 
office. 

TODAY IS PAY DAY 



STAFF The following UNCW employees have successfully completed r 
COMPLETES quirements for the American Red Cross CPR course taught by 
COURSE James Dillon and sponsored by Al Barry, director of safety 
at UNCW: 

William H. Chipps, Jr. 

Fred W. Green, Jr. 

William H. Loughlin 

Mary D. Reid ' 

Joseph M. Johnson, Jr. 

Arnold A. Siko j 

Alison L. Bartel j 

i 

MCGUIRE Phillip McGuire of the history faculty delivered a speech) 
DELIVERS June 24 to ALERT, a newly-formed community based organiza-j 
SPEECH tion in Brunswick County. Dr. McGuire spoke on "A Crisis | 
in the Black Community." 

WOODHOUSE Dr. William Woodhouse of the modern languages department 
GIVES delivered a lecture, "Las empresas internacionales y las 
LECTURE lenguas extra jeras," during the 1983 Graduate Language 

Institute in Spanish held June 27 at UNC-Greensboro. Alscj 
he presented a slide lecture entitled "Del 23-F al 28-0" 
for students of Spanish at the North Carolina School of 
Science and Mathematics May 26. 



PSYCHOLOGY 
FACULTY AT 
CONVENTION 



STUDENTS 
ON SUMMER 
PAYROLL 



Mark Galizio and Michael Perone of the psychology faculty 
represented UNCW at the ninth annual convention of the 
Association for Behavior Analysis in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
last month. Both were invited speakers in the symposium 
on conceptual issues in the experimental analysis of 
human behavior. Dr. Galizio's paper was entitled "In- 
structions and Contingencies: How Powerful is Instruc- 
tional Control?" Dr. Perone 's paper was entitled "Find- 
ing an Audience for Human Operant Behavior." 

Please refer to the UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES MANUAL number 
G,8-l through G,8-4 if your department plans to have a 
student on the payroll who will not be taking courses 
this summer but plans to continue their employment dur- 
ing the summer session. The personnel office will need 
two weeks notice prior to the employee's reporting date 
along with the following information: 



i 



a. NC State application, completed and signed 

b. listing of five major tasks in the temporary 
position 

c. W-'i form, completed and signed 

d. account number from which salary will be 
paid 



STRAW 

HAT 

THEATRE 



Season tickets for the UNCW Straw Hat Theatre productions 
are on sale in Kenan Auditorium. This summer's perfor- 
mances will feature "Snoopy" July 14-17; "Whose Life Is It 
Anyway?" July 21-24; "The Royal Family" July 28-31; "The 
Silver Revue" August 4-7 and "Harold and Maude" August !!■ 
All performances will be at 8:30 nightly in Kenan Auditori 
Season tickets $16; single $4. For additional information 
call Doug Swink at extension 2442 or 791-9695. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 1 
JULY 19, 198'f 



ANDWICH 
FECIAL 



\OOK 
MAILABLE 



F'S A BOY! 



ESULTS 
IVEN 



R. MORGAN 
LECTED 




The University Union Snack bar presents Mary's Homestyle Tomato 
Sandwich Special/includes a small drink for $1. The special, 
served daily from 11 a.m. to 1 pjn^ starts today and ends 
Wednesday, July 25. 

Dr. Hubert Eaton, physician and member of the UNCW Board of 
Trustees, has published his memoirs. Every Man Should Try. The 
book, printed in hardback and paperback, is an account of Dr. 
Eaton's struggles in Wilmington as a black doctor seeking equal 
opportunities for his black patients and seeking opportunities 
to obtain staff privileges for black doctors at the county hospital. 
The book also recounts his mentoring and tutelage of Wimbledon 
tennis star Althea Gibson. Books may be purchased from Dr. 
Eaton's office located at i^ll N. 7th St, the UNCW Bookstore, 
The Bookery at the Cotton Exchange and Belk Beery. 

Charles and Sherry King are pleased to announce the arrival of 
their son, Garrett Charles, on July I'f. Garrett weighed 8 lbs. 
Mom, Dad and Son are doing quite well!! 

Dr. Sybil Miller, assistant professor of chemistry, presented re- 
sults in a poster session on butyrylcholinesterases at the Gordon 
Conference on Enzymes, Coenzymes, and Metabolic Pathways 
held in Meriden, NH, July 2-6. Her paper was entitled "The 
effects of low pH and amonium sulfate on butyrylcholinesterases." 

Dr. John E. Morgan, assistant professor of economics and finance, 
has been selected to attend an economics conference July 29 - 
August 16. The conference, "Recent Developments in Applied 
Economics," is conducted by the Graduate School of Business at 
the University of Chicago and is supported by funds from the 
General Electric Foundation. Morgan was one of 'fO people 
selected nationwide to attend. 



The State Legislature HAS approved a 10% across-the-board Legis- 
lative increase for all SPA employees. The raise, effective July 1, 
will be reflected in the July 31 paychecks. 



SOFTWARE The Lotus Development Corporation is currently offering a 60% 

REDUCED discount on Lotus 1-2-3 and Symphony software to all state 

educational facilities. The discounted prices are $198.00 and 
$279.00 respectively. The software is designed for the IBM 
PC and the Rainbow Computer. A mimimun of six units is re- 
quired to take advantage of the discounted price. Purchasing 
Services will hold reauisitions until August 1 or until six order? 
have been received. For additional information call Dolores 
Harvey at Ext. 3158. , 

NCSEA Effective 3uly 1 the North Carolina State Employees Associatii 

CHANGES became the State Employees of North Carolina (5ENC). A mer 

NAME with NCSEA, DOT, the Highway Department and Corrections 

prompted the name change. District 38, New Hanover, Pender 
Brunswick Counties, has a membership of 615. Total membersh 
statewide is over 'f5,000 making SENC the largest state employ 
association in the United States. All members are encouraged 
attend the amual District 38 meeting of SENC on Thursday, | 
August 2, in the snack bar located downstairs in the Universit>| 
Union. A social hour beginning at 6:30 pjn. will feature free ' 
beverages, hors d'oeuvres, and entertainment. The meeting will 
start at 7:30 p.m. with the election of officers for the 8'f-85 ' 
fiscal year. For more information call Charlie King at Ext. 31< 
Sharon Brewington at Ext. 3250 or Patsy Larrick at Ext. 3169. 



TRAVEL 
DUTIES 



Effective immediately, Jean Mixon of the accounting office wil 
responsible for pending travel reimbursements and advances. 
Travel functions will be supervised by Janice Whitten of the ac 
counting office. All requests for travel advances and reimburse 
ments should be directed to Ms. Mixon at Ext. 3149 or Mrs. Whi 
at Ext. 31^*8. 



NEW 
EMPLOYEES 



FRINGE 
BENEFITS 



Welcome to the following new employees: 

Robert R. Hughes - Housekeeping Staff i 

David A. Dinsmore -SURF Diving Supervisor J 

Stanley Edwards - Analyst Programmer assigned to Syst€| 
Accounting ' 

Jerry B. Falls - SURF Research Vessel Captain i 

Gail Young - Coordinator of Residence Life \: 

Employees on ten month pay options are asked to make arrang€| 
ments for payments on fringe benefits for August coverage by 
Monday, July 23. 



FOR RENT 



Apartment/townhouse at the beach 
31. Call 395-3260 or 256-3023. 



available August 1 - Marc 



ROOMMATE 



Lydia Rector of the psychology department is looking for a 
roommate to share rent and utilities. Call her at Ext. 3370. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



by the sea 




BRARY/ARCHIVES 1 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 2 
AUGUST 2, I9itt 



(-ALTON 
APPOINTED 



'ARKING 
)ECALS 



lOTORPOOL 
MCREASE 



ENC TO 
lEET 



ARMER 
WARDED 



O PAPER 
EXT WEEK 



Bob Walton, director of financial services, has been appointed 
acting vice chancellor for business affairs. Both he and Barbara 
Harlow have relocated to room 118 in Alderman Hall. They 
may be reached at extension 3139. 

UNCW parking decals for 198'f-85 are presently on sale in the 
parking office located in Belk Hall. The cost will be $'f6. 
There will be a $10 fee for registering a second car. For ad- 
ditional information call Cornelia Royal at extension 3537. 

Motorfleet Management in Raleigh has announced a [<;: per mile 
increase in their mileage charge to UNCW effective July 1. 
As a result, the physical plant finds it necessary to pass this 
l( increase on to the using departments. The new charge for 
sedans and wagons will be 21C per mile effective with the 
August billings, reflecting July usage. The current charge of 
30<: per mile for the van will not increase at this time. 

The annual meeting of State Employees of North Carolina, for- 
merly known as the North Carolina State Employees Associa- 
tion, will meet TONIGHT in the snack bar located in the 
University Union. A social hour beginning at 6:30 pjn. will 
offer free beverages, hors d'oeuvres and entertainment. The 
meeting will start at 7:30 p.m. with the election of officers 
for the new fiscal year. All members are invited. For addi- 
tional information call Patsy Larrick at extension 3169. 

Jean Farmer, publications officer, was recently presented the 
Excellence In Design Certificate by the Beckett Paper Company. 
The award was given for outstanding professional achievement 
in her standards of design in the creative use of printing 
papers. 

THERE WILL NOT BE A CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE ON 
THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, DUE TO RENOVATIONS BEING 
DONE IN THE UNIVERSITY PRINTSHOP. 



LUNDEEN The North Carolina Board of Science and Technology has awarded 

RECEIVES a grant of $8,098 to Dr. Carl Lundeen of the biological sciences 

GRANT department to develop a laboratory course in Recorribinant DNA 

Techniques. The course, scheduled to begin spring semester, I985j 
will utilize cloning and analysis systems as students are taught 
methods for growing and isolating cloning vectors, for cleaving 
DNA into fragments which can be moved from one vector to 
another, and for selecting constructed molecules. The award will 
provide finds to purchase laboratory equipment and supplies. 

GUEST Allan D. Louden, on leave from Wake Forest University to com- 

SPEAKER plete requirements for his Ph.D. at the University of Southern 

California, was the guest speaker during a political science 
seminar held on campus July 27. He discussed political campaign 
strategies to Dr. Lee Johnson's class in Southern Politics. 

THEODORE Dr. Terry Theodore, professor of drama in the Creative Arts 

ON WAAV Department, is film, theatre and restaurant critic and can be 

heard weekly on WAAV Radio (980 AM) at 8:15 on Friday 

mornings. 

AEROBICS The Office of Special Programs is offering "Summer Aerobics 

CONTINUED Continued" on Tuesdays and Thursdays, August 2 - 21, at 

5:30 pjn. Cost is $10. All faculty and staff interested in taking 
the course should sign up in the Office of Special Programs 
located in Hoggard Hall TODAY. 

PRINTSHOP The University Printshop will be closed the week of August 6-10 j 

TO CLOSE due to heating and air-conditioning renovations. They will re- j 

NEXT WEEK open August 13 with no future closings anticipated. The print- 

shop staff appreciates the cooperative attitude shown by its 
users and regrets any inconvenience or delays resulting from 
the renovations. For assistance regarding emergency printing 
contact Charles Sanders, director of purchasing, at extension 
3158. 

SANDWICH A "Bologna Club" sandwich for $1.65 is the University Union's 

SPECIAL snackbar special starting today and ending Wednesday, 

August 8. 

HOME FOR Three bedroom, two bath home in Tanglewood area for rent. 

RENT $t^75 per month. Call Dr. Bartolome at 799-4832 or 762-572^^. 

MEGIVERN Dr. James J. Megivern, chairman of the philosophy & religion 

SPEAKS department, was a featured speaker during the 1984 Southeastern 

World Affairs Institute held last week at Warren Wilson College 
in Swannanoa, NC. Sponsored annually by the American Freedorr 
Association, the Institute is partially funded by the NC 
Humanities Committee. 



MOSELEY Dr. Thomas V. Moseley of the department of history delivered 

DELIVERS a lecture July 27 to the United Daughters of the Confederacy 

LECTURE and Sons of Confederate Veterans in Whiteville. He spoke on 

"President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation." 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 3 
AUGUST 16, 198'f 



GYMS 
CLOSED 



BRAUER 
NAMED 



SEPTEMBER 
CALENDAR 



REVISIONS 
RE-ROUTED 



PARKING 
DECALS 



3R. EATON TO 
51GN BOOKS 



^lOSELEY 
5PEAKS 
ro GROUP 



The floors of Trask and Hanover Hall are currently being re- 
finished. Both gyms will be closed until Tuesday, August 28. 
Racquetball courts are still open. All participants of the 
athletic facility are asked to avoid the arena areas during 
this time. 

Dr. Ralph W. Brauer, director of IMBR, has been named to the 
editorial board of the Journal of Applied Physiology, a scholarly 
publication of The American Physiological Society. Dr. Brauer 
has also received an appointment as a guest scientist at the 
Naval Medical Research Institute at Bethesda, MD, to collabo- 
rate with Dr. A. 3. Bachrach in the Environmental Stress 
Program Center. 

All items for inclusion in the September "UNCW" Calendar of 
Events should be sent to the Development Office located in 
UU-209 no later than AUGUST 29. 

All requests for departmental budget revisions should be sent 
to the office of systems and budgeting located in A-207. For 
additional information call Suzanne Bulla at ext. 3772. 

UNCW parking decals for 198'f-85 are presently on sale. The 
cost will be $^6. There will be a $10 fee for registering a 
second car. For information call Cornelia Royal in the parking 
office. 

Dr. Hubert Eaton, author of "Every Man Should Try," will 
conduct a book signing session August 18 from 1 - 3 pjn. 
at Belk Beery. 

Dr. Thomas Moseley, professor of history, presented a program 
July 19 on The Battle of Antietam to the George Davis 
Chapter // Five, Sons of Confederate Veterans. 



NEW 
EMPLOYEES 



PROMOTION 



TAX 

SHELTERED 

ANNUITIES 



SYMPATHY 
EXTENDED 



UNCW welcomes the following new employees: 

Gail Craddock, social research associate in the office of 
institutional research, ext. 3520 

Andrew H. Morris, university residence administrator for 
university residence life, ext. 3530 

Diane Zeaman, director of undergraduate admissions, ext. 3125 

Janice Lion, accountant for financial services, ext. 3227 

Joyce T. Hawkins, secretary in the office of the dean of 
student affairs, ext. 3119 

Sabrina B. Foster, mail clerk in the department of purchasing 
services, ext. 3182 

Joyce J. Johnson, library clerk for library services, ext. 3272 

Debra G. Williams, housekeeping assistant for auxiliary services 
ext. 3*05 

Congratulations to Joseph Hack, plant maintenance supervisor 
for the physical plant, ext. 310'f. 

What are Tax Sheltered Annuities? TSA's offer a special tax 
break to employees of higher education that can allow you } 
to save up to 19% of your gross taxable income. Contribu- 
tions to the program are excluded from gross income so that 
income taxes on these contributions are postponed until the 
TSA is cashed in or until retirement. 

Four plans are currently available: 

1. Equitable Life Assurance Society of the US, (EQUI-VEST) 

2. State Deferred Compensation Plan 

3. Supplemental Retirement Annuities, (SRA) 
If-. Variable Annuity Life Insurance Company, (VALIC) 

Representatives from each of these plans will be on campus 
September f through 11. Interested employees should call 
the personnel office at extension 3160 for appointments. 

Condolences are sent to Sandra Ostrand in the school of 
education on the recent death of her husband, Robert. 



HOUSE Five bedroom house at Wrightsville Beach for rent. For ad- 

FOR RENT ditional information call 799-6105. 

HOUSE Unfurnished two bedroom house for rent. (For faculty or 

FOR RENT staff only). Call 762-3877. 



:ampus 
:ommunique 



UNC by the §ea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER t^ 
AUGUST 23, 19U 



PTEMBER 
\LENDAR 



•LCOME 

VCK 

\NCE 



iRKING 
:CAL5 



3RARY 
)TICE 



UDENT 

VELOPMENT 

INTER 



GOWAN 
>UCTED 



All items for inclusion in the September "UNCW" Calendar of 
Events should be sent to the Development Office located in 
UU-209 no later than August 29. 

A UNCW Welcome Back Dance sponsored by BACCHUS will be 
held Friday, August 31, from 7 p. m. - 1 ajn. in UU-100 and 
the courtyard. Food and beverages will be available at no 
charge. ID's will be required. For more information call the 
SGA Office at ext. 3553 or Pat Leonard at ext. 3119. All 
faculty and staff are invited. 

UNCW parking decals for 198'f-85 are presently on sale. The 
cost is $'f6 for the first car and $10 for a second car. For 
information call Cornelia Royal in the parking office. 

Faculty members are encouraged to prepare Reserve Reading 
Lists for the fall semester as soon as possible. Forms are avail- 
able at the Library Reserve Desk or from departmental 
secretaries. The forms should be submitted to the Reserve 
Desk at least one week prior to class assignments. For assis- 
tance in completing the forms, contact Mrs. Hilda Tyndall 
at ext. 3790. 

The Student Development Center, ext. 3280, is now located in 
Alderman 217. Dr. Diane McKinstry , formerly with Cornell 
University, will be assuming the position of director on 
September I. The services of the center will include: 

Personal counseling 
Career development 
Learning skills 
Disabled students 
Testing 
Workshop/presentations 

Dr. James McGowan, director of graduate studies, was one of 
seven new members recently inducted by the NC Humanities 
Committee. The Humanities Committee, an affiliate of the 
National Endowment for the Humanities, meets three times 
a year to make grants to programs that increase public under- 
standing of the humanities. 



TAX What are Tax Sheltered Annuities? TSA's offer a special tax 

SHELTERED breai< to employees of higher education. Contributions to 

ANNUITIES the program are excluded from gross income so that income 

taxes on these contributions are postponed until the TSA is 

cashed in or until retirement. 



NEW 
EMPLOYEE 



Four plans are currently available: 

1. Equitable Life Assurance Society of the US, (EQUI-VEST) 

2. State Deferred Compensation Plan 

3. Supplemental Retirement Annuities, (SRA) 

4. Variable Annuity Life Insurance Company, (VALIC) 



Representatives from each of these plans will be on campus 
September ^t through 11. Interested employees should call 
the personnel office at ext. 3160 for appointments. 

A UNCW welcome is extended to Dr. Richard H. Mullendore, 
dean of students. He can be reached at ext. 3119. 

Diane Zeeman, director of indergraduate admissions, can 
be reached at ext. 32'f3. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the csea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 5 
AUGUST 30, [9ii^ 



The Development Office staff extends a warm "welcome back" 
to all faculty and staff. We hope that you and your families en- 
joyed a safe and pleasant summer. With the beginning of the 
198^^ fall semester it is time once again to fill out information 
cards for the 198't-85 Faculty & Staff Telephone Directory. 
Each employee will receive a blue information card today along 
with a copy of the CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE. Please fill out this 
card and return to Patsy Larrick in UU-209 no later than 
Tuesday, September 'f. ONLY those cards received on or before 
that date will be included in the directory. The Development 
Office publishes the telephone directory as a service to the 
employees of the university. Distribution is limited to UNCW 
faculty, staff and Board of Trustees. 

Payday is tomorrow. Checks may be picked up from the Univer- 
sity Cashier's Office located in Alderman Hall. 

UNCW parking decals for 198'f-85 may be purchased from Mrs. 
Cornelia Royal in the parking office located in Belk Hall. The 
cost will be $^+6. There will be a $10 fee for registering a 
second car. 

On the physical education facilities fall schedule which was re- 
cently sent to all departments - please make the following change: 

Under free swim hours for Monday, Wednesday and 
Thursday nights - the Monday night free swims have 
been cancelled. 

Due to limited space in the warehouse, all surplus equipment is 
pending transfer to State Surplus in Raleigh for sale. Any de- 
partment who would like an "on-campus" transfer of surplus 
equipment, is asked to go by the warehouse for inspection and 
to process the necessary paperwork. Inspection and transfer 
must be completed prior to September 10. Questions should 
be directed to Sondra Roark at 3153. 

UNCW will observe the Labor Day holiday on Monday, September 3, 



PAYROLL 
DEADLINE 



SYMPATHIES 
EXTENDED 

OSP 
ACTIVITY 



LECTURE ON 
CREATIONISM 



SNACK 
BAR 



WRITERS 

FORUM 



SCULPTURE 
'\CCEPTED 



TAX 

SHELTERED 

ANNUITIES 



All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets reflecting 
shift, holiday and overtime pay must be in the personnel office 
by 8:30 a.m., September 'f, so that payroll computation may be 
completed. Supervisors who do not meet this deadline should 
not expect their employees to be paid on September l^. 

Sympathies are sent to Liz Greene of the personnel office on 
the death of her husband this past weekend. 

The office of special programs will offer Aerobics for Women 
beginning September 5 and 6. Two levels and five sections will 
be available. AH women faculty and staff may register at a 
reduced rate. For information call special programs at Ext. 3195 

Creationism will be the topic of a lecture to be presented by 
Michael Plante, former student, at 7:30 pjn., on September 6, in 
Bryan Auditorium located in Morton Hall. The talk, "Creation 
in the Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East," will be 
presented by the UNCW Museum of World Cultures and the 
Department of Philosophy & Religion. 

Regular hours for the University Union Snack Bar is as follows: 

Monday - Thursday 7 a.m. - 7 pjm. 
Friday - 7 ajn. - 4 pjn. 

The snack bar is now offering take out service. There will be 
a minimal charge on some containers. Clip this article and get 
a FREE 16 oz. soda with any take out order. 

The Creative Writing Program announces that the Wilmington 
Writers Forum Workshop will resume on Saturday, September 8, 
at 7 p,m. in Morton Hall, room Zl'f. Writers are invited to bring 
several copies of their works. 

Stephen LeQuire of the Creative Arts Department - art division 
has had a sculpture accepted for a group traveling exhibition. 
The show of Tri State Sculptors' works has stops scheduled at 
Warren Wilson College, 3ames Madison University, Louisiana 
Tech University, East Carolina University and several others. 
The exhibition will tour approximately two years. 

What are Tax Sheltered Annuities? TSA's offer a special tax 
break to employees of higher education. Contributions to 
the program are excluded from gross income so that income 
taxes on these contributions are postponed until the TSA is 
cashed in or until retirement. 

Four plans are currently available: 

1. Equitable Life Assurance Society of the US, (EQUl-VEST) 

2. State Deferred Compensation Plan 

3. Supplemental Retirement Annuities, (SRA) 

'f. Variable Annuity Life Insurance Company, (VALIC) 

Representatives from each of these plans will be on campus 
September 4 through 11. Interested employees should call 
the personnel office at ext. 3160 for appointments. 



Dr. Thomas V. Moseley of the department of history presented a 
lecture on "Nathan Bedford Forrest - Brice's Cross Roads" to the 
George Davis Chapter //5 of the Sons of Confederate Veterans 
on August 16. 

Columnist William Safire has published a letter from Richard Veit 
of the English department in his latest book, I Stand Corrected; 
More on Language. Veit has also had an article, "198^* Visited: 
English Debased? Students Illiterate?," accepted for publication 
in the winter issue of Et cetera; A Review of General 
Semantics". 

Dr. Louis LaNunziata, assistant professor of curricular studies, 
delivered a workshop entitled "Instructional Strategies for the 
Emotionally Handicapped" August 8 at the second annual Special 
Education Institute for the Fayetteville City, Lee County, and 
Scotland County School Districts. The workshop, held in 
Southern Pines, had approximately 200 teachers, administrators 
and psychologists to attend. 

David Kechley of the Department of Creative Arts - music 
division has received a $500 award from the American Society 
of Composers, Authors and Publishers for 1 98^^-85. This is 
his fifth award since 1979. The awards are given in recogni- 
tion of prestigious work and/or significant performances not 
licensed by the society. 

When sending mail to students via the UNCW post office boxes 
please adhere to the the following requirements: 

Material must be received in the post office four days 
prior to date of required delivery 

If using student name, box number is required 

Mailing must be in box order 

PAPER WEIGHT SIZE 



90// to 110// index 
20// bond to 65// cover 



3" x 5" up to 5" X 8" 
S\" to 11" or 8i" X I'f" 



BOOKLETS 

8y" X 5i" maximum 

Faculty members are encouraged to prepare Reserve Reading 
Lists for the fall semester as soon as possible. Forms are avail- 
able at the Library Reserve Desk or from departmental 
secretaries. The forms should be submitted to the Reserve 
Desk at least one week prior to class assignments. For assis- 
tance in completing the forms, contact Mrs. Hilda Tyndall 
at Ext. 3790. 

A UNCW Welcome Back Dance sponsored by BACCHUS will be 
held August 31 from 7 pjn. - 1 a.m. in UU-100. Food and 
beverages will be available at no charge. All faculty and staff 
are invited. 



Tlic liniversity Union will close Friday at 11 pjn. and reopen 
Tuesday, at 7 a.m. in observance of the Labor Day holiday. 



NEW Welcome to the following new employees: 

EMPLOYEES 

MANAGEMENT AND MARKETING 
Dr. John M. Garris, assistant professor, 
Dr. Sheila A. Adams, associate professor, 
Mr. Earl D. Honeycutt, Jr, lecturer, 
Ms. Laura A. Honeycutt, lecturer 

HISTORY 

Dr. Bruce L. Kinzer, assistant professor, 

Ms. Kathy L. Walker, lecturer, 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Dr. Katherine E. Bruce, assistant professor, 

Dr. James D. Johnson, assistant professor, 

ENGLISH 

Vir. John Evans, lecturer, 

Ms. Laura M. Knotts, lecturer. 

Dr. Thomas G. MacLennon, associate professor 

CREATIVE ARTS 

Ms. Gina C. Pelose, lecturer, 

Mr. Mark Harrington, lecturer, 

MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 
Ms. Karan B. Smith, lecturer, 
Dr. John K. Karlof, associate professor, 

EARTH SCIENCES 

Dr. Ellen P. Metzger, assistant professor, 

Mr. Jack C. Hall, lecturer, 

HPER 

Dr. Arthur W. Miller, assistant professor, 
Dr. Nancy J. Gladwell, assistant professor. 
Dr. Paul Hatcher, assistant professor, 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Dr. Diane B. Dodd, assistant professor. 

Dr. Timothy A. Ballard, assistant professor 

SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 

Dr. Patricia G. Tjaden, assistant professor. 

Dr. Stephen J. McNamee, assistant professor, 

ECONOMICS & FINANCE 

Dr. Harry A. Comeskey, assistant professor, 

ACCOUNTANCY 

Dr. Edward A. Becker, associate professor, 

PHILOSOPHY & RELIGION 

Dr. Robert J. Rafalko, visting assistant professor, 

NURSING 

Dr. Paul A. Gray, assistant professor, 

Also, Wilhelmenia Toney, housekeeping assistant in the physica 
plant; Patricia G. Tyson, clerk typist in financial services and 
Linda S. Teachey, greenhouse manager in biological sciences. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 6 
SEPTEMBER 6, 192,^ 



HPER RECEIVES 
RECOGNITION 



SAFETY 
NOTICE 



PARKING 
DECALS 



FORMER 

STUDENT 

SPEAKS 

PLAY IN 
SRO 

MUSIC 
RECITAL 

WRITERS 
FORUM 

PUBLIC 

FUNDING 

WORKSHOP 



The health, physical education and recreation department was 
the recipient of a recognition award presented by the New 
Hanover County Special Olympics Advisory Board at a dinner 
held last month. The award was given to recognize the exten- 
sive faculty and student participation in the Special Olympics 
program for 1983-8'f. 

Any department who has ordered or received Model 500/200 
Power Supply units from Bio-Rad Labs out of Richmond, CA, 
is asked to call Al Barry, safety officer, at Ext. 3108 as soon 
as possible. 

UNCW parking decals for 198^-85 may be purchased from Mrs. 
Cornelia Royal in the parking office located in Belk Hall. The 
cost is $^^6. Cost for registering a second car is $10. 

Michael Plante, former student, will discuss "Creation in the 
Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East" September 6 at 7:30 p.m. 
in Morton Hall. 

The play, "Working," will be presented September 6, 7, 8, and 9 
at 8 nightly in the SRO Theatre. For reservations call Ext. 3^W. 

A faculty recital by Frank Bongiorno, assistant professor of 
music, will be given September 7 at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. 

The Wilmington Writers Forum Writers Workshop will be held 
September 8 at 7 pjn. in Morton Hall, room 21^. 

The Office of Special Programs and the NC Governor's Office 
will host a Public Funding Workshop September 13 from 8:30 a.m.- 
3:30 p.m. at the Hilton. Owners of small businesses interested in 
applying for federal and state grant money for research will 
have the opportunity to learn fundamentals of proposal writing 
and management. Dr. John Manock, director of research adminis- 
tration, will discuss components of a successful proposal. Lynne 
Crater, contracts and grants officer, will speak on managing 
grant funds. Registration is $30. For information call Ext. 3192. 



TAX 

SHELTERED 

ANNUITIES 



BONGIORNO 
APPOINTED 



NIGHT 
DEANS 



ATTENTION 
GRADES 5-8 



SNACK BAR 
SPECIAL 



PROPOSAL 
ACCEPTED 



PSYCHOLOGY 

PAPER 

DELIVERED 



The four Tax Sheltered Annuity plans currently avail- 
able to UNCW employees include: 

Equitable Life Assurance Society of the US, (EQUI-VE5T 
State Deferred Compensation Plan 
Supplemental Retirement Annuities, (SRA) 
Variable Annuity Life Insurance Company, (VALIC) 

Representatives from these plans will be on campus up through 
September 11 to discuss the special tax breaks available 
to employees of higher education. For additional information 
or appointments, call the personnel office at Ext. 3160. 

Frank J. Bongiorno of the Creative Arts Department - division 
music, has recently been appointed to the position of membersh 
director /treasurer for the North American Saxophone Alliance. 

Thomas Lupton of the mathematical sciences faculty and Rolla 
Nelson of the physics faculty are serving as assistant night dea 
The night deans, on duty Monday - Thursday from 7 p.m. to 
9:30 pjn., may be reached by calling the campus police at 
395- 5636. All notices such as class changes not on the printec 
schedule or any activities such as club meetings, speakers, play 
etc., should be sent to Mr. Lupton in mathematical sciences 
or Mr. Nelson in physics. They will also be available to assist 
people calling the university at night as well as help locate 
students and faculty in the event of an emergency during 
evening classes. 

The Office of Special Programs will offer an after-school coas' 
studies adventure for youngsters in grades 5-8. The program 
will include visiting historical marine points of interest, observ 
ing animal and plant life in salt marshes and beaches, as well 
as trail hiking and fishing. Call special programs at Ext. 3195 
before September 10. 

This week the University Union Snack Bar is featuring nachos, 
with spicy cheese sauce. Clip this article before September 
[i* and get an order of nachos for 60(;;:. 

Stephen LeQuire of the Department of Creative Arts, division 
of art, has had a proposal accepted by Northern Telecom to 
build a large scale sculpture. The sculpture, to be built in twc 
sections, will be assembled and installed for exhibition in 
October at Northern Telecom's annual exhibit of NC sculpture^ 
Northern Telecom, located in Research Triangle Park, is a 
major telecommunications company. 

Gayle Hood, senior, presented a paper, "Admission to White am 
Black Southern Insane Asylums: 1856-1910," during the 
American Psychological Association meeting held last week in 
Toronto, Canada. The paper was co-authored by Drs. Antonio 
Puente and Robert Brown of the psychology department. Also,! 
Dr. Gerald Weeks of the psychology faculty delivered a paper. 



Richard Long, lecturer in the English department, will have his 
chapbook of poems, Years Away from Heaven, published by 
Peloria Press this month. 

"Caribou Mountain: A Porphyry Copper Deposit in Southeastern 
Idaho" by Dr. 3ohn R. Huntsman of the earth sciences depart- 
ment was published in the July-August volume of Economic 
<^eo'oKy» 

Thomas C. McCall, assistant professor of English, has been 
elected to the Editorial Board of English Language Notes, 
University of Colorado. 

The Student Development Center, formerly known as Counseling 
& Testing, is now located in Alderman Hall, room 217. The new 
director is Dr. Diane McKinstry. Services of the Student 
Development Center include: 

Personal Counseling 
Career Development 
Learning Skills 
Disabled Students 
Testing 
Workshops/Presentations 

The following programs are being offered by the Office of Special 
Programs: 

"How to Prepare for the SAT" September 8 at 9 a.m 

"What Managers Do" September 10 at 7 pjn. 

"WORDSTAR" September 10 at 7:30 p.m. 

"Tax Planning for Real Estate Investors with Emphasis 
on Tax Shelters" September 12 at 7 p.m. 

For information on any of the above listed programs call the 
Office of Special Programs at Ext. 3195. 

The New Hanover County Public Library will present a series 
of three foreign films during the month of September. The 
first film, "Smiles of a Summer Night," will be shown September 
li^ at 7:30 p.m. in the upstairs meeting room of the library. 
The second film, "Juliet of the Spirits," will be shown September 
21. The last film, "Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie," is 
scheduled for September 28. For additional information call 
Judy Beck at 763-3303. 

The Department of Creative Arts will present a faculty re- 
cital at 8 p.m., Friday, September 21, in Kenan Auditorium, 
Faculty performers include Richard Deas, Barbara Hill, David 
Kechley, Jerilee Kechley, Sherrill Martin, Jane K. Mathew, 
Rob Nathanson and Joanne Riesz. Kathy Meyer will perform 
as cellist. Compositions on the program include a Schubert 
piano sonata, Schumann lieder, contemporary chamber pieces 
by David Kechley, and a Faure work arranged for voice, 
flute and guitar. The recital is open to the public. There 
is no admission charge. 



FALL 
SCHEDULE 



CLASS 
SCHEDULES 



The below listed physical education facilities are available to 
faculty, staff and students of UNCW only. ID's must be avail 
able upon request. 

Hanover Hall 

8:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Monday - Thursday 
8:00 a.m. - 5-A5 p.m. Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 pjm. Saturday 
1:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Sunday 

Racquetbail Courts 

8:00 ajn. - 9:00 p.m. Monday - Thursday 
8:00 ajn. - 5:tt5 pan. Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 
1:00 pjn. - 6:00 p.m. Sunday 



^ Universal Weight Room 

8:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Monday - Thursday 
8:00 a.m. - 5-A5 p.m. Friday 
9:00 ajn. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 
1:00 pjn. - 6:00 p.m. Sinday 

^ Nautilus Weight Room 

To be posted at a later date 

^ Swimming Pool ( FREE SWIM HOURS ) 

11:00 a.m. - 1:00 pjn. Monday - Friday 
7:00 pjn. - 9:00 pjn. Wednesday & Thursday 
12 noon - 3:00 p.m. Saturday 

* Tennis Courts 

8.-00 ajn. - 11:00 pjn. 

* Except during class and athletic use 

Hanover Hall: 

MWF - 11-12:15 Basketball first six weeks/semester 
MWF - 11-12:15 Volleyball - 2nd six weeks/semester 
TT - 11-12:15 Social REC Leadership 
TT - 8 - 9:15 PE Grades K-3 

Racquetbail Courts; 
M-W 9 - 10:15 
M-W 13:00 - 1^:15 
T-T 9:30 - 10-A5 



Nautilus; 

MWF 9:00 - 9:50 Weight Training Classes 

MWF 10:00 - 10:50 

MWF 11:00 - 11:50 

Tennis 

TT 8:00 - 9:15 
TT 9:30 - 10:t5 
TT 11:00 - 12:15 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 7 
SEPTEMBER 20, 198^ 



FACULTY The Faculty Meeting will be held Thursday, September 27, at 

MEETING 'f pjn. in Bryan Auditorium located in Morton HaU. 

WHO'S Applications for nominees to Who's Who Among Students in 

WHO American Universities and Colleges are now available in the 

dean of students office located in A-110. Nominations will be 
accepted through 5 pjn., Thursday, October 'f. For more infor- 
mation call ext. 3119. 

DR. MARTIN Dr. Sandy Martin, assistant professor of philosophy & religion, 

PUBLISHES has had an article, "Spelman's Emma B. DeLaney and the 

African Mission," published in the spring-summer 198't issue 

of The Journal of Religious Thought. 

CLAIM Employees filing for prescription receipts or doctor bills must 

FORMS attach same behind an employee claim form in order for pay- 

ment to be considered. Claim forms may be picked up from 
the personnel office. Instructions on filing for claims can 
be found on pages 3U & 35 of the benefit booklet. 

EDS CALLS Customer service lines are now open from 8 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

every weekday. EDS has requested that calls be made from 8 - 
9 a.m. on Mondays and Tuesdays and 8 ajn. - 2 pjn. on Wednes- 
days, Thursdays and Fridays. The toll free number is 
1-800-662-6661. 

NEW Welcome to the following new employees: Frances H. Morrisey, 

EMPLOYEES clerk typist in personnel, ext. 3173; Diane McKinstry, director of 

the student development center, ext. 3280; Paula Cummings, 
clerk typist in the athletic department, and Julia Dutcher, 
personnel technician I at IMBR. 

THANK Liz Greene and her family extend their appreciation to all 

YOU faculty and staff for the concern expressed to them following 

the recent death of her husband. 

PARKING UNCW parking decals for 198'f-85 may be purchased from Mrs. 

DECALS Cornelia Royal in the parking office located in Belk Hall. 

The cost is $'f6. Cost for registering a second car is $10. 



ACADEMIC 

COMPUTING 

SERVICES 



ATTENTION 
EMPLOYEES 



PUBLICATION 
AVAILABLE 



Academic Computing Services will operate three terminal cluste 
during the following hours: 

S-221 Social & Behavioral Sciences Building 
8 ajn. - midnight Monday - Sunday 

B-215 Bear Hall 

8 ajn. - midnight Monday - Sunday 

H-117 Hoggard Hall 

8 a.m. - midnight Monday - Sunday 

Classes for employees who want to earn a high school equivalen 
diploma (GED) or just improve reading, writing or math skills 
(ABE) are now available. Classes will begin soon! For addition; 
information call Brenda Dineen in personnel at ext. 3712. 

The Volunteer Center of Wilmington along with the University 
Union has published a listing of volunteer positions available 
in area social service agencies. Copies of the latest edition 
are available by calling Linda Moore, union director, at ext. 
3283. 



CHANNEL The Channel Marker, UNCW's activity calendar, is available to 

MARKER faculty and staff by calling the union administration office at 

ext. 3285. 



GOVERNOR'S 
RUN FOR FUN 



ADVISOR 
NEEDED 



SNACK BAR 
SPECIAL 



SNACK BAR 
HOURS 



INQUIRIES 
NEED TO BE 
ANSWERED 



FILM TO BE 
PRESENTED 



The Seventh Annual Governor's Run for Fun and Health will be 
held Saturday, October 6, at 9 a.m. in the parking lot of the 
Independence Mall Cinema. Participants may run or walk the 
course of 1.5 miles. No entry fee. For additional information i 
call Gary Shell at 763-9871. 

The UNCW Women's Soccer Team is looking for an advisor. Par 
ticipation in the NC Soccer league is at a standstill until an 
advisor can be located. Any faculty member with a knowledge 
of the game is asked to contact Jennifer Wilson at 395-^^681 or 
leave a message in the Women's Soccer mailbox in the SGA Offi 
upstairs in the University Union. 

Jello Pudding Pops, something new for dessert with only 90 | 
calories, is the special this week in the University Union 
Snack bar. Clip this article and get a pudding pop for 25^. 
Offer available today through September 26. 

EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY - THE SNACK BAR HOURS WILL : 

Monday - Thursday 7:30 a.m. - 7:00 pjn. r 

Friday 7:30 a.m, - if.OO pjn. j 

The Union Information Center has received calls in reference 
to a UNCW entry on a nationwide computer bulletin board. 
Does anyone know who to refer these calls to?? Contact Bev 
Cobb at ext. 3833. 

The second in a series of films sponsored by the New Hanover 
County Public Library, entitled "3uliet of the Spirits," will be 
shown September 21 at 7:30 pjrt. upstairs in the library. For 
additional information call Judy Beck at 763-3303. 



>SYCHOLOGY 
■ACULTY 



)R. REEVES 
>UBLISHES 



)R. GEORGE 

'RESENTS 

>APER 



)AVIS 
[LECTED 



>iRTICLE 
'UBLISHED 



)R. AWKARD 
IGNORED 



Three members of the psychology department delivered papers at 
the recent annual convention of the American Psychological Asso- 
ciation held in Toronto, Gerald Weeks delivered a paper on 
"Individual-System Dialectic." Tony Puente's paper was entitled 
"Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum: Treatment of School-Related 
Problems." Bob Brown presented a paper titled "Implications of 
Animal Research for Neuropsychological Intervention." Puente 
also delivered a paper, co-authored by Brown, titled "Admission 
to Southern Black and White Insane Asylums: 1856-1910." 
Brown delivered two other papers, "Teaching and Evaluating 
Writing in an Experimental Psychology Course" and "Implications 
of Diagnosis and Assessment for Understanding Etiology of Learn- 
ing Disabilities." 

An article entitled "Comparision of Behavior of Single-Crystal 
and Polycrystalline CdS in Photoelectrochemical Cells" by Dr. 
James H. Reeves of the department of chemical and physical 
sciences and Dr. Mike Cocivera of the University of Guelph, 
has been published in the September 1984 issue of Journal of the 
Electrochemical Society' (Vol. 139) 

Dr. Robert Y. George, professor of oceanography in the depart- 
ment of biological sciences and IMBR, will present a paper, "Basal 
and Active Metabolic Rates of Deep Sea Animals in Relation to 
Pressure," in the symposium on 'Dynamics of Deep Sea Life' dur- 
ing the 19th European Marine Biology Conference presently being 
held in Plymouth, England. 

Derick G.S. Davis of the department of HPER has recently been 
elected to a second three-year term as a member of the Board 
of Trustees of the North Carolina Recreators Foundation. The 
foundation, a non-profit organization, offers scholarships to 
parks and recreation majors. 

"Commutative Rings with no Super-decomposable Modules" by 
Dr. Paul Jambor, associate professor of mathematical sciences, 
was published in the July issue of Archiv der Mathematik. 

Dr. Joseph C. Awkard, Jr., professor of psychology, was honored 
with two awards at the 17th annual convention of the National 
Association of Black Psychologist held August 1 1 in New York 
City. He received a service award in recognition of his term 
as president in 1979-80 as well as a distinguished behavioral 
scientist award for his work in black psychological perspectives 
over the last 16 years. 



ALENT 
REK 



'&R LECTURE 
lERlES 



The Community Arts Center will present "Talent Trek," imperso- 
nations of famous musicians over the last 30 years, Saturday, 
September 22, at 8 p.m. in the Greenfield Amphitheatre. 
Tickets are $2 and may be purchased at the door. 

The philosophy & religion department will offer eight public lec- 
tures regarding "Moral Choices in America Today: A Public 
Dialogue" beginning TONIGHT. Dr. Thomas Schmid, associate 
professor of P&R, will discuss "Justice and Friendship in 
Family Life" at 8 tonight in King Auditorium. Open to the 
public. 



ORGAN 
RECITAL 



NIGHT 
DEANS 



September 21, will mark the initial public performance of the 
Department of Creative Arts new Rodgers Providence 900 pipe 
organ at UNCW. Dr. Edmund Shay, organ recitalist from 
Columbia College in SC, will present the recital which will dis- 
play the recently installed organ pipes. The recital will be at 
8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. No charge. 

Thomas Lupton of the mathematical sciences faculty and RoUa 
Nelson of the physics faculty are serving as assistant night 
deans. The night deans, on duty Monday - Thursday from 7 pjn 
to 9:30 pjn., may be reached by calling the campus police at 
395-318^. PLEASE NOTE THIS IS NOT THE NUMBER THAT 
WAS ORIGINALLY GIVEN. 



FACULTY 
RECITAL 



OPEN 
HOUSE 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



The Department of Creative Arts will present a faculty recital 
at 3 pjn., Sunday, September 23, in King Auditorium. Faculty 
performers include Richard Deas, David Kechley, Jerilee 
Kechley, Barbara Hill, Sherrill Martin, Jane K. Mathew, Rob 
Nathanson and Joanne Riesz. Kathy Meyer will perform as cel- 
list. The program will include a Schubert piano sonata, Schuma 
lieder, contemporary chamber pieces by David Kechley, and 
a Faure work arranged for voice, flute and guitar. The recital 
is open to the public at no charge. 

All faculty and staff are invited to an "Open House" for The 
Writing Place on Wednesday, September 26, at ^ pjn. in Morton 
Hall - 203. The Writing Place, formerly known as The Center 
for Writing, is a tutoring service set up to help students with 
writing. Refreshments will be served from k - 6 pjn. Hours fc 
The Writing Place are: 

9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 pjn. - 3:00 pjn. Monday 
through Friday. Also, on Wediesday and Thursday 
evenings from 6:00 - 9:00 

The following is a list of upcoming programs sponsored by the 
Office of Special Programs: 

"How the Brain Functions" - September 25 

"Basic Programming I for Ages 7-11" - September 25 

"Break-Even Analysis" - September 26 

For additional information call ext. 3192. 



MATH 

SCIENCES 

COLLOQUIUM 



The mathematical sciences department will once again feature 



FOR FUTURE 
REFERENCE 

MCGUIRE 
APPOINTED 



the Mathematical Sciences Colloquium beginning September 2'f 
at inl5 p.m. in MH-212. Gabriel Lugo will discuss "The Eleven 
Dimensions of Our Universe." (GA) Coffee will be served ar 
It. The talks are rated as follows: 

(GA) General audience 

(UU) Upper division undergraduates and up 

(GF) General faculty 

(MF) Math Sci. faculty 

In the event of another hurricane, free hurricane tracking 
maps will be available in the print shop. 

Dr. Phillip McGuire of the history faculty has recently been a|j 
pointed to the Consolidation Study Commission for the City oil 
Wilmington and New Hanover Cointy. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 




LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 8 
SEPTEMBER 27, 1984 



!CAL 
lADLINE 



?ATUS 
;PORT ON 
; RECTORIES 



The deadline for purchasing 1984-85 parking decals for 
faculty and staff is TOMORROW, September 28. Decals must 
be displayed by 8 a.m. Monday, October 1. 

The 84-85 Faculty/Staff Telephone Directory is presently 
being printed. ETA is the second week in October. 



lYDAY 
)MORROW 



Payroll checks may be picked up Friday, September 28, 
in the university cashier's office upstairs in Alderman 
Hall. 



lX 

[ELTERED 
INUITIES 

iLERGY 
IVERAGE 



I 



BBON CUTTING 



John Pezzoni, VALIC representative, will be on campus 
October 8 in A-208. Interested employees should call 
ext 3160 for appointments. 

EDS will not provide coverage for procedure code 95027, 
"end point" Skin Titration, a form of allergy testing. 
If you are receiving a different form of allergy testing 
and wish to know if coverage will be provided - call 
1-800-662-8868. Be prepared to give specific procedure 
code. 

The Personnel Development/Conference Room Ribbon Cutting 
Ceremony, cancelled due to Hurricane Diana, has been 
rescheduled for Tuesday, October 2, at 3 p.m., in 
Alderman Hall, room 106. Dr. Wagoner will officiate. 
All faculty and staff are invited. Refreshments will 
be served. 



EPAID 
GAL 



IGISTER 
HICLES 



There will not be an open enrollment period for Prepaid 
Legal Insurance in October. New employees may enroll 
within the first 60 days of employment. The premium will 
be $9.50 per month. Open enrollment for employees will 
be held in April of next year. Questions should be 
directed to the personnel office at ext 3160. 

All new faculty and staff must register their cars with 
the parking office within 48 hours of reporting to work. 
For more information call ext 3537. 



GOVERNOR'S The Seventh Annual Governor's Run for Fun and Health will 
RUN FOR FUN be held Saturday, October 6, at 9 a.m. in the parking lot 
of the Independence Mall Cinema. Participants may run or 
walk the course of 1.5 miles. No entry fee. For additior 
information call Gary Shell at 763-9871. 



SNACK 
BAR 



The University Union Snack Bar will feature a "Potato 
Bar" today-October 3. Clip this coupon and get a basic 
potato for 60<? or get one with hot entree toppings for 
$1.40. New hours in the snack bar are Monday-Thursday 
7:30 a.m. -7 p.m., Friday 7:30 a.m. -4 p.m. 



EARTH Dr. Charles F. Dodge of Charles F. Dodge and Associates, Ir 

SCIENCES Arlington, Texas, and Chairman of the Academic Liaison 

COLLOQUIUM committee of the American Association of Petroleum Geolog: 
will present a seminar entitled "History of the Barnhart 
Oil Field West Texas" or "Old Oil Fields Never Die" on 
Monday, October 1, at 4 p.m. in room MS-252. Interested 
individuals are invited to attend. 

STUDENT Student projects from the 1983-84 Art History Surveys are 

ART on display in the lobby of Kenan Hall. The students were^ 

EXHIBITION required to create an original work or a reproduction j 
inspired by a famous work of art or architecture, and \ 
based on research of the style of an individual artist orj 
period in the history of art. The exhibition will contini 
through the end of October. 



CHEMISTRY 
SEMINAR 



Dr. Fred Hawkridge from Virginia Commonwealth University 
will speak on "Direct Electron Transfer to Biological 
Molecules" during the chemistry seminar this Friday, 
Sept. 28. The seminar, to be held in C-114, will begin 
at 2:30 p.m. 



BROOKS 
DODSON 



Brooks Dodson of the English faculty has been appointed 
a reader for this year's English Composition Achievement 
Test given by the Educational Testing Service. The 
reading will take place December 5-10 in Princeton, N.J. 
Last year, the same time, he evaluated over 80,000 essays 



ANN 
CONNER 



Ann Conner, associate professor of art, had two woodblocP 
prints. Spectrum I and Spectrum II , selected for purchase 
by the U.S. Government Art in Foreign Embassies Program. 
The two prints were produced and published in New York. 



MARK 
GALIZIO 



Dr. Mark Galizio of the psychology department has been 
appointed to a 3-year term on the Board of Editors of Th« 
Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. 



PAPER 
PUBLISHED 



Ecology and Reproductive Strategy of a South Louisiana 
Freshwater Mussel, Glebula rotundata (Lamarck) (Unionida< 
Lampsilini) by Courtney T. Hackney, of the department of 
biological sciences, was published in the May 1984 issue 
of Freshwater Invertebrate Biology . The paper was co- 
authored by R. S. Parker and M. F. Vidrine. 



HPER 
CONFERENCE 



The 1984 North Carolina Conference on Professional 
Preparation in Health and Physical Education was held Se; 
21 at NCSU. The following HPER faculty members were in 
attendance: Dr. T.E. Allen, Larry Honeycutt, Judy Lewis 
Dr. L. Hollifield, Dr. Charles Lewis, Dr. Graham Hatcher 
and Dr. Arthur Miller. 



Welcome to James M. Sharkey, lecturer, in the department 
of modern languages. 

All departments are asked to add the following items to their 

central stores catalogue. 

600-13016 Transparencies, thermofax type #389 blackline 

color background (100 pkg) selling unit - pkg. 
600-90102 Feed roller for A.B. Dick mimeo machine part 

#45268 selling unit - pair. 

"Look Homeward, Angel" will be presented by University 
Theatre in Kenan Auditorium at 8 p.m. on October 4-6. 
Winner of the 1958 Pulitzer Prize this play concerns the 
boyhood days of Thomas Wolfe in Asheville before he went 
to Chapel Hill. Director is Doug W. Swink. Admission: 
UNCW Students -$1; general public -$4. For reservations 
call ext 3440. 

University Theatre Series: Season tickets now available for 
"Look Homeward, Angel" (Oct. 4-6) , "The Ghost Sonata" 
(Nov. 28 - Dec. 2), "See How They Run" (Feb. 20-24), "Under 
Milkwood" (Apr. 24-28), and the Readers Theatre "A Wealth 
of Welty" (Oct. 23-25) , and Transformations (April 21-23) . 
Single subscription, $15. For reservations call 
University Theatre Box Office 395-3440. 

Lee Johnston, associate professor of political science, 
participated in the American Judicature Society's Summer 
1984 Institute for Political Scientist. The Chicago Seminar 
examines the judicial branch and the impact of evolving 
public law on the federal government. 

"Perspectives on Bias in Mental Testing," edited by Robert 
Brown of the psychology department and Cecil Reynolds 
(UNCW '74) has been published by Plenum Press. This is the 
first volume by Brown and Reynolds in a series entitled 
"Plenijm Prespectives on Individual Differences." 

The Wilmington Parks and Recreation Department and the 
Community Arts Center will present a series of Sunday 
Afternoon Festivals. The first one, scheduled for 
September 30, will feature the Second Street Drama Club 
performing and directing short plays. Admission is 50<:. 
For additional information call 762-1198. 



The New Hanover County Public Library will present its 
Second Annual Women's Film Festival beginning October 5. 
"Quilts in Women's Lives" will be the first film and will 
be shown at 2 p.m. The next film, "The Angel That Stands 
by Me: Minnie Evans' Paintings," will be shown at 7:30 p.m. 
Both showings will be held in the library. 

Frank J. Bongiorno, assistant professor of music, recently 
was invited to perform in Potsdam, New York for the 
Region and North American Saxophone Alliance Convention. 



TIMESHEETS All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets 
DUE reflecting shift, holiday and overtime pay must be in th 

personnel office by 8:30 a.m. October 1. Supervisors 
who do not meet this deadline should not expect their 
employees to be paid on October 15. 

SUPPLEMENTAL Dewey Jordan of American Family Life Assurance will be c 
MEDICAL campus October 8-12. Employees may stop by the Traininc 

Development Conference Room in A-106 to discuss AFLA's 
Cancer Protection Plan and Hospital Intensive Care Plan, 



UNITED 
WAY 



The United Way Campaign is currently underway on the car 
The State Employee Combined Campaign is your opportunity 
become involved in meeting your community's needs. This 
campaign is the only on-the-job charitable solicitation 
authorized for payroll deduction. All employees are asl' 
to consider your pledge to support the work of the part: 
pating agencies. ALL ENVELOPES AND PLEDGES WILL BE OPEf 
AND PROCESSED BY EMPLOYEES AT THE CAPE FEAR AREA UNITED 
WAY OFFICE, NOT BY CAMPUS PERSONNEL, Regulations estab] 
to govern this campaign specify that each contributor st 
designate how his/her contribution shall be distributed. 
No provision is made for an undesignated gift . Please 
indicate your preference by checking one of the squares 
on the payroll deduction form included in your envelope 
or by writing the name of the agency or agencies you wis 
to support. It is important to specify the amount you 
want to go to each one you list. Information about 
participating agencies can be found in the campaign bro( 
Campus co-chairmen for the 1984 United Way Campaign are ! 
Charles Sanders, director of purchasing services, and j 
Mary Wasson of the English faculty. 1 



MATH 

SCIENCES 

COLLOQUIUM 



Dr. William Schneider, associate professor of history, \ 
discuss "Social History of Science" (PC) during the 
Mathematical Sciences Colloquium October 1 at 4:10 p.m. 
MH-212. Coffee will be served at 4. 



THEATRE 
TRYOUTS 



University Theatre Tryouts for August Strindberg's "Thei 
Ghost Sonata" will be held October 8-10 at 7:30 p.m. am 
October 9 at 4 p.m. in the SRO Theatre. For additional 
information call Terry Rogers at ext 3403. 



P S R 
LECTURE 



The next philosophy & religion lecture on "Moral Choice. 
In America Today" will be held October 4 at 8 p.m. in K J3 
Hall Auditorium. Dr. Robert Fafalko, assistant profess; 
of PSR, will discuss "Ethical Choices in Small Busines " 



ONE-MAN 
SHOW 



WHO'S 
WHO 



Dr. Elliot Engel, professor of English at NCSU, will pr 2 
"Dickens, You Say!," October 8 at 8 p.m. at Thalian Ha . 
The one-man entertainment, sponsored by the New Hanover 
Friends of the Public Library, is free and brings to li 
the many characters of Dickens. Selections will includi 
"The Death of Sidney Carton" from A Tale of Two Cities ! 
and "The Trial of Bardell vs. Pickwick" from The 
Pickwick Papers . All faculty and staff are invited. 

Application forms for nominees to Who's Who Among Studejs 
in American Universities and Colleges are now available in 
the dean of students office located in A-110. Nominati;s 
will be accepted through 5 p.m., Thursday, October 4. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 




LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 



PROGRAM 
IS FINALIST 



HAM 'N 
:GGHEADS 



VITHDRAWAL 
DEADLINE 



\DVISOR 
4EEDED 



lAZZ 
■NSEMBLE5 



/OMEN'S 
NETWORK 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV NUMBER 9 
OCTOBER ^, 198/^ 

The Leadership Development Program in the Cameron School of 
Business Administration, coordinated by Drs. Marjorie Mclnerney 
and Steve Harper, is one of the five finalists for the Innovative 
Education Award sponsored by the Southern Administration 
Association. Approximately 200 business schools were eligible 
for the awards. 

The first 198^-85 Ham n' Eggheads luncheon is scheduled for 
October 5 at 12 noon in the faculty dining room of the university 
cafeteria. Dr. Bob Toplin of the history department will discuss 
"Why the Civil War was Really a War for Southern Independence." 
Anyone interested in making a presentation should contact Bob 
Roer at IMBR. 

Faculty members are asked to remind students that Wednesday, 
October 10, 198^^, is the last day that undergraduate students 
may withdraw from individual courses or all courses and still 
receive a grade of W. Questions should be directed to Murrie 
Lee at ext. 3122. 

The UNCW Women's Soccer Team is "still" looking for an ad- 
visor. Interested faculty members are asked to contact Jennifer 
Wilson at 395-^*681 or leave a message in the Women's Soccer 
mailbox in the SGA Office upstairs in the University Union. 

The UNCW 3azz Ensembles directed by Frank 3. Bongiorno, as- 
sistant professor of music, will present an informal concert 
featuring the sounds of the late "Count" Basie October 10 
at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. The UNCW 7 O'clock Big 
Band will perform Basie's Theme, One O'clock Jump, Switch 
in Time and Basie Straight Ahead. Also, the UNCW Jazz 
Combo will play Misty, Blue Monk and Impressions. For infor- 
mation call ext. 3390. Admission will be $1. 

The Faculty Women's Network would like to extend a welcome to 
new and returning faculty. The network will hold its first meet- 
ing for the 8^-85 academic year on Sunday, October 7, at 
7:30 pjn. at the Canterbury Woods Apartment meeting house. 
For information and/or directions contact Kathleen Berkeley of 
the history faculty at ext. 3309 or Maggie Parish of the English 
department at ext. 3328. All interested faculty are encouraged 
to attend. Dues are $3. 



COLLOQUIUM 
SERIES 



INFORMATION 

SYSTEMS 

NOTICE 



Dr. Ravija Badarinathi of the Cameron School of Business Admi 
tration invites all faculty and staff to the school's 8'f-85 collo< 
um series beginning TODAY at 3:30 pjn. in B-112. The opening 
lecture, featuring Chancellor William H. Wagoner, is entitled 
"Administration: The Warp and Woof of Small, Medium, and Lar 

Due to the monthly expense of keeping online disk storage at 
TUCC - all online disk files will be moved to tape on October 
198^, except for those specifically requested by departments. ^ 
of this data has probably lost its usefulness and should be purg« 
Other data is accessed so infrequently that the move to less 
expensive tape volumes is more than justified. If your departme 
has online disk files at TUCC that should remain - Call Etecky 
Fancher at ext. 35^0 before October 15. 



WHO'S 
WHO 



Today is the deadline for submitting nominations for Who's 
Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges, 
information call the dean of students office. 



Fc 



THEATRE 
TRYOUTS 



P & R 
LECTURES 



University Theatre tryouts for August Strindberg's "The Ghost 
Sonata" will be held October 8-10 at 7:30 pjn. and October 9 a 
k p.m. in the SRO Theatre. Call Terry Rogers at ext. 3'>03. 

Dr. Robert Rafalko, assistant professor of P&R, will discuss 
"Ethical Choices in Small Business" Tonight at 8 in King Hall 
Auditorium. The next P&R lecture is scheduled for October 18 
with Dr. Patricia Rensma discussing "Abortion, Autonomy and 
Governmental Controls." 



ATHLETIC The women's basketball team is looking for girls 8-12 years-old^ 

NOTICE who might be interested in being ball-girls for home games. Ccj 

ext. 3232. 



UNITED 
WAY 



MATH 

SCIENCES 

COLLOQUIUM 



REPS ON 
CAMPUS 



Employees who have not turned in United Way envelopes to 
their account coordinators should do so by 5 pjn., Tuesday, 
October 9. Account coordinators should have their area envelc 
pes turned into their respective division co-chairmen, Mary 
Wasson or Charles Sanders, no later than 5 pjn. October 10. 

David Russell, assistant professor of mathematical sciences, wii 
speak on "Wave-Particle Duality" (UU) at the next mathematics 
sciences colloquium October 8 at 't:10 pjn. in MH-212. Coffee 
will be served at 'f. All faculty and staff are invited. 

Dewey Jordan of American Family Life Assurance will be on 
campus October 8-12 in the Training Development Conference 
Room located in A-106. 



John Pezzoni, VALIC representative, will be on campus Octobt 
in A-2Q8. Interested employees should call ext. 3160 for 
appointments. 

HEALTH The Board of Trustees has established a conversion policy as c 

INSURANCE rected by the Legislature. Employees who terminate from Sta 

service or dependents who are no longer eligible under the 
State's group plan or any other group insurance may convert. ' 
medical examination is required to be eligible for the conversi , 
however, the premiums are higher than group health insurance 



jAFECO 
JFE 



The dependent life insurance premium has been reduced to 97<^ 
per month. As of October 31, 198'>, employees who have reached 
the next age bracket for SAFECO Life Insurance will have an in- 
crease in their premiums. These changes will be reflected in the 
October paycheck for November coverage. The cost of this 
program is always based on the employees' current age as of each 
October 31 as outlined below: 

AMOUNT OF MONTHLY PREMIUM FOR: 
Employee's Age $5.000 Plan $10.000 Plan $20.000 Plan 

Under Age ^0 $125 $2J0 $5.00 

^0 Thru kS U5 3.50 7.00 

50 Thru 59 3.75 7 JO 15X)0 

60 Thru 69 6.25 12J0 25X)0 

Questions on benefits should be directed to Dianne Smith at 
ext. 3162. 



4UNTSMAN 

'RESENTS 

FALK 



50NG10RN0 
NVITED 



30DS0N 
\PPOINTED 



3NE-MAN 
JHOW 

GOVERNOR'S 
^UN FOR FUN 



^LAY 
SCHEDULED 

VILMINGTON 
SYMPHONY 

SNACK BAR 
SPECIAL 

:andidates 

'ORUM 



Dr. John R. Huntsman of the department of earth sciences, pre- 
sented a talk entitled "Conserving our groundwater resources" 
to the Wilmington Chapter of the North Carolina Junior Sorosis 
League on September. 

Frank J. Bongiorno, assistant professor of music, was recently 
invited to perform in Potsdam, NY, for the Region and North 
American Saxophone Alliance Convention. 

The Educational Testing Service has appointed Brooks Dodson, 
professor of English, as a reader for this year's English Composi- 
tion Achievement Test with readings scheduled for December 5-10 
in Princeton, NJ. Last December, as one of approximately 100 
consultants from around the US, Dr. Dodson participated in the 
evaluation of over 80,000 essays. 

Dr. Elliot Engel, professor of English at NCSU, will present 
"Dickens, You Say!," October 8 at 8 p.m. at Thalian Hall. Free. 

The Seventh Annual Governor's Run for Fun and Health will be 
held Saturday, October 6, at 9 a.m. in the parking lot of the 
Independence Mall Cinema. For information call 763-9871. 

The University Theatre will present "Look Homeward Angel" 
October k-G at 8 nightly in Kenan Auditorium. Adults $'t. 

The Wilmington Symphony Orchestra will perform October 9 at 
at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. Adults $5. 

The University Union snack bar special this week will be Gyros, 
a Greek speciality. $1.50. 

The American Association of University Women and the League of 
Women Voters invites faculty and staff to a candidates forum for 
county commissioners October 9 at 7 pjn. in the New Hanover 
County Library. Other forums are scheduled for October 17 
the school board and October 23 the state house and senate. 
Further information to follow. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 

LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER X/ii, 
OCTOBER 11, I3gtt 

LOST & A centralized "Lost & Found" system for the entire campus is 

FOUND located in the Information Center of the University Union. 

Please send items found to Bev Cobb, UU-21'f or call ext. 

3833 with information on where item was found and by whom. 

If you have lost an item - stop by, or call the Information Center 

at ext. 38'fl or 38'f6. 

FACULTY Faculty are reminded that spring requisitions are due in the book- 

REMINDER store on Friday, October IZ 

STUDENT The division of student affairs invites faculty and staff to a 

AFFAIRS reception welcoming all new student affairs staff TODAY from 

RECEPTION 3 - 5 in the University Union Snack Bar. 

P&R Dr. Patricia Rensma, assistant professor of philosophy & religion, 

LECTURE will discuss "Abortion, Autonomy and Governmental Controls" 

at the October 18 Philosophy & Religion Lectures Series on 
"Moral Choices in America Today." The lecture, to be held in 
King Hall Auditorium at 8 p.m., is free and open to the public. 

HAM N' Sue Hiatt of the library will discuss "The Library Use Instruction 

EGGHEADS Program" Friday, October 12, during the noon luncheon of Ham 

n' Eggheads in the Faculty Dining Room of the Cafeteria. 

COMPUTER A reminder that all online disk files on TUCC will be moved 

REMINDER to tape on October 15. If your department has online disk files 

at TUCC that should remain, call Becky Fancher at ext. 35'fO 

before October 15. 

AEROBIC The Office of Special Programs is sponsoring aerobic classes 

CLASSES for university women on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:15 - 

1:00 p.m. beginning October 23. Only women who are employees 

of UNCW may participate. Call ext. 3195. 



PHONE ^^^ 198^^-85 Faculty/Staff Telephone Directories will be dis- 

DIRECTORIES tributed Friday, October 12. Any questions concerning the 

directory should be directed to Patsy Larrick at ext. 3169. 



BOOK 
SALE 



SCHOOL 

BOARD 

FORUM 



FESTIVAL 
OF FILMS 



SNACK BAR 
SPECIAL 



SATCHEL 
FOUND 



The Friends of the New Hanover County Library will host its 
Fall Book Sale October 10-13 in the basement of the Library. 
Hours for October 11 and 12 will be 9 ajn. - 8:30 pjn. and 
9 ajTi. - 5 pjn. on October 13. 

A School Board Forum will be presented October 17 at 7 pjn. 
in the New Hanover County Library. The League of Women 
Voters and the American Association of University Women 
invite all faculty and staff to come out and meet the candi- 
dates. 

The New Hanover County Public Library invites all faculty and 
staff to the second series of films during their Film Festival 
scheduled for October 12. "Anonymous Was A Woman" will be 
shown at 2 p.m. and "Emily Dickinson: A Certain Slant of 
Light" will be shown at 7:30 pjn. Both films are free and will 
be shown at the library. 

The University Union Snack Bar will feature "Filled Wafers" - 
amaretto, NY cheesecake, chocolate & hazelnut and cherries 
jubilee. Clip this article and get 'f wafers at iOc;^ each now, 
through October 2^. 

Fall break schedule for the snack bar will be Monday, October 
15 through Wednesday, October 17 8 a.m. - 2:30 pjn. 

A red and blue book satchel has been found in the ROTC 
office. Owner should call 791-1133 or 799-2719. 



HARPER IS Dr. Stephen C. Harper, associate professor and chairman of 

COLUMNIST the department of management and marketing, has been invited I 

to write the Management Horizons section for the new publica-j 
tion, Carolina Business in Finance. His first article, "Today's jj 
Firms Need Strategic Thinkers, Not Just Long-Range Planners," 
appeared in the September issue. 

STAFF AT Mimi Cunningham, public information officer, and Renee 

WORKSHOP Brantley, publications officer, attended the Communicators' 

Workshop for News Burea Directors and Publications Editors 
last week in Chapel Hill. The workshop was jointly sponsored 
by UNC-CH, NCSU and UNC General Administration. 

WORK Stephen LeQuire of the art division, Creative Arts, has had 

ACCEPTED two works accepted in the 9th Annual American National 

Miniature Show, a competitive exhibition sponsored by the 
Laramie Art Guild, Wyoming. Dates for the show are 
October 1-30. 

JAZZ The UNCW Jazz Ensembles under the direction of Frank J. 

ENSEMBLES Bongiorno, assistant professor of music, performed during 

Riverfest activities this past weekend. 

NEW UNCW welcomes the following new employees: Fethia M. LewiiT 

STAFF housekeeping assistant in the physical plant; Lynda Flewwellin, ■ 

clerk typist in the office of the vice chancellor for academic 
affairs; Robert W. Berg, computer programmer in the departmer 
of information systems; Rosemary Taylor, clerk typist in the 
school of nursing; Mary Fermandez-Castro, clerk typist in the 
school of education and Brunell N. Parker, clerk typist in 
athletics. 



HISTORY 
FACULTY 



AINSLEY 
INVITED 



SPEECH 

COMM. 

DIVISION 



DR. WEST 

PRESENTS 

PAPER 



DR. BRYAN 
:'ARTICIPATES 



;OOD 
.IFE 



:hess 

VNYONE? 



)ID YOU 

:now? 



History faculty members, Walser Allen, Bruce Kinzer, Phillip 
McGuire and Melton McLaurin, attended the fall meeting of 
the Association of Historians in Eastern North Carolina Friday, 
October 5. The meeting was held at North Carolina Wesleyan 
College in Rocky Mount. 

Dr. Frank Ainsley, associate professor of earth sciences, attend- 
ed the annual conference of the Pioneer American Society held 
last week in Cape Girardeau and Sainte Genevieve, MO. He 
is local arrangements chairman for the 1985 Pioneer America 
Society Conference which will be held in eastern NC. 

Dr. Betty Jo Welch, associate professor and coordinator of speech 
communications, was installed as president of the Carolines 
Speech Communication during their convention held September 
27-28 at Clemson University. She was the program planner for 
the convention which featured members of the speech communi- 
cations division. Highlights included Dr. Carole Tallant's program, 
"Selected Carolina Readers in Performance; Mr. Randy Harrington's 
paper on "Psychological Sex Roles of Interactors in Relationships"; 
Dr. Lloyd Rohler's paper on "Jim Hunt's Senatorial Quest"; Mr. 
Frank Trimble's paper, "Duo Interpretation," and performance of 
James Dickey's, "Looking for the Buckhead Boys," and Dr. Steven 
Weiss's paper on "Rhetoric in the English Department." 

Dr. Charles West, associate professor of management & marketing, 
presented a paper, "Problems Implementing MBO in the Sales 
Force," during the September 27 meeting of the Institute of 
Management Sciences (S.E, Chapter) held at Myrtle Beach. While 
there he served as a discussant. Dr. West has also been apfx)int- 
ed by the Carolina Beach Town Council as one of two members 
from Carolina Beach to the County Governments Consolidation 
Study Commission to study the merger of Wilmington, New 
Hanover County and the beaches. 

Dr. William Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs and national 
president of the American College Personnel Association parti- 
cipated along with the presidents of two other national organiza- 
tions and US Secretary of education Terrill Bell in a conference 
October 8 at the University of Maryland announcing the obser- 
vance of National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week October 
8-l(^. 

Faculty and staff are invited to the next "Good Life" lecture en- 
titled "Healthy Babies are no Accident" October 15 at 7:30 pjn. 
in the AHEC Auditorium. Dr. Siew-Jyu Wong, neonatologist, and 
Dr. Kenneth Lovette, obstetrician/gynecologist, will discuss pre- 
natal care and its impact on a baby's health before and after 
birth. The lecture is sponsored by NHMH, AHEC and the New 
Hanover-Pender Medical Society. No charge. 

Faculty and staff are invited to participate in the Sunday After- 
noon Festival of Chess October l^ from 2-5. pjn. at the Communi- 
ty Arts Center. Bring your own chess board and set. For more 
information call 762-1198. No charge. 

The week of October 8-14 is National Collegiate Alcohol 

Awareness Week 
The week of October 6-I(> is Week of the Ocean 
The week of October 13-20 is National Higher Education Week 



FALL SCHEDULE 
FOR U. UNION 



Friday, October 12 
Saturday, October 13 
Smday, October I'f 
Monday, October 15 
Tuesday, October 16 
Wednesday, October 17 
Thursday, October 18 



7 ajn. - 5 p.m. 

CLOSED 
CCLOSED 
7 ajn. - 5 pjn. 
7 a.m. - 5 pjn. 
7 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
Resume Normal Hours 



SAFECO 
LIFE 



The dependent life insurance premium has been reduced to 97( 
per month. As of October 31, 198'f, employees who have reache 
the next age bracket for SAFECO Life Insurance will have an ii 
crease in their premiums. These changes will be reflected in th 
October paycheck for November coverage. The cost of this 
program is always based on the employees' current age as of eai 
October 31 as outlined below: 

AMOUNT OF MONTHLY PREMIUM FOR: 
Employee's Age $5.000 Plan $10,000 Plan $20,000 Plan 



Under Age W 
W Thru ^9 
50 Thru 59 
60 Thru 69 



$125 
1.75 
3.75 
6^5 



$2.50 

'3.50 

7J0 

1230 



$5X)0 

7.00 

15.00 

25/)0 



Questions on benefits should be directed to Dianne Smith at 
ext. 3162. 



LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 



H 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 11 
OCTOBER 18, 198^^ 



SPA SERVICE The Annual Service Awards Ceremony will be held Thursday, 

AWARDS October 25, at 2:30 p.m., in the west wing of the University Union 

Snack bar. Chancellor Wagoner will present service awards to all 
SPA employees who have reached 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 years of 
service as of 3une 30, 198^^. The outstanding SPA Employee of 
the Year will be recognized at this time. A reception will follow 
the ceremony. 

HAM 'N Dr. Alan Hulbert, associate professor of biological sciences, will 

EGGHEADS speak on "Undersea Research at UNCW" at the noon luncheon 

meeting of Ham 'n Eggheads Friday, October 19, in the faculty 
dining room located upstairs in the cafeteria. 

STUDY The second series in The Writing Place Study Skills Forum en- 

SKILLS titled How, When. & What To Underline; Comprehension 

FORUM BeforeTJnderlining will be held Tuesday, October 23, at ^ 

p.m. and 7 pjn. in MH-2G'f. The forum is sponsored by the 

English department. 

AEROBIC The Office of Special Programs is sponsoring aerobic classes for 

CLASSES university women on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:15 - 1 pjn. 

beginning October 23. This offer is FREE and open to women 

employees of UNCW. Call ext. 3195. 

TALLANT Dr. Carole Tallant, assistant professor of speech communications, 

FEATURED will be the featured performer and critic at Baylor University's 

PERFORMER Bearhug Festival this weekend. She will perform works by 

Dorothy Parker, Robert Frost and A. R. Ammons and will 
also deliver the keynote lecture of the festival, "The Why 
of the I in First Person Literature." 

PERSONNEL Periodically, the personnel office will notify employees of special 

NOTICE opportunities pertaining to health and fitness. Currently, the 

Wilmington Athletic Club is offering corporate memberships to 
faculty and staff. Corporate membership means 50% savings for 
this one time only initiation fee and could mean reduced monthly 
rates providing a specific number of employees sign up for mem- 
bership. For more information call Bill Calloway, director of 
personnel, or the Wilmington Athletic Club at 763-9655. 



HISTORY The history department will sponsor a symposium entitled "Religic 

DEPARTMENT and American Politics" October 29 at 8 pjn. in Bryan Auditorium, 

SYMPOSIUM Dr. Robert Toplin, professor of history, will talk about historical 

perspective of religion and politics and some of the common 
features of each that produce moralism; Dr. Robert Rafalko, 
assistant professor of P&R, will look at the moral questions being 
asked and the constitutional issue of separation of church and 
state. Also, Dr. Roger Lowery, associate professor of political 
science, will reflect on the topic from the point of view of a 
political scientist — How is the public reacting? what do the 
polls show? and where does the public stand on the separation of 
church and state? Dr. Thomas Moseley, professor of history, 
will be the moderator. 



PREVIEW 
SHOWING 



P&R 
LECTURE 



SPEECH 

COMM. 

DIVISION 



DR. DOCKAL 
CO-AUTHORS 



PROGRAM 
BOARD 



A docu-drama, "Solomon Northup's Odyssey," produced by Dr. 
Robert B. Toplin, professor of history, will air nationally Decemb 
10 on PBS. The preview showing will be at 7:30 p.m., Monday, 
October 22, in Bryan Auditorium. Dr. Toplin will give a brief pre 
sentation following the showing. Free and open to the public. 

Dr. P. Albert Studdard, professor of ethics in the philosophy & 
religion department at Pembroke State University, will be a 
special guest lecturer in the Philosophy and Religion Lecture 
Series on "Moral Choices in America Today." He will speak 
on the subject of abortion TONIGHT at 8 in King Hall Auditoriur 

Frank Trimble, Carole Tallant, Randy Harrington and Steven Wei; 
members of the speech communication division, will be guest j 
critics at the Carolina Fall Festival October 26-28 in Chapel Hil' 
Mr. Harrington will perform at the festival which will feature th* 
literature of minorities (including women) in performance. j 

Dr. James A. Dockal of the department of earth sciences co- j 
authored an article, "Lead and Zinc Mining in the Dubuque Area.) 
The article was published in Iowa Geology. jl 

i 
Michael Spiro will perform October 22 at 8 p.m. in the Union j 

Courtyard. Presented by the University Program Board, Ad- 1 

mission is free. Refreshments will be served. | 



NATHANSON Robert Nathanson, lecturer of music, will perform in a series of | 

TO PERFORM concerts at the Ethnic Folk Arts Center in New York City 

October 20-22. He has also been accepted into the NC Touring | 
Program for the 1985-86 season. j 

] 

FILM The last in a series of films sponsored by the New Hanover Couij/ 

SCHEDULED Public Library will be held October 19 at 7:30 pjn. in the library 

The film is entitled "The Life and Times of Rosie The Riveter." 
Facilitator will be Dr. Kathleen Berkeley, assistant professor of 
history. 

I 
I 

CANDIDATES A State House and Senate Forum is scheduled for Tuesday, : 

FORUM October 23, at 7 pjn. at the New Hanover County Library. The I 

American Association of University Women in conjunction with j 

the League of Women Voters invite all faculty and staff to com<( 

and meet the local candidates. 



Dr. Steven Weiss, faculty sponsor of UNCW's Students in Free 
Enterprise and member of the speech communication division, 
attended the regional orientation - leadership seminar of Students 
in Free Enterprise October 12-13 in Raleigh. 

A Seminar in Film Production will be presented by creative film 
artists currently working on various films at the North Carolina 
Film Studio. Dr. Terry Theodore, professor of drama, has ar- 
ranged the program and participants and will serve as moderator. 
The program will provide an inside look at how a film is put 
together. The seminar is scheduled for Thursday, November 1, 
in room 213 of the University Union at 7:30 pjn. 

The department of biological sciences will host a seminar Friday, 
October 19, at 2 pjn., in MS-151. Dr. Steve Vogel of the zoology 
department at Duke University will discuss "Two Easy Pieces 
for Winds." All faculty and staff are invited. Refreshments will 
be served. 

The American Association of University Professors would like to 
remind all faculty of the October 26 party for new faculty mem- 
bers. The party, scheduled from 7-10 pjn., will be held at the 
home of David Berman at Wrightsville Beach. 

Dr. Thomas V. Moseley, professor of history, attended the Tenth 
Annual Congress Civil War Round Tables October i*-7 in Jackson, 
MS. Emphasis was on the Vicksburg Campaign highlighted by 
touring Battlefields at Champion Hill, Big Black River, Grand 
Gulf, Port Gibson and Vicksburg. 

"The Importance of Being Earnest," a theatre scenic design by 
Dennis 3. Sporre, chairman of the Department of Creative Arts, 
has been selected for inclusion as a colorplate in the third edition 
of Invitation to the Theatre, one of the most widely used 
theatre introduction texts in the country, by George and Portia 
Kernodle and Edward Pixley. Professor Sporre's design was for a 
production at the University of Arizona. 

The history department will sponsor a series of three films to be 
followed by discussions by various members of the history faculty. 
The first film, "Lion in Winter," will be shown at 7:30 pjn. on 
October 25; "Luther," will be shown at 7:30 pjn. on November 20, 
and "Hearts and Minds" will be shown at 7:30 pjn. December 10. 
All films will be shown in Bryan Auditorium. "Lion in Winter" 
is the story of English King, Henry II (115^-89) and his queen, 
Eleanor of Aquitaine. Dr. Larry Usilton, associate professor of 
history, will lead the discussion. 

Congratulations to the UNCW Gospel Choir upon winning first 
place in the first annual Gospel Choir Competition 
October 7 at Winston-Salem State University. 

The University Readers Theatre will present a Chamber Theatre 
production of "A Wealth of Welty" October 23, 2't, and 25 at 
8 nightly in the SRO Theatre. The show, directed by Carole 
Tallant and Frank Trimble of the Creative Arts Department, 
features two Eudora Welty comic stories, "Why I Live at the 
P.O." and "Petrified Man." Tickets are $3. 



SCARECROW Faculty and staff are invited to the Great Scarecrow Carnival 

CARNIVAL Saturday, October 27, from noon to dusk at Empie Park. Acti- 

vities include a scarecrow making contest, fortune telling, bobb- 
ing for apples, pumpkin painting and storytelling. Bring your ow 
lunch and scarecrow fixings, old clothes, shoes, hat, etc. For 
more information call 762-1198. 

MATH SCI The next Mathematical Sciences Colloquium is scheduled for 

COLLOQUIUM Monday, October 22, with Dr. 3eff Brown of the mathematical 

sciences faculty. The talk will be held in MH-212 at 'frlO pjn. 

Coffee will be served at ^. 



NATIONAL 
CONFERENCE 



SNACK BAR 
SPECIAL 



Fayetteville State University is presenting a national conferenc* 
October 19-20 on George Orwell entitled "198'>: Then & Now." 
Participating from UNCW will be Dr. Margaret Parish of the 
English faculty delivering a paper on "Orwell's 198^ and the 
Novels of Robert Cormier," and Dr. James Megivern of the P&R 
department giving a paper on " 198^ and Millenialism." 

The University Union Snack Bar will feature "a hot lunch specia 
today through October 25. Try a hot entree with two vegetable 
for $1.60. 



DIRECTORY 
CHANGES 



Please make the following changes and updates in the 8'f-85 
faculty/staff phone directory: 

Page 10 - Under Student Affairs 

Add Linda Shaddix, counselor Ext. 3280 

Add - Dr. Patricia B. Lerch (Alfred) 

Assistant Professor - Department of Sociology/Anthropol* 
1805 Grace St (28^*05) 
S-208-E/Ext. 3tt35 
Home phone - 762-0731 



Add - Mr. James Dillon (Becky) 

Locksmith III - Physical Plant 
616 Albemarle Rd (28W5) 
Ext. 3110 
Home phone - 395-5631 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 

LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 12 
OCTOBER 25, 198^ 



ADDITIONAL The following parking lots are now open for use by faculty, staff 

PARKING and students: 

Parking Lot Q located east of the Marine 
Science Building and 

Parking Lot R located east of the Social 
and Behavioral Sciences Building 

SPA AWARDS The Annual Service Awards Ceremony will be held TODAY in 

GIVEN TODAY the west wing of the University Union Snack Bar at 2:30 pjn. 

A reception will follow the ceremony. 

JOHNSTON Dr. W. Lee Johnston, associate professor of political science, has 

PUBLISHES had his article, "A Modified Piagetian Cognitive Development 

Model: Political Impulsiveness In American Youths," published 
in International Journal of Political Education- 

SCHOLARSHIP Dr. Gerald Shinn, professor of philosophy and religion, has re- 

INFORMATION ceived information on applying for Rhodes Scholarships (must be 

postmarked by October 31, 198't); White House Fellowships (dead- 
line December 1), and Harry S. Truman Scholarships (deadline 
November 16). Interested persons should contact Dr. Shinn at 
ext. 3iHl. 

PROGRAM The University Program Board Lecture Committee will present 

BOARD Abbie Hoffman November 8 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 

Faculty and students $2; general public $3. 

DEBATE The UNCW Speech and Debate Team recently returned from the 

TEAM University of Alabama where they participated in their first tourn- 

ament of the season. Earning awards for UNCW was Mitchell 
Butts for 1st in Persuasive Speaking, 5th Overall Speaker and 
5th in Poetry Interpretation and Travis Parker for 5th in Persua- 
sive Speaking. The next tournament will be held November 
9-11 at Appalachian State University. 

HAM N' Dr. Dale McCall of IMBR will speak on "High Altitude Research 

EGGHEADS at IMBR" during the October 26 noon luncheon meeting of Ham 

'n Eggheads in the Faculty Dining Room of the cafeteria. 



P&R LECTURE 
SERIES 



HISTORY 
FILM 



PAYROLL 
DEADLINE 



LEAVE 
REMINDER 



Dr. Sandy Martin, assistant professor of P&R, will discuss "Reli^ 
ious Ethics and American Politics" TONIGHT at 8 in King Hall | 
Auditorium. The lecture, in conjunction with the P&R Lecture j 
Series, will explore the constitutional, historical and theological' 
foundations of the principle of separation of church and state 
in the US. Dr. James Megivern, professor of P&R, will discuss | 
"The Ethics of Nuclear Deterrence" at the next lecture series 
on November 1. 

The first in a series of films sponsored by the history departmei 
is entitled "Lion in Winter." The film, scheduled for TONIGHT 
at 7:30 in Bryan Auditorium, is about English King, Henry 
II (115'f-89). Dr. Larry Usilton, associate professor of history, 
will lead a discussion following the film. 

All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets reflecting 
shift or overtime pay must be in the personnel office before 
10 ajn. November 1 in order for payroll computation to be com- 
pleted. Supervisors who do not meet this deadline should not e> 
pect their employees to be paid on November 15. 

Only 21^0 hours (30 days) of annual leave may be carried over tc 
the January 1 timesheet. Employees should work with super- 
visors to allow for time off if their account is above this maxini 
amount. All questions concerning leave accouits should be madl 
to Alice Maile at ext. 3392. 



FORT Charles Fort, director of the creative writing program and assij! 

TO GIVE tant professor of English, will give three poetry readings during; 

READINGS the month of November. He will read at the fall meeting of th(| 

North Carolina Poetry Society during Culture Week in Raleigh c' 
will address literature and creative writing classes at Atlantic 
Christian College in Wilson. As part of the Writers and Reader;: 
Series by North Carolina writers, he will read at the Weymouth 
Center for the Arts and Humanities in Southern Pines. 



ZULLO TO 

PRESENT 

PAPER 



KECHLEY 
INVITED 



WASSON 

GUEST 

SPEAKER 



NEW 
STAFF 



Victor A. Zullo, professor of earth sciences, will present a papej 
on brachylepadomorph barnacles from the Cretaceous of North 
America at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of 
America in Reno, Nevada, next month. 

Dr. David Kechley of the Department of Creative Arts - music 
division has been invited to participate in two Reading-Rehears! 
sessions by the Minnesota Orchestra. The sessions, to be held lii 
Minneapolis, will consist of rehearsal readings of works along w 
informal panel discussions. Kechley's work, Alexander and the 
Wind-up Mouse, will be featured along with works by other gues 
composers. He was one of eight guest composers selected from, 
across the country to participate. 

Mary Wasson of the English faculty was guest speaker at the 
Annual "Bosses Day Breakfast" sponsored by Professional Secre- 
taries International on October 16. She spoke on "The Organize 
tional and Personal Dynamics of an Effective Boss/Secretary 
Relationship." 

Welcome to the following new employees: Ellen M. Jones, analyi 
programmer in academic computing, and Mary J. Henderson, cler 
stenographer in the physical plant. 



HISTORY The history department will present a symposium, "Religion and 

SYMPOSIUM American Politics," October 29 at 8 pjn. in Bryan Auditorium. 

Dr. Robert Toplin, professor of history, will discuss historical 
perspective of religion and politics and some of the common 
features of each that produce morajism. Dr. Robert Rafalko, 
assistant professor of P&R, will look at the moral questions 
being asked and the constitutional issue of separation of church 
and state. Also, Dr. Roger Lowery, associate professor of 
political science, will reflect on the topic from the point of 
view of a political scientist -- How is the public reacting? 
what do the polls show? and where does the public stand on 
the separation of church and state? Dr. Thomas Moseley, 
professor of history, will be the moderator. 

The AAUP reception for new fac'Jlty will be held Friday, October 
26 from 7-10 pjn. at Wrightsville Beach. The address is 'f East 
Atlanta. Turn left at Newell's, go north 2 blocks past Roberts 
Grocery and turn right onto E. Atlanta. The house is mid-block 
on the right. (If lost call 256-286'J.) All faculty are invited. 

The women's basketball team is looking for girls 8-12 years old 
interested in being ball girls for home games. Call ext. 3232. 

The University Union will present a "Go Bananas" day on Monday, 
October 29, in the Union Courtyard. A banana pie eating contest 
will be featured at noon, followed by a free giant banana split. 
Greystoke, The Legend of Tarzan will be shown on the wide 
screen at 8 pjn. All faculty and staff are invited. 

A one-day free workshop on "Professional Impact, Personal 
Power," will be held November 10 from 9 ajn. - 'f pjn. in the 
McKimmon Center at NCSU. Sponsored by NCSU's Provost Office, 
the workshop is open to all university personnel. Dr. Julie White, 
first woman director of the Institute of Management at Old 
Dominion University, will conduct the program. Topics will in- 
clude "Work Smarter— New Rules for the Game"; "Establish 
Authority—Without Saying a Word"; "Power Talk— Communicate 
with Power"; "Get Recognition— Stand Out as a High Achiever"; 
and "Stand Up to Conflict— Keep Cool Under Fire." For more 
information contact Claudia Patterson at the McKimmon Center 
(919) 737-3^09. 

Ty Rowell, director of development, Charles Sanders, director of 
purchasing services, and Mary Wasson of the English department 
represented UNCW at the October 17 United Way Campaign Re- 
port Luncheon. Mrs. Wasson reported that UNCW had contributed 
$10,161 for the 198^^ campaign or 96% of the goal. Last year 
UNCW contributed 113.8% of its goal. Those who have not con- 
tributed and would like to or those who would like to contribute 
more have until November 12. Pledges, checks or cash may be 
sent to Mary Wasson or Charles Sanders or mailed directly to the 
United Way Office. (Don't forget to indicate it is from UNCW.) 

WATH David Russell, assistant professor of mathematical sciences, will 

SCIENCES discuss "Variational Principles and Sturm-Liouville Problems" 

:OLLOQUIUM October 29 at i^-.lO pjn. in MH-212. (UU) The talk is in associa- 

tion with the Mathematical Sciences Colloquium. 

NACK BAR The University Union Snack Bar special this week will be a 

FECIAL 3UMBO Salad Plate. Offer is good through October 31. Cost 

is $1.75 along with CC coupon. 



RECEPTION 
FOR FACULTY 



ATHLETIC 
NOTICE 

GO BANANAS 
ON MONDAY 



FREE 
WORKSHOP 



UNITED 
WAY 



MEGIVERN 
TO SPEAK 



FILM 
SEMINAR 



MANUSCRIPT 
PUBLISHED 



GUEST 
SPEAKER 

SPEECH COM. 

MEMBERS 

PARTICIPATE 



DIRECTORY 
INFORMATION 




Dr. 3ames Megivern of the P&R department will be one of four 
speakers at the fall conference of the NC Social Work Oncolog, 
Group in Raleigh on October 26. His topic is "Religious Issues ^j 
in Care for the Elderly Cancer Patient," 

A Seminar in Film Production will be presented by creative filr 
artists currently working on various films at the NC Film Studi 
Dr. Terry Theodore, professor of drama, has set up the progran 
and will serve as moderator. The seminar, designed to give an ; 
inside look at how a film is put together, will be held Novembe 
in UU-213 at 7:30 p.m. 

Lawrence P. Rozas and Courtney T. Hackney recently had a me! 
script published in the journal, ESTUARIES, titled "Use of Olig 
haline Marshes by Fishes and Macrofainal Crustaceans in North 
Carolina." The manuscript is based on Rozas' thesis completed 
Marine Biology. A second manuscript, also based on the thesis, 
is in press. Mr. Rozas is currently pursuing his Ph.D. at the 
Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences at the 
University of Virginia. 

Gail Phares will speak on "The Central America Peace AlternaJ 
tive" Sunday, October 28, at 7 p.m. in King Hall. 

The following members of the speech communication division w 
present papers at the 70th Annual Meeting of the Speech Com- 
munication Association to be held November l-'t in Chicago: ! 



Dr. Betty Jo Welch 



Dr. Carole Tallant 



Mr. Frank Trimble 



Dr. Steven Weiss 



"Analysis of Teaching Evaluation i 

Instruments Collected by ACA" 1 

! 

"John Hawkes and His Unreliable 
Narrators" 

"Twice Told Tales: Adapting Mul 
pie Narrators for Stage and Scree 

"The Ontological Argument and thj 

'Frequently Defective Machine:' T; 

Case of Descartes," and "Discipli- ', 

nary Boundaries and the Rhetoric '■ 

Rationality: Progress in Science 

Music" 

Mr. Randy Harrington will chair a panel on "The Role ofil 
National Organizations in the Future of Forensics." 

Please make the following changes or additions to the 8^^-85 
faculty/staff phone directory: 

Add: Robert W. Berg 

Computer Programmer-Academic Computing Services 

357 Lullwater Dr. (28W3) 

Home phone: 799-9767 - UNCW ext. 380if 

Add: Ellen M. Jones 

Analyst Programmer - Academic Computing Services 

l^fl El Ogden Dr. (28W5) 

Home phone: 686-9317 - UNCW ext. 3803 

On page 29 under Gloria J. Hamilton - add ext. 351*1 

On page k2 under Joel Mintzes change ext. 3^*7 1 to ext. 3^*37 

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!! PAYROLL TREATS WILL BE GIVEN O* 
AT THE CASHIER'S OFFICE ON HALLOWEEN DAY!!! 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 




LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 13 
NOVEMBER 1, igg'f 



EMPLOYEES The Democratic Party of New Hanover County invites all staff, 

INVITED faculty and their families to "Celebrate America Day," an old- 

fashioned picnic with music, games and country-fair activities 
Sunday, November 't, from 1:30 - 5:30 pjn. at Hugh McRae Park. 
There will be free hot dogs, popcorn and balloons for all who 
attend. 

WRITERS The Wilmington Writers Forum will meet Saturday, November 3, 

FORUM at 7 pjn., in room 21'f of Morton Hall. The meeting will focus 

on the Creative Writing Program at UNCW. 

HAYWOOD Bob Haywood, campus minister, will give a presentation on 

TO SPEAK Nicaragua and his experiences there in a program TONIGHT at 

7 in Bryan Auditorium. The talk is sponsored by the UNCW 

ROTC program. Free. 

MATH John Karlof, associate professor of mathematical sciences, will 

SCIENCES speak November 5 at '*:10 pjn. in MH-2I2 in conjunction 

with the Mathematical Sciences Colloquium. All faculty and 
staff are invited. Coffee will be served at 'f. 

P&R LECTURE Dr. James Megivern, chairman of P&R, will discuss "The Ethics 

SERIES of Nuclear Deterrence" TONIGHT at 8 in King Hall Auditorium. 

The next lecture sponsored by the P&R department on "Moral 
Choices in America Today" will be presented by Dr. Ference 
Altrichter and Dr. James McGowan on November 8. 

SCHOLARSHIP Leah Grenell, a senior majoring in computer science, has been 

AWARDED selected as the first recipient of the J. Marshall Crews Scholar- 

ship Award. The Crev/s Scholarship Award was established by 
friends of his at the time of his retirement in 1981. Dr. Crews 
started with the university in 19^*8 and held a number of 
positions including registrar, assistant dean of students, dean 
of students, academic dean and dean of admissions as well 
as professor of mathematics. He now holds the position of 
professor emeritus. 



Wnmiwm'm^ 



Dr. William A. Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs, was 
featured as "Tar Heel of the Week" in the October 28 issue of 
the Raleigh News and Observer. 



ZULLO 

PRESENTS 

TALK 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 

FILMS 



MUSICAL 
PRODUCTION 



HAM N' 
EGGHEADS 



ATHLETIC 
NOTICE 

HISTORY 
FILM 



NC 
SYMPHONY 



STUDY 
SKILLS 



FESTIVAL 
OF TREES 



UNC 

PROMO 

DAY 



Victor A. Zullo, professor of geology, presented a talk on the 
tectonic history of the Carolina Coastal Plain at Appalachian 
State University on October 26. 

The New Hanover County Public Library will begin a new film 
series of Hollywood musicals of the thirties and forties. The 
films will be shown on Fridays at 2 p.m. and 7:30 pjn. 

"Cover Girl" is scheduled for November 2 
"Love Me Tonight" is scheduled for November 9 
"Blue Skies" will be shown November 16 

All films are free - faculty and staff are cordially invited to 
attend. More information may be obtained from 3udy Beck at 
763-3303. 

The Wilmington Youth and Children's Theatre will present "Annie 
Get Your Gun" Friday, November 2 at 8 pjn. and Saturday and 
Sunday, November 3 and it, at 3 pjn. Tickets are $2J0. For 
additional information call the Community Arts Center at 
762-1198. 

Dr. Robert Rafalko, assistant professor of philosophy & religion, 
will speak on "Ideology and the Political Parties" Friday, 
November 2, at noon in the faculty dining room of the cafeteria. 
Dr. Paul Hosier, acting director of information systems, will 
discuss "Academic Computing Services: Past, Present and Futuri 
during the next meeting of Ham n' Eggheads on November 9. 

The women's basketball team is still looking for girls 8-12 years 
old interested in being ball girls for home games. Call ext. 3232] 

The second in a series of films sponsored by the history depart- 
ment is entitled "Luther." The film is about Martin Luther's 
quest for faith and dramatizes the development of Luther's 
ideas, sermons and the basis of the Luthern Reformation. 

The NC Symphony is currently conducting its 198*^-85 member- 
ship drive. Concerts for the season include: 

November 28 - Michael Lorimer, guitarist, 

January 25 - Norman Krieger, pianist, 

March 22 - Peter Winograd, violinist, 

All concerts will be held in Kenan Auditorium. Season tickets 
for adults will be $20; senior citizens $15 and students $10. 
For additional information call Doug Swink at ext. 3'f'f2. 

The next Writing Place Study Skills Forum is entitled "Asking thi 
Right Questions." The forum is scheduled for November 13 at 
'f p.m. and 7 p.m. in MH-20'f. 

The second annual Festival of Trees is scheduled for Saturday, 
November 2^, through Friday, November 30, at the Hilton. 
Additional information to follow. 

The UNC Board of Governors and President William Friday will 
present a program on the University's impact on North Carolina i 
November 29 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. See upcoming 
editions of the CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE for further details. 



3LITICAL 
iVARENESS 

EEK 



:ason 

CKETS 



uditions 
:heduled 



^TICLE IN 
JBLICAIION 



\PER 
JBLISHED 



'MPOSIUM 
^ FILM 
lODUCTION 



'INGTON 

■-LIVERS 

vPER 



Political Awareness Week, a week set aside to educate the college 
student voter toward making an "educated" vote, is presently being 
observed. The following faculty members will present views on 
specific topics of political importance: 

Dr. Sylvia Polgar, associate professor of sociology, will discuss 
"Social Programs in the US — A Question of Distributive Justice" 
TODAY at noon in the University Union Courtyard. 

Bob Haywood, campus minister, will discuss "US Policy in 
Nicaragua — A Christian Perspecitive November 2 at noon in the 
University Union Courtyard. 

All faculty and staff are invited. 

1 98^^-85 basketball season tickets are now on sale for faculty and 
staff. Tickets will be available in the athletic office TODAY from 
8 ajn. - 5 pjn. (Tickets will go on sale to the public after today). 

$30 adult season ticket (only 2 adult tickets at this price) 
515 minor season ticket (when purchased with adult ticket) 

Auditions for the solo parts in this year's production of the "Walk- 
In Messiah" will be held from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, November 
10, in Kenan Hall. Dr. 3oe Hickman, assistant professor of music 
and conductor of the Wilmington Symphony Orchestra, will hear 
auditions. Interested soloists should call ext. 3390 to schedule an 
audition time. The "Walk-In Messiah" will be held December 10. 

Dr. Steve Harper, chairman and associate professor of the depart- 
ment of management and marketing, has had his article, "Intra- 
preneurship and Innovation In Today's Corporation," published in 
the October issue of Carolina Business and Finance. 

Dr. Mark Galizio of the psychology department and Dr. Yousry 
Sayed of the department of chemical and physical sciences have 
co-authored a paper along with Stacy Smaltz '83 and Barbara 
Spencer '8^. The paper entitled "The effects of ethanol and nalox- 
one on extinction of jump-up avoidance in rats" was published in 
Alcohol , Vol. 1. In addition, Galizio, Smaltz and Spencer have had 
a paper, "Effects of ethanol and naltrexone on free-operant 
avoidance in rats," published in Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and 
Behavior, Vol. 21. 

A Symposium on Film Production will be presented by creative 
film artists currently working on various films at the NC Film 
Studio. Dr. Terry Theodore, professor of drama, will serve as the 
moderator. The symposium, designed to give an inside look at 
how a film is put together, will be held TONIGHT in UU-2I2 at 
7:30. 

Dr. Robert H. Byington, chairman of the English department, 
delivered a paper entitled "Fire and Foghorns: Ethnographies 
of workers' Communities" during the annual meeting of the 
American Folklore Society held October 18-21 in San Diego. 



MOSELEY Dr. Thomas V. Moseley of the department of history presented a 

PRESENTS program recently on Shiloh to the George Davis Chapter Number 

PROGRAM Five, Sons of Confederate Veterans. During the program he 

extended greetings from John Joycelyn, a "Real Son" of the 
GAR from Maine to Daniel Gordon Bollinger of WhiteviJIe and 
A. Raymond Crow of Wilmington both "Real Sons" and members 
of the George Davis Chapter. "Real Son" refers to an actual 
son of a Confederate Veteran or Union Veteran. 

FACULTY AT Drs. Ravija Badarinathi, Claude Farrell, W.W. Hall, Jr., and John 

CONFERENCE E. Morgan attended the Eighteenth International Atlantic Econon 

Conference held October Jl-l't in Montreal, Quebec. While then 
Dr. Farrell presented a paper co-authored with Badarinathi and 
Hall entitled "Alternative Methods of Tracking and Forecasting 
Regional Economic Activity" and discussed a paper, "Cooperatlor 
Conflicts, and Contradictions in the West African Economic 
Integration Schemes." Dr. Hall discussed the paper, "The 
Capital Constraint: Small Rural Enterprises" while Dr. Morgan 
chaired a session on "Industrial Organization and Corporate 
Strategy" as well as presented a paper entitled "Economic Evi- 
dence and the Antitrust Case." 



ES FACULTY W. Burleigh Harris and Victor A. Zullo of the department of eart 

AT MEETING sciences will present a paper on "Recognition of coastal onlap 

sequences on basin margins using barnacle assemblages" at the 
November annual meeting of the Geological Society of America 
in Reno, Nevada. 

SCIENCE The UNCW Office of Special Programs will sponsor a Fall Selene 

CAMP FOR Camp November 30, ( public school teacher work day ), for child- 

KIDS ren ages 6 - 12. Children will be picked up at Kenan Auditoriun 

(outside) at 8 a.m., taken to the Ft. Fisher Marine center for a 
day of marine education and recreational activities and returned 
to Kenan Auditorium at 5:30 pjn. Children should bring a bag 
lunch, liquid refreshment, a jacket and wear tennis shoes. Regis- 
tration may be done in the office of special programs in room 
225 of Hoggard Hall. Deadline to register is November 23. Fee 
is $12; $10 for additional children in the same family. 

INFORMAL, The UNCW Jazz Fusion and Jazz Combo, under the direction of 

CONCERT Frank J. Bongiorno, will perform an informal concert Sunday, 

November 11, at 3 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Admission is $1. 

HOFFMAN The University Program Board will present Abbie Hoffman on 

TO SPEAK Thursday, November 8, at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. Hoffman 

will speak on "The Current Political Scene and Contemporary 
Issues." Tickets, available at the UU Information Desk, will be 
$2 for faculty and staff. 

SPECIAL The YWCA and Faculty Women's Network will present a program' 

PROGRAM on "Current US Import/Export Policies and their Effect on Lesse 

Developed African and Caribbean Countries" Wednesday, 
November 7, at 7:30 p.m. in Bryan Auditorium. The panel will 
include representatives from Ghana and Grenada, Dr. Dennis 
Carter of the Cameron School of Business, John Dreyfors from 
the NC Department of Commerce and Robert Mack, president of! 
the local chapter of the World Trade Association. Free and 
open to the public. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 




[ 



HISTORY 
FILM 



STUDY 
SKILLS 



HAM N' 
EGGHEADS 



P&R 
LECTURE 



i 



MATH 
SCIENCES 



JAZZ 
CONCERT 



CLUB 
OFFER 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER l^f 
NOVEMBER 8, 19U 

"Luther," a film dealing with Martin Luther's quest for faith, will 
be shown November 20 at 7:30 pjn. in Bryan Auditorium. Walser 
Allen of the history faculty will conduct a discussion following the 
film. The film, sponsored by the history department, is free and 
open to the public. 

The next Writing Place Study Skills Forum, "Asking the Right 
Questions," is scheduled for November 13 at if pjn. and 7 p.m. 
in MH-20^. 

Dr. Paul Hosier, acting director of information systems, will speak 
on "Academic Computing Services: Past, Present and Future" dur- 
ing the November 9 luncheon meeting of Ham n' Eggheads at 
noon in the faculty dining room located upstairs in the cafeteria. 

Dr. Ference Altrichter and Dr. James McGowan will discuss 
"Ethics and the Problem of Objectivity" tonight at 8 in King Hall 
Auditorium. The lecture is sponsored by the department of 
philosophy & religion and is designed to examine "Moral Choices 
in America Today." The next talk is scheduled for November 15 
with Drs. B. Frank Hall and Gerald Shinn speaking on "Ethics and 
the Love of God." Free and open to the public. 

Dr. Kenneth Spackman of the mathematical sciences faculty will 
speak on "Prime Pairs of Mutually Odd Order" (UU) during the 
November 12 Mathematical Sciences Colloquium in MH-212 at 
'f:10 p.m. Faculty and staff are invited. Coffee will be served 
at ^. 

An informal concert by the UNCW Jazz Fusion and Jazz Combo 
under the direction of Frank Bongiorno will be held November 11 
at 3 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. Admission is $1. 

The Crest Fitness Club located at 38 N. Lumina Avenue at 
Wrightsville Beach extends an invitation to ail faculty and staff 
to visit the club and sign up for a "FREE" trial workout. Fa- 
cilities include 19 nautilus machines with 30 exercise stations, a 
full rack of dumbbells, stationary bicycles, complete locker/ 
shower facilities with separate steamrooms for men and women, 
a lounge and restaurant, and a large aerobic/exercise room. For 
additional information call John Poole at 256-5758. 



TASK 
FORCE 



The Dean of Students Office is in the process of establishing a 
new Alcohol Awareness Task Force. The overall mission is to 
assist that office in identifying the issues of alcohol use and mi 
use on the campus and to advise on educational resources avaiL 
able. Any faculty or staff member interested in serving on this 
task force should contact Pat Leonard, associate dean of studei 
at ext. 3119. 



GUEST 
SPEAKER 



ROWELL 
ON PANEL 



REVIEW 
PUBLISHED 



SPORRE AT 

INTERNATIONAL 

MEETING 



PAPER 
PRESENTED 



FACULTY 
AT MEETING 



STAFF AT 
CONFERENCE 



The UNCW Chapter of Psi Chi, National Honour Society in 
Psychology, will present Dr. Dan Estep, associate professor of 
psychology at The University of Georgia, Athens, November 9 
speaking on Sexual behavior in monkeys at U pjn. in room 111 o 
the Social & Behavioral Sciences Building. Persons interested i 
having linch and general discussion with Dr. Estep on that day 
should meet in the main psychology office, room 110 of the 
Social & Behavioral Sciences Building at noon. 

Tyrone Rowell, director of development, discussed "Use of Pub] 
Relations and Publications in Promoting School Image" during tli 
Selling Successful Schools Workshop November 2 at Atlantic 
Beach. The workshop was sponsored by the State Department ( 
Public Instruction, Division of Community Schools and Southeas 
Regional Education Center. 

A review of R.C. Terry's Victorian Popular Fiction. 1860-1880. j 
by Brooks Dodson of the English department, has appeared in ti, 
October 198't issue of Choice. 

Dennis 3. Sporre, chairman of the department of creative arts, 
participated in The International Conference on New Direction: 
in The Arts in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, October 19-28. I 
The conference, sponsored by the International Council of Fine 
Arts Deans, hosted one hundred conference participants from 
Argentina, Bulgaria, Canada, Czechoslovkia, Finland, Great 
Britain, The Netherlands, Poland, Switzerland and the US. 

Dr. Marlene Rosenkoetter, acting dean of the school of nursing 
and Dr. Patricia Rensma of the departn>ent of philosophy & 
religion presented a paper during the annual convention of the 
North Carolina Nurses' Association October 26 in Asheville. 
The paper was titled "Ethical Issues in an Age of Technology." 

Fred Davenport and David Lewis of the department of manage- 
ment and marketing attended the Southeastern Regional Law 
Association meeting held October 25-27 in Nashville, TN. 
Mr. Lewis delivered a paper entitled "Regulation of Pyramid 
Marketing Schemes" while Mr. Davenport presented his paper, 
"Using Redeemed Stock As Security for the Redemption Price.' 

Pat Leonard, Gail Young and Andy Morris from the division of 
student affairs and Charles King and Margaret Taylor of 
the office of business services attended the eleventh NC 
Housing Officers Conference October 29-31 at Appalachian 
State University. Pat Leonard, associate dean of students, 
presented a program, "Women in Higher Education - Different 
Perspectives," and Margaret Taylor, coordinator of auxiliary 
services, presented a program entitled "Higher Pay for Your 
RA: A Statewide Survey of RA Compensation." 



KINZER ON 
RADIO 



Dr. Bruce Kinzer, assistant professor of history, was interviewed 
by WAAV/WGNI Radio November 1 regarding the recent assas- 
sination of Indira Gandhi. 



BROWN 

DELIVERS 

PAPER 



FACULTY 
MEMBERS 
AT MEETING 



HARPER 
SPEAKS 



Dr. Robert Brown, professor of psychology, delivered a paper, 
"Rearing with Shelter Reduces Gerbils' Seizures in a Novel Sit- 
uation," at the recent annual meeting of the International 
Society for Developmental Psychobiology in Baltimore, MD. 
Christopher Schmitt 'S'f was co-author. 

Modern languages faculty members, 3oann Mount, Terry Mount, 
Aida Toplin and William Woodhouse, attended the joint meeting of 
the Foreign Language Association of NC and the American Associ- 
ation of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese October 26-27 
in Charlotte. Drs. Joann Mount and Terry Mount presided during 
FLANC sessions. Dr. Woodhouse is currently serving as secretary/ 
treasurer of the NC Chapter of AATSP. 

Dr. Steve Harper of the department of management and marketing 
discussed "Management Education In The Eighties: A View From 
The Top" at the American Institute For Decision Sciences 
November 7 in Toronto. 



NC SYMPHONY 
TICKETS 



CHINA 
EVENING 



HOFFMAN 

SPEAKS 

TONIGHT 



The 198'>-85 membership drive is still underway. Adult tickets are 
$20 and will include three concerts. Concerts are scheduled for 
November 28, January 25 and March 22. For more information 
call Doug Swink at ext. 3ittt2. 

The Museum of World Cultures is sponsoring a "China Evening" 
at 7:30 pjn., Monday, November 12, in the Randall Library Audi- 
torium. The program will begin with traditional and modern music, 
followed by a film, "The China Heritage." Discussion will be con- 
ducted by Drs. Grace Burton and Carole Fink, who traveled to 
mainland China this past summer, and Dr. Kathy Walker, who lived 
in China for a while and whose speciality is modern Chinese 
History. 

Abbie Hoffman will speak tonight at 8 in Kenan Auditorium. His 
topic will be "The Current Political Scene and Contemporary 
Issues." Tickets are available at the UU Information Desk. 



CALENDARS 
AVAILABLE 



PAPER 
DELIVERED 



NHMH 
SEMINAR 



1985 8 1/2 X 11 calendars are now available in central duplicating. 
Calendars are 80<;!: each and may be ordered by using a copy center 
requisition form. 

Dr. Carole Fink of the history faculty delivered a paper, "The 
Genoa Conference of 1922: Failure of 'Coexistence' with Lenin's 
Russia" during the 50th anniversary meeting of the Southern His- 
torical Association November 2 in Louisville. 

A seminar on "Adolescent Depression and Suicide" will be held 
November l^ at 7:30 p.m. at the AHEC Auditorium. Faculty and 
staff are invited. Free. 



SNACK BAR 
SPECIAL 



The UU Snack Bar special for the week is the Steak 'n' Cheese 
Sandwich served with mushrooms, green peppers and onions. 
The cost is $U0 with CC coupon. Special good through 
November 15. 



SPA SERVICE AWARDS ■ 

The annual service awards ceremony was held October 25 in the University Union. 
The awards are given to SPA employees who have reached 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 yeaij 
of state service. Mr. William Calloway, director of personnel services, served as 
master of ceremonies; Robert Walton, acting vice chancellor for business affairs, in- 
troduced the speaker. Dr. George Bair, assistant to the chancellor. Dr. Charles Cah 
vice chancellor for academic affairs, presented the service awards. Music was 
provided by Frank Bongiorno of the music department while Lelia Henderson, formeii 
UNCW employee, provided entertainment. A reception was held following the 
ceremony. Special recognition was given Eddie Gilchrist upon his retirement 
and to Opal Price of the Cameron School of Business on being named SPA "Employe 
of the Year." Employees receiving awards included: 

FIVE YEARS 



Robert T. Barefoot 
Claude Brown 
Mary F. Carr 
Donna H. Cheatham 
Martha 3o Clemmons 
Beverly M. Cobb 
Billy Dawson 
Anna C. Dayvault 
Harold W. Dubach 
Chyrl K. Ferguson 
James E. Ford 
Elizabeth B. Freeman 



Ruth J. Gardner 
Margaret W. Higgins 
Clarence 3ames 
James Mathis 
Ruben C. McNeil 
Brenda S. Nelson 
Jeanette K. Parnell 
Ernest A. Perry 
Helen P. Washington 
Mary Westbrook 
Ralena W. Wicker 
Robert 3. Wszalek 



TEN YEARS 



Pearl B. Blackwell 
Emily D. Barber 
Alfred O. Barry 
James A. Bryant 
Rebecca A. Chilcote 
Gloria M. Crowell 
Alfred Deas, Sr. 
David N. Gurganus 
Barbara S. Harlow 
Cornelia L. Jenkins 



Sherry F. King 
Patsy T. Larrick 
Joyce H. Lewis 
Nancy D. Maready 
Ethel McCrary 
Linda S. Moore 
Cornelia L. Royal 
Gloria W. Sasser 
Martha L. Shipman 
Esther Southerland 
Carolyn F. Windham 



FIFTEEN YEARS 



NEW 
STAFF 



Catherine D. Kiger 
Barbara M. Treanor 
Robert O. Walton, Jr. 



Welcome to the following new employees. Charlotte M. Durbino, 
computer operator for information systems; John H. Kennedy, 
security officer for campus police and Leonard Warren, painter 
for physical plant. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 

LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 15 
NOVEMBER 15, 198'f 

RECOGNITION UNCW employees who provided special services to the campus dur- 

LUNCHEON ing Hurricane Diana will be recognized at a luncheon TOMORROW, 

November 16. Among those being honored are physical plant em- 
ployees, campus police, resident life employees and others in the 
division of student affairs, ROTC cadets and professional staff. 

OPEN Drs. James Megivern, Sylvia Polgar and William Schneider met 

AAUP with UNC President William C. Friday and Vice President Raymond 

MEETING Dawson on November 11 as members of a North Carolina AAUP 

delegation. They will report on this and other AAUP issues 
TODAY at 3:30 p.m. in room 201 of the University Union. All 
faculty are invited. 

SYMPHONY The NC Symphony will feature Michael Lorimer, guitarist and for- 

TO PERFORM mer Foundation Distinguished Visiting Professor, November 28 at 

8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. For ticket information call Doug 

Swink at ext. 3^'f2. 



FREE 
MOVIES 

ATLANTIS 
BOOKSALE 



INFORMATION 
DESK INFO 




The University Program Board will feature two "free movies" be- 
ginning at 8 p.m. November 20 in Kenan Auditorium. 

The Creative writing Program will sponsor the Atlantis fall book- 
sale along with open student readings and a folk music concert 
Saturday, November 17, from 7-11 p.m. in the University Union 
Snack Bar. Book prices will range in price from 25(^ to $2. 
Admission is $1. 

The University Union Information Center has acquired a collection 
of lost and found items. Persons who have misplaced items such 
as keys, books, etc., should check with them. Also, the center is 
currently upxJating its babysitting and tutoring lists for the 
bureau. Interested persons should contact Bev Cobb at ext. 3833. 

All faculty and staff are cordially invited to join University 
President William C. Friday and area alumni and friends from all 
of the UNC System's campuses for a special "University" 
presentation on Thursday, November 29. A reception at 6:30 p.m., 
featuring heavy hors d'oeuvres, will be held in the University 
Union followed by a film on the UNC System in Kenan Auditorium. 
Reception reservations are $5 each and can be made by contacting 
the development office. 



CONCERT The Ruggieri Piano Trio, in residence at UNCW, will present a 

ON FRIDAY concert at 8 p.m. Friday, November 16, in Kenan Auditorium. Th 

concert will include Mozart's Trio in C Major, K. 5'f8; Beethoven' 
Trio in C Minor, Op. 1, No. 3; and Brahm's Trio in B Major, Opus 
8. Musicians include Pianist Dr. Sherrill Martin, violinist Leopold 
Sipe and cellist Kathy Meyer. The concert is free and open to 
the public. 

POETRY A poetry reading sponsored by the Cape Fear Foundation will be 

READING held Saturday, November 17, at 7:30 p.m. in the alley entrance ol 

the foundation. Admission will be $2. 

WORLD The Museum of World cultures is sponsoring a "Tibet Evening" at 

CULTURES 7:30 p.m. Monday, November 19, in the Randall Library Auditoriu 

The program will begin with music of Tibet, including monks 
chanting, followed by a film on the history of Tibet. Discussion 
will be led by Dr. 3ohn B. Buescher, assistant professor of P&R, 
whose specialty is oriental religions. 

MATH Sandra McLaurin, assistant professor of mathematical sciences, 

SCIENCES will discuss "Placement Testing and Remediation" November 19 

COLLOQUIUM while Paul Jambor, associate professor of mathematical sciences, 

will speak on "Commutative Rings with no Superdecomposables" j 
(MF) November 26. Both talks, sponsored by the mathematical i 
sciences department, will be presented in MH-212 at ^:10 p.m. 
on the respective dates. | 

P&R LECTURE "Ethics and the Love of God" is the topic of the eighth and final 

LECTURE lecture in a series sponsored by the P&R department. The lec- 

ture will be presented by Dr. B. Frank Hall, professor emeritus o 
P&R, and will begin at 8 TONIGHT in King Hall Auditorium. 
Dr. Gerald Shinn, professor of P&R, will respond. 

WOMEN'S The Faculty Women's Network will meet Sunday, November 18, a'. 

NETWORK 7:30 p.m. at the Canterbury Woods meeting complex. Call Kathid 

Berkeley at ext. 3309 for additional information. 

CONCERT The UNCW Concert Band will present an evening of music at 8 

BAND Monday, November 19, in Kenan Auditorium. Conducted by Harr 

McLamb, assistant professor of music, the band will perform wor!' 
by Ralph Vaughan Williams, Dimitri Kabalevsky, Percy Grainger, 
George Gershwin and others. Featured soloist will be percussion^ 
instructor Jack Bircher performing Kabalevsky's Galop for xylo- 
phone and band. No charge. 

GOOD The Good Life series will present Mark Warner, MD, discussing 

LIFE "High Blood Pressure: Disarming the Silent Killer" November 191 

at 7:30 p.m. in the AHEC Auditorium, Free and open to the pub. 

HISTORY "Luther," sponsored by the department of history, will be shown , 

FILM November 20 at 7:30 p.m. in Bryan Auditorium. Walser Allen of j 

the history faculty will conduct a discussion following the film. 

SNACK BAR The University Union Snack Bar special will feature waffles ser\' 

SPECIAL ed from 7:30 - 10:30 a.m. now through November 21. Buy a plair 

waffle for 95<: and CC coupon or buy one with either blueberry 
or strawberry topping for $1.^*5 and CC coupon. The snack bar 
will close at 3 pjn. on November 21 for the Thanksgiving holiday 



RTICLE 
CCEPTED 



AVIS 
ELECTED 



Richard D. Dixon and Diane E. Levy of the department of sociolo- 
gy and anthropology have had an article, "Sex of Children: A 
Community Analysis of Preferences and Predetermination Atti- 
tudes," accepted for publication in The Sociological Quarterly. 
The article will appear in the 1985 second or third issue of the 
publication. 

Derick G^. Davis of the HPER department has been selected to 
coordinate four education sessions at the 1985 Southern Region 
Conference of the National Recreation and Park Association. 
The conference, scheduled from March 30 through April 3, will 
be devoted to the Arts and Humanities in Public Recreation. 



HEMISTRY 
ACULTY AT 
EETING 



3HNSTON 

ELIVERS 

^PER 



EN'S 
ASKETBALL 



DM EN'S 
\SKETBALL 



JM 
ETS 



lAFT 

low 



The following chemistry faculty members participated at the 
Southeastern Regional American Chemical Society Meeting held 
October 2'f-26 in Raleigh: 

Dr. Sybil K. Miller presented a paper entitled "Study of 
the Protective Effect of Various Salts on Acid Inactiva- 
tion of Human Serum Butyrylcholinesterase." Dr. James 
H. Reeves delivered a paper entitled "The Redox Proper- 
ties of Flavins in Acidic Media" and gave a computer 
demonstration on "Low Cost Computer-Controlled Elec- 
trochemistry." Dr. Lewis E. Nance, discussed his current 
research with Aspartame in a paper entitled "Aspartame 
as a Ligand." Dr. 3oan D. Willey outlined the results of 
her two-year study of acid rain in the area, "Sources of 
Rainwater Acidity in Southeastern North Carolina." 
Also, Drs. Charles R. Ward and Jack B. Levy presented 
results of their investigation of the effects of nitrate 
ions on the measurement of standard reduction potentials 
in a paper given by Dr. Ward titled "A Common Textbook 
Error: Nitrates in Voltaic Cells." Dr. Ward also presented 
a computer demonstration called "Prostat: Statistics for 
the Physical Scientist." Dr. Fred Hornack and Mrs. 
Rebecca Jones also attended the meeting. 

Dr. W. Lee Johnston, associate professor of political science, de- 
livered a paper, "The Old South vs. the New South: Election 
Politics in North Carolina," during the annual meeting of the 
Southern Political Science association held November 1-3 in 
Savannah. Drs. Shahzad Ahmad, James Dixon and Roger Lowery 
also attended the meeting. 

The Seahawk Basketball Team will host Radford University on 
November 2^ and Coastal Carolina College November 28. Both 
games will be held at 7:30 p.m. in Trask Coliseum. Individual 
adult tickets are $ii- & $5; high school and under $2 & $2.50. 

The Women Seahawks will host NC A&T November 29 at 7 p.m. 
in Trask Coliseum. Adults $2; high school and under $1. 

The Men and Women swimhawks will host the College of Charles- 
ton November 17 at 2 p.m. The women will host NCSU November 
18 at 1 p.m. while the men take on NCSU at 3 p.m. All swim 
meets are held at the pool. No charge. 

The Wilmington Craft Guild will hold its 12th Annual Christmas 
Craft Show THIS WEEKEND, November 17-18 at the Community 
Arts Center. Door prizes will be awarded hourly. Faculty 
and staff are invited. 



POETRY 

CONTEST 

WINNERS 



FESTIVAL 
OF TREES 



LANUNZIATA 

DELIVERS 

WORKSHOP 



BYINGTON 

CONTRIBUTES 

ESSAY 



EVANS 

CONDUCTS 

WORKSHOP 



BRYAN 

ADDRESSES 

GROUP 



UNITED 
WAY 



MACLENNAN 

PRESENTS 

WORKSHOP 



ARTICLE 
PUBLISHED 




The Creative Writing Program announces the winners of the Ui 
versity Poetry Contest sponsored by the Wilmington Junior Sor 

1st - Aunt Aggie by Julie Buffalo 

2nd - Hitler's Parade by Julie Buffalo 

3rd - Generations by Jackie Nichols 

The Second Annual Festival of Trees will be held Saturday, 
November 2^^, through Friday, November 30, at the Hilton Inn 
Grand Ballroom. Featured attractions include sixty elegantly < 
corated Christmas trees, antique toys and dolls, craft sales, cc 
tinuous entertainment, a children's story room and many other 
special events. Sponsored by the Friends of Hospice, all proce 
will benefit HOSPICE, a program of care and support for term 
ly ill patients and their families. General admission will be $2 
For additional information call 392-'f3l3. 

Approximately 50 school personnel from the Fairmont City Sch 
District attended a workshop presented by Dr. Louis LaNunzia 
assistant professor of curricular studies. The workshop, entith 
"Assessment and Intervention of Maladaptive Behaviors Occurrj 
within the Educational Setting," was given November 12. | 

Dr. Robert Byington, chairman of the English department, has i 
tributed the first essay, "Introduction to Folklore," to a new b 
about folklore pedagogy just published as Volume IX in the puti 
cations of the American Folklore Society, New Series. The bo 
title is Teaching Folklore, ed. Bruce Jackson (Philadelphia: 
University of Pennsylvania Press, 198'fX 

John Evans of the department of English led a computer aware 
ness session at a reunion meeting of Fellows of the NC Writing; 
Project at Atlantic Christian College held recently at Manteo ] 
Senior High school. li 

Dr. Bill Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs, addressed tl; 
topic of issues in campus alcohol marketing practices during a 
plenary session of the Alcohol and Drug Problems association j 
held last week in Boston. 

UNCW is within $75 of reaching its goal of $10,675 for the 19;| 
UW campaign. Anyone who has not made a pledge or those wh 
would like to increase their commitment should call the UW Of 
immediately. The final report luncheon will be held this week.! 

Dr. Thomas G. MacLennan, associate professor of English and dl 
rector of The Writing Place, conducted a one-day workshop in j 
writing center design and operations with faculty members of 
Beaufort Technical College (Sc) on November 8. 

Frank J. Bongiorno, assistant professor of music, has had his 
article, "Developing the Altissimo," published in The Saxophone 
Symposium, an internationally distributed quarterly magazine. 



The development office staff wishes all employees a happy 

Thanksgiving! Faculty and staff will observe the following 

Thanksgiving holiday schedule: -r, , ., , -, 

Thursday, November 22 

Friday, November 23 



COMMUNIQUE 




LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 

VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 16 

NOVEMBER 29, 198'f - UNIVERSITY PROMOTIONS DAY 

SPECIAL President Friday along with other special guests will be on campus 

EVENT TODAY for the fourth in a series of regional meetings designed to 

inform the public about the UNC System and its contributions to NC. 
All faculty and staff are invited to the multi-media presentation en- 
titled "Partners In Progress" TONIGHT at 8 in Kenan Auditorium. 

FORMS Public bid forms for surplus property may be picked uP from purchas- 

AVAILABLE ing services or the warehouse. 

PLAY The University Theatre will present August Strindberg's Macabre Play, 

IN 5.R.O. "The Ghost Sonata" now through Sunday, December 2, at 8 nightly in 

the S.R.O. Theatre. Call ext. 3'f'fO for reservations. Admission $i^. 

MATH The next Mathematical Sciences Colloquium is scheduled for December 

SCIENCES 3 with Ferenc Altrichter discussing "Philosophical Presupositions in 

the Newtonian Conception of Space and Time." The talk will be held 
in MH-212 at '^rlO p.m. Coffee will be served at ^. 

NEW A welcome is extended to the following new employees: Velma Dailey, 

STAFF housekeeping assistant for residence life; Dorothy L. Spears, house- 

keeping assistant; Joyce T. Mills, stock clerk, and Mary 3. Henderson, 
clerk-stenographer in the physical plant. 

PAYROLL All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets reflecting holi- 

DEADLINE day or shift premium MUST be in the personnel office by 8:30 a.m., 

December 3. Supervisors who do not meet this deadline should not ex- 
pect their employees to be paid on December lU. 

TRASK The arena of Trask Coliseum will be closed all day, December 11, in 

COLISEUM order to set up for the Willie Nelson Concert scheduled for that 

evening. Racquetball courts will close at 5 p.m. 

PROGRAM The University program Board will present the movie, "48 Hours," 

BOARD Friday, November 30, at midnight at the College Road Cinema. $1. 

A talent night for students is scheduled fOr 7 p.m. in the UU Snack- 
bar Friday night. Also, the board will present The Royal Lichtenstein 
Quarter Ring Sidwalk Circus Monday, December 3, at noon in front of 
the University Union. 



FESTIVAL 
OF TREES 



The Festival of Trees is presently underway at the Hilton. All pro- 
ceeds will benefit Hospice, a program of care and support for the ter- 
minally ill, Admission $2. 



ALLEN Walser H. Allen of the history faculty delivered an address entitled 

DELIVERS "The American Revolution" to the Colonial Dames of North Carolina 

ADDRESS during their meeting held November 15 at the Burgwin-Wright House 

(Cornwallis House). 

AINSLEY W. Frank Ainsley of the earth sciences faculty presented a slide/ 

PRESENTS lecture on "Settlement Landscapes of Eastern North America" to th( 

PROGRAM Residents of Old Wilmington November l^f. 

TJDEN Dr. Pat Tjaden, assistant professor of sociology/anthropology, pre- 

PRESENTS sented a paper, "Labor for Legality: Organized Efforts to Decrimin 

PAPER lize Lay Mi^^wiferey," during the annual meeting of the American 

Society of Criminology held November 7-11 in Cincinnati. 

MATHEW Jane K. Mathew, assistant professor of voice and piano, will appear 

TO DO in a faculty duo-recital at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln today 

RECITAL The recital will feature a variety of songs for solo voice and duets 

for two soprano voices. Ms. Mathew along with Judy Cole-Shannon c 
UNL will sing duets. She will also sing three Schumann lieder 
and a group of contemporary American art songs. 

MANOCK John J. Manock, director of research administration, participated in 

SPEAKS AT workshop recently for small institutions at the 26th annual meeting 
WORKSHOP the National Council of University Research Administrators held in 
Washington, D.C. He spoke on microcomputer applications in the re- 
search office and use of computerized data management for fiscal 
reports. 

WOLFF Dr. Robert Wolff, coordinator of the recreation management curricu 

PRESENTS lum, presented an educational session titled "Private/Public Coof>era 

SESSION tion" at the annual conference of the North Carolina Recreation 

and Parks Society held November 13 in Greensboro. 



DEAN 
SELECTED 



ZULLO 
PUBLISHES 



CHEMISTRY 
FACULTY 



Dr. Marlene M. Rosenkoetter, acting dean of the school of nursing, 
has been selected for inclusion in the inaugural edition of "Who's 
Who in American Nursing" for her significant contributions to the 
nursing profession. 

Dr. Victor A. Zullo, professor and chairman of the earth sciences de 
partment, has had a pajser on the barnacles of the Miocene Old Chuj 
Formation of southeastern Virginia appear in the Atlantic Coastal 
Plains Association Field Trip guidebook for 198^*. Also, his paper oil 
the Oligocene and Miocene barnacles of North Carolina was publish*] 
in the September issue of the Journal of Paleontology' 

Dr. Charles R. Ward, Dr. Sybil K. Miller and Mrs. Rebecca B. Jones <i 
the department of chemical and physical sciences attended the regii 
al meeting of the Society of College Science Teachers held Novembj 
8-10 in Charlotte. Mrs. Jones served as presider for the session wh.( 
Dr. Miller presented a paper, "A Comparison of UNCW's Chemistry 
Courses for Nursing Students in the B.S. and A.A. Degree Programs.'; 
Dr. Ward delivered a paper entitled "SAT Math Scores and Chemistr 
Grades: Is the Correlation Really that High?" and led a discussion 
on forming State SCST Chapters. Dr. Ward is the NC Coordinator i' 
SCST. 



MILLER Dr. Sybil K. Miller of the department of chemical and physical 

INVITED sciences has been invited to participate in the panel review and ev.j 

ation of proposals submitted to the College Science Instrumentatior 

Program of the National Science Foundation. 



IVEEKS 
^'UBLISHES 



VAXMAN 

DELIVERS 

'APER 



■ACULTY AT 
YMPOSIUM 



ITUDENT TO 

'RESENT 

RESEARCH 



,EWIS 

'RESENTS 

'ROGRAM 



iNGLISH 
"ACULTY 
vT MEETING 



IPER 

iT SESSION 



'AY DAY 
OMORROW 



Gerald R. Weeks, associate professor of psychology, has had two new 
books published. He edited a book, Promoting Change through 
Paradoxical Psvchotherapv> which was written by international 
authors including Viktor Frankl whose first paper was submitted at 
the request of Sigmund Freud. Weeks also coauthored a dictionary 
of sex, marital and family therapy entitled Family Therapy; 
Basic Concepts and Terms. He served as editor ol a special issue 
of Zeitschrift fur Systemische Therapie which includes his article 
entitled "Individual-System Dialectic." In addition, Weeks coauthor- 
ed a paper with Janice Williams on "Use of Paradoxical Techniques 
in a School Setting" (American Journal of Family Therapy, 198't, 12, 
1^7-57). This article has been selected for inclusion in the Inventory 
of Marriage and Family Literature. 

Dr. Barbara Waxman of the English department attended the South 
Atlantic Modern Language Association Convention held November 8-10 
in Atlanta where she delivered a paper, "Finding One's Roots/Finding 
Oneself: Fedalma in George Eliot's The Spanish Gypsy and Avey 
Johnson in Paule Marshall's Praisesong For the Widow. " 

Dr. Larry Cahoon, assistant professor of biological sciences, and Dr. 
Joan Willey of the department of chemical and physical sciences parti- 
cipated in the annual Duke/UNC Oceanography Symposium held 
November 16-17 in Beaufort, NC. Dr. Cahoon presented research re- 
sults on "Benthic Primary Production on the NC Continental Shelf" 
while Dr. Willey talked about "Hurricane Diana; Temporary Cure for 
Acid Rain in Wilmington, NC." 

All faculty and staff are invited to a research presentation by psycho- 
logy senior Richard Loren on December 5 at 'f p.m, in room 108 of the 
Social and Behavioral Sciences Building. Loren is a candidate for the 
first Cape Fear Psychological Association Student Excellence Award. 

Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of the HPER Department, presented a 
program entitled "The Ultimate Quest; Wellness" to the Lower Cape 
Fear Personnel Association during its November business meeting held 
at the Heart of Wil"'ington. Also attending were Dr. William Bryan, 
vice chancellor for student affairs, Mr. William Callaway, director of 
personnel, and Dr. Stephen Harper of the Cameron School of Business. 

Drs. Brooks Dodson and Jo Ann Seiple of the English faculty partici- 
pated in the 15th annual North Carolina English Teachers Association 
Conference in Winston-Salem November 9-10. Dr. Dodson's presenta- 
tion focused on "The Language of Advertising," while Dr. Seiple pre- 
sented a paper on "Teaching Revision to Non-Revisers." 

Dr. F.D. Allen, Mr. Derick Davis, Dr. Nancy Gladwell, Dr. Charles 
Lewis, Dr. Thomas Skalko and Dr. Robert Wolff attended the 198^^ "NC 
Recreation and Parks Society Convention held recently in Greensboro. 
Allen, Davis, Lewis, Skalko and Wolff presided at program sessions. 
Dr. Wolff presented a program on "Public and Private Sector Coopera- 
tion" and Dr. Skalko organized the Research Symposium. Lewis also 
reported to the executive board on the NC Older Citizen Survey being 
conducted by the society in conjunction with UNCW. Mr. Davis was 
the recipient of the Meritorious Service Award for his work in the 
arts and recreation. Approximately forty parks and recreation 
management students from UNCW attended the convention. 

Payroll checks may be picked up from the university cashier's 
office located upstairs in Alderman Hall. 



SOCIAL 
SCHEDULED 



HPER AT 
MEETING 



CONTRACT 
SIGNED 



TRIM THE 
TREE 



UNCW International Students will host a social to meet members o 
the university community Friday, November 30, at 7 pjn., in UU-2C 
All faculty and staff are invited to attend. 

The 37th annual convention of the North Carolina Alliance for He 
Physical Education, Recreation, Athletics, Dance, and Intramurals 
Sports Clubs was held November 15-17 in Greensboro. HPER facu 
members attending included Dr. T.E. Allen, Dr. Graham Hatcher, D 
Lucinda HoUifield, Mr. Larry Honeycutt, Mrs. Judith Lewis, Dr. Ch 
Lewis, Dr. Arthur Miller, Dr. Aisha Hush Gilliam and Dr. Thomas 
Skalko. Dr. HoUifield served as a program session presider; Dr. Le 
presented a program entitled "Outdoor Education in The College P 
sical Education Curricula" and Dr. Skalko presented a program, 
"Leisure Education for The Developmentally Disabled." Over ten 
UNCW physical education majors attended also. 

Gerald R. Weeks of the psychology faculty has signed a contract f 
a Finnish translation of his book. Paradoxical Psychotherapvi (Wee 
& L'Abate, 1982). He has also been selected for inclusion in the l| 
national Who's Who of Sexologists. 

All faculty and staff are invited to help "trim the tree" Monday, 
December 3, from 1 1 a.m. - 2 pjn., in the University Union. PuncH 
cookies will be available. 



STUDY The last series in The Writing Place Study Skills Forum entitled "hj 

SKILLS To Write In A Hurry: The Language Of Test Essays" will be held 

Tuesday, December t^, at 'f p.m. and 7 p.m. in MH-204. 

CENTRAL Please add the following items to your departmental central store: 

STORES catalogue: 

Stock // 

618-57578 Paper trimmer 15" x 15" platform with ruled 

boards and guides, photo materials premier //215 

6^5-57560 Paper, UNCW continuous form letterhead 20 lb 
8 J x 11 micro perforated 25% rag content 
(2500 sheets) 

DIRECTORY The following changes need to be updated in the faculty/staff phoi 

CHANGES directory: 

Page m Dr. Arthur Miller - new ext. 3733 

Page 3*^ Mrs. Rebecca Jones - change ext. to 3279 

WOMEN'S The women Seahawks will host NC A&T TONIGHT at 7 in Trask 

B.BALL Coliseum. The next game is scheduled for Monday, December 3, w 

UNC-Charlotte at 7 p.m. in Trask Coliseum. 

SNACK BAR The University Union Snack Bar will feature a Rueben Sandwich I 

SPECIAL $1.50 and a CC coupon. Special available through Wednesday, 

December 5. NOTE***THE SNACK BAR WILL CL'^SE AT 2:30 

TODAY IN PREPARATION OF THE SPECIAL UNIVERSITY PROM 

TIONS RECEPTION TONIGHT. 



SPECIAL The Office of Special Programs will offer exercise aerobics classe 

PROGRAMS following Christmas break, the week of January 7. Classes will b« 
on Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:15-2 p.m., and 5:30-6:15 p.m., 
and on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:15-1 p.m., and 5:30-6:15 p.a 
Registration is now in progress with a deadline of DECEMBER 20J 
Faculty and staff may register for half the regular price. For 
more information call ext. 3798. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 




LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 



CANDLELIGHT 
SERVICE 



STUDY 
BREAK 



REVIEW 
COURSE 



HISTORY 
FILM 



CHEMISTRY 
SEMINAR 



TRASK 
COLISEUM 



SWIM 
MEETS 



THALIAN 
PLAY 



WOMEN'S 
B BALL 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE ~~ 

VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 17 
DECEMBER 6, 198'f 

A campus-wide Christmas Candlelight Service sponsored by the 
United Christian Campus Ministry will be held December 10, at 
11 p.m. at St. Matthew's Lutheran Church, across College Road 
from Trask Coliseum. All faculty are asked to announce this 
event to their students. Everyone is invited. 

The English Club will host a study break for students during exams 
December 13 from 9:30 - 10:30 a.m. in The Writing Place. Coffee 
and donuts will be served. All students regardless of major are 
invited. 

Cape Fear Technical Institute will offer a Certified Professional 
Secretary's review course titled "Office Administration and Tech- 
nology" beginning December 11 from 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. at Cape Fear 
Tech. For additional information call Brenda Dineen at ext. 3712. 

"Hearts and Minds," a controversial, award winning documentary 
examining the American consciousness that led to US involvement 
in Vietnam, will be shown December 10 at 7:30 p.m. in Bryan Audi- 
torium. Following the film. Dr. Kathy Walker, lecturer in history 
and expert in Asian history, will lead a discussion. Open & free. 

The chemistry division will ^onsor a seminar December 7 at 
2:30 p.m. in (DL) Chemistry/Physics - room U'f where chemistry 
students involved in research will discuss their projects. All 
faculty and staff are invited. 

A reminder that the arena of Trask Coliseum will be closed all 
day, December U, for the Willie Nelson Concert that night. 
Racquetball courts will close at 5 pjm. 

The Seahawk Swimmers, men and women, will participate in their 
last home meet for 198*^ with Virginia Commonwealth University 
Saturday, December 8, at 3 p.m. at the pool. 

The Thalian Association will present "Pirates of Penzance" by 
Gilbert & Sullivan December 6-10 with a matinee on Sunday. Cur- 
tain time is 8 nightly. 

The Shehawks will host ASU Saturday, December 8, at 7 p.m. in 
Trask Coliseum. Monday, December 10, Winston-Salem State 
will play the Shehawks at 7 p.m. in Trask. Admission is $2 
per person. 



MATH Bdb Herbst, distinguished visiting professor, will ^eak on 

SCIENCES "Characterization of Software" djring the December 10 meeting 

the Mathematical Sciences ColFquium. The talk will be held in 
(MO) Morton Hall - 212 at ^:10 p.m. Coffee will be served at ^. 
All interested faculty and staff are invited. 

FORENSIC The UNCW Forensic Team came in 3rd Overall Sweepstakes (Tei 

TEAM Award) during recent competitions at ASU and 5th Sweepstakes 

(Team Award) at Marshall University. 

CHORAL The Wilmington Choral Society will open its itt-i5 season Sunda] 

SOCIETY December 16, at 3 pjm. in Kenan Auditorium with Vivaldi's Giori 

and Schubert's C Major Mass . Tickets, $k for adults and 
$2 for students and senior citizens, are available at Belks, 1 
Glissons and the UU Information Center. Tickets will also be 
available at the door. 

SCHOOLS TO The Laney High School Band under the direction of Levy Galliai 

PERFORM will perform TONIGHT at 8 in Kenan Auditorium. 

The New Hanover High School Orchestra will present a concert 
with Nancy McAllister, conducting, December 11 at 8 pjn. in 
Kenan Auditorium. 



NUTCRACKER 
TO BE HELD 



COMMUNITY 
ORCHESTRA 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



The HoRgard High School Orchestra with David McChesney dir- 
recting, will perform December 12 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditoriur 

There will be an admission charge for each of the performances 

Once again the Wilmington Merchants Association will present " 
Nutcracker." Performances will be held December 7 at 7:30 pji 
and December 8 at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. All performances will fa 
held in Kenan Auditorium. Admission is by donation only. 

The Community Orchestra, ^onsored by the department of crea 
tive arts, will perform December 10 at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditori 
Admission will be $5 for adults and $3 for non-students. 

The Office of Special Programs will offer exercise aerobics cla:; 
following Christmas break, the week of 3anuary 7. The deadlinii 
for registering is December 20. Cost for faculty and staff will 
half the regular price. For additional information call ext. 379i 



DIRECTORY 
CHANGE 



SNACK BAR 
SPECIAL 



FILM 
SCHEDULED 



Please make the following update in the faculty/staff telephone^ 
directory: 

Page i^& - Dr. James Reeves 

Change address to 3625 Sutton Dr. (28^(03) 
Change telephone number to 791-6^7^ 

The University Union Snack Bar special for the week will featut 
the deli sandwich for 20^ off regular price and CC coupon. 
Special good through December 13. 

The New Hanover County Public Library will present the film, 
"Sleeper," December 7 at 7:30 p.m. in the library's meeting room 
Another showing is also scheduled for the same day at 2. 



MOSELEY 
DELIVERS 
ADDRESS 



POEMS TO BE 
PUBLISHED 



DAVIS 

PUBLISHES 

PAPER 



SPORRE 

SIGNS 

CONTRACT 



SPACKMAN 

AUTHORS 

PAPER 



FUN RUN 
HELD 



BUILDING 
CODES 



Dr. Thomas V. Moseley, professor of history, delivered a presenta- 
tion entitled "Valley Forge: George Washington and Baron von 
Steuben" to the Lord Clarendon Chapter, Daughters of American 
Colonists December 1 at the Cape Fear Country Club. 

Richard Long of the English department has had two poems, "La 
Junta" and "Suddenly Into Spring," accepted for publication in 
International Poetry Review* 

Brian F. Davis, assistant professor of physics, along with Kwong 
Chung of NCSU, has had a paper, "The Auger and radiative widths 
of the S, P, and D autoionizing states of Bell," published in the 
November, 198^^ issue of Journal of Phvsics B: Atomir and 
Molecular Physics. 

Dennis J. Sporre, chairman of the department of creative arts, has 
signed a contract with Prentice-Hall for a new book on the arts, 
The Creative Impulse. This will be Sporre's third book for Pren- 
tice HalL 

Dr. Kenneth Spackman, associate professor of mathematical 
sciences, is the author of a paper, "Linearly Recurring Solution 
Sequences for Equations in Finite Fields," published in the October 
IS&ii issue of the Journal of Number TheorV' 

The jshysical education major's club presented a "Fun Run" on 
November 22. Over 150 students and faculty participated in the 
event. Dr. Graham Hatcher of the HPER department is the facul- 
ty advisor for the group while Roger Morgan is club president. 

The chancellor has approved building abbreviation codes for all 
buildings on the UNCW campus. Listed below are the two letter 
codes that have been assigned: 



AL = Alderman Hall 

BR = Bear Hall 

DL = Chemistry-Phsyics Bldg. 

HA = Hanover Hall 

HO = Hoggard Hall 

JA = Hinton James Hall 

KA = Kenan Auditorium 

KE = Kenan Hall 

KI = King Hall 

GH = Greenhouse 

MS = Marine Science 

MO = Morton Hall 

PP = Physical Plant 



RL = Randall Library 
SB = Social & Behavioral Sci Bldg 
TR = Trask Coliseum 
UU = University Union 
CA = Cafeteria 
BK = Belk HaU 
GA = Galloway Hall 
HE = Hewlett Hall 
GR = Dorm 79 

ND = New Dorm Under Const. 
SS = Student Support Center 
WH = Warehouse 
NA = Natatorium 



PARISH Dr. Margaret Parish, assistant professor of English, attended the 

ATTENDS International Federation of Teachers of English Conference held 

CONFERENCE in East Lansing, Michigan, November ll-l'*. The conference wa; 

an invitational one, for which working papers were submitted in 
advance and distributed to conference participants. Her paper 
was titled "Five Beginnings in Search of a Paper." Also, Dr. 
Parish worked as a consultant with seventy teachers, K-12, 
at an inservice workshop in Jacksonville. Her subject was child; 
ren's literature as a stimulus for the writing process. 



PSYCHOLOGY Polly Applefield, Bob Brown and Dick Sanders of the psychology 

FACULTY AT department attended the annual meeting of the North Carolina 

MEETING Cognition Group held December 1 in Charlotte. Brown, Sanders 

and Jane Sparks (UNCW '83) presented a paper. Habituation 
Criteria May Affect Conclusions Based on Dishabituation Techni 
ques. Also, Emily Thompson (UNCW '83) who is presently a 
graduate student at the University of South Carolina presented 
a paper based on her research for Honors in Psychology at UNC 
entitled "Fuzziness" in Two Spatial Concepts and Transformatioi 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 




LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 



HOLIDAY 
DINNER 



POSITION 
AVAILABLE 



ADD 
CODE 



MEDIA 
SEMINAR 



KENAN 

AUDITORIUM 

EVENTS 



EARLY 
PAY DAY 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 18 
DECEMBER 13, 198^ 

The university food services invites all faculty, staff and their 
families to a Christmas dinner Tuesday, December 18, from 'f:30 - 
6:30 pjT\. in the cafeteria. Reservations may be made by call- 
ing Ext. 353^. The cost will be $3 per person. 

Applications for the director of the UNCW Mathematics and 
Science Education Center are presently being accepted. The di- 
rector will administer the center's activities and programs as well 
as assume some teaching responsibilities. A Ph.D. is required. 
Administrative experience and experience working with middle 
and/or secondary public education is desirable. Apply to Dr. 
James McGowan, A-201 no later than DECEMBER 18, 198^^. 

Please add the following to the list of codes for buildings on 
campus: 

ROTC Building = RT 

An economics conference for media personnel will be held next 
week, December 18, from 9:15 ajn. - 2:30 pjn. in UU-210. Spon- 
sored by the Center for Economic Education, part of the Cameron 
School of Business Administration, and the NC Council on Eco- 
nomic Education, the workshop will provide a forum for in depth 
discussion of economic issues that media representatives are 
frequently called upon to report. 

The Williston Alumni Choral Ensemble will perform in Kenan Audi- 
torium December ft at 8 p/n. Admission is $3 per person. 

The Wilmington Choral Society will perform December 16 at 3 pjn. 
Admission is $3. 

The Laney High School Chorus under the direction of Sandra Rush- 
ing, will perform at 7:30 pjn. December 17. Admission is $2. 

The Hanover Singers of New Hanover High School will present a 
program of music December 18 at 8 p.m. 

December payroll checks will be distributed Thursday, December 
20. Checks may be picked up from the university cashier in 
Alderman Hall. Temporary payroll checks will be distributed 
on December I'f. 



UNIVERSITY 

UNION 

HOURS 



University Union hours for the w^ek of Thursday, December 13, 
through Thursday, Decerrber 20 is as follows: 



DIRECTORY 
CHANGE 



DR. OLSON 
EDITS 



WOMEN'S 
B. BALL 

CHORAL 
SOCIETY 



LIBRARY 
REMINDER 



SNACK BAR 
SPECIAL 



STOWELL 
BABY 



SOCIAL 

SECURITY 

INCREASE 



NEW 
EMPLOYEE 



December 13 
December [^ 
December 15 
December 16 
December 17 
December 18 
December 19 
December 20 



Building Hours 
7 ajn - 12 midnight 

7 ajn. - 12 midnight 

12 noon - 12 midnight 

12 noon - 12 midnight 

7 a.m, - 12 midnight 

7 ajn. - 12 midnight 

7 ajD. - 12 midnight 

7 ajn. - 11 pjn. 



Infor. Center 
8 ajn. - 10 pjn. 

8 ajn. - 10 pjn. 

12 noon - 10 pjn. 

12 noon - 10 pjn. 

8 ajTi. - 10 pjn. 

8 ajn. - 10 pjn. 

8 ajn. - 10 pjn. 

8 ajn. - 10 pjn. 



Please make the following update in the faculty/staff telephone 
directory: 

Page 15 - Dr. 3ohn Anderson 

Change ext. 35W to ext. 3730 

Dr. Gary Olson, assistant professor of English and former director] 
of the Center for Writing, has edited a book, Writing Centers; 
Theory and Administration, which has just been published by the 
National Council of Teachers of English, 

The UNCW Seahawks will host St, Augustine's College Saturday, 
December 15, at 5:30 p.m. in Trask Coliseum. Adults $2. 

The Wilmington Choral Society will present Vivaldi's Gloria and 
Schubert's C Major Mass December 16 at 3 pjn. in Kenan Auditor!' 
um. Tickets are $li and may be purchased at the UU Information 
Center. 

Faculty members are encouraged to prepare Reserve Reading List 
for the spring semester as soon as possible. Forms, available at 
the Library Reserve desk or from departmental secretaries, shoulo 
be submitted to the Reserve Desk at least one week prior to clasj 
assignments. Materials on reserve for this past semester will be 
removed after exams unless Hilda Tyndall is notified that the sam 
items will be needed for the same course to be taught during the 
spring semester. Call Ms. Tyndall at ext. 3790 before January 2. 

The University Union Snack Bar will feature the Seahawk, (fried 
egg, cheese, and Canadian bacon on an English muffin) for SO^ 
now through December 21. The snack bar will be open during 
final exams December 13, 17, 18 and 19 from 7-10 p.m. The 
menu will be limited. 

Kim Stowell of information systems is pleased to announce the 
birth of her daughter, Rachel Elizabeth, on December 12. Baby 
Stowell weighed 8 lbs. 1 oz. - Mom and daughter are doing fine! 

Beginning January 1, 1985, the tax rate for Social Security will ir 
crease. The amount deducted will be 7.05% up to a maximum sa- 
lary of $39,600 per year. The tax increase will be reflected in 
the January paycheck. 

A UNCW welcome is extended to Emma K. Thornton, clerk in the 
department of chemical and physical sciences. 



Frank 3. Bongiorno, assistant professor of music, presented a re- 
cital during the Region 7 Convention of the North American Saxo- 
phone Alliance held December 7-8 at 3ames Madison University. 

The Psychiatric Program of New Hanover Memorial Hospital will 
present a seminar on "Eating Disorders" Wednesday, December 12, 
at 7:30 p.m. at the Area Health Education Auditorium, Presenting 
the program will be Dr. 3ohn Parkinson, psychiatrist. Dr. Robert 
Weinstein, psychiatrist, and Diane Dew, registered nurse with 
the psychiatric program. Admission is free. All faculty and 
staff are cordially invited. 

Dr. Charles West of the department of management and marketing 
presented a paper, "Student Case Presentation vs. Teacher-Led 
Discussion: An Experimental Evaluation" during the annual meet- 
ing of the Southern Management Association held November 16 in 
New Orleans. The paper was published during the proceedings of 
the meeting. 

Dr. William B. Harris, professor of earth sciences, has recently 
had his results of five years of radioactive dating on coastal 
plain sediments published in Palaeogeography. Palaeoclimatology, 
Palaeoecology. The paper titled "Rb/5r Glauconite Ages, Sabinian, 
Claibornian, and Jacksonian Units, Southeastern Atlantic Coastal 
Plain, U.S.A." was co-authored by Paul D. FuUagar of UNC-CH 
and Jay A. Winters of the University of Oklahoma. 

When making toll-free telephone calls - do not forget to dial 
"9-1-800 plus the seven digit number." If "8" is dialed rather than 
the "9", the university will be charged for the call. 

The copy center will be closed December 31 but will resume 
normal working schedule on January 2, 1985. 



The Randall Library schedule is as follows: 

Fri., December 21 

Sat., December 22 - Sun., December 30 

Mon., December 31 

Tues., January 1 

Wed., January 2 - Fri., January ^■ 

Sat., January 5 - Sun., January 6 

Mon., January 7 - Fri., January 11 

Sat., January 12 - Sun., January 13 

Mon., January m- 



7'A5 a.m. 3 p.m. 
CLOSED 

7-A5 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
CLOSED 

7 1^5 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
CLOSED 

7:^5 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
CLOSED 
NORMAL SCHEDULE 



The University Union Snack Bar will close Friday, December 21, at 
2 p.m. and reopen January 7-8 from 8:30 a.m. - 2 pjn. Normal 
schedule will resume Wednesday, January 9. 

The UNCW Forensics Team, under the direction of Frank Trimble 
of the creative arts department, participated in and won 
the UNC- Charlotte Tournament December 2. UNCW finished 
first out of the 16 schools who competed. Among schools rep- 
presented were Clemson, Alabama, Appalachian and Tennessee 
Tech. 



PAYROLL 
DEADLINE 



PERSONNEL 
RECORDS 



LEAVE 
RECORDS 



HEALTH 
INSURANCE 



HOLIDAY 
SCHEDULE 



Employees who will be on leave from December 2^* through Ja 
ary 1 should submit timesheets prior to leaving. 

All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets reflecti 
holiday or shift premium must be in the personnel office by 
8:30 a^., January 2, in order for payroll computation to be 
completed* 

Contact the personnel office if there has been a change in ta 
status, marital status, nam«^, address etc. over the past year, 
is also a good time to update beneficiaries on retirement, ann 
and insurance programs. 

Only 2W (30 days) of annual leave may be carried over to th< 
January timesheets. 

Employees are not allowed to carry over negative balances to 
either vacation or sick leave accounts on the January timeshc 
Any negative balance shown on the December timesheet will . 
matically be deducted from the January paycheck. In this eve 
a zero balance will begin the January timesheet. 

Employees who are members of the medical health insurance [i 
have a period of 18 months from the date of service or the d 
of purchase for prescription drugs or medical supplies to file | 
claim. Claims that are received after the 18 month time peril 
will be denied. j 

UNCW will observe the following holiday schedule: 

Noonday, December 2ii . 

Tuesday, December 25 i 

Wednesday, December 26 
Thursday, December 27 
Friday, December 28 
Tuesday, January 1, 1985 



Due to the upcoming holidays, this will be the last issue of the 
CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE until January 3, 1985. 




THE DEVELOPMENT OFFICE STAFF, TY ROWELL, JEAN 
JOYNER, FRANK BOWEN, MIMI CUNNINGHAM, RENEE 
BRANTLEY AND PATSY LARRICK EXTEND HOLIDAY 
GREETINGS TO ALL UNCW EMPLOYFES AND THEIR 
FAMILIES. WE WISH YOU ALL A HAPPY, SAFE AND 
JOYFULL HOLIDAY SEASON. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 




CHANCELLOR'S OFF. 2 



[RAVEL 
lEMINDER 



[RAVEL 
iATE 

:hange 



:iNG 
EMEMBERED 



RGAN 
ONCERT 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 19 
JANUARY 10, 1985 

Registration and/or tuition fees for conferences, workshops or 
conventions which have to be paid for in advance are to be pro- 
cessed via a check request and sent directly to accounting. (Re- 
quisitions sent to purchasing for the above mentioned items will 
be returned to the requisitioning department). The check request 
must reference the approved travel request number and, if ap- . 
propriate, the approved BDA number. Copies of these approved 
forms must be submitted to accounting before the check request 
can be processed. 

The US Internal Revenue Service has issued a ruling that mileage 
reimbursements to employees in excess of ZOJC per mile is tax- 
able income to the emoloyee and that employers must report the 
full reimbursement on a form W-2.wage and tax statement to the 
US Internal Revenue Service and NC Department of Revenue. As 
a result, UNCW will decrease the mileage reimbursement rate 
from 21(;!: to 20.5C per mile for private vehicles used for the em- 
ployee's convenience. You may still elect to complete the form 
for "Certification of Nonavailability of State Owned Vehicle" 
if you desire to be reimbursed at the 25C rate. You should be 
forewarned that the entire amount (25C X number of miles 
traveled) will be subject to all withholding taxes and special re- 
cord keeping requirements must be met to take the deduction on 
your tax return. A more thorough explanation will be included 
with the January paychecks. 

"The Late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Remembered" will be the 
theme of the second annual program of commemoration in his 
honor January 15 at 3:30 pjn. in King Hall Auditorium. The key- 
note address will be delivered by the Rev. Dr. Maurice Wilson, 
pastor of St. Stephen AME Church in Wilmington. The program is 
jointly sponsored by the Office of Minority Affairs and UNCW 
minority students. Musical selections by the UNCW Gospel 
Choir as well as a modem dance selection will also be performed. 
Faculty and staff are cordially invited. 

An organ concert commemorating the UOth birthday of Dr. Albert 
Schweitzer will be held Sunday, January 13, at ^t pjn. at St. 
John's Episcopal Church. All faculty and staff are invited. No 
charge. 



SPECIAL The Office of Special Programs will offer modem dance and jaz; 

PROGRAMS dance classes beginning January 26. Modem Dance I (SP [1^20 A 

B or C) will be taught Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays while 
Jazz Dance I (SP 1^22 A) classes will be taught on Saturdays. 
Cost is $18 for a five-week class, $30 for any combination of tw 
classes and $36 for all three classes. To register call ext. 3195 
or go by HO (Hoggard Hall) room 225. Faculty and staff will be 
given a reduced rate. All classes will be held in HA (Hanover 
Hall). As an introduction to the classes, Candace O'Hearn, danc 
teacher, will present a modern dance exhibition January 22 at 
7:15 pjn. in UU (University Union) room 100. Admission is free. 

A workshop on Wordstar for faculty and staff will be held 
January 25 from 9 ajn. - 't pjn. in KI (King Hall) room 202. The 
workshop, to be taught by Peggy Sullivan, is offered by the Of- 
fice of Special Programs. For additional information call ext. 
3195. 

SPECIAL Two staff members in the Office of Special Program"^ have recer 

PROGRAMS ly assumed new responsibilities in that department. Emily Barbe 

STAFF has been named assistant to Dr. James C. Edmundson, director o: 

special programs, where her responsibilities will include coordi- 
nating all summer conferences, teacher in-service and extension 
programs and assisting with summer school activities. Ms. Barbei 
is located in HO-218. Her extension is 35 'f 7. Annette Anderson 
formerly of the Office of Research Administration, has been 
named information and communication specialist. She will coord 
nate all publicity, brochures and program announcements for the 
Office of Special Programs. Her office is in HO-218 and she ca; 
be reached at ext. 35 'f 7. ', 



SOCIAL 
SECURITY 



MINIMUM 
WAGE 



The tax rate for Social Security has increased. The amount de- 
ducted will be 7.05% up to a maximum salary of $39,600 per yeaij 
The tax increase will be reflected in the January paychecks. 

The minimum wage will remain at $3.35 per hour during 1985. 



TAX 

SHELTERED 

ANNUITIES 



SNACK BAR 
SCHEDULE 



Tax Sheltered Annuities offer a special tax break to employees 
higher education. Contributions to the program are excluded frdj 
gross income, so that income taxes on these contributions are 
postponed until the TSA is cashed in or until retirement. 
The four plans currently available to employees include: 

1. EQUI-VEST 

2. NC Deferred Compensation Plan 

3. Supplemental Retirement Annuities (5RA) 
tt. VALIC 

Representatives from each of these plans will be on campus 
January 23 from 10 ajn. - ^ p/n. in the UU Snack Bar. All facu 
and staff are invited. Personal appointments may be made for 
January 2^* by calling the personnel office at ext. 3160. Also, 
"comparison sheets" or a synopsis on each of the plans may be 
requested by calling ext. 3160. 



Beginning today, the University Union Snack Bar schedule is as 
follows: 

Monday - Thursday 7:30 ajn. - 7 pjn. 

Friday 7:30 ajn. - i^ pjn. 

This week's special is a steak and cheese sandwich for $1.^*5 an 
CC coupon. 



I 



CHWEITZER 
CHEDULE 



ORLD 
ULTURES 



To assist faculty and staff in making plans for special events dur- 
ing the Albert Schweitzer International Prizes scheduled for 
the week of March 17, a list of events is provided: 

Sunday, March 17, 3 pjn^ St. Matthew Passion presented by the 
Wilmington Symphony and Wilmington Choral Society, joined 
by the UNCW Concert Choir in Kenan Auditorium 

Tuesday, March 19, 7 pjn., Bach Memorial Concert at St. 
James Episcopal Church 

Thursday, March 21, 8 pjn., Presentation of prizes in Kenan 
Auditorium 

Friday, March 22, 8 p/n., NC Symphony in Kenan Auditorium 

The prize recipients will be on campus March 20-21 to meet 
with faculty, staff, students and the public. 

The Museum of World Cultures will host the second Dr. Bernard 
Boyd Memorial Lecture January 15 at 7:30 pjn. in Bryan Audi- 
torium with Harvard professor Dr. Paul Hanson speaking on 
"Prophets and Politics in Ancient Israel." 



?85 HOLIDAY 
CHEDULE 



New Year's Day 
Easter Monday 
Independence Day 
Labor Day 
Thanksgiving 
Christmas 



January 1, 

April 8, 

July It, 

September 2, 

November 28 & 29 

December 23, 2if, 25, 26, & 27, 



NGLISH 

LUB 

RIP 



The English Club is planning a trip to England during spring break 
featuring five nights in London and four nights in Oxford. The 
cost is $1,0^^8 and includes lodging, airfare, most ground travel 
and theatre tickets. Contact John Evans at ext. 3326. 



HORAL 
OCIETY 



OMEN'S 
ETWORK 



The Wilmington Choral Society is presently accepting members for 
its spring concert scheduled for March 17. Rehearsals are held 
on Monday nights at 7:30 in KE (Kenan Hall) room 121. 

The Faculty Women's Network will meet January 13 at 7:30 pjn. 
at the home of Maggie Parish (1512-B. Cameron Ct./Canterbury 
Woods Apartments). Pat Leonard, Linda Moore, Sylvia Polgar 
and Kathleen Berkeley will present an outline of the program for 
National Women's History Week. 



RE-GAME 
3CIALS 



CCOUNTING 
OTICE 



BRARY 
LMS 



The alumni association invites all faculty, staff and their fami- 
lies to participate in the 1985 basketball pre-game socials. Each 
social will feature cold cut sandwiches, potato chips, pickles and 
beverages. For information call ext. 3616. ADVANCE RESERVA- 
TIONS ARE REQUIRED. 

Ail travel advances must be requested on the 3-part forms which 
are available through the accounting office. Call Jean Mixon at 
ext. 31 W for additional information. Any advances on photoco- 
pies will be returned to the department. 

The New Hanover County Public Library will present three films 
at 2 pjn. and 7:30 pjn. in the upstairs meeting room of the main 
library on the following days. January 11, "1776"; January 18, 
"Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" and January 25, "All the King's 
Men." 



VENDING 
SERVICES 



SAFETY 
SESSIONS 



The university snack machine vending contract has been awardt 
to Joe Walker Snax, a Tom's Distributor, Any suggestions or 
complaints concerning campus vending should be directed to exi 
3613. Vending refunds may be obtained in the housing office or 
the University Union Information Desk. 

The personnel office will present "Office Safety" training sessi( 
January 15 in the UU Snack Bar (west wing). Mr. Bud Howe ofi 
the Industrial Commission will discuss safety pertaining to the : 
office environment. Sessions will be held from 9 ajn - 11 ajn. , 
and 2:30 pin. - if:30 pjn. All faculty and staff are encouraged | 
attend one of the sessions. . 



REVIEW Dr. Stephen McNamee, assistant professor of sociology, has had 

PUBLISHED book review essay of Wolfgang Schluchter's The Rise of Westerr 

Rationalism; Max Weber's Developmental History published in t^ 

January issue of the Journal of the History of the Behavioral ! 

Sciences. 

MIDDLESWARTH Terry Middleswarth, athletic trainer, was honored during a dinn 
HONORED meeting last month of the Cape Fear Council of Boy Scouts of 

America. He received the "Cape Fear Award," an award given 

for outstanding leadership. 

ARTICLE Dr. Richard D. Dixon, associate professor of sociology & anthro; 

ACCEPTED logy» and Dr. Roger C. Lowery, associate professor of political 

science, have had an article, "A Note About Identifying 
Christians," accepted for publication in the next issue of the 
Southeastern Political Review. 



THALIAN 
SERIES 



WOMEN'S 
B. BALL 



The Thalian Hall Concert Series will present "Ciompi String 
Quartet" Saturday, January 12, at 8 pjn. in Thalian Hall. Ticket 
may be purchased at the Thalian Hall box office or call 763-93! 

The Women Seahawks will host George Mason University at 7 pj 
on January 17 in Trask Coliseum. 



SWIM 
MEET 



The Swimhawks will participate in a swim meet with Old Domin 
University (men & women) January 12 at the pool. 



MEN'S 
B. BALL 



The Seahawks will play Richmond this Saturday, January 12, at 
7:30 pjn. in Trask Coliseum. 



U. UNION 
HOURS 



LIBRARY 
SCHEDULE 




The spring semester schedule for the University Union is as 

follows: ,1 J rr ■ J -7 II 

Monday - Friday 7 ajn. - 11 pjn. 

Saturday noon - 11 pjn. 

Sunday noon - 11 pjn. 

Beginning Monday, January 1^*, Randall Library will operate on 
the following schedule: 



Monday - Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 



7:k5 ajn. - midnight 
7'A5 a.m. - 9 pjn. 
10:00 ajn. - 6 psn. 
1:00 pjn. - midnight 



HAPPY NEW YEAR! HAPPY NEW YEAR! HAPPY NEW YEAF 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 

LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 20 
JANUARY 17, 1985 

The alumni association invites ail faculty, staff and their families 
to the next basketball pre-game social scheduled for January 2k 
in UU-100 at 6 pan. For reservations call extension 3616. 

The staff training and development section of the personnel de- , 
partment is offering the following films for faculty and staff. 
Select a date and call Brenda Dineen at extension 3712 to sign 
up. All films will be shown in the personnel training room. 



Days Offered 
1/18 



1/22, 2(^, & 25 



1/29, 31 & 2/1 



2/5, 6, 7 



Film Tim e 

"Working With Difficult People" 9-11 am 

"Creative Problem Solving" 
"Group Productivity" 

"Microcomputers-An Introduction" 9-11 am 
"Problem Solving Strategies" 
"Team Building" 

"Managing Stress" 9-11 cim 

"New Look at Motivation" 
"Care of the Missing Person" 

"Productivity-Self -Fulfilling Prophecy" 
"Psyching" (9-10:30 am) 



|1 



Dr. Robert Weinstein, psychiatrist, will discuss "Uses of Hypnosis 
in Medicine" January 21 at 7:30 pjn. at the AHEC Auditorium. All 
faculty and staff are invited, (free) 

The Committee for Alternatives to Aggression in Central America, 
a newly formed student group, begins its dialogue Tuesday, 
January 22, at 7:30 pjn. in the Library Auditorium. Drs. John 
Haley and James Megivern along with students who have 
visited Nicaragua will discuss "What's Happening in Central 
America and What You Can Do About It." A film, "Block 
by Block," will be shown January 23 at 7:30 pjn. in the Library 
Auditorium as well as readings of Latin-American poets. 



A presentation by the Magical Mystery Revue will be held 
TONIGHT in Kenan Auditorium at 8. 



CLIFFORD 
READS 



STATUS OF 
WOMEN 



PHONE 
CHANGES 



John Clifford, associate professor of English, read a paper en- . 
titled "Teaching Literature: The Response Theories of Louise 
Rosenblatt & Stanley Fish" at the Modem Lanaguage Association 
convention held December 28-30 in Washington, DC. 

The following is a list of free lectures for today's woman spon- 
sored by the New Hanover Council on the Status of Women. All 
lectures will be held at the public library from 7-9. pjn. 

Dates Topics 

1/23 Health Care for Women: Preventative Medicine 

1/30 The Family Illness: Alcoholism 

2/6 Effective Communication with Health Care 

Professionals 

2/13 Alcoholism and Addiction in Women: Special 

Considerations 

2/20 Women: Alone and Together in the Life Cycle 

Please make the following updates in the faculty/staff telephone] 
directory: 

Page R - Dean Allen - change ext to 3768 

Page 49 - Aisha Rush-Gilliam - change ext to 3824 
Add Debbie Dowd - ext 3258 



SNACK BAR The University Union Snack Bar special this week will feature 

SPECIAL a free cup of coffee with the purchase of one of their new 

desserts. Special ends January 23. 

NEW Charles Fort of the English department is pleased to announce 

BABY the birth of his daughter, Claire Aubin, on Monday, January 7. 

TRIP TO The political science department will sponsor a spring break trip; 

WASHINGTON to Washington, DC. Itinerary will include going to the White 

House, Congress and the Pentagon. Interested persons should at! 

tend the organizational meeting on January 23 in SB-215 at 3. 

SEAHAWK The Seahawks will host Navy Thursday, January 24, at 7:30 pjn.i 

BASKETBALL in Trask Coliseum. ' 



TAX Tax Sheltered Annuities offer a special tax break to employees c 

SHELTERED higher education. Contributions to the program are excluded fro 

ANNUITIES gross income, so that income taxes on these contributions are 

postponed until the TSA is cashed in or until retirement. 

The four plans currently available to employees include: 

1. EQUI-VE5T 

2. NC Deferred Compensation Plan 

3. Supplemental Retirement Annuities (SRA) 

4. VALIC 

Representatives from each of these plans will be on campus , 

January 23 from 10 ajn. - 4 pjn. in the UU Snack Bar. All faculj 
and staff are invited. Personal appointments mav be made for 
January 24 by calling the personnel office at ext. 3160, Also, 
"comparison sheets" or a synopsis on each of the plans may be 
requested by calling ext. 3160. 



Faculty members, Thomas Lupton and RoUa Nelson, will serve as 
assistant night deans throughout the spring semester. Mr. Nelson 
can be reached at 395-3^66 on Monday and Wednesday evenings 
while Mr. Lupton can be reached at 395-3302 on Tuesday and 
Thursday evenings. In the event there is no answer — inquiries 
may be made through the camous police at 395-31 S^f. 

Dr. Stephen McNamee, assistant professor of sociology, has had an 
article, "Neighborhood Decentralization and Organized Citizen 
Participation," accepted for publication in Sociological Focus . 
The article is coauthored by Ms. Kimberly Swisher, former under- 
graduate research assistant to Dr. McNamee and currently a 
graduate student at the University of Florida. 

Books by three members of the English faculty were published 
during the holiday break. Random House published Help book for 
Student Writers by Sally Sullivan, and Bobbs-Merrill publTsKeT 
Writing, Reading, and Research by Richard Veit and John 
Clifford. 

W. Frank Ainsley of the earth sciences department served as a 
member of the advisory committee for a team of Laney High 
School students investigating "The Effects of High Technology on 
the Quality of Life in New Hanover County." The findings were 
presented at a public forum held December 13 at Laney . 

Charles Fort, director of the creative writing program and assis- 
tant professor of English, has been invited by the Goldsboro 
Community Arts Council to give a poetry reading and to lead a 
writer's workshop at the Goldsboro Art Gallery on February 5. 

The following is a list of aerobics classes being offered by the 
Office of Special Programs. Select one that best suits your 
schedule and call extension 3195 to register. (50% off the cost 
for faculty and staff.) 



Course // Dates 



Time 



Room 



SP - 1001 A 1/28-2/6 M/W 6:30-7:15 p.m. HA $ 

(Beginners) 

5P-1001 C 1/29-2/7 Tu/Th 6:30-7:15 pjn. HA $ 

(Beginners) 

SP-1001 E 1/7-2/20 M/W 5:30-6:15 pjn. HA $ 

(Level 1) 

SP-1001 D 1/8-2/21 Tu/Th 12:15-1:00 p/n. HA $ 

(Level 1) 

SP-1002 A 1/8-2/21 Tu/Th 5:30-6:15 pjr\. HA $ 

(Level 2) 

A workshop on Wordstar for faculty and staff will be held 
3arHjary 25 from 9 ajn. - t^ pjn. in Kl-202. The workshop, 
taught by Peggy Sullivan, is offered by the Office of Special 
Programs. Cost is $37J0. Call extension 3195 for additional 
information. 



Emily Barber, assistant to the director of special programs, is 
located in HO-227 and can be reached at extension 35^*6. 



HPER FACILITIES SCHEDULE 



The following is a list of facilities available to all faculty, staff and students of 
UNCW. Id's must be available upon request. 



Hanover Hall, Racquetball Courts 
and Universal Weight Room 

(See class schedules listed below) 



Tennis Courts 

(See class schedules listed below) 



8 ajn. - 9:00 pjn. M-Th 

8 ajn. - 5'A5 pjm. F 

9 ajn. - 5:00 pan. Sat 
1 pjm. - 6:00 pjn. Sun 

8 ajTi. - 1 1 pjn. (all days) 



Hanover Hall 



Racquetball 
Courts 



CLASS SCHEDULES 

8 :00-9:15 ajn. T-T. (first half) Badminton 
9:30-10:'f5 ajn. T-T. (first half) Badminton 
11:00-12:15 MWF (2nd half) Badminton 

10:00-10:50 ajn. (first half) MWF 
11:00-11:50 ajn. (all semester) MWF 

8:00-9:15 ajn. (first half) T-T. 

9:30-10:'>5 ajn. (all semester) t-T, 
11:00-12:15 (all semester) T-T. 

1:00-2:15 (first half) MWF 

9:00-9:50 ajn. (all semester) MWF 



Nautilus 



Tennis 
Courts 



Free Swim 
Hours ** 



SHEHAWKS 
TO PLAY 



9:00-9:50 ajn. (MWF) 
10:00-10:50 ajn. MWF 
11:00-11:50 ajn. MWF 

8:00-9:15 ajn. (2nd half) T-T. 
10:00-10:50 ajn. (2nd half) MWF 

8:00-8:50 ajn. (all semester) MWF 

9:00-9:50 ajn. (all semester) MWF 
12:00-12:50 (all semester) MWF 

1:00-2:15 pjn. (2nd half) MWF 



11K)0 ajn. - iK)0 pjn. Monday - Friday 
7:00 pjn. - 3:00 pjn. Tuesday, Wednesday & Thjrsday 
12:00 - 3K)0 pjn. Saturday 

** Except during home swim meets 



The Women Seahawks will host George Mason University tonigh 
at 7 in Trask Coliseum and the American University on Januar} 
19 at 7 in Trask. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC bv the esea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 21 
JANUARY 21^, 1985 



STAFF 
RECOGNIZED 



SYMPHONY 
TO PERFORM 



SEAHAWK 
BASKETBALL 



PUBLIC 
LECTURE 



WOLFF 
PUBLISHES 



FILMS TO 
3E SHOWN 



WEATHER 
POLICY 



Robert O. Walton, Jr^ acting vice chancellor for business affairs, 
Timothy A. Jordan, assistant director of financial services, and 
Norman R. Kaylor, dean of the Cameron School of Business Ad- . 
ministration, were honored as past presidents of the Wilmington 
Chapter of the National Association of Accountants during the 
groups monthly technical program held January 17. 

The North Carolina Symphony will perform Friday, January 25, 
at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. Norman Krieger, pianist, will 
be the featured performer. 

The UNCW Seahawks will host Navy TONIGHT at 7:30 and 
James Madison University on January 26 at 7:30 pjn. Both 
games will be held in Trask Coliseum. 

A free lecture entitled "The Family Illness: Alcoholism" will be 
presented January 30 at 7 p/n. in the public library located at 
201 Chestnut Street. Sponsored by the New Hanover Council 
on the Status of Women, the lecture is open to the public. 

Dr. Robert Wolff, assistant professor of recreation, has had an 
article, "Do Yourself a Favor • . . ," published in the North 
Carolina Recreation and Park Review, Volume 37, No, 8, 
198^ winter edition. 

The Psychiatric Program of New Hanover Memorial Hospital will 
sponsor "The Cinema and Mental Health Series," a series of 
movies focusing on social and personal issues relating to men- 
tal health. Following each film a member of the psychiatric 
staff will lead a discussion. All films are free and will be 
shown at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of the Area Health Educa- 
tion Center located next to NHMH. All faculty and staff are 
invited. The first movie, "On Golden Pond," (PG) will be 
shown TONIGHT. 

University employees are reminded that in the event adverse 
weather conditions make it hazardous to commute to and from 
work — the university may be temporarily closed. Should this 
condition occur, announcements regarding closing will be publi- 
cized through area media and intracampus announcements. 



PERSONNEL 
TRAINING 



DUES 
HEARING 



The staff training and development section of the personnel de- 
partment is offering the following films for faculty and staff. 
Select a date that best suits your schedule and call Brenda 
Dineen at ext. 3712 to register. All films will be shown in the 
personnel training room. 



Days Offered 
l/2f & 25 



1/29, 31 & 2/1 



Film 

"Microcomputers-An Introduction " 
"Problem Solving Strategies" 
"Team Building" 

"Managing Stress" 

"New Look at Motivation" 

"Care of the Missing Person" 



Time 
9-11 am 



9-11 am 



2/5 6, 7 



"Productivity-Self -Fulfilling Prophecy" 
"Psyching" (9-10:30 am) 



An open public hearing on the "Imolementation of the New SENC 
(State Employees of North Carolina) Dues Structure" will be helc 
Monday, February 'f, from 7-9. pjn. in 5B-212. All UNCW employ* 
es are invited. 



VOLUNTEERS The New Hanover County Special Olympics, Inc. is hosting the Ni 

NEEDED State Special Olympic Bowling Tournament February 2 from j 

10:30 ajn. - 4:30 pjn. at Cardinal Lanes. Special Olympics is a 

sports and fitness program for the mentally retarded. Volunteers! 

and donations are needed. For additional information call 

791-6039. 

SESSIONS An informal discussion on Central American Issues will be held 

SCHEDULED tonight at 7:30 upstairs in Randall Library. Friday, January 25, 

at noon in the union courtyard, a supply drive to benefit 
Nicaraguan war orphans will be held. Everyone is asked to do- 
nate pencils, paper and other school supplies. Both events are 
sponsored by the UNCW Committee for Alternatives to Aggressic 
in Central America. 



BLACK 
OBSERVANCE 



AEROBICS 
CLASSES 



PUBLIC 
FILM 



A one-man play about black leaders, "Can I Speak for You 
Brother?" will begin the observance of Black History Month 
January 30 at 8 pjn. in UU-100. The play will be performed by 
the San Francisco African American Drama Company. All 
faculty and staff are invited. No charge. For more information 
call ext. 38W. 

There have been date changes in the first two aerobics classes 
offered this semester by the Office of Special Programs. Belowi 
is the revised schedule: 



Course 



Dates 



SP-IOOIA 1/28-3/6 
(Beginners) 

SP-IOOIC 1/29-3/7 



Time 
6:30-7:15 pm 

6:30-7:15 pm 



Place 
HA 



HA 



$21 



The New Hanover Public Library will present the film, "All the 
King's \<en," January 25 at 2 p/n. and 7:30 pjn. in the upstairs 
meeting room of the main Library. All faculty and staff are 
invited. 



Applications and nominations are invited for the position of vice 
chancellor for business affairs at UNCW. As the university's 
chief fiscal officer, this position is responsible to the chancellor 
for all university budgets, including receipts and disbursements, 
maintenance of financial records, and preparation of all budget 
documents; supervises the operations of all auxiliary services, 
financial services, non-academic personnel services, purchasing 
services, building and grounds maintenance and capital improve- . 
ments. Candidates must have a minimum of five years of business 
related administrative/managerial experience, preferably in a 
university setting along with a thorough knowledge of NC budge- 
tary procedures. Letters of application/nomination, along with 
a resume and names of three persons who may be contacted 
for reference should be submitted by February 15 to: 

Mrs. Catherine Burruss 

Administrative Assistant 

Office of the Chancellor - UNCW 

Richard Long of the English department has had a poem, "The 
Way to the Magical Order," accepted for publication in The 
Texas Review. 

Charles Fort, director of the creative writing program and as- . 
sistant professor of English, has received the 1985 Randall 
Jarrell Poetry Award sponsored by the O. Henry Festival of 
Greensboro. His poem. The Writer at His Desk, was selected 
from among more than 200 statewide entries commemorating 
William Sydney Porter (1862-1910), better known as "O. Henry." 

An evening of chamber music will be held Jarsjary 31 in King 
Hall Auditorium at 8 pjn. Creative arts faculty members to 
be featured will include 3ane Mathew, soprano, and Sherrill 
Martin, pianist. David Hawkins of East Carolina University 
will play the oboe. The program will feature the first performance 
in North Carolina of "Herr, der du stark and nachtig bist," an 
aria for soprano, oboe, and keyboard from the inpublished 
Bach Cantata 10. Dr. Martin prepared this edition as part of 
her work with the Institute for Renaissance and Baroque Studies 
in College Park, MD, last summer. The program also includes 
two arias by Phiiidor, arias by Handel and Vivaldi, and excerpts 
from Ten Blake Songs for Voice and Oboe by Vaughan Williams. 
All faculty and staff are invited. No admission charge. 

The alumni association invites all faculty, staff and their families 

to the January 26 pre-game basketball social in UU-100 at 

6 p.m. Cold cut sandwiches, potato chips, pickles and beverages 

will be served. Advance reservations are required. Call 

ext. 3616. 



The Seahawks will host Furman University (men and women) 
Saturday, January 26, at 2 pjn. at the pool. 

The University Union Snack Bar special for this week will be the 
"Pizza Sandwich," pepperoni, mozzarella cheese and pizza sauce 
on a hoagie roll, for i5C- 

All faculty and staff are invited to attend the wedding of 
Sabrina Foster on Sunday, February 3, at 3 pjn. at Emmanuel 
Presbyterian Church. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 22 
JANUARY 31, 1985 



UNCW will celebrate Black History Month beginning February 6 
with a lecture by Asa Spaulding, 3r^ member of the UNC Board 
of Governors. Mr. Spaulding will discuss "Contemporary Perspec- 
tive," a topic dealing with problems pressing today's blacks in 
UU-100 at 3 pjn. Following his address will be music by 
the gospel choir and a one man art show by local artist and 
UNCW alumnus Harry Davis. Other programs and events 
are scheduled throughout the month. 

The Faculty Women's Network will meet Friday, February 1, at 
3 pjn. in UU-210. For more information call Linda Moore at ext. 
3283 or Kathleen Berkeley at ext. 3309. 

A public hearing on the "Implementation on the New SENC 
(State Employees of North Carolina) Dues Structure" will be held 
Monday, February % from 7-9. pjn. in SB-212. All UNCW employe- 
es are invited. 

The Department of Creative Arts will present a program of 
chamber music at 8 TONIGHT in King Hall Auditorium featuring 
3ane Mathew, soprano; David Hawkins, oboist, and Sherrill Martin, 
pianist. 

The American Red Cross Blood Mobile Unit will be on campus 
Monday, February ^f, from" 9:30 ajn. - 3 pjn. and on Tuesday, 
February 5, from 11:30 ajn. - 5 pjn. All faculty and staff are 
encouraged to come by the University Union and give. 

Discount coupons for the month of February for Little King are 
available at the UU Information Desk and from residence hall 
advisors. The coupon entitles the bearer to two slices of pizza 
and a 16 oz soft drink for $1.99 (normally a $2.99 value.) Pro- 
ceeds will go to the Task Force Against Family Violence. 

The Thalian production, 70 Girls 70, will be performed Saturday, 
February 2, at 2 pjn. in Thalian Hall. For ticket information call 
763-3398. 



WINNERS Winners of the Wilmington Writers Forum Literary Contest spons 

ANNOUNCED ed by the UNCW Creative Writing Program include the followin] 

Poetry Winners Virginia 3. Whyte, Eloise Shelton, and Glenda 
Harrell 

Short Story Winners 3im Poison, Steve Hill and Earle P. Weir 

CENTRAL Central Stores is now stocking the following item: 

STORES 

618-W519 Ink, mimeo paste Van Son black (sold by the tube) 

PHONE On page 57 of the faculty/staff telephone directory under R. O. 

UPDATE Walton - please make the following change: 

Change home phone to 763-1972 

TRIVIAL The University Union will sponsor a Trivial Pursuit Tournament 

PURSUIT Monday, February 11, in UU-100. Teams of up to six may enter 

ANYONE? either the 't pjn. or 7:30 pjn. games. For additional information 

call student activities at ext. 3827. 



PUBLIC 
LECTURE 



ALUMNI 
SOCIAL 



WORKSHOP 
PRESENTED 



HUMAN 
RELATIONS 



A free lecture on "Effective Communication with Health Care 
Professionals" will be presented February 6 at 7 pjn. in the pub 
library located at 201 Chestnut Street. The lecture is sponsore 
by the New Hanover Council on the Status of Women. All 
faculty and staff are invited. 

Faculty and staff are reminded to make plans to attend the 
pre-game social next Thursday night, February 7. The social, 
featuring cold cut sandwiches, potato chips, pickles and bevera] 
will begin at 6 pjn. Reservations are required. Call Frank Bov 
alumni director, at ext. 3616. j 

A one-day workshop entitled "Educational Programming for Dis- 
ruptive Learners: Applying Behavior-Ajialysis Procedures in thi 
Classroom" was conducted by Dr. Louis LaNunziata, assistant 
professor of curricular studies, January 25 for faculty and staf:| 
of the Fairmont City School District. 

The New Hanover County Public Library will host a series of 
programs entitled Opportunities for Human Relations Personal 
Enrichment. The first program by John Davis, community 
relations specialist with the New Hanover County Human Re- 
lations Commission, titled "Why Human Relations Month?" 
will be held February 7 at 7:30 pjn. in the library. A film will 
also be shown following the address entitled "Prejudice: 
Perceiving and Believing." 



WOMEN 
SEAHAWKS 

SWIM 
TEAM 

SNACK 
BAR 



SEAHAWK 
BASKETBALL 



The Seahawk Women will host Belmont Abbey College this 
Saturday, February 2, at 7 pjn. in Trask Coliseum. 

The Men's Swim Team will meet with UNC-Charlotte Saturday, 
February 2, at 2:30 pjn. 



,i 



The University Union Snack Bar special this week will be Chil i 
Con Came, 10 oz bowl for 85C. Offer good through February ] 
6. 

The Seahawks will host East Carolina University Thursday, 
February 7, at 7:30 pjn, in Trask Coliseum. 



The university bookstore will become an authorized Apple Compu- 
ter dealer through special arrangements negotiated by the UNC 
General Administration. Purchases made through the bookstore 
will result in substantial savings on certain Apple products. Ad- 
ditional information will be supplied to faculty and staff 
in approximately three weeks. 

The Office of Special Programs will offer the following aerobics 
classes beginning February 25 in Hanover Hall. Registration 
deadline is February 18. Faculty and staff will receive a 50% 
discount. 

Beginners, 2/25 - ^f/lO, 1:15-2:00 p.m. M&W - $21 
Level 1, 2/25 - 'f/lO, 5:30-6:15 pjn. M&W - $23 
Level 1, 2/26 - itl3, 12:15-1:00 pjn. T&T - $23 
Level 2, 2/26 - kiS, 5:30-6:15 pjn. T&T - $23 
Beginners, 3/11 - 'f/l?, 6:30-7:15 pjn, M&W - $21 
Beginners, 3/12 -«>/18, 6:30-7:15 p/n, T&T - $21 

Gayla Sanders of the Creative Arts Department will offer the fol- 
lowing art courses for children: 

Early Exploration in Art (ages 5-6) 

February 11 - April 15 (Mondays) 3:15-'t:15 p/n. (fee is $27) 

Art Exploration for the Middle Grades (ages 7-9) 

February 13 - April 17 (Wednesdays) 3:15-<t:15 pjn. (fee $27) 

Advanced Art Explorations (ages 9-12) 

February 13 - April 17 (Wednesdays) *:30-5:30 pan. (fee $27) 

Registration is presently underway with classes limited to 10 
students. Classes will not meet during spring and Easter breaks. 
Call the Office of Special Programs at ext. 3195 for additional 
information. 

The first Great Decisions lecture will be held February 5 at 
7:30 pjn. in King Hall, room 100. "Revolutionary Cuba - Toward 
Accommodation or Conflict?" will be the topic. Fee. 

St. John's Museum of Art will present art exhibitions February 8 - 
March 23 at IH Orange Street. Gallery hours are Tuesday 
through Saturday from 10 ajn. - 5 pjn. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 

IBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 23 
FEBRUARY 7, 1985 

VICTORIAN Faculty and staff from various departments will participate in 

SAMPLER "A Victorian Sampler" Monday, February 11, at 8 pjn. in King Hall 

Auditorium. The program is designed to give people of today a 
sense of what it was like to live during the Victorian Age by 
presenting samples of art, history drama, music, science, medicine 
and literature. The program is free and open to the public. 



DESSERT 
THEATRE 



ORGAN 
RECITAL 



CHILDREN'S 
THEATRE 



ATLANTIS 
AVAILABLE 



BLACK 
HISTORY 



A Dessert Theatre, sponsored by the Fine Arts Committee of the 
University Program Board, will be held Wednesday, February 13, 
at 7:30 pjn. in UU-100. A comedy, "The Marriage-Go-Round," 
will be performed by the Alpha-Omega Players, the nation's most 
active repertory company. The price will be $3 and will in- . 
elude the show, choice of dessert and a beverage. Tickets may 
be purchased at the UU information desk. 

An organ recital marking the dedication of the university's new 
Rodgers 900 Pipe Organ will be held Wednesday, February 13, at 
8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Guest organist will be Douglas Major, 
assistant organist and choirmaster at Washington Cathedral in 
Washington, D. C. The concert is the first in a series of 
"dedicatory" recitals for the organ. Admission will be $2. 

The Pied Piper Theatre will present its annual childrens play 
entitled "The King's Ho Hum" Sunday, February 10, at 3 pxn. 
in Kenan Auditorium, The play, directed by Doug Swink of the 
creative arts faculty, is the lith production presented by the 
Pied Piper Theatre. The play was written by Leu Bosworth with 
original songs by James Burke. 

Copies of ATLANTIS, literary works by students, are present- . 
ly available in the English department and the UU information 
center. 

In observance of "Black History Month" Dr. Phillip McGuire of 
the history department will speak on "The Afro-American 
Family: A History of Educational, Religious and Political Pre- . 
cepts from the Black Community" February 10 at 11 a.m. at 
Central Baptist Church. 



PLANT OF Beginning this week and continuing throughout the semester, the 

THE WEEK Krcsge Greenhouse will feature a "plant of the week." Each we( 

a different plant will be highlighted giving general information 
and tips on care and propagation. This week's featured plant is 
the Anthurium andreanium, better known as the "Flamingo Flowe 
Anyone interested in knowing more about Anthurium andreanium 
should come by the greenhouse or call Linda Teachey, greenhous« 
manager, at ext. 3536. 

UNCW/ECU The alumni mixer with East Carolina University and UNCW 

MIXER will be held TONIGHT at 6:30 in UU-100. RESERVATIONS ONL 

Following the mixer at 8 pjn. the Seahawks will host ECU in 
Trask Coliseum, The Seahawks will take on American University 
during the homecoming game this Saturday, February 9, at 
7:30 pjn. A pre-game social is scheduled for that night prior to 
the game. Faculty and staff interested in attending the social 
should contact Frank Bowen, alumni affairs director, at ext. 361( 
Advance reservations are required. 



OPEN 
LECTURE 



BLACK 

HISTORY 
LECTURE 



"Alcoholism and Addictions in Women: Special Considerations" w 
be the next topic in a series of free programs sponsored by the 
New Hanover Council on the Status of Women. The lecture will 
be held February 13 at 7 pjn. at the main public library. j 

Dr. Geo R. Garrison of Howard University will discuss "African 
Origins of Afro-American Religion" Monday, February 11, at 
at 7:30 pjn. in Bryan Auditorium. 



HUMAN 
RELATIONS 



DISCOUNT 
COUPONS 



The New Hanover Public Library will host the second in a 
series of programs on "Opportunities for Human Relations Per- 
sonal Enrichment" February l^f at 7:30 pjn. at the main library. 
The series will include a presentation of readings done in a 
light-hearted context on the problems facing elderly citizens. 

A reminder that discount coupons good for the month of Februai 
for Little King are available at the UU Information Center and 
from residence hall advisors. The coupon entitles the bearer 
to two slices of pizza and a 16 oz soft drink for $1.99 (normally 
a $2.99 value). Proceeds will go to the Task Force Against 
Family Violence. 



TRIVIAL 
PURSUIT 



A Trivial Pursuit Tournament is scheduled for February 11 in 
UU-100. Teams of up to six may enter either the 4 pjn. or 
7:30 pjn. games. Faculty and staff are invited to participate. 
For additional information call ext. 3827. 



GREAT 
DECISIONS 



DEVELOPMENT 
STAFF AT 
CONFERENCE 



The next Great Decisions lecture, "Soviet Leadership in Transi- 
tion - What Impact on Superpower Relations," by Dr. James 
Dixon, chairman of the political science department, will be 
held February 12 at 7:30 pjn. in King Hall - 100. Fee. For 
more information call the office of special programs. 

Mimi Cunningham, Jean Joyner, Renee Brantley and Patsy Larri 
of the development office staff attended the winter conference! 
of the College News Association of the Carolinas January m-2l 
in Columbia, SC. UNCW will be the host site for the 1985 
summer conference of CNAC. 



ROWELL 
RECOGNIZED 



ST. JOHN'S 
PROGRAMS 



MCKINSTRY 
TO ADDRESS 
TOPICS 



AEROBICS 
CLASSES 



NAUTILUS 
SCHEDULE 



Tyrone Rowell, director of development, was awarded the dis- 
tinguished "SiJver Beaver" award during the annual banquet of 
the Boy Scouts of America held Friday, February 1. The award 
is considered the highest award given for volunteer services 
to the youth of BSA. 

St. John's Museum of Art will sponsor a lecture by Jack Berkman, 
local artist, entitled "Color in Painting" Saturday, February 9, 
at 10 ajn. Scheduled later in the afternoon will be a work- 
shop on Children Print Making (6 years and older) from 1-3. 
(Fee of $5). Another talk by Elziabeth Darrow on "Changing 
Styles" will be conducted Tuesday, February 12, at 11 aan. 
All programs will be held at the museum. 

Dr. Diane McKinstry, director of the student development center, 
will speak with interested faculty at noon February 19 in the 
University Union Snack Bar (east wing). Topics to be discussed 
will include how to spot the student under stress; how to provide 
helpful support and how to assist students in the most effective 
way. 

The office of special programs will offer the following aerobics 
classes beginning February 25 in Hanover Hall. Registration 
deadline is February 18. Faculty and staff will receive a 50% 
discount. 

Beginners, 2/25 - ^/lO, 1:15 - 2:00 pjn. M&W - $21 
Level 1, 2/25 - «f/10, 5:30 - 6:15 pjn. M&W - $23 
Level 1, 2/26 - ^/9, 12:15 - 1:00 pjri. T&T - $23 
Level 2, 2/26 - «t/9, 5:30 - 6:15 p.m. T&T - $23 
Beginners, 3/11 - tt/l7, 6:30 - 7:15 pjn. M&W - $21 
Beginners, 3/12 - 'f/lS, 6:30 - 7:15 pjn. T&T - $21 

The following is the schedule for the Nautilus Weight Room: 
FACULTY AND STAFF 



Monday, Wednesday & Friday 

Tuesday & Thursday 

STUDENTS 

Monday, Wednesday & Friday 

Tuesday & Thursday 



Saturday 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASSES 



8 ajn. - 9 ajn. 
noon - 1 pjn. 
8 aan. - 9 ajn. 



8 a/Ti. - 9 ajTi. 
1 pjn, - 2 pjn. 
8 ajn. - noon 
8 pjTi. - 9 pjn. 

10 ajn. - noon 



Monday, Wednesday & Friday 
ATHLETIC lEAMS 



9 ajn. - noon 



Monday - Friday 2 pjn. - 8 pjn. 

CLUB FOOTBALL & CLUB RUGBY 



Monday & Wednesday 



8 pjn. - 9 pjn. 



»NACK BAR 
SPECIAL 



The University Union Snack Bar special this week will be wafer 
rolls for 10(;t each. Special runs today through February 13. 



NEW New employees on campus include Charlotte Durbino, computer 

EMPLOYEES operator for the office of information systems; Laurin Baker, 

university residence administrator for university residence life, 
and Judy Lassiter, secretary in the office of research adminis- 
tration. 



MEDICAL 
INFO 



A new spouse should be enrolled within 30 days of marriage to 
avoid thr 12-mDnth waiting period for pre-existing conditions. 

New borns should be enrolled prior to birth or within 30 days 
of birth to avoid the 12-mpnth waiting period for pre-existing 
conditions. 



WORKERS' 
COMP 



INQUIRIES 
ON BENEFITS 

RECEPTION 
TO FOLLOW 
GAME 



UNCW provides workers' compensation coverage for its employei 
and it is the university's intent to provide for a safe and health 
ful environment. However, if an injury or illness occurs while 
on the job and if it is compensable by the North Carolina 
Workers' Compensation Act, medical bills and/or limited disa- 
bility benefits may be paid. To assure prompt handling - all 
job-related illnesses or injuries MUST be reported immediately 
to your supervisor/department head. Anyone interested in 
receiving a copy of the university's ten basic safety rules 
and/or Safety Handbook, may call ext. 3162. 



All questions on benefits should be directed to Dianne Smith, 
personnel assistant in the personnel office, at ext. 3162. 



Immediately following the homecoming game Saturday night, 
a reception will be given in conjunction with alumni in the 
University Union Snack Bar until midnight. All faculty, student;; 
and staff are invited. Semi-formal dress is REQUIRED, FREE, j 



COMMUNIQUE All items for inclusion in the CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE must 

DEADLINE be in the development office before noon on Wednesday of 

each week. Distribution is the following Thursday. All 
articles should be sent to Patsy Larrick, editor, UU-209. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



BRARY/ARCHIVES 1 




^ 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 

VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 2U 

FEBRUARY Ik, 1985 - VALENTINE'S DAY 



5J^.O. 
PLAY 



-ILING 
S^ORKSHOP 



3EGREE 

PROGRAM 

APPROVED 

<ENAN 
= VENTS 



3RANT 
\WARDED 



eahawk on 

research 

:ruise 




The University Theatre will present "See How They Run" Febru- 
ary 20 - 2k in the 5.R.O. Theatre nightly at 8. For reservations 
call ext. 3'f'fO. 

A workshop on "Files & Filing/' designed for personnel who per- 
form or supervise filing operations, will be held Wednesday, 
February 20, in UU-iOO. For additional information call Brenda 
Dineen at ext. 3712. 

The UNC Board of Governors has approved a master's degree pro- 
gram in reading education at UNCW. The program, expected to 
begin this fall, will accept approximately 25 students. 

The following programs will be held throughout the week in 
Kenan Auditorium: Alvin Alley Repertory sponsored by the 
Wilmington Concert Association TONIGHT at 8 (fee), Travelogue 
by the Azalea City Kiwanis Club February 18 at 8 p.m. (fee), 
and the Ebony Fashion Show February 20 at 8 pjn. (fee). 

The NC Wildlife Resources Commission has awarded a $2,^*63 
grant to develop a management plan for North Carolina's colonial 
waterbirds. Dr. 3ames Pamell, professor of biology, is studying 
the nesting habits of various waterbirds living on man-made dredg- 
ed material islands in coastal estuaries. The project is also being 
supported by the UNC Sea Grant College Program. 

The Research Vessel Seahawk left Wilmington yesterday for an ex- 
tended training, certification and research cruise. The crew will 
train and test systems to their maximum 300 foot mixed gas diving 
capabilities off the Florida Keys. Diving certification procedures 
conducted by NOAA on board the Seahawk is scheduled from 
February 2k - March 1. After March 13 the Seahawk will cruise 
to the Coral Reef National Marine Sanctuary near Key Largo. 
She is scheduled to be home on April 3. 



HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY!! 



DR. WILLEY 

DELIVERS 

SEMINAR 



BONGIORNO 
SELECTED 



LANUNZIATA 

PRIMARY 

WRITER 



POEM 
ACCEPTED 



MAP 
RELEASED 



Dr. Joan D. WilJey of the division of chemistry and marine sciena 
program gave a seminar on rainwater chemistry in eastern North 
Carolina to the Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric 
Sciences at NCSU February 1. J 

Frank J. Bongiorno, assistant professor of music, was selected 
recently as one of 30 soloists throughout the world to present a 
recital at the Eight World Saxophone Congress 3une 29 at the 
University of Maryland. Mr. Bongiorno will be premiering a new 
work by Dr. David Kechley. 

Dr. Louis LaNunziata, assistant professor of curricular studies, 
was the primary author of an article entitled "Suggestions for 
Phasing out Token Economy Systems in Primary and Intermediate 
Grades." The article, which appeared in the winter volume of 
Techniques; A Journal for Remedial Education and Counseling, 
was co-authored by Drs. J. Cooper of Ohio State and K. Hunt of 
Bloomsbury University of PA. 

A poem. Race War, by Charles Fort of the English department 
has been accepted for publication in the spring issue of Cardinal, 
an anthology of North Carolina writers. 



A map by Dr. John Huntsman, assistant professor of earth 
sciences, has been released as U.S. Geological Survey Map 
MF-1715, The map, co-authored by Lucian Piatt of the depart- 
ment of geology at Bryn Mawr College, is titled "Geologic 
map and cross sections of the Caribou Mountain area, southern 
Idaho." 



i 



FILMS TO 
BE SHOWN 



CHEMISTRY 
SEMINAR 



GREAT 
DECISIONS 



The New Hanover County Public Library will show three short 
films Tuesday, February 19. The films entitled "Scott Joplin: 
King of Ragtime Composers," "Paul Robeson: Tribute to an 
Artist" and "Got It to Tell: A Tribute to Mahalia Jackson" 
will be shown upstairs in the meeting room at 2 pjn. and 
7:30 pjn. Free. 

The 1985 Spring Seminar Series for the Department of Chemical 
Sciences and Physical Sciences/Division of Chemistry will pre- 
sent its second seminar Friday, February 22. Steve Sugheir of 
the chemistry division will discuss "Liquid Crystals" at 2:30 pjD. 
in C-ll'*. Interested faculty and staff are invited to participate.^ 

The next Great Decisions lecture, "What Role for the U.S. in J 
the Persian Gulf?" will be held February 19 at 7:30 pjn. in King 
Hall room 100. Fee. 



SPECIAL 
LECTURE 



GOOD 
LIFE 



"The Lumbee Indians and The Lost Colony" will be the topic of c 
lecture sponsored by the history department Wednesday, Februar 
20, at 7:30 pjn. in Bryan Auditorium. Guest speaker for the 
evening will be Dr. David Eliades, associate professor of 
history at Pembroke State University and co-author of a history 
of the Lumbee Indians entitled, "The Only Land I Know." The 
presentation is in conjunction with the history department's 
observance of North Carolina's ^OOth anniversary dating back 
to the Lost Colony at Roanoke. 

The Good Life Series will present Dr. David Bachman, neurolo- 
gist, discussing "Headaches" February 18 at 7:30 pjn. in the AHE 
Auditorium. Presented in conjunction with New Hanover Memori 
Hospital, the lecture is free and open to the public. 



The Panhellenic Council will sponsor a lecture by Dr. Ann DiBala- . 
Wright of the Life Center of Wilmington Wednesday, February 27, 
at 8 pjn. in UU-100. She will discuss "Current Concerns in 
Women's Health." All faculty and staff are invited. Refreshments 
will be served. For further information call ext. 3827. 

The UNCW Jazz Combo, under the direction of Frank Bongiomo, 
assistant professor of music, will perform at 3 pjn., Sunday, 
February 17, in Kenan Auditorium. Also, performing that 
night will be the Frank Bongiorno Quartet featuring Duke Ladd 
on the piano, Greg Eavey on the drums, Gary Cradock, bass, 
and Frank Bongiomo on alto saxophone. Admission will be $1. 
For more information call ext. 3390. 

A program by Rabbi Robert Waxman of the BViai Israel Synagogue 
entitled "Your 3ewish Neigbor Celebrates" will be held February 
21 at 7:30 pjn. in the meeting room of the main public library. 
All faculty and staff are cordially invited to attend. 

A lecture entitled "Women: Alone and Together in the Life Cycle" 
is scheduled for Wednesday, February 20, at 7 pjn. in the public 
library located downtown. Free and open to the public 

Please make the following update in your faculty/staff telephone 
directory: 

Add: Mr. 3ohn Evans (Linda) 

Lecturer in English 
^^606 Brampton Rd. (28W5) 
Home Phone 392-2383 
Office ext. 3326/ Office location - MH.152 

Faculty and staff are invited to attend the February 18 pre-game 
alumni social at 6 pjn. in UU-100. RESERVATIONS ARE RE- . 
QUIRED. Call ext. 3616. The Seahawks will host Campbell 
University that night. 

As part of a new feature by WECT-TV-6 a local person will be 
selected each week for his/her contributions to the community. 
The first person to receive this title is Mimi Cunningham, public 
information officer for the university. She will appear during a 
special segment of the Jim Bums Show this morning. Congratula- 
tions Mimi!! 



The Seahawks will host Campbell University TONIGHT at 7, 
James Madison University February 16 at 7 pjn, and the College 
of William & Mary February 18 at 5:30 pjn. All games will be 
played in Trask Coliseum. 

The UNCW Seahawks will host Campbell University February 18 
at 7:30 pjn. in Trask Coliseum. 

"A Focus on Malcolm X and His Ideology" by Fred McGee will 
be held February 21 at 3:30 pjn. in UU-201. 

The Thalian Hall Concert Series will present "The Merry Wives 
of Windsor" February 16 at 8 pjn. at Thalian Hall. Tickets are 
$6, $8 and $10. 



DR. BLANKS 

DELIVERS 

ADDRESS 



WHO'S 
NEW? 



MEDICAL 
INSURANCE 



CHAMPUS 
NOTICE 



In observance of Black History Month, Dr. Delilah Blanks of th 
sociology/anthropology department recently delivered an educa 
tional address, "Black Contributors to America's Cultural Grow 
to the Central Baptist Church in Bladenboro. 

A UNCW welcome is extended to David L. Ragin, stock clerk i 
the warehouse, and William J. Ferencak, HVAC mechanic for tl 
physical plant. 

Medical insurance will pay up to $3,000 per thirty consecutive 
days and up to a maximum of $5,000 per calendar year and 
$15,000 per lifetime for the treatment of alcohol and drug dep 
dency. Facilities such as half-way homes and/or recovery farn 
do not meet eligibility requirements set up by the state. 
Only eligible providers (those who meet state criteria) will be 
reimbursed for treatment of chemical dependency. 

CHAMPUS is a supplemental insurance plan for retired military 
personnel and their eligible dependents. The state pays first, 
then CHAMPUS. 



SAVINGS 
BONDS 



Savings Bonds are available through payroll deduction with a 
guaranteed return of 15% interest at five years. Some feature 
Series EE Savings Bonds include: 

1. Interest is free from state and local taxes and federal 
tax may be deferred until bonds are cashed 

2. Savings Bonds are available in $50, %15, $200, $500, 
$1,000, $5,000 and $10,000 denominations 

3. The purchase price is one-half the face amount 

^. Payroll deduction is restricted to a $5 minimum with 

six months to purchase one bond 



BURGER 
SPECIAL 



Brochures and payroll deduction forms may be obtained from t| 
personnel office by calling ext. 3713. 

Beginning TODAY the University Union Snack Bar will offer 
small hamburgers for }>%<; and small cheeseburgers for kZ<;.. 
Special good through March 1. No coupon necessary. 



DONATIONS 

BEING 

ACCEPTED 



OPEN 
HOUSE 



The Committee for Alternatives to Aggression in Central 
America is helping an orphanage in Managua, Nicaragua. Dona 
tions of any nature such as school supplies, clothes, money, 
etc. are welcome. Leave all items in the main office of 
the philosophy & religion department. 

All faculty and staff are invited to an "Open House" in the 
Copy Center TODAY from 8:30 ajn. - ^:30 pjn. Refreshments 
will be served. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 




LIBRARY /ARCHIVES 1 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 25 
FEBRUARY 21, 1985 



PLAY NOW 
RUNNING 



PRE-RETIREMENT 
CONFERENCE 



SAVINGS BONDS 



ECAC TOURNAMENT 



"See How They Run" opened last night in the S.R.O. 
Theatre. Directed by Dr. Terry Theodore, professor of 
drama, the play will run through Sunday, February 24. 
"See How They Run," entertainment for the whole family, 
has a curtain call of 8 nightly. 

Dale Mills and Gary Watson of the N.C. Teachers and State 
Employees Retirement System will hold a pre-retirement 
conference March 13 at 9:30 a.m. in the new building 
auditorium of Cape Fear Technical Institute. The con- 
ference will address procedures, eligibility, calculation 
of benefits, selection of optional payment arrangements 
and other benefits available to members. A representative 
from the Social Security Office has also been invited to 
give an update on Social Security benefits at retirement. 
The conference will last approximately 2 1/2 hours. For 
more information, call Dianne Smith at Extension 3162. 

Savings Bonds are available through payroll deduction with 
a guaranteed return of 7.5% interest at five years. Some 
features of Series EE Savings Bonds include: 

1. Interest is free from state and local taxes and federal 
tax may be deferred until bonds are cashed. 

2. Savings Bonds are available in $50, $75, $200, $500, 
$1,000, $5,000 and $10,000 denominations. 

3. The purchase price is one-half the face amount. 

4. Payroll deduction is restricted to a $5 minimum with 
six months to purchase one bond. 

Brochures and payroll deduction forms may be obtained from 
the personnel office by calling ext . 3713. 

Faculty and staff are reminded that the ECAC Tournament 
will be held in Williamsburg, Virginia March 3-7. 



MARDI GRAS 



A Mardi Gras celebration will be held Feb. 23 at 8 p.m. 
at the Cape Fear Foundation Center located at 9 South 
Front Street. Activities will include a King and Queen 
Parade and a dance. Participants are asked to come in 
costume and to wear masks in order to be eligible for 
contests. Tickets are $5 per person and $8 per couple. Re 
beans and rice, King cake, pralines and other goodies wi] 
be provided. All proceeds will go to the Museum of World 
Ciiltures. For more information call 256-4522. 



SEMINAR 
PLANNED 



The Office of Special Programs will offer a one-day semiri 
on microcomputer communications Friday, March 8, from 8 a 
until 4 p.m. The seminar, taught by Dr. Charles Ward and 
Peggy Sullivan of UNCW, will cover microcomputer communic 
tions, modern telecommunications, online information and 
networking. Lunch, coffee breaks, supplies and reference 
materials will be included in the registration cost. 
Deadline for registering is March 1. Call ext. 3195 for 
additional information. 



POSITION 
AVAILABLE 



Applications and nominations for the position of Special 
Assistant to the Chancellor for Development and Public 
Service are being accepted until 5 p.m., March 29, 1985. 
Duties include 

1) advising on various development matters and assisting 
the design of long-range development plans; 

2) assisting in the continuing efforts of the University i 
enhance the economic, social, and cultural growth of j 
Southeastern North Carolina; 

3) assisting in the design and establishment of the 
University's Center for Economic Development; and 

4) undertaking such other duties as assigned relative to 
public service activities. 

Minimum requirements are a master's degree and eight (8) 
years in development and/or public service. Experience ii 
higher education or executive level industrial-educatio: 
liaison preferred. Maximum salary $52,000. For additiona 
information, contact Mrs. Catherine Burruss, Office of t. 
Chancellor. 



FllM TO AIR The third film in a series on slavery in America will ai 
on American Playhouse (PBS Television) at 9 p.m. Monday, 
Feb. 25. The two-hour drama by Dr. Robert Toplin, profes 
of history, and entitled Charlotte Forten's Mission , rel 
the true story of a woman's effort to help the slaves 
obtain their freedom during the Civil War. 



CONCERT IN 
KENAN 



The UNCW 7 O'clock Jazz Ensemble and the Jazz Fusion gro 
directed by Frank Bongiorno of the music faculty, will 
present a concert Feb. 27 at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 
The Jazz Fusion group will perform "pop" oriented jazz 
compositions including Evil Ways and Birdland . The 7 O'C' 
Jazz Ensemble will perform a variety of jazz composition 
for the big band. Compositions include Misty, What's New! 
A Night In Tunsia, Miles, Take the "A" Train, Cafe Amorej 
and Basie styled blues. Tickets are $1 per person. For 
more information call ext. 3395. 



LUMNI ANNUAL 



All faculty and staff are invited to attend the annual 
UNCW Alumni Social Saturday, March 2, from 8 p.m. to 
midnight in the University Union. Tickets are $12.50 per 
person and include heavy hors d'oeuvres, beverages and a 
casino night. For tickets call Frank Bowen, alumni affairs 
director, at ext. 3616. 



ICILLS 
DRKSHOP 



A workshop designed to help secretaries upgrade their 
professional skills is being offered by The Office of 
Special Programs on Friday, March 22, from 8:30 a.m- 
4:30 p.m. in room 202, King Hall. Instructors for "Future 
Secretary" will be Peggy Sullivan, computer specialist, and 
Michael and Laura Knotts of the English faculty. A luncheon 
from 12:15-1:15 p.m. in the University Union Snack Bar will 
feature fashion consultant Carolyn Forte advising and 
demonstrating techniques on dressing for the office as well 
as solving individual fashion problems. Cost for the work- 
shop and luncheon is $35 for UNCW employees and $45 for 
others. The luncheon is open to anyone on campus who is 
interested. Luncheon cost is $7 and tickets must be presented 
at the luncheon. Deadline for registering for the workshop 
or purchasing luncheon tickets is March 14. Contact the 
Office of Special Programs for more information at ext. 3195. 



)RT SELECTED 



Charles Fort, director of the creative writing program and 
assistant professor of English, has been selected "Man of 
the Week" by WECT-TV 6 and appeared on the Jim Burns Show 
Feb. 20. He read his award-winning poem, 0. Henry At His 
Desk , and discussed his forthcoming book of poems. The 
Town Clock Bvtrning. 



)MEN'S 
SALTH 



The Panhellenic Council will sponsor a lecture by Dr. Ann 
DiBala-Wright of the Life Center of Wilmington on Wednesday, 
February 27, at 8 p.m. She will discuss "Current Concerns 
in Women's Health." Refreshments will be provided. The 
lecture is open to all members of the University Coninunity. 
For questions, please call ext. 3827. 



[LMINGTON 
fMPHONY 



The creative arts department will present an evening of 
music with the Wilmington Symphony Orchestra Feb. 26 at 
8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 



lEAT 

;cisioNs 



Dr. Denis Carter, assistant to the dean of Cameron School 
of Business Adm. , will discuss "Budget Deficit, Trade and 
the Dollar (The Economics of Foreign Policy)" Feb. 26 at 
7:30 p.m. in King Hall 100. 



iflM 

:hedule 



The Seahawk Invitational, men and women, will be held Feb. 
21, 22 S 23 at the pool. 



.IDE 
CTURE 



The P & R department in conjunction with PeaceWorks of 
Wilmington will present the Rev. Collins Kilburn, execu- 
tive director of the N. C. Council of Churches at Raleigh, 
at 8 p.m. Feb. 28 in Bryan Auditorium. His topic will be 
"The Christian Churches in the Soviet Union." 



LIBRARY 
FILM 



CHEMISTRY 
SEMINARS 



A film, "Lady Sings the Blues," will be shown downtown 
the public library Feb. 22 at 2 fi 7:30 p.m. Free. 

Steve Shgheir of the chemistry faculty will discuss "Lie 
Crystals" Feb. 22 at 2:30 p.m. in C-114. Dr. Chia-yu Li 
the East Carolina University chemistry faculty will spec 
"Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Electrochemistry" Mc 
1, at 2:30 p.m. in C-114. Both seminars are in relation 
to the Spring 1985 Seminar by the chemistry division. 



ALUMNI 
SOCIAL 



Faculty and staff are invited to the last UNCW Alumni 
Social Feb. 25 when the Seahawks host William S Mary. Tt 
social will begin at 6 p.m. in UU-100 with sandwiches ar 
beverages. For reservations call ext. 3616. 



BLACK 

HISTORY 

PROGRAMS 



The following programs are scheduled in conjunction witt 
Black History Month. Fred McGee will lecture on "A Focus 
on Malcolm X and His Ideology" TODAY in UU-201 at 3:30 i 
A dance recital will feature the N.C Central Dance Group 
and the UNCW Afro-American Dance Group in UU-100 at 3 p. 
A musical and dance program by the UNCW Gospel Choir anc| 
Afro-American Dance Group will be conducted Feb. 26 at 
7:30 p.m. in UU-100. 



WOMEN'S 
BASKETBALL 



The Shehawks vs. ECU TONIGHT at 7 p. 
Shehawks vs. DiJce University on Feb, 



1. in Trask and The 
23 at 7 p.m. in Tre 



PAPER 
PUBLISHED 



Dr. David M. Russell of the mathematical sciences depart 
has published a new paper titled "Application of New Lov 
Bound Techniques to the Spectra of Li and Li+" in the Fe 
18, 1985 issue of the Physical Review Letters . Professor 
W. M. Greenlee of the University of Arizona mathematics 
department was a co-author. 



FREE 
FIUl 



The psychiatric program of NHMH will show the film, 
"Ordinary People," Feb. 28 at 7 p.m. in the AHEC Auditor! 
Free. 



CAMPUS 

COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the sea 




JMMER 

:hool 



OMEN'S 
^SKETBALL 

HEMISTRY 
iCTURE 



^ACK BAR 

:hedule 

NION 
OURS 



ETIREMENT 
ONFERENCE 



SMESHEETS 
UE MARCH 1 



EN'S 
\SKETBALL 

.ACK 
(STORY 



LM 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 26 
FEBRUARY 28, 1985 

Undergraduate and graduate students interested in attending sum- 
mer school at UNCW may register for classes in the office of 
special programs. Summer Session I begins May 28 and ends 
June 28 while Summer Session II is scheduled from July 8-A.ug. 9. 

The women Seahawks will be participating in the ECAC Tourna- 
ment March 1-3. in Richmond. 

The next talk in the chemistry seminar lecture series is en- . 
titled "Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Electrochemistry" 
with guest speaker Dr. Chia-yu Li of the department of chemis- 
try at ECU. The lecture will be held March 1 at 2:30 pjn. in 
DL-ll'f (chemistry/physics building). 

The University Union Snack Bar will close Friday, March 1, at 
3 pjn. and will reopen Monday, March 11, at 7:30 ajn. 

The University Union will close Friday, March 1, at 7:30 pjn. for 
spring break. During spring break week, the Union will be open 
from 7 ajn. - 5 pjn. M-F. and the Information Center will be open 
from 8 ajn. - k:h5 pjn. M-F. Regular operating hours will resume 
Sunday, March 10. 

A conference on "Pre-retirement" will be held March 13 at 9:30 
ajn. at Cape Fear Technical Institute. The conference will 
address procedures, eligibility, and other benefits available to 
members. In addition, a representative from Social Services will 
give an update on SS benefits at retirement. For more informa- 
tion call Dianne Smith at ext. 3162. 

All temporary employee timesheets and all timesheets reflecting 
shift, holiday and overtime pay must be in the personnel office 
by 8:30 ajn, March 1. 

The Seahawks will host Augusta College TONIGHT at 7:30 in 
Trask Coliseum. 

Joe Capel, director of financial aid, will speak on "What You 
Dont Know Can Hurt Your Pocketbook" TODAY at 3:30 in UU- 
201. 

The film, "Ordinary People," will be shown at 7 TONIGHT at 
AHEC. 



FORT TO 
SERVE 



DAVIS HAS 

PAPER 

PUBLISHED 



STAFF AT 
MEETING 



HPER FACULTY 
AT MEETING 



Charles Fort of the English department has been elected to serve 
as a member of the North Carolina Writers' Network Board of 
Trustees. NCWN is a new organization created to serve writers 
in NC and to provide readings, conferences and small press ex- 
hibits on a local level through the UNCW Creative Writing Pro- 
gram. 

Brian F. Davis of the physics faculty has co-authored a paper, 
"Helium (2s2p) Ip" energy with relativistic corrections," with 
Kwong T. Chung from NCSU. The article appears in the February 
issue of Physical Review A. 

Dr. Richard Mullendore, dean of students, and Dr. David Allen, 
special assistant to the vice chancellor for student affairs, pre- 
sented a program on "Attrition Countermeasures: Information vs 
Intervention" at the National Conference on the Freshman 
Experience held February 19 at the University of South Carolina. 

Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of HPER, and Dr. Robert Wolff, co- 
ordinator of the parks and recreation management curriculum, 
recently attended the 37th annual Municipal and County Recrea- 
tion Directors Conference held at UNC-CH. 



SIZEMORE AT 
SYMPOSIUM 



DR. BRYAN 
SPEAKS AT 
SESSIONS 



KECHLEY AT 
FESTIVAL 



POEM 
ACCEPTED 



Dr. Ronald K. Sizemore, associate professor of biological sciences, 
and his graduate student, James 3ones, Jr., recently attended the i 
National Symposium on the Soft-Shelled Blue Crab Fishery at the | 
Gulf Coast Research Laboratory in Biloxi, MI. Dr. Sizemore pre- 
sented a talk entitled "Involvement of Vibrio spp. in Soft Crab 
Mortality." 

Dr. Bill Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs, presented a 
program on professional issues in student affairs February 13 at 
the University of North Dakota. On February I'f he attended the 
North Dakota College Personnel Association meeting held in 
Bismarck where he presented a session on "Student Affairs Issues 
in the 80's and Beyond." 

Dr. David Kechley of the music faculty attended the New Music 
Festival XIII held February 8 at Memphis State University where 
his work. Dancing, (for 5 percussionists) was performed. While 
there, he also served as a panelist discussing "The New Aesthe- 
tics of Composition." 

A poem, "Over the Bar," by Richard Long of the English faculty 
has been accepted for publication in the spring issue of Cedar j 
Rock. 



MCGUIRE 
SPEAKS TO 
GROUP 

WASSON 

PRESENTS 

SEMINARS 



Phillip McGuire of the history faculty spoke on "Blues-Jazz Sing- 
ers of the 1920's and Their Black Critics" during a workshop held j 
February 21 at NC A&T on the Afro-A/nerican Family. 

Mary Wasson of the English department presented two four-hour 
seminars on "Writing Effective Technical Proposals and Reports" 
at EJ. Dupont De Nemours & Company in Leland on February 
6 and 13. 



ART 
SHOW 



A student art exhibition of drawings and paintings will be on ex- 
hibit in the lobby of Kenan Hall March 1-31, M-F from 8 ajTi.-5.pf 



.EONARD AT 
;ONFERENCE 



OUSHEE 
EELECTED 



■RTICLE TO 
E PUBLISHED 



TAFF AT 
;ONFERENCE 



OPLIN 

ECEIVES 

.WARD 



PERA AT 
T. JAMES 



DET 
EADINGS 



\ZZ GROUP 
iRFORMS 



ZSIDENCE 
FE 



■NTRAL 
rORES 



Patricia L. Leonard, associate dean of students, presented a talk, 
"Institutional Ambiguity: A Lesson to be taught," during the 
February 21 Southeastern Association of Housing Officers Con- 
ference held at Hilton Head. 

Isabell Foushee, federal compliance officer, has recently been 
reelected president of Hanover Federal Credit Union by its 
board of directors. She has served on the board of directors for 
the past seven years. Membership in the Hanover Federal Credit 
Union, located at 3802 Cherry Avenue, is open to all university 
employees. 

An article written by 3ames C. Sabella of the anthropology/soci- 
ology department and John R. Bort of ECU entitled "Technologia 
Apropiada y Estrategias en el Desarollo en la Peninsula de 
Azuero de Panama" has been accepted for publication in 
America Indigena, an international anthropological journal dedicat- 
ed to the study of Indigenous Peoples of the Americas. 

Joe Capell, Pat Cochran and Hank Fuller of the student financial 
aid office attended tlie annual Southern Association of Student 
Financial Aid Administrators meeting held February 17 - 20 in 
Greensboro. The meeting was hosted by the NC Association with 
participation from eight other states. 

Robert Toplin of the history department has received the Eric 
Bamouw Prize for the best film on a historical subject in 198'f. 
The prize, given annually by the Organization of American 
Historians, went to "Solomon Northup's Odyssey", the second in 
Toplin's film series about slavery in America. 

Noye's Fludde, an opera written by Benjamin Brittin, will be pre- 
sented at St. James Episcopal Church Saturday, March 2, at 5 and 
8 pjn. and Sunday, March 3, at 5 pjn. The cast includes Carol 
Ellis and Lewis Walker of the English department; Rush Beeler, 
Bill Lowe and Virginia Callaway of the modem languages depart- 
ment as well as music department faculty members who will 
appear in the orchestra, 

A program sponsored by the Cape Fear Foundation entitled Six 
Poets Reading, will be held Saturday, March 2, at 7:30 pjn. at 
The New Improved Cafe, formerly Granny's. Admission is $3. 

The UNCW Jazz Combo under the direction of Frank J. Bongiorno 
of the music faculty recently performed at the UNC-CFI Jazz 
Festival. Combo members Rick Hefner and Kevin Winegar re- 
ceived outstanding soloists awards during the festival. 

The office of residence life is currently accepting applications 
for resident director and resident assistant positions. Faculty 
and staff are asked to encourage students who exhibit leadership 
abilities to apply for these positions. Additional information may 
be obtained by calling the office of residence life. March 13 is 
the deadline to apply. 

The following item is now available in Central Stores: 

#618-57631 Pens, ballpoint, medium, green, .96 per doz. 



BOOKS 
AVAILABLE 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



Six Certified Professional Secretary review books can be ordered 
through the UNCW Bookstore. These books cover the six areas 
of information which will be tested during the 2-day summer 
exams each year. 

CPS Review for Behavioral Science in Business 

CPS Review for Business Law 

CPS Review for Economics and Management 

CPS Review for Accounting 

CPS Review for Office Administration & Communication 

CPS Review for Office Technology 

Call Arnold Siko, bookstore manager, at ext. 3189 to place 
orders. 

A seminar entitled "Tax Planning for Real Estate Investors with 
Emphasis on Tax Shelters" will be presented March 18 and 20 
from 7-9 pjn. in KI-2P8 (King Hall.) Dr. Ron Copley, associate 
professor of economics and finance, will teach the course. 
The registration deadline is March 12. Cost is $65. 

Candace O'Hearn, dance instructor will direct a Modern Dance 
Workshop from 9!30 - 10'A5 ajn. and a Jazz Dance Workshop from 
11:00 ajn. - 12:15 pjn. on Saturday, March 9, in the back room of; 
Hanover Gym. To register call ext. 3195. Cost is $3. 

A one-day seminar on microcomputer communications will be held 
Friday, March 8, from 8 ajm. - if pjn^ The deadline for registerin 
is March 1. For additional information call ext, 3195. 



SAVINGS 
BONDS 



ECAC 
TOURNAMENT 

ORDERING 
DEADLINE 



For information pertaining to any of the above mentioned course; 
offered by the office of special programs call ext. 3195. 

Savings Bonds are available through payroll deduction with a 
guaranteed return of 7J% interest at five years. Some features 
of Series EE Savings Bonds include the following: 

1. Interest is free from state and local taxes and federal 
tax may be deferred until bonds are cashed 

2. Savings Bonds are available in $50, $75, $200, $500, 
$1,000, $5,000 and $10,000 denominations 

3. The purchase price is one-half the face amount 

tt. Payroll deduction is restricted to a $5 minimum with six 
months to purchase one bond 

Brochures and payroll deduction forms may be obtained from the 
personnel office by calling ext. 3713. 

The ECAC Tournament will be held March 3 - 7 in Williamsburg, i 
VA. ^ 

THE DEADLINE FOR ORDERING FACULTY REGALIA IS 
MONDAY, MARCH k. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC b}' the csea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 27 
MARCH 7, 1985 



Copies of Administrative Memorandum No. 21 'f - February 13, 1985 
regarding Amendments to Board Policy Concerning Political 
Activities of University Employees: Candidacy for and membership 
in General Assembly, are permanently shelved on the faculty re- 
serve shelf in the Randall Library. 

Undergraduate and graduate students interested in attending sum- 
mer school at UNCW may pick up their summer school brochures 
at the office of special programs located in HO-227 between 8 
ajn. - 5 pjn., Monday through Friday, Summer Session I begins May 
28 and ends June 28 while Summer Session II is scheduled from 
3uly 8 through August 9. 

Scholarship applications are available for the State Employees 
Association of North Carolina. Eligible persons include active 
members of SEANC, including spouses or dependent children. Ap- 
plication deadline is April 1, For application forms contact 
Margaret Taylor at ext. 3178. 

Requests for new telephones should be directed to Carl Dempsey, 
assistant to the vice chancellor for business affairs. Requests 
should be in the form of a memorandum giving the building and 
room number where the phone is to be installed as well as the 
budget account number. 

The "Jump Rope for Heart" event is scheduled for March 25 from 
2-5 pjn. in Trask Coliseum. The program is a nationwide activity 
designed to raise money to help support the American Heart 
Association's fight against heart-disease. Faculty, staff and all 
organizations are encouraged to participate in these six-member 
team jumps. Team members secure pledges for each minute their 
team jumps (180 minutes max.) and are eligible to earn prizes for 
the dollars they raise. All interested persons should contact 3udy 
Lewis at ext. 32 5^^. 

Philip Carson, chairman of the UNC Board of Governors, has 
appointed Dr. William H. Wagoner, chancellor, to the advisory 
committee in search of President Friday's successor. Dr. Wagoner 
was one of four chancellors in the UNC system selected to serve. 
The committee will advise the UNC Board of Governors Search 
Committee. 



BUSINESS 
WEEK 



The Cameron School of Business Administration will present Bus- 
iness Week '85 March 11-15. The annual event provides a means I 
for students and business leaders to interact in an informal man- 
ner. The keynote address for Business Week is scheduled for 
Tuesday, March 12, with Victor Kiam, chief executive officer 
with Remington Products, discussing "Entrepreneurship." The pro-' 
gram, open to the public will be held at 7:30 pjm, in Kenan 
Auditorium. Career Day is planned for March [it from 10 ajn. - 
3 pjm. in the University Union. For a list of events during the j 
week call the Cameron School of Business Administration at 
ext. 3501. 



SCIENCE 
FESTIVAL 



WORKSHOP 
SCHEDULED 



The annual New Hanover County Science Festival will be held 
in the Hanover Hall gym March 8 from 8 a.m. - 8 pjn. Junior and 
senior high school students from the county will compete for 
awards. Awards will be presented from 7-8 pjn. in Kenan 
Auditorium. Keynote speaker for the event will be Dr. Alan 
Hulbert, director of science for UNCW's National Undersea Re- 
search Program. The festival is a coordinated effort between th< 
New Hanover County Schools and UNCW through its office of 
special programs. 



A workshop, "Starting to Think International: An Export Work- 
shop," sponsored by the office of special programs is scheduled fci 
Thursday, March 21 and Friday, March 22, at the Hilton. Co- 
sponsored by nine agencies, the workshop will be held from 9 ajn 
to tt pjm. on Thursday with a banquet and meeting scheduled that 
evening from 6-8 pjn. Friday's session, from 9 ajn. - noon, will 
feature a tour of the Wilmington port. Registration fee is $65 
The deadline to register is March 15. For additional information 
call ext. 3196. 



RETIREMENT 
PROGRAM 



CHILD 
ABUSE 



PHILOSOPHICAL 
EVENGINGS 



GREAT 
DECISIONS 



CHEMISTRY 
SEMINAR 



A conference on "Pre-retirement" will be held March 13 at 9:30 
ajn. at Cape Fear Technical Institute. The conference will addre 
procedures, eligibility, and other benefits available to members. 
In addition, the Modified Rule of 85 regarding employees at 
least 60 years of age with 25 years of creditable state service a1 
retirement entitling them to unreduced service retirement al- 
lowance will be discussed. The last effective date that an em- 
ployee may retire under the Modified Rule of 85 is June 1, 1985.5 
For additional information call Dianne Smith at ext. 3162. 

A clinic on child abuse, "It Shouldn't Hurt to be A Child," is 
scheduled for Friday, March 15 at 9 ajn. in Kenan Auditorium. A 
faculty and staff are invited to this program sponsored by the 
New Hanover/Pender County Medical Auxiliary. 

The UNCW Chapter of the National Honor Society of Phi Kappa 
Phi will sponsor two evenings of social philosophy. Dr. Robert 
Rafalko of the department of philosophy & religion will speak on 
"The Rawlsian Revolution" Wednesday, March 13, at 8 pjn. in 
Bryan Auditorium. Dr. Edwin Hettinger of Iowa State Univer- 
sity will discuss "Justifying Intellectual Property" Thursday, Marc 
l^f, at 8 pjn. in Bryan Auditorium. Free and open to the public. 

Dr. Paz Bartolome of the school of education will lecture on "Thd 
Philippines: What Future for Democracy?" March 12 at 7:30 pjn.t 
in KI-100. The lecture is in conjunction with the Great Decisiom 
Series sponsored by the office of special programs. Fee. 

Keith Bowes of the division of chemistry will lecture on 
"Electrophoresis in Space" March 15 at 2:30 pjn. in DL-ll't. 
Interested faculty and staff are welcome. 



RTICLES 
UBLISHED 



INSLEY 

RESENTS 

ORKSHOP 



Articles by three members of the student affairs staff have been 
published in Student Services: The State of Our Work. Articles 
for inclusion in the publication are written by student services 
officers of the University of North Carolina. Articles and indi- 
viduals include: 

"Learning Assistance Services Via a Taped Treatment Program" by 
Ed Reilly, psychological counselor 

"Environmental Strategies to Reduce Student Drinking Problems" 
by William A. Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs 

"A Cooperative Agreement Between a Career Planning and Place- 
ment Center and Job Service of North Carolina: A Viable 
Arrangement to Serve Students Better" by William A. Bryan and 
Sandra Harkin, director of career planning & placement. Also 
helping with this article was Darrell Johnson, director of the 
Employment Security Office in Wilmington, and Carol Atkins, 
assistant director of Job Service for Employment Security 

W. Frank Ainsley of tlie earth sciences faculty presented a work- 
shop entitled "Cultural Geography and Material Cultural Land- 
scapes" February 26 at the 16th annual Social Studies Conference 
held in Pinehurst. 



UNNINGHAM 
iRVES AS 
JDGE 



ATHANSON 

flESENTS 

PNCERT 



:iA STAFF 
JBLISHES 



I. WOLFF 

TTENDS 

•ETING 



I. MARTIN 
OLIVERS 
t)DRESSES 



i)EMS 
[ilBLISHED 



Mimi Cunningham, public information officer, served as a judge 
for the annual School Bell Awards Program held in Raleigh 
February 26. The program, set-up to honor news media who do 
an outstanding job of covering and reporting public school news, 
is sponsored by the North Carolina Association of Educators. 

Guitarist Rob Nathanson of the music department presented a 
concert at Campbell University February ^■. The program included 
"Strumming: A Sonata for Solo Guitar" by Dr. David Kechley. 
Strumming has also been selected for performance during two 
spring concerts sponsored by the NC Composer's Alliance. Mr. 
Nathanson will perform the work in Raleigh on March 17 at the 
NC Museum of Art and in Fayetteville on April 21 at the 
Fayetteville Art Museum. 

Dr. John J. Manock, director of the office of research administra- 
tion, and Ms. K. Lynne Crater, contracts and grants officer, have 
had an article, "Microcomputers: Assisting Research Administra- 
tion Offices with Pre-Award Activities," published in the winter 
198'f edition of the Society of Research Administrators Journal. 

Dr. Robert Wolff, coordinator of the parks and recreation manage- 
ment curriculum, and 2't UNCW recreation students attended the 
National Outdoor Recreation Trends Symposium held February 2i4- 
27 in Myrtle Beach. 

Dr. Sandy Martin of the philosophy & religion department discuss- 
ed "Black Religion in the U.S.: Dispelling Some Myths" at the 
Fort Fisher Air Force Base February 14 in observance of Black 
History Month. Also, he discussed "Racism and Religion" February 
26 to the UNCW Campus Christian Fellowship. 

Charles Fort, director of the creative writing program and assis- 
tant professor of English, has had two prose poems published in 
the spring issue of Crucible, a literary magazine. The poems are 
titled "Give the Monkey a Name" and "Jack Rabbit." 



DR. BRYAN 

KEYNOTE 

SPEAKER 



RESIDENCE 
LIFE 



BASEBALL 
SCHEDULE 



WOMEN'S 
TENNIS 



MEN'S 
TENNIS 



BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT 



POSITION 
OPEN 



NEW 
BABY 



Dr. William Bryan, vice chancellor for student affairs, was the 
keynote speaker at the third annual University of Georgia Studf 
Personnel Association Conference held February 1 at the 
University of Georgia in Athens. The title of his address was 
"Student Affairs Issues in the 80's and Beyond." 

The office of residence life is currently accepting applications 
for resident director and resident assistant positions. Faculty 
and staff are asked to encourage students who exhibit leadershi 
abilities to apply for these positions. Additional information ma 
be obtained by calling the office of residence life. March 13 is 
the deadline to apply. 

UNCW vs. William & Mary March 7 at 3 p.m. 

UNCW vs. Maryland March 8 at 3 pjm. 

UNCW vs. Wake Forest March 9 at 2 pjn. 

UNCW vs. Eastern Kentucky (doubleheader) March 10 at 1 pjn. 

UNCW vs. Eastern Kentucky March 11 at 3 pjn. 

UNCW vs. Purdue March 12 at 3 pjn. 

UNCW vs. Pfeiffer College March 10 at 2 pjn. 
UNCW vs. Aquinas College March 11 at 2 pjn. 
UNCW vs. Pembroke State University March 12 at 2:30 pjn. 

UNCW vs. Francis Marion March 12 at 2:30 pjn. 
UNCW vs. Randolph-Macon March 13 at 2:30 pjn. 
UNCW vs. Campbell University March I't at 2:30 pjn. 

The Seahawk Basketball team will be competing in the Eastern 
College Athletic Conference South Division Tournament in 
Williamsburg beginning today. Other schools participating in 
the tournament include Navy, East Carolina University, Richmoi 
American, William & Mary, James Madison and George Mason. 
GOOD LUCK HAWKS!! 

Applications for the position of director of financial services a' 
UNCW are presently being accepted. Position involves planning 
organizing and directing accounting operations for UNCW. Mus' 
have a thorough knowledge of accounting theories, principles ai 
systems design and a thorough knowledge of governmental accoi 
ing and business operations preferably in a university environme 
Minimum education and experience requirements include gradua- 
tion from a four-year college or university with a degree in 
accounting or business administration and six years of accountit 
or auditing experience, including two years at a supervisory 
level. Preferred minimum requirement: Master of Business 
Administration. State applications must be submitted to the 
UNCW Personnel Office by 5 pjn., Monday, March 25, 1985. 
Salary range - $28,560 - $'t3,788. 

Linda Seal of the department of accountancy is pleased to 
announce the birth of her son, Matthew Jeffery, on January 29, 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 




IBRARY /ARCHIVES 1 







PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 28 
MARCH l^t, 1985 

The third round of Albert Schweitzer International Prizes will be 
presented in ceremonies at 8 p.m., Thursday, March 21, in Kenan 
Auditorium. All faculty and staff are invited to attend and to 
meet the prize recipients for medicine. Dr. Ainslie Henderson, and 
for the humanities, Canon Robin Lamburn, The prize in music will 
be announced at a press conference TODAY at 2:30. In addition 
to the prize ceremonies, a number of special events are planned: 

"St. Matthew Passion" will be presented by the UNCW Concert Choir, Wilmington Cho- 
ral Society and Wilmington Symphony Orchestra at 3 p.m., Sunday, March 17, in Kenan 
Auditorium. Admission is $5. 

"A Bach Memorial Organ Concert" featuring Barbara D. McClure, Joann Johnson, Elsie 
B. Pollock and Linda S. MacKay will be held March 19 at 7 p.m. at St. James Episcopal 
Church. Works by Bach, Pachelbel and Handel will be featured. Free. 

Two time periods have been set aside for students to have the opportunity to mingle 
informally with the prize recipients. FACULTY are urged to announce these times to 
your students and encourage them to take advantage of these opportunities to meet 
great models to live by. Prize winners will be in UU-201, 206, and 207 between 2-^ 
pjn. March 20 and between 10:30 a.m.-noon on March 21. 

The NC Symphony will perform works by Bach and other composers Friday, March 22, 
at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium. Much attention is being focused on Bach this year 
secause March 21 marks his 300th birthday. Bach was Schweitzer's favorite composer. 



JUMP ROPE 
-OR HEART 

:AREER DAY 

:hild 

\BUSE 

OSITION 
DPEN 



ONCERT 
BCHEDULED 



Faculty and staff interested in participating in the "3ump Rope 
for Heart" event scheduled for March 25 at 2 pjn. should call 
Judy Lewis at ext. 325^^. 

In conjunction with Business Week '85 TODAY is "Career Day." 

"It Shouldn't Hurt to be a Child," a program on child abuse, will 
be held Friday, March 15, at 9 a.m. in Kenan Auditorium. 

Applications for the position of director of financial services at 
UNCW are presently being accepted. For additional information 
call the personnel office at ext. 3160. Application deadline is 
5 p.m., Monday, March 25, 1985. Salary range-$28,560-$'t3,788. 

A concert featuring the 6 O'clock Jazz Ensemble, the UNCW Jazz 
Combo and UNCW Jazz Quartet will perform March 2'f at 3 p.m. 
in King Auditorium. 



PERSONNEL The UNCW Board of Trustees, President William Friday and the 

UPDATES UNC Board of Governors have approved the following personnel 

changes: 

PROMOTIONS OF TENURED FACULTY 

Dr. Carolyn S. Dunn from assistant professor to associate professor 
in the department of biological sciences in the college of arts and 
sciences 

Dr. Joseph M. Kishton from assistant professor to associate profes- 
sor in the department of psychology in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Robert D. Roer from assistant professor to associate profes- 
sor in the department of biological sciences in the college of arts 
and sciences 

Dr. Carole Fink from associate professor to professor in the de- 
partment of history in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. 3. Mark Galizio from associate professor to professor in the 
department of psychology in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Lee A. Jackson. 3r. fro'^i associate professor to professor in 
the department of psychology in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Arme B. McCrary from associate professor to professor in the 
department ol biological sciences in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. William H. Overman. Jr. from associate professor to professor 
in the department of psychology in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Claude H. Farrell. Ill from associate professor to professor in 
the department of economics and finance in the Cameron School 
of Business Administration 

Dr. Stephen C. Harper from associate professor to professor in the 
department of management and marketing in the Cameron School 
of Business Administration 

PROMOTIONS GRANTING PERMANENT TENURE 

Dr. Richard M. Dillaman from assistant professor to associate pro- 
fessor with permanent tenure in the department of biological sciences 
in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Charles R. Ward from assistant professor to associate profes- 

sor with permanent tenure in the department of chemical and physical 

sciences in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Wyman G. Fair from associate professor to professor with per- 
manent tenure in the department of mathematical sciences in the 
college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Ronald E. Copley from assistant professor to associate pro- 
tessor with permanent tenure in the department of economics and 
finance in the Cameron School of Business Administration 

Ms. Arlene A. Hanerfeld from lecturer to assistant professor with 
permanent tenure in the William Madison Randall Library 

Ms. Sue Am C. Hiatt from lecturer to assistant professor with per- 
manent tenure in the William Madison Randall Library 

(continued) 



REAPPOINTMENTS WITH PERMANENT TENURE 

Dr. Pauline F, Applefield reappointment to the rank of assistant 
protessor with permanent tenure in the department of psychology 
in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. N. Lucinda Hollifield reappointment to the rank of assistant 
professor with permanent tenure in the department of health, 
physical education and recreation in the college of arts and 
sciences 

Dr. Paul E. Jambor reappointment to the rank of associate profes- 
sor with permanent tenure in the department of mathematical 
sciences in the college of arts and sciences 

Mr. Stephen D. LeOuire reappointment to the rank of assistant 
professor with permanent tenure in the department of creative 
arts in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Shiva K. Saksena reappointment to the rank of assistant pro- 
t^sSor With fjermaneht tenure in the department of mathematical 
sciences in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Richard J. Sanders reappointment to the rank of assistant 
professor with permanent tenure in the department of psychology 
in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Earl Sheridan. 3r. reappointment to the rank of assistant pro- 
fessor with permanent tenure in the department of political 
science in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. David R. Shevach reappointment to the rank of assistant pro- 
fessor with permanent tenure in the department of sociology and 
anthropology in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Carole E. Tallant reappointment to the rank of assistant pro- 
tessor with permanent tenure in the department of creative arts 
in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Ravija Badarinathi reappointment to the rank of assistant 
professor with permanent tenure in the department of management 
and marketing in the Cameron School of Business Administration 

Dr. Charles W. West. Jr. reappointment to the rank of associate 
professor with permanent tenure in the department of management 
and marketing in the Cameron School of Business Administration 

Dr. Marlene M. Rosenkoetter reappointment to the rank of associ- 
ate professor with permanent tenure in the school of nursing 

PROMOTIONS TO THE RANK OF ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 

Ms. Nancy Gilliland from instructor to assistant professor in the 
school of nursing 

Ms. Helen Majette from instructor to assistant professor in the 
school of nursing 

REAPPOINTMENTS TO T HE RANK OF ASSISTANT PROFFSSOR 

Dr. Ferenc Altrichter department of philosophy and religion in the 
college of arts and scien ces 

Mr. Frank J. Bongiorno department of creative arts in the college 
of arts and sciences 

Dr. John B. Buescher department of philosophy and religion in the 
college of arts and sciences 

(continued) 



(Continued) 

PERSONNEL 
UPDATES 



Dr. James A. Dockal department of earth sciences in the collej 
of arts and sciences 

Dr. Susan M. Isen department of philosophy and religion in the 
college of arts and sciences 

Ms. Anne Kendrick department of biological sciences in the 
college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Randy L. LaGrange. department of sociology and anthropok 
in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Richard A. Laws department of earth sciences in the colleg 
of arts and sciences 

Dr. Sybil K. Miller department of chemical and physical science 
the college of arts and sciences 

D r. James H. Reeves department of chemical and physical scien 
in the college of arts and sciences 

Dr. David M. Russell department of mathematical sciences in th 
college of arts and sciences 

Dr. Barbara F. Waxman department of English in the college of 
arts and sciences 

Dr. Steven M. Weiss department of creative arts in the college 
arts and sciences 

Dr. Michael D. Wentworth department of English in the college 
arts and sciences ~" 

Ms. Stephanie Young department of creative arts in the college 
arts and sciences 

Dr. Luther D. Lawson department of economics and finance in l| 
Cameron School of Business Administration 

Dr. Mariorie L. Mclnernev department of management and markc' 
ing in the Cameron School of Business Administration 

Dr. Mary L. Gendernalik department of curricular studies in the 
school of education 

Dr. Carol Chase Thomas department of curricular studies in the 
school of education 

Dr. Eleanor B. Wright department of curricular studies in the 
school of education 



DR. GEORGE 
TO SPEAK 



CHEMISTRY 
SEMINARS 



HISTORY 
FILM 



SNACK BAR 
SPECIAL 



The Cameron School of Business Administration will present Dr, 
Robert George of the biological sciences department and IMBR i 
discussing "Antarctica in Historical Scientific and Economic Peij 
spectives" March 27 at 3:30 p.m. in BR-112. Refreshments will i 
served. 

Keith Bowes will discuss "Electrophoresis in Space" March 15 j 
and Kathleen Chimiak will speak on "Decomposition of Aspartarj 
March 22. Both lectures in conjunction with the division of chej 
istry seminar series, will be held in DL-lli» at 2:30 Djn. i 

A film, "Grand Illusion," presented by the history department w.i 
be shown March 18 at 7:30 p.m. in Bryan Auditorium. Dr. Williai 
Schneider of the history faculty will lead a discussion following 
the film. 

Special this week, March ltt-20, Dole Fruit Juice Bars - various 
flavors - 70 calories - It5<^. In the University Union. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC b}^ the esea 




SCHWEITZER 

INTERNATIONAL 

PRIZES 



WALTON 
NAMED 
NEW VC 



DR. GEORGE 
TO SPEAK 



lASTER 
DINNER 
SPECIAL 



iOOK 
ALE 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 

VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 29 

MARCH 21, 1985 (300th Birthday of 3ohann Sebastian Bach) 

The Albert Schweitzer International Prizes will be presented 
TONIGHT at 8 in Kenan Auditorium. The 1985 prize recipients 
include: Dr. Donald Ainslie Henderson for medicine; Canon Robin 
Lamburn for the humanities and Johann Sebastian Bach (post- 
humously) for music. All faculty, staff and their families are 
invited to attend the ceremonies. Free. 

Students will have the chance to mingle informally with the prize 
recipients TODAY from 10:30 ajn. - noon in UU-201, 206 & 207. 

The NC Symphony will perform works by Bach and other composers 
Friday, March 22, at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. Admission 
charce. 

Robert O. Walton, Jr., former controller and director of financial 
services at UNCW, was named vice chancellor for business af- 
fairs by the UNC Board of Governors on March 8. In this position 
he will be responsible for managing the business functions of the 
university's $25 million annual budget. Under his direction is the 
physical plant, financial and auxiliary services, security, personnel 
and purchasing. Mr. Walton has been with the university since 
1969. He is vice chairman of the Board of Directors of the 
Wilmington Chapter of the American Red Cross, a member of the 
Wilmington East Rotary Club, member of the Board of the Cape 
Fear Council of Boy Scouts and is past president of the National 
Association of Accountants. 

The Cameron School of Business Administration announces the 
next speaker for their colloquium series scheduled for March 27 
at 3:30 pjn. in BR-112. Dr. Robert George of IMBR will deliver 
a slide/presentation entitled "Antartica in Historic, Scientific 
and Economic Perspectives." All faculty and staff are invited. 
Coffee and cookies will be served. Free. 

ARA, campus dining services, will feature a candlelight Easter 
Dinner Special on Monday, April 1, from 'f:30 - 6:30 pjn. in the 
cafeteria, first floor. All faculty, staff and their families are 
invited. Cost is $3.50 per person. Reservations may be made by 
calling 799-2300. Semi-formal attire required. 

The English Club will hold a book sale March 27 from 8 ajn. - 
3 pjn. in the University Union. Donations of books are currently 
being accepted by the English Club. Donations should be de- 
posited in box located in the English department. All donations 
will be appreciated. 



APPLICAIION Scholarship applications are available for the State Employees 

FORMS Association of North Carolina. Eligible persons include active 

members of SEANC, including spouses or dependent children. 

Application deadline is April 1. For application forms call 

Margaret Taylor at ext. 3178. 

JUMP ROPE The "Jump Rope for Heart" event is scheduled for March 25 fror 

FOR HEART 2-^ pjn. in Trask Coliseum. The program is a nationwide activity 

designed to raise money to help support the American Heart 

Association's fight against heart-disease. All interested persons j 

are asked to contact Judy Lewis at ext. 325k. i 

SUMMER Undergraduate and graduate students interested in attending sunr 

SCHOOL mer school may pick up their summer school brochures at the 

office of special programs in HO-227 between 8 a.m. - 5 pjn., 
Monday through Friday. Summer Session I begins May 28 while j 
SS II is scheduled from July 8 through August 9. 

WORKSHOPS A workshop designed to help secretaries upgrade professional ' 

SCHEDULED skills will be held Friday, March 22, from 8:30 ajn. - 'f:30 pjn. 

in KI-202. Cost is $35. For more information call ext. 3195. | 

A workshop, Starting to Think International: An Export Workshcj 
is scheduled for TODAY at the Hilton from 9 ajn. - i^ pjn. with ; 
a banquet and meeting scheduled from 6-8 pjn. Friday's sessioi 
also at the Hilton, from 9 ajn. to noon, will feature a tour of 
the Wilmington port. Registration fee is $35. Both workshops 
are sponsored by the office of special programs. For additional 
information on either of the workshops, call ext. 3196. 

CHEMISTRY Dr. John Stevens of the UNC-Asheville Chemistry Department wi 

SEMINAR discuss "MOssbauer Studies of Transition Compounds" March 29 a 

2:30 p.m. in DL-il't. The lecture is part of a seminar series 
sponsored by the department of chemical and physical sciences, 
division of chemistry. 

GREAT Dr. Lee Johnston of the political science faculty will speak on 

DECISIONS "Future of the Atlantic Alliance: Unity in Diversity?" March 26 

at 7:30 pjn. in KI-100. The lecture is in conjunction with the 
Great Decisions Lecture Series sponsored by the office of 
special programs. Fee. 

CONCERT A concert featuring the 6 O'clock Jazz Ensemble, the UNCW Ja:i 

SCHEDULED Combo and the UNCW Jazz Quartet will perform March 2^ at 

3 pjn. in King Auditorium. 

SYMPHONY The North Carolina Symphony will perform works by Bach and 

TO PERFORM other composers March 22 at 8 p/n. in Kenan Auditorium. 

POSITION Applications for the position of director of financial services 

OPEN at UNCW are presently being accepted. For more information 

call the personnel office at ext. 3160. Application deadline is 

5 pjn., Monday, March 25, 1985. 

KIWANIS The Azalea City Kiwanis Club will show a movie on Egypt 

CLUB March 25 at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. $3. 

JABBERWOCK Delta Sigma Theta will present the Jabberwock Show March 23 

PROGRAM at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. Free. 



INITED WAY 
lAMPAIGN 



The 198f United Way Campaign final figures are in: UNCW con- 
tributed $10,583 to the 198^ Campaign, $«f2 short of the $10,b25 
goal but, $1,076 more than was contributed in 1983 and, $2,567 
more than was contributed in 1982. EPA employees contributed 
$7,573 while SPA employees contributed $3,U10. Charles Sanders 
and Mary Wasson, UNCW division directors for the '8'f campaign, 
would like to thank all of those who helped make the campaign 
a success. 



lAVlS 
;0-AUTHORS 



EOUIRE 
XHIBITS 
CULPTURES 



R. GEORGE 
N WECT 



DHN5TON 
ERVES ON 
OMMITTEE 



E5EARCH IN 
ANAMA FOR 
rUDENTS 



ARPER 
JBLISHE5 



Brian Davis of the department of chemical and physical sciences 
co-authored a paper, "Doubly Excited States in BITT," along 
with M. Agentoft and T. Andersen of the Institute of Physics, 
University of Aarhus, Denmark and K.T. Chung of NCSU. The 
paper appears in Physica Scripta, Vol. 31, 1985. 

Stephen LeQuire of the art faculty has four sculptures included 
in an exhibition at Winthrop College in Rock Hill, SC. Three of 
the four works were built specifically for the show. The Sculp- 
ture Invitational features the work of six sculptors and will be on 
exhibit through the month of March. 

Dr. Robert Y. George, professor of oceanography, was on the 
3im Burn's Program, Channel 6-TV, March 13 to discuss his 
"Recent Passage to India" as a Fulbright Visiting Professor. 

Dr. W. Lee Johnston, associate professor of political science, re- 
cently served on the General Assembly Internship Screening Com- 
mittee for 1985. The committee selects interns from various NC 
public and private colleges and universities who are now working 
in the State Senate and House of Representatives. 

Dr. James Sabella, professor of sociology and anthropology, and 
John Bort of ECU have received a Fulbright Hays Grant to 
conduct a student field research project in Panama this summer. 
The students will be paid a monthly stipend and receive round 
trip air fare. Faculty are asked to have interested students 
contact Dr. Sabella. (Some Spanish speaking ability is required.) 

Dr. Stephen C. Harper, associate professor and chairman of the 
department of management and marketing, has had his article, 
"The Spirit of the Entrepreneur," published in the February issue 
of Carolina Business and Finance. 



DEM 
CCEPTED 



'R. DEAS 
•RVES AS 
JDGE 



Dr. Sally Sullivan, assistant professor of English, has had her 
poem, "Counting on Nothing and Everything" accepted for publi- 
cation in the spring issue of The Crucible. 

Dr. Richard Deas, professor of music, served as a judge during the 
High School Division of the Seventh Annual Piano Festival and 
Competition held March 8 and 9 at Southeastern Community 
College in Whiteville. UNCW students Linda Bennie, Nancy 
Hedgpeth, Ann Landy and Lee Ann Lennon were in attendance. 
Hedgpeth and Lennon played in the collegiate division compe- 
tition as well as the master classes conducted by Dr. John Adams 
of Mars Hill College and Nelita True of the University of Mary- 
land. 



:^. ISEN 
EAKS 



Dr. Susan Isen of the philosophy and rehgion department was the 
keynote speaker February 17 at the National Wildlife Society 
Meeting. Her topic was titled "Animal Rights." 



SURPLUS Surplus property is now available for "on-campus" transfer. Item; 

PROPERTY for inspection may be seen at the warehouse. Inspections and 

transfers must be completed by March 27. Questions should be 

directed to Sondra Roark at ext. 3153. 

BARBECUE A barbecue dinner sponsored by Voiture 2^*5 - Forty and Eight 

DINNER will be held Saturday, March 23, from 11 ajn. - 7 pjn. at America 

Legion Post 10 on Masonboro Loop Road. Donations of $3 or mo 
will be accepted. All proceeds go to the nursing scholarship in 
the school of nursing. For ticket information call ext. 3169. 

HIATT Sue Hiatt of the library was elected to the executive board of 

ELECTED the Society of North Carolina Archivists during their recent sprii 

meeting held in Winston-Salem. 

VIET SIGNS Richard Veit of the English department has contracted with 

CONTRACT Houghton-Milfhn to publish his book on transformational-genera- 

tive syntax. Today's Grammar ; Discovering How the English 
Language Works. He has also had an article reviewing the cu r rei 
state of the English language, "198'f Visited," published in the 
winter issue of Etc.; A Review of General Semantics. His review 
of Stephen White's The Written Word was recently published in 
Choice. 



WOMEN'S 
HISTORY 
WEEK 



NEW STAFF 
AT UNCW 



NEW BABY 



MOVIE 
AT AHEC 

STORYHOUR 
TO BE HELD 



"Women, Money and Exploitation" is the topic of a week-long ob- 
servance of Women's History Week at UNCW March 25 - 29. 
A list of programs is printed below. Faculty are asked to en- 
courage students to attend these functions during the week. 
All programs are free. 

The Phyllis Donawho Show starring WWAY-TV anchorwoman 
Stella Shelton as Phyllis interviewing Cinderella and Supermom a-. 
12:30 pjn. March 25 in the UU courtyard. 

"Come Back to the Five & Dime, 3immy Dean, Jimmy Dean," a 
film, will be shown March 25 at 7:30 pjn. in Bryan Auditorium. 
Discussion will follow with Kathleen Berkeley, Kathy Walker and 
Patricia Lerch. 

March 26 will feature a program by Virginia Mahoney, attorney, 
on "Women's Economic Status Under the Law" at 1:^:30 pjn. in 
the UU courtyard. Also on March 26 a program on "Women and 
Militarism: Ideology, Motherhood and the Bomb" will be held in 
the library auditorium at 7:30 pjn. 

A lecture on "Economics of Violence against Women" will be held 
March 27 at 12:30 pjn, in the UU courtyard. Also on the 27th 
the University Readers Theatre will present Ann Sexton's "Trans- 
formations" at 7:30 pjn. in Bryan Auditorium. 

Welcome to the following new employees: Henry Moore in the 
physical plant; Georgie Stephens in the admissions office and 
Sharon Connelly in the library. 

Anita Veit of the sociology and anthropology department and 
Richard Veit of the English department are the proud parents of 
a daughter, Katherine Christina, born February 21. 

The film, "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," will be shown at 
7 pjn. March 28 at the AHEC Auditorium. 

A Storyhour in honor of Mvrna Henderson, retiring children's 
librarian will be held March 30 at 10:30 ajn. at the puhlic librar; 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 

[BRARY/ ARCHIVES 1 




SPECIAL EDITION 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 

MARCH 25, 1985 VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 30 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

'Board of (governors 



Philip G. Carson 
Chairman 



March 22, 1985 



Search Committee for President 
The University of North Carolina 
Post OfHce Box 2304 
Chapel Hill, N.C. 27515 - 2304 



TO Trustees, Faculty, Alumni, Students, and 

Special Friends of The University of North Carolina 



The Search Committee charged with finding a new President for The 
University of North Carolina and its Advisory Committee will be 
meeting on the campus of Fayetteville State University in Fayette- 
ville on Tuesday, April 9, 1985, at 7:30 P.M. The meeting will be 
in Butler Little Theater. 

This meeting is part of a series of hearings that the Search Com- 
mittee and Advisory Committee are conducting on various campuses 
across the State to give the citizenry of North Carolina - parti- 
cularly those who have a special interest in the University - an 
opportunity to say where they think the statewide University 
should go in the years ahead and what kind of leadership should be 
sought for those years. 

Everyone who is interested is cordially invited to the meeting in 
Fayetteville. Persons wishing to speak at the meeting are\ -, 
requested to call the Office of the Chancellor at Fayetteville ''-' 
(919, 486-1141) by Friday, April 5. The exact amount of tline to 
be allowed each speaker will depend upon the number of persons wjtip 
request to be heard. Wherever possible, it is desirable that an '^ 
organization or other group within the University or the <;pmimjnity 
designate a single person as spokesman for the group, v 

Sincerely yours, 
George M. Wood ~ . ■• . 



Chairman 

Advisory Committee 



Philip G. Carson 

Chairman 1 

Presidential Search Committee 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the sea 




SEARCH 
COMMITTEE 
TO MEET 



BAG LUNCH 
MEETINGS 



WOMEN'S 
HISTORY 



BUDGET 
REVISIONS 



EASTER 
DINNER 
SPECIAL 



PUBLbHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 31 
MARCH 28, 1985 

The Search Committee charged with finding a new President for 
The University of North Carolina along with its advisory com- 
mittee will meet at FayetteviJle State University on April 9 at 
7:30 pjn. in Butler Little Theatre, The meeting is one of a 
series of hearings set up across the state to receive input from 
the public on the UNC System and the type of leadership sought 
for the future. All faculty and staff are invited to attend. 

The Task Force on Women's Issues will sponsor a series of lunch- 
eons entitled "Every Woman's Bag Lunch" beginning Tuesday, 
April 2, from 12:30 - 1:30 pjn. in the UU Snack Bar. The first 
program entitled, "On the Move: Career Strategies for Women," 
will be conducted by Diane McKinstry, director of the student 
development center. All women faculty and staff are invited 
to come and bring a bag lunch. 

In observance of Women's History Week presently underway, a 
film, "Poverty Has a Woman's Face," will be shown at 12:30 pjn. 
TODAY in UU-100. The last program, "If We're So Smart, Why 
Aren't We Rich?" is planned for Friday, March 29, at 12:30 pjn. 
in the Union Courtyard. 

All requests for budget revisions for all General Funds Budgets 
(1-XXX-XX-XXXX-X) should be directed through the appropriate 
administrative office (dean or vice chancellor) to Suzanne Bulla, 
director of systems and budget, in AL-207. 

ARA, campus dining services, will feature a candlelight Easter 
Dinner Special on Monday, April 1, from 't:30 - 6:30 pjn. in the 
cafeteria, first floor. All faculty, staff and their families are 
invited. The cost is $3.50 per person and reservations must be 
made TODAY by calling 799-2300. The following menu will be 
served: 



Carved Roast Beef 
Sliced Baked Ham 
Baked Sweet Potatoes 
with marshmellows 
Dinner Rolls 
Assorted Beverages 



Broccoli Spears & Cheese Sauce 

Squash Casserole 

Fresh New Potatoes 

Salad Bar 

Lemon Cream Pie 

Butterscotch Brownies 

Hot Fudge Sundaes 



CHEMISTRY 
SEMINAR 



HEALTH 
INSURANCE 



PRE-PAID 
LEGAL 



LEGAL REP 
ON CAMPUS 



RETIREMENT 
INCOME PLAN 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



Dr. John Stevens of the department of chemistry at UNC-Ashevil 
will discuss "MOssbauer Studies of Transition Compounds" at the 
next Chemistry Seminar on March 29 at 2:30 pjn. in DL-U^. 

Terry Fonvilie, EDS representative, will be on campus April 15 
from 2 - 'f pjn. and April 16 from 1 1 ajn. - 1 pjn. in King Audi- 
torium. He will address the state's cost containment programs, 
how to complete and mail an insurance claim, reasons why claim; 
are returned, explain benefits and how to request an adjustment. 
Individuals having problems regarding outstanding insurance clainr 
should contact Dianne Smith at ext. 3162. 

All permanent employees are eligible to enroll in the Prepaid 
Legal Services Plan during the month of April. The plan cost is 
$9J0 per month. Applications and information may be obtained 
by calling Patricia Fries at ext. 371 3. 

Mr. Leo Wagoner, representative of Prepaid Legal Services, will 
be on campus Wednesday, April 17, from 11 ajn. - 1:30 pjn. in thj 
personnel training and development conference room located in 
AL-1O6. He will hold an open session lasting approximately 30- 
minutes and will be available to speak with Individual employees 
on a walk-in basis from 11:30 ajTi. - 1:30 pjn. 

All permanent full-time employees are now eligible to enroll in t 
Supplemental Retirement Income Plan of NC. Features include: 

Contributions and income on contributions are tax deferred. In- 
come taxes are deferred until retirement or when withdrawals ar 
made from the account 

Funds are immediately vested. Employee owns the entire balanci 
less maintenance fees until withdrawn 

Contributions to plan are made through payroll deduction 

Plan is administered by Branch Bank and Trust Company 

Plan provides four programs in which to invest: 

A BB&T money market savings account 

B Guaranteed income contract 

C Fidelity equity income fund 

D Fidelity magellan fund 

C and D are no-load equity mutual funds. BB&T enrollment coun' 
selors will be on campus April 17 from 2:30 - 't:30 pjn. in King 
Auditorium to give a presentation and explain the supplemental j 
retirement plan. 

"Self-Management Techniques," a course in changing behavior pal 
terns, will be held April 18 and May 2 from 7-9 pjn. in HO-212. 
The fee is $25 with a registration deadline of April 12. 

A Spring Science Camp for New Hanover County school students 
ages 6-12, will be offered Friday, May 3, teacher work day. Fee 
is $12 and will include a trip to the Marine Resources Center fo 
a study of local marine life. 

A computer course for ages 7-11 on "BASIC Programming - Part 
will be held April 9-25 from 3:30 - 5 pjn. in KI-202 Fee is $W. 

For information concerning any of the above programs call 3195. 



The New Hanover County Public Library will present a series of 
comedy films March 2y beginning at 3 pjn. at the library. Films 
to be shown include "Music Box," "Popeye Meets Sindbad," "Bang- 
ville Police" and "Seven Chances." Admission is free. 

UNCW vs. Methodist College in a doubleheader TODAY starting at 
2:30 

UNCW vs. Ohio University in a doubleheader March 29 at 3 p/n. 

UNCW vs. Coastal Carolina in a doubleheader April 1 at 2 pjn. 

UNCW vs. St. Bonaventure (NY) in a doubleheader April 3 
(tentative) 

UNCW vs. Campbell University TODAY at 2:30 
UNCW vs. UNC-Charlotte April 1 at 2 pjn. 
UNCW vs. Coastal Carolina April 3 at 2 pjn. 

UNCW vs. Elon College March 31 at 9 ajn. 
UNCW vs. Coastal Carolina April f at 2:30 pjn. 

William B. Harris, professor of earth sciences, presented a seminar 
"Correlation of Paleogene Sediments of the Atlantic and Gulf 
Coastal Plain to the European Stratotypes" to the department of 
geology at UNC-CH on March 18. He also dehvered a paper at 
the annual meeting of the American Association of Petroleum 
Geologists held March 2tt in New Orleans. The paper, titled "So- 
dium Distribution in Eocene Carbonates in North Carolina," was 
co-authored by Gerald Baum of ARCO Resources Technology and 
Paul Drez of Exxon Minerals Company. 

"The Funky Chicken for String Quartet," by Dr. David Kechley of 
the Creative Arts Department was recently released on disc by 
the Kronos Quartet. The album, "In Formation," is recorded on 
Reference Recordings (San Francisco) and contains a number of 
short works influenced by jazz and pop styles, but written by com- 
posers of traditional concert music. 

Dr. Robert M. Wolff, coordinator of the recreation curriculum in 
the HPER department, has had an article, "Off Road Vehicles; 
Outdoor Recreation?" published in the NC Recreation and Park 
Society and Park Review Magazine, winter 1985 edition. 

Richard A. Roscher of the department of accountancy presented a 
paper entitled "A Postbaccalaureate Education Requirement to 
Sit for the CPA Examination in North Carolina?" at the Fifteen- 
th Annual North Carolina Accounting Education Colloquium held 
recently in Greenville, NC. 

Dr. Thomas Moseley, professor of history, spoke to Students from 
UNC-W and UNC-CH as well as the George Davis Camp Number 
Five, Sons of Confederate Veterans on Thursday, March 21. His 
presentation was on Stonewall Jackson's Shenandoah Valley 
Campaign. 

An Apple representative will be on campus April 3 in UU-201 
from 10 ajn. - 'f:30 pjn. to give a lecture/demonstration to staff 
and faculty. For more information call the university bookstore. 



ENGLISH Barbara Waxman and Gerald S. Rosselot of the English faculty at- 

FACULTY AT tended the ninth annual meeting of the Philological Association o 

MEETING the Carolinas March l'f-16 at Wake Forest University. During a 

session on Victorian poetry Dr. Waxman read a paper, "Victorian 
Lovers as 'Leavers': The Women in Two Poems by D.G. Rossetti 
and in Eliot's The Spanish Gypsy. " Dr. Rosselot's paper, "Looking 
for Love in Erskine Caldwell's Earliest Novels," was read during 
the Modern American Fiction session. 

CLII-FORD John Clilford, associate professor of English, delivered a paper 

DELIVERS entitled "ihe Research Paper: An Historical Inquiry" and chairec 

PAPER a session on historical rhetoric at the Conference on College Cor 

position and Communications held March 20 - 23 in Minneapolis. 

BUSINESS Fred B. Davenport, Jr., assistant professor of business, has had ar 

FACULTY article, "Exchanges of Timber Interests Under Section 1031," 

PARTICIPATE published in the winter issue of the Journal of Agricultural 

Taxation and Law. 

Dr. Sheila A. Adams, associate professor of management, has had 
critique on Questionable Purchasing Practices published in Critic; 
Incidents in Management. 

Dr. John M. Garris, assistant professor of management, presented j 
invited paper at the 7th annual conference on Computers and ', 
Industrial Engineering in Orlando, FL, March 21. The paper, "Plaj 
Location Models: A Practical Alternative," concerns his research 
into practical ways of applying gradient searches to non-linear 
optimization problems. 

TALK The history department and the UNCW Historical Society will 

BE HELD sponsor a talk on "Ihe Mind of the Master Class" by Eugene 

Genovese and Elizabeth Fox-Genovese. Both have published wide| 
on the history of slavery in the Americas. The program will begii 
at 7 pjn., Monday, April 1, in Bryan Auditorium. 

SCHOLARSHIP Anyone interested in obtaining information on the State Employe? 

INFORMATION Association of North Carolina Scholarship Fund may call Margarei 

Taylor at ext. 3l78. Application deadline is April 1. 

MAC LENNAN Dr. Tom Mac Lennan, director of The Writing Place, eave a pre- 

DELIVERS sentation, "Writing to Learn: Three Approaches to Note-taking," ' 

TALK during the Annual North Carolina International Reading Associa- i 

tion Convention held March I'l in Winston-Salem. 



WRITING 
SEMINAR 



A "Writing Across the Curriculum" conference will be held May 6! 
through May 9 at the Wildacres Retreat in Little Switzerland, NC 
Faculty members interested in attending should contact Dr. 
Mac Lennan at ext. 375'^. 



ENSEMBLE The UNCW Wind Ensemble and Concert Band will perform in Ken: 

& BAND TO Auditorium April 1 at 8 pjn. 

PERFORM 

GREAT The last Great Decisions lecture for this semester will be held 

DECISIONS April 2 at 7:30 pjn. in KI-iQO. Dr. Robert Ralalko of the 

philosophy & religion department will discuss "Intelligence 
Operations: How Undercover Diplomacy Works." Fee. 

STUDENT ART A Student Art Exhibition featuring prints, small ceramics and 

EXHIBITION sculptures will be held in Kenan Hall Lobby April 1-30 from 8 

ajn. - 5 pjn. Monday - Friday,, 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 




LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 



BAG LUNCH 
MEETING 



AZALEA 
FESTIVAL 



AWARDS 
CEREMONY 



LIBRARY 
ITEM 



HISTORY 
FILM 



HISTORY 
LECTURE 



SNACK BAR 
SCHEDULE 

ENDOWED 
SCHOLARSHIP 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 32 
APRIL 4, 1985 

The Task Force on Women's Issues will present Sylvia Polgar, asso- 
ciate professor of sociology, discussing "Why They Don't Listen" 
Tuesday, April 9, at 12:30 pan. in the "U Snack Bar. All women 
faculty and staff are invited to come and bring a bag lunch. 

Next Thursday evening, April 11, approximatelv 6,000 people are 
expected to attend Azalea Festival events being held in Trask 
Coliseum. Faculty are asked to encoura^^e students to arrive 
early for classes and to expect traffic delays. Riegel Road 
beside Trask Coliseum will be closed to all but emergency ve- 
hicles. 

The awards ceremony and reception for the 1985 Shannon Morton 
Essay Contest will be held Thursday, April 11, at 11 a.m. in Bryan 
Auditorium located in Morton Hall. Faculty and staff are invited. 

A copy of the Report of the TIAA-CREF Ad Hoc Cornmittee on 
Goals and Objectives is available for faculty and staff to check 
out at the Randall Library Reserve Desk. 

"Battle of Algiers," a film about urban guerrillas in the Algerian 
war of independence will be presented by the Historical Society 
on April 10 at 8 pjn. in King Auditorium.. 

"Why Ford Pardoned Nixon— -An Exploration into Psycho-history" 
is the topic of a lecture by Duke University history professor 
Peter Wood at 8 pjn., Tuesday, April 9, in Morton Hall. 

The University Union Snack Bar will close Thursday, April ^f, at 
3 pjn. and will reopen Tuesday, April 9, at 7:30 ajn. 

The Wilmington Business and Professional Women's Club presented 
a Sl2,000 endowed scholarship to UNCW on March 29. The 
scholarship was given in memory of Sally R. Wilkins, long-time 
member of WBPW. The endowment will ronstitute a $1,000 
scholarship awarded on an annual basis to a female student who 
meets certain criteria. 

UNCW employees will observe the Easter holiday on Monday, 
April 8. 






LEGAL REP 
ON CAMPUS 



SCHEDULE 
FOR TRASK 



IDEAS 
NEEDED 



Mr. Leo Wagoner, representative of Prepaid Legal Services, will I 
on campus Wednesday, April 17, from 11 ajn. - 1:30 pjn. in the 
personnel training and development conference room in AL-106. 
He will hold an open session lasting 30-minutes and will be avail- 
able to speak with individuals after the session. 

Trask facilities schedule during the Azalea Festival is as follows! 

Tuesday, April 9, Four racquetball courts open for free play 
Wednesday, April 10, through festival, all courts closed 
Thursday, April 11, all facilities close at 5 pjn. 
Friday, April 12, normal hours except racquetball courts 
Saturday, April 13, normal hours except racquetball courts 

Alpha Phi Omega, service fraternity, is presently Poking for pro- 
ject ideas to benefit the university and community. The organize 
tion promotes leadership, friendship and service and is responsibli 
for the successful Pizza Wars project held last semester to benef 
BIG BUDDY. Faculty and staff with service project ideas should 
send same to the Alpha Phi Omega mailbox in the UU Program 
Board Office. 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



BIRTHS 
ANNOUNCED 



SYMPATHY 
EXTENDED 

THANK YOU 



The following is a list of courses offered through the office of 
special programs: 

"Self-Management Techniques," a course in changing behavior pal 
terns, will be held April 18 and May 2. Fee is $25. Registration 
deadline is April 12. 

A Spring Science Camp for New Hanover County school students 
ages 6-12, will be offered May 3. Fee is $12. Registration shou; 
be done by April 26. 

"Tax Planning for Real Estate Investors with Emphasis on Tax 
Shelters," fundamentals of real estate investment and its impact 
on taxes will be held April 22 and 2^* from 7-9:30 pjn. The fee i 
$65. Registration deadline is April 16. 

The following aerobics classes will be offered starting April 15. 
The registration deadline is April 5. Cost for faculty/staff is $5 
COURSE DATES OFFERED DAYS TIME 



Beginners 
Level I 
Level I 
Level II 
Beginners 
Beginners 



^/15 - 5/29 
^/15 - 5/29 
'^/16 - 5/30 
'f/ie - 5/30 
^/22 - 5/29 
^/23 - 5/30 



M&W 
M&W 
T&T 
T&T 
M&W 
T&T 



1:15 - 2 pjn. 
5:30 - 6:15 pjm. 
12:15 - 1 pjn. 
5:30 - 6:15 p.m. 
6:30 - 7:15 pjn. 
6:30 - 7:15 pjn. 



For information on any of the above courses call ext. 3195. 

Dick and Jane Muilendore announce the birth of their daughter, 
Jenna Beth, on March [U, Mother and daughter are fine. The 
father's condition is quite questionable!! 

Rob and Mary Susan Miller are also pleased to announce the birt, 
of their son, Robert Emory Varner, on March 22. Emory weighe< 
7 lbs. 12 1/2 ozs. 

Condolences are extended to Dr. Sherrill Martin of the music 
faculty on the death of her mother this past Friday night. 

Helen Cignotti of the housing office would like to thank faculty 
and staff for their flowers, gifts and cards during her recent 
illness. 



l\ 



Dr. Stephen C. Harper, associate professor and chairman of the de- 
partment of management and marketing, will present "Marketing 
Education In The 80's: A View From The Top" during the 
American Marketing Association's National Educator's Conference 
to be held in Washington, D.C., this August. 

Dr. Richard Deas of the music faculty was a judge during the 
Greenville District Piano Contest held March 16 in Greenville, NC. 
He is a former state chairman of the Piano Teachers Section of 
the NC Music Teachers Association. 

A review by Brooks Dodson of the English faculty on Millgate's 
Walter Scott; The Making of the Novelist has been published in 
the March 1985 issue of Choice. 

Dr. John R. Huntsman of the earth sciences faculty presented a 
paper, "Structural Characteristics of the Hollister Mylonite Zone 
near Littleton, North Carolina," at the annual meeting of the 
Southeastern Section of the Geological Society of America held in 
Knoxville, TN, March 20-22. The paper was co-authored by Eric 
Samson, a 198'f honors graduate in geology. Dr. Huntsman also 
served as a chairman of the technical session on structured 
geology and tectonics. 

Dr. Charles Lewis, chairman of the HPER department, Dr. David 
Miller and Dr. T. Earl Allen al*^ng with several physical education 
majors attended the 1985 Exercise Physiology EXPO held March 22 
at the Human Performance Laboratory at ECU. The EXPO was 
designed for "hands on" participation in the assessment of body 
composition and oxygen consumption through the. utilization of lab- 
oratory equipment by the conferees. 

Dr. Larry W. Usilton, associate professor of history, has had an 
article, "The King's Women and Their Corrodies," accepted for 
publication in Creativity. Influence^ Imagination; the Worlds of 
Medieval Women. Selected Papers from the Ninth Conference of 
the Southeastern Medieval Association* 

John Clifford, director of freshman compositon, has been appoint- 
ed to a three-year term on the Committee on Response to Litera- 
ture of the National Council of Teachers of English. Also, he has 
been asked to be a reader for the journal. College English. 

Drs. Lee Johnston and Earl Sheridan of the political science de- 
partment presented papers at the Southwestern Political Science 
Association meeting in Houston, TX, March 21-23. Johnston's 
paper was titled "The Progressive Southern State: A Case Study 
of North Carolina's Electoral Behavior." Sheridan's paper was 
titled "Republicanism Individualism and the Issue of Slavery in 
Eighteenth Century American Political Thought." 

Terry Fonville, EDS rep, will be on campus April 15 from 2-^ p.m. 
and April 16 from 11 a.m.-lp.m. in King Auditoriufn. For additional 
information call Diame Smith at ext. 3162. 



All permanent employees are eligible to enroll in the Prepaid 
Legal Services Plan during the month of April. The plan 
cost is $9J0 per month. Applications and information may be 
obtained by calling Patricia Fries at ext. 3713. 



BOOKS The Wilmington Branch of the American Association of Universit 

NEEDED Women is seeking donation of books for sale at its annual used 

book sale to be held April 26 and 27 at Rose's at Hanover Centt 
Anyone having books to donate should call Mimi Cunningham at 
ext. 3171. Donations are tax deductible. 

OPEN A reminder that the Search Committee charged with finding a n( 

MEETING President for the UNC system will meet at Fayetteville State 

University on April 9 at 7:30 p.m. in Butler Little Theatre. All 
interested faculty and staff are invited to attend. 

CHEMISTRY Catherine Cole of the division of chemistry will discuss "Phero- 

SEMINAR mones: Chemical Communication" at the April 12 chemistry sem 

nar series to be held in DL-IH at 2:30 pjn. Also, on that same 
day, Darryl Morgan will speak on "Chemistry of Comets." 

WOLFF HAS A chapter written by Dr. Robert M. Wolff, coordinator of the 

CHAPTER recreation management curriculum, entitled "Effective Marketing 

ACCEPTED has been accepted for publication in Epperson, Arlin. Private ai 

Commercial recreation; A Text and Rpferpnre» 2nd edition. 

ALLEN AT An international symposium, funded by the National Endowment 

SYMPOSIUM the Humanities, on "Christianity and the Renaissance" was held 

March 28-30 at FPrida State University in Tallahassee. Walser 
Allen, Jr., of the history faculty was one of four persons attend: 
from NC universities. 



UNCW SPA The consulting firms of Psychological Services, Inc. and Public fi 

EMPLOYEES ministration Service have been contracted by the State of NC 

to conduct a study to identify wage policies that inhibit pay 
equity and to develop a Job Evaluation and Pay System for Stat i 
employees. The project will require cooperation from all state er 
ployees at all levels. At times UNCW employees will be asked t 
serve on panels to advise and to assist in the development of th 
new system. Eventually all employees will be asked for input in 
the project and at times the study may interfere with work plan 
and schedules, but it is hoped that this inconvenience will be he 
to a minimum. The Office of State Personnel as well as the Sta 
Budget Office will be working closely with Psychological Servic 
during the project. 



TAX REP John Pezzoni, VALIC representative, will be on campus April 101 

ON CAMPUS to discuss the special tax breaks available to employees of high- 

er education. For additional information call Patricia Fries at 

ext. 3713. 

NEW A UNCW welcome is extended to William Carter in the physical 

HIRE plant. 

PAYROLL Faculty members who would like to make changes regarding the 

OPTIONS or 12 months salary plan options may contact the personnel of- 

fice at ext. 3713 for the appropriate form. No form is necessar; 
for those who would like to continue on the same plan. 

SPECIAL The Creative Arts Department invites students, faculty and staf 

GUESTS to take advantage of an opportunity to meet Margaret Truman 

ON CAMPUS Daniel, daughter of the late President Truman, and the four 

artists performing in the Schweitzer Medals for Artistry Concer' 
at a university reception and tree planting ceremony beginning j 
11 ajn., Wediesday, April 10, in the lobby of Kenan Hall. The 
tree planting ceremony will take place at approximately ll'A5 a 
near the sidewalk south of Kenan Auditorium. The Marine Corp: 
Trumpeteers will be featured in the tree planting ceremony. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 

LIBRARY/ARCHIVES 1 




ADDENDUM TO 

SPECIAL ISSUE CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE 

April 11, 1985 



R, O, Walton, Jr., Vice Chancellor for Business Affairs, issued the 
following addendum to the emergency edition of the CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE 
distributed April 11. 

The keys lost on Tuesday, April 9, have been recovered. Based 
on an investigation by our campus police and personnel from the Dean of 
Students Office, we believe that misuse or duplication of the keys 
has not taken place. Therefore, we will not be changing locks. 

We would take this opportunity to remind employees that sensitive 
material such as examinations and personnel files should be kept in 
locked file cabinets. Pocketbooks should not be left in site and should 
be locked in file cabinets. Unattended offices should be left locked. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the csea 




EMERGENCY EDITION EMERGENCY EDITION 

APRIL 11, 1985 

SECURITY R. O. Walton, Jr^ Vice Chancellor for Business Affairs, 

EMERGENCY 

has asked the CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE to issue the following 

emergency statement for immediate distribution to faculty and 

staff. Faculty are encouraged to announce this to your classes. 

'' Campus security has been breached through the apparent 

■; theft of keys on Wednesday evening, April 9, 1985. Valuables, 

.'. including test copies, should be secured in locked file cabinets 

J. or removed from campus. Suspicious acting individuals should 

be reported to Campus Police. 

Any valuable belongings in your offices may be in jeopardy* 

Personal property is not covered by University insurance. 

The most sensitive areas on campus are being secured 

first. Complete security will not be regained for some time. 

Campus Police have the situation under investigation. A 

reward for return of the keys is being offered. 



AMPUS 
OMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the ^ea 




EMERGENCY EDITION EMERGENCY EDITION 

APRIL 11, 1985 

SECURITY R. O. Walton, 3r^ Vice Chancellor for Business Affairs, 

EMERGENCY 

has asked the CAMPUS COMMUNIQUE to issue the following 

emergency statement for immediate distribution to faculty and 

staff. Faculty are encouraged to announce this to your classes. 

Campus security has been breached through the apparent 

theft of keys on Wednesday evening, April 9, 1985. Valuables, 

k; including test copies, should be secured in locked file cabinets 

i or removed from campus. Suspicious acting individuals should 

' be reported to Campus Police. 

Any valuable belongings in your offices may be in jeopardy 

;■; Personal property is not covered by University insurance. 

S The most sensitive areas on campus are being secured 

first. Complete security will not be regained for some time. 

Campus Police have the situation under investigation. A 

reward for return of the keys is being offered. 



CAMPUS 



UNC bv the esea 




LADERS 
EEDED 



JNCHEON 
iETING 



:XT BOOK 
iQUISITlONS 

)BBY SHEW 
) PERFORM 



•W 

,:nefit 




ITIATION 
■REMONY 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 33 
APRIL 11, 1985 

Fifteen "high energy" students are needed to serve as summer 
orientation leaders during freshmen orientation. All interested 
students are asked to contact the dean of students office. Ap- 
plication deadline is Friday, April 19. 

The Task Force on Women's Issues will present Barabar Waxman 
of the English department speaking on "The Studying, Working 
Parent" April 16 at 12:30 p.m. in the UU Snack Bar. All women 
faculty and staff are invited to come and bring a bag lunch. 

Faculty are reminded that all fall text book requisitions are due 
in the bookstore on Friday, April 12. 

West Coast trumpeter Bobby Shew will perform with the UNCW 
Jazz Ensembles April 21 at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. The 
concert will be the finale of the Third Annual UNCW 3azz Festi- 
val. The festival will begin April 20 at 1 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium 
featuring performances of high school jazz bands and clinics by 
Bobby Shew. Bobby Shew has been affiliated with the Tommy 
Dorsey Orchestra, Woody Herman, Delia Reese, Paul Anka, Robert 
Goulet, Steve Allen, Roger Williams, Elvis Presley, Tom Jones and 
many more. Tickets for the April 21 concert in Kenan are $3. 

All permanent full-time employees are now eligible to enroll in 
the Supplemental Retirement Income Plan of NC. Plan adminis- 
trators. Branch Bank and Trust Company, will be on campus April 
17 from 2:30 - 't:30 p.m. in King Auditorium to explain the plan. 

Approximately 6,000 people will be attending Azalea Festival 
events TONIGHT in Trask Coliseum. Special traffic controls will 
begin at 6'A5 pjn., as traffic congestion and delays are expected. 

The annual Initiation Ceremony of the UNCW Chapter of the 
National Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi will be held April 16 at 
It p.m. in UU-100. Dr. B. Frank Hall will be honored for his con- 
tribution to the teaching of philosophy; Dr. Carole Fink will be in- 
ducted for scholarly achievements and 38 students will be inducted 
as active members. The featured speaker, Dr. Jon M. Young of 
Fayetteville State University, will discuss "On Learning and 
Judging." 



PROGRAM An Evening With Eve v/ill be presented April 19 at 7 p.m. in the 

AT AHEC AHEC Auditorium by the New Hanover Council on the Status of 

Women and the Wilmington Area Health Education Center. Eve, 
Chris Sizemore, is the woman whose struggle with multiple per- 
sonalities was depicted in tfie film, "The Three Faces of Eve." 
The fee is $5 if paid by April 17 and $7 at the door. Checks may 
be mailed to P O Box I5'f2, Wilmington, NC 28W2. 

STUDENTS During the annual meeting of the Collegiate Academy of the NC 

WIN AWARDS Academy of Sciences held March 28-30 at Guilford College, two 

UNCW students received awards for presentation of results of 
their undergraduate research. Anita K. Lister, an honors research 
student of Dr. Sybil Miller of the department of chemical and 
physical sciences, won third place in the Biological Sciences- 
Section A division for her paper, "Mechanism of Acid Inactivation 
of Human Serum Butyrylcholinesterase and Its Protection by Salt.' 
Maureen Krause, honors research student of Dr. Anne McCrary of 
the department of biological sciences, won third place in the 
Biological Sciences - Section B division for her paper entitled "Eg 
Masses and Veligers of Southeastern North Carolina Nudibranchia.< 

SPANISH The Spanish faculty of the department of modern languages admin 

FACULTY istered the 1985 National Spanish Exan of the American Associa- 

tion of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese to students from 
Southeastern NC on March 30. 



PR CLASS 
ASSISTS 



RED CROSS 
ON CAMPUS 



MOSELEY 

PRESENTS 

SPEECH 



SCHMID 
PUBLISHES 



HARPER 
ARTICLE 
IN ISSUE 



MCGUIRE 
SERVES AS 
COMMENTATOR 



EDITION 
AVAILABLE 



The advanced public relations class of Dr. Steven Weiss, assistant 
professor of speech communication, has been assisting in a pub- 
lic relations campaign for the Cape Fear Substance Abuse Agenc)' 
As a result of their work. Dottle Martin, NC's first lady, will 
appear in 30-second spots on WECT-TV which reflect her con- 
cerns about the threat that drugs pose to the comminity. 



The American Red Cross Blood Mobile will be on campus Weches- 
day, April 17, and Thursday, April 18, from 9:30 ajn. to 3 p.m. in 
the University Union. 

Dr. Thomas V. Moseley, professor of history, presented "Stonewall 
Jackson's Foes in the Valley" during the Seventh Annual Con- 
ference of the Confederate Historical Institute held at New 
Market, VA, April 'f - 6. The conference theme was "The Valley 
Campaigns of 1862 and 186V 

Dr. Thomas Schmid, associate professor of P&R, has had his 
article, "The Socratic Conception of Courage," published in the 
April issue of History of Philosophy Quarterly 

Dr. Stephen C. Harper, chairman of the department of managemen 
and marketing, has had his article, "Management Horizons: Chanf 
Must Be Handled Effectively," published in the March issue of 
Carolina Business and Finance* 

Dr. Phillip McGuire of the history department served as commen- I 
tator for a session on "Slavery: Black and White Masters" during ] 
the Fiftieth Annual Meeting of The Association of Social and Be- j 
havioral Scientists, Inc., held March 27 - 30 in Atlanta. j 

The second edition of Perceiving the Arts by Dennis J. Sporre, 
chairman of the Department of Creative Arts, is now available 
from Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ. 



PAPER 
SELECTED 



HPER 

MEMBERS 

ATTEND 

CONFERENCE 



A paper entitled "Hacia una terminologia coherente para la poesia 
satirica" given by William Woodhouse of the modern languages 
faculty during the 1983 Eighth Congress of the Asociacion Inter- 
nacional de Hispanistas, has been selected for publication in the 
proceedings of that meeting. Also, Dr. Woodhousc's review of 
Trabajo y. vida, by Garfinkel and. Latorre, appeared in the most 
recent issue of Hispania. 

HPER faculty members, Charles Lewis, Nancy Gladwell, Thomas 
Skalko and Robert Wolff, attended the 1985 Southern Regional 
Recreation and Park Conference of the National Recreation and 
Park Association held March 31 - April 2 in Raleigh. Drs. Skalko 
and Gladwell presided at program sessions and Dr. Wolff presented 
a paper on Tourism Strategy Planning. Also in attendance was 
emeritus faculty member, Derick G.5. Davis, who was in charge of 
four arts and recreation sessions. 



5IZEMORE 
PRESENTS 
SEMINAR 



POEM TO BE 
PUBLISHED 



Dr. Ronald Sizemore, associate professor of biological sciences, 
presented a seminar, "The Ecology of Vibrio and Its Plasmids," to 
the department of biology at ECU on March 28. He also co- 
authored with his graduate student, James Hones, Jr., a presenta- 
tion entitled " Vibrio spp. Involved in Sof+ She.l Crab Mortalities," 
which was made at the annual meeting of the American Society 
of Microbiology held March 3-7 in Las Vegas. 

"American Gothic," a poem written by Dr. Sally Sullivan of the 
English faculty, will be published this spring in the premier issue 
of A Carolina Literary Companion. 



HISTORY 
FILM 



"Operation Thunderbolt," a dramatization of Israel's rescue mission 
and the freeing of the hostages at Entebbe Airport on July 'f, 
1976, will be shown Tuesday, April 16, at 7:30 p.m. in the Library 
Auditorium. Faculty and staff are invited. No charge. 



lOOD 
JFE 



Dr. Paul Beck will discuss "Coping with Aging" April 15 at the 
AHEC Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Faculty and staff are invited. 



-ACULTY 
i^ECITAL 



A faculty recital by Frank J. Bongiorno of the music department 
featuring the saxophone will be held April 16 at 8 p.m. in Kenan 
Auditorium. 



PRING 
^EEK 



UNCW will observe "Spring Week" April 15-20. Special events will 
include the following: 

Comedy Concert featuring Steven Wright, seen on the Johnnie 
Carson Show, and David Letterman with special guest Andy 
Andrews April 15 at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. $3. 

Lecture on Feminism and Pornography with Dolores Alexander 
founder and director of Women Against Pornography, and Harry 
Reems, star of "Deep Throat," at 8 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium on 
April 18. $3. 



>NACK BAR 
FECIAL 

JEW BABY 



JEW 
TAFF 



The University Union Snack Bar special this week is an ice cream 
cone for 37(^ a scoop. Special runs now through April 17. 

Dr. Edward J. Reilly, psychological counselor for the the student 
development center, is pleased to announce the birth of his 
daughter, Kimberly Kay, on February 2^^. 

A special welcome to Kenneth D. Johns, diver in the SURF pro- 
gram, and Maryam K. Strickland in the math & sciences center. 



EDS REP Terry Fonville, EDS rep, will be on campus April 15 from 2-'f pjn. 

ON CAMPUS and April 16 from 11 a.m.-lp.m. in King Auditorium. For additions 

information call Dianne Smith at ext. 3162. 

OPEN Ail permanent employees are eligible to enroll in the Prepaid 

ENROLLMENT Legal Services Plan during the month of April. The plan 

cost is $9J0 per month. Applications and information may be 
obtained by calling Patricia Fries at ext. 3713. 

LEGAL Due to illness, Mr. Leo Wagoner, representative for Prepaid Legal 

SERVICES Services, WILL NOT be on campus April 17 as originally planned. 

All questions concerning Prepaid Legal Services should be direct- 
ed to the personnel office at ext. 3713 or 1 -800-662-75^*5. 



SCHEDULE 
FOR TRASK 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



BOOKS 
NEEDED 



PROMOTIONS 
ANNOUNCED 



Trask facilities schedule during the Azalea Festival is as follows: 
TODAY, April 11, all facilities close at 5 p.m. 
Friday, April 12, normal hours except racquetball courts 
Saturday, April 13, normal hours except racquetball courts 

The following is a list of courses offered through the office of 
special programs: i 

"Self-Management Techniques," a course in changing behavior pat-| 
terns, will be held April 18 and May 2. Fee is $25. Registration i 
deadline is April 12. I 

A Spring Science Camp for New Hanover County school students, j 
ages 6-12, will be offered May 3. Fee is $12. Registration should! 
be done by April 26. 

"Tax Planning for Real Estate Investors with Emphasis on Tax 
Shelters," fundamentals of real estate investment and its impact 
on taxes will be held April 22 and 2^* from 7-9:30 p.m. The fee is 
$65. Registration deadline is April 16. 

The following aerobics classes will be offered starting April 15. 
Registration cost to faculty and staff is $1U0. 

DATES OFFERED DAYS TIME 



COURSE 
Beginners 
Level I 
Level I 
Level II 
Beginners 
Beginners 



^15 
'f/15 
4/16 
'f/16 
f/22 

km 



5/29 
5/29 
5/30 
5/30 
5/29 
5/30 



M&W 
M&W 
T&T 
T&T 
M&W 
T&T 



1:15 - 2 p.m. 
5:30 - 6:15 pjn. 
12:15 - 1 pjn. 
5:30 - 6:15 p.m. 
6:30 - 7:15 pjn. 
6:30 - 7:15 p.m. 



For information on any of the above courses call ext. 3195. 

The Wilmington Branch of the American Association of University 
Women is seeking donation of books for sale at its annual used 
book sale to be held April 26 and 27 at Rose's at Hanover Center! 
Anyone having books to donate should call Mimi Cunningham at 
ext. 3171. Donations are tax deductible. 

Robert O. Walton, 3r., vice chancellor for business affairs, has 
announced the following staff promotions: Timothy Jordan has 
been named director of financial services, and Karen R. Powers 
has been named director of accointing. 



COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the sea 




ADMISSIONS 
TO MOVE 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER S^f 
APRIL 18, 1985 

The admissions office, presently located in Alderman Hall, will be 
CLOSED April 22 & 23 in preparation for their move to Hinton 
James Hall. The office will reopen in its new location on April 
21^. 



E. SCIENCES An Earth Sciences Colloquium will be held TODAY at 2:30 pjn. in 

SEMINAR MS-252, Dr. Edward S. Custer, vice president of Gaddy Engineer- 

ing will speak on "The use of geology in solving engineering prob- 
lems in coal mining." Everyone is welcome. Refreshments will be 
served. 

P&R LECTURE A lecture by Joe Wilson, professor at the University of Virginia 

SCHEDULED entitled "Moral Responsibility and Personal Identity: East & West" 

will be held Friday, April 19, at 2 pjn. in SB-107. All faculty and 

staff are invited. 

BROCHURES Brochures on UNCW "Facts 'S^f - '85" are available in limited quan- 

AVAILABLE titles for use by academic and administrative offices. Available 

through the office of institutional research, the brochures provide 
information on enrollment, faculty, graduates by department, 
library volumes, physical facilities, student financial aid, academic 
support services and administration. For copies call ext, 3520. 

FIRST The First Annual UNCW "Formal" for students, faculty, staff and 

FORMAL alumni will be held Friday, April 26, from 9 pjn. - 1 ajn. in the 

Pender Room of the Ramada Im. Semi-formal attire is required. 
Tickets may be purchased for $5 per couple or $3 per person from 
the SGA office, residence life office or alumni affairs office. 

GRADUATION Departments who will be using the services of ARA on commence- 

RECEPTIONS ment day. May 18, MUST contact Marcella Williams at the main 

cafeteria, ext. 353^* or 799-2300, no later than May 6. The cafe- 
teria will be CLOSED May 11-17, 

OSP ANNUAL The office of special programs cordially invites all faculty and 

RECEPTION staff to its annual reception Monday, April 29, from 3 - 'f p.m. in 

UU-100. The reception is given in appreciation to those offices 
who give assistance to the OSP throughout the year. 

CASHIER The cashiers office now located in Alderman Hall will move to its 

TO MOVE new location in Hinton James Hall tomorrow, April 19. The office 

will continue to operate on a normal schedule that day. 



BREAKFAST The University Union Snack Bar special this week, today - Apri 

SPECIAL 2U, will feature 20( off any combo plate, biscuit with meat, Sea 

hawk or croissant. Clip this article and give to cashier upon pu 

chase. 



STAFF 
PROMOTIONS 



CHAMBER 
SINGERS 

LUNCHEON 
MEETING 



BOBBY SHEW 
TO PERFORM 



AWARENESS 
DAY ON lifTH 



PLAY IN 
S.R.O. 



Tammy Blizzard has been appointed coordinator of accounting d 
and records in financial services and *^hirley Mayfield has joinec 
financial services as student accounts manager. 

The Chamber Singers will perform in Kenan Auditorium April IS 
8 pjn. 

The Task Force on Women's Issues will present "Where we go fr" 
here. . ." by members of the task force April 23 at 12:30 p.m. in 
the UU Snack Bar. All women faculty and staff are invited i 

to come and bring a bag linch. 

West Coast trumpeter Bobby Shew will perform with the UNCW 
3azz Ensembles April 21 at 8 pjn. in Kenan Auditorium. The oo 
cert will be the finale of the Third Annual UNCW Jazz Festival; 
The festival will begin April 20 at 1 p.m. in Kenan Auditorium j 
and will feature performances of high school jazz bands and 
clinics by Bobby Shew. 

April 2'f has been designated Awareness Day for disabled studerl 
at UNCW. As a part of the activities for that day, faculty men 
bers are encouraged to allow an awareness activity to be presa 
ed during classes. If a professor chooses to participate, a studf 
will be assigned to come into the classroom with a short attituc 
questionnaire and awareness activity. The process will take 15 
20 minutes. Professors who would like to participate with a 
classroom activity are asked to contact the student developmen 
center at ext. 3280 to arrange for a student to come to your 
class. 

Dylan Thomas' "Under Milkwood" will be presented in the SRO 
Theatre April 2'J - 28 at 8 nightly. The play, directed by Anne I 
Fitzgibbon of the drama department, depicts the inhabitants of i 
a simple Welsh fishing village over a one-day period. Admission j 
is $1 for students and $^ for the general public. For reservatio 
call ext. 3i^W. ; 



STICK TO 
SPEAK 



CRAWFORD 
GROUP TO 
PERFORM 

TRUSTEES 
TO MEET 

COMPOSITION 
RECITAL 

SAXOPHONE 
QUARTET 



The New Hanover Friends of the Public Library will present a | 
gram by NC author and historian, David Stick, April 25 at 7:30 j 
at the main library downtown. The program, free and open to 
the public, will be on the History of Bald Head Island and Cape! 
Fear. 

The University Program Board's Minority Arts Committee will pi 
sent the Cornelious Crawford Group Thursday, April 25, at 8 pj 
in UU-100. Free. 

The UNCW Board of Trustees will meet April 2'f at 12:30 p. m. 
UU-112. 

A composition recital by Antonia Dukas will be presented in 
Kenan Auditorium April 21 at 3 pjn. 

The Saxophone Quartet will perform in Kenan Auditorium April! 
m at 8 pjTi. 




TEETER 
TOTTER 



Signs reflecting the recommendation of the Faculty Senate to cre- 
ate a pedestrian campus have been erected. To call attention to 
this, campus police will initially issue warnings to violators and 
then will cite violators to district court. 

The UNCW Alpha Delta Pi soropity will hold a teeter-totterathon 
Saturday, April 20, from 8 a.m. - 11;30 pjn. at McDonalds located 
on Oleander Drive. All money will be donated to the Ronald 
McDonald House. 



MCNAMEE 
PRESENTS 
PAPER 



WAXMAN AT 
CONFERENCE 



TOPLIN 

DELIVERS 

PAPER 



Dr. Stephen McNamee, faculty member in the department of socio- 
logy and anthropology, presented a paper, "Rationality and the 
Goal Concept in Organizational Theory," at the Southern Sociolo- 
gical Society annual meeting held in Charlotte recently. 

Barbara Waxman of the English department attended the con- 
ference of the Southeastern Nineteenth Century Studies Associa- 
tion held at Georgia Tech April 11 - 13. She delivered a paper 
on Hardy's 3ude the Obscure, titled "Sue Bridehead Revisited: 
Sexual Utopia and the Legacy of 'Goblin Fruit."' 

Robert Toplin of the history department delivered a paper on "The 
Historian as Filmmaker" at the spring meeting of the Association 
of Historians of ^astern North Carolina. 



LEWIS AT 
WORKSHOP 

DR. ALLEN 
SERVES 



Judith Lewis of the HPER faculty attended an Aerobics Dance 
Workshop April 13 at East Carolina University. 

Dr. Dave Allen, special assistant to the vice chancellor for stu- 
dent affairs, served April 12 on a panel of University of Virginia 
alumni from the Center for the Study of Higher Education where 
he addressed the issue "Is There Life After the Doctorate?" 



WILLEY 

DELIVERS 

TALK 



FACULTY 
SERVES AS 
JUDGES 



DR. CREWS 

PRESENTS 

PROGRAM 



CHAPTER 
PUBLISHED 



IMCGUIRE 
PRESIDES 



Dr. Joan D. Willey of the division of chemistry and the marine 
science program delivered a talk, "Acid Deposition and Effects in 
Coastal North Carolina," at the Triangle Conference on Environ- 
mental Technology held April 3. 

Dr. Saul Bachner, professor of curricular studies, and Dr. Brooks 
Dodson, professor of f^nglish, served as judges April 9 during the 
final round of competition in the 1?85 oratorical contest ^on- 
sored by the Wilmington Optimists Clubs. 

Dr. Marshall Crews, UNCW emeritus faculty member and Cape 
Fear Technical Institute Trustee, presented "Policymaking vs. Ad- 
ministration" during the 1985 Southern Region Seminar for the 
Association of Community College Trustees held March 21 - 23 
in Biloxi, ML 

A chapter written by John Evans of the English department en- 
titled "Teaching Literature Using Word Processing" has been pub- 
lished in Writing On-Line; Using Computers in the Teaching of 
Writing, 1985. ~ 

Phillip McGuire, associate professor of history, was presiding 
chairman of a session. Music and the Media, and delivered a paper 
entitled "Black Music Critics and the classic Blues Singers of the 
1920's" at the Fifteenth Annual Meeting of the Popular Culture 
Association held April 3 - 6 in Louisville, KY. 



MR. HALL 
DELIVERS 
PAPER 



CHAPTER 
INSTALLED 



PAPERS 
PRESENTED 



SPRING 
TRIP 



FILM TO 
BE SHOWN 



Mr. Jack C. Hall of the department of earth sciences delivered a 
paper at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Section of the 
Geological Society of America held March 20 - 22 in Knoxville, 
TN. The paper, titled "Middle Ordovician conodont biostratigrap, 
of the Chickamuga Group in the westernmost thrust belts in 
Tennessee and Virginia and in tN'e Sequatchie Valley, Tennessee,' 
was co-authored by Stig M. Bergstrom of Ohio State University. 

The Delta Epsilon Chapter of Phi EpsiPn Kappa, a national or- 
ganization for individuals in health, physical education and recre 
tion, was installed at UNCW in ceremonies April 9. Roger Morgi' 
chapter president, Betsy Bridges, president-elect, Wendy Southerj 
land, secretary, and 12 other individuals were initiated. 
Dr. Graham Hatcher, assistant professor of HPER, serves 
as faculty sponsor. \ 

Dr. Courtney Hackney, associate professor in the department of 
biological sciences, presented a paper, "Variations of shell mor- 
phology in the Carolina Marsh Clam, Poly"'esoda caroliniana (Bo! 
related to geography," at the recent Association of Southeastern! 
Biologists meeting in Murfreesboro, TN. Also, at the same meetij 
Dr. Mark LaSalle, post-doc and instructor in bioFgy, presented 
two papers, "Seasonal abundance and diversity of spiders in two 
marsh plant communities," and "Separating juveniles of similar 
looking spider species." 

The spring trip to London, led by John Evans of the English de- 
partment was a big success. The seventeen travelers spent sevei 
nights in London and attended several theatre performances, 
galleries, and literary sites. For details concerning next year's 
trip contact John Evans at ext. 3326 before May 2. 

A film, Henry V, will be shown April 23 at 7:30 pjn. ui'stairs in 
the New Hanover County Public Library. Free. 



RETIREMENT 
LUNCHEON 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



ROTC 
BANQUET 



BOOK 
SALE 



NEW 
STAFF 



Jack F. Dermid, associate professor of bioJogy, will retire at the 
end of the current semester. The department of biological 
sciences will honor him at a buffet luncheon May 6 at 12 noon ir 
UU-100. The campus oomminity is invited to join the departmen 
in wishing him well in his future endeavors. The cost of the 
luicheon is $6 per person. Interested faculty and staff should se 
checks to Walter Biggs by April 30. 

A ^ring Science Camp for New Hanover Cointy school students 
ages 6-12, will be offered May 3. The camp will include a trip 
to the NC Marine Resources Center. The fee is $12. Deadline 
to register is April 22. For additional information call the offici 
of special programs at ext. 3195. 

The annual ROTC Spring Awards Ceremony will be held April 26 
at 2 pjn. in UU-100. 

The American Association of University Women - Wilmington 
Branch will conduct its "Used Book Sale" April 26 from 
9 ajn. - 5 pjn. at Rose's located at Hanover Center. 

UNCW would like to welcome Linda Munsey, new employee 
working in purchasing services. 



CAMPUS 
COMMUNIQUE 



UNC by the sea 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNCW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 35 
APRIL 25, 1985 



OFFICE The registrar's office presently located in Alderman Hall will 

TO MOVE close May 2 - 3 in preparation for their move to Hinton James 

HaU. The office will reopen in its new location May 6. 

I.D. CARDS Effective May 1 employees working for the physical plant, house- 

TO BE WORN keeping, central stores/warehouse, postal services, campus police 

and housing operations will wear clip on identification cards mak- 
ing it easier to identify them as university personnel. 

PHONE Telephone service will be interrupted on the campus for a few 

SERVICE hours on Saturday, April 27, due to the installation of a power 

generator. 

GRADUATION Departments who will be using the services of ARA on commence- 

RECEPTIONS ment day. May 18, must contact Marcella Williams at the main 

cafeteria, ext. 353^* or 799-2300 no later than May 6. The cafe- 
teria will be CLOSED May 11-17. 

OSP ANNUAL The office of special programs cordially invites all faculty and 

RECEPTION staff to its annual reception Monday, April 29, from 3 - ^f p.m. in 

UU-IOO. 

BAG LUNCH An additional "Everywoman's Bag Lunch" program has been 

SCHEDULED scheduled from 12:30 - 1:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 30, in the UU 

Snack Bar. The topic for this program is "Black Women's issues: 
A Chilly Campus Climate?" Discussion will be led by members of 
the Task Force on Women's Issues. All faculty, staff and 
students are invited. 



AAUW 
BOOK SALE 



WOMEN'S 
ISSUES 



The American Association of University Women's annual used book 
sale will be held from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday, April 
26 - 27, at Rose's at Hanover Center. All faculty and staff are 
invited to come buy for some good book bargains. 

In keeping with its charge to identify the needs of women at 
UNCW, the Ad Hoc Task Force on Women's Issues is requesting 
written suggestions, concerns or recommendations from Interested 
faculty and staff. All comments should be sent by May 13 to the 
Task Force on Women's Issues, Campus Post Office. All responses 
will be kept confidentiaL 



CONNER 
3UDGES 



DR. THOMAS 

PRESENTS 

PAPER 



DR. BROWN 
APPOINTED 
TO BOARD 



HPER FACULTY 
AT MEETING 



Ann Conner, associate professor in the department of creative a 
judged the I6th annual Waccamaw Arts Exhibition, April 21 at tf 
Springmaid Villa Art Museum in Myrtle Beach. The exhibit inciut 
ed works in painting, drawing, graphics and photography. 

Dr. Carol Chase Thomas, assistant professor in the department o 
curricular studies, presented a paper, "The Effects of Text Struc 
ture on the Reading and Writing Performance of Learning Disable 
Students," during the International Convention of the Coincil foi 
Exceptional Children in Anaheim. CA. April 18. 

Dr. Bob Brown, professor of psychology, has been appointed to a 
eight-member Board of Consulting Editors for an upcoming three 
volume Encyclopedia of Special Education to be puDlisheclby Joh 
Wiley & Sons, ~ 

Drs. Graham Hatcher, Lucinda HoUifield, Charles Lewis, Arthur 
Miller, David Miller and Robert Wolff attended the Centennial 
Convention of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Educa 
tion, Recreation, and Dance April 17 - 21 at the World Congress 
Center in Atlanta. Dr. Arthur Miller presided at a program sessi 
and presented a Research Consortium Poster Program presentati( 
entitled "Recommended Course Work For Training Higher Educa- 
tion Personnel." Dr. Lewis and Dr. Wolff presented a program se 
sion entitled "Infusing Commercial Recreation Into The Profes- 
sional Preparation Program." Dr. Lewis also attended the Past 
President's Advisory Committee meetings for The Council on Ou1' 
door Education and the American Association for Leisure and 
Recreation. I 



DR. MANOCK Dr. 3ohn Manock, serving as a panelist on university-industry re- 

SERVES lationships at the joint spring meeting of the Southern Section o 

NCURA Region V and SRA in Galveston, TX, presented a paper 
on the impact of Federal Small Business Research Programs on 
regional institutions. 

BELLAMY ON Mary D. Bellamy, professor of Spanish and supervisor of seconda 

EVALUATION teachers of Spanish and French, participated as a member of th« 

TEAM evaluating teams of the Southern Association of Colleges and 

Schools for Roland Grise School March 20 - 21 and for New 

Hanover High School March 27 - 28. 

HACKNEY Courtney Hackney of the department of biological sciences was 

ELECTED elected to the position of vice-chairperson at a recent meeting 

of the Southeastern Section of the Ecotogical Society of 

America. 



HALL IS 3ack C. Hall of the department of earth sciences is the co-auth 

CO-AUTHOR of a paper entitled "Conodont age determination of the lower 

portion of the Taconic clastic sequence at the Allegheny Front, 
Pendleton County, West Virginia" which was presented at the 
annual meeting of the Southeastern Section of the Geological 
Society of America held March 20 - 22 in Knoxville. 

THEODORE Dr. Terry Theodore, professor of drama in the creative arts de- 

HELPS HOST partment, will help host the 1985 Motion Picture Exhibitors Con 

CONVENTION vention to be held May 9 in Wilmington. Also, Dr. Theodore, wc 

ing with officials of the NC Film Corporation, has arranged a 

business luncheon and extensive tour of the film facilities. 



"REATIVE ARTS 
-ACULTY AT 
::ONVENTION 



The following members of the speech communication division in the 
department of creative arts attended the Southern Speech Commu- 
nication Association Convention April ll-l'f in Winston-Salem. 
Dr. Betty Jo Welch presented "Crisis Intervention in Department 
Leadership" to the Association for Communication Administration; 
Dr. Carole Tallant presented "The Comic Voice of John Hawkes: 
Why No Laughter?" to the Oral Interpretation and Theatre 
Divisions; Dr. Steven Weiss presented "Refutability as a Source 
of Rhetorical Knowledge" to the Southern Forensics Association; 
Randy Harrington performed a selection by Hawkes and Middleton 
for the Interpretation and Theatre Divisions and Dr. Lloyd Rohler 
presented "Desire Over Memory: Jim Hunt's quest for the Senate," 
to the Rhetoric and Public Address Division. 



klAC LENNAN 
SERVES 



:entral 

jTORES 



OFFICERS 
-OR SOCIETY 



Dr. Thomas Mac Lennan, associate professor of English and direc- 
tor of The Writing Place, served this past school year as consul- 
tant to the Bladen County Board of Education's year-long "Compu- 
ter-Assisted Instruction in Writing Project." The project was 
funded by the NC State Department of Public Instruction, 

Please include the following items in the central stores catalogues 

#618-57561 Post-It Notes 3x3, yellow - per pad 
//618-57562 Post-It Routing Requests - per pad 
//618-78001 National Zip Code Directory - each 

New officers for Phi Kappa Phi, the university-wide scholastic 
honor society at UNCW, are as follows: 

President, Dr. Larry Usilton (history) 

Vice-Pres, Dr. Marcee Meyers (curricular studies) 

Sec./Treas, Dr. Lewis Nance (chemistry) 

Public Relations, Dr. Charles West (mgt. & mktg.) 



SPECIAL 
I'ROGRAMS 



The following is